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Sample records for referral patient case-mix

  1. The use of the BDA Case Mix Model to assess the need for referral of patients to specialist dental services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlKindi, N A; Nunn, J

    2016-04-22

    Access to health services is a right for every individual. However, there is evidence that people with disabilities face barriers in accessing dental health. One of the reasons associated with this is the unclear referral pathway existing in the Irish dental health service. The appropriate assignment of patients to relevant services is an important issue to ensure better access to healthcare. This is all the more pertinent because there are only a few trained dental practitioners to provide dental treatment for people with disabilities, as well as even fewer qualified specialists in special care dentistry. The aim of this part of the study was to assess the use of the BDA Case Mix Model to determine the need for referral of patients to specialist dental services, and to determine any association between patient complexity and the need for adjunct measures, such as sedation and general anaesthesia for the management of people with disabilities and complex needs. A retrospective analysis of dental records using the BDA Case Mix Model.Results The results showed that patients with different levels of complexities were being referred to the special care dentistry clinic at the Dublin Dental University Hospital. The results also showed that the need for supportive adjunct measures such as sedation and general anaesthesia was not necessarily the main reason for referring patients to specialist services. The assessment with the BDA Case Mix Model was comprehensive as it looked at many factors contributing to the cases' complexity. Not all categories in the Case Mix Model had significant association with the need for an adjunct.Conclusion The BDA Case Mix Model can be used to measure the need for supportive adjunct measures, such as sedation and general anaesthesia.

  2. The Nephrocare project: referral, patient case-mix, follow-up and quality of renal care in Nordic renal centres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergrem, H.; Goransson, L.G.; Asmundsson, P.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Few studies have focused on patients actually attending renal units for their follow-up over time. This study reports the type of prevalent patients (case-mix) with a renal condition being followed up by 19 renal units in the Nordic countries during 1998-99. MATERIAL AND METHODS...

  3. Churn: patient turnover and case mix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, Christine; Diers, Donna; Aisbett, Chris; Roche, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Patient throughput and casemix changes on nursing wards are little understood aspects of nursing's responsibility for nursing wards/units as hospital operations. In this study, the movement of patients on and off wards in 27 Australian public hospitals (286 wards) were analyzed over a 5-year period. Casemix change at the nursing unit level was also examined. In the data here, medical/surgical patients moved on average more than twice in an average hospital stay of only about 4 days. The absence of ward-level metrics compromises the ability of nursing unit/ward managers to meet their own efficiency and quality standards. Measurements of churn would give nurses another way to talk about the work of nursing to senior management and would give nurse executives a way to describe hospital operations and throughput and the impact on staff, patients, and resource allocation.

  4. General practice performance in referral for suspected cancer: influence of number of cases and case-mix on publicly reported data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murchie, P; Chowdhury, A; Smith, S; Campbell, N C; Lee, A J; Linden, D; Burton, C D

    2015-05-26

    Publicly available data show variation in GPs' use of urgent suspected cancer (USC) referral pathways. We investigated whether this could be due to small numbers of cancer cases and random case-mix, rather than due to true variation in performance. We analysed individual GP practice USC referral detection rates (proportion of the practice's cancer cases that are detected via USC) and conversion rates (proportion of the practice's USC referrals that prove to be cancer) in routinely collected data from GP practices in all of England (over 4 years) and northeast Scotland (over 7 years). We explored the effect of pooling data. We then modelled the effects of adding random case-mix to practice variation. Correlations between practice detection rate and conversion rate became less positive when data were aggregated over several years. Adding random case-mix to between-practice variation indicated that the median proportion of poorly performing practices correctly identified after 25 cancer cases were examined was 20% (IQR 17 to 24) and after 100 cases was 44% (IQR 40 to 47). Much apparent variation in GPs' use of suspected cancer referral pathways can be attributed to random case-mix. The methods currently used to assess the quality of GP-suspected cancer referral performance, and to compare individual practices, are misleading. These should no longer be used, and more appropriate and robust methods should be developed.

  5. Trends in prevalence of patient case-mix adjusters used in the Medicare dialysis payment system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollenbeak, Christopher S; Rubin, Robert J; Tzivelekis, Spiros; Stephens, J Mark

    2015-06-01

    The Medicare End-Stage Renal Disease Prospective Payment System (PPS) used data from 2006-08 to set weights for each case-mix adjuster that is part of the bundled payment formula. The details of the population case-mix were not made public, and little is known about consistency of case-mix over time. This study estimated the prevalence of case-mix adjusters during 2006-2008 and analyzed changes in case-mix prevalence from 2000-2008. Cross-sectional cohort study using United States Renal Data System data for Medicare dialysis patients. Three 3-year cohorts (2000-02, 2003-05, 2006-08) were analyzed for changes over time in case-mix prevalence. Double-digit trends were observed in many case-mix categories between 2000-02 and 2006-08. Large declines were observed in prevalence of patients with low BMI, pericarditis, new to dialysis, and ages 18-44. Large increases were observed in chronic co-morbidities, pneumonia and age cohort 80+. Substantial changes in case-mix adjuster prevalence suggest the PPS payment formula should be regularly updated.

  6. A comparison of patient-centered and case-mix reimbursement for nursing home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemain, T R

    1980-01-01

    The trend in payment for nursing home services has been toward making finer distinctions amont patients and the rates at which their care is reimbursed. The ultimate in differentiation is patient-centered reimbursement, whereas each patient's rate is individually determined. This paper introduces a model of overpayment and under-payment for comparing the potential performance of alternative reimbursement schemes. The model is used in comparing the patient-centered approach with case-mix reimbursement, which assigns a single rate to all patients in a nursing home on the basis of the facility's case mix. Roughly speaking, the case-mix approach is preferable whenever the differences between patient's needs are smaller than the errors in needs assessment. Since this condition appears to hold in practice today, case-mix reimbursement seems preferable for the short term.

  7. Case-mix adjustment and the comparison of community health center performance on patient experience measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M Laura; Rodriguez, Hector P; Solorio, M Rosa

    2010-06-01

    To assess the effect of case-mix adjustment on community health center (CHC) performance on patient experience measures. A Medicaid-managed care plan in Washington State collected patient survey data from 33 CHCs over three fiscal quarters during 2007-2008. The survey included three composite patient experience measures (6-month reports) and two overall ratings of care. The analytic sample includes 2,247 adult patients and 2,859 adults reporting for child patients. We compared the relative importance of patient case-mix adjusters by calculating each adjuster's predictive power and variability across CHCs. We then evaluated the impact of case-mix adjustment on the relative ranking of CHCs. Important case-mix adjusters included adult self-reported health status or parent-reported child health status, adult age, and educational attainment. The effects of case-mix adjustment on patient reports and ratings were different in the adult and child samples. Adjusting for race/ethnicity and language had a greater impact on parent reports than adult reports, but it impacted ratings similarly across the samples. The impact of adjustment on composites and ratings was modest, but it affected the relative ranking of CHCs. To ensure equitable comparison of CHC performance on patient experience measures, reports and ratings should be adjusted for adult self-reported health status or parent-reported child health status, adult age, education, race/ethnicity, and survey language. Because of the differential impact of case-mix adjusters for child and adult surveys, initiatives should consider measuring and reporting adult and child scores separately.

  8. Using case-mix information in strategic hospital marketing. Deriving market research from patient data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, A

    1992-01-01

    Hospital survival requires adaptation, adaptation requires understanding, and understanding requires information. These are the basic equations behind hospital strategic marketing, and one of the answers may lie in hospitals' own patient-data systems. Marketers' and administrators' enlightened application of case-mix information could become one more hospital survival tool.

  9. Variation in case-mix between hospitals treating colorectal cancer patients in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolfschoten, N. E.; Marang van de Mheen, P. J.; Gooiker, G. A.; Eddes, E. H.; Kievit, J.; Tollenaar, R. A. E. M.; Wouters, M. W. J. M.; Bemelman, W. A.; Busch, O. R. C.; van Dam, R. M.; van der Harst, E.; Jansen-Landheer, M. L. E. A.; Karsten, Th M.; van Krieken, J. H. J. M.; Kuijpers, W. G. T.; Lemmens, V. E.; Manusama, E. R.; Meijerink, W. J. H. J.; Rutten, H. J. T.; Wiggers, T.; van de Velde, C. J. H.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine how expected mortality based on case-mix varies between colorectal cancer patients treated in non-teaching, teaching and university hospitals, or high, intermediate and low-volume hospitals in the Netherlands. We used the database of the Dutch Surgical

  10. Benchmarking antibiotic use in Finnish acute care hospitals using patient case-mix adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanerva, Mari; Ollgren, Jukka; Lyytikäinen, Outi

    2011-11-01

    It is difficult to draw conclusions about the prudence of antibiotic use in different hospitals by directly comparing usage figures. We present a patient case-mix adjustment model of antibiotic use to rank hospitals while taking patient characteristics into account. Data on antibiotic use were collected during the national healthcare-associated infection (HAI) prevalence survey in 2005 in Finland in all 5 tertiary care, all 15 secondary care and 10 (25% of 40) other acute care hospitals. The use of antibiotics was measured using use-days/100 patient-days during a 7day period and the prevalence of patients receiving at least two antimicrobials during the study day. Case-mix-adjusted antibiotic use was calculated by using multivariate models and an indirect standardization method. Parameters in the model included age, sex, severity of underlying diseases, intensive care, haematology, preceding surgery, respirator, central venous and urinary catheters, community-associated infection, HAI and contact isolation due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The ranking order changed one position in 12 (40%) hospitals and more than two positions in 13 (43%) hospitals when the case-mix-adjusted figures were compared with those observed. In 24 hospitals (80%), the antibiotic use density observed was lower than expected by the case-mix-adjusted use density. The patient case-mix adjustment of antibiotic use ranked the hospitals differently from the ranking according to observed use, and may be a useful tool for benchmarking hospital antibiotic use. However, the best set of easily and widely available parameters that would describe both patient material and hospital activities remains to be determined.

  11. Cancer patient experience, hospital performance and case mix: evidence from England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Gary A; Saunders, Catherine L; Lyratzopoulos, Georgios

    2014-01-01

      This study aims to explore differences between crude and case mix-adjusted estimates of hospital performance with respect to the experience of cancer patients. This study analyzed the English 2011/2012 Cancer Patient Experience Survey covering all English National Health Service hospitals providing cancer treatment (n = 160). Logistic regression analysis was used to predict hospital performance for each of the 64 evaluative questions, adjusting for age, gender, ethnic group and cancer diagnosis. The degree of reclassification was explored across three categories (bottom 20%, middle 60% and top 20% of hospitals). There was high concordance between crude and adjusted ranks of hospitals (median Kendall's τ = 0.84; interquartile range: 0.82-0.88). Across all questions, a median of 5.0% (eight) of hospitals (interquartile range: 3.8-6.4%; six to ten hospitals) moved out of the extreme performance categories after case mix adjustment. In this context, patient case mix has only a small impact on measured hospital performance for cancer patient experience.

  12. Do effects of common case-mix adjusters on patient experiences vary across patient groups?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Dolf; van der Hoek, Lucas; Rademakers, Jany; Delnoij, Diana; van den Berg, Michael

    2017-11-22

    Many survey studies in health care adjust for demographic characteristics such as age, gender, educational attainment and general health when performing statistical analyses. Whether the effects of these demographic characteristics are consistent between patient groups remains to be determined. This is important as the rationale for adjustment is often that demographic sub-groups differ in their so-called 'response tendency'. This rationale may be less convincing if the effects of response tendencies vary across patient groups. The present paper examines whether the impact of these characteristics on patients' global rating of care varies across patient groups. Secondary analyses using multi-level regression models were performed on a dataset including 32 different patient groups and 145,578 observations. For each demographic variable, the 95% expected range of case-mix coefficients across patient groups is presented. In addition, we report whether the variance of coefficients for demographic variables across patient groups is significant. Overall, men, elderly, lower educated people and people in good health tend to give higher global ratings. However, these effects varied significantly across patient groups and included the possibility of no effect or an opposite effect in some patient groups. The response tendency attributed to demographic characteristics - such as older respondents being milder, or higher educated respondents being more critical - is not general or universal. As such, the mechanism linking demographic characteristics to survey results on patient experiences with quality of care is more complicated than a general response tendency. It is possible that the response tendency interacts with patient group, but it is also possible that other mechanisms are at play.

  13. Do effects of common case-mix adjusters on patient experiences vary across patient groups?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolf de Boer

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many survey studies in health care adjust for demographic characteristics such as age, gender, educational attainment and general health when performing statistical analyses. Whether the effects of these demographic characteristics are consistent between patient groups remains to be determined. This is important as the rationale for adjustment is often that demographic sub-groups differ in their so-called ‘response tendency’. This rationale may be less convincing if the effects of response tendencies vary across patient groups. The present paper examines whether the impact of these characteristics on patients’ global rating of care varies across patient groups. Methods Secondary analyses using multi-level regression models were performed on a dataset including 32 different patient groups and 145,578 observations. For each demographic variable, the 95% expected range of case-mix coefficients across patient groups is presented. In addition, we report whether the variance of coefficients for demographic variables across patient groups is significant. Results Overall, men, elderly, lower educated people and people in good health tend to give higher global ratings. However, these effects varied significantly across patient groups and included the possibility of no effect or an opposite effect in some patient groups. Conclusion The response tendency attributed to demographic characteristics – such as older respondents being milder, or higher educated respondents being more critical – is not general or universal. As such, the mechanism linking demographic characteristics to survey results on patient experiences with quality of care is more complicated than a general response tendency. It is possible that the response tendency interacts with patient group, but it is also possible that other mechanisms are at play.

  14. Inter-provider comparison of patient-reported outcomes: developing an adjustment to account for differences in patient case mix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuttall, David; Parkin, David; Devlin, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a methodology for the case-mix adjustment of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) data permitting the comparison of outcomes between providers on a like-for-like basis. Statistical models that take account of provider-specific effects form the basis of the proposed case-mix adjustment methodology. Indirect standardisation provides a transparent means of case mix adjusting the PROMs data, which are updated on a monthly basis. Recently published PROMs data for patients undergoing unilateral knee replacement are used to estimate empirical models and to demonstrate the application of the proposed case-mix adjustment methodology in practice. The results are illustrative and are used to highlight a number of theoretical and empirical issues that warrant further exploration. For example, because of differences between PROMs instruments, case-mix adjustment methodologies may require instrument-specific approaches. A number of key assumptions are made in estimating the empirical models, which could be open to challenge. The covariates of post-operative health status could be expanded, and alternative econometric methods could be employed. © 2013 Crown copyright.

  15. Case-mix & patients' reports of outcome in Independent Sector Treatment Centres: Comparison with NHS providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, John; Jamieson, Liz; Lewsey, Jim; van der Meulen, Jan; Copley, Lynn; Black, Nick

    2008-04-09

    There has been considerable concern expressed about the outcomes achieved in Independent Sector Treatment Centres (ISTCs) introduced in England since 2003. Our aim was to compare the case-mix and patients' reported outcomes of surgery in ISTCs and in NHS providers. Prospective cohort study of 769 patients treated in six ISTCs and 1895 treated in 20 NHS providers (acute hospitals and treatment centres) in England during 2006-07. Participants underwent one of three day surgery procedures (inguinal hernia repair, varicose vein surgery, cataract extraction) or hip or knee replacement. Change in patient-reported health status and health related quality of life (measured using a disease-specific and a generic (EQ-5D) instrument) was assessed either 3-months (day surgery) or 6-months (hip/knee) after surgery. In addition patient-reported post-operative complications and an overall assessment of success of surgery were collected. Outcome measures were adjusted (using multivariable regression) for patient characteristics (disease severity, duration of symptoms, age, sex, socioeconomic status, general health, previous similar surgery, comorbidity). Post-operative response rates varied by procedure (73%-88%) and were similar for those treated in ISTCs and NHS facilities. Patients treated in ISTCs were healthier, were less likely to have any comorbidity and, for those undergoing cataract surgery or joint replacement, their primary condition was less severe. Those undergoing hernia repair or joint replacement were less likely to have had similar surgery before. When adjustment was made for pre-operative characteristics, patients undergoing cataract surgery or hip replacement in ISTCs achieved a slightly greater improvement in functional status and quality of life than those treated in NHS facilities, while the opposite was true of patients undergoing hernia repair. No significant differences were found for the two other procedures. Patients treated in ISTCs were less likely to

  16. Referral pattern of hemodialysis patients to nephrologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anees, M.; Mumtaz, A.; Nazir, M.; Ibrahim, M.; Kausar, T.

    2007-01-01

    To determine the referral pattern of dialysis patients to nephrologists and the effects of late referral on clinical, hematological and biochemical parameters in patients presenting for the first-time to dialysis center. This study was conducted on all patients of end stage renal diseases presenting for the first-time for undergoing hemodialysis at our center. Patients with acute renal failure were excluded from the study. At presentation, a history was taken from all the patients regarding seeking of nephrology services and referral pattern. Early and late referral was defined as the time of first referral or admission to a nephrologists greater or less than six months respectively before initiation of hemodialysis. All the patients were examined and their blood sample was drawn at the same time for routine hematological, biochemical parameters (urea, creatinine, serum potassium, calcium, phosphate and albumin) and viral markers (Anti HCV and HbsAg). In this study, 248 patients were enrolled, amongst them, 131 (52.8%) were male and 117 (47.2%) were female. Major causes of renal failure were diabetes mellitus, chronic glomerulonephritis and hypertension. Most of the patients were euvolemic and hypertensive. Sixty percent of patients were having very high urea (>200 mg/dl) and creatinine (>8.0 mg/dl). Most of the patients, 226 (91.1%), were anemic (Hemoglobin <11gm/dl) and 224 (90%) were hypoalbuminemic (serum albumin < 4gm/dl) on first presentation. Majority of patients were hyperkalemic, 139 (56.0%), hypocalcemic, 168 (67.7%) and serum phosphate level was high in only 117 (47%) patients. All the patients presented in emergency room to nephrologists at very late stage (100% late referral), when disease was very much advanced. All of them did not have permanent vascular access for hemodialysis on first presentation to dialysis center. Reasons for late referral were non-availability of nephrologists and nephrology services, non-renal doctors biased, unawareness and

  17. Case-mix & patients' reports of outcome in Independent Sector Treatment Centres: Comparison with NHS providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Meulen Jan

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There has been considerable concern expressed about the outcomes achieved in Independent Sector Treatment Centres (ISTCs introduced in England since 2003. Our aim was to compare the case-mix and patients' reported outcomes of surgery in ISTCs and in NHS providers. Methods Prospective cohort study of 769 patients treated in six ISTCs and 1895 treated in 20 NHS providers (acute hospitals and treatment centres in England during 2006–07. Participants underwent one of three day surgery procedures (inguinal hernia repair, varicose vein surgery, cataract extraction or hip or knee replacement. Change in patient-reported health status and health related quality of life (measured using a disease-specific and a generic (EQ-5D instrument was assessed either 3-months (day surgery or 6-months (hip/knee after surgery. In addition patient-reported post-operative complications and an overall assessment of success of surgery were collected. Outcome measures were adjusted (using multivariable regression for patient characteristics (disease severity, duration of symptoms, age, sex, socioeconomic status, general health, previous similar surgery, comorbidity. Results Post-operative response rates varied by procedure (73%–88% and were similar for those treated in ISTCs and NHS facilities. Patients treated in ISTCs were healthier, were less likely to have any comorbidity and, for those undergoing cataract surgery or joint replacement, their primary condition was less severe. Those undergoing hernia repair or joint replacement were less likely to have had similar surgery before. When adjustment was made for pre-operative characteristics, patients undergoing cataract surgery or hip replacement in ISTCs achieved a slightly greater improvement in functional status and quality of life than those treated in NHS facilities, while the opposite was true of patients undergoing hernia repair. No significant differences were found for the two other

  18. All patient refined-diagnostic related group and case mix index in acute care palliative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagman, Ruth L; Walsh, Declan; Davis, Mellar P; Young, Brett

    2007-03-01

    The All Patient Refined-Diagnostic Related Group (APR-DRG) is a modification of the traditional DRG that adds four classes of illness severity and four classes of mortality risk. The APR-DRG is a more accurate assessment of the complexity of care. When individuals with advanced illness are admitted to an acute inpatient palliative medicine unit, there may be a perception that they receive less intense acute care. Most of these patients, however, are multisymptomatic, have several comorbidities, and are older. For all patients admitted to the unit, a guide was followed by staff physicians to document clinical information that included the site(s) of malignancy, site(s) of metastases, disease complications, disease-related symptoms, and comorbidities. We then prospectively compared DRGs, APR-DRGs, and case mix index (CMI) from January 1-June 30, 2003, and February 1-July 31,2004, before and after the use of the guide. The overall mean severity of illness (ASOI) increased by 25% (P DRG classifications captured a higher severity of illness and may better reflect resource utilization.

  19. Should measures of patient experience in primary care be adjusted for case mix? Evidence from the English General Practice Patient Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paddison, Charlotte; Elliott, Marc; Parker, Richard; Staetsky, Laura; Lyratzopoulos, Georgios; Campbell, John L; Roland, Martin

    2012-08-01

    Uncertainties exist about when and how best to adjust performance measures for case mix. Our aims are to quantify the impact of case-mix adjustment on practice-level scores in a national survey of patient experience, to identify why and when it may be useful to adjust for case mix, and to discuss unresolved policy issues regarding the use of case-mix adjustment in performance measurement in health care. Secondary analysis of the 2009 English General Practice Patient Survey. Responses from 2 163 456 patients registered with 8267 primary care practices. Linear mixed effects models were used with practice included as a random effect and five case-mix variables (gender, age, race/ethnicity, deprivation, and self-reported health) as fixed effects. Primary outcome was the impact of case-mix adjustment on practice-level means (adjusted minus unadjusted) and changes in practice percentile ranks for questions measuring patient experience in three domains of primary care: access; interpersonal care; anticipatory care planning, and overall satisfaction with primary care services. Depending on the survey measure selected, case-mix adjustment changed the rank of between 0.4% and 29.8% of practices by more than 10 percentile points. Adjusting for case-mix resulted in large increases in score for a small number of practices and small decreases in score for a larger number of practices. Practices with younger patients, more ethnic minority patients and patients living in more socio-economically deprived areas were more likely to gain from case-mix adjustment. Age and race/ethnicity were the most influential adjustors. While its effect is modest for most practices, case-mix adjustment corrects significant underestimation of scores for a small proportion of practices serving vulnerable patients and may reduce the risk that providers would 'cream-skim' by not enrolling patients from vulnerable socio-demographic groups.

  20. Referral recommendations for osteoarthritis of the knee incorporating patients' preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musila, Nyokabi; Underwood, Martin; McCaskie, Andrew W; Black, Nick; Clarke, Aileen; van der Meulen, Jan H

    2011-01-01

    Background. GPs have to respond to conflicting policy developments. As gatekeeper they are supposed to manage the growing demand for specialist services and as patient advocate they should be responsive to patients' preferences. We used an innovative approach to develop a referral guideline for patients with chronic knee pain that explicitly incorporates patients' preferences. Methods. A guideline development group of 12 members including patients, GPs, orthopaedic surgeons and other health care professionals used formal consensus development informed by systematic evidence reviews. They rated the appropriateness of referral for 108 case scenarios describing patients according to symptom severity, age, body mass, co-morbidity and referral preference. Appropriateness was expressed on scale from 1 (‘strongly disagree’) to 9 (‘strongly agree’). Results. Ratings of referral appropriateness were strongly influenced by symptom severity and patients' referral preferences. The influence of other patient characteristics was small. There was consensus that patients with severe knee symptoms who want to be referred should be referred and that patient with moderate or mild symptoms and strong preference against referral should not be referred. Referral preference had a greater impact on the ratings of referral appropriateness when symptoms were moderate or severe than when symptoms were mild. Conclusions. Referral decisions for patients with osteoarthritis of the knee should only be guided by symptom severity and patients' referral preferences. The guideline development group seemed to have given priority to avoiding inefficient resource use in patients with mild symptoms and to respecting patient autonomy in patients with severe symptoms. PMID:20817791

  1. Do effects of common case-mix adjusters on patient experiences vary across patient groups?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Dolf; van der Hoek, Lucas; Rademakers, Jany; Delnoij, Diana; van den Berg, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Many survey studies in health care adjust for demographic characteristics such as age, gender, educational attainment and general health when performing statistical analyses. Whether the effects of these demographic characteristics are consistent between patient groups remains to be determined. This

  2. Does routinely collected patient-reported outcome data represent the actual case-mix of elective coronary revascularization patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oinasmaa, Salla; Heiskanen, Jari; Hartikainen, Juha; Hippeläinen, Mikko; Miettinen, Heikki; Martikainen, Janne; Roine, Risto P; Tolppanen, Anna-Maija

    2018-04-01

    Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are valuable for effectiveness evaluation, but it is unknown whether the patient views obtained represent the actual case mix. We studied the representativeness of the responses obtained to a routinely administered health-related quality of life (HRQoL) questionnaire in a cardiology unit. Elective coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG; n = 404) and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI; n = 738) patients operated during June 2012 to August 2014 in the Heart Center, Kuopio University Hospital. The characteristics of the patients with a baseline (n = 260 and 290 for CABG and PCI, respectively) or both baseline and follow-up HRQoL measurements (n = 203 and 189 for CABG and PCI, respectively) were compared with those who did not respond (n = 144 and 448 for CABG and PCI). Baseline questionnaires were less likely obtained from older CABG patients (odds ratio 0.51, 95% confidence interval 0.28-0.91) and those with more severe disease (0.20, 0.05-0.79). Among PCI patients, women (0.64, 0.45-0.91), smokers (0.74, 0.53-1.04), and those with more severe disease (0.26, 0.13-0.52) or more hospital days were underrepresented. Routinely collected PROs in cardiac patients may be biased towards younger and healthier patients. This needs to be recognized when evaluating the representativeness of such data. The routine collection of these data should be adequately resourced.

  3. Impact of case-mix on comparisons of patient-reported experience in NHS acute hospital trusts in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raleigh, Veena; Sizmur, Steve; Tian, Yang; Thompson, James

    2015-04-01

    To examine the impact of patient-mix on National Health Service (NHS) acute hospital trust scores in two national NHS patient surveys. Secondary analysis of 2012 patient survey data for 57,915 adult inpatients at 142 NHS acute hospital trusts and 45,263 adult emergency department attendees at 146 NHS acute hospital trusts in England. Changes in trust scores for selected questions, ranks, inter-trust variance and score-based performance bands were examined using three methods: no adjustment for case-mix; the current standardization method with weighting for age, sex and, for inpatients only, admission method; and a regression model adjusting in addition for ethnicity, presence of a long-term condition, proxy response (inpatients only) and previous emergency attendances (emergency department survey only). For both surveys, all the variables examined were associated with patients' responses and affected inter-trust variance in scores, although the direction and strength of impact differed between variables. Inter-trust variance was generally greatest for the unadjusted scores and lowest for scores derived from the full regression model. Although trust scores derived from the three methods were highly correlated (Kendall's tau coefficients 0.70-0.94), up to 14% of trusts had discordant ranks of when the standardization and regression methods were compared. Depending on the survey and question, up to 14 trusts changed performance bands when the regression model with its fuller case-mix adjustment was used rather than the current standardization method. More comprehensive case-mix adjustment of patient survey data than the current limited adjustment reduces performance variation between NHS acute hospital trusts and alters the comparative performance bands of some trusts. Given the use of these data for high-impact purposes such as performance assessment, regulation, commissioning, quality improvement and patient choice, a review of the long-standing method for analysing

  4. Case mix in paediatric rheumatology: implications for training in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sern Chin; Allen, Roger C; Munro, Jane E; Akikusa, Jonathan D

    2012-05-01

    Despite a move towards the provision of specialist training in Australia in settings that extend beyond the public hospital system, formal comparisons of case mix between public and private specialty clinics have rarely been performed. It is therefore unclear for many specialties how well training in one setting prepares trainees for practice in the other. This study aims to compare the case mix of paediatric rheumatology patients seen in public and private settings and the referral sources of patients in each. An audit of all new patients seen in the public and private paediatric rheumatology clinics on campus at Royal Children's Hospital between June 2009 and January 2011. Data related to demographics, primary diagnosis, referral source and location seen were abstracted and compared. Eight hundred and seventy-six new patients were seen during the period of interest. Of these, 429 patients (48.9%) were seen in private clinics. The commonest diagnostic categories for both type of clinics were non-inflammatory musculoskeletal pain/orthopaedic conditions (public 39.4%, private 33.6%) followed by juvenile idiopathic arthritis (public 16.6%, %, private 18.6%), other skin/soft tissue disorders (public 8.7%, private 9.6%) and pain syndromes (public 4.9%, private 11.4%). Patients with haematological and vasculitic disorders were predominantly seen in public clinics. The commonest source of referrals to both clinics was general practitioners (public 40.6%, private 53.1%). The case mix in private paediatric rheumatology clinics closely mirrors that of public clinics at our centre. Training in either setting would provide sufficient case-mix exposure to prepare trainees for practice in the other. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2011 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  5. Injury profiles related to mortality in patients with a low Injury Severity Score: a case-mix issue?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joosse, Pieter; Schep, Niels W L; Goslings, J Carel

    2012-07-01

    Outcome prediction models are widely used to evaluate trauma care. External benchmarking provides individual institutions with a tool to compare survival with a reference dataset. However, these models do have limitations. In this study, the hypothesis was tested whether specific injuries are associated with increased mortality and whether differences in case-mix of these injuries influence outcome comparison. A retrospective study was conducted in a Dutch trauma region. Injury profiles, based on injuries most frequently endured by unexpected death, were determined. The association between these injury profiles and mortality was studied in patients with a low Injury Severity Score by logistic regression. The standardized survival of our population (Ws statistic) was compared with North-American and British reference databases, with and without patients suffering from previously defined injury profiles. In total, 14,811 patients were included. Hip fractures, minor pelvic fractures, femur fractures, and minor thoracic injuries were significantly associated with mortality corrected for age, sex, and physiologic derangement in patients with a low injury severity. Odds ratios ranged from 2.42 to 2.92. The Ws statistic for comparison with North-American databases significantly improved after exclusion of patients with these injuries. The Ws statistic for comparison with a British reference database remained unchanged. Hip fractures, minor pelvic fractures, femur fractures, and minor thoracic wall injuries are associated with increased mortality. Comparative outcome analysis of a population with a reference database that differs in case-mix with respect to these injuries should be interpreted cautiously. Prognostic study, level II.

  6. Physicians' opinions about partner notification methods: case reporting, patient referral, and provider referral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogben, M; St Lawrence, J S; Montaño, D E; Kasprzyk, D; Leichliter, J S; Phillips, W R

    2004-02-01

    The United States has relied upon partner notification strategies to help break the chain of infection and re-infection for sexually transmitted diseases (STD). Physicians are a vital link in the system of STD control, but little is known of physician opinions about partner notification strategies. We collected opinions about partner notification from a national probability sample of physicians in specialties diagnosing STDs. Physicians responded to 17 questions about three relevant forms of STD partner notification: patient based referral, provider based referral, and case reporting. Exploratory factor analyses showed that responses for each form of partner notification could be grouped into four categories: perceived practice norms, infection control, patient relationships, and time/money. Multivariate analyses of the factors showed that physicians endorsed patient based referral most favourably and provider based referral least favourably. Physicians' opinions about partner notification strategies appear to reflect objective reality in some areas, but not in others. Strategies that improve the fit between physicians' opinions and effective notification are needed: some are discussed here.

  7. Changes in case-mix and outcomes of critically ill patients in an Australian tertiary intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, T A; Ho, K M; Dobb, G J; Finn, J C; Knuiman, M W; Webb, S A R

    2010-07-01

    Critical care service is expensive and the demand for such service is increasing in many developed countries. This study aimed to assess the changes in characteristics of critically ill patients and their effect on long-term outcome. This cohort study utilised linked data between the intensive care unit database and state-wide morbidity and mortality databases. Logistic and Cox regression was used to examine hospital survival and five-year survival of 22,298 intensive care unit patients, respectively. There was a significant increase in age, severity of illness and Charlson Comorbidity Index of the patients over a 16-year study period. Although hospital mortality and median length of intensive care unit and hospital stay remained unchanged, one- and five-year survival had significantly improved with time, after adjusting for age, gender; severity of illness, organ failure, comorbidity, 'new' cancer and diagnostic group. Stratified analyses showed that the improvement in five-year survival was particularly strong among patients admitted after cardiac surgery (P = 0.001). In conclusion, although critical care service is increasingly being provided to patients with a higher severity of acute and chronic illnesses, long-term survival outcome has improved with time suggesting that critical care service may still be cost-effectiveness despite the changes in case-mix.

  8. Medicare home health care patient case-mix before and after the Balanced Budget Act of 1997: effect on dual eligible beneficiaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Huai-Che; Temkin-Greener, Helena; Votava, Kathryn; Friedman, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    The Balanced Budget Act (BBA) of 1997 changed the payment system for Medicare home health care (HHC) from cost-based to prospective reimbursement. We used Medical Expenditure Panel Survey data to assess the impact of the BBA on Medicare HHC patient case-mix measured by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Hierarchical Condition Categories (CMS-HCC) model. There was a significant increase in Medicare HHC patient case-mix between the pre-BBA and Prospective Payment System (PPS) periods. The increase in the standardized-predicted risk score from the Interim Payment System period to PPS was nearly 4 times greater for the dual eligibles (Medicare-Medicaid) than for the Medicare-only population. This significantly greater rise in the HHC resources required by dual eligibles as compared to nonduals could be due to a shift in HHC payers from Medicare only to Medicaid rather than be an actual increase in case-mix per se.

  9. Patient satisfaction in neurological second opinions and tertiary referrals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijers, D.; Wieske, L.; Vergouwen, M. D. I.; Richard, E.; Stam, J.; Smets, E. M. A.

    2010-01-01

    Although the number of neurological second opinions (SOs) and tertiary referrals (TRs) is increasing, only little is known about expectations and patient satisfaction in this group of patients. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore expectations of patients who get a neurological SO or

  10. Impact of Case Mix Severity on Quality Improvement in a Patient-centered Medical Home (PCMH) in the Maryland Multi-Payor Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Niharika; Shaya, Fadia T; Chirikov, Viktor V; Sharp, David; Steffen, Ben

    2016-01-01

    We present data on quality of care (QC) improvement in 35 of 45 National Quality Forum metrics reported annually by 52 primary care practices recognized as patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs) that participated in the Maryland Multi-Payor Program from 2011 to 2013. We assigned QC metrics to (1) chronic, (2) preventive, and (3) mental health care domains. The study used a panel data design with no control group. Using longitudinal fixed-effects regressions, we modeled QC and case mix severity in a PCMH. Overall, 35 of 45 quality metrics reported by 52 PCMHs demonstrated improvement over 3 years, and case mix severity did not affect the achievement of quality improvement. From 2011 to 2012, QC increased by 0.14 (P case mix severity did not correlate with QC. In multivariate analyses, higher QC correlated with larger practices, greater proportion of older patients, and readmission visits. Rural practices had higher proportions of Medicaid patients, lower QC, and higher QC improvement in interaction analyses with time. The gains in QC in the chronic disease domain, the preventive care domain, and, most significantly, the mental health care domain were observed over time regardless of patient case mix severity. QC improvement was generally not modified by practice characteristics, except for rurality. © Copyright 2016 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  11. Referrals of Ethiopian Orthopedic Patients for Treatment Abroad ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Most patients were young males from Addis Ababa-the capital. The commonest single diagnosis was osteoarthritis, followed by ACL tear. The top three procedures for which the patients were referred are total hip replacement, ACL reconstruction and total knee replacement. Inter-consultant variation in number of referrals ...

  12. Predicting referral practices of traditional healers of their patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Predicting referral practices of traditional healers of their patients with a mental illness: An application of the Theory of Planned Behaviour. ... From the TPB application, the following cognitive variables were found to predict intentions: attitudes (ß = 0.612, p< 0.01); perceived behavioural control (ß = 0.355, p< 0.01); and past ...

  13. Patient factors in referral choice for total joint replacement surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner-Spady, Barbara L; Marshall, Deborah A; Bohm, Eric; Dunbar, Michael J; Loucks, Lynda; Hennigar, Allan W; Frank, Cy; Noseworthy, Tom W

    2014-04-01

    Although the option of next available surgeon can be found on surgeon referral forms for total joint replacement surgery, its selection varies across surgical practices. Objectives are to assess the determinants of (a) a patient's request for a particular surgeon; and (b) the actual referral to a specific versus the next available surgeon. Questionnaires were mailed to 306 consecutive patients referred to orthopedic surgeons. We assessed quality of life (Oxford Hip and Knee scores, Short Form-12, EuroQol 5D, Pain Visual Analogue Scale), referral experience, and the importance of surgeon choice, surgeon reputation, and wait time. We used logistic regression to build models for the 2 objectives. We obtained 176 respondents (response rate, 58%), 60% female, 65% knee patients, mean age of 65 years, with no significant differences between responders versus nonresponders. Forty-three percent requested a particular surgeon. Seventy-one percent were referred to a specific surgeon. Patients who rated surgeon choice as very/extremely important [adjusted odds ratio (OR), 6.54; 95% confidence interval (CI), 2.57-16.64] and with household incomes of $90,000+ versus <$30,000 (OR, 5.74; 95% CI, 1.56-21.03) were more likely to request a particular surgeon. Hip patients (OR, 3.03; 95% CI, 1.18-7.78), better Physical Component Summary-12 (OR, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.02-1.63), and patients who rated surgeon choice as very/extremely important (OR, 3.88; 95% CI, 1.56-9.70) were more likely to be referred to a specific surgeon. Most patients want some choice in the referral decision. Providing sufficient information is important, so that patients are aware of their choices and can make an informed choice. Some patients prefer a particular surgeon despite longer wait times.

  14. Bridging the care continuum: patient information needs for specialist referrals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steltenkamp Carol L

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Information transfer is critical in the primary care to specialist referral process and has been examined extensively in the US and other countries, yet there has been little attention to the patient's perspective of the information transfer process. This cross-sectional study examined the quality of the information received by patients with a chronic condition from the referring and specialist physician in the specialist referral process and the relationship of the quality of information received to trust in the physicians. Methods Structured telephone interviews were conducted with a random sample of 250 patients who had experienced a referral to a specialist for the first visit for a chronic condition within the prior six months. The sample was selected from the patients who visited specialist physicians at any of the 500 hospitals from the National Research Corporation client base. Results Most patients (85% received a good explanation about the reason for the specialist visit from the referring physician yet 26% felt unprepared about what to expect. Trust in the referring physician was highly associated with the preparatory information patients received. Specialists gave good explanations about diagnosis and treatment, but 26% of patients got no information about follow-up. Trust in the specialist correlated highly with good explanations of diagnosis, treatment, and self-management. Conclusion Preparatory information from referring physicians influences the quality of the referral process, the subsequent coordination of care, and trust in the physician. Changes in the health care system can improve the information transfer process and improve coordination of care for patients.

  15. Patient and professional delay in the referral trajectory of patients with diabetic foot ulcers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, A.P.; Stoeldraaijers, L.G.M.C.; Pero, M.W.M.; Hermkes, P.J.; Carolina, R.C.A.; Elders, P.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Aims: A cohort study investigated referral and treatment trajectories of patients with diabetic foot ulceration consulting podiatrists. The study aims were to quantify patient, professional and treatment (=total) delay and to identify relationships between patient- or professional-related

  16. Effects of intensivist coverage in a post-anaesthesia care unit on surgical patients' case mix and characteristics of the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastrup, Marc; Seeling, Matthes; Barthel, Stefan; Bloch, Andy; le Claire, Marie; Spies, Claudia; Scheller, Matthias; Braun, Jan

    2012-07-18

    There is an increasing demand for intensive care in hospitals, which can lead to capacity limitations in the intensive care unit (ICU). Due to postponement of elective surgery or delayed admission of emergency patients, outcome may be negatively influenced. To optimize the admission process to intensive care, the post-anaesthesia care unit (PACU) was staffed with intensivist coverage around the clock. The aim of this study is to demonstrate the impact of the PACU on the structure of ICU-patients and the contribution to overall hospital profit in terms of changes in the case mix index for all surgical patients. The administrative data of all surgical patients (n = 51,040) 20 months prior and 20 months after the introduction of a round-the-clock intensivist staffing of the PACU were evaluated and compared. The relative number of patients with longer length of stay (LOS) (more than seven days) in the ICU increased after the introduction of the PACU. The average monthly number of treatment days of patients staying less than 24 hours in the ICU decreased by about 50% (138.95 vs. 68.19 treatment days, P case mix index (CMI) per hospital day for all surgical patients was significantly higher after the introduction of a PACU: 0.286 (± 0.234) vs. 0.309 (± 0.272) P case mix index of the patients per hospital day, increased after the implementation of a PACU and more patients can be treated in the same time, due to a better use of resources.

  17. Comparison of patient referral processes between rural and urban health facilities in Liberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kim*

    2013-12-01

    Conclusions: Patient referral systems in Liberia are relatively unsystematic. While formal and informal mechanisms for referrals exist at both rural and urban health facilities, establishing guidelines for referral care practices and transportation strategies tailored to each of these settings will help to strengthen the healthcare system as a whole.

  18. Practices and attitudes of doctors and patients to downward referral in Shanghai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wenya; Li, Meina; Nong, Xin; Ding, Tao; Ye, Feng; Liu, Jiazhen; Dai, Zhixing; Zhang, Lulu

    2017-04-03

    In China, the rate of downward referral is relatively low, as most people are unwilling to be referred from hospitals to community health systems (CHSs). The aim of this study was to explore the effect of doctors' and patients' practices and attitudes on their willingness for downward referral and the relationship between downward referral and sociodemographic characteristics. Doctors and patients of 13 tertiary hospitals in Shanghai were stratified through random sampling. The questionnaire surveyed their sociodemographic characteristics, attitudes towards CHSs and hospitals, understanding of downward referral, recognition of the community first treatment system, and downward referral practices and willingness. Descriptive statistics, χ 2 test and stepwise logistic regression analysis were employed for statistical analysis. Only 20.8% (161/773) of doctors were willing to accept downward referrals, although this proportion was higher among patients (37.6%, 326/866). Doctors' willingness was influenced by education, understanding of downward referral, and perception of health resources in hospitals. Patients' willingness was influenced by marital status, economic factors and recognition of the community first treatment system. Well-educated doctors who do not consider downward referral would increase their workloads and those with a more comprehensive understanding of hospitals and downward referral process were more likely to make a downward referral decision. Single-injury patients fully recognising the community first treatment system were more willing to accept downward referral. Patients' willingness was significantly increased if downward referral was cost-saving. A better medical insurance system was another key factor for patients to accept downward referral decisions, especially for the floating population. To increase the rate of downward referral, the Chinese government should optimise the current referral system and conduct universal publicity for

  19. Study of Herpes Zoster in a Self-Referral Out-Patient Clinic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To study the presentation of herpes zoster (shingles) in self-referral urban primary care setting. Patients and method: During nearly 20 years, patients of Igbo ethnic group presented with herpes zoster, on a self-referral basis, to my urban, week day evening, out patient clinic. The recorded epidemiological parameters ...

  20. Variability in prescription drug expenditures explained by adjusted clinical groups (ACG case-mix: A cross-sectional study of patient electronic records in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serrat Josep

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In view of rapidly increasing prescription costs, case-mix adjustment should be considered for effective control of costs. We have estimated the variability in pharmacy costs explained by ACG in centers using patient electronic records, profiled centers and physicians and analyzed the correlation between cost and quality of prescription. Methods We analyzed 65,630 patient records attending five primary care centers in Spain during 2005. Variables explored were age, gender, registered diagnosed episodes of care during 2005, total cost of prescriptions, physician and center. One ACG was assigned to each patient with ACG case-mix software version 7.1. In a two-part model, logistic regression was used to explain the incurrence of drug expenditure at the first stage and a linear mixed model that considered the multilevel structure of data modeled the cost, conditional upon incurring any expense. Risk and efficiency indexes in pharmacy cost adjusted for ACG were obtained for centers and physicians. Spearman rank correlation between physician expenditure, adjusted for ACG, and a prescription quality index was also obtained. Pediatric and adult data were analyzed separately. Results No prescription was recorded for 13% of adults and 39.6% of children. The proportion of variance of the incurrence of expenditure explained by ACGs was 0.29 in adults and 0.21 in children. For adults with prescriptions, the variance of cost explained by ACGs was 35.4%, by physician-center was 1.8% and age 10.5% (residual 52.3%. For children, ACGs explained 22.4% of cost and physician-center 10.9% (residual 66.7%. Center efficiency index for adults ranged 0.58 to 1.22 and for children 0.32 to 2.36. Spearman correlation between expenditure and prescription quality index was -0.36 in family physicians (p = 0.019, N = 41 and -0.52 in pediatricians (p = 0.08, N = 12. Conclusion In our setting, ACG is the variable studied that explains more variability in

  1. How urgent is urgent? Analysing urgent out-patient referrals to an adult psychiatric service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubbin, S; Llewellyn-Jones, S; Donnelly, P

    2000-01-01

    It was noticed that over some years the number of referrals to the outpatient clinic (from various sources) which were marked 'urgent' had increased. We aimed to examine who makes these urgent referrals and the clinical factors associated with 'urgent' status. A sample of 201 referrals over a 26-month period was examined. Details of the referral requests were collected using a specially designed form. After each 'urgent' assessment, the referral was scored for appropriateness. This gave an indication of the agreement between referrer and clinic doctor as to what should constitute an ¤ urgent' referral. The majority of urgent referrals were from community psychiatric nurses, who, together with psychiatric social workers, make the most appropriate referrals. The more appropriate referrals clearly specified the clinical factors associated with urgent need for review. Patients regarded as suicidal were not associated with significantly higher appropriateness scores. Referrers should try and make 'urgent' outpatient requests as specific as possible: more clinical detail gives a clearer picture to the clinic doctor. Telephone consultations with general practitioners may help to ascertain a clearer picture of urgent requests if detail is lacking. Health professionals may all benefit from education in suicidal risk assessment. ( Int J Psych Clin Pract 2000; 4: 233 - 235).

  2. Patient Understanding of Hypoglycemia in Tertiary Referral Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Hee Cho

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundHypoglycemia is an important complication in the treatment of patients with diabetes. We surveyed the insight by patients with diabetes into hypoglycemia, their hypoglycemia avoidance behavior, and their level of worry regarding hypoglycemia.MethodsA survey of patients with diabetes, who had visited seven tertiary referral centers in Daegu or Gyeongsangbuk-do, Korea, between June 2014 and June 2015, was conducted. The survey contained questions about personal history, symptoms, educational experience, self-management, and attitudes about hypoglycemia.ResultsOf 758 participants, 471 (62.1% had experienced hypoglycemia, and 250 (32.9% had experienced hypoglycemia at least once in the month immediately preceding the study. Two hundred and forty-two (31.8% of the participants had received hypoglycemia education at least once, but only 148 (19.4% knew the exact definition of hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemic symptoms identified by the participants were dizziness (55.0%, sweating (53.8%, and tremor (40.8%. They mostly chose candy (62.1%, chocolate (37.7%, or juice (36.8% as food for recovering hypoglycemia. Participants who had experienced hypoglycemia had longer duration of diabetes and a higher proportion of insulin usage. The mean scores for hypoglycemia avoidance behavior and worry about hypoglycemia were 21.2±10.71 and 23.38±13.19, respectively. These scores tended to be higher for participants with higher than 8% of glycosylated hemoglobin, insulin use, and experience of emergency room visits.ConclusionMany patients had experienced hypoglycemia and worried about it. We recommend identifying patients that are anxious about hypoglycemia and educating them about what to do when they develop hypoglycemic symptoms, especially those who have a high risk of hypoglycemia.

  3. Patient Understanding of Hypoglycemia in Tertiary Referral Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Nan Hee; Kim, Nam Kyung; Han, Eugene; Hong, Jun Hwa; Jeon, Eon Ju; Moon, Jun Sung; Seo, Mi Hae; Lee, Ji Eun; Seo, Hyun Ae; Kim, Mi Kyung; Kim, Hye Soon

    2018-02-01

    Hypoglycemia is an important complication in the treatment of patients with diabetes. We surveyed the insight by patients with diabetes into hypoglycemia, their hypoglycemia avoidance behavior, and their level of worry regarding hypoglycemia. A survey of patients with diabetes, who had visited seven tertiary referral centers in Daegu or Gyeongsangbuk-do, Korea, between June 2014 and June 2015, was conducted. The survey contained questions about personal history, symptoms, educational experience, self-management, and attitudes about hypoglycemia. Of 758 participants, 471 (62.1%) had experienced hypoglycemia, and 250 (32.9%) had experienced hypoglycemia at least once in the month immediately preceding the study. Two hundred and forty-two (31.8%) of the participants had received hypoglycemia education at least once, but only 148 (19.4%) knew the exact definition of hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemic symptoms identified by the participants were dizziness (55.0%), sweating (53.8%), and tremor (40.8%). They mostly chose candy (62.1%), chocolate (37.7%), or juice (36.8%) as food for recovering hypoglycemia. Participants who had experienced hypoglycemia had longer duration of diabetes and a higher proportion of insulin usage. The mean scores for hypoglycemia avoidance behavior and worry about hypoglycemia were 21.2±10.71 and 23.38±13.19, respectively. These scores tended to be higher for participants with higher than 8% of glycosylated hemoglobin, insulin use, and experience of emergency room visits. Many patients had experienced hypoglycemia and worried about it. We recommend identifying patients that are anxious about hypoglycemia and educating them about what to do when they develop hypoglycemic symptoms, especially those who have a high risk of hypoglycemia. Copyright © 2018 Korean Diabetes Association

  4. Variation in family physicians' recording of auscultation abnormalities in patients with acute cough is not explained by case mix. A study from 12 European networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Nick A; Melbye, Hasse; Kelly, Mark J; Cals, Jochen W L; Hopstaken, Rogier M; Coenen, Samuel; Butler, Christopher C

    2013-06-01

    Conflicting data on the diagnostic and prognostic value of auscultation abnormalities may be partly explained by inconsistent use of terminology. To describe general practitioners use of chest auscultation abnormality terms for patients presenting with acute cough across Europe, and to explore the influence of geographic location and case mix on use of these terms. Clinicians recorded whether 'diminished vesicular breathing', 'wheezes', 'crackles' and 'rhonchi' were present in an observational study of adults with acute cough in 13 networks in 12 European countries. We describe the use of these terms overall and by network, and used multilevel logistic regression to explore variation by network, controlling for patients' gender, age, comorbidities, smoking status and symptoms. 2345 patients were included. Wheeze was the auscultation abnormality most frequently recorded (20.6% overall) with wide variation by network (range: 8.3-30.8%). There was similar variation for other auscultation abnormalities. After controlling for patient characteristics, network was a significant predictor of auscultation abnormalities with odds ratios for location effects ranging from 0.37 to 4.46 for any recorded auscultation abnormality, and from 0.25 to 3.14 for rhonchi. There is important variation in recording chest auscultation abnormalities by general practitioners across Europe, which cannot be explained by differences in patient characteristics. There is a need and opportunity for standardization in the detection and classification of lung sounds.

  5. Regional supply of outreach service and length of stay in psychiatric hospital among patients with schizophrenia: National case mix data analysis in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niimura, Junko; Nakanishi, Miharu; Yamasaki, Syudo; Nishida, Atsushi

    2017-12-01

    Several clinical trials have demonstrated that linkage to an outreach service can prevent prolonged length of stay of patients at psychiatric hospitals. However, there has been no investigation of the association between length of stay in psychiatric hospital and regional supply of outreach services using national case mix data. The aim of this study was to clarify the relationship between length of stay in psychiatric hospital and regional supply of outreach services. We used data from the National Patient Survey in Japan, a nationally representative cross-sectional survey of inpatient care conducted every three years from 1996 to 2014. Data from 42,268 patients with schizophrenia who had been admitted to psychiatric hospitals were analyzed. After controlling for patient and regional characteristics, patients in regions with fewer number of visits for psychiatric nursing care at home had significantly longer length of stay in psychiatric hospitals. This finding implies that enhancement of the regional supply of outreach services would prevent prolonged length of stay in psychiatric hospitals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Is the case-mix of patients who self-present to ED similar to general practice and other acute-care facilities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Tim; McDonald, Keith

    2014-12-01

    To benchmark walk-in presentations to emergency departments (ED) with those presenting to other local acute healthcare facilities. A large teaching hospital with an annual ED census of 140, 000 adult patients and surrounding associated acute healthcare providers. A random sample of 384 patients who self-presented to the ED was obtained. Benchmarking data were drawn from two general practices; the Tower Hamlets Community Services walk-in centre (co-located on-site with the ED) and the GP-run out-of-hours service. The case-mix presenting to the ED was characterised by a higher proportion of injuries and chest pain, but fewer simple infections and non-traumatic musculoskeletal conditions as compared to other acute care facilities in our region. Patients with injuries and possible cardiac chest pain were more likely to attend the ED, and those with infection or musculoskeletal problems less likely, as compared with other acute healthcare facilities. The population presenting to the ED is distinct from that presenting to general practice, out-of-hours clinics, or walk-in centres. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  7. The Case Mix of Patients Presenting with Full-Thickness Macular Holes and Progression before Surgery: Implications for Optimum Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madi, Haifa A; Dinah, Christiana; Rees, Jon; Steel, David H W

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of pre-operative spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) characteristics of full-thickness macular holes (FTMH) and effect on optimum management. We retrospectively reviewed SD-OCT characteristics of a consecutive cohort of patients waitlisted for FTMH surgery and categorized them by current evidence-based treatments. Out of the 106 holes analysed, 36 were small, 40 medium and 30 large. Initially, 33 holes had vitreomacular adhesion (VMA). 41 holes were analysed for change in characteristics with a median duration of 8 weeks between the scans. The number of small or medium holes decreased from 20 to 6 and that of large holes doubled. The number of holes with VMA halved. Smaller hole size (p = 0.014) and being phakic (p = 0.048) were associated with a larger increase in size. The strongest predictor of hole progression into a different surgical management category was the presence of VMA. FTMH characteristics can change significantly pre-operatively and affect optimal treatment choice.

  8. Challenges of rehabilitation case mix measurement in Ontario hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Jason Murray; Walker, Jan

    2008-03-01

    Case mix classification systems have been adopted in many countries as a method to manage and finance healthcare in acute care settings; the most popular systems are based on diagnosis related groups. The most successful of those case mix systems differentiate patient types by reflecting both the intensity of resources consumed and patient acuity. Case mix systems for use with non-acute hospital activity have not been as wide-spread; other than in the United States, little attention has been directed towards case mix classification for rehabilitation activity. In a province with over 13 million inhabitants with 2496 rehabilitation beds, inpatient rehabilitation is an important component of hospital care in Ontario, Canada, and consists of the spectrum of intensive rehabilitation activities intended to restore function. Although case mix adjusted activity has been the currency in Ontario's Integrated Population Based Allocation hospital funding formula, rehabilitation activity has not been subjected to case mix measurement. A project to examine case mix classification for adult inpatient rehabilitation activity was initiated by the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care whose outcome was a case mix system and associated cost weights that would result in rehabilitation activity being incorporated into the hospital funding formula. The process described in this study provides Ontario's provincial government with a case mix classification system for adult inpatient rehabilitation activity although there remain areas for improvement.

  9. Gaps in referral to cardiac rehabilitation of patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragam, Krishna G; Dai, Dadi; Neely, Megan L; Bhatt, Deepak L; Roe, Matthew T; Rumsfeld, John S; Gurm, Hitinder S

    2015-05-19

    Rates of referral to cardiac rehabilitation after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) have been historically low despite the evidence that rehabilitation is associated with lower mortality in PCI patients. This study sought to determine the prevalence of and factors associated with referral to cardiac rehabilitation in a national PCI cohort, and to assess the association between insurance status and referral patterns. Consecutive patients who underwent PCI and survived to hospital discharge in the National Cardiovascular Data Registry between July 1, 2009 and March 31, 2012 were analyzed. Cardiac rehabilitation referral rates, and patient and institutional factors associated with referral were evaluated for the total study population and for a subset of Medicare patients presenting with acute myocardial infarction. Patients who underwent PCI (n = 1,432,399) at 1,310 participating hospitals were assessed. Cardiac rehabilitation referral rates were 59.2% and 66.0% for the overall population and the AMI/Medicare subgroup, respectively. In multivariable analyses, presentation with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (odds ratio 2.99; 95% confidence interval: 2.92 to 3.06) and non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (odds ratio: 1.99; 95% confidence interval: 1.94 to 2.03) were associated with increased odds of referral to cardiac rehabilitation. Models adjusted for insurance status showed significant site-specific variability in referral rates, with more than one-quarter of all hospitals referring rehabilitation. Site-specific variation in referral rates is significant and is unexplained by insurance coverage. These findings highlight the potential need for hospital-level interventions to improve cardiac rehabilitation referral rates after PCI. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparison and relationship of thyroid hormones, IL-6, IL-10 and albumin as mortality predictors in case-mix critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quispe E, Álvaro; Li, Xiang-Min; Yi, Hong

    2016-05-01

    To compare the ability of thyroid hormones, IL-6, IL-10, and albumin to predict mortality, and to assess their relationship in case-mix acute critically ill patients. APACHE II scores and serum thyroid hormones (FT3, FT4, and TSH), IL-6, IL-10, and albumin were obtained at EICU admission for 79 cases of mix acute critically ill patients without previous history of thyroid disease. Patients were followed for 28 days with patient's death as the primary outcome. All mean values were compared, correlations assessed with Pearson' test, and mortality prediction assessed by multivariate logistic regression and ROC. Non survivors were older, with higher APACHE II score (p=0.000), IL-6 (p<0.05), IL-10 (p=0.000) levels, and lower albumin (p=0.000) levels compared to survivors at 28 days. IL-6 and IL-10 had significant negative correlation with albumin (p=0.001) and FT3 (p ⩽ 0.05) respectively, while low albumin had a direct correlation with FT3 (p<0.05). In the mortality prediction assessment, IL-10, albumin and APACHE II were independent morality predictors and showed to have a good (0.70-0.79) AUC-ROC (p<0.05). Despite that the entire cohort showed low FT3 serum levels (p=0.000), there was not statistical difference between survivors and non-survivors; neither showed any significance as mortality predictor. IL-6 and IL-10 are correlated with Low FT3 and hypoalbuminemia. Thyroid hormones assessed at EICU admission did not have any predictive value in our study. And finally, high levels of IL-6 and IL-10 in conjunction with albumin could improve our ability to evaluate disease's severity and predict mortality in the critically ill patients. When use in combination with APACHE II scores, our model showed improved mortality prediction. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Cost-Effectiveness of HIV Testing Referral Strategies among Tuberculosis Patients in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhler, Lauren M.; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Saxena, Anjali; Losina, Elena; Muniyandi, Malaisamy; Stoler, Adam W.; Lu, Zhigang; Walensky, Rochelle P.; Flanigan, Timothy P.; Bender, Melissa A.; Freedberg, Kenneth A.; Swaminathan, Soumya

    2010-01-01

    Background Indian guidelines recommend routine referral for HIV testing of all tuberculosis (TB) patients in the nine states with the highest HIV prevalence, and selective referral for testing elsewhere. We assessed the clinical impact and cost-effectiveness of alternative HIV testing referral strategies among TB patients in India. Methods and Findings We utilized a computer model of HIV and TB disease to project outcomes for patients with active TB in India. We compared life expectancy, cost, and cost-effectiveness for three HIV testing referral strategies: 1) selective referral for HIV testing of those with increased HIV risk, 2) routine referral of patients in the nine highest HIV prevalence states with selective referral elsewhere (current standard), and 3) routine referral of all patients for HIV testing. TB-related data were from the World Health Organization. HIV prevalence among TB patients was 9.0% in the highest prevalence states, 2.9% in the other states, and 4.9% overall. The selective referral strategy, beginning from age 33.50 years, had a projected discounted life expectancy of 16.88 years and a mean lifetime HIV/TB treatment cost of US$100. The current standard increased mean life expectancy to 16.90 years with additional per-person cost of US$10; the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was US$650/year of life saved (YLS) compared to selective referral. Routine referral of all patients for HIV testing increased life expectancy to 16.91 years, with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of US$730/YLS compared to the current standard. For HIV-infected patients cured of TB, receiving antiretroviral therapy increased survival from 4.71 to 13.87 years. Results were most sensitive to the HIV prevalence and the cost of second-line antiretroviral therapy. Conclusions Referral of all patients with active TB in India for HIV testing will be both effective and cost-effective. While effective implementation of this strategy would require investment, routine

  12. Comparison of the quality of patient referrals from physicians, physician assistants, and nurse practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohr, Robert H; West, Colin P; Beliveau, Margaret; Daniels, Paul R; Nyman, Mark A; Mundell, William C; Schwenk, Nina M; Mandrekar, Jayawant N; Naessens, James M; Beckman, Thomas J

    2013-11-01

    To compare the quality of referrals of patients with complex medical problems from nurse practitioners (NPs), physician assistants (PAs), and physicians to general internists. We conducted a retrospective comparison study involving regional referrals to an academic medical center from January 1, 2009, through December 31, 2010. All 160 patients referred by NPs and PAs combined and a random sample of 160 patients referred by physicians were studied. Five experienced physicians blinded to the source of referral used a 7-item instrument to assess the quality of referrals. Internal consistency, interrater reliability, and dimensionality of item scores were determined. Differences between item scores for patients referred by physicians and those for patients referred by NPs and PAs combined were analyzed by using multivariate ordinal logistical regression adjusted for patient age, sex, distance of the referral source from Mayo Clinic, and Charlson Index. Factor analysis revealed a 1-dimensional measure of the quality of patient referrals. Interrater reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient for individual items: range, 0.77-0.93; overall, 0.92) and internal consistency for items combined (Cronbach α=0.75) were excellent. Referrals from physicians were scored higher (percentage of agree/strongly agree responses) than were referrals from NPs and PAs for each of the following items: referral question clearly articulated (86.3% vs 76.0%; P=.0007), clinical information provided (72.6% vs 54.1%; P=.003), documented understanding of the patient's pathophysiology (51.0% vs 30.3%; P<.0001), appropriate evaluation performed locally (60.3% vs 39.0%; P<.0001), appropriate management performed locally (53.5% vs 24.1%; P<.0001), and confidence returning patient to referring health care professional (67.8% vs 41.4%; P<.0001). Referrals from physicians were also less likely to be evaluated as having been unnecessary (30.1% vs 56.2%; P<.0001). The quality of referrals to an

  13. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunting and ventriculocisternostomy (ETV) in 400 pediatric patients. Shifts in understanding, diagnostics, case-mix, and surgical management during half a century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, A Henriette; Due-Tønnessen, Bernt J; Lundar, Tryggve; Lindegaard, Karl-Fredrik

    2017-02-01

    To characterize shifts from the 1960s to the first decade in the 21st century as to diagnostics, case-mix, and surgical management of pediatric patients undergoing permanent CSF diversion procedures. One hundred and thirty-four patients below 15 years of age were the first time treated with CSF shunt or ETV for hydrocephalus or idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) in 2009-2013. This represents our current practice. Our previously reported cohorts of shunted children 1967-1970 (n = 128) and 1985-1988 (n = 138) served as backgrounds for comparison. In the 1960s, ventriculography and head circumference measurements were the main diagnostic tools; ventriculoatrial shunt was the preferred procedure (94 %), neural tube defect (NTD) was the leading etiology (33 %), and overall 2-year survival rate was 76 % (non-tumor survival 84 %). In the 1980s, computerized tomography (CT) was the preferred diagnostic imaging tool; ventriculoperitoneal shunt (VPS) had become standard (91 %), the proportion of NTD children declined to 17 %, and the 2-year survival rate was 91 % (non-tumor survival 95 %). Hydrocephalus caused by intracranial hemorrhage had, on the other hand, increased from 7 to 19 %. In the years 2009-2013, when MRI and endoscopic third ventriculocisternostomy (ETV) were matured technologies, 73 % underwent VPS, and 23 % ETV as their initial surgical procedure. The most prevalent etiology was CNS tumor (31 %). The proportion of NTD patients was yet again halved to 8 %, while intracranial hemorrhage was also reduced to 12 %. In this last period, six children were treated with VPS for Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (IIH) due to unsatisfactory response to medical treatment. They all had headache, papilledema, and visual disturbances and responded favorably to treatment. The 2 years of survival was 92 % (non-tumor survival 99 %). In contrast to the previous periods, there was no early shunt related mortality (2 years). Aqueductal stenosis

  14. Factors that influence length of stay for in-patient gynaecology surgery: is the Case Mix Group (CMG) or type of procedure more important?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Mark S; Victory, Rahi; Stitt, Larry; Tsang, Nicole

    2006-02-01

    To compare the association between the Case Mix Group (CMG) code and length of stay (LOS) with the association between the type of procedure and LOS in patients admitted for gynaecology surgery. We examined the records of women admitted for surgery in CMG 579 (major uterine/adnexal procedure, no malignancy) or 577 (major surgery ovary/adnexa with malignancy) between April 1997 and March 1999. Factors thought to influence LOS included age, weight, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score, physician, day of the week on which surgery was performed, and procedure type. Procedures were divided into six categories, four for CMG 579 and two for CMG 577. Data were abstracted from the hospital information costing system (T2 system) and by retrospective chart review. Multivariable analysis was performed using linear regression with backwards elimination. There were 606 patients in CMG 579 and 101 patients in CMG 577, and the corresponding median LOS was four days (range 1-19) for CMG 579 and nine days (range 3-30) for CMG 577. Combined analysis of both CMGs 577 and 579 revealed the following factors as highly significant determinants of LOS: procedure, age, physician, and ASA score. Although confounded by procedure type, the CMG did not significantly account for differences in LOS in the model if procedure was considered. Pairwise comparisons of procedure categories were all found to be statistically significant, even when controlled for other important variables. The type of procedure better accounts for differences in LOS by describing six statistically distinct procedure groups rather than the traditional two CMGs. It is reasonable therefore to consider changing the current CMG codes for gynaecology to a classification based on the type of procedure.

  15. Characteristics of patients with diabetes who accept referrals for care management services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bree Holtz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patients with chronic conditions can improve their health through participation in self-care programs. However, awareness of and enrollment in these programs are generally low. Objective: We sought to identify factors influencing patients’ receptiveness to a referral for programs and services supporting chronic disease management. Methods: We analyzed data from 541 high-risk diabetic patients who completed an assessment between 2010 and 2013 from a computer-based, nurse-led Navigator referral program within a large primary care clinic. We compared patients who accepted a referral to those who declined. Results: A total of 318 patients (75% accepted 583 referrals, of which 52% were for self-care programs. Patients who accepted a referral had more primary care visits in the previous year, were more likely to be enrolled in another program, expressed more interest in using the phone and family or friends for support, and were more likely to report recent pain than those who declined a referral. Discussion: Understanding what factors influence patients’ decisions to consider and participate in self-care programs has important implications for program design and development of strategies to connect patients to programs. This work informs outreach efforts to identify and engage patients who are likely to benefit from self-care activities.

  16. Patterns of Palliative Care Referral in Patients Admitted With Heart Failure Requiring Mechanical Ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiskar, Katie J; Celi, Leo Anthony; McDermid, Robert C; Walley, Keith R; Russell, James A; Boyd, John H; Rush, Barret

    2018-04-01

    Palliative care is recommended for advanced heart failure (HF) by several major societies, though prior studies indicate that it is underutilized. To investigate patterns of palliative care referral for patients admitted with HF exacerbations, as well as to examine patient and hospital factors associated with different rates of palliative care referral. Retrospective nationwide cohort analysis utilizing the National Inpatient Sample from 2006 to 2012. Patients referred to palliative care were compared to those who were not. Patients ≥18 years of age with a primary diagnosis of HF requiring mechanical ventilation (MV) were included. A cohort of non-HF patients with metastatic cancer was created for temporal comparison. Between 2006 and 2012, 74 824 patients underwent MV for HF. A referral to palliative care was made in 2903 (3.9%) patients. The rate of referral for palliative care in HF increased from 0.8% in 2006 to 6.4% in 2012 ( P care referral in patients with cancer increased from 2.9% in 2006 to 11.9% in 2012 ( P care ( P care. The use of palliative care for patients with advanced HF increased during the study period; however, palliative care remains underutilized in this setting. Patient factors such as race and SES affect access to palliative care.

  17. Productivity growth in outpatient child and adolescent mental health services: the impact of case-mix adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halsteinli, Vidar; Kittelsen, Sverre A; Magnussen, Jon

    2010-02-01

    The performance of health service providers may be monitored by measuring productivity. However, the policy value of such measures may depend crucially on the accuracy of input and output measures. In particular, an important question is how to adjust adequately for case-mix in the production of health care. In this study, we assess productivity growth in Norwegian outpatient child and adolescent mental health service units (CAMHS) over a period characterized by governmental utilization of simple productivity indices, a substantial increase in capacity and a concurrent change in case-mix. We analyze the sensitivity of the productivity growth estimates using different specifications of output to adjust for case-mix differences. Case-mix adjustment is achieved by distributing patients into eight groups depending on reason for referral, age and gender, as well as correcting for the number of consultations. We utilize the nonparametric Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) method to implicitly calculate weights that maximize each unit's efficiency. Malmquist indices of technical productivity growth are estimated and bootstrap procedures are performed to calculate confidence intervals and to test alternative specifications of outputs. The dataset consist of an unbalanced panel of 48-60 CAMHS in the period 1998-2006. The mean productivity growth estimate from a simple unadjusted patient model (one single output) is 35%; adjusting for case-mix (eight outputs) reduces the growth estimate to 15%. Adding consultations increases the estimate to 28%. The latter reflects an increase in number of consultations per patient. We find that the governmental productivity indices strongly tend to overestimate productivity growth. Case-mix adjustment is of major importance and governmental utilization of performance indicators necessitates careful considerations of output specifications. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. BDA special care case mix model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, P; Arnold, C; Brown, R; Foster, L V; Greening, S; Monaghan, N; Zoitopoulos, L

    2010-04-10

    Routine dental care provided in special care dentistry is complicated by patient specific factors which increase the time taken and costs of treatment. The BDA have developed and conducted a field trial of a case mix tool to measure this complexity. For each episode of care the case mix tool assesses the following on a four point scale: 'ability to communicate', 'ability to cooperate', 'medical status', 'oral risk factors', 'access to oral care' and 'legal and ethical barriers to care'. The tool is reported to be easy to use and captures sufficient detail to discriminate between types of service and special care dentistry provided. It offers potential as a simple to use and clinically relevant source of performance management and commissioning data. This paper describes the model, demonstrates how it is currently being used, and considers future developments in its use.

  19. High Age Predicts Low Referral of Hyperthyroid Patients to Specialized Hospital Departments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlé, Allan; Pedersen, Inge Bülow; Perrild, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Background: Hospital-based studies may be hampered by referral bias. We investigated how the phenomenon may influence studies of hyperthyroid patients. Methods: By means of a computer-based linkage to the laboratory database and subsequent detailed evaluation of subjects with abnormal test results......, we prospectively identified all 1,148 patients diagnosed with overt hyperthyroidism in a four-year period in and around Aalborg City, Denmark. Each patient was classified according to nosological type of hyperthyroidism. We studied the referral pattern of patients to local hospital units......, and analyzed how referral depended on subtype of disease, sex, age, and degree of biochemical hyperthyroidism. Results: In a 4-year period, 1,032 hyperthyroid patients were diagnosed at primary care offices, and 435 of these (42.2%) were referred to specialized units, 92 patients had hyperthyroidism diagnosed...

  20. Elements of patient-health-care provider communication related to cardiovascular rehabilitation referral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourhabib, Sanam; Chessex, Caroline; Murray, Judy; Grace, Sherry L

    2016-04-01

    Cardiovascular rehabilitation has been designed to decrease the burden of cardiovascular disease. This study described (1) patient-health-care provider interactions regarding cardiovascular rehabilitation and (2) which discussion elements were related to patient referral. This was a prospective study of cardiovascular patients and their health-care providers. Discussion utterances were coded using the Roter Interaction Analysis System. Discussion between 26 health-care providers and 50 patients were recorded. Cardiovascular rehabilitation referral was related to greater health-care provider interactivity (odds ratio = 2.82, 95% confidence interval = 1.01-7.86) and less patient concern and worry (odds ratio = 0.64, 95% confidence interval = 0.45-0.89). Taking time for reciprocal discussion and allaying patient anxiety may promote greater referral. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. Compliance with referrals to medical specialist care: patient and general practice determinants: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Christel E; de Jong, Judith D; Verheij, Robert A; Jansen, Tessa; Korevaar, Joke C; de Bakker, Dinny H

    2016-02-01

    In a gatekeeper system, primary care physicians and patients jointly decide whether or not medical specialist care is needed. However, it is the patient who decides to actually use the referral. Referral non-compliance could delay diagnosis and treatment. The objective of this study was to assess patient compliance with a referral to medical specialist care and identify patient and practice characteristics that are associated with it. Observational study using data on 48,784 referrals to medical specialist care derived from electronic medical records of 58 general practices for the period 2008-2010. Referral compliance was based on claims data of medical specialist care. Logistic multilevel regression analyses were conducted to determine associations between patient and general practice characteristics and referral compliance. In 86.6% of the referrals, patients complied. Patient and not practice characteristics were significantly associated with compliance. Patients from deprived urban areas and patients aged 18-44 years were less likely to comply, whereas patients aged 65 years and older were more likely to comply. About 1 in 8 patients do not use their referral. These patients may not receive adequate care. Demographic and socio-economic factors appear to affect compliance. The results of this study may be used to make general practitioners more aware that some patients are more likely to be noncompliant with referrals.

  2. Referral pathways for patients with TIA avoiding hospital admission: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Bridie Angela; Ali, Khalid; Bulger, Jenna; Ford, Gary A; Jones, Matthew; Moore, Chris; Porter, Alison; Pryce, Alan David; Quinn, Tom; Seagrove, Anne C; Snooks, Helen; Whitman, Shirley; Rees, Nigel

    2017-02-14

    To identify the features and effects of a pathway for emergency assessment and referral of patients with suspected transient ischaemic attack (TIA) in order to avoid admission to hospital. Scoping review. PubMed, CINAHL Web of Science, Scopus. Reports of primary research on referral of patients with suspected TIA directly to specialist outpatient services. We screened studies for eligibility and extracted data from relevant studies. Data were analysed to describe setting, assessment and referral processes, treatment, implementation and outcomes. 8 international studies were identified, mostly cohort designs. 4 pathways were used by family doctors and 3 pathways by emergency department physicians. No pathways used by paramedics were found. Referrals were made to specialist clinic either directly or via a 24-hour helpline. Practitioners identified TIA symptoms and risk of further events using a checklist including the ABCD2 tool or clinical assessment. Antiplatelet medication was often given, usually aspirin unless contraindicated. Some patients underwent tests before referral and discharge. 5 studies reported reduced incident of stroke at 90 days, from 6-10% predicted rate to 1.3-2.1% actual rate. Between 44% and 83% of suspected TIA cases in these studies were referred through the pathways. Research literature has focused on assessment and referral by family doctors and ED physicians to reduce hospitalisation of patients with TIA. No pathways for paramedical use were reported. We will use results of this scoping review to inform development of a paramedical referral pathway to be tested in a feasibility trial. ISRCTN85516498. Stage: pre-results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  3. Factors influencing referral of patients with voice disorders from primary care to otolaryngology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Seth M; Kim, Jaewhan; Roy, Nelson; Courey, Mark

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the frequency, timing, and factors that influence referral of patients with laryngeal/voice disorders to otolaryngology following initial evaluation by a primary care physician (PCP). Retrospective analysis of a large, national administrative US claims database. Patients with a laryngeal disorder based on International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes from January 1, 2004 to December 31, 2008, seen by a PCP as an outpatient (with or without otolaryngology involvement), and continuously enrolled for 12 months were included. Patient age, gender, geographic region, last PCP laryngeal diagnosis, comorbid conditions, time from first PCP visit to first otolaryngology visit, number of PCP outpatient visits, and number of PCP laryngeal diagnoses were collected. Cox and generalized linear regressions were performed. A total of 149,653 unique patients saw a PCP as an outpatient for a laryngeal/voice disorder, with 136,152 (90.9%) only seeing a PCP, 6,013 (4.0%) referred by a PCP to an otolaryngologist, and 3,820 (2.6%) self-referred to an otolaryngologist. Acute laryngitis had a lower hazard ratio (HR) for otolaryngology referral than chronic laryngitis, nonspecific dysphonia, and laryngeal cancer. Having multiple comorbid conditions was associated with a greater HR for otolaryngology referral than having no comorbidities. Patient age, gender, and geographic region also affected otolaryngology referral. The time to otolaryngology evaluation ranged from 3 months. PCP-referred patients had less time to the otolaryngology evaluation than self-referred patients. Multiple factors affected otolaryngology referral for patients with laryngeal/voice disorders. Further education of PCPs regarding appropriate otolaryngology referral for laryngeal/voice disorders is needed. © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  4. Case mix planning in hospitals: a review and future agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hof, Sebastian; Fügener, Andreas; Schoenfelder, Jan; Brunner, Jens O

    2017-06-01

    The case mix planning problem deals with choosing the ideal composition and volume of patients in a hospital. With many countries having recently changed to systems where hospitals are reimbursed for patients according to their diagnosis, case mix planning has become an important tool in strategic and tactical hospital planning. Selecting patients in such a payment system can have a significant impact on a hospital's revenue. The contribution of this article is to provide the first literature review focusing on the case mix planning problem. We describe the problem, distinguish it from similar planning problems, and evaluate the existing literature with regard to problem structure and managerial impact. Further, we identify gaps in the literature. We hope to foster research in the field of case mix planning, which only lately has received growing attention despite its fundamental economic impact on hospitals.

  5. Referral patterns of patients with liver metastases due to colorectal cancer for resection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Al-Sahaf, O

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Colorectal carcinoma accounts for 10% of cancer deaths in the Western World, with the liver being the most common site of distant metastases. Resection of liver metastases is the treatment of choice, with a 5-year survival rate of 35%. However, only 5-10% of patients are suitable for resection at presentation. AIMS: To examine the referral pattern of patients with liver metastases to a specialist hepatic unit for resection. METHODOLOGY: Retrospective review of patient\\'s charts diagnosed with colorectal liver metastases over a 10-year period. RESULTS: One hundred nine (38 women, 71 men) patients with liver metastases were included, mean age 61 years; 79 and 30 patients had synchronous and metachronus metastases, respectively. Ten criteria for referral were identified; the referral rate was 8.25%, with a resection rate of 0.9%. Forty two percent of the patients had palliative chemotherapy; 42% had symptomatic treatment. CONCLUSION: This study highlights the advanced stage of colorectal cancer at presentation; in light of modern evidence-based, centre-oriented therapy of liver metastasis, we conclude that criteria of referral for resection should be based on the availability of treatment modalities.

  6. An audit of referral and treatment patterns of high-risk prostate cancer patients in Alberta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, Majed; Taggar, Amandeep; Tilley, Derek; Kerba, Marc; Kostaras, Xanthoula; Gotto, Geoffrey; Sia, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to determine the impact of clinical practice guidelines (CPG) on rates of radiation oncologist (RO) referral, androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT), radiation therapy (RT), and radical prostatectomy (RP) in patients with high-risk prostate cancer (HR-PCa). All men >18 years, diagnosed with PCa in 2005 and 2012 were identified from the Alberta Cancer Registry. Patient age, aggregated clinical risk group (ACRG) score, Gleason score (GS), pre-treatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA), RO referral, and treatment received were extracted from electronic medical records. Logistic regression modelling was used to examine associations between RO referral rates and relevant factors. HR-PCa was diagnosed in 261 of 1792 patients in 2005 and 435 of 2148 in 2012. Median age and ACRG scores were similar in both years (p>0.05). The rate of patients with PSA >20 were 67% and 57% in 2005 and 2012, respectively (p=0.004). GS ≤6 was found in 13% vs. 5% of patients, GS 7 in 27% vs. 24%, and GS ≥8 in 59% vs. 71% in 2005 and 2012, respectively (p<0.001). In 2005, RO referral rate was 68% compared to 56% in 2012 (p=0.001), use of RT + ADT was 53% compared to 32% (p<0.001), and RP rate was 9% vs. 17% (p=0.002). On regression analysis, older age, 2012 year of diagnosis and higher PSA were associated with decreased RO referral rates (odds ratios [OR] 0.49, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.39-0.61; OR 0.51, 95% CI 0.34-0.76; and OR 0.64, 95% CI 0.39-0.61), respectively [p<0.001]). Since CPG creation in 2005, RO referral rates and ADT + RT use declined and RP rates increased, which demonstrates a need to improve adherence to CPG in the HR-PCa population.

  7. Improving patient access to prevent sight loss: ophthalmic electronic referrals and communication (Scotland).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, A A; Mustafa, M Z; Sanders, R

    2015-02-01

    With the number of people with sight loss predicted to double to four million people in the UK by the year 2050, preventable visual loss is a significant public health issue. Sight loss is associated with an increased risk of falls, accidents and depression and evidence suggests that 50% of sight loss can be avoided. Timely diagnosis is central to the prevention of sight loss. Access to care can be a limiting factor in preventable cases. By improving referrals and access to hospital eye services it is possible to treat and minimise the number of patients with preventable sight loss and the impact this has on wider society. In 2005, NHS Fife took part in a flagship pilot funded by the Scottish government e-health department to evaluate the feasibility, safety, clinical effectiveness, and cost of electronic referral with images of patients directly from community optometrists to Hospital Eye Service (HES). The pilot study showed that electronic referral was feasible, fast, safe, and obviated the need for outpatient appointments in 128 (37%) patients with a high patient satisfaction. The results of the pilot study were presented and in May 2007, the electronic referral system was rolled out regionally in southeast Scotland. Referrals were accepted at a single site with vetting by a trained team and appointments were allocated within 48 hours. Following the implementation of electronic referral, waiting times were reduced from a median of 14 to 4 weeks. Significantly fewer new patients were seen (7462 vs 8714 [p electronic communication between community optometry practices and hospital eye departments. Five electronic forms were specifically designed for cataract, glaucoma, macula, paediatric and general ophthalmic disease. A Virtual Private Network was created which enabled optometrists to connect to the Scottish clinical information gateway system and send referrals to hospital and receive referral status feedback. Numerous hurdles have been encountered and overcome

  8. Patient referral patterns and the spread of hospital-acquired infections through national health care networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjibbe Donker

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Rates of hospital-acquired infections, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, are increasingly used as quality indicators for hospital hygiene. Alternatively, these rates may vary between hospitals, because hospitals differ in admission and referral of potentially colonized patients. We assessed if different referral patterns between hospitals in health care networks can influence rates of hospital-acquired infections like MRSA. We used the Dutch medical registration of 2004 to measure the connectedness between hospitals. This allowed us to reconstruct the network of hospitals in the Netherlands. We used mathematical models to assess the effect of different patient referral patterns on the potential spread of hospital-acquired infections between hospitals, and between categories of hospitals (University medical centers, top clinical hospitals and general hospitals. University hospitals have a higher number of shared patients than teaching or general hospitals, and are therefore more likely to be among the first to receive colonized patients. Moreover, as the network is directional towards university hospitals, they have a higher prevalence, even when infection control measures are equally effective in all hospitals. Patient referral patterns have a profound effect on the spread of health care-associated infections like hospital-acquired MRSA. The MRSA prevalence therefore differs between hospitals with the position of each hospital within the health care network. Any comparison of MRSA rates between hospitals, as a benchmark for hospital hygiene, should therefore take the position of a hospital within the network into account.

  9. Self-referral in a gatekeeping system: patients' reasons for skipping the general-practitioner.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kulu Glasgow, I.; Delnoij, D.; Bakker, D. de

    1998-01-01

    In the Netherlands general practitioners act as the primary level to the more specialized and more expensive secondary health-care. As a rule, patients are required to have a referral from their general practitioners to be able to utilize these services. Not all private insurance companies, however,

  10. Optimizing referral of patients with neuromuscular disorders to allied health care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieterse, A.J.; Cup, E.H.C.; Akkermans, R.P.; Hendricks, H.T.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Wilt, G.J. van der; Oostendorp, R.A.B.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To report the predictive validity of the perceived limitations in activities and need questionnaire (PLAN-Q), a screening instrument to support neurologists to select patients with neuromuscular disorders (NMD) for referral for a one-off consultation by occupational therapist

  11. Effect of education and training on patient referral by public primary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A quasi-experimental study was carried out to determine the effect of health education and training on the Knowledge,attitude and practices of patient referral by primary health care workers in Mushin and Surulere Local Government Areas of Lagos State of Nigeria. Material and method: A total sample of 170 primary health ...

  12. Physicians' tacit and stated policies for determining patient benefit and referral to cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckstead, Jason W; Pezzo, Mark V; Beckie, Theresa M; Shahraki, Farnaz; Kentner, Amanda C; Grace, Sherry L

    2014-01-01

    The benefits of prescribing cardiac rehabilitation (CR) for patients following heart surgery is well documented; however, physicians continue to underuse CR programs, and disparities in the referral of women are common. Previous research into the causes of these problems has relied on self-report methods, which presume that physicians have insight into their referral behavior and can describe it accurately. In contrast, the research presented here used clinical judgment analysis (CJA) to discover the tacit judgment and referral policies of individual physicians. The specific aims were to determine 1) what these policies were, 2) the degree of self-insight that individual physicians had into their own policies, 3) the amount of agreement among physicians, and 4) the extent to which judgments were related to attitudes toward CR. Thirty-six Canadian physicians made judgments and decisions regarding 32 hypothetical cardiac patients, each described on 5 characteristics (gender, age, type of cardiovascular procedure, presence/absence of musculoskeletal pain, and degree of motivation) and then completed the 19 items of the Attitude towards Cardiac Rehabilitation Referral scale. Consistent with previous studies, there was wide variation among physicians in their tacit and stated judgment policies, and self-insight was modest. On the whole, physicians showed evidence of systematic gender bias as they judged women as less likely than men to benefit from CR. Insight data suggest that 1 in 3 physicians were unaware of their own bias. There was greater agreement among physicians in how they described their judgments (stated policies) than in how they actually made them (tacit policies). Correlations between attitude statements and CJA measures were modest. These findings offer some explanation for the slow progress of efforts to improve CR referrals and for gender disparities in referral rates.

  13. Physicians’ Tacit and Stated Policies for Determining Patient Benefit and Referral to Cardiac Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckstead, Jason W.; Pezzo, Mark V.; Beckie, Theresa M.; Shahraki, Farnaz; Kentner, Amanda C.; Grace, Sherry L.

    2015-01-01

    Background The benefits of prescribing cardiac rehabilitation (CR) for patients following heart surgery is well documented. However physicians continue to underutilize CR programs and disparities in the referral of women are common. Previous research into the causes of these problems has relied on self-report methods which presume that physicians have insight into their referral behavior and can describe it accurately. In contrast, the research presented here employed clinical judgment analysis (CJA) to discover the tacit judgment and referral policies of individual physicians. Purpose The specific aims were to determine 1) what these policies were, 2) the degree of self-insight that individual physicians had into their own policies, 3) the amount of agreement among physicians, and 4) the extent to which judgments were related to attitudes toward CR. Method Thirty-six Canadian physicians made judgments and decisions regarding 32 hypothetical cardiac patients, each described on five characteristics (gender, age, type of surgical procedure, presence/absence of musculoskeletal pain, and degree of motivation) and then completed the 19 items of the Attitude towards Cardiac Rehabilitation Referral instrument. Results There was wide variation among physicians in their tacit and stated judgment policies. Physicians exhibited greater agreement in what they believed they were doing (stated policies) than in what they actually did (tacit policies). Nearly one-third of the physicians showed evidence of systematic, and perhaps subliminal, gender bias as they judged women as less likely than men to benefit from CR. Correlations between attitude statements and CJA measures were modest. Conclusions These findings offer some explanation for the slow progress of efforts to improve CR referrals and for gender disparities in referral rates. PMID:23784848

  14. Patient gender affects the referral and recommendation for total joint arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkhoff, Cornelia M; Hawker, Gillian A; Wright, James G

    2011-07-01

    Rates of use of total joint arthroplasty among appropriate and willing candidates are lower in women than in men. A number of factors may explain this gender disparity, including patients' preferences for surgery, gender bias influencing physicians' clinical decision-making, and the patient-physician interaction. We propose a framework of how patient gender affects the patient and physician decision-making process of referral and recommendation for total joint arthroplasty and consider potential interventions to close the gender gap in total joint arthroplasty utilization. The process involved in the referral and recommendation for total joint arthroplasty involves eight discrete steps. A systematic review is used to describe the influence of patient gender and related clinical and nonclinical factors at each step. WHERE ARE WE NOW?: Patient gender plays an important role in the process of referral and recommendation for total joint arthroplasty. Female gender primarily affects Steps 3 through 8, suggesting barriers unique to women exist in the patient-physician interaction. WHERE DO WE NEED TO GO?: Developing and evaluating interventions that improve the quality of the patient-physician interaction should be the focus of future research. HOW DO WE GET THERE?: Potential interventions include using decision support tools that facilitate shared decision-making between patients and their physicians and promoting cultural competency and shared decision-making skills programs as a core component of medical education. Increasing physicians' acceptance and awareness of the unconscious biases that may be influencing their clinical decision-making may require additional skills programs.

  15. The Patient Concerns Inventory integrated as part of routine head and neck cancer follow-up consultations: frequency, case-mix, and items initiated by the patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, S N; Thomson, F; Lowe, D

    2018-03-01

    Introduction The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidance Improving Supportive and Palliative Care for Adults with Cancer (2004) and the Cancer Reform Strategy (2007) support the premise that assessment and discussion of patients' needs for physical, social, psychological, and spiritual wellbeing should be undertaken during oncology follow-up. We report the use of the Patient Concerns Inventory in a routine head and neck cancer clinic setting over a seven-year period, summarising the number of available clinics, the number of patients completing the inventory within a clinic, the range of clinical characteristics and the concerns they wanted to discuss. Methods The data were analysed from oncology follow-up clinics between 1 August 2007 and 10 December 2014. Audit approval was given by the Clinical Audit Department, University Hospital Aintree. Results There were 386 patients with 1198 inventories completed at 220 clinics, median 6 (range 4-7) per clinic. The most common concerns raised by patients across all the clinic consultations were dry mouth (34%), fear of recurrence (33%), sore mouth (26%), dental health (25%), chewing (22%) and fatigue/tiredness (21%). Conclusions The incorporation of the Patient Concerns Inventory as part of routine oncology clinics allows for a more patient initiated and focused consultation available to the majority of patients throughout their follow-up. The inventory allows for greater opportunity to provide holistic targeted multiprofessional intervention and support.

  16. Age and case mix-standardised survival for all cancer patients in Europe 1999-2007: Results of EUROCARE-5, a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baili, Paolo; Di Salvo, Francesca; Marcos-Gragera, Rafael; Siesling, Sabine; Mallone, Sandra; Santaquilani, Mariano; Micheli, Andrea; Lillini, Roberto; Francisci, Silvia

    2015-10-01

    Overall survival after cancer is frequently used when assessing a health care service's performance as a whole. It is mainly used by the public, politicians and the media, and is often dismissed by clinicians because of the heterogeneous mix of different cancers, risk factors and treatment modalities. Here we give survival details for all cancers combined in Europe, correlating it with economic variables to suggest reasons for differences. We computed age and cancer site case-mix standardised relative survival for all cancers combined (ACRS) for 29 countries participating in the EUROCARE-5 project with data on more than 7.5million cancer cases from 87 population-based cancer registries, using complete and period approach. Denmark, United Kingdom (UK) and Eastern European countries had lower survival than neighbouring countries. Five-year ACRS has been increasing throughout Europe, and substantial increases, between 1999-2001 and 2005-2007, have been achieved in countries where survival was lower in the past. Five-year ACRS for men and women are positively correlated with macro-economic variables like the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and Total National Expenditure on Health (TNEH) (R 2 about 70%). Countries with recent larger increases in GDP and TNEH had greater increases in cancer survival. ACRS serves to compare all cancer survival in Europe taking account of the geographical variability in case-mixes. The EUROCARE-5 data on ACRS confirm previous EUROCARE findings. Survival appears to correlate with macro-economic determinants, particularly with investments in the health care system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Infection in burn patients in a referral center in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Blanco, Carlos Enrique; Ramirez-Rivero, Carlos Enrique; Diaz-Martinez, Luis Alfonso; Sosa-Avila, Luis Miguel

    2017-05-01

    Worldwide, burns are responsible for more than 300,000 deaths annually; infection is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in these patients. Early identification and treatment of infection improves outcome. Toward this end it's necessary to identify the institutions flora and organisms that most frequently produces infection. To characterize infections developed by burn patients hospitalized at the University Hospital of Santander (HUS). Burn patients hospitalized in the HUS from January 1 to December 2014 were followed. Medical information regarding infections, laboratory and pathology reports were obtained. Statistical analysis with measures of central tendency, proportions, global and specific incidence density plus overall and specific incidence was obtained. For the microbiological profile proportions were established. 402 burn patients were included, 234 (58.2%) men and 168 (41.8%) women, aged between 6 days and 83 years, median 12.5 years. The burn agents include scald (52.5%), fire (10.0%), gasoline (9.2%), electricity (7.5%), among others. Burn area ranged from 1% to 80% TBS. Cumulative mortality was 1.5%. 27.8% of burned patients had one or more infections. Identified infections include folliculitis (27.0%), urinary tract infection (19.0%), infection of the burn wound (10.4%), pneumonia (8.6%), Central venous catheter (7.4%), bloodstream infection (7.4%) and skin grafts infection (4.3%) among others. Bacteria were responsible for 88.5% of the cases and fungi 11.5%. The most frequently isolated germs were P. aeruginosa, A. baumannii, E. coli, S. aureus and K. pneumoniae. Most gram-negative bacteria were sensitive to Amikacin, gram positive bacteria were sensitive to multiple antibiotics. Burns is a severe trauma that occurs in adult and pediatric patients, has several causative agents and can compromise the patient's life. The burned patient is at risk for a variety of infections. According to the type of infection it is possible to infer the most

  18. Using existing case-mix methods to fund trauma cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monakova, Julia; Blais, Irene; Botz, Charles; Chechulin, Yuriy; Picciano, Gino; Basinski, Antoni

    2010-01-01

    Policymakers frequently face the need to increase funding in isolated and frequently heterogeneous (clinically and in terms of resource consumption) patient subpopulations. This article presents a methodologic solution for testing the appropriateness of using existing grouping and weighting methodologies for funding subsets of patients in the scenario where a case-mix approach is preferable to a flat-rate based payment system. Using as an example the subpopulation of trauma cases of Ontario lead trauma hospitals, the statistical techniques of linear and nonlinear regression models, regression trees, and spline models were applied to examine the fit of the existing case-mix groups and reference weights for the trauma cases. The analyses demonstrated that for funding Ontario trauma cases, the existing case-mix systems can form the basis for rational and equitable hospital funding, decreasing the need to develop a different grouper for this subset of patients. This study confirmed that Injury Severity Score is a poor predictor of costs for trauma patients. Although our analysis used the Canadian case-mix classification system and cost weights, the demonstrated concept of using existing case-mix systems to develop funding rates for specific subsets of patient populations may be applicable internationally.

  19. Patient compliance with a health care provider referral for an occupational therapy lymphedema consult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominick, Sally A; Natarajan, Loki; Pierce, John P; Madanat, Hala; Madlensky, Lisa

    2014-07-01

    Limited information exists on breast cancer patients' compliance to attend outpatient appointments with an occupational therapy (OT) lymphedema specialist. The objectives of this study were (1) to examine patient compliance with a health care provider referral for an OT lymphedema consult and (2) to identify potential barriers to compliance. A retrospective chart review of female breast cancer patients at the UC San Diego Health System was conducted. Electronic medical records were queried for breast cancer patients, who received a health care provider referral for an OT lymphedema consult between June 1, 2010 and December 31, 2011. Descriptive statistics and Fisher's exact chi-square tests were used to examine how specific participant characteristics were associated with attending an OT appointment. A total of 210 female patients received an OT referral from a health care provider related to their breast cancer diagnosis. Forty-three (20.5%) patients did not attend an OT appointment. Non-attenders were more likely to have had fewer lymph nodes removed (Pcancer patients attended recommended OT lymphedema consults, a substantial number of women might benefit from further education about OT for lymphedema prevention following breast cancer treatment. Further research to understand barriers to attendance is recommended, particularly among women with only sentinel nodes removed.

  20. Referrals of Ethiopian Orthopedic Patients for Treatment Abroad.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dell

    developing country could be able to receive patients from abroad and generate a foreign currency. ... from Europe/US are getting operated in Asia or Africa. There are also ... Worries about the standards of surgical practice, .... their specialty and expected to work to the same high standards, following policies and acceptable.

  1. Factors influencing general practitioner referral of patients developing end-stage renal failure: a standardised case-analysis study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Montgomery, Anthony J

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To understand why treatment referral rates for ESRF are lower in Ireland than in other European countries, an investigation of factors influencing general practitioner referral of patients developing ESRF was conducted. METHOD: Randomly selected general practitioners (N = 51) were interviewed using 32 standardised written patient scenarios to elicit referral strategies. Main outcome measures: General practitioner referral levels and thresholds for patients developing end-stage renal disease; referral routes (nephrologist vs other physicians); influence of patient age, marital status and co-morbidity on referral. RESULTS: Referral levels varied widely with the full range of cases (0-32; median = 15) referred by different doctors after consideration of first laboratory results. Less than half (44%) of cases were referred to a nephrologist. Patient age (40 vs 70 years), marital status, co-morbidity (none vs rheumatoid arthritis) and general practitioner prior specialist renal training (yes or no) did not influence referral rates. Many patients were not referred to a specialist at creatinine levels of 129 micromol\\/l (47% not referred) or 250 micromol\\/l (45%). While all patients were referred at higher levels (350 and 480 micromol\\/l), referral to a nephrologist decreased in likelihood as scenarios became more complex; 28% at 129 micromol\\/l creatinine; 28% at 250 micromol\\/l; 18% at 350 micromol\\/l and 14% at 480 micromol\\/l. Referral levels and routes were not influenced by general practitioner age, sex or practice location. Most general practitioners had little current contact with chronic renal patients (mean number in practice = 0.7, s.d. = 1.3). CONCLUSION: The very divergent management patterns identified highlight the need for guidance to general practitioners on appropriate management of this serious condition.

  2. [Case-mix index and length of hospitalization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Andrea, V; Catania, A; Di Matteo, F M; Savino, G; Greco, R; Di Marco, C; De Antoni, E

    2010-05-01

    The ACG (Adjusted Clinical Groups) case-mix system is a classification method of diseases of patients, focused on the person. Depending on the pattern of these morbid conditions, the ACG system assigns each patient to a single group (an ACG group), which allows to capture the effects of a group of diseases in estimates of resource use. Diseases are classified into a diagnostic group (ADG) according to 5 clinical dimensions: duration (acute, recurrent or chronic), severity (minor/major vs stable/unstable), diagnostic assessment (symptoms vs diseases), etiology (infectious, traumatic or other), specialty (medical, surgical, obstetric, ...). All diseases can be classified into these dimensions and into one of 32 groups. The ACG case-mix system uses an algorithm to classify each patient into one of 93 ACG categories. Each person is assigned to an ACG according to his ADG combination, his age and his gender. With the repayment system "case-mix", surgery has become central for all great hospitals in virtue of its great productive potential. The case-mix index is one of the factors which influence the duration of hospitalization. The case-mix system has emphasized the importance of the duration of hospitalization, encouraging the planning of programs in order to discharge patients early after surgical operations. It has also stimulated the surgical activity in operating units with "budget" forecasts in which resources are provided according to an expected level of specialist surgery.

  3. Pattern of referral of noncancer patients to palliative care in the Eastern province of Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafez M Ghanem

    2011-01-01

    Results : From 474 patients, 20 (4.2% had a noncancer diagnosis. The main reason for the referral of noncancer patients was pain control. The most prevalent diagnoses were sickle cell disease (SCD in 6 (30% patients and peripheral arterial disease (PAD in 5 (25%. Conclusions : These findings suggest that the PC needs of noncancer patients are largely unmet in our region. Further efforts are necessary to advance noncancer PC in Saudi Arabia. The PC needs of patients with SCD and PAD need to be addressed in future research.

  4. Referral patterns, diagnosis, and disease management of patients with axial spondyloarthritis: results of an international survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heijde, Désirée; Sieper, Joachim; Elewaut, Dirk; Deodhar, Atul; Pangan, Aileen L; Dorr, Alexander P

    2014-12-01

    Recognition, diagnosis, and management of axial spondyloarthritis (axial SpA) continue to advance. The objectives of this study were to compare referrals, diagnosis, and management of axial SpA in Western Europe (WE), North America (US and Canada), and the rest of world (RoW) in academic and community rheumatology practices and to identify areas for further education. Rheumatologists responded online to the MAXIMA (Management of Axial SpA International and Multicentric Approaches) survey. Questions pertained to referral, diagnosis, and management of axial SpA. Rheumatologists (N = 809) from 56 countries completed the survey about patients with chronic back pain (≥3 months) starting before age 45 years. Responses from academic and community practice rheumatologists were generally similar. Most referrals were from primary care providers. Symptom duration of 3 years or more at referral was reported more frequently by WE and RoW than US respondents. More WE and RoW than US rheumatologists referred to the Assessment of SpondyloArthritis International Society criteria for axial SpA in clinical practice. Rheumatologists reported prescribing disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs for the management of axial SpA. Sulfasalazine was frequently prescribed across regions; methotrexate was more commonly prescribed by US rheumatologists compared with other regions. Referral patterns, diagnosis, and disease management for axial SpA were similar among WE, North America, and RoW rheumatologists and in academic/community practices, although more WE and RoW rheumatologists referred to Assessment of SpondyloArthritis International Society criteria in clinical practice. Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs were commonly prescribed for axial SpA patients, although it was unclear whether these were prescribed for axial or peripheral symptoms.

  5. The exchange of radiotherapy data as part of an electronic patient-referral system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomax, Antony; Grossmann, Martin; Cozzi, Luca; Tercier, Pierre-Alain; Boehringer, Terence; Schneider, Uwe; Logean, Marianne; Volken, Werner; Ratib, Osman; Miralbell, Raymond

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the implementation and use of an electronic patient-referral system as an aid to the efficient referral of patients to a remote and specialized treatment center. Methods and Materials: A system for the exchange of radiotherapy data between different commercial planning systems and a specially developed planning system for proton therapy has been developed through the use of the PAPYRUS diagnostic image standard as an intermediate format. To ensure the cooperation of the different TPS manufacturers, the number of data sets defined for transfer has been restricted to the three core data sets of CT, VOIs, and three-dimensional dose distributions. As a complement to the exchange of data, network-wide application-sharing (video-conferencing) technologies have been adopted to provide methods for the interactive discussion and assessment of treatments plans with one or more partner clinics. Results: Through the use of evaluation plans based on the exchanged data, referring clinics can accurately assess the advantages offered by proton therapy on a patient-by-patient basis, while the practicality or otherwise of the proposed treatments can simultaneously be assessed by the proton therapy center. Such a system, along with the interactive capabilities provided by video-conferencing methods, has been found to be an efficient solution to the problem of patient assessment and selection at a specialized treatment center, and is a necessary first step toward the full electronic integration of such centers with their remotely situated referral centers

  6. Obligatory referral among other factors associated with peritonitis in peritoneal dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oygar, D D; Yalin, A S; Altiparmak, M R; Ataman, R; Serdengecti, K

    2011-01-01

    Peritonitis is one of the major comorbidities of peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients. The aim of this study was to concentrate on potential risk factors, including more recently studied ones among the classical ones for peritonitis, in PD patients. We analysed 109 patients (F/M = 42/67) followed up at least for 3 months in a single centre, a tertiary referral hospital for 360.1 patient years. In the study which is designed as a retrospective cohort study, demographic characteristics, conditions for choosing PD, type of PD treatment, some chemical tests and peritonitis episodes were recorded from the files of the patients. The rate of peritonitis was found to be 0.22 episode/patient year and 22 (20.18%) of the patients had more than one episode. Twenty seven (24.8%) of the patients were allocated to PD due to obligatory reasons. According to multiple regression analysis, the associated factors were found to be PD allocation type (obligatory versus voluntary) (p = 0.04; RR = 2.6), serum albumin level (p = 0.05; RR = 1.2), and anti-hepatitis C Virus Antibody positivity (p = 0.03; RR = 1.6). Frequency of female patients were significantly higher in the group who had multiple episodes (p = 0.01). Obligatory referral which can be an indication of loss of motivation for peritoneal dialysis procedures, is thought to be a strong risk factor for peritonitis in PD patients and should be further studied. Patients with multiple episodes had a higher frequency of obligatory referral as expected and additionally, they were higher in number of females when compared to the ones with single episode.

  7. Initial default among sputum-positive pulmonary TB patients at a referral hospital in Uttarakhand, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehra, Darshan; Kaushik, Rajeev M; Kaushik, Reshma; Rawat, Jagdish; Kakkar, Rajesh

    2013-09-01

    Initial default is a serious issue which can enhance the transmission of TB. We determined the magnitude of and the causative factors for initial default among sputum-positive pulmonary TB (PTB) patients. In this prospective study, 2310 patients attending a referral hospital in Uttarakhand state, north India, with presumptive TB were investigated and 555 patients with sputum-positive PTB were followed-up for initiation of anti-TB treatment (ATT) during 2010-2012. The patients not confirmed as having started ATT were considered initial defaulters. Initial default was seen in 120 (21.6%) patients comprising 22 (18.3%) defaulters during diagnosis and 98 (81.6%) defaulters after referral for directly observed treatment, short-course (DOTS). The initial default rate was significantly higher among patients from rural areas than urban areas, illiterate patients than literate patients and smokeless tobacco-users than non-users (pdefault among patients referred for DOTS were limited trust in DOTS (n = 44, 44.8%), adverse effects of previous ATT (n = 41, 41.8%), dissatisfaction with health services (n = 38, 38.7%), local deaths while taking DOTS (n = 28, 28.5%), advice by others against DOTS (n = 25, 25.5%), disbelief in the diagnosis (n = 18, 18.3%) and patient death before starting treatment (n = 4, 4.0%). A high initial default rate was seen among patients with PTB. There is an urgent need to promote public awareness to lower the initial default rate.

  8. The influence of patients' complexity and general practitioners' characteristics on referrals to outpatient health services in an Italian region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Valent

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND. Patient referrals to outpatient health services may affect both health outcomes and health expenditures. General practitioners (GP have a crucial role in driving the use of outpatient services and recognizing factors which affect referrals is important for health managers and planners. OBJECTIVES. We investigated patient- and physician-related determinants of patient referrals in an Italian region. METHODS. This was cross-sectional study based on the individual linkage of administrative databases from the health information system of the Friuli Venezia Giulia region. For each GP of the region, the association of the number of patient referrals to different types of outpatient services with the proportion of patients with chronic conditions, with the number of hospital admissions and drug prescriptions in 2012, and with GP's characteristics was investigated through multilevel multivariable Poisson regression models. RESULTS. Some chronic conditions (e.g., cancer, autoimmune diseases, endocrine diseases, digestive system diseases were positively associated with the number of referrals, as were hospital admissions and drug prescriptions. Time since GP's graduation was inversely related with referrals. CONCLUSION. Patient complexity and GP's experience affect referral rates. These factors should be considered in case of a reorganization of the general practice structure in Friuli Venezia Giulia.

  9. The effect of misclassification errors on case mix measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Jason M; Botz, Chas K

    2006-12-01

    Case mix systems have been implemented for hospital reimbursement and performance measurement across Europe and North America. Case mix categorizes patients into discrete groups based on clinical information obtained from patient charts in an attempt to identify clinical or cost difference amongst these groups. The diagnosis related group (DRG) case mix system is the most common methodology, with variants adopted in many countries. External validation studies of coding quality have confirmed that widespread variability exists between originally recorded diagnoses and re-abstracted clinical information. DRG assignment errors in hospitals that share patient level cost data for the purpose of establishing cost weights affects cost weight accuracy. The purpose of this study is to estimate bias in cost weights due to measurement error of reported clinical information. DRG assignment error rates are simulated based on recent clinical re-abstraction study results. Our simulation study estimates that 47% of cost weights representing the least severe cases are over weight by 10%, while 32% of cost weights representing the most severe cases are under weight by 10%. Applying the simulated weights to a cross-section of hospitals, we find that teaching hospitals tend to be under weight. Since inaccurate cost weights challenges the ability of case mix systems to accurately reflect patient mix and may lead to potential distortions in hospital funding, bias in hospital case mix measurement highlights the role clinical data quality plays in hospital funding in countries that use DRG-type case mix systems. Quality of clinical information should be carefully considered from hospitals that contribute financial data for establishing cost weights.

  10. A systematic review of patient and health system characteristics associated with late referral in chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aloudat Sarah

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To identify patient and health system characteristics associated with late referral of patients with chronic kidney disease to nephrologists. Methods MEDLINE, CENTRAL, and CINAHL were searched using the appropriate MESH terms in March 2007. Two reviewers individually and in duplicate reviewed the abstracts of 256 articles and selected 18 observational studies for inclusion. The reasons for late referral were categorized into patient or health system characteristics. Data extraction and content appraisal were done using a prespecified protocol. Results Older age, the existence of multiple comorbidities, race other than Caucasian, lack of insurance, lower socioeconomic status and educational levels were patient characteristics associated with late referral of patients with chronic kidney disease. Lack of referring physician knowledge about the appropriate timing of referral, absence of communication between referring physicians and nephrologists, and dialysis care delivered at tertiary medical centers were health system characteristics associated with late referral of patients with chronic kidney disease. Most studies identified multiple factors associated with late referral, although the relative importance and the combined effect of these factors were not systematically evaluated. Conclusion A combination of patient and health system characteristics is associated with late referral of patients with chronic kidney disease. Overall, being older, belonging to a minority group, being less educated, being uninsured, suffering from multiple comorbidities, and the lack of communication between primary care physicians and nephrologists contribute to late referral of patients with chronic kidney disease. Both primary care physicians and nephrologists need to engage in multisectoral collaborative efforts that ensure patient education and enhance physician awareness to improve the care of patients with chronic kidney disease.

  11. Adjusting case mix payment amounts for inaccurately reported comorbidity data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Jason M; Hamm, Jeremy; Hatcher, Jeff

    2010-03-01

    Case mix methods such as diagnosis related groups have become a basis of payment for inpatient hospitalizations in many countries. Specifying cost weight values for case mix system payment has important consequences; recent evidence suggests case mix cost weight inaccuracies influence the supply of some hospital-based services. To begin to address the question of case mix cost weight accuracy, this paper is motivated by the objective of improving the accuracy of cost weight values due to inaccurate or incomplete comorbidity data. The methods are suitable to case mix methods that incorporate disease severity or comorbidity adjustments. The methods are based on the availability of detailed clinical and cost information linked at the patient level and leverage recent results from clinical data audits. A Bayesian framework is used to synthesize clinical data audit information regarding misclassification probabilities into cost weight value calculations. The models are implemented through Markov chain Monte Carlo methods. An example used to demonstrate the methods finds that inaccurate comorbidity data affects cost weight values by biasing cost weight values (and payments) downward. The implications for hospital payments are discussed and the generalizability of the approach is explored.

  12. X-PAT: a multiplatform patient referral data management system for small healthcare institution requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masseroli, Marco; Marchente, Mario

    2008-07-01

    We present X-PAT, a platform-independent software prototype that is able to manage patient referral multimedia data in an intranet network scenario according to the specific control procedures of a healthcare institution. It is a self-developed storage framework based on a file system, implemented in eXtensible Markup Language (XML) and PHP Hypertext Preprocessor Language, and addressed to the requirements of limited-dimension healthcare entities (small hospitals, private medical centers, outpatient clinics, and laboratories). In X-PAT, healthcare data descriptions, stored in a novel Referral Base Management System (RBMS) according to Health Level 7 Clinical Document Architecture Release 2 (CDA R2) standard, can be easily applied to the specific data and organizational procedures of a particular healthcare working environment thanks also to the use of standard clinical terminology. Managed data, centralized on a server, are structured in the RBMS schema using a flexible patient record and CDA healthcare referral document structures based on XML technology. A novel search engine allows defining and performing queries on stored data, whose rapid execution is ensured by expandable RBMS indexing structures. Healthcare personnel can interface the X-PAT system, according to applied state-of-the-art privacy and security measures, through friendly and intuitive Web pages that facilitate user acceptance.

  13. Using geospatial techniques to develop an emergency referral transport system for suspected sepsis patients in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Rafiqul; Abdullah, Abu Yousuf Md; Christou, Aliki; Ali, Nabeel Ashraf; Rahman, Ahmed Ehsnaur; Iqbal, Afrin; Bari, Sanwarul; Hoque, D. M. Emdadul; Arifeen, Shams El; Kissoon, Niranjan; Larson, Charles P.

    2018-01-01

    Background A geographic information system (GIS)-based transport network within an emergency referral system can be the key to reducing health system delays and increasing the chances of survival, especially during an emergency. We employed a GIS to design an emergency transport system for the rapid transfer of pregnant or early post-partum women, newborns, and children under 5 years of age with suspected sepsis under the Interrupting Pathways to Sepsis Initiative (IPSI) project. Methods A GIS database was developed by mapping the villages, roads, and relevant physical features of the study area. A travel-time algorithm was developed to incorporate the time taken by different modes of local transport to reach the health complexes. These were used in a network analysis to identify the shortest routes to the hospitals from the villages, which were categorized into green, yellow, and red zones based on their proximity to the nearest hospitals to provide transport facilities. An emergency call-in centre established for the project managed the transport system, and its data was used to assess the uptake of this transport system amongst distant communities. Results Fifteen pre-existing and two new routes were identified as the shortest routes to the health complexes. The call-in centre personnel used this route information to direct both patients and transport drivers to the nearest transport hubs or pick-up points. Adherence with referral advice was high in areas where the IPSI transport operated. Over the study period, the utilisation of the project’s transport doubled and referral compliance from distant zones similarly increased. Conclusions The GIS system created for this study facilitated rapid referral of patients in emergency from distant zones, using locally available transport and resources. The methodology described in this study to develop and implement an emergency transport system can be applied in similar, rural, low-income country settings. PMID

  14. A complex social intervention for multidisciplinary teams to improve patient referrals in bosttrical care: desing of a stepped wedge study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romijn, A.; Bruijne, M.C. de; Teunissen, P.W.; Groot, C.J.M. de; Wagner, C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: In obstetrics, patients often experience referral situations between different care professionals. In these multidisciplinary teams, a focus on communication and interprofessional collaboration is needed to ensure care of high quality. Crew resource management team training is

  15. A case-mix in-service education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arons, R R

    1985-01-01

    The new case-mix in-service education program at the Presbyterian Hospital in the City of New York is a fine example of physicians and administration working together to achieve success under the new prospective pricing system. The hospital's office of Case-Mix Studies has developed an accurate computer-based information system with historical, clinical, and demographic data for patients discharged from the hospital over the past five years. Reports regarding the cases, diagnoses, finances, and characteristics are shared in meetings with the hospital administration and directors of sixteen clinical departments, their staff, attending physicians, and house officers in training. The informative case-mix reports provide revealing sociodemographic summaries and have proven to be an invaluable tool for planning, marketing, and program evaluation.

  16. Patient factors associated with lung transplant referral and waitlist for patients with cystic fibrosis and pulmonary fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan; Vela, Monica; Rudakevych, Tanya; Wigfield, Christopher; Garrity, Edward; Saunders, Milda R

    2017-03-01

    Since 2005, the Lung Allocation Score (LAS) has prioritized patient benefit and post-transplant survival, reducing waitlist to transplant time to fibrosis (CF) and pulmonary fibrosis (PF). We analyzed the times from transplant eligibility to referral, work-up and waitlisting using Kaplan-Meier curves and log-rank tests. Overall, the referral rate for transplant-eligible patients was 64%. Of those referred, approximately 36% reach the lung transplant waitlist. Referred CF patients were significantly more likely to reach the transplant waitlist than PF patients (CF 60% vs PF 22%, p < 0.05). In addition, CF patients had a shorter wait from transplant eligibility to waitlist than PF patients (329 vs 2,369 days, respectively [25th percentile], p < 0.05). Patients with PF and CF both faced delays from eligibility to referral and waitlist. Quality improvement efforts are needed to better identify and refer appropriate patients for lung transplant evaluation. Targeted interventions may facilitate more efficient evaluation completion and waitlist appearance. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Specialist participation in healthcare delivery transformation: influence of patient self-referral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliu, Oluseyi; Sun, Gordon; Burke, James; Chung, Kevin C; Davis, Matthew M

    2014-01-01

    Improving coordination of care and containing healthcare costs are prominent goals of healthcare reform. Specialist involvement in healthcare delivery transformation efforts like Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) is necessary to achieve these goals. However, patients’ self-referrals to specialists may undermine care coordination and incur unnecessary costs if patients frequently receive care from specialists not engaged in such healthcare delivery transformation efforts. Additionally, frequent self-referrals may also diminish the incentive for specialist participation in reform endeavors like ACOs to get access to a referral base. To examine recent national trends in self-referred new visits to specialists. A descriptive cross-sectional study of new ambulatory visits to specialists from 2000 to 2009 using data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. We calculated nationally representative estimates of the proportion of new specialist visits through self-referrals among Medicare and private insurance beneficiaries. We also estimated the nationally representative absolute number of self-referred new specialist visits among both groups of beneficiaries. Among Medicare and private insurance beneficiaries, self-referred visits declined from 32.2% (95% confidence interval [CI], 24.0%-40.4%) to 19.6% (95% CI, 13.9%-23.3%) and from 32.4% (95% CI, 27.9%-36.8%) to 24.1% (95% CI,18.8%-29.4%), respectively. Hence, at least 1 in 5 and 1 in 4 new visits to specialists among Medicare and private insurance beneficiaries, respectively, are self-referred. The current considerable rate of self-referred new specialist visits among both Medicare and private insurance beneficiaries may have adverse implications for organizations attempting to transform healthcare delivery with improved care coordination.

  18. Case Mix Complexity Differences between Teaching and Nonteaching Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ament, Richard P.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    The differences between teaching and nonteaching hospitals in complexity and variety of cases seen are described. The results show that teaching hospitals could be expected to cost somewhat more per patient even if case mix were the only factor. (Author/MLW)

  19. Trends in referral patterns, invasive management, and mortality in elderly patients referred for exercise stress testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzas-Mosquera, Alberto; Peteiro, Jesús; Broullón, Francisco J; Calviño-Santos, Ramón; Mosquera, Víctor X; Barbeito-Caamaño, Cayetana; Larrañaga-Moreira, José María; Maneiro-Melón, Nicolás; Álvarez-García, Nemesio; Vázquez-Rodríguez, José Manuel

    2015-12-01

    Scarce data are available on the temporal patterns in clinical characteristics and outcomes of elderly patients referred for exercise stress testing. We aimed to assess the trends in baseline characteristics, tests results, referrals for invasive management, and mortality in these patients. We evaluated 11,192 patients aged ≥65years who were referred for exercise stress testing between January 1998 and December 2013. Calendar years were grouped into four quadrennia (1998-2001, 2002-2005, 2006-2009, and 2010-2013), and trends in clinical characteristics of the patients, type and results of the tests, referrals for invasive management, and mortality across the different periods were assessed. Despite a progressive decrease in the proportion of patients with non-interpretable baseline electrocardiograms or prior history of coronary artery disease, there was a gradual and marked increase in the use of cardiac imaging from 32.8% in 1998-2001 to 67.6% in 2010-2013 (pstress testing both without imaging (from 18.9 to 13.6%, pstress testing, we observed a decline over time in the probability of inducible myocardial ischemia, an increase in the use of cardiac imaging and in the rate of coronary revascularization, and an improvement in the survival rate at 1year. Copyright © 2015 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Case-mix adjustment for diabetes indicators: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calsbeek, Hiske; Markhorst, Joekle G M; Voerman, Gerlienke E; Braspenning, Jozé C C

    2016-02-01

    Case-mix adjustment is generally considered indispensable for fair comparison of healthcare performance. Inaccurate results are also unfair to patients as they are ineffective for improving quality. However, little is known about what factors should be adjusted for. We reviewed case-mix factors included in adjustment models for key diabetes indicators, the rationale for their inclusion, and their impact on performance. Systematic review. This systematic review included studies published up to June 2013 addressing case-mix factors for 6 key diabetes indicators: 2 outcomes and 2 process indicators for glycated hemoglobin (A1C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and blood pressure. Factors were categorized as demographic, diabetes-related, comorbidity, generic health, geographic, or care-seeking, and were evaluated on the rationale for inclusion in the adjustment models, as well as their impact on indicator scores and ranking. Thirteen studies were included, mainly addressing A1C value and measurement. Twenty-three different case-mix factors, mostly demographic and diabetes-related, were identified, and varied from 1 to 14 per adjustment model. Six studies provided selection motives for the inclusion of case-mix factors. Marital status and body mass index showed a significant impact on A1C value. For the other factors, either no or conflicting associations were reported, or too few studies (n ≤ 2) investigated this association. Scientific knowledge about the relative importance of case-mix factors for diabetes indicators is emerging, especially for demographic and diabetes-related factors and indicators on A1C, but is still limited. Because arbitrary adjustment potentially results in inaccurate quality information, meaningful stratification that demonstrates inequity in care might be a better guide, as it can be a driver for quality improvement.

  1. Risk Matrix for Prediction of Disease Progression in a Referral Cohort of Patients with Crohn's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, Peter L; Sipeki, Nora; Kovacs, Gyorgy; Palyu, Eszter; Norman, Gary L; Shums, Zakera; Golovics, Petra A; Lovasz, Barbara D; Antal-Szalmas, Peter; Papp, Maria

    2015-10-01

    Early identification of patients with Crohn's disease (CD) at risk of subsequent complications is essential for adapting the treatment strategy. We aimed to develop a prediction model including clinical and serological markers for assessing the probability of developing advanced disease in a prospective referral CD cohort. Two hundred and seventy-one consecutive CD patients (42.4% males, median follow-up 108 months) were included and followed up prospectively. Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibodies (ASCA IgA/IgG) were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The final analysis was limited to patients with inflammatory disease behaviour at diagnosis. The final definition of advanced disease outcome was having intestinal resection or disease behaviour progression. Antibody (ASCA IgA and/or IgG) status, disease location and need for early azathioprine were included in a 3-, 5- and 7-year prediction matrix. The probability of advanced disease after 5 years varied from 6.2 to 55% depending on the combination of predictors. Similar findings were obtained in Kaplan-Meier analysis; the combination of ASCA, location and early use of azathioprine was associated with the probability of developing advanced disease (p < 0.001, log rank test). Our prediction models identified substantial differences in the probability of developing advanced disease in the early disease course of CD. Markers identified in this referral cohort were different from those previously published in a population-based cohort, suggesting that different prediction models should be used in the referral setting. Copyright © 2015 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Profile of respiratory problems in patients presenting to a referral pulmonary clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dasgupta Angira

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of OPD data of 2012 patients in a referral pulmonary clinic at Kolkata was done following a protocol-based approach. Obstructive airway diseases (COPD and asthma were the most common (43% problem followed by infective lung diseases (15% including tuberculosis, bronchogenic carcinoma (8%, ILD (4%, haemopty-sis of undiagnosed etiology (4.5%, chronic cough of undiagnosed etiology (6.5% and pleural diseases (4.6%. Other diseases like obstructive sleep apnoea, sarcoid-osis, systemic diseases with lung involvements etc., and non respiratory problems formed the rest (14.4%.

  3. Understanding Patients' Preferences for Referrals to Specialists for an Asymptomatic Condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlea, Robert; Lenert, Leslie

    2015-01-14

    A specialty referral is a common but complex decision that often requires a primary care provider to balance his or her own interests with those of the patient. To examine the factors that influence a patient's choice of a specialist for consultation for an asymptomatic condition and better understand the tradeoffs that patients are and are not willing to make in this decision. Stratified cross-sectional convenience sample of subjects selected to parallel US population demographics. Members of an Internet survey panel who reported seeing a physician in the past year whose responses met objective quality metrics for attention. Respondents completed an adaptive conjoint analysis survey comparing specialists regarding eight attributes. The reliability of assessments and the predictive validity of models were measured using holdout samples. The relative importance (RI) of different attributes was computed using paired t tests. The implications of utility values were studied using market simulation methods. Five hundred and thirty subjects completed the survey and had responses that met quality criteria. The reliability of responses was high (86% agreement), and models were predictive of patients' preferences (82.6% agreement with holdout choices). The most important attribute for patients was out-of-pocket cost (RI of 19.5%, P communication" with the primary care provider was the most important attribute (RI of 13.1% P importance was whether the specialist practiced shared decision making (RI of 12.2% P well with their primary care provider and practiced shared decision making. Most patients prefer to wait for a doctor who practices shared decision making: Only one-third (32.3%) of patients preferred a paternalistic doctor who was available in 2 weeks over a doctor who practiced decision making but was available in 4 weeks. In the setting of a referral for an asymptomatic but serious condition, out-of-pocket costs are important to patients; however, they also value

  4. Contemplating case mix: A primer on case mix classification and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Andrew P; Poss, Jeffery W; McKillop, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Case mix classifications are the frameworks that underlie many healthcare funding schemes, including the so-called activity-based funding. Now more than ever, Canadian healthcare administrators are evaluating case mix-based funding and deciphering how they will influence their organization. Case mix is a topic fraught with technical jargon and largely relegated to government agencies or private industries. This article provides an abridged review of case mix classification as well as its implications for management in healthcare. © 2015 The Canadian College of Health Leaders.

  5. Spatial Analysis of Case-Mix and Dialysis Modality Associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phirtskhalaishvili, Tamar; Bayer, Florian; Edet, Stephane; Bongiovanni, Isabelle; Hogan, Julien; Couchoud, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    ♦ Health-care systems must attempt to provide appropriate, high-quality, and economically sustainable care that meets the needs and choices of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). France offers 9 different modalities of dialysis, each characterized by dialysis technique, the extent of professional assistance, and the treatment site. The aim of this study was 1) to describe the various dialysis modalities in France and the patient characteristics associated with each of them, and 2) to analyze their regional patterns to identify possible unexpected associations between case-mixes and dialysis modalities. ♦ The clinical characteristics of the 37,421 adult patients treated by dialysis were described according to their treatment modality. Agglomerative hierarchical cluster analysis was used to aggregate the regions into clusters according to their use of these modalities and the characteristics of their patients. ♦ The gradient of patient characteristics was similar from home hemodialyis (HD) to in-center HD and from non-assisted automated peritoneal dialysis (APD) to assisted continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). Analyzing their spatial distribution, we found differences in the patient case-mix on dialysis across regions but also differences in the health-care provided for them. The classification of the regions into 6 different clusters allowed us to detect some unexpected associations between case-mixes and treatment modalities. ♦ The 9 modalities of treatment available make it theoretically possible to adapt treatment to patients' clinical characteristics and abilities. However, although we found an overall appropriate association of dialysis modalities to the case-mix, major inter-region heterogeneity and the low rate of peritoneal dialysis (PD) and home HD suggest that factors besides patients' clinical conditions impact the choice of dialysis modality. The French organization should now be evaluated in terms of patients' quality of

  6. Awareness of, responsiveness to and practice of patients' rights at Uganda's national referral hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagoya, Harriet Rachel; Kibuule, Dan; Mitonga-Kabwebwe, Honoré; Ekirapa-Kiracho, Elizabeth; Ssempebwa, John C

    2013-06-21

    The realisation of patients' rights in resource-constrained and patient-burdened public health care settings in Uganda remains an obstacle towards quality health care delivery, health care-seeking behaviour and health outcomes. Although the Uganda Patients' Charter of 2009 empowers patients to demand quality care, inequitable access and abuse remain common. The study aimed to assess level of awareness of, responsiveness to and practice of patients' rights amongst patients and health workers (HWs) at Uganda's national referral hospital, Mulago Hospital in Kampala. A three-phase cross-sectional questionnaire-based descriptive survey was conducted amongst 211 patients, 98 HWs and 16 key informants using qualitative and quantitative data collection methods. The study was conducted in May-June 2012, 2.5 years after the launch of the Uganda Patients' Charter. At least 36.5% of patients faced a challenge regarding their rights whilst seeking health care. Most of the patients (79%) who met a challenge never attempted to demand their rights. Most patients (81.5%) and HWs (69.4%) had never heard of the Uganda Patients' Charter. Awareness of patients' rights was significantly higher amongst HWs (70%) than patients (40%) ( p bribe HWs with money to access care, and political, socio-economic and tribal status. Awareness of, responsiveness to and practice of patients' rights remains limited at Mulago Hospital. There is a need for urgent implementation of an integrated multilevel, multichannel, patient-centred approach that incorporates social services and addresses intrinsic patient, HW and health system factors to strengthen patients' rights issues at the hospital.

  7. Factors influencing general practitioners in the referral of elderly cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demeaux Jean-Louis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of studies have identified advanced age as a barrier to accessing specialised oncological care. Many factors can influence the care provided for elderly patients after a diagnosis of cancer has been established or is suspected. Only one European study has analysed the decision processes leading general practitioners (GPs to refer elderly patients with cancer to oncologists. The objectives of the current study are to describe the factors that influence these decisions and to identify the particular factors and GP characteristics that are associated with systematic referral of these patients in South-West France. Methods This is a cross-sectional study on a representative sample of GPs in Aquitaine, South-West France. Questionnaire items were selected using a Delphi consensus approach and sent by post. Two logistic regression models were constructed to investigate GPs' decisions to refer these patients. Results The response rate obtained was 30%. Half of the general practitioners reported "always" referring their elderly cancer patients to oncologists. More than 75% reported being influenced by patient-related elements (patient and/or family wishes, comorbid factors, unsuitability of invasive investigations, physical and mental autonomy, by cancer-related elements (severity of symptoms, expected side-effects and an organisational element (whether the general practitioner was used to collaborating with oncologists. Logistic regression analysis showed that cancer site and organisational difficulties in patient management were significantly associated with the decision to refer elderly patients with early-stage cancer. For advanced stages, oncology training, patient age, organisational difficulties in patient management and stage of cancer were significantly associated with the decision to refer elderly patients. Conclusions Cancer-linked factors and organisational difficulties have been highlighted as influencing the

  8. Using social exchange theory to understand non-terminal palliative care referral practices for Parkinson's disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prizer, Lindsay P; Gay, Jennifer L; Perkins, Molly M; Wilson, Mark G; Emerson, Kerstin G; Glass, Anne P; Miyasaki, Janis M

    2017-10-01

    A palliative approach is recommended in the care of Parkinson's disease patients; however, many patients only receive this care in the form of hospice at the end of life. Physician attitudes about palliative care have been shown to influence referrals for patients with chronic disease, and negative physician perceptions may affect early palliative referrals for Parkinson's disease patients. To use Social Exchange Theory to examine the association between neurologist-perceived costs and benefits of palliative care referral for Parkinson's disease patients and their reported referral practices. A cross-sectional survey study of neurologists. A total of 62 neurologists recruited from the National Parkinson Foundation, the Medical Association of Georgia, and the American Academy of Neurology's clinician database. Participants reported significantly stronger endorsement of the rewards ( M = 3.34, SD = 0.37) of palliative care referrals than the costs ( M = 2.13, SD = 0.30; t(61) = -16.10, p < 0.0001). A Poisson regression found that perceived costs, perceived rewards, physician type, and the number of complementary clinicians in practice were significant predictors of palliative care referral. Physicians may be more likely to refer patients to non-terminal palliative care if (1) they work in interdisciplinary settings and/or (2) previous personal or patient experience with palliative care was positive. They may be less likely to refer if (1) they fear a loss of autonomy in patient care, (2) they are unaware of available programs, and/or (3) they believe they address palliative needs. Initiatives to educate neurologists on the benefits and availability of non-terminal palliative services could improve patient access to this care.

  9. A preliminary evaluation of optometric management and referral protocols for pa-tients with diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mehta

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate  the  assessment,  management  and referral practices of South African optometrists in  the  care  of  patients  with  diabetic  retinop-athy  (DR  and  to  recommend  strategies  to improve  and  standardize  patient  management as required.  Methods:  The  study  design  incorporated quantitative,  qualitative  and  clinical  measures that were administered to fourteen experienced optometrists from the Durban area. The quan-titative measure, the questionnaire in appendix I, evaluated the optometrists’ management pro-tocols of patients with diabetes mellitus (DM.  These  included  the  optometrists’  referral  and co-management practices, their awareness and usage  of  appropriate  guidelines  in  the  man-agement  and  referral  of  these  patients,  their perceived levels of competence and confidence in their education, levels of service offered to the patients and finally the role of Continuous Professional  Development  (CPD.  This  self-report information was supplemented by a set of clinical measures where the study sample grad-ed levels of DR, chose appropriate management options  and  indicated  prognosis  for  disease progression based on a set of slides presented to  them.  Finally  the  fourteen  optometrists,  as well as two ophthalmologists, were interviewed using tailored, semi-structured interview sched-ules. These interviews were used to elaborate and corroborate information obtained from the other two research approaches.  Results:  Descriptive  analysis  was  used  to analyse  the  data  from  the  quantitative  and clinical  measures,  whilst  the  interviews  were analysed  thematically.  Although  86%  of  the sample routinely screened for ocular manifesta-tions of DM, there was no standardization in the criteria used by the fourteen optometrists

  10. Patient satisfaction with care in an urban tertiary referral academic glaucoma clinic in the US

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peterson KM

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Kristen M Peterson, Carrie E Huisingh, Christopher Girkin, Cynthia Owsley, Lindsay A Rhodes Department of Ophthalmology, School of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA Background: The purpose of this study was to determine the factors associated with glaucoma patients’ satisfaction with their medical care by fellowship-trained glaucoma specialists in an urban tertiary referral clinic in the US.Methods: A total of 110 established patients aged ≥60 years with a diagnosis of either primary open angle glaucoma, glaucoma suspect, or ocular hypertension monitored by an ophthalmologist with fellowship training in glaucoma were enrolled at an academic, urban, tertiary referral eye clinic. Enrolled patients were administered a general demographics questionnaire along with a Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire-18 (PSQ-18, a Likert scale validated tool. The seven dimensions of patient satisfaction from the PSQ-18 were summarized for the sample overall and by the patients’ age, race, employment status, education level, distance travelled from home address to clinic, and glaucoma therapy type. Two-sample t-tests were used to compare group means. Spearman correlation coefficients were used to correlate satisfaction scores with peripheral vision and visual acuity function.Results: Overall, the general satisfaction scores were high (mean 4.62. Patients ≥70 years of age had lower general satisfaction with their care (mean 4.5 vs 4.8, p=0.03, the interpersonal manner of their appointment (mean 4.7 vs 4.9, p=0.009, and with their time spent with their doctor (mean 4.4 vs 4.7, p=0.03 than patients aged 60–69 years. Non-European descent patients (47% African descent and 1% other of sample were more satisfied with the time they spent with the doctor (mean 4.7 vs 4.4, p=0.04 and with the communication during the appointment (mean 4.8 vs 4.6, p=0.04 than European descent patients (52% of sample. Patients with a higher level of

  11. Study of Various HCV Genotypes in Patients Managing by Referral Clinic in Yazd Province

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    M Pedarzadeh

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Determining virus genotype is a major factor for initiation of treatment because various kinds of genotypes need different antiviral drugs. Distribution of hepatitis C genotype in the word is variable in each country or even in each province. So we need to determine distribution pattern of hepatitis C genotype in our region. This study was performed in referral clinic of Yazd province. Methods: This was a descriptive study conducted between 2007 and 2010 on patients who were observed by Yazd referral clinic (the clinic for evaluating and management of patients with high risk behaviors. Ninety two patients who had positive RIBA test for hepatitis C infection were randomly selected and entered the study. Genotyping was performed using RT-PCR method. The primer was "universal primer HCV". Prevalence of various genotypes was analyzed according to gender, addiction and co- existence of HCV-HIV infection. Personal information and laboratory results were analyzed using SPSS. Results: The most common genotype in our study was genotype 3a (65% of cases, followed by 1a (35%. Globally 83% of patients were IV drug addict. Genotype distribution in these patients was similar to others. Fifteen patients had co-infection of HCV-HIV, and 47% of them were contaminated by genotype 1a and 53% with 3a. We could not find any patient contaminated with genotypes 2 or 4. No other genotypes except 1 & 3 or mixed genotype infection could be determined in our patients. Twenty three percent of patients had negative PCR despite positive RIBA test. This indicates that self improvement from acute hepatitis C infection in IV drug addict patients is similar to other people. Conclusion: According to the results of our study, about 2/3 of patients were infected by genotype 3a. This kind of chronic hepatitis C shows a better response to treatment comparing genotype 1a (or 1b with shorter duration and lower cost drugs. But despite higher incidence of genotype 3a, we

  12. Medicaid prospective payment: Case-mix increase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Samuel L.; Kronenfeld, Jennie J.

    1990-01-01

    South Carolina Medicaid implemented prospective payment by diagnosis-related group (DRG) for inpatient care. The rate of complications among newborns and deliveries doubled immediately. The case-mix index for newborns increased 66.6 percent, which increased the total Medicaid hospital expenditure 5.5 percent. Outlier payments increased total expenditure further. DRG distribution change among newborns has a large impact on spending because newborn complication DRGs have high weights. States adopting a DRG-based payment system for Medicaid should anticipate a greater increase in case mix than Medicare experienced. PMID:10113463

  13. Frequency of referral of patients with safety-related contraindications to magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewey, Marc [Departments of Radiology, Charite, Medical School, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin (Germany)]. E-mail: marc.dewey@charite.de; Schink, Tania [Medical Biometry, Charite, Medical School, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin (Germany)]. E-mail: tania.schink@charite.de; Dewey, Charles F. [Radiology, Outpatient Centre Loebau, Poststr. 20, 02738 Loebau (Germany)]. E-mail: dewey@t-online.de

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: To analyse the frequency of patients with absolute and relative contraindications to magnetic resonance (MR) imaging who were actually referred to an outpatient imaging centre for an MR examination Materials and methods: Altogether a total of 51,547 consecutive patients were included between November 1997 and December 2005. Reasons preventing MR imaging were classified into the following categories: absolute and relative contraindications. Results: The referral frequency of patients with absolute contraindications to MR imaging was 0.41% (211 of 51,547 patients; 95% CI, 0.36-0.47%). The absolute contraindications were shrapnels located in biologically sensitive areas (121 patients, 0.23%; 95% CI, 0.20-0.28%), cardiac pacemakers (42 patients, 0.08%; 95% CI, 0.06-0.11%), and other unsafe implants (48 patients, 0.09%; 95% CI, 0.07-0.12%). Also patients with a relative contraindication to MR imaging were referred such as women with a first-trimester pregnancy (13 patients, 0.03%; 95% CI, 0.01-0.04%). Conclusion: Surprisingly, a considerable number of patients (0.41%) with cardiac pacemakers, other metallic implants (not approved for MR), or shrapnels are referred to MR facilities despite the well-known recommendations not to examine such patients. Thus, absolute contraindications to MR imaging are commonly found among patients referred for MR examinations and every effort needs to be made to screen patients prior to MR imaging for such contraindications to avoid detrimental results. Also, institutions placing implants (approved and unapproved for MR) should become legally responsible for providing the required information to the patients and their physicians.

  14. Frequency of referral of patients with safety-related contraindications to magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewey, Marc; Schink, Tania; Dewey, Charles F.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To analyse the frequency of patients with absolute and relative contraindications to magnetic resonance (MR) imaging who were actually referred to an outpatient imaging centre for an MR examination Materials and methods: Altogether a total of 51,547 consecutive patients were included between November 1997 and December 2005. Reasons preventing MR imaging were classified into the following categories: absolute and relative contraindications. Results: The referral frequency of patients with absolute contraindications to MR imaging was 0.41% (211 of 51,547 patients; 95% CI, 0.36-0.47%). The absolute contraindications were shrapnels located in biologically sensitive areas (121 patients, 0.23%; 95% CI, 0.20-0.28%), cardiac pacemakers (42 patients, 0.08%; 95% CI, 0.06-0.11%), and other unsafe implants (48 patients, 0.09%; 95% CI, 0.07-0.12%). Also patients with a relative contraindication to MR imaging were referred such as women with a first-trimester pregnancy (13 patients, 0.03%; 95% CI, 0.01-0.04%). Conclusion: Surprisingly, a considerable number of patients (0.41%) with cardiac pacemakers, other metallic implants (not approved for MR), or shrapnels are referred to MR facilities despite the well-known recommendations not to examine such patients. Thus, absolute contraindications to MR imaging are commonly found among patients referred for MR examinations and every effort needs to be made to screen patients prior to MR imaging for such contraindications to avoid detrimental results. Also, institutions placing implants (approved and unapproved for MR) should become legally responsible for providing the required information to the patients and their physicians

  15. Case-mix reimbursement for nursing home services: Simulation approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, E. Kathleen; Schlenker, Robert E.

    1986-01-01

    Nursing home reimbursement based on case mix is a matter of growing interest. Several States either use or are considering this reimbursement method. In this article, we present a method for evaluating key outcomes of such a change for Connecticut nursing homes. A simulation model is used to replicate payments under the case-mix systems used in Maryland, Ohio, and West Virginia. The findings indicate that, compared with the system presently used in Connecticut, these systems would better relate dollar payments to measure patient need, and for-profit homes would benefit relative to nonprofit homes. The Ohio methodology would impose the most additional costs, the West Virginia system would actually be somewhat less expensive in terms of direct patient care payments. PMID:10311776

  16. Case-mix reimbursement for nursing home services: simulation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, E K; Schlenker, R E

    1986-01-01

    Nursing home reimbursement based on case mix is a matter of growing interest. Several States either use or are considering this reimbursement method. In this article, we present a method for evaluating key outcomes of such a change for Connecticut nursing homes. A simulation model is used to replicate payments under the case-mix systems used in Maryland, Ohio, and West Virginia. The findings indicate that, compared with the system presently used in Connecticut, these systems would better relate dollar payments to measure patient need, and for-profit homes would benefit relative to nonprofit homes. The Ohio methodology would impose the most additional costs, the West Virginia system would actually be somewhat less expensive in terms of direct patient care payments.

  17. Patient Complaints Emphasize Non-Technical Aspects of Care at a Tertiary Referral Hospital

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    John King

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background:Patient concerns represent opportunities for improvement in orthopaedic care. Thisstudy’s objectiveis to identify the nature and prevalence of unsolicited patient complaints regarding orthopaedic care ata tertiary referral hospital. The primary null hypothesis that there are no demographic factors associatedwith complaint types was tested. Secondarily we determined if the overall complaint number and typesdifferedby year.Methods:Complaints to the hospital ombudsperson by orthopaedic patients between January 1997 and June 2013 werereviewed. All 1118 complaints were categorized: access and availability, humaneness and disrespect, communication,expectations of care and treatment, distrust, billing and research.Results:Patients between 40 and 60 years of age filed the most complaints in all categories except distrust(more common in patients over age 80 and research. Women were slightly more likely to address access andavailability, humaneness, disrespect, and billing compared to men. The overall number of complaints peakedin 1999. The most common issue was access and availability followed by communication, and humaneness/disrespect.Conclusion:Half of concerns voiced by patients addressed interpersonal issues. The largest category was related toaccess and availability. Quality improvement efforts can address technology to improve access and availability as wellas empathy and communication strategies.

  18. Disease patterns and clinical outcomes of patients admitted in intensive care units of tertiary referral hospitals of Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawe, Hendry R; Mfinanga, Juma A; Lidenge, Salum J; Mpondo, Boniventura C T; Msangi, Silas; Lugazia, Edwin; Mwafongo, Victor; Runyon, Michael S; Reynolds, Teri A

    2014-09-23

    In sub-Saharan Africa the availability of intensive care unit (ICU) services is limited by a variety of factors, including lack of financial resources, lack of available technology and well-trained staff. Tanzania has four main referral hospitals, located in zones so as to serve as tertiary level referral centers. All the referral hospitals have some ICU services, operating at varying levels of equipment and qualified staff. We analyzed and describe the disease patterns and clinical outcomes of patients admitted in ICUs of the tertiary referral hospitals of Tanzania. This was a retrospective analysis of ICU patient records, for three years (2009 to 2011) from all tertiary referral hospitals of Tanzania, namely Muhimbili National Hospital (MNH), Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre (KCMC), Mbeya Referral Hospital (MRH) and Bugando Medical Centre (BMC). MNH is the largest of the four referral hospitals with 1300 beds, and MRH is the smallest with 480 beds. The ratio of hospital beds to ICU beds is 217:1 at MNH, 54:1 at BMC, 39:1 at KCMC, and 80:1 at MRH. KCMC had no infusion pumps. None of the ICUs had a point-of-care (POC) arterial blood gas (ABG) analyzer. None of the ICUs had an Intensive Care specialist or a nutritionist. A masters-trained critical care nurse was available only at MNH. From 2009-2011, the total number of patients admitted to the four ICUs was 5627, male to female ratio 1.4:1, median age of 34 years. Overall, Trauma (22.2%) was the main disease category followed by infectious disease (19.7%). Intracranial injury (12.5%) was the leading diagnosis in all age groups, while pneumonia (11.7%) was the leading diagnosis in pediatric patients (<18 years). Patients with tetanus (2.4%) had the longest median length ICU stay: 8 (5,13) days. The overall in-ICU mortality rate was 41.4%. The ICUs in tertiary referral hospitals of Tanzania are severely limited in infrastructure, personnel, and resources, making it difficult or impossible to provide optimum care

  19. Anesthesia Preoperative Clinic Referral for Elevated Hba1c Reduces Complication Rate in Diabetic Patients Undergoing Total Joint Arthroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Kallio, Peter J.; Nolan, Jenea; Olsen, Amy C.; Breakwell, Susan; Topp, Richard; Pagel, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus (DM) is risk factor for complications after orthopedic surgery. Objectives: We tested the hypothesis that anesthesia preoperative clinic (APC) referral for elevated glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) reduces complication rate after total joint arthroplasty (TJA). Patients and Methods: Patients (n = 203) with and without DM were chosen from 1,237 patients undergoing TJA during 2006 - 12. Patients evaluated in the APC had surgery in 2006 - 8 regardless of HbA1c (uncon...

  20. Variation in ‘fast-track’ referrals for suspected cancer by patient characteristic and cancer diagnosis: evidence from 670 000 patients with cancers of 35 different sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y; Mendonca, S C; Abel, G A; Hamilton, W; Walter, F M; Johnson, S; Shelton, J; Elliss-Brookes, L; McPhail, S; Lyratzopoulos, G

    2018-01-01

    Background: In England, ‘fast-track’ (also known as ‘two-week wait’) general practitioner referrals for suspected cancer in symptomatic patients are used to shorten diagnostic intervals and are supported by clinical guidelines. However, the use of the fast-track pathway may vary for different patient groups. Methods: We examined data from 669 220 patients with 35 cancers diagnosed in 2006–2010 following either fast-track or ‘routine’ primary-to-secondary care referrals using ‘Routes to Diagnosis’ data. We estimated the proportion of fast-track referrals by sociodemographic characteristic and cancer site and used logistic regression to estimate respective crude and adjusted odds ratios. We additionally explored whether sociodemographic associations varied by cancer. Results: There were large variations in the odds of fast-track referral by cancer (P<0.001). Patients with testicular and breast cancer were most likely to have been diagnosed after a fast-track referral (adjusted odds ratios 2.73 and 2.35, respectively, using rectal cancer as reference); whereas patients with brain cancer and leukaemias least likely (adjusted odds ratios 0.05 and 0.09, respectively, for brain cancer and acute myeloid leukaemia). There were sex, age and deprivation differences in the odds of fast-track referral (P<0.013) that varied in their size and direction for patients with different cancers (P<0.001). For example, fast-track referrals were least likely in younger women with endometrial cancer and in older men with testicular cancer. Conclusions: Fast-track referrals are less likely for cancers characterised by nonspecific presenting symptoms and patients belonging to low cancer incidence demographic groups. Interventions beyond clinical guidelines for ‘alarm’ symptoms are needed to improve diagnostic timeliness. PMID:29182609

  1. Variation in 'fast-track' referrals for suspected cancer by patient characteristic and cancer diagnosis: evidence from 670 000 patients with cancers of 35 different sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y; Mendonca, S C; Abel, G A; Hamilton, W; Walter, F M; Johnson, S; Shelton, J; Elliss-Brookes, L; McPhail, S; Lyratzopoulos, G

    2018-01-01

    In England, 'fast-track' (also known as 'two-week wait') general practitioner referrals for suspected cancer in symptomatic patients are used to shorten diagnostic intervals and are supported by clinical guidelines. However, the use of the fast-track pathway may vary for different patient groups. We examined data from 669 220 patients with 35 cancers diagnosed in 2006-2010 following either fast-track or 'routine' primary-to-secondary care referrals using 'Routes to Diagnosis' data. We estimated the proportion of fast-track referrals by sociodemographic characteristic and cancer site and used logistic regression to estimate respective crude and adjusted odds ratios. We additionally explored whether sociodemographic associations varied by cancer. There were large variations in the odds of fast-track referral by cancer (P<0.001). Patients with testicular and breast cancer were most likely to have been diagnosed after a fast-track referral (adjusted odds ratios 2.73 and 2.35, respectively, using rectal cancer as reference); whereas patients with brain cancer and leukaemias least likely (adjusted odds ratios 0.05 and 0.09, respectively, for brain cancer and acute myeloid leukaemia). There were sex, age and deprivation differences in the odds of fast-track referral (P<0.013) that varied in their size and direction for patients with different cancers (P<0.001). For example, fast-track referrals were least likely in younger women with endometrial cancer and in older men with testicular cancer. Fast-track referrals are less likely for cancers characterised by nonspecific presenting symptoms and patients belonging to low cancer incidence demographic groups. Interventions beyond clinical guidelines for 'alarm' symptoms are needed to improve diagnostic timeliness.

  2. What is the importance of the referral letter in the patient journey? A pilot survey in Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiwa, Moyez; Arnet, Hayley; Bulsara, Max; Ee, Hooi C; Harwood, Abby

    2009-01-01

    Access to specialists is mediated by general practitioners in many countries. In these settings, specialists rely on information in referral letters when deciding which cases to schedule for their clinics. Two-hundred and seven consecutive referral letters to gastroenterologists were scored for the amount of information relayed to the specialist, using a published schedule. The 'quality' scores for these referral letters were compared for four groups of patients: patients diagnosed with histological lesion, those with no histological lesion, those who failed to attend clinic, or those who had a diagnosis unknown. Forty-two referral letters were generated with a range of quality scores. Four gastroenterologists were asked to identify which letters described patients 'likely' to have a significant or benign colorectal condition, and whether they could triage the cases for their clinic given only the information in the letters. It was not possible to differentiate which letters related to patients in each of the four categories (P = 0.6). Patients who failed to attend were more symptomatic than those with a histological lesion (35.4 versus 28.2, mean difference 7.14, 95% confidence interval (CI) 14.1 to 0.15, P = 0.045). Patients referred 'urgently' were not, on the basis of the referral letters, the most symptomatic group (29.7 versus 27, mean difference 2.7, 95% CI -3.4 to 8.8, P = 0.38). The specialists failed to agree on the proportion of cases that could be triaged for their clinics. The cases that could be triaged contained more information (mean 66.38 versus 49.86, mean difference 16, 95% CI 1.3-31.7, P information relayed and the diagnosis of a histological lesion. However, more information was helpful when deciding which patients to schedule first. By corollary, patients referred with lesser documentation of their clinical presentation may be denied 'urgent' access to the gastroenterology clinic.

  3. [Follow-up of patients with osteoarthritis. Coordinated management and criteria for referral between healthcare levels].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto Pol, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    The correct management of osteoarthritis requires an accurate diagnosis, evaluation of its spread and functional repercussions, and the application of comprehensive and effective individually-tailored treatment aimed at relieving pain and improving physical function with a consequent improvement in quality of life; treatment should also aim to prevent or delay disease progression and its effects. In the National Health Service, primary care is the basic level and the first point of access to healthcare; this level guarantees the continuity of care, coordinates patients, and regulates clinical workflow. Family physicians coordinate the healthcare processes related to chronic diseases and are responsible for the management, diagnosis, evaluation, treatment, and follow-up of patients with osteoarthritis. The clinical practice guidelines internationally accepted as the standard of care for the management of osteoarthritis should be adapted by both Spanish health planning strategies and clinical practice guidelines to the Spanish healthcare setting. The comprehensive assessment of osteoarthritis includes evaluation of its effects on the patient's physical function and quality of life; formulating a treatment plan in collaboration with the patient and adapted to his or her comorbidities; providing advice on basic treatments and their risks and benefits; and carrying out an individually-tailored periodic review. Referral criteria are based on diagnostic confirmation, poor treatment response, and surgical evaluation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  4. Blood transfusion in burn patients: Triggers of transfusion in a referral burn center in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavousi, S H; Ahmadabadi, A; Sedaghat, A; Khadem-Rezaiyan, M; Yaghoubi Moghaddam, Z; Behrouzian, M J; Nemati, S; Saghafi, H

    2018-02-01

    Blood and its derivatives are one of the most lifesaving products in the modern medicine practice. However, it is not an absolutely safe prescription. Many adverse effects such as infection, transfusion-related acute lung injury, immunosuppression, multi-organ dysfunction, acute respiratory syndrome, transfusion errors, transmission of infectious agents such as HIV, HBV, HCV are attributable to blood transfusion. The aim of this study was to describe how and when blood products were transfused in a referral burn center. This cross-sectional study was performed on medical records of all admitted patients in the Department of Burns and Reconstructive Surgery of Imam Reza Hospital, Mashhad, Iran during September 2014 up to August 2015. Transfusion measures such as Hb, Hct and demographic data were extracted from patient records. SPSS version 11.5 was used for data analysis. During the study period, 701 acute burnt patients were admitted with the mean age of 25.5±20.5 years. Sixty-four percent were male and burnt percentage of total body surface area (TBSA) was 30.9±24.3%. About one third (240) of patients received at least one blood product. Mean of the transfused packed red blood cell was 274.1±674.6mL per patient and 8.85mL per 1% of burnt TBSA. Anemia was the most common transfusion trigger. Mortality in burnt patients who received blood products was two folds more than patients who did not receive any blood products. We prescribed less blood products compared with other reviewed burn centers. However, following a written blood transfusion protocol by all clinicians may reduce blood transfusion in unnecessary situations even more significantly. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Quality of referral: What information should be included in a request for diagnostic imaging when a patient is referred to a clinical radiologist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    G Pitman, Alexander

    2017-06-01

    Referral to a clinical radiologist is the prime means of communication between the referrer and the radiologist. Current Australian and New Zealand government regulations do not prescribe what clinical information should be included in a referral. This work presents a qualitative compilation of clinical radiologist opinion, relevant professional recommendations, governmental regulatory positions and prior work on diagnostic error to synthesise recommendations on what clinical information should be included in a referral. Recommended requirements on what clinical information should be included in a referral to a clinical radiologist are as follows: an unambiguous referral; identity of the patient; identity of the referrer; and sufficient clinical detail to justify performance of the diagnostic imaging examination and to confirm appropriate choice of the examination and modality. Recommended guideline on the content of clinical detail clarifies when the information provided in a referral meets these requirements. High-quality information provided in a referral allows the clinical radiologist to ensure that exposure of patients to medical radiation is justified. It also minimises the incidence of perceptual and interpretational diagnostic error. Recommended requirements and guideline on the clinical detail to be provided in a referral to a clinical radiologist have been formulated for professional debate and adoption. © 2017 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  6. Prevalence and Factors Associated with Hydatidiform Mole among Patients Undergoing Uterine Evacuation at Mbarara Regional Referral Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Mulisya, Olivier; Roberts, Drucilla J.; Sengupta, Elizabeth S.; Agaba, Elly; Laffita, Damaris; Tobias, Tusabe; Mpiima, Derrick Paul; Henry, Lugobe; Augustine, Ssemujju; Abraham, Masinda; Hillary, Twizerimana; Mugisha, Julius

    2018-01-01

    Objective. We sought to determine the prevalence of and factors associated with hydatidiform molar gestations amongst patients undergoing uterine evacuation at Mbarara Regional Referral Hospital (MRRH), Mbarara, Uganda. Methods. This was a cross-sectional study carried out from November 2016 to February 2017. All patients admitted for uterine evacuation for nonviable pregnancy were included. The study registered 181 patients. Data were collected on sociodemographics, medical conditions, obste...

  7. Case-Mix, Care Processes, and Outcomes in Medically-Ill Patients Receiving Mechanical Ventilation in a Low-Resource Setting from Southern India: A Prospective Clinical Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, Balasubramanian; Kadhiravan, Tamilarasu; Deepanjali, Surendran; Swaminathan, Rathinam Palamalai

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation is a resource intensive organ support treatment, and historical studies from low-resource settings had reported a high mortality. We aimed to study the outcomes in patients receiving mechanical ventilation in a contemporary low-resource setting. We prospectively studied the characteristics and outcomes (disease-related, mechanical ventilation-related, and process of care-related) in 237 adults mechanically ventilated for a medical illness at a teaching hospital in southern India during February 2011 to August 2012. Vital status of patients discharged from hospital was ascertained on Day 90 or later. Mean age of the patients was 40 ± 17 years; 140 (51%) were men. Poisoning and envenomation accounted for 98 (41%) of 237 admissions. In total, 87 (37%) patients died in-hospital; 16 (7%) died after discharge; 115 (49%) were alive at 90-day assessment; and 19 (8%) were lost to follow-up. Weaning was attempted in 171 (72%) patients; most patients (78 of 99 [79%]) failing the first attempt could be weaned off. Prolonged mechanical ventilation was required in 20 (8%) patients. Adherence to head-end elevation and deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis were 164 (69%) and 147 (62%) respectively. Risk of nosocomial infections particularly ventilator-associated pneumonia was high (57.2 per 1,000 ventilator-days). Higher APACHE II score quartiles (adjusted HR [95% CI] quartile 2, 2.65 [1.19-5.89]; quartile 3, 2.98 [1.24-7.15]; quartile 4, 5.78 [2.45-13.60]), and new-onset organ failure (2.98 [1.94-4.56]) were independently associated with the risk of death. Patients with poisoning had higher risk of reintubation (43% vs. 20%; P = 0.001) and ventilator-associated pneumonia (75% vs. 53%; P = 0.001). But, their mortality was significantly lower compared to the rest (24% vs. 44%; P = 0.002). The case-mix considerably differs from other settings. Mortality in this low-resource setting is similar to high-resource settings. But, further improvements in care processes

  8. Case-Mix, Care Processes, and Outcomes in Medically-Ill Patients Receiving Mechanical Ventilation in a Low-Resource Setting from Southern India: A Prospective Clinical Case Series.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balasubramanian Karthikeyan

    Full Text Available Mechanical ventilation is a resource intensive organ support treatment, and historical studies from low-resource settings had reported a high mortality. We aimed to study the outcomes in patients receiving mechanical ventilation in a contemporary low-resource setting.We prospectively studied the characteristics and outcomes (disease-related, mechanical ventilation-related, and process of care-related in 237 adults mechanically ventilated for a medical illness at a teaching hospital in southern India during February 2011 to August 2012. Vital status of patients discharged from hospital was ascertained on Day 90 or later.Mean age of the patients was 40 ± 17 years; 140 (51% were men. Poisoning and envenomation accounted for 98 (41% of 237 admissions. In total, 87 (37% patients died in-hospital; 16 (7% died after discharge; 115 (49% were alive at 90-day assessment; and 19 (8% were lost to follow-up. Weaning was attempted in 171 (72% patients; most patients (78 of 99 [79%] failing the first attempt could be weaned off. Prolonged mechanical ventilation was required in 20 (8% patients. Adherence to head-end elevation and deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis were 164 (69% and 147 (62% respectively. Risk of nosocomial infections particularly ventilator-associated pneumonia was high (57.2 per 1,000 ventilator-days. Higher APACHE II score quartiles (adjusted HR [95% CI] quartile 2, 2.65 [1.19-5.89]; quartile 3, 2.98 [1.24-7.15]; quartile 4, 5.78 [2.45-13.60], and new-onset organ failure (2.98 [1.94-4.56] were independently associated with the risk of death. Patients with poisoning had higher risk of reintubation (43% vs. 20%; P = 0.001 and ventilator-associated pneumonia (75% vs. 53%; P = 0.001. But, their mortality was significantly lower compared to the rest (24% vs. 44%; P = 0.002.The case-mix considerably differs from other settings. Mortality in this low-resource setting is similar to high-resource settings. But, further improvements in care processes

  9. Medication adherence and its determinants among psychiatric patients in an Ethiopian referral hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demoz Z

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Zaid Demoz,1 Befikadu Legesse,1 Gebrehiwot Teklay,1 Birhanu Demeke,1 Tewodros Eyob,2 Zewdneh Shewamene,3 Mubarek Abera4 1Department of Pharmacy, College of Health Sciences, Mekelle University, Mekelle, 2Department of Pharmacy, College of Public Health and Medical Sciences, Jimma University, Jimma, 3Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, University of Gondar, Gondar, 4Department of Psychiatry, College of Public Health and Medical Sciences, Jimma University, Jimma, Ethiopia Background: The degree to which an individual follows medical advice is a major concern in every medical specialty. Non-adherence to psychiatric treatment regimens has a pro­found impact on the disease course, relapse, future recovery, cost of health care, and the outcome for the patient. The aim of this study was to assess medication adherence and its correlates among psychiatric patients at Ayder Referral Hospital, Northern Ethiopia.Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted from June to September 2013 at Ayder Referral Hospital, where 423 patients were selected by a systematic random sampling technique from all patients attending the psychiatric clinic at the hospital. Data were collected by trained data collectors through interview of the patients using a structured questionnaire. The collected data were entered into Epi Info version 7 and analyzed by Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 16 software. Logistic regression was used to assess independent predictors of adherence. Results: A total of 387 patients completed the interview. Two hundred and sixteen (55.8% and 113 (29.2% were patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia and mood disorder, respectively, while 35 (9% and 23 (5.9% had a diagnosis of drug addiction and autistic disorder. Two hundred and seven (71.6% patients were found to be adherent to their medication. When adherence rates were observed according to type of disorder, 60 (53.1%, 24 (68.6%, 149 (69%, and 18 (78.3% of patients

  10. Reasons for psychiatric consultation referrals in Dutch nursing home patients with dementia: a comparison with normative data on prevalence of neuropsychiatric symptoms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kat, M.G.; Zuidema, S.U.; Ploeg, T. van der; Kalisvaart, K.J.; Gool, W.A. van; Eikelenboom, P.; Jonghe, J.F. de

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study psychiatric consultation referrals of nursing home patients with dementia and to compare referral reasons with normative data on prevalence of neuropsychiatric symptoms. METHODS: This is part of a cross-sectional study of 787 patients residing in 14 nursing homes in the

  11. Reasons for psychiatric consultation referrals in Dutch nursing home patients with dementia: a comparison with normative data on prevalence of neuropsychiatric symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kat, Martin G.; Zuidema, Sytse U.; van der Ploeg, Tjeerd; Kalisvaart, Kees J.; van Gool, Willem A.; Eikelenboom, Piet; de Jonghe, Jos F. M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To study psychiatric consultation referrals of nursing home patients with dementia and to compare referral reasons with normative data on prevalence of neuropsychiatric symptoms. Methods This is part of a cross-sectional study of 787 patients residing in 14 nursing homes in the

  12. Reasons for psychiatric consultation referrals in Dutch nursing home patients with dementia: a comparison with normative data on prevalence of neuropsychiatric symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kat, M.G.; Zuidema, S.U.; van der Ploeg, T.; Kalisvaart, K.J.; van Gool, W.A.; Eikelenboom, P.; de Jonghe, J.F.M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To study psychiatric consultation referrals of nursing home patients with dementia and to compare referral reasons with normative data on prevalence of neuropsychiatric symptoms. Methods: This is part of a cross-sectional study of 787 patients residing in 14 nursing homes in the

  13. Drug-associated cutaneous vasculitis: study of 239 patients from a single referral center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Sanjuán, Francisco; Blanco, Ricardo; Hernández, José L; Pina, Trinitario; González-Vela, María C; Fernández-Llaca, Héctor; Calvo-Río, Vanesa; Loricera, Javier; Armesto, Susana; González-López, Marcos A; Rueda-Gotor, Javier; González-Gay, Miguel A

    2014-11-01

    The 2012 International Chapel Hill Consensus Conference on the Nomenclature of Vasculitides defined drug-associated immune complex vasculitis as a distinct entity included within the category of vasculitis associated with probable etiology. In the present study we assessed the clinical spectrum of patients with drug-associated cutaneous vasculitis (DACV). Case records were reviewed of patients with DACV treated at a tertiary referral hospital over a 36-year period. A diagnosis of DACV was considered if the drug was taken within a week before the onset of the disease. From a series of 773 unselected cutaneous vasculitis cases, 239 patients (30.9%; 133 men and 106 women; mean age 36 yrs) were diagnosed with DACV. Antibiotics (n=149; 62.3%), mainly β-lactams and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAID; n=24; 10%) were the most common drugs. Besides skin lesions (100%), the most common clinical features were joint (51%) and gastrointestinal (38.1%) manifestations, nephropathy (34.7%), and fever (23.8%). The most remarkable laboratory data were increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate (40.2%), presence of serum cryoglobulins (26%), leukocytosis (24.7%), positive antinuclear antibodies (21.1%), anemia (18.8%), and positive rheumatoid factor (17.5%). Despite drug discontinuation and bed rest, 108 patients (45.2%) required medical treatment, mainly corticosteroids (n=71) or immunosuppressive drugs (n=7). After a median followup of 5 months, relapses occurred in 18.4% of patients, and persistent microhematuria or renal insufficiency in 3.3% and 5%, respectively. DACV is generally associated with antibiotics and NSAID. In most cases it has a favorable prognosis, although a small percentage of patients may develop residual renal damage.

  14. Cost of neurocysticercosis patients treated in two referral hospitals in Mexico City, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattarai, Rachana; Carabin, Hélène; Proaño, Jefferson V; Flores-Rivera, Jose; Corona, Teresa; Flisser, Ana; Budke, Christine M

    2015-08-01

    To estimate annual costs related to the diagnosis, treatment and productivity losses among patients with neurocysticercosis (NCC) receiving treatment at two referral hospitals, the Instituto Nacional de Neurologia y Neurocirugia (INNN) and the Hospital de Especialidades of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (HE-IMSS), in Mexico City from July 2007 to August 2008. Information on presenting clinical manifestations, diagnostic tests, hospitalisations, surgical procedures and other treatments received by NCC outpatients was collected from medical charts, and supplemented by an individual questionnaire regarding productivity losses and out-of-pocket expenses related to NCC. The annual average per-patient direct costs were US$ 503 (95% CI: 414-592) and US$ 438 (95% CI: 322-571) for patients without a history of hospitalisation and/or surgery seen at the INNN and the HE-IMSS, respectively. These costs increased to US$ 2506 (95% CI: 1797-3215) and US$ 2170 (95% CI: 1303-3037), respectively, for patients with a history of hospitalisation and/or surgery. The average annual per-patient indirect costs were US$ 246 (95% CI: 165-324) and US$ 114 (95% CI: 51-178), respectively, using minimum salary wages for individuals not officially employed. The total annual cost for patients who had and had not been hospitalised and/or undergone a surgical procedure for the diagnosis or treatment of NCC corresponded to 212% and 41% of an annual minimum wage salary, respectively. The disease tends to affect rural socioeconomically disadvantaged populations and creates health disparities and significant economic losses in Mexico. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Overinterpretation is common in pathological diagnosis of appendix cancer during patient referral for oncologic care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A Valasek

    Full Text Available Low-grade appendiceal mucinous neoplasm (LAMN and appendiceal adenocarcinoma are known to cause the majority of pseudomyxoma peritonei (PMP, i.e. mucinous ascites; however, recognition and proper classification of these neoplasms can be difficult despite established diagnostic criteria.To determine the pathological diagnostic concordance for appendix neoplasia and related lesions during patient referral to an academic medical center specialized in treating patients with PMP.The anatomic pathology laboratory information system was searched to identify cases over a two-year period containing appendix specimens with mucinous neoplasia evaluated by an outside pathology group and by in-house slide review at a single large academic medical center during patient referral.161 cases containing appendix specimens were identified over this period. Forty-six of 161 cases (28.6% contained appendiceal primary neoplasia or lesions. Of these, the originating pathologist diagnosed 23 cases (50% as adenocarcinoma and 23 cases (50% as LAMN; however, the reference pathologist diagnosed 29 cases (63.0% as LAMN, 13 cases (28.3% as adenocarcinoma, and 4 cases (8.7% as ruptured simple mucocele. Importantly, for cases in which the originating pathologist rendered a diagnosis of adenocarcinoma, the reference pathologist rendered a diagnosis of adenocarcinoma (56.5%, 13 of 23, LAMN (39.1%, 9 of 23, or simple mucocele (4.3%, 1 of 23. The overall diagnostic concordance rate for these major classifications was 71.7% (33 of 46 with an unweighted observed kappa value of 0.48 (95% CI, 0.27-0.69, consistent with moderate interobserver agreement. All of the observed discordance (28.3% for major classifications could be attributed to over-interpretation. In addition, the majority of LAMN cases (65.5% had potential diagnostic deficiencies including over-interpretation as adenocarcinoma and lacking or discordant risk stratification (i.e. documentation of extra-appendiceal neoplastic

  16. Causes of referral to the first endocrine visit of patients with thyroid carcinoma in a mildly iodine-deficient area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marina, Michela; Ceda, Gian Paolo; Aldigeri, Raffaella; Ceresini, Graziano

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the causes of the first referral to an endocrine visit of patients with thyroid cancer in a mildly iodine-deficient area and to correlate them with prognostic features. We studied 298 consecutive patients (64 M and 234 F) with thyroid cancer. Of these, 281 had differentiated thyroid cancer. The causes of referral were categorized as follows: (Group A) clinical evidence of a neck lump; (Group B) incidental imaging in subjects without known thyroid diseases; (Group C) incidental imaging during a workup of thyroid disorders. Also, in differentiated thyroid cancer cases, clinical, histomorphologic, and prognostic parameters were compared among the three different groups of referral causes. In both total thyroid cancer and differentiated thyroid cancer cohorts, Group A, B, and C accounted for about 25, 35, and 40 % of causes, respectively. Considering the differentiated thyroid cancer, in Group B, ultrasound accounted for 94 % of cases, with 73 % resulting from screening or serendipitous study. Within a median follow-up of 5.6 [IQR: 2.7-9.5] years, disease-free survival was significantly lower in patients of Group A (Log-Rank test p = 0.030 vs. the other groups of causes). However, at the Cox multivariate analysis only male sex (p = 0.002) and stage (p = 0.005), but not referral cause, resulted independent predictors of events. In patients without known thyroid disease, unjustified thyroid ultrasound represents the main cause of referral of thyroid cancer patients to the first endocrine visit. The fact that this is not related to the disease-free survival strengthens the concept of the uselessness of thyroid cancer screening.

  17. Case-Mix Adjustment of the Bereaved Family Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutney-Lee, Ann; Carpenter, Joan; Smith, Dawn; Thorpe, Joshua; Tudose, Alina; Ersek, Mary

    2018-01-01

    Surveys of bereaved family members are increasingly being used to evaluate end-of-life (EOL) care and to measure organizational performance in EOL care quality. The Bereaved Family Survey (BFS) is used to monitor EOL care quality and benchmark performance in the Veterans Affairs (VA) health-care system. The objective of this study was to develop a case-mix adjustment model for the BFS and to examine changes in facility-level scores following adjustment, in order to provide fair comparisons across facilities. We conducted a cross-sectional secondary analysis of medical record and survey data from veterans and their family members across 146 VA medical centers. Following adjustment using model-based propensity weighting, the mean change in the BFS-Performance Measure score across facilities was -0.6 with a range of -2.6 to 0.6. Fifty-five (38%) facilities changed within ±0.5 percentage points of their unadjusted score. On average, facilities that benefited most from adjustment cared for patients with greater comorbidity burden and were located in urban areas in the Northwest and Midwestern regions of the country. Case-mix adjustment results in minor changes to facility-level BFS scores but allows for fairer comparisons of EOL care quality. Case-mix adjustment of the BFS positions this National Quality Forum-endorsed measure for use in public reporting and internal quality dashboards for VA leadership and may inform the development and refinement of case-mix adjustment models for other surveys of bereaved family members.

  18. Inappropriately Timed Pediatric Orthopaedic Referrals From the Emergency Department Result in Unnecessary Appointments and Financial Burden for Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Taylor J; Blumberg, Todd J; Shah, Apurva S; Sankar, Wudbhav N

    2018-03-01

    Musculoskeletal injuries are among the most common reasons for emergency department (ED) visits in the pediatric population. Many such injuries can be managed with a single follow-up outpatient visit. However, untimely (ie, premature) referrals by emergency physicians to orthopaedic surgeons are common and may inadvertently create need for a second visit, generating unnecessary expenditures. We sought to elucidate the cost of premature musculoskeletal follow-up visits to the patients, families, and the health care system. We performed a retrospective review of pediatric patients with acute musculoskeletal injuries referred from our ED (without a formal orthopaedic consult) to our outpatient clinic. Patients were retrospectively reviewed in a consecutive fashion. The appropriateness of the recommended follow-up time interval was determined for each patient, and the direct and indirect cost of the inappropriate services were calculated utilizing a combination of traditional cost accounting techniques and time-driven activity-based costing. The characteristics of patients with appropriate and untimely follow-up referrals were compared. Two hundred consecutive referrals from the ED were reviewed. Overall, 96.5% of the follow-up visits recommended by the ED were premature, which led 106 (53%) patients to require a second visit to complete their clinical care. Patients who required a second visit were significantly younger (P=0.005), more likely to be male (P=0.042), more likely to have a fracture (Pcost of $342.93 per patient. Untimely referrals for follow-up of acute pediatric musculoskeletal conditions are very common and represent a significant financial burden to patients, families, and the health care system. Over 40% of unnecessary visits resulted from just 3 diagnoses. Improved orthopaedic follow-up guidelines, particularly for these readily recognizable conditions, and feedback to referring providers may reduce poorly timed clinic visits and decrease costs in

  19. Patient-Reported Outcomes following Breast Conservation Therapy and Barriers to Referral for Partial Breast Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrouwe, Sebastian Q; Somogyi, Ron B; Snell, Laura; McMillan, Catherine; Vesprini, Danny; Lipa, Joan E

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the self-reported aesthetic outcome of breast conservation therapy in a generalized sample of patients, and to describe potential barriers to referral for partial breast reconstruction. Consecutive breast conservation therapy patients completing radiotherapy over a 1-year period at a regional cancer center were identified. Eligible patients were contacted by means of mail/e-mail and invited to participate. Participants completed the BREAST-Q breast conservation therapy module along with a questionnaire examining feelings about breast reconstruction. Multiple regression analysis was performed using the satisfaction with breasts scale as the dependent variable. Surveys were completed by 185 of 592 eligible participants (response rate, 31.3 percent; mean age, 61 years) an average of 38 months after lumpectomy. The mean score for the BREAST-Q satisfaction with breasts scale was 59 of 100. Younger age (p = 0.038), lumpectomy reexcision (p = 0.018), and lumpectomy at a nonacademic center (p = 0.026) were significantly associated with lower satisfaction. Bra size, months from lumpectomy, and tumor quadrant/size were not significantly associated with satisfaction (p > 0.05). The most common statements regarding reconstruction were "I don't feel the need for it" (60.0 percent), "I don't like the thought of having breast implants" (22.7 percent), and "I don't want any more surgeon/doctor visits" (22.2 percent). Before lumpectomy, only 1.6 percent had a consultation for reconstruction, and only 22.7 percent were aware of this option. If offered, 33.1 percent of patients would have attended this consultation. There is an unmet demand for partial breast reconstruction, with an opportunity to advocate and increase awareness on behalf of patients undergoing breast conservation therapy.

  20. Is Case-Mix Adjustment Necessary for an Expanded Dialysis Bundle?

    OpenAIRE

    Hirth, Richard A.; Wolfe, Robert A.; Wheeler, John R.C.; Roys, Erik C.; Tedeschi, Philip J.; Pozniak, Alyssa S.; Wright, Glenn T.

    2003-01-01

    Congress has required CMS to expand the Medicare outpatient prospective payment system (PPS) for dialysis services to include as many drugs and diagnostic procedures provided to end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients as possible. One important implementation question is whether dialysis facility case mix should be reflected in payment. We use fiscal year (FY) 2000 cost report and patient billing and clinical data to determine the relationship between costs and case mix, as represented by sev...

  1. Written advice can provide a safe and acceptable alternative to new patient assessment for selected referrals to haematologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganly, Peter S; Keeman, Helen; Spearing, Ruth L; Smith, Mark P; Patton, Nigel; Merriman, Eileen G; Gibbons, Steve S

    2008-01-07

    To measure the safety and acceptability of providing written advice (WA) for selected patients referred to a haematology service, as an alternative to inpatient or outpatient assessment. Review of the initial management and subsequent course of patients newly referred to a tertiary referral hospital in Christchurch, New Zealand, between 16 October 2003 and 8 June 2006. Structured questionnaires were sent to all referring doctors and patients recently managed with WA. Numbers and diagnoses of patients managed with WA, early assessment or delayed assessment; re-referral and treatment details; characteristics of WA letters; and opinions of referring doctors and their patients on the WA process. 26% of new referrals (714/2785) were managed with prompt WA, while 16% (455/2785) received the alternative of delayed assessment. After a median follow-up of 23 months (range, 8-40 months), 13% of those managed with WA (91/714) were re-referred back to the same haematologists; 7% (52/714) were assessed in hospital and 2% (15/714) eventually required treatment. There were no deaths due to haematological causes. Over 90% of responding referring doctors said the WA process was rapid and effective, and 77% of recently managed patients were pleased to be treated by their own doctors. Using WA to manage a substantial minority of patients referred to haematologists can be rapid and safe. It is widely accepted by referring doctors.

  2. Prevalence of Cannabis Residues in Psychiatric Patients: A Case Study of Two Mental Health Referral Hospitals in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Epaenetus A. Awuzu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Various studies have reported that abuse of cannabis is a risk factor for psychosis. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of delta 9-tetrahydrocanabinol (Δ 9 -THC, a major metabolite of cannabis, in psychiatric patients in Uganda, and to assess the diagnostic capacity of two referral mental health hospitals to screen patients for exposure to cannabis in Uganda. Socio-demographic characteristics of the patients were collected through questionnaires and review of medical records. Urine samples were collected from 100 patients and analyzed using Δ 9 -THC immunochromatographic kit (Standard Diagnostics®, South Korea. Seventeen percent of the patients tested positive for Δ 9 -THC residues in their urine. There was strong association ( p < 0.05 between history of previous abuse of cannabis and presence of Δ 9 -THC residues in the urine. Alcohol, cocaine, heroin, pethidine, tobacco, khat and kuber were the other substances abused in various combinations. Both referral hospitals lacked laboratory diagnostic kits for detection of cannabis in psychiatric patients. In conclusion, previous abuse of cannabis is associated with occurrence of the residues in psychiatric patients, yet referral mental health facilities in Uganda do not have the appropriate diagnostic kits for detection of cannabis residues as a basis for evidence-based psychotherapy.

  3. Admission factors associated with hospital mortality in patients with haematological malignancy admitted to UK adult, general critical care units: a secondary analysis of the ICNARC Case Mix Programme Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampshire, Peter A; Welch, Catherine A; McCrossan, Lawrence A; Francis, Katharine; Harrison, David A

    2009-01-01

    Patients with haematological malignancy admitted to intensive care have a high mortality. Adverse prognostic factors include the number of organ failures, invasive mechanical ventilation and previous bone marrow transplantation. Severity-of-illness scores may underestimate the mortality of critically ill patients with haematological malignancy. This study investigates the relationship between admission characteristics and outcome in patients with haematological malignancies admitted to intensive care units (ICUs) in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, and assesses the performance of three severity-of-illness scores in this population. A secondary analysis of the Intensive Care National Audit and Research Centre (ICNARC) Case Mix Programme Database was conducted on admissions to 178 adult, general ICUs in England, Wales and Northern Ireland between 1995 and 2007. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with hospital mortality. The Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) II and ICNARC score were evaluated for discrimination (the ability to distinguish survivors from nonsurvivors); and the APACHE II, SAPS II and ICNARC mortality probabilities were evaluated for calibration (the accuracy of the estimated probability of survival). There were 7,689 eligible admissions. ICU mortality was 43.1% (3,312 deaths) and acute hospital mortality was 59.2% (4,239 deaths). ICU and hospital mortality increased with the number of organ failures on admission. Admission factors associated with an increased risk of death were bone marrow transplant, Hodgkin's lymphoma, severe sepsis, age, length of hospital stay prior to intensive care admission, tachycardia, low systolic blood pressure, tachypnoea, low Glasgow Coma Score, sedation, PaO2:FiO2, acidaemia, alkalaemia, oliguria, hyponatraemia, hypernatraemia, low haematocrit, and uraemia. The ICNARC model had the best discrimination

  4. Admission factors associated with hospital mortality in patients with haematological malignancy admitted to UK adult, general critical care units: a secondary analysis of the ICNARC Case Mix Programme Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Patients with haematological malignancy admitted to intensive care have a high mortality. Adverse prognostic factors include the number of organ failures, invasive mechanical ventilation and previous bone marrow transplantation. Severity-of-illness scores may underestimate the mortality of critically ill patients with haematological malignancy. This study investigates the relationship between admission characteristics and outcome in patients with haematological malignancies admitted to intensive care units (ICUs) in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, and assesses the performance of three severity-of-illness scores in this population. Methods A secondary analysis of the Intensive Care National Audit and Research Centre (ICNARC) Case Mix Programme Database was conducted on admissions to 178 adult, general ICUs in England, Wales and Northern Ireland between 1995 and 2007. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with hospital mortality. The Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) II and ICNARC score were evaluated for discrimination (the ability to distinguish survivors from nonsurvivors); and the APACHE II, SAPS II and ICNARC mortality probabilities were evaluated for calibration (the accuracy of the estimated probability of survival). Results There were 7,689 eligible admissions. ICU mortality was 43.1% (3,312 deaths) and acute hospital mortality was 59.2% (4,239 deaths). ICU and hospital mortality increased with the number of organ failures on admission. Admission factors associated with an increased risk of death were bone marrow transplant, Hodgkin's lymphoma, severe sepsis, age, length of hospital stay prior to intensive care admission, tachycardia, low systolic blood pressure, tachypnoea, low Glasgow Coma Score, sedation, PaO2:FiO2, acidaemia, alkalaemia, oliguria, hyponatraemia, hypernatraemia, low haematocrit, and uraemia. The ICNARC

  5. Identification and Referral of Patients at Risk for Post-traumatic Stress Disorder: A Literature Review and Retrospective Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolduc, Aaron; Hwang, Brice; Hogan, Christopher; Bhalla, Varun K; Nesmith, Elizabeth; Medeiros, Regina; Alexander, Cassie; Holsten, Steven B

    2015-09-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a well-established psychological disorder after severe traumatic injury but remains poorly recognized. Recent changes in the "Resources for Optimal Care of the Injured Trauma Patient 2014" stress the need for comprehensive screening and referral for PTSD and depression after injury. Our purpose was to review the current PTSD literature and perform a retrospective chart review to evaluate screening at our institution. We hypothesized a lack of documentation and thus referral of these patients to mental health professionals. We performed a literature review of 43 publications of risk factors for PTSD in the civilian adult population followed by a retrospective review. Records were analyzed for basic demographics, risk factors found in the literature, and referrals to mental health providers. Risk factors included amputation, dissociative symptoms, female gender, history of mental health disorder, and peri-traumatic emotionality. Traumatic amputation status and gender were recorded in all patients. History of mental health disorder was present in 11.5 per cent patients, absent in 80.75 per cent, and not recorded in 7.75 per cent with an overall documentation of 91.75 per cent. Dissociative symptoms and peri-traumatic emotionality were recorded in 0.5 per cent and 1.0 per cent of patients, respectively. Only 13 patients of 400 (3.25%) were referred to mental health professionals. Despite extensive evidence and literature supporting risk factors for the development of PTSD, identification and treatment at our level 1 trauma center is lacking. There is a need for consistent screening among trauma centers to identify PTSD risk factors and protocols for risk reduction and referrals for patients at risk.

  6. Associations between presence of relevant information in referrals to radiology and prevalence rates in patients with suspected pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedner, Charlotta; Sundgren, Pia C; Kelly, Aine Marie

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess if the presence of information including the pretest probability (Wells score), other known risk factors, and symptoms given on referrals for computed tomography (CT) pulmonary angiography correlated with prevalence rates for pulmonary embolism (PE). Also, to evaluate for differences between a university and a regional hospital setting regarding patient characteristics, amount of relevant information provided on referrals, and prevalence rates for pulmonary embolism. Retrospective review of all consecutive referrals (emergency room, inpatient, and outpatient) for CT performed on children and adults for suspected PE from two sites: a tertiary (university) hospital (site 1) and a secondary (regional) hospital (site 2) over a 5-year period. The overall prevalence rate was 510/3641 or 14% of all referrals. Significantly higher number of males had a positive CT compared to women (18% versus 12%, P relevant information on the referral and the probability for positive finding existed, a slight trend was noted (P = .09). In two categories, "hypoxia" and "signs of deep vein thrombosis," the presence of this information conferred a higher probability for pulmonary embolism, P information conferred a higher probability for pulmonary embolism. The amount of relevant clinical information on the request did not correlate with prevalence rates, which may reflect a lack of documentation on the part of emergency physicians who may use a "gestalt" approach. Request forms likely did not capture all relevant patient risks and many factors may interact with each other, both positively and negatively. Pretest probability estimations were rarely performed, despite their inclusion in major society guidelines. Copyright © 2013 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Global Imaging referral guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawooya, M.; Perez, M.; Lau, L.; Reeed, M.

    2010-01-01

    The medical imaging specialists called for global referral guidelines which would be made available to referring doctors. These referral guidelines should be:- Applicable in different health care settings, including resource-poor settings; Inclusive in terms of the range of clinical conditions; User-friendly and accessible (format/media); Acceptable to stakeholders, in particular to the referrers as the main target audience. To conceive evidence-based medicine as an integration of best research evidence with clinical expertise and patient values. The Direct recipients of the Referral Guidelines would be:- Referrers: general practitioners / family doctors; paediatricians; emergency department doctors; other specialists and health workers. Providers (medical imaging practitioners): radiologists; nuclear medicine physicians; radiographers; other appropriately qualified practitioners providing diagnostic imaging services. For the Referral Guidelines to be effective there need to be: Credibility evidence-based Practicality end user involvement Context local resources, disease profiles Endorsement, opinion leaders Implementation- policy, education, CPOE - Monitoring of the use clinical audit, report feedback. The aim of the Referral Guidelines Project was to: Produce global referral guidelines that are evidence-based, cost effective and appropriate for the local setting, and include consideration of available equipment and expertise (RGWG; SIGs); Include supporting information about radiation doses, potential risks, protection of children and pregnant women (introductory chapter); Facilitate the implementation of the guidelines through guidance and tools (e.g. implementation guides, checklists, capacity building tools, guides on stakeholders engagement, audit support criteria); Conduct pilot testing in different clinical settings from each of the six WHO regions; Promote the inclusion of the referral guidelines in the curricula of medical schools; Develop and implement

  8. Barriers and Motivators for Referral of Patients with Suspected Lynch Syndrome to Cancer Genetic Services: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yen Y.; Fitzgerald, Lisa J.

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the views of general practitioners and specialists on their referral of patients with suspected Lynch syndrome to cancer genetic services. Using a purposive maximum variation sampling strategy, we conducted semi-structured interviews face-to-face with 28 general practitioners and specialists in public or private hospitals and specialist clinics between March and August 2011. General practitioners and specialists were recruited in a major metropolitan area in Australia. Interview transcripts were reviewed by two independent researchers, and thematic analysis was performed using NVivo10 software. The main barriers and motivators identified were: (1) clinician-related (e.g., familiarity with Lynch syndrome and family history knowledge); (2) patient-related (e.g., patients’ interests and personal experience with cancer); and (3) organizational-related (e.g., access to services, guidelines and referral pathway). Referral of patients with suspected Lynch syndrome to cancer genetic services is motivated and hindered by a range of individual, interpersonal and organizational factors. In order to improve the care and quality of life of patients and family with suspected Lynch syndrome, further research is needed to develop supportive tools for clinicians. PMID:25562140

  9. Barriers and Motivators for Referral of Patients with Suspected Lynch Syndrome to Cancer Genetic Services: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen Y. Tan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the views of general practitioners and specialists on their referral of patients with suspected Lynch syndrome to cancer genetic services. Using a purposive maximum variation sampling strategy, we conducted semi-structured interviews face-to-face with 28 general practitioners and specialists in public or private hospitals and specialist clinics between March and August 2011. General practitioners and specialists were recruited in a major metropolitan area in Australia. Interview transcripts were reviewed by two independent researchers, and thematic analysis was performed using NVivo10 software. The main barriers and motivators identified were: (1 clinician-related (e.g., familiarity with Lynch syndrome and family history knowledge; (2 patient-related (e.g., patients’ interests and personal experience with cancer; and (3 organizational-related (e.g., access to services, guidelines and referral pathway. Referral of patients with suspected Lynch syndrome to cancer genetic services is motivated and hindered by a range of individual, interpersonal and organizational factors. In order to improve the care and quality of life of patients and family with suspected Lynch syndrome, further research is needed to develop supportive tools for clinicians.

  10. Referral and Receipt of Treatment for Hepatocellular Carcinoma in United States Veterans: Effect of Patient and Non-Patient Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davila, Jessica A.; Kramer, Jennifer R.; Duan, Zhigang; Richardson, Peter A.; Tyson, Gia L.; Sada, Yvonne H.; Kanwal, Fasiha; El-Serag, Hashem B.

    2014-01-01

    Background The delivery of treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) could be influenced by place of HCC diagnosis (hospitalization vs. outpatient), subspecialty referral following diagnosis, as well as physician and facility factors. We conducted a study to examine the effect of patient and non-patient factors on the place of HCC diagnosis, referral, and treatment in Veterans Administration (VA) hospitals in the United States. Methods Using the VA Hepatitis C Clinical Case Registry, we identified HCV-infected patients who developed HCC during 1998–2006. All cases were verified and staged according to Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) criteria. The main outcomes were place of HCC diagnosis, being seen by a surgeon or oncologist, and treatment. We examined factors related to these outcomes using hierarchical logistic regression. These factors included HCC stage, HCC surveillance, physician specialty, and facility factors, in addition to risk factors, co-morbidity, and liver disease indicators. Results Approximately 37.2% of the 1,296 patients with HCC were diagnosed during hospitalization, 31.0% were seen by a surgeon or oncologist, and 34.3% received treatment. Being seen by a surgeon or oncologist was associated with surveillance (adjusted odds ratio (aOR)=1.47;95%CI:1.20–1.80) and varied by geography (1.74;1.09–2.77). Seeing a surgeon or oncologist was predictive of treatment (aOR=1.43;95%CI:1.24–1.66). There was a significant increase in treatment among patients who received surveillance (aOR=1.37; 95%CI:1.02–1.71), were seen by gastroenterology (1.65;1.21–2.24) or were diagnosed at a transplant facility (1.48;1.15–1.90). Conclusions Approximately 40% of patients were diagnosed during hospitalization. Most patients were not seen by a surgeon or oncologist for treatment evaluation and only 34% received treatment. Only receipt of HCC surveillance was associated with increased likelihood of outpatient diagnosis, being seen by a surgeon or

  11. Crude versus case-mix-adjusted control charts for safety monitoring in thyroid surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duclos, Antoine; Voirin, Nicolas; Touzet, Sandrine; Soardo, Pietro; Schott, Anne-Marie; Colin, Cyrille; Peix, Jean-Louis; Lifante, Jean-Christophe

    2010-12-01

    Patient-safety monitoring based on health-outcome indicators can lead to misinterpretation of changes in case mix. This study aimed to compare the detection of indicator variations between crude and case-mix-adjusted control charts using data from thyroid surgeries. The study population included each patient who underwent thyroid surgery in a teaching hospital from January 2006 to May 2008. Patient safety was monitored according to two indicators, which are immediately recognisable postoperative complications: recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy and hypocalcaemia. Each indicator was plotted monthly on a p-control chart using exact limits. The weighted κ statistic was calculated to measure the agreement between crude and case-mix-adjusted control charts. We evaluated the outcomes of 1405 thyroidectomies. The overall proportions of immediate recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy and hypocalcaemia were 7.4% and 20.5%, respectively. The proportion of agreement in the detection of indicator variations between the crude and case-mix-adjusted p-charts was 95% (95% CI 85% to 99%). The strength of the agreement was κ = 0.76 (95% CI 0.54 to 0.98). The single special cause of variation that occurred was only detected by the case-mix-adjusted p-chart. There was good agreement in the detection of indicator variations between crude and case-mix-adjusted p-charts. The joint use of crude and adjusted charts seems to be a reasonable approach to increase the accuracy of interpretation of variations in outcome indicators.

  12. Epidemiology, etiology and outcomes of burn patients in a Referral Burn Hospital, Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mehdi Soltan Dallal

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Burns and its complications are regarded as a major problem in the society. Skin injuries resulted from ultraviolet radiation, radioactivity, electricity or chemicals as well as respiratory damage from smoke inhalation are considered burns. This study aimed to determine the epidemiology and outcome of burn patients admitted to Motahari Hospital, Tehran, Iran. Methods: Two hundred patients with second-degree burns admitted to Motahari Referral Center of Burn in Tehran, Iran. They were studied during a period of 12 months from May 2012 to May 2013. During the first week of treatment swabs were collected from the burn wounds after cleaning the site with sterile normal saline. Samples were inoculated in blood agar and McConkey agar, then incubation at 37 C for 48 hours. Identification was carried out according to standard conventional biochemical tests. Treatment continued up to epithelial formation and wound healing. Results of microbial culture for each patient was recorded. Healing time of the burn wounds in patients was recorded in log books. Chi-square test and SPSS Software v.19 (IBM, NY, USA were used for data analysis. Results: Our findings indicate that the most causes of burns are hot liquids in 57% of cases and flammable liquid in 21% of cases. The most cases of burns were found to be in the range of 21 to 30 percent with 17.5% and 7% in male and female respectively. Gram-negative bacteria were dominated in 85.7% and among them pseudomonas spp. with 37.5% were the most common cause of infected burns, followed by Enterobacter, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Acinetobacter and Klebsiella spp. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that the most cause of burns in both sex is hot liquid. Men were more expose to burn than women and this might be due to the fact that men are involved in more dangerous jobs than female. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the most common organism encountered in burn infection.

  13. HIV quality report cards: impact of case-mix adjustment and statistical methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohl, Michael E; Richardson, Kelly K; Goto, Michihiko; Vaughan-Sarrazin, Mary; Schweizer, Marin L; Perencevich, Eli N

    2014-10-15

    There will be increasing pressure to publicly report and rank the performance of healthcare systems on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) quality measures. To inform discussion of public reporting, we evaluated the influence of case-mix adjustment when ranking individual care systems on the viral control quality measure. We used data from the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) HIV Clinical Case Registry and administrative databases to estimate case-mix adjusted viral control for 91 local systems caring for 12 368 patients. We compared results using 2 adjustment methods, the observed-to-expected estimator and the risk-standardized ratio. Overall, 10 913 patients (88.2%) achieved viral control (viral load ≤400 copies/mL). Prior to case-mix adjustment, system-level viral control ranged from 51% to 100%. Seventeen (19%) systems were labeled as low outliers (performance significantly below the overall mean) and 11 (12%) as high outliers. Adjustment for case mix (patient demographics, comorbidity, CD4 nadir, time on therapy, and income from VHA administrative databases) reduced the number of low outliers by approximately one-third, but results differed by method. The adjustment model had moderate discrimination (c statistic = 0.66), suggesting potential for unadjusted risk when using administrative data to measure case mix. Case-mix adjustment affects rankings of care systems on the viral control quality measure. Given the sensitivity of rankings to selection of case-mix adjustment methods-and potential for unadjusted risk when using variables limited to current administrative databases-the HIV care community should explore optimal methods for case-mix adjustment before moving forward with public reporting. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2014. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  14. Variation in fistula use across dialysis facilities: is it explained by case-mix?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangri, Navdeep; Moorthi, Ranjani; Tighiouhart, Hocine; Meyer, Klemens B; Miskulin, Dana C

    2010-02-01

    Arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) remain the preferred vascular access for hemodialysis patients. Dialysis facilities that fail to meet Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services goals cite patient case-mix as a reason for low AVF prevalence. This study aimed to determine the magnitude of the variability in AVF usage across dialysis facilities and the extent to which patient case-mix explains it. The vascular access used in 10,112 patients dialyzed at 173 Dialysis Clinic Inc. facilities from October 1 to December 31, 2004, was evaluated. The access in use was considered to be an AVF if it was used for >70% of hemodialysis treatments. Mixed-effects models with a random intercept for dialysis facilities evaluated the effect of facilities on AVF usage. Sequentially adjusted multivariate models measured the extent to which patient factors (case-mix) explain variation across facilities in AVF rates. 3787 patients (38%) were dialyzed using AVFs. There was a significant facility effect: 7.6% of variation in AVF use was attributable to facility. This was reduced to 7.1% after case-mix adjustment. There were no identified specific facility-level factors that explained the interfacility variation. AVF usage varies across dialysis facilities, and patient case-mix did not reduce this variation. In this study, 92% of the total variation in AVF usage was due to patient factors, but most were not measurable. A combination of patient factors and process indicators should be considered in adjudicating facility performance for this quality indicator.

  15. Increasing podiatry referrals for patients with inflammatory arthritis at a tertiary hospital in Singapore: A quality improvement project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, K; Cheung, P P; Rome, K; Santosa, A; Lahiri, M

    2017-06-01

    Foot disease is highly prevalent in people with inflammatory arthritis and is often under-recognized. Podiatry intervention can significantly reduce foot pain and disability, with timely access being the key factor. The aim of this study was to plan and implement a quality improvement project to identify the barriers to, and improve, uptake of podiatry services among patients with inflammatory arthritis-related foot problems seen at a tertiary hospital in Singapore. A 6-month quality improvement program was conducted by a team of key stakeholders using quality improvement tools to identify, implement and test several interventions designed to improve uptake of podiatry services. The number of patients referred for podiatry assessment was recorded on a weekly basis by an experienced podiatrist. The criterion for appropriate referral to podiatry was those patients with current or previous foot problems such as foot pain, swelling and deformity. Interventions included education initiatives, revised workflow, development of national guidelines for inflammatory arthritis, local podiatry guidelines for the management of foot and ankle problems, routine use of outcome measures, and introduction of a fully integrated rheumatology-podiatry service with reduced cost package. Referral rates increased from 8% to 11%, and were sustained beyond the study period. Complete incorporation of podiatry into the rheumatology consultation as part of the multidisciplinary team package further increased referrals to achieve the target of full uptake of the podiatry service. Through a structured quality improvement program, referrals to podiatry increased and improved the uptake and acceptance of rheumatology-podiatry services. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparing colon cancer outcomes: The impact of low hospital case volume and case-mix adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, C; Lingsma, H F; van Leersum, N; Tollenaar, R A E M; Wouters, M W; Steyerberg, E W

    2015-08-01

    When comparing performance across hospitals it is essential to consider the noise caused by low hospital case volume and to perform adequate case-mix adjustment. We aimed to quantify the role of noise and case-mix adjustment on standardized postoperative mortality and anastomotic leakage (AL) rates. We studied 13,120 patients who underwent colon cancer resection in 85 Dutch hospitals. We addressed differences between hospitals in postoperative mortality and AL, using fixed (ignoring noise) and random effects (incorporating noise) logistic regression models with general and additional, disease specific, case-mix adjustment. Adding disease specific variables improved the performance of the case-mix adjustment models for postoperative mortality (c-statistic increased from 0.77 to 0.81). The overall variation in standardized mortality ratios was similar, but some individual hospitals changed considerably. For the standardized AL rates the performance of the adjustment models was poor (c-statistic 0.59 and 0.60) and overall variation was small. Most of the observed variation between hospitals was actually noise. Noise had a larger effect on hospital performance than extended case-mix adjustment, although some individual hospital outcome rates were affected by more detailed case-mix adjustment. To compare outcomes between hospitals it is crucial to consider noise due to low hospital case volume with a random effects model. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Radiologists' responses to inadequate referrals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lysdahl, Kristin Bakke; Hofmann, Bjoern Morten; Espeland, Ansgar

    2010-01-01

    To investigate radiologists' responses to inadequate imaging referrals. A survey was mailed to Norwegian radiologists; 69% responded. They graded the frequencies of actions related to referrals with ambiguous indications or inappropriate examination choices and the contribution of factors preventing and not preventing an examination of doubtful usefulness from being performed as requested. Ninety-five percent (344/361) reported daily or weekly actions related to inadequate referrals. Actions differed among subspecialties. The most frequent were contacting the referrer to clarify the clinical problem and checking test results/information in the medical records. Both actions were more frequent among registrars than specialists and among hospital radiologists than institute radiologists. Institute radiologists were more likely to ask the patient for additional information and to examine the patient clinically. Factors rated as contributing most to prevent doubtful examinations were high risk of serious complications/side effects, high radiation dose and low patient age. Factors facilitating doubtful examinations included respect for the referrer's judgment, patient/next-of-kin wants the examination, patient has arrived, unreachable referrer, and time pressure. In summary, radiologists facing inadequate referrals considered patient safety and sought more information. Vetting referrals on arrival, easier access to referring clinicians, and time for radiologists to handle inadequate referrals may contribute to improved use of imaging. (orig.)

  18. Use of medicinal herbs by patients with severe asthma managed at a Referral Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tacila Pires Mega

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways that may lead to limitations in regular activities, to hospitalizations and a decrease in quality of life. Adherence to drug treatment is crucial for control of the disease. The use of medicinal herbs can reduce adherence to prescriptions, as the medication may be replaced by infusions or herbal products. The objective of this study was to evaluate the frequency of use of traditional herbal medicine among severe asthmatics in Salvador. Information on use of homemade remedies was obtained through application of a questionnaire during patient visits to a referral center. We also collected data on economic and social aspects as well as disease control. One hundred and forty-four (91,1% out of one hundred and fifty-eight patients evaluated used herbal medicines, but only 26.5% attributed improvement of asthma symptoms to this alternative treatment and only 8 had substituted a prescribed medication by herbal medicines. There was a trend towards lower adherence to prescription drug treatment in this group of patients. Despite the high frequency of use of medicinal herbs in our sample, there was no improvement in the asthma treatment in this population compared to non-users. Adherence to conventional drug treatment was satisfactory and there was neither reduction in asthma control nor increase in hospitalizations among the users of medicinal plants.A asma é uma enfermidade inflamatória crônica das vias aéreas que pode resultar em limitações nas atividades diárias, internações e prejuízo da qualidade de vida. A adesão ao tratamento medicamentoso é fundamental para o controle da doença. O uso de plantas medicinais pode reduzir a adesão ao tratamento prescrito, à medida que os medicamentos são substituídos por chás ou ervas. O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a frequência de uso de plantas medicinais entre asmáticos graves em Salvador. As informações sobre uso de rem

  19. Optimization of burn referrals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiband, Hanna K; Lundin, Kira; Alsbjørn, Bjarne

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Correct estimation of the severity of burns is important to obtain the right treatment of the patient and to avoid over- and undertriage. In this study we aimed to assess how often the guidelines for referral of burn injured patients are met at the national burn centre (NBC), Denmar...

  20. Substance use outcomes of patients served by a large US implementation of Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge, Arnie; Linford, Robyn; Bray, Jeremy

    2017-02-01

    To estimate changes in the substance use behaviors of patients who received services as part of the US Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's (SAMHSA) Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) grant program. We use a pre-post design and performance monitoring data collected by SBIRT organizations. For a sample of 17 575 patients, we compare pre-SBIRT substance use with substance use 6 months after receipt of SBIRT services. SBIRT's correlation with changes in substance use was estimated using generalized linear mixed models to account for the clustering of patients within health-care facility and US state. From pre- to post-SBIRT we found large and statistically significant decreases for almost every measure of substance use. Model-adjusted means indicate that the prevalence of alcohol use was lower 6 months later by 35.6%, heavy drinking by 43.4% and illicit drug use by 75.8%. Greater intervention intensity was associated with larger decreases in substance use. The study design does not support causal conclusions and estimated decreases in reported substance use are due, at least in part, to a well-known set of confounders and natural substance use patterns that may be unrelated to any particular SBIRT intervention. Compared with previously published findings on the Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment grant program, our estimates of substance use reduction were smaller, but still consistently large in absolute magnitude and within ranges of estimates from past trials of Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment. © 2017 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  1. Assessment of Referral and Chemotherapy Treatment Patterns for Elderly Patients With Non-small-Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawe, David E; Pond, Gregory R; Ellis, Peter M

    2016-11-01

    Physiologic changes of aging in combination with greater comorbidity could lead to treatment nihilism for elderly patients (≥ 70 years old) with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Randomized trials have shown improved survival with chemotherapy since 1999, but it remains unclear whether these data have translated into practice. We conducted a retrospective, population-based cohort study of NSCLC cases diagnosed in Ontario, Canada from 2000 to 2010. We compared referral and treatment patterns among patients aged treatment with chemotherapy. Of 61,646 patients with NSCLC, 32,131 (52.1%) were ≥ 70 years. Fewer adenocarcinomas were diagnosed in the elderly (29.8% vs. 44%), and more elderly patients lacked microscopic confirmation of malignancy (20.1% vs. 6.2%). Charlson co-morbidity scores ≥ 2 (14.0% vs. 7.4%) were higher in the elderly. Only 59.5% of elderly patients with NSCLC were referred to a medical oncologist, versus 78.5% of younger patients. Elderly patients were less likely to receive chemotherapy (18.3% vs. 46.7%), even among those referred to a medical oncologist (30.1% vs. 58.6%). Neither referral nor treatment changed substantially over time. The elderly also had a shorter median survival (5.8 vs. 9.6 months); however, there was less difference in median survival (13.6 vs. 14.9 months) among patients receiving chemotherapy. Elderly patients are less likely to be considered for systemic therapy for NSCLC, and evidence of benefit has had minimal impact on practice. We believe this disparity could be improved through systematically using tools to comprehensively assess elderly patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. HEMS inter-facility transfer: a case-mix analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Rocco, Damien; Pasquier, Mathieu; Albrecht, Eric; Carron, Pierre-Nicolas; Dami, Fabrice

    2018-05-16

    Helicopter emergency medical services (HEMS) are popular rescue systems despite inconsistent evidence in the scientific literature to support their use for primary interventions, as well as for inter-facility transfer (IFT). There is little research about IFT by HEMS, hence questions remain about the appropriateness of this method of transport. The aim of this study was to describe a case-mix of operational and medical characteristics for IFT activity of a sole HEMS base, and identify indicators of over-triage. This is a retrospective study on HEMS IFT over 36 months, from January 1st 2013 to December 31st 2015. Medical and operational data from the database of the Emergency Department of Lausanne University Hospital, which provides the emergency physicians for this helicopter base, were reviewed. It included distance and time of flight transport, type of care during flight, and estimated distance of transport if conducted by ground. There were 2194 HEMS missions including 979 IFT (44.6%). Most transfers involved adults (> 17 years old; 799 patients, 81.6%). Forty patients (4.1%) were classified as having benefitted from resuscitation or life-saving measures performed in flight, 615 (62.8%) from emergency treatment and 324 (33.1%) from simple clinical examination. The median distance by air between hospitals was 35.4 km. The estimated median distance by road was 47.7 km. The median duration time from origin to destination by air was 12 min. This case-mix of IFTs by HEMS presents a high severity. There are many signs in favour of over-triage. We propose indicators to help choosing whether HEMS is the most appropriate mean of transport to perform the transfer regarding patient condition, geography, and medical competences available aboard ground ambulances; this may reduce over-triage.

  3. Primary care physician management, referral, and relations with specialists concerning patients at risk for cancer due to family history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, M E; Flynn, B S; Stockdale, A

    2013-01-01

    Risk stratification based on family history is a feature of screening guidelines for a number of cancers and referral guidelines for genetic counseling/testing for cancer risk. Our aim was to describe primary care physician perceptions of their role in managing cancer risk based on family history. Structured interviews were conducted by a medical anthropologist with primary care physicians in 3 settings in 2 north-eastern states. Transcripts were systematically analyzed by a research team to identify major themes expressed by participants. Forty interviews were conducted from May 2003 through May 2006. Physicians provided a diversity of views on roles in management of cancer risk based on family history, management practices and patient responses to risk information. They also provided a wide range of perspectives on criteria used for referral to specialists, types of specialists referred to and expected management roles for referred patients. Some primary care physicians appeared to make effective use of family history information for cancer risk management, but many in this sample did not. Increased focus on efficient assessment tools based on recognized guidelines, accessible guides to management options, and patient education and decision aids may be useful directions to facilitate broader use of family history information for cancer risk management. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. A comparison of patients with major depressive disorder recruited through newspaper advertising versus consultation referrals for clinical drug trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, C A; Hooper, C L; Bakish, D

    1997-01-01

    Difficulties in recruiting patients for clinical trials have plagued investigators for many years. One concern is the generalizability of clinical trial results to community practice, that is, whether volunteers recruited through advertising are homogeneous with those seeking treatment in a clinical setting. This article retrospectively compares the baseline characteristics of patients recruited through newspaper advertisements with those recruited through consultation referrals by reviewing the charts of 54 patients enrolled in two clinical trials for major depressive disorder (MDD). We examined demographic data, background information, clinical histories, and baseline status. Results indicated homogeneity for most variables. The consultation group was significantly more likely to have had previous treatment for the current episode of depression. These results suggest that, although the advertisement and consultation groups were very similar, the drug naivety of the advertisement group may make them a preferred source in terms of generalizability to community practice.

  5. Cost-effectiveness implications based on a comparison of nursing home and home health case mix.

    OpenAIRE

    Kramer, A M; Shaughnessy, P W; Pettigrew, M L

    1985-01-01

    Case-mix differences between 653 home health care patients and 650 nursing home patients, and between 455 Medicare home health patients and 447 Medicare nursing home patients were assessed using random samples selected from 20 home health agencies and 46 nursing homes in 12 states in 1982 and 1983. Home health patients were younger, had shorter lengths of stay, and were less functionally disabled than nursing home patients. Traditional long-term care problems requiring personal care were more...

  6. Development of a Medicaid Behavioral Health Case-Mix Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robst, John

    2009-01-01

    Many Medicaid programs have either fully or partially carved out mental health services. The evaluation of carve-out plans requires a case-mix model that accounts for differing health status across Medicaid managed care plans. This article develops a diagnosis-based case-mix adjustment system specific to Medicaid behavioral health care. Several…

  7. The QUIT-PRIMO provider-patient Internet-delivered smoking cessation referral intervention: a cluster-randomized comparative effectiveness trial: study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ford Daniel E

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although screening for tobacco use is increasing with electronic health records and standard protocols, other tobacco-control activities, such as referral of patients to cessation resources, is quite low. In the QUIT-PRIMO study, an online referral portal will allow providers to enter smokers' email addresses into the system. Upon returning home, the smokers will receive automated emails providing education about tobacco cessation and encouragement to use the patient smoking cessation website (with interactive tools, educational resources, motivational email messages, secure messaging with a tobacco treatment specialist, and online support group. Methods The informatics system will be evaluated in a comparative effectiveness trial of 160 community-based primary care practices, cluster-randomized at the practice level. In the QUIT-PRIMO intervention, patients will be provided a paper information-prescription referral and then "e-referred" to the system. In the comparison group, patients will receive only the paper-based information-prescription referral with the website address. Once patients go to the website, they are subsequently randomized within practices to either a standard patient smoking cessation website or an augmented version with access to a tobacco treatment specialist online, motivational emails, and an online support group. We will compare intervention and control practice participation (referral rates and patient participation (proportion referred who go to the website. We will then compare the effectiveness of the standard and augmented patient websites. Discussion Our goal is to evaluate an integrated informatics solution to increase access to web-delivered smoking cessation support. We will analyze the impact of this integrated system in terms of process (provider e-referral and patient login and patient outcomes (six-month smoking cessation. Trial Registration Web-delivered Provider Intervention for

  8. Impact of investigations in general practice on timeliness of referral for patients subsequently diagnosed with cancer: analysis of national primary care audit data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, G P; Saunders, C L; Abel, G A; McPhail, S; Lyratzopoulos, G; Neal, R D

    2015-02-17

    For patients with symptoms of possible cancer who do not fulfil the criteria for urgent referral, initial investigation in primary care has been advocated in the United Kingdom and supported by additional resources. The consequence of this strategy for the timeliness of diagnosis is unknown. We analysed data from the English National Audit of Cancer Diagnosis in Primary Care on patients with lung (1494), colorectal (2111), stomach (246), oesophagus (513), pancreas (327), and ovarian (345) cancer relating to the ordering of investigations by the General Practitioner and their nature. Presenting symptoms were categorised according to National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidance on referral for suspected cancer. We used linear regression to estimate the mean difference in primary-care interval by cancer, after adjustment for age, gender, and the symptomatic presentation category. Primary-care investigations were undertaken in 3198/5036 (64%) of cases. The median primary-care interval was 16 days (IQR 5-45) for patients undergoing investigation and 0 days (IQR 0-10) for those not investigated. Among patients whose symptoms mandated urgent referral to secondary care according to NICE guidelines, between 37% (oesophagus) and 75% (pancreas) were first investigated in primary care. In multivariable linear regression analyses stratified by cancer site, adjustment for age, sex, and NICE referral category explained little of the observed prolongation associated with investigation. For six specified cancers, investigation in primary care was associated with later referral for specialist assessment. This effect was independent of the nature of symptoms. Some patients for whom urgent referral is mandated by NICE guidance are nevertheless investigated before referral. Reducing the intervals between test order, test performance, and reporting can help reduce the prolongation of primary-care intervals associated with investigation use. Alternative models of

  9. Anesthesia Preoperative Clinic Referral for Elevated Hba1c Reduces Complication Rate in Diabetic Patients Undergoing Total Joint Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallio, Peter J; Nolan, Jenea; Olsen, Amy C; Breakwell, Susan; Topp, Richard; Pagel, Paul S

    2015-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is risk factor for complications after orthopedic surgery. We tested the hypothesis that anesthesia preoperative clinic (APC) referral for elevated glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) reduces complication rate after total joint arthroplasty (TJA). Patients (n = 203) with and without DM were chosen from 1,237 patients undergoing TJA during 2006 - 12. Patients evaluated in the APC had surgery in 2006 - 8 regardless of HbA1c (uncontrolled). Those evaluated between in subsequent two-year intervals were referred to primary care for HbA1c ≥ 10% and ≥ 8%, respectively, to improve DM control before surgery. Complications and mortality were quantified postoperatively and at three, six, and twelve months. Length of stay (LOS) and patients requiring a prolonged LOS (> 5 days) were recorded. Patients (197 men, 6 women) underwent 71, 131, and 1 total hip, knee, and shoulder replacements, respectively. Patients undergoing TJA with uncontrolled HbA1c and those with HbA1c patients without DM. An increase in complication rate was observed in DM patients with uncontrolled HbA1c versus patients without DM (P patients with preoperative HbA1c that was uncontrolled or ≥ 10% required prolonged LOS versus those without DM (P diabetics undergoing TJA.

  10. Causes of delay in diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis in patients attending a referral hospital in Western Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayuo, P O; Diero, L O; Owino-Ong'or, W D; Mwangi, A W

    2008-06-01

    To determine the length of delays from onset of symptoms to initiation of treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB). Cross-sectional study. Chest/TB clinic, Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital (MTRH), Eldoret, Kenya. Newly diagnosed smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) patients. Two hundred and thirty patients aged between 12 and 80 (median; 28.5) years were included in the study. They comprised 148 (64.3%, median 30 years) males and 82 (35.7%, median 28 years) females. One hundred and two (44%) came from urban and 128 (56%) came from rural setting covering a median distance of 10 (range 0-100) kilometres and paying Kshs 20 (range 0-200) to facility. Cough was the commonest symptom reported by 228 (99.1%) of the patients followed by chest pain in 214 (80%). The mean patient delay was 11 +/- 17 weeks (range: 1-78 weeks) with no significant difference between males and females, the mean system delay was 3 +/- 5 weeks (range: 0-39 weeks). The median patient, health systems and total delays were 42, 2, and 44 days respectively for all the patients. Marital status, being knowledgeable about TB, distance to clinic and where help is sought first had significant effect on patient delay. Patient delay is the major contributor to delay in diagnosis and initiation of treatment of PTB among our patients. Therefore TB control programmes in this region must emphasise patient education regarding symptoms of tuberculosis and timely health seeking behaviour.

  11. Does routine psychosocial screening improve referral to psychosocial care providers and patient-radiotherapist communication? A cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braeken, Anna P B M; Lechner, Lilian; Eekers, Daniëlle B P; Houben, Ruud M A; van Gils, Francis C J M; Ambergen, Ton; Kempen, Gertrudis I J M

    2013-11-01

    This study tests whether using a screening instrument improves referral to psychosocial care providers (e.g. psychologist) and facilitates patient-radiotherapist communication. A cluster randomized controlled trial was used. Fourteen radiotherapists were randomly allocated to the experimental or control group and 568 of their patients received care in accordance with the group to which their radiotherapist was allocated. Patients in the experimental group were asked to complete a screening instrument before and at the end of the radiation treatment period. All patients were requested to complete questionnaires concerning patient-physician communication after the first consultation and concerning psychosocial care 3 and 12 months post-intervention. Patients who completed the screening instrument were referred to social workers at an earlier stage than patients who did not (Pcommunication. Our results suggest that a simple screening procedure can be valuable for the timely treatment of psychosocial problems in patients. Future efforts should be directed at appropriate timing of screening and enhancing physicians' awareness regarding the importance of identifying, discussing and treating psychosocial problems in cancer patients. Psychosocial screening can be enhanced by effective radiotherapist-patient communication. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The value of chest X-ray in the Scottish Referral Guidelines for suspected head and neck cancer in 2144 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fingland, P; Carswell, V; Tikka, T; Douglas, C M; Montgomery, J

    2018-04-30

    In Scotland, patients with suspected head and neck cancer are referred on the basis of the Scottish Referral Guidelines for Suspected Cancer, rather than the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidelines. A chest X-ray should be requested by the general practitioner at the same time as referral for persistent hoarseness. The evidence for this is level 4. This audit identified adherence to this recommendation and X-ray results. All 'urgent suspicion of cancer' referrals to the ENT department in the National Health Service Greater Glasgow and Clyde for 2015-2016 were audited. Persistent hoarseness for more than 3 weeks instigated referral in 318 patients (15.7 per cent). Chest X-ray was performed in 120 patients (38 per cent), which showed: no abnormality in 116 (96.7 per cent), features of infection in 2 (1.7 per cent) and something else in 2 patients (1.7 per cent). No chest X-ray altered the management of a patient. Performance of chest X-ray does not alter management and its removal from the Scottish Referral Guidelines for Suspected Cancer is recommended.

  13. Injuries and allegations of oral rape: A retrospective review of patients presenting to a London sexual assault referral centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brew-Graves, Emmeline; Morgan, Louise

    2015-08-01

    A retrospective review was carried out of patients seen at the Haven sexual assault referral centre in South East London between January 2009 and September 2010 to determine the frequency and nature of oral injuries found in people reporting oral rape. Ninety five eligible patients were identified and relevant information was extracted from standardised Haven forms completed during forensic medical examination. The main outcome measures were prevalence, type and location of oral injury. Eighteen (19%) were found to have sustained an oral injury. The most common injury was abrasions, followed by bruising and petechiae. The lips were the most common site of injury followed by the soft palate and the inside of the cheeks. It was concluded that injuries in the mouth were not common after an allegation of oral rape. Injuries were minor and did not require treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  14. Contrasting patterns of deficits in visuospatial memory and executive function in patients with major depression with and without ECT referral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsaltas, E; Kalogerakou, S; Papakosta, V-M; Kontis, D; Theochari, E; Koutroumpi, M; Anyfandi, E; Michopoulos, I; Poulopoulou, C; Papadimitriou, G; Oulis, P

    2011-05-01

    The pretreatment neuropsychological profile of drug-resistant patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) referred for electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) may differ from that of their drug-respondent MDD counterparts. Such differences could help in identifying distinct MDD subtypes, thus offering insights into the neuropathology underlying differential treatment responses. Depressed patients with ECT referral (ECTs), depressed patients with no ECT referral (NECTs) and non-psychiatric Controls (matched groups, n=15) were assessed with memory and executive function tests from the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB). ECTs scored significantly lower than NECTs in the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE; p=0.01). NECTs performed worse than Controls in the Paired Associates Learning (PAL) task (p<0.03; Control/NECT p<0.01) and the Spatial Recognition Memory (SRM) task (p<0.05; Controls/NECTs p<0.05); ECTs performed between Controls and NECTs, not differing from either. In the Intra/Extradimensional (IED) set-shifting task, ECTs performed worse that Controls and NECTS (IED: p<0.01; Controls/ECTs p<0.01), particularly in the shift phases, which suggests reduced attentional flexibility. In Stockings of Cambridge (SOC), ECTs abandoned the test early more often than Controls and NECTs (H=11, p<0.01) but ECTs who completed SOC performed comparably to the other two groups. A double dissociation emerged from the comparison of cognitive profiles of ECT and NECT patients. ECTs showed executive deficits, particularly in attentional flexibility, but mild deficits in tests of visuospatial memory. NECTs presented the opposite pattern. This suggests predominantly frontostriatal involvement in ECT versus temporal involvement in NECT depressives.

  15. Clinico-psycho-social profile of patients brought under consultation-liaison psychiatry care in a large tertiary care referral hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Patra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to access the clinico-psycho-social profile of patients brought under consultation-liaison (CL psychiatry care in a large tertiary care referral hospital. Materials and Methods: This study included all patients who were referred for CL psychiatry from among the inpatients in the hospital and the emergency department (during off working hours of the hospital over a period of 1 year. Data were obtained and analyzed in terms of where was the referral placed, by whom, the reason for placing the referral, the primary medical/surgical diagnosis of the patient, the presenting complaints, any past psychiatric history, the psychiatric diagnosis (as per the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Edition, the investigations advised and their reports, the treatment advised (psychotherapeutic and psychopharmacological, the sociodemographic profile of the patients, and the follow-up details. Results: A total of 157 patients were referred to the CL unit over the study period. Out of these, 125 patients were referred among the inpatients and 32 from the emergency department of the hospital. Majority of the patients were in the age group of 25–50 years and were male. The majority of the referrals were made by general physician; most of the referrals were placed from emergency department. The most common reason for referral was for altered sensorium and behavioral abnormalities. The most common diagnosis was delirium followed by depressive episode and alcohol dependence syndrome. Conclusion: There was higher representation of delirium and alcohol-related cases in our study compared to older studies.

  16. Treatment outcome in patients with presumed tubercular uveitis at a tertiary referral eye care centre in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Leslie; Kee, Aera; Yeo, Tun Hang; Dinesh, V G; Ho, Su Ling; Teoh, Stephen C; Agrawal, Rupesh

    2018-02-01

    To report the clinical features and outcome of patients with presumed tubercular uveitis (TBU). Retrospective analysis of patients with presumed TBU at a tertiary referral eye care centre in Singapore between 2007 and 2012 was done. Main outcome measures were failure of complete resolution of uveitis or recurrence of inflammation. Fifty three patients with mean age of 44.18 ± 15.26 years with 54.72% being males were included. 19 (35.85%) had bilateral involvement, with panuveitis and anterior uveitis being the most common presentations. 36 (67.92%) patients received antitubercular therapy (ATT), and 28 received concurrent systemic steroids. 15 (28.30%) eyes of 11 (30.55%) patients in the ATT group and 4 (21.05%) eyes of 3 (17.64%) patients in the non-ATT group had treatment failure (p value = 0.51). The use of ATT, with or without concurrent corticosteroid, may not have a statistically significant impact in improving treatment success in patients with presumed TBU.

  17. Drug-resistant tuberculosis in HIV-infected patients in a national referral hospital, Phnom Penh, Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walls, Genevieve; Bulifon, Sophie; Breysse, Serge; Daneth, Thol; Bonnet, Maryline; Hurtado, Northan; Molfino, Lucas

    2015-01-01

    There are no recent data on the prevalence of drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR TB) in Cambodia. We aim to describe TB drug resistance amongst adults with pulmonary and extra-pulmonary TB and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infection in a national referral hospital in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Between 22 November 2007 and 30 November 2009, clinical specimens from HIV-infected patients suspected of having TB underwent routine microscopy, Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture, and drug susceptibility testing. Laboratory and clinical data were collected for patients with positive M. tuberculosis cultures. M. tuberculosis was cultured from 236 HIV-infected patients. Resistance to any first-line TB drug occurred in 34.7% of patients; 8.1% had multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB). The proportion of MDR TB amongst new patients and previously treated patients was 3.7 and 28.9%, respectively (pCambodia may be higher than previously recognised, particularly amongst HIV-infected patients. Additional prevalence studies are needed. This study also illustrates the feasibility and utility of analysis of non-respiratory specimens in the diagnosis of TB, even in low-resource settings, and suggests that extra-pulmonary specimens should be included in TB diagnostic algorithms.

  18. Are patients' preferences regarding the place of treatment heard and addressed at the point of referral: an exploratory study based on observations of GP-patient consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victoor, Aafke; Noordman, Janneke; Sonderkamp, Johan A; Delnoij, Diana M J; Friele, Roland D; van Dulmen, Sandra; Rademakers, Jany J D J M

    2013-12-10

    Today, in several north-western European countries, patients are encouraged to choose, actively, a healthcare provider. However, patients often visit the provider that is recommended by their general practitioner (GP). The introduction of patient choice requires GPs to support patients to be involved, actively, in the choice of a healthcare provider. We aim to investigate whether policy on patient choice is reflected in practice, i.e. what the role of the patient is in their choices of healthcare providers at the point of referral and to what extent GPs' and patients' healthcare paths influence the role that patients play in the referral decision. In 2007-2008, we videotaped Dutch GP-patient consultations. For this study, we selected, at random, 72 videotaped consultations between 72 patients and 39 GPs in which the patient was referred to a healthcare provider. These were analysed using an observation protocol developed by the researchers. The majority of the patients had little or no input into the choice of a healthcare provider at the point of referral by their GP. Their GPs did not support them in actively choosing a provider and the patients often agreed with the provider that the GP proposed. Patients who were referred for diagnostic purposes seem to have had even less input into their choice of a provider than patients who were referred for treatment. We found that the GP chooses a healthcare provider on behalf of the patient in most consultations, even though policy on patient choice expects from patients that they choose, actively, a provider. On the one hand, this could indicate that the policy needs adjustments. On the other hand, adjustments may be needed to practice. For instance, GPs could help patients to make an active choice of provider. However, certain patients prefer to let their GP decide as their agent. Even then, GPs need to know patients' preferences, because in a principal-agent relationship, it is necessary that the agent is fully

  19. Does case-mix based reimbursement stimulate the development of process-oriented care delivery?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, L.; Dückers, M.L.A.; Wagner, C.; Merode, G.G. van

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Reimbursement based on the total care of a patient during an acute episode of illness is believed to stimulate management and clinicians to reduce quality problems like waiting times and poor coordination of care delivery. Although many studies already show that this kind of case-mix

  20. Clinical Model for NASH and Advanced Fibrosis in Adult Patients With Diabetes and NAFLD: Guidelines for Referral in NAFLD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazick, Jessica; Donithan, Michele; Neuschwander-Tetri, Brent A; Kleiner, David; Brunt, Elizabeth M; Wilson, Laura; Doo, Ed; Lavine, Joel; Tonascia, James; Loomba, Rohit

    2015-07-01

    Approximately 18 million people in the U.S. have coexisting type 2 diabetes and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). It is not known who among these patients has nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) with advanced fibrosis. Therefore, we aimed to determine factors that are associated with both NASH and advanced fibrosis in patients with diabetes and NAFLD in order to identify who should be prioritized for referral to a hepatologist for further diagnostic evaluation and treatment. This study was derived from the NASH Clinical Research Network studies and included 1,249 patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD (including a model development cohort of 346 patients and an independent validation cohort of 100 patients with type 2 diabetes as defined by the American Diabetes Association criteria). Outcome measures were presence of NASH or advanced fibrosis (stage 3 or 4) using cross-validated, by jackknife method, multivariable-adjusted area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) and 95% CI. The mean ± SD age and BMI of patients with diabetes and NAFLD was 52.5 ± 10.3 years and 35.8 ± 6.8 kg/m(2), respectively. The prevalence of NASH and advanced fibrosis was 69.2% and 41.0%, respectively. The model for NASH included white race, BMI, waist, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), Aspartate aminotransferase (AST), albumin, HbA1c, HOMA of insulin resistance, and ferritin with an AUROC of 0.80 (95% CI 0.75-0.84, P = 0.007). The specificity, sensitivity, negative predictive values (NPVs), and positive predictive values (PPVs) were 90.0%, 56.8%, 47.7%, and 93.2%, respectively, and the model correctly classified 67% of patients as having NASH. The model for predicting advanced fibrosis included age, Hispanic ethnicity, BMI, waist-to-hip ratio, hypertension, ALT-to-AST ratio, alkaline phosphatase, isolated abnormal alkaline phosphatase, bilirubin (total and direct), globulin, albumin, serum insulin, hematocrit, international normalized ratio, and platelet count with

  1. Patient and provider determinants of nephrology referral in older adults with severe chronic kidney disease: a survey of provider decision making

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    O'Hare Ann M

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although chronic kidney disease (CKD disproportionately affects older adults, they are less likely to be referred to a nephrologist. Factors that influence the referral decisions of primary care providers (PCPs specifically for older CKD patients have been incompletely described. Patient factors such as dementia, functional disability, and co-morbidity may complicate the decision to refer an older adult. This study evaluated the role of patient and PCP factors in the referral decisions for older adults with stage 4 CKD. Methods We administered a two-part survey to study the decisions of practicing PCPs. First, using a blocked factorial design, vignettes systematically varied 6 patient characteristics: age, race, gender, co-morbidity, functional status, and cognitive status. CKD severity, patient preferences, and degree of anemia were held constant. Second, covariates from a standard questionnaire included PCP estimates of life expectancy, demographics, reaction to clinical uncertainty, and risk aversion. The main outcome was the decision to refer to the nephrologist. Random effects logistic regression models tested independent associations of predictor variables with the referral decision. Results More than half (62.5% of all PCP decisions (n = 680 were to refer to a nephrologist. Vignette-based factors that independently decreased referral included older patient age (OR = 0.27; 95% CI, 0.15 to 0.48 and having moderate dementia (OR = 0.14; 95%CI, 0.07 to 0.25. There were no associations between co-morbidity or impaired functional activity with the referral decision. Survey-based PCP factors that significantly increased the referral likelihood include female gender (OR = 7.75; 95%CI, 2.07 to 28.93, non-white race (OR = 30.29; 95%CI, 1.30 to 703.73, those who expect nephrologists to discuss goals of care (OR = 53.13; 95%CI, 2.42 to 1168.00, those with higher levels of anxiety about uncertainty (OR = 1.28; 95%CI, 1.04 to 1

  2. Sauti Za Wananchi “voice of the people”: patient satisfaction on the medical wards at a Kenyan Referral Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Geren Starr; Jerotich, Tecla Sum; Cheriro, Betsy Rono; Kiptoo, Robert Sitienei; Crowe, Susie Joanne; Koros, Elijah Kipkorir; Muthoni, Doreen Mutegi; Onalo, Paul Theodore

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Patient satisfaction is one indicator of healthcare quality. Few studies have examined the inpatient experiences in resource-scarce environments in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods To examine patient satisfaction on the public medical wards at a Kenyan referral hospital, we performed a cross-sectional survey focused on patients’ satisfaction with medical information and their relationship with staffing and hospital routine. Ratings of communication with providers, efforts to protect privacy, information about costs, food, and hospital environment were also elicited. Results Overall, the average patient satisfaction rating was 64.7, nearly midway between “average” and “good” Higher rated satisfaction was associated with higher self-rated general health scores and self-rated health gains during the hospitalization (p = 0.023 and p = 0.001). Women who shared a hospital bed found privacy to be “below average” to “poor” Most men (72.7%) felt information about costs was insufficient. Patients rated food and environmental quality favorably while also frequently suggesting these areas could be improved. Conclusion Overall, patients expressed satisfaction with the care provided. These ratings may reflect modest patients’ expectations as well as acceptable circumstances and performance. Women expressed concern about privacy while men expressed a desire for more information on costs. Inconsistencies were noted between patient ratings and free response answers. PMID:25469201

  3. High attrition among HIV-infected patients with advanced disease treated in an intermediary referral center in Maputo, Mozambique

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    Lucas Molfino

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: In Mozambique, antiretroviral therapy (ART scale-up has been successfully implemented. However, attrition in care remains a major programmatic challenge. In 2009, an intermediary-level HIV referral center was created in Maputo to ensure access to specialized care for HIV-infected patients with complications (advanced clinical-immunological stage, Kaposi sarcoma, or suspected ART failure. Objective: To determine the attrition from care and to identify risk factors that lead to high attrition among patients referred to an intermediary-level HIV referral center. Design: This was a retrospective cohort study from 2009 to 2011. Results: A total of 1,657 patients were enrolled, 847 (51% were men, the mean age was 36 years (standard deviation: 11, the mean CD4 count was 27 cells/µl (interquartile range: 11–44, and one-third were severely malnourished. The main reasons for referral were advanced clinical stages (WHO stages 3 and 4, and CD4 count <50 cells/µl in 70% of the cases, and 19% had Kaposi sarcoma. The overall attrition rate was 28.7 per 100 person-years (PYs – the mortality rate was 5.0 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.2–5.9 per 100 PYs, and the loss-to-follow-up rate was 23.7 (95% CI: 21.9–25.6 per 100 PYs. There were 793 attritions – 137 deaths and 656 lost to follow-up (LTFU; 77% of all attrition happened within the first year. The factors independently associated with attrition were male sex (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR]: 1.15, 95% CI: 1.0–1.3, low body mass index (aHR: 1.51, 95% CI: 1.2–1.8, WHO clinical stage 3 or 4 (aHR: 1.30, 95% CI: 1.0–1.6; and aHR: 1.91, 95% CI: 1.4–2.5, later year of enrollment (aHR 1.61, 95% CI 1.3–1.9, and ‘being already on ART’ at enrollment (aHR 13.71, 95% CI 11.4–16.4. Conclusions: Attrition rates among HIV-infected patients enrolled in an intermediary referral center were high, mainly related to advanced stage of clinical disease. Measures are required to address this

  4. Case mix-adjusted cost of colectomy at low-, middle-, and high-volume academic centers.

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    Chang, Alex L; Kim, Young; Ertel, Audrey E; Hoehn, Richard S; Wima, Koffi; Abbott, Daniel E; Shah, Shimul A

    2017-05-01

    Efforts to regionalize surgery based on thresholds in procedure volume may have consequences on the cost of health care delivery. This study aims to delineate the relationship between hospital volume, case mix, and variability in the cost of operative intervention using colectomy as the model. All patients undergoing colectomy (n = 90,583) at 183 academic hospitals from 2009-2012 in The University HealthSystems Consortium Database were studied. Patient and procedure details were used to generate a case mix-adjusted predictive model of total direct costs. Observed to expected costs for each center were evaluated between centers based on overall procedure volume. Patient and procedure characteristics were significantly different between volume tertiles. Observed costs at high-volume centers were less than at middle- and low-volume centers. According to our predictive model, high-volume centers cared for a less expensive case mix than middle- and low-volume centers ($12,786 vs $13,236 and $14,497, P case mix at low-volume centers, which may lead to perceived poor performance at these centers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A comparison of placebo response with major depressive disorder in patients recruited through newspaper advertising versus consultation referrals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, C A; Hooper, C L; Bakish, D

    1997-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates few differences between patients recruited through advertising and by consultation referral, and there is some suggestion that those recruited through advertising are more representative of the target community population. However little has been reported on differences in placebo response and compliance in these two patient groups. We conducted a retrospective chart review of 49 patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), recruited through advertising or consultation, randomized to placebo in five clinical trials. Variables included demographics, clinical history, efficacy, compliance, and completion data. Homogeneity was demonstrated for most variables. Differences in placebo groups included significantly lower Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D) scores for the advertisement group throughout the trials. Advertisement patients were also more likely to be early placebo responders and in remission at Days 14 and 28. No differences were found in completion rates or reasons for early termination. Compliance was excellent for both groups. Early placebo response of the advertisement group reinforces the need for trials of at least 8 weeks. In addition, consultation patients may have a more severe illness and be treatment resistant, suggesting they are less generalizable to community practice populations.

  6. Demographic characteristics of chronic pancreatitis patients in the era of endosonography: Experience of a single tertiary referral center in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şişman, Gürhan; Köroğlu, Emine; Erzin, Yusuf; Hatemi, İbrahim; Tuncer, Murat; Şentürk, Hakan

    2016-05-01

    There are no clinical data available about chronic pancreatitis (CP) on a series of patients of sufficient number in Turkey. In this study, the etiology and clinical features of CP were evaluated in one center, which is a tertiary referral hospital. The files of 168 patients who had been diagnosed with CP in our Medical Faculty between October 2007 and May 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. The etiological factors, symptoms, complications, and treatment methods were analyzed. The most common etiological factor was alcohol abuse (39%). The average age±SD was 46±15.2 years, and the male:female ratio was 4.2:1 (it was 2.6:1 for other etiologies except alcohol abuse and 15.5:1 in alcoholic CP patients, ppancreatic calcification (ppancreatic cancer was detected in four patients (2.3%). In majority of the CP patients, the etiology is alcohol abuse in Turkey. The development of diabetes is the most frequent complication of CP, which is independent of the etiology.

  7. Patterns of severe acute renal failure in a referral center in Sudan: Excluding intensive care and major surgery patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaballo, Babikir G.; Khogali, Mohamed S.; Khalifa, Eman H.; Khalil, Eltahir A.G.; El-Hasaan, Ahmad M.; Abu-Aisha, H.

    2007-01-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is a common health problem worldwide. There is limited data on the pattern of ARF in Sudan. Moreover, glomerular diseases, which are a well known cause of ARF, have not been accurately and adequately diagnosed previously. A retrospective study on the patterns of ARF was carried out in a general nephrology referral center in Sudan during the period from February 2003 to February 2004.Patients from intensive care units with ARF and those who developed ARF after massive surgery were excluded from the study. Renal biopsy was performed when indicated and studied with light and immunofluorescent microscopy. Eighty-nine patients (57 (64%) cases were males and mean age was 39+-19.4 years) fulfilled the criteria for the diagnosis of advanced renal failure requiring renal function replacement therapy. Acute tubular necrosis (ATN) was diagnosed in 50 (56%) patients; 33 (66%) ATN patients had renal failure as a complication of volume depletion, fulminant infections (particularly malaria and typhoid fever) or snakebites, and 12 (13.4%) patients ingested paraphenylene-diamine (PPD) (hair/Henna dye) in suicidal attempts. Eight (9%) patients of the total study group had glomerural diseases and 11 (12.3%) had obstructive uropathy associated with ARF; cause of ARF could not be determined in 17 (19%) patients. Fifty-three (60%) patients recovered their renal function, six (6.7%) patients progressed to chronic kidney disease (CKD), 16(18%) died and 14(16%) were lost to follow-up. In conclusion, patients with ARF associated with ATN had a favorable prognosis except when ATN was associated PPD poisoning. (author)

  8. Patterns of severe acute renal failure in a referral center in Sudan: Excluding intensive care and major surgery patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaballo, Babikir G; Khogali, Mohamed S [Nephrology Unit, Military Hospital, Omdurman (Sudan); Khalifa, Eman H [Faculty of Medical Laboratory Sciences, Univ. of Khartoum (Sudan); Khalil, Eltahir A.G.; El-Hasaan, Ahmad M [Institute of Endemic Diseases, Univ. of Khartoum (Sudan); Abu-Aisha, H [The National Ribat Univ., Khartoum (Sudan)

    2007-07-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is a common health problem worldwide. There is limited data on the pattern of ARF in Sudan. Moreover, glomerular diseases, which are a well known cause of ARF, have not been accurately and adequately diagnosed previously. A retrospective study on the patterns of ARF was carried out in a general nephrology referral center in Sudan during the period from February 2003 to February 2004.Patients from intensive care units with ARF and those who developed ARF after massive surgery were excluded from the study. Renal biopsy was performed when indicated and studied with light and immunofluorescent microscopy. Eighty-nine patients (57 (64%) cases were males and mean age was 39+-19.4 years) fulfilled the criteria for the diagnosis of advanced renal failure requiring renal function replacement therapy. Acute tubular necrosis (ATN) was diagnosed in 50 (56%) patients; 33 (66%) ATN patients had renal failure as a complication of volume depletion, fulminant infections (particularly malaria and typhoid fever) or snakebites, and 12 (13.4%) patients ingested paraphenylene-diamine (PPD) (hair/Henna dye) in suicidal attempts. Eight (9%) patients of the total study group had glomerural diseases and 11 (12.3%) had obstructive uropathy associated with ARF; cause of ARF could not be determined in 17 (19%) patients. Fifty-three (60%) patients recovered their renal function, six (6.7%) patients progressed to chronic kidney disease (CKD), 16(18%) died and 14(16%) were lost to follow-up. In conclusion, patients with ARF associated with ATN had a favorable prognosis except when ATN was associated PPD poisoning. (author)

  9. Drug-resistant tuberculosis in HIV-infected patients in a national referral hospital, Phnom Penh, Cambodia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genevieve Walls

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: There are no recent data on the prevalence of drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR TB in Cambodia. We aim to describe TB drug resistance amongst adults with pulmonary and extra-pulmonary TB and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV co-infection in a national referral hospital in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Design: Between 22 November 2007 and 30 November 2009, clinical specimens from HIV-infected patients suspected of having TB underwent routine microscopy, Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture, and drug susceptibility testing. Laboratory and clinical data were collected for patients with positive M. tuberculosis cultures. Results: M. tuberculosis was cultured from 236 HIV-infected patients. Resistance to any first-line TB drug occurred in 34.7% of patients; 8.1% had multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB. The proportion of MDR TB amongst new patients and previously treated patients was 3.7 and 28.9%, respectively (p<0.001. The diagnosis of MDR TB was made after death in 15.8% of patients; in total 26.3% of patients with MDR TB died. The diagnosis of TB was established by culture of extra-pulmonary specimens in 23.6% of cases. Conclusions: There is significant resistance to first-line TB drugs amongst new and previously treated TB–HIV co-infected patients in Phnom Penh. These data suggest that the prevalence of DR TB in Cambodia may be higher than previously recognised, particularly amongst HIV-infected patients. Additional prevalence studies are needed. This study also illustrates the feasibility and utility of analysis of non-respiratory specimens in the diagnosis of TB, even in low-resource settings, and suggests that extra-pulmonary specimens should be included in TB diagnostic algorithms.

  10. Association between Health Information Technology and Case Mix Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young-Taek; Lee, Junsang; Lee, Jinhyung

    2017-10-01

    Health information technology (IT) can assist healthcare providers in ordering medication and adhering to guidelines while improving communication among providers and the quality of care. However, the relationship between health IT and Case Mix Index (CMI) has not been thoroughly investigated; therefore, this study aimed to clarify this relationship. To examine the effect of health IT on CMI, a generalized estimation equation (GEE) was applied to two years of California hospital data. We found that IT was positively associated with CMI, indicating that increased IT adoption could lead to a higher CMI or billing though DRG up-coding. This implies that hospitals' revenue could increase around $40,000 by increasing IT investment by 10%. The positive association between IT and CMI implies that IT adoption itself could lead to higher patient billings. Generally, a higher CMI in a hospital indicates that the hospital provides expensive services with higher coding and therefore receives more money from patients. Therefore, measures to prevent upcoding through IT systems should be implemented.

  11. Variability in case-mix adjusted in-hospital cardiac arrest rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Raina M; Yang, Lin; Becker, Lance B; Berg, Robert A; Nadkarni, Vinay; Nichol, Graham; Carr, Brendan G; Mitra, Nandita; Bradley, Steven M; Abella, Benjamin S; Groeneveld, Peter W

    2012-02-01

    It is unknown how in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) rates vary across hospitals and predictors of variability. Measure variability in IHCA across hospitals and determine if hospital-level factors predict differences in case-mix adjusted event rates. Get with the Guidelines Resuscitation (GWTG-R) (n=433 hospitals) was used to identify IHCA events between 2003 and 2007. The American Hospital Association survey, Medicare, and US Census were used to obtain detailed information about GWTG-R hospitals. Adult patients with IHCA. Case-mix-adjusted predicted IHCA rates were calculated for each hospital and variability across hospitals was compared. A regression model was used to predict case-mix adjusted event rates using hospital measures of volume, nurse-to-bed ratio, percent intensive care unit beds, palliative care services, urban designation, volume of black patients, income, trauma designation, academic designation, cardiac surgery capability, and a patient risk score. We evaluated 103,117 adult IHCAs at 433 US hospitals. The case-mix adjusted IHCA event rate was highly variable across hospitals, median 1/1000 bed days (interquartile range: 0.7 to 1.3 events/1000 bed days). In a multivariable regression model, case-mix adjusted IHCA event rates were highest in urban hospitals [rate ratio (RR), 1.1; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.0-1.3; P=0.03] and hospitals with higher proportions of black patients (RR, 1.2; 95% CI, 1.0-1.3; P=0.01) and lower in larger hospitals (RR, 0.54; 95% CI, 0.45-0.66; PCase-mix adjusted IHCA event rates varied considerably across hospitals. Several hospital factors associated with higher IHCA event rates were consistent with factors often linked with lower hospital quality of care.

  12. The operating room case-mix problem under uncertainty and nurses capacity constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahia, Zakaria; Eltawil, Amr B; Harraz, Nermine A

    2016-12-01

    Surgery is one of the key functions in hospitals; it generates significant revenue and admissions to hospitals. In this paper we address the decision of choosing a case-mix for a surgery department. The objective of this study is to generate an optimal case-mix plan of surgery patients with uncertain surgery operations, which includes uncertainty in surgery durations, length of stay, surgery demand and the availability of nurses. In order to obtain an optimal case-mix plan, a stochastic optimization model is proposed and the sample average approximation method is applied. The proposed model is used to determine the number of surgery cases to be weekly served, the amount of operating rooms' time dedicated to each specialty and the number of ward beds dedicated to each specialty. The optimal case-mix selection criterion is based upon a weighted score taking into account both the waiting list and the historical demand of each patient category. The score aims to maximizing the service level of the operating rooms by increasing the total number of surgery cases that could be served. A computational experiment is presented to demonstrate the performance of the proposed method. The results show that the stochastic model solution outperforms the expected value problem solution. Additional analysis is conducted to study the effect of varying the number of ORs and nurses capacity on the overall ORs' performance.

  13. Investigating admitted patients' satisfaction with nursing care at Debre Berhan Referral Hospital in Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharew, Nigussie Tadesse; Bizuneh, Hailegiorgis Teklegiorgis; Assefa, Hilina Ketema; Habtewold, Tesfa Dejenie

    2018-05-17

    The aims of the study were (1) to assess the level of patient satisfaction with nursing care and (2) to identify factors influencing patient satisfaction. A hospital-based, cross-sectional study was conducted with 252 admitted patients in the medical, surgical and paediatric wards. Debre Berhan Referral Hospital, Debre Berhan, Ethiopia, with a catchment population of 2.8 million. All patients admitted at least for 2 days and capable of independent communication were included. However, patients were excluded on any one of the following conditions: admitted for less than 2 days, cannot understand Amharic language, with critical illness or cognitive impairment that affects judgement, or inability to provide written informed consent. The mean age of the patients was 37.9 (SD=12.9) years, and half (50.4%) of them were male. Patient satisfaction with nursing care, measured by the Newcastle Satisfaction with Nursing Scale, was the outcome variable. Using a mean split approach, patient satisfaction scores were dichotomised into 'satisfied' and 'unsatisfied'. 49.2% of patients were satisfied with nursing care. Educational status and history of admission were significant factors influencing patient satisfaction with nursing care. Patients who had high educational status were 80% less satisfied compared with those who had no formal education (p=0.01, OR=0.2, 95% CI 0.1 to 0.7). Patients who had a history of admission were 2.2 times more satisfied compared with those who had no history of admission (p=0.02, OR=2.2, 95% CI 1.2 to 4.2). About half the admitted patients were satisfied with the nursing care. Satisfaction differed significantly by patients' educational attainment and history of admission. This study provided evidence on patient satisfaction with nursing care in Ethiopia. This information may be useful in comparative studies of patient satisfaction and in identifying characteristics that may explain or predict patient satisfaction. © Article author(s) (or

  14. Shifting brachytherapy monotherapy case mix toward intermediate-risk prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidhar, Vinayak; Mahal, Brandon A; Ziehr, David R; Chen, Yu-Wei; Nezolosky, Michelle D; Viswanathan, Vidya B; Beard, Clair J; Devlin, Phillip M; Martin, Neil E; Orio, Peter F; Nguyen, Paul L

    2015-01-01

    The relative use of brachytherapy (BT) for prostate cancer has declined in recent years. In this setting, we sought to determine whether the case mix of BT monotherapy-treated men has changed over time in terms of risk group composition. The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database was used to identify 30,939 patients diagnosed with prostate adenocarcinoma between 2004 and 2011 who received BT monotherapy. The case mix of BT monotherapy patients was calculated by patient risk group and year of diagnosis. Between 2004 and 2011, the use of BT monotherapy declined overall. The relative percentage of men undergoing BT with low-risk disease declined by 4.5%, whereas the relative percentage of patients with intermediate-risk disease increased by 4.7%. Non-white patients and those from poorer counties did not show shifts in the risk group makeup of BT monotherapy patients, whereas white patients and those from wealthier counties did. Although fewer patients with prostate cancer are undergoing BT monotherapy, men with intermediate-risk disease comprised a significantly larger portion of the BT case mix in 2011 compared with 2004. Future research efforts by brachytherapists should be directed toward improving BT technique, optimizing radiation doses, and obtaining long-term followup data for patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. BIRD: Bio-Image Referral Database. Design and implementation of a new web based and patient multimedia data focused system for effective medical diagnosis and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinciroli, Francesco; Masseroli, Marco; Acerbo, Livio A; Bonacina, Stefano; Ferrari, Roberto; Marchente, Mario

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a low cost software platform prototype supporting health care personnel in retrieving patient referral multimedia data. These information are centralized in a server machine and structured by using a flexible eXtensible Markup Language (XML) Bio-Image Referral Database (BIRD). Data are distributed on demand to requesting client in an Intranet network and transformed via eXtensible Stylesheet Language (XSL) to be visualized in an uniform way on market browsers. The core server operation software has been developed in PHP Hypertext Preprocessor scripting language, which is very versatile and useful for crafting a dynamic Web environment.

  16. A 5-year trend of Helicobacter pylori seroprevalence among dyspeptic patients at Bahir Dar Felege Hiwot Referral Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Workineh M

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Meseret Workineh,1 Desalegn Andargie2 1Immunology and Molecular Biology, School of Biomedical and Laboratory Sciences, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, 2University of Gondar Teaching Hospital, Gondar, Ethiopia Background: Helicobacter pylori infection is a major public health problem affecting half of the world’s population. The prevalence of H. pylori varies in different societies and geographical locations. Thus, timely information on H. pylori epidemiology is critical to combat this infection. This study aimed to determine the seroprevalence and trend of H. pylori infection over a period of 5 years among dyspeptic patients at Bahir Dar Felege Hiwot Referral Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia.Methods: A retrospective analysis of consecutive dyspeptic patients’ records covering the period between January 2009 and December 2013 was conducted. The hospital laboratory generated the data by a serological method of detecting the antibodies for H. pylori from serum by a one-step rapid test device. Chi-square analysis was used to identify significant predictors. A P-value of <0.05 was considered as statistically significant.Results: Among all the study subjects, 2,733 (41.6% were found to be seropositive. The seroprevalence was significantly higher in males (43.2% than in females (39.9% (χ2=9; P=0.002. In terms of age groups of the patients, high rates of H. pylori were found among the participants older than 60 years (57% (χ2=36.6; P≤0.00001. The trend analysis of H. pylori prevalence revealed a fluctuating prevalence; it was 44.5% in the year 2009 and decreased to 34% and 40% in the years 2010 and 2011, respectively. However, there was an increment to 52.5% in the year 2012, and then it decreased to 30.2% in the year 2013.Conclusion: This study showed high seroprevalence of H. pylori among the dyspeptic patients in Bahir Dar Felege Hiwot Referral Hospital. The trend of the seroprevalence varied from year to year in

  17. Acute referral of patients from general practitioners: should the hospital doctor or a nurse receive the call?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mortensen Anne Mette M

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surprisingly little is known about the most efficient organization of admissions to an emergency hospital. It is important to know, who should be in front when the GP requests an acute admission. The aim of the study was to analyse how experienced ED nurses perform when assessing requests for admissions, compared with hospital physicians. Methods Before- and after ED nurse assessment study, in which two cohorts of patients were followed from the time of request for admission until one month later. The first cohort of patients was included by the physicians on duty in October 2008. The admitting physicians were employed in the one of the specialized departments and only received request for admission within their speciality. The second cohort of patients was included by the ED in May 2009. They received all request from the GPs for admission, independent of the speciality in question. Results A total of 944 requests for admission were recorded. There was a non-significant trend towards the nurses admitting a smaller fraction of patients than the physicians (68 versus 74%. While the nurses almost never rejected an admission, the physicians did this in 7% of the requests. The nurses redirected 8% of the patients to another hospital, significantly more than the physicians with only 1%. (p Conclusions We found no differences in the frequency of admitted patients or unnecessary admissions, but the nurses redirected significantly more patients to the right hospital according to the catchment area, and used only half the time for the assessment. We find, that nurses, trained for the assignment, are able to handle referrals for emergency admissions, but also advise the subject to be explored in further studies including other assessment models and GP satisfaction.

  18. Demographic and clinicopathological profile of patients with chronic pancreatitis in a tertiary referral teaching hospital of West Bengal: Personal experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Prosanta Kumar; Mukerjee, Aishik; Adhikary, Chandranath

    2015-09-01

    There is a paucity of data on the demographic and clinicopathological profiles of patients with chronic pancreatitis from the eastern part of India. This study documents the demographic and clinicopathological profiles of patients with chronic pancreatitis presenting to a general surgery unit of a tertiary referral hospital of Kolkata. The records of 145 patients presenting with chronic pancreatitis over a 5-year period were scrutinized and their demographics, clinical profile, and complications and morphological changes of the pancreas are described. Of the 145 patients, more than 50% were under the age of 30 years. Males were affected more frequently than females (M/F = 3.8:1). While idiopathic pancreatitis was the most common form of chronic pancreatitis (41.4%), alcohol was found to be the most common etiology (37.9%). Pain was the most common presenting symptom (n = 143; 98.6%). Sixty-five subjects (45%) had diabetes of which 32 subjects were insulin-dependent. On contrast-enhanced computed tomography, ductal dilatation was seen in 80 (55.17%) subjects, while ductal calculi and ductal dilatation in 54 cases (37.2%). Parenchymal calcification was seen in 45 patients of whom 40 patients (89%) were under the age of 30 years. Pseudocyst was the most common complication (n = 16) followed by biliary obstruction (n = 8) and portal hypertension (n = 4). Patients with alcoholic pancreatitis had significantly higher frequency of severe abdominal pain, diabetes, and local complications as compared to the other forms of pancreatitis in our study. Idiopathic pancreatitis was the most common form of chronic pancreatitis in this study, followed by alcoholic pancreatitis and then tropical pancreatitis.

  19. Association between oral candidiasis and low CD4+ count among HIV positive patients in Hoima Regional Referral Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanteza, Martina; Tusiime, Jayne B; Kalyango, Joan; Kasangaki, Arabat

    2014-11-28

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of Human Immune Virus (HIV) related oral lesions and their association with Cluster of Differentiation 4 (CD4+) count among treatment naïve HIV positive patients. This was a descriptive and analytical cross sectional study. Participants were 346 treatment naïve HIV positive adult patients. These were consecutively recruited from Hoima Regional Referral hospital between March and April 2012. Data collection involved interviews, oral examinations and laboratory analysis. A total of 168(48.6%) participants had oral lesions. The four commonest lesions were oral candidiasis (24.9%, CI = 20.6-29.7%), melanotic hyperpigmentation (17.3%, CI = 13.7-21.7%), kaposi sarcoma (9.3%, CI = 6.6-12.8%) and Oral Hairy Leukoplakia (OHL) (5.5%, CI = 3.5-8.4%). There was significant association between oral candidiasis and immunosuppression measured as CD4+ less than 350 cells/mm3 (OR = 2.69, CI = 1.608-4.502, p Oral candidiasis was the only oral lesion significantly predictive of immunosuppression (OR = 2.56, CI = 1.52-4.30, p Oral candidiasis can be considered as a marker for immunesuppression, making routine oral examinations essential in the management of HIV positive patients.

  20. A Study to Develop the Optimal Military Inter-Institutional Patient Referral Systems Model for DoD (Department of Defense) Military Medical Region III

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-05-01

    I rerr syttemn an do wlon t P ontimal military inter-instittiuonal patient referral systems model for DOD Military Medical Region III. A convenience...Dactin- on the Armed Services Medical Regulating Office and Patient Airlift "lc rcsusl.s of :his study indicated that the single largest breakdown...and the requirement to regulate to the closest medical facility with capability to care for the patient . L! / I Ii I i A STUDY TO DEVELOP THE OPTIMAL

  1. Patients' satisfaction towards radiological service and associated factors in Hawassa University Teaching and referral hospital, Southern Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulisa, Teshome; Tessema, Fasil; Merga, Hailu

    2017-06-26

    Patient satisfaction, one of the main components of quality of care, is a crucial phenomenon for the overall health care delivery system. Even though a number of studies have been conducted about patient satisfaction in different health services, studies in radiology services are flimsy in Ethiopia. This study aimed at assessing patient satisfaction towards radiological service and associated factors in Hawassa University Teaching and Referral hospital. An institution based cross-sectional study was conducted among 321 adult patients presented for radiological service in the study area using stratified sampling technique. Patient satisfaction was measured using SERVQUAL (Service Quality) tool that consisted of seven items: accessibility, quality of radiological service, courtesy of radiology staff, existence of good communication with service provider and desk worker, physical environment and privacy technique. Exit interviews of patients were conducted using a structured and pretested questionnaire. Data was collected by three grade ten completed trained data collectors from May 12 to May 28, 2016. Multiple logistic regressions were used to identify independent factors associated with patient satisfaction on radiological services using SPSS version 21. The overall patient satisfaction towards radiological service was 71.6%. Satisfaction to accessibility of the service was 84.5% while it was 80.6% to courtesy of the staff. Similarly, 81.6% reported satisfied with quality of the service and 59.4% and 71% of reported satisfied with physical environment and radiological service provider respectively. On the other hand, 99.7% of the respondents were dissatisfied with privacy of the service. The study revealed that patients who attended primary school (AOR = 0.317, 95% CI: 0.11-0.88), unemployed patients (AOR = 0.067, 95% CI: 0.007-0.622) and patients who had short waiting time to enter into examination room less than one hour (AOR = 4.12, 95% CI: 1.4-11.62) were

  2. Clinical features of patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage arriving through a referral from a local primary hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Takaaki; Kubota, Tsukasa; Shimazaki, Mitsunori

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the current state of and problems in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage initially diagnosed and treated by general physicians at a local referring hospital and subsequently transferred to our hospital for neurosurgical treatment. We studied 37 consecutive patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage over a 7-year period from April 2001 to March 2008. A total of 7 men and 30 women aged 50 to 89 years (average: 71.2±9.5 years) were included in this study. Thirteen patients (35.1%) were referred to our hospital with diagnoses other than subarachnoid hemorrhage. Twenty-three of 27 patients who had CT scans were diagnosed correctly in the referring hospital, while only 1 of 10 patients was correctly diagnosed without CT. Time from the onset to admission to our hospital ranged from 85 minutes to 144 hours (average: 15.3±29 hours). The reasons of delay in patients who took more than 12 hours to reach us were patients' delay in visiting the referring hospital in 3 cases and uncertain initial diagnosis in 6. All 6 cases complained of sudden headache, but did not undergo CT. All patients were transferred by an ambulance car, and the duration of transfer ranged from 60 to 120 minutes (average: 85.4±15.7 minutes). None of the patients experienced rebleeding during transfer. Subarachnoid hemorrhage can be diagnosed correctly at the local primary hospital with CT, allowing appropriate primary treatments. Initial misdiagnosis is the major cause of delay in transferring patients to neurosurgical facilities. (author)

  3. PHIRST Trial - pharmacist consults: prioritization of HIV-patients with a referral screening tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Catherine; Canneva, Arnaud; Chiasson, Charles-Olivier; Galarneau, Annie; Schnitzer, Mireille E; Sheehan, Nancy L; Wong, Alison Yj

    2017-11-01

    The role of pharmacists in HIV outpatient clinics has greatly increased in the past decades. Given the limited resources of the health system, the prioritization of pharmacist consults is now a main concern. This study aimed to create a scoring system allowing for standardized prioritization of pharmacist consults for patients living with HIV. Data was retrospectively collected from 200 HIV patients attending the Chronic Viral Illness Service at the McGill University Health Center. An expert panel consisting of four pharmacists working in the field of HIV prioritized each patient individually, after which a consensus was established and was considered as the gold standard. In order to create a scoring system, two different methods (Delphi, statistical) were used to assign a weight to each characteristic considered to be important in patient prioritization. A third method (equal weight to each characteristic) was also evaluated. The total score per patient for each method was then compared to the expert consensus in order to establish the score cut-offs to indicate the appropriate categories of delay in which to see the patient. All three systems failed to accurately prioritize patients into urgency categories ("less than 48 h", "less than 1 month", "less than 3 months", "no consult required") according to expert pharmacist consensus. The presence of high level interactions between patient characteristics, the limited number of patients and the low prevalence of some characteristics were hypothesized as the main causes for the results. Creating a prioritization tool for pharmacy consults in HIV outpatient clinics is a complex task and developing a decision tree algorithm may be a more appropriate approach in the future to take into account the importance of combinations of patient characteristic.

  4. Failure to Diagnose Hyperparathyroidism in 10,432 Patients With Hypercalcemia: Opportunities for System-level Intervention to Increase Surgical Referrals and Cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balentine, Courtney J; Xie, Rongbing; Kirklin, James K; Chen, Herbert

    2017-10-01

    To determine whether a significant number of patients with hyperparathyroidism remain undiagnosed and untreated. Failure to diagnose primary hyperparathyroidism and refer patients to surgeons leads to impaired quality of life and increased costs. We hypothesized that many patients with hyperparathyroidism would be untreated due to not considering the diagnosis, inadequate evaluation of hypercalcemia, and under-referral to surgeons. We reviewed administrative data on 682,704 patients from a tertiary referral center between 2011 and 2015, and identified hypercalcemia (>10.5 mg/dL) in 10,432 patients. We evaluated whether hypercalcemic patients underwent measurement of parathyroid hormone (PTH), had documentation of hypercalcemia/hyperparathyroidism, or were referred to surgeons. The mean age of our cohort was 54 years, with 61% females, and 56% whites. Only 3200 (31%) hypercalcemic patients had PTH levels measured, 2914 (28%) had a documented diagnosis of hypercalcemia, and 880 (8%) had a diagnosis of hyperparathyroidism in the medical record. Only 592 (22%) out of 2666 patients with classic hyperparathyroidism (abnormal calcium and PTH) were referred to surgeons. A significant proportion of patients with hyperparathyroidism do not undergo appropriate evaluation and surgical referral. System-level interventions which prompt further evaluation of hypercalcemia and raise physician awareness about hyperparathyroidism could improve outcomes and produce long-term cost savings.

  5. Transfusion requirements in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding: a study in a Blood Unit at a referral hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Garrido

    Full Text Available Objectives: 1. To study transfusion requirements in the Department of Gastroenterology of a Tertiary Referral Hospital, and their evolution over the last seven years. 2. To analyze risk factors associated with greater erythrocyte transfusion requirements. Patients and methods: erythrocyte transfusion requirements were compared for patients admitted to the Department of Gastroenterology at Hospital Virgen del Rocío, Seville, from 1999 to 2005. Clinical data of interest have been analyzed in order to determine factors associated with greater transfusion requirements. Results: 1,611 patients with a mean age of 60.45 years (59.7-61.2 were included in this study; 76.41% were males. Gastric ulcers were the cause of bleeding in 18.4% of cases (with 69% requiring transfusions; duodenal ulcers caused 22.2% of cases (with 52.9% requiring transfusions, and portal hypertension caused 33.6% of cases (with 90.2% requiring transfusions. Upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding of unknown origin requires transfusions in 88.9 and 96.2% of cases, respectively. A multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that clinical presentations such as hematemesis (odds ratio = 3.12, hematochezia (odds ratio = 33.17, gastrointestinal hemorrhage of unknown origin (odds ratio = 6.57, and hemorrhage as a result of portal hypertension (odds ratio = 3.43 were associated with greater transfusion requirements for erythrocyte concentrates. No significant differences were observed between the percentages of patients who received transfusions from 1999 to 2005. Conclusions: 1. No differences have been observed between the percentages of patients who received transfusions over the last seven years at our Department of Gastroenterology. 2. Patients presenting with hematemesis or hematochezia, in addition to those with bleeding of unknown origin or from portal hypertension, are prone to have greater transfusion requirements.

  6. Evaluation of quality of life of adult cancer patients attending Tikur Anbessa specialized referral hospital, Addis Ababa Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadele, Niguse

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the quality of life of cancer patients in the Ethiopian context. This study evaluated quality of life of cancer patients in Ethiopia. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Addis Ababa University Tikur Anbessa Specialized Referral Hospital Addis Ababa, Ethiopia (TASRH) from March to May 2013. A total of 388 cancer patients were included. Translated in to Amharic, the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QOL C-30) was used to measure Quality of life (QoL). The data was analyzed with SPSS Version 17.0. Among the participants, 251(64.7%) were men and 138(35.6%) were below the age of 40 years. Large proportion of patients were diagnosed with breast cancer, 114(29.4%), and cervical cancer, 102(26.3%), and the clinical stages during the beginning of therapy were at stage II a 133(34.3%). The mean of global health status/QoL was 57.28 (SD= 25.28). Quality of life was found to be associated with some functional scales as role functioning, P≤0.001, social function, P=0.00, and symptom scales as pain, P=0.00, loss of appetite, P=0.004, and financial impact, P=0.02, but no associations were noted in relation to socio demographic characteristics. Quality of life assessments should be included in patient treatment protocols to improve their quality of life since being a cancer patient may be associated with a high level of impairment in different aspects of life.

  7. Does case-mix based reimbursement stimulate the development of process-oriented care delivery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, Leti; Dückers, Michel L A; Wagner, Cordula; van Merode, Godefridus G

    2010-11-01

    Reimbursement based on the total care of a patient during an acute episode of illness is believed to stimulate management and clinicians to reduce quality problems like waiting times and poor coordination of care delivery. Although many studies already show that this kind of case-mix based reimbursement leads to more efficiency, it remains unclear whether care coordination improved as well. This study aims to explore whether case-mix based reimbursement stimulates development of care coordination by the use of care programmes, and a process-oriented way of working. Data for this study were gathered during the winter of 2007/2008 in a survey involving all Dutch hospitals. Descriptive and structural equation modelling (SEM) analyses were conducted. SEM reveals that adoption of the case-mix reimbursement within hospitals' budgeting processes stimulates hospitals to establish care programmes by the use of process-oriented performance measures. However, the implementation of care programmes is not (yet) accompanied by a change in focus from function (the delivery of independent care activities) to process (the delivery of care activities as being connected to a chain of interdependent care activities). This study demonstrates that hospital management can stimulate the development of care programmes by the adoption of case-mix reimbursement within hospitals' budgeting processes. Future research is recommended to confirm this finding and to determine whether the establishment of care programmes will in time indeed lead to a more process-oriented view of professionals. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Scoliosis detection, patient characteristics, referral patterns and treatment in the absence of a screening program in Norway

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    Adobor Raphael

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early diagnosis of idiopathic scoliosis allows for observation and timely initiation of brace treatment in order to halt progression. School scoliosis screening programs were abolished in Norway in 1994 for lack of evidence that the programs improved outcome and for the costs involved. The consequences of this decision are discussed. Objectives To describe the detection, patient characteristics, referral patterns and treatment of idiopathic scoliosis at a scoliosis clinic during the period 2003–2011, when there was no screening and to compare treatment modalities to the period 1976–1988 when screening was performed. Methods Patient demographics, age at detection, family history, clinical and radiological charts of consecutive patients referred for scoliosis evaluation during the period 2003–2011, were prospectively registered. Patients were recruited from a catchment area of about 500000 teenagers. Maturity was estimated according to Risser sign and menarcheal status. Severity of pain was recorded by a verbal 5-point scale from no pain to pain at all times. Physical and neurological examinations were conducted. The detector and patient characteristics were recorded. Referral patterns of orthopedic surgeons at local hospitals and other health care providers were recorded. Patient data was obtained by spine surgeons. Treatment modalities in the current period were compared to the period 1976–1988. Results We registered 752 patients with late onset juvenile and adolescent idiopathic scoliosis from 2003–2011. There were 644 (86% girls and 108 (14% boys. Mean age at detection was 14.6 (7–19 years. Sixty percent had Risser sign ≥ 3, whilst 74% were post menarche with a mean age at menarche of 13.2 years. Thirty-one percent had a family history of scoliosis. The mean major curve at first consultation at our clinic was 38° (10°-95°. About 40% had a major curve >40°. Seventy-one percent were detected by patients

  9. Application of case mix index in the allocation of nursing human resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Binru; Chen, Xi; Li, Qiuping

    2018-02-23

    To investigate the feasibility of the case mix index and compare the allocation of nursing human resources between two departments of a hospital with different case mix indexes in China. The case mix index is used to assess the resource allocation of all cases in two departments of a hospital. Its values can determine the resource allocation required to diagnose and treat the patients. Clinical data were obtained from 23 different departments in 2015 and analysed retrospectively from October to November, 2016. Factors influencing the allocation of registered nurses were identified, and balanced quantities of patients with different case mix indexes were chosen from two departments. Spearman correlation analysis was performed. The per capita nursing workload was significant (r = .669, p = .000). The length of hospital stay, quantity of nurses, and department case mix index were correlated with the nursing workload (t = 4.211, p = .000; t = 2.962, p = .008; t = 2.266, p = .035). Education levels (Z = -1.391, p = .164) and the professional titles (Z = -1.832, p = .067) of the nurses were not statistically significant, whereas the registered nurse level differed between two departments (Z = -2.125, p = .034). The case management index provides references for the efficient allocation of registered nurses in clinical practice. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Validation of ACG Case-mix for equitable resource allocation in Swedish primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kronogård Maria

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adequate resource allocation is an important factor to ensure equity in health care. Previous reimbursement models have been based on age, gender and socioeconomic factors. An explanatory model based on individual need of primary health care (PHC has not yet been used in Sweden to allocate resources. The aim of this study was to examine to what extent the ACG case-mix system could explain concurrent costs in Swedish PHC. Methods Diagnoses were obtained from electronic PHC records of inhabitants in Blekinge County (approx. 150,000 listed with public PHC (approx. 120,000 for three consecutive years, 2004-2006. The inhabitants were then classified into six different resource utilization bands (RUB using the ACG case-mix system. The mean costs for primary health care were calculated for each RUB and year. Using linear regression models and log-cost as dependent variable the adjusted R2 was calculated in the unadjusted model (gender and in consecutive models where age, listing with specific PHC and RUB were added. In an additional model the ACG groups were added. Results Gender, age and listing with specific PHC explained 14.48-14.88% of the variance in individual costs for PHC. By also adding information on level of co-morbidity, as measured by the ACG case-mix system, to specific PHC the adjusted R2 increased to 60.89-63.41%. Conclusion The ACG case-mix system explains patient costs in primary care to a high degree. Age and gender are important explanatory factors, but most of the variance in concurrent patient costs was explained by the ACG case-mix system.

  11. Validation of ACG Case-mix for equitable resource allocation in Swedish primary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinski, Andrzej; Kronogård, Maria; Lenhoff, Håkan; Halling, Anders

    2009-09-18

    Adequate resource allocation is an important factor to ensure equity in health care. Previous reimbursement models have been based on age, gender and socioeconomic factors. An explanatory model based on individual need of primary health care (PHC) has not yet been used in Sweden to allocate resources. The aim of this study was to examine to what extent the ACG case-mix system could explain concurrent costs in Swedish PHC. Diagnoses were obtained from electronic PHC records of inhabitants in Blekinge County (approx. 150,000) listed with public PHC (approx. 120,000) for three consecutive years, 2004-2006. The inhabitants were then classified into six different resource utilization bands (RUB) using the ACG case-mix system. The mean costs for primary health care were calculated for each RUB and year. Using linear regression models and log-cost as dependent variable the adjusted R2 was calculated in the unadjusted model (gender) and in consecutive models where age, listing with specific PHC and RUB were added. In an additional model the ACG groups were added. Gender, age and listing with specific PHC explained 14.48-14.88% of the variance in individual costs for PHC. By also adding information on level of co-morbidity, as measured by the ACG case-mix system, to specific PHC the adjusted R2 increased to 60.89-63.41%. The ACG case-mix system explains patient costs in primary care to a high degree. Age and gender are important explanatory factors, but most of the variance in concurrent patient costs was explained by the ACG case-mix system.

  12. Interhospital differences and case-mix in a nationwide prevalence survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanerva, M; Ollgren, J; Lyytikäinen, O

    2010-10-01

    A prevalence survey is a time-saving and useful tool for obtaining an overview of healthcare-associated infection (HCAI) either in a single hospital or nationally. Direct comparison of prevalence rates is difficult. We evaluated the impact of case-mix adjustment on hospital-specific prevalences. All five tertiary care, all 15 secondary care and 10 (25% of 40) other acute care hospitals took part in the first national prevalence survey in Finland in 2005. US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria served to define HCAI. The information collected included demographic characteristics, severity of the underlying disease, use of catheters and a respirator, and previous surgery. Patients with HCAI related to another hospital were excluded. Case-mix-adjusted HCAI prevalences were calculated by using a multivariate logistic regression model for HCAI risk and an indirect standardisation method. Altogether, 587 (7.2%) of 8118 adult patients had at least one infection; hospital-specific prevalences ranged between 1.9% and 12.6%. Risk factors for HCAI that were previously known or identified by univariate analysis (age, male gender, intensive care, high Charlson comorbidity and McCabe indices, respirator, central venous or urinary catheters, and surgery during stay) were included in the multivariate analysis for standardisation. Case-mix-adjusted prevalences varied between 2.6% and 17.0%, and ranked the hospitals differently from the observed rates. In 11 (38%) hospitals, the observed prevalence rank was lower than predicted by the case-mix-adjusted figure. Case-mix should be taken into consideration in the interhospital comparison of prevalence rates. Copyright 2010 The Hospital Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Associated cutaneous diseases in obese adult patients: a prospective study from a skin referral care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mutairi, Nawaf

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the spectrum of skin diseases seen among adult obese patients referred to Farwaniya Hospital. A total of 437 overweight/obese subjects (200 men and 237 women) aged 18-74 years were enrolled in the study, which was conducted from October 2008 to November 2009. Demographic details such as age, sex, occupation, personal and family history of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and obesity were recorded. A thorough examination was performed by an experienced dermatologist (N.A.M.). Blood investigations such as complete blood count, fasting and postprandial blood sugar levels, liver function tests, kidney function tests, lipid profile, and thyroid function tests were done for all patients in addition to hormonal assay and abdominal sonar to exclude polycystic ovary disease for indicated patients. Common skin diseases found among these patients were plantar hyperkeratosis: n = 197; acanthosis nigricans: n = 144; skin tags: n = 131; striae cutis distensae: n = 102; intertrigo: n = 97; acne vulgaris: n = 94. Diabetes mellitus was diagnosed in 87 patients, polycystic ovary syndrome/hyperandrogenism in 74 female patients, and hyperlipidemia in 209 patients. This study shows that certain dermatoses such as plantar hyperkeratosis, acanthosis nigricans, skin tags, striae cutis distensae, and intertrigo are more common among obese persons. Some, such as plantar hyperkeratosis, could serve as markers of obesity and its severity, while the presence of acanthosis nigricans and skin tags may point to underlying internal disease such as diabetes and polycystic ovary syndrome. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Health Evaluation and Referral Assistant: A Randomized Controlled Trial of a Web-Based Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment System to Reduce Risky Alcohol Use Among Emergency Department Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskins, Brianna L; Davis-Martin, Rachel; Abar, Beau; Baumann, Brigitte M; Harralson, Tina; Boudreaux, Edwin D

    2017-05-01

    Computer technologies hold promise for implementing alcohol screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT). Questions concerning the most effective and appropriate SBIRT model remain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of a computerized SBIRT system called the Health Evaluation and Referral Assistant (HERA) on risky alcohol use treatment initiation. Alcohol users (N=319) presenting to an emergency department (ED) were considered for enrollment. Those enrolled (n=212) were randomly assigned to the HERA, to complete a patient-administered assessment using a tablet computer, or a minimal-treatment control, and were followed for 3 months. Analyses compared alcohol treatment provider contact, treatment initiation, treatment completion, and alcohol use across condition using univariate comparisons, generalized estimating equations (GEEs), and post hoc chi-square analyses. HERA participants (n=212; control=115; intervention=97) did not differ between conditions on initial contact with an alcohol treatment provider, treatment initiation, treatment completion, or change in risky alcohol use behavior. Subanalyses indicated that HERA participants, who accepted a faxed referral, were more likely to initiate contact with a treatment provider and initiate treatment for risky alcohol use, but were not more likely to continue engaging in treatment, or to complete treatment and change risky alcohol use behavior over the 3-month period following the ED visit. The HERA promoted initial contact with an alcohol treatment provider and initiation of treatment for those who accepted the faxed referral, but it did not lead to reduced risky alcohol use behavior. Factors which may have limited the HERA's impact include lack of support for the intervention by clinical staff, the low intensity of the brief and stand-alone design of the intervention, and barriers related to patient follow-through, (eg, a lack of transportation or childcare, fees for services, or

  15. Caring Mental Patients Sharing the Same Rooms with Somatic Patients in General and Referral Hospitals in Rwanda: Analysis of Disadvantages and Advantages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitimbwa, Siméon Sebatukura

    2014-01-01

    Hospitalizing mental patients in the same rooms with somatic patients is one of the consequences of the decentralization of mental health units in all hospitals of Rwanda. There is a necessity to discover and to analyze advantages and disadvantages of this practice. Mental health staffs of 31 general and referral hospitals have been interviewed on questions about disadvantages and advantages to hospitalize mental patients together with somatic patients. Results show these disadvantages: a therapeutic environment not appropriate or a lack of harmony in the rooms (58.1% of respondents); a lack of bodily safety for somatic patients (51.6%); a lack of safety on the properties of somatic patients (45.2%); a lack of psychological wellbeing of somatic patients (29%); a lack of safety for mental patients (29%). About the main advantages, 100% of respondents pointed out the treatment of mental patients followed even during the week-end and the break time by the guard nurses doing the ward round visit or the guard; 72.2% said it prevents discrimination, because mental patient feel that he is a patient like others; 50% said it prevents stigmatization (to avoid for example, the expression "he is mad"); 16.7% said that mental patients receive help from somatic patients.

  16. Retrospective Analysis of Outcome of Patients with Metastatic Leiomyosarcoma in a Tertiary Referral Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Cann, Tom; Cornillie, Jasmien; Wozniak, Agnieszka; Debiec-Rychter, Maria; Sciot, Raf; Hompes, Daphne; Vergote, Ignace; Schöffski, Patrick

    2018-01-01

    Leiomyosarcoma is a common subtype of soft tissue sarcoma originating from smooth muscle. We evaluated the clinical course and treatment outcome of patients with metastatic leiomyosarcoma. We retrospectively reviewed the records of patients at the University Hospitals Leuven. We identified 122 patients with metastatic leiomyosarcoma, 77 female, median age 59.5 years. Most patients developed leiomyosarcoma in the extremities (35%), the uterus (20%) or the abdomen (19%); 69% developed metachronous metastasis, 31% had synchronous metastatic disease. Most patients (74%) received palliative systemic therapy. The most common first-line treatments were doxorubicin (n = 47) and an anthracycline combined with an alkylator (n = 28). The objective response rate to first-line palliative systemic therapy was 20% and the median progression-free survival was 4.9 months (range 0.1-17.1). The median survival from diagnosis of metastasis was 20.5 months (range 0.4-126.9). On multivariate analysis, metachronous disease, no progressive disease as best response to first-line treatment, the possibility of metastasectomy with curative intent and use of palliative radiotherapy were indicators for better survival. The prognosis of patients with metastatic leiomyosarcoma is limited and objective responses to first-line systemic therapy are rare. The treatment of metastatic leiomyosarcoma remains an unmet medical need. © 2018 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  17. Referrals for complications following hysteroscopic sterilisation: characteristics associated with symptomatic patients after the Essure procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sills, E Scott; Dalton, Marie M

    2016-06-01

    This report summarises recent experience with a series of symptomatic Essure® patients with an emphasis on clinical presentation, preoperative imaging, surgical intervention, and outcome. This case series presents Essure® patients (n = 7) who sought medical consultation for various complications. This retrospective analysis is based on consultations during a six-month interval beginning in April 2015. In this sample, mean (± SD) patient age was 35.9 ± 3.4 yrs. The gravida/parity status was 3.6 ± 1.1 and 2.4 ± 1.4, respectively. Average duration of exposure to Essure® coils among these patients was 25.6 ± 24.5 (range 5-67) months. Except for one woman, these patients had hysteroscopic sterilisation (HS) either with heavy sedation or under general anaesthesia. More than two Essure® devices were implanted in two women. Complications reported after HS included device migration, coil fragmentation, tissue perforation, and vaginal expulsion of Essure® fragment. Three of seven women have required hysterectomy. The current series offers evidence of migration of contraceptive coils as well as Essure® inserts perforating tissue and being spontaneously expelled. Evaluation of symptomatic HS patients should include determining how many devices have been implanted, as some women have more than two.

  18. The effect of mental comorbidity on service delivery planning in primary care: an analysis with particular reference to patients who request referral without prior assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Antonius; Hilbert, Bernadett; Hörlein, Elisabeth; Wagenpfeil, Stefan; Linde, Klaus

    2013-09-01

    In their everyday practice, primary-care physicians are often asked to refer patients to a specialist without a prior appointment in primary care. Such referrals are problematic, and one might suspect that patients who make such requests are more likely to have mental comorbidities predisposing them toward higher utilization of health-care services. In a cross-sectional study, 307 patients of 13 primary-care practices who requested referral to a specialist without a prior appointment in primary care were given a Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ) containing questions that related to depression, anxiety, panic disorder, and somatoform disorder (independent variables). Further information was obtained about these patients' primary-care contacts, referrals, and days taken off from work with a medical excuse over the course of one year (dependent variables). A regression model was used to compare these patients with 977 other primary-care patients. The groups of patients who did and did not request specialist referral without a primary-care appointment did not differ to any statistically significant extent with respect to mental comorbidity. In the overall group, somatoform disorder was found to be associated with a high rate of primary-care contacts (odds ratio [OR] 2.4, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4-4.3). High rates of referral were strongly correlated (percentage of variance explained, R²) with depression (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.1-4.0; R² = 35.3%), anxiety (OR 4.1, 95% CI 1.8-9.6; R² = 34.5%), panic disorder (OR 5.9, 95% CI 2.1-16.4; R² = 34.3%), and somatoform disorder (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.2-4.0; R² = 34.6%). Taking a long time off from work with a medical excuse was correlated with depression (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.2-4.8), anxiety (OR 4.2, 95% CI 1.7-10.5), and somatoform disorder (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.2-4.2). Mental comorbidity contributes to the increased utilization of health-care services. This should be borne in mind whenever a patient requests many referrals to

  19. Spoligotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from tuberculosis diagnosed patients at Dilla University Referral Hospital and other private clinics, Southern Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gebremedhin Gebrezgabiher

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis strains exsisting in Gedeo zone and the surrounding areas of the Southern Ethiopia using spoligotyping. Methods: A cross sectional study was carried out from February, 2012 to June, 2013 and 97 (76 sputum and 21 fine needle aspirate samples were taken from tuberculosis diagnosed patients at Dilla University Referral Hospital and other private clinics. Culturing, region of difference (RD9 deletion typing and spoligotyping techniques were employed to isolate M. tuberculosis strains. Results: Growth of mycobacteria was observed in 35.1% (34/97. Speciation of isolates showed that 91.2% (31/34 of the isolates were M. tuberculosis. Further characterization led to the identification of 23 different spoligotype patterns of M. tuberculosis of which 61% and 39% displayed unique and cluster patterns, respectively. The most dominant shared type was spoligotype international type 53. Of the 23 strains, 12 have not been registered in the international spoligotyping database (SpolDB4. Seventy one percent of the strains belonged to the Euro-American lineage. Conclusions: This study revealed the existence of both genetically diverse and clustered M. tuberculosis strains from tuberculosis patients in the area, suggesting reactivation of infection and recent transmission, respectively. Molecular epidemiology of M. tuberculosis should be done nationwide in order to set appropriate control measures.

  20. Assessment of pattern and treatment outcome of patients admitted to pediatric intensive care unit, Ayder Referral Hospital, Tigray, Ethiopia, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haftu, Hansa; Hailu, Tedrose; Medhaniye, Araya; G/Tsadik, Teklit

    2018-05-24

    To describe admission pattern and outcome with its predictor variable on the mortality of children admitted to pediatric intensive care unit (PICU), Ayder Referral Hospital, Northern Ethiopia, from September 2012 to August 2014. From 680 admitted patients, 400 patients were analyzed. Average age at admission was 62.99 ± 60.94 months, with F:M ratio of 1:1.2. Overall (from infectious and non-infectious) the most commonly affected systems were respiratory (90/400 pts., 22.5%) and central nervous system (83/400 pts., 20.75%). Most were admitted due to meningitis (44/400 pts., 11%), post-operative (43/400 pts., 10.8%) and acute glomerulonephritis (41/400 pts., 10.3%). The overall mortality rate was 8.5%. Multivariable logistic regression shows, use of inotropes (p = 0.000), need for mechanical ventilator (p = 0.007) and presence of comorbid illness (p = 0.002), infectious cause (p = 0.015) and low level of Glasgow coma scale less than eight (p = 0.04) were independent predictors of mortality. From this study, common cause of PICU admission and death was meningitis. This highlights the importance of focusing on the preventable methods in the public such as vaccine, creating awareness about hygiene, and expanding ICU for early detection and for treatment acutely ill children.

  1. Pattern of palliative care, pain management and referral trends in patients receiving radiotherapy at a tertiary cancer center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuldeep Sharma

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pain is a common primary symptom of advanced cancer and metastatic disease, occurring in 50-75% of all patients. Although palliative care and pain management are essential components in oncology practice, studies show that these areas are often inadequately addressed. Materials and Methods: We randomly selected 152 patients receiving palliative radiotherapy (PRT from October 2006 to August 2008, excluding metastatic bone lesions. Patients′ records were studied retrospectively. Results: A median follow-up of 21 weeks was available for 119 males and 33 females with a median age of 55 years. Maximum (60% patients were of head and neck cancers followed by esophagus (14%, lung (10% and others. Dysphagia, growth/ulcer and pain were the chief indications for PRT. Pain was present in 93 (61% cases out of which, 56 (60% were referred to pain clinic. All except one consulted pain clinic with a median pain score of 8 (0-10 point scale. Fifty-three of these 56 patients (96% received opioid-based treatment with adequate pain relief in 33% cases and loss of follow-up in 40% cases. Only five (3% cases were referred to a hospice. Twenty-two (14% cases were considered for radical treatment following excellent response to PRT. Conclusion: In this selective sample, the standard of analgesic treatment was found to be satisfactory. However, there is a lot of scope for improvement regarding referral to pain clinic and later to the hospice. Patients′ follow-up needs to be improved along with future studies evaluating those patients who were considered for further RT till radical dose. Programs to change the patients′ attitude towards palliative care, physicians′ (residents′ training to improve communication skills, and institutional policies may be promising strategies.

  2. Decision-making and referral processes for patients with motor neurone disease: a qualitative study of GP experiences and evaluation of a new decision-support tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Susan; McDermott, Christopher J

    2017-05-08

    The diagnosis of motor neurone disease (MND) is known to be challenging and there may be delay in patients receiving a correct diagnosis. This study investigated the referral process for patients who had been diagnosed with MND, and whether a newly-developed tool (The Red Flags checklist) might help General Practitioners (GPs) in making referral decisions. We carried out interviews with GPs who had recently referred a patient diagnosed with MND, and interviews/surveys with GPs who had not recently referred a patient with suspected MND. We collected data before the Red Flags checklist was introduced; and again one year later. We analysed the data to identify key recurring themes. Forty two GPs took part in the study. The presence of fasciculation was the clinical feature that most commonly led to consideration of a potential MND diagnosis. GPs perceived that their role was to make onward referrals rather than attempting to make a diagnosis, and delays in correct diagnosis tended to occur at the specialist level. A quarter of participants had some awareness of the newly-developed tool; most considered it useful, if incorporated into existing systems. While fasciculation is the most common symptom associated with MND, other bulbar, limb or respiratory features, together with progression should be considered. There is a need for further research into how decision-support tools should be designed and provided, in order to best assist GPs with referral decisions. There is also a need for further work at the level of secondary care, in order that referrals made are re-directed appropriately.

  3. Preoperative fasting times in elective surgical patients at a referral Hospital in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abebe, Worknehe Agegnehu; Rukewe, Ambrose; Bekele, Negussie Alula; Stoffel, Moeng; Dichabeng, Mompelegi Nicoh; Shifa, Jemal Zeberga

    2016-01-01

    Adults and children are required to fast before anaesthesia to reduce the risk of regurgitation and aspiration of gastric contents. However, prolonged periods of fasting are unnecessary and may cause complications. This study was conducted to evaluate preoperative fasting period in our centre and compare it with the ASA recommendations and factors that influence fasting periods. This is a cross-sectional study of preoperative fasting times among elective surgical patients. A total numbers of 260 patients were interviewed as they arrived at the reception area of operating theatre using questionnaire. Majority of patients (98.1%) were instructed to fast from midnight. Fifteen patients (5.8%) reported that they were told the importance of preoperative fasting. The mean fasting period were 15.9±2.5 h (range 12.0-25.3 h) for solids and 15.3±2.3 h (range 12.0-22.0 h) for liquids. The mean duration of fasting was significantly longer for patients operated after midday compared to those operated before midday, pfasting periods were 7.65 times longer for clear liquid and 2.5 times for solids than the ASA guidelines. It is imperative that the Hospital should establish Preoperative fasting policies and teach the staff who should ensure compliance with guidelines.

  4. Preoperative fasting times in elective surgical patients at a referral Hospital in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abebe, Worknehe Agegnehu; Rukewe, Ambrose; Bekele, Negussie Alula; Stoffel, Moeng; Dichabeng, Mompelegi Nicoh; Shifa, Jemal Zeberga

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Adults and children are required to fast before anaesthesia to reduce the risk of regurgitation and aspiration of gastric contents. However, prolonged periods of fasting are unnecessary and may cause complications. This study was conducted to evaluate preoperative fasting period in our centre and compare it with the ASA recommendations and factors that influence fasting periods. Methods This is a cross-sectional study of preoperative fasting times among elective surgical patients. A total numbers of 260 patients were interviewed as they arrived at the reception area of operating theatre using questionnaire. Results Majority of patients (98.1%) were instructed to fast from midnight. Fifteen patients (5.8%) reported that they were told the importance of preoperative fasting. The mean fasting period were 15.9±2.5 h (range 12.0-25.3 h) for solids and 15.3±2.3 h (range 12.0-22.0 h) for liquids. The mean duration of fasting was significantly longer for patients operated after midday compared to those operated before midday, pfasting periods were 7.65 times longer for clear liquid and 2.5 times for solids than the ASA guidelines. It is imperative that the Hospital should establish Preoperative fasting policies and teach the staff who should ensure compliance with guidelines. PMID:27222691

  5. Drug utilization profile in adult patients with refractory epilepsy at a tertiary referral center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila de Freitas-Lima

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the utilization profile of antiepileptic drugs in a population of adult patients with refractory epilepsy attending a tertiary center. Method Descriptive analyses of data were obtained from the medical records of 112 patients. Other clinical and demographic characteristics were also registered. Results Polytherapies with ≥3 antiepileptic drugs were prescribed to 60.7% of patients. Of the old agents, carbamazepine and clobazam were the most commonly prescribed (72.3% and 58.9% of the patients, respectively. Among the new agents, lamotrigine was the most commonly prescribed (36.6% of the patients. At least one old agent was identified in 103 out of the 104 polytherapies, while at least one new agent was prescribed to 70.5% of the population. The most prevalent combination was carbamazepine + clobazam + lamotrigine. The mean AED load found was 3.3 (range 0.4–7.7. Conclusion The pattern of use of individual drugs, although consistent with current treatment guidelines, is strongly influenced by the public health system.

  6. Mainly the younger hypothyroid patients are referred to hospital - Evidence for referral bias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carle, Allan; Laurberg, Peter; Pedersen, Inge Bülow

    2009-01-01

    . Among patient characteristics recorded at the time of diagnosis-age, gender, nosological subgroup of hypothyroidism, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), total thyroxine (T4), total triiodothyronine (T3), thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb), thyroglobulin antibody (TgAb), and calendar year-we searched...

  7. What is the diagnostic yield of colonoscopy in patients with a referral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eighty seven (60.4%) patients had a normal colonoscopy, 20 (13.9%) diverticular disease, 14 (9.7%) polyps of which 6 (4.2%) were neoplastic, and 9 (6.3%) had colorectal cancer. Conclusions: Constipation is associated with CRC. The presence of constipation should be a criterion for colonoscopy regardless of age or any ...

  8. A multidimensional approach to case mix for home health services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manton, Kenneth G.; Hausner, Tony

    1987-01-01

    Developing a case-mix methodology for home health services is more difficult than developing one for hospitalization and acute health services, because the determinants of need for home health care are more complex and because of the difficulty in defining episodes of care. To evaluate home health service case mix, a multivariate grouping methodology was applied to records from the 1982 National Long-Term Care Survey linked to Medicare records on home health reimbursements. Using this method, six distinct health and functional status dimensions were identified. These dimensions, combined with factors describing informal care resources and local market conditions, were used to explain significant proportions of the variance (r2 = .45) of individual differences in Medicare home health reimbursements and numbers of visits. Though the data were not collected for that purpose, the high level of prediction strongly suggests the feasibility of developing case-mix strategies for home health services. PMID:10312187

  9. Quality of life in vitiligo patients: a report from Razi referral University Hospital in Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feizy V

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study aimed to assess the quality of life in vitiligo sufferers and its relationship with a number of variables such as age, gender, educational level, place of residence, marital status, disease duration, disease extension, visibility of lesions and skin phototype (SPT. Methods: In this study we evaluate the quality of life in patients with vitiligo attending Razi Hospital in July and August 2005. Permission from Professor Finlay was obtained to use the DLQI (Dermatology Life Quality Index questionnaire to evaluate the quality of life. One hundred patients with at least one vitiligo patch (age range= 14–57 answered the question-naire. Other survey questions about mentioned variables were also answered. Scoring was done according to Finlay`s guidelines. The higher the score, the greater the impairment of quality of life. Results: The mean DLQI score in our study was 8.16 (sd=5.423 with a minimum of 0 and a maximum of 28. There were statistically significant relationships between DLQI scores and marital status, skin phototype and disease extension independently, but not between DLQI scores and other variables. The mean DLQI score was significantly higher in married compared to single patients. In fact this difference was significant in women. Married women had a statistically higher score than single women while single and married men had no significant difference. Patients with Skin Phototype IV showed a higher DLQI score than other SPTs, which was statistically notable (p=0.000. The patients with more disease extension had higher score that was statistically significant (p=0.000. Conclusions: This study shows that vitiligo has a major impact on the quality of life and indicates specific groups that are most affected by the disease. Hence, dermatologists should pay attention to the psychologic effects of this cosmetic disease and try to decrease its extension and disfiguring effects by various treatment modalities.

  10. Case-mix payment for nursing home care: lessons from Maryland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feder, J; Scanlon, W

    1989-01-01

    Even before Medicare adopted case-based payments for hospitals, some state Medicaid programs employed case-mix payment systems for nursing home care. Their purpose was less to promote cost containment than to improve access to nursing homes for the most costly patients. This paper evaluates one such system, adopted by the state of Maryland in 1983 as part of an overall reimbursement reform. Using data on nursing home patient characteristics, costs, and staffing, as well as interviews with officials and various providers of care, the article shows that Maryland's system was successful in shifting nursing home service away from light-care and toward heavy-care patients. Furthermore, the shift occurred without inducing readily measurable declines in quality of care and with little additional administrative cost (partly because the state built its case-mix system on preexisting patient review activities). Although states could learn from and improve upon Maryland's experience--most notably in offering incentives to improve quality of care and in targeting community care on the light-care patients that nursing homes become less willing to serve--Maryland demonstrates that case-mix payment can change nursing home behavior in desired directions without substantial negative consequences.

  11. Service quality assessment of a referral hospital in southern Iran with SERVQUAL technique: patients' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghamolaei, Teamur; Eftekhaari, Tasnim Eghbal; Rafati, Shideh; Kahnouji, Kobra; Ahangari, Shamsieh; Shahrzad, Mohammad Esmaeil; Kahnouji, Ataollah; Hoseini, Seyedeh Hamideh

    2014-07-27

    Providing services to patients according to their expectations and needs is necessary for the success of an organization in order to remain in the competitive market. Recognizing these needs and expectations is an important step in offering high quality services. This study was designed to determine the service quality gap of the main hospital of Hormozgan province. This cross sectional study was conducted in 2013 in Bandar Abbas ShahidMohammadi Hospital in the south of Iran. All 96 participants of this study were provided by SERVQUAL questionnaire. Data was analyzed by Wilcoxon and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Service quality gaps were seen in all five service quality dimensions and the overall quality of service. The mean of quality perception score and quality expectation score was 3.44 ± 0.693 and 4.736 ± 0.34, respectively. The highest perception was in assurance dimension and the highest expectation was in Responsiveness and assurance dimensions. Also, the lowest perception was in responsiveness dimension and the lowest expectation was about empathy. In this study, 56.1% of participants defined the quality of services as average. According to the results, this hospital was not able to meet patients' expectations completely. Therefore, action must be taken to decrease the gap between the perception and expectation of the patients.

  12. Case-Mix Variables and Predictors for Outcomes of Laparoscopic Hysterectomy: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driessen, Sara R C; Sandberg, Evelien M; la Chapelle, Claire F; Twijnstra, Andries R H; Rhemrev, Johann P T; Jansen, Frank Willem

    2016-01-01

    The assessment of surgical quality is complex, and an adequate case-mix correction is missing in currently applied quality indicators. The purpose of this study is to give an overview of all studies mentioning statistically significant associations between patient characteristics and surgical outcomes for laparoscopic hysterectomy (LH). Additionally, we identified a set of potential case-mix characteristics for LH. This systematic review was conducted according to the Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies in Epidemiology guidelines. We searched PubMed and EMBASE from January 1, 2000 to August 1, 2015. All articles describing statistically significant associations between patient characteristics and adverse outcomes of LH for benign indications were included. Primary outcomes were blood loss, operative time, conversion, and complications. The methodologic quality of the included studies was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale. The included articles were summed per predictor and surgical outcome. Three sets of case-mix characteristics were determined, stratified by different levels of evidence. Eighty-five of 1549 identified studies were considered eligible. Uterine weight and body mass index (BMI) were the most mentioned predictors (described, respectively, 83 and 45 times) in high quality studies. For longer operative time and higher blood loss, uterine weight ≥ 250 to 300 g and ≥500 g and BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2) dominated as predictors. Previous operations, adhesions, and higher age were also considered as predictors for longer operative time. For complications and conversions, the patient characteristics varied widely, and uterine weight, BMI, previous operations, adhesions, and age predominated. Studies of high methodologic quality indicated uterine weight and BMI as relevant case-mix characteristics for all surgical outcomes. For future development of quality indicators of LH and to compare surgical outcomes adequately, a case-mix

  13. Automatic detection of referral patients due to retinal pathologies through data mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quellec, Gwenolé; Lamard, Mathieu; Erginay, Ali; Chabouis, Agnès; Massin, Pascale; Cochener, Béatrice; Cazuguel, Guy

    2016-04-01

    With the increased prevalence of retinal pathologies, automating the detection of these pathologies is becoming more and more relevant. In the past few years, many algorithms have been developed for the automated detection of a specific pathology, typically diabetic retinopathy, using eye fundus photography. No matter how good these algorithms are, we believe many clinicians would not use automatic detection tools focusing on a single pathology and ignoring any other pathology present in the patient's retinas. To solve this issue, an algorithm for characterizing the appearance of abnormal retinas, as well as the appearance of the normal ones, is presented. This algorithm does not focus on individual images: it considers examination records consisting of multiple photographs of each retina, together with contextual information about the patient. Specifically, it relies on data mining in order to learn diagnosis rules from characterizations of fundus examination records. The main novelty is that the content of examination records (images and context) is characterized at multiple levels of spatial and lexical granularity: 1) spatial flexibility is ensured by an adaptive decomposition of composite retinal images into a cascade of regions, 2) lexical granularity is ensured by an adaptive decomposition of the feature space into a cascade of visual words. This multigranular representation allows for great flexibility in automatically characterizing normality and abnormality: it is possible to generate diagnosis rules whose precision and generalization ability can be traded off depending on data availability. A variation on usual data mining algorithms, originally designed to mine static data, is proposed so that contextual and visual data at adaptive granularity levels can be mined. This framework was evaluated in e-ophtha, a dataset of 25,702 examination records from the OPHDIAT screening network, as well as in the publicly-available Messidor dataset. It was successfully

  14. Referral for assisted reproductive technology: Indications and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ramakantb

    Over an 8-year period, 23 consenting infertile patients/ couples were given referral for assisted conception. The median age was 36 years and mean duration of infertility was 43 months. Indications for referral as shown in Table 1 were male factor in five (21.7%) patients, female factor in seven (30.4%) patients, and both ...

  15. Cost-effectiveness of screening and referral to an alcohol health worker in alcohol misusing patients attending an accident and emergency department: a decision-making approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Barbara; Byford, Sarah; Crawford, Mike J; Patton, Robert; Drummond, Colin; Henry, John A; Touquet, Robin

    2006-01-04

    We present the cost and cost-effectiveness of referral to an alcohol health worker (AHW) and information only control in alcohol misusing patients. The study was a pragmatic randomised controlled trial conducted from April 2001 to March 2003 in an accident and emergency department (AED) in a general hospital in London, England. A total of 599 adults identified as drinking hazardously according to the Paddington Alcohol Test were randomised to referral to an alcohol health worker who delivered a brief intervention (n = 287) or to an information only control (n = 312). Total societal costs, including health and social services costs, criminal justice costs and productivity losses, and clinical measures of alcohol consumption were measured. Levels of drinking were observably lower in those referred to an AHW at 12 months follow-up and statistically significantly lower at 6 months follow-up. Total costs were not significantly different at either follow-up. Referral to AHWs in an AED produces favourable clinical outcomes and does not generate a significant increase in cost. A decision-making approach revealed that there is at least a 65% probability that referral to an AHW is more cost-effective than the information only control in reducing alcohol consumption among AED attendees with a hazardous level of drinking.

  16. Sex chromosome aneuploidy in cytogenetic findings of referral patients from south of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najmeh Jouyan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chromosome abnormality (CA including Sex chromosomes abnormality (SCAs is one of the most important causes of disordered sexual development and infertility. SCAs formed by numerical or structural alteration in X and Y chromosomes, are the most frequently CA encountered at both prenatal diagnosis and at birth. Objective: This study describes cytogenetic findings of cases suspected with CA referred for cytogenetic study. Materials and Methods: Blood samples of 4151 patients referred for cytogenetic analysis were cultured for chromosome preparation. Karyotypes were prepared for all samples and G-Banded chromosomes were analyzed using x100 objective lens. Sex chromosome aneuploidy cases were analyzed and categorized in two groups of Turners and Klinefelter’s syndrome (KFS. Results: Out of 230 (5.54% cases with chromosomally abnormal karyotype, 122 (30% cases suspected of sexual disorder showed SCA including 46% Turner’s syndrome, 46% KFS and the remaining other sex chromosome abnormalities. The frequency of classic and mosaic form of Turner’s syndrome was 33% and 67%, this was 55% and 45% for KFS, respectively. Conclusion: This study shows a relatively high sex chromosome abnormality in this region and provides cytogenetic data to assist clinicians and genetic counselors to determine the priority of requesting cytogenetic study. Differences between results from various reports can be due to different genetic background or ethnicity.

  17. Case-mix adjustment of consumer reports about managed behavioral health care and health plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eselius, Laura L; Cleary, Paul D; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Huskamp, Haiden A; Busch, Susan H

    2008-12-01

    To develop a model for adjusting patients' reports of behavioral health care experiences on the Experience of Care and Health Outcomes (ECHO) survey to allow for fair comparisons across health plans. Survey responses from 4,068 individuals enrolled in 21 managed behavioral health plans who received behavioral health care within the previous year (response rate = 48 percent). Potential case-mix adjustors were evaluated by combining information about their predictive power and the amount of within- and between-plan variability. Changes in plan scores and rankings due to case-mix adjustment were quantified. The final case-mix adjustment model included self-reported mental health status, self-reported general health status, alcohol/drug treatment, age, education, and race/ethnicity. The impact of adjustment on plan report scores was modest, but large enough to change some plan rankings. Adjusting plan report scores on the ECHO survey for differences in patient characteristics had modest effects, but still may be important to maintain the credibility of patient reports as a quality metric. Differences between those with self-reported fair/poor health compared with those in excellent/very good health varied by plan, suggesting quality differences associated with health status and underscoring the importance of collecting quality information.

  18. Contribution of case-mix classification to profiling hospital characteristics and productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwabara, Kazuaki; Matsuda, Shinya; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Ishikawa, Koichi B; Horiguchi, Hiromasa; Hayashida, Kenshi; Fujimori, Kenji

    2011-01-01

    Case-mix classification has made it possible to analyze acute care delivery case volumes and resources. Data arising from observed differences have a role in planning health policy. Aggregated length of hospital stay (LOS) and total charges (TC) as measures of resource use were calculated from 34 case-mix groups at 469 hospitals (1,721,274 eligible patients). The difference between mean resource use of all hospitals and the mean resource use of each hospital was subdivided into three components: amount of variation attributable to hospital practice behavior (efficiency); amount attributable to hospital case-mix (complexity); and amount attributable to the interaction. Hospital characteristics were teaching status (academic or community), ownership, disease coverage, patients, and hospital volume. Multivariate analysis was employed to determine the impact of hospital characteristics on efficiency. Mean LOS and TC were greater for academic than community hospitals. Academic hospitals were least associated with LOS and TC efficiency. Low disease coverage was a predictor of TC efficiency while low patient volume was a predictor of unnecessarily long hospital stays. There was an inverse correlation between complexity and efficiency for both LOS and TC. Policy makers should acknowledge that differentiation of hospital function needs careful consideration when measuring efficiency. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Radiologists' responses to inadequate referrals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lysdahl, Kristin Bakke [Oslo University College, Faculty of Health Sciences, Oslo (Norway); University of Oslo, Section for Medical Ethics, Faculty of Medicine, P.O. Box 1130, Blindern, Oslo (Norway); Hofmann, Bjoern Morten [University of Oslo, Section for Medical Ethics, Faculty of Medicine, P.O. Box 1130, Blindern, Oslo (Norway); Gjoevik University College, Faculty of Health Care and Nursing, Gjoevik (Norway); Espeland, Ansgar [Haukeland University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bergen (Norway); University of Bergen, Section for Radiology, Department of Surgical Sciences, Bergen (Norway)

    2010-05-15

    To investigate radiologists' responses to inadequate imaging referrals. A survey was mailed to Norwegian radiologists; 69% responded. They graded the frequencies of actions related to referrals with ambiguous indications or inappropriate examination choices and the contribution of factors preventing and not preventing an examination of doubtful usefulness from being performed as requested. Ninety-five percent (344/361) reported daily or weekly actions related to inadequate referrals. Actions differed among subspecialties. The most frequent were contacting the referrer to clarify the clinical problem and checking test results/information in the medical records. Both actions were more frequent among registrars than specialists and among hospital radiologists than institute radiologists. Institute radiologists were more likely to ask the patient for additional information and to examine the patient clinically. Factors rated as contributing most to prevent doubtful examinations were high risk of serious complications/side effects, high radiation dose and low patient age. Factors facilitating doubtful examinations included respect for the referrer's judgment, patient/next-of-kin wants the examination, patient has arrived, unreachable referrer, and time pressure. In summary, radiologists facing inadequate referrals considered patient safety and sought more information. Vetting referrals on arrival, easier access to referring clinicians, and time for radiologists to handle inadequate referrals may contribute to improved use of imaging. (orig.)

  20. Case mix adjusted variation in cesarean section rate in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesterton, Johan; Ladfors, Lars; Ekenberg Abreu, Anna; Lindgren, Peter; Saltvedt, Sissel; Weichselbraun, Marianne; Amer-Wåhlin, Isis

    2017-05-01

    Cesarean section (CS) rate is a well-established indicator of performance in maternity care and is also related to resource use. Case mix adjustment of CS rates when performing comparisons between hospitals is important. The objective of this study was to estimate case mix adjusted variation in CS rate between hospitals in Sweden. In total, 139 756 deliveries in 2011 and 2012 were identified in administrative systems in seven regions covering 67% of all deliveries in Sweden. Data were linked to the Medical birth register and population data. Twenty-three different sociodemographic and clinical characteristics were used for adjustment. Analyses were performed for the entire study population as well as for two subgroups. Logistic regression was used to analyze differences between hospitals. The overall CS rate was 16.9% (hospital minimum-maximum 12.1-22.6%). Significant variations in CS rate between hospitals were observed after case mix adjustment: hospital odds ratios for CS varied from 0.62 (95% CI 0.53-0.73) to 1.45 (95% CI 1.37-1.52). In nulliparous, cephalic, full-term, singletons the overall CS rate was 14.3% (hospital minimum-maximum: 9.0-19.0%), whereas it was 4.7% for multiparous, cephalic, full-term, singletons with no previous CS (hospital minimum-maximum: 3.2-6.7%). In both subgroups significant variations were observed in case mix adjusted CS rates. Significant differences in CS rate between Swedish hospitals were found after adjusting for differences in case mix. This indicates a potential for fewer interventions and lower resource use in Swedish childbirth care. Best practice sharing and continuous monitoring are important tools for improving childbirth care. © 2017 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  1. Prevalence and Factors Associated with Hydatidiform Mole among Patients Undergoing Uterine Evacuation at Mbarara Regional Referral Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Mulisya

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. We sought to determine the prevalence of and factors associated with hydatidiform molar gestations amongst patients undergoing uterine evacuation at Mbarara Regional Referral Hospital (MRRH, Mbarara, Uganda. Methods. This was a cross-sectional study carried out from November 2016 to February 2017. All patients admitted for uterine evacuation for nonviable pregnancy were included. The study registered 181 patients. Data were collected on sociodemographics, medical conditions, obstetrics, and gynecological factors. The evacuated tissue received a full gross and histopathologic examination. Cases of pathologically suspected complete hydatidiform mole were confirmed by p57 immunohistochemistry. Data were analyzed using STATA 13. Results. The prevalence of hydatidiform mole was 6.1% (11/181. All detected moles were complete hydatidiform moles, and there were no diagnosed partial hydatidiform moles. Clinical diagnosis of molar pregnancy was suspected in 13 patients, but only 69.2% (9/13 were confirmed as molar pregnancies histologically. Two cases were clinically unsuspected. Factors that had a significant relationship with complete hydatidiform mole included maternal age of 35 years and above (aOR 13.5; CI: 1.46–125.31; p=0.00, gestational age beyond the first trimester at the time of uterine evacuation (aOR 6.2; CI: 1.07–36.14; p=0.04, and history of previous abortion (aOR 4.3; CI: 1.00–18.57; p=0.05. Conclusion. The prevalence of complete hydatidiform mole was high at 6.1%. Associated risk factors included advanced maternal age (35 years and above, history of previous abortions, and gestational age beyond the first trimester at the time of evacuations. Recommendations. We recommend putting in place capacity to do routine histopathological examination of all products of conception especially those at high risk for a molar gestation either by clinical suspicion or by risk factors including advanced maternal age, advanced gestational

  2. Paediatric case mix in a rural clinical school is relevant to future practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Helen M; Maley, Moira A L; Playford, Denese E; Nicol, Pam; Evans, Sharon F

    2017-11-29

    Exposure to a representative case mix is essential for clinical learning, with logbooks established as a way of demonstrating patient contacts. Few studies have reported the paediatric case mix available to geographically distributed students within the same medical school. Given international interest in expanding medical teaching locations to rural contexts, equitable case exposure in rural relative to urban settings is topical. The Rural Clinical School of Western Australia locates students up to 3500 km from the urban university for an academic year. There is particular need to examine paediatric case mix as a study reported Australian graduates felt unprepared for paediatric rotations. We asked: Does a rural clinical school provide a paediatric case mix relevant to future practice? How does the paediatric case mix as logged by rural students compare with that by urban students? The 3745 logs of 76 urban and 76 rural consenting medical students were categorised by presenting symptoms and compared to the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) database Major Diagnostic Categories (MDCs). Rural and urban students logged core paediatric cases, in similar order, despite the striking difference in geographic locations. The pattern of overall presenting problems closely corresponded to Australian paediatric hospital admissions. Rural students logged 91% of cases in secondary healthcare settings; urban students logged 90% of cases in tertiary settings. The top four presenting problems were ENT/respiratory, gastrointestinal/urogenital, neurodevelopmental and musculoskeletal; these made up 60% of all cases. Rural and urban students logged similar proportions of infants, children and adolescents, with a variety of case morbidity. Rural clinical school students logged a mix of core paediatric cases relevant to illnesses of Australian children admitted to public hospitals, with similar order and pattern by age group to urban students, despite major differences

  3. Referral expectations of radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, W.L.; Altmaier, E.; Berberoglu, L.; Morris, K.

    1989-01-01

    The expectation of the referring physician are key to developing a successful practice in radiology. Structured interviews with 17 clinicians in both community care and academic practice documented that accuracy of the radiologic report was the single most important factor in clinician satisfaction. Data intercorrelation showed that accuracy of report correlated with frequency of referral (r = .49). Overall satisfaction of the referring physician with radiology correlated with accuracy (r = .69), patient satisfaction (r = .36), and efficiency in archiving (r = .42). These data may be weighted by departmental managers to allocate resources for improving referring physician satisfaction

  4. Case-Mix for Performance Management: A Risk Algorithm Based on ICD-10-CM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jian; Moran, Eileen; Almenoff, Peter L

    2018-06-01

    Accurate risk adjustment is the key to a reliable comparison of cost and quality performance among providers and hospitals. However, the existing case-mix algorithms based on age, sex, and diagnoses can only explain up to 50% of the cost variation. More accurate risk adjustment is desired for provider performance assessment and improvement. To develop a case-mix algorithm that hospitals and payers can use to measure and compare cost and quality performance of their providers. All 6,048,895 patients with valid diagnoses and cost recorded in the US Veterans health care system in fiscal year 2016 were included in this study. The dependent variable was total cost at the patient level, and the explanatory variables were age, sex, and comorbidities represented by 762 clinically homogeneous groups, which were created by expanding the 283 categories from Clinical Classifications Software based on ICD-10-CM codes. The split-sample method was used to assess model overfitting and coefficient stability. The predictive power of the algorithms was ascertained by comparing the R, mean absolute percentage error, root mean square error, predictive ratios, and c-statistics. The expansion of the Clinical Classifications Software categories resulted in higher predictive power. The R reached 0.72 and 0.52 for the transformed and raw scale cost, respectively. The case-mix algorithm we developed based on age, sex, and diagnoses outperformed the existing case-mix models reported in the literature. The method developed in this study can be used by other health systems to produce tailored risk models for their specific purpose.

  5. Length of home hospice care, family-perceived timing of referrals, perceived quality of care, and quality of death and dying in terminally ill cancer patients who died at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Akemi; Morita, Tatsuya; Kawagoe, Shohei; Shimizu, Megumi; Ozawa, Taketoshi; An, Emi; Kobayakawa, Makoto; Tsuneto, Satoru; Shima, Yasuo; Miyashita, Mitsunori

    2015-02-01

    This study aims to clarify the length of home hospice care, family-perceived timing of referrals, and their effects on the family-perceived quality of care and quality of death and dying of terminally ill cancer patients who died at home and identify the determinants of perceived late referrals. A multicenter questionnaire survey was conducted involving 1,052 family members of cancer patients who died at home supported by 15 home-based hospice services throughout Japan. A total of 693 responses were analyzed (effective response rate, 66 %). Patients received home-based hospice care for a median of 35.0 days, and 8.0 % received home hospice care for less than 1 week. While 1.5 % of the families reported the timing of referrals as early, 42 % reported the timing as late or too late. The families of patients with a length of care of less than 4 weeks were more likely to regard the timing of referrals as late or too late. The patients of family members who regarded the timing of referrals as late or too late had a significantly lower perceived quality of care (effect size, 0.18; P = 0.039) and lower quality of death and dying (effect size, 0.15, P = 0.063). Independent determinants of higher likelihoods of perceived late referrals included: frequent visits to emergency departments, patient being unprepared for worsening condition, and patient having concerns about relationship with new doctor. Discharge nurse availability was independently associated with lower likelihoods of perceived late referrals. A significant number of bereaved families regarded the timing of referrals to home hospices as late, and the perceived timing was associated with the family-perceived quality of care and quality of death and dying. Systematic strategies to overcome the barriers related to perceived late referrals are necessary.

  6. Trends in 30-day mortality rate and case mix for paediatric cardiac surgery in the UK between 2000 and 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Katherine L; Crowe, Sonya; Franklin, Rodney; McLean, Andrew; Cunningham, David; Barron, David; Tsang, Victor; Pagel, Christina; Utley, Martin

    2015-01-01

    To explore changes over time in the 30-day mortality rate for paediatric cardiac surgery and to understand the role of attendant changes in the case mix. Included were: all mandatory submissions to the National Institute of Cardiovascular Outcomes Research (NICOR) relating to UK cardiac surgery in patients aged case mix indicators, in 10 consecutive time periods, from 2000 to 2010. Comparisons were made between two 5-year eras of: 30-day mortality, period prevalence and mean age for 30 groups of specific operations. 30-day mortality for an episode of surgical management. Our analysis includes 36 641 surgical episodes with an increase from 2283 episodes in 2000 to 3939 in 2009 (pcase mix became more complex in terms of the percentage of patients case mix complexity, and compares well with international benchmarks. Definitive repair is now more likely at a younger age for selected infants with congenital heart defects.

  7. Assessing the role of case mix in cesarean delivery rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, E; Lang, J M; Heffner, L J; Cohen, A

    1998-07-01

    Implicit in comparisons of unadjusted cesarean rates for hospitals and providers is the assumption that differences result from management practices rather than differences in case mix. This study proposes a method for comparison of cesarean rates that takes the effect of case mix into account. All women delivered of infants at our institution from December 1, 1994, through July 31, 1995, were classified according to whether they received care from community-based practitioners (N=3913) or from the hospital-based practice that serves a higher-risk population (N=1556). Women were categorized according to both obstetric history (nulliparas, multiparas without a previous cesarean, multiparas with a previous cesarean) and the presence of obstetric conditions influencing the risk of cesarean delivery (multiple birth, breech presentation or transverse lie, preterm, no trial of labor for a medical indication). We determined the percent of women in each parity-obstetric condition subgroup and calculated a standardized cesarean rate for the hospital-based practice using the case mix of the community-based practitioners as the standard. The crude cesarean rate was higher for the hospital-based practice (24.4%) than for the community-based practitioners (21.5%), a rate difference of 2.9% (95% confidence interval=0.4%, 5.4%; P=.02). However, the proportion of women falling into categories conferring a high risk of cesarean delivery (multiple pregnancy, breech presentation or transverse lie, preterm, no trial of labor permitted) was twice as high for the hospital-based practice (24.4% hospital, 12.1% community). The standardization indicates that if the hospital-based practitioners had the same case mix as community-based practitioners, their overall cesarean rate would be 20.1%, similar to the 21.5% rate of community providers (rate difference=-1.4%, 95% confidence interval =-3.1%, 0.3%; P=.11). Standardization for case mix provides a mechanism for distinguishing differences

  8. Retrospective analysis of patients undergoing bowel transit reconstruction in a tertiary referral hospital of São Paulo's east side

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac José Felippe Corrêa Neto

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The morbidity and mortality of patients undergoing bowel transit reconstruction reach significant values. Perhaps this and other factors could explain why 30–60% of patients end up with definitive ostomies, even those with initially temporary ostomies, due to the procedure risks. Objective: To analyze retrospectively the medical records of patients undergoing bowel transit reconstruction in one of the SUS referral hospitals in São Paulo from October 2008 to December 2011. Results: The mean age of our patients was 53.9 years and 54% of those 100 patients studied between October 2008 and December 2011 had significant comorbidity. The indication for creating an initial ostomy was malignancy in 43%, and the mean stoma duration 14.3 months. The mortality rate was 6%. Conclusion: Although the bowel transit reconstruction is a procedure quite desired by patients, its indication should be carefully evaluated, with an appropriate consent from the patient. Resumo: Introdução: A morbi-mortalidade de pacientes submetidos à reconstrução de trânsito intestinal alcança valores significativos e, por esse e outros fatores, talvez se explique o fato que de 30 a 60% dos portadores de ostomia intestinal terminal passam a possuí-la de maneira definitiva, apesar de, na maior parte das vezes, ela ser realizada como procedimento provisório com o argumento de maior segurança do paciente. Objetivo: Analisar retrospectivamente os dados de prontuário de pacientes submetidos à reconstrução de trânsito intestinal em um dos hospitais de referência do SUS na cidade de São Paulo no período de outubro de 2008 a dezembro de 2011. Resultados: A média de idade dos pacientes foi de 53,9 anos e 54% dos 100 pacientes estudados no período de outubro de 2008 e dezembro de 2011 padeciam de alguma comorbidade. A indicação para confecção da ostomia inicial decorreu de doença maligna em 43% e o tempo médio de permanência com o estoma foi de 14

  9. Case mix management education in a Canadian hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffat, M; Prociw, M

    1992-01-01

    The Sunnybrook Health Science Centre's matrix organization model includes a traditional departmental structure, a strategic program-based structure and a case management-based structure--the Clinical Unit structure. The Clinical Unit structure allows the centre to give responsibility for the management of case mix and volume to decentralized Clinical Unit teams, each of which manages its own budget. To train physicians and nurses in their respective roles of Medical Unit directors and Nursing Unit directors, Sunnybrook designed unique short courses on financial management and budgeting, and case-costing and case mix management. This paper discusses how these courses were organized, details their contents and explains how they fit into Sunnybrook's program of decentralized management.

  10. Does Assisted Living Capacity Influence Case Mix at Nursing Homes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Jan P; Khushalani, Jaya

    2015-01-01

    Assisted living facilities (ALFs) have grown over the past few decades. If they attract residents with lower care needs away from nursing homes (NHs), NHs may be left with higher case mix residents. We study the relationship between ALF bed market capacity and NH case mix in a state (Virginia) where ALF bed capacity stabilized after a period of growth. Similarly, NH capacity and use had been stable. While it is interesting to study markets in flux, for planning purposes, it is also important to examine what happens after periods of turbulence and adaptation. Our findings show some substitution of ALF for NH care, but the relationship is not linear with ALF market capacity. Communities need to consider the interplay of ALFs and NHs in planning for long-term care services and supports. Policies supporting ALFs may enable care needs to be met in a lower cost setting than the NH.

  11. Does Assisted Living Capacity Influence Case Mix at Nursing Homes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan P. Clement PhD

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Assisted living facilities (ALFs have grown over the past few decades. If they attract residents with lower care needs away from nursing homes (NHs, NHs may be left with higher case mix residents. We study the relationship between ALF bed market capacity and NH case mix in a state (Virginia where ALF bed capacity stabilized after a period of growth. Similarly, NH capacity and use had been stable. While it is interesting to study markets in flux, for planning purposes, it is also important to examine what happens after periods of turbulence and adaptation. Our findings show some substitution of ALF for NH care, but the relationship is not linear with ALF market capacity. Communities need to consider the interplay of ALFs and NHs in planning for long-term care services and supports. Policies supporting ALFs may enable care needs to be met in a lower cost setting than the NH.

  12. Are patients’ preferences regarding the place of treatment heard and addressed at the point of referral: an exploratory study based on observations of GP-patient consultations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Today, in several north-western European countries, patients are encouraged to choose, actively, a healthcare provider. However, patients often visit the provider that is recommended by their general practitioner (GP). The introduction of patient choice requires GPs to support patients to be involved, actively, in the choice of a healthcare provider. We aim to investigate whether policy on patient choice is reflected in practice, i.e. what the role of the patient is in their choices of healthcare providers at the point of referral and to what extent GPs’ and patients’ healthcare paths influence the role that patients play in the referral decision. Methods In 2007–2008, we videotaped Dutch GP-patient consultations. For this study, we selected, at random, 72 videotaped consultations between 72 patients and 39 GPs in which the patient was referred to a healthcare provider. These were analysed using an observation protocol developed by the researchers. Results The majority of the patients had little or no input into the choice of a healthcare provider at the point of referral by their GP. Their GPs did not support them in actively choosing a provider and the patients often agreed with the provider that the GP proposed. Patients who were referred for diagnostic purposes seem to have had even less input into their choice of a provider than patients who were referred for treatment. Conclusions We found that the GP chooses a healthcare provider on behalf of the patient in most consultations, even though policy on patient choice expects from patients that they choose, actively, a provider. On the one hand, this could indicate that the policy needs adjustments. On the other hand, adjustments may be needed to practice. For instance, GPs could help patients to make an active choice of provider. However, certain patients prefer to let their GP decide as their agent. Even then, GPs need to know patients’ preferences, because in a principal-agent relationship

  13. Using Patient Pathway Analysis to Design Patient-centered Referral Networks for Diagnosis and Treatment of Tuberculosis: The Case of the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfin, Celine; Mantala, Mariquita; Yadav, Rajendra; Hanson, Christy L; Osberg, Mike; Hymoff, Aaron; Makayova, Julia

    2017-11-06

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the 8th leading cause of death in the Philippines. A recent prevalence survey found that there were nearly 70% more cases of tuberculosis than previously estimated. Given these new data, the National TB Program (NTP), operating through a decentralized health system, identified about 58% of the estimated new drug-sensitive (DS) TB patients in 2016. However, the NTP only identified and commenced treatment for around 17% of estimated new drug-resistant patients. In order to reach the remaining 42% of drug-sensitive patients and 83% of drug-resistant patients, it is necessary to develop a better understanding of where patients seek care. National and regional patient pathway analyses (PPAs) were undertaken using existing national survey and NTP data. The PPA assessed the alignment between patient care seeking and the availability of TB diagnostic and treatment services. Systemic referral networks from the community-level Barangay Health Stations (BHSs) to diagnostic facilities have enabled more efficient detection of drug-sensitive tuberculosis in the public sector. Approximately 36% of patients initiated care in the private sector, where there is limited coverage of appropriate diagnostic technologies. Important differences in the alignment between care seeking patterns and diagnostic and treatment availability were found between regions. The PPA identified opportunities for strengthening access to care for all forms of tuberculosis and for accelerating the time to diagnosis by aligning services to where patients initiate care. Geographic variations in care seeking may guide prioritization of some regions for intensified engagement with the private sector. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  14. Functional mapping of hospitals by diagnosis-dominant case-mix analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horiguchi Hiromasa

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Principles and methods for the allocation of healthcare resources among healthcare providers have long been health policy research issues in many countries. Healthcare reforms including the development of a new case-mix system, Diagnosis Procedure Combination (DPC, and the introduction of a DPC-based payment system are currently underway in Japan, and a methodology for adequately assessing the functions of healthcare providers is needed to determine healthcare resource allocations. Methods By two-dimensional mapping of the rarity and complexity of diagnoses for patients receiving treatment, we were able to quantitatively demonstrate differences in the functions of different healthcare service provider groups. Results On average, inpatients had diseases that were 3.6-times rarer than those seen in outpatients, while major teaching hospitals treated inpatients with diseases 3.0-times rarer on average than those seen at small hospitals. Conclusion We created and evaluated a new indicator for DPC, the diagnosis-dominant case-mix system developed in Japan, whereby the system was used to assess the functions of healthcare service providers. The results suggest that it is possible to apply the case-mix system to the integrated evaluation of outpatient and inpatient healthcare services and to the appropriate allocation of healthcare resources among health service providers.

  15. Evaluating performance of local case-mix system by international comparison: a case study in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Wei-Yan; Lu, Ming; Cui, Tao; Hu, Mu

    2011-01-01

    Case-mix is an important tool for health planning and management in many countries. As a major developing country, China is considering the introduction of the case-mix system in the health reform. Beijing, the capital of China, developed a local case-mix version whose performance needs to be evaluated before utilization. The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of the case-mix system developed in Beijing by comparing it with those used in Australia and the U.S.A. A total of 1.3 million inpatient records from 154 hospitals in Beijing in 2008 were grouped respectively using three case-mix systems: (i) Beijing Diagnosis Related Groups (BJ-DRGs); (ii) US-based All Patient DRGs; and (iii) Australian Refined DRGs. Coefficient of variation (CV) and reduction in variance (RIV) were used to measure the performance of DRGs system. The BJ-DRGs produced the best CV and RIV results for expenditure. However, at the level of Major Diagnostic Category (MDC), three MDCs of BJ-DRGs gave the poorest RIVs for both expenditure and length of stay. Although the performance of BJ-DRGs was acceptable, further revision and improvement is needed. Comparisons with other mature DRGs versions can assist in identifying the improvement priorities of the local version. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Stable overall referral rates of primary radiotherapy for newly diagnosed cancer patients in the ageing population of South-Eastern Netherlands, 1975-1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lybeert, Marnix L.M.; Louwman, Marieke; Coebergh, Jan-Willem W.

    2004-01-01

    Background and purpose: To determine the primary radiotherapy (RT) consumption in a population of almost one million inhabitants, served by one RT centre. Primary RT was defined as being planned, started or finished within 4-6 months of diagnosis. Application was evaluated according to tumour category, stage and year of diagnosis during three 8-year periods: 1975-1982, 1983 -1990 and 1991-1998. Results: Most patients were between 60 and 75 years. The number of patients receiving primary RT increased with 3% annually over the whole studied period, but remained proportionally stable for males at 30% and decreased for females from 36.2 to 34.6%. A decrease of referral rates for patients with gynaecological cancer was observed. The introduction of breast-conserving therapy in 1981 and of population screening for women aged 50-69 years in 1992 led to a considerable increase of primary RT. The eightfold increase in number of irradiated patients with localised prostate cancer rather reflected a higher detection rate than an increased referral rate. Except for an important increase of irradiated patients with rectal cancer, largely due to the shift to preoperative RT since 1994, and of patients with brain cancer, only slight alterations in referral rates were observed for the other cancers. Conclusions: Use of primary RT remained proportionally steady and modest. The marked increase in workload was mainly due to more and earlier detection of breast and prostate cancer and treatment changes in rectal cancer. Decreases were observed for each of the gynecological cancers

  17. Nontrauma emergency surgery: optimal case mix for general surgery and acute care surgery training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry-Bukowiec, Jill R; Miller, Barbra S; Doherty, Gerard M; Brunsvold, Melissa E; Hemmila, Mark R; Park, Pauline K; Raghavendran, Krishnan; Sihler, Kristen C; Wahl, Wendy L; Wang, Stewart C; Napolitano, Lena M

    2011-11-01

    To examine the case mix and patient characteristics and outcomes of the nontrauma emergency (NTE) service in an academic Division of Acute Care Surgery. An NTE service (attending, chief resident, postgraduate year-3 and postgraduate year-2 residents, and two physician assistants) was created in July 2005 for all urgent and emergent inpatient and emergency department general surgery patient consults and admissions. An NTE database was created with prospective data collection of all NTE admissions initiated from November 1, 2007. Prospective data were collected by a dedicated trauma registrar and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation-intensive care unit (ICU) coordinator daily. NTE case mix and ICU characteristics were reviewed for the 2-year time period January 1, 2008, through December 31, 2009. During the same time period, trauma operative cases and procedures were examined and compared with the NTE case mix. Thousand seven hundred eight patients were admitted to the NTE service during this time period (789 in 2008 and 910 in 2009). Surgical intervention was required in 70% of patients admitted to the NTE service. Exploratory laparotomy or laparoscopy was performed in 449 NTE patients, comprising 37% of all surgical procedures. In comparison, only 118 trauma patients (5.9% of admissions) required a major laparotomy or thoracotomy during the same time period. Acuity of illness of NTE patients was high, with a significant portion (13%) of NTE patients requiring ICU admission. NTE patients had higher admission Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation III scores [61.2 vs. 58.8 (2008); 58.2 vs. 55.8 (2009)], increased mortality [(9.71% vs. 4.89% (2008); 6.78% vs. 5.16% (2009)], and increased readmission rates (15.5% vs. 7.4%) compared with the total surgical ICU (SICU) admissions. In an era of declining operative caseload in trauma, the NTE service provides ample opportunity for complex general surgery decision making and operative procedures for

  18. The impact of case mix on timely access to appointments in a primary care group practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozen, Asli; Balasubramanian, Hari

    2013-06-01

    At the heart of the practice of primary care is the concept of a physician panel. A panel refers to the set of patients for whose long term, holistic care the physician is responsible. A physician's appointment burden is determined by the size and composition of the panel. Size refers to the number of patients in the panel while composition refers to the case-mix, or the type of patients (older versus younger, healthy versus chronic patients), in the panel. In this paper, we quantify the impact of the size and case-mix on the ability of a multi-provider practice to provide adequate access to its empanelled patients. We use overflow frequency, or the probability that the demand exceeds the capacity, as a measure of access. We formulate problem of minimizing the maximum overflow for a multi-physician practice as a non-linear integer programming problem and establish structural insights that enable us to create simple yet near optimal heuristic strategies to change panels. This optimization framework helps a practice: (1) quantify the imbalances across physicians due to the variation in case mix and panel size, and the resulting effect on access; and (2) determine how panels can be altered in the least disruptive way to improve access. We illustrate our methodology using four test practices created using patient level data from the primary care practice at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. An important advantage of our approach is that it can be implemented in an Excel Spreadsheet and used for aggregate level planning and panel management decisions.

  19. Development of a quarterly referral productivity report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Cai; Sandoval, Alex; Hicks, Katrina N; Edwards, Tim J; Green, Lyle D

    2007-10-11

    The Office of Physician Relations at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC) has developed a dynamic referral productivity reporting tool for its Multidisciplinary Care Centers (MCC). The tool leverages information within the institution's Enterprise Information Warehouse (EIW) using business intelligent software Hyperion Intelligent Explorer Suite 8.3. the referral productivity reports are intended to provide each MCC with detailed referral and registration data outlining how, and from where, patients arrive here for treatment. The reports supports operational and strategic initiatives aimed at improving referral processes and market related program development.

  20. Temporal Trends in Disease Severity and Predicted Surgical Risk at the Time of Referral for Echocardiography in Patients Diagnosed with Aortic Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ersboll, Mads; Samad, Zainab; Al Enezi, Fawaz

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Calcific aortic stenosis (AS) is the most common underlying pathology in patients undergoing heart valve surgery, with an expected increasing prevalence among the aging population. METHODS AND RESULTS: We identified the temporal trends in referral patterns, disease severity, and assoc......BACKGROUND: Calcific aortic stenosis (AS) is the most common underlying pathology in patients undergoing heart valve surgery, with an expected increasing prevalence among the aging population. METHODS AND RESULTS: We identified the temporal trends in referral patterns, disease severity......, and associated surgical risk among patients with AS between January 1, 1995 and December 31, 2012 at the Duke University Hospital. A total of 6103 patients had a finding of mild (n = 3303), moderate (n = 1648), or severe AS (n = 1152) in a native aortic valve. Overall presence of severe AS increased...... with a finding of severe AS, the proportion of patients aged older than 80 years increased to 51.0% in the most recent time period (2010-2012) compared with 32.6% in the preceding time period (P proportion of patients with a logistic EuroSCORE greater than 20...

  1. Sweet syndrome in patients with and without malignancy: A retrospective analysis of 83 patients from a tertiary academic referral center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Caroline A; Noe, Megan H; McMahon, Christine M; Gowda, Asha; Wu, Benedict; Ashchyan, Hovik J; Perl, Alexander E; James, William D; Micheletti, Robert G; Rosenbach, Misha

    2018-02-01

    Sweet syndrome is a neutrophilic dermatosis that may be categorized into classic, malignancy-associated, and drug-induced subtypes. Few studies have systematically analyzed this rare disorder. To describe the clinicopathologic characteristics and treatment of Sweet syndrome and identify characteristics associated with concurrent malignancy. We retrospectively reviewed patients with Sweet syndrome at the University of Pennsylvania from 2005 to 2015. We identified 83 patients (mean age, 57 years; 51% male) with Sweet syndrome: 30% with the classic form, 44% with the malignancy-associated form, 24% with the drug-induced form in the setting of malignancy, and 2% with the drug-induced form. Acute myeloid leukemia was the most common malignancy (in 24 of 83 patients [29%]). Filgrastim was the most common medication (used in 8 of 83 patients [10%]). Leukopenia (P Sweet syndrome, dermatologists should be aware of the potential association of leukopenia, anemia, thrombocytopenia, absence of arthralgia, and histiocytoid or subcutaneous histopathology with malignancy. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. evaluative study of medical doctors' mode of referral for physiother

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Olwafemi Odebiyi

    physicians' mode of referral of patients for physiotherapy in Nigeria. A total of 1192 physicians .... The Influence of Medical School of Graduation. Table 1 shows the .... This must have also been responsible for the high rate of referral observed.

  3. Diagnostic Accuracy of Dual-Source Computerized Tomography Coronary Angiography in Symptomatic Patients Presenting to a Referral Cardiovascular Center During Daily Clinical Practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahdavi, Arash; Mohammadzadeh, Ali; Joodi, Golsa; Tabatabaei, Mohammad Reza; Sheikholeslami, Farhad; Motevalli, Marzieh

    2016-01-01

    There are numerous studies that address the diagnostic value of dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) as an alternative to conventional coronary angiography (CCA). However, the benefit of application of DSCT in a real world clinical setting should be evaluated. To determine the diagnostic accuracy of DSCT technique compared with CCA as the gold standard method in detection of coronary artery stenosis among symptomatic patients who are presented to a referral cardiovascular center during daily clinical practice. Evaluating the medical records of a tertiary care referral cardiovascular center, 47 patients who had undergone DSCT and CCA, and also met the inclusion and exclusion criteria of the study were selected. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and likelihood ratios (LRs) of the DSCT imaging technique were calculated. In total, 97.8% of the segments (628/642) could be visualized with diagnostic image quality via DSCT coronary angiography. The mean heart rate during DSCT was 69.2 ± 12.2 bpm (range: 39 - 83 bpm), and the mean Agatston score was 507.7 ± 590.5 (range: 0 - 2328). Per segment analysis of the findings revealed that the sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, positive LR (PLR) and negative LR (NLR) of DSCT technique for evaluation of patients with coronary artery disease were 93.7%, 96.8%, 92.7%, 97.2%, 29.4, and 0.066, respectively. Also per vessel, analysis of the findings showed a sensitivity of 97.1%, a specificity of 94.0%, PPV of 95.3%, NPV of 96.3%, PLR of 16.1, and NLR of 0.030. Our results indicate that DSCT coronary angiography provides high diagnostic accuracy for the evaluation of CAD patients during daily routine practice of a referral cardiovascular setting

  4. Short Stature Diagnosis and Referral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Maghnie

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The “360° GH in Europe” meeting, which examined various aspects of GH diseases, was held in Lisbon, Portugal, in June 2016. The Merck KGaA (Germany funded meeting comprised three sessions entitled “Short Stature Diagnosis and Referral,” “Optimizing Patient Management,” and “Managing Transition.” Each session had three speaker presentations, followed by a discussion period, and is reported as a manuscript, authored by the speakers. The first session examined current processes of diagnosis and referral by endocrine specialists for pediatric patients with short stature. Requirements for referral vary widely, by country and by patient characteristics such as age. A balance must be made to ensure eligible patients get referred while healthcare systems are not over-burdened by excessive referrals. Late referral and diagnosis of non-GH deficiency conditions can result in increased morbidity and mortality. The consequent delays in making a diagnosis may compromise the effectiveness of GH treatment. Algorithms for growth monitoring and evaluation of skeletal disproportions can improve identification of non-GH deficiency conditions. Performance and validation of guidelines for diagnosis of GH deficiency have not been sufficiently tested. Provocative tests for investigation of GH deficiency remain equivocal, with insufficient information on variations due to patient characteristics, and cutoff values for definition differ not only by country but also by the assay used. When referring and diagnosing causes of short stature in pediatric patients, clinicians need to rely on many factors, but the most essential is clinical experience.

  5. Primary care physician referral patterns in Ontario, Canada: a descriptive analysis of self-reported referral data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddy, Clare; Arbab-Tafti, Sadaf; Moroz, Isabella; Keely, Erin

    2017-08-22

    In many countries, the referral-consultation process faces a number of challenges from inefficiencies and rising demand, resulting in excessive wait times for many specialties. We collected referral data from a sample of family doctors across the province of Ontario, Canada as part of a larger program of research. The purpose of this study is to describe referral patterns from primary care to specialist and allied health services from the primary care perspective. We conducted a prospective study of patient referral data submitted by primary care providers (PCP) from 20 clinics across Ontario between June 2014 and January 2016. Monthly referral volumes expressed as a total number of referrals to all medical and allied health professionals per month. For each referral, we also collected data on the specialty type, reason for referral, and whether the referral was for a procedure. PCPs submitted a median of 26 referrals per month (interquartile range 11.5 to 31.8). Of 9509 referrals eligible for analysis, 97.8% were directed to medical professionals and 2.2% to allied health professionals. 55% of medical referrals were directed to non-surgical specialties and 44.8% to surgical specialties. Medical referrals were for procedures in 30.8% of cases and non-procedural in 40.9%. Gastroenterology received the largest share (11.2%) of medical referrals, of which 62.3% were for colonoscopies. Psychology received the largest share (28.3%) of referrals to allied health professionals. We described patterns of patient referral from primary care to specialist and allied health services for 30 PCPs in 20 clinics across Ontario. Gastroenterology received the largest share of referrals, nearly two-thirds of which were for colonoscopies. Future studies should explore the use of virtual care to help manage non-procedural referrals and examine the impact that procedural referrals have on wait times for gastroenterology.

  6. Interdisciplinary expert consultation via a teleradiology platform. Influence on therapeutic decision-making and patient referral rates to an academic tertiary care center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helck, Andreas; Matzko, M.; Trumm, C.G.; Grosse, C.; Reiser, M.; Ertl-Wagner, B.; Piltz, S.

    2009-01-01

    In addition to teleradiological reporting as a nighthawking or a regular service, teleradiological communication can be used for interdisciplinary expert consultation. We intended to evaluate an interdisciplinary consultation system based on a teleradiology platform with regard to its impact on therapeutic decision-making, directed patient referrals to an academic tertiary care center and the economic benefit for the hospital providing the service. Therefore, consultations from five secondary care centers and consecutive admissions to an academic tertiary care center were prospectively evaluated over a time period of six months. A total of 69 interdisciplinary expert consultations were performed. In 54% of the cases the patients were consecutively referred to the university hospital for further treatment. In all acutely life-threatening emergencies (n=9), fast and focused treatment by referral to the academic tertiary care center was achieved (average time to treat 130 min). The admissions to the academic tertiary care center led to improved utilization of its facilities with additional revenue of more than 1 000 000 Euro p.a. An interdisciplinary expert consultation via a teleradiology platform enables fast and efficient expert care with improved and accelerated patient management and improved utilization of the service providing hospital. (orig.)

  7. Case-mix adjustment approach to benchmarking prevalence rates of nosocomial infection in hospitals in Cyprus and Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritsotakis, Evangelos I; Dimitriadis, Ioannis; Roumbelaki, Maria; Vounou, Emelia; Kontou, Maria; Papakyriakou, Panikos; Koliou-Mazeri, Maria; Varthalitis, Ioannis; Vrouchos, George; Troulakis, George; Gikas, Achilleas

    2008-08-01

    To examine the effect of heterogeneous case mix for a benchmarking analysis and interhospital comparison of the prevalence rates of nosocomial infection. Cross-sectional survey. Eleven hospitals located in Cyprus and in the region of Crete in Greece. The survey included all inpatients in the medical, surgical, pediatric, and gynecology-obstetrics wards, as well as those in intensive care units. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria were used to define nosocomial infection. The information collected for all patients included demographic characteristics, primary admission diagnosis, Karnofsky functional status index, Charlson comorbidity index, McCabe-Jackson severity of illness classification, use of antibiotics, and prior exposures to medical and surgical risk factors. Outcome data were also recorded for all patients. Case mix-adjusted rates were calculated by using a multivariate logistic regression model for nosocomial infection risk and an indirect standardization method.Results. The overall prevalence rate of nosocomial infection was 7.0% (95% confidence interval, 5.9%-8.3%) among 1,832 screened patients. Significant variation in nosocomial infection rates was observed across hospitals (range, 2.2%-9.6%). Logistic regression analysis indicated that the mean predicted risk of nosocomial infection across hospitals ranged from 3.7% to 10.3%, suggesting considerable variation in patient risk. Case mix-adjusted rates ranged from 2.6% to 12.4%, and the relative ranking of hospitals was affected by case-mix adjustment in 8 cases (72.8%). Nosocomial infection was significantly and independently associated with mortality (adjusted odds ratio, 3.6 [95% confidence interval, 2.1-6.1]). The first attempt to rank the risk of nosocomial infection in these regions demonstrated the importance of accounting for heterogeneous case mix before attempting interhospital comparisons.

  8. Risk factors and survival outcome for non-elective referral in non-small cell lung cancer patients--analysis based on the National Lung Cancer Audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, P; Tata, L J; Hubbard, R B

    2014-03-01

    Survival after diagnosis of lung cancer is poor and seemingly lower in the UK than other Western countries, due in large part to late presentation with advanced disease precluding curative treatment. Recent research suggests that around one-third of lung cancer patients reach specialist care after emergency presentation and have a worse survival outcome. Confirmation of these data and understanding which patients are affected may allow a targeted approach to improving outcomes. We used data from the UK National Lung Cancer Audit in a multivariate logistic regression model to quantify the association of non-elective referral in non-small cell lung cancer patients with covariates including age, sex, stage, performance status, co-morbidity and socioeconomic status and used the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazards model to quantify survival by source of referral. In an analysis of 133,530 cases of NSCLC who presented 2006-2011, 19% of patients were referred non-electively (following an emergency admission to hospital or following an emergency presentation to A&E). This route of referral was strongly associated with more advanced disease stage (e.g. in Stage IV - OR: 2.34, 95% CI: 2.14-2.57, p<0.001) and worse performance status (e.g. in PS 4 - OR: 7.28, 95% CI: 6.75-7.86, p<0.001), but was also independently associated with worse socioeconomic status, and extremes of age. These patients were more likely to have died within 1 year of diagnosis (hazard ratio of 1.51 (95% CI: 1.49-1.54) after adjustment for key clinical variables. Our data confirm and quantify poorer survival in lung cancer patients who are referred non-electively to specialist care, which is more common in patients with poorer performance status, higher disease stage and less advantaged socioeconomic status. Work to tackle this late presentation should be urgently accelerated, since its realisation holds the promise of improved outcomes and better healthcare resource utilisation. Copyright

  9. Level of insulin adherence among diabetes mellitus patients in Felege Hiwot Referral Hospital, Bahir Dar, Northwest Ethiopia, 2017: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewabe, Tilahun; Kindie, Selamsew

    2018-05-11

    The objective of this study was to know the level of insulin adherence and to identify factors affecting insulin adherence among diabetes mellitus patients in Felege Hiwot Referral Hospital, Bahir Dar, Northwest Ethiopia. Prevalence of insulin adherence was 59.2%. Patients who are married [AOR = 0.3 (0.14-0.7)], have regular health care visit [AOR = 3.3 (1.5-7.5)] and accessing insulin with low cost [AOR = 2.9 (1.3-6.3)] were more likely to adhere insulin therapy than their counterparts. Recommendations to increase insulin adherence were: government and non-governmental organizations, volunteers and concerned bodies should support syringe and needles for diabetes patients, health care providers and responsible bodies should give intensive health education about the effect of stopping insulin medication.

  10. Referral bias in ALS epidemiological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logroscino, Giancarlo; Marin, Benoit; Piccininni, Marco; Arcuti, Simona; Chiò, Adriano; Hardiman, Orla; Rooney, James; Zoccolella, Stefano; Couratier, Philippe; Preux, Pierre-Marie; Beghi, Ettore

    2018-01-01

    Despite concerns about the representativeness of patients from ALS tertiary centers as compared to the ALS general population, the extent of referral bias in clinical studies remains largely unknown. Using data from EURALS consortium we aimed to assess nature, extent and impact of referral bias. Four European ALS population-based registries located in Ireland, Piedmont, Puglia, Italy, and Limousin, France, covering 50 million person-years, participated. Demographic and clinic characteristics of ALS patients diagnosed in tertiary referral centers were contrasted with the whole ALS populations enrolled in registries in the same geographical areas. Patients referred to ALS centers were younger (with difference ranging from 1.1 years to 2.4 years), less likely to present a bulbar onset, with a higher proportion of familial antecedents and a longer survival (ranging from 11% to 15%) when compared to the entire ALS population in the same geographic area. A trend for referral bias is present in cohorts drawn from ALS referral centers. The magnitude of the possible referral bias in a particular tertiary center can be estimated through a comparison with ALS patients drawn from registry in the same geographic area. Studies based on clinical cohorts should be cautiously interpreted. The presence of a registry in the same area may improve the complete ascertainment in the referral center.

  11. Predicting 6- and 12-Month Risk of Mortality in Patients With Platinum-Resistant Advanced-Stage Ovarian Cancer: Prognostic Model to Guide Palliative Care Referrals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foote, Jonathan; Lopez-Acevedo, Micael; Samsa, Gregory; Lee, Paula S; Kamal, Arif H; Alvarez Secord, Angeles; Havrilesky, Laura J

    2018-02-01

    Predictive models are increasingly being used in clinical practice. The aim of the study was to develop a predictive model to identify patients with platinum-resistant ovarian cancer with a prognosis of less than 6 to 12 months who may benefit from immediate referral to hospice care. A retrospective chart review identified patients with platinum-resistant epithelial ovarian cancer who were treated at our institution between 2000 and 2011. A predictive model for survival was constructed based on the time from development of platinum resistance to death. Multivariate logistic regression modeling was used to identify significant survival predictors and to develop a predictive model. The following variables were included: time from diagnosis to platinum resistance, initial stage, debulking status, number of relapses, comorbidity score, albumin, hemoglobin, CA-125 levels, liver/lung metastasis, and the presence of a significant clinical event (SCE). An SCE was defined as a malignant bowel obstruction, pleural effusion, or ascites occurring on or before the diagnosis of platinum resistance. One hundred sixty-four patients met inclusion criteria. In the regression analysis, only an SCE and the presence of liver or lung metastasis were associated with poorer short-term survival (P < 0.001). Nine percent of patients with an SCE or liver or lung metastasis survived 6 months or greater and 0% survived 12 months or greater, compared with 85% and 67% of patients without an SCE or liver or lung metastasis, respectively. Patients with platinum-resistant ovarian cancer who have experienced an SCE or liver or lung metastasis have a high risk of death within 6 months and should be considered for immediate referral to hospice care.

  12. The relationship between effectiveness and costs measured by a risk-adjusted case-mix system: multicentre study of Catalonian population data bases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flor-Serra Ferran

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The main objective of this study is to measure the relationship between morbidity, direct health care costs and the degree of clinical effectiveness (resolution of health centres and health professionals by the retrospective application of Adjusted Clinical Groups in a Spanish population setting. The secondary objectives are to determine the factors determining inadequate correlations and the opinion of health professionals on these instruments. Methods/Design We will carry out a multi-centre, retrospective study using patient records from 15 primary health care centres and population data bases. The main measurements will be: general variables (age and sex, centre, service [family medicine, paediatrics], and medical unit, dependent variables (mean number of visits, episodes and direct costs, co-morbidity (Johns Hopkins University Adjusted Clinical Groups Case-Mix System and effectiveness. The totality of centres/patients will be considered as the standard for comparison. The efficiency index for visits, tests (laboratory, radiology, others, referrals, pharmaceutical prescriptions and total will be calculated as the ratio: observed variables/variables expected by indirect standardization. The model of cost/patient/year will differentiate fixed/semi-fixed (visits costs of the variables for each patient attended/year (N = 350,000 inhabitants. The mean relative weights of the cost of care will be obtained. The effectiveness will be measured using a set of 50 indicators of process, efficiency and/or health results, and an adjusted synthetic index will be constructed (method: percentile 50. The correlation between the efficiency (relative-weights and synthetic (by centre and physician indices will be established using the coefficient of determination. The opinion/degree of acceptance of physicians (N = 1,000 will be measured using a structured questionnaire including various dimensions. Statistical analysis: multiple regression

  13. Why doctors do not answer referral letters

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Referral letters act as permission slips to allow patients easy access to ... Methods: A qualitative study method was used, as the purpose of this study was to .... The total list of topics ..... Research design: qualitative and quantitative approaches.

  14. [Home health resource utilization measures using a case-mix adjustor model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Sun-Ju; Chang, Hyun-Sook

    2005-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure home health resource utilization using a Case-Mix Adjustor Model developed in the U.S. The subjects of this study were 484 patients who had received home health care more than 4 visits during a 60-day episode at 31 home health care institutions. Data on the 484 patients had to be merged onto a 60-day payment segment. Based on the results, the researcher classified home health resource groups (HHRG). The subjects were classified into 34 HHRGs in Korea. Home health resource utilization according to clinical severity was in order of Minimum (C0) service utilization moderate), and the lowest 97,000 won in group C2F3S1, so the former was 5.82 times higher than the latter. Resource utilization in home health care has become an issue of concern due to rising costs for home health care. The results suggest the need for more analytical attention on the utilization and expenditures for home care using a Case-Mix Adjustor Model.

  15. Risk adjustment for case mix and the effect of surgeon volume on morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, Matthew B; Jaff, Michael R; Rordorf, Guy A

    2013-06-01

    Retrospective studies of large administrative databases have shown higher mortality for procedures performed by low-volume surgeons, but the adequacy of risk adjustment in those studies is in doubt. To determine whether the relationship between surgeon volume and outcomes is an artifact of case mix using a prospective sample of carotid endarterectomy cases. Observational cohort study from January 1, 2008, through December 31, 2010, with preoperative, immediate postoperative, and 30-day postoperative assessments acquired by independent monitors. Urban, tertiary academic medical center. All 841 patients who underwent carotid endarterectomy performed by a vascular surgeon or cerebrovascular neurosurgeon at the institution. Carotid endarterectomy without another concurrent surgery. Stroke, death, and other surgical complications occurring within 30 days of surgery along with other case data. A low-volume surgeon performed 40 or fewer cases per year. Variables used in a comparison administrative database study, as well as variables identified by our univariate analysis, were used for adjusted analyses to assess for an association between low-volume surgeons and the rate of stroke and death as well as other complications. RESULTS The rate of stroke and death was 6.9% for low-volume surgeons and 2.0% for high-volume surgeons (P = .001). Complications were similarly higher (13.4% vs 7.2%, P = .008). Low-volume surgeons performed more nonelective cases. Low-volume surgeons were significantly associated with stroke and death in the unadjusted analysis as well as after adjustment with variables used in the administrative database study (odds ratio, 3.61; 95% CI, 1.70-7.67, and odds ratio, 3.68; 95% CI, 1.72-7.89, respectively). However, adjusting for the significant disparity of American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status classification in case mix eliminated the effect of surgeon volume on the rate of stroke and death (odds ratio, 1.65; 95% CI, 0.59-4.64) and other

  16. Evaluation of specialist referrals at a rural health care clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggerstaff, Mary Ellen; Short, Nancy

    2017-07-01

    Transition to a value-based care system involves reducing costs improving population health and enhancing the patient experience. Many rural hospitals must rely on specialist referrals because of a lack of an internal system of specialists on staff. This evaluation of the existing specialist referrals from primary care was conducted to better understand and improve the referral process and address costs, population health, and the patient experience. A 6-month retrospective chart review was conducted to evaluate quality and outcomes of specialty referrals submitted by 10 primary care providers. During a 6-month period in 2015, there was a total of 13,601 primary care patient visits and 3814 referrals, a referral rate of approximately 27%. The most striking result of this review was that nearly 50% of referred patients were not making the prescribed specialist appointment. Rather than finding a large number of unnecessary referrals, we found overall referral rates higher than expected, and a large percentage of our patients were not completing their referrals. The data and patterns emerging from this investigation would guide the development of referral protocols for a newly formed accountable care organization and lead to further quality improvement projects: a LEAN effort, dissemination of results to clinical and executive staff, protocols for orthopedic and neurosurgical referrals, and recommendations for future process improvements. ©2017 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  17. Understanding case mix across three paediatric services: could integration of primary and secondary general paediatrics alter walk-in emergency attendances?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Lloyd; Coote, Nicky; Klaber, Robert; Watson, Mando; Coren, Michael

    2018-05-04

    To understand the case mix of three different paediatric services, reasons for using an acute paediatric service in a region of developing integrated care and where acute attendances could alternatively have been managed. Mixed methods service evaluation, including retrospective review of referrals to general paediatric outpatients (n=534) and a virtual integrated service (email advice line) (n=474), as well as a prospective survey of paediatric ambulatory unit (PAU) attendees (n=95) and review by a paediatric consultant/registrar to decide where these cases could alternatively have been managed. The case mix of outpatient referrals and the email advice line was similar, but the case mix for PAU was more acute.The most common parental reasons for attending PAU were referral by a community health professional (27.2%), not being able to get a general practitioner (GP) appointment when desired (21.7%), wanting to avoid accident and emergency (17.4%) and wanting specialist paediatric input (14.1%). More than half of PAU presentations were deemed most appropriate for community management by a GP or midwife. The proportion of cases suitable for community management varied by the reason for attendance, with it highestl for parents reporting not being able to get a GP appointment (85%), and lowest for those referred by community health professionals (29%). One in two attendances to acute paediatric services could have been managed in the community. Integration of paediatric services could help address parental reasons for attending acute services, as well as facilitating the community management of chronic conditions. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  18. Direct access and patient/client self-referral to physiotherapy: a review of contemporary practice within the European Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bury, T J; Stokes, E K

    2013-12-01

    Direct access refers to service users being able to refer themselves to physiotherapy without a third-party referral. It represents a model of practice supported globally by the profession, growing research evidence and health policy in some health systems. To the authors' knowledge, no research has been reported to ascertain the extent to which direct access is available within the physiotherapy profession within the European Union (EU). To survey member organisations of the World Confederation for Physical Therapy (WCPT); establish the number of member states within the EU where it is possible for individuals seeking physiotherapy services to self-refer; describe the legislative/regulatory and reimbursement contexts in which physiotherapy services are delivered; examine if physiotherapy practice is different in member states where direct access is permitted compared with member states where direct access is not permitted; and to describe the barriers and facilitators to direct access perceived by member organisations of the WCPT. Cross-sectional, online survey using a purposive sample. Member organisations of the WCPT in the EU. Direct access is not available in all member states of the EU, despite the majority having legislation to regulate the profession, and entry-level education programmes that produce graduates with the requisite competencies. Key barriers perceived are those that can influence policy development, including the views of the medical profession and politicians. Support of service users and politicians, as well as professional autonomy, are seen as key facilitators. These results represent the first report of a comprehensive mapping of direct access to physiotherapy and contexts within the EU. In over half of member states, service users can self-refer to physiotherapists. These results provide insights to further individuals' understanding about the similarities and differences in working practices and service delivery factors, such as

  19. Causes of death in hospitalised HIV-infected patients at a National Referral Centre in Singapore: a retrospective review from 2008 to 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Chen Seong; Lo, Francis A; Cavailler, Philippe; Ng, Oon Tek; Lee, Cheng Chuan; Leo, Yee Sin; Chua, Arlene C

    2012-12-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has improved outcomes for individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This study describes the causes of death in hospitalised HIV-positive patients from 2008 to 2010 in Tan Tock Seng Hospital, the national referral centre for HIV management in Singapore. Data were retrospectively collected from HIV-positive patients who died in Tan Tock Seng Hospital from January 2008 to December 2010. Sixty-seven deaths occurred in the study period. A majority of patients died of non-acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)-defining illnesses (54.7%). The median CD4 count was 39.5 (range, 20.0 to 97.0), and 7 patients had HIV viral loads of <200 copies/mL. There were 27 deaths due to opportunistic infections, 27 due to non AIDS-defining infections, 4 due to non AIDS-associated malignancies. This study also describes 3 deaths due to cardiovascular events, and 1 due to hepatic failure. Patients who had virologic suppression were more likely to die from non AIDS-defining causes. Causes of death in HIV-positive patients have changed in the HAART era. More research is required to further understand and address barriers to testing and treatment to further improve outcomes in HIV/AIDS.

  20. Physician Referral Patterns

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The physician referral data was initially provided as a response to a Freedom of Information (FOIA) request. These files represent data from 2009 through June 2013...

  1. Characteristics and clinical management of patients admitted to cholera wards in a regional referral hospital during the 2012 epidemic in Sierra Leone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Blacklock

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: In 2012, Sierra Leone suffered a nationwide cholera epidemic which affected the capital Freetown and also the provinces. This study aims to describe the characteristics and clinical management of patients admitted to cholera isolation wards of the main referral hospital in the Northern Province and compare management with standard guidelines. Design: All available clinical records of patients from the cholera isolation wards were reviewed retrospectively. There was no active case finding. The following data were collected from the clinical records after patients had left the ward: date of admission, demographics, symptoms, dehydration status, diagnoses, tests and treatments given, length of stay, and outcomes. Results: A total of 798 patients were admitted, of whom 443 (55.5% were female. There were 18 deaths (2.3%. Assessment of dehydration status was recorded in 517 (64.8% of clinical records. An alternative or additional diagnosis was made for 214 patients (26.8%. Intravenous (IV fluids were prescribed to 767 patients (96.1%, including 95% of 141 patients who had documentation of being not severely dehydrated. A history of vomiting was documented in 92.1% of all patients. Oral rehydration solution (ORS was given to 629 (78.8% patients. Doxycycline was given to 380 (47.6% patients, erythromycin to 34 (4.3%, and other antibiotics were used on 247 occasions. Zinc was given to 209 (26.2%. Discussion: This retrospective study highlights the need for efforts to improve the quality of triage, adherence to clinical guidance, and record keeping. Conclusions: Data collection and analysis of clinical practices during an epidemic situation would enable faster identification of those areas requiring intervention and improvement.

  2. Age-Related Health Hazards in Old Patients with First-Time Referral to a Rheumatologist: A Descriptive Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. van Lankveld

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study the prevalence of generic age-related health hazards in elderly patient referred to a rheumatologist. Methods. Patients aged 75 or older referred to a specialized gerontorheumatological outpatient service over a period of 2 years were studied prospectively to determine the prevalence of comorbidities, a history of falls, inactivity, cognitive dysfunction, loneliness, and depression in this patient group. Results. A group of 154 patients were included in the study. Comorbidities were observed in 88% of the patients. At least one fall was reported in the last year by 44% of the patients; 44% of the patients reported low levels of health-enhancing physical activity. Depressed mood and loneliness were elevated in 30% and 31% of the patients, respectively. Mild or moderate cognitive impairment was observed in 13% of the patients. Conclusion. Patients in this study were characterized by poor physical ability, high levels of pain, and high prevalence of age-related health hazards.

  3. Introduction of electronic referral from community associated with more timely review by secondary services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, J; White, S; Day, K J; Gu, Y; Pollock, M

    2011-01-01

    Electronic referral (eReferral) from community into public secondary healthcare services was introduced to 30 referring general medical practices and 28 hospital based services in late 2007. To measure the extent of uptake of eReferral and its association with changes in referral processing. Analysis of transactional data from the eReferral message service and the patient information management system of the affected hospital; interview of clinical, operational and management stakeholders. eReferral use rose steadily to 1000 transactions per month in 2008, thereafter showing moderate growth to 1200 per month in 2010. Rate of eReferral from the community in 2010 is estimated at 56% of total referrals to the hospital from general practice, and as 71% of referrals from those having done at least one referral electronically. Referral latency from letter date to hospital triage improves significantly from 2007 to 2009 (psystem usability issues. With eReferrals, a referral's status can be checked, and its content read, by any authorized user at any time. The period of eReferral uptake was associated with significant speed-up in referral processing without changes in staffing levels. The eReferral system provides a foundation for further innovation in the community-secondary interface, such as electronic decision support and shared care planning systems. We observed substantial rapid voluntary uptake of eReferrals associated with faster, more reliable and more transparent referral processing.

  4. The adaptation of the Sheffield Profile for Assessment and Referral for Care (SPARC) to the Polish clinical setting for needs assessment of advanced cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppert, Wojciech; Majkowicz, Mikolaj; Ahmedzai, Sam H

    2012-12-01

    Assessment of the needs of advanced cancer patients is a very important issue in palliative care. The aim of the study was to adapt the Sheffield Profile for Assessment and Referral for Care (SPARC) to the Polish environment and evaluate its usefulness in needs assessment of patients with advanced cancer. A forward-back translation of the SPARC to Polish was done. The SPARC was used once in 58 consecutive patients with advanced cancer during follow-up. The patients were enrolled from a palliative care unit (25 patients), home care (18 patients), and a day care center (15 patients). The reliability was evaluated by establishing the internal consistency using Cronbach's alpha coefficients. Content validity was analyzed in accordance with the theories of needs by Murray and Maslow as a nonstatistical method of validity assessment. Factor analysis with principal components extraction and varimax rotation of raw data was used to reduce the set of data and assess the construct validity. There were differences regarding religious and spiritual issues and independence and activity between patients in the palliative care unit (worse results) and those at the day care center (better scores). Communication and need for more information items were associated with psychological, social, spiritual, and treatment issues. Cronbach's alpha coefficients and factor analysis demonstrated, respectively, satisfactory reliability and construct validity of the tool. The study demonstrated that the Polish version of the SPARC is a valid and reliable tool recommended for the needs assessment and symptom evaluation of patients with advanced cancer. Copyright © 2012 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Influence of functional dependence on the case mix in a geriatric unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Guerrero, José Luis; Alonso-Fernández, Teresa; Gálvez, Noemí; García-Mayolín, Nieves

    2008-01-01

    To determine the influence of pre-admission functional status on the case mix in a geriatric unit, after adjustment by the diagnosis-related groups (DRG) patient classification system. We performed a retrospective observational study in patients admitted to the geriatric unit of a general hospital over a 2-year period. Patients with a length of stay of less than 2 days and transfers from other medical services and hospitals were excluded. The following data were obtained from the minimum data set and from chart review: age, sex, place of residence before admission, Charlson comorbidity index, pre-admission functional status and mobility, cognitive status, length of hospital stay, rate of in-hospital mortality, and the DRG (and DRG weight) for each patient. A total of 1065 patients were included in this study. The mean age was 84 years (64-102), and 64% were women. Patients with lower functional status were more often female (67.1 vs 55.8%; PDRG weight (P=.03). Once the more frequent DRG were reviewed, patients who were dependent had a greater number of respiratory infections and renal problems and had fewer cerebrovascular diseases. Some clinical characteristics differ in patients with functional dependence. This finding could influence the clinical management of medical services that treat more dependent patients.

  6. Determinants of virological failure among patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy in University of Gondar Referral Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayu, Belete; Tariku, Amare; Bulti, Abera Balcha; Habitu, Yohannes Ayanaw; Derso, Terefe; Teshome, Destaw Fetene

    2017-01-01

    Viral load monitoring is used as an important biomarker for diagnosing treatment failure in patients with HIV infection/AIDS. Ethiopia has started targeted viral load monitoring. However, factors leading to virological failure are not well understood and studied. Thus, the aim of this study was to identify the determinants of virological failure among HIV-infected patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy at the University of Gondar Referral Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia. A case-control study was conducted from May to June 2015. Cases were subjects who had already experienced virological failure; controls were those without virological failure. Data were extracted from 153 cases and 153 controls through chart review. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was carried out to identify factors associated with virological failure, and variables with a p -value failure was observed among patients aged failure. Therefore, evidence-based intervention should be implemented to improve adherence to ART, which in turn helps to boost immunity (CD4) and suppresses viral replication and load. Moreover, attention should be given to younger patients who have had ART for longer periods.

  7. Variation in Surgical Quality Measure Adherence within Hospital Referral Regions: Do Publicly Reported Surgical Quality Measures Distinguish among Hospitals That Patients Are Likely to Compare?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safavi, Kyan C; Dai, Feng; Gilbertsen, Todd A; Schonberger, Robert B

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine whether surgical quality measures that Medicare publicly reports provide a basis for patients to choose a hospital from within their geographic region. Data Source The Department of Health and Human Services' public reporting website, Medicare Claims Processing Manual Baltimore, MD CMS http://www.medicare.gov/hospitalcompare. Study Design We identified hospitals (n = 2,953) reporting adherence rates to the quality measures intended to reduce surgical site infections (Surgical Care Improvement Project, 1–3) in 2012. We defined regions within which patients were likely to compare hospitals using the hospital referral regions (HRRs) from the Dartmouth Atlas of Health Care Project. We described distributions of reported SCIP adherence within each HRR, including medians, interquartile ranges (IQRs), skewness, and outliers. Principal Findings Ninety-seven percent of HRRs had median SCIP-1 scores ≥95 percent. In 93 percent of HRRs, half of the hospitals in the HRR were within 5 percent of the median hospital's score. In 62 percent of HRRs, hospitals were skewed toward the higher rates (negative skewness). Seven percent of HRRs demonstrated positive skewness. Only 1 percent had a positive outlier. SCIP-2 and SCIP-3 demonstrated similar distributions. Conclusions Publicly reported quality measures for surgical site infection prevention do not distinguish the majority of hospitals that patients are likely to choose from when selecting a surgical provider. More studies are needed to improve public reporting's ability to positively impact patient decision making. PMID:24611578

  8. Is travel-time to a specialist centre a risk factor for non-referral, non-attendance and loss to follow-up among patients with hepatitis C (HCV) infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astell-Burt, Thomas; Flowerdew, Robin; Boyle, Paul; Dillon, John

    2012-07-01

    Little is known about why many people diagnosed with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection fail to reach and stay within specialist care services. We used a Geographic Information System and logit regression to investigate whether travel-time to a specialist centre was associated with an increased likelihood of non-referral, non-attendance and loss to follow-up among persons diagnosed with HCV between 1991 and 2003 in Tayside, Scotland (UK). Information was available on referral to, and utilisation of, the single HCV specialist centre in Tayside between 1991 and 2006. Longer travel-time to a specialist centre was associated with an increased likelihood of non-referral to a specialist centre following diagnosis (Odds Ratio: 1.25, 95% Confidence Interval: 1.09, 1.44). Patients living further from an HCV specialist centre were less likely to be referred to it for treatment that could cure their HCV infection. Neither a history of intravenous drug use (IDU), nor area deprivation predicted non-referral. Subsequent to referral, travel-time to a specialist centre was not associated with either non-attendance (0.83 (0.56, 1.21)) or loss to follow-up (0.98 (0.78, 1.22)), although a history of IDU was a strong predictor of both non-attendance and loss to follow-up. Non-attendance was less likely among older patients, while loss to follow-up was more common among those living in deprived areas. Once referred, patients appear able to cope with stress and financial cost of long and frequent journeys to hospital. However, as rates of referral improve from more geographically remote areas, long travel-times to an HCV specialist centre may become an important factor determining future utilisation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Clinical and Laboratory Characteristics of Patients with Nontuberculous Mycobacterium Bloodstream Infection in a Tertiary Referral Hospital in Beijing, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sai-Nan Bian

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: We reported all cases in our hospital diagnosed with bloodstream NTM infection that was rarely reported. In this group of patients, patients usually had a high fever and could have multiple organ involvements. All patients with poor prognosis had underlying diseases.

  10. Acute Care Referral Systems in Liberia: Transfer and Referral Capabilities in a Low-Income Country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jimin; Barreix, Maria; Babcock, Christine; Bills, Corey B

    2017-12-01

    Introduction Following two decades of armed conflict in Liberia, over 95% of health care facilities were partially or completely destroyed. Although the Liberian health system has undergone significant rehabilitation, one particular weakness is the lack of organized systems for referral and prehospital care. Acute care referral systems are a critical component of effective health care delivery and have led to improved quality of care and patient outcomes. Problem This study aimed to characterize the referral and transfer systems in the largest county of Liberia. A cross-sectional, health referral survey of a representative sample of health facilities in Montserrado County, Liberia was performed. A systematic random sample of all primary health care (PHC) clinics, fraction proportional to district population size, and all secondary and tertiary health facilities were included in the study sample. Collected data included baseline information about the health facility, patient flow, and qualitative and quantitative data regarding referral practices. A total of 62 health facilities-41 PHC clinics, 11 health centers (HCs), and 10 referral hospitals (RHs)-were surveyed during the 6-week study period. In sum, three percent of patients were referred to a higher-level of care. Communication between health facilities was largely unsystematic, with lack of specific protocols (n=3; 5.0%) and standardized documentation (n=26; 44.0%) for referral. While most health facilities reported walking as the primary means by which patients presented to initial health facilities (n=50; 81.0%), private vehicles, including commercial taxis (n=37; 60.0%), were the primary transport mechanism for referral of patients between health facilities. This study identified several weaknesses in acute care referral systems in Liberia, including lack of systematic care protocols for transfer, documentation, communication, and transport. However, several informal, well-functioning mechanisms for

  11. Nursing home case-mix reimbursement in Mississippi and South Dakota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arling, Greg; Daneman, Barry

    2002-04-01

    To evaluate the effects of nursing home case-mix reimbursement on facility case mix and costs in Mississippi and South Dakota. Secondary data from resident assessments and Medicaid cost reports from 154 Mississippi and 107 South Dakota nursing facilities in 1992 and 1994, before and after implementation of new case-mix reimbursement systems. The study relied on a two-wave panel design to examine case mix (resident acuity) and direct care costs in 1-year periods before and after implementation of a nursing home case-mix reimbursement system. Cross-lagged regression models were used to assess change in case mix and costs between periods while taking into account facility characteristics. Facility-level measures were constructed from Medicaid cost reports and Minimum Data Set-Plus assessment records supplied by each state. Resident case mix was based on the RUG-III classification system. Facility case-mix scores and direct care costs increased significantly between periods in both states. Changes in facility costs and case mix were significantly related in a positive direction. Medicare utilization and the rate of hospitalizations from the nursing facility also increased significantly between periods, particularly in Mississippi. The case-mix reimbursement systems appeared to achieve their intended goals: improved access for heavy-care residents and increased direct care expenditures in facilities with higher acuity residents. However, increases in Medicare utilization may have influenced facility case mix or costs, and some facilities may have been unprepared to care for higher acuity residents, as indicated by increased rates of hospitalization.

  12. Individual polyp detection rate in routine daily endoscopy practice depends on case-mix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loffeld, R J L F; Liberov, B; Dekkers, P E P

    2015-07-01

    The adenoma detection rate (ADR), a marker of endoscopic quality, is confounded by selection bias. It is not known what the ADR is in normal daily practice. To study the polyp detection rate (PDR) in different endoscopists in the course of years. All consecutive endoscopies of the colon done in 11 years were included. Endoscopies in the regular surveillance programme after polyp removal and after surgery because of colorectal cancer or diverticular disease were scored separately. The number of yearly procedures per endoscopist and presence of polyps, anastomoses, surveillance and cancer were noted. In the period of 11 years, 14,908 consecutive endoscopies of colon and rectum were done by four endoscopists. Two endoscopists had a significantly lower PDR than the other two (p case-mix of patients presented for endoscopy. This result debates the use of the ADR as quality indicator for individual endoscopists.

  13. Automatic referral to cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Jane P

    2008-01-01

    The pervasive negative impact of cardiovascular disease in the United States is well documented. Although advances have been made, the campaign to reduce the occurrence, progression, and mortality continues. Determining evidence-based data is only half the battle. Implementing new and updated clinical guidelines into daily practice is a challenging task. Cardiac rehabilitation is an example of a proven intervention whose benefit is hindered through erratic implementation. The American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation (AACVPR), the American College of Cardiology (ACC), and the American Heart Association (AHA) have responded to this problem by publishing the AACVPR/ACC/AHA 2007 Performance Measures on Cardiac Rehabilitation for Referral to and Delivery of Cardiac Rehabilitation/Secondary Prevention Services. This new national guideline recommends automatic referral to cardiac rehabilitation for every eligible patient (performance measure A-1). This article offers guidance for the initiation of an automatic referral system, including individualizing your protocol with regard to electronic or paper-based order entry structures.

  14. Referral Criteria from Community Clinics to Pediatric Emergency Departments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Urkin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Referral of patients to a pediatric emergency department (PED should be medically justified and the need for referral well communicated. The objectives of this paper were (1 to create a list of criteria for referral from the community to the PED, (2 to describe how community physicians categorize their need for referral, and (3 to determine agreement between the physician's referral letter and the selected criteria. We present a descriptive study of referrals to the PED of Soroka University Medical Center, Beer-Sheva, Israel, during February to April 2003. A list of 22 criteria for referral was created, using the Delphi method for reaching consensus. One or more criteria could be selected from this list for each referral, by the referring community physicians and, independently, based on the physicians' referral letters, by two consultants, and compared. There were 140 referrals included in the study. A total of 262 criteria for referral were selected by the referring community physicians. The criteria most frequently selected were: “Need for same-day consultation/laboratory/imaging result not available in the community” (32.1%, “Suspected life- or organ-threatening infection” (16.4%, and “Need for hospitalization” (15.7%. Rates of agreement regarding criteria for referral between the referring physicians and the two consultants, and a senior community pediatrician and a senior PED pediatrician, were 57.9 and 48.6%, respectively. We conclude that the standard referral letter does not convey in full the level of need for referral to the PED. A list of criteria for referral could augment efficient utilization of emergency department services and improve communication between community physicians and the PED.

  15. Referral to a Commercial Weight Management Program in Patients With Coronary Heart Disease: A PILOT STUDY IN THE NETHERLANDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minneboo, Madelon; Peters, Ron J G; Miller-Kovach, Karen; Lemmens, Jeanine; Bucx, Jeroen J J

    2015-01-01

    To quantify the impact of a commercial weight management program on weight change in obese patients with coronary heart disease. An observational, single-center pilot study in the Netherlands. Forty-five patients diagnosed with a recent acute coronary syndrome and a body mass index of >30 kg/m2 were recruited. The commercial weight management intervention (Weight Watchers) promotes a hypoenergetic and balanced diet, increased physical activity, and group support. The program included weekly 30-minute in-hospital meetings with an experienced coach. The program was offered in parallel with a cardiac rehabilitation program. Thirty-five patients completed the program. Of these patients, 32 patients (91%) decreased body weight. Mean weight change was -5.8 kg (range: +0.6 kg to -15.4 kg), and 20 patients (57%) achieved the target of 5% weight loss of their initial weight. Twenty-seven patients continued the commercial weight loss program after 14 weeks, the mean followup of these patients was 34 weeks and their mean weight change was -9.1 kg (range: 0.0-23.0 kg). Obese patients, discharged after an acute coronary syndrome, who were referred to a commercial weight management program, achieved significant weight loss. Although this is a nonrandomized pilot study with patients who were selected by motivation and by the ability to participate in the program, the proportion of weight loss is significant and promising.

  16. Expectation and satisfaction of HIV/AIDS patients toward the pharmaceutical care provided at Gondar University Referral Hospital, Northwestern Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abebe TB

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Tamrat Befekadu Abebe,1 Daniel Asfaw Erku,2 Begashaw Melaku Gebresillassie,1 Kaleab Taye Haile,3 Abebe Basazn Mekuria4 1Department of Clinical Pharmacy, 2Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, 3Department of Pharmaceutics, 4Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia Purpose: Measurements of patient satisfaction help to assess the performance of health service provision and predict treatment adherence and outcomes. This study aimed to assess human HIV/AIDS patients’ expectation of and satisfaction with the pharmaceutical service delivered at Gondar University Referral Hospital, Ethiopia. Patients and methods: An institution-based cross-sectional study was performed from May 11 to 25, 2015. A total of 291 patients living with HIV/AIDS were included using a simple random sampling method. Data were collected using structured questionnaires measuring expectation and satisfaction of respondents using a Likert scale of 1–5 through face-to-face interviews. The data collected were entered into and analyzed using Statistical Packages for Social Sciences. Comparison was made between those respondents who lived in and outside the town. Results: The overall mean expectation and satisfaction of respondents toward pharmacy setting and services were 3.62 and 3.13, respectively. More than half (56.1% of the participants were dissatisfied with the comfort and convenience of waiting area and private counseling room. Similarly, 69.3% of the respondents claimed that pharmacy professionals did not give information about side effects and drug–drug and drug–food interactions of antiretroviral medications. There was a statistically significant difference between respondents who live in and outside Gondar town in overall expectation (t=3.415, P=0.001 with the pharmacy setting and services. Conclusion: In this study, the overall satisfaction level of respondents with pharmaceutical service (pharmacy setting and services

  17. The social context and the need of information from patients with epilepsy: evaluating a tertiary referral service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas-Lima, Priscila; Monteiro, Edna Almeida; Macedo, Lígia Ribeiro Horta; Funayama, Sandra Souza; Ferreira, Flávia Isaura Santi; Matias Júnior, Ivair; Angelis, Geisa; Nogueira, Adriana Maria Arantes; Alexandre, Veriano; Velasco, Tonicarlo Rodrigues; Pinheiro-Martins, Ana Paula; Sakamoto, Américo Ceiki

    2015-04-01

    Characterize the social profile and the need of information from patients with refractory epilepsy. A semi-structured questionnaire was applied to 103 patients to investigate sociodemographic aspects, pharmacotherapy and any doubts about epilepsy. Patients were highly dependent on having a free and accessible supply of antiepileptic drugs. Sixty-eight percent of the population was unemployed, and 26% confirmed receiving social security benefits due to epilepsy. Twenty-nine percent of the population reached high school. Eighty-five percent of the patients had at least one doubt about epilepsy; treatment and epilepsy aspects in general were the main topics. As observed in developed countries, patients with refractory epilepsy from a developing country also have high rates of unemployment and low educational levels. The results raise a concern about the need of information about epilepsy by patients and their families, urging the necessity to invest in strategies to solve this deficiency in knowledge.

  18. The social context and the need of information from patients with epilepsy: evaluating a tertiary referral service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Freitas-Lima

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective Characterize the social profile and the need of information from patients with refractory epilepsy. Method A semi-structured questionnaire was applied to 103 patients to investigate sociodemographic aspects, pharmacotherapy and any doubts about epilepsy. Results Patients were highly dependent on having a free and accessible supply of antiepileptic drugs. Sixty-eight percent of the population was unemployed, and 26% confirmed receiving social security benefits due to epilepsy. Twenty-nine percent of the population reached high school. Eighty-five percent of the patients had at least one doubt about epilepsy; treatment and epilepsy aspects in general were the main topics. Conclusion : As observed in developed countries, patients with refractory epilepsy from a developing country also have high rates of unemployment and low educational levels. The results raise a concern about the need of information about epilepsy by patients and their families, urging the necessity to invest in strategies to solve this deficiency in knowledge.

  19. Urodynamics findings in transverse myelitis patients with lower urinary tract symptoms: Results from a tertiary referral urodynamic center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gliga, Louise A; Lavelle, Rebecca S; Christie, Alana L; Coskun, Burhan; Greenberg, Benjamin M; Carmel, Maude E; Lemack, Gary E

    2017-02-01

    To characterize urodynamic findings in patients referred with transverse myelitis (TM) and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), as well as to identify any characteristics predictive of urodynamics findings. This is a retrospective review of an IRB-approved neurogenic bladder database of patients followed by a single surgeon between 2001 and 2013. Patient characteristics, questionnaire data, radiologic studies, and urodynamic parameters were analyzed. Of the 836 patients in the neurogenic bladder database, 28 patients (17 females, 11 males) were referred with a principle diagnosis of TM (3%). Twenty-one of twenty-eight patients (75%) underwent urodynamics testing. Bladder management at initial urologic evaluation was CIC or urethral catheter for 16/28 patients (57.1%). Median MCC was 303 ml (85-840 ml), detrusor overactivity (DO) was present in 16/21 (76%), detrusor sphincter dyssynergia (DSD) in 10/21 (48%), and decreased compliance in 7/21 (33%). For those voiding, mean Qmax was 12 ± 10 ml/sec and pdet at Qmax was 41 ± 17 cmH 2 O. Longitudinally extensive TM (LETM) was the only patient characteristic associated with DO (P = 0.0276). No other patient characteristics were associated with urodynamics parameters. Significant urodynamic testing abnormalities are noted in the majority of TM patients undergoing urodynamics, with 95% having DO, DSD, altered compliance, or detrusor underactivity. Other than the association between LETM and DO, there were no patient characteristics predictive of urodynamics findings. Based on the severity of urodynamics findings in our series, patients with TM and LUTS should have thorough baseline urological evaluations including urodynamics and be offered ongoing surveillance. Neurourol. Urodynam. 36:360-363, 2017. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Neurology referrals to a liaison psychiatry service.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzgerald, P

    2012-02-03

    The objective of the present study was to assess the activity of the Liaison Psychiatry service of Cork University Hospital in relation to all in-patient neurology referrals over a 12-month period. Of 1685 neurology admissions, 106 (6%) were referred to liaison psychiatry for assessment. 91 referrals (86%) met criteria for a psychiatric disorder according to DSM-IV, the commonest being major depression (24%) and somatoform disorder (23%). Patients with multiple sclerosis or epilepsy comprised nearly half of all referrals (48 cases; 45%). Approximately 20% of M.S. in-patients (21 cases) were referred for psychiatric assessment, with the corresponding figure in epilepsy being 25% (18 cases). Although only 106 (6%) neurology in-patients were referred to liaison psychiatry, psychiatric diagnoses were documented in 327 (20%) discharge forms, presumably reflecting previous diagnosis. The above findings indicate that psychiatric illness is common among neurology inpatients screened by liaison psychiatry yet referral rates are relatively low in terms of the overall number of neurology in-patients. Psychiatric disorders were diagnosed in 86% of referrals indicating high concordance between neurologists and liaison psychiatry regarding the presence of a psychiatric disorder.

  1. Direct costs of emergency medical care: a diagnosis-based case-mix classification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraff, L J; Cameron, J M; Sekhon, R

    1991-01-01

    To develop a diagnosis-based case mix classification system for emergency department patient visits based on direct costs of care designed for an outpatient setting. Prospective provider time study with collection of financial data from each hospital's accounts receivable system and medical information, including discharge diagnosis, from hospital medical records. Three community hospital EDs in Los Angeles County during selected times in 1984. Only direct costs of care were included: health care provider time, ED management and clerical personnel excluding registration, nonlabor ED expense including supplies, and ancillary hospital services. Indirect costs for hospitals and physicians, including depreciation and amortization, debt service, utilities, malpractice insurance, administration, billing, registration, and medical records were not included. Costs were derived by valuing provider time based on a formula using annual income or salary and fringe benefits, productivity and direct care factors, and using hospital direct cost to charge ratios. Physician costs were based on a national study of emergency physician income and excluded practice costs. Patients were classified into one of 216 emergency department groups (EDGs) on the basis of the discharge diagnosis, patient disposition, age, and the presence of a limited number of physician procedures. Total mean direct costs ranged from $23 for follow-up visit to $936 for trauma, admitted, with critical care procedure. The mean total direct costs for the 16,771 nonadmitted patients was $69. Of this, 34% was for ED costs, 45% was for ancillary service costs, and 21% was for physician costs. The mean total direct costs for the 1,955 admitted patients was $259. Of this, 23% was for ED costs, 63% was for ancillary service costs, and 14% was for physician costs. Laboratory and radiographic services accounted for approximately 85% of all ancillary service costs and 38% of total direct costs for nonadmitted patients

  2. Referral to a Commercial Weight Management Program in Patients With Coronary Heart Disease: A PILOT STUDY IN THE NETHERLANDS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minneboo, Madelon; Peters, Ron J. G.; Miller-Kovach, Karen; Lemmens, Jeanine; Bucx, Jeroen J. J.

    2015-01-01

    To quantify the impact of a commercial weight management program on weight change in obese patients with coronary heart disease. An observational, single-center pilot study in the Netherlands. Forty-five patients diagnosed with a recent acute coronary syndrome and a body mass index of >30 kg/m2 were

  3. Vacuum assisted wound closure in patients with lower extremity arterial disease. The experience from two tertiary referral-centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordmyr, J; Svensson, S; Björck, M; Acosta, S

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to analyze predictors for wound healing, amputation and mortality after vacuum assisted closure (VAC) therapy of wounds in the lower limb in patients with arterial disease. One hundred and twenty one wounds were treated and followed for 12 months at two vascular centres in Uppsala and Malmö, Sweden. VAC therapy was applied in the wound at a topical negative pressure of 125 mmHg. Median age of the patients was 74 years and critical lower limb ischemia was present in 87% of the patients at admission. Intestinal flora was cultivated in 74% of the wounds. VAC associated bleeding occurred in four patients. Complete wound healing was achieved in 66%. Deep groin infections were associated with synthetic graft infection (Plower amputation rate (PVAC therapy of complex wounds in the lower limbs in patients with vascular disease was associated with high healing rates. Non-healed wounds after VAC therapy were predictors for amputation and death.

  4. Treatment outcomes for patients with Middle Eastern Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS CoV) infection at a coronavirus referral center in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Ghamdi, Mohammed; Alghamdi, Khalid M; Ghandoora, Yasmeen; Alzahrani, Ameera; Salah, Fatmah; Alsulami, Abdulmoatani; Bawayan, Mayada F; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Perl, Trish M; Sood, Geeta

    2016-04-21

    Middle Eastern Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is a poorly understood disease with no known treatments. We describe the clinical features and treatment outcomes of patients with laboratory confirmed MERS-CoV at a regional referral center in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. In 2014, a retrospective chart review was performed on patients with a laboratory confirmed diagnosis of MERS-CoV to determine clinical and treatment characteristics associated with death. Confounding was evaluated and a multivariate logistic regression was performed to assess the independent effect of treatments administered. Fifty-one patients had an overall mortality of 37 %. Most patients were male (78 %) with a mean age of 54 years. Almost a quarter of the patients were healthcare workers (23.5 %) and 41 % had a known exposure to another person with MERS-CoV. Survival was associated with male gender, working as a healthcare worker, history of hypertension, vomiting on admission, elevated respiratory rate, abnormal lung exam, elevated alanine transaminase (ALT), clearance of MERS-CoV on repeat PCR polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing, and mycophenolate mofetil treatment. Survival was reduced in the presence of coronary artery disease, hypotension, hypoxemia, CXR (chest X-ray) abnormalities, leukocytosis, creatinine >1 · 5 mg/dL, thrombocytopenia, anemia, and renal failure. In a multivariate analysis of treatments administered, severity of illness was the greatest predictor of reduced survival. Care for patients with MERS-CoV remains a challenge. In this retrospective cohort, interferon beta and mycophenolate mofetil treatment were predictors of increased survival in the univariate analysis. Severity of illness was the greatest predictor of reduced survival in the multivariate analysis. Larger randomized trials are needed to better evaluate the efficacy of these treatment regimens for MERS-CoV.

  5. Coexistence of lichen sclerosus and morphea: a retrospective analysis of 472 patients with localized scleroderma from a German tertiary referral center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuter, Alexander; Wischnewski, Jana; Terras, Sarah; Altmeyer, Peter; Stücker, Markus; Gambichler, Thilo

    2012-12-01

    The coexistence of lichen sclerosus (LiS) and localized scleroderma (LoS) has sporadically been reported in the literature. Recently, a prospective multicenter study demonstrated a surprisingly high percentage of genital LiS in patients with morphea. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of LiS in a cohort of patients with LoS who presented at a tertiary referral medical center for connective tissue diseases in Germany. We retrospectively evaluated the prevalence of genital and extragenital LiS in adult and pediatric patients with different subtypes of LoS. Secondary outcome measures included demographic characteristics and prevalence of other concomitant autoimmune diseases. Of the 472 patients (381 adults, 91 children; mean age: 46 years; range, 4-88 years; female to male ratio: 3.5:1 in adults and 8:1 in children) with LoS, 27 (5.7%) also presented with LiS (19 extragenital and 8 genital lesions). LiS exclusively occurred in patients with plaque-type (morphea) and generalized LoS. Twenty-six of the 27 (96.2%) patients with concomitant LoS and LiS were adults. Compared with LiS in the general population, LiS was significantly more frequent in LoS as indicated by an odds ratio of 18.1 (95% confidence interval 2.6-134.2; P morphea, should be carefully screened for concomitant LiS, including inspection of the anogenital region. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Electronic referrals: what matters to the users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Jim; Gu, Yulong; Day, Karen; White, Sue; Pollock, Malcolm

    2012-01-01

    Between September 2010 and May 2011 we evaluated three implementations of electronic referral (eReferral) systems at Hutt Valley, Northland and Canterbury District Health Boards in New Zealand. Qualitative and quantitative data were gathered through project documentation, database records and stakeholder interviews. This paper reports on the user perspectives based on interviews with 78 clinical, management and operational stakeholders in the three regions. Themes that emerge across the regions are compared and synthesised. Interviews focused on pre-planned domains including quality of referral, ease of use and patient safety, but agendas were adapted progressively to elaborate and triangulate on themes emerging from earlier interviews and to clarify indications from analysis of database records. The eReferral users, including general practitioners, specialists and administrative staff, report benefits in the areas of: (1) availability and transparency of referral-related data; (2) work transformation; (3) improved data quality and (4) the convenience of auto-population from the practice management system into the referral forms. eReferral provides enhanced visibility of referral data and status within the limits of the implementation (which only goes to the hospital door in some cases). Users in all projects indicated the desire to further exploit IT to enhance two-way communication between community and hospital. Reduced administrative handling is a clear work transformation benefit with mixed feedback regarding clinical workload impact. Innovations such as GP eReferral triaging teams illustrate the further potential for workflow transformation. Consistent structure in eReferrals, as well as simple legibility, enhances data quality. Efficiency and completeness is provided by auto-population of forms from system data, but opens issues around data accuracy. All three projects highlight the importance of user involvement in design, implementation and refinement. In

  7. Faecal immunochemical tests to triage patients with lower abdominal symptoms for suspected colorectal cancer referrals in primary care: a systematic review and cost-effectiveness analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westwood, Marie; Corro Ramos, Isaac; Lang, Shona; Luyendijk, Marianne; Zaim, Remziye; Stirk, Lisa; Al, Maiwenn; Armstrong, Nigel; Kleijnen, Jos

    2017-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in the UK. Presenting symptoms that can be associated with CRC usually have another explanation. Faecal immunochemical tests (FITs) detect blood that is not visible to the naked eye and may help to select patients who are likely to benefit from further investigation. To assess the effectiveness of FITs [OC-Sensor (Eiken Chemical Co./MAST Diagnostics, Tokyo, Japan), HM-JACKarc (Kyowa Medex/Alpha Laboratories Ltd, Tokyo, Japan), FOB Gold (Sentinel/Sysmex, Sentinel Diagnostics, Milan, Italy), RIDASCREEN Hb or RIDASCREEN Hb/Hp complex (R-Biopharm, Darmstadt, Germany)] for primary care triage of people with low-risk symptoms. Twenty-four resources were searched to March 2016. Review methods followed published guidelines. Summary estimates were calculated using a bivariate model or a random-effects logistic regression model. The cost-effectiveness analysis considered long-term costs and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) that were associated with different faecal occult blood tests and direct colonoscopy referral. Modelling comprised a diagnostic decision model, a Markov model for long-term costs and QALYs that were associated with CRC treatment and progression, and a Markov model for QALYs that were associated with no CRC. We included 10 studies. Using a single sample and 10 µg Hb/g faeces threshold, sensitivity estimates for OC-Sensor [92.1%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 86.9% to 95.3%] and HM-JACKarc (100%, 95% CI 71.5% to 100%) indicated that both may be useful to rule out CRC. Specificity estimates were 85.8% (95% CI 78.3% to 91.0%) and 76.6% (95% CI 72.6% to 80.3%). Triage using FITs could rule out CRC and avoid colonoscopy in approximately 75% of symptomatic patients. Data from our systematic review suggest that 22.5-93% of patients with a positive FIT and no CRC have other significant bowel pathologies. The results of the base-case analysis suggested minimal difference in QALYs between all of the

  8. Colorectal cancer patients in a tertiary referral centre in Malaysia: a five year follow-up review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Mohd Radzniwan A; Aziz, Aznida Firzah Abdul; Ahmad, Saharuddin; Shah, Shamsul Azhar; Sagap, Ismail

    2009-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the major malignancies in the world. In Malaysia, CRC is fast becoming the commonest cause of cancer death. Its etiology is complex, involving both environmental and genetic factors. This study looked at the profile and outcome of five-year follow-up of patients with CRC. Retrospective case review study done on CRC patients at University Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre (UKMMC), Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Patientsandapos; socio-demographic characteristics, modalities of treatment, cancer characteristics and outcome at 5-year follow up were extracted from the case records. A total of 107 case records of patients were analyzed. Peak age of CRC presentation was 40-69 years (71.1%). Male to female ratio was 1.2:1 with Chinese predominance (52.3%). Anaemia and its related symptoms including per rectal bleeding was the commonest clinical presentation. The median duration of clinical presentation was 13 weeks (IQR 21.8). More than two-thirds presented as non-emergency cases (69.2%). Most patients presented with Dukes C stage (40.2%). The overall 5-year survival rate was 40% with local recurrence rate of 19.6%. Metastasis after curative-intend treatment (surgery with adjuvant therapy) developed in 26% of patients. Lower recurrence (p = 0.016, OR = 0.205) and metastatic disease (p = 0.02, OR = 0.24) found among the Chinese patients. Almost half of the patients defaulted follow up care (43%), most often within the first year of treatment (22.4%) and the Chinese were the least likely to default (p= 0.04, OR = 0.45). Socio-demographic profile of CRC patients in UKMMC is comparable to Asia pacific region. Apparent delay in seeking treatment gives rise to poor overall survival and local recurrence rates.

  9. Case-mix analysis and variation in rates of non-surgical treatment of older women with operable breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, J; Richards, P; Ward, S; Francis, M; Lawrence, G; Collins, K; Reed, M; Wyld, L

    2015-08-01

    Non-surgical management of older women with oestrogen receptor (ER)-positive operable breast cancer is common in the UK, with up to 40 per cent of women aged over 70 years receiving primary endocrine therapy. Although this may be appropriate for frailer patients, for some it may result in treatment failure, contributing to the poor outcomes seen in this age group. Wide variation in the rates of non-operative management of breast cancer in older women exists across the UK. Case mix may explain some of this variation in practice. Data from two UK regional cancer registries were analysed to determine whether variation in treatment observed between 2002 and 2010 at hospital and clinician level persisted after adjustment for case mix. Expected case mix-adjusted surgery rates were derived by logistic regression using the variables age, proxy Charlson co-morbidity score, deprivation quintile, method of cancer detection, tumour size, stage, grade and node status. Data on 17,129 women aged 70 years or more with ER-positive operable breast cancer were analysed. There was considerable variation in rates of surgery at both hospital and clinician level. Despite adjusting for case mix, this variation persisted at hospital level, although not at clinician level. This study demonstrates variation in selection criteria for older women for operative treatment of early breast cancer, indicating that some older women may be undertreated or overtreated, and may partly explain the inferior disease outcomes in this age group. It emphasizes the urgent need for evidence-based guidelines for treatment selection criteria in older women with breast cancer. © 2015 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Peripheral arterial disease among adult diabetic patients attending a large outpatient diabetic clinic at a national referral hospital in Uganda: a descriptive cross sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Mbayo Mwebaze

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Peripheral arterial disease (PAD is one of the recognised diabetic macro vascular complications. It is a marker of generalised systemic atherosclerosis and is closely associated with symptomatic coronary and cerebrovascular disease, hence significant morbidity and mortality. Among African adult diabetic populations, screening and diagnosis of PAD is frequently suboptimal. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and associated clinical factors of PAD in adult ambulatory diabetic patients attending the outpatient diabetic clinic of Mulago national referral and teaching hospital, Kampala Uganda. METHODS: In this descriptive cross sectional study, 146 ambulatory adult diabetic patients were studied. Information about their socio-demographic and clinical characteristics, fasting lipid profile status, blood pressure, glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c levels and presence of albuminuria was collected using a pre tested questionnaire. Measurement of ankle brachial index (ABI to assess for PAD, defined as a ratio less than 0.9 was performed using a portable 5-10 MHz Doppler device. Clinical factors associated with PAD were determined by comparing specific selected characteristics in patients with PAD and those without. RESULTS: The mean age/standard deviation of the study participants was 53.9/12.4 years with a male predominance (75, 51.4%. PAD was prevalent in 57 (39% study participants. Of these, 34 (59.6% had symptomatic PAD. The noted clinical factors associated with PAD in this study population were presence of symptoms of intermittent claudication and microalbuminuria. CONCLUSIONS: This study documents a high prevalence of PAD among adult ambulatory Ugandan diabetic patients. Aggressive screening for PAD using ABI measurement in adult diabetic patients should be emphasised in Uganda especially in the presence of symptoms of intermittent claudication and microalbuminuria.

  11. Etiology of Sudden Cardiac Arrest in Patients with Epilepsy: Experience of Tertiary Referral Hospital in Sapporo City, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Kei; Ochi, Satoko; Enatsu, Rei; Wanibuchi, Masahiko; Mikuni, Nobuhiro; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Uemura, Shuji; Tanno, Katsuhiko; Narimatsu, Eichi; Maekawa, Kunihiko; Usui, Keiko; Mizobuchi, Masahiro

    2016-05-15

    It has been reported that epilepsy patients had higher risk of sudden death than that of the general population. However, in Japan, there is very little literature on the observational research conducted on sudden fatal events in epilepsy. We performed a single-center, retrospective study on all the out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients treated in our emergency department between 2007 and 2013. Among the OHCA patients, we extracted those with a history of epilepsy and then analyzed the characteristics of the fatal events and the background of epilepsy. From 1,823 OHCA patients, a total of 10 cases were enrolled in our study. The median age was 34 years at the time of the incident [9-52 years; interquartile range (IQR), 24-45]. We determined that half of our cases resulted from external causes of death such as drowning and suffocation and the other half were classified as sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). In addition, asphyxia was implicated as the cause in eight cases. Only the two near-drowning patients were immediately resuscitated, but the remaining eight patients died. The median age of first onset of epilepsy was 12 years (0.5-30; IQR, 3-21), and the median disease duration was 25 years (4-38; IQR, 6-32). Patients with active epilepsy accounted for half of our series and they were undergoing poly anti-epileptic drug therapy. The fatal events related to epilepsy tended to occur in the younger adult by external causes. An appropriate therapeutic intervention and a thorough observation were needed for its prevention.

  12. Transcatheter arterial embolisation in upper gastrointestinal bleeding in a sample of 29 patients in a gastrointestinal referral center in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heining-Kruz, S; Finkenzeller, T; Schreyer, A; Dietl, K H; Kullmann, F; Paetzel, C; Schedel, J

    2015-09-01

    This is a retrospective analysis of interventional embolisation performed with catheter angiography in 29 patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding in the setting of a secondary care hospital. From April 2007 to February 2013, 29 patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding underwent endovascular diagnostics and treatment. The diagnosis was established by endoscopy, computed tomography or clinically based on a significant decrease in hemoglobin. Transcatheter arterial embolisation was performed with coils, liquid embolic agents, and particles. The technical and clinical outcomes were assessed by postinterventional endoscopy, hemoglobin concentrations, number of necessary transfusions, or surgical interventions, as well as by post-interventional mortality within 28 days after the procedure. Selective angiographic embolisation in upper gastrointestinal bleeding was primarily successful technically and clinically in 22 of 29 patients. In 4/29 cases an angiographic reintervention was performed, which was successful in 3 cases. In 3 cases of primarily technically unsuccessful procedures reintervention was not attempted. No catheterisation-related complications were recorded. Peri-interventional mortality was 31%, but only 2 of these patients died due to uncontrolled massive bleeding, whereas the lethal outcome in the other 7 patients was due to their underlying diseases. Transcatheter arterial embolisation is an effective and rapid method in the management of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Radiological endovascular interventions may considerably contribute to reduced mortality in GI bleeding by avoiding a potential surgical procedure following unsuccessful endoscopic treatment. The study underlines the importance of the combination of interventional endoscopy with interventional radiology in secondary care hospitals for patient outcome in complex and complicated upper gastrointestinal bleeding situations. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Survival advantage in black versus white men with CKD: effect of estimated GFR and case mix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovesdy, Csaba P; Quarles, L Darryl; Lott, Evan H; Lu, Jun Ling; Ma, Jennie Z; Molnar, Miklos Z; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2013-08-01

    Black dialysis patients have significantly lower mortality compared with white patients, in contradistinction to the higher mortality seen in blacks in the general population. It is unclear whether a similar paradox exists in patients with non-dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease (CKD), and if it does, what its underlying reasons are. Historical cohort. 518,406 white and 52,402 black male US veterans with non-dialysis-dependent CKD stages 3-5. Black race. We examined overall and CKD stage-specific all-cause mortality using parametric survival models. The effect of sociodemographic characteristics, comorbid conditions, and laboratory characteristics on the observed differences was explored in multivariable models. During a median follow-up of 4.7 years, 172,093 patients died (mortality rate, 71.0 [95% CI, 70.6-71.3] per 1,000 patient-years). Black race was associated with significantly lower crude mortality (HR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.94-0.97; P case-mix and laboratory characteristics occurring during the course of kidney disease. Published by Elsevier Inc. on behalf of the National Kidney Foundation, Inc.

  14. Prolonged Duration of Surgery Predicts Postoperative Hypoparathyroidism among Patients Undergoing Total Thyroidectomy in a Tertiary Referral Centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne-Holm, Emilie; Holst Hahn, Christoffer

    2017-01-01

    , to identify early predictive risk factors. METHODS: Based on a single-institution retrospective review, we identified 582 patients who underwent total thyroidectomy between January 2010 and March 2015. Information on age, gender, pathological diagnosis, duration of surgery, autotransplantation of parathyroid...

  15. Prevalence and factors associated with darunavir resistance mutations in multi-experienced HIV-1-infected patients failing other protease inhibitors in a referral teaching center in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose E Vidal

    Full Text Available Information about resistance profile of darunavir (DRV is scarce in Brazil. Our objectives were to estimate the prevalence of DRV resistance mutations in patients failing protease inhibitors (PI and to identify factors associated with having more DRV resistance mutations. All HIV-infected patients failing PI-based regimens with genotyping performed between 2007 and 2008 in a referral teaching center in São Paulo, Brazil, were included. DRV-specific resistance mutations listed by December 2008 IAS-USA panel update were considered. Two Poisson regression models were constructed to assess factors related to the presence of more DRV resistance mutations. A total of 171 HIV-infected patients with available genotyping were included. The number of patients with lopinavir, saquinavir, and amprenavir used in previous regimen were 130 (76%, 83 (49%, and 35 (20%, respectively. The prevalence of major DRV resistance mutations was 50V: 5%; 54M: 1%; 76V: 4%; 84V: 15%. For minor mutations, the rates were 11I: 3%; 32I: 7%; 33F: 23%; 47V: 6%; 54L: 6%; 74P: 3%; 89V: 6%. Only 11 (6% of the genotypes had > 3 DRV resistance mutations. In the clinical model, time of HIV infection of > 10 years and use of amprenavir were independently associated with having more DRV resistance mutations. In the genotyping-based model, only total number of PI resistance mutations was associated with our outcome. In conclusion, the prevalence of DRV mutations was low. Time of HIV infection, use of amprenavir and total number of PI resistance mutations were associated with having more DRV mutations.

  16. High direct costs of medical care in patients with Type 1 diabetes attending a referral clinic in a government-funded hospital in Northern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katam, Kishore K; Bhatia, Vijayalakshmi; Dabadghao, Preeti; Bhatia, Eesh

    2016-01-01

    There is little information regarding costs of managing type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) from low- and middle-income countries. We estimated direct costs of T1DM in patients attending a referral diabetes clinic in a governmentfunded hospital in northern India. We prospectively enrolled 88 consecutive T1DM patients (mean [SD] age 15.3 [8] years) with age at onset clinic of our institution. Data on direct costs were collected for a 12 months-6 months retrospectively followed by 6 months prospectively. Patients belonged predominantly (77%) to the middle socioeconomic strata (SES); 81% had no access to government subsidy or health insurance. The mean direct cost per patient-year of T1DM was `27 915 (inter-quartile range [IQR] `19 852-32 856), which was 18.6% (7.1%-30.1%) of the total family income. A greater proportion of income was spent by families of lower compared to middle SES (32.6% v. 6.6%, p<0.001). The mean out-of-pocket payment for diabetes care ranged from 2% to 100% (mean 87%) of the total costs. The largest expenditure was on home blood glucose monitoring (40%) and insulin (39.5%). On multivariate analysis, total direct cost was associated with annual family income (β=0.223, p=0.033), frequency of home blood glucose monitoring (β=0.249, p=0.016) and use of analogue insulin (β=0.225, p=0.016). Direct costs of T1DM were high; in proportion to their income the costs were greater in the lower SES. The largest expenditure was on home blood glucose monitoring and insulin. Support for insulin and glucose testing strips for T1DM care is urgently required.

  17. Improving and measuring inpatient documentation of medical care within the MS-DRG system: education, monitoring, and normalized case mix index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Benjamin P; Lorenz, Robert R; Luther, Ralph B; Knowles-Ward, Lisa; Kelly, Dianne L; Weil, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    Documentation of the care delivered to hospitalized patients is a ubiquitous and important aspect of medical care. The majority of references to documentation and coding are based on the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Medicare Severity Diagnosis Related Group (MS-DRG) inpatient prospective payment system (IPPS). We educated the members of a clinical care team in a single department (neurosurgery) at our hospital. We measured subsequent documentation improvements in a simple, meaningful, and reproducible fashion. We created a new metric to measure documentation, termed the "normalized case mix index," that allows comparison of hospitalizations across multiple unrelated MS-DRG groups. Compared to one year earlier, the traditional case mix index, normalized case mix index, severity of illness, and risk of mortality increased one year after the educational intervention. We encourage other organizations to implement and systematically monitor documentation improvement efforts when attempting to determine the accuracy and quality of documentation achieved.

  18. Chiropractors' Characteristics Associated with Physician Referrals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanchette, M. A.; Rivard, M.; Dionne, C. E.

    2015-01-01

    , and the percentage of patients referred to other health care providers were associated with a higher number of MD referrals to DCs. The percentage of patients with somatovisceral conditions, using a particular chiropractic technique (hole in one and Thompson), taking his/her own radiographs, being the client...

  19. Intensive Care in India: The Indian Intensive Care Case Mix and Practice Patterns Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divatia, Jigeeshu V; Amin, Pravin R; Ramakrishnan, Nagarajan; Kapadia, Farhad N; Todi, Subhash; Sahu, Samir; Govil, Deepak; Chawla, Rajesh; Kulkarni, Atul P; Samavedam, Srinivas; Jani, Charu K; Rungta, Narendra; Samaddar, Devi Prasad; Mehta, Sujata; Venkataraman, Ramesh; Hegde, Ashit; Bande, B D; Dhanuka, Sanjay; Singh, Virendra; Tewari, Reshma; Zirpe, Kapil; Sathe, Prachee

    2016-04-01

    To obtain information on organizational aspects, case mix and practices in Indian Intensive Care Units (ICUs). An observational, 4-day point prevalence study was performed between 2010 and 2011 in 4209 patients from 124 ICUs. ICU and patient characteristics, and interventions were recorded for 24 h of the study day, and outcomes till 30 days after the study day. Data were analyzed for 4038 adult patients from 120 ICUs. On the study day, mean age, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE II) and sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) scores were 54.1 ± 17.1 years, 17.4 ± 9.2 and 3.8 ± 3.6, respectively. About 46.4% patients had ≥1 organ failure. Nearly, 37% and 22.2% patients received mechanical ventilation (MV) and vasopressors or inotropes, respectively. Nearly, 12.2% patients developed an infection in the ICU. About 28.3% patients had severe sepsis or septic shock (SvSpSS) during their ICU stay. About 60.7% patients without infection received antibiotics. There were 546 deaths and 183 terminal discharges (TDs) from ICU (including left against medical advice or discharged on request), with ICU mortality 729/4038 (18.1%). In 1627 patients admitted within 24 h of the study day, the standardized mortality ratio was 0.67. The APACHE II and SOFA scores, public hospital ICUs, medical ICUs, inadequately equipped ICUs, medical admission, self-paying patient, presence of SvSpSS, acute respiratory failure or cancer, need for a fluid bolus, and MV were independent predictors of mortality. The high proportion of TDs and the association of public hospitals, self-paying patients, and inadequately equipped hospitals with mortality has important implications for critical care in India.

  20. Implementation of a referral to discharge glycemic control initiative for reduction of surgical site infections in gynecologic oncology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Laura; Brown-Broderick, Jennifer; Hearn, James; Malcolm, Janine; Chan, James; Hicks-Boucher, Wendy; De Sousa, Filomena; Walker, Mark C; Gagné, Sylvain

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the frequency of surgical site infections before and after implementation of a comprehensive, multidisciplinary perioperative glycemic control initiative. As part of a CUSP (Comprehensive Unit-based Safety Program) initiative, between January 5 and December 18, 2015, we implemented comprehensive, multidisciplinary glycemic control initiative to reduce SSI rates in patients undergoing major pelvic surgery for a gynecologic malignancy ('Group II'). Key components of this quality of care initiative included pre-operative HbA1c measurement with special triage for patients meeting criteria for diabetes or pre-diabetes, standardization of available intraoperative insulin choices, rigorous pre-op/intra-op/post-op glucose monitoring with control targets set to maintain BG ≤10mmol/L (180mg/dL) and communication/notification with primary care providers. Effectiveness was evaluated against a similar control group of patients ('Group I') undergoing surgery in 2014 prior to implementation of this initiative. We studied a total of 462 patients. Subjects in the screened (Group II) and comparison (Group I) groups were of similar age (avg. 61.0, 60.0years; p=0.422) and BMI (avg. 31.1, 32.3kg/m 2 ; p=0.257). Descriptive statistics served to compare surgical site infection (SSI) rates and other characteristics across groups. Women undergoing surgery prior to implementation of this algorithm (n=165) had an infection rate of 14.6%. Group II (n=297) showed an over 2-fold reduction in SSI compared to Group I [5.7%; p=0.001, adjRR: 0.45, 95% CI: (0.25, 0.81)]. Additionally, approximately 19% of Group II patients were newly diagnosed with either prediabetes (HbA1C 6.0-6.4) or diabetes (HbA1C≥6.5) and were referred to family or internal medicine for appropriate management. Implementation of a comprehensive multidisciplinary glycemic control initiative can lead to a significant reduction in surgical site infections in addition to early identification of an important health

  1. Interventions targeted at primary care practitioners to improve the identification and referral of patients with co-morbid obesity: a realist review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blane, David N; Macdonald, Sara; Morrison, David; O'Donnell, Catherine A

    2015-05-01

    Obesity is one of the most significant public health challenges in the developed world. Recent policy has suggested that more can be done in primary care to support adults with obesity. In particular, general practitioners (GPs) and practice nurses (PNs) could improve the identification and referral of adults with obesity to appropriate weight management services. Previous interventions targeted at primary care practitioners in this area have had mixed results, suggesting a more complex interplay between patients, practitioners, and systems. The objectives of this review are (i) to identify the underlying 'programme theory' of interventions targeted at primary care practitioners to improve the identification and referral of adults with obesity and (ii) to explore how and why GPs and PNs identify and refer individuals with obesity, particularly in the context of weight-related co-morbidity. This protocol will explain the rationale for using a realist review approach and outline the key steps in this process. Realist review is a theory-led approach to knowledge synthesis that provides an explanatory analysis aimed at discerning what works, for whom, in what circumstances, how, and why. In this review, scoping interviews with key stakeholders involved in the planning and delivery of adult weight management services in Scotland helped to inform the identification of formal theories - from psychology, sociology, and implementation science - that will be tested as the review progresses. A comprehensive search strategy is described, including scope for iterative searching. Data analysis is outlined in three stages (describing context-mechanism-outcome configurations, exploring patterns in these configurations, and developing and testing middle-range theories, informed by the formal theories previously identified), culminating in the production of explanatory programme theory that considers individual, interpersonal, and institutional/systems-level components. This is the

  2. Comparing hospital costs: what is gained by accounting for more than a case-mix index?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hvenegaard, Anne; Street, Andrew; Sørensen, Torben Højmark; Gyrd-Hansen, Dorte

    2009-08-01

    We explore what effect controlling for various patient characteristics beyond a case-mix index (DRG) has on inferences drawn about the relative cost performance of hospital departments. We estimate fixed effect cost models in which 3754 patients are clustered within six Danish vascular departments. We compare a basic model including a DRG index only with models also including age and gender, health related characteristics, such as smoking status, diabetes, and American Society of Anesthesiogists score (ASA-score), and socioeconomic characteristics such as income, employment and whether the patient lives alone. We find that the DRG index is a robust and important explanatory factor and adding other routinely collected characteristics such as age and gender and other health related or socioeconomic characteristics do not seem to alter the results significantly. The results are more sensitive to choice of functional form, i.e. in particular to whether costs are log transformed. Our results suggest that the routinely collected characteristics such as DRG index, age and gender are sufficient when drawing inferences about relative cost performance. Adding health related or socioeconomic patient characteristics only slightly improves our model in terms of explanatory power but not when drawing inferences about relative performance. The results are, however, sensitive to whether costs are log transformed.

  3. Study protocol for a cluster randomized controlled trial to evaluate a referral strategy for axial spondyloarthritis in young primary care patients with chronic low back pain; an impact study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoeven, Lonneke; Vergouwe, Yvonne; Koes, Bart W; Hazes, Johanna M W; Weel, Angelique E A M

    2016-07-12

    Axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) is a disabling inflammatory joint disease with chronic low back pain (CLBP) as leading symptom. Recognizing axSpA in the large amount of CLBP patients is difficult for general practioners (GP). This evaluation aims to assess the effect of a referral strategy for axSpA in young primary care patients with CLBP by comparing the use of the strategy with usual care. The effect is measured at three different levels; by patient reported outcomes (the clinical effect), process and costs evaluation. This study design is a cluster randomized controlled trial with GP as clusters. GPs throughout the Netherlands are invited to participate and randomized to either the intervention or the control group. Patients from participating GPs are invited to participate if they have ever been registered with low back pain, without radiation (ICPC L03) and aged 18-45 years. To be included in the study, patients need to have current low back pain and chronic low back pain (>12 weeks). In the intervention arm a referral strategy for axSpA will be applied in CLBP patients, in the control arm care as usual will be provided for CLBP patients. The referral strategy consists of four easy to use variables. All are questions about the back pain complaints of the patients. Data is prospectively collected in an online database at baseline (T0), 4 months (T1), 12 months (T2) and 24 months (T3). After time point T1 (4 months) patients from the control group will also receive the intervention i.e. the application of a referral strategy for axSpA. The effect of the referral strategy is measured at three different levels, by patient outcomes (e.g. pain scores, quality of life), process measures (e.g. number of axSpA diagnoses by rheumatologists) and by costs (work productivity and health care resources use). Our primary outcome is the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire after 4 months, secondary outcomes are pain and quality of life. Costs will be assessed before

  4. Restructuring in response to case mix reimbursement in nursing homes: a contingency approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinn, Jacqueline; Feng, Zhanlian; Mor, Vincent; Intrator, Orna; Grabowski, David

    2008-01-01

    Resident-based case mix reimbursement has become the dominant mechanism for publicly funded nursing home care. In 1998 skilled nursing facility reimbursement changed from cost-based to case mix adjusted payments under the Medicare Prospective Payment System for the costs of all skilled nursing facility care provided to Medicare recipients. In addition, as of 2004, 35 state Medicaid programs had implemented some form of case mix reimbursement. The purpose of the study is to determine if the implementation of Medicare and Medicaid case mix reimbursement increased the administrative burden on nursing homes, as evidenced by increased levels of nurses in administrative functions. The primary data for this study come from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Online Survey Certification and Reporting database from 1997 through 2004, a national nursing home database containing aggregated facility-level information, including staffing, organizational characteristics and resident conditions, on all Medicare/Medicaid certified nursing facilities in the country. We conducted multivariate regression analyses using a facility fixed-effects model to examine the effects of the implementation of Medicaid case mix reimbursement and Medicare Prospective Payment System on changes in the level of total administrative nurse staffing in nursing homes. Both Medicaid case mix reimbursement and Medicare Prospective Payment System increased the level of administrative nurse staffing, on average by 5.5% and 4.0% respectively. However, lack of evidence for a substitution effect suggests that any decline in direct care staffing after the introduction of case mix reimbursement is not attributable to a shift from clinical nursing resources to administrative functions. Our findings indicate that the administrative burden posed by case mix reimbursement has resource implications for all freestanding facilities. At the margin, the increased administrative burden imposed by case mix may

  5. Evaluation of correct diagnosis of referral patients to skin clinic by family physicians: A needs assessment for UME,CME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Ramezanpour

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: It has been demonstrated that the level of welfare and improvement of nations is evaluated by the progress and achievement of their health service networks. The specialization of therapeutic approaches is one of the practical and effective ways to accomplish this goal. The health system savants believe that the family physician guideline is the redeemer of health system section. This study is aimed, to evaluate the accuracy of diagnosis of the dermatologic disease of referred patients by family physician in Zanjan Valiasr hospital in year 2008.Methods: This descriptive and cross-sectional study was done on 173 cases of referred patients from village family physician to dermatologic clinic. After correct diagnosis by dermatologist data including age, sex, family physician diagnosis and dermatologist diagnosis were recorded on data forms and then analyzed by Chi-square test.Results: From 173 referred patients, 76 cases (43.9% were male, 49 cases (28.3% were under 15 years old, 73 cases (42.2% were between 15-30 years old, and rest were more than 30 years old. 28 cases (16.1% have been referred with correct diagnosis.Conclusion: The level of accurate diagnosis by family physicians was law, which can be due to non-familiarity with common local skin disease and lack of enough instruction and education before starting the family physician project. We recommended that before starting this project, specialist workshop be prepared for family physicians.key words: Family Physician, Skin Diseases, Needs Assessment

  6. The Scandinavian Sarcoma Group Central Register: 6,000 patients after 25 years of monitoring of referral and treatment of extremity and trunk wall soft-tissue sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trovik, Clement; Bauer, Henrik C F; Styring, Emelie; Sundby Hall, Kirsten; Vult Von Steyern, Fredrik; Eriksson, Sigvard; Johansson, Ingela; Sampo, Mika; Laitinen, Minna; Kalén, Anders; Jónsson, Halldór; Jebsen, Nina; Eriksson, Mikael; Tukiainen, Erkki; Wall, Najme; Zaikova, Olga; Sigurðsson, Helgi; Lehtinen, Tuula; Bjerkehagen, Bodil; Skorpil, Mikael; Egil Eide, Geir; Johansson, Elisabeth; Alvegard, Thor A

    2017-06-01

    Purpose - We wanted to examine the potential of the Scandinavian Sarcoma Group (SSG) Central Register, and evaluate referral and treatment practice for soft-tissue sarcomas in the extremities and trunk wall (STS) in the Nordic countries. Background - Based on incidence rates from the literature, 8,150 (7,000-9,300) cases of STS of the extremity and trunk wall should have been diagnosed in Norway, Finland, Iceland, and Sweden from 1987 through 2011. The SSG Register has 6,027 cases registered from this period, with 5,837 having complete registration of key variables. 10 centers have been reporting to the Register. The 5 centers that consistently report treat approximately 90% of the cases in their respective regions. The remaining centers have reported all the patients who were treated during certain time periods, but not for the entire 25-year period. Results - 59% of patients were referred to a sarcoma center untouched, i.e. before any attempt at open biopsy. There was an improvement from 52% during the first 5 years to 70% during the last 5 years. 50% had wide or better margins at surgery. Wide margins are now achieved less often than 20 years ago, in parallel with an increase in the use of radiotherapy. For the centers that consistently report, 97% of surviving patients are followed for more than 4 years. Metastasis-free survival (MFS) increased from 67% to 73% during the 25-year period. Interpretation - The Register is considered to be representative of extremity and trunk wall sarcoma disease in the population of Scandinavia, treated at the reporting centers. There were no clinically significant differences in treatment results at these centers.

  7. [Epidemiological aspects of cutaneous mycosis of HIV-infected patients in the National Referral Center of Burkina Faso, West Africa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zida, A; Sawadogo, P M; Diallo, I; Tapsoba, H; Bazie, Z; Drabo, Y J; Guiguemde, T R

    2016-06-01

    Our study aimed to analyze the epidemiological aspects of cutaneous mycosis in people living with human immunodeficiency virus (PLHIV). This is a descriptive study of 382 patients living with HIV. Following an investigation into the risk factors, mycological samples have been performed. Each sample underwent direct examination and cultivation for the identification of fungal species. The Blastese test is used for the identification of Candida albicans. One hundred and six (106) of the 382 people living with human immunodeficiency virus undergo a mycological collection of which 76 gave a positive result. The overall prevalence of cutaneous mycosis was 19.9 %. It was significantly higher in women and in patients who had a CD4 count ≤500/mm3. C. albicans and Trichophyton rubrum were the most isolated species with 22.4 and 19.8 % of all fungal species isolated, respectively. Cutaneous mycoses are common among people living with human immunodeficiency virus and whose CD4 count ≤ 500/mm(3). Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  8. Games policy makers and providers play: introducing case-mix-based payment to hospital chronic care units in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikegami, Naoki

    2009-06-01

    Case-mix-based payment was developed for hospital chronic care units in Japan to replace the flat per diem rate and encourage the admission of patients with higher medical acuity and was part of a policy initiative to make the tariff more evidence based. However, although the criteria for grouping patients were developed from a statistical analysis of resource use, the tariff was subsequently set below costs, particularly for the groups with the lowest medical acuity, both because of the prime minister's decision to decrease total health expenditures and because of the health ministry's decision to target the reductions on chronic care units. Providers quickly adapted to the new payment system mainly by reclassifying their patients to higher medical acuity groups. Some hospitals reported high prevalence rates of urinary tract infections and pressure ulcers. The government responded by issuing directives to providers to calculate the prevalence rates and document the care that has been mandated for the patients at risk. However, in order to monitor compliance and to evaluate whether the patient is being billed for the appropriate case-mix group, the government must invest in developing a comprehensive patient-level database and in training staff for making on-site inspections.

  9. Epidemiological characterization of ostomized patients attended in referral Center from the city of Maceió, Alagoas, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoel Álvaro de Freitas Lins Neto

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Several clinical conditions imply the realization of a bowel ostomy, as a treatment option. However, the presence of a stoma is an important limitation in the quality of life of the ostomized patient. Aim: To define the epidemiological profile of patients enrolled in the Ostomy Program from two reference services in the city of Maceió, Alagoas, regarding gender, age, classification (as permanent or temporary, type of ostomy with respect to the bowel segment used, and causes. Method: This was a descriptive cross-sectional study whose data were obtained from registration forms of active patients in Ostomy Programs on May 2013. Results: Of 216 patients analyzed, 50.5% were female and 49.5% male. The age group with the highest number of cases was that between 60 and 69 years (23.6% and the average age was 51.3 years. Colostomies accounted for 89.4% of the procedures performed, and 56.9% of procedures were temporary ostomies. As for the cause, the most prevalent was colorectal cancer (40.7%, followed by trauma (18.1% and acute abdomen (12.0%. Conclusion: The study provides relevant data that can be used as input for prevention and strategies to improve the health of the ostomized population. Resumo: Introdução: Diversas condições clínicas implicam a realização de uma ostomia intestinal como opção de tratamento. Entretanto, a presença de um estoma é um importante limitador na qualidade de vida da pessoa ostomizada. Objetivo: Definir o perfil epidemiológico dos pacientes cadastrados no Programa de Ostomizados de dois serviços de referência em Maceió, Alagoas quanto a gênero, idade, classificação da ostomia em definitiva ou temporária, tipo de ostomia quanto ao segmento intestinal utilizado e causas. Método: Trata-se de um estudo transversal descritivo cujos dados foram obtidos de fichas cadastrais de pacientes ativos em Programas de Ostomizados no mês de maio de 2013. Resultados: Dos 216 pacientes analisados, 50

  10. Case mix adjustment of health outcomes, resource use and process indicators in childbirth care: a register-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesterton, Johan; Lindgren, Peter; Ekenberg Abreu, Anna; Ladfors, Lars; Lilja, Monica; Saltvedt, Sissel; Amer-Wåhlin, Isis

    2016-05-31

    Unwarranted variation in care practice and outcomes has gained attention and inter-hospital comparisons are increasingly being used to highlight and understand differences between hospitals. Adjustment for case mix is a prerequisite for meaningful comparisons between hospitals with different patient populations. The objective of this study was to identify and quantify maternal characteristics that impact a set of important indicators of health outcomes, resource use and care process and which could be used for case mix adjustment of comparisons between hospitals. In this register-based study, 139 756 deliveries in 2011 and 2012 were identified in regional administrative systems from seven Swedish regions, which together cover 67 % of all deliveries in Sweden. Data were linked to the Medical birth register and Statistics Sweden's population data. A number of important indicators in childbirth care were studied: Caesarean section (CS), induction of labour, length of stay, perineal tears, haemorrhage > 1000 ml and post-partum infections. Sociodemographic and clinical characteristics deemed relevant for case mix adjustment of outcomes and resource use were identified based on previous literature and based on clinical expertise. Adjustment using logistic and ordinary least squares regression analysis was performed to quantify the impact of these characteristics on the studied indicators. Almost all case mix factors analysed had an impact on CS rate, induction rate and length of stay and the effect was highly statistically significant for most factors. Maternal age, parity, fetal presentation and multiple birth were strong predictors of all these indicators but a number of additional factors such as born outside the EU, body mass index (BMI) and several complications during pregnancy were also important risk factors. A number of maternal characteristics had a noticeable impact on risk of perineal tears, while the impact of case mix factors was less pronounced for

  11. Consultation and referral between physicians in new medical practice environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, W A; Holloman, F C

    1985-10-01

    The traditional exchange of medical expertise between physicians for patient benefit has been accomplished by referral. Physicians have traditionally decided when and to whom to refer patients. Health care "systems" now dominate medical practice, and their formats can alter spontaneous collegial interaction in referral. Institutional programs now pursue patient referrals as part of a marketing strategy to attract new patients who then become attached to the institution, rather than to a physician. Referral behavior can affect a physician's personal income in prepaid insurance programs where referrals are discouraged. The referring physician may bear legal liability for actions of the consultant. New practice arrangements and affiliations may place physicians in financial conflict-of-interest situations, challenge ethical commitments, and add new moral responsibility.

  12. Does a pre-hospital emergency pathway improve early diagnosis and referral in suspected stroke patients? – Study protocol of a cluster randomised trial [ISRCTN41456865

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori Giuliano

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early interventions proved to be able to improve prognosis in acute stroke patients. Prompt identification of symptoms, organised timely and efficient transportation towards appropriate facilities, become essential part of effective treatment. The implementation of an evidence based pre-hospital stroke care pathway may be a method for achieving the organizational standards required to grant appropriate care. We performed a systematic search for studies evaluating the effect of pre-hospital and emergency interventions for suspected stroke patients and we found that there seems to be only a few studies on the emergency field and none about implementation of clinical pathways. We will test the hypothesis that the adoption of emergency clinical pathway improves early diagnosis and referral in suspected stroke patients. We designed a cluster randomised controlled trial (C-RCT, the most powerful study design to assess the impact of complex interventions. The study was registered in the Current Controlled Trials Register: ISRCTN41456865 – Implementation of pre-hospital emergency pathway for stroke – a cluster randomised trial. Methods/design Two-arm cluster-randomised trial (C-RCT. 16 emergency services and 14 emergency rooms were randomised either to arm 1 (comprising a training module and administration of the guideline, or to arm 2 (no intervention, current practice. Arm 1 participants (152 physicians, 280 nurses, 50 drivers attended an interactive two sessions course with continuous medical education CME credits on the contents of the clinical pathway. We estimated that around 750 patients will be met by the services in the 6 months of observation. This duration allows recruiting a sample of patients sufficient to observe a 30% improvement in the proportion of appropriate diagnoses. Data collection will be performed using current information systems. Process outcomes will be measured at the cluster level six months after the

  13. Is Accelerated Partner Therapy (APT) a cost-effective alternative to routine patient referral partner notification in the UK? Preliminary cost-consequence analysis of an exploratory trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Tracy E; Tsourapas, Angelos; Sutcliffe, Lorna; Cassell, Jackie; Estcourt, Claudia

    2012-02-01

    To undertake a cost-consequence analysis to assess two new models of partner notification (PN), known as Accelerated Partner Therapy (APT Hotline and APT Pharmacy), as compared with routine patient referral PN, for sex partners of people with chlamydia, gonorrhoea and non-gonococcal urethritis. Comparison of costs and outcomes alongside an exploratory trial involving two genitourinary medicine clinics and six community pharmacies. Index patients selected the PN method (APT Hotline, APT Pharmacy or routine PN) for their partners. Clinics and pharmacies recorded cost and resource use data including duration of consultation and uptake of treatment pack. Cost data were collected prospectively for two out of three interventions, and data were synthesised and compared in terms of effectiveness and costs. Routine PN had the lowest average cost per partner treated (approximately £46) compared with either APT Hotline (approximately £54) or APT Pharmacy (approximately £53) strategies. The cost-consequence analysis revealed that APT strategies were more costly but also more effective at treating partners compared to routine PN. The hotline strategy costs more than both the alternative PN strategies. If we accept that strategies which identify and treat partners the fastest are likely to be the most effective in reducing reinfection and onward transmission, then APT Hotline appears an effective PN strategy by treating the highest number of partners in the shortest duration. Whether the additional benefit is worth the additional cost cannot be determined in this preliminary analysis. These data will be useful for informing development of future randomised controlled trials of APT.

  14. Pattern of chemotherapy-related adverse effects among adult cancer patients treated at Gondar University Referral Hospital, Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belachew SA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sewunet Admasu Belachew,1 Daniel Asfaw Erku,2 Abebe Basazn Mekuria,3 Begashaw Melaku Gebresillassie1 1Department of Clinical Pharmacy, 2Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 3Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia Background: Adverse drug reactions (ADRs are a global problem and constitute a major clinical problem in terms of human suffering. The high toxicity and narrow therapeutic index of chemotherapeutic agents makes oncology pharmacovigilance essential. The objective of the present study was to assess the pattern of ADRs occurring in cancer patients treated with chemotherapy in a tertiary care teaching hospital in Ethiopia.Methods: A cross-sectional study over a 2-year period from September 2013 to August 2015 was conducted on cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy at Gondar University Referral Hospital Oncology Center. Data were collected directly from patients and their medical case files. The reported ADRs were assessed for causality using the World Health Organization’s causality assessment scale and Naranjo’s algorithm. The severities of the reported reactions were also assessed using National Cancer Institute Common Terminology CTCAE version 4.0. The Pearson’s chi-square test was employed to examine the association between two categorical variables.Results: A total of 815 ADRs were identified per 203 patients included in the study. The most commonly occurring ADRs were nausea and vomiting (18.9%, infections (16.7%, neutropenia (14.7%, fever and/or chills (11.3%, and anemia (9.3%. Platinum compounds (31.4% were the most common group of drugs causing ADRs. Of the reported ADRs, 65.8% were grades 3–4 (severe level, 29.9% were grades 1–2 (mild level, and 4.3% were grade 5 (toxic level. Significant association was found between age, number of chemotherapeutic agents, as well as dose of chemotherapy with the occurrence of grades 3–5 toxicity.Conclusion: The high incidence of

  15. Description of the case mix experienced by chiropractic students during a clinical internship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puhl, Aaron A; Reinhart, Christine J; Injeyan, H Stephen; Tibbles, Anthony

    2017-10-01

    The primary objective of this study was to describe the case mix experienced by chiropractic students during their clinical internship at the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College. Secondary objectives were to characterize teaching clinic patient populations, assess the similarity to previously published data for practicing chiropractors, and describe the treatment plans being recommended by interns. A prospective, observational study was conducted using a convenience sample of 24 chiropractic interns. Data were collected by interns using a standardized form that was completed for each new patient and each new complaint examined during the 1-year internship. Standardized forms included data regarding patient demographics, complaint characteristics, and treatment recommendations. Data were included for 23 of 24 participating interns, who described 828 patients and a total of 948 unique complaint presentations. Overall, 60% of patients were female, 86% were 18 to 64 years old, and 23% were naive to chiropractic care. Of all presenting complaints, 93% were pain-based, 67% were chronic, 65% included spinal complaints, and 7% presented with red flags; individual interns' experiences were variable and are described. On average, treatment recommendations called for 9.4 visits and often included multimodal treatment approaches, most commonly soft-tissue therapies (91%), home-based active care (84%), and spine manipulation (70%). The findings of this study suggest that patients presenting to CMCC teaching clinics are similar to those reported previously to attend private chiropractic clinics. While all participating interns encountered multiple complex clinical cases, very few had experience with pediatric populations. This study adds to the few that detail the characteristics of patients attending chiropractic teaching clinics; to our knowledge it is the first to describe average case loads of chiropractic interns.

  16. The effect of state medicaid case-mix payment on nursing home resident acuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhanlian; Grabowski, David C; Intrator, Orna; Mor, Vincent

    2006-08-01

    To examine the relationship between Medicaid case-mix payment and nursing home resident acuity. Longitudinal Minimum Data Set (MDS) resident assessments from 1999 to 2002 and Online Survey Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) data from 1996 to 2002, for all freestanding nursing homes in the 48 contiguous U.S. states. We used a facility fixed-effects model to examine the effect of introducing state case-mix payment on changes in nursing home case-mix acuity. Facility acuity was measured by aggregating the nursing case-mix index (NCMI) from the MDS using the Resource Utilization Group (Version III) resident classification system, separately for new admits and long-stay residents, and by an OSCAR-derived index combining a range of activity of daily living dependencies and special treatment measures. We followed facilities over the study period to create a longitudinal data file based on the MDS and OSCAR, respectively, and linked facilities with longitudinal data on state case-mix payment policies for the same period. Across three acuity measures and two data sources, we found that states shifting to case-mix payment increased nursing home acuity levels over the study period. Specifically, we observed a 2.5 percent increase in the average acuity of new admits and a 1.3 to 1.4 percent increase in the acuity of long-stay residents, following the introduction of case-mix payment. The adoption of case-mix payment increased access to care for higher acuity Medicaid residents.

  17. Using multilevel modeling to assess case-mix adjusters in consumer experience surveys in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damman, Olga C; Stubbe, Janine H; Hendriks, Michelle; Arah, Onyebuchi A; Spreeuwenberg, Peter; Delnoij, Diana M J; Groenewegen, Peter P

    2009-04-01

    Ratings on the quality of healthcare from the consumer's perspective need to be adjusted for consumer characteristics to ensure fair and accurate comparisons between healthcare providers or health plans. Although multilevel analysis is already considered an appropriate method for analyzing healthcare performance data, it has rarely been used to assess case-mix adjustment of such data. The purpose of this article is to investigate whether multilevel regression analysis is a useful tool to detect case-mix adjusters in consumer assessment of healthcare. We used data on 11,539 consumers from 27 Dutch health plans, which were collected using the Dutch Consumer Quality Index health plan instrument. We conducted multilevel regression analyses of consumers' responses nested within health plans to assess the effects of consumer characteristics on consumer experience. We compared our findings to the results of another methodology: the impact factor approach, which combines the predictive effect of each case-mix variable with its heterogeneity across health plans. Both multilevel regression and impact factor analyses showed that age and education were the most important case-mix adjusters for consumer experience and ratings of health plans. With the exception of age, case-mix adjustment had little impact on the ranking of health plans. On both theoretical and practical grounds, multilevel modeling is useful for adequate case-mix adjustment and analysis of performance ratings.

  18. Do financial incentives of introducing case mix reimbursement increase feeding tube use in nursing home residents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teno, Joan M; Feng, Zhanlian; Mitchell, Susan L; Kuo, Sylvia; Intrator, Orna; Mor, Vincent

    2008-05-01

    To determine whether adoption of Medicaid case mix reimbursement is associated with greater prevalence of feeding tube use in nursing home (NH) residents. Secondary analysis of longitudinal administrative data about the prevalence of feeding tube insertion and surveys of states' adoption of case mix reimbursement. NHs in the United States. NH residents at the time of NH inspection between 1993 and 2004. Facility prevalence of feeding tubes reported at the state inspection of NHs reported in the Online Survey, Certification and Reporting database and interviews with state policy makers regarding the adoption of case mix reimbursement. Between 1993 and 2004, 16 states adopted Resource Utilization Group case mix reimbursement. States varied in the prevalence of feeding tubes in their NHs. Although the use of feeding tube increased substantially over the years of the study, once temporal trends and facility fixed effects were accounted for, case mix reimbursement was not associated with greater prevalence of feeding tube use. The adoption of Medicaid case mix reimbursement was not associated with an increase in the prevalence of feeding tube use.

  19. Why Doctors Do Not Answer Referral Letters | Smith | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Healthcare workers at primary healthcare (PHC) clinics are frustrated by the fact that they do not receive replies to their referral letters to doctors. Referral letters act as permission slips to allow patients easy access to treatment by specialists at secondary and tertiary service levels and communicate reasons for ...

  20. Gated SPECT evaluation of myocardial perfusion defects and left ventricular function in chronic atrial fibrillation (CAF) patients - a prevalence study between a General Hospital (GH) and a referral Cardiology Hospital (CH)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, G.; Guimaraes, M.; Marroni, B.; Zagoury, E.; Sprinz, C.; Andrea, S.; Louzada, A.; Ludwig, R.; Graef, C.

    2002-01-01

    Aims: to evaluate myocardial perfusion defects (MPD) prevalence and left ventricular function in CAF patients from a distinct referral basis (a GH and CH populations). Materials and Methods: a retrospective cross-sectional survey including 171 CAF (43 from GH and 128 from CH) and 5415 control patients (2222 from GH and 3193 from CH) submitted to rest/stress myocardial perfusion gated SPECT with Tc99m-MIBI. The following items were collected from CAF patients: the percentage of patients with MPD, the type (fixed, reversible or mixed) and number of segments with MPD and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). The control patients percentage of MPD, their type and number were also collected. Results: CAF from GH and CH were not significantly different in the number of patients with MPD, mean number of segments affected, and LVEF. In GH patients, the CAF group had more segments with MPD (2,4x1,6 p<0,01) and lower LVEF (37%x52% p<0,01) than control group. CAF patients from CH also showed lower LVEF (40%x58% p<0,01) and more fixed MPD (40%x18% p<0,01) than their control group population. Conclusion: our data showed similar prevalence of MPD and reduced LVEF values between CAF patients from a GH and referral CH. The CAF group from CH seemed to have more fixed MPD perhaps reflecting more severe coronary artery disease population or referral bias. The data appears to support the evaluation of myocardial ischemia as a part of CAF possible etiologies. Caution is advised in LVEF evaluation of CAF patients due to increased variability of R-R interval

  1. Health-related quality of life in epilepsy patients receiving anti-epileptic drugs at National Referral Hospitals in Uganda: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabukenya, Anne M; Matovu, Joseph K B; Wabwire-Mangen, Fred; Wanyenze, Rhoda K; Makumbi, Fredrick

    2014-04-12

    Epilepsy is a devastating disorder that impacts on patients' quality of life, irrespective of use of anti epileptic drugs (AEDs). This study estimates the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and its associated predictors among epilepsy patients receiving AEDs. A total of 175 epilepsy patients already receiving AED for at least 3 months were randomly selected and interviewed from mental clinics at Mulago and Butabika national referral hospitals in Uganda between May - July 2011. A HRQOL index, the primary outcome, was constructed using items from Quality Of Life in Epilepsy Inventory (QOLIE-31) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) questionnaires. The internal consistency and adequacy of these items was also computed using Cronbach's alpha and Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin tests. Partial correlations were used to evaluate the contribution of the health dimensions (mental, psychological, social, physical functioning and emotional well being) and, multiple linear regressions to determine factors independently associated with HRQOL. Just about half of the respondents (54%) were males, and nearly two thirds (62%) had received AEDs for at least 12 months. The average age was 26.6 years (SD = 11.1). The overall HRQOL mean score was 58 (SD = 13) on a scale of 0-100. The average scores of different dimensions or subscales ranged from 41 (physical) to 65 (psychological). At least three quarters (75%) of all subscales had good internal consistency and adequacy. The largest variations in the overall HRQOL were explained by social and mental functioning; each accounting for about 30% of the difference in the HRQOL but seizure control features explained a little (6%) variation. Factors negatively associated with HRQOL were poly-therapy (-1.16, p = 0.01) and frequency of seizures (-2.29, p = 0.00). Other factors associated with overall HRQOL included drug side effects, sex, marital status and education. Duration on AEDs was not a significant predictor of HRQOL. The HRQOL

  2. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates from patients attending a public referral center for sexually transmitted diseases in Belo Horizonte, State of Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligia Maria Bedeschi Costa

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The aim of this study was to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility of Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates obtained from patients attending a public referral center for sexually transmitted diseases and specialized care services (STD/SCS in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. Methods Between March 2011 and February 2012, 201 specimens of Neisseria gonorrhoeae were consecutively obtained from men with symptoms of urethritis and women with symptons of cervicitis or were obtained during their initial consultation. The strains were tested using the disk diffusion method, and the minimum inhibitory concentrations of azithromycin, cefixime, ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin, chloramphenicol, penicillin, tetracycline and spectinomycin were determined using the E-test. Results The specimens were 100% sensitive to cefixime, ceftriaxone and spectinomycin and exhibited resistances of 4.5% (9/201, 21.4% (43/201, 11.9% (24/201, 22.4% (45/201 and 32.3% (65/201 to azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, chloramphenicol, penicillin and tetracycline, respectively. Intermediate sensitivities of 17.9% (36/201, 4% (8/201, 16.9% (34/201, 71.1% (143/201 and 22.9% (46/201 were observed for azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, chloramphenicol, penicillin and tetracycline, respectively. The specimens had plasmid-mediated resistance to penicillin PPNG 14.5% (29/201 and tetracycline TRNG 11.5% (23/201. Conclusions The high percentage of detected resistance to penicillin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol and ciprofloxacin indicates that these antibiotics are not appropriate for gonorrhea treatment at the Health Clinic and possibly in Belo Horizonte. The resistance and intermediate sensitivity of these isolates indicates that caution is recommended in the use of azithromycin and emphasizes the need to establish mechanisms for the surveillance of antimicrobial resistance for the effective control of gonorrhea.

  3. Weighing up the weighted case mix tool (WCMT): a psychometric investigation using confirmatory factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duane, B G; Humphris, G; Richards, D; Okeefe, E J; Gordon, K; Freeman, R

    2014-12-01

    To assess the use of the WCMT in two Scottish health boards and to consider the impact of simplifying the tool to improve efficient use. A retrospective analysis of routine WCMT data (47,276 cases). Public Dental Service (PDS) within NHS Lothian and Highland. The WCMT consists of six criteria. Each criterion is measured independently on a four-point scale to assess patient complexity and the dental care for the disabled/impaired patient. Psychometric analyses on the data-set were conducted. Conventional internal consistency coefficients were calculated. Latent variable modelling was performed to assess the 'fit' of the raw data to a pre-specified measurement model. A Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) was used to test three potential changes to the existing WCMT that included, the removal of the oral risk factor question, the removal of original weightings for scoring the Tool, and collapsing the 4-point rating scale to three categories. The removal of the oral risk factor question had little impact on the reliability of the proposed simplified CMT to discriminate between levels of patient complexity. The removal of weighting and collapsing each item's rating scale to three categories had limited impact on reliability of the revised tool. The CFA analysis provided strong evidence that a new, proposed simplified Case Mix Tool (sCMT) would operate closely to the pre-specified measurement model (the WMCT). A modified sCMT can demonstrate, without reducing reliability, a useful measure of the complexity of patient care. The proposed sCMT may be implemented within primary care dentistry to record patient complexity as part of an oral health assessment.

  4. Regional Differences in Case Mix and Peri-operative Outcome After Elective Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair in the Vascunet Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, K; Venermo, M; Beiles, B; Menyhei, G; Altreuther, M; Loftus, I; Björck, M

    2015-06-01

    National differences exist in the outcome of elective abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair. The role of case mix variation was assessed based on an international vascular registry collaboration. All elective AAA repairs with aneurysm size data in the Vascunet database in the period 2005-09 were included. AAA size and peri-operative outcome (crude and age adjusted mortality) were analysed overall and in risk cohorts, as well as per country. Glasgow Aneurysm Score (GAS) was calculated as risk score, and patients were stratified in three equal sized risk cohorts based on GAS. Predictors of peri-operative mortality were analysed with multiple regression. Missing data were handled with multiple imputation. Patients from Australia, Finland, Hungary, Norway, Sweden and the UK (n = 5,895) were analysed; mean age was 72.7 years and 54% had endovascular repair (EVAR). There were significant variations in GAS (lowest = Finland [75.7], highest = UK [79.4], p for comparison of all regions 82. Of those with a GAS >82, 8.4% of men and 20.8% of women had an AAA case selection for elective AAA repair, including variations in AAA size and patient risk profile. These differences partly explain the variations in peri-operative mortality. Further audit is warranted to assess the underlying reasons for the regional variation in case-mix. Copyright © 2015 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Are patients' preferences regarding the place of treatment heard and addressed at the point of referral: an exploratory study based on observations of GP-patient consultations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Victoor, A.; Noordman, J.; Sonderkamp, J.A.; Delnoij, D.M.; Friele, R.D.; Dulmen, S. van; Rademakers, J.J.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Today, in several north-western European countries, patients are encouraged to choose, actively, a healthcare provider. However, patients often visit the provider that is recommended by their general practitioner (GP). The introduction of patient choice requires GPs to support patients

  6. Coding response to a case-mix measurement system based on multiple diagnoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preyra, Colin

    2004-08-01

    To examine the hospital coding response to a payment model using a case-mix measurement system based on multiple diagnoses and the resulting impact on a hospital cost model. Financial, clinical, and supplementary data for all Ontario short stay hospitals from years 1997 to 2002. Disaggregated trends in hospital case-mix growth are examined for five years following the adoption of an inpatient classification system making extensive use of combinations of secondary diagnoses. Hospital case mix is decomposed into base and complexity components. The longitudinal effects of coding variation on a standard hospital payment model are examined in terms of payment accuracy and impact on adjustment factors. Introduction of the refined case-mix system provided incentives for hospitals to increase reporting of secondary diagnoses and resulted in growth in highest complexity cases that were not matched by increased resource use over time. Despite a pronounced coding response on the part of hospitals, the increase in measured complexity and case mix did not reduce the unexplained variation in hospital unit cost nor did it reduce the reliance on the teaching adjustment factor, a potential proxy for case mix. The main implication was changes in the size and distribution of predicted hospital operating costs. Jurisdictions introducing extensive refinements to standard diagnostic related group (DRG)-type payment systems should consider the effects of induced changes to hospital coding practices. Assessing model performance should include analysis of the robustness of classification systems to hospital-level variation in coding practices. Unanticipated coding effects imply that case-mix models hypothesized to perform well ex ante may not meet expectations ex post.

  7. Coding Response to a Case-Mix Measurement System Based on Multiple Diagnoses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preyra, Colin

    2004-01-01

    Objective To examine the hospital coding response to a payment model using a case-mix measurement system based on multiple diagnoses and the resulting impact on a hospital cost model. Data Sources Financial, clinical, and supplementary data for all Ontario short stay hospitals from years 1997 to 2002. Study Design Disaggregated trends in hospital case-mix growth are examined for five years following the adoption of an inpatient classification system making extensive use of combinations of secondary diagnoses. Hospital case mix is decomposed into base and complexity components. The longitudinal effects of coding variation on a standard hospital payment model are examined in terms of payment accuracy and impact on adjustment factors. Principal Findings Introduction of the refined case-mix system provided incentives for hospitals to increase reporting of secondary diagnoses and resulted in growth in highest complexity cases that were not matched by increased resource use over time. Despite a pronounced coding response on the part of hospitals, the increase in measured complexity and case mix did not reduce the unexplained variation in hospital unit cost nor did it reduce the reliance on the teaching adjustment factor, a potential proxy for case mix. The main implication was changes in the size and distribution of predicted hospital operating costs. Conclusions Jurisdictions introducing extensive refinements to standard diagnostic related group (DRG)-type payment systems should consider the effects of induced changes to hospital coding practices. Assessing model performance should include analysis of the robustness of classification systems to hospital-level variation in coding practices. Unanticipated coding effects imply that case-mix models hypothesized to perform well ex ante may not meet expectations ex post. PMID:15230940

  8. The cataract national data set electronic multi-centre audit of 55,567 operations: case-mix adjusted surgeon's outcomes for posterior capsule rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, J M; Taylor, H; Qureshi, K; Smith, R; Johnston, R L

    2011-08-01

    To develop a methodology for case-mix adjustment of surgical outcomes for individual cataract surgeons using electronically collected multi-centre data conforming to the cataract national data set (CND). Routinely collected anonymised data were remotely extracted from electronic patient record (EPR) systems in 12 participating NHS Trusts undertaking cataract surgery. Following data checks and cleaning, analyses were carried out to risk adjust outcomes for posterior capsule rupture rates for individual surgeons, with stratification by surgical grade. A total of 406 surgeons from 12 NHS Trusts submitted data on 55,567 cataract operations between November 2001 and July 2006 (86% from January 2004). In all, 283 surgeons contributed data on >25 cases, providing 54,319 operations suitable for detailed analysis. Case-mix adjusted results of individual surgeons are presented as funnel plots for all surgeons together, and separately for three different grades of surgeon. Plots include 95 and 99.8% confidence limits around the case-mix adjusted outcomes for detection of surgical outliers. Routinely collected electronic data conforming to the CND provides sufficient detail for case-mix adjustment of cataract surgical outcomes. The validation of these risk indicators should be carried out using fresh data to confirm the validity of the risk model. Once validated this model should provide an equitable approach for peer-to-peer comparisons in the context of revalidation.

  9. Employee Referrals and Efficiency Wages

    OpenAIRE

    Kugler, Adriana D.

    2002-01-01

    Many workers believe that personal contacts are crucial for obtaining jobs in high-wage sectors. On the other hand, firms in high-wage sectors report using employee referrals because they help provide screening and monitoring of new employees. This Paper develops a matching model that can explain the link between inter-industry wage differentials and the use of employee referrals. Referrals lower monitoring costs because high-effort referees can exert peer pressure on co-workers, allowing fir...

  10. Open-access ultrasound referrals from general practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hughes, P

    2015-03-01

    Direct access referral for radiological investigations from General Practice (GP) provides an indispensable diagnostic tool and avoids the inherently long waiting time that referral through a hospital based specialty would entail. Improving access to hospital based radiology services is one of Health Information and Quality Authority\\'s key recommendations in its report on patient referrals from general practice. This study aimed to review all GP referrals for ultrasound investigations to a tertiary referral teaching hospital over a seven month period with respect to their demographics, waiting times and diagnostic outcomes. 1,090 ultrasounds originating in general practice were carried out during the study period. Positive findings were recorded in 332 (30.46%) examinations. The median waiting time from receipt of referral to the diagnostic investigation was 56 days (range 16 - 91 years). 71 (6.5%) patients had follow-up imaging investigations while recommendation for hospital based specialty referral was made in 35 cases (3.2%). Significant findings included abdominal aortic aneurysms, metastatic disease and lymphoma. Direct access to ultrasound for general practitioners allows the referring physician to make an informed decision with regard to the need for specialist referral. We believe these findings help support the case for national direct access to diagnostic ultrasound for general practitioners.

  11. Decision-case mix model for analyzing variation in cesarean rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldenburg, L; Waller, W S

    2001-01-01

    This article contributes a decision-case mix model for analyzing variation in c-section rates. Like recent contributions to the literature, the model systematically takes into account the effect of case mix. Going beyond past research, the model highlights differences in physician decision making in response to obstetric factors. Distinguishing the effects of physician decision making and case mix is important in understanding why c-section rates vary and in developing programs to effect change in physician behavior. The model was applied to a sample of deliveries at a hospital where physicians exhibited considerable variation in their c-section rates. Comparing groups with a low versus high rate, the authors' general conclusion is that the difference in physician decision tendencies (to perform a c-section), in response to specific obstetric factors, is at least as important as case mix in explaining variation in c-section rates. The exact effects of decision making versus case mix depend on how the model application defines the obstetric condition of interest and on the weighting of deliveries by their estimated "risk of Cesarean." The general conclusion is supported by an additional analysis that uses the model's elements to predict individual physicians' annual c-section rates.

  12. Robotic partial nephrectomy - Evaluation of the impact of case mix on the procedural learning curve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, A; Ahmed, K; Challacombe, B

    2016-05-01

    Although Robotic partial nephrectomy (RPN) is an emerging technique for the management of small renal masses, this approach is technically demanding. To date, there is limited data on the nature and progression of the learning curve in RPN. To analyse the impact of case mix on the RPN LC and to model the learning curve. The records of the first 100 RPN performed, were analysed at our institution that were carried out by a single surgeon (B.C) (June 2010-December 2013). Cases were split based on their Preoperative Aspects and Dimensions Used for an Anatomical (PADUA) score into the following groups: 6-7, 8-9 and >10. Using a split group (20 patients in each group) and incremental analysis, the mean, the curve of best fit and R(2) values were calculated for each group. Of 100 patients (F:28, M:72), the mean age was 56.4 ± 11.9 years. The number of patients in each PADUA score groups: 6-7, 8-9 and >10 were 61, 32 and 7 respectively. An increase in incidence of more complex cases throughout the cohort was evident within the 8-9 group (2010: 1 case, 2013: 16 cases). The learning process did not significantly affect the proxies used to assess surgical proficiency in this study (operative time and warm ischaemia time). Case difficulty is an important parameter that should be considered when evaluating procedural learning curves. There is not one well fitting model that can be used to model the learning curve. With increasing experience, clinicians tend to operate on more difficult cases. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A Review Of Referral Patterns For Sagittal Synostosis In Ireland: 2008-2013

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Berney, M J

    2018-01-01

    Sagittal synostosis (SS) is the commonest form of craniosynostosis. Children with sagittal synostosis in Ireland are treated in the National Paediatric Craniofacial Centre (NPCC) in Temple Street Children’s University Hospital. This retrospective study analysed the correlation between referral patterns to the unit and age at operation. The notes of 81 patients referred over a 5 year period (April 2008 – April 2013) to the NPCC with non-syndromic SS were reviewed and demographics and referral information were recorded. Of 81 patients reviewed, 60 (74%) were referred before 6 months of age, while 21 (26%) had late referrals. Neonatologists referred 100% of infants before 6 months, paediatricians referred 71%, and GPs 64%. Later referral was associated with a more complex referral pathway, including multiple-steps of referral and unnecessary investigations. Improved clinician knowledge and emphasis on the importance of early referral may lead to a reduction in late referrals.

  14. 75 FR 50880 - TRICARE: Non-Physician Referrals for Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, and Speech Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-18

    ... 0720-AB36 TRICARE: Non-Physician Referrals for Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, and Speech... referrals of beneficiaries to the Military Health System for physical therapy, occupational therapy, and... practitioners will be allowed to issue referrals to patients for physical therapy, occupational therapy, and...

  15. Measuring case-mix complexity of tertiary care hospitals using DRGs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hayoung; Shin, Youngsoo

    2004-02-01

    The objectives of the study were to develop a model that measures and evaluates case-mix complexity of tertiary care hospitals, and to examine the characteristics of such a model. Physician panels defined three classes of case complexity and assigned disease categories represented by Adjacent Diagnosis Related Groups (ADRGs) to one of three case complexity classes. Three types of scores, indicating proportions of inpatients in each case complexity class standardized by the proportions at the national level, were defined to measure the case-mix complexity of a hospital. Discharge information for about 10% of inpatient episodes at 85 hospitals with bed size larger than 400 and their input structure and research and education activity were used to evaluate the case-mix complexity model. Results show its power to predict hospitals with the expected functions of tertiary care hospitals, i.e. resource intensive care, expensive input structure, and high levels of research and education activities.

  16. Inpatient Complexity in Radiology-a Practical Application of the Case Mix Index Metric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabotuwana, Thusitha; Hall, Christopher S; Flacke, Sebastian; Thomas, Shiby; Wald, Christoph

    2017-06-01

    With ongoing healthcare payment reforms in the USA, radiology is moving from its current state of a revenue generating department to a new reality of a cost-center. Under bundled payment methods, radiology does not get reimbursed for each and every inpatient procedure, but rather, the hospital gets reimbursed for the entire hospital stay under an applicable diagnosis-related group code. The hospital case mix index (CMI) metric, as defined by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, has a significant impact on how much hospitals get reimbursed for an inpatient stay. Oftentimes, patients with the highest disease acuity are treated in tertiary care radiology departments. Therefore, the average hospital CMI based on the entire inpatient population may not be adequate to determine department-level resource utilization, such as the number of technologists and nurses, as case length and staffing intensity gets quite high for sicker patients. In this study, we determine CMI for the overall radiology department in a tertiary care setting based on inpatients undergoing radiology procedures. Between April and September 2015, CMI for radiology was 1.93. With an average of 2.81, interventional neuroradiology had the highest CMI out of the ten radiology sections. CMI was consistently higher across seven of the radiology sections than the average hospital CMI of 1.81. Our results suggest that inpatients undergoing radiology procedures were on average more complex in this hospital setting during the time period considered. This finding is relevant for accurate calculation of labor analytics and other predictive resource utilization tools.

  17. Assessment of hospital performance with a case-mix standardized mortality model using an existing administrative database in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Hiroaki; Hashimoto, Hideki; Horiguchi, Hiromasa; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Matsuda, Shinya

    2010-05-19

    Few studies have examined whether risk adjustment is evenly applicable to hospitals with various characteristics and case-mix. In this study, we applied a generic prediction model to nationwide discharge data from hospitals with various characteristics. We used standardized data of 1,878,767 discharged patients provided by 469 hospitals from July 1 to October 31, 2006. We generated and validated a case-mix in-hospital mortality prediction model using 50/50 split sample validation. We classified hospitals into two groups based on c-index value (hospitals with c-index > or = 0.8; hospitals with c-index /=0.8 and were classified as the higher c-index group. A significantly higher proportion of hospitals in the lower c-index group were specialized hospitals and hospitals with convalescent wards. The model fits well to a group of hospitals with a wide variety of acute care events, though model fit is less satisfactory for specialized hospitals and those with convalescent wards. Further sophistication of the generic prediction model would be recommended to obtain optimal indices to region specific conditions.

  18. Assessment of hospital performance with a case-mix standardized mortality model using an existing administrative database in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fushimi Kiyohide

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few studies have examined whether risk adjustment is evenly applicable to hospitals with various characteristics and case-mix. In this study, we applied a generic prediction model to nationwide discharge data from hospitals with various characteristics. Method We used standardized data of 1,878,767 discharged patients provided by 469 hospitals from July 1 to October 31, 2006. We generated and validated a case-mix in-hospital mortality prediction model using 50/50 split sample validation. We classified hospitals into two groups based on c-index value (hospitals with c-index ≥ 0.8; hospitals with c-index Results The model demonstrated excellent discrimination as indicated by the high average c-index and small standard deviation (c-index = 0.88 ± 0.04. Expected mortality rate of each hospital was highly correlated with observed mortality rate (r = 0.693, p Conclusion The model fits well to a group of hospitals with a wide variety of acute care events, though model fit is less satisfactory for specialized hospitals and those with convalescent wards. Further sophistication of the generic prediction model would be recommended to obtain optimal indices to region specific conditions.

  19. 42 CFR 412.620 - Patient classification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...-mix group classifications and weighting factors. We may periodically adjust the case-mix groups and... rehabilitation facilities into mutually exclusive case-mix groups. (2) For purposes of this subpart, case-mix... assessments under § 412.610(c)(1) are used to classify a Medicare patient into an appropriate case-mix group...

  20. Factors influencing adherence to referral advice following pre-referral treatment with artesunate suppositories in children in rural Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simba, Daudi O; Warsame, Marian; Kimbute, Omari; Kakoko, Deodatus; Petzold, Max; Tomson, Goran; Premji, Zul; Gomes, Melba

    2009-07-01

    WHO recommends artemisinin suppository formulations as pre-referral treatment for children who are unable to take oral medication and cannot rapidly reach a facility for parenteral treatment. We investigated factors influencing caretakers' adherence to referral advice following pre-referral treatment of their children with rectal artesunate suppositories. The study was nested within an intervention study that involved pre-referral treatment of all children who came to a community dispenser for treatment because they were unable to take oral medications because of repeated vomiting, lethargy, convulsions or altered consciousness. All patients who did not comply with referral advice were stratified by actions taken post-referral: taking their children to a drug shop, a traditional healer, or not seeking further treatment, and added to a random selection of patients who complied with referral advice. Caretakers of the children were interviewed about their socio-economic status (SES), knowledge about malaria, referral advice given and actions they took following pre-referral treatment. Interview data for 587 caretakers were matched with symptoms of the children, the time of treatment, arrival at a health facility or other actions taken post-pre-referral treatment. The majority (93.5%) of caretakers reported being given referral advice by the community drug dispenser. The odds of adherence with this advice were three times greater for children with altered consciousness and/or convulsions than for children with other symptoms [odds ratio (OR) 3.47, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.32-5.17, P < 0.001]. When questioned, caretakers who remembered when (OR 2.19, 95% CI 1.48-3.23, P < 0.001) and why (OR 1.77, 95% CI 1.07-2.95, P = 0.026) they were advised to proceed to health facility - were more likely to follow referral advice. Cost did not influence adherence except within a catchment area of facilities that charged for services. In these areas, costs deterred adherence by

  1. Obstetrical referrals by traditional birth attendants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Rozina; Hashmi, Haleema; Mustafa, Rubina

    2012-01-01

    In Pakistan 90% of births are conducted by TBA's. In most cases, TBA's are unable to diagnose the complications and are often unable to take decisions on timely referral. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence, nature and outcome of life threatening obstetrical conditions in referrals by Traditional Birth Attendants (TBAs). This Observational, Descriptive study was conducted from January to December 2007, in the obstetrical unit of Fatima Hospital, Baqai Medical University, a tertiary care community based hospital. The study included patients referred by TBA's who developed life threatening obstetric conditions (LTOCs). Total 64 patients were referred by TBA's. The prevalence was 7.8%. Out of them, 53 (82.8%) patients admitted with life threatening obstetric conditions. The near-miss morbidities and mortalities were 45 (84.9%) and 8 (15%) respectively. Maternal mortality to Near-miss morbidity ratio was 1:6. Obstructed labour caused near-miss morbidity in 32 (60.3%) patients with no mortality. Postpartum haemorrhage as life threatening condition developed in 16 (30.1%) patients with 10 (18.8%) near-miss morbidities and 6 (11.3%) mortalities. Puerperal sepsis accounted for 1 (1.88%) near-miss morbidity and 2 (3.76%) mortalities. The mortality index for puerperal sepsis is (66.6%) almost double of postpartum haemorrhage (37.5%). Mortality to near miss morbidity ratio is high. Misidentification and late referrals of complicated cases by TBA's were responsible for near-miss morbidities and mortalities.

  2. Effect of Hospital Case Mix on the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems Star Scores: Are All Stars the Same?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiels, Cornelius A; Hanson, Kristine T; Yost, Kathleen J; Zielinski, Martin D; Habermann, Elizabeth B; Cima, Robert R

    2016-10-01

    We aimed to evaluate variations in patient experience measures across different surgical specialties and to assess the impact of further case-mix adjustment. Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) is a publicly reported survey of patients' hospital experiences that directly influence Medicare reimbursement. All adult surgical inpatients meeting criteria for HCAHPS sampling from 2013 to 2014 at a single academic center were identified. HCAHPS measures were analyzed according to published top-box and Star-rating methodologies, and were dichotomized ("high" vs "low"). Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify independent associations of high patient scores on various HCAHPS measures with specialty, diagnosis-related group complexity, cancer diagnosis, sex, and emergency admission after adjusting for HCAHPS case-mix adjusters (education, overall health status, language, and age). We identified 36,551 eligible patients, of which 30.8% (n = 11,273) completed HCAHPS. Women [odds ratio (OR) 0.78, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.72-0.85, P cases (OR 0.90, 95% CI 0.82-0.99, P = 0.02), and emergency admissions (OR 0.67, 95% CI 0.55-0.82, P case-mix adjustment does not include adjustment for specialty or diagnosis, which may result in artificially lower scores for centers that provide a high level of complex care. Further research is needed to ensure that the HCAHPS is an unbiased comparison tool.

  3. Improving neurosurgical communication and reducing risk and registrar burden using a novel online database referral platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matloob, Samir A; Hyam, Jonathan A; Thorne, Lewis; Bradford, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Documentation of urgent referrals to neurosurgical units and communication with referring hospitals is critical for effective handover and appropriate continuity of care within a tertiary service. Referrals to our neurosurgical unit were audited and we found that the majority of referrals were not documented and this led to more calls to the on-call neurosurgery registrar regarding old referrals. We implemented a new referral system in an attempt to improve documentation of referrals, communication with our referring hospitals and to professionalise the service we offer them. During a 14-day period, number of bleeps, missed bleeps, calls discussing new referrals and previously processed referrals were recorded. Whether new referrals were appropriately documented and referrers received a written response was also recorded. A commercially provided secure cloud-based data archiving telecommunications and database platform for referrals was subsequently introduced within the Trust and the questionnaire repeated during another 14-day period 1 year after implementation. Missed bleeps per day reduced from 16% (SD ± 6.4%) to 9% (SD ± 4.8%; df = 13, paired t-tests p = 0.007) and mean calls per day clarifying previous referrals reduced from 10 (SD ± 4) to 5 (SD ± 3.5; df = 13, p = 0.003). Documentation of new referrals increased from 43% (74/174) to 85% (181/210), and responses to referrals increased from 74% to 98%. The use of a secure cloud-based data archiving telecommunications and database platform significantly increased the documentation of new referrals. This led to fewer missed bleeps and fewer calls about old referrals for the on call registrar. This system of documenting referrals results in improved continuity of care for neurosurgical patients, a significant reduction in risk for Trusts and a more efficient use of Registrar time.

  4. Re-resection rates after breast-conserving surgery as a performance indicator: introduction of a case-mix model to allow comparison between Dutch hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talsma, A K; Reedijk, A M J; Damhuis, R A M; Westenend, P J; Vles, W J

    2011-04-01

    Re-resection rate after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) has been introduced as an indicator of quality of surgical treatment in international literature. The present study aims to develop a case-mix model for re-resection rates and to evaluate its performance in comparing results between hospitals. Electronic records of eligible patients diagnosed with in-situ and invasive breast cancer in 2006 and 2007 were derived from 16 hospitals in the Rotterdam Cancer Registry (RCR) (n = 961). A model was built in which prognostic factors for re-resections after BCS were identified and expected re-resection rate could be assessed for hospitals based on their case mix. To illustrate the opportunities of monitoring re-resections over time, after risk adjustment for patient profile, a VLAD chart was drawn for patients in one hospital. In general three out of every ten women had re-surgery; in about 50% this meant an additive mastectomy. Independent prognostic factors of re-resection after multivariate analysis were histological type, sublocalisation, tumour size, lymph node involvement and multifocal disease. After correction for case mix, one hospital was performing significantly less re-resections compared to the reference hospital. On the other hand, two were performing significantly more re-resections than was expected based on their patient mix. Our population-based study confirms earlier reports that re-resection is frequently required after an initial breast-conserving operation. Case-mix models such as the one we constructed can be used to correct for variation between hospitals performances. VLAD charts are valuable tools to monitor quality of care within individual hospitals. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Percutaneous artery embolization of bleeding rectus sheath hematomas in hemodynamically unstable patients: Outcomes of 43 patients in a tertiary referral hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Cereda

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Rectus sheath hematoma (RSH is an uncommon cause of abdominal pain that can lead to life-threatening bleeding, particularly in elderly patients receiving anticoagulation therapy. Type III RSHs, based on computer tomography (CT evaluation, is characterized by active bleeding with intramuscular or intraperitoneal extension and hemodynamic instability. Medical contemporary knowledge of this condition is contentious and overall 20% of acute mortality has been reported. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively review our experience and outcomes in the management of RSHs treated with percutaneous arterial embolization of the epigastric vessels. We retrospectively analyzed 43 patients with RSH type III, submitted to percutaneous epigastric artery embolization from 2007 to 2015. Percutaneous arterial embolization was feasible and successful in patients with a high burden of comorbidities and receiving anticoagulation therapy. There was no acute mortality and a late mortality at 3 months of 9.1% (4/43 was not directly related to RSHs or arterial embolization. Patients with late mortality had lower ejection fraction, prolonged PTT, greater RDW and warfarin in overlapping with low-molecular-weight heparins. Transcatheter arterial embolization of the epigastric vessels was safe, feasible and effective in stopping the bleeding. Despite anti-platelets/anti-coagulation therapy and a high burden of comorbidities, there was no acute mortality related to RSH.

  6. Development of a model for case-mix adjustment of pressure ulcer prevalence rates.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bours, G.J.J.W.; Halfens, J.; Berger, M.P.; Abu-Saad, H.H.; Grol, R.P.T.M.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute care hospitals participating in the Dutch national pressure ulcer prevalence survey use the results of this survey to compare their outcomes and assess their quality of care regarding pressure ulcer prevention. The development of a model for case-mix adjustment is essential for the

  7. Medicaid payment rates, case-mix reimbursement, and nursing home staffing--1996-2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhanlian; Grabowski, David C; Intrator, Orna; Zinn, Jacqueline; Mor, Vincent

    2008-01-01

    We examined the impact of state Medicaid payment rates and case-mix reimbursement on direct care staffing levels in US nursing homes. We used a recent time series of national nursing home data from the Online Survey Certification and Reporting system for 1996-2004, merged with annual state Medicaid payment rates and case-mix reimbursement information. A 5-category response measure of total staffing levels was defined according to expert recommended thresholds, and examined in a multinomial logistic regression model. Facility fixed-effects models were estimated separately for Registered Nurse (RN), Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN), and Certified Nurse Aide (CNA) staffing levels measured as average hours per resident day. Higher Medicaid payment rates were associated with increases in total staffing levels to meet a higher recommended threshold. However, these gains in overall staffing were accompanied by a reduction of RN staffing and an increase in both LPN and CNA staffing levels. Under case-mix reimbursement, the likelihood of nursing homes achieving higher recommended staffing thresholds decreased, as did levels of professional staffing. Independent of the effects of state, market, and facility characteristics, there was a significant downward trend in RN staffing and an upward trend in both LPN and CNA staffing. Although overall staffing may increase in response to more generous Medicaid reimbursement, it may not translate into improvements in the skill mix of staff. Adjusting for reimbursement levels and resident acuity, total staffing has not increased after the implementation of case-mix reimbursement.

  8. Rural and Urban Differences in Vocational Rehabilitation Case Mix, Delivery Practices, and Employment Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipsen, Catherine; Swicegood, Grant

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To examine rural and urban differences in Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) case mix, delivery practices, and employment outcomes. Methods: Rehabilitation Services Administration 911 (RSA-911) case data do not include location indicators that allow for rural analyses. We compiled RSA-911 data with county and ZIP code information from 47 VR…

  9. Towards successful coordination of electronic health record based-referrals: a qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hysong, Sylvia J; Esquivel, Adol; Sittig, Dean F; Paul, Lindsey A; Espadas, Donna; Singh, Simran; Singh, Hardeep

    2011-07-27

    Successful subspecialty referrals require considerable coordination and interactive communication among the primary care provider (PCP), the subspecialist, and the patient, which may be challenging in the outpatient setting. Even when referrals are facilitated by electronic health records (EHRs) (i.e., e-referrals), lapses in patient follow-up might occur. Although compelling reasons exist why referral coordination should be improved, little is known about which elements of the complex referral coordination process should be targeted for improvement. Using Okhuysen & Bechky's coordination framework, this paper aims to understand the barriers, facilitators, and suggestions for improving communication and coordination of EHR-based referrals in an integrated healthcare system. We conducted a qualitative study to understand coordination breakdowns related to e-referrals in an integrated healthcare system and examined work-system factors that affect the timely receipt of subspecialty care. We conducted interviews with seven subject matter experts and six focus groups with a total of 30 PCPs and subspecialists at two tertiary care Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) medical centers. Using techniques from grounded theory and content analysis, we identified organizational themes that affected the referral process. Four themes emerged: lack of an institutional referral policy, lack of standardization in certain referral procedures, ambiguity in roles and responsibilities, and inadequate resources to adapt and respond to referral requests effectively. Marked differences in PCPs' and subspecialists' communication styles and individual mental models of the referral processes likely precluded the development of a shared mental model to facilitate coordination and successful referral completion. Notably, very few barriers related to the EHR were reported. Despite facilitating information transfer between PCPs and subspecialists, e-referrals remain prone to coordination

  10. Towards successful coordination of electronic health record based-referrals: a qualitative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Lindsey A

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Successful subspecialty referrals require considerable coordination and interactive communication among the primary care provider (PCP, the subspecialist, and the patient, which may be challenging in the outpatient setting. Even when referrals are facilitated by electronic health records (EHRs (i.e., e-referrals, lapses in patient follow-up might occur. Although compelling reasons exist why referral coordination should be improved, little is known about which elements of the complex referral coordination process should be targeted for improvement. Using Okhuysen & Bechky's coordination framework, this paper aims to understand the barriers, facilitators, and suggestions for improving communication and coordination of EHR-based referrals in an integrated healthcare system. Methods We conducted a qualitative study to understand coordination breakdowns related to e-referrals in an integrated healthcare system and examined work-system factors that affect the timely receipt of subspecialty care. We conducted interviews with seven subject matter experts and six focus groups with a total of 30 PCPs and subspecialists at two tertiary care Department of Veterans Affairs (VA medical centers. Using techniques from grounded theory and content analysis, we identified organizational themes that affected the referral process. Results Four themes emerged: lack of an institutional referral policy, lack of standardization in certain referral procedures, ambiguity in roles and responsibilities, and inadequate resources to adapt and respond to referral requests effectively. Marked differences in PCPs' and subspecialists' communication styles and individual mental models of the referral processes likely precluded the development of a shared mental model to facilitate coordination and successful referral completion. Notably, very few barriers related to the EHR were reported. Conclusions Despite facilitating information transfer between PCPs and

  11. External Validation of a Case-Mix Adjustment Model for the Standardized Reporting of 30-Day Stroke Mortality Rates in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Yu

    Full Text Available A case-mix adjustment model has been developed and externally validated, demonstrating promise. However, the model has not been thoroughly tested among populations in China. In our study, we evaluated the performance of the model in Chinese patients with acute stroke.The case-mix adjustment model A includes items on age, presence of atrial fibrillation on admission, National Institutes of Health Stroke Severity Scale (NIHSS score on admission, and stroke type. Model B is similar to Model A but includes only the consciousness component of the NIHSS score. Both model A and B were evaluated to predict 30-day mortality rates in 13,948 patients with acute stroke from the China National Stroke Registry. The discrimination of the models was quantified by c-statistic. Calibration was assessed using Pearson's correlation coefficient.The c-statistic of model A in our external validation cohort was 0.80 (95% confidence interval, 0.79-0.82, and the c-statistic of model B was 0.82 (95% confidence interval, 0.81-0.84. Excellent calibration was reported in the two models with Pearson's correlation coefficient (0.892 for model A, p<0.001; 0.927 for model B, p = 0.008.The case-mix adjustment model could be used to effectively predict 30-day mortality rates in Chinese patients with acute stroke.

  12. Cost of practice in a tertiary/quaternary referral center: is it sustainable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cologne, K G; Hwang, G S; Senagore, A J

    2014-11-01

    Third-party payers are moving toward a bundled care payment system. This means that there will need to be a warranty cost of care-where the cost of complexity and complication rates is built into the bundled payment. The theoretical benefit of this system is that providers with lower complication rates will be able to provide care with lower warranty costs and lower overall costs. This may also result in referring riskier patients to tertiary or quaternary referral centers. Unless the payment model truly covers the higher cost of managing such referred cases, the economic risk may be unsustainable for these centers. We took the last seven patients that were referred by other surgeons as "too high risk" for colectomy at other centers. A contribution margin was calculated using standard Medicare reimbursement rates at our institution and cost of care based on our administrative database. We then recalculated a contribution margin assuming a 3 % reduction in payment for a higher than average readmission rate, like that which will take effect in 2014. Finally, we took into account the cost of any readmissions. Seven patients with diagnosis related group (DRG) 330 were reviewed with an average age of 66.8 ± 16 years, American Society of Anesthesiologists score 2.3 ± 1.0, body mass index 31.6 ± 9.8 kg/m(2) (range 22-51 kg/m(2)). There was a 57 % readmission rate, 29 % reoperation rate, 10.8 ± 7.7 day average initial length of stay with 14 ± 8.6 day average readmission length of stay. Forty-two percent were discharged to a location other than home. Seventy-one percent of these patients had Medicare insurance. The case mix index was 2.45. Average reimbursement for DRG 330 was $17,084 (based on Medicare data) for our facility in 2012, with the national average being $12,520. The total contribution margin among all cases collectively was -$19,122 ± 13,285 (average per patient -$2,731, range -$21,905-$12,029). Assuming a 3 % reimbursement reduction made the overall

  13. A unique approach to quantifying the changing workload and case mix in laparoscopic colorectal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, P R; Gupta, V; Haray, P N

    2011-03-01

    Laparoscopic colorectal surgery includes a range of operations with differing technical difficulty, and traditional parameters, such as conversion and complication rates, may not be sensitive enough to assess the complexity of these procedures. This study aims to define a reproducible and reliable tool for quantifying the total workload and the complexity of the case mix. This is a review of a single surgeon's 10-year experience. The intermediate equivalent value scoring system was used to code complexity of cases. To assess changes in the workload and case mix, the period has been divided into five phases. Three hundred and forty-nine laparoscopic operations were performed, of which there were 264 (75.6%) resections. The overall conversion rate was 17.8%, with progressive improvement over the phases. Complex major operation (CMO), as defined in the British United Provident Association (BUPA) schedule of procedures, accounted for 35% of the workload. In spite of similar numbers of cases in each phase, there was a steady increase in the workload score, correlating with the increasing complexity of the case mix. There was no significant difference in the conversion and complications rates between CMO and non-CMO. The paradoxical increase in the mean operating time with increasing experience corresponded to the progressive increase in the workload score, reflecting the increasing complexity of the case mix. This article establishes a reliable and reproducible tool for quantifying the total laparoscopic colorectal workload of an individual surgeon or of an entire department, while at the same time providing a measure of the complexity of the case mix. © 2011 The Authors. Colorectal Disease © 2011 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  14. Physician self-referral and physician-owned specialty facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casalino, Lawrence P

    2008-06-01

    Physician self-referral ranges from suggesting a follow-up appointment, to sending a patient to a facility in which the doctor has an ownership interest or financial relationship. Physician referral to facilities in which the physicians have an ownership interest is becoming increasingly common and not always medically appropriate. This Synthesis reviews the evidence on physician self-referral arrangements, their effect on costs and utilization, and their effect on general hospitals. Key findings include: the rise in self-referral is sparked by financial, regulatory and clinical incentives, including patient convenience and doctors trying to preserve their income in the changing health care landscape. Strong evidence suggests self-referral leads to increased usage of health care services; but there is insufficient evidence to determine whether this increased usage reflects doctors meeting an unmet need or ordering clinically inappropriate care. The more significant a physician's financial interest in a facility, the more likely the doctor is to refer patients there. Arrangements through which doctors receive fees for patient referrals to third-party centers, such as "pay-per-click," time-share, and leasing arrangements, do not seem to offer benefits beyond increasing physician income. So far, the profit margins of general hospitals have not been harmed by the rise in doctor-owned facilities.

  15. Is the Current Management of Patients Presenting With Spinal Trauma to District General Hospitals Fit for Purpose? Our Experience of Delivering a Spinal Service Using an Electronic Referral Platform in a Large District General Teaching Hospital Without Onsite Spinal Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Daniel S; Marynissen, Hans

    2018-04-12

    A retrospective cross-sectional analysis. To describe the provision of a spinal service using an electronic platform to direct management from an external spinal unit, and quantify time taken to obtain definitive management plans whilst under prescribed spinal immobilization. Most attending district general hospitals following spinal trauma will have stable injuries and normal neurology, with only a small proportion requiring urgent transfer to a specialist centre. A retrospective review of 104 patients admitted following vertebral during a 12-month period. The British Orthopaedic Association Standards for Trauma consensus that "spinal immobilisation is not recommended for more than 48 hours" was the standard of care measured against. 100 patients occupied a total of 975 hospital inpatient bed days. 117 radiological investigations were requested after the point of external referral (47 CT-scans, 37 MRI-scans, and 33 weight bearing radiographs). The period between initial referral to the regional spinal service and then receiving a definitive final management had a median value of 72 hours and a range of 0 - 33 days. Patients will have been under some form of prescribed spinal immobilisation until the definitive management plan was communicated. 34 patients (34% of the overall cohort) had a definitive management plan in place within 48 hours. 80 patients had vertebral injuries (73 stable, 6 unstable), 3 patients had prolapsed intervertebral disks, 1 had metastatic disease, and 17 had not evidence of an acute injury following evaluation. Patients are being placed under prescribed immobilisation for longer than is recommended. Delays in obtaining radiological imaging were an important factor, together with the time taken to receive a definitive management plan. Limitations in social care provision and delays in arranging this were additional barriers to hospital discharge following the final management plan. 4.

  16. Correlates of oncologist-issued referrals for psycho-oncology services: what we learned from the electronic voluntary screening and referral system for depression (eVSRS-D).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joo-Young; Jung, Dooyoung; Kim, Won-Hyoung; Lee, Hyuk-Joon; Noh, Dong-Young; Hahm, Bong-Jin

    2016-02-01

    Depression in cancer patients is under-recognized and under-treated. To better identify depression, we designed a voluntary depression screening system. Based on its data, we examined trends in oncologist-issued referrals for the psycho-oncology service (POS). The Electronic Voluntary Screening and Referral System for Depression (eVSRS-D) comprises self-screening, automated reporting, and referral guidance. Using touch-screen kiosks at a tertiary hospital in Korea, participants with cancer completed the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 at their convenience, received the results, and reported their willingness to participate in POS. At oncology appointments, oncologists received the screening reports and issued referrals following pre-recommended guidelines. The correlates of actual referrals were examined across all participants and within the willing and non-willing groups. Among the 838 participants, 56.3% reported severe depression symptoms, 30.5% wanted a referral, and 14.8% were actually referred. The correlates of participants' desire for referral were more severe depression symptoms, being unmarried, and being metastasis and recurrence free. Among all participants, the correlates of actual referrals were unemployment, less severe depression symptoms, poorer performance, treatment status, and wanting a referral. The sole correlate of actual referrals within the non-willing group was poorer performance, and no significant correlates existed within the willing group. The non-referrals were mostly (87.1%) because of postponed decisions. The eVSRS-D cannot definitively diagnose major depression but may efficiently self-select a population with significant depression symptoms. The patients' willingness to engage the POS most strongly predicted the actual referrals. Oncologist reviews of screening reports may not result in further depression severity-specific referrals. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Barriers to palliative radiotherapy referral: A Canadian perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samant, Rajiv S.; Fitzgibbon, Edward; Meng, Joanne; Graham, Ian D.

    2007-01-01

    Radiotherapy is an effective but underutilized treatment modality for cancer patients. We decided to investigate the factors influencing radiotherapy referral among family physicians in our region. A 30-item survey was developed to determine palliative radiotherapy knowledge and factors influencing referral. It was sent to 400 physicians in eastern Ontario (Canada) and the completed surveys were evaluated. The overall response rate was 50% with almost all physicians seeing cancer patients recently (97%) and the majority (80%) providing palliative care. Approximately 56% had referred patients for radiotherapy previously and 59% were aware of the regional community oncology program. Factors influencing radiotherapy referral included the following: waiting times for radiotherapy consultation and treatment, uncertainty about the benefits of radiotherapy, patient age, and perceived patient inconvenience. Physicians who referred patients for radiotherapy were more than likely to provide palliative care, work outside of urban centres, have hospital privileges and had sought advice from a radiation oncologist in the past. A variety of factors influence the referral of cancer patients for radiotherapy by family physicians and addressing issues such as long waiting times, lack of palliative radiotherapy knowledge and awareness of Cancer Centre services could increase the rate of appropriate radiotherapy patient referral

  18. Evaluating acute medical admissions through emergency departments in Hong Kong: can one adjust for case-mix variation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainer, T H; Sollich, P; Piotrowski, T; Coolen, A C C; Cheng, B; Graham, C A

    2012-12-01

    Healthcare systems are under pressure to efficiently and safely reduce acute care admissions to hospital. There is a need to develop a standardised system for assessing emergency department performance which takes into account case-mix variation. The objective of this study was to derive and validate a standardised tool for assessing variations in medical admissions through emergency departments in Hong Kong. Retrospective study of patients attending emergency departments of 14 acute hospitals in Hong Kong. Data were retrieved from a centralised administrative database. Of 2,531,225 patients who attended emergency departments between 1 January 2001 and 31 December 2003, 780,444 (30.8%) were admitted to medical wards. A model derived from 2001 data shows well-calibrated admission probabilities, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for probability of admission of 90.3 (95% CI ±0.11). The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves for 2002 and 2003 validation sets were 89.9 (95% CI ±0.11) and 89.0 (95% CI ±0.12), respectively. With an averaged benchmark, reductions in medical admissions of up to 19% could be achieved, while under the most optimistic assumption, reductions of up 36% could be achieved. A tool for benchmarking hospital medical admissions and minimising case-mix variation has been derived and validated in Hong Kong, but it requires further validation in other healthcare systems given the wide variations in admission thresholds internationally. This may be used as one potential method to evaluate the performance of emergency departments against a common standard.

  19. Timely Referral to Outpatient Nephrology Care Slows Progression and Reduces Treatment Costs of Chronic Kidney Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard Lonnemann

    2017-03-01

    Discussion: Timely referral to outpatient nephrology care is associated with slowed disease progression, less hospital admissions, reduced total treatment costs, and improved survival in patients with CKD.

  20. Case-mix tool, costs and effectiveness in improving primary care mental health and substance abuse services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riihimäki, Kirsi; Heiska-Johansson, Ainomaija; Ketola, Eeva

    2018-02-01

    Despite its importance in improving care and developing services, high-quality data evaluating cost-effectiveness and services in different case-mix populations is scarce in primary care. The objective was to investigate the service use of those mental health and substance abuse patients, who use lots of services. Primary health care diagnosis-related groups (pDRG) is a tool to evaluate service provider system and improve efficiency, productivity and quality. We viewed all pDRG results available from the year 2015 concerning municipal mental health and substance abuse services. In primary care mental health and substance abuse services, the most common ICD-10-codes were depression and substance abuse. One-fifth of patients produced 57% of costs. Their medium of appointments was 16 per year versus 6 per year of all patients. Only 54% of their diagnoses were recorded in the electronic health records versus 75% of all patients. They made 5.7 different pDRG episodes, including 1.8 episodes of depression, per patient. The average episode cost for this patient group was 301€. pDRG makes health care production transparent also in mental health and substance abuse services. It is easy to identify patients, who use a lot of services and thus induce the majority of costs, and focus on their needs in managing and developing services.

  1. Psychiatric referrals in two general hospitals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doongaji D

    1989-07-01

    Full Text Available A prospective study was undertaken to compare the patterns of psychiatric referrals in two general hospitals in Bombay viz. the King Edward Memorial Hospital (64 cases and the Jaslok Hospital and Research Centre (62 cases. It was observed that depressive symptoms were the most common presenting symptoms in these patients attending either of the hospitals. Similarly, the commonest diagnoses were depression and organic mental disorder. Attempted suicide with organophosphorous compounds was the commonest reason for hospitalization at K.E.M. Hospital (p less than 0.001. A significant number of these patients were females (p less than 0.05. The psychiatric referrals at Jaslok had been hospitalized mainly for suspected medical or neurological illness (p less than 0.001. These patients belonged to higher economic strata and hence had a better paying capacity compared to patients at KEM hospital, a significant number of whom were unemployed (p less than 0.001. The duration of pre-referred illness of patients and their stay at Jaslok hospital were longer as compared to those at KEM Hospital (p less than 0.01. The number of non-relevant special investigations carried out on patients in Jaslok was more (p less than 0.01. Further analysis of diagnoses revealed that a significant number of patients at KEM Hospital were admitted as primary psychiatric illness (p less than 0.05.

  2. Labelling and illness in primary care: comparing factors influencing general practitioners' and psychiatrists' decisions regarding patient referral to mental illness services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, A E; Griffiths, H

    1992-08-01

    GPs and psychiatrists from South Wales were asked to make decisions based on the information included in each of 16 vignettes describing depressed and anxious subjects. This information contained randomly assigned sex, psychiatric label, good and bad psychosocial context and age as well as eight different severity ratings of depression and anxiety symptoms. Our results showed that both GPs and psychiatrists were influenced in their decision making by the severity of the illness, but that GPs alone were also strongly influenced by the presence of male sex and by the presence of a psychiatric label. Good or bad psychosocial context had no influence on the GPs' referral decision, and previous experience in psychiatry or other vocational training had no detectable effect, but this may be because of the sample size.

  3. Economic impact of a head and neck oncologic surgeon: the case mix index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalisi, Scharukh; Sanan, Akshay; Mcdonough, Katie; Hussein, Khalil; Platt, Michael; Truong, Minh Tam; Couch, Marion; Burkey, Brian B

    2014-10-01

    Head and neck oncologic surgery is a time-consuming specialty that requires extensive resources and manpower. Case mix index (CMI) is used in evaluating the complexity and economic impact of surgeons. Head and neck oncologic surgeons generate significant revenue for hospitals, yet compensation is relatively low. Retrospective review of a tertiary hospital's case mix data for 605 otolaryngology admissions from 2009 to 2011 was performed. CMI comparison for head and neck oncologic surgeons versus general otolaryngology was performed. In an otolaryngology department of 9 surgeons; there was a significant difference (p 1) favoring head and neck oncologic surgeons. Head and neck oncologic surgeons increase the CMI for hospitals and ultimately influence the hospital's reimbursement. There is a need for increased collaboration between hospitals and departments in fostering and furthering their head and neck surgical oncology programs by taking CMI into consideration. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Case Mix Management Systems: An Opportunity to Integrate Medical Records and Financial Management System Data Bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusnak, James E.

    1987-01-01

    Due to previous systems selections, many hospitals (health care facilities) are faced with the problem of fragmented data bases containing clinical, demographic and financial information. Projects to select and implement a Case Mix Management System (CMMS) provide an opportunity to reduce the number of separate physical files and to migrate towards systems with an integrated data base. The number of CMMS candidate systems is often restricted due to data base and system interface issues. The hospital must insure the CMMS project provides a means to implement an integrated on-line hospital information data base for use by departments in operating under a DRG-based Prospective Payment System. This paper presents guidelines for use in selecting a Case Mix Mangement System to meet the hospital's financial and operations planning, budgeting, marketing, and other management needs, while considering the data base implications of the implementation.

  5. Measuring performance in health care: case-mix adjustment by boosted decision trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Anke; Holstein, Josiane; Le Gall, Jean-Roger; Lepage, Eric

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the suitability of boosted decision trees for the case-mix adjustment involved in comparing the performance of various health care entities. First, we present logistic regression, decision trees, and boosted decision trees in a unified framework. Second, we study in detail their application for two common performance indicators, the mortality rate in intensive care and the rate of potentially avoidable hospital readmissions. For both examples the technique of boosting decision trees outperformed standard prognostic models, in particular linear logistic regression models, with regard to predictive power. On the other hand, boosting decision trees was computationally demanding and the resulting models were rather complex and needed additional tools for interpretation. Boosting decision trees represents a powerful tool for case-mix adjustment in health care performance measurement. Depending on the specific priorities set in each context, the gain in predictive power might compensate for the inconvenience in the use of boosted decision trees.

  6. Using the simplified case mix tool (sCMT) to identify cost in special care dental services to support commissioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duane, B G; Freeman, R; Richards, D; Crosbie, S; Patel, P; White, S; Humphris, G

    2017-03-01

    To commission dental services for vulnerable (special care) patient groups effectively, consistently and fairly an evidence base is needed of the costs involved. The simplified Case Mixed Tool (sCMT) can assess treatment mode complexity for these patient groups. To determine if the sCMT can be used to identify costs of service provision. Patients (n=495) attending the Sussex Community NHS Trust Special Care Dental Service for care were assessed using the sCMT. sCMT score and costs (staffing, laboratory fees, etc.) besides patient age, whether a new patient and use of general anaesthetic/intravenous sedation. Statistical analysis (adjusted linear regression modelling) compared sCMT score and costs then sensitivity analyses of the costings to age, being a new patient and sedation use were undertaken. Regression tables were produced to present estimates of service costs. Costs increased with sCMT total scale and single item values in a predictable manner in all analyses except for 'cooperation'. Costs increased with the use of IV sedation; with each rising level of the sCMT, and with complexity in every sCMT category, except cooperation. Costs increased with increase in complexity of treatment mode as measured by sCMT scores. Measures such as the sCMT can provide predictions of the resource allocations required when commissioning special care dental services. Copyright© 2017 Dennis Barber Ltd.

  7. The changing case-mix of hip fractures in Scotland - evidence from the Scottish Hip Fracture Audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannah, Stephen D; Ferguson, K B; Smith, R; Hutchison, J; Holt, G

    2017-11-01

    Until discontinued in 2008, the Scottish Hip Fracture Audit collected and reported on data relating to the quality of care of hip fracture patients in Scotland. In 2013, the audit was recommenced under the umbrella of the MSK Audit group, which audits high volume orthopaedic pathways across Scotland. Our aim is to report on the changes in the demographics of hip fracture patients in Scotland between 2003 and 2013. There was an increase in the proportion of male patients from 2003 to 2013 (22.4% to 29.5%; p < 0.0001). An increased percentage of hip fracture patients were admitted from their own home (63.9% to 73.1%; p < 0.0001). Both these factors have deleterious effects on the outcome, and use of necessary resources, following hip fracture. There was also an increase in the percentage of patients who were American Society of Anesthesiologists Grade 3 (52.9% to 56.4%). Over the last decade, there has been a shift in the demographics of Scotland's hip fracture patients. If hip fracture incidence increases as predicted, this potentially more-challenging case-mix will likely impact on multiple health resources.

  8. Case Mix Management Systems: An Opportunity to Integrate Medical Records and Financial Management System Data Bases

    OpenAIRE

    Rusnak, James E.

    1987-01-01

    Due to previous systems selections, many hospitals (health care facilities) are faced with the problem of fragmented data bases containing clinical, demographic and financial information. Projects to select and implement a Case Mix Management System (CMMS) provide an opportunity to reduce the number of separate physical files and to migrate towards systems with an integrated data base. The number of CMMS candidate systems is often restricted due to data base and system interface issues. The h...

  9. Case mix measures and diagnosis-related groups: opportunities and threats for inpatient dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensen, P; Fürstenberg, T; Luger, T A; Steinhoff, M; Roeder, N

    2005-09-01

    The changing healthcare environment world-wide is leading to extensive use of per case payment systems based on diagnosis-related groups (DRG). The aim of this study was to examine the impact of application of different DRG systems used in the German healthcare system. We retrospectively analysed 2334 clinical data sets of inpatients discharged from an academic dermatological inpatient unit in 2003. Data were regarded as providing high coding quality in compliance with the diagnosis and procedure classifications as well as coding standards. The application of the Australian AR-DRG version 4.1, the German G-DRG version 1.0, and the German G-DRG version 2004 was considered in detail. To evaluate more specific aspects, data were broken down into 11 groups based on the principle diagnosis. DRG cost weights and case mix index were used to compare coverage of inpatient dermatological services. Economic impacts were illustrated by case mix volumes and calculation of DRG payments. Case mix index results and the pending prospective revenues vary tremendously from the application of one or another of the DRG systems. The G-DRG version 2004 provides increased levels of case mix index that encourages, in particular, medical dermatology. The AR-DRG version 4.1 and the first German DRG version 1.0 appear to be less suitable to adequately cover inpatient dermatology. The G-DRG version 2004 has been greatly improved, probably due to proceeding calculation standards and DRG adjustments. The future of inpatient dermatology is subject to appropriate depiction of well-established treatment standards.

  10. [Case-Mix of hospital emergencies in the Andalusian Health Service based on the 2012 Minimum Data Set. Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goicoechea Salazar, Juan Antonio; Nieto García, María Adoración; Laguna Téllez, Antonio; Larrocha Mata, Daniel; Canto Casasola, Vicente David; Murillo Cabezas, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    The implementation of digital health records in emergency departments (ED) in hospitals in the Andalusian Health Service and the development of an automatic encoder for this area have allowed us to establish a Minimum Data Set for Emergencies (MDS-ED). The aim of this article is to describe the case mix of hospital EDs using various dimensions contained in the MDS-ED. 3.235.600 hospital emergency records in 2012 were classified in clinical categories from the ICD-9-CM codes generated by the automatic encoder. Operating rules to obtain response time and length of stay were defined. A descriptive analysis was carried out to obtain demographic and chronological indicators as well as hospitalization, return and death rates and response time and length of stay in the Eds. Women generated 54,26% of all occurrences and their average age (39,98 years) was higher than men's (37,61). Paediatric emergencies accounted for 21,49% of the total. The peak hours were from 10:00 to 13:00 and from 16:00 to 17:00. Patients who did not undergo observation (92,67%) remained in the ED an average of 153 minutes. Injuries and poisoning, respiratory diseases, musculoskeletal diseases and symptoms and signs generated over 50% of all visits. 79.191 cases of chest pain, 28.741 episodes of heart failure and 27.989 episodes of serious infections were identified among the most relevant disorders. The MDS-ED makes it possible to address systematically the analysis of hospital emergencies by identifying the activity developed, the case-mix attended, the response times, the time spent in ED and the quality of the care.

  11. Police referrals at the psychiatric emergency service in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jen-Pang; Wu, Chia-Yi; Chiu, Chih-Chiang; Yang, Tsu-Hui; Liu, Tzong-Hsien; Chou, Pesus

    2015-12-01

    The police are the frontline workers in crisis situations involving patients with severe mental illness and act as a primary referral source for psychiatric emergency services (PES) in the community. The aims of this study were to investigate the distribution and characteristics of police referral among psychiatric patients in Taiwan. The study cohort consisted of patients who visited the PES of Taipei City Psychiatric Center from January 2009 to December 2010. The associations between the factors of demographics, clinical characteristics, and psychiatric service utilization and police referral were evaluated. Among the 7656 psychiatric emergency visits, 3029 (39.6%) were referred by the police. These patients referred by police were more likely to be male and aged between 30 to 49 years. Clinical factors related to police referrals including a higher triage assessment level, chief problems included violence, disturbance, substance use, less anxiety, and a diagnosis of unspecified psychosis. The triage assessment level and chief problems assessed by nurses were major predictors. These patients tended to be referred from the catchment area and during the nighttime shift, were discharged during the daytime shift, and stayed longer in the PES. Disposition arrangements such as discharge against medical advice and involuntary admission were also associated with police referrals. Patients referred by the police to the PES were those with more severe psychiatric problems and illnesses assessed by psychiatric nurses and psychiatrists. They tended to have more complex service utilization at the PES. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  12. The influence of referral protocols on the utilization of magnetic resonance imaging: evidence from Manitoba

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mustard, C.A.; McClarty, B.M.; MacEwan, D.W. [Manitoba Univ., Winnipeg, MB (Canada)

    1994-04-01

    The influence of referral protocols on the utilization of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) services was studied. Three neuroradiologists and one radiologist reviewed the indications for MRI for 198 referrals to a facility in Winnipeg, selected at random from patients seen in 1991 for suspected disorders of the brain or the spine. Out-of-province referrals had not been subject to referral protocols, whereas those from within Manitoba had been subject to such protocols. At least three of the four radiologists agreed on whether an examination was appropriate in 88.4 % of the cases. Out-of-province referrals were significantly more likely to be considered inappropriate for MRI (24 %) than referrals from within Manitoba (10 %). It was estimated that the combined effect of instituting protocols and reviewing each referral before the examination could result in a 16 % to 31 % reduction in the demand for MRI services without compromising diagnostic information. 18 refs., 3 tabs.

  13. Hospital accreditation, reimbursement and case mix: links and insights for contractual systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammar, Walid; Khalife, Jade; El-Jardali, Fadi; Romanos, Jenny; Harb, Hilda; Hamadeh, Ghassan; Dimassi, Hani

    2013-12-05

    Resource consumption is a widely used proxy for severity of illness, and is often measured through a case-mix index (CMI) based on Diagnosis Related Groups (DRGs), which is commonly linked to payment. For countries that do not have DRGs it has been suggested to use CMIs derived from International Classification of Diseases (ICD). Our research objective was to use ICD-derived case-mix to evaluate whether or not the current accreditation-based hospital reimbursement system in Lebanon is appropriate. Our study population included medical admissions to 122 hospitals contracted with the Lebanese Ministry of Public Health (MoPH) between June 2011 and May 2012. Applying ICD-derived CMI on principal diagnosis cost (CMI-ICDC) using weighing similar to that used in Medicare DRG CMI, analyses were made by hospital accreditation, ownership and size. We examined two measures of 30-day re-admission rate. Further analysis was done to examine correlation between principal diagnosis CMI and surgical procedure cost CMI (CMI-CPTC), and three proxy measures on surgical complexity, case complexity and surgical proportion. Hospitals belonging to the highest accreditation category had a higher CMI than others, but no difference was found in CMI among the three other categories. Private hospitals had a higher CMI than public hospitals, and those more than 100 beds had a higher CMI than smaller hospitals. Re-admissions rates were higher in accreditation category C hospitals than category D hospitals. CMI-ICDC was fairly correlated with CMI-CPTC, and somehow correlated with the proposed proxies. Our results indicate that the current link between accreditation and reimbursement rate is not appropriate, and leads to unfairness and inefficiency in the system. Some proxy measures are correlated with case-mix but are not good substitutes for it. Policy implications of our findings propose the necessity for changing the current reimbursement system by including case mix and outcome indicators in

  14. Critical care outreach referrals: a mixed-method investigative study of outcomes and experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattison, Natalie; Eastham, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    To explore referrals to a critical care outreach team (CCOT), associated factors around patient management and survival to discharge, and the qualitative exploration of referral characteristics (identifying any areas for service improvement around CCOT). A single-centre mixed method study in a specialist hospital was undertaken, using an explanatory design: participant selection model. In this model, quantitative results (prospective and retrospective episode of care review, including modified early warning system (MEWS), time and delay of referral and patient outcomes for admission and survival) are further explained by qualitative (interview) data with doctors and nurses referring to outreach. Quantitative data were analysed using SPSS +17 and 19, and qualitative data were analysed using grounded theory principles. A large proportion of referrals (124/407 = 30·5%) were made by medical staff. For 97 (97/407 = 23·8%) referrals, there was a delay between the point at which patients deteriorated (as verified by retrospective record review and MEWS score triggers) and the time at when patients were referred. The average delay was 2·96 h (95% CI 1·97-3·95; SD 9·56). Timely referrals were associated with improved outcomes; however, no causal attribution can be made from the circumstances around CCOT referral. Qualitative themes included indications for referral, facilitating factors for referral, barriers to referral and consequences of referral, with an overarching core theory of reassurance. Outreach was seen as back-up and this core theory demonstrates the important, and somewhat less tangible, role outreach has in supporting ward staff to care for at-risk patients. Mapping outreach episodes of care and patient outcomes can help highlight areas for improvement. This study outlines reasons for referral and how outreach can facilitate patient pathways in critical illness. © 2011 The Authors. Nursing in Critical Care © 2011 British Association of Critical Care

  15. Caregivers' compliance with referral advice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lal, Sham; Ndyomugenyi, Richard; Paintain, Lucy

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several malaria endemic countries have implemented community health worker (CHW) programmes to increase access to populations underserved by health care. There is considerable evidence on CHW adherence to case management guidelines, however, there is limited evidence on the compliance...... in the control arm were trained to treat malaria with ACTs based on fever symptoms. Caregivers' referral forms were linked with CHW treatment forms to determine whether caregivers complied with the referral advice. Factors associated with compliance were examined with logistic regression. RESULTS: CHW saw 18......,497 child visits in the moderate-to-high transmission setting and referred 15.2% (2815/18,497) of all visits; in the low-transmission setting, 35.0% (1135/3223) of all visits were referred. Compliance to referral was low, in both settings

  16. Cost-effectiveness of a national exercise referral programme for primary care patients in Wales: results of a randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background A recent HTA review concluded that there was a need for RCTs of exercise referral schemes (ERS) for people with a medical diagnosis who might benefit from exercise. Overall, there is still uncertainty as to the cost-effectiveness of ERS. Evaluation of public health interventions places challenges on conventional health economics approaches. This economic evaluation of a national public health intervention addresses this issue of where ERS may be most cost effective through subgroup analysis, particularly important at a time of financial constraint. Method This economic analysis included 798 individuals aged 16 and over (55% of the randomised controlled trial (RCT) sample) with coronary heart disease risk factors and/or mild to moderate anxiety, depression or stress. Individuals were referred by health professionals in a primary care setting to a 16 week national exercise referral scheme (NERS) delivered by qualified exercise professionals in local leisure centres in Wales, UK. Health-related quality of life, health care services use, costs per participant in NERS, and willingness to pay for NERS were measured at 6 and 12 months. Results The base case analysis assumed a participation cost of £385 per person per year, with a mean difference in QALYs between the two groups of 0.027. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was £12,111 per QALY gained. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis demonstrated an 89% probability of NERS being cost-effective at a payer threshold of £30,000 per QALY. When participant payments of £1 and £2 per session were considered, the cost per QALY fell from £12,111 (base case) to £10,926 and £9,741, respectively. Participants with a mental health risk factor alone or in combination with a risk of chronic heart disease generated a lower ICER (£10,276) compared to participants at risk of chronic heart disease only (£13,060). Conclusions Results of cost-effectiveness analyses suggest that NERS is cost saving in fully

  17. Differences in case-mix can influence the comparison of standardised mortality ratios even with optimal risk adjustment: an analysis of data from paediatric intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manktelow, Bradley N; Evans, T Alun; Draper, Elizabeth S

    2014-09-01

    The publication of clinical outcomes for consultant surgeons in 10 specialties within the NHS has, along with national clinical audits, highlighted the importance of measuring and reporting outcomes with the aim of monitoring quality of care. Such information is vital to be able to identify good and poor practice and to inform patient choice. The need to adequately adjust outcomes for differences in case-mix has long been recognised as being necessary to provide 'like-for-like' comparisons between providers. However, directly comparing values of the standardised mortality ratio (SMR) between different healthcare providers can be misleading even when the risk-adjustment perfectly quantifies the risk of a poor outcome in the reference population. An example is shown from paediatric intensive care. Using observed case-mix differences for 33 paediatric intensive care units (PICUs) in the UK and Ireland for 2009-2011, SMRs were calculated under four different scenarios where, in each scenario, all of the PICUs were performing identically for each patient type. Each scenario represented a clinically plausible difference in outcome from the reference population. Despite the fact that the outcome for any patient was the same no matter which PICU they were to be admitted to, differences between the units were seen when compared using the SMR: scenario 1, 1.07-1.21; scenario 2, 1.00-1.14; scenario 3, 1.04-1.13; scenario 4, 1.00-1.09. Even if two healthcare providers are performing equally for each type of patient, if their patient populations differ in case-mix their SMRs will not necessarily take the same value. Clinical teams and commissioners must always keep in mind this weakness of the SMR when making decisions. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  18. Outcomes following implementation of a pediatric procedural sedation guide for referral to general anesthesia for magnetic resonance imaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunwell, Jocelyn R; Marupudi, Neelima K; Gupta, Rohan V; Travers, Curtis D; McCracken, Courtney E; Williamson, Julie L; Stockwell, Jana A; Fortenberry, James D; Couloures, Kevin; Cravero, Joseph; Kamat, Pradip P

    2016-06-01

    Guidelines for referral of children to general anesthesia (GA) to complete MRI studies are lacking. We devised a pediatric procedural sedation guide to determine whether a pediatric procedural sedation guide would decrease serious adverse events and decrease failed sedations requiring rescheduling with GA. We constructed a consensus-based sedation guide by combining a retrospective review of reasons for referral of children to GA (n = 221) with published risk factors associated with the inability to complete the MRI study with sedation. An interrupted time series analysis of 11 530 local sedation records from the Pediatric Sedation Research Consortium between July 2008 and March 2013, adjusted for case-mix differences in the pre- and postsedation guide cohorts, evaluated whether a sedation guide resulted in decreased severe adverse events (SAE) and failed sedation rates. A significant increase in referrals to GA following implementation of a sedation guide occurred (P pediatric procedural sedation services. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Do poison center triage guidelines affect healthcare facility referrals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, B E; Smith, C A; McKinney, P E; Litovitz, T L; Tandberg, W D

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which poison center triage guidelines influence healthcare facility referral rates for acute, unintentional acetaminophen-only poisoning and acute, unintentional adult formulation iron poisoning. Managers of US poison centers were interviewed by telephone to determine their center's triage threshold value (mg/kg) for acute iron and acute acetaminophen poisoning in 1997. Triage threshold values and healthcare facility referral rates were fit to a univariate logistic regression model for acetaminophen and iron using maximum likelihood estimation. Triage threshold values ranged from 120-201 mg/kg (acetaminophen) and 16-61 mg/kg (iron). Referral rates ranged from 3.1% to 24% (acetaminophen) and 3.7% to 46.7% (iron). There was a statistically significant inverse relationship between the triage value and the referral rate for acetaminophen (p variability in poison center triage values and referral rates for iron and acetaminophen poisoning. Guidelines can account for a meaningful proportion of referral variation. Their influence appears to be substance dependent. These data suggest that efforts to determine and utilize the highest, safe, triage threshold value could substantially decrease healthcare costs for poisonings as long as patient medical outcomes are not compromised.

  20. Factors affecting cardiac rehabilitation referral by physician specialty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Sherry L; Grewal, Keerat; Stewart, Donna E

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is widely underutilized because of multiple factors including physician referral practices. Previous research has shown CR referral varies by type of provider, with cardiologists more likely to refer than primary care physicians. The objective of this study was to compare factors affecting CR referral in primary care physicians versus cardiac specialists. A cross-sectional survey of a stratified random sample of 510 primary care physicians and cardiac specialists (cardiologists or cardiovascular surgeons) in Ontario identified through the Canadian Medical Directory Online was administered. One hundred four primary care physicians and 81 cardiac specialists responded to the 26-item investigator-generated survey examining medical, demographic, attitudinal, and health system factors affecting CR referral. Primary care physicians were more likely to endorse lack of familiarity with CR site locations (P negatively impacting CR referral practices than cardiac specialists. Cardiac specialists were significantly more likely to perceive that their colleagues and department would regularly refer patients to CR than primary care physicians (P Marketing CR site locations, provision of standardized referral forms, and ensuring discharge summaries are communicated to primary care physicians may improve their willingness to refer to CR.

  1. A project investigating music therapy referral trends within palliative care: an Australian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne-Thompson, Anne; Daveson, Barbara; Hogan, Bridgit

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to analyze music therapy (MT) referral trends from palliative care team members across nine Australian inpatient and community-based palliative care settings. For each referral 6 items were collected: referral source, reason and type; time from Palliative Care Program (PCP) admission to MT referral; time from MT referral to death/discharge; and profile of referred patient. Participants (196 female, 158 male) were referred ranging in age from 4-98 years and most were diagnosed with cancer (91%, n = 323). Nurses (47%, n = 167) referred most frequently to music therapy. The mean average time in days for all referrals from PCP admission to MT referral was 11.47 and then 5.19 days to time of death. Differences in length of time to referral ranged from 8.19 days (allied health staff) to 43.75 days (families). Forty-eight percent of referrals (48.5%, n = 172) were completed when the patient was rated at an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Performance (ECOG) of three. Sixty-nine percent (n = 244) were living with others at the time of referral and most were Australian born. Thirty-six percent (36.7%, n = 130) were referred for symptom-based reasons, and 24.5% (n = 87) for support and coping. Implications for service delivery of music therapy practice, interdisciplinary care and benchmarking of music therapy services shall be discussed.

  2. Comparison of different strategies of referral to a fall clinic: How to achieve an optimal casemix?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoon, Y.; Hoogsteen Ossewaarde, M. E.; Scheffer, A. C.; van Rooij, F. J. M.; Olde Rikkert, M. G. M.; de Rooij, S. E.

    2011-01-01

    To study the potential differences in patient characteristics between two referral methods to a fall clinic, specifically: case-finding of patients admitted to an emergency department because of a fall, compared to direct referral to the fall clinic via the general practitioner. Cross-sectional

  3. Comparison of different strategies of referral to a fall clinic: how to achieve an optimal casemix?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoon, Y.; Hoogsteen-Ossewaarde, M.E.; Scheffer, A.C.; Rooij, F.J.M. van; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.; Rooij, S.E. De

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To study the potential differences in patient characteristics between two referral methods to a fall clinic, specifically: case-finding of patients admitted to an emergency department because of a fall, compared to direct referral to the fall clinic via the general practitioner. DESIGN:

  4. Musculoskeletal training: are GP trainees exposed to the right case mix for independent practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, Iain; Wise, Elspeth Mary; Coady, David; Walker, David

    2016-02-01

    Musculoskeletal conditions are common in general practice, but clinicians express poor self confidence in dealing with them. Training in general practice relies on clinical exposure to a range of presentations in order to gain competence. It has been suggested that trainees are exposed to a different case mix from qualified general practices (GPs), due to seeing more minor illness and less chronic disease and that this may be responsible in part for their subsequent lack of confidence. The aims of this study were to analyse the case mix of musculoskeletal conditions encountered by general practice trainees and to compare this to the overall population consulting behaviour. This is a prospective observational study. Thirteen general practices in North East England were recruited. Musculoskeletal disorders encountered by 13 GP trainees (7 junior and 6 senior) were prospectively recorded using a handheld diary. Disorders were classified according to working diagnosis or body region if diagnosis was unclear. Musculoskeletal (MSK) disorders comprised 17 % of consultations, and the distribution of diagnoses of these was in proportion to epidemiological studies of MSK disorders in the UK as they present in primary care. Back pain was the most frequent label with 141 (29 %) consultations with a further 43 (9 %) for neck pain. Inflammatory arthritis accounted for the same number 43 (9 %). Individual joint problems were 115 (24 %) with knee being most common. A specific diagnosis was more likely to be applied when symptoms were more distal and less likely when axial. Trainees are exposed to the same spectrum of MSK disorders as are present in the population as a whole. Case mix does not appear to be a significant factor in low confidence levels in dealing with MSK disorders.

  5. Education of Physicians and Implementation of a Formal Referral System Can Improve Cardiac Rehabilitation Referral and Participation Rates after Percutaneous Coronary Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahhan, Ali; Maddox, William R; Krothapalli, Siva; Farmer, Matthew; Shah, Amit; Ford, Benjamin; Rhodes, Marc; Matthews, Laurie; Barnes, Vernon A; Sharma, Gyanendra K

    2015-08-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is an effective preventive measure that remains underutilised in the United States. The study aimed to determine the CR referral rate (RR) after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) at an academic tertiary care centre, identify barriers to referral, and evaluate awareness of CR benefits and indications (CRBI) among cardiologists. Subsequently, it aimed to evaluate if an intervention consisting of physicians' education about CRBI and implementation of a formal CR referral system could improve RR and consequently participation rate (PR). Data were retrospectively collected for all consecutive patients who underwent PCI over 12 months. Referral rate was determined and variables were compared for differences between referred and non-referred patients. A questionnaire was distributed among the physicians in the Division of Cardiology to assess awareness of CRBI and referral practice patterns. After implementation of the intervention, data were collected retrospectively for consecutive patients who underwent PCI in the following six months. Referral rate and changes in PRs were determined. Prior to the intervention, RR was 17.6%. Different barriers were identified, but the questionnaire revealed lack of physicians' awareness of CRBI and inconsistent referral patterns. After the intervention, RR increased to 88.96% (Odds Ratio 37.73, 95% CI 21.34-66.70, pEducation of providers and implementation of a formal referral system can improve RR and PR. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Concurrent chart review provides more accurate documentation and increased calculated case mix index, severity of illness, and risk of mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazee, Richard C; Matejicka, Anthony V; Abernathy, Stephen W; Davis, Matthew; Isbell, Travis S; Regner, Justin L; Smith, Randall W; Jupiter, Daniel C; Papaconstantinou, Harry T

    2015-04-01

    Case mix index (CMI) is calculated to determine the relative value assigned to a Diagnosis-Related Group. Accurate documentation of patient complications and comorbidities and major complications and comorbidities changes CMI and can affect hospital reimbursement and future pay for performance metrics. Starting in 2010, a physician panel concurrently reviewed the documentation of the trauma/acute care surgeons. Clarifications of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services term-specific documentation were made by the panel, and the surgeon could incorporate or decline the clinical queries. A retrospective review of trauma/acute care inpatients was performed. The mean severity of illness, risk of mortality, and CMI from 2009 were compared with the 3 subsequent years. Mean length of stay and mean Injury Severity Score by year were listed as measures of patient acuity. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA and t-test, with p reimbursement and more accurately stratify outcomes measures for care providers. Copyright © 2015 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Are patients’ preferences regarding the place of treatment heard and addressed at the point of referral: an exploratory study based on observations of GP-patient consultations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Victoor, A.; Noordman, J.; Sonderkamp, J.A.; Delnoij, D.M.J.; Friele, R.D.; Dulmen, S. van; Rademakers, J.J.D.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Today, in several north-western European countries, patients are encouraged to choose, actively, a healthcare provider. However, patients often visit the provider that is recommended by their general practitioner (GP). The introduction of patient choice requires GPs to

  8. Managing Consumer Referrals in a Chain Network

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Arbatskaya; Hideo Konishi

    2014-01-01

    We consider the optimal pricing and referral strategy of a monopoly that uses a simple consumer communication network (a chain) to spread product information. The first-best policy with fully discriminatory position-based referral fees involves standard monopoly pricing and referral fees that provide consumers with strictly positive referral incentives. Effective price discrimination among consumers based on their positions in the chain occurs in both the first-best solution and the second-be...

  9. 42 CFR 484.220 - Calculation of the adjusted national prospective 60-day episode payment rate for case-mix and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... address changes to the case-mix that are a result of changes in the coding or classification of different...-day episode payment rate for case-mix and area wage levels. 484.220 Section 484.220 Public Health... Calculation of the adjusted national prospective 60-day episode payment rate for case-mix and area wage levels...

  10. E-referral Solutions: Successful Experiences, Key Features and Challenges- a Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseriasl, Mansour; Adham, Davoud; Janati, Ali

    2015-06-01

    around the world health systems constantly face increasing pressures which arise from many factors, such as an ageing population, patients and providers demands for equipment's and services. In order to respond these challenges and reduction of health system's transactional costs, referral solutions are considered as a key factor. This study was carried out to identify referral solutions that have had successes. relevant studies identified using keywords of referrals, consultation, referral system, referral model, referral project, electronic referral, electronic booking, health system, healthcare, health service and medical care. These searches were conducted using PubMed, ProQuest, Google Scholar, Scopus, Emerald, Web of Knowledge, Springer, Science direct, Mosby's index, SID, Medlib and Iran Doc data bases. 4306 initial articles were obtained and refined step by step. Finally, 27 articles met the inclusion criteria. we identified seventeen e-referral systems developed in UK, Norway, Finland, Netherlands, Denmark, Scotland, New Zealand, Canada, Australia, and U.S. Implemented solutions had variant degrees of successes such as improved access to specialist care, reduced wait times, timeliness and quality of referral communication, accurate health information transfer and integration of health centers and services. each one of referral solutions has both positive and changeable aspects that should be addressed according to sociotechnical conditions. These solutions are mainly formed in a small and localized manner.

  11. The weakest link: competence and prestige as constraints to referral by isolated nurses in rural Niger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Lerberghe Wim

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For a health district to function referral from health centres to district hospitals is critical. In many developing countries referral systems perform well below expectations. Niger is not an exception in this matter. Beyond obvious problems of cost and access this study shows to what extent the behaviour of the health worker in its interaction with the patient can be a barrier of its own. Methods Information was triangulated from three sources in two rural districts in Niger: first, 46 semi-structured interviews with health centre nurses; second, 42 focus group discussions with an average of 12 participants – patients, relatives of patients and others; third, 231 semi-structured interviews with referred patients. Results Passive patients without 'voice' reinforce authoritarian attitudes of health centre staff. The latter appear reluctant to refer because they see little added value in referral and fear loss of power and prestige. As a result staff communicates poorly and show little eagerness to convince reluctant patients and families to accept referral proposals. Conclusions Diminishing referral costs and distance barriers is not enough to correct failing referral systems. There is also a need for investment in district hospitals to make referrals visibly worthwhile and for professional upgrading of the human resources at the first contact level, so as to allow for more effective referral patterns.

  12. Patient satisfaction with the perioperative surgical services and associated factors at a University Referral and Teaching Hospital, 2014: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebremedhn, Endale Gebreegziabher; Lemma, Girmay Fitiwi

    2017-01-01

    Globally, increasing consideration has been given to the assessment of patient satisfaction as a method of monitor of the quality of health care provision in the health institutions. Perioperative patient satisfaction has been contemplated to be related with the level of postoperative pain intensity, patients' expectation of the outcome, patient health provider relationship, inpatient services, hospital facilities, access to care, waiting time, cost and helpfulness of treatments received. The study aimed to assess the level of patient satisfaction with perioperative surgical services and associated factors. Hospital based quantitative cross-sectional study was conducted in University of Gondar teaching hospital from April1-30, 2014. Structured Amharic version questionnaire and checklist used for data collection. All patients who operated upon during the study period were included. Both bivariate and multivariate logistic regression model used to identify the variables which had association with the dependent variable. P-values patient satisfaction with perioperative surgical services was 98.1%. The variables that had association with the outcome variable from the multivariate analysis were patient admission status (AOR=0.073, CI=0.007-0.765, P=0.029), information about the disease and operation (AOR=0.010, CI=0.001-0.140, P=0.001) and operation theatre staff attention to the patients complains (AOR=0.028, CI=0.002-0.390, P=0.008) respectively. The level of patient satisfaction with perioperative surgical services was high compared with previous studies conducted in the country and other countries in the world. Health professionals need to give emphasis for information on care provision processes, patients' health progress and patients' complaints.

  13. Referrral Systems Development and Survey of Perioperative and Critical Care Referral to Anesthetists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narendra, P L; Hegde, Harihar V; Khan, Maroof Ahmad; Talikoti, Dayanand G; Nallamilli, Samson

    2017-01-01

    Anesthetists come in contact with more than two-third of hospital patients. Timely referral to anesthetists is vital in perioperative and remote site settings. Delayed referrals, improper referrals, and referrals at inappropriate levels can result in inadequate preparation, perioperative complications, and poor outcome. The self administered paper survey to delegates attending anesthesia conferences. Questions were asked on how high-risk, emergency surgical cases remote site and critical care patients were referred to anesthetists and presence of rapid response teams. The response rate was 43.8%. Sixty percent (55.3-64.8, P - 0.001) reported high-risk elective cases were referred after admission. Sixty-eight percent (63.42-72.45, P - 0.001) opined preoperative resting echocardiographs were useful. Six percent (4.16-8.98, P - 0.001) reported emergency room referral before arrival of the patient. Twenty-five percent (20.92-29.42, P - 0.001) indicated high-risk obstetric cases were referred immediately after admission. Consultants practiced preoperative stabilization more commonly than residents (32% vs. 22%) ( P - 0.004). For emergency surgery, resident referrals occurred after surgery time was fixed (40% vs. 28%) ( P - 0.012). Residents dealt with more cases without full investigations in obstetrics (28% vs. 15) ( P = 0.002). Remote site patients were commonly referred to residents after sedation attempts (32% vs. 20%) ( P = 0.036). Only 34.8 said hosptals where tbey practiced had dedicated cardiac arrest team in place. Anesthetic departments must periodically assess whether subgroups of patients are being referred in line with current guidelines. Cancellations, critical incidents and complications arising out of referral delays, and improper referrals must be recorded as referral incidents and a separate referral incident registry must be maintained in each department. Regular referral audits must be encouraged.

  14. [Self-referrals at Emergency Care Access Points and triage by General Practitioner Cooperatives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, M; Rutten, M; Schepers, L; Giesen, P

    2017-01-01

    There is a trend for General Practitioner Cooperatives (GPCs) to co-locate with emergency departments (EDs) of hospitals at Emergency Care Access Points (ECAPs), where the GPCs generally conduct triage and treat a large part of self-referrals who would have gone to the ED by themselves in the past. We have examined patient and care characteristics of self-referrals at ECAPs where triage was conducted by GPCs, also to determine the percentage of self-referrals being referred to the ED. Retrospective cross-sectional observational study. Descriptive analyses of routine registration data from self-referrals of five ECAPs (n = 20.451). Patient age, gender, arrival time, urgency, diagnosis and referral were analysed. Of the self-referrals, 57.9% was male and the mean age was 32.7 years. The number of self-referrals per hour was highest during weekends, particularly between 11 a.m. and 5 p.m. On weekdays, there was a peak between 5 and 9 p.m. Self-referrals were mostly assigned a low-urgency grade (35.7% - U4 or U5) or a mid-urgency grade (49% - U3). Almost half of the self-referrals had trauma of the locomotor system (28%) or the skin (27.3%). In total, 23% of the patients was referred to the ED. Self-referred patients at GPCs are typically young, male and have low- to mid-urgency trauma-related problems. Many self-referrals present themselves on weekend days or early weekday evenings. Over three quarters of these patients can be treated by the GPCs, without referral to the ED. This reduces the workload at the ED.

  15. External Validation of a Case-Mix Adjustment Model for the Standardized Reporting of 30-Day Stroke Mortality Rates in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ping; Pan, Yuesong; Wang, Yongjun; Wang, Xianwei; Liu, Liping; Ji, Ruijun; Meng, Xia; Jing, Jing; Tong, Xu; Guo, Li; Wang, Yilong

    2016-01-01

    A case-mix adjustment model has been developed and externally validated, demonstrating promise. However, the model has not been thoroughly tested among populations in China. In our study, we evaluated the performance of the model in Chinese patients with acute stroke. The case-mix adjustment model A includes items on age, presence of atrial fibrillation on admission, National Institutes of Health Stroke Severity Scale (NIHSS) score on admission, and stroke type. Model B is similar to Model A but includes only the consciousness component of the NIHSS score. Both model A and B were evaluated to predict 30-day mortality rates in 13,948 patients with acute stroke from the China National Stroke Registry. The discrimination of the models was quantified by c-statistic. Calibration was assessed using Pearson's correlation coefficient. The c-statistic of model A in our external validation cohort was 0.80 (95% confidence interval, 0.79-0.82), and the c-statistic of model B was 0.82 (95% confidence interval, 0.81-0.84). Excellent calibration was reported in the two models with Pearson's correlation coefficient (0.892 for model A, pcase-mix adjustment model could be used to effectively predict 30-day mortality rates in Chinese patients with acute stroke.

  16. Innovation in managing the referral process at a Canadian pediatric hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGregor, Daune; Parker, Sandra; MacMillan, Sharon; Blais, Irene; Wong, Eugene; Robertson, Chris J; Bruce-Barrett, Cindy

    2009-01-01

    The provision of timely and optimal patient care is a priority in pediatric academic health science centres. Timely access to care is optimized when there is an efficient and consistent referral system in place. In order to improve the patient referral process and, therefore, access to care, an innovative web-based system was developed and implemented. The Ambulatory Referral Management System enables the electronic routing for submission, review, triage and management of all outpatient referrals. The implementation of this system has provided significant metrics that have informed how processes can be improved to increase access to care. Use of the system has improved efficiency in the referral process and has reduced the work associated with the previous paper-based referral system. It has also enhanced communication between the healthcare provider and the patient and family and has improved the security and confidentiality of patient information management. Referral guidelines embedded within the system have helped to ensure that referrals are more complete and that the patient being referred meets the criteria for assessment and treatment in an ambulatory setting. The system calculates and reports on wait times, as well as other measures.

  17. Timing of Physical Therapy Referral in Adolescent Athletes With Acute Spondylolysis: A Retrospective Chart Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selhorst, Mitchell; Fischer, Anastasia; Graft, Kristine; Ravindran, Reno; Peters, Eric; Rodenberg, Richard; Welder, Eric; MacDonald, James

    2017-05-01

    The purposes of this study were (1) to determine whether the duration of rest before referral to physical therapy (PT) affects the time to make a full return to activity for patients with an acute spondylolysis, (2) to assess the safety of an early referral to PT in patients with an acute spondylolysis. Retrospective chart review. Hospital-based sports medicine clinic. The medical charts of 196 adolescent athletes (mean age = 14.3 ± 1.8 years) with an acute spondylolytic injury met the inclusion criteria and were reviewed. Patients were subgrouped based on physician referral to PT. An aggressive referral group (10 weeks). Duration of rest before clearance to a full return to activity and the frequency of adverse reactions during the course of treatment. Safety was assessed by calculating the risk of experiencing an adverse reaction in each group. Median days to a full return to activity for aggressive referral group (115.5 days, interquartile range 98-150 days) and conservative referral group (140.0 days, interquartile range 114.5-168 days) were significantly different (P = 0.002). Eleven patients had adverse reactions during the course of treatment. The risk of adverse reaction was not statistically significant between groups (P = 0.509). Patients with acute spondylolysis in the aggressive referral group were able to make a full return activity almost 25 days sooner. No differences in the risk of adverse reactions were noted between aggressive and conservative referral groups.

  18. Predictors of first recurrence in Clostridium difficile-associated disease. A study of 306 patients hospitalized in a Romanian tertiary referral center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupse, Mihaela; Flonta, Mirela; Cioara, Andreea; Filipescu, Irina; Todor, Nicolae

    2013-12-01

    Clostridium difficile is recognized as the major cause of nosocomial gastroenteritis usually related to antibiotic treatment. Although treatable, C. difficile--associated disease (CDAD) tends to recur in many patients. The purpose of the study was to analyze the risk factors for recurrence in patients with CDAD after the first treatment with vancomycin, metronidazole or both. We conducted a retrospective study of all patients admitted to the Teaching Hospital of Infectious Diseases Cluj-Napoca, Romania, between January 2011 and October 2012 with the diagnosis of CDAD or who developed diarrhoea after admission. A clinical diagnosis was made and culture and toxin A and B detection were carried out. We performed a statistical analysis taking into consideration: age, gender, previous hospital exposure, previous antibiotic treatment, and treatment duration. The patients were followed-up for at least 60 days. We included 306 patients (177 women and 129 men) with a median age of 71 years; 208 patients (68%) had prior hospitalization and 195 (64%) had received prior antibiotic treatment. Actual treatment consisted of vancomycin in 76 (25%) patients, metronidazole in 132 (43%) and both combined in 98 (32%) patients. The average duration of treatment was 10 days. Sixty patients (20%) experienced 95 recurrences and 9 patients died (3%). Treatment with metronidazole, vancomycin or both for 10 or more days did not prevent recurrences. Age over 70 (RR 1.5, CI 95%: 1.055-2.71) and use of PPI (RR 1.3, CI 95%: 1.16-3.1) significantly increased the risk of first recurrence of CDAD. CDAD recurrence rates were similar to those reported in the literature. The risk of first recurrence was significantly higher in patients older than 70 who also received PPI treatment.

  19. Routine versus needs-based MRI in patients with prolonged low back pain: a comparison of duration of treatment, number of clinical contacts and referrals to surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rikke K; Manniche, Claus; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    The routine use of radiology is normally discouraged in patients with low back pain (LBP). Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) provides clinicians and patients with detailed knowledge of spinal structures and has no known physical side effects. It is possible that insight into the pathological chang...

  20. Epidemiology of infective endocarditis in a large Belgian non-referral hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poesen, K; Pottel, H; Colaert, J; De Niel, C

    2014-06-01

    Guidelines for diagnosis of infective endocarditis are largely based upon epidemiological studies in referral hospitals. Referral bias, however, might impair the validity of guidelines in non-referral hospitals. Recent studies in non-referral care centres on infective endocarditis are sparse. We conducted a retrospective epidemiological study on infective endocarditis in a large non-referral hospital in a Belgian city (Kortrijk). The medical record system was searched for all cases tagged with a putative diagnosis of infective endocarditis in the period 2003-2010. The cases that fulfilled the modified Duke criteria for probable or definite infective endocarditis were included. Compared to referral centres, an older population with infective endocarditis, and fewer predisposing cardiac factors and catheter-related infective endocarditis is seen in our population. Our patients have fewer prosthetic valve endocarditis as well as fewer staphylococcal endocarditis. Our patients undergo less surgery, although mortality rate seems to be highly comparable with referral centres, with nosocomial infective endocarditis as an independent predictor of mortality. The present study suggests that characteristics of infective endocarditis as well as associative factors might differ among non-referral hospitals and referral hospitals.

  1. Transfusion requirements in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding: a study in a Blood Unit at a referral hospital Requerimientos transfusionales en pacientes con hemorragia digestiva: estudio en una Unidad de Sangrantes de un hospital de referencia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Garrido

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: 1. To study transfusion requirements in the Department of Gastroenterology of a Tertiary Referral Hospital, and their evolution over the last seven years. 2. To analyze risk factors associated with greater erythrocyte transfusion requirements. Patients and methods: erythrocyte transfusion requirements were compared for patients admitted to the Department of Gastroenterology at Hospital Virgen del Rocío, Seville, from 1999 to 2005. Clinical data of interest have been analyzed in order to determine factors associated with greater transfusion requirements. Results: 1,611 patients with a mean age of 60.45 years (59.7-61.2 were included in this study; 76.41% were males. Gastric ulcers were the cause of bleeding in 18.4% of cases (with 69% requiring transfusions; duodenal ulcers caused 22.2% of cases (with 52.9% requiring transfusions, and portal hypertension caused 33.6% of cases (with 90.2% requiring transfusions. Upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding of unknown origin requires transfusions in 88.9 and 96.2% of cases, respectively. A multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that clinical presentations such as hematemesis (odds ratio = 3.12, hematochezia (odds ratio = 33.17, gastrointestinal hemorrhage of unknown origin (odds ratio = 6.57, and hemorrhage as a result of portal hypertension (odds ratio = 3.43 were associated with greater transfusion requirements for erythrocyte concentrates. No significant differences were observed between the percentages of patients who received transfusions from 1999 to 2005. Conclusions: 1. No differences have been observed between the percentages of patients who received transfusions over the last seven years at our Department of Gastroenterology. 2. Patients presenting with hematemesis or hematochezia, in addition to those with bleeding of unknown origin or from portal hypertension, are prone to have greater transfusion requirements.

  2. Assessment of Cancer-Related Fatigue, Pain, and Quality of Life in Cancer Patients at Palliative Care Team Referral: A Multicenter Observational Study (JORTC PAL-09).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwase, Satoru; Kawaguchi, Takashi; Tokoro, Akihiro; Yamada, Kimito; Kanai, Yoshiaki; Matsuda, Yoshinobu; Kashiwaya, Yuko; Okuma, Kae; Inada, Shuji; Ariyoshi, Keisuke; Miyaji, Tempei; Azuma, Kanako; Ishiki, Hiroto; Unezaki, Sakae; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Cancer-related fatigue greatly influences quality of life in cancer patients; however, no specific treatments have been established for cancer-related fatigue, and at present, no medication has been approved in Japan. Systematic research using patient-reported outcome to examine symptoms, particularly fatigue, has not been conducted in palliative care settings in Japan. The objective was to evaluate fatigue, pain, and quality of life in cancer patients at the point of intervention by palliative care teams. Patients who were referred to palliative care teams at three institutions and met the inclusion criteria were invited to complete the Brief Fatigue Inventory, Brief Pain Inventory, and European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 15-Palliative. Of 183 patients recruited, the majority (85.8%) were diagnosed with recurrence or metastasis. The largest group (42.6%) comprised lung cancer patients, of whom 67.2% had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Performance Status of 0-1. The mean value for global health status/quality of life was 41.4, and the highest mean European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 15-Palliative symptom item score was for pain (51.0). The mean global fatigue score was 4.1, and 9.8%, 30.6%, 38.7%, and 20.8% of patients' fatigue severity was classified as none (score 0), mild (1-3), moderate (4-6), and severe (7-10), respectively. Cancer-related fatigue, considered to occur more frequently in cancer patients, was successfully assessed using patient-reported outcomes with the Brief Fatigue Inventory for the first time in Japan. Results suggested that fatigue is potentially as problematic as pain, which is the main reason for palliative care.

  3. Derivation and external validation of a case mix model for the standardized reporting of 30-day stroke mortality rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Benjamin D; Campbell, James; Cloud, Geoffrey C; Hoffman, Alex; James, Martin; Tyrrell, Pippa J; Wolfe, Charles D A; Rudd, Anthony G

    2014-11-01

    Case mix adjustment is required to allow valid comparison of outcomes across care providers. However, there is a lack of externally validated models suitable for use in unselected stroke admissions. We therefore aimed to develop and externally validate prediction models to enable comparison of 30-day post-stroke mortality outcomes using routine clinical data. Models were derived (n=9000 patients) and internally validated (n=18 169 patients) using data from the Sentinel Stroke National Audit Program, the national register of acute stroke in England and Wales. External validation (n=1470 patients) was performed in the South London Stroke Register, a population-based longitudinal study. Models were fitted using general estimating equations. Discrimination and calibration were assessed using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis and correlation plots. Two final models were derived. Model A included age (<60, 60-69, 70-79, 80-89, and ≥90 years), National Institutes of Health Stroke Severity Score (NIHSS) on admission, presence of atrial fibrillation on admission, and stroke type (ischemic versus primary intracerebral hemorrhage). Model B was similar but included only the consciousness component of the NIHSS in place of the full NIHSS. Both models showed excellent discrimination and calibration in internal and external validation. The c-statistics in external validation were 0.87 (95% confidence interval, 0.84-0.89) and 0.86 (95% confidence interval, 0.83-0.89) for models A and B, respectively. We have derived and externally validated 2 models to predict mortality in unselected patients with acute stroke using commonly collected clinical variables. In settings where the ability to record the full NIHSS on admission is limited, the level of consciousness component of the NIHSS provides a good approximation of the full NIHSS for mortality prediction. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Asthma referrals: a key component of asthma management that needs to be addressed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Price D

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available David Price,1,2 Leif Bjermer,3 David A Bergin,4 Rafael Martinez5 1Centre of Academic Primary Care, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK; 2Observational and Pragmatic Research Institute, Singapore; 3Department of Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; 4Novartis Ireland Limited, Dublin, Ireland; 5Novartis Pharma AG, Basel, Switzerland Abstract: Heterogeneity of asthma and difficulty in achieving optimal control are the major challenges in the management of asthma. To help attain the best possible clinical outcomes in patients with asthma, several guidelines provide recommendations for patients who will require a referral to a specialist. Such referrals can help in clearing the uncertainty from the initial diagnosis, provide tailored treatment options to patients with persistent symptoms and offer the patients access to health care providers with expertise in the management of the asthma; thus, specialist referrals have a substantial impact on disease prognosis and the patient’s health status. Hurdles in implementing these recommendations include lack of their dissemination among health care providers and nonadherence to these guidelines; these hurdles considerably limit the implementation of specialist referrals, eventually affecting the rate of referrals. In this review, recommendations for specialist referrals from several key international and national asthma guidelines and other relevant published literature are evaluated. Furthermore, we highlight why referrals are not happening, how this can be improved, and ultimately, what should be done in the specialist setting, based on existing evidence in published literature. Keywords: asthma, disease management, specialization, primary care physicians, referral

  5. Comparison of referral and non-referral hypertensive disorders during pregnancy: an analysis of 271 consecutive cases at a tertiary hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ching-Ming; Chang, Shuenn-Dyh; Cheng, Po-Jen

    2005-05-01

    This retrospective cohort study analyzed the clinical manifestations in patients with preeclampsia and eclampsia, assessed the risk factors compared to the severity of hypertensive disorders on maternal and perinatal morbidity, and mortality between the referral and non-referral patients. 271 pregnant women with preeclampsia and eclampsia were assessed (1993 to 1997). Chi-square analysis was used for the comparison of categorical variables, and the comparison of the two independent variables of proportions in estimation of confidence intervals and calculated odds ratio of the referral and non-referral groups. Multivariate logistic regression was used for adjusting potential confounding risk factors. Of the 271 patients included in this study, 71 (26.2%) patients were referrals from other hospitals. Most of the 62 (87.3%) referral patients were transferred during the period 21 and 37 weeks of gestation. Univariate analysis revealed that referral patients with hypertensive disorder were significantly associated with SBP > or =180, DBP > or =105, severe preclampsia, haemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelets (HELLP), emergency C/S, maternal complications, and low birth weight babies, as well as poor Apgar score. Multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed that the risk factors identified to be significantly associated with increased risk of referral patients included: diastolic blood pressure above 105 mmHg (adjusted odds ratio, 2.09; 95 percent confidence interval, 1.06 to 4.13; P = 0.034), severe preeclampsia (adjusted odds ratio, 3.46; 95 percent confidence interval, 1.76 to 6.81; P < 0.001), eclampsia (adjusted odds ratio, 2.77; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.92 to 8.35; P = 0.071), HELLP syndrome (adjusted odds ratio, 18.81; 95 percent confidence interval, 2.14 to 164.99; P = 0.008). The significant factors associated with the referral patients