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Sample records for reductase inhibitor simvastatin

  1. The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, simvastatin, lovastatin and mevastatin inhibit proliferation and invasion of melanoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glynn, Sharon A; O'Sullivan, Dermot; Eustace, Alex J; Clynes, Martin; O'Donovan, Norma

    2008-01-01

    A number of recent studies have suggested that cancer incidence rates may be lower in patients receiving statin treatment for hypercholesterolemia. We examined the effects of statin drugs on in vitro proliferation, migration and invasion of melanoma cells. The ability of lovastatin, mevastatin and simvastatin to inhibit the melanoma cell proliferation was examined using cytotoxicity and apoptosis assays. Effects on cell migration and invasion were assessed using transwell invasion and migration chambers. Hypothesis testing was performed using 1-way ANOVA, and Student's t-test. Lovastatin, mevastatin and simvastatin inhibited the growth, cell migration and invasion of HT144, M14 and SK-MEL-28 melanoma cells. The concentrations required to inhibit proliferation of melanoma cells (0.8–2.1 μM) have previously been achieved in a phase I clinical trial of lovastatin in patients with solid tumours, (45 mg/kg/day resulted in peak plasma concentrations of approximately 3.9 μM). Our results suggest that statin treatment is unlikely to prevent melanoma development at standard doses. However, higher doses of statins may have a role to play in adjuvant therapy by inhibiting growth and invasion of melanoma cells

  2. Inhibition of HMGCoA reductase by simvastatin protects mice from injurious mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manitsopoulos, Nikolaos; Orfanos, Stylianos E; Kotanidou, Anastasia; Nikitopoulou, Ioanna; Siempos, Ilias; Magkou, Christina; Dimopoulou, Ioanna; Zakynthinos, Spyros G; Armaganidis, Apostolos; Maniatis, Nikolaos A

    2015-02-14

    Mortality from severe acute respiratory distress syndrome exceeds 40% and there is no available pharmacologic treatment. Mechanical ventilation contributes to lung dysfunction and mortality by causing ventilator-induced lung injury. We explored the utility of simvastatin in a mouse model of severe ventilator-induced lung injury. Male C57BL6 mice (n = 7/group) were pretreated with simvastatin or saline and received protective (8 mL/kg) or injurious (25 mL/kg) ventilation for four hours. Three doses of simvastatin (20 mg/kg) or saline were injected intraperitoneally on days -2, -1 and 0 of the experiment. Lung mechanics, (respiratory system elastance, tissue damping and airway resistance), were evaluated by forced oscillation technique, while respiratory system compliance was measured with quasi-static pressure-volume curves. A pathologist blinded to treatment allocation scored hematoxylin-eosin-stained lung sections for the presence of lung injury. Pulmonary endothelial dysfunction was ascertained by bronchoalveolar lavage protein content and lung tissue expression of endothelial junctional protein Vascular Endothelial cadherin by immunoblotting. To assess the inflammatory response in the lung, we determined bronchoalveolar lavage fluid total cell content and neutrophil fraction by microscopy and staining in addition to Matrix-Metalloprotease-9 by ELISA. For the systemic response, we obtained plasma levels of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α, Interleukin-6 and Matrix-Metalloprotease-9 by ELISA. Statistical hypothesis testing was undertaken using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey's post hoc tests. Ventilation with high tidal volume (HVt) resulted in significantly increased lung elastance by 3-fold and decreased lung compliance by 45% compared to low tidal volume (LVt) but simvastatin abrogated lung mechanical alterations of HVt. Histologic lung injury score increased four-fold by HVt but not in simvastatin-pretreated mice. Lavage pleocytosis and neutrophilia were

  3. Cyclic nucleotides and mitogen-activated protein kinases: regulation of simvastatin in platelet activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou Ssu-Yu

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 3-Hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins have been widely used to reduce cardiovascular risk. These statins (i.e., simvastatin may exert other effects besides from their cholesterol-lowering actions, including inhibition of platelet activation. Platelet activation is relevant to a variety of coronary heart diseases. Although the inhibitory effect of simvastatin in platelet activation has been studied; the detailed signal transductions by which simvastatin inhibit platelet activation has not yet been completely resolved. Methods The aim of this study was to systematically examine the detailed mechanisms of simvastatin in preventing platelet activation. Platelet aggregation, flow cytometric analysis, immunoblotting, and electron spin resonance studies were used to assess the antiplatelet activity of simvastatin. Results Simvastatin (20-50 μM exhibited more-potent activity of inhibiting platelet aggregation stimulated by collagen than other agonists (i.e., thrombin. Simvastatin inhibited collagen-stimulated platelet activation accompanied by [Ca2+]i mobilization, thromboxane A2 (TxA2 formation, and phospholipase C (PLCγ2, protein kinase C (PKC, and mitogen-activated protein kinases (i.e., p38 MAPK, JNKs phosphorylation in washed platelets. Simvastatin obviously increased both cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP levels. Simvastatin markedly increased NO release, vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP phosphorylation, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS expression. SQ22536, an inhibitor of adenylate cyclase, markedly reversed the simvastatin-mediated inhibitory effects on platelet aggregation, PLCγ2 and p38 MAPK phosphorylation, and simvastatin-mediated stimulatory effects on VASP and eNOS phosphorylation. Conclusion The most important findings of this study demonstrate for the first time that inhibitory effect of simvastatin in platelet activation may involve activation of the cyclic AMP

  4. Quality Enhancement by Inclusion Complex Formation of Simvastatin Tablets

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    Emőke Rédai

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Simvastatin is an inhibitor of hydroxy-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, used in the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. To enhance its bioavailability by inclusion complexation, as host molecule randommethyl-β-cyclodextrin had been used. After evaluating the complexes we chose the kneading product in 1:2 molar ratio for incorporation of 10 mg simvastatin tablets. Materials and methods: We prepared homogenous mixtures of the inclusion complex and some excipients. The tablets were prepared by direct compression. The tablets were evaluated in regard to: weight uniformity, thickness, diameter, hardness, friability, disintegration and dissolution profile. Results: Weights are in the range of 196-208 mg, diameter 6.83-6.86 mm, height 3.86-4.01 mm, hardness 78.3-113.1 N, friability 0.75- 1.19 %, disintegration above 15 minutes. The dissolved amounts of simvastatin from the tablets are higher compared to the dissolution of pure simvastatin, but lower than the dissolution of the complex itself. Excipients, like disintegrants and lubricants greatly influence the dissolution properties of the tablets. Conclusions: According to our results, tablets containing inclusion complex of simvastatin exhibit better solubility, according to the dissolved amount of simvastatin, than pure drug alone. Proper physical parameters of the tablets are obtained by application of 5 % Primellose

  5. 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors and prostatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, F H

    1994-08-01

    5 alpha-Reductase inhibitors are a new class of substances with very specific effects on type I and type II 5 alpha R which may be of use in the treatment of skin disease, such as male pattern baldness, male acne and hirsutism, as well as prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer. At least two types of 5 alpha R inhibitors with a different pH optimum have been described. cDNA encoding for both the type I and the type II enzyme has been cloned. Most of the orally effective 5 alpha R inhibitors belong to the class of 4-azasteroids. The radical substituted in the 17 position of the steroid ring seems to be related to species specific variations and to the types of 5 alpha R enzymes in different species and organ systems. 5 alpha R inhibitors lead to a decrease of plasma DHT by about 65% while there is a slight rise in plasma testosterone. The decrease of tissue DHT in the ventral prostate of the intact rat, the dog and in humans is more pronounced and amounts to about 85%. There is a reciprocal rise of tissue T in these systems. The application of an inhibitor of 5 alpha R type II leads to a shrinkage of BPH in men by about 30%. In the rat a similar shrinkage accompanied by a significant decrease of total organ DNA occurs. This decrease, however, is not as pronounced as can be achieved with castration.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Two-way pharmacokinetic interaction studies between saxagliptin and cytochrome P450 substrates or inhibitors: simvastatin, diltiazem extended-release, and ketoconazole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel C

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Chirag G Patel, Li Li, Suzette Girgis, David M Kornhauser, Ernest U Frevert, David W BoultonBristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ, USABackground: Many medicines, including several cholesterol-lowering agents (eg, lovastatin, simvastatin, antihypertensives (eg, diltiazem, nifedipine, verapamil, and antifungals (eg, ketoconazole are metabolized by and/or inhibit the cytochrome P450 (CYP 3A4 metabolic pathway. These types of medicines are commonly coprescribed to treat comorbidities in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM and the potential for drug-drug interactions of these medicines with new medicines for T2DM must be carefully evaluated.Objective: To investigate the effects of CYP3A4 substrates or inhibitors, simvastatin (substrate, diltiazem (moderate inhibitor, and ketoconazole (strong inhibitor on the pharmacokinetics and safety of saxagliptin, a CYP3A4/5 substrate; and the effects of saxagliptin on these agents in three separate studies.Methods: Healthy subjects were administered saxagliptin 10 mg or 100 mg. Simvastatin, diltiazem extended-release, and ketoconazole doses of 40 mg once daily, 360 mg once daily, and 200 mg twice daily, respectively, were used to determine two-way pharmacokinetic interactions.Results: Coadministration of simvastatin, diltiazem extended-release, or ketoconazole increased mean area under the concentration-time curve values (AUC of saxagliptin by 12%, 109%, and 145%, respectively, versus saxagliptin alone. Mean exposure (AUC of the CYP3A4-generated active metabolite of saxagliptin, 5-hydroxy saxagliptin, decreased with coadministration of simvastatin, diltiazem, and ketoconazole by 2%, 34%, and 88%, respectively. All adverse events were considered mild or moderate in all three studies; there were no serious adverse events or deaths.Conclusion: Saxagliptin, when coadministered with simvastatin, diltiazem extended-release, or ketoconazole, was safe and generally well tolerated in healthy subjects. Clinically

  7. Synergistic Effect of Simvastatin Plus Radiation in Gastric Cancer and Colorectal Cancer: Implications of BIRC5 and Connective Tissue Growth Factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Taekyu; Lee, Inkyoung; Kim, Jungmin; Kang, Won Ki

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the synergistic effect of simvastatin, a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitor plus radiation therapy, on the proliferation and survival of gastric cancer (GC) and colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. We also studied several genes involved in the simvastatin/radiation-induced effects. Gastric cancer (AGS, SNU601, MKN1, and MKN28) and CRC (CoLo320, SW48, HT29, and HCT8) cell lines were treated with 0.2 μM simvastatin alone, or in combination with 0 to 4 Gy of radiation, and subjected to clonogenic survival and proliferation assays in vitro. To assess the molecular mechanism of the combination treatment, we performed microarray analysis, immunoblot assays, small interfering RNA knockdown experiments, and plasmid rescue assays. The antitumoral effects of simvastatin and radiation were evaluated in vivo using xenograft models. The combination therapy of simvastatin plus radiation inhibited basal clonogenic survival and proliferation of GC and CRC cells in vitro. Simvastatin suppressed the expression of BIRC5 and CTGF genes in these cancer cells. In vivo, the combined treatment with simvastatin and radiation significantly reduced the growth of xenograft tumors compared with treatment with radiation alone. We suggest that simvastatin has a synergistic effect with radiation on GC and CRC through the induction of apoptosis, which may be mediated by a simultaneous inhibition of BIRC5 and CTGF expression. A clinical trial of simvastatin in combination with radiation in patients with GC or CRC is warranted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A 6-month trial of simvastatin (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor) in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-06-01

    Jun 1, 1991 ... minations the neutral fat kit, also from Boehringer Mannheim, was used. ..... burn, abdominal discomfort, flatulence, constipation and loose stools. Many of these .... reported participating in regular heavy physical exercise. No.

  9. Is it Simvastatin harmful in children? A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Pisani

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is the most common liver disease in children living in Western countries. Hyperlipidemia, obesity and insulin resistance are common components of the metabolic syndrome, which is frequently associated with NAFLD. Since patients with NAFLD are at high risk to develop cardiovascular disease (CVD, statins are frequently prescribed to patients with NAFLD and hyperlipidemia. The 3-Hydroxy-3-methyl-coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoA reductase is the rate limiting enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis. Simvastatin is a lactone that is readily hydrolyzed in vivo to the corresponding β-hydroxyacid, a potent inhibitor of HMG-CoA reductase. Under treatment with simvastatin, an improvement of enzymatic antioxidant parameters has been described in subjects with hypercholesterolemia. The safety and effectivity of statins in pediatric patients with NAFLD or non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH, and their effect on hepatic fat infiltration or the extent of hepatic fibrosis are not known. Also, no evidences of the effects of a non therapeutic ingestion of this drug on the glutathione homeostasis and in children have been reported. We describe the case of a obese 4-year-old girl in whom an accidental overdose of simvastatin led to decrease levels of glutathione in blood with increase of the GSSG/GSH ratio. No adverse reactions were registered. All laboratory test were normal during the follow up. Only a 35% decrease of Glutathione was observed  such as a possible mechanism of mithocondrial toxicity and depletion of the glutathione pool after the intake of excessive dose of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors.  Further  RCTs are needed in order to establish the safety and efficacy to use of statin for pediatric NAFLD or NASH.

  10. Simvastatin Ameliorates Matrix Stiffness-Mediated Endothelial Monolayer Disruption.

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    Marsha C Lampi

    Full Text Available Arterial stiffening accompanies both aging and atherosclerosis, and age-related stiffening of the arterial intima increases RhoA activity and cell contractility contributing to increased endothelium permeability. Notably, statins are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors whose pleiotropic effects include disrupting small GTPase activity; therefore, we hypothesized the statin simvastatin could be used to attenuate RhoA activity and inhibit the deleterious effects of increased age-related matrix stiffness on endothelial barrier function. Using polyacrylamide gels with stiffnesses of 2.5, 5, and 10 kPa to mimic the physiological stiffness of young and aged arteries, endothelial cells were grown to confluence and treated with simvastatin. Our data indicate that RhoA and phosphorylated myosin light chain activity increase with matrix stiffness but are attenuated when treated with the statin. Increases in cell contractility, cell-cell junction size, and indirect measurements of intercellular tension that increase with matrix stiffness, and are correlated with matrix stiffness-dependent increases in monolayer permeability, also decrease with statin treatment. Furthermore, we report that simvastatin increases activated Rac1 levels that contribute to endothelial barrier enhancing cytoskeletal reorganization. Simvastatin, which is prescribed clinically due to its ability to lower cholesterol, alters the endothelial cell response to increased matrix stiffness to restore endothelial monolayer barrier function, and therefore, presents a possible therapeutic intervention to prevent atherogenesis initiated by age-related arterial stiffening.

  11. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of simvastatin to treat Alzheimer disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, K.L.; Galasko, D.; Galvin, J.E.; Thomas, R.G.; van Dyck, C.H.; Aisen, P.S.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Lowering cholesterol is associated with reduced CNS amyloid deposition and increased dietary cholesterol increases amyloid accumulation in animal studies. Epidemiologic data suggest that use of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins) may decrease the risk of Alzheimer disease (AD) and a single-site trial suggested possible benefit in cognition with statin treatment in AD, supporting the hypothesis that statin therapy is useful in the treatment of AD. Objective: To determine if the lipid-lowering agent simvastatin slows the progression of symptoms in AD. Methods: This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of simvastatin was conducted in individuals with mild to moderate AD and normal lipid levels. Participants were randomly assigned to receive simvastatin, 20 mg/day, for 6 weeks then 40 mg per day for the remainder of 18 months or identical placebo. The primary outcome was the rate of change in the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale–cognitive portion (ADAS-Cog). Secondary outcomes measured clinical global change, cognition, function, and behavior. Results: A total of 406 individuals were randomized: 204 to simvastatin and 202 to placebo. Simvastatin lowered lipid levels but had no effect on change in ADAS-Cog score or the secondary outcome measures. There was no evidence of increased adverse events with simvastatin treatment. Conclusion: Simvastatin had no benefit on the progression of symptoms in individuals with mild to moderate AD despite significant lowering of cholesterol. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class I evidence that simvastatin 40 mg/day does not slow decline on the ADAS-Cog. PMID:21795660

  12. Modulation of morphine antinociceptive tolerance and physical dependence by co-administration of simvastatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansouri, Mohammad Taghi; Khodayar, Mohammad Javad; Tabatabaee, Amirhossein; Ghorbanzadeh, Behnam; Naghizadeh, Bahareh

    2015-10-01

    Statins, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl co-enzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors, are widely used in the management of different diseases beyond their primary indication for lowering cholesterol. Previous studies have demonstrated the neuroprotective effects of simvastatin in different animal models. In the present study, we examined the effects of simvastatin (30, 60, 100 and 300mg/kg, p.o.) on the development and expression of morphine-induced tolerance and dependence in mice. For the induction of morphine tolerance and dependence, mice were twice daily treated with morphine (10mg/kg, s.c.) for 5 consecutive days. Tolerance was evaluated by the hot-plate test and physical dependence by naloxone challenge, on the sixth day. The results showed that oral administration of simvastatin produced antinociceptive activity in a dose-dependent way. Co-administration of simvastatin with morphine did not affect the acute morphine-induced analgesia (10mg/kg, s.c.). However, repeated co-administration of simvastatin with morphine significantly attenuated the development of tolerance to the analgesic effect of morphine and inhibited the naloxone (5mg/kg, s.c.)-precipitated withdrawal signs (jumping and body weight loss). Also, simvastatin at doses of 100 and 300mg/kg attenuated the expression of morphine-induced tolerance and dependence. These data indicated that, while simvastatin can alleviate both development and expression of morphine-induced tolerance, it cannot enhance morphine-induced antinociception. Taken together, simvastatin may be used as an adjutant therapeutic agent in combination with morphine and or other opioids in patients with severe chronic pain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Different effects of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors on sterol synthesis in various human cell types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, A.K. van; Thiel, G.C.F. van; Huisman, R.H.; Moshage, H.; Yap, S.H.; Cohen, L.H.

    1995-01-01

    The three vastatins examined, lovastatin, simvastatin and pravastatin, are equally strong inhibitors of the sterol synthesis in human hepatocytes in culture with IC50-values of 4.1, 8.0 and 2.0 nM, respectively. However, in the human extrahepatic cells: umbilical vascular endothelial cells, retinal

  14. Alpha 1-blockers vs 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors in benign prostatic hyperplasia. A comparative review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J T

    1995-01-01

    During recent years, pharmacological treatment of symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) has become the primary treatment choice for an increasing number of patients. The 2 principal drug classes employed are alpha 1-blockers and 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors. Current information from...... of patients who will respond well to alpha 1-blockers have yet to be identified, and data concerning the long term effects of these drugs are not yet available. 5 alpha-Reductase inhibitors have a slow onset of effect, but treatment leads to improvement in symptoms, reduction of the size of the prostate gland...... and improvement in objective parameters for bladder outflow obstruction. Approximately 30 to 50% of patients will respond to treatment with 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors. The definitive role of pharmacological treatment in symptomatic BPH remains to be established, although it seems that patients unfit...

  15. Dietary sources of aldose reductase inhibitors: prospects for alleviating diabetic complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraswat, Megha; Muthenna, P; Suryanarayana, P; Petrash, J Mark; Reddy, G Bhanuprakash

    2008-01-01

    Activation of polyol pathway due to increased aldose reductase activity is one of the several mechanisms that have been implicated in the development of various secondary complications of diabetes. Though numerous synthetic aldose reductase inhibitors have been tested, these have not been very successful clinically. Therefore, a number of common plant/ natural products used in Indian culinary have been evaluated for their aldose reductase inhibitory potential in the present study. The aqueous extracts of 22 plant-derived materials were prepared and evaluated for the inhibitory property against rat lens and human recombinant aldose reductase. Specificity of these extracts towards aldose reductase was established by testing their ability to inhibit a closely related enzyme viz, aldehyde reductase. The ex vivo incubation of erythrocytes in high glucose containing medium was used to underscore the significance in terms of prevention of intracellular sorbitol accumulation. Among the 22 dietary sources tested, 10 showed considerable inhibitory potential against both rat lens and human recombinant aldose reductase. Prominent inhibitory property was found in spinach, cumin, fennel, lemon, basil and black pepper with an approximate IC50 of 0.2 mg/mL with an excellent selectivity towards aldose reductase. As against this, 10 to 20 times higher concentrations were required for 50% inhibition of aldehyde reductase. Reduction in the accumulation of intracellular sorbitol by the dietary extracts further substantiated their in vivo efficacy. The findings reported here indicate the scope of adapting life-style modifications in the form of inclusion of certain common sources in the diet for the management of diabetic complications.

  16. Prevention of hemodynamic and vascular albumin filtration changes in diabetic rats by aldose reductase inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tilton, R.G.; Chang, K.; Pugliese, G.; Eades, D.M.; Province, M.A.; Sherman, W.R.; Kilo, C.; Williamson, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    This study investigated hemodynamic changes in diabetic rats and their relationship to changes in vascular albumin permeation and increased metabolism of glucose to sorbitol. The effects of 6 wk of streptozocin-induced diabetes and three structurally different inhibitors of aldose reductase were examined on (1) regional blood flow (assessed with 15-microns 85Sr-labeled microspheres) and vascular permeation by 125I-labeled bovine serum albumin (BSA) and (2) glomerular filtration rate (assessed by plasma clearance of 57Co-labeled EDTA) and urinary albumin excretion (determined by radial immunodiffusion assay). In diabetic rats, blood flow was significantly increased in ocular tissues (anterior uvea, posterior uvea, retina, and optic nerve), sciatic nerve, kidney, new granulation tissue, cecum, and brain. 125I-BSA permeation was increased in all of these tissues except brain. Glomerular filtration rate and 24-h urinary albumin excretion were increased 2- and 29-fold, respectively, in diabetic rats. All three aldose reductase inhibitors completely prevented or markedly reduced these hemodynamic and vascular filtration changes and increases in tissue sorbitol levels in the anterior uvea, posterior uvea, retina, sciatic nerve, and granulation tissue. These observations indicate that early diabetes-induced hemodynamic changes and increased vascular albumin permeation and urinary albumin excretion are aldose reductase-linked phenomena. Discordant effects of aldose reductase inhibitors on blood flow and vascular albumin permeation in some tissues suggest that increased vascular albumin permeation is not entirely attributable to hemodynamic change

  17. Synergistic Effect of Simvastatin Plus Radiation in Gastric Cancer and Colorectal Cancer: Implications of BIRC5 and Connective Tissue Growth Factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Taekyu [Division of Hematology-Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, VHS Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Inkyoung [Biomedical Research Institute, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jungmin [Changduk Girls' High School, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Won Ki, E-mail: wonki.kang@samsung.com [Division of Hematology-Oncology, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: We investigated the synergistic effect of simvastatin, a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitor plus radiation therapy, on the proliferation and survival of gastric cancer (GC) and colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. We also studied several genes involved in the simvastatin/radiation-induced effects. Methods and Materials: Gastric cancer (AGS, SNU601, MKN1, and MKN28) and CRC (CoLo320, SW48, HT29, and HCT8) cell lines were treated with 0.2 μM simvastatin alone, or in combination with 0 to 4 Gy of radiation, and subjected to clonogenic survival and proliferation assays in vitro. To assess the molecular mechanism of the combination treatment, we performed microarray analysis, immunoblot assays, small interfering RNA knockdown experiments, and plasmid rescue assays. The antitumoral effects of simvastatin and radiation were evaluated in vivo using xenograft models. Results: The combination therapy of simvastatin plus radiation inhibited basal clonogenic survival and proliferation of GC and CRC cells in vitro. Simvastatin suppressed the expression of BIRC5 and CTGF genes in these cancer cells. In vivo, the combined treatment with simvastatin and radiation significantly reduced the growth of xenograft tumors compared with treatment with radiation alone. Conclusion: We suggest that simvastatin has a synergistic effect with radiation on GC and CRC through the induction of apoptosis, which may be mediated by a simultaneous inhibition of BIRC5 and CTGF expression. A clinical trial of simvastatin in combination with radiation in patients with GC or CRC is warranted.

  18. Bioavailability assessment of hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitor utilizing pulsatile drug delivery system: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Ehab I

    2016-09-01

    Chronotherapy or pulsatile drug delivery system could be achieved by increasing drug plasma concentration exactly at the time of disease incidence. Cholesterol synthesis shows a circadian rhythm being high at late night and early in the morning. Simvastatin (SIM) inhibits hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, which is responsible for cholesterol synthesis. In this study, SIM lipid-based formulation filled in gelatin capsules and coated with aqueous Eudragit® S100 dispersion was prepared for chronotherapeutic treatment of hypercholesterolemia. The pharmacokinetic parameters of SIM capsules were studied in human volunteers after a single oral dose and compared with that of Zocor® tablets as a reference in a randomized cross-over study. Pharmacokinetic parameters such as AUC 0-∞ , C max , T max , t 1/2 and elimination rate constant were determined from plasma concentration-time profile for both formulations. The tested formulation had the ability to delay drug absorption and provide higher drug concentrations from 3 up to 10 h after oral administration compared to that of commercial tablets. The data in this study revealed that the prepared formulation could be effective in chronotherapeutic treatment of hypercholesterolemia. Moreover, the tested formulation was found to enhance SIM bioavailability by 29% over the reference tablets.

  19. Systemic and ocular pharmacokinetics of N-4-benzoylaminophenylsulfonylglycine (BAPSG), a novel aldose reductase inhibitor

    OpenAIRE

    Sunkara, Gangadhar; Ayalasomayajula, Surya P.; Rao, Cheruku S.; Vennerstrom, Jonathan L.; DeRuiter, Jack; Kompella, Uday B.

    2004-01-01

    To better develop N-[4-(benzoylamino)phenylsulfonyl]glycine (BAPSG), a potent and selective aldose reductase inhibitor capable of delaying the progression of ocular diabetic complications, the objective of this study was to assess its pharmacokinetics. The plasma pharmacokinetics of BASPG was assessed in male Sprague-Dawley rats following intravenous, intraperitoneal and oral routes of administration and its distribution to various tissues including those of the eye was studied following intr...

  20. Synthesis and Activity of a New Series of(Z-3-Phenyl-2-benzoylpropenoic Acid Derivatives as Aldose Reductase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Jie Wang

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available During the course of studies directed towards the discovery of novel aldose reductase inhibitors for the treatment of diabetic complications, we synthesized a series of new (Z-3-phenyl-2-benzoylpropenoic acid derivatives and tested their in vitro inhibitory activities on rat lens aldose reductase. Of these compounds, (Z-3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-2-(4-methylbenzoylpropenoicacid(3k was identified as the most potent inhibitor, with an IC50 of 0.49μM. The theoretical binding mode of 3k was obtained by simulation of its docking into the active site of the human aldose reductase crystal structure.

  1. Simvastatin treatment reduces the cholesterol content of membrane/lipid rafts, implicating the N -methyl-D-aspartate receptor in anxiety: a literature review

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    Júlia Niehues da Cruz

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Membrane/lipid rafts (MLRs are plasmalemmal microdomains that are essential for neuronal signaling and synaptic development/stabilization. Inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme-A reductase (statins can disable the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor through disruption of MLRs and, in turn, decrease NMDA-mediated anxiety. This hypothesis will contribute to understanding the critical roles of simvastatin in treating anxiety via the NMDA receptor.

  2. Fragment Discovery for the Design of Nitrogen Heterocycles as Mycobacterium tuberculosis Dihydrofolate Reductase Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelke, Rupesh U; Degani, Mariam S; Raju, Archana; Ray, Mukti Kanta; Rajan, Mysore G R

    2016-08-01

    Fragment-based drug design was used to identify Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) inhibitors. Screening of ligands against the Mtb DHFR enzyme resulted in the identification of multiple fragment hits with IC50 values in the range of 38-90 μM versus Mtb DHFR and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values in the range of 31.5-125 μg/mL. These fragment scaffolds would be useful for anti-tubercular drug design. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Aldose reductase inhibitors from the leaves of Myrciaria dubia (H. B. & K.) McVaugh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, H; Kuroiwa, E; Tachibana, Y; Kawanishi, K; Ayala, F; Moriyasu, M

    2004-11-01

    Ellagic acid (1) and its two derivatives, 4-O-methylellagic acid (2) and 4-(alpha-rhamnopyranosyl)ellagic acid (3) were isolated as inhibitors of aldose reductase (AR) from Myrciaria dubia (H. B. & K.) McVaugh. Compound 2 was the first isolated from the nature. Compound 3 showed the strongest inhibition against human recombinant AR (HRAR) and rat lens AR (RLAR). Inhibitory activity of compound 3 against HRAR (IC50 value = 4.1 x 10(-8) M) was 60 times more than that of quercetin (2.5 x 10(-6) M). The type of inhibition against HRAR was uncompetitive.

  4. Aldose Reductase Inhibitor Protects against Hyperglycemic Stress by Activating Nrf2-Dependent Antioxidant Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirtikar Shukla

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We have shown earlier that pretreatment of cultured cells with aldose reductase (AR inhibitors prevents hyperglycemia-induced mitogenic and proinflammatory responses. However, the effects of AR inhibitors on Nrf2-mediated anti-inflammatory responses have not been elucidated yet. We have investigated how AR inhibitor fidarestat protects high glucose- (HG- induced cell viability changes by increasing the expression of Nrf2 and its dependent phase II antioxidant enzymes. Fidarestat pretreatment prevents HG (25 mM-induced Thp1 monocyte viability. Further, treatment of Thp1 monocytes with fidarestat caused a time-dependent increase in the expression as well as the DNA-binding activity of Nrf2. In addition, fidarestat augmented the HG-induced Nrf2 expression and activity and also upregulated the expression of Nrf2-dependent proteins such as hemeoxygenase-1 (HO1 and NQO1 in Thp1 cells. Similarly, treatment with AR inhibitor also induced the expression of Nrf2 and HO1 in STZ-induced diabetic mice heart and kidney tissues. Further, AR inhibition increased the HG-induced expression of antioxidant enzymes such as SOD and catalase and activation of AMPK-α1 in Thp1 cells. Our results thus suggest that pretreatment with AR inhibitor prepares the monocytes against hyperglycemic stress by overexpressing the Nrf2-dependent antioxidative proteins.

  5. Aldose Reductase Inhibitor Protects against Hyperglycemic Stress by Activating Nrf2-Dependent Antioxidant Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Kirtikar; Pal, Pabitra Bikash; Sonowal, Himangshu; Srivastava, Satish K; Ramana, Kota V

    2017-01-01

    We have shown earlier that pretreatment of cultured cells with aldose reductase (AR) inhibitors prevents hyperglycemia-induced mitogenic and proinflammatory responses. However, the effects of AR inhibitors on Nrf2-mediated anti-inflammatory responses have not been elucidated yet. We have investigated how AR inhibitor fidarestat protects high glucose- (HG-) induced cell viability changes by increasing the expression of Nrf2 and its dependent phase II antioxidant enzymes. Fidarestat pretreatment prevents HG (25 mM)-induced Thp1 monocyte viability. Further, treatment of Thp1 monocytes with fidarestat caused a time-dependent increase in the expression as well as the DNA-binding activity of Nrf2. In addition, fidarestat augmented the HG-induced Nrf2 expression and activity and also upregulated the expression of Nrf2-dependent proteins such as hemeoxygenase-1 (HO1) and NQO1 in Thp1 cells. Similarly, treatment with AR inhibitor also induced the expression of Nrf2 and HO1 in STZ-induced diabetic mice heart and kidney tissues. Further, AR inhibition increased the HG-induced expression of antioxidant enzymes such as SOD and catalase and activation of AMPK- α 1 in Thp1 cells. Our results thus suggest that pretreatment with AR inhibitor prepares the monocytes against hyperglycemic stress by overexpressing the Nrf2-dependent antioxidative proteins.

  6. Identification of HMG-CoA Reductase Inhibitor Active Compound in Medicinal Forest Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelly Rahmania

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death worldwide, hypercholesterolemia is one of the causes. Three medicinal forest plants are potential natural resources to be developed as cholesterol-reducing herbal product, but scientific informations on their mechanism is still limited. The objective of this research is to explore the potency of the leaf of Jati Belanda (Guazuma ulmifolia, Jabon (Antocephalus macrophyllus, and Mindi (Melia azedarach as inhibitor of HMG-CoA reductase (HMGR, a key enzyme in the regulation of cholesterol biosynthesis. Samples were macerated in ethanol 96% and the filtrate was partitioned using n-hexane and chloroform to obtain the ethanolic flavonoid extract. The effect of each extracts on the HMG-CoA reductase activity were analyzed using HMGR assay kit. At concentration of 10 ppm the G.ulmifolia ethanolic extract showed the highest inhibitory activity as well as pravastatin control inhibitor.  The phenolic content of the ethanolic extracts of G.ulmifolia, A.macrophyllus, and M.azedarach were: 11.00, 34.83, and 13.67 mg gallic acid AE/g dried leaves, respectively. The flavonoid content of the ethanolic extracts of G.ulmifolia, A.macrophyllus, and M.azedarach were: 0.22, 0.64, and 0.78 mg QE/g dried leaves, respectively. Interestingly, G.ulmifolia extract the lowest concentration of phenolic and flavonoid content. HPLC analysis showed that all samples contain quercetin at similiar small concentrations (6.7%, 6.6%, and 7.0% for G.ulmifolia, A.macrophyllus, and M.azedarach, respectively. This indicating other active compounds may play some roles in this inhibitory action on HMG-CoA reductase activity. Further identification using LC-MS/MS showed that G.ulmifolia flavonoid extract contained an unidetified coumpound with molecural weight of 380.0723 Da.  

  7. Statins: 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors demonstrate anti-atherosclerotic character due to their antioxidant capacity

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Puttananjaiah, M.H.; Dhale, M.A.; Gaonkar, V.; Keni, S.

    inhibitors (commonly known as statins) are widely used in cardiovascular disease prevention to lower the cholesterol. The antioxidant activity of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors was studied by lipid peroxidation inhibition assay, DPPH, and hydroxyl radical...

  8. Synthesis of organic nitrates of luteolin as a novel class of potent aldose reductase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi-Qin; Cheng, Ning; Zheng, Xiao-Wei; Peng, Sheng-Ming; Zou, Xiao-Qing

    2013-07-15

    Aldose reductase (AR) plays an important role in the design of drugs that prevent and treat diabetic complications. Aldose reductase inhibitors (ARIs) have received significant attentions as potent therapeutic drugs. Based on combination principles, three series of luteolin derivatives were synthesised and evaluated for their AR inhibitory activity and nitric oxide (NO)-releasing capacity in vitro. Eighteen compounds were found to be potent ARIs with IC50 values ranging from (0.099±0.008) μM to (2.833±0.102) μM. O(7)-Nitrooxyethyl-O(3'),O(4')-ethylidene luteolin (La1) showed the most potent AR inhibitory activity [IC50=(0.099±0.008) μM]. All organic nitrate derivatives released low concentrations of NO in the presence of l-cysteine. Structure-activity relationship studies suggested that introduction of an NO donor, protection of the catechol structure, and the ether chain of a 2-carbon spacer as a coupling chain on the luteolin scaffold all help increase the AR inhibitory activity of the resulting compound. This class of NO-donor luteolin derivatives as efficient ARIs offer a new concept for the development and design of new drug for preventive and therapeutic drugs for diabetic complications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, other lipid-lowering medication, antiplatelet therapy, and the risk of venous thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramcharan, A.S.; van Stralen, K.J.; Snoep, J.D.; Mantel-Teeuwisse, A.K.; Doggen, Catharina Jacoba Maria

    2009-01-01

    Background: Statins [3-hydroxymethyl-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors] and antiplatelet therapy reduce the risk of atherosclerotic disease. Besides a reduction of lipid levels, statins might also have antithrombotic and anti-inflammatory properties, and anti-platelet

  10. Effects of direct-to-consumer advertising of hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme a reductase inhibitors on attainment of LDL-C goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, W David; Kleit, Andrew N; Nietert, Paul J; Ornstein, Steven

    2006-12-01

    Although highly controversial, directto-consumer (DTC) television advertising for prescription drugs is an established practice in the US health care industry. While the US Food and Drug Administration is currently reexamining its regulatory stance, little evidence exists regarding the impact of DTC advertising on patient health outcomes. The objective of this research was to study the relationship between heavy television promotion of 3 major hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors ("statins") and the frequency with which patients are able to attain low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) blood-level goals after treatment with any statin. We used logistic regression to determine achievement of LDL-C goals at 6 months after statin treatment, using electronic medical record extract data from patients from geographically dispersed primary care practices in the United States. We identified LDL-C blood levels as being at or less than goal, as defined by risk-adjusted guidelines published by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute from the Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) data. A total of 50,741 patients, identified from 88 practices, were diagnosed with hyperlipidemia and had begun therapy with any statin medication during the 1998-2004 time period. In addition, total dollars spent each month on television advertising at the national and local levels for atorvastatin, pravastatin, and simvastatin were obtained. DTC advertising data were merged by local media market where the physician practice was located and by the month in which the patient was first prescribed a statin. The models were run for all patients who initiated therapy, and also on a subsample of patients who continued to receive prescriptions for the drugs for at least 6 months. Logistic regressions were used to predict the likelihood that each patient attained the ATP III LDL-C blood-level goals as a function of DTC advertising and other factors. High levels of national DTC

  11. Epalrestat, an aldose reductase inhibitor, in diabetic neuropathy: An Indian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A number of diabetic patients with diabetic neuropathy, in India, were treated with epalrestat, an aldose reductase inhibitor. In this study, more than 2000 patients with diabetic neuropathy, who were treated with epalrestat for 3-12 months, were analyzed to assess the efficacy and the adverse reactions of the drug. Method: We analyzed the subjective symptoms (spontaneous pain, numbness, coldness and hypoesthesia and the nerve function tests (motor nerve conduction velocity, sensory nerve conduction velocity and vibration threshold. Result: The improvement rate of the subjective symptoms was 75% (slightly improved or better and that of the nerve function tests 36%. Adverse drug reactions were encountered in 52 (2.5% of the 2190 patients, none of which was severe. Conclusion: Although data are limited, it is strongly suggested that epalrestat is a highly effective and safe agent for the treatment of diabetic neuropathy.

  12. Evaluation of Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase Inhibitors as Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quorum-Quenching Reagents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Liang; Liu, Yang; Sternberg, Claus

    2010-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen which is responsible for a wide range of infections. Production of virulence factors and biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa are partly regulated by cell-to-cell communication quorum-sensing systems. Identification of quorum-quenching reagents...... which block the quorum-sensing process can facilitate development of novel treatment strategies for P. aeruginosa infections. We have used molecular dynamics simulation and experimental studies to elucidate the efficiencies of two potential quorum-quenching reagents, triclosan and green tea...... epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), which both function as inhibitors of the enoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase (ENR) from the bacterial type II fatty acid synthesis pathway. Our studies suggest that EGCG has a higher binding affinity towards ENR of P. aeruginosa and is an efficient quorum-quenching reagent...

  13. The potential behavioral and economic impacts of widespread HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor (statin) use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendle, Mathew H

    2016-12-01

    Dyslipidemia is a common pathology throughout the industrialized world, and HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) are often administered to treat elevated lipid levels. Substantial concern has been raised regarding the aggressive clinical lowering of cholesterol, particularly in light of a growing body of research linking low circulating lipid levels with negative behavioral outcomes in both human samples and non-human primate models. In 2009, Goldstein and colleagues tentatively speculated that the greed, impulsiveness, and lack of foresight that lead to the worldwide economic collapse in 2007-2008 could have been caused (in part) by depressed population cholesterol levels resulting from the widespread use of statins by workers in the financial services industry. This paper reviews the literature that links low circulating lipid levels with neurobehavioral dysfunction, develops Goldstein and colleagues' initial speculation into a formal hypothesis, and proposes several specific studies that could rigorously empirically evaluate this hypothesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Identification of Novel Aldose Reductase Inhibitors from Spices: A Molecular Docking and Simulation Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Antony

    Full Text Available Hyperglycemia in diabetic patients results in a diverse range of complications such as diabetic retinopathy, neuropathy, nephropathy and cardiovascular diseases. The role of aldose reductase (AR, the key enzyme in the polyol pathway, in these complications is well established. Due to notable side-effects of several drugs, phytochemicals as an alternative has gained considerable importance for the treatment of several ailments. In order to evaluate the inhibitory effects of dietary spices on AR, a collection of phytochemicals were identified from Zingiber officinale (ginger, Curcuma longa (turmeric Allium sativum (garlic and Trigonella foenum graecum (fenugreek. Molecular docking was performed for lead identification and molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study the dynamic behaviour of these protein-ligand interactions. Gingerenones A, B and C, lariciresinol, quercetin and calebin A from these spices exhibited high docking score, binding affinity and sustained protein-ligand interactions. Rescoring of protein ligand interactions at the end of MD simulations produced binding scores that were better than the initially docked conformations. Docking results, ligand interactions and ADMET properties of these molecules were significantly better than commercially available AR inhibitors like epalrestat, sorbinil and ranirestat. Thus, these natural molecules could be potent AR inhibitors.

  15. Identification of Novel Aldose Reductase Inhibitors from Spices: A Molecular Docking and Simulation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony, Priya; Vijayan, Ranjit

    2015-01-01

    Hyperglycemia in diabetic patients results in a diverse range of complications such as diabetic retinopathy, neuropathy, nephropathy and cardiovascular diseases. The role of aldose reductase (AR), the key enzyme in the polyol pathway, in these complications is well established. Due to notable side-effects of several drugs, phytochemicals as an alternative has gained considerable importance for the treatment of several ailments. In order to evaluate the inhibitory effects of dietary spices on AR, a collection of phytochemicals were identified from Zingiber officinale (ginger), Curcuma longa (turmeric) Allium sativum (garlic) and Trigonella foenum graecum (fenugreek). Molecular docking was performed for lead identification and molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study the dynamic behaviour of these protein-ligand interactions. Gingerenones A, B and C, lariciresinol, quercetin and calebin A from these spices exhibited high docking score, binding affinity and sustained protein-ligand interactions. Rescoring of protein ligand interactions at the end of MD simulations produced binding scores that were better than the initially docked conformations. Docking results, ligand interactions and ADMET properties of these molecules were significantly better than commercially available AR inhibitors like epalrestat, sorbinil and ranirestat. Thus, these natural molecules could be potent AR inhibitors.

  16. Discovery of Fungal Denitrification Inhibitors by Targeting Copper Nitrite Reductase from Fusarium oxysporum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Masaki; Kumar, Ashutosh; Muddassar, Muhammad; Matsuyama, Akihisa; Yoshida, Minoru; Zhang, Kam Y J

    2017-02-27

    The efficient application of nitrogenous fertilizers is urgently required, as their excessive and inefficient use is causing substantial economic loss and environmental pollution. A significant amount of applied nitrogen in agricultural soils is lost as nitrous oxide (N 2 O) in the environment due to the microbial denitrification process. The widely distributed fungus Fusarium oxysporum is a major denitrifier in agricultural soils and its denitrification activity could be targeted to reduce nitrogen loss in the form of N 2 O from agricultural soils. Here, we report the discovery of first small molecule inhibitors of copper nitrite reductase (NirK) from F. oxysporum, which is a key enzyme in the fungal denitrification process. The inhibitors were discovered by a hierarchical in silico screening approach consisting of pharmacophore modeling and molecular docking. In vitro evaluation of F. oxysporum NirK activity revealed several pyrimidone and triazinone based compounds with potency in the low micromolar range. Some of these compounds suppressed the fungal denitrification in vivo as well. The compounds reported here could be used as starting points for the development of nitrogenous fertilizer supplements and coatings as a means to prevent nitrogen loss by targeting fungal denitrification.

  17. Voriconazole-Induced Hepatitis via Simvastatin- and Lansoprazole-Mediated Drug Interactions: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Jose Luis; Tayek, John A

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic voriconazole concentrations have a narrow window of effectiveness before causing cholestatic hepatitis. After undergoing 1 year of voriconazole therapy for pulmonary aspergillosis, a 44-year-old man began treatment with 30 mg lansoprazole for gastroesophageal reflux symptoms. Within 5 days of starting treatment with lansoprazole, the patient presented with fatigue, jaundice, and cholestatic hepatitis. The hepatitis promptly resolved after stopping lansoprazole treatment. Sixteen months later, the patient was given simvastatin therapy, as recommended by the American Diabetes Association to prevent cardiovascular disease for patients with diabetes who are aged >40 years and have one additional risk factor. Within 2 weeks of taking simvastatin, a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase (statin) therapy, the patient redeveloped fatigue, jaundice, and cholestatic hepatitis. He described both episodes of fatigue and jaundice similarly in terms of onset and intensity. Voriconazole is metabolized by both CYP2C19 and CYP3A4 isoenzymes. Lansoprazole is an inhibitor of the CYP2C19 isoenzyme. Competition between voriconazole and lansoprazole likely led to increased voriconazole serum concentration and acute cholestatic hepatitis in this patient. Simvastatin inhibits the CYP3A4 isoenzyme. After the patient took 10 mg simvastatin daily for 2 weeks, cholestatic hepatitis occurred. The voriconazole concentration remained elevated (4.1 μg/ml) when measured 15 days after stopping simvastatin. The patient's Naranjo Adverse Drug Reaction Probability Scale score of 7 revealed that the cholestatic hepatitis was probably precipitated by lansoprazole. Likewise, the patient's Naranjo score of 9 also revealed that cholestatic hepatitis was attributable to a definite adverse drug reaction precipitated by the addition of simvastatin to the stable baseline regimen of voriconazole. In a single patient, two different inhibitors of the cytochrome P450 pathway stimulated voriconazole

  18. Manumycin A Is a Potent Inhibitor of Mammalian Thioredoxin Reductase-1 (TrxR-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuladhar, Anupama; Rein, Kathleen S

    2018-04-12

    The anticancer effect of manumycin A (Man A) has been attributed to the inhibition of farnesyl transferase (FTase), an enzyme that is responsible for post-translational modification of Ras proteins. However, we have discovered that Man A inhibits mammalian cytosolic thioredoxin reductase 1 (TrxR-1) in a time-dependent manner, with an IC 50 of 272 nM with preincubation and 1586 nM without preincubation. The inhibition of TrxR-1 by Man A is irreversible and is the result of a covalent interaction between Man A and TrxR-1. Evidence presented herein demonstrates that Man A forms a Michael adduct with the selenocysteine residue, which is located in the C-terminal redox center of TrxR-1. Inhibitors of TrxR-1, which act through this mechanism, convert TrxR-1 into a SecTRAP, which utilizes NADPH to reduce oxygen to superoxide radical anion (O 2 -• ).

  19. Trypanocidal Activity of Quinoxaline 1,4 Di-N-oxide Derivatives as Trypanothione Reductase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Fabiola Chacón-Vargas

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease or American trypanosomiasis is a worldwide public health problem. In this work, we evaluated 26 new propyl and isopropyl quinoxaline-7-carboxylate 1,4-di-N-oxide derivatives as potential trypanocidal agents. Additionally, molecular docking and enzymatic assays on trypanothione reductase (TR were performed to provide a basis for their potential mechanism of action. Seven compounds showed better trypanocidal activity on epimastigotes than the reference drugs, and only four displayed activity on trypomastigotes; T-085 was the lead compound with an IC50 = 59.9 and 73.02 µM on NINOA and INC-5 strain, respectively. An in silico analysis proposed compound T-085 as a potential TR inhibitor with better affinity than the natural substrate. Enzymatic analysis revealed that T-085 inhibits parasite TR non-competitively. Compound T-085 carries a carbonyl, a CF3, and an isopropyl carboxylate group at 2-, 3- and 7-position, respectively. These results suggest the chemical structure of this compound as a good starting point for the design and synthesis of novel trypanocidal derivatives with higher TR inhibitory potency and lower toxicity.

  20. Ribonucleotide Reductase Inhibitors: A New Look at an Old Target for Radiosensitization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, Tobias R. [Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Kinsella, Timothy J., E-mail: tkinsella@lifespan.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI (United States)

    2012-01-04

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RR), the rate limiting enzyme in the synthesis and repair of DNA, has been studied as a target for inhibition in the treatment of cancer for many years. While some researchers have focused on RR inhibitors as chemotherapeutic agents, particularly in hematologic malignancies, some of the most promising data has been generated in the field of radiosensitization. Early pre-clinical studies demonstrated that the addition of the first of these drugs, hydroxyurea, to ionizing radiation (IR) produced a synergistic effect in vitro, leading to a large number of clinical studies in the 1970–1980s. These studies, mainly in cervical cancer, initially produced a great deal of interest, leading to the incorporation of hydroxyurea in the treatment protocols of many institutions. However, over time, the conclusions from these studies have been called into question and hydroxyurea has been replaced in the standard of care of cervical cancer. Over the last 10 years, a number of well-done pre-clinical studies have greatly advanced our understanding of RR as a target. Those advances include the elucidation of the role of p53R2 and our understanding of the temporal relationship between the delivery of IR and the response of RR. At the same time, new inhibitors with increased potency and improved binding characteristics have been discovered, and pre-clinical and early clinical data look promising. Here we present a comprehensive review of the pre-clinical and clinical data in the field to date and provide some discussion of future areas of research.

  1. Ribonucleotide Reductase Inhibitors: A New Look at an Old Target for Radiosensitization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, Tobias R.; Kinsella, Timothy J.

    2012-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RR), the rate limiting enzyme in the synthesis and repair of DNA, has been studied as a target for inhibition in the treatment of cancer for many years. While some researchers have focused on RR inhibitors as chemotherapeutic agents, particularly in hematologic malignancies, some of the most promising data has been generated in the field of radiosensitization. Early pre-clinical studies demonstrated that the addition of the first of these drugs, hydroxyurea, to ionizing radiation (IR) produced a synergistic effect in vitro, leading to a large number of clinical studies in the 1970–1980s. These studies, mainly in cervical cancer, initially produced a great deal of interest, leading to the incorporation of hydroxyurea in the treatment protocols of many institutions. However, over time, the conclusions from these studies have been called into question and hydroxyurea has been replaced in the standard of care of cervical cancer. Over the last 10 years, a number of well-done pre-clinical studies have greatly advanced our understanding of RR as a target. Those advances include the elucidation of the role of p53R2 and our understanding of the temporal relationship between the delivery of IR and the response of RR. At the same time, new inhibitors with increased potency and improved binding characteristics have been discovered, and pre-clinical and early clinical data look promising. Here we present a comprehensive review of the pre-clinical and clinical data in the field to date and provide some discussion of future areas of research.

  2. Simvastatin Does Not Affect Vitamin D Status, but Low Vitamin D Levels Are Associated with Dyslipidemia: Results from a Randomised, Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Rejnmark

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Statin drugs act as inhibitors of the 3-hydroxy-3methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA reductase enzyme early in the mevalonate pathway, thereby reducing the endogenous cholesterol synthesis. In recent studies, it has been suggested from epidemiological data that statins also may improve vitamin D status, as measured by increased plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD levels. We now report the results from a randomised controlled trial on effects of simvastatin on plasma 25OHD levels. Design and Methods. We randomised 82 healthy postmenopausal women to one year of treatment with either simvastatin 40 mg/d or placebo and performed measurement at baseline and after 26 and 52 weeks of treatment. The study was completed by 77 subjects. Results. Compared with placebo, plasma levels of cholesterol and low-density lipoproteins decreased in response to treatment with simvastatin, but our study showed no effect of simvastatin on vitamin D status. However, plasma levels of triglycerides were inversely associated with tertiles of plasma 25OHD levels and changes in plasma triglycerides levels correlated inversely with seasonal changes in vitamin D status. Conclusion. Our data do not support a pharmacological effect of statins on vitamin D status, but do suggest that vitamin D may influence plasma lipid profile and thus be of importance to cardiovascular health.

  3. Inhibitors of hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase and risk of fracture among older women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, K A; Andrade, S E; Boles, M; Buist, D S; Chase, G A; Donahue, J G; Goodman, M J; Gurwitz, J H; LaCroix, A Z; Platt, R

    2000-06-24

    Inhibitors of hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (statins) increase new bone formation in rodents and in human cells in vitro. Statin use is associated with increased bone mineral density of the femoral neck. We undertook a population-based case-control study at six health-maintenance organisations in the USA to investigate further the relation between statin use and fracture risk among older women. We investigated women aged 60 years or older. Exposure, outcome, and confounder information was obtained from automated claims and pharmacy data from October, 1994, to September, 1997. Cases had an incident diagnosis of non-pathological fracture of the hip, humerus, distal tibia, wrist, or vertebrae between October, 1996, and September, 1997. Controls had no fracture during this period. We excluded women with records of dispensing of drugs to treat osteoporosis. There were 928 cases and 2747 controls. Compared with women who had no record of statin dispensing during the previous 2 years, women with 13 or more statin dispensings during this period had a decreased risk of non-pathological fracture (odds ratio 0.48 [95% CI 0.27-0.83]) after adjustment for age, number of hospital admissions during the previous year, chronic disease score, and use of non-statin lipid-lowering drugs. No association was found between fracture risk and fewer than 13 dispensings of statins or between fracture risk and use of non-statin lipid-lowering drugs. Statins seem to be protective against non-pathological fracture among older women. These findings are compatible with the hypothesis that statins increase bone mineral density in human beings and thereby decrease the risk of osteoporotic fractures.

  4. Systemic and ocular pharmacokinetics of N-4-benzoylaminophenylsulfonylglycine (BAPSG), a novel aldose reductase inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunkara, Gangadhar; Ayalasomayajula, Surya P.; Rao, Cheruku S.; Vennerstrom, Jonathan L.; DeRuiter, Jack; Kompella, Uday B.

    2015-01-01

    To better develop N-[4-(benzoylamino)phenylsulfonyl]glycine (BAPSG), a potent and selective aldose reductase inhibitor capable of delaying the progression of ocular diabetic complications, the objective of this study was to assess its pharmacokinetics. The plasma pharmacokinetics of BASPG was assessed in male Sprague-Dawley rats following intravenous, intraperitoneal and oral routes of administration and its distribution to various tissues including those of the eye was studied following intraperitoneal administration. In addition, rat plasma protein binding of BAPSG was studied using ultracentrifugation method and its ocular tissue disposition was assessed following topical administration in rabbits. Plasma and tissue levels of BAPSG were analysed using an HPLC assay. BAPSG exhibited dose-proportionate AUC0→∞ (area under the plasma concentration–time curve) following both intravenous and intraperitoneal administration over the dose range (5–50 mg kg−1) studied and an erratic oral absorption profile with low oral bioavailability. The fraction bioavailability following oral and intraperitoneal administration was 0.06 and 0.7–1, respectively. BAPSG exhibited short plasma elimination half-lives in the range 0.5–1.5 h. BAPSG was bound to rat plasma proteins and the percent protein binding ranged from 83 to 99.8%. BAPSG was better distributed to cornea, lens and retina than to brain, following intraperitoneal administration in rats. However, the distribution was lower compared with kidney and liver. Following topical administration in rabbits, BAPSG delivery to the surface ocular tissues, cornea and conjunctiva was higher compared with intraocular tissues, aqueous humour, iris-ciliary body and lens. Thus, BAPSG was distributed to ocular tissues following systemic and topical modes of administration. PMID:15025860

  5. Effects of HMG-CoA Reductase Inhibitors (Statins On Bone Mineral Density and Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nehir Samancı

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxy methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins have been shown to have effects on bone metabolism in laboratory studies. While early clinic studies have showed lower risk for osteoporotic fractures among statin users than nonusers, subsequent studies have found mixed results. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of statins on bone mineral density (BMD and bone metabolism. Thirty-five consecutive postmenopausal hypercholesterolemic women who were treated for at least last 6 months with statins were included in the study. Seventy-five normocholesterolemic age-matched postmenopausal women were in the control group. Subjects with a history of any diseases and used drugs that may affect calcium or bone metabolism were excluded from the study. Age, associated illness, years since menopause, and body mass index (BMI were obtained from all the patients including the control group. Besides, serum calcium, phosphate, alkaline phosphates, parathyroid hormone, 25 hydroxy D3, osteocalcin, and urinary calcium excretion were measured. BMD was measured by using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA at femoral neck and 3rd lomber spine. Mean duration of statin use was 28.17±21.17 months. BMI was found to be statistically higher in statin users than nonusers (27.47±3.67kg/m2 and 25.46±3.91 kg/m2, respectively. The markers of bone metabolism used in the study were found to be similar between the groups. BMD was not different in statin users and nonusers at femoral neck and lomber spine. As conclusion, statin use did not affect BMD and bone metabolism in this study. In our opinion large randomised, controlled, prospective clinical trials are needed to accurately determine the role of statins in the treatment of osteoporosis.

  6. Brevetoxin-2, is a unique inhibitor of the C-terminal redox center of mammalian thioredoxin reductase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Tuladhar, Anupama; Rolle, Shantelle; Lai, Yanhao; Rodriguez Del Rey, Freddy; Zavala, Cristian E; Liu, Yuan; Rein, Kathleen S

    2017-08-15

    Karenia brevis, the Florida red tide dinoflagellate produces a suite of neurotoxins known as the brevetoxins. The most abundant of the brevetoxins PbTx-2, was found to inhibit the thioredoxin-thioredoxin reductase system, whereas the PbTx-3 has no effect on this system. On the other hand, PbTx-2 activates the reduction of small disulfides such as 5,5'-dithio-bis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) by thioredoxin reductase. PbTx-2 has an α, β-unsaturated aldehyde moiety which functions as an efficient electrophile and selenocysteine conjugates are readily formed. PbTx-2 blocks the inhibition of TrxR by the inhibitor curcumin, whereas curcumin blocks PbTx-2 activation of TrxR. It is proposed that the mechanism of inhibition of thioredoxin reduction is via the formation of a Michael adduct between selenocysteine and the α, β-unsaturated aldehyde moiety of PbTx-2. PbTx-2 had no effect on the rates of reactions catalyzed by related enzymes such as glutathione reductase, glutathione peroxidase or glutaredoxin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Persistent erectile dysfunction in men exposed to the 5α-reductase inhibitors, finasteride, or dutasteride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Kiguradze

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Importance Case reports describe persistent erectile dysfunction (PED associated with exposure to 5α-reductase inhibitors (5α-RIs. Clinical trial reports and the manufacturers’ full prescribing information (FPI for finasteride and dutasteride state that risk of sexual adverse effects is not increased by longer duration of 5α-RI exposure and that sexual adverse effects of 5α-RIs resolve in men who discontinue exposure. Objective Our chief objective was to assess whether longer duration of 5α-RI exposure increases risk of PED, independent of age and other known risk factors. Men with shorter 5α-RI exposure served as a comparison control group for those with longer exposure. Design We used a single-group study design and classification tree analysis (CTA to model PED (lasting ≥90 days after stopping 5α-RI. Covariates included subject attributes, diseases, and drug exposures associated with sexual dysfunction. Setting Our data source was the electronic medical record data repository for Northwestern Medicine. Subjects The analysis cohorts comprised all men exposed to finasteride or dutasteride or combination products containing one of these drugs, and the subgroup of men 16–42 years old and exposed to finasteride ≤1.25 mg/day. Main outcome and measures Our main outcome measure was diagnosis of PED beginning after first 5α-RI exposure, continuing for at least 90 days after stopping 5α-RI, and with contemporaneous treatment with a phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor (PDE5I. Other outcome measures were erectile dysfunction (ED and low libido. PED was determined by manual review of medical narratives for all subjects with ED. Risk of an adverse effect was expressed as number needed to harm (NNH. Results Among men with 5α-RI exposure, 167 of 11,909 (1.4% developed PED (persistence median 1,348 days after stopping 5α-RI, interquartile range (IQR 631.5–2320.5 days; the multivariable model predicting PED had four variables: prostate disease

  8. A human fatty acid synthase inhibitor binds β-ketoacyl reductase in the keto-substrate site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardwicke, Mary Ann; Rendina, Alan R; Williams, Shawn P; Moore, Michael L; Wang, Liping; Krueger, Julie A; Plant, Ramona N; Totoritis, Rachel D; Zhang, Guofeng; Briand, Jacques; Burkhart, William A; Brown, Kristin K; Parrish, Cynthia A

    2014-09-01

    Human fatty acid synthase (hFAS) is a complex, multifunctional enzyme that is solely responsible for the de novo synthesis of long chain fatty acids. hFAS is highly expressed in a number of cancers, with low expression observed in most normal tissues. Although normal tissues tend to obtain fatty acids from the diet, tumor tissues rely on de novo fatty acid synthesis, making hFAS an attractive metabolic target for the treatment of cancer. We describe here the identification of GSK2194069, a potent and specific inhibitor of the β-ketoacyl reductase (KR) activity of hFAS; the characterization of its enzymatic and cellular mechanism of action; and its inhibition of human tumor cell growth. We also present the design of a new protein construct suitable for crystallography, which resulted in what is to our knowledge the first co-crystal structure of the human KR domain and includes a bound inhibitor.

  9. Thermodynamic and Structure Guided Design of Statin Based Inhibitors of 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarver, Ronald W.; Bills, Elizabeth; Bolton, Gary; Bratton, Larry D.; Caspers, Nicole L.; Dunbar, James B.; Harris, Melissa S.; Hutchings, Richard H.; Kennedy, Robert M.; Larsen, Scott D.; Pavlovsky, Alexander; Pfefferkorn, Jeffrey A.; Bainbridge, Graeme (Pfizer)

    2008-10-02

    Clinical studies have demonstrated that statins, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) inhibitors, are effective at lowering mortality levels associated with cardiovascular disease; however, 2--7% of patients may experience statin-induced myalgia that limits compliance with a treatment regimen. High resolution crystal structures, thermodynamic binding parameters, and biochemical data were used to design statin inhibitors with improved HMGR affinity and therapeutic index relative to statin-induced myalgia. These studies facilitated the identification of imidazole 1 as a potent (IC{sub 50} = 7.9 nM) inhibitor with excellent hepatoselectivity (>1000-fold) and good in vivo efficacy. The binding of 1 to HMGR was found to be enthalpically driven with a {Delta}H of -17.7 kcal/M. Additionally, a second novel series of bicyclic pyrrole-based inhibitors was identified that induced order in a protein flap of HMGR. Similar ordering was detected in a substrate complex, but has not been reported in previous statin inhibitor complexes with HMGR.

  10. Exploration of natural product ingredients as inhibitors of human HMG-CoA reductase through structure-based virtual screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin SH

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Shih-Hung Lin,1 Kao-Jean Huang,1,2 Ching-Feng Weng,1 David Shiuan1 1Department of Life Science and Institute of Biotechnology, National Dong Hwa University, Hualien, Taiwan, Republic of China; 2Development Center of Biotechnology, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China Abstract: Cholesterol plays an important role in living cells. However, a very high level of cholesterol may lead to atherosclerosis. HMG-CoA (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase is the key enzyme in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway, and the statin-like drugs are inhibitors of human HMG-CoA reductase (hHMGR. The present study aimed to virtually screen for potential hHMGR inhibitors from natural product to discover hypolipidemic drug candidates with fewer side effects and lesser toxicities. We used the 3D structure 1HWK from the PDB (Protein Data Bank database of hHMGR as the target to screen for the strongly bound compounds from the traditional Chinese medicine database. Many interesting molecules including polyphenolic compounds, polisubstituted heterocyclics, and linear lipophilic alcohols were identified and their ADMET (absorption, disrtibution, metabolism, excretion, toxicity properties were predicted. Finally, four compounds were obtained for the in vitro validation experiments. The results indicated that curcumin and salvianolic acid C can effectively inhibit hHMGR, with IC50 (half maximal inhibitory concentration values of 4.3 µM and 8 µM, respectively. The present study also demonstrated the feasibility of discovering new drug candidates through structure-based virtual screening. Keywords: HMG-CoA reductase, virtual screening, curcumin, salvianolic acid C

  11. Molecular structure, spectroscopic and docking analysis of 1,3-diphenylpyrazole-4-propionic acid: A good prostaglandin reductase inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavitha, T.; Velraj, G.

    2018-03-01

    The molecule 1,3-diphenylpyrazole-4-propionic acid (DPPA) was optimized to its minimum energy level using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The vibrational frequencies of DPPA were calculated along with their potential energy distribution (PED) and the obtained values are validated with the help of experimental calculations. The reactivity nature of the molecule was investigated with the aid of various DFT methods such as global reactivity descriptors, local reactivity descriptors, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), natural bond orbitals (NBOs), etc. The prediction of activity spectra for substances (PASS) result forecast that, DPPA can be more active as a prostaglandin (PG) reductase inhibitor. The PGs are biologically synthesized by the cyclooxygenase (COX) enzyme which exists in COX1 and COX2 forms. The PGs produced by COX2 enzyme induces inflammation and fungal infections and hence the inhibition of COX2 enzyme is indispensable in anti-inflammation and anti-fungal activities. The docking analysis of DPPA with COX enzymes (both COX1 and COX2) were carried out and eventually, it was found that DPPA can selectively inhibit COX2 enzyme and can serve as a PG reductase inhibitor thereby acting as a lead compound for the treatment of inflammation and fungal diseases.

  12. Cyclohex-1-ene carboxylic acids: synthesis and biological evaluation of novel inhibitors of human 5 alpha reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baston, Eckhard; Salem, Ola I A; Hartmann, Rolf W

    2003-03-01

    In search of novel nonsteroidal mimics of steroidal inhibitors of 5 alpha reductase, 4-(2-phenylethyl)cyclohex-1-ene carboxylic acids 1-5 were synthesized with different substituents in para position of the phenyl ring (1: N, N-diisopropylcarbamoyl, 2: phenyl, 3: phenoxy, 4: benzoyl, and 5: benzyl). The principal synthetic approach for the desired compounds consisted of a Wittig olefination between 1, 4-dioxaspiro [4.5]-decane-8-carbaldehyde (4g and the appropriate phosphonium salts. The compounds were tested for inhibition of human 5 alpha reductase isozymes 1 and 2 using DU 145 cells and preparations from prostatic tissue, respectively. They turned out to be good inhibitors of the prostatic isozyme 2 with compound 1 being the most potent one (IC(50) = 760 nM). Isozyme 1 was only slightly inhibited. It is concluded that the novel structures are appropriate for being further optimized, aiming at the development of a novel drug for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

  13. Exploration of natural product ingredients as inhibitors of human HMG-CoA reductase through structure-based virtual screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Hung; Huang, Kao-Jean; Weng, Ching-Feng; Shiuan, David

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol plays an important role in living cells. However, a very high level of cholesterol may lead to atherosclerosis. HMG-CoA (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A) reductase is the key enzyme in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway, and the statin-like drugs are inhibitors of human HMG-CoA reductase (hHMGR). The present study aimed to virtually screen for potential hHMGR inhibitors from natural product to discover hypolipidemic drug candidates with fewer side effects and lesser toxicities. We used the 3D structure 1HWK from the PDB (Protein Data Bank) database of hHMGR as the target to screen for the strongly bound compounds from the traditional Chinese medicine database. Many interesting molecules including polyphenolic compounds, polisubstituted heterocyclics, and linear lipophilic alcohols were identified and their ADMET (absorption, disrtibution, metabolism, excretion, toxicity) properties were predicted. Finally, four compounds were obtained for the in vitro validation experiments. The results indicated that curcumin and salvianolic acid C can effectively inhibit hHMGR, with IC50 (half maximal inhibitory concentration) values of 4.3 µM and 8 µM, respectively. The present study also demonstrated the feasibility of discovering new drug candidates through structure-based virtual screening.

  14. Pharmacokinetic and bioavailability studies of commercially available simvastatin tablets in healthy and moderately hyperlipidaemic human subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, M.; Qamar-uz-Zaman, M.; Madni, A.; Usman, M.; Atif, M.; Akhtar, N.; Murtaza, G.

    2011-01-01

    Simvastatin, an analogue of Lovostatin, is a HMG.CoA reductase inhibitor. It is widely used in the treatment of hyperlipidaemia and coronary heart disease (CHD) with low incidence of myopathy and rhabdomyolysis. As these diseases may alter the pharmacokinetics of drugs, the present study was aimed to elaborate the variation in the pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of simvastatin in local healthy and moderately hyperlipidaemic population. Open, single dose and parallel design was applied to study. A total of 36 male volunteers were used for healthy and moderately hyperlipidaemic groups (n 18 for each) in this study on the basis of screening procedures, body chemistry and physical examination. Simvastatin 40 mg tablets (Saista 40, Bosch, Pakistan) were administered to over-night fasted volunteers. Blood samples were collected before dosing (zero time) and at regular intervals of time. The plasma samples were processed through a liquid-liquid extraction procedure and assayed by using HPLC consisting reversed phase C/sub 18/ column (ZORBAX, 4.6 x 150 mm, 5 mu m), UV detector set at 238 nm. The mobile phase consisted of the mixture of 0.025 M sodium dihydrogen phosphate (pH 4.5): acetonitrile (35: 65, v/v) which was pumped at a flow rate of 1.5 mL.min/sup -1/. The retention time of simvastatin was 7.5 minutes. The plasma drug concentration-time profiles of both groups were found significantly (P 0.05) difference between the values of following pharmacokinetic parameters in healthy and hyperlipidaemic volunteers i.e. C/sub max/, t/sub max/, AUC/sub 0-fi), AUMC/sub 0-enfinity), MRT, t/sub 1/2/, Cl/sub t /and K/sub e/. This study confirmed no significant (P > 0.05) difference in pharmacokinetics and bioavailability parameters after the administration of a single oral dose of 40 mg simvastatin (cholesterol lowering drug) to healthy and moderately hyperlipidaemic volunteers. (author)

  15. Caracemide, a site-specific irreversible inhibitor of protein R1 of Escherichia coli ribonucleotide reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, I. K.; Cornett, Claus; Karlsson, M.

    1992-01-01

    The anticancer drug caracemide, N-acetyl-N,O-di(methylcarbamoyl)hydroxylamine, and one of its degradation products, N-acetyl-O-methylcarbamoyl-hydroxylamine, were found to inhibit the enzyme ribonucleotide reductase of Escherichia coli by specific interaction with its larger component protein R1....

  16. A Rational Approach to Identify Inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Enoyl Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chhabria, M. T.; Parmar, K. B.; Brahmkshatriya, Pathik

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 21 (2013), s. 3878-3883 ISSN 1381-6128 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : mycobacterium tuberculosis * enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase * pharmacophore modeling * molecular docking * binding interactions Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry Impact factor: 3.288, year: 2013

  17. Action of lovastatin, simvastatin, and pravastatin on sterol synthesis and their antiproliferative effect in cultured myoblasts from human striated muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, A.K. van; Nègre-Arrariou, P.; Thiel, G.C.F. van; Bolhuis, P.A.; Cohen, L.H.

    1996-01-01

    Lovastatin, simvastatin, and pravastatin are fairly strong inhibitors of sterol synthesis in human myoblasts in culture. Lovastatin and simvastatin have IC50 values of 19 ± 6 nM and 4.0 ± 2.3 nM, respectively. Pravastatin is a weaker inhibitor of sterol synthesis (IC50 value of 110 ± 38 nM). Through

  18. Design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of resveratrol analogues as aromatase and quinone reductase 2 inhibitors for chemoprevention of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Bin; Hoshino, Juma; Jermihov, Katie; Marler, Laura; Pezzuto, John M.; Mesecar, Andrew D.; Cushman, Mark

    2010-01-01

    A series of new resveratrol analogues were designed and synthesized and their inhibitory activities against aromatase were evaluated. The crystal structure of human aromatase (PDB 3eqm) was used to rationalize the mechanism of action of the aromatase inhibitor 32 (IC 50 0.59 μM) through docking, molecular mechanics energy minimization, and computer graphics molecular modeling, and the information was utilized to design several very potent inhibitors, including compounds 82 (IC 50 70 nM) and 84 (IC 50 36 nM). The aromatase inhibitory activities of these compounds are much more potent than that for the lead compound resveratrol, which has an IC 50 of 80 μM. In addition to aromatase inhibitory activity, compounds 32 and 44 also displayed potent QR2 inhibitory activity (IC 50 1.7 μM and 0.27 μM, respectively) and the high-resolution X-ray structures of QR2 in complex with these two compounds provide insight into their mechanism of QR2 inhibition. The aromatase and quinone reductase inhibitors resulting from these studies have potential value in the treatment and prevention of cancer.

  19. X-ray structural studies of quinone reductase 2 nanomolar range inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pegan, Scott D.; Sturdy, Megan; Ferry, Gilles; Delagrange, Philippe; Boutin, Jean A.; Mesecar, Andrew D. (IdRS); (Purdue); (Colorado); (UIC)

    2011-09-06

    Quinone reductase 2 (QR2) is one of two members comprising the mammalian quinone reductase family of enzymes responsible for performing FAD mediated reductions of quinone substrates. In contrast to quinone reductase 1 (QR1) which uses NAD(P)H as its co-substrate, QR2 utilizes a rare group of hydride donors, N-methyl or N-ribosyl nicotinamide. Several studies have linked QR2 to the generation of quinone free radicals, several neuronal degenerative diseases, and cancer. QR2 has been also identified as the third melatonin receptor (MT3) through in cellulo and in vitro inhibition of QR2 by traditional MT3 ligands, and through recent X-ray structures of human QR2 (hQR2) in complex with melatonin and 2-iodomelatonin. Several MT3 specific ligands have been developed that exhibit both potent in cellulo inhibition of hQR2 nanomolar, affinity for MT3. The potency of these ligands suggest their use as molecular probes for hQR2. However, no definitive correlation between traditionally obtained MT3 ligand affinity and hQR2 inhibition exists limiting our understanding of how these ligands are accommodated in the hQR2 active site. To obtain a clearer relationship between the structures of developed MT3 ligands and their inhibitory properties, in cellulo and in vitro IC{sub 50} values were determined for a representative set of MT3 ligands (MCA-NAT, 2-I-MCANAT, prazosin, S26695, S32797, and S29434). Furthermore, X-ray structures for each of these ligands in complex with hQR2 were determined allowing for a structural evaluation of the binding modes of these ligands in relation to the potency of MT3 ligands.

  20. Rational Design of Novel Allosteric Dihydrofolate Reductase Inhibitors Showing Antibacterial Effects on Drug-Resistant Escherichia coli Escape Variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Bharath; Rodrigues, João V; Tonddast-Navaei, Sam; Shakhnovich, Eugene; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2017-07-21

    In drug discovery, systematic variations of substituents on a common scaffold and bioisosteric replacements are often used to generate diversity and obtain molecules with better biological effects. However, this could saturate the small-molecule diversity pool resulting in drug resistance. On the other hand, conventional drug discovery relies on targeting known pockets on protein surfaces leading to drug resistance by mutations of critical pocket residues. Here, we present a two-pronged strategy of designing novel drugs that target unique pockets on a protein's surface to overcome the above problems. Dihydrofolate reductase, DHFR, is a critical enzyme involved in thymidine and purine nucleotide biosynthesis. Several classes of compounds that are structural analogues of the substrate dihydrofolate have been explored for their antifolate activity. Here, we describe 10 novel small-molecule inhibitors of Escherichia coli DHFR, EcDHFR, belonging to the stilbenoid, deoxybenzoin, and chalcone family of compounds discovered by a combination of pocket-based virtual ligand screening and systematic scaffold hopping. These inhibitors show a unique uncompetitive or noncompetitive inhibition mechanism, distinct from those reported for all known inhibitors of DHFR, indicative of binding to a unique pocket distinct from either substrate or cofactor-binding pockets. Furthermore, we demonstrate that rescue mutants of EcDHFR, with reduced affinity to all known classes of DHFR inhibitors, are inhibited at the same concentration as the wild-type. These compounds also exhibit antibacterial activity against E. coli harboring the drug-resistant variant of DHFR. This discovery is the first report on a novel class of inhibitors targeting a unique pocket on EcDHFR.

  1. Discovery and quantitative structure-activity relationship study of lepidopteran HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors as selective insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Yang-Yang; Li, Yuan-Mei; Yin, Yue; Chen, Shan-Shan; Kai, Zhen-Peng

    2017-09-01

    In a previous study we have demonstrated that insect 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR) can be a potential selective insecticide target. Three series of inhibitors were designed on the basis of the difference in HMGR structures from Homo sapiens and Manduca sexta, with the aim of discovering potent selective insecticide candidates. An in vitro bioassay showed that gem-difluoromethylenated statin analogues have potent effects on JH biosynthesis of M. sexta and high selectivity between H. sapiens and M. sexta. All series II compounds {1,3,5-trisubstituted [4-tert-butyl 2-(5,5-difluoro-2,2-dimethyl-6-vinyl-4-yl) acetate] pyrazoles} have some effect on JH biosynthesis, whereas most of them are inactive on human HMGR. In particular, the IC 50 value of compound II-12 (37.8 nm) is lower than that of lovastatin (99.5 nm) and similar to that of rosuvastatin (24.2 nm). An in vivo bioassay showed that I-1, I-2, I-3 and II-12 are potential selective insecticides, especially for lepidopteran pest control. A predictable and statistically meaningful CoMFA model of 23 inhibitors (20 as training sets and three as test sets) was obtained with a value of q 2 and r 2 of 0.66 and 0.996 respectively. The final model suggested that a potent insect HMGR inhibitor should contain suitable small and non-electronegative groups in the ring part, and electronegative groups in the side chain. Four analogues were discovered as potent selective lepidopteran HMGR inhibitors, which can specifically be used for lepidopteran pest control. The CoMFA model will be useful for the design of new selective insect HMGR inhibitors that are structurally related to the training set compounds. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Simvastatin-induced nocturnal leg pain disappears with pravastatin substitution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojaković Nataša

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Statins have similar side effects that do not always occur at the same rate among the various statins. We present a case of simvastatin-induced muscle toxicity that disappeared when pravastatin was substituted for the original drug. Case Outline. A 74-year-old male, a nonsmoker, complained of severe nocturnal leg cramps. The patient also complained that similar painful cramping occurred when he walked rapidly or jogged. Because some components of his lipid panel exceeded the ‘desirable’ range, and as he had a history of myocardial infarction, his family physician prescribed simvastatin (40 mg/day. The patient had taken this medication for the past eight years. The painful nocturnal episodes started two years ago and affected either one or the other leg. Four months ago we discontinued his simvastatin and prescribed pravastatin (80 mg/day. At a follow-up visit six weeks later, the patient reported that his leg pains at night and the pain experienced after brisk walking had disappeared. Four months after the substitution of pravastatin for simvastatin, the patient reported that his complete lack of symptoms had continued. Conclusion. These painful muscle cramps were probably caused by an inadequate vascular supply to the calf and foot muscles. Perhaps a combination of advanced age and atherosclerotic changes created a predisposition for the simvastatin-induced leg cramps. Pravastatin differs from simvastatin in several ways. It is not metabolized by cytochrome P450 (CYP 3A4 oxidases, and thus is not influenced by CYP 3A4 inhibitors like simvastatin. Also, simvastatin is associated with single-nucleotide polymorphisms located within the SLCO1B1 gene on the chromosome 12 and established myopathy, while pravastatin lacks this association. These differences may contribute to increased tolerance to pravastatin in this particular case.

  3. Simvastatin-lnduced nocturnal leg pain disappears with pravastatin substitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojaković, Natasa; Igić, Rajko

    2013-01-01

    Statins have similar side effects that do not always occur at the same rate among the various statins. We present a case of simvastatin-induced muscle toxicity that disappeared when pravastatin was substituted for the original drug. A 74-year-old male, a nonsmoker, complained of severe nocturnal leg cramps. The patient also complained that similar painful cramping occurred when he walked rapidly or jogged. Because some components of his lipid panel exceeded the'desirable' range, and as he had a history of myocardial infarction, his family physician prescribed simvastatin (40 mg/day). The patient had taken this medication for the past eight years. The painful nocturnal episodes started two years ago and affected either one or the other leg. Four months ago we discontinued his simvastatin and prescribed pravastatin (80 mg/day). At a follow-up visit six weeks later, the patient reported that his leg pains at night and the pain experienced after brisk walking had disappeared. Four months after the substitution of pravastatin for simvastatin, the patient reported that his complete lack of symptoms had continued. These painful muscle cramps were probably caused by an inadequate vascular supply to the calf and foot muscles. Perhaps a combination of advanced age and atherosclerotic changes created a predisposition for the simvastatin-induced leg cramps. Pravastatin differs from simvastatin in several ways.l It is not metabolized by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 oxidases, and thus is not influenced by CYP 3A4 inhibitors like simvastatin. Also, simvastatin is associated with single-nucleotide polymorphisms located within the SLCO1B1 gene on the chromosome 12 and established myopathy, while pravastatin lacks this association. These differences may contribute to increased tolerance to pravastatin in this particular case.

  4. Behavioral interactions of simvastatin and fluoxetine in tests of anxiety and depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos T

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Tainaê Santos,1 Monaliza Marizete Baungratz,1 Suellen Priscila Haskel,2 Daniela Delwing de Lima,3 Júlia Niehues da Cruz,4 Débora Delwing Dal Magro,5 José Geraldo Pereira da Cruz51Department of Medicine, 2Department of Physiotherapy, Regional University of Blumenau, Santa Catarina, Brazil; 3Department of Pharmacy, University of Joinville Region, Santa Catarina, Brazil; 4Department of Medicine, University of the Extreme South of Santa Catarina, Santa Catarina, Brazil; 5Department of Natural Sciences, Regional University of Blumenau, Santa Catarina, BrazilAbstract: Simvastatin inhibits 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway, and is widely used to control plasma cholesterol levels and prevent cardiovascular disease. However, emerging evidence indicates that the beneficial effects of simvastatin extend to the central nervous system. The effects of simvastatin combined with fluoxetine provide an exciting and potential paradigm to decreased anxiety and depression. Thus, the present paper investigates the possibility of synergistic interactions between simvastatin and fluoxetine in models of anxiety and depression. We investigated the effects of subchronically administered simvastatin (1 or 10 mg/kg/day combined with fluoxetine (2 or 10 mg/kg at 24, 5, and 1 hour on adult rats before conducting behavioral tests. The results indicate that simvastatin and/or fluoxetine treatment reduces anxiety-like behaviors in the elevated plus-maze and open-field tests. Our results showed that simvastatin and/or fluoxetine induced a significant increase in the swimming activity during the forced swimming test (antidepressant effect, with a concomitant increase in climbing time in simvastatin-treated animals only (noradrenergic activation. We hypothesize that anxiolytic and antidepressant effects of simvastatin and/or fluoxetine produce their behavioral effects through similar mechanisms and provide

  5. Effect of simvastatin on vascular tone in porcine coronary artery: Potential role of the mitochondria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almukhtar, H.; Garle, M.J.; Smith, P.A.; Roberts, R.E.

    2016-01-01

    Statins induce acute vasorelaxation which may contribute to the overall benefits of statins in the treatment of cardiovascular disease. The mechanism underlying this relaxation is unknown. As statins have been shown to alter mitochondrial function, in this study we investigated the role of mitochondria in the relaxation to simvastatin. Relaxation of porcine coronary artery segments by statins was measured using isolated tissue baths. Mitochondrial activity was determined by measuring changes in rhodamine 123 fluorescence. Changes in intracellular calcium levels were determined in freshly isolated smooth muscle cells with Fluo-4 using standard epifluorescent imaging techniques. Simvastatin, but not pravastatin, produced a slow relaxation of the coronary artery, which was independent of the endothelium. The relaxation was attenuated by the mitochondrial complex I inhibitor rotenone (10 μM) and the complex III inhibitor myxothiazol (10 μM), or a combination of the two. The complex III inhibitor antimycin A (10 μM) produced a similar time-dependent relaxation of the porcine coronary artery, which was attenuated by rotenone. Changes in rhodamine 123 fluorescence showed that simvastatin (10 μM) depolarized the membrane potential of mitochondria in both isolated mitochondria and intact blood vessels. Simvastatin and antimycin A both inhibited calcium-induced contractions in isolated blood vessels and calcium influx in smooth muscle cells and this inhibition was prevented by rotenone. In conclusion, simvastatin produces an endothelium-independent relaxation of the porcine coronary artery which is dependent, in part, upon effects on the mitochondria. The effects on the mitochondria may lead to a reduction in calcium influx and hence relaxation of the blood vessel. - Highlights: • Simvastatin produces a relaxation of the porcine coronary artery. • This relaxation is inhibited by mitochondrial complex inhibitors. • Simvastatin alters mitochondrial membrane potential

  6. Effect of simvastatin on vascular tone in porcine coronary artery: Potential role of the mitochondria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almukhtar, H.; Garle, M.J.; Smith, P.A.; Roberts, R.E., E-mail: richard.roberts@nottingham.ac.uk

    2016-08-15

    Statins induce acute vasorelaxation which may contribute to the overall benefits of statins in the treatment of cardiovascular disease. The mechanism underlying this relaxation is unknown. As statins have been shown to alter mitochondrial function, in this study we investigated the role of mitochondria in the relaxation to simvastatin. Relaxation of porcine coronary artery segments by statins was measured using isolated tissue baths. Mitochondrial activity was determined by measuring changes in rhodamine 123 fluorescence. Changes in intracellular calcium levels were determined in freshly isolated smooth muscle cells with Fluo-4 using standard epifluorescent imaging techniques. Simvastatin, but not pravastatin, produced a slow relaxation of the coronary artery, which was independent of the endothelium. The relaxation was attenuated by the mitochondrial complex I inhibitor rotenone (10 μM) and the complex III inhibitor myxothiazol (10 μM), or a combination of the two. The complex III inhibitor antimycin A (10 μM) produced a similar time-dependent relaxation of the porcine coronary artery, which was attenuated by rotenone. Changes in rhodamine 123 fluorescence showed that simvastatin (10 μM) depolarized the membrane potential of mitochondria in both isolated mitochondria and intact blood vessels. Simvastatin and antimycin A both inhibited calcium-induced contractions in isolated blood vessels and calcium influx in smooth muscle cells and this inhibition was prevented by rotenone. In conclusion, simvastatin produces an endothelium-independent relaxation of the porcine coronary artery which is dependent, in part, upon effects on the mitochondria. The effects on the mitochondria may lead to a reduction in calcium influx and hence relaxation of the blood vessel. - Highlights: • Simvastatin produces a relaxation of the porcine coronary artery. • This relaxation is inhibited by mitochondrial complex inhibitors. • Simvastatin alters mitochondrial membrane potential

  7. Simvastatin promotes NPC1-mediated free cholesterol efflux from lysosomes through CYP7A1/LXRα signalling pathway in oxLDL-loaded macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoyang; Zhang, Aolin; Halquist, Matthew S; Yuan, Xinxu; Henderson, Scott C; Dewey, William L; Li, Pin-Lan; Li, Ningjun; Zhang, Fan

    2017-02-01

    Statins, 3-hydroxyl-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, are the first-line medications prescribed for the prevention and treatment of coronary artery diseases. The efficacy of statins has been attributed not only to their systemic cholesterol-lowering actions but also to their pleiotropic effects that are unrelated to cholesterol reduction. These pleiotropic effects have been increasingly recognized as essential in statins therapy. This study was designed to investigate the pleiotropic actions of simvastatin, one of the most commonly prescribed statins, on macrophage cholesterol homeostasis with a focus on lysosomal free cholesterol egression. With simultaneous nile red and filipin staining, analysis of confocal/multi-photon imaging demonstrated that simvastatin markedly attenuated unesterified (free) cholesterol buildup in macrophages loaded with oxidized low-density lipoprotein but had little effect in reducing the sizes of cholesteryl ester-containing lipid droplets; the reduction in free cholesterol was mainly attributed to decreases in lysosome-compartmentalized cholesterol. Functionally, the egression of free cholesterol from lysosomes attenuated pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion. It was determined that the reduction of lysosomal free cholesterol buildup by simvastatin was due to the up-regulation of Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1), a lysosomal residing cholesterol transporter. Moreover, the enhanced enzymatic production of 7-hydroxycholesterol by cytochrome P450 7A1 and the subsequent activation of liver X receptor α underscored the up-regulation of NPC1. These findings reveal a novel pleiotropic effect of simvastatin in affecting lysosomal cholesterol efflux in macrophages and the associated significance in the treatment of atherosclerosis. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  8. Cyclophosphamide as a potent inhibitor of tumor thioredoxin reductase in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xufang; Zhang Jinsong; Xu Tongwen

    2007-01-01

    Cyclophosphamide (CTX) is in the nitrogen mustard group of alkylating antineoplastic chemotherapeutic agents. It is one of the most frequently used antitumor agents for the treatment of a broad spectrum of human cancers. Thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) catalyze the NADPH-dependent reduction of thioredoxin and play an important role in multiple cellular events related to carcinogenesis including cell proliferation, apoptosis, and cell signaling. This enzyme represents a promising target for the development of cytostatic agents. The purpose of this study is to determine whether CTX could target TrxR in vivo. Lewis lung carcinoma and solid H22 hepatoma treated with 50-250 mg/kg CTX for 3 h lost TrxR activity in a dose-dependent fashion. Over 75% and 95% of TrxR activity was lost at the dose of 250 mg/kg. There was, however, a recovery of TrxR activity such that it attained normal levels by 120 h after a dose of 250 mg/kg. In addition, we found that CTX caused a preferential TrxR inhibition over other antioxidant enzymes, such as glutathione peroxidase, catalase, and superoxide dismutase. We also used ascites H22 cells to investigate cancer cells response after TrxR was inhibited by CTX in vivo since CTX is needed to be activated by liver cytochrome P450 enzymes. The time course and dose-dependent changes of cellular TrxR activity were similar with those in tumor tissue. CTX caused a dose-dependent cellular proliferation inhibition which was positively correlated with TrxR inhibition at 3 h. Furthermore, when 3 h CTX-treated cells with various TrxR backgrounds, harvested from ascites-bearing mice, were implanted into mice, the proliferations of these cells were again proportionally dependent on TrxR activity. The TrxR inhibition could thereby be considered as a crucial mechanism contributing to anticancer effect seen upon clinical use of CTX

  9. 5,6-Dihydro-5-aza-2’-deoxycytidine potentiates the anti-HIV-1 activity of ribonucleotide reductase inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Rawson, Jonathan M.; Heineman, Richard H.; Beach, Lauren B.; Martin, Jessica L.; Schnettler, Erica K.; Dapp, Michael J.; Patterson, Steven E.; Mansky, Louis M.

    2013-01-01

    The nucleoside analog 5,6-dihydro-5-aza-2’-deoxycytidine (KP-1212) has been investigated as a first-in-class lethal mutagen of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1). Since a prodrug monotherapy did not reduce viral loads in Phase II clinical trials, we tested if ribonucleotide reductase inhibitors (RNRIs) combined with KP-1212 would improve antiviral activity. KP-1212 potentiated the activity of gemcitabine and resveratrol and simultaneously increased the viral mutant frequency. G-to-C ...

  10. Iodine-123-metaiodobenzylguanidine cardiac scintigraphy in patients with diabetes mellitus. Therapeutic effects of aldose reductase inhibitor and vitamin B12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utsunomiya, Keita

    1997-01-01

    Twenty normal volunteers (C group) and 56 patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) who did not have ischemic heart diseases (DM group), were evaluated by means of iodine-123-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy. The uptake ratio between the cardiac muscle and the upper mediastinum was calculated. The ratio determined from the initial I-123-MIBG scintigraphy image was expressed as HMi, and that determined from the delayed image was expressed as HMd. The washout rate percentage (%WR) was calculated. At least one instance of either the HMi, the HMd, or %WR was outside the mean±1 standard deviation of C group in 34 DM group patients. Aldose reductase inhibitor (ARI) was administered to 17 of the 34 patients and Vitamin B 12 (VB 12 ) to the remaining 17 patients, for 3 to 5 months. Before and after treatment, scintigraphic studies with I-123-MIBG were carried out, and the HMi, HMd, and %WR were calculated. There were no significant differences found in FBG, HbA1c, or 1.5-AG levels after treatment with either drug, when compared to the pretreatment values. Both HMi and HMd in the DM group were significantly lower, and %WR was significantly higher than in the C group. The changes in HMi, HMd, and %WR after treatment with ARI were not significant. After treatment with VB 12 , the HMi and HMd levels were significantly increased (p 12 was shown to be effective for improvement of HMi and HMd in NIDDM. (author)

  11. Downregulation of monocytic differentiation via modulation of CD147 by 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manda V Sasidhar

    Full Text Available CD147 is an activation induced glycoprotein that promotes the secretion and activation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs and is upregulated during the differentiation of macrophages. Interestingly, some of the molecular functions of CD147 rely on its glycosylation status: the highly glycosylated forms of CD147 induce MMPs whereas the lowly glycosylated forms inhibit MMP activation. Statins are hydroxy-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors that block the synthesis of mevalonate, thereby inhibiting all mevalonate-dependent pathways, including isoprenylation, N-glycosylation and cholesterol synthesis. In this study, we investigated the role of statins in the inhibition of macrophage differentiation and the associated process of MMP secretion through modulation of CD147. We observed that differentiation of the human monocytic cell line THP-1 to a macrophage phenotype led to upregulation of CD147 and CD14 and that this effect was inhibited by statins. At the molecular level, statins altered CD147 expression, structure and function by inhibiting isoprenylation and N-glycosylation. In addition, statins induced a shift of CD147 from its highly glycosylated form to its lowly glycosylated form. This shift in N-glycosylation status was accompanied by a decrease in the production and functional activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9. In conclusion, these findings describe a novel molecular mechanism of immune regulation by statins, making them interesting candidates for autoimmune disease therapy.

  12. Downregulation of monocytic differentiation via modulation of CD147 by 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasidhar, Manda V; Chevooru, Sai Krishnaveni; Eickelberg, Oliver; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Neuhaus, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    CD147 is an activation induced glycoprotein that promotes the secretion and activation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and is upregulated during the differentiation of macrophages. Interestingly, some of the molecular functions of CD147 rely on its glycosylation status: the highly glycosylated forms of CD147 induce MMPs whereas the lowly glycosylated forms inhibit MMP activation. Statins are hydroxy-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors that block the synthesis of mevalonate, thereby inhibiting all mevalonate-dependent pathways, including isoprenylation, N-glycosylation and cholesterol synthesis. In this study, we investigated the role of statins in the inhibition of macrophage differentiation and the associated process of MMP secretion through modulation of CD147. We observed that differentiation of the human monocytic cell line THP-1 to a macrophage phenotype led to upregulation of CD147 and CD14 and that this effect was inhibited by statins. At the molecular level, statins altered CD147 expression, structure and function by inhibiting isoprenylation and N-glycosylation. In addition, statins induced a shift of CD147 from its highly glycosylated form to its lowly glycosylated form. This shift in N-glycosylation status was accompanied by a decrease in the production and functional activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9. In conclusion, these findings describe a novel molecular mechanism of immune regulation by statins, making them interesting candidates for autoimmune disease therapy.

  13. Relationships between HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statin) use and strength, balance and falls in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haerer, W; Delbaere, K; Bartlett, H; Lord, S R; Rowland, J

    2012-12-01

    To investigate associations between HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor (statin) use and muscle strength, balance, mobility and falls in older people. Five hundred community-dwelling people aged 70-90 years provided information about their medication use and undertook tests of lower limb strength, postural sway, leaning balance (maximal balance range and coordinated stability tests) and functional mobility. Participants were then followed up for 12 months with respect to falls. After adjusting for general health in analyses of covariance procedures, statin users had poorer maximal balance range than non-statin users (P = 0.017). Statin and non-statin users did not differ with respect to strength, postural sway, mobility or falls experienced in the follow-up year. In a sample of healthy older people, statin use was not associated with muscle weakness, postural sway, reduced mobility or falls. Statin users, however, had poorer leaning balance which may potentially increase fall risk in this group. © 2011 The Authors; Internal Medicine Journal © 2011 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  14. Use of 5-alpha-reductase inhibitors did not increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases in patients with benign prostate hyperplasia: a five-year follow-up study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teng-Fu Hsieh

    Full Text Available This nationwide population-based study investigated the risk of cardiovascular diseases after 5-alpha-reductase inhibitor therapy for benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH using the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD in Taiwan.In total, 1,486 adult patients newly diagnosed with BPH and who used 5-alpha-reductase inhibitors were recruited as the study cohort, along with 9,995 subjects who did not use 5-alpha-reductase inhibitors as a comparison cohort from 2003 to 2008. Each patient was monitored for 5 years, and those who subsequently had cardiovascular diseases were identified. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to compare the risk of cardiovascular diseases between the study and comparison cohorts after adjusting for possible confounding risk factors.The patients who received 5-alpha-reductase inhibitor therapy had a lower cumulative rate of cardiovascular diseases than those who did not receive 5-alpha-reductase inhibitor therapy during the 5-year follow-up period (8.4% vs. 11.2%, P=0.003. In subgroup analysis, the 5-year cardiovascular event hazard ratio (HR was lower among the patients older than 65 years with 91 to 365 cumulative defined daily dose (cDDD 5-alpha-reductase inhibitor use (HR=0.63, 95% confidence interval (CI 0.42 to 0.92; P=0.018, however there was no difference among the patients with 28 to 90 and more than 365 cDDD 5-alpha-reductase inhibitor use (HR=1.14, 95% CI 0.77 to 1.68; P=0.518 and HR=0.83, 95% CI 0.57 to 1.20; P=0.310, respectively.5-alpha-reductase inhibitor therapy did not increase the risk of cardiovascular events in the BPH patients in 5 years of follow-up. Further mechanistic research is needed.

  15. Enhancement of Autophagy by Simvastatin through Inhibition of Rac1-mTOR Signaling Pathway in Coronary Arterial Myocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Miao Wei

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: In addition to their action of lowering blood cholesterol levels, statins modulate biological characteristics and functions of arterial myocytes such as viability, proliferation, apoptosis, survival and contraction. The present study tested whether simvastatin, as a prototype statin, enhances autophagy in coronary arterial myocytes (CAMs to thereby exert their beneficial effects in atherosclerosis. Methods and Results: Using flow cytometry, we demonstrated that simvastatin significantly increased the autophagsome formation in CAMs. Western blot analysis confirmed that simvastatin significantly increased protein expression of typical autophagy markers LC3B and Beclin1 in these CAMs. Confocal microscopy further demonstrated that simvastatin increased fusion of autophagosomes with lysosomes, which was blocked by autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine or silencing of Atg7 genes. Simvastatin reduced mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR activity, which was reversed by Rac1-GTPase overexpression and the mTOR agonist phosphatidic acid. Moreover, both Rac1-GTPase overexpression and activation of mTOR by phosphatidic acid drastically blocked simvastatin-induced autophagosome formation in CAMs. Interestingly, simvastatin increased protein expression of a contractile phenotype marker calponin in CAMs, which was blocked by autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine. Simvastatin markedly reduced proliferation of CAMs under both control and proatherogenic stimulation. However, this inhibitory effect of simvastatin on CAM proliferation was blocked by by autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine or silencing of Atg7 genes. Lastly, animal experiments demonstrated that simvastatin increased protein expression of LC3B and calponin in mouse coronary arteries. Conclusion: Our results indicate that simvastatin inhibits the Rac1-mTOR pathway and thereby increases autophagy in CAMs which may stabilize CAMs in the contractile phenotype to prevent proliferation and growth

  16. Negative Impact of Testosterone Deficiency and 5α-Reductase Inhibitors Therapy on Metabolic and Sexual Function in Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traish, Abdulmaged M

    2017-01-01

    elevated activities of liver function enzymes concomitant with reduction in circulating T levels, worsening erectile dysfunction (ED), and reduced quality of life.Although we have attempted to summarize the current literature pertaining to this critical topic "androgen deficiency" and its impact on men's health and quality of life, there remain many gaps in the knowledge regarding the biochemical pathways that are involved in the pathophysiology of androgen deficiency. We wish to clearly state that there are areas of controversies, including whether age-related androgen deficiency (functional hypogonadism) merits treatment and whether T therapy provided real proven benefits. Finally, considerable debate exists with respect to the potential and purported cardiovascular (CV) risks of treating TD with exogenous T. For brevity sake, we will not discuss in detail the benefits of T therapy in men with TD since this topic is comprehensively covered by Dr. F. Saad's chapter in this book, entitled "Testosterone Therapy and Glucose Homeostasis in Men with Testosterone Deficiency (Hypogonadism)."We have made a concerted effort to address the controversy of T therapy in men with TD in the discussion. However, we wish to acknowledge that these issues will remain a matter of debate for some time to come. Only with advances in fundamental basic science and clinical research, some of these controversial issues may be laid to rest. Nevertheless, we believe that there is considerable body of credible evidence to suggest that T therapy of men with TD is safe and effective and provides a host of health benefits and therefore merits considerations in men with TD, irrespective of the underlying cause or etiology. An additional aspect of androgen deficiency is the drug-induced reduction in 5α-DHT levels by the use of 5α-reductase inhibitors. We also believe that physicians prescribing 5α-reductase inhibitors (i.e., finasteride or dutasteride) for relief of BPH symptoms or treatment of

  17. Risk of Fractures and Falls during and after 5-α Reductase Inhibitor Use: A Nationwide Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, David; Garmo, Hans; Stattin, Pär; Michaëlsson, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Lower urinary tract symptoms are common among older men and 5-α reductase inhibitors (5-ARI) are a group of drugs recommended in treating these symptoms. The effect on prostate volume is mediated by a reduction in dihydrotestosterone; however, this reduction is counterbalanced by a 25% rise in serum testosterone levels. Therefore, 5-ARI use might have systemic effects and differentially affect bone mineral density, muscular mass and strength, as well as falls, all of which are major determinants of fractures in older men. We conducted a nationwide cohort study of all Swedish men who used 5-ARI by comparing their risk of hip fracture, any type of fracture and of falls with matched control men randomly selected from the population and unexposed to 5-ARI. During 1 417 673 person-years of follow-up, 10 418 men had a hip fracture, 19 570 any type of fracture and 46 755 a fall requiring hospital care. Compared with unexposed men, current users of 5-ARI had an adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of 0.96 (95% CI 0.91-1.02) for hip fracture, an HR of 0.94 (95% CI 0.90-0.98) for all fracture and an HR of 0.99 (95% CI 0.96-1.02) for falls. Former users had an increased risk of hip fractures (HR 1.10, 95% CI 1.01-1.19). 5-ARI is safe from a bone health perspective with an unaltered risk of fractures and falls during periods of use. After discontinuation of 5-ARI, there is a modest increase in the rate of fractures and falls.

  18. Risk of Fractures and Falls during and after 5-α Reductase Inhibitor Use: A Nationwide Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Robinson

    Full Text Available Lower urinary tract symptoms are common among older men and 5-α reductase inhibitors (5-ARI are a group of drugs recommended in treating these symptoms. The effect on prostate volume is mediated by a reduction in dihydrotestosterone; however, this reduction is counterbalanced by a 25% rise in serum testosterone levels. Therefore, 5-ARI use might have systemic effects and differentially affect bone mineral density, muscular mass and strength, as well as falls, all of which are major determinants of fractures in older men.We conducted a nationwide cohort study of all Swedish men who used 5-ARI by comparing their risk of hip fracture, any type of fracture and of falls with matched control men randomly selected from the population and unexposed to 5-ARI.During 1 417 673 person-years of follow-up, 10 418 men had a hip fracture, 19 570 any type of fracture and 46 755 a fall requiring hospital care. Compared with unexposed men, current users of 5-ARI had an adjusted hazard ratio (HR of 0.96 (95% CI 0.91-1.02 for hip fracture, an HR of 0.94 (95% CI 0.90-0.98 for all fracture and an HR of 0.99 (95% CI 0.96-1.02 for falls. Former users had an increased risk of hip fractures (HR 1.10, 95% CI 1.01-1.19.5-ARI is safe from a bone health perspective with an unaltered risk of fractures and falls during periods of use. After discontinuation of 5-ARI, there is a modest increase in the rate of fractures and falls.

  19. Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors in Older Persons with Acute Myocardial Infarction: Evidence for an Age–Statin Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foody, JoAnne Micale; Rathore, Saif S.; Galusha, Deron; Masoudi, Frederick A.; Havranek, Edward P.; Radford, Martha J.; Krumholz, Harlan M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To characterize the relationship between hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) and outcomes in older persons with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). DESIGN Observational study. SETTING Acute care hospitals in the United States from April 1998 to June 2001. PARTICIPANTS Medicare patients aged 65 and older with a principal discharge diagnosis of AMI (N = 65,020) who did and did not receive a discharge prescription for statins. MEASUREMENTS The primary outcome of interest was all-cause mortality at 3 years after discharge. RESULTS Of 23,013 patients with AMI assessed, 5,513 (24.0%) were receiving a statin at discharge. Nearly 40% of eligible patients (n =8,452) were aged 80 and older, of whom 1,310 (15.5%) were receiving a statin at discharge. In a multivariable model taking into account demographic, clinical, physician and hospital characteristics, and propensity score, discharge statin therapy was associated with significantly lower 3-year mortality (hazard ratio (HR) =0.89 (95% confidence interval (CI) =0.83–0.96)). In an analysis stratified by age, discharge statins were associated with lower mortality in patients younger than 80 (HR =0.84, 95% CI =0.76–0.92) but not in those aged 80 and older (HR =0.97, 95% CI =0.87–1.09). CONCLUSION Statin therapy is associated with lower mortality in older patients with AMI younger than 80 but not in those aged 80 and older, as a group. This finding questions whether statin efficacy data in younger patients can be broadly applied to the very old and indicates the need for further study of this group. PMID:16551308

  20. Association of Cognitive Impairment in Patients on 3-Hydroxy-3-Methyl-Glutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Satyajeet; Weinstock, Joshua Louis; Ishino, Allyse Sachiko; Benites, Jefferson Felix; Pop, Samantha Rachel; Perez, Christopher David; Gumbs, Edvard Adrian; Rosenbaum, Jennifer Ann; Roccato, Mary Kate; Shah, Hely; Contino, Gabriela; Hunter, Krystal

    2017-07-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death in the United States. A reduction in cholesterol with 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors (statin) significantly reduces mortality and morbidity. Statins may be associated with cognitive impairment or dementia. Our aim was to study the association of cognitive impairment or dementia in patients who were on a statin. Electronic medical records of 3,500 adult patients in our suburban internal medicine office were reviewed. There were 720 (20.6%) patients in the statin treatment group. Dementia or cognitive impairment was an associated comorbid condition in 7.9% patients in the statin treatment group compared to 3.1% patients in the non-statin group (P impairment or dementia showed that among the age ranges of 51 years through 100 years, the patients in the statin treatment group had a higher prevalence of cognitive impairment or dementia compared to the non-statin group. In the statin treatment group, we found significantly higher prevalence of hyperlipidemia (86.3%), hypertension (69.6%), diabetes mellitus (36.0%), osteoarthritis (31.5%), coronary artery disease (26.1%), hypothyroidism (21.5%) and depression (19.3%) compared to the non-statin group (P impairment were on statin therapy compared to 18.9% patients who had no dementia or cognitive impairment and were on statin therapy (P impairment with each year increase in age (1.3 times), in women (2.2 times), African American race (2.7 times), non-consumption of moderate amount of alcohol (two times), diabetes mellitus (1.6 times), hypothyroidism (1.7 times), cerebrovascular accident (3.2 times), and other rheumatological diseases (1.8 times). The association of dementia or cognitive impairment was significantly higher in the patients who were on statin therapy compared to the patients who were not on a statin.

  1. Simvastatin effects on skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Steen; Stride, Nis; Hey-Mogensen, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Glucose tolerance and skeletal muscle coenzyme Q(10) (Q(10)) content, mitochondrial density, and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) capacity were measured in simvastatin-treated patients (n = 10) and in well-matched control subjects (n = 9)....

  2. Anti-neuroinflammatory efficacy of the aldose reductase inhibitor FMHM via phospholipase C/protein kinase C-dependent NF-κB and MAPK pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Ke-Wu [State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing 100191 (China); Li, Jun [Modern Research Center for Traditional Chinese Medicine, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing 100029 (China); Dong, Xin; Wang, Ying-Hong; Ma, Zhi-Zhong; Jiang, Yong; Jin, Hong-Wei [State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing 100191 (China); Tu, Peng-Fei, E-mail: pengfeitu@vip.163.com [State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing 100191 (China); Modern Research Center for Traditional Chinese Medicine, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2013-11-15

    Aldose reductase (AR) has a key role in several inflammatory diseases: diabetes, cancer and cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, AR inhibition seems to be a useful strategy for anti-inflammation therapy. In the central nervous system (CNS), microglial over-activation is considered to be a central event in neuroinflammation. However, the effects of AR inhibition in CNS inflammation and its underlying mechanism of action remain unknown. In the present study, we found that FMHM (a naturally derived AR inhibitor from the roots of Polygala tricornis Gagnep.) showed potent anti-neuroinflammatory effects in vivo and in vitro by inhibiting microglial activation and expression of inflammatory mediators. Mechanistic studies showed that FMHM suppressed the activity of AR-dependent phospholipase C/protein kinase C signaling, which further resulted in downstream inactivation of the IκB kinase/IκB/nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) inflammatory pathway. Therefore, AR inhibition-dependent NF-κB inactivation negatively regulated the transcription and expression of various inflammatory genes. AR inhibition by FMHM exerted neuroprotective effects in lipopolysaccharide-induced neuron–microglia co-cultures. These findings suggested that AR is a potential target for neuroinflammation inhibition and that FMHM could be an effective agent for treating or preventing neuroinflammatory diseases. - Highlights: • FMHM is a natural-derived aldose reductase (AR) inhibitor. • FMHM inhibits various neuroinflammatory mediator productions in vitro and in vivo. • FMHM inhibits neuroinflammation via aldose reductase/PLC/PKC-dependent NF-κB pathway. • FMHM inhibits neuroinflammation via aldose reductase/PLC/PKC-dependent MAPK pathway. • FMHM protects neurons against inflammatory injury in microglia-neuron co-cultures.

  3. Reduced mitochondrial coenzyme Q10 levels in HepG2 cells treated with high-dose simvastatin: A possible role in statin-induced hepatotoxicity?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavintharan, S.; Ong, C.N.; Jeyaseelan, K.; Sivakumar, M.; Lim, S.C.; Sum, C.F.

    2007-01-01

    Lowering of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol is well achieved by 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins). Statins inhibit the conversion of HMG-CoA to mevalonate, a precursor for cholesterol and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ 10 ). In HepG2 cells, simvastatin decreased mitochondrial CoQ 10 levels, and at higher concentrations was associated with a moderately higher degree of cell death, increased DNA oxidative damage and a reduction in ATP synthesis. Supplementation of CoQ 10 , reduced cell death and DNA oxidative stress, and increased ATP synthesis. It is suggested that CoQ 10 deficiency plays an important role in statin-induced hepatopathy, and that CoQ 10 supplementation protects HepG2 cells from this complication

  4. 1H and 13C NMR Chemical Shift Assignments and Conformational Analysis for the Two Diastereomers of the Vitamin K Epoxide Reductase Inhibitor Brodifacoum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cort, John R.; Cho, Herman M.

    2009-01-01

    Proton and 13C NMR chemical shift assignments and 1H-1H scalar couplings for the two diastereomers of the vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) inhibitor brodifacoum have been determined from acetone solutions containing both diastereomers. Data were obtained from homo- and heteronuclear correlation spectra acquired at 1H frequencies of 750 and 900 MHz over a 268-303 K temperature range. Conformations inferred from scalar coupling and 1-D NOE measurements exhibit large differences between the diastereomers. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  5. Compound list: simvastatin [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available simvastatin SST 00117 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/...in_vitro/simvastatin.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_...vitro/simvastatin.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/...Liver/Single/simvastatin.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/

  6. Risk of gynecomastia and breast cancer associated with the use of 5-alpha reductase inhibitors for benign prostatic hyperplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagberg, Katrina Wilcox; Divan, Hozefa A; Fang, Shona C; Nickel, J Curtis; Jick, Susan S

    2017-01-01

    Background Clinical trial results suggest that 5-alpha reductase inhibitors (5ARIs) for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) may increase the risk of gynecomastia and male breast cancer, but epidemiological studies have been limited. Patients and methods We conducted a cohort study with nested case–control analyses using the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink. We identified men diagnosed with BPH who were free from Klinefelter syndrome, prostate, genital or urinary cancer, prostatectomy or orchiectomy, or evidence of gynecomastia or breast cancer. Patients entered the cohort at age ≥40 years and at least 3 years after the start of their electronic medical record. We classified exposure as 5ARIs (alone or in combination with alpha blockers [ABs]), AB only, or unexposed to 5ARIs and ABs. Cases were men who had a first-time diagnosis of gynecomastia or breast cancer. Incidence rates and incidence rate ratios (IRRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) in the gynecomastia analysis and crude and adjusted odds ratios (ORs) with 95% CIs in both analyses were calculated. Results Compared to no exposure, gynecomastia risk was elevated for users of 5ARIs (alone or in combination with ABs) in both the cohort (IRR=3.55, 95% CI 3.05–4.14) and case–control analyses (OR=3.31, 95% CI 2.66–4.10), whereas the risk was null for users of AB only. The increased risk of gynecomastia with the use of 5ARIs persisted regardless of the number of prescriptions, exposure timing, and presence or absence of concomitant prescriptions for drugs known to be associated with gynecomastia. The risk was higher for dutasteride than for finasteride. 5ARI users did not have an increased risk of breast cancer compared to unexposed men (OR=1.52, 95% CI 0.61–3.80). Conclusion In men with BPH, 5ARIs significantly increased the risk of gynecomastia, but not breast cancer, compared to AB use and no exposure. PMID:28228662

  7. Simvastatin attenuates acrolein-induced mucin production in rats: involvement of the Ras/extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ya-Juan; Chen, Peng; Wang, Hai-Xia; Wang, Tao; Chen, Lei; Wang, Xun; Sun, Bei-Bei; Liu, Dai-Shun; Xu, Dan; An, Jing; Wen, Fu-Qiang

    2010-06-01

    Airway mucus overproduction is a cardinal feature of airway inflammatory diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cystic fibrosis. Since the small G-protein Ras is known to modulate cellular functions in the lung, we sought to investigate whether the Ras inhibitor simvastatin could attenuate acrolein-induced mucin production in rat airways. Rats were exposed to acrolein for 12 days, after first being pretreated intragastrically for 24 h with either simvastatin alone or simvastatin in combination with mevalonate, which prevents the isoprenylation needed for Ras activation. Lung tissue was analyzed for extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activity, goblet cell metaplasia and mucin production. To analyze the effect of simvastatin on mucin production in more detail, acrolein-exposed human airway epithelial NCI-H292 cells were pretreated with simvastatin alone or together with mevalonate. Culture medium was collected to detect mucin secretion, and cell lysates were examined for Ras-GTPase activity and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/ERK phosphorylation. In vivo, simvastatin treatment dose-dependently suppressed acrolein-induced goblet cell hyperplasia and metaplasia in bronchial epithelium and inhibited ERK phosphorylation in rat lung homogenates. Moreover, simvastatin inhibited Muc5AC mucin synthesis at both the mRNA and protein levels in the lung. In vitro, simvastatin pretreatment attenuated the acrolein-induced significant increase in MUC5AC mucin expression, Ras-GTPase activity and EGFR/ERK phosphorylation. These inhibitory effects of simvastatin were neutralized by mevalonate administration both in vitro and in vivo. Our results suggest that simvastatin may attenuate acrolein-induced mucin protein synthesis in the airway and airway inflammation, possibly by blocking ERK activation mediated by Ras protein isoprenylation. Thus, the evidence from the experiment suggests that human trials are warranted to determine the potential

  8. Dihydroquinazolines as a novel class of Trypanosoma brucei trypanothione reductase inhibitors: discovery, synthesis, and characterization of their binding mode by protein crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Stephen; Alphey, Magnus S; Jones, Deuan C; Shanks, Emma J; Street, Ian P; Frearson, Julie A; Wyatt, Paul G; Gilbert, Ian H; Fairlamb, Alan H

    2011-10-13

    Trypanothione reductase (TryR) is a genetically validated drug target in the parasite Trypanosoma brucei , the causative agent of human African trypanosomiasis. Here we report the discovery, synthesis, and development of a novel series of TryR inhibitors based on a 3,4-dihydroquinazoline scaffold. In addition, a high resolution crystal structure of TryR, alone and in complex with substrates and inhibitors from this series, is presented. This represents the first report of a high resolution complex between a noncovalent ligand and this enzyme. Structural studies revealed that upon ligand binding the enzyme undergoes a conformational change to create a new subpocket which is occupied by an aryl group on the ligand. Therefore, the inhibitor, in effect, creates its own small binding pocket within the otherwise large, solvent exposed active site. The TryR-ligand structure was subsequently used to guide the synthesis of inhibitors, including analogues that challenged the induced subpocket. This resulted in the development of inhibitors with improved potency against both TryR and T. brucei parasites in a whole cell assay.

  9. In vivo assay for conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone by rat prostatic steroid 5 alpha-reductase and comparison of two inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toomey, R.E.; Goode, R.L.; Petrow, V.; Neubauer, B.L.

    1991-01-01

    An in vivo assay for steroid 5 alpha-reductase in rat ventral prostate has been developed and used to compare the inhibitory activity of N,N-diethyl-4-methyl-3-oxo-4-aza-5 alpha-androstane-17 beta-carboxamide (4-MA) and 6-methylene-4-pregnene-3,20-dione (LY207320). Immature rats (70-80 g) received test compounds 30 min prior to s.c. injection of [3H]-T. The rats were sacrificed 30 min later and the ventral prostates were analyzed for [3H]-T metabolites. Intraprostatic [3H]-T and [3H]-DHT reached peak levels within 5 min after injection of [3H]-T and declined to about 25% of peak levels after 2 hr. 4-MA was a very potent inhibitor of [3H]-DHT formation with an estimated IC50 of 0.2 mg/kg. LY207320, an inhibitor of 5 alpha-reductase in vitro, was weakly active in vivo and did not achieve greater than 45% inhibition at high doses (greater than 200 mg/kg, s.c.). Tissue uptake of [3H]-T was also inhibited by LY207320, which may contribute to its inhibitory activity on accessory sex organ growth in the rat

  10. Symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia: the role of 5-alpha-reductase inhibitors in the prevention of acute urinary retention and surgical therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma Marigliano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH is a disease that affects over 50% of males aged 50 years or older. In men aged >80 years, the incidence is 90%. BPH occurs in 9-25% of males aged 40 to 79 years. Fifty percent of patients with BPH are symptomatic. The symptoms include reduced urinary flow, nocturia, defective bladder emptying, urinary hesitancy, and dysuria. Disease progression can be associated with acute urinary retention (AUR. Prostatic obstruction includes mechanical and dynamic components, the latter mediated by alpha-muscarinic receptors. Treatment with alpha-1-blockers (alfuzosin, doxazosin, tamsulosin, and terazosin leads to rapid amelioration of symptoms and urinary flow, usually within one or two weeks. The 5-alpha reductase inhibitors (5-ARIs are “disease-modifying drugs.” They control the growth of the prostate by blocking the conversion of testosterone into dihydrotestosterone (DHT. Finasteride is a 5–ARI that is selective for type 2 receptors. Dutasteride is a powerful inhibitor of both 5- alpha reductase isoforms (type 1 and 2 and produces more complete suppression of DHT synthesis than finasteride. Dutasteride also has a much longer half-life than finasteride (five weeks versus five to six hours. The authors review the results of clinical trials involving finasteride and dutasteride, with and without alpha-1-blockers, highlighting the important role of dutasteride in improving acute urinary retention and eliminating the need for surgical therapy.

  11. Pre-radiotherapy PSA progression is a negative prognostic factor in prostate cancer patients using 5-alpha-reductase inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taussky, Daniel; Lambert, Carole; Bahary, Jean-Paul; Beauchemin, Marie-Claude; Barkati, Maroie; Menard, Cynthia; Delouya, Guila [Hopital Notre-Dame, Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); CRCHUM-Centre de Recherche du Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Piotte, Julie [Hopital Notre-Dame, Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Zorn, Kevin C.; Zanaty, Marc [Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Section of Urology, Department of Surgery, Montreal, QC (Canada); Krishnan, Vimal [Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Department of Pathology, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2018-01-15

    To investigate the impact of 5-alpha-reductase inhibitor (5-ARI) use on radiotherapy outcomes for localized prostate cancer. We included 203 patients on a 5-ARI from our institutional database comprising over 2500 patients who had been treated with either external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) or brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer. Patients received a 5-ARI for urinary symptoms or active surveillance. Cancer progressions at the time of definitive treatment were analyzed according to the following criteria: (a) progression of Gleason score or increase in cancer volume on biopsy, (b) first biopsy positive for cancer after being treated for urinary symptoms with a 5-ARI, and (c) prostate-specific antigen (PSA) progression with or without a previous cancer diagnosis. Biochemical failure (BF) was defined by the Phoenix definition. Log-rank test was used for survival analysis. At a median follow-up of 38.2 months (standard deviation 22.2 months), 10 (4.9%) patients experienced BF. Concerning prostate cancer progression criteria, 52% of men demonstrated none, 37% showed only one criterion, and 11% showed two. Using univariate analysis, PSA progression (p = 0.004) and appearance of a positive biopsy (p < 0.001) were significant predictive factors for BF, while Gleason progression (p = 0.3) was not. In multivariate analysis adjusted for cancer aggressiveness, rising PSA (hazard ratio, HR, 5.7; 95% confidence interval, CI, 1.1-28.8; p = 0.04) and the number of cancer progression factors (HR 2.9, 95% CI 1.2-7.0, p = 0.02) remained adverse risk factors. PSA progression experienced during 5-ARI treatment before radiotherapy is predictive of worse biochemical outcome. Such details should be considered when counseling men prior to radiation therapy. (orig.) [German] Untersuchung des Einflusses einer Behandlung mit einem 5-Alpha-Reduktaseinhibitor (5-ARI) auf das Ergebnis der Strahlentherapie beim lokalisierten Prostatakarzinom. In die Studie eingeschlossen wurden 203

  12. Simvastatin improves final visual outcome in acute optic neuritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsakiri, Anna; Kallenbach, Klaus; Fuglø, Dan

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, small-scale clinical trials have indicated that statins or 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMGCoA) reductase inhibitors exert pleiotropic immunomodulatory effects, with potential therapeutic implications in multiple sclerosis (MS)....

  13. Prospecting for novel plant-derived molecules of Rauvolfia serpentina as inhibitors of Aldose Reductase, a potent drug target for diabetes and its complications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivalika Pathania

    Full Text Available Aldose Reductase (AR is implicated in the development of secondary complications of diabetes, providing an interesting target for therapeutic intervention. Extracts of Rauvolfia serpentina, a medicinal plant endemic to the Himalayan mountain range, have been known to be effective in alleviating diabetes and its complications. In this study, we aim to prospect for novel plant-derived inhibitors from R. serpentina and to understand structural basis of their interactions. An extensive library of R. serpentina molecules was compiled and computationally screened for inhibitory action against AR. The stability of complexes, with docked leads, was verified using molecular dynamics simulations. Two structurally distinct plant-derived leads were identified as inhibitors: indobine and indobinine. Further, using these two leads as templates, 16 more leads were identified through ligand-based screening of their structural analogs, from a small molecules database. Thus, we obtained plant-derived indole alkaloids, and their structural analogs, as potential AR inhibitors from a manually curated dataset of R. serpentina molecules. Indole alkaloids reported herein, as a novel structural class unreported hitherto, may provide better insights for designing potential AR inhibitors with improved efficacy and fewer side effects.

  14. Prospecting for novel plant-derived molecules of Rauvolfia serpentina as inhibitors of Aldose Reductase, a potent drug target for diabetes and its complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathania, Shivalika; Randhawa, Vinay; Bagler, Ganesh

    2013-01-01

    Aldose Reductase (AR) is implicated in the development of secondary complications of diabetes, providing an interesting target for therapeutic intervention. Extracts of Rauvolfia serpentina, a medicinal plant endemic to the Himalayan mountain range, have been known to be effective in alleviating diabetes and its complications. In this study, we aim to prospect for novel plant-derived inhibitors from R. serpentina and to understand structural basis of their interactions. An extensive library of R. serpentina molecules was compiled and computationally screened for inhibitory action against AR. The stability of complexes, with docked leads, was verified using molecular dynamics simulations. Two structurally distinct plant-derived leads were identified as inhibitors: indobine and indobinine. Further, using these two leads as templates, 16 more leads were identified through ligand-based screening of their structural analogs, from a small molecules database. Thus, we obtained plant-derived indole alkaloids, and their structural analogs, as potential AR inhibitors from a manually curated dataset of R. serpentina molecules. Indole alkaloids reported herein, as a novel structural class unreported hitherto, may provide better insights for designing potential AR inhibitors with improved efficacy and fewer side effects.

  15. Aqueous Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the M. tuberculosis Enoyl-ACP Reductase-NADH System and Its Complex with a Substrate Mimic or Diphenyl Ethers Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo Henrique da Silva Lima

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Molecular dynamics (MD simulations of 12 aqueous systems of the NADH-dependent enoyl-ACP reductase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (InhA were carried out for up to 20–40 ns using the GROMACS 4.5 package. Simulations of the holoenzyme, holoenzyme-substrate, and 10 holoenzyme-inhibitor complexes were conducted in order to gain more insight about the secondary structure motifs of the InhA substrate-binding pocket. We monitored the lifetime of the main intermolecular interactions: hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic contacts. Our MD simulations demonstrate the importance of evaluating the conformational changes that occur close to the active site of the enzyme-cofactor complex before and after binding of the ligand and the influence of the water molecules. Moreover, the protein-inhibitor total steric (ELJ and electrostatic (EC interaction energies, related to Gly96 and Tyr158, are able to explain 80% of the biological response variance according to the best linear equation, pKi = 7.772 − 0.1885 × Gly96 + 0.0517 × Tyr158 (R2 = 0.80; n = 10, where interactions with Gly96, mainly electrostatic, increase the biological response, while those with Tyr158 decrease. These results will help to understand the structure-activity relationships and to design new and more potent anti-TB drugs.

  16. Three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationships and docking studies of some structurally diverse flavonoids and design of new aldose reductase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utpal Chandra De

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aldose reductase (AR plays an important role in the development of several long-term diabetic complications. Inhibition of AR activities is a strategy for controlling complications arising from chronic diabetes. Several AR inhibitors have been reported in the literature. Flavonoid type compounds are shown to have significant AR inhibition. The objective of this study was to perform a computational work to get an idea about structural insight of flavonoid type compounds for developing as well as for searching new flavonoid based AR inhibitors. The data-set comprising 68 flavones along with their pIC 50 values ranging from 0.44 to 4.59 have been collected from literature. Structure of all the flavonoids were drawn in Chembiodraw Ultra 11.0, converted into corresponding three-dimensional structure, saved as mole file and then imported to maestro project table. Imported ligands were prepared using LigPrep option of maestro 9.6 version. Three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationships and docking studies were performed with appropriate options of maestro 9.6 version installed in HP Z820 workstation with CentOS 6.3 (Linux. A model with partial least squares factor 5, standard deviation 0.2482, R 2 = 0.9502 and variance ratio of regression 122 has been found as the best statistical model.

  17. Effect of the Combination of Ezetimibe and Simvastatin on Gluconeogenesis and Oxygen Consumption in the Rat Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracht, Lívia; Caparroz-Assef, Silvana Martins; Bracht, Adelar; Bersani-Amado, Ciomar Aparecida

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the effects of chronic treatment with the combination of ezetimibe and simvastatin on gluconeogenesis in rat liver. Rats were treated daily for 28 days with the combination of ezetimibe and simvastatin (10/40 mg/kg) by oral gavage. To measure gluconeogenesis and the associated pathways, isolated perfused rat liver was used. In addition, subcellular fractions, such as microsomes and mitochondria, were used for complementary measures of enzymatic activities. Treatment with the combination of simvastatin and ezetimibe resulted in a decrease in gluconeogenesis from pyruvate (-62%). Basal oxygen consumption of the treated animals was higher (+22%) than that of the control rats, but the resulting oxygen consumption that occurred after pyruvate infusion was 43% lower in animals treated with the combination of simvastatin and ezetimibe. Oxygen consumption in the livers from treated animals was completely inhibited by cyanide (electron transport chain inhibitor), but not by proadifen (cytochrome P450 inhibitor). Chronic treatment with ezetimibe/simvastatin decreased the activity of the key enzymes glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase by 59% and 45%, respectively, which is probably the major reason for the decreased gluconeogenesis seen in ezetimibe-/simvastatin-treated rats. It is also possible that part of the effect of this combination on gluconeogenesis and on the oxygen consumption is related to the impairment of mitochondrial energy transduction. © 2015 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  18. An approximate but efficient method to calculate free energy trends by computer simulation: Application to dihydrofolate reductase-inhibitor complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Paul R.; Mark, Alan E.; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F.

    1993-06-01

    Derivatives of free energy differences have been calculated by molecular dynamics techniques. The systems under study were ternary complexes of Trimethoprim (TMP) with dihydrofolate reductases of E. coli and chicken liver, containing the cofactor NADPH. Derivatives are taken with respect to modification of TMP, with emphasis on altering the 3-, 4- and 5-substituents of the phenyl ring. A linear approximation allows the encompassing of a whole set of modifications in a single simulation, as opposed to a full perturbation calculation, which requires a separate simulation for each modification. In the case considered here, the proposed technique requires a factor of 1000 less computing effort than a full free energy perturbation calculation. For the linear approximation to yield a significant result, one has to find ways of choosing the perturbation evolution, such that the initial trend mirrors the full calculation. The generation of new atoms requires a careful treatment of the singular terms in the non-bonded interaction. The result can be represented by maps of the changed molecule, which indicate whether complex formation is favoured under movement of partial charges and change in atom polarizabilities. Comparison with experimental measurements of inhibition constants reveals fair agreement in the range of values covered. However, detailed comparison fails to show a significant correlation. Possible reasons for the most pronounced deviations are given.

  19. 5α-Reductase inhibitor is less effective in men with small prostate volume and low serum prostatic specific antigen level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Victor C; Liao, Chun-Hou; Wang, Chung-Cheng; Kuo, Hann-Chorng

    2015-09-01

    Large total prostate volumes (TPVs) or high serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels indicate high-risk clinical progression of benign prostatic hyperplasia. This prospective study investigated the treatment outcome of combined 5α-reductase inhibitor and α-blocker in patients with and without large TPVs or high PSA levels. Men aged ≥ 45 years with International Prostate Symptom scores (IPSS) ≥ 8, TPV ≥ 20 mL, and maximum flow rate ≤ 15 mL/s received a combination therapy (dutasteride plus doxaben) for 2 years. Patients with baseline PSA ≥ 4 ng/mL underwent prostatic biopsy for excluding malignancy. The changes in the parameters from baseline to 24 months after combination therapy were compared in those with and without TPV ≥ 40 mL or PSA levels ≥ 1.5 ng/mL. A total of 285 patients (mean age 72 ± 9 years) completed the study. Combination therapy resulted in significant continuous improvement in IPSS, quality of life index, maximum flow rate, and postvoid residual (all p < 0.0001) regardless of baseline TPV or PSA levels. However, only patients with baseline TPV ≥ 40 mL had significant improvements in IPSS-storage subscore, voided volume, reduction in TPV, transitional zone index, and PSA levels. In addition, patients with baseline TPV < 40 mL and PSA < 1.5 ng/mL had neither a reduction in TPV nor a decrease in serum PSA level. A high TPV indicates more outlet resistance, whereas elevated serum PSA level reflects glandular proliferation. Thus, patients with TPV<40 mL and low PSA levels has less benefit from 5α-reductase inhibitor therapy. The therapeutic effect of combined treatment may arise mainly from the α-blocker in these patients. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. In Silico Screening, Synthesis and In Vitro Evaluation of Some Quinazolinone and Pyridine Derivatives as Dihydrofolate Reductase Inhibitors for Anticancer Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Nerkar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR is the important target for anticancer drugs belonging to the class of antimetabolites as the enzyme plays important role in the de novo purine synthesis. We here report the in silico screening to obtain best fit molecules as DHFR inhibitors, synthesis of some ʻbest fitʼ quinazolinone from 2-phenyl-3-(substituted-benzilidine-amino quinazolinones (Quinazolinone Shiff's bases QSB1-5 and pyridine-4-carbohydrazide Shiff's bases (ISB1-5 derivatives and their in vitro anticancer assay. Synthesis of the molecules was performed using microwave assisted synthesis. The structures of these molecules were elucidated by IR and 1H-NMR. These compounds were then subjected for in vitro anticancer evaluation against five human cancer cell-lines for anticancer cyto-toxicity assay. Methotrexate (MTX was used as standard for this evaluation to give a comparable inhibition of the cell proliferation by DHFR inhibition. Placlitaxel, adriamycin and 5-fluoro-uracil were also used as standard to give a comparable activity of these compounds with other mechanism of anticancer activity. ISB3 (4-(N, N-dimethyl-amino-phenyl Schiff''s base derivative of pyridine carbohydrazide showed equipotent activity with the standards used in in vitro anticancer assay as per the NCI (National Cancer Institute guidelines.

  1. Effects of Long-Term Treatment with Ranirestat, a Potent Aldose Reductase Inhibitor, on Diabetic Cataract and Neuropathy in Spontaneously Diabetic Torii Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayumi Ota

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated ranirestat, an aldose reductase inhibitor, in diabetic cataract and neuropathy (DN in spontaneously diabetic Torii (SDT rats compared with epalrestat, the positive control. Animals were divided into groups and treated once daily with oral ranirestat (0.1, 1.0, 10 mg/kg or epalrestat (100 mg/kg for 40 weeks, normal Sprague-Dawley rats, and untreated SDT rats. Lens opacification was scored from 0 (normal to 3 (mature cataract. The combined scores (0–6 from both lenses represented the total for each animal. DN was assessed by measuring the motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV in the sciatic nerve. Sorbitol and fructose levels were measured in the lens and sciatic nerve 40 weeks after diabetes onset. Cataracts developed more in untreated rats than normal rats (P<0.01. Ranirestat significantly (P<0.01 inhibited rapid cataract development; epalrestat did not. Ranirestat significantly reversed the MNCV decrease (40.7 ± 0.6 m/s in SDT rats dose-dependently (P<0.01. Epalrestat also reversed the prevented MNCV decrease (P<0.05. Sorbitol levels in the sciatic nerve increased significantly in SDT rats (2.05 ± 0.10 nmol/g, which ranirestat significantly suppressed dose-dependently, (P<0.05, <0.01, and <0.01; epalrestat did not. Ranirestat prevents DN and cataract; epalrestat prevents DN only.

  2. Fragment-based design of symmetrical bis-benzimidazoles as selective inhibitors of the trimethoprim-resistant, type II R67 dihydrofolate reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastien, Dominic; Ebert, Maximilian C C J C; Forge, Delphine; Toulouse, Jacynthe; Kadnikova, Natalia; Perron, Florent; Mayence, Annie; Huang, Tien L; Vanden Eynde, Jean Jacques; Pelletier, Joelle N

    2012-04-12

    The continuously increasing use of trimethoprim as a common antibiotic for medical use and for prophylactic application in terrestrial and aquatic animal farming has increased its prevalence in the environment. This has been accompanied by increased drug resistance, generally in the form of alterations in the drug target, dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). The most highly resistant variants of DHFR are known as type II DHFR, among which R67 DHFR is the most broadly studied variant. We report the first attempt at designing specific inhibitors to this emerging drug target by fragment-based design. The detection of inhibition in R67 DHFR was accompanied by parallel monitoring of the human DHFR, as an assessment of compound selectivity. By those means, small aromatic molecules of 150-250 g/mol (fragments) inhibiting R67 DHFR selectively in the low millimolar range were identified. More complex, symmetrical bis-benzimidazoles and a bis-carboxyphenyl were then assayed as fragment-based leads, which procured selective inhibition of the target in the low micromolar range (K(i) = 2-4 μM). The putative mode of inhibition is discussed according to molecular modeling supported by in vitro tests. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  3. Evaluating thermodynamic integration performance of the new amber molecular dynamics package and assess potential halogen bonds of enoyl-ACP reductase (FabI) benzimidazole inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Pin-Chih; Johnson, Michael E

    2016-04-05

    Thermodynamic integration (TI) can provide accurate binding free energy insights in a lead optimization program, but its high computational expense has limited its usage. In the effort of developing an efficient and accurate TI protocol for FabI inhibitors lead optimization program, we carefully compared TI with different Amber molecular dynamics (MD) engines (sander and pmemd), MD simulation lengths, the number of intermediate states and transformation steps, and the Lennard-Jones and Coulomb Softcore potentials parameters in the one-step TI, using eleven benzimidazole inhibitors in complex with Francisella tularensis enoyl acyl reductase (FtFabI). To our knowledge, this is the first study to extensively test the new AMBER MD engine, pmemd, on TI and compare the parameters of the Softcore potentials in the one-step TI in a protein-ligand binding system. The best performing model, the one-step pmemd TI, using 6 intermediate states and 1 ns MD simulations, provides better agreement with experimental results (RMSD = 0.52 kcal/mol) than the best performing implicit solvent method, QM/MM-GBSA from our previous study (RMSD = 3.00 kcal/mol), while maintaining similar efficiency. Briefly, we show the optimized TI protocol to be highly accurate and affordable for the FtFabI system. This approach can be implemented in a larger scale benzimidazole scaffold lead optimization against FtFabI. Lastly, the TI results here also provide structure-activity relationship insights, and suggest the parahalogen in benzimidazole compounds might form a weak halogen bond with FabI, which is a well-known halogen bond favoring enzyme. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. 6-Substituted 3,4-dihydro-naphthalene-2-carboxylic acids: synthesis and structure-activity studies in a novel class of human 5alpha reductase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baston, Eckhard; Salem, Ola I A; Hartmann, Rolf W

    2002-10-01

    Novel 3,4-dihydro-naphthalene-2-carboxylic acids were synthesized and evaluated for 5alpha reductase inhibitory activity. This enzyme exists in two isoforms and is a pharmacological target for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia, male pattern baldness and acne. In the present study non-steroidal compounds capable of mimicking the transition state of the steroidal substrates were prepared. The synthetic strategy for the preparation of compounds 1-6 consisted of triflation followed by subsequent Heck-type carboxylation or methoxy carbonylation for 6-phenyl-3,4-dihydronaphthalen-2(1H)-one 1c. A Negishi-type coupling reaction between 6-(trifluoro-methanesulfonyloxy)-3,4-dihydro-naphthalene-2-carboxylic acid methyl ester 7b and various aryl bromides led, after further transformations, to 6-substituted 3,4-dihydro-naphthalene-2-carboxylic acids 7-15. In a similar way the corresponding naphthalene-2-carboxylic acids 16 and 17 were obtained. The DU 145 cell line and prostate homogenates served as enzyme sources for the human type 1 and type 2 isozymes, whereas ventral prostate was employed to evaluate rat isozyme inhibitory potency. The most active inhibitors identified in this study were 6-[4-(N,N-dicyclohexylaminocarbonyl)phenyl]-3,4-dihydro-naphthalene-2-carboxylic acid (3) (IC50 = 0.09 microM, rat type 1), 6-[3-(N,N-dicyclohexylaminocarbonyl)phenyl]-3,4-dihydro-naphthalene-2-carboxylic acid (13) (IC50 = 0.75 microM, human type 2; IC50 = 0.81 microM, human type 1) and 6-[4-(N,N-diisopropylamino-carbonyl)phenyl]naphthalene-2-carboxylic acid (16) (IC50 = 0.2 microM, human type 2). The latter compound was shown to deactivate the enzyme in an uncompetitive manner (Ki = 90 nM; Km, Testosterone = 0.8-1.0 microM) similar to the steroidal inhibitor Epristeride. Select inhibitors (13 and 16) were tested in vivo using testosterone propionate-treated, juvenile, orchiectomized SD-rats. None of the compounds was active at a dose of 25 mg/kg. This result might in part be

  5. Effects of Simvastatin Beyond Dyslipidemia: Exploring Its Antinociceptive Action in an Animal Model of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome-Type I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graziela Vieira

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Simvastatin is a lipid-lowering agent that blocks the production of cholesterol through inhibition of 3-hydroxy-methyl-glutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA reductase. In addition, recent evidence has suggested its anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive actions during inflammatory and pain disorders. Herein, we investigated the effects of simvastatin in an animal model of complex regional pain syndrome-type I, and its underlying mechanisms. Chronic post-ischemia pain (CPIP was induced by ischemia and reperfusion (IR injury of the left hind paw. Our findings showed that simvastatin inhibited mechanical hyperalgesia induced by CPIP model in single and repeated treatment schedules, respectively; however simvastatin did not alter inflammatory signs during CPIP model. The mechanisms underlying those actions are related to modulation of transient receptor potential (TRP channels, especially TRMP8. Moreover, simvastatin oral treatment was able to reduce the nociception induced by acidified saline [an acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs activator] and bradykinin (BK stimulus, but not by TRPA1, TRPV1 or prostaglandin-E2 (PGE2. Relevantly, the antinociceptive effects of simvastatin did not seem to be associated with modulation of the descending pain circuits, especially noradrenergic, serotoninergic and dopaminergic systems. These results indicate that simvastatin consistently inhibits mechanical hyperalgesia during neuropathic and inflammatory disorders, possibly by modulating the ascending pain signaling (TRPM8/ASIC/BK pathways expressed in the primary sensory neuron. Thus, simvastatin open-up new standpoint in the development of innovative analgesic drugs for treatment of persistent pain, including CRPS-I.

  6. Is Transforming Growth Factor-β Signaling Activated in Human Hypertrophied Prostate Treated by 5-Alpha Reductase Inhibitor?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Kyung Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim. It is well known that androgen deprivation relates to penile fibrosis, so we hypothesize that long-term treatment with 5-alphareductase inhibitors (5ARIs may increase the risk of fibrosis of prostate. Patients and Methods. Thirty-two BPH patients who underwent transurethral resection of the prostate were enrolled. The patients were divided into two groups: group one, 16 patients underwent TURP who had been treated with tamsulosin for 2 years; group two, 16 patients underwent TURP who had been treated with combination of tamsulosin and dutasteride for at least 1 year. We evaluated the expressions of nNOS, iNOS, eNOS, TGF-β1, TGF-β2, phosphorylated-Smad2/3 (p-Smad2/3, E-cadherin, N-cadherin, and α-smooth muscle actin in the resected prostate tissues by western blotting, and the TGF-β concentration was determined by ELISA kit. Results. The expressions of 3 isoforms of NOS were significantly increased in group 2 except of eNOS in lateral prostate, and the expressions of TGF-β1, TGF-β2, and p-Smad2/3 increased about 2-fold compared with group 1. In group 2, the E-cadherin expression decreased while N-cadherin expression increased significantly. Conclusions. The overexpression of nNOS may contribute to prostate smooth muscle relaxation; however, long-time treatment with 5 ARI increases the risk of fibrosis of prostate.

  7. Risk Factor for Diabetes Mellitus and High Blood Glucose With HMG-CoA Reductase Inhibitors Using a Postmarketing Surveillance Database in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashiguchi, Masayuki; Maruyama, Junya; Shimizu, Mikiko; Takahashi, Daichi; Shiga, Tsuyoshi

    2018-02-20

    To investigate whether 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitor (statin) use is associated with an increased risk of diabetes mellitus and hyperglycemia, we performed a nested case-control study using a postmarketing surveillance database in Japan. The database cohort included 26,849 cases of statin use and 5308 cases of other lipid-lowering drug use in patients with hyperlipidemia. Participants received at least 1 type of statin, had a clear medication history of statin use, and had no complications of diabetes mellitus. Cases were defined as onset of diabetes mellitus or hyperglycemia during statin intake. For each case, 20 controls were randomly selected and matched by time point. The factors associated with an increased risk of diabetes mellitus and hyperglycemia during statin intake examined included sex, age, body mass index, statin use duration, complications, concomitant medication, and clinical laboratory tests. Statin-associated diabetes mellitus or hyperglycemia was identified based on abnormal elevation of blood glucose concentrations beyond the reference range. A total of 19,868 patients met the inclusion criteria, of whom 24 were patients in the case group. Two complicating factors, fatty liver (adjusted odds ratio 16.10) and hyperuricemia (adjusted odds ratio 28.96), were extracted for onset of diabetes mellitus or hyperglycemia. Nonalcoholic fatty liver was associated with diabetes mellitus, obesity, and insulin resistance, and hyperuricemia was associated with lifestyle. This study suggested that the onset of diabetes mellitus or hyperglycemia might be increased with statin use in patients with complications of fatty liver and hyperuricemia. © 2018, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  8. Identification of danthron as an isoform-specific inhibitor of HEME OXYGENASE-1/cytochrome P450 reductase interaction with anti-tumor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Yi-Tai; Hsu, Fu-Fei; Hu, Dun-Yao; Chen, Ying-Chih; Hsu, Yuan-Hao; Hsu, John T-A; Chau, Lee-Young

    2018-01-23

    Heme oxygenase (HO) catalyzes NADPH-dependent degradation of heme to liberate iron, carbon monoxide and biliverdin. The interaction between HO and cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR), an electron donor, is essential for HO activity. HO-1 is a stress-inducible isoform whereas HO-2 is constitutively expressed. HO-1 induction is commonly seen in cancers and impacts disease progression, supporting the possibility of targeting HO-1 for cancer therapy. We employed a cell-based bioluminescence resonance energy transfer assay to screen compounds with ability to inhibit HO-1/CPR interaction. The effect of the identified compound on HO-1/CPR interaction was confirmed by pull down assay. Moreover, the anti-tumorigenic activity of the identified compound on HO-1-enhanced tumor growth and migration was assessed by trypan blue exclusion method and wound healing assay. Danthron was identified as an effective small molecule able to interfere with the interaction between HO-1 and CPR but not HO-2 and CPR. Additional experiments with structural analogues of danthron revealed that the positions of hydroxyl moieties significantly affected the potency of inhibition on HO-1/CPR interaction. Pull-down assay confirmed that danthron inhibited the interaction of CPR with HO-1 but not HO-2. Danthron suppressed growth and migration of HeLa cells with stable HO-1 overexpression but not mock cells. In contrast, anthrarufin, a structural analog with no ability to interfere HO-1/CPR interaction, exhibited no significant effect on HO-1-overexpressing HeLa cells. These findings demonstrate that danthron is an isoform-specific inhibitor for HO-1/CPR interaction and may serve as a lead compound for novel anticancer drug.

  9. Iodine-123-metaiodobenzylguanidine cardiac scintigraphy in patients with diabetes mellitus. Therapeutic effects of aldose reductase inhibitor and vitamin B{sub 12}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utsunomiya, Keita [Osaka Medical Coll., Takatsuki (Japan)

    1997-12-01

    Twenty normal volunteers (C group) and 56 patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) who did not have ischemic heart diseases (DM group), were evaluated by means of iodine-123-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy. The uptake ratio between the cardiac muscle and the upper mediastinum was calculated. The ratio determined from the initial I-123-MIBG scintigraphy image was expressed as HMi, and that determined from the delayed image was expressed as HMd. The washout rate percentage (%WR) was calculated. At least one instance of either the HMi, the HMd, or %WR was outside the mean{+-}1 standard deviation of C group in 34 DM group patients. Aldose reductase inhibitor (ARI) was administered to 17 of the 34 patients and Vitamin B{sub 12} (VB{sub 12}) to the remaining 17 patients, for 3 to 5 months. Before and after treatment, scintigraphic studies with I-123-MIBG were carried out, and the HMi, HMd, and %WR were calculated. There were no significant differences found in FBG, HbA1c, or 1.5-AG levels after treatment with either drug, when compared to the pretreatment values. Both HMi and HMd in the DM group were significantly lower, and %WR was significantly higher than in the C group. The changes in HMi, HMd, and %WR after treatment with ARI were not significant. After treatment with VB{sub 12}, the HMi and HMd levels were significantly increased (p<0.01). Thus, measurement of myocardial MIBG accumulation is a promising new method to detect cardiac sympathetic denervation in diabetic patients. With these changes in treatment, VB{sub 12} was shown to be effective for improvement of HMi and HMd in NIDDM. (author)

  10. Effects of aldose reductase inhibitor and vitamin B12 on myocardial uptake of iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utsunomiya, Keita; Narabayashi, Isamu; Tamura, Koji; Nakatani, Yuko; Saika, Yoshinori; Onishi, Satoshi; Kariyone, Shigeo

    1998-01-01

    This study was undertaken to examine the effects of aldose reductase inhibitor (ARI) and vitamin B 12 (VB12) on myocardial uptake of iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) in patients with diabetic autonomic disorder. Myocardial scintigraphy using 123 I-MIBG was performed on 20 healthy volunteers (controls) and 56 patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM), in order to obtain the heart/mediastinum ratio in the initial (HMi) and the delayed images (HMd), and the washout rate (%WR). Thirty-four of the 56 NIDDM patients could be diagnosed as having diabetic autonomic disorder by evaluating their scintigraphic findings in comparison with the controls. Seventeen of these 34 patients received 150 mg/day of epalrestat (ARI group) in three divided doses before meals, and the other 17 received 1.5 mg/day of mecobalamin (VB12 group) in three divided doses after meals, for 3-5 months. According to the presence or absence of clinical symptoms of autonomic or peripheral somatic nerve disorder, the patients were subclassified into four groups. group 1=patients, with autonomic symptoms or somatosensory disorder in the ARI group; group 2=patients without autonomic symptoms or somatosensory disorder in the ARI group; group 3=patients with autonomic symptoms or somatosensory disorder in the VB12 group; and group 4=patients without autonomic symptoms or somatosensory disorder in the VB12 group. After completion of the treatment, myocardial scintigraphy was performed again. Comparing the results obtained before and after the treatment, it was seen that ARI improved only the HMi in group 1 (P=0.046), whereas VB12 significantly improved HMi in the group 3 (P=0.018) and HMi, HMd and %WR in group 4 (P=0.043, P=0.018 and P=0.043, respectively). We conclude that VB12 is more efficacious than ARI in the treatment of diabetic cardiovascular autonomic disorder. (orig.)

  11. 3,5-Dioxopyrazolidines, Novel Inhibitors of UDP-N- Acetylenolpyruvylglucosamine Reductase (MurB) with Activity against Gram-Positive Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Youjun; Severin, Anatoly; Chopra, Rajiv; Krishnamurthy, Girija; Singh, Guy; Hu, William; Keeney, David; Svenson, Kristine; Petersen, Peter J.; Labthavikul, Pornpen; Shlaes, David M.; Rasmussen, Beth A.; Failli, Amedeo A.; Shumsky, Jay S.; Kutterer, Kristina M. K.; Gilbert, Adam; Mansour, Tarek S.

    2006-01-01

    A series of 3,5-dioxopyrazolidines was identified as novel inhibitors of UDP-N-acetylenolpyruvylglucosamine reductase (MurB). Compounds 1 to 3, which are 1,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)-3,5-dioxopyrazolidine-4-carboxamides, inhibited Escherichia coli MurB, Staphyloccocus aureus MurB, and E. coli MurA with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) in the range of 4.1 to 6.8 μM, 4.3 to 10.3 μM, and 6.8 to 29.4 μM, respectively. Compound 4, a C-4-unsubstituted 1,2-bis(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-3,5-dioxopyrazolidine, showed moderate inhibitory activity against E. coli MurB, S. aureus MurB, and E. coli MurC (IC50s, 24.5 to 35 μM). A fluorescence-binding assay indicated tight binding of compound 3 with E. coli MurB, giving a dissociation constant of 260 nM. Structural characterization of E. coli MurB was undertaken, and the crystal structure of a complex with compound 4 was obtained at 2.4 Å resolution. The crystal structure indicated the binding of a compound at the active site of MurB and specific interactions with active-site residues and the bound flavin adenine dinucleotide cofactor. Peptidoglycan biosynthesis studies using a strain of Staphylococcus epidermidis revealed reduced peptidoglycan biosynthesis upon incubation with 3,5-dioxopyrazolidines, with IC50s of 0.39 to 11.1 μM. Antibacterial activity was observed for compounds 1 to 3 (MICs, 0.25 to 16 μg/ml) and 4 (MICs, 4 to 8 μg/ml) against gram-positive bacteria including methicillin-resistant S. aureus, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis, and penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae. PMID:16436710

  12. Enzyme kinetics, inhibitors, mutagenesis and electron paramagnetic resonance analysis of dual-affinity nitrate reductase in unicellular N(2)-fixing cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. PCC 8801.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tung-Hei; Chen, Yung-Han; Huang, Jine-Yung; Liu, Kang-Cheng; Ke, Shyue-Chu; Chu, Hsiu-An

    2011-11-01

    The assimilatory nitrate reductase (NarB) of N(2)-fixing cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. PCC 8801 is a monomeric enzyme with dual affinity for substrate nitrate. We purified the recombinant NarB of Cyanothece sp. PCC 8801 and further investigated it by enzyme kinetics analysis, site-directed mutagenesis, inhibitor kinetics analysis, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The NarB showed 2 kinetic regimes at pH 10.5 or 8 and electron-donor conditions methyl viologen or ferredoxin (Fd). Fd-dependent NR assay revealed NarB with very high affinity for nitrate (K(m)1, ∼1μM; K(m)2, ∼270μM). Metal analysis and EPR results showed that NarB contains a Mo cofactor and a [4Fe-4S] cluster. In addition, the R352A mutation on the proposed nitrate-binding site of NarB greatly altered both high- and low-affinity kinetic components. Furthermore, the effect of azide on the NarB of Cyanothece sp. PCC 8801 was more complex than that on the NarB of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7942 with its single kinetic regime. With 1mM azide, the kinetics of the wild-type NarB was transformed from 2 kinetic regimes to hyperbolic kinetics, and its activity was enhanced significantly under medium nitrate concentrations. Moreover, EPR results also suggested a structural difference between the two NarBs. Taken together, our results show that the NarB of Cyanothece sp. PCC 8801 contains only a single Mo-catalytic center, and we rule out that the enzyme has 2 independent, distinct catalytic sites. In addition, the NarB of Cyanothece sp. PCC 8801 may have a regulatory nitrate-binding site. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Ebselen and analogs as inhibitors of Bacillus anthracis thioredoxin reductase and bactericidal antibacterials targeting Bacillus species, Staphylococcus aureus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Tomas N; Osman, Harer; Werngren, Jim; Hoffner, Sven; Engman, Lars; Holmgren, Arne

    2016-06-01

    Bacillus anthracis is the causative agent of anthrax, a disease associated with a very high mortality rate in its invasive forms. We studied a number of ebselen analogs as inhibitors of B. anthracis thioredoxin reductase and their antibacterial activity on Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The most potent compounds in the series gave IC(50) values down to 70 nM for the pure enzyme and minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) down to 0.4 μM (0.12 μg/ml) for B. subtilis, 1.5 μM (0.64 μg/ml) for S. aureus, 2 μM (0.86 μg/ml) for B. cereus and 10 μg/ml for M. tuberculosis. Minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) were found at 1-1.5 times the MIC, indicating a general, class-dependent, bactericidal mode of action. The combined bacteriological and enzymological data were used to construct a preliminary structure-activity-relationship for the benzoisoselenazol class of compounds. When S. aureus and B. subtilis were exposed to ebselen, we were unable to isolate resistant mutants on both solid and in liquid medium suggesting a high resistance barrier. These results suggest that ebselen and analogs thereof could be developed into a novel antibiotic class, useful for the treatment of infections caused by B. anthracis, S. aureus, M. tuberculosis and other clinically important bacteria. Furthermore, the high barrier against resistance development is encouraging for further drug development. We have characterized the thioredoxin system from B. anthracis as a novel drug target and ebselen and analogs thereof as a potential new class of antibiotics targeting several important human pathogens. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. HMG-CoA reductase regulates CCL17-induced colon cancer cell migration via geranylgeranylation and RhoA activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Haidari, Amr A.; Syk, Ingvar; Thorlacius, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Simvastatin blocked CCL17-induced and CCR4-dependent RhoA activation in HT29 cells. • CCL17/CCR4-mediated migration of colon cancer cells was antagonised by simvastatin. • Cell migration recovered by adding Mevalonate and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate. • Targeting HMG-CoA reductase might be useful to inhibit colon cancer metastasis. - Abstract: Background: Simvastatin is widely used to lower cholesterol levels in patients with cardiovascular diseases, although accumulating evidence suggests that statins, such as simvastatin, also exert numerous anti-tumoral effects. Aim: The aim of this study was to examine the effect of simvastatin on colon cancer cell migration. Methods: Migration assays were performed to evaluate CCL17-induced colon cancer cell (HT-29) chemotaxis. In vitro tumor growth and apoptosis were assessed using a proliferation assay and annexin V assay, respectively. Active RhoA protein levels in CCL17-stimulated colon cancer cells were quantified using a G-LISA assay. Results: We found that simvastatin dose-dependently decreased CCL17-induced colon cancer cell migration. Simvastatin had no effect on colon cancer cell proliferation or apoptosis. Inhibition of beta chemokine receptor 4, CCR4, reduced CCL17-evoked activation of RhoA in colon cancer cells. Moreover, administration of mevalonate reversed the inhibitory effect of simvastatin on CCL17-induced colon cancer cell migration. Interestingly, co-incubation with geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) antagonized the inhibitory impact of simvastatin on colon cancer cell migration triggered by CCL17. Moreover, we observed that simvastatin decreased CCL17-induced activation of RhoA in colon cancer cells. Administration of mevalonate and GGPP reversed the inhibitory effect of simvastatin on CCL17-provoked RhoA activation in colon cancer cells. Conclusions: Taken together, our findings show for the first time that HMG-CoA reductase regulates CCL17-induced colon cancer cell migration via

  15. Simvastatin induces caspase-independent apoptosis in LPS-activated RAW264.7 macrophage cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong Chan; Song, Seok Bean; Lee, Mi Hee; Kang, Kwang Il; Lee, Hayyoung; Paik, Sang-Gi; Kim, Kyoon Eon; Kim, Young Sang

    2006-01-01

    Macrophages participate in several inflammatory pathologies such as sepsis and arthritis. We examined the effect of simvastatin on the LPS-induced proinflammatory macrophage RAW264.7 cells. Co-treatment of LPS and a non-toxic dose of simvastatin induced cell death in RAW264.7 cells. The cell death was accompanied by disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), genomic DNA fragmentation, and caspase-3 activation. Surprisingly, despite caspase-dependent apoptotic cascade being completely blocked by Z-VAD-fmk, a pan-caspase inhibitor, the cell death was only partially repressed. In the presence of Z-VAD-fmk, DNA fragmentation was blocked, but DNA condensation, disruption of MMP, and nuclear translocation of apoptosis inducing factor were obvious. The cell death by simvastatin and LPS was effectively decreased by both the FPP and GGPP treatments as well as mevalonate. Our findings indicate that simvastatin triggers the cell death of LPS-treated RAW264.7 cells through both caspase-dependent and -independent apoptotic pathways, suggesting a novel mechanism of statins for the severe inflammatory disease therapy

  16. Simvastatin inhibits Candida albicans biofilm in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Geoffrey; Vellucci, Vincent F; Kyc, Stephanie; Hostetter, Margaret K

    2009-12-01

    By inhibiting the conversion of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA (HMG-CoA) to mevalonate, statins impair cholesterol metabolism in humans. We reasoned that statins might similarly interfere with the biosynthesis of ergosterol, the major sterol of the yeast cell membrane. As assessed by spectrophotometric and microscopic analysis, significant inhibition of biofilm production was noted after 16-h incubation with 1, 2.5, and 5 muM simvastatin, concentrations that did not affect growth, adhesion, or hyphal formation by C. albicans in vitro. Higher concentrations (10, 20, and 25 muM simvastatin) inhibited biofilm by >90% but also impaired growth. Addition of exogenous ergosterol (90 muM) overcame the effects of 1 and 2.5 muM simvastatin, suggesting that at least one mechanism of inhibition is interference with ergosterol biosynthesis. Clinical isolates from blood, skin, and mucosal surfaces produced biofilms; biofilms from bloodstream isolates were similarly inhibited by simvastatin. In the absence of fungicidal activity, simvastatin's interruption of a critical step in an essential metabolic pathway, highly conserved from yeast to man, has unexpected effects on biofilm production by a eukaryotic pathogen.

  17. Efficacy and safety of aldose reductase inhibitor for the treatment of diabetic cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Hu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Aldose reductase inhibitors (ARIs can block the metabolism of the polyol pathway, and have been used to slow or reverse the progression of diabetic cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (DCAN. The purpose of this study was to review the effectiveness and safety of ARIs in the treatment of DCAN as determined by five cardiac autonomic neuropathy function tests. METHODS: CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus databases (inception to May 2012 were searched to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs and non-randomized controlled trials (non-RCTs investigating ARIs for the treatment of DCAN with an English-language restriction. The data were analyzed using RevMan 5.0, and the heterogeneity between the trials was evaluated using the Cochrane's Q-test as well as the I² test. The type of model (random or fixed used for analysis was based on heterogeneity. Weighted mean differences (WMD with 95% confidence intervals (CI were computed for the five cardiac automatic neuropathy function tests to evaluate the effects. RESULTS: Ten articles met the prerequisites for this review. Analysis of the results showed that ARIs significantly improved function in at least three of the five automatic neuropathy tests, including the resting heart rate variation coefficients (WMD = 0.25, 95%CI 0.02 to 0.48, P = 0.040; the 30∶15 ratio (WMD = 0.06, 95%CI 0.01 to 0.10, P = 0.010 and the postural systolic blood pressure change (WMD = -5.94, 95%CI -7.31 to -4.57, P = 0.001. The expiration/inspiration ratio showed a marginally significant benefit (WMD = 0.05, 95%CI 0.00 to 0.09, P = 0.040. Glycaemic control was not significantly affected by ARIs. Adverse effects of ARIs except for Tolerestat were minimal. CONCLUSIONS: Based on these results, we conclude that ARIs could ameliorate cardiac automatic neuropathy especially mild or asymptomatic DCAN but need further investigation.

  18. Sexual dysfunction in subjects treated with inhibitors of 5α-reductase for benign prostatic hyperplasia: a comprehensive review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corona, G; Tirabassi, G; Santi, D; Maseroli, E; Gacci, M; Dicuio, M; Sforza, A; Mannucci, E; Maggi, M

    2017-07-01

    Despite their efficacy in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia, the popularity of inhibitors of 5α-reductase (5ARIs) is limited by their association with adverse sexual side effects. The aim of this study was to review and meta-analyze currently available randomized clinical trials evaluating the rate of sexual side effects in men treated with 5ARIs. An extensive Medline Embase and Cochrane search was performed including the following words: 'finasteride', 'dutasteride', 'benign prostatic hyperplasia'. Only placebo-controlled randomized clinical trials evaluating the effect of 5ARI in subjects with benign prostatic hyperplasia were considered. Of 383 retrieved articles, 17 were included in this study. Randomized clinical trials enrolled 24,463 in the active and 22,270 patients in the placebo arms, respectively, with a mean follow-up of 99 weeks and mean age of 64.0 years. No difference was observed between trials using finasteride or dutasteride as the active arm considering age, trial duration, prostate volume or International Prostatic Symptoms Score at enrollment. Overall, 5ARIs determined an increased risk of hypoactive sexual desire [OR = 1.54 (1.29; 1.82); p dysfunction [OR = 1.47 (1.29; 1.68); p sexual desire and erectile dysfunction was observed. Meta-regression analysis showed that the risk of hypoactive sexual desire and erectile dysfunction was higher in subjects with lower Q max at enrollment and decreased as a function of trial follow-up. Conversely, no effect of age, low urinary tract symptom or prostate volume at enrollment as well as Q max at end-point was observed. In conclusion, present data show that the use of 5ARI significantly increases the risk of erectile dysfunction and hypoactive sexual desire in subjects with benign prostatic hyperplasia. Patients should be adequately informed before 5ARIs are prescribed. © 2017 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  19. Simvastatin and oxidative stress in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Sanne Tofte; Andersen, Jon Thor Trærup; Nielsen, Torben Kjær

    2016-01-01

    in mitochondrial respiratory complexes I and II and might thereby reduce the formation of reactive oxygen species, which have been implicated in the pathogenesis of arteriosclerosis. Therefore, we hypothesized that simvastatin may reduce oxidative stress in humans in vivo. We conducted a randomized, double......-blinded, placebo-controlled study in which subjects were treated with either 40 mg of simvastatin or placebo for 14 days. The endpoints were six biomarkers for oxidative stress, which represent intracellular oxidative stress to nucleic acids, lipid peroxidation and plasma antioxidants, that were measured in urine.......1% in the placebo group for DNA oxidation and 7.3% in the simvastatin group compared to 3.4% in the placebo group. The differences in biomarkers related to plasma were not statistically significant between the treatments groups, with the exception of total vitamin E levels, which, as expected, were reduced...

  20. A novel class of α-glucosidase and HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors from Ganoderma leucocontextum and the anti-diabetic properties of ganomycin I in KK-Ay mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Bao, Li; Ma, Ke; Zhang, Jinjin; Chen, Baosong; Han, Junjie; Ren, Jinwei; Luo, Huajun; Liu, Hongwei

    2017-02-15

    Three new meroterpenoids, ganoleucin A-C (1-3), together with five known meroterpenoids (4-8), were isolated from the fruiting bodies of Ganoderma leucocontextum. The structures of the new compounds were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic analysis, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, and chemical transformation. The inhibitory effects of 1-8 on HMG-CoA reductase and α-glucosidase were tested in vitro. Ganomycin I (4), 5, and 8 showed stronger inhibitory activity against HMG-CoA reductase than the positive control atorvastatin. Compounds 1, and 3-8 presented potent noncompetitive inhibitory activity against α-glucosidase from both yeast and rat small intestinal mucosa. Ganomycin I (4), the most potent inhibitor against both α-glucosidase and HMG-CoA reductase, was synthesized and evaluated for its in vivo bioactivity. Pharmacological results showed that ganomycin I (4) exerted potent and efficacious hypoglycemic, hypolipidemic, and insulin-sensitizing effects in KK-A y mice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Pleiotropic effects of simvastatin in physically trained ovariectomized rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardes, N.; Brito, J.O.; Fernandes, T.G.; Llesuy, S.F.; Irigoyen, M.C.; Belló-Klein, A.; De Angelis, K.

    2013-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that simvastatin treatment can improve cardiovascular and autonomic functions and membrane lipoperoxidation, with an increased effect when applied to physically trained ovariectomized rats. Ovariectomized rats were divided into sedentary, sedentary+simvastatin and trained+simvastatin groups (n = 8 each). Exercise training was performed on a treadmill for 8 weeks and simvastatin (5 mg/kg) was administered in the last 2 weeks. Blood pressure (BP) was recorded in conscious animals. Baroreflex sensitivity was evaluated by the tachycardic and bradycardic responses to BP changes. Cardiac vagal and sympathetic effects were determined using methylatropine and propranolol. Oxidative stress was evaluated based on heart and liver lipoperoxidation using the chemiluminescence method. The simvastatin-treated groups presented reduced body weight and mean BP (trained+simvastatin = 99 ± 2 and sedentary+simvastatin = 107 ± 2 mmHg) compared to the sedentary group (122 ± 1 mmHg). Furthermore, the trained group showed lower BP and heart rate compared to the other groups. Tachycardic and bradycardic responses were enhanced in both simvastatin-treated groups. The vagal effect was increased in the trained+simvastatin group and the sympathetic effect was decreased in the sedentary+simvastatin group. Hepatic lipoperoxidation was reduced in sedentary+simvastatin (≈21%) and trained+simvastatin groups (≈57%) compared to the sedentary group. Correlation analysis involving all animals demonstrated that cardiac lipoperoxidation was negatively related to the vagal effect (r = -0.7) and positively correlated to the sympathetic effect (r = 0.7). In conclusion, improvement in cardiovascular and autonomic functions associated with a reduction of lipoperoxidation with simvastatin treatment was increased in trained ovariectomized rats

  2. Pleiotropic effects of simvastatin in physically trained ovariectomized rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernardes, N. [Universidade Nove de Julho (UNINOVE), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Unidade de Hipertensão, Instituto do Coração, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Brito, J.O. [Universidade Nove de Julho (UNINOVE), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Fernandes, T.G. [Laboratório de Fisiologia Cardiovascular, Departamento de Fisiologia, Instituto de Ciências Básicas da Saúde, Universdade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Llesuy, S.F. [University of Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Irigoyen, M.C. [Unidade de Hipertensão, Instituto do Coração, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Belló-Klein, A. [Laboratório de Fisiologia Cardiovascular, Departamento de Fisiologia, Instituto de Ciências Básicas da Saúde, Universdade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); De Angelis, K. [Universidade Nove de Julho (UNINOVE), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-05-24

    This study tested the hypothesis that simvastatin treatment can improve cardiovascular and autonomic functions and membrane lipoperoxidation, with an increased effect when applied to physically trained ovariectomized rats. Ovariectomized rats were divided into sedentary, sedentary+simvastatin and trained+simvastatin groups (n = 8 each). Exercise training was performed on a treadmill for 8 weeks and simvastatin (5 mg/kg) was administered in the last 2 weeks. Blood pressure (BP) was recorded in conscious animals. Baroreflex sensitivity was evaluated by the tachycardic and bradycardic responses to BP changes. Cardiac vagal and sympathetic effects were determined using methylatropine and propranolol. Oxidative stress was evaluated based on heart and liver lipoperoxidation using the chemiluminescence method. The simvastatin-treated groups presented reduced body weight and mean BP (trained+simvastatin = 99 ± 2 and sedentary+simvastatin = 107 ± 2 mmHg) compared to the sedentary group (122 ± 1 mmHg). Furthermore, the trained group showed lower BP and heart rate compared to the other groups. Tachycardic and bradycardic responses were enhanced in both simvastatin-treated groups. The vagal effect was increased in the trained+simvastatin group and the sympathetic effect was decreased in the sedentary+simvastatin group. Hepatic lipoperoxidation was reduced in sedentary+simvastatin (≈21%) and trained+simvastatin groups (≈57%) compared to the sedentary group. Correlation analysis involving all animals demonstrated that cardiac lipoperoxidation was negatively related to the vagal effect (r = -0.7) and positively correlated to the sympathetic effect (r = 0.7). In conclusion, improvement in cardiovascular and autonomic functions associated with a reduction of lipoperoxidation with simvastatin treatment was increased in trained ovariectomized rats.

  3. Simvastatin Attenuates the Oxidative Stress, Endothelial Thrombogenicity and the Inducibility of Atrial Fibrillation in a Rat Model of Ischemic Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung-Im Cho

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Increased atrial oxidative stress has an important role in inducing and maintaining atrial fibrillation (AF, and the activation of the small GTPase Rac1 contributes to the oxidative stress. We investigated the relationship of Rac1, atrial endothelial thromboprotective markers and AF inducibility and if simvastatin has a potential beneficial effect on a myocardial infarction (MI-induced heart failure (HF rat model. Rats were randomized into three groups (shams, MI group and simvastatin treatment group and underwent echocardiography, AF induction studies and left atrial (LA fibrosis analysis. Atrial Rac 1, sodium calcium exchanger (INCX, sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS and induced nitric oxide synthase (iNOS were measured. AF inducibility, AF duration and LA fibrosis were significantly higher in the MI group (p < 0.001 vs. sham, which were significantly reduced by simvastatin (p < 0.05 vs. MI. The reduced expressions of atrial eNOS, SERCA, thrombomodulin, tissue factor pathway inhibitor and tissue plasminogen activator in the MI group were significantly improved by simvastatin. Furthermore, the increased expression of atrial iNOS, INCX and Rac1 activity were significantly decreased by the simvastatin. Oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction and thrombogenicity are associated with the promotion of AF in a rat model of ischemic HF. These were associated with increased Rac1 activity, and simvastatin treatment prevents these changes.

  4. Simvastatin (SV) metabolites in mouse tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, C.A.; Vickers, S.

    1990-01-01

    SV, a semisynthetic analog of lovastatin, is hydrolyzed in vivo to its hydroxy acid (SVA), a potent inhibitor of HMG CoA reductase (HR). Thus SV lowers plasma cholesterol. SV is a substrate for mixed function oxidases whereas SVA undergoes lactonization and β-oxidation. Male CD-1 mice were dosed orally with a combination of ( 14 C)SV and ( 3 H)SVA at 25 mg/kg of each, bled and killed at 0.5, 2 and 4 hours. Labeled SV, SVA, 6'exomethylene SV (I), 6'CH 2 OH-SV (II), 6'COOH-SV (III) and a β-oxidized metabolite (IV) were assayed in liver, bile, kidneys, testes and plasma by RIDA. Levels of potential and active HR inhibitors in liver were 10 to 40 fold higher than in other tissues. II and III, in which the configuration at 6' is inverted, may be 2 metabolites of I. Metabolites I-III are inhibitors of HR in their hydroxy acid forms. Qualitatively ( 14 C)SV and ( 3 H)SVA were metabolized similarly (consistent with their proposed interconversion). However 3 H-SVA, I-III (including hydroxy acid forms) achieved higher concentrations than corresponding 14 C compounds (except in gall bladder bile). Major radioactive metabolites in liver were II-IV (including hydroxy acid forms). These metabolites have also been reported in rat tissues. In bile a large fraction of either label was unidentified polar metabolites. The presence of IV indicated that mice (like rats) are not good models for SV metabolism in man

  5. Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... JM, and the Hemophilia Inhibitor Research Study Investigators. Validation of Nijmegen-Bethesda assay modifications to allow inhibitor ... webinars on blood disorders Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) File Formats Help: How do I view different ...

  6. Prostate cancer cells differ in testosterone accumulation, dihydrotestosterone conversion, and androgen receptor signaling response to steroid 5α-reductase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yue; Godoy, Alejandro; Azzouni, Faris; Wilton, John H; Ip, Clement; Mohler, James L

    2013-09-01

    Blocking 5α-reductase-mediated testosterone conversion to dihydrotestosterone (DHT) with finasteride or dutasteride is the driving hypothesis behind two prostate cancer prevention trials. Factors affecting intracellular androgen levels and the androgen receptor (AR) signaling axis need to be examined systematically in order to fully understand the outcome of interventions using these drugs. The expression of three 5α-reductase isozymes, as determined by immunohistochemistry and qRT-PCR, was studied in five human prostate cancer cell lines. Intracellular testosterone and DHT were analyzed using mass spectrometry. A luciferase reporter assay and AR-regulated genes were used to evaluate the modulation of AR activity. Prostate cancer cells were capable of accumulating testosterone to a level 15-50 times higher than that in the medium. The profile and expression of 5α-reductase isozymes did not predict the capacity to convert testosterone to DHT. Finasteride and dutasteride were able to depress testosterone uptake in addition to lowering intracellular DHT. The inhibition of AR activity following drug treatment often exceeded the expected response due to reduced availability of DHT. The ability to maintain high intracellular testosterone might compensate for the shortage of DHT. The biological effect of finasteride or dutasteride appears to be complex and may depend on the interplay of several factors, which include testosterone turnover, enzymology of DHT production, ability to use testosterone and DHT interchangeably, and propensity of cells for off-target AR inhibitory effect. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Progesterone-induced stimulation of mammary tumorigenesis is due to the progesterone metabolite, 5α-dihydroprogesterone (5αP) and can be suppressed by the 5α-reductase inhibitor, finasteride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiebe, John P; Rivas, Martin A; Mercogliano, Maria F; Elizalde, Patricia V; Schillaci, Roxana

    2015-05-01

    Progesterone has long been linked to breast cancer but its actual role as a cancer promoter has remained in dispute. Previous in vitro studies have shown that progesterone is converted to 5α-dihydroprogesterone (5αP) in breast tissue and human breast cell lines by the action of 5α-reductase, and that 5αP acts as a cancer-promoter hormone. Also studies with human breast cell lines in which the conversion of progesterone to 5αP is blocked by a 5α-reductase inhibitor, have shown that the in vitro stimulation in cell proliferation with progesterone treatments are not due to progesterone itself but to the metabolite 5αP. No similar in vivo study has been previously reported. The objective of the current studies was to determine in an in vivo mouse model if the presumptive progesterone-induced mammary tumorigenesis is due to the progesterone metabolite, 5αP. BALB/c mice were challenged with C4HD murine mammary cells, which have been shown to form tumors when treated with progesterone or the progestin, medroxyprogesterone acetate. Cells and mice were treated with various doses and combinations of progesterone, 5αP and/or the 5α-reductase inhibitor, finasteride, and the effects on cell proliferation and induction and growth of tumors were monitored. Hormone levels in serum and tumors were measured by specific RIA and ELISA tests. Proliferation of C4HD cells and induction and growth of tumors was stimulated by treatment with either progesterone or 5αP. The progesterone-induced stimulation was blocked by finasteride and reinstated by concomitant treatment with 5αP. The 5αP-induced tumors expressed high levels of ER, PR and ErbB-2. Hormone measurements showed significantly higher levels of 5αP in serum from mice with tumors than from mice without tumors, regardless of treatments, and 5αP levels were significantly higher (about 4-fold) in tumors than in respective sera, while progesterone levels did not differ between the compartments. The results indicate that

  8. Simvastatin Inhibits Goblet Cell Hyperplasia and Lung Arginase in a Mouse Model of Allergic Asthma: A Novel Treatment for Airway Remodeling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeki, Amir A.; Bratt, Jennifer M.; Rabowsky, Michelle; Last, Jerold A.; Kenyon, Nicholas J.

    2010-01-01

    Airway remodeling in asthma contributes to airway hyperreactivity, loss of lung function, and persistent symptoms. Current therapies do not adequately treat the structural airway changes associated with asthma. The statins are cholesterol-lowering drugs that inhibit the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase, the rate-limiting step of cholesterol biosynthesis in the mevalonate pathway. These drugs have been associated with improved respiratory health and ongoing clinical trials are testing their therapeutic potential in asthma. We hypothesized that simvastatin treatment of ovalbumin-exposed mice would attenuate early features of airway remodeling, by a mevalonate-dependent mechanism. BALB/c mice were initially sensitized to ovalbumin, and then exposed to 1% ovalbumin aerosol for 2 weeks after sensitization for a total of six exposures. Simvastatin (40 mg/kg) or simvastatin plus mevalonate (20 mg/kg) were injected intraperitoneally before each ovalbumin exposure. Treatment with simvastatin attenuated goblet cell hyperplasia, arginase-1 protein expression, and total arginase enzyme activity, but did not alter airway hydroxyproline content or transforming growth factor-β1. Inhibition of goblet cell hyperplasia by simvastatin was mevalonate-dependent. No appreciable changes to airway smooth muscle cells were observed in any of the control or treatment groups. In conclusion, in an acute mouse model of allergic asthma, simvastatin inhibited early hallmarks of airway remodeling, indicators that can lead to airway thickening and fibrosis. Statins are potentially novel treatments for airway remodeling in asthma. Further studies utilizing sub-chronic or chronic allergen exposure models are needed to extend these initial findings. PMID:21078495

  9. Bacteriostatic effect of simvastatin on selected oral streptococci in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene J Whitaker

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context and Objective: Simvastatin is a widely used cholesterol-lowering drug, which has been found to have a number of pleiotropic effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial effectiveness of simvastatin against selected oral streptococci as determined by the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC. Methods: Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sanguis, Streptococcus anginosus, and Streptococcus salivarius were the test microorganisms. The serial dilution method was used to determine the MIC of simvastatin against these organisms. The MIC was defined as the lowest concentration of simvastatin that completely inhibited growth of the test organisms. Results: The data indicate that simvastatin inhibits the growth of the test organisms, with MIC's ranging from 7.8 to 15.6 μg/ml. Conclusions: Simvastatin has MIC's against the selected bacteria that compare favorably with reported values for topical agents such as essential oil, chlorhexidine gluconate, and triclosan. The levels of simvastatin required to inhibit bacterial growth of oral bacteria exceed the reported levels of the drug found in plasma or crevicular fluid of patients who are treated with this cholesterol-lowering drug. However, clinical studies are warranted to investigate the potential use of simvastatin as a novel antiplaque agent that could be used in local drug delivery to the oral cavity of those patients who are prescribed this cholesterol-lowering drug.

  10. In vitro synergism of simvastatin and fluconazole against Candida species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everardo Albuquerque Menezes

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Systemic fungal infections are responsible for high mortality rates. Several species of fungi may be involved, but Candida spp. is the most prevalent. Simvastatin is used to lower cholesterol and also exhibits antifungal action. The aim of this study was to evaluate the synergistic action of simvastatin with fluconazole against strains of Candida spp. Susceptibility testing was performed according to protocol M27-A3, by broth microdilution method and the synergistic effect of simvastatin and fluconazole was calculated based on FICI (Fractional Inhibitory Concentration Index. Eleven strains were evaluated, and simvastatin showed a synergistic effect with fluconazole against 10 (91% of the Candida spp. strains tested. Simvastatin may be a valuable drug in the treatment of systemic infections caused by Candida spp.

  11. Antinociception and anti-inflammation induced by simvastatin in algesiometric assays in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Hugo F; Noriega, Viviana; Olavarria, Loreto; Zepeda, Ramiro J; Sierralta, Fernando; Prieto, Juan C

    2011-12-01

    Statins, belonging to a well-known drug class used for lowering cholesterol through competitive inhibition of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, also have other pleiotropic properties, such as anti-inflammatory action. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of simvastatin in five models of nociceptive behaviour. Oral gavage administration of simvastatin induced a dose-dependent inhibition of nociception for 1 day in the acetic acid writhing (ED(50) = 5.59 ± 0.07), tail-flick (ED(50) = 112.96 ± 8.00), hot-plate (ED(50) = 134.87 ± 2.20), formalin hind paw (ED(50) = 19.86 ± 1.12 in phase I and 23.30 ± 2.05 in phase II) and orofacial formalin (ED(50) = 5.54 ± 2.74 in phase I and 11.48 ± 1.88 in phase II) tests. However, after 3 days, the values were in the acetic acid writhing (ED(50) = 6.14 ± 0.51), tail-flick (ED(50) = 154 ± 8.88), hot-plate (ED(50) = 136.14 ± 2.94), formalin hind paw (ED(50) = 15.93 ± 0.42 in phase I and 17.10 ± 1.80 in phase II) and orofacial formalin (ED(50) = 6.79 ± 0.66 in phase I and 5.80 ± 1.49 in phase II) tests. This study demonstrated the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of simvastatin in five models of tonic or phasic pain. These actions seem to be related to the inhibition of cytokine and prostanoid release and stimulation of nitric oxide synthesis. A possible clinical role of simvastatin could be related to the potentially beneficial effects in the neuropathic pain, and by their pleiotropic properties, they could play a clinical role in anti-inflammatory disease. © 2011 The Authors. Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology © 2011 Nordic Pharmacological Society.

  12. Simvastatin Exposure and Rotator Cuff Repair in a Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deren, Matthew E; Ehteshami, John R; Dines, Joshua S; Drakos, Mark C; Behrens, Steve B; Doty, Stephen; Coleman, Struan H

    2017-03-01

    Simvastatin is a common medication prescribed for hypercholesterolemia that accelerates local bone formation. It is unclear whether simvastatin can accelerate healing at the tendon-bone interface after rotator cuff repair. This study was conducted to investigate whether local and systemic administration of simvastatin increased tendon-bone healing of the rotator cuff as detected by maximum load to failure in a controlled animal-based model. Supraspinatus tendon repair was performed on 120 Sprague-Dawley rats. Sixty rats had a polylactic acid membrane overlying the repair site. Of these, 30 contained simvastatin and 30 did not contain medication. Sixty rats underwent repair without a polylactic acid membrane. Of these, 30 received oral simvastatin (25 mg/kg/d) and 30 received a regular diet. At 4 weeks, 5 rats from each group were killed for histologic analysis. At 8 weeks, 5 rats from each group were killed for histologic analysis and the remaining 20 rats were killed for biomechanical analysis. One rat that received oral simvastatin died of muscle necrosis. Average maximum load to failure was 35.2±6.2 N for those receiving oral simvastatin, 36.8±9.0 N for oral control subjects, 39.5±12.8 N for those receiving local simvastatin, and 39.1±9.3 N for control subjects with a polylactic acid membrane. No statistically significant differences were found between any of the 4 groups (P>.05). Qualitative histologic findings showed that all groups showed increased collagen formation and organization at 8 weeks compared with 4 weeks, with no differences between the 4 groups at each time point. The use of systemic and local simvastatin offered no benefit over control groups. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(2):e288-e292.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Design, Synthesis, and X-ray Crystal Structures of 2,4-Diaminofuro[2,3-d]pyrimidines as Multireceptor Tyrosine Kinase and Dihydrofolate Reductase Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangjee, Aleem; Li, Wei; Lin, Lu; Zeng, Yibin; Ihnat, Michael; Warnke, Linda A.; Green, Dixy W.; Cody, Vivian; Pace, Jim; Queener, Sherry F.

    2009-01-01

    To optimize dual receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) and dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) inhibition, the E- and Z-isomers of 5-[2-(2-methoxyphenyl)prop-1-en-1-yl]furo[2,3-d]pyrimidine-2,4-diamines (1a and 1b) were separated by HPLC and the X-ray crystal structures (2.0 Å and 1.4 Å respectively) with mouse DHFR and NADPH as well as 1b with human DHFR (1.5 Å) were determined. The E- and Z-isomers adopt different binding modes when bound to mouse DHFR. A series of 2,4-diaminofuro[2,3-d]pyrimidines 2–13 were designed and synthesized using the X-ray crystal structures of 1a and 1b with DHFR to increase their DHFR inhibitory activity. Wittig reactions of appropriate 2-methoxyphenyl ketones with 2,4-diamino-6-chloromethyl furo[2,3-d]pyrimidine afforded the C8–C9 unsaturated compounds 2–7 and catalytic reduction gave the saturated 8–13. Homologation of the C9-methyl analog maintains DHFR inhibitory activity. In addition, inhibition of EGFR and PDGFR-β were discovered for saturated C9-homologated analogs 9 and 10 that were absent in the saturated C9-methyl analogs. PMID:19748785

  14. Does simvastatin stimulate bone formation in vivo?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chorev Michael

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Statins, potent compounds that inhibit cholesterol synthesis in the liver have been reported to induce bone formation, both in tissue culture and in rats and mice. To re-examine potential anabolic effects of statins on bone formation, we compared the activity of simvastatin (SVS to the known anabolic effects of PTH in an established model of ovariectomized (OVX Swiss-Webster mice. Methods Mice were ovariectomized at 12 weeks of age (T0, remained untreated for 5 weeks to allow development of osteopenia (T5, followed by treatment for 8 weeks (T13. Whole, trabecular and cortical femoral bone was analyzed by micro-computed tomography (micro CT. Liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS was used to detect the presence of SVS and its active metabolite, simvastatin β-hydroxy acid (SVS-OH in the mouse serum. Results Trabecular BV/TV at T13 was 4.2 fold higher in animals treated with PTH (80 micro-g/kg/day compared to the OVX-vehicle treated group (p in vivo study. Conclusions While PTH demonstrated the expected anabolic effect on bone, SVS failed to stimulate bone formation, despite our verification by LC/MS of the active SVS-OH metabolite in mouse serum. While statins have clear effects on bone formation in vitro, the formulation of existing 'liver-targeted' statins requires further refinement for efficacy in vivo.

  15. Analysis of Simvastatin using a Simple and Fast High Performance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) analytical method for the lipid lowering drug, simvastatin, and to apply the developed method to study the solubility of the drug in various ..... Takano T, Abe S, Hata S. A selected ion monitoring.

  16. Curcuma aeruginosa, a novel botanically derived 5α-reductase inhibitor in the treatment of male-pattern baldness: a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumthong, Ganniga; Asawanonda, Pravit; Varothai, Supenya; Jariyasethavong, Vorapicha; Triwongwaranat, Daranporn; Suthipinittharm, Puan; Ingkaninan, Kornkanok; Leelapornpisit, Pimporn; Waranuch, Neti

    2012-10-01

    Several botanically derived agents are available for the treatment of male-pattern baldness. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of 5% hexane extract of Curcuma aeruginosa, a botanically derived inhibitor of 5α-reductase and 5% minoxidil in the treatment of androgenetic alopecia. Eighty-seven men with androgenetic alopecia (AGA) were randomized to receive 5% Curcuma aeruginosa, 5% minoxidil, combination formulation (5% hexane extract of Curcuma aeruginosa + 5% minoxidil) or placebo, twice daily for 6 months. Efficacy was assessed by target area hair count, global photographic review as well as patients' subjective assessments of hair regrowth and hair shedding. There were statistically significant improvements in global photographic review (p < 0.001), subjects' overall assessments of hair regrowth (p = 0.008), and hair shedding (p = 0.004) when the combination formulation was compared with placebo. Similarly, treatment with 5% minoxidil and 5% C. aeruginosa extract also led to some degrees of hair regrowth. There were no serious adverse events during and after the study. In men with hair loss in the vertex area of the scalp, the combination of 5% hexane extract of C. aeruginosa and 5% minoxidil slowed hair loss and increased hair growth.

  17. Effects of simvastatin on CAT-1-mediated arginine transport and NO level under high glucose conditions in conditionally immortalized rat inner blood-retinal barrier cell lines (TR-iBRB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tun, Temdara; Kang, Young-Sook

    2017-05-01

    Hyperglycemia causes the breakdown of the blood-retinal barrier by impairing endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) function. Statins have many pleiotropic effects such as improving endothelial barrier permeability and increasing eNOS mRNA stability. The objective of this study was to determine effect of simvastatin on l-arginine transport and NO production under high-glucose conditions in conditionally immortalized rat retinal capillary endothelial cell line (TR-iBRB). Changes in l-arginine transport uptake and, expression levels of cationic amino acid transporter 1 (CAT-1) and eNOS mRNA were investigated after pre-treatment with simvastatin and NOS inhibitors (l-NMMA and l-NAME) under high-glucose conditions using TR-iBRB, an in vitro model of iBRB. The NO level released from TR-iBRB cells was examined using Griess reagents. Under high glucose conditions, [ 3 H]l-arginine uptake was decreased in TR-iBRB cells. Simvastatin pretreatment elevated [ 3 H]l-arginine uptake, the expression levels of CAT-1 and eNOS mRNA, and NO production under high-glucose conditions. Moreover, the co-treatment with simvastatin and NOS inhibitors reduced [ 3 H]l-arginine uptake compared to pretreatment with simvastatin alone. Our results suggest that, in the presence of high-glucose levels, increased l-arginine uptake due to simvastatin treatment was associated with increased CAT-1 and eNOS mRNA levels, leading to higher NO production in TR-iBRB cells. Thus, simvastatin might be a good modulator for diabetic retinopathy therapy by increasing of the l-arginine uptake and improving endothelial function in retinal capillary endothelial cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Reduced incidence of new-onset diabetes mellitus after renal transplantation with 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme a reductase inhibitors (statins).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, G V Ramesh; Kim, S Joseph; Huang, Michael; Nash, Michelle M; Zaltzman, Jeffrey S; Fenton, Stanley S A; Cattran, Daniel C; Cole, Edward H; Cardella, Carl J

    2004-11-01

    Statins have anti-inflammatory effects, modify endothelial function and improve peripheral insulin resistance. We hypothesized that statins influence the development of new-onset diabetes mellitus in renal transplant recipients. The records of all previously non-diabetic adults who received an allograft in Toronto between January 1, 1999 and December 31, 2001 were reviewed with follow-up through December 31, 2002. All patients receiving cyclosporine or tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and prednisone were included. New-onset diabetes was diagnosed by the Canadian Diabetic Association criteria: fasting plasma glucose > or =7.0 mmol/L or 2-h postprandial glucose > or =11.1 mmol/L on more than two occasions. Statin use prior to diabetes development was recorded along with other variables. Cox proportional hazards models analyzing statin use as a time-dependent covariate were performed. Three hundred fourteen recipients met study criteria, of whom 129 received statins. New-onset diabetes incidence was 16% (n = 49). Statins (p = 0.0004, HR 0.238[0.109-0.524]) and ACE inhibitors/ARB (p = 0.01, HR 0.309[0.127-0.750]) were associated with decreased risk. Prednisone dose (p = 0.0001, HR 1.007[1.003-1.010] per 1 mg/d at 3 months), weight at transplant (p = 0.02, HR 1.022[1.003-1.042] per 1 kg), black ethnicity (p = 0.02, HR 1.230[1.023-1.480]) and age > or =45 years (p = 0.01, HR 2.226[1.162-4.261]) were associated with increased diabetes. Statin use is associated with reduced new-onset diabetes development after renal transplantation.

  19. Effect of simvastatin on MMPs and TIMPs in cigarette smoke-induced rat COPD model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun J

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Jiawei Sun,1,* Jie Bao,2,* Yanan Shi,3 Bin Zhang,4 Lindong Yuan,5 Junhong Li,1 Lihai Zhang,1 Mo Sun,6 Ling Zhang,2 Wuzhuang Sun1 1Department of Respiratory Medicine, First Hospital of Hebei Medical University, 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, Chest Hospital of Hebei Province, 3Maternal and Child Health Care Center of Hebei Province, 4Department of Emergency, First Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, 5Department of Respiratory Medicine, People’s Hospital of Liaocheng, Liaocheng, 6Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Proteases may play an important role in the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and emphysema in response to cigarette smoke exposure (CSE. The current study was designed to investigate the expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-8, MMP-9, MMP-12, tissue inhibitor of MMP (TIMP-1, and TIMP-4 in rat lung tissues in response to CSE, and assessed the effect of simvastatin in regulating expression of MMPs and TIMPs.Methods: Thirty normal Sprague Dawley (SD rats were divided into control (n=10, CSE (n=10, and CSE plus simvastatin (n=10 groups. Animals were whole-body exposed to the cigarette smoke in the box for 1 hour each time, twice a day, 5 days a week for 16 weeks. Animals of CSE + simvastatin group were intra-gastrically administered simvastatin at a dose of 5 mg/kg/day followed by CSE. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was harvested for inflammatory cell count and lung tissues were stained for morphologic examination. Expression of mRNA and protein level of MMP-8, MMP-9, MMP-12, TIMP-1, and TIMP-4 was assessed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry, respectively.Results: CSE resulted in a significant increase of mean linear intercept (MLI: 34.6±2.0 µm and bronchial wall thickness and diameter (BWT/D, 0.250±0.062 compared to control (MLI: 24.0±1.7 µm, BWT

  20. Simvastatin inhibits the proliferation of human prostate cancer PC-3 cells via down-regulation of the insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekine, Yoshitaka; Furuya, Yosuke; Nishii, Masahiro; Koike, Hidekazu; Matsui, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Kazuhiro

    2008-01-01

    Recently, statins have been being studied for their proapoptic and antimetastatic effects. However, the exact mechanisms of their anticancer action are still unclear. Dolichyl phosphate is a nonsterol isoprenoid derivative in the mevalonate pathway that affects the expression of the Insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R). IGF-1R activation is required for prostate cell proliferation; therefore, IGF-1R inhibitory agents may be of preventive and/or therapeutic value. In this study, the effects of simvastatin on IGF-1R signaling in prostate cancer PC-3 cells were examined. Simvastatin suppressed proliferation and induced apoptosis of PC-3, and the expression of IGF-1R was suppressed by simvastatin. Knockdown of IGF-1R by siRNA led to inhibition of proliferation of PC-3. Simvastatin also inhibited IGF-1-induced activation of both ERK and Akt signaling and IGF-1-induced PC-3 cell proliferation. Our results suggest statins are potent inhibitors of the IGF-1/IGF-1R system in prostate cancer cells and may be beneficial in prostate cancer treatment

  1. Simvastatin enhances bone morphogenetic protein receptor type II expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Hong; Sung, Arthur; Zhao, Guohua; Shi, Lingfang; Qiu Daoming; Nishimura, Toshihiko; Kao, Peter N.

    2006-01-01

    Statins confer therapeutic benefits in systemic and pulmonary vascular diseases. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) receptors serve essential signaling functions in cardiovascular development and skeletal morphogenesis. Mutations in BMP receptor type II (BMPR2) are associated with human familial and idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, and pathologic neointimal proliferation of vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells within small pulmonary arteries. In severe experimental pulmonary hypertension, simvastatin reversed disease and conferred a 100% survival advantage. Here, modulation of BMPR2 gene expression by simvastatin is characterized in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T, pulmonary artery smooth muscle, and lung microvascular endothelial cells (HLMVECs). A 1.4 kb BMPR2 promoter containing Egr-1 binding sites confers reporter gene activation in 293T cells which is partially inhibited by simvastatin. Simvastatin enhances steady-state BMPR2 mRNA and protein expression in HLMVEC, through posttranscriptional mRNA stabilization. Simvastatin induction of BMPR2 expression may improve BMP-BMPR2 signaling thereby enhancing endothelial differentiation and function

  2. Effect of Simvastatin Prodrug on Experimental Periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Aaron D; Zhang, Yijia; Jia, Zhenshan; Zhao, Gang; Wang, Xiaobei; Pranke, Laura; Schmid, Marian J; Wang, Dong; Reinhardt, Richard A

    2016-05-01

    Local application of statins has shown potential in preventing and regenerating bone loss associated with experimental periodontitis. This study evaluates the effect of a novel simvastatin (SIM) prodrug (capable of delivering high doses to periodontitis inflammatory lesion and cells) on experimental periodontitis bone loss and inflammation. Forty mature female Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to ligature-induced experimental periodontitis between maxillary first and second molars (M1-M2). Equal groups were treated with three weekly doses of: 1) prodrug carrier alone (mPEG); 2) 0.5 mg SIM dose equivalent in carrier (SIM/SIM-mPEG); 3) 1.0 mg SIM/SIM-mPEG; 4) 1.5 mg SIM/SIM-mPEG; or 5) ligature alone. Contralateral molars served as unmanipulated controls. Four weeks after initiation of periodontitis, animals were euthanized, the M1-M2 interproximal was evaluated with microcomputed tomography and histology, and data were analyzed with one-way analysis of variance. Ligature alone caused a mean bone loss of 1.01 ± 0.06 mm from the cemento-enamel junction, whereas all doses of SIM/SIM-mPEG reduced bone loss, especially 1.5 mg SIM/SIM-mPEG (0.68 ± 0.05 mm, P periodontitis bone loss and inflammation in rats.

  3. [Rhabdomyolysis secondary to simvastatin and phenofibrate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forcadell-Peris, M J; de Diego-Cabanes, C

    2014-01-01

    Statins, which are used as first-line drugs in the prevention of cardiovascular disease, are usually safe, but in some cases there may be muscular toxicity. Statin-associated myopathy, can present as myalgia, myositis or rhabdomyolysis. Only 0.44 per 10,000 treated and per year, develop rhabdomyolysis. There are many risk factors associated with the patient and with the pharmacological treatment. A risk of muscle injury of 1-5% has been reported with some statins combined with fibrates. The fibrate with the highest risk of myopathy in combination with statins is gemfibrozil, while phenofibrate seems to be the safest. The case is presented of a 60 year-old woman with clinical symptoms and laboratory findings that suggested rhabdomyolysis secondary to a combination of simvastatin and phenofibrate. This case reminds physicians of the need to closely monitor these patients, in addition to alert them to the onset of muscle pain or weakness. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  4. Assessment of simvastatin niosomes for pediatric transdermal drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidan, Ahmed S; Hosny, Khaled M; Ahmed, Osama A A; Fahmy, Usama A

    2016-06-01

    The prevalence of childhood dyslipidemia increases and is considered as an important risk factor for the incidence of cardiovascular disease in the adulthood. To improve dosing accuracy and facilitate the determination of dosing regimens in function of the body weight, the proposed study aims at preparing transdermal niosomal gels of simvastatin as possible transdermal drug delivery system for pediatric applications. Twelve formulations were prepared to screen the influence of formulation and processing variables on critical niosomal characteristics. Nano-sized niosomes with 0.31 μm number-weighted size displayed highest simvastatin release rate with 8.5% entrapment capacity. The niosomal surface coverage by negative charges was calculated according to Langmuir isotherm with n = 0.42 to suggest that the surface association was site-independent, probably producing surface rearrangements. Hypolipidemic activities after transdermal administration of niosomal gels to rats showed significant reduction in cholesterol and triglyceride levels while increasing plasma high-density lipoproteins concentration. Bioavailability estimation in rats revealed an augmentation in simvastatin bioavailability by 3.35 and 2.9 folds from formulation F3 and F10, respectively, compared with oral drug suspension. Hence, this transdermal simvastatin niosomes not only exhibited remarkable potential to enhance its bioavailability and hypolipidemic activity but also considered a promising pediatric antihyperlipidemic formulation.

  5. Myopati hos en patient i behandling med simvastatin og fluconazol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jens Kristian; Lydolph, Magnus Christian; Somnier, Finn

    2016-01-01

    A 69-year-old female was admitted due to progressive loss of muscle strength following addition of fluconazole to long-term simvastatin treatment. Rhabdomyolysis was suspected and both drugs were discontinued. Forced diuresis was initiated together with a short course of prednisolone. After 21...

  6. Simvastatin-nicotinamide co-crystal: design, preparation and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To improve the solubility of simvastatin (SV) by co-crystallization using nicotinamide (Nic) as co-crystal agent (co-former). Methods: In silico molecular modeling of Nic counter to SV were investigated using Auto Dock 4.2. Cocrystal of Nic-SV was obtained by solvent evaporation (SE) using an equimolar ratio of Nic ...

  7. Analysis of Simvastatin using a Simple and Fast High Performance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    simvastatin, and to apply the developed method to study the solubility of the ... samples. Results: The developed HPLC method showed good linearity (R2 = 0.9958 ± 0.0040. ... EXPERIMENTAL ... from the true value served as the measure of.

  8. Simvastatin affects cell motility and actin cytoskeleton distribution of microglia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, HF; Rappert, Angelika A.C.; Mommaas, AM; Van Haastert, ES; Van der Valk, P; Boddeke, HWGM; Biber, KPH; Van den Elsen, PJ

    2006-01-01

    Statin treatment is proposed to be a new potential therapy for multiple sclerosis (MS), an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. The effects of statin treatment on brain cells, however, are hardly understood. We therefore evaluated the effects of simvastatin treatment on

  9. The Remarkable Beneficial Effect of Adding Oral Simvastatin to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Psoriasis is a common chronic inflammatory disease with unpredictable prognosis. Given the immunomodulatory effects of statins, the present study was conducted to determine whether the addition of orally administered simvastatin to the topical betamethasone, a standard antipsoriatic treatment, can produce a more ...

  10. Comparative evaluation of efficacy of subgingivally delivered 1.2% Atorvastatin and 1.2% Simvastatin in the treatment of intrabony defects in chronic periodontitis: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh S. Martande

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Statins are the recently evolved agents that aid in periodontal regeneration and ultimately in attaining periodontal health. Atorvastatin (ATV and Simvastatin (SMV are specific competitive inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-2-methyl-glutaryl coenzyme A reductase. The current study was conducted to compare the effectiveness of 1.2% ATV and 1.2% SMV, in addition to scaling and root planing (SRP, in the treatment of intrabony defects in subjects with chronic periodon-titis. Methods. Ninety-six individuals were categorized into three treatment groups: SRP plus 1.2% ATV, SRP plus 1.2% SMV and SRP plus placebo. Clinical parameters of full-mouth plaque index (PI, modified sulcus bleeding index (mSBI, probing depth (PD, and relative attachment level (RAL were recorded at baseline before SRP and at 3, 6 and 9 months. Bone fill was assessed using percentage radiographic defect depth reduction at baseline, 6 months and 9 months. Results. Both ATV and SMV showed significant PD reduction and RAL gain than placebo. ATV group showed greater mean PD reduction and mean RAL gain as compared to SMV group at 3, 6 and 9 months. Furthermore, ATV group sites exhibited a significantly greater percentage of radiographic defect depth reduction (33.23 ± 3.11%; 34.84 ± 3.07% as compared to SMV (30.39 ± 3.36%; 32.15 ± 3.37% at 6 and 9 months. Conclusion. ATV resulted in greater improvements in clinical parameters with higher percentage of radiographic defect depth reduction as compared to SMV in the treatment of intrabony defects in CP subjects.

  11. Use of Simvastatin and Risk of Acute Pancreatitis: A Nationwide Case-Control Study in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chih-Ming; Liao, Kuan-Fu; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lai, Shih-Wei

    2017-07-01

    The correlation between simvastatin use and acute pancreatitis is explored. A case-control study was conducted to analyze claim data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program. The case group comprising a total of 3882 subjects aged 20 to 84 years with their first acute pancreatitis episode occurring between 1998 and 2011 formed the case group, against 3790 randomly selected controls matched for sex, age, comorbidities, and index year of acute pancreatitis diagnosis. Recent use of simvastatin was defined as subjects whose last remaining simvastatin tablet was noted ≤7 days before the date of acute pancreatitis diagnosis. Remote use of simvastatin was defined as subjects whose last remaining 1 tablet for simvastatin was noted >7 days before the date of acute pancreatitis diagnosis. Never use of simvastatin was defined as subjects who had never been prescribed simvastatin. A multivariable unconditional logistic regression model was used to estimate the odds ratio and 95%CI to explore the correlation between simvastatin use and acute pancreatitis. After adjustment for confounders, multivariable logistic regression analysis revealed that the adjusted odds ratio of acute pancreatitis was 1.3 for subjects with recent use of simvastatin (95%CI 1.02, 1.73), when compared with those with never use of simvastatin. The crude odds ratio decreased to 1.1 for those with remote use of simvastatin (95%CI 0.93, 1.34) but without statistical significance. Recent use of simvastatin is associated with acute pancreatitis. Clinicians should consider the possibility of simvastatin-associated acute pancreatitis for patients presenting for acute pancreatitis without known cause. © 2017, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  12. Preparation of Simvastatin Hydrogel through Arginine Addition for Drug Delivery System

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    Rosyida Niswati Fathmah

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Simvastatin is a lipid lowering agent which has been used recently as drug delivery system for stimulating bone regeneration. Because of low therapeutic efficacy and bioavailability, it is necessary to deliver simvastatin by local administration e.g. by hydrogel system. However, simvastatin has very poor solubility which restricts to prepare hydrogel formulation. The aim of this study is to improve solubility of simvastatin with arginine as co-solvent for developing a controlled released drug delivery system by loading simvastatin into gelatin hydrogel. The solubility study was performed by addition of an excess mass of simvastatin into the specified molar solutions of the arginine. All conical flasks were placed in a mechanical water bath shaker at the temperature of 25, 40, and 50 °C and shaken for a maximum period of 72 hours. The drug concentration was analyzed by UV/Visible spectroscopy at 238 nm. The hydrogel was prepared by a dehydrothermal method. The results showed that simvastatin solubility increases with increasing arginine concentrations and temperature. Characterizations showed a successful preparation of simvastatin-loaded gelatin hydrogel. The arginine simvastatin hydrogel and the gelatin hydrogel (as a blank exhibited a comparable swelling index (ca. 6.5. Furthermore, microparticles of the material show a narrow particle size distribution in the range between 150-250 μm.

  13. Ketopantoyl-lactone reductase from Candida parapsilosis: purification and characterization as a conjugated polyketone reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, H; Shimizu, S; Hattori, S; Yamada, H

    1989-02-24

    Ketopantoyl-lactone reductase (2-dehydropantoyl-lactone reductase, EC 1.1.1.168) was purified and crystallized from cells of Candida parapsilosis IFO 0708. The enzyme was found to be homogeneous on ultracentrifugation, high-performance gel-permeation liquid chromatography and SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The relative molecular mass of the native and SDS-treated enzyme is approximately 40,000. The isoelectric point of the enzyme is 6.3. The enzyme was found to catalyze specifically the reduction of a variety of natural and unnatural polyketones and quinones other than ketopantoyl lactone in the presence of NADPH. Isatin and 5-methylisatin are rapidly reduced by the enzyme, the Km and Vmax values for isatin being 14 microM and 306 mumol/min per mg protein, respectively. Ketopantoyl lactone is also a good substrate (Km = 333 microM and Vmax = 481 mumol/min per mg protein). Reverse reaction was not detected with pantoyl lactone and NADP+. The enzyme is inhibited by quercetin, several polyketones and SH-reagents. 3,4-Dihydroxy-3-cyclobutene-1,2-dione, cyclohexenediol-1,2,3,4-tetraone and parabanic acid are uncompetitive inhibitors for the enzyme, the Ki values being 1.4, 0.2 and 3140 microM, respectively, with isatin as substrate. Comparison of the enzyme with the conjugated polyketone reductase of Mucor ambiguus (S. Shimizu, H. Hattori, H. Hata and H. Yamada (1988) Eur. J. Biochem. 174, 37-44) and ketopantoyl-lactone reductase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae suggested that ketopantoyl-lactone reductase is a kind of conjugated polyketone reductase.

  14. The influence of milling on the dissolution performance of simvastatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimper, Ulrike; Aaltonen, Jaakko; Krauel-Goellner, Karen

    2012-01-01

    properties such as solubility and dissolution rate and, therefore, process induced solid state modifications need to be monitored. The aim of this study was two-fold: firstly, to investigate the dissolution rates of milled and unmilled simvastatin; and secondly, to screen for the main milling factors......, as well as factor interactions in a dry ball milling process using simvastatin as model drug, and to optimize the milling procedure with regard to the opposing responses particle size and process induced disorder by application of a central composite face centered design. Particle size was assessed...... by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and image analysis. Process induced disorder was determined by partial least squares (PLS) regression modeling of respective X-ray powder diffractograms (XRPD) and Raman spectra. Valid and significant quadratic models were built. The investigated milling factors were...

  15. Theoretical and experimental study of fenofibrate and simvastatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolás Vázquez, Inés; Rodríguez-Núñez, Jesús Rubén; Peña-Caballero, Vicente; Ruvalcaba, Rene Miranda; Aceves-Hernandez, Juan Manuel

    2017-12-01

    Fenofibrate, an oral fibrate lipid lowering agent, and simvastatin, which reduces plasma levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, are active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), currently in the market. We characterized these APIs by thermal analysis and conducted X-ray powder diffraction techniques. Studies should be carried out in the formulation stage before the final composition of a polypill may be established. Thus, it was found in thermochemical studies that both compounds present no chemical interactions in an equimolar mixture of solid samples at room temperature. Theoretical studies were employed to determine possible interactions between fenofibrate and simvastatin. A very weak intramolecular hydrogen bond is formed between the hydroxyl group (O5H5) of the simvastatin with chlorine and carbonyl group (C11O4, C1O2) of the fenofibrate molecule. These weak energy hydrogen bonds have no effect on the chemical stability of the compounds studied. The results were obtained using Density Functional Theory methods; particularly the BPE1BPE and B3LYP functional and 6-31++G** basis set. The values of energy show good approximation when are compared with similar calculations previously reported. Infrared spectra of monomers and dimers were obtained via theoretical calculations.

  16. Bioactive constituents from Chinese natural medicines. XXXII. aminopeptidase N and aldose reductase inhibitors from Sinocrassula indica: structures of sinocrassosides B(4), B(5), C(1), and D(1)-D(3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikawa, Toshio; Xie, Haihui; Wang, Tao; Matsuda, Hisashi; Yoshikawa, Masayuki

    2008-10-01

    From the methanolic extract of the whole plant of Sinocrassula indica (Crassulaceae), six new flavonol glycosides, sinocrassosides B(4) (1), B(5) (2), C(1) (3), D(1) (4), D(2) (5), and D(3) (6), were isolated together with 30 compounds. The structures of 1-6 were elucidated on the basis of chemical and physicochemical evidence. In addition, several constituents were found to show inhibitory effects on aminopeptidase N and aldose reductase.

  17. [The hypotriglyceridemic action of the combination of L-carnitine + simvastatin vs. L-carnitine and vs. simvastatin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savica, V; Bellinghieri, G; Lamanna, F

    1992-01-01

    Previous studies had determined the role played by L-carnitine and simvastatin in the treatment of altered lipidemia in dialyzed patients with chronic uremia. The authors carried out a study on the above substances either singly or together administered to the same patients with chronic uremia in hemodialysis. This study was aimed at demonstrating the possible synergic normolipidemic action of both substances in comparison with their single administration, because their different mechanism of action could be metabolically enhanced. The obtained results demonstrated that the therapeutic association proposed is preferable to the use of the single substances. Moreover, a higher and more rapid normolipidemic effect was obtained after using L-carnitina associated with simvastatin with respect to the separated substances.

  18. 5α-reductases in human physiology: an unfolding story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traish, Abdulmaged M

    2012-01-01

    5α-reductases are a family of isozymes expressed in a wide host of tissues including the central nervous system (CNS) and play a pivotal role in male sexual differentiation, development and physiology. A comprehensive literature search from 1970 to 2011 was made through PubMed and the relevant information was summarized. 5α reductases convert testosterone, progesterone, deoxycorticosterone, aldosterone and corticosterone into their respective 5α-dihydro-derivatives, which serve as substrates for 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase enzymes. The latter transforms these 5α-reduced metabolites into a subclass of neuroactive steroid hormones with distinct physiological functions. The neuroactive steroid hormones modulate a multitude of functions in human physiology encompassing regulation of sexual differentiation, neuroprotection, memory enhancement, anxiety, sleep and stress, among others. In addition, 5α -reductase type 3 is also implicated in the N-glycosylation of proteins via formation of dolichol phosphate. The family of 5α-reductases was targeted for drug development to treat pathophysiological conditions, such as benign prostatic hyperplasia and androgenetic alopecia. While the clinical use of 5α-reductase inhibitors was well established, the scope and the magnitude of the adverse side effects of such drugs, especially on the CNS, is still unrecognized due to lack of knowledge of the various physiological functions of this family of enzymes, especially in the CNS. There is an urgent need to better understand the function of 5α-reductases and the role of neuroactive steroids in human physiology in order to minimize the potential adverse side effects of inhibitors targeting 5α-reductases to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia and androgenic alopecia.

  19. Possible increased risk of rhabdomyolysis during concomitant use of simvastatin and gemfibrozil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VanPuijenbroek, EP; DuBufVereijken, PWG; Spooren, PFMJ; VanDoormaal, JJ

    1996-01-01

    The occurrence of rhabdomyolysis is one of the rare side-effects of the cholesterol-lowering agent simvastatin. During the use of lovastatin, an agent related to simvastatin, the risk of this side-effect might be increased when cyclosporin or gemfibrozil are used concomitantly. It is possible that

  20. Effect of Simvastatin on Arterial Stiffness in Patients with Statin Myalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin D. Ballard

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Statins reduce arterial stiffness but are also associated with mild muscle complaints. It is unclear whether individuals with muscle symptoms experience the same vascular benefit or whether statins affect striated and smooth muscle cells differently. We examined the effect of simvastatin treatment on arterial stiffness in patients who did versus those who did not exhibit muscle symptoms. Patients with a history of statin-related muscle complaints (n=115 completed an 8 wk randomized, double-blind, cross-over trial of daily simvastatin 20 mg and placebo. Serum lipids and pulse wave velocity (PWV were assessed before and after each treatment. Muscle symptoms with daily simvastatin treatment were reported by 38 patients (33%. Compared to baseline, central PWV decreased (P=0.01 following simvastatin treatment but not placebo (drug ∗ time interaction: P=0.047. Changes in central PWV with simvastatin treatment were not influenced by myalgia status or time on simvastatin (P≥0.15. Change in central PWV after simvastatin treatment was inversely correlated with age (r=-0.207, P=0.030, suggesting that advancing age is associated with enhanced statin-mediated arterial destiffening. In patients with a history of statin-related muscle complaints, the development of myalgia with short-term simvastatin treatment did not attenuate the improvement in arterial stiffness.

  1. Controlled release of simvastatin from biomimetic β-TCP drug delivery system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Chou

    Full Text Available Simvastatin have been shown to induce bone formation and there is currently a urgent need to develop an appropriate delivery system to sustain the release of the drug to increase therapeutic efficacy whilst reducing side effects. In this study, a novel drug delivery system for simvastatin by means of hydrothermally converting marine exoskeletons to biocompatible beta-tricalcium phosphate was investigated. Furthermore, the release of simvastatin was controlled by the addition of an outer apatite coating layer. The samples were characterized by x-ray diffraction analysis, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and mass spectroscopy confirming the conversion process. The in-vitro dissolution of key chemical compositional elements and the release of simvastatin were measured in simulated body fluid solution showing controlled release with reduction of approximately 25% compared with un-coated samples. This study shows the potential applications of marine structures as a drug delivery system for simvastatin.

  2. IGF-1 prevents simvastatin-induced myotoxicity in C2C12 myotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifacio, Annalisa; Sanvee, Gerda M; Brecht, Karin; Kratschmar, Denise V; Odermatt, Alex; Bouitbir, Jamal; Krähenbühl, Stephan

    2017-05-01

    Statins are generally well tolerated, but treatment with these drugs may be associated with myopathy. The mechanisms of statin-associated myopathy are not completely understood. Statins inhibit AKT phosphorylation by an unclear mechanism, whereas insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) activates the IGF-1/AKT signaling pathway and promotes muscle growth. The aims of the study were to investigate mechanisms of impaired AKT phosphorylation by simvastatin and to assess effects of IGF-1 on simvastatin-induced myotoxicity in C2C12 myotubes. C2C12 mouse myotubes were exposed to 10 μM simvastatin and/or 10 ng/mL IGF-1 for 18 h. Simvastatin inhibited the IGF-1/AKT signaling pathway, resulting in increased breakdown of myofibrillar proteins, impaired protein synthesis and increased apoptosis. Simvastatin inhibited AKT S473 phosphorylation, indicating reduced activity of mTORC2. In addition, simvastatin impaired stimulation of AKT T308 phosphorylation by IGF-1, indicating reduced activation of the IGF-1R/PI3K pathway by IGF-1. Nevertheless, simvastatin-induced myotoxicity could be at least partially prevented by IGF-1. The protective effects of IGF-1 were mediated by activation of the IGF-1R/AKT signaling cascade. Treatment with IGF-1 also suppressed muscle atrophy markers, restored protein synthesis and inhibited apoptosis. These results were confirmed by normalization of myotube morphology and protein content of C2C12 cells exposed to simvastatin and treated with IGF-1. In conclusion, impaired activity of AKT can be explained by reduced function of mTORC2 and of the IGF-1R/PI3K pathway. IGF-1 can prevent simvastatin-associated cytotoxicity and metabolic effects on C2C12 cells. The study gives insight into mechanisms of simvastatin-associated myotoxicity and provides potential targets for therapeutic intervention.

  3. Ketopantoyl lactone reductase is a conjugated polyketone reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, H; Shimizu, S; Hattori, S; Yamada, H

    1989-03-01

    Ketopantoyl lactone reductase (EC 1.1.1.168) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was found to catalyze the reduction of a variety of natural and unnatural conjugated polyketone compounds and quinones, such as isatin, ninhydrin, camphorquinone and beta-naphthoquinone in the presence of NADPH. 5-Bromoisatin is the best substrate for the enzyme (Km = 3.1 mM; Vmax = 650 mumol/min/mg). The enzyme is inhibited by quercetin, and several polyketones. These results suggest that ketopantoyl lactone reductase is a carbonyl reductase which specifically catalyzes the reduction of conjugated polyketones.

  4. [Simvastatin therapy and effect on hiperlipidemia and vascular status in nephrotic children with sustained dyslipidemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksiazek, Joanna; Niemirska, Anna; Lipka, Maria; Wierzbicka, Aldona; Syczewska, Małgorzata; Grenda, Ryszard

    2009-03-01

    Dyslipidemia is common in nephrotic children and persistent lipid abnormalities are risk factor of late vascular complications. The aim of the study was evaluation of efficacy and safety of 12-months simvastatin therapy in nephrotic children with lipid profile abnormalities present despite clinical remission lasting for at least 8 weeks, including ultrasonographic assessment of carotid and femoral arteries. Overall 52 children (40 steroid-dependent and 12 steroid-resistant) were initially introduced to the study and 29 of them were treated with simvastatin. Normalisation of lipid profile was achieved in 19/29 (65.5%) and improvement in 9/29 (31%). Significant reduction in total cholesterol (p 2.0) was small. Increased cIMT was seen at baseline in 4 patients and in 5 after simvastatin treatment, however average and Z-score values in children under simvastatin treatment have decreased. Increased fIMT values were seen at baseline in 2 and in one case after simvastatin treatment. Tolerance of simvastation was very good in all cases but one. Simvastatin therapy was effective and safe in nephrotic non-proteinuric children with abnormal lipid profile. Fair estimation of impact of the 12-months simvastatin therapy on vascular status was not available due to limited number of children with significantly increased IMT at baseline.

  5. Preparation and characterization of simvastatin/DMβCD complex and its pharmacokinetics in rats

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    Gu Fugen

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Simvastatin is poorly bioavailable because it is practically insoluble in water and shows dissolution rate-limited absorption. Solubilizing effects of several β-cyclodextrin (βCD derivatives such as HPβCD, SBEβCD and DMβCD on simvastatin in aqueous solution were investigated using the phase solubility technique. The solubility diagram of simvastatin with each βCD derivative could be classified as AL-type, indicating soluble complex formation of 1:1 stoichiometry. Among the above βCD derivatives DMβCD was found to be the ideal complexing agent for improving drug solubility. The simvastatin complex with DMβCD was prepared using the co-evaporation method and was then characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR and in vitro dissolution. Dissolution and pharmacokinetic studies indicated that the simvastatin/DMβCD complex exhibited an increased dissolution rate, rapid absorption, and improved bioavailability in rats compared to free drug. Maximum plasma concentration (cmax and the time to reach it (tmax were 21.86 μg mL−1 and 1.4 h for the drug complex, 8.25 μg mL−1 and 3.0 h for free drug, respectively. Main pharmacokinetic parameters such as tmax, cmax were significantly different (p < 0.01 between the simvastatin complex and free drug. Bioavailability of the simvastatin complex relative to free drug was up to 167.0 %.

  6. Simvastatin inhibits smoke-induced airway epithelial injury: implications for COPD therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Benjamin B; Zeki, Amir A; Bratt, Jennifer M; Wang, Lei; Filosto, Simone; Walby, William F; Kenyon, Nicholas J; Goldkorn, Tzipora; Schelegle, Edward S; Pinkerton, Kent E

    2013-08-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the third leading cause of death. The statin drugs may have therapeutic potential in respiratory diseases such as COPD, but whether they prevent bronchial epithelial injury is unknown. We hypothesised that simvastatin attenuates acute tobacco smoke-induced neutrophilic lung inflammation and airway epithelial injury. Spontaneously hypertensive rats were given simvastatin (20 mg·kg(-1) i.p.) daily for either 7 days prior to tobacco smoke exposure and during 3 days of smoke exposure, or only during tobacco smoke exposure. Pretreatment with simvastatin prior to and continued throughout smoke exposure reduced the total influx of leukocytes, neutrophils and macrophages into the lung and airways. Simvastatin attenuated tobacco smoke-induced cellular infiltration into lung parenchymal and airway subepithelial and interstitial spaces. 1 week of simvastatin pretreatment almost completely prevented smoke-induced denudation of the airway epithelial layer, while simvastatin given only concurrently with the smoke exposure had no effect. Simvastatin may be a novel adjunctive therapy for smoke-induced lung diseases, such as COPD. Given the need for statin pretreatment there may be a critical process of conditioning that is necessary for statins' anti-inflammatory effects. Future work is needed to elucidate the mechanisms of this statin protective effect.

  7. Simultaneous modulation of the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways by simvastatin in mediating prostate cancer cell apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goc, Anna; Kochuparambil, Samith T; Al-Husein, Belal; Al-Azayzih, Ahmad; Mohammad, Shuaib; Somanath, Payaningal R

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies suggest the potential benefits of statins as anti-cancer agents. Mechanisms by which statins induce apoptosis in cancer cells are not clear. We previously showed that simvastatin inhibit prostate cancer cell functions and tumor growth. Molecular mechanisms by which simvastatin induce apoptosis in prostate cancer cells is not completely understood. Effect of simvastatin on PC3 cell apoptosis was compared with docetaxel using apoptosis, TUNEL and trypan blue viability assays. Protein expression of major candidates of the intrinsic pathway downstream of simvastatin-mediated Akt inactivation was analyzed. Gene arrays and western analysis of PC3 cells and tumor lysates were performed to identify the candidate genes mediating extrinsic apoptosis pathway by simvastatin. Data indicated that simvastatin inhibited intrinsic cell survival pathway in PC3 cells by enhancing phosphorylation of Bad, reducing the protein expression of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and cleaved caspases 9/3. Over-expression of PC3 cells with Bcl-2 or DN-caspase 9 did not rescue the simvastatin-induced apoptosis. Simvastatin treatment resulted in increased mRNA and protein expression of molecules such as TNF, Fas-L, Traf1 and cleaved caspase 8, major mediators of intrinsic apoptosis pathway and reduced protein levels of pro-survival genes Lhx4 and Nme5. Our study provides the first report that simvastatin simultaneously modulates intrinsic and extrinsic pathways in the regulation of prostate cancer cell apoptosis in vitro and in vivo, and render reasonable optimism that statins could become an attractive anti-cancer agent

  8. Effects of simvastatin on apolipoprotein M in vivo and in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilsson-Ehle Peter

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To investigate effects of lipid lowering drug, simvastatin, on apolipoprotein M expression in the hyperlipidemic mice and in hepatic cell line, HepG2 cells. Methods Swiss male mice were randomly divided into the high fat group and control group, and were intragastrically fed with 0.9% saline (control group or lipid emulsion (high fat group at the daily dosage of 15 ml/kg body weight, respectively. After 8 weeks feeding, the hyperlipidemic model was successfully induced and these hyperlipidemic mice were then randomly divided into three experimental groups: vehicle control group, high-dose simvastatin-treated group (100 mg/kg body weight, and low-dose simvastatin-treated group (10 mg/kg body weight. Mice were dosed daily for 6 weeks of simvastatin before mice were sacrificed for determining serum lipid profile and apoM protein levels that was determined by using dot blotting analysis. Effects of simvastatin on apoM mRNA expression in the HepG2 cells were determined by real-time RT-PCR. Results Comparing to high fat model mice without simvastatin treatment, 100 mg/kg simvastatin could significantly increase serum total cholesterol (P P Conclusion The present study suggested that simvastatin, in vivo, had no effect on apoM levels in the hyperlipidemic mouse model. ApoM serum levels in mice were significantly correlated to the animal's age, whereas in cell cultures simvastatin does inhibit apoM expression in the HepG2 cells. The mechanism behind it is not known yet.

  9. Simvastatin induces apoptosis by a Rho-dependent mechanism in cultured cardiac fibroblasts and myofibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copaja, Miguel; Venegas, Daniel; Aranguiz, Pablo; Canales, Jimena; Vivar, Raul; Catalan, Mabel; Olmedo, Ivonne; Rodriguez, Andrea E.; Chiong, Mario; Leyton, Lisette; Lavandero, Sergio; Diaz-Araya, Guillermo

    2011-01-01

    Several clinical trials have shown the beneficial effects of statins in the prevention of coronary heart disease. Additionally, statins promote apoptosis in vascular smooth muscle cells, in renal tubular epithelial cells and also in a variety of cell lines; yet, the effects of statins on cardiac fibroblast and myofibroblast, primarily responsible for cardiac tissue healing are almost unknown. Here, we investigated the effects of simvastatin on cardiac fibroblast and myofibroblast viability and studied the molecular cell death mechanism triggered by simvastatin in both cell types. Methods: Rat neonatal cardiac fibroblasts and myofibroblasts were treated with simvastatin (0.1-10 μM) up to 72 h. Cell viability and apoptosis were evaluated by trypan blue exclusion method and by flow cytometry, respectively. Caspase-3 activation and Rho protein levels and activity were also determined by Western blot and pull-down assay, respectively. Results: Simvastatin induces caspase-dependent apoptosis of cardiac fibroblasts and myofibroblasts in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, with greater effects on fibroblasts than myofibroblasts. These effects were prevented by mevalonate, farnesylpyrophosphate and geranylgeranylpyrophosphate, but not squalene. These last results suggest that apoptosis was dependent on small GTPases of the Rho family rather than Ras. Conclusion: Simvastatin triggered apoptosis of cardiac fibroblasts and myofibroblasts by a mechanism independent of cholesterol synthesis, but dependent of isoprenilation of Rho protein. Additionally, cardiac fibroblasts were more susceptible to simvastatin-induced apoptosis than cardiac myofibroblasts. Thus simvastatin could avoid adverse cardiac remodeling leading to a less fibrotic repair of the damaged tissues. - Research Highlights: → Simvastatin decreases CF and CMF viability independent of cholesterol synthesis. → Simvastatin induces CF and CMF apoptosis in a caspase-dependent manner being CMF more resistant

  10. COMPARATIVE EFFICACY AND SAFETY OF HYPOLIPIDEMIC THERAPY WITH GENERIC AND ORIGINAL MEDICINAL PRODUCTS OF SIMVASTATIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Tarlovskaya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To compare efficacy , safety and pharmacoeconomical characteristics of generic and original medicinal products of simvastatin in achievement of cholesterol and low density lipoprotein target levels. Material and methods. 38 patients with arterial hypertension accompanied by type 2 diabetes with dyslipidemia were included into the study. They had no clinically obvious ischemic heart disease and did not receive hypolipidemic pharmacotherapy for a month before the study start. The patients were randomized into group A or group B. Patients of group A (n=18 received original simvastatin, patients of group B (n=20 received generic simvastatin. Initial simvastatin dose was 20 mg daily. Lipid plasma profile, liver enzymes, creatine phosphokinase were evaluated every 4 weeks. Cost-effectiveness ratio was calculated. Results. 11 patients (61% in group A and only 5 patients (25% in group B (χ2=5.05; р<0.05 achieved cholesterol target level with simvastatin in dose of 20 mg daily in 3 months of the treatment. Creatine phosphokinase blood level did not increase significantly. Achievement of cholesterol target level cost 814 and 952 RUB per patient in groups A and B, respectively , in 1 month of simvastatin treatment. These costs were 643 and 417 RUB per patient in groups A and B, respectively , in 3 months of treatment. Conclusion. The original simvastatin in comparison with generic one has advantages in hypolipidemic effect. Safety profile is similar for both medications. Original simvastatin therapy has lower cost than this for generic simvastatin therapy in achievement of cholesterol target level in 1 month of treatment. In 3 months the cost of treatment per patient is 227 RUB higher for original medication in comparison with this for generic medication.

  11. In vivo pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic interactions of Hibiscus sabdariffa calyces extracts with simvastatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showande, S J; Adegbolagun, O M; Igbinoba, S I; Fakeye, T O

    2017-12-01

    Increasing number of patients use herbs with their medications. Such practice may result in beneficial or harmful herb-drug interactions. A recent survey reported that some participants co-administered Hibiscus sabdariffa, a widely used beverage, or tea, with their antihyperlipidaemic medications. This study therefore evaluated the effect of concomitant administration of Hibiscus sabdariffa calyces' extracts with simvastatin on hyperlipidaemia and pharmacokinetics of the drug in vivo. Factorial experimental designs were used to evaluate the comparative effectiveness and interactions between simvastatin and aqueous extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa (AEHS) on lipid profile parameters in hyperlipidaemia-induced Wistar rats. Different combinations of low (AEHS 250 mg/kg; simvastatin 10 mg/kg) and high doses (AEHS 500 mg/kg; simvastatin 20 mg/kg) were administered individually and concurrently daily for 2 and 4 weeks. Lipid profile parameters were assessed at these treatment periods. Subsequently, the effect of aqueous beverage of Hibiscus sabdariffa (ABHS) on the pharmacokinetics of single-dose 40 mg simvastatin was also evaluated in six healthy human volunteers using two-period randomized crossover design. Blood samples were collected at predetermined times for 24 hours. The plasma obtained was analysed for simvastatin using RP-HPLC/UV method. Aqueous extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa reduced total cholesterol (T c ) better than simvastatin (P = .031). Low-dose AEHS and low-dose simvastatin used concomitantly caused 38.3% and 57.4% reductions in T c and triglyceride levels, respectively, compared with low-dose simvastatin (P Hibiscus sabdariffa lowered T c better than simvastatin and enhanced the antihyperlipidaemic activity of the drug when co-administered at low doses in an animal model. However, aqueous beverage of Hibiscus sabdariffa caused a significant herb-drug interaction resulting in overall reduction in exposure to simvastatin in humans. Caution should

  12. The pleiotropic effects of simvastatin on retinal microvascular endothelium has important implications for ischaemic retinopathies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhold J Medina

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Current guidelines encourage the use of statins to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease in diabetic patients; however the impact of these drugs on diabetic retinopathy is not well defined. Moreover, pleiotropic effects of statins on the highly specialised retinal microvascular endothelium remain largely unknown. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of clinically relevant concentrations of simvastatin on retinal endothelium in vitro and in vivo. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Retinal microvascular endothelial cells (RMECs were treated with 0.01-10 microM simvastatin and a biphasic dose-related response was observed. Low concentrations enhanced microvascular repair with 0.1 microM simvastatin significantly increasing proliferation (p<0.05, and 0.01 microM simvastatin significantly promoting migration (p<0.05, sprouting (p<0.001, and tubulogenesis (p<0.001. High concentration of simvastatin (10 microM had the opposite effect, significantly inhibiting proliferation (p<0.01, migration (p<0.01, sprouting (p<0.001, and tubulogenesis (p<0.05. Furthermore, simvastatin concentrations higher than 1 microM induced cell death. The mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy was used to investigate the possible effects of simvastatin treatment on ischaemic retinopathy. Low dose simvastatin (0.2 mg/Kg promoted retinal microvascular repair in response to ischaemia by promoting intra-retinal re-vascularisation (p<0.01. By contrast, high dose simvastatin(20 mg/Kg significantly prevented re-vascularisation (p<0.01 and concomitantly increased pathological neovascularisation (p<0.01. We also demonstrated that the pro-vascular repair mechanism of simvastatin involves VEGF stimulation, Akt phosphorylation, and nitric oxide production; and the anti-vascular repair mechanism is driven by marked intracellular cholesterol depletion and related disorganisation of key intracellular structures. CONCLUSIONS: A beneficial effect of low

  13. Directed Evolution and Structural Characterization of a Simvastatin Synthase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Xue; Xie, Xinkai; Pashkov, Inna; Sawaya, Michael R.; Laidman, Janel; Zhang, Wenjun; Cacho, Ralph; Yeates, Todd O.; Tang, Yi; UCLA

    2010-02-02

    Enzymes from natural product biosynthetic pathways are attractive candidates for creating tailored biocatalysts to produce semisynthetic pharmaceutical compounds. LovD is an acyltransferase that converts the inactive monacolin J acid (MJA) into the cholesterol-lowering lovastatin. LovD can also synthesize the blockbuster drug simvastatin using MJA and a synthetic {alpha}-dimethylbutyryl thioester, albeit with suboptimal properties as a biocatalyst. Here we used directed evolution to improve the properties of LovD toward semisynthesis of simvastatin. Mutants with improved catalytic efficiency, solubility, and thermal stability were obtained, with the best mutant displaying an {approx}11-fold increase in an Escherichia coli-based biocatalytic platform. To understand the structural basis of LovD enzymology, seven X-ray crystal structures were determined, including the parent LovD, an improved mutant G5, and G5 cocrystallized with ligands. Comparisons between the structures reveal that beneficial mutations stabilize the structure of G5 in a more compact conformation that is favorable for catalysis.

  14. Antioxidant effect of bisphosphonates and simvastatin on chondrocyte lipid peroxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dombrecht, E.J.; De Tollenaere, C.B.; Aerts, K.; Cos, P.; Schuerwegh, A.J.; Bridts, C.H.; Van Offel, J.F.; Ebo, D.G.; Stevens, W.J.; De Clerck, L.S.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of bisphosphonates (BPs) and simvastatin on chondrocyte lipid peroxidation. For this purpose, a flow cytometrical method using C11-BODIPY 581/591 was developed to detect hydroperoxide-induced lipid peroxidation in chondrocytes. Tertiary butylhydroperoxide (t-BHP) induced a time and concentration dependent increase in chondrocyte lipid peroxidation. Addition of a Fe 2+ /EDTA complex to t-BHP or hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) clearly enhanced lipid peroxidation. The lipophilic simvastatin demonstrated a small inhibition in the chondrocyte lipid peroxidation. None of three tested BPs (clodronate, pamidronate, and risedronate) had an effect on chondrocyte lipid peroxidation induced by t-BHP. However, when Fe 2+ /EDTA complex was added to t-BHP or H 2 O 2 , BPs inhibited the lipid peroxidation process varying from 25% to 58%. This study demonstrates that BPs have antioxidant properties as iron chelators, thereby inhibiting the chondrocyte lipid peroxidation. These findings add evidence to the therapeutic potential of bisphosphonates and statins in rheumatoid arthritis

  15. Pravastatin But Not Simvastatin Improves Survival and Neurofunctional Outcome After Cardiac Arrest and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

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    Stefan Bergt, MD

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Cardiac arrest (CA followed by cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR is associated with high mortality and poor neurological outcome. We compared the effects of pravastatin and simvastatin on survival and neurofunction in a murine model of CA/CPR. Pravastatin, a hydrophilic statin, increased survival and neurofunction during a 28-day follow-up period. This therapy was associated with improved pulmonary function, reduced pulmonary edema, and increased endothelial cell function in vitro. In contrast, lipophilic simvastatin did not modulate survival but increased pulmonary edema and impaired endothelial cell function. Although pravastatin may display a therapeutic option for post-CA syndrome, the application of simvastatin may require re-evaluation. Key Words: cardiac arrest, endothelial cell function, ischemia and reperfusion injury, pravastatin, resuscitation, simvastatin

  16. Inhibitory effects of simvastatin on oxidative stress of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Ying; Liu Xiaomin; Wang Yueying; Sun Yanming; Luan Ying

    2008-01-01

    To study the effects of simvastatin on oxidative stress and blood lipid metabolism of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, 168 diabetic patients were randomly divided into simvastatin group and placebo group. The serum levels of SOD and MDA, as well as the lipid profile in patients were observed before and after 12 weeks treatment, respectively. The results showed that the serum levels of SOD in diabetic patients before treatment were significantly lower, and whereas level of MDA was higher than that of controls (P 0.05). The serum levels of HDL-C in patients after treatment with simvastatin were higher, and while the serum levels of TG, TC, LDL-C and VLDL-C were significantly lower than that of before the treatment (P 0.05). Therefore, the simvastatin could significantly inhibit oxidative stress provoked by hyperglycemia and had beneficial effects on the lipid homeostasis of diabetic patients. (authors)

  17. Efficacy of adding topical simvastatin to topical calcipotriol on improvement of cutaneous plaque psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Iraji

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: This study indicates that topical simvastatin is not associated with significant impacts in the treatment of psoriasis as compared to oral form. This study indicates that psoriasis is a systemic disorder with variable skin manifestations.

  18. Influence of particle size and preparation methods on the physical and chemical stability of amorphous simvastatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Fang; Aaltonen, Jaakko; Tian, Fang

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the factors influencing the stability of amorphous simvastatin. Quench-cooled amorphous simvastatin in two particle size ranges, 150-180 microm (QC-big) and ... compared to the crystalline form. The rank of solubility was found to be QC-big=QC-small>CM>crystalline. For the physical stability, the highest crystallization rate was observed for CM, and the slowest rate was detected for QC-big, with an intermediate rate occurring for QC-small. QC exhibited lower...

  19. Simvastatin prevents dopaminergic neurodegeneration in experimental parkinsonian models: the association with anti-inflammatory responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junqiang Yan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In addition to their original applications to lowering cholesterol, statins display multiple neuroprotective effects. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptors interact closely with the dopaminergic system and are strongly implicated in therapeutic paradigms of Parkinson's disease (PD. This study aims to investigate how simvastatin impacts on experimental parkinsonian models via regulating NMDA receptors. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Regional changes in NMDA receptors in the rat brain and anxiolytic-like activity were examined after unilateral medial forebrain bundle lesion by 6-hydroxydopamine via a 3-week administration of simvastatin. NMDA receptor alterations in the post-mortem rat brain were detected by [³H]MK-801(Dizocilpine binding autoradiography. 6-hydroxydopamine treated PC12 was applied to investigate the neuroprotection of simvastatin, the association with NMDA receptors, and the anti-inflammation. 6-hydroxydopamine induced anxiety and the downregulation of NMDA receptors in the hippocampus, CA1(Cornu Ammonis 1 Area, amygdala and caudate putamen was observed in 6-OHDA(6-hydroxydopamine lesioned rats whereas simvastatin significantly ameliorated the anxiety-like activity and restored the expression of NMDA receptors in examined brain regions. Significant positive correlations were identified between anxiolytic-like activity and the restoration of expression of NMDA receptors in the hippocampus, amygdala and CA1 following simvastatin administration. Simvastatin exerted neuroprotection in 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rat brain and 6-hydroxydopamine treated PC12, partially by regulating NMDA receptors, MMP9 (matrix metalloproteinase-9, and TNF-a (tumour necrosis factor-alpha. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results provide strong evidence that NMDA receptor modulation after simvastatin treatment could partially explain its anxiolytic-like activity and anti-inflammatory mechanisms in experimental parkinsonian models. These findings

  20. Pomegranate juice does not affect the disposition of simvastatin in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soo-Jin; Yeo, Chang-Woo; Shim, Eon-Jeong; Kim, Hyunmi; Liu, Kwang-Hyeon; Shin, Jae-Gook; Shon, Ji-Hong

    2016-08-01

    Previous in vitro and in vivo investigations reported controversial results for the inhibitory potential of pomegranate on Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A activity. This study evaluated the effect of pomegranate juice on the disposition of simvastatin, a CYP3A4 substrate, and simvastatin acid, its active metabolite, compared with grapefruit juice in healthy subjects. A single oral pharmacokinetic study of 40 mg simvastatin was conducted as a three-way crossover (control, pomegranate, and grapefruit juices) in 12 healthy male subjects. The subjects took pomegranate or grapefruit juice three times per day for 3 days (900 mL/day) and on the third day, the pharmacokinetic study was executed. Blood samples were collected to 24 h post-dose and the pharmacokinetic parameters of simvastatin and simvastatin acid were compared among the study periods. In the period of grapefruit juice, the mean C max and AUCinf of simvastatin [the geometric mean ratio (90 % CI) 15.6 (11.6-21.0) and 9.1 (6.0-13.7)] were increased significantly when compared with the control period, whereas they were not significantly different in the period of pomegranate juice [C max and AUCinf 1.20 (0.89-1.62) and 1.29 (0.85-1.94)]. The mean C max and AUCinf of simvastatin acid were increased significantly after intake of grapefruit juice, but not pomegranate juice. These results suggest that pomegranate juice affects little on the disposition of simvastatin in humans. Pomegranate juice does not seem to have a clinically relevant inhibitory potential on CYP3A4 activity.

  1. Simvastatin Ameliorates Radiation Enteropathy Development After Localized, Fractionated Irradiation by a Protein C-Independent Mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Junru; Boerma, Marjan; Fu Qiang; Kulkarni, Ashwini; Fink, Louis M.; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Microvascular injury plays a key role in normal tissue radiation responses. Statins, in addition to their lipid-lowering effects, have vasculoprotective properties that may counteract some effects of radiation on normal tissues. We examined whether administration of simvastatin ameliorates intestinal radiation injury, and whether the effect depends on protein C activation. Methods and Materials: Rats received localized, fractionated small bowel irradiation. The animals were fed either regular chow or chow containing simvastatin from 2 weeks before irradiation until termination of the experiment. Groups of rats were euthanized at 2 weeks and 26 weeks for assessment of early and delayed radiation injury by quantitative histology, morphometry, and quantitative immunohistochemistry. Dependency on protein C activation was examined in thrombomodulin (TM) mutant mice with deficient ability to activate protein C. Results: Simvastatin administration was associated with lower radiation injury scores (p < 0.0001), improved mucosal preservation (p = 0.0009), and reduced thickening of the intestinal wall and subserosa (p = 0.008 and p = 0.004), neutrophil infiltration (p = 0.04), and accumulation of collagen I (p = 0.0003). The effect of simvastatin was consistently more pronounced for delayed than for early injury. Surprisingly, simvastatin reduced intestinal radiation injury in TM mutant mice, indicating that the enteroprotective effect of simvastatin after localized irradiation is unrelated to protein C activation. Conclusions: Simvastatin ameliorates the intestinal radiation response. The radioprotective effect of simvastatin after localized small bowel irradiation does not appear to be related to protein C activation. Statins should undergo clinical testing as a strategy to minimize side effects of radiation on the intestine and other normal tissues

  2. Aldose reductase mediates retinal microglia activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Kun-Che; Shieh, Biehuoy; Petrash, J. Mark

    2016-01-01

    Retinal microglia (RMG) are one of the major immune cells in charge of surveillance of inflammatory responses in the eye. In the absence of an inflammatory stimulus, RMG reside predominately in the ganglion layer and inner or outer plexiform layers. However, under stress RMG become activated and migrate into the inner nuclear layer (INL) or outer nuclear layer (ONL). Activated RMG in cell culture secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines in a manner sensitive to downregulation by aldose reductase inhibitors. In this study, we utilized CX3CR1"G"F"P mice carrying AR mutant alleles to evaluate the role of AR on RMG activation and migration in vivo. When tested on an AR"W"T background, IP injection of LPS induced RMG activation and migration into the INL and ONL. However, this phenomenon was largely prevented by AR inhibitors or in AR null mice, or was exacerbated in transgenic mice that over-express AR. LPS-induced increases in ocular levels of TNF-α and CX3CL-1 in WT mice were substantially lower in AR null mice or were reduced by AR inhibitor treatment. These studies demonstrate that AR expression in RMG may contribute to the proinflammatory phenotypes common to various eye diseases such as uveitis and diabetic retinopathy. - Highlights: • AR inhibition prevents retinal microglial activation. • Endotoxin-induced ocular cytokine production is reduced in AR null mice. • Overexpression of AR spontaneously induces retinal microglial activation.

  3. Aldose reductase mediates retinal microglia activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Kun-Che; Shieh, Biehuoy; Petrash, J. Mark, E-mail: mark.petrash@ucdenver.edu

    2016-04-29

    Retinal microglia (RMG) are one of the major immune cells in charge of surveillance of inflammatory responses in the eye. In the absence of an inflammatory stimulus, RMG reside predominately in the ganglion layer and inner or outer plexiform layers. However, under stress RMG become activated and migrate into the inner nuclear layer (INL) or outer nuclear layer (ONL). Activated RMG in cell culture secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines in a manner sensitive to downregulation by aldose reductase inhibitors. In this study, we utilized CX3CR1{sup GFP} mice carrying AR mutant alleles to evaluate the role of AR on RMG activation and migration in vivo. When tested on an AR{sup WT} background, IP injection of LPS induced RMG activation and migration into the INL and ONL. However, this phenomenon was largely prevented by AR inhibitors or in AR null mice, or was exacerbated in transgenic mice that over-express AR. LPS-induced increases in ocular levels of TNF-α and CX3CL-1 in WT mice were substantially lower in AR null mice or were reduced by AR inhibitor treatment. These studies demonstrate that AR expression in RMG may contribute to the proinflammatory phenotypes common to various eye diseases such as uveitis and diabetic retinopathy. - Highlights: • AR inhibition prevents retinal microglial activation. • Endotoxin-induced ocular cytokine production is reduced in AR null mice. • Overexpression of AR spontaneously induces retinal microglial activation.

  4. Modulatory Role of Simvastatin against Aluminium Chloride-Induced Behavioural and Biochemical Changes in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhavan Nampoothiri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Aluminium, a neurotoxic agent in humans, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. In this study, we examined the behavioral and biochemical effects of aluminium in rats with special emphasis on memory centres, namely, hippocampus and frontal cortex. Further, the effect of simvastatin treatment on aluminium intoxication was evaluated. Methods. Rats were exposed to aluminium chloride (AlCl3 for 60 days. Simvastatin (10 mg/kg/p.o. and rivastigmine (1 mg/kg/p.o. were administered daily prior to AlCl3. Behavioral parameters were assessed using Morris water maze test and actophotometer followed by biochemical investigations, namely, acetylcholinesterase (AChE activity, TNF-α level, antioxidant enzymes (GSH, catalase, lipid peroxidation, and nitrite level in hippocampus and frontal cortex. Triglycerides, total cholesterol, LDL, and HDL levels in serum were also determined. Key Findings. Simvastatin treatment improved cognitive function and locomotor activity in rats. Simvastatin reversed hyperlipidemia and significantly rectified the deleterious effect of AlCl3 on AChE activity. Further, in hippocampus and frontal cortex, aluminium-induced elevation in nitrite and TNF-α and reduction in antioxidant enzymes were inhibited by simvastatin. Conclusion. To conclude, the present study suggests that simvastatin per se protects the neurons in hippocampus and frontal cortex from AlCl3, an environmental toxin.

  5. Localised controlled release of simvastatin from porous chitosan–gelatin scaffolds engrafted with simvastatin loaded PLGA-microparticles for bone tissue engineering application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentile, Piergiorgio [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); School of Clinical Dentistry, University of Sheffield, 19 Claremont Crescent, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Nandagiri, Vijay Kumar [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); School of Pharmacy, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, 123, St. Stephen Green, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Daly, Jacqueline [Division of Biology, Department of Anatomy, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, 123, St. Stephen Green, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Chiono, Valeria; Mattu, Clara; Tonda-Turo, Chiara; Ciardelli, Gianluca [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Ramtoola, Zebunnissa, E-mail: zramtoola@rcsi.ie [School of Pharmacy, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, 123, St. Stephen Green, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2016-02-01

    Localised controlled release of simvastatin from porous freeze-dried chitosan–gelatin (CH–G) scaffolds was investigated by incorporating simvastatin loaded poly-(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) acid (PLGA) microparticles (MSIMs) into the scaffolds. MSIMs at 10% w/w simvastatin loading were prepared using a single emulsion-solvent evaporation method. The MSIM optimal amount to be incorporated into the scaffolds was selected by analysing the effect of embedding increasing amounts of blank PLGA microparticles (BL-MPs) on the scaffold physical properties and on the in vitro cell viability using a clonal human osteoblastic cell line (hFOB). Increasing the BL-MP content from 0% to 33.3% w/w showed a significant decrease in swelling degree (from 1245 ± 56% to 570 ± 35%). Scaffold pore size and distribution changed significantly as a function of BL-MP loading. Compressive modulus of scaffolds increased with increasing BL-MP amount up to 16.6% w/w (23.0 ± 1.0 kPa). No significant difference in cell viability was observed with increasing BL-MP loading. Based on these results, a content of 16.6% w/w MSIM particles was incorporated successfully in CH–G scaffolds, showing a controlled localised release of simvastatin able to influence the hFOB cell proliferation and the osteoblastic differentiation after 11 days. - Highlights: • Simvastatin loaded PLGA microparticle engrafted porous CH–G scaffolds were produced. • The microparticle optimal amount to be incorporated into the scaffolds was studied. • Physical properties of scaffolds changed as a function of microparticle loading. • The level of simvastatin released enhanced cell proliferation and mineralisation.

  6. Localised controlled release of simvastatin from porous chitosan–gelatin scaffolds engrafted with simvastatin loaded PLGA-microparticles for bone tissue engineering application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentile, Piergiorgio; Nandagiri, Vijay Kumar; Daly, Jacqueline; Chiono, Valeria; Mattu, Clara; Tonda-Turo, Chiara; Ciardelli, Gianluca; Ramtoola, Zebunnissa

    2016-01-01

    Localised controlled release of simvastatin from porous freeze-dried chitosan–gelatin (CH–G) scaffolds was investigated by incorporating simvastatin loaded poly-(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) acid (PLGA) microparticles (MSIMs) into the scaffolds. MSIMs at 10% w/w simvastatin loading were prepared using a single emulsion-solvent evaporation method. The MSIM optimal amount to be incorporated into the scaffolds was selected by analysing the effect of embedding increasing amounts of blank PLGA microparticles (BL-MPs) on the scaffold physical properties and on the in vitro cell viability using a clonal human osteoblastic cell line (hFOB). Increasing the BL-MP content from 0% to 33.3% w/w showed a significant decrease in swelling degree (from 1245 ± 56% to 570 ± 35%). Scaffold pore size and distribution changed significantly as a function of BL-MP loading. Compressive modulus of scaffolds increased with increasing BL-MP amount up to 16.6% w/w (23.0 ± 1.0 kPa). No significant difference in cell viability was observed with increasing BL-MP loading. Based on these results, a content of 16.6% w/w MSIM particles was incorporated successfully in CH–G scaffolds, showing a controlled localised release of simvastatin able to influence the hFOB cell proliferation and the osteoblastic differentiation after 11 days. - Highlights: • Simvastatin loaded PLGA microparticle engrafted porous CH–G scaffolds were produced. • The microparticle optimal amount to be incorporated into the scaffolds was studied. • Physical properties of scaffolds changed as a function of microparticle loading. • The level of simvastatin released enhanced cell proliferation and mineralisation.

  7. Synthesis and docking analysis of new heterocyclic system of tetrazolo[5',1':2,3][1,3,4]thiadiazepino [7,6-b]quinolines as aldose reductase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Saadatmandzadeh

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: All of the best models formed strong hydrogen bonds with Trp 111 and Tyr 209 via tetrazole moiety. It was found that pi-pi interaction between Tyr 209, Trp 20 and His 110 side chain and quinolin moiety was one of the common factors in enzyme-inhibitor junction. It was found that both hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions are important in the structure and function of biological molecules, especially for inhibition in a complex.

  8. Simvastatin-induced cardiac autonomic control improvement in fructose-fed female rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Juliana da Silva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Because autonomic dysfunction has been found to lead to cardiometabolic disorders and because studies have reported that simvastatin treatment has neuroprotective effects, the objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of simvastatin treatment on cardiovascular and autonomic changes in fructose-fed female rats. METHODS: Female Wistar rats were divided into three groups: controls (n=8, fructose (n=8, and fructose+ simvastatin (n=8. Fructose overload was induced by supplementing the drinking water with fructose (100 mg/L, 18 wks. Simvastatin treatment (5 mg/kg/day for 2 wks was performed by gavage. The arterial pressure was recorded using a data acquisition system. Autonomic control was evaluated by pharmacological blockade. RESULTS: Fructose overload induced an increase in the fasting blood glucose and triglyceride levels and insulin resistance. The constant rate of glucose disappearance during the insulin intolerance test was reduced in the fructose group (3.4+ 0.32%/min relative to that in the control group (4.4+ 0.29%/min. Fructose+simvastatin rats exhibited increased insulin sensitivity (5.4+0.66%/min. The fructose and fructose+simvastatin groups demonstrated an increase in the mean arterial pressure compared with controls rats (fructose: 124+2 mmHg and fructose+simvastatin: 126 + 3 mmHg vs. controls: 112 + 2 mmHg. The sympathetic effect was enhanced in the fructose group (73 + 7 bpm compared with that in the control (48 + 7 bpm and fructose+simvastatin groups (31+8 bpm. The vagal effect was increased in fructose+simvastatin animals (84 + 7 bpm compared with that in control (49 + 9 bpm and fructose animals (46+5 bpm. CONCLUSION: Simvastatin treatment improved insulin sensitivity and cardiac autonomic control in an experimental model of metabolic syndrome in female rats. These effects were independent of the improvements in the classical plasma lipid profile and of reductions in arterial pressure. These results

  9. Antioxidant action of 3-mercapto-5H-1,2,4-triazino[5,6-b]indole-5-acetic acid, an efficient aldose reductase inhibitor, in a 1,1'-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl assay and in the cellular system of isolated erythrocytes exposed to tert-butyl hydroperoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prnova, Marta Soltesova; Ballekova, Jana; Majekova, Magdalena; Stefek, Milan

    2015-01-01

    The subject of this study was 3-mercapto-5H-1,2,4-triazino[5,6-b]indole-5-acetic acid (compound 1), an efficient aldose reductase inhibitor of high selectivity. The antioxidant action of 1 was investigated in greater detail by employing a 1,1'-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) test and in the system of isolated rat erythrocytes. First, the compound was subjected to the DPPH test. Second, the overall antioxidant action of the compound was studied in the cellular system of isolated rat erythrocytes oxidatively stressed by free radicals derived from the lipophilic tert-butyl hydroperoxide. The uptake kinetics of 1 was studied and osmotic fragility of the erythrocytes was evaluated. The DPPH test revealed significant antiradical activity of 1. One molecule of 1 was found to quench 1.48 ± 0.06 DPPH radicals. In the system of isolated erythrocytes, the compound was readily taken up by the cells followed by their protection against free radical-initiated hemolysis. Osmotic fragility of the erythrocytes was not affected by 1. The results demonstrated the ability of 1 to scavenge DPPH and to protect intact erythrocytes against oxidative damage induced by peroxyl radicals. By affecting both the polyol pathway and oxidative stress, the compound represents an example of a promising agent for multi-target pharmacology of diabetic complications.

  10. Simvastatin reduces fibrosis and protects against muscle weakness after massive rotator cuff tear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Max E; Korn, Michael A; Gumucio, Jonathan P; Harning, Julie A; Saripalli, Anjali L; Bedi, Asheesh; Mendias, Christopher L

    2015-02-01

    Chronic rotator cuff tears are a common source of shoulder pain and disability, and patients with chronic cuff tears often have substantial weakness, fibrosis, inflammation, and fat accumulation. Identifying therapies to prevent the development of these pathologic processes will likely have a positive impact on clinical outcomes. Simvastatin is a drug with demonstrated anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic effects in many tissues but had not previously been studied in the context of rotator cuff tears. We hypothesized that after the induction of a massive supraspinatus tear, simvastatin would protect muscles from a loss of force production and fibrosis. We measured changes in muscle fiber contractility, histology, and biochemical markers of fibrosis and fatty infiltration in rats that received a full-thickness supraspinatus tear and were treated with either carrier alone or simvastatin. Compared with vehicle-treated controls, simvastatin did not have an appreciable effect on muscle fiber size, but treatment did increase muscle fiber specific force by 20%. Simvastatin also reduced collagen accumulation by 50% but did not affect triglyceride content of muscles. Several favorable changes in the expression of genes and other markers of inflammation, fibrosis, and regeneration were also observed. Simvastatin partially protected muscles from the weakness that occurs as a result of chronic rotator cuff tear. Fibrosis was also markedly reduced in simvastatin-treated animals. Whereas further studies are necessary, statin medication could potentially help improve outcomes for patients with rotator cuff tears. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Simvastatin in the treatment of asthma: lack of steroid-sparing effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Douglas C; Cowan, Jan O; Palmay, Rochelle; Williamson, Avis; Taylor, D Robin

    2010-10-01

    Statins have anti-inflammatory actions which in theory are potentially beneficial in asthma. Small trials have failed to show a significant benefit, but a systematic study to evaluate the steroid-sparing effect of statin treatment has not been carried out. A randomised, placebo-controlled, crossover trial was conducted of simvastatin 40 mg at night with simultaneous stepwise reduction of fluticasone propionate dose until loss of control occurred, followed by an increase until regain of control ('minimum' dose required) in 51 patients with asthma and sputum eosinophils (steroid-free) ≥ 2%. 43 patients completed the study. There was no significant difference in 'minimum' inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) dose requirement between simvastatin and placebo: (median (IQR) 50 μg daily (0-250) vs 100 μg daily (0-250), p=0.931). 'Minimum' dose distribution was similar (p=0.269). The fluticasone dose at which loss of control occurred did not differ significantly between simvastatin and placebo (p=0.404). In patients with loss of control in both treatment arms, fluticasone dose at loss of control was similar with simvastatin and placebo (median (IQR) 50 μg daily (0-100) for both, p=0.620). In those patients who reached 0 μg/day (n=18), Astma Control Questionnaire (ACQ) was lower (p=0.037), forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)) higher (p<0.01) and sputum eosinophils lower with simvastatin compared with placebo (9.5% compared with 25.4%, p=0.033). Simvastatin does not have clinically important steroid-sparing effects in patients with eosinophilic asthma. In the absence of steroid, simvastatin is associated with minor improvements in symptoms and lung function, and a reduction in sputum eosinophils. Clinical trial number ACTRN12606000531516.

  12. Inhibition of aldose reductase activity by Cannabis sativa chemotypes extracts with high content of cannabidiol or cannabigerol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeriglio, Antonella; Giofrè, Salvatore V; Galati, Enza M; Monforte, Maria T; Cicero, Nicola; D'Angelo, Valeria; Grassi, Gianpaolo; Circosta, Clara

    2018-02-07

    Aldose reductase (ALR2) is a key enzyme involved in diabetic complications and the search for new aldose reductase inhibitors (ARIs) is currently very important. The synthetic ARIs are often associated with deleterious side effects and medicinal and edible plants, containing compounds with aldose reductase inhibitory activity, could be useful for prevention and therapy of diabetic complications. Non-psychotropic phytocannabinoids exert multiple pharmacological effects with therapeutic potential in many diseases such as inflammation, cancer, diabetes. Here, we have investigated the inhibitory effects of extracts and their fractions from two Cannabis sativa L. chemotypes with high content of cannabidiol (CBD)/cannabidiolic acid (CBDA) and cannabigerol (CBG)/cannabigerolic acid (CBGA), respectively, on human recombinant and pig kidney aldose reductase activity in vitro. A molecular docking study was performed to evaluate the interaction of these cannabinoids with the active site of ALR2 compared to known ARIs. The extracts showed significant dose-dependent aldose reductase inhibitory activity (>70%) and higher than fractions. The inhibitory activity of the fractions was greater for acidic cannabinoid-rich fractions. Comparative molecular docking results have shown a higher stability of the ALR2-cannabinoid acids complex than the other inhibitors. The extracts of Cannabis with high content of non-psychotropic cannabinoids CBD/CBDA or CBG/CBGA significantly inhibit aldose reductase activity. These results may have some relevance for the possible use of C. sativa chemotypes based preparations as aldose reductase inhibitors. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The combination of nutraceutical and simvastatin enhances the effect of simvastatin alone in normalising lipid profile without side effects in patients with ischemic heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Campolongo

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: The association of a nutraceutical and simvastatin 20 mg may be a valid therapeutic option for the treatment of hyperlipidemia in patients with ischemic heart disease intolerant to statin at high doses, in the absence of side effects. Further studies are needed to clarify the mechanisms of action of nutraceuticals.

  14. Inhibitory Effects of Simvastatin on Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein-Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Apoptosis in Vascular Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Tao, Yong-Kang; Bai, Yong-Ping; Yan, Sheng-Tao; Zhao, Shui-Ping

    2018-04-20

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL)-induced oxidative stress and endothelial apoptosis are essential for atherosclerosis. Our previous study has shown that ox-LDL-induced apoptosis is mediated by the protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK)/eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α-subunit (eIF2α)/CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP) endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress pathway in endothelial cells. Statins are cholesterol-lowering drugs that exert pleiotropic effects including suppression of oxidative stress. This study aimed to explore the roles of simvastatin on ox-LDL-induced ER stress and apoptosis in endothelial cells. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were treated with simvastatin (0.1, 0.5, or 2.5 μmol/L) or DEVD-CHO (selective inhibitor of caspase-3, 100 μmol/L) for 1 h before the addition of ox-LDL (100 μg/ml) and then incubated for 24 h, and untreated cells were used as a control group. Apoptosis, expression of PERK, phosphorylation of eIF2α, CHOP mRNA level, and caspase-3 activity were measured. Comparisons among multiple groups were performed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by post hoc pairwise comparisons using Tukey's tests. A value of P LDL resulted in a significant increase in apoptosis (31.9% vs. 4.9%, P LDL-induced apoptosis (28.0%, 24.7%, and 13.8%, F = 15.039, all P LDL significantly increased the expression of PERK (499.5%, P LDL-induced expression of PERK (407.8%, 339.1%, and 187.5%, F = 10.121, all P LDL-induced expression of PERK (486.4%) and phosphorylation of eIF2α (418.8%). Exposure of HUVECs to ox-LDL also markedly induced caspase-3 activity together with increased CHOP mRNA level; these effects were inhibited by simvastatin treatment. This study suggested that simvastatin could inhibit ox-LDL-induced ER stress and apoptosis in vascular endothelial cells.

  15. Aldose reductase, oxidative stress and diabetic mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waiho eTang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is a complex metabolic disorder arising from lack of insulin production or insulin resistance 1. DM is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the developed world, particularly from vascular complications such as atherothrombosis in the coronary vessels. Aldose reductase (AR [ALR2; EC 1.1.1.21], a key enzyme in the polyol pathway, catalyzes NADPH-dependent reduction of glucose to sorbitol, leading to excessive accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS in various tissues of DM including the heart, vasculature, neurons, eyes and kidneys. As an example, hyperglycemia through such polyol pathway induced oxidative stress, may have dual heart actions, on coronary blood vessel (atherothrombosis and myocardium (heart failure leading to severe morbidity and mortality (reviewed in 2. In cells cultured under high glucose conditions, many studies have demonstrated similar AR-dependent increases in ROS production, confirming AR as an important factor for the pathogenesis of many diabetic complications. Moreover, recent studies have shown that AR inhibitors may be able to prevent or delay the onset of cardiovascular complications such as ischemia/reperfusion injury, atherosclerosis and atherothrombosis. In this review, we will focus on describing pivotal roles of AR in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases as well as other diabetic complications, and the potential use of AR inhibitors as an emerging therapeutic strategy in preventing DM complications.

  16. Association between methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Association between methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T gene polymorphism and risk of ischemic stroke in North Indian population: A hospital based case–control study. Amit Kumar, Shubham Misra, Anjali Hazarika, Pradeep Kumar, Ram Sagar, Abhishek Pathak, Kamalesh Chakravarty, Kameshwar ...

  17. Acrolein-Induced Dyslipidemia and Acute Phase Response Independenly of HMG-CoA Reductase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conklin, Daniel J.; Prough, Russell A.; Juvan, Peter; Rezen, Tadeja; Rozman, Damjana; Haberzettl, Petra; Srivastava, Sanjay; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2012-01-01

    Scope Aldehydes are ubiquitous natural constituents of foods, water and beverages. Dietary intake represents the greatest source of exposure to acrolein and related aldehydes. Oral acrolein induces dyslipidemia acutely and chronically increases atherosclerosis in mice, yet the mechanisms are unknown. Because lipid synthesis and trafficking are largely under hepatic control, we examined hepatic genes in murine models of acute and chronic oral acrolein exposure. Methods and results Changes in hepatic gene expression were examined using a Steroltalk microarray. Acute acrolein feeding modified plasma and hepatic proteins and increased plasma triglycerides within 15 min. By 6h, acrolein altered hepatic gene expression including Insig1, Insig2 and Hmgcr genes and stimulated an acute phase response (APR) with up-regulation of serum amyloid A genes (Saa) and systemic hypoalbuminemia. To test if decreased HMG-CoA reductase activity could modify acrolein-induced dyslipidemia or the APR, mice were pretreated with simvastatin. Statin treatment, however, did not alter acrolein-induced dyslipidemia or hypoalbuminemia associated with an APR. Few hepatic genes were dysregulated by chronic acrolein feeding in apoE-null mice. These studies confirmed that acute acrolein exposure altered expression of hepatic genes involved with lipid synthesis and trafficking and APR, and thus, indicated a hepatic locus of acrolein-induced dyslipidemia and APR that was independent of HMG CoA-reductase. Conclusion Dietary intake of acrolein could contribute to cardiovascular disease risk by disturbing hepatic function. PMID:21812109

  18. The Influence of Milling on the Dissolution Performance of Simvastatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Rades

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Particle size reduction is a simple means to enhance the dissolution rate of poorly water soluble BCS-class II and IV drugs. However, the major drawback of this process is the possible introduction of process induced disorder. Drugs with different molecular arrangements may exhibit altered properties such as solubility and dissolution rate and, therefore, process induced solid state modifications need to be monitored. The aim of this study was two-fold: firstly, to investigate the dissolution rates of milled and unmilled simvastatin; and secondly, to screen for the main milling factors, as well as factor interactions in a dry ball milling process using simvastatin as model drug, and to optimize the milling procedure with regard to the opposing responses particle size and process induced disorder by application of a central composite face centered design. Particle size was assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and image analysis. Process induced disorder was determined by partial least squares (PLS regression modeling of respective X-ray powder diffractograms (XRPD and Raman spectra. Valid and significant quadratic models were built. The investigated milling factors were milling frequency, milling time and ball quantity at a set drug load, out of which milling frequency was found to be the most important factor for particle size as well as process induced disorder. Milling frequency and milling time exhibited an interaction effect on the responses. The optimum milling settings using the maximum number of milling balls (60 balls with 4 mm diameter was determined to be at a milling frequency of 21 Hz and a milling time of 36 min with a resulting primary particle size of 1.4 μm and a process induced disorder of 6.1% (assessed by Raman spectroscopy and 8.4% (assessed by XRPD, at a set optimization limit of < 2 μm for particle size and < 10% for process induced disorder. This optimum was tested experimentally and the process induced disorder

  19. Essential fatty acids and their metabolites could function as endogenous HMG-CoA reductase and ACE enzyme inhibitors, anti-arrhythmic, anti-hypertensive, anti-atherosclerotic, anti-inflammatory, cytoprotective, and cardioprotective molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das Undurti N

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Lowering plasma low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C, blood pressure, homocysteine, and preventing platelet aggregation using a combination of a statin, three blood pressure lowering drugs such as a thiazide, a β blocker, and an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE inhibitor each at half standard dose; folic acid; and aspirin-called as polypill- was estimated to reduce cardiovascular events by ~80%. Essential fatty acids (EFAs and their long-chain metabolites: γ-linolenic acid (GLA, dihomo-GLA (DGLA, arachidonic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA and other products such as prostaglandins E1 (PGE1, prostacyclin (PGI2, PGI3, lipoxins (LXs, resolvins, protectins including neuroprotectin D1 (NPD1 prevent platelet aggregation, lower blood pressure, have anti-arrhythmic action, reduce LDL-C, ameliorate the adverse actions of homocysteine, show anti-inflammatory actions, activate telomerase, and have cytoprotective properties. Thus, EFAs and their metabolites show all the classic actions expected of the "polypill". Unlike the proposed "polypill", EFAs are endogenous molecules present in almost all tissues, have no significant or few side effects, can be taken orally for long periods of time even by pregnant women, lactating mothers, and infants, children, and adults; and have been known to reduce the incidence cardiovascular diseases including stroke. In addition, various EFAs and their long-chain metabolites not only enhance nitric oxide generation but also react with nitric oxide to yield their respective nitroalkene derivatives that produce vascular relaxation, inhibit neutrophil degranulation and superoxide formation, inhibit platelet activation, and possess PPAR-γ ligand activity and release NO, thus prevent platelet aggregation, thrombus formation, atherosclerosis, and cardiovascular diseases. Based on these evidences, I propose that a rational combination of ω-3 and ω-6 fatty acids and the co

  20. The effects of membrane cholesterol and simvastatin on red blood cell deformability and ATP release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, Alison M; Braunmüller, Susanne; Wan, Jiandi; Franke, Thomas; Stone, Howard A

    2012-05-01

    It is known that deformation of red blood cells (RBCs) is linked to ATP release from the cells. Further, membrane cholesterol has been shown to alter properties of the cell membrane such as fluidity and bending stiffness. Membrane cholesterol content is increased in some cardiovascular diseases, for example, in individuals with acute coronary syndromes and chronic stable angina, and therefore, because of the potential clinical relevance, we investigated the influence of altered RBC membrane cholesterol levels on ATP release. Because of the correlation between statins and reduced membrane cholesterol in vivo, we also investigated the effects of simvastatin on RBC deformation and ATP release. We found that reducing membrane cholesterol increases cell deformability and ATP release. We also found that simvastatin increases deformability by acting directly on the membrane in the absence of the liver, and that ATP release was increased for cells with enriched cholesterol after treatment with simvastatin. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Protective effects of simvastatin on coronary artery function in swine with acute infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liuba, Petru; Pesonen, Erkki; Forslid, Anders

    2006-01-01

    cholesterol) between the groups (p>0.2). CONCLUSION:: Acute infection is associated with impairment of the muscarinic and kinin-related reactivity of coronary circulation. These functional abnormalities are in part prevented by simvastatin through mechanisms unrelated to lipid lowering......BACKGROUND:: The risk for coronary events may rise during acute infection. Perturbation in coronary endothelial function emerges as one important link. We investigated whether simvastatin could protect the coronary arterial function from the adverse effects of acute infection in swine. METHODS......:: Coronary endothelium-dependent and -independent vasomotor responses were assessed by Doppler velocimetry in 12 Chlamydia pneumoniae-infected and 6 sham-infected swine 2 weeks after intratracheal inoculation. Half of animals from the infection group were pre-treated with simvastatin (80mg daily), while...

  2. The binding sites on human heme oxygenase-1 for cytochrome p450 reductase and biliverdin reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinling; de Montellano, Paul R Ortiz

    2003-05-30

    Human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) catalyzes the NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase-dependent oxidation of heme to biliverdin, CO, and free iron. The biliverdin is subsequently reduced to bilirubin by biliverdin reductase. Earlier kinetic studies suggested that biliverdin reductase facilitates the release of biliverdin from hHO-1 (Liu, Y., and Ortiz de Montellano, P. R. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 5297-5307). We have investigated the binding of P450 reductase and biliverdin reductase to truncated, soluble hHO-1 by fluorescence resonance energy transfer and site-specific mutagenesis. P450 reductase and biliverdin reductase bind to truncated hHO-1 with Kd = 0.4 +/- 0.1 and 0.2 +/- 0.1 microm, respectively. FRET experiments indicate that biliverdin reductase and P450 reductase compete for binding to truncated hHO-1. Mutation of surface ionic residues shows that hHO-1 residues Lys18, Lys22, Lys179, Arg183, Arg198, Glu19, Glu127, and Glu190 contribute to the binding of cytochrome P450 reductase. The mutagenesis results and a computational analysis of the protein surfaces partially define the binding site for P450 reductase. An overlapping binding site including Lys18, Lys22, Lys179, Arg183, and Arg185 is similarly defined for biliverdin reductase. These results confirm the binding of biliverdin reductase to hHO-1 and define binding sites of the two reductases.

  3. Effect of simvastatin on CSF Alzheimer disease biomarkers in cognitively normal adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ge; Mayer, Cynthia L; Morelli, Daniel; Millard, Steven P; Raskind, Wendy H; Petrie, Eric C; Cherrier, Monique; Fagan, Anne M; Raskind, Murray A; Peskind, Elaine R

    2017-09-19

    To examine potential disease-modifying effects of statin drugs, we conducted a 12-month randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial of simvastatin in cognitively normal adults using change in CSF Alzheimer disease biomarkers as primary outcome measure. Participants were 45-64 years old and statin-naive with normal cognition and normal or mildly elevated cholesterol. Forty-six participants completed the 1-year study per protocol (25 in the simvastatin and 21 in the placebo group). Simvastatin was titrated to 40 mg/d. CSF Aβ 42 , total tau, and p-tau 181 were measured at baseline and after 12 months of treatment using the INNO-BIA AlzBio3 assay. We used analysis of covariance to assess differences in biomarker change from baseline between treatment groups, adjusting for age, sex, and APOE ε4 status. Changes from baseline did not differ significantly between treatment groups for any CSF biomarker, with p values of 0.53, 0.36, and 0.25 for CSF Aβ 42 , total tau, and p-tau 181 , respectively. There was no significant modifying effect of sex, APOE ε4, or baseline high-density lipoprotein or triglycerides on treatment group for any of the biomarkers (all p > 0.18). However, a significant interaction between treatment group and baseline low-density lipoprotein (LDL) was observed for p-tau 181 ( p = 0.003), where greater decreases from baseline in CSF p-tau 181 concentrations were associated with higher baseline LDL level for the simvastatin group. Simvastatin-related reductions in CSF p-tau 181 concentrations may be modulated by LDL cholesterol. The potential disease-modifying effects of simvastatin on CSF phospho-tau should be further investigated in persons with hypercholesterolemia. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  4. Simvastatin Attenuates Neurogenetic Damage and Improves Neurocongnitive Deficits Induced by Isoflurane in Neonatal Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Wang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Isoflurane inhibited neurogenesis and induced subsequent neurocognitive deficits in developing brain. Simvastatin exerts neuroprotection in a wide range of brain injury models. In the present study, we investigated whether simvastatin could attenuate neurogenetic inhibition and cognitive deficits induced by isoflurane exposure in neonatal rats. Methods: Sprague-Dawley rats at postnatal day (PND 7 and neural stem cells (NSCs were treated with either gas mixture, isoflurane, or simvastatin 60 min prior to isoflurane exposure, respectively. The rats were decapitated at PND 8 and PND 10 for detection of neurogenesis in the subventricular zone (SVZ and subgranular zone (SGZ of the hippocampus by immunostaining. NSC proliferation, viability and apoptosis were assessed by immunohistochemistry, CCK-8 and TUNEL, respectively. The protein expressions of caspase-3, p-Akt and p-GSK-3β both in vivo and vitro were assessed by western blotting. Cognitive functions were assessed by Morris Water Maze test and context fear conditioning test at the adult. Results: Isoflurane exposure inhibited neurogenesis in the SVZ and SGZ, decreased NSC proliferation and viability, promoted NSC apoptosis and led to late cognitive deficits. Furthermore, isoflurane increased caspase-3 expression and decreased protein expressions of p-Akt and p-GSK-3β both in vivo and in vitro. Pretreatment with simvastatin attenuated isoflurane-elicited changes in NSCs and cognitive function. Co-treatment with LY294002 reversed the effect of simvastatin on NSCs in vitro. Conclusion: We for the first time showed that simvastatin, by upregulating Akt/GSK-3β signaling pathway, alleviated isoflurane-induced neurogenetic damage and neurocognitive deficits in developing rat brain.

  5. Charge effect of a liposomal delivery system encapsulating simvastatin to treat experimental ischemic stroke in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campos-Martorell M

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Mireia Campos-Martorell,1 Mary Cano-Sarabia,2 Alba Simats,1 Mar Hernández-Guillamon,1 Anna Rosell,1 Daniel Maspoch,2,3 Joan Montaner1,4 1Neurovascular Research Laboratory, Institut de Recerca Vall d’Hebron, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, 2Catalan Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (ICN2, CSIC and The Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, 3Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats (ICREA, 4Neurovascular Unit, Department of Neurology, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Hospital Vall d’Hebron, Barcelona, Spain Background and aims: Although the beneficial effects of statins on stroke have been widely demonstrated both in experimental studies and in clinical trials, the aim of this study is to prepare and characterize a new liposomal delivery system that encapsulates simvastatin to improve its delivery into the brain. Materials and methods: In order to select the optimal liposome lipid composition with the highest capacity to reach the brain, male Wistar rats were submitted to sham or transitory middle cerebral arterial occlusion (MCAOt surgery and treated (intravenous [IV] with fluorescent-labeled liposomes with different net surface charges. Ninety minutes after the administration of liposomes, the brain, blood, liver, lungs, spleen, and kidneys were evaluated ex vivo using the Xenogen IVIS® Spectrum imaging system to detect the load of fluorescent liposomes. In a second substudy, simvastatin was assessed upon reaching the brain, comparing free and encapsulated simvastatin (IV administration. For this purpose, simvastatin levels in brain homogenates from sham or MCAOt rats at 2 hours or 4 hours after receiving the treatment were detected through ultra-high-protein liquid chromatography. Results: Whereas positively charged liposomes were not detected in brain or plasma 90 minutes after their administration, neutral and negatively charged liposomes

  6. Characterization of human warfarin reductase

    OpenAIRE

    Sokolová, Simona

    2016-01-01

    Charles University in Prague Faculty of Pharmacy in Hradec Králové Department of Biochemical Sciences Candidate: Simona Sokolová Supervisor: PharmDr. Petra Malátková, Ph.D. Title of diploma thesis: Characterization of human warfarin reductase Warfarin is widely used anticoagulant drug. Considering the narrow therapeutic window of warfarin, it is important to fully understand its metabolism in human body. Oxidative, reductive and conjugation reactions are involved in warfarin metabolism. Howev...

  7. Simvastatin reduces neointimal thickening in low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient mice after experimental angioplasty without changing plasma lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhiping; Fukutomi, Tatsuya; Zago, Alexandre C; Ehlers, Raila; Detmers, Patricia A; Wright, Samuel D; Rogers, Campbell; Simon, Daniel I

    2002-07-02

    Statins exert antiinflammatory and antiproliferative actions independent of cholesterol lowering. To determine whether these actions might affect neointimal formation, we investigated the effect of simvastatin on the response to experimental angioplasty in LDL receptor-deficient (LDLR-/-) mice, a model of hypercholesterolemia in which changes in plasma lipids are not observed in response to simvastatin. Carotid artery dilation (2.5 atm) and complete endothelial denudation were performed in male C57BL/6J LDLR-/- mice treated with low-dose (2 mg/kg) or high-dose (20 mg/kg) simvastatin or vehicle subcutaneously 72 hours before and then daily after injury. After 7 and 28 days, intimal and medial sizes were measured and the intima to media area ratio (I:M) was calculated. Total plasma cholesterol and triglyceride levels were similar in simvastatin- and vehicle-treated mice. Intimal thickening and I:M were reduced significantly by low- and high-dose simvastatin compared with vehicle alone. Simvastatin treatment was associated with reduced cellular proliferation (BrdU), leukocyte accumulation (CD45), and platelet-derived growth factor-induced phosphorylation of the survival factor Akt and increased apoptosis after injury. Simvastatin modulates vascular repair after injury in the absence of lipid-lowering effects. Although the mechanisms are not yet established, additional research may lead to new understanding of the actions of statins and novel therapeutic interventions for preventing restenosis.

  8. Enteric microbiome metabolites correlate with response to simvastatin treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rima Kaddurah-Daouk

    Full Text Available Although statins are widely prescribed medications, there remains considerable variability in therapeutic response. Genetics can explain only part of this variability. Metabolomics is a global biochemical approach that provides powerful tools for mapping pathways implicated in disease and in response to treatment. Metabolomics captures net interactions between genome, microbiome and the environment. In this study, we used a targeted GC-MS metabolomics platform to measure a panel of metabolites within cholesterol synthesis, dietary sterol absorption, and bile acid formation to determine metabolite signatures that may predict variation in statin LDL-C lowering efficacy. Measurements were performed in two subsets of the total study population in the Cholesterol and Pharmacogenetics (CAP study: Full Range of Response (FR, and Good and Poor Responders (GPR were 100 individuals randomly selected from across the entire range of LDL-C responses in CAP. GPR were 48 individuals, 24 each from the top and bottom 10% of the LDL-C response distribution matched for body mass index, race, and gender. We identified three secondary, bacterial-derived bile acids that contribute to predicting the magnitude of statin-induced LDL-C lowering in good responders. Bile acids and statins share transporters in the liver and intestine; we observed that increased plasma concentration of simvastatin positively correlates with higher levels of several secondary bile acids. Genetic analysis of these subjects identified associations between levels of seven bile acids and a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP, rs4149056, in the gene encoding the organic anion transporter SLCO1B1. These findings, along with recently published results that the gut microbiome plays an important role in cardiovascular disease, indicate that interactions between genome, gut microbiome and environmental influences should be considered in the study and management of cardiovascular disease. Metabolic

  9. Nitrate reductase gene involvement in hexachlorobiphenyl dechlorination by Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De, Supriyo; Perkins, Michael; Dutta, Sisir K.

    2006-01-01

    Polychlorobiphenyl (PCB) degradation usually occurs through reductive dechlorination under anaerobic conditions and phenolic ring cleavage under aerobic conditions. In this paper, we provide evidence of nitrate reductase (NaR) mediated dechlorination of hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB-153) in Phanerochaete chrysosporium under non-ligninolytic condition and the gene involved. The NaR enzyme and its cofactor, molybdenum (Mo), were found to mediate reductive dechlorination of PCBs even in aerobic condition. Tungsten (W), a competitive inhibitor of this enzyme, was found to suppress this dechlorination. Chlorine release assay provided further evidence of this nitrate reductase mediated dechlorination. Commercially available pure NaR enzyme from Aspergillus was used to confirm these results. Through homology search using TBLASTN program, NaR gene was identified, primers were designed and the RT-PCR product was sequenced. The NaR gene was then annotated in the P. chrysosporium genome (GenBank accession no. AY700576). This is the first report regarding the presence of nitrate reductase gene in this fungus with the explanation why this fungus can dechlorinate PCBs even in aerobic condition. These fungal inoculums are used commercially as pellets in sawdust for enhanced bioremediation of PCBs at the risk of depleting soil nitrates. Hence, the addition of nitrates to the pellets will reduce this risk as well as enhance its activity

  10. Immunocytochemical localization of APS reductase and bisulfite reductase in three Desulfovibrio species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kremer, D.R.; Veenhuis, M.; Fauque, G.; Peck Jr., H.D.; LeGall, J.; Lampreia, J.; Moura, J.J.G.; Hansen, T.A.

    1988-01-01

    The localization of APS reductase and bisulfite reductase in Desulfovibrio gigas, D. vulgaris Hildenborough and D. thermophilus was studied by immunoelectron microscopy. Polyclonal antibodies were raised against the purified enzymes from each strain. Cells fixed with formaldehyde/glutaraldehyde were

  11. Binding of Fidarestat Stereoisomers with Aldose Reductase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae-Sil Lee

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The stereospecificity in binding to aldose reductase (ALR2 of two fidarestat {6-fluoro-2',5'-dioxospiro[chroman-4,4'-imidazolidine]-2-carboxamide} stereoisomers [(2S,4Sand (2R,4S] has been investigated by means of molecular dynamics simulations using freeenergy integration techniques. The difference in the free energy of binding was found to be2.0 ± 1.7 kJ/mol in favour of the (2S,4S-form, in agreement with the experimentalinhibition data. The relative mobilities of the fidarestats complexed with ALR2 indicate alarger entropic penalty for hydrophobic binding of (2R,4S-fidarestat compared to (2S,4S-fidarestat, partially explaining its lower binding affinity. The two stereoisomers differmainly in the orientation of the carbamoyl moiety with respect to the active site and rotationof the bond joining the carbamoyl substituent to the ring. The detailed structural andenergetic insights obtained from out simulations allow for a better understanding of thefactors determining stereospecific inhibitor-ALR2 binding in the EPF charges model.

  12. Inhibition of human anthracycline reductases by emodin — A possible remedy for anthracycline resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hintzpeter, Jan, E-mail: hintzpeter@toxi.uni-kiel.de [Institute of Toxicology and Pharmacology for Natural Scientists, University Medical School Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Brunswiker Str. 10, 24105 Kiel (Germany); Seliger, Jan Moritz [Institute of Toxicology and Pharmacology for Natural Scientists, University Medical School Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Brunswiker Str. 10, 24105 Kiel (Germany); Hofman, Jakub [Department of Biochemical Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy in Hradec Kralove, Charles University in Prague, Heyrovskeho 1203, 50005 Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Martin, Hans-Joerg [Institute of Toxicology and Pharmacology for Natural Scientists, University Medical School Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Brunswiker Str. 10, 24105 Kiel (Germany); Wsol, Vladimir [Department of Biochemical Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy in Hradec Kralove, Charles University in Prague, Heyrovskeho 1203, 50005 Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Maser, Edmund [Institute of Toxicology and Pharmacology for Natural Scientists, University Medical School Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Brunswiker Str. 10, 24105 Kiel (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    The clinical application of anthracyclines, like daunorubicin and doxorubicin, is limited by two factors: dose-related cardiotoxicity and drug resistance. Both have been linked to reductive metabolism of the parent drug to their metabolites daunorubicinol and doxorubicinol, respectively. These metabolites show significantly less anti-neoplastic properties as their parent drugs and accumulate in cardiac tissue leading to chronic cardiotoxicity. Therefore, we aimed to identify novel and potent natural inhibitors for anthracycline reductases, which enhance the anticancer effect of anthracyclines by preventing the development of anthracycline resistance. Human enzymes responsible for the reductive metabolism of daunorubicin were tested for their sensitivity towards anthrachinones, in particular emodin and anthraflavic acid. Intense inhibition kinetic data for the most effective daunorubicin reductases, including IC{sub 50}- and K{sub i}-values, the mode of inhibition, as well as molecular docking, were compiled. Subsequently, a cytotoxicity profile and the ability of emodin to reverse daunorubicin resistance were determined using multiresistant A549 lung cancer and HepG2 liver cancer cells. Emodin potently inhibited the four main human daunorubicin reductases in vitro. Further, we could demonstrate that emodin is able to synergistically sensitize human cancer cells towards daunorubicin at clinically relevant concentrations. Therefore, emodin may yield the potential to enhance the therapeutic effectiveness of anthracyclines by preventing anthracycline resistance via inhibition of the anthracycline reductases. In symphony with its known pharmacological properties, emodin might be a compound of particular interest in the management of anthracycline chemotherapy efficacy and their adverse effects. - Highlights: • Natural and synthetic compounds were identified as inhibitors for human daunorubicin reductases. • Emodin is a potent inhibitor for human daunorubicin

  13. Inhibition of human anthracycline reductases by emodin — A possible remedy for anthracycline resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hintzpeter, Jan; Seliger, Jan Moritz; Hofman, Jakub; Martin, Hans-Joerg; Wsol, Vladimir; Maser, Edmund

    2016-01-01

    The clinical application of anthracyclines, like daunorubicin and doxorubicin, is limited by two factors: dose-related cardiotoxicity and drug resistance. Both have been linked to reductive metabolism of the parent drug to their metabolites daunorubicinol and doxorubicinol, respectively. These metabolites show significantly less anti-neoplastic properties as their parent drugs and accumulate in cardiac tissue leading to chronic cardiotoxicity. Therefore, we aimed to identify novel and potent natural inhibitors for anthracycline reductases, which enhance the anticancer effect of anthracyclines by preventing the development of anthracycline resistance. Human enzymes responsible for the reductive metabolism of daunorubicin were tested for their sensitivity towards anthrachinones, in particular emodin and anthraflavic acid. Intense inhibition kinetic data for the most effective daunorubicin reductases, including IC 50 - and K i -values, the mode of inhibition, as well as molecular docking, were compiled. Subsequently, a cytotoxicity profile and the ability of emodin to reverse daunorubicin resistance were determined using multiresistant A549 lung cancer and HepG2 liver cancer cells. Emodin potently inhibited the four main human daunorubicin reductases in vitro. Further, we could demonstrate that emodin is able to synergistically sensitize human cancer cells towards daunorubicin at clinically relevant concentrations. Therefore, emodin may yield the potential to enhance the therapeutic effectiveness of anthracyclines by preventing anthracycline resistance via inhibition of the anthracycline reductases. In symphony with its known pharmacological properties, emodin might be a compound of particular interest in the management of anthracycline chemotherapy efficacy and their adverse effects. - Highlights: • Natural and synthetic compounds were identified as inhibitors for human daunorubicin reductases. • Emodin is a potent inhibitor for human daunorubicin reductases.

  14. Simvastatin and asymmetric dimethylarginine-homocysteine metabolic pathways in patients with newly detected severe hypercholesterolemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladimirova-Kitova, Ludmila G; Deneva, Tania I

    2010-01-01

    The idea that statin therapy decreases asymmetric dimethylarginine through lowering low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels seems logic. However, controversy exists in the literature concerning this issue. This study compares the effect of moderate (40 mg) to high (80 mg) simvastatin doses on asymmetric dimethylarginine levels in patients with newly detected severe hypercholesterolemia (after targeted LDL levels of or = 7.5 mmol/L and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol > or = 4.9 mmol/L). Asymmetric dimethylarginine levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, total homocystein by the high performance liquid chromatography method. A statistically significant decrease exists in total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and apolipoprotein-B levels as well as apolipoprotein-B/apolipoprotein-A1 index following one month of 40 mg simvastatin therapy (P homocystein levels were also decreased but the difference was not significant (p = 0.571; p = 0.569). A dose-dependent effect was established comparing the influence of moderate (40 mg) to high (80 mg) simvastatin doses on the tested atherogenic biomarkers (lipid profile, apolipoprotein-A1, apolipoprotein-B). Asymmetric dimethylarginine and total homocystein levels showed a statistically significant decrease with 80 mg simvastatin (p homocysteine in contrast to high dose (80 mg) after targeted LDL of < or = 2.6 mmol/L levels are reached in patients with newly detected severe hypercholesterolemia.

  15. Characterization of Amorphous and Co-Amorphous Simvastatin Formulations Prepared by Spray Drying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Craye, Goedele; Löbmann, Korbinian; Grohganz, Holger

    2015-01-01

    In this study, spray drying from aqueous solutions, using the surface-active agent sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) as a solubilizer, was explored as a production method for co-amorphous simvastatin-lysine (SVS-LYS) at 1:1 molar mixtures, which previously have been observed to form a co...

  16. Efficacy, safety and tolerability of simvastatin in children with familial hypercholesterolaemia - Rationale, design and baseline characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jongh, S.; Stalenhoef, A. F. H.; Tuohy, M. B.; Mercuri, M.; Bakker, H. D.; Kastelein, J. J. P.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To describe the rationale, design and baseline data of a study conducted to determine the efficacy, safety and tolerability of simvastatin in children and adolescents with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia (heFH). Methods: Patients were recruited from nine lipid clinics

  17. Plasma lipoproteins and renal function during simvastatin treatment in diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hommel, E; Andersen, P; Gall, M A

    1992-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of simvastatin on plasma lipoproteins and renal function in hypercholesterolaemic Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy. Twenty-six hypercholesterolaemic (total cholesterol greater than or equal to 5.5 mmol/l) Type 1...

  18. Effects of Simvastatin Treatment on Serum Adiponectin Concentrations in Patients With Dislipidemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moezzi, Atefeh; Parizadeh, Seyyed Mohammad Reza; Tavallaie, Shima; Mazidi, Mohsen; Afzali, Fariba; Adab, Afrouz; Ferns, Gordon; Ghayour Mobarhan, Majid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Adiponectin is an adipose tissue-derived protein with anti-inflammatory properties. Statins are a class of cholesterol-lowering drugs, widely used for treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Objectives: In the current study, we aimed to assess the effects of simvastatin on serum levels of adiponectin in patients with dyslipidemia, recruited from Ghaem Hospital, Mashhad, Iran. Materials and Methods: A total of 102 patients with dyslipidemia were treated with simvastatin or placebo during a double-blind, cross-over, placebo-controlled trial. The adiponectin levels were measured before and after each treatment period. Seventy seven participants completed the study. Results: There was a significant reduction in serum total cholesterol (approxmately 21%), low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) (approxmately 28%), and triglycerides (approxmately 11%), after four weeks of treatment with simvastatin (P < 0.001). Conclusions: No significant change in serum adiponectin concentrations was observed after treatment with simvastatin. This may be because of the relatively short duration of treatment and longer treatment duration may be necessary to investigation in future studies. PMID:25389496

  19. Effects of simvastatin treatment on serum adiponectin concentrations in patients with dislipidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moezzi, Atefeh; Parizadeh, Seyyed Mohammad Reza; Tavallaie, Shima; Mazidi, Mohsen; Afzali, Fariba; Adab, Afrouz; Ferns, Gordon; Ghayour Mobarhan, Majid

    2014-08-01

    Adiponectin is an adipose tissue-derived protein with anti-inflammatory properties. Statins are a class of cholesterol-lowering drugs, widely used for treatment of cardiovascular diseases. In the current study, we aimed to assess the effects of simvastatin on serum levels of adiponectin in patients with dyslipidemia, recruited from Ghaem Hospital, Mashhad, Iran. A total of 102 patients with dyslipidemia were treated with simvastatin or placebo during a double-blind, cross-over, placebo-controlled trial. The adiponectin levels were measured before and after each treatment period. Seventy seven participants completed the study. There was a significant reduction in serum total cholesterol (approxmately 21%), low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) (approxmately 28%), and triglycerides (approxmately 11%), after four weeks of treatment with simvastatin (P < 0.001). No significant change in serum adiponectin concentrations was observed after treatment with simvastatin. This may be because of the relatively short duration of treatment and longer treatment duration may be necessary to investigation in future studies.

  20. Rhabdomyolysis in a hepatitis C virus infected patient treated with telaprevir and simvastatin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kanter, C.T.M.M. de; Luin, M. van; Solas, C.; Burger, D.M.; Vrolijk, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    A 46-year old man with a chronic hepatitis C virus infection received triple therapy with ribavirin, pegylated interferon and telaprevir. The patient also received simvastatin. One month after starting the antiviral therapy, the patient was admitted to the hospital because he developed

  1. Photoaffinity labeling of steroid 5 alpha-reductase of rat liver and prostate microsomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, T.; Cheung, A.H.; Reynolds, G.F.; Rasmusson, G.H.

    1985-01-01

    21-Diazo-4-methyl-4-aza-5 alpha-pregnane-3,20-dione (Diazo-MAPD) inhibits steroid 5 alpha-reductase in liver microsomes of female rats with a K/sub i/ value of 8.7 +/- 1.7 nM, and the inhibition is competitive with testosterone. It also inhibits the binding of a 5 alpha-reductase inhibitor, [ 3 H] 17 beta-N,N-diethylcarbamoyl-4-methyl-4-aza-5 alpha-androstan-3-one ([ 3 H]4-MA), to the enzyme in liver microsomes. The inhibition of 5 alpha-reductase activity and of inhibitor binding activity by diazo-MAPD becomes irreversible upon UV irradiation. [1,2- 3 H]Diazo-MAPD binds to a single high affinity site in liver microsomes of female rats, and this binding requires NADPH. Without UV irradiation, this binding is reversible, and it becomes irreversible upon UV irradiation. Both the initial reversible binding and the subsequent irreversible conjugation after UV irradiation are inhibited by inhibitors (diazo-MAPD and 4-MA) and substrates (progesterone and testosterone) of 5 alpha-reductase, but they are not inhibited by 5 alpha-reduced steroids. Photoaffinity labeled liver microsomes of female rats were solubilized and fractionated by high performance gel filtration. The radioactive conjugate eluted in one major peak at Mr 50,000

  2. Biofunctionalization of Titanium Granules with Simvastatin for Improving Osteogenic Activity and Antibacterial Properties (Ex Vivo Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaji, Zahra Gorgin; Houshmand, Behzad; Abbasi, Shahsanam; Shafiei, Sara; Faghihi, Shahab

    Titanium-based biomaterials present good biocompatibility, while their osseointegration and antibacterial properties need to be improved. This study aimed to enhance the bone-bonding ability of titanium-based granules, which are intended to be used as bone graft. The titanium granules were anodized in ethylene glycol-based electrolyte and subsequently annealed to be loaded separately with simvastatin. The samples were then inspected with attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) for drug loading. The release of simvastatin from titanium granule samples was measured after soaking samples in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) for 30 days using ultraviolet-visible (UV/Vis) spectroscopy. The alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of MG63 osteosarcoma-loaded samples was measured, and microbroth dilution assay was performed to evaluate the antibacterial potential of drug-loaded and nonloaded titanium granule samples for bacterial growth. The results expressed the gradual and constant release of simvastatin within the duration of the examination. ALP of the samples showed improved activity of anodized and annealed granules, while the antibacterial test illustrated no significant improvement in their bactericidal effects. However, the simvastatin-loaded samples showed an improved antibacterial effect compared with nonloaded samples. It is assumed that anodizing, annealing, and subsequent simvastatin loading of titanium granules could be used as surface modification to improve osseointegration and restrain bacterial growth and adhesion. It is fair to believe that the results of this study could be used to treat titanium granules as bone graft substitute materials for dental and orthopedic applications.

  3. Hepatic Fgf21 Expression Is Repressed after Simvastatin Treatment in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panos Ziros

    Full Text Available Fibroblast growth factor 21 (Fgf21 is a hormone with emerging beneficial roles in glucose and lipid homeostasis. The interest in Fgf21 as a potential antidiabetic drug and the factors that regulate its production and secretion is growing. Statins are the most widely prescribed drug for the treatment of dyslipidemia. However, the function of statins is not limited to the lowering of cholesterol as they are associated with pleiotropic actions such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective effects. The recently described effect of statins on mitochondrial function and the induction of Fgf21 by mitochondrial stress prompted us to investigate the effect of statin treatment on Fgf21 expression in the liver. To this end, C57BL6J male mice and primary mouse hepatocytes were treated with simvastatin, and Fgf21 expression was subsequently assessed by immunoblotting and quantitative real-time PCR. Hepatic Fgf21 protein and mRNA and circulating levels of FGF21significantly decreased in mice that had received simvastatin in their food (0.1% w/w for 1 week. This effect was also observed with simvastatin doses as low as 0.01% w/w for 1 week or following 2 intraperitoneal injections within a single day. The reduction in Fgf21 mRNA levels was further verified in primary mouse hepatocytes, indicating that the effect of simvastatin is cell autonomous. In conclusion, simvastatin treatment reduced the circulating and hepatic Fgf21 levels and this effect warrants further investigation with reference to its role in metabolism.

  4. Dose-expanded study in the reinforcement of efficacy of simvastatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vichayanrat, Apichati

    2002-04-01

    Two hundred and twenty two hyperlipidemic patients were recruited for a 12-week prospective, multicenter, open-label, titrate-to-goal study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of 20 to 40 mg per day of simvastatin in a Thai population. The efficacy on lipid lowering was evaluated at 4 weeks and 8 weeks after medication. Based on NCEP ATP II guideline and ADA position statement, subjects were categorized into three groups according to LDL-C goals; group I: patients without CHD and with or = 2 CHD risk factors and group III: CHD patients or diabetic patients with > or = 1 risk factors. Significant changes of all lipid parameters from baselines were noted at 4 weeks after medication except for HDL-C levels. Reduction of serum LDL-C, TC and TG by 40 per cent, 29 per cent and 16 per cent respectively and increase of serum HDL-C by 5 per cent were observed at 8 weeks of therapy (p<0.05). At 4 weeks after taking simvastatin 20 mg/day, 78.9 per cent of patients in group I, 67.4 per cent in group II and 40.9 per cent in group III achieved LDL-C goals. Seventeen per cent of the patients who were evaluated at 8 weeks increased the simvastatin dosage to 40 mg per day in the second month of treatment. At 8 weeks of therapy with simvastatin 20-40 mg/day, 90.1 per cent of patients in group I, 77.4 per cent in group II and 66.7 per cent in group III achieved LDL-C goals. Adverse symptoms during therapy, mostly mild, developed in 6.3 per cent of the 222 patients. Simvastatin 20-40 mg/day was effective and well tolerated in managing lipid parameters in Thai patients similar to other ethnic populations.

  5. Oxygen and xenobiotic reductase activities of cytochrome P450.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goeptar, A.R.; Scheerens, H.; Vermeulen, N.P.E.

    1995-01-01

    The oxygen reductase and xenobiotic reductase activities of cytochrome P450 (P450) are reviewed. During the oxygen reductase activity of P450, molecular oxygen is reduced to superoxide anion radicals (O

  6. Crystallographic investigation of the cooperative interaction between trimethoprim, reduced cofactor and dihydrofolate reductase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champness, J.N.; Stammers, D.K.; Beddell, C.R.

    1986-01-01

    The structure of the complex between E. coli form I dihydrofolate reductase, the antibacterial trimethoprim and NADPH has been determined by X-ray crystallography. The inhibitor and cofactor are in mutual contact. A flexible chain segment which includes Met 20 is in contact with the inhibitor in the presence of NADPH, but more distant in its absence. By contrast, the inhibitor conformation is little changed with NADPH present. The authors discuss these observations with regard to the mutually cooperative binding of these ligands to the protein, and to the associated enhancement of inhibitory selectivity shown by trimethoprim for bacterial as opposed to vertebrate enzyme. (Auth.)

  7. Effects of simvastatin in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: Results of a pilot, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina Balaguer

    2016-04-01

    Conclusions: Short-term treatment with simvastatin in stable COPD patients did not modify lung function, pulmonary and systemic inflammation, or vascular stiffness, but it changed Epo and uric acid levels.

  8. Determination of the antibacterial activity of simvastatin against periodontal pathogens, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpa Emani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context and Objective: Statin treatment, apart from its hypolipidemic action has proven its antimicrobial activity by improving the survival rate of patients with severe systemic bacterial infections. Periodontitis is an inflammatory disorder of tooth supporting structures caused by a group of specific microorganisms. The objective of the present study was to determine the antimicrobial activity of pure simvastatin drug against the primary periodontal pathogens. Materials and Methods: Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC was determined against Porphyromonas gingivalis and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans using serial dilution method. Results: MIC of simvastatin against P. gingivalis was 2 μg/ml and A. actinomycetemcomitans was found to be <1 μg/ml which requires further dilutions to determine the exact value. Conclusions: Data suggests a potent antimicrobial activity of simvastatin against both A. actinomycetemcomitans and P gingivalis. Hence simvastatin can be prescribed as a dual action drug in patients with both hyperlipidemia and periodontal disease.

  9. The effect of simvastatin on lipid droplets accumulation in human embryonic kidney cells and pancreatic cancer cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gbelcová, H.; Sveda, M.; Laubertová, L.; Varga, I.; Vítek, L.; Kolář, M.; Strnad, H.; Zelenka, Jaroslav; Boehmer, D.; Ruml, T.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 12, AUG 21 (2013), s. 126 ISSN 1476-511X Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : simvastatin * lipid droplets * DNA microarray Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.310, year: 2013

  10. The use of dimethylsulfoxide as a solvent in enzyme inhibition studies: the case of aldose reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misuri, Livia; Cappiello, Mario; Balestri, Francesco; Moschini, Roberta; Barracco, Vito; Mura, Umberto; Del-Corso, Antonella

    2017-12-01

    Aldose reductase (AR) is an enzyme devoted to cell detoxification and at the same time is strongly involved in the aetiology of secondary diabetic complications and the amplification of inflammatory phenomena. AR is subjected to intense inhibition studies and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is often present in the assay mixture to keep the inhibitors in solution. DMSO was revealed to act as a weak but well detectable AR differential inhibitor, acting as a competitive inhibitor of the L-idose reduction, as a mixed type of non-competitive inhibitor of HNE reduction and being inactive towards 3-glutathionyl-4-hydroxynonanal transformation. A kinetic model of DMSO action with respect to differently acting inhibitors was analysed. Three AR inhibitors, namely the flavonoids neohesperidin dihydrochalcone, rutin and phloretin, were used to evaluate the effects of DMSO on the inhibition studies on the reduction of L-idose and HNE.

  11. High Dose Atorvastatin Associated with Increased Risk of Significant Hepatotoxicity in Comparison to Simvastatin in UK GPRD Cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan T Clarke

    Full Text Available Occasional risk of serious liver dysfunction and autoimmune hepatitis during atorvastatin therapy has been reported. We compared the risk of hepatotoxicity in atorvastatin relative to simvastatin treatment.The UK GPRD identified patients with a first prescription for simvastatin [164,407] or atorvastatin [76,411] between 1997 and 2006, but with no prior record of liver disease, alcohol-related diagnosis, or liver dysfunction. Incident liver dysfunction in the following six months was identified by biochemical value and compared between statin groups by Cox regression model adjusting for age, sex, year treatment started, dose, alcohol consumption, smoking, body mass index and comorbid conditions.Moderate to severe hepatotoxicity [bilirubin >60μmol/L, AST or ALT >200U/L or alkaline phosphatase >1200U/L] developed in 71 patients on atorvastatin versus 101 on simvastatin. Adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] for all atorvastatin relative to simvastatin was 1.9 [95% confidence interval 1.4-2.6]. High dose was classified as 40-80mg daily and low dose 10-20mg daily. Hepatotoxicity occurred in 0.44% of 4075 patients on high dose atorvastatin [HDA], 0.07% of 72,336 on low dose atorvastatin [LDA], 0.09% of 44,675 on high dose simvastatin [HDS] and 0.05% of 119,732 on low dose simvastatin [LDS]. AHRs compared to LDS were 7.3 [4.2-12.7] for HDA, 1.4 [0.9-2.0] for LDA and 1.5 [1.0-2.2] for HDS.The risk of hepatotoxicity was increased in the first six months of atorvastatin compared to simvastatin treatment, with the greatest difference between high dose atorvastatin and low dose simvastatin. The numbers of events in the analyses were small.

  12. High Dose Atorvastatin Associated with Increased Risk of Significant Hepatotoxicity in Comparison to Simvastatin in UK GPRD Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Alan T.; Johnson, Paul C. D.; Hall, Gillian C.; Ford, Ian; Mills, Peter R.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Occasional risk of serious liver dysfunction and autoimmune hepatitis during atorvastatin therapy has been reported. We compared the risk of hepatotoxicity in atorvastatin relative to simvastatin treatment. Methods The UK GPRD identified patients with a first prescription for simvastatin [164,407] or atorvastatin [76,411] between 1997 and 2006, but with no prior record of liver disease, alcohol-related diagnosis, or liver dysfunction. Incident liver dysfunction in the following six months was identified by biochemical value and compared between statin groups by Cox regression model adjusting for age, sex, year treatment started, dose, alcohol consumption, smoking, body mass index and comorbid conditions. Results Moderate to severe hepatotoxicity [bilirubin >60μmol/L, AST or ALT >200U/L or alkaline phosphatase >1200U/L] developed in 71 patients on atorvastatin versus 101 on simvastatin. Adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] for all atorvastatin relative to simvastatin was 1.9 [95% confidence interval 1.4–2.6]. High dose was classified as 40–80mg daily and low dose 10–20mg daily. Hepatotoxicity occurred in 0.44% of 4075 patients on high dose atorvastatin [HDA], 0.07% of 72,336 on low dose atorvastatin [LDA], 0.09% of 44,675 on high dose simvastatin [HDS] and 0.05% of 119,732 on low dose simvastatin [LDS]. AHRs compared to LDS were 7.3 [4.2–12.7] for HDA, 1.4 [0.9–2.0] for LDA and 1.5 [1.0–2.2] for HDS. Conclusions The risk of hepatotoxicity was increased in the first six months of atorvastatin compared to simvastatin treatment, with the greatest difference between high dose atorvastatin and low dose simvastatin. The numbers of events in the analyses were small. PMID:26983033

  13. Genotoxicity evaluation of HMG CoA reductase inhibitor rosuvastatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berber, Ahmet Ali; Celik, Mustafa; Aksoy, Hüseyin

    2014-07-01

    The genotoxic potential of rosuvastatin as one of the statin drugs was assessed by chromosomal aberrations (CAs), micronucleus (MN) and DNA damage by comet assay in the human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Rosuvastatin was used at concentrations of 0.0625, 0.125, 0.25, 0.5 and 1 µg/mL for these in vitro assays. In all assays, a negative and positive control were also included. CA frequencies were significantly increased in all concentrations at 24 hours and significantly increased in all concentrations except 0.0625 µg/mL at 48 hours, compared to the negative control. Rosuvastatin has a decreased mitotic index (MI) at 0.5- and 1-µg/mL concentrations at 24 hours and at 0.25, 0.5 and 1 µg/mL at 48 hours. A significant increase was observed for induction of MN in all treatments, compared to the negative control. Cytokinesis-block proliferation indices were not affected by treatments with rosuvastatin. In the comet assay, significant increases in comet tail length and tail moment were observed at 0.0625-, 0.5- and 1-µg/mL concentrations. Comet intensity was significantly increased in all concentrations except 0.0625 µg/mL. According to these results, rosuvastatin is cytotoxic and clastogenic/aneugenic in human peripheral lymphocytes. Further studies should be conducted in other test systems to evaluate the full genotoxic potential of rosuvastatin.

  14. Inhibitory effect of rhetsinine isolated from Evodia rutaecarpa on aldose reductase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, A; Yasuko, H; Goto, H; Hollinshead, J; Nash, R J; Adachi, I

    2009-03-01

    Aldose reductase inhibitors have considerable potential for the treatment of diabetic complications, without increased risk of hypoglycemia. Search for components inhibiting aldose reductase led to the discovery of active compounds contained in Evodia rutaecarpa Bentham (Rutaceae), which is the one of the component of Kampo-herbal medicine. The hot water extract from the E. rutaecarpa was subjected to distribution or gel filtration chromatography to give an active compound, N2-(2-methylaminobenzoyl)tetrahydro-1H-pyrido[3,4-b]indol-1-one (rhetsinine). It inhibited aldose reductase with IC(50) values of 24.1 microM. Furthermore, rhetsinine inhibited sorbitol accumulation by 79.3% at 100 microM. These results suggested that the E. rutaecarpa derived component, rhetsinine, would be potentially useful in the treatment of diabetic complications.

  15. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of carbonyl reductase from Candida parapsilosis ATCC 7330

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, Nidhi; Mandal, P. K.; Gautham, Namasivayam; Chadha, Anju

    2013-01-01

    The expression, purification, crystallization, preliminary X-ray diffraction and molecular-replacement studies on C. parapsilosis carbonyl reductase are reported. The NAD(P)H-dependent carbonyl reductase from Candida parapsilosis ATCC 7330 catalyses the asymmetric reduction of ethyl 4-phenyl-2-oxobutanoate to ethyl (R)-4-phenyl-2-hydroxybutanoate, a precursor of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors such as Cilazapril and Benazepril. The carbonyl reductase was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by GST-affinity and size-exclusion chromatography. Crystals were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method and diffracted to 1.86 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit contained two molecules of carbonyl reductase, with a solvent content of 48%. The structure was solved by molecular replacement using cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a search model

  16. Simvastatin modulates gingival cytokine and MMP production in a rat model of ligature-induced periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mouchrek Júnior JCE

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available José Carlos Elias Mouchrek Júnior,1 Cristina Gomes Macedo,2 Henrique Ballassini Abdalla,2 Ana Karina Saba,1 Lucas Novaes Teixeira,1 Adriana Quinzeiro e Silva Mouchrek,3 Marcelo Henrique Napimoga,1 Juliana Trindade Clemente-Napimoga,1 Alvaro Henrique Borges,4 Mateus Rodrigues Tonetto,4 Shelon Cristina Souza Pinto,5 Matheus Coelho Bandeca,3 Elizabeth Ferreira Martinez1 1Laboratory of Cell and Molecular Biology, São Leopoldo Mandic Institute and Research Center, Campinas, 2Physiological Sciences, Piracicaba Dental School, University of Campinas, Campinas, São Paulo, 3Department of Dentistry, CEUMA University, São Luis, Maranhão, 4Department of Integrated Dental Science, University of Cuiaba, Cuiabá, Mato Grosso, 5Department of Dentistry, Ponta Grossa State University, Ponta Grossa, Paraná, Brazil Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of simvastatin on the synthesis of cytokines TNF-α and IL-10 and metalloproteinase (MMPs 2 and 9 in a rat model of ligature-induced periodontitis.Materials and methods: Twenty Wistar rats were used, and a cotton ligature was place in a subgingival position encircling the entire cervix of the first molar of the left (ipsilateral side of the mandible. The right (contralateral side of the mandible had no ligature placed and was used as control. After the ligature placement, animals were randomly assigned to two experimental groups (n=10: 1 rats with ligature + vehicle (saline; 10 mL/kg; orally and 2 rats with ligature + simvastatin (25 mg/kg; orally. After 14 days of treatment, the animals were euthanized by anesthetic overdose and the gingival tissue was removed and homogenized in appropriate buffer. MMP-2 and -9 release as well as the IL-10 and TNF-α levels were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Statistical comparison was performed by unpaired Student’s t-test, with p<0.05 representing significance.Results: No differences were observed for TNF-α production between the

  17. [Effect of simvastatin on inducing endothelial progenitor cells homing and promoting bone defect repair].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Quansheng; Wang, Lingying; Zhu, Jinglin; Han, Xiaoguang; Li, Xu; Yang, Yanlin; Sun, Yan; Song, Chunli

    2010-09-01

    To investigate the effect of simvastatin on inducing endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) homing and promoting bone defect repair, and to explore the mechanism of local implanting simvastatin in promoting bone formation. Simvastatin (50 mg) compounded with polylactic acid (PLA, 200 mg) or only PLA (200 mg) was dissolved in acetone (1 mL) to prepare implanted materials (Simvastatin-PLA material, PLA material). EPCs were harvested from bone marrow of 2 male rabbits and cultured with M199; after identified by immunohistochemistry, the cell suspension of EPCs at the 3rd generation (2 x 10(6) cells/mL) was prepared and transplanted into 12 female rabbits through auricular veins (2 mL). After 3 days, the models of cranial defect with 15 cm diameter were made in the 12 female rabbits. And the defects were repaired with Simvastatin-PLA materials (experimental group, n=6) and PLA materials (control group, n=6), respectively. The bone repair was observed after 8 weeks of operation by gross appearance, X-ray film, and histology; gelatin-ink perfusion and HE staining were used to show the new vessels formation in the defect. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed to show the EPCs homing at the defect site. All experimental animals of 2 groups survived to the end of the experiment. After 8 weeks in experimental group, new bone formation was observed in the bone defect by gross and histology, and an irregular, hyperdense shadow by X-ray film; no similar changes were observed in control group. FISH showed that the male EPC containing Y chromosome was found in the wall of new vessels in the defect of experimental group, while no male EPC containing Y chromosome was found in control group. The percentage of new bone formation in defect area was 91.63% +/- 4.07% in experimental group and 59.45% +/- 5.43% in control group, showing significant difference (P < 0.05). Simvastatin can promote bone defect repair, and its mechanism is probably associated with inducing EPCs

  18. Lipid-altering efficacy and safety of ezetimibe/simvastatin versus atorvastatin in patients with hypercholesterolemia and the metabolic syndrome (from the VYMET study)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robinson, Jennifer G; Ballantyne, Christie M; Grundy, Scott M

    2009-01-01

    the lipid-lowering efficacy of ezetimibe/simvastatin 10/20 mg versus atorvastatin 10 or 20 mg, and ezetimibe/simvastatin 10/40 mg versus atorvastatin 40 mg in 1,128 patients with hypercholesterolemia and the metabolic syndrome. The primary end point was the percentage of change from baseline in low......, apolipoprotein B, and lipid/lipoprotein ratios resulted with ezetimibe/simvastatin compared with atorvastatin at all specified dose comparisons (p .../simvastatin than with atorvastatin at all dose comparisons (p atorvastatin 10 mg (p atorvastatin 40 mg (p

  19. Role of aldose reductase C-106T polymorphism among diabetic Egyptian patients with different microvascular complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nermine Hossam Zakaria

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aldose reductase pathway proves that elevated blood glucose promotes cellular dysfunction. The polyol pathway converts excess intracellular glucose into alcohols via activity of the aldose reductase. This enzyme catalyzes the conversion of glucose to sorbitol which triggers variety of intracellular changes in the tissues. Among diabetes, activity is drastically increased in association with three main consequences inside the cells. The aim of this study was to detect the association of the C-106 T polymorphism of the aldose reductase gene and its frequency among a sample of 150 Egyptian adults with type 2 diabetic patients having diabetic microvascular. The detection of the aldose reductase C-106 T polymorphism gene was done by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP. The genotype distribution of the C-106 T polymorphism showed that CC genotype was statistically significantly higher among patients with retinopathy compared to nephropathy. Patients with nephropathy had significant association with the TT genotype when compared with diabetic retinopathy patients. Follow up study after the genotype detection among recently diagnosed diabetic patients in order to give a prophylactic aldose reductase inhibitors; studying the microvascular complications and its relation to the genotype polymorphisms. The study may include multiple gene polymorphisms to make the relation between the gene and the occurrence of these complications more evident.

  20. Effect of Randomized Lipid Lowering With Simvastatin and Ezetimibe on Cataract Development (from the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis Study)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Casper N; Greve, Anders M; Dornonville de la Cour, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Recent American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines on statin initiation on the basis of total atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk argue that the preventive effect of statins on cardiovascular events outweigh the side effects, although this is controversial. Studies...... indicate a possible effect of statin therapy on reducing risk of lens opacities. However, the results are conflicting. The Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis study (NCT00092677) enrolled 1,873 patients with asymptomatic aortic stenosis and no history of diabetes, coronary heart disease, or other...

  1. In silico docking studies of aldose reductase inhibitory activity of commercially available flavonoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arumugam Madeswaran

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The primary objective of this study was to investigate the aldose reductase inhibitory activity of flavonoids using in silico docking studies. In this perspective, flavonoids like biochanin, butein, esculatin, fisetin and herbacetin were selected. Epalrestat, a known aldose reductase inhibitor was used as the standard. In silico docking studies were carried out using AutoDock 4.2, based on the Lamarckian genetic algorithm principle. The results showed that all the selected flavonoids showed binding energy ranging between -9.33 kcal/mol to -7.23 kcal/mol when compared with that of the standard (-8.73 kcal/mol. Inhibition constant (144.13 µM to 4.98 µM and intermolecular energy (-11.42 kcal/mol to -7.83 kcal/mol of the flavonoids also coincide with the binding energy. All the selected flavonoids contributed aldose reductase inhibitory activity because of its structural properties. These molecular docking analyses could lead to the further development of potent aldose reductase inhibitors for the treatment of diabetes.

  2. Effect of simvastatin and ezetimibe on suPAR levels and outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hodges, Gethin W; Bang, Casper N; Forman, Julie L

    2018-01-01

    -lowering therapy also lowers suPAR levels is unknown. METHODS: We investigated whether treatment with Simvastatin 40 mg and Ezetimibe 10 mg lowered plasma suPAR levels in 1838 patients with mild-moderate, asymptomatic aortic stenosis, included in the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) study, using...... and Ezetimibe treatment impeded the progression of the time-related increase in plasma suPAR levels. Year-1 suPAR was associated with all-cause mortality, MCE, and AVE irrespective of baseline levels (SEAS study: NCT00092677)....... cardiovascular events (MCE) composed of ischemic cardiovascular events (ICE) and aortic valve related events (AVE). RESULTS: After 4.3 years of follow-up, suPAR levels had increased by 9.2% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 7.0%-11.5%) in the placebo group, but only by 4.1% (1.9%-6.2%) in the group with lipid...

  3. Tetrathionate reductase of Salmonella thyphimurium: a molybdenum containing enzyme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinojosa-Leon, M.; Dubourdieu, M.; Sanchez-Crispin, J.A.; Chippaux, M.

    1986-01-01

    Use of radioactive molybdenum demonstrates that the tetrathionate reductase of Salmonella typhimurium is a molydenum containing enzyme. It is proposed that this enzyme shares with other molybdo-proteins, such as nitrate reductase, a common molybdenum containing cofactor the defect of which leads to the loss of the tetrathionate reductase and nitrate reductase activities

  4. Effect of Simvastatin, Coenzyme Q10, Resveratrol, Acetylcysteine and Acetylcarnitine on Mitochondrial Respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fišar, Z; Hroudová, J; Singh, N; Kopřivová, A; Macečková, D

    2016-01-01

    Some therapeutic and/or adverse effects of drugs may be related to their effects on mitochondrial function. The effects of simvastatin, resveratrol, coenzyme Q10, acetylcysteine, and acetylcarnitine on Complex I-, Complex II-, or Complex IV-linked respiratory rate were determined in isolated brain mitochondria. The protective effects of these biologically active compounds on the calcium-induced decrease of the respiratory rate were also studied. We observed a significant inhibitory effect of simvastatin on mitochondrial respiration (IC50 = 24.0 μM for Complex I-linked respiration, IC50 = 31.3 μM for Complex II-linked respiration, and IC50 = 42.9 μM for Complex IV-linked respiration); the inhibitory effect of resveratrol was found at very high concentrations (IC50 = 162 μM for Complex I-linked respiration, IC50 = 564 μM for Complex II-linked respiration, and IC50 = 1454 μM for Complex IV-linked respiration). Concentrations required for effective simvastatin- or resveratrol-induced inhibition of mitochondrial respiration were found much higher than concentrations achieved under standard dosing of these drugs. Acetylcysteine and acetylcarnitine did not affect the oxygen consumption rate of mitochondria. Coenzyme Q10 induced an increase of Complex I-linked respiration. The increase of free calcium ions induced partial inhibition of the Complex I+II-linked mitochondrial respiration, and all tested drugs counteracted this inhibition. None of the tested drugs showed mitochondrial toxicity (characterized by respiratory rate inhibition) at drug concentrations achieved at therapeutic drug intake. Resveratrol, simvastatin, and acetylcarnitine had the greatest neuroprotective potential (characterized by protective effects against calcium-induced reduction of the respiratory rate).

  5. [Adverse muscle effects of a podofyllotoxin-containing cytotoxic drug product with simvastatin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaipiainen-Seppänen, Oili; Savolainen, Elina; Elfving, Pia; Kononoff, Aulikki

    2009-01-01

    With the ageing population, drug interactions pose an increasing challenge to health professionals. We describe four patients, for whom concurrent administration of a podofyllotoxin-containing cytotoxic drug product and simvastatin caused severe adverse effects on muscles, including muscle pain, soreness or fatigue or weakness, and in some patients also disintegration of muscle tissue, i.e. rhabdomyolysis. The metabolism of both drugs proceeds via the common CYP3A4 enzyme pathway.

  6. Combined influence of LDLR and HMGCR sequence variation on lipid-lowering response to simvastatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangravite, Lara M.; Medina, Marisa Wong; Cui, Jinrui; Pressman, Sheila; Smith, Joshua D.; Rieder, Mark J.; Guo, Xiuqing; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Krauss, Ronald M.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Although statins are efficacious for lowering LDL-cholesterol (LDLC), there is wide inter-individual variation in response. We tested the extent to which combined effects of common alleles of LDLR and HMGCR can contribute to this variability. Methods and Results Haplotypes in the LDLR 3′-untranslated region (3UTR) were tested for association with lipid-lowering response to simvastatin treatment in the Cholesterol and Pharmacogenetics (CAP) trial (335 African-Americans and 609European-Americans). LDLR haplotype 5 (L5)was associated with smaller simvastatin-induced reductions in LDLC, total cholesterol, non-HDL cholesterol, and apolipoprotein B (P=0.0002–0.03)in African-Americans, but not European-Americans. The combined presence of L5 and previously described HMGCR haplotypes in African-Americans was associated with significantly attenuated apoB reduction(−22.4±1.5% N=89) both compared to noncarriers (−30.6±1.5% N=78, P=0.0001) and to carriers of either individual haplotype (−28.2±1.1% N=158, P=0.001). We observed similar differences when measuring simvastatin-mediated induction of LDLR surface expression using lymphoblast cell lines (P=0.03). Conclusions We have identified a common LDLR 3UTR haplotype that is associated with attenuated lipid-lowering response to simvastatin treatment. Response was further reduced in individuals with both LDLR and previously described HMGCR haplotypes. Previously identified racial differences in statin efficacy were partially explained by increased prevalence of these combined haplotypes in African-Americans. PMID:20413733

  7. A new therapeutic effect of simvastatin revealed by functional improvement in muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Nicholas P; Kim, Min Jeong; Bible, Kenneth L; Adams, Marvin E; Froehner, Stanley C

    2015-10-13

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal, degenerative muscle disease with no effective treatment. DMD muscle pathogenesis is characterized by chronic inflammation, oxidative stress, and fibrosis. Statins, cholesterol-lowering drugs, inhibit these deleterious processes in ischemic diseases affecting skeletal muscle, and therefore have potential to improve DMD. However, statins have not been considered for DMD, or other muscular dystrophies, principally because skeletal-muscle-related symptoms are rare, but widely publicized, side effects of these drugs. Here we show positive effects of statins in dystrophic skeletal muscle. Simvastatin dramatically reduced damage and enhanced muscle function in dystrophic (mdx) mice. Long-term simvastatin treatment vastly improved overall muscle health in mdx mice, reducing plasma creatine kinase activity, an established measure of muscle damage, to near-normal levels. This reduction was accompanied by reduced inflammation, more oxidative muscle fibers, and improved strength of the weak diaphragm muscle. Shorter-term treatment protected against muscle fatigue and increased mdx hindlimb muscle force by 40%, a value comparable to current dystrophin gene-based therapies. Increased force correlated with reduced NADPH Oxidase 2 protein expression, the major source of oxidative stress in dystrophic muscle. Finally, in old mdx mice with severe muscle degeneration, simvastatin enhanced diaphragm force and halved fibrosis, a major cause of functional decline in DMD. These improvements were accompanied by autophagy activation, a recent therapeutic target for DMD, and less oxidative stress. Together, our findings highlight that simvastatin substantially improves the overall health and function of dystrophic skeletal muscles and may provide an unexpected, novel therapy for DMD and related neuromuscular diseases.

  8. Simvastatin Treatment Improves Survival in a Murine Model of Burn Sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beffa, David C; Fischman, Alan J.; Fagan, Shawn P.; Hamrahi, Victoria F.; Kaneki, Masao; Yu, Yong-Ming; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Carter, Edward A.

    2014-01-01

    Infection is the most common and most serious complication of a major burn injury related to burn size. Despite improvements in antimicrobial therapies sepsis still accounts for 50–60% of deaths in burn patients. Given the acute onset and unpredictable nature of sepsis, primary prevention was rarely attempted in its management. However, recent studies have demonstrated that statin treatment can decrease mortality is a murine model of sepsis by preservation of cardiac function and reversal of inflammatory alterations. In addition, it has been shown that treatment with statins is associated with reduced incidence of sepsis in human patients. In the current study groups of CD1 male mice (n=12) were anesthetized and subjected to a dorsal 30% TBSA scald burn injury. Starting 2 hours post burn, the animals were divided into a treatment group receiving 0.2 µ/g simvastatin or a sham group receiving placebo. Simvastatin and placebo were administered by intraperitoneal injection with two dosing regimens; once daily and every 12 hours. On Post burn day 7 cecal ligation and puncture with a 21-gauge needle was performed under ketamine/xylazine anesthesia and the two different dosing schedules were continued. A simvastatin dose dependant improvement in survival was observed in the burn sepsis model. PMID:21145172

  9. Effect of metformin alone compared with metformin plus simvastatin on polycystic ovarian syndrome in Pakistan women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, M.; Tasnim, N.; Mahmud, G.

    2018-01-01

    To determine the efficacy of metformin alone versus metformin plus simvastatin for treatment of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). Study Design:Randomized controlled trial. Place and Duration of Study:Maternal and Child Health Centre, Unit II, Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences (PIMS), from November 2014 to April 2015. Methodology:One hundred and eight patients (108) were randomly divided into metformin group (n=54) and metformin plus simvastatin group (n=54), detailed clinical history, including menstrual details, was taken with thorough examination performed. Baseline ultrasound was performed to evaluate ovarian size and these were considered enlarged with volume >10cc or with >12 follicles in any one ovary. Blood samples were taken at baseline and after three months of therapy to determine the LH/FSH ratio and lipid profile. Efficacy was defined as >15% decrease in the baseline values. Results:The mean age of patients was 28.82 +- 7.18 years. Mean BMI of the patients was 22.41 +-1.55 Kg/m2 . Efficacy was achieved in 66.7% patients with metformin alone, while in 92.6% with combination medication (p=0.001). Conclusion:The combination of metformin plus simvastatin is more efficacious as compared to metformin alone for management of females with PCOS. (author)

  10. Augmented simvastatin cytotoxicity using optimized lipid nanocapsules: a potential for breast cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safwat, Sally; Hathout, Rania M; Ishak, Rania A; Mortada, Nahed D

    2017-03-01

    We noticed paucity in exploiting solutol-based lipid nanocapsules in statins formulations though they carry all favorable properties that are needed for cancer passive targeting such as their small particle size, stealth properties, ability to highly accommodate lipophilic drugs, good internalization and P-gp pump inhibition. The aim of this study was to design and optimize new simvastatin drug delivery systems; lipid nanocapsules intended for administration through the intravenous route as potential treatment for breast cancer. Optimized nanocapsules were prepared by the phase-inversion method according to a D-optimal mixture design, characterized and assessed for their cytotoxicity. Three successful models for particle size, polydispersity index (PDI) and percentage of drug released after 48 h were generated. The prepared lipid nanocapsules acquired spherical and homogenous morphology, good stability and tolerance to sterilization. The obtained release profiles demonstrated desired sustained release pattern. Furthermore, testing selected formulations on human breast cancer adenocarcinoma cells showed augmented cytotoxicity of simvastatin reaching low IC50 values as 1.4 ± 0.02 μg/ml compared to the pure drug. The proposed lipid nanocapsules pose promising candidates as simvastatin carriers intended for the targeting of breast cancer.

  11. Kinetics of carbonyl reductase from human brain.

    OpenAIRE

    Bohren, K M; von Wartburg, J P; Wermuth, B

    1987-01-01

    Initial-rate analysis of the carbonyl reductase-catalysed reduction of menadione by NADPH gave families of straight lines in double-reciprocal plots consistent with a sequential mechanism being obeyed. The fluorescence of NADPH was increased up to 7-fold with a concomitant shift of the emission maximum towards lower wavelength in the presence of carbonyl reductase, and both NADPH and NADP+ caused quenching of the enzyme fluorescence, indicating formation of a binary enzyme-coenzyme complex. D...

  12. Sensitive spectrophotometric assay of simvastatin in pharmaceuticals using permanganate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalsang Tharpa

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Two simple, sensitive, selective and inexpensive spectrophotometric methods are described for the determination of simvastatin (SMT in bulk drug and in tablets using permanganate as the oxidimetric reagent. In method A, SMT is treated with a measured excess of permanganate in acetic acid medium and the unreacted oxidant is measured at 550 nm, whereas in method B the reaction is carried out in alkaline medium and the resulting manganate is measured at 610 nm. In method A, the amount of permanganate reacted corresponds to the SMT content and the absorbance is found to decrease linearly with the concentration; and in method B, the absorbance increases with concentration. The working conditions of assays were optimized, and the methods were validated according to the current ICH guidelines. Under optimum conditions, SMT could be assayed in the concentration ranges, 1.47 - 17.67x10-5 and 2.27 - 27.18 x10-6 mol/L by method A and method B, respectively. The calculated molar absorptivities are 3.2 x 10³ and 2.5 x 10(4 L/mol/cm for method A and method B, respectively with corresponding Sandell sensitivity values of 0.0387 and 0.0178 μg/cm². The limits of detection (LOD and quantification (LOQ have also been reported. Accuracy and precision for the assay were determined by calculating the intra-day and inter-day at three concentrations; the intra-day RSD was Dois métodos espectrofotométricos simples, sensíveis, seletivos e baratos são descritos para a determinação de sinvastatina (SMT a granel e em comprimidos, utilizando permanganato como reagente oxidimétrico. No método A, a SMT é tratada com excesso conhecido de permanganato em meio de ácido acético e o oxidante que não reage é medido a 550 nm, enquanto no método B, a reação é efetuada em meio alcalino e o manganato resultante é medido a 610 nm. No método A, a quantidade de permanganato que reage corresponde ao conteúdo de SMT e a absorbância diminui linearmente com o aumento da

  13. Three months of simvastatin therapy vs. placebo for severe portal hypertension in cirrhosis: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollo-Flores, Priscila; Soldan, Mônica; Santos, Ubiratan Cassano; Kunz, Danielle Gobbi; Mattos, Denise Espindola; da Silva, Alexandre Cerqueira; Marchiori, Roberta Cabral; Rezende, Guilherme Ferreira da Motta

    2015-11-01

    Pleiotropic effects of statins decrease intrahepatic resistance and portal hypertension. We evaluated the effects of simvastatin on hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) and azygos vein blood flow in cirrhotic patients. A 3-month prospective, randomized, triple-blind trial with simvastatin (40 mg/day) vs. placebo was conducted in patients with cirrhotic portal hypertension. HVPG and azygos blood flow, measured by colour Doppler endoscopic ultrasound, were assessed before and after treatment. The primary endpoint was a decrease in the HVPG of at least 20% from baseline or to ≤12 mmHg after the treatment. 34 patients were prospectively enrolled, and 24 completed the protocol. In the simvastatin group 6/11 patients (55%) presented a clinically relevant decrease in the HVPG; no decrease was observed in the placebo group (p=0.036). Patients with medium/large oesophageal varices and previous variceal bleeding had a higher response rate to simvastatin. HVPG and azygos blood flow values were not correlated. No significant adverse events occurred. Simvastatin lowers portal pressure and may even improve liver function. The haemodynamic effect appears to be more evident in patients with severe portal hypertension. Copyright © 2015 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Single-step production of the simvastatin precursor monacolin J by engineering of an industrial strain of Aspergillus terreus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xuenian; Liang, Yajing; Yang, Yong; Lu, Xuefeng

    2017-07-01

    Monacolin J is a key precursor for the synthesis of simvastatin (Zocor), an important drug for treating hypercholesterolemia. Industrially, monacolin J is manufactured through alkaline hydrolysis of lovastatin, a fungal polyketide produced by Aspergillus terreus. Multistep chemical processes for the conversion of lovastatin to simvastatin are laborious, cost expensive and environmentally unfriendly. A biocatalysis process for monacolin J conversion to simvastatin has been developed. However, direct bioproduction of monacolin J has not yet been achieved. Here, we identified a lovastatin hydrolase from Penicillium chrysogenum, which displays a 232-fold higher catalytic efficiency for the in vitro hydrolysis of lovastatin compared to a previously patented hydrolase, but no activity for simvastatin. Furthermore, we showed that an industrial A. terreus strain heterologously expressing this lovastatin hydrolase can produce monacolin J through single-step fermentation with high efficiency, approximately 95% of the biosynthesized lovastatin was hydrolyzed to monacolin J. Our results demonstrate a simple and green technical route for the production of monacolin J, which makes complete bioproduction of the cholesterol-lowering drug simvastatin feasible and promising. Copyright © 2017 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of the effects of subgingival injection of Simvastatin on space re-opening after orthodontic space closure in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arezoo Jahanbin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. This clinical trial evaluated the effect of Simvastatin on space re-opening after orthodontic space closure and its effect on the gingival index (GI and clinical attachment loss (CAL. Methods. 16 females, 25‒40 years old, with spaces between anterior mandibular teeth due to chronic periodontitis were participated in this study. The patients were randomly divided into control and experimental groups. In the experimental group, 1.2% Simvastatin gel and in the control group, 0.9% sodium chloride as a placebo was injected into the pocket depth of the six anterior teeth. The amount of space reopening, GI and CAL were measured. Results. No serious complications were observed during interventions and follow-up periods. Space re-opening was significantly reduced in patients receiving Simvastatin (P < 0.001. Moreover, GI reduction was significantly greater in Sim-vastatin group compared to the control group (P < 0.001. However, CAL did not demonstrate a significant difference between the groups. Conclusion. Simvastatin may decrease space re-opening after orthodontic space closure in human anterior teeth.

  16. Determination of Prazosin and Simvastatin in Landfill Leachate using Liquid Chromatography-Time of Flight-Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zainab Haider Mussa; Zainab Haider Mussa; Fouad Fadhil Al-Qaim; Fouad Fadhil Al-Qaim; Md Pauzi Abdullah; Mohamed Rozali Othman

    2016-01-01

    Human pharmaceuticals have been shown to occur in considerably high amounts in sewage treatment plant (STP) effluents and surface waters. So far there is no data available on the occurrence of prazosin and simvastatin in leachate sample in Malaysia. Thus, this study is the first report to analysis of prazosin and simvastatin in leachate samples by using solid phase extraction-liquid chromatography-time of flight-mass spectrometry (SPE-LC-TOF-MS). The proposed method included isolation and reconstitute procedure. The linearity range was achieved at 1.5-3000 μg/ L and 0.8-125 μg/ L for prazosin and simvstatin, respectively with a determination coefficient (R 2 ) > 0.99. The limit of quantification (LOQ) for prazosin and simvastatin was calculated at 2.1 and 0.5 ng/ L in deionised water (DIW), meanwhile it was recorded at 3.5 and 2.4 ng/ L for prazosin and simvastatin in effluent sample, respectively. Two pharmaceutical compounds were detected in the leachate samples: prazosin and simvastatin at concentrations levels of 3850 and 415 ng/ L, respectively. (author)

  17. Characterization of a cultured human T-cell line with genetically altered ribonucleotide reductase activity. Model for immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, D; Ullman, B

    1983-04-10

    From human CCRF-CEM T-cells growing in continuous culture, we have selected, isolated, and characterized a clonal cell line, APHID-D2, with altered ribonucleotide reductase activity. In comparative growth rate experiments, the APHID-D2 cell line is less sensitive than the parental cell line to growth inhibition by deoxyadenosine in the presence of 10 microM erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)adenine, an inhibitor of adenosine deaminase. The APHID-D2 cell line has elevated levels of all four dNTPs. The resistance of the APHID-D2 cell line to growth inhibition by deoxyadenosine and the abnormal dNTP levels can be explained by the fact that the APHID-D2 ribonucleotide reductase, unlike the parental ribonucleotide reductase, is not normally sensitive to inhibition by dATP. These results suggest that the allosteric site of ribonucleotide reductase which binds both dATP and ATP is altered in the APHID-D2 line. The isolation of a mutant clone of human T-cells which contains a ribonucleotide reductase that has lost its normal sensitivity to dATP and which is resistant to deoxyadenosine-mediated growth inhibition suggests that a primary pathogenic target of accumulated dATP in lymphocytes from patients with adenosine deaminase deficiency may be the cellular ribonucleotide reductase.

  18. Regulation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase activity and cholesterol biosynthesis by oxylanosterols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panini, S.R.; Sexton, R.C.; Gupta, A.K.; Parish, E.J.; Chitrakorn, S.; Rudney, H.

    1986-11-01

    Treatment of rat intestinal epithelial cell cultures with the oxidosqualene cyclase inhibitor, 3 beta-(2-(diethylamino)-ethoxy)androst-5-en-17-one (U18666A), resulted in an accumulation of squalene 2,3:22,23-dioxide (SDO). When U18666A was withdrawn and the cells were treated with the sterol 14 alpha-demethylase inhibitor, ketoconazole, SDO was metabolized to a product identified as 24(S),25-epoxylanosterol. To test the biological effects and cellular metabolism of this compound, we prepared 24(RS),25-epoxylanosterol by chemical synthesis. The epimeric mixture of 24,25-epoxylanosterols could be resolved by high performance liquid chromatography on a wide-pore, non-endcapped, reverse phase column. Both epimers were effective suppressors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase activity of IEC-6 cells. The suppressive action of the natural epimer, 24(S),25-epoxylanosterol, but not that of 24(R),25-epoxylanosterol could be completely prevented by ketoconazole. IEC-6 cells could efficiently metabolize biosynthetic 24(S),25-epoxy(/sup 3/H)anosterol mainly to the known reductase-suppressor 24(S),25-epoxycholesterol. This metabolism was substantially reduced by ketoconazole. These data support the conclusion that 24(S),25-epoxylanosterol per se is not a suppressor of HMG-CoA reductase activity but is a precursor to a regulatory oxysterol(s). It has recently been reported that 25-hydroxycholesterol can occur naturally in cultured cells in amounts sufficient to effect regulation of HMG-CoA reductase. In order to investigate the biological effects of possible precursors of 25-hydroxycholesterol, we chemically synthesized 25-hydroxylanosterol and 25-hydroxylanostene-3-one. Both oxylanosterol derivatives suppressed cellular sterol synthesis at the level of HMG-CoA reductase. (Abstract Truncated)

  19. Inhibition of steroid 5 alpha-reductase by specific aliphatic unsaturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, T; Liao, S

    1992-01-01

    Human or rat microsomal 5 alpha-reductase activity, as measured by enzymic conversion of testosterone into 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone or by binding of a competitive inhibitor, [3H]17 beta-NN-diethulcarbamoyl-4-methyl-4-aza-5 alpha-androstan-3-one ([3H]4-MA) to the reductase, is inhibited by low concentrations (less than 10 microM) of certain polyunsaturated fatty acids. The relative inhibitory potencies of unsaturated fatty acids are, in decreasing order: gamma-linolenic acid greater than cis-4,7,10,13,16,19-docosahexaenoic acid = cis-6,9,12,15-octatetraenoic acid = arachidonic acid = alpha-linolenic acid greater than linoleic acid greater than palmitoleic acid greater than oleic acid greater than myristoleic acid. Other unsaturated fatty acids such as undecylenic acid, erucic acid and nervonic acid, are inactive. The methyl esters and alcohol analogues of these compounds, glycerols, phospholipids, saturated fatty acids, retinoids and carotenes were inactive even at 0.2 mM. The results of the binding assay and the enzymic assay correlated well except for elaidic acid and linolelaidic acid, the trans isomers of oleic acid and linoleic acid respectively, which were much less active than their cis isomers in the binding assay but were as potent in the enzymic assay. gamma-Linolenic acid had no effect on the activities of two other rat liver microsomal enzymes: NADH:menadione reductase and glucuronosyl transferase. gamma-Linolenic acid, the most potent inhibitor tested, decreased the Vmax. and increased Km values of substrates, NADPH and testosterone, and promoted dissociation of [3H]4-MA from the microsomal reductase. gamma-Linolenic acid, but not the corresponding saturated fatty acid (stearic acid), inhibited the 5 alpha-reductase activity, but not the 17 beta-dehydrogenase activity, of human prostate cancer cells in culture. These results suggest that unsaturated fatty acids may play an important role in regulating androgen action in target cells. PMID:1637346

  20. Regulation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase activity and cholesterol biosynthesis by oxylanosterols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panini, S.R.; Sexton, R.C.; Gupta, A.K.; Parish, E.J.; Chitrakorn, S.; Rudney, H.

    1986-01-01

    Treatment of rat intestinal epithelial cell cultures with the oxidosqualene cyclase inhibitor, 3 beta-[2-(diethylamino)-ethoxy]androst-5-en-17-one (U18666A), resulted in an accumulation of squalene 2,3:22,23-dioxide (SDO). When U18666A was withdrawn and the cells were treated with the sterol 14 alpha-demethylase inhibitor, ketoconazole, SDO was metabolized to a product identified as 24(S),25-epoxylanosterol. To test the biological effects and cellular metabolism of this compound, we prepared 24(RS),25-epoxylanosterol by chemical synthesis. The epimeric mixture of 24,25-epoxylanosterols could be resolved by high performance liquid chromatography on a wide-pore, non-endcapped, reverse phase column. Both epimers were effective suppressors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase activity of IEC-6 cells. The suppressive action of the natural epimer, 24(S),25-epoxylanosterol, but not that of 24(R),25-epoxylanosterol could be completely prevented by ketoconazole. IEC-6 cells could efficiently metabolize biosynthetic 24(S),25-epoxy[ 3 H]anosterol mainly to the known reductase-suppressor 24(S),25-epoxycholesterol. This metabolism was substantially reduced by ketoconazole. These data support the conclusion that 24(S),25-epoxylanosterol per se is not a suppressor of HMG-CoA reductase activity but is a precursor to a regulatory oxysterol(s). It has recently been reported that 25-hydroxycholesterol can occur naturally in cultured cells in amounts sufficient to effect regulation of HMG-CoA reductase. In order to investigate the biological effects of possible precursors of 25-hydroxycholesterol, we chemically synthesized 25-hydroxylanosterol and 25-hydroxylanostene-3-one. Both oxylanosterol derivatives suppressed cellular sterol synthesis at the level of HMG-CoA reductase. (Abstract Truncated)

  1. BIOLOGICAL ROLE OF ALDO-KETO REDUCTASES IN RETINOIC ACID BIOSYNTHESIS AND SIGNALING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Xavier eRuiz

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Several aldo-keto reductase (AKR enzymes from subfamilies 1B and 1C show retinaldehyde reductase activity, having low Km and kcat values. Only AKR1B10 and 1B12, with all-trans-retinaldehyde, and AKR1C3, with 9-cis-retinaldehyde, display high catalytic efficiency. Major structural determinants for retinaldehyde isomer specificity are located in the external loops (A and C for AKR1B10, and B for AKR1C3, as assessed by site-directed mutagenesis and molecular dynamics. Cellular models have shown that AKR1B and 1C enzymes are well suited to work in vivo as retinaldehyde reductases and to regulate retinoic acid (RA biosynthesis at hormone pre-receptor level. An additional physiological role for the retinaldehyde reductase activity of these enzymes, consistent with their tissue localization, is their participation in β-carotene absorption. Retinaldehyde metabolism may be subjected to subcellular compartmentalization, based on enzyme localization. While retinaldehyde oxidation to RA takes place in the cytosol, reduction to retinol could take place in the cytosol by AKRs or in the membranes of endoplasmic reticulum by microsomal retinaldehyde reductases. Upregulation of some AKR1 enzymes in different cancer types may be linked to their induction by oxidative stress and to their participation in different signaling pathways related to cell proliferation. AKR1B10 and AKR1C3, through their retinaldehyde reductase activity, trigger a decrease in the RA biosynthesis flow, resulting in RA deprivation and consequently lower differentiation, with an increased cancer risk in target tissues. Rational design of selective AKR inhibitors could lead to development of novel drugs for cancer treatment as well as reduction of chemotherapeutic drug resistance.

  2. The aldo-keto reductase superfamily homepage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyndman, David; Bauman, David R; Heredia, Vladi V; Penning, Trevor M

    2003-02-01

    The aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) are one of the three enzyme superfamilies that perform oxidoreduction on a wide variety of natural and foreign substrates. A systematic nomenclature for the AKR superfamily was adopted in 1996 and was updated in September 2000 (visit www.med.upenn.edu/akr). Investigators have been diligent in submitting sequences of functional proteins to the Web site. With the new additions, the superfamily contains 114 proteins expressed in prokaryotes and eukaryotes that are distributed over 14 families (AKR1-AKR14). The AKR1 family contains the aldose reductases, the aldehyde reductases, the hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases and steroid 5beta-reductases, and is the largest. Other families of interest include AKR6, which includes potassium channel beta-subunits, and AKR7 the aflatoxin aldehyde reductases. Two new families include AKR13 (yeast aldose reductase) and AKR14 (Escherichia coli aldehyde reductase). Crystal structures of many AKRs and their complexes with ligands are available in the PDB and accessible through the Web site. Each structure has the characteristic (alpha/beta)(8)-barrel motif of the superfamily, a conserved cofactor binding site and a catalytic tetrad, and variable loop structures that define substrate specificity. Although the majority of AKRs are monomeric proteins of about 320 amino acids in length, the AKR2, AKR6 and AKR7 family may form multimers. To expand the nomenclature to accommodate multimers, we recommend that the composition and stoichiometry be listed. For example, AKR7A1:AKR7A4 (1:3) would designate a tetramer of the composition indicated. The current nomenclature is recognized by the Human Genome Project (HUGO) and the Web site provides a link to genomic information including chromosomal localization, gene boundaries, human ESTs and SNPs and much more.

  3. Evaluation of the effects of subgingival injection of Simvastatin on space re-opening after orthodontic space closure in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanbin, Arezoo; Abtahi, Mostafa; Namdar, Parastoo; Heravi, Farzin; Sadeghi, Fatemeh; Arab, Hamidreza; Shafaee, Hooman

    2016-01-01

    Background. This clinical trial evaluated the effect of Simvastatin on space re-opening after orthodontic space closure and its effect on the gingival index (GI) and clinical attachment loss (CAL). Methods. 16 females, 25-40 years old, with spaces between anterior mandibular teeth due to chronic periodontitis were participated in this study. The patients were randomly divided into control and experimental groups. In the experimental group, 1.2% Simvastatin gel and in the control group, 0.9% sodium chloride as a placebo was injected into the pocket depth of the six anterior teeth. The amount of space reopening, GI and CAL were measured. Results. No serious complications were observed during interventions and follow-up periods. Space re-opening was significantly reduced in patients receiving Simvastatin (P space re-opening after orthodontic space closure in human anterior teeth.

  4. The effect of simvastatin treatment on the amyloid precursor protein and brain cholesterol metabolism in patients with Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoglund, K; Thelen, K M; Syversen, S

    2005-01-01

    During the last years, several clinical studies have been published trying to elucidate the effect of statin treatment on amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing and metabolism of brain cholesterol in Alzheimer's disease (AD) in humans. We present an open biochemical study where 19 patients...... with AD have been treated with simvastatin (20 mg/day) for 12 months. The aim was to further investigate the effect of simvastatin treatment on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers of APP processing, AD biomarkers as total tau and tau phosphorylated at threonine 181, brain cholesterol metabolism as well...... as on cognitive decline in patients with AD. Despite biochemical data suggesting that treatment with 20 mg/day of simvastatin for 12 months does affect the brain cholesterol metabolism, we did not find any change in CSF or plasma levels of beta-amyloid (Abeta)(1-42). However, by analysis of APP isoforms, we found...

  5. Inhibitory effect of the combination therapy of simvastatin and pinocembrin on atherosclerosis in apoE-deficient mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Hui

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The present study was performed to investigate the effects of the combination therapy of pinocembrin and simvastatin on the atherosclerotic lesions development in the ApoE−/− mice. Methods Eight-week-old male ApoE−/− mice were fed high fat diet (HFD and treated with simvastatin (10 mg/kg per day, pinocembrin (20 mg/kg per day, or the combination therapy (simvastatin 5 mg/kg per day and pinocembrin 20 mg/kg per day for 14 weeks. The serum lipid levels, nitric oxide (NO, endothelin (ET, superoxide dismutase (SOD and malondialdehyde (MDA were determined with spectrophotometric measurement and ELISA assay. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF in serum and aortic root was detected. En face analyses of atherosclerotic lesion in whole aorta and aortic root sections were performed with plaque staining using oil red O. Results The combination treatment with simvastatin and pinocembrin resulted in significantly decreased levels of serum total cholesterol, triglycerides and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, augmented NO levels and SOD activity, inhibited ET and VEGF expression. Immunohistochemistry of aortic valve sections revealed that the combination therapy also suppressed the expression of VEGF induced by HFD. In addition, HFD-induced arterial wall lipid disposition displayed by oil red O staining was reduced significantly in aortic root and whole aorta en face in the combination administrated mice. The effect of the combination was superior to simvastatin alone. Conclusion The combination of simvastatin and pinocembrin synergistically inhibited atherosclerotic lesion development in ApoE−/− mice with hyperlipidemia, which is partially dependent on the protective of vascular endothelium.

  6. Simvastatin Inhibits IL-5-Induced Chemotaxis and CCR3 Expression of HL-60-Derived and Human Primary Eosinophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Chia-Hsiang; Tsai, Wan-Chun; Lee, Ta-Jen; Huang, Chi-Che; Chang, Po-Hung; Su Pang, Jong-Hwei

    2016-01-01

    IL-5-induced chemotaxis of eosinophils is an important feature of allergic airway inflammatory diseases. Simvastatin, a lipid lowering agent, has been shown to exhibit anti-inflammatory and anti-allergic effects. Our aim was to investigate the effect of simvastatin on IL-5-induced eosinophil chemotaxis and its regulatory mechanisms. Eosinophils were derived by treating HL-60 clone 15 (HC15) cells with butyric acid (BA) in an alkaline condition or through direct isolation from human peripheral blood. The expressions of CC chemokine receptor 3 (CCR3) and interleukin (IL)-5 receptors (IL5Rα and β) were analyzed using RT/real-time PCR. The granular proteins were stained using fast green. Eotaxin-induced chemotaxis was measured using a transwell migration assay. CCR3 protein expression was revealed by immunocytochemistry. An animal model of allergic rhinitis was established by challenging Sprague-Dawley® rats repeatedly with ovalbumin. Butyric acid significantly increased the expression of IL5Rα and IL5Rβ, CCR3 and granular proteins in HC15 cells, indicating the maturation of eosinophils (BA-E cells). IL-5 further enhanced the CCR3 expression at both the mRNA and protein levels and the eotaxin-induced chemotaxis of BA-E cells. Simvastatin inhibited the effects of IL-5 on BA-E cells, but not in the presence of mevalonate. Similar results were also exhibited in human primary eosinophils. In vivo animal studies further confirmed that oral simvastatin could significantly suppress the infiltration of eosinophils into turbinate tissues of allergic rats. Therefore, simvastatin was demonstrated to inhibit IL-5-induced CCR3 expression and chemotaxis of eosinophils mediated via the mevalonate pathway. We confirmed that simvastatin also reduced eosinophilic infiltration in allergic rhinitis.

  7. Sitagliptin/Simvastatin: a first combination tablet to treat type 2 diabetes and hypercholesterolemia – a review of its characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramadan WH

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Wijdan H Ramadan, Wissam K Kabbara Department of Pharmacy Practice, School of Pharmacy, Lebanese American University, Byblos, Lebanon Background: The purpose of this study was to review the current literature and information on the combination product Juvisync™ (sitagliptin + simvastatin, which was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in October 2011. Methods: PubMed (2001–2014 was searched for primary and review articles on sitagliptin, simvastatin, or the combination product. Drug manufacturing data and product labeling were also used. Studies of simvastatin, sitagliptin, or the combination were screened and analyzed to include relevant and recent papers. Selected English language trials were limited to those with human subjects and included both safety and efficacy outcomes. Results: When compared with glipizide as add-on therapy to metformin, sitagliptin was noninferior but had lower rates of hypoglycemia and weight gain. In addition, when compared with insulin glargine, sitagliptin was less effective in decreasing glycosylated hemoglobin, but was associated with significantly lower rates of hypoglycemia. Further, trials have shown a beneficial effect of using statins in patients with diabetes mellitus with regard to decreasing cardiovascular risk, regardless of baseline lipid levels or the presence of a cardiac disease. Both medications have also demonstrated an acceptable side effect profile. However, caution is needed when coadministering with any drug that may increase simvastatin levels to reduce the risk of myopathy and rhabdomyolysis. Conclusion: Juvisync should be used in patients requiring both sitagliptin and simvastatin. Both agents have shown good efficacy and acceptable safety profiles. Sitagliptin is a good option for diabetic patients to improve glycemic control with a lower risk of hypoglycemia and weight gain. Keywords: simvastatin, sitagliptin, Juvisync™, diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia

  8. Enzyme structure and interaction with inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    London, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    This article reviews some of the results of studies on the 13 C-labeled enzyme dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques are used in combination with isotopic labeling to learn about the structure and dynamics of this enzyme. 13 C-labeling is used for the purpose of studying enzyme/substrate and enzyme/inhibitor interactions. A second set of studies with DHFR was designed to investigate the basis for the high affinity between the inhibitor methotrexate and DHFR. The label was placed on the inhibitor, rather than the enzyme

  9. Observed and predicted reduction of ischemic cardiovascular events in the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holme, Ingar; Boman, Kurt; Brudi, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    In the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) trial, combined ezetimibe (10 mg) and simvastatin (40 mg) decreased low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels by 50% and ischemic cardiovascular event (ICE) risk by 22% compared to placebo. A larger decrease in ICE risk might have been...... expected for the degree of lipid-lowering observed. This analysis investigated relations between changes in lipoprotein components (LCs), and ICE risk decrease in the SEAS trial in all patients, by severity of aortic stenosis (AS), and compared to results of other clinical trials. A total of 1,570 patients...

  10. Purification and kinetic analysis of cytosolic and mitochondrial thioredoxin glutathione reductase extracted from Taenia solium cysticerci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plancarte, Agustin; Nava, Gabriela

    2015-02-01

    Thioredoxin glutathione reductases (TGRs) (EC 1.8.1.9) were purified to homogeneity from the cytosolic (cTsTGR) and mitochondrial (mTsTGR) fractions of Taenia solium, the agent responsible for neurocysticercosis, one of the major central nervous system parasitic diseases in humans. TsTGRs had a relative molecular weight of 132,000, while the corresponding value per subunit obtained under denaturing conditions, was of 62,000. Specific activities for thioredoxin reductase and glutathione reductase substrates for both TGRs explored were in the range or lower than values obtained for other platyhelminths and mammalian TGRs. cTsTGR and mTsTGR also showed hydroperoxide reductase activity using hydroperoxide as substrate. Km(DTNB) and Kcat(DTNB) values for cTsTGR and mTsTGR (88 µM and 1.9 s(-1); 45 µM and 12.6 s(-1), respectively) and Km(GSSG) and Kcat(GSSG) values for cTsTGR and mTsTGR (6.3 µM and 0.96 s(-1); 4 µM and 1.62 s(-1), respectively) were similar to or lower than those reported for mammalian TGRs. Mass spectrometry analysis showed that 12 peptides from cTsTGR and seven from mTsTGR were a match for gi|29825896 thioredoxin glutathione reductase [Echinococcus granulosus], confirming that both enzymes are TGRs. Both T. solium TGRs were inhibited by the gold compound auranofin, a selective inhibitor of thiol-dependent flavoreductases (I₅₀ = 3.25, 2.29 nM for DTNB and GSSG substrates, respectively for cTsTGR; I₅₀ = 5.6, 25.4 nM for mTsTGR toward the same substrates in the described order). Glutathione reductase activity of cTsTGR and mTsTGR exhibited hysteretic behavior with moderate to high concentrations of GSSG; this result was not observed either with thioredoxin, DTNB or NADPH. However, the observed hysteretic kinetics was suppressed with increasing amounts of both parasitic TGRs. These data suggest the existence of an effective substitute which may account for the lack of the detoxification enzymes glutathione reductase

  11. Effect of Simvastatin collagen graft on wound healing of defective bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Jun Ho; Kim, Gyu Tae [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yong Suk; Lee, Hyeon Woo; Hwang, Eui Hwan [Institute of Oral Biology, School of Dentistry, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-09-15

    To observe and evaluate the effects of Simvastatin-induced osteogenesis on the wound healing of defective bone. 64 defective bones were created in the parietal bone of 32 New Zealand White rabbits. The defects were grafted with collagen matrix carriers mixed with Simvastatin solution in the experimental group of 16 rabbits and with collagen matrix carriers mixed with water in the controlled group. The rabbits were terminated at an interval of 3, 5, 7, and 9 days, 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks after the formation of defective bone. The wound healing was evaluated by soft X-ray radiography. The tissues within defective bones were evaluated through the analysis of flow cytometry for the manifestation of Runx2 and Osteocalcin, and observed histopathologically by using H-E stain and Masson's trichrome stain. Results : 1. In the experimental group, flow cytometry revealed more manifestation of Runx2 at 5, 7, and 9 days and Osteocalcin at 2 weeks than in the controlled groups, but there was few difference in comparison with the controlled group. 2. In the experimental group, flow cytometry revealed considerably more cells and erythrocytes at 5, 7, and 9 days in comparison with the controlled group. 3. In the experimental group, soft x-ray radiography revealed the extended formation of trabeculation at 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks. 4. Histopathological features of the experimental group showed more fibroblasts and newly formed vessels at 5 and 7 days, and the formation of osteoid tissues at 9 days, and the newly formed trabeculations at 4 and 6 weeks. As the induced osteogenesis by Simvastatin, there was few contrast of the manifestation between Runx2 and Osteocalcin based on the differentiation of osteoblasts. But it was considered that the more formation of cells and erythrocytes depending on newly formed vessels in the experimental group obviously had an effect on the bone regeneration.

  12. Effect of Simvastatin collagen graft on wound healing of defective bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Jun Ho; Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Lee, Hyeon Woo; Hwang, Eui Hwan

    2008-01-01

    To observe and evaluate the effects of Simvastatin-induced osteogenesis on the wound healing of defective bone. 64 defective bones were created in the parietal bone of 32 New Zealand White rabbits. The defects were grafted with collagen matrix carriers mixed with Simvastatin solution in the experimental group of 16 rabbits and with collagen matrix carriers mixed with water in the controlled group. The rabbits were terminated at an interval of 3, 5, 7, and 9 days, 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks after the formation of defective bone. The wound healing was evaluated by soft X-ray radiography. The tissues within defective bones were evaluated through the analysis of flow cytometry for the manifestation of Runx2 and Osteocalcin, and observed histopathologically by using H-E stain and Masson's trichrome stain. Results : 1. In the experimental group, flow cytometry revealed more manifestation of Runx2 at 5, 7, and 9 days and Osteocalcin at 2 weeks than in the controlled groups, but there was few difference in comparison with the controlled group. 2. In the experimental group, flow cytometry revealed considerably more cells and erythrocytes at 5, 7, and 9 days in comparison with the controlled group. 3. In the experimental group, soft x-ray radiography revealed the extended formation of trabeculation at 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks. 4. Histopathological features of the experimental group showed more fibroblasts and newly formed vessels at 5 and 7 days, and the formation of osteoid tissues at 9 days, and the newly formed trabeculations at 4 and 6 weeks. As the induced osteogenesis by Simvastatin, there was few contrast of the manifestation between Runx2 and Osteocalcin based on the differentiation of osteoblasts. But it was considered that the more formation of cells and erythrocytes depending on newly formed vessels in the experimental group obviously had an effect on the bone regeneration.

  13. RED ROSELLA TEA AND AVOCADO AS SIMVASTATIN THERAPY SUPPORT REDUCE TOTAL CHOLESTEROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budi Artini

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hypercholesterolemia is a condition characterized by high levels of total cholesterol in the blood. Many studies have proven that steeping tea rosella and flesh of an avocado can reduce total cholesterol levels. This study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of therapy companion rosella tea and  avocado in lowering total cholesterol levels in hypercholesterolemia clients. Method: This type of research is a quasi-experimental study with pre-post test control group design. The population study was a client with hypercholesterolemia in the working area of menganti health centers. First sample group consisted of nine respondents received the drug Simvastatin 10 mg and rosella tea consumed as much as 2 g 1x / day. The second group consisted of nine respondents received the drug Simvastatin 10 mg and avocado meat weighing 330 grams were consumed 1x / day. The control group consisted of 11 respondents have a drug Simvastatin 10 mg oral 1x daily at night before bed. All groups examined total cholesterol levels before treatment and after treatment on day 15. Result: The results of one-way ANOVA test showed a significant difference between before and after treatment in the first group (p=0,001 and second group (p= 0,005, and there is no significant difference before and after treatment in the control group (p= 0,248. The difference between the three groups showed p= 0.025. Conclusion: The conclusion of this study is giving rosella tea and avocado has the same effectiveness in lowering total cholesterol levels so that health workers can suggest the use of rosella tea and avocado as a companion therapy to reduce total cholesterol level.

  14. EFFECT OF SIMVASTATIN TREATMENT ON BONE MINERAL DENSITY IN HYPERCHOLESTEROLEMIC POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Jankovic

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Statins are able to reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality mainly through their hypocholesterolemic effect. Beyond the inhibition of cholesterol synthesis, the identification of pleiotropic mechanisms has motivated many studies to evaluate the effects of statin use on bone mineral density (BMD modification.The aim of our study was to evaluate whether simvastatin treatment (20 mg/d could modify BMD in hypercholesterolemic women (n=28 after one-year treatment as compared with a control group treated only with a diet (n=11. The exclusion criteria was current or previous therapy with statins, bisphosphonates and/or estrogens. The following parameters were determined at the beginning and after one year, and those are: total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL-C and LDL-C (Friedewald equation. The BMD was measured at the lumbar spine by dual energy x-ray absorpiometry (DEXA.In the simvastatin treated group, BMD showed an insignificant 2,812% increase after 12 months, respectively (0,965+0,111 v 0,992+0,110, P>0,05. The group treated only with hypolipidic diet demonstrated a 3,45% decrease in BMD (respectively, 1,042+0,181 v 1.006+0,182; P>0,05 after 12 months. Nevertheless, the comparison of average BMD changes between the two examined groups during one year showed a significant value diference (-0,027+0,037 v 0,036+0,036; P<0,0006.As partly suggested by retrospective or observational data, this longitudinal study indicates that simvastatin treatment achieves a beneficial effect on BMD.

  15. Effects of Topic Simvastatin for the Treatment of Chronic Vascular Cutaneous Ulcers: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raposio, Edoardo; Libondi, Guido; Bertozzi, Nicolò; Grignaffini, Eugenio; Grieco, Michele P

    2015-12-01

    Recent research suggests that statins might be useful in the process of wound healing, playing a positive immune-modulatory role, improving microvascular function and reducing oxidative stress. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the efficacy of topic application of Simvastatin-based cream in the treatment of chronic vascular cutaneous ulcers, comparing this type of treatment to a collagen-based dressing, proven to be effective for ulcer treatment. A total of 20 ulcers were studied in 2 Groups of randomly-chosen patients for a period of one month. In the first Group a 0.5% Simvastatin-based cream was topically administered, while the second Group (control) was treated with an absorbable type I bovine collagen-based medication. Each week, wound healing progress was observed in both Groups, and the ulcers photographed. Wound healing rate was calculated by considering the absolute change in area and by the formula "healing ratio (%) = [(Area 0 - Area t4 )/Area 0 ] × 100," both sets of data being related to the days comprised in the study in order to calculate healing rate per day. Statistical analysis was performed by Student t test. Study endpoint equaling the time-course changes of ulcer areas. At the end of the study, when considering absolute change in area, the experimental Group appeared to heal better and faster than the control Group although differences between the Groups were not statistically significant. Conversely, rates of wound healing in the experimental and control Groups were 46.88% and 64% respectively, revealing statistically significant differences. ( P topic application of a simvastatin-based cream proved to be well- tolerated but not effective in the management of vascular leg ulcers in a 4 week-period.

  16. Respiratory arsenate reductase as a bidirectional enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richey, C.; Chovanec, P.; Hoeft, S.E.; Oremland, R.S.; Basu, P.; Stolz, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    The haloalkaliphilic bacterium Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii is capable of anaerobic chemolithoautotrophic growth by coupling the oxidation of arsenite (As(III)) to the reduction of nitrate and carbon dioxide. Analysis of its complete genome indicates that it lacks a conventional arsenite oxidase (Aox), but instead possesses two operons that each encode a putative respiratory arsenate reductase (Arr). Here we show that one homolog is expressed under chemolithoautotrophic conditions and exhibits both arsenite oxidase and arsenate reductase activity. We also demonstrate that Arr from two arsenate respiring bacteria, Alkaliphilus oremlandii and Shewanella sp. strain ANA-3, is also biochemically reversible. Thus Arr can function as a reductase or oxidase. Its physiological role in a specific organism, however, may depend on the electron potentials of the molybdenum center and [Fe–S] clusters, additional subunits, or constitution of the electron transfer chain. This versatility further underscores the ubiquity and antiquity of microbial arsenic metabolism.

  17. Light Sensitivity of Lactococcus lactis Thioredoxin Reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjoldager, Nicklas

    The thioredoxin system has evolved in all kingdoms of life acting as a key antioxidant system in the defense against oxidative stress. The thioredoxin system utilizes reducing equivalents from NADPH to reduce protein disulfide targets. The reducing equivalents are shuttled via a flavin and redox...... active dithiol motif in thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) to reduce the small ubiquitous thioredoxin (Trx). Trx in turn regulates the protein dithiol/disulfide balance by reduction of protein disulfide targets in e.g. ribonucleotide reductase, peroxiredoxins and methionine sulfoxide reductase. The glutathione......, thus expected to rely mainly on the Trx system for thiol-disulfide control. L. lactis is an important industrial microorganism used as starter culture in the dairy production of cheese, buttermilk etc. and known to be sensitive to oxidative stress. The L. lactis TrxR (LlTrxR) is a homodimeric...

  18. Protective effect of coenzyme Q10 in simvastatin and gemfibrozil induced rhabdomyolysis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farswan, Mamta; Rathod, S P; Upaganlawar, A B; Semwal, Arvind

    2005-10-01

    Administration of simvastatin (80 mg/kg, po. evening dose) and gemfibrozil (600 mg/kg, po twice) for 30 days produced significant decrease in the level of reduced glutathione, superoxide dismutase, catalase and increase in the level of lipid peroxidation and various serum parameters (creatine phosphokinase, lactate dehydrogenase, serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase, creatinine, urea and blood urea nitrogen). This suggested involvement of oxidative stress in rhabdomyolysis. Increase in the level of reduced glutathione, superoxide dismutase, catalase and decrease in the level of lipid peroxidation and serum parameters after administration of antioxidant CoQ10 (10 mg/kg.ip) proved the protective effect of CoQ10 in rhabdomyolysis.

  19. Potency of a novel saw palmetto ethanol extract, SPET-085, for inhibition of 5alpha-reductase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pais, Pilar

    2010-08-01

    The nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-dependent membrane protein 5alpha-reductase irreversibly catalyses the conversion of testosterone to the most potent androgen, 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT). In humans, two 5alpha-reductase isoenyzmes are expressed: type I and type II. Type II is found primarily in prostate tissue. Saw palmetto extract (SPE) has been widely used for the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The mechanisms of the pharmacological effects of SPE include the inhibition of 5alpha-reductase, among other actions. Clinical studies of SPE have been equivocal, with some showing significant results and others not. These inconsistent results may be due, in part, to varying bioactivities of the SPE used in the studies. The aim of the present study was to determine the in vitro potency of a novel saw palmetto ethanol extract (SPET-085), an inhibitor of the 5alpha-reductase isoenzyme type II, in a cell-free test system. On the basis of the enzymatic conversion of the substrate androstenedione to the 5alpha-reduced product 5alpha-androstanedione, the inhibitory potency was measured and compared to those of finasteride, an approved 5alpha-reductase inhibitor. SPET-085 concentration-dependently inhibited 5alpha-reductase type II in vitro (IC(50)=2.88+/-0.45 microg/mL). The approved 5alpha-reductase inhibitor, finasteride, tested as positive control, led to 61% inhibition of 5alpha-reductase type II. SPET-085 effectively inhibits the enzyme that has been linked to BPH, and the amount of extract required for activity is very low compared to data reported for other extracts. It can be concluded from data in the literature that SPET-085 is as effective as a hexane extract of saw palmetto that exhibited the highest levels of bioactivity, and is more effective than other SPEs tested. This study confirmed that SPET-085 has prostate health-promoting bioactivity that also corresponds favorably to

  20. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene polymorphism in type 1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In patients with type-I diabetes mellitus folate deficiency is associated with endothelial dysfunction. So, polymorphism in genes involved in folate metabolism may have a role in vascular disease. This study was designed to evaluate the relationship between methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene polymorphism ...

  1. Prevalence of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase ( MTHFR ) and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) and Cytosolic serine hydroxymethyltransferase (cSHMT) are enzymes involve in folate regulation in human. The C to T transition of the cSHMT and MTHFR genes at the 1420 as well as 677 nucleotides both carries TT genotype respectively. These enzymes have direct and ...

  2. ARTERIAL STIFFNESS PARAMETERS IN PATIENTS WITH MODERATE/HIGH CARDIOVASCULAR RISK DURING LISINOPRIL AND SIMVASTATIN TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Isakova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate parameters of arterial stiffness by non-invasive arteriography in patients with moderate/high cardiovascular risk receiving lisinopril and simvastatin.Material and methods. 20 patients (aged 50-55 y.o. with arterial hypertension of the 1st degree and dislipidemia are included in the study. All patients had pulse wave velocity (PWV ≥ 10 m/s and/or the corrected index of pulse wave augmentation (AI × 80 ≥ -10% according to non-invasive arteriography data; and moderate-high cardiovascular risk (≥ 3%. Patients received therapy with lisinopril and simvastatin. Blood pressure (BP levels and lipid profiles were assessed before therapy and in 1, 2, 6 and 12 month of the observation. Non-invasive arteriography was performed before therapy and in 2, 6 and 12 months later.Results. BP target levels were reached within 1 month of treatment as well as improvement of lipid profile was reached within 2 months in majority of the patients. Reference PWV and AI were reached in 85,7% of patients within one year of treatment.Conclusion. Arterial stiffness parameters help to evaluate cardiovascular risk changes accurately as the results of treatment.

  3. Simvastatin as an Adjunct to Conventional Therapy of Non-infectious Uveitis: A Randomized, Open-Label Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirinsky, Ivan V; Biryukova, Anastasia A; Shirinsky, Valery S

    2017-12-01

    Statins have been shown to reduce ocular inflammation in animal models of uveitis and to prevent development of uveitis in observational studies. There have been no experimental human studies evaluating statins' efficacy and safety in uveitis. In this study, we aimed to investigate efficacy and safety of simvastatin in patients with uveitis. For this single-center, open-label, randomized study, we enrolled patients with acute non-infectious uveitis. The patients were randomized to receive 40 mg simvastatin per day for 2 months in addition to conventional treatment or conventional treatment alone. The studied outcomes were the rate of steroid-sparing control of ocular inflammation, measures of ocular inflammation, intraocular pressure, and visual acuity. Fifty patients were enrolled in the study. Twenty-five patients were randomly assigned to receive simvastatin with conventional treatment and 25 to conventional treatment alone. Simvastatin was associated with significantly higher rates of steroid-sparing ocular inflammation control, decrease in anterior chamber inflammation, and improvement in visual acuity. The treatment was well tolerated, no serious adverse effects were observed. Our findings suggest that statins may have therapeutic potential in uveitis. These results need to be confirmed in double-blind, randomized, controlled studies.

  4. Differential effect of the rs4149056 variant in SLCO1B1 on myopathy associated with simvastatin and atorvastatin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunham, L. R.; Lansberg, P. J.; Zhang, L.; Miao, F.; Carter, C.; Hovingh, G. K.; Visscher, H.; Jukema, J. W.; Stalenhoef, A. F.; Ross, C. J. D.; Carleton, B. C.; Kastelein, J. J. P.; Hayden, M. R.

    2012-01-01

    Statins reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in appropriately selected patients. However, statin-associated myopathy is a significant risk associated with these agents. Recently, variation in the SLCO1B1 gene was reported to predict simvastatin-associated myopathy. The aim of this study was

  5. Simvastatin: structure solution of two new low-temperature phases from synchrotron powder diffraction and ss-NMR

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hušák, M.; Kratochvíl, B.; Jegorov, A.; Brus, Jiří; Maixner, J.; Rohlíček, J.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 3 (2010), s. 511-518 ISSN 1040-0400 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400500602; GA MŠk 2B08021 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : crystal structure * simvastatin * powder diffraction Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.727, year: 2010

  6. Effect of acute and chronic simvastatin treatment on post-ischemic contractile dysfunction in isolated rat heart

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Szárszoi, Ondrej; Malý, J.; Ošťádal, P.; Netuka, I.; Bešík, J.; Kolář, František; Ošťádal, Bohuslav

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 5 (2008), s. 793-796 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0510 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : simvastatin * contractile dysfunction * protection Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 1.653, year: 2008

  7. The effect of simvastatin on inflammation level and carotid artery plaque in patients with diabetes and hyperlipidaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Zhuangfei; Zou Yan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of simvastatin on inflammation level and carotid artery plaque in those patients with diabetes and hyperlipidaemia. Methods: A total of 120 patients with type 2 diabetes, accompanying with hyperlipidaemia were orally administered with 20 mg simvastatin each night for 12 weeks to control blood glucose. The changes of their blood lipid, hs-CRP, TNF-α and carotid artery plaque were observed. Results: After simvastatin administration,the serum total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG) and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) decreased significantly compared to that before treatment (P 0.05). The level of high sensitivity C-reactive protein(hs-CRP), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) descended markedly in patients after treatment versus before treatment (P<0.05 or P<0.01). The carotid artery plaque area, thickness and amounts all improved significantly after treatment (P<0.05 or P<0.01). Conclusion: Simvastatin can reduce the level of serum TC, TG and LDL-C in those patients with diabetes and hyperlipidaemia uniquely, but also diminish the inflammation level by regulating the levels of hs-CRP, TNF-α, thus reversing the occurrence, development of carotid artery plaque, lowering the long-term cerebrocardiovascular complications, and improving patients' prognosis. (authors)

  8. Application of mixture experimental design to simvastatin apparent solubility predictions in the microemulsifion formed by self-microemulsifying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jian; Zheng, Liangyuan

    2007-09-01

    Self-microemulsifying drug delivery systems (SMEDDS) are useful to improve the bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs by increasing their apparent solubility through solubilization. However, very few studies, to date, have systematically examined the level of drug apparent solubility in o/w microemulsion formed by self-microemulsifying. In this study, a mixture experimental design was used to simulate the influence of the compositions on simvastatin apparent solubility quantitatively through an empirical model. The reduced cubic polynomial equation successfully modeled the evolution of simvastatin apparent solubility. The results were presented using an analysis of response surface showing a scale of possible simvastatin apparent solubility between 0.0024 ~ 29.0 mg/mL. Moreover, this technique showed that simvastatin apparent solubility was mainly influenced by microemulsion concentration and, suggested that the drug would precipitate in the gastrointestinal tract due to dilution by gastrointestinal fluids. Furthermore, the model would help us design the formulation to maximize the drug apparent solubility and avoid precipitation of the drug.

  9. Mitochondrial fumarate reductase as a target of chemotherapy: from parasites to cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Chika; Tomitsuka, Eriko; Esumi, Hiroyasu; Harada, Shigeharu; Kita, Kiyoshi

    2012-05-01

    Recent research on respiratory chain of the parasitic helminth, Ascaris suum has shown that the mitochondrial NADH-fumarate reductase system (fumarate respiration), which is composed of complex I (NADH-rhodoquinone reductase), rhodoquinone and complex II (rhodoquinol-fumarate reductase) plays an important role in the anaerobic energy metabolism of adult parasites inhabiting hosts. The enzymes in these parasite-specific pathways are potential target for chemotherapy. We isolated a novel compound, nafuredin, from Aspergillus niger, which inhibits NADH-fumarate reductase in helminth mitochondria at nM order. It competes for the quinone-binding site in complex I and shows high selective toxicity to the helminth enzyme. Moreover, nafuredin exerts anthelmintic activity against Haemonchus contortus in in vivo trials with sheep indicating that mitochondrial complex I is a promising target for chemotherapy. In addition to complex I, complex II is a good target because its catalytic direction is reverse of succinate-ubiquionone reductase in the host complex II. Furthermore, we found atpenin and flutolanil strongly and specifically inhibit mitochondrial complex II. Interestingly, fumarate respiration was found not only in the parasites but also in some types of human cancer cells. Analysis of the mitochondria from the cancer cells identified an anthelminthic as a specific inhibitor of the fumarate respiration. Role of isoforms of human complex II in the hypoxic condition of cancer cells and fetal tissues is a challenge. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biochemistry of Mitochondria, Life and Intervention 2010. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Breast ductal lavage for biomarker assessment in high risk women: rationale, design and methodology of a randomized phase II clinical trial with nimesulide, simvastatin and placebo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazzeroni, Matteo; Radice, Davide; Bonanni, Bernardo; Guerrieri-Gonzaga, Aliana; Serrano, Davide; Cazzaniga, Massimiliano; Mora, Serena; Casadio, Chiara; Jemos, Costantino; Pizzamiglio, Maria; Cortesi, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Despite positive results from large phase III clinical trials proved that it is possible to prevent estrogen-responsive breast cancers with selective estrogen receptor modulators and aromatase inhibitors, no significant results have been reached so far to prevent hormone non-responsive tumors. The Ductal Lavage (DL) procedure offers a minimally invasive method to obtain breast epithelial cells from the ductal system for cytopathologic analysis. Several studies with long-term follow-up have shown that women with atypical hyperplasia have an elevated risk of developing breast cancer. The objective of the proposed trial is to assess the efficacy and safety of a daily administration of nimesulide or simvastatin in women at higher risk for breast cancer, focused particularly on hormone non-responsive tumor risk. The primary endpoint is the change in prevalence of atypical cells and cell proliferation (measured by Ki67) in DL or fine needle aspirate samples, after 12 months of treatment and 12 months after treatment cessation. From 2005 to 2011, 150 women with a history of estrogen receptor negative ductal intraepithelial neoplasia or lobular intraepithelial neoplasia or atypical hyperplasia, or unaffected subjects carrying a mutation of BRCA1 or with a probability of mutation >10% (according to BRCAPRO) were randomized to receive nimesulide 100mg/day versus simvastatin 20mg/day versus placebo for one year followed by a second year of follow-up. This is the first randomized placebo controlled trial to evaluate the role of DL to study surrogate endpoints biomarkers and the effects of these drugs on breast carcinogenesis. In 2007 the European Medicines Agency limited the use of systemic formulations of nimesulide to 15 days. According to the European Institute of Oncology Ethics Committee communication, we are now performing an even more careful monitoring of the study participants. Preliminary results showed that DL is a feasible procedure, the treatment is well tolerated

  11. Pravastatin and simvastatin inhibit the adhesion, replication and proliferation of Toxoplasma gondii (RH strain) in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfelice, Raquel Arruda; da Silva, Suelen Santos; Bosqui, Larissa Rodrigues; Miranda-Sapla, Milena Menegazzo; Barbosa, Bellisa Freitas; Silva, Rafaela José; Ferro, Eloísa A Vieira; Panagio, Luciano Aparecido; Navarro, Italmar Teodorico; Bordignon, Juliano; Conchon-Costa, Ivete; Pavanelli, Wander Rogerio; Almeida, Ricardo Sergio; Costa, Idessania Nazareth

    2017-03-01

    The conventional treatment for toxoplasmosis with pyrimethamine and sulfadiazine shows toxic effects to the host, and it is therefore necessary to search for new drugs. Some studies suggest the use of statins, which inhibit cholesterol synthesis in humans and also the initial processes of isoprenoid biosynthesis in the parasite. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate the activity of the statins pravastatin and simvastatin in HeLa cells infected in vitro with the RH strain of T. gondii. HeLa cells (1×10 5 ) were infected with T. gondii tachyzoites (5×10 5 ) following two different treatment protocols. In the first protocol, T. gondii tachyzoites were pretreated with pravastatin (50 and 100μg/mL) and simvastatin (1.56 and 3.125μg/mL) for 30min prior to infection. In the second, HeLa cells were first infected (5×10 5 ) with tachyzoites and subsequently treated with pravastatin and simvastatin for 24h at the concentrations noted above. Initially, we evaluated the cytotoxicity of drugs by the MTT assay, number of tachyzoites adhered to cells, number of infected cells, and viability of tachyzoites by trypan blue exclusion. The supernatant of the cell cultures was collected post-treatment for determination of the pattern of Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokines by cytometric bead array. There was no cytotoxicity to HeLa cells with 50 and 100μg/mL pravastatin and 1.56 and 3.125μg/mL simvastatin. There was no change in the viability of tachyzoites that received pretreatment. Regarding the pre- and post-treatment of the cells with pravastatin and simvastatin alone, there was a reduction in adhesion, invasion and proliferation of cells to T. gondii. As for the production of cytokines, we found that IL-6 and IL-17 were significantly reduced in cells infected with T. gondii and treated with pravastatin and simvastatin, when compared to control. Based on these results, we can infer that pravastatin and simvastatin alone possess antiproliferative effects on tachyzoites forms

  12. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitory activity and phytocomponent investigation of Basella alba leaf extract as a treatment for hypercholesterolemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baskaran G

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gunasekaran Baskaran,1 Shamala Salvamani,1 Siti Aqlima Ahmad,1 Noor Azmi Shaharuddin,1 Parveen Devi Pattiram,2 Mohd Yunus Shukor1 1Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, 2Department of Food Technology, Faculty of Food Science and Technology, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Selangor, Malaysia Abstract: The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA reductase is the key enzyme of the mevalonate pathway that produces cholesterol. Inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase reduces cholesterol biosynthesis in the liver. Synthetic drugs, statins, are commonly used for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. Due to the side effects of statins, natural HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors of plant origin are needed. In this study, 25 medicinal plant methanol extracts were screened for anti-HMG-CoA reductase activity. Basella alba leaf extract showed the highest inhibitory effect at about 74%. Thus, B. alba was examined in order to investigate its phytochemical components. Gas chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry and reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography analysis revealed the presence of phenol 2,6-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl, 1-heptatriacotanol, oleic acid, eicosyl ester, naringin, apigenin, luteolin, ascorbic acid, and a-tocopherol, which have been reported to possess antihypercholesterolemic effects. Further investigation of in vivo models should be performed in order to confirm its potential as an alternative treatment for hypercholesterolemia and related cardiovascular diseases. Keywords: HMG-CoA reductase, Basella alba, phytochemical, GC-MS/MS, RP-HPLC, hypercholesterolemia

  13. Rapid disintegrating tablets of simvastatin dispersions in polyoxyethylene–polypropylene block copolymer for maximized disintegration and dissolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balata, Gehan F; Zidan, Ahmad S; Abourehab, Mohamad AS; Essa, Ebtessam A

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this research was to improve the dissolution of simvastatin and to incorporate it in rapid disintegrating tablets (RDTs) with an optimized disintegration and dissolution characteristics. Polyoxyethylene–polypropylene block copolymer (poloxamer 188) was employed as a hydrophilic carrier to prepare simvastatin solid dispersions (SDs). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffractometry were employed to understand the interaction between the drug and the carrier in the solid state. The results obtained from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed absence of any chemical interaction between the drug and poloxamer. The results of differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffractometry confirmed the conversion of simvastatin to distorted crystalline state. The SD of 1:2 w/w drug to carrier ratio showed the highest dissolution; hence, it was incorporated in RDT formulations using a 32 full factorial design and response surface methodology. The initial assessments of RDTs demonstrated an acceptable flow, hardness, and friability to indicate good mechanical strength. The interaction and Pareto charts indicated that percentage of croscarmellose sodium incorporated was the most important factor affecting the disintegration time and dissolution parameter followed by the hardness value and their interaction effect. Compression force showed a superior influence to increase RDT’s porosity and to fasten disintegration rather than swelling action by croscarmellose sodium. On the other hand, croscarmellose sodium was most important for the initial simvastatin release. The results suggest the potential use of poloxamer 188-based SD in RDT for the oral delivery of poor water-soluble antihyperlipidemic drug, simvastatin. PMID:27757012

  14. Sitagliptin/Simvastatin: a first combination tablet to treat type 2 diabetes and hypercholesterolemia – a review of its characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadan, Wijdan H; Kabbara, Wissam K

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to review the current literature and information on the combination product Juvisync™ (sitagliptin + simvastatin), which was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in October 2011. Methods PubMed (2001–2014) was searched for primary and review articles on sitagliptin, simvastatin, or the combination product. Drug manufacturing data and product labeling were also used. Studies of simvastatin, sitagliptin, or the combination were screened and analyzed to include relevant and recent papers. Selected English language trials were limited to those with human subjects and included both safety and efficacy outcomes. Results When compared with glipizide as add-on therapy to metformin, sitagliptin was noninferior but had lower rates of hypoglycemia and weight gain. In addition, when compared with insulin glargine, sitagliptin was less effective in decreasing glycosylated hemoglobin, but was associated with significantly lower rates of hypoglycemia. Further, trials have shown a beneficial effect of using statins in patients with diabetes mellitus with regard to decreasing cardiovascular risk, regardless of baseline lipid levels or the presence of a cardiac disease. Both medications have also demonstrated an acceptable side effect profile. However, caution is needed when coadministering with any drug that may increase simvastatin levels to reduce the risk of myopathy and rhabdomyolysis. Conclusion Juvisync should be used in patients requiring both sitagliptin and simvastatin. Both agents have shown good efficacy and acceptable safety profiles. Sitagliptin is a good option for diabetic patients to improve glycemic control with a lower risk of hypoglycemia and weight gain. PMID:25709467

  15. Rapid disintegrating tablets of simvastatin dispersions in polyoxyethylene-polypropylene block copolymer for maximized disintegration and dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balata, Gehan F; Zidan, Ahmad S; Abourehab, Mohamad As; Essa, Ebtessam A

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this research was to improve the dissolution of simvastatin and to incorporate it in rapid disintegrating tablets (RDTs) with an optimized disintegration and dissolution characteristics. Polyoxyethylene-polypropylene block copolymer (poloxamer 188) was employed as a hydrophilic carrier to prepare simvastatin solid dispersions (SDs). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffractometry were employed to understand the interaction between the drug and the carrier in the solid state. The results obtained from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed absence of any chemical interaction between the drug and poloxamer. The results of differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffractometry confirmed the conversion of simvastatin to distorted crystalline state. The SD of 1:2 w/w drug to carrier ratio showed the highest dissolution; hence, it was incorporated in RDT formulations using a 3 2 full factorial design and response surface methodology. The initial assessments of RDTs demonstrated an acceptable flow, hardness, and friability to indicate good mechanical strength. The interaction and Pareto charts indicated that percentage of croscarmellose sodium incorporated was the most important factor affecting the disintegration time and dissolution parameter followed by the hardness value and their interaction effect. Compression force showed a superior influence to increase RDT's porosity and to fasten disintegration rather than swelling action by croscarmellose sodium. On the other hand, croscarmellose sodium was most important for the initial simvastatin release. The results suggest the potential use of poloxamer 188-based SD in RDT for the oral delivery of poor water-soluble antihyperlipidemic drug, simvastatin.

  16. Simvastatin as add-on therapy to interferon β-1a for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (SIMCOMBIN study): a placebo-controlled randomised phase 4 trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Per Soelberg; Lycke, Jan; Erälinna, Juha-Pekka

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis with interferon beta is only partly effective. We aimed to establish whether add-on of simvastatin, a statin with anti-inflammatory properties, improves this efficacy.......Treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis with interferon beta is only partly effective. We aimed to establish whether add-on of simvastatin, a statin with anti-inflammatory properties, improves this efficacy....

  17. Inhibition of NADH-ubiquinone reductase activity by N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide and correlation of this inhibition with the occurrence of energy-coupling site 1 in various organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagi, T.

    1987-01-01

    The NADH-ubiquinone reductase activity of the respiratory chains of several organisms was inhibited by the carboxyl-modifying reagent N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD). This inhibition correlated with the presence of an energy-transducing site in this segment of the respiratory chain. Where the NADH-quinone reductase segment involved an energy-coupling site (e.g., in bovine heart and rat liver mitochondria, and in Paracoccus denitrificans, Escherichia coli, and Thermus thermophilus HB-8 membranes), DCCD acted as an inhibitor of ubiquinone reduction by NADH. By contrast, where energy-coupling site 1 was absent (e.g., in Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondria and BacilLus subtilis membranes), there was no inhibition of NADH-ubiquinone reductase activity by DCCD. In the bovine and P. denitrificans systems, DCCD inhibition was pseudo first order with respect to incubation time, and reaction order with respect to inhibitor concentration was close to unity, indicating that inhibition resulted from the binding of one inhibitor molecule per active unit of NADH-ubiquinone reductase. In the bovine NADH-ubiquinone reductase complex (complex I), [ 14 C]DCCD was preferentially incorporated into two subunits of molecular weight 49,000 and 29,000. The time course of labeling of the 29,000 molecular weight subunit with [ 14 C]DCCD paralleled the time course of inhibition of NADH-ubiquinone reductase activity

  18. Differential expression of 5-alpha reductase isozymes in the prostate and its clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Wang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of human benign or malignant prostatic diseases is closely associated with androgens, primarily testosterone (T and dihydrotestosterone (DHT. T is converted to DHT by 5-alpha reductase (5-AR isozymes. Differential expression of 5-AR isozymes is observed in both human benign and malignant prostatic tissues. 5-AR inhibitors (5-ARI are commonly used for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH and were once promoted as chemopreventive agents for prostate cancer (PCa. This review discusses the role of the differential expression of 5-AR in the normal development of the human prostate and in the pathogenesis and progression of BPH and PCa.

  19. Colchicine triggered severe rhabdomyolysis after long-term low-dose simvastatin therapy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frydrychowicz, Clara; Pasieka, Bastian; Pierer, Matthias; Mueller, Wolf; Petros, Sirak; Weidhase, Lorenz

    2017-01-04

    Rhabdomyolysis is a widely recognized yet rare complication in statin use. Rhabdomyolysis might be triggered by the prescription of high doses of statins or by statin accumulation due to interactions with concomitant medication. Muscle cell destruction as evidenced by myoglobin elevation can induce potentially life-threatening acute renal failure. We report a case of a 70-year-old obese white man with sudden onset of severe rhabdomyolysis with consecutive renal failure. His medication included low-dose simvastatin, which he had taken for 6 years up until the event. The statin was withdrawn immediately. After 3 days of veno-venous hemofiltration his renal function was completely restored. Clinicians in both primary and special care might be unaware that side effects of statins do occur even after a long uneventful statin medication; they should be advised not to exclude that possibility upfront, even if a patient has tolerated the medication for years.

  20. In vivo evaluation of a simvastatin-loaded nanostructured lipid carrier for bone tissue regeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue, Xinxin; Niu, Mao; Zhang, Te; Wang, Cheng; Wu, Wangxi; Zhang, Qi; Lai, Chunhua; Zhou, Lei; Wang, Zhonglei

    2016-01-01

    Alveolar bone loss has long been a challenge in clinical dental implant therapy. Simvastatin (SV) has been demonstrated to exert excellent anabolic effects on bone. However, the successful use of SV to increase bone formation in vivo largely depends on the local concentration of SV at the site of action, and there have been continuing efforts to develop an appropriate delivery system. Specifically, nanostructured lipid carrier (NLC) systems have become a popular type of encapsulation carrier system. Therefore, SV-loaded NLCs (SNs) (179.4 nm in diameter) were fabricated in this study, and the osteogenic effect of the SNs was evaluated in a critical-sized rabbit calvarial defect. Our results revealed that the SNs significantly enhanced bone formation in vivo, as evaluated by hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining, immunohistochemistry, and a fluorescence analysis. Thus, this novel nanostructured carrier system could be a potential encapsulation carrier system for SV in bone regeneration applications. (paper)

  1. Amino acids as co-amorphous excipients for simvastatin and glibenclamide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laitinen, Riikka; Löbmann, Korbinian; Grohganz, Holger

    2014-01-01

    to a few drugs and amino acids. To facilitate the rational selection of amino acids, the practical importance of the amino acid coming from the biological target site of the drug (and associated intermolecular interactions) needs to be established. In the present study, the formation of co......-amorphous systems using cryomilling and combinations of two poorly water-soluble drugs (simvastatin and glibenclamide) with the amino acids aspartic acid, lysine, serine, and threonine was investigated. Solid-state characterization with X-ray powder diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, and Fourier...... in the mixtures. Interestingly, a favorable effect by the excipients on the tautomerism of amorphous glibenclamide in the co-amorphous blends was seen, as the formation of the thermodynamically less stable imidic acid tautomer of glibenclamide was suppressed compared to that of the pure amorphous drug...

  2. Rapid disintegrating tablets of simvastatin dispersions in polyoxyethylene–polypropylene block copolymer for maximized disintegration and dissolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balata GF

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Gehan F Balata,1,2 Ahmad S Zidan,2 Mohamad AS Abourehab,1,3 Ebtessam A Essa4 1Department of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmacy, Umm Al-Qura University, Makkah, Saudi Arabia; 2Department of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmacy, Zagazig University, Zagazig, 3Department of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmacy, El-Minia University, El-Minia, 4Department of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tanta University, Tanta, Egypt Abstract: The objective of this research was to improve the dissolution of simvastatin and to incorporate it in rapid disintegrating tablets (RDTs with an optimized disintegration and dissolution characteristics. Polyoxyethylene–polypropylene block copolymer (poloxamer 188 was employed as a hydrophilic carrier to prepare simvastatin solid dispersions (SDs. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and X-ray diffractometry were employed to understand the interaction between the drug and the carrier in the solid state. The results obtained from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed absence of any chemical interaction between the drug and poloxamer. The results of differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffractometry confirmed the conversion of simvastatin to distorted crystalline state. The SD of 1:2 w/w drug to carrier ratio showed the highest dissolution; hence, it was incorporated in RDT formulations using a 32 full factorial design and response surface methodology. The initial assessments of RDTs demonstrated an acceptable flow, hardness, and friability to indicate good mechanical strength. The interaction and Pareto charts indicated that percentage of croscarmellose sodium incorporated was the most important factor affecting the disintegration time and dissolution parameter followed by the hardness value and their interaction effect. Compression force showed a superior influence to increase RDT’s porosity and to fasten disintegration rather than swelling action by

  3. Aldose Reductase Inhibitory Activity of Compounds from  Zea mays L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Hyeon; Kim, Jin Kyu; Kang, Young-Hee; Lee, Jae-Yong; Kang, Il Jun; Lim, Soon Sung

    2013-01-01

    Aldose reductase (AR) inhibitors have a considerable therapeutic potential against diabetes complications and do not increase the risk of hypoglycemia. Through bioassay-guided fractionation of an EtOH extract of the kernel from purple corn (Zea mays L.), 7 nonanthocyanin phenolic compounds (compound 1–7) and 5 anthocyanins (compound 8–12) were isolated. These compounds were investigated by rat lens aldose reductase (RLAR) inhibitory assays. Kinetic analyses of recombinant human aldose reductase (rhAR) were performed, and intracellular galactitol levels were measured. Hirsutrin, one of 12 isolated compounds, showed the most potent RLAR inhibitory activity (IC50, 4.78 μM). In the kinetic analyses using Lineweaver-Burk plots of 1/velocity and 1/substrate concentration, hirsutrin showed competitive inhibition against rhAR. Furthermore, hirsutrin inhibited galactitol formation in rat lens and erythrocytes sample incubated with a high concentration of galactose; this finding indicates that hirsutrin may effectively prevent osmotic stress in hyperglycemia. Therefore, hirsutrin derived from Zea mays L. may be a potential therapeutic agent against diabetes complications. PMID:23586057

  4. Research progress on the roles of aldose reductase in diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Zhe Li

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Aldose reductase(ARbelonging to nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate(NADPH-dependent aldehyde-keto reductase superfamily, is the key rate-limiting enzyme in the polyol pathway which plays an important role in the body's high-sugar metabolism. AR is widely present in the kidneys, blood vessels, lens, retina, heart, skeletal muscle and other tissues and organs, converts glucose to sorbitol which easy permeability of cell membranes, cause cell swelling, degeneration, necrosis, and have a close relationship with the development of chronic complications of diabetes mellitus. Diabetic retinopathy(DRis a multifactorial disease, the exact cause is currently unknown, but polyol pathway has been demonstrated to play an important role in the pathogenesis of DR. Clinical risk factors such as blood sugar control, blood pressure and other treatments for DR only play a part effect of remission or invalid, if we can find out DR genes associated with the disease, this will contribute to a better understanding of the pathological mechanisms and contribute to the development of new treatments and drugs. The current research progress of AR, AR gene polymorphism, Aldose reductase inhibitors to DR was reviewed in this article.

  5. Pichia stipitis xylose reductase helps detoxifying lignocellulosic hydrolysate by reducing 5-hydroxymethyl-furfural (HMF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Röder Anja

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pichia stipitis xylose reductase (Ps-XR has been used to design Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains that are able to ferment xylose. One example is the industrial S. cerevisiae xylose-consuming strain TMB3400, which was constructed by expression of P. stipitis xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase and overexpression of endogenous xylulose kinase in the industrial S. cerevisiae strain USM21. Results In this study, we demonstrate that strain TMB3400 not only converts xylose, but also displays higher tolerance to lignocellulosic hydrolysate during anaerobic batch fermentation as well as 3 times higher in vitro HMF and furfural reduction activity than the control strain USM21. Using laboratory strains producing various levels of Ps-XR, we confirm that Ps-XR is able to reduce HMF both in vitro and in vivo. Ps-XR overexpression increases the in vivo HMF conversion rate by approximately 20%, thereby improving yeast tolerance towards HMF. Further purification of Ps-XR shows that HMF is a substrate inhibitor of the enzyme. Conclusion We demonstrate for the first time that xylose reductase is also able to reduce the furaldehyde compounds that are present in undetoxified lignocellulosic hydrolysates. Possible implications of this newly characterized activity of Ps-XR on lignocellulosic hydrolysate fermentation are discussed.

  6. [Comparison of Physico-chemical Aspects between E. coli and Human Dihydrofolate Reductase: an Equilibrium Unfolding Study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapliyal, Charu; Jain, Neha; Chaudhuri, Pratima

    2015-01-01

    A protein, differing in origin, may exhibit variable physicochemical behaviour, difference in sequence homology, fold and function. Thus studying structure-function relationship of proteins from altered sources is meaningful in the sense that it may give rise to comparative aspects of their sequence-structure-function relationship. Dihydrofolate reductase is an enzyme involved in cell cycle regulation. It is a significant enzyme as.a target for developing anticancer drugs. Hence, detailed understanding of structure-function relationships of wide variants of the enzyme dihydrofolate reductase would be important for developing an inhibitor or an antagonist against the enzyme involved in the cellular developmental processes. In this communication, we have reported the comparative structure-function relationship between E. coli and human dihydrofolate reductase. The differences in the unfolding behaviour of these two proteins have been investigated to understand various properties of these two proteins like relative' stability differences and variation in conformational changes under identical denaturing conditions. The equilibrium unfolding mechanism of dihydrofolate reductase proteins using guanidine hydrochloride as a denaturant in the presence of various types of osmolytes has been monitored using loss in enzymatic activity, intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence and an extrinsic fluorophore 8-anilino-1-naphthalene-sulfonic acid as probes. It has been observed that osmolytes, such as 1M sucrose, and 30% glycerol, provided enhanced stability to both variants of dihydrofolate reductase. Their level of stabilisation has been observed to be dependent on intrinsic protein stability. It was observed that 100 mM proline does not show any 'significant stabilisation to either of dihydrofolate reductases. In the present study, it has been observed that the human protein is relatively less stable than the E.coli counterpart.

  7. Inhibition of aldose reductase by Gentiana lutea extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akileshwari, Chandrasekhar; Muthenna, Puppala; Nastasijević, Branislav; Joksić, Gordana; Petrash, J Mark; Reddy, Geereddy Bhanuprakash

    2012-01-01

    Accumulation of intracellular sorbitol due to increased aldose reductase (ALR2) activity has been implicated in the development of various secondary complications of diabetes. Thus, ALR2 inhibition could be an effective strategy in the prevention or delay of certain diabetic complications. Gentiana lutea grows naturally in the central and southern areas of Europe. Its roots are commonly consumed as a beverage in some European countries and are also known to have medicinal properties. The water, ethanol, methanol, and ether extracts of the roots of G. lutea were subjected to in vitro bioassay to evaluate their inhibitory activity on the ALR2. While the ether and methanol extracts showed greater inhibitory activities against both rat lens and human ALR2, the water and ethanol extracts showed moderate inhibitory activities. Moreover, the ether and methanol extracts of G. lutea roots significantly and dose-dependently inhibited sorbitol accumulation in human erythrocytes under high glucose conditions. Molecular docking studies with the constituents commonly present in the roots of G. lutea indicate that a secoiridoid glycoside, amarogentin, may be a potential inhibitor of ALR2. This is the first paper that shows G. lutea extracts exhibit inhibitory activity towards ALR2 and these results suggest that Gentiana or its constituents might be useful to prevent or treat diabetic complications.

  8. Inhibition of Aldose Reductase by Gentiana lutea Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrasekhar Akileshwari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulation of intracellular sorbitol due to increased aldose reductase (ALR2 activity has been implicated in the development of various secondary complications of diabetes. Thus, ALR2 inhibition could be an effective strategy in the prevention or delay of certain diabetic complications. Gentiana lutea grows naturally in the central and southern areas of Europe. Its roots are commonly consumed as a beverage in some European countries and are also known to have medicinal properties. The water, ethanol, methanol, and ether extracts of the roots of G. lutea were subjected to in vitro bioassay to evaluate their inhibitory activity on the ALR2. While the ether and methanol extracts showed greater inhibitory activities against both rat lens and human ALR2, the water and ethanol extracts showed moderate inhibitory activities. Moreover, the ether and methanol extracts of G. lutea roots significantly and dose-dependently inhibited sorbitol accumulation in human erythrocytes under high glucose conditions. Molecular docking studies with the constituents commonly present in the roots of G. lutea indicate that a secoiridoid glycoside, amarogentin, may be a potential inhibitor of ALR2. This is the first paper that shows G. lutea extracts exhibit inhibitory activity towards ALR2 and these results suggest that Gentiana or its constituents might be useful to prevent or treat diabetic complications.

  9. Cloning and nitrate induction of nitrate reductase mRNA

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Chi-Lien; Dewdney, Julia; Kleinhofs, Andris; Goodman, Howard M.

    1986-01-01

    Nitrate is the major source of nitrogen taken from the soil by higher plants but requires reduction to ammonia prior to incorporation into amino acids. The first enzyme in the reducing pathway is a nitrate-inducible enzyme, nitrate reductase (EC 1.6.6.1). A specific polyclonal antiserum raised against purified barley nitrate reductase has been used to immunoprecipitate in vivo labeled protein and in vitro translation products, demonstrating that nitrate induction increases nitrate reductase p...

  10. Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) and Eudragit E microparticles: a release system to enhance the aqueous solubility of felodipine and simvastatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazzo, Giovana C.; Pezzini, Bianca R.; Zetola, Melissa; Wagner, Theodoro M.; Caetano, Daniela B.; Boch, Maura; Schmucker, Iara C.; Schucko, Sacha K.

    2009-01-01

    Poor water-soluble drugs are a problem for the development of oral solid dosage forms, since it has great potential for low bioavailability. Thus, release systems that promote the increase of aqueous solubility of these drugs are advantageous. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of incorporation of felodipine and simvastatin in polymeric microparticles, to improve the aqueous solubility of the drugs. Microparticles of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) [PHB] and Eudragit E was prepared by emulsion - solvent evaporation technique and characterized as to morphology and encapsulation efficiency of the drugs. Particles with spherical shapes and high levels of drug encapsulated were obtained. There was a significant increase in aqueous solubility of felodipine and simvastatin after its incorporation into the polymeric microparticles. X-ray diffraction analysis showed the conversion of both drugs to amorphous form, which may have contributed to increased the solubility. (author)

  11. Effect of simvastatin on cognitive functioning in children with neurofibromatosis type 1: A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.C. Krab (Lianne); A. de Goede-Bolder (Arja); F.K. Aarsen (Femke); S. Pluijm (Saskia); M.J. Bouman (Marlies); J.N. van der Geest (Jos); M. Leguin (Maarten); C. Catsman (Coriene); W.F.M. Arts (Willem Frans); S.A. Kushner (Steven); A.J. Silva (Alcino); C.I. de Zeeuw (Chris); H.A. Moll (Henriëtte); Y. Elgersma (Ype)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractContext: Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is among the most common genetic disorders that cause learning disabilities. Recently, it was shown that statin-mediated inhibition of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase restores the cognitive deficits in an NF1 mouse model. Objective:

  12. Regulation of schistosome egg production by HMG CoA reductase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VandeWaa, E.A.; Bennett, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    Hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMG CoA reductase) catalyzes the conversion of HMG CoA to mevalonate in the synthesis of steroids, isoprenoids and terpenes. Mevinolin, an inhibitor of this enzyme, decreased egg production in Schistosoma mansoni during in vitro incubations. This was associated with a reduction in the incorporation of 14 C-acetate into polyisoprenoids and a reduction in the formation of a lipid-linked oligosaccharide. In vivo, mevinolin in daily doses of 50 mg/kg (p.o., from days 30-48 post-infection) caused no change in gross liver pathology in S. mansoni infected mice. However, when parasites exposed to mevinolin or its vehicle in vivo were cultured in vitro, worms from mevinolin-treated mice produced six times more eggs than control parasites. When infected mice were dosed with 250 mg/kg mevinolin daily (p.o., from days 35-45 post-infection), liver pathology was reduced in comparison to control mice. Thus, during in vivo exposure to a high dose of the drug egg production is decreased, while at a lower dose it appears unaffected until the parasites are cultured in a drug-free in vitro system wherein egg production is stimulated to extraordinarily high levels. It may be that at low doses mevinolin, by inhibiting the enzyme, is blocking the formation of a product (such as an isoprenoid) which normally acts to down-regulate enzyme synthesis, resulting in enzyme induction. Induction of HMG CoA reductase is then expressed as increased egg production when the worms are removed from the drug. These data suggest that HMG CoA reductase plays a role in schistosome egg production

  13. Cell death by SecTRAPs: thioredoxin reductase as a prooxidant killer of cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Anestål

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: SecTRAPs (selenium compromised thioredoxin reductase-derived apoptotic proteins can be formed from the selenoprotein thioredoxin reductase (TrxR by targeting of its selenocysteine (Sec residue with electrophiles, or by its removal through C-terminal truncation. SecTRAPs are devoid of thioredoxin reductase activity but can induce rapid cell death in cultured cancer cell lines by a gain of function. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Both human and rat SecTRAPs killed human A549 and HeLa cells. The cell death displayed both apoptotic and necrotic features. It did not require novel protein synthesis nor did it show extensive nuclear fragmentation, but it was attenuated by use of caspase inhibitors. The redox active disulfide/dithiol motif in the N-terminal domain of TrxR had to be maintained for manifestation of SecTRAP cytotoxicity. Stopped-flow kinetics showed that NADPH can reduce the FAD moiety in SecTRAPs at similar rates as in native TrxR and purified SecTRAPs could maintain NADPH oxidase activity, which was accelerated by low molecular weight substrates such as juglone. In a cellular context, SecTRAPs triggered extensive formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS and consequently antioxidants could protect against the cell killing by SecTRAPs. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that formation of SecTRAPs could contribute to the cytotoxicity seen upon exposure of cells to electrophilic agents targeting TrxR. SecTRAPs are prooxidant killers of cells, triggering mechanisms beyond those of a mere loss of thioredoxin reductase activity.

  14. Are the beneficial cardiovascular effects of simvastatin and metformin also associated with a hormone-dependent mechanism improving insulin sensitivity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Bulcão

    Full Text Available In addition to lipid-lowering and cardiovascular protective actions, statins may have beneficial effects on insulin sensitivity. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of simvastatin therapy on insulin resistance and on leptin, adiponectin, and C-reactive protein (CRP levels, as compared to metformin, in overweight pre-diabetic subjects. Forty-one subjects with BMI >25 kg/m² and impaired fasting glucose or impaired glucose tolerance were randomized to take simvastatin, 20 mg/day (N = 20 or metformin, 1.7 g/day (N = 21 for 16 weeks. Blood samples for the determination of metabolic, hormonal, and inflammatory parameters were obtained at baseline and after each treatment. After metformin therapy, significant reductions in mean BMI and waist circumference were observed, and after simvastatin treatment LDL and triglyceride levels were significantly reduced. Insulin resistance determined by the homeostasis model assessment decreased only with metformin. Independently of the type of medication, a significant decrease in CRP levels was detected from baseline to the end of the study. CRP showed a mean reduction of 0.12 ± 0.04 mg/dL (P = 0.002 over time. No change in leptin or adiponectin levels was induced by any therapy. The data suggest that a low dose of simvastatin does not affect insulin resistance in overweight pre-diabetic subjects and has no effect on leptin or adiponectin levels. Further studies including a larger sample size, higher doses of statins, and a placebo control group are necessary to confirm the present data.

  15. Evaluation of Sexual Dimorphism in the Efficacy and Safety of Simvastatin/Atorvastatin Therapy in a Southern Brazilian Cohort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smiderle, Lisiane [Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Lima, Luciana O.; Hutz, Mara Helena [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Sand, Cézar Roberto Van der; Sand, Luiz Carlos Van der; Ferreira, Maria Elvira Wagner; Pires, Renan Canibal [Centro de Diagnóstico Cardiológico, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Almeida, Silvana; Fiegenbaum, Marilu [Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2014-07-15

    Dyslipidemia is the primary risk factor for cardiovascular disease, and statins have been effective in controlling lipid levels. Sex differences in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of statins contribute to interindividual variations in drug efficacy and toxicity. To evaluate the presence of sexual dimorphism in the efficacy and safety of simvastatin/atorvastatin treatment. Lipid levels of 495 patients (331 women and 164 men) were measured at baseline and after 6 ± 3 months of simvastatin/atorvastatin treatment to assess the efficacy and safety profiles of both drugs. Women had higher baseline levels of total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) compared with men (p < 0.0001). After treatment, women exhibited a greater decrease in plasma TC and LDL-C levels compared with men. After adjustment for covariates, baseline levels of TC and LDL-C influenced more than 30% of the efficacy of lipid-lowering therapy (p < 0.001), regardless of sex. Myalgia [with or without changes in creatine phosphokinase (CPK) levels] occurred more frequently in women (25.9%; p = 0.002), whereas an increase in CPK and/or abnormal liver function was more frequent in in men (17.9%; p = 0.017). Our results show that baseline TC and LDL-C levels are the main predictors of simvastatin/atorvastatin therapy efficacy, regardless of sex. In addition, they suggest the presence of sexual dimorphism in the safety of simvastatin/atorvastatin. The effect of sex differences on receptors, transporter proteins, and gene expression pathways needs to be better evaluated and characterized to confirm these observations.

  16. Evaluation of Sexual Dimorphism in the Efficacy and Safety of Simvastatin/Atorvastatin Therapy in a Southern Brazilian Cohort

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smiderle, Lisiane; Lima, Luciana O.; Hutz, Mara Helena; Sand, Cézar Roberto Van der; Sand, Luiz Carlos Van der; Ferreira, Maria Elvira Wagner; Pires, Renan Canibal; Almeida, Silvana; Fiegenbaum, Marilu

    2014-01-01

    Dyslipidemia is the primary risk factor for cardiovascular disease, and statins have been effective in controlling lipid levels. Sex differences in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of statins contribute to interindividual variations in drug efficacy and toxicity. To evaluate the presence of sexual dimorphism in the efficacy and safety of simvastatin/atorvastatin treatment. Lipid levels of 495 patients (331 women and 164 men) were measured at baseline and after 6 ± 3 months of simvastatin/atorvastatin treatment to assess the efficacy and safety profiles of both drugs. Women had higher baseline levels of total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) compared with men (p < 0.0001). After treatment, women exhibited a greater decrease in plasma TC and LDL-C levels compared with men. After adjustment for covariates, baseline levels of TC and LDL-C influenced more than 30% of the efficacy of lipid-lowering therapy (p < 0.001), regardless of sex. Myalgia [with or without changes in creatine phosphokinase (CPK) levels] occurred more frequently in women (25.9%; p = 0.002), whereas an increase in CPK and/or abnormal liver function was more frequent in in men (17.9%; p = 0.017). Our results show that baseline TC and LDL-C levels are the main predictors of simvastatin/atorvastatin therapy efficacy, regardless of sex. In addition, they suggest the presence of sexual dimorphism in the safety of simvastatin/atorvastatin. The effect of sex differences on receptors, transporter proteins, and gene expression pathways needs to be better evaluated and characterized to confirm these observations

  17. Safety and efficacy of the addition of simvastatin to panitumumab in previously treated KRAS mutant metastatic colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baas, Jara M; Krens, Lisanne L; Bos, Monique M; Portielje, Johanneke E A; Batman, Erdogan; van Wezel, Tom; Morreau, Hans; Guchelaar, Henk-Jan; Gelderblom, Hans

    2015-09-01

    Panitumumab has proven efficacy in patients with metastatic or locally advanced colorectal cancer patients, provided that they have no activating KRAS mutation in their tumour. Simvastatin blocks the mevalonate pathway and thereby interferes with the post-translational modification of KRAS. We hypothesize that the activity of the RAS-induced pathway in patients with a KRAS mutation might be inhibited by simvastatin. This would theoretically result in increased sensitivity to panitumumab, potentially comparable with tumours with wild-type KRAS. A Simon two-stage design single-arm, phase II study was designed to test the safety and efficacy of the addition of simvastatin to panitumumab in colorectal cancer patients with a KRAS mutation after failing fluoropyrimidine-based, oxaliplatin-based and irinotecan-based therapy. The primary endpoint of this study was the proportion of patients alive and free from progression 11 weeks after the first administration of panitumumab, aiming for at least 40%, which is comparable with, although slightly lower than, that in KRAS wild-type patients in this setting. If this 40% was reached, then the study would continue into the second step up to 46 patients. Explorative correlative analysis for mutations in the KRAS and related pathways was carried out. One of 14 patients was free from progression at the primary endpoint time. The median progression-free survival was 8.4 weeks and the median overall survival status was 19.6 weeks. We conclude that the concept of mutant KRAS phenotype expression modulation with simvastatin was not applicable in the clinic.

  18. Histological Study on the Protective Effect of Simvastatin on the Retinal Changes Induced by High-Fat Diet in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fayza Ezz Ahmad

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: High-fat diet (HFD feeding is an important model to study the changes induced by insulin resistance, Type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity including retinopathy. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and p53 have been implicated in the development of retinopathy. Objectives: The aim of his study was to analyze histological retinal changes in a high-fat atherogenic mouse model and to evaluate the possible protective effect of simvastatin on these changes including its effects on the expression of VEGF and p53. Materials and Methods: A total of 27 mice (6 weeks old were divided into 3 study groups according to their diet and treatment given; Group I - normal balanced diet-fed mice, Group II - HFD-fed mice, and Group III - HFD-fed mice treated with simvastatin daily for 30 weeks. All mice were followed up for 30 weeks. At the end of the study at 36 weeks of age, eye tissues were collected and retinal sections were examined using light microscopy. Comparison of the thickness of retinal layers in the three groups was carried out. The localization of VEGF in the retina was determined by immunohistochemical analysis, and apoptotic cell death was assessed using the p53. Results: In the HFD-fed mice, there was an increase in the retinal thickness associated with presence of wide intercellular spaces in the outer nuclear layer. Many cells in the inner nuclear layer showed cytoplasmic vacuolations. Expression of VEGF was significantly increased in the retinal ganglion cell layers and nuclear cell layers. Elevated p53 reaction was demonstrated within the inner retina. The histological changes were significantly improved in the simvastatin treated group. Conclusions: HFD-induced structural changes in the retinal layers and simultaneous upregulation of VEGF and p53. Administration of simvastatin improved these retinal alterations. [J Interdiscip Histopathol 2017; 5(3.000: 83-91

  19. Biochemical Changes in Erythrocytes as a Molecular Marker of Cell Damage during Long-Term Simvastatin Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikashinovich, Z I; Belousova, E S

    2016-08-01

    Long-term administration of simvastatin to rats, irrespective of the baseline cholesterol levels, induced biochemical changes in erythrocytes attesting to hypoxic damage (accumulation of lactate and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate), disturbances in ATP-dependent mechanisms of ion homeostasis regulation (decrease in total ATPase and Ca(2+)-ATPase activities), and antioxidant enzymes system imbalance. These changes can be considered as a sensitive indicator and molecular basis of cell damage during long-term administration of statins.

  20. Effect of a high dose of simvastatin on muscle mitochondrial metabolism and calcium signaling in healthy volunteers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galtier, F.; Mura, T.; Raynaud de Mauverger, E.; Chevassus, H.; Farret, A.; Gagnol, J.-P.; Costa, F.; Dupuy, A.

    2012-01-01

    Statin use may be limited by muscle side effects. Although incompletely understood to date, their pathophysiology may involve oxidative stress and impairments of mitochondrial function and of muscle Ca 2+ homeostasis. In order to simultaneously assess these mechanisms, 24 male healthy volunteers were randomized to receive either simvastatin for 80 mg daily or placebo for 8 weeks. Blood and urine samples and a stress test were performed at baseline and at follow-up, and mitochondrial respiration and Ca 2+ spark properties were evaluated on a muscle biopsy 4 days before the second stress test. Simvastatin-treated subjects were separated according to their median creatine kinase (CK) increase. Simvastatin treatment induced a significant elevation of aspartate amino transferase (3.38 ± 5.68 vs − 1.15 ± 4.32 UI/L, P 2+ sparks. However, among statin-treated subjects, those with the highest CK increase displayed a significantly lower Vmax rotenone succinate and an increase in Ca 2+ spark amplitude vs both subjects with the lowest CK increase and placebo-treated subjects. Moreover, Ca 2+ spark amplitude was positively correlated with treatment-induced CK increase in the whole group (r = 0.71, P = 0.0045). In conclusion, this study further supports that statin induced muscular toxicity may be related to alterations in mitochondrial respiration and muscle calcium homeostasis independently of underlying disease or concomitant medication. -- Highlights: ► Statin use may be limited by side effects, particularly myopathy. ► Statins might impair mitochondrial function and muscle Ca2+ signaling in muscle. ► This was tested among healthy volunteers receiving simvastatin 80 mg daily for 8 weeks. ► CK increase was associated with alterations in Ca2+ sparks and mitochondrial function.

  1. The effect of simvastatin on lipid droplets accumulation in human embryonic kidney cells and pancreatic cancer cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gbelcová, H.; Sveda, M.; Laubertová, L.; Varga, I.; Vítek, L.; Kolář, Michal; Strnad, Hynek; Zelenka, J.; Boehmer, D.; Ruml, T.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 12, 21.8.2013 (2013), s. 126 ISSN 1476-511X R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NT13112 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0060 Program:EE Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : simvastatin * lipid droplets * DNA microarray * Nile red * pancreatic cancer Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.310, year: 2013

  2. Simvastatin and metformin inhibit cell growth in hepatitis C virus infected cells via mTOR increasing PTEN and autophagy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A Del Campo

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection has been related to increased risk of development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC while metformin (M and statins treatment seemed to protect against HCC development. In this work, we aim to identify the mechanisms by which metformin and simvastatin (S could protect from liver cancer. Huh7.5 cells were infected with HCV particles and treated with M+S. Human primary hepatocytes were treated with M+S. Treatment with both drugs inhibited Huh7.5 cell growth and HCV infection. In non-infected cells S increased translational controlled tumor protein (TCTP and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN proteins while M inhibited mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR and TCTP. Simvastatin and metformin co-administered down-regulated mTOR and TCTP, while PTEN was increased. In cells infected by HCV, mTOR, TCTP, p62 and light chain 3B II (LC3BII were increased and PTEN was decreased. S+M treatment increased PTEN, p62 and LC3BII in Huh7.5 cells. In human primary hepatocytes, metformin treatment inhibited mTOR and PTEN, but up-regulated p62, LC3BII and Caspase 3. In conclusion, simvastatin and metformin inhibited cell growth and HCV infection in vitro. In human hepatocytes, metformin increased cell-death markers. These findings suggest that M+S treatment could be useful in therapeutic prevention of HCV-related hepatocellular carcinoma.

  3. Comparison of the effects of metformin, flutamide plus oral contraceptives, and simvastatin on the metabolic consequences of polycystic ovary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdous Mehrabian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is one of the common endocrine disorders in women of reproductive ages. It is associated with a range of disorders, such as dyslipidemia, hypertension, insulin resistance (IR, compensatory hyperinsulinemia, gestational, and type 2 diabetes, and increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity. There are different treatments available for PCOS. The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the effects of metformin, flutamide plus oral contraceptives (OCs, and simvastatin on the metabolic consequences of PCOS. Materials and Methods: This study was a single-blind clinical trial. The subjects were selected from a group of patient with PCOS and metabolic syndrome, who were referred to the midwifery clinic of Al-Zahra Hospital and Beheshti Hospital, Isfahan, Iran. A total of 111 subjects were randomly assigned to three groups: metformin, flutamide plus OCs, and simvastatin groups. The measurements were performed at baseline and after 6 months of therapy. Paired t-test, analysis of variance (ANOVA, and chi-square test were applied in this study. Results: A total of 102 subjects were analyzed in this study, 34 subjects were allotted in each group. The prevalence of IR was statistically different between three groups (P-value = 0.001. After a 6-month course, metformin showed larger reduction in fasting blood sugar (FBS level (P-value 0.05. Conclusion: Metformin performed better in FBS reduction. Simvastatin had better performance in terms of reducing TG level and waist circumference.

  4. Topical simvastatin gel as a novel therapeutic modality for palatal donor site wound healing following free gingival graft procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madi, Marwa; Kassem, Abeer

    2018-04-01

    Autogenous soft-tissue grafting is a commonly used procedure nowadays in dentistry. However, the prolonged healing time needed for the donor site leads to increase the patient's pain and discomfort. Statin has been observed to be beneficial in reducing bacterial burden, improving epithelization and wound healing. The aim of this study was to evaluate intra-oral topical application of simvastatin/chitosan gel (10 mg/mL) over the palatal donor site following free gingival graft (FGG) procedure. Subjects indicated for FGG procedure were divided into four groups. Group I: Simvastatin suspension (S), group II: simvastatin/chitosan gel (SC), group III: chitosan gel (C), group IV: petroleum gel (P). Treatment was applied three times/day for the following 7 days. Wound healing was evaluated at day 3, 7 and 14 post-surgery. A visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to measure the experienced discomfort at 1, 3, 5, 7 and 14 days. Statistical significant reduction in wound-healing scores was observed after 3 and 7 days for group II compared to other groups (p  = .015). A significant reduction was also observed in VAS score for group II compared to other groups at day 1, 3, 5 and 7. Topical application of S/C gel could be used as a novel therapeutic modality that improved healing and reduced pain in the palatal donor site following FGG procedure.

  5. Characterization of simvastatin acid uptake by organic anion transporting polypeptide 3A1 (OATP3A1) and influence of drug-drug interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atilano-Roque, Amandla; Joy, Melanie S

    2017-12-01

    Human organic anion transporting polypeptide 3A1 (OATP3A1) is predominately expressed in the heart. The ability of OATP3A1 to transport statins into cardiomyocytes is unknown, although other OATPs are known to mediate the uptake of statin drugs in liver. The pleiotropic effects and uptake of simvastatin acid were analyzed in primary human cardiomyocytes and HEK293 cells transfected with the OATP3A1 gene. Treatment with simvastatin acid reduced indoxyl sulfate-mediated reactive oxygen species and modulated OATP3A1 expression in cardiomyocytes and HEK293 cells transfected with the OATP3A1 gene. We observed a pH-dependent effect on OATP3A1 uptake, with more efficient simvastatin acid uptake at pH5.5 in HEK293 cells transfected with the OATP3A1 gene. The Michaelis-Menten constant (K m ) for simvastatin acid uptake by OATP3A1 was 0.017±0.002μM and the V max was 0.995±0.027fmol/min/10 5 cells. Uptake of simvastatin acid was significantly increased by known (benzylpenicillin and estrone-3-sulfate) and potential (indoxyl sulfate and cyclosporine) substrates of OATP3A1. In conclusion, the presence of OATP3A1 in cardiomyocytes suggests that this transporter may modulate the exposure of cardiac tissue to simvastatin acid due to its enrichment in cardiomyocytes. Increases in uptake of simvastatin acid by OATP3A1 when combined with OATP substrates suggest the potential for drug-drug interactions that could influence clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Simvastatin mitigates increases in risk factors for and the occurrence of cardiac disease following 10 Gy total body irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenarczyk, Marek; Su, Jidong; Haworth, Steven T; Komorowski, Richard; Fish, Brian L; Migrino, Raymond Q; Harmann, Leanne; Hopewell, John W; Kronenberg, Amy; Patel, Shailendra; Moulder, John E; Baker, John E

    2015-06-01

    The ability of simvastatin to mitigate the increases in risk factors for and the occurrence of cardiac disease after 10 Gy total body irradiation (TBI) was determined. This radiation dose is relevant to conditioning for stem cell transplantation and threats from radiological terrorism. Male rats received single dose TBI of 10 Gy. Age-matched, sham-irradiated rats served as controls. Lipid profile, heart and liver morphology and cardiac mechanical function were determined for up to 120 days after irradiation. TBI resulted in a sustained increase in total- and LDL-cholesterol (low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol), and triglycerides. Simvastatin (10 mg/kg body weight/day) administered continuously from 9 days after irradiation mitigated TBI-induced increases in total- and LDL-cholesterol and triglycerides, as well as liver injury. TBI resulted in cellular peri-arterial fibrosis, whereas control hearts had less collagen and fibrosis. Simvastatin mitigated these morphological injuries. TBI resulted in cardiac mechanical dysfunction. Simvastatin mitigated cardiac mechanical dysfunction 20-120 days following TBI. To determine whether simvastatin affects the ability of the heart to withstand stress after TBI, injury from myocardial ischemia/reperfusion was determined in vitro. TBI increased the severity of an induced myocardial infarction at 20 and 80 days after irradiation. Simvastatin mitigated the severity of this myocardial infarction at 20 and 80 days following TBI. It is concluded simvastatin mitigated the increases in risk factors for cardiac disease and the extent of cardiac disease following TBI. This statin may be developed as a medical countermeasure for the mitigation of radiation-induced cardiac disease.

  7. Structure and mechanism of dimethylsulfoxide reductase, a molybdopterin-containing enzyme of DMSO reductase family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEwan, A.G.; Ridge, J.P.; McDevitt, C.A.; Hanson, G.R.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Apart from nitrogenase, enzymes containing molybdenum are members of a superfamily, the molybdopterin-containing enzymes. Most of these enzymes catalyse an oxygen atom transfer and two electron transfer reaction. During catalysis the Mo at the active site cycles between the Mo(VI) and Mo(IV) states. The DMSO reductase family of molybdopterin-containing enzymes all contain a bis(molybdopterin guanine dinucleotide)Mo cofactor and over thirty examples have now been described. Over the last five years crystal structures of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) reductase and four other enzymes of the DMSO reductase family have revealed that enzymes of this family have a similar tertiary structure. The Mo atom at the active site is coordinated by four thiolate ligands provided by the dithiolene side chains of the two MGD molecules of the bis(MGD)Mo cofactor as well as a ligand provided by an amino acid side chain. In addition, an oxygen atom in the form of an oxo, hydroxo or aqua group is also coordinated to the Mo atom. In the case of dimethylsulfoxide reductase X-ray crystallography of the product-reduced species and Raman spectroscopy has demonstrated that the enzyme contains a single exchangeable oxo group that is H-bonded to W116

  8. DNA damage induction of ribonucleotide reductase.

    OpenAIRE

    Elledge, S J; Davis, R W

    1989-01-01

    RNR2 encodes the small subunit of ribonucleotide reductase, the enzyme that catalyzes the first step in the pathway for the production of deoxyribonucleotides needed for DNA synthesis. RNR2 is a member of a group of genes whose activities are cell cycle regulated and that are transcriptionally induced in response to the stress of DNA damage. An RNR2-lacZ fusion was used to further characterize the regulation of RNR2 and the pathway responsible for its response to DNA damage. beta-Galactosidas...

  9. Mechanistic studies with solubilized rat liver steroid 5 alpha-reductase: Elucidation of the kinetic mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, M.A.; Brandt, M.; Greway, A.T.

    1990-01-01

    A solubilized preparation of steroid 5 alpha-reductase from rat liver has been used in studies focused toward an understanding of the kinetic mechanism associated with enzyme catalysis. From the results of analyses with product and dead-end inhibitors, a preferentially ordered binding of substrates and release of products from the surface of the enzyme is proposed. The observations from these experiments were identical with those using the steroid 5 alpha-reductase activity associated with rat liver microsomes. The primary isotope effects on steady-state kinetic parameters when [4S-2H]NADPH was used also were consistent with an ordered kinetic mechanism. Normal isotope effects were observed for all three kinetic parameters (Vm/Km for both testosterone and NADPH and Vm) at all substrate concentrations used experimentally. Upon extrapolation to infinite concentration of testosterone, the isotope effect on Vm/Km for NADPH approached unity, indicating that the nicotinamide dinucleotide phosphate is the first substrate binding to and the second product released from the enzyme. The isotope effects on Vm/Km for testosterone at infinite concentration of cofactor and on Vm were 3.8 +/- 0.5 and 3.3 +/- 0.4, respectively. Data from the pH profiles of these three steady-state parameters and the inhibition constants (1/Ki) of competitive inhibitors versus both substrates indicate that the binding of nicotinamide dinucleotide phosphate involves coordination of its anionic 2'-phosphate to a protonated enzyme-associated base with an apparent pK near 8.0. From these results, relative limits have been placed on several of the internal rate constants used to describe the ordered mechanism of the rat liver steroid 5 alpha-reductase

  10. Cancer cell death induced by phosphine gold(I) compounds targeting thioredoxin reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandin, Valentina; Fernandes, Aristi Potamitou; Rigobello, Maria Pia; Dani, Barbara; Sorrentino, Francesca; Tisato, Francesco; Björnstedt, Mikael; Bindoli, Alberto; Sturaro, Alberto; Rella, Rocco; Marzano, Cristina

    2010-01-15

    The thioredoxin system, composed of thioredoxin reductase (TrxR), thioredoxin (Trx), and NADPH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate), plays a central role in regulating cellular redox homeostasis and signaling pathways. TrxR, overexpressed in many tumor cells and contributing to drug resistance, has emerged as a new target for anticancer drugs. Gold complexes have been validated as potent TrxR inhibitors in vitro in the nanomolar range. In order to obtain potent and selective TrxR inhibitors, we have synthesized a series of linear, 'auranofin-like' gold(I) complexes all containing the [Au(PEt(3))](+) synthon and the ligands: Cl(-), Br(-), cyanate, thiocyanate, ethylxanthate, diethyldithiocarbamate and thiourea. Phosphine gold(I) complexes efficiently inhibited cytosolic and mitochondrial TrxR at concentrations that did not affect the two related oxidoreductases glutathione reductase (GR) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). The inhibitory effect of the redox proteins was also observed intracellularly in cancer cells pretreated with gold(I) complexes. Gold(I) compounds were found to induce antiproliferative effects towards several human cancer cells some of which endowed with cisplatin or multidrug resistance. In addition, they were able to activate caspase-3 and induce apoptosis observed as nucleosome formation and sub-G1 cell accumulation. The complexes with thiocyanate and xanthate ligands were particularly effective in inhibiting thioredoxin reductase and inducing apoptosis. Pharmacodynamic studies in human ovarian cancer cells allowed for the correlation of intracellular drug accumulation with TrxR inhibition that leads to the induction of apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway.

  11. Evidence for simvastatin anti-inflammatory actions based on quantitative analyses of NETosis and other inflammation/oxidation markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ghoul, Walid M.; Kim, Margarita S.; Fazal, Nadeem; Azim, Anser C.; Ali, Ashraf

    2014-01-01

    Simvastatin (SMV) has been shown to exhibit promising anti-inflammatory properties alongside its classic cholesterol lowering action. We tested these emerging effects in a major thermal injury mouse model (3rd degree scald, ~20% TBSA) with previously documented, inflammation-mediated intestinal defects. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) inflammation measurement methods were used alongside classic gut mucosa inflammation and leakiness measurements with exogenous melatonin treatment as a positive control. Our hypothesis is that simvastatin has protective therapeutic effects against early postburn gut mucosa inflammation and leakiness. To test this hypothesis, we compared untreated thermal injury (TI) adult male mice with TI littermates treated with simvastatin (0.2 mg/kg i.p., TI + SMV) immediately following burn injury and two hours before being sacrificed the day after; melatonin-treated (Mel) (1.86 mg/kg i.p., TI + Mel) mice were compared as a positive control. Mice were assessed for the following: (1) tissue oxidation and neutrophil infiltration in terminal ileum mucosa using classic carbonyl, Gr-1, and myeloperoxidase immunohistochemical or biochemical assays, (2) NETosis in terminal ileum and colon mucosa homogenates and peritoneal and fluid blood samples utilizing flow cytometric analyses of the surrogate NETosis biomarkers, picogreen and Gr-1, and (3) transepithelial gut leakiness as measured in terminal ileum and colon with FITC-dextran and transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER). Our results reveal that simvastatin and melatonin exhibit consistently comparable therapeutic protective effects against the following: (1) gut mucosa oxidative stress as revealed in the terminal ileum by markers of protein carbonylation as well as myeloperoxidase (MPO) and Gr-1 infiltration, (2) NETosis as revealed in the gut milieu, peritoneal lavage and plasma utilizing picogreen and Gr-1 flow cytometry and microscopy, and (3) transepithelial gut leakiness as

  12. The effects of simvastatin or interferon-α on infectivity of human norovirus using a gnotobiotic pig model for the study of antivirals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwonil Jung

    Full Text Available The lack of an animal model for human norovirus (HuNoV has hindered the development of therapeutic strategies. This study demonstrated that a commonly used cholesterol-lowering statin medication, simvastatin, which increases HuNoV replication in an in vitro replicon system, also enhances HuNoV infectivity in the gnotobiotic (Gn pig model. In contrast, oral treatment with interferon (IFN-α reduces HuNoV infectivity. Young piglets, all with A or H1 histo-blood group antigens on enterocytes, were treated orally with 8 mg/kg/day of simvastatin; 5 days later, the pigs were inoculated orally with a GII.4 HuNoV (HS194/2009/US strain and then treated with simvastatin for 5 more days. Simvastatin induced significantly earlier onset and longer duration of HuNoV fecal shedding in treated pigs, frequently with higher fecal viral titers. Simvastatin impaired poly (I:C-induced IFN-α expression in macrophages or dendritic cells, possibly due to lowered toll-like receptor (TLR 3 expression; however, the mechanisms were not related to interferon regulatory factor 3 or nuclear factor kappa B signaling pathway. Thus, the enhanced, earlier infectivity of HuNoV in simvastatin-treated pigs coincided with the inhibitory effect of simvastatin on innate immunity. In contrast to the increased HuNoV shedding that simvastatin induced, viral shedding during the treatment period was reduced or curtailed in the HuNoV-inoculated pigs pre-treated/treated with human IFN-α. Our findings are the first to indicate that IFN-α has potential as antiviral therapy against HuNoV. Based on these intriguing and novel findings using the Gn pig model, we confirmed that HuNoV infectivity is altered by treatment with simvastatin or IFN-α. Collectively, these findings indicate that Gn pigs are a useful model to test immunomodulators or efficacy of antivirals against HuNoV.

  13. Optimization of caseinate-coated simvastatin-zein nanoparticles: improved bioavailability and modified release characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed OA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Osama AA Ahmed,1,2 Khaled M Hosny,1,3 Majid M Al-Sawahli,1,4 Usama A Fahmy11Department of Pharmaceutics and Industrial Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; 2Department of Pharmaceutics and Industrial Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Minia University, Minia, Egypt; 3Department of Pharmaceutics and Industrial Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Beni Suef University, Beni Suef, Egypt; 4Holding Company for Biological Products & Vaccines (VACSERA, Cairo, EgyptAbstract: The current study focuses on utilization of the natural biocompatible polymer zein to formulate simvastatin (SMV nanoparticles coated with caseinate, to improve solubility and hence bioavailability, and in addition, to modify SMV-release characteristics. This formulation can be utilized for oral or possible depot parenteral applications. Fifteen formulations were prepared by liquid–liquid phase separation method, according to the Box–Behnken design, to optimize formulation variables. Sodium caseinate was used as an electrosteric stabilizer. The factors studied were: percentage of SMV in the SMV-zein mixture (X1, ethanol concentration (X2, and caseinate concentration (X3. The selected dependent variables were mean particle size (Y1, SMV encapsulation efficiency (Y2, and cumulative percentage of drug permeated after 1 hour (Y3. The diffusion of SMV from the prepared nanoparticles specified by the design was carried out using an automated Franz diffusion cell apparatus. The optimized SMV-zein formula was investigated for in vivo pharmacokinetic parameters compared with an oral SMV suspension. The optimized nanosized SMV-zein formula showed a 131 nm mean particle size and 89% encapsulation efficiency. In vitro permeation studies displayed delayed permeation characteristics, with about 42% and 85% of SMV cumulative amount released after 12 and 48 hours, respectively. Bioavailability estimation in rats revealed an augmentation in SMV bioavailability

  14. The Nuclear Orphan Receptor NR4A1 is Involved in the Apoptotic Pathway Induced by LPS and Simvastatin in RAW 264.7 Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Chan; Song, Seok Bean; Lee, Sang Kyu; Park, Sang Min; Kim, Young Sang

    2014-04-01

    Macrophage death plays a role in several physiological and inflammatory pathologies such as sepsis and arthritis. In our previous work, we showed that simvastatin triggers cell death in LPS-activated RAW 264.7 mouse macrophage cells through both caspase-dependent and independent apoptotic pathways. Here, we show that the nuclear orphan receptor NR4A1 is involved in a caspase-independent apoptotic process induced by LPS and simvastatin. Simvastatin-induced NR4A1 expression in RAW 264.7 macrophages and ectopic expression of a dominant-negative mutant form of NR4A1 effectively suppressed both DNA fragmentation and the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) during LPS- and simvastatin-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, apoptosis was accompanied by Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) translocation to the mitochondria. Our findings suggest that NR4A1 expression and mitochondrial translocation of Bax are related to simvastatin-induced apoptosis in LPS-activated RAW 264.7 macrophages.

  15. Simvastatin Attenuates Contrast-Induced Nephropathy through Modulation of Oxidative Stress, Proinflammatory Myeloperoxidase, and Nitric Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketab E. Al-Otaibi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Contrast media- (CM- induced nephropathy is a serious complication of radiodiagnostic procedures. Available data suggests that the development of prophylaxis strategies is limited by poor understanding of pathophysiology of CM-induced nephropathy. Present study was designed to determine the role of oxidative stress, myeloperoxidase, and nitric oxide in the pathogenesis of iohexol model of nephropathy and its modification with simvastatin (SSTN. Adult Sprague Dawley rats were divided into seven groups. After 24 h of water deprivation, all the rats except in control and SSTN-only groups were injected (10 ml/kg with 25% glycerol. After 30 min, SSTN (15, 30, and 60 mg/kg was administered orally, daily for 4 days. Twenty-four hours after the glycerol injection, iohexol was infused (8 ml/kg through femoral vein over a period of 2 min. All the animals were sacrificed on day 5 and blood and kidneys were collected for biochemical and histological studies. The results showed that SSTN dose dependently attenuated CM-induced rise of creatinine, urea, and structural abnormalities suggesting its nephroprotective effect. A significant increase in oxidative stress (increased lipid hydroperoxides and reduced glutathione levels and myeloperoxidase (MPO and decreased nitric oxide in CM group were reversed by SSTN. These findings support the use of SSTN to combat CM-induced nephrotoxicity.

  16. Characterization of Amorphous and Co-Amorphous Simvastatin Formulations Prepared by Spray Drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craye, Goedele; Löbmann, Korbinian; Grohganz, Holger; Rades, Thomas; Laitinen, Riikka

    2015-12-03

    In this study, spray drying from aqueous solutions, using the surface-active agent sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) as a solubilizer, was explored as a production method for co-amorphous simvastatin-lysine (SVS-LYS) at 1:1 molar mixtures, which previously have been observed to form a co-amorphous mixture upon ball milling. In addition, a spray-dried formulation of SVS without LYS was prepared. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) revealed that SLS coated the SVS and SVS-LYS particles upon spray drying. X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) showed that in the spray-dried formulations the remaining crystallinity originated from SLS only. The best dissolution properties and a "spring and parachute" effect were found for SVS spray-dried from a 5% SLS solution without LYS. Despite the presence of at least partially crystalline SLS in the mixtures, all the studied formulations were able to significantly extend the stability of amorphous SVS compared to previous co-amorphous formulations of SVS. The best stability (at least 12 months in dry conditions) was observed when SLS was spray-dried with SVS (and LYS). In conclusion, spray drying of SVS and LYS from aqueous surfactant solutions was able to produce formulations with improved physical stability for amorphous SVS.

  17. Quantification of simvastatin in mice plasma by near-infrared and chemometric analysis of spectral data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahmy UA

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Usama A Fahmy Department of Pharmaceutics & Industrial Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia Abstract: Time and cost saving is an essential requirement in pharmacokinetics and bioequivalence studies. The aim of this study is to use a simple, fast, and nondestructive near-infrared transmission spectroscopic method to quantify simvastatin (SMV concentrations in mice plasma and also to improve SMV bioavailability by using alpha-lipoic acid as a carrier. Calibration curve was built at a concentration range of 10–250 ng/mL, and HPLC method was considered as a reference method. A partial least squares regression analysis model was used for method development, which gave less root mean square error cross-validation. Comparison of SMV concentrations obtained from both instruments showed no statistically significant differences between all the data. Near-infrared spectroscopy was utilized as a rapid, simple accurate method to quantify drug–plasma concentrations without need for any extraction protocols, and the significant effect of alpha-lipoic acid as a novel carrier to enhance SMV bioavailability is also addressed. Keywords: alpha lipoic acid, bioavailability, non invasive, FTIR, pharmacokinetics

  18. Simvastatin mitigates functional and structural impairment of lung and right ventricle in a rat model of cigarette smoke-induced COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yajie; Jiang, Xue; Zhang, Lihai; Wang, Lihong; Li, Zhu; Sun, Wuzhuang

    2014-01-01

    This study is conducted to investigate an effect of simvastatin on cigarette smoke-induced COPD. Rats were exposed to air (control) and cigarette smoke (smoking) in presence and absence of simvastatin. Heart and lung tissues were harvested for histopathologic and morphometric analysis. Body weight of rat, mean liner intercept (MLI), mean alveolar number (MAN), lung function test, mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP), right ventricular hypertrophy index (RVHI) and 5-HTT level in serum and BALF were examined in experimental rats, respectively. Application of simvastatin mitigated peribronchiolar inflammation and pulmonary bullae formed in the smoke-exposed lungs with weight gain as compared to the smoking rats (P reversal of lung function decline (all P reverses lung function decline and attenuates structural impairments of lung and right ventricle possibly through reducing 5-HTT content in the model of COPD.

  19. Structure and expression of human dihydropteridine reductase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockyer, J.; Cook, R.G.; Milstien, S.; Kaufman, S.; Woo, S.L.C.; Ledley, F.D.

    1987-01-01

    Dihydropteridine reductase catalyzes the NADH-mediated reduction of quinonoid dihydrobiopterin and is an essential component of the pterindependent aromatic amino acid hydroxylating systems. A cDNA for human DHPR was isolated from a human liver cDNA library in the vector λgt11 using a monospecific antibody against sheep DHPR. The nucleic acid sequence and amino acid sequence of human DHPR were determined from a full-length clone. A 112 amino acid sequence of sheep DHPR was obtained by sequencing purified sheep DHPR. This sequence is highly homologous to the predicted amino acid sequence of the human protein. Gene transfer of the recombinant human DHPR into COS cells leads to expression of DHPR enzymatic activity. These results indicate that the cDNA clone identified by antibody screening is an authentic and full-length cDNA for human DHPR

  20. Monodehydroascorbate reductase mediates TNT toxicity in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Emily J; Rylott, Elizabeth L; Beynon, Emily; Lorenz, Astrid; Chechik, Victor; Bruce, Neil C

    2015-09-04

    The explosive 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) is a highly toxic and persistent environmental pollutant. Due to the scale of affected areas, one of the most cost-effective and environmentally friendly means of removing explosives pollution could be the use of plants. However, mechanisms of TNT phytotoxicity have been elusive. Here, we reveal that phytotoxicity is caused by reduction of TNT in the mitochondria, forming a nitro radical that reacts with atmospheric oxygen, generating reactive superoxide. The reaction is catalyzed by monodehydroascorbate reductase 6 (MDHAR6), with Arabidopsis deficient in MDHAR6 displaying enhanced TNT tolerance. This discovery will contribute toward the remediation of contaminated sites. Moreover, in an environment of increasing herbicide resistance, with a shortage in new herbicide classes, our findings reveal MDHAR6 as a valuable plant-specific target. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  1. Intradiscal injection of simvastatin results in radiologic, histologic, and genetic evidence of disc regeneration in a rat model of degenerative disc disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Than, Khoi D.; Rahman, Shayan U.; Wang, Lin; Khan, Adam; Kyere, Kwaku A.; Than, Tracey T.; Miyata, Yoshinari; Park, Yoon-Shin; La Marca, Frank; Kim, Hyungjin M.; Zhang, Huina; Park, Paul; Lin, Chia-Ying

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND CONTEXT A large percentage of back pain can be attributed to degeneration of the intervertebral disc (IVD). Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) is known to play an important role in chondrogenesis of the IVD. Simvastatin is known to up-regulate expression of BMP-2. Thus, we hypothesized that intradiscal injection of simvastatin in a rat model of degenerative disc disease (DDD) would result in retardation of DDD. PURPOSE To develop a novel conservative treatment for DDD and related discogenic back pain. STUDY DESIGN/SETTING Laboratory investigation. METHODS Disc injury was induced in 272 rats via 21-gauge needle puncture. After 6 weeks, injured discs were treated with simvastatin in a saline or hydrogel carrier. Rats were sacrificed at predetermined time points. Outcome measures assessed were radiologic, histologic, and genetic. Radiologically, the MRI index (number of pixels multiplied by corresponding image densities) was determined. Histologically, disc spaces were read by 3 blinded scorers employing a previously described histological grading scale. Genetically, nuclei pulposi were harvested and polymerase chain reaction was run to determine relative levels of aggrecan, collagen type II, and BMP-2 gene expression. This project was supported by Grant No. R01 AR056649 from NIAMS/NIH. There are no other financial conflicts of interest to report. RESULTS Radiologically, discs treated with 5 mg/mL simvastatin in hydrogel or saline demonstrated MRI indices that were normal through 8 weeks post-treatment, although this was more sustained when delivered in hydrogel. Histologically, discs treated with 5 mg/mL simvastatin in hydrogel demonstrated improved grades in comparison to discs treated at higher doses. Genetically, discs treated with 5 mg/mL of simvastatin in hydrogel demonstrated higher gene expression of aggrecan and collagen type II than control. CONCLUSIONS Degenerate discs treated with 5 mg/mL simvastatin in a hydrogel carrier demonstrated

  2. Simvastatin dose and acute kidney injury without concurrent serious muscle injury: A nationwide nested case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lianne Parkin

    Full Text Available Inconsistent findings from four observational studies suggest that the risk of acute kidney injury (AKI may increase with increasing statin dose or potency, but none of the studies took statin-related severe muscle injury, including rhabdomyolysis, into account. We undertook a nationwide nested case-control study in New Zealand to examine the risk of AKI without concurrent serious muscle injury according to simvastatin dose in two cohorts: people without a history of renal disease and people with non-dialysis dependent chronic kidney disease.A total of 334,710 people aged ≥ 18 years without a history of renal disease (cohort 1 and 5,437 with non-dialysis dependent chronic kidney disease (cohort 2 who initiated simvastatin therapy between 1 January 2006 and 31 December 2013 were identified using national pharmaceutical dispensing and hospital discharge data. Patients who developed AKI without concurrent serious muscle injury during follow-up (cases were ascertained using hospital discharge and mortality data (n = 931 from cohort 1, n = 160 from cohort 2. Up to 10 controls per case, matched by date of birth, sex, and cohort entry date were randomly selected from the relevant cohort using risk set sampling.Relative to current use of 20mg simvastatin daily, the adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI in cohort 1 for current use of 40mg and 80mg were 0.9 (95% CI 0.7-1.2 and 1.3 (95% CI 0.7-2.3, respectively. The adjusted odds ratio for 40mg in cohort 2 was 1.1 (95% CI 0.7-1.9; the numbers taking 80mg were very small and the confidence interval was correspondingly wide.The findings of this study suggest that a relationship between statin dose and AKI may not exist independent of serious muscle injury.

  3. Effect of simvastatin in the autonomic system is dependent on the increased gain/sensitivity of the baroreceptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Edson D; Mostarda, Cristiano T; Moraes-Silva, Ivana C; Ferreira, Janaina B; dos Santos, Fernando; Lacchini, Silvia; De Angelis, Kátia; Rodrigues, Bruno; Irigoyen, Maria Cláudia

    2013-01-01

    A number of mechanisms have been proposed to explain the pleiotropic effect of statin therapy to reduce sympathetic outflow in cardiovascular disease. We tested the hypothesis that statin treatment could improve baroreflex gain-sensitivity triggered by morphological adaptations in the mechanoreceptor site, thus reducing sympathetic activity, regardless of arterial pressure (AP) level reduction. Male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) were divided into control (SHR, n = 8) and SHR-simvastatin (5 mg/kg/day, for 7 days) (SHR-S, n = 8). After treatment, AP, baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) in response to AP-induced changes, aortic depressor nerve activity, and spectral analyses of pulse interval (PI) and AP variabilities were performed. Internal and external carotids were prepared for morphoquantitative evaluation. Although AP was similar between groups, sympathetic modulation, represented by the low frequency band of PI (SHR: 6.84 ± 3.19 vs. SHR-S: 2.41 ± 0.96 msec2) and from systolic AP variability (SHR: 3.95 ± 0.36 vs. SHR-S: 2.86 ± 0.18 mmHg2), were reduced in treated animals. In parallel, simvastatin induced an increase of 26% and 21% in the number of elastic lamellae as well as a decrease of 9% and 25% in the carotid thickness in both, external and internal carotid, respectively. Moreover, improved baroreceptor function (SHR: 0.78 ± 0.03 vs. SHR-S: 1.06 ± 0.04% mv/mmHg) was observed in addition to a 115% increase in aortic depressor nerve activity in SHR-S rats. Therefore, our data suggest that the reduction of sympathetic outflow in hypertension by simvastatin treatment may be triggered by structural changes in the carotid arteries and increased BRS in response to an improvement of the baroreceptors discharge and consequently of the afferent pathway of the baroreflex arch. PMID:24303130

  4. The structure of apo and holo forms of xylose reductase, a dimeric aldo-keto reductase from Candida tenuis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanagh, Kathryn L; Klimacek, Mario; Nidetzky, Bernd; Wilson, David K

    2002-07-16

    Xylose reductase is a homodimeric oxidoreductase dependent on NADPH or NADH and belongs to the largely monomeric aldo-keto reductase superfamily of proteins. It catalyzes the first step in the assimilation of xylose, an aldose found to be a major constituent monosaccharide of renewable plant hemicellulosic material, into yeast metabolic pathways. It does this by reducing open chain xylose to xylitol, which is reoxidized to xylulose by xylitol dehydrogenase and metabolically integrated via the pentose phosphate pathway. No structure has yet been determined for a xylose reductase, a dimeric aldo-keto reductase or a family 2 aldo-keto reductase. The structures of the Candida tenuis xylose reductase apo- and holoenzyme, which crystallize in spacegroup C2 with different unit cells, have been determined to 2.2 A resolution and an R-factor of 17.9 and 20.8%, respectively. Residues responsible for mediating the novel dimeric interface include Asp-178, Arg-181, Lys-202, Phe-206, Trp-313, and Pro-319. Alignments with other superfamily members indicate that these interactions are conserved in other dimeric xylose reductases but not throughout the remainder of the oligomeric aldo-keto reductases, predicting alternate modes of oligomerization for other families. An arrangement of side chains in a catalytic triad shows that Tyr-52 has a conserved function as a general acid. The loop that folds over the NAD(P)H cosubstrate is disordered in the apo form but becomes ordered upon cosubstrate binding. A slow conformational isomerization of this loop probably accounts for the observed rate-limiting step involving release of cosubstrate. Xylose binding (K(m) = 87 mM) is mediated by interactions with a binding pocket that is more polar than a typical aldo-keto reductase. Modeling of xylose into the active site of the holoenzyme using ordered waters as a guide for sugar hydroxyls suggests a convincing mode of substrate binding.

  5. The controlled release of simvastatin from TiO{sub 2} nanotubes to promote osteoblast differentiation and inhibit osteoclast resorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Min, E-mail: minlai@jsnu.edu.cn [School of Life Science, Jiangsu Normal University, Xuzhou, Jiangsu 221116 (China); Jin, Ziyang; Yang, Xinyi; Wang, Huaying [School of Life Science, Jiangsu Normal University, Xuzhou, Jiangsu 221116 (China); Xu, Kui [Biomedical Engineering Center, School of Medicine, Ningbo University, Ningbo, Zhejiang 315211 (China)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • The TiO{sub 2} nanotube substrates filled with simvastatin were successfully coated using chitosan/gelatin multilayers. • The bio-functionalized substrates display controlled release of simvastatin in a sustained manner. • The bio-functionalized substrates have great potential for improving osteoblast differentiation. • The bio-functionalized substrates effectively inhibit osteoclast differentiation. - Abstract: The aim of this study was to fabricate a novel drug-releasing bioactive platform that has excellent potential for improving osteoblast differentiation and inhibiting osteoclast resorption. TiO{sub 2} nanotubes (TNTs) with an outer diameter of around 70 nm were prepared by an anodization method. TNTs were filled with simvastatin (SV) and then coated using chitosan/gelatin multilayers (TNT-SV-LBL). The successful fabrication of TNT-SV-LBL substrates was confirmed by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and contact angle measurement, respectively. The in vitro release behavior of simvastatin from TNT-SV-LBL substrates showed a sustained release as compared to the uncoated group. Osteoblasts adhering to TNT-SV-LBL substrates attached well and displayed significantly higher (p < 0.01) cell viability compared with the other substrates. More importantly, osteoblasts grown on TNT-SV-LBL substrates displayed a statistically significant (p < 0.01 or p < 0.05) increase in protein production levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteocalcin (OC) and mRNA expression of runt related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), ALP, collagen type I (Col I), osteopontin (OPN), OC and osteoprotegerin (OPG) compared to the other groups after 4, 7 and 14 days of culture, respectively. Additionally, multinuclear osteoclastic differentiation of RAW264.7 cells grown on TNT-SV-LBL substrates was inhibited as confirmed by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) analysis. These

  6. A remarkable hematological and molecular response pattern in a patient with polycythemia vera during combination therapy with simvastatin and alendronate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Lindholm Sørensen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a 57-year old man with polycythemia vera, who had a remarkable hematological and molecular response during treatment with simvastatin and alendronate. The patient was treated with this combination for 56 months, and during this period the patient has been in complete hematological remission. The JAK2-V617F allele burden has dropped from 64% to sustained values below 20%, and follow-up bone marrow biopsies have revealed no change in PV features, without any regular cytoreductive treatment.

  7. Effect of a high dose of simvastatin on muscle mitochondrial metabolism and calcium signaling in healthy volunteers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galtier, F., E-mail: f-galtier@chu-montpellier.fr [CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); INSERM, CIC 1001, 80 Avenue Augustin Fliche, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); CPID, Faculté de Pharmacie, 15 Av. Charles Flahault, BP 14491, 34093 Montpellier Cedex 5, Montpellier (France); Mura, T., E-mail: t-mura@chu-montpellier.fr [CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); INSERM, CIC 1001, 80 Avenue Augustin Fliche, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Raynaud de Mauverger, E., E-mail: eric.raynaud-de-mauverger@chu-montpellier.fr [CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Université Montpellier 1, 5 bd Henri IV CS 19044, 34967 Montpellier Cedex 2 (France); Université Montpellier 2, Place Eugène Bataillon, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); INSERM, U1046, 371 Avenue du Doyen G. Giraud, CHU Arnaud de Villeneuve, Bâtiment INSERM Crastes de Paulet, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Chevassus, H., E-mail: h-chevassus@chu-montpellier.fr [CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); INSERM, CIC 1001, 80 Avenue Augustin Fliche, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Farret, A., E-mail: a-farret@chu-montpellier.fr [CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); INSERM, CIC 1001, 80 Avenue Augustin Fliche, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Gagnol, J.-P., E-mail: jp-gagnol@chu-montpellier.fr [CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); INSERM, CIC 1001, 80 Avenue Augustin Fliche, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Costa, F., E-mail: francoisecosta@sfr.fr [CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); INSERM, CIC 1001, 80 Avenue Augustin Fliche, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Dupuy, A., E-mail: am-dupuy@chu-montpellier.fr [CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); and others

    2012-09-15

    Statin use may be limited by muscle side effects. Although incompletely understood to date, their pathophysiology may involve oxidative stress and impairments of mitochondrial function and of muscle Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis. In order to simultaneously assess these mechanisms, 24 male healthy volunteers were randomized to receive either simvastatin for 80 mg daily or placebo for 8 weeks. Blood and urine samples and a stress test were performed at baseline and at follow-up, and mitochondrial respiration and Ca{sup 2+} spark properties were evaluated on a muscle biopsy 4 days before the second stress test. Simvastatin-treated subjects were separated according to their median creatine kinase (CK) increase. Simvastatin treatment induced a significant elevation of aspartate amino transferase (3.38 ± 5.68 vs − 1.15 ± 4.32 UI/L, P < 0.001) and CK (− 24.3 ± 99.1 ± 189.3vs 48.3 UI/L, P = 0.01) and a trend to an elevation of isoprostanes (193 ± 408 vs12 ± 53 pmol/mmol creatinine, P = 0.09) with no global change in mitochondrial respiration, lactate/pyruvate ratio or Ca{sup 2+} sparks. However, among statin-treated subjects, those with the highest CK increase displayed a significantly lower Vmax rotenone succinate and an increase in Ca{sup 2+} spark amplitude vs both subjects with the lowest CK increase and placebo-treated subjects. Moreover, Ca{sup 2+} spark amplitude was positively correlated with treatment-induced CK increase in the whole group (r = 0.71, P = 0.0045). In conclusion, this study further supports that statin induced muscular toxicity may be related to alterations in mitochondrial respiration and muscle calcium homeostasis independently of underlying disease or concomitant medication. -- Highlights: ► Statin use may be limited by side effects, particularly myopathy. ► Statins might impair mitochondrial function and muscle Ca2+ signaling in muscle. ► This was tested among healthy volunteers receiving simvastatin 80 mg daily for 8 weeks. ► CK

  8. Regulation of ribonucleotide reductase by Spd1 involves multiple mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nestoras, Konstantinos; Mohammed, Asma Hadi; Schreurs, Ann-Sofie

    2010-01-01

    The correct levels of deoxyribonucleotide triphosphates and their relative abundance are important to maintain genomic integrity. Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) regulation is complex and multifaceted. RNR is regulated allosterically by two nucleotide-binding sites, by transcriptional control, and...

  9. Crystallization and diffraction analysis of thioredoxin reductase from Streptomyces coelicolor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koháryová, Michaela; Brynda, Jiří; Řezáčová, Pavlína; Kollárová, Marta

    2011-01-01

    Thioredoxin reductase from S. coelicolor was crystallized and diffraction data were collected to 2.4 Å resolution. Thioredoxin reductases are homodimeric flavoenzymes that catalyze the transfer of electrons from NADPH to oxidized thioredoxin substrate. Bacterial thioredoxin reductases represent a promising target for the development of new antibiotics. Recombinant thioredoxin reductase TrxB from Streptomyces coelicolor was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. X-ray diffraction data were collected from cryocooled crystals to 2.4 Å resolution using a synchrotron-radiation source. The crystals belonged to the primitive monoclinic space group P2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 82.9, b = 60.6, c = 135.4 Å, α = γ = 90.0, β = 96.5°

  10. Cloning and characterization of a nitrite reductase gene related to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-03-01

    Mar 1, 2010 ... Alexander et al., 2005) and heme-type nitrite reductase gene (Smith and ... owing to a genotype-dependent response (Zhang et al.,. 1991; Sakhanokho et al., ..... Improvement of cell culture conditions for rice. Jpn. Agric. Res.

  11. Characterization of mitochondrial thioredoxin reductase from C. elegans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacey, Brian M.; Hondal, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    Thioredoxin reductase catalyzes the NADPH-dependent reduction of the catalytic disulfide bond of thioredoxin. In mammals and other higher eukaryotes, thioredoxin reductases contain the rare amino acid selenocysteine at the active site. The mitochondrial enzyme from Caenorhabditis elegans, however, contains a cysteine residue in place of selenocysteine. The mitochondrial C. elegans thioredoxin reductase was cloned from an expressed sequence tag and then produced in Escherichia coli as an intein-fusion protein. The purified recombinant enzyme has a k cat of 610 min -1 and a K m of 610 μM using E. coli thioredoxin as substrate. The reported k cat is 25% of the k cat of the mammalian enzyme and is 43-fold higher than a cysteine mutant of mammalian thioredoxin reductase. The enzyme would reduce selenocysteine, but not hydrogen peroxide or insulin. The flanking glycine residues of the GCCG motif were mutated to serine. The mutants improved substrate binding, but decreased the catalytic rate

  12. 5α-reductase activity in rat adipose tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zyirek, M.; Flood, C.; Longcope, C.

    1987-01-01

    We measured the 5 α-reductase activity in isolated cell preparations of rat adipose tissue using the formation of [ 3 H] dihydrotestosterone from [ 3 H] testosterone as an endpoint. Stromal cells were prepared from the epididymal fat pad, perinephric fat, and subcutaneous fat of male rats and from perinephric fat of female rats. Adipocytes were prepared from the epididymal fat pad and perinephric fat of male rats. Stromal cells from the epididymal fat pad and perinephric fat contained greater 5α-reductase activity than did the adipocytes from these depots. Stromal cells from the epididymal fat pad contained greater activity than those from perinephric and subcutaneous depots. Perinephric stromal cells from female rats were slightly more active than those from male rats. Estradiol (10 -8 M), when added to the medium, caused a 90% decrease in 5α-reductase activity. Aromatase activity was minimal, several orders of magnitude less than 5α-reductase activity in each tissue studied

  13. Intraethnic variation in steroid-5-alpha-reductase polymorphisms in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-06-01

    Jun 1, 2015 ... in prostate cancer patients: a potential factor implicated ... reductase alpha polypeptides 1 and 2 in a set of 601 prostate cancer patients from four ..... tion in the key androgen-regulating genes androgen receptor, cytochrome ...

  14. Optimization of caseinate-coated simvastatin-zein nanoparticles: improved bioavailability and modified release characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Osama A A; Hosny, Khaled M; Al-Sawahli, Majid M; Fahmy, Usama A

    2015-01-01

    The current study focuses on utilization of the natural biocompatible polymer zein to formulate simvastatin (SMV) nanoparticles coated with caseinate, to improve solubility and hence bioavailability, and in addition, to modify SMV-release characteristics. This formulation can be utilized for oral or possible depot parenteral applications. Fifteen formulations were prepared by liquid-liquid phase separation method, according to the Box-Behnken design, to optimize formulation variables. Sodium caseinate was used as an electrosteric stabilizer. The factors studied were: percentage of SMV in the SMV-zein mixture (X1), ethanol concentration (X2), and caseinate concentration (X3). The selected dependent variables were mean particle size (Y1), SMV encapsulation efficiency (Y2), and cumulative percentage of drug permeated after 1 hour (Y3). The diffusion of SMV from the prepared nanoparticles specified by the design was carried out using an automated Franz diffusion cell apparatus. The optimized SMV-zein formula was investigated for in vivo pharmacokinetic parameters compared with an oral SMV suspension. The optimized nanosized SMV-zein formula showed a 131 nm mean particle size and 89% encapsulation efficiency. In vitro permeation studies displayed delayed permeation characteristics, with about 42% and 85% of SMV cumulative amount released after 12 and 48 hours, respectively. Bioavailability estimation in rats revealed an augmentation in SMV bioavailability from the optimized SMV-zein formulation, by fourfold relative to SMV suspension. Formulation of caseinate-coated SMV-zein nanoparticles improves the pharmacokinetic profile and bioavailability of SMV. Accordingly, improved hypolipidemic activities for longer duration could be achieved. In addition, the reduced dosage rate of SMV-zein nanoparticles improves patient tolerability and compliance.

  15. The influence of bile salts on the distribution of simvastatin in the octanol/buffer system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Đanić, Maja; Pavlović, Nebojša; Stanimirov, Bojan; Vukmirović, Saša; Nikolić, Katarina; Agbaba, Danica; Mikov, Momir

    2016-01-01

    Distribution coefficient (D) is useful parameter for evaluating drugs permeability properties across biological membranes, which are of importance for drugs bioavailability. Given that bile acids are intensively studied as drug permeation-modifying and -solubilizing agents, the aim of this study was to estimate the influence of sodium salts of cholic (CA), deoxycholic (DCA) and 12-monoketocholic acids (MKC) on distribution coefficient of simvastatin (SV) (lactone [SVL] and acid form [SVA]) which is a highly lipophilic compound with extremely low water solubility and bioavailability. LogD values of SVA and SVL with or without bile salts were measured by liquid-liquid extraction in n-octanol/buffer systems at pH 5 and 7.4. SV concentrations in aqueous phase were determined by HPLC-DAD. Chem3D Ultra program was applied for computation of physico-chemical properties of analyzed compounds and their complexes. Statistically significant decrease in both SVA and SVL logD was observed for all three studied bile salts at both selected pH. MKC exerted the most pronounced effect in the case of SVA while there were no statistically significant differences between observed bile salts for SVL. The calculated physico-chemical properties of analyzed compounds and their complexes supported experimental results. Our data indicate that the addition of bile salts into the n-octanol/buffer system decreases the values of SV distribution coefficient at both studied pH values. This may be the result of the formation of hydrophilic complexes increasing the solubility of SV that could consequently impact the pharmacokinetic parameters of SV and the final drug response in patients.

  16. Cerimetric determination of simvastatin in pharmaceuticals based on redox and complex formation reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basavaiah, K.; Devi, O.Z

    2008-01-01

    Two sensitive spectrophotometric methods are described for the determination of simvastatin (SMT) in bulk drug and in tablets. The methods are based on the oxidation of SMT by a measured excess of cerium (IV) in acid medium followed by determination of unreacted oxidant by two different reaction schemes. In one procedure (method A), the residual cerium (IV) is reacted with a fixed concentration of ferroin and the increase in absorbance is measured at 510 nm. The second approach (method B) involves the reduction of the unreacted cerium (IV) with a fixed quantity of iron (II), and the resulting iron (III) is complexed with thiocyanate and the absorbance measured at 470 nm. In both methods, the amount of cerium (IV) reacted corresponds to SMT concentration. The experimental conditions for both methods were optimized. In method A, the absorbance is found to increase linearly with SMT concentration (r = 0.9995) whereas in method B, the same decreased (r = -0.9943). The systems obey Beer's law for 0.6-7.5 and 0.5-5.0 μg mL -1 for method A and method B, respectively. The calculated molar absorptivity values are 2.7 X 104 and 1.06 X 105 Lmol -1 cm -1 , respectively; and the corresponding sandel sensitivity values are 0.0153 and 0.0039 μg cm -2 , respectively. The limit of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) are reported for both methods. Intra-day and inter-day precision, and accuracy of the methods were established as per the current ICH guidelines. The methods were successfully applied to the determination of SMT in tablets and the results were statistically compared with those of the reference method by applying the Student's t-test and F-test. No interference was observed from the common excipients added to tablets. The accuracy and validity of the methods were further ascertained by performing recovery experiments via standard addition procedure. (author)

  17. Streptococcus sanguinis Class Ib Ribonucleotide Reductase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhlynets, Olga; Boal, Amie K.; Rhodes, DeLacy V.; Kitten, Todd; Rosenzweig, Amy C.; Stubbe, JoAnne

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus sanguinis is a causative agent of infective endocarditis. Deletion of SsaB, a manganese transporter, drastically reduces S. sanguinis virulence. Many pathogenic organisms require class Ib ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) to catalyze the conversion of nucleotides to deoxynucleotides under aerobic conditions, and recent studies demonstrate that this enzyme uses a dimanganese-tyrosyl radical (MnIII2-Y•) cofactor in vivo. The proteins required for S. sanguinis ribonucleotide reduction (NrdE and NrdF, α and β subunits of RNR; NrdH and TrxR, a glutaredoxin-like thioredoxin and a thioredoxin reductase; and NrdI, a flavodoxin essential for assembly of the RNR metallo-cofactor) have been identified and characterized. Apo-NrdF with FeII and O2 can self-assemble a diferric-tyrosyl radical (FeIII2-Y•) cofactor (1.2 Y•/β2) and with the help of NrdI can assemble a MnIII2-Y• cofactor (0.9 Y•/β2). The activity of RNR with its endogenous reductants, NrdH and TrxR, is 5,000 and 1,500 units/mg for the Mn- and Fe-NrdFs (Fe-loaded NrdF), respectively. X-ray structures of S. sanguinis NrdIox and MnII2-NrdF are reported and provide a possible rationale for the weak affinity (2.9 μm) between them. These streptococcal proteins form a structurally distinct subclass relative to other Ib proteins with unique features likely important in cluster assembly, including a long and negatively charged loop near the NrdI flavin and a bulky residue (Thr) at a constriction in the oxidant channel to the NrdI interface. These studies set the stage for identifying the active form of S. sanguinis class Ib RNR in an animal model for infective endocarditis and establishing whether the manganese requirement for pathogenesis is associated with RNR. PMID:24381172

  18. Bee Venom Promotes Hair Growth in Association with Inhibiting 5α-Reductase Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seeun; Erdogan, Sedef; Hwang, Dahyun; Hwang, Seonwook; Han, Eun Hye; Lim, Young-Hee

    2016-06-01

    Alopecia is an important issue that can occur in people of all ages. Recent studies show that bee venom can be used to treat certain diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, neuralgia, and multiple sclerosis. In this study, we investigated the preventive effect of bee venom on alopecia, which was measured by applying bee venom (0.001, 0.005, 0.01%) or minoxidil (2%) as a positive control to the dorsal skin of female C57BL/6 mice for 19 d. Growth factors responsible for hair growth were analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot analysis using mice skins and human dermal papilla cells (hDPCs). Bee venom promoted hair growth and inhibited transition from the anagen to catagen phase. In both anagen phase mice and dexamethasone-induced catagen phase mice, hair growth was increased dose dependently compared with controls. Bee venom inhibited the expression of SRD5A2, which encodes a type II 5α-reductase that plays a major role in the conversion of testosterone into dihydrotestosterone. Moreover, bee venom stimulated proliferation of hDPCs and several growth factors (insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF)2 and 7) in bee venom-treated hDPCs dose dependently compared with the control group. In conclusion, bee venom is a potentially potent 5α-reductase inhibitor and hair growth promoter.

  19. Aldose reductase inhibitory compounds from Xanthium strumarium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Ha Na; Lee, Min Young; Kim, Jin-Kyu; Suh, Hong-Won; Lim, Soon Sung

    2013-09-01

    As part of our ongoing search for natural sources of therapeutic and preventive agents for diabetic complications, we evaluated the inhibitory effects of components of the fruit of Xanthium strumarium (X. strumarium) on aldose reductase (AR) and galactitol formation in rat lenses with high levels of glucose. To identify the bioactive components of X. strumarium, 7 caffeoylquinic acids and 3 phenolic compounds were isolated and their chemical structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic evidence and comparison with published data. The abilities of 10 X. strumarium-derived components to counteract diabetic complications were investigated by means of inhibitory assays with rat lens AR (rAR) and recombinant human AR (rhAR). From the 10 isolated compounds, methyl-3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinate showed the most potent inhibition, with IC₅₀ values of 0.30 and 0.67 μM for rAR and rhAR, respectively. In the kinetic analyses using Lineweaver-Burk plots of 1/velocity and 1/substrate, methyl-3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinate showed competitive inhibition of rhAR. Furthermore, methyl-3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinate inhibited galactitol formation in the rat lens and in erythrocytes incubated with a high concentration of glucose, indicating that this compound may be effective in preventing diabetic complications.

  20. Radiographic Comparison of Bovine Bone Substitute Alone versus Bovine Bone Substitute and Simvastatin for Human Maxillary Sinus Augmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Ali Reza Rasouli Ghahroudi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of bovine bone substitute (Compact Bone B. ® alone versus bovine bone substitute and simvastatin for human maxillary sinus augmentation.Materials and Methods: This study was conducted on 16 sinuses in eight patients. Radiographic assessments were done preoperatively (T0, immediately (T1 and at nine months after sinus grafting (T2. Alveolar bone height and density were assessed on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT scans using Planmeca Romexis™ Imaging Software 2.2.Results: The change in alveolar bone height and density between T0, T1 and T2 was significant in both groups. Alveolar bone height (h0, h1, h2 and vertical height of the grafted bone (g1, g2 in three lines (anterior, middle and posterior were not significantly different between groups. The grafted bone height shrinkage (% in the anterior, middle and posterior limits of the augmented area were not significantly different between groups. The existing alveolar and grafted bone density increased significantly in both groups between T1 and T2, except for the existing alveolar bone density in the control group. There were no statistically significant differences between the alveolar bone density values obtained in TI and T2 between groups, except for the existing alveolar bone density at T1.Conclusions: This study did not show any significant positive effect for simvastatin in maxillary sinus augmentation based on radiographic examination.

  1. Platelet-rich plasma, plasma rich in growth factors and simvastatin in the regeneration and repair of alveolar bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, César; Monsalve, Francisco; Salas, Juan; Morán, Andrea; Suazo, Iván

    2013-12-01

    Platelet preparations promote bone regeneration by inducing cell migration, proliferation and differentiation in the area of the injury, which are essential processes for regeneration. In addition, several studies have indicated that simvastatin (SIMV), widely used for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia, stimulates osteogenesis. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of treatment with either platelet-rich plasma (PRP) or plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF) in combination with SIMV in the regeneration and repair of alveolar bone. The jaws of Sprague Dawley rats (n=18) were subjected to rotary instrument-induced bone damage (BD). Animals were divided into six groups: BD/H 2 O (n=3), distilled water without the drug and alveolar bone damage; BD/H 2 O/PRP (n=3), BD and PRP; BD/H 2 O/PRGF (n=3), BD and PRGF; BD/SIMV (n=3), BD and water with SIMV; BD/SIMV/PRP (n=3), BD, PRP and SIMV; and BD/SIMV/PRGF (n=3), BD, PRGF and SIMV. Conventional histological analysis (hematoxylin and eosin staining) revealed that the BD/SIMV group showed indicators for mature bone tissue, while the BD/SIMV/PRP and BD/SIMV/PRGF groups showed the coexistence of indicators for mature and immature bone tissue, with no statistical differences between the platelet preparations. Simvastatin did not improve the effect of platelet-rich plasma and plasma rich in growth factors. It was not possible to determine which platelet preparation produced superior effects.

  2. Protective effects of l-carnitine and piracetam against mitochondrial permeability transition and PC3 cell necrosis induced by simvastatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Rute A P; Fernandes, Mariana P; de Souza-Pinto, Nadja C; Vercesi, Aníbal E

    2013-02-15

    Mitochondrial oxidative stress followed by membrane permeability transition (MPT) has been considered as a possible mechanism for statins cytotoxicity. Statins use has been associated with reduced risk of cancer incidence, especially prostate cancer. Here we investigated the pathways leading to simvastatin-induced prostate cancer cell death as well as the mechanisms of cell death protection by l-carnitine or piracetam. These compounds are known to prevent and/or protect against cell death mediated by oxidative mitochondrial damage induced by a variety of conditions, either in vivo or in vitro. The results provide evidence that simvastatin induced MPT and cell necrosis were sensitive to either l-carnitine or piracetam in a dose-dependent fashion and mediated by additive mechanisms. When combined, l-carnitine and piracetam acted at concentrations significantly lower than they act individually. These results shed new light into both the cytotoxic mechanisms of statins and the mechanisms underlying the protection against MPT and cell death by the compounds l-carnitine and piracetam. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Preparation of Emulsifying Wax/GMO Nanoparticles and Evaluation as a Delivery System for Repurposing Simvastatin in Bone Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskinazi-Budge, Aaron; Manickavasagam, Dharani; Czech, Tori; Novak, Kimberly; Kunzler, James; Oyewumi, Moses O

    2018-05-30

    Simvastatin (Sim) is a widely known drug in the treatment of hyperlipidemia that has attracted so much attention in bone regeneration based on its potential osteoanabolic effect. However, repurposing of Sim in bone regeneration will require suitable delivery systems that can negate undesirable off-target/side effects. In this study, we have investigated a new lipid nanoparticle (NP) platform that was fabricated using a binary blend of emulsifying wax (Ewax) and glyceryl monooleate (GMO). Using the binary matrix materials, NPs loaded with Sim (0-500 µg/mL) were prepared and showed an average particle size of about 150 nm. NP size stability was dependent on Sim concentration loaded in NPs. The suitability of NPs prepared with the binary matrix materials in Sim delivery for potential application in bone regeneration was supported by biocompatibility in pre-osteoclastic and pre-osteoblastic cells. Additional data demonstrated that biofunctional Sim was released from NPs that facilitated differentiation of osteoblasts (cells that form bones) while inhibiting differentiation of osteoclasts (cells that resorb bones). The overall work demonstrated the preparation of NPs from Ewax/GMO blends and characterization to ascertain potential suitability in Sim delivery for bone regeneration. Additional studies on osteoblast and osteoclast functions are warranted to fully evaluate the efficacy simvastatin-loaded Ewax/GMO NPs using in-vitro and in-vivo approaches.

  4. The effect of metformin on monocyte secretory function in simvastatin-treated patients with impaired fasting glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krysiak, Robert; Okopien, Bogusław

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether metformin affects monocyte secretory function in patients with impaired fasting glucose receiving chronic statin therapy. The study included 48 patients with impaired fasting glucose treated for at least three months with simvastatin (40 mg daily). These patients were randomized to either metformin (3 g daily) or placebo, which was administered together with simvastatin for 90 days. Plasma lipids, glucose homeostasis markers, monocyte cytokine release and plasma C-reactive protein levels were determined before randomization and at the end of the treatment. Compared to placebo, metformin reduced monocyte release of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and interleukin-8, as well as decreased plasma C-reactive protein levels, which were accompanied by an improvement in insulin sensitivity. The obtained results suggest that metformin may inhibit monocyte secretory function and reduce systemic inflammation in statin-treated patients with prediabetes. Impaired fasting glucose patients with high cardiovascular risk may receive the greatest benefits from concomitant treatment with a statin and metformin. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Efficacy and safety of statin therapy in children with familial hypercholesterolemia - A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial with simvastatin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jongh, Saskia; Ose, Leiv; Szamosi, Tamás; Gagné, Claude; Lambert, M.; Scott, Russell; Perron, P.; Dobbelaere, Dries; Saborio, M.; Tuohy, Mary B.; Stepanavage, Michael; Sapre, Aditi; Gumbiner, Barry; Mercuri, Michele; van Trotsenburg, A. S. Paul; Bakker, Henk D.; Kastelein, John J. P.

    2002-01-01

    Background-A multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted to evaluate LDL cholesterol-lowering efficacy, overall safety, and tolerability and the influence on growth and pubertal development of simvastatin in a large cohort of boys and girls with heterozygous

  6. Incorporating simvastatin/poloxamer 407 hydrogel into 3D-printed porous Ti6Al4V scaffolds for the promotion of angiogenesis, osseointegration and bone ingrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao; Li, Wei; Liu, Can; Tan, Jie; Wang, Hong; Hai, Bao; Cai, Hong; Leng, Hui-Jie; Liu, Zhong-Jun; Song, Chun-Li

    2016-10-27

    Three-dimensional porous titanium alloys printed via electron beam melting have low stiffness similar to that of cortical bone and are promising scaffolds for orthopedic applications. However, the bio-inert nature of titanium alloy is poorly compatible with bone ingrowth. We previously observed that simvastatin/poloxamer 407 thermosensitive hydrogel induces endogenous angiogenic/osteogenic growth factors and promotes angiogenesis and osteogenesis, but the mechanical properties of this hydrogel are poor. The purpose of this study was to construct 3D-printed porous titanium scaffolds (pTi scaffolds) filled with simvastatin/hydrogel and evaluate the effects of this composite on osseointegration, bone ingrowth and neovascularization using a tibial defect rabbit model. Four and eight weeks after implantation, the bone volume, bone mineral density, mineral apposition rate, and push-in maximum force of the pTi scaffolds filled with simvastatin/hydrogel were significantly higher than those without simvastatin (p bone and neovascularization (p bone ingrowth.

  7. A comparison of the use, effectiveness and safety of bezafibrate, gemfibrozil and simvastatin in normal clinical practice using the New Zealand Intensive Medicines Monitoring Programme (IMMP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beggs, Peter W; Clark, David WJ; Williams, Sheila M; Coulter, David M

    1999-01-01

    Aims Because of the importance of treating dyslipidaemia in the prevention of ischaemic heart disease and because patient selection criteria and outcomes in clinical trials do not necessarily reflect what happens in normal clinical practice, we compared outcomes from bezafibrate, gemfibrozil and simvastatin therapy under conditions of normal use. Methods A random sample of 200 patients was selected from the New Zealand Intensive Medicines Monitoring Programme’s (IMMP) patient cohorts for each drug. Questionnaires sent to prescribers requested information on indications, risk factors for ischaemic heart disease, lipid profiles with changes during treatment and reasons for stopping therapy. Results 80% of prescribers replied and 83% of these contained useful information. The three groups were similar for age, sex and geographical region, but significantly more patients on bezafibrate had diabetes and/or hypertension than those on gemfibrozil or simvastatin. After treatment and taking the initial measure into account, the changes in serum lipid values were consistent with those generally observed, but with gemfibrozil being significantly less effective than expected. More patients (15.8%) stopped gemfibrozil because of an inadequate response compared with bezafibrate (5.4%) and simvastatin (1.6%). Gemfibrozil treatment was also withdrawn significantly more frequently due to a possible adverse reaction compared with the other two drugs. Conclusions In normal clinical practice in New Zealand gemfibrozil appears less effective and more frequently causes adverse effects leading to withdrawal of treatment than either bezafibrate or simvastatin. PMID:10073746

  8. Structural basis for target protein recognition by the protein disulfide reductase thioredoxin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maeda, Kenji; Hägglund, Per; Finnie, Christine

    2006-01-01

    Thioredoxin is ubiquitous and regulates various target proteins through disulfide bond reduction. We report the structure of thioredoxin (HvTrxh2 from barley) in a reaction intermediate complex with a protein substrate, barley alpha-amylase/subtilisin inhibitor (BASI). The crystal structure...... of this mixed disulfide shows a conserved hydrophobic motif in thioredoxin interacting with a sequence of residues from BASI through van der Waals contacts and backbone-backbone hydrogen bonds. The observed structural complementarity suggests that the recognition of features around protein disulfides plays...... a major role in the specificity and protein disulfide reductase activity of thioredoxin. This novel insight into the function of thioredoxin constitutes a basis for comprehensive understanding of its biological role. Moreover, comparison with structurally related proteins shows that thioredoxin shares...

  9. Cell death in response to antimetabolites directed at ribonucleotide reductase and thymidylate synthase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asuncion Valenzuela, Malyn M; Castro, Imilce; Gonda, Amber; Diaz Osterman, Carlos J; Jutzy, Jessica M; Aspe, Jonathan R; Khan, Salma; Neidigh, Jonathan W; Wall, Nathan R

    2015-01-01

    New agent development, mechanistic understanding, and combinatorial partnerships with known and novel modalities continue to be important in the study of pancreatic cancer and its improved treatment. In this study, known antimetabolite drugs such as gemcitabine (ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor) and 5-fluorouracil (thymidylate synthase inhibitor) were compared with novel members of these two drug families in the treatment of a chemoresistant pancreatic cancer cell line PANC-1. Cellular survival data, along with protein and messenger ribonucleic acid expression for survivin, XIAP, cIAP1, and cIAP2, were compared from both the cell cytoplasm and from exosomes after single modality treatment. While all antimetabolite drugs killed PANC-1 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner, neither family significantly altered the cytosolic protein level of the four inhibitors of apoptosis (IAPs) investigated. Survivin, XIAP, cIAP1, and cIAP2 were found localized to exosomes where no significant difference in expression was recorded. This inability for significant and long-lasting expression may be a reason why pancreatic cancer lacks responsiveness to these and other cancer-killing agents. Continued investigation is required to determine the responsibilities of these IAPs in their role in chemoresistance in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:25767396

  10. Cost-effectiveness of rosuvastatin in comparison with generic atorvastatin and simvastatin in a Swedish population at high risk of cardiovascular events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gandhi SK

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sanjay K Gandhi1, Marie M Jensen2, Kathleen M Fox3, Lee Smolen4, Anders G Olsson5, Thomas Paulsson61AstraZeneca LP, Wilmington, DE, USA; 2AstraZeneca, Lund, Sweden; 3Strategic HealthCare Solution, Monkton, MD; 4Medical Decision Modeling Inc, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 5Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linkoping University, and Stockholm Heart Center, Stockholm; 6AstraZeneca, Sodertalje, SwedenBackground: To assess the long-term cost-effectiveness of rosuvastatin therapy compared with generic simvastatin and generic atorvastatin in reducing the incidence of cardiovascular events and mortality in a Swedish population with Framingham risk ≥20%.Methods: A probabilistic Monte Carlo simulation model based on data from JUPITER (the Justification for the Use of statins in Prevention: an Intervention Trial Evaluating Rosuvastatin was used to estimate the long-term cost-effectiveness of rosuvastatin 20 mg daily versus simvastatin or atorvastatin 40 mg for the prevention of cardiovascular death and morbidity. The three-stage model included cardiovascular event prevention simulating the 4 years of JUPITER, initial prevention beyond the trial, and subsequent cardiovascular event prevention. A Swedish health care payer perspective (direct costs only was modeled for a lifetime horizon, with 2008/2009 as the costing period. Univariate and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed.Results: The incremental cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY gained with rosuvastatin 20 mg over simvastatin or atorvastatin 40 mg ranged from SEK88,113 (rosuvastatin 20 mg versus simvastatin 40 mg; Framingham risk ≥30%; net avoidance of 34 events/1000 patients to SEK497,542 (versus atorvastatin 40 mg: Framingham risk ≥20%; net avoidance of 11 events/1000 patients over a lifetime horizon. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses indicated that at a willingness-to-pay threshold of SEK500,000/QALY, rosuvastatin 20 mg would be cost-effective for approximately 75%–85

  11. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Liping; Feng, Lingling; Zhou, Li; Gui, Jie; Wan, Jian; Hu, Xiaopeng

    2010-01-01

    3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase of Streptococcus pneumoniae has been cloned, overexpressed and purified to homogeneity using Ni–NTA affinity chromatography. Crystals were obtained using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Class II 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductases are potential targets for novel antibiotic development. In order to obtain a precise structural model for use in virtual screening and inhibitor design, HMG-CoA reductase of Streptococcus pneumoniae was cloned, overexpressed and purified to homogeneity using Ni–NTA affinity chromatography. Crystals were obtained using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. A complete data set was collected from a single frozen crystal on a home X-ray source. The crystal diffracted to 2.3 Å resolution and belonged to the orthorhombic space group C222 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 773.4836, b = 90.3055, c = 160.5592 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. Assuming the presence of two molecules in the asymmetric unit, the solvent content was estimated to be 54.1% (V M = 2.68 Å 3 Da −1 )

  12. The influence of Simvastatin and Korargin on the clinical course of coronary heart disease, body weight and distribution of adipose tissue in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

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    E. A. Pogrebniak

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is one of the most influential risk factors for the development of cardiovascular diseases. Incidence of coronary heart diseases (CHD and acute myocardial infarction in diabetic patients is much higher than in people without diabetes. Type 2 DM affects other risk factors of CHD due to the fact that, as a rule, it is accompanied by obesity, hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia and decrease of high density lipoproteins. Purpose of the investigation – to improve the efficiency of treatment of patients with CHD with type 2 DM based on the effect of Simvastatin and Korargin on it’s clinical course, body weight and the distribution of adipose tissue. Materials and methods of the investigation. The study involved 175 patients with CHD aged from 34 to 87, mean age was 61,0 ± 8,0 years, among whom there were 96 (54,9% men and 79 (45,1% women. All surveyed received conventional treatment. Depending on supplementary prescriptions patients were divided into eight groups: 1 group - 22 patients with CHD who were prescribed Simvastatin, 2 group - 20 patients with CHD who were prescribed Korargin, 3 group - 20 patients with coronary artery disease who were prescribed simultaneously both Simvastatin and Korarhin, 4 group - 20 patients with CHD with type 2 diabetes treated with Simvastatin, 5 group - 23 patients with CHD with type 2 diabetes who took Korargin, 6 group - 27 patients with CHD with type 2 diabetes, who were prescribed both Simvastatin and Korargin in addition to conventional treatments, 7 group - 20 patients with CHD who received only conventional treatments, 8 group - 23 patients with coronary artery disease combined with type 2 diabetes who received only conventional treatments. Simvastatin ("Vazostat-Health" FC "Health", Kharkiv was administered at a daily dose of 20 mg at night during 6 months, Korargin (JSC "Engineer", Uman - 0,1 g of L-arginine hydrochloride with 0.1 g of inosine – was administered at a dose of 3

  13. Isolation and characterization of cDNAs encoding leucoanthocyanidin reductase and anthocyanidin reductase from Populus trichocarpa.

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    Lijun Wang

    Full Text Available Proanthocyanidins (PAs contribute to poplar defense mechanisms against biotic and abiotic stresses. Transcripts of PA biosynthetic genes accumulated rapidly in response to infection by the fungus Marssonina brunnea f.sp. multigermtubi, treatments of salicylic acid (SA and wounding, resulting in PA accumulation in poplar leaves. Anthocyanidin reductase (ANR and leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR are two key enzymes of the PA biosynthesis that produce the main subunits: (+-catechin and (--epicatechin required for formation of PA polymers. In Populus, ANR and LAR are encoded by at least two and three highly related genes, respectively. In this study, we isolated and functionally characterized genes PtrANR1 and PtrLAR1 from P. trichocarpa. Phylogenetic analysis shows that Populus ANR1 and LAR1 occurr in two distinct phylogenetic lineages, but both genes have little difference in their tissue distribution, preferentially expressed in roots. Overexpression of PtrANR1 in poplar resulted in a significant increase in PA levels but no impact on catechin levels. Antisense down-regulation of PtrANR1 showed reduced PA accumulation in transgenic lines, but increased levels of anthocyanin content. Ectopic expression of PtrLAR1 in poplar positively regulated the biosynthesis of PAs, whereas the accumulation of anthocyanin and flavonol was significantly reduced (P<0.05 in all transgenic plants compared to the control plants. These results suggest that both PtrANR1 and PtrLAR1 contribute to PA biosynthesis in Populus.

  14. Transcripts of Anthocyanidin Reductase and Leucoanthocyanidin Reductase and Measurement of Catechin and Epicatechin in Tartary Buckwheat

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    Yeon Bok Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Anthocyanidin reductase (ANR and leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR play an important role in the monomeric units biosynthesis of proanthocyanidins (PAs such as catechin and epicatechin in several plants. The aim of this study was to clone ANR and LAR genes involved in PAs biosynthesis and examine the expression of these two genes in different organs under different growth conditions in two tartary buckwheat cultivars, Hokkai T8 and T10. Gene expression was carried out by quantitative real-time RT-PCR, and catechin and epicatechin content was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography. The expression pattern of ANR and LAR did not match the accumulation pattern of PAs in different organs of two cultivars. Epicatechin content was the highest in the flowers of both cultivars and it was affected by light in only Hokkai T8 sprouts. ANR and LAR levels in tartary buckwheat might be regulated by different mechanisms for catechin and epicatechin biosynthesis under light and dark conditions.

  15. A Comparison of Betamethasone Valerate 0.1% Cream Twice Daily Plus Oral Simvastatin Versus Betamethasone Valerate 0.1% Cream Alone in the Treatment of Vitiligo Patients

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    Fariba Iraji

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vitiligo, a common disorder of depigmentation, is often difficult to treat. Corticosteroids are known to be effective, but with modest results. Although simvastatin has been reported to be effective for immunorelated dermatologic disorders including vitiligo, controlled trials are lacking. This study was conducted to compare the efficacy of topical betamethasone valerate 0.1% cream (as a standard method of treatment for vitiligo versus a combination of betamethasone valerate plus oral simvastatin in the treatment of vitiligo. Materials and Methods: Eighty-eight subjects with symmetric vitiligo who had body surface involvement up to 20% were divided randomly into two groups. Group A were treated with betamethasone valerate 01% cream twice daily and Group B with betamethasone valerate 01% cream twice daily and oral simvastatin 80 mg daily for 12 weeks. Finally, 46 patients completed treatment after 12 weeks in both groups. The results were evaluated by a blind dermatologist using Vitiligo Area Scoring Index (VASI score at baseline, 4th, 8th, and 12th week of treatment. In a similar way, subjective assessment performed by patients based on photo evaluation at the end of the study. Results: Despite a continuous reduction in VASI score in both groups, according to both physician (P = 0.13 and patient (P = 0.374 assessment oral simvastatin was not statistically more effective than conventional treatment of vitiligo. Conclusion: This study indicates that oral simvastatin is not associated with significant impacts in the treatment of vitiligo as compared to other inflammatory dermatologic conditions such as psoriasis. Indeed, other studies should be initiated regarding exact molecular and cellular effects of statins in the treatment of vitiligo.

  16. A Comparison of Betamethasone Valerate 0.1% Cream Twice Daily Plus Oral Simvastatin Versus Betamethasone Valerate 0.1% Cream Alone in the Treatment of Vitiligo Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iraji, Fariba; Banihashemi, Seyed Hossin; Faghihi, Gita; Shahmoradi, Zabihollah; Tajmirriahi, Nabet; Jazi, Safoura Bokaie

    2017-01-01

    Vitiligo, a common disorder of depigmentation, is often difficult to treat. Corticosteroids are known to be effective, but with modest results. Although simvastatin has been reported to be effective for immunorelated dermatologic disorders including vitiligo, controlled trials are lacking. This study was conducted to compare the efficacy of topical betamethasone valerate 0.1% cream (as a standard method of treatment for vitiligo) versus a combination of betamethasone valerate plus oral simvastatin in the treatment of vitiligo. Eighty-eight subjects with symmetric vitiligo who had body surface involvement up to 20% were divided randomly into two groups. Group A were treated with betamethasone valerate 01% cream twice daily and Group B with betamethasone valerate 01% cream twice daily and oral simvastatin 80 mg daily for 12 weeks. Finally, 46 patients completed treatment after 12 weeks in both groups. The results were evaluated by a blind dermatologist using Vitiligo Area Scoring Index (VASI) score at baseline, 4 th , 8 th , and 12 th week of treatment. In a similar way, subjective assessment performed by patients based on photo evaluation at the end of the study. Despite a continuous reduction in VASI score in both groups, according to both physician ( P = 0.13) and patient ( P = 0.374) assessment oral simvastatin was not statistically more effective than conventional treatment of vitiligo. This study indicates that oral simvastatin is not associated with significant impacts in the treatment of vitiligo as compared to other inflammatory dermatologic conditions such as psoriasis. Indeed, other studies should be initiated regarding exact molecular and cellular effects of statins in the treatment of vitiligo.

  17. Inhibition of thioredoxin reductase but not of glutathione reductase by the major classes of alkylating and platinum-containing anticancer compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, Anne-Barbara; Anestål, Karin; Jerremalm, Elin; Ehrsson, Hans; Arnér, Elias S J

    2005-09-01

    Mammalian thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) is important for cell proliferation, antioxidant defense, and redox signaling. Together with glutathione reductase (GR) it is the main enzyme providing reducing equivalents to many cellular processes. GR and TrxR are flavoproteins of the same enzyme family, but only the latter is a selenoprotein. With the active site containing selenocysteine, TrxR may catalyze reduction of a wide range of substrates, but can at the same time easily be targeted by electrophilic compounds due to the extraordinarily high reactivity of a selenolate moiety. Here we addressed the inhibition of the enzyme by major anticancer alkylating agents and platinum-containing compounds and we compared it to that of GR. We confirmed prior studies suggesting that the nitrosourea carmustine can inhibit both GR and TrxR. We next found, however, that nitrogen mustards (chlorambucil and melphalan) and alkyl sulfonates (busulfan) efficiently inhibited TrxR while these compounds, surprisingly, did not inhibit GR. Inhibitions were concentration and time dependent and apparently irreversible. Anticancer anthracyclines (daunorubicin and doxorubicin) were, in contrast to the alkylating agents, not inhibitors but poor substrates of TrxR. We also found that TrxR, but not GR, was efficiently inhibited by both cisplatin, its monohydrated complex, and oxaliplatin. Carboplatin, in contrast, could not inhibit any of the two enzymes. These findings lead us to conclude that representative compounds of the major classes of clinically used anticancer alkylating agents and most platinum compounds may easily target TrxR, but not GR. The TrxR inhibition should thereby be considered as a factor that may contribute to the cytotoxicity seen upon clinical use of these drugs.

  18. Determination of the potency of a novel saw palmetto supercritical CO2 extract (SPSE for 5α-reductase isoform II inhibition using a cell-free in vitro test system

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    Pais P

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Pilar Pais, Agustí Villar, Santiago Rull Euromed, Barcelona, Spain Background: The nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-dependent membrane protein 5α-reductase catalyses the conversion of testosterone to the most potent androgen – 5α-dihydrotestosterone. Two 5α-reductase isoenzymes are expressed in humans: type I and type II. The latter is found primarily in prostate tissue. Saw palmetto extract (SPE has been used extensively in the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH. The pharmacological effects of SPE include the inhibition of 5α-reductase, as well as anti-inflammatory and antiproliferative effects. Clinical studies of SPE have been inconclusive – some have shown significant results, and others have not – possibly the result of varying bioactivities of the SPEs used in the studies. Purpose: To determine the in vitro potency in a cell-free test system of a novel SP supercritical CO2 extract (SPSE, an inhibitor of the 5α-reductase isoenzyme type II. Materials and methods: The inhibitory potency of SPSE was compared to that of finasteride, an approved 5α-reductase inhibitor, on the basis of the enzymatic conversion of the substrate androstenedione to the 5α-reduced product 5α-androstanedione. Results: By concentration-dependent inhibition of 5α-reductase type II in vitro (half-maximal inhibitory concentration 3.58±0.05 µg/mL, SPSE demonstrated competitive binding toward the active site of the enzyme. Finasteride, the approved 5α-reductase inhibitor tested as positive control, led to 63%–75% inhibition of 5α-reductase type II. Conclusion: SPSE effectively inhibits the enzyme that has been linked to BPH, and the amount of extract required for activity is comparatively low. It can be confirmed from the results of this study that SPSE has bioactivity that promotes prostate health at a level that is superior to that of many other phytotherapeutic extracts. The

  19. [Syk inhibitors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Yukihiro; Chihara, Kazuyasu; Takeuchi, Kenji; Sada, Kiyonao

    2013-07-01

    Non-receptor type of protein-tyrosine kinase Syk (spleen tyrosine kinase) was isolated in the University of Fukui in 1991. Syk is known to be essential for the various physiological functions, especially in hematopoietic lineage cells. Moreover, ectopic expression of Syk by epigenetic changes is reported to cause retinoblastoma. Recently, novel Syk inhibitors were developed and its usefulness has been evaluated in the treatment of allergic rhinitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. In this review, we will summarize the history, structure, and function of Syk, and then describe the novel Syk inhibitors and their current status. Furthermore, we will introduce our findings of the adaptor protein 3BP2 (c-Abl SH3 domain-binding protein-2), as a novel target of Syk.

  20. The role of biliverdin reductase in colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, M.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, the effects of biliverdin and bilirubin have been studied extensively, and an inhibitory effect of bile pigments in cancer progression has been proposed. In this study we focused on the effects of biliverdin reductase, the enzyme that converts biliverdin to bilirubin, in colorectal cancer. For in vitro experiments we used a human colorectal carcinoma cell line and transfected it with an expression construct of shRNA specific for biliverdin reductase, to create cells with stable knock-down of enzyme expression. Cell proliferation was analyzed using the CASY model TT cell counting device. Western blot protein analysis was performed to study intracellular signaling cascades. Samples of human colorectal cancer were analyzed using immunohistochemistry. We were able to confirm the antiproliferative effects of bile pigments on cancer cells in vitro. However, this effect was attenuated in biliverdin reductase knock down cells. ERK and Akt activation seen under biliverdin and bilirubin treatment was also reduced in biliverdin reductase deficient cells. Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor samples from patients with colorectal cancer showed elevated biliverdin reductase levels. High enzyme expression was associated with lower overall and disease free patient survival. We conclude that BVR is required for bile pigment mediated effects regarding cancer cell proliferation and modulation of intracellular signaling cascades. The role of BVR overexpression in vivo and its exact influence on cancer progression and patient survival need to be further investigated. (author) [de

  1. Syk inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chihara, Kazuyasu; Kimura, Yukihiro; Honjo, Chisato; Takeuchi, Kenji; Sada, Kiyonao

    2013-01-01

    Non-receptor type of protein-tyrosine kinase Syk (spleen tyrosine kinase) was isolated in University of Fukui in 1991. Syk is most highly expressed by haemopoietic cells and known to play crucial roles in the signal transduction through various immunoreceptors of the adaptive immune response. However, recent reports demonstrate that Syk also mediates other biological functions, such as innate immune response, osteoclast maturation, platelet activation and cellular adhesion. Moreover, ectopic expression of Syk by epigenetic changes is reported to cause retinoblastoma. Because of its critical roles on the cellular functions, the development of Syk inhibitors for clinical use has been desired. Although many candidate compounds were produced, none of them had progressed to clinical trials. However, novel Syk inhibitors were finally developed and its usefulness has been evaluated in the treatment of allergic rhinitis, rheumatoid arthritis and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. In this review, we will summarize the history, structure and function of Syk, and then the novel Syk inhibitors and their current status. In addition, we will introduce our research focused on the functions of Syk on Dectin-1-mediated mast cell activation.

  2. Combination of niacin extended-release and simvastatin results in a less atherogenic lipid profile than atorvastatin monotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Insull Jr

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available William Insull Jr1, Peter P Toth2, H Robert Superko3, Roopal B Thakkar4, Scott Krause4, Ping Jiang4, Rhea A Parreno4, Robert J Padley41Baylor College of Medicine and Methodist Hospital, Houston, Texas; 2University of Illinois College of Medicine, Peoria, Illinois; 3Celera, Alameda, California, Mercer University, Atlanta, Georgia; 4Abbott, Abbott Park, Illinois, USAObjective: To compare the effects of combination niacin extended-release + simvastatin (NER/S versus atorvastatin alone on apolipoproteins and lipid fractions in a post hoc analysis from SUPREME, a study which compared the lipid effects of niacin extended-release + simvastatin and atorvastatin in patients with hyperlipidemia or mixed dyslipidemia.Patients and methods: Patients (n = 137 with dyslipidemia (not previously receiving statin therapy or having discontinued any lipid-altering treatment 4–5 weeks prior to the study received NER/S (1000/40 mg/day for four weeks, then 2000/40 mg/day for eight weeks or atorvastatin 40 mg/day for 12 weeks. Median percent changes in apolipoprotein (apo A-1, apo B, and the apo B:A-I ratio, and nuclear magnetic resonance lipoprotein subclasses from baseline to week 12 were compared using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test and Fisher’s exact test.Results: NER/S treatment produced significantly greater percent changes in apo A-I and apo B:A-I, and, at the final visit, apo B <80 mg/dL was attained by 59% versus 33% of patients, compared with atorvastatin treatment (P = 0.003. NER/S treatment resulted in greater percent reductions in calculated particle numbers for low-density lipoprotein (LDL, 52% versus 43%; P = 0.022, small LDL (55% versus 45%; P = 0.011, very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL and total chylomicrons (63% versus 39%; P < 0.001, and greater increases in particle size for LDL (2.7% versus 1.0%; P = 0.007 and VLDL (9.3% versus 0.1%; P < 0.001, compared with atorvastatin.Conclusion: NER/S treatment significantly improved apo A-I levels and the apo

  3. Enhanced mutagenicity of low doses of alkylating agents and UV-light by inhibition of ribonucleotide reductase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenssen, D.

    1986-01-01

    Monofunctional alkylating agents and UV-light are potent inducers of gene mutations in mammalian cells. Most data on these agent are supporting the idea that 0/sup 6/-alkylguanine is the dominating lesion responsible for the mutations induced by the alkylating agents and thymine-dimers in the case of UV-light. However, little is known about the mutagenic fate of these lesions during the replicative process. This is an essential issue to investigate not the least because of quantitative aspects. By investigating the factors affecting the mutagenic yield of these lesions, they hope to get further information on the mechanisms(s) involved. To study this, a system was applied which involves synchronized V79 Chinese hamster cells and inhibitors of the replication process. By applying hydroxyurea (HU), as inhibitor of the ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) step in DNA synthesis, the effect of nucleotide pool imbalance has been studied at the HGPRT-locus using V79 Chinese hamster cells

  4. The Nox/Ferric reductase/Ferric reductase-like families of Eumycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grissa, Ibtissem; Bidard, Frédérique; Grognet, Pierre; Grossetete, Sandrine; Silar, Philippe

    2010-09-01

    Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) are involved in plant biomass degradation by fungi and development of fungal structures. While the ROS-generating NADPH oxidases from filamentous fungi are under strong scrutiny, much less is known about the related integral Membrane (or Ferric) Reductases (IMRs). Here, we present a survey of these enzymes in 29 fungal genomes covering the entire available range of fungal diversity. IMRs are present in all fungal genomes. They can be classified into at least 24 families, underscoring the high diversity of these enzymes. Some are differentially regulated during colony or fruiting body development, as well as by the nature of the carbon source of the growth medium. Importantly, functional characterization of IMRs has been made on proteins belonging to only two families, while nothing or very little is known about the proteins of the other 22 families. Copyright © 2010 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Proanthocyanidin synthesis in Theobroma cacao: genes encoding anthocyanidin synthase, anthocyanidin reductase, and leucoanthocyanidin reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Shi, Zi; Maximova, Siela; Payne, Mark J; Guiltinan, Mark J

    2013-12-05

    The proanthocyanidins (PAs), a subgroup of flavonoids, accumulate to levels of approximately 10% total dry weight of cacao seeds. PAs have been associated with human health benefits and also play important roles in pest and disease defense throughout the plant. To dissect the genetic basis of PA biosynthetic pathway in cacao (Theobroma cacao), we have isolated three genes encoding key PA synthesis enzymes, anthocyanidin synthase (ANS), anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) and leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR). We measured the expression levels of TcANR, TcANS and TcLAR and PA content in cacao leaves, flowers, pod exocarp and seeds. In all tissues examined, all three genes were abundantly expressed and well correlated with PA accumulation levels, suggesting their active roles in PA synthesis. Overexpression of TcANR in an Arabidopsis ban mutant complemented the PA deficient phenotype in seeds and resulted in reduced anthocyanidin levels in hypocotyls. Overexpression of TcANS in tobacco resulted in increased content of both anthocyanidins and PAs in flower petals. Overexpression of TcANS in an Arabidopsis ldox mutant complemented its PA deficient phenotype in seeds. Recombinant TcLAR protein converted leucoanthocyanidin to catechin in vitro. Transgenic tobacco overexpressing TcLAR had decreased amounts of anthocyanidins and increased PAs. Overexpressing TcLAR in Arabidopsis ldox mutant also resulted in elevated synthesis of not only catechin but also epicatechin. Our results confirm the in vivo function of cacao ANS and ANR predicted based on sequence homology to previously characterized enzymes from other species. In addition, our results provide a clear functional analysis of a LAR gene in vivo.

  6. Effect of ammonium and nitrate on ferric chelate reductase and nitrate reductase in Vaccinium species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poonnachit, U; Darnell, R

    2004-04-01

    Most Vaccinium species have strict soil requirements for optimal growth, requiring low pH, high iron availability and nitrogen primarily in the ammonium form. These soils are limited and are often located near wetlands. Vaccinium arboreum is a wild species adapted to a wide range of soils, including high pH, low iron, and nitrate-containing soils. This broader soil adaptation in V. arboreum may be related to increased efficiency of iron or nitrate uptake compared with the cultivated Vaccinium species. Nitrate, ammonium and iron uptake, and nitrate reductase (NR) and ferric chelate reductase (FCR) activities were compared in two Vaccinium species grown hydroponically in either nitrate or ammonia, with or without iron. The species studied were the wild V. arboreum and the cultivated V. corymbosum interspecific hybrid, which exhibits the strict soil requirements of most Vaccinium species. Ammonium uptake was significantly greater than nitrate uptake in both species, while nitrate uptake was greater in the wild species, V. arboreum, compared with the cultivated species, V. corymbosum. The increased nitrate uptake in V. arboreum was correlated with increased root NR activity compared with V. corymbosum. The lower nitrate uptake in V. corymbosum was reflected in decreased plant dry weight in this species compared with V. arboreum. Root FCR activity increased significantly in V. corymbosum grown under iron-deficient conditions, compared with the same species grown under iron-sufficient conditions or with V. arboreum grown under either iron condition. V. arboreum appears to be more efficient in acquiring nitrate compared with V. corymbosum, possibly due to increased NR activity and this may partially explain the wider soil adaptation of V. arboreum.

  7. The Drosophila carbonyl reductase sniffer is an efficient 4-oxonon-2-enal (4ONE) reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Hans-Jörg; Ziemba, Marta; Kisiela, Michael; Botella, José A; Schneuwly, Stephan; Maser, Edmund

    2011-05-30

    Studies with the fruit-fly Drosophila melanogaster demonstrated that the enzyme sniffer prevented oxidative stress-induced neurodegeneration. Mutant flies overexpressing sniffer had significantly extended life spans in a 99.5% oxygen atmosphere compared to wild-type flies. However, the molecular mechanism of this protection remained unclear. Sequence analysis and database searches identified sniffer as a member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily with a 27.4% identity to the human enzyme carbonyl reductase type I (CBR1). As CBR1 catalyzes the reduction of the lipid peroxidation products 4HNE and 4ONE, we tested whether sniffer is able to metabolize these lipid derived aldehydes by carbonyl reduction. To produce recombinant enzyme, the coding sequence of sniffer was amplified from a cDNA-library, cloned into a bacterial expression vector and the His-tagged protein was purified by Ni-chelate chromatography. We found that sniffer catalyzed the NADPH-dependent carbonyl reduction of 4ONE (K(m)=24±2 μM, k(cat)=500±10 min(-1), k(cat)/K(m)=350 s(-1) mM(-1)) but not that of 4HNE. The reaction product of 4ONE reduction by sniffer was mainly 4HNE as shown by HPLC- and GC/MS analysis. Since 4HNE, though still a potent electrophile, is less neurotoxic and protein reactive than 4ONE, one mechanism by which sniffer exerts its neuroprotective effects in Drosophila after oxidative stress may be enzymatic reduction of 4ONE. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Thioredoxin Inhibitors Attenuate Platelet Function and Thrombus Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Clive; Ramasubramoni, Anjana; Pula, Giordano; Harper, Matthew T; Mundell, Stuart J; Coxon, Carmen H

    2016-01-01

    Thioredoxin (Trx) is an oxidoreductase with important physiological function. Imbalances in the NADPH/thioredoxin reductase/thioredoxin system are associated with a number of pathologies, particularly cancer, and a number of clinical trials for thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase inhibitors have been carried out or are underway. Due to the emerging role and importance of oxidoreductases for haemostasis and the current interest in developing inhibitors for clinical use, we thought it pertinent to assess whether inhibition of the NADPH/thioredoxin reductase/thioredoxin system affects platelet function and thrombosis. We used small molecule inhibitors of Trx (PMX 464 and PX-12) to determine whether Trx activity influences platelet function, as well as an unbiased proteomics approach to identify potential Trx substrates on the surface of platelets that might contribute to platelet reactivity and function. Using LC-MS/MS we found that PMX 464 and PX-12 affected the oxidation state of thiols in a number of cell surface proteins. Key surface receptors for platelet adhesion and activation were affected, including the collagen receptor GPVI and the von Willebrand factor receptor, GPIb. To experimentally validate these findings we assessed platelet function in the presence of PMX 464, PX-12, and rutin (a selective inhibitor of the related protein disulphide isomerase). In agreement with the proteomics data, small molecule inhibitors of thioredoxin selectively inhibited GPVI-mediated platelet activation, and attenuated ristocetin-induced GPIb-vWF-mediated platelet agglutination, thus validating the findings of the proteomics study. These data reveal a novel role for thioredoxin in regulating platelet reactivity via proteins required for early platelet responses at sites of vessel injury (GPVI and GPIb). This work also highlights a potential opportunity for repurposing of PMX 464 and PX-12 as antiplatelet agents.

  9. Thioredoxin Inhibitors Attenuate Platelet Function and Thrombus Formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clive Metcalfe

    Full Text Available Thioredoxin (Trx is an oxidoreductase with important physiological function. Imbalances in the NADPH/thioredoxin reductase/thioredoxin system are associated with a number of pathologies, particularly cancer, and a number of clinical trials for thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase inhibitors have been carried out or are underway. Due to the emerging role and importance of oxidoreductases for haemostasis and the current interest in developing inhibitors for clinical use, we thought it pertinent to assess whether inhibition of the NADPH/thioredoxin reductase/thioredoxin system affects platelet function and thrombosis. We used small molecule inhibitors of Trx (PMX 464 and PX-12 to determine whether Trx activity influences platelet function, as well as an unbiased proteomics approach to identify potential Trx substrates on the surface of platelets that might contribute to platelet reactivity and function. Using LC-MS/MS we found that PMX 464 and PX-12 affected the oxidation state of thiols in a number of cell surface proteins. Key surface receptors for platelet adhesion and activation were affected, including the collagen receptor GPVI and the von Willebrand factor receptor, GPIb. To experimentally validate these findings we assessed platelet function in the presence of PMX 464, PX-12, and rutin (a selective inhibitor of the related protein disulphide isomerase. In agreement with the proteomics data, small molecule inhibitors of thioredoxin selectively inhibited GPVI-mediated platelet activation, and attenuated ristocetin-induced GPIb-vWF-mediated platelet agglutination, thus validating the findings of the proteomics study. These data reveal a novel role for thioredoxin in regulating platelet reactivity via proteins required for early platelet responses at sites of vessel injury (GPVI and GPIb. This work also highlights a potential opportunity for repurposing of PMX 464 and PX-12 as antiplatelet agents.

  10. Structure of the Francisella tularensis enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI) in complex with NAD+ and triclosan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehboob, Shahila; Truong, Kent; Santarsiero, Bernard D.; Johnson, Michael E.

    2010-01-01

    Structure of the ternary complex of F. tularensis enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase reveals the structure of the substrate binding loop whose electron density was missing in an earlier structure, and demonstrates a shift in the position of the NAD + cofactor. Enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI) catalyzes the last rate-limiting step in the elongation cycle of the fatty-acid biosynthesis pathway and has been validated as a potential antimicrobial drug target in Francisella tularensis. The development of new antibiotic therapies is important both to combat potential drug-resistant bioweapons and to address the broader societal problem of increasing antibiotic resistance among many pathogenic bacteria. The crystal structure of FabI from F. tularensis (FtuFabI) in complex with the inhibitor triclosan and the cofactor NAD + has been solved to a resolution of 2.1 Å. Triclosan is known to effectively inhibit FabI from different organisms. Precise characterization of the mode of triclosan binding is required to develop highly specific inhibitors. Comparison of our structure with the previously determined FtuFabI structure which is bound to only NAD + reveals the conformation of the substrate-binding loop, electron density for which was missing in the earlier structure, and demonstrates a shift in the conformation of the NAD + cofactor. This shift in the position of the phosphate groups allows more room in the active site for substrate or inhibitor to bind and be better accommodated. This information will be crucial for virtual screening studies to identify novel scaffolds for development into new active inhibitors

  11. Expression and site-directed mutagenesis of human dihydrofolate reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prendergast, N.J.; Delcamp, T.J.; Smith, P.L.; Freisheim, J.H.

    1988-05-17

    A procaryotic high-level expression vector for human dihydrofolate reductase has been constructed and the protein characterized as a first step toward structure-function studies of this enzyme. A vector bearing the tac promoter, four synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides, and a restriction fragment from the dihydrofolate reductase cDNA were ligated in a manner which optimized the transcriptional and translational frequency of the enzyme mRNA. The reductase, comprising ca. 17% of the total soluble protein in the host bacteria, was purified to apparent homogeneity as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and characterized by amino acid composition, partial amino acid sequence, and steady-sate kinetic analysis. This expression vector has been used as a template for double-stranded plasmid DNA site-specific mutagenesis. Functional studies on a Cys-6 ..-->.. Ser-6 mutant enzyme support the contention that Cys-6 is obligatory for organomercurial activation of human dihydrofolate reductase. The Ser-6 mutant enzyme was not activated to any extent following a 24-h incubation with p-(hydroxymercuri)benzoate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (reduced) (NADPH), whereas the k/sub cat/ for Cys-6 reductase increased 2-fold under identical conditions. The specific activities of the Cys-6 and Ser-6 enzymes were virtually identical as determined by methotrexate titration as were the K/sub m/ values for both dihydrofolate and NADPH. The Ser-6 mutant showed a decreased temperature stability and was more sensitive to inactivation by ..cap alpha..-chymotrypsin when compared to the wild-type enzyme. These results suggest that the Ser-6 mutant reductase is conformationally altered relative to the Cys-6 native enzyme.

  12. Expression and site-directed mutagenesis of human dihydrofolate reductase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prendergast, N.J.; Delcamp, T.J.; Smith, P.L.; Freisheim, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    A procaryotic high-level expression vector for human dihydrofolate reductase has been constructed and the protein characterized as a first step toward structure-function studies of this enzyme. A vector bearing the tac promoter, four synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides, and a restriction fragment from the dihydrofolate reductase cDNA were ligated in a manner which optimized the transcriptional and translational frequency of the enzyme mRNA. The reductase, comprising ca. 17% of the total soluble protein in the host bacteria, was purified to apparent homogeneity as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and characterized by amino acid composition, partial amino acid sequence, and steady-sate kinetic analysis. This expression vector has been used as a template for double-stranded plasmid DNA site-specific mutagenesis. Functional studies on a Cys-6 → Ser-6 mutant enzyme support the contention that Cys-6 is obligatory for organomercurial activation of human dihydrofolate reductase. The Ser-6 mutant enzyme was not activated to any extent following a 24-h incubation with p-(hydroxymercuri)benzoate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (reduced) (NADPH), whereas the k/sub cat/ for Cys-6 reductase increased 2-fold under identical conditions. The specific activities of the Cys-6 and Ser-6 enzymes were virtually identical as determined by methotrexate titration as were the K/sub m/ values for both dihydrofolate and NADPH. The Ser-6 mutant showed a decreased temperature stability and was more sensitive to inactivation by α-chymotrypsin when compared to the wild-type enzyme. These results suggest that the Ser-6 mutant reductase is conformationally altered relative to the Cys-6 native enzyme

  13. Methemoglobin reductase activity in intact fish red blood cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank B; Nielsen, Karsten

    2018-01-01

    RBCs in physiological saline at normal Pco2 and pH. After initial loading of oxygenated RBCs with nitrite (partly oxidizing Hb to metHb), the nitrite is removed by three washes of the RBCs in nitrite-free physiological saline to enable the detection of RBC metHb reductase activity in the absence......Hb reductase activity in fish offsets their higher Hb autoxidation and higher likelihood of encountering elevated nitrite. Deoxygenation significantly raised the rates of RBC metHb reduction, and more so in rainbow trout than in carp. The temperature sensitivity of metHb reduction in rainbow trout RBCs...

  14. The use of isothermal titration calorimetry to assess the solubility enhancement of simvastatin by a range of surfactants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Rajesh; Buckton, Graham; Gaisford, Simon

    2007-01-01

    Surfactants are commonly used to increase the solubility of poorly water soluble drugs but the interactions between drug and surfactant can be complex and quantitative relationships can be hard to derive. One approach is to quantify the thermodynamics of interaction and relate these parameters to known solubility or dissolution rate enhancement data. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) was used to measure the enthalpy and free energy of transfer of a model drug (simvastatin) to a number of surfactant (SDS, HTAB, SDCH and Brij 35) micelles. These data were then compared with the solubility enhancements determined for each surfactant using HPLC assays. As expected, there was correlation between the free energy of transfer for the drug to each surfactant and the solubility enhancement of that surfactant. Although the data set is limited, the results suggest that ITC screening of a range of surfactants against a poorly water soluble drug may allow the selection of the best potential solubilising surfactants

  15. Sustained release of simvastatin from hollow carbonated hydroxyapatite microspheres prepared by aspartic acid and sodium dodecyl sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ke; Wang, Yinjing; Zhao, Xu; Li, Yi; Yang, Tao; Zhang, Xue; Wu, Xiaoguang

    2017-06-01

    Hollow carbonated hydroxyapatite (HCHAp) microspheres as simvastatin (SV) sustained-release vehicles were fabricated through a novel and simple one-step biomimetic strategy. Firstly, hollow CaCO 3 microspheres were precipitated through the reaction of CaCl 2 with Na 2 CO 3 in the presence of aspartic acid and sodium dodecyl sulfate. Then, the as-prepared hollow CaCO 3 microspheres were transformed into HCHAp microspheres with a controlled anion-exchange method. The HCHAp microspheres were 3-5μm with a shell thickness of 0.5-1μm and were constructed of short needle nanoparticles. The HCHAp microspheres were then loaded with SV, exhibiting excellent drug-loading capacity and sustained release properties. These results present a new material synthesis strategy for HCHAp microspheres and suggest that the as-prepared HCHAp microspheres are promising for applications in drug delivery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of Titanium Surface Microtopography and Simvastatin on Growth and Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Estrogen-Deprived Cell Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arpornmaeklong, Premjit; Pripatnanont, Prisana; Chookiatsiri, Chonticha; Tangtrakulwanich, Boonsin

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of titanium surface topography and simvastatin on growth and osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) in estrogen-deprived (ED) cell culture. Human BMSCs were seeded on cell culture plates, smooth-surface titanium (Ti) disks, and sandblasted with large grits and acid etched (SLA)-surface Ti disks; and subsequently cultured in regular (fetal bovine serum [FBS]), ED, and ED-with 100 nM simvastatin (ED-SIM) culture media for 14 to 21 days. Live/dead cell staining, scanning electron microscope examination, and cell viability assay were performed to determine cell attachment, morphology, and growth. Expression levels of osteoblast-associated genes, Runx2 and bone sialoprotein and levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, calcium content, and osteocalcin in culture media were measured to determine osteoblastic differentiation. Expression levels of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) were investigated to examine stimulating effects of simvastatin (n = 4 to 5, mean ± SD). In vitro mineralization was verified by calcein staining. Human BMSCs exhibited different attachment and shapes on smooth and SLA titanium surfaces. Estrogen-deprived cell culture decreased cell attachment and growth, particularly on the SLA titanium surface, but cells were able to grow to reach confluence on day 21 in the ED-osteogenic (OS) culture medium. Promoting effects of the SLA titanium surface in ED-OS were significantly decreased. Simvastatin significantly increased osteogenic differentiation of human BMSCs on the SLA titanium surface in the ED-OS medium, and the promoting effects of simvastatin corresponded with the increasing of BMP-2 gene expression on the SLA titanium surface in ED-OS-SIM culture medium. The ED cell culture model provided a well-defined platform for investigating the effects of hormones and growth factors on cells and titanium surface interaction. Titanium, the SLA surface, and simvastatin

  17. Role of Quinone Reductase 2 in the Antimalarial Properties of Indolone-Type Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laure-Estelle Cassagnes

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Indolone-N-oxides have antiplasmodial properties against Plasmodium falciparum at the erythrocytic stage, with IC50 values in the nanomolar range. The mechanism of action of indolone derivatives involves the production of free radicals, which follows their bioreduction by an unknown mechanism. In this study, we hypothesized that human quinone reductase 2 (hQR2, known to act as a flavin redox switch upon binding to the broadly used antimalarial chloroquine, could be involved in the activity of the redox-active indolone derivatives. Therefore, we investigated the role of hQR2 in the reduction of indolone derivatives. We analyzed the interaction between hQR2 and several indolone-type derivatives by examining enzymatic kinetics, the substrate/protein complex structure with X-ray diffraction analysis, and the production of free radicals with electron paramagnetic resonance. The reduction of each compound in cells overexpressing hQR2 was compared to its reduction in naïve cells. This process could be inhibited by the specific hQR2 inhibitor, S29434. These results confirmed that the anti-malarial activity of indolone-type derivatives was linked to their ability to serve as hQR2 substrates and not as hQR2 inhibitors as reported for chloroquine, leading to the possibility that substrate of hQR2 could be considered as a new avenue for the design of new antimalarial compounds.

  18. Determination of the potency of a novel saw palmetto supercritical CO2 extract (SPSE) for 5α-reductase isoform II inhibition using a cell-free in vitro test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pais, Pilar; Villar, Agustí; Rull, Santiago

    2016-01-01

    The nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-dependent membrane protein 5α-reductase catalyses the conversion of testosterone to the most potent androgen - 5α-dihydrotestosterone. Two 5α-reductase isoenzymes are expressed in humans: type I and type II. The latter is found primarily in prostate tissue. Saw palmetto extract (SPE) has been used extensively in the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The pharmacological effects of SPE include the inhibition of 5α-reductase, as well as anti-inflammatory and antiproliferative effects. Clinical studies of SPE have been inconclusive - some have shown significant results, and others have not - possibly the result of varying bioactivities of the SPEs used in the studies. To determine the in vitro potency in a cell-free test system of a novel SP supercritical CO2 extract (SPSE), an inhibitor of the 5α-reductase isoenzyme type II. The inhibitory potency of SPSE was compared to that of finasteride, an approved 5α-reductase inhibitor, on the basis of the enzymatic conversion of the substrate androstenedione to the 5α-reduced product 5α-androstanedione. By concentration-dependent inhibition of 5α-reductase type II in vitro (half-maximal inhibitory concentration 3.58±0.05 μg/mL), SPSE demonstrated competitive binding toward the active site of the enzyme. Finasteride, the approved 5α-reductase inhibitor tested as positive control, led to 63%-75% inhibition of 5α-reductase type II. SPSE effectively inhibits the enzyme that has been linked to BPH, and the amount of extract required for activity is comparatively low. It can be confirmed from the results of this study that SPSE has bioactivity that promotes prostate health at a level that is superior to that of many other phytotherapeutic extracts. The bioactivity of SPSE corresponds favorably to that reported for the hexane extract used in a large number of positive BPH clinical trials, as well as to finasteride

  19. Transcriptional modulation of genes encoding nitrate reductase in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The free aluminum (Al) content in soil can reach levels that are toxic to plants, and this has frequently limited increased productivity of cultures. Four genes encoding nitrate reductase (NR) were identified, named ZmNR1–4. With the aim of evaluating NR activity and the transcriptional modulation of the ZmNR1, ZmNR2, ...

  20. Intramolecular electron transfer in Pseudomonas aeruginosa cd(1) nitrite reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, Ole; Brunori, Maurizio; Cutruzzolà, Francesca

    2009-01-01

    ) as the level of reduction increased in both the WT and the His mutant. Equilibrium standard enthalpy and entropy changes and activation parameters of this ET process were determined. We concluded that negative cooperativity is a common feature among the cd(1) nitrite reductases, and we discuss this control...

  1. Evaluation of the conserve flavin reductase gene from three ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-12-15

    Dec 15, 2009 ... means of PCR technique. The nucleic acid sequences of the PCR primers were designed using conserved nucleic acid sequences of the flavin reductase enzyme from. Rhodococcus sp. strain IGTS8. The oligonucleotide primers were as follows: 5'-GAA TTC ATG TCT GAC. AAG CCG AAT GCC-3' (forward) ...

  2. Molecular Cloning and Expression of Bacterial Mercuric Reductase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-06-21

    Jun 21, 2010 ... In order to characterize the bacterial mercuric reductase (merA) gene, mercury resistant (Hgr). Escherichia coli strains have been isolated from various mercury contaminated sites of India. Their minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for Hg and zone of inhibition for different antibiotics were measured, and ...

  3. Aldose Reductase Inhibitory and Antiglycation Activities of Four ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aldose Reductase Inhibitory and Antiglycation Activities of Four Medicinal Plant Standardized Extracts and Their Main Constituents for the Prevention of ... levels in galactosemic condition by using reverse phase high pressure liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and gas liquid chromatography (GLC) was determined.

  4. Isolation and expression of the Pneumocystis carinii dihydrofolate reductase gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edman, J C; Edman, U; Cao, Mi-Mi

    1989-01-01

    Pneumocystis carinii dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR; 5,6,7,8-tetrahydrofolate: NADP+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.5.1.3) cDNA sequences have been isolated by their ability to confer trimethoprim resistance to Escherichia coli. Consistent with the recent conclusion that P. carinii is a member of the Fungi...

  5. Molecular Cloning and Expression of Bacterial Mercuric Reductase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to characterize the bacterial mercuric reductase (merA) gene, mercury resistant (Hgr) Escherichia coli strains have been isolated from various mercury contaminated sites of India. Their minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for Hg and zone of inhibition for different antibiotics were measured, and finally mer operon ...

  6. Xylose reductase from the thermophilic fungus Talaromyces emersonii

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    Xylose reductase is involved in the first step of the fungal pentose catabolic pathway. The gene .... proteins with reversed coenzyme preference from NADPH to NADH ..... 399–404. Hasper A A, Visser J and de Graaff L H 2000 The Aspergillus.

  7. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Glutathione reductase assay. 864.7375 Section 864.7375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7375 Glutathione...

  8. Plasmid-encoded diacetyl (acetoin) reductase in Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rattray, Fergal P; Myling-Petersen, Dorte; Larsen, Dianna

    2003-01-01

    A plasmid-borne diacetyl (acetoin) reductase (butA) from Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides CHCC2114 was sequenced and cloned. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed an open reading frame encoding a protein of 257 amino acids which had high identity at the amino acid level to diacetyl (acetoin...

  9. Simvastatin and atorvastatin reduce the mechanical properties of tendon constructs in vitro and introduce catabolic changes in the gene expression pattern

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eliasson, Pernilla; Svensson, Rene B; Giannopoulos, Antonis

    2017-01-01

    simvastatin or atorvastatin, low or high dose, respectively, for up to seven days. After seven days of treatment, mechanical testing of the constructs was performed. Collagen content and cell proliferation were also determined. mRNA levels of several target genes were measured after one or seven days....... The maximum force and stiffness were reduced by both statins after 7 days (patorvastatin (p = 0.01) and the cell proliferation rate was decreased by both types of statins (p

  10. Effects of simvastatin/ezetimibe on microparticles, endothelial progenitor cells and platelet aggregation in subjects with coronary heart disease under antiplatelet therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camargo, L.M.; França, C.N.; Izar, M.C.; Bianco, H.T.; Lins, L.S.; Barbosa, S.P.; Pinheiro, L.F.; Fonseca, F.A.H. [Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Departamento de Medicina, São Paulo, SP, Brasil, Departamento de Medicina, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-04-15

    It is not known whether the addition of ezetimibe to statins adds cardiovascular protection beyond the expected changes in lipid levels. Subjects with coronary heart disease were treated with four consecutive 1-week courses of therapy (T) and evaluations. The courses were: T1, 100 mg aspirin alone; T2, 100 mg aspirin and 40 mg simvastatin/10 mg ezetimibe; T3, 40 mg simvastatin/10 mg ezetimibe, and 75 mg clopidogrel (300 mg initial loading dose); T4, 75 mg clopidogrel alone. Platelet aggregation was examined in whole blood. Endothelial microparticles (CD51), platelet microparticles (CD42/CD31), and endothelial progenitor cells (CD34/CD133; CDKDR/CD133, or CD34/KDR) were quantified by flow cytometry. Endothelial function was examined by flow-mediated dilation. Comparisons between therapies revealed differences in lipids (T2 and T3T1 and T4, P=0.001). Decreased platelet aggregation was observed after aspirin (arachidonic acid, T1Simvastatin/ezetimibe diphosphate did not change platelet aggregation, the amount of circulating endothelial and platelet microparticles, or endothelial progenitor cells. Cardiovascular protection following therapy with simvastatin/ezetimibe seems restricted to lipid changes and improvement of endothelial function not affecting the release of microparticles, mobilization of endothelial progenitor cells or decreased platelet aggregation.

  11. Effects of simvastatin/ezetimibe on microparticles, endothelial progenitor cells and platelet aggregation in subjects with coronary heart disease under antiplatelet therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camargo, L.M.; França, C.N.; Izar, M.C.; Bianco, H.T.; Lins, L.S.; Barbosa, S.P.; Pinheiro, L.F.; Fonseca, F.A.H.

    2014-01-01

    It is not known whether the addition of ezetimibe to statins adds cardiovascular protection beyond the expected changes in lipid levels. Subjects with coronary heart disease were treated with four consecutive 1-week courses of therapy (T) and evaluations. The courses were: T1, 100 mg aspirin alone; T2, 100 mg aspirin and 40 mg simvastatin/10 mg ezetimibe; T3, 40 mg simvastatin/10 mg ezetimibe, and 75 mg clopidogrel (300 mg initial loading dose); T4, 75 mg clopidogrel alone. Platelet aggregation was examined in whole blood. Endothelial microparticles (CD51), platelet microparticles (CD42/CD31), and endothelial progenitor cells (CD34/CD133; CDKDR/CD133, or CD34/KDR) were quantified by flow cytometry. Endothelial function was examined by flow-mediated dilation. Comparisons between therapies revealed differences in lipids (T2 and T3T1 and T4, P=0.001). Decreased platelet aggregation was observed after aspirin (arachidonic acid, T1Simvastatin/ezetimibe diphosphate did not change platelet aggregation, the amount of circulating endothelial and platelet microparticles, or endothelial progenitor cells. Cardiovascular protection following therapy with simvastatin/ezetimibe seems restricted to lipid changes and improvement of endothelial function not affecting the release of microparticles, mobilization of endothelial progenitor cells or decreased platelet aggregation

  12. Thioredoxin reductase deficiency potentiates oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death in dopaminergic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Lopert

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are considered major generators of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS which are implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD. We have recently shown that isolated mitochondria consume hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂ in a substrate- and respiration-dependent manner predominantly via the thioredoxin/peroxiredoxin (Trx/Prx system. The goal of this study was to determine the role of Trx/Prx system in dopaminergic cell death. We asked if pharmacological and lentiviral inhibition of the Trx/Prx system sensitized dopaminergic cells to mitochondrial dysfunction, increased steady-state H₂O₂ levels and death in response to toxicants implicated in PD. Incubation of N27 dopaminergic cells or primary rat mesencephalic cultures with the Trx reductase (TrxR inhibitor auranofin in the presence of sub-toxic concentrations of parkinsonian toxicants paraquat; PQ or 6-hydroxydopamine; 6OHDA (for N27 cells resulted in a synergistic increase in H₂O₂ levels and subsequent cell death. shRNA targeting the mitochondrial thioredoxin reductase (TrxR2 in N27 cells confirmed the effects of pharmacological inhibition. A synergistic decrease in maximal and reserve respiratory capacity was observed in auranofin treated cells and TrxR2 deficient cells following incubation with PQ or 6OHDA. Additionally, TrxR2 deficient cells showed decreased basal mitochondrial oxygen consumption rates. These data demonstrate that inhibition of the mitochondrial Trx/Prx system sensitizes dopaminergic cells to mitochondrial dysfunction, increased steady-state H₂O₂, and cell death. Therefore, in addition to their role in the production of cellular H₂O₂ the mitochondrial Trx/Prx system serve as a major sink for cellular H₂O₂ and its disruption may contribute to dopaminergic pathology associated with PD.

  13. dNTP deficiency induced by HU via inhibiting ribonucleotide reductase affects neural tube development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan, Zhen; Wang, Xiuwei; Dong, Yanting; Xu, Lin; Zhu, Zhiqiang; Wang, Jianhua; Zhang, Ting; Niu, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Murine NTDs were successfully induced by means of hydroxyurea (HU). • The impairment of dNTP was induced via inhibition of ribonucleotide reductase. • dNTP deficiency induced by HU caused defective DNA synthesis and repair. • Abnormal apoptosis and proliferation induced by HU affected neural tube development. - Abstract: Exposure to environmental toxic chemicals in utero during the neural tube development period can cause developmental disorders. To evaluate the disruption of neural tube development programming, the murine neural tube defects (NTDs) model was induced by interrupting folate metabolism using methotrexate in our previous study. The present study aimed to examine the effects of dNTP deficiency induced by hydroxyurea (HU), a specific ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) inhibitor, during murine neural tube development. Pregnant C57BL/6J mice were intraperitoneally injected with various doses of HU on gestation day (GD) 7.5, and the embryos were checked on GD 11.5. RNR activity and deoxynucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) levels were measured in the optimal dose. Additionally, DNA damage was examined by comet analysis and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay. Cellular behaviors in NTDs embryos were evaluated with phosphorylation of histone H3 (PH-3) and caspase-3 using immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. The results showed that NTDs were observed mostly with HU treatment at an optimal dose of 225 mg/kg b/w. RNR activity was inhibited and dNTP levels were decreased in HU-treated embryos with NTDs. Additionally, increased DNA damage, decreased proliferation, and increased caspase-3 were significant in NTDs embryos compared to the controls. Results indicated that HU induced murine NTDs model by disturbing dNTP metabolism and further led to the abnormal cell balance between proliferation and apoptosis

  14. Biliverdin reductase: more than a namesake - the reductase, its Peptide fragments, and biliverdin regulate activity of the three classes of protein kinase C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Peter E M; Tudor, Cicerone; Maines, Mahin D

    2012-01-01

    The expanse of human biliverdin reductase (hBVR) functions in the cells is arguably unmatched by any single protein. hBVR is a Ser/Thr/Tyr-kinase, a scaffold protein, a transcription factor, and an intracellular transporter of gene regulators. hBVR is an upstream activator of the insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway and of protein kinase C (PKC) kinases in the two major arms of the pathway. In addition, it is the sole means for generating the antioxidant bilirubin-IXα. hBVR is essential for activation of ERK1/2 kinases by upstream MAPKK-MEK and by PKCδ, as well as the nuclear import and export of ERK1/2. Small fragments of hBVR are potent activators and inhibitors of the ERK kinases and PKCs: as such, they suggest the potential application of BVR-based technology in therapeutic settings. Presently, we have reviewed the function of hBVR in cell signaling with an emphasis on regulation of PKCδ activity.

  15. Biliverdin Reductase: More than a Namesake – The Reductase, Its Peptide Fragments, and Biliverdin Regulate Activity of the Three Classes of Protein Kinase C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Peter E. M.; Tudor, Cicerone; Maines, Mahin. D.

    2012-01-01

    The expanse of human biliverdin reductase (hBVR) functions in the cells is arguably unmatched by any single protein. hBVR is a Ser/Thr/Tyr-kinase, a scaffold protein, a transcription factor, and an intracellular transporter of gene regulators. hBVR is an upstream activator of the insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway and of protein kinase C (PKC) kinases in the two major arms of the pathway. In addition, it is the sole means for generating the antioxidant bilirubin-IXα. hBVR is essential for activation of ERK1/2 kinases by upstream MAPKK-MEK and by PKCδ, as well as the nuclear import and export of ERK1/2. Small fragments of hBVR are potent activators and inhibitors of the ERK kinases and PKCs: as such, they suggest the potential application of BVR-based technology in therapeutic settings. Presently, we have reviewed the function of hBVR in cell signaling with an emphasis on regulation of PKCδ activity. PMID:22419908

  16. Identification of 5α-reductase isoenzymes in canine skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi de Souza, Lucilene; Paradis, Manon; Zamberlam, Gustavo; Benoit-Biancamano, Marie-Odile; Price, Christopher

    2015-10-01

    Alopecia X in dogs is a noninflammatory alopecia that may be caused by a hormonal dysfunction. It may be similar to androgenic alopecia in men that is caused by the effect of dihydrotestosterone (DHT). The 5α-reductase isoenzymes, 5αR1 and 5αR2, and a recently described 5αR3, are responsible for the conversion of testosterone into DHT. However, which 5α-reductases are present in canine skin has not yet been described. The main objective of this study was to determine the pattern of expression of 5α-reductase genes in canine skin. Skin biopsies were obtained from healthy, intact young-mature beagles (three males, four females) at three anatomical sites normally affected by alopecia X (dorsal neck, back of thighs and base of tail) and two sites generally unaffected (dorsal head and ventral thorax). Prostate samples (n = 3) were collected as positive controls for 5α-reductase mRNA abundance measurement by real-time PCR. We detected mRNA encoding 5αR1 and 5αR3 but not 5αR2. There were no significant differences in 5αR1 and 5αR3 mRNA levels between the different anatomical sites, irrespective of gender (P > 0.05). Moreover, the mean mRNA abundance in each anatomical site did not differ between males and females (P > 0.05). To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating the expression of 5α-reductases in canine skin and the expression of 5αR3 in this tissue. These results may help to elucidate the pathogenesis of alopecia X and to determine more appropriate treatments for this disorder. © 2015 ESVD and ACVD.

  17. HMG CoA reductase inhibitors (statins for people with chronic kidney disease not requiring dialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suetonia C. Palmer

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular disease (CVD is the most frequent cause of death in people with early stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD, for whom the absolute risk of cardiovascular events is similar to people who have existing coronary artery disease. This is an update of a review published in 2009, and includes evidence from 27 new studies (25,068 participants in addition to the 26 studies (20,324 participants assessed previously; and excludes three previously included studies (107 participants. This updated review includes 50 studies (45,285 participants; of these 38 (37,274 participants were meta-analysed. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the benefits (such as reductions in all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, major cardiovascular events, MI and stroke; and slow progression of CKD to end-stage kidney disease (ESKD and harms (muscle and liver dysfunction, withdrawal, and cancer of statins compared with placebo, no treatment, standard care or another statin in adults with CKD who were not on dialysis. METHODS: Search methods: We searched the Cochrane Renal Group's Specialised Register to 5 June 2012 through contact with the Trials' Search Co-ordinator using search terms relevant to this review. Selection criteria: Randomised controlled trials (RCTs and quasi-RCTs that compared the effects of statins with placebo, no treatment, standard care, or other statins, on mortality, cardiovascular events, kidney function, toxicity, and lipid levels in adults with CKD not on dialysis were the focus of our literature searches. Data collection and analysis: Two or more authors independently extracted data and assessed study risk of bias. Treatment effects were expressed as mean difference (MD for continuous outcomes (lipids, creatinine clearance and proteinuria and risk ratio (RR for dichotomous outcomes (major cardiovascular events, all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, fatal or non-fatal myocardial infarction (MI, fatal or non-fatal stroke, ESKD, elevated liver enzymes, rhabdomyolysis, cancer and withdrawal rates with 95% confidence intervals (CI. MAIN RESULTS: We included 50 studies (45,285 participants: 47 studies (39,820 participants compared statins with placebo or no treatment and three studies (5547 participants compared two different statin regimens in adults with CKD who were not yet on dialysis. We were able to meta-analyse 38 studies (37,274 participants. The risk of bias in the included studies was high. Seven studies comparing statins with placebo or no treatment had lower risk of bias overall; and were conducted according to published protocols, outcomes were adjudicated by a committee, specified outcomes were reported, and analyses were conducted using intention-to-treat methods. In placebo or no treatment controlled studies, adverse events were reported in 32 studies (68% and systematically evaluated in 16 studies (34%. Compared with placebo, statin therapy consistently prevented major cardiovascular events (13 studies, 36,033 participants; RR 0.72, 95% CI 0.66 to 0.79, all-cause mortality (10 studies, 28,276 participants; RR 0.79, 95% CI 0.69 to 0.91, cardiovascular death (7 studies, 19,059 participants; RR 0.77, 95% CI 0.69 to 0.87 and MI (8 studies, 9018 participants; RR 0.55, 95% CI 0.42 to 0.72. Statins had uncertain effects on stroke (5 studies, 8658 participants; RR 0.62, 95% CI 0.35 to 1.12. Potential harms from statin therapy were limited by lack of systematic reporting and were uncertain in analyses that had few events: elevated creatine kinase (7 studies, 4514 participants; RR 0.84, 95% CI 0.20 to 3.48, liver function abnormalities (7 studies, RR 0.76, 95% CI 0.39 to 1.50, withdrawal due to adverse events (13 studies, 4219 participants; RR 1.16, 95% CI 0.84 to 1.60, and cancer (2 studies, 5581 participants; RR 1.03, 95% CI 0.82 to 130. Statins had uncertain effects on progression of CKD. Data for relative effects of intensive cholesterol lowering in people with early stages of kidney disease were sparse. Statins clearly reduced risks of death, major cardiovascular events, and MI in people with CKD who did not have CVD at baseline (primary prevention. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Statins consistently lower death and major cardiovascular events by 20% in people with CKD not requiring dialysis. Statin-related effects on stroke and kidney function were found to be uncertain and adverse effects of treatment are incompletely understood. Statins have an important role in primary prevention of cardiovascular events and mortality in people who have CKD.

  18. Identification of novel Mycobacterium tuberculosis dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors through rational drug design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mymoona Akhter

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Structure based drug design can be used as an effective tool for the design of new cheiocal entity. Number of novel agents have been identified as antitubercular agents whose mechanism of action needs to be ascertained.

  19. Limited Sampling Strategy for the Prediction of Area Under the Curve (AUC) of Statins: Reliability of a Single Time Point for AUC Prediction for Pravastatin and Simvastatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, N R

    2016-02-01

    Statins are widely prescribed medicines and are also available in fixed dose combinations with other drugs to treat several chronic ailments. Given the safety issues associated with statins it may be important to assess feasibility of a single time concentration strategy for prediction of exposure (area under the curve; AUC). The peak concentration (Cmax) was used to establish relationship with AUC separately for pravastatin and simvastatin using published pharmacokinetic data. The regression equations generated for statins were used to predict the AUC values from various literature references. The fold difference of the observed divided by predicted values along with correlation coefficient (r) were used to judge the feasibility of the single time point approach. Both pravastatin and simvastatin showed excellent correlation of Cmax vs. AUC values with r value ≥ 0.9638 (pAUC predictions and >81% of the predicted values were in a narrower range of >0.75-fold but AUC values showed excellent correlation for pravastatin (r=0.9708, n=115; pAUC predictions. On the basis of the present work, it is feasible to develop a single concentration time point strategy that coincides with Cmax occurrence for both pravastatin and simvastatin from a therapeutic drug monitoring perspective. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Recominant Pinoresino-Lariciresinol Reductase, Recombinant Dirigent Protein And Methods Of Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Norman G.; Davin, Laurence B.; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T.; Fujita, Masayuki , Gang; David R. , Sarkanen; Simo , Ford; Joshua D.

    2003-10-21

    Dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases have been isolated, together with cDNAs encoding dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases. Accordingly, isolated DNA sequences are provided from source species Forsythia intermedia, Thuja plicata, Tsuga heterophylla, Eucommia ulmoides, Linum usitatissimum, and Schisandra chinensis, which code for the expression of dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases. In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for dirigent proteins or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of dirigent protein or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith. In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding dirigent protein or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of dirigent proteins and/or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases.

  1. Recombinant pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase, recombinant dirigent protein, and methods of use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Norman G.; Davin, Laurence B.; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T.; Fujita, Masayuki; Gang, David R.; Sarkanen, Simo; Ford, Joshua D.

    2001-04-03

    Dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases have been isolated, together with cDNAs encoding dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases. Accordingly, isolated DNA sequences are provided which code for the expression of dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases. In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for dirigent proteins or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of dirigent protein or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith. In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding dirigent protein or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of dirigent proteins and/or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases.

  2. Evidence that steroid 5alpha-reductase isozyme genes are differentially methylated in human lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Dorantes, M; Lizano-Soberón, M; Camacho-Arroyo, I; Calzada-León, R; Morimoto, S; Téllez-Ascencio, N; Cerbón, M A

    2002-03-01

    The synthesis of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) is catalyzed by steroid 5alpha-reductase isozymes 1 and 2, and this function determines the development of the male phenotype during embriogenesis and the growth of androgen sensitive tissues during puberty. The aim of this study was to determine the cytosine methylation status of 5alpha-reductase isozymes types 1 and 2 genes in normal and in 5alpha-reductase deficient men. Genomic DNA was obtained from lymphocytes of both normal subjects and patients with primary 5alpha-reductase deficiency due to point mutations in 5alpha-reductase 2 gene. Southern blot analysis of 5alpha-reductase types 1 and 2 genes from DNA samples digested with HpaII presented a different cytosine methylation pattern compared to that observed with its isoschizomer MspI, indicating that both genes are methylated in CCGG sequences. The analysis of 5alpha-reductase 1 gene from DNA samples digested with Sau3AI and its isoschizomer MboI which recognize methylation in GATC sequences showed an identical methylation pattern. In contrast, 5alpha-reductase 2 gene digested with Sau3AI presented a different methylation pattern to that of the samples digested with MboI, indicating that steroid 5alpha-reductase 2 gene possess methylated cytosines in GATC sequences. Analysis of exon 4 of 5alpha-reductase 2 gene after metabisulfite PCR showed that normal and deficient subjects present a different methylation pattern, being more methylated in patients with 5alpha-reductase 2 mutated gene. The overall results suggest that 5alpha-reductase genes 1 and 2 are differentially methylated in lymphocytes from normal and 5alpha-reductase deficient patients. Moreover, the extensive cytosine methylation pattern observed in exon 4 of 5alpha-reductase 2 gene in deficient patients, points out to an increased rate of mutations in this gene.

  3. Inhibition of aldose reductase prevents experimental allergic airway inflammation in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umesh C S Yadav

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The bronchial asthma, a clinical complication of persistent inflammation of the airway and subsequent airway hyper-responsiveness, is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Several studies have shown that oxidative stress plays a key role in initiation as well as amplification of inflammation in airways. However, still there are no good anti-oxidant strategies available for therapeutic intervention in asthma pathogenesis. Most recent studies suggest that polyol pathway enzyme, aldose reductase (AR, contributes to the pathogenesis of oxidative stress-induced inflammation by affecting the NF-kappaB-dependent expression of cytokines and chemokines and therefore inhibitors of AR could be anti-inflammatory. Since inhibitors of AR have already gone through phase-III clinical studies for diabetic complications and found to be safe, our hypothesis is that AR inhibitors could be novel therapeutic drugs for the prevention and treatment of asthma. Hence, we investigated the efficacy of AR inhibition in the prevention of allergic responses to a common natural airborne allergen, ragweed pollen that leads to airway inflammation and hyper-responsiveness in a murine model of asthma.Primary Human Small Airway Epithelial Cells (SAEC were used to investigate the in vitro effects of AR inhibition on ragweed pollen extract (RWE-induced cytotoxic and inflammatory signals. Our results indicate that inhibition of AR prevents RWE -induced apoptotic cell death as measured by annexin-v staining, increase in the activation of NF-kappaB and expression of inflammatory markers such as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, cycloxygenase (COX-2, Prostaglandin (PG E(2, IL-6 and IL-8. Further, BALB/c mice were sensitized with endotoxin-free RWE in the absence and presence of AR inhibitor and followed by evaluation of perivascular and peribronchial inflammation, mucin production, eosinophils infiltration and airway hyperresponsiveness. Our results

  4. YKL071W from Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a novel aldehyde reductase for detoxification of glycolaldehyde and furfural derived from lignocellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hanyu; Ouyang, Yidan; Zhou, Chang; Xiao, Difan; Guo, Yaping; Wu, Lan; Li, Xi; Gu, Yunfu; Xiang, Quanju; Zhao, Ke; Yu, Xiumei; Zou, Likou; Ma, Menggen

    2017-12-01

    Aldehydes generated as by-products during the pretreatment of lignocellulose are the key inhibitors to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which is considered as the most promising microorganism for industrial production of biofuel, xylitol as well as other special chemicals from lignocellulose. S. cerevisiae has the inherent ability to in situ detoxify aldehydes to corresponding alcohols by multiple aldehyde reductases. Herein, we report that an uncharacterized open reading frame YKL071W from S. cerevisiae encodes a novel "classical" short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) protein with NADH-dependent enzymatic activities for reduction of furfural (FF), glycolaldehyde (GA), formaldehyde (FA), and benzaldehyde (BZA). This enzyme showed much better specific activities for reduction of GA and FF than FA and BZA, and displayed much higher Km and Kcat/Km but lower Vmax and Kcat for reduction of GA than FF. For this enzyme, the optimum pH was 5.5 and 6.0 for reduction of GA and FF, and the optimum temperature was 30 °C for reduction of GA and FF. Both pH and temperature affected stability of this enzyme in a similar trend for reduction of GA and FF. Cu 2+ , Zn 2+ , Ni 2+ , and Fe 3+ had severe inhibition effects on enzyme activities of Ykl071wp for reduction of GA and FF. Transcription of YKL071W in S. cerevisiae was significantly upregulated under GA and FF stress conditions, and its transcription is most probably regulated by transcription factor genes of YAP1, CAD1, PDR3, and STB5. This research provides guidelines to identify more uncharacterized genes with reductase activities for detoxification of aldehydes derived from lignocellulose in S. cerevisiae.

  5. High-resolution neutron protein crystallography with radically small crystal volumes: Application of perdeuteration to human aldose reductase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazemann, I.; Dauvergne, M.T.; Blakeley, M.P.; Meilleur, Flora; Haertlein, M.; Van Dorsselaer, A.; Mitschler, A.; Myles, Dean A.A.; Podjarny, A.

    2005-01-01

    Neutron diffraction data have been collected to 2.2 (angstrom) resolution from a small (0.15 mm 3 ) crystal of perdeuterated human aldose reductase (h-AR; MW = 36 kDa) in order to help to determine the protonation state of the enzyme. h-AR belongs to the aldo-keto reductase family and is implicated in diabetic complications. Its ternary complexes (h-AR-coenzyme NADPH-selected inhibitor) provide a good model to study both the enzymatic mechanism and inhibition. Here, the successful production of fully deuterated human aldose reductase (h-AR(D)), subsequent crystallization of the ternary complex h-AR(D)-NADPH-IDD594 and neutron Laue data collection at the LADI instrument at ILL using a crystal volume of just 0.15 mm 3 are reported. Neutron data were recorded to 2 (angstrom) resolution, with subsequent data analysis using data to 2.2 (angstrom). This is the first fully deuterated enzyme of this size (36 kDa) to be solved by neutron diffraction and represents a milestone in the field, as the crystal volume is at least one order of magnitude smaller than those usually required for other high-resolution neutron structures determined to date. This illustrates the significant increase in the signal-to-noise ratio of data collected from perdeuterated crystals and demonstrates that good-quality neutron data can now be collected from more typical protein crystal volumes. Indeed, the signal-to-noise ratio is then dominated by other sources of instrument background, the nature of which is under investigation. This is important for the design of future instruments, which should take maximum advantage of the reduction in the intrinsic diffraction pattern background from fully deuterated samples.

  6. Niacin extended-release/simvastatin combination therapy produces larger favorable changes in high-density lipoprotein particles than atorvastatin monotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toth PP

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Peter P Toth1, Kamlesh M Thakker2, Ping Jiang2, Robert J Padley21University of Illinois College of Medicine, Peoria, and CGH Medical Center, Sterling, 2Abbott, Abbott Park, IL, USABackground: The purpose of this research was to compare the effects of niacin extended-release in combination with simvastatin (NER/S versus atorvastatin monotherapy on high-density lipoprotein (HDL particle number and size in patients with hyperlipidemia or dyslipidemia from the SUPREME study.Methods: This was a post hoc analysis of patients (n = 137 who completed the SUPREME study and who had lipid particle number and size measurements at both baseline and at week 12 by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Following ≥4 weeks without lipid-modifying therapy (washout period, the patients received NER/S 1000/40 mg/day for 4 weeks followed by NER/S 2000/40 mg/day for 8 weeks, or atorvastatin 40 mg/day for 12 weeks. Median percent changes in HDL particle number and size from baseline to week 12 were compared between the NER/S and atorvastatin treatment groups using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Distribution of HDL particle subclasses at week 12 was compared between the treatment groups using the Cochran–Mantel–Haenszel test.Results: Treatment with NER/S resulted in a significantly greater percent reduction in small HDL particle number at week 12 compared with atorvastatin monotherapy (-1.8% versus 4.2%, P = 0.014, and a numerically greater percent increase in large HDL particle number (102.4% versus 39.2%, P = 0.078 compared with atorvastatin monotherapy. A significantly greater percent increase in HDL particle size from baseline at week 12 was observed with NER/S compared with atorvastatin (6.0% versus 1.3%, P < 0.001. NER/S treatment also resulted in a significant shift in HDL particle size from small and medium at baseline to large at week 12 (P < 0.0001.Conclusion: Treatment with NER/S resulted in larger favorable changes in number and size of HDL particle

  7. Hydroxyurea-Mediated Cytotoxicity Without Inhibition of Ribonucleotide Reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Li Phing; Lim, Zun Yi; Cohen, Matan; Kong, Ziqing; Marjavaara, Lisette; Chabes, Andrei; Bell, Stephen D

    2016-11-01

    In many organisms, hydroxyurea (HU) inhibits class I ribonucleotide reductase, leading to lowered cellular pools of deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates. The reduced levels for DNA precursors is believed to cause replication fork stalling. Upon treatment of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus with HU, we observe dose-dependent cell cycle arrest, accumulation of DNA double-strand breaks, stalled replication forks, and elevated levels of recombination structures. However, Sulfolobus has a HU-insensitive class II ribonucleotide reductase, and we reveal that HU treatment does not significantly impact cellular DNA precursor pools. Profiling of protein and transcript levels reveals modulation of a specific subset of replication initiation and cell division genes. Notably, the selective loss of the regulatory subunit of the primase correlates with cessation of replication initiation and stalling of replication forks. Furthermore, we find evidence for a detoxification response induced by HU treatment. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Crystallization of purple nitrous oxide reductase from Pseudomonas stutzeri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomowski, Anja; Zumft, Walter G.; Kroneck, Peter M. H.; Einsle, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    The physiologically active form of nitrous oxide reductase was isolated and crystallized under strict exclusion of dioxygen and diffraction data were collected from crystals belonging to two different space groups. Nitrous oxide reductase (N 2 OR) from Pseudomonas stutzeri catalyzes the final step in denitrification: the two-electron reduction of nitrous oxide to molecular dinitrogen. Crystals of the enzyme were grown under strict exclusion of dioxygen by sitting-drop vapour diffusion using 2R,3R-butanediol as a cryoprotectant. N 2 OR crystallized in either space group P1 or P6 5 . Interestingly, the key determinant for the resulting space group was the crystallization temperature. Crystals belonging to space group P1 contained four 130 kDa dimers in the asymmetric unit, while crystals belonging to space group P6 5 contained a single dimer in the asymmetric unit. Diffraction data were collected to resolutions better than 2 Å

  9. Glutathione reductase: solvent equilibrium and kinetic isotope effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, K.K.; Vanoni, M.A.; Blanchard, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    Glutathione reductase catalyzes the NADPH-dependent reduction of oxidized glutathione (GSSG). The kinetic mechanism is ping-pong, and we have investigated the rate-limiting nature of proton-transfer steps in the reactions catalyzed by the spinach, yeast, and human erythrocyte glutathione reductases using a combination of alternate substrate and solvent kinetic isotope effects. With NADPH or GSSG as the variable substrate, at a fixed, saturating concentration of the other substrate, solvent kinetic isotope effects were observed on V but not V/K. Plots of Vm vs mole fraction of D 2 O (proton inventories) were linear in both cases for the yeast, spinach, and human erythrocyte enzymes. When solvent kinetic isotope effect studies were performed with DTNB instead of GSSG as an alternate substrate, a solvent kinetic isotope effect of 1.0 was observed. Solvent kinetic isotope effect measurements were also performed on the asymmetric disulfides GSSNB and GSSNP by using human erythrocyte glutathione reductase. The Km values for GSSNB and GSSNP were 70 microM and 13 microM, respectively, and V values were 62 and 57% of the one calculated for GSSG, respectively. Both of these substrates yield solvent kinetic isotope effects greater than 1.0 on both V and V/K and linear proton inventories, indicating that a single proton-transfer step is still rate limiting. These data are discussed in relationship to the chemical mechanism of GSSG reduction and the identity of the proton-transfer step whose rate is sensitive to solvent isotopic composition. Finally, the solvent equilibrium isotope effect measured with yeast glutathione reductase is 4.98, which allows us to calculate a fractionation factor for the thiol moiety of GSH of 0.456

  10. Differential expression of disulfide reductase enzymes in a free-living platyhelminth (Dugesia dorotocephala.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Guevara-Flores

    Full Text Available A search of the disulfide reductase activities expressed in the adult stage of the free-living platyhelminth Dugesia dorotocephala was carried out. Using GSSG or DTNB as substrates, it was possible to obtain a purified fraction containing both GSSG and DTNB reductase activities. Through the purification procedure, both disulfide reductase activities were obtained in the same chromatographic peak. By mass spectrometry analysis of peptide fragments obtained after tryptic digestion of the purified fraction, the presence of glutathione reductase (GR, thioredoxin-glutathione reductase (TGR, and a putative thioredoxin reductase (TrxR was detected. Using the gold compound auranofin to selectively inhibit the GSSG reductase activity of TGR, it was found that barely 5% of the total GR activity in the D. dorotocephala extract can be assigned to GR. Such strategy did allow us to determine the kinetic parameters for both GR and TGR. Although It was not possible to discriminate DTNB reductase activity due to TrxR from that of TGR, a chromatofocusing experiment with a D. dorotocephala extract resulted in the obtention of a minor protein fraction enriched in TrxR, strongly suggesting its presence as a functional protein. Thus, unlike its parasitic counterparts, in the free-living platyhelminth lineage the three disulfide reductases are present as functional proteins, albeit TGR is still the major disulfide reductase involved in the reduction of both Trx and GSSG. This fact suggests the development of TGR in parasitic flatworms was not linked to a parasitic mode of life.

  11. Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase I (FabI) Is Essential for the Intracellular Growth of Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericson, Megan E.; Frank, Matthew W.

    2016-01-01

    Enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase catalyzes the last step in each elongation cycle of type II bacterial fatty acid synthesis and is a key regulatory protein in bacterial fatty acid synthesis. Genes of the facultative intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes encode two functional enoyl-acyl carrier protein isoforms based on their ability to complement the temperature-sensitive growth phenotype of Escherichia coli strain JP1111 [fabI(Ts)]. The FabI isoform was inactivated by the FabI selective inhibitor AFN-1252, but the FabK isoform was not affected by the drug, as expected. Inhibition of FabI by AFN-1252 decreased endogenous fatty acid synthesis by 80% and lowered the growth rate of L. monocytogenes in laboratory medium. Robust exogenous fatty acid incorporation was not detected in L. monocytogenes unless the pathway was partially inactivated by AFN-1252 treatment. However, supplementation with exogenous fatty acids did not restore normal growth in the presence of AFN-1252. FabI inactivation prevented the intracellular growth of L. monocytogenes, showing that neither FabK nor the incorporation of host cellular fatty acids was sufficient to support the intracellular growth of L. monocytogenes. Our results show that FabI is the primary enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase of type II bacterial fatty acid synthesis and is essential for the intracellular growth of L. monocytogenes. PMID:27736774

  12. Cloning and sequence of the human adrenodoxin reductase gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Dong; Shi, Y.; Miller, W.L.

    1990-01-01

    Adrenodoxin reductase is a flavoprotein mediating electron transport to all mitochondrial forms of cytochrome P450. The authors cloned the human adrenodoxin reductase gene and characterized it by restriction endonuclease mapping and DNA sequencing. The entire gene is approximately 12 kilobases long and consists of 12 exons. The first exon encodes the first 26 of the 32 amino acids of the signal peptide, and the second exon encodes the remainder of signal peptide and the apparent FAD binding site. The remaining 10 exons are clustered in a region of only 4.3 kilobases, separated from the first two exons by a large intron of about 5.6 kilobases. Two forms of human adrenodoxin reductase mRNA, differing by the presence or absence of 18 bases in the middle of the sequence, arise from alternate splicing at the 5' end of exon 7. This alternately spliced region is directly adjacent to the NADPH binding site, which is entirely contained in exon 6. The immediate 5' flanking region lacks TATA and CAAT boxes; however, this region is rich in G+C and contains six copies of the sequence GGGCGGG, resembling promoter sequences of housekeeping genes. RNase protection experiments show that transcription is initiated from multiple sites in the 5' flanking region, located about 21-91 base pairs upstream from the AUG translational initiation codon

  13. Gene cloning and overexpression of two conjugated polyketone reductases, novel aldo-keto reductase family enzymes, of Candida parapsilosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, M; Delacruz-Hidalgo, A-R G; Akond, M A; Sakuradani, E; Kita, K; Shimizu, S

    2004-04-01

    The genes encoding two conjugated polyketone reductases (CPR-C1, CPR-C2) of Candida parapsilosis IFO 0708 were cloned and sequenced. The genes encoded a total of 304 and 307 amino acid residues for CPR-C1 and CPR-C2, respectively. The deduced amino acid sequences of the two enzymes showed high similarity to each other and to several proteins of the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily. However, several amino acid residues in putative active sites of AKRs were not conserved in CPR-C1 and CPR-C2. The two CPR genes were overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The E. coli transformant bearing the CPR-C2 gene almost stoichiometrically reduced 30 mg ketopantoyl lactone/ml to D-pantoyl lactone.

  14. Towards optimization of odonto/osteogenic bioengineering: in vitro comparison of simvastatin, sodium fluoride, melanocyte-stimulating hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zijah, Vahid; Salehi, Roya; Aghazadeh, Marziyeh; Samiei, Mohammad; Alizadeh, Effat; Davaran, Soodabeh

    2017-06-01

    Tissue engineering has emerged as a potential therapeutic option for dental problems in recent years. One of the policies in tissue engineering is to use both scaffolds and additive factors for enhancing cell responses. This study aims to evaluate and compare the effect of three types of biofactors on poly-caprolactone-poly-ethylene glycol-poly caprolactone (PCL-PEG-PCL) nanofibrous scaffold on human dental pulp stem cell (hDPSCs) engineering. The PCL-PEG-PCL copolymer was synthesized with ring opening polymerization method, and its nanofiber scaffold was prepared by electrospinning method. Nanofibrous scaffold-seeded hDPSCs were treated with sodium fluoride (NaF), melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH), or simvastatin (SIM). Non-treated nanofiber seeded cells were utilized as control. The viability, biocompatibility, adhesion, proliferation rate, morphology, osteo/odontogenic potential, and the expression of tissue-specific genes were studied. The results showed that significant higher results demonstrated significant higher adhesive behavior, viability, alizarin red activity, and dentin specific gene expression in MSH- and SIM-treated cells (p < 0.05). This study is unique; in that, it compares the effects of different treatments for optimization of dental tissue engineering.

  15. Skeletal muscle-specific HMG-CoA reductase knockout mice exhibit rhabdomyolysis: A model for statin-induced myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaki, Yoshinori; Nakagawa, Yoshimi; Miyahara, Shoko; Iwasaki, Hitoshi; Ishii, Akiko; Matsuzaka, Takashi; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Yatoh, Shigeru; Takahashi, Akimitsu; Yahagi, Naoya; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Sone, Hirohito; Ohashi, Ken; Ishibashi, Shun; Yamada, Nobuhiro; Shimano, Hitoshi

    2015-10-23

    HMG-CoA reductase (HMGCR) catalyzes the conversion of HMG-CoA to mevalonic acid (MVA); this is the rate-limiting enzyme of the mevalonate pathway that synthesizes cholesterol. Statins, HMGCR inhibitors, are widely used as cholesterol-reducing drugs. However, statin-induced myopathy is the most adverse side effect of statins. To eludicate the mechanisms underlying statin the myotoxicity and HMGCR function in the skeletal muscle, we developed the skeletal muscle-specific HMGCR knockout mice. Knockout mice exhibited postnatal myopathy with elevated serum creatine kinase levels and necrosis. Myopathy in knockout mice was completely rescued by the oral administration of MVA. These results suggest that skeletal muscle toxicity caused by statins is dependent on the deficiencies of HMGCR enzyme activity and downstream metabolites of the mevalonate pathway in skeletal muscles rather than the liver or other organs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Hepatocyte Hyperproliferation upon Liver-Specific Co-disruption of Thioredoxin-1, Thioredoxin Reductase-1, and Glutathione Reductase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin R. Prigge

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Energetic nutrients are oxidized to sustain high intracellular NADPH/NADP+ ratios. NADPH-dependent reduction of thioredoxin-1 (Trx1 disulfide and glutathione disulfide by thioredoxin reductase-1 (TrxR1 and glutathione reductase (Gsr, respectively, fuels antioxidant systems and deoxyribonucleotide synthesis. Mouse livers lacking both TrxR1 and Gsr sustain these essential activities using an NADPH-independent methionine-consuming pathway; however, it remains unclear how this reducing power is distributed. Here, we show that liver-specific co-disruption of the genes encoding Trx1, TrxR1, and Gsr (triple-null causes dramatic hepatocyte hyperproliferation. Thus, even in the absence of Trx1, methionine-fueled glutathione production supports hepatocyte S phase deoxyribonucleotide production. Also, Trx1 in the absence of TrxR1 provides a survival advantage to cells under hyperglycemic stress, suggesting that glutathione, likely via glutaredoxins, can reduce Trx1 disulfide in vivo. In triple-null livers like in many cancers, deoxyribonucleotide synthesis places a critical yet relatively low-volume demand on these reductase systems, thereby favoring high hepatocyte turnover over sustained hepatocyte integrity.

  17. Sucrose mimics the light induction of Arabidopsis nitrate reductase gene transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Chi-Lien; Acedo, Gregoria N; Kristensen, Michael

    1992-01-01

    can replace light in eliciting an increase of nitrate reductase mRNA accumulation in dark-adapted green Arabidopsis plants. We show further that sucrose alone is sufficient for the full expression of nitrate reductase genes in etiolated Arabidopsis plants. Finally, using a reporter gene, we show......Nitrate reductase, the first enzyme in nitrate assimilation, is located at the crossroad of two energy-consuming pathways: nitrate assimilation and carbon fixation. Light, which regulates the expression of many higher-plant carbon fixation genes, also regulates nitrate reductase gene expression....... Located in the cytosol, nitrate reductase obtains its reductant not from photosynthesis but from carbohydrate catabolism. This relationship prompted us to investigate the indirect role that light might play, via photosynthesis, in the regulation of nitrate reductase gene expression. We show that sucrose...

  18. Structure of octaheme cytochrome c nitrite reductase from Thioalkalivibrio nitratireducens in a complex with phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trofimov, A. A.; Polyakov, K. M.; Boiko, K. M.; Filimonenkov, A. A.; Dorovatovskii, P. V.; Tikhonova, T. V.; Popov, V. O.; Koval'chuk, M. V.

    2010-01-01

    Octaheme cytochrome c nitrite reductase from Thioalkalivibrio nitratireducens (TvNiR) catalyzes the reduction of nitrite and hydroxylamine to ammonia. The structures of the free enzyme and of the enzyme in complexes with the substrate (nitrite ion) and the inhibitor (azide ion) have been solved previously. In this study we report the structures of the oxidized complex of TvNiR with phosphate and of this complex reduced by europium(II) chloride (1.8- and 2.0-A resolution, the R factors are 15.9 and 16.7%, respectively) and the structure of the enzyme in the complex with cyanide (1.76-A resolution, the R factor is 16.5%), which was prepared by soaking a crystal of the oxidized phosphate complex of TvNiR. In the active site of the enzyme, the phosphate ion binds to the iron ion of the catalytic heme and to the side chains of the catalytic residues Arg131, Tyr303, and His361. The cyanide ion is coordinated to the heme-iron ion and is hydrogen bonded to the residue His361. In the structure of reduced TvNiR, the phosphate ion is bound in the same manner as in the structure of oxidized TvNiR, and the nine c oordinated europium ion is located on the surface of one of the crystallographically independent monomers of the enzyme.

  19. Structure of octaheme cytochrome c nitrite reductase from Thioalkalivibrio nitratireducens in a complex with phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trofimov, A. A.; Polyakov, K. M., E-mail: kostya@eimb.relarn.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Engelhardt Institute of Molecular Biology (Russian Federation); Boiko, K. M.; Filimonenkov, A. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Bach Institute of Biochemistry (Russian Federation); Dorovatovskii, P. V. [Kurchatov Center for Synchrotron Radiation and Nanotechnology (Russian Federation); Tikhonova, T. V.; Popov, V. O. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Bach Institute of Biochemistry (Russian Federation); Koval' chuk, M. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2010-01-15

    Octaheme cytochrome c nitrite reductase from Thioalkalivibrio nitratireducens (TvNiR) catalyzes the reduction of nitrite and hydroxylamine to ammonia. The structures of the free enzyme and of the enzyme in complexes with the substrate (nitrite ion) and the inhibitor (azide ion) have been solved previously. In this study we report the structures of the oxidized complex of TvNiR with phosphate and of this complex reduced by europium(II) chloride (1.8- and 2.0-A resolution, the R factors are 15.9 and 16.7%, respectively) and the structure of the enzyme in the complex with cyanide (1.76-A resolution, the R factor is 16.5%), which was prepared by soaking a crystal of the oxidized phosphate complex of TvNiR. In the active site of the enzyme, the phosphate ion binds to the iron ion of the catalytic heme and to the side chains of the catalytic residues Arg131, Tyr303, and His361. The cyanide ion is coordinated to the heme-iron ion and is hydrogen bonded to the residue His361. In the structure of reduced TvNiR, the phosphate ion is bound in the same manner as in the structure of oxidized TvNiR, and the nine{sub c}oordinated europium ion is located on the surface of one of the crystallographically independent monomers of the enzyme.

  20. para-Aminosalicylic acid is a prodrug targeting dihydrofolate reductase in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jun; Rubin, Eric J; Bifani, Pablo; Mathys, Vanessa; Lim, Vivian; Au, Melvin; Jang, Jichan; Nam, Jiyoun; Dick, Thomas; Walker, John R; Pethe, Kevin; Camacho, Luis R

    2013-08-09

    para-Aminosalicylic acid (PAS) is one of the antimycobacterial drugs currently used for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Although it has been in clinical use for over 60 years, its mechanism(s) of action remains elusive. Here we report that PAS is a prodrug targeting dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) through an unusual and novel mechanism of action. We provide evidences that PAS is incorporated into the folate pathway by dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) and dihydrofolate synthase (DHFS) to generate a hydroxyl dihydrofolate antimetabolite, which in turn inhibits DHFR enzymatic activity. Interestingly, PAS is recognized by DHPS as efficiently as its natural substrate para-amino benzoic acid. Chemical inhibition of DHPS or mutation in DHFS prevents the formation of the antimetabolite, thereby conferring resistance to PAS. In addition, we identified a bifunctional enzyme (riboflavin biosynthesis protein (RibD)), a putative functional analog of DHFR in a knock-out strain. This finding is further supported by the identification of PAS-resistant clinical isolates encoding a RibD overexpression mutation displaying cross-resistance to genuine DHFR inhibitors. Our findings reveal that a metabolite of PAS inhibits DHFR in the folate pathway. RibD was shown to act as a functional analog of DHFR, and as for DHFS, both were shown to be associated in PAS resistance in laboratory strains and clinical isolates.

  1. Regulation of Small Mitochondrial DNA Replicative Advantage by Ribonucleotide Reductase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elliot Bradshaw

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Small mitochondrial genomes can behave as selfish elements by displacing wild-type genomes regardless of their detriment to the host organism. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, small hypersuppressive mtDNA transiently coexist with wild-type in a state of heteroplasmy, wherein the replicative advantage of the small mtDNA outcompetes wild-type and produces offspring without respiratory capacity in >95% of colonies. The cytosolic enzyme ribonucleotide reductase (RNR catalyzes the rate-limiting step in dNTP synthesis and its inhibition has been correlated with increased petite colony formation, reflecting loss of respiratory function. Here, we used heteroplasmic diploids containing wild-type (rho+ and suppressive (rho− or hypersuppressive (HS rho− mitochondrial genomes to explore the effects of RNR activity on mtDNA heteroplasmy in offspring. We found that the proportion of rho+ offspring was significantly increased by RNR overexpression or deletion of its inhibitor, SML1, while reducing RNR activity via SML1 overexpression produced the opposite effects. In addition, using Ex Taq and KOD Dash polymerases, we observed a replicative advantage for small over large template DNA in vitro, but only at low dNTP concentrations. These results suggest that dNTP insufficiency contributes to the replicative advantage of small mtDNA over wild-type and cytosolic dNTP synthesis by RNR is an important regulator of heteroplasmy involving small mtDNA molecules in yeast.

  2. A fluorimetric readout reporting the kinetics of nucleotide-induced human ribonucleotide reductase oligomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yuan; Lin, Hongyu; Wisitpitthaya, Somsinee; Blessing, William A; Aye, Yimon

    2014-11-24

    Human ribonucleotide reductase (hRNR) is a target of nucleotide chemotherapeutics in clinical use. The nucleotide-induced oligomeric regulation of hRNR subunit α is increasingly being recognized as an innate and drug-relevant mechanism for enzyme activity modulation. In the presence of negative feedback inhibitor dATP and leukemia drug clofarabine nucleotides, hRNR-α assembles into catalytically inert hexameric complexes, whereas nucleotide effectors that govern substrate specificity typically trigger α-dimerization. Currently, both knowledge of and tools to interrogate the oligomeric assembly pathway of RNR in any species in real time are lacking. We therefore developed a fluorimetric assay that reliably reports on oligomeric state changes of α with high sensitivity. The oligomerization-directed fluorescence quenching of hRNR-α, covalently labeled with two fluorophores, allows for direct readout of hRNR dimeric and hexameric states. We applied the newly developed platform to reveal the timescales of α self-assembly, driven by the feedback regulator dATP. This information is currently unavailable, despite the pharmaceutical relevance of hRNR oligomeric regulation. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Gamma-irradiation activates biochemical systems: induction of nitrate reductase activity in plant callus.

    OpenAIRE

    Pandey, K N; Sabharwal, P S

    1982-01-01

    Gamma-irradiation induced high levels of nitrate reductase activity (NADH:nitrate oxidoreductase, EC 1.6.6.1) in callus of Haworthia mirabilis Haworth. Subcultures of gamma-irradiated tissues showed autonomous growth on minimal medium. We were able to mimic the effects of gamma-irradiation by inducing nitrate reductase activity in unirradiated callus with exogenous auxin and kinetin. These results revealed that induction of nitrate reductase activity by gamma-irradiation is mediated through i...

  4. Immunological comparison of the NADH:nitrate reductase from different cucumber tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Marciniak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Soluble nitrate reductase from cucumber roots (Cucumis sativus L. was isolated and purified with blue-Sepharose 4B. Specific antibodies against the NR protein were raised by immunization of a goat. Using polyclonal antibodies anti-NR properties of the nitrate reductase from various cucumber tissues were examined. Experiments showed difference in immuno-logical properties of nitrate reductase (NR from cotyledon roots and leaves.

  5. The efficiency of dyslipidemia control in real clinical practice and the possibilities of its correction in patients with coronary heart disease and diabetes mellitus in the long -term use of simvastatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Yu. Valikulova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To show the efficiency of dyslipidemia control in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD and diabetes mellitus (DM in real outpatient clinical practice and the possibilities of its correction in the long-term use of simvastatin (simvastatin forte 40 mg in one of theNizhny Novgorod polyclinics.Subjects and methods. The efficiency of lipid profile control was analyzed in a sample from the entire dispensary group of patients with DM (n = 713. Patients at highest cardiovascular risk were selected from the dispensary group and included into a group of CHD and DM. There were a total of 461 (64.7 % such patients. Forty-three patients were identified in this group, who were matched for baseline systolic and diastolic blood pressures, age, gender, and DM duration and were found to have significant hypercholesterolemia. Simvastatin forte 40 mg wasprescribed to these patients at their outpatient visit. During a year, the patient made 6 visits to his/her physician (5 visits at 6-werk intervals and the sixth visit by the end of the follow-up year. The dose of simvastatin was unchanged throughout the study.Results.In the entire dispensary group, 64.7 % of the patients had a concurrence of CHD and DM. This group of patients was at high risk for dyslipidemia. In this group, 2.8 % had a total cholesterol (TC level of ≤ 3.5 mmol/l; 4.7 % had a low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C level of < 1.8 mmol/l. The total lipid profile was analyzed in only 6.3% of the patients from the entire dispensary group. 28.6 % of the patients with type 1 DM and 21.3% of those with CHD and type 2 DM took statins. Fifty-two week therapy with simvastatin forte 40 mg showed its high efficiency in real practice in decreasing the levels of atherogenic lipids and lipoproteins: TC by 27.6 % (p < 0.001, LDL-C by 36.9 % (p < 0.001, and triglycerides by 34.3 % (p < 0.001 with antiatherogenic high-density lipoprotein cholesterol elevation by 15.2 % (p < 0

  6. Histochemical Localization of Glutathione Dependent NBT-Reductase in Mouse Skin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective Localization of the glutathione dependent Nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) reductase in fresh frozen sections of mouse skin and possible dependence of NBT reductase on tissue thiol levels has been investigated. Methods The fresh frozen tissue sections (8m thickness) were prepared and incubated in medium containing NBT, reduced glutathione (GSH) and phosphate buffer. The staining for GSH was performed with mercury orange. Results  The activity of the NBT-reductase in mouse skin has been found to be localized in the areas rich in glutathione and actively proliferating area of the skin. Conclusion The activity of the NBT-reductase seems to be dependent on the glutathione contents.

  7. In vivo photoinactivation of Escherichia coli ribonucleoside reductase by near-ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, J.

    1977-01-01

    Some experimental work is described showing that near-U.V. irradiation of E.coli cells selectively destroys RDP-reductase (ribonucleoside diphosphate reductase) activity in vivo are providing evidence relating the loss of RDP-reductase to loss of cellular visibility and the inactivity of irrdiated cells to support the replication of DNA phages. The data are consistent with the interpretation that the principal cause in the killing of exponentially growing E.coli cells by near-U.V., and the loss of ability of irradiated host cells to support the replication of DNA phages, is the photoinactivation of the RDP-reductase complex. (U.K.)

  8. Identification of the 7-Hydroxymethyl Chlorophyll a Reductase of the Chlorophyll Cycle in Arabidopsis[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meguro, Miki; Ito, Hisashi; Takabayashi, Atsushi; Tanaka, Ryouichi; Tanaka, Ayumi

    2011-01-01

    The interconversion of chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b, referred to as the chlorophyll cycle, plays a crucial role in the processes of greening, acclimation to light intensity, and senescence. The chlorophyll cycle consists of three reactions: the conversions of chlorophyll a to chlorophyll b by chlorophyllide a oxygenase, chlorophyll b to 7-hydroxymethyl chlorophyll a by chlorophyll b reductase, and 7-hydroxymethyl chlorophyll a to chlorophyll a by 7-hydroxymethyl chlorophyll a reductase. We identified 7-hydroxymethyl chlorophyll a reductase, which is the last remaining unidentified enzyme of the chlorophyll cycle, from Arabidopsis thaliana by genetic and biochemical methods. Recombinant 7-hydroxymethyl chlorophyll a reductase converted 7-hydroxymethyl chlorophyll a to chlorophyll a using ferredoxin. Both sequence and biochemical analyses showed that 7-hydroxymethyl chlorophyll a reductase contains flavin adenine dinucleotide and an iron-sulfur center. In addition, a phylogenetic analysis elucidated the evolution of 7-hydroxymethyl chlorophyll a reductase from divinyl chlorophyllide vinyl reductase. A mutant lacking 7-hydroxymethyl chlorophyll a reductase was found to accumulate 7-hydroxymethyl chlorophyll a and pheophorbide a. Furthermore, this accumulation of pheophorbide a in the mutant was rescued by the inactivation of the chlorophyll b reductase gene. The downregulation of pheophorbide a oxygenase activity is discussed in relation to 7-hydroxymethyl chlorophyll a accumulation. PMID:21934147

  9. In vivo photoinactivation of Escherichia coli ribonucleoside reductase by near-ultraviolet light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, J [California Univ., Irvine (USA)

    1977-06-09

    Some experimental work is described showing that near-uv irradiation of E.coli cells selectively destroys RDP-reductase (ribonucleoside diphosphate reductase) activity in vivo are providing evidence relating the loss of RDP-reductase to loss of cellular visibility and the inactivity of irrdiated cells to support the replication of DNA phages. The data are consistent with the interpretation that the principal cause in the killing of exponentially growing E.coli cells by near-uv, and the loss of ability of irradiated host cells to support the replication of DNA phages, is the photoinactivation of the RDP-reductase complex.

  10. In vitro effects of myricetin, morin, apigenin, (+)-taxifolin, (+)-catechin, (−)-epicatechin, naringenin and naringin on cytochrome b5 reduction by purified NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Çelik, Haydar; Koşar, Müberra; Arinç, Emel

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • We assessed inhibitory effects of 8 dietary flavonoids on cytochrome b5 reduction by purified NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase. • The flavonol myricetin was the most potent in inhibiting cytochrome b5 reduction with an IC 50 value of 0.35 μM. • We investigated kinetics of myricetin-induced inhibition in detail. • We explored the structure–inhibitory activity relationship of compounds. • Modulation of cytochrome b5 reduction indicates a potential for myricetin to lead to some food–drug/xenobiotic interactions. - Abstract: The microsomal NADH-dependent electron transport system consisting of cytochrome b5 reductase and cytochrome b5 participates in a number of physiologically important processes including lipid metabolism as well as is involved in the metabolism of various drug and xenobiotics. In the present study, we assessed the inhibitory effects of eight dietary flavonoids representing five distinct chemical classes on cytochrome b5 reduction by purified cytochrome b5 reductase. From the flavonoids tested, myricetin was the most potent in inhibiting cytochrome b5 reduction with an IC 50 value of 0.35 μM. Myricetin inhibited b5 reductase noncompetitively with a K i of 0.21 μM with respect to cofactor NADH, and exhibited a non-linear relationship indicating non-Michaelis–Menten kinetic binding with respect to cytochrome b5. In contrast to the potent inhibitory activity of myricetin, (+)-taxifolin was found to be a weak inhibitor (IC 50 = 9.8 μM). The remaining flavonoids were inactive within the concentration range tested (1–50 μM). Analysis of structure–activity data suggested that simultaneous presence of three OH groups in ring B is a primary structural determinant for a potent enzyme inhibition. Our results suggest that inhibition of the activity of this system by myricetin or myricetin containing diets may influence the metabolism of therapeutic drugs as well as detoxification of xenobiotics

  11. Identification of a Novel Epoxyqueuosine Reductase Family by Comparative Genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zallot, Rémi; Ross, Robert; Chen, Wei-Hung; Bruner, Steven D; Limbach, Patrick A; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie

    2017-03-17

    The reduction of epoxyqueuosine (oQ) is the last step in the synthesis of the tRNA modification queuosine (Q). While the epoxyqueuosine reductase (EC 1.17.99.6) enzymatic activity was first described 30 years ago, the encoding gene queG was only identified in Escherichia coli in 2011. Interestingly, queG is absent from a large number of sequenced genomes that harbor Q synthesis or salvage genes, suggesting the existence of an alternative epoxyqueuosine reductase in these organisms. By analyzing phylogenetic distributions, physical gene clustering, and fusions, members of the Domain of Unknown Function 208 (DUF208) family were predicted to encode for an alternative epoxyqueuosine reductase. This prediction was validated with genetic methods. The Q modification is present in Lactobacillus salivarius, an organism missing queG but harboring the duf208 gene. Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1 is one of the few organisms that harbor both QueG and DUF208, and deletion of both corresponding genes was required to observe the absence of Q and the accumulation of oQ in tRNA. Finally, the conversion oQ to Q was restored in an E. coli queG mutant by complementation with plasmids harboring duf208 genes from different bacteria. Members of the DUF208 family are not homologous to QueG enzymes, and thus, duf208 is a non-orthologous replacement of queG. We propose to name DUF208 encoding genes as queH. While QueH contains conserved cysteines that could be involved in the coordination of a Fe/S center in a similar fashion to what has been identified in QueG, no cobalamin was identified associated with recombinant QueH protein.

  12. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency presenting as a rash.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Crushell, Ellen

    2012-09-01

    We report on the case of a 2-year-old girl recently diagnosed with Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency who originally presented in the neonatal period with a distinctive rash. At 11 weeks of age she developed seizures, she had acquired microcephaly and developmental delay. The rash deteriorated dramatically following commencement of phenobarbitone; both rash and seizures abated following empiric introduction of pyridoxine and folinic acid as treatment of possible vitamin responsive seizures. We postulate that phenobarbitone in combination with MTHFR deficiency may have caused her rash to deteriorate and subsequent folinic acid was helpful in treating the rash and preventing further acute neurological decline as commonly associated with this condition.

  13. Aldose Reductase-Deficient Mice Develop Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Horace T. B.; Chung, Sookja K.; Law, Janice W. S.; Ko, Ben C. B.; Tam, Sidney C. F.; Brooks, Heddwen L.; Knepper, Mark A.; Chung, Stephen S. M.

    2000-01-01

    Aldose reductase (ALR2) is thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of various diseases associated with diabetes mellitus, such as cataract, retinopathy, neuropathy, and nephropathy. However, its physiological functions are not well understood. We developed mice deficient in this enzyme and found that they had no apparent developmental or reproductive abnormality except that they drank and urinated significantly more than their wild-type littermates. These ALR2-deficient mice exhibited a partially defective urine-concentrating ability, having a phenotype resembling that of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. PMID:10913167

  14. Analysis of the physico-chemical quality Enalapril and Simvastatin drugs manipulated in magistral pharmacies from Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Tatiana Cristina Bomfim

    2013-01-01

    The increasing expansion of compounding pharmacy associated with several reports on variances in the quality of compounded drugs demonstrates the need for verification of quality, safety and efficacy of these products. In this work, physical and chemical analyzes were performed to evaluate the quality of some capsules manipulated enalapril and simvastatin, acquired in five pharmacies in Belo Horizonte /Brazil. Among the analyzes are pharmacopoeial tests for appearance, identification, determination of weight, content, related compounds and uniformity of dosage units, and was also performed neutron activation analysis for the determination of inorganic impurities in drugs sampled. The results showed that 60% of the samples were unsatisfactory for pharmacopoeial tests. The contents of the capsules sampled for individual testing unit dose uniformity between 0% and 136.2%. This test is important in evaluating the quality, which influences the safety and efficacy of drug treatment, since it allows you to check if the product contains the proper dosage and necessary for successful pharmacotherapy. On the other hand, underdosing can lead to reduced or absent desired therapeutic response, and overdoses can provide an undesirable effects and even toxic. The concentration of inorganic impurities was considered to be relatively small. However, no specific limits for some chemical elements in medicine hamper a better thread. In addition, further studies must be performed to assess chronic exposure to low concentrations of inorganic impurities, since drugs can be continuously used, and other sources of exposure must also be considered in order to evaluate the risk. The problems related to the quality and safety of compounded drugs are still reality in the country and reveal a serious public health problem, especially regarding the lack of uniformity between the unit doses of medications. It is suggested that the competent authorities to sanitary products, propose changes in

  15. Characterization of interactions of simvastatin, pravastatin, fluvastatin, and pitavastatin with bovine serum albumin: multiple spectroscopic and molecular docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jie-Hua; Wang, Qi; Pan, Dong-Qi; Liu, Ting-Ting; Jiang, Min

    2017-05-01

    The binding interactions of simvastatin (SIM), pravastatin (PRA), fluvastatin (FLU), and pitavastatin (PIT) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) were investigated for determining the affinity of four statins with BSA through multiple spectroscopic and molecular docking methods. The experimental results showed that SIM, PRA, FLU, and PIT statins quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA through a static quenching process and the stable stains-BSA complexes with the binding constants in the order of 10 4  M -1 at 298 K were formed through intermolecular nonbond interaction. The values of ΔH 0 , ΔS 0 and ΔG 0 in the binding process of SIM, PRA, FLU, and PIT with BSA were negative at the studied temperature range, suggesting that the binding process of four statins and BSA was spontaneous and the main interaction forces were van der Waals force and hydrogen-bonding interactions. Moreover, the binding of four statins with BSA was enthalpy-driven process due to |ΔH°|>|TΔS°| under the studied temperature range. From the results of site marker competitive experiments and molecular docking, subdomain IIIA (site II) was the primary binding site for SIM, PRA, FLU, and PIT on BSA. The results of UV-vis absorption, synchronous fluorescence, 3D fluorescence and FT-IR spectra proved that the slight change in the conformation of BSA, while the significant changes in the conformation of SIM, PRA, FLU, and PIT drug in statin-BSA complexes, indicating that the flexibility of statin molecules plays an important role in increasing the stability of statin-BSA complexes.

  16. First-in-man study of simvastatin-eluting stent in de novo coronary lesions: the SIMVASTENT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zago, Alexandre C; Matte, Bruno S; Reginato, Luciana; Iturry-Yamamoto, Germán; Krepsky, Ana; Bergoli, Luiz Carlos C; Balvedi, Julise; Raudales, José C; Saadi, Eduardo K; Zago, Alcides J

    2012-01-01

    Statins have anti-inflammatory and antiproliferative properties irrespective of their cholesterol-lowering effects. The aim of the present study was to evaluate a simvastatin-eluting stent (SimvES) in the treatment of de novo coronary lesions. Forty-two patients with de novo coronary artery lesions were assigned to SimvES, bare-metal stent (BMS) or everolimus-eluting stent (EES) implantation followed by intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) for neointimal quantitative analysis. Six months later, quantitative coronary angiography (QCA) and IVUS were repeated. QCA showed no binary restenosis, a mean in-stent late loss of 1.05 ± 0.25 mm (BMS, 1.12 ± 0.48 mm; EES, 0.20 ± 0.16 mm) and a diameter stenosis of 33.5 ± 7.1% (BMS, 35.5 ± 15.30%; EES, 7.2 ± 3.12%). Control IVUS showed a mean in-stent obstruction of 18.3 ± 9.4% (BMS, 32.8 ± 19.1%; EES, 9.8 ± 2.4%) and a neointimal volume index of 1.58 ± 0.75 mm(3)/mm (BMS, 2.93 ± 1.76 mm(3)/mm; EES, 0.80 ± 0.16 mm(3)/mm). Thrombus, late incomplete apposition and major adverse cardiac events were not observed. In this sample of patients with de novo coronary lesions, the use of a SimvES was not related to major adverse cardiac events, but it was associated with a higher level of neointimal proliferation than expected.

  17. Substrate Specificity, Inhibitor Selectivity and Structure-Function Relationships of Aldo-Keto Reductase 1B15: A Novel Human Retinaldehyde Reductase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Giménez-Dejoz, J.; Kolář, Michal H.; Ruiz, F. X.; Crespo, I.; Cousido-Siah, A.; Podjarny, A.; Barski, O. A.; Fanfrlík, Jindřich; Parés, X.; Farrés, J.; Porté, S.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 7 (2015), e0134506/1-e0134506/19 E-ISSN 1932-6203 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : retinoic acid biosynthesis * site-directed mutagenesis * tumor marker AKR1B15 Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.057, year: 2015 http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0134506

  18. Modeling and Proposed Molecular Mechanism of Hydroxyurea Through Docking and Molecular Dynamic Simulation to Curtail the Action of Ribonucleotide Reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iman, Maryam; Khansefid, Zeynab; Davood, Asghar

    2016-01-01

    Ribonucleotide Reductase (RNR) is an important anticancer chemotherapy target. It has main key role in DNA synthesis and cell growth. Therefore several RNR inhibitors, such as hydroxyurea, have entered the clinical trials. Based on our proposed mechanism, radical site of RNR protein reacts with hydroxyurea in which hydroxyurea is converted into its oxidized form compound III, and whereby the tyrosyl radical is converted into a normal tyrosine residue. In this study, docking and molecular dynamics simulations were used for proposed molecular mechanism of hydroxyurea in RNR inhibition as anticancer agent. The binding affinity of hydroxyurea and compound III to RNR was studied by docking method. The docking study was performed for the crystal structure of human RNR with the radical scavenger Hydroxyurea and its oxidized form to inhibit the human RNR. hydroxyurea and compound III bind at the active site with Tyr-176, which are essential for free radical formation. This helps to understand the functional aspects and also aids in the development of novel inhibitors for the human RNR2. To confirm the binding mode of inhibitors, the molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed using GROMACS 4.5.5, based upon the docked conformation of inhibitors. Both of the studied compounds stayed in the active site. The results of MD simulations confirmed the binding mode of ligands, accuracy of docking and the reliability of active conformations which were obtained by AutoDock. MD studies confirm our proposed mechanism in which compound III reacts with the active site residues specially Tyr-176, and inhibits the radical generation and subsequently inhibits the RNR enzyme.

  19. Proton Pump Inhibitors and Risk of Rhabdomyolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Scott J; Howden, Colin W

    2017-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have been associated with a variety of adverse events, although the level of evidence for many of these is weak at best. Recently, one national regulatory authority has mandated a change to the labeling of one PPI based on reports of possible associated rhabdomyolysis. Thus, in this review we summarize the available evidence linking PPI use with rhabdomyolysis. The level of evidence is insufficient to establish a causal relationship and is largely based on sporadic case reports. In general, patients with suspected PPI-associated rhabdomyolysis have not been re-challenged with a PPI after recovery. The mechanism whereby PPIs might have been associated with rhabdomyolysis is unclear but possibly related to interaction with concomitantly administered drugs such as HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins). For patients with rhabdomyolysis, a careful search must be made for possible etiological factors. In patients who recover from an episode of possible PPI-related rhabdomyolysis but do not have a genuine requirement for PPI treatment, the PPI should not be re-introduced. For those with a definite indication for ongoing PPI treatment, the PPI can be re-introduced but should preferably not be administered with a statin.

  20. Hydroxyurea-resistant vaccinia virus: overproduction of ribonucleotide reductase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slabaugh, M.B.; Mathews, C.K.

    1986-01-01

    Repeated passage of vaccinia virus in increasing concentrations of hydroxyurea followed by plaque purification resulted in the isolation of variants capable of growth in 5 mM hydroxyurea, a drug concentration which inhibited the reproduction of wild-type vaccinia virus 1000-fold. Analyses of viral protein synthesis by using [ 35 S]methionine pulse-labeling at intervals throughout the infection cycle revealed that all isolates overproduced a 34,000-molecular-weight (MW) early polypeptide. Measurement of ribonucleoside-diphosphate reductase activity after infection indicated that 4- to 10-fold more activity was induced by hydroxyurea-resistant viruses than by the wild-type virus. A two-step partial purification resulted in a substantial enrichment for the 34,000-MW protein from extracts of wild-type and hydroxyurea-resistant-virus-infected, but not mock-infected, cells. In the presence of the drug, the isolates incorporated [ 3 H]thymidine into DNA earlier and a rate substantially greater than that of the wild type, although the onset of DNA synthesis was delayed in both cases. The drug resistance trait was markedly unstable in all isolates. In the absence of selective pressure, plaque-purified isolated readily segregated progeny that displayed a wide range of resistance phenotypes. The results of this study indicate that vaccinia virus encodes a subunit of ribonucleotide reductase which is 34,000-MW early protein whose overproduction confers hydroxyurea resistance on reproducing viruses

  1. ADP-ribosylation of dinitrogenase reductase in Rhodobacter capsulatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jouanneau, Y.; Roby, C.; Meyer, C.M.; Vignais, P.M.

    1989-01-01

    In the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus, nitrogenase is regulated by a reversible covalent modification of Fe protein or dinitrogenase reductase (Rc2). The linkage of the modifying group to inactive Rc2 was found to be sensitive to alkali and to neutral hydroxylamine. Complete release of the modifying group was achieved by incubation of inactive Rc2 in 0.4 or 1 M hydroxylamine. After hydroxylamine treatment of the Rc2 preparation, the modifying group could be isolated and purified by affinity chromatography and ion-exchange HPLC. The modifying group comigrated with ADP-ribose on both ion-exchange HPLC and thin-layer chromatography. Analyses by 31 P NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry provided further evidence that the modifying group was ADP-ribose. The NMR spectrum of inactive Rc2 exhibited signals characteristic of ADP-ribose; integration of these signals allowed calculation of a molar ration ADP-ribose/Rc2 of 0.63. A hexapeptide carrying the ADP-ribose moiety was purified from a subtilisin digest of inactive Rc2. The structure of this peptide, determined by amino acid analysis and sequencing, is Gly-Arg(ADP-ribose)-Gly-Val-Ile-Thr. This structure allows identification of the binding site for ADP-ribose as Arg 101 of the polypeptide chain of Rc2. It is concluded that nitrogenase activity in R. capsulatus is regulated by reversible ADP-ribosylation of a specific arginyl residue of dinitrogenase reductase

  2. Crystallization and preliminary characterization of dihydropteridine reductase from Dictyostelium discoideum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Cong; Seo, Kyung Hye; Kim, Hye Lim; Zhuang, Ningning; Park, Young Shik; Lee, Kon Ho

    2008-01-01

    The dihydropteridine reductase from D. discoideum has been crystallized. Diffraction data were collected from a rectangular-shaped crystal to 2.16 Å resolution. Dihydropteridine reductase from Dictyostelium discoideum (dicDHPR) can produce d-threo-BH 4 [6R-(1′R,2′R)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin], a stereoisomer of l-erythro-BH 4 , in the last step of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH 4 ) recycling. In this reaction, DHPR uses NADH as a cofactor to reduce quinonoid dihydrobiopterin back to BH 4 . To date, the enzyme has been purified to homogeneity from many sources. In this report, the dicDHPR–NAD complex has been crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method with PEG 3350 as a precipitant. Rectangular-shaped crystals were obtained. Crystals grew to maximum dimensions of 0.4 × 0.6 × 0.1 mm. The crystal belonged to space group P2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 49.81, b = 129.90, c = 78.76 Å, β = 100.00°, and contained four molecules in the asymmetric unit, forming two closely interacting dicDHPR–NAD dimers. Diffraction data were collected to 2.16 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. The crystal structure has been determined using the molecular-replacement method

  3. Characterization and regulation of Leishmania major 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montalvetti, A; Pena Diaz, Javier; Hurtado, R

    2000-01-01

    In eukaryotes the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase catalyses the synthesis of mevalonic acid, a common precursor to all isoprenoid compounds. Here we report the isolation and overexpression of the gene coding for HMG-CoA reductase from Leishmania major. The protein from L...

  4. Bioinformatics approach of three partial polyprenol reductase genes in Kandelia obovata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basyuni, M.; Wati, R.; Sagami, H.; Oku, H.; Baba, S.

    2018-03-01

    This present study describesthe bioinformatics approach to analyze three partial polyprenol reductase genes from mangrove plant, Kandeliaobovataas well aspredictedphysical and chemical properties, potential peptide, subcellular localization, and phylogenetic. The diversity was noted in the physical and chemical properties of three partial polyprenol reductase genes. The values of chloroplast were relatively high, showed that chloroplast transit peptide occurred in mangrove polyprenol reductase. The target peptide value of mitochondria varied from 0.088 to 0.198 indicated it was possible to be present. These results suggested the importance of understanding the diversity of physicochemical properties of the different amino acids in polyprenol reductase. The subcellular localization of two partial genes located in the plasma membrane. To confirm the homology among the polyprenol reductase in the database, a dendrogram was drawn. The phylogenetic tree depicts that there are three clusters, the partial genes of K. obovata joined the largest one: C23157 was close to Ricinus communis polyprenol reductase. Whereas, C23901 and C24171 were grouped with Ipomoea nil polyprenol reductase, suggested that these polyprenol reductase genes form distinct separation into tropical habitat plants.

  5. Substrate and cofactor binding to nitrile reductase : A mass spectrometry based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gjonaj, L.; Pinkse, M.W.H.; Fernandez Fueyo, E.; Hollmann, F.; Hanefeld, U.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrile reductases catalyse a two-step reduction of nitriles to amines. This requires the binding of two NADPH molecules during one catalytic cycle. For the nitrile reductase from E. coli (EcoNR) mass spectrometry studies of the catalytic mechanism were performed. EcoNR is dimeric and has no Rossman

  6. The structure of Lactococcus lactis thioredoxin reductase reveals molecular features of photo-oxidative damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjoldager, Nicklas; Bang, Maria Blanner; Rykær, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The NADPH-dependent homodimeric flavoenzyme thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) provides reducing equivalents to thioredoxin, a key regulator of various cellular redox processes. Crystal structures of photo-inactivated thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) from the Gram-positive bacterium Lactococcus lactis have...

  7. Sucrose mimics the light induction of Arabidopsis nitrate reductase gene transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Chi-Lien; Acedo, Gregoria N; Kristensen, Michael

    1992-01-01

    Nitrate reductase, the first enzyme in nitrate assimilation, is located at the crossroad of two energy-consuming pathways: nitrate assimilation and carbon fixation. Light, which regulates the expression of many higher-plant carbon fixation genes, also regulates nitrate reductase gene expression. ...