WorldWideScience

Sample records for referenda deliverable d16a

  1. Evaluation, testing and application of participatory approaches. The Role of Local Referenda. Deliverable D16a

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vojtechova, Hana (Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (Czech Republic))

    2009-10-15

    The following two paragraphs provide a summary of the most frequently mentioned advantages and disadvantages of using local referenda as one of instruments of direct democracy. Advantages: - Citizens are better informed thanks to the referendum. - Unlike in the elections, it is the reason rather than emotions than wins in a referendum, as it is concerned with a particular problem and not about empty slogans. - Thanks to the referendum, municipality representatives are more sensitive to the requirements of the citizens. Citizens feel that their opinion is listened to. - Referendum provokes public debate and may displace perpetual opinion polls. - Referendum gives minorities a chance to stir public debate about a topic, which does not mean anything to some people, but is the question of life and death for others. - Strengthens respect for the rule of law. - Citizens are, contrary to municipal representatives, not corruptible and they are not under the pressure of lobby groups. - Referendum is an example of decision making with full responsibility as the citizens bear the consequences of their decisions, which creates a stronger sense of responsibility. - Referendum is a real picture of public opinion, as citizens express their opinion on a particular matter, in contrast to the elections when they vote for the party politically closest to them, even though this party may have a different opinion on the particular issue. Disadvantages: - The general public is not so well-informed that they could make an informed decision on a particular problem, and thus it is often the emotions and not the reason and bare facts that decide. - Local referenda represent decision making without responsibility; the citizens cannot be removed for making a wrong decision. - The outcome of a referendum may be significantly influenced by the formulation of the question and it is not possible to reduce any issue to the question, which may be answered with a simple YES, or NO; in many cases

  2. Evaluation, testing and application of participatory approaches. The Role of Local Referenda. Deliverable D16a

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vojtechova, Hana

    2009-10-01

    The following two paragraphs provide a summary of the most frequently mentioned advantages and disadvantages of using local referenda as one of instruments of direct democracy. Advantages: - Citizens are better informed thanks to the referendum. - Unlike in the elections, it is the reason rather than emotions than wins in a referendum, as it is concerned with a particular problem and not about empty slogans. - Thanks to the referendum, municipality representatives are more sensitive to the requirements of the citizens. Citizens feel that their opinion is listened to. - Referendum provokes public debate and may displace perpetual opinion polls. - Referendum gives minorities a chance to stir public debate about a topic, which does not mean anything to some people, but is the question of life and death for others. - Strengthens respect for the rule of law. - Citizens are, contrary to municipal representatives, not corruptible and they are not under the pressure of lobby groups. - Referendum is an example of decision making with full responsibility as the citizens bear the consequences of their decisions, which creates a stronger sense of responsibility. - Referendum is a real picture of public opinion, as citizens express their opinion on a particular matter, in contrast to the elections when they vote for the party politically closest to them, even though this party may have a different opinion on the particular issue. Disadvantages: - The general public is not so well-informed that they could make an informed decision on a particular problem, and thus it is often the emotions and not the reason and bare facts that decide. - Local referenda represent decision making without responsibility; the citizens cannot be removed for making a wrong decision. - The outcome of a referendum may be significantly influenced by the formulation of the question and it is not possible to reduce any issue to the question, which may be answered with a simple YES, or NO; in many cases

  3. Deliverable 2.1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nunez, Heilyn Camacho; Jonasen, Tanja Svarre; Skov, Mette

    2016-01-01

    This deliverable describes in detail the problem based learning (PBL) approach and its potential for open data education. The first section provides a theoretical description of PBL with the purpose of offering a platform for the design of open data learning activities. Section two describes the ...... the current practice of open data training within the ODEdu partners along with international initiatives. The last section provides pedagogical recommendations for the process of designing the open data courses and online platform aimed at in WP3....

  4. The impact of EU referenda on national electoral politics: evidence from the Dutch case

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, C.E.

    2009-01-01

    This study deals with the issue of increasing contention regarding European matters in national arenas. Specifically, it focuses on the impact of European Union referenda on national elections. EU referenda have two important consequences for national politics: they increase inter-party conflict

  5. Update on Indiana School District Referenda: Legislative Changes and Primary Election Outcomes of 2011. Education Policy Brief. Volume 9, Number 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiller, Stephen C.; Spradlin, Terry E.

    2011-01-01

    The May primary election added seven school district referenda to the total number occurring in Indiana since 2008, three of which passed and four of which were rejected by voters. In the 2011 primary election, there were five General Fund referenda and two construction referenda. Of General Fund referenda, two passed (Crown Point Community School…

  6. 50 CFR 600.1310 - New England and Gulf of Mexico Individual Fishing Quota Referenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... the fishery as represented by landings, sales, expenditures, or other considerations. A Council may... implementation of the referendum through a final rule, NMFS shall provide eligible voters referenda ballots and... NMFS and produce all required documentation and certifications to receive a ballot. NMFS shall provide...

  7. 75 FR 77563 - Nectarines, Pears, and Peaches Grown in California; Continuance Referenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-13

    ... that time, the pear industry has been regulated by a State marketing order. If the results of the pear... DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Parts 916 and 917 [Doc. No. AMS-FV... AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA. ACTION: Referenda order. SUMMARY: This document directs...

  8. The Impact of Debt Limitations and Referenda Requirements on the Cost of School District Bond Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Mary H.; Munley, Vincent G.

    2011-01-01

    One distinction between the markets for corporate and municipal bonds involves institutional constraints that apply to some municipal bond issues. This research focuses on how public finance institutions, in particular explicit debt limits and referenda requirements, affect the borrowing cost of individual school district bond issues. The…

  9. QUEST2: Release 1: Project plan deliverable set

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braaten, F.D.

    1995-01-01

    This Project Management Plan combines the project management deliverables from the P+ methodology which are applicable to Release 1 of the QUEST2 work. This consolidation reflects discussions with WHC QA regarding an appropriate method for ensuring that P+ deliverables fulfill the intent of WHC-CM-3-10 and QR-19

  10. Deconstructing national leadership: politicians' accounts of electoral success and failure in the Irish Lisbon Treaty referenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Michele; Stevenson, Clifford

    2013-03-01

    The Self Categorization approach to national leadership proposes that leaders rhetorically construct national identity as essentialized and inevitable in order to consensualize and mobilize the population. In contrast, discursive studies have demonstrated how national politicians flexibly construct the nation to manage their own accountability in local interactions, though this in turn has neglected broader leadership processes. The present paper brings both approaches together to examine how and when national politicians construct versions of national identity in order to account for their failure as well as success in mobilizing the electorate. Eight semi-structured conversational style interviews were conducted with a strategic sample of eight leading Irish politicians on the subject of the 2008/2009 Irish Lisbon Treaty referenda. Using a Critical Discourse Psychology approach, the hegemonic repertoire of the 'settled will' of the informed and consensualized Irish nation was identified across all interviews. Politicians either endorsed the 'settled will' repertoire as evidence of their successful leadership, or rejected the repertoire by denying the rationality or unity of the populace to account for their failure. Our results suggest national identity is only constructed as essentialized and inevitable to the extent that it serves a strategic political purpose. © 2011 The British Psychological Society.

  11. Record of principal work activities/deliverables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-09-01

    Over the five year period of performance, thirteen task assignments were issued by the DOE to ARINC Research. During the two year base period seven tasks were assigned. Two task assignments were issued for each of the three consecutive one year option periods. Associated with all task assignments were multiple subtasks, some of which required significant effort. These subtasks are appropriately cited in this report under their respective task assignments as principal work activities or deliverables. The technical and management support provided to the DOE under this contract focused on two general areas: (1) appraisal activities and (2) non-appraisal activities. Support to appraisals included planning, document review, developing lines-of-inquiry, interviewing, data collection, report writing, and follow-up. Such work was executed both on-site at the DOE facility under review and off-site. Non-appraisal support was varied and included such areas as document review, data base development, technical assessments. statistical analysis, policy analysis, reliability engineering, and workshop and conference planning and execution

  12. Short-term Canadian natural gas deliverability 2007-2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    This report examined factors that may influence gas supply in the near future, and presented an outlook for natural gas deliverability up to the year 2009. Deliverability was projected under the following 3 scenarios to reflect varying levels of drilling investment that may occur: (1) a reference case; (2) a high case; and (3) a low case. Canadian natural gas has provided approximately 25 per cent of North America's natural gas production over the past few years. Marketable gas sales in 2006 were approximately $42 billion. Approximately 98 per cent of the total Canadian volume of natural gas is produced in the western Canadian sedimentary basin (WCSB). Results of the scenario analyses showed that deliverability decreased in all 3 projected scenarios. By 2009, Canadian natural gas deliverability was projected to decrease to between 410 and 449 million m 3 /d. The report also noted that the annual decline rate of the average natural gas well is 55 per cent. Producers have been maintaining deliverability by increasing the number of wells drilled annually. Gas producers are now targeting the western side of the basin, and are drilling deeper wells in order to access richer deposits of gas. Coalbed methane (CBM) production is also expected to increase over the next few years. It was concluded that Canadian deliverability will continue to play an important role in North American gas supplies. 6 tabs., 6 figs

  13. Participation with a Punch: Community Referenda on Dam Projects and the Right to Free, Prior, and Informed Consent to Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brant McGee

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The 2000 Report of the World Commission on Dams (WCD found that dams can threaten the resources that provide the basis for indigenous and other peoples’ culture, religion, subsistence, social and family structure – and their very existence, through forced relocation – and lead to ecosystem impacts harmful to agriculture, animals and fish. The WCD recommended the effective participation of potentially impacted local people in decisions regarding dam construction. The international right to free, prior, and informed consent (FPIC accorded to indigenous peoples promises not only the opportunity to participate in decisions affecting their lands and livelihoods but to stop unwanted development by refusing consent as well. The newly developed concept of community referenda, held in areas potentially impacted by development projects, provides an accurate measure of the position of local voters on the proposed project through a democratic process that discourages violence, promotes fair and informed debate, and provides an avenue for communities to express their consent or refusal of a specific project. The legal basis, practical and political implications, and Latin American examples of community referenda are explored as a means of implementing the critical goal of the principle of FPIC, the expression of community will and its conclusive impact on development decision-making.

  14. A Cognitive Model of the Effects of Linking Political Referenda to Salient Social Issues: A Lottery Will Fund Education, But Casinos Will Cause Crime?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, M. A.; And Others

    Contrasting a party identification model with a rational decision making model, a cognitive model predicts voter intent on two referenda: (1) an amendment to permit a state lottery; and (2) an amendment to permit residents of each county to vote on whether to permit casino gambling. Supporters of the lottery amendment attempt to strongly link it…

  15. Prospects and Challenges in the Deliverance of Executive Masters ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the recent decade Executive Masters degree programmes have become very popular deliverance in the Tanzanian higher learning institutions. ... Using The Open University of Tanzania as a case study, this article will focus on two programmes, namely; Executive Masters in Business Administration (EMBA) and Masters ...

  16. Check-up Measurement (update). Deliverable D5.22

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holtzer, A.C.G.; Giessen, A.M.D. van der; Djurica, M.

    2015-01-01

    This deliverable D5.22 presents the GEN6 check-up measurement. It describes the most prominent outcomes of the GEN6 project up to this point in time. The check-up measurement helps to focus the monitoring towards the most relevant achievements of the project, such that an efficient and well-targeted

  17. Deliverable 1.2.1 Market Analysis and Business Plan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterson, Carrie Beth

    2009-01-01

    Deliverable 1.2.1 - Market Analysis and Business Plan The main objective of this deliverable is to provide a short overview of 4 communities involved in the pilots, envisaged type of solutions and architectures to be deployed (chapter 2) and market analysis at regional level (chapter 3......) with related business cases. The Market analysis will provide an overview of market requirements, current status and opportunities for the pilot service that will be provided in the context of ISISEMD. This will be realised by performing detailed studies on various sources. Proposals for business modelling...... and business cases (chapter 4) will rely on the concept of value chains. Value chains typically consist of several providers, which together produce a complex product or service....

  18. Southwest British Columbia natural gas supply and deliverability: Discussion paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    A review is presented of energy in British Columbia, the role of natural gas, and options available to enhance gas supply security in the province's most densely populated area, the southwest. British Columbia has abundant natural gas supplies, and production exceeds domestic demand. In 1992, natural gas supplied ca 25% of total provincial end-use energy requirements, but this share is expected to rise to 30% by 2015. Although some say that the province's natural gas production and transmission system should serve only domestic needs, this would have significant negative impacts. Domestic gas supply policy allows gas consumers to contract their own supplies, but contract security is required. Provincial guidelines allow demand-side programs to compete with supply sources to ensure that the resource profile is achieved at least cost. In the southwest, natural gas demand is projected to increase from 189 PJ in 1991 to 262 PJ by 2005. Most gas supplied to this region comes from northeast British Columbia through pipelines that are generally fully contracted. Short-term deliverability can be a problem, especially in peak winter demand periods. The gas industry's contingency plans for shortages are outlined and alternatives to enhance deliverability to the southwest are assessed, including storage, expansion of the pipeline system, supply curtailment, and peaking supply contracts. Aspects of provincial natural gas planning are discussed, including security of supply and deliverability, economic and environmental impacts, consumer costs, safety, and the public interest. A least-cost option for enhancing deliverability (underground storage and an additional liquefied natural gas plant) is estimated to cost consumers $3.69/GJ over 20 years. 9 figs., 1 tab

  19. Experiences from two local processes of debate and referenda on the issue of siting high level nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drottz Sjoberg, B.M.

    1998-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: the paper summarizes results from two interview studies conducted in the communities of Storuman (1995) and Malaa (1997) in northern Sweden regarding whether to continue investigations of the areas for siting of a deep level repository for high level nuclear waste. Active, local participants in the work and discussions preceding each local referendum on the issue were asked to reflect on reasons and considerations related to their opinions, as well as the overall outcome for achieving a deeper understanding of the local processes. The first referendum (1995) yielded a strongly voiced rejection of continuing local investigations (72%), whereas the second (1997) referendum resulted in a marginally negative response (54%). A comparison of the results of the interview studies showed e.g. that the decision processes differed across communities, regarding both time interval and content, and that the local strategies and tactics related to the campaigns preceding the referenda differed. Among the similarities were the types of questions which remained unclear, often related to a long term perspective, e.g. risks and uncertainties regarding material reliability, access to and future safety of the repository, concern for future generations, national and international long-term decision procedures, and roles of responsibility. The discussion focuses on considerations around the issue of local vs. centralized political decisions and the tool provided by the referendum, and touches upon some issues which appeared rather paradoxical. (author)

  20. Load Composition Model Workflow (BPA TIP-371 Deliverable 1A)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chassin, David P.; Cezar, Gustavo V.; /SLAC

    2017-07-17

    This project is funded under Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Strategic Partnership Project (SPP) 17-005 between BPA and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The project in a BPA Technology Improvement Project (TIP) that builds on and validates the Composite Load Model developed by the Western Electric Coordinating Council's (WECC) Load Modeling Task Force (LMTF). The composite load model is used by the WECC Modeling and Validation Work Group to study the stability and security of the western electricity interconnection. The work includes development of load composition data sets, collection of load disturbance data, and model development and validation. This work supports reliable and economic operation of the power system. This report was produced for Deliverable 1A of the BPA TIP-371 Project entitled \\TIP 371: Advancing the Load Composition Model". The deliverable documents the proposed work ow for the Composite Load Model, which provides the basis for the instrumentation, data acquisition, analysis and data dissemination activities addressed by later phases of the project.

  1. Natural Gas Deliverability Task Force report: A joint FERC/DOE project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    The purpose of the FERC/DOE Natural Gas Deliverability Task Force Report was threefold: (1) to review current deliverability data for utility, accuracy, and timeliness; (2) to identify mechanisms for closing significant gaps in information resulting from changing market structures; and (3) to ensure that technologies are available to meet the needs of the emerging, competitive natural gas industry

  2. 20 CFR 638.812 - State and local taxation of Job Corps deliverers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false State and local taxation of Job Corps deliverers. 638.812 Section 638.812 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... § 638.812 State and local taxation of Job Corps deliverers. The Act provides that transactions conducted...

  3. Deliverability on the interstate natural gas pipeline system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    Deliverability on the Interstate Natural Gas Pipeline System examines the capability of the national pipeline grid to transport natural gas to various US markets. The report quantifies the capacity levels and utilization rates of major interstate pipeline companies in 1996 and the changes since 1990, as well as changes in markets and end-use consumption patterns. It also discusses the effects of proposed capacity expansions on capacity levels. The report consists of five chapters, several appendices, and a glossary. Chapter 1 discusses some of the operational and regulatory features of the US interstate pipeline system and how they affect overall system design, system utilization, and capacity expansions. Chapter 2 looks at how the exploration, development, and production of natural gas within North America is linked to the national pipeline grid. Chapter 3 examines the capability of the interstate natural gas pipeline network to link production areas to market areas, on the basis of capacity and usage levels along 10 corridors. The chapter also examines capacity expansions that have occurred since 1990 along each corridor and the potential impact of proposed new capacity. Chapter 4 discusses the last step in the transportation chain, that is, deliverability to the ultimate end user. Flow patterns into and out of each market region are discussed, as well as the movement of natural gas between States in each region. Chapter 5 examines how shippers reserve interstate pipeline capacity in the current transportation marketplace and how pipeline companies are handling the secondary market for short-term unused capacity. Four appendices provide supporting data and additional detail on the methodology used to estimate capacity. 32 figs., 15 tabs.

  4. Possibilities for a valorisation of geomorphologic research deliverables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geilhausen, M.; Götz, J.; Otto, J.-C.; Schrott, L.

    2009-04-01

    Many geomorphological studies focus on fundamental research questions in large parts, although there are lots of applied fields like landslide hazard assessment or water framework directive. As fundamental research is a common property, their outcomes should be more "open" and accessible to the public. This means that scientists have to find new ways presenting their results and outcomes besides publishing in scientific journals. This paper shows possibilities for a valorisation of geomorphologic research deliverables using print as well as digital media. Geotrails explain remarkable and exciting landscape features using information boards and become more and more popular and important for tourism in many parts of the world. With the growing interest in environmental change and outdoor activities, print media like field guides reach an increasing number of people. Field guides and Geotrails can be coupled in order to arise awareness about geomorphological landforms and to deliver more specific information on the site beyond the information given on the boards in the field. As field guides are designed for the general public they can be used for educational purposes as well. Today, this information can also be found in the internet offering virtual trips through landscapes using dynamic maps. Here, server side GIS technologies (WebGIS) using standardised interfaces provide new possibilities to show geomorphic data to the public and to share them with the scientific community. Furthermore, data formats like XML or KML are powerful tools for data exchange and can be used in interactive data viewers like Google Earth. We will present the Geotrail "Geomorphologischer Lehrpfad am Fuße der Zugspitze. Das Reintal - Eine Wanderung durch Raum und Zeit" (Bavarian Alps, Germany). Additionally, three geomorphologic WebGIS applications (Geomorphologic map Turtmanntal, Permafrostmap of Austria, Geomorphologic maps of Germany) will exemplify how geomorphologic information and

  5. Guidelines for Inter-Enterprise Management (IEM), GLOBEMEN Deliverable D23

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tølle, Martin; Vesterager, Johan

    2002-01-01

    This document is a deliverable of Work package 2 of the IMS Globemen (GMN) project: D23 Guidelines for Inter-Enterprise Management (IEM). IMS Globemen is an inter-regional project aiming to develop methods, tools and architectures to support inter-enterprise operations in one-of-kind industries......-Project, the developed solution for Inter-Enterprise Management. The structure of the deliverable is as follows: - Chapter 1 introduces the guidelines and outlines the structure of the deliverable - Chapter 2 defines key terms along with a list of acronyms used in the deliverable - Chapter 3 gives a general introduction...... for inter-enterprise management (IEM). - Chapter 5 contains the actual Guidelines The chapter contains guidelines for how to prepare enterprise network in being able to set up and manage virtual enterprises. The section consists of a set of activities an enterprise should/could consider when preparing...

  6. Modeling & Simulation Education for the Acquisition and T&E Workforce: FY07 Deliverable Package

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Olwell, David H; Johnson, Jean; Few, Stephanie; Didoszak, Jarema M

    2007-01-01

    This technical report presents the deliverables for calendar year 2007 for the "Educating the Modeling and Simulation Workforce" project performed for the DoD Modeling and Simulation Steering Committee...

  7. Project Turnover Deliverables for the SY Farm Enraf Annulus Leak Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SCAIEF, C.C.

    2000-01-01

    This document identifies the deliverables that ensure the end user of the SY Farm Enraf Annulus Leak Detectors (ALD) has all the documentation and training required for operating and maintaining the new system. All deliverable items checked on the Acceptance For Beneficial Use (ABU) form have been completed and are available to the end user. This document was written as required by HNF-IP-0842, Volume IV section 3.12 Acceptance of Structures, Systems, and Components for Beneficial Use. This document applies to the deliverable documentation required to operate and maintain the SY Farm Enraf ALD System. Appendix A provides a copy of the ABU form as listed in the appendix of TWR-4092, Engineering Task Plan for the New SY Farm Annulus Leak Detectors. This document attests that all required deliverable items checked on the ABU have been completed and are available to the end user

  8. Towards transparent, proportionate and deliverable regulation for geological disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    As part of its activities, the Regulators' Forum of the NEA Radioactive Waste Management Committee has been examining the regulatory criteria for the long-term performance of geological disposal. In this context, it organised a workshop entitled 'Towards Transparent, Proportionate and Deliverable Regulation for Geological Disposal', which served to verify current status and needs. Participants included regulators, implementers, policy makers, R and D specialists and academics. Themes addressed included duties to future generations, timescales for regulation, stepwise decision making, roles of optimisation and best available techniques (BAT), multiple lines of reasoning, safety and performance indicators, recognition of uncertainties and the importance of stakeholder interactions. The workshop highlighted the significant amount of work accomplished over the past decade, but also identified important differences between national regulations even if these are not in contradiction with international guidance. Also highlighted was the importance of R and D carried out on behalf of the regulator. In addition to the contributed papers, these proceedings trace the numerous discussions that formed an integral part of the workshop. They constitute an important and unique documentary basis for researchers and radioactive waste management specialists

  9. „CONSTITUTIONAL COURT OF THE REPUBLIC OF CROATIA AND CITIZEN-INITIATED REFERENDA IN THE 2013-2015 PERIOD: ANALYSIS AND PROPOSALS“

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Horvat Vuković

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The author analyzes the decisions of the Constitutional Court of the Republic of Croatia regarding citizen-initiated referenda, adopted in the period between 2013 and 2015. From the referendum on the definition of marriage, through the Court’s ruling on the referendum on the Cyrillic script, to the most recent cases dealing with outsourcing in the public administration and monetization of Croatian highways, she outlines a trend of growing limitations to the popular referendum institute. Paying particular attention to the decision on outsourcing from 8 April 2015, she highlights the problem areas of constitutional jurisprudence and suggests their corrections. Regarding the cogent nature of the obligation to substantiate the initiative with a statement of circumstances that provoked it, she holds that question as falling in the area of legislative discretion. Regarding the “premature nature” of an initiative, she argues that the Court may not tie its destiny to the existence of a Government’s program not yet formalized as a concrete bill. It also cannot clairvoyantly assess the impact of a referendum on the system of public finances. In balancing the right to referendum with budgetary stability, it may only take account of foreseeable consequences and measurable data, and withhold the right to referendum only in cases of decisions whose impact on the state’s fiscal stability would violate the guarantees of the Constitution’s Arts.3 and 16. Finally, she concludes on the impermissibility of applying stricter scrutiny to citizen-initiated referenda then to identical texts adopted by the Croatian Parliament. She holds such escalation of standards of review untenable in the light of a grammatical and teleological interpretation of the Constitution, as well as due to its punitive effect.

  10. Designing equitable workplace dietary interventions: perceptions of intervention deliverers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sarah A; Visram, Shelina; O'Malley, Claire; Summerbell, Carolyn; Araujo-Soares, Vera; Hillier-Brown, Frances; Lake, Amelia A

    2017-10-16

    Workplaces are a good setting for interventions that aim to support workers in achieving a healthier diet and body weight. However, little is known about the factors that impact on the feasibility and implementation of these interventions, and how these might vary by type of workplace and type of worker. The aim of this study was to explore the views of those involved in commissioning and delivering the Better Health at Work Award, an established and evidence-based workplace health improvement programme. One-to-one semi-structured interviews were conducted with 11 individuals in North East England who had some level of responsibility for delivering workplace dietary interventions. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using thematic framework analysis. A number of factors were felt to promote the feasibility and implementation of interventions. These included interventions that were cost-neutral (to employee and employer), unstructured, involved colleagues for support, took place at lunchtimes, and were well-advertised and communicated via a variety of media. Offering incentives, not necessarily monetary, was perceived to increase recruitment rates. Factors that militate against feasibility and implementation of interventions included worksites that were large in size and remote, working patterns including shifts and working outside of normal working hours that were not conducive to workers being able to access intervention sessions, workplaces without appropriate provision for healthy food on site, and a lack of support from management. Intervention deliverers perceived that workplace dietary interventions should be equally and easily accessible (in terms of cost and timing of sessions) for all staff, regardless of their job role. Additional effort should be taken to ensure those staff working outside normal working hours, and those working off-site, can easily engage with any intervention, to avoid the risk of intervention-generated inequalities (IGIs).

  11. Deliverable navigation for multicriteria IMRT treatment planning by combining shared and individual apertures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fredriksson, Albin; Bokrantz, Rasmus

    2013-01-01

    We consider the problem of deliverable Pareto surface navigation for step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiation therapy. This problem amounts to calculation of a collection of treatment plans with the property that convex combinations of plans are directly deliverable. Previous methods for deliverable navigation impose restrictions on the number of apertures of the individual plans, or require that all treatment plans have identical apertures. We introduce simultaneous direct step-and-shoot optimization of multiple plans subject to constraints that some of the apertures must be identical across all plans. This method generalizes previous methods for deliverable navigation to allow for treatment plans with some apertures from a collective pool and some apertures that are individual. The method can also be used as a post-processing step to previous methods for deliverable navigation in order to improve upon their plans. By applying the method to subsets of plans in the collection representing the Pareto set, we show how it can enable convergence toward the unrestricted (non-navigable) Pareto set where all apertures are individual. (paper)

  12. Evolution and development of a deliverability improvement program for gas storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maddox, T.D.; Sikorski, D.L.

    1994-01-01

    With the implementation in November 1993 of FERC Order 636, the responsibilities and contractual obligations for a Gas Transmission Company operating Gas Storage have changed. Among these responsibilities is the ability to deliver gas from storage in a timely manner as specified by gas storage contracts. To ensure that their deliverability obligations are met, a program has been implemented to review well performance and to re-work wells where deliverability can economically be improved. This program is aimed at maintaining or improving deliverability from wells and monitoring their future performance. Re-working existing wells has proven to be an economically successful method of maintaining deliverability compared to drilling new wells to meet this purpose. Re-working can be broken into two groups of wells: wells that have mechanical problems that need to be corrected or wells that need some type of stimulation treatment. In developing a rework program, several things need to be addressed such as: a candidate recognition program, the design of the work to be performed, execution of that work, and the evaluation of the results obtained along with the economics. The Deliverability Improvement Program is in its third year. It has developed from a small pilot program to a substantial part of normal storage activities. The purpose of this paper is to review the processes used to find candidates to work on and an evaluation of work performed

  13. Opening the SMS platform to users : Deliverable D7.2 - RISIS project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Besselaar, P.A.A.; Khalili, A.; de Graaf, K.A.; Idrissou, O.A.K.; van Harmelen, Frank

    2017-01-01

    In this deliverable we describe the SMS (Semantically Mapping Science) data integration platform (http://sms.risis.eu), the technical core within the RISIS data infrastructure for Science, Technology and Innovation Studies (STI). The aim of the platform is to produce richer data to be used in social

  14. Driving simulator test results Deliverable no D6.3. Final draft

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weiland, J.; Mattes, S.; Kuhn, F.; Gelau, Ch.; Schindhelm, R.; Hoedemaeker, D.D.M.

    2003-01-01

    Deliverable 6.3 reports the procedure and results from a driving simulator study. This study was carried out to test the efficiency of the principles of the in-vehicle information manager, which was developed within the Comunicar project. Thirty-six subjects were tested in a fixed-base driving

  15. Monitoring framework and description of indicators. Deliverable D5.1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holtzer, A.C.G.; Giessen, A.M. van der; Munck, S.G.E. de; Poel, M.A.; Smets, R.C.J.

    2012-01-01

    This deliverable describes the monitoring framework that will be used to monitor and evaluate the GEN6 project and its nine pilots. The main topics are IPv6 uptake and governance, as described by the EC. Monitoring and evaluation will be done during the course of the project. This report describes

  16. Test results evaluation: Pilot evaluations Deliverable no D6.5. Final draft

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoedemaeker, D.M.; Dangelmaier, M.; Gelau, C.; Mattes, S.; Montanari, R.

    2003-01-01

    This deliverable describes the User Centred Design approach that has been adopted within the COMUNICAR project. In this design approach several iterative steps were taken to design and evaluate the multimedia Human Machine Interface that is able to manage all the information exchanges between the

  17. Discrepancies between selected Pareto optimal plans and final deliverable plans in radiotherapy multi-criteria optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyroudi, Archonteia; Petersson, Kristoffer; Ghandour, Sarah; Pachoud, Marc; Matzinger, Oscar; Ozsahin, Mahmut; Bourhis, Jean; Bochud, François; Moeckli, Raphaël

    2016-08-01

    Multi-criteria optimization provides decision makers with a range of clinical choices through Pareto plans that can be explored during real time navigation and then converted into deliverable plans. Our study shows that dosimetric differences can arise between the two steps, which could compromise the clinical choices made during navigation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Capabilities and costs for ancillary services provision by wind power plants. Deliverable D 3.1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faiella, Mariano; Hennig, Tobias; Cutululis, Nicolaos Antonio

    This report is the deliverable of the third work package of the REserviceS project and describes the technical options and related costs for the provision of ancillary services specifically from wind energy technologies. It is focused on the set of ancillary services defined in the previous work...

  19. Deliverable 1.2.7: Cross-cultural benefit segmentation of consumers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinders, M.J.; Onwezen, M.C.; Sijtsema, S.J.; Zimmermann, K.L.; Berg, van den I.; Jasiulewicz, A.; Guardia, M.D.; Guerrero, L.

    2010-01-01

    The present report, deliverable D.1.2.7, gives a final view of the work done in ISAFruit Work Package (WP) 1.2. Average Europe fruit consumption is below the recommended level and moreover the consumption level is still decreasing in Europe. A large survey was carried out in four European countries

  20. Deliverable D.8.4. Social data visualization and navigation services -3rd Year Update-

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bitter-Rijpkema, Marlies; Brouns, Francis; Drachsler, Hendrik; Fazeli, Soude; Sanchez-Alonso, Salvador; Rajabi, Enayat; Kolovou, Lamprini

    2015-01-01

    Within the Open Discovery Space our study (T.8.4) focused on ”Enhanced Social Data Visualization & Navigation Services. This deliverable provides the prototype report regarding the deployment of adapted visualization and navigation services to be integrated in the ODS Social Data Management Layer.

  1. Data needs and computational requirements for ST decision making. Internal deliverable ID6.2.1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clement, Rémy; Tournebise, Pascal; Perkin, Samuel

    The objective of this deliverable is to present the requirements for adapting available tools/models and identifying data needs for probabilistic reliability analysis and optimal decision-making in the short-term decision making process. It will serve as a basis for the next tasks of GARPUR work ...

  2. 20 CFR 638.300 - Eligibility for funds and eligible deliverers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Eligibility for funds and eligible deliverers. 638.300 Section 638.300 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR JOB CORPS PROGRAM UNDER TITLE IV-B OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Funding, Site Selection...

  3. Multivariate time series analysis of SafetyNet data. SafetyNet, Building the European Road Safety Observatory, Workpackage 7, Deliverable 7.7.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Commandeur, J.J.F. Bijleveld, F.D. & Bergel, R.

    2009-01-01

    This deliverable provides an application of theories and methods documented in Deliverables 7.4 and 7.5 of work package 7 of the SafetyNet project. In this deliverable, use of select analysis techniques is demonstrated through real world road safety analysis problems, using aggregate data which may

  4. Evaluation of state of the art technologies, GLOBEMEN Deliverable D411

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van den Berg, Roel; Hannus, Matti; Pedersen, Jens Dahl

    2000-01-01

    topics such as tools, methods, and models, and can range from as wide as reference architectures to middleware technology. This document is organised as follows. The next chapter contains some requirements as defined by the industrial partners in Globemen. Chapter 3 contains virtual enterprise concepts...... and constructs for background information. The frame for the remainder of the document is set in chapter 4, where ALIVE (Architecture for Layered Integration of Virtual Enterprises) is introduced. Each of the components in ALIVE is subsequently discussed in detail in the chapters 6 to 10. Chapter 5 discusses...... reference architectures and methodologies, which should guide a user to fill in the various types of integration as indicated by ALIVE. The first type of integration, inter-enterprise coordination, is not described in this deliverable, but in the various WP1-3 deliverables. The topic of modelling languages...

  5. Short-term Canadian natural gas deliverability 2005-2007 : an energy market assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-10-01

    This document examined the factors that influence gas supply in the short-term and presented an outlook for deliverability from 2005 to 2007. Recent trends in the production characteristics of the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin (WCSB) and the east coast offshore provide a better understanding of the short-term gas supply situation. High natural gas prices have resulted in record levels of drilling in Canada's natural gas exploration and production industry. Drilling levels are expected to remain high as industry will continue to maximize efforts to increase production. However, due to the maturity of the WCSB, the effort will result in only a modest increase in production over the next 2 years. The low decline characteristics of natural gas from coal (NGC) wells will have a stabilizing effect on WCSB deliverability over the long-term. It was noted that approximately 98 per cent of Canadian gas is produced from the WCSB with Alberta accounting for 80 per cent of the output. This assessment provided separate deliverability estimates for conventional gas in the WCSB, NGC, and offshore Nova Scotia. The contribution from offshore Nova Scotia will likely remain in the range of 10 to 11 million cubic metres per day until late 2006, and rise to an average of 13 million cubic metres per day in 2007 with added compression. It was concluded that Canadian deliverability will increase slightly through an increase in drilling activity. It was also noted that the province of Alberta and the petroleum industry are addressing the issue of drilling density, access to resources, noise and other environmental aspects of the expected increase in NGC activity. 3 tabs., 16 figs., 3 appendices

  6. Identification of preferred dipole design options and cost estimates: Deliverable D5.2

    CERN Document Server

    Tommasini, Davide

    2017-01-01

    This document contains a description of the preferred 16 Tesla dipole magnet baseline design with its expected performances. The document also includes an analysis of the individual merits and risks of the different, initial design options and gives a justification for the selection of the baseline design. The deliverable includes expected field levels, field errors and a cost estimate, which serve as input for the arc design consolidation.

  7. Short-term Canadian natural gas deliverability 2008-2010 : an energy market assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-10-01

    This document examined the factors that affect gas supply in the short term and presented an outlook for deliverability through 2010. Its primary purpose was to advance public understanding of the short-term gas supply situation in Canada. For the past several years, Canadian natural gas has provided about 25 per cent of combined Canadian and U.S. production. Canadian gas deliverability remained within a narrow range from 2000 to mid-2007 at around 483 million cubic metres and has since begun to decline. About 98 per cent of the Canadian volume comes from the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin (WCSB), with most of the rest coming from Atlantic Canada. Although drilling and development activity in the WCSB has depended on the price of natural gas relative to costs, that price was influenced by uncertainties such as weather-driven market demand, changes in natural gas supply, cost, attractiveness of other basins, availability of imported liquefied natural gas and possible supply disruptions in the Gulf of Mexico. Shale gas and tight gas prospects in the Horn River and Montney plays of northeast British Columbia have attracted considerable interest from Canada's upstream industry. Early stages of shale gas development are also underway in Quebec and the Maritimes. However, the viability of large scale commercial development of shale gas in Canada has yet to be proven. In order to reflect the short-term uncertainty of the North American natural gas market, this report project deliverability under 3 cases that reflect different levels of drilling investment, namely reference case, high case and low case scenarios. 4 tabs., 12 figs

  8. SU-F-T-333: Deliverability Considerations in Modulated Photon Radiotherapy (XMRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGeachy, P [Department of Medical Physics, CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); Weppler, S; Villarreal-Barajas, J [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Center, Calgary, AB (Canada); Zinchenko, Y [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Khan, R [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Modulated Photon Radiotherapy (XMRT), which simultaneously optimizes photon beamlet energy (6 and 18 MV) and fluence, has shown dosimetric improvements for fluence map optimization (FMO) when compared to conventional single-energy intensity modulated radiotherapy. However, generating deliverable multi-leaf collimator (MLC) sequences for XMRT needs to be explored. Therefore, two problems were investigated: 1) The ability to generate MLC-sequenced fluence maps from FMO XMRT solutions for a prostate case 2) The impact of fluence smoothening constraints imposed in the FMO on the deliverability and dose distribution. Methods: XMRT FMO solutions for a clinical prostate case employing standard dosimetric constraints, prescriptions, and a seven coplanar beam arrangement were generated. Smoothening constraints in the FMO utilized a sum of positive gradients approach. Sequenced maps were generated using an in-house optimization algorithm (MLCSO). The maximum leaf speed, minimum leaf separation, and transmission through MLC leaves were set to 2.5 mm/s, 1 mm, and 1%, respectively. The resulting sequenced maps for each field were compared with the original FMO solutions through gamma analysis (0.5%/0.5 mm) and root mean square error (RMSE). This comparison was done for both the smoothed and unsmoothed XMRT solutions. Results: Average RMSE and gamma agreement of 0.44, 93%and 0.36, 95% were obtained for unsmoothed 6 and 18 MV contributions from XMRT sequenced maps. The sequenced maps with smoothening constraints had better agreement with their respective optimal fluences, with RMSEs of 0 and gamma pass rates of 100% for all comparisons. This improved smoothening led to increased dose to critical structures (rectum, bladder, and femoral heads); however solutions were still clinically acceptable. Conclusion: For a clinical prostate case, XMRT FMO fluence maps were suitable for conversion into deliverable MLC sequences. Imposing smoothening constraints during FMO resulted

  9. Short-term Canadian natural gas deliverability 2008-2010 : an energy market assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-10-15

    This document examined the factors that affect gas supply in the short term and presented an outlook for deliverability through 2010. Its primary purpose was to advance public understanding of the short-term gas supply situation in Canada. For the past several years, Canadian natural gas has provided about 25 per cent of combined Canadian and U.S. production. Canadian gas deliverability remained within a narrow range from 2000 to mid-2007 at around 483 million cubic metres and has since begun to decline. About 98 per cent of the Canadian volume comes from the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin (WCSB), with most of the rest coming from Atlantic Canada. Although drilling and development activity in the WCSB has depended on the price of natural gas relative to costs, that price was influenced by uncertainties such as weather-driven market demand, changes in natural gas supply, cost, attractiveness of other basins, availability of imported liquefied natural gas and possible supply disruptions in the Gulf of Mexico. Shale gas and tight gas prospects in the Horn River and Montney plays of northeast British Columbia have attracted considerable interest from Canada's upstream industry. Early stages of shale gas development are also underway in Quebec and the Maritimes. However, the viability of large scale commercial development of shale gas in Canada has yet to be proven. In order to reflect the short-term uncertainty of the North American natural gas market, this report project deliverability under 3 cases that reflect different levels of drilling investment, namely reference case, high case and low case scenarios. 4 tabs., 12 figs.

  10. Ensuring on-time quality data management deliverables from global clinical data management teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zia Haque

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The growing emphasis on off-site and off-shore clinical data management activities mandates a paramount need for adequate solutions geared toward on-time, quality deliverables. The author has been leading large teams that have been involved in successful global clinical data management endeavors. While each study scenario is unique and has to be approached as such, there are several elements in defining strategy and team structure in global clinical data management that can be applied universally. In this article, key roles, practices, and high-level procedures are laid out as a road map to ensure success with the model.

  11. Shuttle orbiter Ku-band radar/communications system design evaluation. Deliverable test equipment evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maronde, R. G.

    1980-07-01

    The Ku-band test equipment, known as the Deliverable System Test equipment (DSTE), is reviewed and evaluated. The DSTE is semiautomated and computer programs were generated for 14 communication mode tests and 17 radar mode tests. The 31 test modules provide a good cross section of tests with which to exercise the Ku-band system; however, it is very limited when being used to verify Ku-band system performance. More detailed test descriptions are needed, and a major area of concern is the DSTE sell-off procedure which is inadequate.

  12. Fluctuations and predictability of wind and hydropower. Deliverable 2.1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giebel, Gregor; Holttinen, H.; Söder, L.

    2004-01-01

    The report forms the deliverable D2.1 of the EU supported project Wind Power Integration in a Liberalised Electricity Market (WILMAR). The handling and generation of the necessary wind and hydro time series for the project’s power system planningsimulation model is described. The wind power...... and the hydro power time series on hourly basis are generated on basis of real data for all the geographical regions included in the analysis in order to realistically represent the various correlations intime and displacement. Models have been developed to generate various realistic future time series based...

  13. 'Archers' of the Blessed City: City's Deliverance in the Coinage of Early Hellenistic Olbia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolba, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Despite continuous and thorough studies of Olbian coinage, the chronology of some coin series produced by this Pontic city and the messages communicated by their types remain obscure. One such controversial issue, standing out from the total mass, is the so-called ‘archers’, the early Hellenistic...... with the major turning point in the city’s history, namely its deliverance from the siege laid by Macedonian troops in the course of Zopyrion’s campaign against the Scythians around 331 BC....

  14. LANL12-RS-107J PYTHON Radiography Analysis Tool (PyRAT). Mid-Year Deliverable Report for FY15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temple, Brian Allen; Armstrong, Jerawan Chudoung

    2015-01-01

    This document is a mid-year report on a deliverable for the PYTHON Radiography Analysis Tool (PyRAT) for project LANL12-RS-107J in FY15. The deliverable is deliverable number 2 in the work package and is titled ''Add the ability to read in more types of image file formats in PyRAT''. Right now PyRAT can only read in uncompressed TIF files (tiff files). It is planned to expand the file formats that can be read by PyRAT, making it easier to use in more situations. A summary of the file formats added include jpeg, jpg, png and formatted ASCII files.

  15. Cost benefit analysis vs. referenda

    OpenAIRE

    Martin J. Osborne; Matthew A. Turner

    2007-01-01

    We consider a planner who chooses between two possible public policies and ask whether a referendum or a cost benefit analysis leads to higher welfare. We find that a referendum leads to higher welfare than a cost benefit analyses in "common value" environments. Cost benefit analysis is better in "private value" environments.

  16. Road Safety Data, Collection, Transfer and Analysis DaCoTa. Deliverable 1.2: Road safety management investigation model and questionnaire.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dupont, H. Martensen, H. Papadimitriou, E. Yannis, G. Muhlrad, N. Jähi, H. Vallet, G. Giustiniani, G. Tripodi, A. Usami, D. Bax, C. Wijnen, W. Schöne, M.-L. Machata, K. Buttler, I. Zysinska, M. Talbot, R. Gitelman, V. & Hakkert, S. & Muhlrad, N. Gitelman, V. & Buttler, I. (Eds.)

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the DaCoTA Work Package 1 is to investigate road safety policy-making and management processes in Europe. In the Deliverables released previously, the Work Package 1 assessed the experts’ needs in terms of road safety knowledge, data and decision support tools (Deliverable 1.1/4.1), as

  17. MO-FG-CAMPUS-TeP3-04: Deliverable Robust Optimization in IMPT Using Quadratic Objective Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shan, J; Liu, W; Bues, M; Schild, S [Mayo Clinic Arizona, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To find and evaluate the way of applying deliverable MU constraints into robust spot intensity optimization in Intensity-Modulated- Proton-Therapy (IMPT) to prevent plan quality and robustness from degrading due to machine deliverable MU-constraints. Methods: Currently, the influence of the deliverable MU-constraints is retrospectively evaluated by post-processing immediately following optimization. In this study, we propose a new method based on the quasi-Newton-like L-BFGS-B algorithm with which we turn deliverable MU-constraints on and off alternatively during optimization. Seven patients with two different machine settings (small and large spot size) were planned with both conventional and new methods. For each patient, three kinds of plans were generated — conventional non-deliverable plan (plan A), conventional deliverable plan with post-processing (plan B), and new deliverable plan (plan C). We performed this study with both realistic (small) and artificial (large) deliverable MU-constraints. Results: With small minimum MU-constraints considered, new method achieved a slightly better plan quality than conventional method (D95% CTV normalized to the prescription dose: 0.994[0.992∼0.996] (Plan C) vs 0.992[0.986∼0.996] (Plan B)). With large minimum MU constraints considered, results show that the new method maintains plan quality while plan quality from the conventional method is degraded greatly (D95% CTV normalized to the prescription dose: 0.987[0.978∼0.994] (Plan C) vs 0.797[0.641∼1.000] (Plan B)). Meanwhile, plan robustness of these two method’s results is comparable. (For all 7 patients, CTV DVH band gap at D95% normalized to the prescription dose: 0.015[0.005∼0.043] (Plan C) vs 0.012[0.006∼0.038] (Plan B) with small MU-constraints and 0.019[0.009∼0.039] (Plan C) vs 0.030[0.015∼0.041] (Plan B) with large MU-constraints) Conclusion: Positive correlation has been found between plan quality degeneration and magnitude of

  18. MO-FG-CAMPUS-TeP3-04: Deliverable Robust Optimization in IMPT Using Quadratic Objective Function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shan, J; Liu, W; Bues, M; Schild, S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To find and evaluate the way of applying deliverable MU constraints into robust spot intensity optimization in Intensity-Modulated- Proton-Therapy (IMPT) to prevent plan quality and robustness from degrading due to machine deliverable MU-constraints. Methods: Currently, the influence of the deliverable MU-constraints is retrospectively evaluated by post-processing immediately following optimization. In this study, we propose a new method based on the quasi-Newton-like L-BFGS-B algorithm with which we turn deliverable MU-constraints on and off alternatively during optimization. Seven patients with two different machine settings (small and large spot size) were planned with both conventional and new methods. For each patient, three kinds of plans were generated — conventional non-deliverable plan (plan A), conventional deliverable plan with post-processing (plan B), and new deliverable plan (plan C). We performed this study with both realistic (small) and artificial (large) deliverable MU-constraints. Results: With small minimum MU-constraints considered, new method achieved a slightly better plan quality than conventional method (D95% CTV normalized to the prescription dose: 0.994[0.992∼0.996] (Plan C) vs 0.992[0.986∼0.996] (Plan B)). With large minimum MU constraints considered, results show that the new method maintains plan quality while plan quality from the conventional method is degraded greatly (D95% CTV normalized to the prescription dose: 0.987[0.978∼0.994] (Plan C) vs 0.797[0.641∼1.000] (Plan B)). Meanwhile, plan robustness of these two method’s results is comparable. (For all 7 patients, CTV DVH band gap at D95% normalized to the prescription dose: 0.015[0.005∼0.043] (Plan C) vs 0.012[0.006∼0.038] (Plan B) with small MU-constraints and 0.019[0.009∼0.039] (Plan C) vs 0.030[0.015∼0.041] (Plan B) with large MU-constraints) Conclusion: Positive correlation has been found between plan quality degeneration and magnitude of

  19. Dosimetric quality, accuracy, and deliverability of modulated radiotherapy treatments for spinal metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kairn, Tanya, E-mail: t.kairn@gmail.com [Genesis Cancer Care Queensland, Auchenflower (Australia); School of Chemistry, Physics, and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane (Australia); Papworth, Daniel [Genesis Cancer Care Queensland, Auchenflower (Australia); Crowe, Scott B. [School of Chemistry, Physics, and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane (Australia); Cancer Care Services, Royal Brisbane and Women' s Hospital, Herston (Australia); Anderson, Jennifer [Genesis Cancer Care Queensland, Auchenflower (Australia); Christie, David R.H. [Genesis Cancer Care Queensland, Auchenflower (Australia); School of Medicine, Bond University, Robina (Australia)

    2016-10-01

    Cancer often metastasizes to the vertebra, and such metastases can be treated successfully using simple, static posterior or opposed-pair radiation fields. However, in some cases, including when re-irradiation is required, spinal cord avoidance becomes necessary and more complex treatment plans must be used. This study evaluated 16 sample intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment plans designed to treat 6 typical vertebral and paraspinal volumes using a standard prescription, with the aim of investigating the advantages and limitations of these treatment techniques and providing recommendations for their optimal use in vertebral treatments. Treatment plan quality and beam complexity metrics were evaluated using the Treatment And Dose Assessor (TADA) code. A portal-imaging–based quality assurance (QA) system was used to evaluate treatment delivery accuracy, and radiochromic film measurements were used to provide high-resolution verification of treatment plan dose accuracy, especially in the steep dose gradient regions between each vertebral target and spinal cord. All treatment modalities delivered approximately the same doses and the same levels of dose heterogeneity to each planning target volume (PTV), although the minimum PTV doses in the vertebral plans were substantially lower than the prescription, because of the requirement that the plans meet a strict constraint on the dose to the spinal cord and cord planning risk volume (PRV). All plans met required dose constraints on all organs at risk, and all measured PTV-cord dose gradients were steeper than planned. Beam complexity analysis suggested that the IMRT treatment plans were more deliverable (less complex, leading to greater QA success) than the VMAT treatment plans, although the IMRT plans also took more time to deliver. The accuracy and deliverability of VMAT treatment plans were found to be substantially increased by limiting the number of

  20. TRANSIT WP3 deliverable D3.2 – “A first prototype of TSI theory”

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haxeltine, Alex; Kemp, René; Dumitru, Adina

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this deliverable (D3. 2) of the TRANSIT research project is to report on the development of a 'first prototype'of a middle-range theory of transformative social innovation. The 'prototype'is presented here in the form a framework for Transformative Social Innovation, which at this ...

  1. Summary of FY 17 Assessments Sandia National Laboratories: Evaluation of FY16 SNL FCT M2 Milestone Deliverables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appel, Gordon John

    2017-03-01

    This report is the milestone deliverable M4FT-17SN111102091 “Summary of Assessments Performed FY17 by SNL QA POC” for work package FT-17SN11110209 titled “Quality Assurance – SNL”. This report summarizes the FY17 assessment performed on Fuel Cycle Technologies / Spent Fuel and Waste Disposition efforts.

  2. CO2-emission trading and green markets for renewable electricity. Wilmar - deliverable 4.1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azuma-Dicke, N.; Morthorst, Poul Erik; Ravn, H.F.

    2004-01-01

    This report is Deliverable 4.1 of the EU project “Wind Power Integration in Liberalised Electricity Markets” (WILMAR) and describes the application of two policy instruments, Tradable Emissions Permits (TEP’s) and Tradable Green Certificates (TGC’s) forelectricity produced from renewable energy...... sources in the European Union and the implications for implementation in the Wilmar model. The introduction of a common emission-trading system in the EU is expected to have an upward effect on the spot pricesat the electricity market. The variations of the spot price imply that some types of power...... generation may change the situation from earning money to losing money despite the increasing spot price. Heavy restrictions on emissions penalise thefossil-fuelled technologies significantly, and the associated increase in the spot price need not compensate for this. Therefore, a market of TEP’s is expected...

  3. Virtual Enterprise Reference Architecture and Methodology (VERAM), Joint D41/D43 deliverable of GLOBEMEN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tølle, Martin; Zwegers, Arian; Vesterager, Johan

    2003-01-01

    . IMS Globemen is an inter-regional project aiming to develop methods, tools and architectures to support inter-enterprise operations in one-of-kind industries, in different lifecycle phases. This deliverable describes an architectural framework VERAM including a description/elaboration of its elements......-of-a-kind-production”, the concept of the Virtual Enterprise (VE) and the Virtual Enterprise Reference Architecture (VERA) developed in GLOBEMEN. - In Chapter 4 a so-called life history example is presented to give a possible scenario about how an enterprise network could evolve over time, and to point out the need for preparing...... and setting up networks and VEs. The life history example in Chapter 4 highlights the potential for preparing and reusing existing knowledge related to enterprise networks and VEs. - As a means to structure relevant knowledge GLOBEMEN developed the VERAM (Virtual Enterprise Reference Architecture...

  4. Outlook for B.C. gas production and deliverability in relation to domestic and export markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phelps, M.E.J.

    1993-01-01

    The business outlook for natural gas in British Columbia is discussed. Drilling activity in B.C. is increasing, and it is predicted that reserve additions over 1993-1998 will total 3.4 terra cubic feet. Deliverability in 1993 is 1.9 billion cubic feet/d, and this is expected to rise 30% by 1998. Westcoast is doubling raw gas capacity at the Pine River plant and is constructing new raw gas transmission lines. Growth is expected to continue at 6%/y for the next five years. In the deregulated environment, short term fluctuations in price are to be expected, however consumers are reluctant to tolerate price increases when levels of disposable income are static or decreasing. Regular, predictable and sustained increases in prices are preferable to sudden, significant oscillations, especially for residental customers

  5. From Field Work to Deliverables. Experiences on the Tin House Courtyard Documentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello Caballero, L.; Mezzino, D.; Federman, A.; Santana Quintero, M.

    2017-08-01

    The Tin House Courtyard is a property of the National Capital Commission (NCC) in Ottawa, Canada. The site is located within the `Mile of History', a historical route running from Parliament Hill to the Governor General's residence. Currently, existing assets are under intervention works that include several preservation and renewal actions. Within the broader project, one of the tasks before construction works started was the documentation of the set of facades. The Carleton Immersive Media Studio (CIMS) at Carleton University in Ottawa was commissioned by NCC to conduct the recording of the area. This paper describes the process undertaken from field work to the final deliverable to the client, as well as the issues faced in between. Nowadays, up to date surveying technologies have revolutionized the methodologies for cultural heritage documentation. In this regard, the recording strategy employed encompassed the use of photogrammetry, laser scanner, total station, as well as different pre and post processing software in order to generate the desired outcomes.

  6. Deliverable 3.3.2 Specification of tests and test groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterson, Carrie Beth; Mitseva, Anelia; Harpur, Jill

    2009-01-01

    Deliverable 3.3.2: Specification of tests and test groups One of the main goals of the ISISEMD project is to offer innovative ICT services to improve the quality of life of elderly persons with cognitive problems or mild dementia and their informal and formal caregivers who provide every day care...... for them. This will be done via integrating intelligent scalable ICT services which will be tested for a period of 12 months under realistic conditions. Offering the services could not be complete without evaluating quality of life improvement, user acceptance and user satisfaction with a representative...... group of the target user groups. This document is devoted to describing important aspects of services evaluation such as: who the test participants will be, inclusion and exclusion criterion, selection standards, how the test participants will be recruited, ethical considerations, etc. Test methodology...

  7. Bioclim Deliverable D7: continuous climate evolution scenarios over western Europe (1000 km scale)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The overall aim of BIOCLIM is to assess the possible long term impacts due to climate change on the safety of radioactive waste repositories in deep formations. This aim is addressed through the following specific objectives: - Development of practical and innovative strategies for representing sequential climatic changes to the geosphere-biosphere system for existing sites over central Europe, addressing the timescale of one million years, which is relevant to the geological disposal of radioactive waste. - Exploration and evaluation of the potential effects of climate change on the nature of the biosphere systems used to assess the environmental impact. - Dissemination of information on the new methodologies and the results obtained from the project among the international waste management community for use in performance assessments of potential or planned radioactive waste repositories. A key point of the project is therefore to develop strategies for representing sequential long-term climatic changes by addressing time scales of relevance to geological disposal of solid radioactive wastes. The integrated strategy, which first step is described in this deliverable (D7), consists of building an integrated, dynamic climate model, to represent all the known important mechanisms for long term climatic variations. The time-dependent results will then be interpreted in terms of regional climate using rule-based and statistical down-scaling approaches. Therefore, the continuous simulation of the climate evolution of the next 200 000 years selected for study is a major objective of the BIOCLIM project. This requires models that account for the simultaneous evolution of the atmosphere, biosphere, land-ice and the ocean. To be able to perform several 200 000-yearlong transient climate simulations, the models have to include all these components, but also need to be simple enough to run fast. Therefore, climate models of intermediate complexity have been chosen to

  8. TU-C-17A-06: Evaluating IMRT Plan Deliverability Via PTV Shape and MLC Motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGurk, R; Smith, VA; Price, M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: For step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans, the dosimetry and deliverability can be affected by the number and shape of the segments used. Thus, plan deliverability is likely related to target volume and shape. We investigated whether the sphericity of target volumes and the previously proposed Modulation Complexity Score (MCS) could be used together to improve the detection of IMRT fields that failed quality assurance (QA). Methods: 526 and 353 IMRT fields from 32 prostate and 28 head-and-neck (H'N) patients, respectively, were analyzed. MCS was used to quantify the complexity of multi-leaf collimator shapes and motion patterns for each field. Sphericity was calculated using the surface area and volume of each patient’s planning target volume (PTV). Logistic regression models with MCS-alone or MCS and sphericity terms were fit to PlanUNC IMRT pass/fail results (5% dose difference, 4mm distance-to-agreement criteria) using SAS 9.3 (Cary, NC). Model concordance, discordance and area under the curve (AUC) were used to quantify model accuracy. Results: Mean (±1 standard deviation) MCS for prostate and H'N were 0.58(±0.15) and 0.40 (±0.14), respectively. Mean sphericity scores were 0.75(±0.05) for prostate and 0.63 (±0.12) for H'N. Both metrics were significantly different between treatment locations (p<0.01, Wilcoxon Rank Sum Test) indicating greater complexity in shape and variations for H'N PTVs. For prostate, concordance, discordance and AUC using MCS alone were 80.8%, 18.7% and 0.811. Including sphericity in the model improved these to 81.7%, 17.7% and 0.820. For H'N, the original concordance, discordance and AUC were of 72.9%, 26.9% and 0.729. Including sphericity into the model improved these metrics to 76.5%, 23.2% and 0.729. Conclusion: Sphericity provides a quantitative measure of PTV shape. While improvement in IMRT QA failure detection was modest for both prostate and H'N plans

  9. Assessment Report Sandia National Laboratories Fuel Cycle Technologies Quality Assurance Evaluation of FY15 SNL FCT M2 Milestone Deliverables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appel, Gordon John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) program activities are conducted in accordance with FCT Quality Assurance Program Document (FCT-QAPD) requirements. The FCT-QAPD interfaces with SNL approved Quality Assurance Program Description (SNL-QAPD) as explained in the Sandia National Laboratories QA Program Interface Document for FCT Activities (Interface Document). This plan describes SNL's FY16 assessment of SNL's FY15 FCT M2 milestone deliverable's compliance with program QA requirements, including SNL R&A requirements. The assessment is intended to confirm that SNL's FY15 milestone deliverables contain the appropriate authenticated review documentation and that there is a copy marked with SNL R&A numbers.

  10. Assessment Report Sandia National Laboratories Fuel Cycle Technologies Quality Assurance Evaluation of FY15 SNL FCT M2 Milestone Deliverables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appel, Gordon John

    2016-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) program activities are conducted in accordance with FCT Quality Assurance Program Document (FCT-QAPD) requirements. The FCT-QAPD interfaces with SNL approved Quality Assurance Program Description (SNL-QAPD) as explained in the Sandia National Laboratories QA Program Interface Document for FCT Activities (Interface Document). This plan describes SNL's FY16 assessment of SNL's FY15 FCT M2 milestone deliverable's compliance with program QA requirements, including SNL R&A requirements. The assessment is intended to confirm that SNL's FY15 milestone deliverables contain the appropriate authenticated review documentation and that there is a copy marked with SNL R&A numbers.

  11. CRISP. Functional Specifications of electric Networks with high degrees of distributed generation. Deliverable D1.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontela, M.; Bacha, S.; Hadsjaid, N.; Andrieu, C.

    2007-09-01

    The deliverable D 1.1 is the first step in the project. This D 1.1 deliverable treats the different components: networks, generation sources and also the actors present in the energy market. The French system is usually commented but comments about the other countries uses are also mentioned. Special attention has been paid to the Dutch system, and a comparison is made between the French and the Dutch system. The main goal of this work is to describe the electric system and its components. Also a benchmarking model is proposed in order to start the studies of the different work package. This benchmarking model implies: the transmission, sub-transmission and distribution electric sub-systems. From this model, different scenarios of perturbations are studied. These scenarios correspond to different framework times (transient and steady states) and they could become fatal for the system operation

  12. Report of Case Studies on Gender Equality as a Focus Point of National and Nativist Discourses (Deliverable 9.7)

    OpenAIRE

    Siim, Birte; Kriszan, Andrea; Ámon, Kata; Knijn, Trudie; Broek, Hans Peter van den; Caponia, Tiziana; Gal, John; Halevy, Dana; Sipic, Josip; Unger, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    The overall aim of WP9.7 is to analyse ‘cross-national case studies on gender equality as the focus of national and nativist discourses’. This deliverable is based on the national reports on the rhetoric of populist radical right parties from the seven selected countries, i.e. Croatia, Denmark, the Netherlands, Hungary, Germany, Italy and Spain, together with Israel. The objective of this synthesis report is to identify similarities and divergences in framing migration, mobility, gender and f...

  13. WE-D-16A-01: ACR Radiology Leadership Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, G

    2014-01-01

    The Radiology Leadership Institute (RLI) was established in 2011 by the American College of Radiology with a mission to prepare leaders who will shape the future of radiology to ensure quality, elevate service and deliver extraordinary patient care. Leadership skills are critical to medical physicists in order for them to assure that imaging and therapy are safe and of the highest quality possible. This session will provide an introduction to the RLI and its programs with an emphasis on how medical physicists can get involved and what they might expect to gain through their engagement with the RLI. The session will also provide a framework for leadership in healthcare with an emphasis on roles and opportunities for medical physicists to enhance their effectiveness as members of the healthcare, medical education, and research communities

  14. WE-D-16A-01: ACR Radiology Leadership Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, G [Duke Clinical Research Institute, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2014-06-15

    The Radiology Leadership Institute (RLI) was established in 2011 by the American College of Radiology with a mission to prepare leaders who will shape the future of radiology to ensure quality, elevate service and deliver extraordinary patient care. Leadership skills are critical to medical physicists in order for them to assure that imaging and therapy are safe and of the highest quality possible. This session will provide an introduction to the RLI and its programs with an emphasis on how medical physicists can get involved and what they might expect to gain through their engagement with the RLI. The session will also provide a framework for leadership in healthcare with an emphasis on roles and opportunities for medical physicists to enhance their effectiveness as members of the healthcare, medical education, and research communities.

  15. Silver deposited carboxymethyl chitosan-grafted magnetic nanoparticles as dual action deliverable antimicrobial materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Duc-Thang; Sabrina, Sabrina; Lee, Cheng-Kang

    2017-04-01

    Carboxymethyl chitosan (CMCS) was known to have a much better antimicrobial activity than chitosan due to the increased cationic -NH 3 + groups resulted from the intra- and intermolecular interactions between the carboxyl and amino groups. CMCS was grafted onto the surface of silica coated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) to obtain magnetically retrievable and deliverable antimicrobial nanoparticles (MNPs@CMCS). The presence of carboxylate groups in CMCS not only enhanced antimicrobial activity but also enabled Ag ions chelating ability to induce the in situ formation of Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs). The deposition of AgNPs on the surface of MNPs@CMCS could significantly increase its antimicrobial activity against planktonic cells due to the dual action of CMCS and AgNPs. Due to its high magnetism, the as-prepared MNPs@CMCS-Ag could be efficiently delivered into an existing biofilm under the guidance of an applied magnetic field. Without direct contact, the Ag ions and/or radical oxygen species (ROS) released from the deposited Ag nanoparticles could effectively kill the bacteria embedded in the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) matrix of biofilm. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. An editorial approach: Mike Nelson’s corridors and The Deliverance and The Patience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Hughes

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This essay contrasts the contemporary British artist Mike Nelson’s approach to constructing his large, multi-room installations with his approach to editing the numerous artist books that he has produced since 2000. This comparison reveals several compositional symmetries between the two, namely pertaining to narrative non-linearity and meta-fictionality. The logic of montage is shown to similarly underscore both the books and the installations. This essay argues that the corridors connecting the different rooms of Nelson’s installations function in a similar way to the logic of montage: they play an integral role as the support that binds the structure of the installation (its multiple rooms together as a whole. This essay argues that the corridor is the primary viewing framework of the installation for the viewer, and that this vantage point is significant because the necessarily partial vision of the installation from the space of the corridor demonstrates the logic of installation art more broadly. I conclude by mapping the key compositional elements of Nelson’s artist books onto his installations, taking the 2001 work The Deliverance and The Patience as a case study, to show that the books do not exemplify the artwork as with traditional exhibition catalogues, but rather parallel it. That is, a structural continuity is established between these two facets of his work.

  17. Conclusions and summaries of feed-back comments from participating countries. Deliverable D18

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drottz Sjoeberg, Britt-Marie; Richardson, Phil; Pritrsky, Jozef

    2009-12-01

    Deliverable 18 is focused on the principal components of risk communication strategies and based on actual experiences from different cultural settings in relation to nuclear waste management (NWM) issues. Essentially it describes how the ideas were presented and developed within the 3rd year of the ARGONA project, in sub-workpackage 4.1. The intention of this work was to delineate good risk communication approaches across national borders, as well as to specify the circumstances that require more specific and unique national or group considerations. Our aim was to provide an in-depth analysis of societal patterns and trends regarding the management of nuclear wastes on the basis of a number of individual participants' understanding and open discussion of the issue between themselves and across the heterogeneous groups represented. To meet these goals we involved a number of stakeholders from ARGONA participating countries (UK, Sweden, Slovakia, Czech Republic) in a one-day focus group in September 2009. Their task was to provide comments on the strategies for risk communication that have emanated from the various interest groups within the different countries. Another reason for their engagement was to elicit their comments on the central features of existing materials and thus point to any strengths and weaknesses associated with various risk communication techniques and more composite risk communication strategies. The results obtained reflect the opinions and sentiments related to risks and safety of various groups in civil society within the participating countries. We also believe that the work performed in D18 fits well into the transparency framework provided in the RISCOM model. This model was successfully used in Sweden and has actually also been applied in the Czech Republic within the ARGONA project. It was shown that if applied in practice this model has a high potential for improving transparency related to consensus building in the NWM area

  18. Short-term Canadian natural gas deliverability 2006-2008 : an energy market assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-10-01

    This report presented an assessment of the expected capability of Canadian gas production through to the year 2008. Strong natural gas prices have led to record drilling levels in Canada's natural gas industry. North American natural gas prices reached a peak near the end of 2005. The rise in prices during 2005 reflected high world crude oil prices, a tight balance between natural gas supply and demand, and disruptions to United States gas supply from 2 hurricanes. In response to rising prices, western Canada drilling activity achieved new highs in early 2006. Higher drilling rates also reflected rising costs for key inputs of steel, fuel, and labour. Gas prices have since softened due to a storage overhang resulting from a mild winter. The combination of rising costs and softening prices has impacted margins for Canadian gas producers. In response, some producers have reduced drilling expansion plans in coalbed methane (CBM) and shallow gas plays in the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin (WCSB). Increases in deeper gas drilling have been maintained. Total gas drilling for 2006 is expected to rise by 3 per cent compared to 2005. The report projected a small increase in Canada's total annual gas production from 484 million m 3 /d in 2005 to 491 million m 3 /d in 2008. Annual average deliverability of conventional gas is expected to decline slightly over the projection period. The decrease is expected to be more than offset by growth in CBM production in western Canada, which is expected to increase from 8 million m 3 /d in 2005 to 27 million m 3 /d in 2008. 5 tabs., 5 figs

  19. The iTREN-2030 reference scenario until 2030. Deliverable D4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiorello, Davide; De Stasio, Claudia; Koehler, Jonathan; Kraft, Markus; Netwon, Sean; Purwanto, Joko; Schade, Burkhard; Schade, Wolfgang; Szimba, Eckhard

    2009-07-01

    The basic objective of iTREN-2030 is to extend the forecasting and assessment capabilities of the TRANS-TOOLS transport model to the new policy issues arising from the technology, environment and energy fields. This is achieved by couplin the TRANS-TOOLS model with three other models, ASTRA, POLES and TREMOVE covering these new policy issues. The TRANS-TOOLS transport network model has been developed to constitute the reference tool for supporting transport policy in the EU and currently is being developed in several European projects. The scenario set-up to be developed in iTREN-2030 has been modified, so that the projects develops a reference scenario and an integrated scenario. For the reference scenario, the three other modelling tools are harmonised with TRANS-TOOLS and made consistent with each other. This results in a coherent scenario for Europe until 2030 for technology, transport, energy, environment and economic development. The integrated scenario will consider the changing framework conditions until 2030, inparticular the policy pressure coming from climate policy and the increasing scarcity of fossil fuels as well as the impact of the financial and economic crisis. Within the iTREN-2030 project, the overall objective of Work Package 4 (WP4) producing tis deliverable is to develop the reference scenario for the quantitative projections using the four modelling tools involved in the project. The main aims of WP4 are to (a) define a consistent framework for using the different tools in an integrated way; (b) calibrate models with exchanged input to a coherent joint reference; (c) implement external input from WP3 and running models for projections; (d) produce output procedures and templates to facilitate assessment in WP5.

  20. Multidimensional correlation among plan complexity, quality and deliverability parameters for volumetric-modulated arc therapy using canonical correlation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Lanxiao; Chen, Shan; Zhu, Xiaoyang; Han, Ce; Zheng, Xiaomin; Deng, Zhenxiang; Zhou, Yongqiang; Gong, Changfei; Xie, Congying; Jin, Xiance

    2018-03-01

    A multidimensional exploratory statistical method, canonical correlation analysis (CCA), was applied to evaluate the impact of complexity parameters on the plan quality and deliverability of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and to determine parameters in the generation of an ideal VMAT plan. Canonical correlations among complexity, quality and deliverability parameters of VMAT, as well as the contribution weights of different parameters were investigated with 71 two-arc VMAT nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) patients, and further verified with 28 one-arc VMAT prostate cancer patients. The average MU and MU per control point (MU/CP) for two-arc VMAT plans were 702.6 ± 55.7 and 3.9 ± 0.3 versus 504.6 ± 99.2 and 5.6 ± 1.1 for one-arc VMAT plans, respectively. The individual volume-based 3D gamma passing rates of clinical target volume (γCTV) and planning target volume (γPTV) for NPC and prostate cancer patients were 85.7% ± 9.0% vs 92.6% ± 7.8%, and 88.0% ± 7.6% vs 91.2% ± 7.7%, respectively. Plan complexity parameters of NPC patients were correlated with plan quality (P = 0.047) and individual volume-based 3D gamma indices γ(IV) (P = 0.01), in which, MU/CP and segment area (SA) per control point (SA/CP) were weighted highly in correlation with γ(IV) , and SA/CP, percentage of CPs with SA plan quality with coefficients of 0.98, 0.68 and -0.99, respectively. Further verification with one-arc VMAT plans demonstrated similar results. In conclusion, MU, SA-related parameters and PTV volume were found to have strong effects on the plan quality and deliverability.

  1. SiteChar. Characterisation of European CO2 storage. Deliverable D8.1. Qualitative and quantitative social site characterisations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunsting, S.; Pol, M.; Paukovic, M. [ECN Policy Studies, Energy research Centre of the Netherlands ECN, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kaiser, M.; Zimmer, R. [Unabhaengiges Institut fuer Umweltfragen UfU, Berlin (Germany); Shackley, S.; Mabon, L. [Scottish Carbon Capture and Storage SCCS, Edinburg, Scotland (United Kingdom); Hepplewhite, F.; Loveridge, R. [Energy Markets Unit, Scottish Government, Edinburg, Scotland (United Kingdom); Mazurowski, M.; Polak-Osiniak, D. [Polish Oil and Gas Company PGNiG, Warszawa (Poland); Rybicki, C. [AGH University of Science and Technology, Krakow (Poland)

    2012-10-15

    At local level, public support has proven crucial to the implementation of CO2 capture and storage (CCS) demonstration projects. Whereas no method exists to guarantee public acceptability of any project, a constructive stakeholder engagement process does increase the likelihood thereof. Social site characterisation can be used as an instrument to explore, plan and evaluate a process of active and constructive local stakeholder engagement in a prospective CCS project as a parallel activity to technical site characterisation. It roughly consists of a formative research phase to get acquainted with the area followed by a series of public information and engagement activities. This deliverable presents results from the first phase for the social site characterisations of a prospective CCS site in Poland (onshore) and the UK (offshore), using qualitative as well as quantitative research methods, as a first step to planning of local public engagement activities and evaluation of these activities that will be undertaken by this consortium at both sites in the near future. Although the term social site characterisation actually refers to the entire process of formative research and subsequent public outreach, and hence to the complete package of awareness work undertaken as part of SiteChar, in the present deliverable the term only refers to the formative research activities as undertaken up to now and as described in this deliverable. The qualitative part of the social site characterisation consisted of (1) a description of relevant social site characteristics such as local history; (2) interviews with relevant local stakeholders; (3) a media analysis of local newspapers. The quantitative part of the social site characterisation consisted of surveys using representative samples to characterise the local population in terms of awareness, knowledge and perceptions of CCS, felt involvement in decision making, extent of local activism, level of trust in representatives and

  2. Supplement to ACUMEN deliverable 5.4a: Description and comparison of indicators in Google Scholar and Web of Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wildgaard, Lorna Elizabeth; Larsen, Birger; Schneider, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    of individual researchers. In this report we begin by comparing database coverage, coverage at seniority and gender-level and then the performance of four basic indicators computed in both databases. In the main deliverable 5.4a, we investigate in a cluster analysis the performance of our previously identified......We collected publication and citation data in two databases to investigate the extent performance of author-level indicators are effected by choice of database, the stability of indicators across databases and ultimately to illustrate how differences in the computed indicators change our perception...

  3. CO2-emission trading and green markets for renewable electricity. WILMAR - deliverable 4.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azuma-Dicke, N.; Weber, C.; Morthorst, P.E.; Ravn, H.F.; Schmidt, R.

    2004-06-01

    This report is Deliverable 4.1 of the EU project 'Wind Power Integration in Liberalised Electricity Markets' (WILMAR) and de-scribes the application of two policy instruments, Tradable Emissions Permits (TEPs) and Tradable Green Certificates (TGCs) for electricity produced from renewable energy sources in the European Union and the implications for implementation in the Wilmar model. The introduction of a common emission-trading system in the EU is expected to have an upward effect on the spot prices at the electric-ity market. The variations of the spot price imply that some types of power generation may change the situation from earning money to losing money despite the increasing spot price. Heavy restrictions on emissions penalise the fossil-fuelled technologies significantly, and the associated increase in the spot price need not compensate for this. Therefore, a market of TEPs is expected to have a significant influence on the electricity spot price. However, the expected price level of TEPs are met with great uncertainty and a study of a number of economical studies shows a price span between zero and 270 USD per ton of CO 2 depending on the participation or non-participation of countries in the scheme. The price-determination at the TGC market is expected to be closely related to the price at the power spot market as the RE-producers of electricity will have expectations to the total price paid for the energy produced, i.e., for the price of electricity at the spot market plus the price per kWh obtained at the green certificate mar-ket. In the Wilmar model, the TGC market can either be handled exogenously, i.e., the increase in renewable capacity and an average annual TGC price are determined outside the model, or a simple TGC module is developed, including the long-term supply functions for the most relevant renewable technologies and an overall TGC quota. Both solutions are rather simple, but to develop a more advanced model for the TGC market seems to be

  4. Suggested Guidelines for Transparency and Participation in Nuclear Waste Management Programmes. Deliverable 22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonsson, Josefin Paeivioe; Andersson, Kjell; Bolado, Ricardo; Drottz Sjoeberg, Britt-Marie; Elam, Mark; Sundqvist, Goeran; Kojo, Matti; Meskens, Gaston; Pritrsky, Jozef; Richardson, Phil; Soneryd, Linda; Steinerova, Lucie; Szerszynski, Bronislaw; Wene, Clas-Otto; Vojtechova, Hana

    2010-02-01

    . Annex 2 gives references for the various sections of the guidelines to more background information in ARGONA deliverables and in the ARGONA Final Report. These guidelines concern nuclear waste management, however, this issue represents only one part of society's concerns in complex and controversial matters. The ARGONA participants believe that many of the following suggested guidelines should be of relevance in a much wider context than nuclear waste management only

  5. Evaluation, testing and application of participatory approaches in the Czech Republic. Guidelines on approaches to siting a deep repository. Deliverable D21

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vojtechova, Hana

    2009-10-01

    Based on the review of experiences in SEA and EIA in the Czech Republic summarized in Deliverable No.3 and the testing of novel participatory and dialogue approaches summarized in Deliverables No.7, 11 and 12 in this report a model for the siting process specifically in the Czech Republic, that takes into account the need for transparency and interaction with the public, within the framework of legal requirements is outlined. Lessons learnt are summarised and a road map specified. The guidelines / recommendations in this report are proposed based on mapping the situation in the Czech Republic and experience gained in connection with the testing and application of novel participatory approaches and dialogue, but many of them are of general validity and can be applied in other countries outside the Czech Republic. This reports links directly to Work package 6, where general guidelines for participation and transparency, reflecting institutional and cultural differences, are given - Deliverable No.22

  6. SiteChar. Characterisation of European CO2 storage. Deliverable D8.2. Trust building and raising public awareness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunsting, S.; Pol, M.; Mastop, E.A. [ECN Policy Studies, Energy research Centre of the Netherlands ECN, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kaiser, M.; Zimmer, R. [Unabhaengiges Institut fuer Umweltfragen UfU, Berlin (Germany); Shackley, S.; Mabon, L.; Howell, R. [Scottish Carbon Capture and Storage SCCS, Edinburg, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-15

    At local level, public support has proven crucial to the implementation of CO2 capture and storage (CCS) demonstration projects. Whereas no method exists to guarantee public acceptability of any project, a constructive stakeholder and community engagement process does increase the likelihood thereof. This deliverable is a follow-up to deliverable D8.1 'Social site characterisation'. Social site characterisation can be used as an instrument to explore, plan and evaluate a process of active and constructive local stakeholder and citizen engagement in a prospective CCS project as a parallel activity to technical site characterisation. It serves as an analytical tool to describe the local social circumstances in the area and to design and evaluate stakeholder and community engagement efforts with the aims of building trust and raising public awareness. Using results from the social site characterisation of the area, the present deliverable focuses on the second purpose. It presents results from public engagement activities designed to raise public awareness and inform public opinion of a prospective CCS site in Poland (onshore) and the UK (offshore): focus conferences. Furthermore, by initiating an enhanced cooperation in planning of new storage sites between project developers, authorities and the local public, focus conferences aim to serve as a 'hinge' between social site characterisation as a research effort and application to real-life project settings. The focus conferences are part of a range of public engagement activities including the setup of public information websites on generic and site-specific CCS, information meetings. A second survey eventually shall evaluate the results of the public engagement activities. The aim of the focus conferences was to raise public awareness and assist public opinion forming processes of a prospective CCS site in Poland (onshore) and the UK (offshore). At the same time, it aimed to present and test a

  7. Police Enforcement Policy and Programmes on European Roads (PEPPER). Deliverable 4a: Good practice in data, data collection and data use for monitoring and evaluating Traffic Law Enforcement.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schagen, I.N.L.G. Bernhoft, I.M. Erke, A. Ewert, U. Kallberg, V.-P. & Skladana, P.

    2008-01-01

    This report is the Deliverable of task 4.3a of the PEPPER project. It describes the good practice requirements regarding data, data collection and data use for monitoring and evaluating Traffic Law Enforcement (TLE). The aim is that, eventually, individual police forces/countries put the identified

  8. Preliminary guidelines for priority setting between measures, Deliverable 3.4 of the H2020 project SafetyCube (Safety CaUsation, Benefits and Efficiency).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martensen, H. Van den Berghe, W. Wijnen, W. Weijermars, W.A.M. Carnis, L. & Elvik, R.

    2017-01-01

    The present deliverable describes the economic assessment of counter measures. Cost-effectiveness analysis and cost-utility analysis are compared to cost-benefit analysis. Cost-effectiveness analysis helps to estimate the costs per prevented fatality or injury. To evaluate the effectiveness in terms

  9. Natural gas market assessment. Natural gas supply, western Canada: Recent developments (1982-1992), [and] short-term deliverability outlook (1993-1996)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-11-01

    A review is presented of the evolution of gas supply from western Canada over the last ten years and a short-term forecast of gas deliverability. To illustrate the changed supply conditions, selected trends and market developments are summarized, including trends in excess deliverability, changes in reserves, the regional distribution of cumulative production, the pace of tieing-in of previously discovered pools for production, the expansion in deliverability from gas storage reservoirs, and recent increases in drilling activity. On the basis of analyses and observations, it is concluded that estimated productive capacity is likely to exceed pipeline capacity on a peak-day basis by a narrow margin over 1993-96. Increasing deliverability from gas storage reservoirs located in the producing provinces is an important factor in handling peak day requirements. From time to time, high demand due to extreme weather conditions could result in pronounced tightness and price fluctuations similar to those seen in winter 1992/93. A strong economic recovery could also result in market tightness, depending on the speed and size of supply response. The growing estimates of resource potential in the western Canada sedimentary basin provide an encouraging indication of the availability of future supply. 29 figs., 3 tabs

  10. Identification of road user related risk factors, Deliverable 5.1 of the H2020 project SafetyCube (Safety CaUsation, Benefits and Efficiency).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filtness, A. & Papadimitriou, E. (Eds.) Leskovšek, B. Focant, N. Martensen, H. Sgarra, V. Usami, D.S. Soteropoulos, A. Stadlbauer, S. Theofilatos, A. Yannis, G. Ziakopoulos, A. Diamandouros, K. Durso, C. Goldenbeld, C. Loenis, B. Schermers, G. Petegem, J.-H. van Elvik, R. Hesjevoll, I.S. Quigley, C. & Papazikou, E.

    2017-01-01

    The present Deliverable (D5.1) describes the identification and evaluation of infrastructure related risk factors. It outlines the results of Task 5.1 of WP5 of SafetyCube, which aimed to identify and evaluate infrastructure related risk factors and related road safety problems by (i) presenting a

  11. Risk of injury by driving with alcohol and other drugs. Driving under the Influence of Drugs, Alcohol and Medicines DRUID, Deliverable 2.3.5.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hels, T. Bernhoft, I.M. Lyckegaard, A. Houwing, S. Hagenzieker, M.P. Legrand, S.-A. Isalberti, C. Van der Linden, T. & Verstraete, A.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this deliverable is to assess the risk of driving with alcohol, illicit drugs and medicines in various European countries. In total nine countries participated in the study on relative risk of serious injury/fatality while positive for psychoactive substances. Six countries

  12. Deliverable 7.1: Legal Framework and Legal Barriers to an Offshore HVDC Electricity Grid in the North Sea : Intermediate Report for Stakeholder Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhout, C.T.

    The present deliverable elaborates the current legal framework for offshore wind and grid development on international, European and national level. It is shown that often, the legal framework needs to be adapted in order to facilitate the development of a meshed offshore electricity grid. This is

  13. Rethinking the Business Model in Construction by the Use of Off-Site System Deliverance: Case of the Shaft Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Christian; Hvam, Lars

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a set of insights to be used in the development of business models for off-site system deliveries contributing to the development of Off-Site Manufacturing practices (OSM). The theoretical offset for discussing the development of business models is the blue ocean strategy...... of installation shafts. Findings from the development and production of the installation shaft show that system deliveries represent a promising strategy for moving from red ocean competitive environment with the predominant cost+ business model, to a blue ocean situation in which the competition emerges...... in the constant pursue of value creation and cost reduction. On the basis of that system deliverances represent a promising strategy in the future development and application of off-site manufacturing practices. The application of system deliveries is however demanding as it represents a fundamental shift...

  14. Data needs and computational requirements for asset management decision making. Internal deliverable ID5.2.1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Catrinu-Renstrom, Maria; Clement, Rémy; Tournebise, Pascal

    addressing to the requirements of RMAC criterion developed in work package 2. The report has been written by several partners, three of them being European TSOs, and the three other being academic partners. Special attention has been paid to address every topic in asset management decision making process......The objective of this deliverable is to present the requirements for adapting available tools/models and identifying data needs for reliability analysis and optimal decision-making for asset management decision making process. It will serve as a basis for the next tasks of GARPUR work package 5...... decision making process, as described in work package 2. Some advanced models exist in scientific literature to characterize the spatio-temporal variation and correlations of relevant factors. Some of these models have been proposed in academia, and offer improved representation with respect to those...

  15. SU-F-BRB-07: A Plan Comparison Tool to Ensure Robustness and Deliverability in Online-Adaptive Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, P; Labby, Z; Bayliss, R A; Geurts, M; Bayouth, J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a plan comparison tool that will ensure robustness and deliverability through analysis of baseline and online-adaptive radiotherapy plans using similarity metrics. Methods: The ViewRay MRIdian treatment planning system allows export of a plan file that contains plan and delivery information. A software tool was developed to read and compare two plans, providing information and metrics to assess their similarity. In addition to performing direct comparisons (e.g. demographics, ROI volumes, number of segments, total beam-on time), the tool computes and presents histograms of derived metrics (e.g. step-and-shoot segment field sizes, segment average leaf gaps). Such metrics were investigated for their ability to predict that an online-adapted plan reasonably similar to a baseline plan where deliverability has already been established. Results: In the realm of online-adaptive planning, comparing ROI volumes offers a sanity check to verify observations found during contouring. Beyond ROI analysis, it has been found that simply editing contours and re-optimizing to adapt treatment can produce a delivery that is substantially different than the baseline plan (e.g. number of segments increased by 31%), with no changes in optimization parameters and only minor changes in anatomy. Currently the tool can quickly identify large omissions or deviations from baseline expectations. As our online-adaptive patient population increases, we will continue to develop and refine quantitative acceptance criteria for adapted plans and relate them historical delivery QA measurements. Conclusion: The plan comparison tool is in clinical use and reports a wide range of comparison metrics, illustrating key differences between two plans. This independent check is accomplished in seconds and can be performed in parallel to other tasks in the online-adaptive workflow. Current use prevents large planning or delivery errors from occurring, and ongoing refinements will lead to

  16. SU-F-P-64: The Impact of Plan Complexity Parameters On the Plan Quality and Deliverability of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy with Canonical Correlation Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, X; Yi, J; Xie, C [The 1st Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of complexity indices on the plan quality and deliverability of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), and to determine the most significant parameters in the generation of an ideal VMAT plan. Methods: A multi-dimensional exploratory statistical method, canonical correlation analysis (CCA) was adopted to study the correlations between VMAT parameters of complexity, quality and deliverability, as well as their contribution weights with 32 two-arc VMAT nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) patients and 31 one-arc VMAT prostate cancer patients. Results: The MU per arc (MU/Arc) and MU per control point (MU/CP) of NPC were 337.8±25.2 and 3.7±0.3, respectively, which were significantly lower than those of prostate cancer patients (MU/Arc : 506.9±95.4, MU/CP : 5.6±1.1). The plan complexity indices indicated that two-arc VMAT plans were more complex than one-arc VMAT plans. Plan quality comparison confirmed that one-arc VMAT plans had a high quality than two-arc VMAT plans. CCA results implied that plan complexity parameters were highly correlated with plan quality with the first two canonical correlations of 0.96, 0.88 (both p<0.001) and significantly correlated with deliverability with the first canonical correlation of 0.79 (p<0.001), plan quality and deliverability was also correlated with the first canonical correlation of 0.71 (p=0.02). Complexity parameters of MU/CP, segment area (SA) per CP, percent of MU/CP less 3 and planning target volume (PTV) were weighted heavily in correlation with plan quality and deliveability . Similar results obtained from individual NPC and prostate CCA analysis. Conclusion: Relationship between complexity, quality, and deliverability parameters were investigated with CCA. MU, SA related parameters and PTV volume were found to have strong effect on the plan quality and deliverability. The presented correlation among different quantified parameters could be used to improve the plan quality and the efficiency

  17. TH-AB-202-03: A Novel Tool for Computing Deliverable Doses in Dynamic MLC Tracking Treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fast, M; Kamerling, C; Menten, M; Nill, S; Oelfke, U [The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Crijns, S; Raaymakers, B [University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In tracked dynamic multi-leaf collimator (MLC) treatments, segments are continuously adapted to the target centroid motion in beams-eye-view. On-the-fly segment adaptation, however, potentially induces dosimetric errors due to the finite MLC leaf width and non-rigid target motion. In this study, we outline a novel tool for computing the 4d dose of lung SBRT plans delivered with MLC tracking. Methods: The following automated workflow was developed: A) centroid tracking, where the initial segments are morphed to each 4dCT phase based on the beams-eye-view GTV shift (followed by a dose calculation on each phase); B) re-optimized tracking, in which all morphed initial plans from (A) are further optimised (“warm-started”) in each 4dCT phase using the initial optimisation parameters but phase-specific volume definitions. Finally, both dose sets are accumulated to the reference phase using deformable image registration. Initial plans were generated according to the RTOG-1021 guideline (54Gy, 3-Fx, equidistant 9-beam IMRT) on the peak-exhale (reference) phase of a phase-binned 4dCT. Treatment planning and delivery simulations were performed in RayStation (research v4.6) using our in-house segment-morphing algorithm, which directly links to RayStation through a native C++ interface. Results: Computing the tracking plans and 4d dose distributions via the in-house interface takes 5 and 8 minutes respectively for centroid and re-optimized tracking. For a sample lung SBRT patient with 14mm peak-to-peak motion in sup-inf direction, mainly perpendicular leaf motion (0-collimator) resulted in small dose changes for PTV-D95 (−13cGy) and GTV-D98 (+18cGy) for the centroid tracking case compared to the initial plan. Modest reductions of OAR doses (e.g. spinal cord D2: −11cGy) were achieved in the idealized tracking case. Conclusion: This study presents an automated “1-click” workflow for computing deliverable MLC tracking doses in RayStation. Adding a non-deliverable

  18. TH-AB-202-03: A Novel Tool for Computing Deliverable Doses in Dynamic MLC Tracking Treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fast, M; Kamerling, C; Menten, M; Nill, S; Oelfke, U; Crijns, S; Raaymakers, B

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In tracked dynamic multi-leaf collimator (MLC) treatments, segments are continuously adapted to the target centroid motion in beams-eye-view. On-the-fly segment adaptation, however, potentially induces dosimetric errors due to the finite MLC leaf width and non-rigid target motion. In this study, we outline a novel tool for computing the 4d dose of lung SBRT plans delivered with MLC tracking. Methods: The following automated workflow was developed: A) centroid tracking, where the initial segments are morphed to each 4dCT phase based on the beams-eye-view GTV shift (followed by a dose calculation on each phase); B) re-optimized tracking, in which all morphed initial plans from (A) are further optimised (“warm-started”) in each 4dCT phase using the initial optimisation parameters but phase-specific volume definitions. Finally, both dose sets are accumulated to the reference phase using deformable image registration. Initial plans were generated according to the RTOG-1021 guideline (54Gy, 3-Fx, equidistant 9-beam IMRT) on the peak-exhale (reference) phase of a phase-binned 4dCT. Treatment planning and delivery simulations were performed in RayStation (research v4.6) using our in-house segment-morphing algorithm, which directly links to RayStation through a native C++ interface. Results: Computing the tracking plans and 4d dose distributions via the in-house interface takes 5 and 8 minutes respectively for centroid and re-optimized tracking. For a sample lung SBRT patient with 14mm peak-to-peak motion in sup-inf direction, mainly perpendicular leaf motion (0-collimator) resulted in small dose changes for PTV-D95 (−13cGy) and GTV-D98 (+18cGy) for the centroid tracking case compared to the initial plan. Modest reductions of OAR doses (e.g. spinal cord D2: −11cGy) were achieved in the idealized tracking case. Conclusion: This study presents an automated “1-click” workflow for computing deliverable MLC tracking doses in RayStation. Adding a non-deliverable

  19. How the NDA Provides Transparency and Visibility of the Technical Deliverability of the R and D Programme - 13303

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seed, Ian; James, Paula; Brownridge, Melanie; McMinn, Mervin

    2013-01-01

    The Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) was created under the UK Energy Act 2004 to ensure the UK historic civil public sector nuclear legacy sites are decommissioned safely, securely, cost effectively and in ways that protect the environment. The delivery will involve carrying out many unique projects within a high hazard environment requiring the very highest standards in safety, security and environmental management. Unique problems require unique solutions and there is a substantial amount of research and development required for each project. The NDA's R and D strategic objective is to ensure that delivery of the NDA's mission is technically underpinned by sufficient and appropriate research and development. This drives a requirement to provide transparency and visibility of the technical deliverability of the programme through the technical baseline and accompanying research and development requirements. The NDA need to have confidence in the technical deliverability of the Site License Companies (SLCs) plans, provide overall visibility of R and D across the NDA Estate and ensure that appropriate R and D is being carried out in a timely manner. They need to identify where coordinated R and D programmes may be advantageous as a result of common needs, risks and opportunities and ensure key R and D needs across NDA are identified, prioritised and work programmes are costed and scheduled in the Lifetime Plans for individual sites and SLCs. Evidence of the Site License Company's approach and their corresponding technical underpinning programmes is achieved through submission of a number of outputs collectively known as TBuRDs (Technical Baseline and Underpinning Research and Development Requirements). This paper is a summary of the information generated by an independent review of those TBuRDs. It highlights some of the key messages, synergies and common R and D activities across the estate. It demonstrates the value of a consistent approach to collecting R

  20. Tank waste remediation system retrieval and disposal mission readiness-to-proceed guidance and requirements to deliverables crosswalk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, C.E.

    1998-01-01

    In September 1996, the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) initiated the first of a two-phase program to remediate waste storage in tanks at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Initiating the first phase, RL signed contracts with two private companies who agreed to receive and vitrify a portion of the tank waste in a demonstration and to return the vitrified product and by-products to the Project Management Hanford Contract (PHMC) team for disposition. The first phase of the overall remediation effort is a demonstration of treatment concepts, and the second phase includes treatment of the remaining tank wastes. The demonstration phase, Phase 1 of the project, is further subdivided into two parts, A and B. During Phase 1A, the vitrification contractors are to establish the technical, operational, regulatory, business, and financial elements required to provide treatment services on a fixed unit price basis. Phase 1A deliverables will be evaluated by RL to determine whether it is in the best interest of the government to have one or more vitrification contractors proceed with Phase 1B, in which 6% to 13% of the tank waste would be treated in the demonstration. In addition, before RL can authorize proceeding with Phase 1B, the PHMC team must demonstrate its readiness to retrieve and deliver the waste to the private contractor(s) and to receive and dispose of the products and by-products returned from the treatment. The PHMC team has organized their plans for providing these vitrification-support services into the Retrieval and Disposal Mission within the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Project. Three RL core teams were established to assist in evaluating the PHMC team's readiness specifically in regard to three task areas: Waste feed delivery; Infrastructure and by-products delivery; and Immobilized products. The core teams each developed a set of criteria and plans to be used in evaluating the PHMC team's readiness to proceed (RTP)

  1. Simulation of Porous Medium Hydrogen Storage - Estimation of Storage Capacity and Deliverability for a North German anticlinal Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B.; Bauer, S.; Pfeiffer, W. T.

    2015-12-01

    Large scale energy storage will be required to mitigate offsets between electric energy demand and the fluctuating electric energy production from renewable sources like wind farms, if renewables dominate energy supply. Porous formations in the subsurface could provide the large storage capacities required if chemical energy carriers such as hydrogen gas produced during phases of energy surplus are stored. This work assesses the behavior of a porous media hydrogen storage operation through numerical scenario simulation of a synthetic, heterogeneous sandstone formation formed by an anticlinal structure. The structural model is parameterized using data available for the North German Basin as well as data given for formations with similar characteristics. Based on the geological setting at the storage site a total of 15 facies distributions is generated and the hydrological parameters are assigned accordingly. Hydraulic parameters are spatially distributed according to the facies present and include permeability, porosity relative permeability and capillary pressure. The storage is designed to supply energy in times of deficiency on the order of seven days, which represents the typical time span of weather conditions with no wind. It is found that using five injection/extraction wells 21.3 mio sm³ of hydrogen gas can be stored and retrieved to supply 62,688 MWh of energy within 7 days. This requires a ratio of working to cushion gas of 0.59. The retrievable energy within this time represents the demand of about 450000 people. Furthermore it is found that for longer storage times, larger gas volumes have to be used, for higher delivery rates additionally the number of wells has to be increased. The formation investigated here thus seems to offer sufficient capacity and deliverability to be used for a large scale hydrogen gas storage operation.

  2. SU-G-BRC-02: A Novel Multi-Criteria Optimization Approach to Generate Deliverable Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) Treatment Plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirlik, G; D’Souza, W; Zhang, H [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To present a novel multi-criteria optimization (MCO) solution approach that generates treatment plans with deliverable apertures using column generation. Methods: We demonstrate our method with 10 locally advanced head-and-neck cancer cases retrospectively. In our MCO formulation, we defined an objective function for each structure in the treatment volume. This resulted in 9 objective functions, including 3 distinct objectives for primary target volume, high-risk and low-risk target volumes, 5 objectives for each of the organs-at-risk (OARs) (two parotid glands, spinal cord, brain stem and oral cavity), and one for the non-target non-OAR normal tissue. Conditional value-at-risk (CVaR) constraints were utilized to ensure at least certain fraction of the target volumes receiving the prescription doses. To directly generate deliverable plans, column generation algorithm was embedded within our MCO approach for aperture shape generation. Final dose distributions for all plans were generated using a Monte Carlo kernel-superposition dose calculation. We compared the MCO plans with the clinical plans, which were created by clinicians. Results: At least 95% target coverage was achieved by both MCO plans and clinical plans. However, the average conformity indices of clinical plans and the MCO plans were 1.95 and 1.35, respectively (31% reduction, p<0.01). Compared to the conventional clinical plan, the proposed MCO method achieved average reductions in left parotid mean dose of 5% (p=0.06), right parotid mean dose of 18% (p<0.01), oral cavity mean dose of 21% (p=0.03), spinal cord maximum dose of 20% (p<0.01), brain stem maximum dose of 61% (p<0.01), and normal tissue maximum dose of 5% (p<0.01), respectively. Conclusion: We demonstrated that the proposed MCO method was able to obtain deliverable IMRT treatment plans while achieving significant improvements in dosimetric plan quality.

  3. Wavetrain 2 : Deliverable 28

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chozas, Julia Fernandez

    Denmark (the Danish TSO) and counts with the interest and collaboration of the wave device developers Pelamis, Wave Dragon and Wavestar. The second case study assesses the macro-economic impact of the introduction of a 100MW farm in Portugal. An Input-Output model based on Leontief theory was developed...... (HMRC) and Hans C. Sorensen (SPOK). It included 3 main parts: a first introduction to microeconomics at project level, a second practical session on the use of economic model Retscreen and a final session introducing macro and socio-economic aspects....

  4. Deliverable 2.2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarabanis, Konstantinos; Efthimios, Tambouris; Zotou, Maria

    2016-01-01

    etc. The report also presents the OD-PBL design pathway, which is a further development of the OD-PBL methodological recommendations presented in the D2.1. This design pathway aims to guide educators when designing learning processes that aim to teach OD by utilizing the PBL learning strategy......The work carried out resulted in the description of the LA field and in the presentation of a total of 18 LA tools that can analyse educational data that can be utilized in the project to support multiple PBL aspects, such as feedback, reflection, self-driven learning, collaboration, application....... The pathway consists of 6 main steps, i.e. Analysis, Gathering of inputs, Design, Development, Implementation and Reflection. Each step provides guidelines on how to plan an OD course and learning processes, and combines all previous project results from D1.1, D1.2, D1.3 and D2.1. Finally, the report presents...

  5. Saph Pani deliverables

    OpenAIRE

    Saph Pani

    2016-01-01

    Summary Saph Pani was an India-EU collaborative project with a duration of three years. The project aimed to improve natural water treatment systems such as bank filtration (BF), managed aquifer recharge (MAR) and natural treatment systems (NTS) for wastewater treatment (e.g. constructed wetlands) in India by building on a combination of local and international expertise. An enhancement of water resources and water supply, particularly in water stressed urban and peri-urban areas was targ...

  6. Bioclim Deliverable D3: global climatic features over the next million years and recommendation for specific situations to be considered

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The BIOCLIM project aims at assessing the possible long-term impacts of climate change on the safety of waste repositories in deep formations using climate simulations of the long-term climate in various European areas. One of the objectives of the project is to develop two strategies for representing sequential climatic changes to the geosphere-biosphere system for different sites over Europe, addressing the time scale of one million years. The results of this work will be interpreted in terms of global or regional changes of climate and of vegetation. The first strategy (hierarchical strategy) will use the full hierarchy of existing climate models (a climate model is a numerical simplified representation of the climate system behaviour and evolution). Simple models (LLN 2-D NH and threshold models; see the description here after) will simulate the overall long-term evolution of the global climate. Their results will then be used as inputs to more complex models (LMD climate models possibly coupled with vegetation models, either SECHIBA or ORCHIDE) and finally climate and vegetation cover will be determined for specific sites at specific times. A second strategy (integrated strategy) will consist in building an integrated climate model, which represents most of the physical mechanisms for studying long-term climatic variations. The results will then be interpreted on a regional scale. This deliverable is the first step of the hierarchical strategy. The purpose of this deliverable is to identify and justify some specific climatic situations amongst different long-term simulations that are of interest for assessing the safety of radioactive waste repository sites and that will be further studied with GCMs (General Circulation Model). The simple threshold (or multi-state) climate model is a modified version of the model from Paillard. It describes the time evolution of the ice volume and the CO 2 concentration. It has two distinct regimes (interglacial and glacial

  7. Bioclim Deliverable D4/5: global climatic characteristics, including vegetation and seasonal cycles over Europe, for snapshots over the next 200,000 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the BIOCLIM project is to develop and present techniques that can be used to develop self-consistent patterns of possible future climate changes over the next million years (climate scenarios), and to demonstrate how these climate scenarios can be used in assessments of the long-term safety of nuclear waste repository sites. Within the project, two strategies are implemented to predict climate change. The first is the hierarchical strategy, in which a hierarchy of climate models is used to investigate the evolution of climate over the period of interest. These models vary from very simple 2-D and threshold models, which simulate interactions between only a few aspects of the earth system, through general circulation models (GCMs) and vegetation models, which simulate in great detail the dynamics and physics of the atmosphere, ocean, and biosphere, to regional models, which focus in particular on the European region and the specific areas of interest. The second strategy is the integrated strategy, in which intermediate complexity climate models are developed, and used to consecutively simulate the development of the earth system over many millennia. Although these models are relatively simple compared to a GCM, they are more advanced than 2D models, and do include physical descriptions of the biosphere, cryo-sphere, atmosphere and ocean. This deliverable, D4/5, focuses on the hierarchical strategy, and in particular the GCM and vegetation model simulation of possible future climates. Deliverable D3 documented the first step in this strategy. The Louvain-la-Neuve 2-D climate model (LLN-2D) was used to estimate (among other variables) annual mean temperatures and ice volume in the Northern Hemisphere over the next 1 million years. It was driven by the calculated evolution of orbital parameters, and plausible scenarios of CO 2 concentration. From the results, 3 future time periods within the next 200,000 years were identified as being extreme, that is

  8. Bioclim Deliverable D6a: regional climatic characteristics for the European sites at specific times: the dynamical down-scaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    many millennia. These results are then interpreted in terms of regional climatic changes using rule-based and statistical down-scaling approaches. This deliverable, D6a, focuses on the hierarchical strategy, and in particular the MAR simulations. According to the hierarchical strategy developed in the BIOCLIM project to predict future climate, six BIOCLIM experiments were run with the MAR model. In addition to these experiments a baseline experiment, presenting the present-day climate simulated by MAR, was also undertaken. In the first step of the hierarchical strategy the LLN 2-D NH climate model simulated the gross features of the climate of the next 1 Myr. Six snapshot experiments were selected from these results. In a second step a GCM and a biosphere model were used to simulate in more detail the climate of the selected time periods. These simulations were performed on a global scale. The third step of the procedure is to derive the regional features of the climate at the same time periods. Therefore the results of the GCM are used as boundary conditions to force the regional climate model (MAR) for the six selected periods and the baseline simulation. The control simulation (baseline) corresponds to the regional climate simulated under present-day conditions, both insolation forcing and atmospheric CO 2 concentration. All the BIOCLIM simulations are compared to that baseline simulation. In addition, other comparisons will also be presented

  9. SiteChar. Characterisation of European CO2 storage. Deliverable 8.4. Quantitative social site characterisations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunsting, S.; Mastop, E.A. [ECN Policy Studies, Energy research Centre of the Netherlands ECN, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kaiser, M.; Zimmer, R. [Unabhaengiges Institut fuer Umweltfragen UfU, Berlin (Germany)

    2013-06-15

    This report describes the results of the last stage of the in-depth social site characterisation activities at two prospective CCS sites as part of the SiteChar project: a CCS onshore site and a CCS offshore site. The onshore site is the Zalecze and Zuchlow site application (Poland - WP5) and the offshore site is the North Sea Moray Firth site (UK - WP3). This deliverable describes the results from a repeated quantitative measurement of local awareness, knowledge, and perceptions of CCS at both sites using representative surveys. For comparison and discussion of all SiteChar WP8 results we refer to the final summary report D8.5. The 2nd survey showed some interesting results. First of all, awareness of CCS was still very low. While in the UK around half of the respondents had at least heard of local plans for CCS, in Poland this was only 21%. It seems that awareness in the UK was mostly induced by specific plans in the area that were abandoned in the course of the SiteChar project. Second, it seems that on the whole the local publics were rather positive about CCS. Most respondents expected a positive impact of CCS on the region. In the UK, arguments for that were mainly economic, while in Poland arguments were mainly related to environmental concerns. Although there are some worries about risks of leakage, especially at the onshore site in Poland, people think that authorities will properly regulate CCS and monitor the safety of CCS. Expectations were mostly that it would be good for the country and that it will help reach international targets for CO2 reduction and buy time to develop renewable energy. Respondents seemed uncertain about the costs of using CCS and whether the technique is ready for widespread use. Especially in Poland people seemed to agree that CCS is essential for tackling climate change. Most differences between the two sites may be attributed to the proximity of the site to the local community. The Polish site is onshore and therefore much

  10. Recording Cultural Heritage Using Terrestrial Laserscanning - Dealing with the System, the Huge Datasets they Create and Ways to Extract the Necessary Deliverables you can Work with

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christofori, E.; Bierwagen, J.

    2013-07-01

    Recording Cultural Heritage objects using terrestrial laserscanning becomes more and more popular over the last years. Since terrestrial Laserscanning System (TLS) Manufacturers have strongly increased the amount and speed of data captured with a single scan at each system upgrade and cutting down system costs the use of TLS Systems for recording cultural heritage is an option for recording worth to think about beside traditional methods like Photogrammetric. TLS Systems can be a great tool for capturing complex cultural heritage object within a short amount of time beside the traditional methods but can be a nightmare to handle for further process if not used right while capturing. Furthermore TLS Systems still have to be recognized as survey equipment, even though some of the manufactures promote them as everyday tool. They have to be used in an intelligent way having in mind the clients and the individual cultural objects needs. Thus the efficient way to use TLS Systems for data recording becomes a relevant topic to deal with the huge Amount of data the Systems collect while recording. Already small projects can turn into huge Pointcloud Datasets that End user, like Architects or Archaeologist neither can't deal with as their technical equipment doesn't fit the requirements of the Dataset nor do they have the software tools to use the Data as the current software tools still are high prized. Even the necessary interpretation of the Dataset can be a tough task if the people who have to work on with the Pointcloud aren't educated right in order to understand TLS and the results it creates. The use of TLS Systems has to have in mind the project requirements of the individual Heritage Object, like the required accuracy, standards for Levels of Details (e.g. "Empfehlungen für die Baudokumentation, Günther Eckstein, Germany"), the required kind of Deliverables (Visualization, 2D Drawings, True Deformation Drawings, 3D Models, BIM or 4D - Animations) as well as the

  11. RECORDING CULTURAL HERITAGE USING TERRESTRIAL LASERSCANNING – DEALING WITH THE SYSTEM, THE HUGE DATASETS THEY CREATE AND WAYS TO EXTRACT THE NECESSARY DELIVERABLES YOU CAN WORK WITH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Christofori

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Recording Cultural Heritage objects using terrestrial laserscanning becomes more and more popular over the last years. Since terrestrial Laserscanning System (TLS Manufacturers have strongly increased the amount and speed of data captured with a single scan at each system upgrade and cutting down system costs the use of TLS Systems for recording cultural heritage is an option for recording worth to think about beside traditional methods like Photogrammetric. TLS Systems can be a great tool for capturing complex cultural heritage object within a short amount of time beside the traditional methods but can be a nightmare to handle for further process if not used right while capturing. Furthermore TLS Systems still have to be recognized as survey equipment, even though some of the manufactures promote them as everyday tool. They have to be used in an intelligent way having in mind the clients and the individual cultural objects needs. Thus the efficient way to use TLS Systems for data recording becomes a relevant topic to deal with the huge Amount of data the Systems collect while recording. Already small projects can turn into huge Pointcloud Datasets that End user, like Architects or Archaeologist neither can't deal with as their technical equipment doesn't fit the requirements of the Dataset nor do they have the software tools to use the Data as the current software tools still are high prized. Even the necessary interpretation of the Dataset can be a tough task if the people who have to work on with the Pointcloud aren't educated right in order to understand TLS and the results it creates. The use of TLS Systems has to have in mind the project requirements of the individual Heritage Object, like the required accuracy, standards for Levels of Details (e.g. "Empfehlungen für die Baudokumentation, Günther Eckstein, Germany", the required kind of Deliverables (Visualization, 2D Drawings, True Deformation Drawings, 3D Models, BIM or 4D

  12. Evaluation of dose prediction errors and optimization convergence errors of deliverable-based head-and-neck IMRT plans computed with a superposition/convolution dose algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihaylov, I. B.; Siebers, J. V.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate dose prediction errors (DPEs) and optimization convergence errors (OCEs) resulting from use of a superposition/convolution dose calculation algorithm in deliverable intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) optimization for head-and-neck (HN) patients. Thirteen HN IMRT patient plans were retrospectively reoptimized. The IMRT optimization was performed in three sequential steps: (1) fast optimization in which an initial nondeliverable IMRT solution was achieved and then converted to multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf sequences; (2) mixed deliverable optimization that used a Monte Carlo (MC) algorithm to account for the incident photon fluence modulation by the MLC, whereas a superposition/convolution (SC) dose calculation algorithm was utilized for the patient dose calculations; and (3) MC deliverable-based optimization in which both fluence and patient dose calculations were performed with a MC algorithm. DPEs of the mixed method were quantified by evaluating the differences between the mixed optimization SC dose result and a MC dose recalculation of the mixed optimization solution. OCEs of the mixed method were quantified by evaluating the differences between the MC recalculation of the mixed optimization solution and the final MC optimization solution. The results were analyzed through dose volume indices derived from the cumulative dose-volume histograms for selected anatomic structures. Statistical equivalence tests were used to determine the significance of the DPEs and the OCEs. Furthermore, a correlation analysis between DPEs and OCEs was performed. The evaluated DPEs were within ±2.8% while the OCEs were within 5.5%, indicating that OCEs can be clinically significant even when DPEs are clinically insignificant. The full MC-dose-based optimization reduced normal tissue dose by as much as 8.5% compared with the mixed-method optimization results. The DPEs and the OCEs in the targets had correlation coefficients greater

  13. APOLLON. Multi-APprOach for high efficiency integrated and inteLLigent cONcentrating PV modules (Systems). Deliverable 7.10. Publication of environmental LCI dataset

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, C.L. [ECN Solar Energy, Petten (Netherlands)

    2013-10-15

    This deliverable makes available the life-cycle inventory used to calculate the energy payback time and the carbon footprint of the Apollon final concentrating photovoltaics (CPV) design developed.. The data below relates to one Apollon module. The results are to be published in Environmental Science and Technology, in a paper, 'Sustainability of Materials and Costs of Materials in a Mirror-based Concentrating Photovoltaic System'. Reference is made to the results for the Spectrolab triple junction solar cell in the following two studies: (1) 'Life cycle assessment of high-concentration photovoltaic systems' (Prog. Photovolt: Res. Appl., vol. 21, pp. 379-388, 2013), and (2) 'Life Cycle Analysis of Two New Concentrator PV Systems', in 23rd European Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conference, Valencia, Spain, 2008.

  14. Towards implementation of transparency and participation in radioactive waste management programmes. ARGONA Final Summary Report. Deliverable 23b

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonsson, Josefin Paeivioe; Andersson, Kjell; Bolado, Ricardo; Drottz Sjoeberg, Britt-Marie; Elam, Mark; Sundqvist, Goeran; Kojo, Matti; Meskens, Gaston; Pritrsky, Jozef; Richardson, Phil; Soneryd, Linda; Steinerova, Lucie; Szerszynski, Bronislaw; Wene, Clas-Otto; Vojtechova, Hana

    2010-02-01

    organization. In such a case, it may be better to clarify the different aims of the two processes . The suggested guidelines in ARGONA Deliverable No. 22 give more advice on how mediation by demonstration and mediation by dialogue can be used and combined. It is evident that participative processes and transparency arenas can improve the quality of societal decision making in specific situations. But, as we have seen any project or programme with this purpose has it limits. Then somehow, society should be able to continue the process in a wider context than the explicit decision situations where transparency arenas take place. This wider context, or philosophical orientation, which we call reflexivity has two meanings; reflexivity as 'contextualisation' or 'becoming aware of how knowledge is produced', and reflexivity' in the meaning of 'self-confrontation' to become aware of the potential of and limits to own knowledge and own role in a discourse setting. Based on the analysis made in ARGONA it is recommended that formally organised transparency arenas should become a universal norm that should inspire and steer the practical political organisation of governance. For any decision making process, to be legitimate it needs to have a certain degree of trust among those affected, those participating and citizens at large. If a stakeholder does not trust the organization of a particular deliberative or transparency setting he will not take part and immediately it will lose legitimacy. This project highlighted four elements in building trust: 1) a jointly agreed aim to gain insight into the complexity of radioactive waste management, 2) real justification meaning that there is a real chance for stakeholders to influence the process, 3) looking back for understating 'why things went the way they went', and 4) adaptability of a decision process to the social and physical reality including reversibility of decisions

  15. MO-D-16A-01: International Day of Medical Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, K; Damilakis, J

    2014-01-01

    International Organization for Medical Physics (IOMP) which represents medical physicists in more than 80 countries decided to celebrate 7th November, birth date of the Polish and naturalized-French physicist Marie Sklodowska-Curie, as International Day of Medical Physics (IDMP). The main purpose of the initiative is to raise the visibility and awareness of medical physicist in the global community, to introduce ourselves to the general public, and bring a message to the community that a group of health professionals, the medical physicists are there to help the patients and other health professionals. First celebration was done in 2013 and now IDMP will be celebrated every year. The theme of IDMP will be different each year. The theme for 2013 was ‘Radiation exposure from medical procedures, ask the Medical Physicist’. The inaugural event was celebrated in 23 countries and the amount of attention gained was remarkable. Main IDMP events were held in Poland, birthplace of Marie Curie, and France, workplace of Marie Curie. This year IOMP celebrates the 2nd IDMP and theme will be ‘Looking into the body-Advancement in Imaging through Medical Physics’ to draw attention to the profound contributions Medical Physics has made to the use of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation for the imaging of human body. A number of countries have informed about events that they are going to organize on IDMP. This gives wide attention to medical physics globally. AAPM is a major and important member of IOMP. It is hoped that AAPM will join in organizing activities. Learning Objectives: To learn about International Day of Medical Physics To become familiar with how first IDMP was celebrated in 2013 and learning achieved To understand on future plans for IDMPs

  16. MO-D-16A-01: International Day of Medical Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, K [Hong Kong Sanatorium ' Hospital, Happy Valley (Hong Kong); Damilakis, J [University of Crete, Crete, CRETE (Greece)

    2014-06-15

    International Organization for Medical Physics (IOMP) which represents medical physicists in more than 80 countries decided to celebrate 7th November, birth date of the Polish and naturalized-French physicist Marie Sklodowska-Curie, as International Day of Medical Physics (IDMP). The main purpose of the initiative is to raise the visibility and awareness of medical physicist in the global community, to introduce ourselves to the general public, and bring a message to the community that a group of health professionals, the medical physicists are there to help the patients and other health professionals. First celebration was done in 2013 and now IDMP will be celebrated every year. The theme of IDMP will be different each year. The theme for 2013 was ‘Radiation exposure from medical procedures, ask the Medical Physicist’. The inaugural event was celebrated in 23 countries and the amount of attention gained was remarkable. Main IDMP events were held in Poland, birthplace of Marie Curie, and France, workplace of Marie Curie. This year IOMP celebrates the 2nd IDMP and theme will be ‘Looking into the body-Advancement in Imaging through Medical Physics’ to draw attention to the profound contributions Medical Physics has made to the use of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation for the imaging of human body. A number of countries have informed about events that they are going to organize on IDMP. This gives wide attention to medical physics globally. AAPM is a major and important member of IOMP. It is hoped that AAPM will join in organizing activities. Learning Objectives: To learn about International Day of Medical Physics To become familiar with how first IDMP was celebrated in 2013 and learning achieved To understand on future plans for IDMPs.

  17. The effect of stent coating on stent deliverability: direct randomised comparison of drug eluting and bare metal stents using the same stent platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siminiak, Tomasz; Link, Rafał; Wołoszyn, Maciej; Kałmucki, Piotr; Baszko, Artur

    2012-01-01

    There is certain experimental and clinical evidence indicating that the covering of bare metal stents (BMS) with drug eluting polymers to produce drug eluting stents (DES) results in increased stent stiffness and modifies the mechanical properties of the stent platform. In addition, it has been speculated that the mechanical performance of DES, compared to BMS, may be related to the type of polymer used to cover stents. We aimed at evaluating the deliverability of DES with a lactate based biodegradable polymer and BMS in patients with stable coronary artery disease in a prospective randomised study. One hundred eleven consecutive patients (age: 36-77, mean 58.8 years) scheduled for routine angioplasty due to stable coronary disease were randomised to receive BMS (Chopin II(TM), Balton, Poland) or paclitaxel eluting stent (Chopin Luc(TM), Balton, Poland) using the same metal platform. Only patients scheduled for angioplasty using the direct implantation technique of a single stent were randomised. The exclusion criteria included patients 〉 80 years, multivessel disease and reference diameter of the target vessel 〉 3.5 mm. In the BMS group (n = 55; 35 males and 20 females), the mean diameter of implanted stents was 3.09 ± 0.40 and the mean length was 11.37 ± 2.80, whereas in the DES group (n = 56; 34 males and 22 females) the mean stent sizes were 3.02 ± 0.34 and 17.90 ± 7.38 mm, respectively (p 〉 0.05 for length). The groups did not significantly differ regarding the frequency of stent implantation to particular coronary vessels. The direct stenting technique was attempted and failed, leading to the stents' implantation after predilatation in five patients in the BMS group and six patients in the DES group. Failure of stent implantation and subsequent implantation of another stent type was observed in no BMS patients and in one DES patient (NS). Although stent covering with lactate based drug eluting polymer may increase its stiffness, it does not affect

  18. Capacity Development and Strengthening for Energy Policy formulation and implementation of Sustainable Energy Projects in Indonesia CASINDO. Deliverable No. 27. Biogas Construction Plan in Segoroyoso Village Yogyakarta Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesmana, Surya Budi; Putra, Sri Atmaja [Muhammadiyah University of Yogyakarta, Yogyakarta (Indonesia)

    2011-10-15

    The overall objective of the CASINDO programme is to establish a self-sustaining and self-developing structure at both the national and regional level to build and strengthen human capacity to enable the provinces of North Sumatra, Yogyakarta, Central Java, West Nusa Tenggara (WNT) and Papua to formulate sound policies for renewable energy and energy efficiency and to develop and implement sustainable energy projects. To achieve the CASINDO objective seven Technical Working Groups have been established with the aim to conduct the technical activities under the various work packages and to produce the agreed deliverables. This report presents results from Technical Working Group IV on Renewable Energy project development. Its main aims were: To identify suitable non-hydro RE projects that can be developed in the province; To conduct an energy needs assessment in a selected location; To develop a business plan for a proposed solution to the identified main energy problem of the target community; To identify potential investors; To construct the project.

  19. Transcriptome Profiling of Neovascularized Corneas Reveals miR-204 as a Multi-target Biotherapy Deliverable by rAAVs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Lu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Corneal neovascularization (NV is the major sight-threatening pathology caused by angiogenic stimuli. Current drugs that directly target pro-angiogenic factors to inhibit or reverse the disease require multiple rounds of administration and have limited efficacies. Here, we identify potential anti-angiogenic corneal microRNAs (miRNAs and demonstrate a framework that employs discovered miRNAs as biotherapies deliverable by recombinant adeno-associated viruses (rAAVs. By querying differentially expressed miRNAs in neovascularized mouse corneas induced by alkali burn, we have revealed 39 miRNAs that are predicted to target more than 5,500 differentially expressed corneal mRNAs. Among these, we selected miR-204 and assessed its efficacy and therapeutic benefit for treating injured corneas. Our results show that delivery of miR-204 by rAAV normalizes multiple novel target genes and biological pathways to attenuate vascularization of injured mouse cornea. Importantly, this gene therapy treatment alternative is efficacious and safe for mitigating corneal NV. Overall, our work demonstrates the discovery of potential therapeutic miRNAs in corneal disorders and their translation into viable treatment alternatives.

  20. Bioclim Deliverable D8b: development of the physical/statistical down-scaling methodology and application to climate model Climber for BIOCLIM Work-package 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The overall aim of BIOCLIM is to assess the possible long term impacts due to climate change on the safety of radioactive waste repositories in deep formations. The main aim of this deliverable is to provide time series of climatic variables at the high resolution as needed by performance assessment (PA) of radioactive waste repositories, on the basis of coarse output from the CLIMBER-GREMLINS climate model. The climatological variables studied here are long-term (monthly) mean temperature and precipitation, as these are the main variables of interest for performance assessment. CLIMBER-GREMLINS is an earth-system model of intermediate complexity (EMIC), designed for long climate simulations (glacial cycles). Thus, this model has a coarse resolution (about 50 degrees in longitude) and other limitations which are sketched in this report. For the purpose of performance assessment, the climatological variables are required at scales pertinent for the knowledge of the conditions at the depository site. In this work, the final resolution is that of the best available global gridded present-day climatology, which is 1/6 degree in both longitude and latitude. To obtain climate-change information at this high resolution on the basis of the climate model outputs, a 2-step down-scaling method is designed. First, physical considerations are used to define variables which are expected to have links which climatological values; secondly a statistical model is used to find the links between these variables and the high-resolution climatology of temperature and precipitation. Thus the method is termed as 'physical/statistical': it involves physically based assumptions to compute predictors from model variables and then relies on statistics to find empirical links between these predictors and the climatology. The simple connection of coarse model results to regional values can not be done on a purely empirical way because the model does not provide enough information - it is both

  1. Bioclim deliverable D8a: development of the rule-based down-scaling methodology for BIOCLIM Work-package 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The BIOCLIM project on modelling sequential Biosphere systems under Climate change for radioactive waste disposal is part of the EURATOM fifth European framework programme. The project was launched in October 2000 for a three-year period. The project aims at providing a scientific basis and practical methodology for assessing the possible long term impacts on the safety of radioactive waste repositories in deep formations due to climate and environmental change. Five work packages (WP) have been identified to fulfill the project objectives. One of the tasks of BIOCLIM WP3 was to develop a rule-based approach for down-scaling from the MoBidiC model of intermediate complexity in order to provide consistent estimates of monthly temperature and precipitation for the specific regions of interest to BIOCLIM (Central Spain, Central England and Northeast France, together with Germany and the Czech Republic). A statistical down-scaling methodology has been developed by Philippe Marbaix of CEA/LSCE for use with the second climate model of intermediate complexity used in BIOCLIM - CLIMBER-GREMLINS. The rule-based methodology assigns climate states or classes to a point on the time continuum of a region according to a combination of simple threshold values which can be determined from the coarse scale climate model. Once climate states or classes have been defined, monthly temperature and precipitation climatologies are constructed using analogue stations identified from a data base of present-day climate observations. The most appropriate climate classification for BIOCLIM purposes is the Koeppen/Trewartha scheme. This scheme has the advantage of being empirical, but only requires monthly averages of temperature and precipitation as input variables. Section 2 of this deliverable (D8a) outline how each of the eight methodological steps have been undertaken for each of the three main BIOCLIM study regions (Central England, Northeast France and Central Spain) using Mo

  2. Diabetes ongoing sustainable care and treatment (DOST: A strategy for informational deliverance through visual dynamic modules sustained by near peer mentoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankur Joshi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The informational continuity for a diabetic patient is of paramount importance. This study on a pilot basis explores the process utility of structured educational modular sessions grounded on the principle of near-peer mentoring. Methodology: Visual modules were prepared for diabetic patients. These modules were instituted to 25 diabetic patients in logical sequences. In the next phase, 4 persons of these 25 patients were designated as diabetic-diabetes ongoing sustainable care and treatment (DOST. Each diabetic-DOST was clubbed with two patients for modular session and informational deliverance during the next 7 days. Process analysis was performed with “proxy-indicators,” namely, monthly glycemic status, knowledge assessment scores, and quality of life. Data were analyzed by interval estimates and through nonparametric analysis. Results: Nonparametric analysis indicated a significant improvement in glycemic status in terms with fasting blood sugar (W = 78 z = 3.04, P = 0.002, 2 h-postprandial blood sugar (W = 54, z = 2.01, P = 0.035, and in knowledge score (c2 = 19.53, df = 3; P = 0.0002. Quality of life score showed significant improvement in 2 out of 7 domains, namely, satisfaction with treatment ([difference in mean score = 1.40 [1.94 to 0.85] and symptom botherness (difference in mean score = 0.98 [1.3–0.65]. Conclusion: Because of inherent methodological limitations and innate biases, at this juncture no conclusive statement can be drawn. Although, primitive process evidences indicate the promising role of the diabetic-DOST strategy.

  3. Diabetes ongoing sustainable care and treatment (DOST): A strategy for informational deliverance through visual dynamic modules sustained by near peer mentoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Ankur; Arutagi, Vishwanath; Nahar, Nitin; Tiwari, Sharad; Singh, Daneshwar; Sethia, Soumitra

    2016-01-01

    The informational continuity for a diabetic patient is of paramount importance. This study on a pilot basis explores the process utility of structured educational modular sessions grounded on the principle of near-peer mentoring. Visual modules were prepared for diabetic patients. These modules were instituted to 25 diabetic patients in logical sequences. In the next phase, 4 persons of these 25 patients were designated as diabetic-diabetes ongoing sustainable care and treatment (DOST). Each diabetic-DOST was clubbed with two patients for modular session and informational deliverance during the next 7 days. Process analysis was performed with "proxy-indicators," namely, monthly glycemic status, knowledge assessment scores, and quality of life. Data were analyzed by interval estimates and through nonparametric analysis. Nonparametric analysis indicated a significant improvement in glycemic status in terms with fasting blood sugar (W = 78 z = 3.04, P = 0.002), 2 h-postprandial blood sugar (W = 54, z = 2.01, P = 0.035), and in knowledge score (χ 2 = 19.53, df = 3; P = 0.0002). Quality of life score showed significant improvement in 2 out of 7 domains, namely, satisfaction with treatment ([difference in mean score = 1.40 [1.94 to 0.85]) and symptom botherness (difference in mean score = 0.98 [1.3-0.65]). Because of inherent methodological limitations and innate biases, at this juncture no conclusive statement can be drawn. Although, primitive process evidences indicate the promising role of the diabetic-DOST strategy.

  4. Theoretical perspectives on participation and democracy - The possibility of bridging the gap between the science of the problems and the politics of the solutions. Deliverable D13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meskens, Gaston; Laes, Erik

    2009-10-01

    on the basis of a broader societal awareness. Both the deliberative and the transparency arenas have to find their places within the framework of the existing political processes. This process takes place within the representative democratic system, but can also include direct democracy in the form of referenda, focus groups or consensus conference. This is called the 'arena of representative democracy'. If, inspired by the RISCOM approach, deliberation, in the sense of free and unconstrained reasoned debate between citizens, would be enriched with regular 'transparency checkups' with regard to the way actors use 'their' knowledge and mandates, one would assume the success of risk governance to be guaranteed. Asserting that this conclusion is too simple is the second aim of this work package. It will be argued that the complex risk-inherent character of the issues at stake implies a governance approach that needs to rely on 'opinions that cannot be turned into facts'. Therefore, in a governance arena, before transparency can be 'stretched', it needs to be 'unlocked' in a culture of reflexivity. While transparency can be 'organised', reflexivity needs to be 'fostered' in the academy and the research institutes (experts) and needs to be 'enabled' on the policy platform (stakeholders, experts, politicians). This study is therefore not only a critical analysis of existing governance methods (theoretical and practical). It will also make a plea for a new way of knowledge generation and a new way of policy making that takes into account the (im)possibilities of using governance methods, knowledge and mandates. Finally, the approach of WP2 is theoretical, and many of the reflections (and proposals) can be applied to different policy themes. Given the context of WP2 and ARGONA as such, obviously the issue of radioactive waste governance will serve as an example and a thread through the whole of the report

  5. Theoretical perspectives on participation and democracy - The possibility of bridging the gap between the science of the problems and the politics of the solutions. Deliverable D13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meskens, Gaston; Laes, Erik (SCK-CEN, Mol (Bulgaria))

    2009-10-15

    principles of RISCOM to practical transparency arenas. Public participation should lead to transparency and insight in order for the system to work on the basis of a broader societal awareness. Both the deliberative and the transparency arenas have to find their places within the framework of the existing political processes. This process takes place within the representative democratic system, but can also include direct democracy in the form of referenda, focus groups or consensus conference. This is called the 'arena of representative democracy'. If, inspired by the RISCOM approach, deliberation, in the sense of free and unconstrained reasoned debate between citizens, would be enriched with regular 'transparency checkups' with regard to the way actors use 'their' knowledge and mandates, one would assume the success of risk governance to be guaranteed. Asserting that this conclusion is too simple is the second aim of this work package. It will be argued that the complex risk-inherent character of the issues at stake implies a governance approach that needs to rely on 'opinions that cannot be turned into facts'.

  6. Taiwan in 2004: Elections, Referenda, and Other Democratic Challenges

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dumbaugh, Kerry

    2005-01-01

    .... In both the presidential and legislative election campaigns, Chen emphasized gaining a separate international identity for Taiwan -- an emphasis to which Beijing strenuously objected as dangerously...

  7. Night Wind - Deliverable D.3.2 main simulation report; Grid architecture for wind power production with energy storage through load shifting in refrigerated warehouses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cronin, Tom; Bindner, Henrik; Zong, Yi

    2008-11-15

    This report represents Deliverable D.3.2 of Work Package 3 in the Night Wind project. The aim of this Work Package was to simulate a cold store (or number of cold stores) within a power system where there is a high degree of wind power penetration. The Night Wind Control System, developed as part of Work Package 5, was to be integrated into the simulations so that the wind power could be 'stored' in the cold store with maximum benefit to the electrical network, utility or cold store owner. To this end, the following have been accomplished: 1) The Night Wind concept has been described in terms of demand side management. 2) Input requirements and data have been specified and collected. Measured data from the existing cold store facility of Partner Logistics has been analysed. 3) Component models for the simulations (including the cold store model itself) have been developed for the simulation platform, IPSYS. 4) The Night Wind Control System (NWCS) from Work Package 5 has been developed so that it finishes computations within two minutes. 5) Controllers including the NWCS) have been operated with the cold store model within IPSYS. 6) Simulations have been performed with the cold store model and an increasing penetration of wind power. This report presents the results of the work undertaken in Work Package 3 which would have benefited from the additional time requested at the project meeting in March 2008, however, this extension of time was not granted. Nevertheless, the work that was possible is considered significantly complete, although it is acknowledged that there has been a delay in the presentation of this report. It should be noted that it was not possible to address the new aspects of Task 3.7 'Verification of simulation results' as there was no implementation of the night wind concept at the demonstration site (Task 7). Verification of the simulation of the present system has, naturally, been carried out and described in this report. (ln)

  8. Intangible assets for intangible deliverables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elsmore, Matthew J.

    2008-01-01

    As the dominant economic business model in Europe, services are important when we consider intangible assets. This article argues a case for some kind of 'special relationship' between service firms and trade marks-specifically bearing in mind the CTM system and new EU services law. On the questi...... of EU businesses. The article suggests a starting point for a fresh yet reassuringly ordinary dialogue within trade mark law, one that asserts it a central role in realising predicted economic benefits of the Internal Market.......As the dominant economic business model in Europe, services are important when we consider intangible assets. This article argues a case for some kind of 'special relationship' between service firms and trade marks-specifically bearing in mind the CTM system and new EU services law. On the question...... if there can be constructive overlap between trade marks and services and how this emerges, the analysis shows there is reason both for and against thinking that together the relevant sets of laws, among other things, ease the transition from national- to Community-based trading for the overwhelming majority...

  9. Gas deliverability forecasting - why bother?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trick, M.

    1996-01-01

    According to the author the answer to the question is an unequivocal 'yes' because gas production forecasting is extremely useful for the management and development of a gas field. To model a gas field, one must take into account reservoir performance, sandface inflow performance, wellbore pressure losses, gathering system pressure losses, and field facility performance. The integration of all these factors in a single computer-based model that incorporates proven technology will facilitate the evaluation of various development strategies. A good computer model can help to predict the most cost effective improvement methods, determine economic viability, estimate how much gas is available, evaluate whether drilling wells or adding compression will produce the most reserves, determine optimum placement of compression, evaluate changes to the gathering system, and determine if production from existing wells can be increased by wellbore modifications

  10. Deliverable 2 (SustainAQ)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneider, O.; Julian, B.; Bosman, R.; Eding, E.

    2009-01-01

    The European Project SustainAQ (Framework 6) aims to identify the limiting factors for the sustainable production of aquatic origin food in Eastern Europe. It focuses on the possible use of Recirculation Aquaculture Systems (RAS) as sustainable method for the production of aquatic animals as

  11. Competent Systems: Effective, Efficient, Deliverable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramson, Bruce

    Recent developments in artificial intelligence and decision analysis suggest reassessing the approaches commonly taken to the design of knowledge-based systems. Competent systems are based on models known as influence diagrams, which graphically capture a domain's basic objects and their interrelationships. Among the benefits offered by influence…

  12. Bioclim Deliverable D6b: application of statistical down-scaling within the BIOCLIM hierarchical strategy: methods, data requirements and underlying assumptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    -study regions were identified, together with the additional issues which arise in applying these techniques to output from the BIOCLIM simulations. This preliminary work is described in this BIOCLIM technical note. It provides an overview of statistical down-scaling methods, together with their underlying assumptions and advantages/disadvantages. Specific issues relating to their application within the BIOCLIM context (i.e., application to the IPSL C M4 D snapshot simulations) are identified, for example, the stationarity issue. The predictor and predictand data sets that would be required to implement these methods within the BIOCLIM hierarchical strategy are also outlined, together with the methodological steps involved. Implementation of these techniques was delayed in order to give priority to the application of the rule-based down-scaling method developed in WP3 to WP2 EMIC output (see Deliverable D8a). This task was not originally planned, but has allowed more comprehensive comparison and evaluation of the BIOCLIM scenarios and down-scaling methods to be undertaken

  13. Deliverable 6.2 - Software: upgraded MC simulation tools capable of simulating a complete in-beam ET experiment, from the beam to the detected events. Report with the description of one (or few) reference clinical case(s), including the complete patient model and beam characteristics

    CERN Document Server

    The ENVISION Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    Deliverable 6.2 - Software: upgraded MC simulation tools capable of simulating a complete in-beam ET experiment, from the beam to the detected events. Report with the description of one (or few) reference clinical case(s), including the complete patient model and beam characteristics

  14. Anti-pancreatic cancer deliverables from sea: first-hand evidence on the efficacy, molecular targets and mode of action for multifarious polyphenols from five different brown-algae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheeja Aravindan

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer (PC remains the fourth leading cause of cancer death with an unacceptable survival that has remained relatively unchanged over the past 25 years. The presence of occult or clinical metastases at the time of diagnosis together with the lack of effective chemotherapies pose a dire need for designing new and targeted therapeutic deliverables that favors the clinical outcome. Herein, we investigated the anti-tumorigenic potential of polyphenols from five different brown-algae in human PC cells (MiaPaCa-2, Panc-1, BXPC-3 and Panc-3.27. Total anti-oxidant capacity (TAC analysis on stepwise polyphenol separations with increasing polarity (Hexane-DCM-EA-methanol identified high levels of TAC in DCM and EA extractions across all seaweeds assessed. All DCM and EA separated polyphenols induced a dose-dependent and sustained (time-independent inhibition of cell proliferation and viability. Further, these polyphenols profoundly enhanced DNA damage (acridine orange/Ethidium bromide staining and DNA fragmentation in all the cell lines investigated. More importantly, luciferase reporter assay revealed a significant inhibition of NFκB transcription in cells treated with polyphenols. Interestingly, QPCR analysis identified a differential yet definite regulation of pro-tumorigenic EGFR, VEGFA, AKT, hTERT, kRas, Bcl2, FGFα and PDGFα transcription in cells treated with DCM and EA polyphenols. Immunoblotting validates the inhibitory potential of seaweed polyphenols in EGFR phosphorylation, kRas, AurKβ and Stat3. Together, these data suggest that intermediate polarity based fractions of seaweed polyphenols may significantly potentiate tumor cell killing and may serve as potential drug deliverable for PC cure. More Studies dissecting out the active constituents in potent fractions, mechanisms of action and synergism, if any, are warranted and are currently in process.

  15. ADAM adaptation and mitigation strategies: supporting European climate policy. Deliverable D3 of work package M1 (code D-M1.3). ADAM 2-degree scenario for Europe - policies and impacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schade, Wolfgang; Jochem, Eberhard; Barker, Terry [and others

    2009-07-31

    ADAM research identifies and appraises existing and new policy options that can contribute to different combinations of adaptation and mitigation strategies. These options address the demands a changing climate will place on protecting citizens and valuable ecosystems - i.e., adaptation - as well as addressing the necessity to restrain/control humankind's perturbation to global climate to a desirable level - i.e., mitigation. The work package Mitigation 1 (Ml) has the core objective to simulate mitigation options and their related costs for Europe until 2050 and 2100 respectively. The focus of this deliverable is on the period 2005 to 2050. The long-term period until 2100 is covered in the previous deliverable D2, applying the POLES model for this time horizon. The analysis constitutes basically a techno-economic analysis. Depending on the sector analyzed it is either directly combined with a policy analysis (e.g. in the transport sector, renewables sector) or the policy analysis is performed qualitatively as a subsequent and independent step after the techno-economic analysis is completed (e.g. in the residential and service sectors). The book includes the following chapters: scenarios and macroeconomic assumptions; methodological issues analyzing mitigation options; the integrated global energy model POLES and its projections for the reference and 2 deg C scenarios; forest and basic materials sector; residential sector in Europe; the service (tertiary) and the primary sectors in Europe; basic products and other manufacturing industry sectors; transport sectors in Europe; renewable sector in Europe; conversion sector in Europe; syntheses and sectoral analysis in Europe; macroeconomic impacts of climate policy in the EU; the effects of the financial crisis on baseline simulations with implications for climate policy modeling: an analysis using the global model E3MG 2008-2012; conclusions and policy recommendations.

  16. ADAM adaptation and mitigation strategies: supporting European climate policy. Deliverable D3 of work package M1 (code D-M1.3). ADAM 2-degree scenario for Europe - policies and impacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schade, Wolfgang; Jochem, Eberhard; Barker, Terry (and others)

    2009-07-31

    ADAM research identifies and appraises existing and new policy options that can contribute to different combinations of adaptation and mitigation strategies. These options address the demands a changing climate will place on protecting citizens and valuable ecosystems - i.e., adaptation - as well as addressing the necessity to restrain/control humankind's perturbation to global climate to a desirable level - i.e., mitigation. The work package Mitigation 1 (Ml) has the core objective to simulate mitigation options and their related costs for Europe until 2050 and 2100 respectively. The focus of this deliverable is on the period 2005 to 2050. The long-term period until 2100 is covered in the previous deliverable D2, applying the POLES model for this time horizon. The analysis constitutes basically a techno-economic analysis. Depending on the sector analyzed it is either directly combined with a policy analysis (e.g. in the transport sector, renewables sector) or the policy analysis is performed qualitatively as a subsequent and independent step after the techno-economic analysis is completed (e.g. in the residential and service sectors). The book includes the following chapters: scenarios and macroeconomic assumptions; methodological issues analyzing mitigation options; the integrated global energy model POLES and its projections for the reference and 2 deg C scenarios; forest and basic materials sector; residential sector in Europe; the service (tertiary) and the primary sectors in Europe; basic products and other manufacturing industry sectors; transport sectors in Europe; renewable sector in Europe; conversion sector in Europe; syntheses and sectoral analysis in Europe; macroeconomic impacts of climate policy in the EU; the effects of the financial crisis on baseline simulations with implications for climate policy modeling: an analysis using the global model E3MG 2008-2012; conclusions and policy recommendations.

  17. TH-D-16A-01: Medical Physics Workshop: Editorial Vision and Guidance On Writing and Reviewing Papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, J; Das, S; Goodsitt, M

    2014-01-01

    On January 1, 2014, editorial leadership of Medical Physics passed from esteemed long-time Editor Bill Hendee to a collective editorial group composed of the three presenters listed above. In this presentation, we would like to outline our vision for the future of Medical Physics and review recent work-in-progress initiatives to implement this vision. Finally, we will close with guidance to authors on how to write a good Medical Physics paper. Vision for Medical Physics and current initiatives: Jeff Williamson, Editor-in-Chief We cannot improve on Dr. Hendee's succinct vision statement “to continue the Journal's tradition of publishing the very best science that propels our discipline forward and improves our contribution to patient care.” More concretely, the Journal should be s the preeminent forum for electronic exchange of cutting edge medical physics science. We seek to identify the best contributions in (a) high impact clinical physics innovations; (b) clinical translation and validation of basic science innovations; or (c) cutting edge basic science developments with potential for patient care improvements. Among the challenges and opportunities we face are: are electronic-only and open access publishing; trends towards more interactive, social-media based scientific communities; and diversification of the medical physics research, authorship, and readership domains, including clinical applications quite foreign to core ABR clinical competencies. To address these issues over the next 3 years, we have reduced the size of our Editorial Board and focused its efforts on improving the Journal's impact through 4 working groups (WGs): WG-1: Review process quality and selectivity Creation of 120 member Board of Associate Editors to improve review uniformity by placing Ms. management in fewer hands New reviewer guidelines and templates Answer: “what is the scope of medical physics research?” Recursive taxonomy for tagging review expertise and article contents WG-2 Improving reader experience Redesigning http://MedPhys.org to host interactive features and gateway to electronic issue archive Experimentation with interactive features beginning with “Point/Counterpoint” Data mining and Journal quality evaluation Find out who are audiences are Identify characteristics of high impact articles Measure effectiveness of innovations Outreach to related communities Special issues presenting high-impact work in designated subcommunities Addressing the needs of new research constituencies: engineers, biophysicists, clinicians Guidelines and templates for reviewers and associate editors: Shiva Das, Therapy Physics Editor We will discuss the Med. Phys. review process and a new initiative to create review templates that attempts to address current shortcomings. Template design is informed by the literature on of the review process effectiveness and practices of other journals. Its goals are to provide authors more constructive criticism to improve the manuscript; quantifying perceived importance and potential impact; and providing structured sections that prompt the reviewer to addresses important technical and editorial elements. While the template is recommended to be used, reviewers could alternatively enter their comments in the older free-form style. The expectations of the template are that it will enable consistently thorough, high quality reviews that accurately separate acceptable vs. substandard submissions but continue our tradition of helping authors to enhance papers with high potential. Ultimately, the goal is to reduce variability and subjectivity in the peer-review process, in turn leading to articles with higher research and clinical impact. We will also discuss interesting perspectives from several journals on aspects of the peer-review process such as public input via comments, influence of author-suggested reviewers, and bias in reviewer selection. Writing good scientific papers and responding to critiques: Mitch Goodsitt, Imaging Physics Editor The essential components of the abstract, introduction, methods, discussion and conclusion sections, as well as the desired writing style and style of the figures and tables will be reviewed. Publishable Medical Physics Ms. must include a clear and concise statement of the novelty and clinical and/or scientific importance of their work. Examples of novelty include: new technical solution to an important clinical problem; new generalizable knowledge; or first demonstration that an existing engineering solution solves a clinical problem. Authors must also include: sufficient background information and rationale; enough detail that the work can be reproduced by others; sufficient statistical analysis to refute or validate their hypothesis, how it compares to; is distinct from, and improves upon others' work; and the limitations of their study. When the authors receive critiques from the referees and associate editor, the authors should provide a detailed point-bypoint response to each comment. We now ask that the authors' rebuttal include the text of the original criticism, the authors' response, and the modified text along with the line numbers in the revised article. We also ask that the new text be highlighted in a different font color in the revised submission. These changes and others will be discussed. Their purpose is to facilitate the review process

  18. TH-D-16A-01: Medical Physics Workshop: Editorial Vision and Guidance On Writing and Reviewing Papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williamson, J [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Das, S [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Goodsitt, M [University Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2014-06-15

    On January 1, 2014, editorial leadership of Medical Physics passed from esteemed long-time Editor Bill Hendee to a collective editorial group composed of the three presenters listed above. In this presentation, we would like to outline our vision for the future of Medical Physics and review recent work-in-progress initiatives to implement this vision. Finally, we will close with guidance to authors on how to write a good Medical Physics paper. Vision for Medical Physics and current initiatives: Jeff Williamson, Editor-in-Chief We cannot improve on Dr. Hendee's succinct vision statement “to continue the Journal's tradition of publishing the very best science that propels our discipline forward and improves our contribution to patient care.” More concretely, the Journal should be s the preeminent forum for electronic exchange of cutting edge medical physics science. We seek to identify the best contributions in (a) high impact clinical physics innovations; (b) clinical translation and validation of basic science innovations; or (c) cutting edge basic science developments with potential for patient care improvements. Among the challenges and opportunities we face are: are electronic-only and open access publishing; trends towards more interactive, social-media based scientific communities; and diversification of the medical physics research, authorship, and readership domains, including clinical applications quite foreign to core ABR clinical competencies. To address these issues over the next 3 years, we have reduced the size of our Editorial Board and focused its efforts on improving the Journal's impact through 4 working groups (WGs): WG-1: Review process quality and selectivity Creation of 120 member Board of Associate Editors to improve review uniformity by placing Ms. management in fewer hands New reviewer guidelines and templates Answer: “what is the scope of medical physics research?” Recursive taxonomy for tagging review expertise and article contents WG-2 Improving reader experience Redesigning http://MedPhys.org to host interactive features and gateway to electronic issue archive Experimentation with interactive features beginning with “Point/Counterpoint” Data mining and Journal quality evaluation Find out who are audiences are Identify characteristics of high impact articles Measure effectiveness of innovations Outreach to related communities Special issues presenting high-impact work in designated subcommunities Addressing the needs of new research constituencies: engineers, biophysicists, clinicians Guidelines and templates for reviewers and associate editors: Shiva Das, Therapy Physics Editor We will discuss the Med. Phys. review process and a new initiative to create review templates that attempts to address current shortcomings. Template design is informed by the literature on of the review process effectiveness and practices of other journals. Its goals are to provide authors more constructive criticism to improve the manuscript; quantifying perceived importance and potential impact; and providing structured sections that prompt the reviewer to addresses important technical and editorial elements. While the template is recommended to be used, reviewers could alternatively enter their comments in the older free-form style. The expectations of the template are that it will enable consistently thorough, high quality reviews that accurately separate acceptable vs. substandard submissions but continue our tradition of helping authors to enhance papers with high potential. Ultimately, the goal is to reduce variability and subjectivity in the peer-review process, in turn leading to articles with higher research and clinical impact. We will also discuss interesting perspectives from several journals on aspects of the peer-review process such as public input via comments, influence of author-suggested reviewers, and bias in reviewer selection. Writing good scientific papers and responding to critiques: Mitch Goodsitt, Imaging Physics Editor The essential components of the abstract, introduction, methods, discussion and conclusion sections, as well as the desired writing style and style of the figures and tables will be reviewed. Publishable Medical Physics Ms. must include a clear and concise statement of the novelty and clinical and/or scientific importance of their work. Examples of novelty include: new technical solution to an important clinical problem; new generalizable knowledge; or first demonstration that an existing engineering solution solves a clinical problem. Authors must also include: sufficient background information and rationale; enough detail that the work can be reproduced by others; sufficient statistical analysis to refute or validate their hypothesis, how it compares to; is distinct from, and improves upon others' work; and the limitations of their study. When the authors receive critiques from the referees and associate editor, the authors should provide a detailed point-bypoint response to each comment. We now ask that the authors' rebuttal include the text of the original criticism, the authors' response, and the modified text along with the line numbers in the revised article. We also ask that the new text be highlighted in a different font color in the revised submission. These changes and others will be discussed. Their purpose is to facilitate the review process.

  19. webinos project deliverable: Phase 1 Security Framework

    OpenAIRE

    webinos consortium

    2011-01-01

    The webinos project aims to deliver a cross-device web application runtime environment, providing a unified development platform and standardized inter-device communication and interaction. This document contains the first iteration of the technical security and privacy framework designed for the webinos project. It accompanies two other documents - D3.1 System Specification and D3.2 API Specifications - and refers to concepts developed in them. The security and privacy architecture aims to p...

  20. THESEUS Deliverable ID2.5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Jørgen Harck; Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Burcharth, Hans F.

    2012-01-01

    As a consequence of climate changes, coastal defenses are worldwide at higher risk of failure. Climate changes can lead to problems in terms of function, stability, and safety of goods and persons. To overcome the problems, different scenarios can be adopted, such as; 1) no upgrade actions...... and repairing the damages 2) upgrade of existing defences by e.g. changing the structure dimensions 3) perform strategic retreat and decommissioning. Within the THESEUS project, the present work task, WT 2.5, focus on upgrading existing rubble mound breakwater defences. Solutions for upgrading parts of rubble...... mound structures are investigated by means of modifying the structure profile and/or adding structure elements. Results from this study will be incorporated in the THESEUS decision tool (DSS-tool) and in the guidelines in work package 5 (WP.5)....

  1. Forlic deliverable 5.1: Persona scenarios

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijsbers, Govert; Leendertse, Matthijs; Leis, Miriam; Kirschner, Paul A.; Hoogveld, Bert; Stoyanov, Slavi; Weber, Mark

    2015-01-01

    This document describes nine persona scenarios. The outcomes of a group concept mapping (GCM) exercise were used as input to create nine personas. The basic data for each persona contains demographic information, its position in a three by three persona matrix, and an overview of the relevant

  2. Improving Response Deliverability in DNS(SEC)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, Gijs; van Rijswijk, Roland; van Rijswijk, Roland M.; Pras, Aiko; Sperotto, Anna

    The Domain Name System provides a critical service on the Internet, where it allows host names to be translated to IP addresses. However, it does not provide any guarantees about authenticity and origin integrity of resolution data. DNSSEC attempts to solve this through the application of

  3. THESEUS Deliverable OD 2.1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Work Package No.: WP 2 and Title: Mitigation of flooding/erosion hazard: innovative coastal structures and sediment management.......Work Package No.: WP 2 and Title: Mitigation of flooding/erosion hazard: innovative coastal structures and sediment management....

  4. Deliverable 5.1, type RE (PP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ytreberg, Erik; Granhag, Lena; Boteler, Benjamin

    The aim of this report is to create a framework to understand and ultimately assess the linkages from the drivers of shipping in the Baltic Sea to its effects on ecosystem services and human wellbeing. Available Drivers Pressures State Impact Response (DPSIR) frameworks are analysed and adapted t...

  5. Assessing Participatory and Dialogue Approaches. Deliverable 15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, P.J.; Hicks, T.W.; Galson, D.A.; Greulich-Smith, T.

    2009-11-01

    This report presents the results of work carried out ARGONA project. The main objective has been to gain some appreciation of the success, or otherwise, of several public involvement approaches associated with radioactive waste disposal facility siting in general and of various involvement activities and techniques in particular, especially any that appear to be novel in their content and/or application. The main focus of the analysis has been to examine three case studies. Firstly the use of stakeholder panels as part of the consultation about the BPEO (Best Practicable Environmental Option) study for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) management at Britain's former centre for fast reactor research and development at Dounreay in northern Scotland; secondly, the series of subsequent 'drop-in' meetings held to communicate information about the development of the agreed solution for these wastes (namely a near-surface disposal facility); thirdly, work carried out by the Nuclear Research Institute at Rez (NRI) in the Czech Republic, as part of ARGONA WP5.1, involving a series of stakeholder meetings to examine radioactive waste management in the context of plans for the management of spent fuel. In order to evaluate the success or usefulness of the approaches, techniques and meetings involved, we have developed a participation process 'Evaluation Matrix'. This has involved the use of criteria against which particular approaches and activities may be judged. In order to develop these we have adapted criteria developed as part of the RISCOM II project and developed a parallel set of descriptions to enable us to examine each activity through the 'lens' of an appropriate Evaluation Matrix. We have then conducted an evaluation using these 'ARGONA criteria' for the three separate case studies. It is recognised that the literature currently fails to offer a methodology for comparing approaches and allowing selection of appropriate techniques for use in particular circumstances. The methodology adopted here has shown that it is however possible to map approaches and techniques against RISCOM-type criteria using a range of information, including feedback forms, questionnaires and interviews. This can inform about how particular approaches are perceived by both sides and assist in development of more suitable methods for the future. Evaluation of the different activities and techniques employed in the three case studies has allowed insight into several common factors, such as timing, purpose of the involvement, scale of the involvement, and development of suitable discussion arenas. We consider that this work makes a contribution to responding to the absence of a comparison methodology by proposing the development of a 'knowledge base' as a basis for reporting participation studies in a manner that would facilitate comparisons and selection of methods appropriate to particular issues. We consider that the resulting knowledge base should be developed in the form of a library of relevant approaches (techniques, meeting types etc) that can be 'indexed' in terms of what the desired end result might be (a requirement for advice; development of societal consensus; provision of clarity regarding a contentious issue etc) and cross referenced as to their suitability at different stages of an involvement process. The intention would then be that a 'customer' agency could consult the knowledge base and identify possible approaches and techniques that would be suitable for use (and adaptation) in the particular situation and at the relevant process stage in question. The approach could be developed more widely to include a large number of processes and a large number of 'requirement criteria' as components in the knowledge base. It should be emphasised, however, that such an approach should be used for communication about what it means to use certain processes, and not as a calculation tool to decide on which method to use in a simple objective manner

  6. OPTIMISE - Deliverable D7.3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Morten

    This report describes the final conclusion on rolling, pressing and filament geometry. The most of the work has previous been described and present in the work package reports that has been made during the project and presented at the 6 months meeting. This report is built up in such a way......, that the main investigations and conclusions on rolling, pressing and filament geometry will be presented in separate parts. In the end of this reports the main recommendations for the mechanical processing will be given....

  7. ESTEEM manual. Deliverable 5 of Create Acceptance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jolivet, E. [IAE, Toulouse (France); Mourik, R.; Raven, R.P.J.M.; Feenstra, C.F.J. [ECN Policy Studies, Petten (Netherlands); Alcantud Torrent, A.; Schaefer, B. [EcoInstitute, Barcelona (Spain); Heiskanen, E. [National Consumer Research Centre NCRC, Helsinki (Finland); Hodson, M. [Centre for Sustainable Urban and Regional Futures SURF, Manchester (United Kingdom); Oniszk-Poplawska, A. [Institute for Renewable Energy IEO, Warszawa (Poland); Difiore, M.; Fucsko, J. [Hungarian Environmental Economics Center MAKK, Budapest (Hungary); Maack, M.H. [Icelandic New Energy INE, Reykjavik (Iceland); Poti, B.M. [CERIS-CNR, Rome (Italy); Prasad, G. [University of Cape Town UCT, Capetown (South Africa); Brohmann, B.; Fritsche, U.R.; Huenecke, K. [OEKO Institut, Freiburg (Germany)

    2008-05-15

    The ESTEEM tool is one of the outcomes of Create Acceptance. ESTEEM (Engage stake-holders through a systematic toolbox to manage new energy projects) is a six step tool which is performed by a consultant in close cooperation with the project manager of a new energy project. The focus of the tool is put on the early recognition and discussion of stakeholders expectations and the integration of these in the design of the project. ESTEEM, including background information is freely available via www.esteem-tool.eu.

  8. Bioclim Deliverable D1: environmental change analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The BIOCLIM project on modelling sequential Biosphere systems under Climate change for radioactive waste disposal is part of the EURATOM fifth European framework programme. The project was launched in October 2000 for a three-year period. The project aims at providing a scientific basis and practical methodology for assessing the possible long term impacts on the safety of radioactive waste repositories in deep formations due to climate and environmental change. The project brings together a number of representatives from both European radioactive waste management organisations which have national responsibilities for the safe disposal of radioactive waste, either as disposers or regulators, and several highly experienced climate research teams. In particular, BIOCLIM aims to address the important objective of how to represent the development of future biosphere systems by addressing both how to model long-term climate change, the relevant environmental consequences of such changes and the implementation of a sequential approach to such changes. The results from the development of this sophisticated approach will be of great benefit for improving long term radiological impact calculations and the information presented in a safety case. Simulations will be conducted to represent the time series of long-term climate in three European areas within which disposal sites may be established (i.e. Central/Southern Spain, Northeast of France and Central Britain). Two complementary strategies will provide representations of future climate predictions together with associated vegetation patterns using either an analysis of distinct climate states or a continuous climate simulation over at least one glacial-interglacial cycle and possibly for other selected periods over the next 1,000,000 years. These results will be used to derive the characteristics of possible future human environments (i.e. biosphere systems) through which radionuclides, emerging from the repository, may be transported to the surface environment and lead to the exposure of Man. Several climate scenarios will be explored in the project and selected climate sequences of particular interest for performance assessments will be studied in detail to establish the context for the development of biosphere assessment models. The aim is not to derive mechanistic models of the whole climate sequence for up to a million years but to use output from the climate change models in order to understand the biosphere system responses that are likely to be important in the context of human and environmental safety. Through this work, the basis for undertaking and assessing the radiological safety of deep repositories and confidence in the assessment results will be improved. The objectives of this first BIOCLIM report are to identify the mechanisms and process that cause long-term climate change and the environmental consequences of such changes (Section 2). This information is presented in summary form as an extensive literature already exists on these subjects. Some of these references are also provided in the appendix. The lessons that have been learned by the waste management agencies and the regulator through application of methodologies used to date to represent climate change in biosphere assessments are summarised in Section 3; further details of current national methodologies and approaches are provided in Appendix A. Section 4 summarises the new approaches that will be used in BIOCLIM to develop and improve long-term climate change models and the consequent impacts on the biosphere systems that have to be represented in biosphere assessment models

  9. SG39 Deliverables. Summary of Methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    For providing useful and physical feedback to nuclear data evaluators from cross section adjustment results, it is necessary to assess the reliability of the adjustment results. For instance, the adjustment results may include so-called 'compensation effects' which cause fictitious alterations of adjusted cross-sections by the cancellation of two or more reactions of cross sections. Typical compensation effects are possible in the following reactions: - Pu-239 fission spectrum and inelastic in general: Equivalent effect through neutron spectrum changes - Capture and (n,2n) for irradiation experiments: Same impact of disappearing the associated isotope - Capture and fission for spectral indices: e.g. U-238 capture (C28) and Pu-239 fission (F49) for C28/F49; Compensation between numerator and denominator - Many reactions for criticalities: Capture, fission, ν, χ, inelastic, elastic,... In addition, useless and unphysical systematic effects may occur in the cross section adjustments. To avoid the compensation effects and to point out systematic effects, several criteria with parameters/indices are recommended to use. This document summarizes the methodology with the definitions of the parameters/indices. Although a lot of parameters/indices are reported in the intermediate report of Subgroup 33, many institutions use their own different nomenclature to describe the parameters/indices about the cross section adjustment. Therefore, Subgroup 39 proposes a common nomenclature for convenience. (author)

  10. SG39 Deliverables. Comments on Covariance Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    The covariance matrix of a scattered data set, x_i (i=1,n), must be symmetric and positive-definite. As one of WPEC/SG39 contributions to the SG40/CIELO project, several comments or recommendations on the covariance data are described here from the viewpoint of nuclear-data users. To make the comments concrete and useful for nuclear-data evaluators, the covariance data of the latest evaluated nuclear data library, JENDL-4.0 and ENDF/B-VII.1 are treated here as the representative materials. The surveyed nuclides are five isotopes that are most important for fast reactor application. The nuclides, reactions and energy regions dealt with are followings: Pu-239: fission (2.5∼10 keV) and capture (2.5∼10 keV), U-235: fission (500 eV∼10 keV) and capture (500 eV∼30 keV), U-238: fission (1∼10 MeV), capture (below 20 keV, 20∼150 keV), inelastic (above 100 keV) and elastic (above 20 keV), Fe-56: elastic (below 850 keV) and average scattering cosine (above 10 keV), and, Na-23: capture (600 eV∼600 keV), inelastic (above 1 MeV) and elastic (around 2 keV)

  11. Deliverable 1.1 Smart grid scenario

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korman, Matus; Ekstedt, Mathias; Gehrke, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the SALVAGE project is to develop better support for managing and designing a secure future smart grid. This approach includes cyber security technologies dedicated to power grid operation as well as support for the migration to the future smart grid solutions, including the legacy...... of ICT that necessarily will be part of it. The objective is further to develop cyber security technology and methodology optimized with the particular needs and context of the power industry, something that is to a large extent lacking in general cyber security best practices and technologies today...

  12. Do School Budgets Matter? The Effect of Budget Referenda on Student Dropout Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung-Gon; Polachek, Solomon W.

    2018-01-01

    This paper analyzes how changes in school expenditures affect dropout rates based on data from 466 school districts in New York during the 2003/04 to the 2007/08 school years. Past traditional regression approaches show mixed results in part because school expenditures are likely endogenous, so that one cannot disentangle cause and effect. The…

  13. 75 FR 41392 - Sorghum Promotion and Research Program: Procedures for the Conduct of Referenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-16

    ... voting procedures, eligibility, disposition of forms and records, FSA's role, and reporting the results... means any harvested portion of Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench or any related species of the genus Sorghum... of the forms and records. FSA would coordinate State and county FSA roles in conducting the...

  14. 75 FR 70573 - Sorghum Promotion and Research Program: Procedures for the Conduct of Referenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-18

    ... definitions, certification and voting procedures, eligibility, disposition of forms and records, the role of... means any harvested portion of Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench or any related species of the genus Sorghum... disposition of the forms and records. FSA will coordinate State and county FSA roles in conducting the...

  15. Can administrative referenda be an instrument of control over large-scale technical installations?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossnagel, A.

    1986-01-01

    An administrative referendum offers the possibility of direct participation of the citizens in decisions concerning large-scale technical installations. The article investigates the legal status of such a referendum on the basis of constitutional and democratic principles. The conclusion drawn is that any attempt to realize more direct democracy in a concrete field of jurisdiction of the state will meet with very large difficulties. On the other hand, the author clearly states more direct democracy for control over the establishment of large-scale technology to be sensible in terms of politics and principles of democracy, and possible within the constitutional system. Developments towards more direct democracy would mean an enhancement of representative democracy and would be adequate vis a vis the problems posed by large-scale technology. (HSCH) [de

  16. Campaign Strategies and Voter Approval of School Referenda: A Mixed Methods Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Paul A.; Ingle, William Kyle

    2009-01-01

    Drawing from state administrative data and surveys of superintendents in Ohio, this mixed methods study examined factors associated with voters' approval of local school levies. Utilizing binomial logistic regression, this study found that new levies and poverty rates were significantly associated with a decrease in the likelihood of passage.…

  17. A Tale of Two Referenda: The Greek Plebiscite of 1946 and the Referendum of July 2015

    OpenAIRE

    Paravantis, Spero

    2018-01-01

    In September 1946, after years of Civil War, Greeks were heading to the polls in order to decide the future of their country. The subject upon which they would be voting on however was not for the parliament and Prime Minister. Rather, the question upon which they were voting was intended to link the continuation of democracy in Greece with the monarchy in place. The question was not phrased this way. The question was if the Greeks wanted a monarchy or not; far too simple a question for its...

  18. SU-D-16A-03: A Radiation Pneumonitis Dose-Response Model Incorporating Non- Local Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, J; Snyder, K; Zhong, H; Chetty, I

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Dose-response models that can reliably predict radiation pneumonitis (RP) to guide radiation therapy (RT) for lung cancer presently do not exist. A model is proposed that incorporates non-local radiationinduced bystander effect (RIBE). Methods: A single sigmoid response function, derived from published data for whole lung irradiation, relates RP probability to cumulative lung damage, regardless of fractionation scheme. Lung damage is assumed to be caused by direct local radiation damage, quantified via the linear-quadratic (LQ) model, and RIBE. Based on published data, RIBE is assumed to be activated when per-fraction dose rises above ∼0.6 Gy, but is constant with dose above that threshold. Integral RIBE damage is assumed proportional to lung volume irradiated above ∼0.6 Gy per fraction. Key model parameters include LQ α and β, and two RIBE parameters: the single-fraction probability δ of damage, and a proportionality parameter κ that relates the potential for RIBE damage to irradiated lung volume. All parameters are tentatively fitted from published data, the RIBE parameters from published RP rates for conventionally fractionated RT (CFRT) and stereotactic body RT (SBRT). Results: The model predicts dose-response curves that are consistent with clinical experience. It provides a tentative explanation for why V20 (33 fractions), V13 (20 fractions) and V5 (<10 fractions) are observed to be correlated with RP. It also provides a plausible explanation for the success of SBRT — RIBE damage increases with the number of fractions, so penalizes CFRT relative to SBRT. Conclusion: The proposed model is relatively simple, extrapolates from published data, plausibly explains several clinical observations, and produces dose-response curves that are consistent with clinical experience. While capable of elaboration, its ability to explain doseresponse experience with different fractionation schemes using a small number of assumptions and parameters is an advantage

  19. SU-D-16A-02: A Novel Methodology for Accurate, Semi-Automated Delineation of Oral Mucosa for Radiation Therapy Dose-Response Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dean, J; Welsh, L; Gulliford, S; Harrington, K; Nutting, C

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The significant morbidity caused by radiation-induced acute oral mucositis means that studies aiming to elucidate dose-response relationships in this tissue are a high priority. However, there is currently no standardized method for delineating the mucosal structures within the oral cavity. This report describes the development of a methodology to delineate the oral mucosa accurately on CT scans in a semi-automated manner. Methods: An oral mucosa atlas for automated segmentation was constructed using the RayStation Atlas-Based Segmentation (ABS) module. A radiation oncologist manually delineated the full surface of the oral mucosa on a planning CT scan of a patient receiving radiotherapy (RT) to the head and neck region. A 3mm fixed annulus was added to incorporate the mucosal wall thickness. This structure was saved as an atlas template. ABS followed by model-based segmentation was performed on four further patients sequentially, adding each patient to the atlas. Manual editing of the automatically segmented structure was performed. A dose comparison between these contours and previously used oral cavity volume contours was performed. Results: The new approach was successful in delineating the mucosa, as assessed by an experienced radiation oncologist, when applied to a new series of patients receiving head and neck RT. Reductions in the mean doses obtained when using the new delineation approach, compared with the previously used technique, were demonstrated for all patients (median: 36.0%, range: 25.6% – 39.6%) and were of a magnitude that might be expected to be clinically significant. Differences in the maximum dose that might reasonably be expected to be clinically significant were observed for two patients. Conclusion: The method developed provides a means of obtaining the dose distribution delivered to the oral mucosa more accurately than has previously been achieved. This will enable the acquisition of high quality dosimetric data for use in dose-response studies. We would like to thank the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council for funding. We acknowledge support from the NIHR RM/ICR Biomedical Research Centre. RayStatation was used under an evaluation agreement with RaySearch Laboratories AB

  20. SU-D-16A-03: A Radiation Pneumonitis Dose-Response Model Incorporating Non- Local Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, J; Snyder, K; Zhong, H; Chetty, I [Henry Ford Health System, Dept. Radiation Oncology, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Dose-response models that can reliably predict radiation pneumonitis (RP) to guide radiation therapy (RT) for lung cancer presently do not exist. A model is proposed that incorporates non-local radiationinduced bystander effect (RIBE). Methods: A single sigmoid response function, derived from published data for whole lung irradiation, relates RP probability to cumulative lung damage, regardless of fractionation scheme. Lung damage is assumed to be caused by direct local radiation damage, quantified via the linear-quadratic (LQ) model, and RIBE. Based on published data, RIBE is assumed to be activated when per-fraction dose rises above ∼0.6 Gy, but is constant with dose above that threshold. Integral RIBE damage is assumed proportional to lung volume irradiated above ∼0.6 Gy per fraction. Key model parameters include LQ α and β, and two RIBE parameters: the single-fraction probability δ of damage, and a proportionality parameter κ that relates the potential for RIBE damage to irradiated lung volume. All parameters are tentatively fitted from published data, the RIBE parameters from published RP rates for conventionally fractionated RT (CFRT) and stereotactic body RT (SBRT). Results: The model predicts dose-response curves that are consistent with clinical experience. It provides a tentative explanation for why V20 (33 fractions), V13 (20 fractions) and V5 (<10 fractions) are observed to be correlated with RP. It also provides a plausible explanation for the success of SBRT — RIBE damage increases with the number of fractions, so penalizes CFRT relative to SBRT. Conclusion: The proposed model is relatively simple, extrapolates from published data, plausibly explains several clinical observations, and produces dose-response curves that are consistent with clinical experience. While capable of elaboration, its ability to explain doseresponse experience with different fractionation schemes using a small number of assumptions and parameters is an advantage.

  1. SU-D-16A-01: A Novel Method to Estimate Normal Tissue Dose for Radiotherapy Patients to Support Epidemiologic Studies of Second Cancer Risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, C [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Jung, J; Pelletier, C [East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Kim, J [University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Lee, C [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Patient cohort of second cancer study often involves radiotherapy patients with no radiological images available: We developed methods to construct a realistic surrogate anatomy by using computational human phantoms. We tested this phantom images both in a commercial treatment planning system (Eclipse) and a custom Monte Carlo (MC) transport code. Methods: We used a reference adult male phantom defined by International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The hybrid phantom which was originally developed in Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline (NURBS) and polygon mesh format was converted into more common medical imaging format. Electron density was calculated from the material composition of the organs and tissues and then converted into DICOM format. The DICOM images were imported into the Eclipse system for treatment planning, and then the resulting DICOM-RT files were imported into the MC code for MC-based dose calculation. Normal tissue doses were calculation in Eclipse and MC code for an illustrative prostate treatment case and compared to each other. Results: DICOM images were generated from the adult male reference phantom. Densities and volumes of selected organs between the original phantom and ones represented within Eclipse showed good agreements, less than 0.6%. Mean dose from Eclipse and MC code match less than 7%, whereas maximum and minimum doses were different up to 45%. Conclusion: The methods established in this study will be useful for the reconstruction of organ dose to support epidemiological studies of second cancer in cancer survivors treated by radiotherapy. We also work on implementing body size-dependent computational phantoms to better represent patient's anatomy when the height and weight of patients are available.

  2. Deliverable 1.2 Specification of industrial benchmark tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arentoft, Mogens; Ravn, Bjarne Gottlieb

    Technical report for the Growth project: IMPRESS, Improvement of precision in forming by simultaneous modelling of deflections in workpiece-die-press system - Output from WP1: Numerical simulation of deflections in workpiece-die-press system.......Technical report for the Growth project: IMPRESS, Improvement of precision in forming by simultaneous modelling of deflections in workpiece-die-press system - Output from WP1: Numerical simulation of deflections in workpiece-die-press system....

  3. Deliverable 1.1 Spec. of industrial problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arentoft, Mogens; Ravn, Bjarne Gottlieb

    Technical report for the Growth roject: IMPRESS, Improvement of precision in formong by simultaneous modelling of deflections in workpiece-die-press system -IMPRESS Output from WP1: Numerical simulation of deflections in workpiece-die-press system......Technical report for the Growth roject: IMPRESS, Improvement of precision in formong by simultaneous modelling of deflections in workpiece-die-press system -IMPRESS Output from WP1: Numerical simulation of deflections in workpiece-die-press system...

  4. Metadata Quality Improvement : DASISH deliverable 5.2A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L'Hours, Hervé; Offersgaard, Lene; Wittenberg, M.; Wloka, Bartholomäus

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this task was to analyse and compare the different metadata strategies of CLARIN, DARIAH and CESSDA, and to identify possibilities of cross-fertilization to take profit from each other solutions where possible. To have a better understanding in which stages of the research lifecycle

  5. CATS Deliverable 2.3 : CATS Observation studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, E. van; Camp, O.M.G.C. op den; Uittenbogaard, J.; Montfort, S. van; Hair-Buijssen, S.H.H.M. de

    2016-01-01

    To support and prepare the introduction of Cyclist-AEB systems and the appropriate consumer tests of such systems, TNO has taken the initiative to set-up a project with passenger car manufacturers and suppliers and the support of Euro NCAP laboratories (such as BASt) to develop a testing system and

  6. Deliverable D1: Engineering study of the Hg converter

    CERN Document Server

    K. Samec et al.

    The development of high-power converter targets otherwise known as neutron sources is today the focus of much attention, driven by the need for ever greater densities of neutron fluxes which are required in the fundamental sciences such as neutron imagery, isotope production and also for the more long-term goal of realising a hybrid sub-critical nuclear reactor. The neutrons in a converter target are produced by a process known in physics as spallation whereby a heavy Z atom releases neutrons below 20 [MeV] when hit by an incoming proton.The Eurisol initiative seeks to develop such an isotope production facility to provide the scientific community with the means to achieving high yields of isotopes and extending the variety of isotopes thus produced towards more exotic types rarely seen in existing facilities.The proposed ISOL facility would use both (a) several 100 kW proton beams on a thick solid target to produce RIBs directly, and (b) a liquid metal 1–5 MW ‘converter’ target to release high fluxes o...

  7. CRISP. Intelligent load shedding. Deliverable 1.5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajic, Z.; Karlsson, D.; Ullah, N.R.; Okuboye, S.; Andrieu, C.; Carlsson, P.

    2005-08-01

    Load shedding has been used to mitigate the consequences of large disturbances in electric power systems, since the beginning of the electrification era. The way to execute the load shedding, i.e. open a circuit breaker, has hardly developed at all for a 100-year period. The modern society dependence on reliable electricity supply is continuously increasing. This means that the consequences of traditional load shedding are not acceptable. In the meantime computer and communication technology has developed tremendously. There is also a trend to use more and more intelligent control and less hardware, such as lines and generators, to provide the required level of reliability for the electric supply. Especially in power systems, and parts of power systems, comprising distributed generation, there seems to be a great potential to improve the overall cost/benefit-ratio for the desired level of reliability, by the use of intelligent load shedding. Intelligent load shedding is a means to improve power system stability, by providing an adapted load control along the distribution network, in situations where the power system otherwise would go unstable. The work with intelligent load shedding in this work package results in various technical principles of dedicated algorithms. These algorithms intend to bring a support tool for the operating system during critical situations. The main aspects are evaluating the right amount and location of power response for a given disturbance, and evaluating the right time response expected in order to comply with an acceptable stability recover. This time response is a main object in order to define appropriate ICT network enabling such a reliable implementation. A main problem of the intelligent load shedding is how to choose load to shed conveniently and quickly. There is a technical problem of finding the right level and location of the load to shed, and also an economical problem of giving incentives in order to have enough remote controlled loads. Some aspects on a dedicated market system are reported in the document in order to start to express some ICT system expectations and requirements. Another aspect is the required coordination of the responses of local production and local controlled loads, in order to combine adequately the efforts to support the system

  8. Deliverance from the "Dark Night of the Soul"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnier, Richard T.; Dixon, Andrea L.; Scheidegger, Corey; Lindberg, Brent

    2009-01-01

    For many individuals, spiritual inspiration, clarity, or epiphany is often preceded by a "dark night of the soul". St. John of the Cross, a Spanish mystic of the 16th century, first described the concept. Today, the phrase "dark night of the soul" is usually associated with the crisis part of the journey to enlightenment. This article defines and…

  9. Deliverable D4.2. Design variables for durability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, J.H.M.

    2015-01-01

    On January 1st 2012, the European project SUS-CON has been started: “SUStainable, innovative and energy efficient CONcrete, based on the integration of all waste materials” (grant agreement no: 285463). The SUS-CON project aims at developing new technology routes to integrate waste materials in the

  10. Intermediate Technical Review Report : Deliverable D0.4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygholm, Ann; Buus, Lillian; Svendsen, Brian Møller

    This report provides a coprehensivi overview of the activities of the Mediterranean Virtual Univeristy Project from the contract start for December 2005. It provides a review of the achievements so far and a discussion of issues currently being adressed along with remedial actions. The report also...

  11. Concept and Model - Kiwi project deliverable D2.8

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durao, Frederico; Dolog, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The Concept and Model for personalisation serves several goals: •    Introducing relevant concepts of personalisation, user and group modelling, statistical model, reasoning and reason maintenance for personalisation. •    Reviewing the related work in personalisation and understanding how......, widget arrangement based on user activity and reasoning maintenance for generation of recommendations....

  12. Designing a Technical System - Deliverables of a Process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olthuis, Wouter; van den Berg, Albert; Callaos, N.; Chu, H-W; Horne, J.; Welsch, F.

    2011-01-01

    Many students of the science and engineering faculties of the University of Twente finish their bachelor’s programme with an individual research assignment of typically 1 to 3 months. These assignments are often evaluated on skills that are implicitly taught during the assignment itself. In order to

  13. Overview of arc design options: Deliverable D2.1

    CERN Document Server

    Chance, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    This document describes the collider layouts to be taken into account for further detailed studies. The optimization of the arc cell lattice and the choice made on the dispersion suppressor are explained. The arc lattice is detailed with the procedures to tune the collider ring and to correct the chromaticity. The correction schemes of the orbit, of the dynamic aperture and of the spurious dispersion are detailed. Finally, the properties of the arc design at the injection energy are shown.

  14. Overview of magnet design options: Deliverable D5.1

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2069265; Toral, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    This document describes the design options for 16 T superconducting dipole magnets for the FCC hadron collider explored in the frame of the activities of WP5. All options have been considered under comparable assumptions and managed using the same tools to ensure a correct judgement and comparison of their relevant pros and cons. Three baseline design configurations have been explored: 1) block-coils, 2) cosine-theta and 3) common-coils. A fourth option, the canted cosine-theta, has been initiated by Swiss (PSI, not part of EuroCirCol) and US (LBNL, EuroCirCol partner) laboratories. The studies show that, adopting a reference margin to the load line of 14 % and with reasonable assumptions on the conductor performance, the total amount of conductor needed for the entire collider is between 7.5 and 10 ktons. depending on the option. The cosine-theta uses less conductor and the canted cosine-theta uses the largest amount. The characterisation of the magnet design options is complete and the work to finalize and ...

  15. Deliverable 9.7 - GALA Dissemination Report 4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westera, Wim; Berta, Riccardo; Moreno-Ger, Pablo; Bellotti, Francesco; Nadolski, Rob; Padrón-Nápoles, Carmen; Boyle, Elizabeth; Beligan, Daniel; Baalsrud Hauge, Jannicke

    2014-01-01

    We have created and executed a separate plan for the transition of GALA to the Serious Games Society for securing the conditions in the post-project phase. For assessing the effectiveness of the dissemination efforts we have devised 5 outward- looking KPIs. All KPI requirements were met. Also,

  16. Deliverable 3.3.1 - Assessment Methodology on ISISEMD platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterson, Carrie Beth

    2009-01-01

    The overall goal of the ISISEMD project is to offer innovative ICT services to improve the quality of life of elderly persons with cognitive problems or mild dementia and their informal and formal caregivers who provide every day care for them. This will be done via the ISISEMD platform – a platf......The overall goal of the ISISEMD project is to offer innovative ICT services to improve the quality of life of elderly persons with cognitive problems or mild dementia and their informal and formal caregivers who provide every day care for them. This will be done via the ISISEMD platform...... by the project partners. This document is devoted to describing the assessment methodology for the ISISEMD platform in terms of key aspects of the assessment, indicators for evaluation, expected benefits, etc....

  17. Deliverable d6.1SME and Stakeholder Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagtmann, Maria Anne; Afroz Alam, Sama; Baird, Alf

    2009-01-01

    -learning courses and study programmes from internationally renowned institutions could be equivalent to a full-time study semester abroad. This might hint towards different perceptions of degrees from companies depending on the way these degrees were obtained. This aspect requires further research based on, e...... The SME and Stakeholder Study was an initial exercise to identify the education needs of the maritime industry [1] and maritime SMEs in particular. The study focused on five North Sea region countries: Denmark, Germany, Norway, Sweden and the UK, but did not look at these countries exclusively....... The study was based on stakeholder views obtained from an internet-based questionnaire [2] and combined them with findings from literature. The key themes of the questionnaire were: o The types of education used in the responding organisations o The relevance of potential education offering types to SMEs...

  18. Intermediate Technical Review Report : Deliverable D0.4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygholm, Ann; Buus, Lillian; Svendsen, Brian Møller

    This report provides a coprehensivi overview of the activities of the Mediterranean Virtual Univeristy Project from the contract start for December 2005. It provides a review of the achievements so far and a discussion of issues currently being adressed along with remedial actions. The report als...

  19. Nanoencapsulation of Mycolic acids as a deliverable to macrophages

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Benadie, Y

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available , with peculiar physical and biological properties. For example, in a mouse model of asthma it was shown that mycolic acids can suppress inhaled allergen triggered inflammation, demonstrating their potential as immunotherapeutic agents. Due to the extremely...

  20. AMADEUS Project Deliverable 1.2: Data Management Plan

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Belén Cristobal

    2018-01-01

    This document describes the initial Data Management Plan (DMP) for AMADEUS project. It addresses Project administration data collected as part of the execution and management of a disruptive research that could be in the market in the incoming years.

  1. Deliverables and Pledges under Ethiopian Trade Competition Law

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Elias N. Stebek

    Code of 1960, special legislation on mandatory safety standards, Ethiopia's criminal law and .... mainstream in countries such as (West) Germany during the post-World War II era until the Mid ..... nature or system of manufacturing or manufacturing place or content or suitableness for ..... Generating an entrepreneurial class.

  2. Campaign Expenditures in School Levy Referenda and Their Relationship to Voter Approval: Evidence from Ohio, 2007-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingle, William Kyle; Johnson, Paul Andrew; Givens, Matt Ryan; Rampelt, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    Using logistic regression, this study sought to understand the relationship between district characteristics, district finances, levy characteristics, and campaign expenditures with new operating levy outcomes. We found that employee benefits as a percentage of the district's budget were negatively associated with levy outcomes, while salaries…

  3. De kloof: effecten van transparant welstandstoezicht, buurtbudgetten en referenda op de door burgers waargenomen afstand tot het bestuur

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lunsing, J.R.

    2015-01-01

    In the Netherlands the word ‘kloof’ is used to describe the metaphorical1 distance between the government and its citizens. The kloof is defined here as the distance that civilians perceive between themselves individually and their government. It is generally believed that without intervention this

  4. Diplomacia de movilización. Referenda de Cataluña y Escocia en la diplomacia en red

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JL Manfredi Sánchez

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introducción. Los movimientos sociales de naturaleza política han innovado en la política internacional. Los actores no estatales han ocupado el espacio de la diplomacia pública, anteriormente limitada al estado nación. Metodología. Se analizan las campañas en redes sociales, los actores, los mensajes y las actividades políticas de los movimientos políticos independentistas catalán y escocés vinculados al referendo. Resultados. El movimiento catalán por la independencia ha apalancado sus resultados en la defensa de la identidad y la comunidad epistémica. Los partidarios escoceses del sí a la creación del nuevo estado sí han orientado la estrategia de protesta hacia la política. Discusión. Se examina la diplomacia de movilización, el uso de las redes sociales para la promoción internacional de mensajes de contenido político y el refuerzo de la lengua y la cultura propia. Conclusiones. Estamos ante una fase expansiva de la diplomacia pública. Más actores se incorporan a la arena internacional mediante la producción y la difusión de mensajes en las redes sociales.

  5. The Voice of the Pupils: An Experimental Comparison of Decisions Made by Elected Pupil Councils, Pupils in Referenda, and Teaching Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilljam, Mikael; Esaiasson, Peter; Lindholm, Torun

    2010-01-01

    This article tests whether the form of decision-making used in school environments affects pupils' views on the legitimacy of the decisions made, and of the decision-making procedure. Building on political science theory on democratic decision-making, it compares pupils' reactions towards decisions made by pupil councils, by pupils via referendum,…

  6. Numerical modeling and experimental testing of a wave energy converter: deliverable D4.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zurkinden, A.S.; Kramer, M.; Ferri, F.; Kofoed, J.P.

    2013-05-15

    The objective of this document is to summarize the outcome of the research which has been carried out during the period May 2011 until June 2012 i.e. during the first year of the PhD study. The work has been done in collaboration with the co-authors. The aim of the project was primarily to provide numerical values for comparison with the experimental test results which were carried out in the same time. It is for this reason why Chapter 4 does consist exclusively of numerical values. Experimental values and measured time series of wave elevations have been used throughout the report in order to a) validate the numerical model and b) preform stochastic analysis. The latter technique is introduced in order to optimize the control parameters of the power take off system. (Author)

  7. Doppler lidar mounted on a wind turbine nacelle - UPWIND deliverable D6.7.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angelou, N.; Mann, J.; Courtney, M.; Sjoeholm, M.

    2010-12-15

    A ZephIR prototype wind lidar manufactured by QinetiQ was mounted on the nacelle of a Vestas V27 wind turbine and measurements of the incoming wind flow towards the rotor of the wind turbine were acquired for approximately 3 months (April - June 2009). The objective of this experiment was the investigation of the turbulence attenuation induced in the lidar measurements. In this report are presented results from data analysis over a 21-hour period (2009-05-05 12:00 - 2009-05-06 09:00). During this period the wind turbine was not operating and the line-of-sight of the lidar was aligned with the wind direction. The analysis included a correlation study between the ZephIR lidar and a METEK sonic anemometer. The correlation analysis was performed using both 10 minutes and 10 Hz wind speed values. The spectral transfer function which describes the turbulence attenuation, which is induced in the lidar measurements, was estimated by means of spectral analysis. An attempt to increase the resolution of the wind speed measurements of a cw lidar was performed, through the deconvolution of the lidar signal. A theoretical model of such a procedure is presented in this report. A simulation has validated the capability of the algorithm to deconvolve and consequently increase the resolution of the lidar system. However the proposed method was not efficient when applied to real lidar wind speed measurements, probably due to the effect, that the wind direction fluctuations along the lidar's line-of-sight have, on the lidar measurements. (Author)

  8. Concept Specifications/Prerequisites for DeepWind Deliverable D8.1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt Paulsen, Uwe; Schløer, Signe; Larsén, Xiaoli Guo

    (NL), NREL(USA), STATOIL(N), VESTAS(DK) and NENUPHAR(F). The report discuss the design considerations for offshore wind turbines, both in general and specifically for Darrieus-type floating turbines, as is the focus of the DeepWind project. The project is considered in a North Sea environment, notably close......The work is a result of the contributions within the DeepWind project which is supported by the European Commission, Grant 256769 FP7 Energy 2010 - Future emerging technologies, and by the DeepWind beneficiaries: DTU(DK), AAU(DK), TUDELFT(NL), TUTRENTO(I), DHI(DK), SINTEF(N), MARINTEK(N), MARIN...

  9. Stakeholders´ Requirements and Reference Scenarios. Deliverable D2.1

    OpenAIRE

    Diamantopoulou, Vasiliki; Mouratidis, Haralambos; Pavlidis, Michalis; Rekleitis, Evangelos

    2016-01-01

    The present document covers important elements on the development of WP2, including: a literature review of the state of the art relevant to security requirements engineering, risk management and supply chain security management standards. Following, the elicitation, analysis and documentation of requirements associated risk management and cyber-security management in ports and their supply chain sectors is presented. Emphasis is given in capturing the perspectives of all stakeholders; includ...

  10. Deliverable 4.3 Decision support guideline based on LCA and cost/efficiency assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Henrik Fred; Hansen, Peter Augusto; Boyer-Souchet, Florence

    2010-01-01

    filtration, PAC addition, anammox, sludge incineration (reference), other sludge inertization technologies (wet oxidation, high temperature pyrolysis, gasification) and sludge triage (including sludge disintegration technologies, i.e. thermal hydrolysis and ultrasound disintegration). They are divided...

  11. Report on Stakeholder Evaluation of Aquatic Resources. Deliverable 5.2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Thi Dieu Phuong; Lund, Søren; Banta, Gary Thomas

    The present report on stakeholder evaluation of highland aquatic resources provides an overview of completed research activities undertaken within the HighARCS project on the value ascribed by users, local communities and stakeholders to functions, goods and services (including non-use values......) derived from the aquatic resources in the Northern and Central of Vietnam. The perceived impact of factors such as environmental degradation, changing demand for goods and services and modified highland aquatic resources management practices on these values has also been assessed....

  12. Deliverable D74.2. Probabilistic analysis methods for support structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gintautas, Tomas

    2018-01-01

    Relevant Description: Report describing the probabilistic analysis for offshore substructures and results attained. This includes comparison with experimental data and with conventional design. Specific targets: 1) Estimate current reliability level of support structures 2) Development of basis...... for probabilistic calculations and evaluation of reliability for offshore support structures (substructures) 3) Development of a probabilistic model for stiffness and strength of soil parameters and for modeling geotechnical load bearing capacity 4) Comparison between probabilistic analysis and deterministic...

  13. Evaluation Criteria to Deliverables Crosswalk for the Tank Farm Contractor (Supercedes HNF-2020)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WOJTASEK, R.D.

    2000-01-01

    Before the Office of River Protection can authorize proceeding with Phase 1B, the Tank Farm Contractor (TFC) must demonstrate readiness to retrieve and deliver the waste to the privatization contractor and to receive and dispose of the products and by-products returned from treatment. The TFC has organized their plans for providing these support services into the within the River Protection Project

  14. D6.7 BRAIN deliverable: Final dissemination, use, and exploitation plan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia Molina, G.

    2012-01-01

    The dissemination and exploitation strategies of BRAIN are reportedin this document. Dissemination activities included maintaining theproject website http://www.brain-project.org/, demonstrating BRAIN’sBCI system at large events such as Hannover fair 2010 and CeBIT 2011, drawing media attention on

  15. Description of the Probabilistic Wind Atlas Methodology, Deliverable D3.1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hahmann, Andrea N.; Witha, Björn; Rife, Daran L.

    against data from 10 meteorological masts in South Africa, part of the Wind Atlas of South Africa (WASA) project, where a long-term set of high-quality observations exist. The results of the ensemble simulations are encouraging, but further analysis is needed to quantify their utility. A key disadvantage...

  16. Similarities and Differences in Risk Communication Strategies on Nuclear Waste Management across Countries. Deliverable D9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drottz Sjoeberg, Britt-Marie; Engen, Ole A.; Richardson, Phil; Pritrsky, Jozef

    2009-12-01

    The part of the project dealt with in this report has, in the first year, focussed on eliciting the underlying assumptions and frameworks that are developed within different countries with respect to how risk communication strategies related to the management of nuclear wastes are understood and implemented in practice. The second year was devoted to discussions on such frameworks across groups within the various countries, and during the third year the discussion are extended in a cross-national discussion form. The activities in the second year of the project involved a series of Focus Group discussions designed to explore some of the issues raised in the face to face interviews that were held in the first year. It was intended to involve those who took part in the interviews in these subsequent discussions, together with any additional individuals whose participation might be considered valuable. This report documents Focus Groups held in the United Kingdom and the Slovak Republic

  17. Deliverable D2.4: Status of Dry Electrode Development Activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mihajlovic, V.; Garcia Molina, G.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of dry electrode development activity within the WP2 is tobuild a dry electrode prototype for brain wave sensing that is comfortable for the user and provides sufficient signal quality. The electrodes are to be utilized in BCI applications, namely Steady-StateVisually Evoked Potential

  18. Deliverable D5: The Multi-Megawatt Target Station (Final Report)

    CERN Document Server

    Karel Samec et al. (CERN, IPUL, ITN, PSI)

    The Eurisol initiative seeks to develop an isotope production facility to provide the scientific community with the means to achieving high yields of isotopes and extending the variety of isotopes thus produced towards more exotic types rarely seen in existing facilities.The Multi-MW converter target at the heart of the projected facility is designed to create isotopes by fissioning uranium carbide (UC) target arranged coaxially around a 4 MW converter target. It is therefore essential that the target be as compact as possible to avoid losing neutrons to capture whilst maximising the neutron flux to enhance the number of fissions per second in the UC targets.The proposed ISOL facility would use both (a) several 100 kW proton beams on a thick solid target to produceRIBs directly, and (b) a liquid metal 4 MW ‘converter’ target to release high fluxes of spallation neutrons which would then produce RIBs by fission in a secondary uranium carbide (UCx) target. An alternative windowless liquid mercury-jet ‘con...

  19. Deliverable 7.2-2: Bayesian Belief Networks: Linking abiotic and biotic data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Geest, Gerben; Kramer, Lilith; Buijse, Tom

    2017-01-01

    Aquatic ecosystems in Europe have been heavily degraded over the past century, as a result of stressors including eutrophication, hydromorphological alterations and overfishing. Accordingly, many measures have been carried out or are planned to improve the ecological status of water bodies. For t...

  20. Decomobil, Deliverable 3.6, Human Centred Design for Safety Critical Transport Systems

    OpenAIRE

    PAUZIE, Annie; MENDOZA, Lucile; SIMOES, Anabela; BELLET, Thierry; MOREAU, Fabien

    2014-01-01

    The scientific seminar on 'Human Centred Design for Safety Critical Transport Systems' organized in the framework of DECOMOBIL has been held the 8th of September 2014 in Lisbon, Portugal, hosted by ADI/ISG. The aims of the event were to present the scientific problematic related to the safety of the complex transport systems and the increasing importance of human-­centred design, with a specific focus on Resilience Engineering concept, a new approach to safety management in highly complex sys...

  1. Highlights of X-Stack ExM Deliverable Swift/T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wozniak, Justin M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-03-31

    Swift/T is a key success from the ExM: System support for extreme-scale, many-task applications1 X-Stack project, which proposed to use concurrent dataflow as an innovative programming model to exploit extreme parallelism in exascale computers. The Swift/T component of the project reimplemented the Swift language from scratch to allow applications that compose scientific modules together to be build and run on available petascale computers (Blue Gene, Cray). Swift/T does this via a new compiler and runtime that generates and executes the application as an MPI program. We assume that mission-critical emerging exascale applications will be composed as scalable applications using existing software components, connected by data dependencies. Developers wrap native code fragments using a higherlevel language, then build composite applications to form a computational experiment. This exemplifies hierarchical concurrency: lower-level messaging libraries are used for fine-grained parallelism; highlevel control is used for inter-task coordination. These patterns are best expressed with dataflow, but static DAGs (i.e., other workflow languages) limit the applications that can be built; they do not provide the expressiveness of Swift, such as conditional execution, iteration, and recursive functions.

  2. Project Dickey: Evaluation of "Deliverance" Leads to Study in Research and Communications Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkhead, Douglas; Starck, Kenneth

    1973-01-01

    Reports on a journalism course at the University of South Carolina in which students follow their own interests by working on group projects to study the source, message, channel, and receiver while learning the principles of communication. (RB)

  3. Modeling & Simulation Education for the Acquisition and T&E Workforce: FY07 Deliverable Package

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-01

    Toyota : 9-602-035; Renault- Nissan : 9-303-023; IDEO: 9-600-143 Other references: NPS-SE--08-M01 165 • Bonabeau, E. (2002), “Predicting the...Pharmaceuticals, Inc 9-600-038; BMW: 9-699-044; 9-699-045; Toyota : 9-602-035; Renault- Nissan : 9-303-023; IDEO: 9-600- 143 Other references...600- 038; BMW: 9-699-044; 9-699-045; Toyota : 9-602-035; Renault- Nissan : 9-303- 023; IDEO: 9-600-143 Other references: • Bonabeau, E. (2002

  4. Discrete return lidar in natural resources: Recommendations for project planning, data processing, and deliverables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey S. Evans; Andrew T. Hudak; Russ Faux; Alistair M. S. Smith

    2009-01-01

    Recent years have seen the progression of light detection and ranging (lidar) from the realm of research to operational use in natural resource management. Numerous government agencies, private industries, and public/private stakeholder consortiums are planning or have recently acquired large-scale acquisitions, and a national U.S. lidar acquisition is likely before...

  5. TradeWind Deliverable 2.2: Forecast error of aggregated wind power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giebel, Gregor; Sørensen, Poul Ejnar; Holttinen, Hannele

    2007-01-01

    Estimates of forecast error of aggregated production for time horizons of intraday and dayahead markets in future will be produced. This will be done by reference to published studies of forecasting for wind generation, and from internal knowledge of WP2 participants. Modelling of wind power fluctuations...

  6. CATS Deliverable 5.1 : CATS verification of test matrix and protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Uittenbogaard, J.; Camp, O.M.G.C. op den; Montfort, S. van

    2016-01-01

    This report summarizes the work conducted within work package (WP) 5 "Verification of test matrix and protocol" of the Cyclist AEB testing system (CATS) project. It describes the verification process of the draft CATS test matrix resulting from WP1 and WP2, and the feasibility of meeting requirements set by CATS consortium based on requirements in Euro NCAP AEB protocols regarding accuracy, repeatability and reproducibility using the developed test hardware. For the cases where verification t...

  7. Interim report deliverable 3.2 : focus group management process of the restricted use technology study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-09-30

    The Altarum Institute, under contract to the Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT), currently is engaged in a project called the Altarum Restricted Use Technology Study. This study, an 18-month effort, seeks to apply restricted use techn...

  8. LLNL Contribution to Sandia Used Fuel Disposition - Security March 2011 Deliverable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blink, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    Cleary (2007) divides the proliferation pathway into stages: diversion, facility misuse, transportation, transformation, and weapons fabrication. King (2010), using Cleary's methodology, compares a deepburn fusion-driven blanket containing weapons-grade plutonium with a PWR burning MOX fuel enrichments of 5-9%. King considers the stages of theft, transportation, transformation, and nuclear explosive fabrication. In the current study of used fuel storage security, a similar approach is appropriate. First, one must consider the adversary's objective, which can be categorized as on-site radionuclide dispersion, theft of material for later radionuclide dispersion, and theft of material for later processing and fabrication into a nuclear explosive. For on-site radionuclide dispersion, only a single proliferation pathway stage is appropriate: dispersion. That situation will be addressed in future reports. For later radionuclide dispersion, the stages are theft, transportation, and transformation (from oxide spent fuel containing both fission products and actinides to a material size and shape suitable for dispersion). For later processing and fabrication into a nuclear explosive, the stages are theft (by an outsider or by facility misuse by an insider), transportation, transformation (from oxide spent fuel containing both fission products and actinides to a metal alloy), and fabrication (of the alloy into a weapon). It should be noted that the theft and transportation stages are similar, and possibly identical, for later radionuclide dispersion and later processing and fabrication into a nuclear explosive. Each stage can be evaluated separately, and the methodology can vary for each stage. For example, King starts with the methodology of Cleary for the theft, transportation, transformation, and fabrication stages. Then, for each stage, King assembles and modifies the attributes and inputs suggested by Cleary. In the theft (also known as diversion) stage, Cleary has five high-level categories (material handling during diversion, difficulty of evading detection by the accounting system, difficulty of evading detection by the material control system, difficulty of conducting undeclared facility modifications for the purpose of diverting nuclear material, and difficulty of evading detection of the facility modifications for the purposes of diverting nuclear material). Each category has one or more subcategories. For example, the first category includes mass per significant quantity (SQ) of nuclear material, volume/SQ of nuclear material, number of items/SQ, material form (solid, liquid, powder, gas), radiation level in terms of dose, chemical reactivity, heat load, and process temperature. King adds the following two subcategories to that list: SQs available for theft, and interruptions/changes (normal and unexpected) in material stocks and flows. For the situation of an orphaned surface storage facility, this approach is applicable, with some of the categories and subcategories being modified to reflect the static situation (no additions or removals of fuel or containers). In addition, theft would require opening a large overpack and either removing a full container or opening that sealed container and then removing one or more spent nuclear fuel assemblies. These activities would require time without observation (detection), heavy-duty equipment, and some degree of protection of the thieves from radiological dose. In the transportation stage, Cleary has two high-level categories (difficulty of handling material during transportation, and difficulty of evading detection during transport). Each category has a number of subcategories. For the situation of an orphaned surface storage facility, these categories are applicable. The transformation stage of Cleary has three high-level categories (facilities and equipment needed to process diverted materials; knowledge, skills, and workforce needed to process diverted materials; and difficulty of evading detection of transformation activities). Again, there are subcategories. King (2007) adds a fourth high-level category: time required to transform the materials. For the situation of an orphaned surface storage facility, the categories are applicable, but the evaluations of each category and subcategory will be significantly different for later radionuclide dispersion than for later processing and fabrication into a nuclear explosive. The fabrication stage of Cleary has three high-level categories (difficulty associated with design, handling difficulties, and knowledge and skills needed to design and fabricate). King replaces the first two high-level categories with the Figure of Merit for Nuclear Explosives Utility (FOM), with subcategories of bare critical mass, heat content of transformed material, dose rate of transformed material, and SQs available for theft. The next section of this report describes the FOM in more detail.

  9. Doppler lidar mounted on a wind turbine nacelle – UPWIND deliverable D6.7.1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelou, Nikolas; Mann, Jakob; Courtney, Michael

    measurements, was estimated by means of spectral analysis. An attempt to increase the resolution of the wind speed measurements of a cw lidar was performed, through the deconvolution of the lidar signal. A theoretical model of such a procedure is presented in this report. A simulation has validated...... the capability of the algorithm to deconvolve and consequently increase the resolution of the lidar system. However the proposed method was not efficient when applied to real lidar wind speed measurements, probably due to the effect, that the wind direction fluctuations along the lidar’s line-of-sight have...

  10. Scenarios for EU citizenship in 2030 - Repertoires for action in thinkable futures (Deliverable 11.5)

    OpenAIRE

    Bakker, Wieger; van der Kolk, Marlot

    2017-01-01

    European Union (EU) citizenship is both about a legal status - a set of civil, social, economic and political rights complementing one’s national citizenship - and about being an active participating member of the EU political community. EU citizenship includes therefore influencing decisionmaking on rules, policies and practices that effect one’s own national and local societies. The opportunities and capacities to exercise these rights and to participate differ between countries, between gr...

  11. Deliverable 4.4 - Review effective feedback and formative assessment in e-learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heitink, Maaike Christine; Veldkamp, Bernard P.; Dobson, Stephen; Argusti, Gabrielle

    2014-01-01

    This systematic review is written in the frame of a European Union funded project called Supporting Lifelong learning with ICT Inquiry-Based Education (LIBE). Through this project, an e-learning environment will be developed for young low educational achievers (aged 16-24). A crucial part in every

  12. On the adequacy of the format proposed to communicate risk and uncertainty. Deliverable D17

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolado, R.

    2009-12-01

    A template was developed in the first part of the ARGONA project to communicate the risk associated to a SNF/HLW repository. As a result of two sets of meetings, the format has evolved into two different formats. The first format has been designed to address an audience composed of people with a good education level (good background in mathematics), while the second one addresses a generic audience containing lay stakeholders. Both formats are implemented as verbal presentations supported by a PowerPoint file containing graphic supporting material and include the following sections: - the concept of risk and its steering role to assess repository safety, - what is a repository and how it works (small differences between formats 1 and 2 in the level of detail), - regulatory limits, - uncertainty sources and the way to tackle them, and - key results from a Safety Case/Safety Assessment to communicate (two different levels of communication of results, which make the most important difference between formats 1 and 2). The preferred output variable to communicate risk is the peak total dose and the preferred graphic representation is the boxplot. The selection of this output variable is a conservative option that reports the worst situation in each Monte Carlo simulation which, additionally, avoids the introduction of time in the results to communicate. The boxplot has been selected because of its easy interpretation and its suitability to facilitate the comparison of results from different scenarios

  13. Comparison of deliverable and exhaustible pressurized air flow rates in laboratory gloveboxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compton, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    Calculations were performed to estimate the maximum credible flow rates of pressurized air into Plutonium Process Support Laboratories gloveboxes. Classical equations for compressible fluids were used to estimate the flow rates. The calculated maxima were compared to another's estimates of glovebox exhaust flow rates and corresponding glovebox internal pressures. No credible pressurized air flow rate will pressurize a glovebox beyond normal operating limits. Unrestricted use of the pressurized air supply is recommended

  14. Deliverable D8.4 - Report on Collaboration with Standardization Bodies, NIS and Other External Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Papastergiou, Spyros; Karantjias, Thanos; Chatzikou, Menia; Vidali, Peggy; Douligeris, Christos; Stavrakakis, Ioannis; Kalogeraki, Eleni-Maria; Zacharias, Marios; Purcarea, Razvan; Cocor, Gabriel; Schauer, Stefan; König, Sandra; Mouratidis, Haris; Pavlidis, Michalis; Polatidis, Nikolaos

    2018-01-01

    Despite the importance of Critical Information Infrastructures (CIIs) and dynamic ICT‐based maritime supply chains (SCs) for port operations, state‐of‐the‐art Risk Management (RM) methodologies for maritime environments pay limited attention to cyber‐security and do not adequately address security processes for international SCs. Motivated by these limitations, MITIGATE will introduce, integrate, validate and commercialize a novel RM system, which will empower stakeholders’ collaboration for ...

  15. Deliverable D4.2. Report on Standards and Regulations Compliance

    OpenAIRE

    Duzha, Armend; Polemi, Nineta; Gouvas, Panagiotis; Karantjias, Athanasis; Papastergious, Spyros; Patsakis, Constantinos; Douligeris, Christios; Glykos, Stamatios; Exarchou, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Despite the importance of Critical Information Infrastructures (CIIs) and dynamic ICT-based maritime supply chains (SCs) for port operations, state-of-the-art Risk Management (RM) methodologies for maritime environments pay limited attention to cyber-security and do not adequately address security processes for international SCs. Motivated by these limitations, MITIGATE will introduce, integrate, validate and commercialize a novel RM system, which will empower stakeholders’ collaboration for ...

  16. CATS Deliverable 5.1 : CATS verification of test matrix and protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uittenbogaard, J.; Camp, O.M.G.C. op den; Montfort, S. van

    2016-01-01

    This report summarizes the work conducted within work package (WP) 5 "Verification of test matrix and protocol" of the Cyclist AEB testing system (CATS) project. It describes the verification process of the draft CATS test matrix resulting from WP1 and WP2, and the feasibility of meeting

  17. Papers of a Canadian Institute conference on basin deliverability in the WCSB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Much of North America depends on the reserves of the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin (WCSB). As the basin reaches maturity, higher drilling levels and higher capital expenditures will be required to meet energy demands. This conference addresses the issue of future production from the WCSB and discusses how increasing decline rates will impact every sector of the natural gas industry. Topics of discussion include transportation assets, price volatility, and the gap between supply and demand. Key questions arising from depleting conventional gas reserves were addressed along with how gas prices will react to supply constraint. The issue of whether unconventional gas can make up for the shortfall in supply was discussed along with strategic decisions regarding the possibility of raising tolls to offset the effects of supply shortage. The impact that Alberta's regulatory environment may have on the economics of production in the WCSB were also discussed. The conference featured 11 presentations, of which 3 have been indexed separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs

  18. Demonstration of Enhanced Filtration for Treatment of Shipyard Storm Water, Deliverable 1, Design Report

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2000-01-01

    .... Shipyards are among the first industries to be targeted by the states for heavier regulation because of their high-profile water front locations and their necessary use of toxic antifouling compounds in hull coatings...

  19. Deliverable 1.2: Report on ENP Policy Concerning its Objectives and Policy Measures over Time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borell, M.; Boschma, R.A.; Monastiriotis, V.; Wesselink, E.

    2012-01-01

    This report consists of two working papers, which subsequently offer an overview of the history, structure and institutional instruments of the ENP and the policies that have been implemented due to the ENP, and a review of the political and political economy literature on the ENP. Together these

  20. Dual-purpose self-deliverable lunar surface PV electrical power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Jack H.; Harris, David W.; Cross, Eldon R.; Flood, Dennis J.

    1991-01-01

    A safe haven and work supported PV power systems on the lunar surface will likely be required by NASA in support of the manned outpost scheduled for the post-2000 lunar/Mars exploration and colonization initiative. Initial system modeling and computer analysis shows that the concept is workable and contains no major high risk technology issues which cannot be resolved in the circa 2000 to 2025 timeframe. A specific selection of the best suited type of electric thruster has not been done; the initial modeling was done using an ion thruster, but Rocketdyne must also evaluate arc and resisto-jets before a final design can be formulated. As a general observation, it appears that such a system can deliver itself to the Moon using many system elements that must be transported as dead payload mass in more conventional delivery modes. It further appears that a larger power system providing a much higher safe haven power level is feasible if this delivery system is implemented, perhaps even sufficient to permit resource prospecting and/or lab experimentation. The concept permits growth and can be expanded to include cargo transport such as habitat and working modules. In short, the combined payload could be manned soon after landing and checkout. NASA has expended substantial resources in the development of electric propulsion concepts and hardware that can be applied to a lunar transport system such as described herein. In short, the paper may represent a viable mission on which previous investments play an invaluable role. A more comprehensive technical paper which embodies second generation analysis and system size will be prepared for near-term presentation.

  1. Data systems and requirements. Road Infrastructure Safety Management Evaluation Tools (RISMET), Deliverable No. 2.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stefan, C. Dietze, M. Marchesini, P. Louise, W. & Candappa, N.L.

    2014-01-01

    “ERA-NET ROAD — Coordination and Implementation of Road Research in Europe” was a Coordination Action funded by the 6th Framework Programme of the EC. The partners in ERA-NET ROAD (ENR) were United Kingdom, Finland, Netherlands, Sweden, Germany, Norway, Switzerland, Austria, Poland, Slovenia and

  2. Export support of renewable energy industries, grant number 1, deliverable number 3. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-14

    The United States Export Council for Renewable Energy (US/ECRE), a consortium of six industry associations, promotes the interests of the renewable energy and energy efficiency member companies which provide goods and services in biomass, geothermal, hydropower, passive solar, photovoltaics, solar thermal, wind, wood energy, and energy efficiency technologies. US/ECRE`s mission is to catalyze export markets for renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies worldwide. Under this grant, US/ECRE has conducted a number of in-house activities, as well as to manage activities by member trade associations, affiliate organizations and non-member contractors and consultants. The purpose of this document is to report on grant coordination and effectiveness.

  3. Export support of renewable energy industries. Task number 1, deliverable number 3. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-14

    The United States Export Council for Renewable Energy (US/ECRE), a consortium of six industry associations, promotes the interests of the renewable energy and energy efficiency member companies which provide goods and services in biomass, geothermal, hydropower, passive solar, photovoltaics, solar thermal, wind, wood energy, and energy efficiency technologies. US/ECRE`s mission is to catalyze export markets for renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies worldwide. Under this grant, US/ECRE has conducted a number of in-house activities, as well as to manage activities by member trade associations, affiliate organizations and non-member contractors and consultants. The purpose of this document is to report on task coordination and effectiveness.

  4. H2FIRST Reference Station Design Task: Project Deliverable 2-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratt, Joseph [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Terlip, Danny [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ainscough, Chris [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kurtz, Jennifer [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Elgowainy, Amgad [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-04-20

    This report presents near-term station cost results and discusses cost trends of different station types. It compares various vehicle rollout scenarios and projects realistic near-term station utilization values using the station infrastructure rollout in California as an example. It describes near-term market demands and matches those to cost-effective station concepts. Finally, the report contains detailed designs for five selected stations, which include piping and instrumentation diagrams, bills of materials, and several site-specific layout studies that incorporate the setbacks required by NFPA 2, the National Fire Protection Association Hydrogen Technologies Code. This work identified those setbacks as a significant factor affecting the ability to site a hydrogen station, particularly liquid stations at existing gasoline stations. For all station types, utilization has a large influence on the financial viability of the station.

  5. Marrying project deliverability models and labour supply for the oil sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albright, R.; Whitaker, C.A. [Fluor Canada Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2005-07-01

    Alberta is predicting a labour shortage to support the construction and operation of planned oil sands projects in the region. This paper provided a framework of options available to stakeholders in addressing resource constraints from the viewpoint of Fluor Canada Ltd. A background of previous projects was presented, which highlighted various strategies used in the management of human resources issues. Strategies included local hiring through the Alberta-based trade unions; recruitment from other Canadian provinces; a higher ratio of apprentices; extremely high utilization crew schedules; and extended use of overtime. It was noted that these strategies resulted in some cost overruns and lower productivity levels. A productivity analysis was used to determine and resolve productivity issues. Various regulations in Alberta were discussed in relation to training programs and skilled immigrants. Various international training facilities operated by Fluor were reviewed. A factor model of human resources issues was presented. Summaries of supply chain management, systems, and technologies were presented. Issues concerning prefabrication, pre-assembly, modularization and offsite fabrication were discussed. It was concluded that by taking advantage of lessons learned in previous projects a solid foundation is set from which to plan for future requirements. Successful project execution is achieved by taking advantage of current technology; enhancing modular construction standards; and using supply chain management techniques and enhanced labour supply solutions. tabs., figs.

  6. Deliverable D7.5 - Best Practices for Replicability and Wider Use

    OpenAIRE

    Karantjias, Thanos; Papastergiou, Spyros; Zacharias, Marios; Purcarea, Razvan; Cocor, Gabriel; Chatzikou, Menia; Douligeris, Christos; Negkas, Dimitrios; Mitropoulos, Sarantis; Daikos, Lampros; Bosse, Claudia

    2018-01-01

    Despite the importance of Critical Information Infrastructures (CIIs) and dynamic ICT‐based maritime supply chains (SCs) for port operations, state‐of‐the‐art Risk Management (RM) methodologies for maritime environments pay limited attention to cyber‐security and do not adequately address security processes for international SCs. Motivated by these limitations, MITIGATE will introduce, integrate, validate and commercialize a novel RM system, which will empower stakeholders’ collaboration for ...

  7. Industrial Fuel Gas Demonstration Plant Program. Demonstration plant operation plan (Deliverable No. 38)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-01-01

    The Demo Plant Operating Plan is composed of the following sequence of events starting with the training or personnel, familiarizing of the personnel with the plant and completing the long-term run in the following sequences: inspection during construction, plant completion, shakedown of equipment, process unit startup, shakedown of process units, variable run operation and a turnaround. During the construction period, technical personnel from DRC, MLGW and IGT will be at the plant site becoming familiar with the equipment, its installation and all of the auxiliaries so that on completion of construction they will be well grounded on the plant detail and its configuration. At the same time the supervisory operating personnel will have hands on training the gasifier operation at the IGT pilot plant to develop a field for gasifier operation. As a plant sections are completed, they will be checked out in accordance with the contractor and operator (client) procedure as outlined. Subsequent to this, various vendor designs and furnished equipment will be checked out operating-wise and a performance test run if feasible. The actual startup of the plant will be subsequential with the support areas as utilities, coal handling and waste treatment being placed in operation first. Subsequent to this the process units will be placed in operation starting from the rear of the process train and working forward. Thus the downstream units will be operating before the reactor is run on coal. The reactor will be checked out on coke operation.

  8. Deliverable 2: tutorial on internet services for SURFnet4 Infrastructure Project 1998

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chimento, P.F.

    1998-01-01

    This document contains a tutorial on the recent work in the area of offering services in the Internet. We cover the principles and some of the details of In- tegrated Services and Differentiated Services. We also explain the relationship to RSVP of each of these architectures. Finally, we draw some

  9. Report assessment match/mismatch and issues with combined funding: deliverable 5.3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heide, M. de; Butter, M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective of the report is to assess how to finance the set-up and / or continuation of what is defined as Large-scale RDI initiatives (LSIs, see Box 1). The report analyses the potential use of different public and private funding sources, and how these can be combined. The analysis will result in

  10. UPWIND Metrology, Deliverable D 1A2.1, List of measurement Parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Schaldemose

    performance measurements - Improvement of aerodynamic codes - Assessment of wind resources In general terms the uncertainty of the testing techniques and methods are typically much higher than the need. Since this problem covers many areas of wind energy, the work package is de-fined as a crosscutting...... activity. The problem is especially relevant for the following areas: Production related - Power performance testing especially in wind farms - Testing of turbine improvements in the order of several percent - Testing of aerodynamic codes - Testing of turbine response to effects such as turbulence...... profiles, turbulence, surface shear recovery distances etc) - Measurements of the interaction wind farms and microclimate The objectives of the metrology work package are to develop metrology tools in wind energy to significantly enhance the quality of measurement and testing techniques. The development...

  11. ACUMEN deliverable D5.4 – Consequences of Indicators. Effects on the users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wildgaard, Lorna Elizabeth; Larsen, Birger; Schneider, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    As funding and evaluation are presented to the researcher as part of the same package, control of the assessment of ‘quality’ and ‘impact’ (in their many guises) in an evaluation can be improved by actively involving the individual researcher. However, encouraging researchers to document...... their activities with bibliometrics means it is important to understand the ethical implications of this type of self-evaluation....

  12. Tradewind Deliverable 6.1: Assessment of increasing capacity on selected transmission corridors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korpås, Magnus; Warland, Leif; Tande, John Olav

    2008-01-01

    This report presents the main activity of Work Package 6 (WP6) in the TradeWind project. The main aim of the work package is to develop relevant proposals for offshore and onshore grid reinforcements based on an evaluation of the effect on the power flows. The analyses presented in this report...

  13. Deliverable 4.1 Homogeneous LCA methodology agreed by NEPTUNE and INNOWATECH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Henrik Fred; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky; Wenzel, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    In order to do a life cycle assessment (LCA) of a waste water treatment technique, a system to handle the mapped inventory data and a life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) method/model is needed. Besides NEPTUNE, another EU-funded project has the same methodology need namely INNOWATECH (contract No....... 036882) running in parallel with NEPTUNE but focusing on industrial waste water. With the aim of facilitating cooperation between the two projects a common LCA methodology framework has been worked out and is described in the following. This methodology work has been done as a joint effort between...... NEPTUNE WP4 and INNOWATECH WP4 represented by the WP4 lead partner IVL. The aim of the co-operation is to establish common methodologies and/or LCA models and/or tools in order to achieve a homogenous approach in INNOWATECH and NEPTUNE. Further, the aim is to facilitate possibilities of data exchange...

  14. Manual on the Socrobust tool and recent experiences with using Socrobust. Deliverable 1 of Create Acceptance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poti, B.M. [CERIS-CNR, Rome (Italy); Mourik, R.; Raven, R.P.J.M.; Feenstra, C.F.J. [ECN Policy Studies, Petten (Netherlands); Jolivet, E. [IAE, Toulouse (France); Alcantud Torrent, A.; Schaefer, B. [EcoInstitute, Barcelona (Spain); Bauknecht, D.; Brohmann, B.; Fritsche, U.R. [OEKO Institut, Freiburg (Germany); Fucsko, J. [Hungarian Environmental Economics Center MAKK, Budapest (Hungary); Heiskanen, E. [NCRC (Finland); Hodson, M. [Centre for Sustainable Urban and Regional Futures SURF, Manchester (United Kingdom); Maack, M.H. [INE (Ireland); Oniszk-Poplawska, A. [Institute for Renewable Energy IEO, Warszawa (Poland)

    2007-06-15

    This first task entailed familiarising the consortium with the original Socrobust tool. The project Socrobust incorporated twenty years of Science and Technology Studies literature into a reflexive method for anticipating future stakeholders reactions to innovation by making explicit the innovator's assumptions build into the design of an innovation. The method needed to be flexible to adapt to a variety of situation and be useful for managers. A standard (consultancy) process was developed, composed by a tool-kit and a protocol for interaction with managers. The Socrobust tool consists of four steps with each different tools. The original Socrobust is a method of assessment based on one stakeholder in the relevant position of managing an innovation project. It was aimed at reflection and learning and less aimed at action and implementation. The WP1 report is an introduction to the original Socrobust toolkit and a critical review of its suitability to measure, promote and support social acceptance of innovative RES and RUE technologies. In general it can be stated that the existing steps and most of the instruments of the original Socrobust toolkit can be maintained, but that additions and small alterations need to be made if the tool is to function as a tool that assists multiple relevant stakeholders simultaneously instead of only the direct developers or innovators. In addition, the Socrobust instruments need additions and alterations to function as a toolkit that can measure societal robustness and create a platform to involve relevant stakeholders in the process of developing a socially robust product. The above briefly discussed results and recommendations are the starting point for the consortium's efforts in WP3, where Socrobust will be developed into a new toolkit and methodology for Create Acceptance (Cultural Influences on Renewable Energy Acceptance and Tools for the development of communication strategies to promotE ACCEPTANCE among key actor groups)

  15. Allowing Students to Select Deliverables for Peer Review: Analysis of a Free-Selection Protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papadopoulos, Pantelis M.; Lagkas, Thomas; Demetriadis, Stavros

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzes the benefits and limitations of a “free-selection” peer assignment protocol by comparing them to the widely implemented “assigned-pair” protocol. The primary motivation was to circumvent the issues that often appear to the instructors implementing peer review activities with pre......-Selection, where students were able to explore and select peer work for review. Result analysis showed a very strong tendency in favor of the Free-Selection students regarding both domain specific (conceptual) and domain-general (reviewing) knowledge....

  16. Mediation by Demonstration and Dialogue. An Evaluation of Practices. Deliverable D12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elam, Mark; Sundqvist, Goeran; Soneryd, Linda

    2009-10-01

    Two basic forms of mediation have been identified and analysed: the public mediation of radioactive waste management by demonstration and by dialogue. The former coincides firstly with the showing and visualizing radioactive waste management issues and solutions for public inspection and recognition. The latter, on the other hand, corresponds firstly with the establishment of different styles of public discussion, deliberation and inquiry for elaborating further on policy issues and solutions. Both forms of mediation provide the basis for the collection and collation of significant bodies of public evidence and testimony which can be used to continuously inform and guide decision-making processes. Principles and Guidelines of Mediation 1. Both mediation by demonstration and mediation by dialogue should be understood as indispensable in the formation of arenas of risk governance in radioactive waste management. 2. As the two basic forms of mediation each has its own part to play in advancing radioactive waste management solutions, neither one should be automatically privileged over the other in any policy process 3. Both mediation by demonstration and mediation by dialogue can be expected to generate large bodies of public evidence and testimony which can be used to help inform and guide decision-making processes. Historically, evidence deriving from mediation by demonstration has been accorded greater prominence in the radioactive waste management field than evidence deriving from mediation by dialogue. For this reason, new ways of effectively combining evidence and testimony deriving from both forms of mediation should be explored in policy processes in future. 4. Because mediation by demonstration builds upon a clear division between those who demonstrate and those who are being asked to see and evaluate what is being shown, mediation by dialogue should be conceived and constructed as an opportunity to unsettle and destabilize these established roles. 5. Because mediation by dialogue serves to erase the divide between 'demonstrators' and the 'inspectors/observers' of radioactive waste management problems and solutions, mediation by demonstration should be conceived as implying the organization of 'show trials' attempting to publicly reaffirm the legitimacy of the division of management powers they support. 6. Neither mediation by demonstration nor mediation by dialogue should be thought of as predominantly technical or political activities. Both should be recognized and appreciated as contributing to the creation of public arenas where 'technology' and 'politics' can be brought into close and continuous contact with each other in the pursuit of exemplary radioactive waste management solutions. 7. Combining mediation by demonstration with mediation by dialogue allows for greater public recognition to be granted to the 'hidden' roles that both play in each other. The two basic forms of mediation always impinge on each other, and recognizing this opens the way for a significant expansion of the dialogues structuring demonstrations, as well as a broader evaluation of the demonstrations woven into dialogues. 8. Mediation by demonstration and mediation by dialogue should not be understood as alternative ways of seeking to advance radioactive waste management solutions, so much as interdependent ways. They serve to sustain and enlarge the relevance of each other. In combination they can help to strengthen the political legitimacy and technical integrity of radioactive waste management solutions. Pursued in apparent isolation from each other, however, they may unnecessarily complicate the communication about radioactive waste management

  17. OpenKnowledge Deliverable 3.3.: A methodology for ontology matching quality evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Yatskevich, Mikalai; Giunchiglia, Fausto; McNeill, Fiona; Shvaiko, Pavel

    2007-01-01

    This document presents an evaluation methodology for the assessment of quality results produced by ontology matchers. In particular, it discusses: (i) several standard quality measures used in the ontology matching evaluation, (ii) a methodology of how to build semiautomatically an incomplete reference alignment allowing for the assessment of quality results produced by ontology matchers and (iii) a preliminary empirical evaluation of the OpenKnowledge ontology matching component.

  18. Human factor tests on car demonstrator Deliverable no D6.4. Final draft

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schindhelm, R.; Gelau, C.; Montanari, R.; Morreale, D.; Deregibus, E.; Hoedemaeker, D.M.; Ridder, S. de; Piamonte, P.

    2003-01-01

    The main objective of the COMUNICAR on-road tests was to evaluate the effect on driver’s workload, acceptance, system usability and driving performance when using the COMUNICAR multimedia HMI which integrates innovative I/O devices and the Information Manager (IM). All these criteria are expected to

  19. Nanoencapsulation of mycolic acids as a deliverable to macrophages - 2nd CSIR Biennial Conference

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Benadie, Y

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available by a Th2 response. Mycolic acids (MA), depicted in Figure 1, which are part of the cell envelope of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, were shown to have potential as immunotherapeutic agents in a mouse model of asthma1. Due to the extremely hydrophobic... the stability of the drug as well as effect controlled release of the agent as a function of in vivo particle degradation2. Figure 1: Generalised structures of MA from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Hydrocarbon chain lengths are indicated as a, b or c, to a...

  20. DELIVERABLE 2.1.2 PRODUCTION ANALYSIS: CHEROKEE AND BUG FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chidsey, Thomas C. Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Over 400 million barrels (64 million m 3 ) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m 3 ) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m 3 ) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado

  1. Highlights of X-Stack ExM Deliverable: MosaStore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ripeanu, Matei [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2016-07-20

    This brief report highlights the experience gained with MosaStore, an exploratory part of the X-Stack project “ExM: System support for extreme-scale, many-task applications”. The ExM project proposed to use concurrent workflows supported by the Swift language and runtime as an innovative programming model to exploit parallelism in exascale computers. MosaStore aims to support this endeavor by improving storage support for workflow-based applications, more precisely by exploring the gains that can be obtained from co-designing the storage system and the workflow runtime engine. MosaStore has been developed primarily at the University of British Columbia.

  2. Policy making structures in the EU and participating countries. Deliverable D2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Kjell; Lidberg, Maria; Falck, Eberhard

    2008-10-01

    The point of departure for the ARGONA project is that participation and transparency are key elements of effective risk governance. The acronym ARGONA stands for 'Arenas for Risk Governance' and the project investigates how approaches of transparency and deliberation relate to each other and also how they relate to the political system in which decisions, for example on the final disposal of nuclear waste, are ultimately taken. The project then turns to study the role played by mediators, who facilitate public engagement with nuclear waste management issues, and the 'conduct of the conduct' of public consultations. By the latter is meant the communication of models used for deliberation and transparency. Furthermore, the project investigates how good risk communication can be organized taking cultural aspects and different arenas into account. In a central part of the project major efforts are made to test and apply approaches to transparency and participation by making explicit what it would mean to use the RISCOM model and other approaches within different cultural and organizational settings. Finally, the ARGONA partners develop guidelines for the application of novel approaches that will enhance real progress in nuclear waste management programmes. The project consists of six work packages that logically starts with a description of the policy making structures that exist within the EU and in the participating countries, including EU Directives, such as Strategic Environmental Assessment and Environmental Impact Assessment Directives, as well as national nuclear safety and environmental legislation. This work package (WP 1) forms the point of departure for the project, in determining the framework within which new arenas can be formed and within which the mediators are acting. A questionnaire was issued and sent to key organizations at national and local levels. The intention was that the work package should be focused on issues that set the scene for e.g. site selection and involvement of stakeholders. One issue is the requirements for, but also if there are any limitations of, the use of novel public participation approaches (as compared to traditional minimal participation such as receiving information, asking questions at public meetings and submitting written comments) within the legal systems. Initially, the basic method of the work package was thus to analyze information gathered by the questionnaire survey. It was later decided to include more of external sources of information in the review such as other governance projects supported by DG Research of the European Commission. Furthermore, a study made on the legal aspects of information and participation in the nuclear sector made by the University of Aberdeen in a contract with DG TREN in 2005-2006 gave starting point for the WP 1 work Paterson et al. This study stays with strict legal requirements and in the discussion in this report we go deeper into how they are practiced with regard to participation and transparency. The decision to complement the survey by taking other sources of information into account and referring to them was made partly to avoid unnecessary duplication of work and partly as the questionnaire responses were fewer than expected. In the end, it is believed that this approach made the work and thus this report richer than otherwise would been the case. This report was concluded with a combination of efforts from Karita and the Joint Research Centre (JRC). In Chapter 2 we give more details on the relevant international agreements, thus mainly referring to the DG TREN report when it comes to national legislation. In chapter 3 we summarize the results from the survey with regard to driving forces behind efforts for participation and transparency, current practices and future needs. Finally, in Chapter 4 we discuss the situation taking both formal requirements, as described in chapter 3 and in the DG TREN report, and the survey responses into account. Appendix 1 provides the questionnaire itself and Appendix 2 lists the responding organizations

  3. Milestone Deliverable: FY18-Q1: Deploy production sliding mesh capability with linear solver benchmarking.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domino, Stefan P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-12-01

    This milestone was focused on deploying and verifying a “sliding-mesh interface,” and establishing baseline timings for blade-resolved simulations of a sub-MW-scale turbine. In the ExaWind project, we are developing both sliding-mesh and overset-mesh approaches for handling the rotating blades in an operating wind turbine. In the sliding-mesh approach, the turbine rotor and its immediate surrounding fluid are captured in a “disk” that is embedded in the larger fluid domain. The embedded fluid is simulated in a coordinate system that rotates with the rotor. It is important that the coupling algorithm (and its implementation) between the rotating and inertial discrete models maintains the accuracy of the numerical methods on either side of the interface, i.e., the interface is “design order.”

  4. A Report on Deliverable Three: Determine a Standard Performance Test for Military Suction Device Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-20

    evaluating device suction while either wetted or completely immersed is highly important to predict performance in battlefield scenarios. Summary...mechanical, electrical, and environmental. OBJECTIVE: Research and review current test methods outlined in ISO 10079 and published journal articles...of contemporary oropharyngeal suction. The American journal of emergency medicine 17, 611- 613 (1999). 4. Hodgetts, T., Mahoney, P., Evans, G

  5. Deliverability and regional pricing in U.S. natural gas markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Stephen P.A.; Yuecel, Mine K.

    2008-01-01

    During the 1980s and early 90s, interstate natural gas markets in the United States made a transition away from the regulation that characterized the previous three decades. With abundant supplies and plentiful pipeline capacity, a new order emerged in which freer markets and arbitrage closely linked natural gas price movements throughout the country. After the mid-1990s, however, U.S. natural gas markets tightened and some pipelines were pushed to capacity. We look for the pricing effects of limited arbitrage through causality testing between prices at nodes on the U.S. natural gas transportation system and interchange prices at regional nodes on North American electricity grids. Our tests do reveal limited arbitrage, which is indicative of bottlenecks in the U.S. natural gas pipeline system. (author)

  6. PATIENT WP4-Deliverable: Curriculum for Handover Training in Medical Education [Public Part

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stieger, Lina; Druener, Susanne; Schröder, Hanna; Sopka, Saša; Hynes, Helen; Henn, Patrick; Maher, Bridget; Orrego, Carola; Hassan, Fatima; Drachsler, Hendrik; Stoyanov, Slavi; Hartkopf, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    What is handover? Handover is the accurate, reliable communication of task-relevant information between doctors and patients and from one care-giver to another. This occurs in many situations in healthcare. Why is handover important? Improperly conducted handovers lead to wrong treatment, delays

  7. Southwest Center for Environmental Excellence and Opportunity Year End Report (Final Deliverable)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1998-11-09

    The Southwest Center for Environmental Excellence and Opportunity (Southwest CEEO) has been in existence since October 1996 at Albuquerque Technical Vocational Institute's (TVI) South Valley Campus. The Special Project was comprised of three objectives: (1) Increasing the number of Hispanics in careers related to the environment by improving education and job training opportunities; (2) Strengthening the infrastructure of Hispanic businesses and building their capacity to participate in environmental clean-up activities and potential technology commercialization; and (3) Increasing the Hispanic community's understanding of and participation in environmental protection through improved access to information and outreach activities, paying attention to cultural and linguistic issues. The Southwest CEEO has been successful in each of the above objective areas and continues to provide valuable services to TVI and the community. The Southwest CEEO has developed a scholarship/mentorship program involving business and industry, community organizations, and TVI faculty that will be replicated by other student mentorship programs. The Southwest CEEO has awarded approximately $50,000 over the two-year program funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Oakland Operations Office. The Southwest CEEO has also developed a K-12 partnership with Albuquerque Public Schools (APS) to enhance environmental education for students and professional development for teachers. Incorporated into these student activities are experimental learning opportunities and curriculum development and/or enhancement. The Southwest CEEO has worked closely with the TVI Small Business Development Center (SBDC) to support Hispanic businesses in technology partnership activities. The Southwest CEEO in partnership the TVI SBDC has provided a large business forum and business workshops. In addition, the Southwest CEEO has developed a Technology Transfer Model that will be expanded in the future to a technology transfer guide to be used by New Mexico SBDC's. The Southwest CEEO has been active in the Albuquerque South Valley Community and Bernalillo County to promote more Hispanic community participation in environmental issues and education opportunities. The Southwest CEEO has hosted community environmental forums, workshops, and conferences. The Southwest CEEO is also participating on the Bernalillo County Environmental Health Department Technology Deployment Initiative Advisory committee, Hispanic Statement of Cooperation Group, and the Groundwater Protection and Action Plan (GPAP) Committee.

  8. Demonstration and Dialogue: Mediation in Swedish Nuclear Waste Management. Deliverable D10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elam, Mark; Sundqvist, Goeran; Lidberg, Maria; Soneryd, Linda

    2008-10-01

    This report analyses mediation and mediators in Swedish nuclear waste management. Mediation is about establishing agreement and building common knowledge. It is argued that demonstrations and dialogue are the two prominent approaches to mediation in Swedish nuclear waste management. Mediation through demonstration is about showing, displaying, and pointing out a path to safe disposal for inspection. It implies a strict division between demonstrator and audience. Mediation through dialogue on the other hand, is about collective acknowledgements of uncertainty and suspensions of judgement creating room for broader discussion. In Sweden, it is the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co. (SKB) that is tasked with finding a method and a site for the final disposal of the nation's nuclear waste. Two different legislative frameworks cover this process. In accordance with the Act on Nuclear Activities, SKB is required to demonstrate the safety of its planned nuclear waste management system to the government, while in respect of the Swedish Environmental Code, they are obliged to organize consultations with the public. How SKB combines these requirements is the main question under investigation in this report in relation to materials deriving from three empirical settings: 1) SKB's safety analyses, 2) SKB's public consultation activities and 3) the 'dialogue projects', initiated by other actors than SKB broadening the public arena for discussion. In conclusion, an attempt is made to characterise the long-term interplay of demonstration and dialogue in Swedish nuclear waste management

  9. Hands Deliverable 4.1.5: Evaluation of Prototype 2 - as seen from the perspective of persuasive technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schärfe, Henrik; Aagaard, Morten; Øhrstrøm, Peter

    2011-01-01

    This document presents the results of the evaluation and testing of the HANDS ICT Tool Prototype 2 from the perspective of persuasive technology. It includes a presentation and a discussion of an evaluation based on a number of user interviews. It also includes an analysis and a discussion of the...

  10. Industrial Fuel Gas Demonstration-Plant Program. Volume II. The environment (Deliverable No. 27). [Baseline environmental data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-08-01

    The proposed site of the Industrial Fuel Gas Demonstration Plant (IFGDP) is located on a small peninsula extending eastward into Lake McKeller from the south shore. The peninsula is located west-southwest of the City of Memphis near the confluence of Lake McKeller and the Mississippi River. The environmental setting of this site and the region around this site is reported in terms of physical, biological, and human descriptions. Within the physical description, this report divides the environmental setting into sections on physiography, geology, hydrology, water quality, climatology, air quality, and ambient noise. The biological description is divided into sections on aquatic and terrestrial ecology. Finally, the human environment description is reported in sections on land use, demography, socioeconomics, culture, and visual features. This section concludes with a discussion of physical environmental constraints.

  11. Final Deliverable W6, D6.4: Coal power plants with carbon capture and storage – A sustainability assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramirez, C.A.; Schakel, W.B.; Wood, R.; Grytli, T.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is increasingly gaining attention as a strategy for the abatement of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. CCS includes the capture of CO2 emissions from electricity generation plants and/or industrial processes, its transport (by pipeline or ships) and sequestration in

  12. Industrial Fuel Gas Demonstration Plant Program. Task III, Demonstration plant safety, industrial hygiene, and major disaster plan (Deliverable No. 35)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-03-01

    This Health and Safety Plan has been adopted by the IFG Demonstration Plant managed by Memphis Light, Gas and Water at Memphis, Tennessee. The plan encompasses the following areas of concern: Safety Plan Administration, Industrial Health, Industrial Safety, First Aid, Fire Protection (including fire prevention and control), and Control of Safety Related Losses. The primary objective of this plan is to achieve adequate control of all potentially hazardous activities to assure the health and safety of all employees and eliminate lost work time to both the employees and the company. The second objective is to achieve compliance with all Federal, state and local laws, regulations and codes. Some thirty specific safe practice instruction items are included.

  13. The challenges of interventions to promote healthier food in independent takeaways in England: qualitative study of intervention deliverers' views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffe, Louis; Penn, Linda; Adams, Jean; Araujo-Soares, Vera; Summerbell, Carolyn D; Abraham, Charles; White, Martin; Adamson, Ashley; Lake, Amelia A

    2018-01-27

    Much of the food available from takeaways, pubs and restaurants particularly that sold by independent outlets, is unhealthy and its consumption is increasing. These food outlets are therefore important potential targets for interventions to improve diet and thus prevent diet related chronic diseases. Local authorities in England have been charged with delivering interventions to increase the provision of healthy food choices in independent outlets, but prior research shows that few such interventions have been rigorously developed or evaluated. We aimed to learn from the experiences of professionals delivering interventions in independent food outlets in England to identify the operational challenges and their suggestions for best practice. We used one-to-one semi-structured qualitative interviews to explore the views and experiences of professionals who were either employees of, or contracted by, a local authority to deliver interventions to increase the provision of healthier food choices in independent food outlets. Purposive sampling was used to recruit a sample which included men and women, from a range of professional roles, across different areas of England. Interviews were informed by a topic guide, and proceeded until no new themes emerged. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using the Framework method. We conducted 11 individual interviews. Participants focussed on independent takeaways and their unhealthy food offerings, and highlighted the advantages and disadvantages of intervention delivery methods, their evaluation and impact. The main barriers to implementation of interventions in independent takeaways were identified as limited funding and the difficulties of engaging the food outlet owner/manager. Engagement was thought to be facilitated by delivering intensive, interactive and tailored interventions, clear and specific information, and incentives, whilst accounting for practical, primarily financial, constraints of food businesses. Alternative intervention approaches, targeting suppliers or customers, were suggested. Participants emphasised independent takeaways as particularly challenging, but worthwhile intervention targets. Participants perceived that interventions need to take account of the potentially challenging operating environment, particularly the primacy of the profit motive. Upstream interventions, engaging suppliers, as well as those that drive consumer demand, may be worth exploring. Rigorous, evidence-informed development and evaluation of such interventions is needed.

  14. The National Shipbuilding Research Program, Application of Industrial Engineering Techniques to Reduce Workers' Compensation and Environmental Costs - Deliverable C

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1999-01-01

    .... Eye injuries have always been difficult to prevent in Blast and Paint due to the nature of work which includes painting, solvent washing, grinding, sanding, abrasive blasting, and mechanical cleaning...

  15. Policy support for large scale demonstration projects for hydrogen use in transport. Deliverable D 5.1 (Part B)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ros, M.E.; Jeeninga, H.; Godfroij, P.

    2007-06-01

    This research addresses the possible policy support mechanisms for hydrogen use in transport to answer the question which policy support mechanism potentially is most effective to stimulate hydrogen in transport and especially for large scale demonstrations. This is done by investigating two approaches. First, the possible policy support mechanisms for energy innovations. Second, by relating these to the different technology development stages (R and D, early market and mass market stage) and reviewing their effect on different parts of the hydrogen energy chain (production, distribution and end-use). Additionally, a comparison of the currently policy support mechanisms used in Europe (on EU level) with the United States (National and State level) is made. The analysis shows that in principle various policy support mechanisms can be used to stimulate hydrogen. The choice for a policy support mechanism should depend on the need to reduce the investment cost (euros/MW), production/use cost (euros/GJ) or increase performance (euros/kg CO2 avoided) of a technology during its development. Careful thought has to be put into the design and choice of a policy support mechanism because it can have effects on other parts of the hydrogen energy chain, mostly how hydrogen is produced. The effectiveness of a policy support mechanism greatly depends on the ability to adapt to the developments of the technology and the changing requirements which come with technological progress. In time different policy support mechanisms have to be applied. For demonstration projects there is currently the tendency to apply R and D subsidies in Europe, while the United States applies a variety of policy support mechanisms. The United States not only has higher and more support for demonstration projects but also has stronger incentives to prepare early market demand (for instance requiring public procurement and sales obligations). In order to re-establish the level playing field, Europe may also need to start applying a combination of production subsidies, investment subsidies, tax exemptions and public procurement in order to successfully start large scale demonstration projects and increase the chance of early market demand and leadership in the hydrogen for transportation. This however does not mean that the incentives that are currently in place in the US should be copied. Setting obligations on the deployment of a new technology that is in the early phase of introduction imposes high risk and may lead to severe negative side effects such as excessive costs or a loss of public acceptance. However, opportunities exist to increase the effectiveness of the financial support mechanisms. By designing the support in a way that it tackles the technology specific barriers at the different parts of the energy chain, by keeping in mind the flexibility of policy support mechanisms and by providing industry with a long term security of support Europe can create an attractive climate for the introduction of hydrogen in transport

  16. Development and demonstration of a gas-fired recuperative confined radiant burner (deliverable 42/43). Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-06-01

    The objective of the project was to develop and demonstrate an innovative, efficient, low-pollutant, recuperative gas-fired IR-system (infrared radiation) for industrial processes (hereafter referred to as the CONRAD-system). The CONRAD-system is confined, so flue gases from the combustion can be kept separated from the product. The gas/air mixture to the burner is preheated by means of the flue gas, which increases the radiant efficiency of the CONRAD-system significantly over traditional gas-fired IR burners. During the first phase of the project, the CONRAD-system was designed and developed. The conducted work included a survey on suitable burner materials, modelling of the burner system, basic design of burner construction, control etc., experimental characterisation of several preprototypes and detailed design of the internal heat exchanger in the burner. The result is a cost effective burner system with a documented radiant efficiency up to 66% and low emissions (NO{sub x} and CO) all in accordance with the criteria of success set up at the start of the project. In the second phase of the project, the burner system was established and tested in laboratory and in four selected industrial applications: 1) Drying of coatings on sand cores in the automotive industry. 2) Baking of bread/cake. 3) General purpose painting/powder curing process 4. Curing of powder paint on wood components. The results from the preliminary tests Overe used to optimise the CONRAD-system, before it was applied in the industrial processes and demonstrated. However, the optimised burners manufactured for demonstration suffered from different 'infant failures', which made the installation in an industrial environment very cumbersome, and even impossible in the food industry and the automotive industry. In the latter cases realistic laboratory tests Overe carried out and the established know how reported for use when the burner problems are overcome.(au)

  17. Report on geotechnical tests with model structures Work Package - Deliverable number: WP 7.2 – D72.2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gintautas, Tomas; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2017-01-01

    This report aims to give a comprehensive summary of the geotechnical tests with model structures that have been performed in work package 7.2 task 7.2.2 within the IRPWIND project. The large-scale tests are intended to determine soil-structure interaction effects in order to support probabilistic...... calculations of the reliability of offshore wind turbine support structures. These calculations are mainly performed in work package 7.4 of the IRPWIND project. However, this report already includes the development of a probabilistic model for the axial bearing capacity / resistance that is obtained using...

  18. Rethinking the Business Model in Construction by the Use of Off-Site System Deliverance: Case of the Shaft Project

    OpenAIRE

    Thuesen, Christian; Hvam, Lars

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a set of insights to be used in the development of business models for off-site system deliveries contributing to the development of Off-Site Manufacturing practices (OSM). The theoretical offset for discussing the development of business models is the blue ocean strategy literature combined with theories on mass-customization and platform development identifying the optimization of cost and value through the handling of complexity as the central process. This framework is...

  19. Comparing photon and proton-based hypofractioned SBRT for prostate cancer accounting for robustness and realistic treatment deliverability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddard, Lee C; Brodin, N Patrik; Bodner, William R; Garg, Madhur K; Tomé, Wolfgang A

    2018-05-01

    To investigate whether photon or proton-based stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT is the preferred modality for high dose hypofractionation prostate cancer treatment. Achievable dose distributions were compared when uncertainties in target positioning and range uncertainties were appropriately accounted for. 10 patients with prostate cancer previously treated at our institution (Montefiore Medical Center) with photon SBRT using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) were identified. MRI images fused to the treatment planning CT allowed for accurate target and organ at risk (OAR) delineation. The clinical target volume was defined as the prostate gland plus the proximal seminal vesicles. Critical OARs include the bladder wall, bowel, femoral heads, neurovascular bundle, penile bulb, rectal wall, urethra and urogenital diaphragm. Photon plan robustness was evaluated by simulating 2 mm isotropic setup variations. Comparative proton SBRT plans employing intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) were generated using robust optimization. Plan robustness was evaluated by simulating 2 mm setup variations and 3% or 1% Hounsfield unit (HU) calibration uncertainties. Comparable maximum OAR doses are achievable between photon and proton SBRT, however, robust optimization results in higher maximum doses for proton SBRT. Rectal maximum doses are significantly higher for Robust proton SBRT with 1% HU uncertainty compared to photon SBRT (p = 0.03), whereas maximum doses were comparable for bladder wall (p = 0.43), urethra (p = 0.82) and urogenital diaphragm (p = 0.50). Mean doses to bladder and rectal wall are lower for proton SBRT, but higher for neurovascular bundle, urethra and urogenital diaphragm due to increased lateral scatter. Similar target conformality is achieved, albeit with slightly larger treated volume ratios for proton SBRT, >1.4 compared to 1.2 for photon SBRT. Similar treatment plans can be generated with IMPT compared to VMAT in terms of target coverage, target conformality, and OAR sparing when range and HU uncertainties are neglected. However, when accounting for these uncertainties during robust optimization, VMAT outperforms IMPT in terms of achievable target conformity and OAR sparing. Advances in knowledge: Comparison between achievable dose distributions using modern, robust optimization of IMPT for high dose per fraction SBRT regimens for the prostate has not been previously investigated.

  20. Tank waste remediation system retrieval and disposal mission readiness-to-proceed guidance and requirements to deliverables crosswalk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, C.E.

    1998-01-01

    Before RL can authorize proceeding with Phase 1B, the PHMC team must demonstrate its readiness to retrieve and deliver the waste to the private contractors and to receive and dispose of the products and byproducts returned from the treatment. The PHMC team has organized their plans for providing these vitrification-support services into the Retrieval and Disposal Mission within the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Program

  1. CATO-2 Deliverable WP 2.3-D03 Background paper on 'Role of CCS in the international climate regime'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagemann, M.; Moltmann, S.; Palenberg, A.; De Visser, E.; Hoehne, N.; Jung, M.; Bakker, S.J.A.

    2011-03-01

    In its recent roadmap the IEA argued that CCS, in order to be effective, needs to be implemented on an international level. International cooperation is necessary to reduce costs, exchange ideas with implementation issues learned from experience and increase CCS implementation in developing countries. The aim of this study is to analyse ways to increase international cooperation in order to roll out CCS globally in developed but also developing countries. In this paper, we reviewed current international support mechanisms for CCS. Under the international climate agreement, the UNFCCC and the Kyoto Protocol, CCS does not play a major role. The clean development mechanism (CDM) is an instrument that could potentially support CCS in developing countries, but currently does not allow CCS and has no approved methodology for this technology. There are some promising developments in other areas of the international negotiations under the UNFCCC, but it is open as to what role CCS will play in them. Possible instruments include nationally appropriate mitigation actions, and climate technology innovation centres under a Technology Mechanism. We conclude that it is promising to consider bilateral and multilateral country partnerships outside the UNFCCC process. A review of existing CCS-related partnerships, undertaken within this study, showed that a growing number of such partnerships exist. These processes tend to focus on a limited number of issues, namely financing and implementation of R and D projects in the power sector, general knowledge exchange and capacity building as well as broad regulatory studies, and regions such as China. They do not sufficiently cover other important issues, such as financing and the implementation of regulatory frameworks. Partnerships with countries other than China, such as South Africa and India, are only small in size to this date. Considering the background information as analysed in this paper, we suggest three possible non-mutually exclusive pathways for CCS for the future. The first is to develop a sophisticated technology mechanism for CCS. The goal of such a mechanism would be to coordinate international efforts and to create a common voice for CCS. A second option is to use current or create new bilateral partnerships that can be accounted as fast track financing under the UNFCCC, which amounts to $30 billion USD until 2012. The third option is to create bilateral initiatives between developed and developing countries that lead to a new type of carbon credits.

  2. Cognitive changes in older road users. Deliverable of the European Project SAMERU, WP1 - Action 1.8

    OpenAIRE

    TOURNIER, Isabelle; CAVALLO, Viola; DOMMES, Aurélie

    2012-01-01

    Le rapport donne un panorama des divers déclins cognitifs se produisant avec l'avancée en âge et examine leur effet sur la sécurité et mobilité des usagers âgés de la route. Several cognitive changes occur during ageing. This report aims at identifying the impact of these cognitive changes on road user safety and mobility. Cognition refers to all forms of knowing and awareness, such as perceiving, remembering, reasoning, judging, imaging, and problem solving. These processes are analyzed f...

  3. ask 6 - Gubbio - Deliverable D21: Geological model of the Gubbio basin (Italy) for the characterization of local seismic response

    OpenAIRE

    Fiorini, E.; Pacor, F.; Bindi, D.; Rovelli, A.; Cara, F.; Di Giulio, G.; Milana, G.; Monachesi, G.; Nieto, D.; Bohm, G.; Albarello, D.; D'Amico, V.; Picozzi, M.; Mucciarelli M.; Scarascia Mugnozza, G.

    2007-01-01

    Within the framework of the project S3 “Ground shaking scenarios for some strategic areas in Italy-Task6” the town of Gubbio has been selected as a test site to compute ground motion taking into account finite fault and site effects. Gubbio is located in central Italy, on the northern slopes of one of the many valleys characterising the central Appennines. The historical settlement is located on a rocky slope, while new developments extend on the Quaternary fluvio-lacustrine de...

  4. Medical University of South Carolina Environmental Hazards Assessment Program. Deliverables: Volume 2, Annual report, July 1, 1993--June 30, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-18

    This reference is concerned with the Crossroads of Humanity workshop which is part of the Environmental Hazards Assessment Program at the Medical University of South Carolina. This workshop was held during the months of June and July 1994. Topics discussed include: Radioactive contamination, aging, medical ethics, and environmental risk analysis.

  5. A meta-modeling technique for analyzing, designing and adapting healthcare processes : A process-deliverable perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blijleven, Vincent; Jaspers, Monique; Wetzels, Marijntje; Koelemeijer, Kitty; Mehrsai, Afshin; Wong, Stephen T. C.; Sloane, Elliot

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare organizations have shown growing interest in implementing lean management. Through systematically identifying and eliminating waste, fewer resources are needed while similar or higher quality healthcare can be delivered. However, doing so demands a holistic view of the interrelationships

  6. Interim report on visioning. BRAID, EC FP7 Coordinated action project 248485, deliverable D4.1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Afsarmanesh, H.; Brielmann, M.S.

    2010-01-01

    The ageing population of Europe is growing very fast. The Bridging Research in Ageing and ICT Development (BRAID) project aims at approaching this phenomenon and many of its arisen challenges. BRAID develops a comprehensive RTD roadmap for "ageing well" which identifies advanced ICT-based approaches

  7. A Testing and Implementation Framework (TIF) for Climate Adaptation Innovations : Initial Version of the TIF - Deliverable 5.1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sebastian, A.G.; Lendering, K.T.; van Loon-Steensma, J.M.; Paprotny, D.; Bellamy, Rob; Willems, Patrick; van Loenhout, Joris; Colaço, Conceição; Dias, Susana; Nunes, Leónia; Rego, Francisco; Koundouri, Phoebe; Xepapadeas, Petros; Vassilopoulos, Achilleas; Wiktor, Paweł; Wysocka-Golec, Justyna

    2017-01-01

    Currently there is no internationally accepted framework for assessing the readiness of innovations that reduce disaster risk. To fill this gap, BRIGAID is developing a standard, comprehensive Testing and Implementation Framework (TIF). The TIF is designed to provide innovators with a framework for

  8. Bioclim Deliverable D2: consolidation of needs of the European waste management agencies and the regulator of the consortium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The nature of long-lived radioactive wastes is that they present a radiological hazard over a period of time that is extremely long compared with the timescale over which the engineered protection systems and institutional management of a disposal, or long-term storage, facility can be guaranteed. On such timescales, it is generally assumed that radionuclides may be slowly released from the containment system, migrating via geosphere pathways until they reach the accessible environment. Hence, there is a need to study the evolution of the environment external to the disposal system and the ways in which this might impact on its long-term radiological safety performance, for example in terms of influences on the migration and accumulation of radionuclides. One method that can contribute to understanding of how the biosphere might change in the future is to develop an awareness of how the characteristics of the region of interest have changed up to the present day as a result of the influences of past climate and environmental changes. It may then be possible to justify the use of environmental conditions that have occurred in the past as indicators of characteristics in the future, according to scientific understanding of the main influences on projected future change over the timescales relevant to the assessment. An important part of the basic understanding that underpins long-term radiological safety assessments is therefore information collected from site characterisation surveys; such data, coupled with palaeo-climate and palaeo-ecological records at regional and global scales, can then be used to reconstruct the progression of past environmental change over periods of time comparable with those of interest to the assessment. This report summarises work undertaken by national agencies from four European countries (France, Spain, United Kingdom and Czech Republic) to develop site and region-specific descriptions of environmental change during the Quaternary period, with particular emphasis on the last glacial cycle. The data and information collated in this report for three of these countries (France, Spain and the United Kingdom) will be used within BIOCLIM to guide the development of down-scaling rules for regional climate characteristics and thereby to provide a basis for linking climate model output to system descriptions required for the purposes long-term safety assessment. In each case, the description begins with a summary of the present-day characteristics of the regions/sites of interest, categorized under the following headings: site location and the geology of the region; human communities and land use; topography; climate; litho-stratigraphy; surface water bodies; and biota These site descriptions are then followed by a detailed presentation of the information base that has enabled palaeo-reconstructions of environmental change to be made within each country. The intention is that, by correlating these reconstructions with the global climate record, it will be possible to develop down-scaling procedures that allow the projected effects of future global climate change to be reflected in assumptions about biosphere conditions relevant to long-term radiological safety assessments. Key outputs from the palaeo-environmental analysis for each selected region include: - a narrative description of the sequence of climate change at a regional scale, expressed in terms of simple climate parameters, such as the estimated mean annual temperature, associated with defined time periods. - associated descriptions of environmental change, taking into account the effects on hydrology, soils and vegetation. - identification of key environmental properties associated with a range of 'typical' conditions that have prevailed in different regions of Europe during the last glacial-interglacial cycle. Additional information for the Czech Republic has also been summarised for interest and comparison. Because the information described here has been derived from national programmes in different countries, different approaches h ave been adopted to the collection of palaeo-data and the interpretation of application of such data to long-term safety assessments. One reason for such differences is that fact that national programmes across Europe are at different stages in the implementation of strategic approaches to the identification, investigation and development of suitable candidate sites for deep geological waste repositories. In addition, differences in the palaeo-histories of regions across Europe (e.g. whether or not they have been subjected to glaciation) mean that the types of evidence that is available for constructing narratives of environmental evolution up to the present day are not the same. Nevertheless, the information provides a valuable resource to guide understanding of the type, magnitude and rate of environmental change in different regions of Europe over a period of 100 000 years or more

  9. IST BENOGO (IST – 2001-39184) Deliverable 4.2.2: "Interactive" sound augmentation as room simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordahl, Rolf

    This document describes a special approach to room simulation. Sound created by the user’s own activity and interaction with the room and reflecting characteristics of the room, may support the feeling of presence. We pursue this hypothesis by 1) generating the sound of footsteps induced by the u......This document describes a special approach to room simulation. Sound created by the user’s own activity and interaction with the room and reflecting characteristics of the room, may support the feeling of presence. We pursue this hypothesis by 1) generating the sound of footsteps induced...... to ensure the desired effect....

  10. Deliverable 4.2-2: Stressor propagation through surface-groundwater linkages and its effect on aquatic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaandorp, Vince; de Louw, Perry; Bloomfield, John

    2017-01-01

    The good ecological status of Europe’s freshwaters is still lacking. This paper reviews the role of groundwater in these systems and demonstrates that it is an important factor to include in surface water management. Groundwater influences streamflow, water chemistry and water temperature...... and connects rivers and streams with their catchment and thus functions as a pathway for stressors to reach the surface water. A new ‘Groundwater DPS’ framework is proposed which shows how groundwater fits in the system of a stressed aquatic ecosystem. The functioning of this framework is demonstrated using...... examples from four different European lowland catchments: the Thames, Odense, Regge and Dinkel catchments. The importance of groundwater varies between scales, between catchments and within catchments. The Groundwater DPS will aid water managers in understanding the importance of groundwater...

  11. Evaluation, testing and application of participatory approaches in the Czech Republic Consensus panel - Spent nuclear fuel management alternatives. Deliverable 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vojtechova, Hana

    2009-06-01

    An important part of the ARGONA project is the testing and application of novel participation and dialogue approaches. The ways in this is being done include a series of events involving different stakeholders such as a focused science shop, a consensus panel and an interaction panel. In the framework of these activities in the Czech Republic the consensus panel was held on June 12, 2008 in Rez and addressed the theme: 'Spent nuclear fuel management alternatives'. The main goals of this consensus panel were: 1. Identification of the main criteria relevant to the assessment of the existing alternatives and determination their importance (weight) from the perspective of all stakeholders; 2. Achieving at least a partial consensus on selecting the most suitable alternative (management of radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel). A broader audience was selected with a suitable mixture of specialists and interested technical and non-technical peers including representatives from NRI, universities, Ministry of Industry and Trade, Ministry of the Environment, State Office for Nuclear Safety and Radioactive Waste Repository Authority, representatives of municipalities and NGOs, and waste producers such as CEZ plc etc. In opinion of all participants, there was a 'safe space' for debate ensured and everyone had the same opportunity to express his opinion. All participants also agreed that the whole course of seminar was transparent and correct. From this perspective, the chosen format of dialogue seems appropriate to ensure the exchange of new information and mutual discussion among the interested parties on the contentious issues in the NWM and nuclear energy in general. It was also found, however, that at present the social and political problems are the most important and the most urgent problems in the field of the nuclear waste management in the Czech Republic. It is very important not only to ensure a safe space for meaningful communication, but also: - To increase the activities of relevant state institutions in communication with the public in the field of NWM and enhance public confidence in the state institutions. - To develop motivation programs as another way how to incite the public interest and to positively influence their attitude towards the radioactive waste disposal, siting of the geological repository, and nuclear power production in general. - To strengthen the political responsibility - a long-lasting consistent and clear political attitude of the government and government parties concerning the problems of the final disposal of spent fuel is lacking in the Czech Republic. The general public misses the necessary long-term guarantees. Recommendations for the organization of further activities: - To select appropriate topics with clearly formulated questions taking into account the character of participants - other issues can be discussed within the scientific community and others in the wider discussion with the public participation. - To use service a professional mediator (as an impartial and independent person managing the whole course of the discussion) to facilitate communication among interested parties during the discussion. This applies mainly in the discussions on contentious issues such as selection of appropriate nuclear waste management alternative or the deep repository siting. - To ensure participation of representatives of state institution such as Ministry of Environment, Ministry of Industry and Trade, Ministry for Regional Development and also representatives of government parties. This is one of the most important prerequisites in order that discussion would be relevant and meaningful and the conclusions obtained could be used practically. - To proceed step by step and set smaller goals - The current situation in the field of NWM in the Czech Republic makes it impossible to achieve consensus among all stakeholders on controversial issues, such as the siting of the deep repository or selecting the optimal alternative to nuclear waste management. Therefore in the present stage it is important to ensure a space for open and meaningful dialogue about these issues, exchange views and explain the positions among all stakeholders rather than to try to achieve consensus upon any terms

  12. Deliverable No. D4.7: Database on farm-level production and sutainability indices assessing sustainable diets

    OpenAIRE

    Zimmermann, A.; Götz, Christian; Leip, A.; Zanten, van, H.H.E.; Hornborg, Sara; Ziegler, Friederike

    2017-01-01

    This paper demonstrates that SUSFANS metrics for assessing the environmental sustainability of the European food system can be effectively produced and applied to assess policy measures and potential innovations that aim at achieving sustainable food and nutrition security in the European Union. The analysis points at important issues that need to be taken into account for the further development and application of metrics.

  13. Deliverable No. D4.7: Database on farm-level production and sutainability indices assessing sustainable diets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, A.; Götz, Christian; Leip, A.; Zanten, van H.H.E.; Hornborg, Sara; Ziegler, Friederike

    2017-01-01

    This paper demonstrates that SUSFANS metrics for assessing the environmental sustainability of the European food system can be effectively produced and applied to assess policy measures and potential innovations that aim at achieving sustainable food and nutrition security in the European Union. The

  14. Deliverable D4.5. Failure Mode and Effect Analysis for 100% waste concrete. SUS-CON

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, J.H.M.

    2014-01-01

    On January 1st 2012, the European project SUS-CON has been started: “SUStainable, innovative and energy efficient CONcrete, based on the integration of all waste materials” (grant agreement no: 285463). The SUS-CON project aims at developing new technology routes to integrate waste materials in the

  15. Medical University of South Carolina Environmental Hazards Assessment Program. Deliverables: Volume 3, Annual report, July 1, 1993--June 30, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-18

    This reference is concerned with the Crossroads of Humanity workshop which is part of the Environmental Hazards Assessment Program at the Medical University of South Carolina. This workshop was held during the month of June and July 1994. Topics discussed include: Perceived Risk Advisory Committee Meeting, surveys of public opinion about hazardous and radioactive materials, genetics,antibodies, and regulatory agencies.

  16. LBNL deliverable to the Tricarb carbon sequestration partnership: Final report on experimental and numerical modeling activities for the Newark Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sumit [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Spycher, Nicolas [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Pester, Nick [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Saldi, Giuseppe [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Beyer, John [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Houseworth, Jim [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Knauss, Kevin [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-09-04

    This report presents findings for hydrological and chemical characteristics and processes relevant to large-scale geologic CO2 sequestration in the Newark Basin of southern New York and northern New Jersey. This work has been conducted in collaboration with the Tri-Carb Consortium for Carbon Sequestration — comprising Sandia Technologies, LLC; Conrad Geoscience; and Schlumberger Carbon Services.

  17. Deliverable 5.2 Study report on consumer motivations and behaviours for fruits and fruit products in the Balkans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijtsema, S.J.; Snoek, H.M.

    2010-01-01

    It is unclear whether fruit consumption in Western Balkan countries (WBC) meets recommended levels from a health perspective. A better understanding consumers' perception of health and motives and barriers of fruit is necessary to get insight in the fruit consumption. The aim of WP 5 is therefore to

  18. DELIVERABLE 1.2.4 CARBON AND OXYGEN ISOTOPIC ANALYSIS: BUG, CHEROKEE, AND PATTERSON CANYON FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eby, David E.; Chidsey, Thomas C. Jr; Kevin McClure; Morgan, Craig D.; Nelson, Stephen T.

    2003-01-01

    Over 400 million barrels (64 million m 3 ) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m 3 ) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m 3 ) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado

  19. DELIVERABLE 1.1.1 REGIONAL PARADOX FORMATION STRUCTURE AND ISOCHORE MAPS, BLANDING SUB-BASIN, UTAH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClure, Kevin; Morgan, Craig D.; Chidsey, Thomas C. Jr.; Eby, David E.

    2003-01-01

    Over 400 million barrels (64 million m 3 ) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m 3 ) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field (figure 1). However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m 3 ) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado

  20. DELIVERABLE 1.2.2 CAPILLARY PRESSURE/MERCURY INJECTION ANALYSIS: CHEROKEE AND BUG FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chidsey, Thomas C. Jr; Eby, David E.

    2003-01-01

    Over 400 million barrels (64 million m 3 ) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m 3 ) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m 3 ) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado

  1. DELIVERABLE 1.2.1A THIN SECTION DESCRIPTIONS: CHEROKEE AND BUG FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chidsey, Thomas C. Jr; Eby, David E.

    2003-01-01

    Over 400 million barrels (64 million m 3 ) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m 3 ) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m 3 ) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado

  2. DELIVERABLE 1.2.3 SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY AND PORE CASTING: CHEROKEE AND BUG FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chidsey, Thomas C. Jr; Eby, David E.; Taylor, Louis H.

    2003-01-01

    Over 400 million barrels (64 million m 3 ) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m 3 ) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m 3 ) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado

  3. Focused science shop - Potential environmental impact of radioactive waste disposal in comparison with other hazardous wastes. Deliverable 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vojtechova, Hana

    2008-07-01

    An important part of the ARGONA project is the testing and application of novel participation and dialogue approaches. The Czech Republic is one of the countries where these approaches will be applied and tested. The ways in this is being done include a series of events involving different stakeholders such as a focused science shop, a consensus panel and an interaction panel. In the framework of these activities in the Czech Republic the focused science shop was held on March 12, 2008 in the Nuclear Research Institute (NRI) in Rez, and addressed the theme: 'Radioactive waste management and radiation risk in comparison with other hazardous waste and risks'. The main goal of this focused science shop was to increase awareness amongst the public of actual and potential effects of radioactive and toxic wastes and to prioritise questions/uncertainties that people might have in this field. The following topics were discussed: - Differences in the general perception of nuclear waste in comparison with other toxic wastes; - General public awareness of the issue of nuclear waste management and other toxic wastes management; - Management and ultimate disposal of radioactive waste and other toxic waste in terms of the technology employed; - NIMBY effect. A broader audience was selected with a suitable mixture of specialists and interested technical and non-technical peers including representatives from NRI, universities, Ministry of Industry and Trade, Ministry of the Environment, State Office for Nuclear Safety and Radioactive Waste Repository Authority, representatives of municipalities and NGOs, and waste producers such as CEZ plc etc. In the Czech Republic there is a general unwillingness by the public to actively participate in the NWM decision-making process. Therefore, despite all the efforts made by the project team, not all invited stakeholders attended the meeting. Despite this, the meeting was very positively received by those who did attend and indicates the beginning of a closer cooperation between all parties concerned. On the basis of the discussion, a significant number of interesting results were obtained

  4. The National Shipbuilding Research Program. Application of Industrial Engineering Techniques to Reduce Workers’ Compensation and Environmental Costs - Deliverable D

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-10-01

    Electrostatic guns provide opportunities for exterior application of topcoats such as urethanes, acrylics , alkyds and epoxies. Most shipbuilding...A hybrid of airless spray and conventional air-atomized spray, this kind of gun uses fluid pressures higher than those used in conventional air...voltage) by simply flipping a switch. All essential controls are located right at the back of the gun. Other electrostatic systems require constant

  5. TradeWind Deliverable 5.1: Effects of increasing wind power penetration on the power flows in European grids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemström, Bettina; Uski-Joutsenvuo, Sanna; Holttinen, Hannele

    2008-01-01

    This report presents the main activities and results of Work Package 5 – Effects of increasing wind power penetration on the power flows in European grids in the TradeWind project. VTT is the leader of Work Package 5 and carries the overall responsibility of this report. The work is based on power...... flow simulations with a grid and market model developed in TradeWind Work Package 3, led by Sintef Energy Research. VTT, Sintef Energy Research and Risø have carried out the simulations of the different scenarios, analysed the results and written Chapter 4 about the impact of wind power on cross...

  6. ACUMEN DELIVERABLE D5.4b – Consequences of Indicators: using indicators on data from Google Scholar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wildgaard, Lorna Elizabeth; Larsen, Birger; Schneider, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    We investigate if Publish or Perish ready-to-use bibliometric indicators can be used by individual scholars to enrich their curriculum vitae. Selected indicators were tested in four different fields and across 5 different academic seniorities. The results show performance in bibliometric evaluati...

  7. Project management support tool implementation. DynaLearn, EC FP7 STREP project 231526, Deliverable D1.1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bredeweg, B.; Liem, J.

    2009-01-01

    Different project management tools have been evaluated. We have chosen several well-known, flexible and mature tools to support management activities and communication between the DynaLearn project participants. We have created a DynaLearn website for stakeholders outside the DynaLearn website. An

  8. Characterization of unpaved road condition through the use of remote sensing project - phase II, deliverable 8-D: final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-07

    Building on the success of developing a UAV based unpaved road assessment system in Phase I, the project team was awarded a Phase II project by the USDOT to focus on outreach and implementation. The project team added Valerie Lefler of Integrated Glo...

  9. Report on the use of the ESTEEM tool and recommendations for improvements. Deliverable 10 of Create Acceptance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jolivet, E. [IAE, Toulouse (France); Mourik, R.; Raven, R.P.J.M.; Feenstra, C.F.J. [ECN Policy Studies, Petten (Netherlands); Alcantud Torrent, A.; Schaefer, B. [EcoInstitute, Barcelona (Spain); Heiskanen, E. [National Consumer Research Centre NCRC, Helsinki (Finland); Hodson, M. [Centre for Sustainable Urban and Regional Futures SURF, Manchester (United Kingdom); Oniszk-Poplawska, A. [Institute for Renewable Energy IEO, Warszawa (Poland); Difiore, M.; Fucsko, J. [Hungarian Environmental Economics Center MAKK, Budapest (Hungary); Maack, M.H. [Icelandic New Energy INE, Reykjavik (Iceland); Poti, B.M. [CERIS-CNR, Rome (Italy); Prasad, G. [University of Cape Town UCT, Capetown (South Africa); Brohmann, B.; Fritsche, U.R.; Huenecke, K. [OEKO Institut, Freiburg (Germany)

    2008-05-15

    The six steps of the ESTEEM tool have been tested and evaluated in five demonstration projects in Europe and one in South Africa: a wind project in Hungary, a biomass project in Germany, a hydrogen project on Iceland, a CCS project in the Netherlands, a solar project in Italy and a solar project in South Africa. All the experiences and recommendations made by the consultants in these demonstration projects have been reported and integrated in the final version of the ESTEEM tool, available via www.esteem-too.eu.

  10. EU project CODE-TEN, Technical reports (deliverables, working papers), see: www.iccr.co.at/transpor/index.htm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leleur, Steen; Moshøj, Claus Rehfeld; Kronbak, Jacob

    1998-01-01

    Methodology for transport infrastructure corridor planning: Baseline methodology DECODE, transport information system (TIS) database, case study corridor IX: Oldenburg - Copenhagen - Stockholm - Helsinki - St. Petersburg - Moscow, formulation of decision support system...

  11. Deliverable 3.1_ITER Project_Guidelines on best practice to be adopted in situ for TEBM use

    OpenAIRE

    Di Sipio, Eloisa; Berteermann, David

    2017-01-01

    The present guidelines concern the best practice to be adopted in situ for the installation of a special form of ground source collector, the helix system, and the use of Thermally Enhanced Backfilling Material (TEBM) as backfilling material in very shallow geothermal application. These best practice are based on the experience acquired on the ITER test site, located in Eltersdorf (Germany), and benefit from skill, expertise and multy-year experience of the two industrial partners of ITER ...

  12. The National Shipbuilding Research Program. Application of Industrial Engineering Techniques to Reduce Workers’ Compensation and Environmental Costs - Deliverable F

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-10-01

    condition affects as much as 2% to 3% of the population. Other conditions that occur during life such as arthritis and osteoporosis (porous bone) are... massage can help relax muscles. 3. Cold can help reduce pain and swelling. 4. Anti-inflammatory such as ibuprofen or aspirin can help reduce

  13. Reliability of offshore wind power production under extreme wind conditions. Deliverable D 9.5. Work Package 9: Electrical grid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cutululis, Nicolaos Antonio; Zeni, Lorenzo

    years, with each year simulated with five random seeds, leading to a total of 25 annual wind power time series for six large offshore wind farms, summing up to a little over 330 wind turbines. Two storm control strategies were used. The analysis involved several aspects inspired from reliability studies....... The aspects investigated are storm events occurrences and durations, storm control strategy impact on the capacity factor (lost production), the loss of production (power produced from wind drops below a certain threshold due to high wind speeds and storm controller) and finally, the wind power production......Reliability of offshore wind production under extreme wind conditions was investigated in this report. The wind power variability from existing and future large offshore wind farms in Western Denmark were simulated using the Correlated Wind model developed at Risø. The analysis was done for five...

  14. LINKS-UP - Learning 2.0 for an Inclusive Knowledge Society - Understanding the Picture : Deliverable 14 Linksup-Events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. (Eva) Szalma; M.W. (Martijn) Hartog; E.R. (Else Rose) Kuiper; E. (Eva) Suba; T. (Thomas) Fischer; A. (Andras) Szucs; S. (Sandra) Schön; J. (Joe) Cullen

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the Events organised and presentations were twofold. On one hand we aimed at the effective dissemination and exploitation of the Links‐up project outcomes, on the other hand we aimed at involving stakeholders of the project and target groups via 'Learning Dialogues' and events to

  15. Medical University of South Carolina Environmental Hazards Assessment Program. Volume 6: Annual report, July 1, 1993--June 30, 1994 deliverables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    The Medical University of South Carolina`s vision is to become the premier national resource for medical information and for environmental/health risk assessment. A key component to the success of the many missions of the Environmental Hazards Assessment Program (EHAP) is timely access to large volumes of data. This study documents the results of the needs assessment effort conducted to determine the information access and processing requirements of EHAP. This report addresses the Department of Environmental Health Science, education and training initiative.

  16. Deliverable No. 1.3: Sustainability metrics for the EU food system: a review across economic, environmental and social considerations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zurek, Monika; Leip, Adrian; Kuijsten, Anneleen; Wijnands, Jo; Terluin, Ida; Shutes, Lindsay; Hebinck, Aniek; Zimmermann, Andrea; Götz, Christian; Hornborg, Sara; Zanten, van Hannah; Ziegler, Friederike; Havlik, Petr; Garrone, Maria; Geleijnse, Marianne; Kuiper, Marijke; Turrini, Aida; Dofkova, Marcela; Trolle, Ellen; Mistura, Lorenza; Dubuisson, Carine; Veer, van 't Pieter; Achterbosch, Thom; Ingram, John; Brem-Wilson, Joshua; Franklin, Alex; Fried, Jana; Guzman Rodriguez, Paola; Owen, Luke; Saxena, Lopa; Trenchard, Liz; Wright, Julia

    2017-01-01

    One of the main objectives of the SUSFANS project is to develop a set of concepts and tools to help policy and decision makers across Europe make sense of the outcomes and trends of the EU food system. This paper proposes a set of metrics for assessing the performance of the EU food system in

  17. Road Safety Data, Collection, Transfer and Analysis DaCoTa. Deliverable 0.1: Final project report.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomas, P. Hill, J. Morris, A.P. Welsh, R. Talbot, R. Muhlrad, N. Vallet, G. Yannis, G. Papadimitriou, E. Evgenikos, P. Dupont, E. Martensen, H. Hermitte, T. Bos, N. & Aarts, L.

    2015-01-01

    The European Road Safety Observatory was established European Commission and first announced in the 2001 Transport White Paper1. It was further developed in the 2003 Road Safety Action Plan 2 where the Commission announced it was to establish a new European Road Safety Observatory (ERSO) to

  18. DELIVERABLE 1.2.1.B THIN SECTION DESCRIPTIONS: LITTLE UTE AND SLEEPING UTE FIELDS, MONTEZUMA COUNTY, COLORADO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eby, David E.; Wray, Laura L.

    2003-01-01

    Over 400 million barrels (64 million m 3 ) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m 3 ) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field in Utah (figure 1). However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m 3 ) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado

  19. API for data and knowledge exchange. DynaLearn, EC FP7 STREP project 231526, Deliverable D3.2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liem, J.; Beek, W.; Linnebank, F.; Bredeweg, B.

    2010-01-01

    This document describes the representations for knowledge exchange between the different components of the DynaLearn software. The basis of these representations is the DynaLearn ontology, which formalizes the basic vocabulary as it is used within the DynaLearn software. Models, simulations, and

  20. Medical University of South Carolina Environmental Hazards Assessment Program. Volume 5: Annual report, July 1, 1993--June 30, 1994 deliverables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    The Medical University of South Carolina`s vision is to become the premier national resource for medical information and for environmental/health risk assessment. A key component to the success of the many missions of the Environmental Hazards Assessment Program (EHAP) is timely access to large volumes of data. This study documents the results of the needs assessment effort conducted to determine the information access and processing requirement of EHAP. The following topics are addressed in this report: environmental medicine and risk communication: curriculum and a professional support network-Department of Family Medicine; environmental hazards assessment and education program in pharmacy graduate education in risk assessment; and graduate education risk assessment.

  1. The role of compensation in nuclear waste facility siting. A literature review and real life examples. Deliverable D16b

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojo, Matti; Richardson, P.J.

    2009-10-01

    The main objective of this report is to introduce and analyse the local decision-making process in the Eurajoki municipality, Finland regarding the siting of the SNF facility, within the framework of compensation theory. The compensation case Eurajoki offers excellent empirical data for analyzing how the negotiations on compensation were implemented at the local level. The successful siting process is particularly interesting as a number of survey studies have suggested that compensation for a radioactive waste repository does not change the percentage of individuals supporting the facility. On the contrary, some compensation proposals have even decreased the existing support. Even among hazardous waste facilities radioactive waste facilities seem to be an exception. The explanation offered is that radioactive waste is regarded with a greater sense of dread than is the case for other hazardous waste. Although monetary incentives and other benefits have been widely applied in the field of nuclear waste management in many countries the conclusion drawn is that compensation-based siting has to date experienced little success. However, two recent examples, one from Finland and the other from Korea, indicate that compensation can play a decisive role in decision-making during the siting of radioactive waste facilities. Furthermore, in Sweden a local benefit package was agreed between the nuclear waste management company SKB AB and the two candidate municipalities, Oskarshamn and Oesthammar in 2009 before the company announced the site. The novel aspect of this arrangement is that the municipality in which the facility is not located (now known to be Oskarshamn) will receive 75% of the total benefit package (around Euro 200 million) given that Oesthammar will receive all the attendant benefits associated with facility development. The main questions posed in this report are as follows: Why was the compensation package a success in the case of Eurajoki? What were the phases of the compensation negotiations? Who were the main actors and what kind of roles did they play? And finally: What can be learned from this case study in Eurajoki? Is it possible to identify some prerequisites for a successful compensation package? Even though this document is focused on the role of compensation, it does not suggest that all siting dilemmas can be solved solely on the basis of compensation. For example in Eurajoki's case, other approaches were also applied. Approaches such as public involvement and risk communication were implemented, mainly by the developer, within the framework of the environmental impact assessment procedure. The conventional approach of impact mitigation could also be identified. Furthermore, it should not be forgotten that the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (in Finnish: STUK) also took some action at the local level

  2. Capacity Development and Strengthening for Energy Policy formulation and implementation of Sustainable Energy Projects in Indonesia CASINDO. Deliverable No. 38. Pro-poor Energy Strategy in Central Java

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumardi, R. Rizal Isnanto; Firdausi, Aulia Latifah Insan [Diponegoro University, Semarang (Indonesia)

    2012-01-15

    The overall objective of the CASINDO programme is to establish a self-sustaining and self-developing structure at both the national and regional level to build and strengthen human capacity to enable the provinces of North Sumatra, Yogyakarta, Central Java, West Nusa Tenggara and Papua to formulate sound policies for renewable energy and energy efficiency and to develop and implement sustainable energy projects.

  3. LINKS-UP - Learning 2.0 for an Inclusive Knowledge Society - Understanding the Picture : Deliverable D4 Final Learning Dialogues Report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.W. (Bert) Mulder; M.W. (Martijn) Hartog; E. Suba; W. (Wolf) Hilzensauer; M. (Markus) Winkler; J. (Joe) Cullen; S. (Sandra) Schaffert; D. (Davide) Calenda; T. (Thomas) Fischer

    2011-01-01

    This work package firstly functions as a data‐gathering activity, to explore and deepen the results, and questions, raised by the earlier research activities and it provides knowledge exchange to engage a wider spectrum of stakeholders to further validate the Links‐up outputs. Two phases of the

  4. Dissemination material template, Deliverable 2.2 of the H2020 project SafetyCube (Safety CaUsation, Benefits and Efficiency).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tros, M. & Houtenbos, M.

    2016-01-01

    Safety CaUsation, Benefits and Efficiency (SafetyCube) is a European Commission supported Horizon 2020 project with the objective of developing an innovative road safety Decision Support System (DSS) that will enable policy-makers and stakeholders to select and implement the most appropriate

  5. National Reachback Systems for Nuclear Security: State-of-play report: ERNCIP Thematic Group Radiological and Nuclear Threats to Critical Infrastructure: Deliverable of task 3.1b

    OpenAIRE

    TOIVONEN H.; HUBERT Schoech; REPPENHAGEN GRIM P.; PIBIDA Leticia; JAMES Mark; ZHANG Weihua; PERÄJÄRVI K.

    2015-01-01

    Operational systems for nuclear security in Finland, France, Denmark, UK, US and Canada were reviewed. The Finnish case is a holistic approach to Nuclear Security Detection Architecture, as defined by the International Atomic Energy Agency; reachback is only one component of the system, albeit an important crosscutting element of the detection architecture. The French and US studies concentrate on the reachback itself. The Danish nuclear security system is information-driven, relying on th...

  6. The Application of Biometrics in Critical Infrastructures Operations: Guidance for Security Managers. ERNCIP Thematic Group Applied Biometrics for CIP. Deliverable: Guidance for Security Managers - Task 2

    OpenAIRE

    REJMAN-GREENE Marek; BRZOZOWSKI Krzysztof; MANSFIELD Tony; SANCHEZ-REILLO Raul; WAGGETT Peter; WHITAKER Geoff

    2015-01-01

    Biometric technologies have advanced considerably over the past decade, and have paved the way for more widespread use by governments, commercial enterprises and, more recently, by the consumer through the introduction of sensors and apps on mobile phones. This report provides introductory information about the application of these technologies to achieve secure recognition of individuals by organisations which form part of critical infrastructures in the EU. As a specific example, it offers ...

  7. Environmental assessment of untreated manure use, manure digestion and codigestion with silage maize : Deliverable for the 'EU-AGRO-BIOGAS' project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de J.W.; Corre, W.J.; Dooren, van H.J.C.

    2010-01-01

    This report describes the environmental impact of untreated manure use, manure digestion, and co-digestion with silage maize for energy production. The life cycle assessment methodology was used. Environmental indicators included were, global warming potential, energy use, eutrophication,

  8. Road Safety Data, Collection, Transfer and Analysis DaCoTa. Deliverable 1.6: Final Report of WP1 – road safety policy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muhlrad, N. Papadimitriou, E. & Yannis, G.

    2015-01-01

    The ‘Policy’ Work Package of DaCoTA was designed to fill in the gap in knowledge on road safety policy making processes, their institutional framework and the data, methods and technical tools needed to base policy formulation and adoption on scientifically-established evidence. More specifically,

  9. The capacity of the consumer to process information and make informed choices in the digital internal market (Deliverable 5.4)

    OpenAIRE

    Sybe de Vries; Marie-Pierre Granger; Silvia Adamo; Andrea Bianculli; Anne-Marie van den Bossche

    2016-01-01

    If we assume that market integration serves the interest of citizens in their capacity as consumers and optimizes consumer welfare, then the EU rules on free movement and competition could, according to Weatherill, be seen as a form of consumer policy.[1] Since national consumer protection law may impede free movement, which in itself is thus designed to advance the consumer interest, the European Court of Justice (hereafter: ECJ or Court), has developed its own notion of consumer interest.[2...

  10. Capacity Development and Strengthening for Energy Policy formulation and implementation of Sustainable Energy Projects in Indonesia CASINDO. Deliverable No. 38. Pro-poor Energy Strategy In North Sumatra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soeharwinto [University of Sumatra Utara, Medan (Indonesia)

    2011-12-15

    The overall objective of the CASINDO programme is to establish a self-sustaining and self-developing structure at both the national and regional level to build and strengthen human capacity to enable the provinces of North Sumatra, Yogyakarta, Central Java, West Nusa Tenggara and Papua to formulate sound policies for renewable energy and energy efficiency and to develop and implement sustainable energy projects. A key component of the recent political reforms undertaken in Indonesia is the decentralization and regional autonomy that were implemented in 2001. This process has devolved almost all powers and responsibilities from the central government to the local government, including responsibilities for energy sector development. This means that regional governments are now responsible for formulating their energy policy and, consequently, must reform their institutional structure and strengthen their human capacity to be able to carry out this new responsibility. In Indonesia, people living in urban areas generally have access to efficient and modern energy supplies. However, the rural communities are generally less fortunate and continue to rely on traditional fuels of firewood, because the energy and electricity production system available to them are costly and inefficient. The aim of CASINDO's Technical Working Group V (TWG V) on Identification of Energy Needs and Assessment for Poor Communities was to establish energy-related needs and priorities of poor communities in selected locations in the Province of Central Java. The target location for Casindo TWG V activities was the village of Sruni, in the Boyolali district, because it is a district which produces a great amount of milk from dairy cows (greatest amount in Central Java); and secondly, because it does not receive any funds from other development programs, as well as from other institutions, while other subdistricts do. In order to identify actual energy needs successfully, the Participatory Rural Appraisal (PRA) was chosen as the main approach in TWG V. The PRA is an effective bottom-up process for analyzing the energy needs of a rural community, as well as one of the possible steps to empower a community to improve its standard of living. The empowerment process or Community Empowerment consists of some steps, i.e.: Self-study by community; Developing groups; Arranging activity plan and action; Monitoring and Evaluation.

  11. Fracture toughness of neutron irradiated solid and powder HIP 316L(N). ITER Task 214, NET deliverable GB6 ECN-5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rensman, J.; Van den Broek, F.P.; Jong, M.; Van Osch, E.V.

    1998-04-01

    The fracture toughness properties of unirradiated and neutron irradiated type 316L(N) stainless steel plate (European Reference Heat ERHII), conventional 316L(N) solid HIP joints (heat PM-130), and 316L(N)-1G powder HIP material have been measured. Compact tension specimens with a thickness of 12 and 5 mm were irradiated in the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten, The Netherlands, simulating the fusion reactor's first wall conditions by a combination of high displacement damage with proportional amounts of helium. The solid HIP (or HIP-bonded) CT-specimens were irradiated in two separate experiments: SIWAS-6 with 1.3 to 2.3 dpa (1.7 dpa av.) at 353 K, and CHARIOT-3 with 2.7 to 3.1 dpa (2.9 dpa av.) at 600 K. The plate material and powder HIP CT-specimens were irradiated in one experiment only, SIWAS-6. The helium content is up to 20 appm for the 2.9 dpa (av.) dose level. Testing temperatures of 353K and 573K have been used for the fracture toughness experiments. The report contains the experimental conditions and summarises the results, which are given in terms of J-resistance curve fits. The main conclusions are that all three materials have very high toughness in the unirradiated state with little difference between them; the solid HIP has the highest toughness, the powder HIP lowest. The toughness of all three materials is reduced significantly by irradiation, the reduction is the least for the plate material and the highest for the powder HIP material. However, many, but not all, of the solid HIP CT specimens showed debonding of the joint during testing. The machined notch of the CT specimens was not exactly on the joint interface, which could lead to unjustified interpretation of the measured values as being the toughness of the joint, the toughness of the joint being probably much lower. The reduction by irradiation of the fracture toughness of the powder HIP material is clearly larger than for plate material, which is confirmed by the observed early initiation of stable crack extension. As these fracture toughness measurements have been obtained by using CT specimens with a thickness of 12 and 5 mm, and as unirradiated austenitic stainless steel has a very high toughness, the values presented do in general not qualify as a size independent material property, but can be used as valid data for constructions with thicknesses of respectively 12 and 5 mm. 12 refs

  12. Low cycle fatigue properties of neutron irradiated solid HIP 316L(N). ITER Task T214, NET deliverable GB6 ECN-5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rensman, J.; Van Osch, E.V.; Tjoa, G.L.; Boskeljon, J.; Van Hoepen, J.

    1998-05-01

    The Low Cycle Fatigue (LCF) properties of neutron irradiated Hot Isostatically Pressed (HIP) joints of type 316L(N) stainless steel (heat PM-130) have been measured, as well as the LCF properties of reference 316L(N)-ERHII. Cylindrical LCF test specimens of 3 mm diameter were irradiated in the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten, The Netherlands, simulating the first wall conditions of future fusion reactors by a combination of high displacement damage with proportional amounts of helium. The solid HIP specimens were irradiated up to a target dose level of 5 dpa at a temperature of 550K. The damage levels realised range from 3.0 to 4.4 dpa, with helium contents up to 41 appm. Testing temperature was equal to the irradiation temperature: 550K. The report contains the experimental conditions and summarises the results, which are given in terms of first cycle stress, the peak stress, the number of cycles where the peak stress is reached, the stress at half life and the plastic strain at half life, and the total number of cycles to failure, N f . The main conclusions are that the unirradiated solid-HIP materials has the same LCF properties as unirradiated 316L(N)-ERHII plate material. The neutron irradiation induces both hardening and reduction of fatigue life. The bond does not seem to have any effect on the fatigue properties for the unirradiated solid HIP 316L(N), whereas a combined effect of irradiation and the bond cannot be established. No failures related to debonding of the joint were observed for the tests. 7 refs

  13. Tensile properties of neutron irradiated solid HIP 316L(N). ITER Task T214, NET deliverable GB6 ECN-5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Osch, E.V.; Tjoa, G.L.; Boskeljon, J.; Van Hoepen, J.

    1998-05-01

    The tensile properties of neutron irradiated Hot Isostatically Pressed (HIP) joints of type 316L(N) stainless steel (heat PM-130) have been measured. Cylindrical tensile test specimens of 4 mm diameter were irradiated in the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten, The Netherlands, simulating the first wall conditions by a combination of high displacement damage with proportional amounts of helium. The solid HIP specimens were irradiated up to a target dose level of 5 dpa at a temperature of 550K. The damage levels realized range from 3.0 to 4.1 dpa, with helium contents up to 38 appm. Post irradiation testing temperatures ranged from 300 to 700K. The report contains the experimental conditions and summarises the results, which are given in terms of engineering stresses and strains and reduction of area. The main conclusions are that the unirradiated solid-HIP material is very soft, assumingly due to the relatively large grain size. Neutron irradiation induces both hardening and reduction of ductility, similar to the behaviour of 316L(N) plate. No failures related to debonding were observed for the tests of the unirradiated samples, however one of eight tested irradiated specimens fractured in the HIP joint, showing a flat fracture surface and a low reduction of area. 6 refs

  14. Addiction and Lifestyles in Contemporary Europe: Reframing Addictions Project (ALICE RAP). Final Evaluation Report Deliverable 21.1, Work Package 21

    OpenAIRE

    Mittelmark, Maurice B.

    2016-01-01

    At the onset of the ALICE RAP project, the following objectives, description of work, and main tasks were agreed for Work Package 21: 1. To evaluate the overall functioning of the collaborative research project, using a state-of-art systems model of partnership functioning. 2. To document the interactions and linkages between project inputs, throughputs and outputs as the project unfolds over five years. 3. To facilitate structured discussions involving all pa...

  15. Nanocrystalline p-hydroxyacetanilide (paracetamol) and gold core-shell structure as a model drug deliverable organic-inorganic hybrid nanostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Subhojit; Paul, Anumita; Chattopadhyay, Arun

    2013-09-01

    We report on the generation of core-shell nanoparticles (NPs) having an organic nanocrystal (NC) core coated with an inorganic metallic shell, being dispersed in aqueous medium. First, NCs of p-hydroxyacetanilide (pHA)--known also as paracetamol--were generated in an aqueous medium. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) evidenced the formation of pHA NCs and of their crystalline nature. The NCs were then coated with Au to form pHA@Au core-shell NPs, where the thickness of the Au shell was on the order of nanometers. The formation of Au nanoshell--surrounding pHA NC--was confirmed from its surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band in the UV/Vis spectrum and by TEM measurements. Further, on treatment of the core-shell particles with a solution comprising NaCl and HCl (pH paracetamol--were generated in an aqueous medium. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) evidenced the formation of pHA NCs and of their crystalline nature. The NCs were then coated with Au to form pHA@Au core-shell NPs, where the thickness of the Au shell was on the order of nanometers. The formation of Au nanoshell--surrounding pHA NC--was confirmed from its surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band in the UV/Vis spectrum and by TEM measurements. Further, on treatment of the core-shell particles with a solution comprising NaCl and HCl (pH < 3), the Au shell could be dissolved, subsequently releasing pHA molecules. The dissolution of Au shell was marked by a gradual diminishing of its SPR band, while the release of pHA molecules in the solution was confirmed from TEM and FTIR studies. The findings suggest that the core-shell NP could be hypothesized to be a model for encapsulating drug molecules, in their crystalline forms, for slow as well as targeted release. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr03566b

  16. Capacity Development and Strengthening for Energy Policy formulation and implementation of Sustainable Energy Projects in Indonesia CASINDO. Deliverable No. 4. Inception report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Linden, N.; Smekens, K. [Unit Policy Studies, Energy research Centre of the Netherlands ECN, Petten (Netherlands); Wijnker, M.; Lemmens, L. [Eindhoven University of Technology TUE, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Kamphuis, E. [ETC Nederland, Leusden (Netherlands); Permana, I. [Technical Education Development Centre TEDC, Bandung (Indonesia); Winarno, O.T. [Institute of Technology of Bandung ITB, Bandung (Indonesia)

    2009-10-15

    The overall objective of the CASINDO programme is to establish a self-sustaining and self-developing structure at both the national and regional level to build and strengthen human capacity to enable the provinces of North Sumatra, Yogyakarta, Central Java, West Nusa Tenggara and Papua to formulate sound policies for renewable energy and energy efficiency and to develop and implement sustainable energy projects. This inception report presents the proposed programmes for addressing the identified training needs, the proposed changes to the monitoring framework and other relevant issues discussed during the inception phase.

  17. Bioclim Deliverable D10 - 12: development and application of a methodology for taking climate-driven environmental change into account in performance assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The BIOCLIM project on modelling sequential Biosphere systems under Climate change for radioactive waste disposal is part of the EURATOM fifth European framework programme. The project was launched in October 2000 for a three-year period. The project aims at providing a scientific basis and practical methodology for assessing the possible long term impacts on the safety of radioactive waste repositories in deep formations due to climate and environmental change. Five work packages have been identified to fulfill the project objectives: - Work package 1 will consolidate the needs of the European agencies of the consortium and summarize how environmental change has been treated to date in performance assessments. - Work packages 2 and 3 will develop two innovative and complementary strategies for representing time series of long term climate change using different methods to analyse extreme climate conditions (the hierarchical strategy) and a continuous climate simulation over more than the next glacial-interglacial cycle (the integrated strategy). - Work package 4 will explore and evaluate the potential effects of climate change on the nature of the biosphere systems. - Work package 5 will disseminate information on the results obtained from the three year project among the international community for further use. The output from the climate models developed and applied in WP2 and WP3 has been interpreted in WP4 ('Biosphere system description') in terms of model requirements for the post-closure radiological performance assessment of deep geological repositories for radioactive wastes, in order to develop a methodology to demonstrate how biosphere systems can be represented in the long-term. The work undertaken in WP4 is described in this report. This report describes the methodology used for identification and characterisation of specific climate states and transitions between those climate states. It also covers the application of those methods in the context of the climate modelling results produced in WP2 and WP3. Within the context of BIOCLIM, WP4 included methodology development and extended the development of illustrative conceptual models of biosphere systems and the transitions between them based on results from WP2 and WP3. This provided an appropriate basis for developing recommendations on how the effects of climate change on the biosphere can be taken into account in PAs, including the advantages/disadvantages and likely viability of potential alternative strategies. However, in order to go beyond this and evaluate which of the alternative methods of taking climate change into account should be preferred in a specific context would require application of the methodology developed under WP4 to proposed facilities at specific sites. It could also require the conceptual models of biosphere system states and transitions to be translated into mathematical models

  18. Conceptual Design of Main Cooling System for a Fusion Power Reactor with Water Cooled Lithium-Lead Blanket. TW1-TRP-PPCS1, Deliverable 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natalizio, Antonio; Collen, Jan

    2002-06-01

    The HTS (Heat Transfer System) conceptual design developed for the PPCS (Power-Plant Conceptual Study) plant model is compliant with the single failure criterion - i.e., the failure of a single active component (e.g., pump) will not cause the reactor to shutdown. The system effective availability (capacity factor), however, is only marginally better than that of the SEAFP design, as the number of loops could not be decreased further, due to coolant inventory limitations. The PPCS Plant Model A has about 70 % more fusion power than the SEAFP model. Therefore, keeping the same number of loops as in the SEAFP model would have implied a 70 % larger inventory. To improve plant availability and safety, however, the number of blanket and first wall loops have been reduced from eight to six, implying a further increase in loop inventory of about 25 %. For these and other reasons, the coolant inventory, at risk from a loss-of-coolant accident, has increased significantly, relative to the SEAFP design (∼130 vs. 50 m 3 ). The proposed heat transport system conceptual design meets, or exceeds, all project specifications

  19. Capacity Development and Strengthening for Energy Policy formulation and implementation of Sustainable Energy Projects in Indonesia CASINDO. Deliverable No. 24. Regional Energy Efficiency Planning 2011 [for Yogyakarta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prahara, Pamungkas Jutta; Hariadi, T.K. [Universitas Muhammadiyah PUSPER-UMY, Yogyakarta (Indonesia)

    2012-06-15

    The overall objective of the CASINDO programme is to establish a self-sustaining and self-developing structure at both the national and regional level to build and strengthen human capacity to enable the provinces of North Sumatra, Yogyakarta, Central Java, West Nusa Tenggara and Papua to formulate sound policies for renewable energy and energy efficiency and to develop and implement sustainable energy projects. Increasing energy demand and decreasing energy supply has to be faced by strategic measures. Daerah Istimewa Yogyakarta (DIY) faces the same problem with more burdens since DIY depends on energy supply from other region. One strategic measure is to reduce energy consumption across sectors. There are, in total, 805.468 electricity consumers in Yogyakarta in the household, social and industrial sector. Through direct measures electricity consumption can be reduced and financial resources can be saved. One of the measures is energy conservation campaign to all sectors in the region which expected to reduce the energy spent, for example to switch off electronic devices totally instead of to put them in standby mode. Survey in the region indicated there are various use of electronic devices in household dominated by refrigeration, television, and AC's. In industries and social, AC and motors are dominating the sector. By applying inverter technology and refrigerant retrofitting to air conditioner can reduce significantly the energy consumption. Changing from old refrigerator with new energy saver refrigerator would also reduce energy consumption. Strategic energy policy and tools has to be identified to push the community to apply the recommended measure. Energy labeling, tax reduction program and energy price increase would make the energy conservation program more feasible and create an environment where inventing in energy efficiency is more attractive. Furthermore a financial resource policy has to be prepared for community education through promotion and campaign on energy conservation program.

  20. Randomized comparison of deliverability and in-hospital complications in implantation of BxSonic(R), Express(R), and Flexmaster(R) coronary stents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Leif; Galløe, Anders; Thayssen, Per

    2005-01-01

    in a native coronary artery were included in the study. There were 494 (664) patients (treated lesions) in the BxSonic(R), 499 (657) in the Express(R) and 500 (658) in the Flexmaster(R) groups. The groups were well matched with regard to age, sex, diabetes, smoking, hypercholesterolemia, hypertension...

  1. Report on the integration of OSPAR Food Webs Indicators into the NEAT tool. EcApRHA Deliverable WP 3.5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haraldsson, M.; Arroyo, N.L.; Capuzzo, E.; Claquin, P.; Kromkamp, J.; Niquil, N.; Ostle, C.; Preciado, I.; Safi, G.

    2017-01-01

    Executive SummaryThe main goal within the EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD) is to achieve an ecosystem“Good Environmental Status” (GES). To go from indicator to ecosystem assessment, the Food Webs groupof the EcApRHA project (applying an Ecosystem Approach to (sub) Regional Habitat

  2. Format to communicate risk and uncertainty about the disposal of radioactive waste to different stakeholders; questionnaire and analysis of the results of the questionnaire. Deliverable D8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolado, R.

    2009-10-01

    This report summarises the activities performed at JRC-IE to develop a format to communicate key ideas about uncertainty and risk associated to a SNF/HLW repository. After a period of literature research in different areas related to the safety assessment of nuclear waste repositories, the following subjects were selected as the key ideas to communicate to different stakeholders This report summarises the activities performed at JRC-IE to develop a format to communicate key ideas about uncertainty and risk associated to a SNF/HLW repository. After a period of literature research in different areas related to the safety assessment of nuclear waste repositories, the following subjects were selected as the key ideas to communicate to different stakeholders - The concept of risk; - What is a repository and how does it work; - Involved uncertainties. Origin, classification and treatment; - Key numeric and graphic results of a safety assessment; - Comparison with other risks. The format chosen is a verbal presentation supported by a PowerPoint file containing graphic material. This is a very flexible format that allows a lot of interaction with the audience. The format has been tested in two in-house debate sessions. The analysis of answers given by participants to a questionnaire and the notes taken during the debate held after the presentation will be used to update the format. Participants in the debate sessions were quite positive about the sections that tackled the concept of risk, the way a repository works and the comparison of safety limits used in European national regulations with the worldwide average radiation level, but they showed some more criticism about the way to communicate some key results from a safety assessment. They found especially difficult to understand some graphic results obtained via sensitivity analysis, and provided suggestions to improve some graphic representations of uncertainty. They also advised to reduce as much as possible the use of mathematical expressions and formulas. The updated format will be tested in the coming future in a risk communication workshop. After getting feedback from the participants in that workshop, the format will be updated again in order to generate its final version.The concept of risk; - What is a repository and how does it work; - Involved uncertainties. Origin, classification and treatment; - Key numeric and graphic results of a safety assessment; - Comparison with other risks. The format chosen is a verbal presentation supported by a PowerPoint file containing graphic material. This is a very flexible format that allows a lot of interaction with the audience. The format has been tested in two in-house debate sessions. The analysis of answers given by participants to a questionnaire and the notes taken during the debate held after the presentation will be used to update the format. Participants in the debate sessions were quite positive about the sections that tackled the concept of risk, the way a repository works and the comparison of safety limits used in European national regulations with the worldwide average radiation level, but they showed some more criticism about the way to communicate some key results from a safety assessment. They found especially difficult to understand some graphic results obtained via sensitivity analysis, and provided suggestions to improve some graphic representations of uncertainty. They also advised to reduce as much as possible the use of mathematical expressions and formulas. The updated format will be tested in the coming future in a risk communication workshop. After getting feedback from the participants in that workshop, the format will be updated again in order to generate its final version

  3. Visual modification of the road environment. EU-project Guarding Automobile Drivers through Guidance Education and Technology GADGET, Deliverable D2, Contract No. RO-97-SC.2235.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sagberg, F. Hakkert, A.S. Larsen, L. Leden, L. Schmotzer, C. & Wouters, P.I.J.

    2003-01-01

    The report is a review and discussion of research regarding effects of the road environment on driver behaviour. The discussion relates to theories and facts regarding driver information needs, limitations of the human visual system, information processing, driver expectations, mental load, and risk

  4. Industrial Fuel Gas Demonstration Plant Program. Conceptual design and evaluation of commercial plant. Volume III. Economic analyses (Deliverable Nos. 15 and 16)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-01-01

    This report presents the results of Task I of Phase I in the form of a Conceptual Design and Evaluation of Commercial Plant report. The report is presented in four volumes as follows: I - Executive Summary, II - Commercial Plant Design, III - Economic Analyses, IV - Demonstration Plant Recommendations. Volume III presents the economic analyses for the commercial plant and the supporting data. General cost and financing factors used in the analyses are tabulated. Three financing modes are considered. The product gas cost calculation procedure is identified and appendices present computer inputs and sample computer outputs for the MLGW, Utility, and Industry Base Cases. The results of the base case cost analyses for plant fenceline gas costs are as follows: Municipal Utility, (e.g. MLGW), $3.76/MM Btu; Investor Owned Utility, (25% equity), $4.48/MM Btu; and Investor Case, (100% equity), $5.21/MM Btu. The results of 47 IFG product cost sensitivity cases involving a dozen sensitivity variables are presented. Plant half size, coal cost, plant investment, and return on equity (industrial) are the most important sensitivity variables. Volume III also presents a summary discussion of the socioeconomic impact of the plant and a discussion of possible commercial incentives for development of IFG plants.

  5. Capacity Development and Strengthening for Energy Policy formulation and implementation of Sustainable Energy Projects in Indonesia CASINDO. Deliverable No. 20. Installation of Demonstration Units at the Indonesian Universities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wijnker, M. [Eindhoven University of Technology TUE, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2011-08-15

    The overall objective of the CASINDO programme is to establish a self-sustaining and self-developing structure at both the national and regional level to build and strengthen human capacity to enable the provinces of North Sumatra, Yogyakarta, Central Java, West Nusa Tenggara and Papua to formulate sound policies for renewable energy and energy efficiency and to develop and implement sustainable energy projects. Each of the five Indonesian partner universities has managed to choose, purchase and install demonstration equipment within the timeline of the Casindo project. This equipment will be presented to students, visitors, lecturers, government personnel and staff of other organizations. Next to this, researchers made research proposals in which use of the demonstration equipment is presented according to the research agenda of the university. The procedure of purchasing and installing equipment has been delayed in several ways, but all universities have managed to finalise the procedure and install the equipment. First research results have been presented and more results will follow in the next months.

  6. New concepts in automatic enforcement. The "Escape" Project, Deliverable 6. Project funded by the European Commission under the Transport RTD Programme of the 4th Framework Programme.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heidstra, J. Goldenbeld, C. Mäkinen, T. Nilsson, G. & Sagberg, F.

    2010-01-01

    One main reason for automatic enforcement, except of the safety situation, is that the police will not be able to take direct action to each detected violator at normal police enforcement activities in some environments. By using detectors and camera technology the violators can be identified and

  7. Road Safety Data, Collection, Transfer and Analysis DaCoTa. Workpackage 3, Data Warehouse: Deliverable 3.1: Annual statistical report 2010.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandstaetter, C. Evgenikos, P. Yannis, G. Papantoniou, P. Argyropoulou E. Broughton, J. Knowles, J. Reurings, M. Vis, M. Pace, J.F. López de Cozar, E. Pérez-Fuster, P. Sanmartín J. & Haddak, M.

    2012-01-01

    The CARE database brings together the disaggregate details of road accidents and casualties across Europe, by combining the national accident databases that are maintained by all EU member states. Access to the CARE database is restricted, however, so it is important that a comprehensive range of

  8. Road Safety Data, Collection, Transfer and Analysis DaCoTa. Workpackage 3, Data Warehouse: Deliverable 3.8: Data warehouse – Final Report.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yannis, G. Evgenikos, P. Aarts, L. Kars, V. Brandstaetter, C. Bauer, R. Broughton, J. Haddak, M. Lefèvre, M. Pascal, L. Amoros, E. Zielinska, A. Wnuk, A. Lucas, M. Pace, J.-F. Sanmartin, J. Kirk, A. & Thomas, P.

    2015-01-01

    During the last two decades, the systematic efforts for gathering and harmonising road accident data at the European level have led to a significant upgrade and enhancement of the CARE database. Moreover, important data collection and harmonization efforts have provided very useful results as

  9. Incident warning systems : accident review. DRIVE II Project V2002 Horizontal Project for the Evaluation of Safety HOPES, Deliverable 17, Workpackage 31, Activity 31.2.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oppe, S. Lindeijer, J.E. & Barjonet, P.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this accident review is to check what proportion of accidents recorded in the past could in principle have been prevented by using an incident warning system (IWS). The accident review was carried out for all three IWS test sites that are part of the HOPES evaluation study. These

  10. Comparative analysis of conceptions of human rights, democracy and the rule of law in selected third countries, FRAME Deliverable 3.3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sosa, L.P.A.; Timmer, A.S.H.

    2015-01-01

    This report presents a comparative analysis of the different understandings and perspectives on human rights, democracy and rule of law in third countries with which EU has established strategic partnerships: China, India, Peru and South Africa. This explorative report focuses on theoretical

  11. Physical and psychological consequences of serious road traffic injuries, Deliverable 7.2 of the H2020 project SafetyCube (Safety CaUsation, Benefits and Efficiency).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijermars, W.A.M. Meunier, J.-C. Bos, N. Perez, C. Hours, M. Johannsen, H. Barnes, J. Brown, L. Quigley, C. Filtness, A. Perez, C. Olabarria, M. Duran, X. Hours, M. Martin, J. Bauer, R. & Johannsen, H.

    2017-01-01

    SafetyCube aims to develop an innovative road safety Decision Support System (DSS) that will enable policy-makers and stakeholders to select the most appropriate strategies, measures and cost-effective approaches to reduce casualties of all road user types and all severities. Work Package 7 of

  12. Definition of user needs and “hot topics”, Deliverable 2.1 of the H2020 project SafetyCube (Safety CaUsation, Benefits and Efficiency).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagström, L. Thomson, R. Skogsmo, I. Houtenbos, M. Durso, C. Thomas, P. Elvik, R. & Wismans, J.

    2016-01-01

    Safety CaUsation, Benefits and Efficiency (SafetyCube) is a European Commission supported Horizon 2020 project with the objective of developing an innovative road safety Decision Support System (DSS) that will enable policymakers and stakeholders to select and implement the most appropriate

  13. IST BENOGO (IST – 2001-39184) Deliverable I-AAU-05-01: Role of sound in VR and Audio Visual Preferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordahl, Rolf

    This Periodic Progres Report (PPR) document reports on the studies done in Aalborg University on December 2004 concerning role of sound in VR, audio-visual correlations and attention triggering. The report contains a description and evaluation of the experiments run, together with the analysis...... of the data captured by the head tracker, which provide valuable insights on the role of sound events in VR....

  14. Handling adaptation governance choices in Sweden, Germany, the UK and the Netherlands. Workpackage 6, Deliverable 6A. Knowledge for Climate, Theme 7 "The governance of Adaptation"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huitema, D.; Mees, H.L.P.; Termeer, K.; Storbjork, S.; Garrelts, H.; Grecksch, K.; Winges, M.; Rayner, T.

    2012-01-01

    This document presents an overview of climate adaptation policies in four countries: Sweden, Germany, the UK and the Netherlands. The present report presents a collection of the papers that were discussed during a workshop with the international partners under KfC theme 7 Governance. To

  15. Accident prediction models for rural junctions on four European countries. Road Infrastructure Safety Management Evaluation Tools (RISMET), Deliverable No. 6.1.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Azeredo Lopes, S. de & Lourenço Cardoso, J.

    2014-01-01

    The "Road Infrastructure Safety Management Evaluation Tools (RISMET)" project targets objective A (Development of evaluation tools) of the Joint Call for Proposals for Safety at the Heart of Road Design ("The Call"). This project aims at developing suitable road safety engineering evaluation tools

  16. Capacity Development and Strengthening for Energy Policy formulation and implementation of Sustainable Energy Projects in Indonesia CASINDO. Deliverable No. 19. Development or improvement of infrastructure for knowledge valorisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wijnker, M. [Eindhoven University of Technology TUE, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2011-11-15

    The overall objective of the CASINDO programme is to establish a self-sustaining and self-developing structure at both the national and regional level to build and strengthen human capacity to enable the provinces of North Sumatra, Yogyakarta, Central Java, West Nusa Tenggara and Papua to formulate sound policies for renewable energy and energy efficiency and to develop and implement sustainable energy projects. All five universities managed to organise workshops visited each by 30-60 participants. At these workshops the relationship and possibilities for co-operation between university, industry, companies, communities etc. were discussed. In total 13-14 workshops have been organised. Most workshops focussed on a specific topic interesting to both local industry and university. Although the contents, audience and (in-depth) discussions were very different at each university, it can be said that ties with local industry in all regions have been improved.

  17. Road Safety Data, Collection, Transfer and Analysis DaCoTa. Workpackage 4, Decision Support: Deliverable 4.9: Developing a road safety index.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bax, C.A. Wesemann, P. Gitelman, V. Shen, Y. Goldenbeld, C. Hermans, E. Doveh, E. Hakkert, S. Wegman, F.C.M. & Aarts, L.T.

    2015-01-01

    Road safety is a major social aim. The countries that perform best in road safety base their most effective policies on an evidence-based, scientific approach. Countries may learn to improve road safety from their own experiences but also from systematic comparison with other countries. This study

  18. Capacity Development and Strengthening for Energy Policy formulation and implementation of Sustainable Energy Projects in Indonesia CASINDO. Deliverable No. 17. Development of Education Programs at Indonesian Universities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wijnker, M. [Eindhoven University of Technology TUE, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2011-08-15

    The overall objective of the CASINDO programme is to establish a self-sustaining and self-developing structure at both the national and regional level to build and strengthen human capacity to enable the provinces of North Sumatra, Yogyakarta, Central Java, West Nusa Tenggara and Papua to formulate sound policies for renewable energy and energy efficiency and to develop and implement sustainable energy projects. All five Indonesian partner universities managed to develop and implement an education program within the timeline of the CASINDO project. UMY (Muhammadiyah University of Yogyakarta, Indonesia), UNRAM (University of Mataram, Mataram, Indonesia) and UNCEN (Cenderawasih University, Jayapura, Papua, Indonesia) have chosen to develop a certificate program. UNDIP (Diponegoro University in Semarang, Java, Indonesia) and USU (University of Sumatra Utara, Medan, Indonesia) have both developed a master program in sustainable energy. UNDIP has already discussed the proposal of their master program with the Ministry of Education and will have to make some improvements. USU will first start the program as a specialisation within the Mechanical Engineering department and in some time continues to make it an independent master program. At all universities both contact persons and lecturers have put a lot of effort in developing the programs and succeeded. Additionally, through CASINDO a network of lecturers between the universities has developed, which will ease future cooperation, after the CASINDO project will have finished.

  19. AETIC - For an economic approach in the elaboration of local climate policies. Synthesis report (deliverable D4.1), June 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Criqui, P.; Menanteau, P.; Bougnoux, B.; Fournier, J.; Saujot, M.; Joumni, H.

    2013-06-01

    This document reports an exploratory research project which aimed at developing a methodology of identification and prioritisation of actions to be implemented in Territorial Climate-Energy Plans (PCETs), while basing on rigorous technical-economic criteria. The Grenoble metropolitan area has been chosen as a case study because of the commitment of local authorities in a sustainable development approach, in particularly in the elaboration of a PCET. The method is notably based on the construction of a set of sector-related curves of Marginal Costs of Reduction of emissions (CMRs). Measures adopted by local authorities are identified for three specific sectors: transports, buildings, and energy production and distribution. The authors also took other actions into account, such as the modification of urban morphology as it has impacts on mobility and transport offer. The report describes the project context, methods used for the construction of sector-related CMR curves, structuring scenarios regarding evolutions of urban morphology, of population and jobs. It reports results obtained for the three studied sectors, and tries to draw lessons from this global approach in terms of strategy and methodology

  20. Capacity Development and Strengthening for Energy Policy formulation and implementation of Sustainable Energy Projects in Indonesia CASINDO. Deliverable No. 38. Pro-poor Energy Strategy in Yogyakarta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosyidi Sri Atmaja P.; Lesmana, Surya Budi Lesmana [Muhammadiyah University of Yogyakarta, Yogyakarta (Indonesia)

    2011-12-15

    The overall objective of the CASINDO programme is to establish a self-sustaining and self-developing structure at both the national and regional level to build and strengthen human capacity to enable the provinces of North Sumatra, Yogyakarta, Central Java, West Nusa Tenggara and Papua to formulate sound policies for renewable energy and energy efficiency and to develop and implement sustainable energy projects. Chapter 2 provides a review of the national, regional and local policy and programs on energy access for poor communities that have been implemented in Yogyakarta region. However, the two villages, i.e., Dusun Srumbung, Segoroyoso village, Pleret District, Bantul Regency and Dusun Wirokerten, Botokenceng Village, Banguntapan District, Bantul Regency, Yogyakarta Region, selected as locations for energy need assessments in this project have not received any support from the energy programs mentioned in this section. Chapter 3 gives the criteria used to select the locations. Chapter 4 provides the results and analysis of the participatory rural appraisal used for the energy needs assessments which have been carried out in the selected locations. Chapter presents the renewable energy potentials in the study area. Chapter 6 gives the results of a stakeholder analysis for implementing the proposed programmes and roadmap. Chapter 7 is the roadmap for RE project implementation for poor community and provincial budget analysis.

  1. Capacity Development and Strengthening for Energy Policy formulation and implementation of Sustainable Energy Projects in Indonesia CASINDO. Deliverable No. 14. Fast-track program at UNDIP and UNCEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wijnker, M. (ed.) [Eindhoven University of Technology TUE, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2011-01-15

    The overall objective of the CASINDO programme is to establish a self-sustaining and self-developing structure at both the national and regional level to build and strengthen human capacity to enable the provinces of North Sumatra, Yogyakarta, Central Java, West Nusa Tenggara and Papua to formulate sound policies for renewable energy and energy efficiency and to develop and implement sustainable energy projects. The relationship between UNDIP (Diponegoro University in Semarang, Java, Indonesia) and TU/e (Eindhoven University of Technology) has improved because of organising two additional activities together. The chosen topics of the two workshops offered a good opportunity to get to know each other. The level of knowledge in sustainable energy and energy efficiency at UNDIP is already on a high level. The relationship between UNCEN (Cenderawasih University, Jayapura, Papua, Indonesia) and TU/e has also improved much through the organisation of two additional activities. Staff of UNCEN took the opportunity to organise two workshops improving their knowledge in the field of sustainable energy and energy efficiency.

  2. Evaluations of the technical changes and social interactions that occurred during the participatory process, and summarizing on improved scientific skills. Jakfish Deliverable 6.1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Röckmann, Christine; Ulrich, Clara; Dreyer, Marion

    Holders) invited fisheries stakeholders to participate in the process of framing the management problem, and to give input and evaluate the scientific models that are used to provide fisheries management advice. JAKFISH investigated various tools to assess and communicate uncertainty around fish stock assessments...

  3. Role of the North Sea power transmission in realising the 2020 renewable energy targets. Planning and permitting challenges: a deliverable from WP 4 regulatory framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kielland, Jens Jacob; Ruud, Audun

    2012-07-01

    This study explores and assesses challenges for the European permitting and planning system with regard to grid development in the North Sea. The following question is discussed: What planning and permitting challenges can influence the realization of an offshore grid in the North Sea? This is answered by referring to the political context of the North Sea and the development of an offshore grid therein. We present the main features of the proposed regulation by the European Commission (COM(2011)658) that will, if it is adapted, impact current grid permitting procedures. Further, key supranational planning tools for offshore grid development are accounted for and the proposed EU measures are discussed with reference to relevant studies on planning and permitting procedures of realizing electricity grids. Finally, the report provides the general findings and conclusions. (Author)

  4. Capacity Development and Strengthening for Energy Policy formulation and implementation of Sustainable Energy Projects in Indonesia CASINDO. Deliverable No. 24. Energy Efficiency in Central Java

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Windarto, Joko; Nugroho, Agung; Hastanto, Ari; Mahartoto, Gigih [Diponegoro University, Semarang (Indonesia)

    2012-01-15

    The overall objective of the CASINDO programme is to establish a self-sustaining and self-developing structure at both the national and regional level to build and strengthen human capacity to enable the provinces of North Sumatra, Yogyakarta, Central Java, West Nusa Tenggara and Papua to formulate sound policies for renewable energy and energy efficiency and to develop and implement sustainable energy projects. Energy has a very important role and has become a basic necessity in national sustainable development. Therefore, energy should be used sparingly and in a rational manner so that present and future energy demand can be met. Given the importance of using energy efficiently Government needs to devise a framework regulating the utilization of energy resources through the efficient application of technology and stimulating energy-saving behaviours. The purpose of this technical working group in CASINDO project is to research the steps and policy measures needed to improve the efficiency of electrical energy consumption in the household, industrial, and commercial buildings sector for Central Java. The government's efforts in promoting energy efficiency in Indonesia are still hampered by public awareness factor. This study exists to promote public awareness of energy efficiency by describing the financial benefits and possibilities of savings energies in order to support the government's energy saving program, replacement of old equipment that uses high power consumption with a new low-power one, reduction of unnecessary lighting, appreciation to the people who find and develop energy-efficient power utilization, persuade industries to uses the speed controller driver for production and fan motor to streamline the electrical energy usage.

  5. Capacity Development and Strengthening for Energy Policy formulation and implementation of Sustainable Energy Projects in Indonesia CASINDO. Deliverable No. 38. Pro-poor Energy Strategy in Papua

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awaluddin, Duha [University of Cenderawasih, Jayapura (Indonesia)

    2011-11-15

    The overall objective of the CASINDO programme is to establish a self-sustaining and self-developing structure at both the national and regional level to build and strengthen human capacity to enable the provinces of North Sumatra, Yogyakarta, Central Java, West Nusa Tenggara and Papua to formulate sound policies for renewable energy and energy efficiency and to develop and implement sustainable energy projects. The need for energy is a very basic requirement for human life. All human activity relates directly or indirectly to the utilization of energy. Energy derived from fossil fuels (petroleum), will run out at a certain point. Because of this, the utilization of new and renewable energy becomes very important and will need to be improved and encouraged. CASINDO, in collaboration with several universities in Indonesia, including the University of Cenderawasih in Jayapura, Papua, has helped facilitate the implementation of new and renewable energy utilization in a target location in Papua. After a lengthy process, it was decided that Enggros village would be the target location for activities in TWG V, in accordance with pre determined criteria. Enggros is a fishermen village located just outside the city of Jayapura, which falls in the category of poor villages and has very limited access to electricity. Several energy laws and policies of central and local governments have been reviewed to assess their impact on the poor. Many of them claim they aim to accommodate the interests of the poor, but the application and implementation of those programs as they occur in the field, is very far from expectations. Most of the poor in the province of Papua, especially in mountainous and remote areas, still do not have access to any form of electricity. This calls for a more integrated over sight and planning for implementation of all the pro-poor energy policies and programs. In addition, an energy needs assessment has been conducted in the target location to obtain a first-hand understanding of the energy situation of the poor in Papua province. The data collected showed that for Enggros, the most pressing energy need is energy for lighting and that the best solution to meet this need is with solar home systems. With regard to pro-poor programs carried out by the Department of Mines and Energy of Papua province, on the whole, they can be considered good enough, but in our view, the post-implementation and evaluation activities could be improved. Furthermore, in some locations where electrical installations have been built, the local community just hopes that the maintenance of the installed electrical equipments, will be carried out by the government. So that ownership of the equipment is very poor. Equipment maintenance costs that were charged to the public, received less serious response from the community itself. This is evident in several areas or villages which have electricity, but people mostly do not pay their electricity bills (results of surveys and interviews). It is therefore important, that together with electrical equipment, communities are given training on its operation and maintenance.

  6. LINKS-UP - Learning 2.0 for an Inclusive Knowledge Society - Understanding the Picture : Deliverable D3 Preliminary Learning Dialogues Report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.W. (Martijn) Hartog; T. (Thomas) Fischer; S. (Sandra) Schaffert; J. (Joe) Cullen; W. (Wolf) Hilzensauer; D. (Davide) Calenda; E. Suba; M. (Markus) Winkler

    2011-01-01

    This work package firstly functions as a data-gathering activity, to explore and deepen the results, and questions, raised by the earlier research activities and it provides knowledge exchange to engage a wider spectrum of stakeholders to further validate the LINKS-UP outputs. Two phases of the

  7. Road Safety Data, Collection, Transfer and Analysis DaCoTa. Workpackage 4, Decision Support: Deliverable 4.4: Forecasting road traffic fatalities in European countries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antoniou, C. Papadimitriou, E. Yannis, G. Bijleveld, F.D. Commandeur, J.J.F. Broughton, J Knowles, J. Dupont, E. Martensen, H. Giustianni, G. Shingo, D. Hermans, E. Lassarre, S. Perez, C. & Santamariña, E.

    2015-01-01

    Traffic crashes have a major impact to European society, in 2008 over 38,000 road users died and over 1.2 million were injured. The economic cost is immense and has been estimated at over 160 billion for the EU 15 alone. The European Commission and National Governments place a high priority on

  8. Fenix deliverable 3.3. Financial and socio-economic impacts of embracing the Fenix concept. Assessment of costs and benefits of FENIX. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Welle, A.J.; Kolokathis, C.; Jansen, J.C.; Madina, C.; Diaz, A.

    2009-10-01

    The key results of cost-benefit analyses of FENIX (Flexibel Electricity Network to integrate the eXpected energy evolution) applications in the FENIX Southern and Northern Demonstration projects are presented and discussed. The net benefits of FENIX flexibility applications under present-day and future baseline circumstances with a year 2020 time horizon are compared with FENIX operational practices at the system level as defined and delineated by the Southern and Northern Demonstrations. The report focuses on selected promising applications for flexible distributed generators. Results of cost-benefit analysis are considered from the perspectives of key stakeholders and society. The report demonstrates that the FENIX flexibility concept has great potential to create additional value to distributed energy resources and their business partners, network system operators and society at large in a variety of applications.

  9. Final report WP 4.2 : Support Structure Concepts for Deep Water Sites: Deliverable D4.2.8 (WP4: offshore foundations and support structures)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vries, W.E.; Vemula, N.K.; Passon, P.; Fischer, T.; Kaufer, D.; Matha, D.; Schmidt, B.; Vorpahl, F.

    2011-01-01

    With the number of offshore wind farms rapidly increasing, in a wide variety of site conditions and using different turbine sizes, the need for alternative support structures other than the conventional monopile structure is apparent and several projects have been realised using other support

  10. Recommendations for the development and application of Evaluation Tools for road infrastructure safety management in the EU. Road Infrastructure Safety Management Evaluation Tools (RISMET), Deliverable No. 7.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schermers, G. Cardoso, J. Elvik, R. Weller, G. Dietze, M. Reurings, M. Azeredo, S. & Charman, S.

    2014-01-01

    “ERA-NET ROAD — Coordination and Implementation of Road Research in Europe” was a Coordination Action funded by the 6th Framework Programme of the EC. The partners in the 2009 ERA-NET ROAD (ENR) Safety at the heart of road design initiative were the United Kingdom, Finland, Netherlands, Sweden,

  11. Road safety performance indicators : country profiles. SafetyNet, Building the European Road Safety Observatory, Workpackage 3, Deliverable 3.7b.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riguelle, F. Eksler, V. Holló, P. Morsink, P. Gent, A. van Gitelman, V. Assum, T. & Rackliff, L.

    2009-01-01

    The EC 6th Framework Integrated Project SafetyNet aims to accelerate the availability and use of harmonised road safety data in Europe. Having such data available throughout Europe would be tremendously beneficial for road safety, since it would enable the evaluation of road safety measures, the

  12. Definition of Smart Energy City and State of the art of 6 Transform cities using Key Performance Indicators. Deliverable 1.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sieverts Nielsen, P.; Amer, S.B.; Halsnaes, K.

    2013-08-15

    This report summarises the work undertaken under the EU-FP7 TRANSFORM project for Work Package 1 (part 1): Becoming a Smart Energy City, state of the Art and Ambition. Part 1 starts with a clear outline of each of the participating cities. The work describes the context in terms of climate, energy assets, ambitions, targets and main possibilities in terms of energy efficiency, flows and energy production. After this first step, the work focuses on the description of what a smart energy city is (this report), what the main Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) are that should be met and how this relates to where the current cities and the living labs are. It describes at the same time the current status of city planning, energy planning tools, and existing energy data. The outline should also include information on energy production, energy flows and energy efficiency, where possible. The work will draw largely on existing Strategic Energy Action Plans, Climate Action Plans and planning documents. This report establishes a definition of smart cities, develops Key Elements, Key Performance Indicators and reports on the state of the art regarding the KPIs for the 6 Transform cities. As specified in the Transform proposal, the objective of the evaluation is to identify previous and existing initiatives as a sort of stocktaking on the way to establishing a smart city transformation pathway for each of the participating cities in the Transform project. The definition of a smart energy city and the key performance indicators will be used throughout Transform the guide the work. (Author)

  13. Busted Butte Unsaturated Zone Transport Test: Fiscal Year 1998 Status Report Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Program Deliverable SPU85M4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bussod, G.Y.; Turin, H.J.; Lowry, W.E.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the status of the Busted Butte Unsaturated Zone Transport Test (UZTT) and documents the progress of construction activities and site and laboratory characterization activities undertaken in fiscal year 1998. Also presented are predictive flow-and-transport simulations for Test Phases 1 and 2 of testing and the preliminary results and status of these test phases. Future anticipated results obtained from unsaturated-zone (UZ) transport testing in the Calico Hills Formation at Busted Butte are also discussed in view of their importance to performance assessment (PA) needs to build confidence in and reduce the uncertainty of site-scale flow-and-transport models and their abstractions for performance for license application. The principal objectives of the test are to address uncertainties associated with flow and transport in the UZ site-process models for Yucca Mountain, as identified by the PA working group in February 1997. These include but are not restricted to: (1) The effect of heterogeneities on flow and transport in unsaturated and partially saturated conditions in the Calico Hills Formation. In particular, the test aims to address issues relevant to fracture-matrix interactions and permeability contrast boundaries; (2) The migration behavior of colloids in fractured and unfractured Calico Hills rocks; (3) The validation through field testing of laboratory sorption experiments in unsaturated Calico Hills rocks; (4) The evaluation of the 3-D site-scale flow-and-transport process model (i.e., equivalent-continuum/dual-permeability/discrete-fracture-fault representations of flow and transport) used in the PA abstractions for license application; and (5) The effect of scaling from lab scale to field scale and site scale

  14. EMPOWER. Deliverable no 5.1 EMPOWERING a reduction in use of conventionally fuelled vehicles using positive policy measures - Living Lab Plan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenewolt, B.; Hjalmarsson, A.; Amelsfort, D. van; Hodgson, F.; Grant-Muller, S.; Sahala, S.; Weerdt, C.A. van der

    2016-01-01

    Through a literature and case study review ten key success factors to support the design and implementation of incentive-scheme based business models within EMPOWER promoting reduction of CFV use were identified, which will provide input to both other tasks within WP 3 as wells as tasks in other

  15. The culture of referendum in Albania: Technical and theoritecal reflections on the abrogative referendum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valbona Pajo Bala

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to analyse the Albanian constitutional and legal framework on referenda, in general, focusing special attention to the abrogative referenda of a law or part thereof. Given the absence of any concrete case of an abrogative referenda held in Albania, which does not creates very much room for discussion in that regard, the paper, through a comparative approach on the referenda culture in other european states, aims at offering to the reader a more complete view on the mechanisms and guarantees enjoyed by voters and the effective way of their use, in order to give life to the direct democracy, but without replacing the representative one. In addition, part of the analyses will be the powers of the Constitutional Court for the ex ante constitutional review of the issue subject to a referendum, the review of constitutionality of the referndum and of its results. In this context, the paper will focus on the constitutional case-law as a tool for increasing the referenda culture and shaping the constitional order, as well as a source of standards and values. Another objective of the paper is to open a discussion on the need for the reception of referenda-related standards elaborated in those European countries, where the culture of helding a referenda and the case-law on the regard is enriched and may serve as a qualitative basis for further reference.

  16. Hydrogeologic map of the Islamic Republic of Mauritania (phase V, deliverable 56), Synthesis of hydrologic data (phase V, deliverable 57), and chemical hydrologic map of the Islamic Republic of Mauritania (added value): Chapter C in Second projet de renforcement institutionnel du secteur minier de la République Islamique de Mauritanie (PRISM-II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedel, Michael J.; Finn, Carol A.; Horton, John D.

    2015-01-01

    A hydrogeologic study was conducted to support mineral-resource assessment activities in Mauritania, Africa. Airborne magnetic depth estimates reveal two primary groundwater basins: the porous coastal Continental Terminal Basin (fill deposits); and the interior, fractured interior Taoudeni Basin. In the Continental Terminal Basin, there is uniform vertical recharge and localized discharge that is coincident with groundwater pumping at Nouakchott. This pumping center induces eastward flow of groundwater from the Atlantic Ocean resulting in a salinity gradient that diminishes quality over 100 km. Groundwater also flows southward into the basin from Western Sahara. By contrast, an interbasin exchange occurs as fresh groundwater flows westward from the Taoudeni Basin. In the Taoudeni Basin, zones of local recharge occur in three areas: northwest at the edge of the Rgueïbat Shield; at the city of Tidjikja; and near the center of the basin. Groundwater also flows across international boundaries: northward into Western Sahara and westward into Mali. At the southern country boundary, the Senegal River serves as both a source and sink of fresh groundwater to the Continental Terminal and Taoudeni basins. Using a geographical information system, thirteen hydrogeologic units are identified based on lateral extent and distinct hydraulic properties for future groundwater model development. Combining this information with drilling productivity, groundwaterquality, and geophysical interpretations (fracturing and absence of subsurface dikes) three potential water-resource development targets were identified: sedimentary rocks of the Jurassic, Cretaceous, and Quaternary Periods; sedimentary rocks of Cambrian and Ordovician Periods; and sedimentary rocks of Neoproterozoic age.

  17. Learning Approaches - Final Report Sub-Project 4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dirckinck-Holmfeld, Lone; Rodríguez Illera, José Luis; Escofet, Anna

    2007-01-01

    The overall aim of Subproject 4 is to apply learning approaches that are appropriate and applicable using ICT. The task is made up of two components 4.1 dealing with learning approaches (see deliverable 4.1), and component 4.2 application of ICT (see deliverable 4.2, deliverable 4.3 & deliverable...

  18. Speed support through the intelligent vehicle : perspective, estimated effects and implementation aspects.[Deliverable of the Intelligent Vehicles project, part of the Traffic Management project within TRANSUMO (TRANsition to SUstainable MObility).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morsink, P. Goldenbeld, C. Dragutinovic, N. Marchau, V. Walta, L. & Brookhuis, K.

    2008-01-01

    Speed management is a central theme in traffic management, aiming to optimize traffic in terms of safety, efficiency and the environment, by reducing speeding and speed differences in traffic. Intelligent vehicles can perform tasks that conventional measures cannot do at all, or do less efficiently.

  19. Capacity Development and Strengthening for Energy Policy formulation and implementation of Sustainable Energy Projects in Indonesia CASINDO. Deliverable No. 11. Report on the in-house trainings by TEDC. Part 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamphuis, E. [ETC Nederland, Leusden (Netherlands); Permana, I. [Technical Education Development Centre TEDC, Bandung (Indonesia)

    2012-02-15

    The overall objective of the CASINDO programme is to establish a self-sustaining and self-developing structure at both the national and regional level to build and strengthen human capacity to enable the provinces of North Sumatra, Yogyakarta, Central Java, West Nusa Tenggara and Papua to formulate sound policies for renewable energy and energy efficiency and to develop and implement sustainable energy projects. This report describes the in-house trainings given by TEDC (Technical Education Development Centre) to 7 SMK (Sekolah Menengah Kejuruan of the Ministry of Education; SMKs are Vocational and Technical Schools) that are currently involved in CASINDO regarding the background of, the approach to and the steps taken for the development of operational curricula at SMK level. The report also explains the results of the in-house trainings.

  20. Conceptual design of power conversion system for a fusion power reactor with self-cooled LiPb-blanket. EFDA Task TW2-TRP-PPCS12 - Deliverable 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieider, Gottfried

    2002-05-01

    For FPRs with self-cooled LiPb-blanket and He-cooled first wall and divertor a conceptual design of the power conversion system is developed with emphasis on component feasibility, safety, reliability and thermal efficiency. The resulting power conversion system with a steam turbine is based on proven technology for Na- and He-cooled fission reactors and is assessed to yield an overall net thermal plant efficiency of ∼40 % provided the high primary coolant temperatures of ∼700 deg C can be achieved. The required complexity of the five linked cooling systems can be expected to influence plant cost and reliability

  1. Road Safety Data, Collection, Transfer and Analysis DaCoTa. Workpackage 6, Driver Behaviour Monitoring through Naturalistic Driving: Deliverable 6.2: Part B: Sampling techniques and naturalistic driving study design.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Commandeur, J.J.F.

    2015-01-01

    In this document we provide an overview of sampling and estimation methods that can be used to obtain population values of risk exposure data and safety performance indicators based on naturalistic driving study designs. More specifically, we discuss how to determine the optimal sample size required

  2. Uranium in the Islamic Republic of Mauritania (phase V, deliverable 81): Chapter N in Second projet de renforcement institutionnel du secteur minier de la République Islamique de Mauritanie (PRISM-II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernette, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Mauritania has 80 known uranium mineral occurrences and is the current focus of active exploration for uranium by a number of private companies. Seventeen occurrences have had resource estimates published and can be considered as mineral deposits. Fourteen of these are calcrete-type deposits with a total resource of 138.3 million tonnes at an average grade of 331 ppm U3O8. The three bedrock-hosted deposits are granite hosted vein/shear zone type deposits with a total resource of 46.5 million tonnes at a grade of 248 ppm U3O8.

  3. Capacity Development and Strengthening for Energy Policy formulation and implementation of Sustainable Energy Projects in Indonesia CASINDO. Deliverable No. 15. Research agendas of the Indonesian partner universities. Part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wijnker, M. [Eindhoven University of Technology TUE, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2010-09-15

    The overall objective of the CASINDO programme is to establish a self-sustaining and self-developing structure at both the national and regional level to build and strengthen human capacity to enable the provinces of North Sumatra, Yogyakarta, Central Java, West Nusa Tenggara and Papua to formulate sound policies for renewable energy and energy efficiency and to develop and implement sustainable energy projects. This report provides an overview of the status of development of research agendas at the five partner universities. The research agendas consists of a research proposals, purchasing and installation of research equipment, cooperation with industries and conducting the research proposals. Start of the development of the agendas is determining the fields of interest and formulating research projects. Research development is an ongoing process and therefore by the end of 2011 part 2 of this report will be prepared which will present the new developments in the research agendas over the coming year.

  4. Road Safety Data, Collection, Transfer and Analysis DaCoTa. Workpackage 6, Driver Behaviour Monitoring through Naturalistic Driving: Deliverable 6.3: Report on small scale naturalistic driving pilot.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pilgerstorfer, M. Runda, K. Brandstätter, C. Christoph, M. Hakkert, S. Ishaq, R. Toledo, T. & Gatscha, M.

    2012-01-01

    WP6 of DaCoTA, Driver Behaviour Monitoring through Naturalistic Driving, aims to develop an implementation plan for a large scale activity that uses Naturalistic Driving (ND) Observations to continuously monitor relevant road safety data within the framework of the European Road Safety Observatory.

  5. Road Safety Data, Collection, Transfer and Analysis DaCoTa. Deliverable 1.1/4.1: Consultation of a panel of experts on the needs for data and technical tools in road safety policy-making.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dupont, H. Martensen, H. Papadimitriou, E. Yannis, G. Muhlrad, N. Jähi, H. Vallet, G. Giustiniani, G. Tripodi, A. Usami, D. Bax, C. Wijnen, W. Schöne, M.-L. Machata, K. Buttler, I. Zysinska, M. Talbot, R. Gitelman, V. & Hakkert, S. & Muhlrad, N. & Dupont, E. (Eds.)

    2012-01-01

    Traffic crashes have a major impact to European society, in 2008 over 38,000 road users died and over 1.2 million were injured. The economic cost is immense and has been estimated at over 160 billion for the EU 15 alone. The European Commission and National Governments place a high priority on

  6. Capacity Development and Strengthening for Energy Policy formulation and implementation of Sustainable Energy Projects in Indonesia CASINDO. Deliverable No. 22. Energy Profile of Yogyakarta Province 2007. Regional CASINDO Team of Yogyakarta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al Hasibi, R.A. [Universitas Muhammadiyah Yogyakarta PUSPER-UMY, Yogyakarta (Indonesia)

    2011-09-15

    The overall objective of the CASINDO programme is to establish a self-sustaining and self-developing structure at both the national and regional level to build and strengthen human capacity to enable the provinces of North Sumatra, Yogyakarta, Central Java, West Nusa Tenggara and Papua to formulate sound policies for renewable energy and energy efficiency and to develop and implement sustainable energy projects. This report gives an overview of the province Yogyakarta, Indonesia, focusing on the energy balance in 2007.

  7. Managing Waste Inventory and License Limits at the Perma-Fix Northwest Facility to Meet CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) Deliverables - 12335

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moak, Don J.; Grondin, Richard L. [Perma-Fix Environmental Services, Inc. - PESI, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Triner, Glen C.; West, Lori D. [East Tennessee Materials and Energy Corporation - M and EC, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHRPC) is a prime contractor to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) focused on the largest ongoing environmental remediation project in the world at the DOE Hanford Site Central Plateau, i.e. the DOE Hanford Plateau Remediation Contract. The East Tennessee Materials and Energy Corporation (M and EC); a wholly owned subsidiary of Perma-Fix Environmental Services, Inc. (PESI), is a small business team member to CHPRC. Our scope includes project management; operation and maintenance of on-site storage, repackaging, treatment, and disposal facilities; and on-site waste management including waste receipt from generators and delivery to on-site and off-site treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. As part of this scope, M and EC staffs the centralized Waste Support Services organization responsible for all waste characterization and acceptance required to support CHPRC and waste generators across the Hanford Site. At the time of the CHPRC contract award (August 2008) slightly more than 9,000 cubic meters (m{sup 3}) of legacy waste was defined as 'no-path-forward waste'. A significant portion of this waste (7,650 m{sup 3}) comprised wastes with up to 50 grams of special nuclear materials (SNM) in oversized packages recovered during retrieval operations and large glove boxes removed from the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). Through a collaborative effort between the DOE, CHPRC, and Perma-Fix Environmental Services, Inc. (PESI), pathways for these problematic wastes were developed that took advantage of commercial treatment capabilities at a nearby vendor facility, Perma-Fix Northwest (PFNW). In the spring of 2009, CHPRC initiated a pilot program under which they began shipping large package, low gram suspect TRU (<15 g SNM per container), and large package contact and remote handled MLLW to the off-site PFNW facility for treatment. PFNW is restricted by the SNM limits set for the total quantity of SNM allowed at the facility in accordance with the facility's radioactive materials license(s) (RML). While both CHPRC and PFNW maintain waste databases to track all waste movements, it became evident early in the process that a tool was needed that married the two systems to better track SNM inventories and sequence waste from the point of generation, through the PFNW facility, and back to the Hanford site for final disposition. This tool, known as the Treatment Integration and Planning Tool (TIPT), has become a robust planning tool that provides real-time data to support compliant and efficient waste generation, transportation, treatment, and disposition. TIPT is developing into the next generation tool that will change the way in which legacy wastes, retrieval wastes and decontamination and decommissioning operations are conducted on the Plateau Remediation Contract (PRC). The real value of the TIPT is its predictive capability. It allows the W and FMP to map out optimal windows for processing waste through the PFNW facility, or through any process that is in some way resource limited. It allows project managers to identify and focus on problem areas before shipments are affected. It has been modified for use in broader applications to predict turnaround times and identify windows of opportunity for processing higher gram wastes through PFNW and to allow waste generators, site-wide, to accurately predict scope, cost, and schedule for waste generation to optimize processing and eliminate storage, double handling, and related costs and unnecessary safety risks. The TIPT addresses the years old problem of how to effectively predict not only what needs to be done, but when. 'When' is the key planning parameter that has been ignored by the generator and processor for many years, but has proven to be the most important parameter for both parties. While further refinement is a natural part of any development process, the current improvements on the TIPT have shown that prediction is a powerful consideration. Even in lean times expected for the foreseeable future, the improved TIPT continues to play a central role in managing our way through those times to assure facilities remain viable and available. It is recommended that other major remediation projects and waste processing facilities incorporate a tool such as TIPT to improve customer-commercial supplier communications and better optimization of resources. (authors)

  8. Compilation and testing of tools and methods for sustainable coastal management at local and regional scales : Deliverable D2.5.4, Thresholds project, 6th framework programme, EU, 108 p.

    OpenAIRE

    Håkanson, Lars

    2008-01-01

    This work describes how general methods and models for sustainable coastal ecosystem management at local to regional scales may be used to address key questions in coastal management and threshold science. The general, process-based mass-balance model (CoastMab) for substances transported to, within and from for coastal areas may be used as a tool to: 1. Combat eutrophication, 2. Rank nutrient fluxes, 3. Estimate the system response related to nutrient reductions and 4. Estimate realistic val...

  9. Capacity Development and Strengthening for Energy Policy formulation and implementation of Sustainable Energy Projects in Indonesia CASINDO. Deliverable No. 10. Report on the in-house trainings by TEDC. Part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamphuis, E. [ETC Nederland, Leusden (Netherlands); Permana, I. [Technical Education Development Centre TEDC, Bandung (Indonesia)

    2011-11-15

    The overall objective of the CASINDO programme is to establish a self-sustaining and self-developing structure at both the national and regional level to build and strengthen human capacity to enable the provinces of North Sumatra, Yogyakarta, Central Java, West Nusa Tenggara and Papua to formulate sound policies for renewable energy and energy efficiency and to develop and implement sustainable energy projects. This report describes the in-house trainings given by TEDC (Technical Education Development Centre) to 4 SMK (Sekolah Menengah Kejuruan of the Ministry of Education; SMKs are Vocational and Technical Schools) that are currently involved in CASINDO regarding the background of, the approach to and the steps taken for the development of operational curricula at SMK level. The report also explains the results of the in-house trainings.

  10. Capacity Development and Strengthening for Energy Policy formulation and implementation of Sustainable Energy Projects in Indonesia CASINDO. Deliverable No. 9. Report on specific competency trainings (basic level) by TEDC for SMK teachers from the five CASINDO regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamphuis, E. [ETC Nederland, Leusden (Netherlands); Permana, I. [Technical Education Development Centre TEDC, Bandung (Indonesia)

    2011-03-15

    The overall objective of the CASINDO programme is to establish a self-sustaining and self-developing structure at both the national and regional level to build and strengthen human capacity to enable the provinces of North Sumatra, Yogyakarta, Central Java, West Nusa Tenggara and Papua to formulate sound policies for renewable energy and energy efficiency and to develop and implement sustainable energy projects. This report describes the trainings conducted by TEDC Bandung (Technical Education Development Centre) on specific competencies for the teachers of the 11 SMKs (Sekolah Menengah Kejuruan of the Ministry of Education; SMKs are Vocational and Technical Schools) involved in CASINDO in the renewable energy technologies micro hydropower , solar photovoltaic, wind energy, biomass, biogas and energy efficiency. The report also contains a description of the Training of Trainers activities conducted by the CASINDO consortium for TEDC staff in the renewable energy technologies micro hydro power, solar photovoltaic, wind energy, biomass , biogas and energy efficiency. Additionally, the report describes training activities that are closely linked to and highly relevant for CASINDO.

  11. Traffic law enforcement by non-police bodies. The "Escape" Project, Deliverable 4. Project funded by the European Commission under the Transport RTD Programme of the 4th Framework Programme.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heidstra, J. Goldenbeld, C. Gelau, C. Mäkinen, T. Jayet, M.-C. & Evers, C.

    2000-01-01

    To ensure some minimal standard for traffic system operation and safety, a system of traffic laws and regulations is necessary. Enforcement of these traffic laws is believed to influence driving behaviour through a mechanism of deterrence: the threat of legal punishment should convince road users to

  12. Areas of interest of potential users for naturalistic observation studies. PROmoting real Life Observations for Gaining Understanding of road user behaviour in Europe PROLOGUE, Deliverable D1.2.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schagen, I.N.L.G. van Craen, S. de Nes, N. van & Eenink, R.

    2010-01-01

    Identification of the interests of potential users is crucial for setting up a useful and broadly supported large-scale naturalistic driving (ND) study. This report describes the results of a survey amongst 72 road transport professionals in Europe from different organisation types that aimed at

  13. Capacity Development and Strengthening for Energy Policy formulation and implementation of Sustainable Energy Projects in Indonesia CASINDO. Deliverable No. 16. Development and execution of pilot research projects at the CASINDO partner universities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wijnker, M. [Eindhoven University of Technology TUE, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2011-09-15

    The overall objective of the CASINDO programme is to establish a self-sustaining and self-developing structure at both the national and regional level to build and strengthen human capacity to enable the provinces of North Sumatra, Yogyakarta, Central Java, West Nusa Tenggara and Papua to formulate sound policies for renewable energy and energy efficiency and to develop and implement sustainable energy projects. Each of the five Indonesian universities managed to develop pilot research projects and wrote research proposals to outline and strengthen their ideas. All of the universities also purchased equipment for the purpose of executing this research. UNCEN (Cenderawasih University, Jayapura, Papua, Indonesia) and UNDIP (Diponegoro University in Semarang, Java, Indonesia) managed to finalize their research within the project period and wrote reports on their results. The other universities could not yet present results due to delay in one or several of the steps within the procedure.

  14. Capacity Development and Strengthening for Energy Policy formulation and implementation of Sustainable Energy Projects in Indonesia CASINDO. Deliverable No. 8. Report on general competency trainings (basic level) by TEDC for SMK teachers from the five CASINDO regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamphuis, E. [ETC Nederland, Leusden (Netherlands); Permana, I. [Technical Education Development Centre TEDC, Bandung (Indonesia)

    2011-03-15

    The overall objective of the CASINDO programme is to establish a self-sustaining and self-developing structure at both the national and regional level to build and strengthen human capacity to enable the provinces of North Sumatra, Yogyakarta, Central Java, West Nusa Tenggara and Papua to formulate sound policies for renewable energy and energy efficiency and to develop and implement sustainable energy projects. This report presents an overview of the training activities on general renewable energy technologies competencies conducted by TEDC Bandung (Technical Education Development Centre), for the teachers of the 11 SMKs (Sekolah Menengah Kejuruan of the Ministry of Education; SMKs are Vocational and Technical Schools) involved in the CASINDO project. The report also contains a description of the Training of Trainers activities conducted by the CASINDO consortium for TEDC staff in the renewable energy technologies micro hydro power, solar photovoltaic, wind energy, biomass , biogas and energy efficiency.

  15. Mineral potential tracts for shoreline Ti-Zr placer deposits (phase V, deliverable 85): Chapter P in Second projet de renforcement institutionnel du secteur minier de la République Islamique de Mauritanie (PRISM-II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudoin, Georges

    2015-01-01

    Shoreline placer Ti deposits are composed of ilmenite, rutile, zircon, monazite, and magnetite in well-sorted, fine- to medium-grained sand in coastal dunes, beaches and inlets. In addition to titanium, zirconium, in particular, and rare earth elements (REE) have become a major source of value in shoreline placer deposits. Shoreline placer deposits form mostly on tropical beaches around the world (fig. 1), and consist of dark sand layers rich in heavy minerals that are resistant to mechanical abrasion and chemical weathering. According to Hamilton (1995), shoreline placer deposits supply approximately 80 percent of the world’s rutile production, 25 percent of ilmenite, 100 percent of zircon, and 50 percent of both monazite and xenotime.

  16. Capacity Development and Strengthening for Energy Policy formulation and implementation of Sustainable Energy Projects in Indonesia CASINDO. Deliverable No. 23. Energy Profile of Yogyakarta Province 2008. Regional CASINDO Team of Yogyakarta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al Hasibi, R.A. [Universitas Muhammadiyah Yogyakarta PUSPER-UMY, Yogyakarta (Indonesia)

    2011-09-15

    The overall objective of the CASINDO programme is to establish a self-sustaining and self-developing structure at both the national and regional level to build and strengthen human capacity to enable the provinces of North Sumatra, Yogyakarta, Central Java, West Nusa Tenggara and Papua to formulate sound policies for renewable energy and energy efficiency and to develop and implement sustainable energy projects. This report gives an overview of the province Yogyakarta, Indonesia, focusing on the energy balance in 2008.

  17. Capacity Development and Strengthening for Energy Policy formulation and implementation of Sustainable Energy Projects in Indonesia CASINDO. Deliverable No. 21. Energy Profile of Yogyakarta Province 2006. Regional CASINDO Team of Yogyakarta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-15

    The overall objective of the CASINDO programme is to establish a self-sustaining and self-developing structure at both the national and regional level to build and strengthen human capacity to enable the provinces of North Sumatra, Yogyakarta, Central Java, West Nusa Tenggara and Papua to formulate sound policies for renewable energy and energy efficiency and to develop and implement sustainable energy projects. This report gives an overview of the province Yogyakarta, Indonesia, focusing on the energy balance in 2006.

  18. Practical guidelines for the registration and monitoring of serious traffic injuries, Deliverable 7.1 of the H2020 project SafetyCube (Safety CaUsation, Benefits and Efficiency).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pérez, K. Weijermars, W.A.M. Amoros, E. Bauer, R. Bos, N. Dupont, E. Filtness, A. Houwing, S. Johannsen, H. Leskovsek, B. Machata, K. Martin, JL. Nuyttens, N. Olabarria, M. Pascal, L. & Van den Berghe, W.

    2017-01-01

    Safety CaUsation, Benefits and Efficiency (SafetyCube) is a European Commission supported Horizon 2020 project. The project’s main objective is the development of an innovative road safety Decision Support System (DSS) that will enable policy-makers and stakeholders to select and implement the most

  19. Road Safety Data, Collection, Transfer and Analysis DaCoTa. Workpackage 3, Data Warehouse: Deliverable 3.7: Design and development of the road safety data warehouse – Final Report.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yannis, G. Evgenikos, P. Aarts, L. Kars, V. & Berg, T. van den

    2015-01-01

    During the last two decades, the systematic efforts for gathering and harmonising road accident data at the European level have led to a significant upgrade and enhancement of the CARE database. Moreover, important data collection and harmonization efforts have provided very useful results as

  20. Capacity Development and Strengthening for Energy Policy formulation and implementation of Sustainable Energy Projects in Indonesia CASINDO. Deliverable No. 12. Report on the approach to roll-out to other SMK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamphuis, E. [ETC Nederland, Leusden (Netherlands); Permana, I. [Technical Education Development Centre TEDC, Bandung (Indonesia)

    2011-11-15

    The overall objective of the CASINDO programme is to establish a self-sustaining and self-developing structure at both the national and regional level to build and strengthen human capacity to enable the provinces of North Sumatra, Yogyakarta, Central Java, West Nusa Tenggara and Papua to formulate sound policies for renewable energy and energy efficiency and to develop and implement sustainable energy projects. This report describes the different strategic options for rolling-out the integration of the renewable energy technologies to other SMK (Sekolah Menengah Kejuruan of the Ministry of Education; SMKs are Vocational and Technical Schools) than those that are currently involved in CASINDO. The report also contains the justification for one strategic option and of the first actions taken to make this strategy work.

  1. Capacity Development and Strengthening for Energy Policy formulation and implementation of Sustainable Energy Projects in Indonesia CASINDO. Deliverable No. 13. Integration of Renewable Energy Technologies in the national curriculum SPECTRUM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamphuis, E. [ETC Nederland, Leusden (Netherlands); Permana, I. [Technical Education Development Centre TEDC, Bandung (Indonesia)

    2011-11-15

    The overall objective of the CASINDO programme is to establish a self-sustaining and self-developing structure at both the national and regional level to build and strengthen human capacity to enable the provinces of North Sumatra, Yogyakarta, Central Java, West Nusa Tenggara and Papua to formulate sound policies for renewable energy and energy efficiency and to develop and implement sustainable energy projects. This report focuses on the achievements for settling a national curriculum for Renewable Energy Technologies (RET) within the framework of national programme SPECTRUM, which includes all curricula of the medium technical schools in Indonesia.

  2. DELIVERABLE 1.3.1 GEOPHYSICAL WELL LOG/CORE DESCRIPTIONS, CHEROKEE AND BUG FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH, AND LITTLE UTE AND SLEEPING UTE FIELDS, MONTEZUMA COUNTY, COLORADO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chidsey, Thomas C. Jr.; Eby, David E.; Wray, Laura L.

    2003-01-01

    Over 400 million barrels (64 million m 3 ) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m 3 ) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m 3 ) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado

  3. DELIVERABLE 1.4.1 AND 1.4.2 CROSS SECTIONS AND FIELD MAPS: CHEROKEE AND BUG FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH, AND LITTLE UTE AND SLEEPING UTE FIELDS, MONTEZUMA COUNTY, COLORADO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chidsey, Thomas C. Jr; Morgan, Craig D.; McClure, Kevin; Eby, David E.; Wray, Laura L.

    2003-01-01

    Over 400 million barrels (64 million m 3 ) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m 3 ) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m 3 ) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado

  4. DELIVERABLE 2.1.1 POROSITY/PERMEABILITY CROSS-PLOTS: CHEROKEE AND BUG FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH, AND LITTLE UTE AND SLEEPING UTE FIELDS, MONTEZUMA COUNTY, COLORADO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chidsey, Thomas C. Jr.; Eby, David E.; Wray, Laura L.

    2003-01-01

    Over 400 million barrels (64 million m 3 ) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m 3 ) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m 3 ) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado

  5. Description of data-sources used in SafetyCube, Deliverable 3.1 of the H2020 project SafetyCube (Safety CaUsation, Benefits and Efficiency).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagström, L. Thomson, R. Hermitte, T. Weijermars, W. Bos, N. Talbot, R. Thomas, P. Dupont, E. Martensen, H. Bauer, R. Hours, M. Høye, E. Jänsch, M. Murkovic, A. Niewöhner, W. Papadimitriou, E. Pérez, C. Phan, V. Usami, D. & Vázquez-de-Prada, J.

    2017-01-01

    Safety CaUsation, Benefits and Efficiency (SafetyCube) is a European Commission supported Horizon 2020 project with the objective of developing an innovative road safety Decision Support System (DSS) that will enable policy-makers and stakeholders to select and implement the most appropriate

  6. Detailed cost-benefit analysis of potential impairment countermeasures. Research in the framework of the European research programme IMMORTAL (Impaired Motorists, Methods of Roadside Testing and Assessment for Licensing) Deliverable P2.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlakveld, W. Wesemann, P. Devillers, E. Elvik, R. & Veisten, K.

    2005-01-01

    Almost all kinds of driver impairments increase accident risks. This study forms part of the European IMMORTAL (Impaired Motorists, Methods Of Roadside Testing and Assessment for Licensing) project. The study provides a cost-benefit analysis (CBA) of several possible policies of impairment

  7. Capacity Development and Strengthening for Energy Policy formulation and implementation of Sustainable Energy Projects in Indonesia CASINDO. Deliverable No. 27. Biogas construction plan in Jeruk Manis Village in Lombok, West Nusa Tenggara

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natsir, A. [University of Mataram, Mataram (Indonesia)

    2011-10-15

    The overall objective of the CASINDO programme is to establish a self-sustaining and self-developing structure at both the national and regional level to build and strengthen human capacity to enable the provinces of North Sumatra, Yogyakarta, Central Java, West Nusa Tenggara (WNT) and Papua to formulate sound policies for renewable energy and energy efficiency and to develop and implement sustainable energy projects. The proposed small-scale renewable energy project to be developed under the Casindo Technical Working Group IV in West Nusa Tenggara is focused on household biogas. The project will be implemented in Jeruk Manis, which has been selected as the target location for the implementation of the renewable energy project in the program Casindo. Administratively, the village of 'Jeruk Manis' is located in the district Sikur, East Lombok, West Nusa Tenggara province. The number of households eligible as the target of the program in Jeruk Manis is 63. To implement the project, the Casindo team in WNT has partnered with Hivos and its BIRU program (Biogas Rumah program or Indonesia Domestic Biogas Programme). The biogas digester construction will be conducted by BIRU Lombok, in collaboration with a construction partner organization called Yayasan Mandiri Membangun Masyarakat Sejahtera (YM3S) and managed by the Casindo project team from the Faculty of Engineering at the University of Mataram. If the project is implemented, it will bring many benefits for poor people in the target location, which are likely to be sustained for a long time. While the benefits of developing biogas in the selected low-income location are obvious and abundant, there are also many challenges. The main problem for the proposed project is finding other interested funders to support the building of household biogas, as the financial capacity of the target households is very small.

  8. Assessment and applicability of evaluation tools: Current practice in a sample of European countries and steps towards a state-of-the-art approach. Road Infrastructure Safety Management Evaluation Tools (RISMET), Deliverables No. 4 and 5.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elvik, R.

    2014-01-01

    This report surveys current practice in a sample of European countries with respect to the use of ten different tools for safety management of road systems. The report also proposes steps that can be taken to bring the use of these management tools closer to their state-of-the-art versions. These

  9. Iron oxide copper-gold deposits in the Islamic Republic of Mauritania (phase V, deliverable 79): Chapter M in Second projet de renforcement institutionnel du secteur minier de la République Islamique de Mauritanie (PRISM-II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernette, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Mauritania hosts one significant copper-gold deposit, Guelb Moghrein and several occurrences, which have been categorized as iron oxide copper-gold (IOCG) deposits but which are atypical in some important respects. Nonetheless, Guelb Moghrein is an economically significant mineral deposit and an attractive exploration target. The deposit is of Archean age and is hosted by a distinctive metacarbonate rock which is part of a greenstone-banded iron formation (BIF) package within a thrust stack in the northern part of the Mauritanide Belt. The surrounding area hosts a number of similar copper-gold occurrences. Based on the characteristics of the Guelb Moghrein deposit and its geologic environment, five tracts which are considered permissive for IOCG type mineralization similar to Guelb Moghrein have been delineated.

  10. Road Safety Data, Collection, Transfer and Analysis DaCoTa. Workpackage 3, Deliverable No. D 3.5: Annual Statistical Report 2011 based on data from CARE / EC from 2000 to 2009.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandstaetter, C. Yannis, G. Evgenikos, P. Argyropoulou, E. Papantoniou, P. Broughton, J. Knowles, J. Reurings, M. Vis, M. Pace, J.-P. López de Cozar, E. Martinez-Pérez, C. Sanmartín, J. & Haddak, M.

    2013-01-01

    Road traffic accidents in the Member States of the European Union annually claim about 34.000 lives and leave more than 1.1 million people injured, representing estimated costs of 140 billion Euros. Since 1984, a large number of measures to reduce road accidents have been taken at a regional level.

  11. Road Safety Data, Collection, Transfer and Analysis DaCoTa. Workpackage 6, Driver Behaviour Monitoring through Naturalistic Driving: Deliverable 6.5: Naturalistic Driving for cross-national monitoring of SPIs and Exposure : an overview.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wegman, R.W.N. & Bos, N.M.

    2015-01-01

    WP6 of DaCoTA, Driver Behaviour Monitoring through Naturalistic Driving, focuses on the usefulness and feasibility of applying the Naturalistic Driving method for monitoring within the framework of ERSO. The aim is to continuously collect comparable information about the road safety level in EU

  12. Road Safety Data, Collection, Transfer and Analysis DaCoTa. Workpackage 6, Driver Behaviour Monitoring through Naturalistic Driving: Deliverable 6.4: Naturalistic Driving for monitoring safety performance indicators and exposure: considerations for implementation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schagen, I.N.L.G. van & Reed, S.

    2015-01-01

    DaCoTA was a Collaborative Project under the European Seventh Framework Programme that aimed to develop tools and methodologies to support road safety policy and further extend and enhance the European Road Safety Observatory (ERSO). One of the Work Packages in DaCoTA, WP6, focused on the usefulness

  13. Overview of the Systems Analysis Framework for the EU Bioeconomy. Deliverable 1.4 of the EU FP 7 SAT-BBE project Systems Analysis Tools Framework for the EU Bio-Based Economy Strategy (SAT BBE)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, van M.G.A.; Meijl, van H.; Smeets, E.M.W.; Tabeau-Kowalska, E.W.

    2014-01-01

    In November 2012 the Systems Analysis Tools Framework for the EU Bio-Based Economy Strategy project (SAT-BBE) was launched with the purpose to design an analysis tool useful to monitoring the evolution and impacts of the bioeconomy. In the SAT-BBE project the development of the analysis tool for the

  14. Capacity Development and Strengthening for Energy Policy formulation and implementation of Sustainable Energy Projects in Indonesia CASINDO. Deliverable No. 25. Renewable Energy Action Plan of West Nusa Tenggara Province 2010-2025

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-08-15

    The overall objective of the CASINDO programme is to establish a self-sustaining and self-developing structure at both the national and regional level to build and strengthen human capacity to enable the provinces of North Sumatra, Yogyakarta, Central Java, West Nusa Tenggara and Papua to formulate sound policies for renewable energy and energy efficiency and to develop and implement sustainable energy projects. This report is expected to become a reference for government and private sectors in the development of renewable energy in West Nusa Tenggara Province, not only the development of renewable energy for electricity generation, but also for other needs such as fuel for industry and cooking fuel for households. The Renewable Energy Action Plan of West Nusa Tenggara Province is a follow-up of the enactment of Presidential Regulation No. 5 Year 2006 concerning National Energy Policy, which the Central Government has set a target utilization of renewable energy by 2025 by 17%. Furthermore, this document contains data and information regarding current utilization of renewable energy, renewable energy potential and development opportunities, target of renewable energy development and action plans necessary to achieve the targets.

  15. Permissive tracts for iron oxide copper-gold deposits in Mauritania (phase V, deliverable 78 ): Chapter M1 in Second projet de renforcement institutionnel du secteur minier de la République Islamique de Mauritanie (PRISM-II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernette, Gregory; Horton, John D.

    2012-01-01

    In 1996, at the request of the Government of the Islamic Republic of Mauritania, a team of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists produced a strategic plan for the acquisition, improvement and modernization of multidisciplinary sets of data to support the growth of the Mauritanian minerals sector and to highlight the geological and mineral exploration potential of the country. In 1999, the Ministry of Petroleum, Energy, and Mines of the Islamic Republic of Mauritania implemented a program for the acquisition of the recommended basic geoscientific information, termed the first Projet de Renforcement Institutionnel du Secteur Minier (Project for Institutional Capacity Building in the Mining Sector, PRISM-I). As a result of the PRISM-I efforts, a great deal of new geological, geophysical, geochemical, remote sensing, and hydrological data became available for evaluation and synthesis. However, the Ministry of Petroleum, Energy, and Mines recognized that additional work was required to extract the full benefit of the data before it could be of greatest use to the international community and of benefit to the Mauritanian minerals and development sector.

  16. Geological and petrophysical characterization of the Ferron Sandstone for 3-D simulation of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir. Deliverable 2.5.4, Ferron Sandstone lithologic strip logs, Emergy & Sevier Counties, Utah: Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, M.L.

    1995-12-08

    Strip logs for 491 wells were produced from a digital subsurface database of lithologic descriptions of the Ferron Sandstone Member of the Mancos Shale. This subsurface database covers wells from the parts of Emery and Sevier Counties in central Utah that occur between Ferron Creek on the north and Last Chance Creek on the south. The lithologic descriptions were imported into a logging software application designed for the display of stratigraphic data. Strip logs were produced at a scale of one inch equals 20 feet. The strip logs were created as part of a study by the Utah Geological Survey to develop a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, and qualitative characterization of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir using the Ferron Sandstone as a surface analogue. The study was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under the Geoscience/Engineering Reservoir Characterization Program.

  17. Legal and administrative measures to support police enforcement of traffic rules. The "Escape" Project, Deliverable 5. Project funded by the European Commission under the Transport RTD Programme of the 4th Framework Programme.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goldenbeld, C. Heidstra, J. Christ, R. Mäkinen, T. & Hakkert, A.S.

    2005-01-01

    This report addresses the question of how legal and administrative systems may support the operation or effectiveness of the total system of traffic law enforcement. In this first chapter we present road safety and traffic enforcement as the efforts of several interlinked organisations and

  18. Organic viticulture and wine-making: development of environment and consumer friendly technologies for organic wine quality improvement and scientifically based legislative framework. Deliverable: D 2.7 Public report about first round qualitative consumer research and market needs

    OpenAIRE

    Stolz, Hanna; Schmid, Otto

    2007-01-01

    This survey of consumers’ perceptions and expectations regarding organic wine and viticulture in the selected case study countries of Italy (IT), France (FR), Germany (DE) and Switzerland (CH) was conducted within the framework of the EU research project ORWINE (Organic viticulture and wine-making: development of environment and consumer friendly technologies for organic wine quality improvement and scientifically based legislative framework). The objectives of the study were to investigat...

  19. April 25, 2003, FY2003 Progress Summary and FY2002 Program Plan, Statement of Work and Deliverables for Development of High Average Power Diode-Pumped Solid State Lasers,and Complementary Technologies, for Applications in Energy and Defense

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, W; Bibeau, C

    2005-01-01

    The High Average Power Laser Program (HAPL) is a multi-institutional, synergistic effort to develop inertial fusion energy (IFE). This program is building a physics and technology base to complement the laser-fusion science being pursued by DOE Defense programs in support of Stockpile Stewardship. The primary institutions responsible for overseeing and coordinating the research activities are the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The current LLNL proposal is a companion document to the one submitted by NRL, for which the driver development element is focused on the krypton fluoride excimer laser option. The NRL and LLNL proposals also jointly pursue complementary activities with the associated rep-rated laser technologies relating to target fabrication, target injection, final optics, fusion chamber, target physics, materials and power plant economics. This proposal requests continued funding in FY03 to support LLNL in its program to build a 1 kW, 100 J, diode-pumped, crystalline laser, as well as research into high gain fusion target design, fusion chamber issues, and survivability of the final optic element. These technologies are crucial to the feasibility of inertial fusion energy power plants and also have relevance in rep-rated stewardship experiments. The HAPL Program pursues technologies needed for laser-driven IFE. System level considerations indicate that a rep-rated laser technology will be needed, operating at 5-10 Hz. Since a total energy of ∼2 MJ will ultimately be required to achieve suitable target gain with direct drive targets, the architecture must be scaleable. The Mercury Laser is intended to offer such an architecture. Mercury is a solid state laser that incorporates diodes, crystals and gas cooling technologies

  20. Final Report on Pilot Studies / Final Report on Classroom Research with STEM and TESL Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biel, Carmen; Wake, Jo Dugstad; Hesse, Friedrich

    This Deliverable is the final report on pilot studies within the NEXT-TELL project (D6.7) and furthermore comprises the Deliverable on Classroom Research with STEM and TESL Assessment (D2.9) in order to avoid redundancies between those two Deliverables.......This Deliverable is the final report on pilot studies within the NEXT-TELL project (D6.7) and furthermore comprises the Deliverable on Classroom Research with STEM and TESL Assessment (D2.9) in order to avoid redundancies between those two Deliverables....

  1. Analysis of energy consumption, indoor climate, occupant satisfaction and overall evaluation of the project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zanghirella, Fabio; Thomsen, Kirsten Engelund; Knudsen, Henrik Nellemose

    . Deliverable 23 Deliverable 23 is a deliverable produced as part of the final reporting of the project. It is meant to provide an overview of energy consumption analysis, indoor climate and occupants satisfaction investigations and an overall evaluation of the project. The distribution is public....

  2. Analysis within the systems development life-cycle

    CERN Document Server

    Rock-Evans, Rosemary

    1987-01-01

    Analysis within the Systems Development Life-Cycle, Book 3: Activity Analysis - The Deliverables provides a comprehensive coverage of the deliverables of activity analysis. The book also details purpose of each deliverable in the context of the next tasks in the systems development cycle (SDC). The text first covers the concept of deliverables and the benefits of making deliverables visible. In the second chapter, the book introduces the main concepts and diagrammatic techniques of activity analysis. The third chapter deals with the important classes or categories of concept, while the fourth

  3. "Fake News": False fears or real concerns?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McGonagle, T.

    2017-01-01

    “Fake news” has become a much-used and much-hyped term in the so-called “post-truth” era that we now live in. It is also much-maligned: it is often blamed for having a disruptive impact on the outcomes of elections and referenda and for skewing democratic public debate, with the 2016 US Presidential

  4. When Crisis Calls for a Referendum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchfield, Terrence A.

    1998-01-01

    The school business official will be involved in many referenda over the course of a career. School budgets, capital projects, equipment acquisitions, school bus purchases, and emergency construction projects are among the most common situations requiring a referendum. A time frame is needed, and most states have guidelines spelling out procedures…

  5. Racial Cleavage in Local Voting: The Case of School and Tax Issue Referendums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Button, James

    1993-01-01

    Explores voting behavior of African Americans and whites in local school and tax referenda to determine whether racial conflict is still a primal factor in noncandidate elections. Results for voters in 5 counties in Florida (over 1,699,000 voters) reveal African-American underregistration and the continuing importance of racial cleavage. (SLD)

  6. 7 CFR 900.310 - Supplementary instructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Conduct of Referenda To Determine Producer Approval of Milk Marketing Orders To Be Made Effective Pursuant to Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, as Amended § 900.310 Supplementary instructions. The... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing...

  7. 7 CFR 900.302 - Associations eligible to vote.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Conduct of Referenda To Determine Producer Approval of Milk Marketing Orders To Be Made Effective Pursuant to Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, as Amended § 900.302 Associations eligible to vote... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing...

  8. 7 CFR 900.305 - Duties of referendum agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Conduct of Referenda To Determine Producer Approval of Milk Marketing Orders To Be Made Effective Pursuant to Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, as Amended § 900.305 Duties of referendum agent. The... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing...

  9. 7 CFR 900.300 - General.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Conduct of Referenda To Determine Producer Approval of Milk Marketing Orders To Be Made Effective Pursuant to Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, as Amended § 900.300 General. Unless otherwise... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements...

  10. 7 CFR 900.306 - Notice of the referendum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Conduct of Referenda To Determine Producer Approval of Milk Marketing Orders To Be Made Effective Pursuant to Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, as Amended § 900.306 Notice of the referendum. (a... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing...

  11. 7 CFR 900.308 - Tabulation of ballots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Conduct of Referenda To Determine Producer Approval of Milk Marketing Orders To Be Made Effective Pursuant to Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, as Amended § 900.308 Tabulation of ballots. (a... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing...

  12. 7 CFR 900.311 - Submittals or requests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Conduct of Referenda To Determine Producer Approval of Milk Marketing Orders To Be Made Effective Pursuant to Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, as Amended § 900.311 Submittals or requests... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing...

  13. 7 CFR 900.304 - Who may vote.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Conduct of Referenda To Determine Producer Approval of Milk Marketing Orders To Be Made Effective Pursuant to Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, as Amended § 900.304 Who may vote. (a) Each producer... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements...

  14. 7 CFR 900.307 - Time for voting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Conduct of Referenda To Determine Producer Approval of Milk Marketing Orders To Be Made Effective Pursuant to Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, as Amended § 900.307 Time for voting. There shall be... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements...

  15. 7 CFR 900.303 - Conduct of referendum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Conduct of Referenda To Determine Producer Approval of Milk Marketing Orders To Be Made Effective Pursuant to Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, as Amended § 900.303 Conduct of referendum. The... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing...

  16. 7 CFR 900.309 - Confidential information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Conduct of Referenda To Determine Producer Approval of Milk Marketing Orders To Be Made Effective Pursuant to Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, as Amended § 900.309 Confidential information. The... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing...

  17. 7 CFR 900.301 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Conduct of Referenda To Determine Producer Approval of Milk Marketing Orders To Be Made Effective Pursuant to Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, as Amended § 900.301 Definitions. As used in this... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements...

  18. "Hired Guns" and "Legitimate Voices": The Politics and Participants of Levy Campaigns in Five Ohio School Districts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingle, William Kyle; Johnson, Paul Andrew; Petroff, Ruth Ann

    2012-01-01

    Background: In Ohio, levy campaigns are a burdensome task for district administrators and stakeholders alike. To date, there is little research on the districts' role in crafting school budget referenda campaigns. Purpose: This study asked three research questions: How did the macropolitical contexts shape stakeholders' decision making in terms of…

  19. Moral politics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapp, Carolin; Traunmüller, Richard; Freitag, Markus

    2014-01-01

    This article combines the research strands of moral politics and political behavior by focusing on the effect of individual and contextual religiosity on individual vote decisions in popular initiatives and public referenda concerning morally charged issues. We rely on a total of 13 surveys with 1...... American research on moral politics, direct democracies, and the public role of religion....

  20. Learning from the EU Constitutional Treaty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crum, B.J.J.

    2012-01-01

    The negative results of referenda on the European Union (EU) Constitutional Treaty in France and the Netherlands, and subsequent low-key adoption of the Treaty of Lisbon raise complex questions about the possible democratization of international organisations. This book provides a full analysis of

  1. Explaining the discrepancy between intentions and actions: the case of hypothetical bias in contingent valuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Icek Ajzen; Thomas C. Brown; Franklin Carvajal

    2004-01-01

    An experiment was designed to account for intention-behavior discrepancies by applying the theory of planned behavior to contingent valuation. College students (N = 160) voted in hypothetical and real payment referenda to contribute $8 to a scholarship fund. Overestimates of willingness to pay in the hypothetical referendum could not be attributed to moderately...

  2. Policy-Making Structures and Their Biases Towards Political Economy and Ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauber, Volkmar

    The author suggests that the ecology movement in Western Europe has reached the limits of reactive politics and cannot achieve more unless it adopts a different strategy. Surveys and referenda show that the public has an overwhelmingly good opinion of the ecology movement but that few will vote on it in elections. Thus, the movement has had little…

  3. Wellhead deliverabilty of natural gas - assembling the evidence. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, W.R.

    1995-09-01

    This report presents information about the wellhead delivery of natural gas--the amount of gas the supply industry can produce and deliver to the pipeline. It is designed to help power industry planners evaluate essential aspects of gas supply as part of their overall assessment and utilization of gas-fired power generation. Low prices caused by excess deliverability have led to minimal exploration for new supplies, with the open-quotes bubbleclose quotes of excess deliverability ending. The report examines the facts pertinent to assessing the outlook for deliverability over the intermediate term. It develops deliverability concepts and relates deliverability to reserves and resources. It assesses the available information for measuring and monitoring availability and suggests improvements in available data. The regional outlook for deliverability growth in the Gulf of Mexico and other leading producing regions is also discussed. The report reviews the historical background of present deliverability trends and discusses the industry dynamics that affect development of future deliverability: lead times for increasing deliverability, the declining base of skilled exploration manpower, advancing gas supply technology, and prices required to encourage exploration and development

  4. Capacity Development and Strengthening for Energy Policy formulation and implementation of Sustainable Energy Projects in Indonesia CASINDO. Deliverable No. 7. Report on the selection of SMKs for the project's target provinces and working agreements between SMKs and the project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamphuis, E. [ETC Nederland, Leusden (Netherlands); Permana, I. [Technical Education Development Centre TEDC, Bandung (Indonesia)

    2010-05-15

    The overall objective of the CASINDO programme is to establish a self-sustaining and self-developing structure at both the national and regional level to build and strengthen human capacity to enable the provinces of North Sumatra, Yogyakarta, Central Java, West Nusa Tenggara and Papua to formulate sound policies for renewable energy and energy efficiency and to develop and implement sustainable energy projects. This report explains the stepwise approach taken in the selection of SMKs (Sekolah Menengah Kejuruan of the Ministry of Education; SMKs are Vocational and Technical Schools) for CASINDO's target provinces. For this, data of the Indonesian Ministry of Education were used, site visits were made and interviews were conducted. The exercise resulted in ranking the 11 best SMKs observed. Terms for working agreements between the SMKs and CASINDO have been formulated as well as a work planning.

  5. Permissive tracts for nickel, copper, platinum group elements (PGE), and chromium deposits of Mauritania (phase V, deliverable 66): Chapter G1 in Second projet de renforcement institutionnel du secteur minier de la République Islamique de Mauritanie (PRISM-II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Cliff D.; Horton, John D.

    2012-01-01

    In 1996, at the request of the Government of the Islamic Republic of Mauritania, a team of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists produced a strategic plan for the acquisition, improvement and modernization of multidisciplinary sets of data to support the growth of the Mauritanian minerals sector and to highlight the geological and mineral exploration potential of the country. In 1999, the Ministry of Petroleum, Energy, and Mines of the Islamic Republic of Mauritania implemented a program for the acquisition of the recommended basic geoscientific information, termed the first Projet de Renforcement Institutionnel du Secteur Minier (Project for Institutional Capacity Building in the Mining Sector, PRISM-I). As a result of the PRISM-I efforts, a great deal of new geological, geophysical, geochemical, remote sensing, and hydrological data became available for evaluation and synthesis. However, the Ministry of Petroleum, Energy, and Mines recognized that additional work was required to extract the full benefit of the data before it could be of greatest use to the international community and of benefit to the Mauritanian minerals and development sector.

  6. Investigation of competitiveness and social-economic benefits of the French solar sector - Final deliverable. Competitiveness and employment of the solar sector in France: situation and prospective by 2023 - Synthesis of the study of social-economic benefits of the development of the French solar sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    This document reports a study which aimed at investigating present costs and benefits of the French solar sector in 2015, and at elaborating realistic assessments of social and economic benefits (jobs, avoided emissions, tax) by 2023, and also at highlighting the competitiveness of solar solutions and at analysing self-consumption models. In order to do so, it reports an analysis of the French solar photovoltaic sector and an analysis of the French solar thermal sector (costs, competitiveness, development scenario, benefits on the medium term), and proposes a comparison between these both sectors

  7. Permissive tracts for sediment-hosted lead-zinc-silver deposits in the Islamic Republic of Mauritania (phase V, deliverable 73): Chapter J in Second projet de renforcement institutionnel du secteur minier de la République Islamique de Mauritanie (PRISM-II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauk, Jeffrey L.

    2015-01-01

    Although Mississippi Valley-type (MVT) deposits have not been recognized in Mauritania there are permissive tracts for these deposits in the regionally extensive Proterozoic carbonate rocks of the Taoudeni Basin. Permissive tracts for undiscovered MVT Pb-Zn-Ag deposits in the Proterozoic carbonate units are supported by the occurrences of MVT mineral and alteration assemblages, presence of evaporites, proximity to major orogenic events that have produced MVT ores elsewhere, red bed sequences and basal aquifers that may have been potential brine migration pathways for large MVT hydrothermal systems.

  8. Mineral potential for nickel, copper, platinum group elements(PGE), and chromium deposits hosted in ultramafic rocks in the Islamic Republic of Mauritania (phase V, deliverable 67): Chapter G in Second projet de renforcement institutionnel du secteur minier de la République Islamique de Mauritanie (PRISM-II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Cliff D.; Marsh, Erin; Anderson, Eric D.

    2015-01-01

    PRISM-I summary documents mention the presence of mafic-ultramafic igneous intrusive rocks in several areas of Mauritania and a number of chromium (Cr) and copper-nickel (Cu-Ni (±Co, Au)) occurrences associated with them. Permissive geologic settings generally include greenstone belts of any age, layered mafic-ultramafic and unlayered gabbro-anorthosite intrusive complexes in cratonic settings, ophiolite complexes, flood basalt provinces, and fluid-rich shear zones cutting accumulations of mafic-ultramafic rocks. Regions of Mauritania having these characteristics that are discussed in PRISM-I texts include the Mesoarchean greenstone belts of the TasiastTijirit terrane in the southwestern Rgueïbat Shield, two separate layered ultramafic complexes in the Amsaga Complex west of Atar, serpentinized metadunites in Mesoarchean rocks of the Rgueïbat Shield in the Zednes map sheet, several lateritized annular mafic-ultramafic complexes in the Paleoproterozoic northwestern portion of the Rgueïbat Shield, and the serpentinized ophiolitic segments of the Gorgol Noir Complex in the axial portion of the southern Mauritanides. Bureau de Recherches Géologiques et Minières (BRGM) work in the “Extreme Sud” zone also suggests that small copper occurrences associated with the extensive Jurassic microgabbroic intrusive rocks in the Taoudeni Basin of southeastern Mauritania could have potential for magmatic Cu-Ni (PGE, Co, Au) sulfide mineralization. Similarly, Jurassic mafic intrusive rocks in the northeastern Taoudeni Basin may be permissive. Known magmatic Cu-Ni deposits of these types in Mauritania are few in number and some uncertainty exists as to the nature of several of the more important ones.

  9. Mineral potential tracts for orogenic, Carlin-like, and epithermal gold deposits in the Islamic Republic of Mauritania, (phase V, deliverable 69): Chapter H in Second projet de renforcement institutionnel du secteur minier de la République Islamique de Mauritanie (PRISM-II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, Richard J.; Marsh, Erin; Anderson, Eric D.; Horton, John D.; Finn, Carol A.; Beaudoin, Georges

    2015-01-01

    The gold resources of Mauritania presently include two important deposits and a series of poorly studied prospects. The Tasiast belt of deposits, which came into production in 2007, is located in the southwestern corner of the Rgueïbat Shield and defines a world-class Paleoproterozoic(?) orogenic gold ore system. The producing Guelb Moghrein deposit occurs along a shear zone in Middle Archean rocks at the bend in the Northern Mauritanides and is most commonly stated to be an iron oxide-copper-gold (IOCG) type of deposit, although it also has some important characteristics of orogenic gold and skarn deposits. Both major deposits are surrounded by numerous prospects that show similar mineralization styles. The Guelb Moghrein deposit, and IOCG deposit types in general are discussed in greater detail in a companion report by Fernette (2015). In addition, many small gold prospects, which are probably orogenic gold occurrences and are suggested to be early Paleozoic in age, occur along the length of Southern Mauritanides. Existing data indicate the gold deposits and prospects in Mauritania have a sulfide assemblage most commonly dominated by pyrrhotite and chalcopyrite, and have ore-related fluids with apparently high salinities.

  10. Road Safety Data, Collection, Transfer and Analysis DaCoTa. Deliverable 1.5. Vol.1 — Analysis of the stakeholder survey: perceived priority and availability of data and tools and relation to the stakeholders' characteristics. Vol.II: Analysis of Road Safety Management in the European countries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papadimitriou, E. Yannis, G. Muhlrad, N. Vallet, G. Butler, I. Gitelman, V. Doveh, E. Dupont, E. Thomas, P. Talbot, R. Giustiniani, G. Machata, K. & Bax, C.

    2015-01-01

    Volume I: This report is part of the ‘Policy’ Work Package of the DaCoTA project (www.dacotaproject.eu). The ‘Policy’ Work Package is designed to fill in the gap in knowledge on road safety policy making processes, their institutional framework and the data, methods and technical tools needed to

  11. Mineral potential for incompatible element deposits hosted in pegmatites, alkaline rocks, and carbonatites in the Islamic Republic of Mauritania (phase V, deliverable 87): Chapter Q in Second projet de renforcement institutionnel du secteur minier de la République Islamique de Mauritanie (PRISM-II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Cliff D.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2015-01-01

    Review of PRISM-I documents and the National inventory of mineral occurrences suggests that resources of U, Th, Nb, Ta, Be, rare earth elements (REEs) and fluorite are known in Mauritania and have been exploited in the past at the Bou Naga alkaline complex. Several different deposit types are indicated by the available data. Pegmatitic veins are recorded in several areas of the Archean and Paleoproterozoic portions of the Rgueïbat Shield and are prospective for resources of Li, Be, Nb, Ta, U, Th, and REEs. Over 150 beryl pegmatites are known in the Khnefissat and Inkebden areas of the Chami greenstone belt, and additional concentrations of pegmatites are known in the Guelb Nich Sud area of the Sebkhet Nich greenstone belt and in the northeastern part of the Amsaga Complex. Due to the small size of these deposits, they are unlikely to be economic unless additional value can be gained by processing contained minerals for their industrial uses.

  12. Road design and environment : best practice on self-explaining and forgiving roads. Deliverable D3 of the RiPCORD-iSEREST project (Road Infrastructure Safety Protection - Core-Research and Development for Road Safety in Europe; Increasing safety and reliability of secondary roads for a sustainable Surface Transport).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matena, S. Louwerse, W. Schermers, G. Vaneerdewegh, P. Pokorny, P. Gaitanidou, L. Elvik, R. & Cardoso, J.

    2009-01-01

    Main objective of work-package 3 of Ripcord-lserest was to collect information on best practices concerning the design of self-explaining and forgiving roads. In order to gain an overview on existing practises on road categorisation and the layout of typical rural roads a questionnaire survey had

  13. Bounded rationality and voting decisions over 160 years: voter behavior and increasing complexity in decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadelmann, David; Torgler, Benno

    2013-01-01

    Using a quasi-natural voting experiment encompassing a 160-year period (1848-2009) in Switzerland, we investigate whether a higher level of complexity leads to increased reliance on trusted parliamentary representatives. We find that when more referenda are held on the same day, constituents are more likely to refer to parliamentary recommendations when making their decisions. This finding holds true even when we narrow our focus to referenda with a relatively lower voter turnout on days on which more than one referendum is held. We also demonstrate that when constituents face a higher level of complexity, they follow the parliamentary recommendations rather than those of interest groups. "Viewed as a geometric figure, the ant's path is irregular, complex, hard to describe. But its complexity is really a complexity in the surface of the beach, not a complexity in the ant." ( [1] p. 51).

  14. A new reality: Funding formula changes and property tax caps and their effects on the role of the school superintendent in the state of Indiana

    OpenAIRE

    Gentry, Patrick L

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to discover how school superintendents were using general fund referenda to meet their school district’s operational budgets. However, after interviews began it became clear that the superintendents wanted to tell a different story and that was how the current school funding mechanism and property tax caps has changed the job of the school superintendent. The research consisted of one-on-one guided interviews of a mixed qualitative methods framework c...

  15. A little fairness may induce a lot of redistribution in democracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tyran, Jean-Robert; Sausgruber, Rupert

    2006-01-01

    We use a model of self-centered inequality aversion suggested by Fehr and Schmidt (Quart. J. Econom. 114 (3) (1999) 817) to study voting on redistribution. We theoretically identify two classes of conditions when an empirically plausible amount of fairness preferences induces redistribution throu...... referenda. We test the predictions of the adapted inequality aversion model in a simple redistribution experiment and find that it predicts voting outcomes far better than the standard model of voting assuming rationality and strict self-interest...

  16. Can we use human judgments to determine the discount rate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, J

    2000-12-01

    It has been suggested that the long-term discount rate for environmental goods should decrease at longer delays. One justification for this suggestion is that human judgments support it. This article presents an experiment showing that judgments concerning discount rates are internally inconsistent. These results point to potential problems with the use of judgments referenda for determining discount rates in cost-benefit analyses.

  17. Daily Exposure to Negative Campaign Messages Decreases Same-Sex Couples’ Psychological and Relational Well-Being

    OpenAIRE

    Frost, D; Fingerhut, A

    2016-01-01

    Throughout history, the rights of stigmatized minority group members have been subject to popular debate and voter referenda. The impact of the resulting devaluing social discourse on the well-being of minority group members remains unknown. For example, exposure to the discourse leading up to decisions on same-sex marriage may have negative consequences for sexual minority individuals and same-sex couples. We examined the impact of exposure to same-sex marriage campaign messages (e.g., comme...

  18. Mechanisms of public participation in the decision-making process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corner, J.

    1993-01-01

    Public inquiries, hearings, referenda and government reviews are among a number of commonly mechanisms through which the public in the relevant OECD countries participate in the decision-making process in respect of nuclear power and its development. The scope, application and effectiveness of these procedures appear to vary from country to country; differences which may result from styles of government, history, national interest and other factors. We listen to each OECD member in turn, explaining how is the situation in his country

  19. Refined analysis results for multimedia network costs and profits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tahkokorpi, M.; Falch, Morten; Skouby, Knud Erik

    This deliverable describes the techno-economic business model developed in EURORIM WP3 and presents the refined results of the multimedia service delivery cost-profit calculations......This deliverable describes the techno-economic business model developed in EURORIM WP3 and presents the refined results of the multimedia service delivery cost-profit calculations...

  20. D1.3 -- Short Report on the First Draft Multi-link Channel Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Troels; Raulefs, Ronald; Steinboeck, Gerhard

    This deliverable is a preliminary report on the activities towards multi-link channel models. It summarizes the activities and achievements of investigations of WP1 Task 1.2 in the first year of the project. In this deliverable work focuses on the characterization of the crosscorrelation of multi...

  1. OSSMETER D3.4 – Language-Specific Source Code Quality Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Vinju (Jurgen); A. Shahi (Ashim); H.J.S. Basten (Bas)

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractThis deliverable is part of WP3: Source Code Quality and Activity Analysis. It provides descriptions and prototypes of the tools that are needed for source code quality analysis in open source software projects. It builds upon the results of: • Deliverable 3.1 where infra-structure and

  2. Cassandra - D7.3.5 - M30 status : Report dissemination results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klievink, A.J.

    2014-01-01

    This deliverable is a status report on the dissemination activities and results in the CASSANDRA project. These status reports are made regularly, with one more to come at the project’s finish. Together, these make up deliverable D7.3 – Dissemination results. In this report, the results of the

  3. Guidance on a better integration of aquaculture, fisheries, and other activities in the coastal zone: from tools to practical examples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stelzenmüller, V.; Schulze, T.; Gimpel, A.; Bartelings, H.; Bello, E.; Bergh, O.; Bolman, B.; Caetano, M.; Davaasuren, N.; Fabi, G.; Ferreira, J.G.; Gault, J.; Gramolini, R.; Grati, F.; Hamon, K.G.; Jak, R.G.; Kopke, K.; Laurans, M.; Mäkinen, T.; O’Donnell, V.; O’Hagan, A.M.; O’Mahony, C.; Oostenbrugge, van H.; Ramos, J.; Saurel, C.; Sell, A.L.; Silvo, K.; Sinschek, K.; Soma, K.; Stenberg, C.; Taylor, N.; Vale, C.; Vasquez, F.; Verner-Jeffreys, D.W.

    2013-01-01

    This guidance document provides a comprehensive assessment of the conflicts and synergies between fisheries, aquaculture and other activities in the coastal zone in six COEXIST case study areas. It forms deliverable D5.2 of the COEXIST project and synthesises deliverable D5.1, which provides a more

  4. A combinatorial wind field model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soleimanzadeh, Maryam; Wisniewski, Rafal; Sloth, Christoffer

    2010-01-01

    This report is the deliverable 2.4 in the project Distributed Control of Large-Scale Oshore Wind Farms with the acronym Aeolus. The objective of this deliverable is to provide an understanding of the wind eld model and dynamic variations superimposed on the mean eld. In this report a dynamical...

  5. A Conceptual Framework for Analyzing the Relations between Demand and Public Procurement for Innovation and between Knowledge-intensive Entrepreneurship and Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timmermans, Bram; Zabala, Jon Mikel; Edquist, Charles

    2010-01-01

    ) in stimulating innovative knowledge-intensive initiatives should also examined in the different deliverables included in the WP. In the case of this particular deliverable, a theoretical framework focusing on the links between demand and public innovative procurement and knowledge intensive entrepreneurship...

  6. OSSMETER D3.2 – Report on Source Code Activity Metrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Vinju (Jurgen); A. Shahi (Ashim)

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractThis deliverable is part of WP3: Source Code Quality and Activity Analysis. It provides descriptions and initial prototypes of the tools that are needed for source code activity analysis. It builds upon the Deliverable 3.1 where infra-structure and a domain analysis have been

  7. D7.1 Quality Plan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryberg, Thomas; Lee, Deirdre; Maglavera, Stavroula

    2009-01-01

    This deliverable includes a detailed description of the quality assurance process for the EATrain2 project, the initial results of the risk assessment and self-evaluation processes as well as a description of the peer-review process for ensuring qualitative deliverables....

  8. Recommendations on future development of decision support systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MCarthur, Stephen; Chen, Minjiang; Marinelli, Mattia

    Deliverable 8.3 reports on the consolidation of experiences from visualisation, decision support prototypes experiments and recommendations on future developments of decision support systems......Deliverable 8.3 reports on the consolidation of experiences from visualisation, decision support prototypes experiments and recommendations on future developments of decision support systems...

  9. Cassandra - D7.3.4 - M24 status report dissemination results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klievink, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    This deliverable is a status report on the dissemination activities and results in the CASSANDRA project. These status reports are made regularly, with two more to come. Together, these make up deliverable D7.3 – Dissemination results. In this fifth report, the results of the dissemination

  10. C2 Domain Ontology within Our Lifetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    25] Masolo, C., et al: The WonderWeb Library of Foundational Ontologies Prelimary Report, WonderWeb Deliverable D17, ISTC -CNR, May 2003. [26...www.ifomis.org/bfo/BFO  [25] Masolo, C., et al: The WonderWeb Library of Foundational Ontologies Prelimary Report, WonderWeb Deliverable D17, ISTC -CNR

  11. KiWi Vision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaffert, Sebastian; Bry, Francois; Dolog, Peter

    This deliverable describes the common vision of the KiWi project, ranging from motivation over use cases and usage scenarios to user interaction, system architecture and technologies, and the research that is performed as part of the project. The deliverable is intended for a wide audience to give...

  12. A Systems Analysis and Design Case Study for a Business Modeling Learning Experience for a Capstone CIS/IS Systems Development Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Jack; Russell, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    The goal is to provide a robust and challenging problem statement for a capstone, advanced systems analysis and design course for CIS/MIS/CS majors. In addition to the problem narrative, a representative solution for much of the business modeling deliverables is presented using the UML paradigm. A structured analysis deliverable will be the topic…

  13. QUEST2: Project plan for preliminary analysis/system architecture phase (PA/SA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braaten, F.D.

    1995-01-01

    This Project Management Plan combines the project management deliverables from the P+ methodology that are applicable to this part of the QUEST2 work. This consolidation reflects discussions with WHC QA regarding an appropriate method for ensuring that P+ deliverables fulfill the intent of WHC-CM-3-10 and QR-19

  14. idSpace D2.3 – Semantic meta-model integration and transformations v2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolog, Peter; Grube, Pascal; Schmid, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    This deliverable discusses an extended set of requirements for transformations and metamodel for creativity techniques. Based on the requirements, the deliverable provides refined meta-model. The metamodel allows for more advanced transforma-tion concepts besides the previously delivered graph tr...... oriented implemen-tation with portlets and widgets in the Liferay portal....

  15. Driver. D530.2 – Tools for the Lessons Learned Framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaik, M.G. van; et al

    2016-01-01

    In this deliverable D530.2 “Tools for the Lessons Learned Framework” the overall lessons learned framework will be clarified based on the delivery D53.1 “Lessons Learned Framework Concept” and aligned with the deliverable D52.1 “Harmonized competence framework”. The Tools for the Lessons Learned

  16. CROSS-COMPLIANCE Facilitating the CAP reform: Compliance and competitiveness of European agriculture : Specific Targeted Research or Innovation Project (STREP) Integrating and Strengthening the European Research Area

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongeneel, R.A.; Bezlepkina, I.; Winsten, J.; Fox, G.

    2008-01-01

    The prime aim or the project was on assessing the impacts of compliance with standards, more specifically those part of cross-compliance, on EU’s external competitiveness. This is why in several deliverables and also in the main text of this Deliverable 13 a lot of attention is given to the EU and

  17. Training industry needs & Technology Industry needs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klemke, Roland; Kuula, Timo; Helin, Kaj; Wild, Fridolin

    2017-01-01

    This deliverable joins D1.1 (User Industry Needs) and D1.2 (Technology Industry Needs and Affordances) and reports on the outcomes of Tasks T1.1 (Training Industry Assessment) and T1.2 (Technology Industry Assessment). We merged the deliverables for the following reasons: For readability ease we

  18. Demand forecasts at national and EU level on a computer-based model taking usage costs into account

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Passamonti, Lucia; Falch, Morten; Björksten, Margareta

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this deliverable is to forecast the residential spending on selected multimedia services such as Tele-entertainment, VOD, AOD, Networked games, Teleshopping and Teleworking.......The objective of this deliverable is to forecast the residential spending on selected multimedia services such as Tele-entertainment, VOD, AOD, Networked games, Teleshopping and Teleworking....

  19. 75 FR 71183 - 23rd Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 206: EUROCAE WG 76 Plenary: AIS and MET Data Link Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-22

    ... the RTCA Program Management Committee. A brief description of the document deliverables called out in... Recommendations deliverable is a holistic, data-link-agnostic technical analysis of delivery methods to and from... Management, and Weather Applications, WG1 Chairmen Working Group 2, AIS Uplink and MET Uplink, Downlink, and...

  20. D5.3 Interaction between currents, wave, structure and subsoil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Erik Damgaard; Sumer, B. Mutlu; Schouten, Jan-Joost

    2015-01-01

    This chapter gives an introduction to deliverable D5.3 - Interaction between currents, waves, structure and subsoil – with respect to the MERMAID project. The deliverable focuses on the conditions in European waters such as the four sites that is addressed in the MERMAID project. The most important...

  1. D1.1 Detailed requirements for GloNet use case and domain glossary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Afsarmanesh, H.; Korojelo, S.; Sargolzaei, M.; Thamburaj, V.; Madhavan, V.; Camarinha-Matos, L.

    2012-01-01

    D1.1 is one of the first deliverables of the project, which sets the base for research in all other WPs in GloNet. The findings reported in this deliverable are resulted through direct involvement of the two energy related industries within the GloNet consortium (iPLON and Prolon), as well as the

  2. Incorporating multi-leaf collimator leaf sequencing into iterative IMRT optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siebers, Jeffrey V.; Lauterbach, Marc; Keall, Paul J.; Mohan, Radhe

    2002-01-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning typically considers beam optimization and beam delivery as separate tasks. Following optimization, a multi-leaf collimator (MLC) or other beam delivery device is used to generate fluence patterns for patient treatment delivery. Due to limitations and characteristics of the MLC, the deliverable intensity distributions often differ from those produced by the optimizer, leading to differences between the delivered and the optimized doses. Objective function parameters are then adjusted empirically, and the plan is reoptimized to achieve a desired deliverable dose distribution. The resulting plan, though usually acceptable, may not be the best achievable. A method has been developed to incorporate the MLC restrictions into the optimization process. Our in-house IMRT system has been modified to include the calculation of the deliverable intensity into the optimizer. In this process, prior to dose calculation, the MLC leaf sequencer is used to convert intensities to dynamic MLC sequences, from which the deliverable intensities are then determined. All other optimization steps remain the same. To evaluate the effectiveness of deliverable-based optimization, 17 patient cases have been studied. Compared with standard optimization plus conversion to deliverable beams, deliverable-based optimization results show improved isodose coverage and a reduced dose to critical structures. Deliverable-based optimization results are close to the original nondeliverable optimization results, suggesting that IMRT can overcome the MLC limitations by adjusting individual beamlets. The use of deliverable-based optimization may reduce the need for empirical adjustment of objective function parameters and reoptimization of a plan to achieve desired results

  3. Analysis within the systems development life-cycle

    CERN Document Server

    Rock-Evans, Rosemary

    1987-01-01

    Analysis within the Systems Development Life-Cycle: Book 1, Data Analysis-The Deliverables provides a comprehensive treatment of data analysis within the systems development life-cycle and all the deliverables that need to be collected in analysis. The purpose of deliverables is explained and a number of alternative ways of collecting them are discussed. This book is comprised of five chapters and begins with an overview of what """"analysis"""" actually means, with particular reference to tasks such as hardware planning and software evaluation and where they fit into the overall cycle. The ne

  4. FLOODPLAIN, SCHOHARIE COUNTY, NEW YORK

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  5. FLOODPLAIN, BEDFORD COUNTY, PA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  6. FLOODPLAIN, PERRY COUNTY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  7. Sacramento County, CA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  8. FLOODPLAIN, Cortland COUNTY, New York

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  9. FLOODPLAIN, MARION COUNTY, OHIO, AND INCORPORATED AREAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  10. FLOODPLAIN MAPPING FOR FANNIN COUNTY TX

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  11. FLOODPLAIN, Surry COUNTY, VA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  12. FLOODPLAIN MAPPING, White COUNTY, IN

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  13. FLOODPLAIN MAPPING, Greene COUNTY, IN

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  14. FLOODPLAIN, JESSAMINE COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  15. FLOODPLAIN, AUGUSTA COUNTY, USA AND INCORPORATED AREAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  16. FLOODPLAIN, KING GEORGE COUNTY, VIRGINIA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  17. FLOODPLAIN, WASATCH COUNTY, UTAH, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  18. FLOODPLAIN, GUERNSEY COUNTY, OHIO

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the 1-percent-annual-chance...

  19. MASON COUNTY, MICHIGAN, USA, REDELINEATION, MASON COUNTY, MICHIGAN

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  20. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE ROCKLAND COUNTY, NY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  1. FLOODPLAIN, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  2. Floodplain Mapping, SOLANO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  3. FLOODPLAIN, WASHINGTON COUNTY, TEXAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classificatinos used are the...

  4. FLOODPLAIN, WAYNE COUNTY, MICHIGAN

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the 1-percent-annual-chance...

  5. FLOODPLAIN, TOWN OF FAIRHAVEN, BRISTOL COUNTY, MASSACHUSETTS PMR

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  6. Floodplain Mapping for Santa Fe County, NM

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  7. FLOODPLAIN, Monroe County, Michigan, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  8. FLOODPLAIN, Nelson COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  9. Civic engagement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puuronen, Vesa; Saari, Kari; Neuvonen, Samuli

    2014-01-01

    Vesa Puuronen, Kari Saari, Samuli Neuvonen, Niko Eskelinen and Klaus Levinsen (2014). (Ch 6), in Mark Ellison and Gary Pollock: Deliverable 4.6: Measuring participation. Europe-wide thematic report....

  10. FLOODPLAIN, ALLAMAKEE COUNTY, IOWA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the 1-percent-annual-chance...

  11. FLOODPLAIN, TAMA COUNTY, IOWA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  12. FLOODPLAIN, SILVER BOW COUNTY, MONTANA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  13. NPS-SCAT (Solar Cell Array Tester), The Construction of NPS' First Prototype CubeSat

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bein, Alexander L

    2008-01-01

    .... This Master's Thesis describes the NPS-SCAT (solar cell array tester) project, including the author's experience as program manager of the project, responsible for budget, schedule and technical deliverables...

  14. FLOODPLAIN, YELLOWSTONE COUNTY, MONTANA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  15. FLOODPLAIN MAPPING SUBMISSION FOR INDIAN RIVER COUNTY, FLORIDA AND INCORPORATED AREAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  16. DCS Floodplain Mapping Submission for SEBASTIAN COUNTY, AR, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  17. FLOODPLAIN, MARTIN COUNTY, KENTUCKY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  18. Engineering Task Plan for Water Supply for Spray Washers on the Support Trucks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BOGER, R.M.

    2000-01-01

    This Engineering Task Plan (ETP) defines the task and deliverables associated with the design, fabrication and testing of an improved spray wash system for the Rotary Mode Core Sampling (RMCS) System Support Trucks

  19. Floodplain Mapping Submission for Fox Lake Physical Map Revision in Dodge County, WI

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  20. Floodplain Mapping for Tuscaloosa County, AL

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — he Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...