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Sample records for reflect fractional crystallization

  1. Reflection Negative Kernels and Fractional Brownian Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palle E. T. Jorgensen

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article we study the connection of fractional Brownian motion, representation theory and reflection positivity in quantum physics. We introduce and study reflection positivity for affine isometric actions of a Lie group on a Hilbert space E and show in particular that fractional Brownian motion for Hurst index 0 < H ≤ 1 / 2 is reflection positive and leads via reflection positivity to an infinite dimensional Hilbert space if 0 < H < 1 / 2 . We also study projective invariance of fractional Brownian motion and relate this to the complementary series representations of GL 2 ( R . We relate this to a measure preserving action on a Gaussian L 2 -Hilbert space L 2 ( E .

  2. LITERATURE SURVEY FOR FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION STUDY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PERSON, J.C.

    2004-01-01

    The literature survey for the fractional crystallization study of material from tank 241-S-112 is completed, fulfilling the requirements of the Test Plan for Tank 241-S-112 Fractional Crystallization Study (Herting 2003). Crystallization involves the formation of one or more solid phases from a fluid phase or an amorphous solid phase. It is applied extensively in the chemical industry, both as a purification process and a separation process. The main advantage of crystallization over distillation is the production of substances with a very high purity, at a low level of energy consumption, and at relatively mild process conditions. Crystallization is one of the older operations in the chemical industry; therefore, practical experience can usually be used for the design and operation of industrial crystallizers. In addition, advances in the understanding of crystallization kinetics can be useful in the control, design, and scale-up of industrial crystallizers. Research work is currently underway; e.g., the CrysCODE (Crystallizer Control and Design) project, littu://www.aui.tudelft.nl/uroiect/Cn/scode/crvscode.htm, at the Delft University of Technology, with the goal of improving the performance and controllability of industrial crystallizers by means of better control and improved design methodologies. Recent developments in fluid dynamics and reactor technology (e.g., compartment approaches) have led to a better understanding of processes and scale-up phenomena. The ultimate aim of such research is to develop a knowledge-based design frame for optimization of industrial crystallization units. Development work is in progress on a rigorous design analysis model for the description of the crystallization process as a function of the reactor geometry, crystallization kinetics, and operating conditions. One modeling effort is aimed at improving the predictive crystallizer model by implementing a population balance equation that depends on two variables: the size and

  3. Simulation and optimization of fractional crystallization processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kaj; Rasmussen, Peter; Gani, Rafiqul

    1998-01-01

    A general method for the calculation of various types of phase diagrams for aqueous electrolyte mixtures is outlined. It is shown how the thermodynamic equilibrium precipitation process can be used to satisfy the operational needs of industrial crystallizer/centrifuge units. Examples of simulation...... and optimization of fractional crystallization processes are shown. In one of these examples, a process with multiple steady states is analyzed. The thermodynamic model applied for describing the highly non-ideal aqueous electrolyte systems is the Extended UNIQUAC model. (C) 1998 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd...

  4. Fractional Brownian motion with a reflecting wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Alexander H. O.; Vojta, Thomas

    2018-02-01

    Fractional Brownian motion, a stochastic process with long-time correlations between its increments, is a prototypical model for anomalous diffusion. We analyze fractional Brownian motion in the presence of a reflecting wall by means of Monte Carlo simulations. Whereas the mean-square displacement of the particle shows the expected anomalous diffusion behavior ˜tα , the interplay between the geometric confinement and the long-time memory leads to a highly non-Gaussian probability density function with a power-law singularity at the barrier. In the superdiffusive case α >1 , the particles accumulate at the barrier leading to a divergence of the probability density. For subdiffusion α implications of these findings, in particular, for applications that are dominated by rare events.

  5. Multiple order reflections in crystal neutron monochromators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulfaro, R.

    1976-01-01

    A study of the higher order reflections in neutron crystal monochromators was made in order to obtain, for the IEA single crystal spectrometer, the operation range of 1,0eV to 0,01eV. Two crystals were studied, an Al(III) near 1,0eV and a Ge(III) in lower energies. For the Ge(III) case the higher order contaminations in the reflected beam were determined using as standard the gold total neutron cross section and performing the crystal reflectivity calculation for several orders of reflection. The knowledge of the contamination for each order as a function of neutron wavelength allows the optimization of the filter thickness in order to avoid higher order neutrons. The Ge(III) crystal was used because its second order reflections are theoretically forbidden, giving an advantage on other crystals, since measurements can be made until 0.02eV directly without filters. In the energy range 0.02 to 0.01eV, order contaminations higher than the second are present, therefore, either quartz filters are employed or calculated corrections are applied to the experimental data. The Al(III) crystal was used in order to estimate the second order contamination effect, in the iridium resonance measurements, at E 0 = 0.654eV. In that region, approximations can be made and it was not necessary to make the crystal reflectivity calculation for the filters thickness optimization. Since only the second order affects the results in that region, tellurium was used for the filtration, because this element has a resonance in the range of neutrons with energy 4E [pt

  6. Measuring Light Reflectance of BGO Crystal Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janecek, Martin; Moses, William W.

    2008-10-01

    A scintillating crystal's surface reflectance has to be well understood in order to accurately predict and optimize the crystal's light collection through Monte Carlo simulations. In this paper, we measure the inner surface reflectance properties for BGO. The measurements include BGO crystals with a mechanically polished surface, rough-cut surface, and chemically etched surface, and with various reflectors attached, both air-coupled and with coupling compound. The measurements are performed with a laser aimed at the center of a hemispherical shaped BGO crystal. The hemispherical shape eliminates any non-perpendicular angles for light entering and exiting the crystal. The reflected light is collected with an array of photodiodes. The laser can be set at an arbitrary angle, and the photodiode array is rotated to fully cover 2pi of solid angle. The current produced in the photodiodes is readout with a digital multimeter connected through a multiplexer. The two rows of photodiodes achieve 5-degree by 4-degree resolution, and the current measurement has a dynamic range of 105:1. The acquired data was not described by the commonly assumed linear combination of specular and diffuse (Lambertian) distributions, except for a very few surfaces. Surface roughness proved to be the most important parameter when choosing crystal setup. The reflector choice was of less importance and of almost no consequence for rough-cut surfaces. Pure specular reflection distribution for all incidence angles was measured for polished surfaces with VM2000 film, while the most Lambertian distribution for any surface finish was measured for titanium dioxide paint. The distributions acquired in this paper will be used to create more accurate Monte Carlo models for light reflection distribution within BGO crystals.

  7. Lunar Magma Ocean Crystallization: Constraints from Fractional Crystallization Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, J. F.; Draper, D. S.

    2015-01-01

    The currently accepted paradigm of lunar formation is that of accretion from the ejecta of a giant impact, followed by crystallization of a global scale magma ocean. This model accounts for the formation of the anorthosite highlands crust, which is globally distributed and old, and the formation of the younger mare basalts which are derived from a source region that has experienced plagioclase extraction. Several attempts at modelling the crystallization of such a lunar magma ocean (LMO) have been made, but our ever-increasing knowledge of the lunar samples and surface have raised as many questions as these models have answered. Geodynamic models of lunar accretion suggest that shortly following accretion the bulk of the lunar mass was hot, likely at least above the solidus]. Models of LMO crystallization that assume a deep magma ocean are therefore geodynamically favorable, but they have been difficult to reconcile with a thick plagioclase-rich crust. A refractory element enriched bulk composition, a shallow magma ocean, or a combination of the two have been suggested as a way to produce enough plagioclase to account for the assumed thickness of the crust. Recently however, geophysical data from the GRAIL mission have indicated that the lunar anorthositic crust is not as thick as was initially estimated, which allows for both a deeper magma ocean and a bulk composition more similar to the terrestrial upper mantle. We report on experimental simulations of the fractional crystallization of a deep (approximately 100km) LMO with a terrestrial upper mantle-like (LPUM) bulk composition. Our experimental results will help to define the composition of the lunar crust and mantle cumulates, and allow us to consider important questions such as source regions of the mare basalts and Mg-suite, the role of mantle overturn after magma ocean crystallization and the nature of KREEP

  8. Fractional decay of quantum dots in photonic crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Philip Trøst; Koenderink, Femius; Lodahl, Peter

    2008-01-01

    We define a practical measure for the degree of fractional decay and establish conditions for the effect to be observable for quantum dots in photonic crystals exhibiting absorptive losses.......We define a practical measure for the degree of fractional decay and establish conditions for the effect to be observable for quantum dots in photonic crystals exhibiting absorptive losses....

  9. Fractional decay of quantum dots in real photonic crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Philip Trøst; Koenderink, A. Femius; Lodahl, Peter

    2008-01-01

    We show that fractional decay may be observable in experiments using quantum dots and photonic crystals with parameters that are currently achievable. We focus on the case of inverse opal photonic crystals and locate the position in the crystal where the effect is most pronounced. Furthermore, we...

  10. Reflective and transflective liquid crystal displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fushan

    Recently transflective liquid crystal displays (LCD) received a lot of attention. A transflective display has a transmissive mode and a reflective mode. It combines the high contrast, high brightness of the transmissive mode with energy-saving of reflective mode and has good performance in various illumination conditions. However, state-of-the-art transflective displays have problems such as different electro-optical properties, difficulty in compatibility and optimization of both modes, low efficiency of light utilization, and complexity in structure. This dissertation focuses on finding new designs of transflective displays that address those problems. One way to do this is to study film compensation of LCD. We first studied film compensation of bistable twisted nematic (BTN) LCD. Starting form the reduced (3x3) Mueller matrices, we derived and simplified the conditions that film compensated BTN can be optimized. Based on these relations, electro-optical properties of some particular configurations, and designs of transflective BTN with high brightness and contrast were given. To confirm and get a better understanding of the results, we use the Poincare sphere to analyze film compensated BTN. The key to this approach is the existence of "fixed points". Compared with the matrix approach, this approach is more simple, elegant, and efficient. We then generalized the Poincare sphere approach to a universal approach of LCD. We applied the universal approach to film compensation of ECB and IPS, and the design of achromatic birefringent filters. We also give two more new designs of transflective displays. In the first design, a dichroic mirror is used to split the visible spectrum into two parts used in transmissive and reflective modes, respectively. Both modes can be optimized. It has a simple structure and good light utilization. A design for a full-color transflective display with good performance is also given. In the second design, each pixel is divided into two

  11. PS-HEMA latex fractionation by sedimentation and colloidal crystallization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cardoso André H.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A poly(styrene-co-hydroxyethylmethacrylate latex underwent sedimentation under gravity followed by an spontaneous and extensive colloidal crystallization. It was then fractionated in three visually distinguishable layers. Latex aliquots layers were sampled at different heigths and the particles were characterized by PCS, microelectrophoresis, infrared spectra and analytical electron microscopy. The major fraction was opalescent and contained the colloidal crystals settled in the bottom of the liquid. Two other latex fractions were obtained, which differed in their chemical compositions, particle sizes and topochemical features from the self-arraying particles. Macrocrystallization of the fractionated latex yielded high quality crystals with a low frequency of defects, which confirms that particle chemical homogeneity is an important factor for particle self-arraying.

  12. Experimental Fractional Crystallization of the Lunar Magma Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, J. F.; Draper, D. S.

    2012-01-01

    The current paradigm for lunar evolution is of crystallization of a global scale magma ocean, giving rise to the anorthositic crust and mafic cumulate interior. It is thought that all other lunar rocks have arisen from this differentiated interior. However, until recently this paradigm has remained untested experimentally. Presented here are the first experimental results of fractional crystallization of a Lunar Magma Ocean (LMO) using the Taylor Whole Moon (TWM) bulk lunar composition [1].

  13. Fractional Wigner Crystal in the Helical Luttinger Liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverso Ziani, N; Crépin, F; Trauzettel, B

    2015-11-13

    The properties of the strongly interacting edge states of two dimensional topological insulators in the presence of two-particle backscattering are investigated. We find an anomalous behavior of the density-density correlation functions, which show oscillations that are neither of Friedel nor of Wigner type: they, instead, represent a Wigner crystal of fermions of fractional charge e/2, with e the electron charge. By studying the Fermi operator, we demonstrate that the state characterized by such fractional oscillations still bears the signatures of spin-momentum locking. Finally, we compare the spin-spin correlation functions and the density-density correlation functions to argue that the fractional Wigner crystal is characterized by a nontrivial spin texture.

  14. FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION FLOWSHEET TESTS WITH ACTUAL TANK WASTE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HERTING, D.L.

    2006-01-01

    Laboratory-scale flowsheet tests of the fractional crystallization process were conducted with actual tank waste samples in a hot cell at the 222-S Laboratory. The process is designed to separate medium-curie liquid waste into a low-curie stream for feeding to supplemental treatment and a high-curie stream for double-shell tank storage. Separations criteria (for Cs-137 sulfate, and sodium) were exceeded in all three of the flowsheet tests that were performed

  15. Hydrogen isotopic fractionation during crystallization of the terrestrial magma ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahlevan, K.; Karato, S. I.

    2016-12-01

    Models of the Moon-forming giant impact extensively melt and partially vaporize the silicate Earth and deliver a substantial mass of metal to the Earth's core. The subsequent evolution of the terrestrial magma ocean and overlying vapor atmosphere over the ensuing 105-6 years has been largely constrained by theoretical models with remnant signatures from this epoch proving somewhat elusive. We have calculated equilibrium hydrogen isotopic fractionation between the magma ocean and overlying steam atmosphere to determine the extent to which H isotopes trace the evolution during this epoch. By analogy with the modern silicate Earth, the magma ocean-steam atmosphere system is often assumed to be chemically oxidized (log fO2 QFM) with the dominant atmospheric vapor species taken to be water vapor. However, the terrestrial magma ocean - having held metallic droplets in suspension - may also exhibit a much more reducing character (log fO2 IW) such that equilibration with the overlying atmosphere renders molecular hydrogen the dominant H-bearing vapor species. This variable - the redox state of the magma ocean - has not been explicitly included in prior models of the coupled evolution of the magma ocean-steam atmosphere system. We find that the redox state of the magma ocean influences not only the vapor speciation and liquid-vapor partitioning of hydrogen but also the equilibrium isotopic fractionation during the crystallization epoch. The liquid-vapor isotopic fractionation of H is substantial under reducing conditions and can generate measurable D/H signatures in the crystallization products but is largely muted in an oxidizing magma ocean and steam atmosphere. We couple equilibrium isotopic fractionation with magma ocean crystallization calculations to forward model the behavior of hydrogen isotopes during this epoch and find that the distribution of H isotopes in the silicate Earth immediately following crystallization represents an oxybarometer for the terrestrial

  16. FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION TESTING WITH INTERIM PRETREATMENT SYSTEM FEEDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HERTING DL

    2008-01-01

    The fractional crystallization process was developed as a pretreatment method for saltcake waste retrieved from Hanford single-shell tanks (SST). The process separates the retrieved SST waste into a high-level waste stream containing the bulk of the radionuclides and a low-activity waste stream containing the bulk of the nonradioactive sodium salts. The Interim Pretreatment System project shifted the focus on pretreatment planning from SST waste to double-shell tank waste

  17. FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION LABORATORY TESTS WITH SIMULATED TANK WASTE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HERTING DL

    2007-01-01

    Results are presented for several simulated waste tests related to development of the fractional crystallization process. Product salt dissolution rates were measured to support pilot plant equipment design. Evaporation tests were performed to evaluate the effects of organics on slurry behavior and to determine optimum antifoam addition levels. A loss-of-power test was performed to support pilot plant accident scenario analysis. Envelope limit tests were done to address variations in feed composition

  18. Controllable reflection of X-rays on crystals of saccharose

    CERN Document Server

    Navasardyan, M A; Hayrapetyan, K T; Gabrielyan, R T

    2003-01-01

    Multiple (ten times and more) increase in intensities of separate reflections and of lauegram reflections from organic single crystals of saccharose (C sub 1 2H sub 2 2O sub 1 1) was observed under influence of certain temperature gradient. On the base of the present experiment and the data of our previous woks we show that the controllable reflection process has a common nature and the intensity of the diffracted beam under external influences does not depend on the total number of electrons per unit volume of the unit cell of the single crystal.

  19. HANFORD MEDIUM-LOW CURIE WASTE PRETREATMENT ALTERNATIVES PROJECT FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION PILOT SCALE TESTING FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HERTING DL

    2008-09-16

    The Fractional Crystallization Pilot Plant was designed and constructed to demonstrate that fractional crystallization is a viable way to separate the high-level and low-activity radioactive waste streams from retrieved Hanford single-shell tank saltcake. The focus of this report is to review the design, construction, and testing details of the fractional crystallization pilot plant not previously disseminated.

  20. Volume reflection efficiency for negative particles in bent crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biryukov, V.M., E-mail: valery.biryukov@ihep.ru

    2017-02-10

    We suggest a formula for the efficiency of a single volume reflection of negatively charged particles in bent crystal planes and compare it to recent experiments at SLAC, MAMI and CERN with electrons and negative pions in the energy range from 0.855 to 150 GeV in Si crystals. We show that Lindhard reversibility rule provides sufficient basis for quantitative understanding of these experiments.

  1. Neutron transmission and reflection at a copper single crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adib, M.; Maayouf, R.M.A.; Abdel-Kawy, A.; Fayek, M.; Habib, N.; Wahba, M.

    1991-01-01

    Neutron transmission and reflection at a copper single crystal cut along the (111) plane were studied with the fixed-scattering-angle spectrometer installed at the ET-RR-1 reactor. The transmission was measured for neutron wavelengths between 0.15 and 0.46 nm and various orientations of the (111) plane with respect to the incident beam. When used as a neutron band pass filter, the crystal is optimally oriented when the neutron beam is incident parallel to the [111] direction. The reflectivity was measured for the (111) plane at 45deg with respect to the incident beam. The results were found to be in reasonable agreement with a value predicted for the reflected intensity at an imperfect crystal with finite absorption. (orig.) [de

  2. Neutron transmission and reflection at a copper single crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adib, M.; Maayouf, R.M.A.; Abdel-Kawy, A.; Fayek, M.; Habib, N. (Atomic Energy Establishment, Cairo (Egypt). Reactor and Neutron Physics Dept.); Wahba, M. (Ain Shams Univ., Cairo (Egypt). Dept. of Engineering Physics and Mathematics)

    1991-06-01

    Neutron transmission and reflection at a copper single crystal cut along the (111) plane were studied with the fixed-scattering-angle spectrometer installed at the ET-RR-1 reactor. The transmission was measured for neutron wavelengths between 0.15 and 0.46 nm and various orientations of the (111) plane with respect to the incident beam. When used as a neutron band pass filter, the crystal is optimally oriented when the neutron beam is incident parallel to the (111) direction. The reflectivity was measured for the (111) plane at 45deg with respect to the incident beam. The results were found to be in reasonable agreement with a value predicted for the reflected intensity at an imperfect crystal with finite absorption. (orig.).

  3. XFEL OSCILLATOR SIMULATION INCLUDING ANGLE-DEPENDENT CRYSTAL REFLECTIVITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fawley, William; Lindberg, Ryan; Kim, K.-J.; Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2010-01-01

    The oscillator package within the GINGER FEL simulation code has now been extended to include angle-dependent reflectivity properties of Bragg crystals. Previously, the package was modified to include frequencydependent reflectivity in order to model x-ray FEL oscillators from start-up from shot noise through to saturation. We present a summary of the algorithms used for modeling the crystal reflectivity and radiation propagation outside the undulator, discussing various numerical issues relevant to the domain of high Fresnel number and efficient Hankel transforms. We give some sample XFEL-O simulation results obtained with the angle-dependent reflectivity model, with particular attention directed to the longitudinal and transverse coherence of the radiation output.

  4. Electrically Tunable Reflective Terahertz Phase Shifter Based on Liquid Crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun; Xia, Tianyu; Jing, Shuaicheng; Deng, Guangsheng; Lu, Hongbo; Fang, Yong; Yin, Zhiping

    2018-02-01

    We present a reflective spatial phase shifter which operates at terahertz regime above 325 GHz. The controllable permittivity of the nematic liquid crystals was utilized to realize a tunable terahertz (THz) reflective phase shifter. The reflective characteristics of the terahertz electromagnetic waves and the liquid crystal parameters were calculated and analyzed. We provide the simulation results for the effect of the incident angle of the plane wave on the reflection. The experiment was carried out considering an array consisting of 30 × 30 patch elements, printed on a 20 × 20 mm quartz substrate with 1-mm thickness. The phase shifter provides a tunable phase range of 300° over the frequency range of 325 to 337.6 GHz. The maximum phase shift of 331° is achieved at 330 GHz. The proposed phase shifter is a potential candidate for THz applications, particularly for reconfigurable reflectarrays.

  5. The effect of experimental resolution on crystal reflectivity and secondary extinction in neutron diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, O.W.; Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage

    1965-01-01

    The reflectivity for neutrons of a plane slab crystal is calculated in the transmission case when the crystal is placed between two Seller collimators. The calculations indicate that the crystal reflectivity, as well as the secondary extinction coefficient, depends signicantly on the angular...... resolution of the collimators. Curves are given for the extinction of the crystal with different crystal and collimator parameters....

  6. Cholesteric Liquid Crystal Based Reflex Color Reflective Displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Asad

    2012-02-01

    Bistable color cholesteric liquid crystal displays are unique LCDs that exhibit high reflectivity, good contrast, extremely low power operation, and are amenable to versatile roll-to-roll manufacturing. The display technology, now branded as Reflex has been in commercialized products since 1996. It has been the subject of extensive research and development globally by a variety of parties in both academic and industrial settings. Today, the display technology is in volume production for applications such as dedicated eWriters (Boogie Board), full color electronic skins (eSkin), and displays for smart cards. The flexibility comes from polymerization induced phase separation using unique materials unparalleled in any other display technology. The blend of monomers, polymers, cross linkers, and other components along with nematic liquid crystals and chiral dopants is created and processed in such ways so as to enable highly efficient manufactrable displays using ultra thin plastic substrates -- often as thin as 50μm. Other significant aspects include full color by stacking or spatial separation, night vision capability, ultra high resolution, as well as active matrix capabilities. Of particular note is the stacking approach of Reflex based displays to show full color. This approach for reflective color displays is unique to this technology. Owing to high transparency in wavelength bands outside the selective reflection band, three primarily color layers can be stacked on top of each other and reflect without interfering with other layers. This highly surprising architecture enables the highest reflectivity of any other reflective electronic color display technology. The optics, architecture, electro-topics, and process techniques will be discussed. This presentation will focus on the physics of the core technology and color, it's evolution from rigid glass based displays to flexible displays, development of products from the paradigm shifting concepts to consumer

  7. Macrobending loss properties of photonic crystal fibres with different air filling fractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Thorkild; Broeng, Jes; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    2001-01-01

    We present experimental and theoretical analysis of macrobending losses of photonic crystal fibres with various air filling fractions. A scalar, effective-index method provides a good description of the losses for fibres with limited air filling fractions, whereas the method overestimates...... the losses for fibres with larger air filling fractions....

  8. HANFORD MEDIUM-LOW CURIE WASTE PRETREATMENT ALTERNATIVES PROJECT-FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION PILOT SCALE TESTING FINAL REPORT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HERTING DL

    2008-01-01

    The Fractional Crystallization Pilot Plant was designed and constructed to demonstrate that fractional crystallization is a viable way to separate the high-level and low-activity radioactive waste streams from retrieved Hanford single-shell tank saltcake. The focus of this report is to review the design, construction, and testing details of the fractional crystallization pilot plant not previously disseminated

  9. Can Fractional Crystallization of a Lunar Magma Ocean Produce the Lunar Crust?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Jennifer F.; Draper, David S.

    2013-01-01

    New techniques enable the study of Apollo samples and lunar meteorites in unprecedented detail, and recent orbital spectral data reveal more about the lunar farside than ever before, raising new questions about the supposed simplicity of lunar geology. Nevertheless, crystallization of a global-scale magma ocean remains the best model to account for known lunar lithologies. Crystallization of a lunar magma ocean (LMO) is modeled to proceed by two end-member processes - fractional crystallization from (mostly) the bottom up, or initial equilibrium crystallization as the magma is vigorously convecting and crystals remain entrained, followed by crystal settling and a final period of fractional crystallization [1]. Physical models of magma viscosity and convection at this scale suggest that both processes are possible. We have been carrying out high-fidelity experimental simulations of LMO crystallization using two bulk compositions that can be regarded as end-members in the likely relevant range: Taylor Whole Moon (TWM) [2] and Lunar Primitive Upper Mantle (LPUM) [3]. TWM is enriched in refractory elements by 1.5 times relative to Earth, whereas LPUM is similar to the terrestrial primitive upper mantle, with adjustments made for the depletion of volatile alkalis observed on the Moon. Here we extend our earlier equilibrium-crystallization experiments [4] with runs simulating full fractional crystallization

  10. Interference effects from coexisting fatty acids on elaidic acid separation by fractionating crystallization: A model study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jala, Ram Chandra Reddy; Guo, Zheng; Bjerring, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    A multi-stage temperature-programmed fractionating crystallization process was carried out to examine the effects of the presence of stearic acid (SA), oleic acid (OA), and linoleic acid (LA) on the separation of elaidic acid (EA). The results showed that the efficiency of fractionating...

  11. Magma oceanography. II - Chemical evolution and crustal formation. [lunar crustal rock fractional crystallization model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhi, J.

    1977-01-01

    A description is presented of an empirical model of fractional crystallization which predicts that slightly modified versions of certain of the proposed whole moon compositions can reproduce the major-element chemistry and mineralogy of most of the primitive highland rocks through equilibrium and fractional crystallization processes combined with accumulation of crystals and trapping of residual liquids. These compositions contain sufficient Al to form a plagioclase-rich crust 60 km thick on top of a magma ocean that was initially no deeper than about 300 km. Implicit in the model are the assumptions that all cooling and crystallization take place at low pressure and that there are no compositional or thermal gradients in the liquid. Discussions of the cooling and crystallization of the proposed magma ocean show these assumptions to be disturbingly naive when applied to the ocean as a whole. However, the model need not be applied to the whole ocean, but only to layers of cooling liquid near the surface.

  12. Blue Shifting Tuning of the Selective Reflection of Polymer Stabilized Cholesteric Liquid Crystals (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-08

    crystal (MLC-2079, Merck). The polymer stabi- lizing network was formed within the samples by photoinitiated polymerization with 50–700 mW cm2 of 365...AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2017-0347 BLUE-SHIFTING TUNING OF THE SELECTIVE REFLECTION OF POLYMER STABILIZED CHOLESTERIC LIQUID CRYSTALS (POSTPRINT...BLUE-SHIFTING TUNING OF THE SELECTIVE REFLECTION OF POLYMER STABILIZED CHOLESTERIC LIQUID CRYSTALS (POSTPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8650-16-F

  13. The Law of Element Abundance Relationships in Igneous Rocks Petrogenetically Associated with Fractional Crystallization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪云亮; 王旺章

    1991-01-01

    Reported in this paper are:1)the law of element abundance relationships:element abun-dances are of power function with each other in an igneous rock petrogenetically associated with fractional crystallization,2)deduction of the law and relevant parameters:abundance relationship constant(a°) and phase constant? from Henry's law and the law of mass conservation,3)the data basis and evidence of the law of element abundance relationships,4)establishment of the equa-bions for element abundance relationships in igneous rocks formed from the same parental magma during the same fractional crystallization stage ,and all measurable parameters involved in the equations.

  14. Contribution of corner reflections from oriented ice crystals to backscattering and depolarization characteristics for off-zenith lidar profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovoi, Anatoli G.; Konoshonkin, Alexander V.; Kustova, Natalia V.; Veselovskii, Igor A.

    2018-06-01

    Backscattering Mueller matrix and the depolarization and color ratios for quasi-horizontally oriented hexagonal ice plates have been calculated within the framework of the physical optics approximation. In the case of a tilted lidar, the dependence of the color and depolarization ratios on polarization of the incident light has been analyzed. It is shown that the corner reflection effect inherent to the pristine hexagonal ice crystals results in sharp peaks of both the backscattering cross section and depolarization ratio at the lidar tilts of about 30° off zenith. The experimental results obtained recently by Veselovskii et al. [13] at the lidar tilt of 43° have been interpreted as a partial manifestation of the corner reflection effect. The retrieval of the vertical profile of the ice crystal fraction consisting of quasi-horizontally oriented hexagonal plates has been demonstrated.

  15. Lattice Boltzmann Simulation of Water Isotope Fractionation During Growth of Ice Crystals in Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, G.; Depaolo, D.; Kang, Q.; Zhang, D.

    2006-12-01

    The isotopic composition of precipitation, especially that of snow, plays a special role in the global hydrological cycle and in reconstruction of past climates using polar ice cores. The fractionation of the major water isotope species (HHO, HDO, HHO-18) during ice crystal formation is critical to understanding the global distribution of isotopes in precipitation. Ice crystal growth in clouds is traditionally treated with a spherically- symmetric steady state diffusion model, with semi-empirical modifications added to account for ventilation and for complex crystal morphology. Although it is known that crystal growth rate, which depends largely on the degree of vapor over-saturation, determines crystal morphology, there are no existing quantitative models that directly relate morphology to the vapor saturation factor. Since kinetic (vapor phase diffusion-controlled) isotopic fractionation also depends on growth rate, there should be a direct relationship between vapor saturation, crystal morphology, and crystal isotopic composition. We use a 2D Lattice-Boltzmann model to simulate diffusion-controlled ice crystal growth from vapor- oversaturated air. In the model, crystals grow solely according to the diffusive fluxes just above the crystal surfaces, and hence crystal morphology arises from the initial and boundary conditions in the model and does not need to be specified a priori. The input parameters needed are the isotope-dependent vapor deposition rate constant (k) and the water vapor diffusivity in air (D). The values of both k and D can be computed from kinetic theory, and there are also experimentally determined values of D. The deduced values of k are uncertain to the extent that the sticking coefficient (or accommodation coefficient) for ice is uncertain. The ratio D/k is a length that determines the minimum scale of dendritic growth features and allows us to scale the numerical calculations to atmospheric conditions using a dimensionless Damkohler number

  16. Parasitic neutron bragg reflections from large imperfect single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naguib, K.; Adib, M

    1998-12-01

    A formula is given which allows to calculate the contribution of the total Bragg scattering from different (hkl) planes to the neutron transmission through a large imperfect single crystals. The formula takes into account the crystal structure type, its mosaic spread value, the plane along which the crystal surface is cut along and its orientation with respect to the neutron beam direction. A computer program ISCANF-1 was developed to calculate the total parasitic scattering cross-section from different (hkl) planes as well as the nuclear and diffuse scattering cross-sections. The ISCANF-1 program was applied to calculate the neutron attenuation through Cu and Zn single crystals, each of them cut along (002) planes. The calculated values of the neutron transmission through Cu and Zn crystals were compared with the measured ones in the wavelength range 0.21-0.47 nm and 0.04-0.52 nm respectively. The measured and calculated values were found to be in reasonable agreement within the statistical accuracy. The computer program ISCANF-1 was also applied to investigate the effect of parasitic Bragg scattering on the neutron filtering characteristics of both Zn and Cu single crystals as a function of their physical parameters.

  17. Parasitic neutron bragg reflections from large imperfect single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naguib, K.; Adib, M.

    1998-01-01

    A formula is given which allows to calculate the contribution of the total Bragg scattering from different (hkl) planes to the neutron transmission through a large imperfect single crystals. The formula takes into account the crystal structure type, its mosaic spread value, the plane along which the crystal surface is cut along and its orientation with respect to the neutron beam direction. A computer program ISCANF-1 was developed to calculate the total parasitic scattering cross-section from different (hkl) planes as well as the nuclear and diffuse scattering cross-sections. The ISCANF-1 program was applied to calculate the neutron attenuation through Cu and Zn single crystals, each of them cut along (002) planes. The calculated values of the neutron transmission through Cu and Zn crystals were compared with the measured ones in the wavelength range 0.21-0.47 nm and 0.04-0.52 nm respectively. The measured and calculated values were found to be in reasonable agreement within the statistical accuracy. The computer program ISCANF-1 was also applied to investigate the effect of parasitic Bragg scattering on the neutron filtering characteristics of both Zn and Cu single crystals as a function of their physical parameters

  18. On the wavelength dependence of the reflectivity of one-dimensionally distorted crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guigay, J.P.

    1986-01-01

    Scaling properties of the integrated reflectivity of non-absorbing perfect or ideally imperfect crystals as a function of wavelength, in the symmetrical Laue and Bragg cases, are shown also to be valid for distorted crystals where the gradient of the lattice phase factor is perpendicular to the crystal surfaces. This result is obtained by an analysis of the Taupin-Takagi equations. Some previous experiments (test of a proposal for extinction-free measurements of F M /F N in polarized neutron scattering by magnetic crystals, and neutron diffraction from curved and non-curved crystals) are discussed from this point of view. (orig.)

  19. Aharonov-Bohm oscillations with fractional period in a multichannel Wigner crystal ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krive, I.V.; Krokhin, A.A.

    1997-01-01

    We study the persistent current in a quasi 1D ring with strongly correlated electrons forming a multichannel Wigner crystal (WC). The influence of the Coulomb interaction manifests itself only in the presence of external scatterers that pin the WC. Two regimes of weak and strong pinning are considered. For strong pinning we predict the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations with fractional period. Fractionalization is due to the interchannel coupling in the process of quantum tunneling of the WC. The fractional period depends on the filling of the channels and may serve as an indicator of non-Fermi-liquid behaviour of interacting electrons in quasi 1D rings. (author). 20 refs

  20. The role of the Concanavalin A-binding fraction in cholesterol crystallization in native human bile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keulemans, Y. C.; Mok, K. S.; Gouma, D. J.; Groen, A. K.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: Many Concanavalin A-binding glycoproteins have been proposed to influence cholesterol crystallization in human bile. This has been studied mainly by addition of the Concanavalin A-binding fraction to model bile. The physiological relevance of the proteins in native bile is not yet

  1. Junior high school students’ reflective thinking on fraction problem solving: In case of gender differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasyid, M. A.; Budiarto, M. T.; Lukito, A.

    2018-01-01

    This study aims to describe reflective thinking of junior high school students on solving the fractions problem in terms of gender differences. This research is a qualitative approach involving one male student and one female student in seventh grade. The data were collected through the assignment of fractional problem solving and interview, then the data were triangulated and analyzed by three stages, namely data condensation, data display and conclusion. The results showed that the subjects of male and female were reacting, elaborating and contemplating at each stage of solving the fractions problem. But at the stage of devising the plan, the female subject was contemplating, relying more on their beliefs, did not consider their experience, in addition, the female subject didn’t use experience of the steps she planned to solve the problem of fractions.

  2. Measurement and models of bent KAP(001) crystal integrated reflectivity and resolution (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loisel, G. P., E-mail: gploise@sandia.gov; Wu, M.; Lake, P.; Dunham, G. S.; Bailey, J. E.; Rochau, G. A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Stolte, W. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Kruschwitz, C. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    The Advanced Light Source beamline-9.3.1 x-rays are used to calibrate the rocking curve of bent potassium acid phthalate (KAP) crystals in the 2.3-4.5 keV photon-energy range. Crystals are bent on a cylindrically convex substrate with a radius of curvature ranging from 2 to 9 in. and also including the flat case to observe the effect of bending on the KAP spectrometric properties. As the bending radius increases, the crystal reflectivity converges to the mosaic crystal response. The X-ray Oriented Programs (XOP) multi-lamellar model of bent crystals is used to model the rocking curve of these crystals and the calibration data confirm that a single model is adequate to reproduce simultaneously all measured integrated reflectivities and rocking-curve FWHM for multiple radii of curvature in both 1st and 2nd order of diffraction.

  3. X-Ray Reflectivity from the Surface of a Liquid Crystal:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pershan, P.S.; Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage

    1984-01-01

    X-ray reflectivity from the surface of a nematic liquid crystal is interpreted as the coherent superposition of Fresnel reflection from the surface and Bragg reflection from smectic order induced by the surface. Angular dependence of the Fresnel effect yields information on surface structure....... Measurement of the intensity of diffuse critical scattering relative to the Fresnel reflection yields the absolute value of the critical part of the density-density correlation function....

  4. Acoustic pressure in cavity of variously sized two-dimensional sonic crystals with various filling fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Liangyu; Chen Lienwen; Liu Chiaming

    2009-01-01

    This study theoretically and experimentally investigates the acoustic pressure in the cavity of a 2D sonic crystal. Such crystals are composed of polymethyl methacrylate cylinders with a square array embedded in air background. The plane wave expansion method and the supercell calculation are employed to calculate the band structure and obtain the defect band. The finite element method is adopted to simulate the pressure field in the sonic crystal and calculate the pressure in the middle of the cavity as a function of frequency. The effects of sizes and filling fractions are investigated, and the quality factor of the cavity is discussed. The measured spectra and pressures in the defect of the sonic crystal demonstrate that the acoustic waves can be localized in the defect at the resonant frequency

  5. Angle-resolved reflection spectroscopy of high-quality PMMA opal crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemtsev, Ivan V.; Tambasov, Igor A.; Ivanenko, Alexander A.; Zyryanov, Victor Ya.

    2018-02-01

    PMMA opal crystal was prepared by a simple hybrid method, which includes sedimentation, meniscus formation and evaporation. We investigated three surfaces of this crystal by angle-resolved reflective light spectroscopy and SEM study. The angle-resolved reflective measurements were carried out in the 400-1100 nm range. We have determined the high-quality ordered surface of the crystal region. Narrow particle size distribution of the surface has been revealed. The average particle diameter obtained with SEM was nearly 361 nm. The most interesting result was that reflectivity of the surface turned out up to 98% at normal light incidence. Using a fit of dependences of the maximum reflectivity wavelength from an angle based on the Bragg-Snell law, the wavelength of maximum 0° reflectivity, the particle diameter and the fill factor have been determined. For the best surface maximum reflectivity wavelength of a 0° angle was estimated to be 869 nm. The particle diameter and fill factor were calculated as 372 nm and 0.8715, respectively. The diameter obtained by fitting is in excellent agreement with the particle diameter obtained with SEM. The reflectivity maximum is assumed to increase significantly when increasing the fill factor. We believe that using our simple approach to manufacture PMMA opal crystals will significantly increase the fabrication of high-quality photonic crystal templates and thin films.

  6. FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION OF HANFORD SINGLE-SHELL TANK WASTES FROM CONCEPT TO PILOT PLANT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GENIESSE, D.J.; NELSON, E.A.; HAMILTON, D.W.; MAJORS, J.H.; NORDAHL, T.K.

    2006-01-01

    The Hanford site has 149 underground single-shell tanks (SST) storing mostly soluble, multi-salt mixed wastes resulting from Cold War era weapons material production. These wastes must be retrieved and the salts immobilized before the tanks can be closed to comply with an overall site-closure consent order entered into by the US Department of Energy, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the State of Washington. Water will be used to retrieve the wastes and the resulting solution will be pumped to a proposed pretreatment process where a high-curie (primarily 137 Cs) waste fraction will be separated from the other waste constituents. The separated waste streams will then be vitrified to allow for safe storage as an immobilized high-level waste, or low-level waste, borosilicate glass. Fractional crystallization, a common unit operation for production of industrial chemicals and pharmaceuticals, was proposed as the method to separate the salt wastes; it works by evaporating excess water until the solubilities of various species in the solution are exceeded (the solubility of a particular species depends on its concentration, temperature of the solution, and the presence of other ionic species in the solution). By establishing the proper conditions, selected pure salts can be crystallized and separated from the radioactive liquid phase. The aforementioned parameters, along with evaporation rate, proper agitation, and residence time, determine nucleation and growth kinetics and the resulting habit and size distribution of the product crystals. These crystals properties are important considerations for designing the crystallizer and solid/liquid separation equipment. A structured program was developed to (a) demonstrate that fractional crystallization could be used to pre-treat Hanford tank wastes and (b) provide data to develop a pilot plant design

  7. A New Method for Simultaneous Measurement of the Integrated Reflectivity of Crystals at Multiple Orders of Reflection and Comparison with New Theoretical Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.G.; Bak, J.G.; Jung, Y.S.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K.W.; Hoelzer, G.; Wehrhan, O.; Foerster, E.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a new method for the simultaneous measurement of the integrated reflectivity of a crystal for multiple orders of reflection at a predefined Bragg angle. The technique is demonstrated with a mica crystal for Bragg angles of 43 o , 47 o , and 50 o . The measured integrated reflectivity for Bragg reflections up to the 24th order is compared with new theoretical predictions, which are also presented in this paper

  8. Formation of anorthosite on the Moon through magma ocean fractional crystallization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuyuki Arai

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Lunar anorthosite is a major rock of the lunar highlands, which formed as a result of plagioclase-floatation in the lunar magma ocean (LMO. Constraints on the sufficient conditions that resulted in the formation of a thick pure anorthosite (mode of plagioclase >95 vol.% is a key to reveal the early magmatic evolution of the terrestrial planets. To form the pure lunar anorthosite, plagioclase should have separated from the magma ocean with low crystal fraction. Crystal networks of plagioclase and mafic minerals develop when the crystal fraction in the magma (φ is higher than ca. 40–60 vol.%, which inhibit the formation of pure anorthosite. In contrast, when φ is small, the magma ocean is highly turbulent, and plagioclase is likely to become entrained in the turbulent magma rather than separated from the melt. To determine the necessary conditions in which anorthosite forms from the LMO, this study adopted the energy criterion formulated by Solomatov. The composition of melt, temperature, and pressure when plagioclase crystallizes are constrained by using MELTS/pMELTS to calculate the density and viscosity of the melt. When plagioclase starts to crystallize, the Mg# of melt becomes 0.59 at 1291 °C. The density of the melt is smaller than that of plagioclase for P > 2.1 kbar (ca. 50 km deep, and the critical diameter of plagioclase to separate from the melt becomes larger than the typical crystal diameter of plagioclase (1.8–3 cm. This suggests that plagioclase is likely entrained in the LMO just after the plagioclase starts to crystallize. When the Mg# of melt becomes 0.54 at 1263 °C, the density of melt becomes larger than that of plagioclase even for 0 kbar. When the Mg# of melt decreases down to 0.46 at 1218 °C, the critical diameter of plagioclase to separate from the melt becomes 1.5–2.5 cm, which is nearly equal to the typical plagioclase of the lunar anorthosite. This suggests that plagioclase could separate from the

  9. LOR-interleaving image reconstruction for PET imaging with fractional-crystal collimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yusheng; Matej, Samuel; Karp, Joel S; Metzler, Scott D

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has become an important modality in medical and molecular imaging. However, in most PET applications, the resolution is still mainly limited by the physical crystal sizes or the detector’s intrinsic spatial resolution. To achieve images with better spatial resolution in a central region of interest (ROI), we have previously proposed using collimation in PET scanners. The collimator is designed to partially mask detector crystals to detect lines of response (LORs) within fractional crystals. A sequence of collimator-encoded LORs is measured with different collimation configurations. This novel collimated scanner geometry makes the reconstruction problem challenging, as both detector and collimator effects need to be modeled to reconstruct high-resolution images from collimated LORs. In this paper, we present a LOR-interleaving (LORI) algorithm, which incorporates these effects and has the advantage of reusing existing reconstruction software, to reconstruct high-resolution images for PET with fractional-crystal collimation. We also develop a 3D ray-tracing model incorporating both the collimator and crystal penetration for simulations and reconstructions of the collimated PET. By registering the collimator-encoded LORs with the collimator configurations, high-resolution LORs are restored based on the modeled transfer matrices using the non-negative least-squares method and EM algorithm. The resolution-enhanced images are then reconstructed from the high-resolution LORs using the MLEM or OSEM algorithm. For validation, we applied the LORI method to a small-animal PET scanner, A-PET, with a specially designed collimator. We demonstrate through simulated reconstructions with a hot-rod phantom and MOBY phantom that the LORI reconstructions can substantially improve spatial resolution and quantification compared to the uncollimated reconstructions. The LORI algorithm is crucial to improve overall image quality of collimated PET, which

  10. Reflectance properties of one-dimensional metal-dielectric ternary photonic crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, G. N., E-mail: gnpandey2009@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Amity Institute of Applied Sciences, AmityUniversity, Noida (U.P.) (India); Kumar, Narendra [Department of Physics (CASH), Modi University of Science and Technology, Lakshmangarh, Sikar, Rajsthan (India); Thapa, Khem B. [Department of Physics, U I E T, ChhatrapatiShahu Ji Maharaj University, Kanpur- (UP) (India); Ojha, S. P. [Department of Physics IIT, Banaras Hindu University (India)

    2016-05-06

    Metallic photonic crystal has a very important application in absorption enhancement in solar cells. It has been found that an ultra-thin metallic layer becomes transparent due to internal scattering of light through the each interface of the dielectric and metal surfaces. The metal has absorption due to their surface plasmon and the plasmon has important parameters for changing optical properties of the metal. We consider ternary metallic-dielectric photonic crystal (MDPC) for having large probabilities to change the optical properties of the MDPC and the photonic crystals may be changed by changing dimensionality, symmetry, lattice parameters, Filling fraction and effective refractive index refractive index contrast. In this present communication, we try to show that the photonic band gap in ternary metal-dielectric photonic crystal can be significantly enlarged when air dielectric constant is considered. All the theoretical analyses are made based on the transfer matrix method together with the Drude model of metal.

  11. Development of an ultrasonic shear reflection technique to monitor the crystallization of cocoa butter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigolle, Annelien; Foubert, Imogen; Hettler, Jan; Verboven, Erik; Demuynck, Ruth; Van Den Abeele, Koen

    2015-09-01

    The quasi-isothermal crystallization process of cocoa butter was monitored by an ultrasonic shear reflection technique utilizing a custom-built experimental set-up in a temperature controlled environment. To facilitate the interpretation of the measurement results, the propagation of shear waves was first theoretically studied in different configurations of gas, liquid or solid layers with varying thickness for the case of normal incidence, yielding theoretical equations of the shear wave reflection coefficient (swRC) for different layering conditions. The typical experimentally observed pattern of the swRC during quasi-isothermal cocoa butter crystallization was subsequently linked to the theoretical equations. The remarkable oscillatory damped response in the swRC as function of the crystallization time could be explained by constructive and destructive interference of a first reflection at the boundary between a plexiglass delay line and the crystallized cocoa butter and a second reflection occurring at the interface between crystallized and liquid substance. This hypothesis was supported by the excitation frequency dependence of the oscillations. The quality of the fit of the theoretical model to the experimental results was very good and also the reproducibility between different independent measurements was acceptable. Finally, measurements at different temperatures (18°C and 20°C) suggested that the technique was able to detect differences in crystallization behavior, as measurements at 18°C displayed faster oscillations compared to measurements at 20°C. Moreover, this was also confirmed by the theoretical model, as a higher value of the crystallization rate parameter K, exhibited more rapid oscillations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Study of phosphoric acid crystallization using a focused beam reflectance measurement method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Yong [School of Chemistry and Resource Environment, Linyi Normal University, Linyi Shandong 276005 (China); Chen, Kui; Wu, Yanyang; Zhu, Jiawen [Chemical Engineering Research Center, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Sheng, Yong [SINOCHEN Fuling Chemical Industrial Co., Ltd, Chongqing 226005 (China)

    2010-10-15

    A way for restoring the crystal size distributions (CSD) from measured chord length distributions (CLD) was reported in this paper. The kinetics of phosphoric acid crystallization process was investigated in cooling mode using focused beam reflectance measurement (FBRM) and digital photo technique. In order to restore the CSD from measured CLD and verify the reliability of FBRM data, digital photo technique in real time and optical microscope were applied in large crystal size and small range, respectively. Results indicated a converting constant A existed between CLD and CSD when crystal growth follows size-independent growth (Mcabe's {delta}L law) law. It was verified by Malvern particles size analysis method. The converting constant A varied with crystal morphology. The crystal growth order increased with the stirring increasing speed during phosphoric acid crystallization process. The trend was especially notable at higher speed situations. It can illustrate that the state of phosphoric acid hemihydrate crystal growth was controlled by both diffusion and surface-integration with the increasing stirring speed. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  13. Adaptive interferometry based on dynamic reflective holograms in cubic photorefractive crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolegov, A A; Shandarov, S M; Simonova, G V; Kabanova, L A; Burimov, Nikolai I; Shmakov, S S; Bykov, V I; Kargin, Yu F

    2011-09-30

    The characteristics of a holographic interferometer, which is based on the interaction of counterpropagating light waves on reflective holograms in cubic photorefractive sillenite crystals of the (100) cut and designed for measuring surface vibration spectra from specularly reflecting objects, have been theoretically analysed and experimentally studied. The experiments showed that an interferometer of this type, based on an Bi{sub 12}TiO{sub 20} : Fe,Cu crystal, makes it possible to measure vibrations with an amplitude of 5 pm. An analysis performed with allowance for the shot and thermal noise of the photodetector showed that vibrations with an amplitude below 1 pm can be measured. A model is proposed to describe the experimentally found strong temperature dependence of the light interaction on reflection holograms in a Bi{sub 12}TiO{sub 20} : Ca crystal. This model takes into account the influence of temperature on the photoinduced charge redistribution over deep donor and shallow trap centres, as well as the drift of the interference pattern in the crystal due to the thermooptical effect and linear expansion of the crystal.

  14. Calculation of spontaneous emission from a V-type three-level atom in photonic crystals using fractional calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Chih-Hsien; Hsieh, Wen-Feng; Wu, Jing-Nuo; Cheng, Szu-Cheng; Li, Yen-Yin

    2011-01-01

    Fractional time derivative, an abstract mathematical operator of fractional calculus, is used to describe the real optical system of a V-type three-level atom embedded in a photonic crystal. A fractional kinetic equation governing the dynamics of the spontaneous emission from this optical system is obtained as a fractional Langevin equation. Solving this fractional kinetic equation by fractional calculus leads to the analytical solutions expressed in terms of fractional exponential functions. The accuracy of the obtained solutions is verified through reducing the system into the special cases whose results are consistent with the experimental observation. With accurate physical results and avoiding the complex integration for solving this optical system, we propose fractional calculus with fractional time derivative as a better mathematical method to study spontaneous emission dynamics from the optical system with non-Markovian dynamics.

  15. Channeling and Volume Reflection Based Crystal Collimation of Tevatron Circulating Beam Halo

    CERN Document Server

    Shiltsev, V.; Drozhdin, A.; Johnson, T.; Legan, A.; Mokhov, N.; Reilly, R.; Still, D.; Tesarek, R.; Zagel, J.; Peggs, S.; Assmann, R.; Previtali, V.; Scandale, W.; Chesnokov, Y.; Yazynin, I.; Guidi, V.; Ivanov, Y.

    2010-01-01

    The T980 crystal collimation experiment is underway at the Tevatron to determine if this technique could increase 980 GeV beam-halo collimation efficiency at high-energy hadron colliders such as the Tevatron and the LHC. T980 also studies various crystal types and parameters. The setup has been substantially enhanced during the Summer 2009 shutdown by installing a new O-shaped crystal in the horizontal goniometer, as well as adding a vertical goniometer with two alternating crystals (O-shaped and multi-strip) and additional beam diagnostics. First measurements with the new system are quite encouraging, with channeled and volume-reflected beams observed on the secondary collimators as predicted. Investigation of crystal collimation efficiencies with crystals in volume reflection and channeling modes are described in comparison with an amorphous primary collimator. Results on the system performance are presented for the end-of-store studies and for entire collider stores. The first investigation of colliding be...

  16. Broadband reflection of polymer-stabilized chiral nematic liquid crystals induced by a chiral azobenzene compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xingwu; Wang, Ling; Chen, Yinjie; Li, Chenyue; Hou, Guoyan; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Xiaoguang; He, Wanli; Yang, Huai

    2014-01-21

    A chiral nematic liquid crystal-photopolymerizable monomer-chiral azobenzene compound composite was prepared and then polymerized under UV irradiation. The reflection wavelength of the composite can be extended to cover the 1000-2400 nm range and also be adjusted to the visible light region by controlling the concentration of chiral compounds.

  17. Simple methods of aligning four-circle diffractometers with crystal reflections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitsui, Y [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences

    1979-08-01

    Simple methods of aligning four-circle diffractometers with crystal reflections are devised. They provide the methods to check (1) perpendicularity of chi plane to the incident beam, (2) zero point of 2theta and linearity of focus-chi center-receiving aperture and (3) zero point of chi.

  18. Characterization of polypropylene–polyethylene blends by temperature rising elution and crystallization analysis fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Hierro, Pilar

    2010-01-01

    The introduction of single-site catalysts in the polyolefins industry opens new routes to design resins with improved performance through multicatalyst-multireactor processes. Physical combination of various polyolefin types in a secondary extrusion process is also a common practice to achieve new products with improved properties. The new resins have complex structures, especially in terms of composition distribution, and their characterization is not always an easy task. Techniques like temperature rising elution fractionation (TREF) or crystallization analysis fractionation (CRYSTAF) are currently used to characterize the composition distribution of these resins. It has been shown that certain combinations of polyolefins may result in equivocal results if only TREF or CRYSTAF is used separately for their characterization. PMID:20730530

  19. Origin of lavas from the Ninetyeast Ridge, Eastern Indian Ocean: An evaluation of fractional crystallization models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludden, J.N.; Thompson, G.; Bryan, W.B.; Frey, F.A.

    1980-08-10

    Ferrobasalts from DSDP sites 214 and 216 on the Ninetyeast Ridge are characterized by high absolute iron (FeO>12.9 wt %), FeO/MgO>1.9, and TiO/sub 2/>2.0 wt %. Their trace element abundances indicate a tholeiitic affinity; however, they are distinct from midocean ridge incompatible element-depleted tholeiites owing to higher contents of Ba, Zr, and Sr and flat to slightly light-REE-enriched, chondrite-normalized REE patterns. Calculations using major and trace element abundances and phase compositions are generally consistent with a model relating most major elements and phase compositions in site 214 and 216 ferrobasalts by fractionation of clinopyroxene and plagio-class. However, some incompatible element abundances for site 216 basalts are not consistent with the fractional crystallization models. Baslats from site 214 can be related to andesitic rocks from the same site by fractionating clinopyroxene, plagioclase and titanomagnetite. Site 254 basalts, at the southern end of the Ninetyeast Ridge, and island tholeiites in the southern Indian Ocean (Amsterdam-St. Paul or Kerguelen-Heard volcanic provinces) possibly represent the most recent activity associated with a hot spot forming the Ninetyeast Ridge. These incompatible-element-enriched tholeiites have major element compositions consistent with those expected for a parental liquid for the site 214 and 216 ferrobasalts. However, differences in the trace element contents of the basalts from the Ninetyeast Ridge sites are not consistent with simple fractional crystallization derivation but require either a complex melting model or a heterogeneous mantle source.

  20. Influence of copper single crystal structures on the reflection of low energy hydrogen and helium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feijen, H.H.W.

    1975-01-01

    A theoretical basis for the 'wedge-focussing' phenomenon is outlined. Investigations have been made to check up to what extent proton reflection can be simulated by using H 2 + or H 3 + as incident ions and analysing the reflected protons. The results of an experimental study of the influence of surface semi-channels on the reflection of low energy ( + , H 2 + and He + ions from copper single crystals with attention to the wedge-focussing effect are presented (G.T.H.)

  1. Interlayer interactions in absorption and reflection spectra of bismuth HTSC crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruchinin, S.P.; Yaremko, A.M.

    1992-01-01

    The HTSC reflection and absorption optic spectra peculiarities are analysed in the paper on the basis of bismuth and thallium. The approach suggested takes into account the complex character of crystals structure, possible localization of excitations in the isolated layers and further excitations exchange due to the interlayer interaction between cuprate (Cu O) and quasi-degenerate bismuth layers (Bi O/3pO). The expressions for the excitation and intensity energies of the corresponding transitions are obtained. It is shown that only part of excitations whose number is determined by the number of layers in the unit cell will be manifest in optical reflection and absorption spectra. The experimental results on spectral dependence of crystal reflection coefficients are analysed

  2. Hanford Supplemental Treatment: Literature and Modeling Review of SRS HLW Salt Dissolution and Fractional Crystallization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, A. S.; Flach, G. P.; Martino, C. J.; Zamecnik, J. R.; Harris, M. K.; Wilmarth, W. R.; Calloway, T. B.

    2005-03-23

    In order to accelerate waste treatment and disposal of Hanford tank waste by 2028, the Department of Energy (DOE) and CH2M Hill Hanford Group (CHG), Inc. are evaluating alternative technologies which will be used in conjunction with the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) to safely pretreat and immobilize the tank waste. Several technologies (Bulk Vitrification and Steam Reforming) are currently being evaluated for immobilizing the pretreated waste. Since the WTP does not have sufficient capacity to pretreat all the waste going to supplemental treatment by the 2028 milestone, two technologies (Selective Dissolution and Fractional Crystallization) are being considered for pretreatment of salt waste. The scope of this task was to: (1) evaluate the recent Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 41 dissolution campaign and other literature to provide a more complete understanding of selective dissolution, (2) provide an update on the progress of salt dissolution and modeling activities at SRS, (3) investigate SRS experience and outside literature sources on industrial equipment and experimental results of previous fractional crystallization processes, and (4) evaluate recent Hanford AP104 boildown experiments and modeling results and recommend enhancements to the Environmental Simulation Program (ESP) to improve its predictive capabilities. This report provides a summary of this work and suggested recommendations.

  3. FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION OF HANFORD SINGLE-SHELL TANK WASTES. A MODELING APPROACH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HAMILTON, D.W.

    2006-01-01

    The Hanford site has 149 underground single-shell tanks (SST) storing mostly soluble, multi-salt, mixed wastes resulting from Cold War era weapons material production. These wastes must be retrieved and the salts immobilized before the tanks can be closed to comply with an overall site closure consent order entered into by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Environmental Protection Agency, and Washington State. Water will be used to retrieve the wastes and the resulting solution will be pumped to the proposed treatment process where a high curie (primarily 137 Cs) waste fraction will be separated from the other waste constituents. The separated waste streams will then be vitrified to allow for safe storage as an immobilized high level waste, or low level waste, borosilicate glass. Fractional crystallization, a common unit operation for production of industrial chemicals and pharmaceuticals, was proposed as the method to separate the salt wastes; it works by evaporating excess water until the solubilities of various species in the solution are exceeded (the solubility of a particular species depends on its concentration, temperature of the solution, and the presence of other ionic species in the solution). By establishing the proper conditions, selected pure salts can be crystallized and separated from the radioactive liquid phase

  4. New structural studies of liquid crystal by reflectivity and resonant X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, P.

    2007-04-01

    This memory presents three structural studies of smectic Liquid Crystals by reflectivity and resonant diffraction of X-rays. It is divided in five chapters. In the first a short introduction to Liquid Crystals is given. In particular, the smectic phases that are the object of this study are presented. The second chapter is consecrated to the X-ray experimental techniques that were used in this work. The three last chapters present the works on which this thesis can be divided. Chapter three demonstrates on free-standing films of MHPOBC (historic liquid crystal that possesses the antiferroelectric sub-phases) the possibility to extend the technique of resonant X-ray diffraction to liquid crystals without resonant element. In the fourth chapter the structure of the B 2 liquid crystal phase of bent-core molecules (or banana molecules) is elucidated by using resonant X-ray diffraction combined with polarization analysis of the diffracted beam. A model of the polarization of the resonant beam diffracted by four different structures proposed for the B 2 phase is developed in this chapter. In the fifth chapter a smectic binary mixture presenting a very original critical point of phase separation is studied by X-ray reflectivity and optical microscopy. A concentration gradient in the direction perpendicular to the plane of the film seems to be induced by the free-standing film geometry. The results of a simplified model of the system are compatible with this interpretation

  5. TECHNICAL ASSESSMENT OF FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION FOR TANK WASTE PRETREATMENT AT THE DOE HANFORD SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HAMILTON, D.W.

    2006-01-03

    Radioactive wastes from one hundred seventy-seven underground storage tanks in the 200 Area of the Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site in Washington State will be retrieved, treated and stored either on site or at an approved off-site repository. DOE is currently planning to separate the wastes into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, which would be treated and permanently disposed in separate facilities. A significant volume of the wastes in the Hanford tanks is currently classified as medium Curie waste, which will require separation and treatment at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). Because of the specific challenges associated with treating this waste stream, DOE EM-21 funded a project to investigate the feasibility of using fractional crystallization as a supplemental pretreatment technology. The two process requirements for fractional crystallization to be successfully applied to Hanford waste include: (1) evaporation of water from the aqueous solution to enrich the activity of soluble {sup 137}Cs, resulting in a higher activity stream to be sent to the WTP, and (2) separation of the crystalline salts that are enriched in sodium, carbonate, sulfate, and phosphate and sufficiently depleted in {sup 137}Cs, to produce a second stream to be sent to Bulk Vitrification. Phase I of this project has just been completed by COGEMA/Georgia Institute of Technology. The purpose of this report is to document an independent expert review of the Phase I results with recommendations for future testing. A team of experts with significant experience at both the Hanford and Savannah River Sites was convened to conduct the review at Richland, Washington the week of November 14, 2005.

  6. TECHNICAL ASSESSMENT OF FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION FOR TANK WASTE PRETREATMENT AT THE DOE HANFORD SITE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HAMILTON, D.W.

    2006-01-01

    Radioactive wastes from one hundred seventy-seven underground storage tanks in the 200 Area of the Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site in Washington State will be retrieved, treated and stored either on site or at an approved off-site repository. DOE is currently planning to separate the wastes into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, which would be treated and permanently disposed in separate facilities. A significant volume of the wastes in the Hanford tanks is currently classified as medium Curie waste, which will require separation and treatment at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). Because of the specific challenges associated with treating this waste stream, DOE EM-21 funded a project to investigate the feasibility of using fractional crystallization as a supplemental pretreatment technology. The two process requirements for fractional crystallization to be successfully applied to Hanford waste include: (1) evaporation of water from the aqueous solution to enrich the activity of soluble 137 Cs, resulting in a higher activity stream to be sent to the WTP, and (2) separation of the crystalline salts that are enriched in sodium, carbonate, sulfate, and phosphate and sufficiently depleted in 137 Cs, to produce a second stream to be sent to Bulk Vitrification. Phase I of this project has just been completed by COGEMA/Georgia Institute of Technology. The purpose of this report is to document an independent expert review of the Phase I results with recommendations for future testing. A team of experts with significant experience at both the Hanford and Savannah River Sites was convened to conduct the review at Richland, Washington the week of November 14, 2005

  7. Observation of Multiple Volume Reflection of Ultrarelativistic Protons by a Sequence of Several Bent Silicon Crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Scandale, Walter; Baricordi, S; Dalpiaz, P; Fiorini, M; Guidi, V; Mazzolari, A; Della Mea, G; Milan, R; Ambrosi, G; Zuccon, P; Bertucci, B; Bürger, W; Duranti, M; Cavoto, G; Santacesaria, R; Valente, P; Luci, C; Iacoangeli, F; Vallazza, E; Afonin, A G; Chesnokov, Yu A; Kotov, V I; Maisheev, V A; Yazynin, I A; Kovalenko, A D; Taratin, A M; Denisov, A S; Gavrikov, Y A; Ivanov, Yu M; Lapina, L P; Malyarenko, L G; Skorogobogatov, V V; Suvorov, V M; Vavilov, S A; Bolognini, D; Hasan, S; Mozzanica, A; Prest, M

    2009-01-01

    The interactions of 400 GeV protons with different sequences of bent silicon crystals have been investigated at the H8 beam line of the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron. The multiple volume reflection of the proton beam has been studied in detail on a five-crystal reflector measuring an angular beam deflection =52.96±0.14 µrad. The efficiency was found larger than 80% for an angular acceptance at the reflector entrance of 70 µrad, with a maximal efficiency value of =0.90±0.01±0.03.

  8. High-Efficiency Volume Reflection of an Ultrarelativistic Proton Beam with a Bent Silicon Crystal

    CERN Document Server

    Scandale, Walter; Carnera, Alberto; Della Mea, Gianantonio; De Salvador, Davide; Milan, Riccardo; Vomiero, Alberto; Baricordi, Stefano; Dalpiaz, Pietro; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Guidi, Vincenzo; Martinelli,Giuliano; Mazzolari, Andrea; Milan, Emiliano; Ambrosi, Giovanni; Azzarello, Philipp; Battiston, Roberto; Bertucci, Bruna; Burger, William J; Ionica, Maria; Zuccon, Paolo; Cavoto, Gianluca; Santacesaria, Roberta; Valente, Paolo; Vallazza, Erik; Afonin, Alexander G; Baranov, Vladimir T; Chesnokov, Yury A; Kotov, Vladilen I; Maisheev, Vladimir A; Yaznin, Igor A; Afansiev, Sergey V; Kovalenko, Alexander D; Taratin, Alexander M; Denisov, Alexander S; Gavrikov, Yury A; Ivanov, Yuri M; Ivochkin, Vladimir G; Kosyanenko, Sergey V; Petrunin, Anatoli A; Skorobogatov, Vyacheslav V; Suvorov, Vsevolod M; Bolognini, Davide; Foggetta,Luca; Hasan, Said; Prest, Michela

    2007-01-01

    The volume reflection phenomenon was detected while investigating 400 GeV proton interactions with bent silicon crystals in the external beam H8 of the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron. Such a process was observed for a wide interval of crystal orientations relative to the beam axis, and its efficiency exceeds 95%, thereby surpassing any previously observed value. These observations suggest new perspectives for the manipulation of high-energy beams, e.g., for collimation and extraction in new-generation hadron colliders, such as the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

  9. X-Ray Topography of the Subsurface Crystal Layers in the Skew Asymmetric Reflection Geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swiątek Z.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The technique of X ray topography with the asymmetric reflection geometry of X-ray diffraction presented in this paper as useful tool for structural characterization of materials, particularly, epitaxial thin films and semiconductor multi-layered crystal systems used for the optoelectronic devices. New possibilities of this technique for a layer-by-layer visualization of structural changes in the subsurface crystal layers are demonstrated for semiconductors after various types of surface treatment, such as chemical etching, laser irradiation and ion implantation.

  10. Time-dependent Bragg diffraction and short-pulse reflection by one-dimensional photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    André, Jean-Michel; Jonnard, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    The time-dependence of the Bragg diffraction by one-dimensional photonic crystals and its influence on the short pulse reflection are studied in the framework of the coupled-wave theory. The indicial response of the photonic crystal is calculated and it appears that it presents a time-delay effect with a transient time conditioned by the extinction length. A numerical simulation is presented for a Bragg mirror in the x-ray domain and a pulse envelope modelled by a sine-squared shape. The potential consequences of the time-delay effect in time-dependent optics of short-pulses are emphasized. (paper)

  11. Crystallization of sheared hard spheres at 64.5% volume fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinney, H. L.; Rietz, F.; Schroeter, M.; Radin, C.

    2017-11-01

    A classic experiment by G.D. Scott Nature 188, 908, 1960) showed that pouring balls into a rigid container filled the volume to an upper limit of 64% of the container volume, which is well below the 74% volume fraction filled by spheres in a hexagonal close packed (HCP) or face center cubic (FCC) lattice. Subsequent experiments have confirmed a ``random closed packed'' (RCP) fraction of about 64%. However, the physics of the RCP limit has remained a mystery. Our experiment on a cubical box filled with 49400 weakly sheared glass spheres reveals a first order phase transition from a disordered to an ordered state at a volume fraction of 64.5%. The ordered state consists of crystallites of mixed FCC and HCP symmetry that coexist with the amorphous bulk. The transition is initiated by homogeneous nucleation: in the shearing process small crystallites with about ten or fewer spheres dissolve, while larger crystallites grow. A movie illustrates the crystallization process. German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD), German Research Foundation (DFG), NSF DMS, and R.A. Welch Foundation.

  12. Spontaneous emission near the band edge of a three-dimensional photonic crystal: a fractional calculus approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, S-C; Wu, J-N; Tsai, M-R; Hsieh, W-F

    2009-01-01

    We suggest a better mathematical method, fractional calculus, for studying the behavior of the atom-field interaction in photonic crystals. By studying the spontaneous emission of an atom in a photonic crystal with a one-band isotropic model, we found that the long-time inducing memory of the spontaneous emission is a fractional phenomenon. This behavior could be well described by fractional calculus. The results show no steady photon-atom bound state for the atomic resonant transition frequency lying in the proximity of the allowed band edge which was encountered in a previous study (Woldeyohannes and John 2003 J. Opt. B: Quantum Semiclass. Opt. 5 R43). The correctness of this result is validated by the 'cut-off smoothing' density of photon states (DOS) with fractional calculus. By obtaining a rigorous solution without the multiple-valued problem for the system, we show that the method of fractional calculus has a logically concise property.

  13. Crystallization history of enriched shergottites from Fe and Mg isotope fractionation in olivine megacrysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collinet, Max; Charlier, Bernard; Namur, Olivier; Oeser, Martin; Médard, Etienne; Weyer, Stefan

    2017-06-01

    Martian meteorites are the only samples available from the surface of Mars. Among them, olivine-phyric shergottites are basalts containing large zoned olivine crystals with highly magnesian cores (Fo 70-85) and rims richer in Fe (Fo 45-60). The Northwest Africa 1068 meteorite is one of the most primitive "enriched" shergottites (high initial 87Sr/86Sr and low initial ε143Nd). It contains olivine crystals as magnesian as Fo 77 and is a major source of information to constrain the composition of the parental melt, the composition and depth of the mantle source, and the cooling and crystallization history of one of the younger magmatic events on Mars (∼180 Ma). In this study, Fe-Mg isotope profiles analyzed in situ by femtosecond-laser ablation MC-ICP-MS are combined with compositional profiles of major and trace elements in olivine megacrysts. The cores of olivine megacrysts are enriched in light Fe isotopes (δ56FeIRMM-14 = -0.6 to -0.9‰) and heavy Mg isotopes (δ26MgDSM-3 = 0-0.2‰) relative to megacryst rims and to the bulk martian isotopic composition (δ56Fe = 0 ± 0.05‰, δ26Mg = -0.27 ± 0.04‰). The flat forsterite profiles of megacryst cores associated with anti-correlated fractionation of Fe-Mg isotopes indicate that these elements have been rehomogenized by diffusion at high temperature. We present a 1-D model of simultaneous diffusion and crystal growth that reproduces the observed element and isotope profiles. The simulation results suggest that the cooling rate during megacryst core crystallization was slow (43 ± 21 °C/year), and consistent with pooling in a deep crustal magma chamber. The megacryst rims then crystallized 1-2 orders of magnitude faster during magma transport toward the shallower site of final emplacement. Megacryst cores had a forsterite content 3.2 ± 1.5 mol% higher than their current composition and some were in equilibrium with the whole-rock composition of NWA 1068 (Fo 80 ± 1.5). NWA 1068 composition is thus close to a

  14. Geometrically distributed one-dimensional photonic crystals for light-reflection in all angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagappan, G; Wu, P

    2009-07-06

    We demonstrate that a series of one-dimensional photonic crystals made of any dielectric materials, with the periods are distributed in a geometrical progression of a common ratio, r rc (theta,P), where rc is a structural parameter that depends on the angle of incidence, theta, and polarization, P, is capable of blocking light of any spectral range. If an omni-directional reflection is desired for all polarizations and for all incident angles smaller than thetao, then r rc (theta(o),p), where p is the polarization with the electric field parallel to the plane of incidence. We present simple and formula like expressions for rc, width of the bandgap, and minimum number of photonic crystals to achieve a perfect light reflection.

  15. Channeling, volume reflection, and volume capture study of electrons in a bent silicon crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. N. Wistisen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We present the experimental data and analysis of experiments conducted at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory investigating the processes of channeling, volume-reflection and volume-capture along the (111 plane in a strongly bent quasimosaic silicon crystal. These phenomena were investigated at 5 energies: 3.35, 4.2, 6.3, 10.5, and 14.0 GeV with a crystal with bending radius of 0.15 m, corresponding to curvatures of 0.053, 0.066, 0.099, 0.16, and 0.22 times the critical curvature, respectively. Based on the parameters of fitting functions we have extracted important parameters describing the channeling process such as the dechanneling length, the angle of volume reflection, the surface transmission, and the widths of the distribution of channeled particles parallel and orthogonal to the plane.

  16. Indexing in single-crystal diffractometry with an obstinate list of reflections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duisenberg, A.J.M.

    1992-01-01

    An indexing method for single-crystal diffractometry is described which is applicable to especially difficult cases such as twin lattices, incommensurate structures, fragmented crystals, long axes and unreliable data. Finding the reciprocal lattice from a cloud of reciprocal-lattice points (reflections) is reduced to finding elementary periods in one-dimensional rows, obtained by projecting all observed points onto the normal to the plane formed by any three of these points. Row periodicity and offending reflections are easily recognized. Each row, by its direction and (reciprocal) spacing, defines one direct axis vector, based upon all cooperating observations. From the direct vectors so obtained a primitive direct cell is chosen and refined against the fitting reflections. The result is one main lattice, or a main lattice and a set of alien reflections. The method operates semi-automatically in the program DIRAX and has been tested, without failure, on hundreds of CAD4 reflection files, among which there were many auto-indexing-resistant lists. (orig.)

  17. Observation of multiple Bragg reflections of neutrons in bent perfect crystals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikula, Pavol; Vrána, Miroslav; Šaroun, Jan; Seong, B. S.; Moon, MK.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 634, č. 1 (2011), S108-S111 ISSN 0168-9002. [International Workshop on Neutron Optics. Grenoble, 17.03.2010-19.03.2010] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP204/10/0654 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : Neutron diffraction * Bent perfect crystal * Multiple reflections Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.207, year: 2011

  18. Study on the Reflection Spectra of One Dimensional Plasma Photonic Crystals Having Exponentially Graded Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, S.; Singh, Vivek; Singh, A. K.

    2013-01-01

    The transfer matrix method is used to study the effect of the permittivity profile on the reflectivity of a one dimensional plasma photonic crystal having exponentially graded material. The analysis shows that the proposed structure works as a perfect mirror within a certain frequency range. These frequency ranges can be completely controlled by the permittivity profile of a graded dielectric layer. As expected we observed that these frequency ranges are also controlled by plasma parameters. (plasma technology)

  19. Time-of-flight studies of multiple Bragg reflections in cylindrically bent perfect crystals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikula, Pavol; Furusaka, M.; Ohkubob, K.; Šaroun, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 12 (2012), s. 1248-1253 ISSN 0021-8898 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB100480901; GA ČR GAP204/10/0654 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : neutron diffraction * time-of-flight method * multiple reflections * bent perfect crystals Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 3.343, year: 2012

  20. Theoretical study of two-dimensional phononic crystals with viscoelasticity based on fractional derivative models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yaozong; Yu Dianlong; Zhao Honggang; Wen Jihong; Wen Xisen

    2008-01-01

    Wave propagation in two-dimensional phononic crystals (PCs) with viscoelasticity is investigated using a finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) method. The viscoelasticity is evaluated using the Kelvin-Voigt model with fractional derivatives (FDs) so that both the dispersion and dissipation are considered. Numerical approximation of FDs is integrated into the FDTD scheme to simulate wave propagation in such PCs. All the constituent materials are treated as isotropic and homogeneous. The gaps are substantially displaced and widened and the attenuation is noticeably enhanced due to the dispersion and dissipation of host material and the complicated multiple scattering between scatterers. These results indicate that the viscoelasticity of the damping host has significant influence on wave propagation in PCs and should be considered

  1. Electromagnetically induced reflectance and Fano resonance in one dimensional superconducting photonic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athe, Pratik; Srivastava, Sanjay; Thapa, Khem B.

    2018-04-01

    In the present work, we demonstrate the generation of optical Fano resonance and electromagnetically induced reflectance (EIR) in one-dimensional superconducting photonic crystal (1D SPC) by numerical simulation using transfer matrix method as analysis tool. We investigated the optical response of 1D SPC structure consisting of alternate layer of two different superconductors and observed that the optical spectra of this structure exhibit two narrow reflectance peaks with zero reflectivity of sidebands. Further, we added a dielectric cap layer to this 1D SPC structure and found that addition of dielectric cap layer transforms the line shape of sidebands around the narrow reflectance peaks which leads to the formation of Fano resonance and EIR line shape in reflectance spectra. We also studied the effects of the number of periods, refractive index and thickness of dielectric cap layer on the lineshape of EIR and Fano resonances. It was observed that the amplitude of peak reflectance of EIR achieves 100% reflectance by increasing the number of periods.

  2. Fractionation of the platinum-group elments and Re during crystallization of basalt in Kilauea Iki Lava Lake, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitcher, L.; Helz, R.T.; Walker, R.J.; Piccoli, P.

    2009-01-01

    Kilauea Iki lava lake formed during the 1959 summit eruption of Kilauea Volcano, then crystallized and differentiated over a period of 35??years. It offers an opportunity to evaluate the fractionation behavior of trace elements in a uniquely well-documented basaltic system. A suite of 14 core samples recovered from 1967 to 1981 has been analyzed for 5 platinum-group elements (PGE: Ir, Os, Ru, Pt, Pd), plus Re. These samples have MgO ranging from 2.4 to 26.9??wt.%, with temperatures prior to quench ranging from 1140????C to ambient (110????C). Five eruption samples were also analyzed. Osmium and Ru concentrations vary by nearly four orders of magnitude (0.0006-1.40??ppb for Os and 0.0006-2.01??ppb for Ru) and are positively correlated with MgO content. These elements behaved compatibly during crystallization, mostly likely being concentrated in trace phases (alloy or sulfide) present in olivine phenocrysts or included chromite. Iridium also correlates positively with MgO, although less strongly than Os and Ru. The somewhat poorer correlation for Ir, compared with Os and Ru, may reflect variable loss of Ir as volatile IrF6 in some of the most magnesian samples. Rhenium is negatively correlated with MgO, behaving as an incompatible trace element. Its behavior in the lava lake is complicated by apparent volatile loss of Re, as suggested by a decrease in Re concentration with time of quenching for lake samples vs. eruption samples. Platinum and Pd concentrations are negatively, albeit weakly, correlated with MgO, so these elements were modestly incompatible during crystallization of the major silicate phases. Palladium contents peaked before precipitation of immiscible sulfide liquid, however, and decline sharply in the most differentiated samples. In contrast, Pt appears to have been unaffected by sulfide precipitation. Microprobe data confirm that Pd entered the sulfide liquid before Re, and that Pt is not strongly chalcophile in this system. Occasional high Pt values

  3. Activated Fraction Of Black Carbon By Cloud Droplets And Ice Crystals At The High Alpine Site Jungfraujoch (3580 m asl)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cozic, J.; Mertes, S. [IFT Leipzig (Georgia); Verheggen, B.; Petzold, A. [DLR, Oberpfaffenhofen (Georgia); Weingartner, E.; Baltensperger, U.

    2005-03-01

    Measurements of black carbon (BC) were made in winter and summer 2004 at the high Alpine site Jungfraujoch in order to study the activation of BC into cloud droplets and ice crystals. Main results showed that the activated fraction represents 61% in summer and that for a large temperature range between -25 C and 5 C, the activated BC fraction increases with increasing temperature and increasing liquid water content. (author)

  4. Volume reflection and channeling of ultrarelativistic protons in germanium bent single crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bellucci

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to the investigation of volume reflection and channeling processes of ultrarelativistic positive charged particles moving in germanium single crystals. We demonstrate that the choice of atomic potential on the basis of the Hartree-Fock method and the correct choice of the Debye temperature allow us to describe the above mentioned processes in a good agreement with the recent experiments. Moreover, the universal form of equations for volume reflection presented in the paper gives a true description of the process at a wide range of particle energies. Standing on this study we make predictions for the mean angle reflection (as a function of the bending radius of positive and negative particles for germanium (110 and (111 crystallographic planes.

  5. Observation of two regions of selective light reflection from a thin film of a cholesteric liquid crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alaverdyan, R B; Dadalyan, T K; Chilingaryan, Yurii S

    2013-01-01

    Two regions of selective light reflection (in the short- and long- wavelength parts of the visible spectrum) from a thin film of a cholesteric liquid crystal (CLC), consisting of the mixture of two CLCs with opposite chirality and a nematic liquid crystal, are experimentally found for the first time. The spectral position of the reflection regions and the separation between them varies depending on the CLC composition and the temperature. The long-wavelength region of reflection corresponds to the region of Bragg reflection from the CLC helix, while the short-wavelength region is probably due to the defects in the structure of the CLC film. (letters)

  6. Accurate wavelength prediction of photonic crystal resonant reflection and applications in refractive index measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermannsson, Pétur Gordon; Vannahme, Christoph; Smith, Cameron L. C.

    2014-01-01

    and superstrate materials. The importance of accounting for material dispersion in order to obtain accurate simulation results is highlighted, and a method for doing so using an iterative approach is demonstrated. Furthermore, an application for the model is demonstrated, in which the material dispersion......In the past decade, photonic crystal resonant reflectors have been increasingly used as the basis for label-free biochemical assays in lab-on-a-chip applications. In both designing and interpreting experimental results, an accurate model describing the optical behavior of such structures...... is essential. Here, an analytical method for precisely predicting the absolute positions of resonantly reflected wavelengths is presented. The model is experimentally verified to be highly accurate using nanoreplicated, polymer-based photonic crystal grating reflectors with varying grating periods...

  7. The Impact of Soil Reflectance on the Quantification of the Green Vegetation Fraction from NDVI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montandon, L. M.; Small, E. E.

    2008-01-01

    The green vegetation fraction (Fg) is an important climate and hydrologic model parameter. A common method to calculate Fg is to create a simple linear mixing rnodeP between two NDVI endmembers: bare soil NDVI (NDVI(sub o)) and full vegetation NDVI (NDVI(sub infinity)). Usually it is assumed that NDVI(sub o), is close to zero (NDVI(sub o) approx.-0.05) and is generally chosen from the lowest observed NDVI values. However, the mean soil NDVI computed from 2906 samples is much larger (NDVI=0.2) and is highly variable (standard deviation=O. 1). We show that the underestimation of NDVI(sub o) yields overestimations of Fg. The largest errors occur in grassland and shrubland areas. Using parameters for NDVI(sub o) and NDVI(sub infinity) derived from global scenes yields overestimations of Fg ((Delta) Fg*) that are larger than 0.2 for the majority of U.S. land cover types when pixel NDVI values are 0.2NDVI(sub pixel)NDVI values. When using conterminous U.S. scenes to derive NDV(sub o) and NDVI(sub infinity), the overestimation is less (0.10-0.17 for 0.2NDVI(sub pixel)NDVI cycle. We propose using global databases of NDVI(sub o) along with information on historical NDVI(sub pixel) values to compute a statistically most-likely estimate of Fg (Fg*). Using in situ measurements made at the Sevilleta LTER, we show that this approach yields better estimates of Fg than using global invariant NDVI(sub o) values estimated from whole scenes (Figure 2). At the two studied sites, the Fg estimate was adjusted by 52% at the grassland and 86% at the shrubland. More significant advances will require information on spatial distribution of soil reflectance.

  8. A high resolution reflecting crystal spectrometer to measure 3 keV pionic hydrogen and deuterium X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badertscher, A.; Bogdan, M.; Goudsmit, P.F.A.; Knecht, L.; Leisi, H.J.; Schroeder, H.C.; Sigg, D.; Zhao, Z.G.; Chatellard, D.; Egger, J.P.; Jeannet, E.; Aschenauer, E.C.; Gabathuler, K.; Simons, L.M.; Rusi El Hassani, A.J.

    1993-01-01

    A reflecting crystal spectrometer consisting of three cylindrically bent quartz (110) crystals is described. It was designed to measure the 3 keV K β X-rays from pionic hydrogen and deuterium. Charge coupled devices (CCDs) were used as X-ray detectors. Projecting the reflexes of all three crystals on one common focus, an instrumental energy resolution below 1 eV was obtained at an energy of 2.9 keV. (orig.)

  9. Trajectory effects in the negative charge-state fraction of 3He and 4He reflected from a sodium target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, P.J.; Eckstein, W.; Verbeek, H.

    1984-01-01

    Measurement of the positive and negative charge-state fractions of He reflected from a sodium target with incident energies in the range of 1.75 keV/nucleon to 5 keV/nucleon are presented. The exit angle of the particles was held constant at 75 0 from the surface normal, while the incident angle was varied from 0 0 (normal incidence) to 75 0 . The positive charge-state fractions exhibited no incident-angle or incident-energy dependence and dependend only upon the exit energy. For normal incidence, the negative charge-state fractions were also only dependent upon the exit energy. However, for glancing incidence, the negative charge-state fractions were incident- and exit-energy dependent. These results are compared to previous results for D [1] and are discussed in terms of the trajectory-dependent formation probability of the negative ions. (orig.)

  10. Reflectivity of single-crystal GeS from 0.1-30 eV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiley, J.D.; Buckel, W.J.; Braun, W.; Fehrenbach, G.W.; Himpsel, F.J.; Koch, E.E.

    1976-03-01

    The reflectivity of single-crystal, orthorhombic GeS has been measured at 300 K for all three polarizations in the photon energy range 0.1-30 eV. Eleven distinct peaks or shoulders are observed, about half of which can be associated with known structure in the valence-band density-of-states. A Kramers-Kronig analysis was performed, giving the optical constants and energy-loss functions in the 0-25 eV range. (orig.) [de

  11. Reflectivity of 1D photonic crystals: A comparison of computational schemes with experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Huerta, J. S.; Ariza-Flores, D.; Castro-García, R.; Mochán, W. L.; Ortiz, G. P.; Agarwal, V.

    2018-04-01

    We report the reflectivity of one-dimensional finite and semi-infinite photonic crystals, computed through the coupling to Bloch modes (BM) and through a transfer matrix method (TMM), and their comparison to the experimental spectral line shapes of porous silicon (PS) multilayer structures. Both methods reproduce a forbidden photonic bandgap (PBG), but slowly-converging oscillations are observed in the TMM as the number of layers increases to infinity, while a smooth converged behavior is presented with BM. The experimental reflectivity spectra is in good agreement with the TMM results for multilayer structures with a small number of periods. However, for structures with large amount of periods, the measured spectral line shapes exhibit better agreement with the smooth behavior predicted by BM.

  12. Crystallization analysis fractionation of poly(ethylene-co-styrene) produced by metallocene catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Kamal, Muhammad Shahzad

    2013-06-06

    Ethylene homo polymer and ethylene-styrene copolymers were synthesized using Cp2ZrCl2 (1)/methyl aluminoxane (MAO) and rac-silylene-bis (indenyl) zirconium dichloride (2)/MAO catalyst systems by varying styrene concentration and reaction conditions. Crystallization analysis fractionation (CRYSTAF), DSC, FTIR and 1H NMR spectroscopy were used for characterizing the synthesized polymers. Interestingly, styrene was able to increase the activity of 1/MAO and 2/MAO catalyst systems at low concentrations, but at higher concentrations the activity decreases. The 1/MAO system at low and high pressure was unable to incorporate styrene, and the final product was pure polyethylene. On the other hand, with 2/MAO polymerization of ethylene and styrene yielded copolymer containing both styrene and ethylene. Results obtained from CRYSTAF and DSC reveal that on using 1/MAO system at high pressure, the resulting polymer in the presence of styrene has similar crystallinity as the polymer produced without styrene. Using both 1/MAO at low pressure and 2/MAO leads to decrease in crystallinity with increase in styrene concentration, even though the former does not incorporate styrene. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  13. Model-Based Normalization of a Fractional-Crystal Collimator for Small-Animal PET Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yusheng; Matej, Samuel; Karp, Joel S; Metzler, Scott D

    2017-05-01

    Previously, we proposed to use a coincidence collimator to achieve fractional-crystal resolution in PET imaging. We have designed and fabricated a collimator prototype for a small-animal PET scanner, A-PET. To compensate for imperfections in the fabricated collimator prototype, collimator normalization, as well as scanner normalization, is required to reconstruct quantitative and artifact-free images. In this study, we develop a normalization method for the collimator prototype based on the A-PET normalization using a uniform cylinder phantom. We performed data acquisition without the collimator for scanner normalization first, and then with the collimator from eight different rotation views for collimator normalization. After a reconstruction without correction, we extracted the cylinder parameters from which we generated expected emission sinograms. Single scatter simulation was used to generate the scattered sinograms. We used the least-squares method to generate the normalization coefficient for each LOR based on measured, expected and scattered sinograms. The scanner and collimator normalization coefficients were factorized by performing two normalizations separately. The normalization methods were also verified using experimental data acquired from A-PET with and without the collimator. In summary, we developed a model-base collimator normalization that can significantly reduce variance and produce collimator normalization with adequate statistical quality within feasible scan time.

  14. Liquidus temperature in the spinel primary phase field: A comparison between optical and crystal fraction methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Brian J.; Hrma, Pavel; Crum, Jarrod V.; Vienna, John D.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Peterson, Jacob A.

    2018-03-01

    Liquidus temperature (TL) was measured for simulated high-level waste borosilicate glasses covering a Hanford composition region, using an optical method and a crystal-fraction extrapolation method with X-ray diffraction data from isothermal heat treatments. The 38 glasses encompassed a one-component-at-a-time variation of a 16-component matrix. The TL values ranged from 1006°C to 1603°C. First-order polynomial models were fitted to data to obtain coefficients in terms of the effect of 1 mass% component addition on the TL: TL-increasing oxides Cr2O3 (264°C), “Others” (minor components, 163°C), oxides of noble metals (137°C), NiO (91°C), Al2O3 and Fe2O3 (~19–21°C); TL-decreasing oxides K2O (-26°C), Na2O (-41°C), and Li2O (-68°C); oxides of little effect MnO, P2O5, ZrO2, F, Bi2O3, SiO2, B2O3, and CaO (9 to -12°C). Also presented are temperatures (T1%) at which glasses contain 1 vol% of spinel as these values are considered relevant to the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. The measured and estimated values are compared and contrasted and the effect of TL and T1% on glass formulation is discussed.

  15. Mechanisms for the reflection of light atoms from crystal surfaces at kilovolt energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, M.; Robinson, M.T.

    1978-01-01

    The computer program MARLOWE was used to investigate the backscattering of protons from the (110) surface of a nickel crystal. Grazing incidence was considered so that anisotropic effects originated mainly from the surface region. The contribution of aligned scattering was studied by comparing the results with similar calculations for an amorphous target. Energy distributions of backscattered particles were investigated for incident energies ranging from 0.1 to 5 keV. The structure of these distributions was explained by making calculations for several target thickness. Specular reflection was found to depend on the structure of the first few atomic planes only. The (110) rows in the surface plane were responsible for focusing into surface semichannels. Focusing in these semichannels was found to be the strongest under total reflection conditions (below about 1.3 keV) while the scattering intensity from surface rows increased with increasing incident energy. The orientation of the plane of incidence was found to have large influence on the relative contributions of the reflection mechanisms involved. (orig.) [de

  16. Permanganate oxidizable carbon reflects a processed soil fraction that is sensitive to management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permanganate oxidizable C (POXC; i.e., active C) is a relatively new method that can quantify labile soil C rapidly and inexpensively. Despite limited reports of positive correlations with particulate organic carbon (POC), microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and other soil carbon (C) fractions, little i...

  17. LEVEL OF ZINC AND ITS FRACTIONS AS REFLECTION OF A CONDITION OF ANTIOXIDANT SYSTEM AT THE CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE LUNG DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Shevcova

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To estimate a possibility of use of zinc and its fractions as the indicator reflecting a condition of antioxidant system at sick HOBL and persons from risk groups. Materials and methods. Patients with COPD, smokers and non-smoking healthy people have participated in a research. Everything participated in a research has carried out spirometry with definition of an indicator of FEV1 and the subsequent calculation of FEV1 % of due. Taking into account importance of the occupied role when forming COPD of an oxidative stress have been determined the level of activity of the main enzyme of antitoskidantny protection — superoxide dismutases; level of zinc and its fractions as main component of enzyme and also albumine as main tranporter of metabolic active zinc. The indicator “a share of the related fraction of zinc” for definition of changes in fractions of zinc is entered. Results of the study. It is defined that at the smoking patients with the minimum malfunction of external breath of change of indicators are similar to that at patients with COPD. Statistically significant differences in the level of the studied indicators at non-smoking patients are also revealed. With use of the correlation analysis of Spirmen reliable high correlation communications between FEV1 % from due and activity level superoxide dismutases and also between activity level superoxide dismutases and the general level of zinc and also zinc connected are defined that confirms a hypothesis of a possibility of use of level of zinc and its fractions as the indicator reflecting a condition of antioxidant system at the smoking persons at screening researches. 

  18. Mutual transformation of light waves by reflection holograms in photorefractive crystals of the 4-bar 3m symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naunyka, V. N.; Shepelevich, V. V., E-mail: vasshep@inbox.ru [Mozyr State Pedagogical University (Belarus)

    2011-05-15

    The mutual transformation of light waves in the case of their simultaneous diffraction from a bulk reflection phase hologram, which was formed in a cubic photorefractive crystal of the 4-bar 3m symmetry class, has been studied. The indicator surfaces of the polarization-optimized values of the relative intensity of the object wave, which make it possible to determine the amplification of this wave for any crystal cut, are constructed. The linear polarization azimuths at which the energy exchange between the light waves reaches a maximum are found numerically for crystals of different cuts.

  19. Crystals with an Open Wave-Vector Surface: Peculiarities of Reflection and Possibilities of Designing Flat Lenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eritsyan, O. S.; Lalayan, A. A.; Arakelyan, O. M.; Papoyan, A. A.; Kostanyan, R. B.

    2010-01-01

    The frequency dependence of the reflection coefficient of MgF 2 crystal in the frequency range of 200-800 cm -1 at different orientations of the optical axis has been investigated. The experimental data are compared with the calculation results. This comparison confirms that the wave vectors for the extraordinary wave have an open surface. This makes it possible to focus a divergent beam refracted at a flat boundary ori- ented perpendicularly to the optical crystal axis. The focusing effect of a plane-parallel MgF 2 crystal plate is calculated.

  20. Deep and tapered silicon photonic crystals for achieving anti-reflection and enhanced absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Yung-Jr; Lee, San-Liang; Coldren, Larry A

    2010-03-29

    Tapered silicon photonic crystals (PhCs) with smooth sidewalls are realized using a novel single-step deep reactive ion etching. The PhCs can significantly reduce the surface reflection over the wavelength range between the ultra-violet and near-infrared regions. From the measurements using a spectrophotometer and an angle-variable spectroscopic ellipsometer, the sub-wavelength periodic structure can provide a broad and angular-independent antireflective window in the visible region for the TE-polarized light. The PhCs with tapered rods can further reduce the reflection due to a gradually changed effective index. On the other hand, strong optical resonances for TM-mode can be found in this structure, which is mainly due to the existence of full photonic bandgaps inside the material. Such resonance can enhance the optical absorption inside the silicon PhCs due to its increased optical paths. With the help of both antireflective and absorption-enhanced characteristics in this structure, the PhCs can be used for various applications.

  1. Fractional order analysis of Sephadex gel structures: NMR measurements reflecting anomalous diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magin, Richard L.; Akpa, Belinda S.; Neuberger, Thomas; Webb, Andrew G.

    2011-12-01

    We report the appearance of anomalous water diffusion in hydrophilic Sephadex gels observed using pulse field gradient (PFG) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The NMR diffusion data was collected using a Varian 14.1 Tesla imaging system with a home-built RF saddle coil. A fractional order analysis of the data was used to characterize heterogeneity in the gels for the dynamics of water diffusion in this restricted environment. Several recent studies of anomalous diffusion have used the stretched exponential function to model the decay of the NMR signal, i.e., exp[-( bD) α], where D is the apparent diffusion constant, b is determined the experimental conditions (gradient pulse separation, durations and strength), and α is a measure of structural complexity. In this work, we consider a different case where the spatial Laplacian in the Bloch-Torrey equation is generalized to a fractional order model of diffusivity via a complexity parameter, β, a space constant, μ, and a diffusion coefficient, D. This treatment reverts to the classical result for the integer order case. The fractional order decay model was fit to the diffusion-weighted signal attenuation for a range of b-values (0 < b < 4000 s mm -2). Throughout this range of b values, the parameters β, μ and D, were found to correlate with the porosity and tortuosity of the gel structure.

  2. Acousto-optic control of internal acoustic reflection in tellurium dioxide crystal in case of strong elastic energy walkoff [Invited].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voloshinov, Vitaly; Polikarpova, Nataliya; Ivanova, Polina; Khorkin, Vladimir

    2018-04-01

    Peculiar cases of acoustic wave propagation and reflection may be observed in strongly anisotropic acousto-optical crystals. A tellurium dioxide crystal serves as a prime example of such media, since it possesses record indexes of acoustic anisotropy. We studied one of the unusual scenarios of acoustic incidence and reflection from a free crystal-vacuum boundary in paratellurite. The directions of the acoustic waves in the (001) plane of the crystal were determined, and their basic characteristics were calculated. The carried-out acousto-optic experiment at the wavelength of light 532 nm and the acoustic frequency 73 MHz confirmed the theoretical predictions. The effects examined in the paper include the acoustic wave propagation with the record walkoff angle 74°. We also observed the incidence of the wave on the boundary at the angle exceeding 90°. Finally, we registered the close-to-back reflection of acoustic energy following the incidence. One of the stunning aspects is the distribution of energy between the incident and the back-reflected wave. The unusual features of the acoustic wave reflections pointed out in the paper are valuable for their possible applications in acousto-optic devices.

  3. Optimum combinations of visible and near-infrared reflectances for estimating the fraction of photosynthetically available radiation absorbed by plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podaire, Alain; Deschamps, Pierre-Yves; Frouin, R.; Asrar, Ghassem

    1991-01-01

    A useful parameter to estimate terrestrial primary productivity, that can be sensed from space, is the daily averaged fraction of Photosynthetically Available Radiation (PAR) absorbed by plants. To evaluate this parameter, investigators have relied on the fact that the relative amount of radiation reflected by a vegetated surface in the visible and near infrared depends on the fraction of the surface covered by the vegetation and therefore, correlates with absorbed PAR. They have used vegetation indices, namely normalized difference and simple ratio, to derive absorbed PAR. The problem with normalized difference and simple ratio is first, they are non linear functions of radiance or reflectance and therefore, cannot be readily applied to heterogeneous targets, second, they are used in generally nonlinear relationships, which make time integrals of the indices not proportional to primary productivity, and third, the relationships depend strongly on the type of canopy and background. To remove these limitations, linear combinations of visible and near infrared reflectances at optimum (one or two) viewing zenith angles are proposed.

  4. Spatiotemporal closure of fractional laser-ablated channels imaged by optical coherence tomography and reflectance confocal microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banzhaf, Christina A.; Wind, Bas S.; Mogensen, Mette

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) offer high-resolution optical imaging of the skin, which may provide benefit in the context of laser-assisted drug delivery. We aimed to characterize postoperative healing of ablative fractional...... laser (AFXL)-induced channels and dynamics in their spatiotemporal closure using in vivo OCT and RCM techniques. Study design/Materials and Methods The inner forearm of healthy subjects (n = 6) was exposed to 10,600 nm fractional CO2 laser using 5 and 25% densities, 120 μm beam diameter, 5, 15, and 25 m......J/microbeam. Treatment sites were scanned with OCT to evaluate closure of AFXL-channels and RCM to evaluate subsequent re-epithelialization. Results OCT and RCM identified laser channels in epidermis and upper dermis as black, ablated tissue defects surrounded by characteristic hyper-and hyporeflective zones. OCT imaged...

  5. Trajectory method in the theory of Laue diffraction of X rays in crystals: II. Effect of total reflection at bending deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohn, V. G.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of total reflection (switching) of a spherical X-ray wave in the case of Laue diffraction in a crystal with bending deformation is analyzed by the trajectory method. Qualitative analytical description and computation of the spatial structure of the reflected beam for large and small distances between the spherical-wave source and the crystal are performed. The mechanism of much more efficient reflection of an X-ray beam by a deformed crystal in comparison with a perfect crystal is clearly demonstrated. It is also shown that the trajectory method is very convenient for description of the total reflection phenomenon.

  6. Trajectory method in the theory of Laue diffraction of X rays in crystals: II. Effect of total reflection at bending deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohn, V. G.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of total reflection (switching) of a spherical X-ray wave in the case of Laue diffraction in a crystal with bending deformation is analyzed by the trajectory method. Qualitative analytical description and computation of the spatial structure of the reflected beam for large and small distances between the spherical-wave source and the crystal are performed. The mechanism of much more efficient reflection of an X-ray beam by a deformed crystal in comparison with a perfect crystal is clearly demonstrated. It is also shown that the trajectory method is very convenient for description of the total reflection phenomenon

  7. FT-IR reflection spectra of single crystals: resolving phonons of different symmetry without using polarised radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    METODIJA NAJDOSKI

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR reflection spectra, asquired at nearnormal incidence, were recorded from single crystals belonging to six crystal systems: CsCr(SO42.12H2O (alum, cubic, K2CuCl2·2H2O (Mitscherlichite, tetragonal, CaCO3 (calcite, hexagonal, KHSO4 (mercallite, orthorhombic, CaSO4·2H2O (gypsum, monoclinic and CuSO4·5H2O (chalcantite, triclinic. The acquired IR reflection spectra were further transformed into absorption spectra, employing the Kramers-Kronig transformation. Except for the cubic alums, the spectra strongly depend on the crystal face from which they were recorded; this is a consequence of anisotropy. Phonons of a given symmetry (E-species, in tetragonal/hexagonal and B-species, in monoclinic crystals may be resolved without using a polariser. The spectrum may be simplified in the case of an orthorhombic crystal, as well. The longitudinal-optical (LO and transversal-optical (TO mode frequencies were calculated in the case of optically isotropic and the simplified spectra of optically uniaxial crystals.

  8. Some properties of the neutron monochromatic beams obtained by multiple Bragg reflections realized in bent perfect single crystals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikula, Pavol; Vrána, Miroslav; Šaroun, Jan; Krejčí, F.; Seong, B. S.; Woo, W.; Furusaka, M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 1 (2013), s. 128-134 ISSN 0021-8898 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP204/10/0654; GA MŠk LM2010011 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : multiple reflections * bent perfect crystals * neutron diffraction Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 3.950, year: 2013

  9. Experimental studies of dispersive double reflections excited in cylindrically bent perfect-crystal slabs at a constant neutron wavelength

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikula, Pavol; Vrána, Miroslav; Šaroun, Jan; Davydov, Vadim; Em, V.; Seong, B. S.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 1 (2012), s. 98-105 ISSN 0021-8898 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP204/10/0654 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : RESIDUAL STRAIN-STRESS INSTRUMENT * MULTIPLE BRAGG-REFLECTIONS * SINGLE-CRYSTAL Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.343, year: 2012

  10. Diet-animal fractionation of nitrogen stable isotopes reflects the efficiency of nitrogen assimilation in ruminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantalapiedra-Hijar, G; Ortigues-Marty, I; Sepchat, B; Agabriel, J; Huneau, J F; Fouillet, H

    2015-04-14

    The natural abundance of ¹⁵N in animal proteins (δ¹⁵Nanimal) is greater than that in the diet consumed by the animals (δ¹⁵Ndiet), with a discrimination factor (Δ¹⁵N = δ¹⁵Nanimal - δ¹⁵Ndiet) that is known to vary according to nutritional conditions. The objectives of the present study were to test the hypothesis that Δ¹⁵N variations depend on the efficiency of nitrogen utilisation (ENU) in growing beef cattle, and to identify some of the physiological mechanisms responsible for this N isotopic fractionation in ruminants. Thus, we performed the regression of the Δ¹⁵N of plasma proteins obtained from thirty-five finishing beef cattle fed standard and non-conventional diets against different feed efficiency indices, including ENU. We also performed the regression of the Δ¹⁵N of different ruminant N pools (plasma and milk proteins, urine and faeces) against different splanchnic N fluxes obtained from multi-catheterised lactating dairy cows. The Δ¹⁵N of plasma proteins was negatively correlated with feed efficiency indices in beef cattle, especially ENU (body protein gain/N intake) and efficiency of metabolisable protein (MP) utilisation (body protein gain/MP intake). Although Δ¹⁵N obtained from different N pools in dairy cows were all negatively correlated with ENU, the highest correlation was found when Δ¹⁵N was calculated from plasma proteins. Δ¹⁵N showed no correlation with urea-N recycling or rumen NH₃ absorption, but exhibited a strong correlation with liver urea synthesis and splanchnic amino acid metabolism, which points to a dominant role of splanchnic tissues in the present N isotopic fractionation study.

  11. Measuring the branching fraction of ω→ ηγ with the crystal ball Experiment at MAMI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steffen, Oliver; Gradl, Wolfgang [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Collaboration: A2-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The Crystal Ball Collaboration uses energy tagged bremstrahlung photons produced from the MAMI electron beam to study photo-induced reactions on nucleons and nuclei. The Crystal Ball/TAPS 4π calorimeter setup is optimized for the detection of neutral final states. Charged particles are identified and measured by the inner detector system. A large data set of photoproduced η{sup p}rime and ω mesons has been obtained during recent data taking periods with the End Point Tagger (E{sub γ}=1.4 to 1.6 GeV) and the liquid hydrogen target. We plan to use this data to measure the branching fraction of the ω→ ηγ decay. Simulation studies for this decay have already started. In this talk we present the current status of the ongoing work and discuss the next steps of the analysis.

  12. Surface topography to reflectivity mapping in two-dimensional photonic crystals designed in germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Husanu, M.A.; Ganea, C.P. [National Institute of Materials Physics, Atomistilor 105b, 077125 Magurele, Ilfov (Romania); Anghel, I. [National Institute for Laser, Plasma & Radiation Physics, Atomistilor 409, 077125 Magurele (Romania); University of Bucharest, Faculty of Physics, Atomistilor 405, 077125 Magurele (Romania); Florica, C.; Rasoga, O. [National Institute of Materials Physics, Atomistilor 105b, 077125 Magurele, Ilfov (Romania); Popescu, D.G., E-mail: dana.popescu@infim.ro [National Institute of Materials Physics, Atomistilor 105b, 077125 Magurele, Ilfov (Romania)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Laser ablation is used for drilling a periodic 2D photonic structure. • Confinement of radiation is revealed by infra-red spectromicroscopy correlated with numerical calculations. • Telecommunication range is accessible upon tuning conveniently the processing parameters. - Abstract: Light confinement in a two dimensional photonic crystal (2D PhC) with hexagonal symmetry is studied using infra-red reflectance spectromicroscopy and numerical calculations. The structure has been realized by laser ablation, using a pulsed laser (λ = 775 nm), perforating an In-doped Ge wafer and creating a lattice of holes with well-defined symmetry. Correlating the spectral signature of the photonic gaps recorded experimentally with the results obtained in the finite difference time domain and finite difference frequency domain calculations, we established the relationship between the geometric parameters of the structure (lattice constants, shape of the hole) and its efficiency in trapping and guiding the radiation in a well-defined frequency range. Besides the gap in the low energy range of transversal electric modes, a second one is identified in the telecommunication range, originating in the localization of the leaky modes within the radiation continuum. The emerging picture is of a device with promising characteristics as an alternative to Si-based technology in photonic device fabrication with special emphasize in energy storage and conversion.

  13. Trapping a single atom with a fraction of a photon using a photonic crystal nanocavity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oosten, D.; Kuipers, L.

    2011-01-01

    We consider the interaction between a single rubidium atom and a photonic crystal nanocavity. Because of the ultrasmall mode volume of the nanocavity, an extremely strong coupling regime can be achieved in which the atom can shift the cavity resonance by many cavity linewidths. We show that this

  14. Measurement of anchoring coefficient of homeotropically aligned nematic liquid crystal using a polarizing optical microscope in reflective mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-In Baek

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Although the homeotropic alignment of liquid crystals is widely used in LCD TVs, no easy method exists to measure its anchoring coefficient. In this study, we propose an easy and convenient measurement technique in which a polarizing optical microscope is used in the reflective mode with an objective lens having a low depth of focus. All measurements focus on the reflection of light near the interface between the liquid crystal and alignment layer. The change in the reflected light is measured by applying an electric field. We model the response of the director of the liquid crystal to the electric field and, thus, the change in reflectance. By adjusting the extrapolation length in the calculation, we match the experimental and calculated results and obtain the anchoring coefficient. In our experiment, the extrapolation lengths were 0.31 ± 0.04 μm, 0.32 ± 0.08 μm, and 0.23 ± 0.05 μm for lecithin, AL-64168, and SE-5662, respectively.

  15. Determination of the dopant weight fraction in polyaniline films using a quartz-crystal microbalance

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ayad, M. M.; Zaki, E. A.; Stejskal, Jaroslav

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 515, č. 23 (2007), s. 8381-8385 ISSN 0040-6090 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4050313 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : dopant weight fraction * polyaniline * polyaniline film Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.693, year: 2007

  16. Research progress of cholesteric liquid crystals with broadband reflection characteristics in application of intelligent optical modulation materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lan-Ying; Gao Yan-Zi; Song Ping; Yuan Xiao; He Bao-Feng; Yang Huai; Wu Xiao-Juan; Chen Xing-Wu; Hu Wang; Guo Ren-Wei; Ding Hang-Jun; Xiao Jiu-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Cholesteric liquid crystals (CLCs) have recently sparked an enormous amount of interest in the development of soft matter materials due to their unique ability to self-organize into a helical supra-molecular architecture and their excellent selective reflection of light based on the Bragg relationship. Nowadays, by the virtue of building the self-organized nanostructures with pitch gradient or non-uniform pitch distribution, extensive work has already been performed to obtain CLC films with a broad reflection band. Based on authors’ many years’ research experience, this critical review systematically summarizes the physical and optical background of the CLCs with broadband reflection characteristics, methods to obtain broadband reflection of CLCs, as well as the application in the field of intelligent optical modulation materials. Combined with the research status and the advantages in the field, the important basic and applied scientific problems in the research direction are also introduced. (topical review)

  17. MgO reflectance data for Monte Carlo simulation of LaBr{sub 3}:Ce scintillation crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scafè, Raffaele, E-mail: raffaele.scafe@uniroma1.it [Dept. of Molecular Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome, Viale Regina Elena 324, I-00161 Rome (Italy); Pani, Roberto; Pellegrini, Rosanna; Cinti, Maria Nerina [Dept. of Molecular Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome, Viale Regina Elena 324, I-00161 Rome (Italy); Bennati, Paolo [INFN-Roma I, Italian National Institute of Nuclear Physics, Piazzale Aldo Moro 5, I-00185 Rome (Italy); Lo Meo, Sergio [National Institution for Insurance against Accidents at Work, Via Fontana Candida 1, I-00040, Monte Porzio Catone (Italy)

    2013-02-11

    Present paper is aimed to estimate the spectral reflectance of MgO as a function of layer thickness around LaBr{sub 3}:5%Ce crystals. A reference emission spectrum of scintillator was calculated averaging 15 experimental trends from literature. A survey on MgO reflectance provided experimental data in the wavelength region of interest without thickness information, while trends with dimensional facts were found in the adjacent wavelength region. An algorithm was developed for interpolating spectral data in the wavelength region of interest for given thickness. A comparison between reflectors for LaBr{sub 3}:Ce is summarized in Appendix A. Results are presented in form of weighted average values as well as numerical trends suitable, in particular, as input for Monte Carlo simulations of encapsulated crystals.

  18. Disposable attenuated total reflection-infrared crystals from silicon wafer: a versatile approach to surface infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabudak, Engin; Kas, Recep; Ogieglo, Wojciech; Rafieian, Damon; Schlautmann, Stefan; Lammertink, R G H; Gardeniers, Han J G E; Mul, Guido

    2013-01-02

    Attenuated total reflection-infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy is increasingly used to characterize solids and liquids as well as (catalytic) chemical conversion. Here we demonstrate that a piece of silicon wafer cut by a dicing machine or cleaved manually can be used as disposable internal reflection element (IRE) without the need for polishing and laborious edge preparation. Technical aspects, fundamental differences, and pros and cons of these novel disposable IREs and commercial IREs are discussed. The use of a crystal (the Si wafer) in a disposable manner enables simultaneous preparation and analysis of substrates and application of ATR spectroscopy in high temperature processes that may lead to irreversible interaction between the crystal and the substrate. As representative application examples, the disposable IREs were used to study high temperature thermal decomposition and chemical changes of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) in a titania (TiO(2)) matrix and assemblies of 65-450 nm thick polystyrene (PS) films.

  19. The Magma Chamber Simulator: Modeling the Impact of Wall Rock Composition on Mafic Magmas during Assimilation-Fractional Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creamer, J. B.; Spera, F. J.; Bohrson, W. A.; Ghiorso, M. S.

    2012-12-01

    Although stoichiometric titration is often used to model the process of concurrent Assimilation and Fractional Crystallization (AFC) within a compositionally evolving magma body, a more complete treatment of the problem involves simultaneous and self-consistent determination of stable phase relationships and separately evolving temperatures of both Magma (M) and Wall Rock (WR) that interact as a composite M-WR system. Here we present results of M-WR systems undergoing AFC forward modeled with the Magma Chamber Simulator (MCS), which uses the phase modeling capabilities of MELTS (Ghiorso & Sack 1995) as the thermodynamic basis. Simulations begin with one of a variety of mafic magmas (e.g. HAB, MORB, AOB) intruding a set mass of Wall Rock (e.g. lherzolite, gabbro, diorite, granite, metapelite), and heat is exchanged as the M-WR system proceeds towards thermal equilibrium. Depending on initial conditions, the early part of the evolution can involve closed system FC while the WR heats up. The WR behaves as a closed system until it is heated beyond the solidus to critical limit for melt fraction extraction (fc), ranging between 0.08 and 0.12 depending on WR characteristics including composition and, rheology and stress field. Once fc is exceeded, a portion of the anatectic liquid is assimilated into the Magma. The MCS simultaneously calculates mass and composition of the mineral assemblage (Magma cumulates and WR residue) and melt (anatectic and Magma) at each T along the equilibration trajectory. Sensible and latent heat lost or gained plus mass gained by the Magma are accounted for by the MCS via governing Energy Constrained- Recharge Assimilation Fractional Crystallization (EC-RAFC) equations. In a comparison of two representative MCS results, consider a granitic WR intruded by HAB melt (51 wt. % SiO2) at liquidus T in shallow crust (0.1 GPa) with a WR/M ratio of 1.25, fc of 0.1 and a QFM oxygen buffer. In the first example, the WR begins at a temperature of 100o

  20. Reflectivity of the gyroid biophotonic crystals in the ventral wing scales of the Green Hairstreak butterfly, Callophrys rubi

    OpenAIRE

    Michielsen, K.; De Raedt, H.; Stavenga, D. G.

    2009-01-01

    We present a comparison of the computer simulation data of gyroid nanostructures with optical measurements (reflectivity spectra and scattering diagrams) of ventral wing scales of the Green Hairstreak butterfly, Callophrys rubi. We demonstrate that the omnidirectional green colour arises from the gyroid cuticular structure grown in the domains of different orientation. We also show that this three-dimensional structure, operating as a biophotonic crystal, gives rise to various polarization ef...

  1. Crystal structure of tveitite-(Y): Fractionation of rare-earth elements between positions and the variety of defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakubovich, O. V.; Massa, W.; Pekov, I. V.; Gavrilenko, P. G.

    2007-01-01

    The crystal structure of the mineral tveitite-(Y) (Y 0.883 Na 0.106 ) (Ca 0.841 LREE 0.159 )(Ca 0.716 Na 0.204 HREE 0.080 )(Ca 0.092 Na 0.074 )F 6.952 from amazonite pegmatites of Rov-Gora Mountain (Keivy, Kola Peninsula) is determined using X-ray diffraction (Stoe IPDS diffractometer, λMoK α , graphite monochromator, 2θ max = 63.5 o , R = 0.051 for 1542 reflections). The main crystal data are as follows: a = 17.020(2) A, c = 9.679(2) A, V = 2428.2(4) A 3 , space group R3-bar, Z = 18, and ρ calcd = 4.00 g/cm 3 . The idealized structural formula of the mineral is represented as (Y,Na) 6 (Ca,LREE) 6 (Ca,Na,HREE) 6 (Ca,Na)F 42 (Z = 3). The defect structure of the mineral manifests itself in a mixed occupation of all four independent cation positions and in a randomly disordered distribution of fluorine atoms over the majority of anion positions. It is shown that the crystal structure of tveitite-(Y) fulfills the function of an 'Eratosthenes sieve' for yttrium cations and two groups of lanthanide cations, so that these cations are distributed over three different positions.

  2. Petrogenesis of Malaysian tin granites: geochemistry, fractional crystallization, U-Pb zircon geochronology and tectonic setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wai-Pan Ng, Samuel; Searle, Mike; Whitehouse, Martin; Chung, Sun-Lin; Ghani, Azman; Robb, Laurence; Sone, Masatoshi; Oliver, Grahame; Gardiner, Nick; Roselee, Mohammad

    2014-05-01

    The Malaysian tin granites forming the backbone of the Thai-Malay Peninsula has been long recognized with two distinct granitic provinces:- 1. Early Permian to Late Triassic Eastern Province with mainly "I-type" (Hbl)-Bt granites with associated Cu-Au deposits, with subordinate Bt granites hosting limited Sn-W deposits, and 2. Late Triassic Main Range Province with mainly "S-type" Bt granites with associated Sn-W deposits, and subordinate (Hbl)-Bt granites. New geochemical data show that Chappell and White's (1974) I-S granite classification adopted in the existing model does not adequately distinguish the granites from one another as previously implied. Trace element geochemistry and Sr-Nd isotopic compositions show that the Malaysian tin granites in both provinces have transitional I-S characteristics. In addition, they inherited within-plate signature from Cambro-Ordovician Gondwana-related source rocks. Previous ages were obtained by whole rock Rb-Sr and biotite K-Ar geochronology in the 70s and 80s, dating methods that may not accurately represent the crystallization age of granites. We re-sampled the entire Malaysian Peninsula and 40 samples were collected for high-precision U-Pb SIMS dating on extracted zircon grains in order to better constrain the magmatic and tectonic evolution of Southeast Asia. The crystallization ages of the Eastern Province granitoids have been constrained ranging from 220 to 290 Ma, while the Main Range (Western) Province granitoids have ages ranging from 200 to 230 Ma. A progressive westward younging trend is apparent across the Eastern Province, but becomes less obvious in the Main Range Province. Our model suggests two east dipping subduction zones. We suggest that subduction roll-back along the Bentong-Raub suture might account for the westward younging trend, in the Eastern province. A second Late Triassic east-dipping subduction zone beneath western Malaysia is proposed in order to explain the "I-type" components to the Main

  3. Reflections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne Embree

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Ideally, editorials are written one to two months before publication in the Journal. It was my turn to write this one. I had planned to write the first draft the evening after my clinic on Tuesday, September 11. It didn't get done that night or during the next week. Somehow, the topic that I had originally chosen just didn't seem that important anymore as I, along my friends and colleagues, reflected on the changes that the events of that day were likely to have on our lives.

  4. Revealing Layers of Pristine Oriented Crystals Embedded Within Deep Ice Clouds Using Differential Reflectivity and the Copolar Correlation Coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keat, W. J.; Westbrook, C. D.

    2017-11-01

    Pristine ice crystals typically have high aspect ratios (≫ 1), have a high density and tend to fall preferentially with their major axis aligned horizontally. Consequently, they can, in certain circumstances, be readily identified by measurements of differential reflectivity (ZDR), which is related to their average aspect ratio. However, because ZDR is reflectivity weighted, its interpretation becomes ambiguous in the presence of even a few, larger aggregates or irregular polycrystals. An example of this is in mixed-phase regions that are embedded within deeper ice cloud. Currently, our understanding of the microphysical processes within these regions is hindered by a lack of good observations. In this paper, a novel technique is presented that removes this ambiguity using measurements from the 3 GHz Chilbolton Advanced Meteorological Radar in Southern England. By combining measurements of ZDR and the copolar correlation coefficient (ρhv), we show that it is possible to retrieve both the relative contribution to the radar signal and "intrinsic" ZDR (ZDRIP) of the pristine oriented crystals, even in circumstances where their signal is being masked by the presence of aggregates. Results from two case studies indicate that enhancements in ZDR embedded within deep ice clouds are typically produced by pristine oriented crystals with ZDRIP values between 3 and 7 dB (equivalent to 5-9 dB at horizontal incidence) but with varying contributions to the radar reflectivity. Vertically pointing 35 GHz cloud radar Doppler spectra and in situ particle images from the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements BAe-146 aircraft support the conceptual model used and are consistent with the retrieval interpretation.

  5. Reflectivity of the gyroid biophotonic crystals in the ventral wing scales of the Green Hairstreak butterfly, Callophrys rubi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michielsen, K; De Raedt, H; Stavenga, D G

    2010-05-06

    We present a comparison of the computer simulation data of gyroid nanostructures with optical measurements (reflectivity spectra and scattering diagrams) of ventral wing scales of the Green Hairstreak butterfly, Callophrys rubi. We demonstrate that the omnidirectional green colour arises from the gyroid cuticular structure grown in the domains of different orientation. We also show that this three-dimensional structure, operating as a biophotonic crystal, gives rise to various polarization effects. We briefly discuss the possible biological utility of the green coloration and polarization effects.

  6. Thermally controllable reflective characteristics from rupture and self-assembly of hydrogen bonds in cholesteric liquid crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wang; Cao, Hui; Song, Li; Zhao, Haiyan; Li, Sijin; Yang, Zhou; Yang, Huai

    2009-10-22

    A cholesteric liquid crystal (Ch-LC) composite, made of a series of cholesteryl esters, a nematic LC, and a hydrogen bond (H-bond) chiral dopant (HCD), was prepared and filled into a planar treated cell. When the cell was heated, the selective reflection of the cell exhibited an unusual blue shift. One of the reasonable mechanisms was that the helical twisting power (HTP) value of cholesteryl esters increased with an increasing temperature. The other one was that the H-bonds of HCD were ruptured when the temperature was above 60.0 degrees C and HCD was split into two kinds of new chiral dopants, which made the HTP value of the chiral dopants change a lot, thus changing the pitch length of the composite greatly. On the basis of this mechanism, a novel thermally controllable reflective color paper could be achieved.

  7. Characterization of a synthetic single crystal diamond detector for dosimetry in spatially fractionated synchrotron x-ray fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livingstone, Jayde, E-mail: Jayde.Livingstone@synchrotron.org.au; Häusermann, Daniel [Imaging and Medical Beamline, Australian Synchrotron, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Stevenson, Andrew W. [Imaging and Medical Beamline, Australian Synchrotron, Clayton, Victoria 3168, Australia and CSIRO Manufacturing, Clayton South, Victoria 3169 (Australia); Butler, Duncan J. [Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency, Yallambie, Victoria 3085 (Australia); Adam, Jean-François [Equipe d’accueil Rayonnement Synchrotron et Recherche Médicale, Université Grenoble Alpes, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility - ID17, Grenoble 38043, France and Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Grenoble, Grenoble 38043 (France)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: Modern radiotherapy modalities often use small or nonstandard fields to ensure highly localized and precise dose delivery, challenging conventional clinical dosimetry protocols. The emergence of preclinical spatially fractionated synchrotron radiotherapies with high dose-rate, sub-millimetric parallel kilovoltage x-ray beams, has pushed clinical dosimetry to its limit. A commercially available synthetic single crystal diamond detector designed for small field dosimetry has been characterized to assess its potential as a dosimeter for synchrotron microbeam and minibeam radiotherapy. Methods: Experiments were carried out using a synthetic diamond detector on the imaging and medical beamline (IMBL) at the Australian Synchrotron. The energy dependence of the detector was characterized by cross-referencing with a calibrated ionization chamber in monoenergetic beams in the energy range 30–120 keV. The dose-rate dependence was measured in the range 1–700 Gy/s. Dosimetric quantities were measured in filtered white beams, with a weighted mean energy of 95 keV, in broadbeam and spatially fractionated geometries, and compared to reference dosimeters. Results: The detector exhibits an energy dependence; however, beam quality correction factors (k{sub Q}) have been measured for energies in the range 30–120 keV. The k{sub Q} factor for the weighted mean energy of the IMBL radiotherapy spectrum, 95 keV, is 1.05 ± 0.09. The detector response is independent of dose-rate in the range 1–700 Gy/s. The percentage depth dose curves measured by the diamond detector were compared to ionization chambers and agreed to within 2%. Profile measurements of microbeam and minibeam arrays were performed. The beams are well resolved and the full width at halfmaximum agrees with the nominal width of the beams. The peak to valley dose ratio (PVDR) calculated from the profiles at various depths in water agrees within experimental error with PVDR calculations from Gafchromic film data

  8. Prize for Industrial Applications of Physics: Reflective Cholesteric Liquid Crystals - Innovations in Materials, Display Technology, and Commercialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Asad

    Reflective Cholesteric Liquid Crystals have been the subject of much research, development, and commercialization - in display technology as well as other embodiments, such as sensors, privacy films, etc. The liquid Crystal Institute (LCI) at Kent State University (KSU) served as a hot bed of much of the research and development in this field in the early 1990's. From here, the reflective technology was licensed to Kent Displays (KDI) to further develop and commercialize. The 90's saw some development in flexible technologies, drive scheme, display design, as well as materials. The early part of the century took a turn with a strong effort in encapsulation based flexible display development. In 2006, KDI engineers and technologists started firming up ambitious plans for the world's first roll-to-roll manufacturing line for bistable cholesteric displays. In 2009, this became a reality! In early 2010, the first eWriter product was launched into the consumer market under the brand Boogie Board®. Within months, this became a success forcing the rapid development of the manufacturing process for the flexible displays. Today, the company has two manufacturing lines, 24 hour roll-to-roll production of flexible displays, millions of Boogie Board products in the global market place, and a growing OEM business in the Boogie Board technology. KDI continues to do basic research, development, and exploration in the bistable display field. It also has had to become an expert in the supply chain management of the unique raw materials needed for flexible display manufacturing, while still managing global operations with sales offices in several continents and a growing and diversified group of individuals. In this presentation, we will present the story, research, development, technology, and latest trends in bistable cholesteric liquid crystal materials with a particular emphasis on the eWriter technology and market.

  9. A far ultraviolet spectroscopic study of the reflectance, luminescence and electronic properties of SrMgF4 single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogorodnikov, I.N.; Pustovarov, V.A.; Omelkov, S.I.; Isaenko, L.I.; Yelisseyev, A.P.; Goloshumova, A.A.; Lobanov, S.I.

    2014-01-01

    The electronic properties of single crystals of SrMgF 4 have been determined using low-temperature (10–293 K) time-resolved vacuum ultraviolet synchrotron radiation spectroscopy, far ultraviolet (3.7–36 eV) reflectance spectra and calculations for the spectra of optical functions. The bandgap of investigated compound was found at E g =12.55eV, the energy threshold for creation of the unrelaxed excitons at E n=1 =11.37eV, and the low-energy fundamental absorption edge at 10.3 eV. Two groups of photoluminescence (PL) bands have been identified: the exciton-type emissions at 2.6–3.3 and 3.3–4.2 eV and defect-related emissions at 1.8–2.6 and 4.2–5.5 eV. It was shown that PL excitation (PLE) for the exciton-type emission bands occurs mainly at the low-energy tail of the fundamental absorption of the crystal with a maximum at 10.7 eV. At excitation energies above E g the energy transfer from the host lattice to the PL emission centers is inefficient. The paper discusses the origin of the excitonic-type PLE spectra taking into account the results of modeling the PLE spectra shape in the framework of a simple diffusion theory and surface energy losses. -- Highlights: • Far-ultraviolet reflection spectra of SrMgF 4 were studied. • Photoluminescence (PL) emission and PL excitation spectra were studied. • Optical function spectra were calculated on the basis of experimental data. • Electronic structure properties of undoped SrMgF 4 crystals were determined

  10. Omnidirectional reflection in one-dimensional ternary photonic crystals and photonic heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shiqi [MOE Key Laboratory of Laser Life Science and Institute of Laser Life Science, College of Biophotonics, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China); Yang, Xiangbo, E-mail: 20001038@m.scnu.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Laser Life Science and Institute of Laser Life Science, College of Biophotonics, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China); School of Physical Education and Sports Science, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Liu, Chengyi Timon [School of Physical Education and Sports Science, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2014-03-01

    Designing dielectric systems to create omnidirectional band gaps (OBGs) is an attractive topic in the field of photonic band gap (PBG) structures. In this Letter, we propose a new approach to create OBGs by ternary photonic heterostructures (TPHs) composed of three kinds of materials with different refractive indices and obtain the formulae of the structures of TPHs, i.e., those of the thicknesses of materials and the number of sub-ternary photonic crystals. It may provide a powerful technique for designing the structures being able to produce OBGs by use of usual materials, lowcost materials, and materials with low refractive indices, etc.

  11. Omnidirectional reflection in one-dimensional ternary photonic crystals and photonic heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Shiqi; Yang, Xiangbo; Liu, Chengyi Timon

    2014-01-01

    Designing dielectric systems to create omnidirectional band gaps (OBGs) is an attractive topic in the field of photonic band gap (PBG) structures. In this Letter, we propose a new approach to create OBGs by ternary photonic heterostructures (TPHs) composed of three kinds of materials with different refractive indices and obtain the formulae of the structures of TPHs, i.e., those of the thicknesses of materials and the number of sub-ternary photonic crystals. It may provide a powerful technique for designing the structures being able to produce OBGs by use of usual materials, lowcost materials, and materials with low refractive indices, etc.

  12. Effect of titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) on largely improving solar reflectance and cooling property of high density polyethylene (HDPE) by influencing its crystallization behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shichao; Zhang, Jun, E-mail: zhangjun@njtech.edu.cn

    2014-12-25

    Highlights: • HDPE/TiO{sub 2} composites have more perfect crystal structure. • Refractive index is the key factor affecting the final solar reflectance. • HDPE/TiO{sub 2} composites can achieve high solar reflectance. • The real cooling property is in accordance with solar reflectance. - Abstract: In this study, the different crystal forms of titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) were added into high density polyethylene (HDPE) to fabricate cool material. Crystal structure, crystallization behavior, crystal morphology were investigated by wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and polarized optical microscope (POM). Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was applied to observe dispersion of TiO{sub 2} particles in the HDPE matrix and the cross section morphology. The solar reflectance and actual cooling property were evaluated by UV–Vis–NIR spectrometer and a self-designed device. By adding TiO{sub 2} particles into HDPE matrix, the polymer chain could crystallize into more perfect and thermal stable lamella. The presence of TiO{sub 2} particles dramatically increased the number of nucleation site therefore decreased the crystal size. The subsequent solar reflectance was related to the degree of crystallinity, the spherulite size of HDPE, refractive index, and distribution of TiO{sub 2} particles in HDPE matrix. It was found the rutile TiO{sub 2} could largely improve the total solar reflectance from 28.2% to 51.1%. Finally, the temperature test showed that the composites had excellent cooling property, which was in accordance with solar reflectance result.

  13. Effect of titanium dioxide (TiO2) on largely improving solar reflectance and cooling property of high density polyethylene (HDPE) by influencing its crystallization behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Shichao; Zhang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • HDPE/TiO 2 composites have more perfect crystal structure. • Refractive index is the key factor affecting the final solar reflectance. • HDPE/TiO 2 composites can achieve high solar reflectance. • The real cooling property is in accordance with solar reflectance. - Abstract: In this study, the different crystal forms of titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) were added into high density polyethylene (HDPE) to fabricate cool material. Crystal structure, crystallization behavior, crystal morphology were investigated by wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and polarized optical microscope (POM). Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was applied to observe dispersion of TiO 2 particles in the HDPE matrix and the cross section morphology. The solar reflectance and actual cooling property were evaluated by UV–Vis–NIR spectrometer and a self-designed device. By adding TiO 2 particles into HDPE matrix, the polymer chain could crystallize into more perfect and thermal stable lamella. The presence of TiO 2 particles dramatically increased the number of nucleation site therefore decreased the crystal size. The subsequent solar reflectance was related to the degree of crystallinity, the spherulite size of HDPE, refractive index, and distribution of TiO 2 particles in HDPE matrix. It was found the rutile TiO 2 could largely improve the total solar reflectance from 28.2% to 51.1%. Finally, the temperature test showed that the composites had excellent cooling property, which was in accordance with solar reflectance result

  14. UV durable colour pigment doped SmA liquid crystal composites for outdoor trans-reflective bi-stable displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, H.; Davey, A. B.; Crossland, W. A.; Chu, D. P.

    2012-10-01

    High brightness trans-reflective bi-stable displays based on smectic A (SmA) liquid crystals (LCs) can have nearly perfect transparency in the clear state and very high reflection in the scattered state. Because the LC material in use is stable under UV radiation, this kind of displays can stand for strong day-light and therefore be ideal for outdoor applications from e-books to public signage and advertisement. However, the colour application has been limited because the traditional colourants in use are conventional dyes which are lack of UV stability and that their colours are easily photo bleached. Here we present a colour SmA display demonstrator using pigments as colourant. Mixing pigments with SmA LCs and maintain the desirable optical switching performance is not straightforward. We show here how it can be done, including how to obtain fine sized pigment nano-particles, the effects of particle size and size distribution on the display performance. Our optimized pigments/SmA compositions can be driven by a low frequency waveform (~101Hz) to a scattered state to exhibit colour while by a high frequency waveform (~103Hz) to a cleared state showing no colour. Finally, we will present its excellent UV life-time (at least <7.2 years) in comparison with that of dye composition (~2.4 years). The complex interaction of pigment nano-particles with LC molecules and the resulting effects on the LC electro-optical performances are still to be fully understood. We hope this work will not only demonstrate a new and practical approach for outdoor reflective colour displays but also provide a new material system for fundamental liquid crystal colloid research work.

  15. Light reflection from crystal platelets in iridophores determines green or brown skin coloration in Takydromus lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriyama, Takeo; Esashi, Jyunko; Hasegawa, Masami

    2017-04-01

    Brown and green are the most commonly imitated colors in prey animals because both colors occur in a range of habitats. Many researchers have evaluated survival with respect to background color matching, but the pigment cell mechanisms underlying such coloration are not known. Dorsal coloration of East Asian Takydromus lizards has shifted from green to brown or from brown to green on multiple occasions during the diversification of the genus, thus giving us an opportunity to examine the cellular mechanisms of background color matching. Brown and green skin were found to differ with respect to the morphological characteristics of iridophores, with different thicknesses of the reflecting platelets and the cytoplasmic spacing between platelets, despite a shared vertical arrangement of pigment cells, i.e., xanthophores in the upper layer, iridophores in the middle layer, and melanophores at the bottom of the dermal layer, among the different Takydromus lizards. Iridophores of brown skin reflected longer wavelengths of light than those of green skin, which may be attributed to the thicker platelets and longer distances between platelets in brown skin. We discuss the potential role of genetic and intracellular mechanisms explaining the thickness and orientation of the light-reflecting platelets of iridophores in Takydromus lizards. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Gravity driven and in situ fractional crystallization processes in the Centre Hill complex, Abitibi Subprovince, Canada: Evidence from bilaterally-paired cyclic units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thériault, R. D.; Fowler, A. D.

    1996-12-01

    The formation of layers in mafic intrusions has been explained by various processes, making it the subject of much controversy. The concept that layering originates from gravitational settling of crystals has been superseded in recent years by models involving in situ fractional crystallization. Here we present evidence from the Centre Hill complex that both processes may be operative simultaneously within the same intrusion. The Centre Hill complex is part of the Munro Lake sill, an Archean layered mafic intrusion emplaced in volcanic rocks of the Abitibi Subprovince. The Centre Hill complex comprises the following lithostratigraphic units: six lower cyclic units of peridotite and clinopyroxenite; a middle unit of leucogabbro; six upper cyclic units of branching-textured gabbro (BTG) and clotted-textured gabbro (CTG), the uppermost of these units being overlain by a marginal zone of fine-grained gabbro. The cyclic units of peridotite/clinopyroxenite and BTG/CTG are interpreted to have formed concurrently through fractional crystallization, associated with periodic replenishment of magma to the chamber. The units of peridotite and clinopyroxenite formed by gravitational accumulation of crystals that grew under the roof. The cyclic units of BTG and CTG formed along the upper margin of the sill by two different mechanisms: (1) layers of BTG crystallized in situ along an inward-growing roof and (2) layers of CTG formed by accumulation of buoyant plagioclase crystals. The layers of BTG are characterized by branching pseudomorphs after fayalite up to 50 cm in length that extend away from the upper margin. The original branching crystals are interpreted to have grown from stagnant intercumulus melt in a high thermal gradient resulting from the injection of new magma to the chamber.

  17. crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yi; Huang, Yisheng; Zhang, Lizhen; Lin, Zhoubin; Sun, Shijia; Wang, Guofu

    2014-07-01

    A Nd3+:Na2La4(WO4)7 crystal with dimensions of ϕ 17 × 30 mm3 was grown by the Czochralski method. The thermal expansion coefficients of Nd3+:Na2La4(WO4)7 crystal are 1.32 × 10-5 K-1 along c-axis and 1.23 × 10-5 K-1 along a-axis, respectively. The spectroscopic characteristics of Nd3+:Na2La4(WO4)7 crystal were investigated. The Judd-Ofelt theory was applied to calculate the spectral parameters. The absorption cross sections at 805 nm are 2.17 × 10-20 cm2 with a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 15 nm for π-polarization, and 2.29 × 10-20 cm2 with a FWHM of 14 nm for σ-polarization. The emission cross sections are 3.19 × 10-20 cm2 for σ-polarization and 2.67 × 10-20 cm2 for π-polarization at 1,064 nm. The fluorescence quantum efficiency is 67 %. The quasi-cw laser of Nd3+:Na2La4(WO4)7 crystal was performed. The maximum output power is 80 mW. The slope efficiency is 7.12 %. The results suggest Nd3+:Na2La4(WO4)7 crystal as a promising laser crystal fit for laser diode pumping.

  18. The conditions for total reflection of low-energy atoms from crystal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, M.; Robinson, M.T.

    1978-01-01

    The critical angles for the total reflection of low-energy particles from Cu rows and (001) planes have been investigated, using the binary collision approximation computer simulation code MARLOWE Breakthrough angles were evaluated for H, N, Ne, Ar, Cu, Xe, and Au in the energy range from 0.1 to 7.5 keV. In both the axial and the planar cases, recoiling of the target atoms lowers the energy barrier which the target surface presents to the heavy projectiles. Consequently, the breakthrough angles are reduced for heavy projectiles below the values expected either from observations on light projectiles or from analytical channeling theory. (orig.) [de

  19. One-dimensional photonic crystals with highly Bi-substituted iron garnet defect in reflection polar geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhailova, T V; Berzhansky, V N; Karavainikov, A V; Shaposhnikov, A N; Prokopov, A R; Lyashko, S D

    2016-01-01

    It is represented the results of modelling of magnetooptical properties in reflection polar geometry of one-dimensional photonic crystal, in which highly Bi-substituted iron garnet defect of composition Bi 1.0 Y 0.5 Gd 1.5 Fe 4.2 A l0.8 O 12 / Bi 2.8 Y 0.2 Fe 5 Oi 2 is located between the dielectric Bragg mirrors (SiO 2 / TiO 2 ) m (were m is number of layer pairs) and buffer SiO 2 and gold top layers of different thicknesses is placed on structure. The modification of spectral line- shapes of microcavity and Tamm plasmon-polariton modes depending on m is found. (paper)

  20. Simulation of ion reflection from a single crystal at grazing angles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpuzov, D.S.; Armour, D.G.; Evdoimov, I.N.

    1979-01-01

    Features of ion scattering for small angles of incidence, up to about 10 0 from the surface, have been examined for 6 keV Ar + ions in a plane of incidence parallel to the direction in the nickel (110) surface. Ions scattered between the surface layer atoms, either above the surface, or slightly below the surface in the semi-channel make a significant contribution to the reflected beam. The angular dependence of experimentally measured energy spectra can be explained when these scattering events are taken into account. In this region of small elastic energy loss and long path lengths close to the surface, inelastic energy losses assume an important role in determining the energy distribution of the scattered particles. (author)

  1. Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy of Hidden Objects, Part I: Interpretation of the Reflection-Absorption-Scattering Fractions in Near-Infrared (NIR) Spectra of Polyethylene Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomerantsev, Alexey L; Rodionova, Oxana Ye; Skvortsov, Alexej N

    2017-08-01

    Investigation of a sample covered by an interfering layer is required in many fields, e.g., for process control, biochemical analysis, and many other applications. This study is based on the analysis of spectra collected by near-infrared (NIR) diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. Each spectrum is a composition of a useful, target spectrum and a spectrum of an interfering layer. To recover the target spectrum, we suggest using a new phenomenological approach, which employs the multivariate curve resolution (MCR) method. In general terms, the problem is very complex. We start with a specific problem of analyzing a system, which consists of several layers of polyethylene (PE) film and underlayer samples with known spectral properties. To separate information originating from PE layers and the target, we modify the system versus both the number of the PE layers as well as the reflectance properties of the target sample. We consider that the interfering spectrum of the layer can be modeled using three components, which can be tentatively called transmission, absorption, and scattering contributions. The novelty of our approach is that we do not remove the reflectance and scattering effects from the spectra, but study them in detail aiming to use this information to recover the target spectrum.

  2. Study of wide band-gap crystal LiCaAlF6 by IR-reflection spectroscopy and ab initio calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikova, N.N.; Klimin, S.A.; Mavrin, B.N.

    2017-01-01

    Polarized IR-reflection spectra and results of ab initio calculations of vibrational and electronic properties of LiCaAlF6 single crystal are presented. It is shown that the crystal band gap is direct. Experimental and theoretical parameters are obtained for dipole-active and all phonons, respectively, including silent modes. Experimental IR-reflection and Raman spectra are well described in the frame of results obtained by ab initio calculations. The peculiarities are discussed concerning the structure of electronic bands, the interatomic interactions, the character of lattice vibrations, and the phonon dispersion.

  3. Manifestation of Crystal Lattice Distortions in the IR Reflection Spectra of Abrasion-Treated ZnSe Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitnikova, V. E.; Dunaev, A. A.; Mamalimov, R. I.; Pakhomov, P. M.; Khizhnyak, S. D.; Chmel, A. E.

    2017-07-01

    The Fourier IR reflection spectra of ZnSe ceramics prepared by hot pressing (HP), physical vapor deposition (PVD), and PVD combined with hot isostatic pressing (HIP) are presented. The optical constants of polished and dry-ground specimens were used for comparison. The grinding treatment simulated the erosion of the outer surface of optical elements made of zinc selenide under the influence of solid dust particles and deposits. In the polished specimens residual stresses showed up in the IR reflection spectra of the ZnSePVD and ZnSeHIP ceramics, which had well-defined orientation of grains, but were not present in the spectra of the ZnSeHIP ceramics as a result of mutual compensation of the stresses in the randomly oriented grains of the material. The stresses, which appeared as a shift of the absorption bands calculated by the Kramers-Kronig method, increased significantly after abrasive treatment of the specimens. For all the treated ceramics the intensity of the absorption bands resulting from the anharmonicity of the vibrations in the distorted crystal lattice increased by several times. The last effect also depends on the production prehistory of the ceramics.

  4. An 'attachment kinetics-based' volume of fraction method for organic crystallization: a fluid-dynamic approach to macromolecular-crystal engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lappa, Marcello

    2003-01-01

    This analysis exhibits a strong interdisciplinary nature and deals with advances in protein (crystal) engineering models and computational methods as well as with novel results on the relative importance of 'controlling forces' in macromolecular crystal growth. The attention is focused in particular on microgravity fluid-dynamic aspects. From a numerical point of view, the growing crystal gives rise to a moving boundary problem. A 'kinetic-coefficient-based' volume tracking method is specifically and carefully developed according to the complex properties and mechanisms of macromolecular protein crystal growth taking into account the possibility of anisotropic (faceted) surface-orientation-dependent growth. The method is used to shed some light on the interplay of surface attachment kinetics and mass transport (diffusive or convective) in liquid phase and on several mechanisms still poorly understood. It is shown that the size of a growing crystal plays a 'critical role' in the relative importance of surface effects and in determining the intensity of convection. Convective effects, in turn, are found to impact growth rates, macroscopic structures of precipitates, particle size and morphology as well as the mechanisms driving growth. The paper introduces a novel computational method (that simulates the growth due to the slow addition of solute molecules to a lattice and can handle the shape of organic growing crystals under the influence of natural convection) and, at the same time, represents a quite exhaustive attempt to help organic crystal growers to discern the complex interrelations among the various parameters under one's control (that are not independent of one another) and to elaborate rational guidelines relating to physical factors that can influence the probability of success in crystallizing protein substances

  5. New results in the relation between intensity distribution of reflected molecular beams and spatial distribution of elementary crystal cells in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikuradse, A.; Weidner, J.

    1974-01-01

    Analytic expressions for the intensity distribution of a molecular beam reflected by a solid surface which consists of face centered cubic elementary cells have been studied. One has also tried to study the influence of the spatial distribution of the elementary crystal cells on the intensity of reflection. Some curves which had been evaluated and designed by a computer are now published. The Kratzer potential of interaction has alway been supposed [fr

  6. Influence of filling fraction on the defect mode and gap closing of a one-dimensional photonic crystal: An analytical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansari, N.; Tehranchi, M.M.

    2010-01-01

    Study of the optical properties of the one-dimensional defective photonic crystals using the gap map is improving through the emergence of new analytical methods, which are easy and without any physical restrictions. Gap map is able to monitor the changes in the defect mode frequencies and photonic band gap regions as a function of filling fractions, and all visible spectra in a single graphic presentation. In this paper, by utilizing a novel technique based on Green's function method for analyzing the defect modes, the gap map and gap closing point of a one-dimensional defective photonic crystal have been demonstrated. This method enables study of the defect modes inside the omnidirectional band gap, which is an important object in the designing of the optical filters. Moreover, as a designing criterion, obtaining the gap closing points inside the gap map enables finding of some filling fraction intervals that each one contains several distinct omnidirectional band gaps simultaneously, using a single photonic crystal. This method has been employed for the design of an optical filter at 1.3 and 1.55 μm, which is applicable for telecommunication.

  7. Slow neutron total cross-section, transmission and reflection calculation for poly- and mono-NaCl and PbF{sub 2} crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansy, Muhammad S., E-mail: mmansy88@asrt.sci.eg [Reactor Physics Department, Nuclear Research Centre, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt); Radioactive Waste Management Unit, Hot Labs Centre, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt); Adib, M.; Habib, N. [Reactor Physics Department, Nuclear Research Centre, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt); Bashter, I.I. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Zagazig University (Egypt); Morcos, H.N.; El-Mesiry, M.S. [Reactor Physics Department, Nuclear Research Centre, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    2016-10-01

    Highlights: • Slow neutron cross-section calculation for poly- and mono-crystalline materials. • Monochromatic features of PbF{sub 2} and NaCl mono-crystals. • Characterization of poly- and mono-crystal filters used in neutron diffraction. • Computer code developed calculates neutron cross-section, transmission & reflection. - Abstract: A detailed study about the calculation of total neutron cross-section, transmission and reflection from crystalline materials was performed. The developed computer code is approved to be sufficient for the required calculations, also an excellent agreement has been shown when comparing the code results with the other calculated and measured values. The optimal monochromator and filter parameters were discussed in terms of crystal orientation, mosaic spread, and thickness. Calculations show that 30 cm thick of PbF{sub 2} poly-crystal is an excellent cold neutron filter producing neutron wavelengths longer than 0.66 nm needed for the investigation of magnetic structure experiments. While mono-crystal filter PbF{sub 2} cut along its (1 1 1), having mosaic spread (η = 0.5°) and thickness 10 cm can only transmit thermal neutrons of the desired wavelengths and suppress epithermal and γ-rays forming unwanted background, when it is cooled to liquid nitrogen temperature. NaCl (2 0 0) and PbF{sub 2} (1 1 1) monochromator crystals having mosaic spread (η = 0.5°) and thickness 10 mm shows high neutron reflectivity for neutron wavelengths (λ = 0.114 nm and λ = 0.43 nm) when they used as a thermal and cold neutron monochromators respectively with very low contamination from higher order reflections.

  8. Transport properties of PrxOs4Sb12 single crystals with high Pr-site filling fraction grown under high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Kenya; Namiki, Takahiro; Saito, Takashi; Tatsuoka, Sho; Imamura, Atsushi; Kuwahara, Keitaro; Aoki, Yuji; Sato, Hideyuki

    2009-01-01

    We have succeeded in growing Pr x Os 4 Sb 12 single crystals under ∼4GPa with high Pr-site filling fraction x. The electrical resistance measurements clearly show that the superconducting (SC) transition is sharper and the onset temperatures is lower in the single crystal samples grown under high pressure compared to that of the sample grown under ambient pressure. These results suggest that the double SC transition ascribed to sample inhomogeneity is suppressed in the sample grown under high pressure. The change of 4f-electron crystalline electric field energy splitting between the Γ 1 ground state and the Γ 4 (2) first excited state in the sample made under high pressure is proposed as one of the possible origins of the suppression of the double SC transition.

  9. Speciation of copper and zinc in size-fractionated atmospheric particulate matter using total reflection mode X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osan, Janos; Meirer, Florian; Groma, Veronika; Toeroek, Szabina; Ingerle, Dieter; Streli, Christina; Pepponi, Giancarlo

    2010-01-01

    The health effects of aerosol depend on the size distribution and the chemical composition of the particles. Heavy metals of anthropogenic origin are bound to the fine aerosol fraction (PM 2.5 ). The composition and speciation of aerosol particles can be variable in time, due to the time-dependence of anthropogenic sources as well as meteorological conditions. Synchrotron-radiation total reflection X-ray fluorescence (SR-TXRF) provides very high sensitivity for characterization of atmospheric particulate matter. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectrometry in conjunction with TXRF detection can deliver speciation information on heavy metals in aerosol particles collected directly on the reflector surface. The suitability of TXRF-XANES for copper and zinc speciation in size-fractionated atmospheric particulate matter from a short sampling period is presented. For high size resolution analysis, atmospheric aerosol particles were collected at different urban and rural locations using a 7-stage May cascade impactor having adapted for sampling on Si wafers. The thin stripe geometry formed by the particulate matter deposited on the May-impactor plates is ideally suited to SR-TXRF. Capabilities of the combination of the May-impactor sampling and TXRF-XANES measurements at HASYLAB Beamline L to Cu and Zn speciation in size-fractionated atmospheric particulate matter are demonstrated. Information on Cu and Zn speciation could be performed for elemental concentrations as low as 140 pg/m 3 . The Cu and Zn speciation in the different size fraction was found to be very distinctive for samples of different origin. Zn and Cu chemical state typical for soils was detected only in the largest particles studied (2-4 μm fraction). The fine particles, however, contained the metals of interest in the sulfate and nitrate forms.

  10. Ore-forming adakitic porphyry produced by fractional crystallization of oxidized basaltic magmas in a subcrustal chamber (Jiamate, East Junggar, NW China)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Tao; Xu, Xing-Wang; Gao, Jun; Peters, Stephen; Zhang, Di; Jielili, Reyaniguli; Xiang, Peng; Li, Hao; Wu, Chu; You, Jun; Liu, Jie; Ke, Qiang

    2018-01-01

    Adakitic intrusions are supposed to have a close genetic and spatial relationship to porphyry Cu deposits. However, the genesis of adakitic intrusions is still under dispute. Here, we describe newly discovered intrusive complex rocks, which are composed of ore-bearing, layered magnetite-bearing gabbroic and adakitic rocks in Jiamate, East Junggar, NW China. These Jiamate Complex intrusions have diagnostic petrologic, geochronologic and geochemical signatures that indicate they were all generated from the same oxidized precursor magma source. Additionally, these layered rocks underwent the same fractional crystallization process as the ore-bearing adakitic rocks in the adjacent Kalaxiangar Porphyry Cu Belt (KPCB) in an oceanic island arc (OIA) setting. The rocks studied for this paper include layered magnetite-bearing gabbroic intrusive rocks that contain: (1) gradual contact changes between lithological units of mafic and intermediate rocks, (2) geochemical signatures that are the same as those found in oceanic island arc (OIA) rocks, (3) typical adakitic geochemistry, and (4) similar characteristics and apparent fractional crystallization relationships of ultra-basic to basic rocks to those in the nearby Beitashan Formation and to ore-bearing adakitic rocks in the KPCB. They also display similar zircon U-Pb and zircon Hf model ages.The Jiamate Complex intrusions contain intergrowths of magnetite and layered gabbro, and the intermediate-acidic intrusions of the Complex display typical adakitic affinities. Moreover, in conjunction with previously published geochronological and geochemistry data of the mafic rocks in the Beitashan Formation and in the KPCB area, additional data generated for the Jiamate Complex intrusions rocks indicate that they were formed from fractional crystallization processes. The Jiamate Complex intrusions most likely were derived from a metasomatized mantle wedge that was underplated at the root of the Saur oceanic island arc (Saur OIA). The

  11. Ore-forming adakitic porphyry produced by fractional crystallization of oxidized basaltic magmas in a subcrustal chamber (Jiamate, East Junggar, NW China)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Tao; Xu, Xing-Wang; Gao, Jun; Peters, Stephen G.; Zhang, Di; Jielili, Reyaniguli; Xiang, Peng; Li, Hao; Wu, Chu; You, Jun; Liu, Jie; Ke, Qiang

    2018-01-01

    Adakitic intrusions are supposed to have a close genetic and spatial relationship to porphyry Cu deposits. However, the genesis of adakitic intrusions is still under dispute. Here, we describe newly discovered intrusive complex rocks, which are composed of ore-bearing, layered magnetite-bearing gabbroic and adakitic rocks in Jiamate, East Junggar, NW China. These Jiamate Complex intrusions have diagnostic petrologic, geochronologic and geochemical signatures that indicate they were all generated from the same oxidized precursor magma source. Additionally, these layered rocks underwent the same fractional crystallization process as the ore-bearing adakitic rocks in the adjacent Kalaxiangar Porphyry Cu Belt (KPCB) in an oceanic island arc (OIA) setting. The rocks studied for this paper include layered magnetite-bearing gabbroic intrusive rocks that contain: (1) gradual contact changes between lithological units of mafic and intermediate rocks, (2) geochemical signatures that are the same as those found in oceanic island arc (OIA) rocks, (3) typical adakitic geochemistry, and (4) similar characteristics and apparent fractional crystallization relationships of ultra-basic to basic rocks to those in the nearby Beitashan Formation and to ore-bearing adakitic rocks in the KPCB. They also display similar zircon U-Pb and zircon Hf model ages. The Jiamate Complex intrusions contain intergrowths of magnetite and layered gabbro, and the intermediate-acidic intrusions of the Complex display typical adakitic affinities. Moreover, in conjunction with previously published geochronological and geochemistry data of the mafic rocks in the Beitashan Formation and in the KPCB area, additional data generated for the Jiamate Complex intrusions rocks indicate that they were formed from fractional crystallization processes. The Jiamate Complex intrusions most likely were derived from a metasomatized mantle wedge that was underplated at the root of the Saur oceanic island arc (Saur OIA

  12. Evaluation of radar reflectivity factor simulations of ice crystal populations from in situ observations for the retrieval of condensed water content in tropical mesoscale convective systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Fontaine

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the evaluation of a technique to estimate cloud condensed water content (CWC in tropical convection from airborne cloud radar reflectivity factors at 94 GHz and in situ measurements of particle size distributions (PSDs and aspect ratios of ice crystal populations. The approach is to calculate from each 5 s mean PSD and flight-level reflectivity the variability of all possible solutions of m(D relationships fulfilling the condition that the simulated radar reflectivity factor (T-matrix method matches the measured radar reflectivity factor. For the reflectivity simulations, ice crystals were approximated as oblate spheroids, without using a priori assumptions on the mass–size relationship of ice crystals. The CWC calculations demonstrate that individual CWC values are in the range ±32 % of the retrieved average CWC value over all CWC solutions for the chosen 5 s time intervals. In addition, during the airborne field campaign performed out of Darwin in 2014, as part of the international High Altitude Ice Crystals/High Ice Water Content (HAIC/HIWC projects, CWCs were measured independently with the new IKP-2 (isokinetic evaporator probe instrument along with simultaneous particle imagery and radar reflectivity. Retrieved CWCs from the T-matrix radar reflectivity simulations are on average 16 % higher than the direct CWCIKP measurements. The differences between the CWCIKP and averaged retrieved CWCs are found to be primarily a function of the total number concentration of ice crystals. Consequently, a correction term is applied (as a function of total number concentration that significantly improves the retrieved CWC. After correction, the retrieved CWCs have a median relative error with respect to measured values of only −1 %. Uncertainties in the measurements of total concentration of hydrometeors are investigated in order to calculate their contribution to the relative error of calculated CWC with respect to

  13. New structural studies of liquid crystal by reflectivity and resonant X-ray diffraction; Nouvelles etudes structurales de cristaux liquides par reflectivite et diffraction resonante des rayons X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, P

    2007-04-15

    This memory presents three structural studies of smectic Liquid Crystals by reflectivity and resonant diffraction of X-rays. It is divided in five chapters. In the first a short introduction to Liquid Crystals is given. In particular, the smectic phases that are the object of this study are presented. The second chapter is consecrated to the X-ray experimental techniques that were used in this work. The three last chapters present the works on which this thesis can be divided. Chapter three demonstrates on free-standing films of MHPOBC (historic liquid crystal that possesses the antiferroelectric sub-phases) the possibility to extend the technique of resonant X-ray diffraction to liquid crystals without resonant element. In the fourth chapter the structure of the B{sub 2} liquid crystal phase of bent-core molecules (or banana molecules) is elucidated by using resonant X-ray diffraction combined with polarization analysis of the diffracted beam. A model of the polarization of the resonant beam diffracted by four different structures proposed for the B{sub 2} phase is developed in this chapter. In the fifth chapter a smectic binary mixture presenting a very original critical point of phase separation is studied by X-ray reflectivity and optical microscopy. A concentration gradient in the direction perpendicular to the plane of the film seems to be induced by the free-standing film geometry. The results of a simplified model of the system are compatible with this interpretation.

  14. Slow neutron total cross-section, transmission and reflection calculation for poly- and mono-NaCl and PbF2 crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansy, Muhammad S.; Adib, M.; Habib, N.; Bashter, I. I.; Morcos, H. N.; El-Mesiry, M. S.

    2016-10-01

    A detailed study about the calculation of total neutron cross-section, transmission and reflection from crystalline materials was performed. The developed computer code is approved to be sufficient for the required calculations, also an excellent agreement has been shown when comparing the code results with the other calculated and measured values. The optimal monochromator and filter parameters were discussed in terms of crystal orientation, mosaic spread, and thickness. Calculations show that 30 cm thick of PbF2 poly-crystal is an excellent cold neutron filter producing neutron wavelengths longer than 0.66 nm needed for the investigation of magnetic structure experiments. While mono-crystal filter PbF2 cut along its (1 1 1), having mosaic spread (η = 0.5°) and thickness 10 cm can only transmit thermal neutrons of the desired wavelengths and suppress epithermal and γ-rays forming unwanted background, when it is cooled to liquid nitrogen temperature. NaCl (2 0 0) and PbF2 (1 1 1) monochromator crystals having mosaic spread (η = 0.5°) and thickness 10 mm shows high neutron reflectivity for neutron wavelengths (λ = 0.114 nm and λ = 0.43 nm) when they used as a thermal and cold neutron monochromators respectively with very low contamination from higher order reflections.

  15. The roles of fractional crystallization, magma mixing, crystal mush remobilization and volatile-melt interactions in the genesis of a young basalt-peralkaline rhyolite suite, the greater Olkaria volcanic complex, Kenya Rift valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, R.; Belkin, H.E.; Fitton, J.G.; Rogers, N.W.; Nejbert, K.; Tindle, A.G.; Marshall, A.S.

    2008-01-01

    The Greater Olkaria Volcanic Complex is a young (???20 ka) multi-centred lava and dome field dominated by the eruption of peralkaline rhyolites. Basaltic and trachytic magmas have been erupted peripherally to the complex and also form, with mugearites and benmoreites, an extensive suite of magmatic inclusions in the rhyolites. The eruptive rocks commonly represent mixed magmas and the magmatic inclusions are themselves two-, three- or four-component mixes. All rock types may carry xenocrysts of alkali feldspar, and less commonly plagioclase, derived from magma mixing and by remobilization of crystal mushes and/or plutonic rocks. Xenoliths in the range gabbro-syenite are common in the lavas and magmatic inclusions, the more salic varieties sometimes containing silicic glass representing partial melts and ranging in composition from anorthite ?? corundum- to acmite-normative. The peralkaline varieties are broadly similar, in major element terms, to the eruptive peralkaline rhyolites. The basalt-trachyte suite formed by a combination of fractional crystallization, magma mixing and resorption of earlier-formed crystals. Matrix glass in metaluminous trachytes has a peralkaline rhyolitic composition, indicating that the eruptive rhyolites may have formed by fractional crystallization of trachyte. Anomalous trace element enrichments (e.g. ??? 2000 ppm Y in a benmoreite) and negative Ce anomalies may have resulted from various Na- and K-enriched fluids evolving from melts of intermediate composition and either being lost from the system or enriched in other parts of the reservoirs. A small group of nepheline-normative, usually peralkaline, magmatic inclusions was formed by fluid transfer between peralkaline rhyolitic and benmoreitic magmas. The plumbing system of the complex consists of several independent reservoirs and conduits, repeatedly recharged by batches of mafic magma, with ubiquitous magma mixing. ?? The Author 2008. Published by Oxford University Press. All

  16. Attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared imaging of large areas using inverted prism crystals and combining imaging and mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, K L Andrew; Kazarian, Sergei G

    2008-10-01

    Attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FT-IR) imaging is a very useful tool for capturing chemical images of various materials due to the simple sample preparation and the ability to measure wet samples or samples in an aqueous environment. However, the size of the array detector used for image acquisition is often limited and there is usually a trade off between spatial resolution and the field of view (FOV). The combination of mapping and imaging can be used to acquire images with a larger FOV without sacrificing spatial resolution. Previous attempts have demonstrated this using an infrared microscope and a Germanium hemispherical ATR crystal to achieve images of up to 2.5 mm x 2.5 mm but with varying spatial resolution and depth of penetration across the imaged area. In this paper, we demonstrate a combination of mapping and imaging with a different approach using an external optics housing for large ATR accessories and inverted ATR prisms to achieve ATR-FT-IR images with a large FOV and reasonable spatial resolution. The results have shown that a FOV of 10 mm x 14 mm can be obtained with a spatial resolution of approximately 40-60 microm when using an accessory that gives no magnification. A FOV of 1.3 mm x 1.3 mm can be obtained with spatial resolution of approximately 15-20 microm when using a diamond ATR imaging accessory with 4x magnification. No significant change in image quality such as spatial resolution or depth of penetration has been observed across the whole FOV with this method and the measurement time was approximately 15 minutes for an image consisting of 16 image tiles.

  17. Amphibole Fractional Crystallization and Delamination in Arc Roots: Implications for the `Missing' Nb Reservoir in the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galster, F.; Chatterjee, R. N.; Stockli, D. F.

    2017-12-01

    Most geologic processes should not fractionate Nb from Ta but Earth's major silicate reservoirs have subchondritic Nb/Ta values. Nb/Ta of >10000 basalts and basaltic andesites from different tectonic settings (GEOROC) cluster around 16, indistinguishable from upper mantle values. In contrast, Nb/Ta in more evolved arc volcanics have progressively lower values, reaching continental crust estimates, and correlate negatively with SiO2 (see figure) and positively with TiO2 and MgO. This global trend suggests that differentiation processes in magmatic arcs could explain bulk crustal Nb/Ta estimates. Understanding processes that govern fractionation of Nb from Ta in arcs can provide key insights on continental crust formation and help identify Earth's `missing' Nb reservoir. Ti-rich phases (rutile, titanite and ilmenite) have DNb/DTa values in the evolved liquid. Lack of correlation between Nb/Ta and K2O in global volcanic rocks implies that biotite plays a minor role in fractionating Nb from Ta during differentiation. Experimental petrology and evidence from exposed arc sections indicate that amphibole fractionation and delamination of island arc roots can explain the andesitic composition of bulk continental crust. Experimental studies have shown that amphibole Mg# correlate with DNb/DTa and amphibole could effectively fractionate Nb from Ta. Preliminary data from lower to middle crustal amphiboles from preserved arcs show sub- to super-chondritic Nb/Ta up to >60. This suggests that delamination of amphibole-rich cumulates can be a viable mechanism for the preferential removal of Nb from the continental crust. Future examination of Nb/Ta ratios in lower crustal amphiboles from various preserved arcs will provide improved constraints on the Nb-Ta paradox of the silicate Earth.

  18. A study of Channeling, Volume Reflection and Volume Capture of 3.35 - 14.0 GeV Electrons in a bent Silicon Crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wistisen, T. N. [Aarhus Univ. (Denmark); Uggerhoj, U. I. [Aarhus Univ. (Denmark); Wienands, U. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Markiewicz, T. W. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Noble, R. J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Benson, B. L. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Smith, T. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Bagli, E. [Univ. of Ferrara (Italy); Bandiera, L. [Univ. of Ferrara (Italy); Germogli, G. [Univ. of Ferrara (Italy); Guidi, V. [Univ. of Ferrara (Italy); Mazzolari, A. [Univ. of Ferrara (Italy); Holtzapple, R. [California Polytechnic State Univ. (CalPoly), San Luis Obispo, CA (United States); Tucker, S. [California Polytechnic State Univ. (CalPoly), San Luis Obispo, CA (United States)

    2015-12-03

    We present the experimental data and analysis of experiments conducted at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory investigating the processes of channeling, volume-reflection and volume-capture along the (111) plane in a strongly bent quasi-mosaic silicon crystal. Additionally, these phenomena were investigated at 5 energies: 3.35, 4.2, 6.3, 10.5 and 14.0 GeV with a crystal with bending radius of 0.15m, corresponding to curvatures of 0.070, 0.088, 0.13, 0.22 and 0.29 times the critical curvature respectively. We have extracted important parameters describing the channeling process such as the dechanneling length, the angle of volume reflection, the surface transmission and the widths of the distribution of channeled particles parallel and orthogonal to the plane.

  19. Study of mixed phase clouds over west Africa: Ice-crystal corner reflection effects observed with a two-wavelength polarization lidar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veselovskii Igor

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Lidar sounding is used for the analysis of possible contribution of the corner reflection (CR effect to the total backscattering in case of ice crystals. Our study is based on observations of mixed phase clouds performed during the SHADOW campaign in Senegal. Mie-Raman lidar allows measurements at 355 nm and 532 nm at 43 dg. off-zenith angle, so the extinction and backscattering Ångström exponents can be evaluated. In some measurements we observed the positive values of backscattering Ångström exponent, which can be attributed to the corner reflection by horizontally oriented ice plates.

  20. Frequency Dependencies of the Exchange Spin Wave Reflection Coefficient on a One-Dimensional Magnon Crystal with Complex Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serhii O. Reshetniak

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions. It is shown that the frequency dependencies are periodic, points of full transmission and areas, full of reflection. Decreasing exchange parameter value in interface causes the increase of reflectance coefficient. Changing the material parameters we get the necessary intensity value of the reflection coefficient depending on the frequency at a constant value of the external magnetic field.

  1. Spectral dependence of backscattering coefficient of mixed phase clouds over West Africa measured with two-wavelength Raman polarization lidar: Features attributed to ice-crystals corner reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veselovskii, I.; Goloub, P.; Podvin, T.; Tanre, D.; Ansmann, A.; Korenskiy, M.; Borovoi, A.; Hu, Q.; Whiteman, D. N.

    2017-11-01

    The existing models predict that corner reflection (CR) of laser radiation by simple ice crystals of perfect shape, such as hexagonal columns or plates, can provide a significant contribution to the ice cloud backscattering. However in real clouds the CR effect may be suppressed due to crystal deformation and surface roughness. In contrast to the extinction coefficient, which is spectrally independent, consideration of diffraction associated with CR results in a spectral dependence of the backscattering coefficient. Thus measuring the spectral dependence of the cloud backscattering coefficient, the contribution of CR can be identified. The paper presents the results of profiling of backscattering coefficient (β) and particle depolarization ratio (δ) of ice and mixed-phase clouds over West Africa by means of a two-wavelength polarization Mie-Raman lidar operated at 355 nm and 532 nm during the SHADOW field campaign. The lidar observations were performed at a slant angle of 43 degree off zenith, thus CR from both randomly oriented crystals and oriented plates could be analyzed. For the most of the observations the cloud backscatter color ratio β355/β532 was close to 1.0, and no spectral features that might indicate the presence of CR of randomly oriented crystals were revealed. Still, in two measurement sessions we observed an increase of backscatter color ratio to a value of nearly 1.3 simultaneously with a decrease of the spectral depolarization ratio δ355/δ532 ratio from 1.0 to 0.8 inside the layers containing precipitating ice crystals. We attribute these changes in optical properties to corner reflections by horizontally oriented ice plates.

  2. LO-TO splittings, effective charges and interactions in electro-optic meta-nitroaniline crystal as studied by polarized IR reflection and transmission spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szostak, M. M.; Le Calvé, N.; Romain, F.; Pasquier, B.

    1994-10-01

    The polarized IR reflection spectra of the meta-nitroaniline ( m-NA) single crystal along the a, b and c crystallographic axes as well as the b and c polarized transmission spectra have been measured in the 100-400 cm -1 region. The LO-TO splitting values have been calculated from the reflection spectra by fitting them with the four parameter dielectric function. The dipole moment derivatives, relevant to dynamic effective charges, of the vibrations have also been calculated and used to check the applicability of the oriented gas model (OGM) to reflection spectra. The discrepancies from the OGM have been discussed in terms of vibronic couplings, weak hydrogen bondings (HB) and intramolecular charge transfer.

  3. Circulating miR-126 and miR-499 reflect progression of cardiovascular disease; correlations with uric acid and ejection fraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Khanaghaei

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe aim of this study was to assess plasma levels of endothelium- and heart-associated microRNAs (miRNAs miR-126 and miR-499, respectively, using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction.MethodsA two-step analysis was conducted on 75 patients undergoing off-pomp coronary artery bypass graft (CABG surgery. Five biomarkers of inflammation and cardiac injury were assessed in addition to the above-mentioned miRNAs.ResultsPlasma concentrations of miRNAs were found to be significantly correlated with plasma levels of cardiac troponin I (cTnI (miR-499, r 0.49, p~0.002; miR-126, r = 0.30, p~0.001, indicating cardiac damage. Data analysis revealed that miR-499 had higher sensitivity and specificity for cardiac injury than miR-126, which reflects more endothelial activation. Interestingly, a strong correlation was observed between both miRNAs and uric acid (UA levels with ventricular contractility measured as ejection fraction (EF (miR-499/EF%, r = 0.58, p~0.004; UA/EF%, r = -0.6, p~0.006; UA/miR-499, r = -0.34; UA/miR-126, r = 0.5, p~0.01.ConclusionsIn patients undergoing CABG, circulating miR-126/499 is associated with presentation of traditional risk factors and reflects post-operative response to injury. Plasma pool of miRNAs likely reflects extracellular miRNAs which are proportional to intracellular miRNA levels. Therefore, circulating levels of these miRNAs have prognostic implications in detection of higher risk of future cardiovascular events.

  4. Neutron forward diffraction by single crystal prisms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We have derived analytic expressions for the deflection as well as transmitted fraction of monochromatic neutrons forward diffracted by a single crystal prism. In the vicinity of a Bragg reflection, the neutron deflection deviates sharply from that for an amorphous prism, exhibiting three orders of magnitude greater sensitivity to ...

  5. Energy-constrained open-system magmatic processes IV: Geochemical, thermal and mass consequences of energy-constrained recharge, assimilation and fractional crystallization (EC-RAFC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wendy A. Bohrson Department of Geological Sciences, Central Washington University, Ellensburg, Washington, 98926, USA; Frank J. Spera Institute for Crustal Studies and Department of Geological Sciences, University of California, Santa Barbara, California, 93106, USA

    2003-01-01

    A wealth of geochemical and petrological data provide evidence that the processes of fractional crystallization, assimilation, and magma recharge (replenishment) dominate the chemical signatures of many terrestrial igneous rocks. Previous work [Spera and Bohrson, 2001 ; Bohrson and Spera, 2001] has established the importance of integrating energy, species and mass conservation into simulations of complex magma chamber processes. An extended version of the energy-constrained formulation, Energy-Constrained Recharge, Assimilation, Fractional Crystallization (EC-RAFC), tracks mass and compositional variations of melt, cumulates, and enclaves in a magma body undergoing simultaneous recharge, assimilation, and fractional crystallization [Spera and Bohrson, 2002]. Because many EC-RAFC results are distinct from those predicted by extant RAFC formulations, the primary goal of this paper is to present a range of geochemical and mass relationships for selected cases that highlight issues relevant to modern petrology. Among the plethora of petrologic problems that have important, well-documented analogues in nature are the geochemical distinctions that arise when a magma body undergoes continuous versus episodic recharge, the connection between erupted magmas and associated cumulate bodies, the behavior of recharge-fractionation dominated systems (RFC), thermodynamic conditions that promote the formation of enclaves versus cumulates, and the conditions under which magma bodies may be described as chemically homogeneous. Investigation of the effects of continuous versus episodic recharge for mafic magma undergoing RAFC in the lower crust indicates that the resulting geochemical trends for melt and solids are sensitive to the intensity and composition of recharge, suggesting that EC-RAFC may be used as a tool to distinguish the nature of the recharge events. Compared to the record preserved in melts, the geochemical and mass characteristics of solids associated with particular

  6. Two gap superconductivity in Ba0.55K0.45Fe2As2 single crystals studied by the directional point-contact Andreev reflection spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabo, P.; Pribulova, Z.; Pristas, G.; Bud'ko, S.L.; Canfield, P.C.; Samuely, P.

    2009-01-01

    First directional point-contact Andreev reflection spectroscopy on the Ba 0.55 K 0.45 Fe 2 As 2 single crystals is presented. The spectra show significant differences when measured in the ab plane in comparison with those measured in the c direction. In the latter case no traces of superconducting energy gap could be found, just a reduced point-contact conductance persisting up to about 100 K and indicating reduced density of states. On the other hand within the ab plane two nodeless superconducting energy gaps Δ S ∼2-5 meV and Δ L ∼9-11 meV are detected.

  7. Influence of magnetic and ultrasonic fields on coefficient of reflectivity of GaAs, GaSb and InAs crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaveryukhin, B.N.; Zaveryukhina, N.N.; Zaveryukhina, E.V.; Volodarskiy, V.V.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Previously we demonstrated for the first time in the world that ultrasonic waves of the megahertz range can change the transport properties and a structure of semiconductors. In this work we have experimentally studied the influence of ultrasonic treatment on the spectral coefficients of reflection R in the magnetic fields of the samples of GaAs-, GaSb- and InAs-crystals. The reflectance spectra in the magnetic field of the samples before and after the ultrasonic treatment (UST) for a certain time were measured in a broad wavelength range including ultraviolet, visible, and infrared spectral regions. The semi-insulating GaAs-crystals had a thickness d=100 μm and a working area S of up to 3sm 2 . The p-GaSb- crystals had an area of S=0.25sm 2 and d =250 μm. The base p-GaSb-layers possessed the concentration N=2·10 17 sm 3 and n-GaSb-layers with a thickness of 0.5 m were created by diffusion doping with phosphorus. Besides, the experiments were performed also for of the n-InAs-crystals. The samples of the InAs-n crystals had a thickness of 100 μm an area S = 0.25 sm 2 . Some remains of sulfuric (S) were discovered in InAs-samples. As could was see from the experiments, all the initial IR spectra measured for the samples with various dopant concentrations NP exhibit maximums (peaks) for 0.2 μm and minimum (holes) for. The reflectance spectra measured after UST for time of t > l hour clearly reveal a shift of the R minima toward longer wavelengths and a general decrease in the reflectance of each sample. The shift of the R is unambiguous evidence of the acoustically stimulated diffusion of impurity (phosphorus) inward of the samples. Discovered peaks and holes slitted and changed their sizes in the magnetic fields. It should be emphasized that behavior of the R spectra of the GaAs-, In As- and GaSb- samples is determined by the same mechanisms. Changes of the R spectra after the UST are explained by acoustically stimulated diffusion of the dopant inward

  8. Reflectivity of the gyroid biophotonic crystals in the ventral wing scales of the Green Hairstreak butterfly, Callophrys rubi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michielsen, K.; De Raedt, H.; Stavenga, D. G.

    2010-01-01

    We present a comparison of the computer simulation data of gyroid nanostructures with optical measurements (reflectivity spectra and scattering diagrams) of ventral wing scales of the Green Hairstreak butterfly, Callophrys rubi. We demonstrate that the omnidirectional green colour arises from the

  9. The effect of a non-hermitian crystal potential on the scattering matrix in reflection electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.E.; Josefsson, T.W.

    1994-01-01

    An extension to include general inelastic scattering effects is developed for the case of reflection electron diffraction scattering from surfaces. In this extension of work by Lynch and Moodie, it is shown how the resultant non-Hermitian matrix problem can be recast in a form that is suitable for computation. In particular, a computational method is outlined based on techniques developed by Eberlein for matrix diagonalisation using complex rotations and shears. The resultant methods are applied to the problem of Convergent Beam RHEED. 23 refs., 3 figs

  10. General method for eliminating wave reflection in 2D photonic crystal waveguides by introducing extra scatterers based on interference cancellation of waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hao; Ouyang, Zhengbiao

    2018-01-01

    We propose a general method for eliminating the reflection of waves in 2 dimensional photonic crystal waveguides (2D-PCWs), a kind of 2D material, by introducing extra scatterers inside the 2D-PCWs. The intrinsic reflection in 2D-PCWs is compensated by the backward-scattered waves from these scatterers, so that the overall reflection is greatly reduced and the insertion loss is improved accordingly. We first present the basic theory for the compensation method. Then, as a demonstration, we give four examples of extremely-low-reflection and high-transmission 90°bent 2D-PCWs created according to the method proposed. In the four examples, it is demonstrated by plane-wave expansion method and finite-difference time-domain method that the 90°bent 2D-PCWs can have high transmission ratio greater than 90% in a wide range of operating frequency, and the highest transmission ratio can be greater than 99.95% with a return loss higher than 43 dB, better than that in other typical 90°bent 2D-PCWs. With our method, the bent 2D-PCWs can be optimized to obtain high transmission ratio at different operating wavelengths. As a further application of this method, a waveguide-based optical bridge for light crossing is presented, showing an optimum return loss of 46.85 dB, transmission ratio of 99.95%, and isolation rates greater than 41.77 dB. The method proposed provides also a useful way for improving conventional waveguides made of cables, fibers, or metal walls in the optical, infrared, terahertz, and microwave bands.

  11. Magnetic switching of optical reflectivity in nanomagnet/micromirror suspensions: colloid displays as a potential alternative to liquid crystal displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubenhofer, S B; Athanassiou, E K; Grass, R N; Koehler, F M; Rossier, M; Stark, W J

    2009-12-02

    Two-particle colloids containing nanomagnets and microscale mirrors can be prepared from iron oxide nanoparticles, microscale metal flakes and high-density liquids stabilizing the mirror suspension against sedimentation by matching the constituent's density. The free Brownian rotation of the micromirrors can be magnetically controlled through an anisotropic change in impulse transport arising from impacts of the magnetic nanoparticles onto the anisotropic flakes. The resulting rapid mirror orientation allows large changes in light transmission and switchable optical reflectivity. The preparation of a passive display was conceptually demonstrated through colloid confinement in a planar cavity over an array of individually addressable solenoids and resulted in 4 x 4 digit displays with a reaction time of less than 100 ms.

  12. Effect of in-material losses on terahertz absorption, transmission, and reflection in photonic crystals made of polar dielectrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serebryannikov, Andriy E., E-mail: andser@amu.edu.pl [Faculty of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Nanotechnology Research Center—NANOTAM, Bilkent University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Nojima, S. [Yokohama City University, Department of Nanosystem Science, Graduate School of Nanobioscience, Kanazawa Ku, 22-2 Seto, Yokohama, Kanagawa 2360027 (Japan); Alici, K. B. [TUBITAK Marmara Research Center, Materials Institute, 41470 Gebze, Kocaeli (Turkey); Ozbay, Ekmel [Nanotechnology Research Center—NANOTAM, Bilkent University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey)

    2015-10-07

    The effect of the material absorption factor on terahertz absorption (A), transmittance (T), and reflectance (R) for slabs of PhC that comprise rods made of GaAs, a polar dielectric, is studied. The main goal was to illustrate how critical a choice of the absorption factor for simulations is and to indicate the importance of the possible modification of the absorption ability by using either active or lossy impurities. The spectra of A, T, and R are strongly sensitive to the location of the polaritonic gap with respect to the photonic pass and stop bands connected with periodicity that enables the efficient combination of the effects of material and structural parameters. It will be shown that the spectra can strongly depend on the utilized value of the material absorption factor. In particular, both narrow and wide absorption bands may appear owing to a variation of the material parameters with a frequency in the vicinity of the polaritonic gap. The latter are often achieved at wideband suppression of transmission, so that an ultra-wide stop band can appear as a result of adjustment of the stop bands having different origin. The results obtained at simultaneous variation of the absorption factor and frequency, and angle of incidence and frequency, indicate the possibility of the existence of wide ranges of tolerance, in which the basic features do remain. This allows for mitigating the accuracy requirements for the absorption factor in simulations and promises the efficient absorption of nonmonochromatic waves and beams with a wide angular spectrum. Suppression of narrowband effects in transmission is demonstrated at rather large values of the absorption factor, when they appear due to either the defect modes related to structural defects or dispersion inspired variations of the material parameters in the vicinity of the polaritonic gap. Comparison with auxiliary structures helps one to detect the common features and differences of homogeneous slabs and slabs of a

  13. Clinical, biophysical, immunohistochemical, and in vivo reflectance confocal microscopy evaluation of the response of subjects with sensitive skin to home-use fractional non-ablative photothermolysis device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richters, R.J.; Hoogedoorn, L.; Uzunbajakava, N.E.; Janssen, L.D.; Tom Nuijs, A.M.; Erp, P.E.J. van; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fractional photothermolysis using professional devices is a well-accepted and a widely used technique for skin rejuvenation. Recently, the technology has also been implemented in devices for home-use. Yet, a subpopulation of consumers exists that reacts excessively to this stimulation

  14. Comments on the paper: 'Optical reflectance, optical refractive index and optical conductivity measurements of nonlinear optics for L-aspartic acid nickel chloride single crystal'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Bikshandarkoil R.; Naik, Suvidha G.; Dhavskar, Kiran T.

    2016-02-01

    We argue that the 'L-aspartic acid nickel chloride' crystal reported by the authors of the title paper (Optics Communications, 291 (2013) 304-308) is actually the well-known diaqua(L-aspartato)nickel(II) hydrate crystal.

  15. Evidence for Cyclical Fractional Crystallization, Recharge, and Assimilation in Basalts of the Kimama Core, Central Snake River Plain, Idaho: A 5.5-million-year Highlight Reel of Petrogenetic processes in a Mid-Crustal Sill Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Katherine E.; Shervais, John W.; Christiansen, Eric H.; Vetter, Scott K.

    2018-02-01

    Basalts erupted in the Snake River Plain of central Idaho and sampled in the Kimama drill core link eruptive processes to the construction of mafic intrusions over 5.5 Ma. Cyclic variations in basalt composition reveal temporal chemical heterogeneity related to fractional crystallization and the assimilation of previously-intruded mafic sills. A range of compositional types are identified within 1912 m of continuous drill core: Snake River olivine tholeiite (SROT), low K SROT, high Fe-Ti, and evolved and high K-Fe lavas similar to those erupted at Craters of the Moon National Monument. Detailed lithologic and geophysical logs document 432 flow units comprising 183 distinct lava flows and 78 flow groups. Each lava flow represents a single eruptive episode, while flow groups document chemically and temporally related flows that formed over extended periods of time. Temporal chemical variation demonstrates the importance of source heterogeneity and magma processing in basalt petrogenesis. Low-K SROT and high Fe-Ti basalts are genetically related to SROT as, respectively, hydrothermally-altered and fractionated daughters. Cyclic variations in the chemical composition of Kimama flow groups are apparent as 21 upward fractionation cycles, six recharge cycles, eight recharge-fractionation cycles, and five fractionation-recharge cycles. We propose that most Kimama basalt flows represent typical fractionation and recharge patterns, consistent with the repeated influx of primitive SROT parental magmas and extensive fractional crystallization coupled with varying degrees of assimilation of gabbroic to ferrodioritic sills at shallow to intermediate depths over short durations. Trace element models show that parental SROT basalts were generated by 5-10% partial melting of enriched mantle at shallow depths above the garnet-spinel lherzolite transition. The distinctive evolved and high K-Fe lavas are rare. Found at four depths, 319 m, 1045 m, 1078 m, and 1189 m, evolved and high K

  16. Coupling Thermal and Chemical Signatures of Crustal Magma Bodies: Energy-Constrained Eruption, Recharge, Assimilation, and Fractional Crystallization (E'RAχFC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohrson, W. A.; Spera, F. J.

    2004-12-01

    Energy-Constrained Eruption, Recharge, Assimilation and Fractional Crystallization (E'RAχFC) tracks the evolution of an open-system magmatic system by coupling conservation equations governing energy, mass and species (isotopes and trace elements). By linking the compositional characteristics of a composite magmatic system (host magma, recharge magma, wallrock, eruptive reservoir) to its mass and energy fluxes, predictions can be made about the chemical evolution of systems characterized by distinct compositional and thermal characteristics. An interesting application of E'RAχFC involves documenting the influence distinct thermal regimes have on the chemical evolution of magmatic systems. Heat transfer between a magma-country rock system at epizonal depths can be viewed as a conjugate heat transfer problem in which the average country rock-magma boundary temperature, Tb, is governed by the relative vigor of hydrothermal convection in the country rock vs. magma convection. For cases where hydrothermal circulation is vigorous and magmatic heat is efficiently transported away from the boundary, contact aureole temperatures (~Tb) are low. In cases where magmatic heat can not be efficiently transported away from the boundary and hydrothermal cells are absent or poorly developed, Tb is relatively high. Simultaneous solution of the differential equations governing momentum and energy conservation and continuity for the coupled hydrothermal-magmatic conjugate heat transfer system enables calculation of the characteristic timescale for EC-RAFC evolution and development of hydrothermal deposits as a function of material and medium properties, sizes of systems and relative efficiency of hydrothermal vs. magmatic heat transfer. Characteristic timescales lie in the range 102-106 yr depending on system size, magma properties and permeability among other parameters. In E'RAχFC, Tb is approximated by the user-defined equilibration temperature, Teq, which is the temperature at

  17. Partition coefficients for Ni, Cu, Pd, Pt, Rh, and Ir between monosulfide solid solution and sulfide liquid and the formation of compositionally zoned Ni-Cu sulfide bodies by fractional crystallization of sulfide liquid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnes, S.J.; Makovicky, E.; Makovicky, M.

    1996-01-01

    of the system. There is a positive correlation between the partition coefficients and sulfur content of the monosulfide solid solution and between the partition coefficients and the sulfur content of the liquid. In sulfur-saturated and sulfur-over-saturated experimental systems, the metals behave in a manner...... (Alexo, Abitibi Greenstone Belt) and a zoned tholeiite-related ore (Oktyabr'sky, Noril'sk region, Siberia). In both cases, the experimental partition coefficients numerically model the composition zones of the actual ores. This supports the model of fractional crystallization of a monosulfide solid...

  18. Geochronology, geochemical and Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb isotopic compositions of the granitoids in the Yemaquan orefield, East Kunlun orogenic belt, northern Qinghai-Tibet Plateau: Implications for magmatic fractional crystallization and sub-solidus hydrothermal alteration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Shuo; Ma, Changqian; Xu, Jiannan

    2017-12-01

    A general consensus has emerged that high field strength elements (HFSE) can mobile to some extent in a hydrothermal fluid. However, there are hot debates on whether sub-solidus hydrothermal alteration can lower the Nb/Ta ratio in evolved melts. In this study, we present petrography, geochronology and geochemistry of the barren and mineralized rocks in the Yemaquan skarn iron deposit, northern Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, to probe magmatic-hydrothermal transition. The barren rocks consist of diorites, granodiorites, granites and syenogranites, whereas the porphyritic granodiorites are associated with mineralization for an excellent consistency between the magmatic zircon U-Pb age (225 ± 2 Ma) and the hydrothermal phlogopite 40Ar-39Ar age (225 ± 1.5 Ma). The Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb isotopic data demonstrate that the Yemaquan granitoids are originated from a relatively homogenous enriched mantle with different degrees of crust contamination (assimilation fractional crystallization, AFC). Trace elements signatures indicate that the porphyritic granodiorites related to mineralization display amphibole crystallization for high water contents, whereas the barren granites have gone through biotite crystallization due to potassium enrichment by continuous upper crust contamination, both of which are responsible for their Nb/Ta ratios, respectively. Modeling results suggest that a basaltic melt with Nb/Ta ratio of 15.3 can reach a minimum Nb/Ta ratio of 12 in the producing granodioritic melt by amphibole fractional crystallization based on partition coefficients of Nb and Ta between amphibole and melts from previous experiments. This may explain the average Nb/Ta ratio (13.7) of the barren granodiorites, while it cannot account for the average Nb/Ta ratio (8.4) of the mineralized porphyritic granodiorites, and it is even lower than that of the granites (10.3) with biotite fractional crystallization. Exsolution of a magmatic-hydrothermal fluid is inevitable when a water saturated magma

  19. Extraordinary absorption of sound in porous lamella-crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Johan; Romero-García, V.; Picó, R.

    2014-01-01

    . Experimental measurements show that strong all-angle sound absorption with almost zero reflectance takes place for a frequency range exceeding two octaves. We demonstrate that lowering the crystal filling fraction increases the wave interaction time and is responsible for the enhancement of intrinsic material......We present the design of a structured material supporting complete absorption of sound with a broadband response and functional for any direction of incident radiation. The structure which is fabricated out of porous lamellas is arranged into a low-density crystal and backed by a reflecting support...

  20. Single-mode pumped high air-fill fraction photonic crystal fiber taper for high-power deep-blue supercontinuum sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Simon Toft; Larsen, Casper; Jakobsen, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Dispersion control with axially nonuniform photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) permits supercontinuum (SC) generation into the deep-blue from an ytterbium pump laser. In this Letter, we exploit the full degrees of freedom afforded by PCFs to fabricate a fiber with longitudinally increasing air-fill fr...

  1. Like a Fraction of Some Bigger Place—The “Creative Industries” in a Peripheral Zone: Reflections from a Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Thomas Matthews

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This article questions the notion of “creative industries” while contributing to the analysis of mediations between the cultural sphere and capitalist relations of production. Research pertaining to the “creative industries”, as well as contributions to the political economy of cultural industries, have often focused on central and metropolitan areas. By contrast, the case study that these reflections are based upon was conducted in a peripheral zone, the Shetland Isles, marked by specific socio-economic, historical, political and cultural features. This study considered the importance of local cultural policies, over the past 35 years, and how they are presently facing a significant revision. However, the rise of “creative industries” discourse, and its applications in public policy can only be understood within a wider national and supra-national context. Moreover, I argue that these evolutions are linked to an extension of cultural industrialisation and commoditisation. By analysing the adaptations and limits that the “creative industries” doctrine encounters in a peripheral zone, this article firstly completes existing critiques of the notion. Secondly, it illustrates how an apparently exceptional terrain magnifies certain key aspects of relations between ideological / cultural superstructures, and the socio-economic infrastructure of contemporary capitalism. In particular, it is concerned with the increasing artificiality of the economic basis of Western societies, and the complex ways in which this phenomenon is translated within the cultural sphere.

  2. Do Children Understand Fraction Addition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braithwaite, David W.; Tian, Jing; Siegler, Robert S.

    2017-01-01

    Many children fail to master fraction arithmetic even after years of instruction. A recent theory of fraction arithmetic (Braithwaite, Pyke, & Siegler, in press) hypothesized that this poor learning of fraction arithmetic procedures reflects poor conceptual understanding of them. To test this hypothesis, we performed three experiments…

  3. Zircon trace element and isotopic (Sr, Nd, Hf, Pb) effects of assimilation-fractional crystallization of pegmatite magma: A case study of the Guangshigou biotite pegmatites from the North Qinling Orogen, central China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Feng; Liu, Jia-Jun; Carranza, Emmanuel John M.; Zhang, Shuai; Zhai, De-Gao; Liu, Gang; Wang, Gong-Wen; Zhang, Hong-Yuan; Sha, Ya-Zhou; Yang, Shang-Song

    2018-03-01

    Evidence for open-system magmatic processes related to wallrock assimilation accompanied by fractional crystallization (AFC) is present in the Guangshigou biotite pegmatites, North Qinling Orogen. The biotite pegmatite-gneiss contacts generally coincide with the greatest enrichment of U and Th. Zircon Usbnd Pb dating constrains the crystallization ages of the biotite pegmatite (rim zone-415 ± 2.6 Ma; internal zone-413.5 ± 2.5 Ma), in line with a pyrite Pbsbnd Pb isochron age (413 ± 22 Ma). Metamict areas in zircon show generally elevated concentrations of trace elements and expulsion of radioactive Pb. Internal zone samples, representing uncontaminated magma, have negative to positive zircon ( 413 Ma) εHf(t) (- 1.53 - + 3.24), low εNd(t) values (- 2.4), and old Hf and Nd model ages (tDM2 = 1.5-1.19 Ga, T2DM = 1.35 Ga, respectively), indicating a dominantly recycled Mesoproterozoic lower crustal material with involvement of some juvenile materials in the source region. The magmatic oxygen fugacity (fO2) and crystallization temperatures ranges from - 24.81 to - 13.34 of log fO2 and 570 °C to 793 °C, respectively. Compared to the internal zone, pegmatite rim samples display a variable and lower εNd(t) values (- 3.9 to - 2.8) and T2DM (1.47-1.37 Ga), but similar Hf isotopic compositions, favouring a three-component isotopic mixing model (recycled Mesoproterozoic lower crust materials, juvenile materials, and host gneiss). Pronounced variations of Ti, Y, U, Th, Hf, and REE concentrations in zircon from grain to grain in individual samples and from area to area within individual grains suggest a fluctuating crystallization environment in hybridized magma from which the rim-hosted zircons crystallized. Variable and high radiogenic Pb ratios of pyrites forming in the hybridized magma were inherited from the matrix. Zircons from both zones exhibit similar Hf isotope patterns, indicating the rim-hosted zircons crystallized during the early stage of hybridization of

  4. Determination of molecular structures of aromatic hydrocarbons of crystal fractions of Noriysk crude by a series of luminescent-spectral methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogloblina, A.I.; Alekseyeva, T.A.; Barabadze, Sh.Sh.; Melikadze, L.D.; Teplitskaya, T.A.

    1979-01-01

    The structure of crystalline aromatic hydrocarbons isolated from the high boiling fraction (540-560 degrees) of Noriysk crude was studied using methods of luminescent-spectral analysis. The individual composition of the crystalline aromatic hydrocarbons was analyzed by a combination of fine structure luminescent spectroscopy and spectrofluorimetric methods in frozen matrices using spectra of fluorescence, phosphorescence and excitation of luminescence. The composite method used at 77 K is very effective and allows detailed characteristics of the molar-group composition of complex mixtures of petroleum aromatic hydrocarbons to the point of identification of individual components.

  5. FRACTIONAL BANKING

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Klimikova

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the reasons of the present financial problems lies In understanding the substance of fractional reserve banking. The substance of fractional banking is in lending more money than the bankers have. Banking of partial reserves is an alternative form which links deposit banking and credit banking. Fractional banking is causing many unfavorable economic impacts in the worldwide system, specifically an inflation.

  6. Fractional thermoelasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Povstenko, Yuriy

    2015-01-01

    This book is devoted to fractional thermoelasticity, i.e. thermoelasticity based on the heat conduction equation with differential operators of fractional order. Readers will discover how time-fractional differential operators describe memory effects and space-fractional differential operators deal with the long-range interaction. Fractional calculus, generalized Fourier law, axisymmetric and central symmetric problems and many relevant equations are featured in the book. The latest developments in the field are included and the reader is brought up to date with current research.  The book contains a large number of figures, to show the characteristic features of temperature and stress distributions and to represent the whole spectrum of order of fractional operators.  This work presents a picture of the state-of-the-art of fractional thermoelasticity and is suitable for specialists in applied mathematics, physics, geophysics, elasticity, thermoelasticity and engineering sciences. Corresponding sections of ...

  7. Reflecting reflection in supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lystbæk, Christian Tang

    associated with reflection and an exploration of alternative conceptions that view reflection within the context of settings which have a more group- and team-based orientation. Drawing on an action research project on health care supervision, the paper questions whether we should reject earlier views...... of reflection, rehabilitate them in order to capture broader connotations or move to new ways of regarding reflection that are more in keeping with not only reflective but also emotive, normative and formative views on supervision. The paper presents a critical perspective on supervision that challenge...... the current reflective paradigm I supervision and relate this to emotive, normative and formative views supervision. The paper is relevant for Nordic educational research into the supervision and guidance...

  8. Interplay of crystal fractionation, sulfide saturation and oxygen fugacity on the iron isotope composition of arc lavas: An example from the Marianas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, H. M.; Prytulak, J.; Woodhead, J. D.; Kelley, K. A.; Brounce, M.; Plank, T.

    2018-04-01

    Subduction zone systems are central to a multitude of processes from the evolution of the continental crust to the concentration of metals into economically viable deposits. The interplay between oxygen fugacity, sulfur saturation, fluid exsolution and fractionating mineral assemblages that gives rise to typical arc magma chemical signatures is, however, still poorly understood and novel geochemical approaches are required to make further progress. Here we examine a well-characterized suite of arc lavas from the Marianas (W. Pacific) for their stable Fe isotope composition. In agreement with previous work and mass balance considerations, contributions from sediments and/or fluids are shown to have negligible effect on Fe isotopes. Instead, we focus on disentangling processes occurring during basalt through dacite differentiation using a sample suite from the island of Anatahan. Anatahan whole rock Fe isotope compositions (δ57Fe) range from -0.05 ± 0.05 to 0.17 ± 0.03 (2 S.D.)‰. A fractionation model is constructed, where three distinct stages of differentiation are required to satisfy the combined major and trace element and isotopic observations. In particular, the sequestration of isotopically heavy Fe into magnetite and isotopically light Fe into sulfide melts yields important constraints. The data require that lavas are first undersaturated with respect to crystalline or molten sulfide, followed by the crystallisation of magnetite, which then triggers late sulfide saturation. The model demonstrates that the final stage of removal of liquid or crystalline sulfide can effectively sequester Cu (and presumably other chalcophiles) and that late stage exsolution of magmatic fluids or brines may not be required to do this, although these processes are not mutually exclusive. Finally, the new Fe isotope data are combined with previous Tl-Mo-V stable isotope determinations on the same samples. Importantly, the multi-valent transition metal stable isotope systems of

  9. Multigap superconductivity and strong electron-boson coupling in Fe-based superconductors: a point-contact Andreev-reflection study of Ba(Fe(1-x)Co(x))2As2 single crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortello, M; Daghero, D; Ummarino, G A; Stepanov, V A; Jiang, J; Weiss, J D; Hellstrom, E E; Gonnelli, R S

    2010-12-03

    Directional point-contact Andreev-reflection measurements in Ba(Fe(1-x)Co(x))2As2 single crystals (T(c) = 24.5 K) indicate the presence of two superconducting gaps with no line nodes on the Fermi surface. The point-contact Andreev-reflection spectra also feature additional structures related to the electron-boson interaction, from which the characteristic boson energy Ω(b)(T) is obtained, very similar to the spin-resonance energy observed in neutron scattering experiments. Both the gaps and the additional structures can be reproduced within a three-band s ± Eliashberg model by using an electron-boson spectral function peaked at Ω(0) = 12 meV ≃ Ω(b)(0).

  10. The role of liquid-liquid immiscibility and crystal fractionation in the genesis of carbonatite magmas: insights from Kerimasi melt inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmics, Tibor; Zajacz, Zoltán; Mitchell, Roger H.; Szabó, Csaba; Wälle, Markus

    2015-02-01

    We have reconstructed the compositional evolution of the silicate and carbonate melt, and various crystalline phases in the subvolcanic reservoir of Kerimasi Volcano in the East African Rift. Trace element concentrations of silicate and carbonate melt inclusions trapped in nepheline, apatite and magnetite from plutonic afrikandite (clinopyroxene-nepheline-perovskite-magnetite-melilite rock) and calciocarbonatite (calcite-apatite-magnetite-perovskite-monticellite-phlogopite rock) show that liquid immiscibility occurred during the generation of carbonatite magmas from a CO2-rich melilite-nephelinite magma formed at relatively high temperatures (1,100 °C). This carbonatite magma is notably more calcic and less alkaline than that occurring at Oldoinyo Lengai. The CaO-rich (32-41 wt%) nature and alkali-"poor" (at least 7-10 wt% Na2O + K2O) nature of these high-temperature (>1,000 °C) carbonate melts result from strong partitioning of Ca (relative to Mg, Fe and Mn) in the immiscible carbonate and the CaO-rich nature (12-17 wt%) of its silicate parent (e.g., melilite-nephelinite). Evolution of the Kerimasi carbonate magma can result in the formation of natrocarbonatite melts with similar composition to those of Oldoinyo Lengai, but with pronounced depletion in REE and HFSE elements. We suggest that this compositional difference results from the different initial parental magmas, e.g., melilite-nephelinite at Kerimasi and a nephelinite at Oldoinyo Lengai. The difference in parental magma composition led to a significant difference in the fractionating mineral phase assemblage and the element partitioning systematics upon silicate-carbonate melt immiscibility. LA-ICP-MS analysis of coeval silicate and carbonate melt inclusions provides an opportunity to infer carbonate melt/silicate melt partition coefficients for a wide range of elements. These data show that Li, Na, Pb, Ca, Sr, Ba, B, all REE (except Sc), U, V, Nb, Ta, P, Mo, W and S are partitioned into the carbonate

  11. Contribution to the measurement of the reflection coefficient for curved crystals between 50 and 80 keV; Contribution a la mesure du coefficient de reflexion de cristaux courbes entre 50 keV et 80 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chartier, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-09-01

    In the first part, we summarize the main approximate theories dealing with the diffraction of electromagnetic radiation by the crystalline medium, allowing the determination of the characteristic properties of flat and bent crystals used in X and gamma-Ray spectroscopy ('Laue Case'). We describe the experimental setting and we explain our method to measure {gamma}: reflectivity of elastically or plastically bent-crystals from narrow wave-length intervals in the continuous X-Ray spectrum. We discuss our experimental results obtained with different crystals (quartz (3140), Al (200), FLi (200) and compare them with theoretical ones. Finally, we refer to a use of the bent-crystal spectrometer (Cauchois arrangement) in dosimetry. (author) [French] Dans la premiere partie, nous resumons les principales approximations theoriques qui traitent la diffraction du rayonnement electromagnetique par le milieu cristallin et permettent de determiner les grandeurs caracteristiques des lames cristallines planes ou courbees utilisees 'par transmission' en spectroscopie X ou gamma. Apres avoir decrit le montage experimental, nous exposons la methode de mesure de {gamma}: coefficient de reflexion de cristaux courbes (elastiquement ou plastiquement). Le domaine energetique etudie est voisin de 100 keV. Dans cette methode, nous n'utilisons pas des rayonnements monoenergetiques provenant de transitions atomiques ou nucleaires mais des bandes etroites d'energie appartenant au spectre continu du rayonnement emis par un tube a rayons X. Les resultats experimentaux obtenus avec differents cristaux (quartz (3140), Al (200), FLi (200)) sont discutes et compares a ceux prevus par la theorie. Nous mentionnons, enfin, une application en dosimetrie du spectrographe a cristal couche (Geometrie Cauchois). (auteur)

  12. Bragg reflection transmission filters for variable resolution monochromators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, D.

    1989-01-01

    There are various methods for improving the angular and spectral resolution of monochromator and analyzer systems. The novel system described here, though limited to higher x-ray energies (>20keV), is based on a dynamical effect occurring on the transmitted beam with a thin perfect crystal plate set in the Bragg reflection case. In the case of Bragg reflection from a perfect crystal, the incident beam is rapidly attenuated as it penetrates the crystal in the range of reflection. This extinction length is of the order of microns. The attenuation length, which determines the amount of normal transmission through the plate is generally much longer. Thus, in the range of the Bragg reflection the attenuation of the transmitted beam can change by several orders of magnitude with a small change in energy or angle. This thin crystal plate cuts a notch in the transmitted beam with a width equal to its Darwin width, thus acting as a transmission filter. When used in a non-dispersive mode with other monochromator crystals, the filter when set at the Bragg angle will reflect the entire Darwin width of the incident beam and transmit the wings of the incident beam distribution. When the element is offset in angle by some fraction of the Darwin width, the filter becomes useful in adjusting the angular width of the transmitted beam and removing a wing. Used in pairs with a symmetric offset, the filters can be used to continuously adjust the intrinsic angular divergence of the beam with good wing reduction. Instances where such filters may be useful are in improving the angular resolution of a small angle scattering camera. These filters may be added to a Bonse-Hart camera with one pair on the incident beam to reduce the intrinsic beam divergence and a second pair on the analyzer arm to improve the analyzer resolution. 2 refs., 3 Figs

  13. Photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægsgaard, Jesper; Hansen, K P; Nielsen, M D

    2003-01-01

    Photonic crystal fibers having a complex microstructure in the transverse plane constitute a new and promising class of optical fibers. Such fibers can either guide light through total internal reflection or the photonic bandgap effect, In this paper, we review the different types and applications...... of photonic crystal fibers with particular emphasis on recent advances in the field....

  14. Fractional charges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saminadayar, L.

    2001-01-01

    20 years ago fractional charges were imagined to explain values of conductivity in some materials. Recent experiments have proved the existence of charges whose value is the third of the electron charge. This article presents the experimental facts that have led theorists to predict the existence of fractional charges from the motion of quasi-particles in a linear chain of poly-acetylene to the quantum Hall effect. According to the latest theories, fractional charges are neither bosons nor fermions but anyons, they are submitted to an exclusive principle that is less stringent than that for fermions. (A.C.)

  15. Fractional fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackiw, R.; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge

    1984-01-01

    The theory of fermion fractionization due to topologically generated fermion ground states is presented. Applications to one-dimensional conductors, to the MIT bag, and to the Hall effect are reviewed. (author)

  16. Two gap superconductivity in Ba{sub 0.55}K{sub 0.45}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} single crystals studied by the directional point-contact Andreev reflection spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szabo, P.; Pribulova, Z. [Centre of Low Temperature Physics, IEP Slovak Academy of Sciences and P.J.Safarik University, Watsonova 47, SK-04001 Kosice (Slovakia); Pristas, G.; Bud' ko, S.L.; Canfield, P.C. [Ames Laboratory and Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Samuely, P., E-mail: samuely@saske.s [Centre of Low Temperature Physics, IEP Slovak Academy of Sciences and P.J.Safarik University, Watsonova 47, SK-04001 Kosice (Slovakia)

    2009-10-15

    First directional point-contact Andreev reflection spectroscopy on the Ba{sub 0.55}K{sub 0.45}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} single crystals is presented. The spectra show significant differences when measured in the ab plane in comparison with those measured in the c direction. In the latter case no traces of superconducting energy gap could be found, just a reduced point-contact conductance persisting up to about 100 K and indicating reduced density of states. On the other hand within the ab plane two nodeless superconducting energy gaps DELTA{sub S}approx2-5 meV and DELTA{sub L}approx9-11 meV are detected.

  17. Intracellular Cadmium Isotope Fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, T. J.; Lee, R. B.; Henderson, G. M.; Rickaby, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    Recent stable isotope studies into the biological utilization of transition metals (e.g. Cu, Fe, Zn, Cd) suggest several stepwise cellular processes can fractionate isotopes in both culture and nature. However, the determination of fractionation factors is often unsatisfactory, as significant variability can exist - even between different organisms with the same cellular functions. Thus, it has not been possible to adequately understand the source and mechanisms of metal isotopic fractionation. In order to address this problem, we investigated the biological fractionation of Cd isotopes within genetically-modified bacteria (E. coli). There is currently only one known biological use or requirement of Cd, a Cd/Zn carbonic anhydrase (CdCA, from the marine diatom T. weissfloggii), which we introduce into the E. coli genome. We have also developed a cleaning procedure that allows for the treating of bacteria so as to study the isotopic composition of different cellular components. We find that whole cells always exhibit a preference for uptake of the lighter isotopes of Cd. Notably, whole cells appear to have a similar Cd isotopic composition regardless of the expression of CdCA within the E. coli. However, isotopic fractionation can occur within the genetically modified E. coli during Cd use, such that Cd bound in CdCA can display a distinct isotopic composition compared to the cell as a whole. Thus, the externally observed fractionation is independent of the internal uses of Cd, with the largest Cd isotope fractionation occurring during cross-membrane transport. A general implication of these experiments is that trace metal isotopic fractionation most likely reflects metal transport into biological cells (either actively or passively), rather than relating to expression of specific physiological function and genetic expression of different metalloenzymes.

  18. Significance of Assimilation and Fractional Crystallization (AFC ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    57

    1 School of Studies in Geology and Water Resource Management, .... In few cases, complete alteration of olivine grains either to ..... Hari KR, Nambiar CG, Furuyama K and Rai SK 2002 Some geochemical and petrogenetic relations between ...

  19. Space-Time Crystal and Space-Time Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shenglong; Wu, Congjun

    2018-03-02

    Crystal structures and the Bloch theorem play a fundamental role in condensed matter physics. We extend the static crystal to the dynamic "space-time" crystal characterized by the general intertwined space-time periodicities in D+1 dimensions, which include both the static crystal and the Floquet crystal as special cases. A new group structure dubbed a "space-time" group is constructed to describe the discrete symmetries of a space-time crystal. Compared to space and magnetic groups, the space-time group is augmented by "time-screw" rotations and "time-glide" reflections involving fractional translations along the time direction. A complete classification of the 13 space-time groups in one-plus-one dimensions (1+1D) is performed. The Kramers-type degeneracy can arise from the glide time-reversal symmetry without the half-integer spinor structure, which constrains the winding number patterns of spectral dispersions. In 2+1D, nonsymmorphic space-time symmetries enforce spectral degeneracies, leading to protected Floquet semimetal states. We provide a general framework for further studying topological properties of the (D+1)-dimensional space-time crystal.

  20. Mystery Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Sonalee; Namakshi, Nama; Zunker, Christina; Warshauer, Hiroko K.; Warshauer, Max

    2016-01-01

    Making math more engaging for students is a challenge that every teacher faces on a daily basis. These authors write that they are constantly searching for rich problem-solving tasks that cover the necessary content, develop critical-thinking skills, and engage student interest. The Mystery Fraction activity provided here focuses on a key number…

  1. Characterization of Coconut Oil Fractions Obtained from Solvent Fractionation Using Acetone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonwai, Sopark; Rungprasertphol, Poonyawee; Nantipipat, Nantinee; Tungvongcharoan, Satinee; Laiyangkoon, Nantikan

    2017-09-01

    This work was aimed to study the solvent fraction of coconut oil (CNO). The fatty acid and triacylglycerol compositions, solid fat content (SFC) and the crystallization properties of CNO and its solid and liquid fractions obtained from fractionation at different conditions were investigated using various techniques. CNO was dissolved in acetone (1:1 w/v) and left to crystallize isothermally at 10°C for 0.5, 1 and 2 h and at 12°C for 2, 3 and 6 h. The solid fractions contained significantly lower contents of saturated fatty acids of ≤ 10 carbon atoms but considerably higher contents of saturated fatty acids with > 12 carbon atoms with respect to those of CNO and the liquid fractions. They also contained higher contents of high-melting triacylglycerol species with carbon number ≥ 38. Because of this, the DSC crystallization onset temperatures and the crystallization peak temperatures of the solid fractions were higher than CNO and the liquid fractions. The SFC values of the solid fractions were significantly higher than CNO at all measuring temperatures before reaching 0% just below the body temperature with the fraction obtained at 12°C for 2 h exhibiting the highest SFC. On the contrary, the SFC values of the liquid fractions were lower than CNO. The crystallization duration exhibited strong influence on the solid fractions. There was no effect on the crystal polymorphic structure possibly because CNO has β'-2 as a stable polymorph. The enhanced SFC of the solid fractions would allow them to find use in food applications where a specific melting temperature is desired such as sophisticated confectionery fats, and the decreased SFC of the liquid fractions would provide them with a higher cold stability which would be useful during extended storage time.

  2. Fraction Reduction through Continued Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carley, Holly

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a method of reducing fractions without factoring. The ideas presented may be useful as a project for motivated students in an undergraduate number theory course. The discussion is related to the Euclidean Algorithm and its variations may lead to projects or early examples involving efficiency of an algorithm.

  3. Flexible Bistable Cholesteric Reflective Displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Deng-Ke

    2006-03-01

    Cholesteric liquid crystals (ChLCs) exhibit two stable states at zero field condition-the reflecting planar state and the nonreflecting focal conic state. ChLCs are an excellent candidate for inexpensive and rugged electronic books and papers. This paper will review the display cell structure,materials and drive schemes for flexible bistable cholesteric (Ch) reflective displays.

  4. A Test of Macromolecular Crystallization in Microgravity: Large, Well-Ordered Insulin Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgstahl, Gloria E. O.; Vahedi-Faridi, Ardeschir; Lovelace, Jeff; Bellamy, Henry D.; Snell, Edward H.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Crystals of insulin grown in microgravity on space shuttle mission STS-95 were extremely well-ordered and unusually large (many > 2 mm). The physical characteristics of six microgravity and six earth-grown crystals were examined by X-ray analysis employing superfine f slicing and unfocused synchrotron radiation. This experimental setup allowed hundreds of reflections to be precisely examined for each crystal in a short period of time. The microgravity crystals were on average 34 times larger, had 7 times lower mosaicity, had 54 times higher reflection peak heights and diffracted to significantly higher resolution than their earth grown counterparts. A single mosaic domain model could account for reflections in microgravity crystals whereas reflections from earth crystals required a model with multiple mosaic domains. This statistically significant and unbiased characterization indicates that the microgravity environment was useful for the improvement of crystal growth and resultant diffraction quality in insulin crystals and may be similarly useful for macromolecular crystals in general.

  5. The Reflective Learning Continuum: Reflecting on Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltier, James W.; Hay, Amanda; Drago, William

    2005-01-01

    The importance of reflection to marketing educators is increasingly recognized. However, there is a lack of empirical research that considers reflection within the context of both the marketing and general business education literature. This article describes the use of an instrument that can be used to measure four identified levels of a…

  6. Progress on photonic crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Lecoq, P; Gundacker, S; Hillemanns, H; Jarron, P; Knapitsch, A; Leclercq, J L; Letartre, X; Meyer, T; Pauwels, K; Powolny, F; Seassal, C

    2010-01-01

    The renewal of interest for Time of Flight Positron Emission Tomography (TOF PET) has highlighted the need for increasing the light output of scintillating crystals and in particular for improving the light extraction from materials with a high index of refraction. One possible solution to overcome the problem of total internal reflection and light losses resulting from multiple bouncing within the crystal is to improve the light extraction efficiency at the crystal/photodetector interface by means of photonic crystals, i.e. media with a periodic modulation of the dielectric constant at the wavelength scale. After a short reminder of the underlying principles this contribution proposes to present the very encouraging results we have recently obtained on LYSO pixels and the perspectives on other crystals such as BGO, LuYAP and LuAG. These results confirm the impressive predictions from our previously published Monte Carlo simulations. A detailed description of the sample preparation procedure is given as well ...

  7. Reflective photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lentine, Anthony L.; Nielson, Gregory N.; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Okandan, Murat; Goeke, Ronald S.

    2018-03-06

    A photovoltaic module includes colorized reflective photovoltaic cells that act as pixels. The colorized reflective photovoltaic cells are arranged so that reflections from the photovoltaic cells or pixels visually combine into an image on the photovoltaic module. The colorized photovoltaic cell or pixel is composed of a set of 100 to 256 base color sub-pixel reflective segments or sub-pixels. The color of each pixel is determined by the combination of base color sub-pixels forming the pixel. As a result, each pixel can have a wide variety of colors using a set of base colors, which are created, from sub-pixel reflective segments having standard film thicknesses.

  8. Adaptive Holography in Liquid Crystal Light-Valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre Huignard

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available By performing two-wave mixing experiments in a liquid crystal light-valve, optical beam amplification is obtained as a strongly resonant process to which a narrow frequency bandwidth is associated. This property is exploited to realize adaptive holographic interferometric systems able to efficiently detect displacements as small as fraction of picometers. Pressure radiation induced deformations of a reflecting membrane are measured with the same type of system. Then, when used with complex wavefronts, like speckle fields, the LCLV-based interferometer allows to detect extremely small phase modulations. The examples shown demonstrate the potentialities of the light-valve for dynamic holography applications.

  9. Fractional vector calculus for fractional advection dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerschaert, Mark M.; Mortensen, Jeff; Wheatcraft, Stephen W.

    2006-07-01

    We develop the basic tools of fractional vector calculus including a fractional derivative version of the gradient, divergence, and curl, and a fractional divergence theorem and Stokes theorem. These basic tools are then applied to provide a physical explanation for the fractional advection-dispersion equation for flow in heterogeneous porous media.

  10. Fractional Schroedinger equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laskin, Nick

    2002-01-01

    Some properties of the fractional Schroedinger equation are studied. We prove the Hermiticity of the fractional Hamilton operator and establish the parity conservation law for fractional quantum mechanics. As physical applications of the fractional Schroedinger equation we find the energy spectra of a hydrogenlike atom (fractional 'Bohr atom') and of a fractional oscillator in the semiclassical approximation. An equation for the fractional probability current density is developed and discussed. We also discuss the relationships between the fractional and standard Schroedinger equations

  11. Nonlinear dynamics of fractional order Duffing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Zengshan; Chen, Diyi; Zhu, Jianwei; Liu, Yongjian

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze the nonlinear dynamics of fractional order Duffing system. First, we present the fractional order Duffing system and the numerical algorithm. Second, nonlinear dynamic behaviors of Duffing system with a fixed fractional order is studied by using bifurcation diagrams, phase portraits, Poincare maps and time domain waveforms. The fractional order Duffing system shows some interesting dynamical behaviors. Third, a series of Duffing systems with different fractional orders are analyzed by using bifurcation diagrams. The impacts of fractional orders on the tendency of dynamical motion, the periodic windows in chaos, the bifurcation points and the distance between the first and the last bifurcation points are respectively studied, in which some basic laws are discovered and summarized. This paper reflects that the integer order system and the fractional order one have close relationship and an integer order system is a special case of fractional order ones.

  12. Meadow based Fraction Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Bergstra, Jan A.

    2015-01-01

    In the context of an involutive meadow a precise definition of fractions is formulated and on that basis formal definitions of various classes of fractions are given. The definitions follow the fractions as terms paradigm. That paradigm is compared with two competing paradigms for storytelling on fractions: fractions as values and fractions as pairs.

  13. The Effect of Thermal Cycling on Crystal-Liquid Separation During Lunar Magma Ocean Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Ryan D.

    2013-01-01

    Differentiation of magma oceans likely involves a mixture of fractional and equilibrium crystallization [1]. The existence of: 1) large volumes of anorthosite in the lunar highlands and 2) the incompatible- rich (KREEP) reservoir suggests that fractional crystallization may have dominated during differentiation of the Moon. For this to have occurred, crystal fractionation must have been remarkably efficient. Several authors [e.g. 2, 3] have hypothesized that equilibrium crystallization would have dominated early in differentiation of magma oceans because of crystal entrainment during turbulent convection. However, recent numerical modeling [4] suggests that crystal settling could have occurred throughout the entire solidification history of the lunar magma ocean if crystals were large and crystal fraction was low. These results indicate that the crystal size distribution could have played an important role in differentiation of the lunar magma ocean. Here, I suggest that thermal cycling from tidal heating during lunar magma ocean crystallization caused crystals to coarsen, leading to efficient crystal-liquid separation.

  14. Disorder in Protein Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarage, James Braun, II

    1990-01-01

    Methods have been developed for analyzing the diffuse x-ray scattering in the halos about a crystal's Bragg reflections as a means of determining correlations in atomic displacements in protein crystals. The diffuse intensity distribution for rhombohedral insulin, tetragonal lysozyme, and triclinic lysozyme crystals was best simulated in terms of exponential displacement correlation functions. About 90% of the disorder can be accounted for by internal movements correlated with a decay distance of about 6A; the remaining 10% corresponds to intermolecular movements that decay in a distance the order of size of the protein molecule. The results demonstrate that protein crystals fit into neither the Einstein nor the Debye paradigms for thermally fluctuating crystalline solids. Unlike the Einstein model, there are correlations in the atomic displacements, but these correlations decay more steeply with distance than predicted by the Debye-Waller model for an elastic solid. The observed displacement correlations are liquid -like in the sense that they decay exponentially with the distance between atoms, just as positional correlations in a liquid. This liquid-like disorder is similar to the disorder observed in 2-D crystals of polystyrene latex spheres, and similar systems where repulsive interactions dominate; hence, these colloidal crystals appear to provide a better analogy for the dynamics of protein crystals than perfectly elastic lattices.

  15. Personal Reflections

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Personal Reflections. Articles in Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Volume 6 Issue 3 March 2001 pp 90-93 Personal Reflections. Why did I opt for Career in Science? Jayant V Narlikar · More Details Fulltext PDF. Volume 9 Issue 8 August 2004 pp 89-89 ...

  16. Reflection groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggermont, G.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, PISA organised proactive meetings of reflection groups on involvement in decision making, expert culture and ethical aspects of radiation protection.All reflection group meetings address particular targeted audiences while the output publication in book form is put forward

  17. Reflection ciphers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boura, Christina; Canteaut, Anne; Knudsen, Lars Ramkilde

    2017-01-01

    study the necessary properties for this coupling permutation. Special care has to be taken of some related-key distinguishers since, in the context of reflection ciphers, they may provide attacks in the single-key setting.We then derive some criteria for constructing secure reflection ciphers...

  18. Quantifying Reflection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alcock, Gordon Lindsay

    2013-01-01

    ´ These are all based on Blooms taxonomy and levels of competence and form a major part of individual student and group learning portfolios. Key Words :Project-Based learning, Reflective Portfolios, Self assessment, Defining learning gains, Developing learning strategies , Reflections on and for learning....... It contrasts the students’ self-assessment in a range of ‘product’ skills such as Revit, Structural Design, Mathematics of construction, Technical Installations; as well as ‘process’ competencies such as ‘Working in a team’, Sharing knowledge, Maintaining a portfolio and Reflecting ON learning and FOR learning......This paper documents 1st semester student reflections on “learning to learn” in a team-based PBL environment with quantitative and qualitative student reflective feedback on the learning gains of 60 Architectural Technology and Construction Management students at VIA University College, Denmark...

  19. Vibrating crystals as possible neutron monochromators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoica, A.D.; Popovici, M.

    1983-09-01

    The Bragg reflection of neutrons of vibratinq perfect crystals is considered. The additional possibilities offered by the Doppler effect for shaping neutron beams in the k-space are discussed. A simple model for computing the vibrating crystal reflectivity is proposed. (author)

  20. Crystals in crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus H.; Schmidt, I.; Carlsson, A.

    2005-01-01

    A major factor governing the performance of catalytically active particles supported on a zeolite carrier is the degree of dispersion. It is shown that the introduction of noncrystallographic mesopores into zeolite single crystals (silicalite-1, ZSM-5) may increase the degree of particle dispersion....... As representative examples, a metal (Pt), an alloy (PtSn), and a metal carbide (beta-Mo2C) were supported on conventional and mesoporous zeolite carriers, respectively, and the degree of particle dispersion was compared by TEM imaging. On conventional zeolites, the supported material aggregated on the outer surface...

  1. FDTD simulation for plasma photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Shaobin; Zhu Chuanxi; Yuan Naichang

    2005-01-01

    Plasma photonic crystals are artificially periodic structures, which are composed of plasmas and dielectric structures (or vacuum). In this paper, the piecewise linear current density recursive convolution (PLCDRC) finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method is applied to study the plasma photonic crystals and those containing defects. In time-domain, the electromagnetic (EM) propagation process and reflection/transmission electric field of Gauss pulses passing through the plasma photonic crystals are investigated. In frequency-domain, the reflection and transmission coefficients of the pulses through the two kinds of crystals are computed. The results illustrate that the plasma photonic crystals mostly reflect for the EM wave of frequencies less than the plasma frequency, and mostly transmit for EM wave of frequencies higher than the plasma frequency. In high frequency domain, the plasma photonic crystals have photonic band gaps, which is analogous to the conventional photonic crystals. (authors)

  2. Virtual Crystallizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Land, T A; Dylla-Spears, R; Thorsness, C B

    2006-08-29

    Large dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystals are grown in large crystallizers to provide raw material for the manufacture of optical components for large laser systems. It is a challenge to grow crystal with sufficient mass and geometric properties to allow large optical plates to be cut from them. In addition, KDP has long been the canonical solution crystal for study of growth processes. To assist in the production of the crystals and the understanding of crystal growth phenomena, analysis of growth habits of large KDP crystals has been studied, small scale kinetic experiments have been performed, mass transfer rates in model systems have been measured, and computational-fluid-mechanics tools have been used to develop an engineering model of the crystal growth process. The model has been tested by looking at its ability to simulate the growth of nine KDP boules that all weighed more than 200 kg.

  3. single crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2018-05-18

    May 18, 2018 ... Abstract. 4-Nitrobenzoic acid (4-NBA) single crystals were studied for their linear and nonlinear optical ... studies on the proper growth, linear and nonlinear optical ..... between the optic axes and optic sign of the biaxial crystal.

  4. Crystal Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schomaker, Verner; Lingafelter, E. C.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses characteristics of crystal systems, comparing (in table format) crystal systems with lattice types, number of restrictions, nature of the restrictions, and other lattices that can accidently show the same metrical symmetry. (JN)

  5. Fractional Vector Calculus and Fractional Special Function

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Ming-Fan; Ren, Ji-Rong; Zhu, Tao

    2010-01-01

    Fractional vector calculus is discussed in the spherical coordinate framework. A variation of the Legendre equation and fractional Bessel equation are solved by series expansion and numerically. Finally, we generalize the hypergeometric functions.

  6. Control of crystal growth in water purification by directional freeze crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlon, William M. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A Directional Freeze Crystallization system employs an indirect contact heat exchanger to freeze a fraction of liquid to be purified. The unfrozen fraction is drained away and the purified frozen fraction is melted. The heat exchanger must be designed in accordance with a Growth Habit Index to achieve efficient separation of contaminants. If gases are dissolved in the liquid, the system must be pressurized.

  7. Specular Reflection of Sunlight from Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varnai, T.; Marshak, A.

    2018-02-01

    The Deep Space Gateway vantage point offers advantages in observing specular reflection from water surfaces or ice crystals in clouds. Such data can give information on clouds and atmospheric aerosols, and help test algorithms of future exoplanet characterization.

  8. Application of the fractional Fourier transform to the design of LCOS based optical interconnects and fiber switches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Brian; Zhang, Zichen; Yang, Haining; Redmond, Maura M; Collings, Neil; Liu, Jinsong; Lin, Ruisheng; Jeziorska-Chapman, Anna M; Moore, John R; Crossland, William A; Chu, D P

    2012-04-20

    It is shown that reflective liquid crystal on silicon (LCOS) spatial light modulator (SLM) based interconnects or fiber switches that use defocus to reduce crosstalk can be evaluated and optimized using a fractional Fourier transform if certain optical symmetry conditions are met. Theoretically the maximum allowable linear hologram phase error compared to a Fourier switch is increased by a factor of six before the target crosstalk for telecom applications of -40 dB is exceeded. A Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm incorporating a fractional Fourier transform modified for use with a reflective LCOS SLM is used to optimize multi-casting holograms in a prototype telecom switch. Experiments are in close agreement to predicted performance.

  9. Monomial Crystals and Partition Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tingley, Peter

    2010-04-01

    Recently Fayers introduced a large family of combinatorial realizations of the fundamental crystal B(Λ0) for ^sln, where the vertices are indexed by certain partitions. He showed that special cases of this construction agree with the Misra-Miwa realization and with Berg's ladder crystal. Here we show that another special case is naturally isomorphic to a realization using Nakajima's monomial crystal.

  10. Liquid Crystals in Decorative and Visual Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makow, David

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * PIGMENT AND STRUCTURAL COLOURS AND THEIR RELEVANCE TO LIQUID CRYSTALS * LIQUID CRYSTAL MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES FOR DECORATIVE AND VISUAL ARTS * Free cholesteric liquid crystals (FCLC's) * Encapsulated liquid crystals (ECLC's) * Nonsteroid Chiral nematics * Polymers with liquid crystalline properties (PLCs) * COLOUR PROPERTIES OF CHOLESTERIC LIQUID CRYSTALS (CLC's) * Molecular structure and the mechanism of colour production * Dependence of perceived colours on the angle of illumination and viewing * Dependence of perceived colours on temperature * Additive colour properties * Methods of doubling the peak reflectance of cholesteric liquid crystals * Colour gamut * Colours of superimposed and pigmented coatings * Colours in transmission * ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS * REFERENCES

  11. Reflectance Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. A.; Cooper, K.; Randolph, M.

    1984-01-01

    A classical description of the one dimensional radiative transfer treatment of vegetation canopies was completed and the results were tested against measured prairie (blue grama) and agricultural canopies (soybean). Phase functions are calculated in terms of directly measurable biophysical characteristics of the canopy medium. While the phase functions tend to exhibit backscattering anisotropy, their exact behavior is somewhat more complex and wavelength dependent. A Monte Carlo model was developed that treats soil surfaces with large periodic variations in three dimensions. A photon-ray tracing technology is used. Currently, the rough soil surface is described by analytic functions and appropriate geometric calculations performed. A bidirectional reflectance distribution function is calculated and, hence, available for other atmospheric or canopy reflectance models as a lower boundary condition. This technique is used together with an adding model to calculate several cases where Lambertian leaves possessing anisotropic leaf angle distributions yield non-Lambertian reflectance; similar behavior is exhibited for simulated soil surfaces.

  12. Diffusion Tensor Magnetic Resonance Imaging Finding of Discrepant Fractional Anisotropy Between the Frontal and Parietal Lobes After Whole-Brain Irradiation in Childhood Medulloblastoma Survivors: Reflection of Regional White Matter Radiosensitivity?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Deqiang; Kwong, Dora; Chan, Godfrey; Leung, Lucullus; Khong, P.-L.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that fractional anisotropy (FA) is more severely reduced in white matter of the frontal lobe compared with the parietal lobe after receiving the same whole-brain irradiation dose in a cohort of childhood medulloblastoma survivors. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two medulloblastoma survivors (15 male, mean [± SD] age = 12.1 ± 4.6 years) and the same number of control subjects (15 male, aged 12.0 ± 4.2 years) were recruited for diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging scans. Using an automated tissue classification method and the Talairach Daemon atlas, FA values of frontal and parietal lobes receiving the same radiation dose, and the ratio between them were quantified and denoted as FFA, PFA, and FA f/p , respectively. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to test for significant differences of FFA, PFA, and FA f/p between medulloblastoma survivors and control subjects. Results: Frontal lobe and parietal lobe white matter FA were found to be significantly less in medulloblastoma survivors compared with control subjects (frontal p = 0.001, parietal p = 0.026). Moreover, these differences were found to be discrepant, with the frontal lobe having a significantly larger difference in FA compared with the parietal lobe. The FA f/p of control and medulloblastoma survivors was 1.110 and 1.082, respectively (p = 0.029). Conclusion: Discrepant FA changes after the same irradiation dose suggest radiosensitivity of the frontal lobe white matter compared with the parietal lobe. Special efforts to address the potentially vulnerable frontal lobe after treatment with whole-brain radiation may be needed so as to balance disease control and treatment-related morbidity

  13. Reflective optics

    CERN Document Server

    Korsch, Dietrich

    1991-01-01

    This is the first book dedicated exclusively to all-reflective imaging systems. It is a teaching tool as well as a practical design tool for anyone who specializes in optics, particularly for those interested in telescopes, infrared, and grazing-incidence systems. The first part of the book describes a unified geometric optical theory of all-reflective imaging systems (from near-normal to grazing incidence) developed from basic principles. The second part discusses correction methods and a multitude of closed-form solutions of well-corrected systems, supplemented with many conventional and unc

  14. Crystallization in polydisperse colloidal suspensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, S.; Bryant, G.; Van Megen, W.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Crystallization and glass formation in colloidal hard spheres has been a very active area of research over the last 15-20 years. For most of this time particle polydispersity has been considered to be a minor concern in these studies. However, over the last few years an increasing number of simulations, theoretical work and experiments have shown that consideration of the polydispersity is critical in understanding these phenomena. In this paper we provide an overview of recent crystallization studies on particles with two very different particle size distributions. These particles exhibit very different equilibrium crystal structures and crystallization kinetics. Based on these measurements and time lapse photographs, we propose a growth mechanism whereby crystallization occurs in conjunction with a local fractionation process near the crystal-fluid interface, which significantly alters the kinetics of crystallite nucleation and growth. This fractionation effect becomes more significant as polydispersity or skewness increases. The unusual crystal structures observed are explained using a schematic model that explains the structure in terms of stacks of planes, which are unregistered due to a high incidence of stacking faults caused by the incorporation of a large number of small particles

  15. Fractional quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Laskin, Nick

    2018-01-01

    Fractional quantum mechanics is a recently emerged and rapidly developing field of quantum physics. This is the first monograph on fundamentals and physical applications of fractional quantum mechanics, written by its founder. The fractional Schrödinger equation and the fractional path integral are new fundamental physical concepts introduced and elaborated in the book. The fractional Schrödinger equation is a manifestation of fractional quantum mechanics. The fractional path integral is a new mathematical tool based on integration over Lévy flights. The fractional path integral method enhances the well-known Feynman path integral framework. Related topics covered in the text include time fractional quantum mechanics, fractional statistical mechanics, fractional classical mechanics and the α-stable Lévy random process. The book is well-suited for theorists, pure and applied mathematicians, solid-state physicists, chemists, and others working with the Schrödinger equation, the path integral technique...

  16. RNA Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Barbara L.; Kundrot, Craig E.

    2003-01-01

    RNA molecules may be crystallized using variations of the methods developed for protein crystallography. As the technology has become available to syntheisize and purify RNA molecules in the quantities and with the quality that is required for crystallography, the field of RNA structure has exploded. The first consideration when crystallizing an RNA is the sequence, which may be varied in a rational way to enhance crystallizability or prevent formation of alternate structures. Once a sequence has been designed, the RNA may be synthesized chemically by solid-state synthesis, or it may be produced enzymatically using RNA polymerase and an appropriate DNA template. Purification of milligram quantities of RNA can be accomplished by HPLC or gel electrophoresis. As with proteins, crystallization of RNA is usually accomplished by vapor diffusion techniques. There are several considerations that are either unique to RNA crystallization or more important for RNA crystallization. Techniques for design, synthesis, purification, and crystallization of RNAs will be reviewed here.

  17. Phononic crystals with one-dimensional defect as sensor materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, Arafa H.; Mehaney, Ahmed

    2017-09-01

    Recently, sensor technology has attracted great attention in many fields due to its importance in many engineering applications. In the present work, we introduce a study using the innovative properties of phononic crystals in enhancing a new type of sensors based on the intensity of transmitted frequencies inside the phononic band gaps. Based on the transfer matrix method and Bloch theory, the expressions of the reflection coefficient and dispersion relation are presented. Firstly, the influences of filling fraction ratio and the angle of incidence on the band gap width are discussed. Secondly, the localization of waves inside band gaps is discussed by enhancing the properties of the defected phononic crystal. Compared to the periodic structure, localization modes involved within the band structure of phononic crystals with one and two defect layers are presented and compared. Trapped localized modes can be detected easily and provide more information about defected structures. Such method could increase the knowledge of manufacturing defects by measuring the intensity of propagated waves in the resonant cavities and waveguides. Moreover, several factors enhance the role of the defect layer on the transmission properties of defected phononic crystals are presented. The acoustic band gap can be used to detect or sense the type of liquids filling the defect layer. The liquids make specific resonant modes through the phononic band gaps that related to the properties of each liquid. The frequency where the maximum resonant modes occur is correlated to material properties and allows to determine several parameters such as the type of an unknown material.

  18. Geochemical studies of abyssal lavas recovered by DSRV Alvin from Eastern Galapagos Rift, Inca Transform, and Ecuador Rift: 2. Phase chemistry and crystallization history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfit, Michael R.; Fornari, Daniel J.

    1983-12-01

    A diverse suite of lavas recovered by DSRV Alvin from the eastern Galapagos rift and Inca transform includes mid-ocean ridge tholeiitic basalts (MORB), iron- and titanium-enriched basalts (FeTi basalts), and abyssal andesites. Rock types transitional in character (ferrobasalts and basaltic andesites) were also recovered. The most mafic glassy basalts contain plagioclase, augite, and olivine as near-liquidus phases, whereas in more fractionated basalts, pigeonite replaces olivine and iron-titanium oxides crystallize. Plagioclase crystallizes after pyroxenes and iron-titanium oxides in andesites, possibly due to increased water contents or cooling rates. Apatite phenocrysts are present in some andesitic glasses. Ovoid sulfide globules are also common in many lavas. Compositional variations of phenocrysts in glassy lavas reflect changes in magma chemistry, temperature of crystallization, and cooling rate. The overall chemical variations parallel the chemical evolution of the lava suite and are similar to those in other fractionated tholeiitic complexes. Elemental partitioning between plagioclase-, pyroxene-, and olivine-glass pairs suggests that equilibration occurred at low pressure in a rather restricted temperature range. Various geothermometers indicate that the most primitive MORB began to crystallize between 1150° and 1200°C with fo2 PH 2 o could have been as high as 1 kbar during andesite crystallization. Compositions of the lavas from the Galapagos rift follow the experimentally determined (1 atm-QFM) liquid line of descent. Least squares calculations for the major elements indicate that the entire suite of lavas can be produced by fractional crystallization of successive residual liquids from a MORB parent magma. FeTi basalts represent 30-65 cumulative weight percent crystallization of plagioclase, augite, and olivine. An additional 30-50% fractionation of pyroxenes, plagioclase, titanomagnetite, and possible apatite is required to generate andesite from Fe

  19. Fractional vector calculus and fractional Maxwell's equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2008-01-01

    The theory of derivatives and integrals of non-integer order goes back to Leibniz, Liouville, Grunwald, Letnikov and Riemann. The history of fractional vector calculus (FVC) has only 10 years. The main approaches to formulate a FVC, which are used in the physics during the past few years, will be briefly described in this paper. We solve some problems of consistent formulations of FVC by using a fractional generalization of the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. We define the differential and integral vector operations. The fractional Green's, Stokes' and Gauss's theorems are formulated. The proofs of these theorems are realized for simplest regions. A fractional generalization of exterior differential calculus of differential forms is discussed. Fractional nonlocal Maxwell's equations and the corresponding fractional wave equations are considered

  20. Fractional statistics and fractional quantized Hall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao, R.; Wu, Y.S.

    1985-01-01

    The authors suggest that the origin of the odd-denominator rule observed in the fractional quantized Hall effect (FQHE) may lie in fractional statistics which govern quasiparticles in FQHE. A theorem concerning statistics of clusters of quasiparticles implies that fractional statistics do not allow coexistence of a large number of quasiparticles at fillings with an even denominator. Thus, no Hall plateau can be formed at these fillings, regardless of the presence of an energy gap. 15 references

  1. Crystallization mechanisms of acicular crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puel, François; Verdurand, Elodie; Taulelle, Pascal; Bebon, Christine; Colson, Didier; Klein, Jean-Paul; Veesler, Stéphane

    2008-01-01

    In this contribution, we present an experimental investigation of the growth of four different organic molecules produced at industrial scale with a view to understand the crystallization mechanism of acicular or needle-like crystals. For all organic crystals studied in this article, layer-by-layer growth of the lateral faces is very slow and clear, as soon as the supersaturation is high enough, there is competition between growth and surface-activated secondary nucleation. This gives rise to pseudo-twinned crystals composed of several needle individuals aligned along a crystallographic axis; this is explained by regular over- and inter-growths as in the case of twinning. And when supersaturation is even higher, nucleation is fast and random. In an industrial continuous crystallization, the rapid growth of needle-like crystals is to be avoided as it leads to fragile crystals or needles, which can be partly broken or totally detached from the parent crystals especially along structural anisotropic axis corresponding to weaker chemical bonds, thus leading to slower growing faces. When an activated mechanism is involved such as a secondary surface nucleation, it is no longer possible to obtain a steady state. Therefore, the crystal number, size and habit vary significantly with time, leading to troubles in the downstream processing operations and to modifications of the final solid-specific properties. These results provide valuable information on the unique crystallization mechanisms of acicular crystals, and show that it is important to know these threshold and critical values when running a crystallizer in order to obtain easy-to-handle crystals.

  2. Initialized Fractional Calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.; Hartley, Tom T.

    2000-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the need for a nonconstant initialization for the fractional calculus and establishes a basic definition set for the initialized fractional differintegral. This definition set allows the formalization of an initialized fractional calculus. Two basis calculi are considered; the Riemann-Liouville and the Grunwald fractional calculi. Two forms of initialization, terminal and side are developed.

  3. Tempered fractional calculus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabzikar, Farzad, E-mail: sabzika2@stt.msu.edu [Department of Statistics and Probability, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48823 (United States); Meerschaert, Mark M., E-mail: mcubed@stt.msu.edu [Department of Statistics and Probability, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48823 (United States); Chen, Jinghua, E-mail: cjhdzdz@163.com [School of Sciences, Jimei University, Xiamen, Fujian, 361021 (China)

    2015-07-15

    Fractional derivatives and integrals are convolutions with a power law. Multiplying by an exponential factor leads to tempered fractional derivatives and integrals. Tempered fractional diffusion equations, where the usual second derivative in space is replaced by a tempered fractional derivative, govern the limits of random walk models with an exponentially tempered power law jump distribution. The limiting tempered stable probability densities exhibit semi-heavy tails, which are commonly observed in finance. Tempered power law waiting times lead to tempered fractional time derivatives, which have proven useful in geophysics. The tempered fractional derivative or integral of a Brownian motion, called a tempered fractional Brownian motion, can exhibit semi-long range dependence. The increments of this process, called tempered fractional Gaussian noise, provide a useful new stochastic model for wind speed data. A tempered fractional difference forms the basis for numerical methods to solve tempered fractional diffusion equations, and it also provides a useful new correlation model in time series.

  4. Tempered fractional calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabzikar, Farzad; Meerschaert, Mark M.; Chen, Jinghua

    2015-07-01

    Fractional derivatives and integrals are convolutions with a power law. Multiplying by an exponential factor leads to tempered fractional derivatives and integrals. Tempered fractional diffusion equations, where the usual second derivative in space is replaced by a tempered fractional derivative, govern the limits of random walk models with an exponentially tempered power law jump distribution. The limiting tempered stable probability densities exhibit semi-heavy tails, which are commonly observed in finance. Tempered power law waiting times lead to tempered fractional time derivatives, which have proven useful in geophysics. The tempered fractional derivative or integral of a Brownian motion, called a tempered fractional Brownian motion, can exhibit semi-long range dependence. The increments of this process, called tempered fractional Gaussian noise, provide a useful new stochastic model for wind speed data. A tempered fractional difference forms the basis for numerical methods to solve tempered fractional diffusion equations, and it also provides a useful new correlation model in time series.

  5. Tempered fractional calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabzikar, Farzad; Meerschaert, Mark M.; Chen, Jinghua

    2015-01-01

    Fractional derivatives and integrals are convolutions with a power law. Multiplying by an exponential factor leads to tempered fractional derivatives and integrals. Tempered fractional diffusion equations, where the usual second derivative in space is replaced by a tempered fractional derivative, govern the limits of random walk models with an exponentially tempered power law jump distribution. The limiting tempered stable probability densities exhibit semi-heavy tails, which are commonly observed in finance. Tempered power law waiting times lead to tempered fractional time derivatives, which have proven useful in geophysics. The tempered fractional derivative or integral of a Brownian motion, called a tempered fractional Brownian motion, can exhibit semi-long range dependence. The increments of this process, called tempered fractional Gaussian noise, provide a useful new stochastic model for wind speed data. A tempered fractional difference forms the basis for numerical methods to solve tempered fractional diffusion equations, and it also provides a useful new correlation model in time series

  6. Reflective Efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Bagnoli

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to highlight some difficulties of Neil Sinhababu’s Humean theory of agency, which depend on his radically reductivist approach, rather than to his Humean sympathies. The argument is that Sinhababu’s theory builds upon a critique of reflective agency which is based on equivocation and misunderstandings of the Kantian approach. Ultimately, the objection is that his reductivist view is unequipped to address the rclassical problems of rational deliberation and agential authority.

  7. Higher fractions theory of fractional hall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostadinov, I.Z.; Popov, V.N.

    1985-07-01

    A theory of fractional quantum Hall effect is generalized to higher fractions. N-particle model interaction is used and the gap is expressed through n-particles wave function. The excitation spectrum in general and the mean field critical behaviour are determined. The Hall conductivity is calculated from first principles. (author)

  8. Preventing Crystal Agglomeration of Pharmaceutical Crystals Using Temperature Cycling and a Novel Membrane Crystallization Procedure for Seed Crystal Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Simone

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a novel membrane crystallization system was used to crystallize micro-sized seeds of piroxicam monohydrate by reverse antisolvent addition. Membrane crystallization seeds were compared with seeds produced by conventional antisolvent addition and polymorphic transformation of a fine powdered sample of piroxicam form I in water. The membrane crystallization process allowed for a consistent production of pure monohydrate crystals with narrow size distribution and without significant agglomeration. The seeds were grown in 350 g of 20:80 w/w acetone-water mixture. Different seeding loads were tested and temperature cycling was applied in order to avoid agglomeration of the growing crystals during the process. Focused beam reflectance measurement (FBRM; and particle vision and measurement (PVM were used to monitor crystal growth; nucleation and agglomeration during the seeded experiments. Furthermore; Raman spectroscopy was used to monitor solute concentration and estimate the overall yield of the process. Membrane crystallization was proved to be the most convenient and consistent method to produce seeds of highly agglomerating compounds; which can be grown via cooling crystallization and temperature cycling.

  9. Evaluation of surviving fraction using nonclonogenic staining densitometry method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiguchi, Iku; Ogawa, Koichi; Ito, Hisao; Hashimoto, Shozo

    1994-01-01

    This study was performed to compare our nonclonogenic survival assay (densitometry assay, DM assay) with the widely used clonogenic assay. The established cell lines (HaLa, RMUG, IMR, GOTO) were grown in F 10 medium. The cells were spread in 24-well plates, irradiated with different doses, cultured for about one week and stained with crystal violet after the culture period. Taking the transparent images of the stained well on the light source with the CCD camera, the images were collected with the matrix size 64 x 64, and the integrated optical density of the entire surface of each well was determined by computer with our original program. As the number of cells in the well is reflected by its staining density, the surviving fraction was calculated as the fraction of growth in the irradiated wells relative to controls. The survival curves obtained by the densitometry method showed good correlations with those obtained by clonogenic assay. It is possible to predict intrinsic radiosensitivity with this assay, even if the cells do not form good colonies. However, this method is based on measurements in cultures which depend on the metabolism and growth kinetics of the irradiated cells. Cells should grow exponetially in the same manner in any well to obtain a result similar to that of clonogenic assay, although growth kinetics may be altered by irradiation. This, the endpoint must be strictly standardized. (author)

  10. Theory of reflection reflection and transmission of electromagnetic, particle and acoustic waves

    CERN Document Server

    Lekner, John

    2016-01-01

    This book deals with the reflection of electromagnetic and particle waves by interfaces. The interfaces can be sharp or diffuse. The topics of the book contain absorption, inverse problems, anisotropy, pulses and finite beams, rough surfaces, matrix methods, numerical methods,  reflection of particle waves and neutron reflection. Exact general results are presented, followed by long wave reflection, variational theory, reflection amplitude equations of the Riccati type, and reflection of short waves. The Second Edition of the Theory of Reflection is an updated and much enlarged revision of the 1987 monograph. There are new chapters on periodically stratified media, ellipsometry, chiral media, neutron reflection and reflection of acoustic waves. The chapter on anisotropy is much extended, with a complete treatment of the reflection and transmission properties of arbitrarily oriented uniaxial crystals. The book gives a systematic and unified treatment reflection and transmission of electromagnetic and particle...

  11. Goos-Haenchen shift in complex crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longhi, Stefano; Della Valle, Giuseppe; Staliunas, Kestutis [Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Departament de Fisica i Enginyeria Nuclear, Instituci Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avanats (ICREA), Universitat Politcnica de Catalunya, Colom 11, E-08222 Terrassa, Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-10-15

    The Goos-Haenchen (GH) effect for wave scattering from complex PT-symmetric periodic potentials (complex crystals) is theoretically investigated, with specific reference to optical GH shift in photonic crystal slabs with a sinusoidal periodic modulation of both real and imaginary parts of the dielectric constant. The analysis highlights some distinct and rather unique features as compared to the GH shift found in ordinary crystals. In particular, as opposed to GH shift in ordinary crystals, which is large at the band gap edges, in complex crystals the GH shift can be large inside the reflection (amplification) band and becomes extremely large as the PT symmetry-breaking threshold is approached.

  12. Crystal collimator systems for high energy frontier

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2100516; Tikhomirov, Viktor; Lobko, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Crystalline collimators can potentially considerably improve the cleaning performance of the presently used collimator systems using amorphous collimators. A crystal-based collimation scheme which relies on the channeling particle deflection in bent crystals has been proposed and extensively studied both theoretically and experimentally. However, since the efficiency of particle capture into the channeling regime does not exceed ninety percent, this collimation scheme partly suffers from the same leakage problems as the schemes using amorphous collimators. To improve further the cleaning efficiency of the crystal-based collimation system to meet the requirements of the FCC, we suggest here a double crystal-based collimation scheme, to which the second crystal is introduced to enhance the deflection of the particles escaping the capture to the channeling regime in its first crystal. The application of the effect of multiple volume reflection in one bent crystal and of the same in a sequence of crystals is simu...

  13. On Reflection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blasco, Maribel

    2012-01-01

    produces: that the self is accessible and transcendable, that reflexivity is universal across space and time, and that the self can act as its own remedial change agent or ‘inner consultant.’ I argue that because reflexivity is understood in many different ways, attention to definition is crucial, both...... on the concepts of selfhood that prevail and how notions of difference are constructed. First, I discuss how the dominant usages of reflexivity in intercultural education reflect and reproduce a Cartesian view of the self that shapes how ICC is conceptualized and taught. I discuss three assumptions that this view...

  14. Inspiring Reflections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muchie, Mammo

    2011-01-01

    A numberof Chris Freeman's colleagues were asked to reflect on what they thought describes his life and work in a few words. Some of the colleagues replied including former SPRU students that were taught or supervised by Chris Freeman. Their views on what they thought were Chris Freeman's defining...... life is not free from fluctuations, cycles, disruptions, crises and destructions both human and ecological. Innovation research ought to position itself to address environmental, financial and economic crises. The third is innovation research for development by addressing not only poverty erdaication...

  15. Reflective Writing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahrenkiel Jørgensen, Andriette

    2016-01-01

    In Breve fra min Have (Letters from my Garden), the Swedish landscape architect, Sven-Ingvar Andersson, produces dialogues about his garden to a wide circle of friends, colleagues, deceased and still living acquaintances such as Karen Blixen, Gertrude Stein, C. Th. Sørensen, Albrecht Dürer, Peter...... Høeg etetera. The dialogues work as a tool of reflection in terms of providing opportunity to examine his own beliefs, to explore the possible reasons for engaging in a particular activity. On the basis of Sven-Ingvar Andersson’s book a teaching program at the Aarhus School of Architecture provides...

  16. Reflective Packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    The aluminized polymer film used in spacecraft as a radiation barrier to protect both astronauts and delicate instruments has led to a number of spinoff applications. Among them are aluminized shipping bags, food cart covers and medical bags. Radiant Technologies purchases component materials and assembles a barrier made of layers of aluminized foil. The packaging reflects outside heat away from the product inside the container. The company is developing new aluminized lines, express mailers, large shipping bags, gel packs and insulated panels for the building industry.

  17. In Situ Focused Beam Reflectance Measurement (FBRM, Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR and Raman Characterization of the Polymorphic Transformation of Carbamazepine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohrab Rohani

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to study the polymorphic transformation of carbamazepine from Form II to Form III in 1-propanol during seeded isothermal batch crystallization. First, the pure Form II and Form III were obtained and characterized. Then their solubilities and metastable zone limits were measured by in-situ attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and focused beam reflectance measurement (FBRM. A transition temperature at about 34.2 °C was deduced suggesting the enantiotropic nature of this compound over the studied temperature range. To quantify the polymorph ratio during the transformation process, a new in-situ quantitative method was developed to measure the fraction of Form II by Raman spectroscopy. Successful tracking of the nucleation of the stable form and the transformation from Form II to Form III during isothermal crystallization was achieved by Raman spectroscopy and FBRM. The results from these three in-situ techniques, FBRM, FTIR and Raman were consistent with each other. The results showed a strong dependency on the amount of seeds added during isothermal crystallization.

  18. Neutron reflectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cousin Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The specular neutron reflectivity is a technique enabling the measurement of neutron scattering length density profile perpendicular to the plane of a surface or an interface, and thereby the profile of chemical composition. The characteristic sizes that are probed range from around 5 Å up 5000 Å. It is a scattering technique that averages information on the entire surface and it is therefore not possible to obtain information within the plane of the interface. The specific properties of neutrons (possibility of tuning the contrast by isotopic substitution, sensitivity to magnetism, negligible absorption, low energy of the incident neutrons makes it particularly interesting in the fields of soft matter, biophysics and magnetic thin films. This course is a basic introduction to the technique and does not address the magnetic reflectivity. It is composed of three parts describing respectively its principle and its formalism, the experimental aspects of the method (spectrometers, samples and two examples related to the materials for energy.

  19. Fractional flux quanta in Josephson junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldobin, E.; Buckenmaier, K.; Gaber, T.; Kemmler, M.; Pfeiffer, J.; Koelle, D.; Kleiner, R. [Physikalisches Inst. - Experimentalphysik II, Univ. Tuebingen (Germany); Weides, M.; Kohlstedt, H. [Center of Nanoelectronic Systems for Information Technology (CNI), Research Centre Juelich (Germany); Siegel, M. [Inst. fuer Mikro- und Nanoelektronische Systeme, Univ. Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Fractional Josephson vortices may appear in the so-called 0-{kappa} Josephson junctions ({kappa} is an arbitrary number) and carry magnetic flux {phi}, which is a fraction of the magnetic flux quantum {phi}{sub 0}{approx}2.07 x 10{sup -15} Wb. Their properties are very different from the usual integer fluxons: they are pinned, and often represent the ground state of the system with spontaneous circulating supercurrent. They behave as well controlled macroscopic spins and can be used to construct bits, qubits, tunable photonic crystals and to study the (quantum) physics of spin systems. In this talk we discuss recent advances in 0-{pi} junction technology and present recent experimental results: evidence of the spontaneous flux in the ground state, spectroscopy of the fractional vortex eigenfrequencies and observation of dynamics effects related to the flipping of the fractional vortices. (orig.)

  20. Asphalt chemical fractionation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obando P, Klever N.

    1998-01-01

    Asphalt fractionation were carried out in the Esmeraldas Oil Refinery using n-pentane, SiO 2 and different mixture of benzene- methane. The fractions obtained were analyzed by Fourier's Transformed Infrared Spectrophotometry (FTIR)

  1. Interpretation of the shape of electron diffraction spots from small polyhedral crystals by means of the crystal shape amplitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumann, W.; Hofmeister, H.; Heydenreich, J.; Komrska, J.

    1988-01-01

    The influence of the crystal shape on the fine structure of transmission electron diffraction (TED) patterns described by the crystal shape amplitude is discussed. A general algebraic expression for the crystal shape amplitude of any crystal polyhedron is used for computing the intensity distribution of TED reflections. The computer simulation method is applied to the analysis of the fine structure of TED patterns of small gold and palladium crystals having octahedral and tetrahedral habits. (orig.)

  2. Smarandache Continued Fractions

    OpenAIRE

    Ibstedt, H.

    2001-01-01

    The theory of general continued fractions is developed to the extent required in order to calculate Smarandache continued fractions to a given number of decimal places. Proof is given for the fact that Smarandache general continued fractions built with positive integer Smarandache sequences baving only a finite number of terms equal to 1 is convergent. A few numerical results are given.

  3. Structural origin of dynamic heterogeneity in three-dimensional colloidal glass formers and its link to crystal nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Takeshi; Tanaka, Hajime

    2010-06-16

    The physical understanding of glass transition remains a major challenge of physics and materials science. Among various glass-forming liquids, a colloidal liquid interacting with hard-core repulsion is now regarded as one of the most ideal model systems. Here we study the structure and dynamics of three-dimensional polydisperse colloidal liquids by Brownian dynamics simulations. We reveal that medium-range crystalline bond orientational order of the hexagonal close packed structure grows in size and lifetime with increasing packing fraction. We show that dynamic heterogeneity may be a direct consequence of this transient structural ordering, which suggests its origin is thermodynamic rather than kinetic. We also reveal that nucleation of crystals preferentially occurs in regions of high medium-range order, reflecting the low crystal-liquid interfacial energy there. These findings may shed new light not only on the fundamental nature of the glass transition, but also the mechanism of crystal nucleation.

  4. Controlled nucleation and crystallization of fluorozirconate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frischat, G.H.

    1993-01-01

    Pt, Se, and Ag, respectively, were used as nucleating agents for a ZrF 4 -BaF 4 -YF 3 -AlF 3 glass. Nucleation and crystal growth rates were determined as a function of experimental conditions. In all cases the bulk crystals mainly consist of β-BaZrF6, leading to a relatively coarse-grained microstructure. However, in the case of Ag used as a nucleating agent, the microstructure is bimodal with an additional fine-grained crystal phase. In the cases of Se and Ag the relative crystal fraction could be developed in a controlled way between 0 and 100%

  5. Optics of globular photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorelik, V S

    2007-01-01

    The results of experimental and theoretical studies of the optical properties of globular photonic crystals - new physical objects having a crystal structure with the lattice period exceeding considerably the atomic size, are presented. As globular photonic crystals, artificial opal matrices consisting of close-packed silica globules of diameter ∼200 nm were used. The reflection spectra of these objects characterising the parameters of photonic bands existing in these crystals in the visible spectral region are presented. The idealised models of the energy band structure of photonic crystals investigated in the review give analytic dispersion dependences for the group velocity and the effective photon mass in a globular photonic crystal. The characteristics of secondary emission excited in globular photonic crystals by monochromatic and broadband radiation are presented. The results of investigations of single-photon-excited delayed scattering of light observed in globular photonic crystals exposed to cw UV radiation and radiation from a repetitively pulsed copper vapour laser are presented. The possibilities of using globular photonic crystals as active media for lasing in different spectral regions are considered. It is proposed to use globular photonic crystals as sensitive sensors in optoelectronic devices for molecular analysis of organic and inorganic materials by the modern methods of laser spectroscopy. The results of experimental studies of spontaneous and stimulated globular scattering of light are discussed. The conditions for observing resonance and two-photon-excited delayed scattering of light are found. The possibility of accumulation and localisation of the laser radiation energy inside a globular photonic crystal is reported. (review)

  6. Butterfly wing color: A photonic crystal demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proietti Zaccaria, Remo

    2016-01-01

    We have theoretically modeled the optical behavior of a natural occurring photonic crystal, as defined by the geometrical characteristics of the Teinopalpus Imperialis butterfly. In particular, following a genetic algorithm approach, we demonstrate how its wings follow a triclinic crystal geometry with a tetrahedron unit base. By performing both photonic band analysis and transmission/reflection simulations, we are able to explain the characteristic colors emerging by the butterfly wings, thus confirming their crystal form.

  7. Fractional smith chart theory

    KAUST Repository

    Shamim, Atif

    2011-03-01

    For the first time, a generalized Smith chart is introduced here to represent fractional order circuit elements. It is shown that the standard Smith chart is a special case of the generalized fractional order Smith chart. With illustrations drawn for both the conventional integer based lumped elements and the fractional elements, a graphical technique supported by the analytical method is presented to plot impedances on the fractional Smith chart. The concept is then applied towards impedance matching networks, where the fractional approach proves to be much more versatile and results in a single element matching network for a complex load as compared to the two elements in the conventional approach. © 2010 IEEE.

  8. Reflected Glory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    The nebula Messier 78 takes centre stage in this image taken with the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla Observatory in Chile, while the stars powering the bright display take a backseat. The brilliant starlight ricochets off dust particles in the nebula, illuminating it with scattered blue light. Igor Chekalin was the overall winner of ESO's Hidden Treasures 2010 astrophotography competition with his image of this stunning object. Messier 78 is a fine example of a reflection nebula. The ultraviolet radiation from the stars that illuminate it is not intense enough to ionise the gas to make it glow - its dust particles simply reflect the starlight that falls on them. Despite this, Messier 78 can easily be observed with a small telescope, being one of the brightest reflection nebulae in the sky. It lies about 1350 light-years away in the constellation of Orion (The Hunter) and can be found northeast of the easternmost star of Orion's belt. This new image of Messier 78 from the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla Observatory is based on data selected by Igor Chekalin in his winning entry to the Hidden Treasures competition [1]. The pale blue tint seen in the nebula in this picture is an accurate representation of its dominant colour. Blue hues are commonly seen in reflection nebulae because of the way the starlight is scattered by the tiny dust particles that they contain: the shorter wavelength of blue light is scattered more efficiently than the longer wavelength red light. This image contains many other striking features apart from the glowing nebula. A thick band of obscuring dust stretches across the image from the upper left to the lower right, blocking the light from background stars. In the bottom right corner, many curious pink structures are also visible, which are created by jets of material being ejected from stars that have recently formed and are still buried deep in dust clouds. Two bright stars, HD 38563A and

  9. Fractional factorial plans

    CERN Document Server

    Dey, Aloke

    2009-01-01

    A one-stop reference to fractional factorials and related orthogonal arrays.Presenting one of the most dynamic areas of statistical research, this book offers a systematic, rigorous, and up-to-date treatment of fractional factorial designs and related combinatorial mathematics. Leading statisticians Aloke Dey and Rahul Mukerjee consolidate vast amounts of material from the professional literature--expertly weaving fractional replication, orthogonal arrays, and optimality aspects. They develop the basic theory of fractional factorials using the calculus of factorial arrangements, thereby providing a unified approach to the study of fractional factorial plans. An indispensable guide for statisticians in research and industry as well as for graduate students, Fractional Factorial Plans features: * Construction procedures of symmetric and asymmetric orthogonal arrays. * Many up-to-date research results on nonexistence. * A chapter on optimal fractional factorials not based on orthogonal arrays. * Trend-free plans...

  10. Fractional Dynamics and Control

    CERN Document Server

    Machado, José; Luo, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Fractional Dynamics and Control provides a comprehensive overview of recent advances in the areas of nonlinear dynamics, vibration and control with analytical, numerical, and experimental results. This book provides an overview of recent discoveries in fractional control, delves into fractional variational principles and differential equations, and applies advanced techniques in fractional calculus to solving complicated mathematical and physical problems.Finally, this book also discusses the role that fractional order modeling can play in complex systems for engineering and science. Discusses how fractional dynamics and control can be used to solve nonlinear science and complexity issues Shows how fractional differential equations and models can be used to solve turbulence and wave equations in mechanics and gravity theories and Schrodinger’s equation  Presents factional relaxation modeling of dielectric materials and wave equations for dielectrics  Develops new methods for control and synchronization of...

  11. Enhancement of crystal homogeneity of protein crystals under application of an external alternating current electric field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koizumi, H.; Uda, S.; Fujiwara, K.; Nozawa, J. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai, 980-8577 (Japan); Tachibana, M. [Graduate School of Nanobioscience, Yokohama City University, 22-2 Seto, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama, 236-0027 (Japan); Kojima, K. [Department of Education, Yokohama Soei University, 1 Miho-tyou, Midori-ku, Yokohama, 226-0015 (Japan)

    2014-10-06

    X-ray diffraction rocking-curve measurements were performed on tetragonal hen egg white (HEW) lysozyme crystals grown with and without the application of an external alternating current (AC) electric field. The crystal quality was assessed by the full width at half maximum (FWHM) value for each rocking curve. For two-dimensional maps of the FWHMs measured on the 440 and the 12 12 0 reflection, the crystal homogeneity was improved under application of an external electric field at 1 MHz, compared with that without. In particular, the significant improvement of the crystal homogeneity was observed for the 12 12 0 reflection.

  12. Crustal contamination and crystal entrapment during polybaric magma evolution at Mt. Somma-Vesuvius volcano, Italy: Geochemical and Sr isotope evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piochi, M.; Ayuso, R.A.; de Vivo, B.; Somma, R.

    2006-01-01

    New major and trace element analyses and Sr-isotope determinations of rocks from Mt. Somma-Vesuvius volcano produced from 25 ky BP to 1944 AD are part of an extensive database documenting the geochemical evolution of this classic region. Volcanic rocks include silica undersaturated, potassic and ultrapotassic lavas and tephras characterized by variable mineralogy and different crystal abundance, as well as by wide ranges of trace element contents and a wide span of initial Sr-isotopic compositions. Both the degree of undersaturation in silica and the crystal content increase through time, being higher in rocks produced after the eruption at 472 AD (Pollena eruption). Compositional variations have been generally thought to reflect contributions from diverse types of mantle and crust. Magma mixing is commonly invoked as a fundamental process affecting the magmas, in addition to crystal fractionation. Our assessment of geochemical and Sr-isotopic data indicates that compositional variability also reflects the influence of crustal contamination during magma evolution during upward migration to shallow crustal levels and/or by entrapment of crystal mush generated during previous magma storage in the crust. Using a variant of the assimilation fractional crystallization model (Energy Conservation-Assimilation Fractional Crystallization; [Spera and Bohrson, 2001. Energy-constrained open-system magmatic processes I: General model and energy-constrained assimilation and fractional crystallization (EC-AFC) formulation. J. Petrol. 999-1018]; [Bohrson, W.A. and Spera, F.J., 2001. Energy-constrained open-system magmatic process II: application of energy-constrained assimilation-fractional crystallization (EC-AFC) model to magmatic systems. J. Petrol. 1019-1041]) we estimated the contributions from the crust and suggest that contamination by carbonate rocks that underlie the volcano (2 km down to 9-10 km) is a fundamental process controlling magma compositions at Mt. Somma

  13. Dividing Fractions: A Pedagogical Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Robert

    2016-01-01

    When dividing one fraction by a second fraction, invert, that is, flip the second fraction, then multiply it by the first fraction. To multiply fractions, simply multiply across the denominators, and multiply across the numerators to get the resultant fraction. So by inverting the division of fractions it is turned into an easy multiplication of…

  14. Helium crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipson, S.G.

    1987-01-01

    Hexagonal close-packed helium crystals in equilibrium with superfluid have been found to be one of the few systems in which an anisotropic solid comes into true thermodynamic equilibrium with its melt. The discovery of roughening transitions at the liquid-solid interface have shown this system to be ideal for the study of the statistical mechanics of interface structures. We describe the effect of roughening on the shape and growth of macroscopic crystals from both the theoretical and experimental points of view. (author)

  15. Crystal collimator systems for high energy frontier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sytov, A. I.; Tikhomirov, V. V.; Lobko, A. S.

    2017-07-01

    Crystalline collimators can potentially considerably improve the cleaning performance of the presently used collimator systems using amorphous collimators. A crystal-based collimation scheme which relies on the channeling particle deflection in bent crystals has been proposed and extensively studied both theoretically and experimentally. However, since the efficiency of particle capture into the channeling regime does not exceed ninety percent, this collimation scheme partly suffers from the same leakage problems as the schemes using amorphous collimators. To improve further the cleaning efficiency of the crystal-based collimation system to meet the requirements of the FCC, we suggest here a double crystal-based collimation scheme, to which the second crystal is introduced to enhance the deflection of the particles escaping the capture to the channeling regime in its first crystal. The application of the effect of multiple volume reflection in one bent crystal and of the same in a sequence of crystals is simulated and compared for different crystal numbers and materials at the energy of 50 TeV. To enhance also the efficiency of use of the first crystal of the suggested double crystal-based scheme, we propose: the method of increase of the probability of particle capture into the channeling regime at the first crystal passage by means of fabrication of a crystal cut and the method of the amplification of nonchanneled particle deflection through the multiple volume reflection in one bent crystal, accompanying the particle channeling by a skew plane. We simulate both of these methods for the 50 TeV FCC energy.

  16. Pressure sensor using liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Devendra S. (Inventor); Holmes, Harlan K. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A pressure sensor includes a liquid crystal positioned between transparent, electrically conductive films (18 and 20), that are biased by a voltage (V) which induces an electric field (E) that causes the liquid crystal to assume a first state of orientation. Application of pressure (P) to a flexible, transparent film (24) causes the conductive film (20) to move closer to or farther from the conductive film (18), thereby causing a change in the electric field (E'(P)) which causes the liquid crystal to assume a second state of orientation. Polarized light (P.sub.1) is directed into the liquid crystal and transmitted or reflected to an analyzer (A or 30). Changes in the state of orientation of the liquid crystal induced by applied pressure (P) result in a different light intensity being detected at the analyzer (A or 30) as a function of the applied pressure (P). In particular embodiments, the liquid crystal is present as droplets (10) in a polymer matrix (12) or in cells (14) in a polymeric or dielectric grid (16) material in the form of a layer (13) between the electrically conductive films (18 and 20). The liquid crystal fills the open wells in the polymer matrix (12) or grid (16) only partially.

  17. Mosaic crystal algorithm for Monte Carlo simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Seeger, P A

    2002-01-01

    An algorithm is presented for calculating reflectivity, absorption, and scattering of mosaic crystals in Monte Carlo simulations of neutron instruments. The algorithm uses multi-step transport through the crystal with an exact solution of the Darwin equations at each step. It relies on the kinematical model for Bragg reflection (with parameters adjusted to reproduce experimental data). For computation of thermal effects (the Debye-Waller factor and coherent inelastic scattering), an expansion of the Debye integral as a rapidly converging series of exponential terms is also presented. Any crystal geometry and plane orientation may be treated. The algorithm has been incorporated into the neutron instrument simulation package NISP. (orig.)

  18. Fractional distillation of oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, L D

    1931-10-31

    A method of dividing oil into lubricating oil fractions without substantial cracking by introducing the oil in a heated state into a fractionating column from which oil fractions having different boiling points are withdrawn at different levels, while reflux liquid is supplied to the top of the column, and additional heat is introduced into the column by contacting with the oil therein a heated fluid of higher monlecular weight than water and less susceptible to thermal decomposition than is the highest boiling oil fraction resulting from the distillation, or of which any products produced by thermal decomposition will not occur in the highest boiling distillate withdrawn from the column.

  19. X-ray reflectivity and surface roughness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ocko, B.M.

    1988-01-01

    Since the advent of high brightness synchrotron radiation sources there has been a phenomenal growth in the use of x-rays as a probe of surface structure. The technique of x-ray reflectivity is particularly relevant to electrochemists since it is capable of probing the structure normal to an electrode surface in situ. In this paper the theoretical framework for x-ray reflectivity is reviewed and the results from previous non-electrochemistry measurements are summarized. These measurements are from the liquid/air interface (CCl 4 ), the metal crystal vacuum interface (Au(100)), and from the liquid/solid interface(liquid crystal/silicon). 34 refs., 5 figs

  20. Photonic crystals: role of architecture and disorder on spectral properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Rupesh; Audhkhasi, Romil; Thyagarajan, Krishna; Banerjee, Varsha

    2018-03-01

    Many of the present-day optical devices use photonic crystals. These are multilayers of dielectric media that control the reflection and transmission of light falling on them. In this paper, we study the optical properties of periodic, fractal, and aperiodic photonic crystals and compare them based on their attributes. Our calculations of the band reflectivity and degree of robustness reveal novel features, e.g., fractal photonic crystals are found to reflect the maximum amount of incident light. On the other hand, aperiodic photonic crystals have the largest immunity to disorder. We believe that such properties will be useful in a variety of applications in the field of optical communication.

  1. Fractional Poisson process (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaotian; Wen Zhixiong; Zhang Shiying

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a stochastic process W H (t)(H-bar (12,1)) which we call fractional Poisson process. The process W H (t) is self-similar in wide sense, displays long range dependence, and has more fatter tail than Gaussian process. In addition, it converges to fractional Brownian motion in distribution

  2. An Appetite for Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkerson, Trena L.; Bryan, Tommy; Curry, Jane

    2012-01-01

    This article describes how using candy bars as models gives sixth-grade students a taste for learning to represent fractions whose denominators are factors of twelve. Using paper models of the candy bars, students explored and compared fractions. They noticed fewer different representations for one-third than for one-half. The authors conclude…

  3. Can Kindergartners Do Fractions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cwikla, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Mathematics professor Julie Cwikla decided that she needed to investigate young children's understandings and see what precurricular partitioning notions young minds bring to the fraction table. Cwikla realized that only a handful of studies have examined how preschool-age and early elementary school-age students solve fraction problems (Empson…

  4. Fractional bosonic strings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Victor Alfonzo; Giusti, Andrea

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a simple generalization of bosonic string theory in the framework of the theory of fractional variational problems. Specifically, we present a fractional extension of the Polyakov action, for which we compute the general form of the equations of motion and discuss the connection between the new fractional action and a generalization the Nambu-Goto action. Consequently, we analyze the symmetries of the modified Polyakov action and try to fix the gauge, following the classical procedures. Then we solve the equations of motion in a simplified setting. Finally, we present a Hamiltonian description of the classical fractional bosonic string and introduce the fractional light-cone gauge. It is important to remark that, throughout the whole paper, we thoroughly discuss how to recover the known results as an "integer" limit of the presented model.

  5. REVIEW: Optics of globular photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelik, V. S.

    2007-05-01

    The results of experimental and theoretical studies of the optical properties of globular photonic crystals - new physical objects having a crystal structure with the lattice period exceeding considerably the atomic size, are presented. As globular photonic crystals, artificial opal matrices consisting of close-packed silica globules of diameter ~200 nm were used. The reflection spectra of these objects characterising the parameters of photonic bands existing in these crystals in the visible spectral region are presented. The idealised models of the energy band structure of photonic crystals investigated in the review give analytic dispersion dependences for the group velocity and the effective photon mass in a globular photonic crystal. The characteristics of secondary emission excited in globular photonic crystals by monochromatic and broadband radiation are presented. The results of investigations of single-photon-excited delayed scattering of light observed in globular photonic crystals exposed to cw UV radiation and radiation from a repetitively pulsed copper vapour laser are presented. The possibilities of using globular photonic crystals as active media for lasing in different spectral regions are considered. It is proposed to use globular photonic crystals as sensitive sensors in optoelectronic devices for molecular analysis of organic and inorganic materials by the modern methods of laser spectroscopy. The results of experimental studies of spontaneous and stimulated globular scattering of light are discussed. The conditions for observing resonance and two-photon-excited delayed scattering of light are found. The possibility of accumulation and localisation of the laser radiation energy inside a globular photonic crystal is reported.

  6. Magnetophotonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, M [Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Fujikawa, R [Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Baryshev, A [Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Khanikaev, A [Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Lim, P B [CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Saitama 332-0012, Japan (Japan); Uchida, H [Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Aktsipetrov, O [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, Moscow, 119992 (Russian Federation); Fedyanin, A [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, Moscow, 119992 (Russian Federation); Murzina, T [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, Moscow, 119992 (Russian Federation); Granovsky, A [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, Moscow, 119992 (Russian Federation)

    2006-04-21

    When the constitutive materials of photonic crystals (PCs) are magnetic, or even only a defect introduced in PCs is magnetic, the resultant PCs exhibit very unique optical and magneto-optical properties. The strong photon confinement in the vicinity of magnetic defects results in large enhancement in linear and nonlinear magneto-optical responses of the media. Novel functions, such as band Faraday effect, magnetic super-prism effect and non-reciprocal or magnetically controllable photonic band structure, are predicted to occur theoretically. All the unique features of the media arise from the existence of magnetization in media, and hence they are called magnetophotonic crystals providing the spin-dependent nature in PCs. (topical review)

  7. Magnetophotonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, M; Fujikawa, R; Baryshev, A; Khanikaev, A; Lim, P B; Uchida, H; Aktsipetrov, O; Fedyanin, A; Murzina, T; Granovsky, A

    2006-01-01

    When the constitutive materials of photonic crystals (PCs) are magnetic, or even only a defect introduced in PCs is magnetic, the resultant PCs exhibit very unique optical and magneto-optical properties. The strong photon confinement in the vicinity of magnetic defects results in large enhancement in linear and nonlinear magneto-optical responses of the media. Novel functions, such as band Faraday effect, magnetic super-prism effect and non-reciprocal or magnetically controllable photonic band structure, are predicted to occur theoretically. All the unique features of the media arise from the existence of magnetization in media, and hence they are called magnetophotonic crystals providing the spin-dependent nature in PCs. (topical review)

  8. Reflect: a practical approach to web semantics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Donoghue, S.I.; Horn, Heiko; Pafilisa, E.

    2010-01-01

    To date, adding semantic capabilities to web content usually requires considerable server-side re-engineering, thus only a tiny fraction of all web content currently has semantic annotations. Recently, we announced Reflect (http://reflect.ws), a free service that takes a more practical approach......: Reflect uses augmented browsing to allow end-users to add systematic semantic annotations to any web-page in real-time, typically within seconds. In this paper we describe the tagging process in detail and show how further entity types can be added to Reflect; we also describe how publishers and content...... web technologies....

  9. Fractional Order Generalized Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Tenreiro Machado

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper formulates a novel expression for entropy inspired in the properties of Fractional Calculus. The characteristics of the generalized fractional entropy are tested both in standard probability distributions and real world data series. The results reveal that tuning the fractional order allow an high sensitivity to the signal evolution, which is useful in describing the dynamics of complex systems. The concepts are also extended to relative distances and tested with several sets of data, confirming the goodness of the generalization.

  10. Fractional finite Fourier transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, Kedar; George, Nicholas

    2004-07-01

    We show that a fractional version of the finite Fourier transform may be defined by using prolate spheroidal wave functions of order zero. The transform is linear and additive in its index and asymptotically goes over to Namias's definition of the fractional Fourier transform. As a special case of this definition, it is shown that the finite Fourier transform may be inverted by using information over a finite range of frequencies in Fourier space, the inversion being sensitive to noise. Numerical illustrations for both forward (fractional) and inverse finite transforms are provided.

  11. Social Trust and Fractionalization:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnskov, Christian

    2008-01-01

    This paper takes a closer look at the importance of fractionalization for the creation of social trust. It first argues that the determinants of trust can be divided into two categories: those affecting individuals' trust radii and those affecting social polarization. A series of estimates using...... a much larger country sample than in previous literature confirms that fractionalization in the form of income inequality and political diversity adversely affects social trust while ethnic diversity does not. However, these effects differ systematically across countries, questioning standard...... interpretations of the influence of fractionalization on trust....

  12. FRACTIONS: CONCEPTUAL AND DIDACTIC ASPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sead Rešić

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Fractions represent the manner of writing parts of whole numbers (integers. Rules for operations with fractions differ from rules for operations with integers. Students face difficulties in understanding fractions, especially operations with fractions. These difficulties are well known in didactics of Mathematics throughout the world and there is a lot of research regarding problems in learning about fractions. Methods for facilitating understanding fractions have been discovered, which are essentially related to visualizing operations with fractions.

  13. Effect of particle nonsphericity on bidirectional reflectance of cirrus clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishchenko, M.I.; Rossow, W.B.; Macke, A.; Lacis, A.A. [Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York, NY (United States)

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes the use of the fractal ice particle method to study the differences in bidirectional reflectance caused by the differences in the single scattering phase functions of spherical water droplets and nonspherical ice crystals.

  14. Some physical applications of fractional Schroedinger equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Xiaoyi; Xu Mingyu

    2006-01-01

    The fractional Schroedinger equation is solved for a free particle and for an infinite square potential well. The fundamental solution of the Cauchy problem for a free particle, the energy levels and the normalized wave functions of a particle in a potential well are obtained. In the barrier penetration problem, the reflection coefficient and transmission coefficient of a particle from a rectangular potential wall is determined. In the quantum scattering problem, according to the fractional Schroedinger equation, the Green's function of the Lippmann-Schwinger integral equation is given

  15. Fractional Stochastic Field Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honkonen, Juha

    2018-02-01

    Models describing evolution of physical, chemical, biological, social and financial processes are often formulated as differential equations with the understanding that they are large-scale equations for averages of quantities describing intrinsically random processes. Explicit account of randomness may lead to significant changes in the asymptotic behaviour (anomalous scaling) in such models especially in low spatial dimensions, which in many cases may be captured with the use of the renormalization group. Anomalous scaling and memory effects may also be introduced with the use of fractional derivatives and fractional noise. Construction of renormalized stochastic field theory with fractional derivatives and fractional noise in the underlying stochastic differential equations and master equations and the interplay between fluctuation-induced and built-in anomalous scaling behaviour is reviewed and discussed.

  16. Discrete fractional calculus

    CERN Document Server

    Goodrich, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    This text provides the first comprehensive treatment of the discrete fractional calculus. Experienced researchers will find the text useful as a reference for discrete fractional calculus and topics of current interest. Students who are interested in learning about discrete fractional calculus will find this text to provide a useful starting point. Several exercises are offered at the end of each chapter and select answers have been provided at the end of the book. The presentation of the content is designed to give ample flexibility for potential use in a myriad of courses and for independent study. The novel approach taken by the authors includes a simultaneous treatment of the fractional- and integer-order difference calculus (on a variety of time scales, including both the usual forward and backwards difference operators). The reader will acquire a solid foundation in the classical topics of the discrete calculus while being introduced to exciting recent developments, bringing them to the frontiers of the...

  17. Fractional smith chart theory

    KAUST Repository

    Shamim, Atif; Radwan, Ahmed Gomaa; Salama, Khaled N.

    2011-01-01

    matching networks, where the fractional approach proves to be much more versatile and results in a single element matching network for a complex load as compared to the two elements in the conventional approach. © 2010 IEEE.

  18. Reflection halo twins : subsun and supersun

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konnen, Gunther P.; van der Werf, Siebren Y.

    2011-01-01

    From an aircraft, a short distinct vertical structure is sometimes seen above the setting sun. Such a feature can be understood as a halo, which is the counterpart of the well-known subsun. Whereas the latter arises from reflections off basal faces of plate-oriented ice crystals illuminated from

  19. Design of Double PG Crystal Neutron Diffractometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adib, M.; Habib, N.; El-Mesiry, M.S.; Fathallah, M.

    2011-01-01

    The design of a diffractometer containing two pyrolytic graphite (PG) crystals to select monochromatic neutrons in the range of wavelengths longer than 0.26 nm is given. The first crystal is high oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) set at glancing angle to reflect monochromatic neutrons with a selected wavelength. The second is a low quality PG crystal filter, set at take-off-angle such that, it transmits the selected monochromatic neutrons and rejects the higher order contaminations accompanying the first order reflection. It was shown that, 2 mm thick of PG crystal having 0.30 FWHM on mosaic spread are the optimum parameters of monochromator PG crystal. While the optimum thickness and mosaic spread of the PG crystal filter were selected to have low contamination factor of higher order reflections. The optimum parameters of the PG filter crystal were calculated using the computer package Graphite recently developed in our laboratory. Calculation shows that, 3 cm thick PG filter (20 on mosaic spread) is sufficient to almost eliminate the higher order contaminations accompanying the main monochromatic neutrons with

  20. Fractional laser skin resurfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexiades-Armenakas, Macrene R; Dover, Jeffrey S; Arndt, Kenneth A

    2012-11-01

    Laser skin resurfacing (LSR) has evolved over the past 2 decades from traditional ablative to fractional nonablative and fractional ablative resurfacing. Traditional ablative LSR was highly effective in reducing rhytides, photoaging, and acne scarring but was associated with significant side effects and complications. In contrast, nonablative LSR was very safe but failed to deliver consistent clinical improvement. Fractional LSR has achieved the middle ground; it combined the efficacy of traditional LSR with the safety of nonablative modalities. The first fractional laser was a nonablative erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG) laser that produced microscopic columns of thermal injury in the epidermis and upper dermis. Heralding an entirely new concept of laser energy delivery, it delivered the laser beam in microarrays. It resulted in microscopic columns of treated tissue and intervening areas of untreated skin, which yielded rapid reepithelialization. Fractional delivery was quickly applied to ablative wavelengths such as carbon dioxide, Er:YAG, and yttrium scandium gallium garnet (2,790 nm), providing more significant clinical outcomes. Adjustable laser parameters, including power, pitch, dwell time, and spot density, allowed for precise determination of percent surface area, affected penetration depth, and clinical recovery time and efficacy. Fractional LSR has been a significant advance to the laser field, striking the balance between safety and efficacy.

  1. Challenging Narcissus, or Reflecting on Reflecting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achilles, C. M.

    The concept of reflective practice and teaching people to be reflective practitioners is examined. The document begins with a look at professional knowledge according to three prominent professionals in the educational administration field: Schon, Schein, and Achilles. "Reflective" strategies that could be incorporated into courses and…

  2. Low reflectance radio frequency load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ives, R. Lawrence; Mizuhara, Yosuke M

    2014-04-01

    A load for traveling microwave energy has an absorptive volume defined by cylindrical body enclosed by a first end cap and a second end cap. The first end cap has an aperture for the passage of an input waveguide with a rotating part that is coupled to a reflective mirror. The inner surfaces of the absorptive volume consist of a resistive material or are coated with a coating which absorbs a fraction of incident RF energy, and the remainder of the RF energy reflects. The angle of the reflector and end caps is selected such that reflected RF energy dissipates an increasing percentage of the remaining RF energy at each reflection, and the reflected RF energy which returns to the rotating mirror is directed to the back surface of the rotating reflector, and is not coupled to the input waveguide. Additionally, the reflector may have a surface which generates a more uniform power distribution function axially and laterally, to increase the power handling capability of the RF load. The input waveguide may be corrugated for HE11 mode input energy.

  3. Series expansion in fractional calculus and fractional differential equations

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Ming-Fan; Ren, Ji-Rong; Zhu, Tao

    2009-01-01

    Fractional calculus is the calculus of differentiation and integration of non-integer orders. In a recently paper (Annals of Physics 323 (2008) 2756-2778), the Fundamental Theorem of Fractional Calculus is highlighted. Based on this theorem, in this paper we introduce fractional series expansion method to fractional calculus. We define a kind of fractional Taylor series of an infinitely fractionally-differentiable function. Further, based on our definition we generalize hypergeometric functio...

  4. Photonic time crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Lunwu; Xu, Jin; Wang, Chengen; Zhang, Jianhua; Zhao, Yuting; Zeng, Jing; Song, Runxia

    2017-12-07

    When space (time) translation symmetry is spontaneously broken, the space crystal (time crystal) forms; when permittivity and permeability periodically vary with space (time), the photonic crystal (photonic time crystal) forms. We proposed the concept of photonic time crystal and rewritten the Maxwell's equations. Utilizing Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method, we simulated electromagnetic wave propagation in photonic time crystal and photonic space-time crystal, the simulation results show that more intensive scatter fields can obtained in photonic time crystal and photonic space-time crystal.

  5. FRACTIONS: CONCEPTUAL AND DIDACTIC ASPECTS

    OpenAIRE

    Sead Rešić; Ismet Botonjić; Maid Omerović

    2016-01-01

    Fractions represent the manner of writing parts of whole numbers (integers). Rules for operations with fractions differ from rules for operations with integers. Students face difficulties in understanding fractions, especially operations with fractions. These difficulties are well known in didactics of Mathematics throughout the world and there is a lot of research regarding problems in learning about fractions. Methods for facilitating understanding fractions have been discovered...

  6. Fractional-order devices

    CERN Document Server

    Biswas, Karabi; Caponetto, Riccardo; Mendes Lopes, António; Tenreiro Machado, José António

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on two specific areas related to fractional order systems – the realization of physical devices characterized by non-integer order impedance, usually called fractional-order elements (FOEs); and the characterization of vegetable tissues via electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) – and provides readers with new tools for designing new types of integrated circuits. The majority of the book addresses FOEs. The interest in these topics is related to the need to produce “analogue” electronic devices characterized by non-integer order impedance, and to the characterization of natural phenomena, which are systems with memory or aftereffects and for which the fractional-order calculus tool is the ideal choice for analysis. FOEs represent the building blocks for designing and realizing analogue integrated electronic circuits, which the authors believe hold the potential for a wealth of mass-market applications. The freedom to choose either an integer- or non-integer-order analogue integrator...

  7. Excitons in the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughlin, R. B.

    1984-09-01

    Quasiparticles of charge 1/m in the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect form excitons, which are collective excitations physically similar to the transverse magnetoplasma oscillations of a Wigner crystal. A variational exciton wavefunction which shows explicitly that the magnetic length is effectively longer for quasiparticles than for electrons is proposed. This wavefunction is used to estimate the dispersion relation of these excitons and the matrix elements to generate them optically out of the ground state. These quantities are then used to describe a type of nonlinear conductivity which may occur in these systems when they are relatively clean.

  8. Crystal Ball results on tau decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowe, S.T.

    1987-10-01

    This report reviews measurements and upper limit determinations for a number of exclusive 1-prong tau decay modes using the Crystal Ball detector. These results are important input to the apparent discrepancy between the topological and sum-of-exclusive branching fractions in 1-prong tau decays

  9. Large deformation behavior of fat crystal networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloek, W.; Vliet, van T.; Walstra, P.

    2005-01-01

    Compression and wire-cutting experiments on dispersions of fully hydrogenated palm oil in sunflower oil with varying fraction solid fat were carried out to establish which parameters are important for the large deformation behavior of fat crystal networks. Compression experiments showed that the

  10. Lambda shifted photonic crystal cavity laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schubert, Martin; Skovgård, Troels Suhr; Ek, Sara

    2010-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate an alternative type of photonic crystal laser design that shifts all the holes in the lattice by a fixed fraction of the targeted emission wavelength. The structures are realized in InGaAsP =1.15 with InGaAsP quantum wells =1.52 as gain material. Cavities with shifts of...

  11. Synchrotron/crystal sample preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. Barry

    1993-01-01

    The Center for Applied Optics (CAO) of the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) prepared this final report entitled 'Synchrotron/Crystal Sample Preparation' in completion of contract NAS8-38609, Delivery Order No. 53. Hughes Danbury Optical Systems (HDOS) is manufacturing the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) mirrors. These thin-walled, grazing incidence, Wolter Type-1 mirrors, varying in diameter from 1.2 to 0.68 meters, must be ground and polished using state-of-the-art techniques in order to prevent undue stress due to damage or the presence of crystals and inclusions. The effect of crystals on the polishing and grinding process must also be understood. This involves coating special samples of Zerodur and measuring the reflectivity of the coatings in a synchrotron system. In order to gain the understanding needed on the effect of the Zerodur crystals by the grinding and polishing process, UAH prepared glass samples by cutting, grinding, etching, and polishing as required to meet specifications for witness bars for synchrotron measurements and for investigations of crystals embedded in Zerodur. UAH then characterized these samples for subsurface damage and surface roughness and figure.

  12. Non-isothermal crystallization of PET/PLA blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Huipeng; Pyda, Marek; Cebe, Peggy

    2009-01-01

    Binary blends of poly(ethylene terephthalate) with poly(lactic acid), PET/PLA, were studied by differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray scattering. The PET/PLA blends, prepared by solution casting, were found to be miscible in the melt over the entire composition range. Both quenched amorphous and semicrystalline blends exhibit a single, composition dependent glass transition temperature. We report the non-isothermal crystallization of (a) PET, with and without the presence of PLA crystals and (b) PLA, with and without the presence of PET crystals. PET can crystallize in all blends, regardless of whether PLA is amorphous or crystalline, and degree of crystallinity of PET decreases as PLA content increases. In contrast, PLA crystallization is strongly affected by the mobility of the PET fraction. When PET is wholly amorphous, PLA can crystallize even in 70/30 blends, albeit weakly. But when PET is crystalline, PLA cannot crystallize when its own content drops below 0.90. These different behaviors may possibly be related to the tendency of each polymer to form constrained chains, i.e., to form the rigid amorphous fraction, or RAF. PET is capable of forming a large amount of RAF, whereas relatively smaller amount of RAF forms in PLA. Like the crystals, the rigid amorphous fraction of one polymer component may inhibit the growth of crystals of the other blend partner.

  13. Fractional gradient and its application to the fractional advection equation

    OpenAIRE

    D'Ovidio, M.; Garra, R.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we provide a definition of fractional gradient operators, related to directional derivatives. We develop a fractional vector calculus, providing a probabilistic interpretation and mathematical tools to treat multidimensional fractional differential equations. A first application is discussed in relation to the d-dimensional fractional advection-dispersion equation. We also study the connection with multidimensional L\\'evy processes.

  14. Photonic Crystal Fibers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kristiansen, Rene E

    2005-01-01

    This report results from a contract tasking Crystal Fibre A/S as follows: Crystal Fibre will conduct research and development of large mode area, dual clad multi-core Yb-doped photonic crystal fiber...

  15. Palm-based diacylglycerol fat dry fractionation: effect of crystallisation temperature, cooling rate and agitation speed on physical and chemical properties of fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razam Ab Latip

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Fractionation which separates the olein (liquid and stearin (solid fractions of oil is used to modify the physicochemical properties of fats in order to extend its applications. Studies showed that the properties of fractionated end products can be affected by fractionation processing conditions. In the present study, dry fractionation of palm-based diacylglycerol (PDAG was performed at different: cooling rates (0.05, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 and 3.0°C/min, end-crystallisation temperatures (30, 35, 40, 45 and 50°C and agitation speeds (30, 50, 70, 90 and 110 rpm to determine the effect of these parameters on the properties and yield of the solid and liquid portions. To determine the physicochemical properties of olein and stearin fraction: Iodine value (IV, fatty acid composition (FAC, acylglycerol composition, slip melting point (SMP, solid fat content (SFC, thermal behaviour tests were carried out. Fractionation of PDAG fat changes the chemical composition of liquid and solid fractions. In terms of FAC, the major fatty acid in olein and stearin fractions were oleic (C18:1 and palmitic (C16:0 respectively. Acylglycerol composition showed that olein and stearin fractions is concentrated with TAG and DAG respectively. Crystallization temperature, cooling rate and agitation speed does not affect the IV, SFC, melting and cooling properties of the stearin fraction. The stearin fraction was only affected by cooling rate which changes its SMP. On the other hand, olein fraction was affected by crystallization temperature and cooling rate but not agitation speed which caused changes in IV, SMP, SFC, melting and crystallization behavior. Increase in both the crystallization temperature and cooling rate caused a reduction of IV, increment of the SFC, SMP, melting and crystallization behaviour of olein fraction and vice versa. The fractionated stearin part melted above 65°C while the olein melted at 40°C. SMP in olein fraction also reduced to a range of

  16. Sweet Work with Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradova, Natalya; Blaine, Larry

    2013-01-01

    Almost everyone loves chocolate. However, the same cannot be said about fractions, which are loved by markedly fewer. Middle school students tend to view them with wary respect, but little affection. The authors attempt to sweeten the subject by describing a type of game involving division of chocolate bars. The activity they describe provides a…

  17. Fermion Number Fractionization

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srimath

    1 . In tro d u ctio n. T he N obel P rize in C hem istry for the year 2000 w as aw arded to A lan J H ... soliton, the ground state of the ferm ion-soliton system can have ..... probability density,in a heuristic w ay that a fractional ferm ion num ber m ay ...

  18. Momentum fractionation on superstrata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bena, Iosif; Martinec, Emil; Turton, David; Warner, Nicholas P.

    2016-01-01

    Superstrata are bound states in string theory that carry D1, D5, and momentum charges, and whose supergravity descriptions are parameterized by arbitrary functions of (at least) two variables. In the D1-D5 CFT, typical three-charge states reside in high-degree twisted sectors, and their momentum charge is carried by modes that individually have fractional momentum. Understanding this momentum fractionation holographically is crucial for understanding typical black-hole microstates in this system. We use solution-generating techniques to add momentum to a multi-wound supertube and thereby construct the first examples of asymptotically-flat superstrata. The resulting supergravity solutions are horizonless and smooth up to well-understood orbifold singularities. Upon taking the AdS_3 decoupling limit, our solutions are dual to CFT states with momentum fractionation. We give a precise proposal for these dual CFT states. Our construction establishes the very nontrivial fact that large classes of CFT states with momentum fractionation can be realized in the bulk as smooth horizonless supergravity solutions.

  19. Fractional Differential Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moustafa El-Shahed

    2007-01-01

    where 2<α<3 is a real number and D0+α is the standard Riemann-Liouville fractional derivative. Our analysis relies on Krasnoselskiis fixed point theorem of cone preserving operators. An example is also given to illustrate the main results.

  20. Vapor liquid fraction determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This invention describes a method of measuring liquid and vapor fractions in a non-homogeneous fluid flowing through an elongate conduit, such as may be required with boiling water, non-boiling turbulent flows, fluidized bed experiments, water-gas mixing analysis, and nuclear plant cooling. (UK)

  1. Brewing with fractionated barley

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donkelaar, van L.H.G.

    2016-01-01

    Brewing with fractionated barley

    Beer is a globally consumed beverage, which is produced from malted barley, water, hops and yeast. In recent years, the use of unmalted barley and exogenous enzymes have become more popular because they enable simpler processing and reduced environmental

  2. Fractionation and rectification apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sauerwald, A

    1932-05-25

    Fractionation and rectifying apparatus with a distillation vessel and a stirring tube, drainage tubes leading from its coils to a central collecting tube, the drainage tubes being somewhat parallel and attached to the outer half of the stirring tube and partly on the inner half of the central collecting tube, whereby distillation and rectification can be effected in a single apparatus.

  3. Fractional charge search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Innes, W.; Klein, S.; Perl, M.; Price, J.C.

    1982-06-01

    A device to search for fractional charge in matter is described. The sample is coupled to a low-noise amplifier by a periodically varying capacitor and the resulting signal is synchronously detected. The varying capacitor is constructed as a rapidly spinning wheel. Samples of any material in volumes of up to 0.05 ml may be searched in less than an hour

  4. BEAM-ish: A Graphical User Interface for the Physical Characterization of Macromolecular Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelace, Jeff; Snell, Edward H.; Pokross, Matthew; Arvai, Andrew S.; Nielsen, Chris; Nguyen, Xuong; Bellamy, Henry D; Borgstahl, Gloria E. O.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Crystal mosaicity is determined from the measurement of the reflection angular width and can be used as an indicator of crystal perfection. A new method has been developed that combines the use of unfocused synchrotron radiation, super-fine phi slicing and a CCD area detector to simultaneously measure the mosaicity of hundreds of reflections . The X-ray beam characteristics and Lorentz correction are deconvoluted from the resulting reflection widths to calculate the true crystal mosaicity.

  5. Reflection-grating photorefractive self-pumped ring mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Iakov, V. A.; Korol'Kov, S. A.; Mamaev, A. V.; Shkunov, V. V.; Zozulia, A. A.

    1991-10-01

    A reflection-grating ring mirror using a photorefractive KNbO2 crystal with a response time of several milliseconds and a reflectivity of as much as 50 percent has been experimentally fabricated. A theoretical analysis of the geometry involved is made which provides only qualitative agreement with the experimental findings.

  6. Solid-state dynamics and single-crystal to single-crystal structural transformations in octakis(3-chloropropyl)octasilsesquioxane and octavinyloctasilsesquioxane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalewska, A; Nowacka, M; Włodarska, M; Zgardzińska, B; Zaleski, R; Oszajca, M; Krajenta, J; Kaźmierski, S

    2017-10-18

    Reactive octahedral silsesquioxanes of rod-like [octakis(3-chloropropyl)octasilsesquioxane - T 8 (CH 2 CH 2 CH 2 Cl) 8 ] and spherical [octavinyloctasilsesquioxane - T 8 (CH[double bond, length as m-dash]CH 2 ) 8 ] structure can undergo reversible thermally induced phase transitions in the solid state. The phase behaviour has been studied with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, including temperature modulated DSC), X-ray diffraction, dielectric relaxation spectroscopy (DRS), and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the solid state (SS NMR), as well as positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) and polarized optical microscopy (POM). The mechanisms involving fitting the molecules into most symmetrical crystal lattices vary for species of different structure. Thermal energy can be used to expand the crystal lattice leading to thermochromism in the case of T 8 (CH[double bond, length as m-dash]CH 2 ) 8 or conversely to an unusual negative thermal expansion of crystals of T 8 (CH 2 CH 2 CH 2 Cl) 8 that results in their self-actuation. The complex behaviour is reflected in unusual changes in the capacitance and fractional free volume of the material. These phenomena can be used for molecular design of advanced well-defined hybrid materials capable of reversible thermally induced structural transformations. The findings present a new perspective for POSS-based flexible metal-organic frameworks (MOF) of cooperative structural transformability via entropy-based translational sub-net sliding.

  7. Preparation of Three-Dimensional Photonic Crystals of Zirconia by Electrodeposition in a Colloidal Crystals Template

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Pan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional photonic crystals of zirconia were prepared by electrodeposition in a colloidal crystals template following calcination at 500 °C. Scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction, and reflectance spectroscopy were employed to characterize the photonic crystals of zirconia. It was found that hydrated zirconium ions could penetrate the colloidal crystals template and reach the substrate easily by electrodeposition, which resulted in stronger bonding between the substrate and the as-deposited membrane. Moreover, the electrodeposited membrane had low water content, leading to a low amount of shrinkage during calcination. Both these properties could suppress detachment from the substrate upon removal of the colloidal crystals template. Therefore, the three-dimensional photonic crystals of zirconia synthesized in this study exhibited very good preservation of the ordered structures of the colloidal crystals template with a high density. A peak of reflection higher than 70% was formed in the reflectance spectrum because of the strong diffraction of the ordered structures.

  8. -Dimensional Fractional Lagrange's Inversion Theorem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. A. Abd El-Salam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Using Riemann-Liouville fractional differential operator, a fractional extension of the Lagrange inversion theorem and related formulas are developed. The required basic definitions, lemmas, and theorems in the fractional calculus are presented. A fractional form of Lagrange's expansion for one implicitly defined independent variable is obtained. Then, a fractional version of Lagrange's expansion in more than one unknown function is generalized. For extending the treatment in higher dimensions, some relevant vectors and tensors definitions and notations are presented. A fractional Taylor expansion of a function of -dimensional polyadics is derived. A fractional -dimensional Lagrange inversion theorem is proved.

  9. Gauge invariant fractional electromagnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazo, Matheus Jatkoske

    2011-01-01

    Fractional derivatives and integrations of non-integers orders was introduced more than three centuries ago but only recently gained more attention due to its application on nonlocal phenomenas. In this context, several formulations of fractional electromagnetic fields was proposed, but all these theories suffer from the absence of an effective fractional vector calculus, and in general are non-causal or spatially asymmetric. In order to deal with these difficulties, we propose a spatially symmetric and causal gauge invariant fractional electromagnetic field from a Lagrangian formulation. From our fractional Maxwell's fields arose a definition for the fractional gradient, divergent and curl operators. -- Highlights: → We propose a fractional Lagrangian formulation for fractional Maxwell's fields. → We obtain gauge invariant fractional electromagnetic fields. → Our generalized fractional Maxwell's field is spatially symmetrical. → We discuss the non-causality of the theory.

  10. Gauge invariant fractional electromagnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazo, Matheus Jatkoske, E-mail: matheuslazo@furg.br [Instituto de Matematica, Estatistica e Fisica - FURG, Rio Grande, RS (Brazil)

    2011-09-26

    Fractional derivatives and integrations of non-integers orders was introduced more than three centuries ago but only recently gained more attention due to its application on nonlocal phenomenas. In this context, several formulations of fractional electromagnetic fields was proposed, but all these theories suffer from the absence of an effective fractional vector calculus, and in general are non-causal or spatially asymmetric. In order to deal with these difficulties, we propose a spatially symmetric and causal gauge invariant fractional electromagnetic field from a Lagrangian formulation. From our fractional Maxwell's fields arose a definition for the fractional gradient, divergent and curl operators. -- Highlights: → We propose a fractional Lagrangian formulation for fractional Maxwell's fields. → We obtain gauge invariant fractional electromagnetic fields. → Our generalized fractional Maxwell's field is spatially symmetrical. → We discuss the non-causality of the theory.

  11. On matrix fractional differential equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adem Kılıçman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to study the matrix fractional differential equations and to find the exact solution for system of matrix fractional differential equations in terms of Riemann–Liouville using Laplace transform method and convolution product to the Riemann–Liouville fractional of matrices. Also, we show the theorem of non-homogeneous matrix fractional partial differential equation with some illustrative examples to demonstrate the effectiveness of the new methodology. The main objective of this article is to discuss the Laplace transform method based on operational matrices of fractional derivatives for solving several kinds of linear fractional differential equations. Moreover, we present the operational matrices of fractional derivatives with Laplace transform in many applications of various engineering systems as control system. We present the analytical technique for solving fractional-order, multi-term fractional differential equation. In other words, we propose an efficient algorithm for solving fractional matrix equation.

  12. Particle reflection and TFTR neutral beam diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Grisham, L.R.; Kugel, H.W.; O'Connor, T.E.; Newman, R.A.; Stevenson, T.N.; von Halle, A.; Williams, M.D.

    1992-04-01

    Determination of two critical neutral beam parameters, power and divergence, are affected by the reflection of a fraction of the incident energy from the surface of the measuring calorimeter. On the TFTR Neutral Beam Test Stand, greater than 30% of the incident power directed at the target chamber calorimeter was unaccounted for. Most of this loss is believed due to reflection from the surface of the flat calorimeter, which was struck at a near grazing incidence (12 degrees). Beamline calorimeters, of a ''V''-shape design, while retaining the beam power, also suffer from reflection effects. Reflection, in this latter case, artificially peaks the power toward the apex of the ''V'', complicating the fitting technique, and increasing the power density on axis by 10 to 20%; an effect of import to future beamline designers. Agreement is found between measured and expected divergence values, even with 24% of the incident energy reflected

  13. The role of crystallization-driven exsolution on the sulfur mass balance in volcanic arc magmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yanqing; Huber, Christian; Bachmann, Olivier; Zajacz, Zoltán; Wright, Heather M.; Vazquez, Jorge A.

    2016-01-01

    The release of large amounts of sulfur to the stratosphere during explosive eruptions affects the radiative balance in the atmosphere and consequentially impacts climate for up to several years after the event. Quantitative estimations of the processes that control the mass balance of sulfur between melt, crystals, and vapor bubbles is needed to better understand the potential sulfur yield of individual eruption events and the conditions that favor large sulfur outputs to the atmosphere. The processes that control sulfur partitioning in magmas are (1) exsolution of volatiles (dominantly H2O) during decompression (first boiling) and during isobaric crystallization (second boiling), (2) the crystallization and breakdown of sulfide or sulfate phases in the magma, and (3) the transport of sulfur-rich vapor (gas influx) from deeper unerupted regions of the magma reservoir. Vapor exsolution and the formation/breakdown of sulfur-rich phases can all be considered as closed-system processes where mass balance arguments are generally easier to constrain, whereas the contribution of sulfur by vapor transport (open system process) is more difficult to quantify. The ubiquitous “excess sulfur” problem, which refers to the much higher sulfur mass released during eruptions than what can be accounted for by amount of sulfur originally dissolved in erupted melt, as estimated from melt inclusion sulfur concentrations (the “petrologic estimate”), reflects the challenges in closing the sulfur mass balance between crystals, melt, and vapor before and during a volcanic eruption. In this work, we try to quantify the relative importance of closed- and open-system processes for silicic arc volcanoes using kinetic models of sulfur partitioning during exsolution. Our calculations show that crystallization-induced exsolution (second boiling) can generate a significant fraction of the excess sulfur observed in crystal-rich arc magmas. This result does not negate the important role of

  14. Unidirectional transmission in 1D nonlinear photonic crystal based on topological phase reversal by optical nonlinearity

    OpenAIRE

    Chong Li; Xiaoyong Hu; Hong Yang; Qihuang Gong

    2017-01-01

    We propose a scheme of unidirectional transmission in a 1D nonlinear topological photonic crystal based on the topological edge state and three order optical nonlinearity. The 1D photonic crystals consists of a nonlinear photonic crystal L and a linear photonic crystal R. In the backward direction, light is totally reflected for the photons transmission prohibited by the bandgap. While in the forward direction, light interacts with the nonlinear photonic crystal L by optical Kerr effect, brin...

  15. Effect of γ-radiation on crystallization of polycaprolactone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Guangming; Xu, Qianyong; Qin Ruifeng; Yan Hongxia; Liang Guozheng

    2005-01-01

    The crystallization behavior of radiation cross-linked poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) was studied by DSC at different cooling rates. The crystallization process was analyzed by the Ozawa equation and the Mo-Zhishen method that is developed from combining the Avrami equation and the Ozawa equation. It was concluded that the crystallization of radiation crosslinked PCL is governed by heterogeneous nucleation and single-dimension growth; the crystal fraction and rates of crystallization are related to the radiation dose and degree of cross-linking; the relationship between relative crystallinity and time follows the Ozawa equation: The higher the degree of crosslinking, the less the crystal velocity constant. The activation energy of crystallization for irradiated PCL is between 65 and 54kJ/mol

  16. On-line monitoring of the crystallization process: relationship between crystal size and electrical impedance spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Yanlin; Yao, Jun; Wang, Mi

    2016-01-01

    On-line monitoring of crystal size in the crystallization process is crucial to many pharmaceutical and fine-chemical industrial applications. In this paper, a novel method is proposed for the on-line monitoring of the cooling crystallization process of L-glutamic acid (LGA) using electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The EIS method can be used to monitor the growth of crystal particles relying on the presence of an electrical double layer on the charged particle surface and the polarization of double layer under the excitation of alternating electrical field. The electrical impedance spectra and crystal size were measured on-line simultaneously by an impedance analyzer and focused beam reflectance measurement (FBRM), respectively. The impedance spectra were analyzed using the equivalent circuit model and the equivalent circuit elements in the model can be obtained by fitting the experimental data. Two equivalent circuit elements, including capacitance ( C 2 ) and resistance ( R 2 ) from the dielectric polarization of the LGA solution and crystal particle/solution interface, are in relation with the crystal size. The mathematical relationship between the crystal size and the equivalent circuit elements can be obtained by a non-linear fitting method. The function can be used to predict the change of crystal size during the crystallization process. (paper)

  17. Surface and bulk crystallization of amorphous solid water films: Confirmation of “top-down” crystallization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Chunqing; Smith, R. Scott; Kay, Bruce D.

    2016-10-01

    The crystallization kinetics of nanoscale amorphous solid water (ASW) films are investigated using temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS). TPD measurements are used to probe surface crystallization and RAIRS measurements are used to probe bulk crystallization. Isothermal TPD results show that surface crystallization is independent of the film thickness (from 100 to 1000 ML). Conversely, the RAIRS measurements show that the bulk crystallization time increases linearly with increasing film thickness. These results suggest that nucleation and crystallization begin at the ASW/vacuum interface and then the crystallization growth front propagates linearly into the bulk. This mechanism was confirmed by selective placement of an isotopic layer (5% D2O in H2O) at various positions in an ASW (H2O) film. In this case, the closer the isotopic layer was to the vacuum interface, the earlier the isotopic layer crystallized. These experiments provide direct evidence to confirm that ASW crystallization in vacuum proceeds by a “top-down” crystallization mechanism.

  18. The Local Fractional Bootstrap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennedsen, Mikkel; Hounyo, Ulrich; Lunde, Asger

    We introduce a bootstrap procedure for high-frequency statistics of Brownian semistationary processes. More specifically, we focus on a hypothesis test on the roughness of sample paths of Brownian semistationary processes, which uses an estimator based on a ratio of realized power variations. Our...... new resampling method, the local fractional bootstrap, relies on simulating an auxiliary fractional Brownian motion that mimics the fine properties of high frequency differences of the Brownian semistationary process under the null hypothesis. We prove the first order validity of the bootstrap method...... and in simulations we observe that the bootstrap-based hypothesis test provides considerable finite-sample improvements over an existing test that is based on a central limit theorem. This is important when studying the roughness properties of time series data; we illustrate this by applying the bootstrap method...

  19. Fractionalization and Entrepreneurial Activities

    OpenAIRE

    Awaworyi Churchill, Sefa

    2015-01-01

    The vast majority of the literature on ethnicity and entrepreneurship focuses on the construct of ethnic entrepreneurship. However, very little is known about how ethnic heterogeneity affects entrepreneurship. This study attempts to fill the gap, and thus examines the effect of ethnic heterogeneity on entrepreneurial activities in a cross-section of 90 countries. Using indices of ethnic and linguistic fractionalization, we show that ethnic heterogeneity negatively influences entrepreneurship....

  20. Investigation of multiple Bragg reflections at a constant neutron wavelength and their possible separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikula, P; Vrána, M; Šaroun, J; Em, V; Seong, B S

    2012-01-01

    Multiple Bragg reflections (MBR) realized in one bent-perfect crystal (BPC) slab by sets of different lattice planes behave differently in comparison to the case of perfect nondeformed or mosaic crystal. Individual sets of lattice planes are mutually in dispersive diffraction geometry and the kinematical approach can be applied on this MBR process. It has been found that contrary to the perfect nondeformed or mosaic crystal, individual reflections participating in the MBR process can be spatially separated.

  1. Fractional Number Operator and Associated Fractional Diffusion Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rguigui, Hafedh

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we study the fractional number operator as an analog of the finite-dimensional fractional Laplacian. An important relation with the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process is given. Using a semigroup approach, the solution of the Cauchy problem associated to the fractional number operator is presented. By means of the Mittag-Leffler function and the Laplace transform, we give the solution of the Caputo time fractional diffusion equation and Riemann-Liouville time fractional diffusion equation in infinite dimensions associated to the fractional number operator.

  2. Microbial Enzyme Activity and Carbon Cycling in Grassland Soil Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, S. D.; Jastrow, J. D.

    2004-12-01

    Extracellular enzymes are necessary to degrade complex organic compounds present in soils. Using physical fractionation procedures, we tested whether old soil carbon is spatially isolated from degradative enzymes across a prairie restoration chronosequence in Illinois, USA. We found that carbon-degrading enzymes were abundant in all soil fractions, including macroaggregates, microaggregates, and the clay fraction, which contains carbon with a mean residence time of ~200 years. The activities of two cellulose-degrading enzymes and a chitin-degrading enzyme were 2-10 times greater in organic matter fractions than in bulk soil, consistent with the rapid turnover of these fractions. Polyphenol oxidase activity was 3 times greater in the clay fraction than in the bulk soil, despite very slow carbon turnover in this fraction. Changes in enzyme activity across the restoration chronosequence were small once adjusted for increases in soil carbon concentration, although polyphenol oxidase activity per unit carbon declined by 50% in native prairie versus cultivated soil. These results are consistent with a `two-pool' model of enzyme and carbon turnover in grassland soils. In light organic matter fractions, enzyme production and carbon turnover both occur rapidly. However, in mineral-dominated fractions, both enzymes and their carbon substrates are immobilized on mineral surfaces, leading to slow turnover. Soil carbon accumulation in the clay fraction and across the prairie restoration chronosequence probably reflects increasing physical isolation of enzymes and substrates on the molecular scale, rather than the micron to millimeter scale.

  3. Modelling the acoustical response of lossy lamella-crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Johan; Mortensen, N. Asger; Willatzen, Morten

    2014-01-01

    The sound propagation properties of lossy lamella-crystals are analysed theoretically utilizing a rig- orous wave expansion formalism and an effective medium approach. We investigate both sup- ported and free-standing crystal slab structures and predict high absorption for a broad range...... of frequencies. A detailed derivation of the formalism is presented, and we show how the results obtained in the subwavelength and superwavelength regimes qualitatively can be reproduced by homogenizing the lamella-crystals. We come to the conclusion that treating this structure within the metamaterial limit...... only makes sense if the crystal filling fraction is sufficiently large to satisfy an effective medium approach....

  4. Optimized dipole antennas on photonic band gap crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, S.D.; Biswas, R.; Ozbay, E.; McCalmont, S.; Tuttle, G.; Ho, K.

    1995-01-01

    Photonic band gap crystals have been used as a perfectly reflecting substrate for planar dipole antennas in the 12--15 GHz regime. The position, orientation, and driving frequency of the dipole antenna on the photonic band gap crystal surface, have been optimized for antenna performance and directionality. Virtually no radiated power is lost to the photonic crystal resulting in gains and radiation efficiencies larger than antennas on other conventional dielectric substrates. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  5. Low-temperature relative reflectivity measurements of reflective and scintillating foils used in rare event searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenkämper, A.; Ulrich, A.; Defay, X.; Feilitzsch, F. v.; Lanfranchi, J.-C.; Mondragón, E.; Münster, A.; Oppenheimer, C.; Potzel, W.; Roth, S.; Schönert, S.; Steiger, H.; Trinh Thi, H. H.; Wawoczny, S.; Willers, M.; Zöller, A.

    2018-03-01

    In this work we investigate the reflectivity of highly reflective multilayer polymer foils used in the CRESST experiment. The CRESST experiment searches directly for dark matter via operating scintillating CaWO4 crystals as targets for elastic dark matter-nucleon scattering. In order to suppress background events, the experiment employs the so-called phonon-light technique which is based on the simultaneous measurement of the heat signal in the main CaWO4 target crystal and of the emitted scintillation light with a separate cryogenic light detector. Both detectors are surrounded by a highly reflective and scintillating multilayer polymer foil to increase the light collection efficiency and to veto surface backgrounds. While this study is motivated by the CRESST experiment, the results are also relevant for other rare event searches using scintillating cryogenic bolometers in the field of the search of dark matter and neutrinoless double beta decay (0 νββ). In this work a dedicated experiment has been set up to determine the relative reflectivity at 300 K and 20 K of three multilayer foils ("VM2000", "VM2002", "Vikuiti") produced by the company 3M. The intensity of a light beam reflected off the foil is measured with a CCD camera. The ratio of the intensities at 300 K and 20 K corresponds to the relative reflectivity change. The measurements performed in this work show no variation of the reflectivity with temperature at a level of ∼1%.

  6. On the radiation accompanying volume reflection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandiera, L.; Bagli, E.; Berra, A.; Bolognini, D.; Dalpiaz, P.; Della Mea, G.; De Salvador, D.; Guidi, V.; Hasan, S.; Lietti, D.; Mazzolari, A.

    2013-01-01

    The electromagnetic radiation emitted by 120 GeV/c volume-reflected electrons in a bent silicon crystal has been investigated at CERN SPS-H4 beamline. The trajectories of electrons crossing a silicon strip-like crystal have been reconstructed through a telescope system based on high precision micro-strip detectors. The experimental setup was also equipped with a spectrometer and an electromagnetic calorimeter to measure the energy loss of the particles under volume reflection condition. Such a system enabled to record the full photon spectrum up to the nominal energy of the beam. Experimental results were compared to recently developed theoretical approaches based on the quasi-classical operators method of Baier and Katkov

  7. Kinetics of Crystallization in Polydisperse Emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashchiev; Kaneko; Sato

    1998-12-01

    The kinetics of isothermal crystallization of the droplets in polydisperse emulsions are analyzed under the condition that each emulsion droplet gives birth to one nucleus only. Expressions are derived for the time dependences of the number of crystallized droplets and the fraction of crystallized droplet volume in the cases of either volume or surface nucleation of the crystals in the droplets. The time for half-crystallization is determined as a function of the emulsion polydispersity, and it is found that the more polydisperse the emulsion, the shorter this time in comparison with that for the corresponding monodisperse emulsion. Formulae are also obtained for the change of the velocity Kv of propagation of ultrasound through polydisperse emulsions during the time t of isothermal crystallization of the droplets in them. Good agreement is found between theory and experiment in an analysis of available Kv(t) data for crystallization in polydisperse palm oil-in-water and n-hexadecane-in-water emulsions. The results obtained are directly applicable to devitrification and polymorphic transformation of disperse solid phases. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  8. Gauge invariant fractional electromagnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazo, Matheus Jatkoske

    2011-09-01

    Fractional derivatives and integrations of non-integers orders was introduced more than three centuries ago but only recently gained more attention due to its application on nonlocal phenomenas. In this context, several formulations of fractional electromagnetic fields was proposed, but all these theories suffer from the absence of an effective fractional vector calculus, and in general are non-causal or spatially asymmetric. In order to deal with these difficulties, we propose a spatially symmetric and causal gauge invariant fractional electromagnetic field from a Lagrangian formulation. From our fractional Maxwell's fields arose a definition for the fractional gradient, divergent and curl operators.

  9. Numerical characterization of nanopillar photonic crystal waveguides and directional couplers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chigrin, Dmitry N.; Lavrinenko, Andrei; Sotomayor Torres, Clivia M.

    2005-01-01

    We numerically characterize a novel type of a photonic crystal waveguide, which consists of several rows of periodically arranged dielectric cylinders. In such a nanopillar photonic crystal waveguide, light confinement is due to the total internal reflection. A nanopillar waveguide is a multimode...

  10. Pressure cryocooling protein crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chae Un [Ithaca, NY; Gruner, Sol M [Ithaca, NY

    2011-10-04

    Preparation of cryocooled protein crystal is provided by use of helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal allowing collection of high resolution data and by heavier noble gas (krypton or xenon) binding followed by helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal for collection of high resolution data and SAD phasing simultaneously. The helium pressurizing is carried out on crystal coated to prevent dehydration or on crystal grown in aqueous solution in a capillary.

  11. The Extended Fractional Subequation Method for Nonlinear Fractional Differential Equations

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Jianping; Tang, Bo; Kumar, Sunil; Hou, Yanren

    2012-01-01

    An extended fractional subequation method is proposed for solving fractional differential equations by introducing a new general ansätz and Bäcklund transformation of the fractional Riccati equation with known solutions. Being concise and straightforward, this method is applied to the space-time fractional coupled Burgers’ equations and coupled MKdV equations. As a result, many exact solutions are obtained. It is shown that the considered method provides a very effective, convenient, and powe...

  12. Functional Fractional Calculus

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Shantanu

    2011-01-01

    When a new extraordinary and outstanding theory is stated, it has to face criticism and skeptism, because it is beyond the usual concept. The fractional calculus though not new, was not discussed or developed for a long time, particularly for lack of its application to real life problems. It is extraordinary because it does not deal with 'ordinary' differential calculus. It is outstanding because it can now be applied to situations where existing theories fail to give satisfactory results. In this book not only mathematical abstractions are discussed in a lucid manner, with physical mathematic

  13. Fractional Reserve Banking

    OpenAIRE

    Andreasen, Niels; Bjerregaard, Mads; Lund, Jonas; Olsen, Ove Bitsch; Rasmussen, Andreas Dalgas

    2012-01-01

    Projektet er bygget op omkring kritisk realisme, som er det gennemgående videnskabelige fundament til undersøgelsen af hvilke strukturelle grunde der er til finansiel ustabilitet i Danmark. Projektet går i dybden med Fractional Reserve Banking og incitamentsstrukturen i banksystemet. Vi bevæger os både på det makro- og mikroøkonomiske niveau i analysen. På makro niveau bruger vi den østrigske skole om konjunktur teori (The Positive Theory of the Cycle). På mikro niveau arbejder vi med princip...

  14. Plasma fractionation issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrugia, Albert; Evers, Theo; Falcou, Pierre-Francois; Burnouf, Thierry; Amorim, Luiz; Thomas, Sylvia

    2009-04-01

    Procurement and processing of human plasma for fractionation of therapeutic proteins or biological medicines used in clinical practice is a multi-billion dollar international trade. Together the private sector and public sector (non-profit) provide large amounts of safe and effective therapeutic plasma proteins needed worldwide. The principal therapeutic proteins produced by the dichotomous industry include gamma globulins or immunoglobulins (including pathogen-specific hyperimmune globulins, such as hepatitis B immune globulins) albumin, factor VIII and Factor IX concentrates. Viral inactivation, principally by solvent detergent and other processes, has proven highly effective in preventing transmission of enveloped viruses, viz. HBV, HIV, and HCV.

  15. Refractive index dependence of Papilio Ulysses butterfly wings reflectance spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isnaeni, Muslimin, Ahmad Novi; Birowosuto, Muhammad Danang

    2016-02-01

    We have observed and utilized butterfly wings of Papilio Ulysses for refractive index sensor. We noticed this butterfly wings have photonic crystal structure, which causes blue color appearance on the wings. The photonic crystal structure, which consists of cuticle and air void, is approximated as one dimensional photonic crystal structure. This photonic crystal structure opens potential to several optical devices application, such as refractive index sensor. We have utilized small piece of Papilio Ulysses butterfly wings to characterize refractive index of several liquid base on reflectance spectrum of butterfly wings in the presence of sample liquid. For comparison, we simulated reflectance spectrum of one dimensional photonic crystal structure having material parameter based on real structure of butterfly wings. We found that reflectance spectrum peaks shifted as refractive index of sample changes. Although there is a slight difference in reflectance spectrum peaks between measured spectrum and calculated spectrum, the trend of reflectance spectrum peaks as function of sample's refractive index is the similar. We assume that during the measurement, the air void that filled by sample liquid is expanded due to liquid pressure. This change of void shape causes non-similarity between measured spectrum and calculated spectrum.

  16. Temperature-reflection I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGady, David A.

    2017-01-01

    -temperature path integrals for quantum field theories (QFTs) should be T-reflection invariant. Because multi-particle partition functions are equal to Euclidean path integrals for QFTs, we expect them to be T-reflection invariant. Single-particle partition functions though are often not invariant under T......In this paper, we revisit the claim that many partition functions are invariant under reflecting temperatures to negative values (T-reflection). The goal of this paper is to demarcate which partition functions should be invariant under T-reflection, and why. Our main claim is that finite...... that T-reflection is unrelated to time-reversal. Finally, we study the interplay between T-reflection and perturbation theory in the anharmonic harmonic oscillator in quantum mechanics and in Yang-Mills in four-dimensions. This is the first in a series of papers on temperature-reflections....

  17. Symmetry fractionalization of visons in Z2 spin liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yang; Cheng, Meng; Fang, Chen

    In this work we study symmetry fractionalization of vison excitations in topological Z2 spin liquids. We show that in the presence of the full SO (3) spin-rotational symmetry and if there is an odd number of spin-1/2 per unit cell, the symmetry fractionalization of visons is completely fixed. On the other hand, visons can have different classes of symmetry fractionalization if the spin-rotational symmetry is reduced. As a concrete example, we show that visons in the Balents-Fisher-Girvin Z2 spin liquid have crystal symmetry fractionalization classes which are not allowed in SO (3) symmetric spin liquids, due to the reduced spin-rotational symmetry.

  18. 'Ionic crystals' consisting of trinuclear macrocations and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T Arumuganathan

    )(ClCH2COO)6(H2O)3]4. [SiW12O40] ... solid state properties to obtain new materials in appli- ... Reflections Collected/unique ... covalent bonds in the relevant crystal lattice having ...... the relevant parameters are given in Tables 5 and 6,.

  19. All-polymer photonic crystal slab sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermannsson, Pétur Gordon; Sørensen, Kristian Tølbøl; Vannahme, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    An all-polymer photonic crystal slab sensor is presented, and shown to exhibit narrow resonant reflection with a FWHM of less than 1 nm and a sensitivity of 31 nm/RIU when sensing media with refractive indices around that of water. This results in a detection limit of 4.5x10-6 RIU when measured...

  20. Crystal structure refinement with SHELXL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheldrick, George M., E-mail: gsheldr@shelx.uni-ac.gwdg.de [Department of Structural Chemistry, Georg-August Universität Göttingen, Tammannstraße 4, Göttingen 37077 (Germany)

    2015-01-01

    New features added to the refinement program SHELXL since 2008 are described and explained. The improvements in the crystal structure refinement program SHELXL have been closely coupled with the development and increasing importance of the CIF (Crystallographic Information Framework) format for validating and archiving crystal structures. An important simplification is that now only one file in CIF format (for convenience, referred to simply as ‘a CIF’) containing embedded reflection data and SHELXL instructions is needed for a complete structure archive; the program SHREDCIF can be used to extract the .hkl and .ins files required for further refinement with SHELXL. Recent developments in SHELXL facilitate refinement against neutron diffraction data, the treatment of H atoms, the determination of absolute structure, the input of partial structure factors and the refinement of twinned and disordered structures. SHELXL is available free to academics for the Windows, Linux and Mac OS X operating systems, and is particularly suitable for multiple-core processors.

  1. Reflectivity and filtering characteristics of pyrolytic graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adib, M.; Abdel-Kawy, A.; Ashry, A.; Abbas, Y.; Wahba, W.

    1988-01-01

    The neutron transmission measurements through oriented pyrolytic graphite (P.G. crystal) were carried out in the wavelength band from 0.15 nm to 6.5 nm at different orientations of the (002) plane of the crystal w.r.t. the neutron beam direction. It was found that the P.G. crystal may be tuned for optimum scattering of second-order neutrons in the wavelength ranging between 0.112 nm and 0.425 nm, by adjusting the filter in an appropriate orientation. The reflectivity of (002), (004) and (006) planes of P.G. were measured and the following results are obtained: the reflectivity of (002) plane was found to be 99% by (transmission method). The ratio of the integrated intensity of the reflected neutrons from (004) and (006) is 3.14+-0.25 and is found to be in agreement with the calculated ratio. The measurements were performed using the fixed scattering angle spectrometer installed in front of the ET-RR-1 reactor horizontal channel

  2. Advances in robust fractional control

    CERN Document Server

    Padula, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    This monograph presents design methodologies for (robust) fractional control systems. It shows the reader how to take advantage of the superior flexibility of fractional control systems compared with integer-order systems in achieving more challenging control requirements. There is a high degree of current interest in fractional systems and fractional control arising from both academia and industry and readers from both milieux are catered to in the text. Different design approaches having in common a trade-off between robustness and performance of the control system are considered explicitly. The text generalizes methodologies, techniques and theoretical results that have been successfully applied in classical (integer) control to the fractional case. The first part of Advances in Robust Fractional Control is the more industrially-oriented. It focuses on the design of fractional controllers for integer processes. In particular, it considers fractional-order proportional-integral-derivative controllers, becau...

  3. Liberating Moral Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horell, Harold D.

    2013-01-01

    The author argues that if we are to foster life-giving and liberating moral reflection, we must first liberate moral reflection from distortions; specifically, from the distorting effects of moral insensitivity, destructive moral relativism, and confusions resulting from a failure to understand the dynamics of moral reflection. The author proposes…

  4. Search for fractional charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    A search was made for fractional charges of the form Z plus two-thirds e, where Z is an integer. It was assumed that the charges exist in natural form bound with other fractional charges in neutral molecules. It was further assumed that these neutral molecules are present in air. Two concentration schemes were employed. One sample was derived from the waste gases from a xenon distillation plant. This assumes that high mass, low vapor pressure components of air are concentrated along with the xenon. The second sample involved ionizing air, allowing a brief recombination period, and then collecting residual ions on the surface of titanium discs. Both samples were analyzed at the University of Rochester in a system using a tandem Van de Graff to accelerate particles through an essentially electrostatic beam handling system. The detector system employed both a Time of Flight and an energy-sensitive gas ionization detector. In the most sensitive mode of analysis, a gas absorber was inserted in the beam path to block the intense background. The presence of an absorber limited the search to highly penetrating particles. Effectively, this limited the search to particles with low Z and masses greater than roughly fifty GeV. The final sensitivities attained were on the order of 1 x 10 -20 for the ionized air sample and 1 x 10 -21 for the gas sample. A discussion of the caveats that could reduce the actual level of sensitivity is included

  5. Rapid Crystallization of the Bishop Magma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualda, G. A.; Anderson, A. T.; Sutton, S. R.

    2007-12-01

    Substantial effort has been made to understand the longevity of rhyolitic magmas, and particular attention has been paid to the systems in the Long Valley area (California). Recent geochronological data suggest discrete magma bodies that existed for hundreds of thousands of years. Zircon crystallization ages for the Bishop Tuff span 100-200 ka, and were interpreted to reflect slow crystallization of a liquid-rich magma. Here we use the diffusional relaxation of Ti zoning in quartz to investigate the longevity of the Bishop magma. We have used such an approach to show the short timescales of crystallization of Ti-rich rims on quartz from early- erupted Bishop Tuff. We have now recognized Ti-rich cores in quartz that can be used to derive the timescales of their crystallization. We studied four samples of the early-erupted Bishop. Hand-picked crystals were mounted on glass slides and polished. Cathodoluminescence (CL) images were obtained using the electron microprobe at the University of Chicago. Ti zoning was documented using the GeoSoilEnviroCARS x-ray microprobe at the Advanced Photon Source (Argonne National Lab). Quartz crystals in all 4 samples include up to 3 Ti-bearing zones: a central core (50-100 μm in diameter, ca. 50 ppm Ti), a volumetrically predominant interior (~40 ppm Ti), and in some crystals a 50-100 μm thick rim (50 ppm Ti). Maximum estimates of core residence times were calculated using a 1D diffusion model, as the time needed to smooth an infinitely steep profile to fit the observed profile. Surprisingly, even for the largest crystals studied - ca. 2 mm in diameter - core residence times are less than 1 ka. Calculated growth rates imply that even cm-sized crystals crystallized in less than 10 ka. Crystal size distribution data show that crystals larger than 3 mm are exceedingly rare, such that the important inference is that the bulk of the crystallization of the early-erupted Bishop magma occurred in only a few thousand years. This timescale

  6. Fractional Reserve in Banking System

    OpenAIRE

    Valkonen, Maria

    2016-01-01

    This thesis is aimed to provide understanding of the role of the fractional reserve in the mod-ern banking system worldwide and particularly in Finland. The fractional reserve banking is used worldwide, but the benefits of this system are very disputable. On the one hand, experts say that the fractional reserve is a necessary instrument for the normal business and profit making. On the other hand, sceptics openly criticize the fractional reserve system and blame it for fiat money (money n...

  7. On matrix fractional differential equations

    OpenAIRE

    Adem Kılıçman; Wasan Ajeel Ahmood

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this article is to study the matrix fractional differential equations and to find the exact solution for system of matrix fractional differential equations in terms of Riemann–Liouville using Laplace transform method and convolution product to the Riemann–Liouville fractional of matrices. Also, we show the theorem of non-homogeneous matrix fractional partial differential equation with some illustrative examples to demonstrate the effectiveness of the new methodology. The main objec...

  8. Fractional Hopfield Neural Networks: Fractional Dynamic Associative Recurrent Neural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Yi-Fei; Yi, Zhang; Zhou, Ji-Liu

    2017-10-01

    This paper mainly discusses a novel conceptual framework: fractional Hopfield neural networks (FHNN). As is commonly known, fractional calculus has been incorporated into artificial neural networks, mainly because of its long-term memory and nonlocality. Some researchers have made interesting attempts at fractional neural networks and gained competitive advantages over integer-order neural networks. Therefore, it is naturally makes one ponder how to generalize the first-order Hopfield neural networks to the fractional-order ones, and how to implement FHNN by means of fractional calculus. We propose to introduce a novel mathematical method: fractional calculus to implement FHNN. First, we implement fractor in the form of an analog circuit. Second, we implement FHNN by utilizing fractor and the fractional steepest descent approach, construct its Lyapunov function, and further analyze its attractors. Third, we perform experiments to analyze the stability and convergence of FHNN, and further discuss its applications to the defense against chip cloning attacks for anticounterfeiting. The main contribution of our work is to propose FHNN in the form of an analog circuit by utilizing a fractor and the fractional steepest descent approach, construct its Lyapunov function, prove its Lyapunov stability, analyze its attractors, and apply FHNN to the defense against chip cloning attacks for anticounterfeiting. A significant advantage of FHNN is that its attractors essentially relate to the neuron's fractional order. FHNN possesses the fractional-order-stability and fractional-order-sensitivity characteristics.

  9. The random continued fraction transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalle, Charlene; Kempton, Tom; Verbitskiy, Evgeny

    2017-03-01

    We introduce a random dynamical system related to continued fraction expansions. It uses random combinations of the Gauss map and the Rényi (or backwards) continued fraction map. We explore the continued fraction expansions that this system produces, as well as the dynamical properties of the system.

  10. How Weird Are Weird Fractions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuffelbeam, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    A positive rational is a weird fraction if its value is unchanged by an illegitimate, digit-based reduction. In this article, we prove that each weird fraction is uniquely weird and initiate a discussion of the prevalence of weird fractions.

  11. On fractional Fourier transform moments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alieva, T.; Bastiaans, M.J.

    2000-01-01

    Based on the relation between the ambiguity function represented in a quasi-polar coordinate system and the fractional power spectra, the fractional Fourier transform moments are introduced. Important equalities for the global second-order fractional Fourier transform moments are derived and their

  12. Fractional dynamic calculus and fractional dynamic equations on time scales

    CERN Document Server

    Georgiev, Svetlin G

    2018-01-01

    Pedagogically organized, this monograph introduces fractional calculus and fractional dynamic equations on time scales in relation to mathematical physics applications and problems. Beginning with the definitions of forward and backward jump operators, the book builds from Stefan Hilger’s basic theories on time scales and examines recent developments within the field of fractional calculus and fractional equations. Useful tools are provided for solving differential and integral equations as well as various problems involving special functions of mathematical physics and their extensions and generalizations in one and more variables. Much discussion is devoted to Riemann-Liouville fractional dynamic equations and Caputo fractional dynamic equations.  Intended for use in the field and designed for students without an extensive mathematical background, this book is suitable for graduate courses and researchers looking for an introduction to fractional dynamic calculus and equations on time scales. .

  13. Nickel-induced crystallization of amorphous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, J A; Arce, R D; Buitrago, R H [INTEC (CONICET-UNL), Gueemes 3450, S3000GLN Santa Fe (Argentina); Budini, N; Rinaldi, P, E-mail: jschmidt@intec.unl.edu.a [FIQ - UNL, Santiago del Estero 2829, S3000AOM Santa Fe (Argentina)

    2009-05-01

    The nickel-induced crystallization of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is used to obtain large grained polycrystalline silicon thin films on glass substrates. a-Si:H is deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition at 200 deg. C, preparing intrinsic and slightly p-doped samples. Each sample was divided in several pieces, over which increasing Ni concentrations were sputtered. Two crystallization methods are compared, conventional furnace annealing (CFA) and rapid thermal annealing (RTA). The crystallization was followed by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy observations, X-ray diffraction, and reflectance measurements in the UV region. The large grain sizes obtained - larger than 100{mu}m for the samples crystallized by CFA - are very encouraging for the preparation of low-cost thin film polycrystalline silicon solar cells.

  14. Diversity of sulfur isotope fractionations by sulfate-reducing prokaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Detmers, Jan; Brüchert, Volker; Habicht, K S

    2001-01-01

    Batch culture experiments were performed with 32 different sulfate-reducing prokaryotes to explore the diversity in sulfur isotope fractionation during dissimilatory sulfate reduction by pure cultures. The selected strains reflect the phylogenetic and physiologic diversity of presently known...... sulfate reducers and cover a broad range of natural marine and freshwater habitats. Experimental conditions were designed to achieve optimum growth conditions with respect to electron donors, salinity, temperature, and pH. Under these optimized conditions, experimental fractionation factors ranged from 2.......0 to 42.0 per thousand. Salinity, incubation temperature, pH, and phylogeny had no systematic effect on the sulfur isotope fractionation. There was no correlation between isotope fractionation and sulfate reduction rate. The type of dissimilatory bisulfite reductase also had no effect on fractionation...

  15. Library search with regular reflectance IR spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staat, H.; Korte, E.H.; Lampen, P.

    1989-01-01

    Characterisation in situ for coatings and other surface layers is generally favourable, but a prerequisite for precious items such as art objects. In infrared spectroscopy only reflection techniques are applicable here. However for attenuated total reflection (ATR) it is difficult to obtain the necessary optical contact of the crystal with the sample, when the latter is not perfectly plane or flexible. The measurement of diffuse reflectance demands a scattering sample and usually the reflectance is very poor. Therefore in most cases one is left with regular reflectance. Such spectra consist of dispersion-like feature instead of bands impeding their interpretation in the way the analyst is used to. Furthermore for computer search in common spectral libraries compiled from transmittance or absorbance spectra a transformation of the reflectance spectra is needed. The correct conversion is based on the Kramers-Kronig transformation. This somewhat time - consuming procedure can be speeded up by using appropriate approximations. A coarser conversion may be obtained from the first derivative of the reflectance spectrum which resembles the second derivative of a transmittance spectrum. The resulting distorted spectra can still be used successfully for the search in peak table libraries. Experiences with both transformations are presented. (author)

  16. Crystals for krypton helium-alpha line emission microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, Jeffrey A.; Haugh, Michael J.

    2018-04-17

    A system for reflecting and recording x-ray radiation from an x-ray emitting event to characterize the event. A crystal is aligned to receive radiation along a first path from an x-ray emitting event. Upon striking the crystal, the x-ray reflects from the crystal along a second path due to a reflection plane of the crystal defined by one of the following Miller indices: (9,7,3) or (11,3,3). Exemplary crystalline material is germanium. The x-rays are reflected to a detector aligned to receive reflected x-rays that are reflected from the crystal along the second path and the detector generates a detector signal in response to x-rays impacting the detector. The detector may include a CCD electronic detector, film plates, or any other detector type. A processor receives and processes the detector signal to generate reflection data representing the x-rays emitted from the x-ray emitting event.

  17. Neutron transmission through pyrolytic graphite crystal II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adib, M., E-mail: mamdouhshihata@yahoo.com [Reactor Physics Department, NRC, AEAE, Cairo (Egypt); Habib, N. [Reactor Physics Department, NRC, AEAE, Cairo (Egypt); Bashter, I.; Saleh, A. [Faculty of Science, Zagazig University (Egypt)

    2011-04-15

    The measured neutron transmissions through 6.7 mm thick pyroletic graphite (PG) crystal set at different take-off-angles with respect to the beam, as a function of wavelength, were compared with the calculated values using a general formula. An adapted version of the computer package graphite was developed in order to provide the required calculations in the neutron energy range from 0.1 MeV to 10 eV. An overall agreement was obtained between the formula fits and the measured data at different take-off-angles. The major dips in transmission caused by various reflections were identified. From the shape of the dips due to 0 0 l reflections, the mosaic spread of the used PG crystal has been determined within an accuracy of 0.12{sup o}. A feasibility study is carried out on using two PG crystals to select from the reactor spectrum a neutron monochromatic beam with wavelengths longer than 0.3 nm and almost free from accompanying higher-order reflections. Calculation shows that 2 mm thick highly oriented PG (0.5{sup o} FWHM on mosaic spread) crystal set at glancing angle 20.0{sup o} reflects first-order monochromatic neutrons with 0.3 nm wavelengths. When 6.0 cm thick PG crystal (2{sup o} FWHM on mosaic spread) set at 60.63{sup o} take-off-angle is inserted on the way of the reflected neutrons, it transmits more than 70% of the first-order neutrons while attenuating the high- order ones by more than 20 times. Similar results were obtained when the selected monochromatic neutrons had wavelengths longer than 0.3 nm.

  18. CRYSTALLIZATION IN MULTICOMPONENT GLASSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRUGER AA; HRMA PR

    2009-10-08

    In glass processing situations involving glass crystallization, various crystalline forms nucleate, grow, and dissolve, typically in a nonuniform temperature field of molten glass subjected to convection. Nuclear waste glasses are remarkable examples of multicomponent vitrified mixtures involving partial crystallization. In the glass melter, crystals form and dissolve during batch-to-glass conversion, melter processing, and product cooling. Crystals often agglomerate and sink, and they may settle at the melter bottom. Within the body of cooling glass, multiple phases crystallize in a non-uniform time-dependent temperature field. Self-organizing periodic distribution (the Liesegnang effect) is common. Various crystallization phenomena that occur in glass making are reviewed.

  19. Crystallization In Multicomponent Glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, A.A.; Hrma, P.R.

    2009-01-01

    In glass processing situations involving glass crystallization, various crystalline forms nucleate, grow, and dissolve, typically in a nonuniform temperature field of molten glass subjected to convection. Nuclear waste glasses are remarkable examples of multicomponent vitrified mixtures involving partial crystallization. In the glass melter, crystals form and dissolve during batch-to-glass conversion, melter processing, and product cooling. Crystals often agglomerate and sink, and they may settle at the melter bottom. Within the body of cooling glass, multiple phases crystallize in a non-uniform time-dependent temperature field. Self-organizing periodic distribution (the Liesegnang effect) is common. Various crystallization phenomena that occur in glass making are reviewed.

  20. Neutrons and the crystal ball experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alyea, J.; Grosnick, D.; Koetke, D.; Manweiler, R.; Spinka, H.; Stanislaus, S.

    1997-01-01

    The Crystal Ball detector, as originally constructed, consisted of a set of 672 optically-isolated NaI crystals, forming an approximately spherical shell and each crystal viewed by a photomultiplier, a charged-particle tracker within the NaI shell, and two endcaps to cover angles close to two colliding beams. The detector geometry subtends a solid angle of about 93% of 4π st (20 degree le θ le 160degree and 0degree le φ le 360degree) from the center. The Crystal Ball detector was used for two long series of experiments at the e + e - colliding beam accelerators SPEAR [1, 2, 3, 4] at SLAC and DORIS [5, 6, 7, 8] at DESY. A new set of measurements using the Crystal Ball detector is planned at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Alternating Gradient Synchrotrons (BNL AGS). These new experiments will use the 672 NaI crystals from the original detector, but neither the tracker nor endcaps. The ''Crystal Ball'' in this note will refer only to the set of NaI crystals. Initially, the reactions to be studied will include π - pr a rrow neutrals with pion beam momenta approximately400-750 MeV/c and K - pr a rrow neutrals with kaon beam momenta approximately600-750 MeV/c. Each of these reactions will include a neutron in the final state. whereas the fraction of e + e - interactions with neutrons at SLAC or DESY was quite small. Consequently, there is relatively little experience understanding the behavior of neutrons in the Crystal Ball

  1. Photonic crystal based sensor for organic solvents and for solvent-water mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenzl, Christoph; Hirsch, Thomas; Wolfbeis, Otto S

    2012-12-12

    Monodisperse polystyrene nanoparticles with a diameter of 173 nm were incorporated into a polydimethylsiloxane matrix where they display an iridescent color that can be attributed to the photonic crystal effect. The film is of violet color if placed in plain water, but turns to red in the presence of the non-polar solvent n-hexane. Several solvents were studied in some detail. We show that such films are capable of monitoring the water content of ethanol/water mixtures, where only 1% (v/v) of water leads to a shift of the peak wavelength of reflected light by 5 nm. The method also can be applied to determine, both visually and instrumentally, the fraction of methanol in ethanol/methanol mixtures. Here, a fraction of 1% of methanol (v/v) results in a wavelength shift of 2 nm. The reflected wavelength is not influenced by temperature changes nor impeded by photobleaching. The signal changes are fully reversible and response times are <1 s.

  2. Photonic Crystal Based Sensor for Organic Solvents and for Solvent-Water Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto S. Wolfbeis

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Monodisperse polystyrene nanoparticles with a diameter of 173 nm were incorporated into a polydimethylsiloxane matrix where they display an iridescent color that can be attributed to the photonic crystal effect. The film is of violet color if placed in plain water, but turns to red in the presence of the non-polar solvent n-hexane. Several solvents were studied in some detail. We show that such films are capable of monitoring the water content of ethanol/water mixtures, where only 1% (v/v of water leads to a shift of the peak wavelength of reflected light by 5 nm. The method also can be applied to determine, both visually and instrumentally, the fraction of methanol in ethanol/methanol mixtures. Here, a fraction of 1% of methanol (v/v results in a wavelength shift of 2 nm. The reflected wavelength is not influenced by temperature changes nor impeded by photobleaching. The signal changes are fully reversible and response times are <1 s.

  3. Motion of channeling particles in a bent crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avakian, A.R.; Harutyunian, A.S.; Hovanessian, A.G.; Shahinian, S.M.; Yang, C.

    1990-01-01

    The motion of high-energy charged particles in a bent crystal is investigated in the approximation of the model of continuous potential of crystallographic planes and with account of incoherent scattering on the atoms of media. Angular distribution of charged particle beams is investigated at the exit of the bent region of the crystal in dependence with the maximum deflection angle and energy of particles. The dependence of the fraction of channeling particles on crystal thickness, crystal curvature and particle energy is found in a simple model approximation. The influence of crystal curvature on incoherent scattering of particles in the crystal is analyzed. The concept of an optimal thickness for the maximum number of particles deflected at a given angle is considered. 8 refs.; 8 figs

  4. Nonhomogeneous fractional Poisson processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Xiaotian [School of Management, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)]. E-mail: swa001@126.com; Zhang Shiying [School of Management, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Fan Shen [Computer and Information School, Zhejiang Wanli University, Ningbo 315100 (China)

    2007-01-15

    In this paper, we propose a class of non-Gaussian stationary increment processes, named nonhomogeneous fractional Poisson processes W{sub H}{sup (j)}(t), which permit the study of the effects of long-range dependance in a large number of fields including quantum physics and finance. The processes W{sub H}{sup (j)}(t) are self-similar in a wide sense, exhibit more fatter tail than Gaussian processes, and converge to the Gaussian processes in distribution in some cases. In addition, we also show that the intensity function {lambda}(t) strongly influences the existence of the highest finite moment of W{sub H}{sup (j)}(t) and the behaviour of the tail probability of W{sub H}{sup (j)}(t)

  5. Nonhomogeneous fractional Poisson processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaotian; Zhang Shiying; Fan Shen

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a class of non-Gaussian stationary increment processes, named nonhomogeneous fractional Poisson processes W H (j) (t), which permit the study of the effects of long-range dependance in a large number of fields including quantum physics and finance. The processes W H (j) (t) are self-similar in a wide sense, exhibit more fatter tail than Gaussian processes, and converge to the Gaussian processes in distribution in some cases. In addition, we also show that the intensity function λ(t) strongly influences the existence of the highest finite moment of W H (j) (t) and the behaviour of the tail probability of W H (j) (t)

  6. Membrane Assisted Enzyme Fractionation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Linfeng

    to the variation in size of the proteins and a reasonable separation factor can be observed only when the size difference is in the order of 10 or more. This is partly caused by concentration polarization and membrane fouling which hinders an effective separation of the proteins. Application of an electric field...... across the porous membrane has been demonstrated to be an effective way to reduce concentration polarization and membrane fouling. In addition, this technique can also be used to separate the proteins based on difference in charge, which to some extent overcome the limitations of size difference...... of proteins on the basis of their charge, degree of hydrophobicity, affinity or size. Adequate purity is often not achieved unless several purification steps are combined thereby increasing cost and reducing product yield. Conventional fractionation of proteins using ultrafiltration membranes is limited...

  7. Surface deterioration of ammonium acid phthalate crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrus, D.M.; Blake, R.L.; Burek, A.J.

    1976-01-01

    In working with various acid phthalate crystals for low energy X-ray spectroscopy, we have observed a relatively rapid surface degradation of ammonium acid phthalate in comparison with similar crystals was observed. It was found that two different samples degraded in a few days upon exposure to high vacuum (10/sup -6/ - 10/sup -7/ torr). The same crystals showed similar effects when exposed to room atmosphere for two to three weeks. One of these crystals deteriorated while kept constantly in a desiccator jar for about two years. The desiccator environment seems to be the most favorable. The observed difference in the surface of these crystals might be described as a change from a transparent, glasslike condition to a white, powderlike haze somewhat akin to frosted glass. A two week exposure to vacuum for a freshly cleaved crystal caused the integrated coefficient of reflection at 23.6 A to decrease by a factor of 2.5. The degraded surface areas tend to form definite rhombohedral patterns. Since the external symmetry of ammonium acid phthalate crystals is rhombohedral, this suggests that the degradation we observe takes place in the form of large etched figures. A possible mechanism may be sublimation, which would proceed more rapidly in vacuum than in air. It is concluded that ammonium acid phthalate should be kept in a desiccator environment as much as possible. Exposures to vacuum should be brief and critical diffraction measurements should be done using a freshly cleaved surface.

  8. Fraction Reduction in Membrane Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Guo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fraction reduction is a basic computation for rational numbers. P system is a new computing model, while the current methods for fraction reductions are not available in these systems. In this paper, we propose a method of fraction reduction and discuss how to carry it out in cell-like P systems with the membrane structure and the rules with priority designed. During the application of fraction reduction rules, synchronization is guaranteed by arranging some special objects in these rules. Our work contributes to performing the rational computation in P systems since the rational operands can be given in the form of fraction.

  9. Thermochemical transformations of anthracite fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belkina, T.V.; Privalov, V.E.; Stepanenko, atM.A.

    1979-08-01

    Research on the nature of thermochemical transformations of anthracite fractions and the possibility of increasing their activity and identifying conditions for their use in the electrode pitch process is described. From research done on different anthracite fractions processed at varying temperatures it was concluded that accumulations of condensates from heating anthracite fractions occur significantly slower in comparison with pitch. As a result the electrode pitch process is prolonged. Thermal treatment of an anthracite fraction causes the formation and accumulation of condensates and promotes thermochemical transformations. Lastly, the use of thermally treated anthracite fractions apparently intensifies the electrode pitch process and improves its quality. (16 refs.) (In Russian)

  10. Toward lattice fractional vector calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2014-09-01

    An analog of fractional vector calculus for physical lattice models is suggested. We use an approach based on the models of three-dimensional lattices with long-range inter-particle interactions. The lattice analogs of fractional partial derivatives are represented by kernels of lattice long-range interactions, where the Fourier series transformations of these kernels have a power-law form with respect to wave vector components. In the continuum limit, these lattice partial derivatives give derivatives of non-integer order with respect to coordinates. In the three-dimensional description of the non-local continuum, the fractional differential operators have the form of fractional partial derivatives of the Riesz type. As examples of the applications of the suggested lattice fractional vector calculus, we give lattice models with long-range interactions for the fractional Maxwell equations of non-local continuous media and for the fractional generalization of the Mindlin and Aifantis continuum models of gradient elasticity.

  11. Spectroscopy of photonic band gaps in mesoporous one-dimensional photonic crystals based on aluminum oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorelik, V.S.; Voinov, Yu.P.; Shchavlev, V.V.; Bi, Dongxue; Shang, Guo Liang; Fei, Guang Tao

    2017-01-01

    Mesoporous one-dimensional photonic crystals based on aluminum oxide have been synthesized by electrochemical etching method. Reflection spectra of the obtained mesoporous samples in a wide spectral range that covers several band gaps are presented. Microscopic parameters of photonic crystals are calculated and corresponding reflection spectra for the first six band gaps are presented.

  12. Resonantly scattering crystals and surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunn, J.M.F.; Mahon, P.J.

    1990-12-01

    We examine coherence effects from forming a crystal of resonant scatterers by generalising the Fano model for autoionising resonances in electron scattering from atoms to a lattice of such scatterers. (We have in mind the case of neutron scattering from nuclei.) We solve this problem to yield two branches to the dispersion relation for the neutron in general and three when the resonance coincides with a Brillouin Zone boundary. The 'width' of the resonance is enhanced over the isolated nucleus, the best candidate for observation being the 2eV 185 Re resonance near the Bragg condition. We use these results to calculate the reflection coefficient from a surface, revealing total external reflection near resonance. We discuss experimental feasibility in both the neutron and electron cases. (author)

  13. Photonic crystal pioneer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anscombe, Nadya

    2011-08-01

    Over the past ten years, Crystal Fiber, now part of NKT Photonics, has been busy commercializing photonic crystal fibre. Nadya Anscombe finds out about the evolution of the technology and its applications.

  14. Crystallization Pathways in Biomineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Steve; Addadi, Lia

    2011-08-01

    A crystallization pathway describes the movement of ions from their source to the final product. Cells are intimately involved in biological crystallization pathways. In many pathways the cells utilize a unique strategy: They temporarily concentrate ions in intracellular membrane-bound vesicles in the form of a highly disordered solid phase. This phase is then transported to the final mineralization site, where it is destabilized and crystallizes. We present four case studies, each of which demonstrates specific aspects of biological crystallization pathways: seawater uptake by foraminifera, calcite spicule formation by sea urchin larvae, goethite formation in the teeth of limpets, and guanine crystal formation in fish skin and spider cuticles. Three representative crystallization pathways are described, and aspects of the different stages of crystallization are discussed. An in-depth understanding of these complex processes can lead to new ideas for synthetic crystallization processes of interest to materials science.

  15. Photonic Crystal Nanocavity Arrays

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Altug, Hatice; Vuckovic, Jelena

    2006-01-01

    We recently proposed two-dimensional coupled photonic crystal nanocavity arrays as a route to achieve a slow-group velocity of light in all crystal directions, thereby enabling numerous applications...

  16. Growth of dopamine crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patil, Vidya, E-mail: vidya.patil@ruparel.edu; Patki, Mugdha, E-mail: mugdha.patki@ruparel.edu [D. G. Ruparel College, Senapati Bapat Marg, Mahim, Mumbai – 400 016 (India)

    2016-05-06

    Many nonlinear optical (NLO) crystals have been identified as potential candidates in optical and electro-optical devices. Use of NLO organic crystals is expected in photonic applications. Hence organic nonlinear optical materials have been intensely investigated due to their potentially high nonlinearities, and rapid response in electro-optic effect compared to inorganic NLO materials. There are many methods to grow organic crystals such as vapor growth method, melt growth method and solution growth method. Out of these methods, solution growth method is useful in providing constraint free crystal. Single crystals of Dopamine have been grown by evaporating the solvents from aqueous solution. Crystals obtained were of the size of orders of mm. The crystal structure of dopamine was determined using XRD technique. Images of crystals were obtained using FEG SEM Quanta Series under high vacuum and low KV.

  17. Neutron transmission measurements of zinc and lead single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adib, M.; Abdel-Kawy, A.

    1988-01-01

    Neutron transmission measurements of zinc and lead single crystals have been carried out in a neutron wavelength band from 0.03 to 0.55 nm at different orientations of the crystal with regard to the beam direction. The measurements were performed using both time-of-flight and fixed-angle scattering spectrometers installed in front of the ET-RR-1 reactor horizontal channels. It was found that the position of the observed dips in the neutron transmission measurements corresponded to the reflections from the (h k l) planes of the hexagonal zinc single crystal which was cut along the (0 0 2) plane, while in the case of lead, the single crystal was cut perpendicular to the (3 1 1) plane. The reflectivity from the (0 0 2) plane of zinc was determined using both transmission and reflection methods. The maximum reflectivity was found to be 55% when the zinc crystal was orientated at 45 0 to the beam direction. The wavelength spread of the observed reflectivity curve was found to be in agreement with the calculated one, taking into consideration the spectrometer's resolution and the crystal mosaic spread. (author)

  18. Misonidazole in fractionated radiotherapy: are many small fractions best

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denekamp, J.; McNally, N.J.; Fowler, J.F.; Joiner, M.C.

    1980-01-01

    The largest sensitizing effect is always demonstrated with six fractions, each given with 2 g/m 2 of misonidazole. In the absence of reoxygenation a sensitizer enhancement ratio of 1.7 is predicted, but this falls to 1.1-1.2 if extensive reoxygenation occurs. Less sensitization is observed with 30 fractions, each with 0.4 g/m 2 of drug. However, for clinical use, the important question is which treatment kills the maximum number of tumour cells. Many of the simulations predict a marked disadvantage of reducing the fraction number for X rays alone. The circumstances in which this disadvantage is offset by the large Sensitizer enhancement ratio values with a six-fraction schedule are few. The model calculations suggest that many small fractions, each with a low drug dose, are safest unless the clinician has some prior knowledge that a change in fraction number is not disadvantageous. (author)

  19. Crystal mosaic spread determination by slow neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adib, M.; Naguib, K.; Abdel Kawy, A.; Ashry, A.; Abbas, Y.; Wahba, M.; Maayouf, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    A method has been established for determination of the crystal mosaic spread. The method is based on recording all neutron-reflected, under bragg condition, from a certain crystal plane. A computer code was developed especially in order to fit the measured wavelength's distribution of the reflected neutrons with the calculated one, assuming that the crystal mosaic spread has a Gaussian shape. The code accounts for the parameters of the time of flight spectrometer used during the present measurements, as well as divergence of the incident neutron beam. The developed method has been applied for determination of the mosaic spread of both zinc and pyrolytic graphite (P.G.) crystals. The mosaic spread values deduced from the present measurements, are 10'+-6' and 3.60 0 +-0.16 0 respectively for Zn and P.G. crystals

  20. Fabrication and properties of gallium metallic photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozhevnikov, V.F.; Diwekar, M.; Kamaev, V.P.; Shi, J.; Vardeny, Z.V.

    2003-01-01

    Gallium metallic photonic crystals with 100% filling factor have been fabricated via infiltration of liquid gallium into opals of 300-nm silica spheres using a novel high pressure-high temperature technique. The electrical resistance of the Ga-opal crystals was measured at temperatures from 10 to 280 K. The data obtained show that Ga-opal crystals are metallic network with slightly smaller temperature coefficient of resistivity than that for bulk gallium. Optical reflectivity of bulk gallium, plain opal and several Ga-opal crystals were measured at photon energies from 0.3 to 6 eV. A pronounced photonic stop band in the visible spectral range was found in both the plain and Ga infiltrated opals. The reflectivity spectra also show increase in reflectivity below 0.6 eV; which we interpret as a significantly lower effective plasma frequency of the metallic mesh in the infiltrated opal compare to the plasma frequency in the pure metal

  1. Apparatus for mounting crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longeway, Paul A.

    1985-01-01

    A thickness monitor useful in deposition or etching reactor systems comprising a crystal-controlled oscillator in which the crystal is deposited or etched to change the frequency of the oscillator. The crystal rests within a thermally conductive metallic housing and arranged to be temperature controlled. Electrode contacts are made to the surface primarily by gravity force such that the crystal is substantially free of stress otherwise induced by high temperature.

  2. ALICE photon spectrometer crystals

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    Members of the mechanical assembly team insert the last few crystals into the first module of ALICE's photon spectrometer. These crystals are made from lead-tungstate, a crystal as clear as glass but with nearly four times the density. When a high-energy particle passes through one of these crystals it will scintillate, emitting a flash of light allowing the energy of photons, electrons and positrons to be measured.

  3. Media for Reflection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Morten

    2016-01-01

    This article develops the concept media for reflection in the interest of conceptualizing the interpretative frames that enable and limit reflection in management and leadership education. The concept ‘media for reflection’ allows us to conceptualize the social and cultural mediation of reflection...... without reducing reflection to an effect of the social structures and cultural norms in which it is embedded. Based on the developed theoretical framework, this article analyses how a renaissance ‘mirror for princes’ and contemporary research-based management education mediate reflection. The content...... of the mediations is analysed as well as the societal and organizational background. Furthermore, the means by which the two media enable and limit reflection in different ways is compared. Finally, the article discusses possible implications of the analysis in terms of management and leadership education....

  4. Dual-readout calorimetry with scintillating crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinci, D

    2009-01-01

    The dual-readout approach, which allows an event-by-event measurement of the electromagnetic shower fraction, was originally demonstrated with the DREAM sampling calorimeter. This approach can be extended to homogeneous detectors like crystals if Cherenkov and scintillation light can be separated. In this paper we present several methods we developed for distinguishing the two components in PWO and BGO based calorimeters and the results obtained.

  5. Fractional statistics and fractional quantized Hall effect. Revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao, R.; Wu, Y.S.

    1984-01-01

    We suggest that the origin of the odd denominator rule observed in the fractional quantized Hall effect (FQHE) may lie in fractional statistics which governs quasiparticles in FQHE. A theorem concerning statistics of clusters of quasiparticles implies that fractional statistics does not allow coexistence of a large number of quasiparticles at fillings with an even denominator. Thus no Hall plateau can be formed at these fillings, regardless of the presence of an energy gap. 15 references

  6. Crystallization Stages of the Bishop Tuff Magma Body Recorded in Crystal Textures in Pumice Clasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pamukcu, Ayla; Gualda, Guilherme A.R.; Anderson, Jr. , Alfred T. (Vanderbilt); (UC)

    2012-07-25

    The Bishop Tuff is a giant silicic ignimbrite erupted at 0.76 Ma in eastern California, USA. Five pumice clasts from the late-erupted Bishop Tuff (Aeolian Buttes) were studied in an effort to better understand the pre- and syn-eruptive history of the Bishop magma body and place constraints on the timescales of its existence. This study complements and expands on a previous study that focused on early-erupted Bishop Tuff pumice clasts. Bulk densities of pumice clasts were measured using an immersion method, and phenocryst crystal contents were determined using a sieving and winnowing procedure. X-ray tomography was used to obtain qualitative and quantitative textural information, particularly crystal size distributions (CSDs). We have determined CSDs for crystals ranging in size from {approx}10 to {approx}1000 {micro}m for three groups of mineral phases: magnetite ({+-}ilmenite), pyroxene + biotite, quartz + feldspar. Similar to early-erupted pumice, late-erupted pumice bulk density and crystal contents are positively correlated, and comparison of crystal fraction vs size trends suggests that the proportion of large crystals is the primary control on crystallinity. Porosity is negatively correlated with crystal content, which is difficult to reconcile with closed-system crystallization. Magnetite and pyroxene + biotite size distributions are fractal in nature, often attributed to fragmentation; however, crystals are mostly whole and euhedral, such that an alternative mechanism is necessary to explain these distributions. Quartz + feldspar size distributions are kinked, with a shallow-sloped log-linear section describing large crystals (> 140 {micro}m) and a steep-sloped log-linear section describing small crystals (< 140 {micro}m). We interpret these two crystal populations as resulting from a shift in crystallization regime. We suggest that the shallow-sloped section describes a pre-eruptive quartz + feldspar growth-dominated regime, whereas the steep

  7. Large three-dimensional photonic crystals based on monocrystalline liquid crystal blue phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Wei; Hou, Chien-Tsung; Li, Cheng-Chang; Jau, Hung-Chang; Wang, Chun-Ta; Hong, Ching-Lang; Guo, Duan-Yi; Wang, Cheng-Yu; Chiang, Sheng-Ping; Bunning, Timothy J; Khoo, Iam-Choon; Lin, Tsung-Hsien

    2017-09-28

    Although there have been intense efforts to fabricate large three-dimensional photonic crystals in order to realize their full potential, the technologies developed so far are still beset with various material processing and cost issues. Conventional top-down fabrications are costly and time-consuming, whereas natural self-assembly and bottom-up fabrications often result in high defect density and limited dimensions. Here we report the fabrication of extraordinarily large monocrystalline photonic crystals by controlling the self-assembly processes which occur in unique phases of liquid crystals that exhibit three-dimensional photonic-crystalline properties called liquid-crystal blue phases. In particular, we have developed a gradient-temperature technique that enables three-dimensional photonic crystals to grow to lateral dimensions of ~1 cm (~30,000 of unit cells) and thickness of ~100 μm (~ 300 unit cells). These giant single crystals exhibit extraordinarily sharp photonic bandgaps with high reflectivity, long-range periodicity in all dimensions and well-defined lattice orientation.Conventional fabrication approaches for large-size three-dimensional photonic crystals are problematic. By properly controlling the self-assembly processes, the authors report the fabrication of monocrystalline blue phase liquid crystals that exhibit three-dimensional photonic-crystalline properties.

  8. Crystal Growth Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheel, Hans J.; Fukuda, Tsuguo

    2004-06-01

    This volume deals with the technologies of crystal fabrication, of crystal machining, and of epilayer production and is the first book on industrial and scientific aspects of crystal and layer production. The major industrial crystals are treated: Si, GaAs, GaP, InP, CdTe, sapphire, oxide and halide scintillator crystals, crystals for optical, piezoelectric and microwave applications and more. Contains 29 contributions from leading crystal technologists covering the following topics: General aspects of crystal growth technology Silicon Compound semiconductors Oxides and halides Crystal machining Epitaxy and layer deposition Scientific and technological problems of production and machining of industrial crystals are discussed by top experts, most of them from the major growth industries and crystal growth centers. In addition, it will be useful for the users of crystals, for teachers and graduate students in materials sciences, in electronic and other functional materials, chemical and metallurgical engineering, micro-and optoelectronics including nanotechnology, mechanical engineering and precision-machining, microtechnology, and in solid-state sciences.

  9. Food crystallization and eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egg products can be utilized to control crystallization in a diverse realm of food products. Albumen and egg yolk can aid in the control of sugar crystal formation in candies. Egg yolk can enhance the textural properties and aid in the control of large ice crystal formation in frozen desserts. In...

  10. Secondary extinction in cylindrical and spherical crystals for X-ray and neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Huachen; Li Zhaohuan; Yang Bin; Shen Caiwan

    2001-01-01

    The distribution of the reflection power ratio for a neutron or x-ray diffracted from a cylindrical crystal immersed in an homogenous incident beam is obtained by the numerical solution of the transfer equations for the first time. The profile well reflects all the physical properties of the absorption and extinction behaviour in the crystals. A systematic investigation of the secondary extinction for cylindrical and spherical crystals was carried out based on these results

  11. Applications of antireflection coatings in sonic crystal-based acoustic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yun; Deng Ke; Xu Shengjun; Qiu Chunyin; Yang Hai; Liu Zhengyou

    2011-01-01

    The unwanted reflection seriously baffles the practical applications of sonic crystals, such as for various acoustic lenses designed by utilizing the in-band properties of sonic crystals. Herein we introduce the concept of the antireflection coating into the sonic crystal-based devices. The efficiency of such accessorial structures is demonstrated well by an originally high reflection system. Promising perspectives can be anticipated in extending the antireflection coating layers into more general acoustic applications through a flexible design process.

  12. Preliminary morphological and X-ray diffraction studies of the crystals of the DNA cetyltrimethylammonium salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osica, V D; Pyatigorskaya, T L; Polyvtsev, O F; Dembo, A T; Kliya, M O; Vasilchenko, V N; Verkin, B I; Sukharevskya, B Y

    1977-04-01

    Double-stranded DNA molecules (molecular weight 2.5 X 10(5) - 5 X 10(5) daltons) have been crystallized from water-salt solutions as cetyltrimethylammonium salts (CTA-DNA). Variation of crystallization conditions results in a production of different types of CTA-DNA crystals: spherulits, dendrites, needle-shaped and faceted rhombic crystals, the latter beeing up to 0.3 mm on a side. X-ray diffraction data indicate that DNA molecules in the crystals form a hexagonal lattice which parameters vary slightly with the morphological type of the crystal. Comparison of the melting curves of the DNA preparation before and after crystallization suggests that DNA molecules are partially fractionated in the course of crystallization. Crystals of the CTA-DNA-proflavine complex have also been obtained.

  13. Fractionation of Pb and Cu in the fine fraction (landfill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczala, Fabio; Orupõld, Kaja; Augustsson, Anna; Burlakovs, Juris; Hogland, Marika; Bhatnagar, Amit; Hogland, William

    2017-11-01

    The fractionation of metals in the fine fraction (landfill was carried out to evaluate the metal (Pb and Cu) contents and their potential towards not only mobility but also possibilities of recovery/extraction. The fractionation followed the BCR (Community Bureau of Reference) sequential extraction, and the exchangeable (F1), reducible (F2), oxidizable (F3) and residual fractions were determined. The results showed that Pb was highly associated with the reducible (F2) and oxidizable (F3) fractions, suggesting the potential mobility of this metal mainly when in contact with oxygen, despite the low association with the exchangeable fraction (F1). Cu has also shown the potential for mobility when in contact with oxygen, since high associations with the oxidizable fraction (F3) were observed. On the other hand, the mobility of metals in excavated waste can be seen as beneficial considering the circular economy and recovery of such valuables back into the economy. To conclude, not only the total concentration of metals but also a better understanding of fractionation and in which form metals are bound is very important to bring information on how to manage the fine fraction from excavated waste both in terms of environmental impacts and also recovery of such valuables in the economy.

  14. Fractional variational calculus in terms of Riesz fractional derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agrawal, O P

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents extensions of traditional calculus of variations for systems containing Riesz fractional derivatives (RFDs). Specifically, we present generalized Euler-Lagrange equations and the transversality conditions for fractional variational problems (FVPs) defined in terms of RFDs. We consider two problems, a simple FVP and an FVP of Lagrange. Results of the first problem are extended to problems containing multiple fractional derivatives, functions and parameters, and to unspecified boundary conditions. For the second problem, we present Lagrange-type multiplier rules. For both problems, we develop the Euler-Lagrange-type necessary conditions which must be satisfied for the given functional to be extremum. Problems are considered to demonstrate applications of the formulations. Explicitly, we introduce fractional momenta, fractional Hamiltonian, fractional Hamilton equations of motion, fractional field theory and fractional optimal control. The formulations presented and the resulting equations are similar to the formulations for FVPs given in Agrawal (2002 J. Math. Anal. Appl. 272 368, 2006 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 39 10375) and to those that appear in the field of classical calculus of variations. These formulations are simple and can be extended to other problems in the field of fractional calculus of variations

  15. Principles of neutron reflection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felcher, G.P.

    1988-08-01

    Neutron reflection is perhaps the most developed branch of slow neutrons optics, which in itself is a direct consequence of the undulatory nature of the neutron. After reviewing the basic types of interactions (nuclear and magnetic) between neutrons and matter, the formalism is introduced to calculate the reflectivity from a sample composed of stacked flat layers and, inversely, to calculate the stacking from reflectivity measurements. Finally, a brief survey of the applications of neutron reflection is given, both in technology and in fundamental research. 32 refs., 6 figs

  16. Storage array reflection considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haire, M.J.; Jordan, W.C.; Taylor, R.G.

    1997-01-01

    The assumptions used for reflection conditions of single containers are fairly well established and consistently applied throughout the industry in nuclear criticality safety evaluations. Containers are usually considered to be either fully water-reflected (i.e. surrounded by 6 to 12 in. of water) for safety calculations or reflected by 1 in. of water for nominal (structural material and air) conditions. Tables and figures are usually available for performing comparative evaluations of containers under various loading conditions. Reflection considerations used for evaluating the safety of storage arrays of fissile material are not as well established

  17. Modelling altered fractionation schedules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, J.F.

    1993-01-01

    The author discusses the conflicting requirements of hyperfractionation and accelerated fractionation used in radiotherapy, and the development of computer modelling to predict how to obtain an optimum of tumour cell kill without exceeding normal-tissue tolerance. The present trend is to shorten hyperfractionated schedules from 6 or 7 weeks to give overall times of 4 or 5 weeks as in new schedules by Herskovic et al (1992) and Harari (1992). Very high doses are given, much higher than can be given when ultrashort schedules such as CHART (12 days) are used. Computer modelling has suggested that optimum overall times, to yield maximum cell kill in tumours ((α/β = 10 Gy) for a constant level of late complications (α/β = 3 Gy) would be X or X-1 weeks, where X is the doubling time of the tumour cells in days (Fowler 1990). For median doubling times of about 5 days, overall times of 4 or 5 weeks should be ideal. (U.K.)

  18. Plasticity size effects in voided crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hussein, M. I.; Borg, Ulrik; Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    singularities in an elastic material. The lattice resistance to dislocation motion, dislocation nucleation, dislocation interaction with obstacles and annihilation are incorporated through a set of constitutive rules. Over the range of length scales investigated, both the discrete dislocation and strain......The shear and equi-biaxial straining responses of periodic voided single crystals are analysed using discrete dislocation plasticity and a continuum strain gradient crystal plasticity theory. In the discrete dislocation formulation the dislocations are all of edge character and are modelled as line...... predictions of the two formulations for all crystal types and void volume fractions considered when the material length scale in the non-local plasticity model chosen to be $0.325\\mu m$ (around ten times the slip plane spacing in the discrete dislocation models)....

  19. Plasticity size effects in voided crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hussein, M.I.; Borg, Ulrik; Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2008-01-01

    as line singularities in an elastic material. The lattice resistance to dislocation motion, dislocation nucleation, dislocation interaction with obstacles and annihilation are incorporated through a set of constitutive rules. Over the range of length scales investigated, both the discrete dislocation......The shear and equi-biaxial straining responses of periodic voided single crystals are analysed using discrete dislocation plasticity and a continuum strain gradient crystal plasticity theory. In the discrete dislocation formulation, the dislocations are all of edge character and are modelled...... between predictions of the two formulations for all crystal types and void volume fractions considered when the material length scale in the non-local plasticity model is chosen to be 0.325 mu m (about 10 times the slip plane spacing in the discrete dislocation models)....

  20. Do protein crystals nucleate within dense liquid clusters?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maes, Dominique; Vorontsova, Maria A.; Potenza, Marco A. C.; Sanvito, Tiziano; Sleutel, Mike; Giglio, Marzio; Vekilov, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of protein-rich clusters and nucleating crystals were characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS), confocal depolarized dynamic light scattering (cDDLS) and depolarized oblique illumination dark-field microscopy. Newly nucleated crystals within protein-rich clusters were detected directly. These observations indicate that the protein-rich clusters are locations for crystal nucleation. Protein-dense liquid clusters are regions of high protein concentration that have been observed in solutions of several proteins. The typical cluster size varies from several tens to several hundreds of nanometres and their volume fraction remains below 10 −3 of the solution. According to the two-step mechanism of nucleation, the protein-rich clusters serve as locations for and precursors to the nucleation of protein crystals. While the two-step mechanism explained several unusual features of protein crystal nucleation kinetics, a direct observation of its validity for protein crystals has been lacking. Here, two independent observations of crystal nucleation with the proteins lysozyme and glucose isomerase are discussed. Firstly, the evolutions of the protein-rich clusters and nucleating crystals were characterized simultaneously by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and confocal depolarized dynamic light scattering (cDDLS), respectively. It is demonstrated that protein crystals appear following a significant delay after cluster formation. The cDDLS correlation functions follow a Gaussian decay, indicative of nondiffusive motion. A possible explanation is that the crystals are contained inside large clusters and are driven by the elasticity of the cluster surface. Secondly, depolarized oblique illumination dark-field microscopy reveals the evolution from liquid clusters without crystals to newly nucleated crystals contained in the clusters to grown crystals freely diffusing in the solution. Collectively, the observations indicate that the protein-rich clusters in

  1. 26 CFR 26.2642-4 - Redetermination of applicable fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... applicable fraction is reduced to reflect any federal or state, estate or inheritance taxes paid from the trust. (4) Imposition of recapture tax under section 2032A—(i) If an additional estate tax is imposed...) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES GENERATION-SKIPPING TRANSFER TAX REGULATIONS UNDER THE TAX REFORM ACT OF 1986 § 26...

  2. Accessible solitons of fractional dimension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Wei-Ping, E-mail: zhongwp6@126.com [Department of Electronic and Information Engineering, Shunde Polytechnic, Guangdong Province, Shunde 528300 (China); Texas A& M University at Qatar, P.O. Box 23874, Doha (Qatar); Belić, Milivoj [Texas A& M University at Qatar, P.O. Box 23874, Doha (Qatar); Zhang, Yiqi [Key Laboratory for Physical Electronics and Devices of the Ministry of Education & Shaanxi Key Lab of Information Photonic Technique, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China)

    2016-05-15

    We demonstrate that accessible solitons described by an extended Schrödinger equation with the Laplacian of fractional dimension can exist in strongly nonlocal nonlinear media. The soliton solutions of the model are constructed by two special functions, the associated Legendre polynomials and the Laguerre polynomials in the fraction-dimensional space. Our results show that these fractional accessible solitons form a soliton family which includes crescent solitons, and asymmetric single-layer and multi-layer necklace solitons. -- Highlights: •Analytic solutions of a fractional Schrödinger equation are obtained. •The solutions are produced by means of self-similar method applied to the fractional Schrödinger equation with parabolic potential. •The fractional accessible solitons form crescent, asymmetric single-layer and multilayer necklace profiles. •The model applies to the propagation of optical pulses in strongly nonlocal nonlinear media.

  3. Thermo-, photo-, and mechano-responsive liquid crystal networks enable tunable photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akamatsu, N; Hisano, K; Tatsumi, R; Aizawa, M; Barrett, C J; Shishido, A

    2017-10-25

    Tunable photonic crystals exhibiting optical properties that respond reversibly to external stimuli have been developed using liquid crystal networks (LCNs) and liquid crystal elastomers (LCEs). These tunable photonic crystals possess an inverse opal structure and are photo-responsive, but circumvent the usual requirement to contain dye molecules in the structure that often limit their applicability and cause optical degradation. Herein, we report tunable photonic crystal films that reversibly tune the reflection peak wavelength under thermo-, photo- and mechano-stimuli, through bilayering a stimuli-responsive LCN including azobenzene units with a colourless inverse opal film composed of non-responsive, flexible durable polymers. By mechanically deforming the azobenzene containing LCN via various stimuli, the reflection peak wavelength from the bilayered film assembly could be shifted on demand. We confirm that the reflection peak shift occurs due to the deformation of the stimuli-responsive layer propagating towards and into the inverse opal layer to change its shape in response, and this shift behaviour is repeatable without optical degradation.

  4. Lithium-bearing fluor-arfvedsonite from Hurricane Mountain, New Hampshire: A crystal-chemical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawthorne, F.C.; Oberti, R.; Ottolini, L.; Foord, E.E.

    1996-01-01

    The structures of two crystals of Li-bearing fluor-arfvedsonite (1) (K0.32Na0.68)Na2(Li0.48Fe 2+2.83Mn2+0.10Zn 0.06Fe3+1.46Ti0.07) (Si7.88Al0.12)O22[Fu1.15(OH) 0.85] and (2) (K0.25Na0.75)Na2(Li0.48Fe 2+2.84Mn2+0.11Zn 0.05Fe3+1.45Ti0.07)(Si 7.89Al0.11)O22[F1.35(OH) 0.65] from a granitic pegmatite, Hurricane Mountain, New Hampshire, have been refined to R indices of 1.5(1.6)% based on 1380(1387) reflections measured with MoK?? X-radiation. The unit cell parameters are (1) a 9.838(4), b 17.991(6), c 5.315(2) A??, 103.78(3)??, V 913.7 A??3 and (2) a 9.832(3), b 17.990(7), c 5.316(3) A??, ?? 103.79(3)??, V 913.2 A??3. Site-scattering refinement shows Li to be completely ordered at the M(3) site in these crystals. The amphibole composition is intermediate between fluor-arfvedsonite and fluor-ferro-leakeite with a small component (???10%) of fluor-ferro-ferri-nybo??ite. These amphibole crystals project into miarolitic cavities in a pegmatitic phase of a riebeckite granite. The early-crystallizing amphibole is close to fluor-ferro-leakeite in composition, but becomes progressively depleted in Li and F as crystals project out into miarolitic cavities; the final amphibole to crystallize is a fibrous Li-poor riebeckite. Li plays a significant role in late-stage fractionation involving the crystallization of alkali amphibole in peralkaline granitic environments.

  5. Fractional Calculus and Shannon Wavelet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Cattani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An explicit analytical formula for the any order fractional derivative of Shannon wavelet is given as wavelet series based on connection coefficients. So that for any 2(ℝ function, reconstructed by Shannon wavelets, we can easily define its fractional derivative. The approximation error is explicitly computed, and the wavelet series is compared with Grünwald fractional derivative by focusing on the many advantages of the wavelet method, in terms of rate of convergence.

  6. Fractional variational principles in action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baleanu, Dumitru [Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Faculty of Art and Sciences, Cankaya University, 06530 Ankara (Turkey); Institute of Space Sciences, PO Box MG-23, R 76900, Magurele-Bucharest (Romania)], E-mail: dumitru@cankaya.edu.tr

    2009-10-15

    The fractional calculus has gained considerable importance in various fields of science and engineering, especially during the last few decades. An open issue in this emerging field is represented by the fractional variational principles area. Therefore, the fractional Euler-Lagrange and Hamilton equations started to be examined intensely during the last decade. In this paper, we review some new trends in this field and we discuss some of their potential applications.

  7. Fractional quiver W-algebras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Taro; Pestun, Vasily

    2018-04-01

    We introduce quiver gauge theory associated with the non-simply laced type fractional quiver and define fractional quiver W-algebras by using construction of Kimura and Pestun (Lett Math Phys, 2018. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11005-018-1072-1; Lett Math Phys, 2018. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11005-018-1073-0) with representation of fractional quivers.

  8. On the Fractional Mean Value

    OpenAIRE

    Hosseinabadi, Abdolali Neamaty; Nategh, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    This work, dealt with the classical mean value theorem and took advantage of it in the fractional calculus. The concept of a fractional critical point is introduced. Some sufficient conditions for the existence of a critical point is studied and an illustrative example rele- vant to the concept of the time dilation effect is given. The present paper also includes, some connections between convexity (and monotonicity) with fractional derivative in the Riemann-Liouville sense.

  9. Propagation of optical vortices with fractional topological charge in free space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Tamelia; Kreminska, Liubov; Golovin, Andrii B.; Crouse, David T.

    2014-10-01

    The behavior of the optical vortices with fractional topological charges in the far-field is assessed through numerical modeling and confirmed by experimental results. The generation of fractional topological charge variations of the phase within a Gaussian beam was achieved by using a liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LCoS SLM). It is shown that a laser beam carrying an optical vortex with a fractional topological charge evolves into a beam with a topological charge of integer value, specifically an integer value closer to the fractional number in the far field. A potential application of this work is for data transmission within optical telecommunication systems.

  10. Deep Space Detection of Oriented Ice Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshak, A.; Varnai, T.; Kostinski, A. B.

    2017-12-01

    The deep space climate observatory (DSCOVR) spacecraft resides at the first Lagrangian point about one million miles from Earth. A polychromatic imaging camera onboard delivers nearly hourly observations of the entire sun-lit face of the Earth. Many images contain unexpected bright flashes of light over both ocean and land. We constructed a yearlong time series of flash latitudes, scattering angles and oxygen absorption to demonstrate conclusively that the flashes over land are specular reflections off tiny ice crystals floating in the air nearly horizontally. Such deep space detection of tropospheric ice can be used to constrain the likelihood of oriented crystals and their contribution to Earth albedo.

  11. Dissenting in Reflective Conversations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Pernille; Boulus, Nina

    2011-01-01

    Reflective monitoring of research practices is essential. However, we often lack formal training in the practices of doing action research, and descriptions of actual inquiry practice are seldom included in publications. Our aim is to provide a glimpse of self-reflective practices based on our...

  12. Self-Reflection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fausing, Bent

    2016-01-01

    will take a look at the establishing of the modern self and possibilities of self-reflection, too. My examples will be from the so-called dark-selfies and from a new selfie form, which merge the present with the previous progressing into the future. I will discuss the media reflections as loos and/or gain...

  13. Thermal neutron spectra measurements in IEAR-1 Reactor, by using a crystal spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulfaro, R.; Figueiredo Neto, A.M.; Stasiulevicius, E.; Vinhas, L.A.

    1975-01-01

    The thermal neutron spectrum of the IEN Argonauta reactor has been measured in the wavelength from 0.7 to 1.9A, using a neutron crystal spectrometer. An aluminium single crystal, in transmission, was used as monochromator. The aluminium crystal reflectivity employed in the analysis of the data was calculated for the first five permitted orders. An effective absorption coefficient of the crystal was used to perform the calculations instead of the macroscopic cross section of the element

  14. Fractionated Spacecraft Architectures Seeding Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mathieu, Charlotte; Weigel, Annalisa

    2006-01-01

    .... Models were developed from a customer-centric perspective to assess different fractionated spacecraft architectures relative to traditional spacecraft architectures using multi-attribute analysis...

  15. Protein Crystal Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    In order to rapidly and efficiently grow crystals, tools were needed to automatically identify and analyze the growing process of protein crystals. To meet this need, Diversified Scientific, Inc. (DSI), with the support of a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract from NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center, developed CrystalScore(trademark), the first automated image acquisition, analysis, and archiving system designed specifically for the macromolecular crystal growing community. It offers automated hardware control, image and data archiving, image processing, a searchable database, and surface plotting of experimental data. CrystalScore is currently being used by numerous pharmaceutical companies and academic and nonprofit research centers. DSI, located in Birmingham, Alabama, was awarded the patent Method for acquiring, storing, and analyzing crystal images on March 4, 2003. Another DSI product made possible by Marshall SBIR funding is VaporPro(trademark), a unique, comprehensive system that allows for the automated control of vapor diffusion for crystallization experiments.

  16. Photonic crystal light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, James G [Albuquerque, NM; Lin, Shawn-Yu [Albuquerque, NM; Bur, James A [Corrales, NM

    2004-07-27

    A light source is provided by a photonic crystal having an enhanced photonic density-of-states over a band of frequencies and wherein at least one of the dielectric materials of the photonic crystal has a complex dielectric constant, thereby producing enhanced light emission at the band of frequencies when the photonic crystal is heated. The dielectric material can be a metal, such as tungsten. The spectral properties of the light source can be easily tuned by modification of the photonic crystal structure and materials. The photonic crystal light source can be heated electrically or other heating means. The light source can further include additional photonic crystals that exhibit enhanced light emission at a different band of frequencies to provide for color mixing. The photonic crystal light source may have applications in optical telecommunications, information displays, energy conversion, sensors, and other optical applications.

  17. Reflection: A Socratic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Seggelen-Damen, Inge C M; Van Hezewijk, René; Helsdingen, Anne S; Wopereis, Iwan G J H

    2017-12-01

    Reflection is a fuzzy concept. In this article we reveal the paradoxes involved in studying the nature of reflection. Whereas some scholars emphasize its discursive nature, we go further and underline its resemblance to the self-biased dialogue Socrates had with the slave in Plato's Meno . The individual and internal nature of the reflection process creates difficulty for studying it validly and reliably. We focus on methodological issues and use Hans Linschoten's view of coupled systems to identify, analyze, and interpret empirical research on reflection. We argue that researchers and research participants can take on roles in several possible system couplings. Depending on who controls the manipulation of the stimulus, who controls the measuring instrument, who interprets the measurement and the response, different types of research questions can be answered. We conclude that reflection may be validly studied by combining different couplings of experimenter, manipulation, stimulus, participant, measurement, and response.

  18. Transient Plasma Photonic Crystals for High-Power Lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, G; Spatschek, K H

    2016-06-03

    A new type of transient photonic crystals for high-power lasers is presented. The crystal is produced by counterpropagating laser beams in plasma. Trapped electrons and electrically forced ions generate a strong density grating. The lifetime of the transient photonic crystal is determined by the ballistic motion of ions. The robustness of the photonic crystal allows one to manipulate high-intensity laser pulses. The scheme of the crystal is analyzed here by 1D Vlasov simulations. Reflection or transmission of high-power laser pulses are predicted by particle-in-cell simulations. It is shown that a transient plasma photonic crystal may act as a tunable mirror for intense laser pulses. Generalizations to 2D and 3D configurations are possible.

  19. COMMERCIAL SNF ACCIDENT RELEASE FRACTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.O. Bader

    1999-10-18

    The purpose of this design analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that are released from an accident event at the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions will be used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the MGR. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total CSNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. The radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses. This subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Potential accidents may involve waste forms that are characterized as either bare (unconfined) fuel assemblies or confined fuel assemblies. The confined CSNF assemblies at the MGR are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or disposal containers (waste packages). In contrast to the bare fuel assemblies, the container that confines the fuel assemblies has the potential of providing an additional barrier for diminishing the total release fraction should the fuel rod cladding breach during an accident. However, this analysis will not take credit for this additional bamer and will establish only the total release fractions for bare unconfined CSNF assemblies, which may however be

  20. COMMERCIAL SNF ACCIDENT RELEASE FRACTIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S.O. Bader

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this design analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that are released from an accident event at the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions will be used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the MGR. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total CSNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. The radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses. This subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Potential accidents may involve waste forms that are characterized as either bare (unconfined) fuel assemblies or confined fuel assemblies. The confined CSNF assemblies at the MGR are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or disposal containers (waste packages). In contrast to the bare fuel assemblies, the container that confines the fuel assemblies has the potential of providing an additional barrier for diminishing the total release fraction should the fuel rod cladding breach during an accident. However, this analysis will not take credit for this additional bamer and will establish only the total release fractions for bare unconfined CSNF assemblies, which may however be

  1. Remote Estimation of Vegetation Fraction and Flower Fraction in Oilseed Rape with Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenghui Fang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study developed an approach for remote estimation of Vegetation Fraction (VF and Flower Fraction (FF in oilseed rape, which is a crop species with conspicuous flowers during reproduction. Canopy reflectance in green, red, red edge and NIR bands was obtained by a camera system mounted on an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV when oilseed rape was in the vegetative growth and flowering stage. The relationship of several widely-used Vegetation Indices (VI vs. VF was tested and found to be different in different phenology stages. At the same VF when oilseed rape was flowering, canopy reflectance increased in all bands, and the tested VI decreased. Therefore, two algorithms to estimate VF were calibrated respectively, one for samples during vegetative growth and the other for samples during flowering stage. The results showed that the Visible Atmospherically Resistant Index (VARIgreen worked most accurately for estimating VF in flower-free samples with an Root Mean Square Error (RMSE of 3.56%, while the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI2 was the best in flower-containing samples with an RMSE of 5.65%. Based on reflectance in green and NIR bands, a technique was developed to identify whether a sample contained flowers and then to choose automatically the appropriate algorithm for its VF estimation. During the flowering season, we also explored the potential of using canopy reflectance or VIs to estimate FF in oilseed rape. No significant correlation was observed between VI and FF when soil was visible in the sensor’s field of view. Reflectance at 550 nm worked well for FF estimation with coefficient of determination (R2 above 0.6. Our model was validated in oilseed rape planted under different nitrogen fertilization applications and in different phenology stages. The results showed that it was able to predict VF and FF accurately in oilseed rape with RMSE below 6%.

  2. Storage array reflection considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haire, M.J.; Jordan, W.C.; Taylor, R.G.

    1997-01-01

    The assumptions used for reflection conditions of single containers are fairly well established and consistently applied throughout the industry in nuclear criticality safety evaluations. Containers are usually considered to be either fully water reflected (i.e., surrounded by 6 to 12 in. of water) for safety calculations or reflected by 1 in. of water for nominal (structural material and air) conditions. Tables and figures are usually available for performing comparative evaluations of containers under various loading conditions. Reflection considerations used for evaluating the safety of storage arrays of fissile material are not as well established. When evaluating arrays, it has become more common for analysts to use calculations to demonstrate the safety of the array configuration. In performing these calculations, the analyst has considerable freedom concerning the assumptions made for modeling the reflection of the array. Considerations are given for the physical layout of the array with little or no discussion (or demonstration) of what conditions are bounded by the assumed reflection conditions. For example, an array may be generically evaluated by placing it in a corner of a room in which the opposing walls are far away. Typically, it is believed that complete flooding of the room is incredible, so the array is evaluated for various levels of water mist interspersed among array containers. This paper discusses some assumptions that are made regarding storage array reflection

  3. Fractions, Number Lines, Third Graders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Kathleen; Ahrendt, Sue; Monson, Debra; Wyberg, Terry; Colum, Karen

    2017-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM) (CCSSI 2010) outlines ambitious goals for fraction learning, starting in third grade, that include the use of the number line model. Understanding and constructing fractions on a number line are particularly complex tasks. The current work of the authors centers on ways to successfully…

  4. Unwrapping Students' Ideas about Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Rebecca M.; Gibbons, Lynsey K.; Kazemi, Elham; Lind, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Supporting students to develop an understanding of the meaning of fractions is an important goal of elementary school mathematics. This involves developing partitioning strategies, creating representations, naming fractional quantities, and using symbolic notation. This article describes how teachers can use a formative assessment problem to…

  5. Understanding Magnitudes to Understand Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Fractions are known to be difficult to learn and difficult to teach, yet they are vital for students to have access to further mathematical concepts. This article uses evidence to support teachers employing teaching methods that focus on the conceptual understanding of the magnitude of fractions.

  6. Financial Planning with Fractional Goals

    OpenAIRE

    Goedhart, Marc; Spronk, Jaap

    1995-01-01

    textabstractWhen solving financial planning problems with multiple goals by means of multiple objective programming, the presence of fractional goals leads to technical difficulties. In this paper we present a straightforward interactive approach for solving such linear fractional programs with multiple goal variables. The approach is illustrated by means of an example in financial planning.

  7. Deterministic ratchets for suspension fractionation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kulrattanarak, T.

    2010-01-01

    Driven by the current insights in sustainability and technological development in
    biorefining natural renewable resources, the food industry has taken an interest in
    fractionation of agrofood materials, like milk and cereal crops. The purpose of fractionation
    is to split the raw

  8. Fermion fractionization and index theorem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirayama, Minoru; Torii, Tatsuo

    1982-01-01

    The relation between the fermion fractionization and the Callias-Bott-Seeley index theorem for the Dirac operator in the open space of odd dimension is clarified. Only the case of one spatial dimension is discussed in detail. Sum rules for the expectation values of various quantities in fermion-fractionized configurations are derived. (author)

  9. The Reflective Foundation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunde Jørgensen, Ida

    Private foundations and cultural philanthropy by élites is viewed with increasing skepticism in recent years, begging the question of the extent to which foundations reflect on their role vis a vis wider societal norms. Through the prism of the New Carlsberg Foundation, financed by the brewery...... Carlsberg A/S, the paper seeks to elucidate the way in which one culturally significant foundation from Denmark has reflected on - and legitimated - its work and investments at critical moments in the past decades. The paper indicates a foundation with a high degree of reflection on the wider societal...

  10. Scattering Study of a Modified Cusp Potential in Conformable Fractional Formalism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Won Sang [Gyeongsang National University, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Zarrinkamar, Saber [Islamic Azad University, Garmsar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zare, Soroush [Islamic Azad University North Tehran Branch, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hassanabadi, Hassan [Shahrood University of Technology, Shahrood (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    The fractional Schr¨odinger equation is considered with a cusp interaction. Exact analytical solutions are obtained and thereby the scattering states as well as transmission and reflection coefficients are determined.

  11. A new fractional wavelet transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Hongzhe; Zheng, Zhibao; Wang, Wei

    2017-03-01

    The fractional Fourier transform (FRFT) is a potent tool to analyze the time-varying signal. However, it fails in locating the fractional Fourier domain (FRFD)-frequency contents which is required in some applications. A novel fractional wavelet transform (FRWT) is proposed to solve this problem. It displays the time and FRFD-frequency information jointly in the time-FRFD-frequency plane. The definition, basic properties, inverse transform and reproducing kernel of the proposed FRWT are considered. It has been shown that an FRWT with proper order corresponds to the classical wavelet transform (WT). The multiresolution analysis (MRA) associated with the developed FRWT, together with the construction of the orthogonal fractional wavelets are also presented. Three applications are discussed: the analysis of signal with time-varying frequency content, the FRFD spectrum estimation of signals that involving noise, and the construction of fractional Harr wavelet. Simulations verify the validity of the proposed FRWT.

  12. Generalized fractional Schroedinger equation with space-time fractional derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shaowei; Xu Mingyu

    2007-01-01

    In this paper the generalized fractional Schroedinger equation with space and time fractional derivatives is constructed. The equation is solved for free particle and for a square potential well by the method of integral transforms, Fourier transform and Laplace transform, and the solution can be expressed in terms of Mittag-Leffler function. The Green function for free particle is also presented in this paper. Finally, we discuss the relationship between the cases of the generalized fractional Schroedinger equation and the ones in standard quantum

  13. Permutation entropy of fractional Brownian motion and fractional Gaussian noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zunino, L.; Perez, D.G.; Martin, M.T.; Garavaglia, M.; Plastino, A.; Rosso, O.A.

    2008-01-01

    We have worked out theoretical curves for the permutation entropy of the fractional Brownian motion and fractional Gaussian noise by using the Bandt and Shiha [C. Bandt, F. Shiha, J. Time Ser. Anal. 28 (2007) 646] theoretical predictions for their corresponding relative frequencies. Comparisons with numerical simulations show an excellent agreement. Furthermore, the entropy-gap in the transition between these processes, observed previously via numerical results, has been here theoretically validated. Also, we have analyzed the behaviour of the permutation entropy of the fractional Gaussian noise for different time delays

  14. Seasonal soybean crop reflectance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaster, E. W. (Principal Investigator); Chance, J. E.

    1983-01-01

    Data are presented from field measurements of 1980 including 5 acquisitions of handheld radiometer reflectance measurements, 7 complete sets of parameters for implementing the Suits mode, and other biophysical parameters to characterize the soybean canopy. LANDSAT calculations on the simulated Brazilian soybean reflectance are included along with data collected during the summer and fall on 1981 on soybean single leaf optical parameters for three irrigation treatments. Tests of the Suits vegetative canopy reflectance model for the full hemisphere of observer directions as well as the nadir direction show moderate agreement for the visible channels of the MSS and poor agreement in the near infrared channel. Temporal changes in the spectral characteristics of the single leaves were seen to occur as a function of maturity which demonstrates that the absorptance of a soybean single leaf is more a function of thetransmittancee characteristics than the seasonally consistent single leaf reflectance.

  15. Polymer Stabilization of Liquid-Crystal Blue Phase II toward Photonic Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Seong-Yong; Jeon, Sung-Wook; Kim, Byeong-Cheon; Bae, Jae-Hyun; Araoka, Fumito; Choi, Suk-Won

    2017-03-15

    The temperature ranges where a pure simple-cubic blue phase (BPII) emerges are quite narrow compared to the body-centered-cubic BP (BPI) such that the polymer stabilization of BPII is much more difficult. Hence, a polymer-stabilized BPII possessing a wide temperature range has been scarcely reported. Here, we fabricate a polymer-stabilized BPII over a temperature range of 50 °C including room temperature. The fabricated polymer-stabilized BPII is confirmed via polarized optical microscopy, Bragg reflection, and Kossel diagram observations. Furthermore, we demonstrate reflective BP liquid-crystal devices utilizing the reflectance-voltage performance as a potential application of the polymer-stabilized BPII. Our work demonstrates the possibility of practical application of the polymer-stabilized BPII to photonic crystals.

  16. Wave reflections from breakwaters

    OpenAIRE

    Dickson, William S.

    1994-01-01

    A new method is presented for estimating the reflection of a random, multi-directional sea from a coastal structure. The technique is applicable to an array of wave gauges of arbitrary geometry deployed seaward of the reflector. An expansion for small oblique wave incidence angles is used to derive an approximate relationship between measured array cross-spectra and a small number of parameters that describe the incident wave properties and the reflectivity of the structure. Model tests with ...

  17. Selectively reflective transparent sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waché, Rémi; Florescu, Marian; Sweeney, Stephen J.; Clowes, Steven K.

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the possibility to selectively reflect certain wavelengths while maintaining the optical properties on other spectral ranges. This is of particular interest for transparent materials, which for specific applications may require high reflectivity at pre-determined frequencies. Although there exist currently techniques such as coatings to produce selective reflection, this work focuses on new approaches for mass production of polyethylene sheets which incorporate either additives or surface patterning for selective reflection between 8 to 13 μ m. Typical additives used to produce a greenhouse effect in plastics include particles such as clays, silica or hydroxide materials. However, the absorption of thermal radiation is less efficient than the decrease of emissivity as it can be compared with the inclusion of Lambertian materials. Photonic band gap engineering by the periodic structuring of metamaterials is known in nature for producing the vivid bright colors in certain organisms via strong wavelength-selective reflection. Research to artificially engineer such structures has mainly focused on wavelengths in the visible and near infrared. However few studies to date have been carried out to investigate the properties of metastructures in the mid infrared range even though the patterning of microstructure is easier to achieve. We present preliminary results on the diffuse reflectivity using FDTD simulations and analyze the technical feasibility of these approaches.

  18. Thoughts on Reflection (Editorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Koufogiannakis

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available There has been some acknowledgement in the published literature that reflection is a crucial element of the evidence based library and information practice (EBLIP model we have adopted (Booth 2004, 2006; Grant 2007; Helliwell 2007. As we work through a problem and try to incorporate the best available evidence into our decision making, reflection is required at several stages, including the very identification of the problem through to our assessment of the process itself and what we have learned in order to inform future practice. However, reflection and reflective writing have not fully been integrated into the process we espouse, and very little has been done to look more closely at this element of the model and how it can be integrated into professional learning.In a recently published research article, Sen (2010 confirms the relationship between reflection and several aspects of professional practice. These include critical review and decision making, two aspects that are tied closely to the evidence based process. Sen notes: Students were more likely to show evidence of learning, self‐development, the ability to review issues crucially, awareness of their own mental functions, ability to make decision [sic] and being empowered when they had mastered the art of reflective practice and the more deeply analytical reflective writing. (p.84 EBLIP (the journal tries to incorporate elements of reflection within the articles we publish. While we clearly believe in the need for our profession to do quality research and publish that research so that it can be accessible to practitioners, we also know that research cannot be looked at in isolation. Our evidence summaries are one way of reflecting critically on previously published research, and in the same vein, our classics bring older research studies back to the foreground. This work needs to continue to be discussed and looked at for its impact on our profession.More directly, the Using

  19. Scintillation crystal mounting apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engdahl, L.W.; Deans, A.J.

    1982-01-01

    An improved detector head for a gamma camera is disclosed. The detector head includes a housing and a detector assembly mounted within the housing. Components of the detector assembly include a crystal sub-assembly, a phototube array, and a light pipe between the phototube array and crystal sub-assembly. The invention provides a unique structure for maintaining the phototubes in optical relationship with the light pipe and preventing the application of forces that would cause the camera's crystal to crack

  20. CMS lead tungstate crystals

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    2000-01-01

    These crystals are made from lead tungstate, a crystal that is as clear as glass yet with nearly four times the density. They have been produced in Russia to be used as scintillators in the electromagnetic calorimeter on the CMS experiment, part of the LHC project at CERN. When an electron, positron or photon passes through the calorimeter it will cause a cascade of particles that will then be absorbed by these scintillating crystals, allowing the particle's energy to be measured.

  1. Macromolecular crystallization in microgravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snell, Edward H; Helliwell, John R

    2005-01-01

    Density difference fluid flows and sedimentation of growing crystals are greatly reduced when crystallization takes place in a reduced gravity environment. In the case of macromolecular crystallography a crystal of a biological macromolecule is used for diffraction experiments (x-ray or neutron) so as to determine the three-dimensional structure of the macromolecule. The better the internal order of the crystal then the greater the molecular structure detail that can be extracted. It is this structural information that enables an understanding of how the molecule functions. This knowledge is changing the biological and chemical sciences, with major potential in understanding disease pathologies. In this review, we examine the use of microgravity as an environment to grow macromolecular crystals. We describe the crystallization procedures used on the ground, how the resulting crystals are studied and the knowledge obtained from those crystals. We address the features desired in an ordered crystal and the techniques used to evaluate those features in detail. We then introduce the microgravity environment, the techniques to access that environment and the theory and evidence behind the use of microgravity for crystallization experiments. We describe how ground-based laboratory techniques have been adapted to microgravity flights and look at some of the methods used to analyse the resulting data. Several case studies illustrate the physical crystal quality improvements and the macromolecular structural advances. Finally, limitations and alternatives to microgravity and future directions for this research are covered. Macromolecular structural crystallography in general is a remarkable field where physics, biology, chemistry and mathematics meet to enable insight to the fundamentals of life. As the reader will see, there is a great deal of physics involved when the microgravity environment is applied to crystallization, some of it known, and undoubtedly much yet to

  2. The Role of Body Crystallization in Asteroidal Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasson, J. T.

    1993-07-01

    Large fractionations (factors of 2000-6000) in Ir/Ni and other ratios demonstrate that the magmatic groups of iron meteorites formed by fractional crystallization, and thus that the residual liquid remained well stirred during core crystallization. Past models have relied on solidification at the base or the top of the core, but body crystallization offers an attractive alternative. The simplest of the earlier models involved convective maxing induced by the liberation of heat and light elements (especially S) during upward crystallization from the center of the core. Other models involving downward crystallization from the core-mantle interface are based on the fact that temperatures at this location are slightly lower than those at the center; no whole-core stirring mechanism is provided by these models. Haack and Scott recently published a variant of the downward crystallization model involving the growth of giant (kilometer-scale) dendrites. Because crystallization creates a boundary layer enriched in S that does not participate in the convection, these models require several K of supercooling to induce crystallization (this undercooling is much greater than the temperature difference between the center of the core and the core-mantle interface). Buoyant forces will occasionally remove droplets of the basal boundary fluid; thus it was thinner and its degree of undercooling less than in that at the ceiling of the magma chamber. Homogeneous nucleation of metals is difficult to achieve; generally 200-300 K of undercooling is required, much more than could possibly occur in an asteroidal core. Crystals could, however, nucleate in the magma body on chromite, probably the first liquidus phase (A. Kracher, personal communication, notes that this is required to explain why Cr behaved like a compatible element despite having a solid/liquid D crystallize. The rate of core crystallization is limited by the rate of heat transport across the core-mantle interface. If

  3. Elastic energy for reflection-symmetric topologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumdar, A; Robbins, J M; Zyskin, M

    2006-01-01

    Nematic liquid crystals in a polyhedral domain, a prototype for bistable displays, may be described by a unit-vector field subject to tangent boundary conditions. Here we consider the case of a rectangular prism. For configurations with reflection-symmetric topologies, we derive a new lower bound for the one-constant elastic energy. For certain topologies, called conformal and anticonformal, the lower bound agrees with a previous result. For the remaining topologies, called nonconformal, the new bound is an improvement. For nonconformal topologies we derive an upper bound, which differs from the lower bound by a factor depending only on the aspect ratios of the prism

  4. Toward lattice fractional vector calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarasov, Vasily E

    2014-01-01

    An analog of fractional vector calculus for physical lattice models is suggested. We use an approach based on the models of three-dimensional lattices with long-range inter-particle interactions. The lattice analogs of fractional partial derivatives are represented by kernels of lattice long-range interactions, where the Fourier series transformations of these kernels have a power-law form with respect to wave vector components. In the continuum limit, these lattice partial derivatives give derivatives of non-integer order with respect to coordinates. In the three-dimensional description of the non-local continuum, the fractional differential operators have the form of fractional partial derivatives of the Riesz type. As examples of the applications of the suggested lattice fractional vector calculus, we give lattice models with long-range interactions for the fractional Maxwell equations of non-local continuous media and for the fractional generalization of the Mindlin and Aifantis continuum models of gradient elasticity. (papers)

  5. Active Photonic Crystal Waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ek, Sara

    This thesis deals with the fabrication and characterization of active photonic crystal waveguides, realized in III-V semiconductor material with embedded active layers. The platform offering active photonic crystal waveguides has many potential applications. One of these is a compact photonic...... due to photonic crystal dispersion. The observations are explained by the enhancement of net gain by light slow down. Another application based on active photonic crystal waveguides is micro lasers. Measurements on quantum dot micro laser cavities with different mirror configurations and photonic...

  6. A crystal barrel

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The production of crystals for the barrel of the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter has been completed. This is an important milestone for the experiment, which received the last of its 62,960 crystals on 9 March. The members of the team responsible for the crystal acceptance testing at CERN display the last crystal for the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter barrel. From left to right: Igor Tarasov, Etiennette Auffray and Hervé Cornet.One of the six machines specially developed to measure 67 different parameters on each crystal. Igor Tarasov is seen inserting the last batch of crystals into the machine. The last of the 62,960 CMS barrel crystals arrived at CERN on 9 March. Once removed from its polystyrene protection, this delicate crystal, like thousands of its predecessors, will be inserted into the last of the 36 supermodules of the barrel electromagnetic calorimeter in a few days' time. This marks the end of an important chapter in an almost 15-year-long journey by the CMS crystals team, some of whose member...

  7. Automation in biological crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Patrick Shaw; Mueller-Dieckmann, Jochen

    2014-06-01

    Crystallization remains the bottleneck in the crystallographic process leading from a gene to a three-dimensional model of the encoded protein or RNA. Automation of the individual steps of a crystallization experiment, from the preparation of crystallization cocktails for initial or optimization screens to the imaging of the experiments, has been the response to address this issue. Today, large high-throughput crystallization facilities, many of them open to the general user community, are capable of setting up thousands of crystallization trials per day. It is thus possible to test multiple constructs of each target for their ability to form crystals on a production-line basis. This has improved success rates and made crystallization much more convenient. High-throughput crystallization, however, cannot relieve users of the task of producing samples of high quality. Moreover, the time gained from eliminating manual preparations must now be invested in the careful evaluation of the increased number of experiments. The latter requires a sophisticated data and laboratory information-management system. A review of the current state of automation at the individual steps of crystallization with specific attention to the automation of optimization is given.

  8. Crystallization Formulation Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Crystallization Formulation Lab fills a critical need in the process development and optimization of current and new explosives and energetic formulations. The...

  9. Children Learn Spurious Associations in Their Math Textbooks: Examples from Fraction Arithmetic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braithwaite, David W.; Siegler, Robert S.

    2018-01-01

    Fraction arithmetic is among the most important and difficult topics children encounter in elementary and middle school mathematics. Braithwaite, Pyke, and Siegler (2017) hypothesized that difficulties learning fraction arithmetic often reflect reliance on associative knowledge--rather than understanding of mathematical concepts and procedures--to…

  10. Ferroelectric Fractional-Order Capacitors

    KAUST Repository

    Agambayev, Agamyrat

    2017-07-25

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride)-based polymers and their blends are used to fabricate electrostatic fractional-order capacitors. This simple but effective method allows us to precisely tune the constant phase angle of the resulting fractional-order capacitor by changing the blend composition. Additionally, we have derived an empirical relation between the ratio of the blend constituents and the constant phase angle to facilitate the design of a fractional order capacitor with a desired constant phase angle. The structural composition of the fabricated blends is investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques.

  11. Ferroelectric Fractional-Order Capacitors

    KAUST Repository

    Agambayev, Agamyrat; Patole, Shashikant P.; Farhat, Mohamed; Elwakil, Ahmed; Bagci, Hakan; Salama, Khaled N.

    2017-01-01

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride)-based polymers and their blends are used to fabricate electrostatic fractional-order capacitors. This simple but effective method allows us to precisely tune the constant phase angle of the resulting fractional-order capacitor by changing the blend composition. Additionally, we have derived an empirical relation between the ratio of the blend constituents and the constant phase angle to facilitate the design of a fractional order capacitor with a desired constant phase angle. The structural composition of the fabricated blends is investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques.

  12. On Generalized Fractional Differentiator Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid A. Jalab

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available By employing the generalized fractional differential operator, we introduce a system of fractional order derivative for a uniformly sampled polynomial signal. The calculation of the bring in signal depends on the additive combination of the weighted bring-in of N cascaded digital differentiators. The weights are imposed in a closed formula containing the Stirling numbers of the first kind. The approach taken in this work is to consider that signal function in terms of Newton series. The convergence of the system to a fractional time differentiator is discussed.

  13. A comparison of two procedures for verbal response time fractionation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotje evan der Linden

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available To describe the mental architecture between stimulus and response, cognitive models often divide the stimulus-response (SR interval into stages or modules. Predictions derived from such models are typically tested by focusing on the moment of response emission, through the analysis of response time (RT distributions. To go beyond the single response event, we recently proposed a method to fractionate verbal RTs into two physiologically defined intervals that are assumed to reflect different processing stages. The analysis of the durations of these intervals can be used to study the interaction between cognitive and motor processing during speech production. Our method is inspired by studies on decision making that used manual responses, in which RTs were fractionated into a premotor time (PMT, assumed to reflect cognitive processing, and a motor time (MT, assumed to reflect motor processing. In these studies, surface EMG activity was recorded from participants' response fingers. EMG onsets, reflecting the initiation of a motor response, were used as the point of fractionation. We adapted this method to speech-production research by measuring verbal responses in combination with EMG activity from facial muscles involved in articulation. However, in contrast to button-press tasks, the complex task of producing speech often resulted in multiple EMG bursts within the SR interval. This observation forced us to decide how to operationalize the point of fractionation: as the first EMG burst after stimulus onset (the stimulus-locked approach, or as the EMG burst that is coupled to the vocal response (the response-locked approach. The point of fractionation has direct consequences on how much of the overall task effect is captured by either interval. Therefore, the purpose of the current paper was to compare both onset-detection procedures in order to make an informed decision about which of the two is preferable. We concluded in favour or the response

  14. Removing grain boundaries from three-dimensional colloidal crystals using active dopants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, B.; Dijkstra, M.; Filion, L.C.

    2016-01-01

    Using computer simulations we explore how grain boundaries can be removed from three-dimensional colloidal crystals by doping with a small fraction of active colloids. We show that for sufficient selfpropulsion, the system is driven into a crystal-fluid coexistence. In this phase separated regime,

  15. Creation, Identity and Reflection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Beatrice Cheşcă

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper “Creation, Identity and Reflection” approaches the identification in the “mirror” of reality with creation, in other words seeking the authors’ identity in the reflected images. Reflection means attempting to find oneself, the mirror being the main principle of creation. Many characters become interesting only when they step into the world beyond the mirror, when their faces are doubled by the other self or when their selves are returned by other characters. The narcissistic concept of the mirror, i.e. the reflection in the mirror and the representation of the mirror itself, is a recurrent one in literature, but the reflection of the self which is not the self (as it is a reflection does not necessarily appear in a mirror or in a photograph or portrait. Sometimes, the not-self is returned to the self by another person or character. As far as Oscar Wilde’s theories are concerned, the main idea is that people are interesting for their masks, not for their inner nature. What Wilde calls “inner nature” is the characters’ un-reflected self and the mask is the reflection, the self in the mirror. Some characters’ relationships develop within a fiction that they dramatically try to preserve and protect with the risk of suffering. They refuse to take off the masks which define them in the others’ minds and hearts; the narcissistic individuals (both artists and characters seek and love their own image which they project upon facts, thus creating a fictive realm.

  16. Low reflectance high power RF load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ives, R. Lawrence; Mizuhara, Yosuke M.

    2016-02-02

    A load for traveling microwave energy has an absorptive volume defined by cylindrical body enclosed by a first end cap and a second end cap. The first end cap has an aperture for the passage of an input waveguide with a rotating part that is coupled to a reflective mirror. The inner surfaces of the absorptive volume consist of a resistive material or are coated with a coating which absorbs a fraction of incident RF energy, and the remainder of the RF energy reflects. The angle of the reflector and end caps is selected such that reflected RF energy dissipates an increasing percentage of the remaining RF energy at each reflection, and the reflected RF energy which returns to the rotating mirror is directed to the back surface of the rotating reflector, and is not coupled to the input waveguide. Additionally, the reflector may have a surface which generates a more uniform power distribution function axially and laterally, to increase the power handling capability of the RF load. The input waveguide may be corrugated for HE11 mode input energy.

  17. On generalized fractional vibration equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Hongzhe; Zheng, Zhibao; Wang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The paper presents a generalized fractional vibration equation for arbitrary viscoelastically damped system. • Some classical vibration equations can be derived from the developed equation. • The analytic solution of developed equation is derived under some special cases. • The generalized equation is particularly useful for developing new fractional equivalent linearization method. - Abstract: In this paper, a generalized fractional vibration equation with multi-terms of fractional dissipation is developed to describe the dynamical response of an arbitrary viscoelastically damped system. It is shown that many classical equations of motion, e.g., the Bagley–Torvik equation, can be derived from the developed equation. The Laplace transform is utilized to solve the generalized equation and the analytic solution under some special cases is derived. Example demonstrates the generalized transfer function of an arbitrary viscoelastic system.

  18. Physcicists rewarded for 'fractional electrons'

    CERN Multimedia

    Ball, P

    1998-01-01

    The 1998 Nobel prize for physics has been awarded to Horst Stormer, Daniel Tsui and Robert Laughlin.Stormer and Tsui were the first to observe the fractional quantum Hall effect and Laughlin provided the theory shortly afterwards (1 page).

  19. Ultracentrifugation for ultrafine nanodiamond fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koniakhin, S. V.; Besedina, N. A.; Kirilenko, D. A.; Shvidchenko, A. V.; Eidelman, E. D.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper we propose a method for ultrafine fractionation of nanodiamonds using the differential centrifugation in the fields up to 215000g. The developed protocols yield 4-6 nm fraction giving main contribution to the light scattering intensity. The desired 4-6 nm fraction can be obtained from various types of initial nanodiamonds: three types of detonation nanodiamonds differing in purifying methods, laser synthesis nanodiamonds and nanodiamonds made by milling. The characterization of the obtained hydrosols was conducted with Dynamic Light Scattering, Zeta potential measurements, powder XRD and TEM. According to powder XRD and TEM data ultracentrifugation also leads to a further fractionation of the primary diamond nanocrystallites in the hydrosols from 4 to 2 nm.

  20. Commercial SNF Accident Release Fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Schulz

    2004-11-05

    The purpose of this analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that could be potentially released from an accident at the repository involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions are used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the repository. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total commercial SNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. Radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses; this subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Accidents may involve waste forms characterized as: (1) bare unconfined intact fuel assemblies, (2) confined intact fuel assemblies, or (3) canistered failed commercial SNF. Confined intact commercial SNF assemblies at the repository are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or waste packages. Four categories of failed commercial SNF are identified: (1) mechanically and cladding-penetration damaged commercial SNF, (2) consolidated/reconstituted assemblies, (3) fuel rods, pieces, and debris, and (4) nonfuel components. It is assumed that failed commercial SNF is placed into waste packages with a mesh screen at each end (CRWMS M&O 1999). In contrast to bare unconfined fuel assemblies, the

  1. Commercial SNF Accident Release Fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, J.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that could be potentially released from an accident at the repository involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions are used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the repository. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total commercial SNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. Radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses; this subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Accidents may involve waste forms characterized as: (1) bare unconfined intact fuel assemblies, (2) confined intact fuel assemblies, or (3) canistered failed commercial SNF. Confined intact commercial SNF assemblies at the repository are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or waste packages. Four categories of failed commercial SNF are identified: (1) mechanically and cladding-penetration damaged commercial SNF, (2) consolidated/reconstituted assemblies, (3) fuel rods, pieces, and debris, and (4) nonfuel components. It is assumed that failed commercial SNF is placed into waste packages with a mesh screen at each end (CRWMS M andO 1999). In contrast to bare unconfined fuel assemblies, the

  2. Bioactive fractions from cantabrian anchovy (Engraulis encrarischolus viscera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando BURGOS-HERNÁNDEZ

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The potential of cantabrian anchovy (Engraulis encrarischolus viscera as a source of bioactive compounds is of interest for both, pharmaceutical and food industries. Cantabrian anchovy guts and heads were freeze-dried, extracted with methanol and subjected to fractionation by solvent partitioning using hexane, ethyl acetate, and butanol. Fractions were tested for antimutagenic, antioxidant, antifungal, and antibacterial activity using the Ames test; DPPH, ABTS, and FRAP assays; the radial grown inhibition assay; and the microbroth dilution method, respectively. Five fractions were obtained from the anchovy gut methanolic extract, in addition to the hexane- (HF, ethyl acetate- (EAF, and butanol-soluble (BF fractions, an aqueous-soluble fraction (ALF and precipitated crystals (ACF in this were also obtained. HF and EAF resulted to be antimutagenic, HF and ALF showed antifungal activity, BF and ACF showed the highest antioxidant potential, and HF and BF were antibacterial against several strains. Anchovy gut, which to the present study had not been reported for any bioactivity, has antimutagenic, antifungal, antioxidant, and antibacterial compounds, which need to be isolated for full characterization and study.

  3. Study of the long-wave neutron monochromator on the base of an artificial mica crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelenyuk, F.M.; Stepanov, S.B.

    1976-01-01

    The reflectivity, integrated reflectivity and mosaic width of a mica monocristal have been investigated for reflectivity of cold neutrons (lama + 8/14 A) by a double crystal spectrometer. The experimental data are compared with the calculated ones obtained with the use of Bacon and Lowde' model

  4. Fractional Reserve Banking: Some Quibbles

    OpenAIRE

    Bagus, Philipp; Howden, David

    2010-01-01

    We explore several unaddressed issues in George Selgin’s (1988) claim that the best monetary system to maintain monetary equilibrium is a fractional reserve free banking one. The claim that adverse clearing balances would limit credit expansion in a fractional reserve free banking system is more troublesome than previously reckoned. Both lengthened clearing periods and interbank agreements render credit expansion unrestrained. “The theory of free banking” confuses increases in money held with...

  5. Intelligent fractions learning system: implementation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Smith, Andrew C

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Conference Proceedings Paul Cunningham and Miriam Cunningham (Eds) IIMC International Information Management Corporation, 2011 ISBN: 978-1-905824-24-3 An Intelligent Fractions Learning System: Implementation Andrew Cyrus SMITH1, Teemu H. LAINE2 1CSIR... to fractions. Our aim with the current research project is to extend the existing UFractions learning system to incorporate automatic data capturing. ?Intelligent UFractions? allows a teacher to remotely monitor the children?s progress during...

  6. Photonic crystal microprisms obtained by carving artificial opals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenollosa, R.; Ibisate, M.; Rubio, S.; López, C.; Meseguer, F.; Sánchez-Dehesa, J.

    2003-01-01

    A method for fabrication of photonic crystal prisms is demonstrated. The procedure is based on micromanipulation techniques, here applied to artificial opals. By means of a microgrinder an opal prism comprising a single crystal (several tens of microns in size) has been carved with three different faces: (111), (110), and (100). The faces were morphologically characterized by scanning electron microscopy and their optical reflectance spectra measured and compared with the theoretical band structure.

  7. Thermotropic Ionic Liquid Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axenov, Kirill V.; Laschat, Sabine

    2011-01-01

    The last five years’ achievements in the synthesis and investigation of thermotropic ionic liquid crystals are reviewed. The present review describes the mesomorphic properties displayed by organic, as well as metal-containing ionic mesogens. In addition, a short overview on the ionic polymer and self-assembled liquid crystals is given. Potential and actual applications of ionic mesogens are also discussed. PMID:28879986

  8. Thermotropic Ionic Liquid Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axenov, Kirill V; Laschat, Sabine

    2011-01-14

    The last five years' achievements in the synthesis and investigation of thermotropic ionic liquid crystals are reviewed. The present review describes the mesomorphic properties displayed by organic, as well as metal-containing ionic mesogens. In addition, a short overview on the ionic polymer and self-assembled liquid crystals is given. Potential and actual applications of ionic mesogens are also discussed.

  9. Thermotropic Ionic Liquid Crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Axenov, Kirill V.; Laschat, Sabine

    2011-01-01

    The last five years’ achievements in the synthesis and investigation of thermotropic ionic liquid crystals are reviewed. The present review describes the mesomorphic properties displayed by organic, as well as metal-containing ionic mesogens. In addition, a short overview on the ionic polymer and self-assembled liquid crystals is given. Potential and actual applications of ionic mesogens are also discussed.

  10. Tactical Miniature Crystal Oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-08-01

    manufactured by this process are expected to require 30 days to achieve minimum aging rates. (4) FUNDEMENTAL CRYSTAL RETRACE MEASUREMENT. An important crystal...considerable measurement time to detect differences and characterize components. Before investing considerable time in a candidate reactive element, a

  11. Crystals in the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2012-01-01

    Bent crystals can be used to deflect charged particle beams. Their use in high-energy accelerators has been investigated for almost 40 years. Recently, a bent crystal was irradiated for the first time in the HiRadMat facility with an extreme particle flux, which crystals would have to withstand in the LHC. The results were very encouraging and confirmed that this technology could play a major role in increasing the beam collimation performance in future upgrades of the machine.   UA9 bent crystal tested with a laser. Charged particles interacting with a bent crystal can be trapped in channelling states and deflected by the atomic planes of the crystal lattice (see box). The use of bent crystals for beam manipulation in particle accelerators is a concept that has been well-assessed. Over the last three decades, a large number of experimental findings have contributed to furthering our knowledge and improving our ability to control crystal-particle interactions. In modern hadron colliders, su...

  12. Xenon fractionation in porous planetesimals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahnle, Kevin; Pollack, James B.; Kasting, James F.

    1990-01-01

    The distinctively fractionated Xe on Mars and earth may have its root in a common source from which both planets accreted. Beginning with Ozima and Nakazawa's (1980) hypothesis that terrestrial Xe fractionation was caused by gravitational separation of adsorbed solar nebular gases inside large porous planetesimals, it is pointed out that Xe would have been trapped as the planetesimal grew and pores were squeezed shut by lithostatic pressure. It is shown that enough fractionated Xe to supply the earth could have been trapped this way. The degree of fractionation is controlled by the lithostatic pressure at the pore-closing front and so would have been roughly the same for all large planetesimals. The predicted degree of fractionation agrees well with that preserved in terrestrial and Martian Xe. Relative to Xe, this source is strongly depleted in other noble gases. In contrast to the original Ozima and Nakazawa hypothesis, the present hypothesis predicts the observed fractionation, and it allows planetary accretion to occur after the dissipation of the solar nebula.

  13. Fractional Charge Definitions and Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldhaber, A.S.

    2004-06-04

    Fractional charge is known through theoretical and experimental discoveries of isolable objects carrying fractions of familiar charge units--electric charge Q, spin S, and the difference of baryon and lepton numbers B-L. With a few simple assumptions all these effects may be described using a generalized version of charge renormalization for locally conserved charges, in which medium correlations yield familiar adiabatic, continuous renormalization, or sometimes nonadiabatic, discrete renormalization. Fractional charges may be carried by fundamental particles or fundamental solitons. Either picture works for the simplest fractional-quantum-Hall-effect quasiholes, though the particle description is far more general. The only known fundamental solitons in three or fewer space dimensions d are the kink (d = 1), the vortex (d = 2), and the magnetic monopole (d = 3). Further, for a charge not intrinsically coupled to the topological charge of a soliton, only the kink and the monopole may carry fractional values. The same reasoning enforces fractional values of B-L for electrically charged elementary particles.

  14. Fractional Charge Definitions and Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldhaber, A.S.

    2004-01-01

    Fractional charge is known through theoretical and experimental discoveries of isolable objects carrying fractions of familiar charge units--electric charge Q, spin S, and the difference of baryon and lepton numbers B-L. With a few simple assumptions all these effects may be described using a generalized version of charge renormalization for locally conserved charges, in which medium correlations yield familiar adiabatic, continuous renormalization, or sometimes nonadiabatic, discrete renormalization. Fractional charges may be carried by fundamental particles or fundamental solitons. Either picture works for the simplest fractional-quantum-Hall-effect quasiholes, though the particle description is far more general. The only known fundamental solitons in three or fewer space dimensions d are the kink (d = 1), the vortex (d = 2), and the magnetic monopole (d = 3). Further, for a charge not intrinsically coupled to the topological charge of a soliton, only the kink and the monopole may carry fractional values. The same reasoning enforces fractional values of B-L for electrically charged elementary particles

  15. Xenon fractionation in porous planetesimals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahnle, K.; Pollack, J.B.; Kasting, J.F.

    1990-01-01

    The distinctively fractionated Xe on Mars and Earth may have its root in a common source from which both planets accreted. We begin with Ozima and Nakazawa's hypothesis that terrestrial Xe fractionation was caused by gravitational separation of adsorbed solar nebular gases inside large porous planetesimals. We point out that Xe would have been trapped as the planetesimal grew and pores were squeezed shut by lithostatic pressure. We show that enough fractionated Xe to supply the Earth could have been trapped this way. The degree of fractionation is controlled by the lithostatic pressure at the pore-closing front and so would have been roughly the same for all large planetesimals. The predicted degree of fractionation agrees well with that preserved in terrestrial and martian Xe. Relative to Xe, this source is strongly depleted in other noble gases. In contrast to the original Ozima and Nakazawa hypothesis, our hypothesis predicts the observed fractionation, and it allows planetary accretion to occur after the dissipation of the solar nebula. The required planetesimals are large, representing a class of object now extinct in the solar system

  16. Biology Reflective Assessment Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayley, Cheryl Ann

    Often students and educators view assessments as an obligation and finality for a unit. In the current climate of high-stakes testing and accountability, the balance of time, resources and emphasis on students' scores related to assessment have been slanted considerably toward the summative side. This tension between assessment for accountability and assessment to inform teaching strains instruction and educators' ability to use that information to design learning opportunities that help students develop deeper conceptual understanding. A substantive body of research indicates that formative and reflective assessment can significantly improve student learning. Biology Reflective Assessment Curriculum (BRAC) examines support provided for high school science students through assessment practices. This investigation incorporates the usage of reflective assessments as a guiding practice for differentiated instruction and student choice. Reflective assessment is a metacognitive strategy that promotes self-monitoring and evaluation. The goals of the curriculum are to promote self-efficacy and conceptual understanding in students learning biology through developing their metacognitive awareness. BRAC was implemented in a high school biology classroom. Data from assessments, metacognitive surveys, self-efficacy surveys, reflective journals, student work, a culminating task and field notes were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the curriculum. The results suggest that students who develop their metacognitive skills developed a deeper conceptual understanding and improved feelings of self-efficacy when they were engaged in a reflective assessment unit embedded with student choice. BRAC is a tool for teachers to use assessments to assist students in becoming metacognitive and to guide student choice in learning opportunities.

  17. Optically Anomalous Crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Shtukenberg, Alexander; Kahr, Bart

    2007-01-01

    Optical anomalies in crystals are puzzles that collectively constituted the greatest unsolved problems in crystallography in the 19th Century. The most common anomaly is a discrepancy between a crystal’s symmetry as determined by its shape or by X-ray analysis, and that determined by monitoring the polarization state of traversing light. These discrepancies were perceived as a great impediment to the development of the sciences of crystals on the basis of Curie’s Symmetry Principle, the grand organizing idea in the physical sciences to emerge in the latter half of the 19th Century. Optically Anomalous Crystals begins with an historical introduction covering the contributions of Brewster, Biot, Mallard, Brauns, Tamman, and many other distinguished crystallographers. From this follows a tutorial in crystal optics. Further chapters discuss the two main mechanisms of optical dissymmetry: 1. the piezo-optic effect, and 2. the kinetic ordering of atoms. The text then tackles complex, inhomogeneous crystals, and...

  18. Organic semiconductor crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chengliang; Dong, Huanli; Jiang, Lang; Hu, Wenping

    2018-01-22

    Organic semiconductors have attracted a lot of attention since the discovery of highly doped conductive polymers, due to the potential application in field-effect transistors (OFETs), light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) and photovoltaic cells (OPVs). Single crystals of organic semiconductors are particularly intriguing because they are free of grain boundaries and have long-range periodic order as well as minimal traps and defects. Hence, organic semiconductor crystals provide a powerful tool for revealing the intrinsic properties, examining the structure-property relationships, demonstrating the important factors for high performance devices and uncovering fundamental physics in organic semiconductors. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the molecular packing, morphology and charge transport features of organic semiconductor crystals, the control of crystallization for achieving high quality crystals and the device physics in the three main applications. We hope that this comprehensive summary can give a clear picture of the state-of-art status and guide future work in this area.

  19. Agglomeration Control during Ultrasonic Crystallization of an Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjorn Gielen

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Application of ultrasound during crystallization can efficiently inhibit agglomeration. However, the mechanism is unclear and sonication is usually enabled throughout the entire process, which increases the energy demand. Additionally, improper operation results in significant crystal damage. Therefore, the present work addresses these issues by identifying the stage in which sonication impacts agglomeration without eroding the crystals. This study was performed using a commercially available API that showed a high tendency to agglomerate during seeded crystallization. The crystallization progress was monitored using process analytical tools (PAT, including focus beam reflectance measurements (FBRM to track to crystal size and number and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR to quantify the supersaturation level. These tools provided insight in the mechanism by which ultrasound inhibits agglomeration. A combination of improved micromixing, fast crystal formation which accelerates depletion of the supersaturation and a higher collision frequency prevent crystal cementation to occur. The use of ultrasound as a post-treatment can break some of the agglomerates, but resulted in fractured crystals. Alternatively, sonication during the initial seeding stage could assist in generating nuclei and prevent agglomeration, provided that ultrasound was enabled until complete desupersaturation at the seeding temperature. FTIR and FBRM can be used to determine this end point.

  20. Isotopic Zonation Within Sulfate Evaporite Mineral Crystals Reveal Quantitative Paleoenvironment Details

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, M.; Rhorssen, M.; Mielke, R. E.

    2008-12-01

    Isotopic variations measured within a single crystal of hydrated magnesium sulfate are greater than 30 permil for delta 2-H, almost 10 permil for δ18O in water of hydration; and greater than 3 permil in sulfate oxygen. These results are interpreted to indicate the relative humidity of the system during evaporation (15 to 20 percent in this test case) and constrain the volume of water involved. The theoretical basis of this system is the isotopic fractionation between the species in solution and those precipitated as evaporite salts. Precipitation preferentially accumulates more of the heavy isotopes of sulfur and oxygen in mineral sulfate, relative to sulfate in solution. During the course of mineral growth this leads to successive depletion of the respective heavier isotopes in the residual brine reflected in a parallel trend in successive precipitates or even in successive zones within a single crystal. The change in isotopic composition at any one time during the process, relative to the initial value, can be described by an isotopic version of the Rayleigh Fractionation equation, depending only on the extent of the completion of the process and the relevant fractionation factor. Evaporation preferentially removes isotopically lighter hydrogen and oxygen leading to successive extents of enrichment in the respective heavier isotopes in the residual water. However, the relative effects on hydrogen and oxygen isotopes differs as function of relative humidity [1]. ALL OF THESE CHANGES ARE PRESERVED IN THE MINERAL ISOTOPE COMPOSITIONS. We precipitated barium sulfate from epsomite or gypsum samples, which was reduced at 1450°C in the presence of graphite and glassy carbon in a Finnigan TC/EA to produce CO for O isotopic analysis in a Finnigan 253 mass spectrometer, while a separate subsample was oxidized to SO2 in a Costech Elemental Analyzer. However, to make progress with this approach we needed to make a large number of measurements of hydration water and so we