WorldWideScience

Sample records for reducing plant heat

  1. Thermodynamic effects when utilizing waste heat from condensation in cases of a reduced vacuum in steam turbine plants of thermal power stations, to provide heat at low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasiljevic, N.; Savic, B.; Stojakovic, M.

    1986-01-01

    There is an interesting variant of cogeneration in the steam turbine system of a thermal power plant, i.e. the utilisation of the waste heat of condensation with a reduced vacuum without reconstruction of the thermal power plant. The thermodynamic effect in cogeneration was calculated in consideration of the dynamics of heat consumption. This cogeneration process has the advantage of saving primary energy without reconstruction of the thermal power plant.

  2. Monitoring wood heating plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The overall aim of the project is to support the increased use of biomass heating plant in the UK by improving the quality and quantity of information available to suppliers and users. This aim will be achieved by: providing a qualitative assessment of the operational performance of a representative range of biomass heating installations including summaries of technical information; providing good case studies for a range of installations addressing the varied market demands; collating performance data of existing installations so as to improve the performance and/or reduce capital and operating costs of existing and future installations; and providing basic operator training and recommending methods optimising/improving plant performance. (author)

  3. ESBWR passive heat exchanger design and performance - reducing plant development costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lumini, E.; Upton, H.A.; Billig, P.F.; Masoni, P.

    1996-01-01

    The EUROPEAN Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR) is a nuclear plant that builds on the solid technological foundation of the Simplified Boiling Reactor (SBWR) design. The major objective of the ESBWR program is to develop a plant design that utilizes the basic simplicity of the SBWR design that utilizes the basic simplicity of the SBWR design features to improve overall economics and to meet the specific requirements found in the European Utility Requirements Documents (EUR). The design is being developed by an international team of utilities, designers and researchers with the objective of meeting European utility and regulatory requirements. The overall approach to improve the commercial attractiveness of the ESBWR compared to the SBWR was to take advantage of the modular design of the passive safety system, the economy of scale, as well as the advantage of simpler systems of the passive plant to reduce overall material quantities and improve plant economics. To take advantage of the economy of scale, the power level of ESBWR was increased to 1190 MWe. Because of the modular nature of the passive safety systems in SBWR, in increase in thermal power of ESBWR to 3613 MWt only requires that the number of Passive Containment Condensers to maintain the passive safety features of ESBWR to four 33 MWt units for ESBWR. This paper reviews the Passive Containment Cooling (PCC) and Isolation Condenser (IC) unit design and addresses their use in the passive safety systems of the 3613 MWt ESBWR. The specific design differences and the applicability of the test completed at the SIET PANTHERS test facility in Piacenza, Italy are addressed as well as outlining additional qualification tests that must be completed on the PCC and IC unit design if they are to used in the passive safety systems of the ESBWR. This paper outlines the test results obtained from the prototype PCC and IC PANTHERS tests facility in Piacenza, Italy which have been used to design the ESBWR PCC/1C

  4. Reducing life cycle greenhouse gas emissions of corn ethanol by integrating biomass to produce heat and power at ethanol plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaliyan, Nalladurai; Morey, R. Vance; Tiffany, Douglas G.

    2011-01-01

    A life-cycle assessment (LCA) of corn ethanol was conducted to determine the reduction in the life-cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for corn ethanol compared to gasoline by integrating biomass fuels to replace fossil fuels (natural gas and grid electricity) in a U.S. Midwest dry-grind corn ethanol plant producing 0.19 hm 3 y -1 of denatured ethanol. The biomass fuels studied are corn stover and ethanol co-products [dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS), and syrup (solubles portion of DDGS)]. The biomass conversion technologies/systems considered are process heat (PH) only systems, combined heat and power (CHP) systems, and biomass integrated gasification combined cycle (BIGCC) systems. The life-cycle GHG emission reduction for corn ethanol compared to gasoline is 38.9% for PH with natural gas, 57.7% for PH with corn stover, 79.1% for CHP with corn stover, 78.2% for IGCC with natural gas, 119.0% for BIGCC with corn stover, and 111.4% for BIGCC with syrup and stover. These GHG emission estimates do not include indirect land use change effects. GHG emission reductions for CHP, IGCC, and BIGCC include power sent to the grid which replaces electricity from coal. BIGCC results in greater reductions in GHG emissions than IGCC with natural gas because biomass is substituted for fossil fuels. In addition, underground sequestration of CO 2 gas from the ethanol plant's fermentation tank could further reduce the life-cycle GHG emission for corn ethanol by 32% compared to gasoline.

  5. Heating plant privatization stagnates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janoska, J.; Benka, M.; Sobinkovic, B.; Haluza, I.

    2005-01-01

    The state has been talking about privatization of 6 municipal heating plants since 2001. The tenders were to start last year. But nothing has happened and the future is uncertain. The city councils would prefer to receive, if not 100%, then at least a majority stake in the heating plants free of charge. But the Cabinet has decided to sell 51% to investors. The privatization agency - the National Property Fund (FNM) is preparing a proposal to increase the stake offered for sale to 67%. According to information provided by the FNM the sale will begin after Cabinet approval. The Fund intends to apply the same model to the sale of all the heating plants. Last year, a major German company Verbundnetz Gas declared its interest in purchasing large municipal heating plants in Slovakia. But it has been waiting for a response ever since. The French company - Dalkia, which has 10-years' experience of doing business in Slovakia, is interested in all the heating plants to be offered for sale. The Austrian company - Stefe is not new to the business either, it is interested mainly in the regions where it has already established itself - Central and Eastern Slovakia. Strategic investors expect financial groups to show interest too. The Penta Group has not hid its ambitions - it has already privatised a company which represents the key to the future development of heat management in Bratislava - Paroplynovy cyklus. Whereas Penta is not new to the heat production business another financial group - Slavia Capital is still surveying the sector. Should it not succeed, it plans several projects that would allow it to take a stake in the sector

  6. Biofuelled heating plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulliksson, Hans; Wennerstaal, L.; Zethraeus, B.; Johansson, Bert-Aake

    2001-11-01

    The purpose of this report is to serve as a basis to enable establishment and operation of small and medium-sized bio-fuel plants, district heating plants and local district heating plants. Furthermore, the purpose of this report is to serve as a guideline and basis when realizing projects, from the first concept to established plant. Taking into account all the phases, from selection of heating system, fuel type, selection of technical solutions, authorization request or application to operate a plant, planning, construction and buying, inspection, performance test, take-over and control system of the plant. Another purpose of the report is to make sure that best available technology is used and to contribute to continuous development of the technology. The report deals mainly with bio-fuelled plants in the effect range 0.3 to10 MW. The term 'plant' refers to combined power and heating plants as well as 'simpler' district heating plants. The last-mentioned is also often referred to as 'local heating plant'. In this context, the term bio fuel refers to a wide range of fuel types. The term bio fuel includes processed fractions like powders, pellets, and briquettes along with unprocessed fractions, such as by-products from the forest industry; chips and bark. Bio fuels also include straw, energy crops and cereal waste products, but these have not been expressly studied in this report. The report is structured with appendixes regarding the various phases of the projects, with the purpose of serving as a helping handbook, or manual for new establishment, helping out with technical and administrative advice and environmental requirements. Plants of this size are already expanding considerably, and the need for guiding principles for design/technology and environmental requirements is great. These guiding principles should comply with the environmental legislation requirements, and must contain advice and recommendations for bio fuel plants in this effect range, also in

  7. SECURE nuclear district heating plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson; Hannus, M.

    1978-01-01

    The role foreseen for the SECURE (Safe Environmentally Clean Urban REactor) nuclear district heating plant is to provide the baseload heating needs of primarily the larger and medium size urban centers that are outside the range of waste heat supply from conventional nuclear power stations. The rationale of the SECURE concept is that the simplicity in design and the inherent safety advantages due to the use of low temperatures and pressures should make such reactors economically feasible in much smaller unit sizes than nuclear power reactors and should make their urban location possible. It is felt that the present design should be safe enough to make urban underground location possible without restriction according to any criteria based on actual risk evaluation. From the environmental point of view, this is a municipal heat supply plant with negligible pollution. Waste heat is negligible, gaseous radioactivity release is negligible, and there is no liquid radwaste release. Economic comparisons show that the SECURE plant is competitive with current fossil-fueled alternatives. Expected future increase in energy raw material prices will lead to additional energy cost advantages to the SECURE plant

  8. Heating plant overcomes coal crisis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobinkovic, B.

    2006-01-01

    At the last moment Kosice managed to overcome the threat of a more than 30-percent heating price increase. The biggest local heat producer, Teplaren Kosice, is running out of coal supplies. The only alternative would be gas, which is far more expensive. The reason for this situation was a dispute of the heating plant with one of its suppliers, Kimex. Some days ago, the dispute was settled and the heating plant is now expecting the first wagon loads of coal to arrive. These are eagerly awaited, as its supplies will not last for more than a month. It all started with a public tender for a coal supplier. Teplaren Kosice (TEKO) announced the tender for the delivery of 120,000 tons of coal in June. Kimex, one of the traditional and biggest suppliers, was disqualified in the course of the tender. The winners of the tender were Slovenergo, Bratislava and S-Plus Trade, Vranov nad Toplou. TEKO signed contracts with them but a district court in Kosice prohibited the company from purchasing coal from these contractors. Kimex filed a complaint claiming that it was disqualified unlawfully. Based on this the court issued a preliminary ruling prohibiting the purchase of coal from the winners of the tender. The heating plant had to wait for the final verdict. The problem was then solved by the company's new Board of Directors, who were appointed in mid October who managed to sign new contracts with the two winners and Kimex. The new contracts cover the purchase of 150-thousand tons of coal, which is 30,000 more than in the original tender specification. Each company will supply one third. (authors)

  9. Heat Pipes Reduce Engine-Exhaust Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, D. F.

    1986-01-01

    Increased fuel vaporization raises engine efficiency. Heat-pipe technology increased efficiency of heat transfer beyond that obtained by metallic conduction. Resulted in both improved engine operation and reduction in fuel consumption. Raw material conservation through reduced dependence on strategic materials also benefit from this type of heat-pipe technology. Applications result in improved engine performance and cleaner environment.

  10. Safety and licensing of nuclear heating plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snell, V.G.; Hilborn, J.W.; Lynch, G.F.; McAuley, S.J.

    1989-09-01

    World attention continues to focus on nuclear district heating, a low-cost energy from a non-polluting fuel. It offers long-term security for countries currently dependent on fossil fuels, and can reduce the burden of fossil fuel transportation on railways and roads. Current initiatives encompass large, centralized heating plants and small plants supplying individual institutions. The former are variants of their power reactor cousins but with enhanced safety features. The latter face the safety and licensing challenges of urban siting and remotely monitored operation, through use of intrinsic safety features such as passive decay heat removal, low stored energy and limited reactivity speed and depth in the control systems. Small heating reactor designs are compared, and the features of the SLOWPOKE Energy System, in the forefront of these designs, are summarized. The challenge of public perception must be met by clearly presenting the characteristics of small heating reactors in terms of scale and transparent safety in design and operation, and by explaining the local benefits

  11. District heating grid of the Daqing Nuclear Heating Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Changwen, Ma [Institute of Nuclear Energy and Technology, Tsingua Univ., Beijing (China)

    1997-09-01

    The Daqing Nuclear Heating Plant is the first commercial heating plant to be built in China. The plant is planned to be used as the main heat resource of one residential quarter of Daqing city. The main parameters of the heating plant are summarized in the paper. The load curve shows that the capacity of the NHP is about 69% of total capacity of the grid. The 12 existing boilers can be used as reserve and peak load heat resources. Two patterns of load following have have been considered and tested on the 5MW Test Heating Reactor. Experiment shows load of heat grid is changed slowly, so automatic load following is not necessary. (author). 9 figs, 1 tab.

  12. Heat pipes to reduce engine exhaust emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, D. F. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A fuel combustor is presented that consists of an elongated casing with an air inlet conduit portion at one end, and having an opposite exit end. An elongated heat pipe is mounted longitudinally in the casing and is offset from and extends alongside the combustion space. The heat pipe is in heat transmitting relationship with the air intake conduit for heating incoming air. A guide conduit structure is provided for conveying the heated air from the intake conduit into the combustion space. A fuel discharge nozzle is provided to inject fuel into the combustion space. A fuel conduit from a fuel supply source has a portion engaged in heat transfer relationship of the heat pipe for preheating the fuel. The downstream end of the heat pipe is in heat transfer relationship with the casing and is located adjacent to the downstream end of the combustion space. The offset position of the heat pipe relative to the combustion space minimizes the quenching effect of the heat pipe on the gaseous products of combustion, as well as reducing coking of the fuel on the heat pipe, thereby improving the efficiency of the combustor.

  13. Reduced risk HTGR concept for industrial heat application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boardman, C.E.; Lipps, A.J.

    1982-01-01

    The industrial process heat market has been identified as major market for the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR), however, this market introduces stringent availability requirements on the reactor system relative to electric plants which feed a large existing grid. The characteristics and requirements of the industrial heat markets are summarized; the risks associated with serving this market with a single large HTGR will be discussed; and the modular concept, which has the potential to reduce both safety and investment risks, will be described. The reference modular concept described consists of several small, relatively benign nuclear heat sources linked together to supply heat energy to a balance-of-plant incorporating a process gas train/thermochemical pipe line system and a normal steam-electric plant

  14. Air Circulation and Heat Exchange Under Reduced Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rygalov, V.; Wheeler, R.; Dixon, M.; Fowler, P.; Hillhouse, L.

    2010-01-01

    Heat exchange rates decrease non-linearly with reductions in atmospheric pressure. This decrease creates risk of thermal stress (elevated leaf temperatures) for plants under reduced pressures. Forced convection (fans) significantly increases heat exchange rate under almost all pressures except below 10 kPa. Plant cultivation techniques under reduced pressures will require forced convection. The cooling curve technique is a reliable means of assessing the influence of environmental variables like pressure and gravity on gas exchange of plant. These results represent the extremes of gas exchange conditions for simple systems under variable pressures. In reality, dense plant canopies will exhibit responses in between these extremes. More research is needed to understand the dependence of forced convection on atmospheric pressure. The overall thermal balance model should include latent and radiative exchange components.

  15. The Marstal Central Solar Heating Plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heller, Alfred; Jochen, Dahm

    1999-01-01

    The central solar heating plant in Marstal is running since 1996 and has been monitored since. The resulting data from the plant is analysed and the plant performance evaluated. A TRNSYS-model (computersimulation) id prepared and validated based on the measured data from the plant. Acceptable good...

  16. Optimum heat storage design for heat integrated multipurpose batch plants

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Stamp, J

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available procedure is presented tha journal homepage: www All rights reserved. ajozi T, Optimum heat storage grated multipurpose batch plants , South Africa y usage in multipurpose batch plants has been in published literature most present methods, time... � 2pL?u?kins ? 1 h3A3?u?cu?U (36) The internal area for heat loss by convection from the heat transfer medium is given by Constraint (37) and the area for convective heat transfer losses to the environment is given in Constraint (38). A1?u? ? 2...

  17. Heat supply from nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stach, V [Ustav Jaderneho Vyzkumu CSKAE, Rez (Czechoslovakia)

    1978-05-01

    The current state of world power production and consumption is assessed. Prognoses made for the years 1980 to 2000 show that nuclear energy should replace the major part of fossil fuels not only in the production of power but also in the production of heat. In this respect high-temperature reactors are highly prospective. The question is discussed of the technical and economic parameters of dual-purpose heat and power plants. It is, however, necessary to solve problems arising from the safe siting of nuclear heat and power plants and their environmental impacts. The economic benefits of combined power and heat production by such nuclear plants is evident.

  18. Heat exchanger. [Nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina, C; Brisseaux, A

    1976-01-19

    This invention concerns a heat exchanger between a fluid flowing through a tube and a gas. Such an exchanger can be used, inter alia, for removing calories that cannot be used for generating electricity in a thermal or nuclear power station. This exchanger can withstand any pressure surges in the system and even the use of a high vapour pressure coolant such as ammonia, since the fluid flows in a round tube with low pressure drops (both with respect to the fluid to be cooled and the cooling air). It is rigid enough to stand up to being moved and handled as well as to gusts of wind. It is formed of units that can be handled without difficulty and that are easily dismantable and interchangeable, even in service, and it is easily maintained. The exchange area is high for a minimum frontal area and this enables the size of the supporting frame to be reduced and makes it easy to hide it behind a screen of trees should this prove necessary. Finally, it is composed of a small number of standard units thus reducing the industrial production cost. These units are rectangular plates, each one being a flat tubular coil fitted between two flat parallel sheet metal plates having on their outer sides flat top raised bosses. These units are assembled together by the tops of the bosses so as to form an exchanger bank, each bank comprising two collectors to which the bank coils are tightly connected.

  19. Heat recovery from a cement plant with a Marnoch Heat Engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saneipoor, P.; Naterer, G.F.; Dincer, I.

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the performance of a new Marnoch Heat Engine (MHE) that recovers waste heat from within a typical cement plant. Two MHE units with compressed air as the working fluid are installed to recover the waste heat. The first unit on the main stack has four pairs of shell and tube heat exchangers. The second heat recovery unit is installed on a clinker quenching system. This unit operates with three pairs of shell and tube heat exchangers. The recovered heat is converted to electricity through the MHE system and used internally within the cement plant. A predictive model and results are presented and discussed. The results show the promising performance of the MHE's capabilities for efficient generation of electricity from waste heat sources in a cement plant. The new heat recovery system increases the efficiency of the cement plant and lowers the CO 2 emissions from the clinker production process. Moreover, it reduces the amount of waste heat to the environment and lowers the temperature of the exhaust gases. - Highlights: → This paper examines the thermodynamic performance of a new Marnoch Heat Engine (MHE) that recovers waste heat to produce electricity and improve the operating efficiency of a typical cement plant. → The first unit of the MHE on the main stack has four pairs of shell and tube heat exchangers and the second heat recovery unit is installed on a clinker quenching system. → Both predicted and experimental results demonstrate the promising performance of the MHE's capabilities for efficient generation of electricity from waste heat sources in a cement plant.

  20. German central solar heating plants with seasonal heat storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, D.; Marx, R.; Nussbicker-Lux, J.; Ochs, F.; Heidemann, W. [Institute of Thermodynamics and Thermal Engineering (ITW), University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 6, D-70550 Stuttgart (Germany); Mueller-Steinhagen, H. [Institute of Thermodynamics and Thermal Engineering (ITW), University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 6, D-70550 Stuttgart (Germany); Institute of Technical Thermodynamics (ITT), German Aerospace Centre (DLR), Stuttgart (Germany)

    2010-04-15

    Central solar heating plants contribute to the reduction of CO{sub 2}-emissions and global warming. The combination of central solar heating plants with seasonal heat storage enables high solar fractions of 50% and more. Several pilot central solar heating plants with seasonal heat storage (CSHPSS) built in Germany since 1996 have proven the appropriate operation of these systems and confirmed the high solar fractions. Four different types of seasonal thermal energy stores have been developed, tested and monitored under realistic operation conditions: Hot-water thermal energy store (e.g. in Friedrichshafen), gravel-water thermal energy store (e.g. in Steinfurt-Borghorst), borehole thermal energy store (in Neckarsulm) and aquifer thermal energy store (in Rostock). In this paper, measured heat balances of several German CSHPSS are presented. The different types of thermal energy stores and the affiliated central solar heating plants and district heating systems are described. Their operational characteristics are compared using measured data gained from an extensive monitoring program. Thus long-term operational experiences such as the influence of net return temperatures are shown. (author)

  1. Reducing Heating In High-Speed Cinematography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Howard A.

    1989-01-01

    Infrared-absorbing and infrared-reflecting glass filters simple and effective means for reducing rise in temperature during high-speed motion-picture photography. "Hot-mirror" and "cold-mirror" configurations, employed in projection of images, helps prevent excessive heating of scenes by powerful lamps used in high-speed photography.

  2. EIR solar heating plant OASE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedemann, K.H.

    1982-03-01

    For a corrosion surveillance program of the EIR solar heating unit, OASE, the coolant of the flat collector circuit is controlled and material samples mounted in a circuit by-pass are tested periodically. The results of the first year of surveillance have been evaluated and interpreted. Furthermore water-ethyleneglycol mixtures without and with corrosion inhibiting additives have been tested. Only the ethyleneglycol and inhibitor contents may be controlled by means of pH and electrical conductivity tests. The metal content in the coolant as a corrosion indicator is not recorded by pH or electrical conductivity readings - they must be determined by chemical analysis. Samples of different materials used in the coolant circuit, mounted in a test by-pass of the circuit and taken out every year for testing give information on the corrosion behaviour of these materials under service conditions. Corrosion can be prevented or reduced by adding inhibitors to the coolant. The optimum inhibitor composition for the concerned material combinations and for the coolant must be determined in laboratory tests. The inhibitor composition used in the flat collector circuit proved not to be the optimum: corrosion on the aluminium of the rollbond absorber plate was not prevented. (Auth.)

  3. Development of a Field Demonstration for Cost-Effective Low-Grade Heat Recovery and Use Technology Designed to Improve Efficiency and Reduce Water Usage Rates for a Coal-Fired Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noble, Russell [Southern Company Services, Incorporated, Birmingham, AL (United States); Dombrowski, K. [AECOM Technical Services, Austin, TX (United States); Bernau, M. [AECOM Technical Services, Austin, TX (United States); Morett, D. [AECOM Technical Services, Austin, TX (United States); Maxson, A. [EPRI, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Hume, S. [EPRI, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2016-06-30

    Coal-based power generation systems provide reliable, low-cost power to the domestic energy sector. These systems consume large amounts of fuel and water to produce electricity and are the target of pending regulations that may require reductions in water use and improvements in thermal efficiency. While efficiency of coal-based generation has improved over time, coal power plants often do not utilize the low-grade heat contained in the flue gas and require large volumes of water for the steam cycle make-up, environmental controls, and for process cooling and heating. Low-grade heat recovery is particularly challenging for coal-fired applications, due in large part to the condensation of acid as the flue gas cools and the resulting potential corrosion of the heat recovery materials. Such systems have also not been of significant interest as recent investments on coal power plants have primarily been for environmental controls due to more stringent regulations. Also, in many regions, fuel cost is still a pass-through to the consumer, reducing the motivation for efficiency improvements. Therefore, a commercial system combining low-grade heat-recovery technologies and associated end uses to cost effectively improve efficiency and/or reduce water consumption has not yet been widely applied. However, pressures from potential new regulations and from water shortages may drive new interest, particularly in the U.S. In an effort to address this issue, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has sought to identify and promote technologies to achieve this goal.

  4. Slow brushing reduces heat pain in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljencrantz, J; Strigo, I; Ellingsen, D M; Krämer, H H; Lundblad, L C; Nagi, S S; Leknes, S; Olausson, H

    2017-08-01

    C-tactile (CT) afferents are unmyelinated low-threshold mechanoreceptors optimized for signalling affective, gentle touch. In three separate psychophysical experiments, we examined the contribution of CT afferents to pain modulation. In total, 44 healthy volunteers experienced heat pain and CT optimal (slow brushing) and CT sub-optimal (fast brushing or vibration) stimuli. Three different experimental paradigms were used: Concurrent application of heat pain and tactile (slow brushing or vibration) stimulation; Slow brushing, applied for variable duration and intervals, preceding heat pain; Slow versus fast brushing preceding heat pain. Slow brushing was effective in reducing pain, whereas fast brushing or vibration was not. The reduction in pain was significant not only when the CT optimal touch was applied simultaneously with the painful stimulus but also when the two stimuli were separated in time. For subsequent stimulation, the pain reduction was more pronounced for a shorter time interval between brushing and pain. Likewise, the effect was more robust when pain was preceded by a longer duration of brush stimulation. Strong CT-related pain reduction was associated with low anxiety and high calmness scores obtained by a state anxiety questionnaire. Slow brushing - optimal for CT activation - is effective in reducing pain from cutaneous heating. The precise mechanisms for the pain relief are as yet unknown but possible mechanisms include inhibition of nociceptive projection neurons at the level of the dorsal horn as well as analgesia through cortical mechanisms. Slow brushing stimuli - optimal for activation of C-tactile fibres - can reduce pain from cutaneous heating. No such effect was seen with fast brushing or vibration. These observations indicate the role of C-tactile fibres in pain modulation. © 2017 European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  5. Flexible use of electricity in heat-only district heating plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Trømborg

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available European energy systems are in a period of significant transition, with the increasing shares of variable renewable energy (VRE and less flexible fossil-based generation units as predominant factors. The supply-side changes are expected to cause large short-term electricity price volatility. More frequent periods of low electricity prices may mean that electric use in flexible heating systems will become more profitable, and such flexible heating systems may, in turn, improve the integration of increasing shares of VRE. The objective of this study is to analyze the likely future of Nordic electricity price levels and variations and how the expected prices might affect the use of electricity and thermal storage in heat-only district heating plants. We apply the North European energy market model Balmorel to provide scenarios for future hourly electricity prices in years with normal, high, and low inflow levels to the hydro power system. The simulation tool energyPRO is subsequently applied to quantify how these electricity price scenarios affect the hourly use of thermal storage and individual boilers in heat-only district heating plants located in Norway. The two studied example plants use wood chips or heat pump as base load representing common technologies for district heating in Norway. The Balmorel results show that annual differences in inflow is still a decisive factor for Norwegian and Nordic electricity prices in year 2030 and that short-term (daily price variability is expected to increase. In the plant-level simulations, we find that tank storage, which is currently installed in only a few district heating plants in Norway, is a profitable flexibility option that will significantly reduce the use of fossil peak load in both biomass and heat-pump-based systems. Installation of an electric boiler in addition to tank storage is profitable in the heat pump system due to the limited capacity of the heat pump. Electricity will hence, to a

  6. Cooling and heating facility for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakuta, Atsuro

    1994-01-01

    The present invention concerns a cooling and heating facility for a nuclear power plant. Namely, a cooling water supply system supplies cooling water prepared by a refrigerator for cooling the inside of the plant. A warm water supply system supplies warm water having its temperature elevated by using an exhausted heat from a reactor water cleanup system. The facility comprises a heat pump-type refrigerator disposed in a cold water supply system for producing cold water and warm water, and warm water pipelines for connecting the refrigerator and the warm water supply system. With such a constitution, when the exhaust heat from the reactor water cleanup system can not be used, warm water prepared by the heat pump type refrigerator is supplied to the warm water supply system by way of the warm water pipelines. Accordingly, when the exhaust heat from the reactor water cleanup system can not be used such as upon inspection of the plant, a portion of the refrigerators in a not-operated state can be used for heating. Supply of boiler steams in the plant is no more necessary or extremely reduced. (I.S.)

  7. Economy of straw-fired heating plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-10-01

    The aim was to produce a detailed survey of the economical aspects of the operation of individual Danish straw-fired heating plants and to compare the results. It is hoped the operators of these plants will thus be encouraged to work together when atttempting to solve problems in this respect and that the gathered information could be used by consultants. The collected data from the survey is presented in the form of tables and graphs. (AB)

  8. Uncertainties in the daily operation of a district heating plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorknæs, Peter

    Studies have found that district heating (DH) systems should play an important role in future sustainable energy systems, but that DH has to adapt to lower heat demands. This means adapting to reduced operation hours for units essential for DHs integration in other parts of the energy system......, such as CHP. It will therefore likely be increasingly important to increase the value per operation hour. The value can be increased by offering balancing for the electricity system. This in turn increases the uncertainties in the daily operation planning of the DH system. In this paper the Danish DH plant...... Ringkøbing District Heating is used as a case to investigate what costs market uncertainties can incur on a DH plant. It is found that the market uncertainties in a 4 months simulated period increased Ringkøbing District Heatings costs by less than 1%. Several factors are however not included in this paper....

  9. Heat exchanger design for desalination plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-03-01

    The Office of Saline Water (OSW) accomplished a very large amount of significant work related to the design and performance of large heat exchanger bundles and enhanced heat transfer surfaces. This work was undertaken to provide basic technical and economic data for the design of distillation plants for the desalination of seawater, and should be of value to other industrial applications as well. The OSW work covers almost every aspect of heat exchanger design, and ranges academic research to data gathering on commercial desalting plants. Exchanger design configurations include multistage flash plant condensers, vertical tube falling film and upflow evaporators, and horizontal tube spray film evaporators. Unfortunately, the data is scattered through a large number of reports of which many are concerned primarily with factors other than heat transfer, and the quality of reporting and the quality of the data are far from consistent. This report catalogues and organizes the heat exchanger data developed by the OSW. Some analysis as to the validity of the data is made and ranges of performance that can be expected are given. Emphasis is placed on the vertical tube, falling film evaporators. A thorough analysis of the large literature file that was surveyed was not possible. No analysis was made of the quality of original data, but apparent data discrepancies are pointed out where such discrepancies happen to be found

  10. Heat recovery from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safa, H.

    2012-01-01

    The thermodynamic efficiency of a standard Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) is around 33%. Therefore, about two third of the heat generated by the nuclear fuel is literally wasted in the environment. Given the fact that the steam coming out from the high pressure turbine is superheated, it could be advantageously used for non electrical applications, particularly for district heating. Considering the technological improvements achieved these last years in heat piping insulation, it is now perfectly feasible to envisage heat transport over quite long distances, exceeding 200 km, with affordable losses. Therefore, it could be energetically wise to revise the modifications required on present reactors to perform heat extraction without impeding the NPP operation. In this paper, the case of a French reactor is studied showing that a large fraction of the wasted nuclear heat can be actually recovered and transported to be injected in the heat distribution network of a large city. Some technical and economical aspects of nuclear district heating application are also discussed. (author)

  11. Air Circulation and Heat Exchange under Reduced Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rygalov, Vadim; Wheeler, Raymond; Dixon, Mike; Hillhouse, Len; Fowler, Philip

    Low pressure atmospheres were suggested for Space Greenhouses (SG) design to minimize sys-tem construction and re-supply materials, as well as system manufacturing and deployment costs. But rarified atmospheres modify heat exchange mechanisms what finally leads to alter-ations in thermal control for low pressure closed environments. Under low atmospheric pressures (e.g., lower than 25 kPa compare to 101.3 kPa for normal Earth atmosphere), convection is becoming replaced by diffusion and rate of heat exchange reduces significantly. During a period from 2001 to 2009, a series of hypobaric experiments were conducted at Space Life Sciences Lab (SLSLab) NASA's Kennedy Space Center and the Department of Space Studies, University of North Dakota. Findings from these experiments showed: -air circulation rate decreases non-linearly with lowering of total atmospheric pressure; -heat exchange slows down with pressure decrease creating risk of thermal stress (elevated leaf tem-peratures) for plants in closed environments; -low pressure-induced thermal stress could be reduced by either lowering system temperature set point or increasing forced convection rates (circulation fan power) within certain limits; Air circulation is an important constituent of controlled environments and plays crucial role in material and heat exchange. Theoretical schematics and mathematical models are developed from a series of observations. These models can be used to establish optimal control algorithms for low pressure environments, such as a space greenhouse, as well as assist in fundamental design concept developments for these or similar habitable structures.

  12. Gas power plants heat the public mind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauveau, L.

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear energy provides most part of the electricity produced in France but fossil thermal plants remain necessary to face peaking demand. The French government has planned to replace all the fossil plants by combined cycle gas plants that release far less CO 2 than classic coal or oil plants. 31 new gas plants have been authorized and among them 2 are operating, 10 are being built and 8 are at the project stage. In some projects like in the little town of Verberie (Oise department) these projects are facing a strong local opposition. The objection of the opponents is two-fold: -) the plant will have a strong negative impact on the wild life particularly the population of boars and stags and -) this huge program of 31 gas plants contradict the government that committed itself to reduce the consumption of fossil energies and to favor renewable energies through its Grenelle environmental policy. (A.C.)

  13. Optimisation of a Swedish district heating system with reduced heat demand due to energy efficiency measures in residential buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Åberg, M.; Henning, D.

    2011-01-01

    The development towards more energy efficient buildings, as well as the expansion of district heating (DH) networks, is generally considered to reduce environmental impact. But the combined effect of these two progressions is more controversial. A reduced heat demand (HD) due to higher energy efficiency in buildings might hamper co-production of electricity and DH. In Sweden, co-produced electricity is normally considered to displace electricity from less efficient European condensing power plants. In this study, a potential HD reduction due to energy efficiency measures in the existing building stock in the Swedish city Linköping is calculated. The impact of HD reduction on heat and electricity production in the Linköping DH system is investigated by using the energy system optimisation model MODEST. Energy efficiency measures in buildings reduce seasonal HD variations. Model results show that HD reductions primarily decrease heat-only production. The electricity-to-heat output ratio for the system is increased for HD reductions up to 30%. Local and global CO 2 emissions are reduced. If co-produced electricity replaces electricity from coal-fired condensing power plants, a 20% HD reduction is optimal for decreasing global CO 2 emissions in the analysed DH system. - Highlights: ► A MODEST optimisation model of the Linköping district heating system is used. ► The impact of heat demand reduction on heat and electricity production is examined. ► Model results show that heat demand reductions decrease heat-only production. ► Local and global CO 2 emissions are reduced. ► The system electricity-to-heat output increases for reduced heat demand up to 30%.

  14. Flexibility of Large-Scale Solar Heating Plant with Heat Pump and Thermal Energy Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luc, Katarzyna Marta; Heller, Alfred; Rode, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    to decrease biomass use in a district heating system. The paper focuses on the renewable energy-based district heating system in Marstal, Denmark, with heat produced in central solar heating plant, wood pellet boiler, heat pump and bio-oil boiler. The plant has been the object of research and developments...

  15. Energy-Recovery Pressure-Reducer in District Heating System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dariusz Borkowski

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Already existing man-made infrastructures that create water flow and unused pressure are interesting energy sources to which micro-hydropower plants can be applied. Apart from water supply systems (WSSs, which are widely described in the literature, significant hydropower potential can also be found in district heating systems (DHSs. In this paper, a prototype, a so-called energy-recovery pressure-reducer (ERPR, utilized for a DHS, is presented. It consisted of a pump as a turbine coupled to a permanent magnet synchronous generator (PMSG. The latter was connected to the power grid through the power electronic unit (PEU. The variable-speed operation allowed one to modify the turbine characteristics to match the substation’s hydraulic conditions. The proposed ERPR device could be installed in series to the existing classic pressure reducing valve (PRV as an independent device that reduces costs and simplifies system installation. The test results of the prototype system located in a substation of Cracow’s DHS are presented. The steady-state curves and regulation characteristics show the prototype’s operating range and efficiency. In this study, the pressure-reducer impact on the electrical and hydraulic systems, and on the environment, were analyzed. The operation tests during the annual heating season revealed an average system’s efficiency of 49%.

  16. French nuclear power plants for heat generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girard, Y.

    1984-01-01

    The considerable importance that France attributes to nuclear energy is well known even though as a result of the economic crisis and the energy savings it is possible to observe a certain downward trend in the rate at which new power plants are being started up. In July 1983, a symbolic turning-point was reached - at more than 10 thousand million kW.h nuclear power accounted, for the first time, for more than 50% of the total amount of electricity generated, or approx. 80% of the total electricity output of thermal origin. On the other hand, the direct contribution - excluding the use of electricity - of nuclear energy to the heat market in France remains virtually nil. The first part of this paper discusses the prospects and realities of the application, at low and intermediate temperatures, of nuclear heat in France, while the second part describes the French nuclear projects best suited to the heat market (excluding high temperatures). (author)

  17. Method and means for heating buildings in a district heating system with waste heat from a thermal power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margen, P.H.E.

    1975-01-01

    The waste heat from a thermal power plant is transported through a municipal heating network to a plurality of buildings to be heated. The quantity of heat thus supplied to the buildings is higher than that required for the heating of the buildings. The excess heat is released from the buildings to the atmosphere in the form of hot air

  18. Cogeneration steam turbine plant for district heating of Berovo (Macedonia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armenski, Slave; Dimitrov, Konstantin

    2000-01-01

    A plant for combined heat and electric power production, for central heating of the town Berovo (Macedonia) is proposed. The common reason to use a co-generation unit is the energy efficiency and a significant reduction of environmental pollution. A coal dust fraction from B rik' - Berovo coal mine is the main energy resource for cogeneration steam turbine plant. The heat consumption of town Berovo is analyzed and determined. Based on the energy consumption of a whole power plant, e. i. the plant for combined and simultaneous production of power is proposed. All necessary facilities of cogeneration plant is examined and determined. For proposed cogeneration steam turbine power plant for combined heat and electric production it is determined: heat and electric capacity of the plant, annually heat and electrical quantity production and annually coal consumption, the total investment of the plant, the price of both heat and electric energy as well as the pay back period. (Authors)

  19. Woodfuel procurement strategies of district heating plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roos, A.; Bohlin, F.; Hektor, B.; Hillring, B.

    2003-01-01

    Woodfuel use in the Swedish district heating sector increased significantly from 1985 to 1999. This study analysed strategies and considerations concerning woodfuel procurement in district heating plants. Priorities and concerns in the industry involved an increased woodfuel share, ambitions to create an environmental image, cost minimisation, awareness about the role of energy policies for fuel choice, improvement of woodfuel quality and the ambition to maintain a competitive woodfuel market with several suppliers. Factor analysis yielded five dimensions in the woodfuel procurement strategies among the district heating companies: (1) increased woodfuel use; (2) import; (3) spot market woodfuel purchases; (4) focus on refined woodfuels; and (5) using price only when deciding whether to use woodfuels or other fuels. Five clusters were defined along the three strategy dimensions (1)-(3). The clusters differed concerning size, experiences from the introduction of woodfuels, perceptions about woodfuels and strategies employed to date. This paper describes different strategies that the district heating companies apply on the woodfuel market. The conclusion is that policies should consider this diversity in procurement strategies, mitigate their negative side-effects and assist to make them cost-effective. (author)

  20. Thermal performance of solar district heating plants in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furbo, Simon; Perers, Bengt; Bava, Federico

    2014-01-01

    The market for solar heating plants connected to district heating systems is expanding rapidly in Denmark. It is expected that by the end of 2014 the 10 largest solar heating plants in Europe will be located in Denmark. Measurements from 23 Danish solar heating plants, all based on flat plate solar...... collectors mounted on the ground, shows measured yearly thermal performances of the solar heating plants placed in the interval from 313 kWh/m² collector to 493 kWh/m² collector with averages for all plants of 411 kWh/m² collector for 2012 and 450 kWh/m² collector for 2013. Theoretical calculations show...... of the cost/performance ratio for solar collector fields, both with flat plate collectors and with concentrating tracking solar collectors. It is recommended to continue monitoring and analysis of all large solar heating plants to document the reliability of the solar heating plants. It is also recommended...

  1. Amplification of heat extremes by plant CO2 physiological forcing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Christopher B; Poulsen, Christopher J; Mankin, Justin S

    2018-03-15

    Plants influence extreme heat events by regulating land-atmosphere water and energy exchanges. The contribution of plants to changes in future heat extremes will depend on the responses of vegetation growth and physiology to the direct and indirect effects of elevated CO 2 . Here we use a suite of earth system models to disentangle the radiative versus vegetation effects of elevated CO 2 on heat wave characteristics. Vegetation responses to a quadrupling of CO 2 increase summer heat wave occurrence by 20 days or more-30-50% of the radiative response alone-across tropical and mid-to-high latitude forests. These increases are caused by CO 2 physiological forcing, which diminishes transpiration and its associated cooling effect, and reduces clouds and precipitation. In contrast to recent suggestions, our results indicate CO 2 -driven vegetation changes enhance future heat wave frequency and intensity in most vegetated regions despite transpiration-driven soil moisture savings and increases in aboveground biomass from CO 2 fertilization.

  2. MicroRNA160 Modulates Plant Development and Heat Shock Protein Gene Expression to Mediate Heat Tolerance in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeng-Shane Lin

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Global warming is causing a negative impact on plant growth and adversely impacts on crop yield. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are critical in regulating the expression of genes involved in plant development as well as defense responses. The effects of miRNAs on heat-stressed Arabidopsis warrants further investigation. Heat stress increased the expression of miR160 and its precursors but considerably reduced that of its targets, ARF10, ARF16, and ARF17. To study the roles of miR160 during heat stress, transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing miR160 precursor a (160OE and artificial miR160 (MIM160, which mimics an inhibitor of miR160, were created. T-DNA insertion mutants of miR160 targets were also used to examine their tolerances to heat stress. Results presented that overexpressing miR160 improved seed germination and seedling survival under heat stress. The lengths of hypocotyl elongation and rachis were also longer in 160OE than the wild-type (WT plants under heat stress. Interestingly, MIM160 plants showed worse adaption to heat. In addition, arf10, arf16, and arf17 mutants presented similar phenotypes to 160OE under heat stress to advance abilities of thermotolerance. Moreover, transcriptome and qRT-PCR analyses revealed that HSP17.6A, HSP17.6II, HSP21, and HSP70B expression levels were regulated by heat in 160OE, MIM160, arf10, arf16, and arf17 plants. Hence, miR160 altered the expression of the heat shock proteins and plant development to allow plants to survive heat stress.

  3. Thermal performance analysis of a solar heating plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Jianhua; Huang, Junpeng; Andersen, Ola Lie

    was developed to calculate thermal performances of the plant. In the Trnsys model, three solar collector fields with a total solar collector area of 33,300 m2, a seasonal water pit heat storage of 75,000 m3, a simplified CO2 HP, a simplified ORC unit and a simplified wood chip boiler were included. The energy......Detailed measurements were carried out on a large scale solar heating plant located in southern Denmark in order to evaluate thermal performances of the plant. Based on the measurements, energy flows of the plant were evaluated. A modified Trnsys model of the Marstal solar heating plant...... consumption of the district heating net was modeled by volume flow rate and given forward and return temperatures of the district heating net. Weather data from a weather station at the site of the plant were used in the calculations. The Trnsys calculated yearly thermal performance of the solar heating plant...

  4. Flue gas recovery system for natural gas combined heat and power plant with distributed peak-shaving heat pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Xiling; Fu, Lin; Wang, Xiaoyin; Sun, Tao; Wang, Jingyi; Zhang, Shigang

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A flue gas recovery system with distributed peak-shaving heat pumps is proposed. • The system can improve network transmission and distribution capacity. • The system is advantageous in energy saving, emission reduction and economic benefits. - Abstract: District heating systems use distributed heat pump peak-shaving technology to adjust heat in secondary networks of substations. This technology simultaneously adjusts the heat of the secondary network and reduces the return-water temperature of the primary network by using the heat pump principle. When optimized, low temperature return-water is able to recycle more waste heat, thereby further improving the heating efficiency of the system. This paper introduces a flue gas recovery system for a natural gas combined heat and power plant with distributed peak-shaving heat pumps. A pilot system comprising a set of two 9F gas-steam combined cycle-back pressure heating units was used to analyse the system configuration and key parameters. The proposed system improved the network transmission and distribution capacity, increased heating capacity, and reduced heating energy consumption without compromising heating safety issues. As such, the proposed system is advantageous in terms of energy saving, emission reduction, and economic benefits.

  5. Ziar nad Hronom will be heated by an underground heat plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiegel, J.

    1999-01-01

    The World Bank and the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development are concerned in co-participation in funding a project for utilising geothermal ground water in heating premises in Ziar nad Hronom. The project implementations costs will be running at U.S.$18 million, of which the two bank institutions would provide for a non-specified part in the form of credit. In heating residential houses, production and commercial infrastructure of Ziar nad Hronom, 72 thousand tonnes of coal are consumed annually to generate 810 TJ heat. By implementing the new project there will be over 100 TJ savings, with a new more efficient distribution hot water network and 39 reconstructed heat exchange station making for effective consumption of heat. The current heat plant will only serve as an auxiliary source under extremely chilly weather conditions with an expected coal consumption of at most 9 thousand tonnes. In addition to cost implications, the geothermal water heating will make a significant contribution through environmental impact. Ecologists calculated that by shutting down the solid fuel burning heat plant the air burden will be reduced by 59 thousand tonnes of carbon dioxide, 290 tonnes of sulfur dioxide, 48 tonnes of nitrogen oxide, 230 tonnes of dust and nearly 12 tonnes of ash. The implementer of the project scheduled to complete in 2001 is a subsidiary of the joint-stock company Zavod SNP - Geothermal, Ltd, Ziar nad Hronom. Aimed at geothermal water sampling in the depth of some 2,500 meters, a trial drill at Ziarska kotlina - site Varticka will last roughly till April 9 1999. The drilling set of Nafta Gbely erected on December 21, 1998 is technically capable of reaching the depth 2,800 meter, just in case that the geothermal water level is lower than the expected 2,500 m. In all In all Nafta Gbely staffs will carry out two production and two reinjection drills. (author)

  6. Optimization of heat supply systems employing nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbanek, J.

    1988-01-01

    Decision making on the further development of heat supply systems requires optimization of the parameters. In particular, meeting the demands of peak load ranges is of importance. The heat supply coefficient α and the annual utilization of peak load equipment τ FS have been chosen as the characteristic quantities to describe them. The heat price at the consumer, C V , offers as the optimization criterion. The transport distance, temperature spread of the heating water, and different curves of annual variation of heat consumption on heat supply coefficient and heat price at the consumer. A comparison between heat supply by nuclear power plants and nuclear heating stations verifies the advantage of combined heat and power generation even with longer heat transport distances as compared with local heat supply by nuclear district heating stations based on the criterion of minimum employment of peak load boilers. (author)

  7. Genetic and epigenetic control of plant heat responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junzhong eLiu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Plants have evolved sophisticated genetic and epigenetic regulatory systems to respond quickly to unfavorable environmental conditions such as heat, cold, drought, and pathogen infections. In particular, heat greatly affects plant growth and development, immunity and circadian rhythm, and poses a serious threat to the global food supply. According to temperatures exposing, heat can be usually classified as warm ambient temperature (about 22-27℃, high temperature (27-30℃ and extremely high temperature (37-42℃, also known as heat stress for the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. The genetic mechanisms of plant responses to heat have been well studied, mainly focusing on elevated ambient temperature-mediated morphological acclimation and acceleration of flowering, modulation of plant immunity and circadian clock by high temperatures, and thermotolerance to heat stress. Recently, great progress has been achieved on epigenetic regulation of heat responses, including DNA methylation, histone modifications, histone variants, ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling, histone chaperones, small RNAs, long non-coding RNAs and other undefined epigenetic mechanisms. These epigenetic modifications regulate the expression of heat-responsive genes and function to prevent heat-related damage. This review focuses on recent progresses regarding the genetic and epigenetic control of heat responses in plants, and pays more attention to the role of the major epigenetic mechanisms in plant heat responses. Further research perspectives are also discussed.

  8. Coal-Fired Power Plant Heat Rate Reductions

    Science.gov (United States)

    View a report that identifies systems and equipment in coal-fired power plants where efficiency improvements can be realized, and provides estimates of the resulting net plant heat rate reductions and costs for implementation.

  9. Design and analysis of heat recovery system in bioprocess plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anastasovski, Aleksandar; Rašković, Predrag; Guzović, Zvonimir

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Heat integration of a bioprocess plant is studied. • Bioprocess plant produces yeast and ethyl-alcohol. • The design of a heat recovery system is performed by batch pinch analysis. • Direct and indirect heat integration approaches are used in process design. • The heat recovery system without a heat storage opportunity is more profitable. - Abstract: The paper deals with the heat integration of a bioprocess plant which produces yeast and ethyl-alcohol. The referent plant is considered to be a multiproduct batch plant which operates in a semi-continuous mode. The design of a heat recovery system is performed by batch pinch analysis and by the use of the Time slice model. The results obtained by direct and indirect heat integration approaches are presented in the form of cost-optimal heat exchanger networks and evaluated by different thermodynamic and economic indicators. They signify that the heat recovery system without a heat storage opportunity can be considered to be a more profitable solution for the energy efficiency increase in a plant

  10. Arrangement to reduce the failure frequency of heat condensate pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liskow, E.; Apelt, W.; Krause, W.; Meisel, L.

    1988-01-01

    The arrangement of throttling devices in heat condensate pipes of NPP with WWER-440 type reactors aims at reducing their failure frequency, ensuring an energetically favourable operation, and enhancing the availability and safety of NPP units

  11. Compact heat exchanger for power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinnunen, L.

    2001-01-01

    Vahterus Oy, located at Kalanti, has manufactured heat exchangers since the beginning of 1990s. About 90% of the equipment produced are exported. In the PSHE (Plate and Shell) solution of the Vahterus heat exchanger the heat is transferred by round plated welded to form a compact package, which is assembled into a cylindrical steel casing. The heat exchanger contains no gaskets or soldered joints, which eliminates the leak risks. Traditional heat exchanges are usually operated at higher temperatures and pressures, but the heat transfer capacities of them are lower. Plate heat exchangers, on the other hand, are efficient, but the application range of them is narrow. Additionally, the rubber gasket of the heat exchange plates, sealing the joints of the heat exchanging plates, does not stand high pressures or temperatures, or corroding fluids. The new welded plate heat exchanger combine the pressure and temperature resistance of tube heat exchangers and the high heat exchange capacity of plate heat exchangers. The new corrosion resisting heat exchanger can be applied for especially hard conditions. The operating temperature range of the PSHE heat exchanger is - 200 - 900 deg C. The pressure resistance is as high as 100 bar. The space requirement of PSHE is only one tenth of the space requirement of traditional tube heat exchangers. Adjusting the number of heat exchanging plates can change the capacity of the heat exchanger. Power range of the heat exchanger can be as high as 80 MW. Due to the corrosion preventive construction and the small dimension the PSHE heat exchanger can be applied for refrigerators using ammonia as refrigerant. These kinds of new Vahterus heat exchangers are in use in 60 countries in more than 2000 refrigerators

  12. Study on a heat recovery system for the thermal power plant utilizing air cooling island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Jian; Fu, Lin; Sun, Fangtian; Zhang, Shigang

    2014-01-01

    A new heat recovery system for CHP (combined heat and power) systems named HRU (heat recovery unit) is presented, which could recover the low grade heat of exhausted steam from the turbine at the thermal power plant directly. Heat recovery of exhausted steam is often accomplished by recovering the heat of cooling water in current systems. Therefore, two processes of heat transfer is needed at least. However, exhausted steam could be condensed in the evaporator of HRU directly, which reduce one process of heat transfer. A special evaporator is designed condense the exhausted steam directly. Simulated results are compared to experiments, which could include the calculation of heat transfer coefficients of different parts of HRU. It is found that about 25Mw of exhausted steam is recovered by this system. HRU could be promising for conventional CHP systems, which could increase the total energy efficiency obviously and enlarge the heating capacity of a built CHP system. - Highlights: • A new heat recovery system for thermal power plant is presented. • A mathematical model including heat transfer coefficients calculation is given. • This heat recovery system is experimented at a thermal power plant. • Performances of this system under different working conditions are simulated

  13. Methods for planning and operating decentralized combined heat and power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palsson, H.

    2000-02-01

    In recent years, the number of decentralized combined heat and power (DCHP) plants, which are typically located in small communities, has grown rapidly. These relatively small plants are based on Danish energy resources, mainly natural gas, and constitute an increasing part of the total energy production in Denmark. The topic of this thesis is the analysis of DCHP plants, with the purpose to optimize the operation of such plants. This involves the modelling of district heating systems, which are frequently connected to DCHP plants, as well as the use of heat storage for balancing between heat and power production. Furthermore, the accumulated effect from increasing number of DCHP plants on the total power production is considered. Methods for calculating dynamic temperature response in district heating (DH) pipes have been reviewed and analyzed numerically. Furthermore, it has been shown that a tree-structured DH network consisting of about one thousand pipes can be reduced to a simple chain structure of ten equivalent pipes without loosing much accuracy when temperature dynamics are calculated. A computationally efficient optimization method based on stochastic dynamic programming has been designed to find an optimum start-stop strategy for a DCHP plant with a heat storage. The method focuses on how to utilize heat storage in connection with CHP production. A model for the total power production in Eastern Denmark has been applied to the accumulated DCHP production. Probability production simulations have been extended from the traditional power-only analysis to include one or several heat supply areas. (au)

  14. Trends in safety objectives for nuclear district heating plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brogli, R [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    Safety objectives for dedicated nuclear heating plants are strongly influenced on the one hand by what is accepted for electricity nuclear stations, and on the other hand by the requirement that for economical reasons heating reactors have to be located close to population centers. The paper discusses the related trends and comes to the conclusion that on account of the specific technical characteristics of nuclear heating plants adequate safety can be provided even for highly populated sites. (author). 8 refs.

  15. Heat shock and plant leachates regulate seed germination of the endangered carnivorous plant Drosophyllum lusitanicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gómez-González

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In fire-prone ecosystems, many plant species have specialized mechanisms of seed dormancy that ensure a successful recruitment after fire. A well-documented mechanism is the germination stimulated by fire-related cues, such as heat shock and smoke. However, less is known about the role of inhibitory germination signals (e.g. allelopathy in regulating post-fire recruitment. Plant leachates derived from the unburned vegetation can enforce dormancy by means of allelopathic compounds, acting as a signal of unfavourable (highly competitive niche for germination in pyrophyte species. Here, we assessed the separate effects of heat shock and plant leachates on seed germination of Drosophyllum lusitanicum, an endangered carnivorous plant endemic to Mediterranean fire-prone heathlands. We performed a germination experiment in which seeds were subjected to three treatments: (1 5 min at 100 °C, (2 watering with plant leachate, and (3 control. Germination rate and seed viability was determined after 63 days. Heat shock stimulated seed germination in D. lusitanicum while plant leachates had inhibitory germination effects without reducing seed viability. Thus, both positive and negative signals could be involved in its successful post-fire recruitment. Fire would break seed dormancy and stimulate seed germination of D. lusitanicum through high temperatures, but also by eliminating allelochemical compounds from the soil. These results help to understand the population dynamics patterns found for D. lusitanicum in natural populations, and highlight the role of fire in the ecology and conservation of this endangered species. Seed dormancy imposed by plant-derived leachates as an adaptive mechanism should be considered more in fire ecology theory.

  16. Utilization of straw in district heating and CHP plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolaisen, L.

    1993-01-01

    In Denmark 64 straw-fired district heating plants and 6 decentral CHP plants have been built since 1980 which are completely or partly straw-fired. The annual straw consumption in the district heating plants is 275,000 tons and in the decentral plants about 200,000 tons. The size of the district heating plants amounts to 0.5 MW - 10 MW and that of the CHP plants to 7 MW - 67 MW heat flow rate. Either whole bales or cut/scarified straw is used for firing. Hesston bales of about 450 kg control the market. The Centre of Biomass Technology is an activity supported 100 % by the Danish Energy Agency with the purpose of increasing the use of straw and wood in the energy supply (orig.)

  17. Heat recovery optimization in a steam-assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashrafi, Omid; Navarri, Philippe; Hughes, Robin; Lu, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    Pinch Analysis was used to improve the energy performance of a typical steam-assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) process. The objective of this work was to reduce the amount of natural gas used for steam generation in the plant and the associated greenhouse gas emissions. The INTEGRATION software was used to analyze how heat is being used in the existing design and identify inefficient heat exchanges causing excessive use of energy. Several modifications to improve the base case heat exchanger network (HEN) were identified. The proposed retrofit projects reduced the process heating demands by improving the existing heat recovery system and by recovering waste heat and decreased natural gas consumption in the steam production unit by approximately 40 MW, representing approximately 8% of total consumption. As a result, the amount of glycol used to transfer energy across the facility was also reduced, as well as the electricity consumption related to glycol pumping. It was shown that the proposed heat recovery projects reduced natural gas costs by C$3.8 million/y and greenhouse gas emissions by 61,700 t/y of CO_2. - Highlights: • A heat integration study using Pinch analysis was performed in a SAGD process. • Several modifications are suggested to improve the existing heat recovery system. • Heat recovery projects increased boiler feed water and combustion air temperatures. • The proposed modifications reduced natural gas use for steam generation. • Heat recovery significantly reduced operating costs and greenhouse gas emissions.

  18. Research of waste heat energy efficiency for absorption heat pump recycling thermal power plant circulating water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Zhang, Yu; Zhou, Liansheng; E, Zhijun; Wang, Kun; Wang, Ziyue; Li, Guohao; Qu, Bin

    2018-02-01

    The waste heat energy efficiency for absorption heat pump recycling thermal power plant circulating water has been analyzed. After the operation of heat pump, the influences on power generation and heat generation of unit were taken into account. In the light of the characteristics of heat pump in different operation stages, the energy efficiency of heat pump was evaluated comprehensively on both sides of benefits belonging to electricity and benefits belonging to heat, which adopted the method of contrast test. Thus, the reference of energy efficiency for same type projects was provided.

  19. Method of reducing the radioactivity in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohashi, Kenya; Honda, Takashi; Furutani, Yasumasa; Kashimura, Eiji; Minato, Akira; Osumi, Katsumi.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the radioactivity in nuclear power plants in contact with pure water at high temperature and high pressure. Method: For suppressing the deposition of radioactive materials in nuclear reactor coolants to the structural materials, oxide layers which are relatively porous but have a sufficient layer thickness are formed as the primary treatment and then thin but dense layers are formed as the secondary treatment. Oxidization is applied by means of heated water or steams with less oxidizing property in the first treatment, while oxidizing treatment is applied with heated water and steams at high oxidizing property in the second treatment, because the effect of suppressing corrosion is insufficient only by means of the membranes in the primary treatment, while the layers formed by the secondary treatment alone are liable to be injured and degraded. Since coolants for use in BWR type reactors usually contain about 200 ppb of dissolved oxygen, it is desirably from 40 to 100 ppb for the primary treatment and from 400 ppb to 8 ppb for the secondary treatment, and non-oxidating heated gases at high purity such as Ar, N 2 , He may be used in addition to heated water and steams. (Kawakami, Y.)

  20. Application and design of an economizer for waste heat recovery in a cogeneration plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martić Igor I.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Energy increase cost has required its more effective use. However, many industrial heating processes generate waste energy. Use of waste-heat recovery systems decreases energy consumption. This paper presents case study of waste heat recovering of the exhaust flue gas in a 1415 kWe cogeneration plant. This waste heat can be recovered by installing an economizer to heat the condensed and fresh water in thermal degasification unit and reduce steam use for maintaining the temperature of 105˚C for oxygen removal. Design methodology of economizer is presented.

  1. Heat recovery from flue gas of coal fired installations with reduced pollutant emission - the Zittau process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, H; Strauss, R; Hofmann, K -D; Suder, M; Hultsch, T; Wetzel, W; Gabrysch, H; Jung, J [Technische Hochschule, Zittau (German Democratic Republic)

    1988-12-01

    Reviews the technology applied in the Zittau process for flue gas heat recovery and flue gas desulfurization in small brown coal fired power plants. Steam generators have a capacity of 6.5 or 10 t/h, low grade fuel with 8.2 MJ/kg calorific value is combusted. Technology has been developed on an experimental 10 t/h steam generator since 1986; an industrial 6.5 t/h prototype steam generator is now in operation achieving 95% SO{sub 2} removal from flue gas with 5600 to 7800 mg SO{sub 2} per m{sup 3} of dry flue gas. The Zittau technology is available in 3 variants: with maximum waste heat recovery, with partial waste heat recovery or without waste heat recovery and only wet flue gas scrubbing. Two flowsheets of flue gas and suspension circulation are provided. The first variant recovers 25.7% of nominal heat capacity (1.1 thermal MW from a 4.2 MW steam generator with 6.5 t/h steam capacity), the second variant recovers 6.5% of waste heat by reducing heat exchangers to 20% of the size of the first variant. Flue gas suspension scrubbing utilizes power plant ash, which is capable of absorbing 50 to 70% of SO{sub 2}, additional 25% SO{sub 2} removal is achieved by providing either 40% ash from another power plant or limestone for suspensions. Various technological details are included. 5 refs.

  2. Low-temperature nuclear heat applications: Nuclear power plants for district heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-08-01

    The IAEA reflected the needs of its Member States for the exchange of information in the field of nuclear heat application already in the late 1970s. In the early 1980s, some Member States showed their interest in the use of heat from electricity producing nuclear power plants and in the development of nuclear heating plants. Accordingly, a technical committee meeting with a workshop was organized in 1983 to review the status of nuclear heat application which confirmed both the progress made in this field and the renewed interest of Member States in an active exchange of information about this subject. In 1985 an Advisory Group summarized the Potential of Low-Temperature Nuclear Heat Application; the relevant Technical Document reviewing the situation in the IAEA's Member States was issued in 1986 (IAEA-TECDOC-397). Programme plans were made for 1986-88 and the IAEA was asked to promote the exchange of information, with specific emphasis on the design criteria, operating experience, safety requirements and specifications for heat-only reactors, co-generation plants and power plants adapted for heat application. Because of a growing interest of the IAEA's Member States about nuclear heat employment in the district heating domaine, an Advisory Group meeting was organized by the IAEA on ''Low-Temperature Nuclear Heat Application: Nuclear Power Plants for District Heating'' in Prague, Czechoslovakia in June 1986. The information gained up to 1986 and discussed during this meeting is embodied in the present Technical Document. 22 figs, 11 tabs

  3. District heating by the Bohunice nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metke, E.; Skvarka, P.

    1984-01-01

    Technical and economical aspects of district heating by the electricity generating nuclear plants in Czechoslovakia are discussed. As a first stage of the project, 240 MW thermal power will be supplied using bleeding lines steam from the B-2 nuclear power plant at Jaslovske Bohunice to heat up water at a central station to 130 grad C. The maximal thermal power that can be produced for district heating by WWER type reactors with regular condensation turbines is estimated to be: 465 MW for a WWER-440 reactor with two 220 MWe turbines and 950 MW for a WWER-1000 reactor with a Skoda made 1000 MWe turbine using a three-stage scheme to heat up water from 60 grad C to 150 grad C. The use of satelite heating turbines connected to the steam collector is expected to improve the efficiency. District heating needs will de taken into account for siting of the new power plants

  4. Nuclear reactor plant for production process heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, M.

    1979-01-01

    The high temperature reactor is suitable as a heat source for carrying out endothermal chemical processes. A heat exchanger is required for separating the reactor coolant gases and the process medium. The heat of the reactor is transferred at a temperature lower than the process temperature to a secondary gas and is compressed to give the required temperature. The compression energy is obtained from the same reactor. (RW) [de

  5. Device for district heating with utilization of waste heat from power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korek, J.

    1976-01-01

    In order to utilize the waste heat developing in power plants - especially in nuclear power plants - the author suggests to lead the waste heat of the coolers for oil (which the bearings are lubricated with), hydrogen (which serves for the stator rotor-cooling), and the stator cooling water to the circulating district heating water and to arrange these heat exchangers one behind another or parallel to each other in the water circuit of the district heating system. The oil cooler of the engine transformer is also connected with the circulation of the district heating water. The runback water of the district heating network could thus be heated from approx. 40 0 C up to 65 0 C. (UA) [de

  6. Heat supply from municipal solid waste incineration plants in Japan: Current situation and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabata, Tomohiro; Tsai, Peii

    2016-02-01

    The use of waste-to-energy technology as part of a municipal solid waste management strategy could reduce the use of fossil fuels and contribute to prevention of global warming. In this study, we examined current heat and electricity production by incineration plants in Japan for external use. Herein, we discuss specific challenges to the promotion of heat utilisation and future municipal solid waste management strategies. We conducted a questionnaire survey to determine the actual conditions of heat production by incineration plants. From the survey results, information of about 498 incineration plants was extracted. When we investigated the relationship between heat production for external use and population density where incineration plants were located, we found that regions with a population density situation. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Utilization of waste heat from nuclear power plants in agriculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horacek, P.

    1981-01-01

    The development of nuclear power will result in the relative and absolute increase in the amount of waste heat which can be used in agriculture for heating greenhouses, open spaces, for fish breeding in heated water, for growing edible mushrooms, growing algae, for frost protection of orchards, air conditioning of buildings for breeding livestock and poultry, and for other purposes. In addition of the positive effect of waste heat, the danger increases of disease, weeds and pests. Pilot plant installations should be build in Czechoslovakia for testing the development of waste heat utilization. (Ha)

  8. REDUCED HEATING LEVEL DURING THE END-OF-YEAR CLOSURE

    CERN Document Server

    ST/CV - ST/FM Groups

    2002-01-01

    To save on energy costs, the heating will once again be operating at a reduced level during the end-of-year closure of the Laboratory. We would ask all those in charge of premises where normal temperature have to be maintained to let us know by 19 December 2002 at the latest (tel. 74195 or 72201). ST/CV - ST/FM Groups

  9. REDUCED HEATING LEVEL DURING THE END-OF-YEAR CLOSURE

    CERN Multimedia

    ST/CV - ST/TFM Groupes

    2001-01-01

    To save on energy costs, the heating will once again be operating at a reduced level during the end-of-year closure of the Laboratory. We would ask all those in charge of premises where normal temperature have to be maintained to let us know by 20 December 2001 at the latest (tel.74195 or 72201).

  10. Reduced heating level during the end-of-year closure

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    To save on energy costs, the heating will once again be operating at a reduced level during the end-of-year closure of the Laboratory. We would ask all those in charge of premises where normal temperature have to be maintained to let us know by 18 December 2003 at the latest (tel. 74195 or 72201). ST/CV - ST/FM Groups

  11. Heat shock proteins of higher plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Key, J.L.; Lin, C.Y.; Chen, Y.M.

    1981-01-01

    The pattern of protein synthesis changes rapidly and dramatically when the growth temperture of soybean seedling tissue is increased from 28 0 C (normal) to about 40 0 C (heat shock). The synthesis of normal proteins is greatly decreased and a new set of proteins, heat shock proteins, is induced. The heat shock proteins of soybean consist of 10 new bands on one-dimensional NaDodSO 4 gels; a more complex pattern is observed on two-dimensional gels. when the tissue is returned to 28 0 C after 4 hr at 40 0 C, there is progressive decline in the synthesis of heat shock proteins and reappearance of a normal pattern of synthesis by 3 or 4 hr. In vitro translation of poly(A) + RNAs isolated from tissued grown at 28 and 40 0 C shows that the heat shock proteins are translated from a ndw set of mRNAs induced at 40 0 C; furthermore, the abundant class mRNAs for many of the normal proteins persist even though they are translated weakly (or not at all) in vivo at 40 or 42.5 0 C. The heat shock response in soybean appears similar to the much-studied heat shock phenomenon in Drosophila

  12. Firing with wood chips in heating and cogeneration plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kofman, P.D.

    1992-01-01

    The document was produced for use as detailed teaching material aimed at spreading information on the use of wood chips as fuel for heating and cogeneration plants. It includes information and articles on wood fuels generally, combustion values, chopping machines, suppliers, occupational health hazards connected with the handling of wood chips, measuring amounts, the selection of types, prices, ash, environmental aspects and information on the establishment of a wood-chip fired district heating plant. (AB)

  13. Central Heating Plant Coal Use Handbook. Volume 1: Technical Reference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-11-01

    CHUTES LIFT TRUCKS MONORAILS , TRAMWAYS J p WEIGHING, 0 MEASURING SCALES COAL METERS HOPPERS SAMPLERS 9 FIRING EQUIPMENT (Source: Power, February...Defense (DOD) installations employ coal- fired central energy plants, the U.S. Army Construction Engineering Research Laboratories (USACERL) was... fired central heat plant operations cost by improving coal quality specifications. The Handbook is tailored for military installation industrial

  14. Optimization of operation for combined heat and power plants - CHP plants - with heat accumulators using a MILP formulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grue, Jeppe; Bach, Inger [Aalborg Univ. (Denmark). Inst. of Energy Technology]. E-mails: jeg@iet.auc.dk; ib@iet.auc.dk

    2000-07-01

    The power generation system in Denmark is extensively based on small combined heat and power plants (CHP plants), producing both electricity and district heating. This project deals with smaller plants spread throughout the country. Often a heat accumulator is used to enable electricity production, even when the heat demand is low. This system forms a very complex problem, both for sizing, designing and operation of CHP plants. The objective of the work is the development of a tool for optimisation of the operation of CHP plants, and to even considering the design of the plant. The problem is formulated as a MILP-problem. An actual case is being tested, involving CHP producing units to cover the demand. The results from this project show that it is of major importance to consider the operation of the plant in detail already in the design phase. It is of major importance to consider the optimisation of the plant operation, even at the design stage, as it may cause the contribution margin to rise significantly, if the plant is designed on the basis of a de-tailed knowledge of the expected operation. (author)

  15. Focused cathode design to reduce anode heating during vircator operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynn, Curtis F.; Dickens, James C.; Neuber, Andreas A. [Center for Pulsed Power and Power Electronics, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Virtual cathode oscillators, or vircators, are a type of high power microwave device which operates based on the instability of a virtual cathode, or cloud of electrons, which forms when electron current injected into the drift tube exceeds the space charge limited current within the drift tube. Anode heating by the electron beam during vircator operation ultimately limits achievable pulse lengths, repetition rates, and the duration of burst mode operation. This article discusses a novel cathode design that focuses electrons through holes in the anode, thus significantly reducing anode heating by the electrons emitted from the cathode during the first transit through the A-K gap. Reflexing electrons continue to deposit energy on the anode; however, the discussed minimization of anode heating by main beam electrons has the potential to enable higher repetition rates as well as efficiency and longer diode lifetime. A simulation study of this type of cathode design illustrates possible advantages.

  16. After-heat removing device in nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizuno, K [Nippon Atomic Industry Group Co. Ltd., Tokyo

    1977-01-14

    Purpose: To prevent water hammer in a BWR type reactor or the like by moving water in pipe lines having stagnant portions in an after-heat removing device. Constitution: To a reactor container, is provided a recycling pump which constitutes a closed loop type recycling system in a nuclear power plant together with a pressure vessel and pipe lines. A pump and a heat exchanger are provided outside of the reactor container and they are connected to up- and down-streams of the recycling pump to form an after-heat removing device in the plant. Upon shutdown of the nuclear power plant, since water in the stagnant portion flows to the intake port of the recycling pump and water from the reactor is spontaneously supplemented thereafter to the stagnant portion, neither pressurized water nor heated steam is generated and thus water hammer is prevented.

  17. Desalination demonstration plant using nuclear heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanra, M.S.; Misra, B.M.

    1998-01-01

    Most of the desalination plants which are operating throughout the world utilize the energy from thermal power station which has the main disadvantage of polluting the environment due to combustion of fossil fuel and with the inevitable rise in prices of fossil fuel, nuclear driven desalination plants will become more economical. So it is proposed to set up nuclear desalination demonstration plant at the location of Madras Atomic Power Station (MAPS), Kalpakkam. The desalination plant will be of a capacity 6300 m 3 /day and based on both Multi Stage Flash (MSF) and Sea Water Reverse Osmosis (SWRO) processes. The MSF plant with performance ratio of 9 will produce water total dissolved solids (TDS-25 ppm) at a rate of 4500 m 3 /day from seawater of 35000 ppm. A part of this water namely 1000 m 3 /day will be used as Demineralised (DM) water after passing it through a mixed bed polishing unit. The remaining 3500 m 3 /day water will be mixed with 1800 m 3 /day water produced from the SWRO plant of TDS of 400 ppm and the same be supplied to industrial/municipal use. The sea water required for MSF and SWRO plants will be drawn from the intake/outfall system of MAPS which will also supply the required electric power pumping. There will be net 4 MW loss of power of MAPS namely 3 MW for MSF and 1 MW for SWRO desalination plants. The salient features of the project as well as the technical details of the both MSF and SWRO processes and its present status are given in this paper. It also contains comparative cost parameters of water produced by both processes. (author)

  18. Calculational tracking of decay heat for FFTF plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cillan, T.F.; Carter, L.L.

    1985-01-01

    A detailed calculational monitoring of decay heat for each assembly on the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) plant is obtained by utilizing a decay heat data base and user friendly computer programs to access the data base. Output includes the time-dependent decay heat for an assembly or a specific set of assemblies, and optional information regarding the curies of activated nuclides along the axial length of the assembly. The decay heat data base is updated periodically, usually at the end of each irradiation cycle. 1 ref., 2 figs

  19. Nuclear heat source component design considerations for HTGR process heat reactor plant concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, C.F.; Kapich, D.; King, J.H.; Venkatesh, M.C.

    1982-05-01

    The coupling of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) and a chemical process facility has the potential for long-term synthetic fuel production (i.e., oil, gasoline, aviation fuel, hydrogen, etc) using coal as the carbon source. Studies are in progress to exploit the high-temperature capability of an advanced HTGR variant for nuclear process heat. The process heat plant discussed in this paper has a 1170-MW(t) reactor as the heat source and the concept is based on indirect reforming, i.e., the high-temperature nuclear thermal energy is transported [via an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX)] to the externally located process plant by a secondary helium transport loop. Emphasis is placed on design considerations for the major nuclear heat source (NHS) components, and discussions are presented for the reactor core, prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV), rotating machinery, and heat exchangers

  20. Nuclear heat source design for an advanced HTGR process heat plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, C.F.; O'Hanlon, T.W.

    1983-01-01

    A high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) coupled with a chemical process facility could produce synthetic fuels (i.e., oil, gasoline, aviation fuel, methanol, hydrogen, etc.) in the long term using low-grade carbon sources (e.g., coal, oil shale, etc.). The ultimate high-temperature capability of an advanced HTGR variant is being studied for nuclear process heat. This paper discusses a process heat plant with a 2240-MW(t) nuclear heat source, a reactor outlet temperature of 950 0 C, and a direct reforming process. The nuclear heat source outputs principally hydrogen-rich synthesis gas that can be used as a feedstock for synthetic fuel production. This paper emphasizes the design of the nuclear heat source and discusses the major components and a deployment strategy to realize an advanced HTGR process heat plant concept

  1. Central solar heating plants with seasonal storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuard, D; Hadorn, J C; Van Gilst, J; Aranovitch, E; Hardacre, A G; Ofverholm, E [eds.

    1982-09-14

    On May 9, 1979, the Federal Department for Buildings released instructions concerning the use of alternative energies. The federal energy policy is to be as much as possible independent on oil imports. The canton Fribourg decided to equip the new maintenance and service center for the national high-road N12, with alternative energy, resources, and to apply new concepts with respect to passive and active solar energy. The project uses active solar energy with an earth-storage and heat pump. A conventional oil-heating system provides energy for peak-loads and can be operated in stand-by. A delay in the construction of the earth storage sub system was requested because it was intended to optimize the system with respect to the solar sub system, and heat pump sub system. The design work was done by SORANE which also is the coordinator for Switzerland in the I.E.A. Task VII. However, the preplanning of the project started in 1978 before the I.E.A. Task VII started. As a consequence, many design parameters were determined before 1980. The optimization of the solar collector, heat-pump etc. sub system was performed by a simulation approach developed by SORANE. The Vaulruz service center has been commissioned during the winter 1981/82.

  2. Nuclear power plant waste heat utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryther, J.H.; Huke, R.E.; Archer, J.C.; Price, D.R.; Jewell, W.J.; Hayes, T.D.; Witherby, H.R.

    1977-09-01

    The possibility of using Vermont Yankee condenser effluent for commercial food growth enhancement was examined. It was concluded that for the Vermont Yankee Nuclear Station, commercial success, both for horticulture and aquaculture endeavors, could not be assured without additional research in both areas. This is due primarily to two problems. First, the particularly low heat quality of our condenser discharge, being nominally 72 +- 2/sup 0/F; and second, to the capital intensive support systems. The capital needed for the support systems include costs of pumps, piping and controls to move the heated water to growing facilities and the costs of large, efficient heat exchangers that may be necessary to avoid regulatory difficulties due to the 1958 Delaney Amendment to the U.S. Food, Drug and Cosmetics Act. Recommendations for further work include construction of a permanent aquaculture research laboratory and a test greenhouse complex based on a greenhouse wherein a variety of heating configurations would be installed and tested. One greenhouse would be heated with biogas from an adjacent anaerobic digester thermally boosted during winter months by Vermont Yankee condenser effluent. The aquaculture laboratory would initially be dedicated to the Atlantic salmon restoration program. It appears possible to raise fingerling salmon to smolt size within 7 months using water warmed to about 60/sup 0/F. The growth rate by this technique is increased by a factor of 2 to 3. A system concept has been developed which includes an aqua-laboratory, producing 25,000 salmon smolt annually, a 4-unit greenhouse test horticulture complex and an 18,000 square foot commercial fish-rearing facility producing 100,000 pounds of wet fish (brook trout) per year. The aqualab and horticulture test complex would form the initial phase of construction. The trout-rearing facility would be delayed pending results of laboratory studies confirming its commercial viability.

  3. Nuclear power plant waste heat utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryther, J.H.; Huke, R.E.; Archer, J.C.; Price, D.R.; Jewell, W.J.; Hayes, T.D.; Witherby, H.R.

    1977-09-01

    The possibility of using Vermont Yankee condenser effluent for commercial food growth enhancement was examined. It was concluded that for the Vermont Yankee Nuclear Station, commercial success, both for horticulture and aquaculture endeavors, could not be assured without additional research in both areas. This is due primarily to two problems. First, the particularly low heat quality of our condenser discharge, being nominally 72 +- 2 0 F; and second, to the capital intensive support systems. The capital needed for the support systems include costs of pumps, piping and controls to move the heated water to growing facilities and the costs of large, efficient heat exchangers that may be necessary to avoid regulatory difficulties due to the 1958 Delaney Amendment to the U.S. Food, Drug and Cosmetics Act. Recommendations for further work include construction of a permanent aquaculture research laboratory and a test greenhouse complex based on a greenhouse wherein a variety of heating configurations would be installed and tested. One greenhouse would be heated with biogas from an adjacent anaerobic digester thermally boosted during winter months by Vermont Yankee condenser effluent. The aquaculture laboratory would initially be dedicated to the Atlantic salmon restoration program. It appears possible to raise fingerling salmon to smolt size within 7 months using water warmed to about 60 0 F. The growth rate by this technique is increased by a factor of 2 to 3. A system concept has been developed which includes an aqua-laboratory, producing 25,000 salmon smolt annually, a 4-unit greenhouse test horticulture complex and an 18,000 square foot commercial fish-rearing facility producing 100,000 pounds of wet fish (brook trout) per year. The aqualab and horticulture test complex would form the initial phase of construction. The trout-rearing facility would be delayed pending results of laboratory studies confirming its commercial viability

  4. Reduced heating level during the end-of-year closure

    CERN Document Server

    ST Department

    2007-01-01

    To save on energy costs, the heating will once again be operating at a reduced level during the end-of-year closure of the Laboratory. We would ask all those in charge of premises where normal temperatures have to be maintained to let us know by 14 December 2007 at the latest (tel. 72201 or 77777 or e-mail fm.support@cern.ch). TS/CV - TS/FM Groups

  5. Reduced heating level during the end-of-year closure

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    To save on energy costs, the heating will once again be operating at a reduced level during the end-of-year closure of the Laboratory. We would ask all those in charge of premises where normal temperature have to be maintained to let us know by 16 December 2004 at the latest (tel. 72201 or 77777 or e-mail fm.support@cern.ch.). TS/CV - TS/FM Groups

  6. Reduced heating level during the end-of-year closure

    CERN Document Server

    TS/CV-TS/FM Group

    2004-01-01

    To save on energy costs, the heating will once again be operating at a reduced level during the end-of-year closure of the Laboratory. We would ask all those in charge of premises where normal temperature have to be maintained to let us know by 16 December 2004 at the latest (tel. 72201 or 77777 or e-mail fm.support@cern.ch.).

  7. Reduced heating level during the end-of-year closure

    CERN Document Server

    TS Department

    2008-01-01

    To save on energy costs, the heating will once again be operating at a reduced level during the end-of-year closure of the Laboratory. We would ask all those in charge of premises where normal temperature have to be maintained to let us know by 12 December 2008 at the latest (tel. 72201 or 77777 or e-mail mailto:fm.support@cern.ch). TS/CV - TS/FM Groups

  8. Reduced heating level during the end-of-year closure

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    To save on energy costs, the heating will once again be operating at a reduced level during the end-of-year closure of the Laboratory. We would ask all those in charge of premises where normal temperature have to be maintained to let us know by 14 December 2007 at the latest (tel. 72201 or 77777 or e-mail mailto:fm.support@cern.ch). TS/CV - TS/FM Groups

  9. Reduced heating level during the end-of-year closure

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    To save on energy costs, the heating will once again be operating at a reduced level during the end-of-year closure of the Laboratory. We would ask all those in charge of premises where normal temperature has to be maintained to let us know by 15 December 2006 at the latest (tel. 72201 or 77777 or e-mail fm.support@cern.ch). TS/CV - TS/FM Groups

  10. Reduced heating level during the end-of-year closure

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    To save on energy costs, the heating will once again be operating at a reduced level during the end-of-year closure of the Laboratory. We would ask all those in charge of premises where normal temperature have to be maintained to let us know by 15 December 2006 at the latest (tel. 72201 or 77777 or e-mail fm.support@cern.ch). TS/CV - TS/FM Groups

  11. Reduced heating level during the end-of-year closure

    CERN Multimedia

    TS/CV Group

    2005-01-01

    To save on energy costs, the heating will once again be operating at a reduced level during the end-of-year closure of the Laboratory. We would ask all those in charge of premises where normal temperatures have to be maintained to let us know by 16 December 2005 at the latest (tel. 72201 or 77777 or e-mail fm.support@cern.ch). Groups TS/CV and TS/FM

  12. Prototype plant for nuclear process heat (PNP), reference phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fladerer, R.; Schrader, L.

    1982-07-01

    The coal gasification processes using nuclear process heat being developed within the framwork of the PNP project, have the advantages of saving feed coal, improving efficiency, reducing emissions, and stabilizing energy costs. One major gasification process is the hydrogasification of coal for producing SNG or gas mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen; this process can also be applied in a conventional route. The first steps to develop this process were planning, construction and operation of a semi-technical pilot plant for hydrogasification of coal in a fluidized bed having an input of 100 kg C/h. Before the completion of the development phase (reference phase) describing here, several components were tested on part of which no operational experience had so far been gained; these were the newly developed devices, e.g. the inclined tube for feeding coal into the fluidized bed, and the raw gas/hydrogenation gas heat exchanger for utilizing the waste heat of the raw gas leaving the gasifier. Concept optimizing of the thoroughly tested equipment parts led to an improved operational behaviour. Between 1976 and 1980, the semi-technical pilot plant was operated for about 19,400 hours under test conditions, more than 7,400 hours of which it has worked under gasification conditions. During this time approx. 1,100 metric tons of dry brown coal and more than 13 metric tons of hard coal were gasified. The longest coherent operational phase under gasification conditions was 748 hours in which 85.4 metric tons of dry brown coal were gasified. Carbon gasification rates up to 82% and methane contents in the dry raw gas (free of N 2 ) up to 48 vol.% were obtained. A detailed evaluation of the test results provided information of the results obtained previously. For the completion of the test - primarily of long-term tests - the operation of the semi-technical pilot plant for hydrogasification of coal is to be continued up to September 1982. (orig.) [de

  13. Heat extraction from turbines of Czechoslovak nuclear power plants for district heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drahy, J.

    1985-01-01

    Two design are described of SKODA extraction turbines for Czechoslovak nuclear power plants with WWER-440 and WWER-1000 reactors. 220 MW steam turbines were originally designed as pure condensation turbines with uncontrolled steam extraction. Optimal ways are now being sought for their use for heating hot water for district heating. For district heating of the town of Trnava, the nuclear power plant at Jaslovske Bohunice will provide a two-step heating of water from 70 to 120 degC with a heat supply of 60 MW th from one turbine unit. The ratio of obtained heat power to lost electric power is 5.08. Investigations showed the possibility of extracting 85 MW th of heat from uncontrolled steam extraction, this at three-step water heating from 60 to 145 degC, the ratio of gained and lost power being 7.14. Information is presented on the SKODA 220 MW turbine with steam extraction for heat supply purposes and on the 1000 MW turbine with 893 MW th heat extraction. The specifications of both types are given. (Pu)

  14. Large Combined Heat and Power Plants for Sustainable Energy System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Rasmus Søgaard; Mathiesen, Brian Vad

    . CHP (combined heat and power) plants in Denmark will change their role from base load production to balancing the fluctuation in renewable energy supply, such as wind power and at the same time they have to change to renewable energy sources. Some solutions are already being planned by utilities...... in Denmark; conversion of pulverised fuel plants from coal to wood pellets and a circulating fluidised bed (CFB) plant for wood chips. From scientific research projects another solution is suggested as the most feasible; the combined cycle gas turbine (CCGT) plant. In this study a four scenarios...

  15. A study of a small nuclear power plant system for district heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imamura, Mitsuru; Sato, Kotaro; Narabayashi, Tadashi; Shimazu, Yoichiro; Tsuji, Masashi

    2008-01-01

    We have studied nuclear power plant for district heating. Already some towns and villages in Hokkaido have requested small reactor for district heating. Using existing technology allows us to shorten development period and to keep a lid on development cost. We decided to develop new reactor based on 'MUTSU' reactor technology. 'MUTSU' had already proved its safety. And 'MUTSU' reactor was boron free reactor. It allows plant system to become more compact and simple. And load following capability by core reactivity become bigger. It means to reduce control rod movement. It leads to dependability enhancement. We calculated burn-up calculation of erbium addition fuel. In the result the core life became about 10 years. In the district heating system, there are not only district heating but also snow melting with warm water. It uses steam condenser's heat, which are only discharged now. This small plant has passive safety system. It is natural cooling of containment vessel. In case of loss of coolant accident, decay heat can remove by natural convection air cooling after 6 hours. Decay heat within 6 hours can remove by evaporative heat transfer of pool on containment vessel. (author)

  16. Application of heat in postcook meat chillers reduces Listeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eglezos, Sofroni; Dykes, Gary A

    2011-06-01

    Electrical air-blowing heaters were used to heat and dry out holding chillers used for postcook commercial processed meats in an attempt to control the presence of Listeria. A baseline study of the prevalence of Listeria in holding chillers in seven facilities was undertaken. Listeria was detected in four of the seven chillers, and swab samples showed Listeria prevalence ranging from 7 (7.8%) of 90 to 6 (20%) of 30, depending on the facility. Two of the facilities with established Listeria contamination (A and E) were chosen for further studies. The heating trials consisted of three individual heating interventions at each of the two facilities, with 2 weeks of postintervention sampling after each treatment. The initial Listeria prevalence in chiller A was 19 (10.6%) of 180, and treatment at 37°C for 36 h reduced prevalence to 3 (1.7%) of 180. The initial Listeria prevalence in chiller E was 7 (7.8%) of 90, and treatment at 50°C for 2 h reduced prevalence to 0 of 90. Both reductions were statistically significant at P prevalence of Listeria in chillers.

  17. Green roofs: roof system reducing heating and cooling costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konasova, Sarka

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Green roofs are among the passive building systems that contribute to the thermal stability of the rooms under the roof in both summer and winter. Green roofs can provide a significant contribution to the thermal balance of the protected space. Over the past ten years, many studies have been carried out to investigate the energy benefits of green roofs in terms of the energy performance of buildings. These studies show that the installation of vegetated cover can achieve energy savings for both winter heating and summer cooling. The green roof, as a thermal insulation, reduces the amount of building operating energy costs and reduces heat losses. This article summarizes current literature and points to situations in which green roofs can play an important role in saving energy for heating and cooling due to improved thermal insulating function of the roof, in case of extensive vegetation coverage without significant overloading of the roof structure and associated over-dimensioning. It is important to note that these energy savings always depend on the particular climate, the type of building and the availability and the type of roof structure.

  18. Environmental Assessment of a Central Heating Plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-02-01

    be critical for wildlife productivity. Nutrient content differs by plant species and vegetative part. Many interactions in the biotic community are...deposits which begin in the Cliffs Ridge area and run west to Negaunee. Concentrations of uranium which have higher readings than background can be found...manganese, aluminium , zinc and selen- ium (Ref. 10). kny effect on the ground-water quality would likely in- volve an increase in one or more of these

  19. Use of waste heat from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olszewski, M.

    1978-01-01

    The paper details the Department of Energy (DOE) program concerning utilization of power plant reject heat conducted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). A brief description of the historical development of the program is given and results of recent studies are outlined to indicate the scope of present efforts. A description of a DOE-sponsored project assessing uses for reject heat from the Vermont Yankee Nuclear Station is also given

  20. Heat integration of an Olefins Plant: Pinch Analysis and mathematical optimization working together

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Beninca

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This work explores a two-step, complexity reducing methodology, to analyze heat integration opportunities of an existing Olefins Plant, identify and quantify reduction of energy consumption, and propose changes of the existing heat exchanger network to achieve these goals. Besides the analysis of plant design conditions, multiple operational scenarios were considered to propose modifications for handling real plant operation (flexibility. On the strength of plant complexity and large dimension, work methodology was split into two parts: initially, the whole plant was evaluated with traditional Pinch Analysis tools. Several opportunities were identified and modifications proposed. Modifications were segregated to represent small and independent portions of the original process. One of them was selected to be re-analyzed, considering two scenarios. Reduction of problem dimension allowed mathematical methodologies (formulation with decomposition, applying LP, MILP and NLP optimization methods to synthesize flexible networks to be applied, generating a feasible modification capable of fulfilling the proposed operational scenarios.

  1. A study of a small nuclear power plant system for district heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imamura, Mitsuru; Sato, Kotaro; Narabayashi, Tadashi; Shimazu, Yoichiro; Tsuji, Masashi

    2009-01-01

    We have studied nuclear power plant for district heating. Already some towns and villages in Hokkaido have requested small reactor for district heating. Using existing technology allows us to shorten development period and to keep a lid on development cost. We decided to develop new reactor based on 'MUTSU' reactor technology because 'MUTSU' had already proved its safety. And this reactor was boron free reactor. It allows plant system to reduce the chemical control system. And moderator temperature coefficient is deeply negative. It means to improve its operability and leads to dependability enhancement. We calculated burn-up calculation of erbium addition fuel. In the result, the core life became about 10 years. And we adapt the cassette type refueling during outagein in order to maintain nonproliferation. In the district heating system, a double heat exchanger system enables to response to load change in season. To obtain the acceptance of public, this system has a leak prevention system of radioactive materials to public. And road heating system of low grade heat utilization from turbine condenser leads to improve the heat utilization efficiency. We carried out performance evaluation test of district heating pipeline. Then the heat loss of pipeline is estimated at about 0.440degC/km. This result meets general condition, which is about 1degC/km. This small plant has passive safety system. It is natural cooling of containment vessel. In case of loss of coolant accident, decay heat can remove by natural convection air cooling after 6 hours. Decay heat within 6 hours can remove by evaporative heat transfer of pool on containment vessel. (author)

  2. Nucleate Boiling Heat Transfer Studied Under Reduced-Gravity Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, David F.; Hasan, Mohammad M.

    2000-01-01

    Boiling is known to be a very efficient mode of heat transfer, and as such, it is employed in component cooling and in various energy-conversion systems. In space, boiling heat transfer may be used in thermal management, fluid handling and control, power systems, and on-orbit storage and supply systems for cryogenic propellants and life-support fluids. Recent interest in the exploration of Mars and other planets and in the concept of in situ resource utilization on the Martian and Lunar surfaces highlights the need to understand how gravity levels varying from the Earth's gravity to microgravity (1g = or > g/g(sub e) = or > 10(exp -6)g) affect boiling heat transfer. Because of the complex nature of the boiling process, no generalized prediction or procedure has been developed to describe the boiling heat transfer coefficient, particularly at reduced gravity levels. Recently, Professor Vijay K. Dhir of the University of California at Los Angeles proposed a novel building-block approach to investigate the boiling phenomena in low-gravity to microgravity environments. This approach experimentally investigates the complete process of bubble inception, growth, and departure for single bubbles formed at a well-defined and controllable nucleation site. Principal investigator Professor Vijay K. Dhir, with support from researchers from the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field, is performing a series of pool boiling experiments in the low-gravity environments of the KC 135 microgravity aircraft s parabolic flight to investigate the inception, growth, departure, and merger of bubbles from single- and multiple-nucleation sites as a function of the wall superheat and the liquid subcooling. Silicon wafers with single and multiple cavities of known characteristics are being used as test surfaces. Water and PF5060 (an inert liquid) were chosen as test liquids so that the role of surface wettability and the magnitude of the effect of interfacial tension on boiling in reduced

  3. Heat pipe air preheater for gas-/oil-fired power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira, D.P.

    1993-02-01

    With the rising costs of fuel, utilities are constantly looking for ways to improve the net plant heat rate of new and existing units. Significant heat rate improvements can be obtained by reducing the exit stack flue gas temperature. This project evaluated two technologies to reduce flue gas temperatures: heat pipes and liquid-coupled heat exchangers. The specific unit chosen for evaluating these systems was Pacific Gas ampersand Electric's 750 MW Moss Landing Power Plant, Unit 7. Both natural gas and low sulfur (0.5%) fuel oil are fired at this plant. Accordingly, the heat exchangers were required to operate on both fuels. This study investigated the heat recovery installation through the preliminary engineering level of detail. At the conclusion of this effort, the results indicated that neither concept was economically attractive for the retrofit situation involved. In addition, several major technical questions remained unresolved concerning the design of a single heat-exchange device capable of operating on gas (sulfur-free) and oil (sulfur-containing) environments over the full normal operating load range. While the technologies this study reviewed have been installed in actual power plant applications, the site-specific aspects of Moss Landing Unit 7 significantly influenced the estimated costs and performance of each alternative. Using more cost-effective and corrosion-resistant materials may help reduce costs. The following conditions would further enhance the viability of lowering exit gas temperatures: Higher capacity factors; rising fuel costs; greater use of sulfur-free fuels, such as natural gas; lower manufacturing costs for heat exchanger technologies; or new unit application

  4. 75 MW heat extraction from Beznau nuclear power plant (Switzerland)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handl, K.H.

    1998-01-01

    The district heat extraction system installed and commissioned at the Beznau Nuclear Power Plant 1983 and 1984 is working successfully since the beginning. Together with a six kilometres extension in 1994, the system now consists of a 35 kilometres main network and 85 kilometres of local distribution pipelines. The eight founding communities as well as three networks joined later have been connected. Today around 2160 consumers of the Refuna district heating, small and large private buildings, industrial and agricultural enterprises are supplied with heat from the Beznau plant (1997: 141'000 MWh). The regional district heat supply system has become an integrated part of the regional infrastructure for around 20'000 inhabitants of the lower Aare valley. Nearly 15 years of operational experience are confirming the success of the strict approval conditions for the housing connections. Remarkably deep return flow temperatures in the district heating network were leading to considerable reserves in the transport capacity of the main pipeline system. The impacts of the heat extraction from the Beznau nuclear power plant, in particular its contribution to the protection of the environment by substituting fossil fuels and preventing CO2-production, have been positive. (author)

  5. Selection of criterions of fuels incineration on heat power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bubnov, V.P.; Minchenko, E.M.; Zelenukho, E.V.

    2006-01-01

    Fuel and energy complex takes first place in industry field of cities and defines in many respects environmental situation of cities. The products of combustion of fuel bring the greatest contribution in environmental contamination. This factor is ignored during calculation of technical and economics indexes. Ecological impact of heat power plants on the environment is determined separately from assessment of ecological damage. Determination of optimal conditions of functioning of heat power plants incineration with respect to technical, economics and ecological indexes with use of multicriterion mathematics model is proposed. (authors)

  6. District heating plants in Europe: Recent experience and innovations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Comelli, G.

    1992-01-01

    This paper contains a critical review of recent experience and innovative features encountered in some European district heating plants. The increased application of cogeneration is pointed out, with reference to traditional, as well as, more recent technology which makes use of combined gas-steam cycles. An example of a combined gas-steam cycle is schematically described. The relevance of fluidized bed combustion and interconnection of heat distribution grids, and their consequences to the environmentally-safe and economical employment of the plants, are evidenced

  7. Waste-heat disposal from US geothermal power plants: An update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, R. C.

    1982-05-01

    Some of the more interesting and significant methods that are currently being studied in the US for reducing waste heat dissipation system costs and water consumption are: (1) allowing plant power output to vary with ambient conditions; (2) use of ammonia to transport waste heat from the turbine condenser to air-cooled coils; (3) development of a plastic-membrane type wet/dry tower; (4) marketing of steam turbines that can tolerate a wider range of back pressure; (5) use of circulating water storage to delay heat dissipation until more favorable conditions exist; (6) development of tubes with enhanced heat transfer surfaces to reduce condenser capital costs; and (7) use of evaporative condensers to reduce costs in binary cycles. Many of these projects involve large scale tests that are now fully installed and producing some preliminary data.

  8. Increased power to heat ratio of small scale CHP plants using biomass fuels and natural gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savola, Tuula; Fogelholm, Carl-Johan

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we present a systematic study of process changes for increased power production in 1-20 MW e combined heat and power (CHP) plants. The changes are simulated, and their economic feasibility evaluated by using existing small scale CHP case plants. Increasing power production in decentralised CHP plants that operate according to a certain heat demand could reduce the fuel consumption and CO 2 emissions per power unit produced and improve the feasibility of CHP plant investments. The CHP plant process changes were simulated under design and off design conditions and an analysis of power and heat production, investment costs and CO 2 emissions was performed over the whole annual heat demand. The results show that using biomass fuels, there are profitable possibilities to increase the current power to heat ratios, 0.23-0.48, of the small scale CHP plants up to 0.26-0.56, depending on the size of the plant. The profitable changes were a two stage district heat exchanger and the addition of a steam reheater and a feed water preheater. If natural gas is used as an additional fuel, the power to heat ratio may be increased up to 0.35-0.65 by integrating a gas engine into the process. If the CO 2 savings from the changes are also taken into account, the economic feasibility of the changes increases. The results of this work offer useful performance simulation and investment cost knowledge for the development of more efficient and economically feasible small scale CHP processes

  9. Dissipation of the reactor heat at the Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neill, J.S.; Babcock, D.F.

    1971-10-01

    The effluent cooling water from the heat exchangers of the Savannah River nuclear reactors is cooled by natural processes as it flows through the stream beds, canals, ponds, and swamps on the plant site. The Langhaar equation, which gives the rate of heat removal from the water surface as a function of the surface temperature, air temperature, relative humidity, and wind speed, is applied satisfactorily to calculate the cooling that occurs at all temperature levels and for all modes of water flow. The application of this equation requires an accounting of effects such as solar heating, shading, mixing, staging, stratification, underflow, rainfall, the imposed heat load, and the rate of change in heat content of the body of water

  10. Method of increased bioethanol concentration with reduced heat consumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bremers, G.; Blija, A.

    2003-01-01

    Ethanol dehydration applying method of non-reflux saline distillation was conduced on a laboratory scale and in bigger pilot equipment. Results make possible recommend new method for the increased of ethanol concentration. Heat consumption reduced by 50% and cooling water consumption by 90 % when the non-reflux distillation was applied. Reflux flow in the column is replacing with contact mass, which consist from saline layer and seclude medium. Basis diagram of ethanol non-reflux saline distillation was established. Distillation equipment and number of plates in the column can calculate using basis diagram. Absolute ethanol can obtain with non-reflux saline distillation. Absolute ethanol use in produce of biofuel (author)

  11. Large-Scale Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Generation at Loviisa Nuclear Power Plant Unit 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergroth, N.

    2010-01-01

    Fortum has applied for a Decision in Principle concerning the construction of a new nuclear power plant unit (Loviisa 3) ranging from 2800-4600 MWth at its site located at the southern coast of Finland. An attractive alternative investigated is a co-generation plant designed for large-scale district heat generation for the Helsinki metropolitan area that is located approximately 75 km west of the site. The starting point is that the district heat generation capacity of 3 unit would be around 1 000 MWth.The possibility of generating district heat for the metropolitan area by Loviisa's two existing nuclear power plant units was investigated back in the 1980s, but it proved unpractical at the time. With the growing concern of the climate change and the subsequent requirements on heat and power generation, the idea is much more attractive today, when recognising its potential to decrease Finland's carbon dioxide emissions significantly. Currently the district heat generation in metropolitan area is based on coal and natural gas, producing some five to seven million tonnes of carbon dioxide emissions annually. Large-scale combined heat and power (CHP) generation at the 3 unit could cut this figure by up to four million tonnes. This would decrease carbon dioxide emissions by as much as six percent. In addition, large-scale CHP generation would increase the overall efficiency of the new unit significantly and hence, reduce the environmental impact on the local marine environment by cutting heat discharges into the Gulf of Nuclear energy has been used for district heating in several countries both in dedicated nuclear heating plants and in CHP generation plants. However, the heat generation capacity is usually rather limited, maximum being around 250 MWth per unit. Set against this, the 3 CHP concept is much more ambitious, not only because of the much larger heat generation output envisaged, but also because the district heating water would have to be transported over a

  12. On usage of heat-condensation type nuclear heat-and-power plants with the TK type turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boldyrev, V.M.; Smirnov, I.A.; Fedyaev, A.V.; Khrilev, L.S.

    1978-01-01

    The problems of the efficiency of nuclear heat-and-plants (NHPP) in the heat-andpower energetics of the USSR are discussed. Most attention is centered on an NHPP of heat-condensation type equipped with constant steam flow turbines of the TK-450/500-60 and K-500-60 types and WWER-1000 reactors. According to the specially developed procedure, the problem of selecting the profile of a TK-type turbine, NHPP composition and applications are subjected to the technico-economic analysis. The distance to the urban area from a central heat-and-power plant utilizing organic and atomic fuel is adopted to be the same and equal to 5, 10 and 15 km, and the thermal load is variable between 500 and 7000 Gcal/hour (the share of hot water supply load in the total thermal load being 0.2). The heat supply system is open-circuited, the hot/return water temperatures being 150/70 deg C. The optimum calculated heat production factor for the NHPP does not exceed 0.7, and the optimum heat production values from controlled turbine outputs are within 500-600 Gcal/hour. The mininum thermal load, for which the NHPP with TK turbines is more effective than an organic fuel heat-and-power station, is about 1000-1500 Gcal/hour if cooling towers are used in the technical water supply system, and if it is possible to construct a water reservoir-cooler for the NHPP, this range is reduced to a thermal load level, at which the combined system becomes more effective than the separate power generation systems, i.e. to 500-600 Gcal/hour

  13. A new method for distribution of consumed heat in a fuel and costs in power and heating plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadrnozka, J [Technical Univ., Brno (Czech Republic)

    1993-09-01

    There is described a new method for distribution of consumed heat in a fuel and costs in the power and heating plants, which is based on the relatively the same proportion of advantages followed from combine generation of electricity and heat on electricity and heat. The method is physically substantiated, it is very universal and it is applied for new types of power and heating plants and for distribution of investment costs and other costs. (orig./GL)

  14. Valve arrangement for a nuclear plant residual heat removal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fidler, G.L.; Hill, R.A.; Carrera, J.P.

    1978-01-01

    Disclosed is an improved valve arrangement for a two-train Residual Heat Removal System (RHRS) of a nuclear reactor plant which ensures operational integrity of the system under single failure circumstances including loss of one of two electrical power sources

  15. EFFICIENCY AND LIFETIME OF SOLAR COLLECTORS FOR SOLAR HEATING PLANTS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The 12.5 m² flat plate solar collector HT, today marketed by Arcon Solvarme A/S, has been used in solar heating plants in Scandinavia since 1983. The collector is designed to operate in a temperature interval between 40°C and 90°C. The efficiency of the collector has been strongly improved since...... it was introduced on the market. The paper will present the increase of the efficiency of the collector due to technical improvements since 1983. Further, measurements from the spring of 2009 of the efficiency of two HT collectors, which have been in operation in the solar heating plant Ottrupgaard, Skørping......, Denmark since 1994 with a constant high flow rate and in the solar heating plant Marstal, Denmark since 1996 with a variable flow rate, will be presented. The efficiencies will be compared to the efficiencies of the collectors when they were first installed in the solar heating plants. The measurements...

  16. EFFICIENCY AND LIFETIME OF SOLAR COLLECTORS FOR SOLAR HEATING PLANTS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Jianhua; Chen, Ziqian; Furbo, Simon

    2009-01-01

    The 12.5 m² flat plate solar collector HT, today marketed by Arcon Solvarme A/S, has been used in solar heating plants in Scandinavia since 1983. The collector is designed to operate in a temperature interval between 40°C and 90°C. The efficiency of the collector has been strongly improved since...... it was introduced on the market. The paper will present the increase of the efficiency of the collector due to technical improvements since 1983. Further, measurements from the spring of 2009 of the efficiency of two HT collectors, which have been in operation in the solar heating plant Ottrupgaard, Skørping......, Denmark since 1994 with a constant high flow rate and in the solar heating plant Marstal, Denmark since 1996 with a variable flow rate, will be presented. The efficiencies will be compared to the efficiencies of the collectors when they were first installed in the solar heating plants. The measurements...

  17. Nuclear power and heating plant control rooms. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malaniuk, B.

    1983-01-01

    The questions are discussed of memory capacity, vigilance, speed of data processing, decision-making quality and other demands placed on operators of nuclear power and heating plants. On the example of the accident at the Three Mile Island-2 nuclear power plant, the instants are shown when failure of the human factor owing to a stress situation resulted in the accident not being coped with in time. It is therefore necessary to place high demands on the choice of operators and to devote equal attention to the human factor as to the safety of the technical equipment of the power plant. (J.B.)

  18. Cost-benefit analysis for combined heat and power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sazdovski, Ace; Fushtikj, Vangel

    2004-01-01

    The paper presents a methodology and practical application of Cost-Benefit Analysis for Combined Heat and Power Plant (Cogeneration facility). Methodology include up-to-date and real data for cogeneration plant in accordance with the trends ill development of the CHP technology. As a case study a CHP plant that could be built-up in Republic of Macedonia is analyzed. The main economic parameters for project evaluation, such as NPV and IRR are calculated for a number of possible scenarios. The analyze present the economic outputs that could be used as a decision for CHP project acceptance for investment. (Author)

  19. Aging management guideline for commercial nuclear power plants - heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booker, S.; Lehnert, D.; Daavettila, N.; Palop, E.

    1994-06-01

    This Aging Management Guideline (AMG) describes recommended methods for effective detection and mitigation of age-related degradation mechanisms in commercial nuclear power plant heat exchangers important to license renewal. The intent of this AMG is to assist plant maintenance and operations personnel in maximizing the safe, useful life of these components. It also supports the documentation of effective aging management programs required under the License Renewal Rule 10 CFR 54. This AMG is presented in a manner that allows personnel responsible for performance analysis and maintenance to compare their plant-specific aging mechanisms (expected or already experienced) and aging management program activities to the more generic results and recommendations presented herein

  20. Aging management guideline for commercial nuclear power plants - heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Booker, S.; Lehnert, D.; Daavettila, N.; Palop, E.

    1994-06-01

    This Aging Management Guideline (AMG) describes recommended methods for effective detection and mitigation of age-related degradation mechanisms in commercial nuclear power plant heat exchangers important to license renewal. The intent of this AMG is to assist plant maintenance and operations personnel in maximizing the safe, useful life of these components. It also supports the documentation of effective aging management programs required under the License Renewal Rule 10 CFR 54. This AMG is presented in a manner that allows personnel responsible for performance analysis and maintenance to compare their plant-specific aging mechanisms (expected or already experienced) and aging management program activities to the more generic results and recommendations presented herein.

  1. Prototype plant for nuclear process heat (PNP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duerrfeld, R.; Kraut-Giesen, G.

    1982-01-01

    1. Goals: Verification of owner's interests during experimental and engineering phase of nuclear coal gasification. 2. Method: 2.1 Witnessing and evaluating of experimental results from running test facilities. 2.2 Influencing experimental program. 2.3 Participation in important meetings of PNP-project. 3. Results: From present point of view the realization of nuclear coal gasification with a nuclear high temperature reactor (HTR) in accordance with the present technical status as well as meeting the existing safety regulations seems to be feasable. R+D-work will be needed for affirmation of design. The gasification of hard coal basing on the allothermal principal has proved to be possible. The examination of the gasifier on a pilot scale is not yet done. The design work for the pilot plant should be started immediately, particularly keeping in mind the decision for erection of PNP in 1990. The calculation of production costs in comparison to autothermal gasification processes is promising better economics, if uncertainties of investment calculation are deemed to be neglectable. (orig.) [de

  2. Theoretical Design of a Thermosyphon for Efficient Process Heat Removal from Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) for Production of Hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piyush Sabharwall; Fred Gunnerson; Akira Tokuhiro; Vivek Utgiker; Kevan Weaver; Steven Sherman

    2007-01-01

    The work reported here is the preliminary analysis of two-phase Thermosyphon heat transfer performance with various alkali metals. Thermosyphon is a device for transporting heat from one point to another with quite extraordinary properties. Heat transport occurs via evaporation and condensation, and the heat transport fluid is re-circulated by gravitational force. With this mode of heat transfer, the thermosyphon has the capability to transport heat at high rates over appreciable distances, virtually isothermally and without any requirement for external pumping devices. For process heat, intermediate heat exchangers (IHX) are required to transfer heat from the NGNP to the hydrogen plant in the most efficient way possible. The production of power at higher efficiency using Brayton Cycle, and hydrogen production requires both heat at higher temperatures (up to 1000 C) and high effectiveness compact heat exchangers to transfer heat to either the power or process cycle. The purpose for selecting a compact heat exchanger is to maximize the heat transfer surface area per volume of heat exchanger; this has the benefit of reducing heat exchanger size and heat losses. The IHX design requirements are governed by the allowable temperature drop between the outlet of the NGNP (900 C, based on the current capabilities of NGNP), and the temperatures in the hydrogen production plant. Spiral Heat Exchangers (SHE's) have superior heat transfer characteristics, and are less susceptible to fouling. Further, heat losses to surroundings are minimized because of its compact configuration. SHEs have never been examined for phase-change heat transfer applications. The research presented provides useful information for thermosyphon design and Spiral Heat Exchanger

  3. Chinese nuclear heating test reactor and demonstration plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Dazhong; Ma Changwen; Dong Duo; Lin Jiagui

    1992-01-01

    In this report the importance of nuclear district heating is discussed. From the viewpoint of environmental protection, uses of energy resources and transport, the development of nuclear heating in China is necessary. The development program of district nuclear heating in China is given in the report. At the time being, commissioning of the 5 MW Test Heating Reactor is going on. A 200 MWt Demonstration Plant will be built. In this report, the main characteristics of these reactors are given. It shows this type of reactor has a high inherent safety. Further the report points out that for this type of reactor the stability is very important. Some experimental results of the driving facility are included in the report. (orig.)

  4. Induction-heating MOCVD reactor with significantly improved heating efficiency and reduced harmful magnetic coupling

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Kuang-Hui; Alotaibi, Hamad S.; Sun, Haiding; Lin, Ronghui; Guo, Wenzhe; Torres-Castanedo, Carlos G.; Liu, Kaikai; Galan, Sergio V.; Li, Xiaohang

    2018-01-01

    In a conventional induction-heating III-nitride metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) reactor, the induction coil is outside the chamber. Therefore, the magnetic field does not couple with the susceptor well, leading to compromised heating efficiency and harmful coupling with the gas inlet and thus possible overheating. Hence, the gas inlet has to be at a minimum distance away from the susceptor. Because of the elongated flow path, premature reactions can be more severe, particularly between Al- and B-containing precursors and NH3. Here, we propose a structure that can significantly improve the heating efficiency and allow the gas inlet to be closer to the susceptor. Specifically, the induction coil is designed to surround the vertical cylinder of a T-shaped susceptor comprising the cylinder and a top horizontal plate holding the wafer substrate within the reactor. Therefore, the cylinder coupled most magnetic field to serve as the thermal source for the plate. Furthermore, the plate can block and thus significantly reduce the uncoupled magnetic field above the susceptor, thereby allowing the gas inlet to be closer. The results show approximately 140% and 2.6 times increase in the heating and susceptor coupling efficiencies, respectively, as well as a 90% reduction in the harmful magnetic flux on the gas inlet.

  5. Induction-heating MOCVD reactor with significantly improved heating efficiency and reduced harmful magnetic coupling

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Kuang-Hui

    2018-02-23

    In a conventional induction-heating III-nitride metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) reactor, the induction coil is outside the chamber. Therefore, the magnetic field does not couple with the susceptor well, leading to compromised heating efficiency and harmful coupling with the gas inlet and thus possible overheating. Hence, the gas inlet has to be at a minimum distance away from the susceptor. Because of the elongated flow path, premature reactions can be more severe, particularly between Al- and B-containing precursors and NH3. Here, we propose a structure that can significantly improve the heating efficiency and allow the gas inlet to be closer to the susceptor. Specifically, the induction coil is designed to surround the vertical cylinder of a T-shaped susceptor comprising the cylinder and a top horizontal plate holding the wafer substrate within the reactor. Therefore, the cylinder coupled most magnetic field to serve as the thermal source for the plate. Furthermore, the plate can block and thus significantly reduce the uncoupled magnetic field above the susceptor, thereby allowing the gas inlet to be closer. The results show approximately 140% and 2.6 times increase in the heating and susceptor coupling efficiencies, respectively, as well as a 90% reduction in the harmful magnetic flux on the gas inlet.

  6. Plant genotypic diversity reduces the rate of consumer resource utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArt, Scott H; Thaler, Jennifer S

    2013-07-07

    While plant species diversity can reduce herbivore densities and herbivory, little is known regarding how plant genotypic diversity alters resource utilization by herbivores. Here, we show that an invasive folivore--the Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica)--increases 28 per cent in abundance, but consumes 24 per cent less foliage in genotypic polycultures compared with monocultures of the common evening primrose (Oenothera biennis). We found strong complementarity for reduced herbivore damage among plant genotypes growing in polycultures and a weak dominance effect of particularly resistant genotypes. Sequential feeding by P. japonica on different genotypes from polycultures resulted in reduced consumption compared with feeding on different plants of the same genotype from monocultures. Thus, diet mixing among plant genotypes reduced herbivore consumption efficiency. Despite positive complementarity driving an increase in fruit production in polycultures, we observed a trade-off between complementarity for increased plant productivity and resistance to herbivory, suggesting costs in the complementary use of resources by plant genotypes may manifest across trophic levels. These results elucidate mechanisms for how plant genotypic diversity simultaneously alters resource utilization by both producers and consumers, and show that population genotypic diversity can increase the resistance of a native plant to an invasive herbivore.

  7. Heat integration of fractionating systems in para-xylene plants based on column optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Ting; Zhang, Bingjian; Chen, Qinglin

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the optimization of xylene fractionation and disproportionation units in a para-xylene plant is performed through a new method for systematic design based on GCC (grand composite curve) and CGCC (column grand composite curve). The distillation columns are retrofitted by CGCC firstly. Heat Integration between the columns and the background xylene separation process are then explored by GCC. We found that potential retrofits for columns suggested by CGCC provide better possibilities for further Heat Integration. The effectiveness of the retrofits is finally evaluated by means of thermodynamics and economic analysis. The results show that energy consumption of the retrofitted fractionating columns decreases by 7.13 MW. With the improved thermodynamic efficiencies, all columns operate with less energy requirements. Coupled with Heat Integration, the energy input of the para-xylene plant is reduced by 30.90 MW, and the energy outputs are increased by 17 MW and 58 MW for generation of the 3.5 MPa and 2.5 MPa steams. The energy requirement after the Heat Integration is reduced by 12% compared to the original unit. The retrofits required a fixed capital cost of 6268.91 × 10 3  $ and saved about 24790.74 × 10 3  $/year worth of steam. The payback time is approximately 0.26 year for the retrofits. - Highlights: • A new method for systematic design is proposed to improve energy saving of the PX plant in retrofit scenarios. • An optimization approach is developed to identify maximum heat recovery in distillation columns. • An efficient Heat Integration procedure of the PX plant is addressed based on the optimal retrofitted distillation columns. • The energy consumption is reduced by 12% after improvement to an industrial case

  8. Considerations upon the possibility of abating the pollution produced by power and heat plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ataman, E.

    1992-01-01

    Power and heat plants that burn fossil fuel in conventional boilers are among the most important man-made stationary emission sources. A review is done concerning the current possibilities to cut pollution mainly by reducing emissions at stack. Concerning the emissions of sulfur and nitrogen oxides, it is argued that at present the most viable and efficient solution for reducing the pollution from the fossil fuel power plants in Romania would be the importation of high technology and catalysts. On the other hand, replacement of classical boilers by fluidized bed combustors with circulating fuel additives would solve totally the problem of SO 2 and NO x emissions. (author)

  9. Nuclear heat source component design considerations for HTGR process heat reactor plant concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, C.F.; Kapich, D.; King, J.H.; Venkatesh, M.C.

    1982-01-01

    Using alternate energy sources abundant in the U.S.A. to help curb foreign oil imports is vitally important from both national security and economic standpoints. Perhaps the most forwardlooking opportunity to realize national energy goals involves the integrated use of two energy sources that have an established technology base in the U.S.A., namely nuclear energy and coal. The coupling of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) and a chemical process facility has the potential for long-term synthetic fuel production (i.e., oil, gasoline, aviation fuel, hydrogen, etc.) using coal as the carbon source. Studies are in progress to exploit the high-temperature capability of an advanced HTGR variant for nuclear process heat. The process heat plant discussed in this paper has a 1170-MW(t) reactor as the heat source and the concept is based on indirect reforming, i.e., the high-temperature nuclear thermal energy is transported (via an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX)) to the externally located process plant by a secondary helium transport loop. Emphasis is placed on design considerations for the major nuclear heat source (NHS) components, and discussions are presented for the reactor core, prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV), rotating machinery, and heat exchangers

  10. Heat Transfer and Latent Heat Storage in Inorganic Molten Salts for Concentrating Solar Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathur, Anoop [Terrafore Inc.

    2013-08-14

    A key technological issue facing the success of future Concentrating Solar Thermal Power (CSP) plants is creating an economical Thermal Energy Storage (TES) system. Current TES systems use either sensible heat in fluids such as oil, or molten salts, or use thermal stratification in a dual-media consisting of a solid and a heat-transfer fluid. However, utilizing the heat of fusion in inorganic molten salt mixtures in addition to sensible heat , as in a Phase change material (PCM)-based TES, can significantly increase the energy density of storage requiring less salt and smaller containers. A major issue that is preventing the commercial use of PCM-based TES is that it is difficult to discharge the latent heat stored in the PCM melt. This is because when heat is extracted, the melt solidifies onto the heat exchanger surface decreasing the heat transfer. Even a few millimeters of thickness of solid material on heat transfer surface results in a large drop in heat transfer due to the low thermal conductivity of solid PCM. Thus, to maintain the desired heat rate, the heat exchange area must be large which increases cost. This project demonstrated that the heat transfer coefficient can be increase ten-fold by using forced convection by pumping a hyper-eutectic salt mixture over specially coated heat exchanger tubes. However,only 15% of the latent heat is used against a goal of 40% resulting in a projected cost savings of only 17% against a goal of 30%. Based on the failure mode effect analysis and experience with pumping salt at near freezing point significant care must be used during operation which can increase the operating costs. Therefore, we conclude the savings are marginal to justify using this concept for PCM-TES over a two-tank TES. The report documents the specialty coatings, the composition and morphology of hypereutectic salt mixtures and the results from the experiment conducted with the active heat exchanger along with the lessons learnt during

  11. Optimizing Waste Heat Utilization in Vehicle Bio-Methane Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Zhen

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Current vehicle bio-methane plants have drawbacks associated with high energy consumption and low recovery levels of waste heat produced during the gasification process. In this paper, we have optimized the performance of heat exchange networks using pinch analysis and through the introduction of heat pump integration technology. Optimal results for the heat exchange network of a bio-gas system producing 10,000 cubic meters have been calculated using a pinch point temperature of 50 °C, a minimum heating utility load of 234.02 kW and a minimum cooling utility load of 201.25 kW. These optimal parameters are predicted to result in energy savings of 116.08 kW (19.75%, whilst the introduction of new heat pump integration technology would afford further energy savings of 95.55 kW (16.25%. The combined energy saving value of 211.63 kW corresponds to a total energy saving of 36%, with economic analysis revealing that these reforms would give annual savings of 103,300 USD. The installation costs required to introduce these process modifications are predicted to require an initial investment of 423,200 USD, which would take 4.1 years to reach payout time based on predicted annual energy savings.

  12. Assessment of Effectiveness of Cool Coat in Reducing Heat Strain among Workers in Steel Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parameswarappa, S B; Narayana, J

    2017-01-01

    A research study was conducted to assess the effectiveness of cool coat in reducing heat strain among workers exposed to heat in a steel plant located in south India. The study consists of assessing heat strain of workers exposed to heat in a steel plant by measuring physiological reactions of workers such as pulse rate and core body temperature with and without cool coat. The coal coat taken for this study was procured from M/s Yamuna Industries, Noida. Out of 140 employees exposed to heat hazard, 101 employees were examined in this study. Study was done in important production units in steel plant having heat hazard. Workers were interviewed and examined and information regarding thermal comfort was collected. First, the heat strain was assessed when the workers were not using cool coats. The air temperature was measured at all hot zone workplaces and found in the range of 34 0 C to 39.4 0 C (Mean: 36.54 0 C & S.D: 1.54). Physiological response such as core body temperature, pulse rate and blood pressure of workers exposed to heat hazard were measured before & after work to know the heat strain sustained by workers when they were working. Maximum core body temperature after work was found to be 39.3 0 C (Mean; 38.52 & S.D; 0.7). Maximum pulse rate of workers after work was found to be 120 beats/minute (Mean; 94.96 beats/minute, S.D: 13.11). The study indicate core body temperature of workers was found more than the permissible exposure limit prescribed by ACGIH, indicating the heat strain sustained by workers is significant, whereas the pulse rate and blood pressure was found normal & not exceeded the limits. Second, with cool coat, the heat strain was assessed among 10 workers selected from the 101 employees. Core body temperature was measured before and soon after work, The core body temperature recorded soon after work was in the range of 35.5 - 37.20C (Mean 36.36, SD= 0.52), indicating a drop in the core body temperature. In this study, a core body

  13. A dynamic analysis of interfuel substitution for Swedish heating plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braennlund, R.; Lundgren, T.

    2000-01-01

    This paper estimates a dynamic model of interfuel substitution for Swedish heating plants. We use the cost share linear logit model developed by Considine and Mount. All estimated own-price elasticities are negative and all cross-price elasticities are positive. The estimated dynamic adjustment rate parameter is small, however increasing with the size of the plant and time, indicating fast adjustments in the fuel mix when changing relative fuel prices. The estimated model is used to illustrate the effects of two different policy changes

  14. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Intermediate Heat Exchanger Acquisition Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizia, Ronald Eugene [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2008-04-01

    DOE has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 900°C to 950°C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed reactor, and use low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while at the same time setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. The purpose of this report is to address the acquisition strategy for the NGNP Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX).This component will be operated in flowing, impure helium on the primary and secondary side at temperatures up to 950°C. There are major high temperature design, materials availability, and fabrication issues that need to be addressed. The prospective materials are Alloys 617, 230, 800H and X, with Alloy 617 being the leading candidate for the use at 950°C. The material delivery schedule for these materials does not pose a problem for a 2018 start up as the vendors can quote reasonable delivery times at the moment. The product forms and amount needed must be finalized as soon as possible. An

  15. Straw fired district heating plants in Denmark. Facts and figures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-05-01

    A series of analyses and comparisons of technical, operational and financial and environmental conditions relating to straw-fired district heating and cogeneration plants in Denmark during the period of May 1993 to June 1995. The report provides an insight into the potentials of straw as a source of energy, particularly in the case of countries where the cultivation of cereals represents a major part of the agricultural economy. (AB)

  16. Heat exchangers for automotive gas turbine power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penny, R.N.

    1974-01-01

    Automotive gas turbine power plants are now in the final stages of development for quantity manufacture. A crucial factor in this development is the regenerative heat exchanger. The relative merits of the rotary regenerative and static recuperative heat exchanger are compared. Thermal efficiency and initial cost are two vital issues involved in the design of small gas turbines for the commercial establishment of gas turbine vehicles. The selection of a material for the rotaty regenerator is essentially related to resolving the two vital issues of future small gas turbines and is, therefore, analysed. The account of the pioneering work involved in engineering the glass ceramic and other non-metal regenerators includes a complete failure analysis based on running experience with over 200 ceramic regenerators. The problems of sealing, supporting and manufacturing the ceramic regenerator are discussed and future practical designs are outlined. Heat exchange theory applied to small gas turbines is also reviewed

  17. Application of heat stress in situ demonstrates a protective role of irradiation on photosynthetic performance in alpine plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchner, Othmar; Stoll, Magdalena; Karadar, Matthias; Kranner, Ilse; Neuner, Gilbert

    2015-04-01

    The impact of sublethal heat on photosynthetic performance, photosynthetic pigments and free radical scavenging activity was examined in three high mountain species, Rhododendron ferrugineum, Senecio incanus and Ranunculus glacialis using controlled in situ applications of heat stress, both in darkness and under natural solar irradiation. Heat treatments applied in the dark reversibly reduced photosynthetic performance and the maximum quantum efficiency of photosystem II (Fv /Fm), which remained impeded for several days when plants were exposed to natural light conditions subsequently to the heat treatment. In contrast, plants exposed to heat stress under natural irradiation were able to tolerate and recover from heat stress more readily. The critical temperature threshold for chlorophyll fluorescence was higher under illumination (Tc (')) than in the dark (Tc). Heat stress caused a significant de-epoxidation of the xanthophyll cycle pigments both in the light and in the dark conditions. Total free radical scavenging activity was highest when heat stress was applied in the dark. This study demonstrates that, in the European Alps, heat waves can temporarily have a negative impact on photosynthesis and, importantly, that results obtained from experiments performed in darkness and/or on detached plant material may not reliably predict the impact of heat stress under field conditions. © 2014 The Authors. Plant, Cell & Environment published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Solar Panels reduce both global warming and Urban Heat Island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéry eMasson

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The production of solar energy in cities is clearly a way to diminish our dependency to fossil fuels, and is a good way to mitigate global warming by lowering the emission of greenhouse gases. However, what are the impacts of solar panels locally ? To evaluate their influence on urban weather, it is necessary to parameterize their effects within the surface schemes that are coupled to atmospheric models. The present paper presents a way to implement solar panels in the Town Energy Balance scheme, taking account of the energy production (for thermal and photovoltaic panels, the impact on the building below and feedback towards the urban micro-climate through radiative and convective fluxes. A scenario of large but realistic deployment of solar panels on the Paris metropolitan area is then simulated. It is shown that solar panels, by shading the roofs, slightly increases the need for domestic heating (3%. In summer however, the solar panels reduce the energy needed for air-conditioning (by 12% and also the Urban Heat Island (UHI: 0.2K by day and up to 0.3K at night. These impacts are larger than those found in previous works, because of the use of thermal panels (that are more efficient than photovoltaic panels and the geographical position of Paris, which is relatively far from the sea. This means that it is not influenced by sea breezes, and hence that its UHI is stronger than for a coastal city of the same size. But this also means that local adaptation strategies aiming to decrease the UHI will have more potent effects. In summary, the deployment of solar panels is good both globally, to produce renewable energy (and hence to limit the warming of the climate and locally, to decrease the UHI, especially in summer, when it can constitute a health threat.

  19. Satellite combined heat and power plants and their legal autonomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loibl, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    Since the landmark decision by the German Court of Justice concerning the term ''plant'' in the context of biogas plants it should be clear beyond doubt that satellite combined heat and power plants (CHPs) are legally autonomous plants pursuant to Para. 3 No. 1 of the Renewable Energy Law (EEG). What has yet to be finally resolved are the conditions under which satellite CHPs are to be regarded as autonomous. This will be a question of distance on the one hand and of operation autonomy on the other. In the individual case both these factors will have to be assessed from the perspective of an average objective, informed citizen. To the extent that its heat and electricity are being utilised in a meaningful manner, the plant's autonomy will be beyond doubt, at least in operational terms. Regarding the remuneration to be paid for satellite CHPs the only case requiring special consideration is when a CHP falls under the EEG of 2012. In this case Para. 1 Section 1 Sentence 2 EEG provides that the remuneration for the CHP in question is to be calculated as if there was a single overall plant. To the extent that none of the CHPs fall under the EEG of 2012, the ruling remains that there is a separate entitlement to remuneration for each satellite CHP. This also holds in cases where satellite CHPs that were commissioned after 1 January 2012 are relocated. When a satellite CHP is replaced by a new one, the rate and duration of remuneration remain unchanged. However, when a new satellite CHP is added to an existing satellite CHP via a gas collector line it is to be treated according to the decisions of the Federal Court of Justice concerning biogas plant extensions: It falls under the law that applies to the existing CHP and has an entitlement to a new minimum remuneration period, albeit subject to the degression rate provided by the EEG version in question.

  20. Small-Scale Combined Heat and Power Plants Using Biofuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salomon-Popa, Marianne [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Energy Technology

    2002-11-01

    In this time period where energy supply and climate change are of special concern, biomass-based fuels have attracted much interest due to their plentiful supply and favorable environmental characteristics (if properly managed). The effective capture and continued sustainability of this renewable resource requires a new generation of biomass power plants with high fuel energy conversion. At the same time, deregulation of the electricity market offers new opportunities for small-scale power plants in a decentralized scheme. These two important factors have opened up possibilities for small-scale combined heat and power (CHP) plants based on biofuels. The objective of this pre-study is to assess the possibilities and technical limitations for increased efficiency and energy utilization of biofuels in small size plants (approximately 10 MWe or lower). Various energy conversion technologies are considered and proven concepts for large-scale fossil fuel plants are an especially important area. An analysis has been made to identify the problems, technical limitations and different possibilities as recognized in the literature. Beyond published results, a qualitative survey was conducted to gain first-hand, current knowledge from experts in the field. At best, the survey results together with the results of personal interviews and a workshop on the role of small-scale plants in distributed generation will serve a guideline for future project directions and ideas. Conventional and novel technologies are included in the survey such as Stirling engines, combustion engines, gas turbines, steam turbines, steam motors, fuel cells and other novel technologies/cycles for biofuels. State-of-the-art heat and power plants will be identified to clarify of the advantages and disadvantages as well as possible obstacles for their implementation.

  1. YAG laser cladding to heat exchanger flange in actual plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toshio, Kojima

    2001-01-01

    This paper is a sequel to ''Development of YAG Laser Cladding Technology to Heat Exchanger Flange'' presented in ICONE-8. A YAG Laser cladding technology is a permanent repairing and preventive maintenance method for heat exchanger's flange (channel side) seating surface which is degraded by the corrosion in long term operation. The material of this flange is carbon steel, and that of cladding wire is type 316 stainless steel so as to have high corrosion resistance. In former paper above, the soundness of cladding layers were presented to be verified. This channel side flange is bolted with tube sheet (shell side) through metal gasket. As the tube sheet side is already cladded a corrosion resistant material, it needs to apply the repairing and preventive maintenance method to only channel side. In 2000 this technology had been performed to the actual heat exchanger (Residual Heat Removal Heat Exchanger; RHR Hx) flange in domestic nuclear power plant. This paper described the outline, special equipment, and our total evaluation for this actual laser cladding work. And also several technical subjects which we should solve and/or improve for the next project was presented. (author)

  2. New Configurations of Micro Plate-Fin Heat Sink to Reduce Coolant Pumping Power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolaei, Alireza Rezania; Rosendahl, Lasse

    2012-01-01

    the optimum heat sink configuration. The particular focus of this study is to reduce the coolant mass flow rate by considering the thermal resistances of the heat sinks and, thereby, to reduce the coolant pumping power in the system. The threedimensional governing equations for the fluid flow and the heat......The thermal resistance of heat exchangers has a strong influence on the electric power produced by a thermoelectric generator (TEG). In this work, a real TEG device is applied to three configurations of micro plate-fin heat sink. The distance between certain microchannels is varied to find...... heat sink configurations reduces the coolant pumping power in the system....

  3. Thermo-economic optimization of a hybrid solar district heating plant with flat plate collectors and parabolic trough collectors in series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Zhiyong; Perers, Bengt; Furbo, Simon

    2018-01-01

    heating network in this study. The results also show that parabolic trough collectors are economically feasible for district heating networks in Denmark. The generic and multivariable levelized cost of heat method can guide engineers and designers on the design, construction and control of large...... to optimize the hybrid solar district heating systems based on levelized cost of heat. It is found that the lowest net levelized cost of heat of hybrid solar heating plants could reach about 0.36 DKK/kWh. The system levelized cost of heat can be reduced by 5–9% by use of solar collectors in the district...

  4. Plant biology in reduced gravity on the Moon and Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, J Z

    2014-01-01

    While there have been numerous studies on the effects of microgravity on plant biology since the beginning of the Space Age, our knowledge of the effects of reduced gravity (less than the Earth nominal 1 g) on plant physiology and development is very limited. Since international space agencies have cited manned exploration of Moon/Mars as long-term goals, it is important to understand plant biology at the lunar (0.17 g) and Martian levels of gravity (0.38 g), as plants are likely to be part of bioregenerative life-support systems on these missions. First, the methods to obtain microgravity and reduced gravity such as drop towers, parabolic flights, sounding rockets and orbiting spacecraft are reviewed. Studies on gravitaxis and gravitropism in algae have suggested that the threshold level of gravity sensing is around 0.3 g or less. Recent experiments on the International Space Station (ISS) showed attenuation of phototropism in higher plants occurs at levels ranging from 0.l g to 0.3 g. Taken together, these studies suggest that the reduced gravity level on Mars of 0.38 g may be enough so that the gravity level per se would not be a major problem for plant development. Studies that have directly considered the impact of reduced gravity and microgravity on bioregenerative life-support systems have identified important biophysical changes in the reduced gravity environments that impact the design of these systems. The author suggests that the current ISS laboratory facilities with on-board centrifuges should be used as a test bed in which to explore the effects of reduced gravity on plant biology, including those factors that are directly related to developing life-support systems necessary for Moon and Mars exploration. © 2013 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  5. First Experience from the World Largest fully commercial Solar Heating Plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heller, Alfred; Furbo, Simon

    1997-01-01

    The first experience from the largest solar heating plant in the world is given. The plant is situated in Marstal and is has a total area of 8000 square m.......The first experience from the largest solar heating plant in the world is given. The plant is situated in Marstal and is has a total area of 8000 square m....

  6. Design precautions for coupling interfaces between nuclear heating reactor and heating grid or desalination plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Wenxiang

    1998-01-01

    Nuclear heating reactor (NHR) has been developed by INET since the early eighties. To achieve its economic viability and safety goal, the NHR is designed with a number of advanced and innovative features, including integrated arrangement, natural circulation, self-pressurized performance, dynamically hydraulic control rod drive and passive safety systems. As a new promising energy system, the NHR can serve for district heating, air conditioning, sea-water desalination and other industrial processes. For all of these applications, it is vital that the design and performance of the coupling interfaces shall insure protection of user ends against radioactive contamination. Therefore, an intermediate circuit is provided in the NHR as a physical barrier, and the operating pressure in the intermediate circuit is higher than that in the primary system. In addition, the radioactivity in the intermediate circuit is monitored continuously, and there are also other protection measures in the design for isolating the intermediate circuit and the heating grid or desalination plant under some emergency conditions. The excellent performance of the above design precautions for the coupling interfaces has been demonstrated by operational practice from the NHR-5, a 5 MW(thermal) experimental NHR, which was put into operation in 1989. This paper presents the main design features of the NHR as well as the special provisions taken in the design for coupling the NHR to the heating grid or desalination plant and some operating experience from the NHR-5. (author)

  7. Studying effect of heating plant parameters on performances of a geothermal-fuelled series cogeneration plant based on Organic Rankine Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habka, Muhsen; Ajib, Salman

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We analyzed performances of a series ORC–CHP plant versus the heating plant parameters. • ORC–CHP power is destructed when raising the heat demand or the return temperature. • Only the high supply temperatures of the heating plant affect negatively the performances. • Reducing the return temperature optimizes both the energetic and exergetic criteria. • Increasing the heat demand improves the exergetic efficiency of the total CHP system. - Abstract: The present work aims to analyze the performance characteristics of the series Combined Heat and Power (CHP) system based on Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) under influence of the heating plant parameters without considering the chemistry of the geothermal water considered as heat source. For evaluation, energetic and exergetic criteria along with the heat transfer capacities have been determined, and also the working fluid R134a has been used. The results showed that increasing the heat demand or the return temperature and only the high supply temperatures lead to destruct the net power generated by the ORC–CHP system. While, influence of the last parameters on the total exergy efficiency and losses is different; whereas raising the heat demands optimizes these exergetic indicators, variation of the supply temperature leads to an optimum for these performances. Since increasing the return temperature has purely negative impacts on all exergetic and energetic criteria, the latter can be improved by reducing this temperature with attention to the heat transfer capacities. Thus, reduction of the return temperature about 5 °C lowers the exhausted stream losses by app. 25% and enhances the power generation by app. 52% and the total exergy efficiency by 9%

  8. CONTAIN calculations of direct containment heating in the Surry plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, D.C.; Louie, D.L.Y.

    1988-01-01

    The draft NUREG-1150 risk analysis performed for the Surry plant identified direct containment heating (DCH) as a potentially dominant contributor to the total public risk associated with this plant. At that time, however, detailed mechanistic calculations of DCH loads were unavailable. Subsequently, a series of analyses of DCH scenarios using the CONTAIN-DCH code was performed in order to put the treatment of DCH on a firmer basis in the final draft of NUREG-1150. The present paper describes some of the results obtained for the Surry plant. A developmental model for DCH has been incorporated into CONTAIN code. This model includes mechanistic treatments of reasonably well-understood phenomena (e.g., heat and mass transfer), together with a parametric treatment of poorly understood phenomena for which mechanistic models are unavailable (e.g., debris de-entrainment from the gas stream due to debris-structure interactions). The DCH model was described in an earlier report, but the present version incorporates a number of advances, including treatment of the chemical equilibria involved in the iron-steam reaction

  9. Atmospheric effects of heat release at large power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Yukio

    1979-01-01

    In power plants, the thermal efficiency of generating electricity is generally 1/3, the rest 2/3 being carried away by cooling water. To release the heat, there are three alternative methods; i.e. cooling water released into sea, cooling water released into a cooling pond, and cooling of such water with a cooling tower. In the third method, cooling towers are stacks of 10m -- 80m bore, and warm cooling water flowing on the side wall is cooled with atmospheric air. The resultant heated air is discharged as plume from their top. Upon condensation, it becomes visible and then leads to the formation of clouds. In this manner, the weather around the sites of power plants is affected, such as reduction of insolation reaching ground and increase in precipitation. The following matters are described: cooling towers; phenomena and prediction methods of visible plume, cloud formation, increase of precipitation and deposition of drifting waterdrops; and effects of the group of power plants. (J.P.N.)

  10. Prospects of heat supply from Temelin nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuba, V.

    1987-01-01

    The possibilities are discussed of using the Temelin nuclear power plant for heat supply to a number of localities in the South Bohemian Region, to a distance of up to 34 km. Direct supply of steam and of 150/70 degC or 180/65 degC hot water is envisaged. An alternative solution has also been proposed allowing to supply steam and hot water simultaneously from 180 degC hot water with quantitative regulation. The hot water is made to expand at a pressure of 0.3 to 0.5 MPa and the low-pressure steam is compressed to a pressure of 0.9 to 1.3 MPa. This steam will be supplied to the existing heating system. The possibility was also studied of supplying Prague with heat and 180/65 degC hot water of a thermal output of up to 1,700 MW using a two-pipe heat supply line of 105 to 125 km in length. (B.S.). 2 figs

  11. Geothermal project will predetermine future of the Kosice heating plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirman, K.

    2003-01-01

    Geoterm, a.s. manager O. Halas describes economic and technical parameters of geothermal energy source by village Durkov near Kosice. It is planned to exploitate geothermal energy source for Kosicka heating plant (TEKO). Three basic variants of technical connecting to geothermal source are developed. Temperature at TEKO entrance should reach 125 degrees, annual heating energy supply will reach 2100 TJ and source output will reach 100 MWt, while admissible deviation at all indicators reaches 10%. The first geothermal energy should by supplied to TEKO in 2007. The investments overlapping 3 billions Slovak crowns are necessary to realize whole project. According to O. Halas a credit from World Bank guaranteed by state is crucial

  12. WASTE HEAT RECOVERY IN HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS: SOLUTION TO REDUCE GLOBAL WARMING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Baradey

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Energy conversion technologies, where waste heat recovery systems are included, have received significant attention in recent years due to reasons that include depletion of fossil fuel, increasing oil prices, changes in climatic conditions, and global warming. For low temperature applications, there are many sources of thermal waste heat, and several recovery systems and potential useful applications have been proposed by researchers [1-4]. In addition, many types of equipment are used to recover waste thermal energy from different systems at low, medium, and high temperature applications, such as heat exchangers, waste heat recovery boiler, thermo-electric generators, and recuperators. In this paper, the focus is on waste heat recovery from air conditioners, and an efficient application of these energy resources. Integration of solar energy with heat pump technologies and major factors that affect the feasibility of heat recovery systems have been studied and reviewed as well. KEYWORDS: waste heat recovery; heat pump.

  13. Modernization and efficiency of heat treatment and heating up plants; Modernisierung und Effizienz von Thermoprozessanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendt, Peter [LOI Thermprocess GmbH, Essen (Germany); Kuehn, Friedhelm [Ingenieurbuero fuer Waermebehandlung, Industrieoefen und Energieberatung, Muelheim (Germany)

    2010-10-15

    A goal of this contribution is to show, using examples of the thermal heat treatment industry and the thermal processing units used there (Beltype plants, routary hearth, walking hearth, walking beam, pusher type furnaces and gas carburizing plants as well as case hardening plants), which increases in efficiency within and outside of the actual thermal treatment process and the necessary thermal processing units for the order are available today. From the possibilities of the reduction of energy employment resulting from that, a high potential for the discharge of the environment can be derived. The economic effect concerning energy employment and saving possibilities will also be considered. Concluding, examples of case-hardening show which variants of a change of process present themselves partially in the future, in order to achieve substantial production increases and thus energy cost reductions. (orig.)

  14. Review of European regulatory and tariff experience with the sale of heat and electricity from combined heat and power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyrelund, A.

    1991-12-01

    The Prince Edward Island Energy Corporation, Edmonton Power, Energy, Mines and Resources Canada and the Canadian Electrical Association commissioned a study to understand how electrical power and district heat from combined heat and power (CHP) plants is priced in Europe. Four northern European countries were investigated, Denmark, Germany, Sweden and Finland. These countries produce 45.8 TWh of power from combined heat and power plants, 7.1% of their annual consumption. In the case of Denmark, CHP accounts for 37.5% of its total power production. The energy situation in each country is reviewed using published statistics, and in particular the rapidly changing situation with regard to environmental and fuel taxes is examined. In order to obtain practical insights with regard to tariffs used by the various utilities, a series of generic examples were examined, supported by specific case studies. Technologies reviewed included: CHP from coal-fuelled extraction plant, CHP from coal-fuelled back pressure plant, waste heat from a municipal waste plant, and gas turbine with waste heat recovery. The benefits and risks associated with different tariff designs are discussed in detail including tariff formulae. This should enable interested parties to develop appropriate tariffs for combined heat and power plants in the context of current electrical utility policies. As a complement to the tariffs for combined heat and power plants, the design of district heating tariffs is also addressed. The typical concepts used in different countries are presented and discussed. 23 tabs

  15. Interactive economic analysis of small-scale heating plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landen, R.A.; Sanders, D.L.; Douglas, B.H.

    1998-11-01

    This report contains the work that has been undertaken by LRZ Limited in pursuance of this agreement. The potential for small-scale biomass heating systems is identified, and surrounding issues relating to acceptance are discussed. Such systems are described, and the origins of capital and running costs examined. A full review of the calculation methods for boiler plant size and fuel consumption is made, and subsequently expounded in four varying case studies. The results of this work are discussed, and the final development of the computer models is reviewed, incorporating further refinements to the method. Finally, data not contained in the text is incorporated in comprehensive appendices. (author)

  16. The agricultural use of heat discharge by nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grauby, A.; Delmas, J.; Foulquier, L.; Guillermin, R.

    1977-01-01

    At a time in which energy savings are of prime importance, it is interesting to be able to offer a technique enabling the use of the heated waters leaving the cooling circuits of electric power plants. Satisfactory and positive results have been obtained by the Environmental Research Service, in the area of open field farming as well as in pisciculture. The use of a network of buried pipes conveying the hot water leads to greater crop yields, off-season scheduling of early and late varieties to benefit from favorable market prices, together with the possibility of adapting priority industrial crops such as soya to our climates [fr

  17. Farm effluent plant produces gas for domestic heat and power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1963-01-01

    A plant for treating farm waste waters, developed by Wright Rain Ltd. and based on a prototype plant invented by J. Fry which has been in continuous use for 5 years on a pig farm at Rietvlei, Johannesburg, is described. Manure is pumped into one end of the digestion tank about one-third of the way up the tank, and anaerobic decomposition occurs at a controlled temperature (optimum 35/sup 0/C); the gas rises to the top and is collected in gas holders to be utilized for domestic heat and power, while an outlet near the bottom of the tank allows decomposed matter to be drawn off for spreading. Results with pig manure suggest that a digestion tank should be planned for a 60-day cycle. Cow and pig manure can be digested without difficulty, but it would be necessary to add water to chicken manure for successful digestion.

  18. A dynamic analysis of interfuel substitution for Swedish heating plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braennlund, Runar; Lundgren, Tommy

    2004-01-01

    This paper estimates a dynamic model of interfuel substitution for Swedish heating plants. We use the cost share linear logit model developed by Considine and Mount [Considine, T.J., Mount, T.D., 1984. The use of linear logit models for dynamic input demand systems. Review of Economics and Statistics 66, 434-443]. All estimated own-price elasticities are negative and all cross-price elasticities are positive. The estimated dynamic adjustment rate parameter is small, however, increasing with the size of the plant and time, indicating fast adjustments in the fuel mix when changing relative fuel prices. The estimated model is used to illustrate the effects of two different policy changes

  19. New Configurations of Micro Plate-Fin Heat Sink to Reduce Coolant Pumping Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezania, A.; Rosendahl, L. A.

    2012-06-01

    The thermal resistance of heat exchangers has a strong influence on the electric power produced by a thermoelectric generator (TEG). In this work, a real TEG device is applied to three configurations of micro plate-fin heat sink. The distance between certain microchannels is varied to find the optimum heat sink configuration. The particular focus of this study is to reduce the coolant mass flow rate by considering the thermal resistances of the heat sinks and, thereby, to reduce the coolant pumping power in the system. The three-dimensional governing equations for the fluid flow and the heat transfer are solved using the finite-volume method for a wide range of pressure drop laminar flows along the heat sink. The temperature and the mass flow rate distribution in the heat sink are discussed. The results, which are in good agreement with previous computational studies, show that using suggested heat sink configurations reduces the coolant pumping power in the system.

  20. Climate change reduces nectar secretion in two common Mediterranean plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takkis, Krista; Tscheulin, Thomas; Tsalkatis, Panagiotis; Petanidou, Theodora

    2015-09-15

    Global warming can lead to considerable impacts on natural plant communities, potentially inducing changes in plant physiology and the quantity and quality of floral rewards, especially nectar. Changes in nectar production can in turn strongly affect plant-pollinator interaction networks-pollinators may potentially benefit under moderate warming conditions, but suffer as resources reduce in availability as elevated temperatures become more extreme. Here, we studied the effect of elevated temperatures on nectar secretion of two Mediterranean Lamiaceae species-Ballota acetabulosa and Teucrium divaricatum. We measured nectar production (viz. volume per flower, sugar concentration per flower and sugar content per flower and per plant), number of open and empty flowers per plant, as well as biomass per flower under a range of temperatures selected ad hoc in a fully controlled climate chamber and under natural conditions outdoors. The average temperature in the climate chamber was increased every 3 days in 3 °C increments from 17.5 to 38.5 °C. Both study species showed a unimodal response of nectar production (volume per flower, sugar content per flower and per plant) to temperature. Optimal temperature for sugar content per flower was 25-26 °C for B. acetabulosa and 29-33 °C for T. divaricatum. According to our results, moderate climate warming predicted for the next few decades could benefit nectar secretion in T. divaricatum as long as the plants are not water stressed, but have a moderate negative effect on B. acetabulosa. Nevertheless, strong warming as predicted by climate change models for the end of the 21st century is expected to reduce nectar secretion in both species and can thus significantly reduce available resources for both wild bees and honeybees in Mediterranean systems. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company.

  1. Exergy analysis of a combined heat and power plant with integrated lignocellulosic ethanol production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lythcke-Jørgensen, Christoffer; Haglind, Fredrik; Clausen, Lasse R.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We model a system where lignocellulosic ethanol production is integrated with a combined heat and power (CHP) plant. • We conduct an exergy analysis for the ethanol production in six different system operation points. • Integrated operation, district heating (DH) production and low CHP loads all increase the exergy efficiency. • Separate operation has the largest negative impact on the exergy efficiency. • Operation is found to have a significant impact on the exergy efficiency of the ethanol production. - Abstract: Lignocellulosic ethanol production is often assumed integrated in polygeneration systems because of its energy intensive nature. The objective of this study is to investigate potential irreversibilities from such integration, and what impact it has on the efficiency of the integrated ethanol production. An exergy analysis is carried out for a modelled polygeneration system in which lignocellulosic ethanol production based on hydrothermal pretreatment is integrated in an existing combined heat and power (CHP) plant. The ethanol facility is driven by steam extracted from the CHP unit when feasible, and a gas boiler is used as back-up when integration is not possible. The system was evaluated according to six operation points that alternate on the following three different operation parameters: Load in the CHP unit, integrated versus separate operation, and inclusion of district heating production in the ethanol facility. The calculated standard exergy efficiency of the ethanol facility varied from 0.564 to 0.855, of which the highest was obtained for integrated operation at reduced CHP load and full district heating production in the ethanol facility, and the lowest for separate operation with zero district heating production in the ethanol facility. The results suggest that the efficiency of integrating lignocellulosic ethanol production in CHP plants is highly dependent on operation, and it is therefore suggested that the

  2. Photovoltaic and Hydrogen Plant Integrated with a Gas Heat Pump for Greenhouse Heating: A Mathematical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandros Sotirios Anifantis

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the traditional energy sources used for greenhouse heating are fossil fuels such as LPG, diesel and natural gas. The global energy demand will continue to grow and alternative technologies need to be developed in order to improve the sustainability of crop production in protected environments. Innovative solutions are represented by renewable energy plants such as photovoltaic, wind and geothermal integrated systems, however, these technologies need to be connected to the power grid in order to store the energy produced. On agricultural land, power grids are not widespread and stand-alone renewable energy systems should be investigated especially for greenhouse applications. The aim of this research is to analyze, by means of a mathematical model, the energy efficiency of a photovoltaic (8.2 kW, hydrogen (2.5 kW and ground source gas heat pump (2.2 kW integrated in a stand-alone system used for heating an experimental greenhouse tunnel (48 m2 during the winter season. A yearlong energy performance analysis was conducted for three different types of greenhouse cover materials, a single layer polyethylene film, an air inflated-double layer polyethylene film, and a double acrylic or polycarbonate. The results of one year showed that the integrated system had a total energy efficiency of 14.6%. Starting from the electric energy supplied by the photovoltaic array, the total efficiency of the hydrogen and ground source gas heat pump system was 112% if the coefficient of the performance of the heat pump is equal to 5. The heating system increased the greenhouse air temperatures by 3–9 °C with respect to the external air temperatures, depending on the greenhouse cover material used.

  3. Flow Boiling Critical Heat Flux in Reduced Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudawar, Issam; Zhang, Hui; Hasan, Mohammad M.

    2004-01-01

    This study provides systematic method for reducing power consumption in reduced gravity systems by adopting minimum velocity required to provide adequate CHF and preclude detrimental effects of reduced gravity . This study proves it is possible to use existing 1 ge flow boiling and CHF correlations and models to design reduced gravity systems provided minimum velocity criteria are met

  4. Combined cycle power plant with integrated low temperature heat (LOTHECO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakaras, E.; Doukelis, A.; Leithner, R.; Aronis, N.

    2004-01-01

    The major driver to enhance the efficiency of the simple gas turbine cycle has been the increase in process conditions through advancements in materials and cooling methods. Thermodynamic cycle developments or cycle integration are among the possible ways to further enhance performance. The current paper presents the possibilities and advantages from the LOTHECO natural gas-fired combined cycle concept. In the LOTHECO cycle, low-temperature waste heat or solar heat is used for the evaporation of injected water droplets in the compressed air entering the gas turbine's combustion chamber. Following a description of this innovative cycle, its advantages are demonstrated by comparison between different gas turbine power generation systems for small and large-scale applications, including thermodynamic and economic analysis. A commercial gas turbine (ALSTOM GT10C) has been selected and computed with the heat mass balance program ENBIPRO. The results from the energy analysis are presented and the features of each concept are discussed. In addition, the exergy analysis provides information on the irreversibilities of each process and suggested improvements. Finally, the economic analysis reveals that the combined cycle plant with a heavy-duty gas turbine is the most efficient and economic way to produce electricity at base load. However, on a smaller scale, innovative designs, such as the LOTHECO concept, are required to reach the same level of performance at feasible costs

  5. Pilot plant for hydrogasification of coal with nuclear heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falkenhain, G.; Velling, G.

    1976-01-01

    In the framework of a research and development programme sponsored by the Ministry of Research and Technology of the Federal Republic of Germany, two process variants for hydrogasification of coal by means of nuclear heat have been developed by the Rheinische Braunkohlenwerke AG, Cologne. For testing these process variants a semi-technical pilot plant for gasification of coal under pressure in a fluidized bed was constructed. The pilot plant, in which the gasification of lignite and hard coal is planned, is designed for a throughput of 100kg carbon per hour corresponding to 400kg raw lignite per hour or 150kg hard coal per hour. The plant should provide data on the influence of the most essential process parameters (pressure, temperature, residence time of gas and coal, type and pre-treatment of feed coal) on the performance of gasification and raw gas composition. Different plant components will also be tested. Since the pilot plant will permit testing of both process variants of hydrogasification, it was designed in such a way that it is possible to vary a great number of process parameters. Thus, for instance, the pressure can be chosen in a range up to 100 bar and pure hydrogen or mixtures of hydrogen, carbon monoxide and steam can be applied as gasification agents. The gasifier is an internally insulated fluidized bed reactor with an inner diameter of 200mm and a height of about 8m, to which an internally insulated cyclone for separation of the entrained fines is attached. The raw gas is then cooled down by direct water scrubbing. (author)

  6. Reduced Urban Heat Island intensity under warmer conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Anna A.; Waugh, Darryn W.; Zaitchik, Ben F.

    2018-06-01

    The Urban Heat Island (UHI), the tendency for urban areas to be hotter than rural regions, represents a significant health concern in summer as urban populations are exposed to elevated temperatures. A number of studies suggest that the UHI increases during warmer conditions, however there has been no investigation of this for a large ensemble of cities. Here we compare urban and rural temperatures in 54 US cities for 2000–2015 and show that the intensity of the Urban Heat Island, measured here as the differences in daily-minimum or daily-maximum temperatures between urban and rural stations or ΔT, in fact tends to decrease with increasing temperature in most cities (38/54). This holds when investigating daily variability, heat extremes, and variability across climate zones and is primarily driven by changes in rural areas. We relate this change to large-scale or synoptic weather conditions, and find that the lowest ΔT nights occur during moist weather conditions. We also find that warming cities have not experienced an increasing Urban Heat Island effect.

  7. 78 FR 55117 - Ultimate Heat Sink for Nuclear Power Plants; Draft Regulatory Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-09

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2013-0203] Ultimate Heat Sink for Nuclear Power Plants; Draft... (DG), DG-1275, ``Ultimate Heat Sink for Nuclear Power Plants.'' This regulatory guide (RG) describes methods and procedures acceptable to the NRC staff that nuclear power plant facility licensees and...

  8. Heat Integration and Renewable Energy in Meat Processing Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Colley, Tracey Anne

    2016-01-01

    This thesis aims to optimise energy efficiency at meat processing plants and minimise their carbon footprint, as a way of reducing operating costs and minimising the potential negative impacts of a carbon price on the red meat industry. In the context of the export meat industry, there is continual competition with the live export trade. Therefore, there is a risk that a carbon price could increase the live export trade over domestic processing of meat, thereby exporti...

  9. Nuclear heat generating plants - technical concepts and market potentials. Chapter 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoene, E.

    1988-01-01

    To determine the advantages and disadvantages of different heat generating systems, a comparison is made between nuclear heat generating plants and competing heat generating systems. Nuclear heat generating plant concepts in practice have to compete with a wide range of existing and new fossil heat generating technologies of the most different capacities, ranging from combined heat and power generation to individual heating in one-family houses. Heat generation costs are calculated by means of a dynamic annuity method from an economic point of view. The development of real prices of fossil energy sources is based on two scenarios characterized as follows: scenario I - insignificant price increase by the year 2000, then stagnant; scenario II - moderate price increase by the year 2010, then stagnant. As a result of that systems comparison it can be stated that the considered nuclear heat generating plants may be an interesting competitive heat generation option, provided the assumptions on which the study is based can be implemented. This applies especially to investment costs. At the same time those plants contribute to a diversification of energy source options on the heat market. Their use leads to a reduction of fossil fuel imports, increasing at the same time short- and long-term supply guarantees. If nuclear heat generating plants substitute fossil heat generating plants, or render the construction of new ones superfluous, they contribute to avoiding chemical air pollutants. (orig./UA) [de

  10. The Apatity nuclear heating plant project: modern technical and economic issues of nuclear heat application in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamov, E.O.; Romenkov, A.A.

    1998-01-01

    Traditionally Russia is a country with advanced structure of centralized heat supply. Many thermal plants and heating networks need technical upgrading to improve their technical and economic efficiency. Fossil fuelled heating capacities have a negative influence on ecology, which can be seen especially in the northern regions of Russia. Furthermore, fossil fuel prices are rising in Russia. The above factors tend to intensify the need for alternative heat sources being capable of solving the problem. Nuclear heat sources may be the alternative. In this paper, the main features of a proposed NHP in the Murmansk region are summarized. (author)

  11. After heat distribution of a mobile nuclear power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, W. G.; Vanbibber, L. E.; Tang, Y. S.

    1971-01-01

    A computer program was developed to analyze the transient afterheat temperature and pressure response of a mobile gas-cooled reactor power plant following impact. The program considers (in addition to the standard modes of heat transfer) fission product decay and transport, metal-water reactions, core and shield melting and displacement, and pressure and containment vessel stress response. Analyses were performed for eight cases (both deformed and undeformed models) to verify operability of the program options. The results indicated that for a 350 psi (241 n/sq cm) initial internal pressure, the containment vessel can survive over 100,000 seconds following impact before creep rupture occurs. Recommendations were developed as to directions for redesign to extend containment vessel life.

  12. Thermodynamic Analysis of a Ship Power Plant Operating with Waste Heat Recovery through Combined Heat and Power Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Grljušić

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this research is to study a cogeneration plant for combined heat & power (CHP production that utilises the low-temperature waste energy in the power plant of a Suezmax-size oil tanker for all heating and electricity requirements during navigation. After considering various configurations, a standard propulsion engine operating at maximum efficiency and a CHP Plant with R245fa fluid using a supercritical organic Rankine cycle (ORC is selected. All the ship heat requirements can be covered by energy of organic fluid after expansion in the turbine, except feeder-booster heating. Hence, an additional quantity of working fluid may be heated using an after Heat Recovery Steam Generator (HRSG directed to the feeder-booster module. An analysis of the obtained results shows that the steam turbine plant does not yield significant fuel savings. However, a CHP plant with R245fa fluid using supercritical ORC meets all of the demands for electrical energy and heat while burning only a small amount of additional fuel in HRSG at the main engine off-design operation.

  13. Concept of a HTR modular plant for generation of process heat in a chemical plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    This final report summarizes the results of a preliminary study on behalf of Buna AG and Leunawerke AG. With regard to the individual situations the study investigated the conditions for modular HTR-2 reactors to cover on-site process heat and electric power demands. HTR-2 reactor erection and operation were analyzed for their economic efficiency compared with fossil-fuel power plants. Considering the prospective product lines, the technical and economic conditions were developed in close cooperation with Buna AG and Leunawerke AG. The study focused on the technical integration of modular HTR reactors into plants with regard to safety concepts, on planning, acceptance and erection concepts which largely exclude uncalculable scheduling and financial risks, and on comparative economic analyses with regard to fossil-fuel power plants. (orig.) [de

  14. Feasibility study for Tashkent Heat and Power Plant Modernizing Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    An investigational study was carried out of the project for energy conservation and greenhouse effect gas emission reduction by introducing the newest and most powerful gas turbine cogeneration facilities to the Tashkent cogeneration plant in Uzbekistan. At the Tashkent cogeneration plant, each of the facilities is being superannuated, which leads to lowering of operational reliability and increase in cost of repairs. In the project, studied was the introduction of the newest and most powerful gas turbine cogeneration facilities with heat output of 100 Gcal/h equivalent to that of one can of the existing hot water boiler and with generated output of 80MW. As a result of the study, obtained were the energy conservation amount of 83.9 ktoe/y and the greenhouse effect gas reduction amount of 179.7 kt-CO2/y. The initial investment amount was 10.003 billion yen. Expenses vs. effects were 8.39 toe/y-million yen in energy conservation amount and 18.0 t-CO2/y-million yen in greenhouse effect gas reduction amount. In the study of profitability, the internal earning rate was 9.24% after tax, the return yield of capital was 41.26%, and the period of ROI was 16.9 years. (NEDO)

  15. Enhancement of LNG plant propane cycle through waste heat powered absorption cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodgers, P.; Mortazavi, A.; Eveloy, V.; Al-Hashimi, S.; Hwang, Y.; Radermacher, R.

    2012-01-01

    In liquefied natural gas (LNG) plants utilizing sea water for process cooling, both the efficiency and production capacity of the propane cycle decrease with increasing sea water temperature. To address this issue, several propane cycle enhancement approaches are investigated in this study, which require minimal modification of the existing plant configuration. These approaches rely on the use of gas turbine waste heat powered water/lithium bromide absorption cooling to either (i) subcool propane after the propane cycle condenser, or (ii) reduce propane cycle condensing pressure through pre-cooling of condenser cooling water. In the second approach, two alternative methods of pre-cooling condenser cooling water are considered, which consist of an open sea water loop, and a closed fresh water loop. In addition for all cases, three candidate absorption chiller configurations are evaluated, namely single-effect, double-effect, and cascaded double- and single-effect chillers. The thermodynamic performance of each propane cycle enhancement scheme, integrated in an actual LNG plant in the Persian Gulf, is evaluated using actual plant operating data. Subcooling propane after the propane cycle condenser is found to improve propane cycle total coefficient of performance (COP T ) and cooling capacity by 13% and 23%, respectively. The necessary cooling load could be provided by either a single-effect, double-effect or cascaded and single- and double-effect absorption refrigeration cycle recovering waste heat from a single gas turbine operated at full load. Reducing propane condensing pressure using a closed fresh water condenser cooling loop is found result in propane cycle COP T and cooling capacity enhancements of 63% and 22%, respectively, but would require substantially higher capital investment than for propane subcooling, due to higher cooling load and thus higher waste heat requirements. Considering the present trend of short process enhancement payback periods in the

  16. Comparison of LCA results of low temperature heat plant using electric heat pump, absorption heat pump and gas-fired boiler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitkiewicz, Anna; Sekret, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Usage of geothermal heat pump can bring environmental benefits. • The lowest environmental impact for whole life cycle is obtained for absorption heat pump. • The value of heat pump COP has a significant influence on environmental impact. • In case of coal based power generation the damage to human health is significant. - Abstract: This study compares the life cycle impacts of three heating plant systems which differ in their source of energy and the type of system. The following heating systems are considered: electric water-water heat pump, absorption water-water heat pump and natural gas fired boiler. The heat source for heat pump systems is low temperature geothermal source with temperature below 20 °C and spontaneous outflow 24 m 3 /h. It is assumed that the heat pumps and boiler are working in monovalent system. The analysis was carried out for heat networks temperature characteristic at 50/40 °C which is changing with outdoor temperature during heating season. The environmental life cycle impact is evaluated within life cycle assessment methodological framework. The method used for life cycle assessment is eco-indicator ‘99. The functional unit is defined as heating plant system with given amount of heat to be delivered to meet local heat demand in assumed average season. The data describing heating plant system is derived from literature and energy analysis of these systems. The data describing the preceding life cycle phases: extraction of raw materials and fuels, production of heating devices and their transportation is taken from Ecoinvent 2.0 life cycle inventory database. The results were analyzed on three levels of indicators: single score indicator, damage category indicators and impact category indicator. The indicators were calculated for characterization, normalization and weighting phases as well. SimaPro 7.3.2 is the software used to model the systems’ life cycle. The study shows that heating plants using a low

  17. Consequences of reduced production of electricity in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Swedish Power Administration has assessed the possibilities of expanding electric power sources other than nuclear power plants for the years 1980 and 1985. Reports on costs in the form of loss of capital and increased operating costs involved in the dismantling of nuclear power plants are made in Supplement 1. The economics division of the Finance Department, starting with a long-range study model of the Swedish economy, has calculated the consequences of a cutback in electric power up to 1980 for Sweden's economy and employment in that year. The consequences of reduction of electricity supplies up to 1985 are summarized in Supplement 2 in this report. It is concluded that in order to be able to manage the problem of supplying electricity by 1985, it will be necessary to increase oil power above what was assumed in the energy policy program. There will have to be new oil-based power as well. According to the Power Administration, oil-power facilities can be expanded to varying degrees, depending upon when the decision is made. The Power Administration's calculations show that 125 TWh is possible in 1985 without nuclear power only if a decision for discontinuation is made in the fall of 1976. This is based on very optimistic assumptions about the time of execution of a program for oil-steam operation, and also on the assumption that extreme measures will be initiated to force expansion of both district-heating distribution and power + heat facilities. Oil consumption for production of electricity in such an electric power system would be about 9 million m 3 , which is about 5 times more than at present and about one-third of the present total consumption of petroleum products in Sweden

  18. Performances of nuclear power plants for combined production of electricity and hot water for district heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bronzen, S.

    The possibilities for using nuclear power plants for combined production of heat and power seem to be very good in the future. With the chosen 600 MWsub (e) BWR plant a heat output up to 1200 MW can be arranged. An alternative, consisting of steam extractions from the low-pressure turbine, offers a flexible solution for heat and power generation. With this alternative the combined plant can use components from normal condensing nuclear power plants. The flexible extraction design also offers a real possibility for using the combined plant in electric peak generation. However, urban siting requires long distance heat transmission and the pipe design for this transmission is a major problem when planning and optimizing the whole nuclear combined heat and power plant. (author)

  19. Biomass Supply Planning for Combined Heat and Power Plants using Stochastic Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guericke, Daniela; Blanco, Ignacio; Morales González, Juan Miguel

    method using stochastic optimization to support the biomass supply planning for combined heat and power plants. Our two-phase approach combines mid-term decisions about biomass supply contracts with the short-term decisions regarding the optimal market participation of the producer to ensure......During the last years, the consumption of biomass to produce power and heat has increased due to the new carbon neutral policies. Nowadays, many district heating systems operate their combined heat and power (CHP) plants using different types of biomass instead of fossil fuel, especially to produce......, and heat demand and electricity prices vary drastically during the planning period. Furthermore, the optimal operation of combined heat and power plants has to consider the existing synergies between the power and heating systems while always fulfilling the heat demand of the system. We propose a solution...

  20. Investigation and application of reduced-order methods for flows study in heat exchanger tube bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomarede, M.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this thesis is to study the ability of model reduction for investigations of flow-induced vibrations in heat exchangers tube bundle systems.These mechanisms are a cause of major concern because heat exchangers are key elements of nuclear power plants and on-board stoke-holds.In a first part, we give a recall on heat exchangers functioning and on vibratory problems to which they are prone. Then, complete calculations leaded with the CFD numerical code Code-Saturne are carried out, first for the flow around a single circular cylinder (fixed then elastically mounted) and then for the case of a tube bundle system submitted to cross-flow. Reduced-order method POD is applied to the flow resolution with fixed structures. The obtained results show the efficiency of this technique for such configurations, using stabilization methods for the dynamical system resolution in the tube-bundle case. Multiphase-POD, which is a method enabling the adaptation of POD to fluid-structure interactions, is applied. Large displacements of a single cylinder elastically mounted under cross-flow, corresponding to the lock-in phenomenon,are well reproduced with this reduction technique. In the same way, large displacements of a confined moving tube in a bundle are shown to be faithfully reconstructed.Finally, the use of model reduction is extended to parametric studies. First, we propose to use the method which consists in projecting Navier-Stokes equations for several values of the Reynolds number on to a unique POD basis. The results obtained confirm the fact that POD predictability is limited to a range of parameter values. Then, a basis interpolation method, constructed using Grassmann manifolds and allowing the construction of a POD basis from other pre-calculated basis, is applied to basic cases. (author)

  1. Experimental drought and heat can delay phenological development and reduce foliar and shoot growth in semiarid trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Henry D; Collins, Adam D; Briggs, Samuel P; Vennetier, Michel; Dickman, L Turin; Sevanto, Sanna A; Garcia-Forner, Núria; Powers, Heath H; McDowell, Nate G

    2015-11-01

    Higher temperatures associated with climate change are anticipated to trigger an earlier start to the growing season, which could increase the terrestrial C sink strength. Greater variability in the amount and timing of precipitation is also expected with higher temperatures, bringing increased drought stress to many ecosystems. We experimentally assessed the effects of higher temperature and drought on the foliar phenology and shoot growth of mature trees of two semiarid conifer species. We exposed field-grown trees to a ~45% reduction in precipitation with a rain-out structure ('drought'), a ~4.8 °C temperature increase with open-top chambers ('heat'), and a combination of both simultaneously ('drought + heat'). Over the 2013 growing season, drought, heat, and drought + heat treatments reduced shoot and needle growth in piñon pine (Pinus edulis) by ≥39%, while juniper (Juniperus monosperma) had low growth and little response to these treatments. Needle emergence on primary axis branches of piñon pine was delayed in heat, drought, and drought + heat treatments by 19-57 days, while secondary axis branches were less likely to produce needles in the heat treatment, and produced no needles at all in the drought + heat treatment. Growth of shoots and needles, and the timing of needle emergence correlated inversely with xylem water tension and positively with nonstructural carbohydrate concentrations. Our findings demonstrate the potential for delayed phenological development and reduced growth with higher temperatures and drought in tree species that are vulnerable to drought and reveal potential mechanistic links to physiological stress responses. Climate change projections of an earlier and longer growing season with higher temperatures, and consequent increases in terrestrial C sink strength, may be incorrect for regions where plants will face increased drought stress with climate change. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Thermodynamic performance analysis of a novel electricity-heating cogeneration system (EHCS) based on absorption heat pump applied in the coal-fired power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hongsheng; Li, Zhenlin; Zhao, Hongbin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Presented a novel waste heat recovery method for Combined Heat and Power system. • Established models of the integrated system based on energy and exergy analysis. • Adopted both design and actual data ensuring the reliability of analysis results. - Abstract: A novel electricity-heating cogeneration system (EHCS) which is equipped with an absorption heat pump (AHP) system to recover waste heat from exhaust steam of the steam turbines in coal-fired thermal power plants is proposed to reduce heating energy consumption and improve the utilization of the fossil fuels in existing CHP (Combined Heat and Power) systems. According to the first and second thermodynamic law, the changes of the performance evaluation indicators are analyzed, and exergy analyses for key components of the system are carried out as well as changes of exergy indexes focusing on 135 MW direct air cooling units before and after modification. Compared with the conventional heating system, the output power increases by about 3.58 MW, gross coal consumption rate and total exergy loss respectively reduces by 11.50 g/kW h and 4.649 MW, while the total thermal and exergy efficiency increases by 1.26% and 1.45% in the EHCS when the heating load is 99,918 kJ at 75% THA condition. Meanwhile, the decrement of total exergy loss and increment of total exergy efficiency increase with the increasing of the heating load. The scheme cannot only bring great economic benefits but also save fossil resources, which has a promising market application potential.

  3. Numerical simulation of flow field in shellside of heat exchanger in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xinliang; Qiu Jinrong; Gong Zili

    2010-01-01

    Heat exchanger is the important equipment of nuclear power plant. Numerical simulation can give the detail information inside the heat exchange, and has been an effective research method. The geometric structure of shell-and-tube heat exchanger is very complex and it is difficult to simulate the whole flow field presently. According to the structure characteristics of the heat exchanger, a periodic whole-section calculation model was presented. The numerical simulation of flow field in shellside of heat exchange of a nuclear power plant was done by using this model. The results of simulation show that heat transfer in the periodic section of the heat exchange is uniform, the heat transfer is enhanced by using baffles in heat exchange, and frictional resistance is primary from the effect of segmental baffles. (authors)

  4. Flexible and stable heat energy recovery from municipal wastewater treatment plants using a fixed-inverter hybrid heat pump system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chae, Kyu-Jung; Ren, Xianghao

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Specially designed fixed-inverter hybrid heat pump system was developed. • Hybrid operation performed better at part loads than single inverter operation. • The applied heat pump can work stably over a wide range of heat load variations. • Heat energy potential of treated effluent was better than influent. • The heat pump’s COP from the field test was 4.06 for heating and 3.64 for cooling. - Abstract: Among many options to improve energy self-sufficiency in sewage treatment plants, heat extraction using a heat pump holds great promise, since wastewater contains considerable amounts of thermal energy. The actual heat energy demand at municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) varies widely with time; however, the heat pumps typically installed in WWTPs are of the on/off controlled fixed-speed type, thus mostly run intermittently at severe part-load conditions with poor efficiency. To solve this mismatch, a specially designed, fixed-inverter hybrid heat pump system incorporating a fixed-speed compressor and an inverter-driven, variable-speed compressor was developed and tested in a real WWTP. In this hybrid configuration, to improve load response and energy efficiency, the base-heat load was covered by the fixed-speed compressor consuming relatively less energy than the variable-speed type at nominal power, and the remaining varying load was handled by the inverter compressor which exhibits a high load-match function while consuming relatively greater energy. The heat pump system developed reliably extracted heat from the treated effluent as a heat source for heating and cooling purposes throughout the year, and actively responded to the load changes with a high measured coefficient of performance (COP) of 4.06 for heating and 3.64 for cooling. Moreover, this hybrid operation yielded a performance up to 15.04% better on part loads than the single inverter operation, suggesting its effectiveness for improving annual energy saving when

  5. Pulse Star Inertial Confinement Fusion Reactor: Heat transfer loop and balance-of-plant considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDowell, M.W.; Blink, J.A.; Curlander, K.A.

    1983-01-01

    A conceptual heat transfer loop and balance-of-plant design for the Pulse Star Inertial Confinement Fusion Reactor has been investigated and the results are presented. The Pulse Star reaction vessel, a perforated steel bell jar about11 m in diameter, is immersed in Li 17 Pb 83 coolant, which flows through the perforations and forms a 1.5-m-thick plenum of droplets around a 8-m-diameter inner chamber. The bell jar and associated pumps, piping, and steam generators are contained within a 17-m-diameter pool of Li 17 Pb 83 coolant to minimize structural requirements and occupied space, resulting in reduced cost. Four parallel heat transfer loops, each with a flow rate of 5.5 m 3 /s, are necessary to transfer 3300 MWt of power. Liquid metal is pumped to the top of the pool, where it flows downward through eight vertical steam generators. Double-walled tubes are used in the steam generators to assure tritium containment without intermediate heat transfer loops. Each pump is a mixed flow type and has a required NPSH of 3.4 m, a speed of 278 rpm, and an impeller diameter of 1.2 m. The steam generator design was optimized by finding the most cost-effective combination of heat exchanger area and pumping power. The design minimizes the total cost (heat exchanger area plus pumping) for the plant lifetime. The power required for the pumps is 36 MWe. Each resulting steam generator is 12 m high and 1.6 m in diameter, with 2360 tubes. The steam generators and pumps fit easily in the pool between the reactor chamber and the pool wall

  6. Pulse*Star Inertial Confinement Fusion Reactor: heat transfer loop and balance of plant considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDowell, M.W.; Murray, K.A.

    1984-01-01

    A conceptual heat transfer loop and balance of plant design for the Pulse*Star Inertial Confinement Fusion Reactor has been investigated and results are presented. The Pulse*Star reaction vessel, a perforated steel bell jar approximately 11 m in diameter, is immersed in Li 17 Pb 83 coolant which flows through the perforations and forms a 1.5 m thick plenum of droplets around an 8 m diameter inner chamber. The reactor and associated pumps, piping, and steam generators are contained within a 17 m diameter pool of Li 17 Pb 83 coolant to minimize structural requirements and occupied space, resulting in reduced cost. Four parallel heat transfer loops with flow rates of 5.5 m 3 /s each are necessary to transfer 3300 MWt of power. The steam generator design was optimized by finding the most cost-effective combination of heat exchanger area and pumping power. Power balance calculations based on an improved electrical conversion efficiency revealed a net electrical output of 1260 MWe to the bus bar and a resulting net efficiency of 39%. Suggested balance-of-plant layouts are also presented

  7. Design of an automatic control system of a district heating nuclear plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zebiri, Abderrahim.

    1980-06-01

    This paper presents the synthesis of the control system of a nuclear/oil fuelled district heating plant. Operating criteria take into account the economical background of the problem. Nuclear reactor control loops were specially conceived, due to the specific perturbations to which is submitted a district heating plant [fr

  8. Studying heat integration options for steam-gas power plants retrofitted with CO2 post-combustion capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carapellucci, Roberto; Giordano, Lorena; Vaccarelli, Maura

    2015-01-01

    Electricity generation from fossil fuels has become a focal point of energy and climate change policies due to its central role in modern economics and its leading contribution to greenhouse gas emissions. Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) is regarded by the International Energy Agency as an essential part of the technology portfolio for carbon mitigation, as it can significantly reduce CO 2 emissions while ensuring electricity generation from fossil fuel power plants. This paper studies the retrofit of natural gas combined cycles (NGCCs) with an amine-based post-combustion carbon capture system. NGCCs with differently rated capacities were analysed under the assumptions that the heat requirement of the capture system was provided via a steam extraction upstream of the low-pressure steam turbine or by an auxiliary unit that was able to reduce the power plant derating related to the energy needs of the CCS system. Different types of auxiliary units were investigated based on power plant size, including a gas turbine cogeneration plant and a supplementary firing unit or boiler fed by natural gas or biomass. Energy and economic analyses were performed in order to evaluate the impact of type and layout of retrofit option on energy, environmental and economic performance of NGCCs with the CCS system. - Highlights: • Steam-gas power plants with an amine-based CO 2 capture unit are examined. • The study concerns three combined cycles with different capacity and plant layout. • Several options to fulfil the heat requirement of the CCS system are explored. • Steam extraction significantly reduces the capacity of steam-gas power plant. • An auxiliary combined heat and power unit allows to reduce power plant derating

  9. Environmental flows and life cycle assessment of associated petroleum gas utilization via combined heat and power plants and heat boilers at oil fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajović, Vuk; Kiss, Ferenc; Maravić, Nikola; Bera, Oskar

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Environmental impact of associated petroleum gas flaring is discussed. • A modern trend of introducing cogeneration systems to the oil fields is presented. • Three alternative utilization options evaluated with life cycle assessment method. • Producing electricity and/or heat instead of flaring would reduce impacts. - Abstract: Flaring of associated petroleum gas is a major resource waste and causes considerable emissions of greenhouse gases and air pollutants. New environmental regulations are forcing oil industry to implement innovative and sustainable technologies in order to compete in growing energy market. A modern trend of introducing energy-effective cogeneration systems to the oil fields by replacing flaring and existing heat generation technologies powered by associated petroleum gas is discussed through material flow analysis and environmental impact assessment. The environmental assessment is based on the consequential life cycle assessment method and mainly primary data compiled directly from measurements on Serbian oil-fields or company-supplied information. The obtained results confirm that the utilization of associated petroleum gas via combined heat and power plants and heat boilers can provide a significant reduction in greenhouse gas emissions and resource depletion by displacing marginal production of heat and electricity. At the base case scenario, which assumes a 100% heat realization rate, the global warming potential of the combined heat and power plant and heat boiler scenarios were estimated at −4.94 and −0.54 kg CO_2_e_q Sm"−"3, whereas the cumulative fossil energy requirements of these scenarios were −48.7 and −2.1 MJ Sm"−"3, respectively. This is a significant reduction compared to the global warming potential (2.25 kg CO_2_e_q Sm"−"3) and cumulative fossil energy requirements (35.36 MJ Sm"−"3) of flaring. Nevertheless, sensitivity analyses have shown that life cycle assessment results are sensitive

  10. Reactor type choice and characteristics for a small nuclear heat and electricity co-generation plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Kukui; Li Manchang; Tang Chuanbao

    1997-01-01

    In China heat supply consumes more than 70 percent of the primary energy resource, which makes for heavy traffic and transportation and produces a lot of polluting materials such as NO x , SO x and CO 2 because of use of the fossil fuel. The utilization of nuclear power into the heat and electricity co-generation plant contributes to the global environmental protection. The basic concept of the nuclear system is an integral type reactor with three circuits. The primary circuit equipment is enclosed in and linked up directly with reactor vessel. The third circuit produces steam for heat and electricity supply. This paper presents basic requirements, reactor type choice, design characteristics, economy for a nuclear co-generation plant and its future application. The choice of the main parameters and the main technological process is the key problem of the nuclear plant design. To make this paper clearer, take for example a double-reactor plant of 450 x 2MW thermal power. There are two sorts of main technological processes. One is a water-water-steam process. Another is water-steam-steam process. Compared the two sorts, the design which adopted the water-water-steam technological process has much more advantage. The system is simplified, the operation reliability is increased, the primary pressure reduces a lot, the temperature difference between the secondary and the third circuits becomes larger, so the size and capacity of the main components will be smaller, the scale and the cost of the building will be cut down. In this design, the secondary circuit pressure is the highest among that of the three circuits. So the primary circuit radioactivity can not leak into the third circuit in case of accidents. (author)

  11. Potential nanotechnology applications for reducing freshwater consumption at coal fired power plants : an early view.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elcock, D. (Environmental Science Division)

    2010-09-17

    , if improved, would reduce energy use and concomitant water consumption. These inefficiencies include air heater inefficiencies, boiler corrosion, low operating temperatures, fuel inefficiencies, and older components that are subject to strain and failure. A variety of nanotechnology applications that could potentially be used to reduce the amount of freshwater consumed - either directly or indirectly - by these areas and activities was identified. These applications include membranes that use nanotechnology or contain nanomaterials for improved water purification and carbon capture; nano-based coatings and lubricants to insulate and reduce heat loss, inhibit corrosion, and improve fuel efficiency; nano-based catalysts and enzymes that improve fuel efficiency and improve sulfur removal efficiency; nanomaterials that can withstand high temperatures; nanofluids that have better heat transfer characteristics than water; nanosensors that can help identify strain and impact damage, detect and monitor water quality parameters, and measure mercury in flue gas; and batteries and capacitors that use nanotechnology to enable utility-scale storage. Most of these potential applications are in the research stage, and few have been deployed at coal-fired power plants. Moving from research to deployment in today's economic environment will be facilitated with federal support. Additional support for research development and deployment (RD&D) for some subset of these applications could lead to reductions in water consumption and could provide lessons learned that could be applied to future efforts. To take advantage of this situation, it is recommended that NETL pursue funding for further research, development, or deployment for one or more of the potential applications identified in this report.

  12. EFFICIENCY OF THE USE OF HEAT PUMPS ON THE CHP PLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juravleov A.A.

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The work is dedicated to the calculus of the efficiency of the use of heat pumps on the CHP plants. There are presented the interdependences between the pay-back period and NPV of heat pump and the price of 1 kWt of thermal power of heat pump and of the tariff of electricity.

  13. Solar heating for an electronics manufacturing plant--Blue Earth, Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Partial space heating for 97,000 square foot plant is supplied by 360 flat plate solar collectors; energy is sorted as heat in indoor 20,000 gallon water tank. System includes all necessary control electronics for year round operation. During December 1978, solar energy supplied 24.4 percent of building's space heating load.

  14. Use of reactor plants of enhanced safety for sea water desalination, industrial and district heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panov, Yu.; Polunichev, V.; Zverev, K.

    1997-01-01

    Russian designers have developed and can deliver nuclear complexes to provide sea water desalination, industrial and district heating. This paper provides an overview of these designs utilizing the ABV, KLT-40 and ATETS-80 reactor plants of enhanced safety. The most advanced nuclear powered water desalination project is the APVS-80. This design consists of a special ship equipped with the distillation desalination plant powered at a level of 160 MW(th) utilizing the type KLT-40 reactor plant. More than 20 years of experience with water desalination and reactor plants has been achieved in Aktau and Russian nuclear ships without radioactive contamination of desalinated water. Design is also proceeding on a two structure complex consisting of a floating nuclear power station and a reverse osmosis desalination plant. This new technology for sea water desalination provides the opportunity to considerably reduce the specific consumption of power for the desalination of sea water. The ABV reactor is utilized in the ''Volnolom'' type floating nuclear power stations. This design also features a desalinator ship which provides sea water desalination by the reverse osmosis process. The ATETS-80 is a nuclear two-reactor cogeneration complex which incorporates the integral vessel-type PWR which can be used in the production of electricity, steam, hot and desalinated water. (author). 9 figs

  15. Analysis of existing structure and emissions of wood combustion plants for the production of heat and electricity in Bavaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joa, Bettina

    2014-01-01

    This work deals with the detailed analysis of the existing structure of all Bavarian wood burning plants for the generation of heat and electricity as well as the determination of the resulting emission emissions in 2013. The number of wood burning plants in the single-chamber fireplaces, wood central heating and wood-fired heating plants which are in operation in the year 2013 were determined, and how many plants are existing in the various areas like pellet stoves, traditional ovens, wood-burning fireplace, pellet central heating systems, wood chips central heating systems, fire-wood central heating systems, wood combined heat and power plant (electricity and heat) and wood power plants (heat). In addition, the regional distribution of the wood burning plants in the Bavarian governmental districts is investigated as well as the type and amount of energy produced by them (heat, electricity). [de

  16. Prototype plant for nuclear process heat (PNP) - operation of the pilot plant for hydrogasification of coal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruengel, N.; Dehms, G.; Fiedler, P.; Gerigk, H.P.; Ruddeck, W.; Schrader, L.; Schumacher, H.J.

    1988-04-01

    The Rheinische Braunkohlenwerke AG developed the process of hydrogasification of coal in a fluidized bed for generation of SNG. On basis of test results obtained in a semi-technical pilot plant of a through-put of 250 kg/h dried coal a large pilot plant was erected processing 10 t/h dried brown coal. This plant was on stream for about 14700 h, of which about 7800 h were with gasifier operation; during this time about 38000 t of dried brown coal of the Rhenish district were processed containing 4 to 25% of ash. At pressures of 60 to 120 bar and temperatures of 800 to 935 0 C carbon conversion rates up to 81 percent and methane amounts of 5000 m 3 (STP)/h were reached. The decisive parameter for methane generation was the hydrogen/coal-ratio. Even at high moisture contents, usually diminishing the methane yield from the coal essentially, by high hydrogen/coal-ratios high methane yields could be obtained. The gasifier itself caused no troubles during the total time operation. Difficulties with the original design of the residual char cooler could be overcome by change-over from water injection to liquid carbon dioxide. The design of the heat recovery system proved well. Alltogether so the size increasement of the gasifier from the semi-technical to the large pilot plant as well as the harmonization of gas generation and gas refining was proved. (orig.) With 20 refs., 20 tabs., 81 figs [de

  17. Effects of the distribution density of a biomass combined heat and power plant network on heat utilisation efficiency in village-town systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yifei; Kang, Jian

    2017-11-01

    The building of biomass combined heat and power (CHP) plants is an effective means of developing biomass energy because they can satisfy demands for winter heating and electricity consumption. The purpose of this study was to analyse the effect of the distribution density of a biomass CHP plant network on heat utilisation efficiency in a village-town system. The distribution density is determined based on the heat transmission threshold, and the heat utilisation efficiency is determined based on the heat demand distribution, heat output efficiency, and heat transmission loss. The objective of this study was to ascertain the optimal value for the heat transmission threshold using a multi-scheme comparison based on an analysis of these factors. To this end, a model of a biomass CHP plant network was built using geographic information system tools to simulate and generate three planning schemes with different heat transmission thresholds (6, 8, and 10 km) according to the heat demand distribution. The heat utilisation efficiencies of these planning schemes were then compared by calculating the gross power, heat output efficiency, and heat transmission loss of the biomass CHP plant for each scenario. This multi-scheme comparison yielded the following results: when the heat transmission threshold was low, the distribution density of the biomass CHP plant network was high and the biomass CHP plants tended to be relatively small. In contrast, when the heat transmission threshold was high, the distribution density of the network was low and the biomass CHP plants tended to be relatively large. When the heat transmission threshold was 8 km, the distribution density of the biomass CHP plant network was optimised for efficient heat utilisation. To promote the development of renewable energy sources, a planning scheme for a biomass CHP plant network that maximises heat utilisation efficiency can be obtained using the optimal heat transmission threshold and the nonlinearity

  18. Water cycle and its management for plant habitats at reduced pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rygalov, Vadim Y.; Fowler, Philip A.; Wheeler, Raymond M.; Bucklin, Ray A.

    2004-01-01

    Experimental and mathematical models were developed for describing and testing temperature and humidity parameters for plant production in bioregenerative life support systems. A factor was included for analyzing systems operating at low (10-101.3 kPa) pressure to reduce gas leakage and structural mass (e.g., inflatable greenhouses for space application). The expected close relationship between temperature and relative humidity was observed, along with the importance of heat exchanger coil temperature and air circulation rate. The presence of plants in closed habitats results in increased water flux through the system. Changes in pressure affect gas diffusion rates and surface boundary layers, and change convective transfer capabilities and water evaporation rates. A consistent observation from studies with plants at reduced pressures is increased evapotranspiration rates, even at constant vapor pressure deficits. This suggests that plant water status is a critical factor for managing low-pressure production systems. The approach suggested should help space mission planners design artificial environments in closed habitats.

  19. Fluid selection for the Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) in biomass power and heat plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drescher, Ulli; Brueggemann, Dieter

    2007-01-01

    In small solid biomass power and heat plants, the ORC is used for cogeneration. This application shows constraints different from other ORC. These constraints are described and an adapted power plant design is presented. The new design influences the selection criteria of working fluids. A software has been developed to find thermodynamic suitable fluids for ORC in biomass power and heat plants. Highest efficiencies are found within the family of alkylbenzenes

  20. Biochar amendment reduced methylmercury accumulation in rice plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu, Rui; Wang, Yongjie [School of Environment, Nanjing University, State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, People’s Republic of China (China); Zhong, Huan, E-mail: zhonghuan@nju.edu.cn [School of Environment, Nanjing University, State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, People’s Republic of China (China); Environmental and Life Sciences Program (EnLS), Trent University, Peterborough, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-08-05

    Highlights: • Biochar amendment could evidently reduce methylmercury (MeHg) levels in rice grain. • Biochar could enhance microbial production of MeHg, probably by providing sulfate. • Biochar could immobilize MeHg in soil, and reduce MeHg availability to rice plants. • Biochar amendment increased grain biomass, leading to biodilution of MeHg in grain. - Abstract: There is growing concern about methylmercury (MeHg) accumulation in rice grains and thus enhanced dietary exposure to MeHg in Asian countries. Here, we explored the possibility of reducing grain MeHg levels by biochar amendment, and the underlying mechanisms. Pot (i.e., rice cultivation in biochar amended soils) and batch experiments (i.e., incubation of amended soils under laboratory conditions) were carried out, to investigate MeHg dynamics (i.e., MeHg production, partitioning and phytoavailability in paddy soils, and MeHg uptake by rice) under biochar amendment (1–4% of soil mass). We demonstrate for the first time that biochar amendment could evidently reduce grain MeHg levels (49–92%). The declines could be attributed to the combined effects of: (1) increased soil MeHg concentrations, probably explained by the release of sulfate from biochar and thus enhanced microbial production of MeHg (e.g., by sulfate-reducing bacteria), (2) MeHg immobilization in soils, facilitated by the large surface areas and high organosulfur content of biochar, and (3) biodilution of MeHg in rice grains, due to the increased grain biomass under biochar amendment (35–79%). These observations together with mechanistic explanations improve understanding of MeHg dynamics in soil-rice systems, and support the possibility of reducing MeHg phytoaccumulation under biochar amendment.

  1. Biochar amendment reduced methylmercury accumulation in rice plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu, Rui; Wang, Yongjie; Zhong, Huan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Biochar amendment could evidently reduce methylmercury (MeHg) levels in rice grain. • Biochar could enhance microbial production of MeHg, probably by providing sulfate. • Biochar could immobilize MeHg in soil, and reduce MeHg availability to rice plants. • Biochar amendment increased grain biomass, leading to biodilution of MeHg in grain. - Abstract: There is growing concern about methylmercury (MeHg) accumulation in rice grains and thus enhanced dietary exposure to MeHg in Asian countries. Here, we explored the possibility of reducing grain MeHg levels by biochar amendment, and the underlying mechanisms. Pot (i.e., rice cultivation in biochar amended soils) and batch experiments (i.e., incubation of amended soils under laboratory conditions) were carried out, to investigate MeHg dynamics (i.e., MeHg production, partitioning and phytoavailability in paddy soils, and MeHg uptake by rice) under biochar amendment (1–4% of soil mass). We demonstrate for the first time that biochar amendment could evidently reduce grain MeHg levels (49–92%). The declines could be attributed to the combined effects of: (1) increased soil MeHg concentrations, probably explained by the release of sulfate from biochar and thus enhanced microbial production of MeHg (e.g., by sulfate-reducing bacteria), (2) MeHg immobilization in soils, facilitated by the large surface areas and high organosulfur content of biochar, and (3) biodilution of MeHg in rice grains, due to the increased grain biomass under biochar amendment (35–79%). These observations together with mechanistic explanations improve understanding of MeHg dynamics in soil-rice systems, and support the possibility of reducing MeHg phytoaccumulation under biochar amendment.

  2. On energy optimisation in multipurpose batch plants using heat storage

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Majozi, T

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available time interval. Indirect heat integration makes use of a heat transfer fluid for storing energy and allows heat integration of processes regardless of the time interval. This is possible as long as the source process takes place before the sink process...

  3. Method of flash evaporation and condensation – heat pump for deep cooling of coal-fired power plant flue gas: Latent heat and water recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yuzhong; Yan, Min; Zhang, Liqiang; Chen, Guifang; Cui, Lin; Song, Zhanlong; Chang, Jingcai; Ma, Chunyuan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A method is developed for deep cooling of flue gas in coal-fired boilers. • The method can recover both latent heat and water from flue gas. • The method utilizes FGD scrubber as a deep cooling exchanger. • The method adopts the direct heat exchange mode to avoid the corrosion problem. - Abstract: Flue gas waste heat recovery and utilization is an efficient means to improve the energy efficiency of coal-fired power plants. At present, the surface corrosion and fouling problems of heat exchanger hinder the development of flue gas deep cooling. In this study, a novel flue gas deep cooling method that can reduce flue gas temperature below the dew point of vapor to recover latent heat and obtain clean water simultaneously is proposed to achieve improved energy efficiency. The heat transfer mode of this method is the direct contact mode, which takes the scrubber, e.g. the flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber, as the deep cooling exchanger. The flash evaporation and condensation (FEC) device and heat pump (HP) are utilized to provide low-temperature medium, such as FGD slurry or water, for washing and deep cooling flue gas, to collect recovered water, and to absorb recovered waste heat. This method is called as the FEC–HP method. This paper elaborated on two optional models of the proposed method. The mechanism for recovering heat and water was also analyzed using the customized flue gas humidity chart, and the method to quantitate recovered heat and water, as well as the results of the case of a 300 MW coal-fired generator set were provided. Net present value calculations showed that this method is profitable in the scenario of burning high-water-content coals. Several potential advantages of this method and suggestions for practical application were also discussed.

  4. Calculation and Designing of Up-to-Date Gas-Flame Plants for Metal Heating and Heat Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Тimoshpolsky

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of development trends in the CIS machine-building industry and current status of the heating and heat treatment furnaces of main machine-building enterprises of the Republic of Belarus as of the 1st quarter of 2008 is given in the paper.The paper presents the most efficient engineering solutions from technological and economic point of view that concern calculation and designing of up-to-date gas-flame plants which are to be applied for modernization of the current heating and heat treatment furnaces of the machine-building enterprises in the Republic of Belarus.A thermo-technical calculation of main indices of the up-to-date gas-flame plant has been carried out in the paper.

  5. Bio energy heating plant heats municipal buildings in Nord-Odal; Bioenergisentral varmer kommunale bygg i Nord-Odal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2008-07-01

    When Nord-Odal planned to build a new nursing home, they wanted to find a more environmental friendly heating system than based on oil and electricity. Several energy consultants evaluated the task. But when all consultants concluded there would be no cost benefit in this task, local experts looked into it - and because they got a long term agreement, it was possible to finance a local bio energy heat plant. (AG)

  6. Safety study on nuclear heat utilization system - accident delineation and assessment on nuclear steelmaking pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, T.; Mizuno, M.; Tsuruoka, K.

    1982-01-01

    This paper presents accident delineation and assessment on a nuclear steelmaking pilot plant as an example of nuclear heat utilization systems. The reactor thermal energy from VHTR is transported to externally located chemical process plant employing helium-heated steam reformer by an intermediate heat transport loop. This paper on the nuclear steelmaking pilot plant will describe (1) system transients under accident conditions, (2) impact of explosion and fire on the nuclear reactor and the public and (3) radiation exposure on the public. The results presented in this paper will contribute considerably to understanding safety features of nuclear heat utilization system that employs the intermediate heat transport loop and the helium-heated steam reformer

  7. Development of technologies on innovative-simplified nuclear power plant using high-efficiency steam injectors (2) analysis of heat balance of innovative-simplified nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, S.; Ohmori, S.; Mori, M.

    2005-01-01

    It is possible to establish simplified system with reduced space and total equipment weight using high-efficiency Steam Injector (SI) instead of low-pressure feedwater heaters in Nuclear Power Plant (NPP)(1)-(6). The SI works as a heat exchanger through direct contact between feedwater from the condensers and extracted steam from the turbines. It can get a higher pressure than supplied steam pressure, so it can reduce the feedwater pumps. The maintenance and reliability are still higher because SI has no movable parts. This paper describes the analysis of the heat balance and plant efficiency of this Innovative- Simplified NPP with high-efficiency SI. The plant efficiency is compared with the electric power of 1100MWe-class BWR system and the Innovative- Simplified BWR system with SI. The SI model is adapted into the heat balance simulator with a simplified model. The results show plant efficiencies of the Innovated-Simplified BWR system are almost equal to the original BWR one. The present research is one of the projects that are carried out by Tokyo Electric Power Company, Toshiba Corporation, and six Universities in Japan, funded from the Institute of Applied Energy (IAE) of Japan as the national public research-funded program. (authors)

  8. Development of technologies on innovative-simplified nuclear power plant using high-efficiency steam injectors. (2) Analysis of heat balance of innovative-simplified nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Shoji; Ohmori, Shuichi; Mori, Mitchitsugu

    2004-01-01

    It is possible to established simplified systems and reduced space and equipments using high-efficiency Steam Injector (SI) instead of low-pressure feed water heaters in Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). The SI works as a heat exchanger through direct contact between feedwater from condenser and extracted steam from turbine. It can get a higher pressure than supplied steam pressure, so it can reduce the feedwater pumps. The maintenance and reliability are still higher because SI has no movable parts. This paper describes the analysis of the heat balance and plant efficiency of this Innovative-Simplified NPP with high-efficiency SI. The plant efficiency is compared with the electric power of 1100MWe class original BWR system and the Innovative-Simplified BWR system with SI. The SI model is adapted into the heat balance simulator with a simplified model. The results show plant efficiencies of the Innovated-Simplified BWR system are almost equal to the original BWR one. The present research is one of the projects that are carried out by Tokyo Electric Power Company, Toshiba Corporation, and six Universities in Japan, funded from the Institute of Applied Energy (IAE) of Japan as the national public research-funded program. (author)

  9. District heating system of Belgrade supplied from the co-generation plant 'Obrenovac' (Yugoslavia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomic, P.; Dobric, Z.; Studovic, M.

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents most relevant technical and economic features of the Project called 'System for supplying Belgrade with heat' (SDGB) from the thermal power plant 'Obrenovac', based on domestic coal and reconstruction of condensing power plant for combined generation of electricity and heat for the needs of municipal energy consumption. The system is designed for transport thermal energy, with capacity of 730 MJ/s from the Thermal Power Plant 'Nikola Tesla' / A to the existing heat plant 'Novi Beograd' based on the natural gas. The paper also gives the comparison of most important technical and economic features of 'SDGB' Project with the similar Project of District Heating System for supplying Prague with the thermal energy from Thermal Power Plant Melnik. (Author)

  10. Plant to reduce reactor scrams and ASSET related analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piirto, A [Teollisuuden Voima Oy (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    The report of events at the plant follows established rules. Basically, three categories of reports exist: first, the reactor scram report, secondly, the operational disturbance report and thirdly, the special report. The last named category covers events defined by authorities. It concentrates on safety related events, for example on failures to follow the requirements stipulated in the plant`s Technical Specifications. In general, special events are nuclear safety on the plant, the safety of the plant personnel or overall, the radiation safety in the plant`s vicinity. In the TVO`s experience feedback activity the greatest emphasis is put on events at the TVO plant. The events on the same type of plants come second. Due to limited resources, somewhat less attention is paid to events on the other types of plants. However, the experience feedback should become wider in practice so that it would be a part of everyday life in nuclear power plant operation.

  11. Reducing Risk for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John M. Beck II; Harold J. Heydt; Emmanuel O. Opare; Kyle B. Oswald

    2010-07-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project, managed by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is directed by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, to research, develop, design, construct, and operate a prototype forth generation nuclear reactor to meet the needs of the 21st Century. As with all large projects developing and deploying new technologies, the NGNP has numerous risks that need to be identified, tracked, mitigated, and reduced in order for successful project completion. A Risk Management Plan (RMP) was created to outline the process the INL is using to manage the risks and reduction strategies for the NGNP Project. Integral to the RMP is the development and use of a Risk Management System (RMS). The RMS is a tool that supports management and monitoring of the project risks. The RMS does not only contain a risk register, but other functionality that allows decision makers, engineering staff, and technology researchers to review and monitor the risks as the project matures.

  12. Reducing Risk for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, John M. II; Heydt, Harold J.; Opare, Emmanuel O.; Oswald, Kyle B.

    2010-01-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project, managed by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is directed by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, to research, develop, design, construct, and operate a prototype forth generation nuclear reactor to meet the needs of the 21st Century. As with all large projects developing and deploying new technologies, the NGNP has numerous risks that need to be identified, tracked, mitigated, and reduced in order for successful project completion. A Risk Management Plan (RMP) was created to outline the process the INL is using to manage the risks and reduction strategies for the NGNP Project. Integral to the RMP is the development and use of a Risk Management System (RMS). The RMS is a tool that supports management and monitoring of the project risks. The RMS does not only contain a risk register, but other functionality that allows decision makers, engineering staff, and technology researchers to review and monitor the risks as the project matures.

  13. Thermodynamic evaluation of CHP (combined heat and power) plants integrated with installations of coal gasification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziębik, Andrzej; Malik, Tomasz; Liszka, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    Integration of a CHP steam plant with an installation of coal gasification and gas turbine leads to an IGCC-CHP (integrated gasification combined cycle-combined heat and power). Two installations of coal gasification have been analyzed, i.e. pressurized entrained flow gasifier – case 1 and pressurized fluidized bed gasifier with CO_2 recirculation – case 2. Basing on the results of mathematical modelling of an IGCC-CHP plant, the algorithms of calculating typical energy indices have been derived. The following energy indices are considered, i.e. coefficient of heat performance and relative savings of chemical energy of fuels. The results of coefficients of heat performance are contained between 1.87 and 2.37. Values exceeding 1 are thermodynamically justified because the idea of cogeneration of heat and electricity based on combining cycles of the heat engine and heat pump the efficiency of which exceeds 1. Higher values concerning waste heat replace more thermodynamically effective sources of heat in CHP plants. Relative savings of the chemical energy of fuels are similar in both cases of IGCC-CHP plants and are contained between the lower value of the CHP (combined heat and power) plants fuelled with coal and higher value of CHP plants fired with natural gas. - Highlights: • Energy savings of fuel is an adequate measure of cogeneration. • Relative energy savings of IGCC-CHP is near the result of a gas and steam CHP. • COHP (coefficient of heat performance) can help to divide fuel between heat fluxes. • Higher values of COHP in the case of waste heat recovery result from the lower thermal parameters.

  14. Economic feasibility of heat supply from nuclear power plants in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roe, K.K.; Oliker, I.

    1987-01-01

    Nuclear energy is regarded as competitive for urban district heating applications. Hot water heat transoport systems of up to 50 miles are feasible for heat loads over 1500 MWt, and heat load density of over 130 MWt/mi 2 is most suitable for nuclear applications. An incremental approach and a nuclear plant design provision for future heat extraction are recommended. Nuclear district heating technology status is discussed, particularly turbine design. Results of a study for retrofitting a major existing nuclear power plant to cogeneration operation are presented. The study indicates that for transmission distances up to 20 miles it is economical to generate and transport between 600 and 1200 MWt of district heat (author)

  15. DENINT power plant cost benefit analysis code: Analysis of methane fuelled power plant/district heating system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cincotti, V.; D'Andrea, A.

    1989-07-01

    The DENINT power plant cost benefit analysis code takes into consideration, not only power production costs at the generator terminals, but also, in the case of cogeneration, the costs of the fuel supply and heat and power distribution systems which depend greatly on the location of the plant. The code is able to allow comparisons of alternatives with varying annual operation hours, fuel cost increases, and different types of fossil fuels and production systems. For illustrative purposes, this paper examines two methane fired cogeneration plant/district heating alternatives

  16. Heat and mass transfer and hydrodynamics in two-phase flows in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Styrikovich, M.A.; Polonskii, V.S.; Tsiklauri, G.V.

    1986-01-01

    This book examines nuclear power plant equipment from the point of view of heat and mass transfer and the behavior of impurities contained in water and in steam, with reference to real water regimes of nuclear power plants. The transfer processes of equipment are considered. Heat and mass transfer are analyzed in the pre-crisis regions of steam-generating passages with non-permeable surfaces, and in capillary-porous structures. Attention is given to forced convection boiling crises and top post-DNB heat transfer. Data on two-phase hydrodynamics in straight and curved channels are correlated and safety aspects of nuclear power plants are discussed

  17. Plate heat exchangers in the power plant industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wersel, M.; Ridell, B.

    1984-01-01

    An increase in heat transfer and stability, small investment, high flexibility, easy maintenance and corrosion resistance are obtained by the design and construction of plate heat exchangers and by the introduction of the herringbone pattern. The plate heat exchanger can be used in nearly 90% of all secondary circuits in powerstations. Examples of its installation are the WYLFA, GENTILLY, RINGHALS and TVO Finland nuclear power-stations. (DG) [de

  18. Economic and environmental efficiency of district heating plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agrell, Per J.; Bogetoft, Peter

    2005-01-01

    heat, have arbitrary valuation.This study concerns the most developed European district heating and cogeneration system, the Danish.By assessing environmental and economic ef¿ciency, the impact of governmental, market and managerial imperfections are estimated.The principal methodological base......District heating, the conversion of primary energy into distributed thermal energy and possible electric energy, is a challenge to regulate.In addition to the ever present asymmetric information in any suf¿ciently complex activity, some of the inputs for district heating, such as excess process...

  19. Technical and economical analysis of concepts for using the heat of biogas plants in rural areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaths, Friederike Annette

    2012-08-01

    Since the implementation of the EEG in Germany the biogas production becomes an independent branch of industry in the agriculture. At this time more than 90 percent of the biogas plants work with co-generation plant for heat and power with a thermal engine efficiencies of more than 50 percent. Because of the location in the rural area heat costumers with a continuous demand of heat over the whole year are rare. This research had a closer look how to use the heat of biogas production efficiently and also generating profit. The aim of the study was to use heat over the whole year, a profitable heat concept without counting the KWK-bonus and an added value on the farm. During the study the following concepts were analyzed: asparagus production using soil heating, drying equipment for different products, the production of fish in aquaculture, the poultry production and the heated production of tomatoes. The results showed different concepts using heat of biogas plants as efficient for farmers. However with only one concept the aims - to use the heat over the whole year, generating a profitable heat concept without counting the KWK-bonus, add an value on the farm - mostly can not be achieved. The combination of different heat concepts is necessary. In this analysis the poultry production in combination with the dryer can be considered as the most efficient concept. Bearing in mind the benefit which can be generated with a heat concept as well as the higher income and the higher technical efficiency of biogas plants operators should implement an individual concept for their heat.

  20. Heterologous expression of a plastid EF-Tu reduces protein thermal aggregation and enhances CO2 fixation in wheat (Triticum aestivum) following heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jianming; Momcilović, Ivana; Clemente, Thomas E; Nersesian, Natalya; Trick, Harold N; Ristic, Zoran

    2008-10-01

    Heat stress is a major constraint to wheat production and negatively impacts grain quality, causing tremendous economic losses, and may become a more troublesome factor due to global warming. At the cellular level, heat stress causes denaturation and aggregation of proteins and injury to membranes leading to alterations in metabolic fluxes. Protein aggregation is irreversible, and protection of proteins from thermal aggregation is a strategy a cell uses to tolerate heat stress. Here we report on the development of transgenic wheat (Triticum aestivum) events, expressing a maize gene coding for plastidal protein synthesis elongation factor (EF-Tu), which, compared to non-transgenic plants, display reduced thermal aggregation of leaf proteins, reduced heat injury to photosynthetic membranes (thylakoids), and enhanced rate of CO(2) fixation after exposure to heat stress. The results support the concept that EF-Tu ameliorates negative effects of heat stress by acting as a molecular chaperone. This is the first demonstration of the introduction of a plastidal EF-Tu in plants that leads to protection against heat injury and enhanced photosynthesis after heat stress. This is also the first demonstration that a gene other than HSP gene can be used for improvement of heat tolerance and that the improvement is possible in a species that has a complex genome, hexaploid wheat. The results strongly suggest that heat tolerance of wheat, and possibly other crop plants, can be improved by modulating expression of plastidal EF-Tu and/or by selection of genotypes with increased endogenous levels of this protein.

  1. Integration of solar process heat into an existing thermal desalination plant in Qatar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieckmann, S.; Krishnamoorthy, G.; Aboumadi, M.; Pandian, Y.; Dersch, J.; Krüger, D.; Al-Rasheed, A. S.; Krüger, J.; Ottenburger, U.

    2016-05-01

    The water supply of many countries in the Middle East relies mainly on water desalination. In Qatar, the water network is completely fed with water from desalination plants. One of these power and desalination plants is located in Ras Abu Fontas, 20 km south of the capital Doha. The heat required for thermal desalination is provided by steam which is generated in waste heat recovery boilers (HRB) connected to gas turbines. Additionally, gas fired boilers or auxiliary firing in the HRBs are used in order to decouple the water generation from the electricity generation. In Ras Abu Fontas some auxiliary boilers run 24/7 because the HRB capacity does not match the demand of the desalination units. This paper contains the techno-economic analysis of two large-scale commercial solar field options, which could reduce the fuel consumption significantly. Both options employ parabolic trough technology with a nominal saturated steam output of 350 t/h at 15 bar (198°C, 240 MW). The first option uses direct steam generation without storage while the second relies on common thermal oil in combination with a molten salt thermal storage with 6 hours full-load capacity. The economic benefit of the integration of solar power depends mainly on the cost of the fossil alternative, and thus the price (respectively opportunity costs) of natural gas. At a natural gas price of 8 US-/MMBtu the internal rate of return on equity (IRR) is expected at about 5%.

  2. Environmental analysis of a potential district heating network powered by a large-scale cogeneration plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravina, Marco; Panepinto, Deborah; Zanetti, Maria Chiara; Genon, Giuseppe

    2017-05-01

    Among the solutions for the achievement of environmental sustainability in the energy sector, district heating (DH) with combined heat and power (CHP) systems is increasingly being used. The Italian city of Turin is in a leading position in this field, having one of the largest DH networks in Europe. The aim of this work is the analysis of a further development of the network, addressed to reduce the presence of pollutants in a city that has long been subject to high concentration levels. The environmental compatibility of this intervention, especially in terms of nitrogen oxides (NO x ) and particulate matter (PM) emissions, is evaluated. The pollutants dispersion is estimated using the CALPUFF model. The forecasting scenario is created firstly by simulating the energy production of the main generation plants in response to the estimated heat demand, and secondly by investigating the amount and the dispersion of pollutants removed due to the elimination of the centralized residential heaters. The results show a future reduction in ground level average NO x concentration ranging between 0.2 and 4 μg/m 3 . The concentration of PM remains almost unchanged. Measures are then taken to lower the uncertainty in the simulation scenarios. This study provides important information on the effects of a change of the energy configuration on air quality in an urban area. The proposed methodological approach is comprehensive and repeatable.

  3. DNS of fully developed turbulent heat transfer of a viscoelastic drag-reducing flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Bo [Department of Oil and Gas Storage and Transportation Engineering, China University of Petroleum, Beijing 102249 (China); Kawaguchi, Yasuo [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, 2641 Yamazaki, Noda, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan)

    2005-10-01

    A direct numerical simulation (DNS) of turbulent heat transfer in a channel flow with a Giesekus model was carried out to investigate turbulent heat transfer mechanism of a viscoelastic drag-reducing flow by additives. The configuration was a fully-developed turbulent channel flow with uniform heat flux imposed on both the walls. The temperature was considered as a passive scalar with the effect of buoyancy force neglected. The Reynolds number based on the friction velocity and half the channel height was 150. Statistical quantities such as root-mean-square temperature fluctuations, turbulent heat fluxes and turbulent Prandtl number were obtained and compared with those of a Newtonian fluid flow. Budget terms of the temperature variance and turbulent heat fluxes were also presented. (author)

  4. Plant to reduce reactor scrams and ASSET related analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piirto, A.

    1997-01-01

    The report of events at the plant follows established rules. Basically, three categories of reports exist: first, the reactor scram report, secondly, the operational disturbance report and thirdly, the special report. The last named category covers events defined by authorities. It concentrates on safety related events, for example on failures to follow the requirements stipulated in the plant's Technical Specifications. In general, special events are nuclear safety on the plant, the safety of the plant personnel or overall, the radiation safety in the plant's vicinity. In the TVO's experience feedback activity the greatest emphasis is put on events at the TVO plant. The events on the same type of plants come second. Due to limited resources, somewhat less attention is paid to events on the other types of plants. However, the experience feedback should become wider in practice so that it would be a part of everyday life in nuclear power plant operation

  5. Maximum wind power plant generation by reducing the wake effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De-Prada-Gil, Mikel; Alías, César Guillén; Gomis-Bellmunt, Oriol; Sumper, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • To analyze the benefit of applying a new control strategy to maximise energy yield. • To operate some wind turbines at non-optimum points for reducing wake effects. • Single, partial and multiple wakes for any wind direction are taken into account. • Thrust coefficient is computed according to Blade Element Momentum (BEM) theory. - Abstract: This paper analyses, from a steady state point of view, the potential benefit of a Wind Power Plant (WPP) control strategy whose main objective is to maximise its total energy yield over its lifetime by taking into consideration that the wake effect within the WPP varies depending on the operation of each wind turbine. Unlike the conventional approach in which each wind turbine operation is optimised individually to maximise its own energy capture, the proposed control strategy aims to optimise the whole system by operating some wind turbines at sub-optimum points, so that the wake effect within the WPP is reduced and therefore the total power generation is maximised. The methodology used to assess the performance of both control approaches is presented and applied to two particular study cases. It contains a comprehensive wake model considering single, partial and multiple wake effects among turbines. The study also takes into account the Blade Element Momentum (BEM) theory to accurately compute both power and thrust coefficient of each wind turbine. The results suggest a good potential of the proposed concept, since an increase in the annual energy captured by the WPP from 1.86% up to 6.24% may be achieved (depending on the wind rose at the WPP location) by operating some specific wind turbines slightly away from their optimum point and reducing thus the wake effect

  6. Calculation of Efficiencies of a Ship Power Plant Operating with Waste Heat Recovery through Combined Heat and Power Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Grljušić

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to investigate the possibility of a combined heat & power (CHP plant, using the waste heat from a Suezmax-size oil tanker’s main engine, to meet all heating and electricity requirements during navigation. After considering various configurations, a standard propulsion engine operating at maximum efficiency, combined with a supercritical Organic Rankine cycle (ORC system, was selected to supply the auxiliary power, using R245fa or R123 as the working fluid. The system analysis showed that such a plant can meet all heat and electrical power requirements at full load, with the need to burn only a small amount of supplementary fuel in a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG when the main engine operates at part load. Therefore, it is possible to increase the overall thermal efficiency of the ship’s power plant by more than 5% when the main engine operates at 65% or more of its specified maximum continuous rating (SMCR.

  7. Project No. 6 - Replacement of the heating and steam plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    At present the Ignalina NPP facilities and Visaginas town are supplied with heat and steam from the district heating facility at Ignalina NPP. A back-up system, dating from 1979, supplies heat and steam when the district heating system is under repair or in case of outages of units 1 and 2. The existing back-up system does no longer meet with applicable technical and safety standards. A breakdown of the back-up system might result in the interruption of the supply to Ignalina NPP of heat and steam necessary for a number of processes, including waste management. Reconstruction of the existing boiler houses is not economically viable option, nor recommendable, for safety reasons, as it would mean the temporary closing of the back-up system. Project activities includes the design, construction and commissioning of the proposed facility, including all licensing documentation

  8. Reducing CO2 emissions and energy consumption of heat-integrated distillation systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadalla, Mamdouh A; Olujic, Zarko; Jansens, Peter J; Jobson, Megan; Smith, Robin

    2005-09-01

    Distillation systems are energy and power intensive processes and contribute significantly to the greenhouse gases emissions (e.g. carbon dioxide). Reducing CO2 emissions is an absolute necessity and expensive challenge to the chemical process industries in orderto meetthe environmental targets as agreed in the Kyoto Protocol. A simple model for the calculation of CO2 emissions from heat-integrated distillation systems is introduced, considering typical process industry utility devices such as boilers, furnaces, and turbines. Furnaces and turbines consume large quantities of fuels to provide electricity and process heats. As a result, they produce considerable amounts of CO2 gas to the atmosphere. Boilers are necessary to supply steam for heating purposes; besides, they are also significant emissions contributors. The model is used in an optimization-based approach to optimize the process conditions of an existing crude oil atmospheric tower in order to reduce its CO2 emissions and energy demands. It is also applied to generate design options to reduce the emissions from a novel internally heat-integrated distillation column (HIDiC). A gas turbine can be integrated with these distillation systems for larger emissions reduction and further energy savings. Results show that existing crude oil installations can save up to 21% in energy and 22% in emissions, when the process conditions are optimized. Additionally, by integrating a gas turbine, the total emissions can be reduced further by 48%. Internal heat-integrated columns can be a good alternative to conventional heat pump and other energy intensive close boiling mixtures separations. Energy savings can reach up to 100% with respect to reboiler heat requirements. Emissions of these configurations are cut down by up to 83%, compared to conventional units, and by 36%, with respect to heat pump alternatives. Importantly, cost savings and more profit are gained in parallel to emissions minimization.

  9. Performance of ultra low temperature district heating systems with utility plant and booster heat pumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ommen, Torben Schmidt; Thorsen, Jan Eric; Markussen, Wiebke Brix

    2017-01-01

    The optimal integration of booster heat pumps in ultra low temperature district heating (ULTDH) was investigated and compared to the performance of low temperature district heating. Two possible heat production technologies for the DH networks were analysed, namely extraction combined heat...... temperature and the heat consumption profile. For reference conditions, the optimal return of ULTDH varies between 21 °C and 27 °C. When using a central HP to supply the DH system, the resulting coefficient of system performance (COSP) was in the range of 3.9 (-) to 4.7 (-) for equipment with realistic...... component efficiencies and effectiveness, when including the relevant parameters such as DH system pressure and heat losses. By using ULTDH with booster HPs, performance improvements of 12% for the reference calculations case were found, if the system was supplied by central HPs. Opposite results were found...

  10. Reducing Pumping Power in Hydronic Heating and Cooling Systems with Microencapsulated Phase Change Material Slurries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karas, Kristoffer Jason

    Phase change materials (PCMs) are being used increasingly in a variety of thermal transfer and thermal storage applications. This thesis presents the results of a laboratory study into the feasibility of improving the performance of hydronic heating and cooling systems by adding microcapsules filled with a PCM to the water used as heat transport media in these systems. Microencapsulated PCMs (MPCMs) increase the heat carrying capacity of heat transport liquids by absorbing or releasing heat at a constant temperature through a change of phase. Three sequences of tests and their results are presented: 1) Thermal cycling tests conducted to determine the melting temperatures and extent of supercooling associated with the MPCMs tested. 2) Hydronic performance tests in which MPCM slurries were pumped through a fin-and-tube, air-to-liquid heat exchanger and their thermal transfer performance compared against that of ordinary water. 3) Mechanical stability tests in which MPCM slurries were pumped in a continuous loop in order to gauge the extent of rupture due to pumping. It is shown that slurries consisting of water and MPCMs ˜ 14-24 mum in diameter improve thermal performance and offer the potential for power savings in the form of reduced pumping requirements. In addition, it is shown that while slurries of MPCMs 2-5 mum in diameter appear to exhibit better mechanical stability than slurries of larger diameter MPCMs, the smaller MPCMs appear to reduce the thermal performance of air-to-liquid heat exchangers.

  11. Wood pellet heating plants. Market survey. 4. upd. ed.; Hackschnitzel-Heizung. Marktuebersicht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-11-15

    Wood pellets from the agriculture and forestry offer an enormous potential for the development of the use of bio energy in the private area as well as in industry and commerce. Within the market survey 'Wood pellet heating systems', the Fachagentur Nachwachsende Rohstoffe e.V. (Guelzow-Pruezen, Federal Republic of Germany) reported on the targets and measures of the Federal Government with respect to the heating with biomass, wood pellets as solid biofuels (standardization of solid biofuels, supply, features, evaluation), wood pellet heating plants, economic considerations, market survey on wood pellet heating plants as well as list of addresses for producers of wood pellet heating plants and suppliers of wood pellets.

  12. Analysis of heat balance on innovative-simplified nuclear power plant using multi-stage steam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Shoji; Ohmori, Shuichi; Mori, Michitsugu

    2006-01-01

    The total space and weight of the feedwater heaters in a nuclear power plant (NPP) can be reduced by replacing low-pressure feedwater heaters with high-efficiency steam injectors (SIs). The SI works as a direct heat exchanger between feedwater from condensers and steam extracted from turbines. It can attain pressures higher than the supplied steam pressure. The maintenance cost is lower than that of the current feedwater heater because of its simplified system without movable parts. In this paper, we explain the observed mechanisms of the SI experimentally and the analysis of the computational fluid dynamics (CFD). We then describe mainly the analysis of the heat balance and plant efficiency of the innovative-simplified NPP, which adapted to the boiling water reactor (BWR) with the high-efficiency SI. The plant efficiencies of this innovative-simplified BWR with SI are compared with those of a 1 100 MWe-class BWR. The SI model is adopted in the heat balance simulator as a simplified model. The results show that the plant efficiencies of the innovate-simplified BWR with SI are almost equal to those of the original BWR. They show that the plant efficiency would be slightly higher if the low-pressure steam, which is extracted from the low-pressure turbine, is used because the first-stage of the SI uses very low pressure. (author)

  13. Performance investigation of a cogeneration plant with the efficient and compact heat recovery system

    KAUST Repository

    Myat, Aung; Thu, Kyaw; Kim, Young-Deuk; Choon, Ng Kim

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the performance investigation of a cogeneration plant equipped with an efficient waste heat recovery system. The proposed cogeneration system produces four types of useful energy namely: (i) electricity, (ii) steam, (iii) cooling

  14. Feasibility study on rehabilitation and improvement of thermal power plants, district heating and heat supply system in Botosani City

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    Discussions have been given on the improvement and modification project intended of saving energies and reducing greenhouse gas emission in the Botosani district heating and heat supplying facilities in Romania. Thirty years have elapsed since the building of the Botosani district heating and heat supplying facilities, whereas noticeable energy loss has occurred due to aged deterioration, such as thermal efficiency decrease, performance decrease, and hot water leakage due to piping corrosion. The present project is intended to improve the heat production and power generation facility efficiencies, and reduce the heat loss in heat transportation and distribution to less than 5%. The improvements will be implemented by replacing and rehabilitating the existing boilers, replacing the turbine generators, and replacing the transportation and distribution pipelines and heat exchangers. As a result of the discussions, the present project is estimated to result in annual fuel conservation of 35,820 tons of crude oil equivalent, and annual reduction of the greenhouse gas emission of 110,835 t-CO2. The total amount of the initial investment for the project would be 11.369 billion yen, and the payback period would be 12 years. The project will produce profit of 31.358 billion yen in 20 years, thus the project is financially feasible. (NEDO)

  15. AsHSP17, a creeping bentgrass small heat shock protein modulates plant photosynthesis and ABA-dependent and independent signalling to attenuate plant response to abiotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xinbo; Sun, Chunyu; Li, Zhigang; Hu, Qian; Han, Liebao; Luo, Hong

    2016-06-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are molecular chaperones that accumulate in response to heat and other abiotic stressors. Small HSPs (sHSPs) belong to the most ubiquitous HSP subgroup with molecular weights ranging from 12 to 42 kDa. We have cloned a new sHSP gene, AsHSP17 from creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera) and studied its role in plant response to environmental stress. AsHSP17 encodes a protein of 17 kDa. Its expression was strongly induced by heat in both leaf and root tissues, and by salt and abscisic acid (ABA) in roots. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants constitutively expressing AsHSP17 exhibited enhanced sensitivity to heat and salt stress accompanied by reduced leaf chlorophyll content and decreased photosynthesis under both normal and stressed conditions compared to wild type. Overexpression of AsHSP17 also led to hypersensitivity to exogenous ABA and salinity during germination and post-germinative growth. Gene expression analysis indicated that AsHSP17 modulates expression of photosynthesis-related genes and regulates ABA biosynthesis, metabolism and ABA signalling as well as ABA-independent stress signalling. Our results suggest that AsHSP17 may function as a protein chaperone to negatively regulate plant responses to adverse environmental stresses through modulating photosynthesis and ABA-dependent and independent signalling pathways. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. PWR passive plant heat removal assessment: Joint EPRI-CRIEPI advanced LWR studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-03-01

    An independent assessment of the capabilities of the PWR passive plant heat removal systems was performed, covering the Passive Residual Heat Removal (PRHR) System, the Passive Safety Injection System (PSIS) and the Passive Containment Cooling System (PCCS) used in a 600 MWe passive plant (e.g., AP600). Additional effort included a review of the test programs which support the design and analysis of the systems, an assessment of the licensability of the plant with regard to heat removal adequacy, and an evaluation of the use of the passive systems with a larger plant. The major conclusions are as follows. The PRHR can remove core decay heat, prevents the pressurizer from filling with water for a loss-of-feedwater transient, and provides safety-grade means for maintaining the reactor coolant system in a safe shutdown condition for the case where the non-safety residual heat removal system becomes unavailable. The PSIS is effective in maintaining the core covered with water for loss-of-coolant accident pipe breaks to eight inches. The PCCS has sufficient heat removal capability to maintain the containment pressure within acceptable limits. The tests performed and planned are adequate to confirm the feasibility of the passive heat removal system designs and to provide a database for verification of the analytical techniques used for the plant evaluations. Each heat removal system can perform in accordance with Regulatory requirements, with the exception that the PRHR system is unable to achieve the required cold shutdown temperature of 200 F within the required 36-hour period. The passive heat removal systems to be used for the 600 MWe plant could be scaled up to a 900 MWe passive plant in a straightforward manner and only minimal, additional confirmatory testing would be required. Sections have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base

  17. Dedicated low temperature nuclear district heating plants: Rationale and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goetzmann, C.A.

    1997-01-01

    Space heating accounts for a substantial fraction of the end-energy consumption in a large number of industrialized countries. Accordingly, efforts have been under way since many years to utilize nuclear energy as a source for district heating. The paper describes the key technical and institutional issues affecting the implementation of such technology. It is argued that the basic case for nuclear district heating is sound but that its introduction merits and drawbacks strongly depend on local circumstances. (author). 4 figs, 1 tab

  18. Dedicated low temperature nuclear district heating plants: Rationale and prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetzmann, C A [Division of Nuclear Power, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    1997-09-01

    Space heating accounts for a substantial fraction of the end-energy consumption in a large number of industrialized countries. Accordingly, efforts have been under way since many years to utilize nuclear energy as a source for district heating. The paper describes the key technical and institutional issues affecting the implementation of such technology. It is argued that the basic case for nuclear district heating is sound but that its introduction merits and drawbacks strongly depend on local circumstances. (author). 4 figs, 1 tab.

  19. Heat recovery from flue gas of coal fired installations with reduced pollutant emission - the Zittau process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, H; Strauss, R; Hofmann, K -D; Suder, M; Hultsch, T; Wetzel, W; Gabrysch, H; Jung, J [Technische Hochschule, Zittau (German Democratic Republic)

    1989-01-01

    Explains the Zittau technology of combined flue gas heat recovery and flue gas desulfurization in small brown coal fired power plants. Steam generators to be equipped with this technology have 6.5 or 10 t/h steam capacity and are intended for combustion of low-grade brown coal (8.2 MJ/kg). An industrial 6.5 t/h prototype steam generator is in operation and it achieves 95% SO{sub 2} removal from flue gas with 5600 to 7800 mg SO{sub 2} per m{sup 3} of dry flue gas. The Zittau technology is available in 3 variants: with maximum waste heat recovery, with partial waste heat recovery or without waste heat recovery and only wet flue gas scrubbing. Two flowsheets of flue gas and suspension circulation are provided. The first variant recovers 25.7% of nominal heat capacity (1.1 thermal MW from a 4.2 MW steam generator with 6.5 t/h steam capacity), which amounts to economizing 2,400 t/a brown coal equivalent over 4,000 annual operating hours. The second variant recovers 6.5% of waste heat, requiring less investment by installing smaller heat exchangers than used in the first variant. All three variants have contact spray separators, suction units and suspension preparation equipment. Flue gas suspension scrubbing is carried out with fly ash produced by the steam generator. This ash is capable of absorbing 50 to 70% of flue gas SO{sub 2}. Supply of additional ash from other plants achieve a further 25% SO{sub 2} removal; a higher desulfurization degree is obtained by adding limestone to suspensions. 5 refs.

  20. Target study of heat supply from Northern Moravia nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pospisil, V.

    The construction is envisaged in Northern Moravia of a nuclear power plant near Blahutovice in the Novy Jicin district. Heat produced by the nuclear power plant will only be used for district heating; process heat will be supplied from local steam sources. An example is discussed of the Prerov locality which currently is supplied from the Prerov heating and power plant (230 MW), a heating plant (36 MW) and from local sources (15 NW). The study estimates that a thermal power of 430 MW will be required at a time of the start of heat supplies from the nuclear power plant. All heat supply pipelines will be designed as a two-tube system divided into sections with section pipe fittings. The number and location of pipe fittings will be selected depending on the terrain configuration. Water of the maximum outlet temperature of 150 degC will be used as a coolant. The control of the system for Northern Moravia is briefly described. (J.P.)

  1. Setting technical and economic features regarding nuclear heating plants implementation for heat supply in Romania by the year 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romascu, G.; Constantin, L.; Gheorghe, A.; Ciocanescu, M.; Ionescu, M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the world wide preoccupation concerning the implementation of nuclear heating plants for fulfilling the heat demand and the main technical data of the reactors destined to such NHP's. The second part of this paper shows technical and economic aspects related to the implementation of NHP's equipped with nuclear thermal reactor specialized in the exclusive heat supply in Romania at the level of the year 2010. Among these aspects the following are mentioned: - the results of researches and the world wide achievements; - the development and structure of the production and of the thermal electric energy as well as the feasibility for covering the demands for nuclear sources; - the impact on environment of various technologies for the production of thermal energy with conventional fuels comparing with NHP; - the philosophy from economic stand point for the covering part of the NHP heat demand. (authors)

  2. Innovative Hybrid CHP systems for high temperature heating plant in existing buildings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Santoli, Livio; Lo Basso, Gianluigi; Nastasi, B.; d’Ambrosio Alfano, Francesca R.; Mazzarella and Piercarlo, Livio

    2017-01-01

    This paper deals with the potential role of new hybrid CHP systems application providing both electricity and heat which are compatible with the building architectural and landscape limitations. In detail, three different plant layout options for high temperature heat production along with the

  3. Implementing Geothermal Plants in the Copenhagen District Heating System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Louise Overvad; Hallgreen, Christine Erikstrup; Larsen, Esben

    2003-01-01

    of geothermal energy in Denmark as well as the Danish potential, which, in former investigations, has been found to be around 100.000 PJ annually, and the economical potential is less, about 15 PJ/year. Since a considerable amount of the Danish power supply is tied to weather and the demand for heating......The possibility of implementing geothermal heating in the Copenhagen district-heating system is assessed. This is done by building up general knowledge on the geological factors that influence the development of useable geothermal resources, factors concerning the exploration and utilization......, an increasing demand for flexibility has been raised. Implementing geothermal heating would improve the flexibility in the Eastern Danish power system. Based on this information, as well as, on the hourly values of the expected production and consumption in 2010 and 2020, a model of the Copenhagen power...

  4. Duct burners in heat recovery system for cogeneration and captive power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumdar, J.

    1992-01-01

    Our oil explorations both onshore and offshore have thrown open bright prospects of cogeneration by using natural gas in gas turbine power plants with heat recovery units. Both for co-gen and combined cycle systems, supplementary firing of GT exhaust gas is normally required. Hence, duct burners have significant role for effective contribution towards of efficacy of heat recovery system for gas turbine exhaust gas. This article details on various aspects of duct burners in heat recovery systems. (author)

  5. Rotating machinery surveillance system reduces plant downtime and radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohanick, J.S.; Robinson, J.C.; Allen, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    A rotating machinery surveillance system (RMSS) was permanently installed at Grand Gulf nuclear station (GGNS) as part of a program sponsored by the US Department of Energy whose goal was to reduce radiation exposure to power plant personnel resulting from the inspection, maintenance, and repair of rotating machinery. The RMSS was installed at GGNS in 1983 to continuously monitor 173 analog vibration signals from proximity probes mounted on 26 machine trains and ∼450 process data points via a computer data link. Vibration frequency spectra, i.e., the vibration amplitude versus frequency of vibration, and various characterizations of these spectra are the fundamental data collected by the RMSS for performing machinery diagnostics. The RMSS collects vibration frequency spectra on a daily basis for all the monitored rotating equipment and automatically stores the collected spectra for review by the vibration engineer. Vibration spectra automatically stored by the RMSS fall into categories that include the last normal, alarm, minimum and maximum, past three-day data set, baseline, current, and user-saved spectra. During first and second fuel-cycle operation at GGNS, several significant vibration problems were detected by the RMSS. Two of these are presented in this paper: recirculation pumps and turbine-generator bearing degradation. The total reduction in personnel radiation exposure at GGNS from 1985 to 1987 due to the presence of the RMSS was estimated to be in the range from 49 to 54 person-rem

  6. Energy saving and consumption reducing evaluation of thermal power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xiu; Han, Miaomiao

    2018-03-01

    At present, energy saving and consumption reduction require energy saving and consumption reduction measures for thermal power plant, establishing an evaluation system for energy conservation and consumption reduction is instructive for the whole energy saving work of thermal power plant. By analysing the existing evaluation system of energy conservation and consumption reduction, this paper points out that in addition to the technical indicators of power plant, market activities should also be introduced in the evaluation of energy saving and consumption reduction in power plant. Ttherefore, a new evaluation index of energy saving and consumption reduction is set up and the example power plant is calculated in this paper. Rresults show that after introducing the new evaluation index of energy saving and consumption reduction, the energy saving effect of the power plant can be judged more comprehensively, so as to better guide the work of energy saving and consumption reduction in power plant.

  7. Reducing heat loss from the energy absorber of a solar collector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Bei Tse; Rabl, Ari

    1976-01-01

    A device is provided for reducing convective heat loss in a cylindrical radiant energy collector. It includes a curved reflective wall in the shape of the arc of a circle positioned on the opposite side of the exit aperture from the reflective side walls of the collector. Radiant energy exiting the exit aperture is directed by the curved wall onto an energy absorber such that the portion of the absorber upon which the energy is directed faces downward to reduce convective heat loss from the absorber.

  8. Value Stream Mapping for Evaluation of Load Scheduling Possibilities in a District Heating Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raivo Melsas

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to provide a solution for load scheduling by implementing value stream mapping, which is a straightforward enough for production management. Decision makers in the industry should have a clear understanding about positive effect from load scheduling and its effect to production outcome and process availability. Value stream mapping is a well-known process optimization tool from lean production philosophy. The aim of value stream mapping is to shorten the lead time of industrial processes and to reduce the intermediate stock amounts. By complementing value stream map with process energy intensity and energy stored in intermediate stocks, we can promote load scheduling possibilities. Our methodology provides a tool that is understandable and traceable for industry-minded decision makers. Finally, we present a real life test example for the new methodology, which is based on the production process of a district heating plant.

  9. Reducing the energy consumption of an earth–air heat exchanger with a PID control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz-Mendez, S.E.; Patiño-Carachure, C.; Herrera-Castillo, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The application of control actions to green technologies has been simulated. • Energy consumption of green technologies can be reduced even more. • The efficiency of green technologies can be raised. • Environmental concerns can be diminished. • The sustainability of the planet can be increased. - Abstract: Reducing environmental emissions is one of the challenges that human being has to overcome. It can only be reached with a proper energetic efficiency and management of the processes that exist in the society nowadays. Several academic works have mentioned that raising the efficiency of a process it also increases sustainability and in turn decreases the environmental impact. One process that requires much attention is the cooling and heating of buildings; this process contributes to the major part of the electric bill, in particular, if a conventional and old air conditioning is used as commonly occurs in many countries. In recent years there have been developed new alternatives that are used in few countries, such as the earth–air heat exchanger, where air is passed through a heat exchanger buried a few meters below the ground. The heat exchanger takes advantage of the well-known difference between the temperature of the surrounding air and the temperature of the ground for cooling or heating the air that is subsequently injected into the buildings. This process requires less energy, then in the present work is thought that a PID (Proportional, Integral and Derivative) controller can be applied to an earth–air heat exchanger to reduce even more the energy consumption. Therefore, a simulation of a thermodynamic model of an earth–air heat exchanger was done and used along with a PID controller, to estimate savings in energy consumption. The results show that the energy consumption can be reduced up to 87% with the PID control, hence the efficiency of the process is increased as well as the sustainability of the planet and thus the

  10. Nuclear power plant with improved arrangements for the removal of post fission and emergency heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buescher, E.; Vinzens, K.

    1977-01-01

    This is concerned with additional equipment for emergency heat removal in a sodium cooled reactor, which operates on failure of the post fission heat removal system. The space for pressure relieving spaces and concrete masses as heat sinks within the reactor cell is no longer required. In this nuclear power plant, a heat exchanger chain transmits heat and power: There is a first sodium circuit between pressure vessel and the first heat exchanger, a second one between the first and second heat excahngers, and a third (Steam) circuit with turbine, condenser and return pump. A fourth circuit connects the secondary side of the condenser with a cooling tower. There is a threee component heat excahgner in the primary circuit after the first heat exchanger, which is built around the first heat exchanger, and is sealed into an unloading space. This space is situated next to the reactor cell and is above the operating level of the sodium in the pressure vessel. It is connected to the cell by an upper duct, normally closed by a bursting disc, and by a lower duct. In the three comopnent heat exchanger, a liquid lead-bismuth eutectic mixture transmits the heat from sodium pipes to water pipes. In normal operation it is used for steam superheating or feedwater preheating. The three component heat exchanger bridges the first and second heat exchangers as an emergency heat exchanger. If in such a case the post fission heat removal has failed, the sodium evaporating in the pressure vessel flows into the unloading space and condenses on the ribs of the emergency heat exchanger. The post fission heat is fed by the water secondary medium directly into the tertiary circuit. The sodium condensate flows back from the unloading space via the lower duct into the reactor cell and maintains the emergency level there. (RW) 891 RW [de

  11. Component design considerations for gas turbine HTGR waste-heat power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, C.F.; Vrable, D.L.

    1976-01-01

    Component design considerations are described for the ammonia waste-heat power conversion system of a large helium gas-turbine nuclear power plant under development by General Atomic Company. Initial component design work was done for a reference plant with a 3000-MW(t) High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR), and this is discussed. Advanced designs now being evaluated include higher core outlet temperature, higher peak system pressures, improved loop configurations, and twin 4000-MW(t) reactor units. Presented are the design considerations of the major components (turbine, condenser, heat input exchanger, and pump) for a supercritical ammonia Rankine waste heat power plant. The combined cycle (nuclear gas turbine and waste-heated plant) has a projected net plant efficiency of over 50 percent. While specifically directed towards a nuclear closed-cycle helium gas-turbine power plant (GT-HTGR), it is postulated that the bottoming waste-heat cycle component design considerations presented could apply to other low-grade-temperature power conversion systems such as geothermal plants

  12. ABA Is Required for Plant Acclimation to a Combination of Salt and Heat Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuhiro Suzuki

    Full Text Available Abiotic stresses such as drought, heat or salinity are a major cause of yield loss worldwide. Recent studies revealed that the acclimation of plants to a combination of different environmental stresses is unique and cannot be directly deduced from studying the response of plants to each of the different stresses applied individually. Here we report on the response of Arabidopsis thaliana to a combination of salt and heat stress using transcriptome analysis, physiological measurements and mutants deficient in abscisic acid, salicylic acid, jasmonic acid or ethylene signaling. Arabidopsis plants were found to be more susceptible to a combination of salt and heat stress compared to each of the different stresses applied individually. The stress combination resulted in a higher ratio of Na+/K+ in leaves and caused the enhanced expression of 699 transcripts unique to the stress combination. Interestingly, many of the transcripts that specifically accumulated in plants in response to the salt and heat stress combination were associated with the plant hormone abscisic acid. In accordance with this finding, mutants deficient in abscisic acid metabolism and signaling were found to be more susceptible to a combination of salt and heat stress than wild type plants. Our study highlights the important role abscisic acid plays in the acclimation of plants to a combination of two different abiotic stresses.

  13. Exchanging and Storing Energy. Reducing Energy Demand through Heat Exchange between Functions and Temporary Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sillem, E.

    2011-06-15

    As typical office buildings from the nineties have large heating and cooling installations to provide heat or cold wherever and whenever needed, more recent office buildings have almost no demand for heating due to high internal heat loads caused by people, lighting and office appliances and because of the great thermal qualities of the contemporary building envelope. However, these buildings still have vast cooling units to cool down servers and other energy consuming installations. At the same time other functions such as dwellings, swimming pools, sporting facilities, archives and museums still need to be heated most of the year. In the current building market there is an increasing demand for mixed-use buildings or so called hybrid buildings. The Science Business Centre is no different and houses a conference centre, offices, a museum, archives, an exhibition space and a restaurant. From the initial program brief it seemed that the building will simultaneously house functions that need cooling most of the year and functions that will need to be heated the majority of the year. Can this building be equipped with a 'micro heating and cooling network' and where necessary temporarily store energy? With this idea a research proposal was formulated. How can the demand for heating and cooling of the Science Business Centre be reduced by using energy exchange between different kinds of functions and by temporarily storing energy? In conclusion the research led to: four optimized installation concepts; short term energy storage in pavilion concept and museum; energy exchange between the restaurant and archives; energy exchange between the server space and the offices; the majority of heat and cold will be extracted from the soil (long term energy storage); the access heat will be generated by the energy roof; PV cells from the energy roof power all climate installations; a total energy plan for the Science Business Centre; a systematic approach for exchanging

  14. Habituation of Salmonella spp. at Reduced Water Activity and Its Effect on Heat Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattick, K. L.; Jørgensen, F.; Legan, J. D.; Lappin-Scott, H. M.; Humphrey, T. J.

    2000-01-01

    The effect of habituation at reduced water activity (aw) on heat tolerance of Salmonella spp. was investigated. Stationary-phase cells were exposed to aw 0.95 in broths containing glucose-fructose, sodium chloride, or glycerol at 21°C for up to a week prior to heat challenge at 54°C. In addition, the effects of different aws and heat challenge temperatures were investigated. Habituation at aw 0.95 resulted in increased heat tolerance at 54°C with all solutes tested. The extent of the increase and the optimal habituation time depended on the solute used. Exposure to broths containing glucose-fructose (aw 0.95) for 12 h resulted in maximal heat tolerance, with more than a fourfold increase in D54 values. Cells held for more than 72 h in these conditions, however, became as heat sensitive as nonhabituated populations. Habituation in the presence of sodium chloride or glycerol gave rise to less pronounced but still significant increases in heat tolerance at 54°C, and a shorter incubation time was required to maximize tolerance. The increase in heat tolerance following habituation in broths containing glucose-fructose (aw 0.95) was RpoS independent. The presence of chloramphenicol or rifampin during habituation and inactivation did not affect the extent of heat tolerance achieved, suggesting that de novo protein synthesis was probably not necessary. These data highlight the importance of cell prehistory prior to heat inactivation and may have implications for food manufacturers using low-aw ingredients. PMID:11055944

  15. Large combined heat and power plants in sustainable energy systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Rasmus Søgaard; Mathiesen, Brian Vad

    2015-01-01

    . It is concluded that the CCGT CHP plant is the most feasible both from a technical analysis and a market economic analysis with electricity exchange. It is found that the current economic framework for large CHP plants in Denmark generates a mismatch between socio economy and business economy as well...

  16. Flow-Boiling Critical Heat Flux Experiments Performed in Reduced Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Mohammad M.; Mudawar, Issam

    2005-01-01

    Poor understanding of flow boiling in microgravity has recently emerged as a key obstacle to the development of many types of power generation and advanced life support systems intended for space exploration. The critical heat flux (CHF) is perhaps the most important thermal design parameter for boiling systems involving both heatflux-controlled devices and intense heat removal. Exceeding the CHF limit can lead to permanent damage, including physical burnout of the heat-dissipating device. The importance of the CHF limit creates an urgent need to develop predictive design tools to ensure both the safe and reliable operation of a two-phase thermal management system under the reduced-gravity (like that on the Moon and Mars) and microgravity environments of space. At present, very limited information is available on flow-boiling heat transfer and the CHF under these conditions.

  17. Stochastic Programming for Fuel Supply Planning of Combined Heat and Power Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guericke, Daniela; Blanco, Ignacio; Morales González, Juan Miguel

    The consumption of biomass to produce power and heat has increased due to the carbon neutral policies. Combined heat and power (CHP) plants often combine biomass with other fuels, e.g., natural gas. The negotiation process for supply contracts involves many uncertainties due to the long planning...... horizon. The demand for biomass is uncertain, and heat demand and electricity prices vary during the planning period. We propose a method using stochastic optimization to support the biomass and natural gas supply planning for CHP plants including short-term decisions for optimal market participation....

  18. Certification of materials for steam generator condensor and regeneration heat exchanger for nuclear plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevanovicj, M.V.; Jovashevicj, V.J.; Jovashevicj, V.D.J.; Spasicj, Zh.Lj.

    1977-01-01

    In the construction of a nuclear power plant almost all known materials are used. The choice depends on working conditions. In this work standard specifications of contemporary materials that take part in larger quantities in the following components of the secondary circuit of PWR-type nuclear power plant are proposed: steam generator with moisture separator, condensor and regenerative heat eXchanger

  19. Optimisation of Control Strategy at the Central Solar Heating Plant in Marstal, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heller, Alfred

    1999-01-01

    The central solar heating plant at Marstal is monitored since 1996. The data is analysed with focus on the applied constrol strategy for the solar collector field. Variable flow is applied which is not the case at the other plants compared. The project analysed the performance, compared...

  20. USING CENTER HOLE HEAT TRANSFER TO REDUCE FORMATION TIMES FOR CERAMIC WASTE FORMS FROM PYROPROCESSING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenneth J. Bateman; Charles W. Solbrig

    2006-01-01

    The waste produced from processing spent fuel from the EBR II reactor must be processed into a waste form suitable for long term storage in Yucca Mountain. The method chosen produces zeolite granules mixed with glass frit, which must then be converted into a solid. This is accomplished by loading it into a can and heating to 900 C in a furnace regulated at 915 C. During heatup to 900 C, the zeolite and glass frit react and consolidate to produce a sodalite monolith. The resultant ceramic waste form (CWF) is then cooled. The waste is 52 cm in diameter and initially 300 cm long but consolidates to 150 cm long during the heating process. After cooling it is then inserted in a 5-DHLW/DOE SNF Long Canister. Without intervention, the waste takes 82 hours to heat up to 900 C in a furnace designed to geometrically fit the cylindrical waste form. This paper investigates the reduction in heating times possible with four different methods of additional heating through a center hole. The hole size is kept small to maximize the amount of CWF that is processed in a single run. A hole radius of 1.82 cm was selected which removes only 1% of the CWF. A reference computation was done with a specified inner hole surface temperature of 915 C to provide a benchmark for the amount of improvement which can be made. It showed that the heatup time can potentially be reduced to 43 hours with center hole heating. The first method, simply pouring high temperature liquid aluminum into the hole, did not produce any noticeable effect on reducing heat up times. The second method, flowing liquid aluminum through the hole, works well as long as the velocity is high enough (2.5 cm/sec) to prevent solidification of the aluminum during the initial front movement of the aluminum into the center hole. The velocity can be reduced to 1 cm/sec after the initial front has traversed the ceramic. This procedure reduces the formation time to near that of the reference case. The third method, flowing a gas

  1. Dual capillary tube / heat exchanger in combination with cycle priming for reducing charge migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Alberto Regio; Kuehl, Steven J.; Litch, Andrew D.; Wu, Guolian

    2017-07-04

    A refrigerator appliance including a multi-capacity compressor and a refrigerant circuit with two conduits and pressure reducing devices arranged in parallel between an evaporator and a condenser. Refrigerant can flow through one, both or none of the conduits and pressure reducing devices. The appliance also has a heat exchanger in contact with either one pressure reducing device, or one conduit between the pressure reducing device and the valve system. The appliance also includes a controller for priming the compressor above a nominal capacity for a predetermined or calculated duration at the beginning of an ON-cycle.

  2. Base-Load and Peak Electricity from a Combined Nuclear Heat and Fossil Combined-Cycle Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conklin, Jim; Forsberg, Charles W.

    2007-01-01

    A combined-cycle power plant is proposed that uses heat from a high-temperature reactor and fossil fuel to meet base-load and peak electrical demands. The high-temperature gas turbine produces shaft power to turn an electric generator. The hot exhaust is then fed to a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) that provides steam to a steam turbine for added electrical power production. A simplified computational model of the thermal power conversion system was developed in order to parametrically investigate two different steady-state operation conditions: base load nuclear heat only from an Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR), and combined nuclear heat with fossil heat to increase the turbine inlet temperature. These two cases bracket the expected range of power levels, where any intermediate power level can result during electrical load following. The computed results indicate that combined nuclear-fossil systems have the potential to offer both low-cost base-load electricity and lower-cost peak power relative to the existing combination of base-load nuclear plants and separate fossil-fired peak-electricity production units. In addition, electric grid stability, reduced greenhouse gases, and operational flexibility can also result with using the conventional technology presented here for the thermal power conversion system coupled with the AHTR

  3. How a retrotransposon exploits the plant's heat stress response for its activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir V Cavrak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Retrotransposons are major components of plant and animal genomes. They amplify by reverse transcription and reintegration into the host genome but their activity is usually epigenetically silenced. In plants, genomic copies of retrotransposons are typically associated with repressive chromatin modifications installed and maintained by RNA-directed DNA methylation. To escape this tight control, retrotransposons employ various strategies to avoid epigenetic silencing. Here we describe the mechanism developed by ONSEN, an LTR-copia type retrotransposon in Arabidopsis thaliana. ONSEN has acquired a heat-responsive element recognized by plant-derived heat stress defense factors, resulting in transcription and production of full length extrachromosomal DNA under elevated temperatures. Further, the ONSEN promoter is free of CG and CHG sites, and the reduction of DNA methylation at the CHH sites is not sufficient to activate the element. Since dividing cells have a more pronounced heat response, the extrachromosomal ONSEN DNA, capable of reintegrating into the genome, accumulates preferentially in the meristematic tissue of the shoot. The recruitment of a major plant heat shock transcription factor in periods of heat stress exploits the plant's heat stress response to achieve the transposon's activation, making it impossible for the host to respond appropriately to stress without losing control over the invader.

  4. Potentials for heat accumulators in thermal power plants; Potenziale fuer Waermespeicher in Heiz(kraft)werken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dengel, Andreas [STEAG New Energies GmbH, Saarbruecken (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    STEAG New Energies GmbH (Saarbruecken, Federal Republic of Germany) is contractor and operator of a variety of decentralized plants for heat production and power generation. The customers consist of communities, cooperation associations, business enterprises as well as industrial enterprises. Beside merely heat generators, so-called heat and power cogeneration plants often are used. The power generation is of minor importance due to the heat-controlled energy supply of the customers. Biomass power plants being operated in line with the Renewable Energy Law are an exemption. The demand for regulating energy increased clearly due to the enhanced volatile feeding of regenerative produced electric power. If the operation of heat and power cogeneration plants becomes more independent from the actual energy demand by using energy storages, then the energy transducer can be implemented in the lucrative market of regulation energy supply. Thus, the potential of such storages at the sites within a company shall be determined. Additionally, the development and testing of a latent heat accumulator for a thermal power plant of the company supplying process vapour with a temperature of 300 Celsius to a foil manufacturing facility is envisaged.

  5. Design option of heat exchanger for the next generation nuclear plant - HTR2008-58175

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, C. H.; Kim, E. S.

    2008-01-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), a very High temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (VHTR) concept, will provide the first demonstration of a closed-loop Brayton cycle at a commercial scale, producing a few hundred megawatts of power in the form of electricity and hydrogen. The power conversion unit (PCU) for the NGNP will take advantage of the significantly higher reactor outlet temperatures of the VHTRs to provide higher efficiencies than can be achieved with the current generation of light water reactors. Besides demonstrating a system design that can be used directly for subsequent commercial deployment, the NGNP will demonstrate key technology elements that can be used in subsequent advanced power conversion systems for other Generation IV reactors. In anticipation of the design, development and procurement of an advanced power conversion system for the NGNP, the system integration of the NGNP and hydrogen plant was initiated to identify the important design and technology options that must be considered in evaluating the performance of the proposed NGNP. As part of the system integration of the VHTRs and the hydrogen production plant, the intermediate heat exchanger is used to transfer the process heat from VHTRs to the hydrogen plant. Therefore, the design and configuration of the intermediate heat exchanger is very important. This paper will include analysis of one stage versus two stage heat exchanger design configurations and simple stress analyses of a printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE), helical coil heat exchanger, and shell/tube heat exchanger. (authors)

  6. Evaluation of focused ultrasound algorithms: Issues for reducing pre-focal heating and treatment time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiannakou, Marinos; Trimikliniotis, Michael; Yiallouras, Christos; Damianou, Christakis

    2016-02-01

    Due to the heating in the pre-focal field the delay between successive movements in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) are sometimes as long as 60s, resulting to treatment time in the order of 2-3h. Because there is generally a requirement to reduce treatment time, we were motivated to explore alternative transducer motion algorithms in order to reduce pre-focal heating and treatment time. A 1 MHz single element transducer with 4 cm diameter and 10 cm focal length was used. A simulation model was developed that estimates the temperature, thermal dose and lesion development in the pre-focal field. The simulated temperature history that was combined with the motion algorithms produced thermal maps in the pre-focal region. Polyacrylimde gel phantom was used to evaluate the induced pre-focal heating for each motion algorithm used, and also was used to assess the accuracy of the simulation model. Three out of the six algorithms having successive steps close to each other, exhibited severe heating in the pre-focal field. Minimal heating was produced with the algorithms having successive steps apart from each other (square, square spiral and random). The last three algorithms were improved further (with small cost in time), thus eliminating completely the pre-focal heating and reducing substantially the treatment time as compared to traditional algorithms. Out of the six algorithms, 3 were successful in eliminating the pre-focal heating completely. Because these 3 algorithms required no delay between successive movements (except in the last part of the motion), the treatment time was reduced by 93%. Therefore, it will be possible in the future, to achieve treatment time of focused ultrasound therapies shorter than 30 min. The rate of ablated volume achieved with one of the proposed algorithms was 71 cm(3)/h. The intention of this pilot study was to demonstrate that the navigation algorithms play the most important role in reducing pre-focal heating. By evaluating in

  7. Scale Resistant Heat Exchanger for Low Temperature Geothermal Binary Cycle Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hays, Lance G. [Energent Corporation, Santa Ana, CA (United States)

    2014-11-18

    Phase 1 of the investigation of improvements to low temperature geothermal power systems was completed. The improvements considered were reduction of scaling in heat exchangers and a hermetic turbine generator (eliminating seals, seal system, gearbox, and lube oil system). A scaling test system with several experiments was designed and operated at Coso geothermal resource with brine having a high scaling potential. Several methods were investigated at the brine temperature of 235 ºF. One method, circulation of abradable balls through the brine passages, was found to substantially reduce scale deposits. The test heat exchanger was operated with brine outlet temperatures as low as 125 ºF, which enables increased heat input available to power conversion systems. For advanced low temperature cycles, such as the Variable Phase Cycle (VPC) or Kalina Cycle, the lower brine temperature will result in a 20-30% increase in power production from low temperature resources. A preliminary design of an abradable ball system (ABS) was done for the heat exchanger of the 1 megawatt VPC system at Coso resource. The ABS will be installed and demonstrated in Phase 2 of this project, increasing the power production above that possible with the present 175 ºF brine outlet limit. A hermetic turbine generator (TGH) was designed and manufacturing drawings produced. This unit will use the working fluid (R134a) to lubricate the bearings and cool the generator. The 200 kW turbine directly drives the generator, eliminating a gearbox and lube oil system. Elimination of external seals eliminates the potential of leakage of the refrigerant or hydrocarbon working fluids, resulting in environmental improvement. A similar design has been demonstrated by Energent in an ORC waste heat recovery system. The existing VPC power plant at Coso was modified to enable the “piggyback” demonstration of the TGH. The existing heat exchanger, pumps, and condenser will be operated to provide the required

  8. Study of regeneration system of 300 MW power unit based on nondeaerating heat balance diagram at reduced load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esin, S. B.; Trifonov, N. N.; Sukhorukov, Yu. G.; Yurchenko, A. Yu.; Grigor'eva, E. B.; Snegin, I. P.; Zhivykh, D. A.; Medvedkin, A. V.; Ryabich, V. A.

    2015-09-01

    More than 30 power units of thermal power stations, based on the nondeaerating heat balance diagram, successfully operate in the former Soviet Union. Most of them are power units with a power of 300 MW, equipped with HTGZ and LMZ turbines. They operate according to a variable electric load curve characterized by deep reductions when undergoing night minimums. Additional extension of the range of power unit adjustment makes it possible to maintain the dispatch load curve and obtain profit for the electric power plant. The objective of this research is to carry out estimated and experimental processing of the operating regimes of the regeneration system of steam-turbine plants within the extended adjustment range and under the conditions when the constraints on the regeneration system and its equipment are removed. Constraints concerning the heat balance diagram that reduce the power unit efficiency when extending the adjustment range have been considered. Test results are presented for the nondeaerating heat balance diagram with the HTGZ turbine. Turbine pump and feed electric pump operation was studied at a power unit load of 120-300 MW. The reliability of feed pump operation is confirmed by a stable vibratory condition and the absence of cavitation noise and vibration at a frequency that characterizes the cavitation condition, as well as by oil temperature maintenance after bearings within normal limits. Cavitation performance of pumps in the studied range of their operation has been determined. Technical solutions are proposed on providing a profitable and stable operation of regeneration systems when extending the range of adjustment of power unit load. A nondeaerating diagram of high-pressure preheater (HPP) condensate discharge to the mixer. A regeneration system has been developed and studied on the operating power unit fitted with a deaeratorless thermal circuit of the system for removing the high-pressure preheater heating steam condensate to the mixer

  9. Nuclear heat generating plants - technical concepts and market potentials. Chapter 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasenkopf, O.; Erhard, W.D.; Nonnenmacher, A.; Hanselmann, M.

    1988-01-01

    Within the framework of a case study under the Federal Ministry of Research and Technology project 'Nuclear heat generating plants - technological concepts and market potentials', the possible applications of such plants were studied giving the district heat supply network of the Technische Werke der Stadt Stuttgart AG (Technical Works of the City of Stuttgart, Inc.) as an example. The use of district heating systems concentrated specifically on areas identified for economical supply because of their topographical position, existing heat density, distance from power plants, and a reasonable delimination from the available gas network. Based on the results of optimization calculations made by the Stuttgart Institute for Nuclear Technology and Energy Conversion, the required investment capital can be estimated as a function of the amount of fuel savings under the Stuttgart case study. (orig./UA) [de

  10. Reducing vibration transfer from power plants by active methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiryukhin, A. V.; Milman, O. O.; Ptakhin, A. V.

    2017-12-01

    The possibility of applying the methods of active damping of vibration and pressure pulsations for reducing their transfer from power plants into the environment, the seating, and the industrial premises are considered. The results of experimental works implemented by the authors on the active broadband damping of vibration and dynamic forces after shock-absorption up to 15 dB in the frequency band up to 150 Hz, of water pressure pulsations in the pipeline up to 20 dB in the frequency band up to 600 Hz, and of spatial low-frequency air noise indoors of a diesel generator at discrete frequency up to 20 dB are presented. It is shown that a reduction of vibration transfer through a vibration-isolating junction (expansion joints) of pipelines with liquid is the most complicated and has hardly been developed so far. This problem is essential for vibration isolation of power equipment from the seating and the environment through pipelines with water and steam in the power and transport engineering, shipbuilding, and in oil and gas pipelines in pumping stations. For improving efficiency, reducing the energy consumption, and decreasing the overall dimensions of equipment, it is advisable to combine the work of an active system with passive damping means, the use of which is not always sufficient. The executive component of the systems of active damping should be placed behind the vibration isolators (expansion joints). It is shown that the existence of working medium and connection of vibration with pressure pulsations in existing designs of pipeline expansion joints lead to growth of vibration stiffness of the expansion joint with the environment by two and more orders as compared with the static stiffness and makes difficulties for using the active methods. For active damping of vibration transfer through expansion joints of pipelines with a liquid, it is necessary to develop expansion joint structures with minimal connection of vibrations and pulsations and minimal

  11. Reducing residential solid fuel combustion through electrified space heating leads to substantial air quality, health and climate benefits in China's Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J.; Mauzerall, D. L.

    2017-12-01

    During periods of high pollution in winter, household space heating can contribute more than half of PM2.5 concentrations in China's Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei (BTH) region. The majority of rural households and some urban households in the region still heat with small stoves and solid fuels such as raw coal, coal briquettes and biomass. Thus, reducing emissions from residential space heating has become a top priority of the Chinese government's air pollution mitigation plan. Electrified space heating is a promising alternative to solid fuel. However, there is little analysis of the air quality and climate implications of choosing various electrified heating devices and utilizing different electricity sources. Here we conduct an integrated assessment of the air quality, human health and climate implications of various electrified heating scenarios in the BTH region using the Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry. We use the Multi-resolution Emission Inventory for China for the year 2012 as our base case and design two electrification scenarios in which either direct resistance heaters or air source heat pumps are installed to replace all household heating stoves. We initially assume all electrified heating devices use electricity from supercritical coal-fired power plants. We find that installing air source heat pumps reduces CO2 emissions and premature deaths due to PM2.5 pollution more than resistance heaters, relative to the base case. The increased health and climate benefits of heat pumps occur because they have a higher heat conversion efficiency and thus require less electricity for space heating than resistance heaters. We also find that with the same heat pump installation, a hybrid electricity source (40% of the electricity generated from renewable sources and the rest from coal) further reduces both CO2 emissions and premature deaths than using electricity only from coal. Our study demonstrates the air pollution and CO2 mitigation potential and

  12. Feasibility studies to improve plant availability and reduce total installed cost in IGCC plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, Kevin [General Electric Company, Houston, TX (United States); Anasti, William [General Electric Company, Houston, TX (United States); Fang, Yichuan [General Electric Company, Houston, TX (United States); Subramanyan, Karthik [General Electric Company, Houston, TX (United States); Leininger, Tom [General Electric Company, Houston, TX (United States); Zemsky, Christine [General Electric Company, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-03-30

    The main purpose of this project is to look at technologies and philosophies that would help reduce the costs of an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plant, increase its availability or do both. GE’s approach to this problem is to consider options in three different areas: 1) technology evaluations and development; 2) constructability approaches; and 3) design and operation methodologies. Five separate tasks were identified that fall under the three areas: Task 2 – Integrated Operations Philosophy; Task 3 – Slip Forming of IGCC Components; Task 4 – Modularization of IGCC Components; Task 5 – Fouling Removal; and Task 6 – Improved Slag Handling. Overall, this project produced results on many fronts. Some of the ideas could be utilized immediately by those seeking to build an IGCC plant in the near future. These include the considerations from the Integrated Operations Philosophy task and the different construction techniques of Slip Forming and Modularization (especially if the proposed site is in a remote location or has a lack of a skilled workforce). Other results include ideas for promising technologies that require further development and testing to realize their full potential and be available for commercial operation. In both areas GE considers this project to be a success in identifying areas outside the core IGCC plant systems that are ripe for cost reduction and ity improvement opportunities.

  13. A multi-biofuel, fluidised-bed district heating plant in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    At the end of 1984, the city of Haessleholm in Sweden started up a 65 MW district heating plant which included a 14 MW solid fuel plant. The plant included a specially-designed fluidised-bed boiler, capable of burning all grades of solid fuel, including organic fuel of such low grade that no other boilers around Haessleholm could use it. By 1992, the district heating system served some 250 detached houses and 6,000 flats as well as several schools and industrial premises. The biofuel boiler provides almost 60% of the energy required. (UK)

  14. Aeroplastic, New Composite Materials with Reduced Heat Transfer and Increased Flame Retardancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Martha K.; Smith, Trent M.; Nichols, James D.; Roberson, Luke B.; Tate, Lanetra C.

    2015-01-01

    A new composite system formulated using commodity grade and engineered grade polymers. The composites can be fabricated into fibers, molded, or otherwise processed into useable articles. Use of this technology reduces the thermal conductivity and peak heat releases rates of the base polymer between 20%-50% while maintaining or enhancing the mechanical properties..

  15. Role of tin as a reducing agent in iron containing heat absorbing ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    infrared region and a narrow weak band for Fe3+ ion at its λmax at around 380 nm was observed in the silicate glass. ... Tin reducing agent; iron heat absorption; silicate glass. 1. ... ing point of aluminium metal is far below than the glass.

  16. Environmental impact of emissions from incineration plants in comparison to typical heating systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wielgosiński, Grzegorz; Namiecińska, Olga; Czerwińska, Justyna

    2018-01-01

    In recent years, five modern municipal waste incineration plants have been built in Poland. Next ones are being constructed and at the same time building of several others is being considered. Despite positive experience with the operation of the existing installations, each project of building a new incinerator raises a lot of emotions and social protests. The main argument against construction of an incineration plant is the emission of pollutants. The work compares emissions from municipal waste incineration plants with those from typical heating plants: in the first part, for comparison large heating plants equipped with pulverized coal-fired boilers (OP-140), stoker-fired boilers (three OR-32 boilers) or gas blocks with heat output of about 100 MW have been selected, while the second part compares WR-10 and WR-25 stoker-fired boilers most popular in our heating industry with thermal treatment systems for municipal waste or refuse-derived-fuel (RDF) with similar heat output. Both absolute emission and impact - immission of pollutants in vicinity of the plant were analyzed.

  17. Environmental impact of emissions from incineration plants in comparison to typical heating systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wielgosiński Grzegorz

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, five modern municipal waste incineration plants have been built in Poland. Next ones are being constructed and at the same time building of several others is being considered. Despite positive experience with the operation of the existing installations, each project of building a new incinerator raises a lot of emotions and social protests. The main argument against construction of an incineration plant is the emission of pollutants. The work compares emissions from municipal waste incineration plants with those from typical heating plants: in the first part, for comparison large heating plants equipped with pulverized coal-fired boilers (OP-140, stoker-fired boilers (three OR-32 boilers or gas blocks with heat output of about 100 MW have been selected, while the second part compares WR-10 and WR-25 stoker-fired boilers most popular in our heating industry with thermal treatment systems for municipal waste or refuse-derived-fuel (RDF with similar heat output. Both absolute emission and impact - immission of pollutants in vicinity of the plant were analyzed.

  18. Economic impact of latent heat thermal energy storage systems within direct steam generating solar thermal power plants with parabolic troughs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seitz, M.; Johnson, M.; Hübner, S.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Integration of a latent heat thermal energy storage system into a solar direct steam generation power cycle. • Parametric study of solar field and storage size for determination of the optimal layout. • Evaluation of storage impact on the economic performance of the solar thermal power plant. • Economic comparison of new direct steam generation plant layout with state-of-the-art oil plant layout. - Abstract: One possible way to further reduce levelized costs of electricity of concentrated solar thermal energy is to directly use water/steam as the primary heat transfer fluid within a concentrated collector field. This so-called direct steam generation offers the opportunity of higher operating temperatures and better exergy efficiency. A technical challenge of the direct steam generation technology compared to oil-driven power cycles is a competitive storage technology for heat transfer fluids with a phase change. Latent heat thermal energy storages are suitable for storing heat at a constant temperature and can be used for direct steam generation power plants. The calculation of the economic impact of an economically optimized thermal energy storage system, based on a latent heat thermal energy storage system with phase change material, is the main focus of the presented work. To reach that goal, a thermal energy storage system for a direct steam generation power plant with parabolic troughs in the solar field was thermally designed to determine the boundary conditions. This paper discusses the economic impact of the designed thermal energy storage system based on the levelized costs of electricity results, provided via a wide parametric study. A state-of-the-art power cycle with a primary and a secondary heat transfer fluid and a two-tank thermal energy storage is used as a benchmark technology for electricity generation with solar thermal energy. The benchmark and direct steam generation systems are compared to each other, based respectively

  19. MINET, Transient Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer Power Plant Network Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Tuyle, G.J.

    2002-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: MINET (Momentum Integral Network) was developed for the transient analysis of intricate fluid flow and heat transfer networks, such as those found in the balance of plant in power generating facilities. It can be utilized as a stand-alone program or interfaced to another computer program for concurrent analysis. Through such coupling, a computer code limited by either the lack of required component models or large computational needs can be extended to more fully represent the thermal hydraulic system thereby reducing the need for estimating essential transient boundary conditions. The MINET representation of a system is one or more networks of volumes, segments, and boundaries linked together via heat exchangers only, i.e., heat can transfer between networks, but fluids cannot. Volumes are used to represent tanks or other volume components, as well as locations in the system where significant flow divisions or combinations occur. Segments are composed of one or more pipes, pumps, heat exchangers, turbines, and/or valves each represented by one or more nodes. Boundaries are simply points where the network interfaces with the user or another computer code. Several fluids can be simulated, including water, sodium, NaK, and air. 2 - Method of solution: MINET is based on a momentum integral network method. Calculations are performed at two levels, the network level (volumes) and the segment level. Equations conserving mass and energy are used to calculate pressure and enthalpy within volumes. An integral momentum equation is used to calculate the segment average flow rate. In-segment distributions of mass flow rate and enthalpy are calculated using local equations of mass and energy. The segment pressure is taken to be the linear average of the pressure at both ends. This method uses a two-plus equation representation of the thermal hydraulic behavior of a system of heat exchangers, pumps, pipes, valves, tanks, etc. With the

  20. Process integration in bioprocess indystry: waste heat recovery in yeast and ethyl alcohol plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raskovic, P.; Anastasovski, A.; Markovska, Lj.; Mesko, V.

    2010-01-01

    The process integration of the bioprocess plant for production of yeast and alcohol was studied. Preliminary energy audit of the plant identified the huge amount of thermal losses, caused by waste heat in exhausted process streams, and reviled the great potential for energy efficiency improvement by heat recovery system. Research roadmap, based on process integration approach, is divided on six phases, and the primary tool used for the design of heat recovery network was Pinch Analysis. Performance of preliminary design are obtained by targeting procedure, for three process stream sets, and evaluated by the economic criteria. The results of process integration study are presented in the form of heat exchanger networks which fulfilled the utilization of waste heat and enable considerable savings of energy in short payback period.

  1. Feasibility study on development of plate-type heat exchanger for BWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohyama, Nobuhiro; Suda, Kenichi; Ogata, Hiroshi; Matsuda, Shinichi; Nagasaka, Kazuhiro; Fujii, Toshi; Nozawa, Toshiya; Ishihama, Kiyoshi; Higuchi, Tomokazu

    2004-01-01

    In order to apply plate-type heat exchanger to RCW, TCW and FPC system in BWR plants, heat test and seismic test of RCW system heat exchanger sample were carried out. The results of these tests showed new design plate-type heat exchanger satisfied the fixed pressure resistance and seismic resistance and keep the function. The evaluation method of seismic design was constructed and confirmed by the results of tests. As anti-adhesion measure of marine organism, an ozone-water circulation method, chemical-feed method and combination of circulation of hot water and air bubbling are useful in place of the chlorine feeding method. Application of the plate-type heat exchanger to BWR plant is confirmed by these investigations. The basic principles, structure, characteristics, application limit and reliability are stated. (S.Y.)

  2. Integrating Waste Heat from CO2 Removal and Coal-Fired Flue Gas to Increase Plant Efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irvin, Nick [Southern Company Services, Inc., Birmingham, AL (United States); Kowalczyk, Joseph [Southern Company Services, Inc., Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2017-04-01

    In project DE-FE0007525, Southern Company Services demonstrated heat integration methods for the capture and sequestration of carbon dioxide produced from pulverized coal combustion. A waste heat recovery technology (termed High Efficiency System) from Mitsubishi Heavy Industries America was integrated into an existing 25-MW amine-based CO2 capture process (Kansai Mitsubishi Carbon Dioxide Recovery Process®1) at Southern Company’s Plant Barry to evaluate improvements in the energy performance of the pulverized coal plant and CO2 capture process. The heat integration system consists of two primary pieces of equipment: (1) the CO2 Cooler which uses product CO2 gas from the capture process to heat boiler condensate, and (2) the Flue Gas Cooler which uses air heater outlet flue gas to further heat boiler condensate. Both pieces of equipment were included in the pilot system. The pilot CO2 Cooler used waste heat from the 25-MW CO2 capture plant (but not always from product CO2 gas, as intended). The pilot Flue Gas Cooler used heat from a slipstream of flue gas taken from downstream of Plant Barry’s air heater. The pilot also included a 0.25-MW electrostatic precipitator. The 25-MW High Efficiency System operated for approximately six weeks over a four month time period in conjunction with the 25-MW CO2 capture facility at Plant Barry. Results from the program were used to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of full-scale implementation of this technology. The test program quantified energy efficiency improvements to a host power plant that could be realized due to the High Efficiency System. Through the execution of this project, the team verified the integrated operation of the High Efficiency System and Kansai Mitsubishi Carbon Dioxide Recovery Process®. The ancillary benefits of the High Efficiency System were also quantified, including reduced water consumption

  3. Working fluid selection for the Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) exhaust heat recovery of an internal combustion engine power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douvartzides, S.; Karmalis, I.

    2016-11-01

    Organic Rankine cycle technology is capable to efficiently convert low-grade heat into useful mechanical power. In the present investigation such a cycle is used for the recovery of heat from the exhaust gases of a four stroke V18 MAN 51/60DF internal combustion engine power plant operating with natural gas. Design is focused on the selection of the appropriate working fluid of the Rankine cycle in terms of thermodynamic, environmental and safety criteria. 37 candidate fluids have been considered and all Rankine cycles examined were subcritical. The thermodynamic analysis of all fluids has been comparatively undertaken and the effect of key operation conditions such as the evaporation pressure and the superheating temperature was taken into account. By appropriately selecting the working fluid and the Rankine cycle operation conditions the overall plant efficiency was improved by 5.52% and fuel consumption was reduced by 12.69%.

  4. Study concerning the erection within the precincts of INR Pitesti of TRIGA prototype nuclear heating plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciocanescu, M.; Ionescu, M.; Constantin, L.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents the problems of nuclear plant energy production as heating source for industrial processes and urban district heating. The study is based on the TRIGA concept due to some of its advantages in comparison with other concepts. The system solutions for a prototype implementation and the aspects of the economical and financial efficiency are outlined. The conclusion is drawn that the TRIGA 53 MWt-reactor is suitable to meet the heating needs of urban and industrial heating systems in this country

  5. Heat exchanger design considerations for high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, C.F.; Vrable, D.L.; Van Hagan, T.H.; King, J.H.; Spring, A.H.

    1980-02-01

    Various aspects of the high-temperature heat exchanger conceptual designs for the gas turbine (HTGR-GT) and process heat (HTGR-PH) plants are discussed. Topics include technology background, heat exchanger types, surface geometry, thermal sizing, performance, material selection, mechanical design, fabrication, and the systems-related impact of installation and integration of the units in the prestressed concrete reactor vessel. The impact of future technology developments, such as the utilization of nonmetallic materials and advanced heat exchanger surface geometries and methods of construction, is also discussed

  6. ANALYSIS OF MEASURED AND MODELED SOLAR RADIATION AT THE TARS SOLAR HEATING PLANT IN DENMARK

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Zhiyong; Perers, Bengt; Furbo, Simon

    2017-01-01

    , such as solar radiation, inlet and outlet temperature for the solar collector field, flow rate and pressure, ambient temperature, Wind speed and wind direction were measured. Global horizontal radiation, direct normal irradiation (DNI) and total radiation on the tilted collector plane of the flat plate...... collector field have been measured in Tars solar heating plant. To determine the accuracy of modeled and measured solar radiation in Tars solar heating plant, monthly comparisons of measured and calculated radiation using 6 empirical models have been carried out. Comparisons of measured and modeled total......A novel combined solar heating plant with tracking parabolic trough collectors (PTC) and flat plate collectors (FPC) has been constructed and put into operation in Tars, 30 km north of Aalborg, Denmark in August 2015. To assess the operation performance of the plant, detailed parameters...

  7. Hygiene problems in building a nuclear power and heat plant near Bratislava

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chorvat, D.; Mizov, J.; Hladky, E.; Kubik, I.; Carach, J.

    1976-01-01

    The results are presented of the calculation of the population exposure due to the release of radioactive products from a nuclear power and heating plant accident into the ambient atmosphere (primary coolant circuit rupture) providing the nuclear power and heating plant is sited approximately 500 m from the Slovnaft chemical works in Bratislava. Ground water contamination was analyzed assuming the infiltration of radioactive products from a surface deposit due to fallout and the direct infiltration of the products into the soil in the area of the plant. The results of the assessment of the design basis accident of a WWER-1000 nuclear power and heating plant show unequivocally that the emergency core cooling system, full-pressure containment and the correct function of the containment spray system are able to keep the accident consequences within acceptable limits thus meeting radiation hygiene requirements related to the siting of similar installations in the vicinity of large housing estates. (Oy)

  8. Analysis of electrical energy consumers operation in the heating plant with proposal of energy savings measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Aleksandar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of power quality measurements, obtained during an energy audit in the heating plant Vreoci in the Electric Power System of Serbia, are presented in the paper. Two steam boilers, rated at 120MW each, are installed in this heating plant, using coal as a fuel. The energy audit encompassed the measurements of the complete set of parameters needed to determine the thermal efficacy of boilers and the entire heating plant. Based on the measurement results, several technical measures for improving energy efficiency of the plant are proposed. The measures evaluated in the paper should contribute to the reduction of fossil fuel usage and CO2 emissions, thereby resulting in a significant impact in both financial and ecological areas.

  9. Waste heat recovery options in a large gas-turbine combined power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upathumchard, Ularee

    This study focuses on power plant heat loss and how to utilize the waste heat in energy recovery systems in order to increase the overall power plant efficiency. The case study of this research is a 700-MW natural gas combined cycle power plant, located in a suburban area of Thailand. An analysis of the heat loss of the combustion process, power generation process, lubrication system, and cooling system has been conducted to evaluate waste heat recovery options. The design of the waste heat recovery options depends to the amount of heat loss from each system and its temperature. Feasible waste heat sources are combustion turbine (CT) room ventilation air and lubrication oil return from the power plant. The following options are being considered in this research: absorption chillers for cooling with working fluids Ammonia-Water and Water-Lithium Bromide (in comparison) and Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) with working fluids R134a and R245fa. The absorption cycles are modeled in three different stages; single-effect, double-effect and half-effect. ORC models used are simple ORC as a baseline, ORC with internal regenerator, ORC two-phase flash expansion ORC and ORC with multiple heat sources. Thermodynamic models are generated and each system is simulated using Engineering Equation Solver (EES) to define the most suitable waste heat recovery options for the power plant. The result will be synthesized and evaluated with respect to exergy utilization efficiency referred as the Second Law effectiveness and net output capacity. Results of the models give recommendation to install a baseline ORC of R134a and a double-effect water-lithium bromide absorption chiller, driven by ventilation air from combustion turbine compartment. The two technologies yield reasonable economic payback periods of 4.6 years and 0.7 years, respectively. The fact that this selected power plant is in its early stage of operation allows both models to economically and effectively perform waste heat

  10. Application of microwave heating to a polyesterification plant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Komorowska-Durka, M.

    2015-01-01

    Utilizing microwave irradiation, a fundamentally different method of the energy transfer, to the chemical process units can potentially be advantageous compared to the conventional heating, inter alia due to the selective nature of interaction of the microwaves with the matter. This doctoral

  11. Reducing the Cost of RLS: Waste Heat from Crop Production Can Be Used for Waste Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamparter, Richard; Flynn, Michael; Kliss, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The applicability of plant-based life support systems has traditionally suffered from the limitations imposed by the high energy demand of controlled environment growth chambers. Theme types of systems are typically less than 2% efficient at converting electrical energy into biomass. The remaining 98% of supplied energy is converted to thermal energy. Traditionally this thermal energy is discharged to the ambient environment as waste heat. This paper describes an energy efficient plant-based life support system which has been designed for use at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station. At the South Pole energy is not lost to the environment. What is lost is the ability to extract useful work from it. The CELSS Antarctic Analog Program (CAAP) has developed a system which is designed to extract useful work from the waste thermal energy generated from plant growth lighting systems. In the CAAP system this energy is used to purify Station Sewage.

  12. Wheat F-Box Protein Gene TaFBA1 Is Involved in Plant Tolerance to Heat Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinxue Li

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Adverse environmental conditions, including high temperature, often affect the growth and production of crops worldwide. F-box protein, a core component of the Skp1-Cullin-F-box (SCF E3 ligase complex, plays an important role in abiotic stress responses. A previously cloned gene from wheat, TaFBA1, encodes a homologous F-box protein. A Yeast two-Hybrid (Y2H assay showed that TaFBA1 interacted with other SCF proteins. We found that the expression of TaFBA1 could be induced by heat stress (45°C. Overexpression of TaFBA1 enhanced heat stress tolerance in transgenic tobacco, because growth inhibition was reduced and photosynthesis increased as compared with those in the wild type (WT plants. Furthermore, the accumulation of H2O2, O2-, and carbonyl protein decreased and cell damage was alleviated in transgenic plants under heat stress, which resulted in less oxidative damage. However, the transgenic plants contained more enzymatic antioxidants after heat stress, which might be related to the regulation of some antioxidant gene expressions. The qRT-PCR analysis showed that the overexpression of TaFBA1 upregulated the expression of genes involved in reactive oxygen species (ROS scavenging, proline biosynthesis, and abiotic stress responses. We identified the interaction of TaFBA1 with Triticum aestivum stress responsive protein 1 (TaASRP1 by Y2H assay and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC assay. The results suggested that TaFBA1 may improve enzymatic antioxidant levels and regulate gene expression by interacting with other proteins, such as TaASRP1, which leads to the enhanced heat stress tolerance seen in the transgenic plants.

  13. Mode selection of China's urban heating and its potential for reducing energy consumption and CO2 emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Xia; Wang, Li; Tong, Lige; Sun, Shufeng; Yue, Xianfang; Yin, Shaowu; Zheng, Lifang

    2014-01-01

    China's carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emission ranks the highest in the world. CO 2 emission from urban central heating, which has an average annual growth rate of 10.3%, is responsible for 4.4% of China's total CO 2 emission. The current policy for improving urban central heating focuses on replacing coal with natural gas. This paper analyzes the existing situation and problems pertaining to urban heating, and evaluates the potential for reducing energy consumption and CO 2 emission by heat pump heating. The results show that the current policy of replacing coal with natural gas for urban central heating decreases energy consumption and CO 2 emission by 16.6% and 63.5%, respectively. On the other hand, replacing coal-based urban central heating with heat pump heating is capable of decreasing energy consumption and CO 2 emission by 57.6% and 81.4%, respectively. Replacing both urban central and decentralized heating with heat pump heating can lead to 67.7% and 85.8% reduction in energy consumption and CO 2 emission, respectively. The decreases in CO 2 emission will account for 24.5% of China's target to reduce total CO 2 emission by 2020. - Highlights: • Existing situation and problems of urban heating in China. • Feasibility of heat pump heating in China. • Potential of energy saving and emission reduction for heat pump heating. • China should adjust urban heating strategy. • Replacing urban central heating and decentralized heating with heat pump heating

  14. Method for reducing excess heat supply experienced in typical Chinese district heating systems by achieving hydraulic balance and improving indoor air temperature control at the building level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Lipeng; Gudmundsson, Oddgeir; Thorsen, Jan Eric; Li, Hongwei; Li, Xiaopeng; Svendsen, Svend

    2016-01-01

    A common problem with Chinese district heating systems is that they supply more heat than the actual heat demand. The reason for this excess heat supply is the general failure to use control devices to adjust the indoor temperature and flow in the building heating systems in accordance with the actual heat demand. This results in 15–30% of the total supplied heat being lost. This paper proposes an integrated approach that aims to reduce the excess heat loss by introducing pre-set thermostatic radiator valves combined with automatic balancing valves. Those devices establish hydraulic balance, and stabilize indoor temperatures. The feasibility and the energy consumption reduction of this approach were verified by means of simulation and a field test. By moving the system from centrally planned heat delivery to demand-driven heat delivery, excess heat loss can be significantly reduced. Results show that once the hydraulic balance is achieved and indoor temperatures are controlled with this integrated approach, 17% heat savings and 42.8% pump electricity savings can be achieved. The energy savings will also have a positive environmental effect with seasonal reductions of 11 kg CO_2, 0.1 kg SO_2, and 0.03 kg NO_x per heating square meter for a typical case in Harbin. - Highlights: • Two real cases reflect the temperature and flow control situation of heating systems in China. • Pre-set radiator valves with automatic balancing valves create dynamic hydraulic balance. • IDA-ICE simulation shows 17% heat saving and 48% pump electricity saving. • This approach can improve the comfort level of multi-storey/high-rise residential buildings. • This approach can reduce excess heat supply and bring out positive environmental impacts.

  15. Potential of HVAC and solar technologies for hospital retrofit to reduce heating energy consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pop, Octavian G.; Abrudan, Ancuta C.; Adace, Dan S.; Pocola, Adrian G.; Balan, Mugur C.

    2018-02-01

    The study presents a combination of several energy efficient technologies together with their potential to reduce the energy consumption and to increase the comfort through the retrofit of a hospital building. The existing situation is characterized by an old and inefficient heating system, by the complete missing of any ventilation and by no cooling. The retrofit proposal includes thermal insulation and a distributed HVAC system consisting of several units that includes air to air heat exchangers and air to air heat pumps. A condensing boiler was also considered for heating. A solar thermal system for preparing domestic hot water and a solar photovoltaic system to assist the HVAC units are also proposed. Heat transfer principles are used for modelling the thermal response of the building to the environmental parameters and thermodynamic principles are used for modelling the behaviour of HVAC, solar thermal system and photovoltaic system. All the components of the heating loads were determined for one year period. The study reveals the capacity of the proposed systems to provide ventilation and thermal comfort with a global reduction of energy consumption of 71.6 %.

  16. Strategies to Reduce the Harmful Effects of Extreme Heat Events: A Four-City Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalonne L. White-Newsome

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Extreme heat events (EHEs are becoming more intense, more frequent and longer lasting in the 21st century. These events can disproportionately impact the health of low-income, minority, and urban populations. To better understand heat-related intervention strategies used by four U.S. cities, we conducted 73 semi-structured interviews with government and non-governmental organization leaders representing public health, general social services, emergency management, meteorology, and the environmental planning sectors in Detroit, MI; New York City, NY; Philadelphia, PA and Phoenix, AZ—cities selected for their diverse demographics, climates, and climate adaptation strategies. We identified activities these leaders used to reduce the harmful effects of heat for residents in their city, as well as the obstacles they faced and the approaches they used to evaluate these efforts. Local leaders provided a description of how local context (e.g., climate, governance and city structure impacted heat preparedness. Despite the differences among study cities, political will and resource access were critical to driving heat-health related programming. Upon completion of our interviews, we convened leaders in each city to discuss these findings and their ongoing efforts through day-long workshops. Our findings and the recommendations that emerged from these workshops could inform other local or national efforts towards preventing heat-related morbidity and mortality.

  17. Connecting people and place: a new framework for reducing urban vulnerability to extreme heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelmi, Olga V; Hayden, Mary H

    2010-01-01

    Climate change is predicted to increase the intensity and negative impacts of urban heat events, prompting the need to develop preparedness and adaptation strategies that reduce societal vulnerability to extreme heat. Analysis of societal vulnerability to extreme heat events requires an interdisciplinary approach that includes information about weather and climate, the natural and built environment, social processes and characteristics, interactions with stakeholders, and an assessment of community vulnerability at a local level. In this letter, we explore the relationships between people and places, in the context of urban heat stress, and present a new research framework for a multi-faceted, top-down and bottom-up analysis of local-level vulnerability to extreme heat. This framework aims to better represent societal vulnerability through the integration of quantitative and qualitative data that go beyond aggregate demographic information. We discuss how different elements of the framework help to focus attention and resources on more targeted health interventions, heat hazard mitigation and climate adaptation strategies.

  18. FoxO/Daf-16 restored thrashing movement reduced by heat stress in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuhashi, Tsubasa; Sakamoto, Kazuichi

    2014-04-01

    Many studies on thermotolerance have been done in Caenorhabditis elegans in order to extend survival under heat stress; Daf-16, a homolog of FoxO in C. elegans, was detected as the key factor in thermotolerance. However, the recovery process from heat stress damage has been seldom discussed. In this study, we analyzed the roles of FoxO/Daf-16 on the recovery from heat stress damage by monitoring thrashing movement. Heat shock reduced the movement, which was restored by culturing at 20°C. Thrashing movement was not restored in the daf-16 mutant, which suggests that Daf-16 is one of the essential factors in repairing the damage. Movement restoration was promoted in the daf-2 mutant, a homolog of insulin/IGF-1-like receptor, in a daf-16-dependent manner. In addition, heat stress decreased the expression of daf-28 and ins-7, agonists of Daf-2. Taken together, these results revealed that FoxO/Daf-16 removes heat stress damage and restores movement via inhibition of the insulin-like signaling pathway in C. elegans, suggesting that FoxO/Daf-16 plays a critical role in thermotolerance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Economic feasibility of heat supply from simple and safe nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, J.

    2001-01-01

    Use of nuclear energy as a heating source is greatly challenged by the economic factor since the nuclear heating reactors have relative small size and often the lower plant load factor. However, use of very simple reactor could be a possible way to economically supply heat. A deep pool reactor (DPR) has been designed for this purpose. The DPR is a novel design of pool type reactor for heat only supply. The reactor core is put in a deep pool. By only putting light static water pressure on the core coolant, the DPR will be able to meet the temperature requirements of heat supply for district heating. The feature of simplicity and safety of DPR makes a decrease of investment cost compared to other reactors for heating only purposes. According to the economical assessments, the capital investment to build a DPR plant is much less than that of a pressurized reactor with pressure vessels. For the DPR with 120 or 200 MW output, it can bear the economical comparison with a usual coal-fired heating plant. Some special means taken in DPR design make an increase of the burn-up level of spent fuel and a decrease of fuel cost. The feasibility studies of DPR in some cities in China show that heating cost using nuclear energy is only one third of that by coal and only one tenth of that by nature gas. Therefore, the DPR nuclear heating system provides an economically attractive solution to satisfy the demands of district heating without contributing to increasing greenhouse gas emissions

  20. Method for reducing excess heat supply experienced in typical Chinese district heating systems by achieving hydraulic balance and improving indoor air temperature control at the building level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Lipeng; Gudmundsson, Oddgeir; Thorsen, Jan Eric

    2016-01-01

    A common problem with Chinese district heating systems is that they supply more heat than the actual heat demand. The reason for this excess heat supply is the general failure to use control devices to adjust the indoor temperature and flow in the building heating systems in accordance with the a......A common problem with Chinese district heating systems is that they supply more heat than the actual heat demand. The reason for this excess heat supply is the general failure to use control devices to adjust the indoor temperature and flow in the building heating systems in accordance...... with the actual heat demand. This results in 15-30% of the total supplied heat being lost. This paper proposes an integrated approach that aims to reduce the excess heat loss by introducing pre-set thermostatic radiator valves combined with automatic balancing valves. Those devices establish hydraulic balance...... that once the hydraulic balance is achieved and indoor temperatures are controlled with this integrated approach, 17% heat savings and 42.8% pump electricity savings can be achieved. The energy savings will also have a positive environmental effect with seasonal reductions of 11 kg CO2, 0.1 kg SO2, and 0...

  1. IMPLEMENTING HEAT SEALED BAG RELIEF and HYDROGEN and METANE TESTING TO REDUCE THE NEED TO REPACK HANFORD TRANSURANIC (TRU) WASTE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MCDONALD, K.M.

    2005-01-01

    The Department of Energy's site at Hanford has a significant quantity of drums containing heat-sealed bags that required repackaging under previous revisions of the TRUPACT-II Authorized Methods for Payload Control (TRAMPAC) before being shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Since glovebox repackaging is the most rate-limiting and resource-intensive step for accelerating Hanford waste certification, a cooperative effort between Hanford's TRU Program and the WIPP site significantly reduced the number of drums requiring repackaging. More specifically, recent changes to the TRAMPAC (Revision 19C), allow relief for heat-sealed bags having more than 390 square inches of surface area. This relief is based on data provided by Hanford on typical Hanford heat-sealed bags, but can be applied to other sites generating transuranic waste that have waste packaged in heat-sealed bags. The paper provides data on the number of drums affected, the attendant cost savings, and the time saved. Hanford also has a significant quantity of high-gram drums with multiple layers of confinement including heat-scaled bags. These higher-gram drums are unlikely to meet the decay-heat limits required for analytical category certification under the TRAMPAC. The combination of high-gram drums and accelerated reprocessing/shipping make it even more difficult to meet the decay-heat limits because of necessary aging requirements associated with matrix depletion. Hydrogen/methane sampling of headspace gases can be used to certify waste that does not meet decay-heat limits of the more restrictive analytical category using the test category. The number of drums that can be qualified using the test category is maximized by assuring that the detection limit for hydrogen and methane is as low as possible. Sites desiring to ship higher-gram drums must understand the advantages of using hydrogen/methane sampling and shipping under the test category. Headspace gas sampling, as specified by the WIPP

  2. Cascade: a review of heat transport and plant design issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, K.A.; McDowell, M.W.

    1984-01-01

    A conceptual heat transfer loop for Cascade, a centrifugal-action solid-breeder reaction chamber, has been investigated and results are presented. The Cascade concept, a double-cone-shaped reaction chamber, rotates along its horizontal axis. Solid Li 2 O or other lithium-ceramic granules are injected tangentially through each end of the chamber. The granules cascade axially from the smaller radii at the ends to the larger radius at the center, where they are ejected into a stationary granule catcher. Heat and tritium are then removed from the granules and the granules are reinjected into the chamber. A 50% dense Li 2 O granule throughput of 2.8 m 3 /s is transferred from the reaction chamber to the steam generators via continuous bucket elevators. The granules then fall by gravity through 4 vertical steam generators. The entire transport system is maintained at the same vacuum conditions present inside the reaction chamber

  3. Impact of different national biomass policies on investment costs of biomass district heating plants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-04-01

    The BIO-COST project - co-ordinated by E.V.A. - was funded by the European Commission's THERMIE Type B Programme. The objective of BIO-COST was to analyse the impact of national biomass policies on the investment costs of biomass district heating (DH) plants. The European comparison should help identifying measures to reduce investment costs for biomass DH plants and/or components down to a 'best practice' level. The investigation is based on the comparison of 20 biomass DH plants by country, with Denmark and Sweden having mainly high energy taxes as driver, while Austria and France rely mainly on subsidy systems. The results of BIO-COST show, that governmental policies can have a big impact especially on grid and buildings costs, effecting of course the overall costs of the plant enormously. Emission standards have their effects especially on the costs for technical equipment, however, this fact was not reflected in the BIO-COST data. The results do not show a clear advantage of either the energy tax approach or the subsidy approach: The French subsidy approach leads to fairly low cost levels compared to the Danish tax approach, while the Swedish tax approach seems to yield the lowest cost level. On the other hand the Austrian subsidy approach seems to intercrease investment costs. In principle both the tax as the subsidy approach can lead to the same effect: a project is calculated in such a way, that it just meets economic breakeven. This is typically the case when the project is not carried out by a private enterprise but by an operator aiming at enhanced public welfare (e.g. co-operative, municipality). In this case a subsidy model might yield more possibilities to encourage an economically efficient development, than a tax. Instead of giving subsidies as a fixed percentage of investments they could be adjusted to the actual needs of the project as proven by a standardised calculation. Of course this can create the incentive to expect higher

  4. Potential use of power plant reject heat in commercial aquaculture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olszewski, M.

    1977-01-01

    Current research and commercial activities in aquaculture operations have been reviewed. An aquaculture system using mostly herbivorous species in pond culture is proposed as a means of using waste heat to produce reasonably priced protein. The system uses waste water streams, such as secondary sewage effluent, animal wastes, or some industrial waste streams as a primary nutrient source to grow algae, which is fed to fish and clams. Crayfish feed on the clam wastes thereby providing a clean effluent from the aquaculture system. Alternate fish associations are presented and it appears that a carp or tilapia association is desirable. An aquaculture system capable of rejecting all the waste heat from a 1000-MW(e) power station in winter can accommodate about half the summer heat rejection load. The aquaculture facility would require approximately 133 ha and would produce 4.1 x 10/sup 5/ kg/year of fish, 1.5 x 10/sup 6/ kg/year of clam meat, and 1.5 x 10/sup 4/ kg/year of live crayfish. The estimated annual pretax profit from this operation is one million dollars. Several possible problem areas have been identified. However, technical solutions appear to be readily available to solve these problems. The proposed system shows considerable economic promise. Small scale experiments have demonstrated the technical feasibility of various components of the system. It therefore appears that a pilot scale experimental facility should be operated.

  5. Potential use of power plant reject heat in commercial aquaculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olszewski, M.

    1977-01-01

    Current research and commercial activities in aquaculture operations have been reviewed. An aquaculture system using mostly herbivorous species in pond culture is proposed as a means of using waste heat to produce reasonably priced protein. The system uses waste water streams, such as secondary sewage effluent, animal wastes, or some industrial waste streams as a primary nutrient source to grow algae, which is fed to fish and clams. Crayfish feed on the clam wastes thereby providing a clean effluent from the aquaculture system. Alternate fish associations are presented and it appears that a carp or tilapia association is desirable. An aquaculture system capable of rejecting all the waste heat from a 1000-MW(e) power station in winter can accommodate about half the summer heat rejection load. The aquaculture facility would require approximately 133 ha and would produce 4.1 x 10 5 kg/year of fish, 1.5 x 10 6 kg/year of clam meat, and 1.5 x 10 4 kg/year of live crayfish. The estimated annual pretax profit from this operation is one million dollars. Several possible problem areas have been identified. However, technical solutions appear to be readily available to solve these problems. The proposed system shows considerable economic promise. Small scale experiments have demonstrated the technical feasibility of various components of the system. It therefore appears that a pilot scale experimental facility should be operated

  6. Technical and economical analyses of combined heat and power generation from distillers grains and corn stover in ethanol plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Lijun; Hanna, Milford A.; Weller, Curtis L.; Jones, David D.

    2009-01-01

    The technical and economical feasibilities of a novel integrated biomass gasification and fuel cell combined heat and power (CHP) system were analyzed for supplying heat and power in an ethanol plant from distillers grains (DG) and corn stover. In a current dry-grind plant with an annual production capacity of 189 million liters (50 million gallons) of ethanol, the energy cost for ethanol production using natural gas at a price of 6.47 US$/GJ for processing heat and commercial grid at a price of 0.062 US$/kWh for electrical power supply was 0.094 US$/liter. If the integrated CHP system using wet DG with 64.7% moisture on a wet basis at 105 US$/dry tonne and corn stover with 20% moisture at 30 US$/dry tonne as feedstock was used to supply heat and power in the ethanol plant, the energy costs for ethanol production would be 0.101 US$/liter and 0.070 US$/liter, which are 107% and 75% of the current energy cost for ethanol production, respectively. To meet the demand of processing heat and power in the ethanol plant, the integrated CHP system required 22.1 dry tonnes of corn stover with 20% moisture or 14.5 dry tonnes of DG with 64.7% moisture on a wet basis per hour, compared with the available 18.8 dry tonnes of DG per hour in the ethanol plant. High-value chemicals such as policosanols, phytosterols and free fatty acids can be extracted out of the raw DG to reduce the cost of DG as a feedstock of the integrated CHP system. The energy cost for ethanol production using the integrated CHP system with corn stover and DG as the feedstock for supplying heat and power can be reduced further by increasing ethanol production scale, decreasing the moisture content of biomass feedstock, and decreasing thermal energy to electricity output ratio of the CHP system. In terms of the energy efficiency of the integrated CHP system and the energy cost for ethanol production, the moisture content of the feedstock going into the integrated CHP should be lower than 70% on a wet basis

  7. Economic evaluation of heat extraction from nuclear power plants - a criterion for deciding their building order

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navratil, J.

    1987-01-01

    Heat extraction from nuclear power plants is an important element in the current concept of supplying the population and industries with heat. Economic evaluation of the extraction is one of the factors of the total economic assessment of potential sites for nuclear power plant construction which can contribute to decision making on the priorities of construction. The methodological approach to the assessment of economic contribution of heat extraction from 2x1000 MW nuclear power plant is exemplified using three such sites on the Czechoslovak territory, viz., Opatovice (eastern Bohemia), Blahutovice (northern Moravia), and Kecerovce (eastern Slovakia). The so-called annual converted cost was used as a suitable quantity completely reflecting all significant economic effects of heat extraction. It is shown that the fuel component of the power plant costs is the decisive factor for the amount of the annual converted cost in respect to heat supply and thus also the economic priority of the construction sites of nuclear power plants. (Z.M.). 3 tabs., 3 refs

  8. Thermodynamic analysis of heat recovery steam generator in combined cycle power plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Kumar Naradasu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Combined cycle power plants play an important role in the present energy sector. The main challenge in designing a combined cycle power plant is proper utilization of gas turbine exhaust heat in the steam cycle in order to achieve optimum steam turbine output. Most of the combined cycle developers focused on the gas turbine output and neglected the role of the heat recovery steam generator which strongly affects the overall performance of the combined cycle power plant. The present paper is aimed at optimal utilization of the flue gas recovery heat with different heat recovery steam generator configurations of single pressure and dual pressure. The combined cycle efficiency with different heat recovery steam generator configurations have been analyzed parametrically by using first law and second law of thermodynamics. It is observed that in the dual cycle high pressure steam turbine pressure must be high and low pressure steam turbine pressure must be low for better heat recovery from heat recovery steam generator.

  9. GreenVMAS: Virtual Organization Based Platform for Heating Greenhouses Using Waste Energy from Power Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Briones, Alfonso; Chamoso, Pablo; Yoe, Hyun; Corchado, Juan M

    2018-03-14

    The gradual depletion of energy resources makes it necessary to optimize their use and to reuse them. Although great advances have already been made in optimizing energy generation processes, many of these processes generate energy that inevitably gets wasted. A clear example of this are nuclear, thermal and carbon power plants, which lose a large amount of energy that could otherwise be used for different purposes, such as heating greenhouses. The role of GreenVMAS is to maintain the required temperature level in greenhouses by using the waste energy generated by power plants. It incorporates a case-based reasoning system, virtual organizations and algorithms for data analysis and for efficient interaction with sensors and actuators. The system is context aware and scalable as it incorporates an artificial neural network, this means that it can operate correctly even if the number and characteristics of the greenhouses participating in the case study change. The architecture was evaluated empirically and the results show that the user's energy bill is greatly reduced with the implemented system.

  10. GreenVMAS: Virtual Organization Based Platform for Heating Greenhouses Using Waste Energy from Power Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso González-Briones

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The gradual depletion of energy resources makes it necessary to optimize their use and to reuse them. Although great advances have already been made in optimizing energy generation processes, many of these processes generate energy that inevitably gets wasted. A clear example of this are nuclear, thermal and carbon power plants, which lose a large amount of energy that could otherwise be used for different purposes, such as heating greenhouses. The role of GreenVMAS is to maintain the required temperature level in greenhouses by using the waste energy generated by power plants. It incorporates a case-based reasoning system, virtual organizations and algorithms for data analysis and for efficient interaction with sensors and actuators. The system is context aware and scalable as it incorporates an artificial neural network, this means that it can operate correctly even if the number and characteristics of the greenhouses participating in the case study change. The architecture was evaluated empirically and the results show that the user’s energy bill is greatly reduced with the implemented system.

  11. Operating experiences with heat-exchanging components of a semi-technical pilot plant for steam gasification of coal using heat from HTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchhoff, R.; Heek, K.H. van

    1984-01-01

    within the framework of the PNP- Project, a semi-technical plant for the development of a process of coal gasification by means of nuclear heat was operated. Here gasification is for the first time implemented in a fluidized bed using heat of an electrically heated helium cycle at pressure up to 40 bar and temperatures normal for HTR. The plant serves for testing and developing various components as immersion heater, insulations, dosing devices, and for compiling sound data for further planning

  12. Optimizing power plant cycling operations while reducing generating plant damage and costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefton, S.A.; Besuner, P.H.; Grimsrud, P. [Aptech Engineering Services, Inc., Sunnyvale, CA (United States); Bissel, A. [Electric Supply Board, Dublin (Ireland)

    1998-12-31

    This presentation describes a method for analyzing, quantifying, and minimizing the total cost of fossil, combined cycle, and pumped hydro power plant cycling operation. The method has been developed, refined, and applied during engineering studies at some 160 units in the United States and 8 units at the Irish Electric Supply Board (ESB) generating system. The basic premise of these studies was that utilities are underestimating the cost of cycling operation. The studies showed that the cost of cycling conventional boiler/turbine fossil power plants can range from between $2,500 and $500,000 per start-stop cycle. It was found that utilities typically estimate these costs by factors of 3 to 30 below actual costs and, thus, often significantly underestimate their true cycling costs. Knowledge of the actual, or total, cost of cycling will reduce power production costs by enabling utilities to more accurately dispatch their units to manage unit life expectancies, maintenance strategies and reliability. Utility management responses to these costs are presented and utility cost savings have been demonstrated. (orig.) 7 refs.

  13. Optimizing power plant cycling operations while reducing generating plant damage and costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefton, S A; Besuner, P H; Grimsrud, P [Aptech Engineering Services, Inc., Sunnyvale, CA (United States); Bissel, A [Electric Supply Board, Dublin (Ireland)

    1999-12-31

    This presentation describes a method for analyzing, quantifying, and minimizing the total cost of fossil, combined cycle, and pumped hydro power plant cycling operation. The method has been developed, refined, and applied during engineering studies at some 160 units in the United States and 8 units at the Irish Electric Supply Board (ESB) generating system. The basic premise of these studies was that utilities are underestimating the cost of cycling operation. The studies showed that the cost of cycling conventional boiler/turbine fossil power plants can range from between $2,500 and $500,000 per start-stop cycle. It was found that utilities typically estimate these costs by factors of 3 to 30 below actual costs and, thus, often significantly underestimate their true cycling costs. Knowledge of the actual, or total, cost of cycling will reduce power production costs by enabling utilities to more accurately dispatch their units to manage unit life expectancies, maintenance strategies and reliability. Utility management responses to these costs are presented and utility cost savings have been demonstrated. (orig.) 7 refs.

  14. Damage to photosystem II due to heat stress without light-driven electron flow: involvement of enhanced introduction of reducing power into thylakoid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marutani, Yoko; Yamauchi, Yasuo; Kimura, Yukihiro; Mizutani, Masaharu; Sugimoto, Yukihiro

    2012-08-01

    Under a moderately heat-stressed condition, the photosystems of higher plants are damaged in the dark more easily than they are in the presence of light. To obtain a better understanding of this heat-derived damage mechanism that occurs in the dark, we focused on the involvement of the light-independent electron flow that occurs at 40 °C during the damage. In various plant species, the maximal photochemical quantum yield of photosystem (PS) II (Fv/Fm) decreased as a result of heat treatment in the dark. In the case of wheat, the most sensitive plant species tested, both Fv/Fm and oxygen evolution rapidly decreased by heat treatment at 40 °C for 30 min in the dark. In the damage, specific degradation of D1 protein was involved, as shown by immunochemical analysis of major proteins in the photosystem. Because light canceled the damage to PSII, the light-driven electron flow may play a protective role against PSII damage without light. Light-independent incorporation of reducing power from stroma was enhanced at 40 °C but not below 35 °C. Arabidopsis mutants that have a deficit of enzymes which mediate the incorporation of stromal reducing power into thylakoid membranes were tolerant against heat treatment at 40 °C in the dark, suggesting that the reduction of the plastoquinone pool may be involved in the damage. In conclusion, the enhanced introduction of reducing power from stroma into thylakoid membranes that occurs around 40 °C causes over-reduction of plastoquinone, resulting in the damage to D1 protein under heat stress without linear electron flow.

  15. Nuclear power and heating plants in the electric power system. Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalincik, L.

    1975-01-01

    Procedures used and results obtained in the following works are described: Incorporation of the nuclear power plants in the power system in the long term perspective; physical limitations on the WWER 440 reactor power changes during fuel campaigns; evaluation of the consumption and start-up characteristics of WWER type nuclear power plants (2x440 MWe); evaluation of refuelling campaigns distribution of nuclear power plant units with regard to comprehensive control properties of nuclear power plants; the possibilities are investigated of the utilization of the WWER type reactor for heat supply in Czechoslovakia. (author)

  16. The thermoelectric generators use for waste heat utilization from cement plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sztekler Karol

    2017-01-01

    Production often entails the formation of by-product which is waste heat. One of the equipment processing heat into electricity is a thermoelectric generator. Its operation is based on the principle of thermoelectric phenomenon, which is known as a Seebeck phenomenon. The simplicity of thermoelectric phenomena allows its use in various industries, in which the main waste product is in the form of heat with the temperature of several hundred degrees. The study analyses the possibility of the thermoelectric systems use for the waste heat utilization resulting in the cement production at the cement plant. The location and design of the thermoelectric system that could be implemented in cement plant is chosen. The analysis has been prepared in the IPSEpro software.

  17. Influence of Tunisian aromatic plants on the prevention of oxidation in soybean oil under heating and frying conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saoudi, Salma; Chammem, Nadia; Sifaoui, Ines; Bouassida-Beji, Maha; Jiménez, Ignacio A; Bazzocchi, Isabel L; Silva, Sandra Diniz; Hamdi, Moktar; Bronze, Maria Rosário

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to improve the oxidative stability of soybean oil by using aromatic plants. Soybean oil flavored with rosemary (ROS) and soybean oil flavored with thyme (THY) were subjected to heating for 24h at 180°C. The samples were analyzed every 6h for their total polar compounds, anisidine values, oxidative stability and polyphenols content. The tocopherols content was determined and volatile compounds were also analyzed. After 24h of heating, the incorporation of these plants using a maceration process reduced the polar compounds by 69% and 71% respectively, in ROS and THY compared to the control. Until 6h of heating, the ROS kept the greatest oxidative stability. The use of the two extracts preserves approximately 50% of the total tocopherols content until 18h for the rosemary and 24h for the thyme flavored oils. Volatile compounds known for their antioxidant activity were also detected in the formulated oils. Aromatic plants added to the soybean oil improved the overall acceptability of potato crisps (p<0.05) until the fifteenth frying. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Production of dry wood chips in connection with a district heating plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yrjölä Jukka

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Moisture and its variation in wood chips make the control of burning in small scale heating appliances difficult resulting in emissions and loss of efficiency. If the quality of wood chips would be better, i. e. dried and sieved fuel with more uniform size distribution would be avail able, the burning could be much cleaner and efficiency higher. In addition higher power out put could be obtained and the investment costs of the burning appliances would be lower. The production of sieved and dried wood chip with good quality could be accomplished in connection with a district heating plant. Then the plant would make profit, in addition to the district heat, from the dried wood chips sold to the neighboring buildings and enterprises sep a rated from the district heating net using wood chips in energy production. The peak power of a district heating plant is required only a short time during the coldest days of the winter. Then the excess capacity during the milder days can be used as heat source for drying of wood chips to be marketed. Then wood chips are sieved and the fuel with best quality is sold and the reject is used as fuel in the plant it self. In a larger district heating plant, quality of the fuel does not need to be so high In this paper the effect of moisture on the fuel chain and on the boiler is discussed. Energy and mass balance calculations as a tool of system design is described and the characteristics of proposed dry chips production method is discussed.

  19. Production planning of combined heat and power plants with regards to electricity price spikes : A machine learning approach

    OpenAIRE

    Fransson, Nathalie

    2017-01-01

    District heating systems could help manage the expected increase of volatility on the Nordic electricity market by starting a combined heat and power production plant (CHP) instead of a heat only production plant when electricity prices are expected to be high. Fortum Värme is interested in adjusting the production planning of their district heating system more towards high electricity prices and in their system there is a peak load CHP unit that could be utilised for this purpose. The econom...

  20. Evaporative cooling with sprinklers to reduce heat-related fruit damage in northern highbush blueberry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hot and sunny weather can cause a considerable amount of fruit damage in blueberries and results in millions of dollars of crop loss each year. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of using sprinklers to reduce the damage. The study was conducted for 2 years in a mature planting ...

  1. Element composition of solid airborne particles deposited in snow in the vicinity of gas-fired heating plant

    OpenAIRE

    Talovskaya, Anna Valerievna; Yazikov, Yegor (Egor) Grigoryevich; Filimonenko, Ekaterina Anatolievna; Samokhina, Nataljya Pavlovna; Shakhova, Tatiana Sergeevna; Parygina, Irina Alekseevna

    2016-01-01

    Local heating plants are the main pollution source of rural areas. Currently, there are few studies on the composition of local heating plants emissions. The article deals with the research results of air pollution level with solid airborne particles in the vicinity of local gas-fired heating plants of some districts of Tomsk region. The snow sampling was conducted for the purpose of solid airborne particles extraction from snow cover. The content of 28 chemical elements (heavy metals, rare e...

  2. On estimation of reliability for pipe lines of heat power plants under cyclic loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verezemskij, V.G.

    1986-01-01

    One of the possible methods to obtain a quantitative estimate of the reliability for pipe lines of the welded heat power plants under cyclic loading due to heating-cooling and due to vibration is considered. Reliability estimate is carried out for a common case of loading by simultaneous cycles with different amplitudes and loading asymmetry. It is shown that scattering of the breaking number of cycles for the metal of welds may perceptibly decrease reliability of the welded pipe line

  3. Organic Matter Application Can Reduce Copper Toxicity in Tomato Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Copper fungicides and bactericides are often used in tomato cultivation and can cause toxic Cu levels in soils. In order to combat this, organic matter can be applied to induce chelation reactions and form a soluble complex by which much of the Cu can leach out of the soil profile or be taken up safely by plants. Organic acids such as citric,…

  4. Dependable Hydrogen and Industrial Heat Generation from the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles V. Park; Michael W. Patterson; Vincent C. Maio; Piyush Sabharwall

    2009-03-01

    The Department of Energy is working with industry to develop a next generation, high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (HTGR) as a part of the effort to supply the US with abundant, clean and secure energy. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, led by the Idaho National Laboratory, will demonstrate the ability of the HTGR to generate hydrogen, electricity, and high-quality process heat for a wide range of industrial applications. Substituting HTGR power for traditional fossil fuel resources reduces the cost and supply vulnerability of natural gas and oil, and reduces or eliminates greenhouse gas emissions. As authorized by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, industry leaders are developing designs for the construction of a commercial prototype producing up to 600 MWt of power by 2021. This paper describes a variety of critical applications that are appropriate for the HTGR with an emphasis placed on applications requiring a clean and reliable source of hydrogen. An overview of the NGNP project status and its significant technology development efforts are also presented.

  5. The Forest Energy Chain in Tuscany: Economic Feasibility and Environmental Effects of Two Types of Biomass District Heating Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Fagarazzi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine two biomass district heating plants operating in Tuscany, with a specific focus on the ex-post evaluation of their economic and financial feasibility and of their environmental benefits. The former biomass district heating plant supplies only public users (Comunità Montana della Lunigiana, CML: administrative body that coordinates the municipalities located in mountain areas, the latter supplies both public and private users (Municipality of San Romano in Garfagnana. Ex-post investment analysis was performed to check both the consistency of results with the forecasts made in the stage of the project design and on the factors, which may have reduced or jeopardized the estimated economic performance of the investment (ex-ante assessment. The results of the study point out appreciable results only in the case of biomass district heating plants involving private users and fuelled by biomasses sourced from third parties. In this case, the factors that most influence ex-post results include the conditions of the woody biomass local market (market prices, the policies of energy selling prices to private users and the temporal dynamics of private users’ connection. To ensure the consistency of ex-post economic outcome with the expected results it is thus important to: (i have good knowledge of the woody local market; (ii define energy selling prices that should be cheap for private users but consistent with energy production costs and (iii constrain private users beforehand to prevent errors in the plant design and in the preliminary estimate of return on investment. Moreover, the results obtained during the monitoring activities could help in providing information on the effectiveness of the supporting measures adopted and also to orient future choices of policy makers and particularly designers, to identify the most efficient configuration of district heating organization for improving energy and

  6. Thermal-hydraulic processes involved in loss of residual heat removal during reduced inventory operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, C.D.; McHugh, P.R.; Naff, S.A.; Johnsen, G.W.

    1991-02-01

    This paper identifies the topics needed to understand pressurized water reactor response to an extended loss of residual heat removal event during refueling and maintenance outages. By identifying the possible plant conditions and cooling methods that would be used for each cooling mode, the controlling thermal-hydraulic processes and phenomena were identified. Controlling processes and phenomena include: gravity drain, core water boil-off, and reflux cooling processes. Important subcategories of the reflux cooling processes include: the initiation of reflux cooling from various plant conditions, the effects of air on reflux cooling, core level depression effects, issues regarding the steam generator secondaries, and the special case of boiler-condenser cooling with once-through steam generators. 25 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  7. Model for optimization of plant investments in combined power and heat production systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantunen, E.; Sinisalo, A.; Koskelainen, L.

    1980-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed for optimal dimensioning and timing the investments of power and heat production system in a community. The required electric power may be purchased by different production systems, such as: thermal power plants, gas turbines, diesel plants, etc. or by delivering all or part of it from a national power company. Also the required heat may be produced in many different ways in single-purpose or combined plants. The model assumes the extent of the heating system fixed, and it is not optimized. It is assumed that the same company is responsible for supplying both the power and heat for the community. It's aim is to allocate the existing capital in an optimal way, and the model may be used for facilitating the decision in such questions as: what kind of production capacity should be purchased in future; how high should the heat and power capacities be; and when should this additional capacity be available. The report also reviews the methods for forecasting the demand of power and heat and their fluctuation during the planning period. The solution of this large-scale non-linear optimization problem is searched via successive linearizations by using the Method of Approximate Programming (MAP). It was found that the solution method is very suitable for this kind of multivariable problems. The computing times with the Functional Mathematical Programmin System (FMPS) in Univac 1108 computer were quite reasonable.

  8. Mathematical model for solar-hydrogen heated desalination plant using humidification-dehumidification process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yassin, Jamal S.; Eljrushi, Gibril S.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model for thermal desalination plant operating with solar energy and hydrogen. This plant is composed of two main systems, the heating system and the distillation system. The distillation system is composed of multi-cells; each cell is using the humidification-dehumidification (H-D) process in the distillation unit and getting the required amount of heat from feed seawater heater. The feed seawater heater is a heat exchanger used to raise the temperature of the preheated seawater coming from the condensation chamber (Dehumidifier) of each cell to about 85 degree centigrade. The heating amount in the heat exchangers is obtained from the thermal storage tank, which gets its energy from solar thermal system and is coupled with a hydrogen-fired backup system to guaranty necessary operating conditions and permit 24 hours solar H-D desalination plant to enhance the performance of this system. The mathematical model studies the performance of the proposed desalination system using thermal solar energy and hydrogen as fuel. Other pertinent variable in the heating and distillation system are also studied. The outcomes of this study are analyzed to enhance the used solar desalination process and make commercial.(Author)

  9. A Laplace transform certified reduced basis method; application to the heat equation and wave equation

    OpenAIRE

    Knezevic, David; Patera, Anthony T.; Huynh, Dinh Bao Phuong

    2010-01-01

    We present a certified reduced basis (RB) method for the heat equation and wave equation. The critical ingredients are certified RB approximation of the Laplace transform; the inverse Laplace transform to develop the time-domain RB output approximation and rigorous error bound; a (Butterworth) filter in time to effect the necessary “modal” truncation; RB eigenfunction decomposition and contour integration for Offline–Online decomposition. We present numerical results to demonstrate the accura...

  10. Reducing uranium and thorium level in Zircon: effect of heat treatment on rate of leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meor Yusoff Meor Sulaiman

    2002-01-01

    Considerable amount of uranium and thorium are found in Malaysian zircon and the level is much higher than the minimum value adopted by many importing countries. Selective leaching had been applied as an important technique to reduce these elements. An initial study was carried out using hydrochloric acid leaching system but the result was not favourable. The rate of uranium and thorium leached can be further improved by introducing a heat pretreatment process prior to leaching (Author)

  11. Some fabrication problems in nuclear power plants heat exchanges, its detectability and implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Condessa, N.C.; Oliveira, R.

    1988-01-01

    On the design and manufacturing follow-up of heat-exchangers of nuclear power plants some care are took into account in order to assure a high degree of confiability allowing the heat-exchanger in operation under severe and aggressive conditions be operating during the useful life of the nuclear power plant. However, despite the care, some problems can ocurr as the ones described on this job; that, if not detected in due time could bring umpleasant problems to the component or to the system in which it is working during operation. (author) [pt

  12. Steam generators and waste heat boilers for process and plant engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Ganapathy, V

    2014-01-01

    Incorporates Worked-Out Real-World ProblemsSteam Generators and Waste Heat Boilers: For Process and Plant Engineers focuses on the thermal design and performance aspects of steam generators, HRSGs and fire tube, water tube waste heat boilers including air heaters, and condensing economizers. Over 120 real-life problems are fully worked out which will help plant engineers in evaluating new boilers or making modifications to existing boiler components without assistance from boiler suppliers. The book examines recent trends and developments in boiler design and technology and presents novel idea

  13. The heat transport system and plant design for the HYLIFE-2 fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    HYLIFE is the name given to a family of self-healing liquid-wall reactor concepts for inertial confinement fusion. This HYLIFE-II concept employs the molten salt, Flibe, for the liquid jets instead of liquid lithium used in the original HYLIFE-I study. A preliminary conceptual design study of the heat transport system and the balance of plant of the HYLIFE-II fusion power plant is described in this paper with special emphasis on a scoping study to determine the best intermediate heat exchanger geometry and flow conditions for minimum cost of electricity. 11 refs., 8 figs

  14. Thermoeconomic Analysis of Hybrid Power Plant Concepts for Geothermal Combined Heat and Power Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Heberle

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We present a thermo-economic analysis for a low-temperature Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC in a combined heat and power generation (CHP case. For the hybrid power plant, thermal energy input is provided by a geothermal resource coupled with the exhaust gases of a biogas engine. A comparison to alternative geothermal CHP concepts is performed by considering variable parameters like ORC working fluid, supply temperature of the heating network or geothermal water temperature. Second law efficiency as well as economic parameters show that hybrid power plants are more efficient compared to conventional CHP concepts or separate use of the energy sources.

  15. Control of distributed heat transfer mechanisms in membrane distillation plants

    KAUST Repository

    Laleg-Kirati, Taous-Meriem

    2017-01-05

    Various examples are provided that are related to boundary control in membrane distillation (MD) processes. In one example, a system includes a membrane distillation (MD) process comprising a feed side and a permeate side separated by a membrane boundary layer; and processing circuitry configured to control a water production rate of the MD process based at least in part upon a distributed heat transfer across the membrane boundary layer. In another example, a method includes determining a plurality of estimated temperature states of a membrane boundary layer separating a feed side and a permeate side of a membrane distillation (MD) process; and adjusting inlet flow rate or inlet temperature of at least one of the feed side or the permeate side to maintain a difference temperature along the membrane boundary layer about a defined reference temperature based at least in part upon the plurality of estimated temperature states.

  16. Steam gasification of coal, project prototype plant nuclear process heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heek, K.H. van

    1982-05-01

    This report describes the tasks, which Bergbau-Forschung has carried out in the field of steam gasification of coal in cooperation with partners and contractors during the reference phase of the project. On the basis of the status achieved to date it can be stated, that the mode of operation of the gas-generator developed including the direct feeding of caking high volatile coal is technically feasible. Moreover through-put can be improved by 65% at minimum by using catalysts. On the whole industrial application of steam gasification - WKV - using nuclear process heat stays attractive compared with other gasification processes. Not only coal is conserved but also the costs of the gas manufactured are favourable. As confirmed by recent economic calculations these are 20 to 25% lower. (orig.) [de

  17. Wheat chloroplast targeted sHSP26 promoter confers heat and abiotic stress inducible expression in transgenic Arabidopsis Plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neetika Khurana

    Full Text Available The small heat shock proteins (sHSPs have been found to play a critical role in physiological stress conditions in protecting proteins from irreversible aggregation. To characterize the hloroplast targeted sHSP26 promoter in detail, deletion analysis of the promoter is carried out and analysed via transgenics in Arabidopsis. In the present study, complete assessment of the importance of CCAAT-box elements along with Heat shock elements (HSEs in the promoter of sHSP26 was performed. Moreover, the importance of 5' untranslated region (UTR has also been established in the promoter via Arabidopsis transgenics. An intense GUS expression was observed after heat stress in the transgenics harbouring a full-length promoter, confirming the heat-stress inducibility of the promoter. Transgenic plants without UTR showed reduced GUS expression when compared to transgenic plants with UTR as was confirmed at the RNA and protein levels by qRT-PCR and GUS histochemical assays, thus suggesting the possible involvement of some regulatory elements present in the UTR in heat-stress inducibility of the promoter. Promoter activity was also checked under different abiotic stresses and revealed differential expression in different deletion constructs. Promoter analysis based on histochemical assay, real-time qPCR and fluorimetric analysis revealed that HSEs alone could not transcribe GUS gene significantly in sHSP26 promoter and CCAAT box elements contribute synergistically to the transcription. Our results also provide insight into the importance of 5`UTR of sHsp26 promoter thus emphasizing the probable role of imperfect CCAAT-box element or some novel cis-element with respect to heat stress.

  18. Simultaneous Waste Heat and Water Recovery from Power Plant Flue Gases for Advanced Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Dexin [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States)

    2016-12-31

    This final report presents the results of a two-year technology development project carried out by a team of participants sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE). The objective of this project is to develop a membrane-based technology to recover both water and low grade heat from power plant flue gases. Part of the recovered high-purity water and energy can be used directly to replace plant boiler makeup water as well as improving its efficiency, and the remaining part of the recovered water can be used for Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD), cooling tower water makeup or other plant uses. This advanced version Transport Membrane Condenser (TMC) with lower capital and operating costs can be applied to existing plants economically and can maximize waste heat and water recovery from future Advanced Energy System flue gases with CO2 capture in consideration, which will have higher moisture content that favors the TMC to achieve higher efficiency.

  19. The Sydvaerme project: District heating from the Barsebeck nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Josefsson, L.

    1977-01-01

    The paper presents a summary report of a study on district heating from Barsebeck Nuclear Power Plant in Sweden, prepared cooperatively by the cities of Malmoe, Lund, Helsingborg, Landskrona and the electric power company Sydkraft. A future number 3 generating set at the Barsebeck nuclear power station could be designed for combined production of heat and electric power. The generating set could be completed after 1983, and could then supply about 65% of total district heating requirements. The first stage of the investigation includes a proposal for a technically feasible solution, sufficiently detailed to permit both technical and economic evaluation of the project. (author)

  20. Control systems for condensing flue-gas coolers related to natural-gas-fired heating plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krighaar, M.; Paulsen, O.

    1992-01-01

    A theoretical study is made of the enthalpy-efficiency for a water-cooled heat exchanger added to a natural gas-fired boiler. Under varying conditions of both water flow and temperature and flue-gas flow and temperature, both in condensing and non-condensing mode, the efficiency seems to be constant. The result is very useful for comparison between two different working conditions. The efficiency is used to calculate the savings achieved for a district heating plant by using a heat exchanger. The energy economic calculations are also helpful for estimating the most appropriate size of heat exchanger. The annual savings are calculated by means of data regarding heat production, flue gas temperature and water return temperature. The savings achieved by using different connection principles such as bypass, reheating and controlled water temperature are also calculated. (author)

  1. Heat supply of the town of Trnava from EBO nuclear plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovarik, Z.

    4 variants of central heat supply from the V-2 Bohunice nuclear power plant were considered. Three included the supply of hot water while the fourth envisaged the supply of steam. The variants of hot water supply differed in the proportion of heat supply during load peak, the range being from 75% to 88% to 100%. The system suggested considers hot water with a maximum overpressure of 2.5 MPa and temperature of 150/70 degC, with possible temporary decrease to 130/70 degC. The estimated power of heat exchange stations is 240 MW at a temperature gradient of 150/70 degC and 180 MW at a temperature gradient 130/70 degC. The location, design and control of the heat supply system and the specifications of heat generation facilities are given. (J.P.)

  2. Feasibility of a single-purpose reactor plant for district heating in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarjanne, R.; Vuori, S.; Eerikaeinen, L.; Saukkoriipi, L.

    A feasibility study of a single-purpose reactor for district heating is presented. The reactor chosen is of an ordinary pressurized water reactor type with a thermal output of 100 to 200 MW. Primary circuit steam generators employed in ordinary PWR's are replaced by water-water heat exchangers. For safety reasons an intermediate circuit separates the primary from the network water. The conditions of the district heating systems in Finland were taken into account, which led to the choice of an average temperature of 160 0 C for the reactor coolant and a pressure of 13.5 bar. This, coupled with minimal control requirements helped design a considerably simple reactor plant. On condition, the reactor satisfies the basic heat demand in a district heating system, the effective annual full-power operation time of the heating reactor is from 5000 h to 7000 h. Economic comparisons indicated that the heating reactor may be competitive if the operation period is of this order. As the reactor has to be sited near the heat consumption area for reasons of economy, the safety aspects are of major importance and may in themselves preclude the realization of the heating idea. (author)

  3. Current status and development of heat exchangers for boiling water reactor nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchiyama, Yoshio; Nishioka, Shuji; Ito, Shizuo

    1975-01-01

    More efficient and reliable operation is required for BWR heat exchangers because of nuclear plant safety and other reasons. Heat exchangers are classified into two categories of systems, the system for normal operation and the system for emergency operation. The present state and future improvement of heat exchangers are described in view of heat transfer performance, material selection, structural design, vibration, and so on. When noncondensing gas exists in vapour, heat transfer performance deteriorates, so that the heat transfer characteristics should be corrected by the adaption of venting the non condensing gas from the system. Heat transfer tubes should have high corrosion resistance to working fluid as well as high thermal conductivity, strength and economy. From that point of view, 30% cupro-nickel tubes will be replaced with 10% cupro-nickel tubes or titanium tubes though some technical development is necessary. These heat exchangers are now designed according to the MITI criteria for the technology concerning nuclear and thermal power generation, ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Sec. III and some other criteria. Most of heat transfer tube failures are caused from the tube vibration induced by working fluid flow, so that the vibration test and analysis were performed on U-tube elements. Some correction was obtained for design and fabrication techniques. (Iwase, T.)

  4. Plants as useful vectors to reduce environmental toxic arsenic content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Nosheen; Mahmood, Qaisar; Maroof Shah, Mohammad; Pervez, Arshid; Sultan, Sikander

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic (As) toxicity in soil and water is an increasing menace around the globe. Its concentration both in soil and environment is due to natural and anthropogenic activities. Rising arsenic concentrations in groundwater is alarming due to the health risks to plants, animals, and human beings. Anthropogenic As contamination of soil may result from mining, milling, and smelting of copper, lead, zinc sulfide ores, hide tanning waste, dyes, chemical weapons, electroplating, gas exhaust, application of municipal sludge on land, combustion of fossil fuels, As additives to livestock feed, coal fly ash, and use of arsenical pesticides in agricultural sector. Phytoremediation can be viewed as biological, solar-driven, pump-and-treat system with an extensive, self-extending uptake network (the root system) that enhances the natural ecosystems for subsequent productive use. The present review presents recent scientific developments regarding phytoremediation of arsenic contaminated environments and its possible detoxification mechanisms in plants.

  5. Plants as Useful Vectors to Reduce Environmental Toxic Arsenic Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nosheen Mirza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic (As toxicity in soil and water is an increasing menace around the globe. Its concentration both in soil and environment is due to natural and anthropogenic activities. Rising arsenic concentrations in groundwater is alarming due to the health risks to plants, animals, and human beings. Anthropogenic As contamination of soil may result from mining, milling, and smelting of copper, lead, zinc sulfide ores, hide tanning waste, dyes, chemical weapons, electroplating, gas exhaust, application of municipal sludge on land, combustion of fossil fuels, As additives to livestock feed, coal fly ash, and use of arsenical pesticides in agricultural sector. Phytoremediation can be viewed as biological, solar-driven, pump-and-treat system with an extensive, self-extending uptake network (the root system that enhances the natural ecosystems for subsequent productive use. The present review presents recent scientific developments regarding phytoremediation of arsenic contaminated environments and its possible detoxification mechanisms in plants.

  6. Plants as Useful Vectors to Reduce Environmental Toxic Arsenic Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Nosheen; Mahmood, Qaisar; Maroof Shah, Mohammad; Pervez, Arshid; Sultan, Sikander

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic (As) toxicity in soil and water is an increasing menace around the globe. Its concentration both in soil and environment is due to natural and anthropogenic activities. Rising arsenic concentrations in groundwater is alarming due to the health risks to plants, animals, and human beings. Anthropogenic As contamination of soil may result from mining, milling, and smelting of copper, lead, zinc sulfide ores, hide tanning waste, dyes, chemical weapons, electroplating, gas exhaust, application of municipal sludge on land, combustion of fossil fuels, As additives to livestock feed, coal fly ash, and use of arsenical pesticides in agricultural sector. Phytoremediation can be viewed as biological, solar-driven, pump-and-treat system with an extensive, self-extending uptake network (the root system) that enhances the natural ecosystems for subsequent productive use. The present review presents recent scientific developments regarding phytoremediation of arsenic contaminated environments and its possible detoxification mechanisms in plants. PMID:24526924

  7. Equipment for secondary water distribution in heat exchanger, especially saturated steam generator for nuclear power plants and heat plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riman, J; Manek, O; Rybnicek, J

    1979-09-15

    A special structure consisting of a system of channels and a distribution plate with ports in-built above the tube-plate of a vertical-type steam generator prevents secondary water vaporization in the space above the tube-plate and thus also salt and sludge sedimentation which causes increased corrosion of heat transfer tubes. The size of the distribution plate ports is variable in the radial direction. The distribution plate is divided by means of the system of channels into at least two parts. The middle section of each part is of the through-flow type.

  8. Using flowering and heat-loss models for improving greenhouse energy-use efficiency in annual bedding plant production

    Science.gov (United States)

    In temperate climates, annual bedding plants are typically produced in heated greenhouses from late winter through early summer. Temperature, photoperiod, light intensity, and transplant date are commonly manipulated during commercial production so that plants are in flower for predetermined market ...

  9. Optimization of a local district heating plant under fuel flexibility and performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudra, Souman; Rosendahl, Lasse; From, Niels

    2011-01-01

    are calculated for various local fuels in energyPRO. A comparison has been made between the reference model and the basis for individual solutions. The greatest reduction in heat price is obtained by replacing one engine with a new biogas where heat production is divided by 66% of biogas, 13% natural gas engines......, an investigation has been made to reduce the use of fossil fuels for district heating system and make use of the local renewable resources (Biogas, Solar and Geothermal) for district heating purpose. In this article, the techno-economic assessment is achieved through the development of a suite of models...

  10. Plants as Useful Vectors to Reduce Environmental Toxic Arsenic Content

    OpenAIRE

    Nosheen Mirza; Qaisar Mahmood; Mohammad Maroof Shah; Arshid Pervez; Sikander Sultan

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic (As) toxicity in soil and water is an increasing menace around the globe. Its concentration both in soil and environment is due to natural and anthropogenic activities. Rising arsenic concentrations in groundwater is alarming due to the health risks to plants, animals, and human beings. Anthropogenic As contamination of soil may result from mining, milling, and smelting of copper, lead, zinc sulfide ores, hide tanning waste, dyes, chemical weapons, electroplating, gas exhaust, applica...

  11. Study of two control rods of a district heating nuclear plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, J.M.

    1979-01-01

    This paper broaches the study of the control rods to ensure a convenient working during load following of the nuclear reactor THERMOS. The mathematical model is descriptive of the whole of the nuclear plant (point model for the core and the heat balances). Two power control are studied. The first, like PWR, is a program for the mean temperature of primary water. The second takes into account the structure of the plant and is described by a schedule of powers [fr

  12. Participation of nuclear power plants in variable operation regimes under conditions of combined electric power and heat generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rydzi, S.

    1988-01-01

    The incorporation of nuclear power units in the control of the output of an electric power system is affected by technical and economic factors as well as by the manner of heat take-off from the nuclear power unit for heating purposes. The effect was therefore studied of the technological solution of converting the heat output of WWER-440 units to operating parameters of turbines in nonrated regimes of operation. Some results of the study are graphically represented. An analysis was also made of limitations preventing WWER-440 units from supplying heat with regard to their incorporation in the electric power transmission system. The results show that using nuclear power units for district heating will in the future strictly determine the seasonal shut-down of nuclear units for fuel exchange and overhauls. This could interfere with the considered concept of the 1.5 year duty time of WWER-440 reactors. With regard to the economy of operation of the nuclear power system and reduced demands on weekend unloading it will be necessary to incorporate in the power system pumped-storage power plants with one-week pumped-storage systems. (Z.M.). 5 figs., 2 tabs., 6 refs

  13. Roles of Protein Synthesis Elongation Factor EF-Tu in Heat Tolerance in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianming Fu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available EF-Tu proteins of plastids, mitochondria, and the cytosolic counterpart EF-1α in plants, as well as EF-Tu proteins of bacteria, are highly conserved and multifunctional. The functions of EF-Tu include transporting the aminoacyl-tRNA complex to the A site of the ribosome during protein biosynthesis; chaperone activity in protecting other proteins from aggregation caused by environmental stresses, facilitating renaturation of proteins when conditions return to normal; displaying a protein disulfide isomerase activity; participating in the degradation of N-terminally blocked proteins by the proteasome; eliciting innate immunity and triggering resistance to pathogenic bacteria in plants; participating in transcription when an E. coli host is infected with phages. EF-Tu genes are upregulated by abiotic stresses in plants, and EF-Tu plays important role in stress responses. Expression of a plant EF-Tu gene confers heat tolerance in E. coli, maize knock-out EF-Tu null mutants are heat susceptible, and over-expression of an EF-Tu gene improves heat tolerance in crop plants. This review paper summarizes the current knowledge of EF-Tu proteins in stress responses in plants and progress on application of EF-Tu for developing crop varieties tolerant to abiotic stresses, such as high temperatures.

  14. Water conservation benefits of urban heat mitigation: can cooling strategies reduce water consumption in California?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahmani, P.; Jones, A. D.

    2017-12-01

    Urban areas are at the forefront of climate mitigation and adaptation efforts given their high concentration of people, industry, and infrastructure. Many cities globally are seeking strategies to counter the consequences of both a hotter and drier climate. While urban heat mitigation strategies have been shown to have beneficial effects on health, energy consumption, and greenhouse gas emissions, their implications for water conservation have not been widely examined. Here we show that broad implementation of cool roofs, an urban heat mitigation strategy, not only results in significant cooling of air temperature, but also meaningfully decreases outdoor water consumption by reducing evaporative and irrigation water demands. Based on a suite of satellite-supported, multiyear regional climate simulations, we find that cool roof adoption has the potential to reduce outdoor water consumption across the major metropolitan areas in California by up to 9%. Irrigation water savings per capita, induced by cool roofs, range from 1.8 to 15.4 gallons per day across 18 counties examined. Total water savings in Los Angeles county alone is about 83 million gallons per day. While this effect is robust across the 15 years examined (2001-2015), including both drought and non-drought years, we find that cool roofs are most effective during the hottest days of the year, indicating that they could play an even greater role in reducing outdoor water use in a hotter future climate. We further show that this synergistic relationship between heat mitigation and water conservation is asymmetrical - policies that encourage direct reductions in irrigation water use can lead to substantial regional warming, potentially conflicting with heat mitigation efforts designed to counter the effects of the projected warming climate.

  15. Thermal analysis of heat and power plant with high temperature reactor and intermediate steam cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fic Adam

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Thermal analysis of a heat and power plant with a high temperature gas cooled nuclear reactor is presented. The main aim of the considered system is to supply a technological process with the heat at suitably high temperature level. The considered unit is also used to produce electricity. The high temperature helium cooled nuclear reactor is the primary heat source in the system, which consists of: the reactor cooling cycle, the steam cycle and the gas heat pump cycle. Helium used as a carrier in the first cycle (classic Brayton cycle, which includes the reactor, delivers heat in a steam generator to produce superheated steam with required parameters of the intermediate cycle. The intermediate cycle is provided to transport energy from the reactor installation to the process installation requiring a high temperature heat. The distance between reactor and the process installation is assumed short and negligable, or alternatively equal to 1 km in the analysis. The system is also equipped with a high temperature argon heat pump to obtain the temperature level of a heat carrier required by a high temperature process. Thus, the steam of the intermediate cycle supplies a lower heat exchanger of the heat pump, a process heat exchanger at the medium temperature level and a classical steam turbine system (Rankine cycle. The main purpose of the research was to evaluate the effectiveness of the system considered and to assess whether such a three cycle cogeneration system is reasonable. Multivariant calculations have been carried out employing the developed mathematical model. The results have been presented in a form of the energy efficiency and exergy efficiency of the system as a function of the temperature drop in the high temperature process heat exchanger and the reactor pressure.

  16. Experiments to investigate direct containment heating phenomena with scaled models of the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchat, T.K.; Pilch, M.M.; Allen, M.D.

    1997-02-01

    The Surtsey Test Facility is used to perform scaled experiments simulating High Pressure Melt Ejection accidents in a nuclear power plant (NPP). The experiments investigate the effects of direct containment heating (DCH) on the containment load. The results from Zion and Surry experiments can be extrapolated to other Westinghouse plants, but predicted containment loads cannot be generalized to all Combustion Engineering (CE) plants. Five CE plants have melt dispersal flow paths which circumvent the main mitigation of containment compartmentalization in most Westinghouse PWRs. Calvert Cliff-like plant geometries and the impact of codispersed water were addressed as part of the DCH issue resolution. Integral effects tests were performed with a scale model of the Calvert Cliffs NPP inside the Surtsey test vessel. The experiments investigated the effects of codispersal of water, steam, and molten core stimulant materials on DCH loads under prototypic accident conditions and plant configurations. The results indicated that large amounts of coejected water reduced the DCH load by a small amount. Large amounts of debris were dispersed from the cavity to the upper dome (via the annular gap). 22 refs., 84 figs., 30 tabs

  17. Techno-economic analysis of a local district heating plant under fuel flexibility and performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudra, Souman; Rosendahl, Lasse

    2017-01-01

    are calculated using the same procedure according to the use of various local renewable fuels known as “biogas option,” “solar option,” “heat pump option,” and “imported heat option.” A comparison has been made between the reference option and other options. The greatest reduction in heat cost is obtained from......, an investigation has been made to reduce the use of fossil fuels for district heating system and make use of the local renewable resources (biogas, solar, and heat pump) for district heating purposes. In this article, the techno-economic assessment is achieved through the development of a suite of models...... the biogas option by replacing a new engine, where 66 % of the current fuel is substituted with biogas....

  18. Reshaping the Built Environment to Reduce Environmental and Public Health Impacts of Summertime Heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, J. E.; Bakewell, K.

    2005-12-01

    , risk of mortality was higher in the black community, and in those living in certain types of low-income and multi-tenant housing. Interventions in the built environment to promote urban heat island mitigation can reduce ambient temperatures, potentially reducing heat-related mortality rates in vulnerable populations, electricity consumption and air pollutant emissions, and slow ozone formation, an important health stressor. These mitigation measures may also serve as adaptive responses for a range of potential future climate conditions. Here we review current research that assesses the health, air quality, and energy conservation benefits in cities from these interventions in the built environment, and discuss the techniques and research objectives of a new pilot community-based project to mitigate the heat island effect in the South Bronx, New York City through implementation of vegetated and high albedo roofing on residential and institutional buildings. Recent studies use mesoscale climate models and a variety of land-use and land-cover scenarios to project the effects of increasing vegetative fraction and albedo within metropolitan regions and to evaluate the impacts of measures that may serve both as adaptive responses to current conditions and mitigation for future climate variability. Through this perspective, we address the questions: What urban design approaches make for resilient cities in a changing environment? What costs and benefits may be expected by the adoption of heat island mitigation techniques within the New York metropolitan region?

  19. Mobile central heating plant ensures the supply during the power-plant modernization. Planning-safe reconstruction; Mobile Heizzentrale sichert Versorgung waehrend Kraftwerksmodernisierung. Planungssicherer Umbau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernhard, Petra [Mobiheat GmbH, Friedberg (Germany). Presse- und Oeffentlichkeitsarbeit

    2012-09-15

    During the comprehensive energetic retrofitting of district heating plants in the spa resort of Badenweiler (Federal Republic of Germany) a mobile 2-MW heating plant from Mobilheat (Ebersberg, Federal Republic of Germany) was used for the heat supply. Thus, the installation of environmental friendly energy supply based on cogeneration plants could be implemented with planning security. This particularly was important because, among other things, the traditional spa resort, the Kurhaus as well as hotels and private customers depend on the heat supply system. These buildings have be supplied with thermal water also in the summer.

  20. A Method to Assess Flux Hazards at CSP Plants to Reduce Avian Mortality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Clifford K.; Wendelin, Timothy; Horstman, Luke; Yellowhair, Julius

    2017-06-27

    A method to evaluate avian flux hazards at concentrating solar power plants (CSP) has been developed. A heat-transfer model has been coupled to simulations of the irradiance in the airspace above a CSP plant to determine the feather temperature along prescribed bird flight paths. Probabilistic modeling results show that the irradiance and assumed feather properties (thickness, absorptance, heat capacity) have the most significant impact on the simulated feather temperature, which can increase rapidly (hundreds of degrees Celsius in seconds) depending on the parameter values. The avian flux hazard model is being combined with a plant performance model to identify alternative heliostat standby aiming strategies that minimize both avian flux hazards and negative impacts on plant performance.

  1. OPTIMIZING TECHNOLOGY TO REDUCE MERCURY AND ACID GAS EMISSIONS FROM ELECTRIC POWER PLANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey C. Quick; David E. Tabet; Sharon Wakefield; Roger L. Bon

    2005-10-01

    Maps showing potential mercury, sulfur, chlorine, and moisture emissions for U.S. coal by county of origin were made from publicly available data (plates 1, 2, 3, and 4). Published equations that predict mercury capture by emission control technologies used at U.S. coal-fired utilities were applied to average coal quality values for 169 U.S. counties. The results were used to create five maps that show the influence of coal origin on mercury emissions from utility units with: (1) hot-side electrostatic precipitator (hESP), (2) cold-side electrostatic precipitator (cESP), (3) hot-side electrostatic precipitator with wet flue gas desulfurization (hESP/FGD), (4) cold-side electrostatic precipitator with wet flue gas desulfurization (cESP/FGD), and (5) spray-dry adsorption with fabric filter (SDA/FF) emission controls (plates 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9). Net (lower) coal heating values were calculated from measured coal Btu values, and estimated coal moisture and hydrogen values; the net heating values were used to derive mercury emission rates on an electric output basis (plate 10). Results indicate that selection of low-mercury coal is a good mercury control option for plants having hESP, cESP, or hESP/FGD emission controls. Chlorine content is more important for plants having cESP/FGD or SDA/FF controls; optimum mercury capture is indicated where chlorine is between 500 and 1000 ppm. Selection of low-sulfur coal should improve mercury capture where carbon in fly ash is used to reduce mercury emissions. Comparison of in-ground coal quality with the quality of commercially mined coal indicates that existing coal mining and coal washing practice results in a 25% reduction of mercury in U.S. coal before it is delivered to the power plant. Further pre-combustion mercury reductions may be possible, especially for coal from Texas, Ohio, parts of Pennsylvania and much of the western U.S.

  2. Development of Molten-Salt Heat Transfer Fluid Technology for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants - Public Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grogan, Dylan C. P.

    2013-08-15

    Executive Summary This Final Report for the "Development of Molten-Salt Heat Transfer Fluid (HTF) Technology for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants” describes the overall project accomplishments, results and conclusions. Phase 1 analyzed the feasibility, cost and performance of a parabolic trough solar power plant with a molten salt heat transfer fluid (HTF); researched and/or developed feasible component options, detailed cost estimates and workable operating procedures; and developed hourly performance models. As a result, a molten salt plant with 6 hours of storage was shown to reduce Thermal Energy Storage (TES) cost by 43.2%, solar field cost by 14.8%, and levelized cost of energy (LCOE) by 9.8% - 14.5% relative to a similar state-of-the-art baseline plant. The LCOE savings range met the project’s Go/No Go criteria of 10% LCOE reduction. Another primary focus of Phase 1 and 2 was risk mitigation. The large risk areas associated with a molten salt parabolic trough plant were addressed in both Phases, such as; HTF freeze prevention and recovery, collector components and piping connections, and complex component interactions. Phase 2 analyzed in more detail the technical and economic feasibility of a 140 MWe,gross molten-salt CSP plant with 6 hours of TES. Phase 2 accomplishments included developing technical solutions to the above mentioned risk areas, such as freeze protection/recovery, corrosion effects of applicable molten salts, collector design improvements for molten salt, and developing plant operating strategies for maximized plant performance and freeze risk mitigation. Phase 2 accomplishments also included developing and thoroughly analyzing a molten salt, Parabolic Trough power plant performance model, in order to achieve the project cost and performance targets. The plant performance model and an extensive basic Engineering, Procurement, and Construction (EPC) quote were used to calculate a real levelized cost of energy (LCOE) of 11.50

  3. Reducing the occurrence of plant events through improved human performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, T.; Burkhart, A.D.

    1993-01-01

    During a routine control room surveillance, the reactor operator is distracted by an alarming secondary annunciator and a telephone call. When the reactor operator resumes the surveillance, he inadvertently performs the procedural steps out of order. This causes a reportable nuclear event. How can procedure-related human performance problems such as this be prevented? The question is vitally important for the nuclear industry. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data observed, open-quotes With the perceived reduction in the number of events caused by equipment failures, INPO and other industry groups and human performance experts agree that a key to continued improvement in plant performance and safety is improved human performance.close quotes In fact, open-quotes more than 50% of the reportable events occurring at nuclear power plants involve human error.close quotes Prevention (or correction) of a human performance problem is normally based on properly balancing the following three factors: (1) supervisory involvement; (2) personnel training; and (3) procedures. The nuclear industry is implementing a formula known as ACME, which better balances supervisory involvement, personnel training, and procedures. Webster's New World Dictionary defines acme as the highest point, the peak. ACME human performance is the goal: ACME Adherence to and use of procedures; Self-Checking; Management Involvement; and Event Investigations

  4. Technical and economical prerequisites of special district-heating nuclear power plant development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baturov, B.B.; Boldyrev, V.M.; Losev, V.L.; Sigal, M.V.

    1983-01-01

    Results are presented of technical and economical analysis of advisability of constructing combined Nuclear Power and Heating Plants (NPHP) assuring the possibility of their location near the areas of heat power consumption in case of observing a given degree of radiation safety for population and personnel. Specific features determining the choice of turbine-driven units for such plants are analyzed. Conditions of competiveness of a specialized NPHP with alternative power units, NPHP based on the WWER-1000 reactor and district heating plants (NDHP), are determined. Analysis of design specifications of NPHP with two VK-500 reactor units and structures of capital investments in such a plant reveal that an increase in the total capital investments in the NPHP would not exceed 2% with account of the difference in costs for grid heaters and a corresponding change in dimensions of operation rooms as well as changes in costs of heat removal system (within one site) at the TK turbine replacement by the T turbine

  5. Soil heating in chaparral fires: effects on soil properties, plant nutrients, erosion, and runoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard F. DeBano; Raymond M. Rice; Conrad C. Eugene

    1979-01-01

    This state-of-the-art report summarizes what is known about the effects of heat on soil during chaparral fires. It reviews the literature on the effects of such fires on soil properties, availabilty and loss of plant nutrients, soil wettability, erosion, and surface runoff. And it reports new data collected during recent prescribed burns and a wildfire in southern...

  6. Stem heat balance method to estimate transpiration of young orange and mango plants

    OpenAIRE

    Vellame,Lucas M.; Coelho Filho,Maurício A.; Paz,Vital P. S.; Coelho,Eugênio F.

    2010-01-01

    The present study had as its main objective the evaluation of the heat balance method in young orange and mango plants under protected environment. The work was carried out at Embrapa Cassava and Tropical Fruits, Cruz das Almas, BA. Later on, estimates of sap flow were conducted for two mango plants cultivated in pots of 15 and 50 L installed on weighting platforms of 45 and 140 kg; sap flow was determined in three orange plants, two of which were also installed on weighing platforms. The val...

  7. Ecological implications of reduced pollen deposition in alpine plants: a case study using a dominant cushion plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Anya; Hooper, Robyn; Molenda, Olivia; Lortie, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    The reproductive assurance hypothesis states that self-incompatible female plants must produce twice the number of seeds relative to their self-compatible hermaphroditic counterparts to persist in gynodioecious populations. This is a viable life-history strategy, provided that pollination rates are sufficiently high. However, reduced pollination rates in alpine plants are likely due to climate induced plant-pollinator mismatches and general declines in pollinators. Using a gynodioecious population of the dominant plant Silene acaulis (Caryophyllaceae), we tested the reproductive assurance hypothesis and also the stress gradient hypothesis with a series of pollinator exclusion trials and extensive measurements of subsequent reproductive output (gender ratio, plant size, percent fruit-set, fruit weight, seeds per fruit, total seeds, seed weight, and seed germination). The reproductive assurance hypothesis was supported with female plants being more sensitive to and less likely to be viable under reductions in pollination rates. These findings are the first to show that the stress gradient hypothesis is also supported under a gradient of pollen supply instead of environmental limitations. Beneficiary abundance was negatively correlated to percent fruit-set under current pollen supply, but became positive under reduced pollen supply suggesting that there are important plant-plant-pollinator interactions related to reproduction in these alpine plant species.

  8. Biochar amendment reduced methylmercury accumulation in rice plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Rui; Wang, Yongjie; Zhong, Huan

    2016-08-05

    There is growing concern about methylmercury (MeHg) accumulation in rice grains and thus enhanced dietary exposure to MeHg in Asian countries. Here, we explored the possibility of reducing grain MeHg levels by biochar amendment, and the underlying mechanisms. Pot (i.e., rice cultivation in biochar amended soils) and batch experiments (i.e., incubation of amended soils under laboratory conditions) were carried out, to investigate MeHg dynamics (i.e., MeHg production, partitioning and phytoavailability in paddy soils, and MeHg uptake by rice) under biochar amendment (1-4% of soil mass). We demonstrate for the first time that biochar amendment could evidently reduce grain MeHg levels (49-92%). The declines could be attributed to the combined effects of: (1) increased soil MeHg concentrations, probably explained by the release of sulfate from biochar and thus enhanced microbial production of MeHg (e.g., by sulfate-reducing bacteria), (2) MeHg immobilization in soils, facilitated by the large surface areas and high organosulfur content of biochar, and (3) biodilution of MeHg in rice grains, due to the increased grain biomass under biochar amendment (35-79%). These observations together with mechanistic explanations improve understanding of MeHg dynamics in soil-rice systems, and support the possibility of reducing MeHg phytoaccumulation under biochar amendment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Rehabilitation of heat exchange equipment a key to power plant life extension and performance improvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taveau, F.; Huiban, A.M. [Alstom Power Heat Exchange, 78 - Velizy Villacoublay (France)

    2001-07-01

    With the current evolutions of the energy market and the life extension of the power plants, all the equipment initially supplied need one day or another partial or total rehabilitation. For heat exchange equipment, this includes the condensers, feed water heaters and various heat exchangers. Modernization is in particular necessary when in-service monitoring and periodic inspections show significant deteriorations of the tubes and cooling water leakages leading to forced outages or when tube and tube plate materials are no longer suited to cooling water characteristics or to updated specifications of the secondary system. Feedwater heaters and heat exchangers damaged by erosion/corrosion, vibrations, etc. can be re-designed, manufactured and replaced easily. The operation is more complex on condensers and requires technical surveys, study of alternative solutions and has a more direct impact on the global output of the power plant. That is why our conference will focus on the condenser refurbishment. (author)

  10. Heat rate curve approximation for power plants without data measuring devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poullikkas, Andreas [Electricity Authority of Cyprus, P.O. Box 24506, 1399 Nicosia (CY

    2012-07-01

    In this work, a numerical method, based on the one-dimensional finite difference technique, is proposed for the approximation of the heat rate curve, which can be applied for power plants in which no data acquisition is available. Unlike other methods in which three or more data points are required for the approximation of the heat rate curve, the proposed method can be applied when the heat rate curve data is available only at the maximum and minimum operating capacities of the power plant. The method is applied on a given power system, in which we calculate the electricity cost using the CAPSE (computer aided power economics) algorithm. Comparisons are made when the least squares method is used. The results indicate that the proposed method give accurate results.

  11. Rehabilitation of heat exchange equipment a key to power plant life extension and performance improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taveau, F.; Huiban, A.M.

    2001-01-01

    With the current evolutions of the energy market and the life extension of the power plants, all the equipment initially supplied need one day or another partial or total rehabilitation. For heat exchange equipment, this includes the condensers, feed water heaters and various heat exchangers. Modernization is in particular necessary when in-service monitoring and periodic inspections show significant deteriorations of the tubes and cooling water leakages leading to forced outages or when tube and tube plate materials are no longer suited to cooling water characteristics or to updated specifications of the secondary system. Feedwater heaters and heat exchangers damaged by erosion/corrosion, vibrations, etc. can be re-designed, manufactured and replaced easily. The operation is more complex on condensers and requires technical surveys, study of alternative solutions and has a more direct impact on the global output of the power plant. That is why our conference will focus on the condenser refurbishment. (author)

  12. The Impact of Reduced Gravity on Free Convective Heat Transfer from a Finite, Flat, Vertical Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotto, Michael A.; Johnson, Kirstyn M.; Nie, Christopher W.; Klaus, David M.

    2017-10-01

    Convective heat transfer is governed by a number of factors including various fluid properties, the presence of a thermal gradient, geometric configuration, flow condition, and gravity. Empirically-derived analytical relationships can be used to estimate convection as a function of these governing parameters. Although it is relatively straightforward to experimentally quantify the contributions of the majority of these variables, it is logistically difficult to assess the influence of reduced-gravity due to practical limitations of establishing this environment. Therefore, in order to explore this regime, a series of tests was conducted to evaluate convection under reduced-gravity conditions averaging 0.45 m/sec2 (0.05 g) achieved aboard a parabolic aircraft. The results showed a reduction in net heat transfer of approximately 61% in flight relative to a 1 g terrestrial baseline using the same setup. The average experimental Nusselt Number of 19.05 ± 1.41 statistically correlated with the predicted value of 18.90 ± 0.63 (N = 13), estimated using the Churchill-Chu correlation for free convective heat transfer from a finite, flat, vertical plate. Extrapolating this to similar performance in true microgravity (10-6 g) indicates that these conditions should yield a Nusselt Number of 1.27, which is 2.6% the magnitude of free convection at 1 g, or a reduction of 97.4%. With advection essentially eliminated, heat transfer becomes limited to diffusion and radiation, which are gravity-independent and nearly equivalent in magnitude in this case. These results offer a general guideline for integrating components that utilize natural (free) convective gas cooling in a spacecraft habitat and properly sizing the thermal control system.

  13. Study of flue gas condensing for biofuel fired heat and power plants; Studie av roekgaskondensering foer biobraensleeldade kraftvaermeanlaeggningar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Axby, Fredrik; Gustafsson, J O; Nystroem, Johan; Johansson, Kent

    2000-11-01

    This report considers questions regarding flue gas condensing plants connected to bio-fuelled heat and power plants. The report consists of two parts, one where nine existing plants are described regarding technical issues and regarding the experience from the different plants. Part two is a theoretical study where heat balance calculations are made to show the technical and economical performance in different plant configurations and operating conditions. Initially the different parts in the flue gas condensing plant are described. Tube, plate and scrubber condensers are described briefly. The different types of humidifiers are also described, rotor, cross-stream plate heat exchanger and scrubber. Nine flue gas-condensing plants have been visited. The plants where chosen considering it should be bio-fuel fired plant primarily heat and power plants. Furthermore we tried to get a good dissemination considering plant configuration, supplier, geographical position, operating situation and plant size. The description of the different plants focuses on the flue gas condenser and the belonging components. The fuel, flue gas and condensate composition is described as well as which materials are used in the different parts of the plant. The experience from operating the plants and the reasons of why they decided to chose the actual condenser supplier are reported.

  14. Drought versus heat: What's the major constraint on Mediterranean green roof plants?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savi, Tadeja, E-mail: tsavi@units.it [Dipartimento di Scienze della Vita, Università di Trieste, Via L. Giorgieri 10, 34127 Trieste (Italy); Dal Borgo, Anna, E-mail: dalborgo.anna@gmail.com [Dipartimento di Scienze della Vita, Università di Trieste, Via L. Giorgieri 10, 34127 Trieste (Italy); Love, Veronica L., E-mail: vllove1@sheffield.ac.uk [Dipartimento di Scienze della Vita, Università di Trieste, Via L. Giorgieri 10, 34127 Trieste (Italy); Department of Landscape, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield, South Yorkshire S10 2TN (United Kingdom); Andri, Sergio, E-mail: s.andri@seic.it [Harpo seic verdepensile, Via Torino 34, 34123 Trieste (Italy); Tretiach, Mauro, E-mail: tretiach@units.it [Dipartimento di Scienze della Vita, Università di Trieste, Via L. Giorgieri 10, 34127 Trieste (Italy); Nardini, Andrea, E-mail: nardini@units.it [Dipartimento di Scienze della Vita, Università di Trieste, Via L. Giorgieri 10, 34127 Trieste (Italy)

    2016-10-01

    Green roofs are gaining momentum in the arid and semi-arid regions due to their multiple benefits as compared with conventional roofs. One of the most critical steps in green roof installation is the selection of drought and heat tolerant species that can thrive under extreme microclimate conditions. We monitored the water status, growth and survival of 11 drought-adapted shrub species grown on shallow green roof modules (10 and 13 cm deep substrate) and analyzed traits enabling plants to cope with drought (symplastic and apoplastic resistance) and heat stress (root membrane stability). The physiological traits conferring efficiency/safety to the water transport system under severe drought influenced plant water status and represent good predictors of both plant water use and growth rates over green roofs. Moreover, our data suggest that high substrate temperature represents a stress factor affecting plant survival to a larger extent than drought per se. In fact, the major cause influencing seedling survival on shallow substrates was the species-specific root resistance to heat, a single and easy measurable trait that should be integrated into the methodological framework for screening and selection of suitable shrub species for roof greening in the Mediterranean. - Highlights: • The use of hardy shrub species for roof greening should be increased. • We monitored water status of 11 shrub species growing on shallow green roofs. • Species heat and drought tolerance, growth, and survival were studied. • High substrate temperature significantly affected plant survival. • Root resistance to heat could be used as trait for species selection for green roofs.

  15. Drought versus heat: What's the major constraint on Mediterranean green roof plants?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savi, Tadeja; Dal Borgo, Anna; Love, Veronica L.; Andri, Sergio; Tretiach, Mauro; Nardini, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Green roofs are gaining momentum in the arid and semi-arid regions due to their multiple benefits as compared with conventional roofs. One of the most critical steps in green roof installation is the selection of drought and heat tolerant species that can thrive under extreme microclimate conditions. We monitored the water status, growth and survival of 11 drought-adapted shrub species grown on shallow green roof modules (10 and 13 cm deep substrate) and analyzed traits enabling plants to cope with drought (symplastic and apoplastic resistance) and heat stress (root membrane stability). The physiological traits conferring efficiency/safety to the water transport system under severe drought influenced plant water status and represent good predictors of both plant water use and growth rates over green roofs. Moreover, our data suggest that high substrate temperature represents a stress factor affecting plant survival to a larger extent than drought per se. In fact, the major cause influencing seedling survival on shallow substrates was the species-specific root resistance to heat, a single and easy measurable trait that should be integrated into the methodological framework for screening and selection of suitable shrub species for roof greening in the Mediterranean. - Highlights: • The use of hardy shrub species for roof greening should be increased. • We monitored water status of 11 shrub species growing on shallow green roofs. • Species heat and drought tolerance, growth, and survival were studied. • High substrate temperature significantly affected plant survival. • Root resistance to heat could be used as trait for species selection for green roofs.

  16. Increase of efficiency of plant materials heat treatment in tubular reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Golubkovich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In agriculture products of pyrolysis of plant materials in the form of waste of the main production can be applied as a source of heat and electric power. Besides, their use prevents ecological pollution of the soil and the atmosphere. Pyrolysis plants can be used for work with tubular reactors anywhere. Due to them farmers can dry grain, using waste heat of diesel generators, heatgenerators, boiler plants and receiving thus gaseous products, liquid and firm fractions. A technology based on cyclic and continuous plant mass movement by a piston in a pipe from a loading site to a place of unloading of a firm phase consistently through cameras of drying, pyrolysis, condensation of gaseous products. Exhaust furnace gases with a temperature up to 600 degrees Celsius are given countercurrent material movement from a power equipment. The gaseous, liquid and firm products from the pyrolysis camera are used for heat and electric power generation. Calculation of parameters of subdrying and pyrolysis cameras is necessary for effective and steady operation of the tubular reactor. The authors determined the speed of raw materials movement, and also duration of drying and pyrolysis in working chambers. An analysis of a simplified mathematical model of process was confirmed with results of experiments. Models of heat treatment of wet plant materials in tubular reactors are worked out on a basis of equality of speeds of material movement in the reactor and distribution of a temperature front in material on radius. The authors defined estimated characteristic for determination of tubular reactor productivity and size of heat, required for drying and pyrolysis.

  17. Perspectives on deciphering mechanisms underlying plant heat stress response and thermotolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamila Lucia Bokszczanin

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Global warming is a major threat for agriculture and food safety and in many cases the negative effects are already apparent. The current challenge of basic and applied plant science is to decipher the molecular mechanisms of heat stress response and thermotolerance in detail and use this information to identify genotypes that will withstand unfavorable environmental conditions. Nowadays X-omics approaches complement the findings of previous targeted studies and highlight the complexity of heat stress response mechanisms giving information for so far unrecognized genes, proteins and metabolites as potential key players of thermotolerance. Even more, roles of epigenetic mechanisms and the involvement of small RNAs in thermotolerance are currently emerging and thus open new directions of yet unexplored areas of plant heat stress response. In parallel it is emerging that although the whole plant is vulnerable to heat, specific organs are particularly sensitive to elevated temperatures. This has redirected research from the vegetative to generative tissues. The sexual reproduction phase is considered as the most sensitive to heat and specifically pollen exhibits the highest sensitivity and frequently an elevation of the temperature just a few degrees above the optimum during pollen development can have detrimental effects for crop production. Compared to our knowledge on heat stress response of vegetative tissues, the information on pollen is still scarce. Nowadays, several techniques for high-throughput X-omics approaches provide major tools to explore the principles of pollen heat stress response and thermotolerance mechanisms in specific genotypes. The collection of such information will provide an excellent support for improvement of breeding programs to facilitate the development of tolerant cultivars. The review aims at describing the current knowledge of thermotolerance mechanisms and the technical advances which will foster new insights into

  18. 60-MW/sub t/ methanation plant design for HTGR process heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, C.R.; Arcilla, N.T.; Hui, M.M.; Hutchins, B.A.

    1982-07-01

    This report describes a 60 MW(t) Methanation Plant for generating steam for industrial applications. The plant consists of four 15 MW(t) methanation trains. Each train is connected to a pipeline and receives synthesis gas (syngas) from a High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Reforming (HTGR-R) plant. Conversion of the syngas to methane and water releases exothermic heat which is used to generate steam. Syngas is received at the Methanation Plant at a temperature of 80 0 F and 900 psia. One adiabatic catalytic reactor and one isothermal catalytic reactor, in each methanation train, converts the syngas to 92.2% (dry bases) methane. Methane and condensate are returned at temperatures of 100 to 125 0 F and at pressures of 860 to 870 psia to the HTGR-R plant for the reproduction of syngas

  19. On the Analysis and Fault-Diagnosis Tools for Small-Scale Heat and Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arriagada, Jaime

    2003-12-01

    The deregulation of the electricity market drives utilities and independent power producers to operate heat and power plants as profit centers. In order to keep the economic margins on the credit side, the preferred measures have been to improve the electrical efficiency through changes in the hardware and boost the overall efficiency through e.g. combined heat and power (CHP) generation. The better understanding of global environmental issues is also pushing the development toward more advanced power plant technology that at the introduction stage may represent a risky option for the plant owner. Recently, there is a growing interest in improving the plant operation instead, and therefore the focus has been put on aspects related to the RAM (reliability-availability-maintenance) of the plants. Small- and mid-scale CHP plants, especially natural gas- and biomass-fueled, have been identified to be important to satisfy the needs of the energy market and help to mitigate the environmental factors in the short- and middle-term. One of the major challenges that these types of plants will face is attaining good RAM at the same time that they cannot support big O and M costs and a lot of personnel. Therefore the implementation of cheap and reliable IT-based tools that help to achieve this goal is essential. Most power plants today are equipped with modern distributed control systems that through a considerable number of sensors deliver large amounts of data to the control room. This paves the way to the introduction of intelligent tools - derived from the artificial intelligence technology - such as artificial neural networks (ANNs) and genetic algorithms (GA). ANNs have a learning ability that makes them useful for the construction of powerful non-physical models based on data from the process, while GA has shown to be a robust optimization method based on the principle of the 'survival-of-the-fittest'. Principally ANNs, but also to a lesser extent GA, have

  20. Model experiments on depressurisation accidents in nuclear process heat plants (HTGR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritsching, G.; Wolf, G. [Internationale Atomreaktorbau G.m.b.H. (INTERATOM), Bergisch Gladbach (Germany, F.R.)

    1981-01-15

    The analysis of depressurisation accidents requires the use of digital computer programs to find out the dynamic loads acting on the plant structures. Because of the importance of such accidents in safety and licensing procedures of nuclear process heat plants, it is necessary to compare these computer results with suitable experiments to show the accuracy and the limits of the programs in question. For this purpose a series of depressurisation experiments has been started at INTERATOM on a small scale model of a primary loop of a nuclear process heat plant. Using the results of these experiments three different computer programs were tested with good success. The development of the experimental program and the estimation of the results was carried out in co-operation with KFA-Juelich and the Technische Hochschule Aachen.

  1. Model experiments on depressurisation accidents in nuclear process heat plants (HTGR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritsching, G.; Wolf, G.

    1981-01-01

    The analysis of depressurisation accidents requires the use of digital computer programs to find out the dynamic loads acting on the plant structures. Because of the importance of such accidents in safety and licensing procedures of nuclear process heat plants, it is necessary to compare these computer results with suitable experiments to show the accuracy and the limits of the programs in question. For this purpose a series of depressurisation experiments has been started at INTERATOM on a small scale model of a primary loop of a nuclear process heat plant. Using the results of these experiments three different computer programs were tested with good success. The development of the experimental program and the estimation of the results was carried out in co-operation with KFA-Juelich and the Technische Hochschule Aachen

  2. A reduced theoretical model for estimating condensation effects in combustion-heated hypersonic tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, L.; Luo, X.; Qin, F.; Yang, J.

    2018-03-01

    As one of the combustion products of hydrocarbon fuels in a combustion-heated wind tunnel, water vapor may condense during the rapid expansion process, which will lead to a complex two-phase flow inside the wind tunnel and even change the design flow conditions at the nozzle exit. The coupling of the phase transition and the compressible flow makes the estimation of the condensation effects in such wind tunnels very difficult and time-consuming. In this work, a reduced theoretical model is developed to approximately compute the nozzle-exit conditions of a flow including real-gas and homogeneous condensation effects. Specifically, the conservation equations of the axisymmetric flow are first approximated in the quasi-one-dimensional way. Then, the complex process is split into two steps, i.e., a real-gas nozzle flow but excluding condensation, resulting in supersaturated nozzle-exit conditions, and a discontinuous jump at the end of the nozzle from the supersaturated state to a saturated state. Compared with two-dimensional numerical simulations implemented with a detailed condensation model, the reduced model predicts the flow parameters with good accuracy except for some deviations caused by the two-dimensional effect. Therefore, this reduced theoretical model can provide a fast, simple but also accurate estimation of the condensation effect in combustion-heated hypersonic tunnels.

  3. A Model for Optimization and Analysis of Energy Flexible Boiler Plants for Building Heating Purposes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, J R

    1996-05-01

    This doctoral thesis presents a model for optimization and analysis of boiler plants. The model optimizes a boiler plant with respect to the annual total costs or with respect to energy consumption. The optimum solution is identified for a given number of energy carriers and defined characteristics of the heat production units. The number of heat production units and the capacity of units related to each energy carrier or the capacity of units related to the same energy carrier can be found. For a problem comprising large variation during a defined analysis period the model gives the operating costs and energy consumption to be used in an extended optimization. The model can be used to analyse the consequences with respect to costs and energy consumption due to capacity margins and shifts in the boundary conditions. The model is based on a search approach comprising an operational simulator. The simulator is based on a marginal cost method and dynamic programming. The simulation is performed on an hourly basis. A general boiler characteristic representation is maintained by linear energy or cost functions. The heat pump characteristics are represented by tabulated performance and efficiency as function of state and nominal aggregate capacities. The simulation procedure requires a heat load profile on an hourly basis. The problem of the presence of capacity margins in boiler plants is studied for selected cases. The single-boiler, oil-fired plant is very sensitive to the magnitude of the losses present during burner off-time. For a plant comprising two oil-fired burners, the impact of a capacity margin can be dampened by the selected capacity configuration. The present incentive, in Norway, to install an electric element boiler in an oil-fired boiler plant is analysed. 77 refs., 74 figs., 12 tabs.

  4. District heating and cooling system for communities through power plant retrofit and distribution network. Final report, Phase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-06-01

    The technical and economic feasibility of retrofitting thermal power plants in Minnesota to accommodate both heat and power generation for district heating was examined and is discussed. Three communities were identified as viable sites for co-generation district heating. (LCL)

  5. Gas-steam turbine plant for cogenerative process at 'Toplifikacija' - Skopje (Joint-Stock Co. for district heating - Macedonia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cvetkovski, Andrijan

    2003-01-01

    The gas-steam power plant for combined heat and electric power production at A.D. 'Toplifikacija' Skopje - TO 'Zapad' is analyzed and determined. The analyzed plant is consisted of gas turbine, heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) and condensate steam turbine with controlled steam extraction. It operates on natural gas as a main fuel source. The heating of the water for the district heating is dine in the heat exchanger, with // heat of controlled extraction from condensate turbine. The advantages of the both binary plant and centralized co generative production compared with the individual are analyzed. The natural gas consumption of for both specific heating and electrical capacity in join production as well as fuel savings compared to the separate production of the same quantity of energy is also analyzed. (Original)

  6. Recent research and development of intermediate heat exchanger for VHTR plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Akira; Matsumura, Noboru; Nishikawa, Hidetsugu; Yamada, Seiya [Nagasaki Shipyard and Engine Works, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Nagasaki (Japan)

    1984-07-01

    This paper describes recent tests which show progress in design of Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) for high-temperature gas cooled reactor plants developed for process heat application utilizing nuclear thermal energy. As the IHX must have a large heat exchanging capacity, the most important consideration is to design a compact heat exchanger having high efficiency. For the improvement of heat transfer characteristics, tests were performed at Mitsubishi Heavy Industries such as, trial manufacturing, heat transfer characteristic tests and nondestructive inspection tests of finned tubes. Results are as follows; (1) Finned tubes produced by rolling were able to be wound helically by bending machine. (2) Laboratory tests showed this tube had good heat transfer characteristics. (3) There was not much difference between finned tubes and bare tubes for detection of defects by the eddy current tests. (4) A trial assembly using the same scale model showed that the present design is easy to assemble. (5) Automatic orbital welding can be adopted for the welding between tube and tube sheet. As the result of the experiences gained from these successful tests, the design of the IHX has been greatly improved. (author)

  7. Design of reactor protection systems for HTR plants generating electric power and process heat problems and solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craemer, B.; Dahm, H.; Spillekothen, H.G.

    1982-06-01

    The design basis of the reactor protection system (RPS) for HTR plants generating process heat and electric power is briefly described and some particularities of process heat plants are indicated. Some particularly important or exacting technical measuring positions for the RPS of a process heat HTR with 500 MWsub(th) power (PNP 500) are described and current R + D work explained. It is demonstrated that a particularly simple RPS can be realized in an HTR with modular design. (author)

  8. Heat stress and reduced plane of nutrition decreases intestinal integrity and function in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, S C; Mani, V; Weber, T E; Rhoads, R P; Patience, J F; Baumgard, L H; Gabler, N K

    2013-11-01

    Heat stress can compromise intestinal integrity and induce leaky gut in a variety of species. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to determine if heat stress (HS) directly or indirectly (via reduced feed intake) increases intestinal permeability in growing pigs. We hypothesized that an increased heat-load causes physiological alterations to the intestinal epithelium, resulting in compromised barrier integrity and altered intestinal function that contributes to the overall severity of HS-related illness. Crossbred gilts (n=48, 43±4 kg BW) were housed in constant climate controlled rooms in individual pens and exposed to 1) thermal neutral (TN) conditions (20°C, 35-50% humidity) with ad libitum intake, 2) HS conditions (35°C, 20-35% humidity) with ad libitum feed intake, or 3) pair-fed in TN conditions (PFTN) to eliminate confounding effects of dissimilar feed intake. Pigs were sacrificed at 1, 3, or 7 d of environmental exposure and jejunum samples were mounted into modified Ussing chambers for assessment of transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and intestinal fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled lipopolysaccharide (LPS) permeability (expressed as apparent permeability coefficient, APP). Further, gene and protein markers of intestinal integrity and stress were assessed. Irrespective of d of HS exposure, plasma endotoxin levels increased 45% (Pwarm summer months.

  9. Waste Tyres as Heat Sink to Reduce the Driveway Surface Temperatures in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniza Abdul Aziz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of roads and driveways are on the rise as automobiles are now a necessity to all. This excessive development with its requirements increased the urban heat temperature and the generation of waste tyres. Waste tyre management has therefore been taken seriously by developed countries and since the European directive to ban used tyre products and whole tire disposal from landfill in 2003 and 2006 respectively, many researchers have looked for alternative ways to use the waste tyre. In Malaysia, The Smart and Cool Home Developer attempted to develop an eco-house by utilising waste tyre as the foundation for the driveway and claimed that the buried tyres act as a heat sink for the concrete and reduce the surface temperature of the driveway. Hence investigations were conducted on two sample houses to investigate this phenomenon. Findings from this pilot study show that waste tyres do act as a heat sink to the concrete driveways which affect the ambient temperature and relative humidity of the immediate surroundings.

  10. Laser surface modification of medical grade alloys for reduced heating in a magnetic resonance imaging environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benafan, O., E-mail: othmane.benafan@nasa.gov, E-mail: raj@ucf.edu; Vaidyanathan, R., E-mail: othmane.benafan@nasa.gov, E-mail: raj@ucf.edu [Advanced Materials Processing and Analysis Center (AMPAC), Materials Science and Engineering, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States); Chen, S.-Y.; Kar, A. [Laser-Advanced Materials Processing Laboratory, Center for Research and Education in Optics and Lasers (CREOL), College of Optics and Photonics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Nanoscale surface modification of medical grade metallic alloys was conducted using a neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser-based dopant diffusion technique. The objective of this approach was to minimize the induction heating by reducing the absorbed radio frequency field. Such an approach is advantageous in that the dopant is diffused into the alloy and is not susceptible to detachment or spallation as would an externally applied coating, and is expected to not deteriorate the mechanical and electrical properties of the base alloy or device. Experiments were conducted using a controlled environment laser system with the ability to control laser properties (i.e., laser power, spot size, and irradiation time) and dopant characteristics (i.e., temperature, concentration, and pressure). The reflective and transmissive properties of both the doped and untreated samples were measured in a radio frequency (63.86 MHz) magnetic field using a system comprising a high power signal generator, a localized magnetic field source and sensor, and a signal analyzer. The results indicate an increase in the reflectivity of the laser-treated samples compared to untreated samples. The effect of reflectivity on the heating of the alloys is investigated through a mathematical model incorporating Maxwell’s equations and heat conduction.

  11. Technological significances to reduce the material problems. Feasibility of heat flux reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Seiichiro; Shimada, Michiya.

    1994-01-01

    For a divertor plate in a fusion power reactor, a high temperature coolant must be used for heat removal to keep thermal efficiency high. It makes the temperature and thermal stress of wall materials higher than the design limits. Issues of the coolant itself, e.g. burnout of high temperature water, will also become a serious problem. Sputtering erosion of the surface material will be a great concern of its lifetime. Therefore, it is necessary to reduce the heat and particle loads to the divertor plate technologically. The feasibility of some technological methods of heat reduction, such as separatrix sweeping, is discussed. As one of the most promising ideas, the methods of radiative cooling of the divertor plasma are summarized based on the recent results of large tokamaks. The feasibility of remote radiative cooling and gas divertor is discussed. The ideas are considered in recent design studies of tokamak power reactors and experimental reactors. By way of example, conceptual designs of divertor plate for the steady state tokamak power reactor are described. (author)

  12. Infrared monitoring of power-plant effluents and heat sinks to optimize plant efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurzbach, Richard N.; Seith, David A.

    2000-03-01

    Infrared imaging of the discharge canal and intake pond of the Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station was initiated to confirm a plant staff suspicion that high water intake temperatures were being influenced by recirculation of discharge flow. To minimize the angle of incidence to the water surface, the inspection was made from the top of the cooling towers. Although there was no evidence of recirculation from the plant discharge to the intake pond, two unexpected inputs of thermal energy were discovered during the inspection. A faulty sluice gate and a damaged cross-around pipe could be seen to be dumping thermal energy into the intake pond. The result was increased temperatures at the intake which threatened plant operation, decreased plant efficiency, and resulted in fewer megawatts available to sell to customers during the critical summer months.

  13. Reducing water consumption of an industrial plant cooling unit using hybrid cooling tower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rezaei, Ebrahim; Shafiei, Sirous; Abdollahnezhad, Aydin

    2010-01-01

    Water consumption is an important problem in dry zones and poor water supply areas. For these areas use of a combination of wet and dry cooling towers (hybrid cooling) has been suggested in order to reduce water consumption. In this work, wet and dry sections of a hybrid cooling tower for the estimation of water loss was modeled. A computer code was also written to simulate such hybrid cooling tower. To test the result of this simulation, a pilot hybrid tower containing a wet tower and 12 compact air cooled heat exchangers was designed and constructed. Pilot data were compared with simulation data and a correction factor was added to the simulation. Ensuring that the simulation represents the actual data, it was applied to a real industrial case and the effect of using a dry tower on water loss reduction of this plant cooling unit was investigated. Finally feasibility study was carried out to choose the best operating conditions for the hybrid cooling tower configuration proposed for this cooling unit.

  14. Ways to achieve optimum utilization of waste gas heat in cement kiln plants with cyclone preheaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbiss, E

    1986-02-01

    Kiln exit gases and the exhaust gases from clinker coolers often cannot be fully utilized in drying plants. In such cases a part of the heat content of the gases should be utilized for water heating. In addition, it is possible to utilize the waste gas heat in conventional steam boilers, with which, depending on design, it is possible to generate electricity at a rate of between 10-30 kWh/t (net output). A new and promising method of utilization of waste gas heat is provided by precalcining systems with bypass, in which up to 100% of the kiln exit gases can be economically bypassed and be utilized in a steam boiler, without requiring any cooling. A development project, already started, gives information on the operational behaviour of such a plant and on the maximum energy recoverable. Alternatively, the bypass gases may, after partial cooling with air or preheater exit gas, be dedusted and then utilized in a grinding/drying plant. Furthermore, they can be used in the cement grinding process for the drying of wet granulated blastfurnace slag or other materials. For this it is not necessary to dedust the bypass gases.

  15. Exergy analysis and evolutionary optimization of boiler blowdown heat recovery in steam power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandani, Amin Mohammadi Khoshkar; Bidi, Mokhtar; Ahmadi, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Heat recovery of boiler blow downed water using a flash tank is modeled. • Exergy destruction of each component is calculated. • Exergy efficiency of the whole system is optimized using GA and PSO algorithms. • Utilizing the flash tank increases the net power and efficiency of the system. - Abstract: In this study, energy and exergy analyses of boiler blowdown heat recovery are performed. To evaluate the effect of heat recovery on the system performance, a steam power plant in Iran is selected and the results of implementation of heat recovery system on the power plant are investigated. Also two different optimization algorithms including GA and PSO are established to increase the plant efficiency. The decision variables are extraction pressure from steam turbine and temperature and pressure of boiler outlet stream. The results indicate that using blowdown recovery technique, the net generated power increases 0.72%. Also energy and exergy efficiency of the system increase by 0.23 and 0.22, respectively. The optimization results show that temperature and pressure of boiler outlet stream have a higher effect on the exergy efficiency of the system in respect to the other decision variables. Using optimization methods, exergy efficiency of the system reaches to 30.66% which shows a 1.86% augmentation with regard to the situation when a flash tank is implemented.

  16. Experimental study of the combined utilization of nuclear power heating plants for big towns and industrial complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumann, J.; Barabas, K.

    1977-01-01

    The paper describes a comparison of nuclear power heating plants with an output corresponding to 1000MW(e) with plants of the same output using coal or oil. The economic aspects are compared, both as regards investment and operation costs. The comparison of the environmental aspects is performed on the atmospheric pollution from exhausts and gaseous emission and on the thermal pollutions in hydrosphere and atmosphere. Basic nuclear power plant schemes with two PWRs, each of 1500MW(th), are described. The plant supplies electric power and heat for factories and municipal heating systems (apartments, shops, and other auxiliary municipal facilities). At the same time the basic heat-flow diagram of a nuclear power heating plant is given, together with the relative losses. The study emphasizes the possible utilization of waste heat for heating glasshouses of 200m 2 . The problems of utilizing waste heat, and the needs of a big town and of industrial complexes in the vicinity of the nuclear power heating plant are also considered. (author)

  17. Effectiveness of Indoor Plant to Reduce CO2 in Indoor Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhaimi Mohd Mahathir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern country strongly emphasizes on indoor air quality (IAQ because it can effect on human health and productivity. Numerous efforts were performed to make sure that sustainability of IAQ is guaranteed. In the last 4th decade, researchers discover that indoor plants have abilities to reduce indoor air pollution. Generally, plants, carbon dioxide (CO2, light, and temperature involve in the photosynthesis process. This paper intends to study the effectiveness of seven indoor plants (Anthurium, Dumb Cane, Golden Pothos, Kadaka Fern, Prayer Plant, Spider Plant, and Syngonium to reduce CO2 with different light level. This study was conducted in one cubic meter of chamber, and each plant was put into the chamber individually with CO2 concentration in the chamber is set at 1000±50ppm, and light intensities is set at 300 and 700 lux, while temperature were fixed at 25±1°C. Based on the results, only the Spider Plant was not able to absorb CO2 during the test at 300 lux of light intensity. Meanwhile, Prayer Plant performed well when tested at 300 or 700 lux of light intensity compare to other investigates plants. This study can conclude that light intensity play an important role for the plant to absorb CO2 effectively. All the indoor plants absorbed more CO2, when the light intensity is increased.

  18. Optimal placement of combined heat and power scheme (cogeneration): application to an ethylbenzene plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zainuddin Abd Manan; Lim Fang Yee

    2001-01-01

    Combined heat and power (CHP) scheme, also known as cogeneration is widely accepted as a highly efficient energy saving measure, particularly in medium to large scale chemical process plants. To date, CHP application is well established in the developed countries. The advantage of a CHP scheme for a chemical plant is two-fold: (i) drastically cut down on the electricity bill from on-site power generation (ii) to save the fuel bills through recovery of the quality waste heat from power generation for process heating. In order to be effective, a CHP scheme must be placed at the right temperature level in the context of the overall process. Failure to do so might render a CHP venture worthless. This paper discusses the procedure for an effective implementation of a CHP scheme. An ethylbenzene process is used as a case study. A key visualization tool known as the grand composite curves is used to provide an overall picture of the process heat source and heat sink profiles. The grand composite curve, which is generated based on the first principles of Pinch Analysis enables the CHP scheme to be optimally placed within the overall process scenario. (Author)

  19. Investigation of waste heat recovery of binary geothermal plants using single component refrigerants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unverdi, M.

    2017-08-01

    In this study, the availability of waste heat in a power generating capacity of 47.4 MW in Germencik Geothermal Power Plant has been investigated via binary geothermal power plant. Refrigerant fluids of 7 different single components such as R-134a, R-152a, R-227ea, R-236fa, R-600, R-143m and R-161 have been selected. The binary cycle has been modeled using the waste heat equaling to mass flow rate of 100 kg/s geothermal fluid. While the inlet temperature of the geothermal fluid into the counter flow heat exchanger has been accepted as 110°C, the outlet temperature has been accepted as 70°C. The inlet conditions have been determined for the refrigerants to be used in the binary cycle. Finally, the mass flow rate of refrigerant fluid and of cooling water and pump power consumption and power generated in the turbine have been calculated for each inlet condition of the refrigerant. Additionally, in the binary cycle, energy and exergy efficiencies have been calculated for 7 refrigerants in the availability of waste heat. In the binary geothermal cycle, it has been found out that the highest exergy destruction for all refrigerants occurs in the heat exchanger. And the highest and lowest first and second law efficiencies has been obtained for R-600 and R-161 refrigerants, respectively.

  20. Intervention to reduce heat stress and improve efficiency among sugarcane workers in El Salvador: Phase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodin, T; García-Trabanino, R; Weiss, I; Jarquín, E; Glaser, J; Jakobsson, K; Lucas, R A I; Wesseling, C; Hogstedt, C; Wegman, D H

    2016-06-01

    Chronic heat stress and dehydration from strenuous work in hot environments is considered an essential component of the epidemic of chronic kidney disease in Central America. (1) To assess feasibility of providing an intervention modelled on OSHA's Water.Rest.Shade programme (WRS) during sugarcane cutting and (2) to prevent heat stress and dehydration without decreasing productivity. Midway through the 6-month harvest, the intervention introduced WRS practices. A 60-person cutting group was provided water supplied in individual backpacks, mobile shaded rest areas and scheduled rest periods. Ergonomically improved machetes and efficiency strategies were also implemented. Health data (anthropometric, blood, urine, questionnaires) were collected preharvest, preintervention, mid-intervention and at the end of harvest. A subsample participated in focus group discussions. Daily wet bulb globe temperatures (WBGT) were recorded. The employer provided individual production records. Over the harvest WBGT was >26°C from 9:00 onwards reaching average maximum of 29.3±1.7°C, around 13:00. Postintervention self-reported water consumption increased 25%. Symptoms associated with heat stress and with dehydration decreased. Individual daily production increased from 5.1 to a high of 7.3 tons/person/day postintervention. This increase was greater than in other cutting groups at the company. Focus groups reported a positive perception of components of the WRS, and the new machete and cutting programmes. A WRS intervention is feasible in sugarcane fields, and appears to markedly reduce the impact of the heat stress conditions for the workforce. With proper attention to work practices, production can be maintained with less impact on worker health. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  1. A small floating seawater desalination plant using a nuclear heating reactor coupled with the MED process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Duo; Wu Shaorong; Zhang Dafang; Wu Zongxin

    1997-01-01

    A small floating seawater desalination plant using a nuclear heating reactor coupled with a multi-effect distillation (MED) process was designed by the Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology, Tsinghua University of China. It was intended to supply potable water to remove coastal areas or islands where both fresh water and energy are severely lacking, and also to serve as a demonstration and training facility. The design of a small floating plant coupled two proven technologies in the cogeneration mode: a nuclear heating reactor (NHR-10), with inherent, passive safety features based on NHR-5 experience, and a low temperature MED process. The secondary loop was designed as a safety barrier between the primary loop and the steam loop. With a 10 MW(th) heating reactor, the floating plant could provide 4,000 m 3 /d of potable water and 750 kW of electricity. The design concept and parameters, safety features, coupling scheme and floating plant layout are presented in the paper. (author). 3 refs, 4 figs, 3 tabs

  2. Seawater desalination plant using nuclear heating reactor coupled with MED process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A small size plant for seawater desalination using nuclear heating reactor coupled with MED process was developed by the Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, China. This seawater desalination plant was designed to supply potable water demand to some coastal location or island where both fresh water and energy source are severely lacking. It is also recommended as a demonstration and training facility for seawater desalination using nuclear energy. The design of small size of seawater desalination plant couples two proven technologies: Nuclear Heating Reactor (NHR) and Multi-Effect Destination (MED) process. The NHR design possesses intrinsic and passive safety features, which was demonstrated by the experiences of the project NHR-5. The intermediate circuit and steam circuit were designed as the safety barriers between the NHR reactor and MED desalination system. Within 10~200 MWt of the power range of the heating reactor, the desalination plant could provide 8000 to 150,000 m3/d of high quality potable water. The design concept and parameters, safety features and coupling scheme are presented.

  3. Seawater desalination plant using nuclear heating reactor coupled with MED process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Shaorong; Dong Duo; Zhang Dafang; Wang Xiuzhen

    2000-01-01

    A small size plant for seawater desalination using nuclear heating reactor coupled with MED process was developed by the Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, China. this seawater desalination plant was designed to supply potable water demand to some coastal location or island where both fresh water and energy source are severely lacking. It is also recommended as a demonstration and training facility for seawater desalination using nuclear energy. The design of small size of seawater desalination plant couples two proven technologies: Nuclear Heating Reactor (NHR) and Multi-Effect Destination (MED) process. The NHR design possesses intrinsic and passive safety features, which was demonstrated by the experiences of the project NHR-5. the intermediate circuit and steam circuit were designed as the safety barriers between the NHR reactor and MED desalination system. Within 10-200 MWt of the power range of the heating reactor, the desalination plant could provide 8000 to 150,000 m 3 /d of high quality potable water. The design concept and parameters, safety features and coupling scheme are presented

  4. Dual-cycle power plant with internal and external heating of a gas turbine circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strach, L.

    1976-01-01

    The present proposal, after a preceding invention by the same inventor, aims at making possible the increased use of gas turbines in nuclear and coal-fired power plants. This is to be achieved by bringing the temperature of the combustion easily from a maximum of 900 0 C, as may be supplied, e.g., by the cooling media of nuclear reactors, up to the 1,700 to 2,000 0 C required as inlet temperature for gas turbines, with the aid of a fossil-fired recuperator. In fossil and nuclear power plants, gas turbines will more and more substitute steam turbines which affect the environment because of their high waste-heat losses. In coal power plants, only that part of the coal will be gasified whose resulting gas causes internal combustion within the furnace, while the remaining part of the coal is used for external combustion in a tabular heater. In a nuclear power plant, undisturbed maximum generation of electric power is to be achieved, even at reactor outages and shutdown periods for refuelling and maintenance, by almost inertia-free increase of the fossil fuel supply to the furnace (provided an extension of the latter for the capacity of heating the combustion air from room temperature till 1,700 to 2,000 0 C). The hazard of ruptures in the primary heat exchanging system is very low, because it is operated with a relative pressure of nearly zero between reactor coolant and gas turbine circuit. (RW) [de

  5. Feasibility study on the St. Petersburg City heat and electric cogeneration plant No.2, etc. scrap and build project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    For the purpose of reducing greenhouse effect gas emissions in line with the Joint Implementation, a survey was made of the scrap and build project for the superannuated Central Heat Power Station in St. Petersburg City. The survey team visited the relevant sites twice during 1999. The team drafted an improvement plan afterwards and presented it to the Russian counterpart, LENENEGRO. Based on the discussions with LENENEGRO, it was determined that the proposed combined cycle cogeneration plant would contain three 67MW-class gas turbines, three heat recovery steam generators and one back pressure turbine to achieve the generation capacity of approximately 200MW and heat supply capacity of 200G cal/hr. The total investment required for this project is about 140 million dollars. The term of the construction work is estimated at 36 months. It is estimated that the implementation of the project will reduce 1,481,979 tons of CO2 per year, or a total of 40,013,434 tons in 27 years after the commencement of operation. In addition, the terminal power generation efficiency will be improved from the current 18.68% to 41%, which leads to an annual fuel saving of 546,301 tons of crude oil or its equivalent. (NEDO)

  6. Linking long-range weather forecasts and heat consumption as a determining factor when buying fuel chips for town heating plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rolev, A.-M.

    1991-12-01

    The aim of this study is to test whether long-range weather forecasts from the meteorological services can be used as a determining factor when buying fuel chips. In the study the fuel consumption of heating plants and the factors determining the monthly consumption are mentioned. Degree-day statistics in Denmark for the last 30 years are explained as well as the difficulties in conjunction with the prediction of long-range weather conditions. This study compares degree days in 1989-1990 month by month with the actual and theoretic chip consumption in three different heating plants the same year. The theoretic chip consumption is calculated on the basis of degree days in a ''standard year'' and the annual chip consumption of the heating plant, among other things. Furthermore, on the basis of degree-day statistics the report makes it possible to estimate the monthly chip consumption of a heating plant in a ''standard year'', in an extremely cold year (maximum degree days), and in an extremely warm year (minimum degree days). However, not everything can be predicted, and it is not yet possible to predict reliable weather forecasts for more than 5 days ahead. The study concludes that long-range weather forecasts cannot be used as a determining factor when buying fuel chips for heating plants. When buying fuel chips one must still use statistics and degree days, supplimented by figures based on experience from actual chip consumption in the individual heating plant. These figures take into consideration the different types of heating plants, as well as heat supply, chip-supplier, storing facilities, other fuels, etc. (au)

  7. Phase separation of cesium from lead borosilicate glass by heat treatment under a reducing atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhanglian; Okada, Takashi, E-mail: t-okada@u-fukui.ac.jp; Nishimura, Fumihiro; Yonezawa, Susumu

    2016-11-05

    Highlights: • Cesium was phase separated from lead borosilicate glass under a reductive atmosphere. • The phase separation occurred on the glass surface that was in contact with the gas. • The leachability of cesium was enhanced by the phase separation. • The degree of such enhancement varied depending on the heat treatment conditions. - Abstract: A phase-separation technique for removing sodium from glass using a heat-treatment method under a reducing atmosphere was previously developed for sodium recovery from waste glass. In this study, this technique was applied to cesium-containing lead borosilicate glass to concentrate the cesium in phase-separated sodium-rich materials for efficient cesium extraction. The theoretical phase-separation temperature of the sodium-rich phase was simulated by thermodynamic equilibrium calculations and was predicted to occur below 700 °C for lead borosilicate glass. Experimentally, a simulated lead borosilicate glass was melted at 1000 °C and subsequently annealed below 700 °C under a CO-containing reducing atmosphere. The phase separation of cesium was found to occur with sodium enrichment on the glass surface that was in contact with the gas phase, promoting cesium extraction from the treated glass using water. The cesium extraction efficiency was affected by the surface area of the treated glass that was in contact with water, and under the examined conditions, the cesium extraction efficiency was up to 66%. Phase separation using reductive heat treatment, combined with a water leaching technique, is suggested to be effective for extracting cesium incorporated in borosilicate glass waste.

  8. Pilot plant experiments for baking of anode blocks in electrically heated ovens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grjotheim, K. (Oslo Univ. (Norway). Dept. of Chemistry); Kvande, H. (Hydro Aluminium AS, Stabekk (Norway)); Naixiang, F.; Shiheng, Z.; An, L.; Guangxia, H. (Northeast Univ. of Technology, Shenyang, LN (China). Dept. of Non-Ferrous Metallurgy)

    1990-04-01

    Pilot plant experiments were made to bake anode blocks in electrically heated baking ovens. About 70% of the baked anodes had a specific electrical resistance between 35 and 60 {Omega}xmm{sup 2}xm{sup -1}. About 25% had higher resistances, and these were returned to the baking ovens and used as heating elements in the next baking cycle. The average electrical energy consumption was 1430 kWh per tonne of anodes produced, which is about only 60% of the energy consumption in classical oil or gas-fired baking ovens. (orig.).

  9. Initiatives to reduce the occupational radiation exposure of ABWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirasawa, Hajime; Urata, Hidehiro; Ueda, Taku; Yamamoto, Seiji; Yaita, Yumi

    2014-01-01

    Toshiba has carried out radiation exposure reduction by radiation level reduction, as reduction of reactor water activated corrosion products concentration, reduction of activated corrosion products deposition and radiation shielding, and exposure time reduction, as remote control and improvement of maintenance work procedures. Water chemistry has been mainly carried out reduction of reactor water activated corrosion products concentration and reduction of activated corrosion products deposition in radiation level reduction. The reduction measures of reactor water activated corrosion products concentration are mainly reduction of iron crud concentration and reduction of cobalt ion concentration. The activated corrosion products deposition are reduced by the means of water quality control and the surface treatment. Water quality control for reduction of activated corrosion products deposition moves to ultra low iron high nickel control from Ni/Fe ratio control. The surface treatments are adopted to the stainless steel piping and carbon steel piping. As a measure further to radiation exposure reduction for ABWR (Advanced Boiling Water Reactors), we report on the effect of generation amount reduction by the adoption of alternate material and the effect of deposition reduction by material change of piping and the adoption of advanced water quality control, etc. (author)

  10. Effect of static mixer on the performance of compact plate heat exchanger with zwitterionic type of drag-reducing additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blais, C.; Wollerstrand, J.

    1997-06-01

    The main task of the project was to investigate the influence of drag-reducing additives (DRA) dissolved in circulating hot water on heat transfer in compact plate heat exchangers (PHE). Furthermore the result of flow disturbance (static mixing) immediately before the PHE on pressure drop and heat transfer was clarified. The project used a new type of DRA (surfactants of zwitterionic type) for two different temperature ranges. A dedicated test rig, `Ansgar`, was built for the purpose. Good thermal and mechanical stability also outside the operating range was observed except some sensitivity for water hardness at high temperatures for DRA2. Similarly to known investigations, the heat transfer coefficient was significantly reduced by DRA in heat exchangers. In PHE used however, the heat transfer reduction was considerably lower in the high flow region. A static mixer placed in front of the PHE was found to significantly improve heat transfer, especially at high flow rates. On the other hand, an additional pressure drop was introduced. Therefore the optimal choice of static mixer needs further investigation. Specially designed PHE combining mixing and heat transfer functions could be beneficial to reducing the effects of additives in thermal systems. The relaxation time (RT) of drag-reducing additives in water solutions flowing through test pipes with known geometries was estimated by monitoring specific pressure drop variation along the pipe. These preliminary experiments in respect to relaxation time showed that RT depends on the flow rate and on the temperature 12 refs, 11 figs, 1 tab

  11. Chromatin changes in response to drought, salinity, heat, and cold stresses in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Myong eKim

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin regulation is essential to regulate genes and genome activities. In plants, the alteration of histone modification and DNA methylation are coordinated with changes in the expression of stress-responsive genes to adapt to environmental changes. Several chromatin regulators have been shown to be involved in the regulation of stress-responsive gene networks under abiotic stress conditions. Specific histone modification sites and the histone modifiers that regulate key stress-responsive genes have been identified by genetic and biochemical approaches, revealing the importance of chromatin regulation in plant stress responses. Recent studies have also suggested that histone modification plays an important role in plant stress memory. In this review, we summarize recent progress on the regulation and alteration of histone modification (acetylation, methylation, phosphorylation, and SUMOylation in response to the abiotic stresses, drought, high-salinity, heat, and cold in plants.

  12. New heating plant for the Wartburg: Exciting task. Neue Heizanlage fuer die Wartburg: Aufregende Aufgabe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stens, H

    1991-04-01

    The obsolete boiler plant of the Wartburg with its open fireplaces and self-constructed gas lances has been replaced by a modern gas-firing plant at instigation and sponsorship of the Ruhrgas AG. Due to the location of the castle the replacement of the plant presented a big problem which could only be solved by opening the foundation wall of the castle restaurant, by a working platform hanging in mid-air over a steep slope as well as by using a 7,5 t crane. The new plant consists of two boilers with a capacity of 430 and 850 kW, a modern electronic control system with automatic temperature control, two indirectly heated domestic water heaters, a new distribution system as well as thermostatic valves at the about 350 radiators. (BWI).

  13. Selective pruning in pineapple plants as means to reduce heterogeneity in fruit quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fassinou Hotegni, V.N.; Lommen, W.J.M.; Struik, P.C.; Agbossou, E.K.

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneity in fruit quality (size and taste) is a major problem in pineapple production chains. The possibilities were investigated of reducing the heterogeneity in pineapple in the field by pruning slips on selected plants, in order to promote the fruit growth on these plants. Slips are side

  14. Special considerations on operating a fuel cell power plant using natural gas with marginal heating value

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, L. Ng; Chien-Liang Lin [Industrial Technology Research Institute, Taiwan (China); Ya-Tang Cheng [Power Research Institute, Taiwan (China)

    1996-12-31

    In realizing new power generation technologies in Taiwan, a phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant (model PC2513, ONSI Corporation) has been installed in the premises of the Power Research Institute of the Taiwan Power Company in Taipei County of Taiwan. The pipeline gas supplying to the site of this power plant has a high percentage of carbon dioxide and thus a slightly lower heating value than that specified by the manufacturer. Because of the lowering of heating value of input gas, the highest Output power from the power plant is understandably less than the rated power of 200 kW designed. Further, the transient response of the power plant as interrupted from the Grid is also affected. Since this gas is also the pipeline gas supplying to the heavily populated Taipei Municipal area, it is conceivable that the success of the operations of fuel cells using this fuel is of vital importance to the promotion of the use of this power generation technology in Taiwan. Hence, experiments were set up to assess the feasibility of this fuel cell power plant using the existing pipeline gas in this part of Taiwan where fuel cells would most likely find useful.

  15. Recovery of flue gas energy in heat integrated IGCC power plants using the contact economizer system

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Madzivhandila, V

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Asia Pacific Confederation of APCChE 2010 Chemical Engineering Congress October 5-8, 2010, Taipei � �� Recovery of flue gas energy in heat integrated IGCC power plants using the contact economizer system Vhutshilo Madzivhandilaa, Thokozani... temperature and the thermal efficiency of the plant. The 13th Asia Pacific Confederation of APCChE 2010 Chemical Engineering Congress October 5-8, 2010, Taipei � �� 1. Introduction The IGCC (Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle) is one...

  16. High temperature alloys for the primary circuit of a prototype nuclear process heat plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ennis, P.J.; Schuster, H.

    1979-01-01

    As part of a comprehensive materials test programme for the High Temperature Reactor Project 'Prototype Plant for Nuclear Process Heat' (PNP), high temperature alloys are being investigated for primary circuit components operating at temperatures above 750 0 C. On the basis of important material parameters, in particular corrosion behaviour and mechanical properties in primary coolant helium, the potential of candidate alloys is discussed. By comparing specific PNP materials data with the requirements of PNP and those of conventional plant, the implications for the materials programme and component design are given. (orig.)

  17. An Optimal Control Approach for an Overall Cryogenic Plant Under Pulsed Heat Loads

    CERN Document Server

    Gómez Palacin, Luis; Blanco Viñuela, Enrique; Maekawa, Ryuji; Chalifour, Michel

    2015-01-01

    This work deals with the optimal management of a cryogenic plant composed by parallel refrigeration plants, which provide supercritical helium to pulsed heat loads. First, a data reconciliation approach is proposed to estimate precisely the refrigerator variables necessary to deduce the efficiency of each refrigerator. Second, taking into account these efficiencies, an optimal operation of the system is proposed and studied. Finally, while minimizing the power consumption of the refrigerators, the control system maintains stable operation of the cryoplant under pulsed heat loads. The management of the refrigerators is carried out by an upper control layer, which balances the relative production of cooling power in each refrigerator. In addition, this upper control layer deals with the mitigation of malfunctions and faults in the system. The proposed approach has been validated using a dynamic model of the cryoplant developed with EcosimPro software, based on first principles (mass and energy balances) and the...

  18. Computerized heat balance models to predict performance of operating nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breeding, C.L.; Carter, J.C.; Schaefer, R.C.

    1983-01-01

    The use of computerized heat balance models has greatly enhanced the decision making ability of TVA's Division of Nuclear Power. These models are utilized to predict the effects of various operating modes and to analyze changes in plant performance resulting from turbine cycle equipment modifications with greater speed and accuracy than was possible before. Computer models have been successfully used to optimize plant output by predicting the effects of abnormal condenser circulating water conditions. They were utilized to predict the degradation in performance resulting from installation of a baffle plate assembly to replace damaged low-pressure blading, thereby providing timely information allowing an optimal economic judgement as to when to replace the blading. Future use will be for routine performance test analysis. This paper presents the benefits of utility use of computerized heat balance models

  19. Exergy analysis of a combined heat and power plant with integrated lignocellulosic ethanol production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lythcke-Jørgensen, Christoffer Ernst; Haglind, Fredrik; Clausen, Lasse Røngaard

    2014-01-01

    production. An exergy analysis is carried out for a modelled polygeneration system in which lignocellulosic ethanol production based on hydrothermal pretreatment is integrated in an existing combined heat and power (CHP) plant. The ethanol facility is driven by steam extracted from the CHP unit when feasible...... district heating production in the ethanol facility. The results suggest that the efficiency of integrating lignocellulosic ethanol production in CHP plants is highly dependent on operation, and it is therefore suggested that the expected operation pattern of such polygeneration system is taken......Lignocellulosic ethanol production is often assumed integrated in polygeneration systems because of its energy intensive nature. The objective of this study is to investigate potential irreversibilities from such integration, and what impact it has on the efficiency of the integrated ethanol...

  20. Heat integration of an ethanol polygeneration plant based on lignocellulose: Comparing weak acid hydrolysis and enzymatic hydrolysis; Energiintegrerat etanolkombinat baserat paa lignocellulosa - Jaemfoerelse mellan svagsyrahydrolys och enzymhydrolys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsson, Marcus; Nordman, Roger; Taherzadeh, Mohammad

    2011-07-01

    Plants for bioethanol production have been planned in several cities in Sweden, including Boraas. This report provides answers to general questions regarding how such a facility's energy demand is affected by the external integration with a heat and power plant and the internal energy integration between process units. Heat integration of a bioethanol plant means that energy is reused as much as is technically possible; this sets a practical minimum level for the energy demand of the plant. In the study, ethanol production from cellulose has been simulated using Aspen Plus. Weak acid hydrolysis and enzymatic hydrolysis have been simulated, each with 50,000 and 100,000 tonnes of ethanol per year, resulting in four simulation cases. In all cases, heat integration is evaluated using pinch analysis. The steam in the ethanol plant has been covered by steam from a heat and power plant similar to that found today in Boraas. It is important to note that the energy quotas reported here includes energy use for upgrading the residual products. This leads to lower energy quotas than would be the case if the upgrading of residuals were allocated outside of the ethanol production. The conclusions from the project are: - The steam demand of the ethanol plant leads to a reduction in both the electricity and heat production of the heat and power plant. For the weak acid hydrolysis, the electricity loss is relatively high, 26-98%, which will affect the revenue significantly. The loss of electricity production is lower for the enzymatic process: 11-47%. - The difference in decreased electricity between the theoretical case of heating the raw material and the two alternative heating cases is about a factor of two, so the design of the heating of raw material is extremely important. - The reduced heat output of the power plant can, in most cases, be balanced by the surplus heat from the ethanol plant, but to completely balance the shortage, heat over 100 deg C must be used

  1. Fiscal 1980 Sunshine Project research report. Development of hydrothermal power plant. Development of binary cycle power plant (Research on heat cycle, heat medium, material and heat medium turbine); 1980 nendo nessui riyo hatsuden plant no kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Binary cycle hatsuden plant no kaihatsu (netsu cycle oyobi netsubaitai no kenkyu, zairyo no kenkyu narabini netsubaitai turbine no kenkyu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1981-03-01

    This report summarizes the fiscal 1980 research result on each element of the next 10MW class geothermal binary cycle power plant, following last year. In the research on heat cycle and heat medium, measurement was made on the liquid density, vapor density, liquid specific heat, vapor specific heat and thermal conductivity of 8 heat media to prepare the precise pressure enthalpy chart. The thermal stability of each medium was also measured under a flow condition. The heat cycle of each medium was calculated in a hydrothermal temperature range of 120-160 degrees C for evaluation of its output. In the research on material, field corrosion test and laboratory simulation were made on 3 kinds of heat exchanger martials for acidic hot water to study the corrosion behavior of welding members. In the research on heat medium turbine, study was made on sealing characteristics such as differential pressure, flow rate and friction of sealing oil for oil film seal and mechanical seal as shaft seal devices of heat medium turbines for the 10MW class geothermal plant. (NEDO)

  2. Off-design performance analysis of organic Rankine cycle using real operation data from a heat source plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, In Seop; Kim, Tong Seop; Lee, Jong Jun

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • ORC systems driven by waste or residual heat from a combined cycle cogeneration plant were analyzed. • An off-design analysis model was developed and validated with commercial ORC data. • A procedure to predict the actual variation of ORC performance using the off-design model was set up. • The importance of using long-term operation data of the heat source plant was demonstrated. - Abstract: There has been increasing demand for cogeneration power plants, which provides high energy utilization. Research on upgrading power plant performance is also being actively pursued. The organic Rankine cycle (ORC) can operate with mid- and low-temperature heat sources and is suitable for enhancing performance of existing power plants. In this study, an off-design analysis model for the ORC was developed, which is driven by waste heat or residual heat from a combined cycle cogeneration plant. The applied heat sources are the exhaust gas from the heat recovery steam generator (Case 1) and waste heat from a heat storage unit (Case 2). Optimal design points of the ORC were selected based on the design heat source condition of each case. Then, the available ORC power output for each case was predicted using actual long-term plant operation data and a validated off-design analysis model. The ORC capacity of Case 2 was almost two times larger than that of Case 1. The predicted average electricity generation of both cases was less than the design output. The results of this paper reveal the importance of both the prediction of electricity generation using actual plant operation data and the need for optimal ORC system sizing.

  3. Preliminary project concerning the straw-fueled combined power-heat plant to be constructed at Glamsbjerg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabriel, S.; Koch, T.

    1994-06-01

    Power and heat generation based on biomass gasification is of great importance due to its beneficial environmental effects and good economy. This report concerns a preliminary project on feasibility and problems of implementing a dual-purpose power plant, supplying both power and district heating to several schools, swimming pools and other public facilities at Glamsbjerg (Funen). The plant is to be based on thermal gasification (pyrolysis) of straw and use of the gas in a diesel engine. The diesels operate the power generator, and their waste heat should be utilized in the local district heating network. In order to establish a stable and flexible straw supply to the plant an evaluation of resources in the area has been carried out. Apart from straw-derived fuel the plant is planned to use natural gas for start and maintenance of the process. The prices of the combined plant and of the fuel processing are estimated in the report. (EG)

  4. Experimental investigations on the transient behaviour of nuclear heat plants with natural convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, E.; Sydow, J.; Wolff, J.

    1988-01-01

    Apart from the theoretical approach, practical experiments concerning the transient behaviour of the primary loop of reactors with natural coolant convection are necessary in order to evaluate the safety systems of reactors providing heat for industrial and communal consumers. The article presents experiments concerning the transient behaviour of the experimental plant DANTON, which models the reactor AST-500, and gives a preview of further research. (orig.) [de

  5. Control Optimization through Simulations of Large Scale Solar Plants for Industrial Heat Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Hassine, Ilyes Ben; Sehgelmeble., Mariela Cotrado; Söll, Robert; Pietruschka, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    The European FP7 Project InSun; which started in April 2012; aims to demonstrate the reliability and efficiency of three different collector technologies suitable for heat production employed in diverse industrial processes in different climatic regions. These collectors are installed and will be monitored in detail over a period of almost two years. One of the plants is installed at Fleischwaren Berger GmbH located in Sieghartskirchen, Austria, a company which produces meat and sausage p...

  6. Plant-Mimetic Heat Pipes for Operation with Large Inertial and Gravitation Stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-16

    equations are non- linear and coupled, but can be solved accurately with reasonable approximations (in particular, the neglect of sensible heat transfer...3: Structure and molecular biology of xylem that control stability and refilling: Beyond the passive robustness against cavitation discussed above...conductance rises with rising ionic strength (Figure 5B) and pH . Via the localized secretion of solutes into the stream of sap, plants can use this

  7. Savannah River Plant Low-Level Waste Heat Utilization Project preliminary analysis. Volume I. Executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-11-01

    A preliminary feasibility study of capturing energy ejected in hot water at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) is presented. The cooling water, drawn from the river or a pond at the rate of 500,000 gallons per minute, is typically heated 80 0 F to about 150 0 F and is then allowed to cool in the atmosphere. The energy added to the water is equivalent to 20 million barrels of oil a year. This study reports that the reject heat can be used directly in an organic Rankine cycle system to evaporate fluids which drive electric generators. The output of one reactor can produce 45,000 kilowatts of electricity. Since the fuel is waste heat, an estimated 45% savings over conventional electric costs is possible over a thirty year period

  8. Experience gained in France on heat recovery from nuclear plants for agriculture and pisciculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balligand, P.; Le Gouellec, P.; Dumont, M.; Grauby, A.

    1978-01-01

    Since 1972, the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Electricite de France, and the French Ministry of Agriculture have jointly examined the possibility of using thermal wastes from nuclear power plants for the benefit of agricultural production. A new process to heat greenhouses with water at 303 K using a double-wall plastic mulching laid directly on the soil has been successfully used for a few years on several hectares. When necessary, heat pumps are utilized. Very good results have been obtained for tomatoes, cucumbers, flowers, and strawberries, etc. Outdoor soil heating with buried pipes has been tested in Cadarache near an experimental pressurized water reactor for market garden crops and forestry. Gains in precocity and yield have been excellent, especially for asparagus, strawberries, and potatoes. Growing of eels has been four times faster in warm water over one year

  9. Reducing the network load and optimization of the economic efficiency of CHP plants by forecast-guided control; Verringerung der Netzbelastung und Optimierung der Wirtschaftlichkeit von KWK-Anlagen durch prognosegefuehrte Steuerung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glaser, Daniel; Adelhardt, Stefan [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Sensorik; beECO GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Heat-guided combined heat and power (CHP) plants often cause large compensation energy amounts, additional costs to the operator respectively and another burden on the parent network. The balance energy is caused by errors in the production forecast whose quality heavily depends on the heat load performance. This paper identifies the forecasting problems with heat-guided CHP and reveals how the accompanying cost and the network burden can be reduced. This is achieved by an improvement of the forecast in conjunction with a forecast-guided control without affecting the heat supply. In addition, an outlook on further measures to the earnings with the system is presented. (orig.)

  10. Reduced program of inspection by induced currents for condenser of Embalse nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obrutsky, L.; Mendonca, H.

    1986-01-01

    In this work it's presented a reduced inspection in service program by the technique of induced currents to the turbine condenser of Embalse's Power Plant (Cordoba). The authors based its elaboration on the results obtained in the exam of a small number of tubes and on experience obtained through four inspections in the condensers of Atucha I Power Plant, through mathematical models of oxygen and ammoniac distribution in both Power Plants, and its experimental verification in the case of Atucha I. This program improves the quality of inspection thereby reducing time, equipment and personnel employed. (C.M.) [pt

  11. Investigation of heat exchangers for energy conversion systems of megawatt-class space power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilmov, D. N.; Mamontov, Yu. N.; Skorohodov, A. S.; Smolyarov, V. A.; Filatov, N. I.

    2016-01-01

    The specifics of operation (high temperatures in excess of 1000 K and large pressure drops of several megapascals between "hot" and "cold" coolant paths) of heat exchangers in the closed circuit of a gasturbine power converter operating in accordance with the Brayton cycle with internal heat recovery are analyzed in the context of construction of space propulsion systems. The design of a heat-exchange matrix made from doubly convex stamped plates with a specific surface relief is proposed. This design offers the opportunity to construct heat exchangers with the required parameters (strength, rigidity, weight, and dimensions) for the given operating conditions. The diagram of the working area of a test bench is presented, and the experimental techniques are outlined. The results of experimental studies of heat exchange and flow regimes in the models of heat exchangers with matrices containing 50 and 300 plates for two pairs of coolants (gas-gas and gas-liquid) are detailed. A criterion equation for the Nusselt number in the range of Reynolds numbers from 200 to 20 000 is proposed. The coefficients of hydraulic resistance for each coolant path are determined as functions of the Reynolds number. It is noted that the pressure in the water path in the "gas-liquid" series of experiments remained almost constant. This suggests that no well-developed processes of vaporization occurred within this heat-exchange matrix design even when the temperature drop between gas and water was as large as tens or hundreds of degrees. The obtained results allow one to design flight heat exchangers for various space power plants.

  12. Effect of heating strategy on power consumption and performance of a pilot plant anaerobic digester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Solares, Teodoro; Valle-Guadarrama, Salvador; Bombardiere, John; Domaschko, Max; Easter, Michael

    2009-05-01

    The effect of heating strategy on power consumption and performance of a pilot plant anaerobic digester treating chicken litter, under thermophilic conditions, has been studied. Heating strategy was evaluated using three different spans (0.2 degrees C, 0.6 degrees C, and 1.0 degree C) for triggering the temperature control system from target temperature (56.7 degrees C). The hydraulic retention time in the pilot plant digester was in the range of 32 to 37 days, varying the total solids concentration fed from 5% to 6%. The results showed that under the experimental conditions, heating was the most energy-demanding process with 95.5% of the energy used. Increments up to 7.5% and 3.8%, respectively, on mechanical and heating power consumption, were observed as the span, for triggering the temperature control system from target temperature, was increased. Under the experimental conditions studied here, an increment of 30.6% on the global biodigester performance index was observed when a span of 1.0 degree C was compared to the one of 0.2 degrees C.

  13. Performance investigation of a cogeneration plant with the efficient and compact heat recovery system

    KAUST Repository

    Myat, Aung

    2011-10-03

    This paper presents the performance investigation of a cogeneration plant equipped with an efficient waste heat recovery system. The proposed cogeneration system produces four types of useful energy namely: (i) electricity, (ii) steam, (iii) cooling and (iv) dehumidification. The proposed plant comprises a Capstone C30 micro-turbine which generates 24 kW of electricity, a compact and efficient waste heat recovery system and a host of waste heat activated devices namely (i) a steam generator, (ii) an absorption chiller, (iii) an adsorption chiller and (iv) a multi-bed desiccant dehumidifier. The numerical analysis for the host of waste heat recovery system and thermally activated devices using FORTRAN power station linked to powerful IMSL library is performed to investigate the performance of the overall system. A set of experiments, both part load and full load, of micro-turbine is conducted to examine the electricity generation and the exhaust gas temperature. It is observed that energy utilization factor (EUF) could achieve as high as 70% while Fuel Energy Saving Ratio (FESR) is found to be 28%.

  14. Reducing deuterium-tritium ice roughness by electrical heating of the saturated vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mapoles, E.R.; Sater, J.D.; Monsler, E.; Pipes, J.

    1996-01-01

    High gain targets for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) contain a layer of deuterium-tritium (DT) ice which surrounds a volume of DT gas in thermal equilibrium with the solid. The roughness of the cryogenic fuel layer inside of ICF targets is one of the sources of imperfections which cause implosions to deviate from perfect one dimensional performance. Experiments at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have shown that applying a heat flux across the inner surface of a hydrogen layer such as that inside an ICF target reduces the intrinsic roughness of the surface. We have developed a technique to generate this heat flux by applying and electric field to the DT vapor in the center of these shells. This vapor has a small but significant conductivity due to ionization caused by beta decay of tritium in the vapor and the solid. We describe here experiments using a 1.15 GHz cavity to apply an electric field to frozen DT inside of a sapphire test cell. The cell and cavity geometry allows visual observation of the frozen layers

  15. Increased efficiency of targeted mutagenesis by CRISPR/Cas9 in plants using heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Chantal; Zhang, Fei; Mendez, Josefina; Lozano, Yamile; Chatpar, Krishna; Irish, Vivian F; Jacob, Yannick

    2018-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system has greatly improved our ability to engineer targeted mutations in eukaryotic genomes. While CRISPR/Cas9 appears to work universally, the efficiency of targeted mutagenesis and the adverse generation of off-target mutations vary greatly between different organisms. In this study, we report that Arabidopsis plants subjected to heat stress at 37°C show much higher frequencies of CRISPR-induced mutations compared to plants grown continuously at the standard temperature (22°C). Using quantitative assays relying on green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter genes, we found that targeted mutagenesis by CRISPR/Cas9 in Arabidopsis is increased by approximately 5-fold in somatic tissues and up to 100-fold in the germline upon heat treatment. This effect of temperature on the mutation rate is not limited to Arabidopsis, as we observed a similar increase in targeted mutations by CRISPR/Cas9 in Citrus plants exposed to heat stress at 37°C. In vitro assays demonstrate that Cas9 from Streptococcus pyogenes (SpCas9) is more active in creating double-stranded DNA breaks at 37°C than at 22°C, thus indicating a potential contributing mechanism for the in vivo effect of temperature on CRISPR/Cas9. This study reveals the importance of temperature in modulating SpCas9 activity in eukaryotes, and provides a simple method to increase on-target mutagenesis in plants using CRISPR/Cas9. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Florally rich habitats reduce insect pollination and the reproductive success of isolated plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Tracie M; Cavers, Stephen; Ennos, Richard; Vanbergen, Adam J; Heard, Matthew S

    2017-08-01

    Landscape heterogeneity in floral communities has the potential to modify pollinator behavior. Pollinator foraging varies with the diversity, abundance, and spatial configuration of floral resources. However, the implications of this variation for pollen transfer and ultimately the reproductive success of insect pollinated plants remains unclear, especially for species which are rare or isolated in the landscape. We used a landscape-scale experiment, coupled with microsatellite genotyping, to explore how the floral richness of habitats affected pollinator behavior and pollination effectiveness. Small arrays of the partially self-compatible plant Californian poppy ( Eschscholzia californica) were introduced across a landscape gradient to simulate rare, spatially isolated populations. The effects on pollinator activity, outcrossing, and plant reproduction were measured. In florally rich habitats, we found reduced pollen movement between plants, leading to fewer long-distance pollination events, lower plant outcrossing, and a higher incidence of pollen limitation. This pattern indicates a potential reduction in per capita pollinator visitation, as suggested by the lower activity densities and richness of pollinators observed within florally rich habitats. In addition, seed production reduced by a factor of 1.8 in plants within florally rich habitats and progeny germination reduced by a factor of 1.2. We show this to be a consequence of self-fertilization within the partially self-compatible plant, E. californica . These findings indicate that locally rare plants are at a competitive disadvantage within florally rich habitats because neighboring plant species disrupt conspecific mating by co-opting pollinators. Ultimately, this Allee effect may play an important role in determining the long-term persistence of rarer plants in the landscape, both in terms of seed production and viability. Community context therefore requires consideration when designing and

  17. Isochoric heating of reduced mass targets by ultra-intense laser produced relativistic electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumayer, P; Lee, H J; Offerman, D; Shipton, E; Kemp, A; Kritcher, A L; Doppner, T; Back, C A; Glenzer, S H

    2009-02-04

    We present measurements of the chlorine K-alpha emission from reduced mass targets, irradiated with ultra-high intensity laser pulses. Chlorinated plastic targets with diameters down to 50 micrometers and mass of a few 10{sup -8} g were irradiated with up to 7 J of laser energy focused to intensities of several 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. The conversion of laser energy to K-alpha radiation is measured, as well as high resolution spectra that allow observation of line shifts, indicating isochoric heating of the target up to 18 eV. A zero-dimensional 2-temperature equilibration model, combined with electron impact K-shell ionization and post processed spectra from collisional radiative calculations reproduces the observed K-alpha yields and line shifts, and shows the importance of target expansion due to the hot electron pressure.

  18. Manning designs for nuclear district-heating plant (NDHP) with RUTA-type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerasimova, V.S.; Mikhan, V.I.; Romenkov, A.A.

    2001-01-01

    RUTA-type reactor is a water cooled water-moderated pool-type reactor with an atmospheric pressure air medium. The reactor has been designed for heating and hot water supply. Nuclear district heating plant (NDHP) with RUTA-type reactor facility has been designed with a three circuit layout. Primary circuit components are arranged integrally in the reactor vessel. Natural coolant circulation mode is used in the primary circuit. A peculiarity of RUTA-based NDHP as engineered system is a smooth nature of its running slow variation of the parameters at transients. Necessary automation with application of computer equipment will be provided for control and monitoring of heat production process at NDHP. Under developing RUTA-based NDHP it is foreseen that operating staff performs control and monitoring of heat generation process and heat output to consumers as well as current maintenance of NDHP components. All other works associated with NDHP operation should be fulfilled by extraneous personnel. In so doing the participation of operating staff is also possible. (author)

  19. Solar-Enhanced Air-Cooled Heat Exchangers for Geothermal Power Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamel Hooman

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the optimization of a Solar-Enhanced Natural-Draft Dry-Cooling Tower (SENDDCT, originally designed by the Queensland Geothermal Energy Centre of Excellence (QGECE, as the air-cooled condenser of a geothermal power plant. The conventional method of heat transfer augmentation through fin-assisted area extension is compared with a metal foam-wrapped tube bundle. Both lead to heat-transfer enhancement, albeit at the expense of a higher pressure drop when compared to the bare tube bundle as our reference case. An optimal design is obtained through the use of a simplified analytical model and existing correlations by maximizing the heat transfer rate with a minimum pressure drop goal as the constraint. Sensitivity analysis was conducted to investigate the effect of sunroof diameter, as well as tube bundle layouts and tube spacing, on the overall performance of the system. Aiming to minimize the flow and thermal resistances for a SENDDCT, an optimum design is presented for an existing tower to be equipped with solar panels to afterheat the air leaving the heat exchanger bundles, which are arranged vertically around the tower skirt. Finally, correlations are proposed to predict the total pressure drop and heat transfer of the extended surfaces considered here.

  20. Exergoeconomic performance optimization of an endoreversible intercooled regenerative Brayton combined heat and power plant coupled to variable-temperature heat reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Bo; Chen, Lingen; Sun, Fengrui [College of Naval Architecture and Power, Naval University of Engineering, Wuhan 430033 (China)

    2012-07-01

    An endoreversible intercooled regenerative Brayton combined heat and power (CHP) plant model coupled to variable-temperature heat reservoirs is established. The exergoeconomic performance of the CHP plant is investigated using finite time thermodynamics. The analytical formulae about dimensionless profit rate and exergy efficiency of the CHP plant with the heat resistance losses in the hot-, cold- and consumer-side heat exchangers, the intercooler and the regenerator are deduced. By taking the maximum profit rate as the objective, the heat conductance allocation among the five heat exchangers and the choice of intercooling pressure ratio are optimized by numerical examples, the characteristic of the optimal dimensionless profit rate versus corresponding exergy efficiency is investigated. When the optimization is performed further with respect to the total pressure ratio, a double-maximum profit rate is obtained. The effects of the design parameters on the double-maximum dimensionless profit rate and corresponding exergy efficiency, optimal total pressure ratio and optimal intercooling pressure ratio are analyzed in detail, and it is found that there exist an optimal consumer-side temperature and an optimal thermal capacitance rate matching between the working fluid and the heat reservoir, respectively, corresponding to a thrice-maximum dimensionless profit rate.

  1. Effectiveness of US state policies in reducing CO2 emissions from power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Don; Bergstrand, Kelly; Running, Katrina

    2014-11-01

    President Obama's landmark initiative to reduce the CO2 emissions of existing power plants, the nation's largest source of greenhouse gas (GHG) pollutants, depends heavily on states and their ability to devise policies that meet the goals set by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Under the EPA's proposed Clean Power Plan, states will be responsible for cutting power plants' carbon pollution 30% from 2005 levels by 2030. States have already adopted several policies to reduce the electricity sector's climate impact. Some of these policies focus on reducing power plants' CO2 emissions, and others address this outcome in a more roundabout fashion by encouraging energy efficiency and renewable energy. However, it remains unclear which, if any, of these direct and indirect strategies actually mitigate plants' emissions because scholars have yet to test their effects using plant-level emission data. Here we use a newly released data source to determine whether states' policies significantly shape individual power plants' CO2 emissions. Findings reveal that certain types of direct strategy (emission caps and GHG targets) and indirect ones (public benefit funds and electric decoupling) lower plants' emissions and thus are viable building blocks of a federal climate regime.

  2. Correct safety requirements during the life cycle of heating plants; Korrekta saekerhetskrav under vaermeanlaeggningars livscykel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tegehall, Jan; Hedberg, Johan [Swedish National Testing and Research Inst., Boraas (Sweden)

    2006-10-15

    The safety of old steam boilers or hot water generators is in principle based on electromechanical components which are generally easy to understand. The use of safety-PLC is a new and flexible way to design a safe system. A programmable system offers more degrees of freedom and consequently new problems may arise. As a result, new standards which use the Safety Integrity Level (SIL) concept for the level of safety have been elaborated. The goal is to define a way of working to handle requirements on safety in control systems of heat and power plants. SIL-requirements are relatively new within the domain and there is a need for guidance to be able to follow the requirements. The target of this report is the people who work with safety questions during new construction, reconstruction, or modification of furnace plants. In the work, the Pressure Equipment Directive, 97/23/EC, as well as standards which use the SIL concept have been studied. Additionally, standards for water-tube boilers have been studied. The focus has been on the safety systems (safety functions) which are used in water-tube boilers for heat and power plants; other systems, which are parts of these boilers, have not been considered. Guidance has been given for the aforementioned standards as well as safety requirements specification and risk analysis. An old hot water generator and a relatively new steam boiler have been used as case studies. The design principles and safety functions of the furnaces have been described. During the risk analysis important hazards were identified. A method for performing a risk analysis has been described and the appropriate content of a safety requirements specification has been defined. If a heat or power plant is constructed, modified, or reconstructed, a safety life cycle shall be followed. The purpose of the safety life cycle is to plan, describe, document, perform, check, test, and validate that everything is correctly done. The components of the safety

  3. Steady-state chlorophyll fluorescence (Fs) as a tool to monitor plant heat and drought stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cendrero Mateo, M.; Carmo-Silva, A.; Salvucci, M.; Moran, S. M.; Hernandez, M.

    2012-12-01

    Crop yield decreases when photosynthesis is limited by heat or drought conditions. Yet farmers do not monitor crop photosynthesis because it is difficult to measure at the field scale in real time. Steady-state chlorophyll fluorescence (Fs) can be used at the field level as an indirect measure of photosynthetic activity in both healthy and physiologically-perturbed vegetation. In addition, Fs can be measured by satellite-based sensors on a regular basis over large agricultural regions. In this study, plants of Camelina sativa grown under controlled conditions were subjected to heat and drought stress. Gas exchange and Fs were measured simultaneously with a portable photosynthesis system under light limiting and saturating conditions. Results showed that Fs was directly correlated with net CO2 assimilation (A) and inversely correlated with non-photochemical quenching (NPQ). Analysis of the relationship between Fs and Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR) revealed significant differences between control and stressed plants that could be used to track the status, resilience, and recovery of photochemical processes. In summary, the results provide evidence that Fs measurements, even without normalization, are an easy means to monitor changes in plant photosynthesis, and therefore, provide a rapid assessment of plant stress to guide farmers in resource applications. Figure1. Net CO2 assimilation rate (A) of Camelina sativa plants under control conditions and after heat stress exposure for 1 or 3 days (1d-HS and 3d-HS, respectively) (right) and control, drought and re-watering conditions (left). Conditions for infra-red gas analysis were: reference CO2 = 380 μmol mol-1, PPFD = 500 μmol m-2 s-1 and Tleaf set to 25°C (control, drought and re-water) or 35°C (HS). Different letters denote significant differences at the α=0.05 level. Values are means±SEM (n=10). Figure 2. Stable chlorophyll fluorescence (Fs) of Camelina sativa plants under control conditions and

  4. Heat-shock responses in two leguminous plants: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, C; Cardemil, L

    2001-08-01

    Relative growth rates, basal and acclimated thermotolerance, membrane damage, fluorescence emission, and relative levels of free and conjugated ubiquitin and HSP70 were compared after 2 h of treatment at different temperatures between Prosopis chilensis and Glycine max (soybean), cv. McCall, to evaluate if the thermotolerance of these two plants was related to levels of accumulation of heat shock proteins. Seedlings of P. chilensis germinated at 25 degrees C and at 35 degrees C and grown at temperatures above germination temperature showed higher relative growth than soybean seedlings treated under the same conditions. The lethal temperature of both species was 50 degrees C after germination at 25 degrees C. However, they were able to grow at 50 degrees C after germination at 35 degrees C. Membrane damage determinations in leaves showed that P. chilensis has an LT(50) 6 degrees C higher than that of soybean. There were no differences in the quantum yield of photosynthesis (F(v)/F(m)), between both plants when the temperatures were raised. P. chilensis showed higher relative levels of free ubiquitin, conjugated ubiquitin and HSP70 than soybean seedlings when the temperatures were raised. Time-course studies of accumulation of these proteins performed at 40 degrees C showed that the relative accumulation rates of ubiquitin, conjugated ubiquitin and HSP70 were higher in P. chilensis than in soybean. In both plants, free ubiquitin decreased during the first 5 min and increased after 30 min of heat shock, conjugated ubiquitin increased after 30 min and HSP70 began to increase dramatically after 20 min of heat shock. From these data it is concluded that P. chilensis is more tolerant to acute heat stress than soybean.

  5. HTGR-GT closed-cycle gas turbine: a plant concept with inherent cogeneration (power plus heat production) capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, C.F.

    1980-04-01

    The high-grade sensible heat rejection characteristic of the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor-gas turbine (HTGR-GT) plant is ideally suited to cogeneration. Cogeneration in this nuclear closed-cycle plant could include (1) bottoming Rankine cycle, (2) hot water or process steam production, (3) desalination, and (4) urban and industrial district heating. This paper discusses the HTGR-GT plant thermodynamic cycles, design features, and potential applications for the cogeneration operation modes. This paper concludes that the HTGR-GT plant, which can potentially approach a 50% overall efficiency in a combined cycle mode, can significantly aid national energy goals, particularly resource conservation

  6. Integration of a PAFC-Cogeneration Plant into an existing District-Heating-System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, Ulrich; Geiger, Bernd; Grohmann, Juergen

    1999-01-01

    The Studiengesellschaft Brennstoffzellen e. V. assigned in the middle of 1995 the Institutions ''Lehrstuhl fir Energiewirtschaft mid Kraftwerkstechnik (IfE)'' to design a concept to integrate an ONSI-PAFC Model C in an existing district heating system. The fuel cell generates about 200 kW electrical and 215 kW thermal power consuming 500 kW natural gas. In the case of complete use of thermal power the fuel cell surpasses the efficiency of conventional systems by about 30 %. The possibilities to install the fuel cell were investigated at three locations, two housing areas, one with 36.000 m2 the other with 60.000 m2 heated area, and one indoor pool. The heating systems are representative of the Federal Republic of Germany. It turned out that the integration of the fuel cell into the existing heating system might be difficult at each location, either the annual consumption of thermal energy was too low or the heating system was operating at a temperature level reducing the usable thermal power of the fuel cell. After further studies the larger housing area was selected, with the intention of using the thermal power of the fuel cell during the whole year and to get high thermal load factors. Some difficulties are caused by the temperature level of the heating system, which is 70/55 o C. (author)

  7. Evaluation of Biodiesel Fuels to Reduce Fossil Fuel Use in Corps of Engineers Floating Plant Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    ER D C/ CH L TR -1 6- 11 Dredging Operations and Environmental Research Program Evaluation of Biodiesel Fuels to Reduce Fossil Fuel Use... Fuels to Reduce Fossil Fuel Use in Corps of Engineers Floating Plant Operations Michael Tubman and Timothy Welp Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory...sensitive emissions, increase use of renewable energy, and reduce the use of fossil fuels was conducted with funding from the U.S. Army Corps of

  8. EFFICACY OF ENDOPHYTIC BACTERIA IN REDUCING PLANT PARASITIC NEMATODE Pratylenchus brachyurus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Harni

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Pratylenchus brachyurus is a major parasitic nematode on patchouli that reduces plant production up to 85%. The use of endophytic bacteria is promising for controlling nematode and promoting plant growth through production of phytohormones and enhancing the availability of soil nutrients. The objective of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of endophytic bacteria to control P. brachyurus on patchouli plant and its influence on plant productions (plant fresh weight and patchouli oil. The study was conducted at Cimanggu Experimental Garden and Laboratory of the Indonesian Spice and Medicinal Crops Research Institute (ISMECRI, Bogor, West Java. The experi-ment was designed in a randomized block with seven treatments and eight replications; each replication consisted of 10 plants. The treatments evaluated were five isolates of endophytic bacteria (Achromobacter xylosoxidans TT2, Alcaligenes faecalis NJ16, Pseudomonas putida EH11, Bacillus cereus MSK and Bacillus subtilis NJ57, synthetic nematicide as a reference, and non-treated plant as a control.  Four-week old patchouli plants of cv. Sidikalang were treated by soaking the roots in suspension of endophytic bacteria (109 cfu  ml-1 for one hour before trans-planting to the field. At one month after planting, the plants were drenched with the bacterial suspension as much as 100 ml per plant. The results showed that applications of the endophytic bacteria could suppress the nematode populations (52.8-80% and increased plant weight (23.62-57.48% compared to the control. The isolate of endophytic bacterium Achromobacter xylosoxidans TT2 was the best and comparable with carbofuran.

  9. Techno-economic analysis of using corn stover to supply heat and power to a corn ethanol plant - Part 2: Cost of heat and power generation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mani, S.; Sokhansanj, S.; Tagore, S.; Turhollow, A.F.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a techno-economic analysis of corn stover fired process heating (PH) and the combined heat and power (CHP) generation systems for a typical corn ethanol plant (ethanol production capacity of 170 dam 3 ). Discounted cash flow method was used to estimate both the capital and operating costs of each system and compared with the existing natural gas fired heating system. Environmental impact assessment of using corn stover, coal and natural gas in the heat and/or power generation systems was also evaluated. Coal fired process heating (PH) system had the lowest annual operating cost due to the low fuel cost, but had the highest environmental and human toxicity impacts. The proposed combined heat and power (CHP) generation system required about 137 Gg of corn stover to generate 9.5 MW of electricity and 52.3 MW of process heat with an overall CHP efficiency of 83.3%. Stover fired CHP system would generate an annual savings of 3.6 M$ with an payback period of 6 y. Economics of the coal fired CHP system was very attractive compared to the stover fired CHP system due to lower fuel cost. But the greenhouse gas emissions per Mg of fuel for the coal fired CHP system was 32 times higher than that of stover fired CHP system. Corn stover fired heat and power generation system for a corn ethanol plant can improve the net energy balance and add environmental benefits to the corn to ethanol biorefinery.

  10. Diversity reduces invasibility in experimental plant communities: the role of plant species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Ruijven, J.; De Deyn, G.B.; Berendse, F.

    2003-01-01

    Several studies have presented experimental evidence that diversity reduces invasibility in grassland communities. The interpretation of these results has been disputed recently and it was proposed that sampling effects were responsible for the observed decrease of invasibility with diversity. The

  11. Economics of long distance transmission, storage and distribution of heat from nuclear plants with existing and newer techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margen, Peter

    1977-01-01

    Nuclear plants can provide heat for district heating in mainly two ways. Central nuclear power plants sufficiently large to be economic as electricity producers could instead be designed for heat extraction at temperatures useful for district heating. The second promising way is to design simple low temperature reactors, so simple and safe that near urban location becomes feasible. The manner of transport distribution and storage of heat is discussed in this paper which are very important especially in the cost calculations. The economic objectives can often be attained already with conventional technigues even when transport distances are large. But newer techniques of transport promise to make even cities at greater distances from major nuclear power plants economically connectible whilst new techniques for small distribution pipes help to extend the economic distribution area to the less dense one-family house districts. (M.S.)

  12. Hexanoic acid protects tomato plants against Botrytis cinerea by priming defence responses and reducing oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finiti, Ivan; de la O Leyva, María; Vicedo, Begonya; Gómez-Pastor, Rocío; López-Cruz, Jaime; García-Agustín, Pilar; Real, Maria Dolores; González-Bosch, Carmen

    2014-08-01

    Treatment with the resistance priming inducer hexanoic acid (Hx) protects tomato plants from Botrytis cinerea by activating defence responses. To investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying hexanoic acid-induced resistance (Hx-IR), we compared the expression profiles of three different conditions: Botrytis-infected plants (Inf), Hx-treated plants (Hx) and Hx-treated + infected plants (Hx+Inf). The microarray analysis at 24 h post-inoculation showed that Hx and Hx+Inf plants exhibited the differential expression and priming of many Botrytis-induced genes. Interestingly, we found that the activation by Hx of other genes was not altered by the fungus at this time point. These genes may be considered to be specific targets of the Hx priming effect and may help to elucidate its mechanisms of action. It is noteworthy that, in Hx and Hx+Inf plants, there was up-regulation of proteinase inhibitor genes, DNA-binding factors, enzymes involved in plant hormone signalling and synthesis, and, remarkably, the genes involved in oxidative stress. Given the relevance of the oxidative burst occurring in plant-pathogen interactions, the effect of Hx on this process was studied in depth. We showed by specific staining that reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation in Hx+Inf plants was reduced and more restricted around infection sites. In addition, these plants showed higher ratios of reduced to oxidized glutathione and ascorbate, and normal levels of antioxidant activities. The results obtained indicate that Hx protects tomato plants from B. cinerea by regulating and priming Botrytis-specific and non-specific genes, preventing the harmful effects of oxidative stress produced by infection. © 2013 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  13. Energy efficiency in process plants with emphasis on heat exchanger networks : optimization, thermodynamics and insight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anantharaman, Rahul

    2011-07-01

    This thesis focuses on energy recovery system design and energy integration to improve the energy efficiency of process plants. The objectives of this work are to (a) develop a systematic methodology based on thermodynamic principles to integrate energy intensive processes and (b) develop a mathematical programming based approach using thermodynamics and insight for solving industrial sized HENS problems. A novel energy integration methodology, Energy Level Composite Curves (ELCC), has been developed that is a synergy of Exergy Analysis and Composite Curves. ELCC is a graphical tool which provides the engineer with insights on energy integration and this work represents the first methodological attempt to represent thermal, mechanical and chemical energy in a graphical form similar to composite curves for the thermal integration of energy intensive processes. This method provides physical insight to integrate energy sources with sinks. The methodology is useful as a screening tool, functioning as an idea generator prior to the heat and power integration step. A simple energy targeting algorithm is developed to obtain utility targets. The ELCC was applied to a methanol plant to show the efficacy of the methodology.The Sequential Framework, an iterative and sequential methodology for Heat Exchanger Network Synthesis (HENS), is presented in this thesis. The main objective of the Sequential Framework is to solve industrial size problems. The subtasks of the design process are solved sequentially using Mathematical Programming. There are two main advantages of the methodology. First, the design procedure is, to a large extent, automated while keeping significant user interaction. Second, the subtasks of the framework (MILP and NLP problems) are much easier to solve numerically than the MINLP models that have been suggested for HENS. Application of the Sequential Framework to literature examples showed that the methodology generated solutions with total annualized costs

  14. A practical cooling strategy for reducing the physiological strain associated with firefighting activity in the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, D; Gregson, W; Sutton, L; Reilly, T

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was to establish whether a practical cooling strategy reduces the physiological strain during simulated firefighting activity in the heat. On two separate occasions under high ambient temperatures (49.6 +/- 1.8 degrees C, relative humidity (RH) 13 +/- 2%), nine male firefighters wearing protective clothing completed two 20-min bouts of treadmill walking (5 km/h, 7.5% gradient) separated by a 15-min recovery period, during which firefighters were either cooled (cool) via application of an ice vest and hand and forearm water immersion ( approximately 19 degrees C) or remained seated without cooling (control). There was no significant difference between trials in any of the dependent variables during the first bout of exercise. Core body temperature (37.72 +/- 0.34 vs. 38.21 +/- 0.17 degrees C), heart rate (HR) (81 +/- 9 vs. 96 +/- 17 beats/min) and mean skin temperature (31.22 +/- 1.04 degrees C vs. 33.31 +/- 1 degrees C) were significantly lower following the recovery period in cool compared with control (p second bout of activity in cool compared to control. Mean skin temperature, HR and thermal sensation were significantly lower during bout 2 in cool compared with control (p < 0.05). It is concluded that this practical cooling strategy is effective at reducing the physiological strain associated with demanding firefighting activity under high ambient temperatures.

  15. Optimization of Combine Heat and Power Plants in the Russian Wholesale Power Market Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Chuchueva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper concerns the relevant problem to optimize the combine heat and power (CHP plants in the Russian wholesale power market conditions. Since 1975 the CHP plants specialists faced the problem of fuel rate or fuel cost reduction while ensuring the fixed level of heat and power production. The optimality criterion was the fuel rate or fuel cost which has to be minimized. Produced heat and power was paid by known tariff. Since the power market started in 2006 the power payment scheme has essentially changed: produced power is paid by market price. In such condition a new optimality criterion the paper offers is a profit which has to be maximized for the given time horizon. Depending on the optimization horizon the paper suggests four types of the problem urgency, namely: long-term, mid-term, short-term, and operative optimization. It clearly shows that the previous problem of fuel cost minimization is a special case of profit maximization problem. To bring the problem to the mixed-integer linear programming problem a new linear characteristic curves of steam and gas turbine are introduced. Error of linearization is 0.6%. The formal statement of the problem of short-term CHP plants optimization in the market conditions is offered. The problem was solved with IRM software (OpenLinkInternational for seven power plants of JSC “Quadra”: Dyagilevskaya CHP, Kurskaya CHP-1, Lipetskaya CHP-2, Orlovskaya CHP, Kurskaya CHP NWR, Tambovskaya CHP, and Smolenskaya CHP-2.The conducted computational experiment showed that a potential profit is between 1.7% and 4.7% of the fuel cost of different CHP plants and depends on the power plant operation conditions. The potential profit value is 2–3 times higher than analogous estimations, which were obtained solving fuel cost minimization problem. The perspectives of the work are formalization of mid-term and long-term CHP plants optimization problem and development of domestic software for the new problem

  16. Fluid selection and parametric analysis on condensation temperature and plant height for a thermogravimetric heat pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najafi, Behzad; Obando Vega, Pedro; Guilizzoni, Manfredo; Rinaldi, Fabio; Arosio, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    The Thermogravimetric Heat Pump (TGHP) is a non-conventional system, implementing a reverse cycle, the main difference of which from the usual vapor compression (Rankine) cycle is a quasi-isothermal compression of the working fluid by a high heat capacity carrier fluid. Previous studies showed that employing HFC134a or PF5050 as working fluids may be promising in terms of thermodynamic performance, though the corresponding required plant heights confine its application to tall buildings (from minimum height of 10–12 storeys to skyscrapers). Accordingly, an investigation has been carried out in the present study in order to determine a group of fluids which allow lower heights under the same input conditions. In order to investigate the performance of the system and the required plant height, operation of a 100 kW TGHP has been simulated for 17 different fluids. Accordingly, the corresponding COPs and required heights are determined and based on the achieved COPs, the optimum fluid for each range of building height is selected. The resulting plant heights range from 20 m to nearly 200 m and R245ca is shown to be the most promising fluid for the lowest plant height range. A parametric study is next carried out in order to study the effect of variations in the condensation temperature and the dimensionless plant height on the performance of the system. The obtained results demonstrate that an increase in the former from 313 K to 348 K, for almost all of the analyzed fluids, causes a reduction of around 50% in the COP. It is also shown that, almost independent of the employed fluid, the maximum values of COP are reached for a dimensionless plant height of around 1.8. Moreover, all the analyzed fluids show basically the same COP trend and, at the same operating conditions, the COP values for all fluids are within a 10% range of variation. This leads to the conclusion that the thermophysical properties of the employed fluid mainly influences the required height of

  17. Economic and safety aspects of using moderator heat for feed water heating in a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patwegar, I.A.; Dutta, Anu; Chaki, S.K.; Venkat Raj, V.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: In the proposed advanced heavy water reactor (AHWR), coolant and moderator are separated by the coolant channel. The coolant absorbs most of the fission heat produced in the reactor core. However, the moderator absorbs about 5 to 6 % of the fission heat. In a reactor producing 750 MW(th) power, this moderator heat is about 40 MW. In the present Indian PHWR (pressurized heavy water reactor) systems, this moderator heat is lost to a sink through the moderator heat exchangers, which are cooled by process water. This paper presents the results of the steam cycle analysis carried out for AHWR using moderator heat exchangers as part of the feed heating system. The present study is an attempt to determine the gain in electrical output (MW) if moderator heat is utilized for feed water heating. The operational and safety aspects of using moderator heat are also discussed in the paper

  18. Combined heat and power plants with parallel tandem steam turbines; Smaaskalig kraftvaerme med parallellkopplade tandemturbiner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinwall, Pontus; Norstroem, Urban; Pettersson, Camilla; Oesterlin, Erik

    2004-12-01

    We investigate the technical and economical conditions for a concept with parallel coupled tandem turbines in small scale combined heat and power plants fired with bio-fuel and waste. Performance and heat production costs at varying electricity prices for the concept with two smaller tandem coupled steam turbines has been compared to the traditional concept with one single multi-staged turbine. Three different types of plants have been investigated: - Bio fuelled CHP plant with thermal capacity of 15 MW{sub th}; - Waste fired CHP plant with thermal capacity of 20 MW{sub th}; - Bio fuelled CHP plant with thermal capacity of 25 MW{sub th}. The simple steam turbines (Curtis turbines) used in the tandem arrangement has an isentropic efficiency of about 49 to 53% compared to the multi-staged steam turbines with isentropic efficiency in the range of 59% to 81%. The lower isentropic efficiency for the single staged turbines is to some extent compensated at partial load when one of the two turbines can be shut down leading to better operational conditions for the one still in operation. For concepts with saturated steam at partial load below 50% the tandem arrangements presents higher electricity efficiency than the conventional single turbine alternative. The difference in annual production of electricity is therefore less than the difference in isentropic efficiency for the two concepts. Production of electricity is between 2% and 42% lower for the tandem arrangements in this study. Investment costs for the turbine island has been calculated for the two turbine concepts and when the costs for turbines, generator, power transmission, condensing system, piping system, buildings, assembling, commissioning and engineering has been added the sum is about the same for the two concepts. For the bio-fuelled plant with thermal capacity of 15 MW{sub th} the turbine island amount to about 10-12 MSEK and about 13-15 MSEK for the waste fired plant with a thermal capacity of 20 MW

  19. Systematic analysis of plant disturbances with a view to reducing scram frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laakso, K.J.

    1984-01-01

    The goal of this project is to improve plant safety and reliability in Swedish BWRs by reducing the frequency of reactor scrams. The history of plant disturbances leading to reactor scrams and turbine trips in five Swedish nuclear power units was reviewed and the contributing causes were carefully analyzed. A total of 625 plant disturbances was included in the search. Improvements to be made in the units were identified and the merits of possible modifications were assessed using reliability engineering and PRA techniques. Emphasis was given to design improvements in the NSSS (Nuclear Steam Supply System) as well as in the electricity generation (turbine plant) area. Examples of various types of recommended modifications will be given, including either their proven or expected efficiency in reducing scram frequency. (orig./HP)

  20. Savannah River Plant Low-Level Waste Heat Utilization Project preliminary analysis. Volume II. Options for capturing the waste heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-11-01

    Options for utilizing the heated SRP effluent are investigated. The temperature and availability characteristics of the heated effluent are analyzed. Technical options for energy recovery are discussed. A number of thermodynamic cycles that could generate electrical power using the energy in the heated SRP effluent are described. Conceptual designs for SRP application of two attractive options are presented. Other direct uses for the heated effluent, as heat sources for agriculture and aquaculture options are discussed

  1. Biomass from agriculture in small-scale combined heat and power plants - A comparative life cycle assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimming, M.; Sundberg, C.; Nordberg, A.; Baky, A.; Bernesson, S.; Noren, O.; Hansson, P.-A.

    2011-01-01

    Biomass produced on farm land is a renewable fuel that can prove suitable for small-scale combined heat and power (CHP) plants in rural areas. However, it can still be questioned if biomass-based energy generation is a good environmental choice with regards to the impact on greenhouse gas emissions, and if there are negative consequences of using of agricultural land for other purposes than food production. In this study, a simplified life cycle assessment (LCA) was conducted over four scenarios for supply of the entire demand of power and heat of a rural village. Three of the scenarios are based on utilization of biomass in 100 kW (e) combined heat and power (CHP) systems and the fourth is based on fossil fuel in a large-scale plant. The biomass systems analyzed were based on 1) biogas production with ley as substrate and the biogas combusted in a microturbine, 2) gasification of willow chips and the product gas combusted in an IC-engine and 3) combustion of willow chips for a Stirling engine. The two first scenarios also require a straw boiler. The results show that the biomass-based scenarios reduce greenhouse gas emissions considerably compared to the scenario based on fossil fuel, but have higher acidifying emissions. Scenario 1 has by far the best performance with respect to global warming potential and the advantage of utilizing a byproduct and thus not occupying extra land. Scenario 2 and 3 require less primary energy and less fossil energy input than 1, but set-aside land for willow production must be available. The low electric efficiency of scenario 3 makes it an unsuitable option.

  2. RCS pressure under reduced inventory conditions following a loss of residual heat removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmrose, D.E.; Hughes, E.D.; Johnsen, G.W.

    1992-01-01

    The thermal-hydraulic response of a closed-reactor coolant system to loss of residual heat removal (RHR) cooling is investigated. The processes examined include: core coolant boiling and steam generator reflux condensation, pressure increase on the primary side, heat transfer mechanisms on the steam generator primary and secondary sides, and effects of noncondensible gas on heat transfer processes

  3. Technology data for energy plants. Individual heating plants and energy transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-05-15

    The present technology catalogue is published in co-operation between the Danish Energy Agency and Energinet.dk and includes technology descriptions for a number of technologies for individual heat production and energy transport. The primary objective of the technology catalogue is to establish a uniform, commonly accepted and up-to-date basis for the work with energy planning and the development of the energy sector, including future outlooks, scenario analyses and technical/economic analyses. The technology catalogue is thus a valuable tool in connection with energy planning and assessment of climate projects and for evaluating the development opportunities for the energy sector's many technologies, which can be used for the preparation of different support programmes for energy research and development. The publication of the technology catalogue should also be viewed in the light of renewed focus on strategic energy planning in municipalities etc. In that respect, the technology catalogue is considered to be an important tool for the municipalities in their planning efforts. (LN)

  4. Fluidized-bed incineration plant equipped with waste heat boilers. Developed for mid-size municipalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handa, Hitoshi

    1988-01-20

    A fluidized bed incineration plant with a waste heat boiler was installed to dispose wastes in Sakura City on March, 1987 and has waste disposing capacity of 120tons/d. Sands are fluidized in the furnace at 700-800/sup 0/C and wastes are burned completely for a short time. The waste heat boiler is used to utilize waste heat to send steam to aquiculturing farms and hot water to the community plaza and further supplies steam to two 90kW back pressure turbines for driving forced draft fan used for the incineration plant. Harmful gases in waste gas are removed by the harmful gas eliminator to lower HCl to 120ppm or less and K value of SOx to 9.0 or less and then cleaned gas is exhausted through the electostatic precipitator and the chimney. Dust and fly ash are transferred to a reservior through a superior seal tight air transportation system, pelletized and disposed for land fill. Bulk waste disposing capacity is 50 tons/d and harmful wastes, magnetic materials, unburnable and burnable wastes are classified and separated. Separated iron purity is 95% or more. (4 figs, 2 photos)

  5. Renovation and rehabilitation of Didi Digomi District Heat Supply Plant (No.48) in Tbilisi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    An investigational study was conducted on the project for energy conservation and reduction in greenhouse effect gas emission at the existing district heating plant in Tbilisi City, Georgia. In the project, the following are conducted for the district heating plants in the Didi-Digomi section and Saburtalo section: renewal/higher efficiency of boiler equipment, adoption of cogeneration using gas turbine, improvement of hot water pipeline and improvement of equipment at heat users. As a result of the study, one plan for cogeneration of 2 units x 6MW class in each section was good in terms of economical efficiency and expenses vs. effects, and the other plan for cogeneration of 17 units (8 units and 9 units) x 6MW class was good in terms of the generated output and regional needs. The amount of energy conservation to be made by the former plan totaled 22,678 toe/y in both sections. The amount of greenhouse effect gas reduction is 70,170 t-CO2/y. The internal earning rate is 1.707% in the Didi-Digomi section and 2.249% in the Saburtalo section. The project profit is lower than the initial investment cost, and therefore, it is necessary to consider the profit from the CO2 emission right. (NEDO)

  6. Feasibility Assessment of Using Power Plant Waste Heat in Large Scale Horticulture Facility Energy Supply Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Gyung Yu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the Korean government has been carrying out projects to construct several large scale horticulture facilities. However, it is difficult for an energy supply to operate stably and economically with only a conventional fossil fuel boiler system. For this reason, several unused energy sources have become attractive and it was found that power plant waste heat has the greatest potential for application in this scenario. In this study, we performed a feasibility assessment of power plant waste heat as an energy source for horticulture facilities. As a result, it was confirmed that there was a sufficient amount of energy potential for the use of waste heat to supply energy to the assumed area. In Dangjin, an horticultural area of 500 ha could be constructed by utilizing 20% of the energy reserves. In Hadong, a horticulture facility can be set up to be 260 ha with 7.4% of the energy reserves. In Youngdong, an assumed area of 65 ha could be built utilizing about 19% of the energy reserves. Furthermore, the payback period was calculated in order to evaluate the economic feasibility compared with a conventional system. The initial investment costs can be recovered by the approximately 83% reduction in the annual operating costs.

  7. Linear stability analysis of flow instabilities with a nodalized reduced order model in heated channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, Subhanker; Singh, Suneet

    2015-01-01

    The prime objective of the presented work is to develop a Nodalized Reduced Order Model (NROM) to carry linear stability analysis of flow instabilities in a two-phase flow system. The model is developed by dividing the single phase and two-phase region of a uniformly heated channel into N number of nodes followed by time dependent spatial linear approximations for single phase enthalpy and two-phase quality between the consecutive nodes. Moving boundary scheme has been adopted in the model, where all the node boundaries vary with time due to the variation of boiling boundary inside the heated channel. Using a state space approach, the instability thresholds are delineated by stability maps plotted in parameter planes of phase change number (N pch ) and subcooling number (N sub ). The prime feature of the present model is that, though the model equations are simpler due to presence of linear-linear approximations for single phase enthalpy and two-phase quality, yet the results are in good agreement with the existing models (Karve [33]; Dokhane [34]) where the model equations run for several pages and experimental data (Solberg [41]). Unlike the existing ROMs, different two-phase friction factor multiplier correlations have been incorporated in the model. The applicability of various two-phase friction factor multipliers and their effects on stability behaviour have been depicted by carrying a comparative study. It is also observed that the Friedel model for friction factor calculations produces the most accurate results with respect to the available experimental data. (authors)

  8. Method to reduce contamination and uptake of lead by plants from car exhaust gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isermann, K.

    1977-03-01

    Splashing and/or washing plants with aqueous solutions of the chelates CaEDTA (max. 5 mM/litre) or Na-polyphosphate (max. 0.5 percent) is an effective way of reducing contamination and uptake of lead by plants within regions where lead is emitted at significant levels. By chelating lead it first becomes unloaded or even negatively charged (for instance with EDTA as Pb/sub 2/EDTA or PbHEDTA/sup 1 -/ and PbEDTA/sup 2 -/). Therefore chelated lead, in contrast to normal Pb/sup 2 +/, is not absorbed, either on negatively charged surfaces of the plants (cuticula) or within the plant-tissue (mesophyll, on negatively charged cell-walls or membranes). Also, Pb-chelate has a larger diameter than bivalent Pb/sup 2 +/, resulting in a restricted lead uptake by the plant roots.

  9. Advances in Nuclear Power Plant Water Chemistry in Reducing Radiation Exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Febrianto

    2005-01-01

    Water quality in light water reactor in Pressurized Water Reactor as well as in Boiling Water Reactor has being gradually improved since the beginning, to reduce corrosion risk and radiation exposure level. Corrosion problem which occurred to both type of reactors can reduce the plants availability, increase the operation and maintenance cost and increase the radiation exposure. Corrosion and radiation exposure risk in both reactor rare different. BWR type reactor has more experiences in corrosion problem because at the type of reactor lets water to boil in the core, while at PWR type reactor, water is kept not to boil. The BWR reactor has also higher radiation exposure rather than the PWR one. Many collaborative efforts of plants manufacturers and plant operator utilities have been done to reduce the radiation exposure level and corrosion risk. (author)

  10. Heat Shock Proteins: A Review of the Molecular Chaperones for Plant Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chang-Jin; Seo, Young-Su

    2015-12-01

    As sessile organisms, plants are exposed to persistently changing stresses and have to be able to interpret and respond to them. The stresses, drought, salinity, chemicals, cold and hot temperatures, and various pathogen attacks have interconnected effects on plants, resulting in the disruption of protein homeostasis. Maintenance of proteins in their functional native conformations and preventing aggregation of non-native proteins are important for cell survival under stress. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) functioning as molecular chaperones are the key components responsible for protein folding, assembly, translocation, and degradation under stress conditions and in many normal cellular processes. Plants respond to pathogen invasion using two different innate immune responses mediated by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) or resistance (R) proteins. HSPs play an indispensable role as molecular chaperones in the quality control of plasma membrane-resident PRRs and intracellular R proteins against potential invaders. Here, we specifically discuss the functional involvement of cytosolic and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) HSPs/chaperones in plant immunity to obtain an integrated understanding of the immune responses in plant cells.

  11. Heat Shock Proteins: A Review of the Molecular Chaperones for Plant Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Jin Park

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available As sessile organisms, plants are exposed to persistently changing stresses and have to be able to interpret and respond to them. The stresses, drought, salinity, chemicals, cold and hot temperatures, and various pathogen attacks have interconnected effects on plants, resulting in the disruption of protein homeostasis. Maintenance of proteins in their functional native conformations and preventing aggregation of non-native proteins are important for cell survival under stress. Heat shock proteins (HSPs functioning as molecular chaperones are the key components responsible for protein folding, assembly, translocation, and degradation under stress conditions and in many normal cellular processes. Plants respond to pathogen invasion using two different innate immune responses mediated by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs or resistance (R proteins. HSPs play an indispensable role as molecular chaperones in the quality control of plasma membrane-resident PRRs and intracellular R proteins against potential invaders. Here, we specifically discuss the functional involvement of cytosolic and endoplasmic reticulum (ER HSPs/chaperones in plant immunity to obtain an integrated understanding of the immune responses in plant cells.

  12. Optimizing Waste Heat Recovery for Class A Biosolids Production from a Combined Cycle Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soroushian, Fred

    2003-07-01

    The City of Corona serves a rapidly growing area of Southern California, The City operates three wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) that produce reclaimed water for unrestricted reuse. The sludge from the three WWTPs is transported to a central sludge treatment facility located at WWTP No. 1. The sludge treatment facility consists of sludge receiving, thickening, anaerobic digestion, and dewatering. In the year 2000, the City was faced with two crises. First, the California power shortage and escalating cost of power severely impacted the industry and businesses. Second, bans on Class B biosolids land application and the shutdown of a local privatized composting facility where the bulk of the City's biosolids were processed or reused forced the City to transport bulk waste a much greater distance. To cost-effectively respond to these crises, the City decided to start generating and supplying power to its constituents by constructing a nominal 30-megawatt (MW) power plant. The feasibility study proved that locating the power plant at the City's largest WWTP produced significant synergies. The reclaimed water from the WWTP could be used for power plant cooling, the waste heat from the power plant could be recovered and used in Class A biosolids processes, the digester gas could be used for supplementing the fuel needs of the sludge dryer, and the combined facilities operation was more efficient than physically separate facilities. This paper presents the results of this analysis as well as the construction and operational aspects of the project. (author)

  13. Harnessing ant defence at fruits reduces bruchid seed predation in a symbiotic ant–plant mutualism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pringle, Elizabeth G.

    2014-01-01

    In horizontally transmitted mutualisms, mutualists disperse separately and reassemble in each generation with partners genetically unrelated to those in the previous generation. Because of this, there should be no selection on either partner to enhance the other's reproductive output directly. In symbiotic ant–plant mutualisms, myrmecophytic plants host defensive ant colonies, and ants defend the plants from herbivores. Plants and ants disperse separately, and, although ant defence can indirectly increase plant reproduction by reducing folivory, it is unclear whether ants can also directly increase plant reproduction by defending seeds. The neotropical tree Cordia alliodora hosts colonies of Azteca pittieri ants. The trees produce domatia where ants nest at stem nodes and also at the node between the peduncle and the rachides of the infloresence. Unlike the stem domatia, these reproductive domatia senesce after the tree fruits each year. In this study, I show that the tree's resident ant colony moves into these ephemeral reproductive domatia, where they tend honeydew-producing scale insects and patrol the nearby developing fruits. The presence of ants significantly reduced pre-dispersal seed predation by Amblycerus bruchid beetles, thereby directly increasing plant reproductive output. PMID:24807259

  14. Harnessing ant defence at fruits reduces bruchid seed predation in a symbiotic ant-plant mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pringle, Elizabeth G

    2014-06-22

    In horizontally transmitted mutualisms, mutualists disperse separately and reassemble in each generation with partners genetically unrelated to those in the previous generation. Because of this, there should be no selection on either partner to enhance the other's reproductive output directly. In symbiotic ant-plant mutualisms, myrmecophytic plants host defensive ant colonies, and ants defend the plants from herbivores. Plants and ants disperse separately, and, although ant defence can indirectly increase plant reproduction by reducing folivory, it is unclear whether ants can also directly increase plant reproduction by defending seeds. The neotropical tree Cordia alliodora hosts colonies of Azteca pittieri ants. The trees produce domatia where ants nest at stem nodes and also at the node between the peduncle and the rachides of the infloresence. Unlike the stem domatia, these reproductive domatia senesce after the tree fruits each year. In this study, I show that the tree's resident ant colony moves into these ephemeral reproductive domatia, where they tend honeydew-producing scale insects and patrol the nearby developing fruits. The presence of ants significantly reduced pre-dispersal seed predation by Amblycerus bruchid beetles, thereby directly increasing plant reproductive output.

  15. Analysis of a Community-based Intervention to Reduce Heat-related Illness during Heat Waves in Licheng, China: a Quasi-experimental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Xu, Xin; Wang, Jun; Zhao, Yun; Song, Xiu Ping; Liu, Zhi Dong; Cao, Li Na; Jiang, Bao Fa; Liu, Qi Yong

    2016-11-01

    To reduce health-related threats of heat waves, interventions have been implemented in many parts of the world. However, there is a lack of higher-level evidence concerning the intervention efficacy. This study aimed to determine the efficacy of an intervention to reduce the number of heat-related illnesses. A quasi-experimental design was employed by two cross-sectional surveys in the year 2014 and 2015, including 2,240 participants and 2,356 participants, respectively. Each survey was designed to include one control group and one intervention group, which conducted in Licheng, China. A representative sample was selected using a multistage sampling method. Data, collected from questionnaires about heat waves in 2014 and 2015, were analyzed using a difference-in-difference analysis and cost effectiveness analysis. Outcomes included changes in the prevalence of heat-related illnesses and cost-effectiveness variables. Relative to the control participants, the prevalence of heat-related illness in the intervention participants decreased to a greater extent in rural areas than in urban areas (OR=0.495 vs. OR=1.281). Moreover, the cost-effectiveness ratio in the intervention group was less than that in the control group (US$15.06 vs. US$15.69 per participant). Furthermore, to avoid one additional patient, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio showed that an additional US$14.47 would be needed for the intervention compared to when no intervention was applied. The intervention program may be considered a worthwhile investment for rural areas that are more likely to experience heat waves. Meanwhile, corresponding improving measures should be presented towards urban areas. Future research should examine whether the intervention strategies could be spread out in other domestic or international regions where heat waves are usually experienced. Copyright © 2016 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  16. Direct containment heating integral effects tests in geometries of European nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, Leonhard; Albrecht, Giancarlo; Caroli, Cataldo; Ivanov, Ivan

    2009-01-01

    The DISCO test facility at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FZK) has been used to perform experiments to investigate direct containment heating (DCH) effects during a severe accident in European nuclear power plants, comprising the EPR, the French 1300 MWe plant P'4, the VVER-1000 and the German Konvoi plant. A high-temperature iron-alumina melt is ejected by steam into scaled models of the respective reactor cavities and the containment vessel. Both heat transfer from dispersed melt and combustion of hydrogen lead to containment pressurization. The main experimental findings are presented and critical parameters are identified. The consequences of DCH are limited in reactors with no direct pathway between the cavity and the containment dome (closed pit). The situation is more severe for reactors which do have a direct pathway between the cavity and the containment (open pit). The experiments showed that substantial fractions of corium may be dispersed into the containment in such cases, if the pressure in the reactor coolant system is elevated at the time of RPV failure. Primary system pressures of 1 or 2 MPa are sufficient to lead to full scale DCH effects. Combustion of the hydrogen produced by oxidation as well as the hydrogen initially present appears to be the crucial phenomenon for containment pressurization.

  17. Direct containment heating integral effects tests in geometries of European nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Leonhard [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FZK), Postfach 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)], E-mail: meyer@iket.fzk.de; Albrecht, Giancarlo [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FZK), Postfach 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Caroli, Cataldo [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, BP 17, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses Cedex (France); Ivanov, Ivan [Technical University of Sofia, BG-1797 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2009-10-15

    The DISCO test facility at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FZK) has been used to perform experiments to investigate direct containment heating (DCH) effects during a severe accident in European nuclear power plants, comprising the EPR, the French 1300 MWe plant P'4, the VVER-1000 and the German Konvoi plant. A high-temperature iron-alumina melt is ejected by steam into scaled models of the respective reactor cavities and the containment vessel. Both heat transfer from dispersed melt and combustion of hydrogen lead to containment pressurization. The main experimental findings are presented and critical parameters are identified. The consequences of DCH are limited in reactors with no direct pathway between the cavity and the containment dome (closed pit). The situation is more severe for reactors which do have a direct pathway between the cavity and the containment (open pit). The experiments showed that substantial fractions of corium may be dispersed into the containment in such cases, if the pressure in the reactor coolant system is elevated at the time of RPV failure. Primary system pressures of 1 or 2 MPa are sufficient to lead to full scale DCH effects. Combustion of the hydrogen produced by oxidation as well as the hydrogen initially present appears to be the crucial phenomenon for containment pressurization.

  18. Safe corrosion inhibitor for treating cooling water on heat power engineering plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaeva, L. A.; Khasanova, D. I.; Mukhutdinova, E. R.; Safin, D. Kh.; Sharifullin, I. G.

    2017-08-01

    Heat power engineering (HPE) consumes significant volumes of water. There are, therefore, problems associated with corrosion, biological fouling, salt deposits, and sludge formation on functional surfaces of heat power equipment. One of the effective ways to solve these problems is the use of inhibitory protection. The development of new Russian import-substituting environmentally friendly inhibitors is very relevant. This work describes experimental results on the OPC-800 inhibitor (TU 2415-092-00206 457-2013), which was produced at Karpov Chemical Plant and designed to remove mineral deposits, scale, and biological fouling from the surfaces of water-rotation node systems on HPE objects. This reagent is successfully used as an effective corrosion inhibitor in the water recycling systems of Tatarstan petrochemical enterprises. To save fresh make-up water, the circulating system is operated in a no-blow mode, which is characterized by high evaporation and salt content coefficients. It was experimentally found that corrosion rate upon treatment of recycled water with the OPC-800 inhibitor is 0.08-0.10 mm/year. HPE mainly uses inhibitors based on oxyethylidene diphosphonic (OEDPA) and nitrilotrimethylphosphonic (NTMPA) acids. The comparative characteristic of inhibition efficiency for OPC-800 and OEDF-Zn-U2 is given. The results obtained indicate that OPC-800 can be used as an inhibitor for treatment of cooling water in HPE plants. In this case, it is necessary to take into account the features of water rotation of a thermal power plant.

  19. Safety Philosophy in Process Heat Plants Coupled to High Temperature Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Nicholas R.; Revankar, Shripad T.

    2011-01-01

    With the future availability of fossil fuel resources in doubt, high temperature nuclear reactors have the potential to be an important technology in the near term. Due to a high coolant outlet temperature, high temperature reactors (HTR) can be used to drive chemical plants that directly utilize process heat. Additionally, the high temperature improves the thermodynamic efficiency of the energy utilization. Many applications of high temperature reactors exist as a thermal driving vector for endothermic chemical process plants. Hydrogen generation using the General Atomics (GA) sulfur iodine (SI) cycle is one promising application of high temperature nuclear heat. The main chemical reactions in the SI cycle are: 1. I 2 +SO 2 + 2H 2 O → 2HI + H 2 SO 4 (Bunsen reaction) 2. H 2 SO 4 → H 2 O + SO 2 + 1/2O 2 (Sulfuric acid decomposition) 3. 2HI → H 2 + I 2 (Hydrogen Iodide decomposition). With the exception of hydrogen and oxygen, all relevant reactants are recycled within the process. However, there are many unresolved safety and operational issues related to implementation of such a coupled plant

  20. Solar thermal power plants for heat and electricity generation; Presentacion de plantas termosolares para generacion de calor y energia electrica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estrada Cajigal, V [Solartronic S. A. de C. V., Cuernavaca (Mexico); Manzini, F; Sanchez, A [Laboratorio de Energia Solar (IIM-UNAM), Temixco (Mexico)

    1993-12-31

    Solar thermal technology is presented for concentration into a point for the production of heat and energy in small and large scale, emphasis is made on the capacity for the combination with current technologies using fossil fuels for electricity generation and process steam, increasing the global efficiency of the power plants and notably reducing the pollutants emission to the air during the insolation hours. It is successfully compared with other solar-thermal technologies. [Espanol] Se presenta la tecnologia termosolar de concentracion puntual para produccion de calor y de energia en pequena y gran escala, se enfatiza su capacidad de combinacion con las tecnologias actuales que utilizan combustibles fosiles para produccion de electricidad y vapor de proceso, aumentando la eficiencia global de las plantas y reduciendo notablemente sus emisiones contaminantes a la atmosfera durante las horas de insolacion. Se le compara exitosamente con otras tecnologias termosolares.

  1. Solar thermal power plants for heat and electricity generation; Presentacion de plantas termosolares para generacion de calor y energia electrica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estrada Cajigal, V. [Solartronic S. A. de C. V., Cuernavaca (Mexico); Manzini, F.; Sanchez, A. [Laboratorio de Energia Solar (IIM-UNAM), Temixco (Mexico)

    1992-12-31

    Solar thermal technology is presented for concentration into a point for the production of heat and energy in small and large scale, emphasis is made on the capacity for the combination with current technologies using fossil fuels for electricity generation and process steam, increasing the global efficiency of the power plants and notably reducing the pollutants emission to the air during the insolation hours. It is successfully compared with other solar-thermal technologies. [Espanol] Se presenta la tecnologia termosolar de concentracion puntual para produccion de calor y de energia en pequena y gran escala, se enfatiza su capacidad de combinacion con las tecnologias actuales que utilizan combustibles fosiles para produccion de electricidad y vapor de proceso, aumentando la eficiencia global de las plantas y reduciendo notablemente sus emisiones contaminantes a la atmosfera durante las horas de insolacion. Se le compara exitosamente con otras tecnologias termosolares.

  2. Linking physiological and cellular responses to thermal stress: β-adrenergic blockade reduces the heat shock response in fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeman, Nicole M; LeBlanc, Sacha; Perry, Steve F; Currie, Suzanne

    2014-08-01

    When faced with stress, animals use physiological and cellular strategies to preserve homeostasis. We were interested in how these high-level stress responses are integrated at the level of the whole animal. Here, we investigated the capacity of the physiological stress response, and specifically the β-adrenergic response, to affect the induction of the cellular heat shock proteins, HSPs, following a thermal stress in vivo. We predicted that blocking β-adrenergic stimulation during an acute heat stress in the whole animal would result in reduced levels of HSPs in red blood cells (RBCs) of rainbow trout compared to animals where adrenergic signaling remained intact. We first determined that a 1 h heat shock at 25 °C in trout acclimated to 13 °C resulted in RBC adrenergic stimulation as determined by a significant increase in cell swelling, a hallmark of the β-adrenergic response. A whole animal injection with the β2-adrenergic antagonist, ICI-118,551, successfully reduced this heat-induced RBC swelling. The acute heat shock caused a significant induction of HSP70 in RBCs of 13 °C-acclimated trout as well as a significant increase in plasma catecholamines. When heat-shocked fish were treated with ICI-118,551, we observed a significant attenuation of the HSP70 response. We conclude that circulating catecholamines influence the cellular heat shock response in rainbow trout RBCs, demonstrating physiological/hormonal control of the cellular stress response.

  3. Economics of long-distance transmission, storage, and distribution of heat from nuclear plants with existing and newer techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margen, P.H.

    1978-01-01

    Conventional and newer types of hot-water pipes are applied to the bulk transport of reject heat from central nuclear power plants to the district heating network of cities or groups of cities. With conventional pipes, the transport of 300 to 2000 MW of heat over distances of 30 to 100 km can be justified, while with newer pipe types, even longer distances would often be economic. For medium-size district heating schemes, low-temperature heat transport from simple heat-only reactors suitable for closer location to cities is of interest. For daily storage of heat on district heating systems, steel heat accumulators are currently used in Sweden. The development of more advanced cheaper heat accumulators, such as lake storage schemes, could make even seasonal heat storage economic. Newer distribution technology extends the economic field of penetration of district heating even to suburban one-family house districts. With proper design and optimization, nuclear district heating can be competitive in a wide market and achieve very substantial fossil-fuel savings

  4. Radiation hygienic assessment of centralized heat and hot water supply of Bilibino village from Bilibin central nuclear heating- and power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eremin, V.A.; Marej, A.N.; Nechiporenko, N.I.; Rasskazov, A.P.; Sayapin, N.P.; Soldatov, G.E.; Shcherbinin, A.S.

    1983-01-01

    The experience in using an atomic power plant for heat and hot water supply of the village of Bilibino is outlined. Particular attention is given to the population radiation safety. It has been demonstrated that radiation safety of the system is ensured by maintaining fixed pressure levels in the heating media and by the hermetic state of heat exchanges. Water in the heat and hot water supply network meets the requirements for drinking water. Radioactive corrosion products were not detected in the test water. Gamma-radiation dose rate from the surface of heating devices and pipe-lines in the test premises did not exceed the natural background, that is, U.U1-0.025 mrad

  5. High temperature corrosion in the service environments of a nuclear process heat plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quadakkers, W.J.

    1987-01-01

    In a nuclear process heat plant the heat-exchanging components fabricated from nickel- and Fe-Ni-based alloys are subjected to corrosive service environments at temperatures up to 950 0 C for service lives of up to 140 000 h. In this paper the corrosion behaviour of the high temperature alloys in the different service environments will be described. It is shown that the degree of protection provided by Cr 2 O 3 -based surface oxide scales against carburization and decarburization of the alloys is primarily determined not by the oxidation potential of the atmospheres but by a dynamic process involving, on the one hand, the oxidizing gas species and the metal and, on the other hand, the carbon in the alloy and the oxide scale. (orig.)

  6. Combined heat and power (cogeneration) plant based on renewable energy sources and electrochemical hydrogen systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigor'ev, S. A.; Grigor'ev, A. S.; Kuleshov, N. V.; Fateev, V. N.; Kuleshov, V. N.

    2015-02-01

    The layout of a combined heat and power (cogeneration) plant based on renewable energy sources (RESs) and hydrogen electrochemical systems for the accumulation of energy via the direct and inverse conversion of the electrical energy from RESs into the chemical energy of hydrogen with the storage of the latter is described. Some efficient technical solutions on the use of electrochemical hydrogen systems in power engineering for the storage of energy with a cyclic energy conversion efficiency of more than 40% are proposed. It is shown that the storage of energy in the form of hydrogen is environmentally safe and considerably surpasses traditional accumulator batteries by its capacitance characteristics, being especially topical in the prolonged absence of energy supply from RESs, e.g., under the conditions of polar night and breathless weather. To provide the required heat consumption of an object during the peak period, it is proposed to burn some hydrogen in a boiler house.

  7. Will nuclear power plant standardization reduce the licensing impact on construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, J.M.; Bingham, W.G.; Keith, D.G.

    1976-01-01

    The NRC and the nuclear industry have been pursuing standardization quite vigorously in an effort to reduce the cost and schedule for the design and construction of nuclear power plants. The NRC is currently reviewing standard plant applications submitted under each of four standardization options. In addition, the NRC has published Standard Review Plans and Standard Technical Specifications. Although problems exist in the implementation of standardization and in areas unaffected by standardization, each of these standardization methods has the potential to reduce the licensing impact on construction

  8. District heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, L.

    1993-01-01

    The environmental risks and uncertainties of a high-energy future are disturbing and give rise to several reservations concerning the use of fossil fuels. A number of technologies will help to reduce atmospheric pollution. In Denmark special importance is attached to the following: Energy conservation. Efficient energy conversion. Renewable energy sources. District heating, combined production of heat and power. Many agree that district heating (DH), produced by the traditional heat-only plant, and combined heat and power (CHP) have enormous potential when considering thermal efficiency and lowered environmental impacts: The basic technology of each is proven, it would be relatively simple to satisfy a substantial part of the energy demand, and their high efficiencies mean reduced pollution including greenhouse gas emissions. This is especially important in high population density areas - the obviously preferred sites for such energy generation. Compared with individual heating DH can provide a community with an operationally efficient and most often also an economically competitive heat supply. This is particularly true under the circumstances where the DH system is supplied from CHP plants. Their use results in very substantial improvements in overall efficiency. Further environmental improvements arise from the reduced air pollution obtainable in reasonably large CHP plants equipped with flue gas cleaning to remove particles, sulphur dioxide, and nitrogen acids. As a consequence of these considerations, DH plays an important role in fulfilling the space and water heating demand in many countries. This is especially the case in Denmark where this technology is utilised to a very great extent. Indeed, DH is one of the reasons why Denmark has relatively good air quality in the cities. (au)

  9. Optimum power yield for bio fuel fired combined heat and power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broden, Henrik; Nystroem, Olle; Joensson, Mikael

    2012-05-15

    Plant owners, suppliers, research institutions, industry representatives and (supporting) authorities are continuing to question the viability of what can be expected by increasing the steam data and the efficiency of cogeneration plants. In recent years, the overall conditions for investment in CHP have changed. Today, there is access to new materials that allow for more advanced steam data while maintaining availability. Although the financial environment with rising prices of electricity, heating and fuel along with the introduction of energy certificates and the interest in broadening the base of fuel has changed the situation. At the same time as the increased interest in renewable energy production creates competition among energy enterprises to find suppliers, increased prices for materials and labor costs have also resulted in increased investment and maintenance costs. Research on advanced steam data for biomass-fired power cogeneration plants has mainly emphasized on technical aspects of material selection and corrosion mechanisms based on performance at 100 % load looking at single years. Reporting has rarely been dealing with the overall economic perspective based on profitability of the CHP installations throughout their entire depreciation period. In the present report studies have been performed on how the choice of steam data affects the performance and economy in biomass-fired cogeneration plants with boilers of drum type and capacities at 30, 80 and 160 MWth with varied steam data and different feed water system configurations. Profitability is assessed on the basis of internal rate of return (IRR) throughout the amortization period of the plants. In addition, sensitivity analyses based on the most essential parameters have been carried out. The target group for the project is plant owners, contractors, research institutions, industry representatives, (supporting) authorities and others who are faced with concerns regarding the viability of what

  10. Timing Effects of Heat-Stress on Plant Ecophysiological Characteristics and Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Heckathorn, Scott A; Mainali, Kumar; Tripathee, Rajan

    2016-01-01

    Heat-waves with higher intensity and frequency and longer durations are expected in the future due to global warming, which could have dramatic impacts in agriculture, economy and ecology. This field study examined how plant responded to heat-stress (HS) treatment at different timing in naturally occurring vegetation. HS treatment (5 days at 40.5°C) were applied to 12 1 m 2 plots in restored prairie vegetation dominated by a warm-season C 4 grass, Andropogon gerardii , and a warm-season C 3 forb, Solidago canadensis , at different growing stages. During and after each heat stress (HS) treatment, temperature were monitored for air, canopy, and soil; net CO 2 assimilation ( A net ), quantum yield of photosystem II (Φ PSII ), stomatal conductance ( g s ), and internal CO 2 level ( C i ), specific leaf area (SLA), and chlorophyll content of the dominant species were measured. One week after the last HS treatment, all plots were harvested and the biomass of above-ground tissue and flower weight of the two dominant species were determined. HS decreased physiological performance and growth for both species, with S. canadensis being affected more than A. gerardii , indicated by negative HS effect on both physiological and growth responses for S. canadensis . There were significant timing effect of HS on the two species, with greater reductions in the net photosynthetic rate and productivity occurred when HS was applied at later-growing season. The reduction in aboveground productivity in S. canadensis but not A. gerardii could have important implications for plant community structure by increasing the competitive advantage of A. gerardii in this grassland. The present experiment showed that HS, though ephemeral, may promote long-term effects on plant community structure, vegetation dynamics, biodiversity, and ecosystem functioning of terrestrial biomes when more frequent and severe HS occur in the future.

  11. Effects of N on plant response to heat-wave: a field study with prairie vegetation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Heckathorn, Scott A; Mainali, Kumar; Hamilton, E William

    2008-11-01

    More intense, more frequent, and longer heat-waves are expected in the future due to global warming, which could have dramatic ecological impacts. Increasing nitrogen (N) availability and its dynamics will likely impact plant responses to heat stress and carbon (C) sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems. This field study examined the effects of N availability on plant response to heat-stress (HS) treatment in naturally-occurring vegetation. HS (5 d at ambient or 40.5 degrees C) and N treatments (+/-N) were applied to 16 1 m(2) plots in restored prairie vegetation dominated by Andropogon gerardii (warm-season C4 grass) and Solidago canadensis (warm-season C3 forb). Before, during, and after HS, air, canopy, and soil temperature were monitored; net CO2 assimilation (P(n)), quantum yield of photosystem II (Phi(PSII)), stomatal conductance (g(s)), and leaf water potential (Psi(w)) of the dominant species and soil respiration (R(soil)) of each plot were measured daily during HS. One week after HS, plots were harvested, and C% and N% were determined for rhizosphere and bulk soil, and above-ground tissue (green/senescent leaf, stem, and flower). Photosynthetic N-use efficiency (PNUE) and N resorption rate (NRR) were calculated. HS decreased P(n), g(s), Psi(w), and PNUE for both species, and +N treatment generally increased these variables (+/-HS), but often slowed their post-HS recovery. Aboveground biomass tended to decrease with HS in both species (and for green leaf mass in S. canadensis), but decrease with +N for A. gerardii and increase with +N for S. canadensis. For A. gerardii, HS tended to decrease N% in green tissues with +N, whereas in S. canadensis, HS increased N% in green leaves. Added N decreased NRR for A. gerardii and HS increased NRR for S. canadensis. These results suggest that heat waves, though transient, could have significant effects on plants, communities, and ecosystem N cycling, and N can influence the effect of heat waves.

  12. Ftreign system studieo of hydrodynamics and heat-mass transfer at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Informa