WorldWideScience

Sample records for reference theta-pinch reactor

  1. Operating point considerations for the Reference Theta-Pinch Reactor (RTPR)

    Krakowski, R.A.; Miller, R.L.; Hagenson, R.L.

    1976-01-01

    Aspects of the continuing engineering design-point reassessment and optimization of the Reference Theta-Pinch Reactor (RTPR) are discussed. An updated interim design point which achieves a favorable energy balance and involves relaxed technological requirements, which nonetheless satisfy more rigorous physics and engineering constraints, is presented

  2. First wall thermal--mechanical analyses of the reference theta-pinch reactor

    Krakowski, R.A.; Hagenson, R.L.; Cort, G.E.

    1977-01-01

    The thermal-mechanical response of the Reference Theta-Pinch Reactor (RTPR) first wall was analyzed. The first wall problems anticipated for a pulsed, high-β fusion power plant can be ameliorated by either alterations in the physics operating point, materials reengineering, or blanket/first wall reconfiguration. Within the latter ''configuration'' scenario, a two-fold approach has been adopted for the thermal-mechanical portion of the RTPR first wall technology assessment. First, a number of new first wall configurations (bonded or unbonded laminated composites, all-ceramic structures, protective and/or sacrificial ''bumpers'') were considered. Second, a more quantitative failure criterion, based on the developing theories of fracture mechanics, was identified. For each first wall configuration, transient heat transfer and thermoelastic stress calculations have been made. Two-dimensional finite element structural analyses have been made for a variety of mechanical boundary conditions. Only the Al 2 O 3 /Nb - 1 Zr system has been considered. The results of this study indicated a wide range of design solutions to the pulsed thermal stress problem anticipated for the RTPR

  3. Engineering design study of a reference theta-pinch reactor (RTPR): environmental impact study

    Draley, J.E.; Krakowski, R.A.; Coultas, T.A.; Maroni, V.A.

    1975-03-01

    The recently completed engineering design study for the Reference Theta-Pinch Reactor (RTPR) has allowed an assessment of the potential environmental impact of an RTPR power plant to be made. During normal operation of the plant, tritium is expected to be released at a rate of 6 Ci/day, an amount that would lead to low maximum doses (0.06 to 0.8 mrem/yr, depending on site and cooling options). These doses, and the anticipated integrated population doses, are considerably less than doses now considered acceptable. Problems related to (i) the required commitment of some natural resources (e.g., beryllium and niobium), (ii) the disposition of activated structural materials and other radioactive waste (76,700 kg/yr or 12 GCi/yr at shutdown) for a five-year niobium component lifetime, and (iii) land despoilment are substantial but do not appear to compromise the viability of RTPR's as a useful power source. Consideration of the occurrence of severe accidents (e.g., liquid-metal fires) and other unusual incidents indicate that their effects will be contained within the plant, but that they may be costly. Radiation doses resulting from accidental release of the operating tritium inventory during a liquid-metal fire would probably be below the level now permitted for fission plants. (U.S.)

  4. Electrical insulators for the theta-pinch fusion reactor

    Clinard, F.W. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The five major applications for electrical insulators in the Reference Theta Pinch Reactor are as follows: (1) first-wall insulator, (2) blanket intersegment insulator, (3) graphite encapsulating insulator, (4) implosion coil insulator, and (5) compression coil insulator. Insulator design proposals and some preliminary test results are given for each application

  5. Cost estimation for a theta-pinch reactor

    Coultas, T.A.; Cook, J.M.; Crnkovich, P.; Dauzvardis, P.

    1976-02-01

    A simulation of a theta-pinch fusion power plant has been completed to the point where economic feasibility can be examined. A PL/I cost subprogram is presented for interfacing with the computer code TPFPP. This code is then used to obtain a first approximation of the costs for the reactor. Independent geometrical and plant design parameters are varied over a wide range, with simultaneous variation of magnetic field, minor first wall radius, and plasma maximum compression. The study indicates that the plant energy balance must be favorable, availability must be high, and major component costs must be low to achieve economical results. Although costing uncertainties remain, it is clear that development of easy and rapid replacement methods for reactor components is essential and that new staging concepts to reduce the implosion energy requirement must be pursued

  6. Liner of a thermonuclear pulse THETA-pinch reactor

    Baranov, G.A.; Izotov, E.N.; Karasev, B.G.; Komin, A.V.; Krivosheev, M.V.; Levashov, A.D.

    1975-01-01

    Some possible constructive solutions to the problem of fabrication of the theta-pinch reactor liner by the method of centrifugal casting in a casting mould are considered. A scheme for liner manufacturing is presented, which includes the following elements: 1) a casting mould of dielectric material presenting a hollow cylinder of 4 m in diam., 3 m in length and 12 t in weight, which rotates at 8 rps in the reactor chamber; 2) a system for heat protection of the casting mould; the volume heat of the mould is suggested to remove by gaseous helium flowing under pressure along axial cooling channels of 5 mm in diam.; the channels are evenly distributed throughout the thickness of the mould shell; 3) a system for preparation and supply of a liquid metal to the casting mould, the metal is being supplied into the casting mould from its both ends at a rate of 1.7 t of the melt per second; 4) a system for rotation of the mould, which comprises two gas turbines mounted on both ends of the mould and two main stop-radial slip supports with gas lubrication

  7. Engineering and physics considerations for a linear theta-pinch hybrid reactor (LTPHR)

    Krakowski, R.A.; Miller, R.L.; Hagenson, R.L.

    1976-01-01

    A fusion-fission hybrid reactor based on pulsed, high-β, linear theta-pinch magnetic confinement is considered. A preliminary design which incorporates key physics, engineering and economic considerations is presented. An extensive presentation of the system energy balance is made, and this energy balance is evaluated parametrically. The feasibility of end-loss reduction is addressed

  8. Thermal Shock Experiment (TSEX): a ''proof-of-principle'' evaluation of the use of electron beam heating to simulate the thermal mechanical environment anticipated for the first wall of the Reference Theta-Pinch Reactor (RTPR)

    Armstrong, P.E.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1977-06-01

    The results of a ''proof-of-principle'' Thermal Shock Experiment (TSEX), designed to simulate the thermal mechanical response of insulator-metal composite first walls anticipated for pulsed high-density fusion reactors, are given. A programmable 10-kV, 1.0-A electron beam was used to pulse repeatedly (0.30-mm)Al 2 O 3 /(1.0-mm) Nb-1Zr composite samples 200 to 300 K, relative to a base-line temperature of 1000 K. The experimental goals of TSEX were established relative to the first-wall environment anticipated for the Reference Theta-Pinch Reactor (RTPR). A detailed description of the TSEX ''proof-of-principle'' apparatus, experimental procedure, and diagnostics is given. The results of extensive thermal analyses are given, which are used to estimate the thermal stresses generated. Although little or no control was exercised over the sample fabrication and thermal history, one sample experienced in excess of 800 thermal cycles of approximately 250 K at approximately 1000 K, and the results of optical and SEM examination of this specimen are presented. The resistance of this sample to macroscopic failure was truly impressive. Recommendations for the construction of an apparatus dedicated to extensive testing of first-wall composites are given on the basis of these ''proof-of-principle'' TSEX results

  9. Computer simulation of a staging system for a theta-pinch reactor (RTPR)

    Crnkovich, P.G.

    1976-02-01

    To reduce excessive energy requirements for the implosion heating system of a theta-pinch reactor, two staging methods, the brute force and bucking field options, were proposed. A Marshall coil and a segmented coil were also considered. Calculations involved in coding these coil designs and staging options into a PL/I subprogram are described. A marked savings in the energy required for the IH system is realized with the bucking option and others

  10. Refrigeration requirements for fusion reactors based upon the theta-pinch concept

    Williamson, K.D. Jr.; King, C.R.

    1976-01-01

    Two refrigeration systems applicable to the theta-pinch fusion concept are described. The first is a 1100 W, 4.5 K refrigerator which will be used for testing superconducting NbTi Magnetic Energy Transfer and Storage (METS) coil systems. This unit is currently being installed and is to be operational by April 1977. The second unit is applicable to the Syllac Fusion Test Reactor (SFTR) and has been conceptually designed. This liquefier-refrigerator is about 22 times larger than those in existence at present and will require 12-MW input electrical power. It will provide 3045 kg/h of liquid helium at 4.5 K

  11. Compact-Toroid Fusion Reactor (CTOR) based on the Field-Reversed Theta Pinch

    Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    Scoping studies of a translating Compact Torus Reactor (CTOR) have been made on the basis of a dynamic plasma model and an overall systems approach. This CTOR embodiment uses a Field-Reversed Theta Pinch as a plasma source. The field-reversed plasmoid would be formed and compressionally heated to ignition prior to injection into and translation through a linear burn chamber, thereby removing the high-technology plamoid source from the hostile reactor environment. Stabilization of the field-reversed plasmoid would be provided by a passive conducting shell located outside the high-temperature blanket but within the low-field superconducting magnets and associated radition shielding. On the basis of this batch-burn but thermally steady-state approach, a reactor concept emerges with a length below approx. 40 m that generates 300 to 400 MWe of net electrical power with a recirculating power fraction less than 0.15

  12. Compact-Toroid fusion reactor based on the field-reversed theta pinch

    Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1981-03-01

    Early scoping studies based on approximate, analytic models have been extended on the basis of a dynamic plasma model and an overall systems approach to examine a Compact Toroid (CTOR) reactor embodiment that uses a Field-Reversed Theta Pinch as a plasma source. The field-reversed plasmoid would be formed and compressionally heated to ignition prior to injection into and translation through a linear burn chamber, thereby removing the high-technology plasmoid source from the hostile reactor environment. Stabilization of the field-reversed plasmoid would be provided by a passive conducting shell located outside the high-temperature blanket but within the low-field superconducting magnets and associated radiation shielding. On the basis of this batch-burn but thermally steady-state approach, a reactor concept emerges with a length below approx. 40 m that generates 300 to 400 MWe of net electrical power with a recirculating power fraction less than 0.15

  13. Energy storage and transfer with homopolar machine for a linear theta-pinch hybrid reactor

    Vogel, H.F.; Brennan, M.; Dase, W.G.; Tolk, K.M.; Weldon, W.F.

    1976-01-01

    The energy storage and transfer system for the compression coils of a linear theta-pinch hybrid reactor (LTPHR) are described. High efficiency and low cost are the principal requirements for the energy storage and transfer of 25MJ/m or 25GJ for a 1-km LTPHR. The circuit efficiency must be approximately 90%, and the cost for the circuit 5-6c/J. Scaling laws and simple relationships between circuit efficiency and cost-per-unit energy as a function of the half cycle time are presented. An important consideration concerns the pulse repetition rate of 2.25 pulses per second, 70x10 6 shots/yr, or 1.7x10 9 shots over the 25-yr plant life. Current interruption to initiate energy transfer is not feasible at this rate. Therefore, a simple ringing circuit with contactors to make and break at the periodically occurring zero-current instances, is considered

  14. Energy storage and transfer with homopolar machine for a linear theta-pinch hybrid reactor

    Vogel, H.F.; Brennan, M.; Dase, W.G.; Tolk, K.M.; Weldon, W.F.

    1975-12-01

    This report describes the energy storage and transfer system for the compression coil system of a linear theta-pinch hybrid reactor (LTPHR). High efficiency and low cost are the principal requirements for the energy storage and transfer of 25 MJ/m or 25 GJ for a 1-km LTPHR. The circuit efficiency must be approximately 90 percent, and the cost for the circuit 5 to 6 cents/J. Scaling laws and simple relationships between circuit efficiency and cost per unit energy as a function of the half cycle time are presented. Capacitors and homopolor machines are considered as energy storage elements with both functioning basically as capacitors. The advantage of the homopolar machine in this application is its relatively low cost, whereas that of capacitors is better efficiency

  15. Structural design aspects of magnetic coils for a linear theta-pinch hybrid reactor

    Bartholomew, R.J.

    1976-02-01

    The structural design aspects of a linear theta-pinch hybrid reactor (LTPHR) are centered in the solenoidal adiabatic compression coil (ACC) which must support the high magnetic pulse forces that tend to expand the coil and separate the leads. The structural model is represented by the theory of elasticity solution to a thick-walled cylinder. Dynamic amplification (or attenuation) is considered by a shock spectrum technique. A composite material is postulated, where the conductor material for each strand is clad with a high-strength stainless steel with insulation considered. Yield strength (for isolated-pulse operation) and endurance limit (for repetitive-pulse operation) for the high-strength steel impose magnetic field strength constraints on the coil design. These constraints are combined in an overall energy balance calculation that includes neutronic considerations to determine an optimum ACC design. The computer code ENBAL was used to incorporate neutronic, electrical, and structural constraints into the overall energy balance of the LTPHR. The lead separation problem is solved by designing spaced clamps to hold the leads together over great distances

  16. Compact-toroid fusion reactor based on the field-reversed theta pinch: reactor scaling and optimization for CTOR

    Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    Early scoping studies based on approximate, analytic models have been extended on the basis of a dynamic plasma model and an overall systems approach to examine a Compact Toroid (CT) reactor embodiment that uses a Field-Reversed Theta Pinch as a plasma source. The field-reversed plasmoid would be formed and compressionally heated to ignition prior to injection into and translation through a linear burn chamber, thereby removing the high-technology plasmoid source from the hostile reactor environment. Stabilization of the field-reversed plasmoid would be provided by a passive conduction shell located outside the high-temperature blanket but within the low-field superconducting magnets and associated radiation shielding. On the basis of this batch-burn but thermally steady-state approach a reactor concept emerges with a length below approx. 40 m that generates 300 to 400 MWe of net electrical power with a recirculating power fraction less than 0.15

  17. Engineering design of a fusion test reactor (FTR) and fusion engineering research facility (FERF) based on a toroidal theta pinch

    Abdou, M.; Burke, R.J.; Dauzvardis, P.V.; Foss, M.; Gerstl, S.A.W.; Maroni, V.A.; Pierce, A.W.; Turner, A.F.; Krakowski, R.A.; Linford, R.K.; Oliphant, T.A.; Ribe, F.L.; Thomassen, K.I.

    1975-01-01

    This paper describes two advanced toroidal theta-pinch devices which are being proposed for future construction. The Fusion Test Reactor (FTR) is being designed to produce thermonuclear energy (at 20 MeV/neutron) equal to the maximum plasma energy (Q=1) and to demonstrate α-particle heating. The Fusion Engineering and Research Facility (FERF) is being designed to test materials in a fusion environment where the average 14-MeV neutron flux from the plasma is greater than or of the order of 5.10 13 n/cm 2 .s over large surface areas. These devices employ the staged theta-pinch principle where the heating is accomplished by rapid (about 0.1 μs) implosion and expansion followed by a slow compression of the plasma. The rapid implosion injects as much heat as possible at as large a plasma radious as possible so that the plasma remains stable even after further compression. The final compression to ignition requires the transfer of a large amount of magnetic energy which implies a long transfer time (about 1 ms) for realistic voltages in the driving circuit. Throughout the heating and burn cycle the plasma must remain in equilibrium and stable to the dominant MHD-modes. A sufficiently large plasma radius guarantees stability against the m = 1 modes. These equilibrium and stability conditions and the requirements on thermonuclear burn determine the design parameters for either machine. The design parameters must also be consistent with economic limitations and technological feasibility of components. In addition to these requirements, the FERF must provide a steady and reliable source of fusion neutrons. (author)

  18. Stage theta pinch experiments

    Linford, R.K.; Downing, J.N.; Gribble, R.F.; Jacobson, A.R.; Platts, D.A.; Thomas, K.S.

    1975-01-01

    The Staged Theta Pinch program is designed to study the technological and physics problems associated with producing fat plasmas and separating the implosion heating from the adiabatic compression. Several methods of implosion heating are discussed. Circuit diagrams and theoretical magnetic field behavior are described for the STP and resonant heating experiments. (MOW)

  19. Staged theta pinch experiments

    Linford, R.K.; Downing, J.N.; Gribble, R.F.; Jacobson, A.R.; Platts, D.A.; Thomas, K.S.

    1976-01-01

    Two implosion heating circuits are being experimentally tested. The principal experiment in the program is the 4.5-m-long Staged Theta Pinch (STP). It uses two relatively low energy (50kJ and 100 kJ), high voltage (125 kV) capacitor banks to produce the theta pinch plasma inside the 20 cm i.d. quartz discharge tube. A lower voltage (50 kV), higher energy (750 kJ) capacitor bank is used to contain the plasma and provide a variable amount of adiabatic compression. Because the experiment produces a higher ratio of implosion heating to compressional heating than conventional theta pinches, it should be capable of producing high temperature plasmas with a much larger ratio of plasma radius to discharge tube radius than has been possible in the past. The Resonant Heating Experiment (RHX) in its initial configuration is the same as a 0.9-m-long section of the high voltage part of the STP experiment and all the plasma results here were obtained with the experiment in that configuration. Part of the implosion bank will be removed and a low inductance crowbar added to convert it to the resonant heating configuration. (U.K.)

  20. Scylla IV-P theta pinch

    Bailey, A.G.; Chandler, G.I.; Ekdahl, C.A. Jr.; Lillberg, J.W.; Machalek, M.D.; Seibel, F.T.

    1976-01-01

    Scylla IV-P is a flexible, linear theta pinch designed to investigate high-density linear concepts, end-stoppering, alternate heating methods, and plasma injection techniques relevant to a pure fusion reactor and/or a fusion-fission hybrid system. The construction and experimental arrangement of the device are briefly described

  1. Energy storage, compression, and switching in a theta-pinch fusion test reactor

    Thomassen, K.I.

    1976-01-01

    A new 488 MJ superconducting magnetic energy storage and transfer system is being proposed for a Scyllac Fusion Test Reactor. The 1280 module system uses vacuum interrupters to switch 26 kA storage currents in 0.7 ms through a capacitive transfer circuit at 60 kV to the compression coils in the machine. Many of the components of the system have been built and tested and a prototype section of the machine is planned. Prototype coils with 381 kJ at 26 kA currents will be built by industry using advanced superconducting wire. The wire uses a Cu and Cu--Ni matrix around filaments of Nb--Ti to minimize eddy current losses. These wires are presently used in a 10 kA braided conductor for 300 kJ pre-prototype coils, and can withstand field changes of approximately 10 7 gauss/sec without inducing normal transitions. Three such 300 kJ coils are being constructed in industry for the LASL program

  2. Material testing in a linear theta pinch

    Alani, R.; Azodi, H.; Naraghi, M.; Safaii, B.; Torabi-Fard, A.

    1983-01-01

    The interaction of stainless steel 316 and Inconel 625 alloys has been investigated with a thermonuclear-like plasma, n = 10 16 cm -3 and Tsub(i) = 1 keV, generated in the Alvand I linear theta pinch. The average power flux is 10 7 W/cm 2 and the interaction time nearly one μs. A theoretical analysis based on the formation of an observed impurity layer near the material, has been used to determine the properties of the impurity layer and the extent of the damage on the material. Although arcing has been observed, the dominant damage mechanism has been assessed to be due to evaporation. Exposure to single shots has produced very heavily defective areas and even surface cracks on the SS 316 sample, but no cracks were observed on Inconel 625 after exposure to even 18 shots. On the basis of temperature rise and evaporation a comparison is made among materials exposed to plasmas of a theta pinch, shock tube, present generation tokamak and an anticipated tokamak reactor. (orig.)

  3. Fabrication of a segmented composite stainless steel-alumina discharge tube for a theta-pinch coil

    Dickinson, J.M.; Stoddard, S.D.; Muller, J.F.

    1975-11-01

    An 80-mm-diam segmented discharge tube that simulated in a simplified way the blanket and first wall of the Reference Theta-Pinch Reactor (RTPR) has been constructed. The segments were fabricated by plasma-arc spraying an alumina coating on tubular stainless steel trapezoids. These were laid up to form a cylinder that was contained in a fully dense alumina vacuum tube. The fabrication processes are discussed in detail

  4. Engineering prototypes for theta-pinch devices

    Hansborough, L.D.; Hammer, C.F.; Hanks, K.W.; McDonald, T.E.; Nunnally, W.C.

    1975-01-01

    Past, present, and future engineering prototypes for theta-pinch plasma-physics devices at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory are discussed. Engineering prototypes are designed to test and evaluate all components under system conditions expected on actual plasma-physics experimental devices. The importance of engineering prototype development increases as the size and complexity of the plasma-physics device increases. Past experiences with the Scyllac prototype and the Staged Theta-Pinch prototype are discussed and evaluated. The design of the proposed Staged Scyllac prototype and the Large Staged Scyllac implosion prototype assembly are discussed

  5. Numerical studies of the linear theta pinch

    Brackbill, J.U.; Menzel, M.T.; Barnes, D.C.

    1975-01-01

    Aspects of several physical problems associated with linear theta pinches were studied using recently developed numerical methods for the solution of the nonlinear equations for time-dependent magnetohydrodynamic flow in two- and three-dimensions. The problems studied include the propagation of end-loss produced rarefaction waves, the flow produced in a proposed injection experiment geometry, and the linear growth and nonlinear saturation of instabilities in rotating plasmas, all in linear geometries. The studies illustrate how numerical computations aid in flow visualization, and how the small amplitude behavior and nonlinear fate of plasmas in unstable equilibria can be connected through the numerical solution of the dynamical equations. (auth)

  6. Rotational instability in a linear theta pinch

    Ekdahl, C.; Bartsch, R.R.; Commisso, R.J.; Gribble, R.F.; McKenna, K.F.; Miller, G.; Siemon, R.E.

    1980-01-01

    The m=1 ''wobble'' instability of the plasma column in a 5-m linear theta pinch has been studied using an axial array of orthogonally viewing position detectors to resolve the wavelength and frequency of the column motion. The experimental results are compared with recent theoretical predictions that include finite Larmor orbit effects. The frequency and wavelength characteristics at saturation agree with the predicted dispersion relation for a plasma rotating faster than the diamagnetic drift speed. Measurements of the magnetic fields at the ends of the pinch establish the existence of currents flowing in such a way that they short out the radial electric fields in the plasma column. The magnitude of rotation, the observed delay in the onset of m=1 motion, and the magnitude of end-shorting currents can all be understood in terms of the torsional Alfven waves that communicate to the central plasma column the information that the ends have been shorted. The same waves are responsible for the torque which rotates the plasma and leads to the observed m=1 instability. Observations of the plasma in the presence of solid end plugs indicate a stabilization of high-m number modes and a reduction of the m=1 amplitude

  7. Simplified scaling model for the THETA-pinch

    Ewing, K. J.; Thomson, D. B.

    1982-02-01

    A simple ID scaing model for the fast Theta pinch was developed and written as a code that would be flexible, inexpensive in computer time, and readily available for use with the Los Alamos explosive-driven high magnetic field program. The simplified model uses three successive separate stages: (1) a snowplow-like radial implosion, (2) an idealized resistive annihilation of reverse bias field, and (3) an adiabatic compression stage of a Beta = 1 plasma for which ideal pressure balance is assumed to hold. The code uses one adjustable fitting constant whose value was first determined by comparison with results from the Los Alamos Scylla III, Scyllacita, and Scylla IA Theta pinches.

  8. Energy transfer efficiency measurements in a theta-pinch

    Cavalcanti, G.H.; Luna, F.R.T.; Trigueiros, A.G.

    1993-01-01

    An increase in energy transfer efficiency of the capacitor bank to the plasma was obtained when the electrical system of a theta-pinch was changed so that the ratio of total inductance to coil inductance was switched of 1/6 to 1/2. A further increase about 20% was obtained for 16/1 ratio. The measurements were made through the current discharge decay, and the spectral analysis of the emitted light from theta-pinch shows a correspondent efficiency increase. (author)

  9. Investigation of plasma turbulence in a theta-pinch-discharge

    Lins, G.

    1980-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with investigations of plasma turbulence in a 3 KJ Theta-Pinch during implosion by high-frequency Stark-effect and Thomson scattering. The next points are modifications of electron-distribution function by ionization in low preionizized turbulent plasma and energy losses by particle flow and heat flow at the ends. (HT)

  10. Instability study during implosion in the Tupa Theta-Pinch

    Kayama, M.E.; Boeckelmann, H.K.

    1986-01-01

    The importance of instabilities which occur during plasma heating in a Theta Pinch, in the implosion phase, is analysed. The plasma diagnostic was done by ultrafast photography and diamagnetic probe. The implosion time and the current layer thickness were calculated using a hybrid code for plasma simulation. The theoretical data were compared with the experimental ones. (M.C.K.) [pt

  11. Steady state theta pinch concept for slow formation of FRC

    Hirano, K.

    1987-05-01

    A steady state high beta plasma flow through a channel along the magnetic field increasing downstream can be regarded as a ''steady state theta pinch'', because if we see the plasma riding on the flow we should observe very similar process taking place in a theta pinch. Anticipating to produce an FRC without using very high voltage technics such as the ones required in a conventional theta pinch, we have studied after the analogy a ''steady state reversed field theta pinch'' which is brought about by steady head-on collision of counter plasma streams along the channel as ejected from two identical co-axial plasma sources mounted at the both ends of the apparatus. The ideal Poisson and shock adiabatic flow models are employed for the analysis of the steady colliding process. It is demonstrated that an FRC involving large numbers of particles is produced only by the weak shock mode which is achieved in case energetic plasma flow is decelerated almost to be stagnated through Poisson adiabatic process before the streams are collided. (author)

  12. A reversed-field theta-pinch plasma machine

    Yasojima, Yoshiyuki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Sasao, Hiroyuki; Ueno, Noboru; Tanaka, Toshihide

    1984-01-01

    Mitsubishi Electric has constructed a reversed-field theta-pinch machine at its Central Research Laboratory and initiated a series of plasma diagnostics and control studies for development of nuclear-fusion technology. Although the device has a linear configuration, a stable high-temperature, high-density toroidal plasma can be generated. The article describes the overall structure, vacuum system, power-supply system, and diagnostics and control system of the plasma machine. (author)

  13. Field reversed theta pinch TC-I UNICAMP

    Honda, R.Y.; Machida, M.; Aramaki, E.A.; Porto, P.; Berni, L.A.

    1990-01-01

    Field reversed configuration TC-I device is 16 cm diameter, 1 meter long with two mirror coils and 30 kJ field reversed theta pinch working for over two years at University of Campinas. Its implosion dynamics and field reversal parameters have been studied using flux excluded loops, internal magnetic probe, visible spectroscopy, photodiode array and image converter camera. The vacuum vessel is a pyrex tube of 14,5 cm diameter pumped with a liquid nitrogen cooled diffusion pump to a base pressure of 6 x 10 -7 Torr. The schematic view of the machine and experimental set up are shown. (Author)

  14. Recent developments in linear theta-pinch research: experiment and theory

    McKenna, K.F.; Bartsch, R.R.; Commisso, R.J.

    1978-01-01

    High energy plasmas offusion interest can be generated in linear theta pinches. However, end losses present a fundamental limitation on the plasma containment time. This paper discusses recent progress in end-loss and end-stoppering experiments and in the theoretical understanding of linear theta-pinch physics

  15. Torus C-I field reversed theta-pinch at UNICAMP

    Machida, M.; Collares, M.P.; Honda, R.Y.; Sakanaka, P.H.; Scheid, V.H.B.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of multipole fields (octopole and quadrupole) on supressing the n=2 rotational instability, field reconnection, particle loss effects is studied, and the viability of transforming the theta-pinch from Campinas, Brazil (100Kv, 55Kj) to the field reversed theta-pinch with plasma translation program is analyzed. (E.G.) [pt

  16. LTPF: a linear theta-pinch neutron source

    Ellis, W.R.

    1975-07-01

    The linear theta pinch is optimized with respect to maximum neutron current on a sample located between the discharge tube and the compression coil wall. Emphasis throughout is placed on physics and technology considerations which govern the choice of parameters. Technological demands are (hopefully) kept to a minimum. Two ''point designs'' are developed which are distinguished by their compressional magnetic field (i.e., coil current) wave-forms: one is sinusoidal and continuous, the other trapezoidal and pulsed intermittently. Both point designs give an average neutron current of approximately 5 x 10 13 n/cm 2 /s. Both devices are characterized by short lengths (approximately 1 m), rapid cycling (2 to 30 kHz), and magnetic mirrors (2 to 5:1) at the ends. A crucial item is the power supply, which is discussed in detail. (U.S.)

  17. Imploding to equilibrium of helically symmetric theta pinches

    Sharky, N.N.

    1978-01-01

    The time-dependent, single-fluid, dissipative magnetohydrodynamic equations are solved in helical coordinates (r,phi), where phi = THETA-kz, k = 2π/L and L is the periodicity length in the z-direction. The two-dimensional numerical calculations simulate theta pinches which have an l = 1 helical field added to them. Given the applied magnetic fields and the initial state of the plasma, we study the time evolution of the system. The plasma is found to experience two kinds of oscillations, occurring on different time scales. These are the radial compression oscillations, and the slower helical oscillations of the plasma column. The plasma motion is followed until these oscillations disappear and an equilibrium is nearly reached. Hence given the amplitude and the rise time of the applied magnetic fields, the calculations allow one to relate the initial state of a cold, homogeneous plasma to its final equilibrium state where it is heated and compressed

  18. Laser--plasma interaction in a theta-pinch geometry

    Armstrong, W.T.

    1978-06-01

    Prompt stimulated Brillouin scatter (SBS) is studied in an experiment wherein a high power, pulsed CO 2 laser irradiates an independently produced, theta-pinch plasma. SBS does not significantly affect laser heating of the plasma. Measurements of density profiles and temperature histories permitted examination of laser refraction, local heating and net absorption. Refractive containment of the CO 2 laser beam by an on-axis density minimum was observed at early times during the laser pulse. However, refractive containment was lost at late times due to the diffusive loss of the density minimum. Classical modeling of the expected heating required ''bleached'' absorption to account for the observed heating. A plasma absorptivity of approximately 46% was inferred from calorimetry measurements at 250 mtorr fill pressure. These results confirm that classical heating and refraction dominated the laser-plasma interaction

  19. Simulation of the implosion of a theta pinch

    Busnardo Neto, J.; Leite Neto, J.P.; Jesus Paes, A.C. de

    1982-01-01

    A two-fluid model was used to simulate the implosion of a theta-pinch, with initial densities varying from 10 12 to 10 16 cm -3 . The gases used were hydrogen, helium, neon and argon; initial temperatures of 2 eV and total ionization were assumed. For hydrogen the anomalous resistivity is dominant everywhere when the density is low (ν sub(eff) - ω sub(pi)). For high densities both resistivities are not high enough to allow diffusion of the magnetic field during the time of the implosion (ν sub(eff) approximatelly 0.3 ω sub(pi)). For heavier gases a surprisingly high value of the anomalous resistivity was found, due to the greater mass, (ν sub(eff) approximatelly 10-12 ω sub(pi)). (Author) [pt

  20. Experimental study of CF4 conical theta pinch plasma expanding into vacuum

    Pedrow, P.D.; Nasiruddin, A.M.

    1989-01-01

    Langmuir probe, photodiode, and optical multichannel analyzer (OMA) measurements have been made on a pulsed CF 4 conical theta pinch plasma. A cloud of CF 4 gas was puffed into a conical theta pinch coil, converted to plasma, and propelled into the vacuum region ahead of the expanding gas cloud. At a position 67 cm away from the conical theta pinch coil, the plasma arrived in separate packets that were about 20 μs in duration. The average drift velocity of these packets corresponded to an energy of about 3 eV. The OMA measurements showed that the second packet contained neutral atomic fluorine as well as charged particles

  1. Measurement of the ion temperature in a diffuse theta pinch

    Kudo, Koichi; Watanabe, Yukio; Ogi, Sukeomi; Sumikawa, Toshio; Akazaki, Masanori

    1979-01-01

    The Doppler broadening of helium ion spectra was observed, and the ion temperature of theta pinch plasma was obtained. The apparatus for the measurement consists of a spectroscope, a photomultiplier and an oscilloscope. The time variation of initial plasma density was obtained. The doppler broadening of the spectra was observed in case of the plasma density of 2 x 10 13 /cm 3 and 3 x 10 12 /cm 3 . The analyses of the spectra gave the ion temperature. The double temperature distribution was seen. The temperature of the low temperature part was 5 to 9 electron-volt, and that of the high temperature part several hundred electron-volt. The high temperature is caused by the thermalization of particles accelerated by the magnetic piston. The decay of high temperature ions is due to the charge exchange with the neutral particles. The time of the highest temperature corresponds to the time at which the luminescent layer reaches to the central axis. (Kato, T.)

  2. Results from TRX-2 slow field-reversed-theta-pinch

    Slough, J.T.; Harding, D.; Hoffman, A.L.

    1984-01-01

    FRCs have been successfully generated in the TRX-2 slow risetime theta pinch. Initial studies indicate that the flux trapping through field reversal is about as good (''50%) as on TRX-1, although the quarter cycle time of the main coil was increased from 3 to 10 μsec. Formation studies have been started using the programmed formation techniques developed on TRX-1. The plasma dynamics are very similar to those exhibited in the faster rise TRX-1 experiments. The formation phase shows the same high degree of symmetry and reproducibility that was observed in TRX-1. Equilibrium behaviour of the FRCs formed is very similar to that observed on TRX-1, as long as impurity content is kept low. T/sub e/ + T/sub i/ temperatures of 400 to 500 eV are obtained and confirmed by impurity line broadening and decay rates. Flux and particle lifetimes ≅ 100 μsec have been observed and show the same strong scaling with x/sub s/ that was observed on TRX-1

  3. Opacity test using a neon-seeded theta pinch

    Thomson, D.B.

    1980-02-01

    Vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) emission from a neon-seeded high-density theta-pinch has been observed for comparison with theoretical radiation emission calculations. The plasma was created in a 25-cm-long theta-coil with 90-kG field having a 3.0-μs quarter period. A gas fill of 1 torr of helium + 2% neon was used. Observation of the HeII 4686 line/continuum ratio gave an electron temperature of 25 +- 4 eV. Shadowgraphs of the plasma radius, taken with a ruby laser, gave an electron density of 0.9 +- 0.09 x 10 18 cm -3 . The VUV emission was observed in radial view and with time resolution with a 2.2-m grazing-incidence monochromator equipped with a photomultiplier and p-terphenyl scintillator. Thin foils of carbon and aluminum were used as filters to absorb stray light and pass emission in the 44- to 100-A region

  4. Kinetic description of linear theta-pinch equilibria

    Batchelor, D.B.; Davidson, R.C.

    1975-01-01

    Equilibrium properties of linear theta-pinch plasmas are studied within the framework of the steady-state (o/x=0) Vlasov-Maxwell equations. The analysis is carried out for an infinitely long plasma column aligned parallel to an externally applied axial magnetic field Bsub(z)sup(ext)esub(z). Equilibrium properties are calculated for the class of rigid-rotor Vlasov equilibria, in which the th component distribution function (Hsub(perpendicular), Psub(theta), upsilonsub(z) depends on perpendicular energy H and canonical angular momentum Psub(theta), exclusively through the linear combination Hsub(perpendicular)-ωsub(j)Psub(theta), where ω;=const.=angular velocity of mean rotation. General equilibrium relations that pertain to the entire class of rigid-rotor Vlasov equilibria are discussed; and specific examples of sharp- and diffuse-boundary equilibrium configurations are considered. Rigid-rotor density and magnetic field profiles are compared with experimentally observed profiles. A general prescription is given for determining the functional dependence of the equilibrium distribution function on Hsub(perpendicular)-ωsub(j)Psub(theta) in circumstances, where the density profile or magnetic field profile is specified. (author)

  5. Study of flow and loss processes at the ends of a linear theta pinch. Progress report for the period June 1, 1976--May 31, 1977

    York, T.M.; Klevans, E.H.

    1977-02-01

    Experimental and analytical studies initiating and supporting research on flow and energy losses at the ends of a linear theta pinch have been carried out. A 25 cm linear pinch coil has been driven by a 515,000 A discharge with 10 μsec half-cycle time supplied by a 100 μF, 18 kV energy storage system. With reliable preionization generated up to 400 mT He, current sheath behavior has been identified with magnetic loop probes and double loop probes. Spectroscopic determination of preionization has been made. A ruby laser Thomson scattering diagnostic has been designed and is being procured. A study of transient plasma behavior in a 10 cm theta pinch has been carried out with a Twyman-Green interferometer using a 7 mW He--Ne CW laser. Pressure, electric field, and velocity probe diagnostics have received preliminary testing. Design work has been completed for the doubling of pinch length and energy storage system. Studies of particle loss scaling and reactor scaling of linear theta pinch devices have been reported. Detailed calculations of plasma properties at the end of the pinch coil following expansion from the central coil have been carried out. A O--D, time dependent computer code that includes conduction, convection, and magnetic field diffusion has been developed. Predicted plasma behavior is in good agreement with experimental data

  6. Plasma resistivity in a slow rising current theta-pinch device

    Kayama, Milton Eiji; Dobrowolsky, Marcelo Shubert; Honda, Roberto Yzumi; Aramaki, Emilia Akemi; Algatti, Mauricio Antonio

    1998-01-01

    Anomalous behavior of plasma resistivity was observed in a Theta-pinch plasma. A comparative analysis was performed with a hybrid numerical code where the Chodura s resistivity algorithm is included. Good agreement was found in the radial plasma dynamic description. The experimental value of resistivity at null field point was found to be one order of magnitude greater than the theoretical prediction. (author)

  7. Energy- and particle-confinement properties of an end-plugged, linear, theta pinch

    Commisso, R.J.; Bartsch, R.R.; Ekdahl, C.A.; McKenna, K.F.; Siemon, R.E.

    1979-01-01

    Experiments show that axial confinement of plasma in a straight theta-pinch solenoid is improved by placing solid lithium deuteride plugs at the ends. The energy confinement is increased nearly threefold in agreement with theoretical estimates which assume classical electron thermal conduction and no convective losses. The confinement of deuterium ions is explained by classical Coulomb collisions in the ablated lithium deuteride plasma

  8. A spectroscopic study of radiation produced in a theta-pinch

    Trigueiros, A.; Machida, M.; Pagan, C.J.B.

    1988-01-01

    Preliminary results of the analysis of the spectra of four times ionized Krypton, Kr-V, are presented. 28 transitions were classified and for five of then the classification is new. We also present the UNICAMP theta-pinch for the study of highly ionized atoms. This device is now in testing. (author) [pt

  9. Plasma behaviors in the open field region of reversed-field theta-pinch

    Aso, Yoshiyuki; Hirano, Keiichi.

    1983-03-01

    A characteristic behavior of the plasma in an open field region of reversed field theta pinch has been studied with the guide field (GF) which extends the field line along the axial direction. The experimental result suggests that the rotaional instability may be induced in FRC after the plasma touches the wall at the ends of the open field. (author)

  10. Plasma experiments on staged theta pinch, implosion heating experiment and Scyllac feedback-sector experiment

    Bartsch, R.R.; Buchenauer, C.J.; Cantrell, E.L.

    1977-01-01

    Results of the Los Alamos theta-pinch program in three areas of investigation are summarized: 1) In the Staged Theta Pinch, results are reported on the effects of magnetic field amplitude and time history of plasma formation. 2) In the Implosion Heating Experiment, density, internal-magnetic field and neutron measurements yield a consistent picture of the implosion which agrees with kinetic computations and with a simple dynamic model of the ions and magnetic piston. 3) In the Scyllac Feedback-Sector Experiment, the l=1, 0 equilibrium plasma parameters have been adjusted to accommodate the feedback stabilization system. With a uniform toroidal discharge tube the m=1 instability is feedback-stabilized in the vertical direction, and confinement in the toroidal direction is extended by feedback control. Results with a helical discharge tube are also reported. (author)

  11. The theta-pinch - a versatile tool for the generation and study of high temperature plasmas

    Hintz, E. [Inst. fuer Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum-Juelich GmbH (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    The more general technical and physical features of theta-pinches are described. Special field of their application are high-ss plasmas. Two examples are analysed and studied in more detail: a high density plasma near thermal equilibrium and a low density plasma far from equilibrium. The latter is of special interest for future investigations. Possibilities of field-reversed configurations are pointed out. (orig.)

  12. The theta-pinch - a versatile tool for the generation and study of high temperature plasmas

    Hintz, E.

    2004-01-01

    The more general technical and physical features of theta-pinches are described. Special field of their application are high-ss plasmas. Two examples are analysed and studied in more detail: a high density plasma near thermal equilibrium and a low density plasma far from equilibrium. The latter is of special interest for future investigations. Possibilities of field-reversed configurations are pointed out. (orig.)

  13. The UNICAMP theta-pinch for spectroscopic study of plasma radiations

    Trigueiros, A.G.; Luna, F.R.T.; Holanda Cavalcanti, G. de; Mania, A.J.

    1993-01-01

    The emission spectrum of six times ionized xenon (Xe VII), has been observed in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) using a theta-pinch discharge. The spectrum was recorded with a 2-meter normal incidence spectrograph in the 300-2000 A region. Preliminary results allow the identification of transitions in the n=5 complex. Ten of these transitions were identified. The identifications are supported by relativistic Hartree-Fock calculations. (author)

  14. END effects on the n = 2 rotational instability in the reversed field theta-pinch

    Aso, Y.; Wu, Ch.; Himeno, S.; Hirano, K.

    1981-07-01

    It is observed that n = 2 rotational mode which appears in the field reversed configuration created by a theta-pinch can be stabilized if the ejected plasmas from the ends are guided out to the far ends of the apparatus by long axial solenoidal fields. This is understood from the fact that endshorting becomes no longer possible before the ejecting plasma tips reach to the ends. Measurement of plasma rotations just outside the separatrix suggests that both preferential diffusion loss and endshorting play a very important role for the n = 2 mode. (author)

  15. Velocity-space particle loss in field-reversed theta pinches

    Hsiao, M.Y.

    1983-01-01

    A field-reversed theta pinch (FRTP) is a compact device for magnetic fusion. It has attracted much attention in recent years since encouraging experimental results have been obtained. However, the definite causes for the observed particle loss rate and plasma rotation are not well known. In this work, we study the velocity-space particle loss (VSPL), i.e., particle loss due to the existence of a loss region in velocity space, in FRTP's in order to have a better understanding about the characteristics of this device

  16. A new formulation of theta pinch implosions - a collisionless wave model

    Tsui, K.H.

    Previous work in theta pinch implosions is characterized by anomalous resistivity owing its origin to plasma instabilities. A diametrically opposite collisionless model is proposed here that consists of an inhomogeneous wave equation. The electron velocities are solved by guiding center approximation. This model offers qualitative explanations to various effects like experimental Alfven scaling law, Alfven penetration time, sheath thickness, shock formation, shock width, piston thickness, Alfven Mach number. Although collision is not essential, the plasma has an apparent resistivity with an effective collision frequency of roughly the same as those anomalous ones used in turbulent model. (Author) [pt

  17. Vacuum ultraviolet emission from argon, krypton, and xenon in a radial-viewed theta pinch

    Engleman, R. Jr.; Thomson, D.B.; Monaghan, D.A.

    1976-03-01

    Vacuum ultraviolet line emission from argon, krypton, and xenon (5 percent in deuterium) has been observed from a plasma (approximately 50 eV and N/sub e/ approximately 10 17 /cm 3 ) produced by the Scyllar linear theta-pinch device. More than 50 emission lines in the 30- to 500-A region have been measured for each gas mixture. Some lines have been identified as due to Ar VII through XI, Kr IX and X, and Xe IX, but many lines remain unassigned

  18. Transient loss of plasma from a theta pinch having an initially reversed magnetic field

    Heidrich, J.E.

    1981-01-01

    The results of an experimental study of the transient loss of plasma from a 25-cm-long theta pinch initially containing a reversed trapped magnetic field are presented. The plasma, amenable to MHD analyses, was a doubly ionized helium plasma characterized by an ion density N/sub i/ = 2 x 10 16 cm -3 and an ion temperature T/sub i/ = 15 eV at midcoil and by N/sub i/ = 0.5 x 10 16 cm -3 and T/sub i/ = 6 eV at a position 2.5 cm beyond the end of the theta coil

  19. Experimental study of the initial plasma formation stage in a linear theta pinch of inverted field

    Casin, G.C.; Alvarez, Ricardo; Rojkind, R.H.; Rodrigo, A.B.

    1986-01-01

    The initial stage of the plasma formation was studied in a linear theta pinch. Experiments were made to determine the machine operating conditions for good shot-to-shot reproducibility. Spectroscopic measurements of electron density and of electron and ion temperature were made afterwards to characterize the plasma at different stages of its heating process. The results obtained indicate that shot-to-shot reproducibility is strongly influenced by the presence of impurities and by the plasma preionization technique used. Under proper operating conditions, excellent reproducibility was observed. The measured values of the plasma parameters are compatible with those determined for similar machines. (Author) [es

  20. Electron temperature in field reversed configurations and theta pinches with closed magnetic field lines

    Newton, A.A.

    1986-01-01

    Field-reversed configurations (FRC) and theta pinches with trapped reversed bias field are essentially the same magnetic confinement systems using closed magnetic field lines inside an open-ended magnetic flux tube. A simple model of joule heating and parallel electron thermal conduction along the open flux lines to an external heat sink gives the electron temperature as Tsub(e)(eV) approx.= 0.05 Bsup(2/3)(G)Lsup(1/3)(cm), where B is the magnetic field and L is the coil length. This model appears to agree with measurements from present FRC experiments and past theta-pinch experiments which cover a range of 40-900 eV. The energy balance in the model is dominated by (a) parallel electron thermal conduction along the open field lines which has a steep temperature dependence, Q is proportional to Tsub(e)sup(7/2), and (b) the assumed rapid perpendicular transport in the plasma bulk which, in experiments to date, may be due to the small number of ion gyroradii across the plasma. (author)

  1. Field-reversed configuration produced by a linear theta-pinch, Tupa-1

    Kayama, M.E.; Boeckelmann, H.K.; Sakanaka, P.H.; Machida, M.

    1987-01-01

    The formation of field reversed configuration, FRC, in one meter mirrorless linear theta-pinch device Tupa-I was observed. This configuration was studied during the first half magnetic cycle of ringing main bank discharge using magnetic probes. The separatrix radius by the exclude flux probe and the ion temperature by visible spectroscopy were measured. The plasma dynamics was observed by the image converter camera. A clear indication of the formation of FRC due to reconnection of the antiparallel bias to the main field and a fast reconnection, less than 0.2 microsec, that is explained in terms of forced reconnection driven by the Kruskal-Schwarzschild instability, are also observed. (author) [pt

  2. FRC formation studies in a field reversed theta pinch with a variable length coil

    Maqueda, R.; Sobehart, J.; Rodrigo, A.B.

    1987-01-01

    The formation phase of field reversed configurations (FRC) produced using a theta pinch has received considerable attention lately in connection with the possibility of developing formation methods in time scales longer than the Alven radial time, which would permit the use of low-voltage technology and represent an important engineering simplification in the trend towards larger scale machines sup (1)). The mechanisms leading to the loss of trapped reversed flux during the preheating 2 ) and formation sup (3,4)) stages, looking for maximization of this quantity in order to improve on the stability and transport properties of the configuration in its final equilibrium state are investigated. As a result, semi-emperical scaling laws have been obtained relating the reversed flux loss with experimental operating parameters during the early stages of the formation process 1 ). (author) [pt

  3. Compact toroid formation using barrier fields and controlled reconnection in the TRX-1 field reversed theta pinch

    Hoffman, A.L.; Armstrong, W.T.

    1982-01-01

    TRX-1 is a new 20 cm diameter, 1-m long field reversed theta pinch with a magnetic field swing of 10 kG in 3 μsec. It employs z discharge preionization and octopole barrier fields to maximize flux trapping on first half cycle operation. Cusp coils are used at the theta pinch ends to delay reconnection and fast mirror coils are used to trigger reconnection at a time designed to maximize axial heating efficiency and toroid lifetime. These controls are designed to study toroid formation methods which are claimed to be especially efficient by Russian experimenters. Studies have been conducted on flux trapping efficiency, triggered reconnection, and equilibrium and lifetime

  4. Implosion heating studies in the Scylla 1B, implosion heating, and staged theta-pinch experiments

    Gribble, R.F.; Hammel, J.E.; Henins, I.; Jahoda, F.C.; Kristal, R.; Linford, R.K.; Marshall, J.; McKenna, K.F.; Sherwood, A.R.; Thomas, K.S.

    1975-01-01

    Three experiments designed to study various aspects of implosion heating in the plasma density range (10 14 -10 16 cm -3 ) used in present theta pinches are described. Initial plasma studies show that, provided a sufficiently high pre-ionization level (>10 14 cm -3 ) is achieved, plasma behaviour is qualitatively the same over a range of two in initial magnetic field rise and a range of four in initial gas fill. The implosion phase is characterized by rapid changes in magnetic-field diffusion rates, the plasma resistivity decreasing rapidly with time. During the implosion some of the plasma density observed is moving ahead of the magnetic piston. Magnetic-field gradients occur in the region outside the area of measurable plasma density implying the presence of hot, low-density plasma in this region. In experiments where the external magnetic field decreases before the maximum compression of the plasma column, secondary breakdown occurs at the discharge tube wall which slows the rate at which magnetic flux diffuses out of the discharge tube. (author)

  5. Numerical simulation of a theta-pinch: two-dimensional hybrid model

    Zenum, C.S.S.

    1987-01-01

    A numerical code based on a 2D-hybrid model, were the electrons are considered as a fluid of zero mass and the ions as discrete particles, was elaborated. The magnetic field responsable by ion acceleration was obtained from equation of motion of the electrons and Maxwell equations. The ions are randomly distributed in a space phase of five dimensions (Vr, Vo, Vz, r, z), according to the Maxwellian. The equation of motion is solved for each ion, and the distribution functions of ion is obtained by the technique of particle into the box. The resistivity was classically and phenomenologically treated. The model was applied to theta-pinch to study: the plasma physical behaviour during the phase of implosion; the effect of reflected ions by magnetic piston; and the effect of magnetic field line reconnection 3D graphics of magnetic field, electric field current density, particle, and pressure densities, electron temperature, ion temperature is presented space phase of ion velocity in function of the position is also shown. The obtained results allow to characterized the obtained phenomena which occur during the phase of implosion. (M.C.K.) [pt

  6. Study of flow and loss processes at the ends of a linear theta pinch. Progress report, June 1, 1977--May 31, 1978

    York, T.M.; Klevans, E.H.

    1978-02-01

    Experimental and analytical studies of end loss from a theta pinch have been carried out. Detailed diagnostic studies of a 25 cm long theta pinch operating with reversed trapped fields have been completed; spectroscopic studies, magnetic probe, pressure probe, double diamagnetic loop, luminosity studies and Thomson scattering studies of the plasma have been carried out over the 8 μsec duration of the transient loss. Two new diagnostic techniques have been developed based on the available Thomson scattering laser source. A study of plasma loss from a 10.5 long theta pinch with an axial Twyman-Green interferometer has been completed and reported. The basic studies needed for subsequent experimental work on heat conduction loss being diagnosed by Thomson scattering data in the end region, with and without mirror coil, has been completed as a part of the mirror field studies

  7. Study of flow and loss processes at the ends of a linear theta pinch. Progress report, June 1, 1978--May 31, 1979

    York, T.M.; Klevans, E.H.

    1979-02-01

    Experimental and analytical studies of end loss from a linear theta pinch have been carried out. Analysis of reduced data on loss from a 25 cm long theta pinch has indicated: rotation at the end of pinch collapse, which appears to persist; ejection of the plasma in two modes, the first of which includes reversed, trapped fields; unique patterns of radial and axial variation of electron density in the end loss flow; substantial inaccuracies in plasma properties indicated by spectroscopy as compared to Thomson scattering. Studies of loss in a 50 cm long pinch with 50 eV, 2 x 10 16 cm -3 plasma are underway

  8. Experimental investigation of energy loss and end loss physics in a linear theta pinch. Scientific report 81-3

    Jacoby, B.A.

    1981-01-01

    The results of an experimental study of particle and thermal loss processes from a 50-cm long theta pinch are presented. The plasma was generated with a 40-mTorr fill of deuterium in a 3.81 cm radius discharge tube; 67% Z-preionization was followed by a main current discharge that produced a 23-kG peak magnetic field in 4.75 μsec. The electron density and temperature in the plasma column at the end of dynamic implosion were characterized by 1.0 x 10 16 cm -3 and 20 eV, respectively. This was followed by adiabatic compression which occurred with the particle and energy loss of interest. The diagnostics employed in this experiment were Thomson scattering, continuum radiation spectroscopy, local magnetic-field probes, local pressure probes, and diamagnetic loops. Axial temperature and density profiles were mapped from the coil into the end region

  9. Studies of end loss from a theta pinch using a Twyman--Green interferometer. Scientific report 77-4

    Freeman, R.S.

    1977-11-01

    The transient rate of flow of plasma from the ends of a short, high density, low temperature linear theta pinch was studied experimentally and analytically. Diagnostic devices were used to study the discharge and plasma properties; these included a Rogowski coil, a magnetic field probe and a Twyman-Green double pass interferometer which was illuminated by a 7 mW He--He laser. The interferometer was used to monitor the passage of fringes with respect to time at two radial positions simultaneously by the use of a photodetector consisting of two fast silicon photodiodes with supporting circuitry. One complete fringe represented a change in number density of 2.942 x 10 16 cm -3

  10. Environmental and technological implications of a theta-pinch fusion power plant

    Coultas, T.A.; Burke, R.J.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1974-01-01

    The environmental effects of this conceptual design were evaluated and found to be little different from other electrical power plants in most regards. Exceptions include a very small release of tritium, a low-hazard isotope, and relatively large amounts of radioactive material which must be either stored on site for eventual reprocessing or permanently discarded. These radioactive materials are nonvolatile and should not pose a difficult disposal problem, although some of the material may remain radioactive for hundreds of years. Natural resources required to build and operate the reference plant are not excessive except perhaps in the case of niobium and beryllium. The accident, sabotage, etc., problems of the plant are very minimal and although accidents can be postulated which would be inconvenient and costly within the plant, the probability of sizable impact on the surroundings is so as to be incredible

  11. Study of flow and loss processes at the ends of a linear theta pinch. Progress report, June 1, 1979-September 30, 1980

    York, T.M.; Klevans, E.H.

    1980-05-01

    Experimental and analytical studies of particle and energy loss at the ends of a linear theta pinch have been carried out. A study of transients occurring in the formation of reversed trapped fields within the coil, and of transients in the end region of a 25 cm long device was completed. A 1-D code has proven to be highly accurate in describing loss events and defining transport mechanisms in different experiments and is described here. A study of loss along field lines in a 50 cm long device has generated new information on loss velocity, axial and radial temperature gradients, and has established an initial effort in understanding thermal loss to the walls. Rotation and parallel trapped fields have been added to the existing 0-D code. A new technique crowbar switch and magnetic field prediction code have been developed. Direct measurment of electron velocity with Thomson scattering was accomplished experimentally. A Nd-glass laser system, frequency doubled, is being developed for low density diagnostics. Theoretical results that accurately predict confinement in FRX devices are described

  12. Tritium management in fusion reactors

    Galloway, T.R.

    1978-05-01

    This is a review paper covering the key environmental and safety issues and how they have been handled in the various magnetic and inertial confinement concepts and reference designs. The issues treated include: tritium accident analyses, tritium process control, occupational safety, HTO formation rate from the gas-phase, disposal of tritium contaminated wastes, and environmental impact--each covering the Joint European Tokamak (J.E.T. experiment), Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), Russian T-20, The Next Step (TNS) designs by Westinghouse/ORNL and General Atomic/ANL, the ANL and ORNL EPR's, the G.A. Doublet Demonstration Reactor, the Italian Fintor-D and the ORNL Demo Studies. There are also the following full scale plant reference designs: UWMAK-III, LASL's Theta Pinch Reactor Design (RTPR), Mirror Fusion Reactor (MFR), Tandem Mirror Reactor (TMR), and the Mirror Hybrid Reactor (MHR). There are four laser device breakeven experiments, SHIVA-NOVA, LLL reference designs, ORNL Laser Fusion power plant, the German ''Saturn,'' and LLL's Laser Fusion EPR I and II

  13. Recent developments in the design of conceptual fusion reactors

    Ribe, F.L.

    1977-01-01

    Since the first round of conceptual fusion reactor designs in 1973 - 1974, there has been considerable progress in design improvement. Two recent tokamak designs of the Wisconsin and Culham groups, with increased plasma beta and wall loading (power density), lead to more compact reactors with easier maintenance. The Reference Theta-Pinch Reactor has undergone considerable upgrading in the design of the first wall insulator and blanket. In addition, a conceptual homopolar energy storage and transfer system has been designed. In the case of the mirror reactor, there are design changes toward improved modular construction and ease of handling, as well as improved direct converters. Conceptual designs of toroidal-multiple-mirror, liner-compression, and reverse-field pinch reactors are also discussed. A design is presented of a toroidal multiple-mirror reactor that combines the advantages of steady-state operation and high-aspect ratio. The liner-compression reactor eliminates a major problem of radiation damage by using a liquid-metal first wall that also serves as a neutron-thermalizing blanket. The reverse-field pinch reactor operates at higher beta, larger current density and larger aspect ratio than a tokamak reactor. These properties allow the possibility of ignition by ohmic heating alone and greater ease of maintenance

  14. Application of Bondarenko formalism to fusion reactors

    Soran, P.D.; Dudziak, D.J.

    1975-01-01

    The Bondarenko formalism used to account for resonance self-shielding effects (temperature and composition) in a Reference Theta-Pinch Reactor is reviewed. A material of interest in the RTPR blanket is 93 Nb, which exhibits a large number of capture resonance in the energy region below 800 keV. Although Nb constitutes a small volume fraction of the blanket, its presence significantly affects the nucleonic properties of the RTPR blanket. The effects of self-shielding in 93 Nb on blanket parameters such as breeding ratio, total afterheat, radioactivity, magnet-coil heating and total energy depositions have been studied. Resonance self-shielding of 93 Nb, as compared to unshielded cross sections, will increase tritium breeding by approximately 7 percent in the RTPR blanket and will decrease blanket radioactivity, total recoverable energy, and magnet-coil heating. Temperature effects change these parameters by less than 2 percent. The method is not restricted to the RTPR, as a single set of Bondarenko f-factors is suitable for application to a variety of fusion reactor designs

  15. Reference Neutron Radiographs of Nuclear Reactor Fuel

    Domanus, Joseph Czeslaw

    1986-01-01

    Reference neutron radiographs of nuclear reactor fuel were produced by the Euraton Neutron Radiography Working Group and published in 1984 by the Reidel Publishing Company. In this collection a classification is given of the various neutron radiographic findings, that can occur in different parts...... of pelletized, annular and vibro-conpacted nuclear fuel pins. Those parts of the pins are shown where changes of appearance differ from those for the parts as fabricated. Also radiographs of those as fabricated parts are included. The collection contains 158 neutron radiographs, reproduced on photographic paper...

  16. Radiolytic production of chemical fuels in fusion reactor systems

    Fish, J D

    1977-06-01

    Miley's energy flow diagram for fusion reactor systems is extended to include radiolytic production of chemical fuel. Systematic study of the economics and the overall efficiencies of fusion reactor systems leads to a criterion for evaluating the potential of radiolytic production of chemical fuel as a means of enhancing the performance of a fusion reactor system. The ecumenicity of the schema is demonstrated by application to (1) tokamaks, (2) mirror machines, (3) theta-pinch reactors, (4) laser-heated solenoids, and (5) inertially confined, laser-pellet devices. Pure fusion reactors as well as fusion-fission hybrids are considered.

  17. Radiolytic production of chemical fuels in fusion reactor systems

    Fish, J.D.

    1977-06-01

    Miley's energy flow diagram for fusion reactor systems is extended to include radiolytic production of chemical fuel. Systematic study of the economics and the overall efficiencies of fusion reactor systems leads to a criterion for evaluating the potential of radiolytic production of chemical fuel as a means of enhancing the performance of a fusion reactor system. The ecumenicity of the schema is demonstrated by application to (1) tokamaks, (2) mirror machines, (3) theta-pinch reactors, (4) laser-heated solenoids, and (5) inertially confined, laser-pellet devices. Pure fusion reactors as well as fusion-fission hybrids are considered

  18. Pulsed fusion reactors

    1975-01-01

    This summer school specialized in examining specific fusion center systems. Papers on scientific feasibility are first presented: confinement of high-beta plasma, liners, plasma focus, compression and heating and the use of high power electron beams for thermonuclear reactors. As for technological feasibility, lectures were on the theta-pinch toroidal reactors, toroidal diffuse pinch, electrical engineering problems in pulsed magnetically confined reactors, neutral gas layer for heat removal, the conceptual design of a series of laser fusion power plants with ''Saturn'', implosion experiments and the problem of the targets, the high brightness lasers for plasma generation, and topping and bottoming cycles. Some problems common to pulsed reactors were examined: energy storage and transfer, thermomechanical and erosion effects in the first wall and blanket, the problems of tritium production, radiation damage and neutron activation in blankets, and the magnetic and inertial confinement

  19. Standards for reference reactor physics measurements

    Harris, D.R.; Cokinos, D.M.; Uotinen, V.

    1990-01-01

    Reactor physics analysis methods require experimental testing and confirmation over the range of practical reactor configurations and states. This range is somewhat limited by practical fuel types such as actinide oxides or carbides enclosed in metal cladding. On the other hand, this range continues to broaden because of the trend of using higher enrichment, if only slightly enriched, electric utility fuel. The need for experimental testing of the reactor physics analysis methods arises in part because of the continual broadening of the range of core designs, and in part because of the nature of the analysis methods. Reactor physics analyses are directed primarily at the determination of core reactivities and reaction rates, the former largely for reasons of reactor control, and the latter largely to ensure that material limitations are not violated. Errors in these analyses can be regarded as being from numerics, from the data base, and from human factors. For numerical, data base, and human factor reasons, then, it is prudent and customary to qualify reactor physical analysis methods against experiments. These experiments can be treated as being at low power or at high power, and each of these types is subject to an American National Standards Institute standard. The purpose of these standards is to aid in improving and maintaining adequate quality in reactor physics methods, and it is from this point of view that the standards are examined here

  20. Progress on the reference mirror fusion reactor design

    Carlson, G.A.; Doggett, J.N.; Moir, R.W.

    1976-01-01

    The design of a reference mirror fusion reactor is underway at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. The reactor, rated at about 900 MWe, features steady-state operation, an absence of plasma impurity problems, and good accessibility for blanket maintenance. It is concluded that a mirror reactor appears workable, but its dollar/kWe cost will be considerably higher than present-day nuclear costs. The cost would be reduced most markedly by an increase in plasma Q

  1. Advanced Burner Reactor 1000MWth Reference Concept

    Cahalan, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Fanning, T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Farmer, M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Grandy, C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Jin, E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kim, T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kellogg, R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Krajtl, L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Lomperski, S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Moisseytsev, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Momozaki, Y. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Park, Y. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Reed, C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Salev, F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Seidensticker, R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sienicki, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Tang, Y. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Tzanos, C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wei, T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Yang, W. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Chikazawa, Y. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2007-09-30

    The primary mission of the ABR Program is to demonstrate the transmutation of transuranics recovered from the LWR spent fuel, and hence, to validate the benefits of the fuel cycle closure to nuclear waste management. The transmutation, or burning of the transuranics is accomplished by fissioning and this is most effectively done in a fast spectrum. In the thermal spectrum of commercial LWRs, some transuranics capture neutrons and become even heavier transuranics rather than being fissioned. Even with repeated recycling, only about 30% can be transmuted, which is an intrinsic limitation of all thermal spectrum reactors. Only in a fast spectrum can all transuranics be effectively fissioned to eliminate their long-term radiotoxicity and decay heat.

  2. Implosion and staging systems for a Scyllac Fusion Test Reactor

    Gribble, R.F.; Linford, R.K.; Thomassen, K.I.

    1976-01-01

    The implosion heating and adiabatic compression processes will be separated in future theta pinch devices. The circuit to achieve the fast implosion heating and power crowbar (staging) for the Scyllac Fusion Test Reactor is described here. The plasma is very tightly coupled to the circuit and presents a varying inductive load. Computer-aided circuit designs which achieve a programmed magnetic field waveform are described. The field approximates a two-step waveform, on-off-on, which is ideal for achieving the large initial plasma radius needed for stability. The components for the circuits have been developed and are being tested in experiments at Los Alamos

  3. Implosion and staging systems for a Scyllac fusion test reactor

    Gribble, R.F.; Linford, R.K.; Thomassen, K.I.

    1975-01-01

    The implosion heating and adiabatic compression processes will be separated in future theta pinch devices. The circuit to achieve the fast implosion heating and power crowbar (staging) for the Scyllac Fusion Test Reactor is described here. The plasma is very tightly coupled to the circuit and presents a varying inductive load. Computer-aided circuit designs which achieve a programmed magnetic field waveform are described. The field approximates a two-step waveform, on-off-on, which is ideal for achieving the large initial plasma radius needed for stability. The components for the circuits have been developed and are being tested in experiments at Los Alamos. (auth)

  4. Conceptual design study of a scyllac fusion test reactor

    Thomassen, K.I.

    1975-07-01

    The report describes a conceptual design study of a fusion test reactor based on the Scyllac toroidal theta-pinch approach to fusion. It is not the first attempt to describe the physics and technology required for demonstrating scientific feasibility of the approach, but it is the most complete design in the sense that the physics necessary to achieve the device goals is extrapolated from experimentally tested MHD theories of toroidal systems,and it uses technological systems whose engineering performance has been carefully calculated to ensure that they meet the machine requirements

  5. Preliminary reactor implications of compact tori: how small is compact

    Krakowski, R.A.; Hagenson, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    The application of simplified but realistic engineering constraints to the special class of wall-stabilized field-reversed theta pinch configurations leads to reactor systems that may be as small as approx. 30 m in length and generating a total thermal power of the order of 500 MWt. Decreased size and power for a given ntau/sub B/ will be accompanied by decreased performance indicators, as reflected in this study by I/sub w/ and the allowable ΔT. It should be noted that this analysis is based upon fixing the duty factor, f/sub l/ = tau/sub s//tau/sub I/

  6. Review of the current status of linear hybrid reactor concepts

    Schultz, K.R.

    1977-07-01

    A review was made of the current status of linear fusion-fission hybrid reactor design studies in the USA. The linear hybrid reactor concepts reviewed include the linear theta-pinch hybrid reactor being studied at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, the electron beam-heated solenoid hybrid reactor under development at Physics International Co., the laser-heated solenoid hybrid reactor being investigated at Mathematical Sciences Northwest, Inc., and the linear fusion waste burning reactor being studied at General Atomic Company. The discussion addresses confinement and heating mechanisms for each concept, as well as the hybrid blanket designs. The current state of the four reactor designs is summarized and the performance of the various concepts compared

  7. Reference reactor module for NASA's lunar surface fission power system

    Poston, David I.; Kapernick, Richard J.; Dixon, David D.; Werner, James; Qualls, Louis; Radel, Ross

    2009-01-01

    Surface fission power systems on the Moon and Mars may provide the first US application of fission reactor technology in space since 1965. The Affordable Fission Surface Power System (AFSPS) study was completed by NASA/DOE to determine the cost of a modest performance, low-technical risk surface power system. The AFSPS concept is now being further developed within the Fission Surface Power (FSP) Project, which is a near-term technology program to demonstrate system-level TRL-6 by 2013. This paper describes the reference FSP reactor module concept, which is designed to provide a net power of 40 kWe for 8 years on the lunar surface; note, the system has been designed with technologies that are fully compatible with a Martian surface application. The reactor concept uses stainless-steel based. UO 2 -fueled, pumped-NaK fission reactor coupled to free-piston Stirling converters. The reactor shielding approach utilizes both in-situ and launched shielding to keep the dose to astronauts much lower than the natural background radiation on the lunar surface. The ultimate goal of this work is to provide a 'workhorse' power system that NASA can utilize in near-term and future Lunar and Martian mission architectures, with the eventual capability to evolve to very high power, low mass systems, for either surface, deep space, and/or orbital missions.

  8. Modification of reference temperature program in reactor regulating system

    Yu, Sung Sik; Lee, Byung Jin; Kim, Se Chang; Cheong, Jong Sik [Korea Power Engineering Company, Inc., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji In; Doo, Jin Yong [Korea Electric Power Cooperation, Yonggwang (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-12-31

    In Yonggwang nuclear units 3 and 4 currently under commercial operation, the cold temperature was very close to the technical specification limit of 298 deg C during initial startup testing, which was caused by the higher-than-expected reactor coolant system flow. Accordingly, the reference temperature (Tref) program needed to be revised to allow more flexibility for plant operations. In this study, the method of a specific test performed at Yonggwang nuclear unit 4 to revise the Tref program was described and the test results were discussed. In addition, the modified Tref program was evaluated on its potential impacts on system performance and safety. The methods of changing the Tref program and the associated pressurizer level setpoint program were also explained. Finally, for Ulchin nuclear unit 3 and 4 currently under initial startup testing, the effects of reactor coolant system flow rate on the coolant temperature were evaluated from the thermal hydraulic standpoint and an optimum Tref program was recommended. 6 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs. (Author)

  9. Reactor risk reference document: Main report: Draft for comment

    1987-02-01

    The Reactor Risk Reference Document, NUREG-1150, provides the results of major risk analyses for five different US light-water reactors (Surry, Zion, Sequoyah, Peach Bottom, and Grand Gulf) using state-of-the-art methods. The broad base of probabilistic risk information contained in this document is intended to provide a data base and insights to be used in a number of regulatory applications. It is anticipated that these regulatory actions will include implementation of the NRC Severe Accident Policy Statement, implementation of NRC safety goal policy, consideration of the NRC Backfit Rule, evaluation and possible revision of regulations or regulatory requirements for emergency preparedness, plant siting, and equipment qualification, and establishment of risks-oriented priorities for allocating agency resources. This report has been published in draft form. For the plants analyzed, this document describes the major factors related to internally initiated events that contribute to severe core damage, frequencies and related uncertainty ranges of severe core damage events, the major factors and severe accident phenomena that could lead to containment failure, the conditional probabilities and uncertainty ranges of early containment failure, the consequences and risks of severe accidents, including the sensitivity of these risks to factors such as evacuation or sheltering measures, comparisons of the risks with NRC safety goals, and cost and risk-reduction analyses of plant-specific measures that could reduce risk from severe accidents

  10. Modification of reference temperature program in reactor regulating system

    Yu, Sung Sik; Lee, Byung Jin; Kim, Se Chang; Cheong, Jong Sik [Korea Power Engineering Company, Inc., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji In; Doo, Jin Yong [Korea Electric Power Cooperation, Yonggwang (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    In Yonggwang nuclear units 3 and 4 currently under commercial operation, the cold temperature was very close to the technical specification limit of 298 deg C during initial startup testing, which was caused by the higher-than-expected reactor coolant system flow. Accordingly, the reference temperature (Tref) program needed to be revised to allow more flexibility for plant operations. In this study, the method of a specific test performed at Yonggwang nuclear unit 4 to revise the Tref program was described and the test results were discussed. In addition, the modified Tref program was evaluated on its potential impacts on system performance and safety. The methods of changing the Tref program and the associated pressurizer level setpoint program were also explained. Finally, for Ulchin nuclear unit 3 and 4 currently under initial startup testing, the effects of reactor coolant system flow rate on the coolant temperature were evaluated from the thermal hydraulic standpoint and an optimum Tref program was recommended. 6 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs. (Author)

  11. Reactor neutron activation analysis on reference materials from intercomparison runs

    Pantelica, A.; Salagean, M.

    2003-01-01

    A review of using the Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) technique in our laboratory to determine major, minor and trace elements in mineral and biological samples from international intercomparison runs organised by IAEA Vienna, IAEA-MEL Monaco, 'pb-anal' Kosice, INCT Warszawa and IPNT Krakow is presented. Neutron irradiation was carried out at WWR-S reactor in Bucharest (short and long irradiation) during 1982-1997 and at TRIGA reactor in Pitesti (long irradiation) during the later period. The following type of materials were analysed: soils, marine sediments, uranium phosphate ore, water sludge, copper flue dust, whey powder, yeast, cereal flour (rye and wheat), marine animal tissue (mussel, garfish and tuna fish), as well as vegetal tissue (seaweed, cabbage, spinach, alfalfa, algae, tea leaves and herbs). The following elements could be, in general, determined: Ag, As, Au, Ba, Br, Ca, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hf, Hg, K, La, Lu, Mo, Na, Nd, Ni, Rb, Sb, Sc, Se, Sm, Sr, Ta, Tb, Th, U, W, Yb and Zn of long-lived radionuclides, as well as Al, Ca, Cl, Cu, Mg, Mn, and Ti of short-lived radionuclides. Data obtained in our laboratory for various matrix samples presented and compared with the intercomparison certified values. The intercomparison exercises offer to the participating laboratories the opportunity to test the accuracy of their analytical methods as well as to acquire valuable Reference Materials/ standards for future analytical applications. (authors)

  12. Reference Monte Carlo calculations of Maria reactor core

    Andrzejewski, K.; Kulikowska, T.

    2002-01-01

    The reference Monte Carlo calculations of MARIA reactor core have been carried to evaluate accuracy of the calculations at each stage of its neutron-physics analysis using deterministic codes. The elementary cell has been calculated with two main goals; evaluation of effects of simplifications introduced in deterministic lattice spectrum calculations by the WIMS code and evaluation of library data in recently developed WIMS libraries. In particular the beryllium data of those libraries needed evaluation. The whole core calculations mainly the first MARIA critical experiment and the first critical core after the 8-year break in operation. Both cores contained only fresh fuel elements but only in the first critical core the beryllium blocks were not poisoned by Li-6 and He-3. Thus the MCNP k-eff results could be compared with the experiment. The MCNP calculations for the cores with beryllium poisoned suffered the deficiency of uncertainty in the poison concentration, but a comparison of power distribution shows that realistic poison levels have been carried out for the operating reactor MARIA configurations. (author)

  13. High Flux Isotope Reactor cold neutron source reference design concept

    Selby, D.L.; Lucas, A.T.; Hyman, C.R.

    1998-05-01

    In February 1995, Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) deputy director formed a group to examine the need for upgrades to the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) system in light of the cancellation of the Advanced neutron Source Project. One of the major findings of this study was that there was an immediate need for the installation of a cold neutron source facility in the HFIR complex. In May 1995, a team was formed to examine the feasibility of retrofitting a liquid hydrogen (LH 2 ) cold source facility into an existing HFIR beam tube. The results of this feasibility study indicated that the most practical location for such a cold source was the HB-4 beam tube. This location provides a potential flux environment higher than the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) vertical cold source and maximizes the space available for a future cold neutron guide hall expansion. It was determined that this cold neutron beam would be comparable, in cold neutron brightness, to the best facilities in the world, and a decision was made to complete a preconceptual design study with the intention of proceeding with an activity to install a working LH 2 cold source in the HFIR HB-4 beam tube. During the development of the reference design the liquid hydrogen concept was changed to a supercritical hydrogen system for a number of reasons. This report documents the reference supercritical hydrogen design and its performance. The cold source project has been divided into four phases: (1) preconceptual, (2) conceptual design and testing, (3) detailed design and procurement, and (4) installation and operation. This report marks the conclusion of the conceptual design phase and establishes the baseline reference concept

  14. High Flux Isotope Reactor cold neutron source reference design concept

    Selby, D.L.; Lucas, A.T.; Hyman, C.R. [and others

    1998-05-01

    In February 1995, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL`s) deputy director formed a group to examine the need for upgrades to the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) system in light of the cancellation of the Advanced neutron Source Project. One of the major findings of this study was that there was an immediate need for the installation of a cold neutron source facility in the HFIR complex. In May 1995, a team was formed to examine the feasibility of retrofitting a liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) cold source facility into an existing HFIR beam tube. The results of this feasibility study indicated that the most practical location for such a cold source was the HB-4 beam tube. This location provides a potential flux environment higher than the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) vertical cold source and maximizes the space available for a future cold neutron guide hall expansion. It was determined that this cold neutron beam would be comparable, in cold neutron brightness, to the best facilities in the world, and a decision was made to complete a preconceptual design study with the intention of proceeding with an activity to install a working LH{sub 2} cold source in the HFIR HB-4 beam tube. During the development of the reference design the liquid hydrogen concept was changed to a supercritical hydrogen system for a number of reasons. This report documents the reference supercritical hydrogen design and its performance. The cold source project has been divided into four phases: (1) preconceptual, (2) conceptual design and testing, (3) detailed design and procurement, and (4) installation and operation. This report marks the conclusion of the conceptual design phase and establishes the baseline reference concept.

  15. Oak Ridge Tokamak experimental power reactor study reference design

    Roberts, M.; Bettis, E.S.

    1975-11-01

    A Tokamak EPR Reference Design is presented as a basis for further design study leading to a Conceptual Design. The set of basic plasma parameters selected--minor radius of 2.25 m, major radius of 6.75 m, magnetic field on axis of 4.8 T and plasma current of 7.2 MA--should produce a reactor-grade plasma with a significant neutron flux, even with the great uncertainty in plasma physics scaling from present experience to large sizes. Neutronics and heat transfer calculations coupled with mechanical design and materials considerations were used to develop a blanket and shield capable of operating at high temperature, protecting the surrounding coils, being maintained remotely and, in a few experimental modules, breeding tritium. Nb 3 Sn and NbTi superconductors are used in the toroidal field coil design. The coil system was developed for a maximum field of 11 T at the winding (to give a field on axis of 4.8 T), and combines multifilamentary superconducting cable with forced flow of supercritical helium enclosed in a steel conduit. The structural system uses a stainless steel center bucking ring and intercoil box beam bracing to provide rigid support for coils against the centering force, overturning moments from poloidal fields and faults, other external forces, and thermal stresses. The poloidal magnetics system is specially designed both to reduce the total volt-second energy requirements and to reduce the magnitude of the rate of field change at the toroidal field coils. The rate of field change imposed upon the toroidal field coils is reduced by at least a factor of 3.3 compared to that due to the plasma alone. Tritium processing, tritium containment and vacuum systems employ double containment and atmospheric cleanup to minimize releases. The document also contains discussions of systems integration and assembly, key research and development needs, and schedule considerations

  16. Reference design for the standard mirror hybrid reactor

    Bender, D.J.; Fink, J.H.; Galloway, T.R.; Kastenberg, W.E.; Lee, J.D.; Devoto, R.S.; Neef, W.S. Jr.; Schultz, K.R.; Culver, D.W.; Rao, S.B.; Rao, S.R.

    1978-05-22

    This report describes the results of a two-year study by Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and General Atomic Co. to develop a conceptual design for the standard (minimum-B) mirror hybrid reactor. The reactor parameters have been chosen to minimize the cost of producing nuclear fuel (/sup 239/Pu) for consumption in fission power reactors (light water reactors). The deuterium-tritium plasma produces approximately 400 MW of fusion power with a plasma Q of 0.64. The fast-fission blanket, which is fueled with depleted uranium and lithium, generates sufficient tritium to run the reactor, has a blanket energy multiplication of M = 10.4, and has a net fissile breeding ratio of Pu/n = 1.51. The reactor has a net electrical output of 600 MWe, a fissile production of 2000 kg of plutonium per year (at a capacity factor of 0.74), and a net plant efficiency of 0.18. The plasma-containment field is generated by a Yin-Yang magnet using NbTi superconductor, and the neutral beam system uses positive-ion acceleration with beam direct conversion. The spherical blanket is based on gas-cooled fast reactor technology. The fusion components, blanket, and primary heat-transfer loop components are all contained within a prestressed-concrete reactor vessel, which provides magnet restraint and supports the primary heat-transfer loop and the blanket.

  17. Reference design for the standard mirror hybrid reactor

    Bender, D.J.; Fink, J.H.; Galloway, T.R.; Kastenberg, W.E.; Lee, J.D.; Devoto, R.S.; Neef, W.S. Jr.; Schultz, K.R.; Culver, D.W.; Rao, S.B.; Rao, S.R.

    1978-01-01

    This report describes the results of a two-year study by Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and General Atomic Co. to develop a conceptual design for the standard (minimum-B) mirror hybrid reactor. The reactor parameters have been chosen to minimize the cost of producing nuclear fuel ( 239 Pu) for consumption in fission power reactors (light water reactors). The deuterium-tritium plasma produces approximately 400 MW of fusion power with a plasma Q of 0.64. The fast-fission blanket, which is fueled with depleted uranium and lithium, generates sufficient tritium to run the reactor, has a blanket energy multiplication of M = 10.4, and has a net fissile breeding ratio of Pu/n = 1.51. The reactor has a net electrical output of 600 MWe, a fissile production of 2000 kg of plutonium per year (at a capacity factor of 0.74), and a net plant efficiency of 0.18. The plasma-containment field is generated by a Yin-Yang magnet using NbTi superconductor, and the neutral beam system uses positive-ion acceleration with beam direct conversion. The spherical blanket is based on gas-cooled fast reactor technology. The fusion components, blanket, and primary heat-transfer loop components are all contained within a prestressed-concrete reactor vessel, which provides magnet restraint and supports the primary heat-transfer loop and the blanket

  18. Necessary stability condition for field-reversed theta pinches

    Cary, J.R.

    1981-03-01

    Toroidal systems of arbitrary cross section without toroidal magnetic field are analyzed via the double adiabatic fluid equations. Such systems are shown to be unstable if there exists one closed field line on which the average of kapparB 2 is positive, where kappa is the curvature. A similar criterion is derived for linear systems and is applied to a noncircular z-pinch

  19. Poloidal flux loss in a field-reversed theta pinch

    Hoffman, A.L.; Milroy, R.D.; Steinhauer, L.C.

    1981-01-01

    Poloidal flux loss has been measured in field-reversed configurations and related to anomalous resistivity near the magnetic field null. The results indicate that mechanisms in addition to the lower-hybrid drift instability are affecting transport

  20. Electrochemistry in light water reactors reference electrodes, measurement, corrosion and tribocorrosion issues

    Bosch, R -W; Celis, Jean-Pierre

    2007-01-01

    There has long been a need for effective methods of measuring corrosion within light water nuclear reactors. This important volume discusses key issues surrounding the development of high temperature reference electrodes and other electrochemical techniques. The book is divided into three parts with part one reviewing the latest developments in the use of reference electrode technology in both pressurised water and boiling water reactors. Parts two and three cover different types of corrosion and tribocorrosion and ways they can be measured using such techniques as electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Topics covered across the book include in-pile testing, modelling techniques and the tribocorrosion behaviour of stainless steel under reactor conditions. Electrochemistry in light water reactors is a valuable reference for all those concerned with corrosion problems in this key technology for the power industry. Discusses key issues surrounding the development of high temperature reference eletrodes A valuab...

  1. Example Work Domain Analysis for a Reference Sodium Fast Reactor

    Hugo, Jacques [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Oxstrand, Johanna [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear industry is currently designing and building a new generation of reactors that will include different structural, functional, and environmental aspects, all of which are likely to have a significant impact on the way these plants are operated. In order to meet economic and safety objectives, these new reactors will all use advanced technologies to some extent, including new materials and advanced digital instrumentation and control systems. New technologies will affect not only operational strategies, but will also require a new approach to how functions are allocated to humans or machines to ensure optimal performance. Uncertainty about the effect of large scale changes in plant design will remain until sound technical bases are developed for new operational concepts and strategies. Up-to-date models and guidance are required for the development of operational concepts for complex socio-technical systems. This report describes how the classical Work Domain Analysis method was adapted to develop operational concept frameworks for new plants. This adaptation of the method is better able to deal with the uncertainty and incomplete information typical of first-of-a-kind designs. Practical examples are provided of the systematic application of the method in the operational analysis of sodium-cooled reactors. Insights from this application and its utility are reviewed and arguments for the formal adoption of Work Domain Analysis as a value-added part of the Systems Engineering process are presented.

  2. Cover gases in nuclear reactors with special reference to argon

    Jose, C.J.; Shah, G.C.; Prabhu, L.H.; Vartak, D.G.

    1975-01-01

    The report describes the specifications of an ideal cover gas for the smooth operation of a nuclear reactor. The advantages of using helium as cover gas, the sources of impurities in helium cover gas and the methods of purification of helium are given in detail. Various problems associated with the use of argon as cover gas and methods to purify and decontaminate argon cover gas are discussed on the basis of experimental data collected. A laboratory model of the system which can be used to evaluate the performance of the gas purification adsorbents is also described. (author)

  3. Fast breeder reactor reference system classification for the ENEA data bank

    Righini, R.

    1988-01-01

    This report contains the Reference System Classification (RSC) of fast breeder reactors: it provides a functional system breakdown of the reactor. For each system the following important characteristics are reported: the main function, the mode of operation, its location in the reactor, the main interface system, its main components and the component working environment (fluid and/or atmosphere type). The RSC represent a basic step in organizing the ENEA data bank for the registration and processing of reliability data on typical fast reactor components; it provides a functional component breakdown and represent a plant-unique identification in the process of omogenization of event-data coming from different reactors. In this report it was tried to take into account different generations of nuclear power plants, different plant layouts and solutions: in particular loop and pool reactors are separately treated

  4. Reactor costs and maintenance, with reference to the Culham Mark II conceptual tokamak reactor design

    Hancox, R.; Mitchell, J.T.D.

    1977-01-01

    Published designs of tokamak reactors have proposed conceptual solutions for most of the technological problems encountered. Two areas which remain uncertain, however, are the capital cost of the reactor and the practicability of reactor maintenance. A cost estimate for the Culham Conceptual Tokamak Reactor (Mk I) is presented. The capital cost of a power station incorporating this reactor would be significantly higher than that of an equivalent fast breeder fission power station, mainly because of the low power density of the fusion reactor which affects both the reactor and building costs. To reduce the fusion station capital costs a new conceptual design is proposed (Mk II) which incorporates a shaped plasma cross-section to give a higher plasma pressure ratio, βsub(t) approximately 0.1. Since the higher power density implies more severe radiation damage of the blanket structure, the question of reactor maintenance assumes greater importance. With the proposed scheme for regular replacement of the blanket, a fusion power station availability around 0.9 should be achievable. (author)

  5. Reactor costs and maintenance, with reference to the Culham Mark II conceptual Tokamak reactor design

    Hancox, R.; Mitchell, J.T.D.

    1976-01-01

    Published designs of tokamak reactors have proposed conceptual solutions for most of the technological problems encountered. Two areas which remain uncertain, however, are capital cost of the reactor and the practicability of reactor maintenance. A cost estimate for the Culham Conceptual Tokamak Reactor (Mk I) is presented. The capital cost of a power station incorporating this reactor would be significantly higher than that of an equivalent fast breeder fission power station, due mainly to the low power density of the fusion reactor which affects both the reactor and building costs. In order to reduce the fusion station capital costs a new conceptual design is proposed (Mk II) which incorporates a shaped plasma cross-section to give a higher plasma pressure ratio, βsub(t) approximately 0.1. Since the higher power density implies more severe radiation damage of the blanket structure, the question of reactor maintenance assumes greater importance. With the proposed scheme for regular replacement of the blanket, a fusion power station availability around 0.9 should be achievable. (orig.) [de

  6. Stable and Unstable Behaviour of Preheated Plasma in Linear and Cusped Theta Pinches; Comportement de Plasmas Prechauffes Stables et Instables Soumis a des Strictions Azimutales Lineaires et Cuspidees; Ustojchivoe i neustojchivoe povedenie predvaritel'no nagretoj plazmy v teta-pinch razryadakh s linejnoj i antiprobkovoj geometriej; Comportamiento de Plasmas Precalentados, Estables e Inestables, Sometidos a Constricciones Azimutales de Geometria Lineal y Cuspidal

    Belitz, R. J.; Bogen, P.; Dippel, K. H.; Jordan, H. L.; Kugler, E.; Miyahara, A.; Noll, P.; Schlueter, J.; Witulski, H. [Association EURATOM-Kernforschungsanlage, Juelich (Germany)

    1966-04-15

    Experiments on the behaviour of the magnetic compression of preheated hydrogen plasmas in theta pinches of linear and spindle-cusped geometries have been made with the following devices: 1) 5kJ linear theta pinch, coil diameter 4.5 cm, length 15 cm, B{sub max} = 50 kGT{sub Vulgar-Fraction-One-Half} = 1.5 {mu}sec; 2) 600-kJ linear theta pinch, coil diameter 10.5 cm, length 128 cm, B{sub max} = 100 kG, T{sub Vulgar-Fraction-One-Half} = 17 {mu}sec; 3) 10-kJ spindle' cusped theta with B{sub max} = 45 kG at point and line cusps, radius 5.2 cm, length 8.5 cm. They all have provisions for preionization by. a capacitively-coupled low-power RF transmitter, magnetic bias field of variable strength and polarity, preheating by pulsed oscillating electrodeless ring discharge, and compression of the plasma by a fast capacitor bank. Observations have been made by using smear and framing camera photography, optical interferometry with Mach-Zehnder and differential interferometers, spectroscopy in the visible and the soft X-ray regions, and magnetic probes. These methods give information on plasma structure, on density profiles, on the distribution of electron and ion-Doppler temperatures and their development in time. Both stable and unstable plasmas were observed in linear devices. By variation of pressure, bias field, preionization, preheating, and impurity concentration, and by disturbing the symmetry of the discharge tube, information on stable and unstable parameter regions could be obtained. Deviations from the symmetry of 1 the plasma column can occur because of: (1) drifts connected with spatial inhomogeneities of the confining magnetic field; (2) axial motions and contractions in plasmas with trapped antiparallel fields, and rarefaction waves due to end losses; (3) rotations, and deformation oscillations of the cross-section of the plasma; and (4) star-shaped instabilities and eruptions. While drifts and axial motions are directly connected with magnetic field

  7. Determining the asymptotic buckling for the reference RB reactor lattice

    Martinc, R.; Sotic, O.

    1969-01-01

    Material buckling was measured for reference lattice of the heavy water reflected system with 2% enriched uranium fuel. Experiments were done for cores with lattice pitch values: 8, 8√2, i 16 cm. Each of these cores had heavy water reflector, as well as active reflector - heavy water lattice with natural uranium fuel. The core was reflected by natural uranium lattice in order to approach asymptotic regime in the central zone. Buckling values obtained with the natural uranium lattice as reflector are, as a rule, lower then in case of heavy water reflector [sr

  8. Development of Power Controller System based on Model Reference Adaptive Control for a Nuclear Reactor

    Mohd Sabri Minhat; Izhar Abu Hussin; Ridzuan Abdul Mutalib

    2014-01-01

    The Reactor TRIGA PUSPATI (RTP)-type TRIGA Mark II was installed in the year 1982. The Power Controller System (PCS) or Automated Power Controller System (APCS) is very important for reactor operation and safety reasons. It is a function of controlled reactivity and reactor power. The existing power controller system is under development and due to slow response, low accuracy and low stability on reactor power control affecting the reactor safety. The nuclear reactor is a nonlinear system in nature, and it is power increases continuously with time. The reactor parameters vary as a function of power, fuel burnup and control rod worth. The output power value given by the power control system is not exactly as real value of reactor power. Therefore, controller system design is very important, an adaptive controller seems to be inevitable. The method chooses is a linear controller by using feedback linearization, for example Model Reference Adaptive Control. The developed APCS for RTP will be design by using Model Reference Adaptive Control (MRAC). The structured of RTP model to produce the dynamic behaviour of RTP on entire operating power range from 0 to 1MWatt. The dynamic behavior of RTP model is produced by coupling of neutronic and thermal-hydraulics. It will be developed by using software MATLAB/Simulink and hardware module card to handle analog input signal. A new algorithm for APCS is developed to control the movement of control rods with uniformity and orderly for RTP. Before APCS test to real plant, simulation results shall be obtained from RTP model on reactor power, reactivity, period, control rod positions, fuel and coolant temperatures. Those data are comparable with the real data for validation. After completing the RTP model, APCS will be tested to real plant on power control system performance by using real signal from RTP including fail-safe operation, system reliable, fast response, stability and accuracy. The new algorithm shall be a satisfied

  9. Reference equilibrium core with central flux irradiation facility for Pakistan research reactor-1

    Israr, M.; Shami, Qamar-ud-din; Pervez, S.

    1997-11-01

    In order to assess various core parameters a reference equilibrium core with Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel for Pakistan Research Reactor (PARR-1) was assembled. Due to increased volume of reference core, the average neutron flux reduced as compared to the first higher power operation. To get a higher neutron flux an irradiation facility was created in centre of the reference equilibrium core where the advantage of the neutron flux peaking was taken. Various low power experiments were performed in order to evaluate control rods worth and neutron flux mapping inside the core. The neutron flux inside the central irradiation facility almost doubled. With this arrangement reactor operation time was cut down from 72 hours to 48 hours for the production of the required specific radioactivity. (author)

  10. Special topics reports for the reference tandem mirror fusion breeder. Volume 2. Reactor safety assessment

    Maya, I.; Hoot, C.G.; Wong, C.P.C.; Schultz, K.R.; Garner, J.K.; Bradbury, S.J.; Steele, W.G.; Berwald, D.H.

    1984-09-01

    The safety features of the reference fission suppressed fusion breeder reactor are presented. These include redundancy and overcapacity in primary coolant system components to minimize failure probability, an improved valve location logic to provide for failed component isolation, and double-walled coolant piping and steel guard vessel protection to further limit the extent of any leak. In addition to the primary coolant and decay heat removal system, reactor safety systems also include an independent shield cooling system, the module safety/fuel transfer coolant system, an auxiliary first wall cooling system, a psssive dump tank cooling system based on the use of heat pipes, and several lithium fire suppression systems. Safety system specifications are justified based on the results of thermal analysis, event tree construction, consequence calculations, and risk analysis. The result is a reactor design concept with an acceptably low probability of a major radioactivity release. Dose consequences of maximum credible accidents appear to be below 10CFR100 regulatory limits

  11. Reference reactor module for NASA's lunar surface fission power system

    Poston, David I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kapernick, Richard J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dixon, David D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Werner, James [INL; Qualls, Louis [ORNL; Radel, Ross [SNL

    2009-01-01

    Surface fission power systems on the Moon and Mars may provide the first US application of fission reactor technology in space since 1965. The Affordable Fission Surface Power System (AFSPS) study was completed by NASA/DOE to determine the cost of a modest performance, low-technical risk surface power system. The AFSPS concept is now being further developed within the Fission Surface Power (FSP) Project, which is a near-term technology program to demonstrate system-level TRL-6 by 2013. This paper describes the reference FSP reactor module concept, which is designed to provide a net power of 40 kWe for 8 years on the lunar surface; note, the system has been designed with technologies that are fully compatible with a Martian surface application. The reactor concept uses stainless-steel based. UO{sub 2}-fueled, pumped-NaK fission reactor coupled to free-piston Stirling converters. The reactor shielding approach utilizes both in-situ and launched shielding to keep the dose to astronauts much lower than the natural background radiation on the lunar surface. The ultimate goal of this work is to provide a 'workhorse' power system that NASA can utilize in near-term and future Lunar and Martian mission architectures, with the eventual capability to evolve to very high power, low mass systems, for either surface, deep space, and/or orbital missions.

  12. Conceptual design of imploding liner fusion reactors

    Turchi, P.J.; Robson, A.E.

    1976-01-01

    The basic new ingredient is the concept of rotationally stabilized liquid metal liners accelerated with free pistons. The liner motion is constrained on its outer surface by the pistons, laterally by channel walls, during acceleration, and on its inner surface, where megagauss field levels are attained by the centrifugal motion of the liner material. In this way, stable, reversible motion of the liner should be possible, permitting repetitive, pulsed operation at interior pressures far greater than can be allowed in static conductor systems. Such higher operating pressures permit the use of simple plasma geometries, such as theta pinches, with greatly reduced dimensions. Furthermore, the implosion of thick, lithium-bearing liners with large radial compression ratios inherently provides the plasma with a surrounding blanket of neutron absorbing liquid metal, thereby substantially reducing the problems of induced radioactivity and first wall damage that haunt conventional fusion reactor designs. The following article discusses the basic operation of liner reactors and several important features influencing their design

  13. Plasma Containment and Stability in a Megajoule Theta-Pinch Experiment; Confinement et Stabilite du Plasma dans un Dispositif a Striction Azimutale de un Megajoule; Uderzhanie i ustojchivost' plazmy pri provedenii ehksperimenta s' megadzhoulevym teta-pinchem; Confinamiento y Estabilidad del Plasma en un Experimento de Estriccion Azimutal de 1 MJ

    Bodin, H. A.B.; Green, T. S.; Newton, A. A.; Niblett, G. B.F.; Reynolds, J. A. [United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority, Culham Laboratory, Abingdon, Berks. (United Kingdom)

    1966-04-15

    This paper describes the application of a fast megajoule capacitor bank to the study of plasma production and confinement in the theta-pinch configuration. Deuterium gas at a pressure in the range 10 to 50 mTorr is pre-ionized by a transient axial current and subsequently compressed by a sinusoidal magnetic field with a peak value of 76 kG and a half-period of 12 {mu}s. The single-turn coil used in the experiment is 200 cm long and 10 cm in diameter. Lateral drift of the plasma to the walls of the discharge tube has been avoided by reduction of the curvature of confining lines of magnetic force using a parallel strip transmission line between the coil and collector. The origin of a low-amplitude circular motion of the plasma about the central equilibrium axis, the so-called wobble phenomenon, is discussed. The general properties of the discharge have been analysed by comparing the measured values of electron temperature, plasma diamagnetism, radial density distribution and neutron yield with numerical predictions using the Hain-Roberts hydromagnetic code. The rate of axial plasma loss has been determined by means of a wide variety of techniques. These include optical interferometry to measure the total number of trapped particles, an analysis of continuum emission in the visible spectrum to give the line density as a function of axial position, and miniature piezo-electric pressure probes to estimate the size of the loss aperture. The results show that the plasma is subject to magnetic field diffusion in the early stages and to cooling of the electrons either by impurity radiation or by thermal conduction along the field lines. The consequent depression of the plasma {beta} to a value about 0.5 at peak field enlarges the magnetic apertures at the ends of the coil and thus leads to axial escape of plasma. .The main problems for the future are therefore the development of a pre-heat system to give a higher temperature plasma at a {beta} of near unity, and the

  14. Nuclear performance calculations for the ELMO Bumpy Torus Reactor (EBTR) reference design

    Santoro, R.T.; Barnes, J.M.

    1977-12-01

    The nuclear performance of the ELMO Bumpy Torus Reactor reference design has been calculated using the one-dimensional discrete ordinates code ANISN and the latest available ENDF/B-IV transport cross-section data and nuclear response functions. The calculated results include estimates of the spatial and integral heating rate with emphasis on the recovery of fusion neutron energy in the blanket assembly and minimization of the energy deposition rates in the cryogenic magnet coil assemblies. The tritium breeding ratio in the natural lithium-laden blanket was calculated to be 1.29 tritium nuclei per incident neutron. The radiation damage in the reactor structural material and in the magnet assembly is also given

  15. Elaboration and qualification of a reference calculation routes for the absorbers in the PWR reactors

    Blanc-Tranchant, P.

    1999-11-01

    The general field in which this work takes place is the field of the accuracy improvement of neutronic calculations, required to operate Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) with a better precision and a lower cost. More specifically, this thesis deals with the calculation of the absorber clusters used to control these reactors. The first aim of that work was to define and validate a reference calculation route of such an absorber cluster, based on the deterministic code Apollo 2. This calculation scheme was then to be checked against experimental data. This study of the complex situation of absorber clusters required several intermediate studies, of simpler problems, such as the study of fuel rods lattices and the study of single absorber rods (B 4 C, AIC, Hafnium) isolated in such lattices. Each one of these different studies led to a particular reference calculation route. All these calculation routes were developed against reference continuous energy Monte-Carlo calculations, carried out with the stochastic code TRIPOLI14. They were then checked against experimental data measured during french experimental programs, undertaken within the EOLE experimental reactor, at the Nuclear Research Center of Cadarache: the MISTRAL experiments for the study of isolated absorber rods and the EPICURE experiments for the study of absorber clusters. This work led to important improvements in the calculation of isolated absorbers and absorber clusters. The reactivity worth of these clusters in particular, can now be obtained with a great accuracy: the discrepancy observed between the calculated and the experimental values is less than 2.5 %, and then slightly lower than the experimental uncertainty. (author)

  16. Development and qualification of reference calculation schemes for absorbers in pressured water reactor

    Blanc-Tranchant, P.

    2001-01-01

    The general field in which this work takes place is the field of the accuracy improvement of neutronic calculations, required to operate Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) with a better precision and a lower cost. More specifically, this thesis deals with the calculation of the absorber clusters used to control these reactors. The first aim of that work was to define and validate a reference calculation route of such an absorber cluster, based on the deterministic code APOLLO2. This calculation scheme was then to be checked against experimental data. This study of the complex situation of absorber clusters required several intermediate studies, of simpler problems, such as the study of fuel rods lattices and the study of single absorber rods (B4C, AIC, Hafnium) isolated in such lattices. Each one of these different studies led to a particular reference calculation route. All these calculation routes were developed against reference continuous energy Monte-Carlo calculations, carried out with the stochastic code TRIPOLI4. They were then checked against experimental data measured during French experimental programs, undertaken within the EOLE experimental reactor, at the Nuclear Research Center of Cadarache: the MISTRAL experiments for the study of isolated absorber rods and the EPICURE experiments for the study of absorber clusters. This work led to important improvements in the calculation of isolated absorbers and absorber clusters. The reactivity worth of these clusters in particular, can now be obtained with a great accuracy: the discrepancy observed between the calculated and the experimental values is less than 2.5 %, and then slightly lower than the experimental uncertainty. (author)

  17. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning reference light water reactors following postulated accidents

    Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I.

    1990-12-01

    The estimated costs for post-accident cleanup at the reference BWR (developed previously in NUREG/CR-2601, Technology, Safety and Costs of Decommissioning Reference Light Water Reactors Following Postulated Accidents) are updated to January 1989 dollars in this report. A simple formula for escalating post-accident cleanup costs is also presented. Accident cleanup following the most severe accident described in NUREG/CR-2601 (i.e., the Scenario 3 accident) is estimated to cost from $1.22 to 1.44 billion, in 1989 dollars, for assumed escalation rates of 4% or 8% in the years following 1989. The time to accomplish cleanup remained unchanged from the 8.3 years originally estimated. No reanalysis of current information on the technical aspects of TMI-2 cleanup has been performed. Only the cost of inflation has been evaluated since the original PNL analysis was completed. 32 refs., 12 tabs

  18. Superconducting magnetic energy storage

    Rogers, J.D.

    1976-01-01

    Fusion power production requires energy storage and transfer on short time scales to create confining magnetic fields and for heating plasmas. The theta-pinch Scyllac Fusion Test Reactor (SFTR) requires 480 MJ of energy to drive the 5-T compression field with a 0.7-ms rise time. Tokamak Experimental Power Reactors (EPR) require 1 to 2 GJ of energy with a 1 to 2-s rise time for plasma ohmic heating. The design, development, and testing of four 300-kJ energy storage coils to satisfy the SFTR needs are described. Potential rotating machinery and homopolar energy systems for both the Reference Theta-Pinch Reactor (RTPR) and tokamak ohmic-heating are presented

  19. Light-water reactors reference system classification for the European reliability data system (ERDS)

    Melis, M.; Mancini, G.

    1982-01-01

    The reference system classification represents a basic stage in the organization of the European reliability data system (ERDS) for light-water reactors, a project actually in development at the Joint Research Centre, Ispra. This project is concerned with operational reliability data collection from the various ''national'' data banks, and centralization in a European reliability data system, so improving the significance of the resulting reliability evaluations. In the framework of the ERDS project, the reference system classification provides a LWR functional break-down and represents a plant-unique identification in the process of homogenization of event-data coming from the various ''national'' organizations. The report, after a brief description of the main objectives of the ERDS project, reviews the criteria followed in the elaboration of the reference system classification; then the detailed classification is presented. The nuclear power station is subdivided in about 180 systems. To each system a sheet is associated, containing: a comprehensive description of system-functions and boundaries; a descritpion of the plant operating mode, linked to the various system functions; a list of the main interface system; and finally, a list of the main components, including type and safety classification

  20. Post-accident cleanup and decommissioning of a reference pressurized water reactor

    Murphy, E.S.; Holter, G.M.

    1982-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of a conceptual study to evaluate the technical requirements, costs, and safety impacts of the cleanup and decommissioning of a large pressurized water reactor (PWR) involved in an accident. The costs and occupational doses for post-accident cleanup and decommissioning are estimated to be substantially higher than those for decommissioning following the orderly shutdown of a reactor. A major factor in these cost and occupational dose increases is the high radiation environment that exists in the containment building following an accident which restricts worker access and increases the difficulty of performing certain tasks. Other factors which influence accident cleanup and decommissioning costs are requirements for the design and construction of special tools and equipment, increased requirements for regulatory approvals, and special waste management needs. Radiation doses to the public from routine accident cleanup and decommissioning operations are estimated to be below permissible radiation dose levels in unrestricted areas and within the range of annual doses from normal background. 6 references, 1 figure, 7 tables

  1. Benchmark reference data on post irradiation analysis of light water reactor fuel samples

    Guardini, S.; Guzzi, G.

    1983-01-01

    The structure of the present report is as follows: in section I the benchmark activity (BM) is described in detail; characteristics of the reactors and fuel assemblies examinated are given, and the technical aspects of the chemical and analytical processes are discussed. In section II all the techniques used to certify the analytical data are presented, together with a discussion of evaluated random and systematic uncertainties. A comparison with the calculated values and the interpretation with ICT (Isotopic Correlation Techniques) is also presented in this section. Section III presents the results. In practice the complete sets of results referring to all JRC measurements are given here for the sake of the completeness and consistency of this final report

  2. Time varying stress in ligaments of perforated plates with reference to prestressed concrete reactor vessels

    Stefanou, G.D.

    1978-01-01

    The work described herein relates to the prediction of stresses in materials which exhibit time varying strains with particular reference to the ligaments of perforated circular concrete slabs, subjected to long-term radial prestress and uniform elevated temperature. The perforations are reinforced with steel liners and arranged in a square central lattice symmetrical about two orthogonal axes. Special reference is made to the distribution of stress in the standpipe region of prestressed concrete cylindrical pressure or containment vessels for gas cooled reactors. In order to assess the stress distribution around the perforated zone of a circular slab, a method of analysis was developed by the author, based on the ''Equivalent Elastic Modulus'' of the perforated zone and the ''Effective Modulus Method'', utilizing experimental data obtained from tests performed on model specimens. The object of this paper is to extend the above method of analysis into the perforated region, and assess the long-term stresses in the ligaments. The proposed method is accomplished by an application of the Finite Element Method for the elastic plane stress case. Comparisons of experimental results and theoretical predictions by the proposed method, and other analytical methods are made for a series of perforated concrete slabs subjected to radial in-plane loading: 10,342 kN/m 2 (1,5000 psi), and uniform elevated temperature of 80 0 C. The investigation, though in general terms, could be applied to the perforated region of cylindrical pressure vessels for nuclear reactors. Finally the paper describes briefly in Appendix 3 a direct solution procedure for calculating time dependent stresses in concrete structures based on the principles of variational calculus. Analytical predictions obtained by the proposed method which is a step-by-step analysis, are compared with the variational principle method. (author)

  3. Maximizing the use of research reactors in training power reactor operating staff with special reference to US experience

    Cox, J.A.

    1976-01-01

    Research reactors have been used in training nuclear power plant personnel for many years. Using the experience in the United States of America a programme is proposed that will maximize the training conducted at a research reactor and lessen the time that the staff must spend training elsewhere. The programme is adaptable to future training of replacement staff and for staff retraining. (author)

  4. Guidelines for the review research reactor safety. Reference document for IAEA Integrated Safety Assessment of Research Reactors (INSARR)

    1997-01-01

    In 1992, the IAEA published new safety standards for research reactors as part of the set of publications considered by its Research Reactor Safety Programme (RRSP). This set also includes publications giving guidance for all safety aspects related to the lifetime of a research reactor. In addition, the IAEA has also revised the Safety Standards for radiation protection. Consequently, it was considered advisable to revise the Integrated Safety Assessment of Research Reactors (INSARR) procedures to incorporate the new requirements and guidance as well as to extend the scope of the safety reviews to currently operating research reactors. The present report is the result of this revision. The purpose of this report is to give guidance on the preparation, execution, reporting and follow-up of safety review mission to research reactors as conducted by the IAEA under its INSARR missions safety service. However, it will also be of assistance to operators and regulators in conducting: (a) ad hoc safety assessments of research reactors to address individual issues such as ageing or safety culture; and (b) other types of safety reviews such as internal and peer reviews and regulatory inspections

  5. Reactor Emergency Action Level Monitor: Volume 2, REALM user's reference guide: Final report

    Touchton, R.A.

    1988-09-01

    A User Manual for the Reactor Emergency Action Level Monitor (REALM) expert system prototype is provided in this volume. REALM has been designed to provide expert assistance in the identification of a nuclear power plant emergency situation and the determination of its severity. REALM has been developed as an expert system which can provide sensor interpretation and situation assessment in a real-time processing environment. In its state of development at project completion, these capabilities are used in an off-line (i.e., stand-alone, desktop) fashion to provide emergency preparedness assistance in the areas of emergency classification training and emergency exercise scenario generation. REALM also serves a prototype and stepping-stone for the possible connection to the plant for on-line use. In order to distinguish the off-line system (now complete) from the on-line system (now moving from a research prototype to an installed system), the term ''REALM'' is used to indicate the on-line version, with users in the control room, technical support center, and the emergency operations facility, The off-line version is referred to as ''uREALM.''

  6. Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference light-water reactors following postulated accidents. Appendices

    Murphy, E S; Holter, G M

    1982-11-01

    Appendices contain information concerning the reference site description; reference PWR facility description; details of reference accident scenarios and resultant contamination levels; generic cleanup and decommissioning information; details of activities and manpower requirements for accident cleanup at a reference PWR; activities and manpower requirements for decommissioning at a reference PWR; costs of decommissioning at a reference PWR; cost estimating bases; safety assessment details; and details of post-accident cleanup and decommissioning at a reference BWR.

  7. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference pressurized water reactor power station. Classification of decommissioning wastes. Addendum 3

    Murphy, E.S.

    1984-09-01

    The radioactive wastes expected to result from decommissioning of the reference pressurized water reactor power station are reviewed and classified in accordance with 10 CFR 61. The 17,885 cubic meters of waste from DECON are classified as follows: Class A, 98.0%; Class B, 1.2%; Class C, 0.1%. About 0.7% (133 cubic meters) of the waste would be generally unacceptable for disposal using near-surface disposal methods

  8. Dragon project reference design assessment study for a 528 MW (E) thorium cycle high temperature gas cooled reactor

    Hosegood, S.B.

    1967-05-01

    The report presents an assessment of the feasibility, safety and cost of a large nuclear power station employing a high temperature gas-cooled reactor. A thermal output 1250 MW was chosen for the study, resulting in a net electrical output of 528.34 MW from a single reactor station, or 1056.7 MW from a twin reactor station. A reference design has been developed and is described. The reactor uses a U-235/Th-232/U-233 fuel cycle, on a feed and breed basis. It is believed that such a reactor could be built at an early date, requiring only a relatively modest development programme. Building costs are estimated to be Pound46.66/kW for a single unit station and Pound42.6/kW for a twin station, with power generation costs of 1.67p/kWh and 1.50p/kWh respectively. Optimisation studies have not been carried out and it should be possible to improve on the costs. The design has been made as flexible as possible to allow units of smaller or larger outputs to be designed with a minimum of change. (U.K.)

  9. Reference ZrH reactor power system for NASA space station post-operational reentry analysis

    Elliott, R.D.

    1970-01-01

    The flight dynamic and heating of a spent ZrH reactor power system returning from orbit at the end of its useful life are analyzed. The results of this analysis indicate that the reactor with a large portion of the lithium shield still surrounding it will impact the earth at a velocity of from 660 to 820 ft/sec, depending upon whether it tumbles or becomes stabilized during the latter part of its trajectory. (U.S.)

  10. The extension of the SWS period or CANDU reactors with particular reference to Douglas Point

    Bennett, C.R.

    1985-01-01

    The foregoing approach to the determination of the fate of a concrete containment building is worth much consideration. The expenditure of $10 8 or its escalated equivalent is too much to pay for the probable saving of fraction of a statistical life. The unquestioning adoption of the dogma of reactor dismantlement displays a complete misunderstanding of the numerics of ''risk'', even the place of reactor dismantling in the spectrum of nuclear risk. The position of the risk of reactor dismantling is more than an order of magnitude lower than the former of these. The most altruistic criterion for any engineering activity is the achievement of the greatest expected net benefit (or the least expected net detriment) when all the consequences of the activity are taken into account. As has been shown this criterion leads to the conclusion that, at least in CANDU reactors and particularly Douglas Point, there is apparently no reason why the S.W.S. period should not be extended indefinitely

  11. Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning a reference pressurized water reactor power station. Appendices

    Smith, R.I.; Konzek, G.J.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.

    1978-05-01

    Detailed appendices are presented under the following headings: reference PWR facility description, reference PWR site description, estimates of residual radioactivity, alternative methods for financing decommissioning, radiation dose methodology, generic decommissioning activities, intermediate dismantlement activities, safe storage and deferred dismantlement activities, compilation of unit cost factors, and safety assessment details

  12. Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors. Main report

    Konzek, G.J.; Ludwick, J.D.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Smith, R.I.

    1982-03-01

    Safety and Cost Information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of two representative licensed nuclear research and test reactors. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between costs (in 1981 dollars), occupational radiation doses, potential radiation dose to the public, and other safety impacts. The alternatives considered are: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and ENTOMB (entombment). The study results are presented in two volumes. Volume 1 (Main Report) contains the results in summary form

  13. Reference modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Plant: Concept description report

    1986-10-01

    This report provides a summary description of the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) concept and interim results of assessments of costs, safety, constructibility, operability, maintainability, and availability. Conceptual design of this concept was initiated in October 1985 and is scheduled for completion in 1987. Participating industrial contractors are Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI), Stone and Webster Engineering Corporation (SWEC), GA Technologies, Inc. (GA), General Electric Co. (GE), and Combustion Engineering, Inc. (C-E).

  14. Reference modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Plant: Concept description report

    1986-10-01

    This report provides a summary description of the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) concept and interim results of assessments of costs, safety, constructibility, operability, maintainability, and availability. Conceptual design of this concept was initiated in October 1985 and is scheduled for completion in 1987. Participating industrial contractors are Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI), Stone and Webster Engineering Corporation (SWEC), GA Technologies, Inc. (GA), General Electric Co. (GE), and Combustion Engineering, Inc

  15. Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning a reference pressurized water reactor power station

    Smith, R.I.; Konzek, G.J.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.

    1978-05-01

    Safety and cost information was developed for the conceptual decommissioning of a large [1175 MW(e)] pressurized water reactor (PWR) power station. Two approaches to decommissioning, Immediate Dismantlement and Safe Storage with Deferred Dismantlement, were studied to obtain comparisons between costs, occupational radiation doses, potential radiation dose to the public, and other safety impacts. Immediate Dismantlement was estimated to require about six years to complete, including two years of planning and preparation prior to final reactor shutdown, at a cost of $42 million, and accumulated occupational radiation dose, excluding transport operations, of about 1200 man-rem. Preparations for Safe Storage were estimated to require about three years to complete, including 1 1 / 2 years for planning and preparation prior to final reactor shutdown, at a cost of $13 million and an accumulated occupational radiation dose of about 420 man-rem. The cost of continuing care during the Safe Storage period was estimated to be about $80 thousand annually. Accumulated occupational radiation dose during the Safe Storage period was estimated to range from about 10 man-rem for the first 10 years to about 14 man-rem after 30 years or more. The cost of decommissioning by Safe Storage with Deferred Dismantlement was estimated to be slightly higher than Immediate Dismantlement. Cost reductions resulting from reduced volumes of radioactive material for disposal, due to the decay of the radioactive containments during the deferment period, are offset by the accumulated costs of surveillance and maintenance during the Safe Storage period

  16. Implosion measurements in a high voltage, large diameter, medium density theta pinch

    Henins, I.; Hammel, J.E.; Jarboe, T.E.; Marshall, J.; Sherwood, A.R.

    1975-01-01

    Extensive sets of density measurements were obtained for two preionization levels with other parameters held constant (B = 0.5 T, n 0 = 4.8 x 10 14 cm -3 , E/sub theta/ = 1 kV/cm). The gross features of the implosion are similar in the two cases, but the density front is double-peaked for the higher preionization case. Generally, the particles move ahead of the driving magnetic field front, but some are also within this front. After reaching the axis the imploding plasma is observed to move outward again through the magnetic field in a manner suggesting anomalous transport. The particles stop at the outer radii. The total number of particles increases during the implosion and thereafter remains about constant. (auth)

  17. Coaxial plasma guns as injectors of high beta linear theta pinches

    Marshall, J.

    1975-01-01

    A brief review of research on coaxial plasma guns and their use is given. Some problems and possibilities of using this gun for beam injection experiments are pointed out. Some scaling laws for gun energy are described

  18. Experiments of spheromak and reversed field configuration in 2m theta pinch

    Nogi, Y.; Shimamura, S.; Ogura, H.; Osanai, Y.; Saito, K.; Shiina, S.; Yoshimura, H.

    1981-01-01

    Since the z-current produces the paramagnetic field near the electrodes, the spheromak formation is more difficult in the straight bias field. In order to help the reconnection at the coil ends, the cusp bias coils are added to both ends of the straight coil. Then the spheromak configuration is formed and the plasma is confined for 5 to 10 μs. On the other hand, the RFC continues for about 30 μs in case of the straight bias field. The confinement time is limited by the rotational instability. Although the start time of the instability is not clear, the elongation of the plasma is detected in 15 to 20 μs after the RFC is formed. The period of the rotation is slightly different every shot. Detailed study of the instability is being pursued

  19. Equilibrium and stability of theta-pinch plasma in modified toroidal multiple mirror field

    Shiina, S.; Saito, K.; Osanai, Y.; Itagaki, T.; Karakizawa, T.; Gesso, H.; Todoroki, J.; Kawakami, I.; Yoshimura, H.

    1976-01-01

    To confine a high-beta plasma a new toroidal magnetic configuration with closed lines of force has been proposed [1]. The configuration is an appropriate superposition of l = 0, l = +- 1, l = +- 2,sup(...), helical fields. In this experiment, it is generated by modifying the multiple mirror field by enclosing the discharge tube in a copper shell which has longitudinal gap. This configuration is preferred for the wall stabilizing effect to that with the separated helical windings. The characteristics of the equilibrium conditions are examined based on the near-axis approximation theory and compared with the experimental results. The stability of plasma in the configurations with l = 0 field and with superposition of l = 0, l = +- 2 fields is investigated in linear geometry. (author)

  20. Flux trapping during field reversal in a field reversed theta pinch

    Milroy, R.D.; Hoffman, A.L.; Slough, J.T.; Harding, D.G.

    1983-01-01

    In this paper we present new results from both numerical and experimental studies of the formation of the conducting sheath near the tube wall and its effectiveness in trapping bias flux during field reversal

  1. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station. Appendices. Volume 2

    Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

    1980-06-01

    Appendices are presented concerning the evaluations of decommissioning financing alternatives; reference site description; reference BWR facility description; radiation dose rate and concrete surface contamination data; radionuclide inventories; public radiation dose models and calculated maximum annual doses; decommissioning methods; generic decommissioning information; immediate dismantlement details; passive safe storage, continuing care, and deferred dismantlement details; entombment details; demolition and site restoration details; cost estimating bases; public radiological safety assessment details; and details of alternate study bases.

  2. Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors. Appendices

    Konzek, G.J.; Ludwick, J.D.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Smith, R.I.

    1982-03-01

    Safety and Cost Information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of two representative licensed nuclear research and test reactors. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between costs (in 1981 dollars), occupational radiation doses, potential radiation dose to the public, and other safety impacts. The alternatives considered are: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and EMTOMB (entombment). The study results are presented in two volumes. Volume 2 (Appendices) contains the detailed data that support the results given in Volume 1, including unit-component data

  3. Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors. Appendices

    Konzek, G.J.; Ludwick, J.D.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Smith, R.I.

    1982-03-01

    Safety and Cost Information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of two representative licensed nuclear research and test reactors. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between costs (in 1981 dollars), occupational radiation doses, potential radiation dose to the public, and other safety impacts. The alternatives considered are: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and EMTOMB (entombment). The study results are presented in two volumes. Volume 2 (Appendices) contains the detailed data that support the results given in Volume 1, including unit-component data.

  4. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station: Comparison of two decommissioning cost estimates developed for the same commercial nuclear reactor power station

    Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I.

    1990-12-01

    This study presents the results of a comparison of a previous decommissioning cost study by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and a recent decommissioning cost study of TLG Engineering, Inc., for the same commercial nuclear power reactor station. The purpose of this comparative analysis on the same plant is to determine the reasons why subsequent estimates for similar plants by others were significantly higher in cost and external occupational radiation exposure (ORE) than the PNL study. The primary purpose of the original study by PNL (NUREG/CR-0672) was to provide information on the available technology, the safety considerations, and the probable costs and ORE for the decommissioning of a large boiling water reactor (BWR) power station at the end of its operating life. This information was intended for use as background data and bases in the modification of existing regulations and in the development of new regulations pertaining to decommissioning activities. It was also intended for use by utilities in planning for the decommissioning of their nuclear power stations. The TLG study, initiated in 1987 and completed in 1989, was for the same plant, Washington Public Supply System's Unit 2 (WNP-2), that PNL used as its reference plant in its 1980 decommissioning study. Areas of agreement and disagreement are identified, and reasons for the areas of disagreement are discussed. 31 refs., 3 figs., 22 tabs

  5. Natural convection in closed vertical cylinders with particular reference to gas cooled reactor standpipes

    Spence, I.D.

    1975-09-01

    The access to the core for fuel assemblies and control rods of the Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor is through the top cap by means of standpipes. The standpipe is essentially a cylindrical, vertical tube with cooled side wall, closed upper end and an orifice at the lower end which is exposed to the hot core fluid. This creates confined natural convection flow in the empty standpipe and this is the subject of this thesis. The investigation is carried out using analytical and experimental methods. For the analytical work, solution of laminar and turbulent flow is attempted using finite-difference computer techniques. The laminar flow performance is evaluated using two different finite-difference procedures, and the results are compared to each other and to existing analytical and experimental results for the open thermosyphon with cool inflow and hot sidewall, i.e. the complementary problem to the present one. For turbulent flow a two equation turbulence model is employed which provides transport equations for the kinetic energy of turbulence and its dissipation rate. The experimental rig is a full scale replica of the Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor control rod mechanism standpipe. Carbon dioxide and helium are used as the working fluids for the series of tests. (author)

  6. Post-accident cleanup and decommissioning of a reference pressurized-water reactor

    Murphy, E.S.; Holter, G.M.

    1982-10-01

    This paper summarizes the results of a conceptual study to evaluate the technical requirements, costs, and safety impacts of the cleanup and decommissioning of a large pressurized water reactor (PWR) involved in an accident. The costs and occupational doses for post-accident cleanup and dcommissioning are estimated to be substantially higher than those for decommissioning following the orderly shutdown of a reactor. A major factor in these cost and occupational dose increases is the high radiation environment that exists in the containment building following an accident which restricts worker access and increases the difficulty of performing certain tasks. Other factors which influence accident cleanup and decommissioning costs are requirements for the design and construction of special tools and equipment, increased requirements for regulatory approvals, and special waste management needs. Radiation doses to the public from routine accident cleanup and decommissioning operations are estimated to be below permissible radiation dose levels in unrestricted areas and within the range of annual doses from normal background

  7. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program A Reference Plan for Control Room Modernization: Planning and Analysis Phase

    Jacques Hugo; Ronald Boring; Lew Hanes; Kenneth Thomas

    2013-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program is collaborating with a U.S. nuclear utility to bring about a systematic fleet-wide control room modernization. To facilitate this upgrade, a new distributed control system (DCS) is being introduced into the control rooms of these plants. The DCS will upgrade the legacy plant process computer and emergency response facility information system. In addition, the DCS will replace an existing analog turbine control system with a display-based system. With technology upgrades comes the opportunity to improve the overall human-system interaction between the operators and the control room. To optimize operator performance, the LWRS Control Room Modernization research team followed a human-centered approach published by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. NUREG-0711, Rev. 3, Human Factors Engineering Program Review Model (O’Hara et al., 2012), prescribes four phases for human factors engineering. This report provides examples of the first phase, Planning and Analysis. The three elements of Planning and Analysis in NUREG-0711 that are most crucial to initiating control room upgrades are: • Operating Experience Review: Identifies opportunities for improvement in the existing system and provides lessons learned from implemented systems. • Function Analysis and Allocation: Identifies which functions at the plant may be optimally handled by the DCS vs. the operators. • Task Analysis: Identifies how tasks might be optimized for the operators. Each of these elements is covered in a separate chapter. Examples are drawn from workshops with reactor operators that were conducted at the LWRS Human System Simulation Laboratory HSSL and at the respective plants. The findings in this report represent generalized accounts of more detailed proprietary reports produced for the utility for each plant. The goal of this LWRS report is to disseminate the technique and provide examples sufficient to

  8. Reference and standard benchmark field consensus fission yields for U.S. reactor dosimetry programs

    Gilliam, D.M.; Helmer, R.G.; Greenwood, R.C.; Rogers, J.W.; Heinrich, R.R.; Popek, R.J.; Kellogg, L.S.; Lippincott, E.P.; Hansen, G.E.; Zimmer, W.H.

    1977-01-01

    Measured fission product yields are reported for three benchmark neutron fields--the BIG-10 fast critical assembly at Los Alamos, the CFRMF fast neutron cavity at INEL, and the thermal column of the NBS Research Reactor. These measurements were carried out by participants in the Interlaboratory LMFBR Reaction Rates (ILRR) program. Fission product generation rates were determined by post-irradiation analysis of gamma-ray emission from fission activation foils. The gamma counting was performed by Ge(Li) spectrometry at INEL, ANL, and HEDL; the sample sent to INEL was also analyzed by NaI(Tl) spectrometry for Ba-140 content. The fission rates were determined by means of the NBS Double Fission Ionization Chamber using thin deposits of each of the fissionable isotopes. Four fissionable isotopes were included in the fast neutron field measurements; these were U-235, U-238, Pu-239, and Np-237. Only U-235 was included in the thermal neutron yield measurements. For the fast neutron fields, consensus yields were determined for three fission product isotopes--Zr-95, Ru-103, and Ba-140. For these fission product isotopes, a separately activated foil was analyzed by each of the three gamma counting laboratories. The experimental standard deviation of the three independent results was typically +- 1.5%. For the thermal neutron field, a consensus value for the Cs-137 yield was also obtained. Subsidiary fission yields are also reported for other isotopes which were studied less intensively (usually by only one of the participating laboratories). Comparisons with EBR-II fast reactor yields from destructive analysis and with ENDF/B recommended values are given

  9. Reactor

    Toyama, Masahiro; Kasai, Shigeo.

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a lmfbr type reactor wherein effusion of coolants through a loop contact portion is reduced even when fuel assemblies float up, and misloading of reactor core constituting elements is prevented thereby improving the reactor safety. Constitution: The reactor core constituents are secured in the reactor by utilizing the differential pressure between the high-pressure cooling chamber and low-pressure cooling chamber. A resistance port is formed at the upper part of a connecting pipe, and which is connect the low-pressure cooling chamber and the lower surface of the reactor core constituent. This resistance part is formed such that the internal sectional area of the connecting pipe is made larger stepwise toward the upper part, and the cylinder is formed larger so that it profiles the inner surface of the connecting pipe. (Aizawa, K.)

  10. Standard reference material certification: contribution of NAA with a TRIGA reactor

    Orvini, E.; Speziali, M.; Salvini, A.; Herborg, C.

    2002-01-01

    Pavia has cooperative links with the major international agencies devoted to the certification of SRMs or CRMs as the Bureau Communautaire de Reference (BCR), the European Institute for Reference Materials and Measurement (IRMM), the USA National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). During these cooperative works, a large amount of analytical data obtained with NAA has been compared, and meaningful methodological information achieved with respect to accuracy and precision in the analysis of several elements at different concentrations in various matrices. Analytical data on As, Cd, Cr, Co, Cu, Cs, Fe, Zn, K, Sc, U, Th, Al, Sb, Mn, V, Hg, Sr, Rb, Se,Pt, all the Rare Earths and halogens Br, Cl, I, have been obtained and contributed for the final certification

  11. Reactor

    Ikeda, Masaomi; Kashimura, Kazuo; Inoue, Kazuyuki; Nishioka, Kazuya.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To facilitate the construction of a reactor containment building, whereby the inspections of the outer wall of a reactor container after the completion of the construction of the reactor building can be easily carried out. Constitution: In a reactor accommodated in a container encircled by a building wall, a space is provided between the container and the building wall encircling the container, and a metal wall is provided in the space so that it is fitted in the building wall in an attachable or detatchable manner. (Aizawa, K.)

  12. Flooding and non-equilibrium in counter-current flows with reference to pressurised water reactors

    Megahed, M.M.M.

    1981-12-01

    During the refill stage of a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) in a Pressurised Water Reactor (PWR) the effectiveness with which the emergency coolant penetrates to the lower plenum, and hence to the core, is of paramount importance. Results of experimental and theoretical work carried out at the University of Strathclyde on two 1/10 scale planar test sections of a PWR downcomer annulus are presented. The experiments involved the countercurrent flows of air and water and the data were compared with existing flooding correlations for tubes. It was found experimentally that, as the inlet air flowed upwards against two opposing waterfalls, an increase in air flowrate caused the waterfalls to mover closer together until a critical air flowrate was reached where the waterfalls collapsed. A theoretical model defined this collapse condition. It was shown to be analogous to the choked flow of air through a nozzle whose cross sectional area varied with pressure. Previous experimental results for steam-water mixtures on similar test sections and the present air-water data were used to study condensation effects. Non-equilibrium effects were isolated and correlated against the dependent parameters of inlet water flowrate, inlet subcooling and downcomer wall temperature. A theoretical model giving good qualitative and quantitative agreement with experiment was developed. (author)

  13. Improvement of reference nuclear data for commercial power reactor analysis and design. Final report

    Levitt, L.; Magurno, B.; Rose, P.

    1977-10-01

    The National Neutron Cross Section Center (NNCSC) has participated in the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) program of improving the nuclear data base to be used as input for the analysis of power reactors. The NNCSC contribution consisted of organizing and participating in specialists' meetings on the Thermal Neutron Cross Sections for the Actinides and Fission Products, participating in a meeting on the recommended value for the 252 Cf anti nu, and keeping abreast of new measurements on the low energy resonance parameters of 238 U. In addition, complete evaluations for seven isotopes of gadolinium have been produced for the next version of the data library. Definitive benchmark calculations using the Monte Carlo code RECAP have been carried out for two homogeneous uranium nitrate critical spheres (ORNL 1 and 2), two water moderated uranium metal lattices (TRX-1 and 2), and three plutonium nitrate spheres (PNL 2, 3, and 5). Results for the uranium spheres gave good agreement with experiments and with previous calculations. The calculation of the TRX lattice parameters, however, casts doubt on the validity of analytic leakage corrections used previously. Eigenvalues of the plutonium nitrate spheres are found to increase with increasing ratio of total 240 Pu/ 239 Pu captures

  14. Safety analysis of the IAEA reference research reactor during loss of flow accident using the code MERSAT

    Hainoun, A.; Ghazi, N.; Abdul-Moaiz, B. Mansour

    2010-01-01

    Using the thermal hydraulic code MERSAT detailed model including primary and secondary loop was developed for the IAEA's reference research reactor MTR 10 MW. The developed model enables the simulation of expected neutronic and thermal hydraulic phenomena during normal operation, reactivity and loss of flow accidents. Two different loss of flow accident (LOFA) have been simulated using slow and fast decrease time of core mass flow. In both cases the expected flow reversal from downward forced to upward natural circulation has been successfully simulated. The results indicate that in both accidents the limit of onset of subcooled boiling was not arrived and consequently no exceed of design limits in term of thermal hydraulic instability or DNB is observed. Finally, the simulation results show good agreement with previous international benchmark analyses accomplished with other qualified channel and thermal hydraulic system codes.

  15. Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors: sensitivity of decommissioning radiation exposure and costs to selected parameters

    Konzek, G.J.

    1983-07-01

    Additional analyses of decommissioning at the reference research and test (R and T) reactors and analyses of five recent reactor decommissionings are made that examine some parameters not covered in the initial study report (NUREG/CR-1756). The parameters examined for decommissioning are: (1) the effect on costs and radiation exposure of plant size and/or type; (2) the effects on costs of increasing disposal charges and of unavailability of waste disposal capacity at licensed waste disposal facilities; and (3) the costs of and the available alternatives for the disposal of nuclear R and T reactor fuel assemblies

  16. Neutronic analysis of a reference LEU core for Pakistan research reactor using oxide fuel

    Akhtar, K.M.; Qazi, M.K.; Bokhari, I.H.; Khan, L.A.; Pervez, S.

    1988-07-01

    Neutronic analysis of a 10 MW reference core for PARR, having 28 fresh LEU fuel elements arranged in a 6x5 configuration has been carried out using standard computer codes WIMS-D, EXTERMINATOR-II, and CITATION. Total nuclear power peaking of 3.2 has bee found to occur in the fuel plate adjacent to the water filled central flux trap at the depth of 43.8 cm from the top of the active core. Replacement of water in central flux trap with an aluminum block, having a 50 mm diameter water filled irradiation channel changes the flux profiles in fuel, core side flux trap and reflector. The thermal flux in the central flux trap decreases by about 53%. Therefore some of the fuel elements will have to be removed and the new configuration has to be analysed to determine the first operating core. However, after achieving some burn-up and confirmation from thermal hydraulic analysis, the core configuration analysed, will be the final working core. (orig./A.B.)

  17. Guidelines for the Review of Research Reactor Safety: Revised Edition. Reference Document for IAEA Integrated Safety Assessment of Research Reactors (INSARR)

    2013-01-01

    The Integrated Safety Assessment of Research Reactors (INSARR) is an IAEA safety review service available to Member States with the objective of supporting them in ensuring and enhancing the safety of their research reactors. This service consists of performing a comprehensive peer review and an assessment of the safety of the respective research reactor. The reviews are based on IAEA safety standards and on the provisions of the Code of Conduct on the Safety of Research Reactors. The INSARR can benefit both the operating organizations and the regulatory bodies of the requesting Member States, and can include new research reactors under design or operating research reactors, including those which are under a Project and Supply Agreement with the IAEA. The first IAEA safety evaluation of a research reactor operated by a Member State was completed in October 1959 and involved the Swiss 20 MW DIORIT research reactor. Since then, and in accordance with its programme on research reactor safety, the IAEA has conducted safety review missions in its Member States to enhance the safety of their research reactor facilities through the application of the Code of Conduct on the Safety of Research Reactors and the relevant IAEA safety standards. About 320 missions in 51 Member States were undertaken between 1972 and 2012. The INSARR missions and other limited scope safety review missions are conducted following the guidelines presented in this publication, which is a revision of Guidelines for the Review of Research Reactor Safety (IAEA Services Series No. 1), published in December 1997. This publication details those IAEA safety standards and guidance publications relevant to the safety of research reactors that have been revised or published since 1997. The purpose of this publication is to give guidance on the preparation, implementation, reporting and follow-up of safety review missions. It is also intended to be of assistance to operators and regulators in conducting

  18. Reactors

    Shah, Vivek; Vaz Salles, Marcos António

    2018-01-01

    The requirements for OLTP database systems are becoming ever more demanding. Domains such as finance and computer games increasingly mandate that developers be able to encode complex application logic and control transaction latencies in in-memory databases. At the same time, infrastructure...... engineers in these domains need to experiment with and deploy OLTP database architectures that ensure application scalability and maximize resource utilization in modern machines. In this paper, we propose a relational actor programming model for in-memory databases as a novel, holistic approach towards......-level function calls. In contrast to classic transactional models, however, reactors allow developers to take advantage of intra-transaction parallelism and state encapsulation in their applications to reduce latency and improve locality. Moreover, reactors enable a new degree of flexibility in database...

  19. Nuclear reactors

    Middleton, J.E.

    1977-01-01

    Reference is made to water cooled reactors and in particular to the cooling system of steam generating heavy water reactors (SGHWR). A two-coolant circuit is described for the latter. Full constructural details are given. (U.K.)

  20. Reactor

    Fujibayashi, Toru.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To provide a boiling water reactor which can enhance a quake resisting strength and flatten power distribution. Structure: At least more than four fuel bundles, in which a plurality of fuel rods are arranged in lattice fashion which upper and lower portions are supported by tie-plates, are bundled and then covered by a square channel box. The control rod is movably arranged within a space formed by adjoining channel boxes. A spacer of trapezoidal section is disposed in the central portion on the side of the channel box over substantially full length in height direction, and a neutron instrumented tube is disposed in the central portion inside the channel box. Thus, where a horizontal load is exerted due to earthquake or the like, the spacers come into contact with each other to support the channel box and prevent it from abnormal vibrations. (Furukawa, Y.)

  1. Scyllac fusion test reactor design

    Linford, R.K.; Oliphant, T.A.; Thomassen, K.I.

    1976-01-01

    The SFTR is a proposed 80-m diameter D-T burning toroidal theta pinch. The system is designed to achieve Q = 1 where Q is the ratio of the total thermonuclear energy output to the maximum stored energy in the plasma. SFTR design studies [1] will provide valuable guidance to the Scyllac related research and to the needed technological development. The portion of the system directly related to the plasma confinement, stability, and heating, is described, and the approach used to obtain an operating point consistent with Q = 1, m = 1 stability, and technological limitations is outlined. (U.K.)

  2. Scyllac fusion test reactor design

    Linford, R.K.; Oliphant, T.A.; Thomassen, K.I.

    1975-01-01

    The SFTR is a proposed 80-m diameter D--T burning toroidal theta pinch. The system is designed to achieve Q = 1 where Q is the ratio of the total thermonuclear energy output to the maximum stored energy in the plasma. SFTR design studies will provide valuable guidance to the Scyllac related research and to the needed technological development. This paper describes the portion of the system directly related to the plasma confinement, stability, and heating, and outlines the approach used to obtain an operating point consistent with Q = 1, m = 1 stability, and technological limitations. (auth)

  3. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference pressurized water reactor power station: Technical support for decommissioning matters related to preparation of the final decommissioning rule

    Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I.

    1988-07-01

    Preparation of the final Decommissioning Rule by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has been assisted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff familiar with decommissioning matters. These efforts have included updating previous cost estimates developed during the series of studies on conceptually decommissioning reference licensed nuclear facilities for inclusion in the Final Generic Environmental Impact Statement (FGEIS) on decommissioning; documenting the cost updates; evaluating the cost and dose impacts of post-TMI-2 backfits on decommissioning; developing a revised scaling formula for estimating decommissioning costs for reactor plants different in size from the reference pressurized water reactor (PWR) described in the earlier study; defining a formula for adjusting current cost estimates to reflect future escalation in labor, materials, and waste disposal costs; and completing a study of recent PWR steam generator replacements to determine realistic estimates for time, costs and doses associated with steam generator removal during decommissioning. This report presents the results of recent PNL studies to provide supporting information in four areas concerning decommissioning of the reference PWR: updating the previous cost estimates to January 1986 dollars; assessing the cost and dose impacts of post-TMI-2 backfits; assessing the cost and dose impacts of recent steam generator replacements; and developing a scaling formula for plants different in size than the reference plant and an escalation formula for adjusting current cost estimates for future escalation

  4. Development and qualification of reference calculation schemes for absorbers in pressured water reactor; Elaboration et qualification de schemas de calcul de reference pour les absorbants dans les reacteurs a eau pressurisee

    Blanc-Tranchant, P

    2001-07-01

    The general field in which this work takes place is the field of the accuracy improvement of neutronic calculations, required to operate Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) with a better precision and a lower cost. More specifically, this thesis deals with the calculation of the absorber clusters used to control these reactors. The first aim of that work was to define and validate a reference calculation route of such an absorber cluster, based on the deterministic code APOLLO2. This calculation scheme was then to be checked against experimental data. This study of the complex situation of absorber clusters required several intermediate studies, of simpler problems, such as the study of fuel rods lattices and the study of single absorber rods (B4C, AIC, Hafnium) isolated in such lattices. Each one of these different studies led to a particular reference calculation route. All these calculation routes were developed against reference continuous energy Monte-Carlo calculations, carried out with the stochastic code TRIPOLI4. They were then checked against experimental data measured during French experimental programs, undertaken within the EOLE experimental reactor, at the Nuclear Research Center of Cadarache: the MISTRAL experiments for the study of isolated absorber rods and the EPICURE experiments for the study of absorber clusters. This work led to important improvements in the calculation of isolated absorbers and absorber clusters. The reactivity worth of these clusters in particular, can now be obtained with a great accuracy: the discrepancy observed between the calculated and the experimental values is less than 2.5 %, and then slightly lower than the experimental uncertainty. (author)

  5. Elaboration and qualification of a reference calculation routes for the absorbers in the PWR reactors; Elaboration et qualification des schemas de calcul de reference pour les absorbants dans les reacteurs a eau pressurisee

    Blanc-Tranchant, P

    1999-11-01

    The general field in which this work takes place is the field of the accuracy improvement of neutronic calculations, required to operate Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) with a better precision and a lower cost. More specifically, this thesis deals with the calculation of the absorber clusters used to control these reactors. The first aim of that work was to define and validate a reference calculation route of such an absorber cluster, based on the deterministic code Apollo 2. This calculation scheme was then to be checked against experimental data. This study of the complex situation of absorber clusters required several intermediate studies, of simpler problems, such as the study of fuel rods lattices and the study of single absorber rods (B{sub 4}C, AIC, Hafnium) isolated in such lattices. Each one of these different studies led to a particular reference calculation route. All these calculation routes were developed against reference continuous energy Monte-Carlo calculations, carried out with the stochastic code TRIPOLI14. They were then checked against experimental data measured during french experimental programs, undertaken within the EOLE experimental reactor, at the Nuclear Research Center of Cadarache: the MISTRAL experiments for the study of isolated absorber rods and the EPICURE experiments for the study of absorber clusters. This work led to important improvements in the calculation of isolated absorbers and absorber clusters. The reactivity worth of these clusters in particular, can now be obtained with a great accuracy: the discrepancy observed between the calculated and the experimental values is less than 2.5 %, and then slightly lower than the experimental uncertainty. (author)

  6. Water chemistry in nuclear power stations with high-temperature reactors with particular reference to the AVR

    Nieder, R.; Resch, G.

    1976-01-01

    The water-steam cycle of a nuclear power plant with a helium-cooled high-temperature reactor differs in design data significantly and extensively from the corresponding cycles of light-water-cooled nuclear reactors and resembles to a great extent the water-steamcycle of a modern conventional power plant. The radioactive constituents of the water-steam cycle can be satisfactorily removed apart from Tritium by means of a pre-coat filter with powder-resisn, as comprehensive experiments have demonstrated. (orig.) [de

  7. Review of aerosol problems and the theory of aerosol physics with particular reference to sodium cooled fast reactors

    Williams, R.J.

    1978-01-01

    Processes that would govern the development, transport, and removal of aerosols, which are of interest in the study of hypothetical core disruptive situations in pool type sodium cooled fast reactors, are discussed. Theoretical descriptions of these processes are presented and known inadequacies indicated. The interpretation of experimental data and numeric solution of the governing equations is briefly considered. (author)

  8. 2nd IAEA research coordination meeting on collection and evaluation of reference data for thermo-mechanical properties of fusion reactor plasma facing materials. Summary report

    Langley, R.A.

    1996-08-01

    The proceedings and results of the 2nd IAEA Research Coordination Meeting on ''Collection and Evaluation of Reference Data for Thermo-mechanical Properties of Fusion Reactor Plasma Facing Materials'' held on March 25, 26 and 27, 1996 at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna are briefly described. This report includes a summary of presentations made by the meeting participants, the results of discussions amongst the participants regarding the status of data, publication of a multi-author review paper and recommendations regarding future work. (author). 1 tab

  9. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a Reference Boiling Water Reactor Power Station. Main report. Volume 1

    Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

    1980-06-01

    Technology, safety and cost information is given for the conceptual decommissioning of a large (1100MWe) boiling water reactor (BWR) power station. Three approaches to decommissioning, immediate dismantlement, safe storage with deferred dismantlement and entombment, were studied to obtain comparisons between costs, occupational radiation doses, potential dose to the public and other safety impacts. It also shows the sensitivity of decommissioning safety and costs to the power rating of a BWR in the range of 200 to 1100 MWe.

  10. Reference core design Mark-III of the experimental multi-purpose, high-temperature, gas-cooled reactor

    Shindo, Ryuiti; Watanabe, Takashi; Ishiguro, Okikazu; Kuroki, Syuzi

    1977-10-01

    The reactivity control system is one of the important items in reactor design, but it is much restricted by structural design of fuel element and pressure vessel in the experimental multi-purpose, high-temperature reactor. Preceding the first conceptual design of the reactor, therefore, the reactivity control system composed of control rod, burnable poison and reserve shutdown system in Mark-II design was re-studied, and several improvements were indicated. (1) The diameter of control rods must be as large as possible because it is impossible to increase the number of control rods. (2) The accuracy in estimation of the reactivity to be compensated with control rods is important because of the mutual interference of pair control rods with the twin configuration in a fuel element. (3) The improvement of core performance in burnup is accompanied by the reduction of design margin for control rods. (4) Increase of the reactivity to be compensated with the burnable poison leads to increase of the core reactivity recovery with burnup, and the assertion of the decrease for recovery of reactivity leads to increase of the temperature dependency of reactivity compensated with control rods. (5) Reduction of reactivity to be compensated with control rods is thus limited by cancellation of the effects in the reactivity recovery and the reactivity temperature dependency. (6) The reserve shutdown system can be designed with margin under the condition of excluding the reactivity of burnup from that to be compensated. (auth.)

  11. Comparative analysis of a hypothetical coolant loss accident in an LMFB reactor with the use of various calculation models for a common reference problem

    Royl, P.

    1979-01-01

    The results of a comparative analysis of the initial and dismantling stages of a hypothetical loss of flow accident in an LMFB reactor are presented. The analyses were made for a common reference problem with four different calculation models (CARMEN/KADIS, SURDYN, CAPRI/KADIS and FRAX). The reference core is described specifically, as are the differences in its geometrical disposition in the models, the static and transient conditions before and after the start of boiling and during dismantling. The differences in the models used for simulating the boiling and the dismantling are compared. The structure of the core, as well as the calculation conditions and hypotheses, were intentionally designed so that the accident would culminate, in all cases, in an energetic hydrodynamic dismantling stage

  12. Development of solid state reference electrodes and pH sensors for monitoring nuclear reactor cooling water systems

    Hettiarachchi, S.; Makela, K.; Macdonald, D.D.

    1991-01-01

    The growing interest in the electrochemical and corrosion behavior of structural alloys in high temperature aqueous systems has stimulated research in the design and testing of reliable reference electrodes and pH sensors for use in such environments. External reference electrodes have been successfully used in the recent years in high temperature aqueous environments, although their long-term stability is questionable. On the other hand, more reliable pH sensors have been developed by various workers for high temperature applications, the major drawback being their sensitivity to dissolved hydrogen, oxygen and other redox species. This paper describes the development of both solid-state reference electrodes and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) pH sensors for application in high temperature aqueous systems. (author)

  13. Neutronic analysis of the European reference design of the water cooled lithium lead blanket for a DEMOnstration reactor

    Petrizzi, L.

    1994-01-01

    Water cooled lithium lead blankets, using liquid Pb-17Li eutectic both as breeder and neutron multiplier material, and martensitic steel as structural material, represent one of the four families under development in the European DEMO blanket programme. Two concepts were proposed, both reaching tritium breeding self-sufficiency: the 'box-shaped' and the 'cylindrical modules'. Also to this scope a new concept has been defined: 'the single box'. A neutronic analysis of the 'single box' is presented. A full 3-D model including the whole assembly and many of the reactor details (divertors, holes, gaps) has been defined, together with a 3-D neutron source. A tritium breeding ration (TBR) value of 1.19 confirms the tritium breeding self-sufficiency of the design. Selected power densities, calculated for the different materials and zones, are here presented. Some shielding capability considerations with respect to the toroidal field coil system are presented too. (author) 10 refs.; 3 figs.; 3 tabs

  14. Preliminary design of experiment ALVAND 1 and low beta plasma source

    Anvari, A.; Azodi, H.; Naraghi, M.; Taherzadeh, M.; Torabi-Fard, A.

    1975-12-01

    The ultimate goal of a two years program, namely ''ALVAND PROJECT'' and problems concerned with the achievement of controlled thermonuclear reactions in Iran is covered. The report consists of six sections. The introduction deals with the advantages of a linear theta pinch and its comparison with toroidal and mirror devices. Attention has been paid to two important properties of the ALVAND 1 device, namely, its property of carrying out important missions in support of high beta controlled thermonuclear research and also its acting as a source for developing different diagnostic apparatus and excercising different measurement techniques. Expected plasma parameters for ALVAND 1 are given in the third section. In the fourth section the low beta plasma source and the important diagnostic techniques that may be developed are discussed. References are given in the fifth section. The calculation of the minimum required radius of a toroidal theta pinch reactor has been given in an appendix, which covers at the same time 2 schematic figures. Finally a program schedule is presented in section six

  15. Implementation of a model reference adaptive control system using neural network to control a fast breeder reactor evaporator

    Ugolini, D.; Yoshikawa, S.; Endou, A.

    1994-01-01

    Artificial intelligence is foreseen as the base for new control systems aimed to replace traditional controllers and to assist and eventually advise plant operators. This paper discusses the development of an indirect model reference adaptive control (MRAC) system, using the artificial neural network (ANN) technique, and its implementation to control the outlet steam temperature of a sodium to water evaporator. The ANN technique is applied in the identification and in the control process of the indirect MRAC system. The emphasis is placed on demonstrating the efficacy of the indirect MRAC system in controlling the outlet steam temperature of the evaporator, and on showing the important function covered by the ANN technique. An important characteristic of this control system is that it relays only on some selected input variables and output variables of the evaporator model. These are the variables that can be actually measured or calculated in a real environment. The results obtained applying the indirect MRAC system to control the evaporator model are quite remarkable. The outlet temperature of the steam is almost perfectly kept close to its desired set point, when the evaporator is forced to depart from steady state conditions, either due to the variation of some input variables or due to the alteration of some of its internal parameters. The results also show the importance of the role played by the ANN technique in the overall control action. The connecting weights of the ANN nodes self adjust to follow the modifications which may occur in the characteristic of the evaporator model during a transient. The efficiency and the accuracy of the control action highly depends on the on-line identification process of the ANN, which is responsible for upgrading the connecting weights of the ANN nodes. (J.P.N.)

  16. Kinetic parameters of the GUINEVERE reference configuration in VENUS-F reactor obtained from a pile noise experiment using Rossi and Feynman methods

    Geslot, Benoit; Pepino, Alexandra; Blaise, Patrick; Mellier, Frederic [CEA, DEN, DER/SPEx, Cadarache, F-13108 St Paul Lez Durance (France); Lecouey, Jean-Luc [LPC Caen, ENSICAEN, Universite de Caen, CNRS/IN2P3, 6 Bd. Marechal Juin 14050 Caen cedex (France); Carta, Mario [ENEA, UTFISST-REANUC, C.R. Casaccia, S.P.040 via Anguillarese 301, 00123 S. Maria Di Galeria, Roma (Italy); Kochetkov, Anatoly; Vittiglio, Guido [SCK.CEN, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Boeretang 200, BE-2400, Mol (Belgium); Billebaud, Annick [LPSC, CNRS, IN2P3/UJF/INPG, 53 Avenue des Martyrs, 38026 Grenoble cedex (France)

    2015-07-01

    A pile noise measurement campaign has been conducted by the CEA in the VENUS-F reactor (SCK-CEN, Mol Belgium) in April 2011 in the reference critical configuration of the GUINEVERE experimental program. The experimental setup made it possible to estimate the core kinetic parameters: the prompt neutron decay constant, the delayed neutron fraction and the generation time. A precise assessment of these constants is of prime importance. In particular, the effective delayed neutron fraction is used to normalize and compare calculated reactivities of different subcritical configurations, obtained by modifying either the core layout or the control rods position, with experimental ones deduced from the analysis of measurements. This paper presents results obtained with a CEA-developed time stamping acquisition system. Data were analyzed using Rossi-α and Feynman-α methods. Results were normalized to reactor power using a calibrated fission chamber with a deposit of Np-237. Calculated factors were necessary to the analysis: the Diven factor was computed by the ENEA (Italy) and the power calibration factor by the CNRS/IN2P3/LPC Caen. Results deduced with both methods are consistent with respect to calculated quantities. Recommended values are given by the Rossi-α estimator, that was found to be the most robust. The neutron generation time was found equal to 0.438 ± 0.009 μs and the effective delayed neutron fraction is 765 ± 8 pcm. Discrepancies with the calculated value (722 pcm, calculation from ENEA) are satisfactory: -5.6% for the Rossi-α estimate and -2.7% for the Feynman-α estimate. (authors)

  17. Application of radcal gamma thermometer assemblies for core coolant monitoring in ASEA ATOM reactors with particular reference to the Barsebaeck plants

    Romslo, K.

    1982-02-01

    In this study reference designs for instrument assemblies containing RGT rods to monitor the core coolant conditions in the Barsebaeck reactors have been worked out. Four such strings would be required to satisfy the Reg. Guide 1.97 reqiurements. The signal transmission to the control room and the presentation of information to the operators have been addressed. Downcomer water level measurement is considered important in order to get an early warning about leakages. Possible ways of diversifying the existing measurement method using RGTs are mentioned, and the design of a downcomer RGT rod has been suggested. To fully comply with Reg. Guide 1.97, water level measurements above core would be required. In a conceptual way it has been shown how an RGT rod could be extended up into this region, if so required. The possibility of making an ideal core coolant monitoring system by replacing one of the structural rods (water rods) in the fuel bundle by an RGT rod is pointed out. There are foreseen, however, several practical obstacles in pursuing the idea. The present state of RGT development and further work required to get the intrument licensed as a coolant monitoring device, has been defined. (Author)

  18. Emergency planning of the city of Munich with reference to nuclear facilities, especially the nuclear power stations Isar I and II, resp. the reactor in Garching

    1990-01-01

    During the hearing of Munich's city council of 13.7.1990 thirteen experts were heard on the following subjects: Hazard potential of Isar reactors and FRM reactor and appropriate radioactive waste transports; responsibilities in emergency planning. Some of the experts cannot visualize a major accident and propose not to cater for it. Shelters and evacuation are not planned for Munich, both solutions not being realizable for all inhabitants. Nuclear phaseout is seen by some as a measure of prevention. (HSCH) [de

  19. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station. Volume 1. Main report. Technical report, September 1977-October 1979

    Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

    1980-06-01

    Technology, safety and cost information is given for the conceptual decommissioning of a large (1100MWe) boiling water reactor (BWR) power station. Three approaches to decommissioning, immediate dismantlement, safe storage with deferred dismantlement and entombment, were studied to obtain comparisons between costs, occupational radiation doses, potential dose to the public and other safety impacts. It also shows the sensitivity of decommissioning safety and costs to the power rating of a BWR in the range of 200 to 1100 MWE

  20. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station. Volume 1. Main report. Technical report, September 1977-October 1979

    Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

    1980-06-01

    Technology, safety and cost information is given for the conceptual decommissioning of a large (1100MWe) boiling water reactor (BWR) power station. Three approaches to decommissioning, immediate dismantlement, safe storage with deferred dismantlement and entombment, were studied to obtain comparisons between costs, occupational radiation doses, potential dose to the public and other safety impacts. It also shows the sensitivity of decommissioning safety and costs to the power rating of a BWR in the range of 200 to 1100 MWE.

  1. X-ray radiographic experimental investigation of the reference level in hydrostatic level measurement systems for boiling water reactors; Roentgen-radiografische Untersuchung des Referenzfuellstandes bei der hydrostatischen Fuellstandsmessung in Siedewasserreaktoren

    Schulz, S.; Hampel, R. [Hochschule Zittau/Goerlitz, Zittau (Germany). Inst. fuer Prozesstechnik, Prozessautomatisierung und Messtechnik (IPM); Boden, S. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), Dresden (Germany). Inst. fuer Fluiddynamik

    2012-11-01

    Hydrostatic level control is of high priority for normal operation safety of BWR-type reactors. For the prevention of undershooting the limiting values precise and secure measuring techniques are indispensable. Actually the filling level is determined form the hydrostatic pressure difference to a reference column. For the secure non-invasive detection of the phase boundary water/steam in inclined tubes the X-ray radiography has been chosen. The experiments were aimed to study possible geometric influences on the water/steam phase boundary. It was shown that the reference filling level is not significantly changed in spite of permanent phase transitions, provided an ideal mechanical construction of the system is given. Future experiments shall be focused on the analysis of interface behavior in case of non-ideal geometries (welds).

  2. Nuclear reactors

    Prescott, R F; George, B V; Baglin, C J

    1978-05-10

    Reference is made to thermal insulation on the inner surfaces of containment vessels of fluid cooled nuclear reactors and particularly in situations where the thermal insulation must also serve a structural function and transmit substantial load forces to the surface which it covers. An arrangement is described that meets this requirement and also provides for core support means that favourably influences the flow of hot coolant from the lower end of the core into a plenum space in the hearth of the reactor. The arrangement comprises a course of thermally insulating bricks arranged as a mosaic covering a wall of the reactor and a course of thermally insulating tiles arranged as a mosaic covering the course of bricks. Full constructional details are given.

  3. Nuclear reactors

    Prescott, R.F.; George, B.V.; Baglin, C.J.

    1978-01-01

    Reference is made to thermal insulation on the inner surfaces of containment vessels of fluid cooled nuclear reactors and particularly in situations where the thermal insulation must also serve a structural function and transmit substantial load forces to the surface which it covers. An arrangement is described that meets this requirement and also provides for core support means that favourably influences the flow of hot coolant from the lower end of the core into a plenum space in the hearth of the reactor. The arrangement comprises a course of thermally insulating bricks arranged as a mosaic covering a wall of the reactor and a course of thermally insulating tiles arranged as a mosaic covering the course of bricks. Full constructional details are given. (UK)

  4. Guide to power reactors

    NONE

    1959-07-15

    The IAEA's major first scientific publication is the Directory of Power Reactors now in operation or under construction in various parts of the world. The purpose of the directory is to present important details of various power projects in such a way as to provide a source of easy reference for anyone interested in the development of the peaceful uses of atomic energy, either at the technical or management level. Six pages have been devoted to each reactor the first of which contains general information, reactor physics data and information about the core. The second and third contain sketches of the fuel element or of the fuel element assembly, and of the horizontal and vertical sections of the reactor. On the fourth page information is grouped under the following heads: fuel element, core heat transfer, control, reactor vessel and over-all dimensions, and fluid flow. The fifth page shows a simplified flow diagram, while the sixth provides information on reflector and shielding, containment and turbo generator. Some information has also been given, when available, on cost estimates and operating staff requirements. Remarks and a bibliography constitute the last part of the description of each reactor. Reactor projects included in this directory are pressurized light water cooled power reactors. Boiling light water cooled power reactors, heavy water cooled power reactors, gas cooled power reactors, organic cooled power reactors liquid metal cooled power reactors and liquid metal cooled power reactors

  5. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station. Volume 2. Appendices. Technical report, September 1977-October 1979

    Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

    1980-06-01

    Technology, safety and cost information is given for the conceptual decommissioning of a large (1100MWe) boiling water reactor (BWR) power station. Three approaches to decommissioning, immediate dismantlement, safe storage with deferred dismantlement and entombment, were studied to obtain comparisons between costs, occupational radiation doses, potential dose to the public and other safety impacts. It also shows the sensitivity of decommissioning safety and costs to the power rating of a BWR in the range of 200 to 1100 MWE. This volume contains the appendices

  6. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station. Volume 2. Appendices. Technical report, September 1977-October 1979

    Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

    1980-06-01

    Technology, safety and cost information is given for the conceptual decommissioning of a large (1100MWe) boiling water reactor (BWR) power station. Three approaches to decommissioning, immediate dismantlement, safe storage with deferred dismantlement and entombment, were studied to obtain comparisons between costs, occupational radiation doses, potential dose to the public and other safety impacts. It also shows the sensitivity of decommissioning safety and costs to the power rating of a BWR in the range of 200 to 1100 MWE. This volume contains the appendices.

  7. Nuclear reactor physics

    Stacey, Weston M

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear reactor physics is the core discipline of nuclear engineering. Nuclear reactors now account for a significant portion of the electrical power generated worldwide, and new power reactors with improved fuel cycles are being developed. At the same time, the past few decades have seen an ever-increasing number of industrial, medical, military, and research applications for nuclear reactors. The second edition of this successful comprehensive textbook and reference on basic and advanced nuclear reactor physics has been completely updated, revised and enlarged to include the latest developme

  8. Fundamentals of reactor chemistry

    Akatsu, Eiko

    1981-12-01

    In the Nuclear Engineering School of JAERI, many courses are presented for the people working in and around the nuclear reactors. The curricula of the courses contain also the subject material of chemistry. With reference to the foreign curricula, a plan of educational subject material of chemistry in the Nuclear Engineering School of JAERI was considered, and the fundamental part of reactor chemistry was reviewed in this report. Since the students of the Nuclear Engineering School are not chemists, the knowledge necessary in and around the nuclear reactors was emphasized in order to familiarize the students with the reactor chemistry. The teaching experience of the fundamentals of reactor chemistry is also given. (author)

  9. Mirror hybrid reactor studies

    Bender, D.J.

    1978-01-01

    The hybrid reactor studies are reviewed. The optimization of the point design and work on a reference design are described. The status of the nuclear analysis of fast spectrum blankets, systems studies for fissile fuel producing hybrid reactor, and the mechanical design of the machine are reviewed

  10. Neptunium: a bibliographic reference

    Mosley, R.E.

    1979-06-01

    A comprehensive bibliograhy of the literature on the element neptunium published prior to January 1976 is presented. A short abstract is given for each listed reference, with a few exceptions. The references are divided into sections categorized as General, Man-Made Sources (Reactors), Man-Made Sources (Fuel Reprocessing), Chemistry (Solubility), Chemistry (Compounds), Chemistry (Isotopes), Analyses (Instrumental), Analyses (Chemical), Chemical (Animal), Biological (Effects), Biological (Animal-Metabolism-Retention), Biological (Air Movement), Biological (Human Inhalation), Measurement, and Dosimetry. The bibliography contains author and keyword indexes and was compiled to serve as a quick reference source for neptunium-related work. 184 citations

  11. Low-level radioactive waste from commercial nuclear reactors. Volume 3. Bibliographic abstracts of significant source references. Part 2. Bibliography for treatment, storage, disposal and transportation regulatory constraints

    Jolley, R.L.; Rodgers, B.R.

    1986-05-01

    The overall task of this program was to provide an assessment of currently available technology for treating commercial low-level radioactive waste (LLRW), to initiate development of a methodology for choosing one technology for a given application, and to identify research needed to improve current treatment techniques and decision methodology. The resulting report is issued in four volumes. Volume 3 of this series is a collection of abstracts of most of the reference documents used for this study. Because of the large volume of literature, the abstracts have been printed in two separate parts. Federal, state, and local regulations affect the decision process for selecting technology applications. Regulations may favor a particular technology and may prevent application of others. Volume 3, part 2 presents abstracts of the regulatory constraint documents that relate to all phases of LLRW management (e.g., treatment, packaging, storage, transportation, and disposal).

  12. Nuclear Reactor Physics

    Stacey, Weston M.

    2001-02-01

    An authoritative textbook and up-to-date professional's guide to basic and advanced principles and practices Nuclear reactors now account for a significant portion of the electrical power generated worldwide. At the same time, the past few decades have seen an ever-increasing number of industrial, medical, military, and research applications for nuclear reactors. Nuclear reactor physics is the core discipline of nuclear engineering, and as the first comprehensive textbook and reference on basic and advanced nuclear reactor physics to appear in a quarter century, this book fills a large gap in the professional literature. Nuclear Reactor Physics is a textbook for students new to the subject, for others who need a basic understanding of how nuclear reactors work, as well as for those who are, or wish to become, specialists in nuclear reactor physics and reactor physics computations. It is also a valuable resource for engineers responsible for the operation of nuclear reactors. Dr. Weston Stacey begins with clear presentations of the basic physical principles, nuclear data, and computational methodology needed to understand both the static and dynamic behaviors of nuclear reactors. This is followed by in-depth discussions of advanced concepts, including extensive treatment of neutron transport computational methods. As an aid to comprehension and quick mastery of computational skills, he provides numerous examples illustrating step-by-step procedures for performing the calculations described and chapter-end problems. Nuclear Reactor Physics is a useful textbook and working reference. It is an excellent self-teaching guide for research scientists, engineers, and technicians involved in industrial, research, and military applications of nuclear reactors, as well as government regulators who wish to increase their understanding of nuclear reactors.

  13. Reference core design Mark-I and -II of the experimental, multi-purpose, high-temperature, gas-cooled reactor

    Shindo, Ryuiti; Hirano, Mitsumasa; Aruga, Takeo; Yasukawa, Sigeru

    1977-10-01

    Reactivity worth of the control rods and power distribution in the initial hot-clean core of reference core design Mark-I and -II have been studied. The need for burnable poison was confirmed, because of the limitations in number, diameter and reactivity worth of the control rods due to structures of pressure vessel and fuel element and to safety of the core. While the initial excess reactivity is reduced by use of the burnable poison, the recovery of core reactivity with burnup of the burnable poison requires a complicated withdrawal sequence of the control rods. The radial power gradient in the core is not large, due to orifice control of the coolant helium flow, effectiveness of the reflector in the small core and continuous distribution of burnup in the core by one-batch refuelling scheme. The local peaking factor in unit orifice regions, therefore, is the most important core design. Control of the axial power distribution is necessary to reduce the maximum fuel temperature and the exponential power distribution peaked toward the inlet of the core is most suitable. However, insertion of the control rods from top of the core disturbs the axial power distribution, so this effect must be considered in design of the withdrawal sequence of control rods. Nuclear properties of the core were revealed from results of the study for the initial hot-clean core. (auth.)

  14. Reactor safety in Eastern Europe

    1995-02-01

    The papers presented to the GRS colloquium refer to the cooperative activities for reactor accident analysis and modification of the GRS computer codes for their application to reactors of the Russian design types of WWER or RBMK. Another topic is the safety of RBMK reactors in particular, and the current status of investigations and studies addressing the containment of unit 4 of the Chernobyl reactor station. All papers are indexed separately in report GRS--117. (HP)

  15. Reactor building

    Ebata, Sakae.

    1990-01-01

    At least one valve rack is disposed in a reactor building, on which pipeways to a main closure valve, valves and bypasses of turbines are placed and contained. The valve rack is fixed to the main body of the building or to a base mat. Since the reactor building is designed as class A earthquake-proofness and for maintaining the S 1 function, the valve rack can be fixed to the building main body or to the base mat. With such a constitution, the portions for maintaining the S 1 function are concentrated to the reactor building. As a result, the dispersion of structures of earthquake-proof portion corresponding to the reference earthquake vibration S 1 can be prevented. Accordingly, the conditions for the earthquake-proof design of the turbine building and the turbine/electric generator supporting rack are defined as only the class B earthquake-proof design conditions. In view of the above, the amount of building materials can be saved and the time for construction can be shortened. (I.S.)

  16. Nuclear reactors

    Barre, Bertrand

    2015-10-01

    After some remarks on the nuclear fuel, on the chain reaction control, on fuel loading and unloading, this article proposes descriptions of the design, principles and operations of different types of nuclear reactors as well as comments on their presence and use in different countries: pressurized water reactors (design of the primary and secondary circuits, volume and chemistry control, backup injection circuits), boiling water reactors, heavy water reactors, graphite and boiling water reactors, graphite-gas reactors, fast breeder reactors, and fourth generation reactors (definition, fast breeding). For these last ones, six concepts are presented: sodium-cooled fast reactor, lead-cooled fast reactor, gas-cooled fast reactor, high temperature gas-cooled reactor, supercritical water-cooled reactor, and molten salt reactor

  17. Growth references

    Buuren, S. van

    2007-01-01

    A growth reference describes the variation of an anthropometric measurement within a group of individuals. A reference is a tool for grouping and analyzing data and provides a common basis for comparing populations.1 A well known type of reference is the age-conditional growth diagram. The

  18. Management of nontritium radioactive wastes from fusion power plants

    Kaser, J.D.; Postma, A.K.; Bradley, D.J.

    1976-09-01

    This report identifies nontritium radioactive waste sources for current conceptual fusion reactor designs. Quantities and compositions of the radwaste are estimated for the tokamaks of the University of Wisconsin (UWMAK-I), the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); the Reference Theta Pinch Reactor of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL); and the Minimum Activation Blanket of the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Disposal of large amounts of radioactive waste appears necessary for fusion reactors. Although the curie (Ci) level of the wastes is comparable to that of fission products in fission reactors, the isotopes are less hazardous, and have shorter half-lives. Therefore radioactivity from fusion power production should pose a smaller risk than radioactivity from fission reactors. Radioactive waste sources identified for the five reference plants are summarized. Specific radwaste treatments or systems had to be assumed to estimate these waste quantities. Future fusion power plant conceptual designs should include radwaste treatment system designs so that assumed designs do not have to be used to assess the environmental effects of the radioactive waste

  19. H Reactor

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The H Reactor was the first reactor to be built at Hanford after World War II.It became operational in October of 1949, and represented the fourth nuclear reactor on...

  20. Alternative breeder reactor technologies

    Spinrad, B.I.

    1978-01-01

    The significance of employing breeder reactors to stretch the world resources of nuclear fuels is briefly discussed, and the various types of breeder concepts are described. General descriptions, advantages, and disadvantages of the liquid metal cooled fast breeder, gas cooled fast breeder, molten salt breeder, thermal breeders, and spectral-shift control reactors are presented. Aspects of safeguarding fissile material connected with breeder operation are examined. 31 references

  1. [Reference citation].

    Brkić, Silvija

    2013-01-01

    Scientific and professional papers represent the information basis for scientific research and professional work. References important for the paper should be cited within the text, and listed at the end of the paper. This paper deals with different styles of reference citation. Special emphasis was placed on the Vancouver Style for reference citation in biomedical journals established by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors. It includes original samples for citing various types of articles, both printed and electronic, as well as recommendations related to reference citation in accordance with the methodology and ethics of scientific research and guidelines for preparing manuscripts for publication.

  2. Iris reactor conceptual design

    Carelli, M.D.; Conway, L.E.; Petrovic, B.; Paramonov, D.V.; Galvin, M.; Todreas, N.E.; Lombardi, C.V.; Maldari, F.; Ricotti, M.E.; Cinotti, L.

    2001-01-01

    IRIS (International Reactor Innovative and Secure) is a modular, integral, light water cooled, low-to-medium power (100-350 MWe) reactor which addresses the requirements defined by the US DOE for Generation IV reactors, i.e., proliferation resistance, enhanced safety, improved economics and fuel cycle sustainability. It relies on the proven technology of light water reactors and features innovative engineering, but it does not require new technology development. This paper discusses the current reference IRIS design, which features a 1000 MWt thermal core with proven 5%-enriched uranium oxide fuel and five-year long straight burn fuel cycle, integral reactor vessel housing helical tube steam generators and immersed spool pumps. Other major contributors to the high level of safety and economic attractiveness are the safety by design and optimized maintenance approaches, which allow elimination of some classes of accidents, lower capital cost, long operating cycle, and high capacity factors. (author)

  3. Nuclear reactor design

    2014-01-01

    This book focuses on core design and methods for design and analysis. It is based on advances made in nuclear power utilization and computational methods over the past 40 years, covering core design of boiling water reactors and pressurized water reactors, as well as fast reactors and high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. The objectives of this book are to help graduate and advanced undergraduate students to understand core design and analysis, and to serve as a background reference for engineers actively working in light water reactors. Methodologies for core design and analysis, together with physical descriptions, are emphasized. The book also covers coupled thermal hydraulic core calculations, plant dynamics, and safety analysis, allowing readers to understand core design in relation to plant control and safety.

  4. Mirror reactor surface study

    Hunt, A. L.; Damm, C. C.; Futch, A. H.; Hiskes, J. R.; Meisenheimer, R. G.; Moir, R. W.; Simonen, T. C.; Stallard, B. W.; Taylor, C. E.

    1976-09-01

    A general survey is presented of surface-related phenomena associated with the following mirror reactor elements: plasma first wall, ion sources, neutral beams, director converters, vacuum systems, and plasma diagnostics. A discussion of surface phenomena in possible abnormal reactor operation is included. Several studies which appear to merit immediate attention and which are essential to the development of mirror reactors are abstracted from the list of recommended areas for surface work. The appendix contains a discussion of the fundamentals of particle/surface interactions. The interactions surveyed are backscattering, thermal desorption, sputtering, diffusion, particle ranges in solids, and surface spectroscopic methods. A bibliography lists references in a number of categories pertinent to mirror reactors. Several complete published and unpublished reports on surface aspects of current mirror plasma experiments and reactor developments are also included.

  5. Mirror reactor surface study

    Hunt, A.L.; Damm, C.C.; Futch, A.H.; Hiskes, J.R.; Meisenheimer, R.G.; Moir, R.W.; Simonen, T.C.; Stallard, B.W.; Taylor, C.E.

    1976-01-01

    A general survey is presented of surface-related phenomena associated with the following mirror reactor elements: plasma first wall, ion sources, neutral beams, director converters, vacuum systems, and plasma diagnostics. A discussion of surface phenomena in possible abnormal reactor operation is included. Several studies which appear to merit immediate attention and which are essential to the development of mirror reactors are abstracted from the list of recommended areas for surface work. The appendix contains a discussion of the fundamentals of particle/surface interactions. The interactions surveyed are backscattering, thermal desorption, sputtering, diffusion, particle ranges in solids, and surface spectroscopic methods. A bibliography lists references in a number of categories pertinent to mirror reactors. Several complete published and unpublished reports on surface aspects of current mirror plasma experiments and reactor developments are also included

  6. Knowledge management in fast reactors

    Kuriakose, K.K.; Satya Murty, S.A.V.; Swaminathan, P.; Raj, Baldev

    2010-01-01

    This paper highlights the work that is being carried out in Knowledge Management of Fast Reactors at Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR) including a few examples of how the knowledge acquired because of various incidents in the initial years has been utilized for the successful operation of Fast Breeder Test Reactor. It also briefly refers to the features of the IAEA initiative on the preservation of Knowledge in the area of Fast Reactors in the form of 'Fast Reactor Knowledge Organization System' (FR-KOS), which is based on a taxonomy for storage and mining of Fast Reactor Knowledge. (author)

  7. Inherently safe reactors

    Maartensson, Anders

    1992-01-01

    A rethinking of nuclear reactor safety has created proposals for new designs based on inherent and passive safety principles. Diverging interpretations of these concepts can be found. This article reviews the key features of proposed advanced power reactors. An evaluation is made of the degree of inherent safety for four different designs: the AP-600, the PIUS, the MHTGR and the PRISM. The inherent hazards of today's most common reactor principles are used as reference for the evaluation. It is concluded that claims for the new designs being inherently, naturally or passively safe are not substantiated by experience. (author)

  8. Elmo Bumpy Torus Reactor

    McAlees, D.G.; Uckan, N.A.; Lidsky, L.M.

    1976-01-01

    In the Elmo Bumpy Torus Reactor (EBTR) study the feasibility of achieving a fusion power plant based on the EBT confinement concept was evaluated. If the present understanding of the physics can be extrapolated to reactor scale devices the reactor could operate at high beta, high power density, and at steady state. The high aspect ratio of the device eases the accessibility, structural design and remote maintenance problems which are common to low aspect ratio machines. A version of the EBTR reference design described here could be constructed with only minor extrapolations in available technology

  9. Reference Assessment

    Bivens-Tatum, Wayne

    2006-01-01

    This article presents interesting articles that explore several different areas of reference assessment, including practical case studies and theoretical articles that address a range of issues such as librarian behavior, patron satisfaction, virtual reference, or evaluation design. They include: (1) "Evaluating the Quality of a Chat Service"…

  10. Fusion-fission hybrid reactors

    Greenspan, E.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter discusses the range of characteristics attainable from hybrid reactor blankets; blanket design considerations; hybrid reactor designs; alternative fuel hybrid reactors; multi-purpose hybrid reactors; and hybrid reactors and the energy economy. Hybrid reactors are driven by a fusion neutron source and include fertile and/or fissile material. The fusion component provides a copious source of fusion neutrons which interact with a subcritical fission component located adjacent to the plasma or pellet chamber. Fissile fuel and/or energy are the main products of hybrid reactors. Topics include high F/M blankets, the fissile (and tritium) breeding ratio, effects of composition on blanket properties, geometrical considerations, power density and first wall loading, variations of blanket properties with irradiation, thermal-hydraulic and mechanical design considerations, safety considerations, tokamak hybrid reactors, tandem-mirror hybrid reactors, inertial confinement hybrid reactors, fusion neutron sources, fissile-fuel and energy production ability, simultaneous production of combustible and fissile fuels, fusion reactors for waste transmutation and fissile breeding, nuclear pumped laser hybrid reactors, Hybrid Fuel Factories (HFFs), and scenarios for hybrid contribution. The appendix offers hybrid reactor fundamentals. Numerous references are provided

  11. Recent references

    Ramavataram, S.

    1991-01-01

    In support of a continuing program of systematic evaluation of nuclear structure data, the National Nuclear Data Center maintains a complete computer file of references to the nuclear physics literature. Each reference is tagged by a keyword string, which indicates the kinds of data contained in the article. This master file of Nuclear Structure References (NSR) contains complete keyword indexes to literature published since 1969, with partial indexing of older references. Any reader who finds errors in the keyword descriptions is urged to report them to the National Nuclear Data Center so that the master NSR file can be corrected. In 1966, the first collection of Recent References was published as a separate issue of Nuclear Data Sheets. Every four months since 1970, a similar indexed bibliography to new nuclear experiments has been prepared from additions to the NSR file and published. Beginning in 1978, Recent References was cumulated annually, with the third issue completely superseding the two issues previously published during a given year. Due to publication policy changes, cumulation of Recent Reference was discontinued in 1986. The volume and issue number of all the cumulative issues published to date are given. NNDC will continue to respond to individual requests for special bibliographies on nuclear physics topics, in addition to those easily obtained from Recent References. If the required information is available from the keyword string, a reference list can be prepared automatically from the computer files. This service can be provided on request, in exchange for the timely communication of new nuclear physics results (e.g., preprints). A current copy of the NSR file may also be obtained in a standard format on magnetic tape from NNDC. Requests for special searches of the NSR file may also be directed to the National Nuclear Data Center

  12. Survey of fusion reactor technology

    Chung, M.K.; Kang, H.D.; Cho, S.W.; Kim, Y.C.; Kim, T.S.; Whang, C.K.; Oh, Y.K.

    1982-01-01

    Design parameters of the Tokamak are as follows: 51 cm of major radius, 14.5 cm minor radius, 2.5 T toroidal magnetic field, 5 x 10 13 /cm 3 electron density, 800 eV electron temperature, 110 KA plasma current and 2 ms energy confinement time. And the Tokamak will have an ironcore transformer with no return legs for ohmic heating. Toroidal field configurations, ripples and pure tension D shape of toroidal field coils were computer-calculated and the rough calculation of poloidal field configuration was carried out manually and then a detailed calculation is underway by utilizing POISSON code. The power supply for toroidal field coils was designed to be enable to store 4 MJ energy by a capacitor bank and the mechanical parts such as a vacuum chamber, observation ports and the supporting mechanism etc. were designed with the aid of a mock-up of actual scale to realize maximum conveniency for operation and maintenance and proper arrangement and dimensions of the constituent parts. The detailed designs of various plasma diagnostics systems were also done. They are magnetic, microwave, X-ray, Laser, electrostatic systems of which the observed data will be analyzed automatically by a CAMAC data acquistion and analysis system in conjunction with Tokamak discharge. Apart from the design works of a compact Tokamak and related facilities, a proto-type theta pinch device was constructed and applied to the turbulent heating experiments. Also, accelerating column and high tension (200 KDC, 100 mA) for intense D-T neutron generator were constructed and now they are under tests. (Author)

  13. Heat exchanges during the re-flooding of a water reactor core - within the framework of the 'reference accident'; Echanges thermiques lors du renoyage d'un coeur de reacteur a eau - dans le cadre de 'l'accident de reference'

    Andreoni, Daniel

    1975-11-28

    After a brief presentation of reported studies made in different countries and regarding the so-called 'reference accident', this research thesis reports the study of reactor re-flooding when the reactor is completely dried and heating elements have reached a temperature between 300 and 900 C, with a constant water flow rate entering the test section, with a constant dissipated electrical power, and by using very simple geometries. After a first part addressing the experimental study, the author reports the development of conduction calculation codes used to compute the flow extracted by the two-phase flow, present the thermal-hydraulic code used to compute local values and to study the correlation of the upstream area exchange coefficient. The author finally reports an analysis of the different existing models and the study of a re-flooding model [French] La presente etude est consacree a l'un des aspects de la surete des reacteurs a eau sous pression, et plus precisement a l'accident tres important qui consiste en une perte de fluide caloporteur (Loss of Coolant Accident - 'LOCA'). Le but de l'etude est de fournir des renseignements necessaires a l'interpretation des experiences effectuees sur des grappes, de donner une correlation de coefficient d'echange dans la zone aval, et de donner aussi un modele de progression du front de trempe pour les analyses de surete. Une etude bibliographique preliminaire nous a permis de faire le point sur les experiences entreprises concernant le refroidissement de secours. Ensuite, les chapitres suivants seront decrits: 1) Le chapitre II, consacre a l'etude experimentale (boucle, sections d'essais, resultats globaux). 2) Le chapitre III ou seront presentes les codes de calcul de conduction, necessaires au calcul du flux extrait par le melange diphasique, le code de thermohydraulique necessaire au calcul des grandeurs locales et l'etude de la correlation du coefficient d'echange de la zone aval. 3) Enfin le chapitre IV ou, apres

  14. Safety of nuclear power reactors

    MacPherson, H.G.

    1982-01-01

    Safety is the major public issue to be resolved or accommodated if nuclear power is to have a future. Probabilistic Risk Analysis (PRA) of accidental releases of low-level radiation, the spread and activity of radiation in populated areas, and the impacts on public health from exposure evolved from the earlier Rasmussen Reactor Safety Study. Applications of the PRA technique have identified design peculiarities in specific reactors, thus increasing reactor safety and establishing a quide for evaluating reactor regulations. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission and reactor vendors must share with utilities the responsibility for reactor safety in the US and for providing reasonable assurance to the public. This entails persuasive public education and information that with safety a top priority, changes now being made in light water reactor hardware and operations will be adequate. 17 references, 2 figures, 2 tables

  15. Reactor Physics

    Ait Abderrahim, A.

    2002-01-01

    SCK-CEN's Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutron and gamma calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation and control, reactor code benchmarking and reactor safety calculations. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 materials testing reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2001 are summarised

  16. Reactor Physics

    Ait Abderrahim, A

    2001-04-01

    The Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis of reactor fuel. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2000 are summarised.

  17. Reactor Physics

    Ait Abderrahim, A

    2002-04-01

    SCK-CEN's Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutron and gamma calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation and control, reactor code benchmarking and reactor safety calculations. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 materials testing reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2001 are summarised.

  18. Reactor Physics

    Ait Abderrahim, A.

    2001-01-01

    The Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis of reactor fuel. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2000 are summarised

  19. Reactor operation

    Shaw, J

    2013-01-01

    Reactor Operation covers the theoretical aspects and design information of nuclear reactors. This book is composed of nine chapters that also consider their control, calibration, and experimentation.The opening chapters present the general problems of reactor operation and the principles of reactor control and operation. The succeeding chapters deal with the instrumentation, start-up, pre-commissioning, and physical experiments of nuclear reactors. The remaining chapters are devoted to the control rod calibrations and temperature coefficient measurements in the reactor. These chapters also exp

  20. Reactor safeguards

    Russell, Charles R

    1962-01-01

    Reactor Safeguards provides information for all who are interested in the subject of reactor safeguards. Much of the material is descriptive although some sections are written for the engineer or physicist directly concerned with hazards analysis or site selection problems. The book opens with an introductory chapter on radiation hazards, the construction of nuclear reactors, safety issues, and the operation of nuclear reactors. This is followed by separate chapters that discuss radioactive materials, reactor kinetics, control and safety systems, containment, safety features for water reactor

  1. Nuclear reactor engineering: Reactor systems engineering. Fourth edition, Volume Two

    Glasstone, S.; Sesonske, A.

    1994-01-01

    This new edition of this classic reference combines broad yet in-depth coverage of nuclear engineering principles with practical descriptions of their application in the design and operation of nuclear power plants. Extensively updated, the fourth edition includes new materials on reactor safety and risk analysis, regulation, fuel management, waste management and operational aspects of nuclear power. This volume contains the following: the systems concept, design decisions, and information tools; energy transport; reactor fuel management and energy cost considerations; environmental effects of nuclear power and waste management; nuclear reactor safety and regulation; power reactor systems; plant operations; and advanced plants and the future

  2. Reactor decommissioning

    Lawton, H.

    1984-01-01

    A pioneering project on the decommissioning of the Windscale Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor, by the UKAEA, is described. Reactor data; policy; waste management; remote handling equipment; development; and recording and timescales, are all briefly discussed. (U.K.)

  3. RA Reactor

    1978-02-01

    In addition to basic characteristics of the RA reactor, organizational scheme and financial incentives, this document covers describes the state of the reactor components after 18 years of operation, problems concerned with obtaining the licence for operation with 80% fuel, problems of spent fuel storage in the storage pool of the reactor building and the need for renewal of reactor equipment, first of all instrumentation [sr

  4. Multiregion reactors

    Moura Neto, C. de; Nair, R.P.K.

    1979-08-01

    The study of reflected reactors can be done employing the multigroup diffusion method. The neutron conservation equations, inside the intervals, can be written by fluxes and group constants. A reflected reactor (one and two groups) for a slab geometry is studied, aplying the continuity of flux and current in the interface. At the end, the appropriated solutions for a infinite cylindrical reactor and for a spherical reactor are presented. (Author) [pt

  5. Nuclear reactor

    Hattori, Sadao; Sato, Morihiko.

    1994-01-01

    Liquid metals such as liquid metal sodium are filled in a reactor container as primary coolants. A plurality of reactor core containers are disposed in a row in the circumferential direction along with the inner circumferential wall of the reactor container. One or a plurality of intermediate coolers are disposed at the inside of an annular row of the reactor core containers. A reactor core constituted with fuel rods and control rods (module reactor core) is contained at the inside of each of the reactor core containers. Each of the intermediate coolers comprises a cylindrical intermediate cooling vessels. The intermediate cooling vessel comprises an intermediate heat exchanger for heat exchange of primary coolants and secondary coolants and recycling pumps for compulsorily recycling primary coolants at the inside thereof. Since a plurality of reactor core containers are thus assembled, a great reactor power can be attained. Further, the module reactor core contained in one reactor core vessel may be small sized, to facilitate the control for the reactor core operation. (I.N.)

  6. Reactor safety in Eastern Europe. Proceedings

    1995-02-01

    The papers presented to the GRS colloquium refer to the cooperative activities for reactor accident analysis and modification of the GRS computer codes for their application to reactors of the Russian design types of WWER or RBMK. Another topic is the safety of RBMK reactors in particular, and the current status of investigations and studies addressing the containment of unit 4 of the Chernobyl reactor station. (HP) [de

  7. Nuclear power reactors

    1982-11-01

    After an introduction and general explanation of nuclear power the following reactor types are described: magnox thermal reactor; advanced gas-cooled reactor (AGR); pressurised water reactor (PWR); fast reactors (sodium cooled); boiling water reactor (BWR); CANDU thermal reactor; steam generating heavy water reactor (SGHWR); high temperature reactor (HTR); Leningrad (RMBK) type water-cooled graphite moderated reactor. (U.K.)

  8. Research reactors

    Merchie, Francois

    2015-10-01

    This article proposes an overview of research reactors, i.e. nuclear reactors of less than 100 MW. Generally, these reactors are used as neutron generators for basic research in matter sciences and for technological research as a support to power reactors. The author proposes an overview of the general design of research reactors in terms of core size, of number of fissions, of neutron flow, of neutron space distribution. He outlines that this design is a compromise between a compact enough core, a sufficient experiment volume, and high enough power densities without affecting neutron performance or its experimental use. The author evokes the safety framework (same regulations as for power reactors, more constraining measures after Fukushima, international bodies). He presents the main characteristics and operation of the two families which represent almost all research reactors; firstly, heavy water reactors (photos, drawings and figures illustrate different examples); and secondly light water moderated and cooled reactors with a distinction between open core pool reactors like Melusine and Triton, pool reactors with containment, experimental fast breeder reactors (Rapsodie, the Russian BOR 60, the Chinese CEFR). The author describes the main uses of research reactors: basic research, applied and technological research, safety tests, production of radio-isotopes for medicine and industry, analysis of elements present under the form of traces at very low concentrations, non destructive testing, doping of silicon mono-crystalline ingots. The author then discusses the relationship between research reactors and non proliferation, and finally evokes perspectives (decrease of the number of research reactors in the world, the Jules Horowitz project)

  9. Reactor physics and reactor computations

    Ronen, Y.; Elias, E.

    1994-01-01

    Mathematical methods and computer calculations for nuclear and thermonuclear reactor kinetics, reactor physics, neutron transport theory, core lattice parameters, waste treatment by transmutation, breeding, nuclear and thermonuclear fuels are the main interests of the conference

  10. An overview of REARA reference design

    Menezes, A.

    1996-01-01

    In an effort to keep fast reactors as an option for an eventual future utilization in Brazil, the Advanced Studies Institute (IEAv) is coordinating a research project (called REARA, from the Portuguese REAtores RApidos (Fast Reactors)) which aims to establish a basic know-how in important aspects of fast reactor technology. A reference design for the primary circuit of a 60 MWt experimental fast reactor has been completed. Fuel pin dimensions and other data were taken mostly from PRISM and EBR-II and were used for calculations which lead to a general core configuration. The reference design is presently being used for testing our calculational tools, for checking different methodologies for core calculations, etc. The REARA reference design is presented, with emphasis in the main results and also in the contribution given by the project team in areas such as neutronics, thermohydraulics, etc. (author). 6 refs, 1 fig., 7 tabs

  11. Nuclear reactors

    Pearson, K.G.

    1977-01-01

    Reference is made to auxiliary means of cooling the nuclear fuel clusters used in light or heavy water cooled nuclear reactors. One method is to provide one or more spray cooling tubes. From holes in the side walls of those tubes coolant water may be sprayed laterally into the cluster against the rods. The flow of main coolant may thus be supplemented or even replaced by the auxiliary coolant. A difficulty, however, is that only those fuel rods close to a spray cooling tube can readily be reached by the auxiliary coolant. In the arrangement described, where the fuel rods are spaced apart by transverse grids, at least one of the interspaces between the grids is provided with an axially extending auxiliary coolant conduit having lateral holes through which an auxiliary coolant is sprayed into the cluster. A deflector is provided that extends from a transverse grid into a position in front of the holes and deflects auxiliary coolant on to parts of the fuel rods otherwise inaccessible to the auxiliary coolant. The construction of the deflector is described. (U.K.)

  12. Research reactors

    Kowarski, L.

    1955-01-01

    It brings together the techniques data which are involved in the discussion about the utility for a research institute to acquire an atomic reactor for research purposes. This type of decision are often taken by non-specialist people who can need a brief presentation of a research reactor and its possibilities in term of research before asking advises to experts. In a first part, it draws up a list of the different research programs which can be studied by getting a research reactor. First of all is the reactor behaviour and kinetics studies (reproducibility factor, exploration of neutron density, effect of reactor structure, effect of material irradiation...). Physical studies includes study of the behaviour of the control system, studies of neutron resonance phenomena and study of the fission process for example. Chemical studies involves the study of manipulation and control of hot material, characterisation of nuclear species produced in the reactor and chemical effects of irradiation on chemical properties and reactions. Biology and medicine research involves studies of irradiation on man and animals, genetics research, food or medical tools sterilization and neutron beams effect on tumour for example. A large number of other subjects can be studied in a reactor research as reactor construction material research, fabrication of radioactive sources for radiographic techniques or applied research as in agriculture or electronic. The second part discussed the technological considerations when choosing the reactor type. The technological factors, which are considered for its choice, are the power of the reactor, the nature of the fuel which is used, the type of moderator (water, heavy water, graphite or BeO) and the reflector, the type of coolants, the protection shield and the control systems. In the third part, it described the characteristics (place of installation, type of combustible and comments) and performance (power, neutron flux ) of already existing

  13. Space nuclear reactor safety

    Damon, D.; Temme, M.; Brown, N.

    1990-01-01

    Definition of safety requirements and design features of the SP-100 space reactor power system has been guided by a mission risk analysis. The analysis quantifies risk from accidental radiological consequences for a reference mission. Results show that the radiological risk from a space reactor can be made very low. The total mission risk from radiological consequences for a shuttle-launched, earth orbit SP-100 mission is estimated to be 0.05 Person-REM (expected values) based on a 1 mREM/yr de Minimus dose. Results are given for each mission phase. The safety benefits of specific design features are evaluated through risk sensitivity analyses

  14. Netherlands Reactor Centre

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    Briefly reviews the last year's work of the twenty year old Netherlands Reactor Centre (RCN) in the fields of reactor safety, fissile material, nuclear fission, non-nuclear energy systems and overseas co-operation. The annual report thus summarised is the last one to appear under the name of RCN. The terms of reference of the organisation having been broadened to include research into energy supply in general, it is to be known in future as the Netherlands Energy Research Centre (ECN). (D.J.B.)

  15. Areva - 2016 Reference document

    2017-01-01

    Areva supplies high added-value products and services to support the operation of the global nuclear fleet. The company is present throughout the entire nuclear cycle, from uranium mining to used fuel recycling, including nuclear reactor design and operating services. Areva is recognized by utilities around the world for its expertise, its skills in cutting-edge technologies and its dedication to the highest level of safety. Areva's 36,000 employees are helping build tomorrow's energy model: supplying ever safer, cleaner and more economical energy to the greatest number of people. This Reference Document contains information on Areva's objectives, prospects and development strategies. It contains estimates of the markets, market shares and competitive position of Areva

  16. Reactor container

    Naruse, Yoshihiro.

    1990-01-01

    The thickness of steel shell plates in a reactor container embedded in sand cussions is monitored to recognize the corrosion of the steel shell plates. That is, the reactor pressure vessel is contained in a reactor container shell and the sand cussions are disposed on the lower outside of the reactor container shell to elastically support the shell. A pit is disposed at a position opposing to the sand cussions for measuring the thickness of the reactor container shell plates. The pit is usually closed by a closing member. In the reactor container thus constituted, the closing member can be removed upon periodical inspection to measure the thickness of the shell plates. Accordingly, the corrosion of the steel shell plates can be recognized by the change of the plate thickness. (I.S.)

  17. Hybrid reactors

    Moir, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    The rationale for hybrid fusion-fission reactors is the production of fissile fuel for fission reactors. A new class of reactor, the fission-suppressed hybrid promises unusually good safety features as well as the ability to support 25 light-water reactors of the same nuclear power rating, or even more high-conversion-ratio reactors such as the heavy-water type. One 4000-MW nuclear hybrid can produce 7200 kg of 233 U per year. To obtain good economics, injector efficiency times plasma gain (eta/sub i/Q) should be greater than 2, the wall load should be greater than 1 MW.m -2 , and the hybrid should cost less than 6 times the cost of a light-water reactor. Introduction rates for the fission-suppressed hybrid are usually rapid

  18. Nuclear reactor

    Garabedian, G.

    1988-01-01

    A liquid reactor is described comprising: (a) a reactor vessel having a core; (b) one or more satellite tanks; (c) pump means in the satellite tank; (d) heat exchanger means in the satellite tank; (e) an upper liquid metal conduit extending between the reactor vessel and the satellite tank; (f) a lower liquid metal duct extending between the reactor vessel and satellite tanks the upper liquid metal conduit and the lower liquid metal duct being arranged to permit free circulation of liquid metal between the reactor vessel core and the satellite tank by convective flow of liquid metal; (g) a separate sealed common containment vessel around the reactor vessel, conduits and satellite tanks; (h) the satellite tank having space for a volume of liquid metal that is sufficient to dampen temperature transients resulting from abnormal operating conditions

  19. Nuclear reactor

    Batheja, P.; Huber, R.; Rau, P.

    1985-01-01

    Particularly for nuclear reactors of small output, the reactor pressure vessel contains at least two heat exchangers, which have coolant flowing through them in a circuit through the reactor core. The circuit of at least one heat exchanger is controlled by a slide valve, so that even for low drive forces, particularly in natural circulation, the required even loading of the heat exchanger is possible. (orig./HP) [de

  20. The nuclear reactor systems

    Bacher, P.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the various nuclear reactor systems, starting with the Generation II, then the present development of the Generation III and the stakes and challenges of the future Generation IV. Some have found appropriate to oppose reactor systems or generations one to another, especially by minimizing the enhancements of generation III compared to generation II or by expecting the earth from generation IV (meaning that generation III is already obsolete). In the first part of the document (chapter 2), some keys are given to the reader to develop its proper opinion. Chapter 3 describes more precisely the various reactor systems and generations. Chapter 4 discusses the large industrial manoeuvres around the generation III, and the last chapter gives some economical references, taking into account, for the various means of power generation, the impediments linked to climate protection

  1. Reactor lattice codes

    Kulikowska, T.

    1999-01-01

    The present lecture has a main goal to show how the transport lattice calculations are realised in a standard computer code. This is illustrated on the example of the WIMSD code, belonging to the most popular tools for reactor calculations. Most of the approaches discussed here can be easily modified to any other lattice code. The description of the code assumes the basic knowledge of reactor lattice, on the level given in the lecture on 'Reactor lattice transport calculations'. For more advanced explanation of the WIMSD code the reader is directed to the detailed descriptions of the code cited in References. The discussion of the methods and models included in the code is followed by the generally used homogenisation procedure and several numerical examples of discrepancies in calculated multiplication factors based on different sources of library data. (author)

  2. The fast breeder reactor

    Keck, O.

    1984-01-01

    Nowadays the fast-breeder reactor is a negative symbol of advanced technology which is getting out of control and, due to its complexity, is incomprehensible for politicians and therefore by-passes the established order. The author lists the most important decisions over state aid to the fast-breeder-reactors up until the mid-seventies and uses documents from the appropriate advisory bodies as reference. He was also aided by interviews with those directly involved with the project. The empirical facts forces us to discard our traditional view of the relationship between state and industry with regard to advanced technology. The author explains that it is impossible to find any economic value in the fast-breeder reactor. The insight gained through this project allows him to draw conclusions which apply to all aspects of state aid to advanced technology. (orig.) [de

  3. Heterogeneous reactors

    Moura Neto, C. de; Nair, R.P.K.

    1979-08-01

    The microscopic study of a cell is meant for the determination of the infinite multiplication factor of the cell, which is given by the four factor formula: K(infinite) = n(epsilon)pf. The analysis of an homogeneous reactor is similar to that of an heterogeneous reactor, but each factor of the four factor formula can not be calculated by the formulas developed in the case of an homogeneous reactor. A great number of methods was developed for the calculation of heterogeneous reactors and some of them are discussed. (Author) [pt

  4. Decommissioning of Swedish nuclear power reactors. Technology and costs

    1994-06-01

    The main topics discussed are planning, technology and costs of decommissioning nuclear power reactors. Oskarshamn-3 (BWR) and Ringhals-4 (PWR) have been used as reference reactors. 29 refs, figs, tabs

  5. Reactor noise analysis of experimental fast reactor 'JOYO'

    Ohtani, Hideji; Yamamoto, Hisashi

    1980-01-01

    As a part of dynamics tests in experimental fast reactor ''JOYO'', reactor noise tests were carried out. The reactor noise analysis techniques are effective for study of plant characteristics by determining fluctuations of process signals (neutron signal, reactor inlet temperature signals, etc.), which are able to be measured without disturbances for reactor operations. The aims of reactor noise tests were to confirm that no unstable phenomenon exists in ''JOYO'' and to gain initial data of the plant for reference of the future data. Data for the reactor noise tests treated in this paper were obtained at 50 MW power level. Fluctuations of process signals were amplified and recorded on analogue tapes. The analysis was performed using noise code (NOISA) of digital computer, with which statistical values of ASPD (auto power spectral density), CPSD (cross power spectral density), and CF (coherence function) were calculated. The primary points of the results are as follows. 1. RMS value of neutron signal at 50 MW power level is about 0.03 MW. This neutron fluctuation is not disturbing reactor operations. 2. The fluctuations of A loop reactor inlet temperatures (T sub(AI)) are larger than the fluctuations of B loop reactor inlet temperature (T sub(BI)). For this reason, the major driving force of neutron fluctuations seems to be the fluctuations of T sub(AI). 3. Core and blanket subassemblies can be divided into two halves (A and B region), with respect to the spacial motion of temperature in the reactor core. A or B region means the region in which sodium temperature fluctuations in subassembly are significantly affected by T sub(AI) or T sub(BI), respectively. This phenomenon seems to be due to the lack of mixing of A and B loop sodium in lower plenum of reactor vessel. (author)

  6. Nuclear reactor engineering: Reactor design basics. Fourth edition, Volume One

    Glasstone, S.; Sesonske, A.

    1994-01-01

    This new edition of this classic reference combines broad yet in-depth coverage of nuclear engineering principles with practical descriptions of their application in design and operation of nuclear power plants. Extensively updated, the fourth edition includes new material on reactor safety and risk analysis, regulation, fuel management, waste management, and operational aspects of nuclear power. This volume contains the following: energy from nuclear fission; nuclear reactions and radiations; neutron transport; nuclear design basics; nuclear reactor kinetics and control; radiation protection and shielding; and reactor materials

  7. Nuclear reactor coolant channels

    Macbeth, R.V.

    1978-01-01

    Reference is made to coolant channels for pressurised water and boiling water reactors and the arrangement described aims to improve heat transfer between the fuel rods and the coolant. Baffle means extending axially within the channel are provided and disposed relative to the fuel rods so as to restrict flow oscillations occurring within the coolant from being propagated transversely to the axis of the channel. (UK)

  8. Materials for nuclear reactors

    Banerjee, S.; Kamath, H.S.

    2005-01-01

    The improved performance of present generation nuclear reactors and the realization of advanced reactor concepts, both, require development of better materials. Physical metallurgy/materials science principles which have been exploited in meeting the exacting requirements of nuclear reactor materials (fuels and structural materials), are outlined citing a few specific examples. While the incentive for improvement of traditional fuels (e.g., UO 2 fuel) is primarily for increasing the average core burn up, the development of advanced fuels (e.g., MOX, mixed carbide, nitride, silicide and dispersion fuels) are directed towards better utilization of fissile and fertile inventories through adaptation of innovative fuel cycles. As the burn up of UO 2 fuel reaches higher levels, a more detailed and quantitative understanding of the phenomena such as fission gas release, fuel restructuring induced by radiation and thermal gradients and pellet-clad interaction is being achieved. Development of zirconium based alloys for both cladding and pressure tube applications is discussed with reference to their physical metallurgy, fabrication techniques and in-reactor degradation mechanisms. The issue of radiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) is covered drawing a comparison between the western and eastern specifications of RPV steels. The search for new materials which can stand higher rates of atomic displacement due to radiation has led to the development of swelling resistant austenitic and ferritic stainless steels for fast reactor applications as exemplified by the development of the D-9 steel for Indian fast breeder reactor. The presentation will conclude by listing various materials related phenomena, which have a strong bearing on the successful development of future nuclear energy systems. (author)

  9. Slurry reactors

    Kuerten, H; Zehner, P [BASF A.G., Ludwigshafen am Rhein (Germany, F.R.)

    1979-08-01

    Slurry reactors are designed on the basis of empirical data and model investigations. It is as yet not possible to calculate the flow behavior of such reactors. The swarm of gas bubbles and cluster formations of solid particles and their interaction in industrial reactors are not known. These effects control to a large extent the gas hold-up, the gas-liquid interface and, similarly as in bubble columns, the back-mixing of liquids and solids. These hydrodynamic problems are illustrated in slurry reactors which constructionally may be bubble columns, stirred tanks or jet loop reactors. The expected effects are predicted by means of tests with model systems modified to represent the conditions in industrial hydrogenation reactors. In his book 'Mass Transfer in Heterogeneous Catalysis' (1970) Satterfield complained of the lack of knowledge about the design of slurry reactors and hence of the impossible task of the engineer who has to design a plant according to accepted rules. There have been no fundamental changes since then. This paper presents the problems facing the engineer in designing slurry reactors, and shows new development trends.

  10. Reactor safety

    Butz, H.P.; Heuser, F.W.; May, H.

    1985-01-01

    The paper comprises an introduction into nuclear physics bases, the safety concept generally speaking, safety devices of pwr type reactors, accident analysis, external influences, probabilistic safety assessment and risk studies. It further describes operational experience, licensing procedures under the Atomic Energy Law, research in reactor safety and the nuclear fuel cycle. (DG) [de

  11. Nuclear reactor

    Mysels, K.J.; Shenoy, A.S.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear reactor is described in which the core consists of a number of fuel regions through each of which regulated coolant flows. The coolant from neighbouring fuel regions is combined in a manner which results in an averaging of the coolant temperature at the outlet of the core. By this method the presence of hot streaks in the reactor is reduced. (UK)

  12. Reactor container

    Kato, Masami; Nishio, Masahide.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent the rupture of the dry well even when the melted reactor core drops into a reactor pedestal cavity. Constitution: In a reactor container in which a dry well disposed above the reactor pedestal cavity for containing the reactor pressure vessel and a torus type suppression chamber for containing pressure suppression water are connected with each other, the pedestal cavity and the suppression chamber are disposed such that the flow level of the pedestal cavity is lower than the level of the pressure suppression water. Further, a pressure suppression water introduction pipeway for introducing the pressure suppression water into the reactor pedestal cavity is disposed by way of an ON-OFF valve. In case if the melted reactor core should fall into the pedestal cavity, the ON-OFF valve for the pressure suppression water introduction pipeway is opened to introduce the pressure suppression water in the suppression chamber into the pedestal cavity to cool the melted reactor core. (Ikeda, J.)

  13. RA Reactor

    1989-01-01

    This chapter includes the following: General description of the RA reactor, organization of work, responsibilities of leadership and operators team, regulations concerning operation and behaviour in the reactor building, regulations for performing experiments, regulations and instructions for inserting samples into experimental channels [sr

  14. Reactor physics

    Ait Abderrahim, H.

    1998-01-01

    Progress in research on reactor physics in 1997 at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK/CEN is described. Activities in the following four domains are discussed: core physics, ex-core neutron transport, experiments in Materials Testing Reactors, international benchmarks

  15. The resonance absorption controlled reactor

    Caro, R.

    1977-01-01

    In this report a new method of reactor control based on tho isotopic moderator composition variation is studied, taking as a reference a D 2 O/H 2 O system. With this method an spectacular increment in the burn-up degree and a sensible reduction of the conventional control system is obtained. An important part of this work has been the detailed analysis of the parameters affecting the neutron spectrum in a heterogeneous reactor. (Author) 50 refs

  16. The resonance absorption controlled reactor

    Caro, R

    1977-07-01

    In this report a new method of reactor control based on tho isotopic moderator composition variation is studied, taking as a reference a D{sub 2}O/H{sub 2}O system. With this method an spectacular increment in the burn-up degree and a sensible reduction of the conventional control system is obtained. An important part of this work has been the detailed analysis of the parameters affecting the neutron spectrum in a heterogeneous reactor. (Author) 50 refs.

  17. Reactor pressure vessel status report

    Strosnider, J.; Wichman, K.; Elliot, B.

    1994-12-01

    This report gives a brief description of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), followed by a discussion of the radiation embrittlement of RPV beltline materials and the two indicators for measuring embrittlement, the end-of-license (EOL) reference temperature and the EOL upper-shelf energy. It also summarizes the GL 92-01 effort and presents, for all 37 boiling water reactor plants and 74 pressurized water reactor plants in the United States, the current status of compliance with regulatory requirements related to ensuring RPV integrity. The staff has evaluated the material data needed to predict neutron embrittlement of the reactor vessel beltline materials. These data will be stored in a computer database entitled the reactor vessel integrity database (RVID). This database will be updated annually to reflect the changes made by the licensees in future submittals and will be used by the NRC staff to assess the issues related to vessel structural integrity

  18. Reactor core

    Azekura, Kazuo; Kurihara, Kunitoshi.

    1992-01-01

    In a BWR type reactor, a great number of pipes (spectral shift pipes) are disposed in the reactor core. Moderators having a small moderating cross section (heavy water) are circulated in the spectral shift pipes to suppress the excess reactivity while increasing the conversion ratio at an initial stage of the operation cycle. After the intermediate stage of the operation cycle in which the reactor core reactivity is lowered, reactivity is increased by circulating moderators having a great moderating cross section (light water) to extend the taken up burnup degree. Further, neutron absorbers such as boron are mixed to the moderator in the spectral shift pipe to control the concentration thereof. With such a constitution, control rods and driving mechanisms are no more necessary, to simplify the structure of the reactor core. This can increase the fuel conversion ratio and control great excess reactivity. Accordingly, a nuclear reactor core of high conversion and high burnup degree can be attained. (I.N.)

  19. Reactor container

    Fukazawa, Masanori.

    1991-01-01

    A system for controlling combustible gases, it has been constituted at present such that the combustible gases are controlled by exhausting them to the wet well of a reactor container. In this system, however, there has been a problem, in a reactor container having plenums in addition to the wet well and the dry well, that the combustible gases in such plenums can not be controlled. In view of the above, in the present invention, suction ports or exhaust ports of the combustible gas control system are disposed to the wet well, the dry well and the plenums to control the combustible gases in the reactor container. Since this can control the combustible gases in the entire reactor container, the integrity of the reactor container can be ensured. (T.M.)

  20. Reactor container

    Kojima, Yoshihiro; Hosomi, Kenji; Otonari, Jun-ichiro.

    1997-01-01

    In the present invention, a catalyst for oxidizing hydrogen to be disposed in a reactor container upon rupture of pipelines of a reactor primary coolant system is prevented from deposition of water droplets formed from a reactor container spray to suppress elevation of hydrogen concentration in the reactor container. Namely, a catalytic combustion gas concentration control system comprises a catalyst for oxidizing hydrogen and a support thereof. In addition, there is also disposed a water droplet deposition-preventing means for preventing deposition of water droplets in a reactor pressure vessel on the catalyst. Then, the effect of the catalyst upon catalytic oxidation reaction of hydrogen can be kept high. The local elevation of hydrogen concentration can be prevented even upon occurrence of such a phenomenon that various kinds of mobile forces in the container such as dry well cooling system are lost. (I.S.)

  1. Nuclear reactor

    Tilliette, Z.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a nuclear reactor and especially a high-temperature reactor in which provision is made within a pressure vessel for a main cavity containing the reactor core and a series of vertical cylindrical pods arranged in spaced relation around the main cavity and each adapted to communicate with the cavity through two collector ducts or headers for the primary fluid which flows downwards through the reactor core. Each pod contains two superposed steam-generator and circulator sets disposed in substantially symmetrical relation on each side of the hot primary-fluid header which conveys the primary fluid from the reactor cavity to the pod, the circulators of both sets being mounted respectively at the bottom and top ends of the pod

  2. Radioactive nuclides in nuclear reactors

    Akatsu, Eiko

    1982-12-01

    In the Nuclear Engineering School of JAERI, many courses are presented for the people working in and around nuclear reactors. The curricula of the courses contain also chemical subject materials. With reference to the foreign curricula, a plan of educational subject material of chemistry was considered for students of the school in the previous report (JAERI-M 9827), where the first part of the plan, ''Fundamentals of Reactor Chemistry'', was reviewed. This report is a review of the second part of the plan containing fission products chemistry, actinoids elements chemistry and activated reactor materials chemistry. (author)

  3. Physics of pressurized water reactors

    Gruen, A.

    1980-01-01

    The objective of this lecture is to demonstrate typical problems and solutions encountered in the design and operation of PWR power plants. The examples selected for illustration refer to PWR's of KWU design and to results of KWU design methods. In order to understand the physics of a power reactor it is necessary to have some knowledge of the structure and design of the power plant system of which the reactor is a part. It is therefore assumed that the reader is familiar with the design of the more important components and systems of a PWR, such as fuel assemblies, control assemblies, core lay-out, reactor coolant system, instrumentation. (author)

  4. Reactor surveillance by noise analysis

    Ciftcioglu, Ozer

    1988-01-01

    A real-time noise analysis system is designed for the TRIGA reactor at Istanbul Technical University. By means of the noise techniques, reactor surveillance is performed together with failure diagnosis. The fast data processing is carried out by FFT in real-time so that malfunction or non-stationary operation of the reactor in long term can be identified by comparing the noise power spectra with the corresponding reference patterns while the decision making procedure is accomplished by the method of hypothesis testing. The system being computer based safety instrumentation involves CAMAC in conjunction with the RT-11 (PDP-11) single user dedicated environment. (author)

  5. Reactor building

    Maruyama, Toru; Murata, Ritsuko.

    1996-01-01

    In the present invention, a spent fuel storage pool of a BWR type reactor is formed at an upper portion and enlarged in the size to effectively utilize the space of the building. Namely, a reactor chamber enhouses reactor facilities including a reactor pressure vessel and a reactor container, and further, a spent fuel storage pool is formed thereabove. A second spent fuel storage pool is formed above the auxiliary reactor chamber at the periphery of the reactor chamber. The spent fuel storage pool and the second spent fuel storage pool are disposed in adjacent with each other. A wall between both of them is formed vertically movable. With such a constitution, the storage amount for spent fuels is increased thereby enabling to store the entire spent fuels generated during operation period of the plant. Further, since requirement of the storage for the spent fuels is increased stepwisely during periodical exchange operation, it can be used for other usage during the period when the enlarged portion is not used. (I.S.)

  6. Reactor container

    Shibata, Satoru; Kawashima, Hiroaki

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To optimize the temperature distribution of the reactor container so as to moderate the thermal stress distribution on the reactor wall of LMFBR type reactor. Constitution: A good heat conductor (made of Al or Cu) is appended on the outer side of the reactor container wall from below the liquid level to the lower face of a deck plate. Further, heat insulators are disposed to the outside of the good heat conductor. Furthermore, a gas-cooling duct is circumferentially disposed at the contact portion between the good heat conductor and the deck plate around the reactor container. This enables to flow the cold heat from the liquid metal rapidly through the good heat conductor to the cooling duct and allows to maintain the temperature distribution on the reactor wall substantially linear even with the abrupt temperature change in the liquid metal. Further, by appending the good heat conductor covered with inactive metals not only on the outer side but also on the inside of the reactor wall to introduce the heat near the liquid level to the upper portion and escape the same to the cooling layer below the roof slab, the effect can be improved further. (Ikeda, J.)

  7. Nuclear reactor

    Rau, P.

    1980-01-01

    The reactor core of nuclear reactors usually is composed of individual elongated fuel elements that may be vertically arranged and through which coolant flows in axial direction, preferably from bottom to top. With their lower end the fuel elements gear in an opening of a lower support grid forming part of the core structure. According to the invention a locking is provided there, part of which is a control element that is movable along the fuel element axis. The corresponding locking element is engaged behind a lateral projection in the opening of the support grid. The invention is particularly suitable for breeder or converter reactors. (orig.) [de

  8. What have fusion reactor studies done for you today?

    Kulchinski, G.L.

    1985-01-01

    The University of Wisconsin examines the fusion program and puts into perspective what return is being made on investments in fusion reactor studies. Illustations show financial support for fusion research from the four major programs, FY'82 expenditures on fusion research, and the total expenditures on fusion research since 1951. Topics discussed include the estimated number of scientists conducting fusion research, the conceptual design study of a fusion reactor, scoping study of a reactor, the chronology of fusion reactor design studies, published fusion reactor studies 1967-1983, conceptual fusion reactor design studies, STARFIRE reference design, MARS central cell, HYLIFE reaction chamber, and selected contributions of reactor design studies to base programs

  9. Nuclear reactors

    Prescott, R.F.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear reactor containment vessel faced internally with a metal liner is provided with thermal insulation for the liner, comprising one or more layers of compressible material such as ceramic fiber, such as would be conventional in an advanced gas-cooled reactor and also a superposed layer of ceramic bricks or tiles in combination with retention means therefor, the retention means (comprising studs projecting from the liner, and bolts or nuts in threaded engagement with the studs) being themselves insulated from the vessel interior so that the coolant temperatures achieved in a High-Temperature Reactor or a Fast Reactor can be tolerated with the vessel. The layer(s) of compressible material is held under a degree of compression either by the ceramic bricks or tiles themselves or by cover plates held on the studs, in which case the bricks or tiles are preferably bedded on a yielding layer (for example of carbon fibers) rather than directly on the cover plates

  10. Nuclear reactor

    Miyashita, Akio.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To facilitate and accelerate a leakage test of valves of a main steam pipe by adding a leakage test partition valve thereto. Constitution: A leakage testing partition valve is provided between a pressure vessel for a nuclear reactor and the most upstream side valve of a plurality of valves to be tested for leakage, a testing branch pipe is communicated with the downstream side of the partition valve, and the testing water for preventing leakage is introduced thereto through the branch pipe. Since main steam pipe can be simply isolated by closing the partition valve in the leakage test, the leakage test can be conducted without raising or lowering the water level in the pressure vessel, and since interference with other work in the reactor can be eliminated, the leakage test can be readily conducted parallel with other work in the reactor in a short time. Clean water can be used without using reactor water as the test water. (Yoshihara, H.)

  11. Reactor container

    Abe, Yoshihito; Sano, Tamotsu; Ueda, Sabuo; Tanaka, Kazuhisa.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the liquid surface disturbance in LMFBR type reactors. Constitution: A horizontal flow suppressing mechanism mainly comprising vertical members is suspended near the free liquid surface of coolants in the upper plenum. The horizontal flow of coolants near the free liquid surface is reduced by the suppressing mechanism to effectively reduce the surface disturbance. The reduction in the liquid surface disturbance further prevails to the entire surface region with no particular vertical variations to the free liquid surface to remarkably improve the preventive performance for the liquid surface disturbance. Accordingly, it is also possible to attain the advantageous effects such as prevention for the thermal fatigue in reactor vessel walls, reactor upper mechanisms, etc. and prevention of burning damage to the reactor core due to the reduction of envolved Ar gas. (Kamimura, M.)

  12. REACTOR SHIELD

    Wigner, E.P.; Ohlinger, L.E.; Young, G.J.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1959-02-17

    Radiation shield construction is described for a nuclear reactor. The shield is comprised of a plurality of steel plates arranged in parallel spaced relationship within a peripheral shell. Reactor coolant inlet tubes extend at right angles through the plates and baffles are arranged between the plates at right angles thereto and extend between the tubes to create a series of zigzag channels between the plates for the circulation of coolant fluid through the shield. The shield may be divided into two main sections; an inner section adjacent the reactor container and an outer section spaced therefrom. Coolant through the first section may be circulated at a faster rate than coolant circulated through the outer section since the area closest to the reactor container is at a higher temperature and is more radioactive. The two sections may have separate cooling systems to prevent the coolant in the outer section from mixing with the more contaminated coolant in the inner section.

  13. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Miller, H.I.; Smith, R.C.

    1958-01-21

    This patent relates to nuclear reactors of the type which use a liquid fuel, such as a solution of uranyl sulfate in ordinary water which acts as the moderator. The reactor is comprised of a spherical vessel having a diameter of about 12 inches substantially surrounded by a reflector of beryllium oxide. Conventionnl control rods and safety rods are operated in slots in the reflector outside the vessel to control the operation of the reactor. An additional means for increasing the safety factor of the reactor by raising the ratio of delayed neutrons to prompt neutrons, is provided and consists of a soluble sulfate salt of beryllium dissolved in the liquid fuel in the proper proportion to obtain the result desired.

  14. Breeder reactors

    Gollion, H.

    1977-01-01

    The reasons for the development of fast reactors are briefly reviewed (a propitious neutron balance oriented towards a maximum uranium burnup) and its special requirements (cooling, fissile material density and reprocessing) discussed. The three stages in the French program of fast reactor development are outlined with Rapsodie at Cadarache, Phenix at Marcoule, and Super Phenix at Creys-Malville. The more specific features of the program of research and development are emphasized: kinetics and the core, the fuel and the components [fr

  15. Nuclear reactor

    Schulze, I.; Gutscher, E.

    1980-01-01

    The core contains a critical mass of UN or U 2 N 3 in the form of a noncritical solution with melted Sn being kept below a N atmosphere. The lining of the reactor core consists of graphite. If fission progresses part of the melted metal solution is removed and cleaned from fission products. The reactor temperatures lie in the range of 300 to 2000 0 C. (Examples and tables). (RW) [de

  16. Reactor technology

    Erdoes, P.

    1977-01-01

    This is one of a series of articles discussing aspects of nuclear engineering ranging from a survey of various reactor types for static and mobile use to mention of atomic thermo-electric batteries of atomic thermo-electric batteries for cardiac pacemakers. Various statistics are presented on power generation in Europe and U.S.A. and economics are discussed in some detail. Molten salt reactors and research machines are also described. (G.M.E.)

  17. Extrap conceptual fusion reactor design study

    Eninger, J.E; Lehnert, B.

    1987-12-01

    A study has recently been initiated to asses the fusion reactor potential of the Extrap concept. A reactor model is defined that fulfills certain economic and environmental criteria. This model is applied to Extrap and a reference reactor is outlined. The design is optimized by varying parameters subject to both physics and engineering constraints. Several design options are examined and key engineering issues are identified and addressed. Some preliminary results and conclusions of this work are summarized. (authors)

  18. Pool type liquid metal fast breeder reactors

    Guthrie, B.M.

    1978-08-01

    Various technical aspects of the liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR), specifically pool type LMFBR's, are summarized. The information presented, for the most part, draws upon existing data. Special sections are devoted to design, technical feasibility (normal operating conditions), and safety (accident conditions). A survey of world fast reactors is presented in tabular form, as are two sets of reference reactor parameters based on available data from present and conceptual LMFBR's. (auth)

  19. Reactor containment

    Kawabe, Ryuhei; Yamaki, Rika.

    1990-01-01

    A water vessel is disposed and the gas phase portion of the water vessel is connected to a reactor container by a pipeline having a valve disposed at the midway thereof. A pipe in communication with external air is extended upwardly from the liquid phase portion to a considerable height so as to resist against the back pressure by a waterhead in the pipeline. Accordingly, when the pressure in the container is reduced to a negative level, air passes through the pipeline and uprises through the liquid phase portion in the water vessel in the form of bubbles and then flows into the reactor container. When the pressure inside of the reactor goes higher, since the liquid surface in the water vessel is forced down, water is pushed up into the pipeline. Since the waterhead pressure of a column of water in the pipeline and the pressure of the reactor container are well-balanced, gases in the reactor container are not leaked to the outside. Further, in a case if a great positive pressure is formed in the reactor container, the inner pressure overcomes the waterhead of the column of water, so that the gases containing radioactive aerosol uprise in the pipeline. Since water and the gases flow being in contact with each other, this can provide the effect of removing aerosol. (T.M.)

  20. Fast reactors

    Vasile, A.

    2001-01-01

    Fast reactors have capacities to spare uranium natural resources by their breeding property and to propose solutions to the management of radioactive wastes by limiting the inventory of heavy nuclei. This article highlights the role that fast reactors could play for reducing the radiotoxicity of wastes. The conversion of 238 U into 239 Pu by neutron capture is more efficient in fast reactors than in light water reactors. In fast reactors multi-recycling of U + Pu leads to fissioning up to 95% of the initial fuel ( 238 U + 235 U). 2 strategies have been studied to burn actinides: - the multi-recycling of heavy nuclei is made inside the fuel element (homogeneous option); - the unique recycling is made in special irradiation targets placed inside the core or at its surroundings (heterogeneous option). Simulations have shown that, for the same amount of energy produced (400 TWhe), the mass of transuranium elements (Pu + Np + Am + Cm) sent to waste disposal is 60,9 Kg in the homogeneous option and 204.4 Kg in the heterogeneous option. Experimental programs are carried out in Phenix and BOR60 reactors in order to study the feasibility of such strategies. (A.C.)

  1. Korean Reference HLW Disposal System

    Choi, Heui Joo; Lee, J. Y.; Kim, S. S. (and others)

    2008-03-15

    This report outlines the results related to the development of Korean Reference Disposal System for High-level radioactive wastes. The research has been supported around for 10 years through a long-term research plan by MOST. The reference disposal method was selected via the first stage of the research during which the technical guidelines for the geological disposal of HLW were determined too. At the second stage of the research, the conceptual design of the reference disposal system was made. For this purpose the characteristics of the reference spent fuels from PWR and CANDU reactors were specified, and the material and specifications of the canisters were determined in term of structural analysis and manufacturing capability in Korea. Also, the mechanical and chemical characteristics of the domestic Ca-bentonite were analyzed in order to supply the basic design parameters of the buffer. Based on these parameters the thermal and mechanical analysis of the near-field was carried out. Thermal-Hydraulic-Mechanical behavior of the disposal system was analyzed. The reference disposal system was proposed through the second year research. At the final third stage of the research, the Korean Reference disposal System including the engineered barrier, surface facilities, and underground facilities was proposed through the performance analysis of the disposal system.

  2. Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference boiling water reactor power station. Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure - main report. Final report

    Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; Konzek, G.J.; McDuffie, P.N.

    1996-07-01

    The NRC staff is in need of updated bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to update the needed bases documentation. This report presents the results of a review and reevaluation of the PNL 1980 decommissioning study of the Washington Public Power Supply System`s Washington Nuclear Plant Two (WNP-2), which is a boiling water reactor (BWR), located at Richland, Washington, including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives. These alternatives now include an initial 5-7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. Included for information (but not part of the license termination cost) is an estimate of the cost to demolish the decontaminated and clean structures on the site and to restore the site to a {open_quotes}green field{close_quotes} condition. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low- level waste (i.e., Greater-Than-Class C), and reflects 1993 costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities. Sensitivity of the total license termination cost to the disposal costs at different low-level radioactive waste disposal sites, to different depths of contaminated concrete surface removal within the facilities, and to different transport distances is also examined.

  3. Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference boiling water reactor power station. Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure - main report. Final report

    Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; Konzek, G.J.; McDuffie, P.N.

    1996-07-01

    The NRC staff is in need of updated bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to update the needed bases documentation. This report presents the results of a review and reevaluation of the PNL 1980 decommissioning study of the Washington Public Power Supply System's Washington Nuclear Plant Two (WNP-2), which is a boiling water reactor (BWR), located at Richland, Washington, including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives. These alternatives now include an initial 5-7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. Included for information (but not part of the license termination cost) is an estimate of the cost to demolish the decontaminated and clean structures on the site and to restore the site to a open-quotes green fieldclose quotes condition. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low- level waste (i.e., Greater-Than-Class C), and reflects 1993 costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities. Sensitivity of the total license termination cost to the disposal costs at different low-level radioactive waste disposal sites, to different depths of contaminated concrete surface removal within the facilities, and to different transport distances is also examined

  4. The GBR reactor an economically competitive Breeder

    Chermanne, J.

    1974-01-01

    In this article the design is described of a 1200 MWe fast breeder, gas-cooled reactor (GBR-4), prepared by a group of experts of the Gas Breeder Reactor Association and used as a reference system for economical and safety evaluations, as well as for defining the research and development program focussed on such concept and the specifications of the prospective demonstrative plant

  5. Irradiation embrittlement of reactor vessel steels

    Bros, J.

    2000-01-01

    From the historical decision of closing the Yankee Rowe NPP because of the uncertainties on the level of reactor pressure vessel neutron embrittlement, this paper reviews the technical-scientist bases of the degradation phenomena, and refers to the evolution of reactor pressure vessel radiation surveillance programs. (Author)

  6. Seismic research on graphite reactor core

    Lai Shigang; Sun Libin; Zhang Zhengming

    2013-01-01

    Background: Reactors with graphite core structure include production reactor, water-cooled graphite reactor, gas-cooled reactor, high-temperature gas-cooled reactor and so on. Multi-body graphite core structure has nonlinear response under seismic excitation, which is different from the response of general civil structure, metal connection structure or bolted structure. Purpose: In order to provide references for the designing and construction of HTR-PM. This paper reviews the history of reactor seismic research evaluation from certain countries, and summarizes the research methods and research results. Methods: By comparing the methods adopted in different gas-cooled reactor cores, inspiration for our own HTR seismic research was achieved. Results and Conclusions: In this paper, the research ideas of graphite core seismic during the process of designing, constructing and operating HTR-10 are expounded. Also the project progress of HTR-PM and the research on side reflection with the theory of similarity is introduced. (authors)

  7. Reactor accidents and the environment

    Beattie, J.R.; Griffiths, R.F.; Kaiser, G.D.; Kinchin, G.H.

    1978-01-01

    This is a condensed version of a paper, entitled 'The Environmental Impact of Radioactive Releases from Accidents in Nuclear Power Reactors', by the authors, presented to the Nuclear Energy Panel of the International Atomic Energy Agency/United Nations Environmental Programme. Headings include - Effects of ionising radiation on man; number of deaths expected from leukaemia and other cancers; risk estimates for incidence of benign nodules and thyroid cancer; maximum permissible levels and emergency levels of radiation and radioactivity; ICRP recommended dose limits for members of the general public; atmospheric dispersion and modelling; ICRP emergency reference levels for 1 131 , Cs 137 , Ru 106 and Sr 90 ; environmental consequences of accidental releases from nuclear power reactors; environmental impact of accidents to Magnox gas-cooled reactors; environmental impact of accidents to advanced gas-cooled reactors; environmental impact of accidents to fast reactors; and nature of risks. consequences are examined in terms of early and late biological effects on man, and contamination of land areas. Serious accidents are of low probability of occurrence, and the risk of accidents to nuclear power reactors is estimated to be very small. 43 references. (U.K.)

  8. Generation IV reactors: reactor concepts

    Cardonnier, J.L.; Dumaz, P.; Antoni, O.; Arnoux, P.; Bergeron, A.; Renault, C.; Rimpault, G.; Delpech, M.; Garnier, J.C.; Anzieu, P.; Francois, G.; Lecomte, M.

    2003-01-01

    Liquid metal reactor concept looks promising because of its hard neutron spectrum. Sodium reactors benefit a large feedback experience in Japan and in France. Lead reactors have serious assets concerning safety but they require a great effort in technological research to overcome the corrosion issue and they lack a leader country to develop this innovative technology. In molten salt reactor concept, salt is both the nuclear fuel and the coolant fluid. The high exit temperature of the primary salt (700 Celsius degrees) allows a high energy efficiency (44%). Furthermore molten salts have interesting specificities concerning the transmutation of actinides: they are almost insensitive to irradiation damage, some salts can dissolve large quantities of actinides and they are compatible with most reprocessing processes based on pyro-chemistry. Supercritical water reactor concept is based on operating temperature and pressure conditions that infers water to be beyond its critical point. In this range water gets some useful characteristics: - boiling crisis is no more possible because liquid and vapour phase can not coexist, - a high heat transfer coefficient due to the low thermal conductivity of supercritical water, and - a high global energy efficiency due to the high temperature of water. Gas-cooled fast reactors combining hard neutron spectrum and closed fuel cycle open the way to a high valorization of natural uranium while minimizing ultimate radioactive wastes and proliferation risks. Very high temperature gas-cooled reactor concept is developed in the prospect of producing hydrogen from no-fossil fuels in large scale. This use implies a reactor producing helium over 1000 Celsius degrees. (A.C.)

  9. Research reactors - an overview

    West, C.D.

    1997-01-01

    A broad overview of different types of research and type reactors is provided in this paper. Reactor designs and operating conditions are briefly described for four reactors. The reactor types described include swimming pool reactors, the High Flux Isotope Reactor, the Mark I TRIGA reactor, and the Advanced Neutron Source reactor. Emphasis in the descriptions is placed on safety-related features of the reactors. 7 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Areva, reference document 2006

    2006-01-01

    This reference document contains information on the AREVA group's objectives, prospects and development strategies, particularly in Chapters 4 and 7. It contains information on the markets, market shares and competitive position of the AREVA group. Content: - 1 Person responsible for the reference document and persons responsible for auditing the financial statements; - 2 Information pertaining to the transaction (Not applicable); - 3 General information on the company and its share capital: Information on AREVA, on share capital and voting rights, Investment certificate trading, Dividends, Organization chart of AREVA group companies, Equity interests, Shareholders' agreements; - 4 Information on company operations, new developments and future prospects: Overview and strategy of the AREVA group, The Nuclear Power and Transmission and Distribution markets, The energy businesses of the AREVA group, Front End division, Reactors and Services division, Back End division, Transmission and Distribution division, Major contracts, The principal sites of the AREVA group, AREVA's customers and suppliers, Sustainable Development and Continuous Improvement, Capital spending programs, Research and development programs, intellectual property and trademarks, Risk and insurance; - 5 Assets - Financial position - Financial performance: Analysis of and comments on the group's financial position and performance, 2006 Human Resources Report, Environmental Report, Consolidated financial statements, Notes to the consolidated financial statements, AREVA SA financial statements, Notes to the corporate financial statements; 6 - Corporate Governance: Composition and functioning of corporate bodies, Executive compensation, Profit-sharing plans, AREVA Values Charter, Annual Combined General Meeting of Shareholders of May 3, 2007; 7 - Recent developments and future prospects: Events subsequent to year-end closing for 2006, Outlook; 8 - Glossary; 9 - Table of concordance

  11. Areva reference document 2007

    2008-01-01

    This reference document contains information on the AREVA group's objectives, prospects and development strategies, particularly in Chapters 4 and 7. It contains also information on the markets, market shares and competitive position of the AREVA group. Content: 1 - Person responsible for the reference document and persons responsible for auditing the financial statements; 2 - Information pertaining to the transaction (not applicable); 3 - General information on the company and its share capital: Information on Areva, Information on share capital and voting rights, Investment certificate trading, Dividends, Organization chart of AREVA group companies, Equity interests, Shareholders' agreements; 4 - Information on company operations, new developments and future prospects: Overview and strategy of the AREVA group, The Nuclear Power and Transmission and Distribution markets, The energy businesses of the AREVA group, Front End division, Reactors and Services division, Back End division, Transmission and Distribution division, Major contracts 140 Principal sites of the AREVA group, AREVA's customers and suppliers, Sustainable Development and Continuous Improvement, Capital spending programs, Research and Development programs, Intellectual Property and Trademarks, Risk and insurance; 5 - Assets financial position financial performance: Analysis of and comments on the group's financial position and performance, Human Resources report, Environmental report, Consolidated financial statements 2007, Notes to the consolidated financial statements, Annual financial statements 2007, Notes to the corporate financial statements; 6 - Corporate governance: Composition and functioning of corporate bodies, Executive compensation, Profit-sharing plans, AREVA Values Charter, Annual Ordinary General Meeting of Shareholders of April 17, 2008; 7 - Recent developments and future prospects: Events subsequent to year-end closing for 2007, Outlook; Glossary; table of concordance

  12. Ingestion of radiocesium and strontium-90 by self-suppliers and non-self-suppliers in the first year following the Chernobyl reactor accident. Data taken as a basis for derivation of secondary intervention reference levels

    1988-01-01

    In Southeast Bavaria, the region of Germany with the highest Cs deposition, 20 self and non-self-suppliers were selected for observation of the ingestion and incorporation of radiocesium by means of check measurements of radioactivity in prepared diet duplicates and in the whole body. The results are comparatively analyzed. Surveys conducted in February/March 1987 show that both populations differ significantly in Cs incorporation. Children and adults among the self-suppliers revealed a Cs incorporation 3.5 times higher than that of the non-self-suppliers. An average Cs concentration of 8900 Bq was measured among the adult self-suppliers. By comparison, the average Cs concentration among the adult non-self-suppliers was only 2310 Bq. In the same period, a supply rate of 110 Bq/d (45-216 Bq/d) was measured among the adult self-suppliers, and a supply rate of 17 Bq/d (10-27 Bq/d) among the adult non-self-suppliers. The amount of activity incorporated per day was 77 Bq/d (64-96 Bq/d) among the younger children of the self-suppliers, and 32 Bq/d (24-40 Bq/d) among the older children of the non-self-suppliers. The specific activity of strontium 90 in dairy, meat and vegetable products mainly from the self-sufficiency areas was also analyzed. The average concentration of the activity of strontium 90 in raw milk was 0.4 Bq/l in February/March 1987, and the average specific activity for the other food products was 0.25-3 Bq/kg. The average values for the ingestion of strontium 90 over all the food products lie approximately between 0.3-0.5 Bq per person and day, and are comparable with the value of 0.3 Bq in the period before the reactor accident in Chernobyl. Starting from these values, the relative contamination of food as well as the effective dose equivalent of both groups of suppliers for the first year after the reactor accident in Chernobyl was measured. (orig./MG) [de

  13. Cooling nuclear reactor fuel

    Porter, W.H.L.

    1975-01-01

    Reference is made to water or water/steam cooled reactors of the fuel cluster type. In such reactors it is usual to mount the clusters in parallel spaced relationship so that coolant can pass freely between them, the coolant being passed axially from one end of the cluster in an upward direction through the cluster and being effective for cooling under normal circumstances. It has been suggested, however, that in addition to the main coolant flow an auxiliary coolant flow be provided so as to pass laterally into the cluster or be sprayed over the top of the cluster. This auxiliary supply may be continuously in use, or may be held in reserve for use in emergencies. Arrangements for providing this auxiliary cooling are described in detail. (U.K.)

  14. Sodium as a reactor coolant

    Cesar, S.B.G.

    1989-01-01

    This work is related to the use of sodium as a reactor coolant, to the advantages and problems related to its use, its mechanical, thermophysics, eletronical, magnetic and nuclear properties. It is mainly a bibliographic review, with the aim of gathering the necessary information to persons initiating in the study of sodium and also as reference source. (author) [pt

  15. Nuclear research reactors in the world. June 1988 ed.

    1988-01-01

    This is the third edition of Reference Data Series No. 3, Nuclear Research Reactors in the World, which replaces the Agency's publications Power and Research Reactors in Member States and Research Reactors in Member States. This booklet contains general information, as of the end of June 1988, on research reactors in operation, under construction, planned, and shut down. The information is collected by the Agency through questionnaires sent to the Member States through the designated national correspondents. All data on research reactors, training reactors, test reactors, prototype reactors and critical assemblies are stored in the IAEA Research Reactor Data Base (RRDB) system. This system contains all the information and data previously published in the Agency's publication Power and Research Reactors in Member States as well as additional information. 12 figs, 19 tabs

  16. Pseudo-harmonics method: an application to thermal reactors

    Silva, F.C. da; Rotenberg, S.; Thome Filho, Z.D.

    1985-10-01

    Several applications of the Pseudo-Harmonics method are presented, aiming to calculate the neutron flux and the perturbed eigenvalue of a nuclear reactor, like PWR, with three enrichment regions as Angra-1 reactor. In the reference reactor, perturbations of several types as global as local were simulated. The results were compared with those from the direct calculation. (E.G.) [pt

  17. Effects of ionizing radiation of electrical properites of refractory insulators

    van Lint, V.A.J.; Bunch, J.M.

    1975-01-01

    The Los Alamos Reference Theta Pinch Reactor (RTPR) requires on the first wall an electrical insulator which will withstand transient high voltage at high temperature 10 sec after severe neutron and ionizing irradiation. Few measurements of electrical parameters for heavily disordered refractory insulators have been reported; estimates are made as to whether breakdown strength or conductivity will be degraded by the irradiation. The approach treats separately short-term ionization effects (free and trapped electrons and holes) and long-term gross damage effects (transmutation products and various lattice defects). The following processes could produce unacceptable conduction across the first wall insulator: (a) delayed electronic conductivity 10 sec after the prompt ionization by bremsstrahlung; (b) prompt electronic conductivity from delayed ionization; (c) electronic breakdown; (d) electronic or ionic conductivity due to thermal motion in the disordered material, possibly leading to thermal breakdown. Worst-case calculations based on lower limits to recombination coefficients limit process (a) to sigma much less than 5 x 10 -14 mho/cm. Data on ionization-induced conductivity in insulators predict for process (b) sigma much less than 10 -8 mho/cm. Electronic breakdown generally occurs at fields well above the 10 5 V/cm required for RTPR. Thermal breakdown is negligible due to the short voltage pulse. Ionic and electronic conduction must be studied theoretically and experimentally in the type of highly disordered materials that result from neutron irradiation of the first wall

  18. Bioconversion reactor

    McCarty, Perry L.; Bachmann, Andre

    1992-01-01

    A bioconversion reactor for the anaerobic fermentation of organic material. The bioconversion reactor comprises a shell enclosing a predetermined volume, an inlet port through which a liquid stream containing organic materials enters the shell, and an outlet port through which the stream exits the shell. A series of vertical and spaced-apart baffles are positioned within the shell to force the stream to flow under and over them as it passes from the inlet to the outlet port. The baffles present a barrier to the microorganisms within the shell causing them to rise and fall within the reactor but to move horizontally at a very slow rate. Treatment detention times of one day or less are possible.

  19. Reference document 2001. A (AREVA) for.

    2002-01-01

    This reference document 2001, on the group Areva, provides data and information on the Areva emerges, overview of operations, sustainable development policy, research and development programs, nuclear power activities (front-end, reactors and services back-end divisions), components (connectors division and STMicroelectronics, human resources, share data and financial information (financial report 2001, financial report first-half 2002). (A.L.B.)

  20. Nuclear reactor

    Scholz, M.

    1976-01-01

    An improvement of the accessibility of that part of a nuclear reactor serving for biological shield is proposed. It is intended to provide within the biological shield, distributed around the circumference of the reactor pressure vessel, several shielding chambers filled with shielding material, which are isolated gastight from the outside by means of glass panes with a given bursting strength. It is advantageous that, on the one hand, inspection and maintenance will be possible without great effort and, on the other, a large relief cross section will be at desposal if required. (UWI) [de

  1. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    Wigner, E.P.; Weinberg, A.W.; Young, G.J.

    1958-04-15

    A nuclear reactor which uses uranium in the form of elongated tubes as fuel elements and liquid as a coolant is described. Elongated tubular uranium bodies are vertically disposed in an efficient neutron slowing agent, such as graphite, for example, to form a lattice structure which is disposed between upper and lower coolant tanks. Fluid coolant tubes extend through the uranium bodies and communicate with the upper and lower tanks and serve to convey the coolant through the uranium body. The reactor is also provided with means for circulating the cooling fluid through the coolant tanks and coolant tubes, suitable neutron and gnmma ray shields, and control means.

  2. Mirror hybrid (fusion--fission) reactor

    Bender, D.J.; Lee, J.D.; Neef, W.S.; Devoto, R.S.; Galloway, T.R.; Fink, J.H.; Schultz, K.R.; Culver, D.; Rao, S.

    1977-10-01

    The reference mirror hybrid reactor design performed by LLL and General Atomic is summarized. The reactor parameters have been chosen to minimize the cost of producing fissile fuel for consumption in fission power reactors. As in the past, we have emphasized the use of existing technology where possible and a minimum extrapolation of technology otherwise. The resulting reactor may thus be viewed as a comparatively near-term goal of the fusion program, and we project improved performance for the hybrid in the future as more advanced technology becomes available

  3. NCSU reactor sharing program. Final technical report

    Perez, P.B.

    1997-01-01

    The Nuclear Reactor Program at North Carolina State University provides the PULSTAR Research Reactor and associated facilities to eligible institutions with support, in part, from the Department of Energy Reactor Sharing Program. Participation in the NCSU Reactor Sharing Program continues to increase steadily with visitors ranging from advance high school physics and chemistry students to Ph.D. level research from neighboring universities. This report is the Final Technical Report for the DOE award reference number DE-FG05-95NE38136 which covers the period September 30, 1995 through September 30, 1996

  4. Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference pressurized Water Reactor Power Station. Volume 2, Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure: Appendices, Final report

    Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; McDuffie, P.N.

    1995-11-01

    With the issuance of the final Decommissioning Rule (July 27, 1998), owners and operators of licensed nuclear power plants are required to prepare, and submit to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for review, decommissioning plans and cost estimates. The NRC staff is in need of bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to provide some of the needed bases documentation. This report contains the results of a review and reevaluation of the 1978 PNL decommissioning study of the Trojan nuclear power plant (NUREG/CR-0130), including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the nuclear power plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives. These alternatives now include an initial 5--7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool, prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. Included for information (but not presently part of the license termination cost) is an estimate of the cost to demolish the decontaminated and clean structures on the site and to restore the site to a ``green field`` condition. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste (i.e., Greater-Than-Class C), and reflects 1993 costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities.

  5. Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference pressurized Water Reactor Power Station. Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure, Volume 1, Final report

    Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; McDuffie, P.N. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    With the issuance of the final Decommissioning Rule (July 27, 1988), owners and operators of licensed nuclear power plants are required to prepare, and submit to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for review, decommissioning plans and cost estimates. The NRC staff is in need of bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to provide some of the needed bases documentation. This report contains the results of a review and reevaluation of the {prime}978 PNL decommissioning study of the Trojan nuclear power plant (NUREG/CR-0130), including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the nuclear power plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives. These alternatives now include an initial 5--7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool, prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. Included for information (but not presently part of the license termination cost) is an estimate of the cost to demolish the decontaminated and clean structures on the site and to restore the site to a ``green field`` condition. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste (i.e., Greater-Than-Class C), and reflects 1993 costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities.

  6. Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference boiling water reactor power station. Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure - appendices. Final report

    Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; Konzek, G.J.; McDuffie, P.N.

    1996-07-01

    The NRC staff is in need of decommissioning bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to update the needed bases documentation. This report presents the results of a review and reevaluation of the PNL 1980 decommissioning study of the Washington Public Power Supply System`s Washington Nuclear Plant Two (WNP-2) located at Richland, Washington, including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives. These alternatives now include an initial 5-7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. Included for information (but not presently part of the license termination cost) is an estimate of the cost to demolish the decontaminated and clear structures on the site and to restore the site to a {open_quotes}green field{close_quotes} condition. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste (i.e., Greater-Than-Class C), and reflects 1993 costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities. Sensitivity of the total license termination cost to the disposal costs at different low-level radioactive waste disposal sites, to different depths of contaminated concrete surface removal within the facilities, and to different transport distances is also examined.

  7. Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference boiling water reactor power station. Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure - appendices. Final report

    Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; Konzek, G.J.; McDuffie, P.N.

    1996-07-01

    The NRC staff is in need of decommissioning bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to update the needed bases documentation. This report presents the results of a review and reevaluation of the PNL 1980 decommissioning study of the Washington Public Power Supply System's Washington Nuclear Plant Two (WNP-2) located at Richland, Washington, including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives. These alternatives now include an initial 5-7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. Included for information (but not presently part of the license termination cost) is an estimate of the cost to demolish the decontaminated and clear structures on the site and to restore the site to a open-quotes green fieldclose quotes condition. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste (i.e., Greater-Than-Class C), and reflects 1993 costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities. Sensitivity of the total license termination cost to the disposal costs at different low-level radioactive waste disposal sites, to different depths of contaminated concrete surface removal within the facilities, and to different transport distances is also examined

  8. Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference pressurized Water Reactor Power Station. Volume 2, Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure: Appendices, Final report

    Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; McDuffie, P.N.

    1995-11-01

    With the issuance of the final Decommissioning Rule (July 27, 1998), owners and operators of licensed nuclear power plants are required to prepare, and submit to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for review, decommissioning plans and cost estimates. The NRC staff is in need of bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to provide some of the needed bases documentation. This report contains the results of a review and reevaluation of the 1978 PNL decommissioning study of the Trojan nuclear power plant (NUREG/CR-0130), including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the nuclear power plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives. These alternatives now include an initial 5--7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool, prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. Included for information (but not presently part of the license termination cost) is an estimate of the cost to demolish the decontaminated and clean structures on the site and to restore the site to a ''green field'' condition. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste (i.e., Greater-Than-Class C), and reflects 1993 costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities

  9. Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference pressurized Water Reactor Power Station. Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure, Volume 1, Final report

    Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; McDuffie, P.N.

    1995-11-01

    With the issuance of the final Decommissioning Rule (July 27, 1988), owners and operators of licensed nuclear power plants are required to prepare, and submit to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for review, decommissioning plans and cost estimates. The NRC staff is in need of bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to provide some of the needed bases documentation. This report contains the results of a review and reevaluation of the '978 PNL decommissioning study of the Trojan nuclear power plant (NUREG/CR-0130), including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the nuclear power plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives. These alternatives now include an initial 5--7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool, prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. Included for information (but not presently part of the license termination cost) is an estimate of the cost to demolish the decontaminated and clean structures on the site and to restore the site to a ''green field'' condition. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste (i.e., Greater-Than-Class C), and reflects 1993 costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities

  10. Request for Naval Reactors Comment on Proposed PROMETHEUS Space Flight Nuclear Reactor High Tier Reactor Safety Requirements and for Naval Reactors Approval to Transmit These Requirements to Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    D. Kokkinos

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this letter is to request Naval Reactors comments on the nuclear reactor high tier requirements for the PROMETHEUS space flight reactor design, pre-launch operations, launch, ascent, operation, and disposal, and to request Naval Reactors approval to transmit these requirements to Jet Propulsion Laboratory to ensure consistency between the reactor safety requirements and the spacecraft safety requirements. The proposed PROMETHEUS nuclear reactor high tier safety requirements are consistent with the long standing safety culture of the Naval Reactors Program and its commitment to protecting the health and safety of the public and the environment. In addition, the philosophy on which these requirements are based is consistent with the Nuclear Safety Policy Working Group recommendations on space nuclear propulsion safety (Reference 1), DOE Nuclear Safety Criteria and Specifications for Space Nuclear Reactors (Reference 2), the Nuclear Space Power Safety and Facility Guidelines Study of the Applied Physics Laboratory

  11. Hot Experimental Facility reference flowsheet

    North, E.D.

    1982-01-01

    This paper is a useful set of background information of HEF flowsheets, although many changes have been made in the past three years. The HEF reference flowsheet is a modified high-acid PUREX flowsheet capable of operating in the coprocessing mode or with full partitioning of U and Pu. Adequate decontamination factors are provided to purify high-burnup, fast breeder-reactor fuels to levels required for recycle back to a fuel fabrication facility. Product streams are mixed U-Pu oxide and uranium oxide. No contaminated liquid wastes are intentionally discharged to the environment. All wastes are solidified and packaged for appropriate disposal. Acid and water are recovered for internal recycle. Excess water is treated and discharged from the plant stack. Several changes have been made in the reference flowsheet since that time, and these are noted briefly

  12. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    Marmonier, Pierre; Mesnage, Bernard; Nervi, J.C.

    1975-01-01

    This invention refers to fuel assemblies for a liquid metal cooled fast neutron reactor. Each assembly is composed of a hollow vertical casing, of regular polygonal section, containing a bundle of clad pins filled with a fissile or fertile substance. The casing is open at its upper end and has a cylindrical foot at its lower end for positioning the assembly in a housing provided in the horizontal diagrid, on which the core assembly rests. A set of flat bars located on the external surface of the casing enables it to be correctly orientated in its housing among the other core assemblies [fr

  13. Brazilian multipurpose reactor

    NONE

    2014-07-01

    The Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor (RMB) Project is an action of the Federal Government, through the Ministry of Science Technology and Innovation (MCTI) and has its execution under the responsibility of the Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN). Within the CNEN, the project is coordinated by the Research and Development Directorate (DPD) and developed through research units of this board: Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (IPEN); Nuclear Engineering Institute (IEN); Centre for Development of Nuclear Technology (CDTN); Regional Center of Nuclear Sciences (CRCN-NE); and Institute of Radiation Protection and Dosimetry (IRD). The Navy Technological Center in Sao Paulo (CTMSP) and also the participation of other research centers, universities, laboratories and companies in the nuclear sector are important and strategic partnerships. The conceptual design and the safety analysis of the reactor and main facilities, related to nuclear and environmental licensing, are performed by technicians of the research units of DPD / CNEN. The basic design was contracted to engineering companies as INTERTHECNE from Brazil and INVAP from Argentine. The research units from DPD/CNEN are also responsible for the design verification on all engineering documents developed by the contracted companies. The construction and installation should be performed by specific national companies and international partnerships. The Nuclear Reactor RMB will be a open pool type reactor with maximum power of 30 MW and have the OPAL nuclear reactor of 20 MW, built in Australia and designed by INVAP, as reference. The RMB reactor core will have a 5x5 configuration, consisting of 23 elements fuels (EC) of U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} dispersion-type Al having a density of up to 3.5 gU/cm{sup 3} and enrichment of 19.75% by weight of {sup 23{sup 5}}U. Two positions will be available in the core for materials irradiation devices. The main objectives of the RMB Reactor and the other nuclear and radioactive

  14. Brazilian multipurpose reactor

    2014-01-01

    The Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor (RMB) Project is an action of the Federal Government, through the Ministry of Science Technology and Innovation (MCTI) and has its execution under the responsibility of the Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN). Within the CNEN, the project is coordinated by the Research and Development Directorate (DPD) and developed through research units of this board: Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (IPEN); Nuclear Engineering Institute (IEN); Centre for Development of Nuclear Technology (CDTN); Regional Center of Nuclear Sciences (CRCN-NE); and Institute of Radiation Protection and Dosimetry (IRD). The Navy Technological Center in Sao Paulo (CTMSP) and also the participation of other research centers, universities, laboratories and companies in the nuclear sector are important and strategic partnerships. The conceptual design and the safety analysis of the reactor and main facilities, related to nuclear and environmental licensing, are performed by technicians of the research units of DPD / CNEN. The basic design was contracted to engineering companies as INTERTHECNE from Brazil and INVAP from Argentine. The research units from DPD/CNEN are also responsible for the design verification on all engineering documents developed by the contracted companies. The construction and installation should be performed by specific national companies and international partnerships. The Nuclear Reactor RMB will be a open pool type reactor with maximum power of 30 MW and have the OPAL nuclear reactor of 20 MW, built in Australia and designed by INVAP, as reference. The RMB reactor core will have a 5x5 configuration, consisting of 23 elements fuels (EC) of U 3 Si 2 dispersion-type Al having a density of up to 3.5 gU/cm 3 and enrichment of 19.75% by weight of 23 5 U. Two positions will be available in the core for materials irradiation devices. The main objectives of the RMB Reactor and the other nuclear and radioactive facilities are

  15. Neutronic reactor

    Wende, C.W.J.

    1976-01-01

    The method of operating a water-cooled neutronic reactor having a graphite moderator is described which comprises flowing a gaseous mixture of carbon dioxide and helium, in which the helium comprises 40--60 volume percent of the mixture, in contact with the graphite moderator. 2 claims, 4 figures

  16. Neutronic reactor

    Wende, C.W.J.

    1976-01-01

    A safety rod for a nuclear reactor has an inner end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient and neutron capture cross section approximately equal to those of the adjacent shield, a central portion containing materials of high neutron capture cross section and an outer end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient at least equal to that of the adjacent shield

  17. Reactor facility

    Suzuki, Hiroaki; Murase, Michio; Yokomizo, Osamu.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a BWR type reactor facility capable of suppressing the amount of steams generated by the mutual effect of a failed reactor core and coolants upon occurrence of an imaginal accident, and not requiring spacial countermeasures for enhancing the pressure resistance of the container vessel. Namely, a means for supplying cooling water at a temperature not lower by 30degC than the saturated temperature corresponding to the inner pressure of the containing vessel upon occurrence of an accident is disposed to a lower dry well below the pressure vessel. As a result, upon occurrence of such an accident that the reactor core should be melted and flown downward of the pressure vessel, when cooling water at a temperature not lower than the saturated temperature, for example, cooling water at 100degC or higher is supplied to the lower dry well, abrupt generation of steams by the mutual effect of the failed reactor core and cooling water is scarcely caused compared with a case of supplying cooling water at a temperature lower than the saturation temperature by 30degC or more. Accordingly, the amount of steams to be generated can be suppressed, and special countermeasure is no more necessary for enhancing the pressure resistance of the container vessel is no more necessary. (I.S.)

  18. Nuclear reactor

    Gilroy, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    An improved cover structure for liquid metal cooled fast breeder type reactors is described which it is claimed reduces the temperature differential across the intermediate grid plate of the core cover structure and thereby reduces its subjection to thermal stresses. (UK)

  19. Reactor licensing

    Harvie, J.D.

    2002-01-01

    This presentation discusses reactor licensing and includes the legislative basis for licensing, other relevant legislation , the purpose of the Nuclear Safety and Control Act, important regulations, regulatory document, policies, and standards. It also discusses the role of the CNSC, its mandate and safety philosophy

  20. Nuclear reactor

    Hattori, Sadao; Sekine, Katsuhisa.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To decrease the thickness of a reactor container and reduce the height and the height and plate thickness of a roof slab without using mechanical vibration stoppers. Constitution: Earthquake proofness is improved by filling fluids such as liquid metal between a reactor container and a secondary container and connecting the outer surface of the reactor container with the inner surface of the secondary container by means of bellows. That is, for the horizontal seismic vibrations, horizontal loads can be supported by the secondary container without providing mechanical vibration stoppers to the reactor container and the wall thickness can be reduced thereby enabling to simplify thermal insulation structure for the reduction of thermal stresses. Further, for the vertical seismic vibrations, verical loads can be transmitted to the secondary container thereby enabling to reduce the wall thickness in the same manner as for the horizontal load. By the effect of transferring the point of action of the container load applied to the roof slab to the outer circumferential portion, the intended purpose can be attained and, in addition, the radiation dose rate at the upper surface of the roof slab can be decreased. (Kamimura, M.)

  1. Reactor system

    Miyano, Hiroshi; Narabayashi, Naoshi.

    1990-01-01

    The represent invention concerns a reactor system with improved water injection means to a pressure vessel of a BWR type reactor. A steam pump is connected to a heat removing system pipeline, a high pressure water injection system pipeline and a low pressure water injection system pipeline for injecting water into the pressure vessel. A pump actuation pipeline is disposed being branched from a main steam pump or a steam relieaf pipeline system, through which steams are supplied to actuate the steam pump and supply cooling water into the pressure vessel thereby cooling the reactor core. The steam pump converts the heat energy into the kinetic energy and elevates the pressure of water to a level higher than the pressure of the steams supplied by way of a pressure-elevating diffuser. Cooling water can be supplied to the pressure vessel by the pressure elevation. This can surely inject cooling water into the pressure vessel upon loss of coolant accident or in a case if reactor scram is necessary, without using an additional power source. (I.N.)

  2. Reactor core

    Matsuura, Tetsuaki; Nomura, Teiji; Tokunaga, Kensuke; Okuda, Shin-ichi

    1990-01-01

    Fuel assemblies in the portions where the gradient of fast neutron fluxes between two opposing faces of a channel box is great are kept loaded at the outermost peripheral position of the reactor core also in the second operation cycle in the order to prevent interference between a control rod and the channel box due to bending deformation of the channel box. Further, the fuel assemblies in the second row from the outer most periphery in the first operation cycle are also kept loaded at the second row in the second operation cycle. Since the gradient of the fast neutrons in the reactor core is especially great at the outer circumference of the reactor core, the channel box at the outer circumference is bent such that the surface facing to the center of the reactor core is convexed and the channel box in the second row is also bent to the identical direction, the insertion of the control rod is not interfered. Further, if the positions for the fuels at the outermost periphery and the fuels in the second row are not altered in the second operation cycle, the gaps are not reduced to prevent the interference between the control rod and the channel box. (N.H.)

  3. New about research reactors

    Egorenkov, P.M.

    2001-01-01

    The multi-purpose research reactor MAPLE (Canada) and concept of new reactor MAPLE-CNF as will substitute the known Canadian research reactor NRU are described. New reactor will be used as contributor for investigations into materials, neutron beams and further developments for the CANDU type reactor. The Budapest research reactor (BRR) and its application after the last reconstruction are considered also [ru

  4. Nuclear research reactors in the world. May 1987 ed.

    1987-01-01

    This is the second edition of Reference Data Series No.3, Nuclear Research Reactors in the World, which replaces the Agency's publications Power and Research Reactors in Member States and Research Reactors in Member States. This booklet contains general information, as of the end of May 1987, on research reactors in operation, under construction, planned, and shut down. The information is collected by the Agency through questionnaires sent to the Member States through the designated national correspondents. 11 figs, 19 tabs

  5. Hanford B Reactor Building Hazard Assessment Report

    Griffin, P. W.

    1999-01-01

    The 105-B Reactor (hereinafter referred to as B Reactor) is located in the 100 Area of the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The B Reactor is one of nine plutonium production reactors that were constructed in the 1940s during the Cold War Era. Construction of the B Reactor began June 7, 1943, and operation began on September 26, 1944. The Environmental Restoration Contractor was requested by RL to provide an assessment/characterization of the B Reactor building to determine and document the hazards that are present and could pose a threat to the environment and/or to individuals touring the building. This report documents the potential hazards, determines the feasibility of mitigating the hazards, and makes recommendations regarding areas where public tour access should not be permitted

  6. Reactor core of nuclear reactor

    Sasagawa, Masaru; Masuda, Hiroyuki; Mogi, Toshihiko; Kanazawa, Nobuhiro.

    1994-01-01

    In a reactor core, a fuel inventory at an outer peripheral region is made smaller than that at a central region. Fuel assemblies comprising a small number of large-diameter fuel rods are used at the central region and fuel assemblies comprising a great number of smalldiameter fuel rods are used at the outer peripheral region. Since a burning degradation rate of the fuels at the outer peripheral region can be increased, the burning degradation rate at the infinite multiplication factor of fuels at the outer region can substantially be made identical with that of the fuels in the inner region. As a result, the power distribution in the direction of the reactor core can be flattened throughout the entire period of the burning cycle. Further, it is also possible to make the degradation rate of fuels at the outer region substantially identical with that of fuels at the inner side. A power peak formed at the outer circumferential portion of the reactor core of advanced burning can be lowered to improve the fuel integrity, and also improve the reactor safety and operation efficiency. (N.H.)

  7. Issues facing the U. S. mirror program

    George, T.V.

    1978-07-01

    Some of the current issues associated with the U.S. Magnetic Mirror Program are analyzed. They are presented as five separate papers entitled: (1) Relevant Issues Broughtup by the Mirror Reactor Design Studies. (2) An Assessment of the Design Study of the 1 MeV Neutral Beam Injector Required for a Tandem Mirror Reactor. (3) The Significance of the Radial Plasma Size Measured in Units of Ion Gyroradii in Tandem Mirrors and Field Reversed Mirrors. (4) Producing Field Reversed Mirror Plasmas by Methods used in Field Reversed Theta Pinch. (5) RF Stoppering of Mirror Confined Plasma.

  8. Areva - 2014 Reference document

    2015-01-01

    Areva supplies high added-value products and services to support the operation of the global nuclear fleet. The company is present throughout the entire nuclear cycle, from uranium mining to used fuel recycling, including nuclear reactor design and operating services. Areva is recognized by utilities around the world for its expertise, its skills in cutting-edge technologies and its dedication to the highest level of safety. Areva's 44,000 employees are helping build tomorrow's energy model: supplying ever safer, cleaner and more economical energy to the greatest number of people. This Reference Document contains information on Areva's objectives, prospects and development strategies. It contains estimates of the markets, market shares and competitive position of Areva. Contents: 1 - Person responsible; 2 - Statutory auditors; 3 - Selected financial information; 4 - Risk factors; 5 - Information about the issuer; 6 - Business overview; 7 - Organizational structure; 8 - Property, plant and equipment; 9 - Analysis of and comments on the group's financial position and performance; 10 - Capital resources; 11 - Research and development programs, patents and licenses; 12 - Trend information; 13 - Profit forecasts; 14 - Administrative, management and supervisory bodies and senior management; 15 - Compensation and benefits; 16 - Functioning of administrative, management and supervisory bodies and senior management; 17 - Employees; 18 - Principal shareholders; 19 - Transactions with related parties; 20 - Financial information concerning assets, financial positions and financial performance; 21 - Additional information; 22 - Major contracts; 23 - Third party information, statements by experts and declarations of interest; 24 - Documents on display; 25 - information on holdings; appendix: Report of the Chairman of the Board of Directors on governance, internal control procedures and risk management, Statutory Auditors' report, Corporate social

  9. Neutronic study using oxide and nitride fuels for the Super Phenix 2 reactor

    Batista, J.L.; Renke, C.A.C.

    1991-11-01

    This report presents a neutronic analysis and a description of the Super Phenix 2 reactor, taken as reference. We present the methodology and results for cell and global reactor calculations for oxide (U O 2 - Pu O 2 ) and nitride (U N - Pu N) fuels. To conclude we compare the performance of oxide and nitride fuels for the reference reactor. (author)

  10. Evaluation of Torsatrons as reactors

    Lyon, J.F.; Gulec, K.; Miller, R.L.; El-Guebaly, L.

    1994-03-01

    Stellarators have significant operational advantages over tokamaks as ignited steady-state reactors. This scoping study, which uses an integrated cost-minimization code that incorporates costing and reactor component models self-consistently with a 1-D energy transport calculation, shows that a torsatron reactor could also be economically competitive with a tokamak reactor. The projected cost of electricity (COE) estimated using the Advanced Reactor Innovation and Evaluation Studies (ARIES) costing algorithms is 65.6 mill/kW(e)h in constant 1992 dollars for a reference 1-GW(e) Compact Torsatron reactor case. The COE is relatively insensitive (<10% variation) over a wide range of assumptions, including variations in the maximum field allowed on the coils, the coil elongation, the shape of the density profile, the beta limit, the confinement multiplier, and the presence of a large loss region for alpha particles. The largest variations in the COE occur for variations in the electrical power output demanded and the plasma-coil separation ratio

  11. Environmental aspects of fusion reactors

    Coffman, F.E.; Williams, J.M.

    1975-01-01

    With the continued depletion of fossil and uranium resources in the coming decades, the U. S. will be forced to look more toward renewable energy resources (e.g., wind, tidal, geothermal, and solar power) and toward such longer-term and nondepletable energy resources as fissile fast breeder reactors and fusion power. Several reference reactor designs have been completed for full-scale fusion power reactors that indicate that the environmental impacts from construction, operation, and eventual decommissioning of fusion reactors will be quite small. The principal environmental impact from fusion reactor operation will be from thermal discharges. Some of the safety and environmental characteristics that make fusion reactors appear attractive include an effectively infinite fuel supply at low cost, inherent incapability for a ''nuclear explosion'' or a ''nuclear runaway,'' the absence of fission products, the flexibility of selecting low neutron-cross-section structural materials so that emergency core cooling for a loss-of-coolant or other accident will not be necesary, and the absence of special nuclear materials such as 235 U or 239 Pu, so that diversion of nuclear weapons materials will not be possible and nuclear blackmail will not be a serious concern

  12. Light-water nuclear reactors

    Drevon, G.

    1983-01-01

    This work gives basic information on light-water reactors which is advanced enough for the reader to become familiar with the essential objectives and aspects of their design, their operation and their insertion in the industrial, economic and human environment. In view of the capital role of electric energy in the modern economy a significant place is given to electron-nuclear power stations, particularly those of the type adopted for the French programme. The work includes sixteen chapters. The first chapter relates the history and presents the various applications of light water reactors. The second refers to the general elementary knowledge of reactor physics. The third chapter deals with the high power light-water nuclear power station and thereby introduces the ensuing chapters which, up to and including chapter 13, are devoted to the components and the various aspects of the operation of power stations, in particular safety and the relationship with the environment. Chapter 14 provides information on the reactors adapted to applications other than the generation of electricity on an industrial scale. Chapter 15 shows the extent of the industrial effort devoted to light-water reactors and chapter 16 indicates the paths along which the present work is preparing the future of these reactors. The various chapters have been written to allow for separate consultation. An index of the main technical terms and a bibliography complete the work [fr

  13. Neutronic calculation of reactor cells

    Jaliff, J.O.

    1981-01-01

    Multigroup calculations of cylindrical pin cells were programmed, in Fortran IV, upon the basis of collision probabilities in each energy group. A rational approximation to the fuel-to-fuel collision probability in resonance groups was used. Together with the intermediate resonance theory, cross sections corrected for heterogeneity and absorber interactions were found. For the optimization of the program, the cell of a BWR reactor was taken as reference. Data for such a cell and the reactor's operating conditions are presented. PINCEL is a fast and flexible program, with checked results, around a 69-group library. (M.E.L.) [es

  14. Nuclear reactor

    Gibbons, J.F.; McLaughlin, D.J.

    1978-01-01

    In the pressure vessel of the water-cooled nuclear reactor there is provided an internal flange on which the one- or two-part core barrel is hanging by means of an external flange. A cylinder is extending from the reactor vessel closure downwards to a seat on the core cupport structure and serves as compression element for the transmission of the clamping load from the closure head to the core barrel (upper guide structure). With the core barrel, subject to tensile stress, between the vessel internal flange and its seat on one hand and the compression of the cylinder resp. hold-down element between the closure head and the seat on the other a very strong, elastic sprung structure is obtained. (DG) [de

  15. Nuclear reactor

    Sasaki, Tomozo.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the nuclear reactor availability by enabling to continuously exchange fuels in the natural-slightly enriched uranium region during operation. Constitution: A control rod is withdrawn to the midway of a highly enriched uranium region by means of control rod drives and the highly enriched uranium region is burnt to maintain the nuclear reactor always at a critical state. At the same time, fresh uranium-slightly enriched uranium is continuously supplied gravitationally from a fresh fuel reservoir through fuel reservoir to each of fuel pipes in the natural-slightly enriched uranium region. Then, spent fuels reduced with the reactivity by the burn up are successively taken out from the bottom of each of the fuel pipes through an exit duct and a solenoid valve to the inside of a spent fuel reservoir and the burn up in the natural-slightly enriched uranium region is conducted continuously. (Kawakami, Y.)

  16. Nuclear reactor

    Sakurai, Mikio; Yamauchi, Koki.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the channel stability and the reactor core stability in a spontaneous circulation state of coolants. Constitution: A reactor core stabilizing device comprising a differential pressure automatic ON-OFF valve is disposed between each of a plurality of jet pumps arranged on a pump deck. The stabilizing device comprises a piston exerted with a pressure on the lower side of the pump deck by way of a pipeway and a valve for flowing coolants through the bypass opening disposed to the pump deck by the opening and closure of the valve ON-OFF. In a case where the jet pumps are stopped, since the differential pressure between the upper and the lower sides of the pump deck is removed, the valve lowers gravitationally into an opened state, whereby the coolants flow through the bypass opening to increase the spontaneous circulation amount thereby improve the stability. (Yoshino, Y.)

  17. Nuclear reactor

    Aleite, W.; Bock, H.W.; Struensee, S.

    1976-01-01

    The invention concerns the use of burnable poisons in a nuclear reactor, especially in PWRs, in order to improve the controllability of the reactor. An unsymmetrical arrangement in the lattice is provided, if necessary also by insertion of special rods for these additions. It is proposed to arrange the burnable poisons in fuel elements taken over from a previous burn-up cycle and to distribute them, going out from the side facing the control rods, over not more than 20% of the lenth of the fuel elements. It seems sufficient, for the burnable poisons to bind an initial reactivity of only 0.1% and to become ineffective after normal operation of 3 to 4 months. (ORU) [de

  18. Reactor container

    Ichiki, Tadaharu; Saba, Kazuhisa.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the earthquake resistance as well as reduce the size of a container for a nuclear reactor with no adverse effects on the decrease of impact shock to the container and shortening of construction step. Constitution: Reinforcing profile steel materials are welded longitudinally and transversely to the inner surface of a container, and inner steel plates are secured to the above profile steel materials while keeping a gap between the materials and the container. Reactor shielding wall planted to the base concrete of the container is mounted to the pressure vessel, and main steam pipeways secured by the transverse beams and led to the outside of container is connected. This can improve the rigidity earthquake strength and the safetiness against the increase in the inside pressure upon failures of the container. (Yoshino, Y.)

  19. Reactor container

    Oyamada, Osamu; Furukawa, Hideyasu; Uozumi, Hiroto.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To lower the position of an intermediate slab within a reactor container and fitting a heat insulating material to the inner wall of said intermediate slab, whereby a space for a control rod exchanging device and thermal stresses of the inner peripheral wall are lowered. Constitution: In the pedestal at the lower part of a reactor pressure vessel there is formed an intermediate slab at a position lower than diaphragm floor slab of the outer periphery of the pedestal thereby to secure a space for providing automatic exchanging device of a control rod driving device. Futhermore, a heat insulating material is fitted to the inner peripheral wall at the upper side of the intermediate slab part, and the temperature gradient in the wall thickness direction at the time of a piping rupture trouble is made gentle, and thermal stresses at the inner peripheral wall are lowered. (Sekiya, K.)

  20. Industrial structure at research reactor suppliers

    Roegler, H.-J.; Bogusch, E.; Friebe, T.

    2001-01-01

    Due to the recent joining of the forces of Framatome S. A. from France and the Nuclear Division of Siemens AG Power Generation (KWU) from Germany to a Joint Venture named Framatome Advanced Nuclear Power S.A.S., the issue of the necessary and of the optimal industrial structure for nuclear projects as a research reactor is, was discussed internally often and intensively. That discussion took place also in the other technical fields such as Services for NPPs but also in the field of interest here, i. e. Research Reactors. In summarizing the statements of this presentation one can about state that: Research Reactors are easier to build than NPPs, but not standardised; Research Reactors need a wide spectrum of skills and experiences; to design and build Research Reactors needs an experienced team especially in terms of management and interfaces; Research Reactors need background from built reference plants more than from operating plants; Research Reactors need knowledge of suitable experienced subsuppliers. Two more essential conclusions as industry involved in constructing and upgrading research reactors are: Research Reactors by far are more than a suitable core that generates a high neutron flux; every institution that designs and builds a Research Reactor lacks quality or causes safety problems, damages the reputation of the entire community

  1. Neutronic reactor

    Lewis, W.R.

    1978-01-01

    Disclosed is a graphite-moderated, water-cooled nuclear reactor including a plurality of rectangular graphite blocks stacked in abutting relationship in layers, alternate layers having axes which are normal to one another, alternate rows of blocks in alternate layers being provided with a channel extending through the blocks, said channeled blocks being provided with concave sides and having smaller vertical dimensions than adjacent blocks in the same layer, there being nuclear fuel in the channels

  2. Nuclear reactors

    Humphreys, P.; Davidson, D.F.; Thatcher, G.

    1980-01-01

    The cooling system of a liquid metal cooled fast breeder nuclear reactor of the pool kind is described. It has an intermediate heat exchange module comprising a tube-in-shell heat exchanger and an electromagnetic flow coupler in the base region of the module. Primary coolant is flowed through the heat exchanger being driven by electromagnetic interaction with secondary liquid metal coolant flow effected by a mechanical pump. (author)

  3. Nuclear reactor

    Jungmann, A.

    1975-01-01

    Between a PWR's reactor pressure vessel made of steel and the biological shield made of concrete there is a gap. This gap is filled up with a heat insulation facting the reactor pressure vessel, for example with insulating concrete segments jacketed with sheet steel and with an additional layer. This layer serves for smooth absorption of compressive forces originating in radial direction from the reactor pressure vessel. It consists of cylinder-segment shaped bricks made of on situ concrete, for instance. The bricks have cooling agent ports in one or several rows which run parallel to the wall of the pressure vessel and in alignment with superposed bricks. Between the layer of bricks and the biological shield or rather the heat insulation, there are joints which are filled, however, with injected mortar. That guarantees a smooth series of connected components resistant tom compression. Besides, a slip foil can be set between the heat insulation and the joining joint filled with mortar for the reduction of the friction at thermal expansions. (TK) [de

  4. Nuclear reactors

    Yoshioka, Michiko.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain an optimum structural arrangement of IRM having a satisfactory responsibility to the inoperable state of a nuclear reactor and capable of detecting the reactor power in an averaged manner. Constitution: As the structural arrangement of IRM, from 6 to 16 even number of IRM are bisected into equial number so as to belong two trip systems respectively, in which all of the detectors are arranged at an equal pitch along a circumference of a circle with a radius rl having the center at the position of the central control rod in one trip system, while one detector is disposed near the central control rod and other detectors are arranged substantially at an equal pitch along the circumference of a circle with a radius r2 having the center at the position for the central control rod in another trip system. Furthermore, the radius r1 and r2 are set such that r1 = 0.3 R, r2 = 0.5 R in the case where there are 6 IRM and r1 = 0.4 R and R2 = 0.8 R where there are eight IRM where R represents the radius of the reactor core. (Kawakami, Y.)

  5. MLR reactor

    Ryazantsev, E.P.; Egorenkov, P.M.; Nasonov, V.A.; Smimov, A.M.; Taliev, A.V.; Gromov, B.F.; Kousin, V.V.; Lantsov, M.N.; Radchenko, V.P.; Sharapov, V.N.

    1998-01-01

    The Material Testing Loop Reactor (MLR) development was commenced in 1991 with the aim of updating and widening Russia's experimental base to validate the selected directions of further progress of the nuclear power industry in Russia and to enhance its reliability and safety. The MLR reactor is the pool-type one. As coolant it applies light water and as side reflector beryllium. The direction of water circulation in the core is upward. The core comprises 30 FA arranged as hexagonal lattice with the 90-95 mm pitch. The central materials channel and six loop channels are sited in the core. The reflector includes up to 11 loop channels. The reactor power is 100 MW. The average power density of the core is 0.4 MW/I (maximal value 1.0 MW/l). The maximum neutron flux density is 7.10 14 n/cm 2 s in the core (E>0.1 MeV), and 5.10 14 n/cm 2 s in the reflector (E<0.625 eV). In 1995 due to the lack of funding the MLR designing was suspended. (author)

  6. Nuclear reactor

    Shirakawa, Toshihisa.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent cladding tube injuries due to thermal expansion of each of the pellets by successively extracting each of the control rods loaded in the reactor core from those having less number of notches, as well as facilitate the handling work for the control rods. Constitution: A recycle flow control device is provided to a circulation pump for forcibly circulating coolants in the reactor container and an operational device is provided for receiving each of the signals concerning number of notches for each of the control rods and flow control depending on the xenon poisoning effect obtained from the signals derived from the in-core instrument system connected to the reactor core. The operational device is connected with a control rod drive for moving each of the control rods up and down and a recycle flow control device. The operational device is set with a pattern for the aimed control rod power and the sequence of extraction. Upon extraction of the control rods, they are extracted successively from those having less notch numbers. (Moriyama, K.)

  7. Reactor container

    Hidaka, Masataka; Hatamiya, Shigeo; Kawasaki, Terufumi; Fukui, Toru; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Kataoka, Yoshiyuki; Kawabe, Ryuhei; Murase, Michio; Naito, Masanori.

    1990-01-01

    In order to suppress the pressure elevation in a reactor container due to high temperature and high pressure steams jetted out upon pipeway rupture accidents in the reactor container, the steams are introduced to a pressure suppression chamber for condensating them in stored coolants. However, the ability for suppressing the pressure elevation and steam coagulation are deteriorated due to the presence of inactive incondensible gases. Then, there are disposed a vent channel for introducing the steams in a dry well to a pressure suppression chamber in the reactor pressure vessel, a closed space disposed at the position lower than a usual liquid level, a first channel having an inlet in the pressure suppression chamber and an exit in the closed space and a second means connected by way of a backflow checking means for preventing the flow directing to the closed space. The first paths are present by plurality, a portion of which constitutes a syphon. The incondensible gases and the steams are discharged to the dry well at high pressure by using the difference of the water head for a long cooling time after the pipeway rupture accident. Then, safety can be improved without using dynamic equipments as driving source. (N.H.)

  8. Reactor core in FBR type reactor

    Masumi, Ryoji; Kawashima, Katsuyuki; Kurihara, Kunitoshi.

    1989-01-01

    In a reactor core in FBR type reactors, a portion of homogenous fuels constituting the homogenous reactor core is replaced with multi-region fuels in which the enrichment degree of fissile materials is lower nearer to the axial center. This enables to condition the composition such that a reactor core having neutron flux distribution either of a homogenous reactor core or a heterogenous reactor core has substantially identical reactivity. Accordingly, in the transfer from the homogenous reactor core to the axially heterogenous reactor core, the average reactivity in the reactor core is substantially equal in each of the cycles. Further, by replacing a portion of the homogenous fuels with a multi-region fuels, thereby increasing the heat generation near the axial center, it is possiable to reduce the linear power output in the regions above and below thereof and, in addition, to improve the thermal margin in the reactor core. (T.M.)

  9. Fast reactor database. 2006 update

    2006-12-01

    plants. The recurring themes are the selection and summary of the data associated with the choice of coolant, fuel and structural materials, reduction of the steel weight, simplification of the plant design/layout, other important fast reactor design issues, and how to solve these problems. In the field of fast reactor design and operational data, the last reference document published by the IAEA was the 1996 Fast Reactor Database (IAEA-TECDOC-866). Since its publication, quite a lot has happened: the construction of two new reactors has been launched, and conceptual/design studies were initiated for various fast reactors, e.g. the Japanese JSFR-1500 and the Russian BN-1800 (both cooled by sodium), as well as for a wholly new line of LMFR concepts - modular reactors cooled by sodium and by lead-bismuth alloy, and prototype and demonstration commercial size fast reactors cooled by lead. The data were produced by the IAEA's Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors (TWG-FR). For many of the TWG-FR Member States there is a significant history of fast reactor development, often extending over a period of 40+ years. The new and updated information on LMFR, which are in operation, under construction or development, has been prepared with contributions from China, India, Japan, Republic of Korea and the Russian Federation. The information contained in IAEA-TECDOC-866, produced by France, Germany, Italy, the UK and the USA, was included in the present report with some modification taking into account last events

  10. Standard Reference Tables -

    Department of Transportation — The Standard Reference Tables (SRT) provide consistent reference data for the various applications that support Flight Standards Service (AFS) business processes and...

  11. Lower activation materials and magnetic fusion reactors

    Conn, R.W.; Bloom, E.E.; Davis, J.W.; Gold, R.E.; Little, R.; Schultz, K.R.; Smith, D.L.; Wiffen, F.W.

    1984-01-01

    Radioactivity in fusion reactors can be effectively controlled by materials selection. The detailed relationship between the use of a material for construction of a magnetic fusion reactor and the material's characteristics important to waste disposal, safety, and system maintainability has been studied. The quantitative levels of radioactivation are presented for many materials and alloys, including the role of impurities, and for various design alternatives. A major outcome has been the development of quantitative definitions to characterize materials based on their radioactivation properties. Another key result is a four-level classification scheme to categorize fusion reactors based on quantitative criteria for waste management, system maintenance, and safety. A recommended minimum goal for fusion reactor development is a reference reactor that (a) meets the requirements for Class C shallow land burial of waste materials, (b) permits limited hands-on maintenance outside the magnet's shield within 2 days of a shutdown, and (c) meets all requirements for engineered safety. The achievement of a fusion reactor with at least the characteristics of the reference reactor is a realistic goal. Therefore, in making design choices or in developing particular materials or alloys for fusion reactor applications, consideration must be given to both the activation characteristics of a material and its engineering practicality for a given application

  12. Neutron beam experiments using nuclear research reactors: honoring the retirement of professor Bernard W. Wehring -II. 5. Testing Moderating Detection Systems with 252Cf-Based Reference Neutron Fields

    Hertel, Nolan E.; Sweezy, Jeremy; Sauber, Jeremiah S.; Vaughn, David; Cook, Andrew; Tays, Jeff; Ro, Tae-Ik

    2001-01-01

    In recent years, Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) has been involved in a number of neutron dosimetry research projects. Several reference neutron fields are now available for such projects. They are all based on the use of a 252 Cf source. The source can be used by itself to create a reference un-moderated 252 Cf neutron field, or it can be placed inside several different moderating assemblies. The spectra created by placing the source inside these assemblies and the un-moderated source are employed to investigate detector and dosimeter responses. Currently, the set of moderators available includes a 30-cm diam cadmium-covered D 2 O spherical shell, a 30-cm-thick iron spherical shell, a 30-cm-diam polyethylene spherical shell, an 18.3-cm-thick tungsten spherical shell, a 16-cm-thick lead spherical shell, and a 9-cm-thick tantalum spherical shell. In addition, the 252 Cf source can be placed inside a neutron howitzer recently constructed at Georgia Tech. The howitzer is a WEP cylinder loaded with boron that has a 10.16-cm-diam cylindrical opening. When the source is placed in the cylindrical penetration of the howitzer, a neutron field ∼30 cm in diameter is created at a distance of 50 cm from the californium source. Over the last few years, Bonner sphere spectrometers using LiI(Eu) scintillators and LiF thermoluminescence dosimeters have been calibrated using this facility at Georgia Tech. Recently, the Neely Nuclear Research Center (NNRC) acquired an LB 6411 neutron probe (product of EG and G Berthold). This probe is designed to measure ambient dose equivalent in accordance with International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 60 recommendations. It consists of a cylindrical 3 He proportional counter surrounded by a 25-cm-diam spherical polyethylene moderator. Its neutron response is optimized for dose rate measurements of neutrons between thermal energies and 20 MeV (Ref. 5). As a test of the instrument's ability to measure ambient

  13. Molten salt reactors: reactor cores

    1983-01-01

    In this critical analysis of the MSBR I project are examined the problems concerning the reactor core. Advantages of breeding depend essentially upon solutions to technological problems like continuous reprocessing or graphite behavior under neutron irradiation. Graphite deformation, moderator unloading, control rods and core instrumentation require more studies. Neutronics of the core, influence of core geometry and salt composition, fuel evolution, and thermohydraulics are reviewed [fr

  14. Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned, 1991

    Simpson, B.

    1992-07-01

    This document contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1991. The book is divided into three major sections: Section 1 consists of a reactor locator map and reactor tables; Section 2 includes nuclear reactors that are operating, being built, or planned; and Section 3 includes reactors that have been shut down permanently or dismantled. Sections 2 and 3 contain the following classification of reactors: Civilian, Production, Military, Export, and Critical Assembly. Export reactor refers to a reactor for which the principal nuclear contractor is an American company -- working either independently or in cooperation with a foreign company (Part 4, in each section). Critical assembly refers to an assembly of fuel and assembly of fuel and moderator that requires an external source of neutrons to initiate and maintain fission. A critical assembly is used for experimental measurements (Part 5)

  15. Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned, 1991

    Simpson, B.

    1992-07-01

    This document contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1991. The book is divided into three major sections: Section 1 consists of a reactor locator map and reactor tables; Section 2 includes nuclear reactors that are operating, being built, or planned; and Section 3 includes reactors that have been shut down permanently or dismantled. Sections 2 and 3 contain the following classification of reactors: Civilian, Production, Military, Export, and Critical Assembly. Export reactor refers to a reactor for which the principal nuclear contractor is an American company -- working either independently or in cooperation with a foreign company (Part 4, in each section). Critical assembly refers to an assembly of fuel and assembly of fuel and moderator that requires an external source of neutrons to initiate and maintain fission. A critical assembly is used for experimental measurements (Part 5).

  16. Increased SRP reactor power

    MacAfee, I.M.

    1983-01-01

    Major changes in the current reactor hydraulic systems could be made to achieve a total of about 1500 MW increase of reactor power for P, K, and C reactors. The changes would be to install new, larger heat exchangers in the reactor buildings to increase heat transfer area about 24%, to increase H 2 O flow about 30% per reactor, to increase D 2 O flow 15 to 18% per reactor, and increase reactor blanket gas pressure from 5 psig to 10 psig. The increased reactor power is possible because of reduced inlet temperature of reactor coolant, increased heat removal capacity, and increased operating pressure (larger margin from boiling). The 23% reactor power increase, after adjustment for increased off-line time for reactor reloading, will provide a 15% increase of production from P, K, and C reactors. Restart of L Reactor would increase SRP production 33%

  17. Reference document 2001. A (AREVA) for..; Document de reference 2001. A (AREVA) comme..

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This reference document 2001, on the group Areva, provides data and information on the Areva emerges, overview of operations, sustainable development policy, research and development programs, nuclear power activities (front-end, reactors and services back-end divisions), components (connectors division and STMicroelectronics, human resources, share data and financial information (financial report 2001, financial report first-half 2002). (A.L.B.)

  18. Nuclear research reactors

    1985-01-01

    It's presented data about nuclear research reactors in the world, retrieved from the Sien (Nuclear and Energetic Information System) data bank. The information are organized in table forms as follows: research reactors by countries; research reactors by type; research reactors by fuel and research reactors by purpose. (E.G.) [pt

  19. Nuclear reactor physics course for reactor operators

    Baeten, P.

    2006-01-01

    The education and training of nuclear reactor operators is important to guarantee the safe operation of present and future nuclear reactors. Therefore, a course on basic 'Nuclear reactor physics' in the initial and continuous training of reactor operators has proven to be indispensable. In most countries, such training also results from the direct request from the safety authorities to assure the high level of competence of the staff in nuclear reactors. The aim of the basic course on 'Nuclear Reactor Physics for reactor operators' is to provide the reactor operators with a basic understanding of the main concepts relevant to nuclear reactors. Seen the education level of the participants, mathematical derivations are simplified and reduced to a minimum, but not completely eliminated

  20. Nuclear reactor

    Jolly, R.

    1979-01-01

    The support grid for the fuel rods of a liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor has a regular hexagonal contour and contains a large number of unit cells arranged honeycomb fashion. The totality of these cells make up a hexagonal shape. The grid contains a number of strips of material, and there is a window in each of three sidewalls staggered by one sidewall. The other sidewalls have embossed protrusions, thus generating a guide lining or guide bead. The windows reduce the rigidity of the areas in the middle between the ends of the cells. (DG) [de

  1. Nuclear reactor

    Anthony, A.J.; Gruber, E.A.

    1979-01-01

    A nuclear reactor with control rods in channels between fuel assemblies wherein the fuel assemblies incorporate guide rods which protrude outwardly into the control rod channels to prevent the control rods from engaging the fuel elements. The guide rods also extend back into the fuel assembly such that they are relatively rigid members. The guide rods are tied to the fuel assembly end or support plates and serve as structural members which are supported independently of the fuel element. Fuel element spacing and support means may be attached to the guide rods. 9 claims

  2. Advanced nuclear reactor types and technologies

    Ignatiev, V [ed.; Feinberg, O; Morozov, A [Russian Research Centre ` Kurchatov Institute` , Moscow (Russian Federation); Devell, L [Studsvik Eco and Safety AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    1995-07-01

    The document is a comprehensive world-wide catalogue of concepts and designs of advanced fission reactor types and fuel cycle technologies. Two parts have been prepared: Part 1 Reactors for Power Production and Part 2 Heating and Other Reactor Applications. Part 3, which will cover advanced waste management technology, reprocessing and disposal for different nuclear fission options is planned for compilation during 1995. The catalogue was prepared according to a special format which briefly presents the project title, technical approach, development status, application of the technology, reactor type, power output, and organization which developed these designs. Part 1 and 2 cover water cooled reactors, liquid metal fast reactors, gas-cooled reactors and molten salt reactors. Subcritical accelerator-driven systems are also considered. Various reactor applications as power production, heat generation, ship propulsion, space power sources and transmutation of such waste are included. Each project is described within a few pages with the main features of an actual design using a table with main technical data and figure as well as references for additional information. Each chapter starts with an introduction which briefly describes main trends and approaches in this field. Explanations of terms and abbreviations are provided in a glossary.

  3. Advanced nuclear reactor types and technologies

    Ignatiev, V.; Devell, L.

    1995-01-01

    The document is a comprehensive world-wide catalogue of concepts and designs of advanced fission reactor types and fuel cycle technologies. Two parts have been prepared: Part 1 Reactors for Power Production and Part 2 Heating and Other Reactor Applications. Part 3, which will cover advanced waste management technology, reprocessing and disposal for different nuclear fission options is planned for compilation during 1995. The catalogue was prepared according to a special format which briefly presents the project title, technical approach, development status, application of the technology, reactor type, power output, and organization which developed these designs. Part 1 and 2 cover water cooled reactors, liquid metal fast reactors, gas-cooled reactors and molten salt reactors. Subcritical accelerator-driven systems are also considered. Various reactor applications as power production, heat generation, ship propulsion, space power sources and transmutation of such waste are included. Each project is described within a few pages with the main features of an actual design using a table with main technical data and figure as well as references for additional information. Each chapter starts with an introduction which briefly describes main trends and approaches in this field. Explanations of terms and abbreviations are provided in a glossary

  4. Reactor parameters for European economic, safety and environmental studies

    Hancox, R.; Cooke, P.I.H.; Spears, W.R.

    1990-01-01

    Parameter sets for five 1200 MW e tokamak reactors were developed for the European Study Group on the Environmental, Safety-related and Economic Potential of Fusion Power, showing today's perception of the range of reactors likely to be available as a result of the Commission's fusion programme. On the basis of the cost of generating electricity, relative to a fission reactor, a reference set was chosen and endorsed by the Group for further studies including that on the environmental impact of fusion power. Key physics and technology parameters for the reference reactor are compared with values used in the ITER design, and with those from American studies. (author)

  5. Material test reactor fuel research at the BR2 reactor

    Dyck, Steven Van; Koonen, Edgar; Berghe, Sven van den [Institute for Nuclear Materials Science, SCK-CEN, Boeretang, Mol (Belgium)

    2012-03-15

    The construction of new, high performance material test reactor or the conversion of such reactors' core from high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) based fuel requires several fuel qualification steps. For the conversion of high performance reactors, high density dispersion or monolithic fuel types are being developed. The Uranium-Molybdenum fuel system has been selected as reference system for the qualification of LEU fuels. For reactors with lower performance characteristics, or as medium enriched fuel for high performance reactors, uranium silicide dispersion fuel is applied. However, on the longer term, the U-Mo based fuel types may offer a more efficient fuel alternative and-or an easier back-end solution with respect to the silicide based fuels. At the BR2 reactor of the Belgian nuclear research center, SCK-CEN in Mol, several types of fuel testing opportunities are present to contribute to such qualification process. A generic validation test for a selected fuel system is the irradiation of flat plates with representative dimensions for a fuel element. By flexible positioning and core loading, bounding irradiation conditions for fuel elements can be performed in a standard device in the BR2. For fuel element designs with curved plates, the element fabrication method compatibility of the fuel type can be addressed by incorporating a set of prototype fuel plates in a mixed driver fuel element of the BR2 reactor. These generic types of tests are performed directly in the primary coolant flow conditions of the BR2 reactor. The experiment control and interpretation is supported by detailed neutronic and thermal-hydraulic modeling of the experiments. Finally, the BR2 reactor offers the flexibility for irradiation of full size prototype fuel elements, as 200mm diameter irradiation channels are available. These channels allow the accommodation of various types of prototype fuel elements, eventually using a dedicated cooling loop to provide the

  6. Nuclear reactors

    Prescott, R.F.; George, B.V.; Baglin, C.J.

    1979-01-01

    In a nuclear reactor (e.g. one having coolant down-flow through a core to a hearth below) thermal insulation (e.g. of a floor of the hearth) comprises a layer of bricks and a layer of tiles thereon, with smaller clearances between the tiles than between the bricks but with the bricks being of reduced cross-section immediately adjacent the tiles so as to be surrounded by interconnected passages, of relatively large dimensions, constituting a continuous chamber extending behind the layer of tiles. By this arrangement, lateral coolant flow in the inter-brick clearances is much reduced. The reactor core is preferably formed of hexagonal columns, supported on diamond-shaped plates each supported on a pillar resting on one of the hearth-floor tiles. Each plate has an internal duct, four upper channels connecting the duct with coolant ducts in four core columns supported by the plate, and lower channels connecting the duct to a downwardly-open recess common to three plates, grouped to form a hexagon, at their mutually-adjacent corners. This provides mixing, and temperature-averaging, of coolant from twelve columns

  7. Reactor container

    Oikawa, Hirohide; Otonari, Jun-ichiro; Tozaki, Yuka.

    1993-01-01

    Partition walls are disposed between a reactor pressure vessel and a suppression chamber to separate a dry well to an upper portion and a lower portion. A communication pipe is disposed to the partition walls. One end of the communication pipe is opened in an upper portion of the dry well at a position higher than a hole disposed to a bent tube of the suppression chamber. When coolants overflow from a depressurization valve by an erroneous operation of an emergency reactor core cooling device, the coolants accumulate in the upper portion of the dry well. When the pipeline is ruptured at the upper portion of the pressure vessel, only the inside of the pressure vessel and the upper portion of the dry well are submerged in water. In this case, the water level of the coolants does not elevate to the opening of the commuication pipe but they flow into the suppression chamber from the hole disposed to the bent tube. Since the coolants do not flow out to the lower portion of the dry well, important equipments such as control rod drives disposed at the lower portion of the dry wall can be prevented from submerging in water. (I.N.)

  8. Reactor monitor

    Takada, Tamotsu.

    1992-01-01

    The device of the present invention monitors a reactor so that each of the operations for the relocation of fuel assemblies and the withdrawal and the insertion of control rods upon exchange of fuel assemblies and control rods in the reactor. That is, when an operator conducts relocating operation by way of a fuel assembly operation section, the device of the present invention judges whether the operation indication is adequate or not, based on the information of control rod arrangement in a control rod memory section. When the operation indication is wrong, a stop signal is sent to a fuel assembly relocating device. Further, when the operator conducts control rod operation by way of a control rod operation section, the device of the present invention judges in the control rod withdrawal judging section, as to whether the operation indication given by the operator is adequate or not by comparing it with fuel assembly arrangement information. When the operation indication is wrong, a stop signal is sent to control rod drives. With such procedures, increase of nuclear heating upon occurrence of erroneous operation can be prevented. (I.S.)

  9. Nuclear reactors

    Matheson, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    A nuclear reactor has an upper and a lower grid plate. Protrusions project from the upper grid plate. Fuel assemblies having end fittings fit between the grid plates. An arrangement is provided for accepting axial forces generated during the operation of the nuclear reactor by the flow of the cooling medium and thermal expansion and irradiation-induced growth of the fuel assembly, which comprises rods. Each fuel assembly rests on the lower grid plate and its upper end is elastically supported against the upper grid plate by the above-mentioned arrangement. The arrangement comprises four (for example) torsion springs each having a torsion tube and a torsion bar nested within the torsion tube and connected at one end thereto. The other end of the torsion bar is connected to an associated one of four lever arms. The torsion tube is rigidly connected to the other end fitting and the springs are disposed such that the lever arms are biassed against the protrusions. (author)

  10. Reactor core fuel management

    Silvennoinen, P.

    1976-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: concepts of reactor physics; neutron diffusion; core heat transfer; reactivity; reactor operation; variables of core management; computer code modules; alternative reactor concepts; methods of optimization; general system aspects. (U.K.)

  11. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    Tsotsis, Theodore T [Huntington Beach, CA; Sahimi, Muhammad [Altadena, CA; Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak [Richmond, CA; Harale, Aadesh [Los Angeles, CA; Park, Byoung-Gi [Yeosu, KR; Liu, Paul K. T. [Lafayette Hill, PA

    2011-03-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  12. Reactor outage schedule (tentative)

    Walton, R.P.

    1969-11-01

    This single page document is the November 1, 1969 reactor refueling outage schedule for the Hanford Production Reactor. It also contains data on the amounts and types of fuels to be loaded and relocated in the production reactor.

  13. Reactor outage schedule (tentative)

    Walton, R.P.

    1969-10-01

    This single page document is the October 1, 1969 reactor refueling outage schedule for the Hanford Production Reactor. It also contains data on the amounts and types of fuels to be loaded and relocated in the Production Reactor.

  14. Reactor outage schedule (tentative)

    Walton, R.P.

    1969-10-15

    This single page document is the October 15, 1969 reactor refueling outage schedule for the Hanford Production Reactor. It also contains data on the amounts and types of fuels to be loaded and relocated in the Production Reactor.

  15. Reactor outage schedule (tentative)

    Walton, R.P.

    1969-09-15

    This single page document is the September 15, 1969 reactor refueling outage schedule for the Hanford Production Reactor. It also contains data on the amounts and types of fuels to be loaded and relocated in the Production Reactor.

  16. Reactor outage schedule (tentative)

    Walton, R.P.

    1969-12-15

    This single page document is the December 16, 1969 reactor refueling outage schedule for the Hanford Production Reactor. It also contains data on the amounts and types of fuels to be loaded and relocated in the Production reactor.

  17. Reactor outage schedule (tentative)

    Walton, R.P.

    1969-12-01

    This single page document is the December 1, 1969 reactor refueling outage schedule for the Hanford Production Reactor. It also contains data on the amounts and types of fuels to be loaded and relocated in the Production reactor.

  18. Reactor theory and power reactors. 1. Calculational methods for reactors. 2. Reactor kinetics

    Henry, A.F.

    1980-01-01

    Various methods for calculation of neutron flux in power reactors are discussed. Some mathematical models used to describe transients in nuclear reactors and techniques for the reactor kinetics' relevant equations solution are also presented

  19. Neutron noise in nuclear reactors

    Blaquiere, A.; Pachowska, R.

    1961-06-01

    The power of a nuclear reactor, in the operating conditions, presents fluctuations due to various causes. This random behaviour can be included in the study of 'noises'. Among other sources of noise, we analyse hereafter the fluctuations due: a) to the discontinuous emissions of neutrons from an independent source; b) to the multiplication of neutrons inside the reactor. The method which we present makes use of the analogies between the rules governing a nuclear reactor in operation and a number of radio-electrical systems, in particular the feed-back loops. The reactor can be characterized by its 'passing band' and is described as a system submitted to a sequence of random pulses. In non linear operating condition, the effect of neutron noise is defined by means of a non-linear functional, this theory is thus related to previous works the references of which are given at the end of the present report. This leads us in particular in the case of nuclear reactors to some results given by A. Blaquiere in the case of radio-electrical loops. (author) [fr

  20. 2002 reference document; Document de reference 2002

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This 2002 reference document of the group Areva, provides information on the society. Organized in seven chapters, it presents the persons responsible for the reference document and for auditing the financial statements, information pertaining to the transaction, general information on the company and share capital, information on company operation, changes and future prospects, assets, financial position, financial performance, information on company management and executive board and supervisory board, recent developments and future prospects. (A.L.B.)

  1. Nordic study on reactor waste

    1981-08-01

    In 1981, 14 nuclear power reactors are in operation and 2 under construction in the Nordic countries. So far, the reactor waste originating from day-to-day operation of these plants has been stored in solidified form at the reactor sites. Within a few years a satisfactory disposal procedure needs to be established. While the main R and D effects in the waste field have earlier been devoted to the question of irradiated fuel and waste from reprocessing, there is therefore now an increased interest in reactor waste with its much lower radioactivity but somewhat larger volumes. Since 1977, efforts have been made in a joint Nordic study to examine which facts need to be known in order to perform a comprehensive safety assessment of a reactor waste management system. In the present study a Reference system related to the waste generated over 30 years from six 500 MW-reactors is examined. The dominating radionuclides during storage and transportation accident scenarios are Cs-134, Cs-137 and Co-60. For most of the release scenarios from repositories Cs-137 and Sr-90 are dominating. Some scenarios are, however, dominated by the very longlived nuclides I-129 and C-14. A closer examination of the concentration in the waste of these nuclides and of their leaching properties indicates that their small - but significant - influence, as calculated, is probably grossly overestimated. The mechanical stability obtained in routine solidification processes of reactor waste products in conjunction with the outer container (steel drum, transport container, etc.) turns out to be sufficient. Difficulties were encountered in applying ICRP methodology and available dose calculation methods to calculation of population doses due to small activity releases, and effects extending into the far future. (EG)

  2. The role of research reactor and its future

    Nakagome, Yoshihiro

    2005-01-01

    About a half century passed since the start of operation of research reactors. Many research reactors were stopped their operation or decommissioned. With the practical use of nuclear energy, the meaning of research reactor has been buried in oblivion in the developed countries. Furthermore, under the nuclear weapons nonproliferation policy, the use of high enriched uranium fuel in research reactors is obliged to change to the use of low enriched uranium fuel. In such severe situation, this paper refers to the role of the research reactor once more through the operation experience of university-owned research reactor KUR (Kyoto University Reactor, Japan) and describes that research reactor is indispensable for the preparation to the second coming nuclear age. (author)

  3. Power generation costs for alternate reactor fuel cycles

    Smolen, G.R.; Delene, J.G.

    1980-09-01

    The total electric generating costs at the power plant busbar are estimated for various nuclear reactor fuel cycles which may be considered for power generation in the future. The reactor systems include pressurized water reactors (PWR), heavy-water reactors (HWR), high-temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGR), liquid-metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR), light-water pre-breeder and breeder reactors (LWPR, LWBR), and a fast mixed spectrum reactor (FMSR). Fuel cycles include once-through, uranium-only recycle, and full recycle of the uranium and plutonium in the spent fuel assemblies. The U 3 O 8 price for economic transition from once-through LWR fuel cycles to both PWR recycle and LMFBR systems is estimated. Electric power generation costs were determined both for a reference set of unit cost parameters and for a range of uncertainty in these parameters. In addition, cost sensitivity parameters are provided so that independent estimations can be made for alternate cost assumptions

  4. Molten salts in nuclear reactors

    Dirian, J.; Saint-James

    1959-01-01

    Collection of references dealing with the physicochemical studies of fused salts, in particular the alkali and alkali earth halides. Numerous binary, ternary and quaternary systems of these halides with those of uranium and thorium are examined, and the physical properties, density, viscosity, vapour pressure etc... going from the halides to the mixtures are also considered. References relating to the corrosion of materials by these salts are included and the treatment of the salts with a view to recuperation after irradiation in a nuclear reactor is discussed. (author) [fr

  5. The CEA research reactors

    Schwartz, J.P.

    1993-01-01

    Two main research reactors, specifically designed, PEGASE reactor and Laue-Langevin high flux reactor, are presented. The PEGASE reactor was designed at the end of the 50s for the study of the gas cooled reactor fuel element behaviour under irradiation; the HFR reactor, was designed in the late 60s to serve as a high yield and high level neutron source. Historical backgrounds, core and fuel characteristics and design, flux characteristics, etc., are presented. 5 figs

  6. Atomic reactor thermal engineering

    Kim, Gwang Ryong

    1983-02-01

    This book starts the introduction of atomic reactor thermal engineering including atomic reaction, chemical reaction, nuclear reaction neutron energy and soon. It explains heat transfer, heat production in the atomic reactor, heat transfer of fuel element in atomic reactor, heat transfer and flow of cooler, thermal design of atomic reactor, design of thermodynamics of atomic reactor and various. This deals with the basic knowledge of thermal engineering for atomic reactor.

  7. Operational and reliability experience with reactor instrumentation

    Dixon, F.; Gow, R.S.

    1978-01-01

    In the last 15 years the CEGB has experienced progressive plant development, integration and changes in operating regime through nine nuclear (gas-cooled reactor) power stations with corresponding instrumentation advances leading towards more refined centralized control. Operation and reliability experience with reactor instrumentation is reported in this paper with reference to the progressive changes related to the early magnox, late magnox and AGR periods. Data on instrumentation reliability in terms of reactor forced outages are presented and show that the instrumentation contributions to loss of generating plant availability are small. Reactor safety circuits, neutron flux and temperature measurements, gas analysis and vibration monitoring are discussed. In reviewing the reactor instrumentation the emphasis is on reporting recent experience, particularly on AGR equipment, but overall performance and changes to magnox equipment are included so that some appreciation can be obtained of instrumentation requirements with respect to plant lifetimes. (author)

  8. Status of the US stellarator reactor study

    Lyon, J.F.; Gulec, K.; Miller, R.L.; El-Guebaly, L.

    1994-01-01

    Stellarators have significant operational advantages over tokamaks as ignited steady-state reactors. This scoping study, which uses an integrated cost-minimization code that incorporates costing and reactor component models self-consistently with a 1-D energy transport calculation, shows that a torsatron reactor could also be competitive with a tokamak reactor. The projected cost of electricity (COE) estimated using the ARIES costing algorithms is 62.5 mill/kW(e)h in constant 1992 dollars for a 1-GW(e) Compact Torsatron reactor reference case. The COE is relatively insensitive (< 10% variation) over a wide range of assumptions including variations in the maximum field allowed on the coils, the coil elongation, the shape of the density profile, the beta limit, the confinement multiplier, and the presence of a large loss region for alpha particles. The largest variations in the COE occur for variations in the electrical power output demanded and the plasma-coil separation ratio

  9. Nuclear reactor types

    Jones, P.M.S.

    1987-01-01

    The characteristics of different reactor types designed to exploit controlled fission reactions are explained. Reactors vary from low power research devices to high power devices especially designed to produce heat, either for direct use or to produce steam to drive turbines to generate electricity or propel ships. A general outline of basic reactors (thermal and fast) is given and then the different designs considered. The first are gas cooled, including the Magnox reactors (a list of UK Magnox stations and reactor performance is given), advanced gas cooled reactors (a list of UK AGRs is given) and the high temperature reactor. Light water cooled reactors (pressurized water [PWR] and boiling water [BWR] reactors) are considered next. Heavy water reactors are explained and listed. The pressurized heavy water reactors (including CANDU type reactors), boiling light water, steam generating heavy water reactors and gas cooled heavy water reactors all come into this category. Fast reactors (liquid metal fast breeder reactors and gas cooled fast reactors) and then water-cooled graphite-moderated reactors (RBMK) (the type at Chernobyl-4) are discussed. (U.K.)

  10. Water level monitoring device in nuclear reactor

    Miura, Kiyohide; Otake, Tomohiro.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To monitor the water level in a pressure vessel of BWR type nuclear reactors at high accuracy by improving the compensation functions. Constitution: In the conventional water level monitor in a nuclear reactor, if the pressure vessel is displaced by the change of the pressure in the reactor or the temperature of the reactor water, the relative level of the reference water head in a condensation vessel is changed to cause deviation between the actual water level and the indicated water level to reduce the monitoring accuracy. According to the invention, means for detecting the position of the reference water head and means for detection the position in the condensation vessel are disposed to the pressure vessel. Then, relative positional change between the condensation vessel and the reference water head is calculated based on detection sinals from both of the means. The water level is compensated and calculated by water level calculation means based on the relative positional change, water level signals from the level gage and the pressure signals from the pressure gage. As a result, if the pressure vessel is displaced due to the change of the temperature or pressure, it is possible to measure the reactor water level accurately thereby remakably improve the reliability for the water level control in the nuclear reactor. (Horiuchi, T.)

  11. Status of fusion reactor blanket design

    Smith, D.L.; Sze, D.K.

    1986-02-01

    The recent Blanket Comparison and Selection Study (BCSS), which was a comprehensive evaluation of fusion reactor blanket design and the status of blanket technology, serves as an excellent basis for further development of blanket technology. This study provided an evaluation of over 130 blanket concepts for the reference case of electric power producing, DT fueled reactors in both Tokamak and Tandem Mirror (TMR) configurations. Based on a specific set of reactor operating parameters, the current understanding of materials and blanket technology, and a uniform evaluation methodology developed as part of the study, a limited number of concepts were identified that offer the greatest potential for making fusion an attractive energy source

  12. Nuclear reactor safety: physics and engineering aspects

    Kinchin, G.H.

    1982-01-01

    In order to carry out the sort of probabilistic analysis referred to by Farmer (Contemp. Phys.; 22:349(1981)), it is necessary to have a good understanding of the processes involved in both normal and accident conditions in a nuclear reactor. Some of these processes, for a variety of different reactor systems, are considered in sections dealing with the neutron chain reaction, the removal of heat from the reactor, material problems, reliability of protective systems and a number of specific topics of particular interest from the point of view of physics or engineering. (author)

  13. The Modular Helium Reactor for Hydrogen Production

    E. Harvego; M. Richards; A. Shenoy; K. Schultz; L. Brown; M. Fukuie

    2006-01-01

    For electricity and hydrogen production, an advanced reactor technology receiving considerable international interest is a modular, passively-safe version of the high-temperature, gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), known in the U.S. as the Modular Helium Reactor (MHR), which operates at a power level of 600 MW(t). For hydrogen production, the concept is referred to as the H2-MHR. Two concepts that make direct use of the MHR high-temperature process heat are being investigated in order to improve the efficiency and economics of hydrogen production. The first concept involves coupling the MHR to the Sulfur-Iodine (SI) thermochemical water splitting process and is referred to as the SI-Based H2-MHR. The second concept involves coupling the MHR to high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) and is referred to as the HTE-Based H2-MHR

  14. Argentinean integrated small reactor design and scale economy analysis of integrated reactor

    Florido, P. C.; Bergallo, J. E.; Ishida, M. V.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the design of CAREM, which is Argentinean integrated small reactor project and the scale economy analysis results of integrated reactor. CAREM project consists on the development, design and construction of a small nuclear power plant. CAREM is an advanced reactor conceived with new generation design solutions and standing on the large experience accumulated in the safe operation of Light Water Reactors. The CAREM is an indirect cycle reactor with some distinctive and characteristic features that greatly simplify the reactor and also contribute to a highly level of safety: integrated primary cooling system, self pressurized, primary cooling by natural circulation and safety system relying on passive features. For a fully doupled economic evaluation of integrated reactors done by IREP (Integrated Reactor Evaluation Program) code transferred to IAEA, CAREM have been used as a reference point. The results shows that integrated reactors become competitive with power larger than 200MWe with Argentinean cheapest electricity option. Due to reactor pressure vessel construction limit, low pressure drop steam generator are used to reach power output of 200MWe for natural circulation. For forced circulation, 300MWe can be achieved. (author)

  15. Reactor safety

    Meneley, D.A.

    The people of Ontario have begun to receive the benefits of a low cost, assured supply of electrical energy from CANDU nuclear stations. This indigenous energy source also has excellent safety characteristics. Safety has been one of the central themes of the CANDU development program from its very beginning. A great deal of work has been done to establish that public risks are small. However, safety design criteria are now undergoing extensive review, with a real prospect of more stringent requirements being applied in the future. Considering the newness of the technology it is not surprising that a consensus does not yet exist; this makes it imperative to discuss the issues. It is time to examine the policies and practice of reactor safety management in Canada to decide whether or not further restrictions are justified in the light of current knowledge

  16. Nuclear reactor

    Schabert, H.P.; Weber, R.; Bauer, A.

    1975-01-01

    The refuelling of a PWR power reactor of about 1,200 MWe is performed by a transport pipe in the containment leading from an external to an internal fuel pit. A wagon to transport the fuel elements can go from a vertical loading position to an also vertical deloading position in the inner fuel pit via guide rollers. The necessary horizontal movement is effected by means of a cable line through the transport pipe which is inclined at least 10 0 . Gravity thus helps in the movement to the deloading position. The cable line with winch is fastened outside the containment. Swivelling devices tip the wagon from the horizontal to the vertical position or vice versa. Loading and deloading are done laterally. (TK/LH) [de

  17. Nuclear reactor

    Schweiger, F.; Glahe, E.

    1976-01-01

    In a nuclear reactor of the kind which is charged with spherical reaction elements and in which control rods are arranged to be thrust directly into the charge, each control rod has at least one screw thread on its external surface so that as the rod is thrust into the charge it is caused to rotate and thus make penetration easier. The length of each control rod may have two distinct portions, a latter portion which carries a screw thread and a lead-in portion which is shorter than the latter portion and which may carry a thread of greater pitch than that on the latter portion or may have a number of axially extending ribs instead of a thread

  18. Reactor container

    Furukawa, Hideyasu; Oyamada, Osamu; Uozumi, Hiroto.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a container for a reactor provided with a pressure suppressing chamber pool which can prevent bubble vibrating load, particularly negative pressure generated at the time of starting to release exhaust from a main steam escape-safety valve from being transmitted to a lower liner plate of the container. Constitution: This arrangement is characterized in that a safety valve exhaust pool for main steam escape, in which a pressure suppressing chamber pool is separated and intercepted from pool water in the pressure suppressing chamber pool, a safety valve exhaust pipe is open into said safety valve exhaust pool, and an isolator member, which isolates the bottom liner plate in the pressure suppressing chamber pool from the pool water, is disposed on the bottom of the safety valve exhaust pool. (Nakamura, S.)

  19. Nuclear reactors

    Prescott, R.F.

    1976-01-01

    In the system described the fuel elements are arranged vertically in groups and are supported in such a manner as to tend to tilt them towards the center of the respective group, the fuel elements being urged laterally into abutment with one another. The elements have interlocking bearing pads, whereby lateral movement of adjacent elements is resisted; this improves the stability of the reactor core during refuelling operations. Fuel elements may comprise clusters of parallel fuel pins enclosed in a wrapper of hexagonal cross section, with bearing pads in the form of spline-like ribs located on each side of the wrapper and extending parallel to the longitudinal axis of the fuel element, being interlockable with ribs on pads of adjacent fuel elements. The arrangement is applicable to a reactor core in which fuel elements and control rod guide tubes are arranged in modules each of which comprises a cluster of at least three fuel elements, one of which is rigidly supported whilst the others are resiliently tilted towards the center of the cluster so as to lean on the rigidly supported element. It is also applicable to modules comprising a cluster of six fuel elements, each resiliently tilted towards a central void to form a circular arch. The modules may include additional fuel elements located outside the clusters and also resiliently tilted towards the central voids, the latter being used to accommodate control rod guide tubes. The need for separate structural members to act as leaning posts is thus avoided. Such structural members are liable to irradiation embrittlement, that could lead to core failure. (U.K.)

  20. VBE reference framework

    Afsarmanesh, H.; Camarinha-Matos, L.M.; Ermilova, E.; Camarinha-Matos, L.M.; Afsarmanesh, H.; Ollus, M.

    2008-01-01

    Defining a comprehensive and generic "reference framework" for Virtual organizations Breeding Environments (VBEs), addressing all their features and characteristics, is challenging. While the definition and modeling of VBEs has become more formalized during the last five years, "reference models"

  1. CMS Statistics Reference Booklet

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The annual CMS Statistics reference booklet provides a quick reference for summary information about health expenditures and the Medicare and Medicaid health...

  2. Nuclear reactor neutron shielding

    Speaker, Daniel P; Neeley, Gary W; Inman, James B

    2017-09-12

    A nuclear reactor includes a reactor pressure vessel and a nuclear reactor core comprising fissile material disposed in a lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel. The lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel is disposed in a reactor cavity. An annular neutron stop is located at an elevation above the uppermost elevation of the nuclear reactor core. The annular neutron stop comprises neutron absorbing material filling an annular gap between the reactor pressure vessel and the wall of the reactor cavity. The annular neutron stop may comprise an outer neutron stop ring attached to the wall of the reactor cavity, and an inner neutron stop ring attached to the reactor pressure vessel. An excore instrument guide tube penetrates through the annular neutron stop, and a neutron plug comprising neutron absorbing material is disposed in the tube at the penetration through the neutron stop.

  3. Changing quantum reference frames

    Palmer, Matthew C.; Girelli, Florian; Bartlett, Stephen D.

    2013-01-01

    We consider the process of changing reference frames in the case where the reference frames are quantum systems. We find that, as part of this process, decoherence is necessarily induced on any quantum system described relative to these frames. We explore this process with examples involving reference frames for phase and orientation. Quantifying the effect of changing quantum reference frames serves as a first step in developing a relativity principle for theories in which all objects includ...

  4. Multimegawatt Space Reactor Safety

    Stanley, M.L.

    1989-01-01

    The Multimegawatt (MMW) Space Reactor Project supports the Strategic Defense Initiative Office requirement to provide reliable, safe, cost-effective, electrical power in the MMW range. Specifically, power may be used for neutral particle beams, free electron lasers, electromagnetic launchers, and orbital transfer vehicles. This power plant technology may also apply to the electrical power required for other uses such as deep-space probes and planetary exploration. The Multimegawatt Space Reactor Project, the Thermionic Fuel Element Verification Program, and Centaurus Program all support the Multimegawatt Space Nuclear Power Program and form an important part of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) space and defense power systems activities. A major objective of the MMW project is the development of a reference flight system design that provides the desired levels of public safety, health protection, and special nuclear material (SNM) protection when used during its designated missions. The safety requirements for the MMW project are a hierarchy of requirements that consist of safety requirements/regulations, a safety policy, general safety criteria, safety technical specifications, safety design specifications, and the system design. This paper describes the strategy and philosophy behind the development of the safety requirements imposed upon the MMW concept developers. The safety organization, safety policy, generic safety issues, general safety criteria, and the safety technical specifications are discussed

  5. Tokamak experimental power reactor

    Stacey, W.M. Jr.; Abdou, M.A.; Brooks, J.N.

    1978-01-01

    A tokamak experimental power reactor has been designed that is capable of producing net electric power over a wide range of possible operating conditions. A net production of 81 MW of electricity is expected from the design reference conditions that assume a value of 0.07 for beta-toroidal, a maximum toroidal magnetic field of 9 T and a thermal conversion efficiency of 30%. Impurity control is achieved through the use of a low-Z first wall coating. This approach allows a burn time of 60 seconds without the incorporation of a divertor. The system is cooled by a dual pressurized water/steam system that could potentially provide thermal efficiencies as high as 39%. The first surface facing the plasma is a low-Z coated water cooled panel that is attached to a 20 cm thick blanket module. The vacuum boundary is removed a total of 22 cm from the plasma, thereby minimizing the amount of radiation damage in this vital component. Consideration is given in the design to the possible use of the EPR as a materials test reactor. It is estimated that the total system could be built for less than 550 million dollars

  6. EPRTM Reactor neutron instrumentation

    Pfeiffer, Maxime; SALA, Stephanie

    2013-06-01

    The core safety during operation is linked, in particular, to the respect of criteria related to the heat generated in fuel rods and to the heat exchange between the rods and the coolant. This local power information is linked to the power distribution in the core. In order to evaluate the core power distribution, the EPR TM reactor relies on several types of neutron detectors: - ionization chambers located outside the vessel and used for protection and monitoring - a fixed in-core instrumentation based on Cobalt Self Powered Neutron Detectors used for protection and monitoring - a mobile reference in-core instrumentation based on Vanadium aero-balls This document provides a description of this instrumentation and its use in core protection, limitation, monitoring and control functions. In particular, a description of the detectors and the principles of their signal generation is supplied as well as the description of the treatments related to these detectors in the EPR TM reactor I and C systems (including periodical calibration). (authors)

  7. Nuclear reactor instrumentation

    Duncombe, E.; McGonigal, G.

    1976-01-01

    Reference is made to the instrumentation of liquid metal cooled fast reactors. In order to ensure the safe operation of such reactors it is necessary to constantly monitor the coolant flowing through the fuel assemblies for temperature and rate of flow, requiring a large number of sensors. An improved and simplified arrangement is claimed in which the fuel assemblies feed a fraction of coolant to three instrument units arranged to sense the temperature and rate of flow of samples of coolant. Each instrument unit comprises a sleeve housing a sensing unit and has a number of inlet ducts arranged for receiving coolant from a fuel assembly together with a single outlet. The sensing unit has three thermocouple hot junctions connected in series, the hot junctions and inlet ducts being arranged in pairs. Electromagnetic windings around an inductive core are arranged to sense variation in flow of liquid metal by flux distortion. Fission product sensing means may also be provided. Full constructional details are given. (U.K.)

  8. Reactor coolant pump motors manufacturing capability and references

    Baudin, Patyrick [AREVA NP, Paris (France)

    2008-04-15

    Flywheel: - Main inertia of the RCP rotor: - 2 disks, shrunk to the upper side of the shaft, driven in rotation by 3 keys. - Material: rolling A533 grade B class 1 low alloy steel plates - Major inertia of the RCP rotor (Allows a slow shut down of the RCP). - Centered by the runner collar in normal operating conditions. - Designed to withstand over-speed of 1.25 x nominal rotating speed. - Easy periodic ultrasonic inspection without disassembly of the flywheel and/or removal of the motor. Anti-reverse rotation device: Prevents reverse rotation of shaft-line when RCP is stopped and others running. 5 forged pawls assembled on the flywheel outside diameter. Ratchet plate with shock absorbers and springs. Operation: Pawls are maintained lifted by centrifugal effect since N > 150 rpm. During RCP shut-down, as N < 150 rpm pawls drop on the ratchet plate prevents reverse-rotation due to reverse torque. Inertia effects are limited by shock-absorbers. Double thrust bearing 'Kings bury' type designed to support loads of about 60 tons 8 babbit ted steel shoes with temperature sensors, equalizing pads distribute equal axial load on each shoe, designed to withstand normal, transient and incidental loading conditions. Viscosity pump ensure continuous oil lubrication and oil circulation to cooler. Instrumentation: shoes temperature (167 .deg. F max). High pressure oil pump provides an oil film between runner and shoes before and during RCP start-up and shut-down. Secondary function: oil spray into the upper guide bearing. Characteristics: minimum oil injection pressure 610 psi. Upper guide bearing 8 babbit ted steel shoes. Preloaded shoes to improve the vibratory behavior. Lubricated by oil. Oil capacity: {+-} 240 gallons. Magnetic core made of high silicon steel sheets, insulated on both sides with 'ALKOPHOS' Stacks of sheets are periodically spaced by vent spacers Winding made of rectangular section copper bars, insulated with mica tape Vacuum impregnation with epoxy resin End turns supports: {center_dot} coil stacking is made by lacing up technique {center_dot} two rings and additional wedges rows increase end-turns stiffness. Magnetic core made of high silicon steel sheets, insulated on both faces with 'ALKOPHOS'. Stacks of sheets are periodically spaced vent spacers. Squirrel cage consists of copper alloy bars brazed to the end rings. Short circuit rings are maintained by non magnetic steel retaining ring to withstand centrifugal and mechanical loads.

  9. Reactor coolant pump motors manufacturing capability and references

    Baudin, Patyrick

    2008-01-01

    Flywheel: - Main inertia of the RCP rotor: - 2 disks, shrunk to the upper side of the shaft, driven in rotation by 3 keys. - Material: rolling A533 grade B class 1 low alloy steel plates - Major inertia of the RCP rotor (Allows a slow shut down of the RCP). - Centered by the runner collar in normal operating conditions. - Designed to withstand over-speed of 1.25 x nominal rotating speed. - Easy periodic ultrasonic inspection without disassembly of the flywheel and/or removal of the motor. Anti-reverse rotation device: Prevents reverse rotation of shaft-line when RCP is stopped and others running. 5 forged pawls assembled on the flywheel outside diameter. Ratchet plate with shock absorbers and springs. Operation: Pawls are maintained lifted by centrifugal effect since N > 150 rpm. During RCP shut-down, as N < 150 rpm pawls drop on the ratchet plate prevents reverse-rotation due to reverse torque. Inertia effects are limited by shock-absorbers. Double thrust bearing 'Kings bury' type designed to support loads of about 60 tons 8 babbit ted steel shoes with temperature sensors, equalizing pads distribute equal axial load on each shoe, designed to withstand normal, transient and incidental loading conditions. Viscosity pump ensure continuous oil lubrication and oil circulation to cooler. Instrumentation: shoes temperature (167 .deg. F max). High pressure oil pump provides an oil film between runner and shoes before and during RCP start-up and shut-down. Secondary function: oil spray into the upper guide bearing. Characteristics: minimum oil injection pressure 610 psi. Upper guide bearing 8 babbit ted steel shoes. Preloaded shoes to improve the vibratory behavior. Lubricated by oil. Oil capacity: ± 240 gallons. Magnetic core made of high silicon steel sheets, insulated on both sides with 'ALKOPHOS' Stacks of sheets are periodically spaced by vent spacers Winding made of rectangular section copper bars, insulated with mica tape Vacuum impregnation with epoxy resin End turns supports: · coil stacking is made by lacing up technique · two rings and additional wedges rows increase end-turns stiffness. Magnetic core made of high silicon steel sheets, insulated on both faces with 'ALKOPHOS'. Stacks of sheets are periodically spaced vent spacers. Squirrel cage consists of copper alloy bars brazed to the end rings. Short circuit rings are maintained by non magnetic steel retaining ring to withstand centrifugal and mechanical loads

  10. Regulation for installation and operation of reactor

    1977-01-01

    Concerning the description of an application for the approval of installation of a reactor, stipulated in Article 23 paragraph 2 of the Law for Regulation of Nuclear Source Materials, Nuclear Fuel Materials and Reactors (hereinafter referred to as the Law), the following items must be written. Namely, the heat output of the reactor in Article 23 paragraph 2 item 3 of the Law, the position, structure and facilities of the reactor facilities, described according to the stipulated classifications, the work plan, nuclear fuel materials employed, and the disposal of spent fuel. Concerning an application for the approval of a reactor installed aboard a foreign ship, stipulations are made separately. Description of an application for the approval of change of the heat output of a reactor and others should include the stipulated items. When it is wished to undergo inspection of the construction and performance of reactor facilities, an application for that end including the required items should be filed. Various safety measures preventing personnel from being exposed to radiation should be taken. When a foreign atomic-powered ship tries to enter a Japanese port, the stipulated necessary informations should be reported 60 days before such ship actually enters the Japanese port. A chief technician of reactors should take and pass the official examination. (Rikitake, Y.)

  11. The plutonium recycle for PWR reactors from brazilian nuclear program

    Rubini, L.A.

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to evaluate the material requirements of the nuclear fuel cycle with plutonium recycle. The study starts with the calculation of a reference reactor and has flexibility to evaluate the demand under two alternatives of nuclear fuel cycle for Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR): Without plutonium recycle; and with plutonium recycle. Calculations of the reference reactor have been carried out with the CELL-CORE codes. Variations in the material requirements were studied considering changes in the installed nuclear capacity of PWR reactors, the capacity factor of these reactors, and the introduction of fast breeders. Recycling plutonium produced inside the system can reach economies of about 5% U 3 O 8 and 6% separative work units if recycle is assumed only after the fifth operation cycle of the thermal reactors. (author)

  12. Gas cooled reactor assessment. Volume II. Final report, February 9, 1976--June 30, 1976

    1976-08-01

    This report was prepared to document the estimated power plant capital and operating costs, and the safety and environmental assessments used in support of the Gas Cooled Reactor Assessment performed by Arthur D. Little, Inc. (ADL), for the U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration. The gas-cooled reactor technologies investigated include: the High Temperature Gas Reactor Steam Cycle (HTGR-SC), the HTGR Direct Cycle (HTGR-DC), the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) and the Gas Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR). Reference technologies used for comparison include: Light Water Reactors (LWR), the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR), conventional coal-fired steam plants, and coal combustion for process heat

  13. Progress of nuclear fusion research and review on development of fusion reactors

    1976-01-01

    Set up in October 1971, the ad hoc Committee on Survey of Nuclear Fusion Reactors has worked on overall fusion reactor aspects and definition of the future problems under four working groups of core, nuclear heat, materials and system. The presect volume is intended to provide reference materials in the field of fusion reactor engineering, prepared by members of the committee. Contents are broadly the following: concept of the nuclear fusion reactor, fusion core engineering, fusion reactor blanket engineering, fusion reactor materials engineering, and system problems in development of fusion reactors. (Mori, K.)

  14. IAEA biological reference materials

    Parr, R.M.; Schelenz, R.; Ballestra, S.

    1988-01-01

    The Analytical Quality Control Services programme of the IAEA encompasses a wide variety of intercomparisons and reference materials. This paper reviews only those aspects of the subject having to do with biological reference materials. The 1988 programme foresees 13 new intercomparison exercises, one for major, minor and trace elements, five for radionuclides, and seven for stable isotopes. Twenty-two natural matrix biological reference materials are available: twelve for major, minor and trace elements, six for radionuclides, and four for chlorinated hydrocarbons. Seven new intercomparisons and reference materials are in preparation or under active consideration. Guidelines on the correct use of reference materials are being prepared for publication in 1989 in consultation with other major international producers and users of biological reference materials. The IAEA database on available reference materials is being updated and expanded in scope, and a new publication is planned for 1989. (orig.)

  15. FBR type reactor

    Kimura, Kimitaka; Fukuie, Ken; Iijima, Tooru; Shimpo, Masakazu.

    1994-01-01

    In an FBR type reactor for exchanging fuels by pulling up reactor core upper mechanisms, a connection mechanism is disposed for connecting the top of the reactor core and the lower end of the reactor core upper mechanisms. In addition, a cylindrical body is disposed surrounding the reactor core upper mechanisms, and a support member is disposed to the cylindrical body for supporting an intermediate portion of the reactor core upper mechanisms. Then, the lower end of the reactor core upper mechanisms is connected to the top of the reactor core. Same displacements are caused to both of them upon occurrence of earthquakes and, as a result, it is possible to eliminate mutual horizontal displacement between a control rod guide hole of the reactor core upper mechanisms and a control rod insertion hole of the reactor core. In addition, since the intermediate portion of the reactor core upper mechanisms is supported by the support member disposed to the cylindrical body surrounding the reactor core upper mechanisms, deformation caused to the lower end of the reactor core upper mechanisms is reduced, so that the mutual horizontal displacement with respect to the control rod insertion hole of the reactor core can be reduced. As a result, performance of control rod insertion upon occurrence of the earthquakes is improved, so that reactor shutdown is conducted more reliably to improve reactor safety. (N.H.)

  16. The prototype fast reactor

    Broomfield, A.M.

    1985-01-01

    The paper concerns the Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR), which is a liquid metal cooled fast reactor power station, situated at Dounreay, Scotland. The principal design features of a Fast Reactor and the PFR are given, along with key points of operating history, and health and safety features. The role of the PFR in the development programme for commercial reactors is discussed. (U.K.)

  17. Department of reactor technology

    1980-01-01

    The activities of the Department of Reactor Technology at Risoe during 1979 are described. The work is presented in five chapters: Reactor Engineering, Reactor Physics and Dynamics, Heat Transfer and Hydraulics, The DR 1 Reactor, and Non-Nuclear Activities. A list of the staff and of publications is included. (author)

  18. NCSU Reactor Sharing Program

    Perez, P.B.

    1993-01-01

    The Nuclear Reactor Program at North Carolina State University provides the PULSTAR Research Reactor and associated facilities to eligible institutions with support, in part, from the Department of Energy Reactor Sharing Program. Participation in the NCSU Reactor Sharing Program continues to increase steadily with visitors ranging from advance high school physics and chemistry students to Ph.D. level research from neighboring universities

  19. Reactor safety method

    Vachon, L.J.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to safety means for preventing a gas cooled nuclear reactor from attaining criticality prior to start up in the event the reactor core is immersed in hydrogenous liquid. This is accomplished by coating the inside surface of the reactor coolant channels with a neutral absorbing material that will vaporize at the reactor's operating temperature

  20. Physics of nuclear reactors

    Baeten, Peter

    2006-01-01

    This course gives an introduction to Nuclear Reactor Physics. The first chapter explains the most important parameters and concepts in nuclear reactor physics such as fission, cross sections and the effective multiplication factor. Further on, in the second chapter, the flux distributions in a stationary reactor are derived from the diffusion equation. Reactor kinetics, reactor control and reactor dynamics (feedback effects) are described in the following three chapters. The course concludes with a short description of the different types of existing and future reactors. (author)

  1. Reactor core and initially loaded reactor core of nuclear reactor

    Koyama, Jun-ichi; Aoyama, Motoo.

    1989-01-01

    In BWR type reactors, improvement for the reactor shutdown margin is an important characteristic condition togehter with power distribution flattening . However, in the reactor core at high burnup degree, the reactor shutdown margin is different depending on the radial position of the reactor core. That is , the reactor shutdown margin is smaller in the outer peripheral region than in the central region of the reactor core. In view of the above, the reactor core is divided radially into a central region and as outer region. The amount of fissionable material of first fuel assemblies newly loaded in the outer region is made less than the amount of the fissionable material of second fuel assemblies newly loaded in the central region, to thereby improve the reactor shutdown margin in the outer region. Further, the ratio between the amount of the fissionable material in the upper region and that of the fissionable material in the lower portion of the first fuel assemblies is made smaller than the ratio between the amount of the fissionable material in the upper region and that of the fissionable material in the lower region of the second fuel assemblies, to thereby obtain a sufficient thermal margin in the central region. (K.M.)

  2. Nuclear reactors. Introduction

    Boiron, P.

    1997-01-01

    This paper is an introduction to the 'nuclear reactors' volume of the Engineers Techniques collection. It gives a general presentation of the different articles of the volume which deal with: the physical basis (neutron physics and ionizing radiations-matter interactions, neutron moderation and diffusion), the basic concepts and functioning of nuclear reactors (possible fuel-moderator-coolant-structure combinations, research and materials testing reactors, reactors theory and neutron characteristics, neutron calculations for reactor cores, thermo-hydraulics, fluid-structure interactions and thermomechanical behaviour of fuels in PWRs and fast breeder reactors, thermal and mechanical effects on reactors structure), the industrial reactors (light water, pressurized water, boiling water, graphite moderated, fast breeder, high temperature and heavy water reactors), and the technology of PWRs (conceiving and building rules, nuclear parks and safety, reactor components and site selection). (J.S.)

  3. Research about reactor operator's personality characteristics and performance

    Wei Li; He Xuhong; Zhao Bingquan

    2003-01-01

    To predict and evaluate the reactor operator's performance by personality characteristics is an important part of reactor operator safety assessment. Using related psychological theory combined with the Chinese operator's fact and considering the effect of environmental factors to personality analysis, paper does the research about the about the relationships between reactor operator's performance and personality characteristics, and offers the reference for operator's selection, using and performance in the future. (author)

  4. Fast breeder reactors: can we learn from experience

    Keck, O.

    1981-01-01

    An economic analysis of FBRs, in particular the long-term benefits to be expected, with reference to the experience of the West German fast breeder reactor programme suggests ways of bringing more realism into governmental decisions on the development of new reactor types. It is suggested that if reactor manufacturers and utilities financed commercial-size demonstration plants from their own funds, then the government would get more realistic advice. (U.K.)

  5. Thermonuclear reactor

    Yasutomi, Yoshiyuki; Nakagawa, Moroo; Sawai, Yuichi; Chiba, Akio; Suzuki, Yasutaka.

    1997-01-01

    Silicon composited with reinforcing metals is used for a divertor cooling substrate having an effect as a cooling tube to provide a silicon base composite material having increased electric resistance and toughness. The blending ratio of reinforcing materials in the form of granules, whiskers or long fibers is controlled in order to control heat conductivity, electric resistivity and mechanical performances. The divertor cooling substrate comprising the silicon base composite material is integrated with a plasma facing material. The production method therefor includes ordinary metal matrix composite forming methods such as powder metallurgy, melting penetration method, high pressure solidification casting method, centrifugal casting method and vacuum casting method. Since the cooling plate is constituted with the light metal and highly electric resistant metal base composite material, sharing force due to eddy current can be reduced, and radiation exposure can be minimized. Accordingly, a cooling structure for a thermonuclear reactor effective for the improvement of environmental problems caused by waste disposal can be attained. (N.H.)

  6. Nuclear reactor

    Irion, L.; Tautz, J.; Ulrych, G.

    1976-01-01

    This additional patent complements the arrangement of non-return valves to prevent loss of cooling water on fracture of external tubes in the main coolant circuit (according to PS 24 24 427.7) by ensuring that the easily movable valves only operate in case of a fault, but do not flutter in operation, because the direction of flow is not the same at each location where they are installed. The remedy for this undesirable effect consists of allocating 1 non-return valve unit with 5 to 10 valves to each (of several) ducts for the cooling water intake. These units are installed in the annular space between the reactor vessel and the pressure vessel below the inlet of the ducts. Due to flow guidance surfaces in the same space, the incoming cooling water is deflected downwards and as the guiding surfaces are closed at the sides, must pass parallel to the valves of the non-return valve unit. On fracture of the external cooling water inlet pipe concerned, all valves of this unit close due to reversal of flow on the outlet side. (TK) [de

  7. Nuclear reactor coolant channels

    Macbeth, R.V.

    1978-01-01

    A nuclear reactor coolant channel is described that is suitable for sub-cooled reactors as in pressurised water reactors as well as for bulk boiling, as in boiling water reactors and steam generating nuclear reactors. The arrangement aims to improve heat transfer between the fuel elements and the coolant. Full constructional details are given. See also other similar patents by the author. (U.K.)

  8. Fast breeder reactors

    Heinzel, V.

    1975-01-01

    The author gives a survey of 'fast breeder reactors'. In detail the process of breeding, the reasons for the development of fast breeders, the possible breeder reactors, the design criteria, fuels, cladding, coolant, and safety aspects are reported on. Design data of some experimental reactors already in operation are summarized in stabular form. 300 MWe Prototype-Reactors SNR-300 and PFR are explained in detail and data of KWU helium-cooled fast breeder reactors are given. (HR) [de

  9. Reactor-specific spent fuel discharge projections, 1987-2020

    Walling, R.C.; Heeb, C.M.; Purcell, W.L.

    1988-03-01

    The creation of five reactor-specific spent fuel data bases that contain information on the projected amounts of spent fuel to be discharged from U.S. commercial nuclear reactors through the year 2020 is described. The data bases contain detailed spent fuel information from existing, planned, and projected pressurized water reactors (PWR) and boiling water eactors (BWR), and one existing high temperature gas reactor (HTGR). The projections are based on individual reactor information supplied by the U.S. reactor owners. The basic information is adjusted to conform to Energy Information Administration (EIA) forecasts for nuclear installed capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharged. The EIA cases considered are: No New Orders (assumes increasing burnup), No New Orders with No Increased Burnup, Upper Reference (assumes increasing burnup), Upper Reference with No Increased Burnup, and Lower Reference (assumes increasing burnup). Detailed, by-reactor tables are provided for annual discharged amounts of spent fuel, for storage requirements assuming maximum at-reactor storage, and for storage requirements assuming maximum at-reactor storage plus intra-utility transshipment of spent fuel. 8 refs., 8 figs., 10 tabs

  10. Reactor-specific spent fuel discharge projections: 1986 to 2020

    Heeb, C.M.; Walling, R.C.; Purcell, W.L.

    1987-03-01

    The creation of five reactor-specific spent fuel data bases that contain information on the projected amounts of spent fuel to be discharged from US commercial nuclear reactors through the year 2020 is described. The data bases contain detailed spent-fuel information from existing, planned, and projected pressurized water reactors (PWR) and boiling water reactors (BWR). The projections are based on individual reactor information supplied by the US reactor owners. The basic information is adjusted to conform to Energy Information Agency (EIA) forecasts for nuclear installed capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharged. The EIA cases considered are: (1) No new orders with extended burnup, (2) No new orders with constant burnup, (3) Upper reference (which assumes extended burnup), (4) Upper reference with constant burnup, and (5) Lower reference (which assumes extended burnup). Detailed, by-reactor tables are provided for annual discharged amounts of spent fuel, for storage requirements assuming maximum-at-reactor storage, and for storage requirements assuming maximum-at-reactor plus intra-utility transshipment of spent fuel. 6 refs., 8 figs., 8 tabs

  11. Corrosion behavior of duplex and reference cladding in NPP Grohnde

    Besch, O.A.; Yagnik, S.K.; Eucken, C.M.; Bradley, E.R.

    1996-01-01

    The Nuclear Fuel Industry Research (NFIR) Group undertook a lead test assembly (LTA) program in NPP Grohnde PWR in Germany to assess the corrosion performance of duplex and reference cladding. Two identical 16 by 16 LTAs, each containing 32 peripheral test rods, completed four reactor cycles, reaching a peak rod burnup of 46 MWd/kgU. The results from poolside examinations performed at the end of each cycle, together with power histories and coolant chemistry, are reported. Five different cladding materials were characterized during fabrication. The corrosion performance of the cladding materials was tracked in long-term tests in high-pressure, high-temperature autoclaves. The relative ranking of corrosion behavior in such tests corresponded well with the in-reactor corrosion performance. The extent and distribution of hydriding in duplex and reference specimens during the autoclave testing has been characterized. The in-reactor corrosion data indicate that the low-tin Zircaloy-4 reference cladding, R2, had an improved corrosion resistance compared to high-tin Zircaloy-4 reference cladding, R1. Two types of duplex cladding, D1 (Zr-2.5% Nb) and D2 (Zr-0.4% Fe-0.5% Sn), showed an even further improvement in corrosion resistance compared to R2 cladding. The third duplex cladding, D3 (Zr-4 + 1.0% Nb), had significantly less corrosion resistance, which was inferior to R1. The in-reactor and out-reactor corrosion performances have been ranked

  12. Nuclear power reactors in the world. April 1990 ed.

    1990-01-01

    This is the tenth edition of Reference Data Series No. 2, Nuclear Power Reactors in the World, which is published once per year, to present the most recent reactor data available to the Agency. It contains the following summarized information: General information as of the end of 1989 on power reactors operating or under construction, and shut down; Performance data on reactors operating in the Agency's Member States, as reported to the IAEA. The information is collected by the Agency by circulating questionnaires to the Member States through the designated national correspondents. The replies are used to maintain computerized files on general and design data of, and operating experience with, power reactors. The Agency's power reactor information system (PRIS) comprising the above files provides all the information and data previously published in the Agency's Power Reactors in Member States and currently published in the Agency's Operating Experience with Nuclear Power Stations in Member States

  13. Nuclear power reactors in the world. Apr 1991 ed.

    1991-01-01

    This is the eleventh edition of Reference Data Series No. 2, Nuclear Power Reactors in the World, which is published once per year, to present the most recent reactor data available to the Agency. It contains the following summarized information: General information as of the end of 1990, on power reactors operating or under construction, and shut down; performance data on reactors operating in the Agency's Member States, as reported to the IAEA. This information is collected by the Agency by circulating questionnaires to the Member States through the designated national correspondents. The replies are used to maintain computerized files on general and design data of, and operating experience with, power reactors. The Agency's Power Reactor Information System (PRIS) comprising the above files provides all the information and data previously published in the Agency's Power Reactors in Member States and currently published in the Agency's Operating Experience with Nuclear Power Stations in Member States. 5 figs, 19 tabs

  14. Nuclear power reactors in the world. Apr 1985 ed.

    1985-01-01

    This is the fifth edition of Reference Data Series No. 2, Nuclear Power Reactors in the World, which replaces the Agency's publication Power Reactors in Member States. This bulletin contains the following summarized information on nuclear power reactors in the world: General information as of the end of 1984 on reactors operating or under construction and such additional information on planned and shutdown reactors as is available; Performance data on major reactor types operating in the Agency's Member States. The information is collected by the Agency by circulating questionnaires to the Member States through the designated national correspondents. The replies are used to maintain computerized files on general and design data of and operating experience with reactors

  15. Indoor air: Reference bibliography

    Campbell, D.; Staves, D.; McDonald, S.

    1989-07-01

    The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency initially established the indoor air Reference Bibliography in 1987 as an appendix to the Indoor Air Quality Implementation Plan. The document was submitted to Congress as required under Title IV--Radon Gas and Indoor Air Quality Research of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986. The Reference Bibliography is an extensive bibliography of reference materials on indoor air pollution. The Bibliography contains over 4500 citations and continues to increase as new articles appear

  16. Android quick APIs reference

    Cinar, Onur

    2015-01-01

    The Android Quick APIs Reference is a condensed code and APIs reference for the new Google Android 5.0 SDK. It presents the essential Android APIs in a well-organized format that can be used as a handy reference. You won't find any technical jargon, bloated samples, drawn out history lessons, or witty stories in this book. What you will find is a software development kit and APIs reference that is concise, to the point and highly accessible. The book is packed with useful information and is a must-have for any mobile or Android app developer or programmer. In the Android Quick APIs Refe

  17. Reactor Physics Training

    Baeten, P.

    2007-01-01

    University courses in nuclear reactor physics at the universities consist of a theoretical description of the physics and technology of nuclear reactors. In order to demonstrate the basic concepts in reactor physics, training exercises in nuclear reactor installations are also desirable. Since the number of reactor facilities is however strongly decreasing in Europe, it becomes difficult to offer to students a means for demonstrating the basic concepts in reactor physics by performing training exercises in nuclear installations. Universities do not generally possess the capabilities for performing training exercises. Therefore, SCK-CEN offers universities the possibility to perform (on a commercial basis) training exercises at its infrastructure consisting of two research reactors (BR1 and VENUS). Besides the organisation of training exercises in the framework of university courses, SCK-CEN also organizes theoretical courses in reactor physics for the education and training of nuclear reactor operators. It is indeed a very important subject to guarantee the safe operation of present and future nuclear reactors. In this framework, an understanding of the fundamental principles of nuclear reactor physics is also necessary for reactor operators. Therefore, the organisation of a basic Nuclear reactor physics course at the level of reactor operators in the initial and continuous training of reactor operators has proven to be indispensable. In most countries, such training also results from the direct request from the safety authorities to assure the high level of competence of the staff in nuclear reactors. The objectives this activity are: (1) to provide training and education activities in reactor physics for university students and (2) to organise courses in nuclear reactor physics for reactor operators

  18. Introduction to reactor internal materials for pressurized water reactor

    Ryu, Woo Suk; Hong, Joon Hwa; Jee, Se Hwan; Lee, Bong Sang; Kuk, Il Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-06-01

    This report reviewed the R and D states of reactor internal materials in order to be a reference for researches and engineers who are concerning on localization of the materials in the field or laboratory. General structure of PWR internals and material specification for YGN 3 and 4 were reviewed. States-of-arts on R and D of stainless steel and Alloy X-750 were reviewed, and degradation mechanisms of the components were analyzed. In order to develop the good domestic materials for reactor internal, following studies would be carried out: microstructure, sensitization behavior, fatigue property, irradiation-induced stress corrosion cracking/radiation-induced segregation, radiation embrittlement. (Author) 7 refs., 14 figs., 5 tabs.,.

  19. Introduction to reactor internal materials for pressurized water reactor

    Ryu, Woo Suk; Hong, Joon Hwa; Jee, Se Hwan; Lee, Bong Sang; Kuk, Il Hyun

    1994-06-01

    This report reviewed the R and D states of reactor internal materials in order to be a reference for researches and engineers who are concerning on localization of the materials in the field or laboratory. General structure of PWR internals and material specification for YGN 3 and 4 were reviewed. States-of-arts on R and D of stainless steel and Alloy X-750 were reviewed, and degradation mechanisms of the components were analyzed. In order to develop the good domestic materials for reactor internal, following studies would be carried out: microstructure, sensitization behavior, fatigue property, irradiation-induced stress corrosion cracking/radiation-induced segregation, radiation embrittlement. (Author) 7 refs., 14 figs., 5 tabs.,

  20. Evaluation of neutronic characteristics of in-pile test reactor for fast reactor safety research

    Uto, N.; Ohno, S.; Kawata, N. [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1996-09-01

    An extensive research program has been carried out at the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation for the safety of future liquid-metal fast breeder reactors to be commercialized. A major part of this program is investigation and planning of advanced safety experiments conducted with a new in-pile safety test facility, which is larger and more advanced than any of the currently existing test reactors. Such a transient safety test reactor generally has unique neutronic characteristics that require various studies from the reactor physics point of view. In this paper, the outcome of the neutronics study is highlighted with presenting a reference core design concept and its performance in regard to the safety test objectives. (author)

  1. The fast breeder reactor

    Collier, J.

    1990-01-01

    The arguments for and against the fast breeder reactor are debated. The case for the fast reactor is that the world energy demand will increase due to increasing population over the next forty years and that the damage to the global environment from burning fossil fuels which contribute to the greenhouse effect. Nuclear fission is the only large scale energy source which can achieve a cut in the use of carbon based fuels although energy conservation and renewable sources will also be important. Fast reactors produce more energy from uranium than other types of (thermal) reactors such as AGRs and PWRs. Fast reactors would be important from about 2020 onwards especially as by then many thermal reactors will need to be replaced. Fast reactors are also safer than normal reactors. The arguments against fast reactors are largely economic. The cost, especially the capital cost is very high. The viability of the technology is also questioned. (UK)

  2. Nuclear reactor instrumentation at research reactor renewal

    Baers, B.; Pellionisz, P.

    1981-10-01

    The paper overviews the state-of-the-art of research reactor renewals. As a case study the instrumentation reconstruction of the Finnish 250 kW TRIGA reactor is described, with particular emphasis on the nuclear control instrumentation and equipment which has been developed and manufactured by the Central Research Institute for Physics, Budapest. Beside the presentation of the nuclear instrument family developed primarily for research reactor reconstructions, the quality assurance policy conducted during the manufacturing process is also discussed. (author)

  3. Safeguarding research reactors

    Powers, J.A.

    1983-03-01

    The report is organized in four sections, including the introduction. The second section contains a discussion of the characteristics and attributes of research reactors important to safeguards. In this section, research reactors are described according to their power level, if greater than 25 thermal megawatts, or according to each fuel type. This descriptive discussion includes both reactor and reactor fuel information of a generic nature, according to the following categories. 1. Research reactors with more than 25 megawatts thermal power, 2. Plate fuelled reactors, 3. Assembly fuelled reactors. 4. Research reactors fuelled with individual rods. 5. Disk fuelled reactors, and 6. Research reactors fuelled with aqueous homogeneous fuel. The third section consists of a brief discussion of general IAEA safeguards as they apply to research reactors. This section is based on IAEA safeguards implementation documents and technical reports that are used to establish Agency-State agreements and facility attachments. The fourth and last section describes inspection activities at research reactors necessary to meet Agency objectives. The scope of the activities extends to both pre and post inspection as well as the on-site inspection and includes the examination of records and reports relative to reactor operation and to receipts, shipments and certain internal transfers, periodic verification of fresh fuel, spent fuel and core fuel, activities related to containment and surveillance, and other selected activities, depending on the reactor

  4. Three core concepts for producing uranium-233 in commercial pressurized light water reactors for possible use in water-cooled breeder reactors

    Conley, G.H.; Cowell, G.K.; Detrick, C.A.; Kusenko, J.; Johnson, E.G.; Dunyak, J.; Flanery, B.K.; Shinko, M.S.; Giffen, R.H.; Rampolla, D.S.

    1979-12-01

    Selected prebreeder core concepts are described which could be backfit into a reference light water reactor similar to current commercial reactors, and produce uranium-233 for use in water-cooled breeder reactors. The prebreeder concepts were selected on the basis of minimizing fuel system development and reactor changes required to permit a backfit. The fuel assemblies for the prebreeder core concepts discussed would occupy the same space envelope as those in the reference core but contain a 19 by 19 array of fuel rods instead of the reference 17 by 17 array. An instrument well and 28 guide tubes for control rods have been allocated to each prebreeder fuel assembly in a pattern similar to that for the reference fuel assemblies. Backfit of these prebreeder concepts into the reference reactor would require changes only to the upper core support structure while providing flexibility for alternatives in the type of fuel used

  5. Reactor core of FBR type reactor

    Hayashi, Hideyuki; Ichimiya, Masakazu.

    1994-01-01

    A reactor core is a homogeneous reactor core divided into two regions of an inner reactor core region at the center and an outer reactor core region surrounding the outside of the inner reactor core region. In this case, the inner reactor core region has a lower plutonium enrichment degree and less amount of neutron leakage in the radial direction, and the outer reactor core region has higher plutonium enrichment degree and greater amount of neutron leakage in the radial direction. Moderator materials containing hydrogen are added only to the inner reactor core fuels in the inner reactor core region. Pins loaded with the fuels with addition of the moderator materials are inserted at a ratio of from 3 to 10% of the total number of the fuel pins. The moderator materials containing hydrogen comprise zirconium hydride, titanium hydride, or calcium hydride. With such a constitution, fluctuation of the power distribution in the radial direction along with burning is suppressed. In addition, an absolute value of the Doppler coefficient can be increased, and a temperature coefficient of coolants can be reduced. (I.N.)

  6. Reactor core for LMFBR type reactors

    Masumi, Ryoji; Azekura, Kazuo; Kurihara, Kunitoshi; Bando, Masaru; Watari, Yoshio.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the power distribution fluctuations and obtain flat and stable power distribution throughout the operation period in an LMFBR type reactor. Constitution: In the inner reactor core region and the outer reactor core region surrounding the same, the thickness of the inner region is made smaller than the axial height of the reactor core region and the radial width thereof is made smaller than that of the reactor core region and the volume thereof is made to 30 - 50 % for the reactor core region. Further, the amount of the fuel material per unit volume in the inner region is made to 70 - 90 % of that in the outer region. The difference in the neutron infinite multiplication factor between the inner region and the outer region is substantially constant irrespective of the burnup degree and the power distribution fluctuation can be reduced to about 2/3, by which the effect of thermal striping to the reactor core upper mechanisms can be moderated. Further, the maximum linear power during operation can be reduced by 3 %, by which the thermal margin in the reactor core is increased and the reactor core fuels can be saved by 3 %. (Kamimura, M.)

  7. Marketing Reference Services.

    Norman, O. Gene

    1995-01-01

    Relates the marketing concept to library reference services. Highlights include a review of the literature and an overview of marketing, including research, the marketing mix, strategic plan, marketing plan, and marketing audit. Marketing principles are applied to reference services through the marketing mix elements of product, price, place, and…

  8. Reference class forecasting

    Flyvbjerg, Bent

    optimisme og misinformation. RCF bygger på teorier, som vandt Daniel Kahneman Nobelprisen i økonomi i 2002. RCF estimerer budgettet for et givet projekt på grundlag af de faktiske udfald for budgetterne i en reference-klasse af projekter. RCF udføres i tre trin: 1. Identifikation af en relevant reference...

  9. IAEA high temperature gas cooled reactor activities

    Kendall, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    IAEA activities on high temperature gas cooled reactors are conducted with the review and support of Member States, primarily through the International Working Group on Gas Cooled Reactors (IWGGCR). This paper summarises the results of the IAEA gas cooled reactor project activities in recent years along with ongoing current activities through a review of Co-ordinated Research Projects (CRPs), meetings and other international efforts. A series of three recently completed CRPs have addressed the key areas of reactor physics for LEU fuel, retention of fission products, and removal of post shutdown decay heat through passive heat transport mechanisms. These activities along with other completed and ongoing supporting CRPs and meetings are summarised with reference to detailed documentation of the results. (author)

  10. Tokamak reactor studies

    Baker, C.C.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of tokamak reactor studies with particular attention to commercial reactor concepts developed within the last three years. Emphasis is placed on DT fueled reactors for electricity production. A brief history of tokamak reactor studies is presented. The STARFIRE, NUWMAK, and HFCTR studies are highlighted. Recent developments that have increased the commercial attractiveness of tokamak reactor designs are discussed. These developments include smaller plant sizes, higher first wall loadings, improved maintenance concepts, steady-state operation, non-divertor particle control, and improved reactor safety features

  11. Laser fusion power reactor system (LFPRS)

    Kovacik, W.P.

    1977-01-01

    This report gives detailed information for each of the following areas: (1) reference concept description, (2) nuclear design, (3) structural design, (4) thermal and fluid systems design, (5) materials design and analysis, (6) reactor support systems and balance of plant, (7) instrumentation and control, (8) environment and safety, (9) economics assessment, and (10) development requirements

  12. The development of high-temperature reactors in the Federal Republic of Germany

    Engelmann, P.; Krings, F.

    1980-01-01

    The principal features of high-temperature reactors are recalled, then the current state of technology of the line in the Federal Republic of Germany is described. Reference is made to the experience of operating the AVR reactor, the construction of the THTR-300 reactor as well as the HTT and PNP projects [fr

  13. Areva reference document 2007; Areva document de reference 2007

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    This reference document contains information on the AREVA group's objectives, prospects and development strategies, particularly in Chapters 4 and 7. It contains also information on the markets, market shares and competitive position of the AREVA group. Content: 1 - Person responsible for the reference document and persons responsible for auditing the financial statements; 2 - Information pertaining to the transaction (not applicable); 3 - General information on the company and its share capital: Information on Areva, Information on share capital and voting rights, Investment certificate trading, Dividends, Organization chart of AREVA group companies, Equity interests, Shareholders' agreements; 4 - Information on company operations, new developments and future prospects: Overview and strategy of the AREVA group, The Nuclear Power and Transmission and Distribution markets, The energy businesses of the AREVA group, Front End division, Reactors and Services division, Back End division, Transmission and Distribution division, Major contracts 140 Principal sites of the AREVA group, AREVA's customers and suppliers, Sustainable Development and Continuous Improvement, Capital spending programs, Research and Development programs, Intellectual Property and Trademarks, Risk and insurance; 5 - Assets financial position financial performance: Analysis of and comments on the group's financial position and performance, Human Resources report, Environmental report, Consolidated financial statements 2007, Notes to the consolidated financial statements, Annual financial statements 2007, Notes to the corporate financial statements; 6 - Corporate governance: Composition and functioning of corporate bodies, Executive compensation, Profit-sharing plans, AREVA Values Charter, Annual Ordinary General Meeting of Shareholders of April 17, 2008; 7 - Recent developments and future prospects: Events subsequent to year-end closing for 2007, Outlook; Glossary; table of concordance.

  14. Areva, reference document 2006; Areva, document de reference 2006

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    This reference document contains information on the AREVA group's objectives, prospects and development strategies, particularly in Chapters 4 and 7. It contains information on the markets, market shares and competitive position of the AREVA group. Content: - 1 Person responsible for the reference document and persons responsible for auditing the financial statements; - 2 Information pertaining to the transaction (Not applicable); - 3 General information on the company and its share capital: Information on AREVA, on share capital and voting rights, Investment certificate trading, Dividends, Organization chart of AREVA group companies, Equity interests, Shareholders' agreements; - 4 Information on company operations, new developments and future prospects: Overview and strategy of the AREVA group, The Nuclear Power and Transmission and Distribution markets, The energy businesses of the AREVA group, Front End division, Reactors and Services division, Back End division, Transmission and Distribution division, Major contracts, The principal sites of the AREVA group, AREVA's customers and suppliers, Sustainable Development and Continuous Improvement, Capital spending programs, Research and development programs, intellectual property and trademarks, Risk and insurance; - 5 Assets - Financial position - Financial performance: Analysis of and comments on the group's financial position and performance, 2006 Human Resources Report, Environmental Report, Consolidated financial statements, Notes to the consolidated financial statements, AREVA SA financial statements, Notes to the corporate financial statements; 6 - Corporate Governance: Composition and functioning of corporate bodies, Executive compensation, Profit-sharing plans, AREVA Values Charter, Annual Combined General Meeting of Shareholders of May 3, 2007; 7 - Recent developments and future prospects: Events subsequent to year-end closing for 2006, Outlook; 8 - Glossary; 9 - Table of concordance.

  15. Areva reference document 2007; Areva document de reference 2007

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    This reference document contains information on the AREVA group's objectives, prospects and development strategies, particularly in Chapters 4 and 7. It contains also information on the markets, market shares and competitive position of the AREVA group. Content: 1 - Person responsible for the reference document and persons responsible for auditing the financial statements; 2 - Information pertaining to the transaction (not applicable); 3 - General information on the company and its share capital: Information on Areva, Information on share capital and voting rights, Investment certificate trading, Dividends, Organization chart of AREVA group companies, Equity interests, Shareholders' agreements; 4 - Information on company operations, new developments and future prospects: Overview and strategy of the AREVA group, The Nuclear Power and Transmission and Distribution markets, The energy businesses of the AREVA group, Front End division, Reactors and Services division, Back End division, Transmission and Distribution division, Major contracts 140 Principal sites of the AREVA group, AREVA's customers and suppliers, Sustainable Development and Continuous Improvement, Capital spending programs, Research and Development programs, Intellectual Property and Trademarks, Risk and insurance; 5 - Assets financial position financial performance: Analysis of and comments on the group's financial position and performance, Human Resources report, Environmental report, Consolidated financial statements 2007, Notes to the consolidated financial statements, Annual financial statements 2007, Notes to the corporate financial statements; 6 - Corporate governance: Composition and functioning of corporate bodies, Executive compensation, Profit-sharing plans, AREVA Values Charter, Annual Ordinary General Meeting of Shareholders of April 17, 2008; 7 - Recent developments and future prospects: Events subsequent to year-end closing for 2007, Outlook; Glossary; table of

  16. Areva, reference document 2006; Areva, document de reference 2006

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    This reference document contains information on the AREVA group's objectives, prospects and development strategies, particularly in Chapters 4 and 7. It contains information on the markets, market shares and competitive position of the AREVA group. Content: - 1 Person responsible for the reference document and persons responsible for auditing the financial statements; - 2 Information pertaining to the transaction (Not applicable); - 3 General information on the company and its share capital: Information on AREVA, on share capital and voting rights, Investment certificate trading, Dividends, Organization chart of AREVA group companies, Equity interests, Shareholders' agreements; - 4 Information on company operations, new developments and future prospects: Overview and strategy of the AREVA group, The Nuclear Power and Transmission and Distribution markets, The energy businesses of the AREVA group, Front End division, Reactors and Services division, Back End division, Transmission and Distribution division, Major contracts, The principal sites of the AREVA group, AREVA's customers and suppliers, Sustainable Development and Continuous Improvement, Capital spending programs, Research and development programs, intellectual property and trademarks, Risk and insurance; - 5 Assets - Financial position - Financial performance: Analysis of and comments on the group's financial position and performance, 2006 Human Resources Report, Environmental Report, Consolidated financial statements, Notes to the consolidated financial statements, AREVA SA financial statements, Notes to the corporate financial statements; 6 - Corporate Governance: Composition and functioning of corporate bodies, Executive compensation, Profit-sharing plans, AREVA Values Charter, Annual Combined General Meeting of Shareholders of May 3, 2007; 7 - Recent developments and future prospects: Events subsequent to year-end closing for 2006, Outlook; 8 - Glossary; 9 - Table of concordance.

  17. Reactor Physics Programme

    De Raedt, C.

    2000-01-01

    The Reactor Physics and Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis on reactor fuel. This expertise is applied within the Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Research Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments. Progress and achievements in 1999 in the following areas are reported on: (1) investigations on the use of military plutonium in commercial power reactors; (2) neutron and gamma calculations performed for BR-2 and for other reactors; (3) the updating of neutron and gamma cross-section libraries; (4) the implementation of reactor codes; (6) the management of the UNIX workstations; and (6) fuel cycle studies

  18. Reactor Physics Programme

    De Raedt, C

    2000-07-01

    The Reactor Physics and Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis on reactor fuel. This expertise is applied within the Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Research Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments. Progress and achievements in 1999 in the following areas are reported on: (1) investigations on the use of military plutonium in commercial power reactors; (2) neutron and gamma calculations performed for BR-2 and for other reactors; (3) the updating of neutron and gamma cross-section libraries; (4) the implementation of reactor codes; (6) the management of the UNIX workstations; and (6) fuel cycle studies.

  19. Uranium reference materials

    Donivan, S.; Chessmore, R.

    1987-07-01

    The Technical Measurements Center has prepared uranium mill tailings reference materials for use by remedial action contractors and cognizant federal and state agencies. Four materials were prepared with varying concentrations of radionuclides, using three tailings materials and a river-bottom soil diluent. All materials were ground, dried, and blended thoroughly to ensure homogeneity. The analyses on which the recommended values for nuclides in the reference materials are based were performed, using independent methods, by the UNC Geotech (UNC) Chemistry Laboratory, Grand Junction, Colorado, and by C.W. Sill (Sill), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho. Several statistical tests were performed on the analytical data to characterize the reference materials. Results of these tests reveal that the four reference materials are homogeneous and that no large systematic bias exists between the analytical methods used by Sill and those used by TMC. The average values for radionuclides of the two data sets, representing an unbiased estimate, were used as the recommended values for concentrations of nuclides in the reference materials. The recommended concentrations of radionuclides in the four reference materials are provided. Use of these reference materials will aid in providing uniform standardization among measurements made by remedial action contractors. 11 refs., 9 tabs

  20. STL pocket reference

    Lischner, Ray

    2003-01-01

    The STL Pocket Reference describes the functions, classes, and templates in that part of the C++ standard library often referred to as the Standard Template Library (STL). The STL encompasses containers, iterators, algorithms, and function objects, which collectively represent one of the most important and widely used subsets of standard library functionality. The C++ standard library, even the subset known as the STL, is vast. It's next to impossible to work with the STL without some sort of reference at your side to remind you of template parameters, function invocations, return types--ind

  1. Handbook of reference electrodes

    Inzelt, György; Scholz, Fritz

    2013-01-01

    Reference Electrodes are a crucial part of any electrochemical system, yet an up-to-date and comprehensive handbook is long overdue. Here, an experienced team of electrochemists provides an in-depth source of information and data for the proper choice and construction of reference electrodes. This includes all kinds of applications such as aqueous and non-aqueous solutions, ionic liquids, glass melts, solid electrolyte systems, and membrane electrodes. Advanced technologies such as miniaturized, conducting-polymer-based, screen-printed or disposable reference electrodes are also covered. Essen

  2. Regular Expression Pocket Reference

    Stubblebine, Tony

    2007-01-01

    This handy little book offers programmers a complete overview of the syntax and semantics of regular expressions that are at the heart of every text-processing application. Ideal as a quick reference, Regular Expression Pocket Reference covers the regular expression APIs for Perl 5.8, Ruby (including some upcoming 1.9 features), Java, PHP, .NET and C#, Python, vi, JavaScript, and the PCRE regular expression libraries. This concise and easy-to-use reference puts a very powerful tool for manipulating text and data right at your fingertips. Composed of a mixture of symbols and text, regular exp

  3. CSS Pocket Reference

    Meyer, Eric

    2011-01-01

    When you're working with CSS and need a quick answer, CSS Pocket Reference delivers. This handy, concise book provides all of the essential information you need to implement CSS on the fly. Ideal for intermediate to advanced web designers and developers, the 4th edition is revised and updated for CSS3, the latest version of the Cascading Style Sheet specification. Along with a complete alphabetical reference to CSS3 selectors and properties, you'll also find a short introduction to the key concepts of CSS. Based on Cascading Style Sheets: The Definitive Guide, this reference is an easy-to-us

  4. Biomedical Engineering Desk Reference

    Ratner, Buddy D; Schoen, Frederick J; Lemons, Jack E; Dyro, Joseph; Martinsen, Orjan G; Kyle, Richard; Preim, Bernhard; Bartz, Dirk; Grimnes, Sverre; Vallero, Daniel; Semmlow, John; Murray, W Bosseau; Perez, Reinaldo; Bankman, Isaac; Dunn, Stanley; Ikada, Yoshito; Moghe, Prabhas V; Constantinides, Alkis

    2009-01-01

    A one-stop Desk Reference, for Biomedical Engineers involved in the ever expanding and very fast moving area; this is a book that will not gather dust on the shelf. It brings together the essential professional reference content from leading international contributors in the biomedical engineering field. Material covers a broad range of topics including: Biomechanics and Biomaterials; Tissue Engineering; and Biosignal Processing* A hard-working desk reference providing all the essential material needed by biomedical and clinical engineers on a day-to-day basis * Fundamentals, key techniques,

  5. LINQ Pocket Reference

    Albahari, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Ready to take advantage of LINQ with C# 3.0? This guide has the detail you need to grasp Microsoft's new querying technology, and concise explanations to help you learn it quickly. And once you begin to apply LINQ, the book serves as an on-the-job reference when you need immediate reminders. All the examples in the LINQ Pocket Reference are preloaded into LINQPad, the highly praised utility that lets you work with LINQ interactively. Created by the authors and free to download, LINQPad will not only help you learn LINQ, it will have you thinking in LINQ. This reference explains: LINQ's ke

  6. R quick syntax reference

    Tollefson, Margot

    2014-01-01

    The R Quick Syntax Reference is a handy reference book detailing the intricacies of the R language. Not only is R a free, open-source tool, R is powerful, flexible, and has state of the art statistical techniques available. With the many details which must be correct when using any language, however, the R Quick Syntax Reference makes using R easier.Starting with the basic structure of R, the book takes you on a journey through the terminology used in R and the syntax required to make R work. You will find looking up the correct form for an expression quick and easy. With a copy of the R Quick

  7. The safety basis of the integral fast reactor program

    Pedersen, D.R.; Seidel, B.R.

    1990-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) and metallic fuel have emerged as the US Department of Energy reference reactor concept and fuel system for the development of an advanced liquid-metal reactor. This article addresses the basic elements of the IFR reactor concept and focuses on the safety advances achieved by the IFR Program in the areas of (1) fuel performance, (2) superior local faults tolerance, (3) transient fuel performance, (4) fuel-failure mechanisms, (5) performance in anticipated transients without scram, (6) core-melt mitigation, and (7) actinide recycle

  8. Undergraduate reactor control experiment

    Edwards, R.M.; Power, M.A.; Bryan, M.

    1992-01-01

    A sequence of reactor and related experiments has been a central element of a senior-level laboratory course at Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) for more than 20 yr. A new experiment has been developed where the students program and operate a computer controller that manipulates the speed of a secondary control rod to regulate TRIGA reactor power. Elementary feedback control theory is introduced to explain the experiment, which emphasizes the nonlinear aspect of reactor control where power level changes are equivalent to a change in control loop gain. Digital control of nuclear reactors has become more visible at Penn State with the replacement of the original analog-based TRIGA reactor control console with a modern computer-based digital control console. Several TRIGA reactor dynamics experiments, which comprise half of the three-credit laboratory course, lead to the control experiment finale: (a) digital simulation, (b) control rod calibration, (c) reactor pulsing, (d) reactivity oscillator, and (e) reactor noise

  9. Reactor System Design

    Chi, S. K.; Kim, G. K.; Yeo, J. W.

    2006-08-01

    SMART NPP(Nuclear Power Plant) has been developed for duel purpose, electricity generation and energy supply for seawater desalination. The objective of this project IS to design the reactor system of SMART pilot plant(SMART-P) which will be built and operated for the integrated technology verification of SMART. SMART-P is an integral reactor in which primary components of reactor coolant system are enclosed in single pressure vessel without connecting pipes. The major components installed within a vessel includes a core, twelve steam generator cassettes, a low-temperature self pressurizer, twelve control rod drives, and two main coolant pumps. SMART-P reactor system design was categorized to the reactor coe design, fluid system design, reactor mechanical design, major component design and MMIS design. Reactor safety -analysis and performance analysis were performed for developed SMART=P reactor system. Also, the preparation of safety analysis report, and the technical support for licensing acquisition are performed

  10. Fusion reactor design studies

    Emmert, G.A.; Kulcinski, G.L.; Santarius, J.F.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics on the ARIES tokamak: systems; plasma power balance; impurity control and fusion ash removal; fusion product ripple loss; energy conversion; reactor fueling; first wall design; shield design; reactor safety; and fuel cost and resources

  11. Nuclear reactors; graphical symbols

    1987-11-01

    This standard contains graphical symbols that reveal the type of nuclear reactor and is used to design graphical and technical presentations. Distinguishing features for nuclear reactors are laid down in graphical symbols. (orig.) [de

  12. Control for nuclear reactor

    Ash, E.B.; Bernath, L.; Facha, J.V.

    1980-01-01

    A nuclear reactor is provided with several hydraulically-supported spherical bodies having a high neutron absorption cross section, which fall by gravity into the core region of the reactor when the flow of supporting fluid is shut off. (auth)

  13. Hybrid plasmachemical reactor

    Lelevkin, V. M., E-mail: lelevkin44@mail.ru; Smirnova, Yu. G.; Tokarev, A. V. [Kyrgyz-Russian Slavic University (Kyrgyzstan)

    2015-04-15

    A hybrid plasmachemical reactor on the basis of a dielectric barrier discharge in a transformer is developed. The characteristics of the reactor as functions of the dielectric barrier discharge parameters are determined.

  14. Ship propulsion reactors technology

    Fribourg, Ch.

    2002-01-01

    This paper takes the state of the art on ship propulsion reactors technology. The french research programs with the corresponding technological stakes, the reactors specifications and advantages are detailed. (A.L.B.)

  15. Guidebook to nuclear reactors

    Nero, A.V. Jr.

    1976-05-01

    A general introduction to reactor physics and theory is followed by descriptions of commercial nuclear reactor types. Future directions for nuclear power are also discussed. The technical level of the material is suitable for laymen

  16. continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR)

    AFRICAN JOURNALS ONLINE (AJOL) · Journals · Advanced Search ... stirred tank reactor (CSTR) and the small and large intestines as plug flow reactor (PFR) ... from the two equations are used for the reactor sizing of the modeled reactors.

  17. Reactor physics aspects of CANDU reactors

    Critoph, E.

    1980-01-01

    These four lectures are being given at the Winter Course on Nuclear Physics at Trieste during 1978 February. They constitute part of the third week's lectures in Part II: Reactor Theory and Power Reactors. A physical description of CANDU reactors is given, followed by an overview of CANDU characteristics and some of the design options. Basic lattice physics is discussed in terms of zero energy lattice experiments, irradiation effects and analytical methods. Start-up and commissioning experiments in CANDU reactors are reviewed, and some of the more interesting aspects of operation discussed - fuel management, flux mapping and control of the power distribution. Finally, some of the characteristics of advanced fuel cycles that have been proposed for CANDU reactors are summarized. (author)

  18. Molten salt breeder reactor

    1977-01-01

    MSBR Study Group formed in October 1974 has studied molten salt breeder reactor and its various aspects. Usage of a molten salt fuel, extremely interesting as reactor chemistry, is a great feature to MSBR; there is no need for separate fuel making, reprocessing, waste storage facilities. The group studied the following, and these results are presented: molten salt technology, molten salt fuel chemistry and reprocessing, reactor characteristics, economy, reactor structural materials, etc. (Mori, K.)

  19. Zero energy reactor 'RB'

    Popovic, D; Takac, S; Markovic, H; Raisic, N; Zdravkovic, Z; Radanovic, Lj [Boris Kidric Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1959-03-15

    In 1958 the zero energy reactor RB was built with the purpose of enabling critical experiments with various reactor systems to be carried out. The first core assembly built in this reactor consists of heavy water as moderator and natural uranium metal as fuel. In order to be able to obtain very accurate results when measuring the main characteristics of the assembly the reactor was built as a completely bare system. (author)

  20. Reactor utilization, Annex A

    Martinc, R.; Stanic, A.

    1984-01-01

    Reactor was operated until August 1984 due to prohibition issued by the Ministry since the reactor does not have the emergency cooling system nor special filters in the ventilation system yet. This means that the operation plan was fulfilled by 69%. This annex includes detailed tables containing data about utilization of reactor experimental channels, irradiated samples, as well as interruptions of operation. Detailed data about reactor power during this period are shown as well

  1. PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor

    Masood, Z.

    2016-01-01

    The PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor is the only research reactor in Malaysia. This 1 MW TRIGA Mk II reactor first reached criticality on 28 June 1982 and is located at the Malaysian Nuclear Agency premise in Bangi, Malaysia. This reactor has been mainly utilised for research, training and education and isotope production. Over the years several systems have been refurbished or modernised to overcome ageing and obsolescence problems. Major achievements and milestones will also be elaborated in this paper. (author)

  2. Nuclear reactor shutdown system

    Mangus, J.D.; Cooper, M.H.

    1982-01-01

    An improved nuclear reactor shutdown system is described comprising a temperature sensitive device connected to control the electric power supply to a magnetic latch holding a body of a neutron absorbing material. The temperature sensitive device is exposed to the reactor coolant so that when the reactor coolant temperature rises above a specific level, the temperature sensitive device will cause deenergization of the magnetic latch to allow the body of neutron absorbing material to enter the reactor core. (author)

  3. Optimal primitive reference frames

    Jennings, David

    2011-01-01

    We consider the smallest possible directional reference frames allowed and determine the best one can ever do in preserving quantum information in various scenarios. We find that for the preservation of a single spin state, two orthogonal spins are optimal primitive reference frames; and in a product state, they do approximately 22% as well as an infinite-sized classical frame. By adding a small amount of entanglement to the reference frame, this can be raised to 2(2/3) 5 =26%. Under the different criterion of entanglement preservation, a very similar optimal reference frame is found; however, this time it is for spins aligned at an optimal angle of 87 deg. In this case 24% of the negativity is preserved. The classical limit is considered numerically, and indicates under the criterion of entanglement preservation, that 90 deg. is selected out nonmonotonically, with a peak optimal angle of 96.5 deg. for L=3 spins.

  4. Reference Climatological Stations

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Reference Climatological Stations (RCS) network represents the first effort by NOAA to create and maintain a nationwide network of stations located only in areas...

  5. Toxicity Reference Database

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Toxicity Reference Database (ToxRefDB) contains approximately 30 years and $2 billion worth of animal studies. ToxRefDB allows scientists and the interested...

  6. Python essential reference

    Beazley, David M

    2009-01-01

    Python Essential Reference is the definitive reference guide to the Python programming language — the one authoritative handbook that reliably untangles and explains both the core Python language and the most essential parts of the Python library. Designed for the professional programmer, the book is concise, to the point, and highly accessible. It also includes detailed information on the Python library and many advanced subjects that is not available in either the official Python documentation or any other single reference source. Thoroughly updated to reflect the significant new programming language features and library modules that have been introduced in Python 2.6 and Python 3, the fourth edition of Python Essential Reference is the definitive guide for programmers who need to modernize existing Python code or who are planning an eventual migration to Python 3. Programmers starting a new Python project will find detailed coverage of contemporary Python programming idioms.

  7. Collaborative networks: Reference modeling

    Camarinha-Matos, L.M.; Afsarmanesh, H.

    2008-01-01

    Collaborative Networks: Reference Modeling works to establish a theoretical foundation for Collaborative Networks. Particular emphasis is put on modeling multiple facets of collaborative networks and establishing a comprehensive modeling framework that captures and structures diverse perspectives of

  8. Ozone Standard Reference Photometer

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Standard Reference Photometer (SRP) Program began in the early 1980s as collaboration between NIST and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to design,...

  9. Nuclear design of a very-low-activation fusion reactor

    Cheng, E.T.; Hopkins, G.R.

    1983-06-01

    An investigation was conducted to study the nuclear design aspects of using very-low-activation materials, such as SiC, MgO, and aluminum for fusion-reactor first wall, blanket, and shield applications. In addition to the advantage of very-low radioactive inventory, it was found that the very-low-activation fusion reactor can also offer an adequate tritium-breeding ratio and substantial amount of blanket nuclear heating as a conventional-material-structured reactor does. The most-stringent design constraint found in a very-low-activation fusion reactor is the limited space available in the inboard region of a tokamak concept for shielding to protect the superconducting toroidal field coil. A reference design was developed which mitigates the constraint by adopting a removable tungsten shield design that retains the inboard dimensions and gives the same shield performance as the reference STARFIRE tokamak reactor design

  10. Enterprise Reference Library

    Bickham, Grandin; Saile, Lynn; Havelka, Jacque; Fitts, Mary

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Johnson Space Center (JSC) offers two extensive libraries that contain journals, research literature and electronic resources. Searching capabilities are available to those individuals residing onsite or through a librarian s search. Many individuals have rich collections of references, but no mechanisms to share reference libraries across researchers, projects, or directorates exist. Likewise, information regarding which references are provided to which individuals is not available, resulting in duplicate requests, redundant labor costs and associated copying fees. In addition, this tends to limit collaboration between colleagues and promotes the establishment of individual, unshared silos of information The Integrated Medical Model (IMM) team has utilized a centralized reference management tool during the development, test, and operational phases of this project. The Enterprise Reference Library project expands the capabilities developed for IMM to address the above issues and enhance collaboration across JSC. Method: After significant market analysis for a multi-user reference management tool, no available commercial tool was found to meet this need, so a software program was built around a commercial tool, Reference Manager 12 by The Thomson Corporation. A use case approach guided the requirements development phase. The premise of the design is that individuals use their own reference management software and export to SharePoint when their library is incorporated into the Enterprise Reference Library. This results in a searchable user-specific library application. An accompanying share folder will warehouse the electronic full-text articles, which allows the global user community to access full -text articles. Discussion: An enterprise reference library solution can provide a multidisciplinary collection of full text articles. This approach improves efficiency in obtaining and storing reference material while greatly reducing labor, purchasing and

  11. Fuel bundle for nuclear reactor

    Long, J.W.; Flora, B.S.; Ford, K.L.

    1977-01-01

    The invention concerns a new, simple and inexpensive system for assembling and dismantling a nuclear reactor fuel bundle. Several fuel rods are fitted in parallel rows between two retaining plates which secure the fuel rods in position and which are maintained in an assembled position by means of several stays fixed to the two end plates. The invention particularly refers to an improved apparatus for fixing the stays to the upper plate by using locking fittings secured to rotating sleeves which are applied against this plate [fr

  12. Physical protection of power reactors

    Darby, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    Sandia Laboratories has applied a systematic approach to designing physical protection systems for nuclear facilities to commercial light-water reactor power plants. A number of candidate physical protection systems were developed and evaluated. Focus is placed on the design of access control subsystems at each of three plant layers: the protected area perimeter, building surfaces, and vital areas. Access control refers to barriers, detectors, and entry control devices and procedures used to keep unauthorized personnel and contraband out of the plant, and to control authorized entry into vital areas within the plant

  13. Integral data for fast reactors

    Collins, P.J.; Poenitz, W.P.; McFarlane, H.F.

    1988-01-01

    Requirements at Argonne National Laboratory to establish the best estimates and uncertainties for LMR design parameters have lead to an extensive evaluation of the available critical experiment database. Emphasis has been put upon selection of a wide range of cores, including both benchmark, assemblies covering a range of spectra and compositions and power reactor mock-up assemblies with diverse measured parameters. The integral measurements have been revised, where necessary, using the most recent reference data and a covariance matrix constructed. A sensitivity database has been calculated, embracing all parameters, which enables quantification of the relevance of the integral data to parameters calculated with ENDF/B-V.2 cross sections

  14. Liquid metal reactor absorber technology

    Pitner, A.L.

    1990-10-01

    The selection of boron carbide as the reference liquid metal reactor absorber material is supported by results presented for irradiation performance, reactivity worth compatibility, and benign failure consequences. Scram response requirements are met easily with current control rod configurations. The trend in absorber design development is toward larger sized pins with fewer pins per bundle, providing economic savings and improved hydraulic characteristics. Very long-life absorber designs appear to be attainable with the application of vented pin and sodium-bonded concepts. 3 refs., 3 figs

  15. Comparability of reference values

    Rossbach, M.; Stoeppler, M.

    1993-01-01

    Harmonization of certified values in Reference Materials (RMs) can be carried out by applying nuclear analytical techniques to RMs of various matrix types and concentration levels. Although RMs generally should not be used as primary standards the cross evaluation of concentrations in RMs leads to better compatibility of reference values and thus to a greater agreement between analytical results from different laboratories using these RMs for instrument calibration and quality assurance. (orig.)

  16. Electronics engineer's reference book

    Turner, L W

    1976-01-01

    Electronics Engineer's Reference Book, 4th Edition is a reference book for electronic engineers that reviews the knowledge and techniques in electronics engineering and covers topics ranging from basics to materials and components, devices, circuits, measurements, and applications. This edition is comprised of 27 chapters; the first of which presents general information on electronics engineering, including terminology, mathematical equations, mathematical signs and symbols, and Greek alphabet and symbols. Attention then turns to the history of electronics; electromagnetic and nuclear radiatio

  17. 2002 reference document

    2002-01-01

    This 2002 reference document of the group Areva, provides information on the society. Organized in seven chapters, it presents the persons responsible for the reference document and for auditing the financial statements, information pertaining to the transaction, general information on the company and share capital, information on company operation, changes and future prospects, assets, financial position, financial performance, information on company management and executive board and supervisory board, recent developments and future prospects. (A.L.B.)

  18. The fast reactor

    1980-02-01

    The subject is discussed as follows: brief description of fast reactors; advantage in conserving uranium resources; experience, in UK and elsewhere, in fast reactor design, construction and operation; safety; production of plutonium, security aspects; consideration of future UK fast reactor programme. (U.K.)

  19. Mirror fusion reactor design

    Neef, W.S. Jr.; Carlson, G.A.

    1979-01-01

    Recent conceptual reactor designs based on mirror confinement are described. Four components of mirror reactors for which materials considerations and structural mechanics analysis must play an important role in successful design are discussed. The reactor components are: (a) first-wall and thermal conversion blanket, (b) superconducting magnets and their force restraining structure, (c) neutral beam injectors, and (d) plasma direct energy converters

  20. Towards nuclear fusion reactors

    1993-11-01

    The results of nuclear fusion researches in JAERI are summarized. In this report, following themes are collected: the concept of fusion reactor (including ITER), fusion reactor safety, plasma confinement, fusion reactor equipment, and so on. Includes glossary. (J.P.N.)