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Sample records for reflectometry tdr irrigation

  1. Soil Moisture Measurement through Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR). Irrigation Application; Medicion de la humedad del suelo por reflectometria en el dominio temporal (TDR). Aplicacion en irrigacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinonez Pedroza, Hector E.; Ruelle, Pierre; Nemeth Ildiko [Cemagre, (France)

    2002-03-01

    Knowledge of how moisture varies in the soil is essential to determine the actual rate of evapotranspiration in crops and, thus, the amount of water necessary for irrigation. Lisimeters, tensiometers and the neutron probe have been widely used for precise measurement of soil moisture in order to calibrate models of irrigation scheduling or to calculate volumes of irrigation water. Despite the usefulness of such measurements, these methods have limited use because of problems like high cost of lisimeters and neutron probes as well as their strict regulation, limited range of validity of tensiometers. Moreover, the measurements obtained from these methods generally describe noncontinuous points in time. Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) is a viable to such methods because of its precision and the continuity of its measurements. This study evaluates soil moisture, using the neutron and TDR methods in maize crop irrigated by gravity in closed furrows. The results show that even though the absolute determinations of moisture are different in the 30-90 cm profiles, moisture variations were similar in all cases and respond consequently to the additions of water and to evapotranspiration. Neutron probe drawback become evident on its no-continuous measurements contrasting with the continuous measurements of TDR, which allows a detailed analysis of the infiltration and evapotranspiration phenomenal at instantaneous time scales. [Spanish] El conocimiento de la variacion de la humedad del suelo es esencial para determinar la evapotranspiracion real de los cultivos. Esta ultima, a su vez, permite conocer las cantidades necesarias de agua de riego. Los lisimetros, los tensiometros y el aspersor de nuestro s han sido ampliamente usados para la medicion precisa de la humedad del suelo con propositos de calibracion de modelos de programacion del riego o para su utilizacion directa en el calculo de volumenes de riego. A pesar de la importancia de tales mediciones, su uso es muy

  2. Efficient reconstruction of dispersive dielectric profiles using time domain reflectometry (TDR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Leidenberger

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a numerical model for time domain reflectometry (TDR signal propagation in dispersive dielectric materials. The numerical probe model is terminated with a parallel circuit, consisting of an ohmic resistor and an ideal capacitance. We derive analytical approximations for the capacitance, the inductance and the conductance of three-wire probes. We couple the time domain model with global optimization in order to reconstruct water content profiles from TDR traces. For efficiently solving the inverse problem we use genetic algorithms combined with a hierarchical parameterization. We investigate the performance of the method by reconstructing synthetically generated profiles. The algorithm is then applied to retrieve dielectric profiles from TDR traces measured in the field. We succeed in reconstructing dielectric and ohmic profiles where conventional methods, based on travel time extraction, fail.

  3. Technical Note:Practical considerations on the use of down-sized time-domain reflectometry (TDR probes

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    M. A. Mojid

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Nine time-domain reflectometry (TDR probes, 2 to 10 cm long, were evaluated by comparing their measurement accuracy of TDR-pulse travel time in a sand and sandy loam soil, and electrical conductivity in NaCl solutions. TDR probes tTDR varied erratically with the predicted pulse travel time tg (from volumetric soil-water content for the probes tTDR varied linearly with tg and followed the 1:1 line. TDR could not measure tTDR Lmin and the lowest allowable soil-water content qmin that the probe can accurately measure govern this lowest pulse travel time tmin. The mean absolute deviation between tTDR and tg was 77 ps for the 2.3 cm long probe and 1.39 ps for all probes ≥2.5 cm in length. All probes ≥2.5 cm in length measured electrical conductivity of salt solutions sTDR that compared well with the electrical conductivity measured by a conductivity meter sm. The length of the probes did not exert any noticeable influence on the accuracy of electrical conductivity measurement. Keywords: TDR probe, pulse travel time, dielectric constant, electrical conductivity

  4. Removal of non aqueous phase liquid liquid (NAPL) from a loam soil monitored by time domain reflectometry (TDR) technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    comegna, alessandro; coppola, Antonio; dragonetti, giovanna; ajeel, ali; saeed, ali; sommella, angelo

    2016-04-01

    Non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) are compounds with low or no solubility with water. These compounds, due to the several human activities, can be accidentally introduced in the soil system and thus constitute a serious geo-environmental problem, given the toxicity level and the high mobility. The remediation of contaminated soil sites requires knowledge of the contaminant distribution in the soil profile and groundwater. Methods commonly used to characterize contaminated sites are coring, soil sampling and the installation of monitoring wells for the collection of groundwater samples. The main objective of the present research is to explore the potential application of time domain reflectometry (TDR) technique in order to evaluate the effect of contaminant removal in a loam soil, initially contaminated with NAPL and then flushed with different washing solutions. The experimental setup consist of: i) a Techtronix cable tester; ii) a three-wire TDR probe with wave guides 14.5 cm long inserted vertically into the soil samples; iii) a testing cell of 8 cm in diameter and 15 cm high; iv) a peristaltic pump for upward injection of washing solution. In laboratory, soil samples were oven dried at 105°C and passed through a 2 mm sieve. Known quantities of soil and NAPL (corn oil, a non-volatile and non-toxic organic compound) were mixed in order to obtain soil samples with different degrees of contamination. Once a soil sample was prepared, it was repacked into a plastic cylinder and then placed into the testing cell. An upward injection of washing solution was supplied to the contaminated sample with a rate q=1.5 cm3/min, which corresponds to a darcian velocity v=6.0 cm/h. The out coming fluid, from the soil column was collected, then the washing solution and oil was separated. Finally both the amount of oil that was remediated and the dielectric permittivity (measured via TDR) of the contaminated soil sample were recorded. Data collected were employed to implement a

  5. Rapid estimation of topsoil hydraulic properties from coupled inversion of TDR data during falling head infiltration

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    Mboh, C.; Huisman, J. A.; Vereecken, H.

    2010-12-01

    Fast and accurate estimation of topsoil hydraulic properties is very important in many environmental and engineering fields of study. On a small scale, one way of estimating these properties is to monitor infiltration of water into the soil with time domain reflectometry (TDR). Traditionally, TDR data collected during infiltration events are initially converted into average water content along the length of the TDR probe using travel time techniques. These water content averages are then used to inversely estimate soil hydraulic properties by calibrating a hydraulic model or an analytical solution of Richard’s equation describing the infiltration event. However, travel time analysis is subjective and difficult to use for interpretation of TDR measurements made during infiltration events. Moreover, all the errors made in converting the TDR data into water content averages directly propagate to the estimated hydraulic properties. In this study, we examine a new approach to estimating topsoil hydraulic properties from TDR data collected during falling head infiltration. Unlike the classical travel-time based approach to interpreting TDR, we interpret TDR measurements based on inverse modeling of TDR waveforms which has the potential to retrieve spatially resolved soil dielectric permittivity profiles. Instead of using TDR-inferred water content averages as in the traditional approach, we directly use the TDR waveforms to estimate soil properties. This was achieved by coupling a forward model of TDR waveform propagation to a hydrological model describing falling head infiltration. By perturbing the hydraulic parameters in the hydrological model, water content profiles are simulated and converted to TDR waveforms using the TDR forward model. This is repeated until a close fit between measured and modeled TDR waveforms is found. Apart from its potential to provide accurate and hydrologically relevant estimates of topsoil hydraulic properties, the coupled approach also

  6. Water requirements and management of maize under drip and sprinkler irrigation. 2000 annual report for Agricultural Technology Utilization and Transfer (ATUT) project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research at Ismailia, Egypt, focused on irrigation management of maize, fava bean, wheat, and alfalfa. In 1998, the two weighing lysimeters at Ismailia were recalibrated successfully with precision of 0.01 mm; and a state-of-the-art time domain reflectometry (TDR) system for soil water balance measu...

  7. Soil moisture calibration of TDR multilevel probes

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    Serrarens Daniel

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Time domain reflectometry (TDR probes are increasingly used for field estimation of soil water content. The objective of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of the multilevel TDR probe under field conditions. For this purpose, eight such TDR probes were installed in small plots that were seeded with beans and sorghum. Data collection from the probes was such that soil moisture readings were automated and logged using a standalone field unit. Neutron probe measurements were used to calibrate the TDR probes. Soil-probe contact and soil compaction were critical to the accuracy of the TDR, especially when a number of TDR probes are combined for a single calibration curve. If each probe is calibrated individually, approximate measurement errors were between 0.005 and 0.015 m³ m-3. However, measurement errors doubled to approximately 0.025 to 0.03 m³ m-3, when TDR probes were combined to yield a single calibration curve.

  8. A reevaluation of TDR propagation time determination in soils and geological media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Time domain reflectometry (TDR) is an established method for the determination of apparent dielectric permittivity and water content in soils. Using current waveform interpretation procedures, signal attenuation and variation in dielectric media properties along the transmission line can significant...

  9. Soil volumetric water content measurements using TDR technique

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    S. Vincenzi

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available A physical model to measure some hydrological and thermal parameters in soils will to be set up. The vertical profiles of: volumetric water content, matric potential and temperature will be monitored in different soils. The volumetric soil water content is measured by means of the Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR technique. The result of a test to determine experimentally the reproducibility of the volumetric water content measurements is reported together with the methodology and the results of the analysis of the TDR wave forms. The analysis is based on the calculation of the travel time of the TDR signal in the wave guide embedded in the soil.

  10. A new probe for in situ TDR moisture measurement

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    Yokuda, E. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Smith, R. [Sonsub Services, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    1993-05-01

    This paper explains the development of a new Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) probe which can be inserted through waste and soil to a depth of 14 feet with minimal labor and minimal soil disturbance. TDR has been used for 10 years as a method for measuring soil moisture contents. Conventional TDR probes are 30 centimeters long and therefore are difficult to insert at depths below a few feet. Recently, a probe has been developed which can be inserted to depths of 14 feet with the use of a vibratory drill. Quality objectives for the instrument, preliminary data, and suggestions for future developments are presented.

  11. A new probe for in situ TDR moisture measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokuda, E. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Smith, R. (Sonsub Services, Inc., Houston, TX (United States))

    1993-01-01

    This paper explains the development of a new Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) probe which can be inserted through waste and soil to a depth of 14 feet with minimal labor and minimal soil disturbance. TDR has been used for 10 years as a method for measuring soil moisture contents. Conventional TDR probes are 30 centimeters long and therefore are difficult to insert at depths below a few feet. Recently, a probe has been developed which can be inserted to depths of 14 feet with the use of a vibratory drill. Quality objectives for the instrument, preliminary data, and suggestions for future developments are presented.

  12. Estimation of water percolation by different methods using TDR

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    Alisson Jadavi Pereira da Silva

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Detailed knowledge on water percolation into the soil in irrigated areas is fundamental for solving problems of drainage, pollution and the recharge of underground aquifers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the percolation estimated by time-domain-reflectometry (TDR in a drainage lysimeter. We used Darcy's law with K(θ functions determined by field and laboratory methods and by the change in water storage in the soil profile at 16 points of moisture measurement at different time intervals. A sandy clay soil was saturated and covered with plastic sheet to prevent evaporation and an internal drainage trial in a drainage lysimeter was installed. The relationship between the observed and estimated percolation values was evaluated by linear regression analysis. The results suggest that percolation in the field or laboratory can be estimated based on continuous monitoring with TDR, and at short time intervals, of the variations in soil water storage. The precision and accuracy of this approach are similar to those of the lysimeter and it has advantages over the other evaluated methods, of which the most relevant are the possibility of estimating percolation in short time intervals and exemption from the predetermination of soil hydraulic properties such as water retention and hydraulic conductivity. The estimates obtained by the Darcy-Buckingham equation for percolation levels using function K(θ predicted by the method of Hillel et al. (1972 provided compatible water percolation estimates with those obtained in the lysimeter at time intervals greater than 1 h. The methods of Libardi et al. (1980, Sisson et al. (1980 and van Genuchten (1980 underestimated water percolation.

  13. Assessment of soil electromagnetic parameters and their variation with soil water, salts: a comparison among EMI and TDR measuring methods

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    Chaali, Nesrine; Coppola, Antonio; Comegna, Alessandro; Dragonetti, Giovanna

    2015-04-01

    Numerous studies have analyzed the possibility of the extension of Electromagnetic Induction EMI calibration coefficients determined at field scale, to predict the depth distribution of bulk electrical conductivity ECb within unmonitored sites and/or times, in order to appraise the effect of salts dynamics on soils and plants. However, in the literature, it has been determined that the extension of those EMI calibration coefficients can be awkward since the calibration parameters are highly site-specific because of changes in water content, temperature, root development, soil physical properties, etc... So they can only be used in sites having similar characteristics in terms of EMI. Furthermore there is a difference in the observation windows of EMI sensors and of sensors (Time Domain Reflectometry TDR, Electrical Resistance Tomography ERT, ect...) used for measuring the ECb to be then used for the calibration and validation of the EMI. By consequence the actual variability of the soil salinity will be hidden due to the fact that data coming from EMI and other sensors have different variability patterns and structure, and are then influenced by different noises. The main objectives of this work were: 1) develop a practical and cost-effective technique that uses TDR data as ground-truth data for calibrating and validating of the EMI larger scale sensor, 2) using a Fourier transform FT analysis by applying a specific noise filter to the original data, to find the correlations between the TDR and the EMI data. An experiment was designed by irrigating three transects of green beans, 30 m long each, with three irrigation salinity inputs (1dSm-1, 3dSm-1, 6dSm-1). The irrigation volumes were estimated by measuring soil water content at different depths by using a Diviner 2000. During the experiment, the EM in both the vertical (EMV) and horizontal (EMH) configurations were regularly measured by a Geonics EM38 device. TDR probes were inserted vertically at the soil

  14. CORRTEX: a compact and versatile system for time domain reflectometry

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    Deupree, R.G.; Eilers, D.D.; McKown, T.O.; Storey, W.H.

    1981-01-01

    The CORRTEX (COntinuous Reflectometry for Radius versus Time EXperiments) system was designed to be an adaptable and versatile unit for performing time domain reflectometry (TDR). The system consists of a coaxial cable, a digital TDR, which uses a Motorola 6800 microprocessor, a power source or battery pack, and an output terminal or recording driver. Desirable criteria for the system are discussed as well as the operation of the CORRTEX system. The types of present applications of the CORRTEX system are summarized and data presented.

  15. Water and crop efficiency evaluation of surface irrigation methods in the Piemonte plain (NW Italy).

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    Ferraris, S.; Canone, D.; Bevilacqua, I.; Calderon, F.; Previati, M.; Haverkamp, R.

    2009-04-01

    The Piedmont plain in the provinces of Turin and Cuneo is characterised by surface irrigation systems. Maize is the most spread crop. The increasing frequency of dry springs and summers has enhanced the scarcity of water for such irrigation systems. The aim of this work is to evaluate the efficiency of surface irrigation in three representative farms and provide a tool for prediction of future efficiencies in relation to possible change in irrigation practices. During three growing seasons (2006 - 2007 - 2008) automatic Time Domain Reflectometry gages have been put at different depths in the fields. Soil specific parameters have been estimated from TDR measurements and the soil water balance during several irrigation events has been computed.

  16. Comparing bulk electrical conductivities spatial series obtained by Time Domain Reflectometry and Electromagnetic Induction sensors

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    Saeed, Ali; Ajeel, Ali; dragonetti, giovanna; Comegna, Alessandro; Lamaddalena, Nicola; Coppola, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    solution (and of the water content) induced by natural soil heterogeneity. Thus, the variability of TDR readings is expected to come from a combination of smaller and larger-scale variations. By contrast, an EMI sensor reading partly smoothes the small-scale variability seen by a TDR probe. As a consequence, the variability revealed by profile-integrated EMI and local (within a given depth interval) TDR readings may have completely different characteristics. In this study, a comparison between the variability patterns of σb revealed by TDR and EMI sensors was carried out. The database came from a field experiment conducted in the Mediterranean Agronomic Institute (MAI) of Valenzano (Bari). The soil was pedologically classified as Colluvic Regosol, consisting of a silty loam with an average depth of 60 cm on a shallow fractured calcareous rock. The experimental field (30m x 15.6 m; for a total area of 468 m2) consisted of three transects of 30 m length and 4.2 width, cultivated with green bean and irrigated with three different salinity levels (1 dS/m, 3dS/m, 6dS/m). Each transect consisted of seven crop rows irrigated by a drip irrigation system (dripper discharge q=2 l/h.). Water salinity was induced by adding CaCl2 to the tap water. All crop-soil measurements were conducted along the middle row at 24 monitoring sites, 1m apart. The spatial and temporal evolution of bulk electrical conductivity (σb) of soil was monitored by i) an Electromagnetic Induction method (EM38-DD) and ii) Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR). Herein we will focus on the methodology we used to elaborate the database of this experiment. Mostly, the data elaboration was devoted to make TDR and EMI data actually comparable. Specifically, we analysed the effect of the different observation windows of TDR and EMI sensors on the different spatial and temporal variability observed in the data series coming from the two sensors. After exploring the different patterns and structures of variability of the

  17. Soil water retention measurements using a combined tensiometer-coiled time domain reflectometry probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaz, C.M.P.; Hopmans, J.W.; Macedo, A.

    2002-01-01

    0.98. In addition, the mixing model approach, adapted for the tensiometer-coiled TDR probe, was successful in explaining the functional form of the coiled TDR data with about 30% of the coiled-TDR probe measurement explained by the bulk soil dielectric constant. This new TDR development provides......The objective of the presented study was to develop a single probe that can be used to determine soil water retention curves in both laboratory and field conditions, by including a coiled time domain reflectometry (TDR) probe around the porous cup of a standard tensiometer. The combined tensiometer......-silica sand], Columbia [Coarse-loamy, mixed, superactive, nonacid, thermic Oxyaquic Xerofluvents], Lincoln sandy loam (sandy, mixed, thermic Typic Ustifluvents), and a washed sand - SR130) was measured with the combined tensiometer-coiled TDR probe (coil) as a function of the soil water content (0...

  18. Mini Tensiometer-Time Domain Reflectometry Coil Probe for Measuring Soil Water Retention Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Subedi, Shaphal; Kawamoto, Ken; Karunarathna, Anurudda Kumara

    2013-01-01

    -time domain reflectometry (T-TDR) coil probes, 6-mm wide and 32-mm long. The coil probes were calibrated against a conventional three-rod probe and were used for measuring θ for a aggregated volcanic ash soil (VAS) and a uniform sand. A commonly-used dielectric mixing model did not accurately describe......Time domain reflectometry (TDR) is used widely for measuring soil-water content. New TDR coil probe technology facilitates the development of small, nondestructive probes for simultaneous measurement of soil-water content (θ) and soil-water potential (ψ). In this study we developed mini tensiometer...... between measured soil-water retention curves (ψ > –100 cm H2O) by the new T-TDR coil probes and independent measurements by the hanging water column method....

  19. Estimation of water absorption coefficient using the TDR method

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    Suchorab, Zbigniew; Majerek, Dariusz; Brzyski, Przemysław; Sobczuk, Henryk; Raczkowski, Andrzej

    2017-07-01

    Moisture accumulation and transport in the building barriers is an important feature that influences building performance, causing serious exploitation problems as increased energy use, mold and bacteria growth, decrease of indoor air parameters that may lead to sick building syndrome (SBS). One of the parameters that is used to describe moisture characteristic of the material is water absorption coefficient being the measure of capillary behavior of the material as a function of time and the surface area of the specimen. As usual it is determined using gravimetric methods according to EN 1925:1999 standard. In this article we demonstrate the possibility of determination of water absorption coefficient of autoclaved aerated concrete (AAC) using the Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) method. TDR is an electric technique that had been adopted from soil science and can be successfully used for real-time monitoring of moisture transport in building materials and envelopes. Data achieved using TDR readouts show high correlation with standard method of moisture absorptivity coefficient determination.

  20. Efficiency of water application of irrigation systems based on microsprinkling in banana plantations

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    Alisson Jadavi Pereira da Silva

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Further food production may be limited by the reduced availability of water resources. Since irrigated agriculture is the productive sector that presents a higher demand of water, this sector has been under intense pressure in order to ensure food production with improved efficiency of water use. This study aimed to use the Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR technique to measure percolation losses and to determine water application efficiency of banana (Musa spp. trees using microsprinkler irrigation systems. Three systems were studied: (i one 32 L h-1 microsprinkler for four plants; (ii one 60 L h-1 microsprinkler for four plants; and (iii one 60 L h-1 microsprinkler for two plants. Systems that replace water to the soil with the lowest variation of infiltrated water depths at different distances from plant pseudostem were the most efficient. The water application efficiency of microsprinkler irrigation systems using the (i, (ii, and (iii microsprinkler systems were 85%, 80 % and 90 % respectively.

  1. Complex permittivity model for time domain reflectometry soil water content sensing: II. Calibration

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    Despite numerous applications of time domain reflectometry (TDR), serious difficulties in estimating accurate soil water contents under field conditions remain, especially in fine-textured soils. Our objectives were to calibrate a complex dielectric mixing model described by Schwartz et al. (this is...

  2. Complex permittivity model for time domain reflectometry soil water content sensing: I. Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despite numerous applications of time-domain reflectometry (TDR), serious difficulties exist in estimating accurate soil water contents under field conditions remain, especially in fine-textured soils. We developed a physically-based calibration model to predict the frequency and temperature depende...

  3. Improved theory of time domain reflectometry with variable coaxial cable length for electrical conductivity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although empirical models have been developed previously, a mechanistic model is needed for estimating electrical conductivity (EC) using time domain reflectometry (TDR) with variable lengths of coaxial cable. The goals of this study are to: (1) derive a mechanistic model based on multisection tra...

  4. A Time-Domain Reflectometry Method with Variable Needle Pulse Width for Measuring the Dielectric Properties of Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Andrzej Wilczek; Agnieszka Szypłowska; Marcin Kafarski; Wojciech Skierucha

    2016-01-01

    Time-domain reflectometry (TDR) methods used for measuring the dielectric properties of materials mostly utilize step or needle electrical pulses of constant amplitudes and shapes. Our novel approach enables determining the dielectric relaxation time of a sample using the analysis of the amplitudes of reflected pulses of two widths, in addition to bulk dielectric permittivity and electrical conductivity commonly obtained by the TDR technique. The method was developed for various values of ele...

  5. Landfill cover performance monitoring using time domain reflectometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neher, E.R.; Cotten, G.B. [Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); McElroy, D. [Lockheed-Martin Idaho Technologies Company, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1998-03-01

    Time domain reflectometry (TDR) systems were installed to monitor soil moisture in two newly constructed landfill covers at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Each TDR system includes four vertical arrays with each array consisting of four TDR probes located at depths of 15, 30, 45, and 60 cm. The deepest probes at 60 cm were installed beneath a compacted soil layer to analyze infiltration through the compacted layer. Based on the TDR data, infiltration through the two covers between March and October, 1997 ranged from less than measurable to 1.5 cm. However, due to a prohibition on penetrating the buried waste and resulting limits on probe placement depths, deeper percolation was not evaluated. Some of the advantages found in the application of TDR for infiltration monitoring at this site are the relative low cost and rugged nature of the equipment. Also, of particular importance, the ability to collect frequent moisture measurements allows the capture and evaluation of soil moisture changes resulting from episodic precipitation events. Disadvantages include the inability to install the probes into the waste, difficulties in interpretation of infiltration during freeze/thaw periods, and some excessive noise in the data.

  6. Active Time Domain Reflectometry for Tamper Indication in Unattended Safeguards Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheen, David M.; Smith, Leon E.; Tedeschi, Jonathan R.; Moore, David E.; Gavric, Gordan; Conrad, Ryan C.

    2015-07-14

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) continues to expand its use of unattended measurement systems. An increasing number of systems and an expanding family of instruments create challenges in terms of deployment efficiency and the implementation of data authentication measures. In collaboration with the IAEA, tamper-indicating measures to address data-transmission authentication challenges with unattended safeguards systems are under investigation. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is studying the viability of active time-domain reflectometry (TDR) along two parallel but interconnected paths: (1) swept-frequency TDR as the highly flexible, laboratory gold standard to which field-deployable options can be compared, and (2) a low-cost commercially available spread-spectrum TDR technology as one option for field implementation. This paper describes the TDR methods under investigation and the associated benchtop test-bed, tampering scenarios of interest,, and viability measurement results to date (e.g., comparison of relative sensitivity to tamper scenarios).

  7. Estimation of Soil-Water Characteristic Curves in Multiple-Cycles Using Membrane and TDR System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Won-Taek; Jung, Young-Seok; Kang, Seonghun; Lee, Jong-Sub

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to estimate multiple-cycles of the soil-water characteristic curve (SWCC) using an innovative volumetric pressure plate extractor (VPPE), which is incorporated with a membrane and time domain reflectometry (TDR). The pressure cell includes the membrane to reduce the experimental time and the TDR probe to automatically estimate the volumetric water content. For the estimation of SWCC using the VPPE system, four specimens with different grain size and void ratio are prepared. The volumetric water contents of the specimens according to the matric suction are measured by the burette system and are estimated in the TDR system during five cycles of SWCC tests. The volumetric water contents estimated by the TDR system are almost identical to those determined by the burette system. The experimental time significantly decreases with the new VPPE. The hysteresis in the SWCC is largest in the first cycle and is nearly identical after 1.5 cycles. As the initial void ratio decreases, the air entry value increases. This study suggests that the new VPPE may effectively estimate multiple-cycles of the SWCC of unsaturated soils. PMID:28774139

  8. Metrological assessment of TDR performance for measurement of potassium concentration in soil solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac de M. Ponciano

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Despite the growing use of the time domain reflectometry (TDR technique to monitoring ions in the soil solution, there are few studies that provide insight into measurement error. To overcome this lack of information, a methodology, based on the central limit theorem error, was used to quantify the uncertainty associated with using the technique to estimate potassium ion concentration in two soil types. Mathematical models based on electrical conductivity and soil moisture derived from TDR readings were used to estimate potassium concentration, and the results were compared to potassium concentration determined by flame spectrophotometry. It was possible to correct for random and systematic errors associated with TDR readings, significantly increasing the accuracy of the potassium estimation methodology. However, a single TDR reading can lead to an error of up to ± 18.84 mg L-1 K+ in soil solution (0 to 3 dS m-1, with a 95.42% degree of confidence, for a loamy sand soil; and an error of up to ± 12.50 mg L-1 of K+ (0 to 2.5 dS m-1 in soil solution, with a 95.06% degree of confidence, for a sandy clay soil.

  9. Comparing Exapotranspiration Rates Estimated from Atmosphiric Flux and TDR Soil Moisture Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schelde, Kirsten; Ringgaard, Rasmus; Herbst, Mathias

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of water vapor fluxes using eddy covariance (EC) and measurements of root zone soil moisture depletion using time domain reflectometry (TDR) represent two independent approaches to estimating evapotranspiration. This study investigated the possibility of using TDR to provide a lower...... limit estimate (disregarding dew evaporation) of evapotranspiration on dry days. During a period of 7 wk, the two independent measuring techniques were applied in a barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) field, and six dry periods were identified. Measurements of daily root zone soil moisture depletion were...... compared with daily estimates of water vapor loss. During the first dry periods, agreement between the two approaches was good, with average daily deviation between estimates below 1.0 mm d−1 Toward the end of the measurement period, the estimates of the two techniques tended to deviate due to different...

  10. A Model-Based Probabilistic Inversion Framework for Wire Fault Detection Using TDR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuet, Stefan R.; Timucin, Dogan A.; Wheeler, Kevin R.

    2010-01-01

    Time-domain reflectometry (TDR) is one of the standard methods for diagnosing faults in electrical wiring and interconnect systems, with a long-standing history focused mainly on hardware development of both high-fidelity systems for laboratory use and portable hand-held devices for field deployment. While these devices can easily assess distance to hard faults such as sustained opens or shorts, their ability to assess subtle but important degradation such as chafing remains an open question. This paper presents a unified framework for TDR-based chafing fault detection in lossy coaxial cables by combining an S-parameter based forward modeling approach with a probabilistic (Bayesian) inference algorithm. Results are presented for the estimation of nominal and faulty cable parameters from laboratory data.

  11. A New Non-Destructive TDR System Combined with a Piezoelectric Stack for Measuring Properties of Geomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanyong Choi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Dry density and water content are two important factors affecting the degree of soil compaction. Conventional methods such as the sand cone test and the plate load test are used to measure such properties for evaluating the degree of compaction and the stiffness of soil in the field. However, these tests are generally very time-consuming and are inherent with some errors depending on the operator (in particular for the sand cone test. Elastic modulus is an indicator to describe the stress-strain behavior of soil and in some cases is used as a design input parameter. Although a rod type TDR (Time Domain Reflectometry system has been recently proposed to overcome some shortcomings of the conventional methods (particularly the sand cone test, it requires driving the probes into the ground, thus implying that it is still a time-consuming and destructive testing method. This study aims to develop a new non-destructive TDR system that can rapidly measure the dry density, water content, and elastic modulus of soil on the surface of compacted soil, without disturbing the ground. In this study, the Piezoelectric Stack, which is an instrument for measuring the elastic modulus of soil, has been added to the TDR system with a flat type probe, leading to a non-destructive TDR system that is capable of measuring the dry density, water content, and elastic modulus of soil. The new TDR system developed is light enough for an engineer to carry. Results of the standard compaction and TDR tests on sand showed that the dry densities and the moisture contents measured with the new TDR system were in good agreement with those measured with the standard compaction test, respectively. Consequently, it appears that the new TDR system developed will be very useful to advance the current practice of compaction quality control.

  12. An automatic time domain reflectometry device to measure and store soil water contents for stand-alone field use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsen, van den H.G.M.; Kokot, J.; Skierucha, W.; Halbertsma, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    A field set-up was developed to measure soil moisture content on ten different positions using the time domain reflectometry (TDR) technique. The set-up works on a 12 V battery or solar panel system, independent of an external power source, has low power consumption, and compact dimensions. The

  13. Monitoring temporal development of spatial soil water content variation: comparison of ground penetrating radar and time domain reflectometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, J.A.; Snepvangers, J.J.J.C.; Bouten, W.; Heuvelink, G.B.M.

    2003-01-01

    We compare the capability of ground penetrating radar (GPR) and time domain reflectometry (TDR) to assess the temporal development of spatial variation of surface volumetric water content. In the case of GPR, we measured surface water content with the ground wave, which is a direct wave between the

  14. Anal acoustic reflectometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitchell, Peter J; Klarskov, Niels; Telford, Karen J

    2011-01-01

    Anal acoustic reflectometry is a new technique of assessing anal sphincter function. Five new variables reflecting anal canal function are measured: the opening and closing pressure, the opening and closing elastance, and hysteresis.......Anal acoustic reflectometry is a new technique of assessing anal sphincter function. Five new variables reflecting anal canal function are measured: the opening and closing pressure, the opening and closing elastance, and hysteresis....

  15. Evaluation of TDR sensors to estimate moisture content in a highly saline soil from northern Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristi Matte, F.; Hernandez, M. F.; Fierro, V.; Hausner, M. B.; Munoz, J.; Suarez, F. I.

    2013-12-01

    The major component of the water budget in many of the volcanic basins located in northern Chile is evaporation from zones with shallow groundwater tables. Therefore, the water fluxes in the vadose zone in those dry volcanic-origin soils are of particular interest. In these soils, it has been reported that traditional time domain reflectometry (TDR) measurement methods are ineffective. TDR is a fast and nondestructive indirect electromagnetic method that is used to estimate soil moisture from the soil's apparent dielectric permittivity. The relationship between moisture content and apparent dielectric permittivity is influenced by many factors, such as length of the sensor's rods, salinity of porous media and soil mineralogy. In volcanic soils, it has been reported that Topp's 'universal' relationship is no longer valid. In this study, we evaluated the performance of TDR probes for the estimation of soil moisture in a highly saline and volcanic-origin soil from the Salar del Huasco basin, northern Chile. TDR sensors with rods of 7.5 and 30 cm were used to test the dielectric permittivity of different potassium chloride solutions of known permittivity (with electrical conductivity ranging from 0.015 to 12.9 dS/m). The TDR probes were then used to test the permittivity of soils at known water contents and temperatures. The effects of temperature and the salinity of the solutions on the apparent permittivity were negligible, and the shorter rods proved more accurate than the longer rods. Furthermore, neither the Topp's equation nor previously proposed relationships for volcanic-origin soils developed around the world were adequate to represent the soil's moisture content used in this study. Based on the results, we propose a new relationship between moisture content and apparent dielectric permittivity for the volcanic-origin soil of the Salar del Huasco basin. Further research is ongoing to obtain analogous relationships between moisture content and apparent

  16. Active Time-Domain Reflectometry for Unattended Safeguards Systems FY15 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tedeschi, Jonathan R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Smith, Leon E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Moore, David E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sheen, David M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Conrad, Ryan C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gavric, Gordan [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) continues to expand its use of unattended measurement systems. An increasing number of systems and an expanding family of instruments create challenges in terms of deployment efficiency and the implementation of data authentication measures. In collaboration with the IAEA, tamper-indicating measures to address data-transmission authentication challenges with unattended safeguards systems are under investigation. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is studying the viability of active time-domain reflectometry (TDR) along two parallel but interconnected paths: (1) swept-frequency TDR as the highly flexible, laboratory gold standard to which field-deployable options can be compared, and (2) a low-cost commercially available spread-spectrum TDR technology as one option for field implementation. This report describes PNNL’s FY15 progress in the viability study including: an overview of the TDR methods under investigation; description of the testing configurations and mock tampering scenarios; results from a preliminary sensitivity comparison of the two TDR methods; demonstration of a quantitative metric for estimating field performance that acknowledges the need for high detection probability while minimizing false alarms. FY15 progress reported here sets the stage for a rigorous comparison of the candidate TDR methods, over a range of deployment scenarios and perturbing effects typical of IAEA unattended monitoring systems.

  17. Models for moisture estimation in different horizons of yellow argisol using TDR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Silva Santos Alvares de Almeida

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The determination of soil moisture is very important because it is the property with the most influence on the dielectric constant of the medium. Time-domain reflectometry (TDR is an indirect technique used to estimate the water content of the soil (? based on its dielectric constant (Ka. Like any other technique, it has advantages and disadvantages. Among the major disadvantages is the need for calibration, which requires consideration of the soil characteristics. This study aimed to perform the calibration of a TDR100 device to estimate the volumetric water content of four horizons of a Yellow Argisol. Calibration was performed under laboratory conditions using disturbed soil samples contained in PVC columns. The three rods of the handcrafted probes were vertically installed in the soil columns. Weight measurements with digital scales and daily readings of the dielectric constant with the TDR device were taken. For all soil horizons evaluated, the best fits between the dielectric constant and the volumetric water content were related to the cubic polynomial model. The Ledieu model overestimated by approximately 68 % the volumetric water content in the A and AB horizons, and underestimating by 69 % in Bt2, in relation to volumetric water content obtained by gravimetry. The underestimation by linear, Topp, Roth, and Malicki models ranged from 50 % to 85 % for all horizons.

  18. Study on Elastic Helical TDR Sensing Cable for Distributed Deformation Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Li

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to detect distributed ground surface deformation, an elastic helical structure Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR sensing cable is shown in this paper. This special sensing cable consists of three parts: a silicone rubber rope in the center; a couple of parallel wires coiling around the rope; a silicone rubber pipe covering the sensing cable. By analyzing the relationship between the impedance and the structure of the sensing cable, the impedance model shows that the sensing cable impedance will increase when the cable is stretched. This specific characteristic is verified in the cable stretching experiment which is the base of TDR sensing technology. The TDR experiment shows that a positive reflected signal is created at the stretching deformation point on the sensing cable. The results show that the deformation section length and the stretching elongation will both affect the amplitude of the reflected signal. Finally, the deformation locating experiments show that the sensing cable can accurately detect the deformation point position on the sensing cable.

  19. Time-Domain Reflectometry for Tamper Indication in Unattended Monitoring Systems for Safeguards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tedeschi, Jonathan R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Smith, Leon E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Moore, David E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sheen, David M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Conrad, Ryan C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-12-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) continues to expand its use of unattended, remotely monitored measurement systems. An increasing number of systems and an expanding family of instruments create challenges in terms of deployment efficiency and the implementation of data authentication measures. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) leads a collaboration that is exploring various tamper-indicating (TI) measures that could help to address some of the long-standing detector and data-transmission authentication challenges with IAEA’s unattended systems. PNNL is investigating the viability of active time-domain reflectometry (TDR) along two parallel but interconnected paths: (1) swept-frequency TDR as the highly flexible, laboratory gold standard to which field-deployable options can be compared, and (2) a low-cost commercially available spread-spectrum TDR technology as one option for field implementation. This report describes PNNL’s progress and preliminary findings from the first year of the study, and describes the path forward.

  20. Reflectometry on D17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cubitt, R. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 - Grenoble (France)

    1997-04-01

    As part of the package of instrument upgrades planned over the next few years, D17 is based on a straightened cold neutron-guide and converted into a dedicated and versatile reflectometer. In the meantime, in order for ILL to become as fully involved as possible in this growing area of activity, the current D17 has been optimised for reflectometry. Results of this project are presented. (author).

  1. TDR Using Autocorrelation and Varying-Duration Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucena, Angel; Mullinex, Pam; Huang, PoTien; Santiago, Josephine; Mata, Carlos; Zavala, Carlos; Lane, John

    2008-01-01

    In an alternative to a prior technique of time-domain-reflectometry (TDR) in which very short excitation pulses are used, the pulses have very short rise and fall times and the pulse duration is varied continuously between a minimum and a maximum value. In both the present and prior techniques, the basic idea is to (1) measure the times between the generation of excitation pulses and the reception of reflections of the pulses as indications of the locations of one or more defects along a cable and (2) measure the amplitudes of the reflections as indication of the magnitudes of the defects. In general, an excitation pulse has a duration T. Each leading and trailing edge of an excitation pulse generates a reflection from a defect, so that a unique pair of reflections is associated with each defect. In the present alternative technique, the processing of the measured reflection signal includes computation of the autocorrelation function R(tau) identical with fx(t)x(t-tau)dt where t is time, x(t) is the measured reflection signal at time t, and taus is the correlation interval. The integration is performed over a measurement time interval short enough to enable identification and location of a defect within the corresponding spatial interval along the cable. Typically, where there is a defect, R(tau) exhibits a negative peak having maximum magnitude for tau in the vicinity of T. This peak can be used as a means of identifying a leading-edge/trailing-edge reflection pair. For a given spatial interval, measurements are made and R(tau) computed, as described above, for pulse durations T ranging from the minimum to the maximum value. The advantage of doing this is that the effective signal-to-noise ratio may be significantly increased over that attainable by use of a fixed pulse duration T.

  2. Mobile TDR for geo-referenced measurement of soil water content and electrical conductivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Anton; Schelde, Kirsten; Drøscher, Per

    2007-01-01

    content and electrical conductivity within two research fields. Measurements made during the early or late season, when soil moisture levels are close to field capacity, are related to the amount of plant available water and soil texture. Combined measurements of water content and electrical conductivity...... analysis of the soil water measurements, recommendations are made with respect to sampling strategies. Depending on the variability of a given area, between 15 and 30 ha can be mapped with respect to soil moisture and electrical conductivity with sufficient detail within 8 h......The development of site-specific crop management is constrained by the availability of sensors for monitoring important soil and crop related conditions. A mobile time-domain reflectometry (TDR) unit for geo-referenced soil measurements has been developed and used for detailed mapping of soil water...

  3. The HLT, DAQ and DCS TDR

    CERN Document Server

    Wickens, F. J

    At the end of June the Trigger-DAQ community achieved a major milestone with the submission to the LHCC of the Technical Design Report (TDR) for DAQ, HLT and DCS. The first unbound copies were handed to the LHCC referees on the scheduled date of 30th June, this was followed a few days later by a limited print run which produced the first bound copies (see Figure 1). As had previously been announced both to the LHCC and the ATLAS Collaboration it was not possible on this timescale to give a complete validation of all of the aspects of the architecture in the TDR. So it had been agreed that further work would continue over the summer to provide more complete results for the formal review by the LHCC of the TDR in September. Thus there followed an intense programme of measurements and analysis: especially to provide results for HLT both in testbeds and for the event selection software itself; to provide additional information on scaling of the dataflow aspects; to provide first results on the new prototype ROBin...

  4. Contributions to the 4. reflectometry workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clairet, F

    1999-09-15

    This document contains ten papers presented during the 4. workshop on reflectometry. Those papers deal with the utility of reflectometry to plasma density fluctuations study or reflectometry based plasma diagnostics: X mode reflectometry on edge density profile measurements on Tore Supra; recent results of reflectometry on ASDEX-UPGRADE; automatic evaluation of density profiles with high temporal resolution; the TJ-II reflectometry system; doppler reflectometry for the investigation of poloidally propagating density perturbations; poloidal rotation measuremin Tore Supra by oblique reflectometry; pulsed radar reflectometry at TEXTOR-94; density profile reconstruction methods using dispersive effects in pulse radar reflectometry; fluctuation reflectometry: two dimensional full wave modelling; phase ramping and modulation of reflectometer signals. (A.L.B.)

  5. Active Time-Domain Reflectometry for Unattended Safeguards Systems: FY16 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tedeschi, Jonathan R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Smith, Leon E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Conrad, Ryan C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gavric, Gordan [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zalavadia, Mital A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Keller, Daniel T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pratt, Richard M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-10-21

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) continues to expand its use of unattended measurement systems. An increasing number of systems and an expanding family of instruments create challenges in terms of deployment efficiency and the implementation of data authentication measures. Traditional data security measures, for example tamper-indicating (TI) conduit, are impractical for the long separation distances (often 100 meters or more) between unattended monitoring system (UMS) components. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is studying the viability of active time-domain reflectometry (TDR) for the detection of cable tampering in unattended radiation detection systems. The instrument concept under investigation would allow for unmanned cable integrity measurements, remote surveillance reporting and locating of cable faults and/or tampers. This report describes PNNL’s FY16 progress and includes: an overview of the TDR methods under investigation; description of the TDR evaluation testbed developed by PNNL; development and testing of advanced signal processing algorithms to extract weak signals from relatively high noise levels; and initial testing of a laboratory prototype intended for IAEA UMS applications and based on a commercially available TDR module. Preliminary viability findings and recommendations for the next stage of development and testing are provided.

  6. Fault Detection of Aircraft Cable via Spread Spectrum Time Domain Reflectometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xudong SHI

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available As the airplane cable fault detection based on TDR (time domain reflectometry is affected easily by various noise signals, which makes the reflected signal attenuate and distort heavily, failing to locate the fault. In order to solve these problems, a method of spread spectrum time domain reflectometry (SSTDR is introduced in this paper, taking the advantage of the sharp peak of correlation function. The test signal is generated from ML sequence (MLS modulated by sine wave in the same frequency. Theoretically, the test signal has the very high immunity of noise, which can be applied with excellent precision to fault location on the aircraft cable. In this paper, the method of SSTDR was normally simulated in MATLAB. Then, an experimental setup, based on LabVIEW, was organized to detect and locate the fault on the aircraft cable. It has been demonstrated that SSTDR has the high immunity of noise, reducing some detection errors effectively.

  7. Temperature effects on soil bulk dielectric permittivity measured by time domain reflectometry: Experimental evidence and hypothesis development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wraith, Jon M.; Or, Dani

    1999-02-01

    Reports on temperature (T) effects on time domain reflectometry (TDR) measurements of soil water content (θ) are contradictory and often exhibit conflicting trends. We imposed step T changes on sealed columns of four soils having variable θ, while monitoring bulk apparent dielectric constant (or permittivity ɛb) and bulk electrical conductivity (σb) using TDR. Measured ɛb increased substantially with increasing temperature for one silt loam soil, for all θ. For another silt loam soil and for an Oxisol, measured ɛb increased with increasing T at relatively low θ but decreased with increasingT at higher θ. For a sandy loam soil, measured ɛb decreased with increasing T for all θ. The experimental results led to the hypothesis that TDR-measured ɛb is determined by an interplay between two competing phenomena: (1) the reduction in the dielectric constant of bulk water with increased T; and (2) the increase in TDR-measured ɛb with increased T due to release of bound water. TDRmeasured ɛb is thus dependent on solid surface area and wetness. Our results have implications for routine use of TDR in fine-textured and organic soils and potentially for microwave remote sensing of soil water status.

  8. Reflectometry diagnostics on TCV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina Cabrera, Pedro; Coda, Stefano; Porte, Laurie; Offeddu, Nicola; Tcv Team

    2017-10-01

    Both profile reflectometer and Doppler back-scattering (DBS) diagnostics are being developed for the TCV Tokamak using a steerable quasi-optical launcher and universal polarizers. First results will be presented. A pulse reflectometer is being developed to complement Thomson Scattering measurements of electron density, greatly increasing temporal resolution and also effectively enabling fluctuation measurements. Pulse reflectometry consists of sending short pulses of varying frequency and measuring the roundtrip group-delay with precise chronometers. A fast arbitrary waveform generator is used as a pulse source feeding frequency multipliers that bring the pulses to V-band. A DBS diagnostic is currently operational in TCV. DBS may be used to infer the perpendicular velocity and wave number spectrum of electron density fluctuations in the 3-15 cm-1 wave-number range. Off-the-shelf transceiver modules, originally used for VNA measurements, are being used in a Doppler radar configuration. See author list of S. Coda et al., 2017 Nucl. Fusion 57 102011.

  9. Cable Damage Detection System and Algorithms Using Time Domain Reflectometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, G A; Robbins, C L; Wade, K A; Souza, P R

    2009-03-24

    This report describes the hardware system and the set of algorithms we have developed for detecting damage in cables for the Advanced Development and Process Technologies (ADAPT) Program. This program is part of the W80 Life Extension Program (LEP). The system could be generalized for application to other systems in the future. Critical cables can undergo various types of damage (e.g. short circuits, open circuits, punctures, compression) that manifest as changes in the dielectric/impedance properties of the cables. For our specific problem, only one end of the cable is accessible, and no exemplars of actual damage are available. This work addresses the detection of dielectric/impedance anomalies in transient time domain reflectometry (TDR) measurements on the cables. The approach is to interrogate the cable using time domain reflectometry (TDR) techniques, in which a known pulse is inserted into the cable, and reflections from the cable are measured. The key operating principle is that any important cable damage will manifest itself as an electrical impedance discontinuity that can be measured in the TDR response signal. Machine learning classification algorithms are effectively eliminated from consideration, because only a small number of cables is available for testing; so a sufficient sample size is not attainable. Nonetheless, a key requirement is to achieve very high probability of detection and very low probability of false alarm. The approach is to compare TDR signals from possibly damaged cables to signals or an empirical model derived from reference cables that are known to be undamaged. This requires that the TDR signals are reasonably repeatable from test to test on the same cable, and from cable to cable. Empirical studies show that the repeatability issue is the 'long pole in the tent' for damage detection, because it is has been difficult to achieve reasonable repeatability. This one factor dominated the project. The two-step model

  10. Contact Angles of Water-repellent Porous Media Inferred by Tensiometer- TDR Probe Measurement Under Controlled Wetting and Drying Cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Subedi, Shaphal; Komatsu, Ken; Komatsu, Toshiko

    2013-01-01

    The time dependency of water repellency (WR) in hydrophobic porous media plays a crucial role for water infiltration processes after rainfall and for the long-term performance of capillary barrier systems. The contact angle (CA) of hydrophobic media normally decreases with continuous contact...... with water, eventually allowing water imbibition. However, the effect of the reduction in CA with soil-water contact time on the water retention function of hydrophobic media is not yet fully understood. In this study, water retention characteristics were measured using a hanging water column apparatus...... equipped with a mini-time domain reflectometry (TDR) coil probe under controlled wetting and drying in a water-repellent volcanic ash soil (VAS) and in sands coated with different hydrophobic agents. The contact angle (CA–SWRC) under imbibition was evaluated based on the inflection points on the water...

  11. Polarized neutron reflectometry at Dhruva reactor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    structure by NR and magnetic moment per Fe atom by PNR. Keywords. Neutron reflectometry; polarized neutron; multilayers; interface; roughness; magnetic moment. PACS Nos 61.12.Ha; 68.35.Ct; 75.70.Cn. 1. Introduction. Neutron reflectometry (NR) is an important non-destructive technique today for determining thin film ...

  12. The promise of urethral pressure reflectometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khayyami, Yasmine; Klarskov, Niels; Lose, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    pressure reflectometry (UPR), a method that measures pressure and the corresponding cross-sectional area along the entire length of the urethra continuously by means of acoustic reflectometry, have been performed. The studies have mainly been performed on patients with stress urinary incontinence (SUI...

  13. Advanced techniques for microwave reflectometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, J.; Branas, B.; Luna, E. de la; Estrada, T. [Asociacion Euratom-CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Zhuravlev, V. [Asociacion Euratom-CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain)]|[Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Hartfuss, H.J.; Hirsch, M.; Geist, T. [Max-Planck Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Segovia, J.; Oramas, J.L. [Univ. Politecnica, Madrid (Spain)

    1994-12-31

    Microwave reflectometry has been applied during the last years as a plasma diagnostic of increasing interest, mainly due to its simplicity, no need for large access ports and low radiation damage of exposed components. Those characteristics make reflectometry an attractive diagnostic for the next generation devices. Systems used either for density profile or density fluctuations have also shown great development, from the original single channel heterodyne to the multichannel homodyne receivers. In the present work we discuss three different advanced reflectometer systems developed by CIEMAT members in collaboration with different institutions. The first one is the broadband heterodyne reflectometer installed on W7AS for density fluctuations measurements. The decoupling of the phase and amplitude of the reflected beam allows for quantitative analysis of the fluctuations. Recent results showing the behavior of the density turbulence during the L-H transition on W7AS are shown. The second system shows how the effect of the turbulence can be used for density profile measurements by reflectometry in situations where the complicated geometry of the waveguides cannot avoid many parasitic reflections. Experiments from the TJ-I tokamak will be shown. Finally, a reflectometer system based on the Amplitude Modulation (AM) technique for density profile measurements is discussed and experimental results from the TJ-I tokamak are shown. The AM system offers the advantage of being almost insensitive to the effect of fluctuations. It is able to take a direct measurement of the time delay of the microwave pulse which propagates to the reflecting layer and is reflected back. In order to achieve fast reconstruction for real time monitoring of the density profile application of Neural Networks algorithms will be presented the method can reduce the computing times by about three orders of magnitude. 10 refs., 10 figs.

  14. Caracterização física de dois substratos orgânicos para plantas e a estimativa da umidade por meio da reflectometria no domínio do tempo Physical characterization of two organic substrates for plants and the estimate of water content through the time domain reflectometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Manuel Mestas Valero

    2009-04-01

    influenced by substrates physical properties, mainly on irrigation handling, where understanding about water retention and pore aeration is essential. Water volume determination on substrates used during experiments has been necessary, and in this way the use of the Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR can represent an advance about this kind of researches. Based on water retention curve determination, this research, has been carried on physical characterizations of two organic substrates: coconut fiber and pine bark substrates. Also, a calibration curve has been adjusted for each tested substrates, and through TDR technique was estimated the water content. In a general, except to the dry density, the tested substrates has showed similar characteristics about its water-air relation. In the range readily available water, for both tested substrates, the TDR technique has showed a good performance on the water content estimative, with a determination coefficient of 0.9319 to the pine barks and 0.9385 to the coconut fiber.

  15. An improved thermo-time domain reflectometry method for determination of ice contents in partially frozen soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhengchao; Ren, Tusheng; Kojima, Yuki; Lu, Yili; Horton, Robert; Heitman, Joshua L.

    2017-12-01

    Measuring ice contents (θi) in partially frozen soils is important for both engineering and environmental applications. Thermo-time domain reflectometry (thermo-TDR) probes can be used to determine θi based on the relationship between θi and soil heat capacity (C). This approach, however, is accurate in partially frozen soils only at temperatures below -5 °C, and it performs poorly on clayey soils. In this study, we present and evaluate a soil thermal conductivity (λ)-based approach to determine θi with thermo-TDR probes. Bulk soil λ is described with a simplified de Vries model that relates λ to θi. From this model, θi is estimated using inverse modeling of thermo-TDR measured λ. Soil bulk density (ρb) and thermo-TDR measured liquid water content (θl) are also needed for both C-based and λ-based approaches. A theoretical analysis is performed to quantify the sensitivity of C-based and λ-based θi estimates to errors in these input parameters. The analysis indicates that the λ-based approach is less sensitive to errors in the inputs (C, λ, θl, and ρb) than is the C-based approach when the same or the same percentage errors occur. Further evaluations of the C-based and λ-based approaches are made using experimentally determined θi at different temperatures on eight soils with various textures, total water contents, and ρb. The results show that the λ-based thermo-TDR approach significantly improves the accuracy of θi measurements at temperatures ≤-5 °C. The root mean square errors of λ-based θi estimates are only half those of C-based θi. At temperatures of -1 and -2 °C, the λ-based thermo-TDR approach also provides reasonable θi, while the C-based approach fails. We conclude that the λ-based thermo-TDR method can reliably determine θi even at temperatures near the freezing point of water (0 °C).

  16. Flash X-Ray (FXR) Accelerator Optimization - Beam-induced Voltage Simulation and TDR Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ong, M M; Vogtlin, G E

    2004-04-07

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is evaluating design alternatives to improve the voltage regulation in our Flash X-Ray (FXR) accelerator cell and pulse-power system. The goal is to create a more mono-energetic electron beam that will create an x-ray source with a smaller spot-size. Studying the interaction of the beam and accelerator cell will generate improved designs for high-current accelerators at Livermore and elsewhere. When an electron beam crosses the energized gap of an accelerator cell, the electron energy is increased. However, the beam with the associated electromagnetic wave also looses a small amount of energy because of the increased impedance seen across the gap. The phenomenon is sometimes called beam loading. It can also be described as a beam-induced voltage at the gap which is time varying. This creates beam energy variations that we need to understand and control. A high-fidelity computer simulation of the beam and cell interaction has been completed to quantify the time varying induced voltage at the gap. The cell and pulse-power system was characterized using a Time-domain Reflectometry (TDR) measurement technique with a coaxial air-line to drive the cell gap. The beam-induced cell voltage is computed by convoluting the cell impedance with measured beam current. The voltage was checked against other measurements to validate the accuracy. The simulation results predicted that there are significant beam-induced gap voltage variations. Beam-induced voltages from different current profiles and cell impedances were simulated and compared. This allows us to predict the effect on voltage regulation for different design alternatives before making hardware changes and high-voltage testing. The beam-induced voltages are incorporated into a larger accelerator system-model to quantify their effect on total beam energy variations.

  17. Analysis of soil water dynamics in an agroforestry system based on detailed soil water records from time-domain reflectometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Jackson

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Time domain reflectometry [TDR] was used to investigate the spatial and temporal variation in surface soil water dynamics under a number of types of vegetation, including both trees and crops grown in isolation, and grown together as an agroforestry system. The installation and operation of this technique are presented, and discussed in terms of its suitability to monitor rapid fluctuations in soil-water content in a spatially heterogeneous system such as that described in this experiment. The relatively small sampling volume of each of the TDR waveguides permitted discrete measurements to be made of soil water content (θv. In the tree-only and tree+crop treatments, this revealed considerable variation in θv resulting from spatial redistribution of rainfall under the tree canopies, with a significant input to soil close to the base of the trees being made by stemflow, i.e. water intercepted by the tree canopy and channelled down the stem. Over the experimental period (one rainy season the TDR data suggested that net recharge to the soil profile in the sole crop system was 53 mm, almost 75% more than occurred in either of the two treatments containing trees, reflecting greater rainfall interception by the tree canopies.

  18. Magnetic waveguides for neutron reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaydukov, Yu.; Petrzhik, A. M.; Borisenko, I. V.; Kalabukhov, A.; Winkler, D.; Keller, T.; Ovsyannikov, G. A.; Keimer, B.

    2017-10-01

    We show that the sensitivity and depth selectivity of neutron reflectometry can be greatly enhanced through a waveguide design that takes advantage of the spin-dependent magnetic neutron scattering potential to steer spin-up and spin-down neutrons into waveguide modes with different depth profiles. Using a bilayer of manganate and ruthenate ferromagnets, we demonstrate that a magnetic waveguide structure with sharp spin-up and spin-down modes centered in the two different layers can be generated by adding a magnetically inactive capping layer. The resulting reflectometric data allow accurate and reliable determination of a small in-plane magnetization in the ruthenate layer, despite its immediate proximity to the manganate layer with much larger magnetization. Magnetic neutron waveguides thus enable depth-sensitive measurements of small electronic spin polarizations in a large variety of magnetic multilayers and devices.

  19. In situ quantification of membrane foulant accumulation by reflectometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schroen, C. G. P. H.; Roosjen, A.; Norde, W.; Boom, R. M.; Tang, K.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present laser light reflectometry [1] (not to be mistaken with ultrasound reflectometry [2] that uses ultrasound waves) as a tool for quantitative investigation of (the initial stages of) fouling on membrane-like surfaces. Reflectometry allows in situ investigation of adsorption

  20. Reflectometry techniques for density profile measurements on fusion plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laviron, C.; Donne, A. J. H.; Manso, M. E.; Sanchez, J.

    1996-01-01

    Reflectometry applied to the measurement of density profiles on fusion plasmas has been subject to many recent developments. After a brief reminder of the principles of reflectometry, the theoretical accuracy of reflectometry measurements is discussed. The main difficulties limiting the performance,

  1. Time domain reflectometry-measuring dielectric permittivity to detect soil non-acqeous phase liquids contamination-decontamination processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Comegna

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Contamination of soils with non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL constitutes a serious geo-environmental problem, given the toxicity level and high mobility of these organic compounds. To develop effective decontamination methods, characterisation and identification of contaminated soils are needed. The objective of this work is to explore the potential of dielectric permittivity measurements to detect the presence of NAPLs in soils. The dielectric permittivity was measured by Time Domain Reflectometry method (TDR in soil samples with either different volumetric content of water (w and NAPL (NAPL or at different stages during immiscible displacement test carried out with two different flushing solutions. A mixing model proposed by Francisca and Montoro, was calibrated to estimate the volume fraction of contaminant present in soil. Obtained results, showed that soil contamination with NAPL and the monitoring of immiscible fluid displacement, during soil remediation processes, can be clearly identified from dielectric measurements.

  2. A Time-Domain Reflectometry Method with Variable Needle Pulse Width for Measuring the Dielectric Properties of Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Wilczek

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Time-domain reflectometry (TDR methods used for measuring the dielectric properties of materials mostly utilize step or needle electrical pulses of constant amplitudes and shapes. Our novel approach enables determining the dielectric relaxation time of a sample using the analysis of the amplitudes of reflected pulses of two widths, in addition to bulk dielectric permittivity and electrical conductivity commonly obtained by the TDR technique. The method was developed for various values of electrical conductivity and relaxation time using numerical simulations of a five-rod probe placed in a material with complex dielectric permittivity described by the Debye model with an added electrical conductivity term. The characterization of amplitudes of two pulses of selected widths was done with regard to the dielectric parameters of simulated materials. The required probe parameters were obtained solely from numerical simulations. Verification was performed for the probe placed in aqueous KCl solutions with 14 different electrical conductivity values. The determined relaxation time remained roughly constant and independent of electrical conductivity. The obtained electrical conductivity agreed with the reference values. Our results indicate that the relaxation time, dielectric permittivity and electrical conductivity of the tested solutions can be simultaneously determined using a simple analysis of the amplitude and reflection time of two needle pulses of different widths.

  3. A Time-Domain Reflectometry Method with Variable Needle Pulse Width for Measuring the Dielectric Properties of Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczek, Andrzej; Szypłowska, Agnieszka; Kafarski, Marcin; Skierucha, Wojciech

    2016-02-04

    Time-domain reflectometry (TDR) methods used for measuring the dielectric properties of materials mostly utilize step or needle electrical pulses of constant amplitudes and shapes. Our novel approach enables determining the dielectric relaxation time of a sample using the analysis of the amplitudes of reflected pulses of two widths, in addition to bulk dielectric permittivity and electrical conductivity commonly obtained by the TDR technique. The method was developed for various values of electrical conductivity and relaxation time using numerical simulations of a five-rod probe placed in a material with complex dielectric permittivity described by the Debye model with an added electrical conductivity term. The characterization of amplitudes of two pulses of selected widths was done with regard to the dielectric parameters of simulated materials. The required probe parameters were obtained solely from numerical simulations. Verification was performed for the probe placed in aqueous KCl solutions with 14 different electrical conductivity values. The determined relaxation time remained roughly constant and independent of electrical conductivity. The obtained electrical conductivity agreed with the reference values. Our results indicate that the relaxation time, dielectric permittivity and electrical conductivity of the tested solutions can be simultaneously determined using a simple analysis of the amplitude and reflection time of two needle pulses of different widths.

  4. Evaluation of rainfall infiltration characteristics in a volcanic ash soil by time domain reflectometry method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hasegawa

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Time domain reflectometry (TDR was used to monitor soil water conditions and to evaluate infiltration characteristics associated with rainfall into a volcanic-ash soil (Hydric Hapludand with a low bulk density. Four 1 m TDR probes were installed vertically along a 6 m line in a bare field. Three 30 cm and one 60 cm probes were installed between the 1 m probes. Soil water content was measured every half or every hour throughout the year. TDR enabled prediction of the soil water content precisely even though the empirical equation developed by Topp et al. (1980 underestimated the water content. Field capacity, defined as the amount of water stored to a depth of 1 m on the day following heavy rainfall, was 640 mm. There was approximately 100 mm difference in the amount of water stored between field capacity and the driest period. Infiltration characteristics of rainfall were investigated for 36 rainfall events exceeding 10 mm with a total amount of rain of 969 mm out of an annual rainfall of 1192 mm. In the case of 25 low intensity rainfall events with less than 10 mm h-1 on to dry soils, the increase in the amount of water stored to a depth of 1 m was equal to the cumulative rainfall. For rain intensity in excess of 10 mm h-1, non-uniform infiltration occurred. The increase in the amount of water stored at lower elevation locations was 1.4 to 1.6 times larger than at higher elevation locations even though the difference in ground height among the 1 m probes was 6 cm. In the two instances when rainfall exceeded 100 mm, including the amount of rain in a previous rainfall event, the increase in the amount of water stored to a depth of 1 m was 65 mm lower than the total quantity of rain on the two occasions (220 mm; this indicated that 65 mm of water or 5.5% of the annual rainfall had flowed away either by surface runoff or bypass flow. Hence, approximately 95% of the annual rainfall was absorbed by the soil matrix but it is not possible to simulate

  5. Reflectometry techniques for density profile measurements on fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laviron, C. [Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d`Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Donne, A.J.H. [Associatie Euratom-FOM, Nieuwegein (Netherlands). FOM-Instituut voor Plasmafysica; Manso, M.E. [Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisbon (Portugal). Lab. de Quimica Organica; Sanchez, J. [EURATOM-CIEMAT for Fusion Association, Madrid (Spain)

    1996-03-01

    Reflectometry applied to the measurement of density profiles on fusion plasmas has been subject to many recent developments. After a brief reminder of the principles of reflectometry, the theoretical accuracy of reflectometry measurements is discussed. The main difficulties limiting the performance, namely the plasma fluctuations and the quality of the transmission lines, are analysed. The different techniques used for reflectometry are then presented. The present status and achievements of actual implementations of these techniques are shown, with an analysis of their respective limitations and merits, as well as foreseen developments. (author). 70 refs.

  6. BASE Temperature Data Record (TDR) from the SSM/I and SSMIS Sensors, CSU Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The BASE Temperature Data Record (TDR) dataset from Colorado State University (CSU) is a collection of the raw unprocessed antenna temperature data that has been...

  7. Measurements of effective non-rainfall in soil with the use of time-domain reflectometry technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakonieczna, Anna; Kafarski, Marcin; Wilczek, Andrzej; Szypłowska, Agnieszka; Skierucha, Wojciech

    2014-05-01

    The non-rainfall vectors are fog, dew, hoarfrost and vapour adsorption directly from the atmosphere. The measurements of the amount of water supplied to the soil due to their temporary existence are essential, because in dry areas such water uptake can exceed that of rainfall. Although several devices and methods were proposed for estimating the effective non-rainfall input into the soil, the measurement standard has not yet been established. This is mainly due to obstacles in measuring small water additions to the medium, problems with taking readings in actual soil samples and atmospheric disturbances during their course in natural environment. There still exists the need for automated devices capable of measuring water deposition on real-world soil surfaces, whose resolution is high enough to measure the non-rainfall intensity and increase rate, which are usually very low. In order to achieve the desirable resolution and accuracy of the effective non-rainfall measurements the time-domain reflectometry (TDR) technique was employed. The TDR sensor designed and made especially for the purpose was an untypical waveguide. It consisted of a base made of laminate covered with copper, which served as a bottom of a cuboidal open container in which the examined materials were placed, and a copper signal wire placed on the top of the container. The wire adhered along its entire length to the tested material in order to eliminate the formation of air gaps between the two, what enhanced the accuracy of the measurements. The tested porous materials were glass beads, rinsed sand and three soil samples, which were collected in south-eastern Poland. The diameter ranges of their constituent particles were measured with the use of the laser diffraction technique. The sensor filled with the wetted material was placed on a scale and connected to the TDR meter. The automated readings of mass and TDR time were collected simultaneously every minute. The TDR time was correlated with the

  8. Utilização da TDR para monitoramento da solução de nitrato de potássio em Latossolo Vermelho-Amarelo Use of tdr for monitoring the potassium nitrate solution in dystrophic Red-Yellow Latossol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo do N. Lopes

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available O conhecimento da distribuição e armazenamento da solução no solo é de grande importância para a agricultura, pois a interação entre os nutrientes e a água é um dos fatores que influenciam diretamente no rendimento das culturas. Das várias técnicas utilizadas para o monitoramento da solução no solo, a reflectometria no domínio do tempo (TDR vem sendo bastante difundida entre os pesquisadores por apresentar inúmeras vantagens, dentre as quais a mensuração em tempo real e a possibilidade de leituras automatizadas. O principal objetivo desta pesquisa foi avaliar a distribuição da solução de KNO3 no perfil de um Latossolo Vermelho-Amarelo. Sondas de Reflectometria no Domínio do Tempo (TDR foram utilizadas para monitorar a distribuição de solução no solo aplicada por gotejadores de fluxo constante nas vazões de 2; 4 e 8 L h-1. Considerando-se os resultados de diferentes perfis, observou-se maior armazenamento da solução próxima ao gotejador, diminuindo progressivamente para frente de molhamento. Pouco mais da metade da solução aplicada (65% foi armazenada na primeira camada (0-0,10 m para todos os ensaios, e 22% foi armazenada na próxima camada (0,10-0,20 m. Comparando-se diferentes taxas de aplicação, observou-se maior armazenamento de água para o gotejador de 4 L h-1, com 60; 72 e 63% de solução de KNO3 aplicada acumulada na primeira camada (0-0,10 m para gotejadores de 2; 4 e 8 L h-1, respectivamente. Os resultados sugerem que, com base no volume e frequência utilizada neste experimento, seria vantajoso aplicar pequenas quantidades de água em intervalos mais frequentes para reduzir perdas por percolação.Knowledge of water distribution in soil is of great importance to agriculture, since water is one of the factors that most influence the yield of crops. There are many techniques used for monitoring of soil water content, the Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR has been widespread among researchers to present

  9. Dental optical coherence domain reflectometry explorer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Everett, Matthew J. (Livermore, CA); Colston, Jr., Billy W. (Livermore, CA); Sathyam, Ujwal S. (Livermore, CA); Da Silva, Luiz B. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2001-01-01

    A hand-held, fiber optic based dental device with optical coherence domain reflectometry (OCDR) sensing capabilities provides a profile of optical scattering as a function of depth in the tissue at the point where the tip of the dental explorer touches the tissue. This system provides information on the internal structure of the dental tissue, which is then used to detect caries and periodontal disease. A series of profiles of optical scattering or tissue microstructure are generated by moving the explorer across the tooth or other tissue. The profiles are combined to form a cross-sectional, or optical coherence tomography (OCT), image.

  10. Preliminary experiments about the measure of the magnetic properties of a material by means of TDR probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persico, Raffaele

    2016-04-01

    In this contribution, the possibility of measuring possible magnetic properties of materials by means of a TDR probe is studied. A transmission line model is adopted and data in time and frequency domain are exploited together. Simulation results are shown, at the moment based on a bifilar line model. Magnetic properties of materials can be of interest for several applications. In particular, the presence of magnetic features in the soil or in any substance, might be associated to some contaminant (presumably containing some metallic element as iron, nickel or chromium [1]). This kind of pollution might occur close to some farms, especially regarding the dying of dresses, the production of some medicines, the tanning of leather issues. Moreover, modern agriculture puts in the soil several fertilizing substances, and there is a debate about the quantity of heavy metals spread in the terrain by these activities [2]. Still, some depuration-mud can be affected by an excessive presence of metallic elements, because of the presence of batteries, skins, varnishes, cosmetics, and so on [2]. Moreover, it is thought that the soil on the planet Mars might show magnetic properties [3]. Finally, in GPR prospecting, possible magnetic characteristics of the soil or of the targets might be of interest too [4], but they cannot be retrieved by means of only GPR data [5]. In the present paper, the results of a preliminary study are exposed with regard to the possibility to measure the magnetic properties of a material by mean of a TDR probe [6-7]. In particular a TDR probe is essentially a transmission line (a bifilar model will be exploited in this work) open at the end, form which most of the impinging energy (ideally the whole of thi energy in a lossless medium) is back reflected. In particular, this allows a customary measure of the propagation velocity in the medium if an impulsive signal is generated. In fact, the return time along a path of known length is measured. The

  11. Probing Interfaces in Metals Using Neutron Reflectometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Demkowicz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid-state interfaces play a major role in a variety of material properties. They are especially important in determining the behavior of nano-structured materials, such as metallic multilayers. However, interface structure and properties remain poorly understood, in part because the experimental toolbox for characterizing them is limited. Neutron reflectometry (NR offers unique opportunities for studying interfaces in metals due to the high penetration depth of neutrons and the non-monotonic dependence of their scattering cross-sections on atomic numbers. We review the basic physics of NR and outline the advantages that this method offers for investigating interface behavior in metals, especially under extreme environments. We then present several example NR studies to illustrate these advantages and discuss avenues for expanding the use of NR within the metals community.

  12. Amplitude modulation reflectometry for density profile measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuravlev, V.; Sanchez, J.; Luna, E. de la; Estrada, T.; Branas, B.; Frances, M. [Association EURATOM/CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Hirsch, M.; Geist, T.; Hartfuss, H.J. [Max Plank Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Euratom-Ass, 85748 Garching (Germany); Hanson, G.R.; Wilgen, J.B. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-8072 (United States); Kaita, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States)

    1997-03-01

    Amplitude modulation (AM) reflectometry is a technique for density profile measurements in magnetic fusion plasmas based on the measurement of the phase delay of the modulation in the amplitude of a microwave beam launched and reflected at the plasma. Results from AM experiments in the PBX-M tokamak and the W7-AS stellarator are presented. A general analysis of the capabilities of the technique is performed, particularly centered in the effects of spatial turbulence. Simulations of the effects of two-dimensional turbulence have been performed for medium size (W7-AS) and large devices (LHD stellarator, ITER), showing the capability of the AM technique to operate in turbulent plasmas. Finally, possible solutions to the problem of parasitic reflections in AM systems are presented as development options. (orig.) 4 refs.

  13. Polarized Neutron Reflectometry of Nickel Corrosion Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Mary H; Welbourn, Rebecca J L; Zarbakhsh, Ali; Gutfreund, Philipp; Clarke, Stuart M

    2015-06-30

    Polarized neutron reflectometry has been used to investigate the detailed adsorption behavior and corrosion inhibition mechanism of two surfactants on a nickel surface under acidic conditions. Both the corrosion of the nickel surface and the structure of the adsorbed surfactant layer could be monitored in situ by the use of different solvent contrasts. Layer thicknesses and roughnesses were evaluated over a range of pH values, showing distinctly the superior corrosion inhibition of one negatively charged surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate) compared to a positively charged example (dodecyl trimethylammonium bromide) due to its stronger binding interaction with the surface. It was found that adequate corrosion inhibition occurs at significantly less than full surface coverage.

  14. Urethral pressure reflectometry in women with pelvic organ prolapse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khayyami, Yasmine; Lose, Gunnar; Klarskov, Niels

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: The mechanism of continence in women with pelvic organ prolapse (POP) before and after surgery remains unknown. Urethral pressure reflectometry (UPR) separates women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI) from continent women by measuring urethral opening pressure...

  15. Sensitivity analysis for oblique incidence reflectometry using Monte Carlo simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamran, Faisal; Andersen, Peter E.

    2015-01-01

    Oblique incidence reflectometry has developed into an effective, noncontact, and noninvasive measurement technology for the quantification of both the reduced scattering and absorption coefficients of a sample. The optical properties are deduced by analyzing only the shape of the reflectance...

  16. Proceeding of the 5th international workshop on reflectometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawahata, Kazuo (ed.)

    2001-05-01

    This is the proceedings of the 5th International Workshop on Reflectometry, which was held on 5-7 March, 2001, at the National Institute for Fusion Science. In this workshop, the latest experimental results in reflectometry (profile and fluctuations studies), new technological developments and a broad scope of the theory and simulation codes were presented. The 19 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (author)

  17. Viscoelastic assessment of anal canal function using acoustic reflectometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitchell, Peter J; Klarskov, Niels; Telford, Karen J

    2012-01-01

    Anal acoustic reflectometry is a new reproducible technique that allows a viscoelastic assessment of anal canal function. Five new variables reflecting anal canal function are measured: the opening and closing pressure, opening and closing elastance, and hysteresis.......Anal acoustic reflectometry is a new reproducible technique that allows a viscoelastic assessment of anal canal function. Five new variables reflecting anal canal function are measured: the opening and closing pressure, opening and closing elastance, and hysteresis....

  18. Feasibility of using cone penetrometer truck (CPT) to install time domain reflectometry (TDR) and fiber optic slope failure detectors in pavement structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    A new method of cable installation using a heavy-duty Cone Penetration Test : (CPT) truck was developed and practiced successfully in this study. The coaxial and fiber : optic cables were pushed along with the cone rods by the hydraulic system integr...

  19. TDR Technique for Estimating the Intensity of Evapotranspiration of Turfgrasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janik, Grzegorz; Wolski, Karol; Daniel, Anna; Albert, Małgorzata; Skierucha, Wojciech; Wilczek, Andrzej; Szyszkowski, Paweł; Walczak, Amadeusz

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents a method for precise estimation of evapotranspiration of selected turfgrass species. The evapotranspiration functions, whose domains are only two relatively easy to measure parameters, were developed separately for each of the grass species. Those parameters are the temperature and the volumetric moisture of soil at the depth of 2.5 cm. Evapotranspiration has the character of a modified logistic function with empirical parameters. It assumes the form ETR(θ (2.5 cm), T (2.5 cm)) = A/(1 + B · e (-C · (θ (2.5 cm) · T (2.5 cm)), where: ETR(θ (2.5 cm), T (2.5 cm)) is evapotranspiration [mm · h(-1)], θ (2.5 cm) is volumetric moisture of soil at the depth of 2.5 cm [m(3) · m(-3)], T (2.5 cm) is soil temperature at the depth of 2.5 cm [°C], and A, B, and C are empirical coefficients calculated individually for each of the grass species [mm · h(1)], and [-], [(m(3) · m(-3) · °C)(-1)]. The values of evapotranspiration calculated on the basis of the presented function can be used as input data for the design of systems for the automatic control of irrigation systems ensuring optimum moisture conditions in the active layer of lawn swards.

  20. A scientometric evaluation of the Chagas disease implementation research programme of the PAHO and TDR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Laura Carbajal-de-la-Fuente

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR is an independent global programme of scientific collaboration cosponsored by the United Nations Children's Fund, the United Nations Development Program, the World Bank, and the World Health Organization. TDR's strategy is based on stewardship for research on infectious diseases of poverty, empowerment of endemic countries, research on neglected priority needs, and the promotion of scientific collaboration influencing global efforts to combat major tropical diseases. In 2001, in view of the achievements obtained in the reduction of transmission of Chagas disease through the Southern Cone Initiative and the improvement in Chagas disease control activities in some countries of the Andean and the Central American Initiatives, TDR transferred the Chagas Disease Implementation Research Programme (CIRP to the Communicable Diseases Unit of the Pan American Health Organization (CD/PAHO. This paper presents a scientometric evaluation of the 73 projects from 18 Latin American and European countries that were granted by CIRP/PAHO/TDR between 1997 and 2007. We analyzed all final reports of the funded projects and scientific publications, technical reports, and human resource training activities derived from them. Results about the number of projects funded, countries and institutions involved, gender analysis, number of published papers in indexed scientific journals, main topics funded, patents inscribed, and triatomine species studied are presented and discussed. The results indicate that CIRP/PAHO/TDR initiative has contributed significantly, over the 1997-2007 period, to Chagas disease knowledge as well as to the individual and institutional-building capacity.

  1. TDR Technique for Estimating the Intensity of Evapotranspiration of Turfgrasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Janik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a method for precise estimation of evapotranspiration of selected turfgrass species. The evapotranspiration functions, whose domains are only two relatively easy to measure parameters, were developed separately for each of the grass species. Those parameters are the temperature and the volumetric moisture of soil at the depth of 2.5 cm. Evapotranspiration has the character of a modified logistic function with empirical parameters. It assumes the form ETRθ2.5 cm,T2.5 cm=A/1+B·e-C·θ2.5 cm·T2.5 cm, where: ETRθ2.5 cm,T2.5 cm is evapotranspiration [mm·h−1], θ2.5 cm is volumetric moisture of soil at the depth of 2.5 cm [m3·m−3], T2.5 cm is soil temperature at the depth of 2.5 cm [°C], and A, B, and C are empirical coefficients calculated individually for each of the grass species [mm·h1], and [—], [(m3·m−3·°C−1]. The values of evapotranspiration calculated on the basis of the presented function can be used as input data for the design of systems for the automatic control of irrigation systems ensuring optimum moisture conditions in the active layer of lawn swards.

  2. Monitoring of lithium plating by neutron reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avdeev, M. V.; Rulev, A. A.; Bodnarchuk, V. I.; Ushakova, E. E.; Petrenko, V. I.; Gapon, I. V.; Tomchuk, O. V.; Matveev, V. A.; Pleshanov, N. K.; Kataev, E. Yu.; Yashina, L. V.; Itkis, D. M.

    2017-12-01

    The development of high-capacity rechargeable and safe metallic lithium negative electrodes for next-generation batteries requires an in-depth understanding of reasons for nonuniform lithium plating during lithium-metal battery charge. It drives the interest for the tools enabling efficient monitoring of electrochemical interfaces where lithium electrodeposition occurs. We report on a three-electrode electrochemical cell designed to track lithium electrodeposition from aprotic electrolytes by neutron reflectometry (NR) in the specular reflectivity mode. We performed a case study of Li plating from LiClO4 solution in propylene carbonate. The sensitivity was optimized by tuning the neutron scattering contrast for a given electrode material (Cu film) and the electrolyte, which was done employing a deuterated solvent. The analysis of the scattering length density (SLD) profiles derived from the modeling of the reflectivity data clearly demonstrated that the deposition of nm-thin Li layers above initially formed solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer can be detected and their roughness, which is a characterizing parameter of electrodeposition nonuniformity, can be estimated. It makes NR a proper tool for further studies of "dendritic" lithium growth.

  3. Amplitude modulation reflectometry for large fusion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, J.; Zhuravlev, V.; Luna, E. de la; Estrada, T.; Branas, B. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain)

    1992-12-31

    One of the main problems which has been present in most reflectometers during the last years is the need for a coherent tracking of the phase delay: fast density fluctuations and strong modulation on the amplitude of the reflected signal usually produce ``fringe jumps`` in the phase signal. In such a situation the ``history`` of the phase evolution is lost and big errors can arise in the determination of the density profile. This problem will become more severe in large fusion devices, operating at high densities with high magnetic field: the cutoff wavelength becomes shorter and the phase delays involved become larger as well as the effect of the broadband fluctuations. Amplitude modulation reflectometry performs a time delay measurement by the determination of the phase delay of the modulating envelope of a millimeter wave beam reflected at the plasma. The phase delays involved are in the range <2{pi} and the measurement is not negatively affected by the broadband fluctuations. The phase readout can be directly obtained without complicated fringe counters: the method provides a promising possibility for real time determination of the plasma position and density profile, which will be very important for the next step devices (ITER-NET). (author) 2 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Dielectric dispersion and thermodynamic behavior of stearic acid binary mixtures with alcohol as co-solvent using time domain reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvester, M. Maria; Ganesh, T.; Karunakaran, D. J. S. Anand; Senthilkumar, P.; Hudge, Praveen G.; Kumbharkhane, A. C.

    Dielectric permittivity and relaxation dynamics of binary and ternary mixture of stearic acid on various concentration and their thermodynamic effects are studied. The static dielectric constant (ɛ0), dielectric permittivity (ɛ‧) and dielectric loss (ɛ‧‧) are found by bilinear calibration. The relaxation time (τ), dielectric strength (Δɛ) and the excess permittivity (ɛE) are found. The thermodynamic parameters such as enthalpy (ΔH), entropy (ΔS) and Gibb’s free energy (ΔG) are evolved. The significant changes in dielectric parameters are due to the intramolecular and intermolecular interactions in response to the applied frequency. The permittivity spectra of stearic acid-alcohol in the frequency range of 10MHz to 30GHz have been measured using picoseconds Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR). The dielectric parameters (ɛ0, ɛ‧, ɛ‧‧) are found by bilinear calibration method. Influence of temperature in intermolecular interaction and the relaxation process are also studied. The FT-IR spectral analysis reveals that the conformation of functional groups and formation for hydrogen bonding are present in both binary and ternary mixtures of stearic acid.

  5. Pulse compression radar reflectometry for density measurements on fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costley, A.; Prentice, R. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Laviron, C. [Compagnie Generale des Matieres Nucleaires (COGEMA), 78 - Velizy-Villacoublay (France); Prentice, R. [Toulouse-3 Univ., 31 (France). Centre d`Etude Spatiale des Rayonnements

    1994-07-01

    On tokamaks and other toroidal machines, reflectometry is a very rapidly developing technique for density profile measurements, particularly near the edge. Its principle relies on the total reflection of an electromagnetic wave at a cutoff layer, where the critical density is reached and the local refractive index goes to zero. With the new fast frequency synthesizers now available, a method based on pulse compression radar is proposed for plasma reflectometry, overcoming the limitations of the previous reflectometry methods. The measurement can be made on a time-scale which is effectively very short relatively to the plasma fluctuations, and the very high reproducibility and stability of the source allows an absolute calibration of the waveguides to be made, which corrects for the effects of the parasitic reflections. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  6. Doppler reflectometry for the investigation of poloidally propagating density perturbations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirsch, M.; Baldzuhn, J.; Kurzan, B. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Euratom-Association, Garching (Germany); Holzhauer, E. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Plasmaforschung

    1999-09-15

    A modification of microwave reflectometry is discussed where the direction of observation is tilted with respect to the normal onto the reflecting surface. The experiment is similar to scattering where a finite resolution in k-space exists but keeps the radial localization of reflectometry. The observed poloidal wavenumber is chosen by Bragg's condition via the tilt anglethe resolution in k-space is determined by the antenna pattern. From the Doppler shift of the reflected wave the poloidal propagation velocity of density perturbations is obtained. The diagnostic capabilities of Doppler reflectometry are investigated using full wave code calculations. The method offers the possibility to observe changes in the poloidal propagation velocity of density perturbations and their radial shear with a temporal resolution of about 10{mu}s. (authors)

  7. Polarized neutron reflectometry of magnetic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toperverg, B. P.

    2015-12-01

    Among a number of methods employed to characterize various types of magnetic nano-structures Polarized Neutron Reflectometry (PNR) is shown to be a unique tool providing a scope of quantitative information on magnetization arrangement over relevant scales. Deeply penetrating into materials neutron spins are able to resolve vectorial profile of magnetic induction with accuracy of a fraction of Oersted over a fraction of nano-meters. This property is exploited in measurements of specular PNR which hence constitutes the method of depth resolved vector magnetometry widely used to examine magnetic states in exchange coupled magnetic superlattices, exchange bias systems, spin valves, exchange springs, superconducting/ferromagnetic heterostructure, etc. Off-specular polarized neutron scattering (OS-PNS) measures the in-plane magnetization distribution over scales from hundreds of nanoto hundreds of micrometers providing, in combination with specular PNR, access to lateral long range fluctuations of the magnetization vector and magnetic domains in these systems. OSPNS is especially useful in studies of co-operative magnetization reversal processes in various films and multilayers laterally patterned into periodic arrays of stripes, or islands of various dimentions, shapes, internal structures, etc., representing an interest for e.g. spintronics. Smaller sizes of 10?100 nm are accessed with the method of Polarized Neutrons Grazing Incidence Small Angle Scattering (PN-GISAS), which in a combination with specular PNR and OS-PNS is used to study self-assembling of magnetic nano-particles on flat surfaces, while Polarized Neutron Grazing Incidence Diffraction (PN-GID) complete the scope of magnetic information over wide range of scales in 3D space. The review of recent results obtained employing the methods listed above is preceded by the detailed theoretical consideration and exemplified by new developments addressing with PNR fast magnetic kinetics in nano-systems.

  8. Turbulence and Beam Size Effects on Reflectometry Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estrada, T.; Sanchez, J.; Zhuravlev, V.; Luna, E. de la; Branas, B. [Ciemat.Madrid (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    A two dimensional code based on the WKB approximation is used to simulate reflectometry measurements in plasmas with turbulence. The work aims to understand, first the role of turbulence in the determination of density profiles with reflectometry and, second, the ability of reflectometry techniques to give reliable information on the characteristics of the turbulence itself. The effects on the profile determination of a rotating turbulence structure with non-perpendicular reflection are analysed. The influence of the turbulence level, fluctuation wavelengths and antenna beam size on the density profile determination has been studied in a static plasma with perpendicular launching. The code has been used to simulate correlation measurements. The results show the correlation of the reflectometry signals for different turbulence parameters. Errors in the correlation length increase when 2-dimensional effects become important, though the homodyne signal works better than the phase. The correlation simulations also show the way for new methods to determine the group delay and therefore the density profile. (Author) 15 refs.

  9. TDR measurements looking for complex dielectric permittivity and complex magnetic permeability in lossy materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persico, Raffaele

    2017-04-01

    TDR probes can be exploited for the measure of the electromagnetic characteristics of the soil, or of any penetrable material. They are commonly exploited as instruments for the measure of the propagation velocity of the electromagnetic waves in the probed medium [1], in its turn useful for the proper focusing of GPR data [2-5]. However, a more refined hardware and processing can allow to extrapolate from these probes also the discrimination between dielectric and magnetic characteristics of the material under test, which can be relevant for a better interpretation of the buried scenario or in order to infer physical-chemical characteristics of the material at hand. This requires a TDR probe that can work in frequency domain, and in particular that allows to retrieve the reflection coefficient at the air soil interface. It has been already shown [6] that in lossless cases this can be promising. In the present contribution, it will be shown at the EGU conference that it is possible to look for both the relative complex permittivity and the relative magnetic permeability of the probed material, on condition that the datum has an acceptable SNR and that some diversity of information is guaranteed, either by multifrequency data or by a TDR that can prolong its arms in the soil. References [1] F. Soldovieri, G. Prisco, R. Persico, Application of Microwave Tomography in Hydrogeophysics: some examples, Vadose Zone Journal, vol. 7, n. 1 pp. 160-170, Feb. 2008. [2] I. Catapano, L. Crocco, R. Persico, M. Pieraccini, F. Soldovieri, "Linear and Nonlinear Microwave Tomography Approaches for Subsurface Prospecting: Validation on Real Data", IEEE Trans. on Antennas and Wireless Propagation Letters, vol. 5, pp. 49-53, 2006. [3] G. Leucci, N. Masini, R. Persico, F. Soldovieri." GPR and sonic tomography for structural restoration : the case of the Cathedral of Tricarico", Journal of Geophysics and Engineering, vol. 8, pp. S76-S92, Aug. 2011. [4] S. Piscitelli, E. Rizzo, F. Cristallo

  10. An anther development F-box (ADF) protein regulated by tapetum degeneration retardation (TDR) controls rice anther development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Li, Yixing; Song, Shufeng; Deng, Huafeng; Li, Na; Fu, Xiqin; Chen, Guanghui; Yuan, Longping

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we reported that a F-box protein, OsADF, as one of the direct targets of TDR , plays a critical role in rice tapetum cell development and pollen formation. The tapetum, the innermost sporophytic tissue of anther, plays an important supportive role in male reproduction in flowering plants. After meiosis, tapetal cells undergo programmed cell death (PCD) and provide nutrients for pollen development. Previously we showed that tapetum degeneration retardation (TDR), a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, can trigger tapetal PCD and control pollen wall development during anther development. However, the comprehensive regulatory network of TDR remains to be investigated. In this study, we cloned and characterized a panicle-specific expression F-box protein, anther development F-box (OsADF). By qRT-PCR and RNA in situ hybridization, we further confirmed that OsADF expressed specially in tapetal cells from stage 9 to stage 12 during anther development. In consistent with this specific expression pattern, the RNAi transgenic lines of OsADF exhibited abnormal tapetal degeneration and aborted microspores development, which eventually grew pollens with reduced fertility. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the TDR, a key regulator in controlling rice anther development, could regulate directly the expression of OsADF by binding to E-box motifs of its promoter. Therefore, this work highlighted the possible regulatory role of TDR, which regulates tapetal cell development and pollen formation via triggering the possible ADF-mediated proteolysis pathway.

  11. Irrigation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Under contract with Marshall Space Flight Center, Midwest Research Institute compiled a Lubrication Handbook intended as a reference source for designers and manufacturers of aerospace hardware and crews responsible for maintenance of such equipment. Engineers of Lindsay Manufacturing Company learned of this handbook through NASA Tech Briefs and used it for supplemental information in redesigning gear boxes for their center pivot agricultural irrigation system.

  12. A comparison of second order derivative based models for time domain reflectometry wave form analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adaptive waveform interpretation with Gaussian filtering (AWIGF) and second order bounded mean oscillation operator Z square 2(u,t,r) are TDR analysis methods based on second order differentiation. AWIGF was originally designed for relatively long probe (greater than 150 mm) TDR waveforms, while Z s...

  13. Correlation reflectometry techniques for TJ-I and ATF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, J.; Branas, B.; Estrada, T. (Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain)) (and others)

    1991-01-01

    Two point radial correlation reflectometry has been used on TJ-I tokamak and ATF stellarator, to extend deeper in the plasma bulk the successful studies on electrostatic edge turbulence already performed by Langmuir probes. The use of broadband homodyne systems allows access to a larger range of radial positions but imposes some constraints on the ability of reflectometry to determine correlation lengths and the k-spectrum of the density fluctuations: cos[phi] and not directly the phase delay [phi] is measured. Different techniques are used to overcome the ambiguities introduced by the homodyne measurement: slow frequency sweeping for TJ-I and dual sine/cosine detection with fringe counting algorithms for ATF. (author) 8 refs., 5 figs.

  14. Phase shift reflectometry for sub-surface defect detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asundi, Anand; Lei, Huang; Eden, Teoh Kang Min; Sreemathy, Parthasarathy; May, Watt Sook

    2012-11-01

    Phase Shift Reflectometry has recently been seen as a novel alternative to interferometry since it can provide warpage measurement over large areas with no need for large optical components. To confirm its capability and to explore the use of this method for sub-surface defect detection, a Chinese magic mirror is used. This bronze mirror which dates back to the Chinese Han Dynasty appears at first sight to be an ordinary convex mirror. However, unlike a normal mirror, when illuminated by a beam of light, an image is formed onto a screen. It has been hypothesized that there are indentations inside the mirror which alter the path of reflected light rays and hence the reflected image. This paper explores various methods to measure these indentations. Of the methods test Phase Shift Reflectometry (PSR) was found suitable to be the most suitable both in terms of the sensitivity and the field of view.

  15. Carbon Fiber TOW Angle Determination Using Microwave Reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, William C.; Moore, Jason P.; Juarez, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Advanced Composites Project is investigating technologies that increase automated remote inspection of aircraft composite structures. Therefore, microwave Frequency Domain Reflectometry (FDR) is being investigated as a method of enabling rapid remote inspection of angular orientation of the tow using microwave radiation. This work will present preliminary data demonstrating that frequency shifts in the reflection spectrum of a carbon fiber tow sample are indicative of the angle of the tow with respect to an interrogating antenna's linear polarized output.

  16. Sonda de tdr para a estimativa de umidade em bagaço de Cana-de-açúcar

    OpenAIRE

    Claudinei F. Souza; Cirilo,Lucas da S; Bastos,Reinaldo G.; Peres,José G.; Oliveira, Aline F.

    2016-01-01

    RESUMO O bagaço de cana-de-açúcar pode ser utilizado como suporte sólido para cultivo de microrganismos, e apesar de fundamental, o monitoramento da umidade em tempo real nesses processos ainda é pouco pesquisado. Sendo assim, o presente trabalho teve como objetivo propor e validar a TDR para estimar a umidade em bagaço de cana-de-açúcar, visando a seu uso como suporte para cultivo em estado sólido, considerando a produção de ácido cítrico. A sonda de TDR proposta foi analisada fisicamente, e...

  17. A fast TDR-inversion technique for the reconstruction of spatial soil moisture content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Schlaeger

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Spatial moisture distribution in natural soil or other material is a valuably information for many applications. Standard measurement techniques give only mean or punctual results. Therefore a new inversion algorithm has been developed to derive moisture profiles along single TDR sensor-probes. The algorithm uses the full information content of TDR reflection data measured from one or both sides of an embedded probe. The system consisting of sensor probe and surrounded soil can be interpreted as a nonuniform transmission-line. The algorithm is based on the telegraph equations for nonuniform transmission-lines and an optimization approach to reconstruct the distribution of the capacitance and effective conductance along the transmission-line with high spatial resolution. The capacitance distribution can be converted into permittivity and water content by means of a capacitance model and dielectric mixing rules. Numerical investigations have been carried out to verify the accuracy of the inversion algorithm. Single- and double-sided time-domain reflection data were used to determine the capacitance and effective conductance profiles of lossless and lossy materials. The results show that single-sided reflection data are sufficient for lossless (or low-loss cases. In case of lossy material two independent reflection measurements are required to reconstruct a reliable capacitance profile. The inclusion of an additional effective conductivity profile leads to an improved capacitance profile. The algorithm converges very fast and yields a capacitance profile within a sufficiently short time. The additional transformation to the water content requires no significant calculation time.

  18. Sensor placement for soil water monitoring in lemon irrigated by micro sprinkler Posicionamento de sensores para monitoramento de água no solo em limoeiro irrigado por microaspersão

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugênio F. Coelho

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available This research had as its objective the investigation of an alternative strategy for soil sensor placement to be used in citrus orchards irrigated by micro sprinkler. An experiment was carried out in a Tahiti lemon orchard under three irrigation intervals of 1, 2 and 3 days. Soil water potential, soil water content distribution and root water extraction were monitored by a time-domain-reflectometry (TDR in several positions in soil profiles radial to the trees. Root length and root length density were determined from digital root images at the same positions in the soil profiles where water content was monitored. Results showed the importance of considering root water extraction in the definition of soil water sensor placement. The profile regions for soil water sensor placement should correspond to the intersection of the region containing at least 80% of total root length and the region of at least 80% of total water extraction. In case of tensiometers, the region of soil water potential above -80 kPa should be included in the intersection.Este trabalho teve como objetivo investigar uma estratégia alternativa de posicionamento de sensores de água no solo, para uso em pomares de citros irrigados por microaspersão. Um experimento foi conduzido em um pomar de limão Tahiti, sob três intervalos de irrigação: 1, 2 e 3 dias. A distribuição de umidade, potenciais de água e extração de água do solo foram monitorados por um analisador de umidade de reflectometria no domínio do tempo (TDR em várias posições, em perfis do solo radiais às plantas. Comprimento e densidade de raízes foram determinados a partir de imagens digitais nas mesmas posições onde a umidade fora monitorada. Os resultados mostraram a importância de se considerar a extração de água pelas raízes na definição da posição dos sensores de água do solo. As regiões do perfil para posicionamento de sensores de água do solo devem corresponder à interseção da

  19. Incoherent Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometry for Distributed Thermal Sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karamehmedovic, Emir

    2006-01-01

    increasing frequency, after which the inverse Fourier transform is applied to the signal from the backscattered light. This technique is compared with the more conventional optical time domain reflectometry, where a short pulse is sent through the fibre, and the location of the scattering section...... developed and implemented in Matlab. The computer model is calibrated and tested, and describes the entire system with high precision. Noise analysis and digital processing of the detected signal are discussed as well. An equation describing the standard deviation of the measured temperature is derived...

  20. Nonlinear Diffuse fs-Pulse Reflectometry of Harmonic Upconversion Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Kijatkin

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear diffuse femtosecond-pulse reflectometry is introduced as a powerful experimental tool for the unambiguous characterization of polar and non-polar point symmetry groups of harmonic upconversion nanoparticles. Using intense ultrashort 40 femtosecond laser pulses and an appropriate figure of merit (FOM, second and third harmonic emission serve for the structural characterization of polar Yb-doped lithium niobate and non-polar titanium dioxide nanoparticles. The tool is capable of differentiating these two samples by FOM values that differ by up to 13 orders of magnitude. The general applicability to harmonic upconversion nanoparticles over a broad range of intensities and wavelength spectrum, is discussed.

  1. Profile measurements of thin liquid films using reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanchak, M. S.; Vangsness, M. D.; Byrd, L. W.; Ervin, J. S.; Jones, J. G.

    2013-11-01

    Microscope-based reflectometry was used to measure the thickness profile of thin films of n-octane on silicon wafer substrates. Coupled with micro-positioning motorized stages and custom software, two-dimensional profiles of the film thickness from the adsorbed film (˜10 nm) to the intrinsic meniscus (˜1000 nm) were automatically and repeatedly measured. The reflectometer aperture was modified to provide better spatial resolution in areas of high curvature, the transition region, where evaporative flux is at a maximum. This technique will provide data for the validation of both existing and future models of thin film evaporation.

  2. Detection of Atmospheric Water Deposits in Porous Media Using the TDR Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Nakonieczna

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Investigating the intensity of atmospheric water deposition and its diurnal distribution is essential from the ecological perspective, especially regarding dry geographic regions. It is also important in the context of monitoring the amount of moisture present within building materials in order to protect them from excessive humidity. The objective of this study was to test a constructed sensor and determine whether it could detect and track changes in the intensity of atmospheric water deposition. An operating principle of the device is based on the time-domain reflectometry technique. Two sensors of different plate volumes were manufactured. They were calibrated at several temperatures and tested during field measurements. The calibration turned out to be temperature independent. The outdoor measurements indicated that the upper limits of the measurement ranges of the sensors depended on the volumes of the plates and were equal to 1:2 and 2:8 mm H2O. The respective sensitivities were equal to 3.2 x 10-3 and 7.5 x 10-3 g∙ps-1. The conducted experiments showed that the construction of the designed device and the time-domain reflectometry technique were appropriate for detecting and tracing the dynamics of atmospheric water deposition. The obtained outcomes were also collated with the readings taken in an actual soil sample. For this purpose, an open container sensor, which allows investigating atmospheric water deposition in soil, was manufactured. It turned out that the readings taken by the porous ceramic plate sensor reflected the outcomes of the measurements performed in a soil sample.

  3. Detection of atmospheric water deposits in porous media using the TDR technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakonieczna, Anna; Kafarski, Marcin; Wilczek, Andrzej; Szypłowska, Agnieszka; Janik, Grzegorz; Albert, Małgorzata; Skierucha, Wojciech

    2015-04-13

    Investigating the intensity of atmospheric water deposition and its diurnal distribution is essential from the ecological perspective, especially regarding dry geographic regions. It is also important in the context of monitoring the amount of moisture present within building materials in order to protect them from excessive humidity. The objective of this study was to test a constructed sensor and determine whether it could detect and track changes in the intensity of atmospheric water deposition. An operating principle of the device is based on the time-domain reflectometry technique. Two sensors of different plate volumes were manufactured. They were calibrated at several temperatures and tested during field measurements. The calibration turned out to be temperature independent. The outdoor measurements indicated that the upper limits of the measurement ranges of the sensors depended on the volumes of the plates and were equal to 1:2 and 2:8 mm H2O. The respective sensitivities were equal to 3.2 x 10(-3) and 7.5 x 10(-3) g∙ps(-1). The conducted experiments showed that the construction of the designed device and the time-domain reflectometry technique were appropriate for detecting and tracing the dynamics of atmospheric water deposition. The obtained outcomes were also collated with the readings taken in an actual soil sample. For this purpose, an open container sensor, which allows investigating atmospheric water deposition in soil, was manufactured. It turned out that the readings taken by the porous ceramic plate sensor reflected the outcomes of the measurements performed in a soil sample.

  4. Irrigation and Autocracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, Jeanet Sinding; Kaarsen, Nicolai; Wingender, Asger Moll

    We show that societies with a history of irrigation-based agriculture have been less likely to adopt democracy than societies with a history of rainfed agriculture. Rather than actual irrigation, the empirical analysis is based on how much irrigation potentially can increase yields.Irrigation...

  5. Research proposal on : amplitude modulated reflectometry system for JET divertor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, J.; Branas, T.; Estrada, T.; Luna, E. de la

    1992-12-31

    Amplitude Modulated reflectrometry is presented here as a tool for density profile measurements in the JET divertor plasmas. One of the main problems which has been presented in most reflectometers during the last years is the need for a coherent tracking of the phase delay: fast density fluctuations and strong modulation on the amplitude of the reflected signal usually bring to fringe jumps` in the phase signal, which are a big problem when the phase values are much larger than 2 pi. The conditions in the JET divertor plasmas: plasma geometry, access and long oversized broad-band waveguide paths makes very difficult the phase measurements at the millimeter wave range. AM reflectrometry is to some extension an intermediate solution between the classical phase delay reflectometry, so far applied to small distances, and the time domain reflectrometry, used for ionospheric studies and recently also proposed for fusion plasma. the main advantage is to allow the use of millimeter wave reflectometry with moderate phase shifts (approx 2 pi). (author)

  6. Research proposal on : amplitude modulated reflectometry system for JET divertor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, J.; Branas, T.; Estrada, T.; Luna, E. de la.

    1992-01-01

    Amplitude Modulated reflectrometry is presented here as a tool for density profile measurements in the JET divertor plasmas. One of the main problems which has been presented in most reflectometers during the last years is the need for a coherent tracking of the phase delay: fast density fluctuations and strong modulation on the amplitude of the reflected signal usually bring to fringe jumps' in the phase signal, which are a big problem when the phase values are much larger than 2 pi. The conditions in the JET divertor plasmas: plasma geometry, access and long oversized broad-band waveguide paths makes very difficult the phase measurements at the millimeter wave range. AM reflectrometry is to some extension an intermediate solution between the classical phase delay reflectometry, so far applied to small distances, and the time domain reflectrometry, used for ionospheric studies and recently also proposed for fusion plasma. the main advantage is to allow the use of millimeter wave reflectometry with moderate phase shifts (approx 2 pi). (author)

  7. Calibration of TDR Test Probe for Measuring Moisture in the Body of the Railway Substructure and its Subgrade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobeš Peter

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the introduction of the paper there is characterized a way of monitoring the moisture in the railway substructure in the experimental stand, which is a part of the experimental workplace of the Department of Railway Engineering and Track Management. A substantial part of the paper is devoted to the calibration of TDR test probe for selected rock materials as a basic prerequisite for the determination of the actual moisture in the body of the railway substructure and subgrade.

  8. Evaluation of an operational real-time irrigation scheduling scheme for drip irrigated citrus fields in Picassent, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dazhi; Hendricks-Franssen, Harrie-Jan; Han, Xujun; Jiménez Bello, Miguel Angel; Martínez Alzamora, Fernando; Vereecken, Harry

    2017-04-01

    Irrigated agriculture accounts worldwide for 40% of food production and 70% of fresh water withdrawals. Irrigation scheduling aims to minimize water use while maintaining the agricultural production. In this study we were concerned with the real-time automatic control of irrigation, which calculates daily water allocation by combining information from soil moisture sensors and a land surface model. The combination of soil moisture measurements and predictions by the Community Land Model (CLM) using sequential data assimilation (DA) is a promising alternative to improve the estimate of soil and plant water status. The LETKF (Local Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter) was chosen to assimilate soil water content measured by FDR (Frequency Domain Reflectometry) into CLM and improve the initial (soil moisture) conditions for the next model run. In addition, predictions by the GFS (Global Forecast System) atmospheric simulation model were used as atmospheric input data for CLM to predict an ensemble of possible soil moisture evolutions for the next days. The difference between predicted and target soil water content is defined as the water deficit, and the irrigation amount was calculated by the integrated water deficit over the root zone. The corresponding irrigation time to apply the required water was introduced in SCADA (supervisory control and data acquisition system) for each citrus field. In total 6 fields were irrigated according our optimization approach including data assimilation (CLM-DA) and there were also 2 fields following the FAO (Food and Agriculture Organization) water balance method and 4 fields controlled by farmers as reference. During the real-time irrigation campaign in Valencia from July to October in 2015 and June to October in 2016, the applied irrigation amount, stem water potential and soil moisture content were recorded. The data indicated that 5% 20% less irrigation water was needed for the CLM-DA scheduled fields than for the other fields

  9. Dynamic Biomechanical Examination of the Lumbar Spine with Implanted Total Disc Replacement (TDR) Utilizing a Pendulum Testing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Alan H; Paller, David J; Koruprolu, Sarath; McDonnell, Matthew; Palumbo, Mark A; Crisco, Joseph J

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Biomechanical cadaver investigation Objective To examine dynamic bending stiffness and energy absorption of the lumbar spine with and without implanted Total Disc Replacement (TDR) under simulated physiologic motion. Summary of background data The pendulum testing system is capable of applying physiologic compressive loads without constraining motion of functional spinal units (FSUs). The number of cycles to equilibrium observed under pendulum testing is a measure of the energy absorbed by the FSU. Methods Five unembalmed, frozen human lumbar FSUs were tested on the pendulum system with axial compressive loads of 181N, 282N, 385N, and 488N before and after Synthes ProDisc-L TDR implantation. Testing in flexion, extension, and lateral bending began by rotating the pendulum to 5° resulting in unconstrained oscillatory motion. The number of rotations to equilibrium was recorded and bending stiffness (N-m/°) was calculated and compared for each testing mode. Results In flexion/extension, the TDR constructs reached equilibrium with significantly (ppendulum system. Although the effects on clinical performance of motion preserving devices are not fully known, these results provide further insight into the biomechanical behavior of this device under approximated physiologic loading conditions. PMID:22869057

  10. Differential CLE peptide perception by plant receptors implicated from structural and functional analyses of TDIF-TDR interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhijie; Chakraborty, Sayan; Xu, Guozhou; Kobe, Bostjan

    2017-04-06

    Tracheary Element Differentiation Inhibitory Factor (TDIF) belongs to the family of post-translationally modified CLE (CLAVATA3/embryo surrounding region (ESR)-related) peptide hormones that control root growth and define the delicate balance between stem cell proliferation and differentiation in SAM (shoot apical meristem) or RAM (root apical meristem). In Arabidopsis, Tracheary Element Differentiation Inhibitory Factor Receptor (TDR) and its ligand TDIF signaling pathway is involved in the regulation of procambial cell proliferation and inhibiting its differentiation into xylem cells. Here we present the crystal structures of the extracellular domains (ECD) of TDR alone and in complex with its ligand TDIF resolved at 2.65 Åand 2.75 Å respectively. These structures provide insights about the ligand perception and specific interactions between the CLE peptides and their cognate receptors. Our in vitro biochemical studies indicate that the interactions between the ligands and the receptors at the C-terminal anchoring site provide conserved binding. While the binding interactions occurring at the N-terminal anchoring site dictate differential binding specificities between different ligands and receptors. Our studies will open different unknown avenues of TDR-TDIF signaling pathways that will enhance our knowledge in this field highlighting the receptor ligand interaction, receptor activation, signaling network, modes of action and will serve as a structure function relationship model between the ligand and the receptor for various similar leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases (LRR-RLKs).

  11. New density profile reconstruction methods in X-mode reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, R. B.; Hacquin, S.; Heuraux, S.; Sabot, R.

    2017-04-01

    The reconstruction method published by Bottollier-Curtet and Ichtchenko in 1987 has been the standard method of density profile reconstruction for X-mode reflectometry ever since, with only minor revision. Envisaging improved accuracy and stability of the reconstruction method, functions more complex than the linear are evaluated here to describe the refractive index shape in each integration step. The stability and accuracy obtained when using parabolic and fixed or adaptative fractional power functions are compared to the previous method and tested against spurious events and phase noise. The developed relation from the plasma parameters to the best integration shapes allows for the optimization of the reconstruction for any profile shape. In addition, the density profiles can be reconstructed using less probing frequencies without accuracy loss, which speed up the reconstruction algorithm and enable real-time monitoring of faster density profile evolution.

  12. Neutron reflectometry as a tool to study magnetism.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felcher, G. P.

    1999-09-21

    Polarized-neutron specular reflectometry (PNR) was developed in the 1980's as a means of measuring magnetic depth profiles in flat films. Starting from simple profiles, and gradually solving structures of greater complexity, PNR has been used to observe or clarify a variety of magnetic phenomena. It has been used to measure the absolute magnetization of films of thickness not exceeding a few atomic planes, the penetration of magnetic fields in micron-thick superconductors, and the detailed magnetic coupling across non-magnetic spacers in multilayers and superlattices. Although PNR is considered a probe of depth dependent magnetic structure, laterally averaged in the plane of the film, the development of new scattering techniques promises to enable the characterization of lateral magnetic structures. Retaining the depth-sensitivity of specular reflectivity, off-specular reflectivity may be brought to resolve in-plane structures over nanometer to micron length scales.

  13. A numerical study of ultra-short-pulse reflectometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, B.I.; Afeyan, B.B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Chou, A.E. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering]|[California Univ., Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Applied Science; Luhmann, N.C. Jr. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Applied Science

    1994-05-01

    Ultra-short-pulse reflectometry is studied by means of the numerical integration of a one-dimensional full-wave equation for ordinary modes propagating in a plasma. The numerical calculations illustrate the potential of using the reflection of ultra-short-pulse, microwaves as an effective probe of the density profile even in the presence of significant density fluctuations. The difference in time delays of differing frequency components of the microwaves can be used to deduce the density profile. The modification of the reflected pulses in the presence of density fluctuations is examined and can be understood based on considerations of Bragg resonance. A simple and effective profile-reconstruction algorithm using the zero-crossings of the reflected pulse and subsequent Abel inversion is demonstrated. The robustness of the profile reconstruction algorithm in the presence of a sufficiently small amplitude density perturbation is assessed.

  14. Implementing and Characterizing a Video Reflectometry Set-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunill-Rodríguez, Margarita; Castro-Ramos, Jorge; Vázquez-Montiel José, Sergio; Delgado-Atencio, A.

    2008-04-01

    Video reflectometry is a technique to obtain information of the optical parameters of biological tissues from the study of the lateral distribution of the light in combination with the use of a theoretical model for light tissue interaction. One of its main advantages is that either in vitro or in vivo measurements are performed with no need of physical contact. The video reflectometry experimental set-up used in this work consist of an He-Ne laser (632.8 nm, 35 mW) as a point light source, a CCD camera (Sony, XC-ST70) to record the lateral distribution Rd(r) of the light backscattered by the phantoms samples and five neutral density filters to allow a proper measurement of the light distribution. Six pictures of the tissue are taken with each neutral filter, and loaded and processed by a MathCAD(R) program script developed by us to obtain the lateral distribution Rd(r). The preparation and experimentation of tissue phantoms are described when agar gels are used as the matrix. Intralipid and India ink are used as the scattering and absorber centers, respectively. During the characterization of this experimental set-up, regarding the repeatability of measurements, highly scattering media such as samples of commercial milk and a cylindrical volume of Teflon were used. Experimental results are discussed and compared with Farrell's theoretical formulation of lateral distribution Rd(r) for semiinfinite media. The experimental array implemented in combination with our MathCAD(R) code provides an adequate tool to record the lateral distribution of light in phantoms with optical properties similar to human tissues. The standard deviation of the lateral distribution is negligible for practical applications of this technique. We found acceptable results between the theoretical predictions and the experimental measurements performed with the set-up presented.

  15. Density profile measurements by amplitude modulation reflectometry on the TJ-1 tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luna, E. de la; Zhuravlev, V.; Branas, B.; Sanchez, J.; Estrada, T. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain); Segovia, J.; Oramas, J.L. [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (Spain)

    1993-12-31

    Amplitude Modulation (AM) reflectometry has been proposed as an alternative method to the more traditional swept frequency reflectometry systems which can be strongly affected by the presence of plasma density fluctuations. Compared to the time domain systems, the time measurements are replaced in AM reflectometry by much simpler phase delay measurements. In AM reflectometry, the time delay of the microwave beam propagating to the reflecting layer and back is directly obtained through the phase delay of the modulating envelope, which is directly measured in a linear (0-2{pi}) phase meter. This method avoids operation with multifringe counters and is a very attractive alternative for real time determination of the plasma position and density profile. In order to achieve real time density profile monitoring, fast analysis methods are necessary, first results of Neural Networks application to the problem of fast inversion of the density profile are shown. (author) 3 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Urethral pressure reflectometry before and after tension-free vaginal tape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saaby, Marie-Louise; Klarskov, Niels; Lose, Gunnar

    2012-01-01

    Urethral pressure reflectometry (UPR) is a new method for measuring pressure and cross-sectional area in the urethra. Our aim was to investigate if the UPR parameters at rest and during squeeze were unchanged after TVT.......Urethral pressure reflectometry (UPR) is a new method for measuring pressure and cross-sectional area in the urethra. Our aim was to investigate if the UPR parameters at rest and during squeeze were unchanged after TVT....

  17. Effects of turbulent fluctuations on density measurements with microwave reflectometry in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazzucato, E.; Nazikian, R.

    1994-08-01

    The short-scale turbulence of tokamak plasmas has deleterious effects on the measurement of plasma density with microwave reflectometry. Density fluctuations may lead to large amplitude and phase modulations of the reflected wave which can impair the measurement of the wave group delay, and hence the determination of the plasma density. The role played by different types of turbulent fluctuations and the limitations imposed on microwave reflectometry are discussed in this paper.

  18. Small Acreage Irrigation Management

    OpenAIRE

    Heaton, Kevin M.

    2008-01-01

    Field irrigation application methods include surface (wild flooding, border, furrow, basins), sprinkler (hand line, wheel move, solid set, center pivot), low flow or micro-irrigation (drip, trickle, micro-spray), and subirrigation (water table manipulation under special conditions).

  19. Ghana - Agriculture - Irrigation

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millennium Challenge Corporation — The Millennium Development Authority (MiDA) financed the construction of a new irrigation scheme in Kpong and the renovation of two irrigation schemes in Botanga and...

  20. Theoretical aspects of the use of pulsed reflectometry in a spheromak plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, B. J., LLNL

    1998-06-11

    Pulsed reflectometry using both ordinary (O) and extraordinary (X) modes has the potential of providing time and space-resolved measurements of the electron density, the magnitude of the magnetic field, and the magnetic shear as a function of radius. Such a diagnostic also yields the current profile from the curl of the magnetic field. This research addresses theoretical issues associated with the use of reflectometry in the SSPX spheromak experiment at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. We have extended a reflectometry simulation model to accommodate O and X-mode mixed polarization and linear mode conversion between the two polarizations. A Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin-Jeffreys (WKBJ) formula for linear mode conversion agrees reasonably well with direct numerical solutions of the wave equation, and we have reconstructed the magnetic pitch-angle profile by matching the results of the WKBJ formula with the mode conversion data observed in simulations using a least-squares determination of coefficients in trial functions for the profile. The reflectometry data also yield information on fluctuations. Instrumental issues, e.g., the effects of microwave mixers and filters on model reflectometry pulses, have been examined to optimize the performance of the reflectometry diagnostics.

  1. Wetland monitoring with Global Navigation Satellite System reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuffada, Cinzia; Shah, Rashmi; Chew, Clara; Lowe, Stephen T.; Mannucci, Anthony J.; Cardellach, Estel; Brakenridge, G. Robert; Geller, Gary; Rosenqvist, Ake

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Information about wetland dynamics remains a major missing gap in characterizing, understanding, and projecting changes in atmospheric methane and terrestrial water storage. A review of current satellite methods to delineate and monitor wetland change shows some recent advances, but much improved sensing technologies are still needed for wetland mapping, not only to provide more accurate global inventories but also to examine changes spanning multiple decades. Global Navigation Satellite Systems Reflectometry (GNSS‐R) signatures from aircraft over the Ebro River Delta in Spain and satellite measurements over the Mississippi River and adjacent watersheds demonstrate that inundated wetlands can be identified under different vegetation conditions including a dense rice canopy and a thick forest with tall trees, where optical sensors and monostatic radars provide limited capabilities. Advantages as well as constraints of GNSS‐R are presented, and the synergy with various satellite observations are considered to achieve a breakthrough capability for multidecadal wetland dynamics monitoring with frequent global coverage at multiple spatial and temporal scales. PMID:28331894

  2. The Rise of GNSS Reflectometry for Earth Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuffada, Cinzia; Li, Zhijin; Nghiem, Son V.; Lowe, Steve; Shah, Rashmi; Clarizia, Maria Paola; Cardellach, Estel

    2015-01-01

    The Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) reflectometry, i.e. GNSS-R, is a novel remote-sensing technique first published in that uses GNSS signals reflected from the Earth's surface to infer its surface properties such as sea surface height (SSH), ocean winds, sea-ice coverage, vegetation, wetlands and soil moisture, to name a few. This communication discusses the scientific value of GNSS-R to (a) furthering our understanding of ocean mesoscale circulation toward scales finer than those that existing nadir altimeters can resolve, and (b) mapping vegetated wetlands, an emerging application that might open up new avenues to map and monitor the planet's wetlands for methane emission assessments. Such applications are expected to be demonstrated by the availability of data from GEROS-ISS, an ESA experiment currently in phase A, and CyGNSS [3], a NASA mission currently in development. In particular, the paper details the expected error characteristics and the role of filtering played in the assimilation of these data to reduce the altimetric error (when averaging many measurements).

  3. Synthetic Microwave Imaging Reflectometry diagnostic using 3D FDTD Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, Scott; Jenkins, Thomas; Smithe, David; King, Jacob; Nimrod Team Team

    2017-10-01

    Microwave Imaging Reflectometry (MIR) has become a standard diagnostic for understanding tokamak edge perturbations, including the edge harmonic oscillations in QH mode operation. These long-wavelength perturbations are larger than the normal turbulent fluctuation levels and thus normal analysis of synthetic signals become more difficult. To investigate, we construct a synthetic MIR diagnostic for exploring density fluctuation amplitudes in the tokamak plasma edge by using the three-dimensional, full-wave FDTD code Vorpal. The source microwave beam for the diagnostic is generated and refelected at the cutoff surface that is distorted by 2D density fluctuations in the edge plasma. Synthetic imaging optics at the detector can be used to understand the fluctuation and background density profiles. We apply the diagnostic to understand the fluctuations in edge plasma density during QH-mode activity in the DIII-D tokamak, as modeled by the NIMROD code. This work was funded under DOE Grant Number DE-FC02-08ER54972.

  4. Examining small molecule: HIV RNA interactions using arrayed imaging reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaimayo, Wanaruk; Miller, Benjamin L.

    2014-03-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) has been the subject of intense research for more than three decades as it causes an uncurable disease: Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome, AIDS. In the pursuit of a medical treatment, RNAtargeted small molecules are emerging as promising targets. In order to understand the binding kinetics of small molecules and HIV RNA, association (ka) and dissociation (kd) kinetic constants must be obtained, ideally for a large number of sequences to assess selectivity. We have developed Aqueous Array Imaged Reflectometry (Aq-AIR) to address this challenge. Using a simple light interference phenomenon, Aq-AIR provides real-time high-throughput multiplex capabilities to detect binding of targets to surface-immobilized probes in a label-free microarray format. The second generation of Aq-AIR consisting of high-sensitivity CCD camera and 12-μL flow cell was fabricated. The system performance was assessed by real-time detection of MBNL1-(CUG)10 and neomycin B - HIV RNA bindings. The results establish this second-generation Aq-AIR to be able to examine small molecules binding to RNA sequences specific to HIV.

  5. A phased array antenna for Doppler reflectometry in ASDEX upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, Stefan; Lechte, Carsten; Kasparek, Walter [IGVP, Universitaet Stuttgart, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Hennequin, Pascale [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, CNRS, Ecole Polytech., F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Conway, Garrard; Happel, Tim [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Collaboration: ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-07-01

    In a toroidal plasma, Doppler reflectometry (DR) allows investigating electron density fluctuations with finite k {sub perpendicular} {sub to}. The injected microwave beam's frequency determines the radial position of the probed region, its tilt angle selects the wavenumber satisfying the Bragg condition for backscattering. The rotation velocity can be calculated from the Doppler shift of the backscattered signal's frequency. By varying the injected frequency, radial profiles can be reconstructed. Varying the tilt angle resolves the k {sub perpendicular} {sub to} -spectrum of the fluctuations. For DR, a pair of phased array antennas (PAAs) has been designed, built, and installed in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. Beam steering is done by slightly changing the injected frequency, thus, the PAAs do not need any movable parts or electronics inside the vacuum vessel. From 75 to 105 GHz, the PAAs feature 13 frequency bands, each with an angular scan range of -20 to +20 {sup circle}. So, for each angle, there are 13 radial positions to be probed. The results from PAA characterisation, commissioning, and first DR measurements are presented.

  6. Wetland monitoring with Global Navigation Satellite System reflectometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghiem, Son V; Zuffada, Cinzia; Shah, Rashmi; Chew, Clara; Lowe, Stephen T; Mannucci, Anthony J; Cardellach, Estel; Brakenridge, G Robert; Geller, Gary; Rosenqvist, Ake

    2017-01-01

    Information about wetland dynamics remains a major missing gap in characterizing, understanding, and projecting changes in atmospheric methane and terrestrial water storage. A review of current satellite methods to delineate and monitor wetland change shows some recent advances, but much improved sensing technologies are still needed for wetland mapping, not only to provide more accurate global inventories but also to examine changes spanning multiple decades. Global Navigation Satellite Systems Reflectometry (GNSS-R) signatures from aircraft over the Ebro River Delta in Spain and satellite measurements over the Mississippi River and adjacent watersheds demonstrate that inundated wetlands can be identified under different vegetation conditions including a dense rice canopy and a thick forest with tall trees, where optical sensors and monostatic radars provide limited capabilities. Advantages as well as constraints of GNSS-R are presented, and the synergy with various satellite observations are considered to achieve a breakthrough capability for multidecadal wetland dynamics monitoring with frequent global coverage at multiple spatial and temporal scales.

  7. Research proposal on: amplitude modulated reflectometry system for the JET divertor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, J.; Branas, B.; Estrada, T.; Luna, E. de la

    1992-07-01

    Amplitude Modulated reflectometry is presented here as a tool for density profile measurements in the JET divertor plasmas. One of the main problems which has been present in most reflectometers during the last years is the need for a coherent tracking of the phase delay: fast density fluctuations and strong modulation on the amplitude of the reflected signal usually bring to fringe jumps in the phase signal, which are a big problem when the phase values are much larger than 2{pi} The conditions in the JET divertor plasmas: plasma geometry, access and long oversized broad- band waveguide paths makes very difficult the phase measurements at the millimeter wave range. AM reflectometry is to some extension an intermediate solution between the classical phase delay reflectometry, so far applied to small distances, and the time domain reflectometry, used for onospheric studies and recently also proposed for fusion plasmas. The main advantage is to allow the use of millimeter wave reflectometry with moderate phase shifts ( {approx} 2{pi} ). (Author) 2 refs.

  8. Water relations and photosynthesis as criteria for adequate irrigation management in 'Tahiti' lime trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Cláudio Ricardo da

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Irrigation scheduling based on soil moisture status is one of the most useful methods because of its practicality and low cost. The effects of available soil water depletion on evapotranspiration (ETc, transpiration (E, leaf water potential at predawn (psiP and midday (psiM, stomatal conductance (gs and net CO2 assimilation (A in lime 'Tahiti' trees (Citrus latifolia were evaluated to improve irrigation schedule and minimize water use without causing water stress. The trees were spaced 7 4 m and drip-irrigated by four drippers with the available soil water content (AWC depleted by suspension of irrigation (40 days. Leaf water potential was measured on a pressure chamber (psiP and psiM and leaf gas exchange was measured by infrared gas analyzer (E, gs and A. Evapotranspiration was determined with the aid of weighing lysimeter. Water soil content and potential (psiS were monitored with TDR probes and tensiometers, respectively, installed at 0.3, 0.6 and 0.9 m depths. Meteorological variables were monitored with an automatic weather station in the experimental area. The threshold AWC level for the onset of ETc decline was 43%, and 60% for gs, A, E and Y P. Also, psiP was more sensitive to AWC than psiM, and is therefore a better tool for irrigation. When AWC was around 60%, values of psiP and psis were -0.62 MPa and -48.8 kPa, respectively.

  9. IRRIGATION AND AUTOCRACY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, Jeanet Sinding; Kaarsen, Nicolai; Wingender, Asger Moll

    2017-01-01

    Irrigated agriculture makes societies more likely to be ruled by authoritarian regimes. Ancient societies have long been thought to follow this pattern. We empirically show that irrigation affects political regimes even in the present. To avoid endogeneity, we use geographical and climatic...... variation to identify irrigation dependent societies. We find that countries whose agriculture depended on irrigation are about six points less democratic on the 21-point polity2 scale than countries where agriculture has been rainfed. We find qualitatively similar results across regions within countries....... We argue that the effect has historical origins: irrigation allowed landed elites in arid areas to monopolize water and arable land. This made elites more powerful and better able to oppose democratization. Consistent with this conjecture, we show that irrigation dependence predicts land inequality...

  10. The Mawala irrigation scheme

    OpenAIRE

    de Bont, Chris

    2018-01-01

    This booklet was written to share research results with farmers and practitioners in Tanzania. It gives a summary of the empirical material collected during three months of field work in the Mawala irrigation scheme (Kilimanjaro Region), and includes maps, tables and photos. It describes the history of the irrigation scheme, as well current irrigation and farming practices. It especially focuses on the different kinds of infrastructural improvement in the scheme (by farmers and the government...

  11. Adjacent segment degeneration following ProDisc-C total disc replacement (TDR) and anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF): does surgeon bias effect radiographic interpretation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laxer, Eric B; Brigham, Craig D; Darden, Bruce V; Bradley Segebarth, P; Alden Milam, R; Rhyne, Alfred L; Odum, Susan M; Spector, Leo R

    2017-04-01

    Many investigators have reported the financial conflicts of interest (COI), which could result in potential bias in the reporting of outcomes for patients undergoing total disc replacement (TDR) rather than anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). This bias may be subconsciously introduced by the investigator in a non-blinded radiographic review. The purpose of this study was to determine if bias was present when a group of spine specialists rated adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) following cervical TDR or ACDF. Potential bias in the assessment of ASD was evaluated through the reviews of cervical radiographs (pre- and 6 years post-operative) from patients participating in the ProDisc-C FDA trial (ProDisc-C IDE #G030059). The index level was blinded on all radiographs during the first review, but unblinded in the second. Five reviewers (a radiologist, two non-TDR surgeons, and two TDR surgeons), two of whom had a COI with the ProDisc-C trial sponsor, assessed ASD on a three point scale: yes, no, or unable to assess. Intra- and inter-rater reliabilities between all raters were assessed by the Kappa statistic. The intra-rater reliability between reviews was substantial, indicating little to no bias in assessing ASD development/progression. The Kappa statistics were 0.580 and 0.644 for the TDR surgeons (p < 0.0001), 0.718 and 0.572 for the non-TDR surgeons (p < 0.0001), and 0.642 for the radiologist (p < 0.0001). Inter-rater reliability for the blinded review ranged from 0.316 to 0.607 (p < 0.0001) and from 0.221 to 0.644 (p < 0.0001) for the unblinded review. The knowledge of the surgical procedure performed did not bias the assessment of ASD.

  12. Armenia - Irrigation Infrastructure

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millennium Challenge Corporation — This study evaluates irrigation infrastructure rehabilitation in Armenia. The study separately examines the impacts of tertiary canals and other large infrastructure...

  13. Flextube reflectometry and pressure recordings for level diagnosis in obstructive sleep apnoea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, C E; Grymer, L; Hilberg, O

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare sound reflections in a flexible tube (flextube reflectometry) with pressure-catheter recordings (ApneaGraph) for identifying the predominant obstructive level of the upper airway during sleep. Seventeen males with suspected obstructive sleep apnoea...... and retrolingual narrowing) measured by flextube reflectometry and the percentage of retropalatal ("upper") obstructive apnoeas and hypopnoeas of the total number ("upper", "intermediate" and "lower") measured by ApneaGraph (Spearman's correlation coefficient r = 0.24, p = 0.36, N = 17). In conclusion diverging...... results were found in flextube reflectometry studies and pressure-recordings performed on different nights regarding the level distribution of obstructions during sleep. Possible explanations of this discrepancy are discussed....

  14. Optical pulse compression reflectometry: proposal and proof-of-concept experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Weiwen; Yang, Shuo; Long, Xin; Chen, Jianping

    2015-01-12

    This paper proposes a novel reflectometry based on the frequency modulation pulse-compression technology, called optical pulse compression reflectometry (OPCR). Linear frequency modulation (LFM) pulse is taken as an example to implement the OPCR. Its working principle and theoretical analysis are demonstrated. The spatial resolution is determined by the sweeping range of the LFM rather than the pulse width, which overcomes the tradeoff between spatial resolution and measurement range in the conventional pulse-based optical time domain reflectometry. The influence of the laser's phase noise on the integrated side lobe ratio and peak side lobe ratio is theoretically studied. Thanks to the continuous acquisition nature of the OPCR, time averaging is valid to eliminate the influence and results in the measurement range of the OPCR beyond a few times of the source coherent length. A proof-of-concept experiment of the OPCR is carried out to verify the spatial resolution and measurement range.

  15. Understanding dynamic changes in live cell adhesion with neutron reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junghans, Ann

    Understanding the structure and functionality of biological systems on a nanometer-resolution and short temporal scales is important for solving complex biological problems, developing innovative treatment, and advancing the design of highly functionalized biomimetic materials. For example, adhesion of cells to an underlying substrate plays a crucial role in physiology and disease development, and has been investigated with great interest for several decades. In the talk, we would like to highlight recent advances in utilizing neutron scattering to study bio-related structures in dynamic conditions (e . g . under the shear flow) including in-situ investigations of the interfacial properties of living cells. The strength of neutron reflectometry is its non-pertubative nature, the ability to probe buried interfaces with nanometer resolution and its sensitivity to light elements like hydrogen and carbon. That allows us to study details of cell - substrate interfaces that are not accessible with any other standard techniques. We studied the adhesion of human brain tumor cells (U251) to quartz substrates and their responses to the external mechanical forces. Such cells are isolated within the central nervous system which makes them difficult to reach with conventional therapies and therefore making them highly invasive. Our results reveal changes in the thickness and composition of the adhesion layer (a layer between the cell lipid membrane and the quartz substrate), largely composed of hyaluronic acid and associated proteoglycans, when the cells were subjected to shear stress. Further studies will allow us to determine more conditions triggering changes in the composition of the bio-material in the adhesion layer. This, in turn, can help to identify changes that correlate with tumor invasiveness, which can have significant medical impact for the development of targeted anti-invasive therapies.

  16. Application of imaging spectroscopic reflectometry for characterization of gold reduction from organometallic compound by means of plasma jet technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodák, Jiří; Nečas, David; Pavliňák, David; Macak, Jan M.; Řičica, Tomáš; Jambor, Roman; Ohlídal, Miloslav

    2017-02-01

    This work presents a new application of imaging spectroscopic reflectometry to determine a distribution of metallic gold in a layer of an organogold precursor which was treated by a plasma jet. Gold layers were prepared by spin coating from a solution of the precursor containing a small amount of polyvinylpyrrolidone on a microscopy glass, then they were vacuum dried. A difference between reflectivity of metallic gold and the precursor was utilized by imaging spectroscopic reflectometry to create a map of metallic gold distribution using a newly developed model of the studied sample. The basic principle of the imaging spectroscopic reflectometry is also shown together with the data acquisition principles. XPS measurements and microscopy observations were made to complete the imaging spectroscopic reflectometry results. It is proved that the imaging spectroscopic reflectometry represents a new method for quantitative evaluation of local reduction of metallic components from metaloorganic compounds.

  17. Radio-frequency reflectometry on an undoped AlGaAs/GaAs single electron transistor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MacLeod, S. J.; See, A. M.; Keane, Z. K.

    2014-01-01

    Radio frequency reflectometry is demonstrated in a sub-micron undoped AlGaAs/GaAs device. Undoped single electron transistors (SETs) are attractive candidates to study single electron phenomena, due to their charge stability and robust electronic properties after thermal cycling. However, these d......Radio frequency reflectometry is demonstrated in a sub-micron undoped AlGaAs/GaAs device. Undoped single electron transistors (SETs) are attractive candidates to study single electron phenomena, due to their charge stability and robust electronic properties after thermal cycling. However...

  18. Correlation Reflectometry for Turbulence and Magnetic Field Measurements in Fusion Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.J. Kramer; R. Nazikian; and E. Valeo

    2002-07-09

    For the interpretation of correlation reflectometry data a fast two-dimensional full wave code has been developed in which realistic plasma geometries are used. Results of this code are compared with experiments and turbulence correlation lengths and fluctuation levels are extracted with statistical optics methods. It is shown that in general the measured reflectometer correlation length is not equal to the turbulence correlation length. The code is also used to study the possibility of O-X correlation reflectometry in FIRE for the determination of the local magnetic field strength. It was found that this is only possible at very low fluctuation levels.

  19. Irrigation water quality assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increasing demands on fresh water supplies by municipal and industrial users means decreased fresh water availability for irrigated agriculture in semi arid and arid regions. There is potential for agricultural use of treated wastewaters and low quality waters for irrigation but this will require co...

  20. Irrigation Systems. Student's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarillo Coll., TX.

    This guide is intended for use by individuals preparing for a career in commercial and residential irrigation. The materials included are geared toward students who have had some experience in the irrigation business; they are intended to be presented in 10 six-hour sessions. The first two sections deal with using this guide and preparing for the…

  1. Irrigation Systems. Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarillo Coll., TX.

    This guide is intended for use by licensed irrigators who wish to teach others how to design and install residential and commercial irrigation systems. The materials included in the guide have been developed under the assumption that the instructors who use it have little or no formal training as teachers. The first section presents detailed…

  2. The Tomato FRUITFULL Homologs TDR4/FUL1 and MBP7/FUL2 Regulate Ethylene-Independent Aspects of Fruit Ripening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bemer, M.; Karlova, R.B.; Ballester, A.R.; Tikunov, Y.M.; Bovy, A.G.; Wolters-Arts, M.; Barros Rossetto, de P.; Angenent, G.C.; Maagd, de R.A.

    2012-01-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) contains two close homologs of the Arabidopsis thaliana MADS domain transcription factor FRUITFULL (FUL), FUL1 (previously called TDR4) and FUL2 (previously MBP7). Both proteins interact with the ripening regulator RIPENING INHIBITOR (RIN) and are expressed during fruit

  3. Irrigation in endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haapasalo, M; Shen, Y; Wang, Z; Gao, Y

    2014-03-01

    Irrigation is a key part of successful root canal treatment. It has several important functions, which may vary according to the irrigant used: it reduces friction between the instrument and dentine, improves the cutting effectiveness of the files, dissolves tissue, cools the file and tooth, and furthermore, it has a washing effect and an antimicrobial/antibiofilm effect. Irrigation is also the only way to impact those areas of the root canal wall not touched by mechanical instrumentation. Sodium hypochlorite is the main irrigating solution used to dissolve organic matter and kill microbes effectively. High concentration sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) has a better effect than 1 and 2% solutions. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) is needed as a final rinse to remove the smear layer. Sterile water or saline may be used between these two main irrigants, however, they must not be the only solutions used. The apical root canal imposes a special challenge to irrigation as the balance between safety and effectiveness is particularly important in this area. Different means of delivery are used for root canal irrigation, from traditional syringe-needle delivery to various machine-driven systems, including automatic pumps and sonic or ultrasonic energy.

  4. Application of Zeeman spatial beam-splitting in polarized neutron reflectometry

    OpenAIRE

    Kozhevnikov, S. V.; Ignatovich, V. K.; Radu, F.

    2017-01-01

    Neutron Zeeman spatial beam-splitting is considered at reflection from magnetically noncollinear films. Two applications of Zeeman beam-splitting phenomenon in polarized neutron reflectometry are discussed. One is the construction of polarizing devices with high polarizing efficiency. Another one is the investigations of magnetically noncollinear films with low spin-flip probability. Experimental results are presented for illustration.

  5. Comparative study of anal acoustic reflectometry and anal manometry in the assessment of faecal incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornung, B R; Mitchell, P J; Carlson, G L

    2012-01-01

    Anal acoustic reflectometry (AAR) is a reproducible technique providing a novel physiological assessment of anal sphincter function. It may have advantages over conventional anal manometry. The aims of this study were to determine the ability of AAR and anal manometry to identify changes in anal...

  6. Anal acoustic reflectometry: a new technique for assessing anal sphincter function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitchell, P J; Klarskov, N; Hosker, G

    2010-01-01

    Anal acoustic reflectometry (AAR) is a new technique that offers an assessment of anal sphincter function by the measurement of additional parameters not available with conventional manometry. The aim of this study is to describe the technique, methodology and initial pilot study results....

  7. GEROS-ISS: GNSS REflectometry, Radio Occultation and Scatterometry onboard the International Space Station

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wickert, Jens; Cardellach, Estel; Bandeiras, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    GEROS-ISS stands for GNSS REflectometry, radio occultation, and scatterometry onboard the International Space Station (ISS). It is a scientific experiment, successfully proposed to the European Space Agency in 2011. The experiment as the name indicates will be conducted on the ISS. The main focus...

  8. Use of Anal Acoustic Reflectometry in the Evaluation of Men With Passive Fecal Leakage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornung, Benjamin R; Telford, Karen J; Carlson, Gordon L

    2017-01-01

    an age-matched group of men with no symptoms of anal incontinence or anorectal pathology. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Variables measured with anal acoustic reflectometry and anal manometry in the incontinent and continent men were compared. RESULTS: Thirty subjects were recruited, of whom 15 were men...

  9. Differential reflectometry versus tactile sense detection of subgingival calculus in dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakibaie, Fardad; Walsh, Laurence J.

    2012-10-01

    Detecting dental calculus is clinically challenging in dentistry. This study used typodonts with extracted premolar and molar teeth and simulated gingival tissue to compare the performance of differential reflectometry and periodontal probing. A total of 30 extracted teeth were set in an anatomical configuration in stone to create three typodonts. Clear polyvinyl siloxane impression material was placed to replicate the periodontal soft tissues. Pocket depths ranged from 10 to 15 mm. The three models were placed in a phantom head, and an experienced dentist assessed the presence of subgingival calculus first using the DetecTar (differential reflectometry) and then a periodontal probe. Scores from these two different methods were compared to the gold standard (direct examination of the root surface using 20× magnification) to determine the accuracy and reproducibility. Differential reflectometry was more accurate than tactile assessment (79% versus 60%), and its reproducibility was also higher (Cohen kappa 0.54 versus 0.39). Both methods performed better on single rooted premolar teeth than on multirooted teeth. These laboratory results indicate that differential reflectometry allows more accurate and reproducible detection of subgingival calculus than conventional probing, and supports its use for supplementing traditional periodontal examination methods in dental practice.

  10. Anal acoustic reflectometry predicts the outcome of percutaneous nerve evaluation for faecal incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornung, B R; Carlson, G L; Mitchell, P J

    2014-01-01

    variables of anal sphincter function measured by anal acoustic reflectometry (AAR) could predict the outcome of PNE for faecal incontinence. METHODS: Women with faecal incontinence undergoing PNE were recruited. AAR, followed by anal manometry, was performed on the day of surgery, immediately before PNE...

  11. Dissolution and Protection of Aluminium Oxide in Corrosive Aqueous Media - An Ellipsometry and Reflectometry Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karlsson, P.M.; Postmus, B.R.; Palmqvist, A.E.C.

    2009-01-01

    Dissolution of alumina has been studied from wafers in aqueous solution by means of ellipsometry and reflectometry. It was discovered that the dissolution of aluminium oxide is promoted by ethanol amines like N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)glycine and triethanolamine, and that this dissolution is retarded

  12. Vision of irrigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Braz-Tangerino

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Irrigation not only has been a key factor for the development and maintenance of human societies but it still plays this role now and it is foreseen that in the future as well. Its evolution has been constrained to the advance in knowledge on matters regarding Agronomy and Water Engineering and in technology however, many challenges deserve further research. It is worth to note that Brazil has strongly promoted irrigation in the last decade. Within the limited extension of this article, some current topics in irrigation, some of them are innovative such us the research line studying water flow in soil-plant in Mediterranean plants and its consequences on water use,. and future challenges are presented with the purpose of stimulate publication of Irrigation papers in the journal “Ingeniería del Agua” among Portuguese and Spanish language communities.

  13. Advances in Irrigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, W. R.

    This is the first volume of Advances in Irrigation, a new serial publication by the publishers of Advances in Agronomy and Advances in Hydroscience and designed to follow the same format. The editor is a well-known researcher and writer on irrigation and related subjects and has assembled a collection of highly regarded and respected authors for the initial volume. The readership for this volume will probably be mainly specialists and students interested in irrigation and an occasional design engineer.The seven contributions in this volume fall roughly into two classes: research and practice. Three papers (“Conjunctive Use of Rainfall and Irrigation in Semi-arid Regions,” by Stewart and Musik, “Irrigation Scheduling Using Soil Moisture Measurements: Theory and Practice,” by G. S. and M. D. Campbell, and “Use of Solute Transport Models to Estimate Salt Balance Below Irrigated Cropland,” by Jury) cover topics that have been the subject of a number of reviews. The contributions here provide brief, well-written, and authoritative summaries of the chosen topics and serve as good introductions or reviews. They should lend themselves well to classroom use in various ways. They also should be helpful to the nonspecialist interested in getting a sense of the subject without going into great detail.

  14. Optimization of GPS Interferometric Reflectometry for Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiang

    GPS Interferometric Reflectometry (GPS-IR), a passive microwave remote sensing technique utilizing GPS signal as a source of opportunity, characterizes the Earth's surface through a bistatic radar configuration. The key idea of GPS-IR is utilizing a ground-based antenna to coherently receive the direct, or line-of-sight (LOS), signal and the Earth's surface reflected signal simultaneously. The direct and reflected signals create an interference pattern of the Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR), which contains the information about the Earth's surface environment. GPS-IR has proven its utility in a variety of environmental remote sensing applications, including the measurements of near-surface soil moisture, coastal sea level, snow depth and snow water equivalent, and vegetation biophysical parameters. A major approach of the GPS-IR technique is using the SNR data provided by the global network of the geodetic GPS stations deployed for tectonic and surveying applications. The geodetic GPS networks provide wide spatial coverage and have no additional cost for this capability expansion. However, the geodetic GPS instruments have intrinsic limitations: the geodetic-quality GPS antennas are designed to suppress the reflected signals, which is counter to the requirement of GPS-IR. As a result, it is desirable to refine and optimize the instrument and realize the full potential of the GPS-IR technique. This dissertation first analyzes the signal characteristics of four available polarizations of the GPS signal, and then discusses how these characteristics are related to and can be used for remote sensing applications of GPS-IR. Two types of antennas, a half-wavelength dipole antenna and a patch antenna, are proposed and fabricated to utilize the desired polarizations. Four field experiments are conducted to assess the feasibility of the design criteria and the performance of the proposed antennas. Three experiments are focused on snow depth measurement. The Table Mountain

  15. MISTRALE: Soil moisture mapping service based on a UAV-embedded GNSS-Reflectometry sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Vyvere, Laura; Desenfans, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    Around 70 percent of worldwide freshwater is used by agriculture. To be able to feed an additional 2 billion people by 2030, water demand is expected to increase tremendously in the next decades. Farmers are challenged to produce "more crop per drop". In order to optimize water resource management, it is crucial to improve soil moisture situation awareness, which implies both a better temporal and spatial resolution. To this end, the objective of the MISTRALE project (Monitoring soIl moiSture and waTeR-flooded Areas for agricuLture and Environment) is to provide UAV-based soil moisture maps that could complement satellite-based and field measurements. In addition to helping farmers make more efficient decisions about where and when to irrigate, MISTRALE moisture maps are an invaluable tool for risk management and damage evaluation, as they provide highly relevant information for wetland and flood-prone area monitoring. In order to measure soil water content, a prototype of a new sensor, called GNSS-Reflectometry (GNSS-R), is being developed in MISTRALE. This approach consists in comparing the direct signal, i.e. the signal travelling directly from satellite to receiver (in this case, embedded in the UAV), with its ground-reflected equivalent. Since soil dielectric properties vary with moisture content, the reflected signal's peak power is affected by soil moisture, unlike the direct one. In order to mitigate the effect of soil surface roughness on measurements, both left-hand and right-hand circular polarization reflected signals have to be recorded and processed. When it comes to soil moisture, using GNSS signals instead of traditional visible/NIR imagery has many advantages: it is operational under cloud cover, during the night, and also under vegetation (bushes, grass, trees). In addition, compared to microwaves, GNSS signal (which lies in L-band, between 1.4 and 1.8 GHz) is less influenced by variation on thermal background. GNSS frequencies are then ideal

  16. Tracking the career development of scientists in low- and middle-income countries trained through TDR's research capacity strengthening programmes: Learning from monitoring and impact evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Béatrice Halpaap

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR co-sponsored by UNICEF, UNDP, World Bank and WHO has been supporting research capacity strengthening in low- and middle-income countries for over 40 years. In order to assess and continuously optimize its capacity strengthening approaches, an evaluation of the influence of TDR training grants on research career development was undertaken. The assessment was part of a larger evaluation conducted by the European Science Foundation. A comprehensive survey questionnaire was developed and sent to a group of 117 trainees supported by TDR who had completed their degree (masters or PhD between 2000 and 2012; of these, seventy seven (77 responded. Most of the respondents (80% rated TDR support as a very important factor that influenced their professional career achievements. The "brain drain" phenomenon towards high-income countries was particularly low amongst TDR grantees: the rate of return to their region of origin upon completion of their degree was 96%. A vast majority of respondents are still working in research (89%, with 81% of respondents having participated in multidisciplinary research activities; women engaged in multidisciplinary collaboration to a higher extent than men. However, only a minority of all have engaged in intersectoral collaboration, an aspect that would require further study. The post-degree career choices made by the respondents were strongly influenced by academic considerations. At the time of the survey, 92% of all respondents hold full-time positions, mainly in the public sector. Almost 25% of the respondents reported that they had influenced policy and practice changes. Some of the challenges and opportunities faced by trainees at various stages of their research career have been identified. Modalities to overcome these will require further investigation. The survey evidenced how TDR's research capacity grant programmes made a difference on

  17. Application of imaging spectroscopic reflectometry for characterization of gold reduction from organometallic compound by means of plasma jet technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vodák, Jiří, E-mail: jiri.vodak@yahoo.com [Institute of Physical Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Brno University of Technology, Technická 2, 616 69 Brno (Czech Republic); Nečas, David [RG Plasma Technologies, CEITEC Masaryk University, Kamenice 5, 625 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Pavliňák, David [Department of Physical Electronics, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Macak, Jan M [Center of Materials and Nanotechnologies, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Pardubice, Nám. Čs. Legií 565, 530 02 Pardubice (Czech Republic); Řičica, Tomáš; Jambor, Roman [Department of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Pardubice, Studentská 573, 532 10 Pardubice (Czech Republic); Ohlídal, Miloslav [Institute of Physical Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Brno University of Technology, Technická 2, 616 69 Brno (Czech Republic); Institute of Physics, Faculty of Mining and Geology, VŠB – Technical University of Ostrava (Czech Republic)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • Metallic gold is reduced from an organometallic compound layer using a plasma jet. • Imaging spectroscopic reflectometry is used to locate areas with metallic gold. • The results are completed with XPS and optical microscopy observations. - Abstract: This work presents a new application of imaging spectroscopic reflectometry to determine a distribution of metallic gold in a layer of an organogold precursor which was treated by a plasma jet. Gold layers were prepared by spin coating from a solution of the precursor containing a small amount of polyvinylpyrrolidone on a microscopy glass, then they were vacuum dried. A difference between reflectivity of metallic gold and the precursor was utilized by imaging spectroscopic reflectometry to create a map of metallic gold distribution using a newly developed model of the studied sample. The basic principle of the imaging spectroscopic reflectometry is also shown together with the data acquisition principles. XPS measurements and microscopy observations were made to complete the imaging spectroscopic reflectometry results. It is proved that the imaging spectroscopic reflectometry represents a new method for quantitative evaluation of local reduction of metallic components from metaloorganic compounds.

  18. Drip irrigation using a PLC based adaptive irrigation system

    OpenAIRE

    Shahidian, S.; Serralheiro, R. P.; Teixeira, J. L.; Santos, F. L.; Oliveira, M. R. G.; Costa, J. L.; Toureiro, C.; Haie, Naim; Machado, R. M.

    2009-01-01

    Most of the water used by man goes to irrigation. A major part of this water is used to irrigate small plots where it is not feasible to implement full-scale Evapotranspiration based irrigation controllers. During the growth season crop water needs do not remain constant and varies depending on the canopy, growth stage and climate conditions such as temperature, wind, relative humidity and solar radiation. Thus, it is necessary to find an economic irrigation controller that can adapt the dail...

  19. Crop growth and two dimensional modeling of soil water transport in drip irrigated potatoes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plauborg, Finn; Iversen, Bo Vangsø; Mollerup, Mikkel

    2009-01-01

    of abscisic acid (ABA). Model outputs from the mechanistic simulation model Daisy, in SAFIR developed to include 2D soil processes and gas exchange processes based on Ball et al. and Farquhar were compared with measured crop dynamics, final DM yield and volumetric water content in the soil measured by TDR...... probes. The probes were installed parallel to the tillage direction at different positions in the potato ridge. The new Daisy 2D model showed to be able to simulate crop growth, water use and soil water distribution fairly well......Drip irrigation can be an effective way to improve water and nitrogen use efficiency in soil and hence to reduce the environmental pollution. In the EU project SAFIR ( http://www.safir4eu.org/ ) a potato experiment was carried out in lysimeters on three different soil types: coarse sand, loamy sand...

  20. Amplified, frequency swept lasers for frequency domain reflectometry and OCT imaging: design and scaling principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, R; Wojtkowski, M; Taira, K; Fujimoto, J; Hsu, K

    2005-05-02

    We demonstrate a high-speed, frequency swept, 1300 nm laser source for frequency domain reflectometry and OCT with Fourier domain/swept-source detection. The laser uses a fiber coupled, semiconductor amplifier and a tunable fiber Fabry-Perot filter. We present scaling principles which predict the maximum frequency sweep speed and trade offs in output power, noise and instantaneous linewidth performance. The use of an amplification stage for increasing output power and for spectral shaping is discussed in detail. The laser generates ~45 mW instantaneous peak power at 20 kHz sweep rates with a tuning range of ~120 nm full width. In frequency domain reflectometry and OCT applications the frequency swept laser achieves 108 dB sensitivity and ~10 mum axial resolution in tissue. We also present a fast algorithm for real time calibration of the fringe signal to equally spaced sampling in frequency for high speed OCT image preview.

  1. Application of time–frequency wavelet analysis in the reflectometry of thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astaf’ev, S. B., E-mail: bard@crys.ras.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography, Federal Scientific Research Centre “Crystallography and Photonics” (Russian Federation); Shchedrin, B. M. [Moscow State University, Faculty of Computational Mathematics and Cybernetics (Russian Federation); Yanusova, L. G. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography, Federal Scientific Research Centre “Crystallography and Photonics” (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    The application of time–frequency wavelet analysis for solving the reflectometry inverse problem is considered. It is shown that a simultaneous transform of specular intensity curve, depending on the grazing angle and spatial frequency, allows one to determine not only the thickness but also the alteration order of individual regions (layers) with characteristic behavior of electron density. This information makes it possible to reconstruct the electron density profile in the film cross section as a whole (i.e., to solve the inverse reflectometry problem). The application of the time–frequency transform is illustrated by examples of reconstructing (based on X-ray reflectivity data) the layer alternation order in models of two-layer films with inverted arrangement of layers and a four-layer film on a solid substrate.

  2. Microwave Imaging Reflectometry for the Measurement of Turbulent Fluctuations in Tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Mazzucato

    2004-02-19

    This article describes a numerical study of microwave reflectometry for the measurement of turbulent fluctuations in tokamak-like plasmas with a cylindrical geometry. Similarly to what was found previously in plane-stratified plasmas, the results indicate that the characteristics of density fluctuations cannot be uniquely determined from the reflected waves if the latter are allowed to propagate freely to the point of detection, as in standard reflectometry. Again, we find that if the amplitude of fluctuations is below a threshold that is set by the spectrum of poloidal wave numbers, the local characteristics of density fluctuations can be obtained from the phase of reflected waves when these are collected with a wide aperture antenna, and an image of the cutoff is formed onto an array of phase-sensitive detectors.

  3. Low coherence re-flectometry of skin: benefits for skin imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zimnyakov D.A.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Goal: to examine the effectiveness of use low coherent reflectometry method for diagnostic purposes in clinical dermatology. Materials and methods. For measurements optical coherence tomography OCS1300SS (Thorlab, USA with swiped frequency was used. 12 patients with different skin diseases were studied (psoriasis, acne, scleroderma, etc.. Results. Distinct border was detected between layers with different optical characteristics (and structure at a depth of 1000 m to 2000 microns for majority of the samples studied. It is important to note that a good regerneration of distribution of the interference signal during transmission from one section to another and close to an exponential decay of signal with an increase in depth of probing. Conclusion. As a criterion of pathological changes,may be proposed the degree of spatial uniformity in distribution decay constant of interference signal in depth obtained with help of low coherent reflectometry (in vivo.

  4. The effect of irrigation uniformity on irrigation water requirements ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Irrigated agriculture is the largest user of water in South Africa. Due to the limited amount of water resources, the efficient and equitable use of water is of paramount importance. This can only be achieved through effective design, maintenance and management of irrigation systems. The uniformity with which an irrigation ...

  5. GNSS-Reflectometry with GEROS-ISS: Overview and recent results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wickert, Jens; Andersen, Ole Baltazar; G., Beyerle

    2015-01-01

    GEROS-ISS (GEROS hereafter) stands for GNSS REflectometry, Radio Occultation and Scatterometry onboard the International Space Station. It is a scientific experiment, proposed to the European Space Agency (ESA) in 2011 for installation aboard the ISS. The main focus of GEROS is the dedicated use...... of signals from the currently available Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) for remote sensing of the System Earth with focus to Climate Change characterisation. The GEROS mission idea and the current status are briefly reviewed....

  6. Characterization of Polarization-Maintaining Fiber Using High-Sensitivity Optical-Frequency-Domain Reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froggatt, Mark E.; Gifford, Dawn K.; Kreger, Steven; Wolfe, Matthew; Soller, Brian J.

    2006-11-01

    Optical-frequency-domain reflectometry is used to measure the group-index difference and the refractive-index difference (i.e., beat length) between the fast and slow modes in polarization-maintaining optical fiber. The Rayleigh scatter normally present in the fiber is measured in reflection. This measurement, in turn, enables a distributed measurement of the fiber's birefringence that is rapid and completely nondestructive.

  7. Poloidal correlation reflectometry at W7-X: radial electric field and coherent fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windisch, T.; Krämer-Flecken, A.; Velasco, JL; Könies, A.; Nührenberg, C.; Grulke, O.; Klinger, T.; the W7-X Team

    2017-10-01

    Poloidal correlation reflectometry measurements during the first plasma campaign of the optimized stellarator Wendelstein-7X are presented. The radial electric field is determined and a comparison with neoclassical calculations and shows good qualitative agreement. The measured density fluctuation spectrum exhibits coherent low- and high-frequency modes. Magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) modeling results suggest that the coherent fluctuations are caused by stable MHD-modes and Alfvén waves.

  8. Global mapping of stratigraphy of an old-master painting using sparsity-based terahertz reflectometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Junliang; Locquet, Alexandre; Melis, Marcello; Citrin, D S

    2017-11-08

    The process by which art paintings are produced typically involves the successive applications of preparatory and paint layers to a canvas or other support; however, there is an absence of nondestructive modalities to provide a global mapping of the stratigraphy, information that is crucial for evaluation of its authenticity and attribution, for insights into historical or artist-specific techniques, as well as for conservation. We demonstrate sparsity-based terahertz reflectometry can be applied to extract a detailed 3D mapping of the layer structure of the 17th century easel painting Madonna in Preghiera by the workshop of Giovanni Battista Salvi da Sassoferrato, in which the structure of the canvas support, the ground, imprimatura, underpainting, pictorial, and varnish layers are identified quantitatively. In addition, a hitherto unidentified restoration of the varnish has been found. Our approach unlocks the full promise of terahertz reflectometry to provide a global and detailed account of an easel painting's stratigraphy by exploiting the sparse deconvolution, without which terahertz reflectometry in the past has only provided a meager tool for the characterization of paintings with paint-layer thicknesses smaller than 50 μm. The proposed modality can also be employed across a broad range of applications in nondestructive testing and biomedical imaging.

  9. Planning for an Irrigation System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, J. Howard; Anderson, Carl L.

    The publication, with the aid of tables and colored illustrations and diagrams, presents information to help the farmer who is considering the installation of an irrigation system determine whether or not to irrigate, the type of system to use, and the irrigation cost and return on investment. Information is presented on the increase in yield to…

  10. dry vs irrigated

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-05

    Oct 5, 2009 ... (dry vs irrigated) on the genetic relationships among the selected cotton lines from F6 population was studied using a ... a crop plant to produce its economic product with mini- mum loss in a water-deficit ..... Analysis System (NTSYS-pc) Version 2.0 software package (Rohlf,. 1993). The resulting genetic ...

  11. Evaluating two irrigation controllers under subsurface drip irrigated tomato crop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Ghobari, H.M.; Mohammad, F.S.; El Marazky, M.S.A.

    2016-07-01

    Smart systems could be used to improve irrigation scheduling and save water under Saudi Arabia’s present water crisis scenario. This study investigated two types of evapotranspiration-based smart irrigation controllers, SmartLine and Hunter Pro-C2, as promising tools for scheduling irrigation and quantifying plants’ water requirements to achieve water savings. The effectiveness of these technologies in reducing the amount of irrigation water was compared with the conventional irrigation scheduling method as a control treatment. The two smart irrigation sensors were used for subsurface irrigation of a tomato crop (cv. Nema) in an arid region. The results showed that the smart controllers significantly reduced the amount of applied water and increased the crop yield. In general, the Hunter Pro-C2 system saved the highest amount of water and produced the highest crop yield, resulting in the highest water irrigation efficiency compared with the SmartLine controller and the traditional irrigation schedule. It can be concluded that the application of advanced scheduling irrigation techniques such as the Hunter controller under arid conditions can realise economic benefits by saving large amounts of irrigation water.

  12. Evaluating two irrigation controllers under subsurface drip irrigated tomato crop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein M. Al-Ghobari

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Smart systems could be used to improve irrigation scheduling and save water under Saudi Arabia’s present water crisis scenario. This study investigated two types of evapotranspiration-based smart irrigation controllers, SmartLine and Hunter Pro-C2, as promising tools for scheduling irrigation and quantifying plants’ water requirements to achieve water savings. The effectiveness of these technologies in reducing the amount of irrigation water was compared with the conventional irrigation scheduling method as a control treatment. The two smart irrigation sensors were used for subsurface irrigation of a tomato crop (cv. Nema in an arid region. The results showed that the smart controllers significantly reduced the amount of applied water and increased the crop yield. In general, the Hunter Pro-C2 system saved the highest amount of water and produced the highest crop yield, resulting in the highest water irrigation efficiency compared with the SmartLine controller and the traditional irrigation schedule. It can be concluded that the application of advanced scheduling irrigation techniques such as the Hunter controller under arid conditions can realise economic benefits by saving large amounts of irrigation water.

  13. Noise Assessment and Error Analysis of GNSS Reflectometry Data for Water Surface Altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Tiago; Castro, Rita; Peres, Tiago; Carola, Jorge; Bandeiras, Jorge; Catarino, Nuno; Antunes, Carlos; Freire da Silva, Pedro

    2015-04-01

    The field of GNSS reflectometry has been gaining a lot of popularity in recent years, mostly because of its potential to generate multiple types of measurements on a global scale with a high repeatability rate. However, the challenge is to operationalize a GNSS reflectometry system with accuracy compatible with other technologies, such as satellite altimetry. Deimos Engenharia is currently leading the FP7 E-GEM project, which aims to evolve the current status of GNSS reflectometry in order to allow the implementation of operational applications (mainly in the domains of ocean altimetry and scatterometry). Within E-GEM Deimos is developing a ground instrument to collect reflectometry observables - namely, direct and reflected waveforms or autocorrelation functions that will be used to derive sea surface altimetry through the delay differences method. This paper presents the work that has been done in order to assess the expected noise for the Galileo E1 signal for the direct and reflected waveforms, as well as their delay differences that are used to obtain the final altimetric result. Several methods were used to estimate the noise, including tracking methods, fits and maxima determination, and the comparison with Gaussian noise expectations is performed. The results obtained using different methods will be presented. The Water Surface Altimetry is also derived, based on the delay differences and satellite elevation, and compared with concurrent tide gauge data. It can be concluded that without integration the noise level is of the order of 8 m, in good agreement with the expected values, taken into account that no filtering is applied. Moreover, some effects were detected and were not eliminated with delay differences, indicating that other error sources may be contributing to the noise (such as unwanted multipath). When the integration is performed the noise level is of the order of 50 cm, and for the delay differences the noise seems to approach a Gaussian

  14. Review on Trickle Irrigation Application in Groundwater Irrigation Schemes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prastowo

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The Government of Indonesia has developed groundwater irrigation schemes in some province e.g. East Java, Central Java, Yogyakarta, Wast Java, Bali, West Nusa Tenggara and East Nusa Tenggara. However, not all regions were able to optimally utilize it. The irrigation effeciency of groundwater irrigation scheme was about 59%, while the wells-pumping efficiencies were varied from 28 to 98 %. In thefuture, the irrigation effieciency should be increased to anticipate water deficit during dry season. The application of trickle irrigation in indonesia has not been widely developed. Although trickle system has been used, however, it is still limited for few commercial agribusinesses. Trickle irrigation systems have a prospect to be developed in some regions having limited water resources. For preliminary stage, the systems could be applied in groundwater irrigation schemes that have been developed either by farmers or government.

  15. SWAP Modeling Results of Monitored Soil Water Moisture Data of Irrigation Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiliger, A.; Garsia-Orenes, F.; van den Elsen, E.; Mataix-Solera, J.; Semenov, V.

    2009-04-01

    In arid and semiarid zones of the Mediterranean regions a shortage of fresh water resources constitutes some time dramatic problem. In these regions with growing population and the scarce of rainfall irregularity in time during growing season an efficient use of water irrigation became a main challenge for future extensive agriculture development. In the frame of FP6 Water-Reuse project 516731 project a special field experimentation has been carried out in Alicante Region of Spain (Location UTM X: 693.809, Y: 4.279.922, Z: 626) on a Sandy Typic Xerofkuvent (Soil Survey Staff, 1999), Calcaric Fluvisol (WRB, FAO, 1989). with aim to investigate water regime in water repellent soils under irrigation of vine Vitus Labrusca. During field experimentation from 2006 till 2008 on 9 plots, there the same regime of irrigation water application was maintained, a monitoring of weather parameters was done by automatic meteorological station as well as a monitoring of soil water moisture was done by set of data-loggers and TDR-soil moisture sensors ECO-2 installed at different depts. SWAP model was used to simulate water regime of irrigated plots. Empirical coefficients of van Genuchten-Mualem's equations were calculated by pedotransfer functions derived from HYPRES data base using measured values of bulk density, organic matter content and soil texture. Testing of validity of the use of estimated curves was done by comparison with unsaturated soil hydraulic parameters of water retention and hydraulic conductivity measured in vitro by Wind's method on soil samples. Calibration of SWAP model for each plot was done on measured soil moisture data of irrigation events by adjusting a value of saturated hydraulic coefficient. Verification of the SWAP model was done by full range of experimental data. Similarity and non-similarity of the water regime at experimental plots as well as results of verification of SWAP model were analyzed

  16. Relation between denaturation time measured by optical coherence reflectometry and thermal lesion depth during radiofrequency cardiac ablation: Feasibility numerical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Suárez, Ana; Herranz, David; Berjano, Enrique; Rubio-Guivernau, Jose L; Margallo-Balbás, Eduardo

    2017-11-23

    Radiofrequency (RF) catheter ablation is a minimally invasive medical procedure used to thermally destroy the focus of cardiac arrhythmias. Novel optical techniques are now being integrated into RF catheters in order to detect the changes in tissue properties. Loss of birefringence due to fiber denaturation at around 70°C is related to changes in accumulated phase retardation and can be measured by polarization-sensitive optical coherence reflectometry (PS-OCR). Since irreversible thermal lesions are produced when the tissue reaches 50°C, our goal was to seek the mathematical relationship between both isotherms. A two-dimensional model based on a coupled electric-thermal problem was built and solved using the finite element method. The model consisted of cardiac tissue, blood, and a non-irrigated electrode with a sensor embedded in its tip to maintain a specific target electrode temperature. Computer simulations were conducted by varying the tissue characteristics. Lesion depth was estimated by the 50°C isotherm, while the denaturation time (TD) was taken as the time at which the 70°C isotherm reached a depth of 0.75 mm (which corresponds to the optical depth reached by PS-OCR technology). A strong correlation (R2  > 0.83) was found between TD and lesion depth and an even stronger correlation (R2  > 0.96) was found between TD and the time required to achieve a specific lesion depth. For instance, the ablation time required to ensure a minimum lesion depth of 3 mm was 1.33 × TD + 3.93 × seconds. The computer results confirmed the strong relationship between denaturation time and lesion depth and suggest that measuring denaturation time by PS-OCR could provide information on the ablation time required to reach a specific lesion depth. Lasers Surg. Med. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Spectrophotometric determination of irrigant extrusion using passive ultrasonic irrigation, EndoActivator, or syringe irrigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Figueroa, Carolina; McClanahan, Scott B; Bowles, Walter R

    2014-10-01

    Sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) irrigation is critical to endodontic success, and several new methods have been developed to improve irrigation efficacy (eg, passive ultrasonic irrigation [PUI] and EndoActivator [EA]). Using a novel spectrophotometric method, this study evaluated NaOCl irrigant extrusion during canal irrigation. One hundred fourteen single-rooted extracted teeth were decoronated to leave 15 mm of the root length for each tooth. Cleaning and shaping of the teeth were completed using standardized hand and rotary instrumentation to an apical file size #40/0.04 taper. Roots were sealed (not apex), and 54 straight roots (n = 18/group) and 60 curved roots (>20° curvature, n = 20/group) were included. Teeth were irrigated with 5.25% NaOCl by 1 of 3 methods: passive irrigation with needle, PUI, or EA irrigation. Extrusion of NaOCl was evaluated using a pH indicator and a spectrophotometer. Standard curves were prepared with known amounts of irrigant to quantify amounts in unknown samples. Irrigant extrusion was minimal with all methods, with most teeth showing no NaOCl extrusion in straight or curved roots. Minor NaOCl extrusion (1-3 μL) in straight roots or curved roots occurred in 10%-11% of teeth in all 3 irrigant methods. Two teeth in both the syringe irrigation and the EA group extruded 3-10 μL of NaOCl. The spectrophotometric method used in this study proved to be very sensitive while providing quantification of the irrigant levels extruded. Using the PUI or EA tip to within 1 mm of the working length appears to be fairly safe, but apical anatomy can vary in teeth to allow extrusion of irrigant. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Irrigation mitigates against heat extremes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiery, Wim; Fischer, Erich; Visser, Auke; Hirsch, Annette L.; Davin, Edouard L.; Lawrence, Dave; Hauser, Mathias; Seneviratne, Sonia I.

    2017-04-01

    Irrigation is an essential practice for sustaining global food production and many regional economies. Emerging scientific evidence indicates that irrigation substantially affects mean climate conditions in different regions of the world. Yet how this practice influences climate extremes is currently unknown. Here we use gridded observations and ensemble simulations with the Community Earth System Model to assess the impacts of irrigation on climate extremes. While the influence of irrigation on annual mean temperatures is limited, we find a large impact on temperature extremes, with a particularly strong cooling during the hottest day of the year (-0.78 K averaged over irrigated land). The strong influence on hot extremes stems from the timing of irrigation and its influence on land-atmosphere coupling strength. Together these effects result in asymmetric temperature responses, with a more pronounced cooling during hot and/or dry periods. The influence of irrigation is even more pronounced when considering subgrid-scale model output, suggesting that local effects of land management are far more important than previously thought. Finally we find that present-day irrigation is partly masking GHG-induced warming of extreme temperatures, with particularly strong effects in South Asia. Our results overall underline that irrigation substantially reduces our exposure to hot temperature extremes and highlight the need to account for irrigation in future climate projections.

  19. Making the user visible: analysing irrigation practices and farmers’ logic to explain actual drip irrigation performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benouniche, M.; Kuper, M.; Hammani, A.; Boesveld, H.

    2014-01-01

    The actual performance of drip irrigation (irrigation efficiency, distribution uniformity) in the field is often quite different from that obtained in experimental stations. We developed an approach to explain the actual irrigation performance of drip irrigation systems by linking measured

  20. Applicability of X-ray reflectometry to studies of polymer solar cell degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Wenzel; Gevorgyan, Suren; Schleputz, C.M.

    2008-01-01

    Although degradation of polymer solar cells is widely acknowledged, the cause, physical or chemical, has not been identified. The purpose of this work is to determine the applicability of X-ray reflectometry for in situ observation of physical degradation mechanisms. We find that the rough...... interfaces of the polymer solar cell constituent layers seriously obstruct the sensitivity of the technique, rendering it impossible to elucidate changes in the layer/interface structure at the sub-nanometer level. (c) 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  1. Precision bragg reflectors obtained by molecular beam epitaxy under in situ tunable dynamic reflectometry control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardinal, V.; Legros, R.; Fontaine, C.

    1995-12-31

    Highly accurate layer thickness are required for multilayers involved in photonic devices, such as Bragg reflectors. In this letter, we demonstrate that precise, real-time monitoring of molecular beam epitaxy growing layers can be achieved by near-normal incidence dynamic reflectometry with a tunable sapphire-titanium laser used as a source. The advantage of this new technique lies in the possibility of synchronizing the material changes and the reflectivity extrema by selecting adequate analysis wavelengths. This technique is shown to provide 885 nm GaAs-AlAs Bragg reflectors with a layer thickness accuracy in excess of 1%. (author). 17 refs.

  2. Urethral pressure reflectometry; a novel technique for simultaneous recording of pressure and cross-sectional area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Mikael; Klarskov, Niels; Sønksen, Jens

    2012-01-01

    in several studies. But the technique, which was based on the field gradient principle, was never implemented in the clinical setting because of technical limitations. In 2005, urethral pressure reflectometry was introduced as a new technique in female urodynamics. The technique has been shown to be more...... reproducible than conventional urethral pressure profilometry, when measuring incontinence in women. In 2010 it was also introduced as a new measuring technique in the anal canal. This study, adds a new and interesting technique to the field of male urodynamics. For the first time, sound waves have been used...

  3. High-speed optical correlation-domain reflectometry without using acousto-optic modulator

    CERN Document Server

    Shizuka, Makoto; Hayashi, Neisei; Mizuno, Yosuke; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2015-01-01

    To achieve a distributed reflectivity measurement along an optical fiber, we develop a simplified cost-effective configuration of optical correlation- (or coherence-) domain reflectometry based on a synthesized optical coherence function by sinusoidal modulation. By excluding conventional optical heterodyne detection (practically, without using an acousto-optic modulator) and by exploiting the foot of the Fresnel reflection spectrum, the electrical bandwidth required for signal processing is lowered down to several megahertz. We evaluate the basic system performance and demonstrate its high-speed operation (10 ms for one scan) by tracking a moving reflection point in real time.

  4. Thermal analysis of the in-vessel components of the ITER plasma-position reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quental, P. B.; Policarpo, H.; Luís, R.; Varela, P.

    2016-11-01

    The ITER plasma position reflectometry system measures the edge electron density profile of the plasma, providing real-time supplementary contribution to the magnetic measurements of the plasma-wall distance. Some of the system components will be in direct sight of the plasma and therefore subject to plasma and stray radiation, which may cause excessive temperatures and stresses. In this work, thermal finite element analysis of the antenna and adjacent waveguides is conducted with ANSYS V17 (ANSYS® Academic Research, Release 17.0, 2016). Results allow the identification of critical temperature points, and solutions are proposed to improve the thermal behavior of the system.

  5. Irrigation water management: Basic principles and applications

    OpenAIRE

    Victor B. Ella

    2007-01-01

    This presentation defines the term, irrigation, as well as explains the common methods of irrigation in attempt to define the fundamental principles needed to wisely design an irrigation system. It outlines a typical drip irrigation set-up, and discusses management of an irrigation system, including water volume application suggestions. LTRA-5 (Agroforestry and Sustainable Vegetable Production)

  6. Urethral pressure reflectometry. A method for simultaneous measurements of pressure and cross-sectional area in the female urethra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarskov, Niels

    2012-01-01

    A novel technique for simultaneous measurements of pressure and cross-sectional area (CA) in the female urethra, denoted Urethral Pressure Reflectometry (UPR), was devised. A very thin and highly flexible polyurethane-bag was placed in the urethra. A pump applied increasing and decreasing pressures...... to the polyurethane-bag and thereby opened and closed the urethra. Sound waves were continually sent into the polyurethane-bag and the cross-sectional area (CA) of the bag (urethra) could be measured from the reflections with Acoustic Reflectometry. The CA of the bag was measured for each mm of the bag and 10 times...

  7. Effect of irrigation on heavy metals content of wastewater irrigated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is an urgent need to educate farmers on the dangers of the presence of heavy metals in soils as well as the quality of irrigation water especially if it comes from tanning industries for increased crop production. Accordingly, soil and irrigation wastewater study was conducted to assess the concentrations of heavy ...

  8. Soil Suitability Classification of Tomas Irrigation Scheme for Irrigated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The parametric method reveals that all the mapping units had an index of current productivity (IPC) of 5.63 (N2) which is permanently not suitable. Tomas irrigation scheme was found to be potentially moderately suitable (S2) for irrigated rice production using non-parametric method after the soil fertility status was amended.

  9. Assessment of Irrigation Water Quality and Suitability for Irrigation in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A number of factors like geology, soil, effluents, sewage disposal and other environmental conditions in which the water stays or moves and interacts are among the factors that affect the quality of irrigation water. This study was conducted to determine the quality and suitability of different water sources for irrigation purpose ...

  10. Irrigation trends in Kansas, 1991–2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This fact sheet examines trends in total reported irrigation water use and acres irrigated as well as irrigation water use by crop type and system type in Kansas for...

  11. Time-domain Statistics of the Electromagnetic Bias in GNSS-Reflectometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ghavidel

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Global Navigation Satellite Systems-Reflectometry (GNSS-R is an emerging remote sensing technique that uses navigation signals reflected on the Earth’s surface as sources of opportunity for scatterometry and altimetry. The time-domain statistics of the electromagnetic bias in GNSS-R altimetry are investigated to assess the residual electromagnetic bias after averaging during the dwell time (as long as 100 s. A three-dimensional time-evolving sea surface is generated using Elfouhaily’s ocean surface height spectrum and spreading function. This surface is illuminated by a right hand circular polarization electromagnetic wave at L-band. Then, the scattered waves are computed using the Physical Optics method under the Kirchhoff Approximation. The electromagnetic bias is estimated using a numerical technique previously validated at C- and Ku-bands, and then extrapolated at L-band. Montecarlo simulations for different sea surface realizations consecutive in time are performed so as to analyze the electromagnetic bias statistics up to the 4PthP order moments. Histograms and distribution of the time domain electromagnetic bias are also used for statistical interpretation. All statistical descriptors confirmed that the electromagnetic bias has a non-Gaussian behavior. This study is important to assess the residual electromagnetic bias in future GNSS-R altimetry missions, such as the “GNSS Reflectometry, Radio Occultation and Scatterometry on board the International Space Station” experiment onboard the International Space Station.

  12. Electrochemical lithiation of silicon electrodes. Neutron reflectometry and secondary ion mass spectrometry investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerliu, Bujar; Doerrer, Lars; Hueger, Erwin [Technische Univ. Clausthal, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany). AG Mikrokinetik; Seidlhofer, Beatrix-Kamelia; Steitz, Roland [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Borchardt, Guenter; Schmidt, Harald [Technische Univ. Clausthal, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany). AG Mikrokinetik; Clausthaler Zentrum fuer Materialtechnik (CZM), Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    In-situ neutron reflectometry and ex-situ secondary ion mass spectrometry in combination with electrochemical methods were used to study the lithiation of amorphous silicon electrodes. For that purpose specially designed closed three-electrode electrochemical cells with thin silicon films as the working electrode and lithium as counter and reference electrodes were used. The neutron reflectometry results obtained in-situ during galvanostatic cycling show that the incorporation, redistribution and removal of Li in amorphous silicon during a lithiation cycle can be monitored. It was possible to measure the volume modification during lithiation, which is found to be rather independent of cycle number, current density and film thickness and in good agreement with first-principles calculations as given in literature. Indications for an inhomogeneous lithiation mechanism were found by secondary ion mass spectrometry measurements. Lithium tracer diffusion experiments indicate that the diffusivities inside the lithiated region (D > 10{sup -15} m{sup 2} s{sup -1}) are considerably higher than in pure amorphous silicon as known from literature. This suggests a kinetics based explanation for the occurrence of an inhomogeneous lithiation mechanism.

  13. Comparative structure analysis of magnetic fluids at interface with silicon by neutron reflectometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avdeev, M.V. [Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Petrenko, V.I., E-mail: vip@nf.jinr.ru [Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Kyiv Taras Shevchenko National University, Kyiv (Ukraine); Gapon, I.V. [Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Kyiv Taras Shevchenko National University, Kyiv (Ukraine); Bulavin, L.A. [Kyiv Taras Shevchenko National University, Kyiv (Ukraine); Vorobiev, A.A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University (Sweden); Soltwedel, O. [Max-Planck-Institut for Solid State Research, Outstation at MLZ, Garching (Germany); Balasoiu, M. [Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Vekas, L. [Center for Fundamental and Advanced Technical Research, Romanian Academy-Timisoara Branch, Timisoara (Romania); Zavisova, V.; Kopcansky, P. [Institute of Experimental Physics, SAS, Kosice (Slovakia)

    2015-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Nanoparticles adsorption is studied by neutron reflectometry. • Non-polar and aqueous ferrofluids at interface are considered and compared. • Just one well-defined adsorption layer of nanoparticles is observed. • Preferable adsorption of non-aggregated particles from bulk is concluded. - Abstract: The adsorption of surfactant coated magnetic nanoparticles from highly stable magnetic fluids on crystalline functionalized silicon is studied by neutron reflectometry. Two types of magnetic fluids based on nanomagnetite dispersed and stabilized in non-polar organic solvent (deuterated benzene) and strongly polar solvent (heavy water) are considered. In both cases the interface shows the formation of just one well-defined adsorption layer of nanoparticles, which is insensitive to the effect of the external magnetic field. Still, the particle concentration in the benzene-based fluid is higher in the vicinity to the silicon surface as compared to the bulk distribution. Despite the presence of an aggregate fraction in the water-based system the width of the adsorption layer is consistent with the size of separated particles, thus showing the preferable adsorption of non-aggregated particles.

  14. Preferential flow effects on transport and fate of chemicals and microorganisms in soils irrigated with wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puddu, Rita; Corrias, Roberto; Dessena, Maria Antonietta; Ferralis, Marcella; Marras, Gabriele; Pin, Paola; Spanu, Paola

    2010-05-01

    This work is part of a multidisciplinary research properly planned by the ENAS (Cagliari-Sardinia-Italy) to verify the consequences of urban wastewater reuse in irrigation practices on chemical, biological and hydrological behavior of agricultural soils of the Had as Soualem area (Morocco). The area consists of Fluventic Haploxerept soils, according to USDA Soil Taxonomy. Undisturbed large soil columns, 70 cm height and 20 cm diameter, were collected from plots, the locations of which were preliminarily individuated through a prior pedological study. The soils are characterized by an apparent structure, suggesting that preferential flow processes may occur in the study area, which may impact usable groundwater at depth. Wastewater reuse for irrigation simultaneously solves water shortage and wastewater disposal problems. Unfortunately, wastewaters generally contain high concentrations of suspended and dissolved solids, both organic and inorganic, and microbial contaminants (virus and bacteria) added to wastewater during domestic and industrial usage. Most of these contaminants are only partially removed during conventional sewage treatment so they remain in the irrigation water. Although adsorbing ions and microbes are relatively immobile within porous media, preferential flow and adsorption to mobile colloids can enhance their transport. There is limited knowledge regarding the role of preferential flow and colloidal transport on adsorbing contaminants. The main aim of this research is to determine the influence of preferential flow and colloids on wastewater contaminant transport. Leaching rates and arrival time of wastewater contaminants will be determined using field and laboratory measurements at the study sites in combination with preferential flow numerical modeling. To achieve these objectives the soil columns were analyzed for physical, chemical, and microbial characterization. At the laboratory, an experimental facility was set up and sensors for

  15. Validation study of two-microphone acoustic reflectometry for determination of breathing tube placement in 200 adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raphael, David T; Benbassat, Maxim; Arnaudov, Dimiter; Bohorquez, Alex; Nasseri, Bita

    2002-12-01

    Acoustic reflectometry allows the construction of a one-dimensional image of a cavity, such as the airway or the esophagus. The reflectometric area-distance profile consists of a constant cross-sectional area segment (length of endotracheal tube), followed either by a rapid increase in the area beyond the carina (tracheal intubation) or by an immediate decrease in the area (esophageal intubation). Two hundred adult patients were induced and intubated, without restrictions on anesthetic agents or airway adjunct devices. A two-microphone acoustic reflectometer was used to determine whether the breathing tube was placed in the trachea or esophagus. A blinded reflectometer operator, seated a distance away from the patient, interpreted the acoustic area-distance profile alone to decide where the tube was placed. Capnography was used as the gold standard. Of 200 tracheal intubations confirmed by capnography, the reflectometer operator correctly identified 198 (99% correct tracheal intubation identification rate). In two patients there were false-negative results, patients with a tracheal intubation were interpreted as having an esophageal intubation. A total of 14 esophageal intubations resulted, all correctly identified by reflectometry, for a 100% esophageal intubation identification rate. Acoustic reflectometry is a rapid, noninvasive method by which to determine whether breathing tube placement is correct (tracheal) or incorrect (esophageal). Reflectometry determination of tube placement may be useful in airway emergencies, particularly in cases where visualization of the glottic area is not possible and capnography may fail, as in patients with cardiac arrest.

  16. Innovative Sea Surface Monitoring with GNSS-Reflectometry aboard ISS: Overview and Recent Results from GEROS-ISS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wickert, Jens; Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Bandeiras, J.

    GEROS-ISS (GEROS hereafter) stands for GNSS REflectometry, Radio Occultation and Scatterometry onboard the International Space Station. It is a scientific experiment, proposed to the European Space Agency (ESA)in 2011 for installation aboard the ISS. The main focus of GEROS is the dedicated use o...

  17. Urethral pressure reflectometry, a novel technique for simultaneous recording of pressure and cross-sectional area in the prostatic urethra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Mikael; Klarskov, Niels; Sønksen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Urethral pressure reflectometry (UPR) was introduced in 2005, for simultaneous measurement of pressure and cross-sectional area in the female urethra. It has shown to be more reproducible than conventional pressure measurement. Recently, it has been tested in the anal canal...

  18. Doppler shift estimation for GNSS reflectometry using a land topography adapted reflection model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semmling, Maximilian; Peraza, Luis; Falck, Carsten; Gerland, Sebastian; Wickert, Jens

    2016-04-01

    A GNSS setup with a receiver capable for reflectometry is operated by GFZ at Kongsfjorden (Spitsbergen), 78°54'14''N, 11°52'37''E, 512 m above ellipsoid (WGS-84). This permanent station at the Zeppelin mountain outpost, operated by the Norwegian Polar Institute (NPI), accumulates data since Summer 2013 observing reflections over the fjord and the adjacent land surface. Especially the presence of sea ice over the fjord and snow cover over land are of interest for reflectometry to investigate altimetry and remote sensing applications. The setup contains a GORS (GNSS Occultation Reflectometry Scatterometry) two-frontend receiver, which is based on commercial JAVAD hardware. The receiver is connected to one up-looking and one horizon-looking patch antenna with right-handed and left-handed circular polarization, respectively. Both antennas are installed on the same mount approximately 475 m above the fjord mean sea level. Reflections are observed at low transmitter elevation angles (between 10 and 2°). For these geometries the relative Doppler shift (sea surface reflected relative to direct signal) is almost constant 0.5 to 0.6 Hz and can be calculated with an established reflection model. Rather easily, sea surface reflections are identified in the data and the corresponding reflection points are located. About 55 daily recurring reflection events over the fjord are observed. They form a fan-shaped swath with 3 to 13 km distance around the receiver, corresponding to elevations of 10° to 2°. Also signatures of potential land reflections are found in the data. About 13 daily recurring events extend mainly over land. The potential land signatures have a rather variable Doppler shift between 0.2 to 1Hz. The significant topography of the mountainous surrounding, which varies between sea level and 900 m altitude, prevents the use of established reflection models. A topography adapted reflection model, which considers sloped surface facets, is developed. It incorporates

  19. Estimation of the daily water consumption by maize under Atlantic climatic conditions (A Coruña, NW Spain using Frequency Domain Reflectometry – a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Mestas-Valero

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Climatic variables and soil present a high spatio-temporal variability. Evapotranspiration estimations based on climatic variables may be inadequate for assessing soil water content in the root-influenced zone and/or soil water consumption by plants. Other methods may provide better estimates of this water consumption. The aim of this study was to quantify the soil moisture dynamics in the root-influenced zone and to assess the daily water consumption by the crop using Frequency Domain Reflectometry (FDR. The studied site is located in A Coruña (Spain. The study was carried out from June to October in 2008 and 2009, in a maize (Zea mays, L. field on a silt-clay textured soil. Evapotranspiration was estimated by the Penman-Monteith equation using meteorological data from a station located on the experimental site. Soil water content in the root-influenced zone (0–60 cm depth was hourly monitored each 20 cm (0–20 cm, 20–40 cm, and 40–60 cm using FDR. Evaluations were performed on days with slight or no rainfall. During the study period, the magnitude of the diurnal soil water loss was more evident in the first layer (0–20 cm depth and less important in the subsequent soil layers. The greatest consumption occurred between 14 and 19 h, up to 53.64% of the total. Overall, daily water consumption increased significantly with soil water content (p-value < 0.001. In general, water losses from the 0–20 cm soil layer were greater than in subsoil horizons due to maize water-uptake and evaporation. In contrast, water content in the deepest part of the soil profile was close to saturation, even on the driest days of the studied period. Evapotranspiration overestimate maize water requirements as its values were greater than those measured with the probe. In conclusion, FDR allows a more accurate estimation of the soil water balance. Therefore, monitoring soil water content would be useful in the assessment of saturation risks or water

  20. Neutron reflectometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klösgen-Buchkremer, Beate Maria

    2014-01-01

    differences among isotopes. Especially, there is a huge between for hydrogen and deuterium, and as well for magnetic materials like iron and the different isotopes of nickel. Accordingly, optical contrast may be varied by distinct deuteration allowing for selective optical matching and contrast enhancement...... to several hundreds of nanometers in dimensions, and they are often difficult to characterize using optical techniques due to their small size, or because many interesting phenomena are located at buried interfaces....

  1. Absorção de água pelas raízes do limoeiro sob distintas freqüências de irrigação Water uptake by lemon roots under different irrigation frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delfran B. dos Santos

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se, nesse trabalho, caracterizar a absorção de água pelas raízes do limoeiro 'Taiti' (Citrus latifolia Tanaka no perfil de solo sob diferentes intervalos de irrigação por microaspersão. O estudo foi realizado em condições semi-áridas, em solo franco arenoso, cuja absorção de água pelas raízes das plantas foi determinada a partir da umidade em diversas posições no perfil do solo entre duas irrigações, por meio de sondas de TDR. A distribuição radicular foi avaliada a partir de dados de comprimento e diâmetro das raízes nas mesmas posições das sondas de TDR. Conforme os resultados, verificou-se que: (i à medida que as raízes se afastam do microaspersor, a extração de água pelas raízes do limoeiro é reduzida; (ii o limoeiro extrai mais água do solo quando não há restrição de disponibilidade hídrica; (iii sempre que os intervalos entre as irrigações aumentam, cresce também a área de extração de água pelo sistema radicular do limoeiro; (iv as raízes das plantas com diâmetros entre 0,5-2 mm foram as que mais extraíram água do solo.The present work had the objective of characterizing water uptake by 'Taiti' lemon (Citrus latifolia Tanaka roots in the soil profile under different microsprinkler irrigation intervals. The work was conducted under semi-arid conditions, in a sandy loam soil. Water uptake by roots was determined from soil water content by means of TDR probes, at several positions in the soil profile between two irrigation events. The root distribution was evaluated based upon data of length and root diameter at the same locations of TDR probes. According to the results, it was verified that: (i water uptake reduced as the distance root-microsprinkler increased; (ii lemon crop extracts more water when there is no restriction to the available water in the wetted volume; (iii the area of water uptake by lemon roots increases with increase in the irrigation intervals; (iv roots with

  2. Sensing technologies for precision irrigation

    CERN Document Server

    Ćulibrk, Dubravko; Minic, Vladan; Alonso Fernandez, Marta; Alvarez Osuna, Javier; Crnojevic, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    This brief provides an overview of state-of-the-art sensing technologies relevant to the problem of precision irrigation, an emerging field within the domain of precision agriculture. Applications of wireless sensor networks, satellite data and geographic information systems in the domain are covered. This brief presents the basic concepts of the technologies and emphasizes the practical aspects that enable the implementation of intelligent irrigation systems. The authors target a broad audience interested in this theme and organize the content in five chapters, each concerned with a specific technology needed to address the problem of optimal crop irrigation. Professionals and researchers will find the text a thorough survey with practical applications.

  3. Benefits of increased irrigation efficiency in the Murrumbidgee Irrigation Area

    OpenAIRE

    Kemp, Adrian; Hafi, Ahmed

    2001-01-01

    Limited water availability in the face of increasing competing demands for water; including water for environmental purposes, has highlighted the need to make the most efficient use of the available water in the Murray Darling Basin. This study forces on the Murrumbidgee Irrigation Area (MIA) and considers the benefits of increasing irrigation efficiency. A model of the MIA which incorporates both on and off farm components is used to evaluate the benefits of adopting two on-farm options-twin...

  4. Comparative structure analysis of magnetic fluids at interface with silicon by neutron reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avdeev, M. V.; Petrenko, V. I.; Gapon, I. V.; Bulavin, L. A.; Vorobiev, A. A.; Soltwedel, O.; Balasoiu, M.; Vekas, L.; Zavisova, V.; Kopcansky, P.

    2015-10-01

    The adsorption of surfactant coated magnetic nanoparticles from highly stable magnetic fluids on crystalline functionalized silicon is studied by neutron reflectometry. Two types of magnetic fluids based on nanomagnetite dispersed and stabilized in non-polar organic solvent (deuterated benzene) and strongly polar solvent (heavy water) are considered. In both cases the interface shows the formation of just one well-defined adsorption layer of nanoparticles, which is insensitive to the effect of the external magnetic field. Still, the particle concentration in the benzene-based fluid is higher in the vicinity to the silicon surface as compared to the bulk distribution. Despite the presence of an aggregate fraction in the water-based system the width of the adsorption layer is consistent with the size of separated particles, thus showing the preferable adsorption of non-aggregated particles.

  5. Flextube reflectometry for level diagnosis in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea and snoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, C E; Hilberg, O; Grymer, L

    2002-01-01

    per hour recording and the RDI (respiratory disturbance index = apnoeas and hypopneas per hour recording) by ResMed AutoSet (AS), which is a device based on nasal pressure variations. We performed sleep studies on 54 patients referred for snoring or OSA; 1) at home with AS; 2) in hospital using......The aim of this study was to use sound reflections in a flexible tube (flextube reflectometry) for identifying the predominant obstructive level of the upper airway in a series of patients referred to a sleep clinic. We also wished to study the relationship between the number of flextube narrowings...... correlation between the number of flextube narrowings per hour recording and the RDIs by the AS (Spearman's correlation coefficient r = 0.62, p

  6. Spatial-Resolution Improvement in Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometry System Based on Tunable Linear Fiber Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Guoyu; Li Yan [Institute of Information Engineering, Handan College, Handan, 056005 (China); Zhao Peng, E-mail: guoyu_li@yahoo.cn [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2011-02-01

    In optical frequency domain reflectometry (OFDR) system, the spatial resolution is obtained by using the total frequency-sweep span of the tunable laser. However, in practice, the spatial resolution is severely limited by nonlinearity in the lightwave-frequency sweep of the tunable laser. A closed-loop PZT modulated DBR linear fiber laser is proposed to improve the spatial resolution of the OFDR system. Experimental results show that the spatial resolution of OFDR system has improved greatly. When the frequency sweep excursion is 66GHz and the fiber under test (FUT) is 7 m, the OFDR system has a spatial resolution of 1.5 m with open-loop PZT modulated laser. But the spatial resolution increases to 35 cm with closed-loop PZT modulated laser.

  7. Long-range vibration sensor based on correlation analysis of optical frequency-domain reflectometry signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Zhenyang; Yao, X Steve; Liu, Tiegen; Du, Yang; Liu, Kun; Han, Qun; Meng, Zhuo; Chen, Hongxin

    2012-12-17

    We present a novel method to achieve a space-resolved long- range vibration detection system based on the correlation analysis of the optical frequency-domain reflectometry (OFDR) signals. By performing two separate measurements of the vibrated and non-vibrated states on a test fiber, the vibration frequency and position of a vibration event can be obtained by analyzing the cross-correlation between beat signals of the vibrated and non-vibrated states in a spatial domain, where the beat signals are generated from interferences between local Rayleigh backscattering signals of the test fiber and local light oscillator. Using the proposed technique, we constructed a standard single-mode fiber based vibration sensor that can have a dynamic range of 12 km and a measurable vibration frequency up to 2 kHz with a spatial resolution of 5 m. Moreover, preliminarily investigation results of two vibration events located at different positions along the test fiber are also reported.

  8. Real-time locating and speed measurement of fibre fuse using optical frequency-domain reflectometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shoulin; Ma, Lin; Fan, Xinyu; Wang, Bin; He, Zuyuan

    2016-05-05

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate real-time locating and speed measurement of fibre fuse by analysing the Doppler shift of reflected light using optical frequency-domain reflectometry (OFDR). Our method can detect the start of a fibre fuse within 200 ms which is equivalent to a propagation distance of about 10 cm in standard single-mode fibre. We successfully measured instantaneous speed of propagating fibre fuses and observed their subtle fluctuation owing to the laser power instability. The resolution achieved for speed measurement in our demonstration is 1 × 10(-3) m/s. We studied the fibre fuse propagation speed dependence on the launched power in different fibres. Our method is promising for both real time fibre fuse monitoring and future studies on its propagation and termination.

  9. Kinetics of Particle Adsorption in Stagnation Point Flow Studied by Optical Reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhmer; van der Zeeuw EA; Koper

    1998-01-15

    The kinetics of adsorption of nano-sized silica particles on a polymer pretreated surface were followed in situ by using optical reflectometry in a stagnation point flow setup. Conversion of the reflectometric signal to the surface coverage could be performed using a homogeneous slab model which was verified by determining the particle density on SEM pictures taken in the stagnation point and by comparison with a model which includes the particulate nature of the layer explicitly. The effects of salt concentration on the plateau adsorbed amounts for all particle sizes can be described with an effective hard sphere concept. Although initial slopes and plateau values are in reasonable agreement with a random sequential adsorption model, this model does not accurately describe the evolution of the surface coverage as a function of time in a stagnation point flow system. Copyright 1998 Academic Press. Copyright 1998Academic Press

  10. Monitoring Protein Fouling on Polymeric Membranes Using Ultrasonic Frequency-Domain Reflectometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Fong

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Novel signal-processing protocols were used to extend the in situ sensitivity of ultrasonic frequency-domain reflectometry (UFDR for real-time monitoring of microfiltration (MF membrane fouling during protein purification. Different commercial membrane materials, with a nominal pore size of 0.2 µm, were challenged using bovine serum albumin (BSA and amylase as model proteins. Fouling induced by these proteins was observed in flat-sheet membrane filtration cells operating in a laminar cross-flow regime. The detection of membrane-associated proteins using UFDR was determined by applying rigorous statistical methodology to reflection spectra of ultrasonic signals obtained during membrane fouling. Data suggest that the total power reflected from membrane surfaces changes in response to protein fouling at concentrations as low as 14 μg/cm2, and results indicate that ultrasonic spectra can be leveraged to detect and monitor protein fouling on commercial MF membranes.

  11. Performance Analysis of the ITER Plasma Position Reflectometry (PPR) Ex-vessel Transmission Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Fernández, J.; Simonetto, A.; Cappa, Á.; Rincón, M. E.; Cabrera, S.; Ramos, F. J.

    2017-11-01

    As the design of the ITER Plasma Position Reflectometry (PPR) diagnostic progresses, some segments of the transmission line have become fully specified and estimations of their performance can already be obtained. This work presents the calculations carried out for the longest section of the PPR, which is in final state of design and will be the main contributor to the total system performance. Considering the 88.9 mm circular corrugated waveguide (CCWG) that was previously chosen, signal degradation calculations have been performed. Different degradation sources have been studied: ohmic attenuation losses for CCWG; mode conversion losses for gaps, mitre bends, waveguide sag and different types of misalignments; reflection and absorption losses due to microwave windows and coupling losses to free space Gaussian beam. Contributions from all these sources have been integrated to give a global estimation of performance in the transmission lines segments under study.

  12. Effect of mechanical polishing on the surface structure of glasses studied by grazing angle neutron reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maaza, M.; Farnoux, B.; Samuel, F.; Sella, C.; Trocellier, P.

    1993-07-01

    Grazing angle neutron reflectometry, optical and mechanical roughness profilometry techniques have been used to study the effects of the polishing operations on the surface of Borkron Schott glass (special borosilicate glass for neutron optics applications) as the polishing tool pressure P and the mean grain size of the polishing powder Φ. The neutron reflectivity investigations have shown that there is formation of a layer at the surface glass substrate. This layer is less dense than the bulk substrate and its thickness is around 60 Å. The optical and mechanical profilometry measurements have shown that both roughness and waviness decrease with P and Φ. All the experimental results show a good correlation between the neutron refractive index, the thickness and the roughness of the surface layer and the waviness of the glass surface with the two mechanical polishing parameters. The previous techniques have been completed by secondary ion mass spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy measurements.

  13. Low-Coherence Reflectometry for Refractive Index Measurements of Cells in Micro-Capillaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpignano, Francesca; Rigamonti, Giulia; Mazzini, Giuliano; Merlo, Sabina

    2016-01-01

    The refractive index of cells provides insights into their composition, organization and function. Moreover, a good knowledge of the cell refractive index would allow an improvement of optical cytometric and diagnostic systems. Although interferometric techniques undoubtedly represent a good solution for quantifying optical path variation, obtaining the refractive index of a population of cells non-invasively remains challenging because of the variability in the geometrical thickness of the sample. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of infrared low-coherence reflectometry for non-invasively quantifying the average refractive index of cell populations gently confined in rectangular glass micro-capillaries. A suspension of human red blood cells in plasma is tested as a reference. As a use example, we apply this technique to estimate the average refractive index of cell populations belonging to epithelial and hematological families. PMID:27727172

  14. 76 FR 20971 - Turlock Irrigation District and Modesto Irrigation District; Notice of Intent To File License...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-14

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Turlock Irrigation District and Modesto Irrigation District; Notice of..., 2011. d. Submitted By: Turlock Irrigation District and Modesto Irrigation District. e. Name of Project... Regulatory Affairs, Turlock Irrigation District, P.O. Box 949, Turlock, California 95381, 209-883-8241 and...

  15. 77 FR 4291 - Turlock Irrigation District; Modesto Irrigation District; Notice of Proposed Restricted Service...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-27

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Turlock Irrigation District; Modesto Irrigation District; Notice of Proposed... any Order issuing a license. Turlock Irrigation District and Modesto Irrigation District, as the..., Turlock Irrigation District, P.O. Box 949, Turlock, CA 95381. Greg Dias or Representative, Modesto...

  16. 77 FR 5507 - Turlock Irrigation District, Modesto Irrigation District; Notice of Proposed Restricted Service...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-03

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Turlock Irrigation District, Modesto Irrigation District; Notice of Proposed... any Order issuing a license. Turlock Irrigation District and Modesto Irrigation District, as the..., Sacramento, CA 95816. Robert Nees, or Representative, Turlock Irrigation District, P.O. Box 949, Turlock, CA...

  17. 75 FR 43958 - Turlock Irrigation District and Modesto Irrigation District; Notice of Application for Amendment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-27

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Turlock Irrigation District and Modesto Irrigation District; Notice of...: May 24, 2010. d. Applicant: Turlock Irrigation District and Modesto Irrigation District. e. Name of.... g. Filed Pursuant to: Federal Power Act, 16 USC 791a-825r. h. Applicant Contact: Turlock Irrigation...

  18. Progress Report on the GROWTH (GNSS Reflectometry for Ocean Waves, Tides, and Height) Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitazawa, Y.; Ichikawa, K.; Akiyama, H.; Ebinuma, T.; Isoguchi, O.; Kimura, N.; Konda, M.; Kouguchi, N.; Tamura, H.; Tomita, H.; Yoshikawa, Y.; Waseda, T.

    2016-12-01

    Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), such as GPS is a system of satellites that provide autonomous geo-spatial positioning with global coverage. It allows small electronic receivers to determine their location to high precision using radio signals transmitted from satellites, GNSS reflectometry (GNSS-R) involves making measurements from the reflections from the Earth of navigation signals from GNSS satellites. Reflected signals from sea surface are considered that those are useful to observe sea state and sea surface height. We have started a research program for GNSS-R applications on oceanographic observations under the contract with MEXT (Ministry of Education Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, JAPAN) and launched a Japanese research consortium, GROWTH (GNSS Reflectometry for Ocean Waves, Tides, and Height). It is aiming to evaluate the capabilities of GNSS-R observations for oceanographic phenomena with different time scales, such as ocean waves (1/10 to tens of seconds), tides (one or half days), and sea surface dynamic height (a few days to years). In situ observations of ocean wave spectrum, wind speed vertical profile, and sea surface height will be quantitatively compared with equivalent estimates from simultaneous GNSS-R measurements. The GROWTH project will utilize different types of observation platforms; marine observation towers (about 20 m height), multi-copters (about 100 to 150 m height), and much higher-altitude CYGNSS data. Cross-platform data, together with in situ oceanographic observations, will be compared after adequate temporal averaging that accounts differences of the footprint sizes and temporal and spatial scales of oceanographic phenomena. This paper will provide overview of the GROWTH project, preliminary test results, obtained by the multi-sensor platform at observation towers, suggest actual footprint sizes and identification of swell. Preparation status of a ground station which will be supplied to receive CYGNSS data

  19. Irrigation Controllers Specification and Certification

    Science.gov (United States)

    WaterSense labeled irrigation controllers, which act like a thermostat for your sprinkler system telling it when to turn on and off, use local weather and landscape conditions to tailor watering schedules to actual conditions on the site.

  20. Irrigation Sprinklers Notice of Intent

    Science.gov (United States)

    High-efficiency irrigation sprinklers aim to deliver water more evenly to the landscape than traditional sprinklers and/or regulate outlet pressure to ensure a constant flow rate over a range of supply pressures.

  1. Swing Set Irrigation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambe Verma

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT India is a vast country based on agriculture and irrigation is the most important factor for agriculture. In India there are many sources provide for irrigation. Every day new technologies are emerged in the world which brings a revolutionary change in the nature of this world. day by day the energy resources used by the large population of this world are coming on the last stage This project give the idea that how the other different form of energy can be used and implemented efficiently to overcome from this problem The aim of this project is to achieve the objective of energy lasting problem which is likely to be faced over in coming decades. Energy lasting is a big problem in India. This is faced by every people who live in the country. Swing energy is the form of energy. In this paper we have represented the methodology of swing energy using for rural area of application. This paper is all about Swing Set Water Pump in which the water pump will execute with the help of a swing set of canopy type. As we need a motor to operate the water pump but in this project we use the swing in the place of motor and we use oscillatory motion of swing in the place of rotating motion of a motor. Everybody has needed the energy at an increasing rate ever since he came on the Earth. Because of this lot of energy has been exhausted and wasted. All the member are dedicated the amount of their important time to participate in multiple meetings read and research for making the content to the report. We would especially like to thanks for the efficient condition of the entire Advisory member and their experiences. This study was initial and performed within the BUDDHA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY GIDA Gorakhpur the final report represents the labour and interest of the entire member working for this project. Finally we would like to thanks to all the member of our college workshop who helped us in manufacturing of this project model.

  2. Integrated optical coherence tomography and reflectometry system for ocular anterior segment imaging and tear film thickness evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hui; Baig, Sarfaraz; Jiang, Guomin; Wang, Michael R.

    2014-06-01

    We report an integrated optical coherence tomography (OCT) and reflectometry system for ophthalmology imaging. The dual-functional device provides a complementary high-resolution tear film evaluation by reflectometry and anterior segment imaging by OCT, offering a more comprehensive anterior segment examination. The imaging measurement capabilities have been demonstrated on a human eye as well as on a model eye. The minimum measured tear film thickness is 0.3 μm with measurement resolution of less than ±0.58% of film thickness yet the OCT anterior segment offers a depth resolution of 7 μm with a 45-nm bandwidth superluminescent light source at 840-nm center wavelength. The integrated system has demonstrated the capability for three-dimensional imaging in the anterior segment of the eye.

  3. Er:Yb phosphate glass laser with nonlinear absorber for phase-sensitive optical time domain reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhirnov, A. A.; Pnev, A. B.; Svelto, C.; Norgia, M.; Pesatori, A.; Galzerano, G.; Laporta, P.; Shelestov, D. A.; Karasik, V. E.

    2017-11-01

    A novel laser for phase-sensitive optical time-domain reflectometry (Φ-OTDR) is presented. The advantages of a compact solid-state laser are listed, current problems are shown. Experiments with a microchip single-optical-element laser, from setup construction to usage in Φ-OTDR system, are presented. New laser scheme with two-photon intracavity absorber is suggested and its advantages are described.

  4. Irrigation in dose assessments models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergstroem, Ulla; Barkefors, Catarina [Studsvik RadWaste AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2004-05-01

    SKB has carried out several safety analyses for repositories for radioactive waste, one of which was SR 97, a multi-site study concerned with a future deep bedrock repository for high-level waste. In case of future releases due to unforeseen failure of the protective multiple barrier system, radionuclides may be transported with groundwater and may reach the biosphere. Assessments of doses have to be carried out with a long-term perspective. Specific models are therefore employed to estimate consequences to man. It has been determined that the main pathway for nuclides from groundwater or surface water to soil is via irrigation. Irrigation may cause contamination of crops directly by e.g. interception or rain-splash, and indirectly via root-uptake from contaminated soil. The exposed people are in many safety assessments assumed to be self-sufficient, i.e. their food is produced locally where the concentration of radionuclides may be the highest. Irrigation therefore plays an important role when estimating consequences. The present study is therefore concerned with a more extensive analysis of the role of irrigation for possible future doses to people living in the area surrounding a repository. Current irrigation practices in Sweden are summarised, showing that vegetables and potatoes are the most common crops for irrigation. In general, however, irrigation is not so common in Sweden. The irrigation model used in the latest assessments is described. A sensitivity analysis is performed showing that, as expected, interception of irrigation water and retention on vegetation surfaces are important parameters. The parameters used to describe this are discussed. A summary is also given how irrigation is proposed to be handled in the international BIOMASS (BIOsphere Modelling and ASSessment) project and in models like TAME and BIOTRAC. Similarities and differences are pointed out. Some numerical results are presented showing that surface contamination in general gives the

  5. Radiological Evaluation of Penetration of the Irrigant according to Three Endodontic Irrigation Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Said Dhaimy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This experimental study is to compare radiographs based on the penetration depth of the irrigant following three final irrigation techniques. Material and Method. A sample of sixty teeth with single roots were prepared with stainless steel K files followed by mechanized Ni-Ti files iRace® under irrigation with 2.5% sodium hypochlorite. Radiopaque solution was utilized to measure the penetration depth of the irrigant. Three irrigation techniques were performed during this study: (i passive irrigation, (ii manually activated irrigation, and (iii passive irrigation with an endodontic needle CANAL CLEAN®. Radiographs were performed to measure the length of irrigant penetration in each technique. Results. In comparison, passive irrigation with a conventional syringe showed infiltration of the irrigant by an average of 0.682±0.105, whereas the manually activated irrigation technique indicated an average of 0.876±0.066 infiltration. Irrigation with an endodontic syringe showed an average infiltration of 0.910±0.043. The results revealed highly significant difference between the three irrigation techniques (α=5%. Conclusion. Adding manual activation to the irrigant improved the result by 20%. This study indicates that passive irrigation with an endodontic needle has proved to be the most effective irrigation technique of the canal system.

  6. Irrigation and groundwater in Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertsen, Maurits; Iftikhar Kazmi, Syed

    2010-05-01

    Introduction of large gravity irrigation system in the Indus Basin in late nineteenth century without a drainage system resulted in water table rise consequently giving rise to water logging and salinity problems over large areas. In order to cope with the salinity and water logging problem government initiated salinity control and reclamation project (SCARP) in 1960. Initially 10,000 tube wells were installed in different areas, which not only resulted in the lowering of water table, but also supplemented irrigation. Resulting benefits from the full irrigation motivated framers to install private tube wells. Present estimate of private tube wells in Punjab alone is around 0.6 million and 48 billion cubic meter of groundwater is used for irrigation, contributing is 1.3 billion to the economy. The Punjab meets 40% of its irrigation needs from groundwater abstraction. Today, farmers apply both surface water flows and groundwater from tubewells, creating a pattern of private and public water control. As the importance of groundwater in sustaining human life and ecology is evident so are the threats to its sustainability due to overexploitation, but sufficient information for its sustainable management especially in developing countries is still required. Sustainable use of groundwater needs proper quantification of the resource and information on processes involved in its recharge and discharge. Groundwater recharge is broadly defined as water that reaches the aquifer from any direction (Lerner 1997). Sustainability and proper management of groundwater resource requires reliable quantification of the resource. In order to protect the resource from contamination and over exploitation, identification of recharge sources and their contribution to resource is a basic requirement. Physiochemical properties of some pesticides and their behavior in soil and water can make them potential tracers of subsurface moisture movement. Pesticides are intensively used in the area to

  7. AGROCLIMATIC DETERMINANTS OF IRRIGATION NEEDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leszek Łabędzki

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper is a review of the so far used in Poland methods and criteria for assessing the needs of irrigation for planning purposes, the assessment because of the agroclimatic conditions and taking into account the soil water retention. Irrigation needs of the most are determined taking into account crop water deficits. This is the factor that is characterized by a shortage of precipitation in relation to the water requirements of crops. Some methods use only the meteorological parameters that determine the state of the atmosphere-soil-plant system, and some also take into account soil water retention and its availability for plants.

  8. Developing Automatic Controllers for sprinkler irrigation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Playán, E.; Salvador, R.; Cavero, J.; López, C.; Lecina, S.; Zapata, N.

    2012-04-01

    The application of new technologies to the control and automation of irrigation processes is quickly gaining attention. The automation of irrigation execution (through irrigation controllers) is now widespread. However, the automatic generation and execution of irrigation schedules is receiving growing attention due to the possibilities offered by the telemetry/remote control systems currently being installed in collective pressurized networks. These developments can greatly benefit from the combination of irrigation system and crop models, and from the interaction with agrometeorological databases, hydraulic models of pressurized collective distribution networks, weather forecasts and management databases for water users associations. Prospects for the development of such systems in collective sprinkler irrigation systems are analyzed in this presentation. Additionally, experimental results are presented on the application of these concepts to a hydrant irrigating a solid-set irrigated maize field.

  9. Sustainable management after irrigation system transfer : experiences in Colombia - the RUT irrigation district

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Urrutia Cobo, N.

    2006-01-01

    Colombiais a tropical country located in South America. It has a total area of 114 million ha. In Colombia two irrigation sectors are distinguished: the small-scale irrigation and the large-scale irrigation sector. The small-scale irrigation sector is developed on lands

  10. 75 FR 35778 - Modesto Irrigation District and Turlock Irrigation District; Notice of Preliminary Permit...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-23

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Modesto Irrigation District and Turlock Irrigation District; Notice of... Competing Applications June 16, 2010. On February 1, 2010, Modesto Irrigation District and Turlock Irrigation District filed an application for a preliminary permit, pursuant to section 4(f) of the Federal...

  11. SURDEV: surface irrigation software; design, operation, and evaluation of basin, border, and furrow irrigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jurriëns, M.; Zerihun, D.; Boonstra, J.; Feyen, J.

    2001-01-01

    SURDEV is a computer package for the design, operation, and evaluation of surface irrigation. SURDEV combines three sub-programs: BASDEV (for basin irrigation), FURDEV (for furrow irrigation), and BORDEV for (border irrigation). This combination enables the user to simulate many of the problems

  12. Modernisation Strategy for National Irrigation Systems in the Philippines: Balanac and Sta. Maria River Irrigation Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delos Reyes, M.L.F.

    2017-01-01

    This book examines the nature and impact of irrigation system rehabilitation on increasing the actual area irrigated by the publicly funded canal irrigation systems of the Philippines. It proposes a system diagnosis approach for the development of a more appropriate and climate-smart irrigation

  13. 77 FR 16828 - Turlock Irrigation District, & Modesto Irrigation District; Notice of Dispute Resolution Process...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Turlock Irrigation District, & Modesto Irrigation District; Notice of... relicensing proceeding for the Don Pedro Hydroelectric Project No. 2299-075.\\1\\ Turlock Irrigation District and the Modesto Irrigation District (collectively, the Districts), are co-licensees for the Don Pedro...

  14. Testing of Piezo-Actuated Glass Micro-Membranes by Optical Low-Coherence Reflectometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlo, Sabina; Poma, Paolo; Crisà, Eleonora; Faralli, Dino; Soldo, Marco

    2017-02-25

    In this work, we have applied optical low-coherence reflectometry (OLCR), implemented with infra-red light propagating in fiberoptic paths, to perform static and dynamic analyses on piezo-actuated glass micro-membranes. The actuator was fabricated by means of thin-film piezoelectric MEMS technology and was employed for modifying the micro-membrane curvature, in view of its application in micro-optic devices, such as variable focus micro-lenses. We are here showing that OLCR incorporating a near-infrared superluminescent light emitting diode as the read-out source is suitable for measuring various parameters such as the micro-membrane optical path-length, the membrane displacement as a function of the applied voltage (yielding the piezo-actuator hysteresis) as well as the resonance curve of the fundamental vibration mode. The use of an optical source with short coherence-time allows performing interferometric measurements without spurious resonance effects due to multiple parallel interfaces of highly planar slabs, furthermore selecting the plane/layer to be monitored. We demonstrate that the same compact and flexible setup can be successfully employed to perform spot optical measurements for static and dynamic characterization of piezo-MEMS in real time.

  15. Multi-GNSS and Multi-frequency SNR Multipath Reflectometry of Snow Depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabibi, S.; Geremia-Nievinski, F.; van Dam, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    Global Navigation Satellite System multipath reflectometry (GNSS-MR) uses ground-based signals of opportunity to retrieve snow depth at an intermediate space scale. This technique is based on the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the simultaneously received direct (line-of-sight) and coherently ground reflected signals. In this contribution, forward and inverse modeling of SNR observations is presented for GLONASS-MR, extending GPS-MR to multiple GNSS. The coupling of the surface and antenna responses from short-delay near-grazing incidence multipath from CDMA and FDMA satellite navigation systems are simulated using an electromagnetic forward model. The inverse model is used to estimate parameter corrections responsible for observation residuals to estimate snow depth. The correlation between snow depth retrievals using GPS L2C signal and GLONASS R2-C/A signal is excellent, with r2 value of 0.990. In a related approach, dual-frequency SNR-based GNSS-MR, which is based on linear combination of SNR observables, is used to estimate snow depth. This ionospheric delay free method synthesizes longer carrier wavelengths ("widelaning" or delta-k) to isolate the direct power contribution in environmental retrievals.

  16. Blood oxygenation measurements by multichannel reflectometry on the venous and arterial structures of the retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vucea, Valentina; Bernard, Pierre-Jean; Sauvageau, Patrick; Diaconu, Vasile

    2011-09-10

    The aim of the present study was to propose a model and a method to derive the oxyhemoglobin blood content in the retinal veins and arteries by full spectrum reflectometry measurements in the spectral zone from 430 to 680 nm. We proposed a mathematical equation expressed as a linear combination of two terms S(OHb)(λ) and S(Hb)(λ) representing the normalized spectral absorption functions of the hemoglobin and the oxyhemoglobin, one term λ(-n) representing the ocular media absorption with scattering, and a family of multi-Gaussian functions, which usefully compensate for the noncompatibility of the model and the experimental data in the red spectral zone. The present paper suggests that the spectral reflection function in the area from 520 to 580 nm is optimal in calculating the oxyhemoglobin concentration of the blood contained in the endothelial structures of retinal vessels. The model calculation needs a function (1/λ)(-n) that corrects for the ocular media absorption and light scattering on the vessels' structures. For the spectral area of lights with wavelength larger than 580 nm, the reflected light represents mainly the light scattering on the red blood cells.

  17. Time-resolved neutron reflectometry and photovoltaic device studies on sequentially deposited PCDTBT-fullerene layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clulow, Andrew J; Tao, Chen; Lee, Kwan H; Velusamy, Marappan; McEwan, Jake A; Shaw, Paul E; Yamada, Norifumi L; James, Michael; Burn, Paul L; Gentle, Ian R; Meredith, Paul

    2014-09-30

    We have used steady-state and time-resolved neutron reflectometry to study the diffusion of fullerene derivatives into the narrow optical gap polymer poly[N-9″-hepta-decanyl-2,7-carbazole-alt-5,5-(4',7'-di-2-thienyl-2',1',3'-benzothiadiazole)] (PCDTBT) to explore the sequential processing of the donor and acceptor for the preparation of efficient organic solar cells. It was found that when [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric-acid-methyl-ester (60-PCBM) was deposited onto a thin film of PCDTBT from dichloromethane (DCM), a three-layer structure was formed that was stable below the glass-transition temperature of the polymer. When good solvents for the polymer were used in conjunction with DCM, both 60-PCBM and [6,6]-phenyl-C71-butyric-acid-methyl-ester (70-PCBM) were seen to form films that had a thick fullerene layer containing little polymer and a PCDTBT-rich layer near the interface with the substrate. Devices composed of films prepared by sequential deposition of the polymer and fullerene had efficiencies of up to 5.3%, with those based on 60-PCBM close to optimized bulk heterojunction (BHJ) cells processed in the conventional manner. Sequential deposition of pure components to form the active layer is attractive for large-area device fabrication, and the results demonstrate that this processing method can give efficient solar cells.

  18. High-pressure cell for neutron reflectometry of supercritical and subcritical fluids at solid interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, Justin R; Rother, Gernot; Browning, James F; Ankner, John F; Banuelos, Jose L; Anovitz, Lawrence M; Wesolowski, David J; Cole, David R

    2012-04-01

    A new high-pressure cell design for use in neutron reflectometry (NR) for pressures up to 50 MPa and a temperature range of 300-473 K is described. The cell design guides the neutron beam through the working crystal without passing through additional windows or the bulk fluid, which provides for a high neutron transmission, low scattering background, and low beam distortion. The o-ring seal is suitable for a wide range of subcritical and supercritical fluids and ensures high chemical and pressure stability. Wafers with a diameter of 5.08 cm (2 in.) and 5 mm or 10 mm thickness can be used with the cells, depending on the required pressure and momentum transfer range. The fluid volume in the sample cell is very small at about 0.1 ml, which minimizes scattering background and stored energy. The cell design and pressure setup for measurements with supercritical fluids are described. NR data are shown for silicon/silicon oxide and quartz wafers measured against air and subsequently within the high-pressure cell to demonstrate the neutron characteristics of the high-pressure cell. Neutron reflectivity data for supercritical CO(2) in contact with quartz and Si/SiO(2) wafers are also shown. © 2012 American Institute of Physics

  19. Testing of Piezo-Actuated Glass Micro-Membranes by Optical Low-Coherence Reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlo, Sabina; Poma, Paolo; Crisà, Eleonora; Faralli, Dino; Soldo, Marco

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we have applied optical low-coherence reflectometry (OLCR), implemented with infra-red light propagating in fiberoptic paths, to perform static and dynamic analyses on piezo-actuated glass micro-membranes. The actuator was fabricated by means of thin-film piezoelectric MEMS technology and was employed for modifying the micro-membrane curvature, in view of its application in micro-optic devices, such as variable focus micro-lenses. We are here showing that OLCR incorporating a near-infrared superluminescent light emitting diode as the read-out source is suitable for measuring various parameters such as the micro-membrane optical path-length, the membrane displacement as a function of the applied voltage (yielding the piezo-actuator hysteresis) as well as the resonance curve of the fundamental vibration mode. The use of an optical source with short coherence-time allows performing interferometric measurements without spurious resonance effects due to multiple parallel interfaces of highly planar slabs, furthermore selecting the plane/layer to be monitored. We demonstrate that the same compact and flexible setup can be successfully employed to perform spot optical measurements for static and dynamic characterization of piezo-MEMS in real time. PMID:28245603

  20. Testing of Piezo-Actuated Glass Micro-Membranes by Optical Low-Coherence Reflectometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Merlo

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we have applied optical low-coherence reflectometry (OLCR, implemented with infra-red light propagating in fiberoptic paths, to perform static and dynamic analyses on piezo-actuated glass micro-membranes. The actuator was fabricated by means of thin-film piezoelectric MEMS technology and was employed for modifying the micro-membrane curvature, in view of its application in micro-optic devices, such as variable focus micro-lenses. We are here showing that OLCR incorporating a near-infrared superluminescent light emitting diode as the read-out source is suitable for measuring various parameters such as the micro-membrane optical path-length, the membrane displacement as a function of the applied voltage (yielding the piezo-actuator hysteresis as well as the resonance curve of the fundamental vibration mode. The use of an optical source with short coherence-time allows performing interferometric measurements without spurious resonance effects due to multiple parallel interfaces of highly planar slabs, furthermore selecting the plane/layer to be monitored. We demonstrate that the same compact and flexible setup can be successfully employed to perform spot optical measurements for static and dynamic characterization of piezo-MEMS in real time.

  1. Wideband dectection of spontaneous Brillouin scattering spectrum in Brillouin optical time-domain reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yuangang; Dou, Rongrong; Zhang, Xuping

    2008-12-01

    Brillouin Optical Time-Domain Reflectometry (BOTDR) is attracting significant attention due to its immense potential applications in temperature or strain monitoring. Conventional BOTDR system based on Spontaneous Brillouin Scattering Spectrum(SBSS) narrow-band detection is not only time-consuming but also controlling complicated. To overcome the drawbacks of the conventional detection method, a new SBSS wideband detection method is proposed in this paper. In the new detection method, the whole SBSS is captured by use of a wideband receiver in a single measurement, and Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT) signal processing algorithm is used to obtain the SBSS. The configuration of a heterodyne detection BOTDR system based on SBSS wideband detection is presented, and the data processing method, the spatial resolution of the system and the measurement time is discussed. The BOTDR system based on SBSS wideband detection has been demonstrated, and a temperature resolution of 3°C and a spatial resolution of 2 m have been achieved. The measurement time is only about one-tenth that of conventional narrow-band detection method.

  2. Microwave dielectric study of an oligomeric electrolyte gelator by time domain reflectometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Shyamal Kumar; Yagihara, Shin; Yoshida, Masaru; Shibayama, Mitsuhiro

    2009-07-30

    The dynamics of water molecules in aqueous solutions of an oligomeric electrolyte gelator, poly[pyridinium-1,4-diyliminocarbonyl-1,4-phenylene-methylene chloride] (1-Cl) was characterized by microwave dielectric measurements using the time domain reflectometry method. The dielectric dispersion and absorption curves related to the orientational motion of water molecules were described by the Cole-Cole equation. Discontinuities were observed in the concentration dependence of the dielectric relaxation strength, Deltaepsilonh, as well as in the Cole-Cole parameter, betah. These discontinuities were observed between the samples with concentrations of 6 and 7 g/L 1-Cl/water, which correspond to a change in the transparency. Such a discontinuity corresponds to the observation of the critical concentration of gelation. The interaction between water and 1-Cl molecules was discussed from the tauh-betah diagram. As 1-Cl carries an amide group, it could be expected that 1-Cl may interact hydrophilically with water, but the present result suggests that 1-Cl interact hydrophobically with water.

  3. High-pressure cell for neutron reflectometry of supercritical and subcritical fluids at solid interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, Justin R.; Rother, Gernot; Browning, James F.; Ankner, John F.; Banuelos, Jose L.; Anovitz, Lawrence M.; Wesolowski, David J.; Cole, David R.

    2012-04-01

    A new high-pressure cell design for use in neutron reflectometry (NR) for pressures up to 50 MPa and a temperature range of 300-473 K is described. The cell design guides the neutron beam through the working crystal without passing through additional windows or the bulk fluid, which provides for a high neutron transmission, low scattering background, and low beam distortion. The o-ring seal is suitable for a wide range of subcritical and supercritical fluids and ensures high chemical and pressure stability. Wafers with a diameter of 5.08 cm (2 in.) and 5 mm or 10 mm thickness can be used with the cells, depending on the required pressure and momentum transfer range. The fluid volume in the sample cell is very small at about 0.1 ml, which minimizes scattering background and stored energy. The cell design and pressure setup for measurements with supercritical fluids are described. NR data are shown for silicon/silicon oxide and quartz wafers measured against air and subsequently within the high-pressure cell to demonstrate the neutron characteristics of the high-pressure cell. Neutron reflectivity data for supercritical CO2 in contact with quartz and Si/SiO2 wafers are also shown.

  4. Application of spatial time domain reflectometry measurements in heterogeneous, rocky substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, C.; Scheuermann, A.; Arnold, S.; Baumgartl, T.

    2016-10-01

    Measurement of soil moisture across depths using sensors is currently limited to point measurements or remote sensing technologies. Point measurements have limitations on spatial resolution, while the latter, although covering large areas may not represent real-time hydrologic processes, especially near the surface. The objective of the study was to determine the efficacy of elongated soil moisture probes—spatial time domain reflectometry (STDR)—and to describe transient soil moisture dynamics of unconsolidated mine waste rock materials. The probes were calibrated under controlled conditions in the glasshouse. Transient soil moisture content was measured using the gravimetric method and STDR. Volumetric soil moisture content derived from weighing was compared with values generated from a numerical model simulating the drying process. A calibration function was generated and applied to STDR field data sets. The use of elongated probes effectively assists in the real-time determination of the spatial distribution of soil moisture. It also allows hydrologic processes to be uncovered in the unsaturated zone, especially for water balance calculations that are commonly based on point measurements. The elongated soil moisture probes can potentially describe transient substrate processes and delineate heterogeneity in terms of the pore size distribution in a seasonally wet but otherwise arid environment.

  5. Tracking serum antibody response to viral antigens with arrayed imaging reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mace, Charles R.; Rose, Robert C.; Miller, Benjamin L.

    2009-02-01

    Arrayed Imaging Reflectometry, or "AIR", is a new label-free technique for detecting proteins that relies on bindinginduced changes in the response of an antireflective coating on the surface of a silicon ship. Because the technique provides high sensitivity, excellent dynamic range, and readily integrates with standard silicon wafer processing technology, it is an exceptionally attractive platform on which to build systems for detecting proteins in complex solutions. In our early research, we used AIR chips bearing secreted receptor proteins from enteropathogenic E. coli to develop sensors for this pathogen. Recently, we have been exploring an alternative strategy: Rather than detecting the pathogen directly, can one immobilize antigens from a pathogen, and employ AIR to detect antibody responses to those antigens? Such a strategy would provide enhanced sensitivity for pathogen detection (as the immune system essentially amplifies the "signal" caused by the presence of an organism to which it responds), and would also potentially prove useful in the process of vaccine development. We describe herein preliminary results in the application of such a strategy to the detection of antibodies to human papillomavirus (HPV).

  6. Distributed acoustic and vibration sensing via optical fractional Fourier transform reflectometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiloh, Lihi; Eyal, Avishay

    2015-02-23

    Distributed acoustic sensing has been traditionally implemented using optical reflectometry. Here we describe an alternative to the common interrogation approaches. According to the new method the frequency of the source is varied sinusoidally with time. For a sufficiently high scan frequency there is a position along the fiber,  z(0), for which the roundtrip time is half the scan period. Back-reflections from this point will generate a linear chirp at the receiver output. The Fractional Fourier Transform (FrFT) is used to analyze the receiver output and yields the reflection profile at z(0) and its vicinity. The method, which enables high spatial resolution at long distances with high scan rates, is demonstrated by detecting deliberate perturbations in the Rayleigh backscatter profile at the end of a 20km fiber with a scanning frequency of ~2.5kHz. The spatial resolution at this range and scan-rate is characterized by a measurement of the backscatter profile from a FBG's-array and is found to be ~2.8m.

  7. Adsorption kinetics of cationic polyelectrolytes studied with stagnation point adsorption reflectometry and quartz crystal microgravimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enarsson, Lars-Erik; Wågberg, Lars

    2008-07-15

    The effects of charge density, pH, and salt concentration on polyelectrolyte adsorption onto the oxidized surface of silicon wafers were studied using stagnation point adsorption reflectometry and quartz crystal microgravimetry. Five different polyelectrolytescationic polyacrylamides of four charge densities and one cationic dextranwere examined. The adsorption kinetics was characterized using each technique, and the adsorption kinetics observed was in line with the impinging jet theory and the theory for one-dimensional diffusion, respectively. The polyelectrolyte adsorption increased with pH as an effect of the increased silica surface charge. A maximum in the saturation adsorption for both types of polyelectrolytes was found at 10 mM NaCl concentration. A significant adsorption also occurred at 1 M NaCl, which indicated a significant nonionic contribution to the adsorption mechanism. The fraction of solvent in the adsorbed layer was determined to be 70-80% by combining the two analysis techniques. This indicated a loose structure of the adsorbed layer and an extended conformation at the surface, favoring loops and tails. However, considering the solution structure with a hydrodynamic diameter larger than 100 nm for the CPAM and a thickness of the adsorbed layer on the order of 10 nm, the results showed that the adsorption is accompanied by a drastic change in polymer conformation. Furthermore, this conformation change takes place on a time scale far shorter than seconds.

  8. Global Navigation Satellite Systems Reflectometry as a Remote Sensing Tool for Agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Egido

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS signals for remote sensing applications, generally referred to as GNSS-Reflectometry (GNSS-R, is gaining increasing interest among the scientific community as a remote sensing tool for land applications. This paper describes a long term experimental campaign in which an extensive dataset of GNSS-R polarimetric measurements was acquired over a crop field from a ground-based stationary platform. Ground truth ancillary data were also continuously recorded during the whole experimental campaign. The duration of the campaign allowed to cover a full crop growing season, and as a consequence of seasonal rains on the experimental area, data could be recorded over a wide variety of soil conditions. This enabled a study on the effects of different land bio-geophysical parameters on GNSS scattered signals. It is shown that significant power variations in the measured GNSS reflected signals can be detected for different soil moisture and vegetation development conditions. In this work we also propose a technique based on the combination of the reflected signal’s polarizations in order to improve the integrity of the observables with respect to nuisance parameters such as soil roughness.

  9. Relaxation dynamics and thermophysical properties of vegetable oils using time-domain reflectometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonkamble, Anil A; Sonsale, Rahul P; Kanshette, Mahesh S; Kabara, Komal B; Wananje, Kunal H; Kumbharkhane, Ashok C; Sarode, Arvind V

    2017-04-01

    Dielectric relaxation studies of vegetable oils are important for insights into their hydrogen bonding and intermolecular dynamics. The dielectric relaxation and thermo physical properties of triglycerides present in some vegetable oils have been measured over the frequency range of 10 MHz to 7 GHz in the temperature region 25 to 10 °C using a time-domain reflectometry approach. The frequency and temperature dependence of dielectric constants and dielectric loss factors were determined for coconut, peanut, soya bean, sunflower, palm, and olive oils. The dielectric permittivity spectra for each of the studied vegetable oils are explained using the Debye model with their complex dielectric permittivity analyzed using the Havriliak-Negami equation. The dielectric parameters static permittivity (ε 0), high-frequency limiting static permittivity (ε ∞), average relaxation time (τ 0), and thermodynamic parameters such as free energy (∆F τ), enthalpy (∆H τ), and entropy of activation (∆S τ) were also measured. Calculation and analysis of these thermodynamic parameters agrees with the determined dielectric parameters, giving insights into the temperature dependence of the molecular dynamics of these systems.

  10. Urethral pressure reflectometry in women with pelvic organ prolapse: a study of reproducibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khayyami, Yasmine; Lose, Gunnar; Klarskov, Niels

    2017-05-01

    The mechanism of continence in women with pelvic organ prolapse (POP) before and after surgery remains unknown. Urethral pressure reflectometry (UPR) separates women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI) from continent women by measuring urethral opening pressure at an abdominal pressure of 50 cmH2O (P O-Abd 50). UPR can help identify women with POP at risk of postoperative de novo SUI. The aim of this study was to investigate the reproducibility of UPR in women with POP. Women with anterior or posterior vaginal wall prolapse were recruited for this prospective, observational study from our outpatient clinic. The women were examined with UPR on two occasions. Measurements were done at rest, and during squeezing and straining. Statistical analyses were performed using SAS 9.4. A Bland-Altman analysis with limits of agreement and coefficients of variation was used to determine the level of agreement between measurements. Paired t tests were used to estimate the difference; a two-tailed P value of pressures at rest or during squeezing or in the values of P O-Abd 50. P O-Abd 50 showed limits of agreement of 15.3 cmH2O and a coefficient of variation of 9.9 %. UPR was found to be a highly reproducible method in women with POP. UPR may be used in future studies to help reveal urodynamic features predictive of postoperative de novo SUI in women with POP.

  11. Waveguide Mode Reflectometry for Obstacle Detection in the LHC Beam Pipe Including Signal Attenuation

    CERN Document Server

    Kroyer, Tom; Mahner, Edgar

    2003-01-01

    Unexpected obstacle formation in the LHC beam-pipe during assembly, cool down and operation may lead to major disturbances. Thus a fast, precise, sensitive and reliable means to detect and characterize such a fault is highly desirable, preferably without the need to break the vacuum. Waveguide mode time domain reflectometry using the synthetic pulse technique has been selected for this purpose. The system will use a modern vector network analyzer operating using essentially the fundamental TM mode on the LHC beam-screen. The objective is to measure over a full arc with access from either side both in reflection and transmission mode. If the proposed system is implemented a total of 32 couplers will be permanently installed, which may be used in normal operation for beam diagnostics and other applications. The attenuation of several short beam-screen sections has been measured both for TE and TM modes by means of a resonator method and these data are compared with theoretical results. Waveguide calibration on ...

  12. Brillouin optical time domain reflectometry for fast detection of dynamic strain incorporating double-edge technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shangguan, Mingjia; Wang, Chong; Xia, Haiyun; Shentu, Guoliang; Dou, Xiankang; Zhang, Qiang; Pan, Jian-wei

    2017-09-01

    For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, a direct detection Brillouin optical time-domain reflectometry (BOTDR) is demonstrated for fast distributed dynamic strain sensing incorporating double-edge technique, time-division multiplexing technique and upconversion technique. In order to guarantee the robust stability of the system, the double-edge technique is implemented by using a convert single-channel FPI and a fiber-coupled upconversion single-photon detector, incorporating a time-division multiplexing method. The upconversion single-photon detector is adopted to upconvert the backscattering photons from 1548.1 nm to 863 nm, which is subsequently detected by a Silicon avalanche photodiode (Si-APD). In the experiment, dynamic strain disturbance up to 1.9 mε over 1.5 km of a polarization maintaining fiber is detected at a sampling rate of 30 Hz. An accuracy of ± 30 με and spatial resolution of 0.6 m are realized.

  13. Measuring Transpiration to Regulate Winter Irrigation Rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuelson, Lisa [Auburn University

    2006-11-08

    Periodic transpiration (monthly sums) in a young loblolly pine plantation between ages 3 and 6 was measured using thermal dissipation probes. Fertilization and fertilization with irrigation were better than irrigation alone in increasing transpiration of young loblolly pines during winter months, apparently because of increased leaf area in fertilized trees. Irrigation alone did not significantly increase transpiration compared with the non-fertilized and non-irrigated control plots.

  14. 21 CFR 876.5895 - Ostomy irrigator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ostomy irrigator. 876.5895 Section 876.5895 Food... DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5895 Ostomy irrigator. (a) Identification. An ostomy irrigator is a device that consists of a container for fluid, tubing with a cone-shaped...

  15. small scale irrigation management practices

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lm = Labor-use man-days,. Pn =Purchased inputs in Naira,. Fx = Fertilizer used in kilogram,. 1w = Quantity of irrigation water used in ha-cm, and U = Stochastic error term. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION. Age of the farmers is an important factor that determines labor productivity in traditional agriculture. The average age of ...

  16. Sediment transport in irrigation canals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mendez V., N.J.

    1998-01-01

    The world population is rapidly increasing and is expected to double to about 10 billion by the year 2050. To support an increasing population in terms of food sufficiency, more and more water will be required. Irrigation is the most critical component of the modern package of inputs to

  17. Speed control variable rate irrigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speed control variable rate irrigation (VRI) is used to address within field variability by controlling a moving sprinkler’s travel speed to vary the application depth. Changes in speed are commonly practiced over areas that slope, pond or where soil texture is predominantly different. Dynamic presc...

  18. The Tomato FRUITFULL Homologs TDR4/FUL1 and MBP7/FUL2 Regulate Ethylene-Independent Aspects of Fruit Ripening[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemer, Marian; Karlova, Rumyana; Ballester, Ana Rosa; Tikunov, Yury M.; Bovy, Arnaud G.; Wolters-Arts, Mieke; Rossetto, Priscilla de Barros; Angenent, Gerco C.; de Maagd, Ruud A.

    2012-01-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) contains two close homologs of the Arabidopsis thaliana MADS domain transcription factor FRUITFULL (FUL), FUL1 (previously called TDR4) and FUL2 (previously MBP7). Both proteins interact with the ripening regulator RIPENING INHIBITOR (RIN) and are expressed during fruit ripening. To elucidate their function in tomato, we characterized single and double FUL1 and FUL2 knockdown lines. Whereas the single lines only showed very mild alterations in fruit pigmentation, the double silenced lines exhibited an orange-ripe fruit phenotype due to highly reduced lycopene levels, suggesting that FUL1 and FUL2 have a redundant function in fruit ripening. More detailed analyses of the phenotype, transcriptome, and metabolome of the fruits silenced for both FUL1 and FUL2 suggest that the genes are involved in cell wall modification, the production of cuticle components and volatiles, and glutamic acid (Glu) accumulation. Glu is responsible for the characteristic umami taste of the present-day cultivated tomato fruit. In contrast with previously identified ripening regulators, FUL1 and FUL2 do not regulate ethylene biosynthesis but influence ripening in an ethylene-independent manner. Our data combined with those of others suggest that FUL1/2 and TOMATO AGAMOUS-LIKE1 regulate different subsets of the known RIN targets, probably in a protein complex with the latter. PMID:23136376

  19. The tomato FRUITFULL homologs TDR4/FUL1 and MBP7/FUL2 regulate ethylene-independent aspects of fruit ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemer, Marian; Karlova, Rumyana; Ballester, Ana Rosa; Tikunov, Yury M; Bovy, Arnaud G; Wolters-Arts, Mieke; Rossetto, Priscilla de Barros; Angenent, Gerco C; de Maagd, Ruud A

    2012-11-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) contains two close homologs of the Arabidopsis thaliana MADS domain transcription factor FRUITFULL (FUL), FUL1 (previously called TDR4) and FUL2 (previously MBP7). Both proteins interact with the ripening regulator RIPENING INHIBITOR (RIN) and are expressed during fruit ripening. To elucidate their function in tomato, we characterized single and double FUL1 and FUL2 knockdown lines. Whereas the single lines only showed very mild alterations in fruit pigmentation, the double silenced lines exhibited an orange-ripe fruit phenotype due to highly reduced lycopene levels, suggesting that FUL1 and FUL2 have a redundant function in fruit ripening. More detailed analyses of the phenotype, transcriptome, and metabolome of the fruits silenced for both FUL1 and FUL2 suggest that the genes are involved in cell wall modification, the production of cuticle components and volatiles, and glutamic acid (Glu) accumulation. Glu is responsible for the characteristic umami taste of the present-day cultivated tomato fruit. In contrast with previously identified ripening regulators, FUL1 and FUL2 do not regulate ethylene biosynthesis but influence ripening in an ethylene-independent manner. Our data combined with those of others suggest that FUL1/2 and TOMATO AGAMOUS-LIKE1 regulate different subsets of the known RIN targets, probably in a protein complex with the latter.

  20. Carbon dioxide emission in relation with irrigation and organic amendments from a sweet corn field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fares, Ali; Bensley, Adam; Bayabil, Haimanote; Awal, Ripendra; Fares, Samira; Valenzuela, Hector; Abbas, Farhat

    2017-06-03

    Soil moisture and organic matter level affects soil respiration and microbial activities, which in turn impact greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of irrigation levels (75% [deficit], 100% [full], and 125% [excess] of reference crop evapotranspiration requirements), and organic amendments (OA) type (chicken manure [CM] and bone meal [BM]) and OA application rates (0,168, 336 and 672 kg total N ha(-1)) on (i) soil physical properties (bulk density, organic matter content and soil moisture content) and (ii) soil carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from a highly weathered tropical Hawai'ian soil. Carbon dioxide readings were consistently taken once or twice a week for the duration of the cropping season. A drip irrigation system was used to apply the appropriate amount of irrigation water to the treatment plots. Treatments were randomly selected and corresponding organic amendments were manually incorporated into the soil. Plots were cultivated with sweet corn (Zea mays 'SS-16'). Soil moisture content within and below the rootzone was monitored using a TDR 300 soil moisture sensor (Spectrum Technologies, Inc., Plainfield, IL, USA) connected with 12 cm long prongs. Soil bulk density and organic matter content were determined at the end of the cropping season. Analysis of variance results revealed that OA type, rate, and their interaction had significant effect on soil CO2 flux (P < 0.05). Among the OA rates, all CM mostly resulted in significantly higher soil CO2 fluxes compared to BM and control treatment (p < 0.05). The two highest rates of BM treatment were not significantly different from the control with regard to soil CO2 flux. In addition, organic amendments affected soil moisture dynamics during the crop growing season and organic matter content measured after the crop harvest. While additional studies are needed to further investigate the effect of irrigation levels on soil CO2 flux, it is recommended that in order to

  1. Saline nasal irrigation for upper respiratory conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabago, David; Zgierska, Aleksandra

    2009-11-15

    Saline nasal irrigation is an adjunctive therapy for upper respiratory conditions that bathes the nasal cavity with spray or liquid saline. Nasal irrigation with liquid saline is used to manage symptoms associated with chronic rhinosinusitis. Less conclusive evidence supports the use of spray and liquid saline nasal irrigation to manage symptoms of mild to moderate allergic rhinitis and acute upper respiratory tract infections. Consensus guidelines recommend saline nasal irrigation as a treatment for a variety of other conditions, including rhinitis of pregnancy and acute rhinosinusitis. Saline nasal irrigation appears safe, with no reported serious adverse events. Minor adverse effects can be avoided with technique modification and salinity adjustment.

  2. Irrigation effectiveness of continuous ultrasonic irrigation system: An ex vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamleh, Ahmed; Suda, Hideaki; Adorno, Carlos G

    2017-09-07

    This study evaluated the irrigation extrusion and smear layer (SL) removal of continuous ultrasonic irrigation (CUI). Forty root canals were shaped, embedded in warm sterile saline agar colored with 1% acid red, and distributed into four groups; three groups had the final irrigation sequence of sodium hypochlorite and EDTA solutions performed by using syringe irrigation (SI), EndoVac (EV), and CUI, respectively. Group 4 had the canals ultrasonically irrigated with saline (CUIS). Irrigant extrusion was verified by a color change of the agar. The SL was evaluated under scanning electron microscope. Irrigant extrusion was observed in two and four teeth in the CUI and SI, respectively, whilst none had irrigant extruded in the EV. In term of SL, the CUI was comparable to EV at 1 and 3 mm but different to SI at 1 mm. Although CUI might clean the root canal system effectively, it was unable to avoid irrigant extrusion.

  3. Advances in Measuring Soil Moisture using Global Navigation Satellite Systems Interferometric Reflectometry (GNSS-IR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, A. W.; Small, E. E.; Owen, S. E.; Hardman, S. H.; Wong, C.; Freeborn, D. J.; Larson, K. M.

    2016-12-01

    GNSS Interferometric Reflectometry (GNSS-IR) uses GNSS signals reflected off the land to infer changes in the near-antenna environment and monitor fluctuations in soil moisture, as well as other related hydrologic variables: snow depth/snow water equivalent (SWE), vegetation water content, and water level [Larson and Small, 2013; McCreight, et al., 2014; Larson et al., 2013]. GNSS instruments installed by geoscientists and surveyors to measure land motions can measure soil moisture fluctuations with accuracy (RMSE sites in the western U.S. (Figure 1) from a single network (the Plate Boundary Observatory) has been operated by the University of Colorado (CU) at http://xenon.colorado.edu/portal since October 2012. JPL and CU are funded by NASA ESTO to refactor the PBO H2O software within an Apache OODT framework for robust operational analysis of soil moisture data and auto-configuration when new stations are added. We will report progress on the new GNSS H2O analysis portal, and plans to expand to global networks and from GPS to other GNSS signals. ReferencesLarson, K. M., & Small, E. E. (2013) Eos, 94(52), 505-512. McCreight, J. L., Small, E. E., & Larson, K. M. (2014). Water Resour. Res., 50(8), 6892-6909. Larson, K. M., Ray, R. D., Nievinski, F. G., & Freymueller, J. T. (2013). IEEE Geosci Remote S, 10(5), 1200-1204. Small, E. E., Larson, K. M., Chew, C. C., Dong, J., & Ochsner, T. E. (2016). IEEE J Sel. Top. Appl. PP(39). Figure 1: (R) Western U.S. GPS-IR soil moisture sites. (L): Products derived from GNSS reflection data for (clockwise from upper left) vegetation water content, SWE, sea level, and volumetric soil moisture.

  4. Snow Depth Variations Estimated from GPS-Reflectometry: A Case Study in Alaska from L2P SNR Data

    OpenAIRE

    Shuanggen Jin; Xiaodong Qian; Hakan Kutoglu

    2016-01-01

    Snow is a water resource and plays a significant role in the water cycle. However, traditional ground techniques for snow monitoring have many limitations, e.g., high-cost and low resolution. Recently, the new Global Positioning System-Reflectometry (GPS-R) technique has been developed and applied for snow sensing. However, most previous studies mainly used GPS L1C/A and L2C Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) data to retrieve snow depth. In this paper, snow depth variations are retrieved from new we...

  5. High-resolution FMCW reflectometry using a single-mode vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser

    OpenAIRE

    Iiyama, Koichi; Matsui, Shin Ichiro; Kobayashi, Takao; Maruyama, Takeo

    2011-01-01

    High-resolution frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) reflectometry is realized by using a single-mode vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) as a frequency-swept light source for the first time. The optical frequency of the VCSEL is swept by the injection current modulation. The experimental spatial resolution of 250 μm was achieved, which is the best value when an injection current tuned laser diode is used as a frequency-swept light source. © 2011 IEEE.

  6. Electromagnetic signal penetration in a planetary soil simulant: Estimated attenuation rates using GPR and TDR in volcanic deposits on Mount Etna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauro, S. E.; Mattei, E.; Cosciotti, B.; Di Paolo, F.; Arcone, S. A.; Viccaro, M.; Pettinelli, E.

    2017-07-01

    Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) is a well-established geophysical terrestrial exploration method and has recently become one of the most promising for planetary subsurface exploration. Several future landing vehicles like EXOMARS, 2020 NASA ROVER, and Chang'e-4, to mention a few, will host GPR. A GPR survey has been conducted on volcanic deposits on Mount Etna (Italy), considered a good analogue for Martian and Lunar volcanic terrains, to test a novel methodology for subsoil dielectric properties estimation. The stratigraphy of the volcanic deposits was investigated using 500 MHz and 1 GHz antennas in two different configurations: transverse electric and transverse magnetic. Sloping discontinuities have been used to estimate the loss tangents of the upper layer of such deposits by applying the amplitude-decay and frequency shift methods and approximating the GPR transmitted signal by Gaussian and Ricker wavelets. The loss tangent values, estimated using these two methodologies, were compared and validated with those retrieved from time domain reflectometry measurements acquired along the radar profiles. The results show that the proposed analysis, together with typical GPR methods for the estimation of the real part of permittivity, can be successfully used to characterize the electrical properties of planetary subsurface and to define some constraints on its lithology of the subsurface.

  7. Features of design of the Doppler reflectometry diagnostics at the L-2M stellarator intended for operation under conditions of high ECRH power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharchevskii, A. A.; Bogachev, N. N.; Malakhov, D. V.; Nefedov, V. I.; Skvortsova, N. N.

    2017-10-01

    Features of design of the Doppler reflectometry diagnostics at the L-2M stellarator are discussed. This contact-free diagnostics is intended for experiments carried out under conditions of high-power microwave plasma heating at a frequency of electron cyclotron resonance. Resources of the proposed Doppler reflectometry scheme were studied with allowance for the installation of a new system of rejection microwave filters involving the Fabry–Perot resonance filter and pin-shaped waveguide filters. The simulation results of the resonator-filter operation as well as the results of test measurements using the MVNA-8-350 millimeter vector network analyzer are presented.

  8. Present-day irrigation mitigates heat extremes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiery, Wim; Davin, Edouard L.; Lawrence, David M.; Hirsch, Annette L.; Hauser, Mathias; Seneviratne, Sonia I.

    2017-02-01

    Irrigation is an essential practice for sustaining global food production and many regional economies. Emerging scientific evidence indicates that irrigation substantially affects mean climate conditions in different regions of the world. Yet how this practice influences climate extremes is currently unknown. Here we use ensemble simulations with the Community Earth System Model to assess the impacts of irrigation on climate extremes. An evaluation of the model performance reveals that irrigation has a small yet overall beneficial effect on the representation of present-day near-surface climate. While the influence of irrigation on annual mean temperatures is limited, we find a large impact on temperature extremes, with a particularly strong cooling during the hottest day of the year (-0.78 K averaged over irrigated land). The strong influence on extremes stems from the timing of irrigation and its influence on land-atmosphere coupling strength. Together these effects result in asymmetric temperature responses, with a more pronounced cooling during hot and/or dry periods. The influence of irrigation is even more pronounced when considering subgrid-scale model output, suggesting that local effects of land management are far more important than previously thought. Our results underline that irrigation has substantially reduced our exposure to hot temperature extremes in the past and highlight the need to account for irrigation in future climate projections.

  9. IRRIGATION OF ORNAMENTAL PLANT NURSERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo de Aguiar do Couto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Airports consume significant amounts of water which can be compared to the volume consumed by mid-size cities, thus practices aimed at reducing water consumption are important and necessar y. The objective of this study was to assess the reuse potential of sewage effluent produced at a mid-size international airport for nursery irri gation. The sewage treatment system consisted of a facultative pond followed by a constructed wetland, which were monitored during one hydrological year a nd the parameters COD, pH, solids, nitrogen, phosphorus and Escherichia coli we re analyzed. Removal efficiencies of 85% and 91% were achieved for C OD and solids, respectively. Removal efficiencies for ammonia nitrogen a nd total phosphorus were 77% and 59%, respectively. In terms of E. coli concen tration, the treated effluent met the recommendations by the World Health Organization for reuse in irrigation with the advantage of providing high levels of residual nutrient. The ornamental species Impatiens walleriana was irrigated with treated sewage effluent and plant growth characteristics were evalua ted. The experiment showed that reuse can enhance plant growth without signi ficantly affecting leaf tissue and soil characteristics. This study highlighted th e importance of simple technologies for sewage treatment especially in count ries which still do not present great investment in sanitation and proved that effluent reuse for landscape irrigation can provide great savings of water and financial resources for airport environments.

  10. A New CT Method for Assessing 3D Movements in Lumbar Facet Joints and Vertebrae in Patients before and after TDR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Svedmark

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study describes a 3D-CT method for analyzing facet joint motion and vertebral rotation in the lumbar spine after TDR. Ten patients were examined before and then three years after surgery, each time with two CT scans: provoked flexion and provoked extension. After 3D registration, the facet joint 3D translation and segmental vertebral 3D rotation were analyzed at the operated level (L5-S1 and adjacent level (L4-L5. Pain was evaluated using VAS. The median (±SD 3D movement in the operated level for the left facet joint was 3.2 mm (±1.9 mm before and 3.5 mm (±1.7 mm after surgery and for the right facet joint was 3.0 mm (±1.0 mm before and 3.6 mm (±1.4 mm after surgery. The median vertebral rotation in the sagittal plane at the operated level was 5.4° (±2.3° before surgery and 6.8° (±1.7° after surgery and in the adjacent level was 7.7° (±4.0° before and 9.2° (±2.7° after surgery. The median VAS was reduced from 6 (range 5–8 to 3 (range 2–8 in extension and from 4 (range 2–6 to 2 (range 1–3 in flexion.

  11. Development of an Irrigation Scheduling Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BAKHSHAL KHAN LASHARI

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an irrigation scheduling software named ?Mehran Model? which computes reference evapotranspiration (ETo using FAO-56 Penman Monteith method and crop evapotranspiration (ETc by dual crop coefficients. The model can develop irrigation schedules for sixty-six crop types using soil and water balance approach. The model distinguishes soil texture classes, irrigation methods, and designs real time irrigation schedule for a crop using daily weather data of a reference site. The Mehran Model also includes planning on demand basis as well as rotational (warabandi irrigation schedules, and synchronizes both systems as well. The model has been field tested and validated on planning and management of irrigation schedules for cotton and wheat crops in Lower Indus Basin of Pakistan. Statistical analysis showed that the model at an average overestimated seasonal ETc of cotton and wheat crop by 2.41% and 4.31% respectively.

  12. A review of transanal irrigation in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Mary

    2017-08-10

    This article discusses transanal irrigation: what it is, the clinical conditions that might be helped by it and less invasive options that should be considered before starting irrigation. It looks at the delivery of this procedure, describes the different options available and compares and contrasts devices manufactured by five different companies. Contraindications are listed and side-effects discussed. Problems and possible solutions are considered. Transanal irrigation education for nurses and teaching patients is reviewed. Follow-up is discussed, including the reasons why some patients abandon irrigation. Quality of life can be improved for those who become successful users of transanal irrigation. When patients do continue to irrigate, even when this is not problem free, it can help them regain control over their bowel dysfunction by allowing them to evacuate their bowels at a time and a place that is convenient.

  13. Desorption of bottle-brush polyelectrolytes from silica by addition of linear polyelectrolytes studied by QCM-D and reflectometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naderi, Ali; Olanya, Geoffrey; Makuska, Ricardas; Claesson, Per M

    2008-07-15

    The possibility of exchanging adsorbed layers of PEO(45)MEMA:METAC-X brush polyelectrolytes (with two different charge densities, 10 and 75 mol%, denoted by X), with poly(MAPTAC), a highly charged linear polyelectrolyte, was investigated by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation and reflectometry. The studies were conducted on a silica substrate at pH 10, conditions under which only electrostatic interactions are effective in the adsorption process. Based on the results, it was concluded that PEO(45)MEMA:METAC-10 forms an inhomogeneous layer at the interface through which poly(MAPTAC) chains can easily diffuse to reach the surface. On the other hand, the PEO(45)MEMA:METAC-75 layer was not affected when exposed to a poly(MAPTAC) solution. We argue that the observed effect for PEO(45)MEMA:METAC-75 is due to the formation of a homogeneous protective brush layer, in combination with the small difference in surface affinity between the bottle-brush polyelectrolyte and poly(MAPTAC), together with the difficulty of displacing highly charged polyelectrolyte chains once they are adsorbed on the oppositely charged surface. We also use the combination of QCM-D and reflectometry data to calculate the water content and layer thickness of the adsorbed layers.

  14. Effects of Irrigation in India on the Atmospheric Water Budget

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuinenburg, O.A.; Hutjes, R.W.A.; Stacke, T.; Wiltshire, A.; Lucas-Picher, P.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of large-scale irrigation in India on the moisture budget of the atmosphere was investigated using three regional climate models and one global climate model, all of which performed an irrigated run and a natural run without irrigation. Using a common irrigation map, year-round irrigation

  15. Effects of Seven Different Irrigation Techniques on Debris and the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-09-19

    Sep 19, 2015 ... Brush, NaviTip FX, manual dynamic irrigation, and conventional irrigation. The .... with 2 mL 5.25% NaOCl between each file. The teeth were divided randomly into 8 groups (n = 10) and final irrigation procedures were performed. Irrigation ..... irrigation techniques has become more important in terms of ...

  16. 77 FR 21556 - Don Pedro Hydroelectric Project: Turlock Irrigation District; Modesto Irrigation District...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Don Pedro Hydroelectric Project: Turlock Irrigation District; Modesto Irrigation District; Supplement to Notice of Study Dispute Resolution Technical Conference On March 16, 2012...

  17. Electron reflectometry as a probe of the Martian crust and atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillis, Robert James

    This thesis is devoted to the expansion of the technique of electron reflectometry from its prior purpose in mapping lunar crustal magnetic fields to the same purpose at Mars, where the presence of a substantial atmosphere considerably complicates matters. Previous work, using magnetometer data from the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft, established the existence of surprisingly strong crustal remanent magnetic fields and placed important constraints both upon the properties of the crustal magnetic sources responsible for the fields and upon the timing and orientation of Mars's ancient core dynamo. To build upon this work, I have analyzed pitch angle distributions of magnetically reflecting solar wind electrons measured by the MGS Magnetometer/ Electron Reflectometer (MAG/ER) to create a map of Martian crustal magnetic fields at ~195 km altitude, giving greater spatial resolution and sensitivity than was previously possible using magnetometer data alone. Low magnetic fields measured above most volcanoes indicate thermal demagnetization of the crust by magmatism and underplating after the cessation of the core dynamo, while relatively high fields measured above the Hadriaca Patera volcano imply that Martian volcanism predates this cessation and is significantly older than any exposed volcanic surface. The geographic and size distribution of demagnetization signatures of impact craters and the suggested presence of magnetic edge effects, indicates that (1) crustal magnetization occurs at typically shallower depths in the northern Martian lowlands than in the southern highlands and (2) the typical crustal magnetic coherence scale, is >100 km. A comparison of crater retention ages with magnetic signatures of some of the oldest impact basins on Mars confirms that Mars's core dynamo ceased operating early in the planet's history, >4 billion years ago. Significant differences in magnetization between geologically contemporary basins suggests that the dynamo's final

  18. A Fram Strait Experiment: Sensing Sea Ice Conditions using Shipborne GNSS Reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semmling, Maximilian; Rösel, Anja; Ludwig, Marcel; Bratrein, Marius; Gerland, Sebastian; Wickert, Jens

    2017-04-01

    Cruises of the Norwegian research vessel (R/V) Lance provide regular in-situ measurements of ocean and sea ice properties in Fram Strait, at the major link between the Arctic and the Atlantic Ocean. A GNSS reflectometry (GNSS-R) setup has been installed aboard R/V Lance to investigate sea ice remote sensing opportunities during the Fram Strait 2016 cruise. The experiment is based on previous coastal investigations, which demonstrated the ocean altimetric potential of GNSS-R and its sensitivity to the sea ice cover. The presence of sea ice can be detected by the reduced sea surface roughness that affects the coherence of the GNSS-R carrier phase. Differential phase observations of the reflected signal relative to the direct signal are considered here. The objective of this study is the retrieval of the coherent differential phase resolving the altimetric effect of changes in the sea ice thickness. Grazing reflections with satellite elevations commercial JAVAD hardware. Two antenna links are starbord-looking with right- and left-handed circular polarization to detect the reflected signal. One right-handed antenna is up-looking for reference to the direct signal. In-phase and quadrature (I,Q) samples from the three antenna links were recorded during the entire Fram Strait cruise, between 25 August and 13 September 2016. The ship's track on its main section went from Svalbard at 10° E roughly along 79° N to the Eastern Greenland coast at 13° W and back. Different ice conditions were encountered: open water with a rough sea surface close to Svalbard, a dense coverage of multiyear drift ice in the centre of Fram Strait and multiyear fast ice at the Greenland coast. The recorded events comprise about 920 hours of observations with an almost omnidirectional view and 1° to 30° elevation. Most data can be referred to sea surface reflections. However, parts are also affected by multipath from the ship. The specular reflection power ratio is mapped over the entire cruise

  19. Frequency domain reflectometry NDE for aging cables in nuclear power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, S. W.; Jones, A. M.; Fifield, L. S.; Hartman, T. S.

    2017-02-01

    Degradation of the cable jacket, electrical insulation, and other cable components of installed cables within nuclear power plants (NPPs) is known to occur as a function of age, temperature, radiation, and other environmental factors. Although system tests verify cable function under normal loads, demonstration of some cable's ability to perform under exceptional loads associated with design-basis events is essential to assuring plant integrity. The cable's ability to perform safely over the initial 40-year planned and licensed life has generally been demonstrated and there have been very few age-related cable failures. With greater than 1000 km of power, control, instrumentation, and other cables typically found in an NPP, replacing all the cables would be a severe cost burden. Justification for life extension to 60 and 80 years requires a cable aging management program that includes condition monitoring to justify cable performance under normal operation as well as accident conditions. A variety of tests are available to assess various aspects of electrical and mechanical cable performance, but none are suitable for all cable configurations nor does any single test confirm all features of interest. One particularly promising test that is beginning to be used more and more by utilities is frequency domain reflectometry (FDR). FDR is a nondestructive electrical inspection technique used to detect and localize faults in power and communication system conductors along the length of a cable from a single connection point. FDR detects discontinuities in the electrical impedance that arise due to cable splices or similar changes along the path of the conductor pair. In addition, FDR has the potential to provide sensitivity to insulation degradation by detecting small changes in impedance between the cable conductors being examined. The technique is also sensitive to cable bends, the particular lay of the cable in tray, proximity to other cable, and other factors that

  20. Remote Sensing of Tropical Cyclones: Applications from Microwave Radiometry and Global Navigation Satellite System Reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Mary

    Tropical cyclones (TCs) are important to observe, especially over the course of their lifetimes, most of which is spent over the ocean. Very few in situ observations are available. Remote sensing has afforded researchers and forecasters the ability to observe and understand TCs better. Every remote sensing platform used to observe TCs has benefits and disadvantages. Some remote sensing instruments are more sensitive to clouds, precipitation, and other atmospheric constituents. Some remote sensing instruments are insensitive to the atmosphere, which allows for unobstructed observations of the ocean surface. Observations of the ocean surface, either of surface roughness or emission can be used to estimate ocean surface wind speed. Estimates of surface wind speed can help determine the intensity, structure, and destructive potential of TCs. While there are many methods by which TCs are observed, this thesis focuses on two main types of remote sensing techniques: passive microwave radiometry and Global Navigation Satellite System reflectometry (GNSS-R). First, we develop and apply a rain rate and ocean surface wind speed retrieval algorithm for the Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD). HIRAD, an airborne passive microwave radiometer, operates at C-band frequencies, and is sensitive to rain absorption and emission, as well as ocean surface emission. Motivated by the unique observing geometry and high gradient rain scenes that HIRAD typically observes, a more robust rain rate and wind speed retrieval algorithm is developed. HIRAD's observing geometry must be accounted for in the forward model and retrieval algorithm, if high rain gradients are to be estimated from HIRAD's observations, with the ultimate goal of improving surface wind speed estimation. Lastly, TC science data products are developed for the Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS). The CYGNSS constellation employs GNSS-R techniques to estimate ocean surface wind speed in all precipitating

  1. Modernisation Strategy for National Irrigation Systems in the Philippines: Balanac and Sta. Maria River Irrigation Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Delos Reyes, M.L.F.

    2017-01-01

    This book examines the nature and impact of irrigation system rehabilitation on increasing the actual area irrigated by the publicly funded canal irrigation systems of the Philippines. It proposes a system diagnosis approach for the development of a more appropriate and climate-smart irrigation modernisation plan. It investigates the validity of the design assumptions on percolation and the prospects of water availability estimation as well as characterizes the system operation and management...

  2. Senegal - Irrigation and Water Resource Management

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millennium Challenge Corporation — IMPAQ: This evaluation report presents findings from the baseline data collected for the Irrigation and Water Resources Management (IWRM) project, which serves as...

  3. Effect of biofilm in irrigation pipes on the microbial quality of irrigation water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aim: To test the hypothesis that microbial quality of irrigation water can be substantially altered by the association of E. coli with pipe lining in irrigation systems. Methods and Results: The sprinkler irrigation system was outfitted with coupons that were extracted before four 2-hour long irri...

  4. Role of sediment in the design and management of irrigation canals : Sunsari Morang Irrigation Scheme, Nepal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paudel, K.

    2010-01-01

    Sediment transport in irrigation canals The sediment transport aspect is a major factor in irrigation development as it determines to a large extent the sustainability of an irrigation scheme, particularly in case of unlined canals in alluvial soils. Investigations in this respect started since

  5. Automation of irrigation systems to control irrigation applications and crop water use efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agricultural irrigation management to slow water withdrawals from non-replenishing quality water resources is a global endeavor and vital to sustaining irrigated agriculture and dependent rural economies. Research in site-specific irrigation management has shown that water use efficiency, and crop p...

  6. 78 FR 3892 - Turlock Irrigation District and Modesto Irrigation District; Notice Clarifying Party Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Turlock Irrigation District and Modesto Irrigation District; Notice Clarifying Party Status On January 9, 2013, the Modesto Irrigation District (Modesto) filed a motion for...

  7. Factors affecting irrigant extrusion during root canal irrigation: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boutsioukis, C.; Psimma, Z.; van der Sluis, L.W.M.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to conduct a systematic review and critical analysis of published data on irrigant extrusion to identify factors causing, affecting or predisposing to irrigant extrusion during root canal irrigation of human mature permanent teeth. An electronic search was conducted

  8. A way to reach high accuracy in the determination of the magnetic London penetration depth in superconductors by polarized neutron reflectometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maaza, M. [Universite du Maine, 72 - Le Mans (France). Lab. de Physique de l`Etat Condense]|[Frank Laboratory for Neutron Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Chernenko, L.P. [Frank Laboratory for Neutron Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Korneev, D. [Frank Laboratory for Neutron Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Pardo, B. [Institut d`Optique Theorique et Appliquee, Bat. 503, Universite d`Orsay, 91403 Orsay Cedex (France); Sella, C. [Laboratoire de Physique des Materiaux, CNRS de Meudon-Bellevue, 1 place Aristide Briand, Meudon principal (France); Bridou, F. [Institut d`Optique Theorique et Appliquee, Bat. 503, Universite d`Orsay, 91403 Orsay Cedex (France)

    1996-08-05

    We suggest a way to refine the picture of the London penetration depth {Lambda} into superconductors determined by polarized neutron reflectometry. With a thin film of 2000 A, the flipping ratio exhibits numerous contrasted oscillations, which is not the case for bulk samples. (orig.).

  9. A way to reach high accuracy in the determination of the magnetic London penetration depth in superconductors by polarized neutron reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mâaza, M.; Chernenko, L. P.; Korneev, D.; Pardo, B.; Sella, C.; Bridou, F.

    1996-02-01

    We suggest a way to refine the picture of the London penetration depth Λ into superconductors determined by polarized neutron reflectometry. With a thin film of 2000 Å, the flipping ratio exhibits numerous contrasted oscillations, which is not the case for bulk samples.

  10. The effect of single oral doses of duloxetine, reboxetine, and midodrine on the urethral pressure in healthy female subjects, using urethral pressure reflectometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarskov, Niels; Cerneus, Dirk; Sawyer, William

    2018-01-01

    AIMS: To evaluate the effect on urethral pressure of reference drugs known to reduce stress urinary incontinence symptoms by different effect size and mechanisms of action on urethral musculature under four test conditions in healthy female subjects using urethral pressure reflectometry. METHODS...

  11. Assessment of irrigation schemes in Turkey based on management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessment of irrigation schemes in Turkey based on management types. ... The assessment used the International Water Management Institute (IWMI)'s six performance indicators for the year 2001. ... Key Words: Comparative indicators, irrigation project, management types, irrigation management, performance, Turkey.

  12. Irrigation as an Historical Climate Forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Benjamin I.; Shukla, Sonali P.; Puma, Michael J.; Nazarenko, Larissa S.

    2014-01-01

    Irrigation is the single largest anthropogenic water use, a modification of the land surface that significantly affects surface energy budgets, the water cycle, and climate. Irrigation, however, is typically not included in standard historical general circulation model (GCM) simulations along with other anthropogenic and natural forcings. To investigate the importance of irrigation as an anthropogenic climate forcing, we conduct two 5-member ensemble GCM experiments. Both are setup identical to the historical forced (anthropogenic plus natural) scenario used in version 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, but in one experiment we also add water to the land surface using a dataset of historically estimated irrigation rates. Irrigation has a negligible effect on the global average radiative balance at the top of the atmosphere, but causes significant cooling of global average surface air temperatures over land and dampens regional warming trends. This cooling is regionally focused and is especially strong in Western North America, the Mediterranean, the Middle East, and Asia. Irrigation enhances cloud cover and precipitation in these same regions, except for summer in parts of Monsoon Asia, where irrigation causes a reduction in monsoon season precipitation. Irrigation cools the surface, reducing upward fluxes of longwave radiation (increasing net longwave), and increases cloud cover, enhancing shortwave reflection (reducing net shortwave). The relative magnitude of these two processes causes regional increases (northern India) or decreases (Central Asia, China) in energy availability at the surface and top of the atmosphere. Despite these changes in net radiation, however, climate responses are due primarily to larger magnitude shifts in the Bowen ratio from sensible to latent heating. Irrigation impacts on temperature, precipitation, and other climate variables are regionally significant, even while other anthropogenic forcings (anthropogenic aerosols

  13. Irrigated Agricultural in the United States, State-Level Data

    OpenAIRE

    Hanchar, John J.

    1989-01-01

    This report presents previously unreported State-level data on the structure and characteristics of irrigated farms in Arkansas, Louisiana, Florida, and the 17 Western States, which together account for 93 percent of all irrigated acres in the Nation. Irrigated farms produce about 30 percent of the sales of agricultural products from all U.S. farms. Data include distributions of irrigated farms, irrigated acres, and value of agricultural products sold from irrigated farms for a variety of far...

  14. Identifying the potential for irrigation development in Mozambique: Capitalizing on the drivers behind farmer-led irrigation expansion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekman, P.W.; Veldwisch, G.J.A.; Bolding, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Smallholder irrigation in Central Mozambique predominantly takes place in an informal setting. This renders these smallholders and their activities invisible for policy purposes. Identification efforts of smallholder irrigation as well as the potential for new irrigation development are often the

  15. Reclaimed Water for Turfgrass Irrigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xunzhong Zhang

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable irrigation of turfgrass grown on coarse-textured soils with reclaimed water must avoid detrimental effects of soluble salts on plant growth and soil quality and groundwater enrichment of nitrogen (N and phosphorus (P. The purpose of this study was (1 to investigate the effects of irrigating with municipal reclaimed water containing higher concentrations of soluble salts than potable water on turfgrass growth and quality and (2 to compare the effects of reclaimed and potable water on turfgrass assimilation and leaching of N and P. A sand-based medium plumbed to supply potable and reclaimed water and instrumented with lysimeters to collect leachate was planted with hybrid bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon x Cynodon transvaalensis var. Tifsport and creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera var. L-93. Both species produced high quality turfgrass with the reclaimed water. Although both grasses are moderately or highly salt tolerant when fully established, the bermudagrass growth and quality were reduced by the reclaimed water upon breaking dormancy, and its N use during this period was reduced. Continuous use of reclaimed water of the quality used in the study poses a potential soil Na accumulation problem. Both turfgrasses assimilated high amounts of N and P with minimal potential losses to groundwater.

  16. Review of ultrasonic irrigation in endodontics: increasing action of irrigating solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozo, Sandra; Llena, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Effective irrigant delivery and agitation are prerequisites for successful endodontic treatment. Ultrasonic irrigation can be performed with or without simultaneous ultrasonic instrumentation. Existing literature reveals that ultrasonic irrigation may have a very positive effect on chemical, biological and physical debridement of the root canal system as investigated in many in vitro studies. Objective: The purpose of this review article was to summarize and discuss the available information concerning ultrasonic irrigation in endodontics. Methods: This article presents an overview of ultrasonic irrigation methods and their debridement efficacy. In this paper the relevant literature on passive ultrasonic irrigation is reviewed. Information from original scientific papers or reviews listed in MEDLINE and Cochrane were included in the review. Results: The use of ultrasound in the irrigation procedure results in improved canal cleanliness, better irrigant transfer to the canal system, soft tissue debridement, and removal of smear layer and bacteria. There are many in vitro studies, but there is a need to standardize protocols, and correlate the clinical efficacy of ultrasonic devices with improved treatment outcomes. Understanding the basis of ultrasonic irrigation is fundamental for clinicians and researchers to improve the design and use of ultrasonic irrigation. Key words:Ultrasonic irrigation, ultrasound, smear layer, endodontics. PMID:22143738

  17. Irrigation practices affecting land degradation in Sicily

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crescimanno, G.

    2001-01-01

    The available amount of fresh water for agriculture, and specifically for irrigation, is decreasing all over the world. The quality of irrigation water is deteriorating, and saline/sodic waters are increasingly used in many arid and semi-arid regions of the world. Salinization is closely

  18. Water Resources Impacts on Tribal Irrigation Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minihane, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) Branch of Irrigation and Power provides oversight and technical support to select irrigation projects and systems on tribal lands. The BIA provides operations and maintenance support for 16 irrigation systems. To make the best use of limited resources, the BIA must incorporate climate change impacts on hydrology and water management for these irrigation systems in the coming decades. The 16 irrigation projects discussed here are divided into three climatological regions: the Pacific Northwest Region, the Greater Rocky Mountain Region, and the Western, Southwest, & Navajo Region. Significant climate projections that impact irrigation systems in one or more of these regions include increased temperatures and evaporative demand, earlier snowmelt and runoff, an increase in floods, an increase in heavy precipitation events, an increase in the frequency and intensity of droughts, and declining water supplies. Some irrigation projects are particularly vulnerable to these climate impacts because they are in already water-stressed areas or areas in which water resources are over-allocated. Other irrigation projects will have to adjust their storage and water management strategies to accommodate changes in the timing of streamflow. Overall, though, the BIA will be better able to assist tribal nations by incorporating expected climate impacts into their water resources management practices.

  19. Supporting farmer-led irrigation in Mozambique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekman, Wouter; Veldwisch, Gert Jan

    2016-01-01

    Smallholder irrigation technologies introduced in sub-Saharan Africa are often unsustainable in the sense that they are not maintained by their users. In contrast, there is clear evidence that smallholder farmers have been developing and expanding irrigated areas. An approach was developed that

  20. Deciphering groundwater quality for irrigation and domestic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Various water quality indices like SAR, SSP, PI, RSC, MAR and KR have been calculated for each water sample to identify the irrigational suitability standard. According to most of these parameters, the groundwater has been found to be well to moderately suitable for irrigation. In the post-monsoon session exceptionally ...

  1. Men, Masculinities and Water Powers in Irrigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwarteveen, M.Z.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this article is to provide an informed plea for more explicitly identifying, naming and unravelling the linkages between water control and gender in irrigation. The fact that power, expertise and status in irrigation tend to have a strong masculine connotation is by now quite well

  2. Precision irrigation for improving crop water management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Precision irrigation is gaining attention by the agricultural industry as a means to optimize water inputs, reduce environmental degradation from runoff or deep percolation and maintain crop yields. This presenation will discuss the mechanical and software framework of the irrigation scheduling sup...

  3. Using Automation to Improve Surface Irrigation Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the Lower Mississippi Water Resource Area (WRA 08), also called the Mid-South, 2 million ha of cropland (80% of the irrigated farmland) employ surface irrigation, almost equally divided between furrow (52%) and controlled flooding (48%). Because Mid-South farmers experience less-than-optimal surf...

  4. Prospects and Constraints of Household Irrigation Practices ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Constraints and prospects of hand dug wells related to household irrigation were assessed in Hayelom watershed (~1045 ha), by evaluating groundwater suitability for irrigation, soil quality and impact of intervention. 181 hand dug wells have come into existence in the watershed due to intervention and benefiting about ...

  5. Syringe irrigation: blending endodontics and fluid dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boutsioukis, C.; van der Sluis, L.W.M.; Basrani, B.

    2015-01-01

    Syringe irrigation remains a widely used irrigant delivery method during root canal treatment. An interdisciplinary approach involving well-established methods from the field of fluid dynamics can provide new insights into the mechanisms involved in cleaning and disinfection of the root canal system

  6. Irrigation of treated wastewater in Braunschweig, Germany

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ternes, T.A.; Bonerz, M.; Herrmann, N.

    2007-01-01

    In this study the fate of pharmaceuticals and personal care products which are irrigated on arable land with treated municipal waste-water was investigated. In Braunschweig, Germany, wastewater has been irrigated continuously for more than 45 years. In the winter time only the effluent...... of the sewage treatment plant (STP) of Braunschweig is used for irrigation, while during summer digested sludge is mixed with the effluent. In the present case study six wells and four lysimeters located in one of the irrigated agricultural fields were monitored with regard to the occurrence of 52...... pharmaceuticals and two personal care products (PPCPs; e.g. betablockers, antibiotics, antiphlogistics, carbamazepine, musk fragrances, iodinated contrast media (ICM) and estrogens). No differences in PPCP pollution of the groundwater were found due to irrigation of STP effluents with and without addition...

  7. Effect of biofilm in irrigation pipes on microbial quality of irrigation water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachepsky, Y; Morrow, J; Guber, A; Shelton, D; Rowland, R; Davies, G

    2012-03-01

    The focus of this work was to investigate the contribution of native Escherichia coli to the microbial quality of irrigation water and to determine the potential for contamination by E. coli associated with heterotrophic biofilms in pipe-based irrigation water delivery systems. The aluminium pipes in the sprinkler irrigation system were outfitted with coupons that were extracted before each of the 2-h long irrigations carried out with weekly intervals. Water from the creek water and sprinklers, residual water from the previous irrigation and biofilms on the coupons were analysed for E. coli. High E. coli concentrations in water remaining in irrigation pipes between irrigation events were indicative of E. coli growth. In two of the four irrigations, the probability of the sample source, (creek vs sprinkler), being a noninfluential factor, was only 0.14, that is, source was an important factor. The population of bacteria associated with the biofilm on pipe walls was estimated to be larger than that in water in pipes in the first three irrigation events and comparable to one in the fourth event. Biofilm-associated E. coli can affect microbial quality of irrigation water and, therefore, should not be neglected when estimating bacterial mass balances for irrigation systems. This work is the first peer-reviewed report on the impact of biofilms on microbial quality of irrigation waters. Flushing of the irrigation system may be a useful management practice to decrease the risk of microbial contamination of produce. Because microbial water quality can be substantially modified while water is transported in an irrigation system, it becomes imperative to monitor water quality at fields, rather than just at the intake. © No claim to US Government works Letters in Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  8. The urethral closure function in continent and stress urinary incontinent women assessed by urethral pressure reflectometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saaby, Marie-Louise

    2014-02-01

    Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) occurs when the bladder pressure exceeds the urethral pressure in connection with physical effort or exertion or when sneezing or coughing and depends both on the strength of the urethral closure function and the abdominal pressure to which it is subjected. The urethral closure function in continent women and the dysfunction causing SUI are not known in details. The currently accepted view is based on the concept of a sphincteric unit and a support system. Our incomplete knowledge relates to the complexity of the closure apparatus and to inadequate assessment methods which so far have not provided robust urodynamic diagnostic tools, severity measures, or parameters to assess outcome after intervention. Urethral Pressure Reflectometry (UPR) is a novel method that measures the urethral pressure and cross-sectional area (by use of sound waves) simultaneously. The technique involves insertion of only a small, light and flexible polyurethane bag in the urethra and therefore avoids the common artifacts encountered with conventional methods. The UPR parameters can be obtained at a specific site of the urethra, e.g. the high pressure zone, and during various circumstances, i.e. resting and squeezing. During the study period, we advanced the UPR technique to enable faster measurement (within 7 seconds by the continuous technique) which allowed assessment during increased intra-abdominal pressure induced by physical straining. We investigated the urethral closure function in continent and SUI women during resting and straining by the "fast" UPR technique. Thereby new promising urethral parameters were provided that allowed characterization of the closure function based on the permanent closure forces (primarily generated by the sphincteric unit, measured by the Po-rest) and the adjunctive closure forces (primarily generated by the support system, measured by the abdominal to urethral pressure impact ratio (APIR)). The new parameters enabled

  9. Historical influence of irrigation on climate extremes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiery, Wim; Davin, Edouard L.; Lawrence, Dave; Hauser, Mathias; Seneviratne, Sonia I.

    2016-04-01

    Land irrigation is an essential practice sustaining global food production and many regional economies. During the last decades, irrigation amounts have been growing rapidly. Emerging scientific evidence indicates that land irrigation substantially affects mean climate conditions in different regions of the world. However, a thorough understanding of the impact of irrigation on extreme climatic conditions, such as heat waves, droughts or intense precipitation, is currently still lacking. In this context, we aim to assess the historical influence of irrigation on the occurrence of climate extremes. To this end, two simulations are conducted over the period 1910-2010 with a state-of-the-art global climate model (the Community Earth System Model, CESM): a control simulation including all major anthropogenic and natural external forcings except for irrigation and a second experiment with transient irrigation enabled. The two simulations are evaluated for their ability to represent (i) hot, dry and wet extremes using the HadEX2 and ERA-Interim datasets as a reference, and (ii) latent heat fluxes using LandFlux-EVAL. Assuming a linear combination of climatic responses to different forcings, the difference between both experiments approximates the influence of irrigation. We will analyse the impact of irrigation on a number of climate indices reflecting the intensity and duration of heat waves. Thereby, particular attention is given to the role of soil moisture changes in modulating climate extremes. Furthermore, the contribution of individual biogeophysical processes to the total impact of irrigation on hot extremes is quantified by application of a surface energy balance decomposition technique to the 90th and 99th percentile surface temperature changes.

  10. Drip irrigation uptake in traditional irrigated fields: The edaphological impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puy, Arnald; García Avilés, José M; Balbo, Andrea L; Keller, Michèle; Riedesel, Svenja; Blum, Daniel; Bubenzer, Olaf

    2017-11-01

    Historical and traditional flood-irrigated (FI) schemes are progressively being upgraded by means of drip irrigation (DI) to tackle current water and demographic challenges. This modernization process is likely to foster several changes of environmental relevance at the system level. In this paper we assess the effects derived from DI uptake on soil health and structure in ancient FI systems through the case study of Ricote, SE Spain, first established in the 10-13th centuries CE. We approach the topic by means of physico-chemical analyses (pH, electrical conductivity, available P, carbon analyses, bulk density, soil water content and particle size distribution), Electrical Resistivity Measurements (ERT) and robust statistics. We reach a power of 1-ß = 77 aiming at detecting a large effect size (f ≥ 0.4). Results indicate that, compared to FI, DI soils present significantly higher water content, a higher proportion of coarse particles relative to fines due to clay translocation, and less dispersion in salt contents. The soils away from the emitters, which were formerly FI and comparatively account for larger extensions, appear significantly depleted in organic matter, available P and N. These results are not affected by departures from statistical model assumptions and suggest that DI uptake in formerly FI systems might have relevant implications in terms of soil degradation and emission of greenhouse gases. A proper assessment of the edaphological trade-offs derived from this modernization process is mandatory in order to tackle undesired environmental consequences. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Irreversible lithium storage during lithiation of amorphous silicon thin film electrodes studied by in-situ neutron reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerliu, Bujar; Hüger, Erwin; Horisberger, Michael; Stahn, Jochen; Schmidt, Harald

    2017-08-01

    Amorphous silicon is a promising high-capacity anode material for application in lithium-ion batteries. However, a huge drawback of the material is that the large capacity losses taking place during cycling lead to an unstable performance. In this study we investigate the capacity losses occurring during galvanostatic lithiation of amorphous silicon thin film electrodes by in-situ neutron reflectometry experiments for the first ten cycles. As determined from the analysis of the neutron scattering length density and of the film thickness, the capacity losses are due to irreversible storage of lithium in the electrode. The amount of stored lithium increases during cycling to 20% of the maximum theoretical capacity after the 10th cycle. Possible explanations are discussed.

  12. Ordinary mode reflectometry. Modification of the scattering and cut-off responses due to the shape of localized density fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fanack, C.; Boucher, I.; Heuraux, S.; Leclert, G. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 54 - Nancy (France). Lab. de Physique du Solide; Clairet, F.; Zou, X.L. [Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d`Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee

    1996-01-01

    Ordinary wave reflectometry in a plasma containing a localized density perturbation is studied with a 1-D model. The phase response is studied as a function of the wavenumber and position of the perturbation. It is shown that it strongly depends upon the perturbation shape and size. For a small perturbation wavenumber, the response is due to the oscillation of the cut-off layer. For larger wavenumbers, two regimes are found: for a broad perturbation, the phase response is an image of the perturbation itself; for a narrow perturbation, it is rather an image of the Fourier transform. For tokamak plasmas it turns out that, for the fluctuation spectra usually observed, the phase response comes primarily from those fluctuations that are localized at the cut-off. Results of a 2-D numerical model show that geometry effects are negligible for the scattering by radial fluctuations. (author). 18 refs.

  13. Neural Stem Cell Spreading on Lipid Based Artificial Cell Surfaces, Characterized by Combined X-ray and Neutron Reflectometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Huth

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available We developed a bioadhesive coating based on a synthetic peptide-conjugate (AK-cyclo[RGDfC] which contains multiples of the arginyl-glycyl-aspartic acid (RGD amino acid sequence. Biotinylated AK-cyclo[RGDfC] is bound to a supported lipid bilayer via a streptavidin interlayer. Layering, hydration and packing of the coating is quantified by X-ray and neutron reflectometry experiments. AK-cyclo[RGDfC] binds to the streptavidin interlayer in a stretched-out on edge configuration. The highly packed configuration with only 12% water content maximizes the number of accessible adhesion sites. Enhanced cell spreading of neural stem cells was observed for AK-cyclo[RGDfC] functionalized bilayers. Due to the large variety of surfaces which can be coated by physisorption of lipid bilayers, this approach is of general interest for the fabrication of biocompatible surfaces.

  14. Super-Resolution Defect Characterization Using Microwave Near-Field Resonance Reflectometry and Cross-correlation Image Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyuskin, Oleksandr; Fusco, Vincent

    2017-12-01

    A super-resolution defect characterization technique based on near-field resonance reflectometry and cross-correlation image processing is proposed in this paper. The hardware part of the microwave imaging system employs a novel loaded aperture (LA) probe which allows collimation of the electromagnetic field to approximately λ/10 focal spot(s) at λ/100 to λ/10 stand-off distances, λ being the wavelength of radiation in free space. The characteristic raw image spatial resolution of the LA probe is around λ/10 in one dimension with amplitude contrast/sensitivity exceeding 10-20 dB. It is demonstrated that the LA spatial resolution can be at least two times enhanced in two dimensions in the image plane using basic cross-correlation image processing while retaining a very high level of amplitude contrast of at least 10 dB.

  15. Modification of ordinary-mode reflectometry system to detect lower-hybrid waves in Alcator C-Moda)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, S. G.; Shiraiwa, S.; Parker, R. R.; Dominguez, A.; Kramer, G. J.; Marmar, E. S.

    2012-10-01

    Backscattering experiments to detect lower-hybrid (LH) waves have been performed in Alcator C-Mod, using the two modified channels (60 GHz and 75 GHz) of an ordinary-mode reflectometry system with newly developed spectral recorders that can continuously monitor spectral power at a target frequency. The change in the baseline of the spectral recorder during the LH wave injection is highly correlated to the strength of the X-mode non-thermal electron cyclotron emission. In high density plasmas where an anomalous drop in the lower hybrid current drive efficiency is observed, the observed backscattered signals are expected to be generated near the last closed flux surface, demonstrating the presence of LH waves within the plasma. This experimental technique can be useful in identifying spatially localized LH electric fields in the periphery of high-density plasmas.

  16. Effect of fesoterodine on urethral closure function in women with stress urinary incontinence assessed by urethral pressure reflectometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarskov, Niels; Darekar, Amanda; Scholfield, David

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: The aim was to evaluate, using urethral pressure reflectometry (UPR), the effect of fesoterodine on urethral function in women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI). METHODS: Women aged 18 to 65 years were eligible for this randomised, double-blind, placebo......-controlled, crossover study if they had had clinically significant SUI or SUI-predominant mixed urinary incontinence for >3 months. Each participant received fesoterodine 4 mg, fesoterodine 8 mg, and placebo once daily for 7 days, with a 7- to 10-day washout between treatments. UPR was performed at baseline and 4 to 8...... variables (total urinary incontinence, SUI, or urgency urinary incontinence episodes per 24 h). Adverse events were reported by 8 participants taking fesoterodine 4 mg, 17 taking fesoterodine 8 mg, and 8 taking placebo. CONCLUSIONS: Fesoterodine did not affect urethral pressure or significantly decrease...

  17. Review of ultrasonic irrigation in endodontics: increasing action of irrigating solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozo, Sandra; Llena, Carmen; Forner, Leopoldo

    2012-05-01

    Effective irrigant delivery and agitation are prerequisites for successful endodontic treatment. Ultrasonic irrigation can be performed with or without simultaneous ultrasonic instrumentation. Existing literature reveals that ultrasonic irrigation may have a very positive effect on chemical, biological and physical debridement of the root canal system as investigated in many in vitro studies. The purpose of this review article was to summarize and discuss the available information concerning ultrasonic irrigation in endodontics. This article presents an overview of ultrasonic irrigation methods and their debridement efficacy. In this paper the relevant literature on passive ultrasonic irrigation is reviewed. Information from original scientific papers or reviews listed in MEDLINE and Cochrane were included in the review. The use of ultrasound in the irrigation procedure results in improved canal cleanliness, better irrigant transfer to the canal system, soft tissue debridement, and removal of smear layers and bacteria. There are many in vitro studies, but there is a need to standardize protocols, and correlate the clinical efficacy of ultrasonic devices with improved treatment outcomes. Understanding the basis of ultrasonic irrigation is fundamental for clinicians and researchers to improve the design and use of ultrasonic irrigation.

  18. IRRIGATION WATER PRICING AND COST RECUPERATION FOR SUSTAINABILITY OF IRRIGATION PROJECTS IN NYANYADZI, ZIMBABWE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ephraim Chifamba

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Water pricing and recuperation of the costs of irrigation investment have been litigious issues for many decades in the dry area of Nyanyadzi because the community view irrigation as a development expenditure, financed by donors and the government for backward areas through lowering of food prices and reduction of tariffs. The soaring charges for irrigation water are questioned, as well as, the diminutive percentage of farmers who fundamentally recompense the charges. The failure to institute clear cost recuperation and water pricing methods has threatened the viability and sustainability of irrigation projects in the study area. The study used both qualitative and quantitative research methodologies. The study revealed that where the economy is usually subsidized, convalesce the cost of water delivery is much more complicated and difficult. In the case of establishing user fees, these should be estimated as a percentage of the "traditional user's capability for payment" derived from irrigation benefits (the net increase in farmers' income as a result of irrigation. Nyanyadzi has an opportunity in irrigation led development, if stakeholders address critical challenges in the planning, design, water delivery and maintenance of its irrigation systems. Since Nyanyadzi faces severe budgetary difficulties in financing irrigation projects, it is obligatory to consider the foundation on which irrigation projects operate and impose the principle of self sustaining. Sustainable methods of irrigation evaluation and collection of fees must be considered in light of Nyanyadzi's economic and technical environment. The research noted that water use efficiency is required in order to maximize the benefits farmers derive from the irrigation projects and extraordinarily high user fees should be avoided in the project development stages, where the payment capability is much less at the beginning than at the maturity stages of irrigation projects.

  19. Biological degradation of chernozems under irrigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oksana Naydyonova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We studied the changes in the state of microbial cenosis of Ukraine’s chernozems under irrigation. Considerable part of Ukraine’s chernozems is located in the areas where humidification is insufficient and unstable. Irrigation is a soil-reclamation measure for chernozems of Ukrainian Forest-steppe and Steppe which enables getting the assured yield, especially vegetable and fodder crops. At the same time, irrigation is a powerful anthropogenic factor that affects the soil, causes a significant transformation of many of its properties and regimes including biological ones. Often these changes are negative. The purpose of our investigation was to identify changes in the state of microbial cenoses of chernozem soils under irrigation which depend on such factors as the quality of irrigation water, the duration and intensity of irrigation, the initial properties of soil, the structure of crop rotation, usage of fertilizing systems and agroameliorative techniques. We identified direction and evaluated a degree of changes in biological properties of chernozems under influence of irrigation in different agro-irrigational and soil-climatic conditions. In the long-term stationary field experiments we identified the following biological indices of irrigated soils and their non-irrigated analogues: a number of microorganisms which belong to main ecological-trophic groups, activity of soil enzymes (dehydrogenase, invertase, phenol oxidase, soil phytotoxic activity, cellulose destroying capacity of soil, indices of oligotrophy and mineralization, summary biological index (SBI and index of biological degradation (BDI. Results of researches showed that irrigation unbalanced the soil ecosystem and stipulated the forming of microbial cenosis with new parameters. Long-term intensive irrigation of typical chernozem (Kharkiv Region with fresh water under condition of 4-fields vegetable crop rotation led to the degradation changes of its microbial cenosis such as

  20. Irrigation Water Management in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aureo S de Oliveira

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Latin American countries show a great potential for expanding their irrigated areas. Irrigation is important for strengthening local and regional economy and for enhancing food security. The present paper aimed at providing a brief review on key aspects of irrigation management in Latin America. Poor irrigation management can have great impact on crop production and on environment while good management reduces the waste of soil and water and help farmers maximizing their profits. It was found that additional research is needed to allow a better understanding of crop water requirements under Latin American conditions as well as to provide farmers with local derived information for irrigation scheduling. The advantages of deficit irrigation practices and the present and future opportunities with the application of remote sensing tools for water management were also considered. It is clear that due to the importance of irrigated agriculture, collaborative work among Latin American researchers and institutions is of paramount importance to face the challenges imposed by a growing population, environment degradation, and competition in the global market.

  1. Irrigation water use in Kansas, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanning-Rush, Jennifer L.

    2016-03-22

    This report, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Kansas Department of Agriculture, Division of Water Resources, presents derivative statistics of 2013 irrigation water use in Kansas. The published regional and county-level statistics from the previous 4 years (2009–12) are shown with the 2013 statistics and are used to calculate a 5-year average. An overall Kansas average and regional averages also are calculated and presented. Total reported irrigation water use in 2013 was 3.3 million acre-feet of water applied to 3.0 million irrigated acres.

  2. Impact of irrigation, nitrogen fertilization, and spatial management on maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    The spatial management of irrigation water and N fertilization can be employed to reduce interactive effects, thus increasing water and N use efficiency and reducing pollution. Partial root-zone irrigation is a modified form of deficit irrigation which involves irrigating only one part of the root z...

  3. Using container weights to determine irrigation needs: A simple method

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Kasten Dumroese; Mark E. Montville; Jeremiah R. Pinto

    2015-01-01

    Proper irrigation can reduce water use, water waste, and incidence of disease. Knowing when to irrigate plants in container nurseries can be determined by weighing containers. This simple method is quantifiable, which is a benefit when more than one worker is responsible for irrigation. Irrigation is necessary when the container weighs some target as a proportion of...

  4. Validation of an extracted tooth model of endodontic irrigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, C K; Burnside, G; Chan, S N; Giles, L H; Jarad, F D

    2011-01-01

    An extracted tooth model of endodontic irrigation, incorporating reproducible inoculation and irrigation procedures, was tested against Enterococcus faecalis using a variety of different irrigants in a Latin square methodology. ANOVA revealed no significant variations between the twelve teeth or experiments undertaken on different occasions; however, variation between irrigants was significant. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Problems of Public Health Importance Associated with Irrigation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These effects arise from the source and quality of irrigation water, the irrigation method and the run-off from the irrigated land. The main effects are transmission of water-borne disease, proliferation of disease vectors with subsequent increase in water-based diseases, toxic effects from chemicals in irrigation water, and ...

  6. The effects of different irrigation levels on flowering and flower ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    “Judith”) plant grown in a plastic greenhouse and irrigated by a drip irrigation system under Mediterranean conditions was investigated. Irrigation intervals varied from 1 to 6 days in I1 and 4 to 12 days in I2 treatments. Both irrigation intervals (I) and pan coefficient (Pc) significantly influenced carnation yield. Maximum yields ...

  7. Is the Revitalisation of Smallholder Irrigation Schemes (RESIS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Smallholder irrigation in South Africa comprises only 3% of the irrigated area. Despite this relatively small area share, Limpopo Province is using the development of smallholder irrigation as a way of developing rural areas and correcting historical imbalances. Unlike the smallholder irrigation developed in most African ...

  8. Reform in Indian canal irrigation: does technology matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Narain, V.

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the implications of technology - the design of canal irrigation for irrigation management reform. With reference to two different design systems in Indian irrigation - shejpali and warabandi - it shows that the potential for reform varies with the design of canal irrigation.

  9. Productivity of irrigated gamba grass ( Andropogon Gayanus Kunth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Productivity of irrigated gamba grass ( Andropogon Gayanus Kunth ) as influenced by flood irrigation and compost manure levels in zaria. ... A field experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of varying levels of irrigation volume, irrigation frequency and compost manure application on growth components, forage yield ...

  10. Distribuição de água no solo aplicado por gotejamento enterrado e superficial Soil water distribution for subsurface and surface drip irrigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan C. Barros

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Devido à falta de estudos sobre o movimento da água quando aplicada abaixo da superfície, realizou-se este trabalho com o objetivo de avaliar a distribuição de água aplicada pelo sistema de gotejamento enterrado e convencional. O experimento de campo foi conduzido na área experimental do Departamento de Engenharia Rural da ESALQ/USP - Piracicaba, SP. Para o estudo, trincheiras foram abertas e instaladas sondas de TDR, dispostas a 0,05; 0,15; 0,25; 0,35 e 0,45 m profundidade, e a 0,05; 0,15; 0,25; 0,35 m comprimento, totalizando 17 sondas por trincheira. Os tratamentos foram baseados na profundidade de aplicação (0,0 e 0,10 m e vazão aplicada (2 e 4 L h-1: ENT2; ENT4; SUP2 e SUP4. A cada hora era aplicado 1 L de água (total de 10 L, seguida de leituras com o TDR. Medições do disco úmido e saturado foram feitas com régua milimetrada; além disso, estabeleceu-se um volume controle onde foi avaliada a uniformidade de aplicação; assim, foi possível verificar, em relação aos sistemas superficiais, que os sistemas enterrados apresentaram menor área superficial molhada e atingiram maior largura e profundidade; já as maiores concentrações foram obtidas próximas ao ponto de emissão.Studies of sub-surface water movement is an interesting topic in irrigation but, in spite of the its importance, there is little literature. One of the purposes of this study was to contribute to this subject and evaluate the distribution of water applied by both subsurface drip irrigation (SDI and conventional irrigation. Experiments were conducted at the Department of Rural Engineering (ESALQ/USP, located at Piracicaba, SP. Trenches were opened and 17 three-rod TDR probes were installed, placed at 0.05, 0.15, 0.25, 0.35 and 0.45 m depths, and to 0.05, 0.15, 0.25, 0.35 m intervals. This procedure was repeated using a dripper buried at 0 and 0.10 m for each discharge rate of 2 and 4 L h-1 tested. Wetted soil volume was observed with 1 L of water

  11. Role of sediment in the design and management of irrigation canals : Sunsari Morang Irrigation Scheme, Nepal

    OpenAIRE

    Paudel, K.

    2010-01-01

    Sediment transport in irrigation canals The sediment transport aspect is a major factor in irrigation development as it determines to a large extent the sustainability of an irrigation scheme, particularly in case of unlined canals in alluvial soils. Investigations in this respect started since Kennedy published his channel-forming discharge theory in 1895. Subsequently different theories have been developed and are used around the world. All of them assume uniform and steady flow conditions ...

  12. Analysis of Irrigation Water Quality at Kadawa Irrigation Project for Improved Productivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AR Sanda

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In the face of water scarcity and the several negative consequences, such as water wastage, flooding, water logging, soil losses and production losses, conserving the finite amount of fresh water is a must. The quality of irrigation water must therefore be ascertained. The chemical quality of three sources of irrigation water from canal and drainage water, namely drainage water, fresh irrigation water from canal, and drainage/irrigation water mixture, were analyzed from Kadawa irrigation Project for year 2013 and 2014 cropping seasons, with the view to evaluating the potential risks associated with their use in irrigation and hence their suitability or otherwise for irrigation purposes. The analysis revealed that the use of drainage water alone for irrigation may result in problems associated with salinity, while a blend of drainage/irrigation water in the ratio of 1:1 is a viable means of water conservation and a good means of crop production. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/ije.v3i3.11082 International Journal of Environment Vol.3(3 2014: 235-240

  13. ASPECTS OF DRIP IRRIGATION ON SLOPES

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Oprea Radu; Daniel Bucur

    2010-01-01

    .... Drip irrigation consists in the slow and controlled administration of water in the area of the root system of the plants for the purposes of fulfilling their physiological needs and is considered...

  14. Research Group "Irrigation, Agronomy and the Environment"

    OpenAIRE

    Aragüés Lafarga, Ramón; Playán Jubillar, Enrique

    2013-01-01

    Research Group Objective: Generate scientific and technological information in the “soil-water-cropatmosphere” interface leading to more competitive, efficient and sustainable agricultural systems with emphasis on irrigation, agronomy and the environment, and with an applied-research focus.

  15. Estimated Irrigated Agricultural Water Use In 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset is a 100-meter cell resolution raster dataset of estimated use of irrigated agricultural water use data for the southwestern U.S. The dataset was...

  16. Micro-pressure drip irrigation technology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-05-17

    May 17, 2010 ... 1National Engineering Research Center for Water-saving Irrigation at Yangling, Institute of Soil and Water .... between minimum pipe wall thickness, δ, and pressure is: ..... First, water supply and fertilizer injection devices for.

  17. Automatic bladder irrigation after vaginal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, G; Holt, E

    1975-12-01

    Comparing Cystomatic irrigation of the bladder with conventional gravity drainage, there was no decrease in immediate urinary infection rates nor was there any obvious improvement in the speed of recovery of bladder function.

  18. Strategic irrigation against apple scab (Venturia inaequalis)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsgaard, Maren

    2012-01-01

    In Denmark there are several organic orchards, that do not spray at all, and they seek non-spraying methods to prevent apple scab. In this pilot trial, irrigation with water at strategic moments was tested to prevent scab-infection. In April-June 2011 in five organic orchards we irrigated...... the orchard floor, to force the ascospores to be released. We irrigated with at least 0.2 mm of water in dry periods, at least 12 hours before rain forecast. The idea was to empty the stock of ascospores during dry spells, so they would dry out without infecting the leaves. To find the best strategic times...... for irrigation, we used the local weather forecast and the scab-warning programme Rimpro based on data from climate stations located in the orchards. In this first year of trial we experienced difficulties in spreading the water evenly. A water wagon turned out to work better than sprinklers. We found...

  19. Water users associations and irrigation water pricing

    OpenAIRE

    Srđević, Zorica; Srđević, Bojan

    2012-01-01

    A brief review of contemporary discussion on irrigation water pricing and implementation of related strategies to collect annual fees is presented. Emphasis is on water pricing and its relation to water users associations' interests and real power. An example from Spain is provided to illustrate how contemporary multi-criteria analysis and its tools (AHP and TOPSIS) can be used to identify best irrigation water pricing and collection strategy; two water districts with 1500 farmers served as c...

  20. Proceedings of the solar irrigation workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-06-01

    The ERDA Solar Irrigation Workshop was structured to be a major vehicle for information dissemination and technology transfer. It covered a wide range of subject matter related to crop irrigation including current hardware, economics, experiments, and international requirements. Speakers represented manufacturers, ranchers, governmental entities, universities and research firms. The proceedings consist of one page abstracts for each presentation, a brief biographical sketch of each speaker and sources for further information on each subject.

  1. Soil resistivity monitoring of an irrigation experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Dahlin, Torleif; Aronsson, Par; Thornelof, Mats

    2014-01-01

    Resistivity measurements were used for tracing water transport during a three-year irrigation study. Three different rates of landfill leachate irrigation and one control treatment were applied to two cultivars of short-rotation willow coppice. Groundwater level measurements and water sampling were carried out in pipes installed in the centre of each plot. Resistivity was measured with permanently installed electrodes along six lines running through the centre of the plots. The resistivity re...

  2. System contemplations for precision irrigation in agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Martin J. W.

    2017-04-01

    This communication contemplates political, biological and technical aspects for efficient and profitable irrigation in sustainable agriculture. A standard for irrigation components is proposed. The need for many, and three-dimensionally distributed, soil measurement points is explained, thus enabling the control of humidity in selected layers of earth. Combined wireless and wired data transmission is proposed. Energy harvesting and storage together with mechanical sensor construction are discussed.

  3. Smart Water Conservation System for Irrigated Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    a semi - arid climate , where indoor air is mostly re-circulated, and HVAC unit temperature set points are intentionally high to conserve energy...Traditional Irrigation System • May be applicable in any climate (i.e., arid and/or semi - arid ). • Are economical in many regions of the country where...consumption for irrigation at our DoD installations located in semi - arid regions where alternative water conservation measures are being pursued. The

  4. Coil irrigation in sugar cane (Saccharum officinarum)

    OpenAIRE

    Jesús Sánchez Gutiérrez; Yoslén Fernández Gálvez; Mayra Martínez Pírez; Camilo Bonet Pérez; Manuel A Hernández Victoria; Arlandy Noy Perera

    2016-01-01

    This study was made at the Basic Seed Bank of the Local Sugar Cane Research Station for the Mideastern Cuba, based in Camaguey, on brown carbonate soil, between 2013 and 12014. Coil irrigation was applied to meet the water requirements for the crop, according to the edafoclimatic conditions and the different phenological phases it has. The Savo method was used to determine useful rain water. Adjustment and complementation of the irrigation program was based on indicators that characterize the...

  5. Simulated climate effects of desert irrigation geoengineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Wei; Moore, John C.; Cao, Long; Ji, Duoying; Zhao, Liyun

    2017-04-01

    Geoengineering, the deliberate large-scale manipulation of earth’s energy balance to counteract global warming, is an attractive proposition for sparsely populated deserts. We use the BNU and UVic Earth system models to simulate the effects of irrigating deserts under the RCP8.5 scenario. Previous studies focused on increasing desert albedo to reduce global warming; in contrast we examine how extending afforestation and ecological projects, that successfully improve regional environments, fair for geoengineering purposes. As expected desert irrigation allows vegetation to grow, with bare soil or grass gradually becoming shrub or tree covered, with increases in terrestrial carbon storage of 90.3 Pg C (UVic-ESCM) - 143.9 Pg C (BNU-ESM). Irrigating global deserts makes the land surface temperature decrease by 0.48 °C and land precipitation increase by 100 mm yr-1. In the irrigated areas, BNU-ESM simulates significant cooling of up to 4.2 °C owing to the increases in low cloud and latent heat which counteract the warming effect due to decreased surface albedo. Large volumes of water would be required to maintain global desert irrigation, equivalent 10 mm/year of global sea level (BNU-ESM) compensate for evapotranspiration losses. Differences in climate responses between the deserts prompt research into tailored albedo-irrigation schemes.

  6. Grower demand for sensor-controlled irrigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenberg, Erik; Majsztrik, John; Saavoss, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Water scarcity is likely to increase in the coming years, making improvements in irrigation efficiency increasingly important. An emerging technology that promises to increase irrigation efficiency substantially is a wireless irrigation sensor network that uploads sensor data into irrigation management software, creating an integrated system that allows real-time monitoring and control of moisture status that has been shown in experimental settings to reduce irrigation costs, lower plant loss rates, shorten production times, decrease pesticide application, and increase yield, quality, and profit. We use an original survey to investigate likely initial acceptance, ceiling adoption rates, and profitability of this new sensor network technology in the nursery and greenhouse industry. We find that adoption rates for a base system and demand for expansion components are decreasing in price, as expected. The price elasticity of the probability of adoption suggests that sensor networks are likely to diffuse at a rate somewhat greater than that of drip irrigation. Adoption rates for a base system and demand for expansion components are increasing in specialization in ornamental production: growers earning greater shares of revenue from greenhouse and nursery operations are willing to pay more for a base system and are willing to purchase larger numbers of expansion components at any given price. We estimate that growers who are willing to purchase a sensor network expect investment in this technology to generate significant profit, consistent with findings from experimental studies.

  7. Congenital nasolacrimal duct obstruction: irrigation or probing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y S; Moon, S C; Yoo, K W

    2000-12-01

    The authors investigated the efficacy of antibiotic irrigation as the therapeutic option in congenital nasolacrimal duct obstruction. We retrospectively reviewed the medical record of 76 patients' eyes in whom congenital nasolacrimal duct obstruction had been diagnosed. In 50 of these patients, the colonizing microorganism was identified and, irrigation through canaliculi was performed using antibiotics of suitable sensitivity. Nasolacrimal system probing was performed on 26 patients as the control group. Treatment was regarded successful when over a 4 week period epiphora or mucous discharge disappeared and when saline passed without resistance on irrigation. 96.0% of patients in the irrigation group and 84.6% of patients in probing group were treated successfully. There was no statistical difference in the success rate between the two groups (P = 0.173). The recovery period based on culture results was 3.22 +/- 0.37 months in the group in which microorganisms were isolated and 2.39 +/- 0.35 months in the group in which no organisms were isolated. There were no statistically significant differences in the success rates between the group in which there was growth and the group in which there was no growth (P = 0.1308). Thus a similar result was obtained using nasolacrimal probing and canaliculus antibiotic irrigation in congenital nasolacrimal duct obstruction. Antibiotic irrigation is a safe and simple therapeutic option in congenital nasolacrimal duct obstruction.

  8. Irrigation efficiency and quality of irrigation return flows in the Ebro River Basin: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Causapé, J; Quílez, D; Aragüés, R

    2006-06-01

    The review analysis of twenty two irrigation efficiency (IE) studies carried out in the Ebro River Basin shows that IE is low (average IE)(avg)(= 53%) in surface-irrigated areas with high-permeable and shallow soils inadequate for this irrigation system, high (IE)(avg)(= 79%) in surface-irrigated areas with appropriate soils for this system, and very high (IE)(avg)(= 94%) in modern, automated and well managed sprinkler-irrigated areas. The unitary salt (total dissolved solids) and nitrate loads exported in the irrigation return flows (IRF) of seven districts vary, depending on soil salinity and on irrigation and N fertilization management, between 3-16 Mg salt/ha x year and 23-195 kg NO)(3) (-)-N/ha x year, respectively. The lower nitrate loads exported from high IE districts show that a proper irrigation design and management is a key factor to reduce off-site nitrogen pollution. Although high IE's also reduce off-site salt pollution, the presence of salts in the soil or subsoil may induce relatively high salt loads (>or=14 Mg/ha x year) even in high IE districts. Two important constrains identified in our revision were the short duration of most surveys and the lack of standards for conducting irrigation efficiency and mass balance studies at the irrigation district level. These limitations {emphasize the need for the establishment of a permanent and standardized network of drainage monitoring stations for the appropriate off-site pollution diagnosis and control of irrigated agriculture.

  9. Sustainable management after irrigation system transfer: experiences in Colombia: the RUT irrigation district

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cobo, N.U.

    2006-01-01

    This book is focused in the formulation of a framework for the sustainable management of the irrigation systems transferred to the users organizations by the government. It describes the experience of the irrigation management transfer in Colombia, the impacts from a technical, social, environment

  10. Role of irrigation and irrigation automation in improving crop water use efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    In arid climates, irrigation is required for significant agricultural production. In subhumid and semiarid climates, supplemental irrigation is recognized as both economically necessary (prevention of crop losses in periodic droughts) and as a means to improve overall crop water use effi...

  11. Biofilms in irrigation pipes affect the microbial quality of irrigation water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irrigation is an essential element in the production of many food crops. Irrigation water is often delivered to fields from surface or subsurface sources via pipe-based systems. Surface waters are known to contain pathogenic microorganisms. Disease outbreaks in crops that are eaten raw (i.e. leafy g...

  12. Performing drip irrigation by the farmer managed Seguia Khrichfa irrigation system, Morocco

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, van der S.

    2016-01-01

    Drip irrigation is represented in literature and agricultural policies as a modern and water saving technology. Because this technology is often associated with ‘modern’ agriculture and development, it seems out-of-place in ‘traditional’ farmer managed irrigation systems

  13. Comparison between ultrasonic irrigation and syringe irrigation in clinical and laboratory studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shulan; Liu, Jianxin; Dong, Gang; Peng, Bin; Yang, Pishan; Chen, Zhenggang; Yang, Fang; Guo, Dawei

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonic irrigation and syringe irrigation were compared for their efficacy at cleaning root canal in vivo and in vitro. The in vivo study used 60 anterior teeth or premolars from 60 patients with periapical periodontitis who were randomly assigned to a syringe irrigation group (group S) or an ultrasonic irrigation group (group U). After instrumentation with a K-file using the step-back technique, the two groups received ultrasonic or syringe irrigation using 40 mL of 2.5% NaOCl respectively, followed by conventional lateral compaction. The in vitro study used 60 extracted single-canal premolars, which were also divided into U and S groups, and underwent the same irrigation and compaction. Forty of them were evaluated histologically by light microscopy, and the remaining 20 by scanning electron microscopy. No difference in main root canal filling was observed between the U and S groups. Notably, group U had a larger number of obturated lateral canals than group S. Moreover, a smaller amount of organic debris and more open dentinal tubules were observed in the root canal in group U than in group S. Our findings suggest that ultrasonic irrigation has a greater capacity to clean instrumented root canals than syringe irrigation. (J Oral Sci 58, 373-378, 2016).

  14. Economic feasibility of converting center pivot irrigation to subsurface drip irrigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Advancements in irrigation technology have increased water use efficiency. However, producers can be reluctant to convert to a more efficient irrigation system when the initial investment costs are high. This study examines the economic feasibility of replacing low energy precision application (LEPA...

  15. Irrigation Requirement Estimation Using Vegetation Indices and Inverse Biophysical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bounoua, Lahouari; Imhoff, Marc L.; Franks, Shannon

    2010-01-01

    We explore an inverse biophysical modeling process forced by satellite and climatological data to quantify irrigation requirements in semi-arid agricultural areas. We constrain the carbon and water cycles modeled under both equilibrium, balance between vegetation and climate, and non-equilibrium, water added through irrigation. We postulate that the degree to which irrigated dry lands vary from equilibrium climate conditions is related to the amount of irrigation. The amount of water required over and above precipitation is considered as an irrigation requirement. For July, results show that spray irrigation resulted in an additional amount of water of 1.3 mm per occurrence with a frequency of 24.6 hours. In contrast, the drip irrigation required only 0.6 mm every 45.6 hours or 46% of that simulated by the spray irrigation. The modeled estimates account for 87% of the total reported irrigation water use, when soil salinity is not important and 66% in saline lands.

  16. Irrigation Analysis Based on Long-Term Weather Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James R. Mahan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Irrigation management is based upon delivery of water to a crop in the correct amount and time, and the crop’s water need is determined by calculating evapotranspiration (ET using weather data. In 1994, an ET-network was established in the Texas High Plains to manage irrigation on a regional scale. Though producers used the ET-network, by 2010 public access was discontinued. Why did producers allow a valuable irrigation-management tool to be eliminated? Our objective was to analyze the effect of declining well capacities on the usefulness of cotton ET (ETc for irrigation. Thirty years (1975–2004 of daily ETc data were used to compare irrigation demand vs. irrigation responses at four locations, analyzed for multiple years and range of well capacities for three irrigation-intervals. Results indicated that when well capacities declined to the point that over-irrigation was not possible, the lower well capacities reduced the value of ETc in terms of the number of irrigations and total amount of water applied. At well capacities <1514 L·min−1 the fraction of irrigations for which ETc information was used to determine the irrigation amount was <35% across years and irrigation intervals. The value of an ETc-based irrigation may fall into disuse when irrigation-water supplies decline.

  17. Cleaning of Root Canal System by Different Irrigation Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanomaru-Filho, Mário; Miano, Lucas Martinati; Chávez-Andrade, Gisselle Moraima; Torres, Fernanda Ferrari Esteves; Leonardo, Renato de Toledo; Guerreiro-Tanomaru, Juliane Maria

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the cleaning of main and lateral canals using the irrigation methods: negative pressure irrigation (EndoVac system), passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI) and manual irrigation (MI). Resin teeth were used. After root canal preparation, four lateral canals were made at 2 and 7 mm from the apex. Root canals were filled with contrast solution and radiographed pre- and post-irrigation using digital radiographic system [radiovisiography (RVG)]. The irrigation protocols were: MI1-manual irrigation [22 G needle at 5 mm short of working length-WL]; MI2-manual irrigation (30G needle at 2 mm short of WL); PUI; EV1-EndoVac (microcannula at 1 mm short of WL); EV2-Endovac (microcannula at 3 mm short of WL). The obtained images, initial (filled with contrast solution) and final (after irrigation) were analyzed by using image tool 3.0 software. Statistical analysis was performed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey tests (5% significance level). EV1 and EV2, followed by PUI showed better cleaning capacity than manual irrigation (MI1 and MI2) (p irrigation and PUI promoted better cleaning of main and simulated lateral canals. Conventional manual irrigation technique may promote less root canal cleaning in the apical third. For this reason, the search for other irrigation protocols is important, and EndoVac and PUI are alternatives to contribute to irrigation effectiveness.

  18. ASPECTS OF DRIP IRRIGATION ON SLOPES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oprea Radu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, water and its supply raise problems of strategic importance, of great complexity, being considered one of the keys to sustainable human development. Drip irrigation consists in the slow and controlled administration of water in the area of the root system of the plants for the purposes of fulfilling their physiological needs and is considered to be one of the variants of localized irrigation. Water is distributed in a uniform and slow manner, drop by drop, in a quantity and with a frequency that depend on the needs of the plant, thanks to the exact regulation of the water flow rate and pressure, as well as to the activation of the irrigation based on the information recorded by the tensiometer with regard to soil humidity. This method enables the exact dosage of the water quantity necessary in the various evolution stages of the plant, thus eliminating losses. By applying the irrigation with 5 liters of water per linear meter, at a 7 days interval, in the month of august, for a vine cultivated on a slope, in layers covered with black film and irrigated via dropping, soil humidity immediately after irrigation reaches its highest level, but within the limits of active humidity, on the line of the irrigation band. Three days later, the water content of the soil in the layer is relatively uniform, and, after this interval, it is higher in the points situated at the basis of the film. This technology of cultivation on slopes favors the accumulation, in the soil, of the water resulted from heavy rains and reduces soil losses as a result of erosion.

  19. Wavelet-cointegration prediction of irrigation water in the irrigation district

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinping; Li, Yanyan; Zhao, Yong; Hong, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Affected by various influencing factors, many time series analysis methods are used to predict irrigation water. However, it is often assumed to be stationary for the hydrologic time series which will result in an insignificant "spurious regression". Actually, irrigation water is largely determined by rainfall and crop water requirement in the irrigation district. With the wavelet analysis method, the varying fluctuation characteristics of rainfall, irrigation water, and crop water requirement with multi-temporal scales are exhibited. The cointegration equilibrium relationship amongst their original time series and decomposed time series are also revealed by the cointegration theory. Combining the wavelet analysis method with the cointegration theory, the wavelet-cointegration prediction model of irrigation water is proposed. The results show that the model has the available prediction accuracy, and the relative errors of all predicted years are less than 5%, except 2004 and 2012.

  20. Irrigation Training Manual. Planning, Design, Operation, and Management of Small-Scale Irrigation Systems [and] Irrigation Reference Manual. A Technical Reference to Be Used with the Peace Corps Irrigation Training Manual T0076 in the Selection, Planning, Design, Operation, and Management of Small-Scale Irrigation Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, LeRoy; And Others

    This resource for trainers involved in irrigated agriculture training for Peace Corps volunteers consists of two parts: irrigation training manual and irrigation reference manual. The complete course should fully prepare volunteers serving as irrigation, specialists to plan, implement, evaluate and manage small-scale irrigation projects in arid,…

  1. Carbon and water footprints of irrigated corn and non-irrigated wheat in Northeast Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahão, Raphael; Carvalho, Monica; Causapé, Jesús

    2017-02-01

    Irrigation increases yields and allows several crops to be produced in regions where it would be naturally impossible due to limited rainfall. However, irrigation can cause several negative environmental impacts, and it is important to understand these in depth for the correct application of mitigation measures. The life cycle assessment methodology was applied herein to compare the main irrigated and non-irrigated crops in Northeast Spain (corn and wheat, respectively), identifying those processes with greater contribution to environmental impacts (carbon and water footprint categories) and providing scientifically-sound information to facilitate government decisions. Due to concerns about climate change and water availability, the methods selected for evaluation of environmental impacts were IPCC 2013 GWP (carbon footprint) and water scarcity indicator (water footprint). The area studied, a 7.38-km(2) basin, was monitored for 12 years, including the period before, during, and after the implementation of irrigation. The functional unit, to which all material and energy flows were associated with, was the cultivation of 1 ha, throughout 1 year. The overall carbon footprint for irrigated corn was higher, but when considering the higher productivity achieved with irrigation, the emissions per kilogram of corn decrease and finally favor this irrigated crop. When considering the water footprint, the volumes of irrigation water applied were so high that productivity could not compensate for the negative impacts associated with water use in the case of corn. Nevertheless, consideration of productivities and gross incomes brings the results closer. Fertilizer use (carbon footprint) and irrigation water (water footprint) were the main contributors to the negative impacts detected.

  2. Multiple resolution chirp reflectometry for fault localization and diagnosis in a high voltage cable in automotive electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Seung Jin; Lee, Chun Ku; Shin, Yong-June; Park, Jin Bae

    2016-12-01

    A multiple chirp reflectometry system with a fault estimation process is proposed to obtain multiple resolution and to measure the degree of fault in a target cable. A multiple resolution algorithm has the ability to localize faults, regardless of fault location. The time delay information, which is derived from the normalized cross-correlation between the incident signal and bandpass filtered reflected signals, is converted to a fault location and cable length. The in-phase and quadrature components are obtained by lowpass filtering of the mixed signal of the incident signal and the reflected signal. Based on in-phase and quadrature components, the reflection coefficient is estimated by the proposed fault estimation process including the mixing and filtering procedure. Also, the measurement uncertainty for this experiment is analyzed according to the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement. To verify the performance of the proposed method, we conduct comparative experiments to detect and measure faults under different conditions. Considering the installation environment of the high voltage cable used in an actual vehicle, target cable length and fault position are designed. To simulate the degree of fault, the variety of termination impedance (10 Ω , 30 Ω , 50 Ω , and 1 \\text{k} Ω ) are used and estimated by the proposed method in this experiment. The proposed method demonstrates advantages in that it has multiple resolution to overcome the blind spot problem, and can assess the state of the fault.

  3. Spaceborne GNSS reflectometry for ocean winds: First results from the UK TechDemoSat-1 mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foti, Giuseppe; Gommenginger, Christine; Jales, Philip; Unwin, Martin; Shaw, Andrew; Robertson, Colette; Roselló, Josep

    2015-07-01

    First results are presented for ocean surface wind speed retrieval from reflected GPS signals measured by the low Earth orbiting UK TechDemoSat-1 satellite (TDS-1). Launched in July 2014, TDS-1 provides the first new spaceborne Global Navigation Satellite System-Reflectometry (GNSS-R) data since the pioneering UK-Disaster Monitoring Mission (UK-DMC) experiment in 2003. Examples of onboard-processed delay-Doppler maps reveal excellent data quality for winds up to 27.9 m/s. Collocated Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT) winds are used to develop and evaluate a wind speed algorithm based on signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the bistatic radar equation. For SNRs greater than 3 dB, wind speed is retrieved without bias and a precision around 2.2 m/s between 3 and 18 m/s even without calibration. Exploiting lower SNR signals, however, requires good knowledge of the antenna beam, platform attitude, and instrument gain setting. This study demonstrates the capabilities of low-cost, low-mass, and low-power GNSS-R receivers ahead of their launch on the NASA Cyclone GNSS (CYGNSS) constellation in 2016.

  4. Field Measurements and Numerical Simulations of Temperature and Moisture in Highway Engineering Using a Frequency Domain Reflectometry Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yong-Sheng; Zheng, Jian-Long; Chen, Zeng-Shun; Zhang, Jun-Hui; Li, Yong

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a systematic pioneering study on the use of agricultural-purpose frequency domain reflectometry (FDR) sensors to monitor temperature and moisture of a subgrade in highway extension and reconstruction engineering. The principle of agricultural-purpose FDR sensors and the process for embedding this kind of sensors for subgrade engineering purposes are introduced. Based on field measured weather data, a numerical analysis model for temperature and moisture content in the subgrade’s soil is built. Comparisons of the temperature and moisture data obtained from numerical simulation and FDR-based measurements are conducted. The results show that: (1) the embedding method and process, data acquisition, and remote transmission presented are reasonable; (2) the temperature and moisture changes are coordinated with the atmospheric environment and they are also in close agreement with numerical calculations; (3) the change laws of both are consistent at positions where the subgrade is compacted uniformly. These results suggest that the data measured by the agricultural-purpose FDR sensors are reliable. The findings of this paper enable a new and effective real-time monitoring method for a subgrade’s temperature and moisture changes, and thus broaden the application of agricultural-purpose FDR sensors. PMID:27294935

  5. Adsorption of bovine serum albumin on previously formed PAH/PSS multilayer: a stagnation point optical reflectometry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primorac, Elena; Dapić, Irena; Strbe, Nina; Kovacević, Davor

    2010-03-01

    The method of stagnation point optical reflectometry was applied for investigation of adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) on previously formed poly(allylamine hydrochloride)/poly(sodium 4-styrenesulphonate) (PAH/PSS) multilayer with PAH being a terminal layer. The solid substrate was silica in the form of silicon wafers carrying an oxide layer. In order to interpret the adsorption of BSA, the build-up mechanism of PAH/PSS multilayers was examined with special emphasis on the effect of electrolyte concentration, pH of solution, and the anchoring (precursor) layer on that process. Additionally, the effect of BSA concentration and of the anchoring layer on BSA adsorption was investigated. It was shown that in all investigated systems the adsorption of BSA depends on conditions under which the multilayer was formed (ionic strength, pH and presence of an anchoring layer), as well as on BSA concentration. It follows that adsorption of BSA could be controlled not only by choosing suitable BSA concentration, but also by modifying the preformed multilayer.

  6. First Spaceborne GNSS-Reflectometry Observations of Hurricanes From the UK TechDemoSat-1 Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foti, Giuseppe; Gommenginger, Christine; Srokosz, Meric

    2017-12-01

    We present the first examples of Global Navigation Satellite Systems-Reflectometry (GNSS-R) observations of hurricanes using spaceborne data from the UK TechDemoSat-1 (TDS-1) mission. We confirm that GNSS-R signals can detect ocean condition changes in very high near-surface ocean wind associated with hurricanes. TDS-1 GNSS-R reflections were collocated with International Best Track Archive for Climate Stewardship (IBTrACS) hurricane data, MetOp ASCAT A/B scatterometer winds, and two reanalysis products. Clear variations of GNSS-R reflected power (σ0) are observed as reflections travel through hurricanes, in some cases up to and through the eye wall. The GNSS-R reflected power is tentatively inverted to estimate wind speed using the TDS-1 baseline wind retrieval algorithm developed for low to moderate winds. Despite this, TDS-1 GNSS-R winds through the hurricanes show closer agreement with IBTrACS estimates than winds provided by scatterometers and reanalyses. GNSS-R wind profiles show realistic spatial patterns and sharp gradients that are consistent with expected structures around the eye of tropical cyclones.

  7. Deep in situ dry-etch monitoring of III-V multilayer structures using laser reflectometry and reflectivity modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Moussa, H; Meriadec, C; Manin, L; Sagnes, I; Raj, R

    2002-01-01

    Deep reactive ion etching of III-V multilayer structures is an important issue for long wavelength vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSELs) where full laser structures are usually very thick. Test etchings were performed on GaAs/Al sub x Ga sub 1 sub - sub x As Bragg mirror structures and monitored using laser reflectometry at 651.4 nm. In order to perform very deep etching, up to 9 mu m, we designed and fabricated a special two-level mask made up of a thick nitride layer and a thin nickel layer. The etching rate is a complex function of many parameters and may change from run to run for similar structures. Therefore, it is important to have a method to control accurately the process in situ by continuously matching, experimental curves with the results of the reflectivity modeling. Here, we present a model, based on the Abeles matrix method, of the normal incidence reflectivity of a multilayer stack as a function of etch depth. Comparison between the model and the observed reflectivity variation durin...

  8. Field Measurements and Numerical Simulations of Temperature and Moisture in Highway Engineering Using a Frequency Domain Reflectometry Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Sheng Yao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a systematic pioneering study on the use of agricultural-purpose frequency domain reflectometry (FDR sensors to monitor temperature and moisture of a subgrade in highway extension and reconstruction engineering. The principle of agricultural-purpose FDR sensors and the process for embedding this kind of sensors for subgrade engineering purposes are introduced. Based on field measured weather data, a numerical analysis model for temperature and moisture content in the subgrade’s soil is built. Comparisons of the temperature and moisture data obtained from numerical simulation and FDR-based measurements are conducted. The results show that: (1 the embedding method and process, data acquisition, and remote transmission presented are reasonable; (2 the temperature and moisture changes are coordinated with the atmospheric environment and they are also in close agreement with numerical calculations; (3 the change laws of both are consistent at positions where the subgrade is compacted uniformly. These results suggest that the data measured by the agricultural-purpose FDR sensors are reliable. The findings of this paper enable a new and effective real-time monitoring method for a subgrade’s temperature and moisture changes, and thus broaden the application of agricultural-purpose FDR sensors.

  9. Bacteriological analysis of horticultural irrigation water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ákylla Fernanda Souza Silva

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed the quality of water used for the irrigation of five crops based upon microorganism indicators of fecal contamination (group coliforms and contamination by organic material (Pseudomonas aeruginosa in both the water and in the irrigated food. The study also verified the decrease in the activity of these microorganisms by heterotrophic bacterial count before and after treatment with three different sanitizers. The presence of coliform (NMP > 1600 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa was observed in both the irrigation water and in the irrigated food, and the coefficient of variation (R2 revealed a strong correlation between the rates of contamination of the water and food. All of the sanitizers evaluated reduced the bacterial load of the food, especially sanitization with vinegar at 200 ppm, which, in addition to greatly reducing food contamination, is also considered a low-cost and toxicologically safe product, and therefore may be indicated for this purpose. Thus, the use of poor quality water in the irrigation of vegetables may directly contribute to food contamination, with serious implications for the health of consumers.

  10. Caloric testing by continuous automatic alternating irrigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reker, U

    1980-01-01

    Quantitative caloric test results show a high variability. They were described as questionable by Frenzel (1955) and a review of the test was recommended by Hood (1973). Thus, we developed a new method: continuous automatic alternating irrigation. An irrigator is connected to two water-baths of 30 degrees C and 44 degrees C. A time-relays switches over from one bath to the other every 60 s. The continuous, but alternating, irrigations produce subsequently alternating exponential temperature waves in the temporal bone. The mathematical model shows a quasi-periodicity and sufficient symmetry of the alternating thermal gradient across the canal, except for the first stimulus. After 11 irrigations of 60 s, a short (20 s) "washout" irrigation terminates the sequence. By the five repetitions of each stimulus and the additional possibility of correlating the response to the paper-marked stimulus periodicity the judgement is far more reliable and therefore, in doubtful cases, despite the five-fold data, quicker. The technical device is simple enough for routine use and inexpensive. The results of the caloric test are now much more clear-cut and the correlation to a known clinical pathology is remarkably high.

  11. Municipal Treated Wastewater Irrigation: Microbiological Risk Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Lonigro

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Municipal wastewater for irrigation, though treated, can contain substances and pathogens toxic for humans and animals. Pathogens, although not harmful from an agronomical aspect, undoubtedly represent a major concern with regards to sanitary and hygienic profile. In fact, vegetable crops irrigated with treated wastewater exalt the risk of infection since these products can also be eaten raw, as well as transformed or cooked. Practically, the evaluation of the microbiological risk is important to verify if the microbial limits imposed by law for treated municipal wastewater for irrigation, are valid, thus justifying the treatments costs, or if they are too low and, therefore, they don’ t justify them. Different probabilistic models have been studied to assess the microbiological risk; among these, the Beta-Poisson model resulted the most reliable. Thus, the Dipartimento di Scienze delle Produzioni Vegetali of the University of Bari, which has been carrying out researches on irrigation with municipal filtered wastewater for several years, considered interesting to verify if the microbial limits imposed by the italian law n.185/03 are too severe, estimating the biological risk by the probabilistic Beta-Poisson model. Results of field trials on vegetable crops irrigated by municipal filtered wastewater, processed by the Beta-Poisson model, show that the probability to get infection and/or illness is extremely low, and that the actual italian microbial limits are excessively restrictive.

  12. Coil irrigation in sugar cane (Saccharum officinarum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Sánchez Gutiérrez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was made at the Basic Seed Bank of the Local Sugar Cane Research Station for the Mideastern Cuba, based in Camaguey, on brown carbonate soil, between 2013 and 12014. Coil irrigation was applied to meet the water requirements for the crop, according to the edafoclimatic conditions and the different phenological phases it has. The Savo method was used to determine useful rain water. Adjustment and complementation of the irrigation program was based on indicators that characterize the exploitation scheme. The machine´s working parameters were determined to meet the water needs, and increase crop´s overall yields. The evaluations and results achieved have contributed to new proposals for management and operation of coil irrigation, and they are important to increase its efficiency.

  13. Assessment of drainage water quality in pre- and post-irrigation seasons for supplemental irrigation use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexakis, Dimitris; Gotsis, Dimitris; Giakoumakis, Spyros

    2012-08-01

    Knowledge on hydrochemistry is very important to assess the quality of water for effective management of water resources or drainage water reuse. On this basis, an assessment of water quality was conducted in the Agoulinitsa district in Peloponnese (western Greece). Both drainage and irrigation channel water samples have been collected, treated, and subjected to chemical analysis. A characterization has been carried out using the Piper-trilinear diagram. Assessment of the water samples from the point of view of sodium adsorption ratio, Na(+)%, and residual sodium carbonate indicated that 60.0% and 83.3% of the drainage water samples during pre- and post-irrigation season, respectively, as well as the irrigation channel water samples, are chemically suitable for irrigation use. Moreover, assessment of the water samples by comparing quality parameters with the Food and Agriculture Organization guidelines indicated that 20.0% and 44.4% of the drainage water samples collected during pre- and post-irrigation season, respectively, as well as the irrigation channel water samples could cause slight to moderate problems to the plants. On the other hand, 80.0% and 55.6% of the drainage water samples collected during pre- and post-irrigation season, respectively, could cause immediate development of severe problems to the plants growth.

  14. The occurrence of heavy metals in irrigated and non-irrigated arable soils, NW Albania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasa, Elian; Felix-Henningsen, Peter; Duering, Rolf-Alexander; Gjoka, Fran

    2014-06-01

    The study analysed the content of heavy metals in surface soil and sediment samples from the Bregu i Matit Plain in NW Albania in relation to irrigation in order to evaluate the soil pollution and the potential risk to human health. Evaluation of soil pollution was performed using the enrichment factor and geo-accumulation index. Contents of cadmium, chromium and nickel of irrigated soils were significantly higher than those of non-irrigated soil, while contents of lead (in three of the irrigated locations), zinc and arsenic (in one of the irrigated locations) were significantly lower. Correlation analysis (CA) and principal component analysis (PCA) indicated that the primary source of the first three metals was irrigation, and the last three metals were originated from other anthropic sources, like the use of chemicals, etc. Enrichment factor (E f) calculation showed that irrigated soils were most enriched in cadmium, chromium, copper and nickel. Index of geo-accumulation (I geo) revealed that arable soils of Bregu i Matit are unpolluted to moderately polluted with cadmium, chromium, copper and zinc and moderately to strongly polluted with nickel and arsenic. The presence of heavy metals in the studied soils indicates a potential risk of transfer of these elements in the food chain. Therefore, further studies on the speciation of heavy metals in the studied soils in order to evaluate their mobility are needed.

  15. Modeling the future of irrigation: A parametric description of pressure compensating drip irrigation emitter performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamshery, Pulkit; Wang, Ruo-Qian; Tran, Davis V; Winter V, Amos G

    2017-01-01

    Drip irrigation is a means of distributing the exact amount of water a plant needs by dripping water directly onto the root zone. It can produce up to 90% more crops than rain-fed irrigation, and reduce water consumption by 70% compared to conventional flood irrigation. Drip irrigation may enable millions of poor farmers to rise out of poverty by growing more and higher value crops, while not contributing to overconsumption of water. Achieving this impact will require broadening the engineering knowledge required to design new, low-cost, low-power drip irrigation technology, particularly for poor, off-grid communities in developing countries. For more than 50 years, pressure compensating (PC) drip emitters-which can maintain a constant flow rate under variations in pressure, to ensure uniform water distribution on a field-have been designed and optimized empirically. This study presents a parametric model that describes the fluid and solid mechanics that govern the behavior of a common PC emitter architecture, which uses a flexible diaphragm to limit flow. The model was validated by testing nine prototypes with geometric variations, all of which matched predicted performance to within R2 = 0.85. This parametric model will enable irrigation engineers to design new drip emitters with attributes that improve performance and lower cost, which will promote the use of drip irrigation throughout the world.

  16. Modeling the future of irrigation: A parametric description of pressure compensating drip irrigation emitter performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pulkit Shamshery

    Full Text Available Drip irrigation is a means of distributing the exact amount of water a plant needs by dripping water directly onto the root zone. It can produce up to 90% more crops than rain-fed irrigation, and reduce water consumption by 70% compared to conventional flood irrigation. Drip irrigation may enable millions of poor farmers to rise out of poverty by growing more and higher value crops, while not contributing to overconsumption of water. Achieving this impact will require broadening the engineering knowledge required to design new, low-cost, low-power drip irrigation technology, particularly for poor, off-grid communities in developing countries. For more than 50 years, pressure compensating (PC drip emitters-which can maintain a constant flow rate under variations in pressure, to ensure uniform water distribution on a field-have been designed and optimized empirically. This study presents a parametric model that describes the fluid and solid mechanics that govern the behavior of a common PC emitter architecture, which uses a flexible diaphragm to limit flow. The model was validated by testing nine prototypes with geometric variations, all of which matched predicted performance to within R2 = 0.85. This parametric model will enable irrigation engineers to design new drip emitters with attributes that improve performance and lower cost, which will promote the use of drip irrigation throughout the world.

  17. Evaluation of mulched drip irrigation for cotton in arid Northwest China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Z.; Jin, M.; Simunek, J.; van Genuchten, M.T.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/31481518X

    2014-01-01

    Field experiments were conducted in arid Southern Xinjiang, Northwest China, for 3 years to evaluate sustainable irrigation regimes for cotton. The experiments involved mulched drip irrigation during the growing season and flood irrigation afterward. The drip irrigation experiments included control

  18. Dwarf cashew growth irrigated with saline waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Orlando Carvallo Guerra

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The cashew production is one of the most important agricultural activities from the social-economical viewpoint for the North East of Brazil; besides to produce a great deal of hand labor, it is very important as an exporting commodity. The inadequate use of irrigation in the semi arid regions of the North East of Brazil has induced soil salinization and consequently problems for the irrigated agriculture. In spite of this, few works have been conducted to study the effect of saline stress on the growth and development of the cashew. Because of the lack of information for this crop, an experiment was conducted to study the effect of salinity stress on the phytomass production and nutrient accumulation on the different organs of the precocious dwarf cashew (Anacardium occidentale L. clone CCP76. The study was conducted under controlled conditions using as statistical scheme a randomized block design factorial with six replicates. Five salinity treatments were considered for the irrigation water (electrical conductivities of 0.8, 1.6, 2.4, 3.2 and 4.0 dS m-1 at 25oC. The increasing in salinity of the irrigation water reduced the phytomass at different organs of the studied plant. The nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, chloride and sodium in the plant varied with the salinity of the irrigation water according with the part of the plant analyzed; in some parts increased, in others decreased, in others increased initially and decreased afterwards, and finally, in other part of the plant the salinity of the irrigation water did not affect the nutrient concentration.

  19. Apical pressure created during irrigation with the GentleWave™ system compared to conventional syringe irrigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haapasalo, Markus; Shen, Ya; Wang, Zhejun; Park, Ellen; Curtis, Allison; Patel, Payal; Vandrangi, Prashanthi

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare pressures at the apical foramen created by conventional syringe irrigation and the GentleWave™ System, which releases high-velocity degassed irrigants to the pulp chamber and uses broad-spectrum sound energy for cleaning. The apical pressure generated during irrigation was measured for palatal and distobuccal root canals of four extracted maxillary molars after no instrumentation, minimal instrumentation to a size #15/.04, instrumentation to a size #40/.04 taper, and after perforating the apical foramen to size #40. The root canals opened into an air-tight custom fixture coupled to a piezoresistive pressure transducer. Apical pressures were measured for the GentleWave™ System and syringe-needle irrigation at different irrigant flow rates, with the needle tip at 1 and 3 mm from the apical foramen using 30-gauge (G) open-ended or side-vented safety tip needles. The GentleWave™ System generated negative apical pressures (P irrigation); the mean pressures were between -13.07 and -17.19 mmHg. The 30 G needles could not reach the 1 and 3 mm from the working length in uninstrumented and 1 mm in minimally instrumented canals. The mean positive pressures between 6.46 and 110.34 mmHg were measured with needle irrigation depending on the flow rate, needle insertion depth, and size of the root canal. The GentleWave™ System creates negative pressure at the apical foramen during root canal cleaning irrespective of the size of canal instrumentation. Positive apical pressures were measured for syringe irrigation. Negative pressure during irrigation contributes to improved safety as compared to high-positive pressure.

  20. Strategy of Irrigation Branch in Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeyliger, A.; Ermolaeva, O.

    2012-04-01

    At this moment, at the starting time of the program on restoration of a large irrigation in Russia till 2020, the scientific and technical community of irrigation branch does not have clear vision on how to promote a development of irrigated agriculture and without repeating of mistakes having a place in the past. In many respects absence of a vision is connected to serious backlog of a scientific and technical and informational and technological level of development of domestic irrigation branch from advanced one. Namely such level of development is necessary for the resolving of new problems in new conditions of managing, and also for adequate answers to new challenges from climate and degradation of ground & water resources, as well as a rigorous requirement from an environment. In such important situation for irrigation branch when it is necessary quickly generate a scientific and technical politics for the current decade for maintenance of translation of irrigated agriculture in the Russian Federation on a new highly effective level of development, in our opinion, it is required to carry out open discussion of needs and requirements as well as a research for a adequate solutions. From political point of view a framework organized in FP6 DESIRE 037046 project is an example of good practice that can serve as methodical approach how to organize and develop such processes. From technical point of view a technology of operational management of irrigation at large scale presents a prospective alternative to the current type of management based on planning. From point of view ICT operational management demands creation of a new platform for the professional environment of activity. This platform should allow to perceive processes in real time, at their partial predictability on signals of a straight line and a feedback, within the framework of variability of decision making scenarious, at high resolution and the big ex-awning of sensor controls and the gauges

  1. Evaluation some Forage Legumes in Limited Irrigation Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Moniri Far

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Forage legumes respond differently to limited irrigation regimes. Their evaluation may, thus, help to select drought tolerant types for limited irrigation conditions. In this study four type of forage legume were studied for two years in Tikma-Dash Research Station of East Azarbaijan Agricultural and Natural Research Center, Tabriz, Iran, in a randomized complete block design using split-plot experiment in 2011-2013 years. Irrigation regimes (without irrigation, one irrigation and two irrigations were assigned to main plots and four forage types (hairy vetch, grass pea, Pannonica sativa and lathyrus were assigned to subplots. The results of analysis of variance showed that the effect of irrigation on plant height, number of shoots, leaf area and plant fresh and dry weights were not significant. Howere, legume types affected these traits significantly (P≤0.01. The effect of irrigation levels and legume types on protein content of hay were significant (P

  2. The Power to Resist: Irrigation Management Transfer in Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suhardiman, D.

    2013-01-01

    In the last two decades, international donors have promoted Irrigation Management Transfer (IMT) as an international remedy to management problems in government irrigation systems in many developing countries. This article analyses the political processes that shape IMT policy formulation and

  3. Performance of arthroscopic irrigation systems assessed with automatic blood detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuijthof, G. J. M.; de Vaal, M. M.; Sierevelt, I. N.; Blankevoort, L.; van der List, M. P. J.

    2011-01-01

    During arthroscopies, bleeding episodes occur as a result of tissue damage. Irrigation systems assist in minimizing these disturbances. The performance of three arthroscopic irrigation systems in clearing bleeding episodes was evaluated objectively. One surgeon performed 99 shoulder arthroscopies

  4. Irrigated and non-irrigated radiofrequency ablation systems and ways of non-irrigated RF systems development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evtushenko, A. V.; Evtushenko, V. V.; Bykov, A. N.; Sergeev, V. S.; Syryamkin, V. I.; Kistenev, Yu. V.; Anfinogenova, Ya. D.; Smyshlyaev, K. A.; Kurlov, I. O.

    2015-11-01

    Improving of radiofrequency ablation systems for the myocardium is one of the fundamental problems of cardiac surgery. We used pig left ventricular myocardium as a working model. Mean thickness of the left ventricular wall was 10.1 ± 5.6 mm. The studies were performed on 10 hearts. The mean weight of hearts was 294.7 ± 21g. Research is being done on the electrophysical bench in 2 stages. In the first stage the hearts were placed on the electrophysical bench and heated to 36.6°C. In the second stage heart cooled to 20°C. The monopolar radiofrequency exposure was processing on the myocardium by two types of electrodes: spherical irrigated electrode and non-irrigated penetrating one within 20 seconds. The electrical resistance of the myocardium was measured at different temperatures before and after exposure. This paper shows that the decrease in ambient temperature combined with using of new penetrating electrodes for radiofrequency ablation gives better results than using of irrigated and non-irrigated systems. This method allows significantly reduce time exposure for a maximum depth of destruction in the myocardium.

  5. Water-Energy balance in pressure irrigation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Raúl; Rodríguez-Sinobas, Leonor; Juana, Luis; Laguna, Francisco V.; Castañón, Guillermo; Gil, María; Benitez, Javier

    2013-04-01

    Modernization of irrigation schemes, generally understood as transformation of surface irrigation systems into pressure -sprinkler and trickle- irrigation systems, aims at, among others, improving irrigation efficiency and reduction of operation and maintenance efforts made by the irrigators. Automation techniques become easier after modernization, and operation management plays an important role in energy efficiency issues. Modern systems use to include elevated water reservoirs with enough capacity to irrigate during peak water demand period about 16 to 48 h. However, pressure irrigation systems, in contrast, carry a serious energy cost. Energy requirements depend on decisions taken on management strategies during the operation phase, which are conditioned by previous decisions taken on the design project of the different elements which compose the irrigation system. Most of the countries where irrigation activity is significant bear in mind that modernization irrigation must play a key role in the agricultural infrastructure policies. The objective of this study is to characterize and estimate the mean and variation of the energy consumed by common types of irrigation systems according to their management possibilities. Also is an objective to estimate the fraction of the water reservoirs available along the irrigation campaign for storing the energy from renewable sources during their availability periods. Simulation taking into account all elements comprising the irrigation system has been used to estimate the energy requirements of typical irrigation systems of several crop production systems. The simulation of various types of irrigation systems and management strategies, in the framework imposed by particular cropping systems, would help to develop criteria for improving the energy balance in relation to the irrigation water supply productivity and new opportunities in the renewable energy field.

  6. The management perspective on the performance of the irrigation subsector

    OpenAIRE

    Nijman, C.

    1993-01-01

    INVESTMENT IN IRRIGATION has been immense in the past. Estimated average annual investments of US$ 15 billion makes irrigation the largest subsector of the agricultural sector, that is itself by far the largest sector of development investment. Since the mid-1960s the awareness spread that the performance of irrigation investments was far below its potential. The size of this underperformance is well represented by Seckler's alarming conclusion that the average irrigation investment costs twi...

  7. Automatic programmers for solid set sprinkler irrigation systems

    OpenAIRE

    Zapata Ruiz, María Valvanera; Salvador Esteban, Raquel; Cavero Campo, José; Lecina Brau, Sergio; Playán Jubillar, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The application of new technologies to the control and automation of irrigation processes is becoming very important in the last decade. Although automation of irrigation execution (irrigation programmers) is now widespread the automatic generation and execution of irrigation schedules is receiving growing attention due to the possibilities offered by the telemetry / remote control systems currently being installed in collective pressurized networks. In this paper, a protot...

  8. Irrigation development and management in Ghana: Prospects and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... existing schemes. It is envisaged that irrigation will be seen in its right perspective as a multidisciplinary activity to ensure the success of schemes. There is the need for running a postgraduate programme in irrigation at the KNUST to enhance the nations efforts at developing and managing irrigation projects successfully.

  9. Land Evaluation for improved Rice Production in Watari Irrigation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed at raising irrigated rice production in Watari Irrigation scheme, in Kano state, as to bridge the gap between the demand for rice and its supply. The food and Agricultural Organization FAO, (1985) frame work for land evaluation for irrigated rice production was employed, and the soil map of the study area has ...

  10. Effects of different irrigation programs on yield and quality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-07-11

    Jul 11, 2011 ... This study was carried out to determine the effects of different irrigation programs on yield and quality parameters of eggplant under greenhouse conditions, using Class A pan evaporation calculations and different plant-pan coefficients. Irrigation water was applied through drip irrigation method twice a ...

  11. Fertilization and irrigation of Eucalyptus in southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul W. Moore

    1983-01-01

    An experiment to determine the interaction of three levels of irrigation, three levels of fertility and three densities of planting was started at the University of California Moreno Ranch in 1982. Differential irrigation and fertility treatments will begin in June of 1983. Some current practices of irrigation and fertilization by southern California growers are...

  12. Soil and water management in spate irrigation systems in Eritrea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hadera, M.T.

    2001-01-01

    Spate irrigation has been practised over 100 years in the Red Sea coastal zone of Eritrea such as the Sheeb area. Main problem of the spate irrigation system is water shortage caused by irregular rainfall in the highlands of Eritrea and breaching of the irrigation structures by destructive

  13. Technical descriptions of ten irrigation technologies for conserving energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrer, B.J.; Wilfert, G.L.

    1983-05-01

    Technical description of ten technologies which were researched to save energy in irrigated agriculture are presented. These technologies are: well design and development ground water supply system optimization, column and pump redesign, variable-speed pumping, pipe network optimization, reduced-pressure center-pivot systems, low-energy precision application, automated gated-pipe system, computerized irrigation scheduling, and instrumented irrigation scheduling. (MHR)

  14. Yield, irrigation production efficiency and economic return of broccoli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... effect of irrigation methods and irrigation schedules on marketable yield, irrigation oroduction efficiency and economic return of Broccoli (Brassica oleracea. Var. italica). lrrigation was applied when the sum of daily pan evaporation data from United States Weather Bureau (USWB) class- A-open ran reach approximately to ...

  15. Heavy metals accumulation in edible part of vegetables irrigated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hassana Ibrahim Mustapha

    In this present study, the quality of municipal wastewater used for irrigation of spinach was investigated for its heavy metal build-up. The municipal wastewater used for irrigation and the irrigated spinach samples were collected and analyzed for their heavy metal concentrations. The results indicate that the municipal ...

  16. Socio–economic and environmental effects of Bakolori irrigation and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is in recognition of the enormous influence of irrigation on farm level productivity and enhanced living standard that government and development agencies embark on gigantic irrigation projects. This study therefore, investigated the socio - economic and environmental impacts of two irrigation projects in a semi arid ...

  17. Irrigation technology for smallholder farmers: a strategy for achieving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper highlights the importance of rural irrigation schemes in addressing community and household food security and ensuring health nutrition uptake by irrigators and surrounding communities. Rural irrigation systems enable farmers to become net food sellers allowing them to benefit from food price volatility.

  18. Field Irrigation Practice and the Performance of Smallholder ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To a large extent, the farmers\\' practices were determined by their perceptions and understanding of irrigation events. An assortment of irrigation scheduling methods was practised, water application approaches were not as per system design and there was a general tendency to over irrigate. The performance of both ...

  19. A land suitability system for spate irrigation schemes in Eritrea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tesfai, M.H.

    2002-01-01

    Spate irrigation is a system used for wetting land prior to planting. Use is made of seasonal rivers (wadis) producing flash floods in the uplands, which are directed by structures to irrigate fields in the lowlands. A land suitability system for spate irrigation schemes in Eritrea was studied in

  20. Breaking the Vicious Cycle in Irrigation Farming System for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper is a pilot investigation into irrigation activities and the need for a reform to attain food security in Nigeria. Oke-Oyi irrigation project of the. Lower Niger River Basin Development Authority, Ilorin was chosen as epitome of irrigation projects in Nigeria. Structured questionnaire were administered on the 135 farmers ...

  1. Irrigation methods for efficient water application: 40 years of South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    irrigation systems. Drip irrigation is considered to be one of the most efficient irrigation systems available, but through a WRC-supported research project evidence was obtained from the literature as well as from on-farm and in-field testing that even this system can be inefficient, as a result of poor water quality, mismanage-.

  2. Evaluation of potential water conservation using site-specific irrigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    With the advent of site-specific variable-rate irrigation (VRI) systems, irrigation can be spatially managed within sub-field-sized zones. Spatial irrigation management can optimize spatial water use efficiency and may conserve water. Spatial VRI systems are currently being managed by consultants ...

  3. 76 FR 58293 - Rate Adjustments for Indian Irrigation Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-20

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Rate Adjustments for Indian Irrigation Projects AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs... has an interest in, irrigation projects located on or associated with various Indian reservations throughout the United States. We are required to establish irrigation assessment rates to recover the costs...

  4. 75 FR 67095 - Rate Adjustments for Indian Irrigation Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Rate Adjustments for Indian Irrigation Projects AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs... has an interest in irrigation projects located on or associated with various Indian reservations throughout the United States. We are required to establish irrigation assessment rates to recover the ] costs...

  5. 21 CFR 876.5220 - Colonic irrigation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Colonic irrigation system. 876.5220 Section 876...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5220 Colonic irrigation system. (a) Identification. A colonic irrigation system is a device intended to instill water into the colon...

  6. Effects of different irrigation programs on yield and quality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to determine the effects of different irrigation programs on yield and quality parameters of eggplant under greenhouse conditions, using Class A pan evaporation calculations and different plant-pan coefficients. Irrigation water was applied through drip irrigation method twice a week during the ...

  7. Critical parameters for maize yield under irrigation farming in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examines the critical variables that determine maize yield under irrigation farming in the savanna ecological zone of Kwara State. Seventy-five soil samples were randomly collected from irrigation farm of Oke-Oyi irrigation project of the Lower Niger River Basin Development Authority Ilorin and bulked into 15 ...

  8. 75 FR 29577 - Rate Adjustments for Indian Irrigation Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-26

    ... Indian Irrigation Projects AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Rate Adjustments. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) owns, or has an interest in, irrigation projects located on or... irrigation assessment rates to recover the costs to administer, operate, maintain, and rehabilitate these...

  9. 21 CFR 872.6510 - Oral irrigation unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Oral irrigation unit. 872.6510 Section 872.6510...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6510 Oral irrigation unit. (a) Identification. An oral irrigation unit is an AC-powered device intended to provide a pressurized stream of water to...

  10. The impact of smallholder irrigation on household welfare: The case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The potential of smallholder irrigated agriculture to enhance food security and alleviate rural poverty has led the South African Government to prioritise and invest significantly in irrigation establishment, rehabilitation and revitalisation. The question addressed in this study pertains to the extent to which smallholder irrigation ...

  11. Determinants of micro irrigation adoption for maize production in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study is an assessment of the determinants of micro irrigation adoption for maize production in smallholder irrigation schemes. The focus of the study was on Hama Mavhaire irrigation scheme in Midlands Province, Zimbabwe. An assessment of the major production constraints in the scheme was carried out, factors that ...

  12. 21 CFR 886.4360 - Ocular surgery irrigation device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ocular surgery irrigation device. 886.4360 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4360 Ocular surgery irrigation device. (a) Identification. An ocular surgery irrigation device is a device intended to be suspended over the...

  13. 77 FR 63850 - Rate Adjustments for Indian Irrigation Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-17

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Rate Adjustments for Indian Irrigation Projects AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs... has an interest in irrigation projects located on or associated with various Indian reservations throughout the United States. We are required to establish irrigation assessment rates to recover the costs...

  14. 77 FR 10767 - Rate Adjustments for Indian Irrigation Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-23

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Rate Adjustments for Indian Irrigation Projects AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs... interest in, irrigation projects located on or associated with various Indian reservations throughout the United States. We are required to establish irrigation assessment rates to recover the costs to...

  15. 25 CFR 152.32 - Irrigation fee; payment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Irrigation fee; payment. 152.32 Section 152.32 Indians... Conveyances of Trust Or Restricted Lands § 152.32 Irrigation fee; payment. Collection of all construction costs against any Indian-owned lands within Indian irrigation projects is deferred as long as Indian...

  16. 76 FR 26759 - Rate Adjustments for Indian Irrigation Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-09

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Rate Adjustments for Indian Irrigation Projects AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs... interest in, irrigation projects located on or associated with various Indian reservations throughout the United States. We are required to establish irrigation assessment rates to recover the costs to...

  17. Irrigation farmers motivation for participating in social networking in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One hundred and ninety four irrigation farmers were randomly selected from three irrigation farming areas in two states of Kwara and Kogi in north central Nigeria. Data were obtained using a structured questionnaire. The Motivation for undertaking irrigation farming and their level of participation in social networking were ...

  18. Fertigation - Injecting soluble fertilizers into the irrigation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas D. Landis; Jeremy R. Pinto; Anthony S. Davis

    2009-01-01

    Fertigation (fertilization + irrigation) is the newest way for nursery managers to apply fertilizer, and has become a standard practice in container nurseries. Because of the inherent inefficient water distribution patterns in field irrigation systems, fertigation has not been widely used in bareroot nurseries. However, a bareroot nursery with a center-pivot irrigation...

  19. Comparison of Endovac irrigation system with conventional irrigation for removal of intracanal smear layer: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abarajithan, Mohan; Dham, Sonal; Velmurugan, Natanasabapathy; Valerian-Albuquerque, Denzil; Ballal, Suma; Senthilkumar, Hemamalathi

    2011-09-01

    This study comparatively evaluated the efficacy of Endovac irrigation system with conventional needle irrigation in removing smear layer from the root canal. Thirty permanent maxillary central incisors were divided into 3 groups of 10 teeth each. In group I, the teeth were instrumented and irrigated by conventional irrigation using 27-gauge irrigation needle. In group II, irrigation was done using Endovac irrigation system. In group III (negative control) chemomechanical preparation was performed using saline solution. Scanning electron microscope evaluation was done for assessment of smear layer removal in the coronal, middle, and apical thirds. Data were analyzed using post hoc test and Kruskal-Wallis test for significance at P irrigation. Copyright © 2011. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  20. Development of a flexible Doppler reflectometry system and its application to turbulence characterization in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troester, Carolin Helma

    2008-04-15

    An essential challenge in present fusion plasma research is the study of plasma turbulence. The turbulence behavior is investigated experimentally on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak using Doppler reflectometry, a diagnostic technique sensitive to density fluctuations at a specific wavenumber k {sub perpendicular} {sub to}. This microwave radar diagnostic utilizes localized Bragg backscattering of the launched beam (k{sub 0}) by the density fluctuations at the plasma cutoff layer. The incident angle {theta} selects the probed k {sub perpendicular} {sub to} via the Bragg condition k {sub perpendicular} {sub to} {approx} 2k{sub 0}sin{theta}. The measured Doppler shifted frequency spectrum allows the determination of the perpendicular plasma rotation velocity, u {sub perpendicular} {sub to} =v{sub E} {sub x} {sub B}+v{sub turb}, directly from the Doppler frequency shift(f{sub D} = u {sub perpendicular} {sub to} k {sub perpendicular} {sub to} /2{pi}), and the turbulence amplitude from the backscattered power level. This thesis work presents a survey of u {sub perpendicular} {sub to} radial profiles and k {sub perpendicular} {sub to} spectrum measurements for a variety of plasma conditions obtained by scanning the antenna tilt angle. This was achieved by extending the existing V-band Doppler reflectometry system (50 - 75 GHz) with a new W-band system (75 - 110 GHz), which was especially designed for measuring the k {sub perpendicular} {sub to} spectrum and additionally expands the radial coverage into the plasma core region. It consists of a remote steerable antenna with an adjustable line of sight allowing for dynamic wavenumber selection up to 25 cm {sup -1} and a reflectometer with a 'phase locked loop' stabilized transmitter allowing for the precise determination of the instrument response function. The proper system functionality was demonstrated by laboratory testing and benckmarking against the V-band system. The new profile measurements obtained show a

  1. GLORI (GLObal navigation satellite system Reflectometry Instrument): A New Airborne GNSS-R receiver for land surface applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motte, Erwan; Zribi, Mehrez; Fanise, Pascal

    2015-04-01

    GLORI (GLObal navigation satellite system Reflectometry Instrument) is a new receiver dedicated to the airborne measurement of surface parameters such as soil moisture and biomass above ground and sea state (wave height and direction) above oceans. The instrument is based on the PARIS concept [Martin-Neira, 1993] using both the direct and surface-reflected L-band signals from the GPS constellation as a multistatic radar source. The receiver is based on one up-looking and one down-looking dual polarization hemispherical active antennas feeding a low-cost 4-channel SDR direct down-conversion receiver tuned to the GPS L1 frequency. The raw measurements are sampled at 16.368MHz and stored as 2-bit, IQ binary files. In post-processing, GPS acquisition and tracking are performed on the direct up-looking signal while the down-looking signal is processed blindly using tracking parameters from the direct signal. The obtained direct and reflected code-correlation waveforms are the basic observables for geophysical parameters inversion. The instrument was designed to be installed aboard the ATR42 experimental aircraft from the French SAFIRE fleet as a permanent payload. The long term goal of the project is to provide real-time continuous surface information for every flight performed. The aircraft records attitude information through its Inertial Measurement Unit and a commercial GPS receiver records additional information such as estimated doppler and code phase, receiver location, satellites azimuth and elevation. A series of test flights were performed over both the Toulouse and Gulf of Lion (Mediterranean Sea) regions during the period 17-21 Nov 2014 together with the KuROS radar [Hauser et al., 2014]. Using processing methods from the literature [Egido et al., 2014], preliminary results demonstrate the instrument sensitivity to both ground and ocean surface parameters estimation. A dedicated scientific flight campaign is planned at the end of second quarter 2015 with

  2. Share of irrigated land and farm size in rainwater harvesting irrigation in Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wakeyo, Mekonnen B.; Gardebroek, Koos

    2017-01-01

    Rainfall shortages constrain small-holders' agricultural production in developing countries and with ongoing climate change these shortages may increase in volume and frequency. Rainwater harvesting irrigation is an interesting technology that decreases this risk. Therefore, one would expect an

  3. Identifying and locating land irrigated by center-pivot irrigation systems using satellite imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, R. O.

    1980-01-01

    A methodology for using Landsat imagery for the identification and location of land irrigated by center-pivot irrigation systems is presented. The procedure involves the use of sets of Landsat band 5 imagery taken separated in time by about three weeks during the irrigation season, a zoom transfer scope and mylar base maps to record the locations of center pivots. Further computer processing of the data has been used to obtain plots of center-pivot irrigation systems and tables indicating the distribution and growth of systems by county for the state of Nebraska, and has been found to be in 95% agreement with current high-altitude IR photography. The information obtainable can be used for models of ground-water aquifers or resource planning.

  4. Snow Depth Variations Estimated from GPS-Reflectometry: A Case Study in Alaska from L2P SNR Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuanggen Jin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Snow is a water resource and plays a significant role in the water cycle. However, traditional ground techniques for snow monitoring have many limitations, e.g., high-cost and low resolution. Recently, the new Global Positioning System-Reflectometry (GPS-R technique has been developed and applied for snow sensing. However, most previous studies mainly used GPS L1C/A and L2C Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR data to retrieve snow depth. In this paper, snow depth variations are retrieved from new weak GPS L2P SNR data at three stations in Alaska and evaluated by comparing with in situ measurements. The correlation coefficients for the three stations are 0.79, 0.88 and 0.98, respectively. The GPS-estimated snow depths from the L2P SNR data are further compared with L1C/A results at three stations, showing a high correlation of 0.94, 0.93 and 0.95, respectively. These results indicate that geodetic GPS observations with SNR L2P data can well estimate snow depths. The samplings of 15 s or 30 s have no obvious effect on snow depth estimation using GPS SNR L2P measurements, while the range of 5°–35°elevation angles has effects on results with a decreasing correlation of 0.96 and RMSE of 0.04 m when compared to the range of 5°–30° with correlation of 0.98 and RMSE of 0.03 m. GPS SNR data below 30° elevation angle are better to estimate snow depth.

  5. Comparison of Anterior Segment Measurements with Optical Low-coherence Reflectometry and Partial-coherence Interferometry Optical Biometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, Ertuğrul; Duran, Mustafa; Çetinkaya, Tuğba; Arıtürk, Nurşen

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate a new noncontact optical biometer using partial-coherence interferometry and to compare the clinical measurements with those obtained from the device using optical low-coherence reflectometry (OLCR). Ondokuz Mayis University, Samsun, Turkey. Nonrandomized, prospective clinical trial. The study was performed on the healthy phakic eyes of volunteers in the year 2014. Measurements of axial length (AL), anterior chamber depth (ACD), central corneal thickness (CCT), mean keratometry (K), and white-to-white (WTW) measurements obtained with the low-time coherence interferometry (LTCI) were compared with those obtained with the OLCR. The results were evaluated using Bland-Altman analyses. The differences between both methods were assessed using the paired t-test, and its correlation was evaluated by Pearson's coefficient. We examined seventy participants with a mean age of 33.06 (±9.7) (range: 19-53) years. AL measurements with LTCI and OLCR were 23.7 (±1.08) mm and 23.7 (±1.1) mm, respectively. ACD was 3.6 (±0.4) mm and 3.5 (±0.4) mm for LTCI and OLCR, respectively. The mean CCT measurements for both devices were 533 (±28) mm and 522 (±28) mm, respectively. The mean K readings measurements for LTCI and OLCR were 43.3 (±1.5) D and 43.3 (±1.5) D, respectively. The mean WTW distance measurements for both devices were 12.0 (±0.5) mm and 12.1 (±0.5) mm, respectively. Measurements with LTCI correlated well with those with the OLCR. These two devices showed good agreement for the measurement of all parameters.

  6. Simulation of space-borne tsunami detection using GNSS-Reflectometry applied to tsunamis in the Indian Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Stosius

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Within the German-Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System project GITEWS (Rudloff et al., 2009, a feasibility study on a future tsunami detection system from space has been carried out. The Global Navigation Satellite System Reflectometry (GNSS-R is an innovative way of using reflected GNSS signals for remote sensing, e.g. sea surface altimetry. In contrast to conventional satellite radar altimetry, multiple height measurements within a wide field of view can be made simultaneously. With a dedicated Low Earth Orbit (LEO constellation of satellites equipped with GNSS-R, densely spaced sea surface height measurements could be established to detect tsunamis. This simulation study compares the Walker and the meshed comb constellation with respect to their global reflection point distribution. The detection performance of various LEO constellation scenarios with GPS, GLONASS and Galileo as signal sources is investigated. The study concentrates on the detection performance for six historic tsunami events in the Indian Ocean generated by earthquakes of different magnitudes, as well as on different constellation types and orbit parameters. The GNSS-R carrier phase is compared with the PARIS or code altimetry approach. The study shows that Walker constellations have a much better reflection point distribution compared to the meshed comb constellation. Considering simulation assumptions and assuming technical feasibility it can be demonstrated that strong tsunamis with magnitudes (M ≥8.5 can be detected with certainty from any orbit altitude within 15–25 min by a 48/8 or 81/9 Walker constellation if tsunami waves of 20 cm or higher can be detected by space-borne GNSS-R. The carrier phase approach outperforms the PARIS altimetry approach especially at low orbit altitudes and for a low number of LEO satellites.

  7. Simulation of space-borne tsunami detection using GNSS-Reflectometry applied to tsunamis in the Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stosius, R.; Beyerle, G.; Helm, A.; Hoechner, A.; Wickert, J.

    2010-06-01

    Within the German-Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System project GITEWS (Rudloff et al., 2009), a feasibility study on a future tsunami detection system from space has been carried out. The Global Navigation Satellite System Reflectometry (GNSS-R) is an innovative way of using reflected GNSS signals for remote sensing, e.g. sea surface altimetry. In contrast to conventional satellite radar altimetry, multiple height measurements within a wide field of view can be made simultaneously. With a dedicated Low Earth Orbit (LEO) constellation of satellites equipped with GNSS-R, densely spaced sea surface height measurements could be established to detect tsunamis. This simulation study compares the Walker and the meshed comb constellation with respect to their global reflection point distribution. The detection performance of various LEO constellation scenarios with GPS, GLONASS and Galileo as signal sources is investigated. The study concentrates on the detection performance for six historic tsunami events in the Indian Ocean generated by earthquakes of different magnitudes, as well as on different constellation types and orbit parameters. The GNSS-R carrier phase is compared with the PARIS or code altimetry approach. The study shows that Walker constellations have a much better reflection point distribution compared to the meshed comb constellation. Considering simulation assumptions and assuming technical feasibility it can be demonstrated that strong tsunamis with magnitudes (M) ≥8.5 can be detected with certainty from any orbit altitude within 15-25 min by a 48/8 or 81/9 Walker constellation if tsunami waves of 20 cm or higher can be detected by space-borne GNSS-R. The carrier phase approach outperforms the PARIS altimetry approach especially at low orbit altitudes and for a low number of LEO satellites.

  8. Phase segregation of sulfonate groups in Nafion interface lamellae, quantified via neutron reflectometry fitting techniques for multi-layered structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCaluwe, Steven C; Kienzle, Paul A; Bhargava, Pavan; Baker, Andrew M; Dura, Joseph A

    2014-08-21

    Neutron reflectometry analysis methods for under-determined, multi-layered structures are developed and used to determine the composition depth profile in cases where the structure is not known a priori. These methods, including statistical methods, sophisticated fitting routines, and coupling multiple data sets, are applied to hydrated and dehydrated Nafion nano-scaled films with thicknesses comparable to those found coating electrode particles in fuel cell catalyst layers. These results confirm the lamellar structure previously observed on hydrophilic substrates, and demonstrate that for hydrated films they can accurately be described as layers rich in both water and sulfonate groups alternating with water-poor layers containing an excess of fluorocarbon groups. The thickness of these layers increases slightly and the amplitude of the water volume fraction oscillation exponentially decreases away from the hydrophilic interface. For dehydrated films, the composition oscillations die out more rapidly. The Nafion-SiO2 substrate interface contains a partial monolayer of sulfonate groups bonded to the substrate and a large excess of water compared to that expected by the water-to-sulfonate ratio, λ, observed throughout the rest of the film. Films that were made thin enough to truncate this lamellar region showed a depth profile nearly identical to thicker films, indicating that there are no confinement or surface effects altering the structure. Comparing the SLD profile measured for films dried at 60 °C to modeled composition profiles derived by removing water from the hydrated lamellae suggests incomplete re-mixing of the polymer groups upon dehydration, indicated limited polymer mobility in these Nafion thin films.

  9. Irrigation Practice Affects Soil Phosphorus Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ippolito, J.; Bjorneberg, D.

    2011-12-01

    It is expected, given the same water source applied to the same soil, that changes in soil chemistry would be subtle when comparing furrow and sprinkler irrigation practices. From four paired fields, we collected soil (after similar crops were harvested in September) from the 0-5 cm depth. Samples were analyzed for changes in soil P chemistry due to sprinkler or furrow irrigation using: 1) the Olsen soil test P extraction; 2) the alkaline phosphatase enzyme assay; 3) a sequential extraction technique which fractionated inorganic and organic soil P pools; and 4) a measure of the amorphous soil Al and Fe mineral phases. Olsen-extractable soil P was lower under sprinkler irrigation; however, this was not due to a reduction in microbial phosphatase activity. Soils under sprinkler irrigation contained lower inorganic P concentrations in soluble/Al-bound/Fe-bound and in the occluded phases, lesser amounts of organic P present in the moderately labile and non-labile fractions, and contained lower amorphous Fe concentrations. These results indicate that the method of water application affects soil chemistry and nutrient cycling.

  10. Management of irrigation schemes in arid countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menenti, M.; Azzali, S.; Urso, d' G.

    1995-01-01

    The issue of the actual practical scope of remote sensing is to some extent a matter of unfulfilled promises in the early stage of remote sensing by satellites. A detailed analysis of irrigation management procedures should always come first. Once data requirements are defined in detail, the actual

  11. Using a System Model for Irrigation Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Leonardo; de Miranda, Eu; Sánchez-Román, Rodrigo; Orellana-González, Alba

    2014-05-01

    When using Systems Thinking variables involved in any process have a dynamic behavior, according to nonstatic relationships with the environment. In this paper it is presented a system dynamics model developed to be used as an irrigation management tool. The model involves several parameters related to irrigation such as: soil characteristics, climate data and culture's physiological parameters. The water availability for plants in the soil is defined as a stock in the model, and this soil water content will define the right moment to irrigate and the water depth required to be applied. The crop water consumption will reduce soil water content; it is defined by the potential evapotranspiration (ET) that acts as an outflow from the stock (soil water content). ET can be estimated by three methods: a) FAO Penman-Monteith (ETPM), b) Hargreaves-Samani (ETHS) method, based on air temperature data and c) Class A pan (ETTCA) method. To validate the model were used data from the States of Ceará and Minas Gerais, Brazil, and the culture was bean. Keyword: System Dynamics, soil moisture content, agricultural water balance, irrigation scheduling.

  12. Water quality and irrigation [Chapter 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas D. Landis; Kim M. Wilkinson

    2009-01-01

    Water is the single most important biological factor affecting plant growth and health. Water is essential for almost every plant process: photosynthesis, nutrient transport, and cell expansion and development. In fact, 80 to 90 percent of a seedling's weight is made up of water. Therefore, irrigation management is the most critical aspect of nursery operations....

  13. Evaluation model development for sprinkler irrigation uniformity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2010). The most commonly used term for placing a numerical value on uniformity of application for agricultural irrigation systems is Christiansen's coefficient of uniformity expressed as a percent (Christiansen,. 1942). It is based on the absolute deviation of individual amounts from the mean amount. Another parameter that.

  14. Streamflow Prediction in Ungauged, Irrigated Basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M.; Thompson, S. E.

    2016-12-01

    The international "predictions in ungauged basins" or "PUB" effort has broadened and improved the tools available to support water resources management in sparsely observed regions. These tools have, however, been primarily focused on regions with limited diversion of surface or shallow groundwater resources. Incorporating anthropogenic activity into PUB methods is essential given the high level of development of many basins. We extended an existing stochastic framework used to predict the flow duration curve to explore the effects of irrigation on streamflow dynamics. Four canonical scenarios were considered in which irrigation water was (i) primarily sourced from water imports, (ii) primarily sourced from direct in-channel diversions, (iii) sourced from shallow groundwater with direct connectivity to stream channels, or (iv) sourced from deep groundwater that is indirectly connected to surface flow via a shallow aquifer. By comparing the predicted flow duration curves to those predicted by accounting for climate and geomorphic factors in isolation, specific "fingerprints" of human water withdrawals could be identified for the different irrigation scenarios, and shown to be sensitive to irrigation volumes and scheduling. The results provide a first insight into PUB methodologies that could be employed in heavily managed basins.

  15. Parasitological Contamination of Wastewater Irrigated and Raw ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Occurrence of infective stages of intestinal parasites on wastewater-irrigated vegetables may pose public health hazards to farming communities in the study areas. Therefore, evaluation and surveillance of parasitological quality of vegetables is crucial in an attempt to control vegetable-transmitted parasitic infections.

  16. Irrigation performance assessment in Crimea, Ukraine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavlov, S.S.; Roerink, G.J.; Hellegers, P.J.G.J.; Popovych, V.F.

    2006-01-01

    After the collapse of the Soviet Union the performance of irrigated agriculture decreased drastically in Ukraine, due to problems related to the transition from a centrally planned economy to a market economy. Before formulating recommendations on required actions to modify this problematic

  17. Irrigation management of muskmelon with tensiometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio José de Santana

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The production and consumption of muskmelon have been increasing (MELO et al., 2014, thus, information on techniques for higher field productions are necessary. The experiment described in the present work was conducted in the IFTM, Uberaba, State of Minas Gerais, Brazil, aiming to evaluate the muskmelon yield under different soil water tensions. A randomized block experimental design was used with five treatments (soil water tensions of 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 kPa and four replications (plots of two rows of 14 plants. Two harvests were carried out and the fruit yield, stem diameter, number of fruits per plant and efficiency of water use were evaluated. Irrigation was performed with a drip irrigation system and managed with tensiometry. The cultivar Bonus n.2 was used with spacing of 1.0 x 0.6 m. The data of the variables were subjected to the F test and regression test. The treatments showed statistical differences in number of fruits per plant, fruit weight (fruit yield and stem diameter. The highest fruit yield found was 1.36 kg fruit-1 and the highest water use efficiency was 4.08 g mm-1 with irrigation for a soil water tension of 10 kPa. The lowest fruit yield was found with irrigation for a soil water tension of 50 kPa.

  18. Scheduling irrigation for jujube (Ziziphus jujuba Mill.)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-08-30

    Aug 30, 2010 ... 2Institute of Soil and Water Conservation, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Ministry of Water Resources, Yangling. Shaanxi 712100 ... Key words: Water stress, water status indicators, soil water potential, Jujube (Ziziphus jujuba Mill.) ...... of cover crops and irrigation rates on tomato yields and quality in a.

  19. PERCUTANEOUS CALYCEAL IRRIGATION FOR SMALL CALYCEAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and has a variable success rate, while multiple tracks increase the risk of complications of. PNL, especially bleeding. We herein describe a technique of intra- operative percutaneous calyceal irrigation us- ing fluoroscopic and endoscopic guide. This helps to increase the stone clearance rate dur- ing PNL without the need ...

  20. The efficiency of drip irrigation unpacked

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, van der S.; Zwarteveen, M.Z.; Boesveld, H.; Kuper, M.

    2013-01-01

    Drip irrigation figures prominently in water policy debates as a possible solution to water scarcity problems, based on the assertion that it will improve water use efficiencies. We use this article to carefully trace the scientific basis of this assertion. Through a systematic review of the

  1. Reuse of drainage water from irrigated areas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willardson, L.S.; Boels, D.; Smedema, L.K.

    1997-01-01

    Increasing competition for water of good quality and the expectation that at least half of the required increase in food production in the near-future decades must come from the world's irrigated land requires to produce more food by converting more of the diverted water into food. Reuse of the

  2. Comparative anti-microbial efficacy of Azadirachta indica irrigant with standard endodontic irrigants: A preliminary study

    OpenAIRE

    Arindam Dutta; Mala Kundabala

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The anti-microbial efficacy of 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (SHC) and 0.2% chlorhexidine gluconate were compared with an experimental irrigant formulated from the Neem tree, Azadirachta indica A. Juss. Materials and Methods: A sample of 36 single rooted anterior teeth with periapical radiolucency and absence of response to vitality tests that required root canal treatment were selected for this study. The test irrigants and their combinations were assigned to five different groups ...

  3. Irrigating lives : development intervention and dynamics of social relationships in an irrigation project

    OpenAIRE

    Magadlela, D.

    2000-01-01

    This study is about rural agricultural development and social processes of change in rural Zimbabwe. It is aimed at understanding how irrigation intervention in a remote rural context changed the cultural, social, political and farming lives of people. It is a study of people coping with changes in their livelihoods which had been introduced from outside by development intervention. The study was sustained by the realisation that irrigation is not just a matter of technical artefacts...

  4. Irrigation et paludisme : un couple infernal?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mergeai, G.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Irrigation and Malaria - a Terrible Combination?. Increasing agricultural productivity is a priority in most of the developing countries and using irrigation is one of the most efficient ways of achieving this goal. Almost half a billion people in the world contract malaria every year and approximately one million die as a result. The majority of these victims are farmers or members of their families. In infected areas, malaria continues to have major negative impacts on agricultural productivity. For example, in the Equateur province of the DRC, after access to production means, fevers are considered the second biggest obstacle to the development of agricultural activities. In the Ivory Coast, a study has shown that growers suffering from malaria were about half as productive as their healthy colleagues. The disease often strikes at the start of the rainy season when work begins again in the fields. It reduces the amount of land cultivated and affects the amount of care taken with crops. Agricultural practices influence the risk of contracting malaria. Irrigation, in particular, can encourage the proliferation of vectors of the disease and make it more likely to spread. This tendency can be observed in many locations where irrigated rice production is on the increase. Paradoxically, however, an increased number of mosquitoes does not systematically result in more malaria. In Ethiopia, malaria is more prevalent close to the micro-dams sponsored by the government, whereas, in Tanzania, there is less malaria in irrigated areas. Various theories can be put forward in order to explain this paradox. In particular, increased income due to higher rice yields enables farmers to purchase insecticide-treated mosquito nets. It also allows them to eat better, which strengthens their immune systems. It also appears that the negative impact of irrigation systems is greater in areas, in which immunity levels were low in the population prior to the creation of

  5. Evaluation of hydraulic performance of downstream-controlled Maira-PHLC irrigation canals under crop-based irrigation operations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munir, S.; Schultz, B.; Suryadi, F.X.; Bharati, L.

    2012-01-01

    Demand-based irrigation systems are operated according to crop water requirements. As crop water requirements remain variable throughout the growing season, the discharges in the canal also vary to meet demands. The irrigation system under study is a demand-based semi-automatic irrigation system,

  6. Single-end-access distributed strain sensing with wide dynamic range using higher-speed Brillouin optical correlation-domain reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Yosuke; Hayashi, Neisei; Fukuda, Hideyuki; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2017-07-01

    Single-end-access real-time fiber-optic distributed strain sensing has recently been demonstrated using an ultrahigh-speed configuration of Brillouin optical correlation-domain reflectometry (BOCDR). Its extremely high sampling rate was, however, achieved at the cost of a limited strain dynamic range (cost-effective higher-speed configuration of BOCDR with a wide strain dynamic range (up to 2.0%; evaluated by static strain measurement). This value is larger than that of any other BOCDR configuration. Using this configuration, we demonstrate some fundamental distributed strain measurements and breakage detection.

  7. Design of an Ultra-wide Band Waveguide Transition for the Ex-vessel Transmission Line of ITER Plasma Position Reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonetto, A.; Platania, P.; Garavaglia, S.; Gittini, G.; Granucci, G.; Pallotta, F.

    2017-11-01

    Plasma position reflectometry for ITER requires interfaces between in-vessel and ex-vessel waveguides. An ultra broadband interface (15-75 GHz) was designed between moderately oversized rectangular waveguide (20 × 12 mm), operated in TE01 (i.e., tall waveguide mode), and circular corrugated waveguide, with 88.9-mm internal diameter, propagating HE11. The interface was designed both as a sequence of waveguide components and as a quasi-optical confocal telescope. The design and the simulated performance are described for both concepts. The latter one requires more space but has better performance, and shall be prototyped.

  8. Assessing the performance of surface and subsurface drip systems on irrigation water use efficiency of citrus orchards in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amparo Martinez-Gimeno, Maria; Provenzano, Giuseppe; Bonet, Luis; Intrigliolo, Diego S.; Badal, Eduardo; Ballestrer, Carlos

    2017-04-01

    .2 MPa in the remaining period of the year. In each sub-plot, soil water contents at different depths were monitored with a Frequency Domain Reflectometry probe (EnviroScan, Sentek, Stepney, Australia.), whereas ψstem values were acquired approximately weekly, with a Scholander chamber (Model 600 Pressure Chamber Instrument), on leaves wrapped in bags at least one hour before measurements. At the end of each season, the number of fruit per plant, the average fruit weight, the total yield and their corresponding variability were determined for each treatment. The results showed that within both DI and SDI, treatments with the double number of emitters per plant had the highest yield, number of fruit, fruit weight and IWUE, although with no statistically significant differences. IWUE associated to DI and SDI was, on average for the two years, 6.5 and 7.4 kg/m3, respectively. The best management option was achieved with the SDI14, to which corresponded the minimum seasonal irrigation volumes, with water savings compared to DI7 of about 23% and 28% in 2014 and 2015, respectively.

  9. Simulated errors in deep drainage beneath irrigated settings: Partitioning vegetation, texture and irrigation effects using Monte Carlo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, J. P.; Gates, J. B.; Nasta, P.

    2014-12-01

    Groundwater in irrigated regions is impacted by timing and rates of deep drainage. Because field monitoring of deep drainage is often cost prohibitive, numerical soil water models are frequently the main method of estimation. Unfortunately, few studies have quantified the relative importance of likely error sources. In this study, three potential error sources are considered within a Monte Carlo framework: water retention parameters, rooting depth, and irrigation practice. Error distributions for water retention parameters were determined by 1) laboratory hydraulic measurements and 2) pedotransfer functions. Error distributions for rooting depth were developed from literature values. Three irrigation scheduling regimes were considered: one representing pre-scheduled irrigation ignoring preceding rainfall, one representing pre-scheduled irrigation that was altered based on preceding rainfall, and one representing algorithmic irrigation scheduling informed by profile matric potential sensors. This approach was applied to an experimental site in Nebraska with silt loam soils and irrigated corn for 2002-2012. Results are based on Six Monte-Carlo simulations, each consisting of 1000 Hydrus 1D simulations at daily timesteps, facilitated by parallelization on a 12-node computing cluster. Results indicate greater sensitivity to irrigation regime than to hydraulic or vegetation parameters (median values for prescheduled irrigation, prescheduled irrigation altered by rainfall, and algorithmic irrigation were 310 ,100, and 110 mm/yr, respectively). Error ranges were up to 700% higher for pedotransfer functions than for laboratory-measured hydraulic functions. Deep drainage was negatively correlated with alpha and maximum root zone depth and, for some scenarios, positively correlated with n. The relative importance of error sources differed amongst the irrigation scenarios because of nonlinearities amongst parameter values, profile wetness, and deep drainage. Compared to pre

  10. Automation in irrigation process in family farm with Arduino platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kianne Crystie Bezerra da Cunha

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The small farmers tend not to use mechanical inputs in the irrigation process due to the high cost than conventional irrigation systems have and in other cases, the lack of knowledge and technical guidance makes the farmer theme using the system. Thus, all control and monitoring are made by hand without the aid of machines and this practice can lead to numerous problems from poor irrigation, and water waste, energy, and deficits in production. It is difficult to deduce when to irrigate, or how much water applied in cultivation, measure the soil temperature variables, temperature, and humidity, etc. The objective of this work is to implement an automated irrigation system aimed at family farming that is low cost and accessible to the farmer. The system will be able to monitor all parameters from irrigation. For this to occur, the key characteristics of family farming, Arduino platform, and irrigation were analyzed.

  11. ASSESSMENT OF IRRIGATION EFFICIENCIES UNDER CENTRAL ANATOLIA CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Ersoy Yildirim

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Turkey is located within semi-arid climate zone and large portion of the country experience water deficits. Thus, efficient water use has become a significand issue in agricultural practices. Current global warming and climate change have aggravated such deficiencies. Konya province is located right at the center of Central Anatolia region and mostly groundwater is used in irrigations. Excessive groundwater withdrawals drop groundwaters levels and also increase energy costs. Although farmers pay quite high sums for energy, they were not using water efficiently and thus were not able to get desired benefits from the irrigations. In this study, irrigation practices of an irrigation cooperative were assessed and compared with optimum irrigation programs created through IRSIS irrigation scheduling software. It was concluded that all irrigation practices of the region were wrong and way behind the optimum ones.

  12. Precision overhead irrigation is suitable for several Central Valley crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey P. Mitchell

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Overhead systems are the dominant irrigation technology in many parts of the world, but they are not widely used in California even though they have higher water application efficiency than furrow irrigation systems and lower labor requirements than drip systems. With water and labor perennial concerns in California, the suitability of overhead systems merits consideration. From 2008 through 2013, in studies near Five Points, California, we evaluated overhead irrigation for wheat, corn, cotton, tomato, onion and broccoli as an alternative to furrow and drip irrigation. With the exception of tomato, equal or increased yields were achieved with overhead irrigation. Many variables are involved in the choice of an irrigation system, but our results suggest that, with more research to support best management practices, overhead irrigation may be useful to a wider set of California farmers than currently use it.

  13. Irrigation Signals Detected From SMAP Soil Moisture Retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawston, Patricia M.; Santanello, Joseph A.; Kumar, Sujay V.

    2017-12-01

    Irrigation can influence weather and climate, but the magnitude, timing, and spatial extent of irrigation are poorly represented in models, as are the resulting impacts of irrigation on the coupled land-atmosphere system. One way to improve irrigation representation in models is to assimilate soil moisture observations that reflect an irrigation signal to improve model states. Satellite remote sensing is a promising avenue for obtaining these needed observations on a routine basis, but to date, irrigation detection in passive microwave satellites has proven difficult. In this study, results show that the new enhanced soil moisture product from the Soil Moisture Active Passive satellite is able to capture irrigation signals over three semiarid regions in the western United States. This marks an advancement in Earth-observing satellite skill and the ability to monitor human impacts on the water cycle.

  14. Biochar enhances yield and quality of tomato under reduced irrigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saleem Akhtar, Saqib; Li, Guitong; Andersen, Mathias Neumann

    2014-01-01

    Biochar is an amendment that can be used for enhancing soil water storage which may increase crop productivity. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of biochar on physiology, yield and quality of tomato under different irrigation regimes. From early flowering to fruit maturity...... stages, the plants were subjected to full irrigation (FI), deficit irrigation (DI) and partial root-zone drying irrigation (PRD) and two levels of biochar (0% and 5% by weight). In FI, the plants were irrigated daily to pot water holding capacity while in DI and PRD, 70% of FI was irrigated on either...... the whole or one side of the pots, respectively. In PRD, irrigation was switched between sides when the soil water content of the dry side decreased to 15%. The results showed that addition of biochar increased the soil moisture contents in DI and PRD, which consequently improved physiology, yield...

  15. Two Challenges for U.S. Irrigation Due to Climate Change: Increasing Irrigated Area in Wet States and Increasing Irrigation Rates in Dry States

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Robert I.; Girvetz, Evan H.

    2013-01-01

    Agricultural irrigation practices will likely be affected by climate change. In this paper, we use a statistical model relating observed water use by U.S. producers to the moisture deficit, and then use this statistical model to project climate changes impact on both the fraction of agricultural land irrigated and the irrigation rate (m3ha−1). Data on water withdrawals for US states (1985–2005) show that both quantities are highly positively correlated with moisture deficit (precipitation – PET). If current trends hold, climate change would increase agricultural demand for irrigation in 2090 by 4.5–21.9 million ha (B1 scenario demand: 4.5–8.7 million ha, A2 scenario demand: 9.1–21.9 million ha). Much of this new irrigated area would occur in states that currently have a wet climate and a small fraction of their agricultural land currently irrigated, posing a challenge to policymakers in states with less experience with strict regulation of agriculture water use. Moreover, most of this expansion will occur in states where current agricultural production has relatively low market value per hectare, which may make installation of irrigation uneconomical without significant changes in crops or practices by producers. Without significant increases in irrigation efficiency, climate change would also increase the average irrigation rate from 7,963 to 8,400–10,415 m3ha−1 (B1 rate: 8,400–9,145 m3ha−1, A2 rate: 9,380–10,415 m3ha−1). The irrigation rate will increase the most in states that already have dry climates and large irrigation rates, posing a challenge for water supply systems in these states. Accounting for both the increase in irrigated area and irrigation rate, total withdrawals might increase by 47.7–283.4 billion m3 (B1 withdrawal: 47.7–106.0 billion m3, A2 withdrawal: 117.4–283.4 billion m3). Increases in irrigation water-use efficiency, particularly by reducing the prevalence of surface irrigation, could eliminate the increase in

  16. Drip irrigation management in different chufa planting strategies: yield and irrigation water use efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual-Seva, Nuria; San Bautista, Alberto; López-Galarza, Salvador; Maroto, José Vicente; Pascual, Bernardo

    2013-04-01

    In a study presented in the EGU assembly 2012, it was analysed how yield and irrigation water use efficiency (IWUE) in chufa (Cyperus esculentus L. var. sativus), crop, were affected by planting strategy (ridges and flat raised beds, with two and three plant rows along them) and irrigation system [furrow (FI) and drip irrigation (DI)]. Each irrigation session started when the Volumetric Soil Water Content (VSWC) in ridges dropped to 80% of field capacity; beds were irrigated simultaneously with ridges and with the same irrigation duration. R produced lower yield than the two types of beds, and yields in DI were higher than those FI. Ridges led to the highest IWUE with DI, and to the lowest with FI. Then, it was decided to analyse, in DI, how yield and IWUE responded to start each irrigation session when the VSWC in the central point of different planting strategies [ridges (R), and flat raised beds with two (b) and three (B) plant rows along them] dropped to 80% of field capacity. In R and b, plants were irrigated by a single dripline per plant row, while in B two irrigation layouts were assayed: a single dripline per plant row (B3) and two driplines per bed (B2), placing each dripline between two planting rows. Irrigation session stop was also automated as a function of the VSWC. Results show that yield was affected (P˜0.01) by planting strategy; the greatest yield was obtained in b (2.4 kgm-2), differing (P˜0.05) from that obtained in R (2.1 kgm-2), with intermediate yields in B2 (2.3 kgm-2) and B3 (2.3 kgm-2). Yield was not affected (P˜0.05) by the utilisation of two or three driplines in B. Considerably less irrigation water was applied (IWA) in R (376 mm) than in B3 (465 mm), B2 (475 mm) and b (502 mm). This automatic irrigation management, as a function of the VSWC in each planting strategy, lead to adjust the IWA to the plant water requirements, which were similar in all three flat raised beds, since they correspond to the same planting density, that was

  17. Improving irrigation management in L'Horta Nord (Valencia, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual-Seva, Nuria; San Bautista, Alberto; López-Galarza, Salvador; Maroto, Jose Vicente; Pascual, Bernardo

    2014-05-01

    L'Horta Nord is an important irrigation district in Valencia (Spain), especially for vegetable crops. The traditional cropping pattern in the region consists of a rotation of chufa with crops such as potato, onion, lettuce, escarole and red cabbage, being all these crops furrow irrigated. Currently, the quality of the water used is acceptable, water is not expensive and there are no limitations on supply. Consequently, growers are not aware of the volumes of water used, application efficiencies, nor water productivity for any of the crops cited. The European Framework Directive 2000/60, based on the precautionary principle, considers preventive action for measures to be taken; moreover, drought periods are becoming more frequent and extended, and water is being diverted to other uses. Thus, water use is an issue to improve. In this sense, the current situation of the irrigation in the area is analysed using chufa (Cyperus esculentus L. var. sativus Boeck.) as representative of the crops, since most of the crops in the area have shallow root systems, as chufa, which are irrigated in similar patterns. In order to analyse the irrigation performance of the traditional chufa crop as well as to achieve more sustainable results, different studies have been carried out, during the last decade. Efforts have been directed to increase water productivity, increasing yield and minimising the volumes of water applied. Different planting configurations and different irrigation thresholds, not only in furrow irrigation but also in drip irrigation, are examples of how the irrigation performance could be improved. Herein is presented a two-year study, comparing, in both furrow and drip irrigation, two irrigation schedules based on the volumetric soil water content, which was continuously monitored using capacitance sensors. Yield was significantly affected by the growing season, the irrigation system and by the irrigation schedule, and by the second order interactions of the

  18. The fluid mechanics of root canal irrigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulabivala, K; Ng, Y-L; Gilbertson, M; Eames, I

    2010-12-01

    Root canal treatment is a common dental operation aimed at removing the contents of the geometrically complex canal chambers within teeth; its purpose is to remove diseased or infected tissue. The complex chamber is first enlarged and shaped by instruments to a size sufficient to deliver antibacterial fluids. These irrigants help to dissolve dying tissue, disinfect the canal walls and space and flush out debris. The effectiveness of the procedure is limited by access to the canal terminus. Endodontic research is focused on finding the instruments and clinical procedures that might improve success rates by more effectively reaching the apical anatomy. The individual factors affecting treatment outcome have not been unequivocally deciphered, partly because of the difficulty in isolating them and in making the link between simplified, general experimental models and the complex biological objects that are teeth. Explicitly considering the physical processes within the root canal can contribute to the resolution of these problems. The central problem is one of fluid motion in a confined geometry, which makes the dispersion and mixing of irrigant more difficult because of the absence of turbulence over much of the canal volume. The effects of treatments can be understood through the use of scale models, mathematical modelling and numerical computations. A particular concern in treatment is that caustic irrigant may penetrate beyond the root canal, causing chemical damage to the jawbone. In fact, a stagnation plane exists beyond the needle tip, which the irrigant cannot penetrate. The goal is therefore to shift the stagnation plane apically to be coincident with the canal terminus without extending beyond it. Needle design may solve some of the problems but the best design for irrigant penetration conflicts with that for optimal removal of the bacterial biofilm from the canal wall. Both irrigant penetration and biofilm removal may be improved through canal fluid

  19. A Software-Defined GNSS Reflectometry Recording Receiver with Wide-Bandwidth, Multi-Band Capability and Digital Beam-Forming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serni Ribó

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present the Software PARIS Interferometric Receiver (SPIR, a high-speed GNSS reflectometry recording receiver which has been designed and implemented with the primary goal of demonstrating the synoptic capabilities of the interferometric technique in GNSS Reflectrometry. Thanks to the use of large bandwidth GNSS signals, this technique is advantageous in comparison to the so-called clean-replica processing, when sea surface altimetric applications are pursued. The SPIR receiver down-converts, samples, and records the GNSS signals acquired by the sixteen elements of two antenna arrays. It can operate at any of the common GNSS L1, L2, or L5 bands. Digital beam-forming and signal processing is performed off-line by its dedicated signal processor, so that the GNSS reflectometry can be applied to different transmitting satellites using the same set of recorded signals. Alternatively, different processing techniques can be compared by applying them to exactly the same signals. This article focuses on the SPIR instrument hardware and software, as well as the remote sensing observables that can be obtained using this equipment.

  20. Optimization of the method for assessment of brain perfusion in humans using contrast-enhanced reflectometry: multidistance time-resolved measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milej, Daniel; Janusek, Dariusz; Gerega, Anna; Wojtkiewicz, Stanislaw; Sawosz, Piotr; Treszczanowicz, Joanna; Weigl, Wojciech; Liebert, Adam

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the study was to determine optimal measurement conditions for assessment of brain perfusion with the use of optical contrast agent and time-resolved diffuse reflectometry in the near-infrared wavelength range. The source-detector separation at which the distribution of time of flights (DTOF) of photons provided useful information on the inflow of the contrast agent to the intracerebral brain tissue compartments was determined. Series of Monte Carlo simulations was performed in which the inflow and washout of the dye in extra- and intracerebral tissue compartments was modeled and the DTOFs were obtained at different source-detector separations. Furthermore, tests on diffuse phantoms were carried out using a time-resolved setup allowing the measurement of DTOFs at 16 source-detector separations. Finally, the setup was applied in experiments carried out on the heads of adult volunteers during intravenous injection of indocyanine green. Analysis of statistical moments of the measured DTOFs showed that the source-detector separation of 6 cm is recommended for monitoring of inflow of optical contrast to the intracerebral brain tissue compartments with the use of continuous wave reflectometry, whereas the separation of 4 cm is enough when the higher-order moments of DTOFs are available.

  1. Case study on the dynamics of ultrafast laser heating and ablation of gold thin films by ultrafast pump-probe reflectometry and ellipsometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pflug, T.; Wang, J.; Olbrich, M.; Frank, M.; Horn, A.

    2018-02-01

    To increase the comprehension of ultrafast laser ablation, the ablation process has to be portrayed with sufficient temporal resolution. For example, the temporal modification of the complex refractive index {\\tilde{n}} and the relative reflectance of a sample material after irradiation with ultrafast single-pulsed laser radiation can be measured with a pump-probe setup. This work describes the construction and validation of a pump-probe setup enabling spatially, temporally, and spectroscopically resolved Brewster angle microscopy, reflectometry, ellipsometry, and shadow photography. First pump-probe reflectometry and ellipsometry measurements are performed on gold at λ _{probe}= 440 nm and three fluences of the single-pulsed pump radiation at λ _{pump}= 800 nm generating no, gentle, and strong ablation. The relative reflectance overall increases at no and gentle ablation. At strong ablation, the relative reflectance locally decreases, presumable caused by emitted thermal electrons, ballistic electrons, and ablating material. The refractive index n is slightly decreasing after excitation, while the extinction coefficient k is increasing.

  2. Comparison of a continuous ultrasonic irrigation device and conventional needle irrigation in the removal of root canal debris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Tyson O; Sedgley, Christine M

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare a continuous ultrasonic irrigation device (VPro StreamClean System [VSS], Vista Dental Products, Racine, WI) with conventional needle irrigation when used as a final irrigation procedure to debride the apical region of the root canal. The null hypothesis that there is no difference was tested. Root canals of matched pairs (N = 20) of extracted human teeth were prepared to an apical size of 36/.04 using Profile series 29/.04 rotary files (Dentsply Tulsa Dental, Tulsa, OK) with 6% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) irrigation. One tooth of each pair was randomly assigned to receive final irrigation with either VSS or conventional needle irrigation. The gauge of the needle (#30), the irrigation cycles (ie, 5 mL NaOCl, 5 mL 15% EDTA, and 5 mL NaOCl), the irrigant flow rate (5 mL/min), and needle depth placement (1 mm from the working length [WL]) were experimental constants. Serial sections were obtained at 1 and 3 mm from the WL, stained with hematoxylin-eosin, and viewed at 100× magnification for the presence of debris. The percentage of debris in the canal lumen after VSS or conventional needle irrigation was compared by using the Wilcoxon matched pairs test. There was significantly less debris in the VSS group compared with the conventional needle irrigation group at the 1-mm level (1.50% [VSS] vs 9.90% [conventional needle irrigation], P = .0001) and the 3-mm level (0.45% [VSS] vs 5.16% [conventional needle irrigation], P = .0014). The null hypothesis was rejected. Final irrigation with the VSS compared with conventional needle irrigation delivery resulted in significantly less debris present in root canals at 1 and 3 mm from the WL. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Saline water irrigation of quinoa and chickpea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hirich, A.; Jelloul, A.; Choukr-Allah, R.

    2014-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted in the south of Morocco to evaluate the response of chickpea and quinoa to different irrigation water salinity treatments (1, 4, 7 and 10 dS m-1 for chickpea and 1, 10, 20 and 30 dS m-1 for quinoa). Increasing salinity affected significantly (P ... and height and caused delay and reduction in seed emergence, quinoa was shown to be more resistant than chickpea. Dry biomass, seed yield, harvest index and crop water productivity were affected significantly (P ... and seed yield for both quinoa and chickpea while increasing salinity resulted in increase - in the case of quinoa - and decrease - in the case of chickpea - in harvest index and crop water productivity. Na+ and Na+/K+ ratio increased with increasing irrigation water salinity, while K+ content decreased...

  4. Irrigation drainage: Green River basin, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Doyle W.; Waddell, Bruce; Miller, Jerry B.

    1988-01-01

    A reconnaissance of wildlife areas in the middle Green River basin of Utah during 1986-87 determined that concentrations of selenium in water and biological tissues were potentially harmful to wildlife at the Stewart Lake Waterfowl Management Area and in the Ouray National Wildlife Refuge. Concentations of selenium in irrigation drainage entering Stewart Lake ranged from 14 to 140 micrograms per liter; liver tissue from coots collected from the lake contained selenium concentrations of as much as 26 micrograms per gram and samples of tissue from carp contained as much as 31 micrograms per gram. Concentrations of selenium in a pond at the Ouray National Wildlife Refuge, which receives irrigation water and shallow ground water, were as much as 93 micrograms per liter. Liver tissue from coots collected from this pond contained selenium concentrations of as much as 43 micrograms per gram; eggs of water birds contained as much as 120 micrograms per gram.

  5. Genetic base of Brazilian irrigated rice cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hudson de Oliveira Rabelo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to estimate the genetic base of Brazilian irrigated rice cultivars released in the period from 1965 to 2012. The genealogies of the cultivars were obtained based on information from marketing folders, websites, crossings records, and scientific articles. The following factors were calculated: relative genetic contribution (RGC, accumulated genetic contribution (AGC, frequency (in percentage of each ancestor in the genealogy (FAG, number of ancestors that constitute each cultivar (NAC,number of ancestors responsible for 60%, 70%, 80% and 90% of the genetic base (NAGB, and average number of ancestor per cultivar (ANAC. The cultivars were also grouped based on the period of release (1965-1980, 1981-1990, 1991-2000 and 2001-2012. For each grouping, the previously described factors were also estimated. A total of 110 cultivars were studied and it was concluded that the genetic base of Brazilian irrigated rice cultivars is narrow.

  6. Irrigants in non-surgical endodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, John D; Fleury, Alex A P

    2006-01-01

    This paper highlights that one of the main goals of root canal treatment is the elimination of microorganisms from the contaminated root canal system. Instrumentation alone will not allow for adequate debridement and disinfection of the complex and diverse root canal system. Chemomechanical debridement is required. The importance of the use of irrigants during non-surgical root canal treatment has frequently been neglected both during instruction of dental students and later in the clinical practice of endodontics. The article highlights 'shape, clean and fill' vs. 'clean, shape and fill' to enable chemomechanical debridement. Our protocol advises mechanical debridement and copious irrigation for a minimum of twenty minutes with 2.5% to 6% solutions of sodium hypochlorite, followed by a rinse with a 17% solution of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and a final rinse with 2% chlorhexidine. The canals are dried with high volume aspirators and sterile paper points.

  7. Online decision support system for surface irrigation management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenchao; Cui, Yuanlai

    2017-04-01

    Irrigation has played an important role in agricultural production. Irrigation decision support system is developed for irrigation water management, which can raise irrigation efficiency with few added engineering services. An online irrigation decision support system (OIDSS), in consist of in-field sensors and central computer system, is designed for surface irrigation management in large irrigation district. Many functions have acquired in OIDSS, such as data acquisition and detection, real-time irrigation forecast, water allocation decision and irrigation information management. The OIDSS contains four parts: Data acquisition terminals, Web server, Client browser and Communication system. Data acquisition terminals are designed to measure paddy water level, soil water content in dry land, ponds water level, underground water level, and canals water level. A web server is responsible for collecting meteorological data, weather forecast data, the real-time field data, and manager's feedback data. Water allocation decisions are made in the web server. Client browser is responsible for friendly displaying, interacting with managers, and collecting managers' irrigation intention. Communication system includes internet and the GPRS network used by monitoring stations. The OIDSS's model is based on water balance approach for both lowland paddy and upland crops. Considering basic database of different crops water demands in the whole growth stages and irrigation system engineering information, the OIDSS can make efficient decision of water allocation with the help of real-time field water detection and weather forecast. This system uses technical methods to reduce requirements of user's specialized knowledge and can also take user's managerial experience into account. As the system is developed by the Browser/Server model, it is possible to make full use of the internet resources, to facilitate users at any place where internet exists. The OIDSS has been applied in

  8. Smart Water Conservation System for Irrigated Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    technical support provided by Mr. Scott Clark and Mr. Glen DeWillie of HydroGeoLogic, Inc. as well as administrative support from Mr. Peter Knowles and Ms...scenarios on a typical administrative facility surrounded by irrigated turf. Building 1000, found at NBVC was chosen for the analysis and comparison...Size (Combined Track, Football and Soccer Field) 7,500 FT2 Average Rain Per year 14 Inches/year Rainwater Available @ 50% normal 129,395 gallons

  9. Coolidge solar powered irrigation pumping project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    A 150 kW solar thermal electric power plant which includes over 2100 square meters of parabolic trough type collectors and an organic Rankine cycle turbine engine was constructed on an irrigated farm. The plant is interconnected with the electrical utility grid. Operation is providing an evaluation of equipment performance and operating and maintenance requirements as well as the desirability of an on farm location.

  10. Hydraulics of IDEal Drip Irrigation Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Evan J

    2009-01-01

    The hydraulics of IDEal drip irrigation system components were analyzed under controlled laboratory conditions and the results can be applied to the design of IDEal systems. The hydraulic loss coefficient for the lateral-submain connector valves was determined based on laboratory measurements. It was found that the hydraulic loss due to friction in the lay-flat laterals can be accurately estimated with standard friction loss equations using a smaller effective diameter based on the wall thi...

  11. Irrigation port hydration in phacoemulsification surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzuki H

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Hisaharu Suzuki,1 Yoichiro Masuda,2 Yuki Hamajima,1 Hiroshi Takahashi3 1Department of Ophthalmology, Nippon Medical School Musashikosugi Hospital, Kawasaki City, Kanagawa, 2Department of Ophthalmology, The Jikei University, Katsushika Medical Center, Tokyo, 3Department of Ophthalmology, Nippon Medical School, Tokyo, Japan Background: In most cases, hydration is performed by water injection into the stromal tissue with a needle. The technique is simple, however it is sometimes troublesome.Purpose: We describe a simple technique for hydrating the corneal stroma in cataract surgery using an irrigation port.Patients and methods: The technique began by pushing the irrigation port against the corneal stroma for a few seconds during phacoemulsification, which generated edema in the corneal incision that subsequently prevented leakage. This procedure is called the hydration using irrigation port (HYUIP technique. A total of 60 eyes were randomized and placed in two groups, 30 eyes underwent surgeries using the HYUIP technique (HYUIP group and 30 eyes underwent surgeries without the HYUIP technique (control. The three points evaluated during each surgery included 1 the occurrence of anterior chamber collapse during the pulling out of the I/A tip after inserting the intraocular lens, 2 the need for conventional hydration, and 3 watertight completion at the end stage of surgery.Results: The anterior chamber collapse and the need for conventional hydration were significantly smaller in the HYUIP group compared to the control group. Regarding the self-sealing completion, no significant difference was observed between the two groups.Conclusion: The HYUIP technique is an effective method for creating self-sealing wound. In addition, this technique helps to prevent anterior chamber collapse. Keywords: cataract surgery, hydration, irrigation and aspiration, phacoemulsification, wound, self-sealing 

  12. Comparative anti-microbial efficacy of Azadirachta indica irrigant with standard endodontic irrigants: A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Arindam; Kundabala, Mala

    2014-03-01

    The anti-microbial efficacy of 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (SHC) and 0.2% chlorhexidine gluconate were compared with an experimental irrigant formulated from the Neem tree, Azadirachta indica A. Juss. A sample of 36 single rooted anterior teeth with periapical radiolucency and absence of response to vitality tests that required root canal treatment were selected for this study. The test irrigants and their combinations were assigned to five different groups and saline served as the control. Access cavities were prepared using an aseptic technique and samples collected for both anaerobic culture and Gram stained smears, followed by irrigation and sample collection again. The number of organisms were expressed in colony forming units/ml after 72 h of incubation; the smears were analyzed for their microbial loads and tissue clearance and assessed as per defined criteria. Our results found the maximum reduction in microbial loads, when analyzed by culture method, with a combination of SHC and the experimental neem irrigant. Maximum tissue clearance on the Gram Stained smears was also found with the same combination. Neem irrigant has anti-microbial efficacy and can be considered for endodontic use.

  13. A comparison of open irrigated and non-irrigated tip catheter ablation for pulmonary vein isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Stuart P; Aggarwal, Gunjan; Boyd, Anita C; Jin, Yuanzhe; Ross, David L

    2004-07-01

    The relative efficacy and safety of open irrigated tip catheters compared with conventional non-irrigated catheters for pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) is unknown. Forty-eight patients undergoing PVI using an open irrigated tip ablation catheter (Group 1) were compared with a group of 31 historical controls (Group 2). The control group underwent similar procedures using a standard, 4 mm tip, temperature controlled ablation catheter. Electrical mapping with a circular catheter was used to guide segmental radiofrequency ablation at the vein ostia. At follow-up (3.5+/-3.5 months) after a single procedure 35/48 (73%) patients in Group 1 and 14/31 (45%) in Group 2 were in sinus rhythm (p=0.03). Antiarrhythmic drug use was lower among those in Group 1 maintained in sinus rhythm (9/35 (26%) vs 8/14 (57%), p=0.002). Recurrent atrial fibrillation was more common in Group 2 (28/31 (90%) vs 28/48 (58%) p=0.004). Serious complications were uncommon in both groups. Compared with an historical control group, pulmonary vein isolation using open irrigated tip catheters was superior to ablation with conventional 4 mm tip catheters. Patients undergoing ablation with an irrigated tip catheter were less likely to experience symptomatic recurrences of atrial fibrillation or require further therapy for post-procedural arrhythmias.

  14. Effect of three different irrigation solutions applied by passive ultrasonic irrigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Llena

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives This study evaluated the maximum depth and percentage of irrigant penetration into dentinal tubules by passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI. Materials and Methods Thirty extracted human teeth were instrumented and divided into three groups. According to final irrigation regimen, 5.25% sodium hypochlorite (Group A, NaOCl, 2% chlorhexidine (Group B, CHX and saline solution (Group C, control group were applied with Irrisafe 20 tips (Acteon and PUI. Irrigant was mixed with 0.1% rhodamine B. Sections at 2 mm, 5 mm, and 8 mm from the apex were examined with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM. The percentage and maximum depth of irrigant penetration were measured. Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney test were performed for overall comparison between groups at each level and for pairwise comparison, respectively. Within a group, Wilcoxon test was performed among different levels. p values less than 0.05 were considered significant. Results In all groups, highest penetration depth and percentage of penetration were observed at the 8 mm level. At 2 mm level, Groups A and B had significantly greater depths and percentages in penetration than Group C (p < 0.05, but there were no significant differences between Groups A and B. At 5 mm level, penetration depths and percentage of penetration was not significantly different among the groups. Conclusions NaOCl and CHX applied by PUI showed similar depth and percentage of penetration at all evaluated levels.

  15. Effects of traditional flood irrigation on invertebrates in lowland meadows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirmel, Jens; Alt, Martin; Rudolph, Isabell; Entling, Martin H

    2014-01-01

    Lowland meadow irrigation used to be widespread in Central Europe, but has largely been abandoned during the 20th century. As a result of agri-environment schemes and nature conservation efforts, meadow irrigation is now being re-established in some European regions. In the absence of natural flood events, irrigation is expected to favour fauna typical of lowland wet meadows. We analysed the effects of traditional flood irrigation on diversity, densities and species composition of three invertebrate indicator taxa in lowland meadows in Germany. Unexpectedly, alpha diversity (species richness and Simpson diversity) and beta diversity (multivariate homogeneity of group dispersions) of orthopterans, carabids, and spiders were not significantly different between irrigated and non-irrigated meadows. However, spider densities were significantly higher in irrigated meadows. Furthermore, irrigation and elevated humidity affected species composition and shifted assemblages towards moisture-dependent species. The number of species of conservation concern, however, did not differ between irrigated and non-irrigated meadows. More variable and intensive (higher duration and/or frequency) flooding regimes might provide stronger conservation benefits, additional species and enhance habitat heterogeneity on a landscape scale.

  16. Rice Photosynthetic Productivity and PSII Photochemistry under Nonflooded Irrigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibing He

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonflooded irrigation is an important water-saving rice cultivation technology, but little is known on its photosynthetic mechanism. The aims of this work were to investigate photosynthetic characteristics of rice during grain filling stage under three nonflooded irrigation treatments: furrow irrigation with plastic mulching (FIM, furrow irrigation with nonmulching (FIN, and drip irrigation with plastic mulching (DI. Compared with the conventional flooding (CF treatment, those grown in the nonflooded irrigation treatments showed lower net photosynthetic rate (PN, lower maximum quantum yield (Fv/Fm, and lower effective quantum yield of PSII photochemistry (ΦPSII. And the poor photosynthetic characteristics in the nonflooded irrigation treatments were mainly attributed to the low total nitrogen content (TNC. Under non-flooded irrigation, the PN, Fv/Fm, and ΦPSII significantly decreased with a reduction in the soil water potential, but these parameters were rapidly recovered in the DI and FIM treatments when supplementary irrigation was applied. Moreover, The DI treatment always had higher photosynthetic productivity than the FIM and FIN treatments. Grain yield, matter translocation, and dry matter post-anthesis (DMPA were the highest in the CF treatment, followed by the DI, FIM, and FIN treatments in turn. In conclusion, increasing nitrogen content in leaf of rice plants could be a key factor to improve photosynthetic capacity in nonflooded irrigation.

  17. Root Zone Sensors for Irrigation Management in Intensive Agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Hemming

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Crop irrigation uses more than 70% of the world’s water, and thus, improving irrigation efficiency is decisive to sustain the food demand from a fast-growing world population. This objective may be accomplished by cultivating more water-efficient crop species and/or through the application of efficient irrigation systems, which includes the implementation of a suitable method for precise scheduling. At the farm level, irrigation is generally scheduled based on the grower’s experience or on the determination of soil water balance (weather-based method. An alternative approach entails the measurement of soil water status. Expensive and sophisticated root zone sensors (RZS, such as neutron probes, are available for the use of soil and plant scientists, while cheap and practical devices are needed for irrigation management in commercial crops. The paper illustrates the main features of RZS’ (for both soil moisture and salinity marketed for the irrigation industry and discusses how such sensors may be integrated in a wireless network for computer-controlled irrigation and used for innovative irrigation strategies, such as deficit or dual-water irrigation. The paper also consider the main results of recent or current research works conducted by the authors in Tuscany (Italy on the irrigation management of container-grown ornamental plants, which is an important agricultural sector in Italy.

  18. Irrigation Capability Evaluation of Illushi Floodplain, Edo State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Umweni

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Many irrigation projects, especially in the developing tropical regions, are embarked upon without any land capability assessment, resulting in avoidable and undesirable ecological consequences. The aim of this study is to assess the irrigation capability potentials of the soils of a rice growing Illushi/Ega community in Edo State of Nigeria. Soils of Illushi/Ega (200 ha were studied to establish their irrigation capabilities. Water samples were collected from the rivers within and near the sites at the proposed points of intake structures and analyzed for salinity (ECw, permeability (SAR and ion toxicity [Chlorine (Cl and Boron (B]. Gravity irrigation suitability assessment was carried out following the guidelines of the United States Bureau for Land Reclamation (USBR, 1953 and FAO (1979. Results showed that about 5.5 % of the land was non-irrigable, 11.5 % was marginally irrigable, 30.5% was moderately irrigable and 52.5 % highly irrigable.Thus about 83 % of the total land area was found to be irrigable. The results of analyses of irrigation water [ECw, SAR and Cl and B (ion toxicity problems in water sources were 0.1 – 0.7 dS m-1, 1.2 – 1.7, 0.6 – 1.8 cmol kg-1 and 0.5 – 0.7 mg kg-1] also show that there is no indication of salinity or ion toxicity problem.

  19. Men, Masculinities and Water Powers in Irrigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margreet Zwarteveen

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to provide an informed plea for more explicitly identifying, naming and unravelling the linkages between water control and gender in irrigation. The fact that power, expertise and status in irrigation tend to have a strong masculine connotation is by now quite well established, and underlies calls for more women in water decision making, engineering education and professions. Yet, the questions of how and why water control, status and expertise are linked to masculinity, and of whether and how such links work to legitimise the exercise of power, are seldom asked. To date, associations between masculinity and professional water performance have largely been taken for granted and remained unexamined. The resulting perceived normalcy makes mechanisms of (gendered power and politics in water appear self-evident, unchangeable, and indeed gender-neutral. The article reviews examples of the masculinity of irrigation in different domains to argue that exposing and challenging such hitherto hidden dimensions of (gendered power is important for the identification of new avenues of gender progressive change, and for shedding a new and interesting light on the workings of power in water.

  20. Irrigation-based livelihood challenges and opportunities : a gendered technology of irrigation development intervention in the Lower Moshi irrigation scheme Tanzania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kissawike, K.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis is a study of a modernised irrigation scheme in Tanzania. It aims to understand how irrigation and agricultural technologies have interacted with local society to transform production, paying particular attention to gender relations and changes for women farmers. The thesis seeks to

  1. Energy performance of sprinkler irrigated maize, wheat and sunflower in Vigia irrigation district

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Sandra; Rodrigues, Goncalo Caleia; Paredes, Paula; Pereira, Luis S. [Centro de Engenharia dos Biossistemas (CEER/ISA), Lisboa (Portugal)], E-mail: lspereira@isa.utl.pt

    2008-07-01

    The energy potential of a crop may be evaluated through life cycle assessment methodologies. These refer to the computation of the crop's energy balance and other related indicators, such as the energy ratio and the energetic efficiency, that may be used as to assess how a given irrigated crop may be used for production of biofuel. This study concerns sprinkler irrigated sunflower, wheat and maize crops using data relative to the campaign of 2007 in the Vigia Irrigation District, Alentejo. A model was developed and various scenarios were considered. The modelling results lead to the conclusion that the maize crop is the most efficient in producing energy and sunflower is the least one for all the alternative scenarios considered. (author)

  2. From rainfed agriculture to stress-avoidance irrigation: I. A generalized irrigation scheme with stochastic soil moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vico, Giulia; Porporato, Amilcare

    2011-02-01

    With vast regions already experiencing water shortages, it is becoming imperative to manage sustainably the available water resources. As agriculture is by far the most important user of freshwater and the role of irrigation is projected to increase in face of climate change and increased food requirements, it is particularly important to develop simple, widely applicable models of irrigation water needs for short- and long-term water resource management. Such models should synthetically provide the key irrigation quantities (volumes, frequencies, etc.) for different irrigation schemes as a function of the main soil, crop, and climatic features, including rainfall unpredictability. Here we consider often-employed irrigation methods (e.g., surface and sprinkler irrigation systems, as well as modern micro-irrigation techniques) and describe them under a unified conceptual and theoretical framework, which includes rainfed agriculture and stress-avoidance irrigation as extreme cases. We obtain mostly analytical solutions for the stochastic steady state of soil moisture probability density function with random rainfall timing and amount, and compute water requirements as a function of climate, crop, and soil parameters. These results provide the necessary starting point for a full assessment of irrigation strategies, with reference to sustainability, productivity, and profitability, developed in a companion paper [Vico G, Porporato A. From rainfed agriculture to stress-avoidance irrigation: II. Sustainability, crop yield, and net profit. Adv Water Resour 2011;34(2):272-81].

  3. Impact of alternate furrow irrigation with different irrigation intervals on yield, water use efficiency, and economic return of corn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awad Abd El-Halim

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Alternate furrow irrigation with proper irrigation intervals could save irrigation water and result in high grain yield with low irrigation costs in arid areas. Two field experiments were conducted in the Middle Nile Delta area of Egypt during the 2010 and 2011 seasons to investigate the impact of alternate furrow irrigation with 7-d (AFI7 and 14-d intervals (AFI14 on yield, crop water use efficiency, irrigation water productivity, and economic return of corn (Zea mays L. as compared with every-furrow irrigation (EFI, conventional method with 14-d interval. Results indicated that grain yield increased under the AFI7 treatment, whereas it tended to decrease under AFI14 as compared with EFI. Irrigation water saving in the AFI7 and AFI14 treatments was approximately 7% and 17%, respectively, as compared to the EFI treatment. The AFI14 and AFI7 treatments improved both crop water use efficiency and irrigation water productivity as compared with EFI. Results also indicated that the AFI7 treatment did not only increase grain yield, but also increased the benefit-cost ratio, net return, and irrigation water saving. Therefore, if low cost water is available and excess water delivery to the field does not require any additional expense, then the AFI7 treatment will essentially be the best choice under the study area conditions.

  4. Impacts of Irrigation on the Heat Fluxes and Near-Surface Temperature in an Inland Irrigation Area of Northern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jiang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Irrigated agriculture has the potential to alter regional to global climate significantly. We investigate how irrigation will affect regional climate in the future in an inland irrigation area of northern China, focusing on its effects on heat fluxes and near-surface temperature. Using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model, we compare simulations among three land cover scenarios: the control scenario (CON, the irrigation scenario (IRR, and the irrigated cropland expansion scenario (ICE. Our results show that the surface energy budgets and temperature are sensitive to changes in the extent and spatial pattern of irrigated land. Conversion to irrigated agriculture at the contemporary scale leads to an increase in annual mean latent heat fluxes of 12.10 W m−2, a decrease in annual mean sensible heat fluxes of 8.85 W m−2, and a decrease in annual mean temperature of 1.3 °C across the study region. Further expansion of irrigated land increases annual mean latent heat fluxes by 18.08 W m−2, decreases annual mean sensible heat fluxes by 12.31 W m−2, and decreases annual mean temperature by 1.7 °C. Our simulated effects of irrigation show that changes in land use management such as irrigation can be an important component of climate change and need to be considered together with greenhouse forcing in climate change assessments.

  5. Where Does the Irrigation Water Go? An Estimate of the Contribution of Irrigation to Precipitation Using MERRA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jiangfeng; Dirmeyer, Paul A.; Wisser, Dominik; Bosilovich, Michael G.; Mocko, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Irrigation is an important human activity that may impact local and regional climate, but current climate model simulations and data assimilation systems generally do not explicitly include it. The European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Interim Re-Analysis (ERA-Interim) shows more irrigation signal in surface evapotranspiration (ET) than the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) because ERA-Interim adjusts soil moisture according to the observed surface temperature and humidity while MERRA has no explicit consideration of irrigation at the surface. But, when compared with the results from a hydrological model with detailed considerations of agriculture, the ET from both reanalyses show large deficiencies in capturing the impact of irrigation. Here, a back-trajectory method is used to estimate the contribution of irrigation to precipitation over local and surrounding regions, using MERRA with observation-based corrections and added irrigation-caused ET increase from the hydrological model. Results show substantial contributions of irrigation to precipitation over heavily irrigated regions in Asia, but the precipitation increase is much less than the ET increase over most areas, indicating that irrigation could lead to water deficits over these regions. For the same increase in ET, precipitation increases are larger over wetter areas where convection is more easily triggered, but the percentage increase in precipitation is similar for different areas. There are substantial regional differences in the patterns of irrigation impact, but, for all the studied regions, the highest percentage contribution to precipitation is over local land.

  6. Improvement of sustainability of irrigation in olive by the accurate management of regulated deficit irrigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memmi, Houssem; Moreno, Marta M.; Gijón, M. Carmen; Pérez-López, David

    2015-04-01

    Regulated Deficit Irrigation (RDI) is a useful tool to balance the improvement of productivity and water saving. This methodology is based in keeping the maximum yield with deficit irrigation. The key consists in setting water deficit during a non-sensitive phenological period. In olive, this phenological period is pit hardening, although, the accurate delimitation of the end of this period is nowadays under researching. Another interesting point in this methodology is how deep can be the water stress during the non-sensitive period. In this assay, three treatments were used in 2012 and 2013. A control treatment (T0), irrigated following FAO methodology, without water stress during the whole season and two RDI treatments in which water stress was avoided only during stage I and III of fruit growth. During stage II, widely considered as pit hardening, irrigation was ceased until trees reach the stated water stress threshold. Water status was monitored by means of stem water potential (ψs) measurements. When ψs value reached -2 MPa in T1 treatment, trees were irrigated but with a low amount of water with the aim of keeping this water status for the whole stage II. The same methodology was used for T2 treatment, but with a threshold of -3 MPa. Water status was also controlled by leaf conductance measurements. Fruit size and yield were determined at the end of each season. The statistically design was a randomized complete blocks with four repetitions. The irrigation amount in T1 and T2 was 50% and 65% less than T0 at the end of the study. There were no significant differences among treatments in terms of yield in 2012 (year off) and 2013 (year on).

  7. Traditional and contemporary techniques for optimizing root canal irrigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holliday, Richard; Alani, Aws

    2014-01-01

    Canal irrigation during root canal treatment is an important component of chemo-mechanical debridement of the root canal system. Traditional syringe irrigation can be enhanced by activating the irrigant to provide superior cleaning properties. This activation can be achieved by simple modifications in current technique or by contemporary automated devices. Novel techniques are also being developed, such as the Self-adjusting File (Re-Dent-Nova, Ra'anana, Israel), Ozone (Healozone, Dental Ozone, London, UK), Photoactivated Disinfection and Ultraviolet Light Disinfection. This paper reviews the techniques available to enhance traditional syringe irrigation, contemporary irrigation devices and novel techniques, citing their evidence base, advantages and disadvantages. Recent advances in irrigation techniques and canal disinfection and debridement are relevant to practitioners carrying out root canal treatment.

  8. Principles of drip irrigation management in vegetable production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruhi BAŞTUĞ

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Because drip irrigation normally supplies water to a specific part of the soil volume occupied by plant, limited areas to be wetted in soil volume near each emitter or along each lateral line. This is an important context for irrigation system design, operation and management and cultural practices management. Therefore, this characteristic must be taken into consideration for appropriate management of vegetable drip irrigation systems with knowledge requires including of soil hydraulic characteristics, plant growth and water use characteristics and evaporative demand. The irrigation schedule must integrate these features and conform to existing irrigation system and cultural constraits. Additionally, irrigation management program must be coupled with the fertilizer management program to avoid excessive water applications that leach plant nutrients in soil.

  9. Comparison of Manual and Automatic Irrigation of Pot Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haahr, Vagner

    1975-01-01

    An air-lift principle for transport of water was adapted for automatic irrigation of experimental pots originally constructed for manual irrigation by the weighing method. The two irrigation techniques were compared in an experiment with increasing amounts of nitrogen fertilizer to spring barley....... Productions of grain and straw and chemical composition were almost the same after the two irrigation methods, and it was concluded that the laborious manual watering could be replaced by automatic irrigation. Comparison of the yield from individual plants in the pots showed a large difference between centre...... plants and border plants independent of irrigation principle. The increase in yield per pot with increasing N fertilization was at the highest N level caused only by an increase in yield of the border plants....

  10. Effect of low-cost irrigation methods on microbial contamination of lettuce irrigated with untreated wastewater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keraita, Bernard; Konradsen, Flemming; Drechsel, P.

    2007-01-01

    were analysed for thermotolerant coliforms and helminth eggs. RESULTS: Lettuce irrigated with drip kits had the lowest levels of contamination, with, on average, 4 log units per 100 g, fewer thermotolerant coliforms than that irrigated with watering cans. However, drip kits often got clogged, required...... lower crop densities and restricted other routine farm activities. Watering cans were the most popular method. Using watering cans with caps on outlets from a height coliforms by 2.5 log units and helminthes by 2.3 eggs per 100 g of lettuce compared with using watering cans...

  11. Optimizing preplant irrigation for maize under limited water in the high plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Due to inadequate irrigation capacity, some farmers in the United States High Plains apply preplant irrigation to buffer the crop between irrigation events during the cropping season. The purpose of the study was to determine preplant irrigation amount and irrigation capacity combinations that optim...

  12. 25 CFR 171.415 - Can I place an obstruction on a BIA irrigation project?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Can I place an obstruction on a BIA irrigation project... IRRIGATION OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE Irrigation Facilities § 171.415 Can I place an obstruction on a BIA irrigation project? No. You may not place obstructions on BIA irrigation projects. (a) If you do so, we will...

  13. Spatial Quantification of Groundwater Abstraction in the Irrigated Indus Basin

    OpenAIRE

    Cheema, M.J.M.; W. W. Immerzeel; Bastiaanssen, W. G. M.

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater abstraction and depletion were assessed at a 1-km resolution in the irrigated areas of the Indus Basin using remotely sensed evapotranspiration (ET) and precipitation; a process-based hydrological model and spatial information on canal water supplies. A calibrated Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model was used to derive total annual irrigation applied in the irrigated areas of the basin during the year 2007. The SWAT model was parameterized by station corrected precipitation...

  14. Principles of drip irrigation management in vegetable production

    OpenAIRE

    Ruhi BAŞTUĞ

    2014-01-01

    Because drip irrigation normally supplies water to a specific part of the soil volume occupied by plant, limited areas to be wetted in soil volume near each emitter or along each lateral line. This is an important context for irrigation system design, operation and management and cultural practices management. Therefore, this characteristic must be taken into consideration for appropriate management of vegetable drip irrigation systems with knowledge requires including of soil hydraulic chara...

  15. Water quality and bead loss in irrigation filters

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro, TAP; Paterniani, JES; Airoldi, RPD; da Silva, MJM

    2004-01-01

    Among the irrigation systems used today, trickle irrigation is one of the most efficient methods. This research, conducted by means of field tests, had the objective of comparing head loss evolution on water filtration with a disc filter (130 mum) and a non-woven synthetic fabric filter used in a drip irrigation system. The test consisted of fertirrigation with organic fertilizer, and chemical treatment of the water with sodium hypochlorite. Physical, chemical, and biological parameters were ...

  16. Influence of Irrigation Scheduling Using Thermometry on Peach Tree Water Status and Yield under Different Irrigation Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huihui Zhang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Remotely-sensed canopy temperature from infrared thermometer (IRT sensors has long been shown to be effective for detecting plant water stress. A field study was conducted to investigate peach tree responses to deficit irrigation which was controlled using canopy to air temperature difference (ΔT during the postharvest period at the USDA-ARS (U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service San Joaquin Valley Agricultural Sciences Center in Parlier, California, USA. The experimental site consisted of a 1.6 ha early maturing peach tree orchard. A total of 18 IRT sensors were used to control six irrigation treatments including furrow, micro-spray, and surface drip irrigation systems with and without postharvest deficit irrigation. During the postharvest period in the 2012–2013 and 2013–2014 growing seasons, ΔT threshold values at mid-day was tested to trigger irrigation in three irrigation systems. The results showed that mid-day stem water potentials (ψ for well irrigated trees were maintained at a range of −0.5 to −1.2 MPa while ψ of deficit irrigated trees dropped to lower values. Soil water content in deficit surface drip irrigation treatment was higher compared to deficit furrow and micro-spray irrigation treatments in 2012. The number of fruits and fruit weight from peach trees under postharvest deficit irrigation treatment were less than those well-watered trees; however, no statistically significant (at the p < 0.05 level reduction in fruit size or quality was found for trees irrigated by surface drip and micro-spray irrigation systems by deficit irrigation. Beside doubles, we found an increased number of fruits with deep sutures and dimples which may be a long-term (seven-year postharvest regulated deficit irrigation impact of deficit irrigation on this peach tree variety. Overall, deployment of IRT sensors provided real-time measurement of canopy water status and the information is valuable for making irrigation

  17. Crop water stress of tomato as affected by irrigation regimes

    OpenAIRE

    H. Ismail; S. Z. Abubakar; M. A. Oyebode; N. J. Shanono; M. K. Dalhat

    2014-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted at the Irrigation Research Station, Kadawa Kano State, Nigeria (located 11o 30’ N, 08o 30’ E and 486 m above mean sea level) during 2012/2013 dry season to evaluate crop water stress index of tomato (lycopersicon enculentum; UC82B) as affected by irrigation regimes. The experiment consisted of four levels of irrigation water application depth of 100%, 75%, 50% and 25%  replacement of moisture depleted and three irrigation intervals (7, 14 and 21 days) com...

  18. Uncertainties in modelling the climate impact of irrigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vrese, Philipp; Hagemann, Stefan

    2017-11-01

    Irrigation-based agriculture constitutes an essential factor for food security as well as fresh water resources and has a distinct impact on regional and global climate. Many issues related to irrigation's climate impact are addressed in studies that apply a wide range of models. These involve substantial uncertainties related to differences in the model's structure and its parametrizations on the one hand and the need for simplifying assumptions for the representation of irrigation on the other hand. To address these uncertainties, we used the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology's Earth System model into which a simple irrigation scheme was implemented. In order to estimate possible uncertainties with regard to the model's more general structure, we compared the climate impact of irrigation between three simulations that use different schemes for the land-surface-atmosphere coupling. Here, it can be shown that the choice of coupling scheme does not only affect the magnitude of possible impacts but even their direction. For example, when using a scheme that does not explicitly resolve spatial subgrid scale heterogeneity at the surface, irrigation reduces the atmospheric water content, even in heavily irrigated regions. Contrarily, in simulations that use a coupling scheme that resolves heterogeneity at the surface or even within the lowest layers of the atmosphere, irrigation increases the average atmospheric specific humidity. A second experiment targeted possible uncertainties related to the representation of irrigation characteristics. Here, in four simulations the irrigation effectiveness (controlled by the target soil moisture and the non-vegetated fraction of the grid box that receives irrigation) and the timing of delivery were varied. The second experiment shows that uncertainties related to the modelled irrigation characteristics, especially the irrigation effectiveness, are also substantial. In general the impact of irrigation on the state of the land

  19. A Fuzzy analytical hierarchy process approach in irrigation networks maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riza Permana, Angga; Rintis Hadiani, Rr.; Syafi’i

    2017-11-01

    Ponorogo Regency has 440 Irrigation Area with a total area of 17,950 Ha. Due to the limited budget and lack of maintenance cause decreased function on the irrigation. The aim of this study is to make an appropriate system to determine the indices weighted of the rank prioritization criteria for irrigation network maintenance using a fuzzy-based methodology. The criteria that are used such as the physical condition of irrigation networks, area of service, estimated maintenance cost, and efficiency of irrigation water distribution. 26 experts in the field of water resources in the Dinas Pekerjaan Umum were asked to fill out the questionnaire, and the result will be used as a benchmark to determine the rank of irrigation network maintenance priority. The results demonstrate that the physical condition of irrigation networks criterion (W1) = 0,279 has the greatest impact on the assessment process. The area of service (W2) = 0,270, efficiency of irrigation water distribution (W4) = 0,249, and estimated maintenance cost (W3) = 0,202 criteria rank next in effectiveness, respectively. The proposed methodology deals with uncertainty and vague data using triangular fuzzy numbers, and, moreover, it provides a comprehensive decision-making technique to assess maintenance priority on irrigation network.

  20. Wafer characteristics via reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    2010-10-19

    Various exemplary methods (800, 900, 1000, 1100) are directed to determining wafer thickness and/or wafer surface characteristics. An exemplary method (900) includes measuring reflectance of a wafer and comparing the measured reflectance to a calculated reflectance or a reflectance stored in a database. Another exemplary method (800) includes positioning a wafer on a reflecting support to extend a reflectance range. An exemplary device (200) has an input (210), analysis modules (222-228) and optionally a database (230). Various exemplary reflectometer chambers (1300, 1400) include radiation sources positioned at a first altitudinal angle (1308, 1408) and at a second altitudinal angle (1312, 1412). An exemplary method includes selecting radiation sources positioned at various altitudinal angles. An exemplary element (1650, 1850) includes a first aperture (1654, 1854) and a second aperture (1658, 1858) that can transmit reflected radiation to a fiber and an imager, respectfully.