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Sample records for reducing aerodynamic drag

  1. Methods of reducing vehicle aerodynamic drag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirenko V.; Rohatgi U.

    2012-07-08

    A small scale model (length 1710 mm) of General Motor SUV was built and tested in the wind tunnel for expected wind conditions and road clearance. Two passive devices, rear screen which is plate behind the car and rear fairing where the end of the car is aerodynamically extended, were incorporated in the model and tested in the wind tunnel for different wind conditions. The conclusion is that rear screen could reduce drag up to 6.5% and rear fairing can reduce the drag by 26%. There were additional tests for front edging and rear vortex generators. The results for drag reduction were mixed. It should be noted that there are aesthetic and practical considerations that may allow only partial implementation of these or any drag reduction options.

  2. Reducing Aerodynamic Drag on Empty Open Cargo Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, James C.; Storms, Bruce L.; Dzoan, Dan

    2009-01-01

    Some simple structural modifications have been demonstrated to be effective in reducing aerodynamic drag on vehicles that have empty open cargo bays. The basic idea is to break up the airflow in a large open cargo bay by inserting panels to divide the bay into a series of smaller bays. In the case of a coal car, this involves inserting a small number (typically between two and four) of vertical full-depth or partial-depth panels.

  3. CHARACTERISTICS OF WIND DEFLECTOR FOR REDUCING AERODYNAMIC DRAG OF VAN-BODY TRUCK

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Du Guang-sheng; Lei Li; Zhou Lian-di

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, the differences in the characteristics of airflow around the van-body truck and of the aerodynamic drag, which were caused by the installation of a wind deflector, were studied by experimentally and numerically. The results show that after the installation of the deflector, the airflow around the top and bottom of the truck becoms smooth, the intensity of tail-vortex is weakened and its contribution area lessened. It also indicates that the aerodynamic characteristics of the airflow are changed distinctly and the aerodynamic drag is reduced considerably. The effect of the thin-wall deflector is better than the solid one in decreasing the drag. It is also concluded that proper design of the gap between the deflector bottom and the top of the driver cab can enhance the effect of the deflector in reducing drag.

  4. DOE's effort to reduce truck aerodynamic drag through joint experiments and computations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salari, Kambiz (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory); Browand, Fred (University of Southern California); Sreenivas, Kidambi (University of Tennessee, Chattanooga); Pointer, W. David (Argonne National Laboratory); Taylor, Lafayette (University of Tennessee, Chattanooga); Pankajakshan, Ramesh (University of Tennessee, Chattanooga); Whitfield, David (University of Tennessee, Chattanooga); Plocher, Dennis (University of Southern California); Ortega, Jason M. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory); Merzel, Tai (University of Southern California); McCallen, Rose (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory); Walker, Stephen M (NASA Ames Research Center); Heineck, James T (NASA Ames Research Center); Hassan, Basil; Roy, Christopher John (Auburn University); Storms, B. (NASA Ames Research Center); Ross, James (NASA Ames Research Center); Englar, Robert (Georgia Tech Research Institute); Rubel, Mike (Caltech); Leonard, Anthony (Caltech); Radovich, Charles (University of Southern California); Eastwood, Craig (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory); Paschkewitz, John (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory); Castellucci, Paul (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory); DeChant, Lawrence Justin.

    2005-08-01

    Class 8 tractor-trailers are responsible for 11-12% of the total US consumption of petroleum. Overcoming aero drag represents 65% of energy expenditure at highway speeds. Most of the drag results from pressure differences and reducing highway speeds is very effective. The goal is to reduce aerodynamic drag by 25% which would translate to 12% improved fuel economy or 4,200 million gal/year. Objectives are: (1) In support of DOE's mission, provide guidance to industry in the reduction of aerodynamic drag; (2) To shorten and improve design process, establish a database of experimental, computational, and conceptual design information; (3) Demonstrate new drag-reduction techniques; and (4) Get devices on the road. Some accomplishments are: (1) Concepts developed/tested that exceeded 25% drag reduction goal; (2) Insight and guidelines for drag reduction provided to industry through computations and experiments; (3) Joined with industry in getting devices on the road and providing design concepts through virtual modeling and testing; and (4) International recognition achieved through open documentation and database.

  5. DOE's effort to reduce truck aerodynamic drag : joint experiments and computations lead to smart design.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaste, David M (NASA Ames Research Center, Moffet Field, CA); Salari, Kambiz (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA); Hammache, Mustapha (University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA); Browand, Fred (University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA); Pointer, W. David (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Ortega, Jason M. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA); McCallen, Rose (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA); Walker, Stephen M (NASA Ames Research Center, Moffet Field, CA); Heineck, James T (NASA Ames Research Center, Moffet Field, CA); Hassan, Basil; Roy, Christopher John (Auburn University, Auburn, AL); Storms, B. (NASA Ames Research Center, Moffet Field, CA); Satran, D. (NASA Ames Research Center, Moffet Field, CA); Ross, James (NASA Ames Research Center, Moffet Field, CA); Englar, Robert (Georgia Tech Research Institute, Atlanta, GA); Chatalain, Philippe (Caltech, Pasadena, CA); Rubel, Mike (Caltech, Pasadena, CA); Leonard, Anthony (Caltech, Pasadena, CA); Hsu, Tsu-Ya (University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA); DeChant, Lawrence Justin.

    2004-06-01

    At 70 miles per hour, overcoming aerodynamic drag represents about 65% of the total energy expenditure for a typical heavy truck vehicle. The goal of this US Department of Energy supported consortium is to establish a clear understanding of the drag producing flow phenomena. This is being accomplished through joint experiments and computations, leading to the smart design of drag reducing devices. This paper will describe our objective and approach, provide an overview of our efforts and accomplishments, and discuss our future direction.

  6. DOE's Effort to Reduce Truck Aerodynamic Drag-Joint Experiments and Computations Lead to Smart Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCallen, R; Salari, K; Ortega, J; DeChant, L; Hassan, B; Roy, C; Pointer, W; Browand, F; Hammache, M; Hsu, T; Leonard, A; Rubel, M; Chatalain, P; Englar, R; Ross, J; Satran, D; Heineck, J; Walker, S; Yaste, D; Storms, B

    2004-06-17

    At 70 miles per hour, overcoming aerodynamic drag represents about 65% of the total energy expenditure for a typical heavy truck vehicle. The goal of this US Department of Energy supported consortium is to establish a clear understanding of the drag producing flow phenomena. This is being accomplished through joint experiments and computations, leading to the 'smart' design of drag reducing devices. This paper will describe our objective and approach, provide an overview of our efforts and accomplishments, and discuss our future direction.

  7. Test, Evaluation, and Demonstration of Practical Devices/Systems to Reduce Aerodynamic Drag of Tractor/Semitrailer Combination Unit Trucks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Smith; Karla Younessi; Matt Markstaller; Dan Schlesinger; Bhaskar Bhatnagar; Donald Smith; Bruno Banceu; Ron Schoon; V.K. Sharma; Mark Kachmarsky; Srikant Ghantae; Michael Sorrels; Conal Deedy; Justin Clark; Skip Yeakel; Michael D. Laughlin; Charlotte Seigler; Sidney Diamond

    2007-04-30

    Class 8 heavy-duty trucks account for over three-quarters of the total diesel fuel used by commercial trucks (trucks with GVWRs more than 10,000 pounds) in the United States each year. At the highway speeds at which these trucks travel (i.e., 60 mph or greater), aerodynamic drag is a major part of total horsepower needed to move the truck down the highway, Reductions in aerodynamic drag can yield measurable benefits in fuel economy through the use of relatively inexpensive and simple devices. The goal of this project was to examine a number of aerodynamic drag reduction devices and systems and determine their effectiveness in reducing aerodynamic drag of Class 8 tractor/semitrailer combination-units, thus contributing to DOE's goal of reducing transportation petroleum use. The project team included major heavy truck manufacturers in the United States, along with the management and industry expertise of the Truck Manufacturers Association as the lead investigative organization. The Truck Manufacturers Association (TMA) is the national trade association representing the major North American manufacturers of Class 6-8 trucks (GVWRs over 19,500 lbs). Four major truck manufacturers participated in this project with TMA: Freightliner LLC; International Truck and Engine Corporation; Mack Trucks Inc.; and Volvo Trucks North America, Inc. Together, these manufacturers represent over three-quarters of total Class 8 truck sales in the United States. These four manufacturers pursued complementary research efforts as part of this project. The project work was separated into two phases conducted over a two-year period. In Phase I, candidate aerodynamic devices and systems were screened to focus research and development attention on devices that offered the most potential. This was accomplished using full-size vehicle tests, scale model tests, and computational fluid dynamics analyses. In Phase II, the most promising devices were installed on full-size trucks and their

  8. DOE Project on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCallen, R; Salari, K; Ortega, J; Castellucci, P; Pointer, D; Browand, F; Ross, J; Storms, B

    2007-01-04

    Class 8 tractor-trailers consume 11-12% of the total US petroleum use. At highway speeds, 65% of the energy expenditure for a Class 8 truck is in overcoming aerodynamic drag. The project objective is to improve fuel economy of Class 8 tractor-trailers by providing guidance on methods of reducing drag by at least 25%. A 25% reduction in drag would present a 12% improvement in fuel economy at highway speeds, equivalent to about 130 midsize tanker ships per year. Specific goals include: (1) Provide guidance to industry in the reduction of aerodynamic drag of heavy truck vehicles; (2) Develop innovative drag reducing concepts that are operationally and economically sound; and (3) Establish a database of experimental, computational, and conceptual design information, and demonstrate the potential of new drag-reduction devices. The studies described herein provide a demonstration of the applicability of the experience developed in the analysis of the standard configuration of the Generic Conventional Model. The modeling practices and procedures developed in prior efforts have been applied directly to the assessment of new configurations including a variety of geometric modifications and add-on devices. Application to the low-drag 'GTS' configuration of the GCM has confirmed that the error in predicted drag coefficients increases as the relative contribution of the base drag resulting from the vehicle wake to the total drag increases and it is recommended that more advanced turbulence modeling strategies be applied under those circumstances. Application to a commercially-developed boat tail device has confirmed that this restriction does not apply to geometries where the relative contribution of the base drag to the total drag is reduced by modifying the geometry in that region. Application to a modified GCM geometry with an open grille and radiator has confirmed that the underbody flow, while important for underhood cooling, has little impact on the drag

  9. Aerodynamic Drag and Gyroscopic Stability

    CERN Document Server

    Courtney, Elya R

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the effects on aerodynamic drag of rifle bullets as the gyroscopic stability is lowered from 1.3 to 1.0. It is well known that a bullet can tumble for stability less than 1.0. The Sierra Loading Manuals (4th and 5th Editions) have previously reported that ballistic coefficient decreases significantly as gyroscopic stability, Sg, is lowered below 1.3. These observations are further confirmed by the experiments reported here. Measured ballistic coefficients were compared with gyroscopic stabilities computed using the Miller Twist Rule for nearly solid metal bullets with uniform density and computed using the Courtney-Miller formula for plastic-tipped bullets. The experiments reported here also demonstrate a decrease in aerodynamic drag near Sg = 1.23 +/- 0.02. It is hypothesized that this decrease in drag over a narrow band of Sg values is due to a rapid damping of coning motions (precession and nutation). Observation of this drag decrease at a consistent value of Sg demonstrates the relati...

  10. Thermal lift generation and drag reduction in rarefied aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekardan, Cem; Alexeenko, Alina

    2016-11-01

    With the advent of the new technologies in low pressure environments such as Hyperloop and helicopters designed for Martian applications, understanding the aerodynamic behavior of airfoils in rarefied environments are becoming more crucial. In this paper, verification of rarefied ES-BGK solver and ideas such as prediction of the thermally induced lift and drag reduction in rarefied aerodynamics are investigated. Validation of the rarefied ES-BGK solver with Runge-Kutta discontinous Galerkin method with experiments in transonic regime with a Reynolds number of 73 showed that ES-BGK solver is the most suitable solver in near slip transonic regime. For the quantification of lift generation, A NACA 0012 airfoil is studied with a high temperature surface on the bottom for the lift creation for different Knudsen numbers. It was seen that for lower velocities, continuum solver under predicts the lift generation when the Knudsen number is 0.00129 due to local velocity gradients reaching slip regime although lift coefficient is higher with the Boltzmann ES-BGK solutions. In the second part, the feasibility of using thermal transpiration for drag reduction is studied. Initial study in drag reduction includes an application of a thermal gradient at the upper surface of a NACA 0012 airfoil near trailing edge at a 12-degree angle of attack and 5 Pa pressure. It was seen that drag is reduced by 4 percent and vortex shedding frequency is reduced due to asymmetry introduced in the flow due to temperature gradient causing reverse flow due to thermal transpiration phenomena.

  11. Exploring the Aerodynamic Drag of a Moving Cyclist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theilmann, Florian; Reinhard, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Although the physics of cycling itself is a complex mixture of aerodynamics, physiology, mechanics, and heuristics, using cycling as a context for teaching physics has a tradition of certainly more than 30 years. Here, a possible feature is the discussion of the noticeable resistant forces such as aerodynamic drag and the associated power…

  12. Aerodynamic Drag Reduction for a Generic Truck Using Geometrically Optimized Rear Cabin Bumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdellah Ait Moussa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The continuous surge in gas prices has raised major concerns about vehicle fuel efficiency, and drag reduction devices offer a promising strategy. In this paper, we investigate the mechanisms by which geometrically optimized bumps, placed on the rear end of the cabin roof of a generic truck, reduce aerodynamic drag. The incorporation of these devices requires proper choices of the size, location, and overall geometry. In the following analysis we identify these factors using a novel methodology. The numerical technique combines automatic modeling of the add-ons, computational fluid dynamics and optimization using orthogonal arrays, and probabilistic restarts. Numerical results showed reduction in aerodynamic drag between 6% and 10%.

  13. Does an active adjustment of aerodynamic drag make sense?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciejewski, Marek

    2016-09-01

    The article concerns evaluation of the possible impact of the gap between the tractor and semitrailer on the aerodynamic drag coefficient. The aim here is not to adjust this distance depending on the geometrical shape of the tractor and trailer, but depending solely on the speed of articulated vehicle. All the tests have form of numerical simulations. The method of simulation is briefly explained in the article. It considers various issues such as the range and objects of tests as well as the test conditions. The initial (pre-adaptive) and final (after adaptation process) computational meshes have been presented as illustrations. Some of the results have been presented in the form of run chart showing the change of value of aerodynamic drag coefficients in time, for different geometric configurations defined by a clearance gap between the tractor and semitrailer. The basis for a detailed analysis and conclusions were the averaged (in time) aerodynamic drag coefficients as a function of the clearance gap.

  14. DOE Project on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag FY 2005 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCallen, R C; Salari, K; Ortega, J; Castellucci, P; Eastwood, C; Paschkewitz, J; Pointer, W D; DeChant, L J; Hassan, B; Browand, F; Radovich, C; Merzel, T; Plocher, D; Ross, J; Storms, B; Heineck, J T; Walker, S; Roy, C J

    2005-11-14

    Class 8 tractor-trailers consume 11-12% of the total US petroleum use. At high way speeds, 65% of the energy expenditure for a Class 8 truck is in overcoming aerodynamic drag. The project objective is to improve fuel economy of Class 8 tractor-trailers by providing guidance on methods of reducing drag by at least 25%. A 25% reduction in drag would present a 12% improvement in fuel economy at highway speeds, equivalent to about 130 midsize tanker ships per year. Specific goals include: (1) Provide guidance to industry in the reduction of aerodynamic drag of heavy truck vehicles; and (2) Establish a database of experimental, computational, and conceptual design information, and demonstrate the potential of new drag-reduction devices.

  15. Aerodynamic drag of modern soccer balls

    OpenAIRE

    Asai, Takeshi; SEO, KAZUYA

    2013-01-01

    Soccer balls such as the Adidas Roteiro that have been used in soccer tournaments thus far had 32 pentagonal and hexagonal panels. Recently, the Adidas Teamgeist II and Adidas Jabulani, respectively having 14 and 8 panels, have been used at tournaments; the aerodynamic characteristics of these balls have not yet been verified. Now, the Adidas Tango 12, having 32 panels, has been developed for use at tournaments; therefore, it is necessary to understand its aerodynamic characteristics. Through...

  16. Development of reduced drag concepts for acoustic liners using experimental methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasinski, Christopher

    2016-11-01

    Commercial aircraft have used acoustic liners to reduce engine noise for many years, although their drag production has been largely unstudied. The next generation of aircraft may benefit from additional surface area covered by acoustic liner, thus understanding their drag production mechanism is crucial for future designs. An accurate direct aerodynamic drag measurement technique has been developed using a force balance with linear air bearings. Using 3D-printed and conventional liners, low-drag designs are being developed. This paper will investigate the underlying fluid mechanics governing the drag production in acoustic liners and describe new attempts to reduce aerodynamic drag.

  17. Spacecraft Re-Entry Impact Point Targeting Using Aerodynamic Drag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Sanny R.; Bevilacqua, Riccardo

    2017-01-01

    The ability to re-enter the atmosphere at a desired location is important for spacecraft containing components that may survive re-entry. While impact point targeting has traditionally been initiated through impulsive burns with chemical thrusters on large vehicles such as the Space Shuttle, and the Soyuz and Apollo capsules, many small spacecraft do not host thrusters and require an alternative means of impact point targeting to ensure that falling debris do not cause harm to persons or property. This paper discusses the use of solely aerodynamic drag force to perform this targeting. It is shown that by deploying and retracting a drag device to vary the ballistic coefficient of the spacecraft, any desired longitude and latitude on the ground can be targeted provided that the maneuvering begins early enough and the latitude is less than the inclination of the orbit. An analytical solution based on perturbations from a numerically propagated trajectory is developed to map the initial state and ballistic coefficient profile of a spacecraft to its impact point. This allows the ballistic coefficient profile necessary to reach a given target point to be rapidly calculated, making it feasible to generate the guidance for the decay trajectory onboard the spacecraft. The ability to target an impact point using aerodynamic drag will enhance the capabilities of small spacecraft and will enable larger space vehicles containing thrusters to save fuel by more effectively leveraging the available aerodynamic drag.

  18. FY 2004 Annual Report: DOE Project on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCallen, R C; Salari, K; Ortega, J; Castellucci, P; Eastwood, C; Whittaker, K; DeChant, L J; Roy, C J; Payne, J L; Hassan, B; Pointer, W D; Browand, F; Hammache, M; Hsu, T; Ross, J; Satran, D; Heineck, J T; Walker, S; Yaste, D; Englar, R; Leonard, A; Rubel, M; Chatelain, P

    2004-11-18

    The objective of this report is: (1) Provide guidance to industry in the reduction of aerodynamic drag of heavy truck vehicles; and (2) Establish a database of experimental, computational, and conceptual design information, and demonstrate potential of new drag-reduction devices. The approaches used were: (1) Develop and demonstrate the ability to simulate and analyze aerodynamic flow around heavy truck vehicles using existing and advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools; (2) Through an extensive experimental effort, generate an experimental data base for code validation; (3) Using experimental data base, validate computations; (4) Provide industry with design guidance and insight into flow phenomena from experiments and computations; and (5) Investigate aero devices (e.g., base flaps, tractor-trailer gap stabilizer, underbody skirts and wedges, blowing and acoustic devices), provide industry with conceptual designs of drag reducing devices, and demonstrate the full-scale fuel economy potential of these devices.

  19. Aerodynamic Drag Reduction for A Generic Sport Utility Vehicle Using Rear Suction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdellah Ait Moussa

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The high demand for new and improved aerodynamic drag reduction devices has led to the invention of flow control mechanisms and continuous suction is a promising strategy that does not have major impact on vehicle geometry. The implementation of this technique on sport utility vehicles (SUV requires adequate choice of the size and location of the opening as well as the magnitude of the boundary suction velocity. In this paper we introduce a new methodology to identifying these parameters for maximum reduction in aerodynamic drag. The technique combines automatic modeling of the suction slit, computational fluid dynamics (CFD and a global search method using orthogonal arrays. It is shown that a properly designed suction mechanism can reduce drag by up to 9%..

  20. FY2003 Annual Report: DOE Project on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCallen, R C; Salari, K; Ortega, J; DeChant, L J; Roy, C J; Payne, J J; Hassan, B; Pointer, W D; Browand, F; Hammache, M; Hsu, T; Ross, J; Satran, D; Heineck, J; Walker, S; Yaste, D; Englar, R; Leonard, A; Rubel, M; Chatelain, P

    2003-10-24

    Objective: {sm_bullet} Provide guidance to industry in the reduction of aerodynamic drag of heavy truck vehicles. {sm_bullet} Establish a database of experimental, computational, and conceptual design information, and demonstrate potential of new drag-reduction devices.

  1. Aerodynamic drag from two tubes in side-by-side arrangement for different tube shapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Олександр Михайлович Терех

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Experimental investigations of aerodynamic drag from two tubes in side-by-side arrangement for different tube shapes in the range of Reynolds numbers from 4000 to16000 are performed. Comparison of experimental data is executed. It is set, that the tubes of drop-shaped form have less aerodynamic drag and the tubes of flat-oval and dumb-bell forms have greater drag as compared to drag of circular tubes

  2. Hydrodynamic and Aerodynamic Tests of Models of Flying-boat Hulls Designed Flow Aerodynamic Drag - NACA Models 74, 74-A, and 75

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truscott, Starr; Parkinson, J B; Ebert, John W , Jr; Valentine, E Floyd

    1938-01-01

    The present tests illustrate how the aerodynamic drag of a flying boat hull may be reduced by following closely the form of a low drag aerodynamic body and the manner in which the extent of the aerodynamic refinement is limited by poorer hydrodynamic performance. This limit is not sharply defined but is first evidenced by an abnormal flow of water over certain parts of the form accompanied by a sharp increase in resistance. In the case of models 74-A and 75, the resistance (sticking) occurs only at certain combinations of speed, load, and trim and can be avoided by proper control of the trim at high water speeds. Model 75 has higher water resistance at very high speeds than does model 74-A. With constant speed propellers and high takeoff speeds, it appears that the form of model 75 would give slightly better takeoff performance. Model 74-A, however, has lower aerodynamic drag than does model 75 for the same volume of hull.

  3. Reducing drag of a commuter train, using engine exhaust momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Dong Keun

    The objective of this thesis was to perform numerical investigations of two different methods of injecting fluid momentum into the air flow above a commuter train to reduce its drag. Based on previous aerodynamic modifications of heavy duty trucks in improving fuel efficiency, two structural modifications were designed and applied to a Metrolink Services commuter train in the Los Angeles (LA) County area to reduce its drag and subsequently improve fuel efficiency. The first modification was an L-shaped channel, added to the exhaust cooling fan above the locomotive roof to divert and align the exhaust gases in the axial direction. The second modification was adding an airfoil shaped lid over the L-shape channel, to minimize the drag of the perturbed structure, and thus reduce the overall drag. The computational fluid dynamic (CFD) software CCM+ from CD-Adapco with the ?-? turbulence model was used for the simulations. A single train set which consists of three vehicles: one locomotive, one trailer car and one cab car were used. All the vehicles were modeled based on the standard Metrolink fleet train size. The wind speed was at 90 miles per hour (mph), which is the maximum speed for the Orange County Metrolink line. Air was used as the exhaust gas in the simulation. The temperature of the exhausting air emitting out of the cooling fan on the roof was 150 F and the average fan speed was 120 mph. Results showed that with the addition of the lid, momentum injection results in reduced flow separation and pressure recovery behind the locomotive, which reduces the overall drag by at least 30%.

  4. Aerodynamic drag reduction of a simplified squareback vehicle using steady blowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlewood, R. P.; Passmore, M. A.

    2012-08-01

    A large contribution to the aerodynamic drag of a vehicle arises from the failure to fully recover pressure in the wake region, especially on squareback configurations. A degree of base pressure recovery can be achieved through careful shape optimisation, but the freedom of an automotive aerodynamicist to implement significant shape changes is limited by a variety of additional factors such styling, ergonomics and loading capacity. Active flow control technologies present the potential to create flow field modifications without the need for external shape changes and have received much attention in previous years within the aeronautical industry and, more recently, within the automotive industry. In this work the influence of steady blowing applied at a variety of angles on the roof trailing edge of a simplified ¼ scale squareback style vehicle has been investigated. Hot-wire anemometry, force balance measurements, surface pressure measurements and PIV have been used to investigate the effects of the steady blowing on the vehicle wake structures and the resulting body forces. The energy consumption of the steady jet is calculated and is used to deduce an aerodynamic drag power change. Results show that overall gains can be achieved; however, the large mass flow rate required restricts the applicability of the technique to road vehicles. Means by which the mass flow rate requirements of the jet may be reduced are discussed and suggestions for further work put forward.

  5. Aerodynamic drag reduction of a simplified squareback vehicle using steady blowing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Littlewood, R.P. [LaVisionUK Ltd, Grove, Oxon (United Kingdom); Passmore, M.A. [Loughborough University, Department of Aeronautical and Automotive Engineering, Loughborough (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-15

    A large contribution to the aerodynamic drag of a vehicle arises from the failure to fully recover pressure in the wake region, especially on squareback configurations. A degree of base pressure recovery can be achieved through careful shape optimisation, but the freedom of an automotive aerodynamicist to implement significant shape changes is limited by a variety of additional factors such styling, ergonomics and loading capacity. Active flow control technologies present the potential to create flow field modifications without the need for external shape changes and have received much attention in previous years within the aeronautical industry and, more recently, within the automotive industry. In this work the influence of steady blowing applied at a variety of angles on the roof trailing edge of a simplified 1/4 scale squareback style vehicle has been investigated. Hot-wire anemometry, force balance measurements, surface pressure measurements and PIV have been used to investigate the effects of the steady blowing on the vehicle wake structures and the resulting body forces. The energy consumption of the steady jet is calculated and is used to deduce an aerodynamic drag power change. Results show that overall gains can be achieved; however, the large mass flow rate required restricts the applicability of the technique to road vehicles. Means by which the mass flow rate requirements of the jet may be reduced are discussed and suggestions for further work put forward. (orig.)

  6. Characterization of aerodynamic drag force on single particles: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kale, S.R.

    1987-10-01

    An electrodynamic balance was used to measure the drag coefficient and also to record the size and shape of spheres, and coal and oil shale particles (100 ..mu..m to 200 ..mu..m in size). The electrodynamic balance consisted of a central, and two end electrodes. The resulting electric field stably suspended a charged particle. A suspended particle, back illuminated by a light emitting diode, was viewed by a video camera. The image was analyzed for particle position control and was calibrated to give the diameter of spheres, or the area equivalent diameter of nonspherical particles. The drag coefficient was calculated from the air velocity and the dc voltage required to keep the particle at the balance center. The particle Reynolds number varied from 0.2 to 13. Three particles each of coal and oil shale were captured and photographed by a scanning electron microscope and the motion of all the particles was recorded on video tape. Drag coefficient vs Reynolds number data for spheres agreed well with correlations. Data for thirteen particles each of coal and oil shale indicated a power law relationship between drag coefficient and Reynolds number. All these particles exhibited higher drag than spheres and were also observed to rotate. The rotation, however, did not affect the drag coefficient. The choice of characteristic dimension affects the drag characteristics of oil shale more strongly than for coal, owing to the flake-like shape of oil shale. 38 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Evaluation of Aerodynamic Drag and Torque for External Tanks in Low Earth Orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, William C; Witzgall, Christoph

    2006-01-01

    A numerical procedure is described in which the aerodynamic drag and torque in low Earth orbit are calculated for a prototype Space Shuttle external tank and its components, the "LO2" and "LH2" tanks, carrying liquid oxygen and hydrogen, respectively, for any given angle of attack. Calculations assume the hypersonic limit of free molecular flow theory. Each shell of revolution is assumed to be described by a series of parametric equations for their respective contours. It is discretized into circular cross sections perpendicular to the axis of revolution, which yield a series of ellipses when projected according to the given angle of attack. The drag profile, that is, the projection of the entire shell is approximated by the convex envelope of those ellipses. The area of the drag profile, that is, the drag area, and its center of area moment, that is, the drag center, are then calculated and permit determination of the drag vector and the eccentricity vector from the center of gravity of the shell to the drag center. The aerodynamic torque is obtained as the cross product of those vectors. The tanks are assumed to be either evacuated or pressurized with a uniform internal gas distribution: dynamic shifting of the tank center of mass due to residual propellant sloshing is not considered.

  8. Space Age Swimsuit Reduces Drag, Breaks Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    A space shuttle and a competitive swimmer have a lot more in common than people might realize: Among other forces, both have to contend with the slowing influence of drag. NASA s Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate focuses primarily on improving flight efficiency and generally on fluid dynamics, especially the forces of pressure and viscous drag, which are the same for bodies moving through air as for bodies moving through water. Viscous drag is the force of friction that slows down a moving object through a substance, like air or water. NASA uses wind tunnels for fluid dynamics research, studying the forces of friction in gasses and liquids. Pressure forces, according to Langley Research Center s Stephen Wilkinson, dictate the optimal shape and performance of an airplane or other aero/hydro-dynamic body. In both high-speed flight and swimming, says Wilkinson, a thin boundary layer of reduced velocity fluid surrounds the moving body; this layer is about 2 centimeters thick for a swimmer.

  9. Does Polishing a Rifle Bore Reduce Bullet Drag?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-17

    thus lower drag. A Remington 700 5R Mil-Spec chambered in 300 Winchester Magnum was used. The bullets used were a 155.5 grain Berger Fullbore Boat...drag on the bullets. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Ballistic coefficient, aerodynamic drag, rifle bore, bore polishing, Remington 700 5R 16. SECURITY...A Remington 700 5R Mil-Spec chambered in 300 Winchester Magnum was used. The bullets used were a 155.5 grain Berger Fullbore Boat Tail and a 125

  10. Flow drag and heat transfer characteristics of drag-reducing nanofluids with CuO nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping-Yang; Wang, Xue-Jiao; Liu, Zhen-Hua

    2017-02-01

    A new kind of aqueous CuO nanofluid with drag-reducing performance was developed. The new working fluid was an aqueous CTAC (cetyltrimethyl ammonium chloride) solution with CuO nanoparticles added and has both special effects of drag-reducing and heat transfer enhancement. An experiment was carried out to investigate the forced convective flow and heat transfer characteristics of conventional drag reducing fluid (aqueous CTAC solution) and the new drag-reducing nanofluid in a test tube with an inner diameter of 25.6 mm. Results indicated that there were no obvious differences of the drag-reducing characteristics between conventional drag reducing fluid and new drag-reducing nanofluid. However, their heat transfer characteristics were obvious different. The heat transfer characteristics of the new drag-reducing nanofluid significantly depend on the liquid temperature, the nanoparticle concentration and the CTAC concentration. The heat transfer enhancement technology of nanofluid could be applied to solve the problem of heat transfer deterioration for conventional drag-reducing fluids.

  11. Flow drag and heat transfer characteristics of drag-reducing nanofluids with CuO nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping-Yang; Wang, Xue-Jiao; Liu, Zhen-Hua

    2016-05-01

    A new kind of aqueous CuO nanofluid with drag-reducing performance was developed. The new working fluid was an aqueous CTAC (cetyltrimethyl ammonium chloride) solution with CuO nanoparticles added and has both special effects of drag-reducing and heat transfer enhancement. An experiment was carried out to investigate the forced convective flow and heat transfer characteristics of conventional drag reducing fluid (aqueous CTAC solution) and the new drag-reducing nanofluid in a test tube with an inner diameter of 25.6 mm. Results indicated that there were no obvious differences of the drag-reducing characteristics between conventional drag reducing fluid and new drag-reducing nanofluid. However, their heat transfer characteristics were obvious different. The heat transfer characteristics of the new drag-reducing nanofluid significantly depend on the liquid temperature, the nanoparticle concentration and the CTAC concentration. The heat transfer enhancement technology of nanofluid could be applied to solve the problem of heat transfer deterioration for conventional drag-reducing fluids.

  12. Vapor layers reduce drag without the crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakarelski, Ivan; Berry, Joseph; Chan, Derek; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur

    2016-11-01

    The drag of a solid sphere moving in fluid is known to be only a function of the Reynolds number, Re and diminishes rapidly at the drag crisis around Re 3 ×105. A Leidenfrost vapor layer on a hot sphere surface can trigger the onset of the drag crisis at lower Re. By using a range of high viscosity perfluorocarbon liquids, we show that the drag reduction effect, can occur over a wide range of Re, from as low as 600. The Navier slip model with a viscosity dependent slip length captures the observed drag reduction and wake shape.

  13. September 2002 Working Group Meeting on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag: Presentations and Summary of Comments and Conclusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCallen, R

    2002-09-01

    A Working Group Meeting on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag was held at NASA Ames Research Center on September 23, 2002. The purpose of the meeting was to present and discuss technical details on the experimental and computational work in progress and future project plans. Representatives from the Department of Energy (DOE)/Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy/Office of FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), NASA Ames Research Center (NASA), University of Southern California (USC), California Institute of Technology (Caltech), Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Freightliner, and Portland State University participated in the meeting. This report contains the technical presentations (viewgraphs) delivered at the Meeting, briefly summarizes the comments and conclusions, and outlines the future action items. The meeting began with an introduction by the Project Lead Rose McCallen of LLNL, where she emphasized that the world energy consumption is predicted to relatively soon exceed the available resources (i.e., fossil, hydro, non-breeder fission). This short fall is predicted to begin around the year 2050. Minimizing vehicle aerodynamic drag will significantly reduce our Nation's dependence on foreign oil resources and help with our world-wide fuel shortage. Rose also mentioned that educating the populace and researchers as to our world energy issues is important and that our upcoming United Engineering Foundation (UEF) Conference on ''The Aerodynamics of Heavy Vehicles: Trucks, Busses, and Trains'' was one way our DOE Consortium was doing this. Mentioned were the efforts of Fred Browand from USC in organizing and attracting internationally recognized speakers to the Conference. Rose followed with an overview of the DOE project goals, deliverables, and FY03 activities. The viewgraphs are attached at the end of this

  14. Aerodynamic drag of a transiting sphere by large-scale tomographic-PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terra, W.; Sciacchitano, A.; Scarano, F.

    2017-07-01

    A method is introduced to measure the aerodynamic drag of moving objects such as ground vehicles or athletes in speed sports. Experiments are conducted as proof-of-concept that yield the aerodynamic drag of a sphere towed through a square duct in stagnant air. The drag force is evaluated using large-scale tomographic PIV and invoking the time-average momentum equation within a control volume in a frame of reference moving with the object. The sphere with 0.1 m diameter moves at a velocity of 1.45 m/s, corresponding to a Reynolds number of 10,000. The measurements in the wake of the sphere are conducted at a rate of 500 Hz within a thin volume of approximately 3 × 40 × 40 cubic centimeters. Neutrally buoyant helium-filled soap bubbles are used as flow tracers. The terms composing the drag are related to the flow momentum, the pressure and the velocity fluctuations and they are separately evaluated. The momentum and pressure terms dominate the momentum budget in the near wake up to 1.3 diameters downstream of the model. The pressure term decays rapidly and vanishes within 5 diameters. The term due to velocity fluctuations contributes up to 10% to the drag. The measurements yield a relatively constant value of the drag coefficient starting from 2 diameters downstream of the sphere. At 7 diameters the measurement interval terminates due to the finite length of the duct. Error sources that need to be accounted for are the sphere support wake and blockage effects. The above findings can provide practical criteria for the drag evaluation of generic bluff objects with this measurement technique.

  15. Research on the aerodynamic characteristics of a lift drag hybrid vertical axis wind turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojing Sun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Compared with a drag-type vertical axis wind turbines, one of the greatest advantages for a lift-type vertical axis wind turbines is its higher power coefficient (Cp. However, the lift-type vertical axis wind turbines is not a self-starting turbine as its starting torque is very low. In order to combine the advantage of both the drag-type and the lift-type vertical axis wind turbines, a lift drag hybrid vertical axis wind turbines was designed in this article and its aerodynamics and starting performance was studied in detail with the aid of computational fluid dynamics simulations. Numerical results indicate that the power coefficient of this lift drag hybrid vertical axis wind turbines declines when the distance between its drag-type blades and the center of rotation of the turbine rotor increases, whereas its starting torque can be significantly improved. Studies also show that unlike the lift-type vertical axis wind turbines, this lift drag hybrid-type vertical axis wind turbines could be able to solve the problem of low start-up torque. However, the installation position of the drag blade is very important. If the drag blade is mounted very close to the spindle, the starting torque of the lift drag hybrid-type vertical axis wind turbines may not be improved at all. In addition, it has been found that the power coefficient of the studied vertical axis wind turbines is not as good as expected and possible reasons have been provided in this article after the pressure distribution along the surfaces of the airfoil-shaped blades of the hybrid turbine was analyzed.

  16. July 2004 Working Group Meeting on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag: Presentation, Summary of Comments, and Conclusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCallen, R; Salari, K; Ortega, J; Castellucci, P; Eastwood, C; DeChant, L; Hassan, B; Browand, F; Arcas, D; Ross, J; Heineck, J; Storms, B; Walker, S; Leonard, A; Roy, C; Whitfield, D; Pointer, D; Sofu, T; Englar, R; Funk, R

    2004-08-17

    A Working Group Meeting on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag was held in Portland, Oregon on July 1, 2004. The purpose of the meeting was to provide a summary of achievements, discuss pressing issues, present a general overview of future plans, and to provide a forum for dialogue with the Department of Energy (DOE) and industry representatives. The meeting was held in Portland, because the DOE Aero Team participated in an exclusive session on Heavy Truck Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag at the 34th AIAA Fluid Dynamics Conference and Exhibit in Portland on the morning of July 1st, just preceding our Working Group meeting. Even though the paper session was on the last day of the Conference, the Team presented to a full room of interested attendees.

  17. Moving Model Test of High-Speed Train Aerodynamic Drag Based on Stagnation Pressure Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mingzhi; Du, Juntao; Li, Zhiwei; Huang, Sha; Zhou, Dan

    2017-01-01

    A moving model test method based on stagnation pressure measurements is proposed to measure the train aerodynamic drag coefficient. Because the front tip of a high-speed train has a high pressure area and because a stagnation point occurs in the center of this region, the pressure of the stagnation point is equal to the dynamic pressure of the sensor tube based on the obtained train velocity. The first derivation of the train velocity is taken to calculate the acceleration of the train model ejected by the moving model system without additional power. According to Newton's second law, the aerodynamic drag coefficient can be resolved through many tests at different train speeds selected within a relatively narrow range. Comparisons are conducted with wind tunnel tests and numerical simulations, and good agreement is obtained, with differences of less than 6.1%. Therefore, the moving model test method proposed in this paper is feasible and reliable.

  18. Development of a Kevlar/PMR-15 reduced drag DC-9 nacelle fairing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, R. T.; Hrach, F. J.

    1980-01-01

    The paper describes an advanced composite fairing designed to reduce drag on DC-9 nacelles as a part of the NASA Engine Component Improvement Program. This fairing is the aft enclosure for the thrust reverser actuator system on JT8D engine nacelles and is subjected to a 500 F exhaust flow during the reverse thrust. A reduced-drag configuration was developed by using in-flight tuft surveys for flow visualization in order to identify areas with low-quality flow, and then modifying the aerodynamic lines to improve the flow. A fabrication method for molding the part in an autoclave was developed; this material system is suitable for 500 F. The resultant composite fairing reduces the overall aircraft drag 1% with a weight reduction of 40% when compared with a metal component.

  19. September 2002 Working Group Meeting on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag: Presentations and Summary of Comments and Conclusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCallen, R

    2002-09-01

    A Working Group Meeting on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag was held at NASA Ames Research Center on September 23, 2002. The purpose of the meeting was to present and discuss technical details on the experimental and computational work in progress and future project plans. Representatives from the Department of Energy (DOE)/Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy/Office of FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), NASA Ames Research Center (NASA), University of Southern California (USC), California Institute of Technology (Caltech), Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Freightliner, and Portland State University participated in the meeting. This report contains the technical presentations (viewgraphs) delivered at the Meeting, briefly summarizes the comments and conclusions, and outlines the future action items. The meeting began with an introduction by the Project Lead Rose McCallen of LLNL, where she emphasized that the world energy consumption is predicted to relatively soon exceed the available resources (i.e., fossil, hydro, non-breeder fission). This short fall is predicted to begin around the year 2050. Minimizing vehicle aerodynamic drag will significantly reduce our Nation's dependence on foreign oil resources and help with our world-wide fuel shortage. Rose also mentioned that educating the populace and researchers as to our world energy issues is important and that our upcoming United Engineering Foundation (UEF) Conference on ''The Aerodynamics of Heavy Vehicles: Trucks, Busses, and Trains'' was one way our DOE Consortium was doing this. Mentioned were the efforts of Fred Browand from USC in organizing and attracting internationally recognized speakers to the Conference. Rose followed with an overview of the DOE project goals, deliverables, and FY03 activities. The viewgraphs are attached at the end of this

  20. Development of Drag Reducing Polymer of FDR-SPC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Inwon; Park, Hyun; Chun, Ho Hwan

    2015-11-01

    In this study, a novel FDR-SPC (Frictional Drag Reduction Self-Polishing Copolymer) is first synthesized in this study. The drag reducing functional radical such as PEGMA (Poly(ethylene) glycol methacrylate) has been utilized to participate in the synthesis process of the SPC. The release mechanism of drag reducing radical is accounted for the hydrolysis reaction between the FDR-SPC and seawater. The types of the baseline SPC monomers, the molecular weight and the mole fraction of PEGMA were varied in the synthesis process. The resulting SPCs were coated to the substrate plates for the subsequent hydrodynamic test for skin friction measurement. A significant reduction in Reynolds stress was observed in a range of specimen, with the maximum drag reduction being 15.9% relative to the smooth surface for PRD3-1.

  1. Why fibers are better turbulent drag reducing agents than polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boelens, Arnout; Muthukumar, Murugappan

    2016-11-01

    It is typically found in literature that fibers are not as effective as drag reducing agents as polymers. However, for low concentrations, when adding charged polymers to either distilled or salt water, it is found that polymers showing rod-like behavior are better drag reducing agents than polymers showing coil-like behavior. In this study, using hybrid Direct Numerical Simulation with Langevin dynamics, a comparison is performed between polymer and fiber stress tensors in turbulent flow. The stress tensors are found to be similar, suggesting a common drag reducing mechanism in the onset regime. Since fibers do not have an elastic backbone, this must be a viscous effect. Analysis of the viscosity tensor reveals that all terms are negligible, except the off-diagonal shear viscosity associated with rotation. Based on this analysis, we are able to explain why charged polymers showing rod-like behavior are better drag reducing agents than polymers showing coil-like behavior. Additionally, we identify the rotational orientation time as the unifying time scale setting a new time criterion for drag reduction by both flexible polymers and rigid fibers. This research was supported by NSF Grant No. DMR-1404940 and AFOSR Grant No. FA9550-14-1-0164.

  2. Study of the triple-mass Tethered Satellite System under aerodynamic drag and J2 perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzaghi, Pourya; Assadian, Nima

    2015-11-01

    The dynamics of multi-tethered satellite formations consisting of three masses are studied in this paper. The triple-mass triple-tethered satellite system is modeled under the low Earth orbit perturbations of drag and Earth's oblateness and its equilibrium conditions are derived. It is modeled as three equal end-masses connected by a uniform-mass straight tether. The lengths of tethers are supposed to be constant and in this manner the angles of the plane consisting the masses are taken as the state variables of the system. The governing equations of motion are derived using Lagrangian approach. The aerodynamic drag perturbation is expressed as an external non-conservative force and the Earth oblateness (J2 perturbation) is considered as a term of potential energy. The equilibrium conditions of this system are found and their stability is investigated through the linear stability theory. Then, the results are verified by using a nonlinear simulation for three types of equilibrium conditions.

  3. Aerodynamic Improvements of an Empty Timber Truck can Have the Potential of Significantly Reducing Fuel Consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Magnus; Marashi, Seyedeh Sepideh; Karlsson, Matts

    2012-11-01

    In the present study, aerodynamic drag (AD) has been estimated for an empty and a fully loaded conceptual timber truck (TT) using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). The increasing fuel prices have challenged heavy duty vehicle (HDV) manufactures to strive for better fuel economy, by e.g. utilizing drag reducing external devices. Despite this knowledge, the TT fleets seem to be left in the dark. Like HDV aerodynamics, similarities can be observed as a large low pressure wake is formed behind the tractor (unloaded) and downstream of the trailer (full load) thus generating AD. As TTs travel half the time without any cargo, focus on drag reduction is important. The full scaled TTs where simulated using the realizable k-epsilon model with grid adaption techniques for mesh independence. Our results indicate that a loaded TT reduces the AD significantly as both wake size and turbulence kinetic energy are lowered. In contrast to HDV the unloaded TTs have a much larger design space available for possible drag reducing devices, e.g. plastic wrapping and/or flaps. This conceptual CFD study has given an indication of the large AD difference between the unloaded and fully loaded TT, showing the potential for significant AD improvements.

  4. Aerodynamic drag reduction tests on a full-scale tractor-trailer combination with several add-on devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montoya, L.C.; Steers, L.L.

    1974-12-01

    Aerodynamic drag tests were performed on a conventional cab-over-engine tractor with a 45-foot trailer and five commercially available or potentially available add-on devices using the coast-down method. The tests ranged in velocity from approximately 30 miles per hour to 65 miles per hour and included some flow visualization. A smooth, level runway at Edwards Air Force Base was used for the tests, and deceleration measurements were taken with both accelerometers and stopwatches. An evaluation of the drag reduction results obtained with each of the five add-on devices is presented.

  5. The effect of plasma actuator on the depreciation of the aerodynamic drag on box model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harinaldi, Budiarso, Julian, James; Rabbani M., N.

    2016-06-01

    Recent active control research advances have provided many benefits some of which in the field of transportation by land, sea as well as by air. Flow engineering by using active control has proven advantages in energy saving significantly. One of the active control equipment that is being developed, especially in the 21st century, is a plasma actuator, with the ability to modify the flow of fluid by the approach of ion particles makes these actuators a very powerful and promising tool. This actuator can be said to be better to the previously active control such as suction, blowing and synthetic jets because it is easier to control, more flexible because it has no moving parts, easy to be manufactured and installed, and consumes a small amount of energy with maximum capability. Plasma actuator itself is the composition of a material composed of copper and a dielectric sheet, where the copper sheets act as an electricity conductor and the dielectric sheet as electricity insulator. Products from the plasma actuators are ion wind which is the result of the suction of free air around the actuator to the plasma zone. This study investigates the ability of plasma actuators in lowering aerodynamic drag which is commonly formed in the models of vehicles by varying the shape of geometry models and the flow speed.

  6. A coating of passively oscillating flexible cilia to reduce drag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revell, Alistair; Harwood, Adrian; O'Connor, Joseph; Sanchez, Jonathan; Favier, Julien

    2016-11-01

    We present results related to the reduction of wake drag by the coordinated action of a layer of passively oscillating flexible cilia. Inspired by the pop-up of bird feathers, this configuration is shown to self-adapt to the surrounding flow, leading to a stabilization of the wake, a reduction of the mean drag and of lift oscillations. The study is performed using Lattice Boltzmann method, coupled to a recent version of the immersed boundary method. We will present the physical analysis of the coupling between multiple beating cilia and an incoming fluid flow. The modal behaviour of the cilia dynamics will be discussed, as well as their effect on an archetype of unsteady separated boundary layer (first the oscillating channel flow and then the circular cylinder). In the latter case results demonstrate an optimal drag occurs for a particular stiffness, compared to the control case where the same cilia are fixed. It appears that the optimal results are due to a reconfiguration of the elastic coating according to the local vorticity of the flow, and a frequency lock-in, which leads to more stable wake and reduced drag. The structural parameters of the layer will be varied. Results from the PEL-SKIN project: funded by EU Grant #334954.

  7. The BMW analytic aerodynamic drag method for the Vinti satellite theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, J. S.; Mistretta, G. D.; Bonavito, N. L.

    1972-01-01

    In order to retain separability in the Vinti theory of earth satellite motion when a non conservative force such as air drag is considered, a set of variational equations for the orbital elements are introduced, and expressed as functions of the transverse, radial, and normal components of the nonconservative forces acting on the system. In particular, the atmospheric density profile is written as a fitted exponential function of the eccentric anomaly, which reproduces tabular values of static model atmospheric densities at all altitudes to within ninety-eight percent and simultaneously reduces the variational equations to indefinite integrals with closed form evaluations, whose limits are in terms of the eccentric anomaly. The values of the limits for any arbitrary time interval are obtained from the Vinti program. Results of the BMW (Bonavito, Mistretta, Watson) theory for the case of the intense air drag satellites San Marco-2 and Air Force Cannonball are given. These results indicate that the satellite ephemerides produced by the BMW theory in conjunction with the Vinti program are of very high accuracy. In addition, since the program is entirely analytic, several months of ephemerides can be obtained within a few seconds of computer time.

  8. Aerodynamic Drag Analysis of 3-DOF Flex-Gimbal GyroWheel System in the Sense of Ground Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Huo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available GyroWheel is an innovative device that combines the actuating capabilities of a control moment gyro with the rate sensing capabilities of a tuned rotor gyro by using a spinning flex-gimbal system. However, in the process of the ground test, the existence of aerodynamic disturbance is inevitable, which hinders the improvement of the specification performance and control accuracy. A vacuum tank test is a possible candidate but is sometimes unrealistic due to the substantial increase in costs and complexity involved. In this paper, the aerodynamic drag problem with respect to the 3-DOF flex-gimbal GyroWheel system is investigated by simulation analysis and experimental verification. Concretely, the angular momentum envelope property of the spinning rotor system is studied and its integral dynamical model is deduced based on the physical configuration of the GyroWheel system with an appropriately defined coordinate system. In the sequel, the fluid numerical model is established and the model geometries are checked with FLUENT software. According to the diversity and time-varying properties of the rotor motions in three-dimensions, the airflow field around the GyroWheel rotor is analyzed by simulation with respect to its varying angular velocity and tilt angle. The IPC-based experimental platform is introduced, and the properties of aerodynamic drag in the ground test condition are obtained through comparing the simulation with experimental results.

  9. May 2003 Working Group Meeting on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag: Presentations and Summary of Comments and Conclusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCallen, R; Salari, K; Ortega, J; Browand, F; Hammache, M; Hsu, T Y; Arcas, D; Leoard, A; Chatelain, P; Rubel, M; Roy, C; DeChant, L; Hassan, B; Ross, J; Satran, D; Walker, S; Heineck, J T; Englar, R; Pointer, D; Sofu, T

    2003-05-01

    A Working Group Meeting on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag was held at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory on May 29-30, 2003. The purpose of the meeting was to present and discuss suggested guidance and direction for the design of drag reduction devices determined from experimental and computational studies. Representatives from the Department of Energy (DOE)/Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy/Office of FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), NASA Ames Research Center (NASA), University of Southern California (USC), California Institute of Technology (Caltech), Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Clarkson University, and PACCAR participated in the meeting. This report contains the technical presentations (viewgraphs) delivered at the Meeting, briefly summarizes the comments and conclusions, provides some highlighted items, and outlines the future action items.

  10. March 2001 Working Group Meeting on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag: Presentations and Summary of Comments and Conclusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenman, R; Dunn, T; Owens, J; Laskowski, G; Flowers, D; Browand, F; Knight, A; Hammache, M; Leoard, A; Rubel, M; Salari, K; Rutledge, W; Ross, J; Satran, D; Heineck, J T; Walker, S; Driver, D; Storms, B

    2001-05-14

    A Working Group Meeting on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag was held at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory on March 28 and 29, 2001. The purpose of the meeting was to present and discuss technical details on the experimental and computational work in progress and future project plans. Due to the large participation from industry and other research organizations, a large portion of the meeting (all of the first day and part of the second day) was devoted to the presentation and discussion of industry's perspective and work being done by other organizations on the demonstration of commercial software and the demonstration of a drag reduction device. This report contains the technical presentations (viewgraphs) delivered at the Meeting, briefly summarizes the comments and conclusions, and outlines the future action items.

  11. The 'W' prawn-trawl with emphasised drag-force transfer to its centre line to reduce overall system drag.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheslav Balash

    Full Text Available For prawn trawling systems, drag reduction is a high priority as the trawling process is energy intensive. Large benefits have occurred through the use of multiple-net rigs and thin twine in the netting. An additional positive effect of these successful twine-area reduction strategies is the reduced amount of otter board area required to spread the trawl systems, which leads to further drag reduction. The present work investigated the potential of redirecting the drag-strain within a prawn trawl away from the wings and the otter boards to the centre line of the trawl, where top and bottom tongues have been installed, with an aim to minimise the loading/size of the otter boards required to spread the trawl. In the system containing the new 'W' trawl, the drag redirected to the centre-line tongues is transferred forward through a connected sled and towing wires to the trawler. To establish the extent of drag redirection to the centre-line tongues and the relative drag benefits of the new trawl system, conventional and 'W' trawls of 3.65 m headline length were tested firstly over a range of spread ratios in the flume tank, and subsequently at optimum spread ratio in the field. The developed 'W' trawl effectively directed 64% of netting-drag off the wings and onto the centre tongues, which resulted in drag savings in the field of ∼20% for the associated 'W' trawl/otter-board/sled system compared to the traditional trawl/otter-board arrangement in a single trawl or twin rig configuration. Furthermore, based on previously published data, the new trawl when used in a twin rig system is expected to provide approximately 12% drag reduction compared to quad rig. The twin 'W' trawl system also has benefits over quad rig in that a reduced number of cod-end/By-catch Reduction Device units need to be installed and attended each tow.

  12. April 2002 Working Group Meeting on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag: Presentations and Summary of Comments and Conclusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salari, K; Dunn, T; Ortega, J; Yen-Nakafuji, D; Browand, F; Arcas, D; Jammache, M; Leoard, A; Chatelain, P; Rubel, M; Rutledge, W; McWherter-Payne, M; Roy, Ca; Ross, J; Satran, D; Heineck, J T; Storms, B; Pointer, D; Sofu, T; Weber, D; Chu, E; Hancock, P; Bundy, B; Englar, B

    2002-08-22

    A Working Group Meeting on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag was held at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory on April 3 and 4, 2002. The purpose of the meeting was to present and discuss technical details on the experimental and computational work in progress and future project plans. Representatives from the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Transportation Technology Office of Heavy Vehicle Technology (OHVT), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), NASA Ames Research Center, University of Southern California (USC), and California Institute of Technology (Caltech), Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI), and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Volvo Trucks, and Freightliner Trucks presented and participated in discussions. This report contains the technical presentations (viewgraphs) delivered at the Meeting, briefly summarizes the comments and conclusions, and outlines the future action items.

  13. Reduced order modeling of steady flows subject to aerodynamic constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimmermann, Ralf; Vendl, Alexander; Goertz, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    A novel reduced-order modeling method based on proper orthogonal decomposition for predicting steady, turbulent flows subject to aerodynamic constraints is introduced. Model-order reduction is achieved by replacing the governing equations of computational fluid dynamics with a nonlinear weighted ...

  14. Aerodynamic Shutoff Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstman, Raymond H.

    1992-01-01

    Aerodynamic flow achieved by adding fixed fairings to butterfly valve. When valve fully open, fairings align with butterfly and reduce wake. Butterfly free to turn, so valve can be closed, while fairings remain fixed. Design reduces turbulence in flow of air in internal suction system. Valve aids in development of improved porous-surface boundary-layer control system to reduce aerodynamic drag. Applications primarily aerospace. System adapted to boundary-layer control on high-speed land vehicles.

  15. Invariant Type-B characteristics of drag-reducing microalgal biopolymer solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasljevic, K.; Hall, K.; Chapman, D.; Matthys, E. F.

    2017-05-01

    The drag-reducing properties of polysaccharides from marine microalgae were investigated. They were compared to two drag-reducing additives studied extensively in the past, synthetic poly(ethylene) oxide, one of the most effective drag-reducing additives; and Xanthan Gum, another biopolymer often considered a model polymer for chemical and rheological research. Compared to Xanthan Gum, the most effective polymers from our microalgae show a higher drag-reducing efficiency in terms of necessary concentration to achieve a given level of drag reduction. In addition, they show a striking Type-B drag reduction behavior, which may be a very useful quality in most drag reduction applications, thanks to the independence of the drag reduction level on flow conditions such as velocity, shear stress, and tube diameter. With these polymers from microalgae we did not see evidence of Type-A behavior over the wide range of conditions studied (including pipe diameters up to 52 mm). Importantly, this suggests that the Drag Reduction coefficient in pipe flow for ideal drag-reducing solutions such as the polysaccharides investigated here is invariant at a given additive concentration of flow or solution parameters like ionic strength and can be used as a solution property to predict its drag reduction effectiveness over a wide range of conditions. On the contrary, Xanthan Gum showed evidence of both Type-A behavior in large diameter pipes and Type-B behavior in smaller ones. The polymers from microalgae also showed high resistance to degradation. Considering that these microalgae are very effective producers of polysaccharides (both extracellular and intracellular), they appear to be very promising additives for drag reduction applications.

  16. Aerodynamic Drag Reduction Technologies Testing of Heavy-Duty Vocational Vehicles and a Dry Van Trailer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragatz, Adam [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Thornton, Matthew [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-10-01

    This study focused on two accepted methods for quantifying the benefit of aerodynamic improvement technologies on vocational vehicles: the coastdown technique, and on-road constant speed fuel economy measurements. Both techniques have their advantages. Coastdown tests are conducted over a wide range in speed and allow the rolling resistance and aerodynamic components of road load force to be separated. This in turn allows for the change in road load and fuel economy to be estimated at any speed, as well as over transient cycles. The on-road fuel economy measurements only supply one lumped result, applicable at the specific test speed, but are a direct measurement of fuel usage and are therefore used in this study as a check on the observed coastdown results. Resulting coefficients were then used to populate a vehicle model and simulate expected annual fuel savings over real-world vocational drive cycles.

  17. Experimental Results of Winglets on First, Second, and Third Generation Jet Transports. [to reduce drag coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flechner, S. G.; Jacobs, P. F.

    1978-01-01

    Results of wind tunnel investigations of four jet transport configurations representing both narrow and wide-body configurations and also a future advanced aerodynamic configuration are presented including performance and wing root bending moment data. The effects of winglets on the aerodynamic characteristics throughout the flight envelope were studied. The results indicate that winglets improved the cruise lift to drag ratio between 4 and 8 percent, depending on the transport configuration. The data also indicate that ratios of relative aerodynamic gain to relative structural weight penalty for winglets are 1.5 to 2.5 times those for wing-tip extensions. Over the complete range of flight conditions, winglets produce no adverse effects on buffet onset, lateral-directional stability, and aileron control effectiveness.

  18. Aerodynamics Research Revolutionizes Truck Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    During the 1970s and 1980s, researchers at Dryden Flight Research Center conducted numerous tests to refine the shape of trucks to reduce aerodynamic drag and improved efficiency. During the 1980s and 1990s, a team based at Langley Research Center explored controlling drag and the flow of air around a moving body. Aeroserve Technologies Ltd., of Ottawa, Canada, with its subsidiary, Airtab LLC, in Loveland, Colorado, applied the research from Dryden and Langley to the development of the Airtab vortex generator. Airtabs create two counter-rotating vortices to reduce wind resistance and aerodynamic drag of trucks, trailers, recreational vehicles, and many other vehicles.

  19. The role of aerodynamic drag in propagation of interplanetary coronal mass ejections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vršnak, B.; Žic, T.; Falkenberg, Thea Vilstrup;

    2010-01-01

    Context. The propagation of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) and the forecast of their arrival on Earth is one of the central issues of space weather studies. Aims. We investigate to which degree various ICME parameters (mass, size, take-off speed) and the ambient solar-wind paramete...... streams. We apply the model to the Sun-Earth event associated with the CME of 25 July 2004 and compare the results with the outcome of the numerical MHD modeling....... (density and velocity) affect the ICME Sun-Earth transit time. Methods. We study solutions of a drag-based equation of motion by systematically varying the input parameters. The analysis is focused on ICME transit times and 1 AU velocities. Results. The model results reveal that wide ICMEs of low masses...

  20. March 2000 Working Group Meeting on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic DragL Presentations and Summary of Comments and Conclusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCallen, R.; Flowers, D.; Dunn, T.; Owens, J.; Browand, F.; Hammache, M.; Loenard, A.; Brady, M.; Salari, K.; Rutledge, W.; Scheckler, R.; Ross, J.; Storms, B.; Heineck, J.T.; Arledge, T

    2000-05-15

    A Working Group Meeting on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag was held at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory on March 16, 2000. The purpose of the meeting was to present technical details on the experimental and computational plans and approaches and provide an update on progress in the analysis of experimental results, model developments, simulations, and an investigation of an aerodynamic device. The focus of the meeting was a review of University of Southern California's (USC) experimental plans and results, NASA Ames experimental plans, the computational results from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for the integrated tractor-trailer benchmark geometry called the Ground Transportation System (GTS) Model, and turbulence model development and benchmark simulation for a rounded cube from California Institute of Technology (Caltech). Much of the meeting discussion involved deficiencies in commercial software, needed modeling improvements, and the importance of detailed data for code validation. The present and projected budget and funding situation was also discussed. Presentations were given by representatives from the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Transportation Technology Office of Heavy Vehicle Technology (OHVT), LLNL, SNL, NASA Ames, USC, and Caltech. Representatives from Argonne National Laboratory also participated via telephone. This report contains the technical presentations (viewgraphs) delivered at the Meeting, briefly summarizes the comments and conclusions, and outlines the future action items. There were 3 major issues raised at the meeting. (1) Our funding is inadequate to satisfy industries request for high Reynolds number experimentation and computation. Plans are to respond to the DOD and DOE requests for proposals, which require a 50-50 cost share with industry, to acquire funding for high Reynolds number experiments at NASA Ames. (2) The deficiencies in commercial software, the

  1. Kevlar/PMR-15 reduced drag DC-9 reverser stang fairing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, R. T.

    1982-01-01

    A reduced drag fairing for the afterbody enclosing the thrust reverser actuators on the DC-9 has been developed with Kevlar-49/PMR-15 advanced composite material. The improved fairing reduces airplane drag 1% compared to the production baseline. Use of composites reduces weight 40% compared to an equivalent metal fairing. The Kevlar-49/PMR-15 advanced composite is an organic matrix material system that can be used at temperatures up to 500 F.

  2. Improving the durability of a drag-reducing nanocoating by enhancing its mechanical stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Mengjiao; Zhang, Songsong; Dong, Hongyu; Han, Shihui; Wei, Hao; Shi, Feng

    2015-02-25

    The durability of superhydrophobic surface is a major problem to restrict industrial application of superhydrophobic materials from laboratory research, which can be attributed to a more general issue of mechanical stability for superhydrophobic coatings. Therefore, in order to handle this issue, we have fabricated a mechanically stable drag-reducing coating composed of elastic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and hydrophobic copper particles on model ships, which can resist mechanical abrasion and has displayed a durable drag-reducing effect. In comparison with normal Au superhydrophobic coatings, the as-prepared PDMS/copper coatings showed durable drag reduction performance with a similar drag-reducing rate before (26%) and after (24%) mechanical abrasion. The mechanism for the enhanced mechanical stability and maintained drag reduction of the superhydrophobic surfaces was investigated through characterizations of surface morphology, surface wettability, and water adhesive force evaluation before and after abrasion. This is the first demonstration to realize the application of durable drag reduction by improving the mechanical stability of superhydrophobic coatings. We do believe that superhydrophobic surfaces with good resistance to mechanical abrasion or scratching may draw wide attention and gain significant applications with durable drag-reducing properties.

  3. March 1999 working group meeting on heavy vehicle aerodynamic drag: presentations and summary of comments and conclusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brady, M; Browand, F; McCallen, R; Ross, J; Salari, K

    1999-03-01

    A Working Group Meeting on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag was held at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California on March 11, 1999. The purpose of the meeting was to present technical details on the experimental and computational plans and approaches and provide an update on progress in obtaining experimental results, model developments, and simulations. The focus of the meeting was a review of the experimental results for the integrated tractor-trailer benchmark geometry called the Sandia Model in the NASA Ames 7 ft x 10 ft wind tunnel. The present and projected budget and funding situation was also discussed. Presentations were given by representatives from the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Transportation Technology Office of Heavy Vehicle Technology (OHVT), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), University of Southern California (USC), California Institute of Technology (Caltech), and NASA Ames Research Center.This report contains the technical presentations (viewgraphs) delivered at the Meeting, briefly summarizes the comments and conclusions, and outlines the future action items.

  4. Preparation of microencapsulated α-olefin drag reducing polymer used in oil pipeline transportation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Bing; Xing, Wenguo; Dong, Guilin; Chen, Xiangjun; Zhou, Ningning; Qin, Zhanbo; Zhang, Changqiao

    2011-01-01

    Microcapsules containing oil drag-reducing polymer particles were prepared by melting-scattering and condensing of polyethylene wax, in-situ polymerization of urea and formaldehyde, and interfacial...

  5. Grafted natural polymer as new drag reducing agent: An experimental approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulbari Hayder A.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation introduces a new natural drag reducing agent which has the ability to improve the flow in pipelines carrying aqueous or hydrocarbon liquids in turbulent flow. Okra (Abelmoschus esculentus mucilage drag reduction performance was tested in water and hydrocarbon (gas-oil media after grafting. The drag reduction test was conducted in a buildup closed loop liquid circulation system consists of two pipes 0.0127 and 0.0381 m Inside Diameter (ID, four testing sections in each pipe (0.5 to 2.0 m, tank, pump and pressure transmitters. Reynolds number (Re, additive concentration and the transported media type (water and gas-oil, were the major drag reduction variables investigated. The experimental results show that, new additive drag reduction ability is high with maximum percentage of drag reduction (%Dr up to 60% was achieved. The experimental results showed that the drag reduction ability increased by increasing the additive concentration. The %Dr was found to increase by increasing the Re by using the water-soluble additive while it was found to decrease by increasing the Re when using the oil-soluble additive. The %Dr was higher in the 0.0381 m ID pipe. Finally, the grafted and natural mucilage showed high resistance to shear forces when circulated continuously for 200 seconds in the closed-loop system.

  6. Active Drag-Reducing Technique Using Bumps on Transonic Wings%跨音速机翼采用鼓包主动减阻技术研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Research on shock wave drag-reducing using two dimensional and three dimensional bumps is performed, including comparisons on wings of large aircraft. The mechanism of bump drag-reducing is researched via supercritical airfoil profile, and geometrical shape and location of bump are optimized. The research results show that location, shape and serial distribution of bump have significant effects on drag-reducing for wings. Finally, the drag-reducing technique using bumps is applied to the large aircraft. As a result, the presented technique reduces shock wave drag to a great extent, increases the ratio of lift to drag, and improves aerodynamic efficiency of the aircraft.%对二维、三维鼓包进行激波控制减阻,并在大型客机的机翼上进行了对比研究。在研究鼓包减阻的机理时,采用了超临界翼型,鼓包的几何形状及鼓包位置的优化也进行了研究。研究结果表明,鼓包位置、形状及串列式分布对机翼的减阻影响较大。最后把得到的研究结果应用到大型飞机的激波减阻上,结果表明,该方法能较大程度地减小激波阻力,进而提高飞机的升阻比,提高飞机的气动效率。

  7. Application Research on Drag Reduced Conductors for Electric Power Transmission Lines in Strong Wind Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Dong Qing

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The breeze vibration duration of conductors is long, the vibration amplitude is strong and the frequency range is wide for electric power transmission lines in strong wind areas, which seriously affects the safe and stable operation of transmission lines. There are two design schemes of conductors which can achieve the purpose of reducing wind-induced disaster. One is enhancing the structural strength of conductors to withstand wind load, but the investment is enormous and the effect is limited. The other is developing drag reduced conductors to reduce wind load by changing conductor structure. This paper started from application feasibility analysis of drag reduced conductors and designed four drag reduced conductors by structure optimization of the conventional aluminium conductor steel reinforced JL/G1A-630/45-45/7, denoted as DFY630/45(45°-R3.5, DFY630/45(60°-R3.5, DFY630/45(45°–R3.2 and DFY630/45(60°-R3.2, respectively. The wind tunnel test was performed and the wind resistance coefficients in unit length of five conductors were compared. Result showed that the wind resistance coefficients in unit length of four drag reduced conductors were obviously lower than that of the conventional conductor. By controlling the manufacturing process, popularization and application of drag reduced conductors for transmission lines in strong wind areas can be realized.

  8. Influence of wind on aerodynamic drag for the second case of the arrangement of the equipment on the LE 060EA locomotive bodywork

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorin ARSENE

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The electric power supply equipment of electric railways vehicles of surface is placed on the their body. The arrangement of the equipment on the vehicle body determines the variation of the aerodynamic drag. The gusts of wind occurring during the vehicle movement result in additional requests. The case of the locomotive of type LE 060 EA 5100kW moving with the second driving position is analyzed in this paper. For this particular case the components ensemble of the power supply system was geometric modelled in 3D format at 1:1 scale. The resulted model was placed in air flow simulation software to determine the aerodynamic resistance. The wind influence is analyzed for five point values of its speed. The wind direction is simulated by eight point values of the angle that it makes to the longitudinal axis of the vehicle.

  9. Stochastic Modeling of Lift and Drag Dynamics to Obtain Aerodynamic Forces with Local Dynamics on Rotor Blade under Unsteady Wind Inflow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ramzan Luhur

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This contribution provides the development of a stochastic lift and drag model for an airfoil FX 79-W-151A under unsteady wind inflow based on wind tunnel measurements. Here we present the integration of the stochastic model into a well-known standard BEM (Blade Element Momentum model to obtain the corresponding aerodynamic forces on a rotating blade element. The stochastic model is integrated as an alternative to static tabulated data used by classical BEM. The results show that in comparison to classical BEM, the BEM with stochastic approach additionally reflects the local force dynamics and therefore provides more information on aerodynamic forces that can be used by wind turbine simulation codes

  10. Tomographic PIV investigation on coherent vortex structures over shark-skin-inspired drag-reducing riblets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shao-Qiong; Li, Shan; Tian, Hai-Ping; Wang, Qing-Yi; Jiang, Nan

    2016-04-01

    Nature has shown us that the microstructure of the skin of fast-swimming sharks in the ocean can reduce the skin friction drag due to the well-known shark-skin effect. In the present study, the effect of shark-skin-inspired riblets on coherent vortex structures in a turbulent boundary layer (TBL) is investigated. This is done by means of tomographic particle image velocimetry (TPIV) measurements in channel flows over an acrylic plate of drag-reducing riblets at a friction Reynolds number of 190. The turbulent flows over drag-reducing riblets are verified by a planar time-resolved particle image velocimetry (TRPIV) system initially, and then the TPIV measurements are performed. Two-dimensional (2D) experimental results with a drag-reduction rate of around 4.81 % are clearly visible over triangle riblets with a peak-to-peak spacing s+ of 14, indicating from the drag-reducing performance that the buffer layer within the TBL has thickened; the logarithmic law region has shifted upward and the Reynolds shear stress decreased. A comparison of the spatial topological distributions of the spanwise vorticity of coherent vortex structures extracted at different wall-normal heights through the improved quadrant splitting method shows that riblets weaken the amplitudes of the spanwise vorticity when ejection (Q2) and sweep (Q4) events occur at the near wall, having the greatest effect on Q4 events in particular. The so-called quadrupole statistical model for coherent structures in the whole TBL is verified. Meanwhile, their spatial conditional-averaged topological shapes and the spatial scales of quadrupole coherent vortex structures as a whole in the overlying turbulent flow over riblets are changed, suggesting that the riblets dampen the momentum and energy exchange between the regions of near-wall and outer portion of the TBL by depressing the bursting events (Q2 and Q4), thereby reducing the skin friction drag.

  11. Studies of Aerodynamic Drag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-01

    viscosity, but because of its involvement in the determination of other important physical constants. A good example is Millikan’s classic oil drop ...apparatus was made by Bearden (1939) with a specific interest in the oil drop experiment. This configuration is probably the simplest from the point...34-f F5 drop to zero at the surface, i.e. ui= 0. This new boundary condition is known as the "no slip" condition, and holds provided that the mean

  12. Drag-Reducing Agent for Aqueous Liquid Flowing in Turbulent Mode through Pipelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainab Y. Shnain

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, mucilage was extracted from Malabar spinach and tested for drag-reducing properties in aqueous liquids flowing through pipelines. Friction produced by liquids flowing in turbulent mode through pipelines increase power consumption. Drag-reducing agents (DRA such as polymers, suspended solids and surfactants are used to reduce power losses. There is a demand for natural, biodegradable DRA and mucilage is emerging as an attractive alternative to conventional DRAs. Literature review revealed that very little research has been done on the drag-reducing properties of this mucilage and there is an opportunity to explore the potential applications of mucilage from Malabar spinach. An experimental piping rig was used to study the DR properties of the mucilage on water under the effect of varying pipe dimensions and mucilage concentrations. It is shown that these additives can dramatically reduce friction drag provided that the flow is occurring under turbulent conditions. Experimental results also show that DR increases when the mucilage concentration increases.

  13. Application and numerical simulation research on biomimetic drag-reducing technology for gas pipelining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Deyuan; Luo Yuehao; Chen Huawei [Beihang Univ., Beijing (China). School of Mechanical Engineering and Automation

    2011-06-15

    For the purpose of increasing the transmission capacity of gas pipelines, the internal coating technology has been vastly put into application, and a remarkable benefit has been achieved so far. However, with the reduction of wall roughness, the small convex parts are all completely submerged in the viscous sublayer, the gas pipeline becomes a 'hydraulic smooth pipe', even by smoothing the coating surface further, it is difficult to reduce wall friction. Therefore, in order to increase the transportation capacity on the basis of internal coating, the new methods and technologies should be researched and investigated, and perhaps, the biomimetic drag-reducing technology is a good approach. In this paper, according to the planning parameters of the second pipeline of the West-to-East gas transmission project, the best drag reducing effect grooves are calculated and designed, and based on the characteristics and properties of internal coating (AW-01 epoxy resin), the Pre-Cured Micro- Rolling Technology (PCMRT) is discussed and presented, the rolling equipment is also designed and analyzed, the rolling process can be easily added on the available production line. Aiming at the field operating parameters of the gas pipeline in China, and the drag-reducing effect of the grooved surface is analyzed and discussed comprehensively. In addition, the economic benefit of adopting the biomimetic drag reduction technology is investigated. (orig.)

  14. Elytra boost lift, but reduce aerodynamic efficiency in flying beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, L Christoffer; Engel, Sophia; Baird, Emily; Dacke, Marie; Muijres, Florian T; Hedenström, Anders

    2012-10-07

    Flying insects typically possess two pairs of wings. In beetles, the front pair has evolved into short, hardened structures, the elytra, which protect the second pair of wings and the abdomen. This allows beetles to exploit habitats that would otherwise cause damage to the wings and body. Many beetles fly with the elytra extended, suggesting that they influence aerodynamic performance, but little is known about their role in flight. Using quantitative measurements of the beetle's wake, we show that the presence of the elytra increases vertical force production by approximately 40 per cent, indicating that they contribute to weight support. The wing-elytra combination creates a complex wake compared with previously studied animal wakes. At mid-downstroke, multiple vortices are visible behind each wing. These include a wingtip and an elytron vortex with the same sense of rotation, a body vortex and an additional vortex of the opposite sense of rotation. This latter vortex reflects a negative interaction between the wing and the elytron, resulting in a single wing span efficiency of approximately 0.77 at mid downstroke. This is lower than that found in birds and bats, suggesting that the extra weight support of the elytra comes at the price of reduced efficiency.

  15. Influence of hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces on reducing aerodynamic insect residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, K. Ghokulla; Milionis, Athanasios; Loth, Eric; Farrell, Thomas E.; Crouch, Jeffrey D.; Berry, Douglas H.

    2017-01-01

    Insect fouling during takeoff, climb and landing can result in increased drag and fuel consumption for aircrafts with laminar-flow surfaces. This study investigates the effectiveness of various hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces in reducing residue of insects on an aerodynamic surface at relatively high impact speeds (about 45 m/s). An experimental setup consisting of a wind tunnel and a method to inject live flightless fruit flies was used to test the effectiveness of various surfaces against insect fouling. Insect fouling was analyzed based on residue area and height from multiple impacts. In general most of the residue area was due to the hemolymph spreading while most of the residue height was due to adhesion of exoskeleton parts. Hydrophobic and especially superhydrophobic surfaces performed better than a hydrophilic aluminum surface in terms of minimizing the residue area of various insect components (exoskeleton, hemolymph, and red fluid). Surfaces with reduced wettability and short lateral length scales tended to have the smallest residue area. Residue height was not as strongly influenced by surface wettability since even a single exoskeleton adhered to the surface upon impact was enough to produce a residue height of the order of one mm. In general, the results indicate that hemolymph spread needs to be avoided (e.g. by having reduced wettability and short lateral correlation lengths) in order to minimize the residue area, while exoskeleton adherence needs to be avoided (e.g. by having oleophobic properties and micro/nano roughness) in order to minimize the residue height. In particular, two of the superhydrophobic coatings produced substantial reduction in residue height and area, relative to the baseline surface of aluminum. However, the surfaces also showed poor mechanical durability on the high-speed insect impact location. This suggests that although low wettability materials show great insect anti-fouling behavior, their durability needs to

  16. Speeding-up the computation of high-lift aerodynamics using a residual-based reduced-order model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mifsud, M.; Zimmermann, R.; Goertz, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we propose a strategy for speeding-up the computation of the aerodynamics of industrial high-lift configurations using a residual-based reduced-order model (ROM). The ROM is based on the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) of a set of solutions to the Navier–Stokes equations...... is augmented with the latest CFD computed flow solution. Using this strategy, a considerable reduction in the total number of iterations to reach the converged steady-state solution is achieved when compared with conventional computational techniques used in industry for a series of computations such as drag...... governing fluid flow at different parameter values, from which a set of orthogonal basis vectors is evaluated. By considering an initial set of few snapshots at different angles of attack, a ROM is constructed which is used to predict a solution at an angle of attack which is just outside the space spanned...

  17. Bio-replicated forming of the biomimetic drag-reducing surfaces in large area based on shark skin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Xin; ZHANG DeYuan; LI Xiang; LI YuanYue

    2008-01-01

    On the investigation of biomimetic drag-reducing surface, direct replication of the firm scarfskins on low-resistance creatures to form biomimetic drag-reducing surfaces with relatively vivid morphology relative to the living prototype is a new attempt of the bio-replicated forming technology. Taking shark skin as the bio-replication template, the hot embossing method was applied to the micro-replication of its outward morphology. Furthermore, the skins were jointed together to form the drag-reducing sur-face in large area. The results of the resistance measurements in a water tunnel according to the flat-plate sample pieces have shown that the biomimetic shark-skin coating fabricated by the bio-replicated forming method has significant drag reduction effect, and that the drag reduction effi-ciency reached 8.25% in the test conditions.

  18. Application of reduced-order controller to turbulent flows for drag reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Keun H.; Cortelezzi, Luca; Kim, John; Speyer, Jason

    2001-05-01

    A reduced-order linear feedback controller is designed and applied to turbulent channel flow for drag reduction. From the linearized two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations a distributed feedback controller, which produces blowing/suction at the wall based on the measured turbulent streamwise wall-shear stress, is derived using model reduction techniques and linearquadratic-Gaussian/loop-transfer-recovery control synthesis. The quadratic cost criterion used for synthesis is composed of the streamwise wall-shear stress, which includes the control effort of blowing/suction. This distributed two-dimensional controller developed from a linear system theory is shown to reduce the skin friction by 10% in direct numerical simulations of a low-Reynolds number turbulent nonlinear channel flow. Spanwise shear-stress variation, not captured by the distributed two-dimensional controller, is suppressed by augmentation of a simple spanwise ad hoc control scheme. This augmented three-dimensional controller, which requires only the turbulent streamwise velocity gradient, results in a further reduction in the skin-friction drag. It is shown that the input power requirement is significantly less than the power saved by reduced drag. Other turbulence characteristics affected by these controllers are also discussed.

  19. 高速列车气动阻力地板效应数值研究%Numerical study of ground effects on high speed train aerodynamic drag

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周健; 欧平; 刘沛清; 郭昊

    2016-01-01

    Based on wind tunnel tests of aerodynamic drag on two kinds of 1/25th scale CRH2 models,research of aerodynamic drag with different experimental ground planes was carried out by numerical simulation.The reliability of the numerical methods was verified by comparing the results of simulation and tests.By analyzing the variation of the flow field and resistance distribu-tion on the train body with the usage of the wind tunnel wall,the stationary ground plane,and the moving ground plane in simulation,it is found that:ground effects of different planes have a great influence on the drag measurement of the high speed train;the moving ground plane gives the best simulation performance;the results of drag computed with the other two ground planes are less than that with the moving plane and the difference increases with the increase of the body length,therefore,it is almost impossible to simulate the flow field of the real train operation.Fi-nally the mechanism of influence by ground planes is analyzed and references are provided for drag measurement of high speed train on different ground planes.%针对CRH2型动车组外形,在2种1∶25缩比模型风洞试验基础上,展开基于数值模拟的明线情况高速列车不同地板试验条件阻力测量影响研究。通过与风洞试验结果对比,确定数值方法的可靠性;通过数值模拟风洞壁地板、固定地板、移动地板下高速列车流场分布与阻力变化情况表明,不同试验地板的地面效应对高速列车阻力测量结果影响很大,移动地板模拟效果最佳,固定地板与风洞壁地板阻力测量值小于移动地板情况,且差距随车身长度的增加而增加,很难模拟真实列车运行的流场;通过深入分析不同地板条件的影响机理,为高速列车不同地板条件风洞阻力测量结果提供参考意见。

  20. Blood soluble drag-reducing polymers prevent lethality from hemorrhagic shock in acute animal experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameneva, Marina V; Wu, Zhongjun J; Uraysh, Arkady; Repko, Brandon; Litwak, Kenneth N; Billiar, Timothy R; Fink, Mitchell P; Simmons, Richard L; Griffith, Bartley P; Borovetz, Harvey S

    2004-01-01

    Over the past several decades, blood-soluble drag reducing polymers (DRPs) have been shown to significantly enhance hemodynamics in various animal models when added to blood at nanomolar concentrations. In the present study, the effects of the DRPs on blood circulation were tested in anesthetized rats exposed to acute hemorrhagic shock. The animals were acutely resuscitated either with a 2.5% dextran solution (Control) or using the same solution containing 0.0005% or 5 parts per million (ppm) concentration of one of two blood soluble DRPs: high molecular weight (MW=3500 kDa) polyethylene glycol (PEG-3500) or a DRP extracted from Aloe vera (AVP). An additional group of animals was resuscitated with 0.0075% (75 ppm) polyethylene glycol of molecular weight of 200 kDa (PEG-200), which possesses no drag-reducing ability. All of the animals were observed for two hours following the initiation of fluid resuscitation or until they expired. We found that infusion of the DRP solutions significantly improved tissue perfusion, tissue oxygenation, and two-hour survival rate, the latter from 19% (Control) and 14% (PEG-200) to 100% (AVP) and 100% (PEG-3500). Furthermore, the Control and PEG-200 animals that survived required three times more fluid to maintain their blood pressure than the AVP and PEG-3500 animals. Several hypotheses regarding the mechanisms underlying these observed beneficial hemodynamic effects of DRPs are discussed. Our findings suggest that the drag-reducing polymers warrant further investigation as a potential clinical treatment for hemorrhagic shock and possibly other microcirculatory disorders.

  1. Leidenfrost Vapor Layers Reduce Drag without the Crisis in High Viscosity Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakarelski, Ivan U.; Berry, Joseph D.; Chan, Derek Y. C.; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T.

    2016-09-01

    The drag coefficient CD of a solid smooth sphere moving in a fluid is known to be only a function of the Reynolds number Re and diminishes rapidly at the drag crisis around Re ˜3 ×1 05 . A Leidenfrost vapor layer on a hot sphere surface can trigger the onset of the drag crisis at a lower Re. By using a range of high viscosity perfluorocarbon liquids, we show that the drag reduction effect can occur over a wide range of Re, from as low as ˜600 to 1 05. The Navier slip model with a viscosity dependent slip length can fit the observed drag reduction and wake shape.

  2. Experiments on bubble generation by a hydrofoil moving beneath the water surface for reducing ship drag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Ichiro; Murai, Yuichi; Takahashi, Yoshiaki; Sakamaki, Haruki; Tsukahara, Takahiro; Ozaki, Tsubasa; Tasaka, Yuji; Oishi, Yoshihiko

    2014-04-01

    We have invented two types of hydrofoil bubble generator for drag reduction of ship that can reduce the energy for air bubble generation on the ship hull. Their fundamental process of air entrainment and subsequent bubble generation by the hydrofoil facility are described by a simple fluid dynamic model. We experimentally determined the critical velocity of the bubble generation and the relationship between air volume flow rate and the hydrofoil velocity. The magnitude of the negative pressure produced above the hydrofoil, which is a driving force of the air entrainment, depends on the shape of the hydrofoil, gap ratio (normalized depth of the hydrofoil), Reynolds number, Froude number, and angle of attack. Recent applications of the drag-reduction technology with air bubbles to a ship save about 10%-15% of the total energy consumption of the ship. The device works as a self-priming pump when the draft of the ship is shallow (hydrofoil depends on the flow condition around the hydrofoil, proper operation of compressors is necessary. We also show experimental results on optimization of hydrofoils to enhance the hydrofoil performance of air entrainment and air bubble generation.

  3. Effective Medium Theory for Drag Reducing Micro-patterned Surfaces in Turbulent Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Battiato, Ilenia

    2013-01-01

    Inspired by the lotus effect, many studies in the last decade have focused on micro- and nano-patterned surfaces. They revealed that patterns at the micro-scale combined with high contact angles can significantly reduce skin drag. However, the mechanisms and parameters that control drag reduction, e.g. Reynolds number and pattern geometry, are still unclear. We propose an effective medium representation of the micro-features, that treats the latter as a porous medium, and provides a framework to model flow over patterned surfaces in both Cassie and Wenzel states. Our key result is a closed-form expression for the skin friction coefficient in terms of frictional Reynolds (or K\\'arm\\'an) number in turbulent regime, the viscosity ratio between the fluid in and above the features, and their geometrical properties. We apply the proposed model to turbulent flows over superhydrophobic ridged surfaces. The model predictions agree with laboratory experiments for Reynolds numbers ranging from 3000 to 10000.

  4. Drag reducing polymers decrease hepatic injury and metastases after liver ischemia-reperfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdani, Hamza O.; Sud, Vikas; Goswami, Julie; Loughran, Patricia; Huang, Hai; Simmons, Richard L.; Tsung, Allan

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Surgery, a crucial therapeutic modality in the treatment of solid tumors, can induce sterile inflammatory processes which can result in metastatic progression. Liver ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) injury, an inevitable consequence of hepatic resection of metastases, has been shown to foster hepatic capture of circulating cancer cells and accelerate metastatic growth. Efforts to reduce these negative consequences have not been thoroughly investigated. Drag reducing polymers (DRPs) are blood-soluble macromolecules that can, in nanomolar concentrations, increase tissue perfusion, decrease vascular resistance and decrease near-wall microvascular concentration of neutrophils and platelets thereby possibly reducing the inflammatory microenvironment. We hypothesize that DRP can potentially be used to ameliorate metastatic capture of tumor cells and tumor growth within the I/R liver. Methods Experiments were performed utilizing a segmental ischemia model of mice livers. Five days prior or immediately prior to ischemia, murine colon adenocarcinoma cells (MC38) were injected into the spleen. DRP (polyethylene oxide) or a control of low-molecular-weight polyethylene glycol without drag reducing properties were administered intraperitoneally at the onset of reperfusion. Results After three weeks from I/R, we observed that liver I/R resulted in an increased ability to capture and foster growth of circulating tumor cells; in addition, the growth of pre-existing micrometastases was accelerated three weeks later. These effects were significantly curtailed when mice were treated with DRPs at the time of I/R. Mechanistic investigations in vivo indicated that DRPs protected the livers from I/R injury as evidenced by significant decreases in hepatocellular damage, neutrophil recruitment into the liver, formation of neutrophil extracellular traps, deposition of platelets, formation of microthrombi within the liver sinusoids and release of inflammatory cytokines

  5. Drag reducing polymers decrease hepatic injury and metastases after liver ischemia-reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohme, Samer; Kameneva, Marina V; Yazdani, Hamza O; Sud, Vikas; Goswami, Julie; Loughran, Patricia; Huang, Hai; Simmons, Richard L; Tsung, Allan

    2017-08-29

    Surgery, a crucial therapeutic modality in the treatment of solid tumors, can induce sterile inflammatory processes which can result in metastatic progression. Liver ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) injury, an inevitable consequence of hepatic resection of metastases, has been shown to foster hepatic capture of circulating cancer cells and accelerate metastatic growth. Efforts to reduce these negative consequences have not been thoroughly investigated. Drag reducing polymers (DRPs) are blood-soluble macromolecules that can, in nanomolar concentrations, increase tissue perfusion, decrease vascular resistance and decrease near-wall microvascular concentration of neutrophils and platelets thereby possibly reducing the inflammatory microenvironment. We hypothesize that DRP can potentially be used to ameliorate metastatic capture of tumor cells and tumor growth within the I/R liver. Experiments were performed utilizing a segmental ischemia model of mice livers. Five days prior or immediately prior to ischemia, murine colon adenocarcinoma cells (MC38) were injected into the spleen. DRP (polyethylene oxide) or a control of low-molecular-weight polyethylene glycol without drag reducing properties were administered intraperitoneally at the onset of reperfusion. After three weeks from I/R, we observed that liver I/R resulted in an increased ability to capture and foster growth of circulating tumor cells; in addition, the growth of pre-existing micrometastases was accelerated three weeks later. These effects were significantly curtailed when mice were treated with DRPs at the time of I/R. Mechanistic investigations in vivo indicated that DRPs protected the livers from I/R injury as evidenced by significant decreases in hepatocellular damage, neutrophil recruitment into the liver, formation of neutrophil extracellular traps, deposition of platelets, formation of microthrombi within the liver sinusoids and release of inflammatory cytokines. DRPs significantly attenuated

  6. Effect of Drag Reducing Polymer and Suspended Solid on the Rate of Diffusion Controlled Corrosion in 90° Copper Elbow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouad, Mohamed Ahmed; Zewail, Taghreed Mohamed; Amine, Nieven Kamal Abbes

    2016-06-01

    Rate of diffusion controlled corrosion in 90° Copper Elbow acidified dichromate has been investigated in relation to the following parameters: effect of solution velocity in the absence and presence of drag- reducing polymer on the rate of diffusion controlled corrosion, and effect of the presence of suspended solids on the rate of diffusion controlled corrosion. It was found that the presence of drag reducing polymer inhibited the rate of mass transfer, while the presence of suspended solid increased significantly the rate of mass transfer.

  7. Leidenfrost Vapor Layers Reduce Drag without the Crisis in High Viscosity Liquids

    KAUST Repository

    Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev

    2016-09-08

    The drag coefficient CD of a solid smooth sphere moving in a fluid is known to be only a function of the Reynolds number Re and diminishes rapidly at the drag crisis around Re∼3×105. A Leidenfrost vapor layer on a hot sphere surface can trigger the onset of the drag crisis at a lower Re. By using a range of high viscosity perfluorocarbon liquids, we show that the drag reduction effect can occur over a wide range of Re, from as low as ∼600 to 105. The Navier slip model with a viscosity dependent slip length can fit the observed drag reduction and wake shape. © 2016 American Physical Society.

  8. Improvements in aerodynamics for the purpose of either increasing power output or reducing fuel consumption of commercial vehicles. Einsatz des Fahrleistungsgewinnes durch verbesserte Aerodynamik zur Fahrleistungssteigerung oder zur Verbrauchsminimierung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porth, D.; Kraemer, W.

    1993-05-01

    The effects of particularly efficient aerodynamic measures on fuel consumption, power output and economy have been detemined by means of systematic investigations carried out in the wind tunnel with a 1:2,5 model of a heavy-duty tractor/semitrailer combination and an original vehicle, and by means of corresponding comparative measurements in driving operation. The excess output gained from reducing the drag coefficient is another useful potential for improvement, which can be used for either increasing power output or further reducing fuel consumption by adapting the drive line. (orig.)

  9. Drag-reducing performance of obliquely aligned superhydrophobic surface in turbulent channel flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Sho; Mamori, Hiroya; Fukagata, Koji

    2017-04-01

    Friction drag reduction effect by superhydrophobic surfaces in a turbulent channel flow is investigated by means of direct numerical simulation. The simulations are performed under a constant pressure gradient at the friction Reynolds number of 180. A special focus is laid upon the influence of the angle of microridge structure to flow direction, while the gas area fraction on the surface is kept at 50% and the groove width is kept constant at 33.75 wall units. Larger drag reduction effect is observed for a smaller angle: the bulk-mean velocity is increased about 15% when the microridge is parallel to the flow. The drag reduction effect is found to deteriorate rapidly with the microridge angle due to a decrease in the slip velocity. The Reynolds stress budgets show that the modification in each physical effect is qualitatively similar but more pronounced when the microridge is aligned with the stream.

  10. A Reduced-Complexity Investigation of Blunt Leading-Edge Separation Motivated by UCAV Aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckring, James M.; Boelens, Okko J.

    2015-01-01

    A reduced complexity investigation for blunt-leading-edge vortical separation has been undertaken. The overall approach is to design the fundamental work in such a way so that it relates to the aerodynamics of a more complex Uninhabited Combat Air Vehicle (UCAV) concept known as SACCON. Some of the challenges associated with both the vehicle-class aerodynamics and the fundamental vortical flows are reviewed, and principles from a hierarchical complexity approach are used to relate flow fundamentals to system-level interests. The work is part of roughly 6-year research program on blunt-leading-edge separation pertinent to UCAVs, and was conducted under the NATO Science and Technology Organization, Applied Vehicle Technology panel.

  11. Preparation of Nano-Scale Biopolymer Extracted from Coconut Residue and Its Performance as Drag Reducing Agent (DRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Muhammad Luqman Bin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Drag or frictional force is defined as force that acts opposite to the object’s relative motion through a fluid which then will cause frictional pressure loss in the pipeline. Drag Reducing Agent (DRA is used to solve this issue and most of the DRAs are synthetic polymers but has some environmental issues. Therefore for this study, biopolymer known as Coconut Residue (CR is selected as the candidate to replace synthetic polymers DRA. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of Nano-scale biopolymer DRA on the application of water injection system. Carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC is extracted by synthesizing the cellulose extracted from CR under the alkali-catalyzed reaction using monochloroacetic acid. The synthesize process is held in controlled condition whereby the concentration of NaOH is kept at 60%wt, 60 °C temperature and the reaction time is 4 hours. For every 25 g of dried CR used, the mass of synthesized CMC yield is at an average of 23.8 g. The synthesized CMC is then grinded in controlled parameters using the ball milling machine to get the Nano-scale size. The particle size obtained from this is 43.32 Nm which is in range of Nano size. This study proved that Nano-size CMC has higher percentage of drag reduction (%DR and flow increase (%FI if compared to normal-size CMC when tested in high and low flow rate; 44% to 48% increase in %DR and %FI when tested in low flow rate, and 16% to 18% increase in %DR and %FI when tested in high flow rate. The success of this research shows that Nano-scale DRA can be considered to be used to have better performance in reducing drag.

  12. Performance losses of drag-reducing spanwise forcing at moderate values of the Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatti, Davide; Quadrio, Maurizio

    2013-12-01

    A fundamental problem in the field of turbulent skin-friction drag reduction is to determine the performance of the available control techniques at high values of the Reynolds number Re. We consider active, predetermined strategies based on spanwise forcing (oscillating wall and streamwise-traveling waves applied to a plane channel flow), and explore via Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) up to Reτ = 2100 the rate at which their performance deteriorates as Re is increased. To be able to carry out a comprehensive parameter study, we limit the computational cost of the simulations by adjusting the size of the computational domain in the homogeneous directions, compromising between faster computations and the increased need of time-averaging the fluctuating space-mean wall shear-stress. Our results, corroborated by a few full-scale DNS, suggest a scenario where drag reduction degrades with Re at a rate that varies according to the parameters of the wall forcing. In agreement with already available information, keeping them at their low-Re optimal value produces a relatively quick decrease of drag reduction. However, at higher Re the optimal parameters shift towards other regions of the parameter space, and these regions turn out to be much less sensitive to Re. Once this shift is accounted for, drag reduction decreases with Re at a markedly slower rate. If the slightly favorable trend of the energy required to create the forcing is considered, a chance emerges for positive net energy savings also at large values of the Reynolds number.

  13. Shape optimization of active and passive drag-reducing devices on a D-shaped bluff body

    CERN Document Server

    Semaan, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Shape optimization of an active and a passive drag-reducing device on a two-dimensional D-shaped bluff body is performed. The two devices are: Coanda actuator, and randomly-shaped trailing-edge flap. The optimization sequence is performed by coupling the genetic algorithm software DAKOTA to the mesh generator Pointwise and to the CFD solver OpenFOAM. For the the active device the cost functional is the power ratio, whereas for the passive device it is the drag coefficient. The optimization leads to total power savings of $\\approx 70\\%$ for the optimal Coanda actuator, and a 40\\% drag reduction for the optimal flap. This reduction is mainly achieved through streamlining the base flow and suppressing the vortex shedding. The addition of either an active or a passive device creates two additional smaller recirculation regions in the base cavity that shifts the larger recirculation region away from the body and increases the base pressure. The results are validated against more refined URANS simulations for selec...

  14. Large-eddy simulation of a turbulent flow over a heavy vehicle with drag reduction devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangseung; Kim, Myeongkyun; You, Donghyun

    2015-11-01

    Aerodynamic drag contributes to a considerable amount of energy loss of heavy vehicles. To reduce the energy loss, drag reduction devices such as side skirts and boat tails, are often installed to the side and the rear of a heavy vehicle. In the present study, turbulent flow around a heavy vehicle with realistic geometric details is simulated using large-eddy simulation (LES), which is capable of providing unsteady flow physics responsible for aerodynamic in sufficient detail. Flow over a heavy vehicle with and without a boat tail and side skirts as drag reduction devices is simulated. The simulation results are validated against accompanying in-house experimental measurements. Effects of a boat tail and side skirts on drag reduction are discussed in detail. Supported by the Korea Agency for Infrastructure Technology Advancement (KAIA) Grant NTIS 1615007940.

  15. Aerodynamic Design of a Locomotive Fairing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stucki, Chad; Maynes, Daniel

    2016-11-01

    Rising fuel cost has motivated increased fuel efficiency of freight trains. At cruising speed, the largest contributing factor to the fuel consumption is the aerodynamic drag. As a result of air stagnation at the front of the train and substantial flow separation behind, the leading locomotive and trailing railcar experience greater drag than intermediate cars. This work introduces the design of streamlined nose fairings to be attached to freight locomotives as a means of reducing the leading locomotive drag. The aerodynamic performance of each fairing design is modeled using a commercial CFD software package. The K-epsilon turbulence model is used, and fluid properties are equivalent to atmospheric air at standard conditions. A selection of isolated screening studies are performed, and a multidimensional regression is used to predict optimal-performing fairing designs. Between screening studies, careful examination of the flow field is performed to inspire subsequent fairing designs. Results are presented for 250 different nose fairings. The best performing fairing geometry predicts a nominal drag reduction of 17% on the lead locomotive in a train set. This drag reduction is expected to result in nearly 1% fuel savings for the entire train.

  16. Nanomolar concentration of blood-soluble drag-reducing polymer inhibits experimental metastasis of human breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Z

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Zhijie Ding,1,* Marion Joy,1,* Marina V Kameneva,1-3 Partha Roy1,3-6 1Department of Bioengineering, 2Department of Surgery, 3McGowan Institute of Regenerative Medicine, 4Department of Pathology, 5Department of Cell Biology, 6Magee Women’s Research Institute, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Metastasis is the leading cause of cancer mortality. Extravasation of cancer cells is a critical step of metastasis. We report a novel proof-of-concept study that investigated whether non-toxic blood-soluble chemical agents capable of rheological modification of the near-vessel-wall blood flow can reduce extravasation of tumor cells and subsequent development of metastasis. Using an experimental metastasis model, we demonstrated that systemic administration of nanomolar concentrations of so-called drag-reducing polymer dramatically impeded extravasation and development of pulmonary metastasis of breast cancer cells in mice. This is the first proof-of-principle study to directly demonstrate physical/rheological, as opposed to chemical, way to prevent cancer cells from extravasation and developing metastasis and, thus, it opens the possibility of a new direction of adjuvant interventional approach in cancer. Keywords: breast cancer, metastasis, extravasation, hemodynamics, drag-reducing polymer, blood cell traffic, microvessels

  17. Investigation on Drag Reduction of Trucks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Xiao-ni; LIU Zhen-yan

    2008-01-01

    A study of the mechanism of fences was given to reduce drag by means of theoretical analysis, numerical simulation and experimental research. A 3D mathematical model has been developed based on computational fluid dynamics software Phoenics that was capable of handling steady state, 3D flow to simulate the flow field around the truck. The experiment made in a low speed wind tunnel is used as references for validation. By analyzing the results of calculation and experiment, the flowing mechanism of the flow field around the container truck and the drag-reducing mechanism of #-shaped fences on the truck are unveiled, which provides theoretical guidance to the aerodynamic formation designing and amelioration.

  18. STUDY ON AERODYNAMIC CHARACTERISTICS OF VAN-BODY TRUCKS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of the van-body truck were studied by means of theoretical analysis, numerical simulation and wind tunnel experiments. The concept of critical length was presented for the van-body truck in wind tunnel experiments, the proper critical Reynolds number was found and the effects of ground parameters in ground effect simulation on the aerodynamic measurements were examined. It shows that two structure parameters, van height and the gap between the cab and the van, can obviously influence the aerodynamic characteristics, and the additional aerodynamic devices, the wind deflector and the vortex regulator in the rear, can considerably reduce the aerodynamic drag of the van-body truck. Numerical simulations provided rich information of the flow fields around the van-body trucks.

  19. A design and analysis approach for drag reduction on aircraft with adaptive lifting surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusher, Aaron Anthony

    Adaptive lifting surfaces, which can be tailored for different flight conditions, have been shown to be beneficial for drag reduction when compared with conventional non-adaptive surfaces. Applying multiple trailing-edge flaps along the wing span allows for the redistribution of lift to suit different flight conditions. The current approach uses the trailing-edge flap distribution to reduce both induced- and profile- components of drag with a trim constraint. Induced drag is reduced by optimally redistributing the lift between the lifting surfaces and along the span of each surface. Profile drag is reduced through the use of natural laminar flow airfoils, which maintain distinct low-drag-ranges (drag buckets) surrounding design lift values. The low-drag-ranges can be extended to include off-design values through small flap deflections, similar to cruise flaps. Trim is constrained for a given static margin by considering longitudinal pitching moment contributions from changes in airfoil section due to individual flap deflections, and from the redistribution of fore-and-aft lift due to combination of flap deflections. The approach uses the concept of basic and additional lift to linearlize the problem, which allows for standard constrained-minimization theory to be employed for determining optimal flap-angle solutions. The resulting expressions for optimal flap-angle solutions are presented as simple matrix equations. This work presents a design and analysis approach which is used to produce flap-angle solutions that independently reduce induced, profile, and total drag. Total drag is defined to be the sum of the induced- and profile-components of drag. The general drag reduction approach is adapted for each specific situation to develop specific drag reduction schemes that are applied to single- and multiple-surface configurations. Successful results show that, for the application of the induced drag reduction schemes on a tailless aircraft, near-elliptical lift

  20. Nanomolar concentration of blood-soluble drag-reducing polymer inhibits experimental metastasis of human breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Zhijie; Joy, Marion; Kameneva, Marina V; Roy, Partha

    2017-01-01

    Metastasis is the leading cause of cancer mortality. Extravasation of cancer cells is a critical step of metastasis. We report a novel proof-of-concept study that investigated whether non-toxic blood-soluble chemical agents capable of rheological modification of the near-vessel-wall blood flow can reduce extravasation of tumor cells and subsequent development of metastasis. Using an experimental metastasis model, we demonstrated that systemic administration of nanomolar concentrations of so-called drag-reducing polymer dramatically impeded extravasation and development of pulmonary metastasis of breast cancer cells in mice. This is the first proof-of-principle study to directly demonstrate physical/rheological, as opposed to chemical, way to prevent cancer cells from extravasation and developing metastasis and, thus, it opens the possibility of a new direction of adjuvant interventional approach in cancer. PMID:28280386

  1. Reducing the Drag and Damage of a High-Speed Train by Analyzing and Optimizing its Boundary Layer Separation and Roll-up into Wake Vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chung-Hsiang; Marcus, Philip

    2012-11-01

    We present numerical calculations of the boundary layers and shed wake vortices behind several aerodynamic bodies and generic models of high-speed trains. Our calculations illustrate new visual diagnostics that we developed that clearly show where the separation of a boundary layer occurs and where, how, and with what angles (with respect to the stream-wise direction) the wake vortices form. The calculations also illustrate novel 3D morphing and mesh ``pushing and pulling'' techniques that allow us to change the shapes of aerodynamic bodies and models in a controlled and automated manner without spurious features appearing. Using these tools we have examined the patterns of the shed vortices behind generic bodies and trains and correlated them with the changes in the drag as well as with the effects of the shed vortices on the environment. In particular, we have applied these techniques to the end car of a next-generation, high-speed train in order to minimize the drag and to minimize the adverse effects of the shed vortices on the track ballast.

  2. Simultaneous drag and flow measurements of Olympic skeleton athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Yae Eun; Digiulio, David; Peters, Steve; Wei, Timothy

    2009-11-01

    The Olympic sport of skeleton involves an athlete riding a small sled face first down a bobsled track at speeds up to 130 km/hr. In these races, the difference between gold and missing the medal stand altogether can be hundredths of a second per run. As such, reducing aerodynamic drag through proper body positioning is of first order importance. To better study the flow behavior and to improve the performance of the athletes, we constructed a static force balance system on a mock section of a bobsled track. Athlete and the sled are placed on the force balance system which is positioned at the exit of an open loop wind tunnel. Simultaneous drag force and DPIV velocity field measurements were made along with video recordings of body position to aid the athletes in determining their optimal aerodynamic body position.

  3. The aerodynamic cost of head morphology in bats: maybe not as bad as it seems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieter Vanderelst

    Full Text Available At first sight, echolocating bats face a difficult trade-off. As flying animals, they would benefit from a streamlined geometric shape to reduce aerodynamic drag and increase flight efficiency. However, as echolocating animals, their pinnae generate the acoustic cues necessary for navigation and foraging. Moreover, species emitting sound through their nostrils often feature elaborate noseleaves that help in focussing the emitted echolocation pulses. Both pinnae and noseleaves reduce the streamlined character of a bat's morphology. It is generally assumed that by compromising the streamlined charactered of the geometry, the head morphology generates substantial drag, thereby reducing flight efficiency. In contrast, it has also been suggested that the pinnae of bats generate lift forces counteracting the detrimental effect of the increased drag. However, very little data exist on the aerodynamic properties of bat pinnae and noseleaves. In this work, the aerodynamic forces generated by the heads of seven species of bats, including noseleaved bats, are measured by testing detailed 3D models in a wind tunnel. Models of Myotis daubentonii, Macrophyllum macrophyllum, Micronycteris microtis, Eptesicus fuscus, Rhinolophus formosae, Rhinolophus rouxi and Phyllostomus discolor are tested. The results confirm that non-streamlined facial morphologies yield considerable drag forces but also generate substantial lift. The net effect is a slight increase in the lift-to-drag ratio. Therefore, there is no evidence of high aerodynamic costs associated with the morphology of bat heads.

  4. The aerodynamics and hydrodynamics of plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennos, A R

    1999-12-01

    Because they grow away from their substratum to compete for light, plants have to withstand hydrodynamic or aerodynamic drag. Both water and land plants reconfigure in response to this drag, and this is presumed to reduce the risk of mechanical failure. However, there is little unequivocal evidence of drag reduction in large trees as a result of reconfiguration. Land plants must also transport water internally to their tissues, and many have developed xylem tracheids and vessels that help speed up this process. Recent evidence that tree height is limited by water supply suggests that water transport efficiency must be a crucial element in tree design. However, the resistance of many parts of the xylem is still unknown. More focused work is urgently required to shed light on the evolution and ecology of plants in relation to the flow of fluids.

  5. Induce Drag Reduction of an Airplane Wing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Fazle Rabbi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This work describes the aerodynamic characteristics for aircraft wing model with and without slotted winglet. When an aircraft moves forward with a high speed then a small circulatory motion of air is created at the wingtip due to the pressure difference between the upper and lower surface of the wing is called vortices. This circulatory fluid tends to leak from lower to upper surface of wing which causes downward motion is called “downwash” and generates a component of the local lift force in the direction of the free stream called induced drag. Downwash causes reduction of lift and contribute induced drag to the total drag. Drag reduction for aerial vehicles has a range of positive ramifications: reduced fuel consumption, larger operational range, greater endurance and higher achievable speeds. An experimental study is conducted to examine the potentiality of slotted winglet for the reduction of induced drag, and for the improvement of lift coefficient without increasing the span of aircraft wing. The model composed of a swept wing built from NACA 0012 airfoil. The test conducted in subsonic wind tunnel of 1m×1m rectangular test section at flow speed 25m/s placing the wing without winglet, wing with winglet at 30° inclination, wing with winglet at 60° inclination, and wing with winglet at 70° inclination at angle of attack ranging from 0 to 16 degree. The test result shows 20- 25% reduction in drag coefficient and 10-20% increase in lift coefficient by using slotted winglet.

  6. Dynamics of falling droplet and elongational properties of dilute nonionic surfactant solutions with drag-reducing ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamano, Shinji; Ohashi, Yota; Morinishi, Yohei

    2017-05-01

    The dynamics of the falling droplet through a nozzle for dilute nonionic surfactant (oleyl-dimethylamine oxide, ODMAO) aqueous solutions with viscoelastic and drag-reducing properties were investigated at different concentrations of ODMAO solutions Cs = 500, 1000, and 1500 ppm by weight. The effects of the flow rate and tube outer diameter on the length of the filament, which was the distance between the tube exit and the lower end of a droplet at the instant when the droplet almost detached from the tube, were clarified by flow visualization measurements by a high-speed video camera. Two types of breaking-off processes near the base of the droplet and within the filament were classified by the Ohnesorge number Oh and the Weber number We. In the regime of the higher Oh and We, the length of the filament became drastically larger at Cs = 1000 and 1500 ppm, whose high spinnability represented the strong viscoelasticity of ODMAO solutions. In the case where the filament was broken up near the lower end of the neck and thinning in time, the thinning of the diameter of the filament was measured by a light-emitting diode micrometer. As for the elasto-capillary thinning of dilute nonionic surfactant solutions, the initial necking process was similar to that of Newtonian fluids and then followed the exponential thinning like polymer solutions. The apparent elongational viscosity of the dilute nonionic surfactant solution was evaluated in the elasto-capillary thinning regime, in which the elongation rate was almost constant. At Cs = 1000 and 1500 ppm, the Trouton ratio, which was the ratio of the apparent elongational viscosity to the shear viscosity, was found to be several orders of magnitude larger than that of Newtonian fluids, while the shear viscosity measured by the capillary viscometer was almost the same order of the Newtonian fluids. The higher elongational property would be closely related to the higher drag-reducing ability of dilute nonionic surfactant

  7. MODIFICATIONS TO REDUCE DRAG OUT AT A PRINTED CIRCUIT BOARD MANUFACTURER

    Science.gov (United States)

    This MnTAP/EPA Waste Reduction Innovative Technology Evaluation project at Micom, Inc., demonstrated the waste reducing capability of two simple rinsing modifications on an etchant and an electroless copper process. he simple, tow (or no) cost, low technology changes that were ma...

  8. Cable Aerodynamic Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleissl, Kenneth

    to a categorization of the different control technics together with an identification of two key mechanisms for reduction of the design drag force. During this project extensive experimental work examining the aerodynamics of the currently used cable surface modifications together with new innovative proposals have...

  9. Aerodynamically shaped vortex generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Otto Laver; Velte, Clara Marika; Øye, Stig;

    2016-01-01

    An aerodynamically shaped vortex generator has been proposed, manufactured and tested in a wind tunnel. The effect on the overall performance when applied on a thick airfoil is an increased lift to drag ratio compared with standard vortex generators. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  10. Fabrication of a micro through-hole array by gas-blowing a PDMS-treated polyamide screen for a flexible drag-reducing skin-like device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Zhou, Kai; Zhao, Xiang; Kong, Quancun

    2017-01-01

    We propose a method for fabricating a flexible skin-like device for generating and trapping micro bubbles with the aim of reducing underwater drag. This low-cost, efficient, high-pressure gas-blow method is used to fabricate a micro through-hole array in a flexible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) gel-based skin. The key parameters in the gas-blowing method are investigated, such as the viscosity of PDMS and the blowing pressure in order to optimize the quality of through-hole layer. Deviation of the linear dimensions of the obtained micro holes was less than 4.5%. In addition, multiphase computational fluid dynamics models were built to analyze the drag-reduction performance of bell-shaped holes made by this method. Compared with cylindrical through holes produced by molding, the drag-reduction effect of bell-shaped holes increased as much as 34%.

  11. Drag reduction by wing tip slots in a gliding Harris' hawk, Parabuteo unicinctus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker

    1995-01-01

    The anterior-most primary feathers of many birds that soar over land bend upwards and separate vertically to form slotted wing tips during flight. The slots are thought to reduce aerodynamic drag, although drag reduction has never been demonstrated in living birds. Wing theory explains how the feathers that form the tip slots can reduce induced drag by spreading vorticity horizontally along the wing and by acting as winglets, which are used on aircraft to make wings non-planar and to spread vorticity vertically. This study uses the induced drag factor to measure the induced drag of a wing relative to that of a standard planar wing with the same span, lift and speed. An induced drag factor of less than 1 indicates that the wing is non-planar. The minimum drag of a Harris' hawk gliding freely in a wind tunnel was measured before and after removing the slots by clipping the tip feathers. The unclipped hawk had 70­90 % of the drag of the clipped hawk at speeds between 7.3 and 15.0 m s-1. At a wing span of 0.8 m, the unclipped hawk had a mean induced drag factor of 0.56, compared with the value of 1.10 assumed for the clipped hawk. A Monte Carlo simulation of error propagation and a sensitivity analysis to possible errors in measured and assumed values showed that the true mean value of the induced drag factor for the unclipped hawk was unlikely to be more than 0.93. These results for a living bird support the conclusions from a previous study of a feathered tip on a model wing in a wind tunnel: the feathers that form the slotted tips reduce induced drag by acting as winglets that make the wings non-planar and spread vorticity both horizontally and vertically.

  12. Aerodynamics of a Cycling Team in a Time Trial: Does the Cyclist at the Front Benefit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iniguez-de-la Torre, A.; Iniguez, J.

    2009-01-01

    When seasonal journeys take place in nature, birds and fishes migrate in groups. This provides them not only with security but also a considerable saving of energy. The power they need to travel requires overcoming aerodynamic or hydrodynamic drag forces, which can be substantially reduced when the group travels in an optimal arrangement. Also in…

  13. New insights into the microvascular mechanisms of drag reducing polymers: effect on the cell-free layer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Brands

    Full Text Available Drag-reducing polymers (DRPs significantly increase blood flow, tissue perfusion, and tissue oxygenation in various animal models. In rectangular channel microfluidic systems, DRPs were found to significantly reduce the near-wall cell-free layer (CFL as well as modify traffic of red blood cells (RBC into microchannel branches. In the current study we further investigated the mechanism by which DRP enhances microvascular perfusion. We studied the effect of various concentrations of DRP on RBC distribution in more relevant round microchannels and the effect of DRP on CFL in the rat cremaster muscle in vivo. In round microchannels hematocrit was measured in parent and daughter branch at baseline and after addition of DRP. At DRP concentrations of 5 and 10 ppm, the plasma skimming effect in the daughter branch was eliminated, as parent and daughter branch hematocrit were equivalent, compared to a significantly lowered hematocrit in the daughter branch without DRPs. In anesthetized rats (N=11 CFL was measured in the cremaster muscle tissue in arterioles with a diameter of 32.6 ± 1.7 µm. In the control group (saline, N=6 there was a significant increase in CFL in time compared to corresponding baseline. Addition of DRP at 1 ppm (N=5 reduced CFL significantly compared to corresponding baseline and the control group. After DRP administration the CFL reduced to about 85% of baseline at 5, 15, 25 and 35 minutes after DRP infusion was complete. These in vivo and in vitro findings demonstrate that DRPs induce a reduction in CFL width and plasma skimming in the microvasculature. This may lead to an increase of RBC flux into the capillary bed, and thus explain previous observations of a DRP mediated enhancement of capillary perfusion.

  14. Uncovering changes in spider orb-web topology owing to aerodynamic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaera, Ramón; Soler, Alejandro; Teus, Jaime

    2014-09-06

    An orb-weaving spider's likelihood of survival is influenced by its ability to retain prey with minimum damage to its web and at the lowest manufacturing cost. This set of requirements has forced the spider silk to evolve towards extreme strength and ductility to a degree that is rare among materials. Previous studies reveal that the performance of the web upon impact may not be based on the mechanical properties of silk alone, aerodynamic drag could play a role in the dissipation of the prey's energy. Here, we present a thorough analysis of the effect of the aerodynamic drag on wind load and prey impact. The hypothesis considered by previous authors for the evaluation of the drag force per unit length of thread has been revisited according to well-established principles of fluid mechanics, highlighting the functional dependence on thread diameter that was formerly ignored. Theoretical analysis and finite-element simulations permitted us to identify air drag as a relevant factor in reducing deterioration of the orb web, and to reveal how the spider can take greater-and not negligible-advantage of drag dissipation. The study shows the beneficial air drag effects of building smaller and less dense webs under wind load, and larger and denser webs under prey impact loads. In essence, it points out why the aerodynamics need to be considered as an additional driving force in the evolution of silk threads and orb webs.

  15. Reexamination of the Classical View of how Drag-Reducing Polymer Solutions Modify the Mean Velocity Profile: Baseline Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farsiani, Yasaman; Baade, Jacquelyne; Elbing, Brian

    2016-11-01

    Recent numerical and experimental data have shown that the classical view of how drag-reducing polymer solutions modify the mean turbulent velocity profile is incorrect. The classical view is that the log-region is unmodified from the traditional law-of-the-wall for Newtonian fluids, though shifted outward. Thus the current study reexamines the modified velocity distribution and its dependence on flow and polymer properties. Based on previous work it is expected that the behavior will depend on the Reynolds number, Weissenberg number, ratio of solvent viscosity to the zero-shear viscosity, and the ratio between the coiled and fully extended polymer chain lengths. The long-term objective for this study includes a parametric study to assess the velocity profile sensitivity to each of these parameters. This study will be performed using a custom design water tunnel, which has a test section that is 1 m long with a 15.2 cm square cross section and a nominal speed range of 1 to 10 m/s. The current presentation focuses on baseline (non-polymeric) measurements of the velocity distribution using PIV, which will be used for comparison of the polymer modified results. Preliminary polymeric results will also be presented. This work was supported by NSF Grant 1604978.

  16. Development of design tools for reduced aerodynamic noise wind turbines (draw)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagner, S.; Guidati, G.; Ostertag, J.; Bareiss, R.; Wittum, G.; Huurdeman, B.; Braun, K.; Hirsch, C.; Kang, S.; Khodak, A.; Overmeire, M. van; Bladt, G.; Nienhaus, A.; Dassen, A.G.M.; Parchen, R.R.; Looijmans, K.

    1997-01-01

    The major aim of the present project was the development of new predictïon models for the aerodynamic noise generation at wind turbine blades. These models should be transferred to computer codes and should be sensitive enough to consider even small changes in the airfoil geometry. This accuracy is

  17. A Conventional Liner Acoustic/Drag Interaction Benchmark Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howerton, Brian M.; Jones, Michael G.

    2017-01-01

    The aerodynamic drag of acoustic liners has become a significant topic in the design of such for aircraft noise applications. In order to evaluate the benefits of concepts designed to reduce liner drag, it is necessary to establish the baseline performance of liners employing the typical design features of conventional configurations. This paper details a set of experiments in the NASA Langley Grazing Flow Impedance Tube to quantify the relative drag of a number of perforate-over-honeycomb liner configurations at flow speeds of M=0.3 and 0.5. These conventional liners are investigated to determine their resistance factors using a static pressure drop approach. Comparison of the resistance factors gives a relative measurement of liner drag. For these same flow conditions, acoustic measurements are performed with tonal excitation from 400 to 3000 Hz at source sound pressure levels of 140 and 150 dB. Educed impedance and attenuation spectra are used to determine the interaction between acoustic performance and drag.

  18. The role of drag in insect hovering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z Jane

    2004-11-01

    Studies of insect flight have focused on aerodynamic lift, both in quasi-steady and unsteady regimes. This is partly influenced by the choice of hovering motions along a horizontal stroke plane, where aerodynamic drag makes no contribution to the vertical force. In contrast, some of the best hoverers--dragonflies and hoverflies--employ inclined stroke planes, where the drag in the down- and upstrokes does not cancel each other. Here, computation of an idealized dragonfly wing motion shows that a dragonfly uses drag to support about three quarters of its weight. This can explain an anomalous factor of four in previous estimates of dragonfly lift coefficients, where drag was assumed to be small. To investigate force generation and energy cost of hovering flight using different combination of lift and drag, I study a family of wing motion parameterized by the inclined angle of the stroke plane. The lift-to-drag ratio is no longer a measure of efficiency, except in the case of horizontal stroke plane. In addition, because the flow is highly stalled, lift and drag are of comparable magnitude, and the aerodynamic efficiency is roughly the same up to an inclined angle about 60 degrees , which curiously agrees with the angle observed in dragonfly flight. Finally, the lessons from this special family of wing motion suggests a strategy for improving efficiency of normal hovering, and a unifying view of different wing motions employed by insects.

  19. Aerodynamic Optimization of an Over-the-Wing-Nacelle-Mount Configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Sasaki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An over-the-wing-nacelle-mount airplane configuration is known to prevent the noise propagation from jet engines toward ground. However, the configuration is assumed to have low aerodynamic efficiency due to the aerodynamic interference effect between a wing and a nacelle. In this paper, aerodynamic design optimization is conducted to improve aerodynamic efficiency to be equivalent to conventional under-the-wing-nacelle-mount configuration. The nacelle and wing geometry are modified to achieve high lift-to-drag ratio, and the optimal geometry is compared with a conventional configuration. Pylon shape is also modified to reduce aerodynamic interference effect. The final wing-fuselage-nacelle model is compared with the DLR F6 model to discuss the potential of Over-the-Wing-Nacelle-Mount geometry for an environmental-friendly future aircraft.

  20. GASP- General Aviation Synthesis Program. Volume 3: Aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hague, D.

    1978-01-01

    Aerodynamics calculations are treated in routines which concern moments as they vary with flight conditions and attitude. The subroutines discussed: (1) compute component equivalent flat plate and wetted areas and profile drag; (2) print and plot low and high speed drag polars; (3) determine life coefficient or angle of attack; (4) determine drag coefficient; (5) determine maximum lift coefficient and drag increment for various flap types and flap settings; and (6) determine required lift coefficient and drag coefficient in cruise flight.

  1. Aerodynamic design trends for commercial aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbig, R.; Koerner, H.

    1986-01-01

    Recent research on advanced-configuration commercial aircraft at DFVLR is surveyed, with a focus on aerodynamic approaches to improved performance. Topics examined include transonic wings with variable camber or shock/boundary-layer control, wings with reduced friction drag or laminarized flow, prop-fan propulsion, and unusual configurations or wing profiles. Drawings, diagrams, and graphs of predicted performance are provided, and the need for extensive development efforts using powerful computer facilities, high-speed and low-speed wind tunnels, and flight tests of models (mounted on specially designed carrier aircraft) is indicated.

  2. Aerodynamic properties of spherical balloon wind sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtl, G. H.; Demandel, R. E.; Krivo, S. J.

    1972-01-01

    A first-order theory of the fluctuating lift and drag coefficients associated with the aerodynamically induced motions of rising and falling spherical wind sensors is developed. The equations of motion of a sensor are perturbed about an equilibrium state in which the buoyancy force balances the mean vertical drag force. It is shown that, to within first order in perturbation quantities, the aerodynamic lift force is confined to the horizontal, and the fluctuating drag force associated with fluctuations in the drag coefficient acts along the vertical. The perturbation equations are transformed with Fourier-Stieltjes integrals. The resulting equations lead to relationships between the power spectra of the aerodynamically induced velocity components and the spectra of the fluctuating lift and drag coefficients.

  3. Endplate effect on aerodynamic characteristics of threedimensional wings in close free surface proximity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jae Hwan; Kim, Mi Jeong; Yoon, Hyun Sik; Hung, Pham Anh; Chun, Ho Hwan; Park, Dong Woo

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the aerodynamic characteristics of a three-dimensional (3D) wing with an endplate in the vicinity of the free surface by solving incompressible Navier-Stokes equations with the turbulence closure model. The endplate causes a blockage effect on the flow, and an additional viscous effect especially near the endplate. These combined effects of the endplate significantly reduce the magnitudes of the velocities under the lower surface of the wing, thereby enhancing aerodynamic performance in terms of the force coefficients. The maximum lift-to-drag ratio of a wing with an endplate is increased 46% compared to that of wing without an endplate at the lowest clearance. The tip vortex of a wing-with-endplate (WWE) moved laterally to a greater extent than that of a wing-without-endplate (WOE). This causes a decrease in the induced drag, resulting in a reduction in the total drag.

  4. Comparison of predicting drag methods using computational fluid dynamics in 2d/3d viscous flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU; ZiQiang; WANG; XiaoLu; LIU; Jie; LIU; Zhou

    2007-01-01

    As a result of the necessity of aircraft engineering design and the progress of computational fluid dynamics (CFD), techniques of accurately predicting aerodynamic drag are being increasingly explored. According to the momentum balance, the drag can be represented by an integral over a cross-flow plane (called wake integration method) at an arbitrary distance behind the configuration. A formulation to reduce the size of the wake cross plane region required for calculating the drag is developed by using cutoff parameters of vorticity and entropy. This increases the calculation accuracy and decreases the computation time required. Numerical experiments are made to obtain the threshold values of these cutoff parameters. The wake integration method is applied to predict drags of some examples including airfoil, a variety of wings and wing-body combination. Numerical results are compared with those of traditional surface integration method, showing that the predicting drag values with the wake integration method are closer to the experimental data. The results also show that drag prediction within engineering accuracy is possible by using CFD and the numerical drag optimization of complex aircraft configurations is possible, too.

  5. New drag laws for flapping flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agre, Natalie; Zhang, Jun; Ristroph, Leif

    2014-11-01

    Classical aerodynamic theory predicts that a steadily-moving wing experiences fluid forces proportional to the square of its speed. For bird and insect flight, however, there is currently no model for how drag is affected by flapping motions of the wings. By considering simple wings driven to oscillate while progressing through the air, we discover that flapping significantly changes the magnitude of drag and fundamentally alters its scaling with speed. These measurements motivate a new aerodynamic force law that could help to understand the free-flight dynamics, control, and stability of insects and flapping-wing robots.

  6. Aerodynamic characteristics of a high-wing transport configuration with a over-the-wing nacelle-pylon arrangement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, W. P.; Abeyounis, W. K.

    1985-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the effects on the aerodynamic characteristics of a high-wing transport configuration of installing an over-the-wing nacelle-pylon arrangement. The tests are conducted at Mach numbers from 0.70 to 0.82 and at angles of attack from -2 deg to 4 deg. The configurational variables under study include symmetrical and contoured nacelles and pylons, pylon size, and wing leading-edge extensions. The symmetrical nacelles and pylons reduce the lift coefficient, increase the drag coefficient, and cause a nose-up pitching-moment coefficient. The contoured nacelles significantly reduce the interference drag, though it is still excessive. Increasing the pylon size reduces the drag, whereas adding wing leading-edge extension does not affect the aerodynamic characteristics significantly.

  7. Unsteady Operation of New Type Turbofan Engine with Aerodynamic Torque Converter Reducing Front Fan Speed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Toshiaki KANEMOTO; Seita SEKI; Kazunori IDENO; Ahmed Mohamed GALAL

    2005-01-01

    It is desired to increase the rotational speed of the core engine of the turbofan so as to get the best efficiency for the next leap of engine technology. The conventional mechanism in which the front fan is directly connected to the output shaft of a core engine, have a limit of increasing the spool speed, because the fan diameter is very large. The authors have proposed a new driving system in which the front fan is driven through the aerodynamic torque converter. The front fan can work at the best performance at slower speed while the core engine runs more efficiently at higher speed. Continuously, this paper discusses the response of the front fan in the unsteady operation of the core engine, accompanying with the internal flow. The system has the acceptable responsibility in the unsteady operation which is very important for the aircrafts.

  8. Aerodynamic Design Methodology for Blended Wing Body Transport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Peifeng; ZHANG Binqian; CHEN Yingchun; YUAN Changsheng; LIN Yu

    2012-01-01

    This paper puts forward a design idea for blended wing body (BWB).The idea is described as that cruise point,maximum lift to drag point and pitch trim point are in the same flight attitude.According to this design idea,design objectives and constraints are defined.By applying low and high fidelity aerodynamic analysis tools,BWB aerodynamic design methodology is established by the combination of optimization design and inverse design methods.High lift to drag ratio,pitch trim and acceptable buffet margin can be achieved by this design methodology.For 300-passenger BWB configuration based on static stability design,as compared with initial configuration,the maximum lift to drag ratio and pitch trim are achieved at cruise condition,zero lift pitching moment is positive,and buffet characteristics is well.Fuel burn of 300-passenger BWB configuration is also significantly reduced as compared with conventional civil transports.Because aerodynamic design is carried out under the constraints of BWB design requirements,the design configuration fulfills the demands for interior layout and provides a solid foundation for continuous work.

  9. Aerodynamics of cyclist posture, bicycle and helmet characteristics in time trial stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabroux, Vincent; Barelle, Caroline; Favier, Daniel

    2012-07-01

    The present work is focused on the aerodynamic study of different parameters, including both the posture of a cyclist's upper limbs and the saddle position, in time trial (TT) stages. The aerodynamic influence of a TT helmet large visor is also quantified as a function of the helmet inclination. Experiments conducted in a wind tunnel on nine professional cyclists provided drag force and frontal area measurements to determine the drag force coefficient. Data statistical analysis clearly shows that the hands positioning on shifters and the elbows joined together are significantly reducing the cyclist drag force. Concerning the saddle position, the drag force is shown to be significantly increased (about 3%) when the saddle is raised. The usual helmet inclination appears to be the inclination value minimizing the drag force. Moreover, the addition of a large visor on the helmet is shown to provide a drag coefficient reduction as a function of the helmet inclination. Present results indicate that variations in the TT cyclist posture, the saddle position and the helmet visor can produce a significant gain in time (up to 2.2%) during stages.

  10. Numerical Investigation on Aerodynamic Force of Streamlined Box Girder with Uniform Air Suction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Ke

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the flow around a streamlined box girder with uniform air suction has been investigated numerically. Two-dimensional incompressible unsteady Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS equations are solved in conjunction with the SST k −ω turbulence model in simulations. Taking the Great Belt Bridge girder as an example, cases of different suction positions on the girder section were discussed. The effect of the suction ratio and the angle of attack (AOA of wind also were investigated. The result showed that the aerodynamic drag force was influenced by the uniform suction through either upper surface or lower surface of the box girder. The larger the suction ratio was, the more the drag-reducing could be. The suction position and AOA had a comprehensive effect on the drag force. The vortex shedding frequency was also affected by air suction. For the aerodynamic lift force and moment, air suction showed no obvious influence. If necessary, using a combined suction scheme to reduce the aerodynamic drag force or to control the flow wake would be more efficient in engineering design.

  11. Measuring Shear Stress with a Microfluidic Sensor to improve Aerodynamic Efficiency Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Skin friction drag is directly proportional to the local shear stress of a surface and can be the largest factor in an aerodynamic body's total parasitic drag. The...

  12. Gastronomiske drags

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leer, Jonatan

    2013-01-01

    with Jennifer Parson and Clarissa Dickson Wright (1996-1999). I will argue that the two self-declared fat women can be read as “gastronomic drags” by their transgression of a “recognizable” feminine way of “doing food”. The article is theoretically informed by the reflections on drag as subversive practice...... of appearing either too radical or not radical enough. The article concludes with some reflections on the development of the cooking show as a site for gendered negotiation from the 90’s and today....

  13. Effects of aerodynamic particle interaction in turbulent non-dilute particle-laden flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salewski, Mirko; Fuchs, Laszlo

    2008-01-01

    decreases by more than 40% in the dense particle region in the near-field of the jet due to the introduction of aerodynamic four-way coupling. The jet of monodisperse particles therefore penetrates further into the crossflow in this case. The strength of the counterrotating vortex pair (CVP) and turbulence...... is applied to simulate monodisperse, rigid, and spherical particles injected into crossflow as an idealization of a spray jet in crossflow. A domain decomposition technique reduces the computational cost of the aerodynamic particle interaction model. It is shown that the average drag on such particles...... particles under such conditions is suggested. In this idealized atomizing mixture, the effect of aerodynamic four-way coupling reverses: The aerodynamic particle interaction results in a stronger CVP and enhances turbulence levels....

  14. Studies on aerodynamic interferences between the components of transport airplane using unstructured Navier-Stokes simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, G.; Ye, Z. [Northwestern Polytechnical Univ., National Key Lab. of Aerodynamic Design and Research, Xi' an (China)]. E-mail: wanggang@nwpu.edu.cn; yezy@nwpu.edu.cn

    2005-07-01

    It is well known that the aerodynamic interference flows widely exist between the components of conventional transport airplane, for example, the wing-fuselage juncture flow, wing-pylon-nacelle flow and tail-fuselage juncture flow. The main characteristic of these aerodynamic interferences is flow separation, which will increase the drag, reduce the lift and cause adverse influence on the stability and controllability of the airplane. Therefore, the modern civil transport designers should do their best to eliminate negative effects of aerodynamic interferences, which demands that the aerodynamic interferences between the aircraft components should be predicted and analyzed accurately. Today's CFD techniques provide us powerful and efficient analysis tools to achieve this objective. In this paper, computational investigations of the interferences between transport aircraft components have been carried out by using a viscous flow solver based on mixed element type unstructured meshes. (author)

  15. Aerodynamic Reconstruction Applied to Parachute Test Vehicle Flight Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassady, Leonard D.; Ray, Eric S.; Truong, Tuan H.

    2013-01-01

    The aerodynamics, both static and dynamic, of a test vehicle are critical to determining the performance of the parachute cluster in a drop test and for conducting a successful test. The Capsule Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) project is conducting tests of NASA's Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) parachutes at the Army Yuma Proving Ground utilizing the Parachute Test Vehicle (PTV). The PTV shape is based on the MPCV, but the height has been reduced in order to fit within the C-17 aircraft for extraction. Therefore, the aerodynamics of the PTV are similar, but not the same as, the MPCV. A small series of wind tunnel tests and computational fluid dynamics cases were run to modify the MPCV aerodynamic database for the PTV, but aerodynamic reconstruction of the flights has proven an effective source for further improvements to the database. The acceleration and rotational rates measured during free flight, before parachute inflation but during deployment, were used to con rm vehicle static aerodynamics. A multibody simulation is utilized to reconstruct the parachute portions of the flight. Aerodynamic or parachute parameters are adjusted in the simulation until the prediction reasonably matches the flight trajectory. Knowledge of the static aerodynamics is critical in the CPAS project because the parachute riser load measurements are scaled based on forebody drag. PTV dynamic damping is critical because the vehicle has no reaction control system to maintain attitude - the vehicle dynamics must be understood and modeled correctly before flight. It will be shown here that aerodynamic reconstruction has successfully contributed to the CPAS project.

  16. Giant Frictional Drag in Double Bilayer Graphene Heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kayoung; Xue, Jiamin; Dillen, David C.; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Tutuc, Emanuel

    2016-07-01

    We study the frictional drag between carriers in two bilayer graphene flakes separated by a 2-5 nm thick hexagonal boron nitride dielectric. At temperatures (T ) lower than ˜10 K , we observe a large anomalous negative drag emerging predominantly near the drag layer charge neutrality. The anomalous drag resistivity increases dramatically with reducing T , and becomes comparable to the layer resistivity at the lowest T =1.5 K . At low T the drag resistivity exhibits a breakdown of layer reciprocity. A comparison of the drag resistivity and the drag layer Peltier coefficient suggests a thermoelectric origin of this anomalous drag.

  17. Experimental investigation on tip vortices and aerodynamics of a wing with ground effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruimin; Sun; Daichin

    2011-01-01

    The tip vortices and aerodynamics of a NACA0012 wing in the vicinity of the ground were studied in a wind tunnel.The wing tip vortex structures and lift/drag forces were measured by a seven-hole probe and a force balance,respectively.The evolution of the flow structures and aerodynamics with a ground height were analyzed.The vorticity of tip vortices was found to reduce with the decreasing of the ground height,and the position of vortex-core moved gradually to the outboard of the wing tip.Therefore,the d...

  18. Aerodynamic Optimization of the Nose Shape of a Train Using the Adjoint Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Munoz-Paniagua

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The adjoint method is used in this paper for the aerodynamic optimization of the nose shape of a train. This method has been extensively applied in aircraft or ground vehicle aerodynamic optimization, but is still in progress in train aerodynamics. Here we consider this innovative optimization method and present its application to reduce the aerodynamic drag when the train is subjected to front wind. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method, highlighting the requirements, limitations and capabilities of it. Furthermore, a significant reduction of the aerodynamic drag in a short number of solver calls is aimed as well. The independence of the computational cost with respect to the number of design variables that define the optimal candidate is stressed as the most interesting characteristic of the adjoint method. This behavior permits a more complete modification of the shape of the train nose because the number of design variables is not a constraint anymore. The information obtained from the sensitivity field permits determining the regions of the geometry where a small modification of the nose shape might introduce a larger improvement of the train performance. A good agreement between this information and the successive geometry modifications is observed here.

  19. Aerodynamics of badminton shuttlecocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Aekaansh; Desai, Ajinkya; Mittal, Sanjay

    2013-08-01

    A computational study is carried out to understand the aerodynamics of shuttlecocks used in the sport of badminton. The speed of the shuttlecock considered is in the range of 25-50 m/s. The relative contribution of various parts of the shuttlecock to the overall drag is studied. It is found that the feathers, and the net in the case of a synthetic shuttlecock, contribute the maximum. The gaps, in the lower section of the skirt, play a major role in entraining the surrounding fluid and causing a difference between the pressure inside and outside the skirt. This pressure difference leads to drag. This is confirmed via computations for a shuttlecock with no gaps. The synthetic shuttle experiences more drag than the feather model. Unlike the synthetic model, the feather shuttlecock is associated with a swirling flow towards the end of the skirt. The effect of the twist angle of the feathers on the drag as well as the flow has also been studied.

  20. Aerodynamic Leidenfrost effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Anaïs; Bird, James C.; Clanet, Christophe; Quéré, David

    2016-12-01

    When deposited on a plate moving quickly enough, any liquid can levitate as it does when it is volatile on a very hot solid (Leidenfrost effect). In the aerodynamic Leidenfrost situation, air gets inserted between the liquid and the moving solid, a situation that we analyze. We observe two types of entrainment. (i) The thickness of the air gap is found to increase with the plate speed, which is interpreted in the Landau-Levich-Derjaguin frame: Air is dynamically dragged along the surface and its thickness results from a balance between capillary and viscous effects. (ii) Air set in motion by the plate exerts a force on the levitating liquid. We discuss the magnitude of this aerodynamic force and show that it can be exploited to control the liquid and even to drive it against gravity.

  1. Drag Coefficient and Foam in Hurricane Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golbraikh, E.; Shtemler, Y.

    2016-12-01

    he present study is motivated by recent findings of saturation and even decrease in the drag coefficient (capping) in hurricane conditions, which is accompanied by the production of a foam layer on the ocean surface. As it is difficult to expect at present a comprehensive numerical modeling of the drag coefficient saturation that is followed by wave breaking and foam production, there is no complete confidence and understanding of the saturation phenomenon. Our semi-empirical model is proposed for the estimation of the foam impact on the variation of the effective drag coefficient, Cd , with the reference wind speed U10 in stormy and hurricane conditions. The proposed model treats the efficient air-sea aerodynamic roughness length as a sum of two weighted aerodynamic roughness lengths for the foam-free and foam-covered conditions. On the available optical and radiometric measurements of the fractional foam coverage,αf, combined with direct wind speed measurements in hurricane conditions, which provide the minimum of the effective drag coefficient, Cd for the sea covered with foam. The present model yields Cd10 versus U10 in fair agreement with that evaluated from both open-ocean and laboratory measurements of the vertical variation of mean wind speed in the range of U10 from low to hurricane speeds. The present approach opens opportunities for drag coefficient modeling in hurricane conditions and hurricane intensity estimation by the foam-coverage value using optical and radiometric measurements.

  2. A parametric study of planform and aeroelastic effects on aerodynamic center, alpha- and q- stability derivatives. Appendix A: A computer program for calculating alpha- and q- stability derivatives and induced drag for thin elastic aeroplanes at subsonic and supersonic speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roskam, J.; Lan, C.; Mehrotra, S.

    1972-01-01

    The computer program used to determine the rigid and elastic stability derivatives presented in the summary report is listed in this appendix along with instructions for its use, sample input data and answers. This program represents the airplane at subsonic and supersonic speeds as (a) thin surface(s) (without dihedral) composed of discrete panels of constant pressure according to the method of Woodward for the aerodynamic effects and slender beam(s) for the structural effects. Given a set of input data, the computer program calculates an aerodynamic influence coefficient matrix and a structural influence coefficient matrix.

  3. Kevlar/PMR-15 polyimide matrix composite for a complex shaped DC-9 drag reduction fairing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, R. T.; Mccarthy, R. F.; Willer, M. S.; Hrach, F. J.

    1982-01-01

    The Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) Program was established by NASA to improve the fuel efficiency of commercial transport aircraft and thereby to reduce the amount of fuel consumed by the air transportation industry. One of the final items developed by the program is an improved fairing which is the aft closure for the thrust reverser actuators on the JT8D nacelles on DC-9 aircraft. The reduced-drag fairing uses, in the interest of weight savings, an advanced composite construction. The composite material contains Kevlar 49 fibers in a PMR-15 matrix. Attention is given to the aerodynamic configuration, the material system, and aspects of fabrication development.

  4. Experimental Analysis of Aerodynamic Aspects of Sport Utility Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DINESH Y DHANDE

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In an era fuel efficiency has become topic of discussion not only among the scholar researchers but also common men. As rapid and continuous increase in prizes of fuels consumers are going for most fuel efficient vehicles. By aerodynamic styling of vehicle one can not only improve the fuel efficiency but also ensure better stability and good handling characteristics of vehicles at higher speed especially on highways. The paper describes assessment of drag force (Fd and drag coefficient (Cd by conventional wind tunnel method. Theexperimental calculations were performed on subsonic wind tunnel having test section of 100cm x 30cm x 30 cm. Exact replica of model of sports utility vehicle (suv on reduced scale 1:32 is used to for experimentation to calculate Fd and Cd.

  5. Boundary layer control and profile drag of stationkeeping airships; Teiryugata hikosen no kyokaiso seigyo to keijo teiko

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuuchi, K.; Yamamura, N. [University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba (Japan); Eguchi, Y. [Honda Motor Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Adachi, T. [Osaka Sangyo Univ., Osaka (Japan); Onda, M. [Mechanical Engineering Lab., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-03-25

    Our aim is to optimize the aerodynamic shape of airships, which cruise at high Reynolds number. A cryogenic wind tunnel is used to achieve the desired flow. In the present paper we discuss the drag coefficient for airship models incorporating suction slots, for the purpose of boundary layer control. The pressure distributions on the models are measured over a wide range of Reynolds number for various suction discharges. By integrating the pressure distributions, it was found that the profile drag could be reduced using boundary layer control as low as the theoretical limit. Furthermore, the flow patterns around the models can be classified into four categories. The relationship between suction and surface velocity was also examined, which is critical in understanding drag reduction. 7 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. KNOW-BLADE Task-2 report: Aerodynamic accessories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, J.; Sørensen, Niels N.; Zahle, Frederik

    2004-01-01

    of a pulsating jet placed at the leading edge in order to enhance mean lift. The general trend is that increased pulsation frequency is beneficial, in that it reduces the oscillation amplitude and raisesthe mean lift level while lowering the mean drag level. An increased jet exit velocity has a tendency...... the airfoil geometry. In general the 7mm stallstrips placed at P00 and P-02 had the greatest effect on the max lift followed by stall strip P02. Unfortunately, there was not sufficient agreement between the experimental results and the simulations to draw any conclusions of optimum position andgeometry......In the EC project KNOW-BLADE a work package has been defined to investigate the possibility to numerically model aerodynamic accessories in existing Navier-Stokes solvers. Four different aerodynamic accessories have been investigated. Firstly, thepotential of applying active flow control by means...

  7. TRO-2D - A code for rational transonic aerodynamic optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, W. H., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Features and sample applications of the transonic rational optimization (TRO-2D) code are outlined. TRO-2D includes the airfoil analysis code FLO-36, the CONMIN optimization code and a rational approach to defining aero-function shapes for geometry modification. The program is part of an effort to develop an aerodynamically smart optimizer that will simplify and shorten the design process. The user has a selection of drag minimization and associated minimum lift, moment, and the pressure distribution, a choice among 14 resident aero-function shapes, and options on aerodynamic and geometric constraints. Design variables such as the angle of attack, leading edge radius and camber, shock strength and movement, supersonic pressure plateau control, etc., are discussed. The results of calculations of a reduced leading edge camber transonic airfoil and an airfoil with a natural laminar flow are provided, showing that only four design variables need be specified to obtain satisfactory results.

  8. Multi-Objective Flight Control for Drag Minimization and Load Alleviation of High-Aspect Ratio Flexible Wing Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Ting, Eric; Chaparro, Daniel; Drew, Michael; Swei, Sean

    2017-01-01

    As aircraft wings become much more flexible due to the use of light-weight composites material, adverse aerodynamics at off-design performance can result from changes in wing shapes due to aeroelastic deflections. Increased drag, hence increased fuel burn, is a potential consequence. Without means for aeroelastic compensation, the benefit of weight reduction from the use of light-weight material could be offset by less optimal aerodynamic performance at off-design flight conditions. Performance Adaptive Aeroelastic Wing (PAAW) technology can potentially address these technical challenges for future flexible wing transports. PAAW technology leverages multi-disciplinary solutions to maximize the aerodynamic performance payoff of future adaptive wing design, while addressing simultaneously operational constraints that can prevent the optimal aerodynamic performance from being realized. These operational constraints include reduced flutter margins, increased airframe responses to gust and maneuver loads, pilot handling qualities, and ride qualities. All of these constraints while seeking the optimal aerodynamic performance present themselves as a multi-objective flight control problem. The paper presents a multi-objective flight control approach based on a drag-cognizant optimal control method. A concept of virtual control, which was previously introduced, is implemented to address the pair-wise flap motion constraints imposed by the elastomer material. This method is shown to be able to satisfy the constraints. Real-time drag minimization control is considered to be an important consideration for PAAW technology. Drag minimization control has many technical challenges such as sensing and control. An initial outline of a real-time drag minimization control has already been developed and will be further investigated in the future. A simulation study of a multi-objective flight control for a flight path angle command with aeroelastic mode suppression and drag

  9. A novel hydrodynamic approach of drag-reducing polymers to improve left ventricular hypertrophy and aortic remodeling in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang X

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Xinlu Zhang,1,* Xu Wang,2,* Feng Hu,1 Boda Zhou,3 Hai-Bin Chen,1 Daogang Zha,1 Yili Liu,1 Yansong Guo,4 Lemin Zheng,2 Jiancheng Xiu1 1Department of Cardiology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, 2The Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences and Institute of Systems Biomedicine, School of Basic Medical Sciences, and Key Laboratory of Molecular Cardiovascular Sciences of Ministry of Education, Peking University Health Science Center, 3Department of Cardiology, Key Laboratory of Molecular Cardiovascular Sciences of Ministry of Education, and Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Molecular Biology and Regulatory Peptides of Ministry of Health, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing, 4Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Fujian Provincial Hospital, Fuzhou, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Drag-reducing polymers (DRPs, when added in minute concentrations, have been shown to decrease peripheral vascular resistance. In this study, the effect of DRPs on the hypertension-induced left ventricular hypertrophy and aortic remodeling was evaluated in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR. Male SHR and age-matched Wistar rats were divided into four groups and received intravenous injection of normal saline (NS or DRPs. Body weight (BW, heart rate (HR and systolic blood pressure (SBP were measured. Echocardiography was used to evaluate the changes in left ventricle (LV function and global wall motion. The LV and aorta were stained by hematoxylin and eosin. Cell size of cardiomyocytes and aortic medial thickness were evaluated for each section. The expression of endothelin-1 (ET-1 of LV and aorta was examined by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. There was no significant difference in the increase of SBP among SHR + NS, SHR + 10DRP and SHR + 20DRP groups. SHR + NS group had markedly smaller left ventricular end

  10. A Note on Disk Drag Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Gunther, Neil J

    2012-01-01

    The electrical power consumed by typical magnetic hard disk drives (HDD) not only increases linearly with the number of spindles but, more significantly, it increases as very fast power-laws of speed (RPM) and diameter. Since the theoretical basis for this relationship is neither well-known nor readily accessible in the literature, we show how these exponents arise from aerodynamic disk drag and discuss their import for green storage capacity planning.

  11. Aerodynamic optimization of an HSCT configuration using variable-complexity modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, M. G.; Mason, W. H.; Grossman, B.; Haftka, R. T.

    1993-01-01

    An approach to aerodynamic configuration optimization is presented for the high-speed civil transport (HSCT). A method to parameterize the wing shape, fuselage shape and nacelle placement is described. Variable-complexity design strategies are used to combine conceptual and preliminary-level design approaches, both to preserve interdisciplinary design influences and to reduce computational expense. Conceptual-design-level (approximate) methods are used to estimate aircraft weight, supersonic wave drag and drag due to lift, and landing angle of attack. The drag due to lift, wave drag and landing angle of attack are also evaluated using more detailed, preliminary-design-level techniques. New, approximate methods for estimating supersonic wave drag and drag due to lift are described. The methodology is applied to the minimization of the gross weight of an HSCT that flies at Mach 2.4 with a range of 5500 n.mi. Results are presented for wing planform shape optimization and for combined wing and fuselage optimization with nacelle placement. Case studies include both all-metal wings and advanced composite wings.

  12. Research on the drag reduction performance induced by the counterflowing jet for waverider with variable blunt radii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shi-bin; Wang, Zhen-guo; Barakos, George N.; Huang, Wei; Steijl, Rene

    2016-10-01

    Waverider will endure the huge aero-heating in the hypersonic flow, thus, it need be blunt for the leading edge. However, the aerodynamic performance will decrease for the blunt waverider because of the drag hoik. How to improve the aerodynamic performance and reduce the drag and aero-heating is very important. The variable blunt radii method will improve the aerodynamic performance, however, the huge aero-heating and bow shock wave at the head is still serious. In the current study, opposing jet is used in the waverider with variable blunt radii to improve its performance. The three-dimensional coupled implicit Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes(RANS) equation and the two equation SST k-ω turbulence model have been utilized to obtain the flow field properties. The numerical method has been validated against the available experimental data in the open literature. The obtained results show that the L/D will drop 7-8% when R changes from 2 to 8. The lift coefficient will increase, and the drag coefficient almost keeps the same when the variable blunt radii method is adopted, and the L/D will increase. The variable blunt radii method is very useful to improve the whole characteristics of blunt waverider and the L/D can improve 3%. The combination of the variable blunt radii method and opposing jet is a novel way to improve the whole performance of blunt waverider, and L/D can improve 4-5%. The aperture as a novel way of opposing jet is suitable for blunt waverider and also useful to improve the aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic characteristics of waverider in the hypersonic flow. There is the optimal P0in/P0 that can make the detached shock wave reattach the lower surface again so that the blunt waverider can get the better aerodynamic performance.

  13. Comparative study of the hydrodynamic drag reducer efficiency in petroleum samples; Estudo comparativo da eficiencia de redutores de atrito hidrodinamico comerciais em amostras de petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabadini, Edvaldo; Silva, Marcelo Alves da [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil); Ziglio, Claudio Marcos; Carvalho, Carlos Henrique Monteiro de; Rocha, Nelson de Oliveira [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES)

    2008-07-01

    In this work the efficiency of five commercial additives which produce drag reduction in petroleum was determined and compared. The studies were carried out in a rheometer using samples of petroleum from Bacia de Campos diluted in 50% of toluene. For such purpose the rheometer acts as a 'torquemeter', in which the magnitude of the drag reduction promoted by the additive is directly proportional to the difference in torque applied to maintain the sample in a specific flow rate. The obtained results have shown excellent capability of the additives to promote drag reduction (up to 20%) and small difference of efficiency among the additives was detectable. (author)

  14. The Effect of Aerodynamic Evaluators on the Multi-Objective Optimization of Flatback Airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M.; Slew, K. Lee; Matida, E.

    2016-09-01

    With the long lengths of today's wind turbine rotor blades, there is a need to reduce the mass, thereby requiring stiffer airfoils, while maintaining the aerodynamic efficiency of the airfoils, particularly in the inboard region of the blade where structural demands are highest. Using a genetic algorithm, the multi-objective aero-structural optimization of 30% thick flatback airfoils was systematically performed for a variety of aerodynamic evaluators such as lift-to-drag ratio (Cl/Cd), torque (Ct), and torque-to-thrust ratio (Ct/Cn) to determine their influence on airfoil shape and performance. The airfoil optimized for Ct possessed a 4.8% thick trailing-edge, and a rather blunt leading-edge region which creates high levels of lift and correspondingly, drag. It's ability to maintain similar levels of lift and drag under forced transition conditions proved it's insensitivity to roughness. The airfoil optimized for Cl/Cd displayed relatively poor insensitivity to roughness due to the rather aft-located free transition points. The Ct/Cn optimized airfoil was found to have a very similar shape to that of the Cl/Cd airfoil, with a slightly more blunt leading-edge which aided in providing higher levels of lift and moderate insensitivity to roughness. The influence of the chosen aerodynamic evaluator under the specified conditions and constraints in the optimization of wind turbine airfoils is shown to have a direct impact on the airfoil shape and performance.

  15. 聚丙烯酰胺压裂液减阻剂的合成及性能%Synthesis and properties of polyacrylamide drag reducer for fracturing fluid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张锋三; 沈一丁; 王磊; 马国艳; 苏莹; 任婷

    2016-01-01

    目前,非常规油气藏的开采备受重视,常规水基冻胶压裂液因其流变性较差及摩阻较高而无法满足降压增注的施工工艺,达到体积压裂的目的。为了解决伤害性较大及摩阻较高等问题,本文推出了一种能够同时满足降低摩阻、提高流变性的压裂液减阻剂。采用反相乳液聚合方式合成出了此种聚丙烯酰胺压裂液减阻剂,通过优化合成工艺,利用丙烯酰胺、3-烯丙基-2-羟基-1-丙烷磺酸钠及丙烯酸十八酯合成出了一种性能稳定的白色乳液压裂液减阻剂,并利用红外光谱仪、投射电子显微镜及激光粒度仪对聚丙烯酰胺乳液的结构及乳液粒径进行表征,结果表明,聚丙烯酰胺压裂液减阻剂中含有磺酸基和十八酯基团,乳液粒径为80nm,粒径较小。随后通过对乳液的减阻率及流变性测试,研究结果表明,在室温下,流速为10m/s、浓度为1g/L 时,压裂液减阻剂的减阻率为78%,减阻性能较好,另外,压裂液减阻剂具有较好的溶解性、耐剪切性和黏弹性,与常规黏土稳定剂和助排剂有着较好的配伍性。能够满足非常规油气藏体积压裂施工要求。%Unconventional reservoirs were very important oil-gas areas. Traditional water fracturing fluid had the trouble of rheological property and friction which made the fluid unable to satisfy the technology for reducing pressure and increasing injection. To solve the problem,the polyacrylamide fracturing fluid drag reducing agent(PAM-FR)was synthesized by polyacrylamide(PAM)and 2-acrylamido-2- methyl propane sulfonic acid(AMPS)and stearyl acrylate(SA)with inverse emulsion polymerization. Using an infrared spectrometer,projection electron microscope and laser particle size analyzer,the structure and size of PAM-FR were characterized. In PAM-FR containing sulfonic acid groups,the emulsion particle size of PAM-FR is 80nm. When testing the ability of drag

  16. Aerodynamics of bridge hangers in smooth and turbulent flow and implications on aeroelastic stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demartino, Cristoforo; Ricciardelli, Francesco; Georgakis, Christos T.

    2015-01-01

    and Georgakis, measuring roughness and shape deviation of the wind tunnel model, justified the measured aerodynamic coefficients. Flamand et al. [4], using the Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD), measured the spatial and temporal correlation of the pressure pattern along the HDPE tube with surface...... of a full scale yawed bridge cable section model, for varying Reynolds numbers and wind angles-of-attack, using passive dynamic wind tunnel tests. They demonstrated that the in-plane aerodynamic damping of a bridge cable section and the overall dynamic response are strongly affected by changes in the angle...... by an extruded High Density PolyEthylene (HDPE) circular sheath [1]. In the last 20 years, several bridge cable manufacturers have introduced surface modifications on HDPE sheath in order to reduce the drag and to ensure the aerodynamic stability in all climatic conditions. In the case of plain HDPE sheaths...

  17. Theoretical-Numerical Study of Feasibility of Use of Winglets on Low Aspect Ration Wings at Subsonic and Transonic Mach Numbers to Reduce Drag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlman, John M.; Liaw, Paul; Cerney, Michael J.

    1988-01-01

    A numerical design study was conducted to assess the drag reduction potential of winglets installed on a series of low aspect ratio wings at a design point of M=0.8, C sub L=0.3. Wing-winglet and wing-alone design geometries were obtained for wings of aspect ratios between 1.75 and 2.67, having leading edge sweep angles between 45 and 60 deg. Winglet length was fixed at 15% of wing semispan. To assess the relative performance between wing-winglet and wing-alone configurations, the PPW nonlinear extended small disturbance potential flow code was utilized. This model has proven to yield plausible transonic flow field simulations for the series of low aspect ratio configurations selected. Predicted decreases in pressure drag coefficient for the wing-winglet configurations relative to the corresponding wing-alone planform are about 15% at the design point. Predicted decreases in wing-winglet total drag coefficient are about 12%, relative to the corresponding wing-alone design. Longer winglets (25% of the wing semispan) yielded decreases in the pressure drag of up to 22% and total drag of up to 16.4%. These predicted drag coefficient reductions are comparable to reductions already demonstrated by actual winglet designs installed on higher aspect ratio transport type aircraft.

  18. Scalable, Lightweight, Low-Cost Aero/Electrodynamic Drag Deorbit Module Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed effort will develop the "Terminator Tape Deorbit Module", a lightweight, low-cost, scalable de-orbit module that will utilize both aerodynamic drag...

  19. CME propagation: Where does the solar wind drag take over?

    CERN Document Server

    Sachdeva, Nishtha; Colaninno, Robin; Vourlidas, Angelos

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the Sun-Earth dynamics of a set of eight well observed solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs) using data from the STEREO spacecraft. We seek to quantify the extent to which momentum coupling between these CMEs and the ambient solar wind (i.e., the aerodynamic drag) influences their dynamics. To this end, we use results from a 3D flux rope model fit to the CME data. We find that solar wind aerodynamic drag adequately accounts for the dynamics of the fastest CME in our sample. For the relatively slower CMEs, we find that drag-based models initiated below heliocentric distances ranging from 15 to 50 $R_{\\odot}$ cannot account for the observed CME trajectories. This is at variance with the general perception that the dynamics of slow CMEs are influenced primarily by solar wind drag from a few $R_{\\odot}$ onwards. Several slow CMEs propagate at roughly constant speeds above 15--50 $R_{\\odot}$. Drag-based models initiated above these heights therefore require negligible aerodynamic drag to explain their...

  20. Surrogate Based Optimization of Aerodynamic Noise for Streamlined Shape of High Speed Trains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenxu Sun

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Aerodynamic noise increases with the sixth power of the running speed. As the speed increases, aerodynamic noise becomes predominant and begins to be the main noise source at a certain high speed. As a result, aerodynamic noise has to be focused on when designing new high-speed trains. In order to perform the aerodynamic noise optimization, the equivalent continuous sound pressure level (SPL has been used in the present paper, which could take all of the far field observation probes into consideration. The Non-Linear Acoustics Solver (NLAS approach has been utilized for acoustic calculation. With the use of Kriging surrogate model, a multi-objective optimization of the streamlined shape of high-speed trains has been performed, which takes the noise level in the far field and the drag of the whole train as the objectives. To efficiently construct the Kriging model, the cross validation approach has been adopted. Optimization results reveal that both the equivalent continuous sound pressure level and the drag of the whole train are reduced in a certain extent.

  1. Polymer flexibility and turbulent drag reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gillissen, J.J.J.

    2008-01-01

    Polymer-induced drag reduction is the phenomenon by which the friction factor of a turbulent flow is reduced by the addition of small amounts of high-molecular-weight linear polymers, which conformation in solution at rest can vary between randomly coiled and rodlike. It is well known that drag redu

  2. Numerical simulation on heat transfer characteristics for turbulent drag-reducing flow with additives%添加剂湍流减阻流动的传热特性数值计算

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李昌烽; 许世铎; 冯晓东; 王迎慧

    2009-01-01

    The reynolds stress model and the Cross viscosity equation have been adopted to simulate the turbulent flow and temperature fields of the dilute polyacrylamide (PAM) solution in a two-dimensional axisymmetric circular tube. The effect of flow velocity on drag reduction and heat transfer performance of drag-reducing fluid have been investigated systematically. The results indicate that the drag reduction (DR) and heat transfer reduction (HTR) of drag-reducing fluid increase with increasing flow velocity and approach the asymptotes, and HTR is greater than DR all the time. The comparison between Colburn factor and friction coefficient shows that Colburn analogy is not so much applicable to the drag-reducing fluid,especially for the low bulk flow Reynolds number conditions.%采用雷诺应力模型和Cross粘度方程,对二维轴对称圆管内湍流流动的聚丙烯酰胺稀溶液(PAM)的流场和温度场进行了数值模拟.在数值计算结果的基础上,系统研究了流速对减阻流体的减阻性能和传热特性的影响.结果表明,减阻流体的减阻率和传热降低率随流速的增大逐渐增大到渐进值,而且传热降低率恒大于减阻率. 减阻流体柯尔本(Colburn)因子与摩擦系数的对比结果表明柯尔本比拟,特别是在较低流动雷诺数下有较大偏差.

  3. A novel hydrodynamic approach of drag-reducing polymers to improve left ventricular hypertrophy and aortic remodeling in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinlu; Wang, Xu; Hu, Feng; Zhou, Boda; Chen, Hai-Bin; Zha, Daogang; Liu, Yili; Guo, Yansong; Zheng, Lemin; Xiu, Jiancheng

    Drag-reducing polymers (DRPs), when added in minute concentrations, have been shown to decrease peripheral vascular resistance. In this study, the effect of DRPs on the hypertension-induced left ventricular hypertrophy and aortic remodeling was evaluated in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Male SHR and age-matched Wistar rats were divided into four groups and received intravenous injection of normal saline (NS) or DRPs. Body weight (BW), heart rate (HR) and systolic blood pressure (SBP) were measured. Echocardiography was used to evaluate the changes in left ventricle (LV) function and global wall motion. The LV and aorta were stained by hematoxylin and eosin. Cell size of cardiomyocytes and aortic medial thickness were evaluated for each section. The expression of endothelin-1 (ET-1) of LV and aorta was examined by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry. There was no significant difference in the increase of SBP among SHR + NS, SHR + 10DRP and SHR + 20DRP groups. SHR + NS group had markedly smaller left ventricular end-systolic diameter and left ventricular end-diastolic diameter but bigger anterior and posterior systolic wall thicknesses, while there was no significant difference in fractional shortening and ejection fraction. The cross-sectional areas (CSAs) of cardiomyocytes and the medial thickness of the aorta in SHR + 10 (ppm) DRP and SHR + 20 (ppm) DRP groups were significantly reduced compared with SHR + NS group. The expression of ET-1 in SHR + 10DRP and SHR + 20DRP groups was significantly attenuated. These results suggest that chronic treatment with DRPs can protect against left ventricular hypertrophy and aortic remodeling. DRPs may offer a new approach to the treatment of left ventricular hypertrophy and aortic remodeling caused by hypertension.

  4. Wind tunnel experiment of drag of isolated tree models in surface boundary layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    For very sparse tree land individual tree was the basic element of interaction between atmosphere and the surface. Drag of isolated tree was preliminary aerodynamic index for analyzing the atmospheric boundary layer of this kind of surface. A simple pendulum method was designed and carried out in wind tunnel to measure drag of isolated tree models according to balance law of moment of force. The method was easy to conduct and with small error. The results showed that the drag and drag coefficient of isolated tree increased with decreasing of its permeability or porosity. Relationship between drag coefficient and permeability of isolated tree empirically was expressed by quadric curve.

  5. Drag reduction of high altitude airships by active boundary layer control. Effect of a cusp on the reduction; Nodo kyokaiso seigyo ni yoru koso hikosen no teiko teigen. Cusp ni yoru teigen koka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamura, N. [Nissan Motor Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Matsuuchi, K.; Yamazaki, S.; Sasaki, A. [University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba (Japan); Onda, M. [Mechanical Engineering Lab., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-02-25

    The aerodynamic character of station-keeping airships at high Reynolds numbers is examined. The boundary layer developing on the surface is sucked by an axial flow fan through a slot located at the rear part of the airship and the sucked gas is blown out as a jet. To know the effect of the cusp two models with and without a cusp attached to the inlet of the suction slot were used. The flow field near the inlet, in particular the pressure on the surface, was measured as the suction discharge was varied. We obtained the form drag by integrating the pressure distribution in a wide range of Reynolds number and of suction discharge. Taking into account the jet thrust and the calculated friction drag, we finally determined the total drag and evaluated the role of the cusp. It was found that the cusp plays an efficient role in reducing the drag. 7 refs., 12 figs.

  6. Aerodynamic data of space vehicles

    CERN Document Server

    Weiland, Claus

    2014-01-01

    The capacity and quality of the atmospheric flight performance of space flight vehicles is characterized by their aerodynamic data bases. A complete aerodynamic data base would encompass the coefficients of the static longitudinal and lateral motions and the related dynamic coefficients. In this book the aerodynamics of 27 vehicles are considered. Only a few of them did really fly. Therefore the aerodynamic data bases are often not complete, in particular when the projects or programs were more or less abruptly stopped, often due to political decisions. Configurational design studies or the development of demonstrators usually happen with reduced or incomplete aerodynamic data sets. Therefore some data sets base just on the application of one of the following tools: semi-empirical design methods, wind tunnel tests, numerical simulations. In so far a high percentage of the data presented is incomplete and would have to be verified. Flight mechanics needs the aerodynamic coefficients as function of a lot of var...

  7. Optimization and design of an aircraft’s morphing wing-tip demonstrator for drag reduction at low speed, Part I – Aerodynamic optimization using genetic, bee colony and gradient descent algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea Koreanschi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an ‘in-house’ genetic algorithm is described and applied to an optimization problem for improving the aerodynamic performances of an aircraft wing tip through upper surface morphing. The algorithm’s performances were studied from the convergence point of view, in accordance with design conditions. The algorithm was compared to two other optimization methods, namely the artificial bee colony and a gradient method, for two optimization objectives, and the results of the optimizations with each of the three methods were plotted on response surfaces obtained with the Monte Carlo method, to show that they were situated in the global optimum region. The optimization results for 16 wind tunnel test cases and 2 objective functions were presented. The 16 cases used for the optimizations were included in the experimental test plan for the morphing wing-tip demonstrator, and the results obtained using the displacements given by the optimizations were evaluated.

  8. Shape optimization for aerodynamic efficiency and low observability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinh, Hoang; Van Dam, C. P.; Dwyer, Harry A.

    1993-01-01

    Field methods based on the finite-difference approximations of the time-domain Maxwell's equations and the potential-flow equation have been developed to solve the multidisciplinary problem of airfoil shaping for aerodynamic efficiency and low radar cross section (RCS). A parametric study and an optimization study employing the two analysis methods are presented to illustrate their combined capabilities. The parametric study shows that for frontal radar illumination, the RCS of an airfoil is independent of the chordwise location of maximum thickness but depends strongly on the maximum thickness, leading-edge radius, and leadingedge shape. In addition, this study shows that the RCS of an airfoil can be reduced without significant effects on its transonic aerodynamic efficiency by reducing the leading-edge radius and/or modifying the shape of the leading edge. The optimization study involves the minimization of wave drag for a non-lifting, symmetrical airfoil with constraints on the airfoil maximum thickness and monostatic RCS. This optimization study shows that the two analysis methods can be used effectively to design aerodynamically efficient airfoils with certain desired RCS characteristics.

  9. Investigation into the Mechanism of Polymer Thread Drag Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    drag reducers than polyacrylamides of equal molecular weight. The drag reduction increases as the Re or Cm increases. The concentrations of polymer...wall region, 10 < y’ < 100, for drag reduction to occur. The normalized distance from the wall is defined as y* = yut/v; u, is the friction velocity...AP 30, a polyacrylamide solution, with a 5000 ppm concentration on the centerline of a water flow in a glass tube, they achieved drag reduction up to

  10. Aerodynamics and thermal physics of helicopter ice accretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yiqiang

    Ice accretion on aircraft introduces significant loss in airfoil performance. Reduced lift-to- drag ratio reduces the vehicle capability to maintain altitude and also limits its maneuverability. Current ice accretion performance degradation modeling approaches are calibrated only to a limited envelope of liquid water content, impact velocity, temperature, and water droplet size; consequently inaccurate aerodynamic performance degradations are estimated. The reduced ice accretion prediction capabilities in the glaze ice regime are primarily due to a lack of knowledge of surface roughness induced by ice accretion. A comprehensive understanding of the ice roughness effects on airfoil heat transfer, ice accretion shapes, and ultimately aerodynamics performance is critical for the design of ice protection systems. Surface roughness effects on both heat transfer and aerodynamic performance degradation on airfoils have been experimentally evaluated. Novel techniques, such as ice molding and casting methods and transient heat transfer measurement using non-intrusive thermal imaging methods, were developed at the Adverse Environment Rotor Test Stand (AERTS) facility at Penn State. A novel heat transfer scaling method specifically for turbulent flow regime was also conceived. A heat transfer scaling parameter, labeled as Coefficient of Stanton and Reynolds Number (CSR = Stx/Rex --0.2), has been validated against reference data found in the literature for rough flat plates with Reynolds number (Re) up to 1x107, for rough cylinders with Re ranging from 3x104 to 4x106, and for turbine blades with Re from 7.5x105 to 7x106. This is the first time that the effect of Reynolds number is shown to be successfully eliminated on heat transfer magnitudes measured on rough surfaces. Analytical models for ice roughness distribution, heat transfer prediction, and aerodynamics performance degradation due to ice accretion have also been developed. The ice roughness prediction model was

  11. Drag prediction method of powered-on civil aircraft based on thrust drag bookkeeping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yufei

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A drag prediction method based on thrust drag bookkeeping (TDB is introduced for civil jet propulsion/airframe integration performance analysis. The method is derived from the control volume theory of a powered-on nacelle. Key problem of the TDB is identified to be accurate prediction of velocity coefficient of the powered-on nacelle. Accuracy of CFD solver is validated by test cases of the first AIAA Propulsion Aerodynamics Workshop. Then the TDB method is applied to thrust and drag decomposing of a realistic aircraft. A linear relation between the computations assumed free stream Mach number and the velocity coefficient result is revealed. The thrust losses caused by nozzle internal drag and pylon scrubbing are obtained by the isolated nacelle and mapped on to the in-flight whole configuration analysis. Effects of the powered-on condition are investigated by comparing through-flow configuration with powered-on configuration. The variance on aerodynamic coefficients and pressure distribution is numerically studied.

  12. Drag Reduction by Microvortexes in Transverse Microgrooves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao Wang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A transverse microgrooved surface was employed here to reduce the surface drag force by creating a slippage in bottom layer in turbulent boundary layer. A detailed simulation and experimental investigation on drag reduction by transverse microgrooves were given. The computational fluid dynamics simulation, using RNG k-ε turbulent model, showed that the vortexes were formed in the grooves and they were a main reason for the drag reduction. On the upside of the vortex, the revolving direction was consistent with the main flow, which decreased the flow shear stress by declining the velocity gradient. The experiments were carried out in a high-speed water tunnel with flow velocity varying from 17 to 19 m/s. The experimental results showed that the drag reduction was about 13%. Therefore, the computational and experimental results were cross-checked and consistent with each other to prove that the presented approach achieved effective drag reduction underwater.

  13. Aerodynamic instability of a cylinder with thin ice accretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjelstrup, Henrik; Georgakis, Christos

    2009-01-01

    prototyping. Next, a series of static wind tunnel tests were undertaken to determine the aerodynamic force coefficients of the rapidly prototyped hanger sectional model. Finally the aerodynamic force coefficients (drag, lift and moment), found from the static wind tunnel tests, were used to determine...... the potential for aerodynamic instability of the hanger through application of the quasi-steady theory developed by Gjelstrup et al. [9-10]. The application of the theoretical model yield regions of expected aerodynamic instability in which the observed vibrations of the Great Belt East Bridge hangers lie....

  14. Real-Time Adaptive Least-Squares Drag Minimization for Performance Adaptive Aeroelastic Wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrier, Yvonne L.; Nguyen, Nhan T.; Ting, Eric

    2016-01-01

    This paper contains a simulation study of a real-time adaptive least-squares drag minimization algorithm for an aeroelastic model of a flexible wing aircraft. The aircraft model is based on the NASA Generic Transport Model (GTM). The wing structures incorporate a novel aerodynamic control surface known as the Variable Camber Continuous Trailing Edge Flap (VCCTEF). The drag minimization algorithm uses the Newton-Raphson method to find the optimal VCCTEF deflections for minimum drag in the context of an altitude-hold flight control mode at cruise conditions. The aerodynamic coefficient parameters used in this optimization method are identified in real-time using Recursive Least Squares (RLS). The results demonstrate the potential of the VCCTEF to improve aerodynamic efficiency for drag minimization for transport aircraft.

  15. Covariance analysis of differential drag-based satellite cluster flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Yaacov, Ohad; Ivantsov, Anatoly; Gurfil, Pini

    2016-06-01

    One possibility for satellite cluster flight is to control relative distances using differential drag. The idea is to increase or decrease the drag acceleration on each satellite by changing its attitude, and use the resulting small differential acceleration as a controller. The most significant advantage of the differential drag concept is that it enables cluster flight without consuming fuel. However, any drag-based control algorithm must cope with significant aerodynamical and mechanical uncertainties. The goal of the current paper is to develop a method for examination of the differential drag-based cluster flight performance in the presence of noise and uncertainties. In particular, the differential drag control law is examined under measurement noise, drag uncertainties, and initial condition-related uncertainties. The method used for uncertainty quantification is the Linear Covariance Analysis, which enables us to propagate the augmented state and filter covariance without propagating the state itself. Validation using a Monte-Carlo simulation is provided. The results show that all uncertainties have relatively small effect on the inter-satellite distance, even in the long term, which validates the robustness of the used differential drag controller.

  16. Aerodynamic analysis of an isolated vehicle wheel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leśniewicz, P.; Kulak, M.; Karczewski, M.

    2014-08-01

    Increasing fuel prices force the manufacturers to look into all aspects of car aerodynamics including wheels, tyres and rims in order to minimize their drag. By diminishing the aerodynamic drag of vehicle the fuel consumption will decrease, while driving safety and comfort will improve. In order to properly illustrate the impact of a rotating wheel aerodynamics on the car body, precise analysis of an isolated wheel should be performed beforehand. In order to represent wheel rotation in contact with the ground, presented CFD simulations included Moving Wall boundary as well as Multiple Reference Frame should be performed. Sliding mesh approach is favoured but too costly at the moment. Global and local flow quantities obtained during simulations were compared to an experiment in order to assess the validity of the numerical model. Results of investigation illustrates dependency between type of simulation and coefficients (drag and lift). MRF approach proved to be a better solution giving result closer to experiment. Investigation of the model with contact area between the wheel and the ground helps to illustrate the impact of rotating wheel aerodynamics on the car body.

  17. Theoretical and Experimental studies of aerodynamic interference effects. [aerodynamic forces on winglets and on wing nacelle configurations for the YC-14 and KC-135 aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rettie, I. H.

    1980-01-01

    Theoretical studies of aerodynamic forces on winglets shed considerable light on the mechanism by which these devices can reduce drag at constant total lift and on the necessity for proper alignment and cambering to achieve optimum favorable interference. Results of engineering studies, wind tunnel tests and performance predictions are reviewed for installations proposed for the AMST YC-14 and the KC-135 airplanes. The other major area of aerodynamic interference discussed is that of engine nacelle installations. Slipper and overwing nacelles have received much attention because of their potential for noise reduction, propulsive lift and improved ground clearance. A major challenge is the integration of such nacelles with the supercritical flow on the upper surface of a swept wing in cruise at high subsonic speeds.

  18. The Aerodynamics of Frisbee Flight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Baumback

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This project will describe the physics of a common Frisbee in flight. The aerodynamic forces acting on the Frisbee are lift and drag, with lift being explained by Bernoulli‘s equation and drag by the Prandtl relationship. Using V. R. Morrison‘s model for the 2-dimensional trajectory of a Frisbee, equations for the x- and y- components of the Frisbee‘s motion were written in Microsoft Excel and the path of the Frisbee was illustrated. Variables such as angle of attack, area, and attack velocity were altered to see their effect on the Frisbee‘s path and to speculate on ways to achieve maximum distance and height.

  19. Rarefaction Effects in Hypersonic Aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riabov, Vladimir V.

    2011-05-01

    The Direct Simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) technique is used for numerical analysis of rarefied-gas hypersonic flows near a blunt plate, wedge, two side-by-side plates, disk, torus, and rotating cylinder. The role of various similarity parameters (Knudsen and Mach numbers, geometrical and temperature factors, specific heat ratios, and others) in aerodynamics of the probes is studied. Important kinetic effects that are specific for the transition flow regime have been found: non-monotonic lift and drag of plates, strong repulsive force between side-by-side plates and cylinders, dependence of drag on torus radii ratio, and the reverse Magnus effect on the lift of a rotating cylinder. The numerical results are in a good agreement with experimental data, which were obtained in a vacuum chamber at low and moderate Knudsen numbers from 0.01 to 10.

  20. Aerodynamic Analysis of Morphing Blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Caleb; Macphee, David; Carlisle, Madeline

    2016-11-01

    Interest in morphing blades has grown with applications for wind turbines and other aerodynamic blades. This passive control method has advantages over active control methods such as lower manufacturing and upkeep costs. This study has investigated the lift and drag forces on individual blades with experimental and computational analysis. The goal has been to show that these blades delay stall and provide larger lift-to-drag ratios at various angles of attack. Rigid and flexible airfoils were cast from polyurethane and silicone respectively, then lift and drag forces were collected from a load cell during 2-D testing in a wind tunnel. Experimental data was used to validate computational models in OpenFOAM. A finite volume fluid-structure-interaction solver was used to model the flexible blade in fluid flow. Preliminary results indicate delay in stall and larger lift-to-drag ratios by maintaining more optimal angles of attack when flexing. Funding from NSF REU site Grant EEC 1358991 is greatly appreciated.

  1. Wind Tunnel Experiments to Assess the Effect of Back-Mounted Radio Transmitters on Bird Body Drag

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The aerodynamic drag of bird bodies was measured in a wind tunnel, with and without back-mounted dummy radio transmitters. Flight performance estimates indicate that...

  2. Development of Pneumatic Aerodynamic Devices to Improve the Performance, Economics, and Safety of Heavy Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert J. Englar

    2000-06-19

    Under contract to the DOE Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies, the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) is developing and evaluating pneumatic (blown) aerodynamic devices to improve the performance, economics, stability and safety of operation of Heavy Vehicles. The objective of this program is to apply the pneumatic aerodynamic aircraft technology previously developed and flight-tested by GTRI personnel to the design of an efficient blown tractor-trailer configuration. Recent experimental results obtained by GTRI using blowing have shown drag reductions of 35% on a streamlined automobile wind-tunnel model. Also measured were lift or down-load increases of 100-150% and the ability to control aerodynamic moments about all 3 axes without any moving control surfaces. Similar drag reductions yielded by blowing on bluff afterbody trailers in current US trucking fleet operations are anticipated to reduce yearly fuel consumption by more than 1.2 billion gallons, while even further reduction is possible using pneumatic lift to reduce tire rolling resistance. Conversely, increased drag and down force generated instantaneously by blowing can greatly increase braking characteristics and control in wet/icy weather due to effective ''weight'' increases on the tires. Safety is also enhanced by controlling side loads and moments caused on these Heavy Vehicles by winds, gusts and other vehicles passing. This may also help to eliminate the jack-knifing problem if caused by extreme wind side loads on the trailer. Lastly, reduction of the turbulent wake behind the trailer can reduce splash and spray patterns and rough air being experienced by following vehicles. To be presented by GTRI in this paper will be results developed during the early portion of this effort, including a preliminary systems study, CFD prediction of the blown flowfields, and design of the baseline conventional tractor-trailer model and the pneumatic wind-tunnel model.

  3. Aerodynamic Analysis of the Truss-Braced Wing Aircraft Using Vortex-Lattice Superposition Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Eric Bi-Wen; Reynolds, Kevin Wayne; Nguyen, Nhan T.; Totah, Joseph J.

    2014-01-01

    The SUGAR Truss-BracedWing (TBW) aircraft concept is a Boeing-developed N+3 aircraft configuration funded by NASA ARMD FixedWing Project. This future generation transport aircraft concept is designed to be aerodynamically efficient by employing a high aspect ratio wing design. The aspect ratio of the TBW is on the order of 14 which is significantly greater than those of current generation transport aircraft. This paper presents a recent aerodynamic analysis of the TBW aircraft using a conceptual vortex-lattice aerodynamic tool VORLAX and an aerodynamic superposition approach. Based on the underlying linear potential flow theory, the principle of aerodynamic superposition is leveraged to deal with the complex aerodynamic configuration of the TBW. By decomposing the full configuration of the TBW into individual aerodynamic lifting components, the total aerodynamic characteristics of the full configuration can be estimated from the contributions of the individual components. The aerodynamic superposition approach shows excellent agreement with CFD results computed by FUN3D, USM3D, and STAR-CCM+. XXXXX Demand for green aviation is expected to increase with the need for reduced environmental impact. Most large transports today operate within the best cruise L/D range of 18-20 using the conventional tube-and-wing design. This configuration has led to marginal improvements in aerodynamic efficiency over this past century, as aerodynamic improvements tend to be incremental. A big opportunity has been shown in recent years to significantly reduce structural weight or trim drag, hence improved energy efficiency, with the use of lightweight materials such as composites. The Boeing 787 transport is an example of a modern airframe design that employs lightweight structures. High aspect ratio wing design can provide another opportunity for further improvements in energy efficiency. Historically, the study of high aspect ratio wings has been intimately tied to the study of

  4. Drag Reduction by Leidenfrost Vapor Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakarelski, Ivan U.; Marston, Jeremy O.; Chan, Derek Y. C.; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T.

    2011-05-01

    We demonstrate and quantify a highly effective drag reduction technique that exploits the Leidenfrost effect to create a continuous and robust lubricating vapor layer on the surface of a heated solid sphere moving in a liquid. Using high-speed video, we show that such vapor layers can reduce the hydrodynamic drag by over 85%. These results appear to approach the ultimate limit of drag reduction possible by different methods based on gas-layer lubrication and can stimulate the development of related energy saving technologies.

  5. Drag Reduction by Leidenfrost Vapor Layers

    KAUST Repository

    Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev

    2011-05-23

    We demonstrate and quantify a highly effective drag reduction technique that exploits the Leidenfrost effect to create a continuous and robust lubricating vapor layer on the surface of a heated solid sphere moving in a liquid. Using high-speed video, we show that such vapor layers can reduce the hydrodynamic drag by over 85%. These results appear to approach the ultimate limit of drag reduction possible by different methods based on gas-layer lubrication and can stimulate the development of related energy saving technologies.

  6. Optimal cycling time trial position models: aerodynamics versus power output and metabolic energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fintelman, D M; Sterling, M; Hemida, H; Li, F-X

    2014-06-03

    The aerodynamic drag of a cyclist in time trial (TT) position is strongly influenced by the torso angle. While decreasing the torso angle reduces the drag, it limits the physiological functioning of the cyclist. Therefore the aims of this study were to predict the optimal TT cycling position as function of the cycling speed and to determine at which speed the aerodynamic power losses start to dominate. Two models were developed to determine the optimal torso angle: a 'Metabolic Energy Model' and a 'Power Output Model'. The Metabolic Energy Model minimised the required cycling energy expenditure, while the Power Output Model maximised the cyclists׳ power output. The input parameters were experimentally collected from 19 TT cyclists at different torso angle positions (0-24°). The results showed that for both models, the optimal torso angle depends strongly on the cycling speed, with decreasing torso angles at increasing speeds. The aerodynamic losses outweigh the power losses at cycling speeds above 46km/h. However, a fully horizontal torso is not optimal. For speeds below 30km/h, it is beneficial to ride in a more upright TT position. The two model outputs were not completely similar, due to the different model approaches. The Metabolic Energy Model could be applied for endurance events, while the Power Output Model is more suitable in sprinting or in variable conditions (wind, undulating course, etc.). It is suggested that despite some limitations, the models give valuable information about improving the cycling performance by optimising the TT cycling position.

  7. Drag coefficient and plant form response to wind speed in three plant species: Burning Bush (Euonymus alatus), Colorado Blue Spruce (Picea pungens glauca.), and Fountain Grass (Pennisetum setaceum)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, J. A.; Nickling, W. G.; King, J.

    2002-12-01

    Whole-plant drag coefficients (Cd) for three plant species: Burning Bush (Euonymus alatus), Colorado Blue Spruce (Picea pungens glauca.), and Fountain Grass (Pennisetum setaceum) in five different porosity configurations were developed from force versus wind speed data collected with a force balance in a recirculating wind tunnel. The average Cd for the Burning Bush, Colorado Spruce, and Fountain Grass in their untrimmed forms were 0.42 (±0.03), 0.39 (±0.04), and 0.34 (±0.06), respectively. Drag curves (Cd versus flow Reynolds number (Re) function) for the Burning Bush and Colorado Spruce were found to exhibit, for the lower porosity configurations, a rise to a maximum around flow Reynolds numbers (Re = ρuhh/ν) of 2 × 105. Fountain Grass Cd was shown to be dependent upon Re to values >5 × 105. The Burning Bush and Colorado Spruce plants reduced their drag, upon reaching their maxima, by decreasing their frontal area and increasing their porosity. Maximum Cd for these plants occurred at optical porosities of ˜0.20. The Fountain Grass reduced drag at high Re by decreasing frontal area and porosity. The mechanism of drag reduction in Fountain Grass was continual reconfiguration to a more aerodynamic form as evidenced by continual reduction of Cd with Re.

  8. Bubble Drag Reduction Requires Large Bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschoof, Ruben A.; van der Veen, Roeland C. A.; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-09-01

    In the maritime industry, the injection of air bubbles into the turbulent boundary layer under the ship hull is seen as one of the most promising techniques to reduce the overall fuel consumption. However, the exact mechanism behind bubble drag reduction is unknown. Here we show that bubble drag reduction in turbulent flow dramatically depends on the bubble size. By adding minute concentrations (6 ppm) of the surfactant Triton X-100 into otherwise completely unchanged strongly turbulent Taylor-Couette flow containing bubbles, we dramatically reduce the drag reduction from more than 40% to about 4%, corresponding to the trivial effect of the bubbles on the density and viscosity of the liquid. The reason for this striking behavior is that the addition of surfactants prevents bubble coalescence, leading to much smaller bubbles. Our result demonstrates that bubble deformability is crucial for bubble drag reduction in turbulent flow and opens the door for an optimization of the process.

  9. Bubble drag reduction requires large bubbles

    CERN Document Server

    Verschoof, Ruben A; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-01-01

    In the maritime industry, the injection of air bubbles into the turbulent boundary layer under the ship hull is seen as one of the most promising techniques to reduce the overall fuel consumption. However, the exact mechanism behind bubble drag reduction is unknown. Here we show that bubble drag reduction in turbulent flow dramatically depends on the bubble size. By adding minute concentrations (6 ppm) of the surfactant Triton X-100 into otherwise completely unchanged strongly turbulent Taylor-Couette flow containing bubbles, we dramatically reduce the drag reduction from more than 40% to about 4%, corresponding to the trivial effect of the bubbles on the density and viscosity of the liquid. The reason for this striking behavior is that the addition of surfactants prevents bubble coalescence, leading to much smaller bubbles. Our result demonstrates that bubble deformability is crucial for bubble drag reduction in turbulent flow and opens the door for an optimization of the process.

  10. Aerodynamics profile not in stationary flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А.А. Загорулько

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available  Consider the question about influence of unsteady flight on the size of drag and lift coefficients of theaerodynamic profile. Distinctive features of this investigation are obtaining data about aerodynamic drag chancing in process unsteady on high angle at attack and oscillation profile in subsonic and transonic flight. Given analysis of oscillation profile show, that dynamic loops accompany change of lift and dray force. The researches show that it is necessary to clarity the mathematic model of the airplane flight dynamics by introducing numbers, with take into account unsteady effects.

  11. Drag Coefficients of Low Altitude Stationary Flight Test Airship Estimated from Flight Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuyama, Masahiro; Matsumoto, Takashi

    Flight tests were carried out to obtain aerodynamic characteristics of the low altitude stationary flight test airship. The deceleration test method was used in a flight experiment to obtain the drag coefficient. Combining with the deceleration test result, the minimum drag coefficient was acquired by equating a thrust force with the corresponding drag force at the steady level flight. As a result, 0.044±0.002 were obtained on the minimum drag coefficient of the airship. Modifications of the deceleration test data analysis are proposed to be applicable to test data obtained under non-zero attack angle etc. in the paper.

  12. NASP aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Allen H., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the critical aerodynamic technologies needed to support the development of a class of aircraft represented by the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP). The air-breathing, single-stage-to-orbit mission presents a severe challenge to all of the aeronautical disciplines and demands an extension of the state-of-the-art in each technology area. While the largest risk areas are probably advanced materials and the development of the scramjet engine, there remains a host of design issues and technology problems in aerodynamics, aerothermodynamics, and propulsion integration. The paper presents an overview of the most significant propulsion integration problems, and defines the most critical fluid flow phenomena that must be evaluated, defined, and predicted for the class of aircraft represented by the Aero-Space Plane.

  13. Application of CAD/CAE class systems to aerodynamic analysis of electric race cars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, L.; Baier, A.; Buchacz, A.; Majzner, M.; Sobek, M.

    2015-11-01

    Aerodynamics is one of the most important factors which influence on every aspect of a design of a car and car driving parameters. The biggest influence aerodynamics has on design of a shape of a race car body, especially when the main objective of the race is the longest distance driven in period of time, which can not be achieved without low energy consumption and low drag of a car. Designing shape of the vehicle body that must generate the lowest possible drag force, without compromising the other parameters of the drive. In the article entitled „Application of CAD/CAE class systems to aerodynamic analysis of electric race cars” are being presented problems solved by computer analysis of cars aerodynamics and free form modelling. Analysis have been subjected to existing race car of a Silesian Greenpower Race Team. On a basis of results of analysis of existence of Kammback aerodynamic effect innovative car body were modeled. Afterwards aerodynamic analysis were performed to verify existence of aerodynamic effect for innovative shape and to recognize aerodynamics parameters of the shape. Analysis results in the values of coefficients and aerodynamic drag forces. The resulting drag forces Fx, drag coefficients Cx(Cd) and aerodynamic factors Cx*A allowed to compare all of the shapes to each other. Pressure distribution, air velocities and streams courses were useful in determining aerodynamic features of analyzed shape. For aerodynamic tests was used Ansys Fluent CFD software. In a paper the ways of surface modeling with usage of Realize Shape module and classic surface modeling were presented. For shapes modeling Siemens NX 9.0 software was used. Obtained results were used to estimation of existing shapes and to make appropriate conclusions.

  14. Experimental investigation of drag coefficients of gobi surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董治宝; 屈建军; 刘小平; 张伟民; 王训明

    2002-01-01

    The response of gobi surfaces to the near-surface air flow can be characterized quantitatively by drag coefficients. By using wind tunnel tests, an attempt is made to define the relationship between the drag coefficients of gobi surfaces and gravel size and coverage. It is concluded that the drag coefficients of gobi surfaces tend to be constants when gravel coverage is over 40%-50%. Consequently, we think that the gobi deflation planes expanding vastly in the arid Northwestern China are aerodynamically stable, at least not the supplying sources of current dust storms, and therefore the emphasis on dust storm control should be paid on the so-called "earth gobi" that has low gravel coverage. The prediction model for drag coefficients of gobi surfaces has been developed by regressing drag coefficients on gravel size and coverage, the predicted results are in reasonably good agreement with wind tunnel results (R 2 = 0.94). The change of drag coefficients with gravel friction Reynolds number implies that the development extent of drag effect increases with gravel size and coverage.

  15. A SIMPLIFIED THEORY FOR UNSTEADY AERODYNAMIC FORCES ACTING ON AN AIRFOIL FLYING ABOVE SEA-WAVES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHENG Qi-hu; WU De-ming; ZHANG Liang

    2004-01-01

    A simplified theoretical method based on the quasi-steady wing theory was proposed to study the unsteady aerodynamic forces acting on an airfoil flying in non-uniform flow. Comparison between the theoretical results and the numerical results based on nonlinear theory was made. It shows that the simplified theory is a good approximation for the investigation of the aerodynamic characteristics of an airfoil flying above sea-waves. From on the simplified theory it is also found that an airfoil can get thrust from a wave-disturbed airflow and thus the total drag is reduced. And the relationship among the thrust, the flying altitude, the flying speed and the wave parameters was worked out and discussed.

  16. Aerodynamics of a cycling team in a time trial: does the cyclist at the front benefit?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iniguez-de-la Torre, A; Iniguez, J [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Salamanca, E37071 (Spain)], E-mail: nacho@usal.es

    2009-11-15

    When seasonal journeys take place in nature, birds and fishes migrate in groups. This provides them not only with security but also a considerable saving of energy. The power they need to travel requires overcoming aerodynamic or hydrodynamic drag forces, which can be substantially reduced when the group travels in an optimal arrangement. Also in this area, humans imitate nature, which is especially evident in the practice of outdoor sports and motor competitions. Cycle races, in which speeds of up to 15 m s{sup -1} are frequent, offer great opportunities to appreciate the advantage of travelling in a group. Here we present a brief analysis of the aerodynamics of a cycling team in a time-trial challenge, showing how each rider is favoured according to his position in the group. We conclude that the artificial tail wind created by the team also benefits the cyclist at the front by about 5%.

  17. Drag on Sessile Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Andrew J. B.; Fleck, Brian; Nobes, David; Sen, Debjyoti; Amirfazli, Alidad; University of Alberta Mechanical Engineering Collaboration

    2013-11-01

    We present the first ever direct measurements of the coefficient of drag on sessile drops at Reynolds numbers from the creeping flow regime up to the point of incipient motion, made using a newly developed floating element differential drag sensor. Surfaces of different wettabilities (PMMA, Teflon, and a superhydrophobic surface (SHS)), wet by water, hexadecane, and various silicone oils, are used to study the effects of drop shape, and fluid properties on drag. The relation between drag coefficient and Reynolds number (scaled by drop height) varies slightly with liquid-solid system and drop volume with results suggesting the drop experiences increased drag compared to similar shaped solid bodies due to drop oscillation influencing the otherwise laminar flow. Drops adopting more spherical shapes are seen to experience the greatest force at any given airspeed. This indicates that the relative exposed areas of drops is an important consideration in terms of force, with implications for the shedding of drops in applications such as airfoil icing and fuel cell flooding. The measurement technique used in this work can be adapted to measure drag force on other deformable, lightly adhered objects such as dust, sand, snow, vesicles, foams, and biofilms. The authours acknowledge NSERC, Alberta Innovates Technology Futures, and the Killam Trusts.

  18. Vortical sources of aerodynamic force and moment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J. Z.; Wu, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that the aerodynamic force and moment can be expressed in terms of vorticity distribution (and entropy variation for compressible flow) on near wake plane, or in terms of boundary vorticity flux on the body surface. Thus the vortical sources of lift and drag are clearly identified, which is the real physical basis of optimal aerodynamic design. Moreover, these sources are highly compact, hence allowing one to concentrate on key local regions of the configuration, which have dominating effect to the lift and drag. A detail knowledge of the vortical low requires measuring or calculating the vorticity and dilatation field, which is however still a challenging task. Nevertheless, this type of formulation has some unique advantages; and how to set up a well-posed problem, in particular how to establish vorticity-dilatation boundary conditions, is addressed.

  19. AEROX: Computer program for transonic aircraft aerodynamics to high angles of attack. Volume 1: Aerodynamic methods and program users' guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelson, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    The AEROX program estimates lift, induced-drag and pitching moments to high angles (typ. 60 deg) for wings and for wingbody combinations with or without an aft horizontal tail. Minimum drag coefficients are not estimated, but may be input for inclusion in the total aerodynamic parameters which are output in listed and plotted formats. The theory, users' guide, test cases, and program listing are presented.

  20. Bioinspired surfaces for turbulent drag reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovin, Kevin B; Gose, James W; Perlin, Marc; Ceccio, Steven L; Tuteja, Anish

    2016-08-06

    In this review, we discuss how superhydrophobic surfaces (SHSs) can provide friction drag reduction in turbulent flow. Whereas biomimetic SHSs are known to reduce drag in laminar flow, turbulence adds many new challenges. We first provide an overview on designing SHSs, and how these surfaces can cause slip in the laminar regime. We then discuss recent studies evaluating drag on SHSs in turbulent flow, both computationally and experimentally. The effects of streamwise and spanwise slip for canonical, structured surfaces are well characterized by direct numerical simulations, and several experimental studies have validated these results. However, the complex and hierarchical textures of scalable SHSs that can be applied over large areas generate additional complications. Many studies on such surfaces have measured no drag reduction, or even a drag increase in turbulent flow. We discuss how surface wettability, roughness effects and some newly found scaling laws can help explain these varied results. Overall, we discuss how, to effectively reduce drag in turbulent flow, an SHS should have: preferentially streamwise-aligned features to enhance favourable slip, a capillary resistance of the order of megapascals, and a roughness no larger than 0.5, when non-dimensionalized by the viscous length scale.This article is part of the themed issue 'Bioinspired hierarchically structured surfaces for green science'.

  1. Estimation of unsteady aerodynamic forces using pointwise velocity data

    CERN Document Server

    Gómez, F; Blackburn, H M

    2016-01-01

    A novel method to estimate unsteady aerodynamic force coefficients from pointwise velocity measurements is presented. The methodology is based on a resolvent-based reduced-order model which requires the mean flow to obtain physical flow structures and pointwise measurement to calibrate their amplitudes. A computationally-affordable time-stepping methodology to obtain resolvent modes in non-trivial flow domains is introduced and compared to previous existing matrix-free and matrix-forming strategies. The technique is applied to the unsteady flow around an inclined square cylinder at low Reynolds number. The potential of the methodology is demonstrated through good agreement between the fluctuating pressure distribution on the cylinder and the temporal evolution of the unsteady lift and drag coefficients predicted by the model and those computed by direct numerical simulation.

  2. Improved Aerodynamic Analysis for Hybrid Wing Body Conceptual Design Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gern, Frank H.

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of ongoing efforts to develop, evaluate, and validate different tools for improved aerodynamic modeling and systems analysis of Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) aircraft configurations. Results are being presented for the evaluation of different aerodynamic tools including panel methods, enhanced panel methods with viscous drag prediction, and computational fluid dynamics. Emphasis is placed on proper prediction of aerodynamic loads for structural sizing as well as viscous drag prediction to develop drag polars for HWB conceptual design optimization. Data from transonic wind tunnel tests at the Arnold Engineering Development Center s 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel was used as a reference data set in order to evaluate the accuracy of the aerodynamic tools. Triangularized surface data and Vehicle Sketch Pad (VSP) models of an X-48B 2% scale wind tunnel model were used to generate input and model files for the different analysis tools. In support of ongoing HWB scaling studies within the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) program, an improved finite element based structural analysis and weight estimation tool for HWB center bodies is currently under development. Aerodynamic results from these analyses are used to provide additional aerodynamic validation data.

  3. Natural aerodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Scorer, R S

    1958-01-01

    Natural Aerodynamics focuses on the mathematics of any problem in air motion.This book discusses the general form of the law of fluid motion, relationship between pressure and wind, production of vortex filaments, and conduction of vorticity by viscosity. The flow at moderate Reynolds numbers, turbulence in a stably stratified fluid, natural exploitation of atmospheric thermals, and plumes in turbulent crosswinds are also elaborated. This text likewise considers the waves produced by thermals, transformation of thin layer clouds, method of small perturbations, and dangers of extra-polation.Thi

  4. Aerodynamic control of bridge cables through shape modification: A preliminary study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleissl, Kenneth; Georgakis, Christos

    2011-01-01

    to suffer from either dry inclined galloping, ‘‘drag crisis’’ or Den Hartog galloping, the shrouded cylinder is found to be stable for all angles of attack, albeit with an increase in drag at typical design wind velocities. Finally, turbulent flow is found to introduce an increased amount of aerodynamic...

  5. Action of drag reduces in mono and two--phase low in pipeline; Acao de redutores de atrito em escoamentos mono bifasicos em tubulacoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paes, Diogo M.; Franca, Fernando A. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Mecanica; Bizotto, Vanessa C. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Lab. Kelsen Valente Serra (LABPETRO); Sabadini, Edvaldo [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    2008-07-01

    The phenomenon of hydrodynamic drag reduction (DR) takes place when small amounts of polymer with high molecular weight are added to a turbulent flow. This phenomenon is very important in pumping process, mainly in petroleum industries. Studies on DR have been made using high-grade polyacrylamide (PAM) and a commercial polymer (FA920, basically composed by PAM) in water solution, both with a high molecular weight. At first, studies were developed in a double gap type rheometer using small amount of polymer. They provided information on the polymer concentration in which the maximum DR was reached, the amount of drag reduction and the solution mechanical stability along a turbulent shearing process. The results indicated a limiting 17%DR when a 2 ppm aqueous solution of high grade PAM was tested. These tests, besides giving preliminary estimations, are limited in terms of engineering application due to the low shearing rates applied by the viscometer. The tests performed at LabPetro-UNICAMP comprised of pressure drop measurements in actual pipe flows, single water and two-phase airwater flows, using the previous knowledge acquired with the viscometer tests. In the former case, the classical Moody diagram, (f vs Re) has been drawn to show the %DR in terms of the friction factor reduction for the Reynolds number in the 2x10{sup 4} to 10{sup 5} range. Single phase flows attained up to 37% DR with commercial PAM (FA 920), depending on the polymer concentration. Preliminary results of DR tests performed with air-water flows, in different flow patterns - stratified-wavy and slug flows, are shown. To infer the air-water flow pattern, high speed filming was used. (author)

  6. Numerical investigation of the aerodynamic and structural characteristics of a corrugated wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hord, Kyle

    Previous experimental studies on static, bio-inspired corrugated wings have shown that they produce favorable aerodynamic properties such as delayed stall compared to streamlined wings and flat plates at high Reynolds numbers (Re ≥ 4x104). The majority of studies have been carried out with scaled models of dragonfly forewings from the Aeshna Cyanea in either wind tunnels or water channels. In this thesis, the aerodynamics of a corrugated airfoil was studied using computational fluid dynamics methods at a low Reynolds number of 1000. Structural analysis was also performed using the commercial software SolidWorks 2009. The flow field is described by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations on an overlapping grid using the pressure-Poisson method. The equations are discretized in space with second-order accurate central differences. Time integration is achieved through the second-order Crank-Nicolson implicit method. The complex vortex structures that form in the corrugated airfoil valleys and around the corrugated airfoil are studied in detail. Comparisons are made with experimental measurements from corrugated wings and also with simulations of a flat plate. Contrary to the studies at high Reynolds numbers, our study shows that at low Reynolds numbers the wing corrugation does not provide any aerodynamic benefit compared to a smoothed flat plate. Instead, the corrugated profile generates more pressure drag which is only partially offset by the reduction of friction drag, leading to more total drag than the flat plate. Structural analysis shows that the wing corrugation can increase the resistance to bending moments on the wing structure. A smoothed structure has to be three times thicker to provide the same stiffness. It was concluded the corrugated wing has the structural benefit to provide the same resistance to bending moments with a much reduced weight.

  7. Uncertainty Quantification and Sensitivity Analysis of Transonic Aerodynamics with Geometric Uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojing Wu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Airfoil geometric uncertainty can generate aerodynamic characteristics fluctuations. Uncertainty quantification is applied to compute its impact on the aerodynamic characteristics. In addition, the contribution of each uncertainty variable to aerodynamic characteristics should be computed by the uncertainty sensitivity analysis. In the paper, Sobol’s analysis is used for uncertainty sensitivity analysis and a nonintrusive polynomial chaos method is used for uncertainty quantification and Sobol’s analysis. It is difficult to describe geometric uncertainty because it needs a lot of input parameters. In order to alleviate the contradiction between the variable dimension and computational cost, a principal component analysis is introduced to describe geometric uncertainty of airfoil. Through this technique, the number of input uncertainty variables can be reduced and typical global deformation modes can be obtained. By uncertainty quantification, we can learn that the flow characteristics of shock wave and boundary layer separation are sensitive to the geometric uncertainty in transonic region, which is the main reason that transonic drag is sensitive to the geometric uncertainty. The sensitivity analysis shows that the model can be simplified by eliminating unimportant geometric modes. Moreover, which are the most important geometric modes to transonic aerodynamics can be learnt. This is very helpful for airfoil design.

  8. Drag-shield drop tower residual acceleration optimisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, A.; Sorribes-Palmer, F.; Fernandez De Pierola, M.; Duran, J.

    2016-07-01

    Among the forces that appear in drop towers for microgravity experiments, aerodynamic drag plays a crucial role in the residual acceleration. Buoyancy can also be critical, especially at the first instances of the drop when the low speed of the experimental platform makes the aerodynamic drag small compared with buoyancy. In this paper the perturbation method is used to formulate an analytical model which has been validated experimentally. The experimental test was conduced by undergraduate students of aerospace engineering at the Institute of Microgravity ‘Ignacio Da Riva’ of the Technical University of Madrid (IDR/UPM) microgravity tower. The test helped students to understand the influence of the buoyancy on the residual acceleration of the experiment platform. The objective of the students was to understand the physical process during the drop, identify the main parameters involved in the residual acceleration and determine the most suitable configuration for the next drop tower proposed to be built at UPM.

  9. Prediction of Aerodynamic Coefficients using Neural Networks for Sparse Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, T.; Bardina, Jorge; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Basic aerodynamic coefficients are modeled as functions of angles of attack and sideslip with vehicle lateral symmetry and compressibility effects. Most of the aerodynamic parameters can be well-fitted using polynomial functions. In this paper a fast, reliable way of predicting aerodynamic coefficients is produced using a neural network. The training data for the neural network is derived from wind tunnel test and numerical simulations. The coefficients of lift, drag, pitching moment are expressed as a function of alpha (angle of attack) and Mach number. The results produced from preliminary neural network analysis are very good.

  10. Wake analysis of aerodynamic components for the glide envelope of a jackdaw (Corvus monedula).

    Science.gov (United States)

    KleinHeerenbrink, Marco; Warfvinge, Kajsa; Hedenström, Anders

    2016-05-15

    Gliding flight is a relatively inexpensive mode of flight used by many larger bird species, where potential energy is used to cover the cost of aerodynamic drag. Birds have great flexibility in their flight configuration, allowing them to control their flight speed and glide angle. However, relatively little is known about how this flexibility affects aerodynamic drag. We measured the wake of a jackdaw (Corvus monedula) gliding in a wind tunnel, and computed the components of aerodynamic drag from the wake. We found that induced drag was mainly affected by wingspan, but also that the use of the tail has a negative influence on span efficiency. Contrary to previous work, we found no support for the separated primaries being used in controlling the induced drag. Profile drag was of similar magnitude to that reported in other studies, and our results suggest that profile drag is affected by variation in wing shape. For a folded tail, the body drag coefficient had a value of 0.2, rising to above 0.4 with the tail fully spread, which we conclude is due to tail profile drag.

  11. Measuring the Effects of Lift and Drag on Projectile Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Rod

    2012-01-01

    The trajectory of a projectile through the air is affected both by gravity and by aerodynamic forces. The latter forces can conveniently be ignored in many situations, even when they are comparatively large. For example, if a 145-g, 74-mm diameter baseball is pitched at 40 ms[superscript -1] (89.5 mph), it experiences a drag force of about 1.5 N.…

  12. Asymptotic analytical methods in fluid mechanics related to drag prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inger, G. R.

    1975-01-01

    Some recent theoretical work of a purely analytical nature is described which promises to provide engineering predictions for the important drag-related phenomena of flow in the stall regime. This analytical work deals with rigorous asymptotic studies of the complete Navier-Stokes equations that govern the viscous flow around any aerodynamic body under conditions where boundary layer separation takes place from the body surface.

  13. Acoustic Liner Drag: Measurements on Novel Facesheet Perforate Geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howerton, Brian M.; Jones, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Interest in characterization of the aerodynamic drag of acoustic liners has increased in the past several years. This paper details experiments in the NASA Langley Grazing Flow Impedance Tube to quantify the relative drag of several perforate-over-honeycomb liner configurations at flow speeds of centerline flow Mach number equals 0.3 and 0.5. Various perforate geometries and orientations are investigated to determine their resistance factors using a static pressure drop approach. Comparison of these resistance factors gives a relative measurement of liner drag. For these same flow conditions, acoustic measurements are performed with tonal excitation from 400 to 3000 hertz at source sound pressure levels of 140 and 150 decibels. Educed impedance and attenuation spectra are used to determine the impact of variations in perforate geometry on acoustic performance.

  14. Numerical and experimental investigations of drag force on scaled car model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponnusamy Nallusamy Selvaraju

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The numerical simulation and wind tunnel experiment were involved to observe the aerodynamic characteristics of car model. The investigation of aerodynamic characteristics on car model were difficult by using wind tunnel. It provides more comprehensive experimental data as a reference to validate the numerical simulation. In the wind tunnel experiments, the pressures on various ports over the car model were measured by using pressure scanner (64 bit channels. The drag force was calculated based on experimental and computational results. The realizable k-e model was employed to compute the aerodynamic drag and surface pressure distribution over a car model simulated at various wind velocity. The tetrahedron mesh approach was used to discretize the computational domain for accuracy. The computational results showed a good agreement with the experimental data and the results revealed that the induced aerodynamic drag determines the best car shape. In order to reveal the internal connection between the aerodynamic drag and wake vortices, the turbulent kinetic, re-circulation length, position of vortex core, and velocity profile in the wake were investigated by numerical analysis.

  15. Lift and Drag Measurements of Superhydrophobic Hydrofoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sur, Samrat; Kim, Jeong-Hyun; Rothstein, Jonathan

    2015-11-01

    For several years, superhydrophobic surfaces which are chemically hydrophobic with micron or nanometer scale surface features have been considered for their ability to reduce drag and produce slip in microfluidic devices. More recently it has been demonstrated that superhydrophobic surfaces reduce friction coefficient in turbulent flows as well. In this talk, we will consider that modifying a hydrofoil's surface to make it superhydrophobic has on the resulting lift and drag measurements over a wide range of angles of attack. Experiments are conducted over the range of Reynolds numbers between 10,000hydrofoil is made superhydrophobic. The hydrofoils are coated Teflon that has been hot embossed with a 325grit stainless steel woven mesh to produce a regular pattern of microposts. In addition to fully superhydrophobic hydrofoils, selectively coated symmetrical hydrofoils will also be examined to study the effect that asymmetries in the surface properties can have on lift and drag. Partially funded by NSF CBET-1334962.

  16. Charged aerodynamics of a Low Earth Orbit cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capon, C. J.; Brown, M.; Boyce, R. R.

    2016-11-01

    This work investigates the charged aerodynamic interaction of a Low Earth Orbiting (LEO) cylinder with the ionosphere. The ratio of charge to neutral drag force on a 2D LEO cylinder with diffusely reflecting cool walls is derived analytically and compared against self-consistent electrostatic Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations. Analytical calculations predict that neglecting charged drag in an O+ dominated LEO plasma with a neutral to ion number density ratio of 102 will cause a 10% over-prediction of O density based on body accelerations when body potential (ɸB) is ≤ -390 V. Above 900 km altitude in LEO, where H+ becomes the dominant ion species, analytical predictions suggest charge drag becomes equivalent to neutral drag for ɸB ≤ -0.75 V. Comparing analytical predictions against PIC simulations in the range of 0 PIC simulations, our in-house 6 degree of freedom orbital propagator saw a reduction in the semi-major axis of a 10 kg satellite at 700 km of 6.9 m/day and 0.98 m/day at 900 km compared that caused purely by neutral drag - 0.67 m/day and 0.056 m/day respectively. Hence, this work provides initial evidence that charged aerodynamics may become significant compared to neutral aerodynamics for high voltage LEO bodies.

  17. Bionic Research on Bird Feather for Drag Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beibei Feng

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available To reduce friction drag with bionic method in a more feasible way, the surface microstructure of bird feather was analyzed attempting to reveal the biologic features responding to skin friction drag reduction. Then comparative bionic surface mimicking bird feather was fabricated through hot-rolling technology for drag reduction. The microriblet film was formed on a PVC substrate through a self-developed hot-rolling equipment. The bionic surface with micron-scale riblets formed spontaneously due to the elastic-plastic deformation of PVC in high temperature and high pressure environment. Comparative experiments between micro-structured bionic surface and smooth surface were performed in a wind tunnel to evaluate the effect of bionic surface on drag reduction, and significant drag reduction efficiency was obtained. Numerical simulation results show that microvortex induced in the solid-gas interface of bionic surface has the effect of shear stress reduction and the small level of an additional pressure drag resulting from pressure distribution deviation on bird feather like surface, hence reducing the skin friction drag significantly. Therefore, with remarkable drag reduction performance and simple fabrication technology, the proposed drag reduction technique shows the promise for practical applications.

  18. The influence of flight style on the aerodynamic properties of avian wings as fixed lifting surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J. Lees

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The diversity of wing morphologies in birds reflects their variety of flight styles and the associated aerodynamic and inertial requirements. Although the aerodynamics underlying wing morphology can be informed by aeronautical research, important differences exist between planes and birds. In particular, birds operate at lower, transitional Reynolds numbers than do most aircraft. To date, few quantitative studies have investigated the aerodynamic performance of avian wings as fixed lifting surfaces and none have focused upon the differences between wings from different flight style groups. Dried wings from 10 bird species representing three distinct flight style groups were mounted on a force/torque sensor within a wind tunnel in order to test the hypothesis that wing morphologies associated with different flight styles exhibit different aerodynamic properties. Morphological differences manifested primarily as differences in drag rather than lift. Maximum lift coefficients did not differ between groups, whereas minimum drag coefficients were lowest in undulating flyers (Corvids. The lift to drag ratios were lower than in conventional aerofoils and data from free-flying soaring species; particularly in high frequency, flapping flyers (Anseriformes, which do not rely heavily on glide performance. The results illustrate important aerodynamic differences between the wings of different flight style groups that cannot be explained solely by simple wing-shape measures. Taken at face value, the results also suggest that wing-shape is linked principally to changes in aerodynamic drag, but, of course, it is aerodynamics during flapping and not gliding that is likely to be the primary driver.

  19. The influence of flight style on the aerodynamic properties of avian wings as fixed lifting surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriadis, Grigorios; Nudds, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    The diversity of wing morphologies in birds reflects their variety of flight styles and the associated aerodynamic and inertial requirements. Although the aerodynamics underlying wing morphology can be informed by aeronautical research, important differences exist between planes and birds. In particular, birds operate at lower, transitional Reynolds numbers than do most aircraft. To date, few quantitative studies have investigated the aerodynamic performance of avian wings as fixed lifting surfaces and none have focused upon the differences between wings from different flight style groups. Dried wings from 10 bird species representing three distinct flight style groups were mounted on a force/torque sensor within a wind tunnel in order to test the hypothesis that wing morphologies associated with different flight styles exhibit different aerodynamic properties. Morphological differences manifested primarily as differences in drag rather than lift. Maximum lift coefficients did not differ between groups, whereas minimum drag coefficients were lowest in undulating flyers (Corvids). The lift to drag ratios were lower than in conventional aerofoils and data from free-flying soaring species; particularly in high frequency, flapping flyers (Anseriformes), which do not rely heavily on glide performance. The results illustrate important aerodynamic differences between the wings of different flight style groups that cannot be explained solely by simple wing-shape measures. Taken at face value, the results also suggest that wing-shape is linked principally to changes in aerodynamic drag, but, of course, it is aerodynamics during flapping and not gliding that is likely to be the primary driver.

  20. Aerodynamic design of electric and hybrid vehicles: A guidebook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, D. W.

    1980-01-01

    A typical present-day subcompact electric hybrid vehicle (EHV), operating on an SAE J227a D driving cycle, consumes up to 35% of its road energy requirement overcoming aerodynamic resistance. The application of an integrated system design approach, where drag reduction is an important design parameter, can increase the cycle range by more than 15%. This guidebook highlights a logic strategy for including aerodynamic drag reduction in the design of electric and hybrid vehicles to the degree appropriate to the mission requirements. Backup information and procedures are included in order to implement the strategy. Elements of the procedure are based on extensive wind tunnel tests involving generic subscale models and full-scale prototype EHVs. The user need not have any previous aerodynamic background. By necessity, the procedure utilizes many generic approximations and assumptions resulting in various levels of uncertainty. Dealing with these uncertainties, however, is a key feature of the strategy.

  1. Atmospheric testing of wind turbine trailing edge aerodynamic brakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, L.S. [Wichita State Univ., KS (United States); Migliore, P.G. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Quandt, G.A.

    1997-12-31

    An experimental investigation was conducted using an instrumented horizontal-axis wind turbine that incorporated variable span trailing-edge aerodynamic brakes. A primary goal was to directly compare study results with (infinite-span) wind tunnel data and to provide information on how to account for device span effects during turbine design or analysis. Comprehensive measurements were utilized to define effective changes in the aerodynamic coefficients, as a function of angle of attack and control deflection, for three device spans and configurations. Differences in the lift and drag behavior are most pronounced near stall and for device spans of less than 15%. Drag performance is affected only minimally (<70%) for 15% or larger span devices. Interestingly, aerodynamic controls with characteristic vents or openings appear most affected by span reductions and three-dimensional flow.

  2. Reducing Fuel Consumption through Semi-Automated Platooning with Class 8 Tractor Trailer Combinations (Poster)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lammert, M.; Gonder, J.

    2014-07-01

    This poster describes the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's evaluation of the fuel savings potential of semi-automated truck platooning. Platooning involves reducing aerodynamic drag by grouping vehicles together and decreasing the distance between them through the use of electronic coupling, which allows multiple vehicles to accelerate or brake simultaneously. The NREL study addressed the need for data on American style line-haul sleeper cabs with modern aerodynamics and over a range of trucking speeds common in the United States.

  3. Flight testing of live Monarch butterflies to determine the aerodynamic benefit of butterfly scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Amy; Cranford, Jacob; Conway, Jasmine; Slegers, Nathan; Dechello, Nicole; Wilroy, Jacob

    2014-11-01

    Evolutionary adaptations in the morphological structure of butterfly scales (0.1 mm in size) to develop a unique micro-patterning resulting in a surface drag alteration, stem from a probable aerodynamic benefit of minimizing the energy requirement to fly a very lightweight body with comparably large surface area in a low Re flow regime. Live Monarch butterflies were tested at UAHuntsville's Autonomous Tracking and Optical Measurement (ATOM) Laboratory, which uses 22 Vicon T40 cameras that allow for millimeter level tracking of reflective markers at 515 fps over a 4 m × 6 m × 7 m volume. Data recorded included the flight path as well as the wing flapping angle and wing-beat frequency. Insects were first tested with their scales intact, and then again with the scales carefully removed. Differences in flapping frequency and/or energy obtained during flight due to the removal of the scales will be discussed. Initial data analysis indicates that scale removal in some specimens leads to increased flapping frequencies for similar energetic flight or reduced flight speed for similar flapping frequencies. Both results point to the scales providing an aerodynamic benefit, which is hypothesized to be linked to leading-edge vortex formation and induced drag. Funding from the National Science Foundation (CBET and REU) is gratefully acknowledged.

  4. Effects of unsteady deformation of flapping wing on its aerodynamic forces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Gang; SUN Mao

    2008-01-01

    Effects of unsteady deformation of a flapping model insect wing on its aerodynamic force production are studied by solving the Navier-Stokes equations on a dynamically deforming grid.Aerodynamic forces on the flapping wing are not much affected by considerable twist,but affected by camber deformation.The effect of combined camber and twist deformation is similar to that of camber deformation.With a deformation of 6% camber and 20°twist(typical values observed for wings of many insects),lift is increased bv 10%~20%and lift-to-drag ratio by around 10%compared with the case of a rigid flat-plate wing.As a result.the deformation can increase the maximum lift coefficient of an insect.and reduce its power requirement for flight.For example,for a hovering bumblebee with dynamically deforming wings(6%camber and 20°twist),aerodynamic power required is reduced by about 16%compared with the case of rigid wings.

  5. Cyclist drag in team pursuit: influence of cyclist sequence, stature, and arm spacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defraeye, Thijs; Blocken, Bert; Koninckx, Erwin; Hespel, Peter; Verboven, Pieter; Nicolai, Bart; Carmeliet, Jan

    2014-01-01

    In team pursuit, the drag of a group of cyclists riding in a pace line is dependent on several factors, such as anthropometric characteristics (stature) and position of each cyclist as well as the sequence in which they ride. To increase insight in drag reduction mechanisms, the aerodynamic drag of four cyclists riding in a pace line was investigated, using four different cyclists, and for four different sequences. In addition, each sequence was evaluated for two arm spacings. Instead of conventional field or wind tunnel experiments, a validated numerical approach (computational fluid dynamics) was used to evaluate cyclist drag, where the bicycles were not included in the model. The cyclist drag was clearly dependent on his position in the pace line, where second and subsequent positions experienced a drag reduction up to 40%, compared to an individual cyclist. Individual differences in stature and position on the bicycle led to an intercyclist variation of this drag reduction at a specific position in the sequence, but also to a variation of the total drag of the group for different sequences. A larger drag area for the group was found when riding with wider arm spacing. Such numerical studies on cyclists in a pace line are useful for determining the optimal cyclist sequence for team pursuit.

  6. Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Flying-Boat Hull Having a Length-Beam Ratio of 15, TED No. NACA 2206

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riebe, John M.; Naeseth, Rodger L.

    1951-01-01

    An investigation was made in the Langley 300 MPH 7- by 10-foot tunnel to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of a flying-boat hull of a length-beam ratio of 15 in the presence of a wing. The investigation was an extension of previous tests made on hulls of length-beam ratios of 6, 9, and 12; these hulls were designed to have approximately the same hydrodynamic performance with respect to spray and resistance characteristics. Comparison with the previous investigation at lower length-beam ratios indicated a reduction in minimum drag coefficients of 0.0006 (10 peroent)with fixed transition when the length-beam ratio was extended from 12 to 15. As with the hulls of lower length-beam ratio, the drag reduction with a length-beam ratio of 15 occurred throughout the range of angle of attack tested and the angle of attack for minimum drag was in the range from 2deg to 3deg. Increasing the length-beam ratio from 12 to 15 reduced the hull longitudinal instability by an mount corresponding to an aerodynamic-center shift of about 1/2 percent of the mean aerodynamic chord of the hypothetical flying boat. At an angle of attack of 2deg, the value of the variation of yawing-moment coefficient with angle of yaw for a length-beam ratio of 15 was 0.00144, which was 0.00007 larger than the value for a length-beam ratio of 12.

  7. Skylon Aerodynamics and SABRE Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Unmeel; Afosmis, Michael; Bowles, Jeffrey; Pandya, Shishir

    2015-01-01

    An independent partial assessment is provided of the technical viability of the Skylon aerospace plane concept, developed by Reaction Engines Limited (REL). The objectives are to verify REL's engineering estimates of airframe aerodynamics during powered flight and to assess the impact of Synergetic Air-Breathing Rocket Engine (SABRE) plumes on the aft fuselage. Pressure lift and drag coefficients derived from simulations conducted with Euler equations for unpowered flight compare very well with those REL computed with engineering methods. The REL coefficients for powered flight are increasingly less acceptable as the freestream Mach number is increased beyond 8.5, because the engineering estimates did not account for the increasing favorable (in terms of drag and lift coefficients) effect of underexpanded rocket engine plumes on the aft fuselage. At Mach numbers greater than 8.5, the thermal environment around the aft fuselage is a known unknown-a potential design and/or performance risk issue. The adverse effects of shock waves on the aft fuselage and plumeinduced flow separation are other potential risks. The development of an operational reusable launcher from the Skylon concept necessitates the judicious use of a combination of engineering methods, advanced methods based on required physics or analytical fidelity, test data, and independent assessments.

  8. Sphere Drag and Heat Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Zhipeng; He, Boshu; Duan, Yuanyuan

    2015-07-20

    Modelling fluid flows past a body is a general problem in science and engineering. Historical sphere drag and heat transfer data are critically examined. The appropriate drag coefficient is proposed to replace the inertia type definition proposed by Newton. It is found that the appropriate drag coefficient is a desirable dimensionless parameter to describe fluid flow physical behavior so that fluid flow problems can be solved in the simple and intuitive manner. The appropriate drag coefficient is presented graphically, and appears more general and reasonable to reflect the fluid flow physical behavior than the traditional century old drag coefficient diagram. Here we present drag and heat transfer experimental results which indicate that there exists a relationship in nature between the sphere drag and heat transfer. The role played by the heat flux has similar nature as the drag. The appropriate drag coefficient can be related to the Nusselt number. This finding opens new possibilities in predicting heat transfer characteristics by drag data. As heat transfer for flow over a body is inherently complex, the proposed simple means may provide an insight into the mechanism of heat transfer for flow past a body.

  9. Classical Aerodynamic Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R. T. (Compiler)

    1979-01-01

    A collection of papers on modern theoretical aerodynamics is presented. Included are theories of incompressible potential flow and research on the aerodynamic forces on wing and wing sections of aircraft and on airship hulls.

  10. Advanced Topics in Aerodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filippone, Antonino

    1999-01-01

    "Advanced Topics in Aerodynamics" is a comprehensive electronic guide to aerodynamics,computational fluid dynamics, aeronautics, aerospace propulsion systems, design and relatedtechnology. We report data, tables, graphics, sketches,examples, results, photos, technical andscientific literature...

  11. Advanced Topics in Aerodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filippone, Antonino

    1999-01-01

    "Advanced Topics in Aerodynamics" is a comprehensive electronic guide to aerodynamics,computational fluid dynamics, aeronautics, aerospace propulsion systems, design and relatedtechnology. We report data, tables, graphics, sketches,examples, results, photos, technical andscientific literature...

  12. Bionic Research on Fish Scales for Drag Reduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhaoliang Dou; Jiadao Wang; Darong Chen

    2012-01-01

    To reduce friction drag with bionic method in a more feasible way,the surface microstructure of fish scales was analyzed attempting to reveal the biologic features responding to skin friction drag reduction.Then comparable bionic surface mimicking fish scales was fabricated through coating technology for drag reduction.The paint mixture was coated on a substrate through a self-developed spray-painting apparatus.The bionic surface with micron-scale caves formed spontaneously due to the interfacial convection and deformation driven by interfacial tension gradient in the presence of solvent evaporation.Comparative experiments between bionic surface and smooth surface were performed in a water tunnel to evaluate the effect of bionic surface on drag reduction,and visible drag reduction efficiency was obtained.Numerical simulation results show that gas phase develops in solid-liquid interface of bionic surface with the effect of surface topography and partially replaces the solid-liquid shear force with gas-liquid shear force,hence reducing the skin friction drag effectively.Therefore,with remarkable drag reduction performance and simple fabrication technology,the proposed drag reduction technique shows the promise for practical applications.

  13. Uncertainty Quantification in Numerical Aerodynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Litvinenko, Alexander

    2017-05-16

    We consider uncertainty quantification problem in aerodynamic simulations. We identify input uncertainties, classify them, suggest an appropriate statistical model and, finally, estimate propagation of these uncertainties into the solution (pressure, velocity and density fields as well as the lift and drag coefficients). The deterministic problem under consideration is a compressible transonic Reynolds-averaged Navier-Strokes flow around an airfoil with random/uncertain data. Input uncertainties include: uncertain angle of attack, the Mach number, random perturbations in the airfoil geometry, mesh, shock location, turbulence model and parameters of this turbulence model. This problem requires efficient numerical/statistical methods since it is computationally expensive, especially for the uncertainties caused by random geometry variations which involve a large number of variables. In numerical section we compares five methods, including quasi-Monte Carlo quadrature, polynomial chaos with coefficients determined by sparse quadrature and gradient-enhanced version of Kriging, radial basis functions and point collocation polynomial chaos, in their efficiency in estimating statistics of aerodynamic performance upon random perturbation to the airfoil geometry [D.Liu et al \\'17]. For modeling we used the TAU code, developed in DLR, Germany.

  14. Wind speed scaling and the drag coefficient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Wind speed scaling in similarity law in wind-generated waves and the drag coefficient are studied. In analyzing the data in the wind wave channel, it is found that the u. scaling greatly reduces the scatter in the U10 scaling. The u. scaling has much less scatter than the scaling using other wind speeds. The friction velocity seems to play a distinctive role in wave growth. The result is important in the applications of the similarity law and in wave modeling. In theory it gives an insight into the mechanism of wind wave interaction. It is found that wave steepness is important in influencing the drag coefficient. The variability of the coefficients in the currently widely used drag form can be explained by the differences in wave steepness in the observations. A drag coefficient model with wind speed and wave steepness as parameters is proposed. An explanation for Kahma' s result that the u. scaling does not reduce the scatter in the U10 scaling is given.

  15. Drag reduction using slippery liquid infused surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultmark, Marcus; Stone, Howard; Smits, Alexander; Jacobi, Ian; Samaha, Mohamed; Wexler, Jason; Shang, Jessica; Rosenberg, Brian; Hellström, Leo; Fan, Yuyang

    2013-11-01

    A new method for passive drag reduction is introduced. A surface treatment inspired by the Nepenthes pitcher plant, previously developed by Wong et al. (2011), is utilized and its design parameters are studied for increased drag reduction and durability. Nano- and micro-structured surfaces infused with a lubricant allow for mobility within the lubricant itself when the surface is exposed to flow. The mobility causes slip at the fluid-fluid interface, which drastically reduces the viscous friction. These new surfaces are fundamentally different from the more conventional superhydrophobic surfaces previously used in drag reduction studies, which rely on a gas-liquid interface. The main advantage of the liquid infused surfaces over the conventional surfaces is that the lubricant adheres more strongly to the surface, decreasing the risk of failure when exposed to turbulence and other high-shear flows. We have shown that these surfaces can reduce viscous drag up to 20% in both Taylor-Couette flow and in a parallel plate rheometer. Supported under ONR Grants N00014-12-1-0875 and N00014-12-1-0962 (program manager Ki-Han Kim).

  16. Theoretical and applied aerodynamics and related numerical methods

    CERN Document Server

    Chattot, J J

    2015-01-01

    This book covers classical and modern aerodynamics, theories and related numerical methods, for senior and first-year graduate engineering students, including: -The classical potential (incompressible) flow theories for low speed aerodynamics of thin airfoils and high and low aspect ratio wings. - The linearized theories for compressible subsonic and supersonic aerodynamics. - The nonlinear transonic small disturbance potential flow theory, including supercritical wing sections, the extended transonic area rule with lift effect, transonic lifting line and swept or oblique wings to minimize wave drag. Unsteady flow is also briefly discussed. Numerical simulations based on relaxation mixed-finite difference methods are presented and explained. - Boundary layer theory for all Mach number regimes and viscous/inviscid interaction procedures used in practical aerodynamics calculations. There are also four chapters covering special topics, including wind turbines and propellers, airplane design, flow analogies and h...

  17. The Aerodynamics of Heavy Vehicles III : Trucks, Buses and Trains

    CERN Document Server

    Orellano, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    This volume contains papers presented at the International conference “The Aerodynamics of Heavy Vehicles III: Trucks, Buses and Trains” held in Potsdam, Germany, September 12-17, 2010 by Engineering Conferences International (ECI). Leading scientists and engineers from industry, universities and research laboratories, including truck and high-speed train manufacturers and operators were brought together to discuss computer simulation and experimental techniques to be applied for the design of more efficient trucks, buses and high-speed trains in the future.   This conference was the third in the series after Monterey-Pacific Groove in 2002 and Lake Tahoe in 2007.  The presentations address different aspects of train aerodynamics (cross wind effects, underbody flow, tunnel aerodynamics and aeroacoustics, experimental techniques), truck aerodynamics (drag reduction, flow control, experimental and computational techniques) as well as computational fluid dynamics and bluff body, wake and jet flows.

  18. Coulomb drag in quantum circuits

    OpenAIRE

    Levchenko, Alex; Kamenev, Alex

    2008-01-01

    We study drag effect in a system of two electrically isolated quantum point contacts (QPC), coupled by Coulomb interactions. Drag current exhibits maxima as a function of QPC gate voltages when the latter are tuned to the transitions between quantized conductance plateaus. In the linear regime this behavior is due to enhanced electron-hole asymmetry near an opening of a new conductance channel. In the non-linear regime the drag current is proportional to the shot noise of the driving circuit,...

  19. Drag Reduction, from Bending to Pruning

    CERN Document Server

    Lopez, Diego; Michelin, Sébastien; de Langre, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    Most plants and benthic organisms have evolved efficient reconfiguration mechanisms to resist flow-induced loads. These mechanisms can be divided into bending, in which plants reduce their sail area through elastic deformation, and pruning, in which the loads are decreased through partial breakage of the structure. In this work, we show by using idealized models that these two mechanisms or, in fact, any combination of the two, are equally efficient to reduce the drag experienced by terrestrial and aquatic vegetation.

  20. Collisional Effects on Nonlinear Ion Drag Force for Small Grains

    CERN Document Server

    Hutchinson, I H

    2013-01-01

    The ion drag force arising from plasma flow past an embedded spherical grain is calculated self-consistently and non-linearly using particle in cell codes, accounting for ion-neutral collisions. Using ion velocity distribution appropriate for ion drift driven by a force field gives wake potential and force greatly different from a shifted Maxwellian distribution, regardless of collisionality. The low-collisionality forces are shown to be consistent with estimates based upon cross-sections for scattering in a Yukawa (shielded) grain field, but only if non-linear shielding length is used. Finite collisionality initially enhances the drag force, but only by up to a factor of 2. Larger collisionality eventually reduces the drag force. In the collisional regime, the drift distribution gives larger drag than the shift distribution even at velocities where their collisionless drags are equal. Comprehensive practical analytic formulas for force that fit the calculations are provided.

  1. Gravity Tunnel Drag

    CERN Document Server

    Concannon, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The time it takes to fall down a tunnel through the center of the Earth to the other side takes approximately 42 minutes, but only when given several simplifying assumptions: a uniform density Earth; a gravitational field that varies linearly with radial position; a non-rotating Earth; a tunnel evacuated of air; and zero friction along the sides of the tunnel. Though several papers have singularly relaxed the first three assumptions, in this paper we relax the final two assumptions and analyze the motion of a body experiencing these types of drag forces in the tunnel. Under such drag forces, we calculate the motion of a transport vehicle through a tunnel of the Earth under uniform density, under constant gravitational acceleration, and finally under the more realistic Preliminary Reference Earth Model (PREM) density data. We find the density profile corresponding to a constant gravitational acceleration better models the motion through the tunnel compared to the PREM density profile, and the uniform density m...

  2. Nash equilibrium and multi criterion aerodynamic optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhili; Zhang, Lianhe

    2016-06-01

    Game theory and its particular Nash Equilibrium (NE) are gaining importance in solving Multi Criterion Optimization (MCO) in engineering problems over the past decade. The solution of a MCO problem can be viewed as a NE under the concept of competitive games. This paper surveyed/proposed four efficient algorithms for calculating a NE of a MCO problem. Existence and equivalence of the solution are analyzed and proved in the paper based on fixed point theorem. Specific virtual symmetric Nash game is also presented to set up an optimization strategy for single objective optimization problems. Two numerical examples are presented to verify proposed algorithms. One is mathematical functions' optimization to illustrate detailed numerical procedures of algorithms, the other is aerodynamic drag reduction of civil transport wing fuselage configuration by using virtual game. The successful application validates efficiency of algorithms in solving complex aerodynamic optimization problem.

  3. 添加减阻剂的前混合磨料射流切割性能试验研究%Experimental Study on the Performance of Pre-mixed Abrasive Jet with Addition of Drag Reducing Agent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于以兵; 邓松圣; 陈晓晨; 廖松

    2016-01-01

    In order to improve the cutting ability of pre⁃mixed abrasive water jet and the efficiency of emergency repairing, cat⁃ionic polyacrylamide (PAM) and cetyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (CTAC) are used as drag reducing agents and the cutting depth is chosen as the evaluation index to carry out the cutting experiment of X60 steel plate. The results show that:the addition of drag re⁃ducing agent can improve the cutting ability of pre⁃mixed abrasive jet effectively;during the pressure range of 25~40 MPa, the opti⁃mal additive amount of PAM is 20 mg/kg, and the optimum additive amount of CTAC/NaSal is 30 mg/kg;CTAC/NaSal is better than PAM in term of resistance reduction effect; with the addition of CTAC/NaSal, the same cutting depth can still be obtained while pump pressure is reduced by 5 MPa.%为提高前混合磨料射流的切割能力和应急抢修的作业效率,选用阳离子聚丙烯酰胺(PAM)和十六烷三甲基氯化铵(CTAC)作为减阻剂,以切割深度为评价指标,对X60钢板进行切割试验。结果表明:减阻剂的添加能够有效提高前混合磨料射流的切割能力;在压力为25~40 MPa时,PAM的最优添加量为20 mg/kg,CTAC/NaSal的最优添加量为30 mg/kg;CTAC/NaSal的减阻效果优于PAM,添加CTAC/NaSal后泵压调低5 MPa,仍可以获得与无减阻剂时相同的切割深度。

  4. Research on Drag Reducing Agents Formula Applied to the Wet Limestone FGD System%湿式石灰石烟气脱硫循环系统减阻剂配方研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马双忱; 熊远南; 吴国栋; 王一宁; 刘席洋; 谢佳林

    2014-01-01

    The polymer compounds, such as polyethyleneoxide (PEO), polyacrylamide (PAM) are able to reduce the pipe fluid resistance. Nowadays, flue gas desulfurization in power plants mainly adopts the method of wet limestone/gypsum method; Circulation pump transporting circulation slurry causes large resistance, consuming a lot of energy in the desulfurization system. Therefore, the experimental research on resistance reduction for desulfurization system in power plants was carried out. To simulate actual environment in wet limestone desulfurization slurry, different concentrations of drag reducing agent (DRA) were added into the slurry, and flow properties of desulfurization slurry and resistance reduction performance of polymer were investigated at the same time. The best formula of DRA was obtained through the experimental analysis of influence factors upon drag-reduction performance of polymer PEO PAM. The study shows that DRA has the best resistance reduction effect at the optimum mass concentration ratio of PEO, PAM and thiourea of 3:1:2 and DRA concentration of 600 mg/L, and the best resistance reduction rate is about 40%.%高聚物聚氧化乙烯(polyethyleneoxide,PEO)、聚丙烯酰胺(polyacrylamide,PAM)能够减少管道中流体阻力。目前,电厂脱硫主要以湿式石灰石石膏法为主,脱硫系统中循环泵传输浆液产生巨大的阻力耗能。因此,文中针对电厂脱硫系统进行减阻实验研究。模拟实际环境中的生产情况,在湿式石灰石脱硫浆液中,添加不同浓度的减阻剂,研究浆液流体特性以及高聚物的减阻性能。基于影响高聚物 PEO、PAM 减阻效果的因素实验分析,探索最佳的减阻剂配方。研究表明,高聚物PEO、PAM均存在自最佳减阻浓度;减阻剂配方由 PEO、PAM、硫脲3种组分按质量浓度配比3:1:2组成,600 mg/L减阻剂的减阻效果最佳,最佳减阻率在40%左右。

  5. Drag reduction through self-texturing compliant bionic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Eryong; Li, Longyang; Wang, Gang; Zeng, Zhixiang; Zhao, Wenjie; Xue, Qunji

    2017-01-01

    Compliant fish skin is effectively in reducing drag, thus the design and application of compliant bionic materials may be a good choice for drag reduction. Here we consider the drag reduction of compliant bionic materials. First, ZnO and PDMS mesh modified with n-octadecane were prepared, the drag reduction of self-texturing compliant n-octadecane were studied. The results show that the mesh modified by ZnO and PDMS possess excellent lipophilic and hydrophobic, thus n-octadecane at solid, semisolid and liquid state all have good adhesion with modified mesh. The states of n-octadecane changed with temperature, thus, the surface contact angle and adhesive force all varies obviously at different state. The contact angle decreases with temperature, the adhesive force shows a lower value at semisolid state. Furthermore, the drag testing results show that the compliant n-octadecane film is more effectively in drag reduction than superhydrophobic ZnO/PDMS film, indicating that the drag reduction mechanism of n-octadecane is significantly different with superhydrophobic film. Further research shows that the water flow leads to self-texturing of semisolid state n-octadecane, which is similar with compliant fish skin. Therefore, the compliant bionic materials of semisolid state n-octadecane with regular bulge plays a major role in the drag reduction.

  6. Aerodynamic Optimization of Micro Aerial Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siew Ping Yeong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Computational fluid dynamics (CFD study was done on the propeller design of a micro aerial vehicle (quadrotor-typed to optimize its aerodynamic performance via Shear Stress Transport K-Omega (SST k-ω turbulence model. The quadrotor model used was WL-V303 Seeker. The design process started with airfoils selection and followed by the evaluation of drone model in hovering and cruising conditions. To sustain a 400g payload, by Momentum Theory an ideal thrust of 5.4 N should be generated by each rotor of the quadrotor and this resulted in an induced velocity of 7.4 m/s on the propeller during hovering phase, equivalent to Reynolds number of 10403 at 75% of the propeller blade radius. There were 6 propellers investigated at this Reynolds number. Sokolov airfoil which produced the largest lift-to-drag ratio was selected for full drone installation to be compared with the original model (benchmark. The CFD results showed that the Sokolov propeller generated 0.76 N of thrust more than the benchmark propeller at 7750 rpm. Despite generating higher thrust, higher drag was also experienced by the drone installed with Sokolov propellers. This resulted in lower lift-to-drag ratio than the benchmark propellers. It was also discovered that the aerodynamic performance of the drone could be further improved by changing the rotating direction of each rotor. Without making changes on the structural design, the drone performance increased by 39.58% in terms of lift-to-drag ratio by using this method.

  7. Numerical and Experimental Investigations on the Aerodynamic Characteristic of Three Typical Passenger Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    yiping wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The numerical simulation and wind tunnel experiment were employed to investigate the aerodynamic characteristics of three typical rear shapes: fastback, notchback and squareback. The object was to investigate the sensibility of aerodynamic characteristic to the rear shape, and provide more comprehensive experimental data as a reference to validate the numerical simulation. In the wind tunnel experiments, the aerodynamic six components of the three models with the yaw angles range from -15 and 15 were measured. The realizable k-ε model was employed to compute the aerodynamic drag, lift and surface pressure distribution at a zero yaw angle. In order to improve the calculation efficiency and accuracy, a hybrid Tetrahedron-Hexahedron-Pentahedral-Prism mesh strategy was used to discretize the computational domain. The computational results showed a good agreement with the experimental data and the results revealed that different rear shapes would induce very different aerodynamic characteristic, and it was difficult to determine the best shape. For example, the fastback would obtain very low aerodynamic drag, but it would induce positive lift which was not conducive to stability at high speed, and it also would induce bad crosswind stability. In order to reveal the internal connection between the aerodynamic drag and wake vortices, the turbulent kinetic, recirculation length, position of vortex core and velocity profile in the wake were investigated by numerical simulation and PIV experiment.

  8. Drag Reduction by Polymeric and Nonpolymeric Additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Christopher; Sreenivasan, K. R.

    1997-11-01

    To investigate the ``self-healing'' property of drag reducing surfactant micelles we have conducted a comparative study between high polymers and surfactants in six turbulent pipe flows (Reynolds numbers between 2000 and 90,000) with varying intensities o f secondary flow. Friction factor values are measured in a straight pipe of 185 diameters; three pipes, each turning through four 90 degree elbows, of lengths 1085 diameters, 875 diameters, and 600 diameters; and a twice-turned coiled pipe, radius of curv ature of 24 diameters and length of 290 diameters. All the flows are gravity driven to prevent degradation effects caused by pump impellers. The large stresses set up by the secondary flows degrade the fragile polymers, thus reducing their effectivness as a drag reducer. The ``self-healing'' of the micelles enables the surfactant to maintain its effectivness. We will present the ``self-healing'' characteristics of the surfactant micelles using the polymer data as the datum.

  9. Numerical Research on Drag Reduction Characteristics of Supercavitating Body of Revolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FUHui-ping; LUChuan-jing; LIJie

    2004-01-01

    Drag reduction characteristics of supercavitating body of revolution was researched numerically with a bubble two-phase flow model embodied in commercial CFD code Fluent 6.0.The work included the effects of body shape on drag coefficient and supercavity sizes; supercavity control; drag coefficient Cd as a function of cavitation number; and the effect of the ratio of length L to diameter D on drag reduction rate. Research on drag reduction mechanism of supercavitation shows that supercavitation can reduce not only the friction drag coefficient but also the pressure drag coefficient. There may be a best combination among body shape, the ratio L/D, cavitation number, engineering feasibility and so on, which makes the drag reduction ratehighest.

  10. Gliding flight: drag and torque of a hawk and a falcon with straight and turned heads, and a lower value for the parasite drag coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, V A

    2000-12-01

    Raptors - falcons, hawks and eagles in this study - such as peregrine falcons (Falco peregrinus) that attack distant prey from high-speed dives face a paradox. Anatomical and behavioral measurements show that raptors of many species must turn their heads approximately 40 degrees to one side to see the prey straight ahead with maximum visual acuity, yet turning the head would presumably slow their diving speed by increasing aerodynamic drag. This paper investigates the aerodynamic drag part of this paradox by measuring the drag and torque on wingless model bodies of a peregrine falcon and a red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) with straight and turned heads in a wind tunnel at a speed of 11.7 m s(-)(1). With a turned head, drag increased more than 50 %, and torque developed that tended to yaw the model towards the direction in which the head pointed. Mathematical models for the drag required to prevent yawing showed that the total drag could plausibly more than double with head-turning. Thus, the presumption about increased drag in the paradox is correct. The relationships between drag, head angle and torque developed here are prerequisites to the explanation of how a raptor could avoid the paradox by holding its head straight and flying along a spiral path that keeps its line of sight for maximum acuity pointed sideways at the prey. Although the spiral path to the prey is longer than the straight path, the raptor's higher speed can theoretically compensate for the difference in distances; and wild peregrines do indeed approach prey by flying along curved paths that resemble spirals. In addition to providing data that explain the paradox, this paper reports the lowest drag coefficients yet measured for raptor bodies (0.11 for the peregrine and 0.12 for the red-tailed hawk) when the body models with straight heads were set to pitch and yaw angles for minimum drag. These values are markedly lower than value of the parasite drag coefficient (C(D,par)) of 0.18 previously

  11. Turbulent drag reduction in dilute polymer solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreenivasan, K. R.; White, Christopher M.

    1998-11-01

    It is well known that the addition of small amounts of flexible polymers reduces drag in turbulent pipe flows. However, the underlying physics is still poorly understood. This paper will consider two aspects: The dependence of the onset of drag reduction on polymer concentration, and the so-called maximum drag reduction asymptote. The latter defines the maximum drag reduction possible for any polymer at a given Reynolds number, independent of the polymer concentration and detailed polymeric structure [1]. It is shown tentatively that a modest reworking of de Gennes' theory [2] is compatible with available experimental data. The principal element of the theory is that the polymers do not get stretched fully, but that the partially extended polymers store elastic energy and interfere with cascade mechanisms in turbulence. A conclusive understanding requires experiments in which the polymer properties that go into the theory are directly measured. [1] P.S. Virk, AIChE J., 21, 625 (1975) [2] P.G. de Gennes, Introduction to Polymer Dynamics, University of Cambridge (1990)

  12. Drag reduction in turbulent flows over superhydrophobic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniello, Robert J.; Waterhouse, Nicholas E.; Rothstein, Jonathan P.

    2009-08-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate that periodic, micropatterned superhydrophobic surfaces, previously noted for their ability to provide laminar flow drag reduction, are capable of reducing drag in the turbulent flow regime. Superhydrophobic surfaces contain micro- or nanoscale hydrophobic features which can support a shear-free air-water interface between peaks in the surface topology. Particle image velocimetry and pressure drop measurements were used to observe significant slip velocities, shear stress, and pressure drop reductions corresponding to drag reductions approaching 50%. At a given Reynolds number, drag reduction is found to increase with increasing feature size and spacing, as in laminar flows. No observable drag reduction was noted in the laminar regime, consistent with previous experimental results for the channel geometry considered. The onset of drag reduction occurs at a critical Reynolds number where the viscous sublayer thickness approaches the scale of the superhydrophobic microfeatures and performance is seen to increase with further reduction in viscous sublayer height. These results indicate superhydrophobic surfaces may provide a significant drag reducing mechanism for marine vessels.

  13. Development of a Plasma Injector for Supersonic Drag Reduction Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Methods to reduce the turbulent viscous skin friction stand out as paramount to increasing the energy efficiency, and therefore the aerodynamic efficiency of...

  14. Experimental study of aerodynamic interference effects on aerostatic coefficients of twin deck bridges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiwen LIU; Zhengqing CHEN; Gao LIU; Xinpeng SHAO

    2009-01-01

    The aerodynamic interference effects on aero-static coefficients of twin deck bridges with large span were investigated in detail by means of wind tunnel test.The distances between the twin decks and wind attack angles were changed during the wind tunnel test to study the effects on aerodynamic interferences of aerostatic coefficients of twin decks. The research results have shown that the drag coefficients of the leeward deck are much smaller than that of a single leeward deck. The drag coefficients of a windward deck decrease slightly com-pared with that of a single deck. The lift and torque coefficients of windward and leeward decks are also affected slightly by the aerodynamic interference of twin decks. And the aerodynamic interference effects on lift and torque coefficients of twin decks can be neglected.

  15. Influence of short rear end tapers on the wake of a simplified square-back vehicle: wake topology and rear drag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Anna-Kristina; Pavia, Giancarlo; Passmore, Martin

    2016-11-01

    As vehicle manufacturers work to reduce energy consumption of all types of vehicles, external vehicle aerodynamics has become increasingly important. Whilst production vehicle shape optimisation methods are well developed, the need to make further advances requires deeper understanding of the highly three-dimensional flow around bluff bodies. In this paper, the wake flow of a generic bluff body, the Windsor body, based on a square-back car geometry, was investigated by means of balance measurements, surface pressure measurements and 2D particle image velocimetry planes. Changes in the wake topology are triggered by the application of short tapers (4 % of the model length) to the top and bottom edges of the base, representing a shape optimisation that is realistic for many modern production vehicles. The base drag is calculated and correlated with the aerodynamic drag data. The results not only show the effectiveness of such small devices in modifying the time average topology of the wake but also shed some light on the effects produced by different levels of upwash and downwash on the bi-stable nature of the wake itself.

  16. Estimation Methods for Determination of Drag Characteristics of Fly-by-Wire Aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Girija

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available "In this paper, several parameter/state estimation approaches for the determination of drag polars from flight data are described and evaluated for a fly-by-wire (FBW aircraft. Both model-based approaches (MBAs and non-model-based approaches (NMBAs are considered. Dynamic response data from roller coaster and wind- up-turn manoeuvres are generated in a FBW aircraft flight simulator at different flight conditions and the typical performance results are presented. A novel approach to estimate the drag polar has been evaluated. It has been found that the NMBAs perform better than the MBAs. Classically, the MBAs have been used for the determination of drag polars. The merits of an NMBA are that it does not require specification of the detailed model of the aerodynamic coefficients and it can be suitably used for online estimation of drag polars from the flight data of aerospace vehicles

  17. Estimation of unsteady aerodynamics in the wake of a freely flying European starling (Sturnus vulgaris.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadar Ben-Gida

    Full Text Available Wing flapping is one of the most widespread propulsion methods found in nature; however, the current understanding of the aerodynamics in bird wakes is incomplete. The role of the unsteady motion in the flow and its contribution to the aerodynamics is still an open question. In the current study, the wake of a freely flying European starling has been investigated using long-duration high-speed Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV in the near wake. Kinematic analysis of the wings and body of the bird has been performed using additional high-speed cameras that recorded the bird movement simultaneously with the PIV measurements. The wake evolution of four complete wingbeats has been characterized through reconstruction of the time-resolved data, and the aerodynamics in the wake have been analyzed in terms of the streamwise forces acting on the bird. The profile drag from classical aerodynamics was found to be positive during most of the wingbeat cycle, yet kinematic images show that the bird does not decelerate. It is shown that unsteady aerodynamics are necessary to satisfy the drag/thrust balance by approximating the unsteady drag term. These findings may shed light on the flight efficiency of birds by providing a partial answer to how they minimize drag during flapping flight.

  18. Improvement in Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Paraglider Wing Canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashud, Mohammad; Umemura, Akira

    To determine the parameters which can improve the overall performance of a paraglider wing canopy, we have been investigating the fundamental aerodynamic characteristics of an inflatable cell model which is designed to represent the dynamic behaviors of each cell comprising the wing canopy. This paper describes the results of a series of wind tunnel experiments. It is shown that significant drag reduction can be achieved by adopting an appropriately designed shape for the soft cloth comprising the upper surface. A trade-off relationship between the aerodynamic quality (characterized by the lift-to-drag ratio) and structural strength (characterized by the internal air pressure coefficient) of the canopy is also examined in detail.

  19. Time dependent superhydrophobicity of drag reducing surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    This paper was presented at the 3rd Micro and Nano Flows Conference (MNF2011), which was held at the Makedonia Palace Hotel, Thessaloniki in Greece. The conference was organised by Brunel University and supported by the Italian Union of Thermofluiddynamics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, University of Thessaly, IPEM, the Process Intensification Network, the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, the Heat Transfer Society, HEXAG - the Heat Exchange Action Group, and the Energy Institute. ...

  20. 芦荟减阻剂对烧伤休克大鼠微循环的影响%Effects of Drag-reducing polymer derived from Aloe vera on microcirculation in burn rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张俊莉; 蔡淑敏; 李涛; 曾振华; 高友光; 陈仲清

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of drag-reducing polymers on microcirculation in 40%total body surface area burn-injured rats. Methods SD rats were randomized into control group, drag-reducing polymer (DRPs) group and normal saline (NS) group (5 minutes after scald, drag-reducing polymer or saline was injected for fluid resuscitation). Wet dry weigh ratio of lung, histopathologic changes and arterial blood gas at 24 hour were respectively measured by wet dry weigh ratio method, hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining and arterial blood gas analysis. The velocity of flow of red cell in oblique ridge and the survival time of burn-injured rats were observed. Results Compared with control group, rats in NS group exhibit significant lung injury characterized by a high W/D (P < 0.01), accumulation of a large number of neutrophils in HE stain, low partial pressure of oxygen (PO2) and high lactate (Lac) (P<0.05 or P<0.01) in arterial blood. Compared with the NS group, DRPs treatment rats exhibit significantly reduced lung injury characterized by W/D reducing (P < 0.05), the reduction of neutrophil infiltration, increased PO2, decreased Lac (P<0.05, P<0.01). In addition, DRPs treatment obviously increases the burn-induced low velocity of flow of red cell in oblique ridge (P<0.01). Moreover, the survival time of burned rats can be improved by DRPs treatment (P < 0.05). Conclusion DRPs ameliorates burn-induced acute lung injury, the mechanism may be through improving the burn-induced microcirculation disorders.%目的:探讨芦荟减阻剂对大鼠40%体表面积深Ⅱ度烧伤休克模型微循环的影响。方法:SD大鼠随机分为3组:对照组、减阻剂组及盐水组(烫伤后5 min给予减阻剂或者盐水进行补液复苏)。检测烧伤休克后24 h肺湿干重比(W/D)、病理及动脉血气;活体微循环观测技术观察烧伤休克后脊斜肌微动脉红细胞流速;观察动物的存活时间。结果:与对照组比较,盐

  1. When superfluids are a drag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, David C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    The article considers the dramatic phenomenon of seemingly frictionless flow of slow-moving superfluids. Specifically the question of whether an object in a superfluid flow experiences any drag force is addressed. A brief account is given of the history of this problem and it is argued that recent advances in ultracold atomic physics can shed much new light on this problem. The article presents the commonly held notion that sufficiently slow-moving superfluids can flow without drag and also discusses research suggesting that scattering quantum fluctuations might cause drag in a superfluid moving at any speed.

  2. Influence of satellite aerodynamics on atmospheric density determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karr, G. R.; Smith, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of aerodynamic factors which influence the interpretation of satellite dynamic response. These factors include: (1) the influence of satellite orientation and shape on the drag coefficient; (2) the effect of changes in the gas flow properties with altitude; and (3) the influence of upper atmospheric winds on the interpretation of data. These factors represent the greatest source of error in current data reduction. For this reason, an estimate is made of a possible correction to present density models.

  3. Variability of Bed Drag on Cohesive Beds under Wave Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilgar Safak

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Drag force at the bed acting on water flow is a major control on water circulation and sediment transport. Bed drag has been thoroughly studied in sandy waters, but less so in muddy coastal waters. The variation of bed drag on a muddy shelf is investigated here using field observations of currents, waves, and sediment concentration collected during moderate wind and wave events. To estimate bottom shear stress and the bed drag coefficient, an indirect empirical method of logarithmic fitting to current velocity profiles (log-law, a bottom boundary layer model for combined wave-current flow, and a direct method that uses turbulent fluctuations of velocity are used. The overestimation by the log-law is significantly reduced by taking turbulence suppression due to sediment-induced stratification into account. The best agreement between the model and the direct estimates is obtained by using a hydraulic roughness of 10 - 4 m in the model. Direct estimate of bed drag on the muddy bed is found to have a decreasing trend with increasing current speed, and is estimated to be around 0.0025 in conditions where wave-induced flow is relatively weak. Bed drag shows an increase (up to fourfold with increasing wave energy. These findings can be used to test the bed drag parameterizations in hydrodynamic and sediment transport models and the skills of these models in predicting flows in muddy environments.

  4. Variability of bed drag on cohesive beds under wave action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safak, Ilgar

    2016-01-01

    Drag force at the bed acting on water flow is a major control on water circulation and sediment transport. Bed drag has been thoroughly studied in sandy waters, but less so in muddy coastal waters. The variation of bed drag on a muddy shelf is investigated here using field observations of currents, waves, and sediment concentration collected during moderate wind and wave events. To estimate bottom shear stress and the bed drag coefficient, an indirect empirical method of logarithmic fitting to current velocity profiles (log-law), a bottom boundary layer model for combined wave-current flow, and a direct method that uses turbulent fluctuations of velocity are used. The overestimation by the log-law is significantly reduced by taking turbulence suppression due to sediment-induced stratification into account. The best agreement between the model and the direct estimates is obtained by using a hydraulic roughness of 10  m in the model. Direct estimate of bed drag on the muddy bed is found to have a decreasing trend with increasing current speed, and is estimated to be around 0.0025 in conditions where wave-induced flow is relatively weak. Bed drag shows an increase (up to fourfold) with increasing wave energy. These findings can be used to test the bed drag parameterizations in hydrodynamic and sediment transport models and the skills of these models in predicting flows in muddy environments.

  5. Aerodynamic shape optimization using control theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuther, James

    1996-01-01

    Aerodynamic shape design has long persisted as a difficult scientific challenge due its highly nonlinear flow physics and daunting geometric complexity. However, with the emergence of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) it has become possible to make accurate predictions of flows which are not dominated by viscous effects. It is thus worthwhile to explore the extension of CFD methods for flow analysis to the treatment of aerodynamic shape design. Two new aerodynamic shape design methods are developed which combine existing CFD technology, optimal control theory, and numerical optimization techniques. Flow analysis methods for the potential flow equation and the Euler equations form the basis of the two respective design methods. In each case, optimal control theory is used to derive the adjoint differential equations, the solution of which provides the necessary gradient information to a numerical optimization method much more efficiently then by conventional finite differencing. Each technique uses a quasi-Newton numerical optimization algorithm to drive an aerodynamic objective function toward a minimum. An analytic grid perturbation method is developed to modify body fitted meshes to accommodate shape changes during the design process. Both Hicks-Henne perturbation functions and B-spline control points are explored as suitable design variables. The new methods prove to be computationally efficient and robust, and can be used for practical airfoil design including geometric and aerodynamic constraints. Objective functions are chosen to allow both inverse design to a target pressure distribution and wave drag minimization. Several design cases are presented for each method illustrating its practicality and efficiency. These include non-lifting and lifting airfoils operating at both subsonic and transonic conditions.

  6. Study on aerodynamic characteristics of tactical missile with morphing wings%可变形翼战术导弹气动特性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张公平; 段朝阳; 廖志忠

    2011-01-01

    为进一步拓宽现有战术导弹的性能包线,通过工程估算及实验数据校核,分析了一类典型轴对称基准弹的纵向气动特性.然后,分别针对变后掠角弹翼与变翼展弹翼,研究了这两种可变形翼导弹的升力、阻力及静稳定度特性,揭示了弹翼变形对全弹气动特性的影响机理.最后,根据不同变形方式的气动计算结果,提出一种可在导弹飞行过程中同时改善其升力及阻力特性的方法.结果表明,所提出的变后掠与变翼展方法均能有效提高战术导弹的升力,并降低阻力.%To extend performance envelop of the existing tactical missiles, we study the aerodynamic characteristics of a representative axisymmetric baseline missile based on the engineering estimating and test data verifying.Then, the lift and drag characteristics of two morphing missiles with variable-sweep wings and variable-span wings are researched respectively, and the impact mechanism of morphing wings on aerodynamic characteristics is explained. Finally, based on the aerodynamic data of the two different morphing modes, a method is presented to give consideration to the characteristics of lift and drag. The results show that the variable-sweep wings and variablespan wings can effectively increase lift and reduce drag.

  7. Survival in a rat model of lethal hemorrhagic shock is prolonged following resuscitation with a small volume of a solution containing a drag-reducing polymer derived from aloe vera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macias, Carlos A; Kameneva, Marina V; Tenhunen, Jyrki J; Puyana, Juan-Carlos; Fink, Mitchell P

    2004-08-01

    Drag-reducing polymers (DRP) increase tissue perfusion at constant driving pressure. We sought to evaluate the effects of small-volume resuscitation with a solution containing a DRP in a rat model of hemorrhage. Anesthetized rats were hemorrhaged at a constant rate over 25 min. In protocol A, total blood loss was 2.45 mL/100 g, whereas in protocol B, total blood loss was 3.15 mL/100 g. Five minutes after hemorrhage, the animals were resuscitated with 7 mL/kg of either normal saline (NS) or NS containing 50 microg/mL of an aloe vera-derived DRP. In protocol B, a third group (CON) was not resuscitated. Whole-body O2 consumption (Vo2) and CO2 production (Vco2) were measured using indirect calorimetry. In protocol A, 5/10 rats in the NS group and 8/10 rats in the DRP group survived for 4 h (P = 0.14). Mean arterial pressure was higher in the DRP-treated group than in the NS-treated group 45 min after resuscitation (89 +/- 8 vs. 68 +/- 5 mmHg, respectively; P < 0.05). In protocol B, survival rates over 2 h in the DRP, NS, and CON groups were 5/15, 1/14, and 0/7, respectively (P < 0.05). Compared with NS-treated rats, those resuscitated with DRP achieved a higher peak Vo2 (9.0 +/- 1.0 vs. 6,3+/- 1.0 mL/kg/min) and Vco2 (9.0 +/- 1.1 vs. 6.0 +/- 1.0 mL/kg/min) after resuscitation. We conclude that resuscitation with a small volume of DRP prolongs survival in rats with lethal hemorrhagic shock.

  8. INTEGRATED AERODYNAMIC MEASUREMENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHUTTE, HK

    1992-01-01

    The myoelastic-aerodynamic model of phonation implies that aerodynamic factors are crucial to the evaluation of voice function, Subglottal pressure and mean flow rate represent the vocal power source. If they can be related to the magnitude of the radiated sound power, they may provide an index of v

  9. Reinforced aerodynamic profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to the prevention of deformations in an aerodynamic profile caused by lack of resistance to the bending moment forces that are created when such a profile is loaded in operation. More specifically, the invention relates to a reinforcing element inside an aerodynamic...

  10. A perturbative model for predicting the high-Reynolds-number behaviour of the streamwise travelling waves technique in turbulent drag reduction

    CERN Document Server

    Belan, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The background of this work is the problem of reducing the aerodynamic turbulent friction drag, which is an important source of energy waste in innumerable technological fields. We develop a theoretical framework aimed at predicting the behaviour of existing drag reduction techniques when used at the large values of Re which are typical of applications. We focus on one recently proposed and very promising technique, which consists in creating at the wall streamwise-travelling waves of spanwise velocity. A perturbation analysis of the Navier-Stokes equations that govern the fluid motion is carried out, for the simplest wall-bounded flow geometry, i.e. the plane channel flow. The streamwise base flow is perturbed by the spanwise time-varying base flow induced by the travelling waves. An asymptotic expansion is then carried out with respect to the velocity amplitude of the travelling wave. The analysis, although based on several assumptions, leads to predictions of drag reduction that agree well with the measure...

  11. Experimental study of drag reduction in flumes and spillway tunnels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-kui WANG; Chun-bo JIANG

    2010-01-01

    Experiments in an open flume model and spillway tunnel model were carried out using drag reduction techniques.Two drag reduction techniques were adopted in the experiments:polymer addition and coating.The drag reduction effect of a polyacrylamide(PAM)solution and dimethyl silicone oil coating were studied in the flume model experiments,and the results were analyzed.Experiments were then carried out with a model of the Xiluodu Hydropower Station,the second largest dam in China.In order to reduce the resistance,the spillway tunnels were internally coated with dimethyl silicone oil.This is the first time that these drag reduction techniques have been applied to so large a hydraulic model.The experimental results show that the coating technique can effectively increase flood discharge.The outlet velocity and the jet trajectory distance are also increased,which enhances the energy dissipation of the spillway tunnel.

  12. An Efficient Radial Basis Function Mesh Deformation Scheme within an Adjoint-Based Aerodynamic Optimization Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, Vincent

    Mesh deformation schemes play an important role in numerical aerodynamic optimization. As the aerodynamic shape changes, the computational mesh must adapt to conform to the deformed geometry. In this work, an extension to an existing fast and robust Radial Basis Function (RBF) mesh movement scheme is presented. Using a reduced set of surface points to define the mesh deformation increases the efficiency of the RBF method; however, at the cost of introducing errors into the parameterization by not recovering the exact displacement of all surface points. A secondary mesh movement is implemented, within an adjoint-based optimization framework, to eliminate these errors. The proposed scheme is tested within a 3D Euler flow by reducing the pressure drag while maintaining lift of a wing-body configured Boeing-747 and an Onera-M6 wing. As well, an inverse pressure design is executed on the Onera-M6 wing and an inverse span loading case is presented for a wing-body configured DLR-F6 aircraft.

  13. Investigates on Aerodynamic Characteristics of Projectile with Triangular Cross Section

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YI Wen-jun; WANG Zhong-yuan; LI Yan; QIAN Ji-sheng

    2009-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of projectiles with triangular and circular cross sections are investigated respectively by use of free-flight experiment. Processed the experiment data, curves of flight velocity variation and nutation of both projectiles are obtained, based on the curves, their aerodynamic force and moment coefficients are found out by data fitting, and their aerodynamic performances are compared and analyzed. Results show that the projectile with triangular cross section has smaller resistance, higher lift-drag ratio, better static stability, higher stability capability and more excellent maneuverability than those of the projectile with circular cross section, therefore it can be used in the guided projectiles; under lower rotation speed, the triangular section projectile has greater Magnus moment leading to bigger projectile distribution.

  14. Aerodynamic and engineering design of a 1.5 s high quality microgravity drop tower facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belser, Valentin; Breuninger, Jakob; Reilly, Matthew; Laufer, René; Dropmann, Michael; Herdrich, Georg; Hyde, Truell; Röser, Hans-Peter; Fasoulas, Stefanos

    2016-12-01

    Microgravity experiments are essential for research in space science, biology, fluid mechanics, combustion, and material sciences. One way to conduct microgravity experiments on Earth is by using drop tower facilities. These facilities combine a high quality of microgravity, adequate payload masses and have the advantage of virtually unlimited repeatability under same experimental conditions, at a low cost. In a collaboration between the Institute of Space Systems (IRS) at the University of Stuttgart and Baylor University (BU) in Waco, Texas, a new drop tower is currently under development at the Center for Astrophysics, Space Physics and Engineering Research (CASPER). The design parameters of the drop tower ask for at least 1.5 s in free fall duration while providing a quality of at least 10-5 g. Previously, this quality has only been achieved in vacuum drop tower facilities where the capsule experiences virtually zero aerodynamic drag during its free fall. Since this design comes at high costs, a different drop tower design concept, which does not require an evacuated drop shaft, was chosen. It features a dual-capsule system in which the experiment capsule is shielded from aerodynamic forces by surrounding it with a drag shield during the drop. As no other dual-capsule drop tower has been able to achieve a quality as good as or better than 10-5 g previous work optimized the design with an aerodynamic perspective by using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations to determine the ideal shape and size of the outer capsule and to specify the aerodynamically crucial dimensions for the overall system. Experiments later demonstrated that the required quality of microgravity can be met with the proposed design. The main focus of this paper is the mechanical realization of the capsule as well as the development and layout of the surrounding components, such as the release mechanism, the deceleration device and the drop shaft. Because the drop tower facility is a

  15. Analysis of detailed aerodynamic field measurements using results from an aeroelastic code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schepers, J.G. [Energy Research Centre, Petten (Netherlands); Feigl, L. [Ecotecnia S. coop.c.l. (Spain); Rooij, R. van; Bruining, A. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands)

    2004-07-01

    In this article an analysis is given of aerodynamic field measurements on wind turbine blades. The analysis starts with a consistency check on the measurements, by relating the measured local aerodynamic segment forces to the overall rotor loads. It is found that the results are very consistent. Moreover, a comparison is made between measured results and results calculated from an aeroelastic code. On the basis of this comparison, the aerodynamic modelling in the aeroelastic code could be improved. This holds in particular for the modelling of 3D stall effects, not only on the lift but also on the drag, and for the modelling of tip effects (author)

  16. Finding optimum airfoil shape to get maximum aerodynamic efficiency for a wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sogukpinar, Haci; Bozkurt, Ismail

    2017-02-01

    In this study, aerodynamic performances of S-series wind turbine airfoil of S 825 are investigated to find optimum angle of attack. Aerodynamic performances calculations are carried out by utilization of a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) method withstand finite capacity approximation by using Reynolds-Averaged-Navier Stokes (RANS) theorem. The lift and pressure coefficients, lift to drag ratio of airfoil S 825 are analyzed with SST turbulence model then obtained results crosscheck with wind tunnel data to verify the precision of computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) approximation. The comparison indicates that SST turbulence model used in this study can predict aerodynamics properties of wind blade.

  17. Aerodynamics of a hybrid airship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andan, Amelda Dianne; Asrar, Waqar; Omar, Ashraf A.

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this paper is to present the results of a numerical study of the aerodynamic parameters of a wingless and a winged-hull airship. The total forces and moment coefficients of the airships have been computed over a range of angles. The results obtained show that addition of a wing to a conventional airship increases the lift has three times the lifting force at positive angle of attack as compared to a wingless airship whereas the drag increases in the range of 19% to 58%. The longitudinal and directional stabilities were found to be statically stable, however, both the conventional airship and the hybrid or winged airships were found to have poor rolling stability. Wingless airship has slightly higher longitudinal stability than a winged airship. The winged airship has better directional stability than the wingless airship. The wingless airship only possesses static rolling stability in the range of yaw angles of -5° to 5°. On the contrary, the winged airship initially tested does not possess rolling stability at all. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations show that modifications to the wing placement and its dihedral have strong positive effect on the rolling stability. Raising the wings to the center of gravity and introducing a dihedral angle of 5° stabilizes the rolling motion of the winged airship.

  18. Measures for reducing drag loss in order to further optimize the economy of tractor/semitrailer combinations. Pt. 3. Fahrwiderstandsreduzierende Massnahmen zur weiteren Optimierung der Wirtschaftlichkeit von Sattelzuegen. T. 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porth, D.; Kraemer, W.

    1992-12-01

    In the third part aerodynamic measures considered particularly effective with regard to fuel consumption and overall economy are proved on the basis of the results of the wind tunnel tests and of the comparison measurements on the original vehicle using an improved measurement technique. (orig.).

  19. Flexible Thermal Protection System Development for Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    DelCorso, Joseph A.; Bruce, Walter E., III; Hughes, Stephen J.; Dec, John A.; Rezin, Marc D.; Meador, Mary Ann B.; Guo, Haiquan; Fletcher, Douglas G.; Calomino, Anthony M.; Cheatwood, McNeil

    2012-01-01

    The Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerators (HIAD) project has invested in development of multiple thermal protection system (TPS) candidates to be used in inflatable, high downmass, technology flight projects. Flexible TPS is one element of the HIAD project which is tasked with the research and development of the technology ranging from direct ground tests, modelling and simulation, characterization of TPS systems, manufacturing and handling, and standards and policy definition. The intent of flexible TPS is to enable large deployable aeroshell technologies, which increase the drag performance while significantly reducing the ballistic coefficient of high-mass entry vehicles. A HIAD requires a flexible TPS capable of surviving aerothermal loads, and durable enough to survive the rigors of construction, handling, high density packing, long duration exposure to extrinsic, in-situ environments, and deployment. This paper provides a comprehensive overview of key work being performed within the Flexible TPS element of the HIAD project. Included in this paper is an overview of, and results from, each Flexible TPS research and development activity, which includes ground testing, physics-based thermal modelling, age testing, margins policy, catalysis, materials characterization, and recent developments with new TPS materials.

  20. Drag/thrust analysis of jet-propelled transonic transport aircraft; definition of physical drag components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Destarac, D. [Office National d' Etudes et de Recherches Aerospatiales (ONERA), 92 - Chatillon (France); Van der Vooren, J. [Senior research scientist, retired, Hoekse Waard (Netherlands)

    2004-09-01

    Drag/thrust analysis of jet-propelled transonic transport aircraft on the basis of calculated viscous flow is discussed. Unique definitions for viscous drag plus wave drag and for induced drag are established. The concept of additive through flow drag is introduced. Drag/thrust bookkeeping is given attention. All drag components can be calculated in the flow region adjacent to the aircraft, where numerical accuracy is expectingly highest. Uniform handling of complex aircraft configurations is brought within reach. Near-field/far-field drag balances are exact. Computational aspects are discussed, in particular the elimination of spurious drag sources. Numerical examples are given for a wing-body and for a wing-body-pylon-nacelle configuration. In either case, the spurious drag sources are eliminated. Acceptable agreement is obtained for the total drag in the first case, and for the installation drag in the second case. Extension of the analysis presented to propeller-driven transport aircraft is straightforward. (author)

  1. Statistical Analysis of CFD Solutions from the Fourth AIAA Drag Prediction Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Joseph H.

    2010-01-01

    A graphical framework is used for statistical analysis of the results from an extensive N-version test of a collection of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics codes. The solutions were obtained by code developers and users from the U.S., Europe, Asia, and Russia using a variety of grid systems and turbulence models for the June 2009 4th Drag Prediction Workshop sponsored by the AIAA Applied Aerodynamics Technical Committee. The aerodynamic configuration for this workshop was a new subsonic transport model, the Common Research Model, designed using a modern approach for the wing and included a horizontal tail. The fourth workshop focused on the prediction of both absolute and incremental drag levels for wing-body and wing-body-horizontal tail configurations. This work continues the statistical analysis begun in the earlier workshops and compares the results from the grid convergence study of the most recent workshop with earlier workshops using the statistical framework.

  2. Statistical Analysis of CFD Solutions From the Fifth AIAA Drag Prediction Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Joseph H.

    2013-01-01

    A graphical framework is used for statistical analysis of the results from an extensive N-version test of a collection of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics codes. The solutions were obtained by code developers and users from North America, Europe, Asia, and South America using a common grid sequence and multiple turbulence models for the June 2012 fifth Drag Prediction Workshop sponsored by the AIAA Applied Aerodynamics Technical Committee. The aerodynamic configuration for this workshop was the Common Research Model subsonic transport wing-body previously used for the 4th Drag Prediction Workshop. This work continues the statistical analysis begun in the earlier workshops and compares the results from the grid convergence study of the most recent workshop with previous workshops.

  3. Statistical Analysis of CFD Solutions from the 6th AIAA CFD Drag Prediction Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derlaga, Joseph M.; Morrison, Joseph H.

    2017-01-01

    A graphical framework is used for statistical analysis of the results from an extensive N- version test of a collection of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes computational uid dynam- ics codes. The solutions were obtained by code developers and users from North America, Europe, Asia, and South America using both common and custom grid sequencees as well as multiple turbulence models for the June 2016 6th AIAA CFD Drag Prediction Workshop sponsored by the AIAA Applied Aerodynamics Technical Committee. The aerodynamic con guration for this workshop was the Common Research Model subsonic transport wing- body previously used for both the 4th and 5th Drag Prediction Workshops. This work continues the statistical analysis begun in the earlier workshops and compares the results from the grid convergence study of the most recent workshop with previous workshops.

  4. Drag reduction of flow boiling with polymer additives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The drag-reducing effect of polymer additive aqueous solution was investigated in flow boiling, and the polymer additives were two kinds of polyacrylamide (PAM) with relative molecular mass about 2.56×106 and 8.55×106. The frictional pressure drop was calculated according to the measured total pressure drop. The results show that the flow drag of flow boiling is reduced by adding a small amount of PAM to water when heat flux is in the range of 15.1 kW*m-2 to 47.0 kW*m-2, when the mass fraction of PAM is higher than 2.0×10-5, the drag-reducing effect is obvious. Drag-reducing effect of PAM, whose relative molecular mass is 8.55×106, is slightly better than that of 2.56×106 at the same mass fraction, and the greater the flow rate of the additive solution, the better the effect of the drag reduction.

  5. Drag Torque Prediction Model for the Wet Clutches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Jibin; PENG Zengxiong; YUAN Shihua

    2009-01-01

    Reduction of drag torque in disengaged wet clutch is one of important potentials for vehicle transmission improvement. The flow of the oil film in clutch clearance is investigated. A three-dimension Navier-Stokes(N-S) equation based on laminar flow is presented to model the drag torque. Pressure and speed distribution in radial and circumferential directions are deduced. The theoretical analysis reveals that oil flow acceleration in radial direction caused by centrifugal force is the key reason for the shrinking of oil film as constant feeding flow rate. The peak drag torque occurs at the beginning of oil film shrinking. A variable is introduced to describe effective oil film area and drag torque after oil film shrinking is well evaluated with the variable. Under the working condition, tests were made to obtain drag torque curves at different clutch speed and oil viscosity. The tests confirm that simulation results agree with test data. The model performs well in the prediction of drag torque and lays a theoretical foundation to reduce it.

  6. Hypersonic wave drag reduction performance of cylinders with repetitive laser energy depositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, J; Hong, Y J; Li, Q; Huang, H, E-mail: fangjuan314@163.com [Academy of Equipment Command and Technology, Post Box 3380-86, Huairou Dis. Beijing 101416 (China)

    2011-02-01

    It has been widely research that wave drag reduction on hypersonic vehicle by laser energy depositions. Using laser energy to reduce wave drag can improve vehicle performance. A second order accurate scheme based on finite-difference method and domain decomposition of structural grid is used to compute the drag performance of cylinders in a hypersonic flow of Mach number 2 at altitude of 15km with repetitive energy depositions. The effects of frequency on drag reduction are studied. The calculated results show: the recirculation zone is generated due to the interaction between bow shock over the cylinder and blast wave produced by energy deposition, and a virtual spike which is supported by an axis-symmetric recirculation, is formed in front of the cylinder. By increasing the repetitive frequency, the drag is reduced and the oscillation of the drag is decreased; however, the energy efficiency decreases by increasing the frequency.

  7. A computational study of the aerodynamic forces and power requirements of dragonfly Aeschna juncea hovering

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, M; Sun, Mao; Lan, Shi Long

    2004-01-01

    Aerodynamic force generation and mechanical power requirements of a dragonfly (Aeschna juncea) in hovering flight are studied. The method of numerically solving the Navier-Stokes equations in moving overset grids is used. There are two large vertical force peaks in one flapping cycle. One is in the first half of the cycle, which is mainly due to the hindwings in their downstroke; the other is in the second half of the cycle, which is mainly due to the forewings in their downstroke. Hovering with a large stroke plane angle, the dragonfly uses drag as a major source for its weight supporting force (approximately 65% of the total vertical force is contributed by the drag and 35% by the lift of the wings). The vertical force coefficient of a wing is twice as large as the quasi-steady value. The interaction between the fore- and hindwings is not very strong and is detrimental to the vertical force generation. Compared with the case of a single wing in the same motion, the interaction effect reduces the vertical fo...

  8. Fluid-thermal analysis of aerodynamic heating over spiked blunt body configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Qihao; Xu, Jinglei; Guo, Shuai

    2017-03-01

    When flying at hypersonic speeds, the spiked blunt body is constantly subjected to severe aerodynamic heating. To illustrate the thermal response of different configurations and the relevant flow field variation, a loosely-coupled fluid-thermal analysis is performed in this paper. The Mesh-based parallel Code Coupling Interface (MpCCI) is adopted to implement the data exchange between the fluid solver and the thermal solver. The results indicate that increases in spike diameter and length will result in a sharp decline of the wall temperature along the spike, and the overall heat flux is remarkably reduced to less than 300 W/cm2 with the aerodome mounted at the spike tip. Moreover, the presence and evolution of small vortices within the recirculation zone are observed and proved to be induced by the stagnation effect of reattachment points on the spike. In addition, the drag coefficient of the configuration with a doubled spike length presents a maximum drop of 4.59% due to the elevated wall temperature. And the growing difference of the drag coefficient is further increased during the accelerating process.

  9. Active disturbance rejection control for drag tracking in mars entry guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yuanqing; Chen, Rongfang; Pu, Fan; Dai, Li

    2014-03-01

    Future Mars missions will require precision landing capability, which motivates the need for entry closed-loop guidance schemes. A new tracking law - active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) - is presented in this paper. The ability of the ADRC tracking law to handle the atmospheric models and the vehicle’s aerodynamic errors is investigated. Monte Carlo simulations with dispersions in entry state variables, drag and lift coefficients, and atmospheric density show effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  10. Effects of Polymer Parameters on Drag Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safieddine, Abbas Mohammad

    Ryskin. This work provides strong experimental evidence in support of the theories suggesting that drag reduction is a result of polymer extension in a turbulent flow field. This macromolecular extension leads to a local fluid viscosity increase, effectively altering the turbulent energy balance. This in turn leads to a reduction in the intensity of the smallest eddies, thereby reducing friction and enhancing flow.

  11. Gravitational Capture of Asteroids by Gas Drag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Vieira Neto

    2009-01-01

    captured by the planet got its velocity reduced and could been trapped as an irregular satellite. It is well known that, depending on the time scale of the gas envelope, an asteroid will spiral and collide with the planet. So, we simulate the passage of the asteroid in the gas envelope with its density decreasing along the time. Using this approach, we found effective captures, and have a better understanding of the whole process. Finally, we conclude that the origin of the irregular satellites cannot be attributed to the gas drag capture mechanism alone.

  12. The aerodynamics of jumping rope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aristoff, Jeffrey; Stone, Howard

    2011-03-01

    We present the results of a combined theoretical and experimental investigation of the motion of a rotating string that is held at both ends (i.e. a jump rope). In particular, we determine how the surrounding fluid affects the shape of the string at high Reynolds numbers: the string bends toward the axis of rotation, thereby reducing its total drag. We derive a pair of coupled non-linear differential equations that describe the shape, the numerical solution of which compares well with asymptotic approximations and experiments. Implications for successful skipping will be discussed.

  13. AERODYNAMIC CHARACTERISTICS ABOUT MINING DUMP TRUCK AND THE IMPROVEMENT OF HEAD SHAPE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The external flow field around a certain mining dump truck was simulated. The airflow structure and the aerodynamic drag were discussed, and the relationship between airflow characteristics and aerodynamic drag were obtained. In order to solve the problem of head shape of the truck, three scenarios including edge rounding, installing splitter planes and their combination were put forward to improve the head shape through numerical simulation and analysis. The model and method were selected to be three dimensional and time-independent. The Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations were solved using the finite volume method. The RNG k-ε model was chosen for the closure of the turbulent quantities. The results show that the third scenario is the best one, because of its aerodynamic characteristics being better than those of unimproved model.

  14. Aerodynamic performances of cruise missile flying above local terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, A.; Saad, M. R.; Che Idris, A.; Rahman, M. R. A.; Sujipto, S.

    2016-10-01

    Cruise missile can be classified as a smart bomb and also Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) due to its ability to move and manoeuvre by itself without a pilot. Cruise missile flies in constant velocity in cruising stage. Malaysia is one of the consumers of cruise missiles that are imported from other nations, which can have distinct geographic factors including their local terrains compared to Malaysia. Some of the aerodynamic performances of missile such as drag and lift coefficients can be affected by the local geographic conditions in Malaysia, which is different from the origin nation. Therefore, a detailed study must be done to get aerodynamic performance of cruise missiles that operate in Malaysia. The effect of aerodynamic angles such as angle of attack and side slip can be used to investigate the aerodynamic performances of cruise missile. Hence, subsonic wind tunnel testings were conducted to obtain the aerodynamic performances of the missile at various angle of attack and sideslip angles. Smoke visualization was also performed to visualize the behaviour of flow separation. The optimum angle of attack found was at α=21° and side slip, β=10° for optimum pitching and yawing motion of cruise missile.

  15. Heavy Class Helicopter Fuselage Model Drag Reduction by Active Flow Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Gregorio, F.

    2017-08-01

    A comprehensive experimental investigation of helicopter blunt fuselage drag reduction using active flow control is being carried out within the European Clean Sky program. The objective is to demonstrate the capability of several active flow technologies to decrease fuselage drag by alleviating the flow separation occurring in the rear area of some helicopters. The work is performed on a simplified blunt fuselage at model-scale. Two different flow control actuators are considered for evaluation: steady blowing, unsteady blowing (or pulsed jets). Laboratory tests of each individual actuator are first performed to assess their performance and properties. The fuselage model is then equipped with these actuators distributed in 3 slots located on the ramp bottom edge. This paper addresses the promising results obtained during the wind-tunnel campaign, since significant drag reductions are achieved for a wide range of fuselage angles of attack and yaw angles without detriment of the other aerodynamic characteristics.

  16. Experimental investigation on drag and heat flux reduction in supersonic/hypersonic flows: A survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen-guo; Sun, Xi-wan; Huang, Wei; Li, Shi-bin; Yan, Li

    2016-12-01

    The drag and heat reduction problem of hypersonic vehicles has always attracted the attention worldwide, and the experimental test approach is the basis of theoretical analysis and numerical simulation. In the current study, research progress of experimental investigations on drag and heat reduction are summarized by several kinds of mechanism, namely the forward-facing cavity, the opposing jet, the aerospike, the energy deposition and their combinational configurations, and the combinational configurations include the combinational opposing jet and forward-facing cavity concept and the combinational opposing jet and aerospike concept. The geometric models and flow conditions are emphasized, especially for the basic principle for the drag and heat flux reduction of each device. The measurement results of aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic are compared and analyzed as well, which can be a reference for assessing the accuracy of numerical results.

  17. Spatially distributed control for optimal drag reduction of the flow past a circular cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poncet, Philippe; Hildebrand, Roland; Cottet, Georges-Henri; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    We report high drag reduction in direct numerical simulations of controlled flows past circular cylinders at Reynolds numbers of 300 and 1000. The flow is controlled by the azimuthal component of the tangential velocity of the cylinder surface. Starting from a spanwise-uniform velocity profile that leads to high drag reduction, the optimization procedure identifies, for the same energy input, spanwise-varying velocity profiles that lead to higher drag reduction. The three-dimensional variations of the velocity field, corresponding to modes A and B of three-dimensional wake instabilities, are largely responsible for this drag reduction. The spanwise wall velocity variations introduce streamwise vortex braids in the wake that are responsible for reducing the drag induced by the primary spanwise vortices shed by the cylinder. The results demonstrate that extending two-dimensional controllers to three-dimensional flows is not optimal as three-dimensional control strategies can lead efficiently to higher drag reduction.

  18. Drag Moderation by the Melting of an Ice Surface in Contact with Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakarelski, Ivan U.; Chan, Derek Y. C.; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T.

    2015-07-01

    We report measurements of the effects of a melting ice surface on the hydrodynamic drag of ice-shell-metal-core spheres free falling in water at a Reynolds of number Re ˜2 ×104- 3 ×105 and demonstrate that the melting surface induces the early onset of the drag crisis, thus reducing the hydrodynamic drag by more than 50%. Direct visualization of the flow pattern demonstrates the key role of surface melting. Our observations support the hypothesis that the drag reduction is due to the disturbance of the viscous boundary layer by the mass transfer from the melting ice surface.

  19. Drag Moderation by the Melting of an Ice Surface in Contact with Water

    KAUST Repository

    Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev

    2015-07-24

    We report measurements of the effects of a melting ice surface on the hydrodynamic drag of ice-shell-metal-core spheres free falling in water at a Reynolds of number Re∼2×104–3×105 and demonstrate that the melting surface induces the early onset of the drag crisis, thus reducing the hydrodynamic drag by more than 50%. Direct visualization of the flow pattern demonstrates the key role of surface melting. Our observations support the hypothesis that the drag reduction is due to the disturbance of the viscous boundary layer by the mass transfer from the melting ice surface.

  20. Contribution of velocity-vorticity correlations to the frictional drag in wall-bounded turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Min; Ahn, Junsun; Hwang, Jinyul; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2016-08-01

    The relationship between the frictional drag and the velocity-vorticity correlations in wall-bounded turbulent flows is derived from the mean vorticity equation. A formula for the skin friction coefficient is proposed and evaluated with regards to three canonical wall-bounded flows: turbulent boundary layer, turbulent channel flow, and turbulent pipe flow. The frictional drag encompasses four terms: advective vorticity transport, vortex stretching, viscous, and inhomogeneous terms. Drag-reduced channel flow with the slip condition is used to test the reliability of the formula. The advective vorticity transport and vortex stretching terms are found to dominate the contributions to the frictional drag.

  1. Drag Reduction of Bacterial Cellulose Suspensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Ogata

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Drag reduction due to bacterial cellulose suspensions with small environmental loading was investigated. Experiments were carried out by measuring the pressure drop in pipe flow. It was found that bacterial cellulose suspensions give rise to drag reduction in the turbulent flow range. We observed a maximum drag reduction ratio of 11% and found that it increased with the concentration of the bacterial cellulose suspension. However, the drag reduction effect decreased in the presence of mechanical shear.

  2. Coulomb drag in the mesoscopic regime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, N.A.; Flensberg, Karsten; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2002-01-01

    We present a theory for Coulomb drag between two mesoscopic systems which expresses the drag in terms of scattering matrices and wave functions. The formalism can be applied to both ballistic and disordered systems and the consequences can be studied either by numerical simulations or analytic...... average drag for chaotic 2D-systems and dominating fluctuations of drag between quasi-ballistic wires with almost ideal transmission....

  3. Comparison of the aerodynamics of bridge cables with helical fillets and a pattern-indented surface in normal flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleissl, Kenneth; Georgakis, Christos

    2011-01-01

    -wind induced vibrations (RWIVs). The modifications are based on re-search undertaken predominantly in Europe and Japan, with two different systems prevailing; HDPE tubing fitted with helical surface fillets and HDPE tubing with pattern-indented sur-faces. In the US and Europe, helical fillets dominate, whilst...... pattern indented surfaces are more common in Asia. Research into the effectiveness of helical fillets and pattern-indented surfaces has shown that, besides their potential to suppress rain-wind induced vibrations, they are also modestly reducing drag forces at design wind velocities. This is of particular...... that different researchers, in different facilities, with varying wind-tunnel flow characteristics and performance, have developed each separately. As part of a comprehensive review of the aerodynamics of existing cable surface modifica-tions, the resulting static force coefficients obtained from wind...

  4. Effect of tail size reductions on longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a three surface F-15 model with nonaxisymmetric nozzles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frassinelli, Mark C.; Carson, George T., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the effects of horizontal and vertical tail size reductions on the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a modified F-15 model with canards and 2-D convergent-divergent nozzles. Quantifying the drag decrease at low angles of attack produced by tail size reductions was the primary focus. The model was tested at Mach numbers of 0.40, 0.90, and 1.20 over an angle of attack of -2 degree to 10 degree. The nozzle exhaust flow was simulated using high pressure air at nozzle pressure ratios varying from 1.0 (jet off) to 7.5. Data were obtained on the baseline configuration with and without tails as well as with reduced horizontal and/or vertical tail sizes that were 75, 50, and 25 percent of the baseline tail areas.

  5. Analytical calculation of the drag force near drag crisis of a falling sphere

    CERN Document Server

    Assis, Armando V D B; Branco, N S

    2010-01-01

    We obtain analitically the $v^2$ dependence of the drag force on a falling sphere close to the drag crisis, as well as the drag coefficient at the drag crisis, with excellent agreement with experiment. We take into account the effects of viscosity in creating a turbulent boundary layer and perform the calculations using the Navier-Stokes equation.

  6. Aerodynamic characteristics of sixteen electric, hybrid, and subcompact vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, D. W.

    1979-01-01

    An elementary electric and hybrid vehicle aerodynamic data base was developed using data obtained on sixteen electric, hybrid, and sub-compact production vehicles tested in the Lockheed-Georgia low-speed wind tunnel. Zero-yaw drag coefficients ranged from a high of 0.58 for a boxey delivery van and an open roadster to a low of about 0.34 for a current four-passenger proto-type automobile which was designed with aerodynamics as an integrated parameter. Vehicles were tested at yaw angles up to 40 degrees and a wing weighting analysis is presented which yields a vehicle's effective drag coefficient as a function of wing velocity and driving cycle. Other parameters investigated included the effects of windows open and closed, radiators open and sealed, and pop-up headlights. Complete six-component force and moment data are presented in both tabular and graphical formats. Only limited commentary is offered since, by its very nature, a data base should consist of unrefined reference material. A justification for pursuing efficient aerodynamic design of EHVs is presented.

  7. Two cases of aerodynamic adjustment of sastrugi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Amory

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In polar regions, sastrugi are a direct manifestation of wind driven snow and form the main surface roughness elements. In turn, sastrugi influence the local wind field and associated aeolian snow mass fluxes. Little attention has been paid to these feedback processes, mainly because of experimental difficulties, and, as a result most polar atmospheric models currently ignore sastrugi. More accurate quantification of the influence of sastrugi remains a major challenge. In the present study, wind profiles and aeolian snow mass fluxes were analyzed jointly on a sastrugi covered snowfield in Antarctica. Neutral stability 10 m air-snow drag coefficients CDN10 were computed from six level wind speed profiles collected in Adélie Land during austral winter 2013. The aeolian snow mass flux in the first meter above the surface of the snow was also measured using a windborne snow acoustic sensor. This paper focuses on two cases during which sastrugi responses to shifts in wind direction were evidenced by variations in snow mass flux and drag coefficients. Using this dataset, it was shown that (i the timescale of sastrugi aerodynamic adjustment can be as short as 3 h for friction velocities of 1 m s−1 or above and during strong windborne snow conditions, (ii CDN10 values were in the range of 1.3–1.5 × 103 when the wind was well aligned with the sastrugi and increased to 3 × 103 or higher when the wind only shifted 20–30°, (iii CDN10 can increase (to 120 % and the aeolian snow mass flux can decrease (to 80 % in response to a shift in wind direction, and (iv knowing CDN10 is not sufficient to estimate the erosion flux that results from drag partitioning at the surface because CDN10 includes the contribution of the sastrugi form drag. These results not only support the existence of feedback mechanisms linking sastrugi, aeolian particle transport and surface drag properties over snow surface but also provide orders of magnitude, although further

  8. Subsonic aerodynamic characteristic of semispan commercial transport model with wing-mounted advanced ducted propeller operating in reverse thrust. [conducted in the Langley 14 by 22 foot subsonic wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applin, Zachary T.; Jones, Kenneth M.; Gile, Brenda E.; Quinto, P. Frank

    1994-01-01

    A test was conducted in the Langley 14 by 22 Foot Subsonic Tunnel to determine the effect of the reverse-thrust flow field of a wing-mounted advanced ducted propeller on the aerodynamic characteristics of a semispan subsonic high-lift transport model. The advanced ducted propeller (ADP) model was mounted separately in position alongside the wing so that only the aerodynamic interference of the propeller and nacelle affected the aerodynamic performance of the transport model. Mach numbers ranged from 0.14 to 0.26; corresponding Reynolds numbers ranged from 2.2 to 3.9 x 10(exp 6). The reverse-thrust flow field of the ADP shielded a portion of the wing from the free-stream airflow and reduced both lift and drag. The reduction in lift and drag was a function of ADP rotational speed and free-stream velocity. Test results included ground effects data for the transport model and ADP configuration. The ground plane caused a beneficial increase in drag and an undesirable slight increase in lift. The ADP and transport model performance in ground effect was similar to performance trends observed for out of ground effect. The test results form a comprehensive data set that supports the application of the ADP engine and airplane concept on the next generation of advanced subsonic transports. Before this investigation, the engine application was predicted to have detrimental ground effect characteristics. Ground effect test measurements indicated no critical problems and were the first step in proving the viability of this engine and airplane configuration.

  9. Coulomb drag in coherent mesoscopic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Niels Asger; Flensberg, Karsten; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2001-01-01

    , such as the random matrix theory, or by numerical simulations. We show that Coulomb drag is sensitive to localized states, which usual transport measurements do not probe. For chaotic 2D systems we find a vanishing average drag, with a nonzero variance. Disordered 1D wires show a finite drag, with a large variance......We present a theory for Coulomb drag between two mesoscopic systems. Our formalism expresses the drag in terms of scattering matrices and wave functions, and its range of validity covers both ballistic and disordered systems. The consequences can be worked out either by analytic means...

  10. Biomimetic Drag Reduction Study on Herringbone Riblets of Bird Feather

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huawei Chen; Fugang Rao; Xiaopeng Shang; Deyuan Zhang; Ichiro Hagiwara

    2013-01-01

    Birds have gradually formed various excellent structures such as streamlined shape and hollow shaft of feather to improve their flying performance by millions of years of natural selection.As typical property of bird feather,herringbone riblets align along the shaft of each feather,which is caused by perfect link of barbs,especially for the primary and secondary feathers of wings.Such herringbone riblets of feather are assumed to have great impact on drag reduction.In this paper,microstructures of secondary feathers of adult pigeons are investigated by SEM,and their structural parameters are statistically obtained.Based on quantitative analysis of feather structure,novel biomimetic herringbone riblets with narrow smooth edge are proposed to reduce surface drag.In comparison with traditional microgroove riblets and other drag reduction structures,the drag reduction rate of the proposed biomimetic herringbone riblets is experimentally clarified up to 16%,much higher than others.Moreover,the drag reduction mechanism of herringbone riblets are also confirmed and exploited by CFD.

  11. Drag reduction in electro-osmosis of polymer solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Feng-Ming; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2007-05-01

    Electro-osmosis is the preferred transport mechanism in microfluidic systems. Drag reduction in electro-osmosis of polymer solutions is observed due to polymer depletion in the electric double layer (EDL). The well-known Helmholtz-Smoluchowski (HS) equation indicates that the electro-osmosis mobility is inversely proportional to the solution viscosity. For low molecular weight the polymer size (R) is smaller than the EDL thickness (λ) and the HS equation is valid. For high molecular weight (R>λ) the chains in the EDL are partially sheared and the effective viscosity is smaller than the solution viscosity. Salt addition reduces λ and can enhance drag reduction substantially.

  12. Computational analysis of methods for reduction of induced drag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janus, J. M.; Chatterjee, Animesh; Cave, Chris

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this effort was to perform a computational flow analysis of a design concept centered around induced drag reduction and tip-vortex energy recovery. The flow model solves the unsteady three-dimensional Euler equations, discretized as a finite-volume method, utilizing a high-resolution approximate Riemann solver for cell interface flux definitions. The numerical scheme is an approximately-factored block LU implicit Newton iterative-refinement method. Multiblock domain decomposition is used to partition the field into an ordered arrangement of blocks. Three configurations are analyzed: a baseline fuselage-wing, a fuselage-wing-nacelle, and a fuselage-wing-nacelle-propfan. Aerodynamic force coefficients, propfan performance coefficients, and flowfield maps are used to qualitatively access design efficacy. Where appropriate, comparisons are made with available experimental data.

  13. Turbulent drag reduction by polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonn, Daniel [Van der Waals-Zeeman Instituut, University of Amsterdam, Valckenierstraat 65 1018, XE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Amarouchene, Yacine [CPMOH, Universite Bordeaux 1, 351 Cours de la Liberation, 33405 Talence cedex (France); Wagner, Christian [Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Universitaet des Saarlandes, Saarbruecken (Germany); Douady, Stephane [Laboratoire de Physique Statistique de l' ENS, 24 rue Lhomond, 75231 Paris cedex 05 (France); Cadot, Olivier [ENSTA, Chemin de la Huniere, 91761 Palaiseau cedex (France)

    2005-04-13

    The reduction of turbulent energy dissipation by addition of polymers is studied experimentally. We first address the question of where the action of the polymers is taking place. Subsequently, we show that there is a direct correlation of drag reduction with the elongational viscosity of the polymers. For this, the reduction of turbulent energy dissipation by addition of the biopolymer DNA is studied. These results open the way for a direct visualization study of the polymer conformation in a turbulent boundary layer.

  14. Drag Effects in Charm Photoproduction

    CERN Document Server

    Norrbin, E

    1999-01-01

    We have refined a model for charm fragmentation at hadron colliders. This model can also be applied to the photoproduction of charm. We investigate the effect of fragmentation on the distribution of produced charm quarks. The drag effect is seen to produce charm hadrons that are shifted in rapidity in the direction of the beam remnant. We also study the importance of different production mechanisms such as charm in the photon and from parton showers.

  15. Self-burrowing seeds: drag reduction in granular media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Wonjong; Choi, Sung Mok; Kim, Wonjung; Kim, Ho-Young

    2014-11-01

    We present the results of a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of drag reduction of self-burrowing seeds in granular media. In response to environmental changes in humidity, the awn (a tail-like appendage of seed) of Pelargonium carnosum exhibits coiling-uncoiling deformation which induces the thrust and rotary motions of the head of the seed against the surface of the soil. Using various sizes of glass beads that mimic the granular soil, we measure the thrust forces required for the seed of Pelargonium carnosum to penetrate into granular media with and without rotation. Our quantitative measurements show that the rotation of the seed remarkably reduces the granular drag as compared to the drag against the non-spinning seed. This leads us to conclude that the hygroscopically active awns of Pelargonium carnosum enables its seed to dig into the relatively coarse granular soils.

  16. Aerodynamic Design of the Hybrid Wing Body Propulsion-Airframe Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, May-Fun; Kim, Hyoungjin; Lee, ByungJoon; Liou, Meng-Sing

    2017-01-01

    A hybrid wingbody (HWB) concept is being considered by NASA as a potential subsonic transport aircraft that meets aerodynamic, fuel, emission, and noise goals in the time frame of the 2030s. While the concept promises advantages over conventional wing-and-tube aircraft, it poses unknowns and risks, thus requiring in-depth and broad assessments. Specifically, the configuration entails a tight integration of the airframe and propulsion geometries; the aerodynamic impact has to be carefully evaluated. With the propulsion nacelle installed on the (upper) body, the lift and drag are affected by the mutual interference effects between the airframe and nacelle. The static margin for longitudinal stability is also adversely changed. We develop a design approach in which the integrated geometry of airframe (HWB) and propulsion is accounted for simultaneously in a simple algebraic manner, via parameterization of the planform and airfoils at control sections of the wingbody. In this paper, we present the design of a 300-passenger transport that employs distributed electric fans for propulsion. The trim for stability is achieved through the use of the wingtip twist angle. The geometric shape variables are determined through the adjoint optimization method by minimizing the drag while subject to lift, pitch moment, and geometry constraints. The design results clearly show the influence on the aerodynamic characteristics of the installed nacelle and trimming for stability. A drag minimization with the trim constraint yields a reduction of 10 counts in the drag coefficient.

  17. The Effect of Sodium Hydroxide on Drag Reduction using a Biopolymer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Harvin Kaur A/P Gurchran

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Drag reduction is observed as reduced frictional pressure losses under turbulent flow conditions and hence, substantially increases the flowrate of the fluid. Practical application includes water flooding system, pipeline transport and drainage system. Drag reduction agent, such as polymers, can be introduced to increase the flowrate of water flowing, reducing the water accumulation in the system and subsequently lesser possibility of heavy flooding. Currently used polymer as drag reduction agents is carboxymethylcellulose, to name one. This is a synthetic polymer which will seep into the ground and further harm our environment in excessive use of accumulation. A more environmentally-friendly drag reduction agent, such as the polymer derived from natural sources or biopolymer, is then required for such purpose. As opposed to the synthetic polymers, the potential of biopolymers as drag reduction agents, especially those derived from a local plant source, are not extensively explored. The drag reduction of a polymer produced from a local plant source within the turbulent regime will be explored and assessed in this study using a rheometer where a reduced a torque produced can be perceived as a reduction of drag. The cellulose powder was converted to carboxymethylcellulose (CMC by etherification process using sodium monochloroacetate and sodium hydroxide. The carboxymethylation reaction then was optimized against concentration of NaOH. The research is structured to focus on producing the biopolymer and also assess the drag reduction ability of the biopolymer produced against concentration of sodium hydroxide.

  18. Experimental Study of Aerodynamic Behavior in Wind Tunnels with Ornithopter and Plane Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marie-Francoise SCIBILIA; Jan WOJCIECHOWSKI

    2006-01-01

    There are similarities between planes and birds. In fact aerodynamics bases are the same. In order to make some comparisons, this paper presents two series of experiments: one in a wind tunnel with an ornithopter model for measurements of aerodynamic forces with flapping wings. The wing movement has two degrees of freedom flapping around the longitudinal axis of the model and feathering around the wing axis. Measurements of aerodynamic forces: lift and drag in static case averaging values during many cycles of movement and in dynamic case have been performed. The other part of the paper concerns velocity and turbulence measurements on a metal plane wall jet in a wind tunnel with and without a rough surface, with and without acoustic vibrations in order to simulate a plane wing. Aerodynamic characteristics have been obtained in all cases.

  19. Aerodynamic Study about an Automotive Vehicle with Capacity for Only One Occupan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida R.A

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The presented study describes the aerodynamic behavior of a compact, single occupant, automotive vehicle. To optimize the aerodynamic characteristics of this vehicle, a flow dynamics study was conducted using a virtual model. The outer surfaces of the vehicle body were designed using Computer Aided Design (CAD tools and its aerodynamic performance simulated virtually using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD software. Parameters such as pressure coefficient (Cp, coefficient of friction (Cf and graphical analysis of the streamlines were used to understand the flow dynamics and propose recommendations aimed at improving the coefficient of drag (Cd. The identification of interaction points between the fluid and the flow structure was the primary focus of study to develop these propositions. The study of phenomena linked to the characteristics of the model presented here, allowed the identification of design features that should be avoided to generate improved aerodynamic performance

  20. Aerodynamic Analysis of a Manned Space Vehicle for Missions to Mars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Pezzella

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the aerodynamic analysis of a manned braking system entering the Mars atmosphere with the aim to support planetary entry system design studies. The exploration vehicle is an axisymmetric blunt body close to the Apollo capsule. Several fully three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics analyses have been performed to address the capsule aerodynamic performance. To this end, a wide range of flow conditions including reacting and nonreacting flow, different angles of attack, and Mach numbers have been investigated and compared. Moreover, nonequilibrium effects on the flow field around the entry vehicle have also been investigated. Results show that real-gas effects, for all the angles of attack considered, increase both the aerodynamic drag and pitching moment whereas the lift is only slighted affected. Finally, results comparisons highlight that experimental and CFD aerodynamic findings available for the Apollo capsule in air adequately represent the static coefficients of the capsule in the Mars atmosphere.

  1. Aerodynamics of Race Cars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Race car performance depends on elements such as the engine, tires, suspension, road, aerodynamics, and of course the driver. In recent years, however, vehicle aerodynamics gained increased attention, mainly due to the utilization of the negative lift (downforce) principle, yielding several important performance improvements. This review briefly explains the significance of the aerodynamic downforce and how it improves race car performance. After this short introduction various methods to generate downforce such as inverted wings, diffusers, and vortex generators are discussed. Due to the complex geometry of these vehicles, the aerodynamic interaction between the various body components is significant, resulting in vortex flows and lifting surface shapes unlike traditional airplane wings. Typical design tools such as wind tunnel testing, computational fluid dynamics, and track testing, and their relevance to race car development, are discussed as well. In spite of the tremendous progress of these design tools (due to better instrumentation, communication, and computational power), the fluid dynamic phenomenon is still highly nonlinear, and predicting the effect of a particular modification is not always trouble free. Several examples covering a wide range of vehicle shapes (e.g., from stock cars to open-wheel race cars) are presented to demonstrate this nonlinear nature of the flow field.

  2. Effects of surface drag on low-level frontogenesis within baroclinic waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yi; TAN ZheMin

    2007-01-01

    Using a three-dimensional nonhydrostatic mesoscale numerical model (MM5), the evolution and structures of baroclinic waves with and without surface drag in case of dry and moist atmosphere are simulated, with special emphases on the effects of surface drag on the low-level frontal structure and frontogenesis. There are two different effects of surface drag on the low-level frontogenesis in the dry case. On one hand, the surface drag weakens the low-level frontogenesis and less inclined to develop the baroclinic wave due to the dissipation. But on the other hand, the surface drag induces a strong ageostrophic flow, which prolongs the low-level frontogenesis and finally leads to the enhancement of cold front. Compared with the no surface drag case, the surface drag increases the frontal slope especially in the boundary layer, where the front is almost vertical to the surface, and then enhances the prefrontal vertical motion. All these conclusions expanded the analytical theory of Tan and Wu (1990). In the moist atmosphere, the influence of surface drag on frontal rainbands is also obvious. The surface drag weakens the convection, and reduces the energy dissipation near the surface when the initial relative humidity is relatively weak. At this time, the confluence induced post-frontal updrafts moves across the cold front and reinforces the prefrontal convection, which is beneficial to the maintenance of the rainband in cold sector. Given the enhancement of relative humidity, the moist convection dominates the low-level frontogenesis while the retardation of surface drag on energy dissipation is not obvious, therefore the effects of surface drag on the low-level frontogenesis and precipitation are reduced.

  3. Satellite Aerodynamics and Density Determination from Satellite Dynamic Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karr, G. R.

    1972-01-01

    The aerodynamic drag and lift properties of a satellite are first expressed as a function of two parameters associated with gas-surface interaction at the satellite surface. The dynamic response of the satellite as it passes through the atmosphere is then expressed as a function of the two gas-surface interaction parameters, the atmospheric density, the satellite velocity, and the satellite orientation to the high speed flow. By proper correlation of the observed dynamic response with the changing angle of attack of the satellite, it is found that the two unknown gas-surface interaction parameters can be determined. Once the gas-surface interaction parameters are known, the aerodynamic properties of the satellite at all angles of attack are also determined.

  4. Experimental Investigation on Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Paraglider Wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashud, Mohammad; Umemura, Akira

    The fundamental aerodynamic characteristics of a paraglider’s canopy are investigated in wind tunnel experiments using an inflatable cell model designed to represent the dynamic behaviors of each cell comprising the canopy. At attack angles greater than a few degrees, the cell model inflates fully. To characterize its aerodynamic characteristics, we focus our attention on the flow around the inflated cell model at the plane of symmetry of the model. The cross-sectional profile of the inflated cell model, streamline pattern, internal air pressure and external surface pressure distribution are measured at various attack angles in order to identify the function of air intake and to obtain the lift and drag coefficients of the airfoil with an open air intake. The results reveal the mechanism of how the cell inflates into a stable wing shape and bears the buckling force caused by the cables suspending a pay load.

  5. Aerodynamic characteristics research on wide-speed range waverider configuration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Waverider generated from a given flow field has a high lift-to-drag ratio because of attached bow shock on leading edge. However, leading edge blunt and off-design condition can make bow shock off leading edge and have unfavorable influence on aerodynamic characteristics. So these two problems have always been concerned as important engineering science issues by aeronautical engineering scientists. In this paper, through respectively using low speed and high speed waverider design principles, a wide-speed rang vehicle is designed, which can level takeoff and accelerate to hypersonic speed for cruise. In addition, sharp leading edge is blunted to alleviated aeroheating. Theoretical study and wind tunnel test show that this vehicle has good aerodynamic performance in wide-speed range of subsonic, transonic, supersonic and hypersonic speeds.

  6. Experimental study on the aerodynamic performance of a Savonius rotor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujisawa, Nobuyuki; Gotoh, Futoshi (Gunma Univ., Kiryu (Japan). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1994-08-01

    The aerodynamic performance of a Savonius rotor has been studied by measuring the pressure distributions on the blade surfaces at various rotor angles and tip-speed ratios. It is found that the pressure distributions on the rotating rotor differ remarkably from those on the still rotor especially on the convex side of the advancing blade, where a low pressure region is formed by the moving wall effect of the blade. The torque and power performances, evaluated by integrating the pressure, are in close agreement with those by the direct torque measurement. The drag and side force performance is also studied.

  7. Evolving aerodynamic airfoils for wind turbines through a genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, J. J.; Gómez, E.; Grageda, J. I.; Couder, C.; Solís, A.; Hanotel, C. L.; Ledesma, JI

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, genetic algorithms stand out for airfoil optimisation, due to the virtues of mutation and crossing-over techniques. In this work we propose a genetic algorithm with arithmetic crossover rules. The optimisation criteria are taken to be the maximisation of both aerodynamic efficiency and lift coefficient, while minimising drag coefficient. Such algorithm shows greatly improvements in computational costs, as well as a high performance by obtaining optimised airfoils for Mexico City's specific wind conditions from generic wind turbines designed for higher Reynolds numbers, in few iterations.

  8. Perching aerodynamics and trajectory optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickenheiser, Adam; Garcia, Ephrahim

    2007-04-01

    Advances in smart materials, actuators, and control architecture have enabled new flight capabilities for aircraft. Perching is one such capability, described as a vertical landing maneuver using in-flight shape reconfiguration in lieu of high thrust generation. A morphing, perching aircraft design is presented that is capable of post stall flight and very slow landing on a vertical platform. A comprehensive model of the aircraft's aerodynamics, with special regard to nonlinear affects such as flow separation and dynamic stall, is discussed. Trajectory optimization using nonlinear programming techniques is employed to show the effects that morphing and nonlinear aerodynamics have on the maneuver. These effects are shown to decrease the initial height and distance required to initiate the maneuver, reduce the bounds on the trajectory, and decrease the required thrust for the maneuver. Perching trajectories comparing morphing versus fixed-configuration and stalled versus un-stalled aircraft are presented. It is demonstrated that a vertical landing is possible in the absence of high thrust if post-stall flight capabilities and vehicle reconfiguration are utilized.

  9. Morphologic and Aerodynamic Considerations Regarding the Plumed Seeds of Tragopogon pratensis and Their Implications for Seed Dispersal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casseau, V.; De Croon, G.C.H.E.; Izzo, D.; Pandolfi, C.

    2015-01-01

    Tragopogon pratensis is a small herbaceous plant that uses wind as the dispersal vector for its seeds. The seeds are attached to parachutes that increase the aerodynamic drag force and increase the total distance travelled. Our hypothesis is that evolution has carefully tuned the air permeability of

  10. ATEFlap aerodynamic model, a dynamic stall model including the effects of trailing edge flap deflection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergami, L.; Gaunaa, M.

    2012-02-15

    The report presents the ATEFlap aerodynamic model, which computes the unsteady lift, drag and moment on a 2D airfoil section equipped with Adaptive Trailing Edge Flap. The model captures the unsteady response related to the effects of the vorticity shed into the wake, and the dynamics of flow separation a thin-airfoil potential flow model is merged with a dynamic stall model of the Beddoes-Leishmann type. The inputs required by the model are steady data for lift, drag, and moment coefficients as function of angle of attack and flap deflection. Further steady data used by the Beddoes- Leishmann dynamic stall model are computed in an external preprocessor application, which gives the user the possibility to verify, and eventually correct, the steady data passed to the aerodynamic model. The ATEFlap aerodynamic model is integrated in the aeroelastic simulation tool HAWC2, thus al- lowing to simulate the response of a wind turbine with trailing edge flaps on the rotor. The algorithms used by the preprocessor, and by aerodynamic model are presented, and modifications to previous implementations of the aerodynamic model are briefly discussed. The performance and the validity of the model are verified by comparing the dynamic response computed by the ATEFlap with solutions from CFD simulations. (Author)

  11. Wing Tip Drag Reduction at Nominal Take-Off Mach Number: An Approach to Local Active Flow Control with a Highly Robust Actuator System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Bauer

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses wind tunnel test results aimed at advancing active flow control technology to increase the aerodynamic efficiency of an aircraft during take-off. A model of the outer section of a representative civil airliner wing was equipped with two-stage fluidic actuators between the slat edge and wing tip, where mechanical high-lift devices fail to integrate. The experiments were conducted at a nominal take-off Mach number of M = 0.2. At this incidence velocity, separation on the wing section, accompanied by increased drag, is triggered by the strong slat edge vortex at high angles of attack. On the basis of global force measurements and local static pressure data, the effect of pulsed blowing on the complex flow is evaluated, considering various momentum coefficients and spanwise distributions of the actuation effort. It is shown that through local intensification of forcing, a momentum coefficient of less than c μ = 0.6 % suffices to offset the stall by 2.4°, increase the maximum lift by more than 10% and reduce the drag by 37% compared to the uncontrolled flow.

  12. Effects of surface drag on low-level frontogenesis within baroclinic waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Using a three-dimensional nonhydrostatic mesoscale numerical model (MM5), the evolution and structures of baroclinic waves with and without surface drag in case of dry and moist atmosphere are simulated, with special emphases on the effects of surface drag on the low-level frontal structure and frontogenesis. There are two different effects of surface drag on the low-level frontogenesis in the dry case. On one hand, the surface drag weakens the low-level frontogenesis and less inclined to develop the baroclinic wave due to the dissipation. But on the other hand, the surface drag induces a strong ageostrophic flow, which prolongs the low-level frontogenesis and finally leads to the enhancement of cold front. Compared with the no surface drag case, the surface drag increases the frontal slope espe- cially in the boundary layer, where the front is almost vertical to the surface, and then enhances the prefrontal vertical motion. All these conclusions expanded the analytical theory of Tan and Wu (1990). In the moist atmosphere, the influence of surface drag on frontal rainbands is also obvious. The surface drag weakens the convection, and reduces the energy dissipation near the surface when the initial relative humidity is relatively weak. At this time, the confluence induced post-frontal updrafts moves across the cold front and reinforces the prefrontal convection, which is beneficial to the maintenance of the rainband in cold sector. Given the enhancement of relative humidity, the moist convection domi- nates the low-level frontogenesis while the retardation of surface drag on energy dissipation is not obvious, therefore the effects of surface drag on the low-level frontogenesis and precipitation are re- duced.

  13. Rheological and drag reduction properties of hydroxypropyl xanthan gum solutions☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meng Tian; Bo Fang; Leiping Jin; Yongjun Lu; Xiaohui Qiu; Hao Jin; Kejing Li

    2015-01-01

    Hydroxypropyl xanthan gum (HXG) was prepared from xanthan gum (XG) and propylene oxide under alkaline condition. Rheological and drag reduction properties of different concentrations of aqueous HXG and XG solution were studied. The micro-structure network of HXG and XG solutions was investigated by Cryo-FESEM. The re-sults showed that HXG and XG solutions could exhibit shear thinning property. The apparent viscosity of 6 g·L−1 HXG solution was 1.25 times more than that of 6 g·L−1 XG solution. The storage modulus G′and the loss modulus G″of HXG solutions were greater than those of XG solutions, and thixotropic and viscoelastic prop-erties were more significant in HXG solutions. The HXG and XG solutions reduced the pressure drop of straight pipe, and the maximum drag reduction of 1 g·L−1 HXG and XG in smooth tube reached 72.8%and 68.1%, respec-tively. Drag reduction rate was increased as the concentration increased. The HXG solution may become a new polymeric drag reducer.

  14. A Computational Investigation of Unsteady Aerodynamics of Insect-Inspired Fixed Wing Micro Aerial Vehicle’s 2D Airfoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somashekar V

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A Micro air vehicle (MAV is defined as class of unmanned air vehicle (UAV having a linear dimension of less than 15 centimeters and a mass of less than 100 grams with flight speeds of 6 to 12 meters per second. MAVs fall within a Reynolds number (Re range of 50,000 and 120,000, in which many causes of unsteady aerodynamic effects are not fully understood. The research field of low Reynolds number aerodynamics is currently an active one, with many defence organizations, universities, and corporations working towards a better understanding of the physical processes of this aerodynamic regime. In the present work, it is proposed to study the unsteady aerodynamic analysis of 2D airfoil using CFD software and Xfoil panel code method. The various steps involved in this work are geometric modelling using CATIA V5R17, meshing using ICEM CFD, and solution and postprocessing through FLUENT. The finite control volume analysis and Xfoil panel code method has been carried out to predict aerodynamic characteristics such as lift coefficients, drag coefficients, moment coefficients, pressure coefficients, and flow visualization. The lift and drag coefficients were compared for all the simulations with experimental results. It was observed that for the 2D airfoil, lift and drag both compared well for the midrange angle of attack from −10 to 15 degree AOA.

  15. Transonic Drag Reduction Through Trailing-Edge Blowing on the FAST-MAC Circulation Control Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, David T.; Jones, Gregory S.; Milholen, William E., II; Goodliff, Scott L.

    2017-01-01

    A third wind tunnel test of the FAST-MAC circulation control semi-span model was completed in the National Transonic Facility at the NASA Langley Research Center where the model was configured for transonic testing of the cruise configuration with 0deg flap detection to determine the potential for transonic drag reduction with the circulation control blowing. The model allowed independent control of four circulation control plenums producing a high momentum jet from a blowing slot near the wing trailing edge that was directed over a 15% chord simple-hinged ap. Recent upgrades to transonic semi-span flow control testing at the NTF have demonstrated an improvement to overall data repeatability, particularly for the drag measurement, that allows for increased confidence in the data results. The static thrust generated by the blowing slot was removed from the wind-on data using force and moment balance data from wind-o thrust tares. This paper discusses the impact of the trailing-edge blowing to the transonic aerodynamics of the FAST-MAC model in the cruise configuration, where at flight Reynolds numbers, the thrust-removed corrected data showed that an overall drag reduction and increased aerodynamic efficiency was realized as a consequence of the blowing.

  16. Numerical simulation on drag reduction of revolution body through bionic riblet surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Numerical simulations of flow fields on the bionic riblet and the smooth revolution bodies were performed based on the SST k-ω turbulence model in order to explain the mechanisms of the skin friction drag reduction, base drag reduction on the riblet surface, and flow control behaviors of riblet surface near the wall. The simulation results show that the riblet surface arranged on the rearward of the revolution body can reduce the skin friction drag by 8.27%, the base drag by 9.91% and the total drag by 8.59% at Ma number 0.8. The riblet surface reduces the skin friction drag by reducing the velocity gradient and turbulent intensity, and reduces the base drag by weakening the pumping action on the dead water region which behind the body of revolution caused by the external flow. The flow control behavior on boundary layer shows that the riblet surface can cut the low-speed flow near the wall effectively, and restrain the low-speed flow concentrating in span direction, thus weaken the instability of the low speed steaks produced by turbulent flow bursting.

  17. Nonlinear Aerodynamic ROM-Structural ROM Methodology for Inflatable Aeroelasticity in Hypersonic Atmospheric Entry Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ZONA Technology proposes to develop an innovative nonlinear structural reduced order model (ROM) - nonlinear aerodynamic ROM methodology for the inflatable...

  18. Baseball Aerodynamics: What do we know and how do we know it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Alan

    2009-11-01

    Baseball aerodynamics is governed by three phenomenological quantities: the coefficients of drag, lift, and moment, the latter determining the spin decay time constant. In past years, these quantities were studied mainly in wind tunnel experiments, whereby the forces on the baseball are measured directly. More recently, new tools are being used that focus on measuring accurate baseball trajectories, from which the forces can be inferred. These tools include high-speed motion analysis, video tracking of pitched baseballs (the PITCHf/x system), and Doppler radar tracking. In this contribution, I will discuss what these new tools are teaching us about baseball aerodynamics.

  19. A NEW GENERAL 3DOF QUASI-STEADY AERODYNAMIC INSTABILITY MODEL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjelstrup, Henrik; Larsen, Allan; Georgakis, Christos;

    2008-01-01

    but can generally be applied for aerodynamic instability prediction for prismatic bluff bodies. The 3DOF, which make up the movement of the model, are the displacements in the XY-plane and the rotation around the bluff body’s rotational axis. The proposed model incorporates inertia coupling between...... the three degrees of freedom and is capable of estimating the onset of aerodynamic instability for changes in drag, lift and moment, which is a function of wind angle of attack in relation to the x-axis of the bluff body, Reynolds number and wind angle in relation to the length axis of the bluff body...

  20. Computational electromagnetic-aerodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Shang, Joseph J S

    2016-01-01

    Presents numerical algorithms, procedures, and techniques required to solve engineering problems relating to the interactions between electromagnetic fields, fluid flow, and interdisciplinary technology for aerodynamics, electromagnetics, chemical-physics kinetics, and plasmadynamics This book addresses modeling and simulation science and technology for studying ionized gas phenomena in engineering applications. Computational Electromagnetic-Aerodynamics is organized into ten chapters. Chapter one to three introduce the fundamental concepts of plasmadynamics, chemical-physics of ionization, classical magnetohydrodynamics, and their extensions to plasma-based flow control actuators, high-speed flows of interplanetary re-entry, and ion thrusters in space exploration. Chapter four to six explain numerical algorithms and procedures for solving Maxwell’s equation in the time domain for computational electromagnetics, plasma wave propagation, and the time-dependent c mpressible Navier-Stokes equation for aerodyn...

  1. Coulomb drag in the mesoscopic regime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, N. Asger; Flensberg, Karsten; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2002-01-01

    We present a theory for Coulomb drug between two mesoscopic systems which expresses the drag in terms of scattering matrices and wave functions. The formalism can be applied to both ballistic and disordered systems and the consequences can be studied either by numerical simulations or analytic...... average drag for chaotic 2D-systems and dominating fluctuations of drag between quasi-ballistic wires with almost ideal transmission....

  2. CFD calculations on the unsteady aerodynamic characteristics of a tilt-rotor in a conversion mode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Peng; Zhao Qijun; Zhu Qiuxian

    2015-01-01

    In order to calculate the unsteady aerodynamic characteristics of a tilt-rotor in a conver-sion mode, a virtual blade model (VBM) and an real blade model (RBM) are established respec-tively. A new multi-layer moving-embedded grid technique is proposed to reduce the numerical dissipation of the tilt-rotor wake in a conversion mode. In this method, a grid system generated abound the rotor accounts for rigid blade motions, and a new searching scheme named adaptive inverse map (AIM) is established to search corresponding donor elements in the present moving-embedded grid system to translate information among the different computational zones. A dual-time method is employed to fulfill unsteady calculations on the flowfield of the tilt-rotor, and a second-order centered difference scheme considering artificial viscosity is used to calculate the flux. In order to improve the computing efficiency, the single program multiple data (SPMD) model parallel acceleration technology is adopted, according to the characteristic of the current grid system. The lift and drag coefficients of an NACA0012 airfoil, the dynamic pressure distributions below a typical rotor plane, and the sectional pressure distributions on a three-bladed Branum–Tung tilt-rotor in hover flight are calculated respectively, and the present VBM and RBM are val-idated by comparing the calculated results with available experimental data. Then, unsteady aero-dynamic forces and flowfields of an XV-15 tilt-rotor in different modes, such as a fixed conversion mode at different tilt angles (15?, 30?, 60?) and a whole conversion mode which converses from 0? to 90?, are numerically simulated by the VBM and RBM respectively. By analyses and comparisons on the simulated results of unsteady aerodynamic forces of the tilt-rotor in different modes, some meaningful conclusions about distorted blade-tip vortex distribution and unsteady aerodynamic force variation in a conversion mode are obtained, and these investigation

  3. CFD calculations on the unsteady aerodynamic characteristics of a tilt-rotor in a conversion mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Peng

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to calculate the unsteady aerodynamic characteristics of a tilt-rotor in a conversion mode, a virtual blade model (VBM and an real blade model (RBM are established respectively. A new multi-layer moving-embedded grid technique is proposed to reduce the numerical dissipation of the tilt-rotor wake in a conversion mode. In this method, a grid system generated abound the rotor accounts for rigid blade motions, and a new searching scheme named adaptive inverse map (AIM is established to search corresponding donor elements in the present moving-embedded grid system to translate information among the different computational zones. A dual-time method is employed to fulfill unsteady calculations on the flowfield of the tilt-rotor, and a second-order centered difference scheme considering artificial viscosity is used to calculate the flux. In order to improve the computing efficiency, the single program multiple data (SPMD model parallel acceleration technology is adopted, according to the characteristic of the current grid system. The lift and drag coefficients of an NACA0012 airfoil, the dynamic pressure distributions below a typical rotor plane, and the sectional pressure distributions on a three-bladed Branum–Tung tilt-rotor in hover flight are calculated respectively, and the present VBM and RBM are validated by comparing the calculated results with available experimental data. Then, unsteady aerodynamic forces and flowfields of an XV-15 tilt-rotor in different modes, such as a fixed conversion mode at different tilt angles (15°, 30°, 60° and a whole conversion mode which converses from 0° to 90°, are numerically simulated by the VBM and RBM respectively. By analyses and comparisons on the simulated results of unsteady aerodynamic forces of the tilt-rotor in different modes, some meaningful conclusions about distorted blade-tip vortex distribution and unsteady aerodynamic force variation in a conversion mode are obtained, and these

  4. A Numerical Methodology for Aerodynamic Shape Optimization in Turbulent Flow Enabling Large Geometric Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osusky, Lana Maria

    The increase in the availability and power of computational resources over the last fifteen years has contributed to the development of many different types of numerical optimization methods and created a large area of research focussed on numerical aerodynamic shape optimization and, more recently, high-fidelity multidisciplinary optimization. Numerical optimization provides dramatic savings when designing new aerodynamic configurations, as it allows the designer to focus more on the development of a well-posed design problem rather than on performing an exhaustive search of the design space via the traditional cut-and-try approach, which is expensive and time-consuming. It also reduces the dependence on the designer's experience and intuition, which can potentially lead to more optimal designs. Numerical optimization methods are particularly attractive when designing novel, unconventional aircraft for which the designer has no pre-existing studies or experiences from which to draw; these methods have the potential to discover new designs that might never have been arrived at without optimization. This work presents an extension of an efficient gradient-based numerical aerodynamic shape optimization algorithm to enable optimization in turbulent flow. The algorithm includes an integrated geometry parameterization and mesh movement scheme, an efficient parallel Newton-Krylov-Schur algorithm for solving the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations, which are fully coupled with the one-equation Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model, and a discrete-adjoint gradient evaluation. In order to develop an efficient methodology for optimization in turbulent flows, the viscous and turbulent terms in the ii governing equations were linearized by hand. Additionally, a set of mesh refinement tools was introduced in order to obtain both an acceptable control volume mesh and a sufficiently refined computational mesh from an initial coarse mesh. A series of drag minimization

  5. Hypervelocity Aerodynamics and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-06-06

    Report: Hypervelocity Aerodynamics and Control 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) T. C. Adamson, Jr. and R. IA. Howe 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14. DATE...6] pulse applied. If the Mxyz system as shown is Fig. 3 r 3. , is used, then we have R21= k costo -t4 ksin yot 1 6r= ro 1 (4) -- (6k 2 - 5 -30k 2 sin

  6. CME Dynamics Using STEREO and LASCO Observations: The Relative Importance of Lorentz Forces and Solar Wind Drag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdeva, Nishtha; Subramanian, Prasad; Vourlidas, Angelos; Bothmer, Volker

    2017-09-01

    We seek to quantify the relative contributions of Lorentz forces and aerodynamic drag on the propagation of solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs). We use Graduated Cylindrical Shell (GCS) model fits to a representative set of 38 CMEs observed with the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and the Solar and Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft. We find that the Lorentz forces generally peak between 1.65 and 2.45 R⊙ for all CMEs. For fast CMEs, Lorentz forces become negligible in comparison to aerodynamic drag as early as 3.5 - 4 R⊙. For slow CMEs, however, they become negligible only by 12 - 50 R⊙. For these slow events, our results suggest that some of the magnetic flux might be expended in CME expansion or heating. In other words, not all of it contributes to the propagation. Our results are expected to be important in building a physical model for understanding the Sun-Earth dynamics of CMEs.

  7. Transformance: reading the gospel in drag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCune, Jeffrey Q

    2004-01-01

    Despite the large body of scholarship on drag and its performance of misogyny, mimicry, and masculinity, little attention has been paid to the role of musical genres in Black drag performance and its reception. This essay explores drag performances of gospel music and its relationship with the spectator at the Biology Bar, a Black gay drag site in Chicago. By examining the shift from the club "space" to the church "place," this research locates several possibilities for queer gospel performances. Through the introduction of a theory of transformance, this essay highlights the contradictions, complications, and complexities of the relationship between the Black church and the Black gay community.

  8. Extensibility enables locomotion under isotropic drag

    CERN Document Server

    Pak, On Shun

    2011-01-01

    Anisotropic viscous drag is usually believed to be a requirement for the low Reynolds number locomotion of slender bodies such as flagella and cilia. Here we show that locomotion under isotropic drag is possible for extensible slender bodies. After general considerations, a two-ring swimmer and a model dinoflagellate flagellum are studied analytically to illustrate how extensibility can be exploited for self-propulsion without drag anisotropy. This new degree of freedom could be useful for some complex swimmer geometries and locomotion in complex fluid environments where drag anisotropy is weak or even absent.

  9. Coulomb drag in coherent mesoscopic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Asger; Flensberg, Karsten; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2001-01-01

    We present a theory for Coulomb drag between two mesoscopic systems. Our formalism expresses the drag in terms of scattering matrices and wave functions, and its range of validity covers both ballistic and disordered systems. The consequences can be worked out either by analytic means, such as th......We present a theory for Coulomb drag between two mesoscopic systems. Our formalism expresses the drag in terms of scattering matrices and wave functions, and its range of validity covers both ballistic and disordered systems. The consequences can be worked out either by analytic means...

  10. Improvements of evaporation drag model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-Yan; XU Ji-Jun

    2004-01-01

    A special visible experiment facility has been designed and built, and an observable experiment is performed by pouring one or several high-temperature particles into a water pool in the facility. The experiment result has verified Yang's evaporation drag model, which holds that the non-symmetric profile of the local evaporation rate and the local density of vapor would bring about a resultant force on the hot particle so as to resist its motion. However, in Yang's evaporation drag model, radiation heat transfer is taken as the only way to transfer heat from hot particle to the vapor-liquid interface, and all of the radiation energy is deposited on the vapor-liquid interface and contributed to the vaporization rate and mass balance of the vapor film. In improved model heat conduction and heat convection are taken into account. This paper presents calculations of the improved model, putting emphasis on the effect of hot particle's temperature on the radiation absorption behavior of water.

  11. Ontogeny of aerodynamics in mallards: comparative performance and developmental implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dial, Terry R; Heers, Ashley M; Tobalske, Bret W

    2012-11-01

    Wing morphology correlates with flight performance and ecology among adult birds, yet the impact of wing development on aerodynamic capacity is not well understood. Recent work using chukar partridge (Alectoris chukar), a precocial flier, indicates that peak coefficients of lift and drag (C(L) and C(D)) and lift-to-drag ratio (C(L):C(D)) increase throughout ontogeny and that these patterns correspond with changes in feather microstructure. To begin to place these results in a comparative context that includes variation in life-history strategy, we used a propeller and force-plate model to study aerodynamic force production across a developmental series of the altricial-flying mallard (Anas platyrhynchos). We observed the same trend in mallards as reported for chukar in that coefficients of vertical (C(V)) and horizontal force (C(H)) and C(V):C(H) ratio increased with age, and that measures of gross-wing morphology (aspect ratio, camber and porosity) in mallards did not account for intraspecific trends in force production. Rather, feather microstructure (feather unfurling, rachis width, feather asymmetry and barbule overlap) all were positively correlated with peak C(V):C(H). Throughout ontogeny, mallard primary feathers became stiffer and less transmissive to air at both macroscale (between individual feathers) and microscale (between barbs/barbules/barbicels) levels. Differences between species were manifest primarily as heterochrony of aerodynamic force development. Chukar wings generated measurable aerodynamic forces early (aerodynamic force production until just prior to fledging (day 60), and showed dramatic improvement within a condensed 2-week period. These differences in timing may be related to mechanisms of escape used by juveniles, with mallards swimming to safety and chukar flap-running up slopes to take refuge. Future comparative work should test whether the need for early onset of aerodynamic force production in the chukar, compared with delayed, but

  12. Numerical Simulation of High Drag Reduction in a Turbulent Channel Flow with Polymer Additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubief, Yves

    2003-01-01

    The addition of small amounts of long chain polymer molecules to wall-bounded flows can lead to dramatic drag reduction. Although this phenomenon has been known for about fifty years, the action of the polymers and its effect on turbulent structures are still unclear. Detailed experiments have characterized two distinct regimes (Warholic et al. 1999), which are referred to as low drag reduction (LDR) and high drag reduction (HDR). The first regime exhibits similar statistical trends as Newtonian flow: the log-law region of the mean velocity profile remains parallel to that of the Newtonian ow but its lower bound moves away from the wall and the upward shift of the log-region is a function of drag reduction, DR. Although streamwise fluctuations are increased and transverse ones are reduced, the shape of the rms velocity profiles is not qualitatively modified. At higher drag reductions, of the order of 40-50%, the ow enters the HDR regime for which the slope of the log-law is dramatically augmented and the Reynolds shear stress is small (Warholic et al. 1999; Ptasinski et al. 2001). The drag reduction is eventually bounded by a maximum drag reduction (MDR) (Virk & Mickley 1970) which is a function of the Reynolds number. While several experiments report mean velocity profiles very close to the empirical profile of Virk & Mickley (1970) for MDR conditions, the observations regarding the structure of turbulence can differ significantly. For instance, Warholic et al. (1999) measured a near-zero Reynolds shear stress, whereas a recent experiment (Ptasinski et al. 2001) shows evidence of non-negligible Reynolds stress in their MDR flow. To the knowledge of the authors, only the LDR regime has been documented in numerical simulations (Sureshkumar et al. 1997; Dimitropoulos et al. 1998; Min et al. 2001; Dubief & Lele 2001; Sibilla & Baron 2002). This paper discusses the simulation of polymer drag reduced channel ow at HDR using the FENE-P (Finite Elastic non

  13. Superhydrophobic drag reduction in laminar flows: a critical review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choongyeop; Choi, Chang-Hwan; Kim, Chang-Jin

    2016-12-01

    A gas in between micro- or nanostructures on a submerged superhydrophobic (SHPo) surface allows the liquid on the structures to flow with an effective slip. If large enough, this slippage may entail a drag reduction appreciable for many flow systems. However, the large discrepancies among the slippage levels reported in the literature have led to a widespread misunderstanding on the drag-reducing ability of SHPo surfaces. Today we know that the amount of slip, generally quantified with a slip length, is mainly determined by the structural features of SHPo surfaces, such as the pitch, solid fraction, and pattern type, and further affected by secondary factors, such as the state of the liquid-gas interface. Reviewing the experimental data of laminar flows in the literature comprehensively and comparing them with the theoretical predictions, we provide a global picture of the liquid slip on structured surfaces to assist in rational design of SHPo surfaces for drag reduction. Because the trapped gas, called plastron, vanishes along with its slippage effect in most application conditions, lastly we discuss the recent efforts to prevent its loss. This review is limited to laminar flows, for which the SHPo drag reduction is reasonably well understood.

  14. Interactive point cloud blending by drag-and-drop

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    With the rapid development of 3D digital photography and 3D digital scanning devices, massive amount of point samples can be generated in acquisition of complex, real-world objects, and thus create an urgent need for advanced point-based processing and editing. In this paper, we present an interactive method for blending point-based geometries by dragging-anddropping one point-based model onto another model's surface metaphor. We first calculate a blending region based on the polygon of interest when the user drags-and-drops the model. Radial basis function is used to construct an implicit surface which smoothly interpolates with the transition regions. Continuing the drag-and-drop operation will make the system recalculate the blending regions and reconstruct the transition regions. The drag-and-drop operation can be compound in a constructive solid geometry (CSG) manner to interactively construct a complex point-based model from multiple simple ones. Experimental results showed that our method generates good quality transition regions between two raw point clouds and can effectively reduce the rate of overlapping during the blending.

  15. DRAG REDUCTION EFFECT OF COUPLING FLEXIBLE TUBES WITH TURBULENT FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Shu-peng; JIN Guo-yu; LI Da-mei; Yang Lin

    2008-01-01

    To analyze the mechanism of drag reducing effect by coupling flexible tubes with turbulent flow, based on experimental examination of more obvious turbulent drag reduction effect in flexible tubes than in rigid tubes, experimental investigation was performed on the effect of turbulent drag reduction, fluctuating vibration characteristics of flexible tube and the correlations by using a double-tube system and laser displacement sensor. The results are as follows: with the decrease of the thickness of the flexible tubes, the root mean square of fluctuating amplitude of the outer wall of the tubes increases, and the non-dimensional burst period increases, resulting in the increase of the reduction rate of drag coefficient by coupling flexible tubes with turbulent flow. At applied pressure-balanced air on the outer wall and the Reynolds number of about 1.75 104, the non-dimensional burst periods of the flexible tubes with the thickness of 2 mm, 3 mm, 4 mm are 141, 126, 105, respectively.

  16. Laminar Drag Reduction in Microchannels Using Ultrahydrophobic Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Jia; Perot, Blair; Rothstein, Jonathan

    2003-11-01

    In devices where the fluid flow is laminar, there are currently no methods for reducing drag. We will present a series of experiments which demonstrate a 20-30% drag reduction for the flow of water through microchannels using hydrophobic surfaces with micron sized roughness. These 'ultrahydrophobic' surfaces are fabricated using photolithography to etch microposts and microridges with specific size, spacing and arrangement into silicon. The surfaces are then reacted with an organosilane to make them hydrophobic. The resulting surfaces have contact angles greater than 150 degrees. Pressure drop measurements are made for a series of ultrahydrophobic surface patterns, flow rates and microchannel heights. Pressure drop measurements across hydrophobic smooth surfaces are found to correlate precisely with theory while the drag reduction observed for the flow across these ultrahydrophobic surfaces is found to increase with increasing micropost spacing and decreasing micropost area. A physical model will be presented which explains the drag reduction in terms of a shear-free air-water interface between microposts supported by surface tension. Confirmation of the model will be presented with optical measurements of the displacement of the air-water interface under flow.

  17. Evaluation of polymers with drag reduction potential used in drilling fluids; Avaliacao de polimeros com potencial de reducao de arraste usado em fluidos de perfuracao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Marcus V.D.; Costa, Francileide G. da [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES)]. E-mail: mvferreira.puc@petrobras.com.br; Lopes, Lea; Figueiredo, Marcos S.; Lucas, Elizabete F. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Macromoleculas]. E-mail: elucas@ima.ufrj.br

    2005-07-01

    The employment of linear chain polymers with high molecular weight in fluids as drag reducers became a current practice in the chemical industry. The petroleum industry presents several potential applications for drag reducers. Although some commercial products are available for specific applications, the major drag reduction mechanisms are, still unknown nowadays, despite of several theories about the phenomena. The aim of this work is to evaluate the rheological behavior of partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (PHPA) and xanthan and diu tan gums solutions that have drag reduction characteristics. It is expected that these polymers present a good drag reduction potential. All these polymers will be evaluated as drag reducers in a pressure drop flow loop. The final step is to correlate drag reduction tendency with rheological properties and molecular structure. (author)

  18. Initial Aerodynamic and Acoustic Study of an Active Twist Rotor Using a Loosely Coupled CFD/CSD Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, David D. Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Preliminary aerodynamic and performance predictions for an active twist rotor for a HART-II type of configuration are performed using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, OVERFLOW2, and a computational structural dynamics (CSD) code, CAMRAD -II. These codes are loosely coupled to compute a consistent set of aerodynamics and elastic blade motions. Resultant aerodynamic and blade motion data are then used in the Ffowcs-Williams Hawkins solver, PSU-WOPWOP, to compute noise on an observer plane under the rotor. Active twist of the rotor blade is achieved in CAMRAD-II by application of a periodic torsional moment couple (of equal and opposite sign) at the blade root and tip at a specified frequency and amplitude. To provide confidence in these particular active twist predictions for which no measured data is available, the rotor system geometry and computational set up examined here are identical to that used in a previous successful Higher Harmonic Control (HHC) computational study. For a single frequency equal to three times the blade passage frequency (3P), active twist is applied across a range of control phase angles at two different amplitudes. Predicted results indicate that there are control phase angles where the maximum mid-frequency noise level and the 4P non -rotating hub vibrations can be reduced, potentially, both at the same time. However, these calculated reductions are predicted to come with a performance penalty in the form of a reduction in rotor lift-to-drag ratio due to an increase in rotor profile power.

  19. Drag Coefficient of Thin Flexible Cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Chelakara; Gurram, Harika

    2015-11-01

    Measurements of drag coefficients of thin flexible cylindrical wires are described for the Reynolds number range between 250 - 1000. Results indicate that the coefficient values are about 20 to 30 percent lower than the reported laminar flow values for rigid cylinders. Possible fluid dynamics mechanism causing the reduction in drag will be discussed.

  20. Determination of the surface drag coefficient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahrt, L.; Vickers, D.; Sun, J.L.

    2001-01-01

    This study examines the dependence of the surface drag coefficient on stability, wind speed, mesoscale modulation of the turbulent flux and method of calculation of the drag coefficient. Data sets over grassland, sparse grass, heather and two forest sites are analyzed. For significantly unstable ...

  1. Progress in vehicle aerodynamics and thermal management. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedemann, Jochen (ed.) [Stuttgart Univ. (DE). Inst. fuer Kraftfahrwesen und Verbrennungsmotoren (IVK); Forschungsinstitut fuer Kraftfahrwesen und Fahrzeugmotoren (FKFS), Stuttgart (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Vehicle aerodynamics and thermal management are subjects of increasing importance for automotive development especially regarding the necessity to reduce the energy consumption of the vehicle as well as the need to improve ist comfort. This book is intended for engineers, physicists, and mathematicians who work on vehicle aerodynamics. It is also addressed to people in research organizations, at universities and agencies. It may be of interest to technical journalists and to students. (orig.)

  2. DRAG ON SUBMICRON NANOPARTICLE AGGREGATES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    F.; Einar; Kruis

    2005-01-01

    A new procedure was developed for estimating the effective collision diameter of an aggregate composed of primary particles of any size. The coagulation coefficient of two oppositely charged particles was measured experimentally and compared with classic Fuchs theory, including a new method to account for particle non-sphericity. A second set of experiments were performed on well-defined nanoparticle aggregates at different stages of sintering, i.e. from the aggregate to the fully sintered stage. Here, electrical mobility was used to characterize the particle drag. The aggregates are being built from two different size-fractionated nanoparticle aerosols, the non-aggregated particles are discarded by an electrofilter and then they are passed through a furnace at concentrations low enough not to induce coagulation.

  3. Investigations of Fluid-Structure-Coupling and Turbulence Model Effects on the DLR Results of the Fifth AIAA CFD Drag Prediction Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keye, Stefan; Togiti, Vamish; Eisfeld, Bernhard; Brodersen, Olaf P.; Rivers, Melissa B.

    2013-01-01

    The accurate calculation of aerodynamic forces and moments is of significant importance during the design phase of an aircraft. Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) based Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has been strongly developed over the last two decades regarding robustness, efficiency, and capabilities for aerodynamically complex configurations. Incremental aerodynamic coefficients of different designs can be calculated with an acceptable reliability at the cruise design point of transonic aircraft for non-separated flows. But regarding absolute values as well as increments at off-design significant challenges still exist to compute aerodynamic data and the underlying flow physics with the accuracy required. In addition to drag, pitching moments are difficult to predict because small deviations of the pressure distributions, e.g. due to neglecting wing bending and twisting caused by the aerodynamic loads can result in large discrepancies compared to experimental data. Flow separations that start to develop at off-design conditions, e.g. in corner-flows, at trailing edges, or shock induced, can have a strong impact on the predictions of aerodynamic coefficients too. Based on these challenges faced by the CFD community a working group of the AIAA Applied Aerodynamics Technical Committee initiated in 2001 the CFD Drag Prediction Workshop (DPW) series resulting in five international workshops. The results of the participants and the committee are summarized in more than 120 papers. The latest, fifth workshop took place in June 2012 in conjunction with the 30th AIAA Applied Aerodynamics Conference. The results in this paper will evaluate the influence of static aeroelastic wing deformations onto pressure distributions and overall aerodynamic coefficients based on the NASA finite element structural model and the common grids.

  4. Ultrafast photon drag detector for intersubband spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigg, Hans; Graf, Stephan; Kwakernaak, Martin H.; Margotte, Bernd; Erni, Daniel; Van Son, Peter; Köhler, Klaus

    1996-03-01

    The photon drag effect of a 2D electron gas is measured using the ps infrared pulses of the wavelength-tunable free electron laser source FELIX. The pulsed photon drag response is found to depend critically on the coupling characteristics of the electrical circuit. We therefore developed an impedance and velocity matched photon drag detector. It consists of a GaAs/AlGaAs multi quantum well sample which forms an integral part of a microstrip line. A Ge-prism enables incoupling at the critical total reflection angle. This novel transmission line integrated photon drag detector (TIP-detector) generates signal transients below 10 ps rise and fall times. Its continuous spectral response through the intersubband resonance is investigated at room temperature and at T=100 K. An analysis of the spectral lineshape of the photon drag current response yields information about the momentum relaxation times of the electrons in the ground and excited subbands.

  5. Turbulent drag in a rotating frame

    CERN Document Server

    Campagne, Antoine; Gallet, Basile; Cortet, Pierre-Philippe; Moisy, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    What is the turbulent drag force experienced by an object moving in a rotating fluid? This open and fundamental question can be addressed by measuring the torque needed to drive an impeller at constant angular velocity $\\omega$ in a water tank mounted on a platform rotating at a rate $\\Omega$. We report a dramatic reduction in drag as $\\Omega$ increases, down to values as low as $12$\\% of the non-rotating drag. At small Rossby number $Ro = \\omega/\\Omega$, the decrease in drag coefficient $K$ follows the approximate scaling law $K \\sim Ro$, which is predicted in the framework of nonlinear inertial wave interactions and weak-turbulence theory. However, stereoscopic particle image velocimetry measurements indicate that this drag reduction rather originates from a weakening of the turbulence intensity in line with the two-dimensionalization of the large-scale flow.

  6. Investigation of drag reduction through a flapping mechanism on circular cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asif, Md. Asafuddoula; Gupta, Avijit Das; Rana, M. D. Juwel; Ahmed, Dewan Hasan

    2016-07-01

    During flapping wing, a bird develops sufficient lift force as well as counteracts drag and increases its speed through different orientations of feathers on the flapping wings. Differently oriented feathers play a significant role in drag reduction during flying of a bird. With an objective to investigate the effect of installation of such flapping mechanism as a mean of drag reduction in case of flow over circular cylinder, this concept has been implemented through installation of continuous and mini flaps, made of MS sheet metal, where flaps are oriented at different angles as like feathers of flapping wings. The experiments are carried out in a subsonic wind tunnel. After validation and comparison with conventional result of drag analysis of a single cylinder, effects of flapping with Reynolds number variation, implementation of different orientations of mini flaps and variation of different interspacing distance between mini flaps are studied to find the most effective angle of attack of drag reduction on the body of circular cylinder. This research show that, installation of continuous flap reduces value of drag co-efficient, CD up to 66%, where as mini flaps are found more effective by reducing it up to 73%. Mini flaps of L/s=6.25, all angled at 30O, at the 30O angular position on the body of circular cylinder has been found the most effective angle of attack for drag reduction in case of flow over circular cylinder.

  7. Aerodynamics of wind turbines

    CERN Document Server

    Hansen, Martin O L

    2015-01-01

    Aerodynamics of Wind Turbines is the established essential text for the fundamental solutions to efficient wind turbine design. Now in its third edition, it has been substantially updated with respect to structural dynamics and control. The new control chapter now includes details on how to design a classical pitch and torque regulator to control rotational speed and power, while the section on structural dynamics has been extended with a simplified mechanical system explaining the phenomena of forward and backward whirling modes. Readers will also benefit from a new chapter on Vertical Axis W

  8. Aerodynamic Response of a Pitching Airfoil with Pulsed Circulation Control for Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panther, Chad C.

    Vertical Axis Wind Turbines (VAWTs) have experienced a renewed interest in development for urban, remote, and offshore applications. Past research has shown that VAWTs cannot compete with Horizontals Axis Wind Turbines (HAWTs) in terms of energy capture efficiency. VAWT performance is plagued by dynamic stall (DS) effects at low tip-speed ratios (lambda), where each blade pitches beyond static stall multiple times per revolution. Furthermore, for lambdasize and strength of wake vorticity during DS, resulting in lower profile drag relative to baseline and steady actuation cases. A database of pitching airfoil test data, including overshoot and hysteresis of aerodynamic coefficients (Cl, Cd), was compiled for improved analytical model inputs to update CCVAWT performance predictions, where the aforementioned L/D improvements will be directly reflected. Relative to a conventional VAWT with annual power output of 1 MW, previous work at WVU proved that the addition of steady jet CC could improve total output to 1.25 MW. However, the pumping cost to generate the continuous jet reduced yearly CCVAWT net gains to 1.15 MW. The current study has shown that pulsed CC jets can recover 4% of the pumping demands due to reduced mass flow requirements, increasing annual CCVAWT net power production to 1.19 MW, a 19% improvement relative to the conventional turbine.

  9. Mechanically Robust Superhydrophobic Surfaces for Turbulent Drag Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovin, Kevin; Boban, Mathew; Xia, Charlotte; Tuteja, Anish

    2014-11-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces (SHS) resist wetting by keeping a thin air layer within their texture. Such surfaces have been shown to reduce skin friction during laminar and transitional flows. However, turbulent boundary layer flows exhibit high shear stresses that damage the fragile microstructure of most SHS, and it is yet unclear to what extent these surfaces can reduce drag. Moreover, the increasing pressure fluctuations and decreasing wall unit length experienced during turbulent flow makes designing mechanically robust SHS with the correct roughness scales a challenge. In this work we evaluate many different SHS in terms of their hydrophobicity, mechanical durability and roughness. Whereas even commercially available SHS lose their superhydrophobic properties after slight mechanical abrasion, our novel coatings survive up to 200x longer. Moreover, we evaluate how the roughness of such surfaces changes with mechanical abrasion, and we design SHS with the correct roughness to display optimal drag reduction in turbulent boundary layer flows. Funding from ONR.

  10. Drag-based composite super-twisting sliding mode control law design for Mars entry guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhenhua; Yang, Jun; Li, Shihua; Guo, Lei

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the drag-based trajectory tracking guidance problem is investigated for Mars entry vehicle subject to uncertainties. A composite super twisting sliding mode control method based on finite-time disturbance observer is proposed for guidance law design. The proposed controller not only eliminates the effects of matched and mismatched disturbances due to uncertainties of atmospheric models and vehicle aerodynamics but also guarantees the continuity of control action. Numerical simulations are carried out on the basis of Mars Science Laboratory mission, where the results show that the proposed methods can improve the Mars entry guidance precision as compared with some existing guidance methods including PID and ADRC.

  11. A Practical Method to Estimate the Aerodynamic Coefficients of a Small-Scale Paramotor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razvan-Viorel MIHAI

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available There are few aircraft other than lighter-than-air vehicles that have the payload carrying capability, short field take-off, and slow speed ranges afforded by a powered parafoil. One very interesting aspect of the powered parafoils or paramotors, is their tendency to fly at a constant airspeed whether it is climbing, descending, or flying straight-and-level. Not only are the aircraft speed stable, but they have pendulum stability as well, due to the mass of the airframe suspended significantly below the canopy. This allows the aircraft to maintain a safe roll attitude and effectively turn in a coordinated manner when the steering pedals are deflected. One of the challenges of flying these aircraft is the necessity of controlling altitude with thrust, and direction with asymmetric drag. The paper presents a practical method to estimate the aerodynamic coefficients of a small-scale paramotor in order to obtain a suitable mathematical model for the aerial vehicle. Thus, a reduced state linear model based on a simplified nonlinear six degree-of-freedom model (6 DOF is described. The autonomous control relies on the paramotor dynamics. And those equations depend on the aerodynamic coefficients. The task in this paper is to record the data of steady state flight regime, and to process it offline. Therefore, the system identification of the small-scale aerial vehicle can be done using the Two-Step Method, resulting an efficient six degree-of-freedom mini-paramotor model. The current work will permit the implementation of the control architecture in order to achieve the autonomous control of the small-scale paramotor through waypoints.

  12. Temperature dependence of coulomb drag between finite-length quantum wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peguiron, J; Bruder, C; Trauzettel, B

    2007-08-24

    We evaluate the Coulomb drag current in two finite-length Tomonaga-Luttinger-liquid wires coupled by an electrostatic backscattering interaction. The drag current in one wire shows oscillations as a function of the bias voltage applied to the other wire, reflecting interferences of the plasmon standing waves in the interacting wires. In agreement with this picture, the amplitude of the current oscillations is reduced with increasing temperature. This is a clear signature of non-Fermi-liquid physics because for coupled Fermi liquids the drag resistance is always expected to increase as the temperature is raised.

  13. AIAA Applied Aerodynamics Conference, 10th, Palo Alto, CA, June 22-24, 1992, Technical Papers. Pts. 1 AND 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    Consideration is given to vortex physics and aerodynamics; supersonic/hypersonic aerodynamics; STOL/VSTOL/rotors; missile and reentry vehicle aerodynamics; CFD as applied to aircraft; unsteady aerodynamics; supersonic/hypersonic aerodynamics; low-speed/high-lift aerodynamics; airfoil/wing aerodynamics; measurement techniques; CFD-solvers/unstructured grid; airfoil/drag prediction; high angle-of-attack aerodynamics; and CFD grid methods. Particular attention is given to transonic-numerical investigation into high-angle-of-attack leading-edge vortex flow, prediction of rotor unsteady airloads using vortex filament theory, rapid synthesis for evaluating the missile maneuverability parameters, transonic calculations of wing/bodies with deflected control surfaces; the static and dynamic flow field development about a porous suction surface wing; the aircraft spoiler effects under wind shear; multipoint inverse design of an infinite cascade of airfoils, turbulence modeling for impinging jet flows; numerical investigation of tail buffet on the F-18 aircraft; the surface grid generation in a parameter space; and the flip flop nozzle extended to supersonic flows.

  14. The Influence of wave state and sea spray on drag coefficient from low to high wind speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jian; Zhong, Zhong; Li, Xunqiang; Jiang, Guorong; Zeng, Wenhua; Li, Yan

    2016-02-01

    Ocean waves alter the roughness of sea surface, and sea spray droplets redistribute the momentum flux at the air-sea interface. Hence, both wave state and sea spray influence sea surface drag coefficient. Based on the new sea spray generation function which depends on sea surface wave, a wave-dependent sea spray stress is obtained. According to the relationship between sea spray stress and the total wind stress on the sea surface, a new formula of drag coefficient at high wind speed is acquired. With the analysis of the new drag coefficient, it is shown that the drag coefficient reduces at high wind speed, indicating that the sea spray droplets can limit the increase of drag coefficient. However, the value of high wind speed corresponding to the initial reduced drag coefficient is not fixed, and it depends on the wave state, which means the influence of wave cannot be ignored. Comparisons between the theoretical and measured sea surface drag coefficients in field and laboratory show that under different wave ages, the theoretical result of drag coefficient could include the measured data, and it means that the new drag coefficient can be used properly from low to high wind speeds under any wave state condition.

  15. The Aerodynamic Plane Table

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahm, A F

    1924-01-01

    This report gives the description and the use of a specially designed aerodynamic plane table. For the accurate and expeditious geometrical measurement of models in an aerodynamic laboratory, and for miscellaneous truing operations, there is frequent need for a specially equipped plan table. For example, one may have to measure truly to 0.001 inch the offsets of an airfoil at many parts of its surface. Or the offsets of a strut, airship hull, or other carefully formed figure may require exact calipering. Again, a complete airplane model may have to be adjusted for correct incidence at all parts of its surfaces or verified in those parts for conformance to specifications. Such work, if but occasional, may be done on a planing or milling machine; but if frequent, justifies the provision of a special table. For this reason it was found desirable in 1918 to make the table described in this report and to equip it with such gauges and measures as the work should require.

  16. Aerodynamics of sports balls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    Research data on the aerodynamic behavior of baseballs and cricket and golf balls are summarized. Cricket balls and baseballs are roughly the same size and mass but have different stitch patterns. Both are thrown to follow paths that avoid a batter's swing, paths that can curve if aerodynamic forces on the balls' surfaces are asymmetric. Smoke tracer wind tunnel tests and pressure taps have revealed that the unbalanced side forces are induced by tripping the boundary layer on the seam side and producing turbulence. More particularly, the greater pressures are perpendicular to the seam plane and only appear when the balls travel at velocities high enough so that the roughness length matches the seam heigh. The side forces, once tripped, will increase with spin velocity up to a cut-off point. The enhanced lift coefficient is produced by the Magnus effect. The more complex stitching on a baseball permits greater variations in the flight path curve and, in the case of a knuckleball, the unsteady flow effects. For golf balls, the dimples trip the boundary layer and the high spin rate produces a lift coefficient maximum of 0.5, compared to a baseball's maximum of 0.3. Thus, a golf ball travels far enough for gravitational forces to become important.

  17. The role of free stream turbulence and blade surface conditions on the aerodynamic performance of wind turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Victor Hugo

    with a 24-grit abrasive sheet. The role of turbulence and surface roughness on the aerodynamic performance of the wind turbine blade was investigated utilizing the following experimental techniques: (i) static pressure measurements around the blade, (ii) constant temperature anemometry (CTA) hot-wire and pitottube measurements of the velocity deficit at the wake, and (iii) two-dimensional particle image velocimetry (2-D PIV) measurements of the mean global flow. Results indicate that turbulence significantly increases the blade's lift coefficient for moderate to post-stall angles of attack (where the range tested was from zero to 18 degrees). This was accompanied without an increase in the drag coefficient for angles of attack below 14 degrees (prior to stall) and a significant reduction in drag for post-stall angles of attack at 16 and 18 degrees. This resulted in considerable increases to the aerodynamic efficiency of the blade, as quantified by the lift to drag ratio, L/D for all angles of attack except zero degrees. Conversely, surface roughness had a detrimental effect on the aerodynamic performance, as verified by 2-D PIV measurements of the mean flow which indicates that surface roughness promotes flow separation. Vortex generators (which are a form of passive flow control and sometimes utilized in wind turbine blades to mitigate the adverse effects of surface roughness) were demonstrated to be very effective in restoring aerodynamic performance. There was a significant increase in the lift coefficient of the blade (while marginally reducing the drag coefficient) thereby increasing the L/D ratio drastically from 1.076 to 2.791 at 18 degrees angle of attack. Finally, earlier work focused on the feasibility of synthetic jets (active flow control) to improve the aerodynamic and aeroelastic performance of wind turbine blades without free stream turbulence or surface roughness. Wind turbine models (including S809 airfoil-based) demonstrated a re-attachment of the

  18. Aerodynamics Design and Genetic Algorithms for Optimization of Airship Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejati, Vahid; Matsuuchi, Kazuo

    A special and effective aerodynamics calculation method has been applied for the flow field around a body of revolution to find the drag coefficient for a wide range of Reynolds numbers. The body profile is described by a first order continuous axial singularity distribution. The solution of the direct problem then gives the radius and inviscid velocity distribution. Viscous effects are considered by means of an integral boundary layer procedure, and for determination of the transition location the forced transition criterion is applied. By avoiding those profiles, which result in the separation of the boundary layer, the drag can be calculated at the end of the body by using Young's formula. In this study, a powerful optimization procedure known as a Genetic Algorithms (GA) is used for the first time in the shape optimization of airship hulls. GA represents a particular artificial intelligence technique for large spaces, striking a remarkable balance between exploration and exploitation of search space. This method could reach to minimum objective function through a better path, and also could minimize the drag coefficient faster for different Reynolds number regimes. It was found that GA is a powerful method for such multi-dimensional, multi-modal and nonlinear objective function.

  19. Aerodynamic analysis of Audi A4 Sedan using CFD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birwa, S. K.; Rathi, N.; Gupta, R.

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents the aerodynamic influence of velocity and ground clearance for Audi A4 Sedan. The topology of the test vehicle was modeled using CATIA P3 V5 R17. ANSYS FLUENT 12 was the CFD solver employed in this study. The distribution of pressure and velocity was obtained. The velocities were 30, 40, 50 and 60 m/s and ground clearances were 76.2 mm,101.6 mm,127 mm and 152.4 mm. The simulation results were compared with the available resources. It was found that the drag coefficient decreases with the velocity increasing from 30 to 60 m/s and increases with the ground clearance from 101.6 mm to 152.4 mm. Further decrease in ground clearance showed no effect on the value of coefficient of drag. The lift coefficient was found to decrease firstly with ground clearance from 152.4 mm to 101.6 mm, and then increase from 101.6 mm to 76.2 mm. Both the lift coefficient and drag coefficient was found to be minimum for the ground clearance of 101.6 mm as designed by the company.

  20. Numerical study of aerodynamic characteristics of FSW aircraft with dierent wing positions under supersonic condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Juanmian; Zhao Shuai; Wang Suozhu

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the influence of forward-swept wing (FSW) positions on the aero-dynamic characteristics of aircraft under supersonic condition (Ma=1.5). The numerical method based on Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS) equations, Spalart–Allmaras (S–A) turbu-lence model and implicit algorithm is utilized to simulate the flow field of the aircraft. The aerody-namic parameters and flow field structures of the horizontal tail and the whole aircraft are presented. The results demonstrate that the spanwise flow of FSW flows from the wingtip to the wing root, generating an upper wing surface vortex and a trailing edge vortex nearby the wing root. The vortexes generated by FSW have a strong downwash effect on the tail. The lower the vertical position of FSW, the stronger the downwash effect on tail. Therefore, the effective angle of attack of tail becomes smaller. In addition, the lift coefficient, drag coefficient and lift–drag ratio of tail decrease, and the center of pressure of tail moves backward gradually. For the whole aircraft, the lower the vertical position of FSW, the smaller lift, drag and center of pressure coefficients of aircraft. The closer the FSW moves towards tail, the bigger pitching moment and center of pres-sure coefficients of the whole aircraft, but the lift and drag characteristics of the horizontal tail and the whole aircraft are basically unchanged. The results have potential application for the design of new concept aircraft.

  1. Aerodynamic Characteristics of Three Deep-Stepped Planing-Tail Flying-Boat Hulls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riebe, John M.; Naeseth, Rodger L.

    1947-01-01

    An investigation was made in the Langley 300 MPH 7- by 10-foot tunnel to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of three deep-stepped planing-tail flying-boat hulls differing only in the amount of step fairing. The hulls were derived by increasing the unfaired step depth of a planing-tail hull of a previous aerodynamic investigation to a depth about 92 percent of the hull beam. Tests were also made on a transverse-stepped hull with an extended afterbody for the purpose of comparison and in order to extend and verify the results of a previous investigation. The investigation indicated that the extended afterbody hull had a minimum drag coefficient about the same as a conventional hull, 0.0066, and an angle-of-attack range for minimum drag coefficient of 0.0057 which was 14 percent less than the transverse stepped hull with extended afterbody; the hulls with step fairing had up to 44 percent less minimum drag coefficient than the transverse-stepped hull, or slightly more drag than a streamlined body having approximately the same length and volume. Longitudinal and lateral instability varied little with step fairing and was about the same as a conventional hull.

  2. Drag-free Small Satellite Platforms for Future Geodesy Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conklin, J. W.; Hong, S.; Nguyen, A.; Serra, P.; Balakrishnan, K.; Buchman, S.; De Bra, D. B.; Hultgren, E.; Zoellner, A.

    2013-12-01

    Continuous satellite geodesy measurements lasting into the foreseeable future are critical for the understanding of our changing planet. It is therefore imperative that we explore ways to reduce costs, while maintaining science return. Small satellite platforms represent a promising path forward if ways can be found to reduce the size, weight, and power of the necessary instrumentation. One key enabling technology is a precision small-scale drag-free system under development at the University of Florida and Stanford University. A drag-free satellite (a) contains and shields a free-floating test mass from all non-gravitational forces, and (b) precisely measures the position of the test mass inside the satellite. A feedback control system commands thrusters to fly the 'tender' spacecraft with respect to the test mass. Thus, both test mass and spacecraft follow a pure geodesic in spacetime. By tracking the relative positions of low Earth orbiting drag-free satellites, using laser interferometry for example, the detailed shape of geodesics, and through analysis, the higher order harmonics of the Earth's geopotential can be determined. Drag-free systems can be orders of magnitude more accurate that accelerometer-based systems because they fundamentally operate at extremely low acceleration levels, and are therefore not limited by dynamic range like accelerometers. Since no test mass suspension force is required, larger gaps between the test mass and satellite are possible, which reduces the level of unwanted disturbing forces produced by the satellite itself. The small satellite platform also enables cost-effective constellations, which can increase the temporal resolution of gravity field maps by more-frequently observing given locations on the Earth. Mixed-orbit constellations can also markedly enhance observational strength, decorrelate gravity coefficient estimates, and help address the fundamental aliasing problem that exists with previous missions. The

  3. 经纬网络充气机翼构形特征与气动性能分析%Analysis of configuration characteristics and aerodynamic performance on longitude-latitude network inflatable wings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    The inflatable wing is a good innovational conception for the near space solar-powered aircraft.The problems of configuration characteristics and aerodynamic analysis of inflatable wings were taken as the aim of the current study.First,configuration characteristics were analyzed and designed.Then the model of 3d network inflatable wing was developed.With computational fluid dynamics method,aerodynamic performances of 2d inflatable wing profile and 3d network inflatable wing were studied.Numerical simulation result shows that the aerodynamic performances of2d inflatable wing profile and 3d network inflatable wing have reduced slightly at the design Reynolds number.Meanwhile,with the structure of flow field and mechanism analysis,the reason for the total drag coefficients of inflatable wings increasing significantly lies in that,in those bumpy areas of the inflatable wing,vortexes which cause the friction drag has a reduction in some extent,but the pressure drag has a significant increase,so the total aerodynamic performance decreases.%将充气机翼应用于临近空间太阳能飞行器是具有创新性的设计概念。针对充气机翼构形特征和气动分析的相关问题,对构形特征进行分析和设计,并建立经纬网络充气机翼的模型;进一步运用数值方法,通过与标准翼型对比,分析二维充气机翼、三维经纬网络充气机翼的气动性能。数值分析结果表明,在设计的雷诺数条件下,充气机翼的气动性能相比于标准翼型有所降低。在此基础上,结合对流场结构和流动机理的研究,分析出导致充气机翼总阻力系数明显增加的主要原因是:充气机翼表面许多凹陷的局部区域所形成的涡结构,导致局部的摩阻有小幅的减小,但压差阻力大幅增加,最终使得总的气动性能有所降低。

  4. On the Minimum Induced Drag of Wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Albion H.

    2011-01-01

    Of all the types of drag, induced drag is associated with the creation and generation of lift over wings. Induced drag is directly driven by the span load that the aircraft is flying at. The tools by which to calculate and predict induced drag we use were created by Ludwig Prandtl in 1903. Within a decade after Prandtl created a tool for calculating induced drag, Prandtl and his students had optimized the problem to solve the minimum induced drag for a wing of a given span, formalized and written about in 1920. This solution is quoted in textbooks extensively today. Prandtl did not stop with this first solution, and came to a dramatically different solution in 1932. Subsequent development of this 1932 solution solves several aeronautics design difficulties simultaneously, including maximum performance, minimum structure, minimum drag loss due to control input, and solution to adverse yaw without a vertical tail. This presentation lists that solution by Prandtl, and the refinements by Horten, Jones, Kline, Viswanathan, and Whitcomb.

  5. Coulomb drag between helical Luttinger liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kainaris, N.; Gornyi, I. V.; Levchenko, A.; Polyakov, D. G.

    2017-01-01

    We theoretically study Coulomb drag between two helical edges with broken spin-rotational symmetry, such as would occur in two capacitively coupled quantum spin Hall insulators. For the helical edges, Coulomb drag is particularly interesting because it specifically probes the inelastic interactions that break the conductance quantization for a single edge. Using the kinetic equation formalism, supplemented by bosonization, we find that the drag resistivity ρD exhibits a nonmonotonic dependence on the temperature T . In the limit of low T ,ρD vanishes with decreasing T as a power law if intraedge interactions are not too strong. This is in stark contrast to Coulomb drag in conventional quantum wires, where ρD diverges at T →0 irrespective of the strength of repulsive interactions. Another unusual property of Coulomb drag between the helical edges concerns higher T for which, unlike in the Luttinger liquid model, drag is mediated by plasmons. The special type of plasmon-mediated drag can be viewed as a distinguishing feature of the helical liquid—because it requires peculiar umklapp scattering only available in the presence of a Dirac point in the electron spectrum.

  6. Orographic drag uncertainties impact forecast skill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandu, Irina; Zadra, Ayrton; Wedi, Nils; Bacmeister, Julio

    2017-04-01

    Despite their importance for the large-scale circulation, to date the representation of drag processes remains a major source of uncertainty in global models. Among the different drag processes the representation of orographic drag is particularly challenging. This has been recently highlighted by the WMO Working Group on Numerical Experimentation (WGNE) 'Drag project' which demonstrated that the main NWP and climate models differ significantly in representation of the total parameterized surface stress and in the partitioning of surface stress among various physical processes, particularly in regions with orography. Here we discuss how uncertain is the representation of orographic drag in models, and we illustrate how this uncertainty affects the skill of medium range weather forecasts. Namely we show how different is the representation of the resolved orography even in models with similar headline horizontal resolution. We also use the results of the WGNE 'Drag project' to illustrate how much models differ in terms of the total parameterized surface stress and its partition among various processes. Finally, we use the Integrated Forecasting System of ECMWF to demonstrate how much these intermodel differences either in the resolved orography or the representation subgrid drag affect the forecast skill.

  7. Drag reduction through wave-current interactions with a marine hydrofoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully, Susan; Viola, Ignazio Maria; Ingram, David

    2015-11-01

    A hydrofoil exposed to oscillating flow experiences a reduction in drag due to the Knoller-Betz effect. This is experimentally identifiable by an increasingly inverted von Kármán wake and a corresponding thrust force on the foil. The rate of drag reduction, dependent on plunge amplitude and frequency, reduces with unsteady flow phenomena at higher reduced frequencies. For experimental ease, investigations of this effect have relied on actively plunging/pitching a foil within a steady current. However, one potential application is to drag reduction in high-speed ships adopting submerged foils. In this case the foil is travelling through wave-current induced oscillatory flow, resulting in an additional dynamic variation of hydrostatic pressure across the chord; a phenomena not fully addressed in previous experiments. Here we investigate the effects of this pressure gradient on drag reduction for a stationary foil in combined waves and current, through a combination of force measurements and particle image velocimetry.

  8. Lubricant-impregnated surfaces for drag reduction in viscous laminar flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Brian; Khalil, Karim; Varanasi, Kripa; MIT Team

    2013-11-01

    For the first time, we explore the potential of lubricant impregnated surfaces (LIS) in reducing drag. LIS, inspired by the surface of the Nepenthes pitcher plant, have been introduced as a novel way of functionalizing a surface. LIS are characterized by extremely low contact angle hysteresis and have been show to effectively repel various liquids including water, oils, ketchup and blood. Motivated by the slippery nature of such surfaces, we explore the potential of LIS to reduce drag in internal flows. We observe a reduction in drag for LIS surfaces in a viscous laminar drag flow and model the impact of relevant system parameters (lubricant viscosity, working fluid viscosity, solid fraction, depth of texture, etc.).

  9. Wind Tunnel Tests on Aerodynamic Characteristics of Advanced Solid Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Keiichi; Fujimoto, Keiichiro; Nonaka, Satoshi; Irikado, Tomoko; Fukuzoe, Moriyasu; Shima, Eiji

    The Advanced Solid Rocket is being developed by JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency). Since its configuration has been changed very recently, its aerodynamic characteristics are of great interest of the JAXA Advanced Solid Rocket Team. In this study, we carried out wind tunnel tests on the aerodynamic characteristics of the present configuration for Mach 1.5. Six test cases were conducted with different body configurations, attack angles, and roll angles. A six component balance, oilflow visualization, Schlieren images were used throughout the experiments. It was found that, at zero angle-of-attack, the flow around the body were perturbed and its drag (axial force) characteristics were significantly influenced by protruding body components such as flanges, cable ducts, and attitude control units of SMSJ (Solid Motor Side Jet), while the nozzle had a minor role. With angle-of-attack of five degree, normal force of CNα = 3.50±0.03 was measured along with complex flow features observed in the full-component model; whereas no crossflow separations were induced around the no-protuberance model with CNα = 2.58±0.10. These values were almost constant with respect to the angle-of-attack in both of the cases. Furthermore, presence of roll angle made the flow more complicated, involving interactions of separation vortices. These data provide us with fundamental and important aerodynamic insights of the Advanced Solid Rocket, and they will be utilized as reference data for the corresponding numerical analysis.

  10. Study on the aerodynamic behavior of a UAV with an applied seeder for agricultural practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felismina, Raimundo; Silva, Miguel; Mateus, Artur; Malça, Cândida

    2017-06-01

    It is irrefutable that the use of Unmanned Airborne Vehicle Systems (UAVs) in agricultural tasks and on the analysis of health and vegetative conditions represents a powerful tool in modern agriculture. To contribute to the growth of the agriculture economic sector a seeder to be coupled to any type of UAV was previously developed and designed by the authors. This seeder allows for the deposition of seeds with positional accuracy, i.e., seeds are accurately deposited at pre-established distances between plants [1]. This work aims at analyzing the aerodynamic behavior of UAV/Seeder assembly to determine the suitable inclination - among 0°, 15° and 30° - for its takeoff and for its motion during the seeding operation and, in turn, to define the suitable flight plan that increases the batteries autonomy. For this the ANSYS® FLUENT computational tool was used to simulate a wind tunnel which has as principle the Navier-Stokes differential equations, that designates the fluid flow around the UAV/Seeder assembly. The aerodynamic results demonstrated that for take-off the UAV inclination of 30° is the aerodynamically most favorable position due to the lower aerodynamic drag during the climb. Concerning flying motion during the seeding procedure the UAV inclination of 0° is that which leads to lower UAV/Seeder frontal area and drag coefficient.

  11. Effects of surface design on aerodynamic forces of iced bridge cables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koss, Holger

    2014-01-01

    In recent years the relevance of ice accretion for wind-induced vibration of structural bridge cables has been recognised and became a subject of research in bridge engineering. Full-scale monitoring and observation indicate that light precipitation at moderate low temperatures between zero and -5......°C may lead to large amplitude vibrations of bridge cables under wind action. For the prediction of aerodynamic instability quasi-steady models have been developed estimating the cable response magnitude based on structural properties and aerodynamic force coefficients for drag, lift and torsion...... influences the accretion of ice to an extent that the aerodynamic forces differ significantly amongst the designs. The experiments were conducted in a wind tunnel facility capable amongst others to simulate in-cloud icing conditions....

  12. Variable Camber Continuous Aerodynamic Control Surfaces and Methods for Active Wing Shaping Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhan T. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An aerodynamic control apparatus for an air vehicle improves various aerodynamic performance metrics by employing multiple spanwise flap segments that jointly form a continuous or a piecewise continuous trailing edge to minimize drag induced by lift or vortices. At least one of the multiple spanwise flap segments includes a variable camber flap subsystem having multiple chordwise flap segments that may be independently actuated. Some embodiments also employ a continuous leading edge slat system that includes multiple spanwise slat segments, each of which has one or more chordwise slat segment. A method and an apparatus for implementing active control of a wing shape are also described and include the determination of desired lift distribution to determine the improved aerodynamic deflection of the wings. Flap deflections are determined and control signals are generated to actively control the wing shape to approximate the desired deflection.

  13. Prediction of Aerodynamic Coefficients for Wind Tunnel Data using a Genetic Algorithm Optimized Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, T.; Aragon, Cecilia; Bardina, Jorge; Britten, Roy

    2002-01-01

    A fast, reliable way of predicting aerodynamic coefficients is produced using a neural network optimized by a genetic algorithm. Basic aerodynamic coefficients (e.g. lift, drag, pitching moment) are modelled as functions of angle of attack and Mach number. The neural network is first trained on a relatively rich set of data from wind tunnel tests of numerical simulations to learn an overall model. Most of the aerodynamic parameters can be well-fitted using polynomial functions. A new set of data, which can be relatively sparse, is then supplied to the network to produce a new model consistent with the previous model and the new data. Because the new model interpolates realistically between the sparse test data points, it is suitable for use in piloted simulations. The genetic algorithm is used to choose a neural network architecture to give best results, avoiding over-and under-fitting of the test data.

  14. Numerical study on the aerodynamic performance and safe running of high-speed trains in sandstorms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-bing XIONG; Wen-guang YU; Da-wei CHEN; Xue-ming SHAO

    2011-01-01

    The influence of sandstorms on train aerodynamic performance and safe running was studied in response to the frequent occurrence of sandstorm weather in north China.An Eulerian two-phase model in the computational fluid dynamic (CFD) software FLUENT,validated with published data,was used to solve the gas-solid multiphase flow of a sandstorm around a train.The train aerodynamic performance under different sandstorm levels and no sand conditions was then simulated.Results showed that in sandstorm weather,the drag,lift,side forces and overturning moment increase by variable degrees.Based on a numerical analysis of aerodynamic characteristics,an equation of train stability was also derived using the theory of moment balance from the view of dynamics.A recommended speed limit of a train under different sandstorm levels was calculated based on the stability analysis.

  15. Drag and Torque on Locked Screw Propeller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Tabaczek

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Few data on drag and torque on locked propeller towed in water are available in literature. Those data refer to propellers of specific geometry (number of blades, blade area, pitch and skew of blades. The estimation of drag and torque of an arbitrary propeller considered in analysis of ship resistance or propulsion is laborious. The authors collected and reviewed test data available in the literature. Based on collected data there were developed the empirical formulae for estimation of hydrodynamic drag and torque acting on locked screw propeller. Supplementary CFD computations were carried out in order to prove the applicability of the formulae to modern moderately skewed screw propellers.

  16. Frame-Dragging from Charged Rotating Body

    CERN Document Server

    Dubey, Anuj Kumar

    2016-01-01

    In the present paper, we have considered the three parameters: mass, charge and rotation to discuss their combined effect on frame dragging for a charged rotating body. If we consider the ray of light which is emitted radially outward from a rotating body then the frame dragging shows a periodic nature with respect to coordinate $\\phi$ (azimuthal angle). It has been found that the value of frame dragging obtains a maximum at, $ \\phi =\\frac{\\pi}{2}$ and a minimum at $ \\phi =\\frac{3 \\pi}{2}$.

  17. Integrated structural-aerodynamic design optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haftka, R. T.; Kao, P. J.; Grossman, B.; Polen, D.; Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper focuses on the processes of simultaneous aerodynamic and structural wing design as a prototype for design integration, with emphasis on the major difficulty associated with multidisciplinary design optimization processes, their enormous computational costs. Methods are presented for reducing this computational burden through the development of efficient methods for cross-sensitivity calculations and the implementation of approximate optimization procedures. Utilizing a modular sensitivity analysis approach, it is shown that the sensitivities can be computed without the expensive calculation of the derivatives of the aerodynamic influence coefficient matrix, and the derivatives of the structural flexibility matrix. The same process is used to efficiently evaluate the sensitivities of the wing divergence constraint, which should be particularly useful, not only in problems of complete integrated aircraft design, but also in aeroelastic tailoring applications.

  18. On Turbulent Contribution to Frictional Drag in Wall-Bounded Turbulent Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Feng-Chen; KAWAGUCHI Yasuo; HISHIDA Koichi; OSHIMA Marie

    2006-01-01

    @@ We propose a simple model for turbulent contribution to the frictional drag in a wall-bounded turbulent flow based on the characteristic parameters of turbulent bursting events. It is verified on water and drag-reducing surfactant solution flows investigated by particle image velocimetry in experiments. It is obtained that the turbulent contribution to the skin friction factor is linearly proportional to the product of the spatial frequency and strength of turbulent bursts originated from the wall.

  19. Drag reduction by surface treatment in turbulent Taylor-Couette flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greidanus, A. J.; Delfos, R.; Westerweel, J.

    2011-12-01

    We use a Taylor-Couette facility to study the drag reducing effects of commercial surface products at high shear Reynolds numbers (Res) under perfect couter-rotating conditions (riwi = -rowo). The correlation between torque contribution of the von Kármán flow and shear Reynolds number is investigated. At this moment no significant drag changes are found for the commercial products. However, further research is needed to exclude uncertainties and errors from the torque measurements.

  20. Discrete vortex method simulations of aerodynamic admittance in bridge aerodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Johannes Tophøj; Hejlesen, Mads Mølholm; Larsen, Allan;

    , and to determine aerodynamic forces and the corresponding flutter limit. A simulation of the three-dimensional bridge responseto turbulent wind is carried out by quasi steady theory by modelling the bridge girder as a line like structure [2], applying the aerodynamic load coefficients found from the current version...... of DVMFLOW in a strip wise fashion. Neglecting the aerodynamic admittance, i.e. the correlation of the instantaneous lift force to the turbulent fluctuations in the vertical velocities, leads to higher response to high frequency atmospheric turbulence than would be obtained from wind tunnel tests....

  1. Wind Turbines Wake Aerodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vermeer, L.; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Crespo, A.

    2003-01-01

    The aerodynamics of horizontal axis wind turbine wakes is studied. The contents is directed towards the physics of power extraction by wind turbines and reviews both the near and the far wake region. For the near wake, the survey is restricted to uniform, steady and parallel flow conditions......, thereby excluding wind shear, wind speed and rotor setting changes and yawed conditions. The emphasis is put on measurements in controlled conditions.For the far wake, the survey focusses on both single turbines and wind farm effects, and the experimental and numerical work are reviewed; the main interest...... is to study how the far wake decays downstream, in order to estimate the effect produced in downstream turbines.The article is further restricted to horizontal axis wind turbines and excludes all other types of turbines....

  2. Aerodynamics of wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Otto Laver

    Aerodynamics of Wind Turbines is the established essential text for the fundamental solutions to efficient wind turbine design. Now in its third edition, it has been substantially updated with respect to structural dynamics and control. The new control chapter now includes details on how to design...... a classical pitch and torque regulator to control rotational speed and power, while the section on structural dynamics has been extended with a simplified mechanical system explaining the phenomena of forward and backward whirling modes. Readers will also benefit from a new chapter on Vertical Axis Wind...... Turbines (VAWT). Topics covered include increasing mass flow through the turbine, performance at low and high wind speeds, assessment of the extreme conditions under which the turbine will perform and the theory for calculating the lifetime of the turbine. The classical Blade Element Momentum method...

  3. Wind Turbines Wake Aerodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vermeer, L.; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Crespo, A.

    2003-01-01

    The aerodynamics of horizontal axis wind turbine wakes is studied. The contents is directed towards the physics of power extraction by wind turbines and reviews both the near and the far wake region. For the near wake, the survey is restricted to uniform, steady and parallel flow conditions......, thereby excluding wind shear, wind speed and rotor setting changes and yawed conditions. The emphasis is put on measurements in controlled conditions.For the far wake, the survey focusses on both single turbines and wind farm effects, and the experimental and numerical work are reviewed; the main interest...... is to study how the far wake decays downstream, in order to estimate the effect produced in downstream turbines.The article is further restricted to horizontal axis wind turbines and excludes all other types of turbines....

  4. Aerodynamics of Small Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Thomas J.

    In this review we describe the aerodynamic problems that must be addressed in order to design a successful small aerial vehicle. The effects of Reynolds number and aspect ratio (AR) on the design and performance of fixed-wing vehicles are described. The boundary-layer behavior on airfoils is especially important in the design of vehicles in this flight regime. The results of a number of experimental boundary-layer studies, including the influence of laminar separation bubbles, are discussed. Several examples of small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) in this regime are described. Also, a brief survey of analytical models for oscillating and flapping-wing propulsion is presented. These range from the earliest examples where quasi-steady, attached flow is assumed, to those that account for the unsteady shed vortex wake as well as flow separation and aeroelastic behavior of a flapping wing. Experiments that complemented the analysis and led to the design of a successful ornithopter are also described.

  5. Introduction to transonic aerodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Vos, Roelof

    2015-01-01

    Written to teach students the nature of transonic flow and its mathematical foundation, this book offers a much-needed introduction to transonic aerodynamics. The authors present a quantitative and qualitative assessment of subsonic, supersonic, and transonic flow around bodies in two and three dimensions. The book reviews the governing equations and explores their applications and limitations as employed in modeling and computational fluid dynamics.  Some concepts, such as shock and expansion theory, are examined from a numerical perspective. Others, including shock-boundary-layer interaction, are discussed from a qualitative point of view. The book includes 60 examples and more than 200 practice problems. The authors also offer analytical methods such as Method of Characteristics (MOC) that allow readers to practice with the subject matter.  The result is a wealth of insight into transonic flow phenomena and their impact on aircraft design, including compressibility effects, shock and expansion waves, sho...

  6. Drag bias feedback for the analytic drag control entry guidance system. [for the space shuttle orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, H. C.

    1976-01-01

    The Analytic Drag Control (ADC) entry guidance has been developed and baselined for the space shuttle orbiter entry. A method is presented which corrects the orbiter entry guidance commanded bank angle for biases between navigated drag and guidance computed reference drag. This is accomplished by an integral feedback technique, which uses the drag bias information to adjust the difference between navigated and reference altitude rate used by the ADC guidance. The method improves the capability of the ADC guidance system by compensating for any error source which causes a bias between the navigated drag and reference drag profile. These errors include navigated altitude rate errors, atmosphere dispersions, and roll attitude deadband effects. A discussion of the method and results of digital computer entry simulations is presented.

  7. The physics of orographic gravity wave drag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A C Teixeira

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The drag and momentum fluxes produced by gravity waves generated in flow over orography are reviewed, focusing on adiabatic conditions without phase transitions or radiation effects, and steady mean incoming flow. The orographic gravity wave drag is first introduced in its simplest possible form, for inviscid, linearized, non-rotating flow with the Boussinesq and hydrostatic approximations, and constant wind and static stability. Subsequently, the contributions made by previous authors (primarily using theory and numerical simulations to elucidate how the drag is affected by additional physical processes are surveyed. These include the effect of orography anisotropy, vertical wind shear, total and partial critical levels, vertical wave reflection and resonance, non-hydrostatic effects and trapped lee waves, rotation and nonlinearity. Frictional and boundary layer effects are also briefly mentioned. A better understanding of all of these aspects is important for guiding the improvement of drag parametrization schemes.

  8. Drag sails for space debris mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visagie, Lourens; Lappas, Vaios; Erb, Sven

    2015-04-01

    The prudence for satellites to have a mitigation or deorbiting strategy has been brought about by the ever increasing amount of debris in Earth orbit. Drag augmentation is a potentially passive method for de-orbiting in LEO but its collision risk mitigation efficiency is sometimes underestimated by not taking all the relevant factors into account. This paper shows that using drag augmentation from a deployable drag-sail to de-orbit a satellite in LEO will lead to a reduction in collision risk. In order to support this finding, the models that are needed in order to evaluate the collision risk of a decaying object under drag conditions are presented. A comparison is performed between the simpler Area-Time-Product (ATP) and more precise collision risk analysis, and the effects that are overlooked in the simple ATP calculation are explained.

  9. Alleviation of fuselage form drag using vortex flows: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wortman, A.

    1987-09-15

    The concept of using vortex generators to reduce the fuselage form drag of transport aircraft combines the outflow from the plane of symmetry which is induced by the rotational component of the vortex flow with the energization of the boundary layer to reduce the momentum thickness and to delay or eliminate flow separation. This idea was first advanced by the author in 1981. Under a DOE grant, the concept was validated in wind tunnel tests of approximately 1:17 scale models of fuselages of Boeing 747 and Lockheed C-5 aircraft. The search for the minimum drag involved three vortex generator configurations with three sizes of each in six locations clustered in the aft regions of the fuselages at the beginning of the tail upsweep. The local Reynolds number, which is referred to the length of boundary layer run from the nose, was approximately 10{sup 7} so that a fully developed turbulent boundary layer was present. Vortex generator planforms ranged from swept tapered, through swept straight, to swept reverse tapered wings whose semi-spans ranged from 50% to 125% of the local boundary layer thickness. Pitch angles of the vortex generators were varied by inboard actuators under the control of an external proportional digital radio controller. It was found that certain combinations of vortex generator parameters increased drag. However, with certain configurations, locations, and pitch angles of vortex generators, the highest drag reductions were 3% for the 747 and about 6% for the C-5, thus confirming the arguments that effectiveness increases with the rate of upsweep of the tail. Greatest gains in performance are therefore expected on aft loading military transports. 10 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Integrated lift/drag controller for aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olcott, J. W.; Seckel, E.; Ellis, D. R. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A system for altering the lift/drag characteristics of powered aircraft to provide a safe means of glide path control includes a control device integrated for coordination action with the aircraft throttle. Such lift/drag alteration devices as spoilers, dive brakes, and the like are actuated by manual operation of a single lever coupled with the throttle for integrating, blending or coordinating power control. Improper operation of the controller is inhibited by safety mechanisms.

  11. Aerodynamic design and analysis of small horizontal axis wind turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xinzi

    This work investigates the aerodynamic design and analysis of small horizontal axis wind turbine blades via the blade element momentum (BEM) based approach and the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) based approach. From this research, it is possible to draw a series of detailed guidelines on small wind turbine blade design and analysis. The research also provides a platform for further comprehensive study using these two approaches. The wake induction corrections and stall corrections of the BEM method were examined through a case study of the NREL/NASA Phase VI wind turbine. A hybrid stall correction model was proposed to analyse wind turbine power performance. The proposed model shows improvement in power prediction for the validation case, compared with the existing stall correction models. The effects of the key rotor parameters of a small wind turbine as well as the blade chord and twist angle distributions on power performance were investigated through two typical wind turbines, i.e. a fixed-pitch variable-speed (FPVS) wind turbine and a fixed-pitch fixed-speed (FPFS) wind turbine. An engineering blade design and analysis code was developed in MATLAB to accommodate aerodynamic design and analysis of the blades.. The linearisation for radial profiles of blade chord and twist angle for the FPFS wind turbine blade design was discussed. Results show that, the proposed linearisation approach leads to reduced manufacturing cost and higher annual energy production (AEP), with minimal effects on the low wind speed performance. Comparative studies of mesh and turbulence models in 2D and 3D CFD modelling were conducted. The CFD predicted lift and drag coefficients of the airfoil S809 were compared with wind tunnel test data and the 3D CFD modelling method of the NREL/NASA Phase VI wind turbine were validated against measurements. Airfoil aerodynamic characterisation and wind turbine power performance as well as 3D flow details were studied. The detailed flow

  12. Advanced Electric Systems and Aerodynamics for Efficiency Improvements in Heavy Duty Trucks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry Slone; Jeffrey Birkel

    2007-10-31

    The Advanced Electric Systems and Aerodynamics for Efficiency Improvements in Heavy Duty Trucks program (DE-FC26-04NT42189), commonly referred to as the AES program, focused on areas that will primarily benefit fuel economy and improve heat rejection while driving over the road. The AES program objectives were to: (1) Analyze, design, build, and test a cooling system that provided a minimum of 10 percent greater heat rejection in the same frontal area with no increase in parasitic fan load. (2) Realize fuel savings with advanced power management and acceleration assist by utilizing an integrated starter/generator (ISG) and energy storage devices. (3) Quantify the effect of aerodynamic drag due to the frontal shape mandated by the area required for the cooling system. The program effort consisted of modeling and designing components for optimum fuel efficiency, completing fabrication of necessary components, integrating these components into the chassis test bed, completing controls programming, and performance testing the system both on a chassis dynamometer and on the road. Emission control measures for heavy-duty engines have resulted in increased engine heat loads, thus introducing added parasitic engine cooling loads. Truck electrification, in the form of thermal management, offers technological solutions to mitigate or even neutralize the effects of this trend. Thermal control offers opportunities to avoid increases in cooling system frontal area and forestall reduced fuel economy brought about by additional aerodynamic vehicle drag. This project explored such thermal concepts by installing a 2007 engine that is compliant with current regulations and bears additional heat rejection associated with meeting these regulations. This newer engine replaced the 2002 engine from a previous project that generated less heat rejection. Advanced power management, utilizing a continuously optimized and controlled power flow between electric components, can offer additional

  13. Aerodynamics Investigation of Faceted Airfoils at Low Reynolds Number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napolillo, Zachary G.

    The desire and demand to fly farther and faster has progressively integrated the concept of optimization with airfoil design, resulting in increasingly complex numerical tools pursuing efficiency often at diminishing returns; while the costs and difficulty associated with fabrication increases with design complexity. Such efficiencies may often be necessary due to the power density limitations of certain aircraft such as small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and micro air vehicles (MAVs). This research, however, focuses on reducing the complexity of airfoils for applications where aerodynamic performance is less important than the efficiency of manufacturing; in this case a Hybrid Projectile. By employing faceted sections to approximate traditional contoured wing sections it may be possible to expedite manufacturing and reduce costs. We applied this method to the development of a low Reynolds number, disposable Hybrid Projectile requiring a 4.5:1 glide ratio, resulting in a series of airfoils which are geometric approximations to highly contoured cross-sections called ShopFoils. This series of airfoils both numerically and experimentally perform within a 10% margin of the SD6060 airfoil at low Re. Additionally, flow visualization has been conducted to qualitatively determine what mechanisms, if any, are responsible for the similarity in performance between the faceted ShopFoil sections and the SD6060. The data obtained by these experiments did not conclusively reveal how the faceted surfaces may influence low Re flow but did indicate that the ShopFoil s did not maintain flow attachment at higher angles of attack than the SD6060. Two reasons are provided for the unexpected performance of the ShopFoil: one is related to downwash effects, which are suspected of placing the outer portion of the span at an effective angle of attack where the ShopFoils outperform the SD6060; the other is the influence of the tip vortex on separation near the wing tips, which possibly

  14. Experimental Investigation of Tunnel Discharge Ability by Using Drag Reduction Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-kui WANG

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The experiments in an open flume model and in the spillway tunnel models were carried out by using drag reduction technique. The drag reduction experiments in open channel model adopted two techniques: polymer addition and coating. The drag reduction effect of polyacrylamide (PAM solution and the dimethyl silicone oil coating were studied by the flume model experiments, and the results were satisfied. Then the experiments were carried out in the model of a Hydropower station, which is the second largest dam in China. In order to reduce the resistance, the spillway tunnel models were coated inside with the dimethyl silicone oil. It is the first time that applying the drag reduction technique in the large hydraulic model. The experimental results show that the coating technique can effectively increase the ability of flood discharge. The outlet velocity and the jet trajectory distance were also increased, which is beneficial to the energy dissipation of the spillway tunnel.

  15. Effect of Jet-nozzle-expansion Ratio on Drag of Parabolic Afterbodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englert, Gerald W; Vargo, Donald J; Cubbison, Robert W

    1954-01-01

    The interaction of the flow from one convergent and two convergent-divergent nozzles on parabolic afterbodies was studied at free-stream Mach numbers of 2.0, 1.6, and 0.6 over a range of jet pressure ratio. The influence of the jet on boattail and base drag was very pronounced. Study of the total external afterbody drag values at supersonic speeds indicated that, over most of the high-pressure-ratio range, increasing the nozzle design expansion ratio increased the drag even though the boattail area was reduced. Increasing the pressure ratio tended to increase slightly the total-drag increment caused by angle-of-attack operation.

  16. Noise aspects at aerodynamic blade optimisation projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schepers, J.G. [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation, Petten (Netherlands)

    1997-12-31

    This paper shows an example of an aerodynamic blade optimisation, using the program PVOPT. PVOPT calculates the optimal wind turbine blade geometry such that the maximum energy yield is obtained. Using the aerodynamic optimal blade design as a basis, the possibilities of noise reduction are investigated. The aerodynamic optimised geometry from PVOPT is the `real` optimum (up to the latest decimal). The most important conclusion from this study is, that it is worthwhile to investigate the behaviour of the objective function (in the present case the energy yield) around the optimum: If the optimum is flat, there is a possibility to apply modifications to the optimum configuration with only a limited loss in energy yield. It is obvious that the modified configurations emits a different (and possibly lower) noise level. In the BLADOPT program (the successor of PVOPT) it will be possible to quantify the noise level and hence to assess the reduced noise emission more thoroughly. At present the most promising approaches for noise reduction are believed to be a reduction of the rotor speed (if at all possible), and a reduction of the tip angle by means of low lift profiles, or decreased twist at the outboard stations. These modifications were possible without a significant loss in energy yield. (LN)

  17. Naval Aerodynamics Test Facility (NATF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NATF specializes in Aerodynamics testing of scaled and fullsized Naval models, research into flow physics found on US Navy planes and ships, aerosol testing and...

  18. Computational aerodynamics and artificial intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, U. B.; Kutler, P.

    1984-01-01

    The general principles of artificial intelligence are reviewed and speculations are made concerning how knowledge based systems can accelerate the process of acquiring new knowledge in aerodynamics, how computational fluid dynamics may use expert systems, and how expert systems may speed the design and development process. In addition, the anatomy of an idealized expert system called AERODYNAMICIST is discussed. Resource requirements for using artificial intelligence in computational fluid dynamics and aerodynamics are examined. Three main conclusions are presented. First, there are two related aspects of computational aerodynamics: reasoning and calculating. Second, a substantial portion of reasoning can be achieved with artificial intelligence. It offers the opportunity of using computers as reasoning machines to set the stage for efficient calculating. Third, expert systems are likely to be new assets of institutions involved in aeronautics for various tasks of computational aerodynamics.

  19. Fundamentals of modern unsteady aerodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Gülçat, Ülgen

    2010-01-01

    This introduction to the principles of unsteady aerodynamics covers all the core concepts, provides readers with a review of the fundamental physics, terminology and basic equations, and covers hot new topics such as the use of flapping wings for propulsion.

  20. Pre-Test Assessment of the Upper Bound of the Drag Coefficient Repeatability of a Wind Tunnel Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbrich, N.; L'Esperance, A.

    2017-01-01

    A new method is presented that computes a pre{test estimate of the upper bound of the drag coefficient repeatability of a wind tunnel model. This upper bound is a conservative estimate of the precision error of the drag coefficient. For clarity, precision error contributions associated with the measurement of the dynamic pressure are analyzed separately from those that are associated with the measurement of the aerodynamic loads. The upper bound is computed by using information about the model, the tunnel conditions, and the balance in combination with an estimate of the expected output variations as input. The model information consists of the reference area and an assumed angle of attack. The tunnel conditions are described by the Mach number and the total pressure or unit Reynolds number. The balance inputs are the partial derivatives of the axial and normal force with respect to all balance outputs. Finally, an empirical output variation of 1.0 microV/V is used to relate both random instrumentation and angle measurement errors to the precision error of the drag coefficient. Results of the analysis are reported by plotting the upper bound of the precision error versus the tunnel conditions. The analysis shows that the influence of the dynamic pressure measurement error on the precision error of the drag coefficient is often small when compared with the influence of errors that are associated with the load measurements. Consequently, the sensitivities of the axial and normal force gages of the balance have a significant influence on the overall magnitude of the drag coefficient's precision error. Therefore, results of the error analysis can be used for balance selection purposes as the drag prediction characteristics of balances of similar size and capacities can objectively be compared. Data from two wind tunnel models and three balances are used to illustrate the assessment of the precision error of the drag coefficient.

  1. Numerical simulation for the influence of injected laser power on plasma drag reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Z; Fang, J [Department of Postgraduates, Academy of Equipment Command and Technology, 3380 Post box, Huairou Beijing 101416 (China); Dou, Z G; Huang, H, E-mail: liuzhun0@gmail.com [Department of Basic Theories, Academy of Equipment Command and Technology, 3380 Post box, Huairou Beijing 101416 (China)

    2011-02-01

    Laser plasma drag reduction is a new method to reduce the wave drag of hypersonic flight. Inject laser power is an important parameter. An appropriate laser power should be chosen when laser power was injected to achieve the best drag reduction effect via the minimum laser power. The effect of inject laser power on the performance of laser plasma drag reduction when incoming flight Mach number is 6.5 and at 30km altitude was simulated numerically. The result indicates that the drag can be effectively reduced by energy injection in the upstream flow. The larger the inject power is, the smaller the drag of the blunt body obtained. The energy injection can also influence the pressure and temperature on the surface of blunt body. When laser energy injected, high pressure region on the surface moves to the back of the hemisphere, the pressure of stagnation point decreased. There are two peaks of temperature on the blunt surface, one is the stagnation point and the other is the high pressure region. Temperature of the surface after high pressure region is lower comparison to the condition that no energy injected.

  2. Drag reduction for external and internal boundary layers using riblets and polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reidy, Laurel W.; Anderson, Greg W.

    1988-01-01

    The efficiency of riblets and a drag-reducing polymer solution (a polyacrylamide slurry) in high-speed water tunnels for reducing drag in turbulent boundary layers was investigated in two experiments. One was an external flow experiment, in which riblets were applied to a flat plate in a high-speed water tunnel and the skin friction drag was calculated from velocity profile data. The second was an internal flow experiment, in which riblets were applied to the inside of a 6-in diameter pipe and the friction factor was calculated from mass flow rate and pressure drop measurements. Both experiments used adhesive-backed vinyl riblet film with 0.003-in height and spacing of the symmetric V-grooves. For the flat plate test, free stream velocity and Re data indicated a maximum drag reduction of about 8.1 percent. With riblets in the pipe, however, there was about three times as much friction reduction. When the polymer slurry was used in conjunction with riblets in the pipe flow, the total drag reduction was approximately equal to the sum of the drag reductions of the two techniques used separately, with some dependence on Reynolds number.

  3. Introduction to wind turbine aerodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Schaffarczyk, Alois Peter

    2014-01-01

    Wind-Turbine Aerodynamics is a self-contained textbook which shows how to come from the basics of fluid mechanics to modern wind turbine blade design. It presents a fundamentals of fluid dynamics and inflow conditions, and gives a extensive introduction into theories describing the aerodynamics of wind turbines. After introducing experiments the book applies the knowledge to explore the impact on blade design.The book is an introduction for professionals and students of very varying levels.

  4. Comparative Analysis of the Wing Geometry Design for an Aerodynamic Gondola of a Recoverable and Reusable Probe Balloon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Rubio Forero

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The present paper describes two conceptual wing designs that maintain equals the wing area, the aspect ratio, the wing span and the aerodynamic profiles, varying wing shape by changing the length of the root and tip chord of each model, in order to determinate the most efficient wing geometry design of an aerodynamic nacelle than could be implemented in a recoverable and reusable radio probe. The lift and drag coefficients are analyzed in function of the angle of attack, as a comparative parameter, finding an improvement on the lift when the tip chord has more length.

  5. System Identification and POD Method Applied to Unsteady Aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Deman; Kholodar, Denis; Juang, Jer-Nan; Dowell, Earl H.

    2001-01-01

    The representation of unsteady aerodynamic flow fields in terms of global aerodynamic modes has proven to be a useful method for reducing the size of the aerodynamic model over those representations that use local variables at discrete grid points in the flow field. Eigenmodes and Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) modes have been used for this purpose with good effect. This suggests that system identification models may also be used to represent the aerodynamic flow field. Implicit in the use of a systems identification technique is the notion that a relative small state space model can be useful in describing a dynamical system. The POD model is first used to show that indeed a reduced order model can be obtained from a much larger numerical aerodynamical model (the vortex lattice method is used for illustrative purposes) and the results from the POD and the system identification methods are then compared. For the example considered, the two methods are shown to give comparable results in terms of accuracy and reduced model size. The advantages and limitations of each approach are briefly discussed. Both appear promising and complementary in their characteristics.

  6. Cotunneling Drag Effect in Coulomb-Coupled Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, A. J.; Lim, J. S.; Sánchez, David; López, Rosa; Amasha, S.; Katine, J. A.; Shtrikman, Hadas; Goldhaber-Gordon, D.

    2016-08-01

    In Coulomb drag, a current flowing in one conductor can induce a voltage across an adjacent conductor via the Coulomb interaction. The mechanisms yielding drag effects are not always understood, even though drag effects are sufficiently general to be seen in many low-dimensional systems. In this Letter, we observe Coulomb drag in a Coulomb-coupled double quantum dot and, through both experimental and theoretical arguments, identify cotunneling as essential to obtaining a correct qualitative understanding of the drag behavior.

  7. Effect of The Swimmer's Head Position on Passive Drag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortesi, Matteo; Gatta, Giorgio

    2015-12-22

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the head position on passive drag with a towing-line experiment in a swimming pool. The tests were performed on ten male swimmers with regional level swimming skills and at least 10 years of competitive swimming experience. They were towed underwater (at a depth of 60 cm) at three speeds (1.5, 1.7 and 1.9 m/s) and in two body positions (arms above the swimmer's head and arms alongside the body). These two body positions were repeated while the swimmer's head was positioned in three different ways: head-up, head-middle and head-down in relation to the body's horizontal alignment. The results showed a reduction of 4-5.2% in the average passive drag at all speeds when the head was down or aligned to the swimmer's arms alongside the body, in comparison to the head-up position. A major significant decrease of 10.4-10.9% (p < 0.05) was shown when the head was down or aligned at the swimmer's arms above the swimmer's head. The passive drag tended to decrease significantly by a mean of 17.6% (p < 0.001) for all speeds examined with the arms alongside the body position rather than with the arms above the head position. The swimmer's head location may play an important role in reducing hydrodynamic resistance during passive underwater gliding.

  8. The Mechanism of Drag Reduction around Bodies of Revolution Using Bionic Non-Smooth Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-mei Tian; Lu-quan Ren; Qing-ping Liu; Zhi-wu Han; Xiao Jiang

    2007-01-01

    Bionic non-smooth surfaces (BNSS) can reduce drag. Much attention has been paid to the mechanism of shear stress reduction by riblets. The mechanism of pressure force reduction by bionic non-smooth surfaces on bodies of revolution has not been, well investigated. In this work CFD simulation has revealed the mechanism of drag reduction by BNSS, which may work in three ways. First, BNSS on bodies of revolution may lower the surface velocity of the medium, which prevents the sudden speed up of air on the cross section. So the bottom pressure of the model would not be disturbed sharply, resulting in less energy loss and drag reduction. Second, the magnitude of vorticity induced by the bionic model becomes smaller because, due to the sculpturing, the growth of tiny air bubbles is avoided. Thus the large moment of inertia induced by large air bubble is reduced. The reduction of the vorticity could reduce the dissipation of the eddy. So the pressure force could also be reduced. Third, the thickness of the momentum layer on the model becomes less which, according to the relationship between the drag coefficient and the momentum thickness, reduces drag.

  9. Hydrodynamic Drag on Streamlined Projectiles and Cavities

    KAUST Repository

    Jetly, Aditya

    2016-04-19

    The air cavity formation resulting from the water-entry of solid objects has been the subject of extensive research due to its application in various fields such as biology, marine vehicles, sports and oil and gas industries. Recently we demonstrated that at certain conditions following the closing of the air cavity formed by the initial impact of a superhydrophobic sphere on a free water surface a stable streamlined shape air cavity can remain attached to the sphere. The formation of superhydrophobic sphere and attached air cavity reaches a steady state during the free fall. In this thesis we further explore this novel phenomenon to quantify the drag on streamlined shape cavities. The drag on the sphere-cavity formation is then compared with the drag on solid projectile which were designed to have self-similar shape to that of the cavity. The solid projectiles of adjustable weight were produced using 3D printing technique. In a set of experiments on the free fall of projectile we determined the variation of projectiles drag coefficient as a function of the projectiles length to diameter ratio and the projectiles specific weight, covering a range of intermediate Reynolds number, Re ~ 104 – 105 which are characteristic for our streamlined cavity experiments. Parallel free fall experiment with sphere attached streamlined air cavity and projectile of the same shape and effective weight clearly demonstrated the drag reduction effect due to the stress-free boundary condition at cavity liquid interface. The streamlined cavity experiments can be used as the upper bound estimate of the drag reduction by air layers naturally sustained on superhydrophobic surfaces in contact with water. In the final part of the thesis we design an experiment to test the drag reduction capacity of robust superhydrophobic coatings deposited on the surface of various model vessels.

  10. Efficient optimization of integrated aerodynamic-structural design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haftka, R. T.; Grossman, B.; Eppard, W. M.; Kao, P. J.; Polen, D. M.

    1989-01-01

    Techniques for reducing the computational complexity of multidisciplinary design optimization (DO) of aerodynamic structures are described and demonstrated. The basic principles of aerodynamic and structural DO are reviewed; the formulation of the combined DO problem is outlined; and particular attention is given to (1) the application of perturbation methods to cross-sensitivity computations and (2) numerical approximation procedures. Trial DOs of a simple sailplane design are presented in tables and graphs and discussed in detail. The IBM 3090 CPU time for the entire integrated DO was reduced from an estimated 10 h to about 6 min.

  11. Introduction. Computational aerodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Paul G

    2007-10-15

    The wide range of uses of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for aircraft design is discussed along with its role in dealing with the environmental impact of flight. Enabling technologies, such as grid generation and turbulence models, are also considered along with flow/turbulence control. The large eddy simulation, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes and hybrid turbulence modelling approaches are contrasted. The CFD prediction of numerous jet configurations occurring in aerospace are discussed along with aeroelasticity for aeroengine and external aerodynamics, design optimization, unsteady flow modelling and aeroengine internal and external flows. It is concluded that there is a lack of detailed measurements (for both canonical and complex geometry flows) to provide validation and even, in some cases, basic understanding of flow physics. Not surprisingly, turbulence modelling is still the weak link along with, as ever, a pressing need for improved (in terms of robustness, speed and accuracy) solver technology, grid generation and geometry handling. Hence, CFD, as a truly predictive and creative design tool, seems a long way off. Meanwhile, extreme practitioner expertise is still required and the triad of computation, measurement and analytic solution must be judiciously used.

  12. Potential impacts of advanced aerodynamic technology on air transportation system productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushnell, Dennis M. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    Summaries of a workshop held at NASA Langley Research Center in 1993 to explore the application of advanced aerodynamics to airport productivity improvement are discussed. Sessions included discussions of terminal area productivity problems and advanced aerodynamic technologies for enhanced high lift and reduced noise, emissions, and wake vortex hazard with emphasis upon advanced aircraft configurations and multidisciplinary solution options.

  13. Models of Lift and Drag Coefficients of Stalled and Unstalled Airfoils in Wind Turbines and Wind Tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spera, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Equations are developed with which to calculate lift and drag coefficients along the spans of torsionally-stiff rotating airfoils of the type used in wind turbine rotors and wind tunnel fans, at angles of attack in both the unstalled and stalled aerodynamic regimes. Explicit adjustments are made for the effects of aspect ratio (length to chord width) and airfoil thickness ratio. Calculated lift and drag parameters are compared to measured parameters for 55 airfoil data sets including 585 test points. Mean deviation was found to be -0.4 percent and standard deviation was 4.8 percent. When the proposed equations were applied to the calculation of power from a stall-controlled wind turbine tested in a NASA wind tunnel, mean deviation from 54 data points was -1.3 percent and standard deviation was 4.0 percent. Pressure-rise calculations for a large wind tunnel fan deviated by 2.7 percent (mean) and 4.4 percent (standard). The assumption that a single set of lift and drag coefficient equations can represent the stalled aerodynamic behavior of a wide variety of airfoils was found to be satisfactory.

  14. Aerodynamic Characteristics of the Crest with Membrane Attachment on Cretaceous Pterodactyloid Nyctosaurus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XING Lida; WU Jianghao; LU Yi; L(U) Junchang; JI Qiang

    2009-01-01

    The Nyctosaurus specimen KJ1 was reconstructed under the hypothesis that there is a membrane attached to the crest;the so-called headsail crest.The aerodynamic forces and moment acting on the headsail crest were analyzed.It was shown that KJ1 might adjust the angle of the headsail crest relative to the air current as one way to generate thrust(one of the aerodynamic forces,used to overcome body drag in forward flight)and that the magnitude of the thrust and moment could vary with the gesture angle and the relative locafion between the aerodynamic center of the headsail crest and body's center of gravity.Three scenarios were tested for comparison:the crest with membrane attachment,the crest without membrane attachment and the absence of a cranial crest.It was shown that the aerodynamic characteristics(increasing.maintaining and decreasing thrusts and moment) would have almost disappear in flight for the crest without membrane attachment and Was non-existent without the cranial crest.It is suggested from aerodynamics evidence alone that Nyctosaurus specimen KJ1 had a membrane attached to the crest and used this reconstructed form for auxiliary flight control.

  15. Vorticity Confinement Applied to Turbulent Wing Tip Vortices for Wake-Integral Drag Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Kristopher; Povitsky, Alex

    2013-11-01

    In the current study the vorticity confinement (VC) approach was applied to tip vortices shed by edges of stationary wings in order to predict induced drag by far-field integration in Trefftz plane. The VC parameter was evaluated first by application to convection of vortices in 2-D uniform flow and then to tip vortices shed in 3-D simulation of finite-aspect ratio rectangular wing in subsonic flight. Dependence of VC parameter on the flight Mach number and the angle of attack was evaluated. The aerodynamic drag results with application of VC to prevent numerical diffusion are much closer to analytic lifting line theory compared to integration over surface of wing while the viscous profile drag is more accurately evaluated by surface integration. To apply VC to viscous and turbulent flows, it is shown that VC does not affect the physical rate of dissipation of vortices in viscous/turbulent flows at time scales corresponding to convection of vortices from the wing to Trefftz plane of integration. To account for turbulent effects on tip vortices, VC was applied in combination with Spalart-Allmaras, k- ɛ, and six Reynolds stresses models of turbulence. The results are compared to experiments to validate the physical dissipation of tip vortex. This research was supported by The Dayton Area Graduate Studies Institute (DAGSI) and US Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) grants in 2009-2013, US Army Research Office (ARO) in 2012-2013 and ASEE/AFRL summer faculty grant.

  16. Linear drag law for high-Reynolds-number flow past an oscillating body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agre, Natalie; Childress, Stephen; Zhang, Jun; Ristroph, Leif

    2016-07-01

    An object immersed in a fast flow typically experiences fluid forces that increase with the square of speed. Here we explore how this high-Reynolds-number force-speed relationship is affected by unsteady motions of a body. Experiments on disks that are driven to oscillate while progressing through air reveal two distinct regimes: a conventional quadratic relationship for slow oscillations and an anomalous scaling for fast flapping in which the time-averaged drag increases linearly with flow speed. In the linear regime, flow visualization shows that a pair of counterrotating vortices is shed with each oscillation and a model that views a train of such dipoles as a momentum jet reproduces the linearity. We also show that appropriate scaling variables collapse the experimental data from both regimes and for different oscillatory motions into a single drag-speed relationship. These results could provide insight into the aerodynamic resistance incurred by oscillating wings in flight and they suggest that vibrations can be an effective means to actively control the drag on an object.

  17. The role of aerodynamic drag in propagation of interplanetary coronal mass ejections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vršnak, B.; Žic, T.; Falkenberg, Thea Vilstrup;

    2010-01-01

    Context. The propagation of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) and the forecast of their arrival on Earth is one of the central issues of space weather studies. Aims. We investigate to which degree various ICME parameters (mass, size, take-off speed) and the ambient solar-wind paramete...

  18. Solute drag on perfect and extended dislocations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sills, R. B.; Cai, W.

    2016-04-01

    The drag force exerted on a moving dislocation by a field of mobile solutes is studied in the steady state. The drag force is numerically calculated as a function of the dislocation velocity for both perfect and extended dislocations. The sensitivity of the non-dimensionalized force-velocity curve to the various controlling parameters is assessed, and an approximate analytical force-velocity expression is given. A non-dimensional parameter S characterizing the strength of the solute-dislocation interaction, the background solute fraction ?, and the dislocation character angle ?, are found to have the strongest influence on the force-velocity curve. Within the model considered here, a perfect screw dislocation experiences no solute drag, but an extended screw dislocation experiences a non-zero drag force that is about 10 to 30% of the drag on an extended edge dislocation. The solutes can change the spacing between the Shockley partials in both stationary and moving extended dislocations, even when the stacking fault energy remains unaltered. Under certain conditions, the solutes destabilize an extended dislocation by either collapsing it into a perfect dislocation or causing the partials to separate unboundedly. It is proposed that the latter instability may lead to the formation of large faulted areas and deformation twins in low stacking fault energy materials containing solutes, consistent with experimental observations of copper and stainless steel containing hydrogen.

  19. Leidenfrost vapour layer moderation of the drag crisis and trajectories of superhydrophobic and hydrophilic spheres falling in water

    KAUST Repository

    Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the dynamic effects of a Leidenfrost vapour layer sustained on the surface of heated steel spheres during free fall in water. We find that a stable vapour layer sustained on the textured superhydrophobic surface of spheres falling through 95 °C water can reduce the hydrodynamic drag by up to 75% and stabilize the sphere trajectory for the Reynolds number between 104 and 106, spanning the drag crisis in the absence of the vapour layer. For hydrophilic spheres under the same conditions, the transition to drag reduction and trajectory stability occurs abruptly at a temperature different from the static Leidenfrost point. The observed drag reduction effects are attributed to the disruption of the viscous boundary layer by the vapour layer whose thickness depends on the water temperature. Both the drag reduction and the trajectory stabilization effects are expected to have significant implications for development of sustainable vapour layer based technologies. © the Partner Organisations 2014.

  20. Pressure distribution and aerodynamic coefficients associated with heat addition to supersonic air stream adjacent to two-dimensional supersonic wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkel, I Irving; Serafini, John S; Gregg, John L

    1952-01-01

    The modifications in the pressure distributions and the aerodynamic coefficients associated with additions of heat to the two-dimensional supersonic in viscid flow field adjacetnt to the lower surface of of a 5-percent-thickness symmetrical circular-arc wing are presented in this report. The pressure distributions are obtained by the use of graphical method which gives the two-dimensional supersonic inviscid flow field obtained with moderate heat addition. The variation is given of the lift-drag ratio and of the aerodynamic coefficients of lift, drag, and moment with free stream Mach number, angle of attack, and parameters defining extent and amount of heat addition. The six graphical solutions used in this study included Mach numbers of 3.0 and 5.0 and angles of attack of 0 degrees and 2 degrees.

  1. Plasma Aerodynamic Control Effectors for Improved Wind Turbine Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehul P. Patel; Srikanth Vasudevan; Robert C. Nelson; Thomas C. Corke

    2008-08-01

    Orbital Research Inc is developing an innovative Plasma Aerodynamic Control Effectors (PACE) technology for improved performance of wind turbines. The PACE system is aimed towards the design of "smart" rotor blades to enhance energy capture and reduce aerodynamic loading and noise using flow-control. The PACE system will provide ability to change aerodynamic loads and pitch distribution across the wind turbine blade without any moving surfaces. Additional benefits of the PACE system include reduced blade structure weight and complexity that should translate into a substantially reduced initial cost. During the Phase I program, the ORI-UND Team demonstrated (proof-of-concept) performance improvements on select rotor blade designs using PACE concepts. Control of both 2-D and 3-D flows were demonstrated. An analytical study was conducted to estimate control requirements for the PACE system to maintain control during wind gusts. Finally, independent laboratory experiments were conducted to identify promising dielectric materials for the plasma actuator, and to examine environmental effects (water and dust) on the plasma actuator operation. The proposed PACE system will be capable of capturing additional energy, and reducing aerodynamic loading and noise on wind turbines. Supplementary benefits from the PACE system include reduced blade structure weight and complexity that translates into reduced initial capital costs.

  2. Finding the Force -- Consistent Particle Seeding for Satellite Aerodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Parham, J Brent

    2013-01-01

    When calculating satellite trajectories in low-earth orbit, engineers need to adequately estimate aerodynamic forces. But to this day, obtaining the drag acting on the complicated shapes of modern spacecraft suffers from many sources of error. While part of the problem is the uncertain density in the upper atmosphere, this works focuses on improving the modeling of interacting rarified gases and satellite surfaces. The only numerical approach that currently captures effects in this flow regime---like self-shadowing and multiple molecular reflections---is known as test-particle Monte Carlo. This method executes a ray-tracing algorithm to follow particles that pass through a control volume containing the spacecraft and accumulates the momentum transfer to the body surfaces. Statistical fluctuations inherent in the approach demand particle numbers in the order of millions, often making this scheme too costly to be practical. This work presents a parallel test-particle Monte Carlo method that takes advantage of b...

  3. EFFECTIVE DIFFUSION AND EFFECTIVE DRAG COEFFICIENT OF A BROWNIAN PARTICLE IN A PERIODIC POTENTIAL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongyun Wang

    2011-01-01

    We study the stochastic motion of a Brownian particle driven by a constant force over a static periodic potential.We show that both the effective diffusion and the effective drag coefficient are mathematically well-defined and we derive analytic expressions for these two quantities.We then investigate the asymptotic behaviors of the effective diffusion and the effective drag coefficient,respectively,for small driving force and for large driving force.In the case of small driving force,the effective diffusion is reduced from its Brownian value by a factor that increases exponentially with the amplitude of the potential.The effective drag coefficient is increased by approximately the same factor.As a result,the Einstein relation between the diffusion coefficient and the drag coefficient is approximately valid when the driving force is small.For moderately large driving force,both the effective diffusion and the effective drag coefficient are increased from their Brownian values,and the Einstein relation breaks down. In the limit of very large driving force,both the effective diffusion and the effective drag coefficient converge to their Brownian values and the Einstein relation is once again valid.

  4. Comparing aerodynamic efficiency in birds and bats suggests better flight performance in birds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian T Muijres

    Full Text Available Flight is one of the energetically most costly activities in the animal kingdom, suggesting that natural selection should work to optimize flight performance. The similar size and flight speed of birds and bats may therefore suggest convergent aerodynamic performance; alternatively, flight performance could be restricted by phylogenetic constraints. We test which of these scenarios fit to two measures of aerodynamic flight efficiency in two passerine bird species and two New World leaf-nosed bat species. Using time-resolved particle image velocimetry measurements of the wake of the animals flying in a wind tunnel, we derived the span efficiency, a metric for the efficiency of generating lift, and the lift-to-drag ratio, a metric for mechanical energetic flight efficiency. We show that the birds significantly outperform the bats in both metrics, which we ascribe to variation in aerodynamic function of body and wing upstroke: Bird bodies generated relatively more lift than bat bodies, resulting in a more uniform spanwise lift distribution and higher span efficiency. A likely explanation would be that the bat ears and nose leaf, associated with echolocation, disturb the flow over the body. During the upstroke, the birds retract their wings to make them aerodynamically inactive, while the membranous bat wings generate thrust and negative lift. Despite the differences in performance, the wake morphology of both birds and bats resemble the optimal wake for their respective lift-to-drag ratio regimes. This suggests that evolution has optimized performance relative to the respective conditions of birds and bats, but that maximum performance is possibly limited by phylogenetic constraints. Although ecological differences between birds and bats are subjected to many conspiring variables, the different aerodynamic flight efficiency for the bird and bat species studied here may help explain why birds typically fly faster, migrate more frequently and migrate

  5. Comparing aerodynamic efficiency in birds and bats suggests better flight performance in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muijres, Florian T; Johansson, L Christoffer; Bowlin, Melissa S; Winter, York; Hedenström, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Flight is one of the energetically most costly activities in the animal kingdom, suggesting that natural selection should work to optimize flight performance. The similar size and flight speed of birds and bats may therefore suggest convergent aerodynamic performance; alternatively, flight performance could be restricted by phylogenetic constraints. We test which of these scenarios fit to two measures of aerodynamic flight efficiency in two passerine bird species and two New World leaf-nosed bat species. Using time-resolved particle image velocimetry measurements of the wake of the animals flying in a wind tunnel, we derived the span efficiency, a metric for the efficiency of generating lift, and the lift-to-drag ratio, a metric for mechanical energetic flight efficiency. We show that the birds significantly outperform the bats in both metrics, which we ascribe to variation in aerodynamic function of body and wing upstroke: Bird bodies generated relatively more lift than bat bodies, resulting in a more uniform spanwise lift distribution and higher span efficiency. A likely explanation would be that the bat ears and nose leaf, associated with echolocation, disturb the flow over the body. During the upstroke, the birds retract their wings to make them aerodynamically inactive, while the membranous bat wings generate thrust and negative lift. Despite the differences in performance, the wake morphology of both birds and bats resemble the optimal wake for their respective lift-to-drag ratio regimes. This suggests that evolution has optimized performance relative to the respective conditions of birds and bats, but that maximum performance is possibly limited by phylogenetic constraints. Although ecological differences between birds and bats are subjected to many conspiring variables, the different aerodynamic flight efficiency for the bird and bat species studied here may help explain why birds typically fly faster, migrate more frequently and migrate longer distances

  6. Aerodynamic noise emission from turbulent shear layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pao, S. P.

    1973-01-01

    The Phillips (1960) convected wave equation is employed in this paper to study aerodynamic noise emission processes in subsonic and supersonic shear layers. The wave equation in three spatial dimensions is first reduced to an ordinary differential equation by Fourier transformation and then solved via the WKBJ method. Three typical solutions are required for discussions in this paper. The current results are different from the classical conclusions. The effects of refraction, convection, Mach-number dependence and temperature dependence of turbulent noise emission are analyzed in the light of solutions to the Phillips equation.

  7. A new technique for investigating the induced and profile drag coefficients of a smooth wing and a tubercled wing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolzon Michael

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The induced and profile drag coefficients of a wing are typically determined through a complex experimental technique, such as wake surveying. Such a technique requires measurement of all three orthogonal components of the downstream velocity to find the components of drag, which results in the necessary usage of a sophisticated and costly measurement device, such as multi-hole pressure probe. However, in this paper data is presented which demonstrate that the relative changes in the induced and profile drag coefficients can largely be determined through the sole measurement of the downstream, streamwise velocity. To demonstrate this, the induced and profile drags of two NACA 0021 wings, one with a smooth leading edge and the other wing a tubercled leading edge for comparison, are determined through the measurement of the three orthogonal velocities. The downstream, streamwise velocity distribution of each wing is then constructed and relationships can be determined. The wings were surveyed at 3°, 9°, and 12°. It has been found that the relative magnitude of the profile drag coefficient can be found for all considered angles of attack, while the relative magnitude of the induced drag coefficient can be found at 9° and 12°. These findings produce an innovative, simpler, and more cost effective experimental technique in determining the components of drag of a wing, and reduces the burdensome requirement of a sophisticated measurement device for such an experiment. Further investigation is required to determine the induced drag at 3°.

  8. Discrete vortex method simulations of aerodynamic admittance in bridge aerodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Johannes Tophøj; Hejlesen, Mads Mølholm; Larsen, Allan

    , and to determine aerodynamic forces and the corresponding flutter limit. A simulation of the three-dimensional bridge responseto turbulent wind is carried out by quasi steady theory by modelling the bridge girder as a line like structure [2], applying the aerodynamic load coefficients found from the current version...... of DVMFLOW in a strip wise fashion. Neglecting the aerodynamic admittance, i.e. the correlation of the instantaneous lift force to the turbulent fluctuations in the vertical velocities, leads to higher response to high frequency atmospheric turbulence than would be obtained from wind tunnel tests....... In the present work we have extended the laminar oncoming flow in DVMFLOW to a turbulent one, modelled by seeding the upstream flow with vortex particles synthesized from prescribed atmospheric turbulence velocity spectra [3] . The discrete spectrum is sampled from the continuous spectrum subject to a lower cutoff...

  9. The influence of the wake of a flapping wing on the production of aerodynamic forces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianghao Wu; Mao Sun; Xing Zhang

    2005-01-01

    The effect of the wake of previous strokes on the aerodynamic forces of a flapping model insect wing is studied using the method of computational fluid dynamics. The wake effect is isolated by comparing the forces and flows of the starting stroke (when the wake has not developed) with those of a later stroke (when the wake has developed). The following has been shown. (1) The wake effect may increase or decrease the lift and drag at the beginning of a half-stroke (downstroke or upstroke), depending on the wing kinematics at stroke reversal. The reason for this is that at the beginning of the half-stroke, the wing "impinges" on the spanwise vorticity generated by the wing during stroke reversal and the distribution of the vorticity is sensitive to the wing kinematics at stroke reversal. (2) The wake effect decreases the lift and increases the drag in the rest part of the half-stroke. This is because the wing moves in a downwash field induced by previous half-stroke's starting vortex, tip vortices and attached leading edge vortex (these vortices form a downwash producing vortex ring). (3) The wake effect decreases the mean lift by 6%-18% (depending on wing kinematics at stroke reversal) and slightly increases the mean drag. Therefore, it is detrimental to the aerodynamic performance of the flapping wing.

  10. Optimized aerodynamic design process for subsonic transport wing fitted with winglets. [wind tunnel model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlman, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    The aerodynamic design of a wind-tunnel model of a wing representative of that of a subsonic jet transport aircraft, fitted with winglets, was performed using two recently developed optimal wing-design computer programs. Both potential flow codes use a vortex lattice representation of the near-field of the aerodynamic surfaces for determination of the required mean camber surfaces for minimum induced drag, and both codes use far-field induced drag minimization procedures to obtain the required spanloads. One code uses a discrete vortex wake model for this far-field drag computation, while the second uses a 2-D advanced panel wake model. Wing camber shapes for the two codes are very similar, but the resulting winglet camber shapes differ widely. Design techniques and considerations for these two wind-tunnel models are detailed, including a description of the necessary modifications of the design geometry to format it for use by a numerically controlled machine for the actual model construction.

  11. Benchmarking aerodynamic prediction of unsteady rotor aerodynamics of active flaps on wind turbine blades using ranging fidelity tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlas, Thanasis; Jost, Eva; Pirrung, Georg; Tsiantas, Theofanis; Riziotis, Vasilis; Navalkar, Sachin T.; Lutz, Thorsten; van Wingerden, Jan-Willem

    2016-09-01

    Simulations of a stiff rotor configuration of the DTU 10MW Reference Wind Turbine are performed in order to assess the impact of prescribed flap motion on the aerodynamic loads on a blade sectional and rotor integral level. Results of the engineering models used by DTU (HAWC2), TUDelft (Bladed) and NTUA (hGAST) are compared to the CFD predictions of USTUTT-IAG (FLOWer). Results show fairly good comparison in terms of axial loading, while alignment of tangential and drag-related forces across the numerical codes needs to be improved, together with unsteady corrections associated with rotor wake dynamics. The use of a new wake model in HAWC2 shows considerable accuracy improvements.

  12. Balancing acts: drag queens, gender and faith.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan-Blum, Constance R

    2004-01-01

    While engaged in research on the same-sex marriage debate in mainline denominations, I interviewed 23 LGBT Christians, four of whom were drag queens. While it is not possible to generalize from such a small sample, the drag queens in this study insist on maintaining their identity as Christians despite the hegemonic discourse that renders faith and LGBT identities mutually exclusive. They developed innovative approaches to reconciling their gender and sexual identities with their spirituality. Their innovations are potentially liberating not just for them personally, but for LGBT people generally because they challenge Christianity's rigid dichotomies of gender and sexuality.

  13. Modeling the Aerodynamics and Performances of a Historic Airplane: the Spanish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. González-Betes

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The process of modeling the aerodynamics and performances of a historic airplane is very similar to the conceptual and preliminary design phases of a new plane, with the advantage of knowing the configuration and that the airplane was airworthy; thus it is unnecessary to outline and assess many different alternatives. However, the drag polar, the real performances, stability features, etc, are still unknown. For various reasons (in particular because of two World Wars, or the Civil War in the Spanish case most details of many historical airplanes have been lost.In the present research work, the situation is as follows. In June 1933 the "Cuatro Vientos", a Spanish-built Bréguet XIX Super TR, flew non-stop from Seville to Cuba; a distance of 7500 km (about 4100 nautical miles in around 40 hours. A few days later, in a far less complicated stage between Havana and Mexico, the airplane was lost with its occupants to a storm in the Yucatan peninsula.The modeling considered in this paper starts by addressing the aerodynamic modifications introduced in the airplane for the extremely long flight. Then, with the help of old and present day aerodynamic data and methods the drag polar is estimated. The available engine data is completed and extrapolated to obtain information on power and fuel consumption. Finally, all this data is integrated to provide a reliable and technically sound reproduction of the Seville-Cuba flight.

  14. Aerodynamic mechanism of forces generated by twisting model-wing in bat flapping flight

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    管子武; 余永亮

    2014-01-01

    The aerodynamic mechanism of the bat wing membrane along the lateral border of its body is studied. The twist-morphing that alters the angle of attack (AOA) along the span-wise direction is observed widely during bat flapping flight. An assumption is made that the linearly distributed AOA is along the span-wise direction. The plate with the aspect ratio of 3 is used to model a bat wing. A three-dimensional (3D) unsteady panel method is used to predict the aerodynamic forces generated by the flapping plate with leading edge separation. It is found that, relative to the rigid wing flapping, twisting motion can increase the averaged lift by as much as 25% and produce thrust instead of drag. Furthermore, the aerodynamic forces (lift/drag) generated by a twisting plate-wing are similar to those of a pitching rigid-wing, meaning that the twisting in bat flight has the same function as the supination/pronation motion in insect flight.

  15. Variable-complexity aerodynamic optimization of an HSCT wing using structural wing-weight equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, M. G.; Unger, E. R.; Mason, W. H.; Grossman, B.; Haftka, R. T.

    1992-01-01

    A new approach for combining conceptual and preliminary design techniques for wing optimization is presented for the high-speed civil transport (HSCT). A wing-shape parametrization procedure is developed which allows the linking of planform and airfoil design variables. Variable-complexity design strategies are used to combine conceptual and preliminary-design approaches, both to preserve interdisciplinary design influences and to reduce computational expense. In the study, conceptual-design-level algebraic equations are used to estimate aircraft weight, supersonic wave drag, friction drag and drag due to lift. The drag due to lift and wave drag are also evaluated using more detailed, preliminary-design-level techniques. The methodology is applied to the minimization of the gross weight of an HSCT that flies at Mach 3.0 with a range of 6500 miles.

  16. Aerodynamic effects of simulated ice shapes on two-dimensional airfoils and a swept finite tail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alansatan, Sait

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate the effect of simulated glaze ice shapes on the aerodynamic performance characteristics of two-dimensional airfoils and a swept finite tail. The two dimensional tests involved two NACA 0011 airfoils with chords of 24 and 12 inches. Glaze ice shapes computed with the LEWICE code that were representative of 22.5-min and 45-min ice accretions were simulated with spoilers, which were sized to approximate the horn heights of the LEWICE ice shapes. Lift, drag, pitching moment, and surface pressure coefficients were obtained for a range of test conditions. Test variables included Reynolds number, geometric scaling, control deflection and the key glaze ice features, which were horn height, horn angle, and horn location. For the three-dimensional tests, a 25%-scale business jet empennage (BJE) with a T-tail configuration was used to study the effect of ice shapes on the aerodynamic performance of a swept horizontal tail. Simulated glaze ice shapes included the LEWICE and spoiler ice shapes to represent 9-min and 22.5-min ice accretions. Additional test variables included Reynolds number and elevator deflection. Lift, drag, hinge moment coefficients as well as boundary layer velocity profiles were obtained. The experimental results showed substantial degradation in aerodynamic performance of the airfoils and the swept horizontal tail due to the simulated ice shapes. For the two-dimensional airfoils, the largest aerodynamic penalties were obtained when the 3-in spoiler-ice, which was representative of 45-min glaze ice accretions, was set normal to the chord. Scale and Reynolds effects were not significant for lift and drag. However, pitching moments and pressure distributions showed great sensitivity to Reynolds number and geometric scaling. For the threedimensional study with the swept finite tail, the 22.5-min ice shapes resulted in greater aerodynamic performance degradation than the 9-min ice shapes. The addition of 24

  17. Fundamentals of modern unsteady aerodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Gülçat, Ülgen

    2016-01-01

    In this book, the author introduces the concept of unsteady aerodynamics and its underlying principles. He provides the readers with a comprehensive review of the fundamental physics of free and forced unsteadiness, the terminology and basic equations of aerodynamics ranging from incompressible flow to hypersonics. The book also covers modern topics related to the developments made in recent years, especially in relation to wing flapping for propulsion. The book is written for graduate and senior year undergraduate students in aerodynamics and also serves as a reference for experienced researchers. Each chapter includes ample examples, questions, problems and relevant references.   The treatment of these modern topics has been completely revised end expanded for the new edition. It now includes new numerical examples, a section on the ground effect, and state-space representation.

  18. Aerodynamics in the classroom and at the ball park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Rod

    2012-04-01

    Experiments suitable for classroom projects or demonstrations are described concerning the aerodynamics of polystyrene balls. A light ball with sufficient backspin can curve vertically upward through the air, defying gravity and providing a dramatic visual demonstration of the Magnus effect. A ball projected with backspin can also curve downward with a vertical acceleration greater than that due to gravity if the Magnus force is negative. These effects were investigated by filming the flight of balls projected in an approximately horizontal direction so that the lift and drag forces could be easily measured. The balls were also fitted with artificial raised seams and projected with backspin toward a vertical target in order to measure the sideways deflection over a known horizontal distance. It was found that (a) a ball with a seam on one side can deflect either left or right depending on its launch speed and (b) a ball with a baseball seam can also deflect sideways even when there is no sideways component of the drag or lift forces acting on the ball. Depending on the orientations of the seam and the spin axis, a sideways force on a baseball can arise either if there is rough patch on one side of the ball or if there is a smooth patch. A scuff ball with a rough patch on one side is illegal in baseball. The effect of a smooth patch is a surprising new observation.

  19. Advancements in adaptive aerodynamic technologies for airfoils and wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jepson, Jeffrey Keith

    Although aircraft operate over a wide range of flight conditions, current fixed-geometry aircraft are optimized for only a few of these conditions. By altering the shape of the aircraft, adaptive aerodynamics can be used to increase the safety and performance of an aircraft by tailoring the aircraft for multiple flight conditions. Of the various shape adaptation concepts currently being studied, the use of multiple trailing-edge flaps along the span of a wing offers a relatively high possibility of being incorporated on aircraft in the near future. Multiple trailing-edge flaps allow for effective spanwise camber adaptation with resulting drag benefits over a large speed range and load alleviation at high-g conditions. The research presented in this dissertation focuses on the development of this concept of using trailing-edge flaps to tailor an aircraft for multiple flight conditions. One of the major tasks involved in implementing trailing-edge flaps is in designing the airfoil to incorporate the flap. The first part of this dissertation presents a design formulation that incorporates aircraft performance considerations in the inverse design of low-speed laminar-flow adaptive airfoils with trailing-edge cruise flaps. The benefit of using adaptive airfoils is that the size of the low-drag region of the drag polar can be effectively increased without increasing the maximum thickness of the airfoil. Two aircraft performance parameters are considered: level-flight maximum speed and maximum range. It is shown that the lift coefficients for the lower and upper corners of the airfoil low-drag range can be appropriately adjusted to tailor the airfoil for these two aircraft performance parameters. The design problem is posed as a part of a multidimensional Newton iteration in an existing conformal-mapping based inverse design code, PROFOIL. This formulation automatically adjusts the lift coefficients for the corners of the low-drag range for a given flap deflection as

  20. Turbulent Drag Reduction: Studies of Feedback Control and Flow Over Riblets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Haecheon

    reduced in drag-reducing configurations. Instantaneous flow fields near the riblets are investigated in detail and a physical explanation for the observed drag reduction is proposed.

  1. The effect of foam on waves and the aerodynamic roughness of the water surface at high winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Vdovin, Maxim; Sergeev, Daniil; Kandaurov, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    Air-sea coupling at extreme winds is of special interest now in connection with the problem of explanation of the sea surface drag saturation at the wind speed exceeding 30 m/s. The idea on saturation (and even reduction) of the coefficient of aerodynamic resistance of the sea surface at hurricane wind speed first suggested in [1] on the basis of theoretical analysis of sensitivity of maximum wind speed in a hurricane to the ratio of the enthalpy and momentum exchange coefficients was then confirmed by a number of field (e.g.[2]) and laboratory [3] experiments, which showed that the sea surface drag coefficient was significantly reduced in comparison with the parameterization obtained at moderate to strong wind conditions. The theoretical explanations of the effect of the sea surface drag reduction exploit either peculiarities of the air flow over breaking waves (e.g.[4,5]) or the effect of sea drops and spray on the wind-wave momentum exchange (e.g. [6,7]). Recently an alternative hypothesis was suggested in [8], where the surface drag reduction in hurricanes was explained by the influence of foam covering sea surface on its aerodynamic roughness. This paper describes a series of laboratory experiments in Thermostratified Wind-Wave Tank (TSWiWaT) of IAP directed to investigation of the foam impact on the short-wave part of the surface waves and the momentum exchange in the atmospheric boundary layer at high winds in the range of equivalent 10-m wind speed from 12 to 38 m/s. A special foam generator was designed for these experiments. The air flow parameters were retrieved from measurements of the velocity profiles. The frequency-wavenumber spectra of surface waves were retrieved from the measurements of water surface elevation by the array 3-channel wave gauge. Foam coverage of water surface was controlled by video filming of the water surface. The results of measurements were compared with predictions of the quasi-linear model of atmospheric boundary layer over

  2. The aerodynamics of wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming; Troldborg, Niels

    2013-01-01

    In the paper we present state-of-the-art of research in wind turbine aerodynamics. We start be giving a brief historical review and a survey over aerodynamic research in wind energy. Next, we focus on some recent research results obtained by our wind energy group at Department of Mechanical...... Engineering at DTU. In particular, we show some new results on the classical problem of the ideal rotor and present a series of new results from an on-going research project dealing with the modelling and simulation of turbulent flow structures in the wake behind wind turbines....

  3. Rotor/body aerodynamic interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betzina, M. D.; Smith, C. A.; Shinoda, P.

    1985-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation was conducted in which independent, steady state aerodynamic forces and moments were measured on a 2.24 m diam. two bladed helicopter rotor and on several different bodies. The mutual interaction effects for variations in velocity, thrust, tip-path-plane angle of attack, body angle of attack, rotor/body position, and body geometry were determined. The results show that the body longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics are significantly affected by the presence of a rotor and hub, and that the hub interference may be a major part of such interaction. The effects of the body on the rotor performance are presented.

  4. Engineering models in wind energy aerodynamics: Development, implementation and analysis using dedicated aerodynamic measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, J.G.

    2012-01-01

    The subject of aerodynamics is of major importance for the successful deployment of wind energy. As a matter of fact there are two aerodynamic areas in the wind energy technology: Rotor aerodynamics and wind farm aerodynamics. The first subject considers the flow around the rotor and the second

  5. Engineering models in wind energy aerodynamics: Development, implementation and analysis using dedicated aerodynamic measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, J.G.

    2012-01-01

    The subject of aerodynamics is of major importance for the successful deployment of wind energy. As a matter of fact there are two aerodynamic areas in the wind energy technology: Rotor aerodynamics and wind farm aerodynamics. The first subject considers the flow around the rotor and the second subj

  6. Experimental investigation of drag reduction by forward facing high speed gas jet for a large angle blunt cone at Mach 8

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Balla Venukumar; K P J Reddy

    2007-02-01

    Substantial aerodynamic drag, while flying at hypersonic Mach number, due to the presence of strong standing shock wave ahead of a large-angle bluntcone configuration, is a matter of great design concern. Preliminary experimental results for the drag reduction by a forward-facing supersonic air jet for a 60° apex-angle blunt cone at a flow Mach number of 8 are presented in this paper. The measurements are carried out using an accelerometer-based balance system in the hypersonic shock tunnel HST2 of the Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore. About 29% reduction in the drag coefficient has been observed with the injection of a supersonic gas jet.

  7. Unsteady aerodynamics of membrane wings with adaptive compliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiser, Jillian; Breuer, Kenneth

    2016-11-01

    Membrane wings are known to provide superior aerodynamic performance at low Reynolds numbers (Re =104 -105), primarily due to passive shape adaptation to flow conditions. In addition to this passive deformation, active control of the fluid-structure interaction and resultant aerodynamic properties can be achieved through the use of dielectric elastomer actuators as the wing membrane material. When actuated, membrane pretension is decreased and wing camber increases. Additionally, actuation at resonance frequencies allows additional control over wing camber. We present results using synchronized (i) time-resolved particle image velocimetry (PIV) to resolve the flow field, (ii) 3D direct linear transformation (DLT) to recover membrane shape, (iii) lift/drag/torque measurements and (iv) near-wake hot wire anemometry measurements to characterize the fluid-structure interactions. Particular attention is paid to cases in which the vortex shedding frequency, the membrane resonance, and the actuation frequency coincide. In quantitatively examining both flow field and membrane shape at a range of actuation frequencies and vortex shedding frequencies, this work seeks to find actuation parameters that allow for active control of boundary layer separation over a range of flow conditions. Also at Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Division Newport.

  8. Aerodynamic control in compressible flow using microwave driven discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAndrew, Brendan

    A new aerodynamic control scheme based on heating of the free stream flow is developed. The design, construction, and operation of a unique small scale wind tunnel to perform experiments involving this control scheme is detailed. Free stream heating is achieved by means of microwave driven discharges, and the resulting flow perturbations are used to alter the pressure distribution around a model in the flow. The experimental facility is also designed to allow the injection of an electron beam into the free stream for control of the discharge. Appropriate models for the fluid flow and discharge physics are developed, and comparisons of calculations based on those models are made with experimental results. The calculations have also been used to explore trends in parameters beyond the range possible in the experiments. The results of this work have been (1) the development of an operating facility capable of supporting free stream heat addition experiments in supersonic flow, (2) the development of a compatible instrumented model designed to make lift and drag measurements in a low pressure, high electrical noise environment, (3) a theoretical model to predict the change in breakdown threshold in the presence of an electron beam or other source of ionization, and (4) successful demonstration of aerodynamic control using free stream heat addition.

  9. Advanced Aerodynamic Technologies for Future Green Regional Aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalin NAE

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Future Green Regional Aircraft (GRA will operate over airports located in the neighborhood of densely populated areas, with high frequency of takeoff/ landing events and, hence, strongly contribute to community noise and gaseous emissions. These issues currently limit further growth of traffic operated by regional airliners which, in the next future, will have to face even more stringent environmental normative worldwide and therefore re-designed to incorporate advanced active aerodynamic technologies. The new concept behind GRA is based on several mainstream technologies: airframe low-noise (LN, aerodynamic load control (LC and load alleviation (LA. These technologies integrate relevant concepts for hybrid and natural laminar flow (HLC/NLF wing, active control of wing movables and aeroelastic tailoring for LC/LA functions, passive means (micro-riblets for turbulent flow drag reduction, innovative gapless architectures (droop nose, morphing flap beside conventional high-lift devices (HLDs, active flow control through synthetic jets, low-noise solutions applied to HLDs (liners, fences, and to fuselage-mounted main and nose landing gears (bay/doors acoustic treatments, fairings, wheels hub cap. The paper deals with the technological readiness level (TRL assessment of the most promising technologies and overall integration in the new generation of GRA, as a highly optimized configuration able to meet requirements for FlighPath 2050.

  10. Effect of flapping trajectories on the dragonfly aerodynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The effects of translational, figure-eight and double-figure-eight flapping trajectories on the dragonfly aerodynamics were numerically studied by solving the Navier-Stokes equations. There is a common characteristic regarding the lift/drag force coefficients that the downstroke flapping provides the lift forces while the upstroke flapping creates the thrust forces for different flapping trajectories. The maximum lift force coefficient exceeds five for the translational trajectory. It is greater than six for the figure-eight and double-figure-eight flapping trajectories, which is sufficiently larger than unity under the steady state flight condition. The ellipse and double-figure-eight flapping trajectories yield the decrease of the lift force, while the figure-eight flapping trajectory yields higher lift force as well as the thrust force than the translational flapping one. During the insect flight, the wing flapping status should be changed instantaneously to satisfy various requirements. Study of the flapping trajectories on the insect aerodynamics is helpful for the design of the Micro-air-vehicles (MAVs).

  11. Drag force and transport property of a small cylinder in free molecule flow: A gas-kinetic theory analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Changran; Li, Zhigang; Wang, Hai

    2016-08-01

    Analytical expressions are derived for aerodynamic drag force on small cylinders in the free molecule flow using the gas-kinetic theory. The derivation considers the effect of intermolecular interactions between the cylinder and gas media. Two limiting collision models, specular and diffuse scattering, are investigated in two limiting cylinder orientations with respect to the drift velocity. The earlier solution of Dahneke [B. E. Dahneke, J. Aerosol Sci. 4, 147 (1973), 10.1016/0021-8502(73)90066-9] is shown to be a special case of the current expressions in the rigid-body limit of collision. Drag force expressions are obtained for cylinders that undergo Brownian rotation and for those that align with the drift velocity. The validity of the theoretical expressions is tested against experimental mobility data available for carbon nanotubes.

  12. Judicial civil procedure dragging out in Kosovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rrustem Qehaja

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This article tends to deal with one of the most worrying issues in the judicial system of Kosovo the problem of judicial civil procedure dragging out. The article analyses the reasons of these dragging outs of the judicial civil procedure focusing on the context of one of the basic procedural principles in civil procedure-the principle of economy or efficiency in the courts. Dragging out of civil procedure in Kosovo has put in question not only the basic principles of civil procedure, but it also challenges the general principles related to human rights and freedoms sanctioned not only by the highest legal act of the country, but also with international treaties. The article tends to give a reflection to the most important reasons that effect and influence in these dragging outs of civil procedure, as well as, at the same time aims to give the necessary alternatives to pass through them by identifying dilemmas within the judicial practice. As a result, the motives of this scientific paper are exactly focused at the same time on identifying the dilemmas, as well as presenting ideas, to overstep them, including the judicial practice of the European Court of Human Rights on Article 6 of the European Convention on Human Rights, by which it is given the possibility to offering people efficient and within a reasonable time legal protection of their rights before national courts. For these reasons, the paper elaborates this issue based on both, the legal theory and judicial practice.

  13. ABM Drag_Pass Report Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Forest; Gladden, Roy; Khanampornpan, Teerapat

    2008-01-01

    dragREPORT software was developed in parallel with abmREPORT, which is described in the preceding article. Both programs were built on the capabilities created during that process. This tool generates a drag_pass report that summarizes vital information from the MRO aerobreaking drag_pass build process to facilitate both sequence reviews and provide a high-level summarization of the sequence for mission management. The script extracts information from the ENV, SSF, FRF, SCMFmax, and OPTG files, presenting them in a single, easy-to-check report providing the majority of parameters needed for cross check and verification as part of the sequence review process. Prior to dragReport, all the needed information was spread across a number of different files, each in a different format. This software is a Perl script that extracts vital summarization information and build-process details from a number of source files into a single, concise report format used to aid the MPST sequence review process and to provide a high-level summarization of the sequence for mission management reference. This software could be adapted for future aerobraking missions to provide similar reports, review and summarization information.

  14. Predicting the Arrival Time of Coronal Mass Ejections with the Graduated Cylindrical Shell and Drag Force Model

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Tong; Wan, Linfeng; Cheng, Xin; Ding, Mingde; Zhang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Accurately predicting the arrival of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) at the Earth based on remote images is of critical significance in the study of space weather. In this paper, we make a statistical study of 21 Earth directed CMEs, exploring in particular the relationship between CME initial speeds and transit times. The initial speed of a CME is obtained by fitting the CME with the Graduated Cylindrical Shell model and is thus free of projection effects. We then use the drag force model to fit results of the transit time versus the initial speed. By adopting different drag regimes, i.e., the viscous, aerodynamics, and hybrid regimes, we get similar results, with the least mean estimation error of the hybrid model of 12.9 hours. CMEs with a propagation angle (the angle between the propagation direction and the Sun-Earth line) larger than its half angular width arrive at the Earth with an angular deviation caused by factors other than the radial solar wind drag. The drag force model cannot be well applied to s...

  15. The drag and terminal velocity of volcanic ash and lapilli with 3D shape obtained by X-ray microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dioguardi, Fabio; Mele, Daniela; Dellino, Pierfrancesco; Dürig, Tobias

    2017-04-01

    New experiments of falling volcanic particles were performed in order to define drag and terminal velocity models applicable in a wide range of Reynolds number Re. Experiments were carried out with fluids of various viscosities and with particles that cover a wide range of size, density and shape. Particle shape, which strongly influences fluid drag, was measured in 3D by High-resolution X-ray microtomography, by which sphericity and fractal dimension were obtained, the latter used for quantifying the aerodynamic drag of irregular particles for the first time. With this method, the measure of particle shape descriptors proved to be easier and less operator dependent than previously used 2D image particle analyses. Drag laws that make use of the new 3D parameters were obtained by fitting particle data to the experiments, and single-equation terminal velocity models were derived. They work well both at high and low Re (3x10-2 scientists to model particle transportation of explosive eruptions. Some volcanological application examples are finally presented.

  16. 曲面形栅格翼气动特性研究%Investigation of aerodynamic characteristics on circular-arc grid-fin configurations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李永红; 黄勇; 陈建中; 苏继川

    2016-01-01

    In order to reduce flow choking and the corresponding high drag force,an im-proved circular-arc grid-fin configuration is proposed in the present study.Compared to the con-ventional grid-fin configuration,the circular-arc layout decreases the length of the fin cell as to reduce the flow choking.Meanwhile,the circular-arc grid fins can be conveniently folded against the body so as to make them easier to store and transport.Viscous computational fluid dynamic simulations were performed to investigate flows over single grid fin.Comparisons of drag coeffi-cients between circular-arc and sweptback grid fins indicate that both configurations have signifi-cant drag reduction under subsonic、transonic and supersonic than baseline grid fin configuration. However,when the flow velocity is above the third critical Mach number,the drag reduction of circular-arc grid fin is higher than that of sweptback grid fin.Through aerodynamic analysis of two different windward forms of circular-arc grid fins,it is clear that before the third critical Mach number,the lift coefficient of the convex plane windward model is much greater than the concave plane windward model (approximately 30%)and the baseline model,after the third criti-cal Mach number the lift coefficient of the convex plane windward model and the baseline model tend to be consistent,while the concave plane windward model has a greater lift coefficient.%与常规栅格翼布局相比,曲面形栅格翼布局减小了栅格翼翼元的等固壁通道的长度,从而有效降低了翼元内气流的壅塞,另外,这种栅格翼布局结构简单,易于折叠,减小了飞行器的轮廓尺寸,具有很好的工程应用前景。本文通过数值模拟方法,在亚、跨、超声速条件下,研究了曲面形栅格翼布局的减阻效果和减阻机理,对比了曲面形栅格翼和常规后掠形栅格翼布局的减阻效果,并对不同迎风方式的曲面形栅格翼气动特性进行了分析。

  17. Unsteady aerodynamics modeling for flight dynamics application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing; He, Kai-Feng; Qian, Wei-Qi; Zhang, Tian-Jiao; Cheng, Yan-Qing; Wu, Kai-Yuan

    2012-02-01

    In view of engineering application, it is practicable to decompose the aerodynamics into three components: the static aerodynamics, the aerodynamic increment due to steady rotations, and the aerodynamic increment due to unsteady separated and vortical flow. The first and the second components can be presented in conventional forms, while the third is described using a one-order differential equation and a radial-basis-function (RBF) network. For an aircraft configuration, the mathematical models of 6-component aerodynamic coefficients are set up from the wind tunnel test data of pitch, yaw, roll, and coupled yawroll large-amplitude oscillations. The flight dynamics of an aircraft is studied by the bifurcation analysis technique in the case of quasi-steady aerodynamics and unsteady aerodynamics, respectively. The results show that: (1) unsteady aerodynamics has no effect upon the existence of trim points, but affects their stability; (2) unsteady aerodynamics has great effects upon the existence, stability, and amplitudes of periodic solutions; and (3) unsteady aerodynamics changes the stable regions of trim points obviously. Furthermore, the dynamic responses of the aircraft to elevator deflections are inspected. It is shown that the unsteady aerodynamics is beneficial to dynamic stability for the present aircraft. Finally, the effects of unsteady aerodynamics on the post-stall maneuverability are analyzed by numerical simulation.

  18. Unsteady aerodynamics modeling for flight dynamics application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing Wang; Kai-Feng He; Wei-Qi Qian; Tian-Jiao Zhang; Yan-Qing Cheng; Kai-Yuan Wu

    2012-01-01

    In view of engineering application,it is practicable to decompose the aerodynamics into three components:the static aerodynamics,the aerodynamic increment due to steady rotations,and the aerodynamic increment due to unsteady separated and vortical flow.The first and the second components can be presented in conventional forms,while the third is described using a one-order differential equation and a radial-basis-function (RBF) network. For an aircraft configuration,the mathematical models of 6-component aerodynamic coefficients are set up from the wind tunnel test data of pitch,yaw,roll,and coupled yawroll large-amplitude oscillations.The flight dynamics of an aircraft is studied by the bifurcation analysis technique in the case of quasi-steady aerodynamics and unsteady aerodynamics,respectively.The results show that:(1) unsteady aerodynamics has no effect upon the existence of trim points,but affects their stability; (2) unsteady aerodynamics has great effects upon the existence,stability,and amplitudes of periodic solutions; and (3) unsteady aerodynamics changes the stable regions of trim points obviously.Furthermore,the dynamic responses of the aircraft to elevator deflections are inspected.It is shown that the unsteady aerodynamics is beneficial to dynamic stability for the present aircraft.Finally,the effects of unsteady aerodynamics on the post-stall maneuverability are analyzed by numerical simulation.

  19. Low Speed Aerodynamics of the X-38 CRV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komerath, N. M.; Funk, R.; Ames, R. G.; Mahalingam, R.; Matos, C.

    1998-01-01

    This project was performed in support of the engineering development of the NASA X-38 Crew Return Vehicle (CRV)system. Wind tunnel experiments were used to visualize various aerodynamic phenomena encountered by the CRV during the final stages of descent and landing. Scale models of the CRV were used to visualize vortex structures above and below the vehicle, and in its wake, and to quantify their trajectories. The effect of flaperon deflection on these structures was studied. The structure and dynamics of the CRV's wake during the drag parachute deployment stage were measured. Regions of high vorticity were identified using surveys conducted in several planes using a vortex meter. Periodic shedding of the vortex sheets from the sides of the CRV was observed using laser sheet videography as the CRV reached high angles of attack during the quasi-steady pitch-up prior to parafoil deployment. Using spectral analysis of hot-film anemometer data, the Strouhal number of these wake fluctuations was found to be 0.14 based on the model span. Phenomena encountered in flight test during parafoil operation were captured in scale-model tests, and a video photogrammetry technique was implemented to obtain parafoil surface shapes during flight in the tunnel. Forces on the parafoil were resolved using tension gages on individual lines. The temporal evolution of the phenomenon of leading edge collapse was captured. Laser velocimetry was used to demonstrate measurement of the porosity of the parafoil surface. From these measurements, several physical explanations have been developed for phenomena observed at various stages of the X-38 development program. Quantitative measurement capabilities have also been demonstrated for continued refinement of the aerodynamic technologies employed in the X-38 project. Detailed results from these studies are given in an AIAA Paper, two slide presentations, and other material which are given on a Web-based archival resource. This is the Digital

  20. Significance of relative velocity in drag force or drag power estimation for a tethered float

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vethamony, P.; Sastry, J.S.

    There is difference in opinion regarding the use of relative velocity instead of particle velocity alone in the estimation of drag force or power. In the present study, a tethered spherical float which undergoes oscillatory motion in regular waves...

  1. Reynolds-dependence of turbulent skin-friction drag reduction induced by spanwise forcing

    CERN Document Server

    Gatti, Davide

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines how increasing the value of the Reynolds number $Re$ affects the ability of spanwise-forcing techniques to yield turbulent skin-friction drag reduction. The control strategy is the streamwise-travelling waves of spanwise wall velocity (Quadrio {\\em et al. J. Fluid Mech.}, vol. 627, 2009, pp. 161--178). The study builds upon an extensive drag-reduction database created with Direct Numerical Simulation of a turbulent channel flow for two, 5-fold separated values of $Re$, namely $Re_\\tau=200$ and $Re_\\tau=1000$. The sheer size of the database, which for the first time systematically addresses the amplitude of the forcing, allows a comprehensive view of the drag-reducing characteristics of the traveling waves, and enables a detailed description of the changes occurring when $Re$ increases. The effect of using a viscous scaling based on the friction velocity of either the non-controlled flow or the drag-reduced flow is described. In analogy with other wall-based drag reduction techniques, like ...

  2. Computational and Experimental Investigation on Aerodynamic Characteristics of Terminally Sensitive Projectile with S-C Shaped Fins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Zhi-peng; LIU Rong-zhong; GUO Rui

    2012-01-01

    The design of terminally sensitive projectile scanning platform requires a better understanding of its aerodynamic characteristics.The terminally sensitive projectile with S-C fins has a complex aerodynamic shape,which is constructed with small length to diameter ratio cylindrical body on which two low aspect ratio fins are installed.The study focuses on the effect of fin aspect ratio on the aerodynamic characteristics.Simulation was carried on based on computational fluid dynamics(CFD) method,and the pressure distribution characteristic,drag coefficient,lift coefficient and rolling moment coefficient varying with attack angle were obtained.A free flying experimental investigation focused on the kinetic aerodynamics was made.The results show that the fins provide sufficient drag to balance the terminally sensitive projectile weight to keep it flying at low and stable speed.The lift coefficient has a negative linear varying with attack angle.The rolling moment decrease with the increase in attack angle and the decrease in wing span area.

  3. Application Program Interface for the Orion Aerodynamics Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Philip E.; Thompson, James

    2013-01-01

    input data files are in standard formatted ASCII, also for improved portability. The API contains its own implementation of multidimensional table reading and lookup routines. The same aerodynamics input file can be used without modification on all implementations. The turnaround time from aerodynamics model release to a working implementation is significantly reduced

  4. A hybrid original approach for prediction of the aerodynamic coefficients of an ATR-42 scaled wing model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abdallah; en Mosbah; Ruxandra Mihaela; otez; Thien My; ao

    2016-01-01

    A new approach for the prediction of lift, drag, and moment coefficients is presented. This approach is based on the support vector machines (SVMs) methodology and an optimization meta-heuristic algorithm called extended great deluge (EGD). The novelty of this approach is the hybridization between the SVM and the EGD algorithm. The EGD is used to optimize the SVM parameters. The training and validation of this new identification approach is realized using the aerodynamic coefficients of an ATR-42 wing model. The aerodynamic coefficients data are obtained with the XFoil software and experimental tests using the Price–Paıdoussis wind tunnel. The predicted results with our approach are compared with those from the XFoil software and experimental results for different flight cases of angles of attack and Mach numbers. The main pur-pose of this methodology is to rapidly predict aircraft aerodynamic coefficients.

  5. Lewis icing research tunnel test of the aerodynamic effects of aircraft ground deicing/anti-icing fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runyan, L. James; Zierten, Thomas A.; Hill, Eugene G.; Addy, Harold E., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation of the effect of aircraft ground deicing/anti-icing fluids on the aerodynamic characteristics of a Boeing 737-200ADV airplane was conducted. The test was carried out in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel. Fluids tested include a Newtonian deicing fluid, three non-Newtonian anti-icing fluids commercially available during or before 1988, and eight new experimental non-Newtonian fluids developed by four fluid manufacturers. The results show that fluids remain on the wind after liftoff and cause a measurable lift loss and drag increase. These effects are dependent on the high-lift configuration and on the temperature. For a configuration with a high-lift leading-edge device, the fluid effect is largest at the maximum lift condition. The fluid aerodynamic effects are related to the magnitude of the fluid surface roughness, particularly in the first 30 percent chord. The experimental fluids show a significant reduction in aerodynamic effects.

  6. A hybrid original approach for prediction of the aerodynamic coefficients of an ATR-42 scaled wing model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdallah Ben Mosbah

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A new approach for the prediction of lift, drag, and moment coefficients is presented. This approach is based on the support vector machines (SVMs methodology and an optimization meta-heuristic algorithm called extended great deluge (EGD. The novelty of this approach is the hybridization between the SVM and the EGD algorithm. The EGD is used to optimize the SVM parameters. The training and validation of this new identification approach is realized using the aerodynamic coefficients of an ATR-42 wing model. The aerodynamic coefficients data are obtained with the XFoil software and experimental tests using the Price–Païdoussis wind tunnel. The predicted results with our approach are compared with those from the XFoil software and experimental results for different flight cases of angles of attack and Mach numbers. The main purpose of this methodology is to rapidly predict aircraft aerodynamic coefficients.

  7. Nacelle drag reduction: An analytically-guided experimental program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetana, F. O.

    1975-01-01

    Modifications are proposed to standard estimating procedures, as well as the BODY computer program, which predict that the drag of two nacelles will equal the drag of the fuselage. A preliminary computer analysis that considers increased dimensions for the nacelle forebody so that the noise is relatively less blunt indicates a reduction in form drag much greater than the increase in skin friction drag attributable to increased surface area.

  8. Navier slip model of drag reduction by Leidenfrost vapour layers

    OpenAIRE

    Berry, Joseph D; Vakarelski, Ivan U.; Chan, Derek Y. C.; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T.

    2016-01-01

    Recent experiments found that a hot solid sphere that is able to sustain a stable Leidenfrost vapour layer in a liquid exhibits significant drag reduction during free fall. The variation of the drag coefficient with Reynolds number shows substantial deviation from the characteristic drag crisis behavior at high Reynolds numbers. Results obtained with liqiuds of different viscosities show that onset of the drag crisis depends on the viscosity ratio of the vapor to the liquid. The key feature o...

  9. Brief communication: Two well-marked cases of aerodynamic adjustment of sastrugi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amory, C.; Naaim-Bouvet, F.; Gallée, H.; Vignon, E.

    2016-04-01

    In polar regions, sastrugi are a direct manifestation of drifting snow and form the main surface roughness elements. In turn, sastrugi alter the generation of atmospheric turbulence and thus modify the wind field and the aeolian snow mass fluxes. Little attention has been paid to these feedback processes, mainly because of experimental difficulties. As a result, most polar atmospheric models currently ignore sastrugi over snow-covered regions. This paper aims at quantifying the potential influence of sastrugi on the local wind field and on snow erosion over a sastrugi-covered snowfield in coastal Adélie Land, East Antarctica. We focus on two erosion events during which sastrugi responses to shifts in wind direction have been interpreted from temporal variations in drag and aeolian snow mass flux measurements during austral winter 2013. Using this data set, it is shown that (i) neutral stability, 10 m drag coefficient (CDN10) values are in the range of 1.3-1.5 × 10-3 when the wind is well aligned with the sastrugi, (ii) as the wind shifts by only 20-30° away from the streamlined direction, CDN10 increases (by 30-120 %) and the aeolian snow mass flux decreases (by 30-80 %), thereby reflecting the growing contribution of the sastrugi form drag to the total surface drag and its inhibiting effect on snow erosion, (iii) the timescale of sastrugi aerodynamic adjustment can be as short as 3 h for friction velocities greater than 1 m s-1 and during strong drifting snow conditions and (iv) knowing CDN10 is not sufficient to estimate the snow erosion flux that results from drag partitioning at the surface because CDN10 includes the contribution of the sastrugi form drag.

  10. Aerodynamic design via control theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jameson, Antony

    1988-01-01

    The question of how to modify aerodynamic design in order to improve performance is addressed. Representative examples are given to demonstrate the computational feasibility of using control theory for such a purpose. An introduction and historical survey of the subject is included.

  11. POEMS in Newton's Aerodynamic Frustum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampedro, Jaime Cruz; Tetlalmatzi-Montiel, Margarita

    2010-01-01

    The golden mean is often naively seen as a sign of optimal beauty but rarely does it arise as the solution of a true optimization problem. In this article we present such a problem, demonstrating a close relationship between the golden mean and a special case of Newton's aerodynamical problem for the frustum of a cone. Then, we exhibit a parallel…

  12. POEMS in Newton's Aerodynamic Frustum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampedro, Jaime Cruz; Tetlalmatzi-Montiel, Margarita

    2010-01-01

    The golden mean is often naively seen as a sign of optimal beauty but rarely does it arise as the solution of a true optimization problem. In this article we present such a problem, demonstrating a close relationship between the golden mean and a special case of Newton's aerodynamical problem for the frustum of a cone. Then, we exhibit a parallel…

  13. Effect of the Backward-Facing Step Location on the Aerodynamics of a Morphing Wing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadi Mishriky

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, aircraft morphing technology has drawn a lot of attention in the aerospace community, because it is likely to improve the aerodynamic performance and the versatility of aircraft at different flight regimes. With the fast paced advancements in this field, a parallel stream of research is studying different materials and designs to develop reliable morphing skins. A promising candidate for a viable morphing skin is the sliding skin, where two or more rigid surfaces remain in contact and slide against each other during morphing. The overlapping between each two panels create a backward-facing step on the airfoil surface which has a critical effect on the aerodynamics of the wing. This paper presents a numerical study of the effect of employing a backward-facing step on the suction side of a National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA 2412 airfoil at a high Reynolds number of 5.9 × 106. The effects of the step location on the lift coefficient, drag coefficient and critical angle of attack are studied to find a favorable location for the step along the chord-wise direction. Results showed that employing a step on the suction side of the NACA 2412 airfoil can adversely affect the aforementioned aerodynamic properties. A drop of 21.1% in value of the lift coefficient and an increase of 120.8% in the drag coefficient were observed in case of a step located at 25% of the chord length. However, these effects are mitigated by shifting the step location towards the trailing edge. Introducing a step on the airfoil caused the airfoil’s thickness to change, which in turn has affected the transition point of the viscous boundary layer from laminar to turbulent. The location of the step, prior or post the transition point, has a noteworthy effect on the pressure and shear stress distribution, and consequently on the values of the lift and drag coefficients.

  14. A simple analytical aerodynamic model of Langley Winged-Cone Aerospace Plane concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamadi, Bandu N.

    1994-01-01

    A simple three DOF analytical aerodynamic model of the Langley Winged-Coned Aerospace Plane concept is presented in a form suitable for simulation, trajectory optimization, and guidance and control studies. The analytical model is especially suitable for methods based on variational calculus. Analytical expressions are presented for lift, drag, and pitching moment coefficients from subsonic to hypersonic Mach numbers and angles of attack up to +/- 20 deg. This analytical model has break points at Mach numbers of 1.0, 1.4, 4.0, and 6.0. Across these Mach number break points, the lift, drag, and pitching moment coefficients are made continuous but their derivatives are not. There are no break points in angle of attack. The effect of control surface deflection is not considered. The present analytical model compares well with the APAS calculations and wind tunnel test data for most angles of attack and Mach numbers.

  15. Interference-free measurements of the subsonic aerodynamics of slanted-base ogive cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britcher, Colin P.; Alcorn, Charles W.

    1991-01-01

    Drag, lift, pitching moment, and base-pressure measurements have been made, free of support interference, on a range of slanted-base ogive cylinders, using the NASA Langley Research Center 13-in magnetic suspension and balance system. Test Mach numbers were in the range 0.04-0.2. Two types of wake flow were observed, a quasi-symmetric turbulent closure or a longitudinal vortex flow. Aerodynamic characteristics differ dramatically between the two wake types. Drag measurements are shown to be in agreement with previous tests. A hysteretic behavior of the wake with varying Reynold's number has been discovered for the 45-deg base. An interaction between forebody boundary-layer state and wake flow and base pressures has been detected for higher slant angles.

  16. 14 CFR 25.697 - Lift and drag devices, controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Lift and drag devices, controls. 25.697....697 Lift and drag devices, controls. (a) Each lift device control must be designed so that the pilots....101(d). Lift and drag devices must maintain the selected positions, except for movement produced by an...

  17. 14 CFR 25.699 - Lift and drag device indicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Lift and drag device indicator. 25.699....699 Lift and drag device indicator. (a) There must be means to indicate to the pilots the position of each lift or drag device having a separate control in the cockpit to adjust its position. In addition...

  18. Analytical observations on the aerodynamics of a delta wing with leading edge flaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, S.; Tavella, D.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of a leading edge flap on the aerodynamics of a low aspect ratio delta wing is studied analytically. The separated flow field about the wing is represented by a simple vortex model composed of a conical straight vortex sheet and a concentrated vortex. The analysis is carried out in the cross flow plane by mapping the wing trace, by means of the Schwarz-Christoffel transformation into the real axis of the transformed plane. Particular attention is given to the influence of the angle of attack and flap deflection angle on lift and drag forces. Both lift and drag decrease with flap deflection, while the lift-to-drag ratioe increases. A simple coordinate transformation is used to obtain a closed form expression for the lift-to-drag ratio as a function of flap deflection. The main effect of leading edge flap deflection is a partial suppression of the separated flow on the leeside of the wing. Qualitative comparison with experiments is presented, showing agreement in the general trends.

  19. Aerodynamic performance enhancement of a flying wing using nanosecond pulsed DBD plasma actuator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Menghu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Experimental investigation of aerodynamic control on a 35° swept flying wing by means of nanosecond dielectric barrier discharge (NS-DBD plasma was carried out at subsonic flow speed of 20–40 m/s, corresponding to Reynolds number of 3.1 × 105–6.2 × 105. In control condition, the plasma actuator was installed symmetrically on the leading edge of the wing. Lift coefficient, drag coefficient, lift-to-drag ratio and pitching moment coefficient were tested with and without control for a range of angles of attack. The tested results indicate that an increase of 14.5% in maximum lift coefficient, a decrease of 34.2% in drag coefficient, an increase of 22.4% in maximum lift-to-drag ratio and an increase of 2° at stall angle of attack could be achieved compared with the baseline case. The effects of pulsed frequency, amplitude and chord Reynolds number were also investigated. And the results revealed that control efficiency demonstrated strong dependence on pulsed frequency. Moreover, the results of pitching moment coefficient indicated that the breakdown of leading edge vortices could be delayed by plasma actuator at low pulsed frequencies.

  20. Offset of a Drag-Free Sensor from the Center of Gravity of Its Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starin, Scott R.

    2003-01-01

    The drag-free satellite is one that encloses a proof mass, shielding it from atmospheric drag and solar radiation pressure (SRP). By sensing the location of the proof mass in the body and using thrusters to force the spacecraft to follow the proof mass in a closed-loop fashion, the effects of drag and SRP may be eliminated from the spacecraft orbit. Thus, several benefits may be gained, including improved ephemeris propagation and reduced operational costs. The package including the proof mass and the location sensing equipment may be considered as a single sensor; if generalized, such a sensor could be manufactured and used more easily in satellite designs, similar to how current missions use, for example, rate gyros and magnetometers. The flight heritage of the technology has been such that the proof mass sensor is a primary facet of the mission, allowing it to dominate design considerations. In particular, this paper discusses the effects that may be expected if a generalized drag-free sensor is placed some distance away from the spacecraft center of gravity. The proof mass will follow a given gravitational orbit, and a separation from the spacecraft center of gravity places the spacecraft itself in a different orbit from the proof mass, requiring additional fuel just to maintain function of the drag- free sensor. Conclusions include some guiding principles for determining whether certain mission characteristics may restrict or preclude the use of drag-free sensors for that mission. These principles may be used both by mission planners considering drag-free missions and by hardware designers considering or pursuing the development of such generalized sensors.