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Sample records for reduces mitochondrial dysfunction

  1. Melatonin reduces hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction in diabetic obese rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agil, Ahmad; El-Hammadi, Mazen; Jiménez-Aranda, Aroa; Tassi, Mohamed; Abdo, Walied; Fernández-Vázquez, Gumersindo; Reiter, Russel J

    2015-08-01

    Hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction is thought to play a role in the development of liver steatosis and insulin resistance, which are both common characteristics of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). It was hypothesized that the antioxidant properties of melatonin could potentially improve the impaired functions of hepatic mitochondria in diabetic obese animals. Male Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats and lean littermates (ZL) were given either melatonin (10 mg/kg BW/day) orally for 6 wk (M-ZDF and M-ZL) or vehicle as control groups (C-ZDF and C-ZL). Hepatic function was evaluated by measurement of serum alanine transaminase and aspartate transaminase levels, liver histopathology and electron microscopy, and hepatic mitochondrial functions. Several impaired functions of hepatic mitochondria were observed in C-ZDF in comparison with C-ZL rats. Melatonin treatment to ZDF rats decreases serum levels of ALT (P diabetic-induced mitochondrial abnormalities, glycogen, and lipid accumulation. Melatonin improves mitochondrial dysfunction in M-ZDF rats by increasing activities of mitochondrial citrate synthase (P melatonin augments ATP production (P melatonin reduces liver steatosis and mitochondria dysfunction in ZDF rats. Therefore, it may be beneficial in the treatment of diabesity.

  2. Melatonin and succinate reduce rat liver mitochondrial dysfunction in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavodnik, I B; Lapshina, E A; Cheshchevik, V T; Dremza, I K; Kujawa, J; Zabrodskaya, S V; Reiter, R J

    2011-08-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and an increase in mitochondrial reactive oxygen species in response to hyperglycemia during diabetes lead to pathological consequences of hyperglycemia. The aim of the present work was to investigate the role of a specific functional damage in rat liver mitochondria during diabetes as well as to evaluate the possibility of metabolic and antioxidative correction of mitochondrial disorders by pharmacological doses of succinate and melatonin. In rat liver mitochondria, streptozotocin-induced diabetes was accompanied by marked impairments of metabolism: we observed a significant activation of α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (by 60%, pdiabetic animals, melatonin (10 mg/kg b.w., 30 days) or succinate (50 mg/kg b.w., 30 days) reversed the oxygen consumption rate V(3) and the acceptor control ratio to those in nondiabetic animals. Melatonin enhanced the inhibited activity of catalase in the cytoplasm of liver cells and prevented mitochondrial glutathione-S-transferase inhibition while succinate administration prevented α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase activation. The mitochondria dysfunction associated with diabetes was partially remedied by succinate or melatonin administration. Thus, these molecules may have benefits for the treatment of diabetes. The protective mechanism may be related to improvements in mitochondrial physiology and the antioxidative status of cells.

  3. New therapeutic approach: diphenyl diselenide reduces mitochondrial dysfunction in acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure.

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    Nélson R Carvalho

    Full Text Available The acute liver failure (ALF induced by acetaminophen (APAP is closely related to oxidative damage and depletion of hepatic glutathione, consequently changes in cell energy metabolism and mitochondrial dysfunction have been observed after APAP overdose. Diphenyl diselenide [(PhSe2], a simple organoselenium compound with antioxidant properties, previously demonstrated to confer hepatoprotection. However, little is known about the protective mechanism on mitochondria. The main objective of this study was to investigate the effects (PhSe2 to reduce mitochondrial dysfunction and, secondly, compare in the liver homogenate the hepatoprotective effects of the (PhSe2 to the N-acetylcysteine (NAC during APAP-induced ALF to validate our model. Mice were injected intraperitoneal with APAP (600 mg/kg, (PhSe2 (15.6 mg/kg, NAC (1200 mg/kg, APAP+(PhSe2 or APAP+NAC, where the (PhSe2 or NAC treatment were given 1 h following APAP. The liver was collected 4 h after overdose. The plasma alanine and aspartate aminotransferase activities increased after APAP administration. APAP caused a remarkable increase of oxidative stress markers (lipid peroxidation, reactive species and protein carbonylation and decrease of the antioxidant defense in the liver homogenate and mitochondria. APAP caused a marked loss in the mitochondrial membrane potential, the mitochondrial ATPase activity, and the rate of mitochondrial oxygen consumption and increased the mitochondrial swelling. All these effects were significantly prevented by (PhSe2. The effectiveness of (PhSe2 was similar at a lower dose than NAC. In summary, (PhSe2 provided a significant improvement to the mitochondrial redox homeostasis and the mitochondrial bioenergetics dysfunction caused by membrane permeability transition in the hepatotoxicity APAP-induced.

  4. Molecular basis of reduced birth weight in smoking pregnant women: mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis.

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    Garrabou, Glòria; Hernàndez, Ana-Sandra; Catalán García, Marc; Morén, Constanza; Tobías, Ester; Córdoba, Sarai; López, Marta; Figueras, Francesc; Grau, Josep M; Cardellach, Francesc

    2016-01-01

    In utero exposure of fetuses to tobacco is associated with reduced birth weight. We hypothesized that this may be due to the toxic effect of carbon monoxide (CO) from tobacco, which has previously been described to damage mitochondria in non-pregnant adult smokers. Maternal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), newborn cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMCs) and placenta were collected from 30 smoking pregnant women and their newborns and classified as moderate and severe smoking groups, and compared to a cohort of 21 non-smoking controls. A biomarker for tobacco consumption (cotinine) was assessed by ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay). The following parameters were measured in all tissues: mitochondrial chain complex IV [cytochrome c oxidase (COX)] activity by spectrophotometry, mitochondrial DNA levels by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, oxidative stress by spectrophotometric lipid peroxide quantification, mitochondrial mass through citrate synthase spectrophotometric activity and apoptosis by Western blot parallelly confirmed by TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labelling) assay in placenta. Newborns from smoking pregnant women presented reduced birth weight by 10.75 percent. Materno-fetal mitochondrial and apoptotic PBMC and CBMC parameters showed altered and correlated values regarding COX activity, mitochondrial DNA, oxidative stress and apoptosis. Placenta partially compensated this dysfunction by increasing mitochondrial number; even so ratios of oxidative stress and apoptosis were increased. A CO-induced mitotoxic and apoptotic fingerprint is present in smoking pregnant women and their newborn, with a lack of filtering effect from the placenta. Tobacco consumption correlated with a reduction in birth weight and mitochondrial and apoptotic impairment, suggesting that both could be the cause of the reduced birth weight in smoking pregnant women.

  5. Naringenin reduces oxidative stress and improves mitochondrial dysfunction via activation of the Nrf2/ARE signaling pathway in neurons.

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    Wang, Kaihua; Chen, Zhenzhen; Huang, Longjian; Meng, Bing; Zhou, Xinmei; Wen, Xiaodong; Ren, Ding

    2017-09-13

    Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are considered to be major contributing factors in the development and progression of many neurodegenerative diseases. Naringenin (NAR) is an abundant flavanone in the Citrus genus and has been found to exert antioxidant, anticarcinogenic and antimutagenic effects. However, the potential underlying mechanism of its antioxidant effects remains unclear. In the present study, the authors investigated the antioxidant effect of NAR on neurons in vitro. Neurons isolated from the brains of Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into a control group, model group, NAR-L group, NAR-M group and NAR-H group. The model group received hypoxia and re-oxygenation treatment, and the NAR-L, NAR-M and NAR-H groups received 20, 40 and 80 µM NAR, respectively. The levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in each group were detected by chloromethyl-2',7'dichlorodihydro fluorescein diacetate staining, and differences in mitochondrial dysfunction were analyzed through measurement of mitochondrial membrane potential (∆ψm), adenine nucleotide translocase transport activity and adenine nucleotide levels. MTT and flow cytometry assays were also used to analyze cell proliferation and apoptosis, and the effects of NAR on the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)/antioxidant response element (ARE) signaling pathway were investigated using small interfering RNA methods. The authors detected an increased accumulation of ROS in the model group, and high-dose NAR could significantly reduce the levels of ROS. Furthermore, NAR could improve mitochondrial dysfunction, as indicated by increased levels of high-energy phosphates, enhanced mitochondrial ANT transport activity and increased mitochondrial membrane potential. Moreover, NAR increased cell viability and decreased the rate of cell apoptosis. NAR also increased the expression of Nrf2 and its downstream target genes. These findings demonstrated that NAR could reduce oxidative

  6. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Cancer

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    Michelle L Boland

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A mechanistic understanding of how mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to cell growth and tumorigenesis is emerging beyond Warburg as an area of research that is under-explored in terms of its significance for clinical management of cancer. Work discussed in this review focuses less on the Warburg effect and more on mitochondria and how dysfunctional mitochondria modulate cell cycle, gene expression, metabolism, cell viability and other more conventional aspects of cell growth and stress responses. There is increasing evidence that key oncogenes and tumor suppressors modulate mitochondrial dynamics through important signaling pathways and that mitochondrial mass and function vary between tumors and individuals but the sigificance of these events for cancer are not fully appreciated. We explore the interplay between key molecules involved in mitochondrial fission and fusion and in apoptosis, as well as in mitophagy, biogenesis and spatial dynamics and consider how these distinct mechanisms are coordinated in response to physiological stresses such as hypoxia and nutrient deprivation. Importantly, we examine how deregulation of these processes in cancer has knockon effects for cell proliferation and growth. Scientifically, there is also scope for defining what mitochondria dysfunction is and here we address the extent to which the functional consequences of such dysfunction can be determined and exploited for cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  7. Exenatide Reduces Tumor Necrosis Factor-α-induced Apoptosis in Cardiomyocytes by Alleviating Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan-Yuan Cao; Zhang-Wei Chen; Yan-Hua Gao; Xing-Xu Wang; Jian-Ying Ma; Shu-Fu Chang; Ju-Ying Qian

    2015-01-01

    Background: Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) plays an important role in progressive contractile dysfunction in several cardiac diseases.The cytotoxic effects of TNF-α are suggested to be partly mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS)-and mitochondria-dependent apoptosis.Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) or its analogue exhibits protective effects on the cardiovascular system.The objective of the study was to assess the effects of exenatide, a GLP-1 analogue, on oxidative stress, and apoptosis in TNF-c-treated cardiomyocytes in vitro.Methods: Isolated neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were divided into three groups: Control group, with cells cultured in normal conditions without intervention;TNF-α group, with cells incubated with TNF-c (40 ng/ml) for 6, 12, or 24 h without pretreatment with exenatide;and exenatide group, with cells pretreated with exenatide (100 nmol/L) 30 mins before TNF-α (40 ng/ml) stimulation.We evaluated apoptosis by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay and flow cytometry, measured ROS production and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) by specific the fluorescent probes, and assessed the levels of proteins by Western blotting for all the groups.Results: Exenatide pretreatment significantly reduced cardiomyocyte apoptosis as measured by flow cytometry and TUNEL assay at 12 h and 24 h.Also, exenatide inhibited excessive ROS production and maintained MMP.Furthermore, declined cytochrome-c release and cleaved caspase-3 expression and increased bcl-2 expression with concomitantly decreased Bax activation were observed in exenatide-pretreated cultures.Conclusion: These results suggested that exenatide exerts a protective effect on cardiomyocytes, preventing TNF-α-induced apoptosis;the anti-apoptotic effects may be associated with protection of mitochondrial function.

  8. Mitochondrial dysfunction and organophosphorus compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karami-Mohajeri, Somayyeh [Department of Toxicology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Toxicology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abdollahi, Mohammad, E-mail: Mohammad.Abdollahi@UToronto.Ca [Department of Toxicology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    Organophosphorous (OPs) pesticides are the most widely used pesticides in the agriculture and home. However, many acute or chronic poisoning reports about OPs have been published in the recent years. Mitochondria as a site of cellular oxygen consumption and energy production can be a target for OPs poisoning as a non-cholinergic mechanism of toxicity of OPs. In the present review, we have reviewed and criticized all the evidences about the mitochondrial dysfunctions as a mechanism of toxicity of OPs. For this purpose, all biochemical, molecular, and morphological data were retrieved from various studies. Some toxicities of OPs are arisen from dysfunction of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation through alteration of complexes I, II, III, IV and V activities and disruption of mitochondrial membrane. Reductions of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis or induction of its hydrolysis can impair the cellular energy. The OPs disrupt cellular and mitochondrial antioxidant defense, reactive oxygen species generation, and calcium uptake and promote oxidative and genotoxic damage triggering cell death via cytochrome C released from mitochondria and consequent activation of caspases. The mitochondrial dysfunction induced by OPs can be restored by use of antioxidants such as vitamin E and C, alpha-tocopherol, electron donors, and through increasing the cytosolic ATP level. However, to elucidate many aspect of mitochondrial toxicity of Ops, further studies should be performed. - Highlights: • As a non-cholinergic mechanism of toxicity, mitochondria is a target for OPs. • OPs affect action of complexes I, II, III, IV and V in the mitochondria. • OPs reduce mitochondrial ATP. • OPs promote oxidative and genotoxic damage via release of cytochrome C from mitochondria. • OP-induced mitochondrial dysfunction can be restored by increasing the cytosolic ATP.

  9. Piracetam improves mitochondrial dysfunction following oxidative stress

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction including decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential and reduced ATP production represents a common final pathway of many conditions associated with oxidative stress, for example, hypoxia, hypoglycemia, and aging.Since the cognition-improving effects of the standard nootropic piracetam are usually more pronounced under such pathological conditions and young healthy animals usually benefit little by piracetam, the effect of piracetam on mitochondrial dysfunction fol...

  10. Mitochondrial dysfunction in myofibrillar myopathy.

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    Vincent, Amy E; Grady, John P; Rocha, Mariana C; Alston, Charlotte L; Rygiel, Karolina A; Barresi, Rita; Taylor, Robert W; Turnbull, Doug M

    2016-10-01

    Myofibrillar myopathies (MFM) are characterised by focal myofibrillar destruction and accumulation of myofibrillar elements as protein aggregates. They are caused by mutations in the DES, MYOT, CRYAB, FLNC, BAG3, DNAJB6 and ZASP genes as well as other as yet unidentified genes. Previous studies have reported changes in mitochondrial morphology and cellular positioning, as well as clonally-expanded, large-scale mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions and focal respiratory chain deficiency in muscle of MFM patients. Here we examine skeletal muscle from patients with desmin (n = 6), ZASP (n = 1) and myotilin (n = 2) mutations and MFM protein aggregates, to understand how mitochondrial dysfunction may contribute to the underlying mechanisms causing disease pathology. We have used a validated quantitative immunofluorescent assay to study respiratory chain protein levels, together with oxidative enzyme histochemistry and single cell mitochondrial DNA analysis, to examine mitochondrial changes. Results demonstrate a small number of clonally-expanded mitochondrial DNA deletions, which we conclude are due to both ageing and disease pathology. Further to this we report higher levels of respiratory chain complex I and IV deficiency compared to age matched controls, although overall levels of respiratory deficient muscle fibres in patient biopsies are low. More strikingly, a significantly higher percentage of myofibrillar myopathy patient muscle fibres have a low mitochondrial mass compared to controls. We concluded this is mechanistically unrelated to desmin and myotilin protein aggregates; however, correlation between mitochondrial mass and muscle fibre area is found. We suggest this may be due to reduced mitochondrial biogenesis in combination with muscle fibre hypertrophy.

  11. Insulin Resistance and Mitochondrial Dysfunction.

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    Gonzalez-Franquesa, Alba; Patti, Mary-Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Insulin resistance precedes and predicts the onset of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in susceptible humans, underscoring its important role in the complex pathogenesis of this disease. Insulin resistance contributes to multiple tissue defects characteristic of T2D, including reduced insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in insulin-sensitive tissues, increased hepatic glucose production, increased lipolysis in adipose tissue, and altered insulin secretion. Studies of individuals with insulin resistance, both with established T2D and high-risk individuals, have consistently demonstrated a diverse array of defects in mitochondrial function (i.e., bioenergetics, biogenesis and dynamics). However, it remains uncertain whether mitochondrial dysfunction is primary (critical initiating defect) or secondary to the subtle derangements in glucose metabolism, insulin resistance, and defective insulin secretion present early in the course of disease development. In this chapter, we will present the evidence linking mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance, and review the potential for mitochondrial targets as a therapeutic approach for T2D.

  12. Mitochondrial dysfunctions in Parkinson's disease.

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    Gautier, C A; Corti, O; Brice, A

    2014-05-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders (ND) include a wide spectrum of diseases characterized by progressive neuronal dysfunctions or degeneration. With an estimated cost of 135 billion € in 2010 in the European Union (Olesen et al., 2012), they put an enormous economic as well as social burden on modern societies. Hence, they have been the subject of a huge amount of research for the last fifty years. For many of these diseases, our understanding of their profound causes is incomplete and this hinders the discovery of efficient therapies. ND form a highly heterogeneous group of diseases affecting various neuronal subpopulations reflecting different origins and different pathological mechanisms. However, some common themes in the physiopathology of these disorders are emerging. There is growing evidence that mitochondrial dysfunctions play a pivotal role at some point in the course of neurodegeneration. In some cases (e.g. Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis), impairment of mitochondrial functions probably occurs late in the course of the disease. In a subset of ND, current evidence suggests that mitochondrial dysfunctions play a more seminal role in neuronal demise. Parkinson's disease (PD) presents one of the strongest cases based in part on post-mortem studies that have shown mitochondrial impairment (e.g. reduced complex I activity) and oxidative damage in idiopathic PD brains. The occurrence of PD is largely sporadic, but clinical syndromes resembling sporadic PD have been linked to specific environmental insults or to mutations in at least 5 distinct genes (α-synuclein, parkin, DJ-1, PINK1 and LRRK2). It is postulated that the elucidation of the pathogenic mechanisms underlying the selective dopaminergic degeneration in familial and environmental Parkinsonism should provide important clues to the pathogenic mechanisms responsible for idiopathic PD. Hence, numerous cellular and animal models of the disease have been generated that mimic these

  13. Mitochondrial dysfunction in autism.

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    Legido, Agustín; Jethva, Reena; Goldenthal, Michael J

    2013-09-01

    Using data of the current prevalence of autism as 200:10,000 and a 1:2000 incidence of definite mitochondrial (mt) disease, if there was no linkage of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and mt disease, it would be expected that 1 in 110 subjects with mt disease would have ASD and 1 in 2000 individuals with ASD would have mt disease. The co-occurrence of autism and mt disease is much higher than these figures, suggesting a possible pathogenetic relationship. Such hypothesis was initially suggested by the presence of biochemical markers of abnormal mt metabolic function in patients with ASD, including elevation of lactate, pyruvate, or alanine levels in blood, cerebrospinal fluid, or brain; carnitine level in plasma; and level of organic acids in urine, and by demonstrating impaired mt fatty acid β-oxidation. More recently, mtDNA genetic mutations or deletions or mutations of nuclear genes regulating mt function have been associated with ASD in patients or in neuropathologic studies on the brains of patients with autism. In addition, the presence of dysfunction of the complexes of the mt respiratory chain or electron transport chain, indicating abnormal oxidative phosphorylation, has been reported in patients with ASD and in the autopsy samples of brains. Possible pathogenetic mechanisms linking mt dysfunction and ASD include mt activation of the immune system, abnormal mt Ca(2+) handling, and mt-induced oxidative stress. Genetic and epigenetic regulation of brain development may also be disrupted by mt dysfunction, including mt-induced oxidative stress. The role of the purinergic system linking mt dysfunction and ASD is currently under investigation. In summary, there is genetic and biochemical evidence for a mitochondria (mt) role in the pathogenesis of ASD in a subset of children. To determine the prevalence and type of genetic and biochemical mt defects in ASD, there is a need for further research using the latest genetic technology such as next

  14. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease

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    P. C. Keane

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is a progressive, neurodegenerative condition that has increasingly been linked with mitochondrial dysfunction and inhibition of the electron transport chain. This inhibition leads to the generation of reactive oxygen species and depletion of cellular energy levels, which can consequently cause cellular damage and death mediated by oxidative stress and excitotoxicity. A number of genes that have been shown to have links with inherited forms of PD encode mitochondrial proteins or proteins implicated in mitochondrial dysfunction, supporting the central involvement of mitochondria in PD. This involvement is corroborated by reports that environmental toxins that inhibit the mitochondrial respiratory chain have been shown to be associated with PD. This paper aims to illustrate the considerable body of evidence linking mitochondrial dysfunction with neuronal cell death in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc of PD patients and to highlight the important need for further research in this area.

  15. Mitochondrial disease and endocrine dysfunction.

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    Chow, Jasmine; Rahman, Joyeeta; Achermann, John C; Dattani, Mehul T; Rahman, Shamima

    2017-02-01

    Mitochondria are critical organelles for endocrine health; steroid hormone biosynthesis occurs in these organelles and they provide energy in the form of ATP for hormone production and trafficking. Mitochondrial diseases are multisystem disorders that feature defective oxidative phosphorylation, and are characterized by enormous clinical, biochemical and genetic heterogeneity. To date, mitochondrial diseases have been found to result from >250 monogenic defects encoded across two genomes: the nuclear genome and the ancient circular mitochondrial genome located within mitochondria themselves. Endocrine dysfunction is often observed in genetic mitochondrial diseases and reflects decreased intracellular production or extracellular secretion of hormones. Diabetes mellitus is the most frequently described endocrine disturbance in patients with inherited mitochondrial diseases, but other endocrine manifestations in these patients can include growth hormone deficiency, hypogonadism, adrenal dysfunction, hypoparathyroidism and thyroid disease. Although mitochondrial endocrine dysfunction frequently occurs in the context of multisystem disease, some mitochondrial disorders are characterized by isolated endocrine involvement. Furthermore, additional monogenic mitochondrial endocrine diseases are anticipated to be revealed by the application of genome-wide next-generation sequencing approaches in the future. Understanding the mitochondrial basis of endocrine disturbance is key to developing innovative therapies for patients with mitochondrial diseases.

  16. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Lysosomal Storage Disorders

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    Mario de la Mata

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs describe a heterogeneous group of rare inherited metabolic disorders that result from the absence or loss of function of lysosomal hydrolases or transporters, resulting in the progressive accumulation of undigested material in lysosomes. The accumulation of substances affects the function of lysosomes and other organelles, resulting in secondary alterations such as impairment of autophagy, mitochondrial dysfunction, inflammation and apoptosis. LSDs frequently involve the central nervous system (CNS, where neuronal dysfunction or loss results in progressive neurodegeneration and premature death. Many LSDs exhibit signs of mitochondrial dysfunction, which include mitochondrial morphological changes, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm, diminished ATP production and increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Furthermore, reduced autophagic flux may lead to the persistence of dysfunctional mitochondria. Gaucher disease (GD, the LSD with the highest prevalence, is caused by mutations in the GBA1 gene that results in defective and insufficient activity of the enzyme β-glucocerebrosidase (GCase. Decreased catalytic activity and/or instability of GCase leads to accumulation of glucosylceramide (GlcCer and glucosylsphingosine (GlcSph in the lysosomes of macrophage cells and visceral organs. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been reported to occur in numerous cellular and mouse models of GD. The aim of this manuscript is to review the current knowledge and implications of mitochondrial dysfunction in LSDs.

  17. Mitochondrial dysfunction in cancer

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    Kinga Księżakowska-Łakoma

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are semi-autonomous organelles of eukaryotic cells. They perform crucial functions such as generating most of the cellular energy through the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS system and some other metabolic processes. In addition, mitochondria are involved in regulation of cell death and reactive oxygen species (ROS generation. Also, mitochondria play important roles in carcinogenesis via altering energy metabolism, resistance to apoptosis, increase of production of ROS and mtDNA (mitochondrial genome changes. Studies have suggested that aerobic glycolysis is high in malignant tumors. Probably, it correlates with high glucose intake of cancerous tissues. This observation is contrary to Warburg’s theory that the main way of energy generation in cancer cells is non-oxidative glycolysis. Further studies have suggested that in tumor cells both oxidative phosphorylation and glycolysis were active at various rates. An increase of intracellular oxidative stress induces damage of cellular structure and somatic mutations. Further studies confirmed that permanent activity of oxidative stress and the influence of chronic inflammation damage the healthy neighboring epithelium and may lead to carcinogenesis. For instance, chronic inflammato­ry bowel disease could be related to high risk of colon adenocarcinoma. The data have shown a role of ROS generation, mtDNA or nDNA alterations and abnormal apoptotic machinery in endometrial cancer progress. Recent studies suggest that mtDNA mutations might play a potential role in endometrial cancer progress and indicate an increase of mitochondrial biogenesis in this cancer. The investigators suggested that MtCOI and MtND6 alteration has an influence on assembly of respiratory complexes in endometrial cancer. In many human cancers, there is a deregulation of the balance between cell growth and death. The tumor cells can avoid apoptosis through a loss of balance between anti- and pro

  18. Mitochondrial dysfunction in heart failure.

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    Rosca, Mariana G; Hoppel, Charles L

    2013-09-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a complex chronic clinical syndrome. Energy deficit is considered to be a key contributor to the development of both cardiac and skeletal myopathy. In HF, several components of cardiac and skeletal muscle bioenergetics are altered, such as oxygen availability, substrate oxidation, mitochondrial ATP production, and ATP transfer to the contractile apparatus via the creatine kinase shuttle. This review focuses on alterations in mitochondrial biogenesis and respirasome organization, substrate oxidation coupled with ATP synthesis in the context of their contribution to the chronic energy deficit, and mechanical dysfunction of the cardiac and skeletal muscle in HF. We conclude that HF is associated with decreased mitochondrial biogenesis and function in both heart and skeletal muscle, supporting the concept of a systemic mitochondrial cytopathy. The sites of mitochondrial defects are located within the electron transport and phosphorylation apparatus and differ with the etiology and progression of HF in the two mitochondrial populations (subsarcolemmal and interfibrillar) of cardiac and skeletal muscle. The roles of adrenergic stimulation, the renin-angiotensin system, and cytokines are evaluated as factors responsible for the systemic energy deficit. We propose a cyclic AMP-mediated mechanism by which increased adrenergic stimulation contributes to the mitochondrial dysfunction.

  19. Mitochondrial dysfunction and Huntington disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a chronic autosomal-dominant neurodegenerative disease. The gene coding Huntingtin has been identified, but the pathogenic mechanisms of the disease are still not fully understood. This paper reviews the involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in pathogenesis of HD.

  20. Postconditioning with cyclosporine a reduces early renal dysfunction by inhibiting mitochondrial permeability transition.

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    Lemoine, Sandrine; Pillot, Bruno; Rognant, Nicolas; Augeul, Lionel; Rayberin, Maud; Varennes, Annie; Laville, Maurice; Ovize, Michel; Juillard, Laurent

    2015-04-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury leads to mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening, which contributes to cell death. The aim of this study is to determine whether ischemic or pharmacological postconditioning with cyclosporine A (CsA) might protect the kidney from lethal reperfusion injury. Male mice underwent a unilateral (right) nephrectomy followed by 30 minutes of contralateral (left) clamping of the renal artery. We studied 4 groups at 20 minutes and 24 hours of reperfusion: a sham group (n = 4), an ischemic group (n = 6), CsA-postconditioned group (postcond-CsA, injection of 3 mg/kg of CsA 5 minutes before the end of ischemia, (n = 6), and an ischemic postconditioning (IPC) group (n = 6), consisting of 3 cycles of 30 seconds of renal ischemia with 30 seconds intervening reperfusion. After 24 hours of reperfusion, we measured plasma creatinine, urea, and histological kidney injury. The kidney mitochondria were isolated to assess the mitochondria calcium retention capacity and oxidative phosphorylation. At 24 hours after reperfusion, serum creatinine decreased in postcond-CsA and IPC compared to ischemic group. The histological score was also significantly improved with postcond-CsA and IPC. At 20 minutes and 24 hours of reperfusion, calcium retention capacity was decreased significantly in the ischemic group. The mitochondrial respiration stay decreased in the ischemic group at 24 hours of reperfusion, whereas the respiration was improved significantly in the postcond-CsA and IPC group. Bax and cleaved caspase 3 decreased in PostCsA and IPC group. Our results suggest that IPC and CsA, administered immediately before reperfusion, protect the kidney from lethal injury.

  1. Piracetam improves mitochondrial dysfunction following oxidative stress.

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    Keil, Uta; Scherping, Isabel; Hauptmann, Susanne; Schuessel, Katin; Eckert, Anne; Müller, Walter E

    2006-01-01

    1.--Mitochondrial dysfunction including decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential and reduced ATP production represents a common final pathway of many conditions associated with oxidative stress, for example, hypoxia, hypoglycemia, and aging. 2.--Since the cognition-improving effects of the standard nootropic piracetam are usually more pronounced under such pathological conditions and young healthy animals usually benefit little by piracetam, the effect of piracetam on mitochondrial dysfunction following oxidative stress was investigated using PC12 cells and dissociated brain cells of animals treated with piracetam. 3.--Piracetam treatment at concentrations between 100 and 1000 microM improved mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP production of PC12 cells following oxidative stress induced by sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and serum deprivation. Under conditions of mild serum deprivation, piracetam (500 microM) induced a nearly complete recovery of mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP levels. Piracetam also reduced caspase 9 activity after SNP treatment. 4.--Piracetam treatment (100-500 mg kg(-1) daily) of mice was also associated with improved mitochondrial function in dissociated brain cells. Significant improvement was mainly seen in aged animals and only less in young animals. Moreover, the same treatment reduced antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase) in aged mouse brain only, which are elevated as an adaptive response to the increased oxidative stress with aging. 5.--In conclusion, therapeutically relevant in vitro and in vivo concentrations of piracetam are able to improve mitochondrial dysfunction associated with oxidative stress and/or aging. Mitochondrial stabilization and protection might be an important mechanism to explain many of piracetam's beneficial effects in elderly patients.

  2. Assessing mitochondrial dysfunction in cells.

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    Brand, Martin D; Nicholls, David G

    2011-04-15

    Assessing mitochondrial dysfunction requires definition of the dysfunction to be investigated. Usually, it is the ability of the mitochondria to make ATP appropriately in response to energy demands. Where other functions are of interest, tailored solutions are required. Dysfunction can be assessed in isolated mitochondria, in cells or in vivo, with different balances between precise experimental control and physiological relevance. There are many methods to measure mitochondrial function and dysfunction in these systems. Generally, measurements of fluxes give more information about the ability to make ATP than do measurements of intermediates and potentials. For isolated mitochondria, the best assay is mitochondrial respiratory control: the increase in respiration rate in response to ADP. For intact cells, the best assay is the equivalent measurement of cell respiratory control, which reports the rate of ATP production, the proton leak rate, the coupling efficiency, the maximum respiratory rate, the respiratory control ratio and the spare respiratory capacity. Measurements of membrane potential provide useful additional information. Measurement of both respiration and potential during appropriate titrations enables the identification of the primary sites of effectors and the distribution of control, allowing deeper quantitative analyses. Many other measurements in current use can be more problematic, as discussed in the present review.

  3. Mitochondrial dysfunction in cancer chemoresistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Giannattasio, Sergio; Moro, Loredana

    2014-11-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been associated with cancer development and progression. Recent evidences suggest that pathogenic mutations or depletion of the mitochondrial genome can contribute to development of chemoresistance in malignant tumors. In this review we will describe the current knowledge on the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in the development of chemoresistance in cancer. We will also discuss the significance of this research topic in the context of development of more effective, targeted therapeutic modalities and diagnostic strategies for cancer patients, with a particular focus on the potential use of PARP inhibitors in cancer patients displaying mitochondrial DNA mutations. We will discuss recent studies highlighting the importance of the cross-talk between the tumor microenvironment and mitochondrial functionality in determining selective response to certain chemotherapeutic drugs. Finally, owing to the similarities between cancer and yeast cell metabolism, we will point out the use of yeast as a model system to study cancer-related genes and for anti-cancer drugs screening. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Implications of mitochondrial DNA mutations and mitochondrial dysfunction in tumorigenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianxin Lu; Lokendra Kumar Sharma; Yidong Bai

    2009-01-01

    Alterations in oxidative phosphorylation resulting from mitochondrial dysfunction have long been hypothesized to be involved in tumorigenesis. Mitochondria have recently been shown to play an important role in regulating both programmed cell death and cell proliferation. Furthermore, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations have been found in various cancer cells. However, the role of these mtDNA mutations in tumorigenesis remains largely unknown. This review focuses on basic mitochondrial genetics, mtDNA mutations and consequential mitochondrial dysfunction associated with cancer. The potential molecular mechanisms, mediating the pathogenesis from mtDNA mutations and mitochondrial dysfunction to tumorigenesis are also discussed.

  5. Mitochondrial dysfunction underlying outer retinal diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lefevere, Evy; Toft-Kehler, Anne Katrine; Vohra, Rupali

    2017-01-01

    Dysfunction of photoreceptors, retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) or both contribute to the initiation and progression of several outer retinal disorders. Disrupted Müller glia function might additionally subsidize to these diseases. Mitochondrial malfunctioning is importantly associated with outer...... retina pathologies, which can be classified as primary and secondary mitochondrial disorders. This review highlights the importance of oxidative stress and mitochondrial DNA damage, underlying outer retinal disorders. Indeed, the metabolically active photoreceptors/RPE are highly prone to these hallmarks...... of mitochondrial dysfunction, indicating that mitochondria represent a weak link in the antioxidant defenses of outer retinal cells....

  6. Mitochondrial dysfunction in neuromuscular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsetos, Christos D; Koutzaki, Sirma; Melvin, Joseph J

    2013-09-01

    This review deciphers aspects of mitochondrial (mt) dysfunction among nosologically, pathologically, and genetically diverse diseases of the skeletal muscle, lower motor neuron, and peripheral nerve, which fall outside the traditional realm of mt cytopathies. Special emphasis is given to well-characterized mt abnormalities in collagen VI myopathies (Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy and Bethlem myopathy), megaconial congenital muscular dystrophy, limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2 (calpainopathy), centronuclear myopathies, core myopathies, inflammatory myopathies, spinal muscular atrophy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 2, and drug-induced peripheral neuropathies. Among inflammatory myopathies, mt abnormalities are more prominent in inclusion body myositis and a subset of polymyositis with mt pathology, both of which are refractory to corticosteroid treatment. Awareness is raised about instances of phenotypic mimicry between cases harboring primary mtDNA depletion, in the context of mtDNA depletion syndrome, and established neuromuscular disorders such as spinal muscular atrophy. A substantial body of experimental work, derived from animal models, attests to a major role of mitochondria (mt) in the early process of muscle degeneration. Common mechanisms of mt-related cell injury include dysregulation of the mt permeability transition pore opening and defective autophagy. The therapeutic use of mt permeability transition pore modifiers holds promise in various neuromuscular disorders, including muscular dystrophies.

  7. SECONDARY MITOCHONDRIAL DYSFUNCTION IN ACUTE CORONARY SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. A. Vasyuk

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available So-called “metabolic” direction has been developing intensively during last decades. Its aim is the theoretical and practical analysis of the role of metabolic disorders in initiation and progression of many diseases. The pathogenic peculiarities of acute coronary syndrome (ACS which result in developing of secondary mitochondrial dysfunction are considered as a subject of this review. The methods of laboratory diagnosis of mitochondrial dysfunction and possibilities of its pharmaceutical correction in patients with ACS are reviewed.

  8. Cerebral energy metabolism during induced mitochondrial dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, T H; Bindslev, TT; Pedersen, S M

    2013-01-01

    In patients with traumatic brain injury as well as stroke, impaired cerebral oxidative energy metabolism may be an important factor contributing to the ultimate degree of tissue damage. We hypothesize that mitochondrial dysfunction can be diagnosed bedside by comparing the simultaneous changes in...... in brain tissue oxygen tension (PbtO(2)) and cerebral cytoplasmatic redox state. The study describes cerebral energy metabolism during mitochondrial dysfunction induced by sevoflurane in piglets....

  9. Mitochondrial aging and age-related dysfunction of mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A; Sobenin, Igor A; Revin, Victor V; Orekhov, Alexander N; Bobryshev, Yuri V

    2014-01-01

    Age-related changes in mitochondria are associated with decline in mitochondrial function. With advanced age, mitochondrial DNA volume, integrity and functionality decrease due to accumulation of mutations and oxidative damage induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS). In aged subjects, mitochondria are characterized by impaired function such as lowered oxidative capacity, reduced oxidative phosphorylation, decreased ATP production, significant increase in ROS generation, and diminished antioxidant defense. Mitochondrial biogenesis declines with age due to alterations in mitochondrial dynamics and inhibition of mitophagy, an autophagy process that removes dysfunctional mitochondria. Age-dependent abnormalities in mitochondrial quality control further weaken and impair mitochondrial function. In aged tissues, enhanced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis contributes to an increase in the percentage of apoptotic cells. However, implementation of strategies such as caloric restriction and regular physical training may delay mitochondrial aging and attenuate the age-related phenotype in humans.

  10. Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in corneal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallabh, Neeru A; Romano, Vito; Willoughby, Colin E

    2017-05-23

    The cornea is the anterior transparent surface and the main refracting structure of the eye. Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are implicated in the pathogenesis of inherited (e.g. Kearns Sayre Syndrome) and acquired corneal diseases (e.g. keratoconus and Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy). Both antioxidants and reactive oxygen species are found in the healthy cornea. There is increasing evidence of imbalance in the oxidative balance and mitochondrial function in the cornea in disease states. The cornea is vulnerable to mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress due to its highly exposed position to ultraviolet radiation and high oxygen tension. The corneal endothelium is vulnerable to accumulating mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage due to the post- mitotic nature of endothelial cells, yet their mitochondrial genome is continually replicating and mtDNA mutations can develop and accumulate with age. The unique physiology of the cornea predisposes this structure to oxidative damage, and there is interplay between inherited and acquired mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative damage and a number of corneal diseases. By targeting mitochondrial dysfunction in corneal disease, emerging treatments may prevent or reduce visual loss. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  11. Evidence of Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Autism and Implications for Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A. Rossignol

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Classical mitochondrial diseases occur in a subset of individuals with autism and are usually caused by genetic anomalies or mitochondrial respiratory pathway deficits. However, in many cases of autism, there is evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction (MtD without the classic features associated with mitochondrial disease. MtD appears to be more common in autism and presents with less severe signs and symptoms. It is not associated with discernable mitochondrial pathology in muscle biopsy specimens despite objective evidence of lowered mitochondrial functioning. Exposure to environ-mental toxins is the likely etiology for MtD in autism. This dysfunction then contributes to a number of diagnostic symptoms and comorbidities observed in autism including: cognitive impairment, language deficits, abnormal energy metabolism, chronic gastrointestinal problems, abnormalities in fatty acid oxidation, and increased oxidative stress. MtD and oxidative stress may also explain the high male to female ratio found in autism due to increased male vulnerability to these dysfunctions. Biomarkers for mitochondrial dysfunction have been identified, but seem widely under-utilized despite available therapeutic interventions. Nutritional supplementation to decrease oxidative stress along with factors to improve reduced glutathione, as well as hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT represent supported and rationale approaches. The underlying pathophysiology and autistic symptoms of affected individuals would be expected to either improve or cease worsening once effective treatment for MtD is implemented.

  12. Mitochondrial small conductance SK2 channels prevent glutamate-induced oxytosis and mitochondrial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolga, Amalia M; Netter, Michael F; Perocchi, Fabiana; Doti, Nunzianna; Meissner, Lilja; Tobaben, Svenja; Grohm, Julia; Zischka, Hans; Plesnila, Nikolaus; Decher, Niels; Culmsee, Carsten

    2013-04-12

    Small conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK2/K(Ca)2.2) channels are known to be located in the neuronal plasma membrane where they provide feedback control of NMDA receptor activity. Here, we provide evidence that SK2 channels are also located in the inner mitochondrial membrane of neuronal mitochondria. Patch clamp recordings in isolated mitoplasts suggest insertion into the inner mitochondrial membrane with the C and N termini facing the intermembrane space. Activation of SK channels increased mitochondrial K(+) currents, whereas channel inhibition attenuated these currents. In a model of glutamate toxicity, activation of SK2 channels attenuated the loss of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential, blocked mitochondrial fission, prevented the release of proapoptotic mitochondrial proteins, and reduced cell death. Neuroprotection was blocked by specific SK2 inhibitory peptides and siRNA targeting SK2 channels. Activation of mitochondrial SK2 channels may therefore represent promising targets for neuroprotective strategies in conditions of mitochondrial dysfunction.

  13. Mitochondrial Small Conductance SK2 Channels Prevent Glutamate-induced Oxytosis and Mitochondrial Dysfunction*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolga, Amalia M.; Netter, Michael F.; Perocchi, Fabiana; Doti, Nunzianna; Meissner, Lilja; Tobaben, Svenja; Grohm, Julia; Zischka, Hans; Plesnila, Nikolaus; Decher, Niels; Culmsee, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Small conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK2/KCa2.2) channels are known to be located in the neuronal plasma membrane where they provide feedback control of NMDA receptor activity. Here, we provide evidence that SK2 channels are also located in the inner mitochondrial membrane of neuronal mitochondria. Patch clamp recordings in isolated mitoplasts suggest insertion into the inner mitochondrial membrane with the C and N termini facing the intermembrane space. Activation of SK channels increased mitochondrial K+ currents, whereas channel inhibition attenuated these currents. In a model of glutamate toxicity, activation of SK2 channels attenuated the loss of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential, blocked mitochondrial fission, prevented the release of proapoptotic mitochondrial proteins, and reduced cell death. Neuroprotection was blocked by specific SK2 inhibitory peptides and siRNA targeting SK2 channels. Activation of mitochondrial SK2 channels may therefore represent promising targets for neuroprotective strategies in conditions of mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:23430260

  14. Activation of mitochondrial STAT-3 and reduced mitochondria damage during hypothermia treatment for post-cardiac arrest myocardial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chien-Hua; Tsai, Min-Shan; Chiang, Chih-Yen; Su, Yu-Jen; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Chang, Wei-Tien; Chen, Huei-Wen; Chen, Wen-Jone

    2015-11-01

    While therapeutic hypothermia improves the outcomes of individuals in cardiac arrest, the hemodynamic responses and mechanisms which underlie hypothermia-induced cardioprotection are not fully understood. Therefore, we investigated the mechanism by which induced hypothermia preserves cardiac function and protects against mitochondrial damage following cardiac arrest. Cardiac arrest was induced in adult male Wistar rats by asphyxiation for 8.5 min. Following resuscitation, the animals were randomly assigned to a hypothermia (32 °C) or normothermia (37 °C) group. Monitoring results showed that cardiac output at the fourth hour after resuscitation was significantly better in rats treated with hypothermia when compared to rats treated with normothermia (P mitochondrial permeability transition pores occurred less frequently in the hypothermic group. While complex I/III activity in the electron transport reaction was damaged after cardiac arrest and resuscitation, the degree of injury was ameliorated by hypothermia treatment (P mitochondrial integrity and electron transport activity.

  15. Decreased mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation capacity in the human heart with left ventricular systolic dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stride, Nis; Larsen, Steen; Hey-Mogensen, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) with left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD) is associated with a shift in substrate utilization and a compromised energetic state. Whether these changes are connected with mitochondrial dysfunction is not known. We hypothesized that the cardiac phenotype in LVSD could...... be caused by reduced mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) capacity and reduced mitochondrial creatine kinase (miCK) capacity. The study aim was to test mitochondrial OXPHOS capacity in LVSD myocardium compared with OXPHOS capacity in a comparable patient group without LVSD....

  16. Mitochondrial dysfunction in ataxia-telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentin-Vega, Yasmine A; Maclean, Kirsteen H; Tait-Mulder, Jacqueline; Milasta, Sandra; Steeves, Meredith; Dorsey, Frank C; Cleveland, John L; Green, Douglas R; Kastan, Michael B

    2012-02-09

    Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) plays a central role in DNA damage responses, and its loss leads to development of T-cell malignancies. Here, we show that ATM loss also leads to intrinsic mitochondrial abnormalities in thymocytes, including elevated reactive oxygen species, increased aberrant mitochondria, high cellular respiratory capacity, and decreased mitophagy. A fraction of ATM protein is localized in mitochondria, and it is rapidly activated by mitochondrial dysfunction. Unexpectedly, allelic loss of the autophagy regulator Beclin-1 significantly delayed tumor development in ATM-null mice. This effect was not associated with rescue of DNA damage signaling but rather with a significant reversal of the mitochondrial abnormalities. These data support a model in which ATM plays direct roles in modulating mitochondrial homeostasis and suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction and associated increases in mitochondrial reactive oxygen species contribute to the cancer-prone phenotype observed in organisms lacking ATM. Thus, ataxia-telangiectasia should be considered, at least in part, as a mitochondrial disease.

  17. Melatonin in Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Related Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatramanujam Srinivasan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction is considered one of the major causative factors in the aging process, ischemia/reperfusion (I/R, septic shock, and neurodegenerative disorders like Parkinson's disease (PD, Alzheimer's disease (AD, and Huntington's disease (HD. Increased free radical generation, enhanced mitochondrial inducible nitric oxide (NO synthase activity, enhanced NO production, decreased respiratory complex activity, impaired electron transport system, and opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore all have been suggested as factors responsible for impaired mitochondrial function. Melatonin, the major hormone of the pineal gland, also acts as an antioxidant and as a regulator of mitochondrial bioenergetic function. Both in vitro and in vivo, melatonin was effective for preventing oxidative stress/nitrosative stress-induced mitochondrial dysfunction seen in experimental models of PD, AD, and HD. In addition, melatonin is known to retard aging and to inhibit the lethal effects of septic shock or I/R lesions by maintaining respiratory complex activities, electron transport chain, and ATP production in mitochondria. Melatonin is selectively taken up by mitochondrial membranes, a function not shared by other antioxidants. Melatonin has thus emerged as a major potential therapeutic tool for treating neurodegenerative disorders such as PD or AD, and for preventing the lethal effects of septic shock or I/R.

  18. Hepatitis C Virus-Induced Mitochondrial Dysfunctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birke Bartosch

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic hepatitis C is characterized by metabolic disorders and a microenvironment in the liver dominated by oxidative stress, inflammation and regeneration processes that lead in the long term to hepatocellular carcinoma. Many lines of evidence suggest that mitochondrial dysfunctions, including modification of metabolic fluxes, generation and elimination of oxidative stress, Ca2+ signaling and apoptosis, play a central role in these processes. However, how these dysfunctions are induced by the virus and whether they play a role in disease progression and neoplastic transformation remains to be determined. Most in vitro studies performed so far have shown that several of the hepatitis C virus (HCV proteins localize to mitochondria, but the consequences of these interactions on mitochondrial functions remain contradictory, probably due to the use of artificial expression and replication systems. In vivo studies are hampered by the fact that innate and adaptive immune responses will overlay mitochondrial dysfunctions induced directly in the hepatocyte by HCV. Thus, the molecular aspects underlying HCV-induced mitochondrial dysfunctions and their roles in viral replication and the associated pathology need yet to be confirmed in the context of productively replicating virus and physiologically relevant in vitro and in vivo model systems.

  19. How do yeast sense mitochondrial dysfunction?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry A. Knorre

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Apart from energy transformation, mitochondria play important signaling roles. In yeast, mitochondrial signaling relies on several molecular cascades. However, it is not clear how a cell detects a particular mitochondrial malfunction. The problem is that there are many possible manifestations of mitochondrial dysfunction. For example, exposure to the specific antibiotics can either decrease (inhibitors of respiratory chain or increase (inhibitors of ATP-synthase mitochondrial transmembrane potential. Moreover, even in the absence of the dysfunctions, a cell needs feedback from mitochondria to coordinate mitochondrial biogenesis and/or removal by mitophagy during the division cycle. To cope with the complexity, only a limited set of compounds is monitored by yeast cells to estimate mitochondrial functionality. The known examples of such compounds are ATP, reactive oxygen species, intermediates of amino acids synthesis, short peptides, Fe-S clusters and heme, and also the precursor proteins which fail to be imported by mitochondria. On one hand, the levels of these molecules depend not only on mitochondria. On the other hand, these substances are recognized by the cytosolic sensors which transmit the signals to the nucleus leading to general, as opposed to mitochondria-specific, transcriptional response. Therefore, we argue that both ways of mitochondria-to-nucleus communication in yeast are mostly (if not completely unspecific, are mediated by the cytosolic signaling machinery and strongly depend on cellular metabolic state.

  20. Mitochondrial tRNA cleavage by tRNA-targeting ribonuclease causes mitochondrial dysfunction observed in mitochondrial disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Tetsuhiro, E-mail: atetsu@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Shimizu, Ayano; Takahashi, Kazutoshi; Hidaka, Makoto; Masaki, Haruhiko, E-mail: amasaki@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • MTS-tagged ribonuclease was translocated successfully to the mitochondrial matrix. • MTS-tagged ribonuclease cleaved mt tRNA and reduced COX activity. • Easy and reproducible method of inducing mt tRNA dysfunction. - Abstract: Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a genome possessed by mitochondria. Since reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated during aerobic respiration in mitochondria, mtDNA is commonly exposed to the risk of DNA damage. Mitochondrial disease is caused by mitochondrial dysfunction, and mutations or deletions on mitochondrial tRNA (mt tRNA) genes are often observed in mtDNA of patients with the disease. Hence, the correlation between mt tRNA activity and mitochondrial dysfunction has been assessed. Then, cybrid cells, which are constructed by the fusion of an enucleated cell harboring altered mtDNA with a ρ{sup 0} cell, have long been used for the analysis due to difficulty in mtDNA manipulation. Here, we propose a new method that involves mt tRNA cleavage by a bacterial tRNA-specific ribonuclease. The ribonuclease tagged with a mitochondrial-targeting sequence (MTS) was successfully translocated to the mitochondrial matrix. Additionally, mt tRNA cleavage, which resulted in the decrease of cytochrome c oxidase (COX) activity, was observed.

  1. Mitochondrial dysfunction in type 2 diabetes and obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Kurt; Mogensen, Martin; Sahlin, Kent

    2008-01-01

    Insulin resistance in skeletal muscle is a major hallmark of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) and obesity that is characterized by impaired insulin-mediated glucose transport and glycogen synthesis and by increased intramyocellular content of lipid metabolites. Several studies have provided evidence...... for mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle of type 2 diabetic and prediabetic subjects, primarily due to a lower content of mitochondria (mitochondrial biogenesis) and possibly to a reduced functional capacity per mitochondrion. This article discusses the latest advances in the understanding of the molecular...... mechanisms underlying insulin resistance in human skeletal muscle in T2D and obesity, with a focus on possible links between insulin resistance and mitochondrial dysfunction....

  2. Mitochondrial dysfunction and risk of cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, M; Melbye, M; Diaz, L J

    2015-01-01

    -years of follow-up, 19 subjects developed a primary cancer. The corresponding SIR for any primary cancer was 1.06 (95% confidence interval 0.68-1.63). Subgroup analyses according to mutational subtype yielded similar results, for example, a SIR of 0.94 (95% CI 0.53 to 1.67) for the m.3243A>G maternally inherited......BACKGROUND: Mitochondrial mutations are commonly reported in tumours, but it is unclear whether impaired mitochondrial function per se is a cause or consequence of cancer. To elucidate this, we examined the risk of cancer in a nationwide cohort of patients with mitochondrial dysfunction. METHODS...... matrilineal relatives to a cohort member with a genetically confirmed maternally inherited mDNA mutation. Information on cancer was obtained by linkage to the Danish Cancer Register. Standardised incidence ratios (SIRs) were used to assess the relative risk of cancer. RESULTS: During 7334 person...

  3. Mitochondrial dysfunction links ceramide activated HRK expression and cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhan Rizvi

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Cell death is an essential process in normal development and homeostasis. In eyes, corneal epithelial injury leads to the death of cells in underlying stroma, an event believed to initiate corneal wound healing. The molecular basis of wound induced corneal stromal cell death is not understood in detail. Studies of others have indicated that ceramide may play significant role in stromal cell death following LASIK surgery. We have undertaken the present study to investigate the mechanism of death induced by C6 ceramide in cultures of human corneal stromal (HCSF fibroblasts. METHODS: Cultures of HCSF were established from freshly excised corneas. Cell death was induced in low passage (p<4 cultures of HCSF by treating the cells with C6 ceramide or C6 dihydroceramide as a control. Cell death was assessed by Live/Dead cell staining with calcein AM and ethidium homodimer-1 as well as Annexin V staining, caspase activation and TUNEL staining Mitochondrial dysfunction was assessed by Mito Sox Red, JC-1 and cytochrome C release Gene expression was examined by qPCR and western blotting. RESULTS: Our data demonstrate ceramide caused mitochondrial dysfunction as evident from reduced MTT staining, cyto c release from mitochondria, enhanced generation of ROS, and loss in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm. Cell death was evident from Live -Dead Cell staining and the inability to reestablish cultures from detached cells. Ceramide induced the expression of the harikari gene(HRK and up-regulated JNK phosphorylation. In ceramide treated cells HRK was translocated to mitochondria, where it was found to interact with mitochondrial protein p32. The data also demonstrated HRK, p32 and BAD interaction. Ceramide-induced expression of HRK, mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death were reduced by HRK knockdown with HRK siRNA. CONCLUSION: Our data document that ceramide is capable of inducing death of corneal stromal fibroblasts through the induction of HRK

  4. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Metabolic Syndrome and Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulaganathan Mabalirajan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Though severe or refractory asthma merely affects less than 10% of asthma population, it consumes significant health resources and contributes significant morbidity and mortality. Severe asthma does not fell in the routine definition of asthma and requires alternative treatment strategies. It has been observed that asthma severity increases with higher body mass index. The obese-asthmatics, in general, have the features of metabolic syndrome and are progressively causing a significant burden for both developed and developing countries thanks to the westernization of the world. As most of the features of metabolic syndrome seem to be originated from central obesity, the underlying mechanisms for metabolic syndrome could help us to understand the pathobiology of obese-asthma condition. While mitochondrial dysfunction is the common factor for most of the risk factors of metabolic syndrome, such as central obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes, the involvement of mitochondria in obese-asthma pathogenesis seems to be important as mitochondrial dysfunction has recently been shown to be involved in airway epithelial injury and asthma pathogenesis. This review discusses current understanding of the overlapping features between metabolic syndrome and asthma in relation to mitochondrial structural and functional alterations with an aim to uncover mechanisms for obese-asthma.

  5. Bedside diagnosis of mitochondrial dysfunction in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, A.; Nielsen, T. H.; Nilsson, O.

    2014-01-01

    to diagnose and separate cerebral ischemia and mitochondrial dysfunction bedside. The study explores whether cerebral biochemical variables in SAH patients most frequently exhibit a pattern indicating ischemia or mitochondrial dysfunction. Methods - In 55 patients with severe SAH, intracerebral microdialysis...... was performed during neurocritical care with bedside analysis and display of glucose, pyruvate, lactate, glutamate, and glycerol. The biochemical patterns observed were compared to those previously described in animal studies of induced mitochondrial dysfunction as well as the pattern obtained in patients...... with recirculated cerebral infarcts. Results - In 29 patients, the biochemical pattern indicated mitochondrial dysfunction while 10 patients showed a pattern of cerebral ischemia, six of which also exhibited periods of mitochondrial dysfunction. Mitochondrial dysfunction was observed during 5162 h. An ischemic...

  6. The effect of mitochondrial dysfunction on cytosolic nucleotide metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Claus Desler; Lykke, Anne; Rasmussen, Lene Juel

    2010-01-01

    of cytosolic ribonucleotides and deoxyribonucleotides, which in turn can result in aberrant RNA and DNA synthesis. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to genomic instability, and it is possible that the limiting effect of mitochondrial dysfunction on the levels of nucleotides and resulting aberrant RNA...... and DNA synthesis in part can be responsible for this link. This paper summarizes the parts of the metabolic pathways responsible for nucleotide metabolism that can be affected by mitochondrial dysfunction....

  7. Role and Treatment of Mitochondrial DNA-Related Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Sporadic Neurodegenerative Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Swerdlow, Russell H.

    2011-01-01

    Several sporadic neurodegenerative diseases display phenomena that directly or indirectly relate to mitochondrial function. Data suggesting altered mitochondrial function in these diseases could arise from mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are reviewed. Approaches for manipulating mitochondrial function and minimizing the downstream consequences of mitochondrial dysfunction are discussed.

  8. Neurodegenerative and Fatiguing Illnesses, Infections and Mitochondrial Dysfunction: Use of Natural Supplements to Improve Mitochondrial Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garth L. Nicolson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Many chronic diseases and illnesses are associated with one or more chronic infections, dysfunction of mitochondria and reduced production of ATP. This results in fatigue and other symptoms that occur in most if not all chronic conditions and diseases. Methods: This is a review of the published literature on chronic infections in neurodegenerative diseases and fatiguing illnesses that are also typified by mitochondrial dysfunction. This contribution also reviews the use of natural supplements to enhance mitochondrial function and reduce the effects of chronic infections to improve overall function in various chronic illnesses. Results: Mitochondrial function can be enhanced by the use of various natural supplements, notably Lipid Replacement Therapy (LRT using glyerolphospholipids and other mitochondrial supplements. In various chronic illnesses that are characterized by the presence of chronic infections, such as intracellular bacteria (Mycoplasma, Borrelia, Chlamydia and other infections and viruses, LRT has proven useful in multiple clinical trials. For example, in clinical studies on chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia syndrome and other chronic fatiguing illnesses where a large majority of patients have chronic infections, LRT significantly reduced fatigue by 35-43% in different clinical trials and increased mitochondrial function. In clinical trials on patients with multiple intracellular bacterial infections and intractable fatigue LRT plus other mitochondrial supplements significantly decreased fatigue and improved mood and cognition. Conclusions: LRT formulations designed to improve mitochondrial function appear to be useful as non-toxic dietary supplements for reducing fatigue and restoring mitochondrial and other cellular membrane functions in patients with chronic illnesses and multiple chronic infections.

  9. Correlation between mitochondrial dysfunction and the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-yu LIU

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is a progressive neurodegenerative disease. A growing number of studies have shown that mitochondrial dysfunction plays an important role in the pathogenesis of PD. Therefore, this review will mainly discuss the research progress on the correlation between PD and abnormal mitochondrial dynamics, mitochondrial autophapy as well as mitochondrial DNA mutations and mitochondrial complex Ⅰ inhibition.doi:10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.02.012

  10. Protective role of melatonin in mitochondrial dysfunction and related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradies, Giuseppe; Paradies, Valeria; Ruggiero, Francesca M; Petrosillo, Giuseppe

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondria are the powerhouse of the eukaryotic cell through their use of oxidative phosphorylation to generate ATP. Mitochondrial dysfunction is considered an important contributing factor in a variety of physiopathological situations such as aging, heart ischemia/reperfusion injury, diabetes and several neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases, as well as in cell death. Increased formation of reactive oxygen species, altered respiratory chain complexes activity and opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore have been suggested as possible factors responsible for impaired mitochondrial function. Therefore, preventing mitochondrial dysfunction could be an effective therapeutic strategy against cellular degenerative processes. Cardiolipin is a unique phospholipid located at the level of inner mitochondrial membrane where it plays an important role in mitochondrial bioenergetics, as well as in cell death. Cardiolipin abnormalities have been associated with mitochondrial dysfunction in a variety of pathological conditions and aging. Melatonin, the major secretory product of the pineal gland, is a well-known antioxidant agent and thus an effective protector of mitochondrial bioenergetic function. Melatonin was reported to prevent mitochondrial dysfunction from oxidative damage by preserving cardiolipin integrity, and this may explain, at least in part, the beneficial effect of this compound in mitochondrial physiopathology. In this article, mechanisms through which melatonin exerts its protective role in mitochondrial dysfunction and related disorders are reviewed.

  11. Hyperoxia activates ATM independent from mitochondrial ROS and dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resseguie, Emily A; Staversky, Rhonda J; Brookes, Paul S; O'Reilly, Michael A

    2015-08-01

    High levels of oxygen (hyperoxia) are often used to treat individuals with respiratory distress, yet prolonged hyperoxia causes mitochondrial dysfunction and excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) that can damage molecules such as DNA. Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase is activated by nuclear DNA double strand breaks and delays hyperoxia-induced cell death through downstream targets p53 and p21. Evidence for its role in regulating mitochondrial function is emerging, yet it has not been determined if mitochondrial dysfunction or ROS activates ATM. Because ATM maintains mitochondrial homeostasis, we hypothesized that hyperoxia induces both mitochondrial dysfunction and ROS that activate ATM. In A549 lung epithelial cells, hyperoxia decreased mitochondrial respiratory reserve capacity at 12h and basal respiration by 48 h. ROS were significantly increased at 24h, yet mitochondrial DNA double strand breaks were not detected. ATM was not required for activating p53 when mitochondrial respiration was inhibited by chronic exposure to antimycin A. Also, ATM was not further activated by mitochondrial ROS, which were enhanced by depleting manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2). In contrast, ATM dampened the accumulation of mitochondrial ROS during exposure to hyperoxia. Our findings suggest that hyperoxia-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and ROS do not activate ATM. ATM more likely carries out its canonical response to nuclear DNA damage and may function to attenuate mitochondrial ROS that contribute to oxygen toxicity.

  12. Mitochondrial dysfunction and potential anticancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lleonart, Matilde E; Grodzicki, Robert; Graifer, Dmitri M; Lyakhovich, Alex

    2017-07-06

    Mitochondrial dysfunction (MDF) has been identified as an important factor in various diseases ranging from neurological disorders, to diseases of the cardiovascular system and metabolic syndromes. MDF was also found in cancer as well as in cancer predisposition syndromes with defective DNA damage response (DDR) machinery. Moreover, a recent highlight arises from the detection of MDF in eukaryotic cells upon treatment with antibiotics. In this review, we focus on recent studies of MDF in pathological conditions with a particular emphasis on the effects of various classes of antibiotics on mitochondria. Special attention is given to the role of autophagy/mitophagy in MDF and repurposing antibiotics as anticancer drugs. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and mitochondrial dysfunction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongzhong Wei; R Scott Rector; John P Thyfault; Jamal A Ibdah

    2008-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) includes hepatic steatosis, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), fibrosis,and cirrhosis. NAFLD is the most common liver disorder in the United States and worldwide. Due to the rapid rise of the metabolic syndrome, the prevalence of NAFLD has recently dramatically increased and will continue to increase. NAFLD has also the potential to progress to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) or liver failure. NAFLD is strongly linked to caloric overconsumption, physical inactivity, insulin resistance and genetic factors. Although significant progress in understanding the pathogenesis of NAFLD has been achieved in years, the primary metabolic abnormalities leading to lipid accumulation within hepatocytes has remained poorly understood.Mitochondria are critical metabolic organelles serving as "cellular power plants". Accumulating evidence indicate that hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction is crucial to the pathogenesis of NAFLD. This review is focused on the significant role of mitochondria in the development of NAFLD.

  14. Mitochondrial dysfunctions in neurodegenerative diseases: relevance to Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hroudová, Jana; Singh, Namrata; Fišar, Zdeněk

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunctions are supposed to be responsible for many neurodegenerative diseases dominating in Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and Huntington's disease (HD). A growing body of evidence suggests that defects in mitochondrial metabolism and particularly of electron transport chain may play a role in pathogenesis of AD. Structurally and functionally damaged mitochondria do not produce sufficient ATP and are more prominent in producing proapoptotic factors and reactive oxygen species (ROS), and this can be an early stage of several mitochondrial disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases. Mitochondrial dysfunctions may be caused by both mutations in mitochondrial or nuclear DNA that code mitochondrial components and by environmental causes. In the following review, common aspects of mitochondrial impairment concerned about neurodegenerative diseases are summarized including ROS production, impaired mitochondrial dynamics, and apoptosis. Also, damaged function of electron transport chain complexes and interactions between pathological proteins and mitochondria are described for AD particularly and marginally for PD and HD.

  15. Unraveling Biochemical Pathways Affected by Mitochondrial Dysfunctions Using Metabolomic Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demine, Stéphane; Reddy, Nagabushana; Renard, Patricia; Raes, Martine; Arnould, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction(s) (MDs) can be defined as alterations in the mitochondria, including mitochondrial uncoupling, mitochondrial depolarization, inhibition of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, mitochondrial network fragmentation, mitochondrial or nuclear DNA mutations and the mitochondrial accumulation of protein aggregates. All these MDs are known to alter the capacity of ATP production and are observed in several pathological states/diseases, including cancer, obesity, muscle and neurological disorders. The induction of MDs can also alter the secretion of several metabolites, reactive oxygen species production and modify several cell-signalling pathways to resolve the mitochondrial dysfunction or ultimately trigger cell death. Many metabolites, such as fatty acids and derived compounds, could be secreted into the blood stream by cells suffering from mitochondrial alterations. In this review, we summarize how a mitochondrial uncoupling can modify metabolites, the signalling pathways and transcription factors involved in this process. We describe how to identify the causes or consequences of mitochondrial dysfunction using metabolomics (liquid and gas chromatography associated with mass spectrometry analysis, NMR spectroscopy) in the obesity and insulin resistance thematic. PMID:25257998

  16. Unraveling Biochemical Pathways Affected by Mitochondrial Dysfunctions Using Metabolomic Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Demine

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction(s (MDs can be defined as alterations in the mitochondria, including mitochondrial uncoupling, mitochondrial depolarization, inhibition of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, mitochondrial network fragmentation, mitochondrial or nuclear DNA mutations and the mitochondrial accumulation of protein aggregates. All these MDs are known to alter the capacity of ATP production and are observed in several pathological states/diseases, including cancer, obesity, muscle and neurological disorders. The induction of MDs can also alter the secretion of several metabolites, reactive oxygen species production and modify several cell-signalling pathways to resolve the mitochondrial dysfunction or ultimately trigger cell death. Many metabolites, such as fatty acids and derived compounds, could be secreted into the blood stream by cells suffering from mitochondrial alterations. In this review, we summarize how a mitochondrial uncoupling can modify metabolites, the signalling pathways and transcription factors involved in this process. We describe how to identify the causes or consequences of mitochondrial dysfunction using metabolomics (liquid and gas chromatography associated with mass spectrometry analysis, NMR spectroscopy in the obesity and insulin resistance thematic.

  17. Genetics Home Reference: multiple mitochondrial dysfunctions syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... links) National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: Encephalopathy Information Page North American Mitochondrial Disease Consortium: Overview of Mitochondrial Diseases Educational Resources ( ...

  18. Mitochondrial Dysfunction: Different Routes to Alzheimer’s Disease Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquale Picone

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are dynamic ATP-generating organelle which contribute to many cellular functions including bioenergetics processes, intracellular calcium regulation, alteration of reduction-oxidation potential of cells, free radical scavenging, and activation of caspase mediated cell death. Mitochondrial functions can be negatively affected by amyloid β peptide (Aβ, an important component in Alzheimer’s disease (AD pathogenesis, and Aβ can interact with mitochondria and cause mitochondrial dysfunction. One of the most accepted hypotheses for AD onset implicates that mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are one of the primary events in the insurgence of the pathology. Here, we examine structural and functional mitochondrial changes in presence of Aβ. In particular we review data concerning Aβ import into mitochondrion and its involvement in mitochondrial oxidative stress, bioenergetics, biogenesis, trafficking, mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP formation, and mitochondrial protein interaction. Moreover, the development of AD therapy targeting mitochondria is also discussed.

  19. Geniposide attenuates mitochondrial dysfunction and memory deficits in APP/PS1 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Cui; Liu, Xiaoli; Liu, Hongjuan; Chen, Tong; Zhang, Wensheng

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction appear early and contribute to the disease progression in Alzheimer's disease (AD), which can be detected extensively in AD patients brains as well as in transgenic AD mice brains. Thus, treatments that result in attenuation of oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction may hold potential for AD treatment. Geniposide, a pharmacologically active component purified from gardenia fruit, exhibits anti-oxidative, antiinflammatory and other important therapeutic properties. However, whether geniposide has any protective effect on oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in AD transgenic mouse model has not yet been reported. Here, we demonstrate that intragastric administration of geniposide significantly reduces oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in addition to improving learning and memory in APP/PS1 mice. Geniposide exerts protective effects on mitochondrial dysfunction in APP/PS1 mice through suppressing the mitochondrial oxidative damage and increasing the mitochondrial membrane potential and activity of cytochrome c oxidase. These studies indicate that geniposide may attenuate memory deficits through the suppression of mitochondrial oxidative stress. Thus, geniposide may be a potential therapeutic reagent for halting and preventing AD progress.

  20. Dysfunction of mitochondrial dynamics in the brains of scrapie-infected mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hong-Seok; Choi, Yeong-Gon; Shin, Hae-Young; Oh, Jae-Min; Park, Jeong-Ho; Kim, Jae-Il; Carp, Richard I; Choi, Eun-Kyoung; Kim, Yong-Sun

    2014-05-30

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a common and prominent feature of many neurodegenerative diseases, including prion diseases; it is induced by oxidative stress in scrapie-infected animal models. In previous studies, we found swelling and dysfunction of mitochondria in the brains of scrapie-infected mice compared to brains of controls, but the mechanisms underlying mitochondrial dysfunction remain unclear. To examine whether the dysregulation of mitochondrial proteins is related to the mitochondrial dysfunction associated with prion disease, we investigated the expression patterns of mitochondrial fusion and fission proteins in the brains of ME7 prion-infected mice. Immunoblot analysis revealed that Mfn1 was up-regulated in both whole brain and specific brain regions, including the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, of ME7-infected mice compared to controls. Additionally, expression levels of Fis1 and Mfn2 were elevated in the hippocampus and the striatum, respectively, of the ME7-infected brain. In contrast, Dlp1 expression was significantly reduced in the hippocampus in the ME7-infected brain, particularly in the cytosolic fraction. Finally, we observed abnormal mitochondrial enlargement and histopathological change in the hippocampus of the ME7-infected brain. These observations suggest that the mitochondrial dysfunction, which is presumably caused by the dysregulation of mitochondrial fusion and fission proteins, may contribute to the neuropathological changes associated with prion disease.

  1. Harmonization of Mangiferin on methylmercury engendered mitochondrial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Shubhankar; Paul, Ajanta; Mumbrekar, Kamalesh D; Rao, Satish B S

    2017-02-01

    Mangiferin (MGN), a C-glucosylxanthone abundantly found in mango plants, was studied for its potential to ameliorate methylmercury (MeHg) induced mitochondrial damage in HepG2 (human hepatocarcinoma) cell line. Cell viability experiments performed using 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5- diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) showed protective property of MGN in annulling MeHg-induced cytotoxicity. Conditioning the cells with optimal dose of MGN (50 µM) lowered MeHg-induced oxidative stress, calcium influx/efflux, depletion of mitochondrial trans-membrane potential and prevented mitochondrial fission as observed by decrease in Mitotracker red fluorescence, expression of pDRP1 (serine 616), and DRP1 levels. MGN pre-treated cells demonstrated elevation in the activities of glutathione (GSH), Glutathione-S-transferase (GST), Glutathione peroxidase (GPx), Glutathione reductase (GR), reduced levels of Aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) enzyme complexes. In addition, the anti-apoptotic effect of MGN was clearly indicated by the reduction in MeHg-induced apoptotic cells analyzed by flowcytometric analysis after Annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide staining. In conclusion, the present work demonstrates the ability of a dietary polyphenol, MGN to ameliorate MeHg-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction in human hepatic cells in vitro. This hepatoprotective potential may be attributed predominantly to the free radical scavenging/antioxidant property of MGN, by facilitating the balancing of cellular Ca(2+) ions, maintenance of redox homeostasis and intracellular antioxidant activities, ultimately preserving the mitochondrial function and cell viability after MeHg intoxication. As MeHg intoxication occurs over a period of time, continuous consumption of such dietary compounds may prove to be very useful in promoting human health. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 630-644, 2017.

  2. Linking telomere loss and mitochondrial dysfunction in chronic disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez-Ebsen, Ana Carlota; Gregersen, Niels; Olsen, Rikke Kj

    2017-01-01

    , including telomeric DNA, causing telomere shortening. In fact, primary mitochondrial dysfunction (for example respiratory chain disorders) and secondary mitochondrial dysfunction (such as metabolic diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, cardiovascular diseases, and mood disorders, among others) have been...... shown to have shorter telomeres than healthy individuals. Drawing a mechanistic connection between telomere function and mitochondria biology will provide a broader perspective for understanding the pathophysiology of diseases and their relation to the aging process, and may provide opportunities...

  3. Alcohol dehydrogenase accentuates ethanol-induced myocardial dysfunction and mitochondrial damage in mice: role of mitochondrial death pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Rui; Ren, Jun

    2010-01-18

    Binge drinking and alcohol toxicity are often associated with myocardial dysfunction possibly due to accumulation of the ethanol metabolite acetaldehyde although the underlying mechanism is unknown. This study was designed to examine the impact of accelerated ethanol metabolism on myocardial contractility, mitochondrial function and apoptosis using a murine model of cardiac-specific overexpression of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). ADH and wild-type FVB mice were acutely challenged with ethanol (3 g/kg/d, i.p.) for 3 days. Myocardial contractility, mitochondrial damage and apoptosis (death receptor and mitochondrial pathways) were examined. Ethanol led to reduced cardiac contractility, enlarged cardiomyocyte, mitochondrial damage and apoptosis, the effects of which were exaggerated by ADH transgene. In particular, ADH exacerbated mitochondrial dysfunction manifested as decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and accumulation of mitochondrial O(2) (*-). Myocardium from ethanol-treated mice displayed enhanced Bax, Caspase-3 and decreased Bcl-2 expression, the effect of which with the exception of Caspase-3 was augmented by ADH. ADH accentuated ethanol-induced increase in the mitochondrial death domain components pro-caspase-9 and cytochrome C in the cytoplasm. Neither ethanol nor ADH affected the expression of ANP, total pro-caspase-9, cytosolic and total pro-caspase-8, TNF-alpha, Fas receptor, Fas L and cytosolic AIF. Taken together, these data suggest that enhanced acetaldehyde production through ADH overexpression following acute ethanol exposure exacerbated ethanol-induced myocardial contractile dysfunction, cardiomyocyte enlargement, mitochondrial damage and apoptosis, indicating a pivotal role of ADH in ethanol-induced cardiac dysfunction possibly through mitochondrial death pathway of apoptosis.

  4. Experimental treatments for mitochondrial dysfunction in sepsis: A narrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilang Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response to infection. Sepsis, which can lead to severe sepsis, septic shock, and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, is an important cause of mortality. Pathogenesis is extremely complex. In recent years, cell hypoxia caused by mitochondrial dysfunction has become a hot research field. Sepsis damages the structure and function of mitochondria, conversely, mitochondrial dysfunction aggravated sepsis. The treatment of sepsis lacks effective specific drugs. The aim of this paper is to undertake a narrative review of the current experimental treatment for mitochondrial dysfunction in sepsis. The search was conducted in PubMed databases and Web of Science databases from 1950 to January 2014. A total of 1,090 references were retrieved by the search, of which 121 researches met all the inclusion criteria were included. Articles on the relationship between sepsis and mitochondria, and drugs used for mitochondrial dysfunction in sepsis were reviewed retrospectively. The drugs were divided into four categories: (1 Drug related to mitochondrial matrix and respiratory chain, (2 drugs of mitochondrial antioxidant and free radical scavengers, (3 drugs related to mitochondrial membrane stability, (4 hormone therapy for septic mitochondria. In animal experiments, many drugs show good results. However, clinical research lacks. In future studies, the urgent need is to develop promising drugs in clinical trials.

  5. Impaired glycogen synthase activity and mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Kurt; Beck-Nielsen, Henning

    2006-01-01

    expression analysis and proteomics have pointed to abnormalities in mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and cellular stress in muscle of type 2 diabetic subjects, and recent work suggests that impaired mitochondrial activity is another early defect in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. This review...... will discuss the latest advances in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying insulin resistance in human skeletal muscle in type 2 diabetes with focus on possible links between impaired glycogen synthase activity and mitochondrial dysfunction....

  6. Oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and the mitochondria theory of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Yahui; Trabucco, Sally E; Zhang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Aging is characterized by a progressive decline in cellular function, organismal fitness and increased risk of age-associated diseases and death. One potential cause of aging is the progressive accumulation of dysfunctional mitochondria and oxidative damage with age. Considerable efforts have been made in our understanding of the role of mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in aging and age-associated diseases. This chapter outlines the interplay between oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction, and discusses their impact on senescence, cell death, stem cell function, age-associated diseases and longevity.

  7. Mitochondrial APE1/Ref-1 suppressed protein kinase C-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in mouse endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Hee Kyoung; Lee, Yu Ran; Park, Myoung Soo; Choi, Sunga; Park, Kyoungsook; Lee, Sang Ki; Kim, Cuk-Seong; Park, Jin Bong; Jeon, Byeong Hwa

    2014-07-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) induces mitochondrial dysfunction, which is an important pathological factor in cardiovascular diseases. The role of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease-1/redox factor-1 (APE1/Ref-1) on PKC-induced mitochondrial dysfunction has not been variously investigated. In this study, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), an activator of protein kinase C, induced mitochondrial hyperpolarization and reactive oxygen species generation and also increased mitochondrial translocation of APE1/Ref-1. APE1/Ref-1 overexpression suppressed PMA-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. In contrast, gene silencing of APE1/Ref-1 increased the sensitivity of mitochondrial dysfunction. Moreover, mitochondrial targeting sequence (MTS)-fused APE1/Ref-1 more effectively suppressed PMA-induced mitochondrial dysfunctions. These results suggest that mitochondrial APE1/Ref-1 is contributed to the protective role to protein kinase C-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in endothelial cells.

  8. Therapeutic Strategies for Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Oxidative Stress in Age-Related Metabolic Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, J S; Kumar, S; Vijayan, M; Bhatti, G K; Reddy, P H

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria are complex, intercellular organelles present in the cells and are involved in multiple roles including ATP formation, free radicals generation and scavenging, calcium homeostasis, cellular differentiation, and cell death. Many studies depicted the involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage in aging and pathogenesis of age-related metabolic disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. Remarkable advancements have been made in understanding the structure, function, and physiology of mitochondria in metabolic disorders such as diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular diseases, and stroke. Further, much progress has been done in the improvement of therapeutic strategies, including lifestyle interventions, pharmacological, and mitochondria-targeted therapeutic approaches. These strategies were mainly focused to reduce the mitochondrial dysfunction caused by oxidative stress and to retain the mitochondrial health in various diseases. In this chapter, we have highlighted the involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathophysiology of various disorders and recent progress in the development of mitochondria-targeted molecules as therapeutic measures for metabolic disorders.

  9. Hypoxia induces mitochondrial mutagenesis and dysfunction in inflammatory arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Biniecka, Monika

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the levels and spectrum of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) point mutations in synovial tissue from patients with inflammatory arthritis in relation to in vivo hypoxia and oxidative stress levels. METHODS: Random Mutation Capture assay was used to quantitatively evaluate alterations of the synovial mitochondrial genome. In vivo tissue oxygen levels (tPO(2)) were measured at arthroscopy using a Licox probe. Synovial expression of lipid peroxidation (4-hydroxynonenal [4-HNE]) and mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (CytcO II) deficiency were assessed by immunohistochemistry. In vitro levels of mtDNA point mutations, reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential, and markers of oxidative DNA damage (8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2\\'-deoxyguanine [8-oxodG]) and lipid peroxidation (4-HNE) were determined in human synoviocytes under normoxia and hypoxia (1%) in the presence or absence of superoxide dismutase (SOD) or N-acetylcysteine (NAC) or a hydroxylase inhibitor (dimethyloxalylglycine [DMOG]). Patients were categorized according to their in vivo tPO(2) level (<20 mm Hg or >20 mm Hg), and mtDNA point mutations, immunochemistry features, and stress markers were compared between groups. RESULTS: The median tPO(2) level in synovial tissue indicated significant hypoxia (25.47 mm Hg). Higher frequency of mtDNA mutations was associated with reduced in vivo oxygen tension (P = 0.05) and with higher synovial 4-HNE cytoplasmic expression (P = 0.04). Synovial expression of CytcO II correlated with in vivo tPO(2) levels (P = 0.03), and levels were lower in patients with tPO(2) <20 mm Hg (P < 0.05). In vitro levels of mtDNA mutations, ROS, mitochondrial membrane potential, 8-oxo-dG, and 4-HNE were higher in synoviocytes exposed to 1% hypoxia (P < 0.05); all of these increased levels were rescued by SOD and DMOG and, with the exception of ROS, by NAC. CONCLUSION: These findings demonstrate that hypoxia-induced mitochondrial dysfunction drives

  10. Roles of mitochondrial fragmentation and reactive oxygen species in mitochondrial dysfunction and myocardial insulin resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Tomoyuki [Internal Medicine III, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handayama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan); Saotome, Masao, E-mail: msaotome@hama-med.ac.jp [Internal Medicine III, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handayama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan); Nobuhara, Mamoru; Sakamoto, Atsushi; Urushida, Tsuyoshi; Katoh, Hideki; Satoh, Hiroshi [Internal Medicine III, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handayama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan); Funaki, Makoto [Clinical Research Center for Diabetes, Tokushima University Hospital, 2-50-1 Kuramoto-cho, Tokushima 770-8503 (Japan); Hayashi, Hideharu [Internal Medicine III, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handayama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan)

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: Evidence suggests an association between aberrant mitochondrial dynamics and cardiac diseases. Because myocardial metabolic deficiency caused by insulin resistance plays a crucial role in heart disease, we investigated the role of dynamin-related protein-1 (DRP1; a mitochondrial fission protein) in the pathogenesis of myocardial insulin resistance. Methods and Results: DRP1-expressing H9c2 myocytes, which had fragmented mitochondria with mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ{sub m}) depolarization, exhibited attenuated insulin signaling and 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) uptake, indicating insulin resistance. Treatment of the DRP1-expressing myocytes with Mn(III)tetrakis(1-methyl-4-pyridyl)porphyrin pentachloride (TMPyP) significantly improved insulin resistance and mitochondrial dysfunction. When myocytes were exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), they increased DRP1 expression and mitochondrial fragmentation, resulting in ΔΨ{sub m} depolarization and insulin resistance. When DRP1 was suppressed by siRNA, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance were restored. Our results suggest that a mutual enhancement between DRP1 and reactive oxygen species could induce mitochondrial dysfunction and myocardial insulin resistance. In palmitate-induced insulin-resistant myocytes, neither DRP1-suppression nor TMPyP restored the ΔΨ{sub m} depolarization and impaired 2-DG uptake, however they improved insulin signaling. Conclusions: A mutual enhancement between DRP1 and ROS could promote mitochondrial dysfunction and inhibition of insulin signal transduction. However, other mechanisms, including lipid metabolite-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, may be involved in palmitate-induced insulin resistance. - Highlights: • DRP1 promotes mitochondrial fragmentation and insulin-resistance. • A mutual enhancement between DRP1 and ROS ipromotes insulin-resistance. • Palmitate increases DRP1 expression and induces insulin

  11. Implications of mitochondrial dynamics on neurodegeneration and on hypothalamic dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio eZorzano

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dynamics is a term that encompasses the movement of mitochondria along the cytoskeleton, regulation of their architecture, and connectivity mediated by tethering and fusion/fission. The importance of these events in cell physiology and pathology has been partially unraveled with the identification of the genes responsible for the catalysis of mitochondrial fusion and fission. Mutations in two mitochondrial fusion genes (MFN2 and OPA1 cause neurodegenerative diseases, namely Charcot-Marie Tooth type 2A and autosomal dominant optic atrophy. Alterations in mitochondrial dynamics may be involved in the pathophysiology of prevalent neurodegenerative conditions. Moreover, impairment of the activity of mitochondrial fusion proteins dysregulates the function of hypothalamic neurons, leading to alterations in food intake and in energy homeostasis. Here we review selected findings in the field of mitochondrial dynamics and their relevance for neurodegeneration and hypothalamic dysfunction.

  12. Secondary mitochondrial dysfunction in propionic aciduria: a pathogenic role for endogenous mitochondrial toxins.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwab, M.A.; Sauer, S.W.; Okun, J.G.; Nijtmans, L.G.J.; Rodenburg, R.J.T.; Heuvel, L.P.W.J. van den; Drose, S.; Brandt, U.; Hoffmann, G.F.; Laak, H.J. ter; Kolker, S.; Smeitink, J.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction during acute metabolic crises is considered an important pathomechanism in inherited disorders of propionate metabolism, i.e. propionic and methylmalonic acidurias. Biochemically, these disorders are characterized by accumulation of propionyl-CoA and metabolites of alternat

  13. Reperfusion promotes mitochondrial dysfunction following focal cerebral ischemia in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the cell death observed after cerebral ischemia, and several mechanisms for this dysfunction have been proposed. Reperfusion after transient cerebral ischemia may cause continued and even more severe damage to the brain. Many lines of evidence have shown that mitochondria suffer severe damage in response to ischemic injury. The purpose of this study was to observe the features of mitochondrial dysfunction in isolated mitochondria during the reperfusion period following focal cerebral ischemia. METHODS: Male Wistar rats were subjected to focal cerebral ischemia. Mitochondria were isolated using Percoll density gradient centrifugation. The isolated mitochondria were fixed for electron microscopic examination; calcium-induced mitochondrial swelling was quantified using spectrophotometry. Cyclophilin D was detected by Western blotting. Fluorescent probes were used to selectively stain mitochondria to measure their membrane potential and to measure reactive oxidative species production using flow cytometric analysis. RESULTS: Signs of damage were observed in the mitochondrial morphology after exposure to reperfusion. The mitochondrial swelling induced by Ca(2+ increased gradually with the increasing calcium concentration, and this tendency was exacerbated as the reperfusion time was extended. Cyclophilin D protein expression peaked after 24 hours of reperfusion. The mitochondrial membrane potential was decreased significantly during the reperfusion period, with the greatest decrease observed after 24 hours of reperfusion. The surge in mitochondrial reactive oxidative species occurred after 2 hours of reperfusion and was maintained at a high level during the reperfusion period. CONCLUSIONS: Reperfusion following focal cerebral ischemia induced significant mitochondrial morphological damage and Ca(2+-induced mitochondrial swelling. The mechanism of this swelling may be mediated by

  14. Review: quantifying mitochondrial dysfunction in complex diseases of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horan, Martin P; Pichaud, Nicolas; Ballard, J William O

    2012-10-01

    There is accumulating evidence that mitochondrial respiratory malfunction is associated with aging-associated complex diseases. However, progress in our understanding of these diseases has been hampered by the sensitivity and throughput of systems employed to quantify dysfunction and inherent limitations of the biological systems studied. In this review, we describe and contrast two methodologies that have been developed for measuring mitochondrial function to address the need for improved sensitivity and increased throughput. We then consider the utility of each methodology in studying three biological systems: isolated mitochondria, cultured cells, and cell fibers and tissues. Finally, we discuss the application of each methodology in the study of mitochondrial dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and aging-associated autophagy impairment and mitochondrial malfunction. We conclude that the methodologies are complementary, and researchers may need to examine multiple biological systems to unravel complex diseases of aging.

  15. Mitochondrial dysfunction: a neglected component of skin diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feichtinger, René G; Sperl, Wolfgang; Bauer, Johann W; Kofler, Barbara

    2014-09-01

    Aberrant mitochondrial structure and function influence tissue homeostasis and thereby contribute to multiple human disorders and ageing. Ten per cent of patients with primary mitochondrial disorders present skin manifestations that can be categorized into hair abnormalities, rashes, pigmentation abnormalities and acrocyanosis. Less attention has been paid to the fact that several disorders of the skin are linked to alterations of mitochondrial energy metabolism. This review article summarizes the contribution of mitochondrial pathology to both common and rare skin diseases. We explore the intriguing observation that a wide array of skin disorders presents with primary or secondary mitochondrial pathology and that a variety of molecular defects can cause dysfunctional mitochondria. Among them are mutations in mitochondrial- and nuclear DNA-encoded subunits and assembly factors of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complexes; mutations in intermediate filament proteins involved in linking, moving and shaping of mitochondria; and disorders of mitochondrial DNA metabolism, fatty acid metabolism and heme synthesis. Thus, we assume that mitochondrial involvement is the rule rather than the exception in skin diseases. We conclude the article by discussing how improving mitochondrial function can be beneficial for aged skin and can be used as an adjunct therapy for certain skin disorders. Consideration of mitochondrial energy metabolism in the skin creates a new perspective for both dermatologists and experts in metabolic disease.

  16. Mitochondrial dysfunction in the limelight of Parkinson's disease pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Rebecca; Starkov, Anatoly A; Beal, M Flint; Thomas, Bobby

    2009-07-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative movement disorder with unknown etiology. It is marked by widespread neurodegeneration in the brain with profound loss of A9 midbrain dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra pars compacta. Several theories of biochemical abnormalities have been linked to pathogenesis of PD of which mitochondrial dysfunction due to an impairment of mitochondrial complex I and subsequent oxidative stress seems to take the center stage in experimental models of PD and in postmortem tissues of sporadic forms of illness. Recent identification of specific gene mutations and their influence on mitochondrial functions has further reinforced the relevance of mitochondrial abnormalities in disease pathogenesis. In both sporadic and familial forms of PD abnormal mitochondrial paradigms associated with disease include impaired functioning of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, aging associated damage to mitochondrial DNA, impaired calcium buffering, and anomalies in mitochondrial morphology and dynamics. Here we provide an overview of specific mitochondrial functions affected in sporadic and familial PD that play a role in disease pathogenesis. We propose to utilize these gained insights to further streamline and focus the research to better understand mitochondria's role in disease development and exploit potential mitochondrial targets for therapeutic interventions in PD pathogenesis.

  17. Mitochondrial integrity in a neonatal bovine model of right ventricular dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruns, Danielle R; Brown, R Dale; Stenmark, Kurt R; Buttrick, Peter M; Walker, Lori A

    2015-01-15

    Right ventricular (RV) function is a key determinant of survival in patients with both RV and left ventricular (LV) failure, yet the mechanisms of RV failure are poorly understood. Recent studies suggest cardiac metabolism is altered in RV failure in pulmonary hypertension (PH). Accordingly, we assessed mitochondrial content, dynamics, and function in hearts from neonatal calves exposed to hypobaric hypoxia (HH). This model develops severe PH with concomitant RV hypertrophy, dilation, and dysfunction. After 2 wk of HH, pieces of RV and LV were obtained along with samples from age-matched controls. Comparison with control assesses the effect of hypoxia, whereas comparison between the LV and RV in HH assesses the additional impact of RV overload. Mitochondrial DNA was unchanged in HH, as was mitochondrial content as assessed by electron microscopy. Immunoblotting for electron transport chain subunits revealed a small increase in mitochondrial content in HH in both ventricles. Mitochondrial dynamics were largely unchanged. Activity of individual respiratory chain complexes was reduced (complex I) or unchanged (complex V) in HH. Key enzymes in the glycolysis pathway were upregulated in both HH ventricles, alongside upregulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α protein. Importantly, none of the changes in expression or activity were different between ventricles, suggesting the changes are in response to HH and not RV overload. Upregulation of glycolytic modulators without chamber-specific mitochondrial dysfunction suggests that mitochondrial capacity and activity are maintained at the onset of PH, and the early RV dysfunction in this model results from mechanisms independent of the mitochondria.

  18. Dysfunction of mitochondrial dynamics in the brains of scrapie-infected mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hong-Seok [Department of Microbiology, College of Medicine, Hallym University, 1 Okcheon-dong, Chuncheon, Gangwon-do 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Ilsong Institute of Life Science, Hallym University, 1605-4 Gwanyang-dong, Dongan-gu, Anyang, Gyeonggi-do 431-060 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yeong-Gon; Shin, Hae-Young; Oh, Jae-Min [Ilsong Institute of Life Science, Hallym University, 1605-4 Gwanyang-dong, Dongan-gu, Anyang, Gyeonggi-do 431-060 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jeong-Ho [Department of Microbiology, College of Medicine, Hallym University, 1 Okcheon-dong, Chuncheon, Gangwon-do 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Ilsong Institute of Life Science, Hallym University, 1605-4 Gwanyang-dong, Dongan-gu, Anyang, Gyeonggi-do 431-060 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae-Il [Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Pukyong National University, 599-1 Daeyeon-3-dong, Nam-gu, Busan 608-737 (Korea, Republic of); Carp, Richard I. [New York State Institute for Basic Research in Developmental Disabilities, 1050 Forest Hill Road, Staten Island, NY 10314 (United States); Choi, Eun-Kyoung, E-mail: ekchoi@hallym.ac.kr [Ilsong Institute of Life Science, Hallym University, 1605-4 Gwanyang-dong, Dongan-gu, Anyang, Gyeonggi-do 431-060 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong-Sun, E-mail: yskim@hallym.ac.kr [Department of Microbiology, College of Medicine, Hallym University, 1 Okcheon-dong, Chuncheon, Gangwon-do 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Ilsong Institute of Life Science, Hallym University, 1605-4 Gwanyang-dong, Dongan-gu, Anyang, Gyeonggi-do 431-060 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-30

    Highlights: • Mfn1 and Fis1 are significantly increased in the hippocampal region of the ME7 prion-infected brain, whereas Dlp1 is significantly decreased in the infected brain. • Dlp1 is significantly decreased in the cytosolic fraction of the hippocampus in the infected brain. • Neuronal mitochondria in the prion-infected brains are enlarged and swollen compared to those of control brains. • There are significantly fewer mitochondria in the ME7-infected brain compared to the number in control brain. - Abstract: Mitochondrial dysfunction is a common and prominent feature of many neurodegenerative diseases, including prion diseases; it is induced by oxidative stress in scrapie-infected animal models. In previous studies, we found swelling and dysfunction of mitochondria in the brains of scrapie-infected mice compared to brains of controls, but the mechanisms underlying mitochondrial dysfunction remain unclear. To examine whether the dysregulation of mitochondrial proteins is related to the mitochondrial dysfunction associated with prion disease, we investigated the expression patterns of mitochondrial fusion and fission proteins in the brains of ME7 prion-infected mice. Immunoblot analysis revealed that Mfn1 was up-regulated in both whole brain and specific brain regions, including the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, of ME7-infected mice compared to controls. Additionally, expression levels of Fis1 and Mfn2 were elevated in the hippocampus and the striatum, respectively, of the ME7-infected brain. In contrast, Dlp1 expression was significantly reduced in the hippocampus in the ME7-infected brain, particularly in the cytosolic fraction. Finally, we observed abnormal mitochondrial enlargement and histopathological change in the hippocampus of the ME7-infected brain. These observations suggest that the mitochondrial dysfunction, which is presumably caused by the dysregulation of mitochondrial fusion and fission proteins, may contribute to the

  19. Oxidative Stress, Mitochondrial Dysfunction, and Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hang Cui

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aging is an intricate phenomenon characterized by progressive decline in physiological functions and increase in mortality that is often accompanied by many pathological diseases. Although aging is almost universally conserved among all organisms, the underlying molecular mechanisms of aging remain largely elusive. Many theories of aging have been proposed, including the free-radical and mitochondrial theories of aging. Both theories speculate that cumulative damage to mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS is one of the causes of aging. Oxidative damage affects replication and transcription of mtDNA and results in a decline in mitochondrial function which in turn leads to enhanced ROS production and further damage to mtDNA. In this paper, we will present the current understanding of the interplay between ROS and mitochondria and will discuss their potential impact on aging and age-related diseases.

  20. Molecular profiling of mitochondrial dysfunction in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyak, Erzsebet; Zhang, Zhe; Falk, Marni J

    2012-01-01

    Cellular effects of primary mitochondrial dysfunction, as well as potential mitochondrial disease therapies, can be modeled in living animals such as the microscopic nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans. In particular, molecular analyses can provide substantial insight into the mechanism by which genetic and/or pharmacologic manipulations alter mitochondrial function. The relative expression of individual genes across both nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, as well as relative quantitation of mitochondrial DNA content, can be readily performed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis of C. elegans. Additionally, microarray expression profiling offers a powerful tool by which to survey the global genetic consequences of various causes of primary mitochondrial dysfunction and potential therapeutic interventions at both the single gene and integrated pathway level. Here, we describe detailed protocols for RNA and DNA isolation from whole animal populations in C. elegans, qRT-PCR analysis of both nuclear and mitochondrial genes, and global nuclear genome expression profiling using the Affymetrix GeneChip C. elegans Genome Array.

  1. Mitochondrial dysfunction in psychiatric morbidity: current evidence and therapeutic prospects

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    Toker L

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Lilach Toker,1 Galila Agam2,3 1Department of Psychiatry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 2Department of Clinical Biochemistry and Pharmacology, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel; 3Mental Health Center, Beer-Sheva, Israel Abstract: Cumulating evidence for the involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in psychiatric disorders leaves little to no doubt regarding the involvement of this pathology in mood disorders. However, mitochondrial abnormalities are also observed in a wide range of disorders spanning from cancer and diabetes to various neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental disorders such as Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, Huntington’s, autism, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The apparent lack of specificity questions the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in psychiatric disorders, in general, and in mood disorders, in particular. Is mitochondrial dysfunction a general phenomenon, simplistically rendering brain cells to be more vulnerable to a variety of disease-specific perturbations? Or is it an epiphenomenon induced by various disease-specific factors? Or possibly, the severity and the anatomical region of the dysfunction are the ones responsible for the distinct features of the disorders. Whichever of the aforementioned ones, if any, is correct, “mitochondrial dysfunction” became more of a cliché than a therapeutic target. In this review, we summarize current studies supporting the involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in different psychiatric disorders. We address the question of specificity and causality of the different findings and provide an alternative explanation for some of the aforementioned questions. Keywords: bipolar disorder, psychiatric disorders, schizophrenia, Stanley Foundation Brain Collection

  2. Evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction in obese adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilms, L; Larsen, J; Pedersen, P L

    2010-01-01

    and elucidate whether a lower metabolic rate is present. Methods: In a group of 34 obese adolescents (age adolescent, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and basal oxygen consumption were measured...... and mitochondrial function in peripheral blood monocytes was determined by flow cytometry. Results: Significant increase in TSH (3.06 +/- 1.56 mU/L vs. 2.33 +/- 0.91 mU/L, p adolescents...... compared with lean adolescents. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated a lower mitochondrial mass (6385 +/- 1962 a.u. vs. 7608 +/- 2328 a.u., p adolescents compared with lean adolescents...

  3. Early Myocardial Dysfunction is Not Caused by Mitochondrial Abnormalities in a Rat Model of Peritonitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeding, Lonneke; van der Laarse, Willem J.; van Veelen, Toke A.; Lamberts, Regis R.; Niessen, Hans W. M.; Kneyber, Martin C. J.; Groeneveld, A. B. Johan; Plotz, Frans B.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Patients with complicated intra-abdominal infections are prone to develop multiple organ failure, including myocardial dysfunction. We hypothesized that early dysfunction during sepsis is associated with inflammation, mitochondrial injury, impaired mitochondrial function, and activation

  4. Mechanisms of Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    derived primarily from glycolysis and fatty acid oxidation. OXPHOS uses about 95% of the oxygen delivered to tissues, producing most of the ATP...Rotig A, de Lonlay P, Chretien D, Foury F, Koenig M, et al. (1997) Aconitase and mitochondrial iron- sulphur protein deficiency in Friedreich ataxia

  5. Modes of metabolic compensation during mitochondrial disease using the Drosophila model of ATP6 dysfunction.

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    Alicia M Celotto

    Full Text Available Numerous mitochondrial DNA mutations cause mitochondrial encephalomyopathy: a collection of related diseases for which there exists no effective treatment. Mitochondrial encephalomyopathies are complex multisystem diseases that exhibit a relentless progression of severity, making them both difficult to treat and study. The pathogenic and compensatory metabolic changes that are associated with chronic mitochondrial dysfunction are not well understood. The Drosophila ATP6(1 mutant models human mitochondrial encephalomyopathy and allows the study of metabolic changes and compensation that occur throughout the lifetime of an affected animal. ATP6(1animals have a nearly complete loss of ATP synthase activity and an acute bioenergetic deficit when they are asymptomatic, but surprisingly we discovered no chronic bioenergetic deficit in these animals during their symptomatic period. Our data demonstrate dynamic metabolic compensatory mechanisms that sustain normal energy availability and activity despite chronic mitochondrial complex V dysfunction resulting from an endogenous mutation in the mitochondrial DNA. ATP6(1animals compensate for their loss of oxidative phosphorylation through increases in glycolytic flux, ketogenesis and Kreb's cycle activity early during pathogenesis. However, succinate dehydrogenase activity is reduced and mitochondrial supercomplex formation is severely disrupted contributing to the pathogenesis seen in ATP6(1 animals. These studies demonstrate the dynamic nature of metabolic compensatory mechanisms and emphasize the need for time course studies in tractable animal systems to elucidate disease pathogenesis and novel therapeutic avenues.

  6. Oxidative stress–induced mitochondrial dysfunction drives inflammation and airway smooth muscle remodeling in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegman, Coen H.; Michaeloudes, Charalambos; Haji, Gulammehdi; Narang, Priyanka; Clarke, Colin J.; Russell, Kirsty E.; Bao, Wuping; Pavlidis, Stelios; Barnes, Peter J.; Kanerva, Justin; Bittner, Anton; Rao, Navin; Murphy, Michael P.; Kirkham, Paul A.; Chung, Kian Fan; Adcock, Ian M.; Brightling, Christopher E.; Davies, Donna E.; Finch, Donna K.; Fisher, Andrew J.; Gaw, Alasdair; Knox, Alan J.; Mayer, Ruth J.; Polkey, Michael; Salmon, Michael; Singh, David

    2015-01-01

    Background Inflammation and oxidative stress play critical roles in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Mitochondrial oxidative stress might be involved in driving the oxidative stress–induced pathology. Objective We sought to determine the effects of oxidative stress on mitochondrial function in the pathophysiology of airway inflammation in ozone-exposed mice and human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells. Methods Mice were exposed to ozone, and lung inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), and mitochondrial function were determined. Human ASM cells were isolated from bronchial biopsy specimens from healthy subjects, smokers, and patients with COPD. Inflammation and mitochondrial function in mice and human ASM cells were measured with and without the presence of the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant MitoQ. Results Mice exposed to ozone, a source of oxidative stress, had lung inflammation and AHR associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and reflected by decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), increased mitochondrial oxidative stress, and reduced mitochondrial complex I, III, and V expression. Reversal of mitochondrial dysfunction by the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant MitoQ reduced inflammation and AHR. ASM cells from patients with COPD have reduced ΔΨm, adenosine triphosphate content, complex expression, basal and maximum respiration levels, and respiratory reserve capacity compared with those from healthy control subjects, whereas mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were increased. Healthy smokers were intermediate between healthy nonsmokers and patients with COPD. Hydrogen peroxide induced mitochondrial dysfunction in ASM cells from healthy subjects. MitoQ and Tiron inhibited TGF-β–induced ASM cell proliferation and CXCL8 release. Conclusions Mitochondrial dysfunction in patients with COPD is associated with excessive mitochondrial ROS levels, which contribute to enhanced inflammation and cell

  7. Mitochondrial dysfunction in schizophrenia: pathways, mechanisms and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekaran, Ashwini; Venkatasubramanian, Ganesan; Berk, Michael; Debnath, Monojit

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria play a critical role in regulating cellular functions including bioenergetics, calcium homeostasis, redox signalling, and apoptotic cell death. Mitochondria are also essential to many aspects of neurodevelopment and neuronal functions. However, mitochondrial impairment may affect bioenergetics in the developing brain and alter critical neuronal processes leading to neurodevelopmental abnormalities. Schizophrenia is a chronic and severe neuropsychiatric disorder of neurodevelopmental origin. Immuno-inflammatory pathway is one of the widely appreciated mechanisms that has consistently been implicated in the neurodevelopmental origin of schizophrenia. However, the source of inflammation and the underlying neurobiological mechanisms leading to schizophrenia are yet to be fully ascertained. Recent understanding reveals that perturbation of mitochondrial network dynamics might lead to various nervous system disorders with inflammatory pathologies. Mitochondrial deficit, altered redox balance and chronic low-grade inflammation are evident in schizophrenia. It is hypothesized that oxidative/nitrosative stress responses due to mitochondrial dysfunctions might activate immuno-inflammatory pathways and subsequently lead to neuroprogressive changes in schizophrenia. Herein, we summarise the current understanding of molecular links between mitochondrial dysfunctions and pathogenesis of schizophrenia based on evidence from genomics, proteomics and imaging studies, which together support a role for mitochondrial impairment in the pathogenetic pathways of schizophrenia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Protection from palmitate-induced mitochondrial DNA damage prevents from mitochondrial oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, apoptosis, and impaired insulin signaling in rat L6 skeletal muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuzefovych, Larysa V; Solodushko, Viktoriya A; Wilson, Glenn L; Rachek, Lyudmila I

    2012-01-01

    Saturated free fatty acids have been implicated in the increase of oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, apoptosis, and insulin resistance seen in type 2 diabetes. The purpose of this study was to determine whether palmitate-induced mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage contributed to increased oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, apoptosis, impaired insulin signaling, and reduced glucose uptake in skeletal muscle cells. Adenoviral vectors were used to deliver the DNA repair enzyme human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase/(apurinic/apyrimidinic) lyase (hOGG1) to mitochondria in L6 myotubes. After palmitate exposure, we evaluated mtDNA damage, mitochondrial function, production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, apoptosis, insulin signaling pathways, and glucose uptake. Protection of mtDNA from palmitate-induced damage by overexpression of hOGG1 targeted to mitochondria significantly diminished palmitate-induced mitochondrial superoxide production, restored the decline in ATP levels, reduced activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) kinase, prevented cells from entering apoptosis, increased insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of serine-threonine kinase (Akt) (Ser473) and tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1, and thereby enhanced glucose transporter 4 translocation to plasma membrane, and restored insulin signaling. Addition of a specific inhibitor of JNK mimicked the effect of mitochondrial overexpression of hOGG1 and partially restored insulin sensitivity, thus confirming the involvement of mtDNA damage and subsequent increase of oxidative stress and JNK activation in insulin signaling in L6 myotubes. Our results are the first to report that mtDNA damage is the proximal cause in palmitate-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and impaired insulin signaling and provide strong evidence that targeting DNA repair enzymes into mitochondria in skeletal muscles could be a potential therapeutic treatment for insulin resistance.

  9. MLN64 induces mitochondrial dysfunction associated with increased mitochondrial cholesterol content

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    Elisa Balboa

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available MLN64 is a late endosomal cholesterol-binding membrane protein that has been implicated in cholesterol transport from endosomal membranes to the plasma membrane and/or mitochondria, in toxin-induced resistance, and in mitochondrial dysfunction. Down-regulation of MLN64 in Niemann-Pick C1 deficient cells decreased mitochondrial cholesterol content, suggesting that MLN64 functions independently of NPC1. However, the role of MLN64 in the maintenance of endosomal cholesterol flow and intracellular cholesterol homeostasis remains unclear. We have previously described that hepatic MLN64 overexpression increases liver cholesterol content and induces liver damage. Here, we studied the function of MLN64 in normal and NPC1-deficient cells and we evaluated whether MLN64 overexpressing cells exhibit alterations in mitochondrial function. We used recombinant-adenovirus-mediated MLN64 gene transfer to overexpress MLN64 in mouse liver and hepatic cells; and RNA interference to down-regulate MLN64 in NPC1-deficient cells. In MLN64-overexpressing cells, we found increased mitochondrial cholesterol content and decreased glutathione (GSH levels and ATPase activity. Furthermore, we found decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial fragmentation and increased mitochondrial superoxide levels in MLN64-overexpressing cells and in NPC1-deficient cells. Consequently, MLN64 expression was increased in NPC1-deficient cells and reduction of its expression restore mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial superoxide levels. Our findings suggest that MLN64 overexpression induces an increase in mitochondrial cholesterol content and consequently a decrease in mitochondrial GSH content leading to mitochondrial dysfunction. In addition, we demonstrate that MLN64 expression is increased in NPC cells and plays a key role in cholesterol transport into the mitochondria.

  10. MLN64 induces mitochondrial dysfunction associated with increased mitochondrial cholesterol content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balboa, Elisa; Castro, Juan; Pinochet, María-José; Cancino, Gonzalo I; Matías, Nuria; José Sáez, Pablo; Martínez, Alexis; Álvarez, Alejandra R; Garcia-Ruiz, Carmen; Fernandez-Checa, José C; Zanlungo, Silvana

    2017-08-01

    MLN64 is a late endosomal cholesterol-binding membrane protein that has been implicated in cholesterol transport from endosomal membranes to the plasma membrane and/or mitochondria, in toxin-induced resistance, and in mitochondrial dysfunction. Down-regulation of MLN64 in Niemann-Pick C1 deficient cells decreased mitochondrial cholesterol content, suggesting that MLN64 functions independently of NPC1. However, the role of MLN64 in the maintenance of endosomal cholesterol flow and intracellular cholesterol homeostasis remains unclear. We have previously described that hepatic MLN64 overexpression increases liver cholesterol content and induces liver damage. Here, we studied the function of MLN64 in normal and NPC1-deficient cells and we evaluated whether MLN64 overexpressing cells exhibit alterations in mitochondrial function. We used recombinant-adenovirus-mediated MLN64 gene transfer to overexpress MLN64 in mouse liver and hepatic cells; and RNA interference to down-regulate MLN64 in NPC1-deficient cells. In MLN64-overexpressing cells, we found increased mitochondrial cholesterol content and decreased glutathione (GSH) levels and ATPase activity. Furthermore, we found decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial fragmentation and increased mitochondrial superoxide levels in MLN64-overexpressing cells and in NPC1-deficient cells. Consequently, MLN64 expression was increased in NPC1-deficient cells and reduction of its expression restore mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial superoxide levels. Our findings suggest that MLN64 overexpression induces an increase in mitochondrial cholesterol content and consequently a decrease in mitochondrial GSH content leading to mitochondrial dysfunction. In addition, we demonstrate that MLN64 expression is increased in NPC cells and plays a key role in cholesterol transport into the mitochondria. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Salidroside Stimulates Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Protects against H2O2-Induced Endothelial Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Shasha; Yang, Xiaoyan; Li, Wenjing; Bian, Fang; Wu, Dan; Chi, Jiangyang; Xu, Gao; Zhang, Yonghui; Jin, Si

    2014-01-01

    Salidroside (SAL) is an active component of Rhodiola rosea with documented antioxidative properties. The purpose of this study is to explore the mechanism of the protective effect of SAL on hydrogen peroxide- (H2O2-) induced endothelial dysfunction. Pretreatment of the human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) with SAL significantly reduced the cytotoxicity brought by H2O2. Functional studies on the rat aortas found that SAL rescued the endothelium-dependent relaxation and reduced superoxide anion (O2∙−) production induced by H2O2. Meanwhile, SAL pretreatment inhibited H2O2-induced nitric oxide (NO) production. The underlying mechanisms involve the inhibition of H2O2-induced activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and Akt, as well as the redox sensitive transcription factor, NF-kappa B (NF-κB). SAL also increased mitochondrial mass and upregulated the mitochondrial biogenesis factors, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma-coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1α), and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) in the endothelial cells. H2O2-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, as demonstrated by reduced mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) and ATP production, was rescued by SAL pretreatment. Taken together, these findings implicate that SAL could protect endothelium against H2O2-induced injury via promoting mitochondrial biogenesis and function, thus preventing the overactivation of oxidative stress-related downstream signaling pathways. PMID:24868319

  12. Salidroside Stimulates Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Protects against H2O2-Induced Endothelial Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shasha Xing

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Salidroside (SAL is an active component of Rhodiola rosea with documented antioxidative properties. The purpose of this study is to explore the mechanism of the protective effect of SAL on hydrogen peroxide- (H2O2- induced endothelial dysfunction. Pretreatment of the human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs with SAL significantly reduced the cytotoxicity brought by H2O2. Functional studies on the rat aortas found that SAL rescued the endothelium-dependent relaxation and reduced superoxide anion (O2∙- production induced by H2O2. Meanwhile, SAL pretreatment inhibited H2O2-induced nitric oxide (NO production. The underlying mechanisms involve the inhibition of H2O2-induced activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK, and Akt, as well as the redox sensitive transcription factor, NF-kappa B (NF-κB. SAL also increased mitochondrial mass and upregulated the mitochondrial biogenesis factors, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma-coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1α, and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM in the endothelial cells. H2O2-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, as demonstrated by reduced mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm and ATP production, was rescued by SAL pretreatment. Taken together, these findings implicate that SAL could protect endothelium against H2O2-induced injury via promoting mitochondrial biogenesis and function, thus preventing the overactivation of oxidative stress-related downstream signaling pathways.

  13. Mitochondrial dysfunction accounts for the stochastic heterogeneity in telomere-dependent senescence.

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    João F Passos

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Aging is an inherently stochastic process, and its hallmark is heterogeneity between organisms, cell types, and clonal populations, even in identical environments. The replicative lifespan of primary human cells is telomere dependent; however, its heterogeneity is not understood. We show that mitochondrial superoxide production increases with replicative age in human fibroblasts despite an adaptive UCP-2-dependent mitochondrial uncoupling. This mitochondrial dysfunction is accompanied by compromised [Ca(2+]i homeostasis and other indicators of a retrograde response in senescent cells. Replicative senescence of human fibroblasts is delayed by mild mitochondrial uncoupling. Uncoupling reduces mitochondrial superoxide generation, slows down telomere shortening, and delays formation of telomeric gamma-H2A.X foci. This indicates mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species (ROS as one of the causes of replicative senescence. By sorting early senescent (SES cells from young proliferating fibroblast cultures, we show that SES cells have higher ROS levels, dysfunctional mitochondria, shorter telomeres, and telomeric gamma-H2A.X foci. We propose that mitochondrial ROS is a major determinant of telomere-dependent senescence at the single-cell level that is responsible for cell-to-cell variation in replicative lifespan.

  14. Mitochondrial dysfunction in DDR-related cancer predisposition syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyakhovich, Alex; Graifer, Dmitry; Stefanovie, Barbora; Krejci, Lumir

    2016-04-01

    Given the key role of mitochondria in various cellular events, it is not surprising that mitochondrial dysfunction (MDF) is seen in many pathological conditions, in particular cancer. The mechanisms defining MDF are not clearly understood and may involve genetic defects, misbalance of reactive oxygen species (ROS), impaired autophagy (mitophagy), acquired mutations in mitochondrial or nuclear DNA and inability of cells to cope with the consequences. The importance of MDF arises from its detection in the syndromes with defective DNA damage response (DDR) and cancer predisposition. Here, we will focus on the dual role of these syndromes in cancer predisposition and MDF with specific emphasis on impaired autophagy.

  15. Myricitrin alleviates MPP⁺-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in a DJ-1-dependent manner in SN4741 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhibiao; Zeng, Weijun; Tao, Kai; Lu, Fangfang; Gao, Guodong; Yang, Qian

    2015-03-06

    Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction have been linked to Parkinson's disease. DJ-1 is a recessive familial PD gene involved in antioxidative function and mitochondrial maintenance. Myricitrin, a flavanoid isolated from the root bark of Myrica cerifera, has potent antioxidative properties. In the present study, we investigated the protective effects of myricitrin against MPP(+)-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in SN4741 cells and attempted to elucidate the mechanisms underlying this protection. The results showed that incubating SN4741 cells with myricitrin significantly reduced cell death induced by the neurotoxin MPP(+). Furthermore, myricitrin protected cells from MPP(+)-induced effects on mitochondrial morphology and function. However, these protective effects were lost under DJ-1-deficient conditions. Thus, our results suggest that myricitrin alleviates MPP(+)-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and increases cell viability via DJ-1, indicating that myricitrin is a potential beneficial agent for age-related neurodegenerative diseases, particularly Parkinson's disease.

  16. Resveratrol attenuates methylglyoxal-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis by Sestrin2 induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Kyuhwa; Seo, Suho; Han, Jae Yun; Ki, Sung Hwan; Shin, Sang Mi

    2014-10-15

    Methylglyoxal is found in high levels in the blood and other tissues of diabetic patients and exerts deleterious effects on cells and tissues. Previously, we reported that resveratrol, a polyphenol in grapes, induced the expression of Sestrin2 (SESN2), a novel antioxidant protein, and inhibited hepatic lipogenesis. This study investigated whether resveratrol protects cells from the methylglyoxal-induced toxicity via SESN2 induction. Methylglyoxal significantly induced cell death in HepG2 cells. However, cells pretreated with resveratrol were rescued from methylglyoxal-induced apoptosis. Resveratrol attenuated glutathione (GSH) depletion and ROS production promoted by methylglyoxal. Moreover, mitochondrial damage was observed by methylglyoxal treatment, but resveratrol restored mitochondrial function, as evidenced by the observed lack of mitochondrial permeability transition and increased ADP/ATP ratio. Resveratrol treatment inhibited SESN2 depletion elicited by methylglyoxal. SESN2 overexpression repressed methylglyoxal-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis. Likewise, rotenone-induced cytotoxicity was not observed in SESN2 overexpressed cells. Furthermore, siRNA knockdown of SESN2 reduced the ability of resveratrol to prevent methylglyoxal-induced mitochondrial permeability transition. In addition, when mice were exposed to methylglyoxal after infection of Ad-SESN2, the plasma levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and GSH depletion by methylglyoxal in liver was reduced in Ad-SESN2 infected mice. Our results demonstrated that resveratrol is capable of protecting cells from methylglyoxal-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress via SESN2 induction.

  17. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in infected pregnant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Нана Мерабівна Пасієшвілі

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The infected pregnant women have been various perinatal complications. The aim of the work was to clarify the role of oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in the development of perinatal complications in infected pregnant.Methods. The study included 68 pregnant women with signs of maternal-fetal infection (MFI and 30 pregnant women who were found infected (control group. Later pregnant with MFI were divided into 2 groups: the first included 30 women who received traditional antibacterial and antiviral therapy, the second group consisted of 28 women who were additionally given an immunomodulator in combination with ozone therapy.Results. During pregnancy with MFI it is characterized the thrombophilic disorders, break immune homeostasis pregnant, endothelial dysfunction, which adversely affects perinatal indicators.Conclusions. The use of immunomodulators and ozone therapy in the complex treatment of MFI is pathogenetically substantiated effective treatment of oxidative stress and mitochondrial toxicity in the prevention of perinatal complications in infected women

  18. Mitochondrial dysfunction in schizophrenia: an evolutionary perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Vanessa F; Andreazza, Ana C; Kennedy, James L

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SCZ) is a severe psychiatric illness with a lifetime prevalence of 0.4 %. A disturbance of energy metabolism has been suggested as part of the etiopathogenesis of the disorder. Several lines of evidence have proposed a connection between etiopathogenesis of SCZ and human brain evolution, which was characterized by an increase in the energy requirement, demanding a co-evolution of the mitochondrial system. Mitochondria are key players in brain energy homeostasis and multiple lines of evidence suggest that the system is disrupted in SCZ. In this review, we will describe the current knowledge on pathways/system involved in the human brain evolution as well as the main theories regarding the evolutionary origin of SCZ. We will furthermore discuss the role of mitochondria in the context of brain energy metabolism and its role in the etiopathogenesis of SCZ. Understanding SCZ in the context of human brain evolution opens a new perspective to elucidate pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the origin and/or portions of the complex symptomatology of this severe mental disorder.

  19. Circulating acylcarnitines as biomarkers of mitochondrial dysfunction after acetaminophen overdose in mice and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Mitchell R; Li, Feng; Sharpe, Matthew R; Williams, C David; Curry, Steven C; Ma, Xiaochao; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2014-02-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is a widely used analgesic. However, APAP overdose is hepatotoxic and is the primary cause of acute liver failure in the developed world. The mechanism of APAP-induced liver injury begins with protein binding and involves mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. Recent efforts to discover blood biomarkers of mitochondrial damage have identified increased plasma glutamate dehydrogenase activity and mitochondrial DNA concentration in APAP overdose patients. However, a problem with these markers is that they are too large to be released from cells without cell death or loss of membrane integrity. Metabolomic studies are more likely to reveal biomarkers that are useful at early time points, before injury begins. Similar to earlier work, our metabolomic studies revealed that acylcarnitines are elevated in serum from mice after treatment with toxic doses of APAP. Importantly, a comparison with furosemide demonstrated that increased serum acylcarnitines are specific for mitochondrial dysfunction. However, when we measured these compounds in plasma from humans with liver injury after APAP overdose, we could not detect any significant differences from control groups. Further experiments with mice showed that N-acetylcysteine, the antidote for APAP overdose in humans, can reduce acylcarnitine levels in serum. Altogether, our data do not support the clinical measurement of acylcarnitines in blood after APAP overdose due to the standard N-acetylcysteine treatment in patients, but strongly suggest that acylcarnitines would be useful mechanistic biomarkers in other forms of liver injury involving mitochondrial dysfunction.

  20. Salvianolic acid B inhibits mitochondrial dysfunction by up-regulating mortalin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yunxia; Hu, Yingying; E, Qiukai; Zuo, Ji; Yang, Ling; Liu, Wen

    2017-03-02

    Salvianolic acid B is an antioxidative ingredient derived from Radix Salviae miltiorrhizae that has been widely used to treat liver diseases. However, the therapeutic mechanism underlying Salvianolic acid B has remained largely unknown. Our studies verified that Salvianolic acid B efficiently blocked mitochondrial deformation and dysfunction induced by H2O2 in the human hepatocyte cell line HL7702. Mortalin, a mitochondrial molecular chaperone, maintains mitochondrial morphology stabilization and function integrity. Previous results showed that mortalin overexpression has been observed in hematoma carcinoma cells and that mortalin maintains mitochondrial homeostasis and antagonizes oxidative stress damage. We found that Salvianolic acid B significantly up-regulated mortalin protein expression levels. In addition, Salvianolic acid B lost the function of preventing mitochondrial deformation and dysfunction induced by oxidative stress under mortalin knockdown conditions. We further found that mortalin overexpression increases the mRNA expression of mitofusin-related factor Mfn1 and mitofission-related factor hFis1. In conclusion, Salvianolic acid B maintains the mitochondrial structure stabilization and functional integrity by up-regulating mortalin, which may be associated with increased mitofusin factor Mfn1 and reduced mitofission factor hFis1.

  1. Salvianolic acid B inhibits mitochondrial dysfunction by up-regulating mortalin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yunxia; Hu, Yingying; E, Qiukai; Zuo, Ji; Yang, Ling; Liu, Wen

    2017-01-01

    Salvianolic acid B is an antioxidative ingredient derived from Radix Salviae miltiorrhizae that has been widely used to treat liver diseases. However, the therapeutic mechanism underlying Salvianolic acid B has remained largely unknown. Our studies verified that Salvianolic acid B efficiently blocked mitochondrial deformation and dysfunction induced by H2O2 in the human hepatocyte cell line HL7702. Mortalin, a mitochondrial molecular chaperone, maintains mitochondrial morphology stabilization and function integrity. Previous results showed that mortalin overexpression has been observed in hematoma carcinoma cells and that mortalin maintains mitochondrial homeostasis and antagonizes oxidative stress damage. We found that Salvianolic acid B significantly up-regulated mortalin protein expression levels. In addition, Salvianolic acid B lost the function of preventing mitochondrial deformation and dysfunction induced by oxidative stress under mortalin knockdown conditions. We further found that mortalin overexpression increases the mRNA expression of mitofusin-related factor Mfn1 and mitofission-related factor hFis1. In conclusion, Salvianolic acid B maintains the mitochondrial structure stabilization and functional integrity by up-regulating mortalin, which may be associated with increased mitofusin factor Mfn1 and reduced mitofission factor hFis1. PMID:28251987

  2. Rapamycin attenuates mitochondrial dysfunction via activation of mitophagy in experimental ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Qiang [Department of Neurology, Shanghai Sixth People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200233 (China); Department of Neurology, Shanghai Ninth People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200011 (China); Zhang, Ting [Department of Neurology, Shanghai Sixth People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200233 (China); Wang, Jixian [Department of Neurology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Med-X Research Institute and School of Biomedical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200030 (China); Zhang, Zhijun [Med-X Research Institute and School of Biomedical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200030 (China); Zhai, Yu [Department of Neurology, Shanghai Ninth People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200011 (China); Yang, Guo-Yuan, E-mail: gyyang0626@gmail.com [Department of Neurology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Med-X Research Institute and School of Biomedical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200030 (China); Sun, Xiaojiang, E-mail: sunxj19@gmail.com [Department of Neurology, Shanghai Sixth People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200233 (China)

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • Rapamycin enhances mitophagy via increasing p62 translocation to the mitochondria. • Rapamycin attenuates brain ischemic damage and improves mitochondrial function. • The protection of rapamycin to mitochondrial is linked to enhanced mitophagy. - Abstract: Rapamycin has been demonstrated to exhibit neuroprotective functions via the activation of autophagy in a cerebral ischemia model. However, the involvement of mitophagy in this process and its contribution to the protection of mitochondrial function remains unknown. The present study explored the characteristics of mitophagy after cerebral ischemia and the effect of rapamycin on mitochondrial function. Male Sprague–Dawley rats underwent transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO). Neurological deficits scores; infarct volumes; mitophagy morphology; and the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and mitochondrial membrane potentials (Δψm) were examined. The expression of LC3, Beclin-1 and p62 in the mitochondrial fraction combined with transmission electronic microscopy were used to explore mitophagic activity after ischemia. We also blocked autophagosome formation using 3-methyladenine (3-MA) to check the linkage between the mitochondrial protective effect of rapamycin and enhanced mitophagy. We observed that rapamycin significantly enhanced mitophagy, as evidenced by the increase in LC3-II and Beclin-1 expression in the mitochondria and p62 translocation to the mitochondria. Rapamycin reduced infarct volume, improved neurological outcomes and inhibited mitochondrial dysfunction compared with the control animals (p < 0.05). However, these protective effects were reversed by 3-methyladenine treatment after rapamycin. The present study indicates that rapamycin treatment attenuates mitochondrial dysfunction following cerebral ischemia, which is linked to enhanced mitophagy.

  3. Mitochondrial DNA Alterations and Reduced Mitochondrial Function in Aging

    OpenAIRE

    Hebert, Sadie L.; Lanza, Ian R.; Nair, K. Sreekumaran

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative damage to mitochondrial DNA increases with aging. This damage has the potential to affect mitochondrial DNA replication and transcription which could alter the abundance or functionality of mitochondrial proteins. This review describes mitochondrial DNA alterations and changes in mitochondrial function that occur with aging. Age-related alterations in mitochondrial DNA as a possible contributor to the reduction in mitochondrial function are discussed.

  4. Calcium-dependent mitochondrial function and dysfunction in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivovarova, Natalia B; Andrews, S Brian

    2010-09-01

    Calcium is an extraordinarily versatile signaling ion, encoding cellular responses to a wide variety of external stimuli. In neurons, mitochondria can accumulate enormous amounts of calcium, with the consequence that mitochondrial calcium uptake, sequestration and release play pivotal roles in orchestrating calcium-dependent responses as diverse as gene transcription and cell death. In this review, we consider the basic chemistry of calcium as a 'sticky' cation, which leads to extremely high bound/free ratios, and discuss areas of current interest or controversy. Topics addressed include methodologies for measuring local intracellular calcium, mitochondrial calcium buffering and loading capacity, mitochondrially directed spatial calcium gradients, and the role of calcium overload-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction in glutamate-evoked excitotoxic injury and neurodegeneration. Finally, we consider the relationship between delayed calcium de-regulation, the mitochondrial permeability transition and the generation of reactive oxygen species, and propose a unified view of the 'source specificity' and 'calcium overload' models of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-dependent excitotoxicity. Non-NMDA receptor mechanisms of excitotoxicity are discussed briefly. Journal compilation © 2010 FEBS. No claim to original US government works.

  5. Mitochondrial dysfunction in aging and longevity: a causal or protective role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulliam, Daniel A; Bhattacharya, Arunabh; Van Remmen, Holly

    2013-10-20

    Among the most highly investigated theories of aging is the mitochondrial theory of aging. The basis of this theory includes a central role for altered or compromised mitochondrial function in the pathophysiologic declines associated with aging. In general, studies in various organisms, including nematodes, rodents, and humans, have largely upheld that aging is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. However, results from a number of studies directly testing the mitochondrial theory of aging by modulating oxidant production or scavenging in vivo in rodents have generally been inconsistent with predictions of the theory. Interestingly, electron transport chain mutations or deletions in invertebrates and mice that causes mitochondrial dysfunction paradoxically leads to enhanced longevity, further challenging the mitochondrial theory of aging. How can mitochondrial dysfunction contribute to lifespan extension in the mitochondrial mutants, and what does it mean for the mitochondrial theory of aging? It will be important to determine the potential mechanisms that lead to enhanced longevity in the mammalian mitochondrial mutants.

  6. Relationship between mitochondrial electron transport chain dysfunction, development, and life extension in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane L Rea

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Prior studies have shown that disruption of mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC function in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans can result in life extension. Counter to these findings, many mutations that disrupt ETC function in humans are known to be pathologically life-shortening. In this study, we have undertaken the first formal investigation of the role of partial mitochondrial ETC inhibition and its contribution to the life-extension phenotype of C. elegans. We have developed a novel RNA interference (RNAi dilution strategy to incrementally reduce the expression level of five genes encoding mitochondrial proteins in C. elegans: atp-3, nuo-2, isp-1, cco-1, and frataxin (frh-1. We observed that each RNAi treatment led to marked alterations in multiple ETC components. Using this dilution technique, we observed a consistent, three-phase lifespan response to increasingly greater inhibition by RNAi: at low levels of inhibition, there was no response, then as inhibition increased, lifespan responded by monotonically lengthening. Finally, at the highest levels of RNAi inhibition, lifespan began to shorten. Indirect measurements of whole-animal oxidative stress showed no correlation with life extension. Instead, larval development, fertility, and adult size all became coordinately affected at the same point at which lifespan began to increase. We show that a specific signal, initiated during the L3/L4 larval stage of development, is sufficient for initiating mitochondrial dysfunction-dependent life extension in C. elegans. This stage of development is characterized by the last somatic cell divisions normally undertaken by C. elegans and also by massive mitochondrial DNA expansion. The coordinate effects of mitochondrial dysfunction on several cell cycle-dependent phenotypes, coupled with recent findings directly linking cell cycle progression with mitochondrial activity in C. elegans, lead us to propose that cell cycle checkpoint control

  7. Mitochondrial Dysfunction and β-Cell Failure in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongmin Alex Ma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is the most common human endocrine disease and is characterized by peripheral insulin resistance and pancreatic islet β-cell failure. Accumulating evidence indicates that mitochondrial dysfunction is a central contributor to β-cell failure in the evolution of T2DM. As reviewed elsewhere, reactive oxygen species (ROS produced by β-cell mitochondria as a result of metabolic stress activate several stress-response pathways. This paper focuses on mechanisms whereby ROS affect mitochondrial structure and function and lead to β-cell failure. ROS activate UCP2, which results in proton leak across the mitochondrial inner membrane, and this leads to reduced β-cell ATP synthesis and content, which is a critical parameter in regulating glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. In addition, ROS oxidize polyunsaturated fatty acids in mitochondrial cardiolipin and other phospholipids, and this impairs membrane integrity and leads to cytochrome c release into cytosol and apoptosis. Group VIA phospholipase A2 (iPLA2β appears to be a component of a mechanism for repairing mitochondrial phospholipids that contain oxidized fatty acid substituents, and genetic or acquired iPLA2β-deficiency increases β-cell mitochondrial susceptibility to injury from ROS and predisposes to developing T2DM. Interventions that attenuate ROS effects on β-cell mitochondrial phospholipids might prevent or retard development of T2DM.

  8. Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage in parkin-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacino, James J; Sagi, Dijana; Goldberg, Matthew S; Krauss, Stefan; Motz, Claudia; Wacker, Maik; Klose, Joachim; Shen, Jie

    2004-04-30

    Loss-of-function mutations in parkin are the predominant cause of familial Parkinson's disease. We previously reported that parkin-/- mice exhibit nigrostriatal deficits in the absence of nigral degeneration. Parkin has been shown to function as an E3 ubiquitin ligase. Loss of parkin function, therefore, has been hypothesized to cause nigral degeneration via an aberrant accumulation of its substrates. Here we employed a proteomic approach to determine whether loss of parkin function results in alterations in abundance and/or modification of proteins in the ventral midbrain of parkin-/- mice. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometry revealed decreased abundance of a number of proteins involved in mitochondrial function or oxidative stress. Consistent with reductions in several subunits of complexes I and IV, functional assays showed reductions in respiratory capacity of striatal mitochondria isolated from parkin-/- mice. Electron microscopic analysis revealed no gross morphological abnormalities in striatal mitochondria of parkin-/- mice. In addition, parkin-/- mice showed a delayed rate of weight gain, suggesting broader metabolic abnormalities. Accompanying these deficits in mitochondrial function, parkin-/- mice also exhibited decreased levels of proteins involved in protection from oxidative stress. Consistent with these findings, parkin-/- mice showed decreased serum antioxidant capacity and increased protein and lipid peroxidation. The combination of proteomic, genetic, and physiological analyses reveal an essential role for parkin in the regulation of mitochondrial function and provide the first direct evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage in the absence of nigral degeneration in a genetic mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

  9. Mitochondrial dysfunction in psychiatric and neurological diseases: cause(s), consequence(s), and implications of antioxidant therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasote, Deepak M; Hegde, Mahabaleshwar V; Katyare, Surendra S

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is at the base of development and progression of several psychiatric and neurologic diseases with different etiologies. MtDNA/nDNA mutational damage, failure of endogenous antioxidant defenses, hormonal malfunction, altered membrane permeability, metabolic dysregulation, disruption of calcium buffering capacity and ageing have been found to be the root causes of mitochondrial dysfunction in psychatric and neurodegenerative diseases. However, the overall consequences of mitochondrial dysfunction are only limited to increase in oxidative/nitrosative stress and cellular energy crises. Thus far, extensive efforts have been made to improve mitochondrial function through specific cause-dependent antioxidant therapy. However, owing to complex genetic and interlinked causes of mitochondrial dysfunction, it has not been possible to achieve any common, unique supportive antioxidant therapeutic strategy for the treatment of psychiatric and neurologic diseases. Hence, we propose an antioxidant therapeutic strategy for management of consequences of mitochondrial dysfunction in psychiatric and neurologic diseases. It is expected that this will not only reduces oxidative stress, but also promote anaerobic energy production.

  10. Mitochondrial dysfunction in neurodegenerative diseases associated with copper imbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Luisa; Lombardo, Marco F; Ciriolo, Maria R; Rotilio, Giuseppe

    2004-03-01

    Copper is an essential transition metal ion for the function of key metabolic enzymes, but its uncontrolled redox reactivity is source of reactive oxygen species. Therefore a network of transporters strictly controls the trafficking of copper in living systems. Deficit, excess, or aberrant coordination of copper are conditions that may be detrimental, especially for neuronal cells, which are particularly sensitive to oxidative stress. Indeed, the genetic disturbances of copper homeostasis, Menkes' and Wilson's diseases, are associated with neurodegeneration. Furthermore, copper interacts with the proteins that are the hallmarks of neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, prion diseases, and familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In all cases, copper-mediated oxidative stress is linked to mitochondrial dysfunction, which is a common feature of neurodegeneration. In particular we recently demonstrated that in copper deficiency, mitochondrial function is impaired due to decreased activity of cytochrome c oxidase, leading to production of reactive oxygen species, which in turn triggers mitochondria-mediated apoptotic neurodegeneration.

  11. Resveratrol attenuates methylglyoxal-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis by Sestrin2 induction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Kyuhwa; Seo, Suho; Han, Jae Yun; Ki, Sung Hwan; Shin, Sang Mi, E-mail: smshin@chosun.ac.kr

    2014-10-15

    Methylglyoxal is found in high levels in the blood and other tissues of diabetic patients and exerts deleterious effects on cells and tissues. Previously, we reported that resveratrol, a polyphenol in grapes, induced the expression of Sestrin2 (SESN2), a novel antioxidant protein, and inhibited hepatic lipogenesis. This study investigated whether resveratrol protects cells from the methylglyoxal-induced toxicity via SESN2 induction. Methylglyoxal significantly induced cell death in HepG2 cells. However, cells pretreated with resveratrol were rescued from methylglyoxal-induced apoptosis. Resveratrol attenuated glutathione (GSH) depletion and ROS production promoted by methylglyoxal. Moreover, mitochondrial damage was observed by methylglyoxal treatment, but resveratrol restored mitochondrial function, as evidenced by the observed lack of mitochondrial permeability transition and increased ADP/ATP ratio. Resveratrol treatment inhibited SESN2 depletion elicited by methylglyoxal. SESN2 overexpression repressed methylglyoxal-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis. Likewise, rotenone-induced cytotoxicity was not observed in SESN2 overexpressed cells. Furthermore, siRNA knockdown of SESN2 reduced the ability of resveratrol to prevent methylglyoxal-induced mitochondrial permeability transition. In addition, when mice were exposed to methylglyoxal after infection of Ad-SESN2, the plasma levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and GSH depletion by methylglyoxal in liver was reduced in Ad-SESN2 infected mice. Our results demonstrated that resveratrol is capable of protecting cells from methylglyoxal-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress via SESN2 induction. - Highlights: • Resveratrol decreased methylglyoxal-induced apoptosis. • Resveratrol attenuated GSH depletion and ROS production promoted by methylglyoxal. • Resveratrol restored the mitochondrial function by Sestrin2 induction. • Induction of Sestrin2

  12. Reactive oxygen species, apoptosis, and mitochondrial dysfunction in hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamogashira, Teru; Fujimoto, Chisato; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is involved in several apoptotic and necrotic cell death pathways in auditory tissues. These pathways are the major causes of most types of sensorineural hearing loss, including age-related hearing loss, hereditary hearing loss, ototoxic drug-induced hearing loss, and noise-induced hearing loss. ROS production can be triggered by dysfunctional mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and increases or decreases in ROS-related enzymes. Although apoptotic cell death pathways are mostly activated by ROS production, there are other pathways involved in hearing loss that do not depend on ROS production. Further studies of other pathways, such as endoplasmic reticulum stress and necrotic cell death, are required.

  13. Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Immune Cell Metabolism in Sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Sepsis is a life threatening condition mediated by systemic infection, but also triggered by hemorrhage and trauma. These are significant causes of organ injury implicated in morbidity and mortality, as well as post-sepsis complications associated with dysfunction of innate and adaptive immunity. The role of cellular bioenergetics and loss of metabolic plasticity of immune cells is increasingly emerging in the pathogenesis of sepsis. This review describes mitochondrial biology and metabolic alterations of immune cells due to sepsis, as well as indicates plausible therapeutic opportunities.

  14. Ketones prevent synaptic dysfunction induced by mitochondrial respiratory complex inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do Young; Vallejo, Johana; Rho, Jong M

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Ketones have previously shown beneficial effects in models of neurodegenerative disorders, particularly against associated mitochondrial dysfunction and cognitive impairment. However, evidence of a synaptic protective effect of ketones remains lacking. We tested the effects of ketones on synaptic impairment induced by mitochondrial respiratory complex (MRC) inhibitors using electrophysiological, reactive oxygen species (ROS) imaging and biochemical techniques. MRC inhibitors dose-dependently suppressed both population spike (PS) and field potential amplitudes in the CA1 hippocampus. Pre-treatment with ketones strongly prevented changes in the PS, whereas partial protection was seen in the field potential. Rotenone (Rot; 100 nmol/L), a MRC I inhibitor, suppressed synaptic function without altering ROS levels and PS depression by Rot was unaffected by antioxidants. In contrast, antioxidant-induced PS recovery against the MRC II inhibitor 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP; 1 mmol/L) was similar to the synaptic protective effects of ketones. Ketones also suppressed ROS generation induced by 3-NP. Finally, ketones reversed the decreases in ATP levels caused by Rot and 3-NP. In summary, our data demonstrate that ketones can preserve synaptic function in CA1 hippocampus induced by MRC dysfunction, likely through an antioxidant action and enhanced ATP generation. PMID:20374433

  15. Melatonin prevents mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance in rat skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodoro, Bruno G; Baraldi, Flavia G; Sampaio, Igor H; Bomfim, Lucas H M; Queiroz, André L; Passos, Madla A; Carneiro, Everardo M; Alberici, Luciane C; Gomis, Ramon; Amaral, Fernanda G; Cipolla-Neto, José; Araújo, Michel B; Lima, Tanes; Akira Uyemura, Sérgio; Silveira, Leonardo R; Vieira, Elaine

    2014-09-01

    Melatonin has a number of beneficial metabolic actions and reduced levels of melatonin may contribute to type 2 diabetes. The present study investigated the metabolic pathways involved in the effects of melatonin on mitochondrial function and insulin resistance in rat skeletal muscle. The effect of melatonin was tested both in vitro in isolated rats skeletal muscle cells and in vivo using pinealectomized rats (PNX). Insulin resistance was induced in vitro by treating primary rat skeletal muscle cells with palmitic acid for 24 hr. Insulin-stimulated glucose uptake was reduced by palmitic acid followed by decreased phosphorylation of AKT which was prevented my melatonin. Palmitic acid reduced mitochondrial respiration, genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and the levels of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates whereas melatonin counteracted all these parameters in insulin-resistant cells. Melatonin treatment increases CAMKII and p-CREB but had no effect on p-AMPK. Silencing of CREB protein by siRNA reduced mitochondrial respiration mimicking the effect of palmitic acid and prevented melatonin-induced increase in p-AKT in palmitic acid-treated cells. PNX rats exhibited mild glucose intolerance, decreased energy expenditure and decreased p-AKT, mitochondrial respiration, and p-CREB and PGC-1 alpha levels in skeletal muscle which were restored by melatonin treatment in PNX rats. In summary, we showed that melatonin could prevent mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance via activation of CREB-PGC-1 alpha pathway. Thus, the present work shows that melatonin play an important role in skeletal muscle mitochondrial function which could explain some of the beneficial effects of melatonin in insulin resistance states.

  16. Localization of 1-deoxysphingolipids to mitochondria induces mitochondrial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alecu, Irina; Tedeschi, Andrea; Behler, Natascha; Wunderling, Klaus; Lamberz, Christian; Lauterbach, Mario A R; Gaebler, Anne; Ernst, Daniela; Van Veldhoven, Paul P; Al-Amoudi, Ashraf; Latz, Eicke; Othman, Alaa; Kuerschner, Lars; Hornemann, Thorsten; Bradke, Frank; Thiele, Christoph; Penno, Anke

    2017-01-01

    1-Deoxysphingolipids (deoxySLs) are atypical sphingolipids that are elevated in the plasma of patients with type 2 diabetes and hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1 (HSAN1). Clinically, diabetic neuropathy and HSAN1 are very similar, suggesting the involvement of deoxySLs in the pathology of both diseases. However, very little is known about the biology of these lipids and the underlying pathomechanism. We synthesized an alkyne analog of 1-deoxysphinganine (doxSA), the metabolic precursor of all deoxySLs, to trace the metabolism and localization of deoxySLs. Our results indicate that the metabolism of these lipids is restricted to only some lipid species and that they are not converted to canonical sphingolipids or fatty acids. Furthermore, exogenously added alkyne-doxSA [(2S,3R)-2-aminooctadec-17-yn-3-ol] localized to mitochondria, causing mitochondrial fragmentation and dysfunction. The induced mitochondrial toxicity was also shown for natural doxSA, but not for sphinganine, and was rescued by inhibition of ceramide synthase activity. Our findings therefore indicate that mitochondrial enrichment of an N-acylated doxSA metabolite may contribute to the neurotoxicity seen in diabetic neuropathy and HSAN1. Hence, we provide a potential explanation for the characteristic vulnerability of peripheral nerves to elevated levels of deoxySLs.

  17. High Glucose Causes Human Cardiac Progenitor Cell Dysfunction by Promoting Mitochondrial Fission: Role of a GLUT1 Blocker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, He Yun; Park, Ji Hye; Jang, Woong Bi; Ji, Seung Taek; Jung, Seok Yun; Kim, Da Yeon; Kang, Songhwa; Kim, Yeon Ju; Yun, Jisoo; Kim, Jae Ho; Baek, Sang Hong; Kwon, Sang-Mo

    2016-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the most common cause of death in diabetic patients. Hyperglycemia is the primary characteristic of diabetes and is associated with many complications. The role of hyperglycemia in the dysfunction of human cardiac progenitor cells that can regenerate damaged cardiac tissue has been investigated, but the exact mechanism underlying this association is not clear. Thus, we examined whether hyperglycemia could regulate mitochondrial dynamics and lead to cardiac progenitor cell dysfunction, and whether blocking glucose uptake could rescue this dysfunction. High glucose in cardiac progenitor cells results in reduced cell viability and decreased expression of cell cycle-related molecules, including CDK2 and cyclin E. A tube formation assay revealed that hyperglycemia led to a significant decrease in the tube-forming ability of cardiac progenitor cells. Fluorescent labeling of cardiac progenitor cell mitochondria revealed that hyperglycemia alters mitochondrial dynamics and increases expression of fission-related proteins, including Fis1 and Drp1. Moreover, we showed that specific blockage of GLUT1 improved cell viability, tube formation, and regulation of mitochondrial dynamics in cardiac progenitor cells. To our knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate that high glucose leads to cardiac progenitor cell dysfunction through an increase in mitochondrial fission, and that a GLUT1 blocker can rescue cardiac progenitor cell dysfunction and downregulation of mitochondrial fission. Combined therapy with cardiac progenitor cells and a GLUT1 blocker may provide a novel strategy for cardiac progenitor cell therapy in cardiovascular disease patients with diabetes.

  18. Induction of Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Oxidative Stress in Leishmania donovani by Orally Active Clerodane Diterpene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathuria, Manoj; Bhattacharjee, Arindam; Sashidhara, Koneni V.; Singh, Suriya Pratap

    2014-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the mechanistic aspects of cell death induced by a clerodane diterpene (K-09) in Leishmania donovani promastigotes that was previously demonstrated to be safe and orally active against visceral leishmaniasis (VL). K-09 caused depolarization of the mitochondrion and the generation of reactive oxygen species, triggering an apoptotic response in L. donovani promastigotes. Mitochondrial dysfunction subsequently resulted in the release of cytochrome c into the cytosol, impairing ATP production. Oxidative stress caused the depletion of reduced glutathione, while pretreatment with antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) was able to abrogate oxidative stress. However, NAC failed to restore the mitochondrial membrane potential or intracellular calcium homeostasis after K-09 treatment, suggesting that the generation of oxidative stress is a downstream event relative to the other events. Caspase-3/-7-like protease activity and genomic DNA fragmentation were observed. Electron microscopy studies revealed gross morphological alterations typical of apoptosis, including severe mitochondrial damage, pyknosis of the nucleus, structural disruption of the mitochondrion-kinetoplast complex, flagellar pocket alterations, and the displacement of organelles. Moreover, an increased number of lipid droplets was detected after K-09 treatment, which is suggestive of altered lipid metabolism. Our results indicate that K-09 induces mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress-mediated apoptotic cell death in L. donovani promastigotes, sharing many features with metazoan apoptosis. These mechanistic insights provide a basis for further investigation toward the development of K-09 as a potential drug candidate for VL. PMID:25070112

  19. Mitochondria-Targeted Peptide Reverses Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Cognitive Deficits in Sepsis-Associated Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing; Zhang, Mingqiang; Hao, Shuangying; Jia, Ming; Ji, Muhuo; Qiu, Lili; Sun, Xiaoyan; Yang, Jianjun; Li, Kuanyu

    2015-08-01

    Sepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE) is associated with increased mortality, morbidity, and long-term cognitive impairments. Its pathophysiology remains to be determined and an effective pharmacologic treatment is lacking. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of the mitochondria-targeted peptide SS-31 on mitochondrial function and cognitive deficits in SAE mice. C57BL/6 male mice were randomly divided into sham, sham + SS-31, cecal ligation and puncture (CLP), and CLP + SS-31 groups. Peptide SS-31 (5 mg/kg) was intraperitoneally administrated immediately after operation and afterwards once daily for six consecutive days. Surviving mice were subjected to behavioral tests and the hippocampus was collected for biochemical analysis 7 days after operation. The results showed that CLP resulted in high mortality rate and cognitive deficits, representative characteristics of SAE. A physiological mechanistic investigation revealed that mitochondrial function of hippocampus was severely impaired, coupled with reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, triggering neuronal apoptosis and inflammation. Notably, administration of peptide SS-31 protected the integrity of mitochondria, reversed the mitochondrial dysfunction, inhibited the apoptosis resulting from the release of cytochrome c, diminished the response of inflammation, and ultimately reversed the behavior deficits in the SAE mice. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that daily treatment with mitochondria-targeted peptide SS-31 reduces mortality rate and ameliorates cognitive deficits, which is possibly through a mechanism of reversing mitochondrial dysfunction and partial inhibition of neuronal apoptosis and inflammation in the hippocampus of the SAE mice.

  20. High saturated fat feeding prevents left ventricular dysfunction and enhances mitochondrial function in heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accumulation of lipids in the heart is associated with contractile dysfunction, and has been proposed to be a causative factor in mitochondrial dysfunction. We have previously shown that administration of a high saturated fat diet in heart failure (HF) increased mitochondrial respiration and ETC com...

  1. Further Commentary on Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Autism Spectrum Disorder: Assessment and Treatment Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dager, Stephen R.; Corrigan, Neva M.; Estes, Annette; Shaw, Dennis W. W.

    2012-01-01

    The authors respond to a recent letter (Rossignol and Frye 2011) critical of their paper, "Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and MRI reveal no evidence for brain mitochondrial dysfunction in children with autism spectrum disorder" (Corrigan et al. 2011). Further considerations regarding the assessment of mitochondrial dysfunction in autism…

  2. Prolonged Fasting Identifies Skeletal Muscle Mitochondrial Dysfunction as Consequence Rather Than Cause of Human Insulin Resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeks, J.; Herpen, N.A.; Mensink, M.R.; Moonen-Kornips, E.; Beurden, van D.; Hesselink, M.K.C.; Schrauwen, P.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE-Type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance have been associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, but it is debated whether this is a primary factor in the pathogenesis of the disease. To test the concept that mitochondrial dysfunction is secondary to the development of insulin resistance, we

  3. Prolonged Fasting Identifies Skeletal Muscle Mitochondrial Dysfunction as Consequence Rather Than Cause of Human Insulin Resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeks, J.; Herpen, N.A.; Mensink, M.R.; Moonen-Kornips, E.; Beurden, van D.; Hesselink, M.K.C.; Schrauwen, P.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE-Type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance have been associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, but it is debated whether this is a primary factor in the pathogenesis of the disease. To test the concept that mitochondrial dysfunction is secondary to the development of insulin resistance, we em

  4. Intrauterine growth retardation increases the susceptibility of pigs to high-fat diet-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingbo Liu

    Full Text Available It has been recognized that there is a relationship between prenatal growth restriction and the development of metabolic-related diseases in later life, a process involved in mitochondrial dysfunction. In addition, intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR increases the susceptibility of offspring to high-fat (HF diet-induced metabolic syndrome. Recent findings suggested that HF feeding decreased mitochondrial oxidative capacity and impaired mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle. Therefore, we hypothesized that the long-term consequences of IUGR on mitochondrial biogenesis and function make the offspring more susceptible to HF diet-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. Normal birth weight (NBW, and IUGR pigs were allotted to control or HF diet in a completely randomized design, individually. After 4 weeks of feeding, growth performance and molecular pathways related to mitochondrial function were determined. The results showed that IUGR decreased growth performance and plasma insulin concentrations. In offspring fed a HF diet, IUGR was associated with enhanced plasma leptin levels, increased concentrations of triglyceride and malondialdehyde (MDA, and reduced glycogen and ATP contents in skeletal muscle. High fat diet-fed IUGR offspring exhibited decreased activities of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD. These alterations in metabolic traits of IUGR pigs were accompanied by impaired mitochondrial respiration function, reduced mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA contents, and down-regulated mRNA expression levels of genes responsible for mitochondrial biogenesis and function. In conclusion, our results suggest that IUGR make the offspring more susceptible to HF diet-induced mitochondrial dysfunction.

  5. A small volatile bacterial molecule triggers mitochondrial dysfunction in murine skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Aria Tzika

    Full Text Available Mitochondria integrate distinct signals that reflect specific threats to the host, including infection, tissue damage, and metabolic dysfunction; and play a key role in insulin resistance. We have found that the Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing infochemical, 2-amino acetophenone (2-AA, produced during acute and chronic infection in human tissues, including in the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF patients, acts as an interkingdom immunomodulatory signal that facilitates pathogen persistence, and host tolerance to infection. Transcriptome results have led to the hypothesis that 2-AA causes further harm to the host by triggering mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle. As normal skeletal muscle function is essential to survival, and is compromised in many chronic illnesses, including infections and CF-associated muscle wasting, we here determine the global effects of 2-AA on skeletal muscle using high-resolution magic-angle-spinning (HRMAS, proton ((1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR metabolomics, in vivo (31P NMR, whole-genome expression analysis and functional studies. Our results show that 2-AA when injected into mice, induced a biological signature of insulin resistance as determined by (1H NMR analysis-, and dramatically altered insulin signaling, glucose transport, and mitochondrial function. Genes including Glut4, IRS1, PPAR-γ, PGC1 and Sirt1 were downregulated, whereas uncoupling protein UCP3 was up-regulated, in accordance with mitochondrial dysfunction. Although 2-AA did not alter high-energy phosphates or pH by in vivo (31P NMR analysis, it significantly reduced the rate of ATP synthesis. This affect was corroborated by results demonstrating down-regulation of the expression of genes involved in energy production and muscle function, and was further validated by muscle function studies. Together, these results further demonstrate that 2-AA, acts as a mediator of interkingdom modulation, and likely effects insulin resistance

  6. Efficiency of mitochondrially targeted gallic acid in reducing brain mitochondrial oxidative damage.

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    Parihar, P; Jat, D; Ghafourifar, P; Parihar, M S

    2014-07-03

    Oxidative stress is associated with mitochondrial impairments. Supplying mitochondria with potent antioxidants can reduce oxidative stress—induced mitochondrial impairment. Gallic acid can be used to reduce oxidative burden in mitochondria. In order to increase the bioavailability of gallic acid inside the mitochondria we synthesized mitochondrially targeted gallic acid and explored its preventive effects against sodium nitroprusside induced oxidative stress in isolated mitochondria. Our observations revealed an increase in oxidative stress,decrease in reduced glutathione in mitochondria and increase in the mitochondrial permeability pore transition due to sodium nitroprusside treatment. Pre—treatment of gallic acid and mitochondrially targeted gallic acid to sodium nitroprusside treated mitochondria not only significantly reduced the oxidative stress but also prevented mitochondrial permeability pore transition to a significant difference. Mitochondrially targeted gallic acid was found more effective in reducing oxidative stress and mitochondrial permeability pore transition than gallic acid. We conclude that mitochondrially targeted gallic acid can be used for preventing mitochondrial impairment caused by oxidative stress.

  7. Assessment of Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Monoamine Oxidase Contribution to Oxidative Stress in Human Diabetic Hearts

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    O. M. Duicu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria-related oxidative stress is a pathomechanism causally linked to coronary heart disease (CHD and diabetes mellitus (DM. Recently, mitochondrial monoamine oxidases (MAOs have emerged as novel sources of oxidative stress in the cardiovascular system and experimental diabetes. The present study was purported to assess the mitochondrial impairment and the contribution of MAOs-related oxidative stress to the cardiovascular dysfunction in coronary patients with/without DM. Right atrial appendages were obtained from 75 patients randomized into 3 groups: (1 Control (CTRL, valvular patients without CHD; (2 CHD, patients with confirmed CHD; and (3 CHD-DM, patients with CHD and DM. Mitochondrial respiration was measured by high-resolution respirometry and MAOs expression was evaluated by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 emission was assessed by confocal microscopy and spectrophotometrically. The impairment of mitochondrial respiration was substrate-independent in CHD-DM group. MAOs expression was comparable among the groups, with the predominance of MAO-B isoform but no significant differences regarding oxidative stress were detected by either method. Incubation of atrial samples with MAOs inhibitors significantly reduced the H2O2 in all groups. In conclusion, abnormal mitochondrial respiration occurs in CHD and is more severe in DM and MAOs contribute to oxidative stress in human diseased hearts with/without DM.

  8. Coupling calcium dynamics and mitochondrial bioenergetic: an in silico study to simulate cardiomyocyte dysfunction.

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    Das, Phonindra Nath; Pedruzzi, Gabriele; Bairagi, Nandadulal; Chatterjee, Samrat

    2016-03-01

    The coupling of intracellular Ca(2+) dynamics with mitochondrial bioenergetic is crucial for the functioning of cardiomyocytes both in healthy and disease conditions. The pathophysiological signature of the Cardiomyocyte Dysfunction (CD) is commonly related to decreased ATP production due to mitochondrial functional impairment and to an increased mitochondrial calcium content ([Ca(2+)]m). These features advanced the therapeutic approaches which aim to reduce [Ca(2+)]m. But whether [Ca(2+)]m overload is the pathological trigger for CD or a physiological consequence, remained controversial. We addressed this issue in silico and showed that [Ca(2+)]m might not directly cause CD. Through model parameter recalibration, we demonstrated how mitochondria cope up with functionally impaired processes and consequently accumulate calcium. A strong coupling of the [Ca(2+)]m oscillations with the ATP synthesis rate ensures robust calcium cycling and avoids CD. We suggested a cardioprotective role of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter and predicted that a mitochondrial sodium calcium exchanger could be a potential therapeutic target to restore the normal functioning of the cardiomyocyte.

  9. Dysfunctional mitochondrial bioenergetics and the pathogenesis of hepatic disorders

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    Christopher eAuger

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The liver is involved in a variety of critical biological functions including the homeostasis of glucose, fatty acids, amino acids and the synthesis of proteins that are secreted in the blood. It is also at the forefront in the detoxification of noxious metabolites that would otherwise upset the functioning of the body. As such, this vital component of the mammalian system is exposed to a notable quantity of toxicants on a regular basis. It therefore comes as no surprise that there are over a hundred disparate hepatic disorders, encompassing such afflictions as fatty liver disease, hepatitis and liver cancer. Most if not all of liver functions are dependent on energy, an ingredient that is primarily generated by the mitochondrion, the power house of all cells. This organelle is indispensable in providing adenosine triphosphate (ATP, a key effector of most biological processes. Dysfunctional mitochondria lead to a shortage in ATP, the leakage of deleterious reactive oxygen species (ROS and the excessive storage of fats. Here we examine how incapacitated mitochondrial bioenergetics triggers the pathogenesis of various hepatic diseases. Exposure of liver cells to detrimental environmental hazards such as oxidative stress, metal toxicity and various xenobiotics results in the inactivation of crucial mitochondrial enzymes and decreased ATP levels. The contribution of the latter to hepatic disorders and potential therapeutic cues to remedy these conditions are elaborated.

  10. p53 and mitochondrial dysfunction: novel insight of neurodegenerative diseases.

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    Dai, Chun-Qiu; Luo, Ting-Ting; Luo, Shi-Cheng; Wang, Jia-Qi; Wang, Sheng-Ming; Bai, Yun-Hu; Yang, Yan-Ling; Wang, Ya-Yun

    2016-08-01

    Mitochondria are organelles responsible for vital cell functions. p53 is a transcription factor that regulates the DNA stability and cell growth normality. Recent studies revealed that p53 can influence mitochondrial function changing from normal condition to abnormal condition under different stress levels. In normal state, p53 can maintain mitochondrial respiration through transactivation of SCO2. When stress stimuli presents, SCO2 overexpresses and leads to ROS generation. ROS promotes p53 inducing MALM (Mieap-induced accumulation of lysosome-like organelles within mitochondria) to repair dysfunctional mitochondria and MIV (Mieap-induced vacuole) to accomplish damaged mitochondria degradation. If stress or damage is irreversible, p53 will translocate to mitochondria, leading into apoptosis or necrosis. Neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease and Alzheimer's disease are still lack of clear explanations of mechanisms, but more studies have revealed the functional relationship between mitochondria and p53 towards the pathological development of these diseases. In this review, we discuss that p53 plays the vital role in the function of mitochondria in the aspect of pathological change metabolism. We also analyze these diseases with novel targeted treating molecules which are related to p53 and mitochondria, hoping to present novel therapies in future clinic.

  11. The Krebs cycle and mitochondrial mass are early victims of endothelial dysfunction: proteomic approach.

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    Addabbo, Francesco; Ratliff, Brian; Park, Hyeong-Cheon; Kuo, Mei-Chuan; Ungvari, Zoltan; Csiszar, Anna; Ciszar, Anna; Krasnikov, Boris; Krasnikof, Boris; Sodhi, Komal; Zhang, Fung; Nasjletti, Alberto; Goligorsky, Michael S

    2009-01-01

    Endothelial cell dysfunction is associated with bioavailable nitric oxide deficiency and an excessive generation of reactive oxygen species. We modeled this condition by chronically inhibiting nitric oxide generation with subpressor doses of N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) in C57B6 and Tie-2/green fluorescent protein mouse strains. L-NMMA-treated mice exhibited a slight reduction in vasorelaxation ability, as well as detectable abnormalities in soluble adhesion molecules (soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cellular adhesion molecule-1, and matrix metalloproteinase 9), which represent surrogate indicators of endothelial dysfunction. Proteomic analysis of the isolated microvasculature using 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectroscopy revealed abnormal expression of a cluster of mitochondrial enzymes, which was confirmed using immunodetection. Aconitase-2 and enoyl-CoA-hydratase-1 expression levels were decreased in L-NMMA-treated animals; this phenotype was absent in nitric oxide synthase-1 and -3 knockout mice. Depletion of aconitase-2 and enoyl-CoA-hydratase-1 resulted in the inhibition of the Krebs cycle and enhanced pyruvate shunting toward the glycolytic pathway. To assess mitochondrial mass in vivo, co-localization of green fluorescent protein and MitoTracker fluorescence was detected by intravital microscopy. Quantitative analysis of fluorescence intensity showed that L-NMMA-treated animals exhibited lower fluorescence of MitoTracker in microvascular endothelia as a result of reduced mitochondrial mass. These findings provide conclusive and unbiased evidence that mitochondriopathy represents an early manifestation of endothelial dysfunction, shifting cell metabolism toward "metabolic hypoxia" through the selective depletion of both aconitase-2 and enoyl-CoA-hydratase-1. These findings may contribute to an early preclinical diagnosis of endothelial dysfunction.

  12. Acrylamide induces mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis in BV-2 microglial cells.

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    Liu, Zhigang; Song, Ge; Zou, Chen; Liu, Gongguan; Wu, Wanqiang; Yuan, Tian; Liu, Xuebo

    2015-07-01

    Acrylamide (ACR), a potent neurotoxin, can be produced during food processing at high temperature. This study examined the redox-dependent apoptotic and inflammatory responses of ACR in an immortalized mouse microglia cell line BV2. The exposure of BV2 cells to ACR reduced cell viability and induced apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. ACR impaired cell energy metabolism by decreasing mitochondrial respiration, anaerobic glycolysis, and lowering expression of the complex I, III, and IV subunits. Mitochondrial dysfunction was associated with a decrease of the mitochondrial membrane potential and the Bcl-2/Bax ratio, thus resulting in activation of the mitochondrion-driven apoptotic signaling. This was accompanied by (a) the modulation of redox-sensitive signaling, suppressed Akt activation and increased JNK and p38 activation, and (b) increased expression of NFκB and downstream inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and nitric oxide generation, thus supporting indirectly a proinflammatory effect of ACR. Nrf2 expression was also increased but not its translocation to the nucleus. Expectedly, the electrophilic attack of ACR on GSH resulted in substantial loss of GSH with a minor GSSG formation. These changes in the cell׳s redox status elicited by ACR resulted in increased H2O2 formation. The changes in mitochondrial functionality and complex subunit expression caused by ACR were reversed by N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC). Likewise, NAC restored the cell׳s redox status by increasing GSH levels with concomitant attenuation of H2O2 generation; these effects resulted in decreased apoptotic cell death and inflammatory responses. ACR-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction along with a more oxidized redox status seems to be critical events leading to activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway and inflammatory responses.

  13. Mitochondrial dysfunction and respiratory chain defects in a rodent model of methotrexate-induced enteritis.

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    Kolli, V K; Natarajan, K; Isaac, B; Selvakumar, D; Abraham, P

    2014-10-01

    The efficacy of methotrexate (MTX), a widely used chemotherapeutic drug, is limited by its gastrointestinal toxicity and the mechanism of which is not clear. The present study investigates the possible role of mitochondrial damage in MTX-induced enteritis. Small intestinal injury was induced in Wistar rats by the administration of 7 mg kg(-1) body wt. MTX intraperitoneally for 3 consecutive days. MTX administration resulted in severe small intestinal injury and extensive damage to enterocyte mitochondria. Respiratory control ratio, the single most useful and reliable test of mitochondrial function, and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yll)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide reduction, a measure of cell viability were significantly reduced in all the fractions of MTX-treated rat enterocytes. A massive decrease (nearly 70%) in the activities of complexes II and IV was also observed. The results of the present study suggest that MTX-induced damage to enterocyte mitochondria may play a critical role in enteritis. MTX-induced alteration in mitochondrial structure may cause its dysfunction and decreases the activities of the electron chain complexes. MTX-induced mitochondrial damage can result in reduced adenosine triphosphate synthesis, thereby interfering with nutrient absorption and enterocyte renewal. This derangement may contribute to malabsorption of nutrients, diarrhea, and weight loss seen in patients on MTX chemotherapy.

  14. Posttranslational modifications and dysfunction of mitochondrial enzymes in human heart failure.

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    Sheeran, Freya L; Pepe, Salvatore

    2016-08-01

    Deficiency of energy supply is a major complication contributing to the syndrome of heart failure (HF). Because the concurrent activity profile of mitochondrial bioenergetic enzymes has not been studied collectively in human HF, our aim was to examine the mitochondrial enzyme defects in left ventricular myocardium obtained from explanted end-stage failing hearts. Compared with nonfailing donor hearts, activity rates of complexes I and IV and the Krebs cycle enzymes isocitrate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase, and aconitase were lower in HF, as determined spectrophotometrically. However, activity rates of complexes II and III and citrate synthase did not differ significantly between the two groups. Protein expression, determined by Western blotting, did not differ between the groups, implying posttranslational perturbation. In the face of diminished total glutathione and coenzyme Q10 levels, oxidative modification was explored as an underlying cause of enzyme dysfunction. Of the three oxidative modifications measured, protein carbonylation was increased significantly by 31% in HF (P transport chain and Krebs cycle enzymes without altered expression of protein levels. Augmented oxidative modification of crucial enzyme subunit structures implicates dysfunction due to diminished capacity for management of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, thus contributing further to reduced bioenergetics in human HF.

  15. Tau oligomers impair memory and induce synaptic and mitochondrial dysfunction in wild-type mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The correlation between neurofibrillary tangles of tau and disease progression in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients remains an area of contention. Innovative data are emerging from biochemical, cell-based and transgenic mouse studies that suggest that tau oligomers, a pre-filament form of tau, may be the most toxic and pathologically significant tau aggregate. Results Here we report that oligomers of recombinant full-length human tau protein are neurotoxic in vivo after subcortical stereotaxic injection into mice. Tau oligomers impaired memory consolidation, whereas tau fibrils and monomers did not. Additionally, tau oligomers induced synaptic dysfunction by reducing the levels of synaptic vesicle-associated proteins synaptophysin and septin-11. Tau oligomers produced mitochondrial dysfunction by decreasing the levels of NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (electron transport chain complex I), and activated caspase-9, which is related to the apoptotic mitochondrial pathway. Conclusions This study identifies tau oligomers as an acutely toxic tau species in vivo, and suggests that tau oligomers induce neurodegeneration by affecting mitochondrial and synaptic function, both of which are early hallmarks in AD and other tauopathies. These results open new avenues for neuroprotective intervention strategies of tauopathies by targeting tau oligomers. PMID:21645391

  16. Tau oligomers impair memory and induce synaptic and mitochondrial dysfunction in wild-type mice

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    Jackson George R

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The correlation between neurofibrillary tangles of tau and disease progression in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD patients remains an area of contention. Innovative data are emerging from biochemical, cell-based and transgenic mouse studies that suggest that tau oligomers, a pre-filament form of tau, may be the most toxic and pathologically significant tau aggregate. Results Here we report that oligomers of recombinant full-length human tau protein are neurotoxic in vivo after subcortical stereotaxic injection into mice. Tau oligomers impaired memory consolidation, whereas tau fibrils and monomers did not. Additionally, tau oligomers induced synaptic dysfunction by reducing the levels of synaptic vesicle-associated proteins synaptophysin and septin-11. Tau oligomers produced mitochondrial dysfunction by decreasing the levels of NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (electron transport chain complex I, and activated caspase-9, which is related to the apoptotic mitochondrial pathway. Conclusions This study identifies tau oligomers as an acutely toxic tau species in vivo, and suggests that tau oligomers induce neurodegeneration by affecting mitochondrial and synaptic function, both of which are early hallmarks in AD and other tauopathies. These results open new avenues for neuroprotective intervention strategies of tauopathies by targeting tau oligomers.

  17. Mitochondrial Dynamics in Mitochondrial Diseases

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    Juan M. Suárez-Rivero

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are very versatile organelles in continuous fusion and fission processes in response to various cellular signals. Mitochondrial dynamics, including mitochondrial fission/fusion, movements and turnover, are essential for the mitochondrial network quality control. Alterations in mitochondrial dynamics can cause neuropathies such as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease in which mitochondrial fusion and transport are impaired, or dominant optic atrophy which is caused by a reduced mitochondrial fusion. On the other hand, mitochondrial dysfunction in primary mitochondrial diseases promotes reactive oxygen species production that impairs its own function and dynamics, causing a continuous vicious cycle that aggravates the pathological phenotype. Mitochondrial dynamics provides a new way to understand the pathophysiology of mitochondrial disorders and other diseases related to mitochondria dysfunction such as diabetes, heart failure, or Hungtinton’s disease. The knowledge about mitochondrial dynamics also offers new therapeutics targets in mitochondrial diseases.

  18. DNA double-strand breaks activate ATM independent of mitochondrial dysfunction in A549 cells.

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    Kalifa, Lidza; Gewandter, Jennifer S; Staversky, Rhonda J; Sia, Elaine A; Brookes, Paul S; O'Reilly, Michael A

    2014-10-01

    Excessive nuclear or mitochondrial DNA damage can lead to mitochondrial dysfunction, decreased energy production, and increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Although numerous cell signaling pathways are activated when cells are injured, the ataxia telangiectasia mutant (ATM) protein has emerged as a major regulator of the response to both mitochondrial dysfunction and nuclear DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Because mitochondrial dysfunction is often a response to excessive DNA damage, it has been difficult to determine whether nuclear and/or mitochondrial DNA DSBs activate ATM independent of mitochondrial dysfunction. In this study, mitochondrial and nuclear DNA DSBs were generated in the A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cell line by infecting with retroviruses expressing the restriction endonuclease PstI fused to a mitochondrial targeting sequence (MTS) or nuclear localization sequence (NLS) and a hemagglutinin antigen epitope tag (HA). Expression of MTS-PstI-HA or NLS-PstI-HA activated the DNA damage response defined by phosphorylation of ATM, the tumor suppressor protein p53 (TP53), KRAB-associated protein (KAP)-1, and structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC)-1. Phosphorylated ATM and SMC1 were detected in nuclear fractions, whereas phosphorylated TP53 and KAP1 were detected in both mitochondrial and nuclear fractions. PstI also enhanced expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 and inhibited cell growth. This response to DNA damage occurred in the absence of detectable mitochondrial dysfunction and excess production of ROS. These findings reveal that DNA DSBs are sufficient to activate ATM independent of mitochondrial dysfunction and suggest that the activated form of ATM and some of its substrates are restricted to the nuclear compartment, regardless of the site of DNA damage.

  19. The role of SIGMAR1 gene mutation and mitochondrial dysfunction in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

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    Fukunaga, Kohji; Shinoda, Yasuharu; Tagashira, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients exhibit diverse pathologies such as endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in motor neurons. Five to ten percent of patients have familial ALS, a form of the disease caused by mutations in ALS-related genes, while sporadic forms of the disease occur in 90-95% of patients. Recently, it was reported that familial ALS patients exhibit a missense mutation in SIGMAR1 (c.304G > C), which encodes sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R), substituting glutamine for glutamic acid at amino acid residue 102 (p.E102Q). Expression of that mutant Sig-1R(E102Q) protein reduces mitochondrial ATP production, inhibits proteasome activity and causes mitochondrial injury, aggravating ER stress-induced neuronal death in neuro2A cells. In this issue, we discuss mechanisms underlying mitochondrial impairment seen in ALS motor neurons and propose that therapies that protect mitochondria might improve the quality of life (QOL) of ALS patients and should be considered for clinical trials.

  20. Parkinson phenotype in aged PINK1-deficient mice is accompanied by progressive mitochondrial dysfunction in absence of neurodegeneration.

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    Suzana Gispert

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Parkinson's disease (PD is an adult-onset movement disorder of largely unknown etiology. We have previously shown that loss-of-function mutations of the mitochondrial protein kinase PINK1 (PTEN induced putative kinase 1 cause the recessive PARK6 variant of PD. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Now we generated a PINK1 deficient mouse and observed several novel phenotypes: A progressive reduction of weight and of locomotor activity selectively for spontaneous movements occurred at old age. As in PD, abnormal dopamine levels in the aged nigrostriatal projection accompanied the reduced movements. Possibly in line with the PARK6 syndrome but in contrast to sporadic PD, a reduced lifespan, dysfunction of brainstem and sympathetic nerves, visible aggregates of alpha-synuclein within Lewy bodies or nigrostriatal neurodegeneration were not present in aged PINK1-deficient mice. However, we demonstrate PINK1 mutant mice to exhibit a progressive reduction in mitochondrial preprotein import correlating with defects of core mitochondrial functions like ATP-generation and respiration. In contrast to the strong effect of PINK1 on mitochondrial dynamics in Drosophila melanogaster and in spite of reduced expression of fission factor Mtp18, we show reduced fission and increased aggregation of mitochondria only under stress in PINK1-deficient mouse neurons. CONCLUSION: Thus, aging Pink1(-/- mice show increasing mitochondrial dysfunction resulting in impaired neural activity similar to PD, in absence of overt neuronal death.

  1. Centella asiatica Attenuates D-Galactose-Induced Cognitive Impairment, Oxidative and Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Mice

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    Anil Kumar

    2011-01-01

    l (D-galactose. Centella asiatica also attenuated enhanced acetylcholine esterase enzyme level in D-galactose senescence mice. Present study highlights the protective effect of Centella asiatica against D-galactose induced behavioral, biochemical and mitochondrial dysfunction in mice.

  2. Celastrol attenuates mitochondrial dysfunction and inflammation in palmitate-mediated insulin resistance in C3A hepatocytes.

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    Abu Bakar, Mohamad Hafizi; Sarmidi, Mohamad Roji; Tan, Joo Shun; Mohamad Rosdi, Mohamad Norisham

    2017-03-15

    Accumulating evidence indicates that mitochondrial dysfunction-induced inflammation is among the convergence points for the greatest hallmarks of hepatic insulin resistance. Celastrol, an anti-inflammatory compound from the root of Tripterygium Wilfordii has been reported to mitigate insulin resistance and inflammation in animal disease models. Nevertheless, the specific mechanistic actions of celastrol in modulating such improvements at the cellular level remain obscure. The present study sought to explore the mechanistic roles of celastrol upon insulin resistance induced by palmitate in C3A human hepatocytes. The hepatocytes exposed to palmitate (0.75mM) for 48h exhibited reduced both basal and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, mitochondrial dysfunction, leading to increased mitochondrial oxidative stress with diminished fatty acid oxidation. Elevated expressions of nuclear factor-kappa B p65 (NF-κB p65), c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathways and the amplified release of pro-inflammatory cytokines including IL-8, IL-6, TNF-α and CRP were observed following palmitate treatment. Consistently, palmitate reduced and augmented phosphorylated Tyrosine-612 and Serine-307 of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) proteins, respectively in hepatocytes. However, celastrol at the optimum concentration of 30nM was able to reverse these deleterious occasions and protected the cells from mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance. Importantly, we presented evidence for the first time that celastrol efficiently prevented palmitate-induced insulin resistance in hepatocytes at least, via improved mitochondrial functions and insulin signaling pathways. In summary, the present investigation underlines a conceivable mechanism to elucidate the cytoprotective potential of celastrol in attenuating mitochondrial dysfunction and inflammation against the development of hepatic insulin resistance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Curcumin alleviates oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in astrocytes.

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    Daverey, Amita; Agrawal, Sandeep K

    2016-10-01

    Oxidative stress plays a critical role in various neurodegenerative diseases, thus alleviating oxidative stress is a potential strategy for therapeutic intervention and/or prevention of neurodegenerative diseases. In the present study, alleviation of oxidative stress through curcumin is investigated in A172 (human glioblastoma cell line) and HA-sp (human astrocytes cell line derived from the spinal cord) astrocytes. H2O2 was used to induce oxidative stress in astrocytes (A172 and HA-sp). Data show that H2O2 induces activation of astrocytes in dose- and time-dependent manner as evident by increased expression of GFAP in A172 and HA-sp cells after 24 and 12h respectively. An upregulation of Prdx6 was also observed in A172 and HA-sp cells after 24h of H2O2 treatment as compared to untreated control. Our data also showed that curcumin inhibits oxidative stress-induced cytoskeleton disarrangement, and impedes the activation of astrocytes by inhibiting upregulation of GFAP, vimentin and Prdx6. In addition, we observed an inhibition of oxidative stress-induced inflammation, apoptosis and mitochondria fragmentation after curcumin treatment. Therefore, our results suggest that curcumin not only protects astrocytes from H2O2-induced oxidative stress but also reverses the mitochondrial damage and dysfunction induced by oxidative stress. This study also provides evidence for protective role of curcumin on astrocytes by showing its effects on attenuating reactive astrogliosis and inhibiting apoptosis.

  4. Respiratory dysfunction by AFG3L2 deficiency causes decreased mitochondrial calcium uptake via organellar network fragmentation

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    Maltecca, Francesca; De Stefani, Diego; Cassina, Laura; Consolato, Francesco; Wasilewski, Michal; Scorrano, Luca; Rizzuto, Rosario; Casari, Giorgio

    2012-01-01

    The mitochondrial protein AFG3L2 forms homo-oligomeric and hetero-oligomeric complexes with paraplegin in the inner mitochondrial membrane, named m-AAA proteases. These complexes are in charge of quality control of misfolded proteins and participate in the regulation of OPA1 proteolytic cleavage, required for mitochondrial fusion. Mutations in AFG3L2 cause spinocerebellar ataxia type 28 and a complex neurodegenerative syndrome of childhood. In this study, we demonstrated that the loss of AFG3L2 in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) reduces mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake capacity. This defect is neither a consequence of global alteration in cellular Ca2+ homeostasis nor of the reduced driving force for Ca2+ internalization within mitochondria, since cytosolic Ca2+ transients and mitochondrial membrane potential remain unaffected. Moreover, experiments in permeabilized cells revealed unaltered mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake speed in Afg3l2−/− cells, indicating the presence of functional Ca2+ uptake machinery. Our results show that the defective Ca2+ handling in Afg3l2−/− cells is caused by fragmentation of the mitochondrial network, secondary to respiratory dysfunction and the consequent processing of OPA1. This leaves a number of mitochondria devoid of connections to the ER and thus without Ca2+ elevations, hampering the proper Ca2+ diffusion along the mitochondrial network. The recovery of mitochondrial fragmentation in Afg3l2−/− MEFs by overexpression of OPA1 rescues the impaired mitochondrial Ca2+ buffering, but fails to restore respiration. By linking mitochondrial morphology and Ca2+ homeostasis, these findings shed new light in the molecular mechanisms underlining neurodegeneration caused by AFG3L2 mutations. PMID:22678058

  5. The Plant Decapeptide OSIP108 Can Alleviate Mitochondrial Dysfunction Induced by Cisplatin in Human Cells

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    Pieter Spincemaille

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effect of the Arabidopsis thaliana-derived decapeptide OSIP108 on human cell tolerance to the chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin (Cp, which induces apoptosis and mitochondrial dysfunction. We found that OSIP108 increases the tolerance of HepG2 cells to Cp and prevents Cp-induced changes in basic cellular metabolism. More specifically, we demonstrate that OSIP108 reduces Cp-induced inhibition of respiration, decreases glycolysis and prevents Cp-uptake in HepG2 cells. Apart from its protective action against Cp in human cells, OSIP108 also increases the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae tolerance to Cp. A limited yeast-based study of OSIP108 analogs showed that cyclization does not severely affect its activity, which was further confirmed in HepG2 cells. Furthermore, the similarity in the activity of the D-stereoisomer (mirror image form of OSIP108 with the L-stereoisomer suggests that its mode of action does not involve binding to a stereospecific receptor. In addition, as OSIP108 decreases Cp uptake in HepG2 cells and the anti-Cp activity of OSIP108 analogs without free cysteine is reduced, OSIP108 seems to protect against Cp-induced toxicity only partly via complexation. Taken together, our data indicate that OSIP108 and its cyclic derivatives can protect against Cp-induced toxicity and, thus, show potential as treatment options for mitochondrial dysfunction- and apoptosis-related conditions.

  6. Mechanisms of disease: Mitochondrial dysfunction in sensory neuropathy and other complications in diabetes.

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    Fernyhough, Paul; McGavock, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is a major complication of diabetes that involves the sensory and autonomic nervous systems and leads to significant morbidity and impact on quality of life of patients. Mitochondrial stress has been proposed as a major mediator of insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle in type 2 diabetes and a trigger of diabetic complications such as nephropathy and cardiomyopathy in humans and animal models. Recent studies in the peripheral nervous system in type 1 and type 2 diabetic animal models suggest a role for mitochondrial dysfunction in neurodegeneration in diabetes. This chapter focuses on the nature of sensory nerve dysfunction in diabetes and presents these findings in the context of diabetes-induced nerve degeneration mediated by alterations in mitochondrial physiology. Diabetes-induced dysfunction in calcium homeostasis is discussed and causative associations with suboptimal mitochondrial physiology are developed. Comparisons are made with mitochondrial-dependent dysfunction in muscle and cardiac tissue in diabetes. It is clear that across a range of complications of diabetes mitochondrial physiology is impaired; in general, a reduction in respiratory chain capability is apparent. Where appropriate, we provide clinical evidence for mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathogenesis of complications in patients with diabetes. This abnormal activity may predispose mitochondria to generate elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS), although experimental proof remains lacking, but more importantly will deleteriously alter the bioenergetic status of neurons.

  7. Water-Soluble Coenzyme Q10 Reduces Rotenone-Induced Mitochondrial Fission.

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    Li, Hai-Ning; Zimmerman, Mary; Milledge, Gaolin Z; Hou, Xiao-Lin; Cheng, Jiang; Wang, Zhen-Hai; Li, P Andy

    2017-02-11

    Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. It is usually accompanied by an imbalance in mitochondrial dynamics and changes in mitochondrial morphology that are associated with impaired function. The objectives of this study were to identify the effects of rotenone, a drug known to mimic the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease, on mitochondrial dynamics. Additionally, this study explored the protective effects of water-soluble Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) against rotenone-induced cytotoxicity in murine neuronal HT22 cells. Our results demonstrate that rotenone elevates protein expression of mitochondrial fission markers, Drp1 and Fis1, and causes an increase in mitochondrial fragmentation as evidenced through mitochondrial staining and morphological analysis. Water-soluble CoQ10 prevented mitochondrial dynamic imbalance by reducing Drp1 and Fis1 protein expression to pre-rotenone levels, as well as reducing rotenone treatment-associated mitochondrial fragmentation. Hence, water-soluble CoQ10 may have therapeutic potential in treating patients with Parkinson's disease.

  8. Fructose induces mitochondrial dysfunction and triggers apoptosis in skeletal muscle cells by provoking oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Natasha; Maurya, Chandan K; Arha, Deepti; Avisetti, Deepa R; Prathapan, Ayyappan; Raj, Palayyan S; Raghu, Kozhiparambil G; Kalivendi, Shasi V; Tamrakar, Akhilesh Kumar

    2015-07-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle has been implicated in the development of insulin resistance, a major characteristic of type 2 diabetes. There is evidence that oxidative stress results from the increased production of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species leads to mitochondrial dysfunction, tissue damage, insulin resistance, and other complications observed in type 2 diabetes. It has been suggested that intake of high fructose contributes to insulin resistance and other metabolic disturbances. However, there is limited information about the direct effect of fructose on the mitochondrial function of skeletal muscle, the major metabolic determinant of whole body insulin activity. Here, we assessed the effect of fructose exposure on mitochondria-mediated mechanisms in skeletal muscle cells. Exposure of L6 myotubes to high fructose stimulated the production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide (NO), and the expression of inducible NO synthase. Fructose-induced oxidative stress was associated with increased translocation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor-2 to the nucleus, decreases in mitochondrial DNA content and mitochondrial dysfunctions, as evidenced by decreased activities of citrate synthase and mitochondrial dehydrogenases, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, decreased activity of the mitochondrial respiratory complexes, and impaired mitochondrial energy metabolism. Furthermore, positive Annexin-propidium iodide staining and altered expression of Bcl-2 family members and caspases in L6 myotubes indicated that the cells progressively became apoptotic upon fructose exposure. Taken together, these findings suggest that exposure of skeletal muscle cells to fructose induced oxidative stress that decreased mitochondrial DNA content and triggered mitochondrial dysfunction, which caused apoptosis.

  9. Knockdown of LYRM1 rescues insulin resistance and mitochondrial dysfunction induced by FCCP in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Qin, Zhen-Ying; Dai, Yong-mei; Wang, Yu-Mei; Zhu, Guan-zhong; Zhao, Ya-Ping; Ji, Chen-Bo; Zhu, Jin-Gai; Shi, Chun-Mei; Qiu, Jie; Cao, Xin-Guo; Guo, Xi-Rong

    2014-09-01

    LYR motif-containing 1 (LYRM1) was recently discovered to be involved in adipose tissue homeostasis and obesity-associated insulin resistance. We previously demonstrated that LYRM1 overexpression might contribute to insulin resistance and mitochondrial dysfunction. Additionally, knockdown of LYRM1 enhanced insulin sensitivity and mitochondrial function in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. We investigated whether knockdown of LYRM1 in 3T3-L1 adipocytes could rescue insulin resistance and mitochondrial dysfunction induced by the cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenyl-hydrazone (FCCP), a mitochondrion uncoupler, to further ascertain the mechanism by which LYRM1 is involved in obesity-associated insulin resistance. Incubation of 3T3-L1 adipocytes with 1 µM FCCP for 12 h decreased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, reduced intracellular ATP synthesis, increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, impaired insulin-stimulated Glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4) translocation, and diminished insulin-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of Insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) and serine phosphorylation of Protein Kinase B (Akt). Knockdown of LYRM1 restored insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, rescued intracellular ATP synthesis, reduced intracellular ROS production, restored insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation, and rescued insulin-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS-1 and serine phosphorylation of Akt in FCCP-treated 3T3-L1 adipocytes. This study indicates that FCCP-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance are ameliorated by knockdown of LYRM1.

  10. The Role of Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Psychiatric Disease

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    Scaglia, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain disorders are a group of genetically and clinically heterogeneous disorders caused by the biochemical complexity of mitochondrial respiration and the fact that two genomes, one mitochondrial and one nuclear, encode the components of the respiratory chain. These disorders can manifest at birth or present later in…

  11. Sepsis-induced cardiac mitochondrial dysfunction involves altered mitochondrial-localization of tyrosine kinase Src and tyrosine phosphatase SHP2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qun S Zang

    Full Text Available Our previous research demonstrated that sepsis produces mitochondrial dysfunction with increased mitochondrial oxidative stress in the heart. The present study investigated the role of mitochondria-localized signaling molecules, tyrosine kinase Src and tyrosine phosphatase SHP2, in sepsis-induced cardiac mitochondrial dysfunction using a rat pneumonia-related sepsis model. SD rats were given an intratracheal injection of Streptococcus pneumoniae, 4×10(6 CFU per rat, (or vehicle for shams; heart tissues were then harvested and subcellular fractions were prepared. By Western blot, we detected a gradual and significant decrease in Src and an increase in SHP2 in cardiac mitochondria within 24 hours post-inoculation. Furthermore, at 24 hours post-inoculation, sepsis caused a near 70% reduction in tyrosine phosphorylation of all cardiac mitochondrial proteins. Decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of certain mitochondrial structural proteins (porin, cyclophilin D and cytochrome C and functional proteins (complex II subunit 30kD and complex I subunit NDUFB8 were evident in the hearts of septic rats. In vitro, pre-treatment of mitochondrial fractions with recombinant active Src kinase elevated OXPHOS complex I and II-III activity, whereas the effect of SHP2 phosphatase was opposite. Neither Src nor SHP2 affected complex IV and V activity under the same conditions. By immunoprecipitation, we showed that Src and SHP2 consistently interacted with complex I and III in the heart, suggesting that complex I and III contain putative substrates of Src and SHP2. In addition, in vitro treatment of mitochondrial fractions with active Src suppressed sepsis-associated mtROS production and protected aconitase activity, an indirect marker of mitochondrial oxidative stress. On the contrary, active SHP2 phosphatase overproduced mtROS and deactivated aconitase under the same in vitro conditions. In conclusion, our data suggest that changes in mitochondria

  12. Chronically ischemic mouse skeletal muscle exhibits myopathy in association with mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipinos, Iraklis I; Swanson, Stanley A; Zhu, Zhen; Nella, Aikaterini A; Weiss, Dustin J; Gutti, Tanuja L; McComb, Rodney D; Baxter, B Timothy; Lynch, Thomas G; Casale, George P

    2008-07-01

    A myopathy characterized by mitochondrial pathology and oxidative stress is present in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Patients with PAD differ in disease severity, mode of presentation, and presence of comorbid conditions. In this study, we used a mouse model of hindlimb ischemia to isolate and directly investigate the effects of chronic inflow arterial occlusion on skeletal muscle microanatomy, mitochondrial function and expression, and oxidative stress. Hindlimb ischemia was induced by staged ligation/division of the common femoral and iliac arteries in C57BL/6 mice, and muscles were harvested 12 wk later. Muscle microanatomy was examined by bright-field microscopy, and mitochondrial content was determined as citrate synthase activity in muscle homogenates and ATP synthase expression by fluorescence microscopy. Electron transport chain (ETC) complexes I through IV were analyzed individually by respirometry. Oxidative stress was assessed as total protein carbonyls and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) adducts and altered expression and activity of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD). Ischemic muscle exhibited histological features of myopathy and increased mitochondrial content compared with control muscle. Complex-dependent respiration was significantly reduced for ETC complexes I, III, and IV in ischemic muscle. Protein carbonyls, HNE adducts, and MnSOD expression were significantly increased in ischemic muscle. MnSOD activity was not significantly changed, suggesting MnSOD inactivation. Using a mouse model, we have demonstrated for the first time that inflow arterial occlusion alone, i.e., in the absence of other comorbid conditions, causes myopathy with mitochondrial dysfunction and increased oxidative stress, recapitulating the muscle pathology of PAD patients.

  13. Mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to alveolar developmental arrest in hyperoxia-exposed mice.

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    Ratner, Veniamin; Starkov, Anatoly; Matsiukevich, Dzmitry; Polin, Richard A; Ten, Vadim S

    2009-05-01

    This study investigated whether mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to alveolar developmental arrest in a mouse model of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). To induce BPD, 3-day-old mice were exposed to 75% O2. Mice were studied at two time points of hyperoxia (72 h or 2 wk) and after 3 weeks of recovery in room air (RA). A separate cohort of mice was exposed to pyridaben, a complex-I (C-I) inhibitor, for 72 hours or 2 weeks. Alveolarization was quantified by radial alveolar count and mean linear intercept methods. Pulmonary mitochondrial function was defined by respiration rates, ATP-production rate, and C-I activity. At 72 hours, hyperoxic mice demonstrated significant inhibition of C-I activity, reduced respiration and ATP production rates, and significantly decreased radial alveolar count compared with controls. Exposure to pyridaben for 72 hours, as expected, caused significant inhibition of C-I and ADP-phosphorylating respiration. Similar to hyperoxic littermates, these pyridaben-exposed mice exhibited significantly delayed alveolarization compared with controls. At 2 weeks of exposure to hyperoxia or pyridaben, mitochondrial respiration was inhibited and associated with alveolar developmental arrest. However, after 3 weeks of recovery from hyperoxia or 2 weeks after 72 hours of exposure to pyridaben alveolarization significantly improved. In addition, there was marked normalization of C-I and mitochondrial respiration. The degree of hyperoxia-induced pulmonary simplification and recovery strongly (r(2) = 0.76) correlated with C-I activity in lung mitochondria. Thus, the arrest of alveolar development induced by either hyperoxia or direct inhibition of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation indicates that bioenergetic failure to maintain normal alveolar development is one of the fundamental mechanisms responsible for BPD.

  14. Cellular dysfunction in diabetes as maladaptive response to mitochondrial oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naudi, Alba; Jove, Mariona; Ayala, Victoria; Cassanye, Anna; Serrano, Jose; Gonzalo, Hugo; Boada, Jordi; Prat, Joan; Portero-Otin, Manuel; Pamplona, Reinald

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in diabetes long-term complications. In this paper, we summarize the growing evidence suggesting that hyperglycemia-induced overproduction of superoxide by mitochondrial electron transport chain triggers a maladaptive response by affecting several metabolic and signaling pathways involved in the pathophysiology of cellular dysfunction and diabetic complications. In particular, it is our goal to describe physiological mechanisms underlying the mitochondrial free radical production and regulation to explain the oxidative stress derived from a high intracellular glucose concentration and the resulting maladaptive response that leads to a cellular dysfunction and pathological state. Finally, we outline potential therapies for diabetes focused to the prevention of mitochondrial oxidative damage.

  15. Diastolic Dysfunction Induced by a High-Fat Diet Is Associated with Mitochondrial Abnormality and Adenosine Triphosphate Levels in Rats

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    Ki-Woon Kang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundObesity is well-known as a risk factor for heart failure, including diastolic dysfunction. However, this mechanism in high-fat diet (HFD-induced obese rats remain controversial. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether cardiac dysfunction develops when rats are fed with a HFD for 10 weeks; additionally, we sought to investigate the association between mitochondrial abnormalities, adenosine triphosphate (ATP levels and cardiac dysfunction.MethodsWe examined myocardia in Wistar rats after 10 weeks of HFD (45 kcal% fat, n=6 or standard diet (SD, n=6. Echocardiography, histomorphologic analysis, and electron microscopy were performed. The expression levels of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS subunit genes, peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor γ co-activator-1α (PGC1α and anti-oxidant enzymes were assessed. Markers of oxidative stress damage, mitochondrial DNA copy number and myocardial ATP level were also examined.ResultsAfter 10 weeks, the body weight of the HFD group (349.6±22.7 g was significantly higher than that of the SD group (286.8±14.9 g, and the perigonadal and epicardial fat weights of the HFD group were significantly higher than that of the SD group. Histomorphologic and electron microscopic images were similar between the two groups. However, in the myocardium of the HFD group, the expression levels of OXPHOS subunit NDUFB5 in complex I and PGC1α, and the mitochondrial DNA copy number were decreased and the oxidative stress damage marker 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine was increased, accompanied by reduced ATP levels.ConclusionDiastolic dysfunction was accompanied by the mitochondrial abnormality and reduced ATP levels in the myocardium of 10 weeks-HFD-induced rats.

  16. Repeated Administration of Mercury Intensifies Brain Damage in Multiple Sclerosis through Mitochondrial Dysfunction

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    Kahrizi, Farzad; Salimi, Ahmad; Noorbakhsh, Farshid; Faizi, Mehrdad; Mehri, Freshteh; Naserzadeh, Parvaneh; Naderi, Nima; Pourahmad, Jalal

    2016-01-01

    In this study we investigated the additive effect of mercury on the brain mitochondrial dysfunction in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model. Experimental animals (female C57BL/6 mice) are divided into four groups (n = 8); control, Hg, EAE, EAE with Hg. EAE model of MS induced by injecting myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG). Neurobehavioral alterations are recorded and then mice were sacrificed at day 28 and brain mitochondria were isolated and mitochondrial toxicity parameters including mitochondrial swelling, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and cytochrome c release were measured. Our results showed that repeated treatment of mercury following induction of EAE in mice significantly increased the neurobehavioral scores, as well as mitochondrial toxicity through ROS formation, mitochondrial swelling, collapse of MMP and cytochrome c release. Our findings proved that repeated exposure with mercury accelerates progression of MS through mitochondrial damage related to oxidative stress and finally apoptosis.

  17. Modulation of cadmium-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and volume changes by temperature in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onukwufor, John O. [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, Canada C1A 4P3 (Canada); Kibenge, Fred [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, Canada C1A 4P3 (Canada); Stevens, Don [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, Canada C1A 4P3 (Canada); Kamunde, Collins, E-mail: ckamunde@upei.ca [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, Canada C1A 4P3 (Canada)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Interactions of Cd and temperature exacerbate mitochondrial dysfunction and enhance Cd accumulation. • Cd uptake by mitochondria occurs through the Ca uniporter. • Temperature exacerbates Cd-induced mitochondrial volume changes. • Low concentrations of Cd inhibit mitochondrial swelling. - Abstract: We investigated how temperature modulates cadmium (Cd)-induced mitochondrial bioenergetic disturbances, metal accumulation and volume changes in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). In the first set of experiments, rainbow trout liver mitochondrial function and Cd content were measured in the presence of complex I substrates, malate and glutamate, following exposure to Cd (0–100 μM) at three (5, 13 and 25 °C) temperatures. The second set of experiments assessed the effect of temperature on Cd-induced mitochondrial volume changes, including the underlying mechanisms, at 15 and 25 °C. Although temperature stimulated both state 3 and 4 rates of respiration, the coupling efficiency was reduced at temperature extremes due to greater inhibition of state 3 at low temperature and greater stimulation of state 4 at the high temperature. Cadmium exposure reduced the stimulatory effect of temperature on state 3 respiration but increased that on state 4, consequently exacerbating mitochondrial uncoupling. The interaction of Cd and temperature yielded different responses on thermal sensitivity of state 3 and 4 respiration; the Q{sub 10} values for state 3 respiration increased at low temperature (5–13 °C) while those for state 4 increased at high temperature (13–25 °C). Importantly, the mitochondria accumulated more Cd at high temperature suggesting that the observed greater impairment of oxidative phosphorylation with temperature was due, at least in part, to a higher metal burden. Cadmium-induced mitochondrial volume changes were characterized by an early phase of contraction followed by swelling, with temperature changing the kinetics and

  18. The interactive roles of zinc and calcium in mitochondrial dysfunction and neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivovarova, Natalia B; Stanika, Ruslan I; Kazanina, Galina; Villanueva, Idalis; Andrews, S Brian

    2014-02-01

    Zinc has been implicated in neurodegeneration following ischemia. In analogy with calcium, zinc has been proposed to induce toxicity via mitochondrial dysfunction, but the relative role of each cation in mitochondrial damage remains unclear. Here, we report that under conditions mimicking ischemia in hippocampal neurons - normal (2 mM) calcium plus elevated (> 100 μM) exogenous zinc - mitochondrial dysfunction evoked by glutamate, kainate or direct depolarization is, despite significant zinc uptake, primarily governed by calcium. Thus, robust mitochondrial ion accumulation, swelling, depolarization, and reactive oxygen species generation were only observed after toxic stimulation in calcium-containing media. This contrasts with the lack of any mitochondrial response in zinc-containing but calcium-free medium, even though zinc uptake and toxicity were strong under these conditions. Indeed, abnormally high, ionophore-induced zinc uptake was necessary to elicit any mitochondrial depolarization. In calcium- and zinc-containing media, depolarization-induced zinc uptake facilitated cell death and enhanced accumulation of mitochondrial calcium, which localized to characteristic matrix precipitates. Some of these contained detectable amounts of zinc. Together these data indicate that zinc uptake is generally insufficient to trigger mitochondrial dysfunction, so that mechanism(s) of zinc toxicity must be different from that of calcium. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  19. Liver mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of experimental nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira C.P.M.S.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress and hepatic mitochondria play a role in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of the disease. Fatty liver was induced in Wistar rats with a choline-deficient diet (CD; N = 7 or a high-fat diet enriched with PUFAs-omega-3 (H; N = 7 for 4 weeks. The control group (N = 7 was fed a standard diet. Liver mitochondrial oxidation and phosphorylation were measured polarographically and oxidative stress was estimated on the basis of malondialdehyde and glutathione concentrations. Moderate macrovacuolar liver steatosis was observed in the CD group and mild liver steatosis was observed in the periportal area in the H group. There was an increase in the oxygen consumption rate by liver mitochondria in respiratory state 4 (S4 and a decrease in respiratory control rate (RCR in the CD group (S4: 32.70 ± 3.35; RCR: 2.55 ± 0.15 ng atoms of O2 min-1 mg protein-1 when compared to the H and control groups (S4: 23.09 ± 1.53, 17.04 ± 2.03, RCR: 3.15 ± 0.15, 3.68 ± 0.15 ng atoms of O2 min-1 mg protein-1, respectively, P < 0.05. Hepatic lipoperoxide concentrations were significantly increased and the concentration of reduced glutathione was significantly reduced in the CD group. A choline-deficient diet causes moderate steatosis with disruption of liver mitochondrial function and increased oxidative stress. These data suggest that lipid peroxidation products can impair the flow of electrons along the respiratory chain, causing overreduction of respiratory chain components and enhanced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species. These findings are important in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

  20. Targeted overexpression of mitochondrial catalase prevents radiation-induced cognitive dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parihar, Vipan K; Allen, Barrett D; Tran, Katherine K; Chmielewski, Nicole N; Craver, Brianna M; Martirosian, Vahan; Morganti, Josh M; Rosi, Susanna; Vlkolinsky, Roman; Acharya, Munjal M; Nelson, Gregory A; Allen, Antiño R; Limoli, Charles L

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced disruption of mitochondrial function can elevate oxidative stress and contribute to the metabolic perturbations believed to compromise the functionality of the central nervous system. To clarify the role of mitochondrial oxidative stress in mediating the adverse effects of radiation in the brain, we analyzed transgenic (mitochondrial catalase [MCAT]) mice that overexpress human catalase localized to the mitochondria. Compared with wild-type (WT) controls, overexpression of the MCAT transgene significantly decreased cognitive dysfunction after proton irradiation. Significant improvements in behavioral performance found on novel object recognition and object recognition in place tasks were associated with a preservation of neuronal morphology. While the architecture of hippocampal CA1 neurons was significantly compromised in irradiated WT mice, the same neurons in MCAT mice did not exhibit extensive and significant radiation-induced reductions in dendritic complexity. Irradiated neurons from MCAT mice maintained dendritic branching and length compared with WT mice. Protected neuronal morphology in irradiated MCAT mice was also associated with a stabilization of radiation-induced variations in long-term potentiation. Stabilized synaptic activity in MCAT mice coincided with an altered composition of the synaptic AMPA receptor subunits GluR1/2. Our findings provide the first evidence that neurocognitive sequelae associated with radiation exposure can be reduced by overexpression of MCAT, operating through a mechanism involving the preservation of neuronal morphology. Our article documents the neuroprotective properties of reducing mitochondrial reactive oxygen species through the targeted overexpression of catalase and how this ameliorates the adverse effects of proton irradiation in the brain.

  1. Liver mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of experimental nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.P.M.S. Oliveira

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress and hepatic mitochondria play a role in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of the disease. Fatty liver was induced in Wistar rats with a choline-deficient diet (CD; N = 7 or a high-fat diet enriched with PUFAs-omega-3 (H; N = 7 for 4 weeks. The control group (N = 7 was fed a standard diet. Liver mitochondrial oxidation and phosphorylation were measured polarographically and oxidative stress was estimated on the basis of malondialdehyde and glutathione concentrations. Moderate macrovacuolar liver steatosis was observed in the CD group and mild liver steatosis was observed in the periportal area in the H group. There was an increase in the oxygen consumption rate by liver mitochondria in respiratory state 4 (S4 and a decrease in respiratory control rate (RCR in the CD group (S4: 32.70 ± 3.35; RCR: 2.55 ± 0.15 ng atoms of O2 min-1 mg protein-1 when compared to the H and control groups (S4: 23.09 ± 1.53, 17.04 ± 2.03, RCR: 3.15 ± 0.15, 3.68 ± 0.15 ng atoms of O2 min-1 mg protein-1, respectively, P < 0.05. Hepatic lipoperoxide concentrations were significantly increased and the concentration of reduced glutathione was significantly reduced in the CD group. A choline-deficient diet causes moderate steatosis with disruption of liver mitochondrial function and increased oxidative stress. These data suggest that lipid peroxidation products can impair the flow of electrons along the respiratory chain, causing overreduction of respiratory chain components and enhanced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species. These findings are important in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

  2. Spinosad induces programmed cell death involves mitochondrial dysfunction and cytochrome C release in Spodoptera frugiperda Sf9 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mingjun; Wang, Bo; Gao, Jufang; Zhang, Yang; Xu, Wenping; Tao, Liming

    2017-02-01

    Spinosad, a reduced-risk insecticide, acts on the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and the gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor in the nervous system of target insects. However, its mechanism of action in non-neural insect cells is unclear. This study aimed to evaluate mitochondrial functional changes associated with spinosad in Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) insect cells. Our results indicate that in Sf9 cells, spinosad induces programmed cell death and mitochondrial dysfunction through enhanced reactive oxygen species production, mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening, and mitochondrial membrane potential collapse, eventually leading to cytochrome C release and apoptosis. The cytochrome C release induced by spinosad treatment was partly inhibited by the mPTP inhibitors cyclosporin A and bongkrekic acid. Subsequently, we found that spinosad downregulated Bcl-2 expression and upregulated p53 and Bax expressions, activated caspase-9 and caspase-3, and triggered PARP cleavage in Sf9 cells. These findings suggested that spinosad-induced programmed cell death was modulated by mitochondrial dysfunction and cytochrome C release.

  3. Fetal and neonatal nicotine exposure in Wistar rats causes progressive pancreatic mitochondrial damage and beta cell dysfunction.

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    Jennifer E Bruin

    Full Text Available Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT is currently recommended as a safe smoking cessation aid for pregnant women. However, fetal and neonatal nicotine exposure in rats causes mitochondrial-mediated beta cell apoptosis at weaning, and adult-onset dysglycemia, which we hypothesize is related to progressive mitochondrial dysfunction in the pancreas. Therefore in this study we examined the effect of fetal and neonatal exposure to nicotine on pancreatic mitochondrial structure and function during postnatal development. Female Wistar rats were given saline (vehicle control or nicotine bitartrate (1 mg/kg/d via subcutaneous injection for 2 weeks prior to mating until weaning. At 3-4, 15 and 26 weeks of age, oral glucose tolerance tests were performed, and pancreas tissue was collected for electron microscopy, enzyme activity assays and islet isolation. Following nicotine exposure mitochondrial structural abnormalities were observed beginning at 3 weeks and worsened with advancing age. Importantly the appearance of these structural defects in nicotine-exposed animals preceded the onset of glucose intolerance. Nicotine exposure also resulted in significantly reduced pancreatic respiratory chain enzyme activity, degranulation of beta cells, elevated islet oxidative stress and impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion compared to saline controls at 26 weeks of age. Taken together, these data suggest that maternal nicotine use during pregnancy results in postnatal mitochondrial dysfunction that may explain, in part, the dysglycemia observed in the offspring from this animal model. These results clearly indicate that further investigation into the safety of NRT use during pregnancy is warranted.

  4. Protective effect of Boerhaavia diffusa L. against mitochondrial dysfunction in angiotensin II induced hypertrophy in H9c2 cardiomyoblast cells.

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    Ayyappan Prathapan

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a critical role in the development of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. So mitochondria are emerging as one of the important druggable targets in the management of cardiac hypertrophy and other associated complications. In the present study, effects of ethanolic extract of Boerhaavia diffusa (BDE, a green leafy vegetable against mitochondrial dysfunction in angiotensin II (Ang II induced hypertrophy in H9c2 cardiomyoblasts was evaluated. H9c2 cells challenged with Ang II exhibited pathological hypertrophic responses and mitochondrial dysfunction which was evident from increment in cell volume (49.09±1.13%, protein content (55.17±1.19%, LDH leakage (58.74±1.87%, increased intracellular ROS production (26.25±0.91%, mitochondrial superoxide generation (65.06±2.27%, alteration in mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm, opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP and mitochondrial swelling. In addition, activities of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes (I-IV, aconitase, NADPH oxidase, thioredoxin reductase, oxygen consumption rate and calcium homeostasis were evaluated. Treatment with BDE significantly prevented the generation of intracellular ROS and mitochondrial superoxide radicals and protected the mitochondria by preventing dissipation of ΔΨm, opening of mPTP, mitochondrial swelling and enhanced the activities of respiratory chain complexes and oxygen consumption rate in H9c2 cells. Activities of aconitase and thioredoxin reductase which was lowered (33.77±0.68% & 45.81±0.71% respectively due to hypertrophy, were increased in BDE treated cells (P≤0.05. Moreover, BDE also reduced the intracellular calcium overload in Ang II treated cells. Overall results revealed the protective effects of B. diffusa against mitochondrial dysfunction in hypertrophy in H9c2 cells and the present findings may shed new light on the therapeutic potential of B. diffusa in addition to its

  5. Bioenergetics, mitochondrial dysfunction, and oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of septic encephalopathy.

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    Bozza, Fernando A; D'Avila, Joana C; Ritter, Cristiane; Sonneville, Romain; Sharshar, Tarek; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe

    2013-05-01

    Sepsis is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in intensive care units. Acute and long-term brain dysfunctions have been demonstrated both in experimental models and septic patients. Sepsis-associated encephalopathy is an early and frequent manifestation but is underdiagnosed, because of the absence of specific biomarkers and of confounding factors such as sedatives used in the intensive care unit. Sepsis-associated encephalopathy may have acute and long-term consequences including development of autonomic dysfunction, delirium, and cognitive impairment. The mechanisms of sepsis-associated encephalopathy involve mitochondrial and vascular dysfunctions, oxidative stress, neurotransmission disturbances, inflammation, and cell death. Here we review specific evidence that links bioenergetics, mitochondrial dysfunction, and oxidative stress in the setting of brain dysfunctions associated to sepsis.

  6. Mitochondrial iron and energetic dysfunction distinguish fibroblasts and induced neurons from pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santambrogio, Paolo; Dusi, Sabrina; Guaraldo, Michela; Rotundo, Luisa Ida; Broccoli, Vania; Garavaglia, Barbara; Tiranti, Valeria; Levi, Sonia

    2015-09-01

    Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration is an early onset autosomal recessive movement disorder caused by mutation of the pantothenate kinase-2 gene, which encodes a mitochondrial enzyme involved in coenzyme A synthesis. The disorder is characterised by high iron levels in the brain, although the pathological mechanism leading to this accumulation is unknown. To address this question, we tested primary skin fibroblasts from three patients and three healthy subjects, as well as neurons induced by direct fibroblast reprogramming, for oxidative status, mitochondrial functionality and iron parameters. The patients' fibroblasts showed altered oxidative status, reduced antioxidant defence, and impaired cytosolic and mitochondrial aconitase activities compared to control cells. Mitochondrial iron homeostasis and functionality analysis of patient fibroblasts indicated increased labile iron pool content and reactive oxygen species development, altered mitochondrial shape, decreased membrane potential and reduced ATP levels. Furthermore, analysis of induced neurons, performed at a single cell level, confirmed some of the results obtained in fibroblasts, indicating an altered oxidative status and signs of mitochondrial dysfunction, possibly due to iron mishandling. Thus, for the first time, altered biological processes have been identified in vitro in live diseased neurons. Moreover, the obtained induced neurons can be considered a suitable human neuronal model for the identification of candidate therapeutic compounds for this disease.

  7. Hydrogen peroxide production and mitochondrial dysfunction contribute to the fusaric acid-induced programmed cell death in tobacco cells.

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    Jiao, Jiao; Sun, Ling; Zhou, Benguo; Gao, Zhengliang; Hao, Yu; Zhu, Xiaoping; Liang, Yuancun

    2014-08-15

    Fusaric acid (FA), a non-specific toxin produced mainly by Fusarium spp., can cause programmed cell death (PCD) in tobacco suspension cells. The mechanism underlying the FA-induced PCD was not well understood. In this study, we analyzed the roles of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and mitochondrial function in the FA-induced PCD. Tobacco suspension cells were treated with 100 μM FA and then analyzed for H2O2 accumulation and mitochondrial functions. Here we demonstrate that cells undergoing FA-induced PCD exhibited H2O2 production, lipid peroxidation, and a decrease of the catalase and ascorbate peroxidase activities. Pre-treatment of tobacco suspension cells with antioxidant ascorbic acid and NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenyl iodonium significantly reduced the rate of FA-induced cell death as well as the caspase-3-like protease activity. Moreover, FA treatment of tobacco cells decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP content. Oligomycin and cyclosporine A, inhibitors of the mitochondrial ATP synthase and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, respectively, could also reduce the rate of FA-induced cell death significantly. Taken together, the results presented in this paper demonstrate that H2O2 accumulation and mitochondrial dysfunction are the crucial events during the FA-induced PCD in tobacco suspension cells.

  8. Catecholamine-induced cardiac mitochondrial dysfunction and mPTP opening: protective effect of curcumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izem-Meziane, Malika; Djerdjouri, Bahia; Rimbaud, Stephanie; Caffin, Fanny; Fortin, Dominique; Garnier, Anne; Veksler, Vladimir; Joubert, Frederic; Ventura-Clapier, Renee

    2012-02-01

    The present study was designed to characterize the mitochondrial dysfunction induced by catecholamines and to investigate whether curcumin, a natural antioxidant, induces cardioprotective effects against catecholamine-induced cardiotoxicity by preserving mitochondrial function. Because mitochondria play a central role in ischemia and oxidative stress, we hypothesized that mitochondrial dysfunction is involved in catecholamine toxicity and in the potential protective effects of curcumin. Male Wistar rats received subcutaneous injection of 150 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) isoprenaline (ISO) for two consecutive days with or without pretreatment with 60 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) curcumin. Twenty four hours after, cardiac tissues were examined for apoptosis and oxidative stress. Expression of proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and function were measured by real-time RT-PCR. Isolated mitochondria and permeabilized cardiac fibers were used for swelling and mitochondrial function experiments, respectively. Mitochondrial morphology and permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening were assessed by fluorescence in isolated cardiomyocytes. ISO treatment induced cell damage, oxidative stress, and apoptosis that were prevented by curcumin. Moreover, mitochondria seem to play an important role in these effects as respiration and mitochondrial swelling were increased following ISO treatment, these effects being again prevented by curcumin. Importantly, curcumin completely prevented the ISO-induced increase in mPTP calcium susceptibility in isolated cardiomyocytes without affecting mitochondrial biogenesis and mitochondrial network dynamic. The results unravel the importance of mitochondrial dysfunction in isoprenaline-induced cardiotoxicity as well as a new cardioprotective effect of curcumin through prevention of mitochondrial damage and mPTP opening.

  9. Ginsenoside Rg1 Attenuates Isoflurane-induced Caspase-3 Activation via Inhibiting Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MIAO Hui Hui; ZHEN Yu; DING Guan Nan; HONG Fang Xiao; XIE Zhong Cong; TIAN Ming

    2015-01-01

    Objective The inhalation anesthetic isoflurane has been shown to induce mitochondrial dysfunction and caspase activation, which may lead to learning and memory impairment. Ginsenoside Rg1 is reported to be neuroprotective. We therefore set out to determine whether ginsenoside Rg1 can attenuate isoflurane-induced caspase activation via inhibiting mitochondrial dysfunction. Methods We investigated the effects of ginsenoside Rg1 at concentrations of 12.5, 25, and 50 µmol/L and pretreatment times of 12 h and 24 h on isoflurane-induced caspase-3 activation in H4 naïve and stably transfected H4 human neuroglioma cells that express full-length human amyloid precursor protein (APP) (H4-APP cells). For mitochondrial dysfunction, we assessed mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) and adenosine-5’-triphosphate (ATP) levels. We employed Western blot analysis, chemiluminescence, and flowcytometry. Results Here we show that pretreatment with 50 µmol/L ginsenoside Rg1 for 12 h attenuated isoflurane-induced caspase-3 activation and mitochondrial dysfunction in H4-APP cells, while pretreatment with 25 and 50 µmol/L ginsenoside Rg1 for 24 h attenuated isoflurane-induced caspase-3 activation and mitochondrial dysfunction in both H4 naïve and H4-APP cells. Conclusion These data suggest that ginsenoside Rg1 may ameliorate isoflurane-induced caspase-3 activation by inhibiting mitochondrial dysfunction. Pending further studies, these findings might recommend the use of ginsenoside Rg1 in preventing and treating isoflurane-induced neurotoxicity.

  10. Hydrogen sulfide protects HUVECs against hydrogen peroxide induced mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress.

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    Ya-Dan Wen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hydrogen sulfide (H₂S has been shown to have cytoprotective effects in models of hypertension, ischemia/reperfusion and Alzheimer's disease. However, little is known about its effects or mechanisms of action in atherosclerosis. Therefore, in the current study we evaluated the pharmacological effects of H₂S on antioxidant defenses and mitochondria protection against hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂ induced endothelial cells damage. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: H₂S, at non-cytotoxic levels, exerts a concentration dependent protective effect in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs exposed to H₂O₂. Analysis of ATP synthesis, mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm and cytochrome c release from mitochondria indicated that mitochondrial function was preserved by pretreatment with H₂S. In contrast, in H₂O₂ exposed endothelial cells mitochondria appeared swollen or ruptured. In additional experiments, H₂S was also found to preserve the activities and protein expressions levels of the antioxidants enzymes, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione-S-transferase in H₂O₂ exposed cells. ROS and lipid peroxidation, as assessed by measuring H₂DCFDA, dihydroethidium (DHE, diphenyl-l-pyrenylphosphine (DPPP and malonaldehyde (MDA levels, were also inhibited by H₂S treatment. Interestingly, in the current model, D, L-propargylglycine (PAG, a selective inhibitor of cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE, abolished the protective effects of H₂S donors. INNOVATION: This study is the first to show that H₂S can inhibit H₂O₂ mediated mitochondrial dysfunction in human endothelial cells by preserving antioxidant defences. SIGNIFICANCE: H₂S may protect against atherosclerosis by preventing H₂O₂ induced injury to endothelial cells. These effects appear to be mediated via the preservation of mitochondrial function and by reducing the deleterious effects of oxidative stress.

  11. Mitochondrial complex I dysfunction induced by cocaine and cocaine plus morphine in brain and liver mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha-Oliveira, Teresa; Silva, Lisbeth; Silva, Ana Maria; Moreno, António J; Oliveira, Catarina R; Santos, Maria S

    2013-06-07

    Mitochondrial function and energy metabolism are affected in brains of human cocaine abusers. Cocaine is known to induce mitochondrial dysfunction in cardiac and hepatic tissues, but its effects on brain bioenergetics are less documented. Furthermore, the combination of cocaine and opioids (speedball) was also shown to induce mitochondrial dysfunction. In this work, we compared the effects of cocaine and/or morphine on the bioenergetics of isolated brain and liver mitochondria, to understand their specific effects in each tissue. Upon energization with complex I substrates, cocaine decreased state-3 respiration in brain (but not in liver) mitochondria and decreased uncoupled respiration and mitochondrial potential in both tissues, through a direct effect on complex I. Morphine presented only slight effects on brain and liver mitochondria, and the combination cocaine+morphine had similar effects to cocaine alone, except for a greater decrease in state-3 respiration. Brain and liver mitochondrial respirations were differentially affected, and liver mitochondria were more prone to proton leak caused by the drugs or their combination. This was possibly related with a different dependence on complex I in mitochondrial populations from these tissues. In summary, cocaine and cocaine+morphine induce mitochondrial complex I dysfunction in isolated brain and liver mitochondria, with specific effects in each tissue.

  12. Near infrared radiation rescues mitochondrial dysfunction in cortical neurons after oxygen-glucose deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhanyang; Liu, Ning; Zhao, Jianhua; Li, Yadan; McCarthy, Thomas J; Tedford, Clark E; Lo, Eng H; Wang, Xiaoying

    2015-04-01

    Near infrared radiation (NIR) is known to penetrate and affect biological systems in multiple ways. Recently, a series of experimental studies suggested that low intensity NIR may protect neuronal cells against a wide range of insults that mimic diseases such as stroke, brain trauma and neurodegeneration. However, the potential molecular mechanisms of neuroprotection with NIR remain poorly defined. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that low intensity NIR may attenuate hypoxia/ischemia-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in neurons. Primary cortical mouse neuronal cultures were subjected to 4 h oxygen-glucose deprivation followed by reoxygenation for 2 h, neurons were then treated with a 2 min exposure to 810-nm NIR. Mitochondrial function markers including MTT reduction and mitochondria membrane potential were measured at 2 h after treatment. Neurotoxicity was quantified 20 h later. Our results showed that 4 h oxygen-glucose deprivation plus 20 h reoxygenation caused 33.8 ± 3.4 % of neuron death, while NIR exposure significantly reduced neuronal death to 23.6 ± 2.9 %. MTT reduction rate was reduced to 75.9 ± 2.7 % by oxygen-glucose deprivation compared to normoxic controls, but NIR exposure significantly rescued MTT reduction to 87.6 ± 4.5 %. Furthermore, after oxygen-glucose deprivation, mitochondria membrane potential was reduced to 48.9 ± 4.39 % of normoxic control, while NIR exposure significantly ameliorated this reduction to 89.6 ± 13.9 % of normoxic control. Finally, NIR significantly rescued OGD-induced ATP production decline at 20 min after NIR. These findings suggest that low intensity NIR can protect neurons against oxygen-glucose deprivation by rescuing mitochondrial function and restoring neuronal energetics.

  13. Sodium valproate induces mitochondrial respiration dysfunction in HepG2 in vitro cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komulainen, Tuomas; Lodge, Tiffany; Hinttala, Reetta; Bolszak, Maija; Pietilä, Mika; Koivunen, Peppi; Hakkola, Jukka; Poulton, Joanna; Morten, Karl J; Uusimaa, Johanna

    2015-05-04

    Sodium valproate (VPA) is a potentially hepatotoxic antiepileptic drug. Risk of VPA-induced hepatotoxicity is increased in patients with mitochondrial diseases and especially in patients with POLG1 gene mutations. We used a HepG2 cell in vitro model to investigate the effect of VPA on mitochondrial activity. Cells were incubated in glucose medium and mitochondrial respiration-inducing medium supplemented with galactose and pyruvate. VPA treatments were carried out at concentrations of 0-2.0mM for 24-72 h. In both media, VPA caused decrease in oxygen consumption rates and mitochondrial membrane potential. VPA exposure led to depleted ATP levels in HepG2 cells incubated in galactose medium suggesting dysfunction in mitochondrial ATP production. In addition, VPA exposure for 72 h increased levels of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS), but adversely decreased protein levels of mitochondrial superoxide dismutase SOD2, suggesting oxidative stress caused by impaired elimination of mitochondrial ROS and a novel pathomechanism related to VPA toxicity. Increased cell death and decrease in cell number was detected under both metabolic conditions. However, immunoblotting did not show any changes in the protein levels of the catalytic subunit A of mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ, the mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes I, II and IV, ATP synthase, E3 subunit dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase of pyruvate dehydrogenase, 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase and glutathione peroxidase. Our results show that VPA inhibits mitochondrial respiration and leads to mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and increased cell death, thus suggesting an essential role of mitochondria in VPA-induced hepatotoxicity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Mitochondrial and Ubiquitin Proteasome System Dysfunction in Ageing and Disease: Two Sides of the Same Coin?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime M. Ross

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction and impairment of the ubiquitin proteasome system have been described as two hallmarks of the ageing process. Additionally, both systems have been implicated in the etiopathogenesis of many age-related diseases, particularly neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. Interestingly, these two systems are closely interconnected, with the ubiquitin proteasome system maintaining mitochondrial homeostasis by regulating organelle dynamics, the proteome, and mitophagy, and mitochondrial dysfunction impairing cellular protein homeostasis by oxidative damage. Here, we review the current literature and argue that the interplay of the two systems should be considered in order to better understand the cellular dysfunction observed in ageing and age-related diseases. Such an approach may provide valuable insights into molecular mechanisms underlying the ageing process, and further discovery of treatments to counteract ageing and its associated diseases. Furthermore, we provide a hypothetical model for the heterogeneity described among individuals during ageing.

  15. Developmental programming of obesity and insulin resistance: does mitochondrial dysfunction in oocytes play a role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Nigel; Robker, Rebecca L

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a key defect associated with obesity, type 2 diabetes and other metabolic diseases. While a number of factors have been suggested to cause defects in insulin action, there is a very strong association between inappropriate lipid deposition in insulin target tissues and the development of insulin resistance. In recent times, a large number of studies have reported changes in markers of mitochondrial metabolism in insulin-resistant individuals, leading to the theory that defects in mitochondrial substrate oxidation are responsible for the buildup of lipid intermediates and the development of insulin resistance. The primary support for the mitochondrial theory of insulin resistance comes from studies in skeletal muscle; however, there is recent evidence in murine models that mitochondrial dysfunction in oocytes may also play a role. Oocytes from obese or insulin-resistant mice have been shown to exhibit abnormalities in many different mitochondrial parameters, including mitochondrial morphology and membrane potential. Here we review the findings regarding the link between mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance, and propose that abnormalities in mitochondrial metabolism in oocytes may predispose to the development of obesity and insulin resistance and thus contribute to the inter-generational programming of metabolic disease. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Mechanism of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy)-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction in rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Kwan-Hoon; Upreti, Vijay V; Yu, Li-Rong; Lee, Insong J; Ye, Xiaoying; Eddington, Natalie D; Veenstra, Timothy D; Song, Byoung-Joon

    2008-09-01

    Despite numerous reports citing the acute hepatotoxicity caused by 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) (ecstasy), the underlying mechanism of organ damage is poorly understood. We hypothesized that key mitochondrial proteins are oxidatively modified and inactivated in MDMA-exposed tissues. The aim of this study was to identify and investigate the mechanism of inactivation of oxidatively modified mitochondrial proteins, prior to the extensive mitochondrial dysfunction and liver damage following MDMA exposure. MDMA-treated rats showed abnormal liver histology with significant elevation in plasma transaminases, nitric oxide synthase, and the level of hydrogen peroxide. Oxidatively modified mitochondrial proteins in control and MDMA-exposed rats were labeled with biotin-N-maleimide (biotin-NM) as a sensitive probe for oxidized proteins, purified with streptavidin-agarose, and resolved using 2-DE. Comparative 2-DE analysis of biotin-NM-labeled proteins revealed markedly increased levels of oxidatively modified proteins following MDMA exposure. Mass spectrometric analysis identified oxidatively modified mitochondrial proteins involved in energy supply, fat metabolism, antioxidant defense, and chaperone activities. Among these, the activities of mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase, 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolases, and ATP synthase were significantly inhibited following MDMA exposure. Our data show for the first time that MDMA causes the oxidative inactivation of key mitochondrial enzymes which most likely contributes to mitochondrial dysfunction and subsequent liver damage in MDMA-exposed animals.

  17. Suppression of Cpn10 increases mitochondrial fission and dysfunction in neuroblastoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Jung Park

    Full Text Available To date, several regulatory proteins involved in mitochondrial dynamics have been identified. However, the precise mechanism coordinating these complex processes remains unclear. Mitochondrial chaperones regulate mitochondrial function and structure. Chaperonin 10 (Cpn10 interacts with heat shock protein 60 (HSP60 and functions as a co-chaperone. In this study, we found that down-regulation of Cpn10 highly promoted mitochondrial fragmentation in SK-N-MC and SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. Both genetic and chemical inhibition of Drp1 suppressed the mitochondrial fragmentation induced by Cpn10 reduction. Reactive oxygen species (ROS generation in 3-NP-treated cells was markedly enhanced by Cpn10 knock down. Depletion of Cpn10 synergistically increased cell death in response to 3-NP treatment. Furthermore, inhibition of Drp1 recovered Cpn10-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction in 3-NP-treated cells. Moreover, an ROS scavenger suppressed cell death mediated by Cpn10 knockdown in 3-NP-treated cells. Taken together, these results showed that down-regulation of Cpn10 increased mitochondrial fragmentation and potentiated 3-NP-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction in neuroblastoma cells.

  18. Ethanolamine and phosphoethanolamine inhibit mitochondrial function in vitro: implications for mitochondrial dysfunction hypothesis in depression and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modica-Napolitano, Josephine S; Renshaw, Perry F

    2004-02-01

    A growing body of experimental evidence suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction, including alterations in phospholipid metabolism, might be involved in the pathophysiology of affective illnesses, such as depression and bipolar disorder. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the phosphomonoester phosphoethanolamine (PE) and the lipid metabolite choline (Cho), which are known to be altered in depression and bipolar disorder, and/or their precursors/metabolites, might directly affect mitochondrial bioenergetic function in vitro. To this end, rates of oxygen consumption in freshly isolated, intact mitochondria were determined polarographically in the presence and absence of PE, Cho, ethanolamine (Etn), glycerophosphoethanolamine (GPE), and glycerophosphocholine (GPC). The data demonstrate that PE and Etn inhibit mitochondrial respiratory activity in a dose-dependent manner, whereas Cho, GPC, and GPE have no measurable effect on bioenergetic function. This reflects a specific inhibition by Etn and PE on mitochondrial function rather than a more generalized phenomenon induced by similarities in structure between the lipid metabolites. These results also suggest a possible relationship between mitochondrial dysfunction and altered phospholipid metabolism in the brains of patients with depression and bipolar disorder.

  19. Mitochondrial and Ubiquitin Proteasome System Dysfunction in Ageing and Disease: Two Sides of the Same Coin?

    OpenAIRE

    Jaime M. Ross; Lars Olson; Giuseppe Coppotelli

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and impairment of the ubiquitin proteasome system have been described as two hallmarks of the ageing process. Additionally, both systems have been implicated in the etiopathogenesis of many age-related diseases, particularly neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. Interestingly, these two systems are closely interconnected, with the ubiquitin proteasome system maintaining mitochondrial homeostasis by regulating organelle dynamics, t...

  20. Maternal Metabolic Syndrome Programs Mitochondrial Dysfunction via Germline Changes across Three Generations

    OpenAIRE

    Jessica L. Saben; Anna L. Boudoures; Zeenat Asghar; Alysha Thompson; Andrea Drury; Wendy Zhang; Maggie Chi; Andrew Cusumano; Suzanne Scheaffer; Kelle H. Moley

    2016-01-01

    Maternal obesity impairs offspring health, but the responsible mechanisms are not fully established. To address this question, we fed female mice a high-fat/high-sugar diet from before conception until weaning and then followed the outcomes in the next three generations of offspring, all fed a control diet. We observed that female offspring born to obese mothers had impaired peripheral insulin signaling that was associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and altered mitochondrial dynamic and c...

  1. Metabolic Characterization of Intact Cells Reveals Intracellular Amyloid Beta but Not Its Precursor Protein to Reduce Mitochondrial Respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Patrick M.; von Einem, Bjoern; Walther, Paul; Calzia, Enrico; von Arnim, Christine A. F.

    2016-01-01

    One hallmark of Alzheimer´s disease are senile plaques consisting of amyloid beta (Aβ), which derives from the processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer´s disease and both Aβ and APP have been reported to affect mitochondrial function in isolated systems. However, in intact cells, considering a physiological localization of APP and Aβ, it is pending what triggers the mitochondrial defect. Thus, the aim of this study was to dissect the impact of APP versus Aβ in inducing mitochondrial alterations with respect to their subcellular localization. We performed an overexpression of APP or beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1), increasing APP and Aβ levels or Aβ alone, respectively. Conducting a comprehensive metabolic characterization we demonstrate that only APP overexpression reduced mitochondrial respiration, despite lower extracellular Aβ levels compared to BACE overexpression. Surprisingly, this could be rescued by a gamma secretase inhibitor, oppositionally indicating an Aβ-mediated mitochondrial toxicity. Analyzing Aβ localization revealed that intracellular levels of Aβ and an increased spatial association of APP/Aβ with mitochondria are associated with reduced mitochondrial respiration. Thus, our data provide marked evidence for a prominent role of intracellular Aβ accumulation in Alzheimer´s disease associated mitochondrial dysfunction. Thereby it highlights the importance of the localization of APP processing and intracellular transport as a decisive factor for mitochondrial function, linking two prominent hallmarks of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:28005987

  2. Mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death in neurodegenerative diseases through nitroxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar, Mohammed; Essa, Musthafa Mohamed; Daradkeh, Ghazi; Abdelmegeed, Mohamed A; Choi, Youngshim; Mahmood, Lubna; Song, Byoung-Joon

    2016-04-15

    Mitochondria are important for providing cellular energy ATP through the oxidative phosphorylation pathway. They are also critical in regulating many cellular functions including the fatty acid oxidation, the metabolism of glutamate and urea, the anti-oxidant defense, and the apoptosis pathway. Mitochondria are an important source of reactive oxygen species leaked from the electron transport chain while they are susceptible to oxidative damage, leading to mitochondrial dysfunction and tissue injury. In fact, impaired mitochondrial function is commonly observed in many types of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, alcoholic dementia, brain ischemia-reperfusion related injury, and others, although many of these neurological disorders have unique etiological factors. Mitochondrial dysfunction under many pathological conditions is likely to be promoted by increased nitroxidative stress, which can stimulate post-translational modifications (PTMs) of mitochondrial proteins and/or oxidative damage to mitochondrial DNA and lipids. Furthermore, recent studies have demonstrated that various antioxidants, including naturally occurring flavonoids and polyphenols as well as synthetic compounds, can block the formation of reactive oxygen and/or nitrogen species, and thus ultimately prevent the PTMs of many proteins with improved disease conditions. Therefore, the present review is aimed to describe the recent research developments in the molecular mechanisms for mitochondrial dysfunction and tissue injury in neurodegenerative diseases and discuss translational research opportunities.

  3. Bergenin attenuates renal injury by reversing mitochondrial dysfunction in ethylene glycol induced hyperoxaluric rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Deepika; Gautam, Diksha; Sharma, Minu; Singla, S K

    2016-11-15

    Bergenin, isolated from Bergenia ligulata is a potent antioxidant and antilithiatic agent. Present work was designed to establish the biochemical role of bergenin on mitochondrial dysfunction in the ethylene glycol induced hyperoxaluric rat model. Bergenin was administrated at a dose of 10mg/kg body wt i.p. from 14th day of establishing the 28 days hyperoxaluria rat model. α-Tocopherol was given as positive control at a dose of 100mg/kg body wt i.p. Mitochondrial dysfunction was studied by evaluating the activities of respiratory chain complexes, mitochondrial membrane potential and reactive oxygen species. Histopathological analysis of the kidney tissue was done after Pizzolato staining. Also, expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein -1(MCP-1) and kidney injury marker protein (KIM-1) were studied and the levels of IL-1β were evaluated in kidney tissue homogenate. Mitochondrial dysfunction during stone crystallization was evident by decreased activities of electron transport chain complexes I, II and IV and augmented mitochondrial oxidative stress in hyperoxaluric rats. Bergenin treatment significantly (Pproduction and expression of KIM-1 and MCP-1 in the renal tissue. The findings of the present study provide evidence that bergenin exerted protective effects in hyperoxaluria through mitochondrial protection that involves attenuation of oxidative stress. Hence, it presented itself as an effective remedy in combating urolithiasis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Liver mitochondrial dysfunction is reverted by insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II in aging rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castilla-Cortazar Inma

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Serum IGF-I and IGF-II levels decline with age. IGF-I replacement therapy reduces the impact of age in rats. We have recently reported that IGF-II is able to act, in part, as an analogous of IGF-I in aging rats reducing oxidative damage in brain and liver associated with a normalization of antioxidant enzyme activities. Since mitochondria seem to be the most important cellular target of IGF-I, the aim of this work was to investigate whether the cytoprotective actions of IGF-II therapy are mediated by mitochondrial protection. Methods Three groups of rats were included in the experimental protocol young controls (17 weeks old; untreated old rats (103 weeks old; and aging rats (103 weeks old treated with IGF-II (2 μg/100 g body weight and day for 30 days. Results Compared with young controls, untreated old rats showed an increase of oxidative damage in isolated mitochondria with a dysfunction characterized by: reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP and ATP synthesis and increase of intramitochondrial free radicals production and proton leak rates. In addition, in untreated old rats mitochondrial respiration was not blocked by atractyloside. In accordance, old rats showed an overexpression of the active fragment of caspases 3 and 9 in liver homogenates. IGF-II therapy corrected all of these parameters of mitochondrial dysfunction and reduced activation of caspases. Conclusions The cytoprotective effects of IGF-II are related to mitochondrial protection leading to increased ATP production reducing free radical generation, oxidative damage and apoptosis.

  5. Amelioration of mitochondrial dysfunction-induced insulin resistance in differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes via inhibition of NF-κB pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakar, Mohamad Hafizi Abu; Sarmidi, Mohamad Roji; Kai, Cheng Kian; Huri, Hasniza Zaman; Yaakob, Harisun

    2014-12-02

    A growing body of evidence suggests that activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) signaling pathways is among the inflammatory mechanism involved in the development of insulin resistance and chronic low-grade inflammation in adipose tissues derived from obese animal and human subjects. Nevertheless, little is known about the roles of NF-κB pathways in regulating mitochondrial function of the adipose tissues. In the present study, we sought to investigate the direct effects of celastrol (potent NF-κB inhibitor) upon mitochondrial dysfunction-induced insulin resistance in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Celastrol ameliorates mitochondrial dysfunction by altering mitochondrial fusion and fission in adipocytes. The levels of oxidative DNA damage, protein carbonylation and lipid peroxidation were down-regulated. Further, the morphology and quantification of intracellular lipid droplets revealed the decrease of intracellular lipid accumulation with reduced lipolysis. Moreover, massive production of the pro-inflammatory mediators tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) were markedly depleted. Insulin-stimulated glucose uptake activity was restored with the enhancement of insulin signaling pathways. This study signified that the treatments modulated towards knockdown of NF-κB transcription factor may counteract these metabolic insults exacerbated in our model of synergy between mitochondrial dysfunction and inflammation. These results demonstrate for the first time that NF-κB inhibition modulates mitochondrial dysfunction induced insulin resistance in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

  6. Amelioration of Mitochondrial Dysfunction-Induced Insulin Resistance in Differentiated 3T3-L1 Adipocytes via Inhibition of NF-κB Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Hafizi Abu Bakar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A growing body of evidence suggests that activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB signaling pathways is among the inflammatory mechanism involved in the development of insulin resistance and chronic low-grade inflammation in adipose tissues derived from obese animal and human subjects. Nevertheless, little is known about the roles of NF-κB pathways in regulating mitochondrial function of the adipose tissues. In the present study, we sought to investigate the direct effects of celastrol (potent NF-κB inhibitor upon mitochondrial dysfunction-induced insulin resistance in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Celastrol ameliorates mitochondrial dysfunction by altering mitochondrial fusion and fission in adipocytes. The levels of oxidative DNA damage, protein carbonylation and lipid peroxidation were down-regulated. Further, the morphology and quantification of intracellular lipid droplets revealed the decrease of intracellular lipid accumulation with reduced lipolysis. Moreover, massive production of the pro-inflammatory mediators tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and interleukin-1β (IL-1β were markedly depleted. Insulin-stimulated glucose uptake activity was restored with the enhancement of insulin signaling pathways. This study signified that the treatments modulated towards knockdown of NF-κB transcription factor may counteract these metabolic insults exacerbated in our model of synergy between mitochondrial dysfunction and inflammation. These results demonstrate for the first time that NF-κB inhibition modulates mitochondrial dysfunction induced insulin resistance in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

  7. Oestrogens ameliorate mitochondrial dysfunction in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Carla; Montopoli, Monica; Perli, Elena; Orlandi, Maurizia; Fantin, Marianna; Ross-Cisneros, Fred N; Caparrotta, Laura; Martinuzzi, Andrea; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Ghelli, Anna; Sadun, Alfredo A; d'Amati, Giulia; Carelli, Valerio

    2011-01-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy, the most frequent mitochondrial disease due to mitochondrial DNA point mutations in complex I, is characterized by the selective degeneration of retinal ganglion cells, leading to optic atrophy and loss of central vision prevalently in young males. The current study investigated the reasons for the higher prevalence of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy in males, exploring the potential compensatory effects of oestrogens on mutant cell metabolism. Control and Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy osteosarcoma-derived cybrids (11778/ND4, 3460/ND1 and 14484/ND6) were grown in glucose or glucose-free, galactose-supplemented medium. After having shown the nuclear and mitochondrial localization of oestrogen receptors in cybrids, experiments were carried out by adding 100 nM of 17β-oestradiol. In a set of experiments, cells were pre-incubated with the oestrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182780. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy cybrids in galactose medium presented overproduction of reactive oxygen species, which led to decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, increased apoptotic rate, loss of cell viability and hyper-fragmented mitochondrial morphology compared with control cybrids. Treatment with 17β-oestradiol significantly rescued these pathological features and led to the activation of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase 2. In addition, 17β-oestradiol induced a general activation of mitochondrial biogenesis and a small although significant improvement in energetic competence. All these effects were oestrogen receptor mediated. Finally, we showed that the oestrogen receptor β localizes to the mitochondrial network of human retinal ganglion cells. Our results strongly support a metabolic basis for the unexplained male prevalence in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and hold promises for a therapeutic use for oestrogen-like molecules.

  8. Mitochondria-specific accumulation of amyloid β induces mitochondrial dysfunction leading to apoptotic cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Moon-Yong; Han, Sun-Ho; Son, Sung Min; Hong, Hyun-Seok; Choi, Young-Ju; Byun, Jayoung; Mook-Jung, Inhee

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria are best known as the essential intracellular organelles that host the homeostasis required for cellular survival, but they also have relevance in diverse disease-related conditions, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Amyloid β (Aβ) peptide is the key molecule in AD pathogenesis, and has been highlighted in the implication of mitochondrial abnormality during the disease progress. Neuronal exposure to Aβ impairs mitochondrial dynamics and function. Furthermore, mitochondrial Aβ accumulation has been detected in the AD brain. However, the underlying mechanism of how Aβ affects mitochondrial function remains uncertain, and it is questionable whether mitochondrial Aβ accumulation followed by mitochondrial dysfunction leads directly to neuronal toxicity. This study demonstrated that an exogenous Aβ(1-42) treatment, when applied to the hippocampal cell line of mice (specifically HT22 cells), caused a deleterious alteration in mitochondria in both morphology and function. A clathrin-mediated endocytosis blocker rescued the exogenous Aβ(1-42)-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction. Furthermore, the mitochondria-targeted accumulation of Aβ(1-42) in HT22 cells using Aβ(1-42) with a mitochondria-targeting sequence induced the identical morphological alteration of mitochondria as that observed in the APP/PS AD mouse model and exogenous Aβ(1-42)-treated HT22 cells. In addition, subsequent mitochondrial dysfunctions were demonstrated in the mitochondria-specific Aβ(1-42) accumulation model, which proved indistinguishable from the mitochondrial impairment induced by exogenous Aβ(1-42)-treated HT22 cells. Finally, cellular toxicity was directly induced by mitochondria-targeted Aβ(1-42) accumulation, which mimics the apoptosis process in exogenous Aβ(1-42)-treated HT22 cells. Taken together, these results indicate that mitochondria-targeted Aβ(1-42) accumulation is the necessary and sufficient condition for Aβ-mediated mitochondria impairments, and leads

  9. Naringin ameliorates gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity and associated mitochondrial dysfunction, apoptosis and inflammation in rats: possible mechanism of nephroprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Bidya Dhar; Tatireddy, Srujana; Koneru, Meghana; Borkar, Roshan M; Kumar, Jerald Mahesh; Kuncha, Madhusudana; Srinivas, R; Shyam Sunder, R; Sistla, Ramakrishna

    2014-05-15

    Gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity has been well documented, although its underlying mechanisms and preventive strategies remain to be investigated. The present study was designed to investigate the protective effect of naringin, a bioflavonoid, on gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity and to elucidate the potential mechanism. Serum specific renal function parameters (blood urea nitrogen and creatinine) and histopathology of kidney tissues were evaluated to assess the gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity. Renal oxidative stress (lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation, enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants), inflammatory (NF-kB [p65], TNF-α, IL-6 and MPO) and apoptotic (caspase 3, caspase 9, Bax, Bcl-2, p53 and DNA fragmentation) markers were also evaluated. Significant decrease in mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase, cytochrome c oxidase and mitochondrial redox activity indicated the gentamicin-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. Naringin (100mg/kg) treatment along with gentamicin restored the mitochondrial function and increased the renal endogenous antioxidant status. Gentamicin induced increased renal inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6), nuclear protein expression of NF-κB (p65) and NF-κB-DNA binding activity and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were significantly decreased upon naringin treatment. In addition, naringin treatment significantly decreased the amount of cleaved caspase 3, Bax, and p53 protein expression and increased the Bcl-2 protein expression. Naringin treatment also ameliorated the extent of histologic injury and reduced inflammatory infiltration in renal tubules. U-HPLS-MS data revealed that naringin co-administration along with gentamicin did not alter the renal uptake and/or accumulation of gentamicin in kidney tissues. These findings suggest that naringin treatment attenuates renal dysfunction and structural damage through the reduction of oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, inflammation and apoptosis in

  10. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and MRI Reveal No Evidence for Brain Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrigan, Neva M.; Shaw, Dennis. W. W.; Richards, Todd L.; Estes, Annette M.; Friedman, Seth D.; Petropoulos, Helen; Artru, Alan A.; Dager, Stephen R.

    2012-01-01

    Brain mitochondrial dysfunction has been proposed as an etiologic factor in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging ([superscript 1]HMRS) and MRI were used to assess for evidence of brain mitochondrial dysfunction in longitudinal samples of children with ASD or developmental delay (DD), and cross-sectionally…

  11. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and MRI Reveal No Evidence for Brain Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrigan, Neva M.; Shaw, Dennis. W. W.; Richards, Todd L.; Estes, Annette M.; Friedman, Seth D.; Petropoulos, Helen; Artru, Alan A.; Dager, Stephen R.

    2012-01-01

    Brain mitochondrial dysfunction has been proposed as an etiologic factor in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging ([superscript 1]HMRS) and MRI were used to assess for evidence of brain mitochondrial dysfunction in longitudinal samples of children with ASD or developmental delay (DD), and cross-sectionally…

  12. The role of sirtuins in mitochondrial function and doxorubicin-induced cardiac dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolinsky, Vernon W

    2017-08-28

    Anthracycline chemotherapeutics such as doxorubicin continue to be important treatments for many cancers. Through improved screening and therapy, more patients are surviving and living longer after the diagnosis of their cancer. However, anthracyclines are associated with both short- and long-term cardiotoxic effects. Doxorubicin-induced mitochondrial dysfunction is a central mechanism in the cardiotoxic effects of doxorubicin that contributes to impaired cardiac energy levels, increased reactive oxygen species production, cardiomyocyte apoptosis and the decline in cardiac function. Sirtuins are protein deacetylases that are activated by low energy levels and stimulate energy production through their activation of transcription factors and enzymatic regulators of cardiac energy metabolism. In addition, sirtuins activate oxidative stress resistance pathways. SIRT1 and SIRT3 are expressed at high levels in the cardiomyocyte. This review examines the function of sirtuins in the regulation of cardiac mitochondrial function, with a focus on their role in heart failure and an emphasis on their effects on doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity. We discuss the potential for sirtuin activation in combination with anthracycline chemotherapy in order to mitigate its cardiotoxic side-effects without reducing the antineoplastic activity of anthracyclines.

  13. A vanillin derivative causes mitochondrial dysfunction and triggers oxidative stress in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Hyo Kim

    Full Text Available Vanillin is a well-known food and cosmetic additive and has antioxidant and antimutagenic properties. It has also been suggested to have antifungal activity against major human pathogenic fungi, although it is not very effective. In this study, the antifungal activities of vanillin and 33 vanillin derivatives against the human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans, the main pathogen of cryptococcal meningitis in immunocompromised patients, were investigated. We found a structural correlation between the vanillin derivatives and antifungal activity, showing that the hydroxyl or alkoxy group is more advantageous than the halogenated or nitrated group in benzaldehyde. Among the vanillin derivatives with a hydroxyl or alkoxy group, o-vanillin and o-ethyl vanillin showed the highest antifungal activity against C. neoformans. o-Vanillin was further studied to understand the mechanism of antifungal action. We compared the transcriptome of C. neoformans cells untreated or treated with o-vanillin by using RNA sequencing and found that the compound caused mitochondrial dysfunction and triggered oxidative stress. These antifungal mechanisms of o-vanillin were experimentally confirmed by the significantly reduced growth of the mutants lacking the genes involved in mitochondrial functions and oxidative stress response.

  14. A vanillin derivative causes mitochondrial dysfunction and triggers oxidative stress in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Hyo; Lee, Han-Ok; Cho, Yong-Joon; Kim, Jeongmi; Chun, Jongsik; Choi, Jaehyuk; Lee, Younghoon; Jung, Won Hee

    2014-01-01

    Vanillin is a well-known food and cosmetic additive and has antioxidant and antimutagenic properties. It has also been suggested to have antifungal activity against major human pathogenic fungi, although it is not very effective. In this study, the antifungal activities of vanillin and 33 vanillin derivatives against the human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans, the main pathogen of cryptococcal meningitis in immunocompromised patients, were investigated. We found a structural correlation between the vanillin derivatives and antifungal activity, showing that the hydroxyl or alkoxy group is more advantageous than the halogenated or nitrated group in benzaldehyde. Among the vanillin derivatives with a hydroxyl or alkoxy group, o-vanillin and o-ethyl vanillin showed the highest antifungal activity against C. neoformans. o-Vanillin was further studied to understand the mechanism of antifungal action. We compared the transcriptome of C. neoformans cells untreated or treated with o-vanillin by using RNA sequencing and found that the compound caused mitochondrial dysfunction and triggered oxidative stress. These antifungal mechanisms of o-vanillin were experimentally confirmed by the significantly reduced growth of the mutants lacking the genes involved in mitochondrial functions and oxidative stress response.

  15. Pleurotus ostreatus opposes mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in acetaminophen-induced hepato-renal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naguib, Yahya M; Azmy, Rania M; Samaka, Rehab M; Salem, Mohamed F

    2014-12-15

    Acetaminophen (APAP)-induced toxicity is a predominant cause of acute hepatic and renal failure. In both humans and rodents toxicity begins with a reactive metabolite that binds to proteins. This leads to mitochondrial dysfunction and nuclear DNA fragmentation resulting in necrotic cell death. Pleurotus ostreatus (an edible oyster mushroom) is well recognized as a flavourful food, as well as a medicinal supplement. In the present study, we evaluated the role of Pleurotus ostreatus in the protection against APAP-induced hepato-renal toxicity. We also explored the mechanism by which Pleurotus ostreatus exerts its effects. Ninety adult male Swiss albino mice were divided into three groups (30 mice/group). Mice were offered normal diet (control and APAP groups), or diet supplemented with 10% Pleurotus ostreatus (APAP + Pleurotus ostreatus) for 10 days. Mice were either treated with vehicle (control group, single intra-peritoneal injection.), or APAP (APAP and APAP + Pleurotus ostreatus groups, single intra-peritoneal injection, 500 mg/kg), 24 hours after the last meal. APAP increased serum levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), urinary kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), and hepatic and renal malondialdehyde (MDA) content. APAP decreased hepatic and renal glutathione (GSH) content, as well as glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities. Supplementation with Pleurotus ostreatus significantly reduced APAP-induced elevated levels of ALT, AST, GDH, creatinine, BUN, KIM-1and MDA, while GSH level, and GSH-Px and SOD activities were significantly increased. Our findings were further validated by histopathology; treatment with Pleurotus ostreatus significantly decreased APAP-induced cell necrosis in liver and kidney tissues. We report here that the antioxidant effect of Pleurotus ostreatus opposes mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative

  16. Astragalus Polysaccharide Attenuated Iron Overload-Induced Dysfunction of Mesenchymal Stem Cells via Suppressing Mitochondrial ROS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Yang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs have the ability to differentiate into multilineage cells such as osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and cardiomyocytes. Dysfunction of BMSCs in response to pathological stimuli participates in the development of diseases such as osteoporosis. Astragalus polysaccharide (APS is a major active ingredient of Astragalus membranaceus, a commonly used anti-aging herb in traditional Chinese medicine. The aim of this study was to investigate whether APS protects against iron overload-induced dysfunction of BMSCs and its underlying mechanisms. Methods: BMSCs were exposed to ferric ammonium citrate (FAC with or without different concentrations of APS. The viability and proliferation of BMSCs were assessed by CCK-8 assay and EdU staining. Cell apoptosis, senescence and pluripotency were examined utilizing TUNEL staining, β-galactosidase staining and qRT-PCR respectively. The reactive oxygen species (ROS level was assessed in BMSCs with a DCFH-DA probe and MitoSOX Red staining. Results: Firstly, we found that iron overload induced by FAC markedly reduced the viability and proliferation of BMSCs, but treatment with APS at 10, 30 and 100 μg/mL was able to counter the reduction of cell proliferation. Furthermore, exposure to FAC led to apoptosis and senescence in BMSCs, which were partially attenuated by APS. The pluripotent genes Nanog, Sox2 and Oct4 were shown to be downregulated in BMSCs after FAC treatment, however APS inhibited the reduction of Nanog, Sox2 and Oct4 expression. Further study uncovered that APS treatment abrogated the increase of intracellular and mitochondrial ROS level in FAC-treated BMSCs. Conclusion: Treatment of BMSCs with APS to impede mitochondrial ROS accumulation can remarkably inhibit apoptosis, senescence, and the reduction of proliferation and pluripotency of BMSCs caused by FAC-induced iron overload.

  17. Targeted overexpression of mitochondrial catalase protects against cancer chemotherapy-induced skeletal muscle dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliam, Laura A A; Lark, Daniel S; Reese, Lauren R; Torres, Maria J; Ryan, Terence E; Lin, Chien-Te; Cathey, Brook L; Neufer, P Darrell

    2016-08-01

    The loss of strength in combination with constant fatigue is a burden on cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Doxorubicin, a standard chemotherapy drug used in the clinic, causes skeletal muscle dysfunction and increases mitochondrial H2O2 We hypothesized that the combined effect of cancer and chemotherapy in an immunocompetent breast cancer mouse model (E0771) would compromise skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiratory function, leading to an increase in H2O2-emitting potential and impaired muscle function. Here, we demonstrate that cancer chemotherapy decreases mitochondrial respiratory capacity supported with complex I (pyruvate/glutamate/malate) and complex II (succinate) substrates. Mitochondrial H2O2-emitting potential was altered in skeletal muscle, and global protein oxidation was elevated with cancer chemotherapy. Muscle contractile function was impaired following exposure to cancer chemotherapy. Genetically engineering the overexpression of catalase in mitochondria of muscle attenuated mitochondrial H2O2 emission and protein oxidation, preserving mitochondrial and whole muscle function despite cancer chemotherapy. These findings suggest mitochondrial oxidants as a mediator of cancer chemotherapy-induced skeletal muscle dysfunction. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Lycopene Prevents Amyloid [Beta]-Induced Mitochondrial Oxidative Stress and Dysfunctions in Cultured Rat Cortical Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Mingyue; Jiang, Zheng; Liao, Yuanxiang; Song, Zhenyao; Nan, Xinzhong

    2016-06-01

    Brains affected by Alzheimer's disease (AD) show a large spectrum of mitochondrial alterations at both morphological and genetic level. The causal link between β-amyloid (Aβ) and mitochondrial dysfunction has been established in cellular models of AD. We observed previously that lycopene, a member of the carotenoid family of phytochemicals, could counteract neuronal apoptosis and cell damage induced by Aβ and other neurotoxic substances, and that this neuroprotective action somehow involved the mitochondria. The present study aims to investigate the effects of lycopene on mitochondria in cultured rat cortical neurons exposed to Aβ. It was found that lycopene attenuated Aβ-induced oxidative stress, as evidenced by the decreased intracellular reactive oxygen species generation and mitochondria-derived superoxide production. Additionally, lycopene ameliorated Aβ-induced mitochondrial morphological alteration, opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pores and the consequent cytochrome c release. Lycopene also improved mitochondrial complex activities and restored ATP levels in Aβ-treated neuron. Furthermore, lycopene prevented mitochondrial DNA damages and improved the protein level of mitochondrial transcription factor A in mitochondria. Those results indicate that lycopene protects mitochondria against Aβ-induced damages, at least in part by inhibiting mitochondrial oxidative stress and improving mitochondrial function. These beneficial effects of lycopene may account for its protection against Aβ-induced neurotoxicity.

  19. Phosphodiesterase-3 inhibitor (cilostazol) attenuates oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in the heart

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Siriporn C.Chattipakorn; Savitree Thummasorn; Jantira Sanit; Nipon Chattipakorn

    2014-01-01

    Background Cilostazol is a type 3 phosphodiesterase inhibitor which has been previously demonstrated to prevent the occurrence of tachyarrhythmia and improve defibrillation efficacy. However, the mechanism for this beneficial effect is still unclear. Since cardiac mito-chondria have been shown to play a crucial role in fatal cardiac arrhythmias and that oxidative stress is one of the main contributors to arr-hythmia generation, we tested the effects of cilostazol on cardiac mitochondria under severe oxidative stress. Methods Mitochondria were isolated from rat hearts and treated with H2O2 to induce oxidative stress. Cilostazol, at various concentrations, was used to study its protective effects. Pharmacological interventions, including a mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) blocker, cyclosporine A (CsA), and an inner membrane anion channel (IMAC) blocker, 4’-chlorodiazepam (CDP), were used to investigate the mechanistic role of cilostazol on cardiac mitochondria. Cardiac mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, mitochondrial membrane potential change and mi-tochondrial swelling were determined as indicators of cardiac mitochondrial function. Results Cilostazol preserved cardiac mitochondrial function when exposed to oxidative stress by preventing mitochondrial depolarization, mitochondrial swelling, and decreasing ROS produc-tion. Conclusions Our findings suggest that cardioprotective effects of cilostazol reported previously could be due to its prevention of car-diac mitochondrial dysfunction caused by severe oxidative stress.

  20. Effect of Mitochondrial Dysfunction on Carbon Metabolism and Gene Expression in Flower Tissues of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maria V.Busi; Maria E.Gomez-Lobato; Sebastian P.Rius; Valeria R.Turowski; Paula Casati; Eduardo J.Zabaleta; Diego F.Gomez-Casati; Alejandro Araya

    2011-01-01

    We characterized the transcriptomic response of transgenic plants carrying a mitochondrial dysfunction induced by the expression of the unedited form of the ATP synthase subunit 9.The u-ATP9 transgene driven by A9 and APETALA3 promoters induce mitochondrial dysfunction revealed by a decrease jn both oxygen uptake and adenine nucleotides(ATP,ADP)levels without changes in the ATP/ADP ratio.Furthermore,we measured an increase in ROS accumulation and a decrease in glutathione and ascorbate levels with a concomitant oxidative stress response.The transcriptome analysis of young Arabidopsis flowers,validated by Qrt-PCR and enzymatic or functional tests,showed dramatic changes in u-ATP9 plants.Both lines display a modification in the expression of various genes involved in carbon,lipid,and cell wall metabolism,suggesting that an important metabolic readjustment occurs in plants with a mitochondrial dysfunction.Interestingly,transcript levels involved in mitochondrial respiration,protein synthesis,and degradation are affected.Moreover,the Ievels of several mRNAs encoding for transcription factors and DNA binding proteins were also changed.Some of them are involved in stress and hormone responses,suggesting that several signaling pathways overlap.Indeed,the transcriptome data revealed that the mitochondrial dysfunction dramatically alters the expression of genes involved in signaling pathways,including those related to ethylene,absicic acid,and auxin signal transduction.Our data suggest that the mitochondrial dysfunction model used in this report may be usefuI to uncover the retrograde signaling mechanism between the nucleus and mitochondria in plant cells.

  1. Mitochondrial polymerase gamma dysfunction and aging cause cardiac nuclear DNA methylation changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koczor, Christopher A; Ludlow, Ivan; Fields, Earl; Jiao, Zhe; Ludaway, Tomika; Russ, Rodney; Lewis, William

    2016-04-01

    Cardiomyopathy (CM) is an intrinsic weakening of myocardium with contractile dysfunction and congestive heart failure (CHF). CHF has been postulated to result from decreased mitochondrial energy production and oxidative stress. Effects of decreased mitochondrial oxygen consumption also can accelerate with aging. We previously showed DNA methylation changes in human hearts with CM. This was associated with mitochondrial DNA depletion, being another molecular marker of CM. We examined the relationship between mitochondrial dysfunction and cardiac epigenetic DNA methylation changes in both young and old mice. We used genetically engineered C57Bl/6 mice transgenic for a cardiac-specific mutant of the mitochondrial polymerase-γ (termed Y955C). Y955C mice undergo left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) at a young age (∼ 94 days old), and LVH decompensated to CHF at old age (∼ 255 days old). Results found 95 genes differentially expressed as a result of Y955C expression, while 4,452 genes were differentially expressed as a result of aging hearts. Moreover, cardiac DNA methylation patterns differed between Y955C (4,506 peaks with 68.5% hypomethylation) and aged hearts (73,286 peaks with 80.2% hypomethylated). Correlatively, of the 95 Y955C-dependent differentially expressed genes, 30 genes (31.6%) also displayed differential DNA methylation; in the 4,452 age-dependent differentially expressed genes, 342 genes (7.7%) displayed associated DNA methylation changes. Both Y955C and aging demonstrated significant enrichment of CACGTG-associated E-box motifs in differentially methylated regions. Cardiac mitochondrial polymerase dysfunction alters nuclear DNA methylation. Furthermore, aging causes a robust change in cardiac DNA methylation that is partially associated with mitochondrial polymerase dysfunction. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Mitochondrial dysfunction in brain cortex mitochondria of STZ-diabetic rats: effect of l-Arginine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, M Del Carmen; Lores-Arnaiz, Silvia; Albertoni Borghese, M Florencia; Balonga, Sabrina; Lavagna, Agustina; Filipuzzi, Ana Laura; Cicerchia, Daniela; Majowicz, Monica; Bustamante, Juanita

    2013-12-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in many diseases, including diabetes. It is well known that oxygen free radical species are produced endogenously by mitochondria, and also nitric oxide (NO) by nitric oxide synthases (NOS) associated to mitochondrial membranes, in consequence these organelles constitute main targets for oxidative damage. The aim of this study was to analyze mitochondrial physiology and NO production in brain cortex mitochondria of streptozotocin (STZ) diabetic rats in an early stage of diabetes and the potential effect of L-arginine administration. The diabetic condition was characterized by a clear hyperglycaemic state with loose of body weight after 4 days of STZ injection. This hyperglycaemic state was associated with mitochondrial dysfunction that was evident by an impairment of the respiratory activity, increased production of superoxide anion and a clear mitochondrial depolarization. In addition, the alteration in mitochondrial physiology was associated with a significant decrease in both NO production and nitric oxide synthase type I (NOS I) expression associated to the mitochondrial membranes. An increased level of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) in brain cortex homogenates from STZ-diabetic rats indicated the presence of lipid peroxidation. L-arginine treatment to diabetic rats did not change blood glucose levels but significantly ameliorated the oxidative stress evidenced by lower TBARS and a lower level of superoxide anion. This effect was paralleled by improvement of mitochondrial respiratory function and a partial mitochondrial repolarization.In addition, the administration of L-arginine to diabetic rats prevented the decrease in NO production and NOSI expression. These results could indicate that exogenously administered L-arginine may have beneficial effects on mitochondrial function, oxidative stress and NO production in brain cortex mitochondria of STZ-diabetic rats.

  3. Pseudolaric acid B-induced autophagy contributes to senescence via enhancement of ROS generation and mitochondrial dysfunction in murine fibrosarcoma L929 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Min; Fan, Simiao; Yao, Guodong; Li, Zhao; Zhou, Haiyan; Tashiro, Shin-ichi; Onodera, Satoshi; Xia, Mingyu; Ikejima, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Pseudolaric acid B (PAB) is the primary biologically active compound isolated from the root bark of P. kaempferi Gordon. Our previous study demonstrated that PAB induced mitotic catastrophe in L929 cells and indicated that only a small percentage (12%) of the cells undergoing mitotic catastrophe displayed an apoptotic phenotype after PAB treatment for 72 h. In this study, we found that a minority of the cells undergoing mitotic catastrophe ended in apoptosis, and a majority of them entered a period of senescence. Further data confirmed that PAB induced autophagy, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and mitochondrial dysfunction in L929 cells. Subsequently, we found that autophagy inhibitors significantly delayed the senescence process, indicating that autophagy facilitated senescence. Moreover, ROS scavenger significantly decreased the autophagic level and improved mitochondrial function. Additionally, autophagy inhibitors effectively reduced ROS levels and ameliorated mitochondrial function. In conclusion, autophagy promoted senescence via enhancement of ROS generation and mitochondrial dysfunction in PAB-treated L929 cells.

  4. Modulation of Rho GTPases rescues brain mitochondrial dysfunction, cognitive deficits and aberrant synaptic plasticity in female mice modeling Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Filippis, Bianca; Valenti, Daniela; Chiodi, Valentina; Ferrante, Antonella; de Bari, Lidia; Fiorentini, Carla; Domenici, Maria Rosaria; Ricceri, Laura; Vacca, Rosa Anna; Fabbri, Alessia; Laviola, Giovanni

    2015-06-01

    Rho GTPases are molecules critically involved in neuronal plasticity and cognition. We have previously reported that modulation of brain Rho GTPases by the bacterial toxin CNF1 rescues the neurobehavioral phenotype in MeCP2-308 male mice, a model of Rett syndrome (RTT). RTT is a rare X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder and a genetic cause of intellectual disability, for which no effective therapy is available. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been proposed to be involved in the mechanism of the disease pathogenesis. Here we demonstrate that modulation of Rho GTPases by CNF1 rescues the reduced mitochondrial ATP production via oxidative phosphorylation in the brain of MeCP2-308 heterozygous female mice, the condition which more closely recapitulates that of RTT patients. In RTT mouse brain, CNF1 also restores the alterations in the activity of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) complexes and of ATP synthase, the molecular machinery responsible for the majority of cell energy production. Such effects were achieved through the upregulation of the protein content of those MRC complexes subunits, which were defective in RTT mouse brain. Restored mitochondrial functionality was accompanied by the rescue of deficits in cognitive function (spatial reference memory in the Barnes maze), synaptic plasticity (long-term potentiation) and Tyr1472 phosphorylation of GluN2B, which was abnormally enhanced in the hippocampus of RTT mice. Present findings bring into light previously unknown functional mitochondrial alterations in the brain of female mice modeling RTT and provide the first evidence that RTT brain mitochondrial dysfunction can be rescued by modulation of Rho GTPases.

  5. Trichodermin induces cell apoptosis through mitochondrial dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum stress in human chondrosarcoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Chen-Ming [Graduate Institute of Basic Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Wang, Shih-Wei [Department of Medicine, Mackay Medical College, New Taipei City, Taiwan (China); Lee, Tzong-Huei [Graduate Institute of Pharmacognosy, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Tzeng, Wen-Pei [Graduate Institute of Sports and Health, National Changhua University of Education, Changhua, Taiwan (China); Hsiao, Che-Jen [School of Respiratory Therapy, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Liu, Shih-Chia [Department of Orthopaedics, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Tang, Chih-Hsin, E-mail: chtang@mail.cmu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Basic Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Biotechnology, College of Health Science, Asia University, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2013-10-15

    Chondrosarcoma is the second most common primary bone tumor, and it responds poorly to both chemotherapy and radiation treatment. Nalanthamala psidii was described originally as Myxosporium in 1926. This is the first study to investigate the anti-tumor activity of trichodermin (trichothec-9-en-4-ol, 12,13-epoxy-, acetate), an endophytic fungal metabolite from N. psidii against human chondrosarcoma cells. We demonstrated that trichodermin induced cell apoptosis in human chondrosarcoma cell lines (JJ012 and SW1353 cells) instead of primary chondrocytes. In addition, trichodermin triggered endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress protein levels of IRE1, p-PERK, GRP78, and GRP94, which were characterized by changes in cytosolic calcium levels. Furthermore, trichodermin induced the upregulation of Bax and Bid, the downregulation of Bcl-2, and the dysfunction of mitochondria, which released cytochrome c and activated caspase-3 in human chondrosarcoma. In addition, animal experiments illustrated reduced tumor volume, which led to an increased number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells and an increased level of cleaved PARP protein following trichodermin treatment. Together, this study demonstrates that trichodermin is a novel anti-tumor agent against human chondrosarcoma cells both in vitro and in vivo via mitochondrial dysfunction and ER stress. - Highlights: • Trichodermin induces chondrosarcoma apoptosis. • ER stress is involved in trichodermin-induced cell death. • Trichodermin induces chondrosarcoma death in vivo.

  6. Cigarette smoke-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toorn, Marco van der

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis we studied the effects of cigarette smoke (CS) on mitochondrial function and oxidative stress in epithelial cells and discussed the potential of these phenomena in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD). In the first three chapters we demonstrated that CS di

  7. Mitochondrial dysfunction induced by different concentrations of gadolinium ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jie; Zhou, Zhi-Qiang; Jin, Jian-Cheng; Yuan, Lian; He, Huan; Jiang, Feng-Lei; Yang, Xiao-Gang; Dai, Jie; Liu, Yi

    2014-04-01

    Gadolinium-based compounds are the most widely used paramagnetic contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging on the world. But the tricationic gadolinium ion (Gd(3+)) could induce cell apoptosis probably because of its effects on mitochondria. Until now, the mechanism about how Gd(3+) interacts with mitochondria is not well elucidated. In this work, mitochondrial swelling, collapsed transmembrane potential and decreased membrane fluidity were observed to be important factors for mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mtPTP) opening induced by Gd(3+). The protection effect of CsA (Cyclosporin A) could confirm high concentration of Gd(3+) (500 μM) would trigger mtPTP opening. Moreover, mitochondrial outer membrane breakdown and volume expansion observed clearly by transmission electron microscopy and the release of Cyt c (Cytochrome c) could explain the mtPTP opening from another aspect. In addition, MBM(+) (monobromobimane(+)) and DTT (dithiothreitol) could protect thiol (-SH) groups from oxidation so that the toxicity of Gd(3+) might be resulted from the chelation of -SH of membrane proteins by free Gd(3+). Gd(3+) could inhibit the initiation of mitochondrial membrane lipid peroxidation, so it might interact with anionic lipids too. These findings will highly contribute to the safe applications of Gd-based agents.

  8. Neurotrophin Therapy of Neurodegenerative Disorders with Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    SUBJECT TERMS mitochondria, neurotrophin, BDNF, trkB, trisomy 16, oxidative stress, rotenone, Parkinsons 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17...16:mediation by caspases. Journal of Neurochemistry 72:1769-1772. Bambrick LL, Krueger BK, Fiskum G (2005) Mitochondrial function in the trisomy 16

  9. Therapeutic attenuation of mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in neurotoxin models of Parkinson's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Stack, Edward C.; Ferro, Joellyn L.; Kim, Jinho; Del Signore, Steven J.; Goodrich, Sarah; Matson, Samantha; Hunt, Bonnie B.; Cormier, Kerry; Smith, Karen; Matson, Wayne R.; Ryu, Hoon; Ferrante, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Therapeutic attenuation of mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in neurotoxin models of Parkinson?s disease correspondence: Corresponding author. GRECC Unit 182B, Bedford VA Medical Center, 200 Springs Road, Bedford, MA 01730, USA. Tel.: +1 781 687 2908; fax: +1 781 687 3515. (Ferrante, Robert J.) (Ferrante, Robert J.) Department of Neurology, Boston University School of Medicine - Boston--> , MA 02118--> ...

  10. Mitochondrial and bioenergetic dysfunction in human hepatic cells infected with dengue 2 virus

    OpenAIRE

    El-Bacha, Tatiana; Midlej, Victor; Pereira da Silva, Ana Paula; Silva da Costa, Leandro; Benchimol, Marlene; Galina, Antonio; Da Poian, Andrea T.

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondrial and bioenergetic dysfunction in human hepatic cells infected with dengue 2 virus correspondence: Corresponding author. Fax: +55 21 22708647. (El-Bacha, Tatiana) (El-Bacha, Tatiana) Laboratorio de Bioquimica de Virus, Instituto de Bioquimica Medica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro - RJ-Brasil--> , Av. Bauhinia n? 400 ? CCS Bloco H 2? andar--> , sala 22. Ilha do Governador--> ...

  11. Green tea polyphenols attenuate glial swelling and mitochondrial dysfunction following oxygen-glucose deprivation in cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astrocyte swelling is a major component of cytotoxic brain edema in ischemia. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction have been hypothesized to contribute to such swelling in cultures. We investigated the protective effects of polyphenol-rich green tea extract (GTE) on key features of ischemi...

  12. Mitochondrial and bioenergetic dysfunction in human hepatic cells infected with dengue 2 virus

    OpenAIRE

    El-Bacha, Tatiana; Midlej, Victor; Silva, Ana Paula Pereira da; COSTA,LEANDRO SILVA DA; Benchimol, Marlene; Galina, Antonio; POIAN,ANDREA T. DA

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondrial and bioenergetic dysfunction in human hepatic cells infected with dengue 2 virus correspondence: Corresponding author. Fax: +55 21 22708647. (El-Bacha, Tatiana) (El-Bacha, Tatiana) Laboratorio de Bioquimica de Virus, Instituto de Bioquimica Medica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro - RJ-Brasil--> , Av. Bauhinia n? 400 ? CCS Bloco H 2? andar--> , sala 22. Ilha do Governador--> ...

  13. Frontal cortical mitochondrial dysfunction and mitochondria-related β-amyloid accumulation by chronic sleep restriction in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongyi; Wu, Huijuan; He, Jialin; Zhuang, Jianhua; Liu, Zhenyu; Yang, Yang; Huang, Liuqing; Zhao, Zhongxin

    2016-08-17

    Mitochondrial dysfunction induced by mitochondria-related β-amyloid (Aβ) accumulation is increasingly being considered a novel risk factor for sporadic Alzheimer's disease pathophysiology. The close relationship between chronic sleep restriction (CSR) and cortical Aβ elevation was confirmed recently. By assessing frontal cortical mitochondrial function (electron microscopy manifestation, cytochrome C oxidase concentration, ATP level, and mitochondrial membrane potential) and the levels of mitochondria-related Aβ in 9-month-old adult male C57BL/6J mice subjected to CSR and as an environmental control (CO) group, we aimed to evaluate the association of CSR with mitochondrial dysfunction and mitochondria-related Aβ accumulation. In this study, frontal cortical mitochondrial dysfunction was significantly more severe in CSR mice compared with CO animals. Furthermore, CSR mice showed higher mitochondria-associated Aβ, total Aβ, and mitochondria-related β-amyloid protein precursor (AβPP) levels compared with CO mice. In the CSR model, mouse frontal cortical mitochondrial dysfunction was correlated with mitochondria-associated Aβ and mitochondria-related AβPP levels. However, frontal cortical mitochondria-associated Aβ levels showed no significant association with cortical total Aβ and mitochondrial AβPP concentrations. These findings indicated that CSR-induced frontal cortical mitochondrial dysfunction and mitochondria-related Aβ accumulation, which was closely related to mitochondrial dysfunction under CSR.

  14. Mitochondrial targeted β-lapachone induces mitochondrial dysfunction and catastrophic vacuolization in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jing; Lim, Chaemin; Sacher, Joshua R; Van Houten, Bennett; Qian, Wei; Wipf, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondria play important roles in tumor cell physiology and survival by providing energy and metabolites for proliferation and metastasis. As part of their oncogenic status, cancer cells frequently produce increased levels of mitochondrial-generated reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, extensive stimulation of ROS generation in mitochondria has been shown to be able to induce cancer cell death, and is one of the major mechanisms of action of many anticancer agents. We hypothesized that enhancing mitochondrial ROS generation through direct targeting of a ROS generator into mitochondria will exhibit tumor cell selectivity, as well as high efficacy in inducing cancer cell death. We thus synthesized a mitochondrial targeted version of β-lapachone (XJB-Lapachone) based on our XJB mitochondrial targeting platform. We found that the mitochondrial targeted β-lapachone is more efficient in inducing apoptosis compared to unconjugated β-lapachone, and the tumor cell selectivity is maintained. XJB-Lapachone also induced extensive cellular vacuolization and autophagy at a concentration not observed with unconjugated β-lapachone. Through characterization of mitochondrial function we revealed that XJB-Lapachone is indeed more capable of stimulating ROS generation in mitochondria, which led to a dramatic mitochondrial uncoupling and autophagic degradation of mitochondria. Taken together, we have demonstrated that targeting β-lapachone accomplishes higher efficacy through inducing ROS generation directly in mitochondria, resulting in extensive mitochondrial and cellular damage. XJB-Lapachone will thus help to establish a novel platform for the design of next generation mitochondrial targeted ROS generators for cancer therapy.

  15. Reduced basal autophagy and impaired mitochondrial dynamics due to loss of Parkinson's disease-associated protein DJ-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Krebiehl

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mitochondrial dysfunction and degradation takes a central role in current paradigms of neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease (PD. Loss of DJ-1 function is a rare cause of familial PD. Although a critical role of DJ-1 in oxidative stress response and mitochondrial function has been recognized, the effects on mitochondrial dynamics and downstream consequences remain to be determined. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using DJ-1 loss of function cellular models from knockout (KO mice and human carriers of the E64D mutation in the DJ-1 gene we define a novel role of DJ-1 in the integrity of both cellular organelles, mitochondria and lysosomes. We show that loss of DJ-1 caused impaired mitochondrial respiration, increased intramitochondrial reactive oxygen species, reduced mitochondrial membrane potential and characteristic alterations of mitochondrial shape as shown by quantitative morphology. Importantly, ultrastructural imaging and subsequent detailed lysosomal activity analyses revealed reduced basal autophagic degradation and the accumulation of defective mitochondria in DJ-1 KO cells, that was linked with decreased levels of phospho-activated ERK2. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We show that loss of DJ-1 leads to impaired autophagy and accumulation of dysfunctional mitochondria that under physiological conditions would be compensated via lysosomal clearance. Our study provides evidence for a critical role of DJ-1 in mitochondrial homeostasis by connecting basal autophagy and mitochondrial integrity in Parkinson's disease.

  16. Hydroxytyrosol ameliorates oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity in rats with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granados-Principal, Sergio; El-Azem, Nuri; Pamplona, Reinald; Ramirez-Tortosa, Cesar; Pulido-Moran, Mario; Vera-Ramirez, Laura; Quiles, Jose L; Sanchez-Rovira, Pedro; Naudí, Alba; Portero-Otin, Manuel; Perez-Lopez, Patricia; Ramirez-Tortosa, Mcarmen

    2014-07-01

    Oxidative stress is involved in several processes including cancer, aging and cardiovascular disease, and has been shown to potentiate the therapeutic effect of drugs such as doxorubicin. Doxorubicin causes significant cardiotoxicity characterized by marked increases in oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Herein, we investigate whether doxorubicin-associated chronic cardiac toxicity can be ameliorated with the antioxidant hydroxytyrosol in rats with breast cancer. Thirty-six rats bearing breast tumors induced chemically were divided into 4 groups: control, hydroxytyrosol (0.5mg/kg, 5days/week), doxorubicin (1mg/kg/week), and doxorubicin plus hydroxytyrosol. Cardiac disturbances at the cellular and mitochondrial level, mitochondrial electron transport chain complexes I-IV and apoptosis-inducing factor, and oxidative stress markers have been analyzed. Hydroxytyrosol improved the cardiac disturbances enhanced by doxorubicin by significantly reducing the percentage of altered mitochondria and oxidative damage. These results suggest that hydroxytyrosol improve the mitochondrial electron transport chain. This study demonstrates that hydroxytyrosol protect rat heart damage provoked by doxorubicin decreasing oxidative damage and mitochondrial alterations.

  17. Beneficial effect of the bioflavonoid quercetin on cholecystokinin-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in isolated rat pancreatic acinar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Heike; Jonas, Ludwig; Wakileh, Michael; Krüger, Burkhard

    2014-03-01

    The pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis (AP) is still poorly understood. Thus, a reliable pharmacological therapy is currently lacking. In recent years, an impairment of the energy metabolism of pancreatic acinar cells, caused by Ca(2+)-mediated depolarization of the inner mitochondrial membrane and a decreased ATP supply, has been implicated as an important pathological event. In this study, we investigated whether quercetin exerts protection against mitochondrial dysfunction. Following treatment with or without quercetin, rat pancreatic acinar cells were stimulated with supramaximal cholecystokinin-8 (CCK). CCK caused a decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and ATP concentration, whereas the mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity was significantly increased. Quercetin treatment before CCK application exerted no protection on MMP but increased ATP to a normal level, leading to a continuous decrease in the dehydrogenase activity. The protective effect of quercetin on mitochondrial function was accompanied by a reduction in CCK-induced changes to the cell membrane. Concerning the molecular mechanism underlying the protective effect of quercetin, an increased AMP/ATP ratio suggests that the AMP-activated protein kinase system may be activated. In addition, quercetin strongly inhibited CCK-induced trypsin activity. The results indicate that the use of quercetin may be a therapeutic strategy for reducing the severity of AP.

  18. Drugs indicated for mitochondrial dysfunction as treatments for acute encephalopathy with onset of febrile convulsive status epileptics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omata, Taku; Fujii, Katsunori; Takanashi, Jun-Ichi; Murayama, Kei; Takayanagi, Masaki; Muta, Kaori; Kodama, Kazuo; Iida, Yukiko; Watanabe, Yoshimi; Shimojo, Naoki

    2016-01-15

    We studied the efficacy of drugs indicated for mitochondrial dysfunction in the treatment of 21 patients with acute encephalopathy with onset of febrile convulsive status epilepticus at our hospital from January 2006 to December 2014. Among them, 11 patients had been treated with a mitochondrial drug cocktail consisting of vitamin B1, vitamin C, biotin, vitamin E, coenzyme Q10, and l-carnitine (prescription group) and 10 patients were not treated with the cocktail (non-prescription group). We retrospectively reviewed age, trigger, clinical form, treatment start time, and sequelae. Clinical form was classified into a biphasic group presenting acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion (AESD) and a monophasic group. Sequelae were classified as (A) no sequelae group or (B) sequelae group, and differences in the interval between diagnosis and treatment were also evaluated. The sequelae were not different between the mitochondrial drug cocktail prescription and non-prescription groups, but significantly better in the group administered the mitochondrial drug cocktail within 24h (P=0.035). We expect that early treatment with a mitochondrial drug cocktail could prevent sequelae in acute encephalopathy with onset of febrile convulsive status epilepticus. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. [Digestive system disease as manifestation of the pleiotropic action of genes in mitochondrial dysfunction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrechanina, O Ia; Hrechanina, Iu B; Husar, V A; Molodan, L V

    2014-11-01

    Defined involvement lesions of the digestive system of clinical manifestations of mitochondrial dysfunction associated with both point mutations and polymorphism of mitochondrial DNA. The nature of the clinical signs of mtDNA polymorphisms carriers--multi organical, a progressive, clinical polymorphism, genetic heterogeneity with predominant involvement of energotropic bodies (cerebrum, cordis, hepatic). Set individual nosological forms of mitochondrial dysfunctions--syndromes Leia, Leber, Cairns, Sarah, MERRF, MELAS, NARP, MNGIE confirmed by clinical and genetic, morphological, biochemical, enzymatic, molecular genetics methods. It was found that 84-88% of these syndromes involving the violation of the digestive system with varying degrees of injury. This damage will be the first in the complex chain signs recovery which determines the direction of early rehabilitation.

  20. Alzheimer's Proteins, Oxidative Stress, and Mitochondrial Dysfunction Interplay in a Neuronal Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Bobba

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we discuss the interplay between beta-amyloid (A peptide, Tau fragments, oxidative stress, and mitochondria in the neuronal model of cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs in which the molecular events reminiscent of AD are activated. The identification of the death route and the cause/effect relationships between the events leading to death could be helpful to manage the progression of apoptosis in neurodegeneration and to define antiapoptotic treatments acting on precocious steps of the death process. Mitochondrial dysfunction is among the earliest events linked to AD and might play a causative role in disease onset and progression. Recent studies on CGNs have shown that adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT impairment, due to interaction with toxic N-ter Tau fragment, contributes in a significant manner to bioenergetic failure and mitochondrial dysfunction. These findings open a window for new therapeutic strategies aimed at preserving and/or improving mitochondrial function.

  1. Mitochondrial Oxidative Stress due to Complex I Dysfunction Promotes Fibroblast Activation and Melanoma Cell Invasiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Letizia Taddei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased ROS (cellular reactive oxygen species are characteristic of both fibrosis and tumour development. ROS induce the trans-differentiation to myofibroblasts, the activated form of fibroblasts able to promote cancer progression. Here, we report the role of ROS produced in response to dysfunctions of mitochondrial complex I, in fibroblast activation and in tumour progression. We studied human fibroblasts with mitochondrial dysfunctions of complex I, leading to hyperproduction of ROS. We demonstrated that ROS level produced by the mutated fibroblasts correlates with their activation. The increase of ROS in these cells provides a greater ability to remodel the extracellular matrix leading to an increased motility and invasiveness. Furthermore, we evidentiated that in hypoxic conditions these fibroblasts cause HIF-1α stabilization and promote a proinvasive phenotype of human melanoma cells through secretion of cytokines. These data suggest a possible role of deregulated mitochondrial ROS production in fibrosis evolution as well as in cancer progression and invasion.

  2. Ablation of toll-like receptor 4 mitigates cardiac mitochondrial dysfunction in hyperhomocysteinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeremic, Nevena; Weber, Gregory J; Tyagi, Suresh C

    2017-07-24

    Hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) is a risk factor for adverse cardiovascular events; however, the mechanism for development of this disease is still unknown. Toll-like receptor 4 (TRL4) is a molecule involved in the immune response pathway and is quickly becoming a receptor of interest in the field of hypertension. In this study, we hypothesized that ablation of TLR4 mitigates cardiac mitochondrial dysfunction in a model of HHcy. Five strains of mice (C57BL/6J, CBS(+/-), C3H, CBS(+/-)/C3H, and C3H/HeOuJ) 10-12 weeks old were utilized. We found that HHcy causes heart hypertrophy and promotes oxidative stress while mice with HHcy and inactivated TLR4 showed significant improvement in examined parameters. A dominance of endothelial cell mitochondrial fission over mitochondrial fusion in HHcy and oxidative stress was observed, which may explain the endothelial cell loss and dysfunction that contributes to inward cardiac remodeling.

  3. Hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction is a feature of Glycogen Storage Disease Type Ia (GSDIa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah, Benjamin L.; Sinha, Rohit A.; Wu, Yajun; Singh, Brijesh K.; Lim, Andrea; Hirayama, Masahiro; Landau, Dustin J.; Bay, Boon Huat; Koeberl, Dwight D.; Yen, Paul M.

    2017-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSDIa, von Gierke disease) is the most common glycogen storage disorder. It is caused by the deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase, an enzyme which catalyses the final step of gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis. Clinically, GSDIa is characterized by fasting hypoglycaemia and hepatic glycogen and triglyceride overaccumulation. The latter leads to steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, and the formation of hepatic adenomas and carcinomas. Currently, little is known about the function of various organelles and their impact on metabolism in GSDIa. Accordingly, we investigated mitochondrial function in cell culture and mouse models of GSDIa. We found impairments in oxidative phosphorylation and changes in TCA cycle metabolites, as well as decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and deranged mitochondrial ultra-structure in these model systems. Mitochondrial content also was decreased, likely secondary to decreased mitochondrial biogenesis. These deleterious effects culminated in the activation of the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. Taken together, our results demonstrate a role for mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathogenesis of GSDIa, and identify a new potential target for the treatment of this disease. They also provide new insight into the role of carbohydrate overload on mitochondrial function in other hepatic diseases, such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. PMID:28317891

  4. Role of mitochondrial dysfunction in hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Ming Li; Hong Zhou; Qian Cai; Guang-Xia Xiao

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells.METHODS: Hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis of human intestinal epithelial cell line SW-480 was established. Cell apoptosis was determined by Annexin-V and PI doublestained flow cytometry and DNA gel electrophoresis.Morphological changes were examined with light and electron microscopy. For other observations, mitochondrial function,cytochrome c release, mitochondrial translocation and membrane potential were determined simultaneously.RESULTS: Percentage of apoptotic cells induced with 400μ mol/L hydrogen peroxide increased significantly at I h or 3h after stimulation and recovered rapidly. Meanwhile percentage of apoptotic cells induced with 4 mmol/L hydrogen peroxide increased with time. In accordance with these changes, we observed decreased mitochondrial function in 400 μmol/L H2O2-stimualted cells at 1 h or 3 h and in 4 mmol/L H2O2-stimualted cells at times examined.Correspondingly, swelling cristae and vacuole-like mitochondria were noted. Release of cytochrome c,decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial translocation were also found to be the early signs of apoptosis.CONCLUSION: Dysfunctional mitochondria play a role in the apoptosis of SW-480 cell line induced by hydrogen peroxide.

  5. Methylglyoxal Induces Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Cell Death in Liver

    OpenAIRE

    Seo, Kyuhwa; Ki, Sung Hwan; Shin, Sang Mi

    2014-01-01

    Degradation of glucose is aberrantly increased in hyperglycemia, which causes various harmful effects on the liver. Methylglyoxal is produced during glucose degradation and the levels of methylglyoxal are increased in diabetes patients. In this study we investigated whether methylglyoxal induces mitochondrial impairment and apoptosis in HepG2 cells and induces liver toxicity in vivo. Methylglyoxal caused apoptotic cell death in HepG2 cells. Moreover, methylglyoxal significantly promoted the p...

  6. Naringin ameliorates gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity and associated mitochondrial dysfunction, apoptosis and inflammation in rats: Possible mechanism of nephroprotection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahu, Bidya Dhar [Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacology Division, Indian Institute of Chemical Technology (IICT), Hyderabad 500 007 (India); Tatireddy, Srujana [National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research (NIPER), Hyderabad 500 037 (India); Koneru, Meghana [Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacology Division, Indian Institute of Chemical Technology (IICT), Hyderabad 500 007 (India); Borkar, Roshan M. [National Centre for Mass Spectrometry, Indian Institute of Chemical Technology (IICT), Hyderabad 500 007 (India); Kumar, Jerald Mahesh [CSIR-Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology (CCMB), Hyderabad 500 007 (India); Kuncha, Madhusudana [Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacology Division, Indian Institute of Chemical Technology (IICT), Hyderabad 500 007 (India); Srinivas, R. [National Centre for Mass Spectrometry, Indian Institute of Chemical Technology (IICT), Hyderabad 500 007 (India); Shyam Sunder, R. [Faculty of Pharmacy, Osmania University, Hyderabad 500 007 (India); Sistla, Ramakrishna, E-mail: sistla@iict.res.in [Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacology Division, Indian Institute of Chemical Technology (IICT), Hyderabad 500 007 (India)

    2014-05-15

    Gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity has been well documented, although its underlying mechanisms and preventive strategies remain to be investigated. The present study was designed to investigate the protective effect of naringin, a bioflavonoid, on gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity and to elucidate the potential mechanism. Serum specific renal function parameters (blood urea nitrogen and creatinine) and histopathology of kidney tissues were evaluated to assess the gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity. Renal oxidative stress (lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation, enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants), inflammatory (NF-kB [p65], TNF-α, IL-6 and MPO) and apoptotic (caspase 3, caspase 9, Bax, Bcl-2, p53 and DNA fragmentation) markers were also evaluated. Significant decrease in mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase, cytochrome c oxidase and mitochondrial redox activity indicated the gentamicin-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. Naringin (100 mg/kg) treatment along with gentamicin restored the mitochondrial function and increased the renal endogenous antioxidant status. Gentamicin induced increased renal inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6), nuclear protein expression of NF-κB (p65) and NF-κB-DNA binding activity and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were significantly decreased upon naringin treatment. In addition, naringin treatment significantly decreased the amount of cleaved caspase 3, Bax, and p53 protein expression and increased the Bcl-2 protein expression. Naringin treatment also ameliorated the extent of histologic injury and reduced inflammatory infiltration in renal tubules. U-HPLS-MS data revealed that naringin co-administration along with gentamicin did not alter the renal uptake and/or accumulation of gentamicin in kidney tissues. These findings suggest that naringin treatment attenuates renal dysfunction and structural damage through the reduction of oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, inflammation and apoptosis in

  7. Resveratrol attenuates MPP(+)-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and cell apoptosis via AKT/GSK-3β pathway in SN4741 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Weijun; Zhang, Wei; Lu, Fangfang; Gao, Li; Gao, Guodong

    2017-01-10

    Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction play crucial role in the dopaminergic neurons death, which is the pathological feature of Parkinson's disease (PD). Resveratrol (Res), a polyphenol derived from grapes and blueberries, has been reported to reduce oxidative stress injury and to restore mitochondrial function. In this study, we aimed to explore the underlying molecular mechanism of the beneficial effects of Res against MPP+- induced mitochondrial dysfunction and cell apoptosis in SN4741 cells. The data showed that Res significantly alleviated MPP+- induce cytotoxicity and restored MPP+- induced mitochondrial dysfunction in SN4741 cells. Moreover, Res rescued MPP+- induced a decline on the level of p-AKT, p-GSK-3βand the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax, and an elevation on the expression of Bax and caspase-3, 9. However, inhibition GSK-3β activity clearly abolished the protective effects of Res. Taken together, these results suggest that Res attenuates MPP+- induced mitochondrial dysfunction and cell apoptosis, and these protections may be achieved through AKT/GSK-3β pathway. These also indicate that Res could be a promising therapeutic agent for PD.

  8. Pro-oxidant effect of ALA is implicated in mitochondrial dysfunction of HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laafi, Jihane; Homedan, Chadi; Jacques, Caroline; Gueguen, Naig; Schmitt, Caroline; Puy, Hervé; Reynier, Pascal; Carmen Martinez, Maria; Malthièry, Yves

    2014-11-01

    Heme biosynthesis begins in the mitochondrion with the formation of delta-aminolevulinic acid (ALA). In acute intermittent porphyria, hereditary tyrosinemia type I and lead poisoning patients, ALA is accumulated in plasma and in organs, especially the liver. These diseases are also associated with neuromuscular dysfunction and increased incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma. Many studies suggest that this damage may originate from ALA-induced oxidative stress following its accumulation. Using the MnSOD as an oxidative stress marker, we showed here that ALA treatment of cultured cells induced ROS production, increasing with ALA concentration. The mitochondrial energetic function of ALA-treated HepG2 cells was further explored. Mitochondrial respiration and ATP content were reduced compared to control cells. For the 300 μM treatment, ALA induced a mitochondrial mass decrease and a mitochondrial network imbalance although neither necrosis nor apoptosis were observed. The up regulation of PGC-1, Tfam and ND5 genes was also found; these genes encode mitochondrial proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis activation and OXPHOS function. We propose that ALA may constitute an internal bioenergetic signal, which initiates a coordinated upregulation of respiratory genes, which ultimately drives mitochondrial metabolic adaptation within cells. The addition of an antioxidant, Manganese(III) tetrakis(1-methyl-4-pyridyl)porphyrin (MnTMPyP), resulted in improvement of maximal respiratory chain capacity with 300 μM ALA. Our results suggest that mitochondria, an ALA-production site, are more sensitive to pro-oxidant effect of ALA, and may be directly involved in pathophysiology of patients with inherited or acquired porphyria. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and Société française de biochimie et biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  9. Reduced calcium-dependent mitochondrial damage underlies the reduced vulnerability of excitotoxicity-tolerant hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivovarova, Natalia B; Stanika, Ruslan I; Watts, Charlotte A; Brantner, Christine A; Smith, Carolyn L; Andrews, S Brian

    2008-03-01

    In central neurons, over-stimulation of NMDA receptors leads to excessive mitochondrial calcium accumulation and damage, which is a critical step in excitotoxic death. This raises the possibility that low susceptibility to calcium overload-induced mitochondrial damage might characterize excitotoxicity-resistant neurons. In this study, we have exploited two complementary models of preconditioning-induced excitotoxicity resistance to demonstrate reduced calcium-dependent mitochondrial damage in NMDA-tolerant hippocampal neurons. We have further identified adaptations in mitochondrial calcium handling that account for enhanced mitochondrial integrity. In both models, enhanced tolerance was associated with improved preservation of mitochondrial membrane potential and structure. In the first model, which exhibited modest neuroprotection, mitochondria-dependent calcium deregulation was delayed, even though cytosolic and mitochondrial calcium loads were quantitatively unchanged, indicating that enhanced mitochondrial calcium capacity accounts for reduced injury. In contrast, the second model, which exhibited strong neuroprotection, displayed further delayed calcium deregulation and reduced mitochondrial damage because downregulation of NMDA receptor surface expression depressed calcium loading. Reducing calcium entry also modified the chemical composition of the calcium-buffering precipitates that form in calcium-loaded mitochondria. It thus appears that reduced mitochondrial calcium loading is a major factor underlying the robust neuroprotection seen in highly tolerant cells.

  10. Deficiencies in mitochondrial dynamics sensitize Caenorhabditis elegans to arsenite and other mitochondrial toxicants by reducing mitochondrial adaptability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Anthony L; Godebo, Tewodros R; Smith, Latasha L; Leuthner, Tess C; Maurer, Laura L; Meyer, Joel N

    2017-07-15

    Mitochondrial fission, fusion, and mitophagy are interlinked processes that regulate mitochondrial shape, number, and size, as well as metabolic activity and stress response. The fundamental importance of these processes is evident in the fact that mutations in fission (DRP1), fusion (MFN2, OPA1), and mitophagy (PINK1, PARK2) genes can cause human disease (collectively >1/10,000). Interestingly, however, the age of onset and severity of clinical manifestations varies greatly between patients with these diseases (even those harboring identical mutations), suggesting a role for environmental factors in the development and progression of certain mitochondrial diseases. Using the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans, we screened ten mitochondrial toxicants (2, 4-dinitrophenol, acetaldehyde, acrolein, aflatoxin B1, arsenite, cadmium, cisplatin, doxycycline, paraquat, rotenone) for increased or decreased toxicity in fusion (fzo-1, eat-3)-, fission (drp-1)-, and mitophagy (pdr-1, pink-1)-deficient nematodes using a larval growth assay. In general, fusion-deficient nematodes were the most sensitive to toxicants, including aflatoxin B1, arsenite, cisplatin, paraquat, and rotenone. Because arsenite was particularly potent in fission- and fusion-deficient nematodes, and hundreds of millions of people are chronically exposed to arsenic, we investigated the effects of these genetic deficiencies on arsenic toxicity in more depth. We found that deficiencies in fission and fusion sensitized nematodes to arsenite-induced lethality throughout aging. Furthermore, low-dose arsenite, which acted in a "mitohormetic" fashion by increasing mitochondrial function (in particular, basal and maximal oxygen consumption) in wild-type nematodes by a wide range of measures, exacerbated mitochondrial dysfunction in fusion-deficient nematodes. Analysis of multiple mechanistic changes suggested that disruption of pyruvate metabolism and Krebs cycle activity underlie the observed arsenite

  11. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis linked to a novel SOD1 mutation with muscle mitochondrial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corti, Stefania; Donadoni, Chiara; Ronchi, Dario; Bordoni, Andreina; Fortunato, Francesco; Santoro, Domenico; Del Bo, Roberto; Lucchini, Valeria; Crugnola, Veronica; Papadimitriou, Dimitra; Salani, Sabrina; Moggio, Maurizio; Bresolin, Nereo; Comi, Giacomo P

    2009-01-15

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative motor neuron disorder. Mutations in Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) cause approximately 20% of familial ALS. One of the possible mechanisms whereby they induce disease is mitochondrial dysfunction in motor neurons. Here we describe a patient with ALS and muscle mitochondrial oxidative defect associated with a novel SOD1 mutation. Direct sequencing of SOD1 gene revealed a heterozygous mutation in codon 22 substituting a highly conserved amino acid, from glutamine to arginine (Q22R). Muscle biopsy showed a neurogenic pattern associated with cytochrome c oxidase (COX) deficiency in several muscle fibers. Western blot analysis demonstrated a reduction in SOD1 content in the cytoplasmic and mitochondrial fractions. These results suggest that a minute quantity of mutant SOD1 protein contributes to a mitochondrial toxicity also in muscle tissue.

  12. Neuroprotective Effect of Lycopene Against PTZ-induced Kindling Seizures in Mice: Possible Behavioural, Biochemical and Mitochondrial Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Manveen; Kumar, Anil

    2016-02-01

    Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are the major contributing factors in the pathophysiology of various neurological disorders. Recently, antioxidant therapies aimed at reducing oxidative stress gained a considerable attention in epilepsy treatment. Lycopene, a carotenoid antioxidant, has received scientific interest in recent years. So, the present study has been designed to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of lycopene against the pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced kindling epilepsy. Laca mice received lycopene (2.5, 5 and 10 mg/kg) and sodium valproate for a period of 29 days and PTZ (40 mg/kg i.p (Intraperitoneal)) injection on alternative days. Various behavioural (kindling score), biochemical parameters (lipid peroxidation, superoxide dismutase, reduced glutathione, catalase and nitrite) and mitochondrial enzyme complex activities (I, II and IV) were assessed in the brain. Results depicted that repeated administration of a sub-convulsive dose of PTZ (40 mg/kg) significantly increased kindling score, oxidative damage and impaired mitochondrial enzyme complex activities (I, II and IV) as compared with naive animals. Lycopene (5 and 10 mg/kg) and sodium valproate (100 mg/kg) treatment for a duration of 29 days significantly attenuated kindling score, reversed oxidative damage and restored mitochondrial enzyme complex activities (I, II and IV) as compared with control. Thus, present study demonstrates the neuroprotective potential of lycopene in PTZ-induced kindling in mice.

  13. C-phycocyanin prevents cisplatin-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Rojas, Berenice; Rodríguez-Rangel, Daniela Sarai; Granados-Castro, Luis Fernando; Negrette-Guzmán, Mario; León-Contreras, Juan Carlos; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Molina-Jijón, Eduardo; Reyes, José L; Zazueta, Cecilia; Pedraza-Chaverri, José

    2015-08-01

    The potential of C-phycocyanin (C-PC) to prevent cisplatin (CP)-induced kidney mitochondrial dysfunction was determined in CD-1 male mice. The CP-induced mitochondrial dysfunction was characterized by ultrastructural abnormalities and by decrease in the following parameters in isolated kidney mitochondria: adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced oxygen consumption (state 3), respiratory control ratio, ADP/oxygen (ADP/O) ratio, adenosine triphosphate synthesis, membrane potential, calcium retention, glutathione (GSH) content, and activity of respiratory complex I, aconitase, catalase, and GSH peroxidase. These mitochondria also showed increase in hydrogen peroxide production, malondialdehyde, and 3-nitrotyrosine protein adducts content. The above-described changes, as well as CP-induced nephrotoxicity, were attenuated in mice pretreated with a single injection of C-PC. Our data suggest that the attenuation of mitochondrial abnormalities is involved in the protective effect of C-PC against CP-induced nephrotoxicity. This is the first demonstration that C-PC pretreatment prevents CP-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in mice.

  14. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 in the development of diabetic retinopathy and mitochondrial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Ghulam; Kowluru, Renu A

    2010-09-01

    In the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy, retinal mitochondria become dysfunctional resulting in accelerated apoptosis of its capillary cells. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2) is considered critical in cell integrity and cell survival, and diabetes activates MMP2 in the retina and its capillary cells. This study aims at elucidating the mechanism by which MMP2 contributes to the development of diabetic retinopathy. Using isolated bovine retinal endothelial cells, the effect of regulation of MMP2 (by its siRNA and pharmacological inhibitor) on superoxide accumulation and mitochondrial dysfunction was evaluated. The effect of inhibiting diabetes-induced retinal superoxide accumulation on MMP2 and its regulators was investigated in diabetic mice overexpressing mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (MnSOD). Inhibition of MMP2 ameliorated glucose-induced increase in mitochondrial superoxide and membrane permeability, prevented cytochrome c leakage from the mitochondria, and inhibited capillary cell apoptosis. Overexpression of MnSOD protected the retina from diabetes-induced increase in MMP2 and its membrane activator (MT1-MMP), and decrease in its tissue inhibitor (TIMP-2). These results implicate that, in diabetes, MMP2 activates apoptosis of retinal capillary cells by mitochondrial dysfunction increasing their membrane permeability. Understanding the role of MMP2 in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy should help lay ground for MMP2-targeted therapy to retard the development of retinopathy in diabetic patients.

  15. Honokiol induces reactive oxygen species-mediated apoptosis in Candida albicans through mitochondrial dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lingmei; Liao, Kai; Hang, Chengcheng; Wang, Dayong

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of honokiol on induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS), antioxidant defense systems, mitochondrial dysfunction, and apoptosis in Candida albicans. Methods To measure ROS accumulation, 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein diacetate fluorescence was used. Lipid peroxidation was assessed using both fluorescence staining and a thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) assay. Protein oxidation was determined using dinitrophenylhydrazine derivatization. Antioxidant enzymatic activities were measured using commercially available detection kits. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) genes expression was measured using real time RT-PCR. To assess its antifungal abilities and effectiveness on ROS accumulation, honokiol and the SOD inhibitor N,N′-diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) were used simultaneously. Mitochondrial dysfunction was assessed by measuring the mitochondrial membrane potential (mtΔψ). Honokiol-induced apoptosis was assessed using an Annexin V-FITC apoptosis detection kit. Results ROS, lipid peroxidation, and protein oxidation occurred in a dose-dependent manner in C. albicans after honokiol treatment. Honokiol caused an increase in antioxidant enzymatic activity. In addition, honokiol treatment induced SOD genes expression in C. albicans cells. Moreover, addition of DDC resulted in increased endogenous ROS levels and potentiated the antifungal activity of honokiol. Mitochondrial dysfunction was confirmed by measured changes to mtΔψ. The level of apoptosis increased in a dose-dependent manner after honokiol treatment. Conclusions Collectively, these results indicate that honokiol acts as a pro-oxidant in C. albicans. Furthermore, the SOD inhibitor DDC can be used to potentiate the activity of honokiol against C. albicans. PMID:28192489

  16. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Cancer and Neurodegenerative Diseases: Spotlight on Fatty Acid Oxidation and Lipoperoxidation Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Barrera

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In several human diseases, such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases, the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS, produced mainly by mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, is increased. In cancer cells, the increase of ROS production has been associated with mtDNA mutations that, in turn, seem to be functional in the alterations of the bioenergetics and the biosynthetic state of cancer cells. Moreover, ROS overproduction can enhance the peroxidation of fatty acids in mitochondrial membranes. In particular, the peroxidation of mitochondrial phospholipid cardiolipin leads to the formation of reactive aldehydes, such as 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE and malondialdehyde (MDA, which are able to react with proteins and DNA. Covalent modifications of mitochondrial proteins by the products of lipid peroxidation (LPO in the course of oxidative cell stress are involved in the mitochondrial dysfunctions observed in cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. Such modifications appear to affect negatively mitochondrial integrity and function, in particular energy metabolism, adenosine triphosphate (ATP production, antioxidant defenses and stress responses. In neurodegenerative diseases, indirect confirmation for the pathogenetic relevance of LPO-dependent modifications of mitochondrial proteins comes from the disease phenotypes associated with their genetic alterations.

  17. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Cancer and Neurodegenerative Diseases: Spotlight on Fatty Acid Oxidation and Lipoperoxidation Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, Giuseppina; Gentile, Fabrizio; Pizzimenti, Stefania; Canuto, Rosa Angela; Daga, Martina; Arcaro, Alessia; Cetrangolo, Giovanni Paolo; Lepore, Alessio; Ferretti, Carlo; Dianzani, Chiara; Muzio, Giuliana

    2016-01-01

    In several human diseases, such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases, the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), produced mainly by mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, is increased. In cancer cells, the increase of ROS production has been associated with mtDNA mutations that, in turn, seem to be functional in the alterations of the bioenergetics and the biosynthetic state of cancer cells. Moreover, ROS overproduction can enhance the peroxidation of fatty acids in mitochondrial membranes. In particular, the peroxidation of mitochondrial phospholipid cardiolipin leads to the formation of reactive aldehydes, such as 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) and malondialdehyde (MDA), which are able to react with proteins and DNA. Covalent modifications of mitochondrial proteins by the products of lipid peroxidation (LPO) in the course of oxidative cell stress are involved in the mitochondrial dysfunctions observed in cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. Such modifications appear to affect negatively mitochondrial integrity and function, in particular energy metabolism, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production, antioxidant defenses and stress responses. In neurodegenerative diseases, indirect confirmation for the pathogenetic relevance of LPO-dependent modifications of mitochondrial proteins comes from the disease phenotypes associated with their genetic alterations. PMID:26907355

  18. Amphetamines promote mitochondrial dysfunction and DNA damage in pulmonary hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pin-I; Cao, Aiqin; Miyagawa, Kazuya; Tojais, Nancy F.; Hennigs, Jan K.; Li, Caiyun G.; Sweeney, Nathaly M.; Inglis, Audrey S.; Wang, Lingli; Li, Dan; Ye, Matthew; Feldman, Brian J.

    2017-01-01

    Amphetamine (AMPH) or methamphetamine (METH) abuse can cause oxidative damage and is a risk factor for diseases including pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAECs) from AMPH-associated-PAH patients show DNA damage as judged by γH2AX foci and DNA comet tails. We therefore hypothesized that AMPH induces DNA damage and vascular pathology by interfering with normal adaptation to an environmental perturbation causing oxidative stress. Consistent with this, we found that AMPH alone does not cause DNA damage in normoxic PAECs, but greatly amplifies DNA damage in hypoxic PAECs. The mechanism involves AMPH activation of protein phosphatase 2A, which potentiates inhibition of Akt. This increases sirtuin 1, causing deacetylation and degradation of HIF1α, thereby impairing its transcriptional activity, resulting in a reduction in pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 and impaired cytochrome c oxidase 4 isoform switch. Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation is inappropriately enhanced and, as a result of impaired electron transport and mitochondrial ROS increase, caspase-3 is activated and DNA damage is induced. In mice given binge doses of METH followed by hypoxia, HIF1α is suppressed and pulmonary artery DNA damage foci are associated with worse pulmonary vascular remodeling. Thus, chronic AMPH/METH can induce DNA damage associated with vascular disease by subverting the adaptive responses to oxidative stress. PMID:28138562

  19. Mitochondrial dysfunction and sarcopenia of aging: from signaling pathways to clinical trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzetti, Emanuele; Calvani, Riccardo; Cesari, Matteo; Buford, Thomas W.; Lorenzi, Maria; Behnke, Bradley J.; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan

    2013-01-01

    Sarcopenia, the age-related loss of muscle mass and function, imposes a dramatic burden on individuals and society. The development of preventive and therapeutic strategies against sarcopenia is therefore perceived as an urgent need by health professionals and has instigated intensive research on the pathophysiology of this syndrome. The pathogenesis of sarcopenia is multifaceted and encompasses lifestyle habits, systemic factors (e.g., chronic inflammation and hormonal alterations), local environment perturbations (e.g., vascular dysfunction), and intramuscular specific processes. In this scenario, derangements in skeletal myocyte mitochondrial function are recognized as major factors contributing to the age-dependent muscle degeneration. In this review, we summarize prominent findings and controversial issues on the contribution of specific mitochondrial processes – including oxidative stress, quality control mechanisms and apoptotic signaling – on the development of sarcopenia. Extramuscular alterations accompanying the aging process with a potential impact on myocyte mitochondrial function are also discussed. We conclude with presenting methodological and safety considerations for the design of clinical trials targeting mitochondrial dysfunction to treat sarcopenia. Special emphasis is placed on the importance of monitoring the effects of an intervention on muscle mitochondrial function and identifying the optimal target population for the trial. PMID:23845738

  20. Nat1 Deficiency Is Associated with Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Exercise Intolerance in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indumathi Chennamsetty

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We recently identified human N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2 as an insulin resistance (IR gene. Here, we examine the cellular mechanism linking NAT2 to IR and find that Nat1 (mouse ortholog of NAT2 is co-regulated with key mitochondrial genes. RNAi-mediated silencing of Nat1 led to mitochondrial dysfunction characterized by increased intracellular reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial fragmentation as well as decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, biogenesis, mass, cellular respiration, and ATP generation. These effects were consistent in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, C2C12 myoblasts, and in tissues from Nat1-deficient mice, including white adipose tissue, heart, and skeletal muscle. Nat1-deficient mice had changes in plasma metabolites and lipids consistent with a decreased ability to utilize fats for energy and a decrease in basal metabolic rate and exercise capacity without altered thermogenesis. Collectively, our results suggest that Nat1 deficiency results in mitochondrial dysfunction, which may constitute a mechanistic link between this gene and IR.

  1. Ketamine Causes Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hiroyuki; Uchida, Tokujiro; Makita, Koshi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Ketamine toxicity has been demonstrated in nonhuman mammalian neurons. To study the toxic effect of ketamine on human neurons, an experimental model of cultured neurons from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) was examined, and the mechanism of its toxicity was investigated. Methods Human iPSC-derived dopaminergic neurons were treated with 0, 20, 100 or 500 μM ketamine for 6 and 24 h. Ketamine toxicity was evaluated by quantification of caspase 3/7 activity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, mitochondrial membrane potential, ATP concentration, neurotransmitter reuptake activity and NADH/NAD+ ratio. Mitochondrial morphological change was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy and confocal microscopy. Results Twenty-four-hour exposure of iPSC-derived neurons to 500 μM ketamine resulted in a 40% increase in caspase 3/7 activity (P ketamine (100 μM) decreased the ATP level (22%, P ketamine concentration, which suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction preceded ROS generation and caspase activation. Conclusions We established an in vitro model for assessing the neurotoxicity of ketamine in iPSC-derived neurons. The present data indicate that the initial mitochondrial dysfunction and autophagy may be related to its inhibitory effect on the mitochondrial electron transport system, which underlies ketamine-induced neural toxicity. Higher ketamine concentration can induce ROS generation and apoptosis in human neurons. PMID:26020236

  2. Mitochondrial dysfunction and sarcopenia of aging: from signaling pathways to clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzetti, Emanuele; Calvani, Riccardo; Cesari, Matteo; Buford, Thomas W; Lorenzi, Maria; Behnke, Bradley J; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan

    2013-10-01

    Sarcopenia, the age-related loss of muscle mass and function, imposes a dramatic burden on individuals and society. The development of preventive and therapeutic strategies against sarcopenia is therefore perceived as an urgent need by health professionals and has instigated intensive research on the pathophysiology of this syndrome. The pathogenesis of sarcopenia is multifaceted and encompasses lifestyle habits, systemic factors (e.g., chronic inflammation and hormonal alterations), local environment perturbations (e.g., vascular dysfunction), and intramuscular specific processes. In this scenario, derangements in skeletal myocyte mitochondrial function are recognized as major factors contributing to the age-dependent muscle degeneration. In this review, we summarize prominent findings and controversial issues on the contribution of specific mitochondrial processes - including oxidative stress, quality control mechanisms and apoptotic signaling - on the development of sarcopenia. Extramuscular alterations accompanying the aging process with a potential impact on myocyte mitochondrial function are also discussed. We conclude with presenting methodological and safety considerations for the design of clinical trials targeting mitochondrial dysfunction to treat sarcopenia. Special emphasis is placed on the importance of monitoring the effects of an intervention on muscle mitochondrial function and identifying the optimal target population for the trial. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Molecular basis of muscle wasting. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Galactose enhances oxidative metabolism and reveals mitochondrial dysfunction in human primary muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline Aguer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human primary myotubes are highly glycolytic when cultured in high glucose medium rendering it difficult to study mitochondrial dysfunction. Galactose is known to enhance mitochondrial metabolism and could be an excellent model to study mitochondrial dysfunction in human primary myotubes. The aim of the present study was to 1 characterize the effect of differentiating healthy human myoblasts in galactose on oxidative metabolism and 2 determine whether galactose can pinpoint a mitochondrial malfunction in post-diabetic myotubes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Oxygen consumption rate (OCR, lactate levels, mitochondrial content, citrate synthase and cytochrome C oxidase activities, and AMPK phosphorylation were determined in healthy myotubes differentiated in different sources/concentrations of carbohydrates: 25 mM glucose (high glucose (HG, 5 mM glucose (low glucose (LG or 10 mM galactose (GAL. Effect of carbohydrates on OCR was also determined in myotubes derived from post-diabetic patients and matched obese non-diabetic subjects. OCR was significantly increased whereas anaerobic glycolysis was significantly decreased in GAL myotubes compared to LG or HG myotubes. This increased OCR in GAL myotubes occurred in conjunction with increased cytochrome C oxidase activity and expression, as well as increased AMPK phosphorylation. OCR of post-diabetic myotubes was not different than that of obese non-diabetic myotubes when differentiated in LG or HG. However, whereas GAL increased OCR in obese non-diabetic myotubes, it did not affect OCR in post-diabetic myotubes, leading to a significant difference in OCR between groups. The lack of an increase in OCR in post-diabetic myotubes differentiated in GAL was in relation with unaltered cytochrome C oxidase activity levels or AMPK phosphorylation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that differentiating human primary myoblasts in GAL enhances aerobic metabolism. Because this cell

  4. Prohibitin reduces mitochondrial free radical production and protects brain cells from different injury modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ping; Qian, Liping; D’Aurelio, Marilena; Cho, Sunghee; Wang, Gang; Manfredi, Giovanni; Pickel, Virginia; Iadecola, Costantino

    2012-01-01

    Prohibitin is an essential mitochondrial protein that has been implicated in a wide variety of functions in many cell types, but its role in neurons remains unclear. In a proteomic screen of rat brains in which ischemic tolerance was induced by electrical stimulation of the cerebellar fastigial nucleus, we found that prohibitin is upregulated in mitochondria. This observation prompted us to investigate the role of prohibitin in neuronal death and survival. We found that prohibitin is upregulated also in the ischemic tolerance induced by transient ischemia in vivo, or oxygen-glucose deprivation in neuronal cultures. Cell fractionation and electron microscopic immunolabeling studies demonstrated that prohibitin is localized to neuronal mitochondria. Upregulation of prohibitin in neuronal cultures or hippocampal slices was markedly neuroprotective, whereas prohibitin gene-silencing increased neuronal vulnerability, an effect associated with loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and increased mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species. Prohibitin upregulation was associated with reduced production of reactive oxygen species in mitochondria exposed to the complex I inhibitor rotenone. In addition, prohibitin protected complex I activity from the inhibitory effects of rotenone. These observations, collectively, establish prohibitin as an endogenous neuroprotective protein involved in ischemic tolerance. Prohibitin exerts beneficial effects on neurons by reducing mitochondrial free radical production. The data with complex I activity suggest that prohibitin may stabilize the function of complex I. The protective effect of prohibitin has potential translational relevance in diseases of the nervous system associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. PMID:22238093

  5. Humanin rescues cultured rat cortical neurons from NMDA-induced toxicity through the alleviation of mitochondrial dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui A

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Ai-Ling Cui,1 Ying-Hua Zhang,2 Jian-Zhong Li,3 Tianbin Song,4 Xue-Min Liu,1 Hui Wang,2 Ce Zhang,5 Guo-Lin Ma,6 Hui Zhang,7 Kefeng Li8 1Anatomy Department, Changzhi Medical College, Changzhi, Shanxi, 2Key Laboratory of Tissue Regeneration of Henan Province, Xinxiang Medical University, Xinxiang, Henan, 3Clinical Laboratory of Heji Hospital Affiliated to Changzhi Medical College, Changzhi, Shanxi, 4Department of Nuclear Medicine, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, 5Department of Physiology, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan, Shanxi, 6Department of Radiology, China-Japan Friendship Hospital, Beijing, 7Department of Radiology, First Clinical Medical College, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan, Shanxi, People’s Republic of China; 8School of Medicine, University of California – San Diego, San Diego, CA, USA Abstract: N-methyl-D-aspartate (NDMA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity has been implicated in a variety of pathological situations such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD and Parkinson’s disease. However, no effective treatments for the same have been developed so far. Humanin (HN is a 24-amino acid peptide originally cloned from the brain of patients with AD and it prevents stress-induced cell death in many cells/tissues. In our previous study, HN was found to effectively rescue rat cortical neurons. It is still not clear whether HN protects the neurons through the attenuation of mitochondrial dysfunction. In this study, excitatory toxicity was induced by NMDA, which binds the NMDA receptor in primarily cultured rat cortical neurons. We found that NMDA (100 µmol/L dramatically induced the decrease of cell viability and caused mitochondrial dysfunction. Pretreatment of the neurons with HN (1 µmol/L led to significant increases of mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase (SDH activity and membrane potential. In addition, HN pretreatment significantly reduced the excessive production of both reactive oxygen species (ROS and nitric

  6. Hyperthyroidism causes cardiac dysfunction by mitochondrial impairment and energy depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Sangeeta; Kar, Dipak; De, Kakali; Chander, Vivek; Bandyopadhyay, Arun

    2013-05-01

    This study elucidates the role of metabolic remodeling in cardiac dysfunction induced by hyperthyroidism. Cardiac hypertrophy, structural remodeling, and expression of the genes associated with fatty acid metabolism were examined in rats treated with triiodothyronine (T3) alone (8 μg/100 g body weight (BW), i.p.) for 15 days or along with a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha agonist bezafibrate (Bzf; 30 μg/100 g BW, oral) and were found to improve in the Bzf co-treated condition. Ultrastructure of mitochondria was damaged in T3-treated rat heart, which was prevented by Bzf co-administration. Hyperthyroidism-induced oxidative stress, reduction in cytochrome c oxidase activity, and myocardial ATP concentration were also significantly checked by Bzf. Heart function studied at different time points during the course of T3 treatment shows an initial improvement and then a gradual but progressive decline with time, which is prevented by Bzf co-treatment. In summary, the results demonstrate that hyperthyroidism inflicts structural and functional damage to mitochondria, leading to energy depletion and cardiac dysfunction.

  7. Troglitazone, but not rosiglitazone, damages mitochondrial DNA and induces mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death in human hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachek, Lyudmila I; Yuzefovych, Larysa V; Ledoux, Susan P; Julie, Neil L; Wilson, Glenn L

    2009-11-01

    Thiazolidinediones (TZDs), such as troglitazone (TRO) and rosiglitazone (ROSI), improve insulin resistance by acting as ligands for the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARgamma). TRO was withdrawn from the market because of reports of serious hepatotoxicity. A growing body of evidence suggests that TRO caused mitochondrial dysfunction and induction of apoptosis in human hepatocytes but its mechanisms of action remain unclear. We hypothesized that damage to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is an initiating event involved in TRO-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and hepatotoxicity. Primary human hepatocytes were exposed to TRO and ROSI. The results obtained revealed that TRO, but not ROSI at equimolar concentrations, caused a substantial increase in mtDNA damage and decreased ATP production and cellular viability. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger, N-acetyl cystein (NAC), significantly diminished the TRO-induced cytotoxicity, suggesting involvement of ROS in TRO-induced hepatocyte cytotoxicity. The PPARgamma antagonist (GW9662) did not block the TRO-induced decrease in cell viability, indicating that the TRO-induced hepatotoxicity is PPARgamma-independent. Furthermore, TRO induced hepatocyte apoptosis, caspase-3 cleavage and cytochrome c release. Targeting of a DNA repair protein to mitochondria by protein transduction using a fusion protein containing the DNA repair enzyme Endonuclease III (EndoIII) from Escherichia coli, a mitochondrial translocation sequence (MTS) and the protein transduction domain (PTD) from HIV-1 TAT protein protected hepatocytes against TRO-induced toxicity. Overall, our results indicate that significant mtDNA damage caused by TRO is a prime initiator of the hepatoxicity caused by this drug.

  8. Wheat germ supplementation alleviates insulin resistance and cardiac mitochondrial dysfunction in an animal model of diet-induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojo, Babajide; Simenson, Ashley J; O'Hara, Crystal; Wu, Lei; Gou, Xin; Peterson, Sandra K; Lin, Daniel; Smith, Brenda J; Lucas, Edralin A

    2017-08-01

    Obesity is strongly associated with insulin resistance (IR), along with mitochondrial dysfunction to metabolically active tissues and increased production of reactive O2 species (ROS). Foods rich in antioxidants such as wheat germ (WG), protect tissues from damage due to ROS and modulate some negative effects of obesity. This study examined the effects of WG supplementation on markers of IR, mitochondrial substrate metabolism and innate antioxidant markers in two metabolically active tissues (i.e. liver and heart) of C57BL/6 mice fed a high-fat-high-sucrose (HFS) diet. Male C57BL/6 mice, 6-week-old, were randomised into four dietary treatment groups (n 12 mice/group): control (C, 10 % fat kcal), C+10 % WG, HFS (60 % fat kcal) or HFS+10 % WG (HFS+WG). After 12 weeks of treatment, HFS+WG mice had significantly less visceral fat (-16 %, P=0·006) compared with the HFS group. WG significantly reduced serum insulin (P=0·009), the insulinotropic hormone, gastric inhibitory peptide (P=0·0003), and the surrogate measure of IR, homoeostatic model assessment of IR (P=0·006). HFS diet significantly elevated (45 %, P=0·02) cardiac complex 2 mitochondrial VO2, suggesting increased metabolic stress, whereas WG stabilised this effect to the level of control. Consequently, genes which mediate antioxidant defense and mitochondrial biogenesis (superoxide dismutase 2 (Sod2) and PPARγ coactivator 1-α (Pgc1a), respectively) were significantly reduced (P<0·05) in the heart of the HFS group, whereas WG supplementation tended to up-regulate both genes. WG significantly increased hepatic gene expression of Sod2 (P=0·048) but not Pgc1a. Together, these results showed that WG supplementation in HFS diet, reduced IR and improved cardiac mitochondrial metabolic functions.

  9. Implications of altered glutathione metabolism in aspirin-induced oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in HepG2 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haider Raza

    Full Text Available We have previously reported that acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin, ASA induces cell cycle arrest, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in HepG2 cells. In the present study, we have further elucidated that altered glutathione (GSH-redox metabolism in HepG2 cells play a critical role in ASA-induced cytotoxicity. Using selected doses and time point for ASA toxicity, we have demonstrated that when GSH synthesis is inhibited in HepG2 cells by buthionine sulfoximine (BSO, prior to ASA treatment, cytotoxicity of the drug is augmented. On the other hand, when GSH-depleted cells were treated with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC, cytotoxicity/apoptosis caused by ASA was attenuated with a significant recovery in oxidative stress, GSH homeostasis, DNA fragmentation and some of the mitochondrial functions. NAC treatment, however, had no significant effects on the drug-induced inhibition of mitochondrial aconitase activity and ATP synthesis in GSH-depleted cells. Our results have confirmed that aspirin increases apoptosis by increased reactive oxygen species production, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory functions. These effects were further amplified when GSH-depleted cells were treated with ASA. We have also shown that some of the effects of aspirin might be associated with reduced GSH homeostasis, as treatment of cells with NAC attenuated the effects of BSO and aspirin. Our results strongly suggest that GSH dependent redox homeostasis in HepG2 cells is critical in preserving mitochondrial functions and preventing oxidative stress associated complications caused by aspirin treatment.

  10. Mitochondrial dysfunction is involved in the toxic activity of boric acid against Saprolegnia.

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    Shimaa E Ali

    Full Text Available There has been a significant increase in the incidence of Saprolegnia infections over the past decades, especially after the banning of malachite green. Very often these infections are associated with high economic losses in salmonid farms and hatcheries. The use of boric acid to control the disease has been investigated recently both under in vitro and in vivo conditions, however its possible mode of action against fish pathogenic Saprolegnia is not known. In this study, we have explored the transformation in Saprolegnia spores/hyphae after exposure to boric acid (1 g/L over a period 4-24 h post treatment. Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM, early changes in Saprolegnia spores were detected. Mitochondrial degeneration was the most obvious sign observed following 4 h treatment in about 20% of randomly selected spores. We also investigated the effect of the treatment on nuclear division, mitochondrial activity and function using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM. Fluorescence microscopy was also used to test the effect of treatment on mitochondrial membrane potential and formation of reactive oxygen species. Additionally, the viability and proliferation of treated spores that correlated to mitochondrial enzymatic activity were tested using an MTS assay. All obtained data pointed towards changes in the mitochondrial structure, membrane potential and enzymatic activity following treatment. We have found that boric acid has no effect on the integrity of membranes of Saprolegnia spores at concentrations tested. It is therefore likely that mitochondrial dysfunction is involved in the toxic activity of boric acid against Saprolegnia spp.

  11. Mitochondrial dysfunction is involved in the toxic activity of boric acid against Saprolegnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Shimaa E; Thoen, Even; Evensen, Øystein; Wiik-Nielsen, Jannicke; Gamil, Amr A A; Skaar, Ida

    2014-01-01

    There has been a significant increase in the incidence of Saprolegnia infections over the past decades, especially after the banning of malachite green. Very often these infections are associated with high economic losses in salmonid farms and hatcheries. The use of boric acid to control the disease has been investigated recently both under in vitro and in vivo conditions, however its possible mode of action against fish pathogenic Saprolegnia is not known. In this study, we have explored the transformation in Saprolegnia spores/hyphae after exposure to boric acid (1 g/L) over a period 4-24 h post treatment. Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), early changes in Saprolegnia spores were detected. Mitochondrial degeneration was the most obvious sign observed following 4 h treatment in about 20% of randomly selected spores. We also investigated the effect of the treatment on nuclear division, mitochondrial activity and function using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Fluorescence microscopy was also used to test the effect of treatment on mitochondrial membrane potential and formation of reactive oxygen species. Additionally, the viability and proliferation of treated spores that correlated to mitochondrial enzymatic activity were tested using an MTS assay. All obtained data pointed towards changes in the mitochondrial structure, membrane potential and enzymatic activity following treatment. We have found that boric acid has no effect on the integrity of membranes of Saprolegnia spores at concentrations tested. It is therefore likely that mitochondrial dysfunction is involved in the toxic activity of boric acid against Saprolegnia spp.

  12. Proteasomal Dysfunction Induced By Diclofenac Engenders Apoptosis Through Mitochondrial Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amanullah, Ayeman; Upadhyay, Arun; Chhangani, Deepak; Joshi, Vibhuti; Mishra, Ribhav; Yamanaka, Koji; Mishra, Amit

    2017-05-01

    Diclofenac is the most commonly used phenylacetic acid derivative non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that demonstrates significant analgesic, antipyretic, and anti-inflammatory effects. Several epidemiological studies have demonstrated anti-proliferative activity of NSAIDs and examined their apoptotic induction effects in different cancer cell lines. However, the precise molecular mechanisms by which these pharmacological agents induce apoptosis and exert anti-carcinogenic properties are not well known. Here, we have observed that diclofenac treatment induces proteasome malfunction and promotes accumulation of different critical proteasome substrates, including few pro-apoptotic proteins in cells. Exposure of diclofenac consequently elevates aggregation of various ubiquitylated misfolded proteins. Finally, we have shown that diclofenac treatment promotes apoptosis in cells, which could be because of mitochondrial membrane depolarization and cytochrome c release into cytosol. This study suggests possible beneficial insights of NSAIDs-induced apoptosis that may improve our existing knowledge in anti-proliferative interspecific strategies development. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 1014-1027, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Thymol, a dietary monoterpene phenol abrogates mitochondrial dysfunction in β-adrenergic agonist induced myocardial infarcted rats by inhibiting oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagoor Meeran, M F; Jagadeesh, G S; Selvaraj, P

    2016-01-25

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been suggested to be one of the important pathological events in isoproterenol (ISO), a synthetic catecholamine and β-adrenergic agonist induced myocardial infarction (MI). In this context, we have evaluated the impact of thymol against ISO induced oxidative stress and calcium uniporter malfunction involved in the pathology of mitochondrial dysfunction in rats. Male albino Wistar rats were pre and co-treated with thymol (7.5 mg/kg body weight) daily for 7 days. Isoproterenol (100 mg/kg body weight) was subcutaneously injected into rats on 6th and 7th day to induce MI. To explore the extent of cardiac mitochondrial damage, the activities/levels of cardiac marker enzymes, mitochondrial lipid peroxidation products, antioxidants, lipids, calcium, adenosine triphosphate and multi marker enzymes were evaluated. Isoproterenol induced myocardial infarcted rats showed a significant increase in the activities of cardiac diagnostic markers, heart mitochondrial lipid peroxidation, lipids, calcium, and a significant decrease in the activities/levels of heart mitochondrial superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, reduced glutathione, isocitrate, malate, α-ketoglutarate and NADH-dehydrogenases, cytochrome-C-oxidase, and adenosine triphosphate. Thymol pre and co-treatment showed near normalized effects on all the biochemical parameters studied. Transmission electron microscopic findings and mitochondrial swelling studies confirmed our biochemical findings. The in vitro study also revealed the potent free-radical scavenging activity of thymol. Thus, thymol attenuates the involvement of ISO against oxidative stress and calcium uniporter malfunction associated with mitochondrial dysfunction in rats.

  14. Early detection of myocardial dysfunction in children with mitochondrial disease: An ultrasound and two-dimensional strain echocardiography study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcus, K.A.; Barends, M.; Morava, E.; Feuth, T.; Korte, C.L. de; Kapusta, L.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Myocardial dysfunction in children diagnosed with mitochondrial disease is an ominous sign and has been associated with substantial increased mortality rates. Early detection of cardiac involvement would therefore be desirable. Two dimensional strain echocardiography (2DSTE) has proven t

  15. Successful use of albuterol in a patient with central core disease and mitochondrial dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Albuterol, a selective beta-adrenergic agonist, has been used experimentally in combination with exercise therapy in a few inherited neuromuscular disorders to increase muscle strength and muscle volume . We report on a 9-year-old boy with central core disease and mitochondrial dysfunction due to compound heterozygous RYR1 mutations receiving albuterol treatment for 1 year. Throughout the period of albuterol administration, the patient underwent an aerobic exercise regime of training sessions...

  16. Mitochondrial dysfunction in calf muscles of patients with combined peripheral arterial disease and diabetes type 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard Pedersen, Brian; Bækgaard, Niels; Quistorff, Bjørn

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study elucidate the effects on muscle mitochondrial function in patients suffering from combined peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) and the relation to patient symptoms and treatment. METHODS: Near Infra Red Spectroscopy (NIRS) calf muscle exercise tests...... tested applying high resolution oxygraphy on isolated muscle fibers. RESULTS: The NIRS exercise tests showed evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction in the PAD+T2D group by a longer recovery of the deoxygenation resulting from exercise in spite of a higher exercise oxygenation level compared to the PAD...... were conducted on Forty subjects, 15 (PAD), 15 (PAD+T2D) and 10 healthy age matched controls (CTRL) recruited from the vascular outpatient clinic at Gentofte County Hospital, Denmark. Calf muscle biopsies (~ 80 mg) (Gastrocnemius and Anterior tibial muscles) were sampled and mitochondrial function...

  17. Maternal Metabolic Syndrome Programs Mitochondrial Dysfunction via Germline Changes across Three Generations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saben, Jessica L; Boudoures, Anna L; Asghar, Zeenat; Thompson, Alysha; Drury, Andrea; Zhang, Wendy; Chi, Maggie; Cusumano, Andrew; Scheaffer, Suzanne; Moley, Kelle H

    2016-06-28

    Maternal obesity impairs offspring health, but the responsible mechanisms are not fully established. To address this question, we fed female mice a high-fat/high-sugar diet from before conception until weaning and then followed the outcomes in the next three generations of offspring, all fed a control diet. We observed that female offspring born to obese mothers had impaired peripheral insulin signaling that was associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and altered mitochondrial dynamic and complex proteins in skeletal muscle. This mitochondrial phenotype persisted through the female germline and was passed down to the second and third generations. Our results indicate that maternal programming of metabolic disease can be passed through the female germline and that the transfer of aberrant oocyte mitochondria to subsequent generations may contribute to the increased risk for developing insulin resistance.

  18. Maternal Metabolic Syndrome Programs Mitochondrial Dysfunction via Germline Changes across Three Generations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica L. Saben

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Maternal obesity impairs offspring health, but the responsible mechanisms are not fully established. To address this question, we fed female mice a high-fat/high-sugar diet from before conception until weaning and then followed the outcomes in the next three generations of offspring, all fed a control diet. We observed that female offspring born to obese mothers had impaired peripheral insulin signaling that was associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and altered mitochondrial dynamic and complex proteins in skeletal muscle. This mitochondrial phenotype persisted through the female germline and was passed down to the second and third generations. Our results indicate that maternal programming of metabolic disease can be passed through the female germline and that the transfer of aberrant oocyte mitochondria to subsequent generations may contribute to the increased risk for developing insulin resistance.

  19. Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Oxidative Stress in Asthma: Implications for Mitochondria-Targeted Antioxidant Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Hemachandra Reddy

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is a complex, inflammatory disorder characterized by airflow obstruction of variable degrees, bronchial hyper-responsiveness, and airway inflammation. Asthma is caused by environmental factors and a combination of genetic and environmental stimuli. Genetic studies have revealed that multiple loci are involved in the etiology of asthma. Recent cellular, molecular, and animal-model studies have revealed several cellular events that are involved in the progression of asthma, including: increased Th2 cytokines leading to the recruitment of inflammatory cells to the airway, and an increase in the production of reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial dysfunction in the activated inflammatory cells, leading to tissue injury in the bronchial epithelium. Further, aging and animal model studies have revealed that mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are involved and play a large role in asthma. Recent studies using experimental allergic asthmatic mouse models and peripheral cells and tissues from asthmatic humans have revealed antioxidants as promising treatments for people with asthma. This article summarizes the latest research findings on the involvement of inflammatory changes, and mitochondrial dysfunction/oxidative stress in the development and progression of asthma. This article also addresses the relationship between aging and age-related immunity in triggering asthma, the antioxidant therapeutic strategies in treating people with asthma.

  20. Mitochondrial Dysfunction: The Road to Alpha-Synuclein Oligomerization in PD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Esteves

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available While the etiology of Parkinson's disease remains largely elusive, there is accumulating evidence suggesting that mitochondrial dysfunction occurs prior to the onset of symptoms in Parkinson's disease. Mitochondria are remarkably primed to play a vital role in neuronal cell survival since they are key regulators of energy metabolism (as ATP producers, of intracellular calcium homeostasis, of NAD+/NADH ratio, and of endogenous reactive oxygen species production and programmed cell death. In this paper, we focus on mitochondrial dysfunction-mediated alpha-synuclein aggregation. We highlight some of the findings that provide proof of evidence for a mitochondrial metabolism control in Parkinson's disease, namely, mitochondrial regulation of microtubule-dependent cellular traffic and autophagic lysosomal pathway. The knowledge that microtubule alterations may lead to autophagic deficiency and may compromise the cellular degradation mechanisms that culminate in the progressive accumulation of aberrant protein aggregates shields new insights to the way we address Parkinson's disease. In line with this knowledge, an innovative window for new therapeutic strategies aimed to restore microtubule network may be unlocked.

  1. Protective effect of Phyllanthus fraternus against bromobenzene-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in rat kidney

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vadde Ramakrishna; Sriram Gopi; Oruganti H.Setty

    2012-01-01

    Phyllanthus fraternus (PF) (Euphorbiaceae) is used in ancient Indian traditional phytomedicine to treat various human diseases including hepatic and renal disorders.The present study was designed to investigate the protective effect of PF aqueous extract against bromobenzene-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in rat kidney,compared with vitamin E used as positive control.Male Wistar rats divided into six (A-F) groups and the experimental animals were administered bromobenzene with or without prior administration of PF extract or vitamin E.Animals were sacrificed and the kidneys obtained for studying mitochondrial function and histopathology.Administration of bromobenzene caused significant changes,including decrease in the mitochondrial respiration and P/O ratios,an increase in lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation,and a decrease in the activities of antioxidant enzymes (catalase,superoxide dismutase,glutathione reductase,and glutathione peroxidase) in mitochondria with significant histopathological changes in the kidney.However,prior administration of the PF extract showed significant protection against bromobenzene induced renal damage by reversing all above parameters.Mitochondrial dysfunction induced by bromobenzene was protected much better with the PF extract than with vitamin E.These results suggested that the Phyllanthus fraternus extract is an efficient armament against nephrotoxicity induced by bromobenzene.

  2. Circadian Dysfunction in Response to in Vivo Treatment with the Mitochondrial Toxin 3-Nitropropionic Acid

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    Takashi Kudo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Sleep disorders are common in neurodegenerative diseases including Huntington's disease (HD and develop early in the disease process. Mitochondrial alterations are believed to play a critical role in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases. In the present study, we evaluated the circadian system of mice after inhibiting mitochondrial complex II of the respiratory chain with the toxin 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP. We found that a subset of mice treated with low doses of 3-NP exhibited severe circadian deficit in behavior. The temporal patterning of sleep behavior is also disrupted in some mice with evidence of difficulty in the initiation of sleep behavior. Using the open field test during the normal sleep phase, we found that the 3-NP-treated mice were hyperactive. The molecular clockwork responsible for the generation of circadian rhythms as measured by PER2::LUCIFERASE was disrupted in a subset of mice. Within the SCN, the 3-NP treatment resulted in a reduction in daytime firing rate in the subset of mice which had a behavioral deficit. Anatomically, we confirmed that all of the treated mice showed evidence for cell loss within the striatum but we did not see evidence for gross SCN pathology. Together, the data demonstrates that chronic treatment with low doses of the mitochondrial toxin 3-NP produced circadian deficits in a subset of treated mice. This work does raise the possibility that the neural damage produced by mitochondrial dysfunction can contribute to the sleep/circadian dysfunction seen so commonly in neurodegenerative diseases.

  3. Rat liver mitochondrial dysfunction by addition of copper(II) or iron(III) ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saporito-Magriñá, Christian; Musacco-Sebio, Rosario; Acosta, Juan M; Bajicoff, Sofía; Paredes-Fleitas, Paola; Boveris, Alberto; Repetto, Marisa G

    2017-01-01

    Increased copper (Cu) and iron (Fe) levels in liver and brain are associated to oxidative stress and damage with increased phospholipid oxidation process. The aim of this work was to assess the toxic effects of Cu(2+) and Fe(3+) addition to rat liver mitochondria by determining mitochondrial respiration in states 3 (active respiration) and 4 (resting respiration), and phospholipid peroxidation. Both, Cu(2+) and Fe(3+) produced decreases in O2 consumption in a concentration-dependent manner in active state 3: both ions by 42% with malate-glutamate as complex I substrate (concentration for half maximal response (C50) 60μM Cu(2+) and 1.25mM Fe(3+)), and with succinate as complex II substrate: 64-69% with C50 of 50μM Cu(2+) and with C50 of 1.25mM of Fe(3+). Respiratory control decreased with Cu(2+) (C50 50μM) and Fe(3+) (C50 1.25-1-75mM) with both substrates. Cu(2+) produced a 2-fold increase and Fe(3+) a 5-fold increase of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) content from 25μM Cu(2+) (C50 40μM) and from 100μM Fe(3+) (C50 1.75mM). Supplementations with Cu(2+) and Fe(3+) ions induce mitochondrial dysfunction with phospholipid peroxidation in rat liver mitochondria. Although is proved that a Fenton/Haber Weiss mechanism of oxidative damage occurs in metal-ion induced mitochondrial toxicity, slightly different responses to the metal ions suggest some differences in the mechanism of intracellular toxicity. The decreased rates of mitochondrial respiration and the alteration of mitochondrial function by phospholipid and protein oxidations lead to mitochondrial dysfunction, cellular dyshomeostasis and cell death.

  4. Thioredoxin reductase deficiency potentiates oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death in dopaminergic cells.

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    Pamela Lopert

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are considered major generators of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS which are implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD. We have recently shown that isolated mitochondria consume hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂ in a substrate- and respiration-dependent manner predominantly via the thioredoxin/peroxiredoxin (Trx/Prx system. The goal of this study was to determine the role of Trx/Prx system in dopaminergic cell death. We asked if pharmacological and lentiviral inhibition of the Trx/Prx system sensitized dopaminergic cells to mitochondrial dysfunction, increased steady-state H₂O₂ levels and death in response to toxicants implicated in PD. Incubation of N27 dopaminergic cells or primary rat mesencephalic cultures with the Trx reductase (TrxR inhibitor auranofin in the presence of sub-toxic concentrations of parkinsonian toxicants paraquat; PQ or 6-hydroxydopamine; 6OHDA (for N27 cells resulted in a synergistic increase in H₂O₂ levels and subsequent cell death. shRNA targeting the mitochondrial thioredoxin reductase (TrxR2 in N27 cells confirmed the effects of pharmacological inhibition. A synergistic decrease in maximal and reserve respiratory capacity was observed in auranofin treated cells and TrxR2 deficient cells following incubation with PQ or 6OHDA. Additionally, TrxR2 deficient cells showed decreased basal mitochondrial oxygen consumption rates. These data demonstrate that inhibition of the mitochondrial Trx/Prx system sensitizes dopaminergic cells to mitochondrial dysfunction, increased steady-state H₂O₂, and cell death. Therefore, in addition to their role in the production of cellular H₂O₂ the mitochondrial Trx/Prx system serve as a major sink for cellular H₂O₂ and its disruption may contribute to dopaminergic pathology associated with PD.

  5. IL-6 induces lipolysis and mitochondrial dysfunction, but does not affect insulin-mediated glucose transport in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Chenbo; Chen, Xiaohui; Gao, Chunlin; Jiao, Liuhong; Wang, Jianguo; Xu, Guangfeng; Fu, Hailong; Guo, Xirong; Zhao, Yaping

    2011-08-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) has emerged as an important cytokine involved in the regulation of metabolism. However, the role of IL-6 in the etiology of obesity and insulin resistance is not fully understood. Mitochondria are key organelles of energy metabolism, and there is growing evidence that mitochondrial dysfunction plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of obesity-associated insulin resistance. In this study, we determined the direct effect of IL-6 on lipolysis in adipocytes, and the effects of IL-6 on mitochondrial function were investigated. We found that cells treated with IL-6 displayed fewer lipids and an elevated glycerol release rate. Further, IL-6 treatment led to decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, decreased cellular ATP production, and increased intracellular ROS levels. The mitochondria in IL-6-treated cells became swollen and hollow with reduced or missing cristae. However, insulin-stimulated glucose transport was unaltered. PGC-1α, NRF1, and mtTFA mRNA levels were markedly increased, and the mitochondrial contents were also increased. Our results demonstrate that IL-6 can exert a direct lipolytic effect and induce mitochondrial dysfunction. However, IL-6 did not affect insulin sensitivity in adipocytes in vitro. We deduce that in these cells, enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis might play a compensatory role in glucose transport.

  6. Current Experience in Testing Mitochondrial Nutrients in Disorders Featuring Oxidative Stress and Mitochondrial Dysfunction: Rational Design of Chemoprevention Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Pagano

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available An extensive number of pathologies are associated with mitochondrial dysfunction (MDF and oxidative stress (OS. Thus, mitochondrial cofactors termed “mitochondrial nutrients” (MN, such as α-lipoic acid (ALA, Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10, and l-carnitine (CARN (or its derivatives have been tested in a number of clinical trials, and this review is focused on the use of MN-based clinical trials. The papers reporting on MN-based clinical trials were retrieved in MedLine up to July 2014, and evaluated for the following endpoints: (a treated diseases; (b dosages, number of enrolled patients and duration of treatment; (c trial success for each MN or MN combinations as reported by authors. The reports satisfying the above endpoints included total numbers of trials and frequencies of randomized, controlled studies, i.e., 81 trials testing ALA, 107 reports testing CoQ10, and 74 reports testing CARN, while only 7 reports were retrieved testing double MN associations, while no report was found testing a triple MN combination. A total of 28 reports tested MN associations with “classical” antioxidants, such as antioxidant nutrients or drugs. Combinations of MN showed better outcomes than individual MN, suggesting forthcoming clinical studies. The criteria in study design and monitoring MN-based clinical trials are discussed.

  7. Current Experience in Testing Mitochondrial Nutrients in Disorders Featuring Oxidative Stress and Mitochondrial Dysfunction: Rational Design of Chemoprevention Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, Giovanni; Aiello Talamanca, Annarita; Castello, Giuseppe; Cordero, Mario D.; d’Ischia, Marco; Gadaleta, Maria Nicola; Pallardó, Federico V.; Petrović, Sandra; Tiano, Luca; Zatterale, Adriana

    2014-01-01

    An extensive number of pathologies are associated with mitochondrial dysfunction (MDF) and oxidative stress (OS). Thus, mitochondrial cofactors termed “mitochondrial nutrients” (MN), such as α-lipoic acid (ALA), Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), and l-carnitine (CARN) (or its derivatives) have been tested in a number of clinical trials, and this review is focused on the use of MN-based clinical trials. The papers reporting on MN-based clinical trials were retrieved in MedLine up to July 2014, and evaluated for the following endpoints: (a) treated diseases; (b) dosages, number of enrolled patients and duration of treatment; (c) trial success for each MN or MN combinations as reported by authors. The reports satisfying the above endpoints included total numbers of trials and frequencies of randomized, controlled studies, i.e., 81 trials testing ALA, 107 reports testing CoQ10, and 74 reports testing CARN, while only 7 reports were retrieved testing double MN associations, while no report was found testing a triple MN combination. A total of 28 reports tested MN associations with “classical” antioxidants, such as antioxidant nutrients or drugs. Combinations of MN showed better outcomes than individual MN, suggesting forthcoming clinical studies. The criteria in study design and monitoring MN-based clinical trials are discussed. PMID:25380523

  8. Mitochondrial dysfunction as a central actor in intellectual disability-related diseases: an overview of Down syndrome, autism, Fragile X and Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenti, Daniela; de Bari, Lidia; De Filippis, Bianca; Henrion-Caude, Alexandra; Vacca, Rosa Anna

    2014-10-01

    Clinical manifestations typical of mitochondrial diseases are often present in various genetic syndromes associated with intellectual disability, a condition leading to deficit in cognitive functions and adaptive behaviors. Until now, the causative mechanism leading to intellectual disability is unknown and the progression of the condition is poorly understood. We first report latest advances on genetic and environmental regulation of mitochondrial function and its role in brain development. Starting from the structure, function and regulation of the oxidative phosphorylation apparatus, we review how mitochondrial biogenesis and dynamics play a central role in neurogenesis and neuroplasticity. We then discuss how dysfunctional mitochondria and alterations in reactive oxygen species homeostasis are potentially involved in the pathogenesis of various neurodevelopmental syndromes with a special focus on Down, Rett, Fragile X syndromes and autism spectrum disorders. Finally, we review and suggest novel therapeutic approaches aimed at improving intellectual disability by activating mitochondrial function and reducing oxidative stress to amiliorate the quality of life in the subjects affected.

  9. Oxidative Stress and Mitochondrial Dysfunction across Broad-Ranging Pathologies: Toward Mitochondria-Targeted Clinical Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Pagano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Beyond the disorders recognized as mitochondrial diseases, abnormalities in function and/or ultrastructure of mitochondria have been reported in several unrelated pathologies. These encompass ageing, malformations, and a number of genetic or acquired diseases, as diabetes and cardiologic, haematologic, organ-specific (e.g., eye or liver, neurologic and psychiatric, autoimmune, and dermatologic disorders. The mechanistic grounds for mitochondrial dysfunction (MDF along with the occurrence of oxidative stress (OS have been investigated within the pathogenesis of individual disorders or in groups of interrelated disorders. We attempt to review broad-ranging pathologies that involve mitochondrial-specific deficiencies or rely on cytosol-derived prooxidant states or on autoimmune-induced mitochondrial damage. The established knowledge in these subjects warrants studies aimed at elucidating several open questions that are highlighted in the present review. The relevance of OS and MDF in different pathologies may establish the grounds for chemoprevention trials aimed at compensating OS/MDF by means of antioxidants and mitochondrial nutrients.

  10. Methylglyoxal induces oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, K S; Choi, E M; Rhee, S Y; Kim, Y S

    2014-02-01

    Methylglyoxal is a reactive dicarbonyl compound produced by glycolytic processing and identified as a precursor of advanced glycation end products. The elevated methylglyoxal levels in patients with diabetes are believed to contribute to diabetic complications, including bone defects. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of methylglyoxal on the function of osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells. The data indicated that methylglyoxal decreased osteoblast differentiation and induced osteoblast cytotoxicity. Pretreatment of MC3T3-E1 cells with aminoguanidine (a carbonyl scavenger), Trolox (an antioxidant), and cyclosporin A (a blocker of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore) prevented methylglyoxal-induced cytotoxicity in MC3T3-E1 cells. However, BAPTA/AM (an intracellular Ca(2+) chelator) and dantrolene (an inhibitor of endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) release) did not reverse the cytotoxic effect of methylglyoxal. Methylglyoxal increased the formation of intracellular reactive oxygen species, mitochondrial superoxide, and cardiolipin peroxidation in osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells. Methylglyoxal also decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential and intracellular ATP and nitric oxide levels, suggesting that carbonyl stress-induced loss of mitochondrial integrity contributes to the cytotoxicity of methylglyoxal. Furthermore, the results demonstrated that methylglyoxal induced protein adduct formation, inactivation of glyoxalase I, and activation of glyoxalase II. Aminoguanidine reversed all aforementioned effects of methylglyoxal. Taken together, these data support the notion that high methylglyoxal concentrations have detrimental effects on osteoblasts through a mechanism involving oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction.

  11. Garlic extract attenuates brain mitochondrial dysfunction and cognitive deficit in obese-insulin resistant rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintana, Hiranya; Sripetchwandee, Jirapas; Supakul, Luerat; Apaijai, Nattayaporn; Chattipakorn, Nipon; Chattipakorn, Siriporn

    2014-12-01

    Oxidative stress in the obese-insulin resistant condition has been shown to affect cognitive as well as brain mitochondrial functions. Garlic extract has exerted a potent antioxidant effect. However, the effects of garlic extract on the brain of obese-insulin resistant rats have never been investigated. We hypothesized that garlic extract improves cognitive function and brain mitochondrial function in obese-insulin resistant rats induced by long-term high-fat diet (HFD) consumption. Male Wistar rats were fed either normal diet or HFD for 16 weeks (n = 24/group). At week 12, rats in each dietary group received either vehicle or garlic extract (250 and 500 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) for 28 days. Learning and memory behaviors, metabolic parameters, and brain mitochondrial function were determined at the end of treatment. HFD led to increased body weight, visceral fat, plasma insulin, cholesterol, and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, indicating the development of insulin resistance. Furthermore, HFD rats had cognitive deficit and brain mitochondrial dysfunction. HFD rats treated with both doses of garlic extract had decreased body weight, visceral fat, plasma cholesterol, and MDA levels. Garlic extract also improved cognitive function and brain mitochondrial function, which were impaired in obese-insulin resistant rats caused by HFD consumption.

  12. Mitochondrial dysfunction and loss of glutamate uptake in primary astrocytes exposed to titanium dioxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Christina L.; Natarajan, Vaishaali; Hayward, Stephen L.; Khalimonchuk, Oleh; Kidambi, Srivatsan

    2015-11-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles are currently the second most produced engineered nanomaterial in the world with vast usage in consumer products leading to recurrent human exposure. Animal studies indicate significant nanoparticle accumulation in the brain while cellular toxicity studies demonstrate negative effects on neuronal cell viability and function. However, the toxicological effects of nanoparticles on astrocytes, the most abundant cells in the brain, have not been extensively investigated. Therefore, we determined the sub-toxic effect of three different TiO2 nanoparticles (rutile, anatase and commercially available P25 TiO2 nanoparticles) on primary rat cortical astrocytes. We evaluated some events related to astrocyte functions and mitochondrial dysregulation: (1) glutamate uptake; (2) redox signaling mechanisms by measuring ROS production; (3) the expression patterns of dynamin-related proteins (DRPs) and mitofusins 1 and 2, whose expression is central to mitochondrial dynamics; and (4) mitochondrial morphology by MitoTracker® Red CMXRos staining. Anatase, rutile and P25 were found to have LC50 values of 88.22 +/- 10.56 ppm, 136.0 +/- 31.73 ppm and 62.37 +/- 9.06 ppm respectively indicating nanoparticle specific toxicity. All three TiO2 nanoparticles induced a significant loss in glutamate uptake indicative of a loss in vital astrocyte function. TiO2 nanoparticles also induced an increase in reactive oxygen species generation, and a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, suggesting mitochondrial damage. TiO2 nanoparticle exposure altered expression patterns of DRPs at low concentrations (25 ppm) and apoptotic fission at high concentrations (100 ppm). TiO2 nanoparticle exposure also resulted in changes to mitochondrial morphology confirmed by mitochondrial staining. Collectively, our data provide compelling evidence that TiO2 nanoparticle exposure has potential implications in astrocyte-mediated neurological dysfunction.Titanium dioxide (Ti

  13. Mitochondrial dysfunction in primary human fibroblasts triggers an adaptive cell survival program that requires AMPK-alpha

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Distelmaier, F.; Valsecchi, F.; Liemburg-Apers, D.; Lebiedzinska, M.; Rodenburg, R.; Heil, S.; Keijer, J.; Fransen, J.; Imamura, H.; Danhauser, K.; Seibt, A.; Viollet, B.; Gellerich, F.; Smeitink, J.; Wieckowski, M.; Willems, P.; Koopman, W.J.H.

    2015-01-01

    Dysfunction of complex I (CI) of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) features prominently in human pathology. Cell models of ETC dysfunction display adaptive survival responses that still are poorly understood but of relevance for therapy development. Here we comprehensively examined ho

  14. Mitochondrial dysfunction in primary human fibroblasts triggers an adaptive cell survival program that requires AMPK-alpha

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Distelmaier, F.; Valsecchi, F.; Liemburg-Apers, D.; Lebiedzinska, M.; Rodenburg, R.; Heil, S.; Keijer, J.; Fransen, J.; Imamura, H.; Danhauser, K.; Seibt, A.; Viollet, B.; Gellerich, F.; Smeitink, J.; Wieckowski, M.; Willems, P.; Koopman, W.J.H.

    2015-01-01

    Dysfunction of complex I (CI) of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) features prominently in human pathology. Cell models of ETC dysfunction display adaptive survival responses that still are poorly understood but of relevance for therapy development. Here we comprehensively examined

  15. Mitochondrial dysfunction in primary human fibroblasts triggers an adaptive cell survival program that requires AMPK-alpha

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Distelmaier, F.; Valsecchi, F.; Liemburg-Apers, D.C.; Lebiedzinska, M.; Rodenburg, R.J.T.; Heil, S.; Keijer, J.; Fransen, J.A.; Imamura, H.; Danhauser, K.; Seibt, A.; Viollet, B.; Gellerich, F.N.; Smeitink, J.; Wieckowski, M.R.; Willems, P.H.G.M.; Koopman, W.J.H.

    2015-01-01

    Dysfunction of complex I (CI) of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) features prominently in human pathology. Cell models of ETC dysfunction display adaptive survival responses that still are poorly understood but of relevance for therapy development. Here we comprehensively examined ho

  16. Mitochondrial dysfunction in primary human fibroblasts triggers an adaptive cell survival program that requires AMPK-α

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Distelmaier (Felix); F. Valsecchi (Federica); D.C. Liemburg-Apers (Dania C.); M. Lebiedzinska (Magdalena); R.J.T. Rodenburg (Richard); S.G. Heil (Sandra); J. Keijer (Jaap); J.A.M. Fransen (Jack); H. Imamura (Hiromi); K. Danhauser (Katharina); A. Seibt (Annette); B. Viollet (Benoit); F.N. Gellerich (Frank); J.A.M. Smeitink (Jan); M.R. Wieckowski (Mariusz R.); P.H.G.M. Willems (Peter H.G.M.); W.J.H. Koopman (W. J H)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractDysfunction of complex I (CI) of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) features prominently in human pathology. Cell models of ETC dysfunction display adaptive survival responses that still are poorly understood but of relevance for therapy development. Here we comprehensively

  17. Coupling diverse routes of calcium entry to mitochondrial dysfunction and glutamate excitotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanika, Ruslan I; Pivovarova, Natalia B; Brantner, Christine A; Watts, Charlotte A; Winters, Christine A; Andrews, S Brian

    2009-06-16

    Overactivation of NMDA receptors (NMDARs) is a critical early step in glutamate-evoked excitotoxic injury of CNS neurons. Distinct NMDAR-coupled pathways specified by, for example, receptor location or subunit composition seem to govern glutamate-induced excitotoxic death, but there is much uncertainty concerning the underlying mechanisms of pathway selection. Here we ask whether, and if so how, route-specific vulnerability is coupled to Ca(2+) overload and mitochondrial dysfunction, which is also a known, central component of exitotoxic injury. In cultured hippocampal neurons, overactivation of only extrasynaptic NMDARs resulted in Ca(2+) entry strong enough to promote Ca(2+) overload, which subsequently leads to mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death. Receptor composition per se appears not to be a primary factor for specifying signal coupling, as NR2B inhibition abolished Ca(2+) loading and was protective only in predominantly NR2B-expressing young neurons. In older neurons expressing comparable levels of NR2A- and NR2B-containing NMDARs, amelioration of Ca(2+) overload required the inhibition of extrasynaptic receptors containing both NR2 subunits. Prosurvival synaptic stimuli also evoked Ca(2+) entry through both N2A- and NR2B-containing NMDARs, but, in contrast to excitotoxic activation of extrasynaptic NMDARs, produced only low-amplitude cytoplasmic Ca(2+) spikes and modest, nondamaging mitochondrial Ca(2+) accumulation. The results--showing that the various routes of excitotoxic Ca(2+) entry converge on a common pathway involving Ca(2+) overload-induced mitochondrial dysfunction--reconcile and unify many aspects of the "route-specific" and "calcium load-dependent" views of exitotoxic injury.

  18. The interplay between iron accumulation, mitochondrial dysfunction and inflammation during the execution step of neurodegenerative disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela J. Urrutia

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A growing set of observations points to mitochondrial dysfunction, iron accumulation, oxidative damage and chronic inflammation as common pathognomonic signs of a number of neurodegenerative diseases that includes Alzheimer's disease, Huntington disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Friedrich’s ataxia and Parkinson’s disease. Particularly relevant for neurodegenerative processes is the relationship between mitochondria and iron. The mitochondrion upholds the synthesis of iron-sulfur clusters and heme, the most abundant iron-containing prosthetic groups in a large variety of proteins, so a fraction of incoming iron must go through this organelle before reaching its final destination. In turn, the mitochondrial respiratory chain is the source of reactive oxygen species (ROS derived from leaks in the electron transport chain. The co-existence of both iron and ROS in the secluded space of the mitochondrion makes this organelle particularly prone to hydroxyl radical-mediated damage. In addition, a connection between the loss of iron homeostasis and inflammation is starting to emerge; thus, inflammatory cytokines like TNF-alpha and IL-6 induce the synthesis of the divalent metal transporter 1 and promote iron accumulation in neurons and microglia. Here, we review the recent literature on mitochondrial iron homeostasis and the role of inflammation on mitochondria dysfunction and iron accumulation on the neurodegenerative process that lead to cell death in Parkinson’s disease. We also put forward the hypothesis that mitochondrial dysfunction, iron accumulation and inflammation are part of a synergistic self-feeding cycle that ends in apoptotic cell death, once the antioxidant cellular defense systems are finally overwhelmed.

  19. Therapeutic inhibition of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species with mito-TEMPO reduces diabetic cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Rui; Cao, Ting; Xiong, Sidong; Ma, Jian; Fan, Guo-Chang; Lacefield, James C.; Lu, Yanrong; Le Tissier, Sydney; Peng, Tianqing

    2016-01-01

    Aims The mitochondria are important sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the heart. Mitochondrial ROS production has been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic cardiomyopathy, suggesting that therapeutic strategies specifically targeting mitochondrial ROS may have benefit in this disease. We investigated the therapeutic effects of mitochondria-targeted antioxidant mito-TEMPO on diabetic cardiomyopathy. Methods The mitochondria-targeted antioxidant mito-TEMPO was administrated after diabetes onset in a mouse model of streptozotocin-induced type-1 diabetes and type-2 diabetic db/db mice. Cardiac adverse changes were analyzed and myocardial function assessed. Cultured adult cardiomyocytes were stimulated with high glucose, and mitochondrial superoxide generation and cell death were measured. Results Incubation with high glucose increased mitochondria superoxide generation in cultured cardiomyocytes, which was prevented by mito-TEMPO. Co-incubation with mito-TEMPO abrogated high glucose-induced cell death. Mitochondrial ROS generation, and intracellular oxidative stress levels were induced in both type-1 and type-2 diabetic mouse hearts. Daily injection of mito-TEMPO for 30 days inhibited mitochondrial ROS generation, prevented intracellular oxidative stress levels, decreased apoptosis and reduced myocardial hypertrophy in diabetic hearts, leading to improvement of myocardial function in both type-1 and type-2 diabetic mice. Incubation with mito-TEMPO or inhibition of Nox2-containing NADPH oxidase prevented oxidative stress levels and cell death in high glucose-stimulated cardiomyocytes. Mechanistic study revealed that the protective effects of mito-TEMPO were associated with down-regulation of ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Conclusions Therapeutic inhibition of mitochondrial ROS by mito-TEMPO reduced adverse cardiac changes and mitigated myocardial dysfunction in diabetic mice. Thus, mitochondria-targeted antioxidants may be an effective therapy for diabetic

  20. Natural terpenes prevent mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and release of apoptotic proteins during nimesulide-hepatotoxicity in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brijesh Kumar Singh

    Full Text Available Nimesulide, an anti-inflammatory and analgesic drug, is reported to cause severe hepatotoxicity. In this study, molecular mechanisms involved in deranged oxidant-antioxidant homeostasis and mitochondrial dysfunction during nimesulide-induced hepatotoxicity and its attenuation by plant derived terpenes, camphene and geraniol has been explored in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Hepatotoxicity due to nimesulide (80 mg/kg BW was evident from elevated SGPT, SGOT, bilirubin and histo-pathological changes. Antioxidants and key redox enzymes (iNOS, mtNOS, Cu/Zn-SOD, Mn-SOD, GPx and GR were altered significantly as assessed by their mRNA expression, Immunoblot analysis and enzyme activities. Redox imbalance along with oxidative stress was evident from decreased NAD(PH and GSH (56% and 74% respectively; P<0.001, increased superoxide and secondary ROS/RNS generation along with oxidative damage to cellular macromolecules. Nimesulide reduced mitochondrial activity, depolarized mitochondria and caused membrane permeability transition (MPT followed by release of apoptotic proteins (AIF; apoptosis inducing factor, EndoG; endonuclease G, and Cyto c; cytochrome c. It also significantly activated caspase-9 and caspase-3 and increased oxidative DNA damage (level of 8-Oxoguanine glycosylase; P<0.05. A combination of camphene and geraniol (CG; 1:1, when pre-administered in rats (10 mg/kg BW, accorded protection against nimesulide hepatotoxicity in vivo, as evident from normalized serum biomarkers and histopathology. mRNA expression and activity of key antioxidant and redox enzymes along with oxidative stress were also normalized due to CG pre-treatment. Downstream effects like decreased mitochondrial swelling, inhibition in release of apoptotic proteins, prevention of mitochondrial depolarization along with reduction in oxidized NAD(PH and increased mitochondrial electron flow further supported protective action of selected terpenes against nimesulide toxicity. Therefore

  1. Mitochondrial dysfunction and loss of glutamate uptake in primary astrocytes exposed to titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Christina L; Natarajan, Vaishaali; Hayward, Stephen L; Khalimonchuk, Oleh; Kidambi, Srivatsan

    2015-11-28

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles are currently the second most produced engineered nanomaterial in the world with vast usage in consumer products leading to recurrent human exposure. Animal studies indicate significant nanoparticle accumulation in the brain while cellular toxicity studies demonstrate negative effects on neuronal cell viability and function. However, the toxicological effects of nanoparticles on astrocytes, the most abundant cells in the brain, have not been extensively investigated. Therefore, we determined the sub-toxic effect of three different TiO2 nanoparticles (rutile, anatase and commercially available P25 TiO2 nanoparticles) on primary rat cortical astrocytes. We evaluated some events related to astrocyte functions and mitochondrial dysregulation: (1) glutamate uptake; (2) redox signaling mechanisms by measuring ROS production; (3) the expression patterns of dynamin-related proteins (DRPs) and mitofusins 1 and 2, whose expression is central to mitochondrial dynamics; and (4) mitochondrial morphology by MitoTracker® Red CMXRos staining. Anatase, rutile and P25 were found to have LC50 values of 88.22 ± 10.56 ppm, 136.0 ± 31.73 ppm and 62.37 ± 9.06 ppm respectively indicating nanoparticle specific toxicity. All three TiO2 nanoparticles induced a significant loss in glutamate uptake indicative of a loss in vital astrocyte function. TiO2 nanoparticles also induced an increase in reactive oxygen species generation, and a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, suggesting mitochondrial damage. TiO2 nanoparticle exposure altered expression patterns of DRPs at low concentrations (25 ppm) and apoptotic fission at high concentrations (100 ppm). TiO2 nanoparticle exposure also resulted in changes to mitochondrial morphology confirmed by mitochondrial staining. Collectively, our data provide compelling evidence that TiO2 nanoparticle exposure has potential implications in astrocyte-mediated neurological dysfunction.

  2. In vitro treatment of HepG2 cells with saturated fatty acids reproduces mitochondrial dysfunction found in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ruiz, Inmaculada; Solís-Muñoz, Pablo; Fernández-Moreira, Daniel; Muñoz-Yagüe, Teresa; Solís-Herruzo, José A

    2015-02-01

    Activity of the oxidative phosphorylation system (OXPHOS) is decreased in humans and mice with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Nitro-oxidative stress seems to be involved in its pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to determine whether fatty acids are implicated in the pathogenesis of this mitochondrial defect. In HepG2 cells, we analyzed the effect of saturated (palmitic and stearic acids) and monounsaturated (oleic acid) fatty acids on: OXPHOS activity; levels of protein expression of OXPHOS complexes and their subunits; gene expression and half-life of OXPHOS complexes; nitro-oxidative stress; and NADPH oxidase gene expression and activity. We also studied the effects of inhibiting or silencing NADPH oxidase on the palmitic-acid-induced nitro-oxidative stress and subsequent OXPHOS inhibition. Exposure of cultured HepG2 cells to saturated fatty acids resulted in a significant decrease in the OXPHOS activity. This effect was prevented in the presence of a mimic of manganese superoxide dismutase. Palmitic acid reduced the amount of both fully-assembled OXPHOS complexes and of complex subunits. This reduction was due mainly to an accelerated degradation of these subunits, which was associated with a 3-tyrosine nitration of mitochondrial proteins. Pretreatment of cells with uric acid, an antiperoxynitrite agent, prevented protein degradation induced by palmitic acid. A reduced gene expression also contributed to decrease mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-encoded subunits. Saturated fatty acids induced oxidative stress and caused mtDNA oxidative damage. This effect was prevented by inhibiting NADPH oxidase. These acids activated NADPH oxidase gene expression and increased NADPH oxidase activity. Silencing this oxidase abrogated totally the inhibitory effect of palmitic acid on OXPHOS complex activity. We conclude that saturated fatty acids caused nitro-oxidative stress, reduced OXPHOS complex half-life and activity, and decreased gene expression of mtDNA-encoded subunits

  3. Mitochondrial dysfunction induces EMT through the TGF-β/Smad/Snail signaling pathway in Hep3B hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

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    Yi, Eui-Yeun; Park, Shi-Young; Jung, Seung-Youn; Jang, Won-Jun; Kim, Yung-Jin

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been found to be associated with various pathological conditions, particularly cancer. However, the mechanisms underlying tumor malignancy induced by mitochondrial dysfunction are not fully understood. In the present study, the effects of mitochondrial dysfunction on epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), were investigated using mitochondrial-depleted ρ(0) cells derived from the Hep3B hepatocarcinoma cell line. The Hep3B/ρ(0) cells displayed the EMT phenotype with more aggressive migration and higher invasiveness compared to their parental cells. The Hep3B/ρ(0) cells also showed typical expression pattern of EMT markers such as vimentin and E-cadherin. These phenotypes in Hep3B/ρ(0) cells were mediated by increased transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) through the canonical Smad-dependent signaling pathway. Additionally, TGF-β signaling was activated via induction of c-Jun/AP-1 expression and activity. Therefore, mitochondrial dysfunction induces EMT through TGF-β/Smad/Snail signaling via c-Jun/AP-1 activation. These results indicate that mitochondrial dysfunction plays an important role in the EMT process and could be a novel therapeutic target for malignant cancer therapy.

  4. Lycopene induces apoptosis in Candida albicans through reactive oxygen species production and mitochondrial dysfunction.

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    Choi, Hyemin; Lee, Dong Gun

    2015-08-01

    Lycopene, a well-known carotenoid pigment found in tomatoes, has shown various biological functions. In our previous report, we showed that lycopene induces two apoptotic hallmarks, plasma membrane depolarization and G2/M cell cycle arrest, in Candida albicans. In this study, we investigated the ability of lycopene to induce apoptosis, and the mechanism by which it regulates apoptosis. FITC-Annexin V staining, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) analysis, and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) assay showed that lycopene exerted its antifungal activity during the early and late stages of apoptosis in C. albicans. During apoptosis, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were increased, and specifically the hydroxyl radicals contributed to the fungal cell death. Furthermore, lycopene treatment caused intracellular Ca(2+) overload and mitochondrial dysfunction, such as mitochondrial depolarization and cytochrome c release from the mitochondria to the cytoplasm. At last caspase activation was triggered. In summary, lycopene exerted its antifungal effects against C. albicans by inducing apoptosis via ROS production and mitochondrial dysfunction.

  5. Mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction variably increases oxidant stress in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingley, Stephen; Polyak, Erzsebet; Lightfoot, Richard; Ostrovsky, Julian; Rao, Meera; Greco, Todd; Ischiropoulos, Harry; Falk, Marni J

    2010-03-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and associated oxidant stress have been linked with numerous complex diseases and aging largely by in vitro determination of mitochondria oxidant production and scavenging. We applied targeted in vivo fluorescence analyses of mitochondria-dense pharyngeal tissue in Caenorhabditis elegans to better understand relative mitochondrial effects, particularly on matrix oxidant burden, of respiratory chain complex, MnSOD, and insulin receptor mutants displaying variable longevity. The data demonstrate significantly elevated in vivo matrix oxidant burden in the short-lived complex I mutant, gas-1(fc21), which was associated with limited superoxide scavenging capacity despite robust MnSOD induction, as well as decreased mitochondria content and membrane potential. Significantly increased MnSOD activity was associated with in vivo matrix oxidant levels similar to wild-type in the long-lived respiratory chain complex III mutant, isp-1(qm150). Yet, despite greater superoxide scavenging capacity in the complex III mutant than in the significantly longer-lived insulin receptor mutant, daf-2(e1368), only the former showed modest oxidative stress sensitivity. Furthermore, increased longevity was seen in MnSOD knockout mutants (sod-2(ok1030) and sod-2(gk257)) that had decreased MnSOD scavenging capacity and increased in vivo matrix oxidant burden. Thus, factors beside oxidant stress must underlie RC mutant longevity in C. elegans. This work highlights the utility of the C. elegans model as a tractable means to non-invasively monitor multi-dimensional in vivo consequences of primary mitochondrial dysfunction.

  6. L-Lactate Protects Skin Fibroblasts against Aging-Associated Mitochondrial Dysfunction via Mitohormesis

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    Jaroslav Zelenka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A moderate elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS production and a mild inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory chain have been associated with a health promotion and a lifespan extension in several animal models of aging. Here, we tested whether this phenomenon called mitohormesis could be mediated by L-lactate. The treatment with 5 mM L-lactate significantly increased H2O2 production and slightly inhibited the respiration in cultured skin fibroblasts and in isolated mitochondria. The L-lactate exposure was associated with oxidation of intracellular glutathione, phosphorylation of 5′AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK, and induction of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1α (PGC1α transcription. A replicative aging of fibroblasts (L0 with a constant (LC, or intermittent 5 mM L-lactate (LI in media showed that the high-passage LI fibroblasts have higher respiration, lower H2O2 release, and lower secretion of L-lactate compared to L0 and LC. This protection against mitochondrial dysfunction in LI cells was associated with lower activity of mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1, less signs of cellular senescence, and increased autophagy compared to L0 and LC. In conclusion, we demonstrated that intermittent but not constant exposure to L-lactate triggers mitohormesis, prevents aging-associated mitochondrial dysfunction, and improves other markers of aging.

  7. Polydatin Protecting Kidneys against Hemorrhagic Shock-Induced Mitochondrial Dysfunction via SIRT1 Activation and p53 Deacetylation

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    Zhenhua Zeng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To ascertain if mitochondrial dysfunction (MD of kidney cells is present in severe hemorrhagic shock and to investigate whether polydatin (PD can attenuate MD and its protective mechanisms. Research Design and Methods. Renal tubular epithelial cells (RTECs from rat kidneys experiencing HS and a cell line (HK-2 under hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R treatment were used. Morphology and function of mitochondria in isolated RTECs or cultured HK-2 cells were evaluated, accompanied by mitochondrial apoptosis pathway-related proteins. Result. Severe MD was found in rat kidneys, especially in RTECs, as evidenced by swollen mitochondria and poorly defined cristae, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm, and reduced ATP content. PD treatment attenuated MD partially and inhibited expression of proapoptotic proteins. PD treatment increased SIRT1 activity and decreased acetylated-p53 levels. Beneficial effect of PD was abolished partially when the SIRT1 inhibitor Ex527 was added. Similar phenomena were shown in the H/R cell model; when pifithrin-α (p53 inhibitor was added to the PD/Ex527 group, considerable therapeutic effects were regained compared with the PD group apart from increased SIRT1 activity. Conclusions. MD is present in severe HS, and PD can attenuate MD of RTECs via the SIRT1-p53 pathway. PD might be a promising therapeutic drug for acute renal injury.

  8. Standardized Kaempferia parviflora Extract Inhibits Intrinsic Aging Process in Human Dermal Fibroblasts and Hairless Mice by Inhibiting Cellular Senescence and Mitochondrial Dysfunction

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    Ji-Eun Park

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Intrinsic skin aging is a complex biological phenomenon mainly caused by cellular senescence and mitochondrial dysfunction. This study evaluated the inhibitory effect of Kaempferia parviflora Wall ex. Baker ethanol extract (KPE on H2O2-stimulated cellular senescence and mitochondrial dysfunction both in vitro and in vivo. KPE significantly increased cell growth and suppressed senescence-associated β-galactosidase activation. KPE inhibited the expression of cell-cycle inhibitors (p53, p21, p16, and pRb and stimulated the expression of cell-cycle activators (E2F1 and E2F2. H2O2-induced hyperactivation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B (AKT signaling pathway was suppressed by KPE through regulated expression of forkhead box O3a (FoxO3a and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR. KPE attenuated inflammatory mediators (interleukin-6 (IL-6, IL-8, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 and increased the mRNA expression of PGC-1α, ERRα, NRF1, and Tfam, which modulate mitochondrial biogenesis and function. Consequently, reduced ATP levels and increased ROS level were also reversed by KPE treatment. In hairless mice, KPE inhibited wrinkle formation, skin atrophy, and loss of elasticity by increasing the collagen and elastic fibers. The results indicate that KPE prevents intrinsic aging process in hairless mice by inhibiting cellular senescence and mitochondrial dysfunction, suggesting its potential as a natural antiaging agent.

  9. Standardized Kaempferia parviflora Extract Inhibits Intrinsic Aging Process in Human Dermal Fibroblasts and Hairless Mice by Inhibiting Cellular Senescence and Mitochondrial Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji-Eun; Woo, Seon Wook; Kim, Mi-Bo; Kim, Changhee; Hwang, Jae-Kwan

    2017-01-01

    Intrinsic skin aging is a complex biological phenomenon mainly caused by cellular senescence and mitochondrial dysfunction. This study evaluated the inhibitory effect of Kaempferia parviflora Wall ex. Baker ethanol extract (KPE) on H2O2-stimulated cellular senescence and mitochondrial dysfunction both in vitro and in vivo. KPE significantly increased cell growth and suppressed senescence-associated β-galactosidase activation. KPE inhibited the expression of cell-cycle inhibitors (p53, p21, p16, and pRb) and stimulated the expression of cell-cycle activators (E2F1 and E2F2). H2O2-induced hyperactivation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B (AKT) signaling pathway was suppressed by KPE through regulated expression of forkhead box O3a (FoxO3a) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). KPE attenuated inflammatory mediators (interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)) and increased the mRNA expression of PGC-1α, ERRα, NRF1, and Tfam, which modulate mitochondrial biogenesis and function. Consequently, reduced ATP levels and increased ROS level were also reversed by KPE treatment. In hairless mice, KPE inhibited wrinkle formation, skin atrophy, and loss of elasticity by increasing the collagen and elastic fibers. The results indicate that KPE prevents intrinsic aging process in hairless mice by inhibiting cellular senescence and mitochondrial dysfunction, suggesting its potential as a natural antiaging agent.

  10. Identification of interacting partners of Human Mpv17-like protein with a mitigating effect of mitochondrial dysfunction through mtDNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Reiko; Ueki, Misuzu; Yasuda, Toshihiro

    2015-10-01

    Human Mpv17-like protein (M-LPH) has been suggested to participate in mitochondrial function. In this study, we investigated the proteins that interact with M-LPH, and identified four: H2A histone family, member X (H2AX), ribosomal protein S14 (RPS14), ribosomal protein S3 (RPS3) and B-cell receptor-associated protein 31 (Bap31). Immunofluorescence and subcellular fractionation studies revealed that M-LPH is localized predominantly in the nucleus, to some extent in a subset of mitochondria, and marginally in the cytosol. Mitochondrial M-LPH appeared as punctate foci, and these were co-localized with a subset of mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) and mtDNA, indicating that M-LPH is localized in or in close proximity to mitochondrial nucleoids. RNAi-mediated knockdown of M-LPH resulted in an increase of mtDNA damage and reduced the expression of mtDNA-encoded genes. A ROS inducer, antimycin A, caused an increase in both the number and size of the mitochondrial M-LPH foci, and these foci were co-localized with two enzymes, DNA polymerase γ (POLG) and DNA ligase III (LIG3), both involved in mtDNA repair. Furthermore, knockdown of M-LPH hampered mitochondrial localization of these enzymes. Taken together, these observations suggest that M-LPH is involved in the maintenance of mtDNA and protects cells from mitochondrial dysfunction.

  11. Sustained activation of Akt elicits mitochondrial dysfunction to block Plasmodium falciparum infection in the mosquito host.

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    Shirley Luckhart

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The overexpression of activated, myristoylated Akt in the midgut of female transgenic Anopheles stephensi results in resistance to infection with the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum but also decreased lifespan. In the present study, the understanding of mitochondria-dependent midgut homeostasis has been expanded to explain this apparent paradox in an insect of major medical importance. Given that Akt signaling is essential for cell growth and survival, we hypothesized that sustained Akt activation in the mosquito midgut would alter the balance of critical pathways that control mitochondrial dynamics to enhance parasite killing at some cost to survivorship. Toxic reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RNOS rise to high levels in the midgut after blood feeding, due to a combination of high NO production and a decline in FOXO-dependent antioxidants. Despite an apparent increase in mitochondrial biogenesis in young females (3 d, energy deficiencies were apparent as decreased oxidative phosphorylation and increased [AMP]/[ATP] ratios. In addition, mitochondrial mass was lower and accompanied by the presence of stalled autophagosomes in the posterior midgut, a critical site for blood digestion and stem cell-mediated epithelial maintenance and repair, and by functional degradation of the epithelial barrier. By 18 d, the age at which An. stephensi would transmit P. falciparum to human hosts, mitochondrial dysfunction coupled to Akt-mediated repression of autophagy/mitophagy was more evident and midgut epithelial structure was markedly compromised. Inhibition of RNOS by co-feeding of the nitric-oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME at infection abrogated Akt-dependent killing of P. falciparum that begins within 18 h of infection in 3-5 d old mosquitoes. Hence, Akt-induced changes in mitochondrial dynamics perturb midgut homeostasis to enhance parasite resistance and decrease mosquito infective lifespan. Further, quality control of mitochondrial

  12. Sustained activation of Akt elicits mitochondrial dysfunction to block Plasmodium falciparum infection in the mosquito host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckhart, Shirley; Giulivi, Cecilia; Drexler, Anna L; Antonova-Koch, Yevgeniya; Sakaguchi, Danielle; Napoli, Eleonora; Wong, Sarah; Price, Mark S; Eigenheer, Richard; Phinney, Brett S; Pakpour, Nazzy; Pietri, Jose E; Cheung, Kong; Georgis, Martha; Riehle, Michael

    2013-02-01

    The overexpression of activated, myristoylated Akt in the midgut of female transgenic Anopheles stephensi results in resistance to infection with the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum but also decreased lifespan. In the present study, the understanding of mitochondria-dependent midgut homeostasis has been expanded to explain this apparent paradox in an insect of major medical importance. Given that Akt signaling is essential for cell growth and survival, we hypothesized that sustained Akt activation in the mosquito midgut would alter the balance of critical pathways that control mitochondrial dynamics to enhance parasite killing at some cost to survivorship. Toxic reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RNOS) rise to high levels in the midgut after blood feeding, due to a combination of high NO production and a decline in FOXO-dependent antioxidants. Despite an apparent increase in mitochondrial biogenesis in young females (3 d), energy deficiencies were apparent as decreased oxidative phosphorylation and increased [AMP]/[ATP] ratios. In addition, mitochondrial mass was lower and accompanied by the presence of stalled autophagosomes in the posterior midgut, a critical site for blood digestion and stem cell-mediated epithelial maintenance and repair, and by functional degradation of the epithelial barrier. By 18 d, the age at which An. stephensi would transmit P. falciparum to human hosts, mitochondrial dysfunction coupled to Akt-mediated repression of autophagy/mitophagy was more evident and midgut epithelial structure was markedly compromised. Inhibition of RNOS by co-feeding of the nitric-oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME at infection abrogated Akt-dependent killing of P. falciparum that begins within 18 h of infection in 3-5 d old mosquitoes. Hence, Akt-induced changes in mitochondrial dynamics perturb midgut homeostasis to enhance parasite resistance and decrease mosquito infective lifespan. Further, quality control of mitochondrial function in the

  13. Mitochondrial dysfunction as a mediator of hippocampal apoptosis in a model of hepatic encephalopathy.

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    Bustamante, J; Lores-Arnaiz, S; Tallis, S; Roselló, D M; Lago, N; Lemberg, A; Boveris, A; Perazzo, J C

    2011-08-01

    In this study, we describe the presence of apoptosis, associated with a mitochondrial dysfunction in the hippocampus of animals in an experimental model defined as minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE). This experimental model was studied after 10 days of induced portal vein calibrated stricture, leading to portal hypertension and to a moderate hyperammonemia, without the presence of other evident central nervous system changes. The molecular mechanisms here proposed indicate the presence of apoptotic intrinsic pathways that point to hippocampal mitochondria as an important mediator of apoptosis in this experimental model. In this model of MHE, the presence of DNA fragmentation is documented by 2.3-times increased number of TUNEL-positive cells. These findings together with a higher ratio of the Bcl-2 family members Bax/Bcl-xL in the outer mitochondrial membrane of the MHE animals together with 11% of cytochrome c release indicate the presence of apoptosis in this experimental model. A detailed analysis of the hippocampal mitochondrial physiology was performed after mitochondrial isolation. The determination of the respiratory rate in the presence of malate plus glutamate and ADP showed a 45% decrease in respiratory control in MHE animals as compared with the sham group. A marked decrease of cytochrome oxidase (complex IV of the electron transport chain) was also observed, showing 46% less activity in hippocampal mitochondria from MHE animals. In addition, mitochondria from these animals showed less ability to maintain membrane potential (ΔΨ (m)) which was 13% lower than the sham group. Light scattering experiments showed that mitochondria from MHE animals were more sensitive to swell in the presence of increased calcium concentrations as compared with the sham group. In addition, in vitro studies performed in mitochondria from sham animals showed that mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) could be a mitochondrial mediator of the apoptotic signaling in the

  14. Silybum marianum oil attenuates oxidative stress and ameliorates mitochondrial dysfunction in mice treated with D-galactose

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    Shu Yun Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Silybum marianum has been used as herbal medicine for the treatment of liver disease, liver cirrhosis, and to prevent liver cancer in Europe and Asia since ancient times. Silybum marianum oil (SMO, a by-product of silymarin production, is rich in essential fatty acids, phospholipids, sterols, and vitamin E. However, it has not been very good development and use. Objective: In the present study, we used olive oil as a control to investigate the antioxidant and anti-aging effect of SMO in D-galactose (D-gal-induced aging mice. Materials and Methods: D-gal was injected intraperitoneally (500 mg/kg body weight daily for 7 weeks while SMO was simultaneously administered orally. The triglycerides (TRIG and cholesterol (CHOL levels were estimated in the serum. Superoxide dismutase (SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px, total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC, monoamine oxidase (MAO, malondialdehyde (MDA, caspase-3, and Bcl-2 were determined in the liver and brain. The activities of Na + -K + -adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase, Ca 2+ -Mg 2+ -ATPase, membrane potential (ΔΨm, and membrane fluidity of the liver mitochondrial were estimated. Results: SMO decreased levels of TRIG and CHOL in aging mice. SMO administration elevated the activities of SOD, GSH-Px, and T-AOC, which are suppressed by aging. The levels of MAO and MDA in the liver and brain were reduced by SMO administration in aging mice. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay showed that SMO significantly decreased the concentration of caspase-3 and improved the activity of Bcl-2 in the liver and brain of aging mice. Furthermore, SMO significantly attenuated the D-gal induced liver mitochondrial dysfunction by improving the activities of Na + -K + -ATPase, Ca 2+ -Mg 2+ -ATPase, membrane potential (ΔΨm, and membrane fluidity. Conclusion: These results indicate that SMO effectively attenuated oxidative damage and improved apoptosis related factors as well as liver mitochondrial dysfunction in

  15. Mitochondrial dysfunction reveals the role of mRNA poly(A tail regulation in oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy pathogenesis.

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    Aymeric Chartier

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD, a late-onset disorder characterized by progressive degeneration of specific muscles, results from the extension of a polyalanine tract in poly(A binding protein nuclear 1 (PABPN1. While the roles of PABPN1 in nuclear polyadenylation and regulation of alternative poly(A site choice are established, the molecular mechanisms behind OPMD remain undetermined. Here, we show, using Drosophila and mouse models, that OPMD pathogenesis depends on affected poly(A tail lengths of specific mRNAs. We identify a set of mRNAs encoding mitochondrial proteins that are down-regulated starting at the earliest stages of OPMD progression. The down-regulation of these mRNAs correlates with their shortened poly(A tails and partial rescue of their levels when deadenylation is genetically reduced improves muscle function. Genetic analysis of candidate genes encoding RNA binding proteins using the Drosophila OPMD model uncovers a potential role of a number of them. We focus on the deadenylation regulator Smaug and show that it is expressed in adult muscles and specifically binds to the down-regulated mRNAs. In addition, the first step of the cleavage and polyadenylation reaction, mRNA cleavage, is affected in muscles expressing alanine-expanded PABPN1. We propose that impaired cleavage during nuclear cleavage/polyadenylation is an early defect in OPMD. This defect followed by active deadenylation of specific mRNAs, involving Smaug and the CCR4-NOT deadenylation complex, leads to their destabilization and mitochondrial dysfunction. These results broaden our understanding of the role of mRNA regulation in pathologies and might help to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying neurodegenerative disorders that involve mitochondrial dysfunction.

  16. Melatonin protects against uric acid-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and triglyceride accumulation in C2C12 myotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maarman, Gerald J; Andrew, Brittany M; Blackhurst, Dee M; Ojuka, Edward O

    2017-04-01

    Excess uric acid has been shown to induce oxidative stress, triglyceride accumulation, and mitochondrial dysfunction in the liver and is an independent predictor of type-2 diabetes. Skeletal muscle plays a dominant role in type 2 diabetes and presents a large surface area to plasma uric acid. However, the effects of uric acid on skeletal muscle are underinvestigated. Our aim was therefore to characterize the effects of excessive uric acid on oxidative stress, triglyceride content, and mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle C2C12 myotubes and assess how these are modulated by the antioxidant molecule melatonin. Differentiated C2C12 myotubes were exposed to 750 µM uric acid or uric acid + 10 nM melatonin for 72 h. Compared with control, uric acid increased triglyceride content by ~237%, oxidative stress by 32%, and antioxidant capacity by 135%. Uric acid also reduced endogenous ROUTINE respiration, complex II-linked oxidative phosphorylation, and electron transfer system capacities. Melatonin counteracted the effects of uric acid without further altering antioxidant capacity. Our data demonstrate that excess uric acid has adverse effects on skeletal muscle similar to those previously reported in hepatocytes and suggest that melatonin at a low physiological concentration of 10 nM may be a possible therapy against some adverse effects of excess uric acid.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Few studies have investigated the effects of uric acid on skeletal muscle. This study shows that hyperuricemia induces mitochondrial dysfunction and triglyceride accumulation in skeletal muscle. The findings may explain why hyperuricemia is an independent predictor of diabetes. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Mitochondrial dysfunction reveals the role of mRNA poly(A) tail regulation in oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartier, Aymeric; Klein, Pierre; Pierson, Stéphanie; Barbezier, Nicolas; Gidaro, Teresa; Casas, François; Carberry, Steven; Dowling, Paul; Maynadier, Laurie; Bellec, Maëlle; Oloko, Martine; Jardel, Claude; Moritz, Bodo; Dickson, George; Mouly, Vincent; Ohlendieck, Kay; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Trollet, Capucine; Simonelig, Martine

    2015-03-01

    Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD), a late-onset disorder characterized by progressive degeneration of specific muscles, results from the extension of a polyalanine tract in poly(A) binding protein nuclear 1 (PABPN1). While the roles of PABPN1 in nuclear polyadenylation and regulation of alternative poly(A) site choice are established, the molecular mechanisms behind OPMD remain undetermined. Here, we show, using Drosophila and mouse models, that OPMD pathogenesis depends on affected poly(A) tail lengths of specific mRNAs. We identify a set of mRNAs encoding mitochondrial proteins that are down-regulated starting at the earliest stages of OPMD progression. The down-regulation of these mRNAs correlates with their shortened poly(A) tails and partial rescue of their levels when deadenylation is genetically reduced improves muscle function. Genetic analysis of candidate genes encoding RNA binding proteins using the Drosophila OPMD model uncovers a potential role of a number of them. We focus on the deadenylation regulator Smaug and show that it is expressed in adult muscles and specifically binds to the down-regulated mRNAs. In addition, the first step of the cleavage and polyadenylation reaction, mRNA cleavage, is affected in muscles expressing alanine-expanded PABPN1. We propose that impaired cleavage during nuclear cleavage/polyadenylation is an early defect in OPMD. This defect followed by active deadenylation of specific mRNAs, involving Smaug and the CCR4-NOT deadenylation complex, leads to their destabilization and mitochondrial dysfunction. These results broaden our understanding of the role of mRNA regulation in pathologies and might help to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying neurodegenerative disorders that involve mitochondrial dysfunction.

  18. Intracellular Ca2+ release through ryanodine receptors contributes to AMPA receptor-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction and ER stress in oligodendrocytes

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    Ruiz, A; Matute, C; Alberdi, E

    2010-01-01

    Overactivation of ionotropic glutamate receptors in oligodendrocytes induces cytosolic Ca2+ overload and excitotoxic death, a process that contributes to demyelination and multiple sclerosis. Excitotoxic insults cause well-characterized mitochondrial alterations and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) dysfunction, which is not fully understood. In this study, we analyzed the contribution of ER-Ca2+ release through ryanodine receptors (RyRs) and inositol triphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) to excitotoxicity in oligodendrocytes in vitro. First, we observed that oligodendrocytes express all previously characterized RyRs and IP3Rs. Blockade of Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release by TMB-8 following α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate (AMPA) receptor-mediated insults attenuated both oligodendrocyte death and cytosolic Ca2+ overload. In turn, RyR inhibition by ryanodine reduced as well the Ca2+ overload whereas IP3R inhibition was ineffective. Furthermore, AMPA-triggered mitochondrial membrane depolarization, oxidative stress and activation of caspase-3, which in all instances was diminished by RyR inhibition. In addition, we observed that AMPA induced an ER stress response as revealed by α subunit of the eukaryotic initiation factor 2α phosphorylation, overexpression of GRP chaperones and RyR-dependent cleavage of caspase-12. Finally, attenuating ER stress with salubrinal protected oligodendrocytes from AMPA excitotoxicity. Together, these results show that Ca2+ release through RyRs contributes to cytosolic Ca2+ overload, mitochondrial dysfunction, ER stress and cell death following AMPA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity in oligodendrocytes. PMID:21364659

  19. [Cyclosporin A causes oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in renal tubular cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez de Hornedo, J; de Arriba, G; Calvino, M; Benito, S; Parra, T

    2007-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in cyclosporin A (CsA) nephrotoxicity. As mitochondria are one of the main sources of ROS in cells, we evaluated the role of CsA in mitochondrial structure and function in LLC-PK1 cells. We incubated cells with CsA 1 microM for 24 hours and studies were performed with flow citometry and confocal microscopy. We studied mitochondrial NAD(P)H content, superoxide anion (O2.-) production (MitoSOX Red), oxidation of cardiolipin of inner mitochondrial membrane (NAO) and mitochondrial membrane potential (DIOC2(3)). Also we analyzed the intracellular ROS synthesis (H2DCF-DA) and reduced glutation (GSH) of cells. Our results showed that CsA decreased NAD(P)H and membrane potential, and increased O2.- in mitochondria. CsA also provoked oxidation of cardiolipin. Furthermore, CsA increased intracellular ROS production and decreased GSH content. These results suggest that CsA has crucial effects in mitochondria. CsA modified mitochondrial physiology through the decrease of antioxidant mitochondrial compounds as NAD(P)H and the dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential and increase of oxidants as O2.-. Also, CsA alters lipidic structure of inner mitochondrial membrane through the oxidation of cardiolipin. These effects trigger a chain of events that favour intracellular synthesis of ROS and depletion of GSH that can compromise cellular viability. Nephrotoxic cellular effects of CsA can be explained, at least in part, through its influence on mitochondrial functionalism.

  20. Linoleic acid suppresses colorectal cancer cell growth by inducing oxidant stress and mitochondrial dysfunction

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    Shen Shengrong

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Some polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs, if not all, have been shown to have tumoricidal action, but their exact mechanism(s of action is not clear. In the present study, we observed that n-6 PUFA linoleic acid (LA inhibited tumor cell growth at high concentrations (above 300 μM; while low concentrations (100-200 μM promoted proliferation. Analysis of cell mitochondrial membrane potential, reactive oxygen species (ROS formation, malondialdehyde (MDA accumulation and superoxide dismutase (SOD activity suggested that anti-cancer action of LA is due to enhanced ROS generation and decreased cell anti-oxidant capacity that resulted in mitochondrial damage. Of the three cell lines tested, semi-differentiated colorectal cancer cells RKO were most sensitive to the cytotoxic action of LA, followed by undifferentiated colorectal cancer cell line (LOVO while the normal human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC were the most resistant (the degree of sensitivity to LA is as follows: RKO > LOVO > HUVEC. LA induced cell death was primed by mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Pre-incubation of cancer cells with 100 μM LA for 24 hr enhanced sensitivity of differentiated and semi-differentiated cells to the subsequent exposure to LA. The relative resistance of LOVO cells to the cytotoxic action of LA is due to a reduction in the activation of caspase-3. Thus, LA induced cancer cell apoptosis by enhancing cellular oxidant status and inducing mitochondrial dysfunction.

  1. Mitochondrial oxidative stress and dysfunction in rat brain induced by carbofuran exposure.

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    Kamboj, Sukhdev Singh; Kumar, Vikas; Kamboj, Amit; Sandhir, Rajat

    2008-11-01

    Repeated low-dose exposure to carbofuran exerts its neurotoxic effects by non-cholinergic mechanisms. Emerging evidence indicates that oxidative stress plays an important role in carbofuran neurotoxicity after sub-chronic exposure. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the role of mitochondrial oxidative stress and dysfunction as a primary event responsible for neurotoxic effects observed after sub-chronic carbofuran exposure. Carbofuran was administered to rats at a dose of 1 mg/kg orally for a period of 28 days. There was a significant inhibition in the activity of acetylcholinesterase (66.6%) in brain samples after 28 days of carbofuran exposure. Mitochondrial respiratory chain functions were assessed in terms of MTT (3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) reduction and activity of succinate dehydrogenase in isolated mitochondria. It was observed that carbofuran exposure significantly inhibited MTT reduction (31%) and succinate dehydrogenase activity (57%). This was accompanied by decrease in low-molecular weight thiols (66.6%) and total thiols (37.4%) and an increase in lipid peroxidation (43.7%) in the mitochondria isolated from carbofuran-exposed rat brain. The changes in mitochondrial oxidative stress and functions were associated with impaired cognitive and motor functions in the animals exposed to carbofuran as compared to the control animals. Based on these results, it is clear that carbofuran exerts its neurotoxicity by impairing mitochondrial functions leading to oxidative stress and neurobehavioral deficits.

  2. Molecular insights into mitochondrial dysfunction in cancer-related muscle wasting.

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    Antunes, Diana; Padrão, Ana Isabel; Maciel, Elisabete; Santinha, Deolinda; Oliveira, Paula; Vitorino, Rui; Moreira-Gonçalves, Daniel; Colaço, Bruno; Pires, Maria João; Nunes, Cláudia; Santos, Lúcio L; Amado, Francisco; Duarte, José Alberto; Domingues, Maria Rosário; Ferreira, Rita

    2014-06-01

    Alterations in muscle mitochondrial bioenergetics during cancer cachexia were previously suggested; however, the underlying mechanisms are not known. So, the goal of this study was to evaluate mitochondrial phospholipid remodeling in cancer-related muscle wasting and its repercussions to respiratory chain activity and fiber susceptibility to apoptosis. An animal model of urothelial carcinoma induced by exposition to N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)-nitrosamine (BBN) and characterized by significant body weight loss due to skeletal muscle mass decrease was used. Morphological evidences of muscle atrophy were associated to decreased respiratory chain activity and increased expression of mitochondrial UCP3, which altogether highlight the lower ability of wasted muscle to produce ATP. Lipidomic analysis of isolated mitochondria revealed a significant decrease of phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylglycerol and cardiolipin in BBN mitochondria, counteracted by increased phosphatidylcholine levels. Besides the impact on membrane fluidity, this phospholipid remodeling seems to justify, at least in part, the lower oxidative phosphorylation activity observed in mitochondria from wasted muscle and their increased susceptibility to apoptosis. Curiously, no evidences of lipid peroxidation were observed but proteins from BBN mitochondria, particularly the metabolic ones, seem more prone to carbonylation with the consequent implications in mitochondria functionality. Overall, data suggest that bladder cancer negatively impacts skeletal muscle activity specifically by affecting mitochondrial phospholipid dynamics and its interaction with proteins, ultimately leading to the dysfunction of this organelle. The regulation of phospholipid biosynthetic pathways might be seen as potential therapeutic targets for the management of cancer-related muscle wasting.

  3. Investigation of mitochondrial dysfunction by sequential microplate-based respiration measurements from intact and permeabilized neurons.

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    Pascaline Clerc

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction is a component of many neurodegenerative conditions. Measurement of oxygen consumption from intact neurons enables evaluation of mitochondrial bioenergetics under conditions that are more physiologically realistic compared to isolated mitochondria. However, mechanistic analysis of mitochondrial function in cells is complicated by changing energy demands and lack of substrate control. Here we describe a technique for sequentially measuring respiration from intact and saponin-permeabilized cortical neurons on single microplates. This technique allows control of substrates to individual electron transport chain complexes following permeabilization, as well as side-by-side comparisons to intact cells. To illustrate the utility of the technique, we demonstrate that inhibition of respiration by the drug KB-R7943 in intact neurons is relieved by delivery of the complex II substrate succinate, but not by complex I substrates, via acute saponin permeabilization. In contrast, methyl succinate, a putative cell permeable complex II substrate, failed to rescue respiration in intact neurons and was a poor complex II substrate in permeabilized cells. Sequential measurements of intact and permeabilized cell respiration should be particularly useful for evaluating indirect mitochondrial toxicity due to drugs or cellular signaling events which cannot be readily studied using isolated mitochondria.

  4. trans,trans-2,4-decadienal induces mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress.

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    Sigolo, Carlos A O; Di Mascio, Paolo; Kowaltowski, Alicia J; Garcia, Camila C M; Medeiros, Marisa H G

    2008-04-01

    Lipid peroxidation produces a large number of reactive aldehydes as secondary products. We have previously shown that the reaction of cytochrome c with trans,trans-2,4-decadienal (DDE), an aldehyde generated as a product of lipid peroxidation in cell membranes, results in the formation of adducts. Mass spectrometry analysis indicated that His-33, Lys-39, Lys-72 and Lys-100 in cytochrome c were modified by DDE. In the present work, we investigated the effect of DDE on isolated rat liver mitochondria. DDE (162 microM) treatment increases the rate of mitochondrial oxygen consumption. Extensive mitochondrial swelling upon treatment with DDE (900 nM-162 microM) was observed by light scattering and transmission electron microscopy experiments. DDE-induced loss of inner mitochondrial membrane potentials, monitored by safranin O fluorescence, was also observed. Furthermore, DDE-treated mitochondria showed an increase in lipid peroxidation, as monitored by MDA formation. These results suggest that reactive aldehydes promote mitochondrial dysfunction.

  5. Investigation of mitochondrial dysfunction by sequential microplate-based respiration measurements from intact and permeabilized neurons.

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    Clerc, Pascaline; Polster, Brian M

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a component of many neurodegenerative conditions. Measurement of oxygen consumption from intact neurons enables evaluation of mitochondrial bioenergetics under conditions that are more physiologically realistic compared to isolated mitochondria. However, mechanistic analysis of mitochondrial function in cells is complicated by changing energy demands and lack of substrate control. Here we describe a technique for sequentially measuring respiration from intact and saponin-permeabilized cortical neurons on single microplates. This technique allows control of substrates to individual electron transport chain complexes following permeabilization, as well as side-by-side comparisons to intact cells. To illustrate the utility of the technique, we demonstrate that inhibition of respiration by the drug KB-R7943 in intact neurons is relieved by delivery of the complex II substrate succinate, but not by complex I substrates, via acute saponin permeabilization. In contrast, methyl succinate, a putative cell permeable complex II substrate, failed to rescue respiration in intact neurons and was a poor complex II substrate in permeabilized cells. Sequential measurements of intact and permeabilized cell respiration should be particularly useful for evaluating indirect mitochondrial toxicity due to drugs or cellular signaling events which cannot be readily studied using isolated mitochondria.

  6. The Roads to Mitochondrial Dysfunction in a Rat Model of Posttraumatic Syringomyelia

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    Zhiqiang Hu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The pathophysiology of posttraumatic syringomyelia is incompletely understood. We examined whether local ischemia occurs after spinal cord injury. If so, whether it causes neuronal mitochondrial dysfunction and depletion, and subsequent energy metabolism impairment results in cell starvation of energy and even cell death, contributing to the enlargement of the cavity. Local blood flow was measured in a rat model of posttraumatic syringomyelia that had received injections of quisqualic acid and kaolin. We found an 86±11% reduction of local blood flow at C8 where a cyst formed at 6 weeks after syrinx induction procedure (P<0.05, and no difference in blood flow rate between the laminectomy and intact controls. Electron microscopy confirmed irreversible neuronal mitochondrion depletion surrounding the cyst, but recoverable mitochondrial loses in laminectomy rats. Profound energy loss quantified in the spinal cord of syrinx animals, and less ATP and ADP decline observed in laminectomy rats. Our findings demonstrate that an excitotoxic injury induces local ischemia in the spinal cord and results in neuronal mitochondrial depletion, and profound ATP loss, contributing to syrinx enlargement. Ischemia did not occur following laminectomy induced trauma in which mitochondrial loss and decline in ATP were reversible. This confirms excitotoxic injury contributing to the pathology of posttraumatic syringomyelia.

  7. Polychlorinated Biphenyls Induce Mitochondrial Dysfunction in SH-SY5Y Neuroblastoma Cells.

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    Stefania Cocco

    Full Text Available Chronic exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs, ubiquitous environmental contaminants, can adversely affect the development and function of the nervous system. Here we evaluated the effect of PCB exposure on mitochondrial function using the PCB mixture Aroclor-1254 (A1254 in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. A 6-hour exposure to A1254 (5 μg/ml reduced cellular ATP production by 45%±7, and mitochondrial membrane potential, detected by TMRE, by 49%±7. Consistently, A1254 significantly decreased oxidative phosphorylation and aerobic glycolysis measured by extracellular flux analyzer. Furthermore, the activity of mitochondrial protein complexes I, II, and IV, but not V (ATPase, measured by BN-PAGE technique, was significantly reduced after 6-hour exposure to A1254. The addition of pyruvic acid during exposure to A1254 significantly prevent A1254-induced cell injury, restoring resting mitochondrial membrane potential, ATP levels, oxidative phosphorylation and aerobic glycolysis. Furthermore, pyruvic acid significantly preserved the activity of mitochondrial complexes I, II and IV and increased basal activity of complex V. Collectively, the present results indicate that the neurotoxicity of A1254 depends on the impairment of oxidative phosphorylation, aerobic glycolysis, and mitochondrial complexes I, II, and IV activity and it was counteracted by pyruvic acid.

  8. Platycodin D induced apoptosis and autophagy in PC-12 cells through mitochondrial dysfunction pathway

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    Zeng, Chuan-Chuan; Zhang, Cheng; Yao, Jun-Hua; Lai, Shang-Hai; Han, Bing-Jie; Li, Wei; Tang, Bing; Wan, Dan; Liu, Yun-Jun

    2016-11-01

    In this article, the in vitro cytotoxicity of platycodin D was evaluated in human PC-12, SGC-7901, BEL-7402, HeLa and A549 cancer cell lines. PC-12 cells were sensitive to platycodin D treatment, with an IC50 value of 13.5 ± 1.2 μM. Morphological and comet assays showed that platycodin D effectively induced apoptosis in PC-12 cells. Platycodin D increased the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and induced a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential. Platycodin D induced cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase in the PC-12 cell line. Platycodin D can induce autophagy. In addition, platycodin D can down-regulate the expression of Bcl-2 and Bcl-x, and up-regulate the levels of Bid protein in the PC-12 cells. The results demonstrated that platycodin D induced PC-12 cell apoptosis through a ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction pathway.

  9. 线粒体功能障碍与心血管疾病%Roles of mitochondrial dysfunction in cardiovascular diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊燕; 张梅; 陈菲; 方伟进

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria are important organelles of energy generation in eukaryocytes and play a pivotal role in cell calcium homeostasis, signal transduction and apoptotic regulation. The possible causes leading to mitochondrial dysfunction include oxidative stress, Ca + disorder, reduction of mitochondrial biosynthesis and mitochondrial DNA mutations, all of which are also closely related to the development of cardiovascular diseases. Understanding the mitochondrial dysfunction and its important role in cardiovascular diseases are very significant for elucidating the mechanisms of cardiovascular diseases.

  10. Macroautophagy and Cell Responses Related to Mitochondrial Dysfunction, Lipid Metabolism and Unconventional Secretion of Proteins

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    Thierry Arnould

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Macroautophagy has important physiological roles and its cytoprotective or detrimental function is compromised in various diseases such as many cancers and metabolic diseases. However, the importance of autophagy for cell responses has also been demonstrated in many other physiological and pathological situations. In this review, we discuss some of the recently discovered mechanisms involved in specific and unspecific autophagy related to mitochondrial dysfunction and organelle degradation, lipid metabolism and lipophagy as well as recent findings and evidence that link autophagy to unconventional protein secretion.

  11. Macroautophagy and Cell Responses Related to Mitochondrial Dysfunction, Lipid Metabolism and Unconventional Secretion of Proteins

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    Demine, Stéphane; Michel, Sébastien; Vannuvel, Kayleen; Wanet, Anaïs; Renard, Patricia; Arnould, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    Macroautophagy has important physiological roles and its cytoprotective or detrimental function is compromised in various diseases such as many cancers and metabolic diseases. However, the importance of autophagy for cell responses has also been demonstrated in many other physiological and pathological situations. In this review, we discuss some of the recently discovered mechanisms involved in specific and unspecific autophagy related to mitochondrial dysfunction and organelle degradation, lipid metabolism and lipophagy as well as recent findings and evidence that link autophagy to unconventional protein secretion. PMID:24710422

  12. The roads to mitochondrial dysfunction in a rat model of posttraumatic syringomyelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhiqiang; Tu, Jian

    2015-01-01

    The pathophysiology of posttraumatic syringomyelia is incompletely understood. We examined whether local ischemia occurs after spinal cord injury. If so, whether it causes neuronal mitochondrial dysfunction and depletion, and subsequent energy metabolism impairment results in cell starvation of energy and even cell death, contributing to the enlargement of the cavity. Local blood flow was measured in a rat model of posttraumatic syringomyelia that had received injections of quisqualic acid and kaolin. We found an 86 ± 11% reduction of local blood flow at C8 where a cyst formed at 6 weeks after syrinx induction procedure (P syringomyelia.

  13. Mitochondrial dysfunction bridges negative affective disorders and cardiomyopathy in socially isolated rats: Pros and cons of fluoxetine.

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    Sonei, Nazanin; Amiri, Shayan; Jafarian, Iman; Anoush, Mahdieh; Rahimi-Balaei, Maryam; Bergen, Hugo; Haj-Mirzaian, Arya; Hosseini, Mir-Jamal

    2017-02-01

    Objectives Depression is tightly associated with cardiovascular comorbidity and accounts for high financial and social burden worldwide. Mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to the pathophysiology of depression and cardiovascular disorders; its contribution to depression-cardiovascular comorbidity has not yet been investigated. Methods Adolescent rats were subjected to 4 weeks of isolation (social isolation stress or SIS) or social conditions (control), and then they were divided into treatment (fluoxetine, 7.5 mg/kg/day for 21 days) and non-treatment groups. After different housing conditions and treatment, animals were evaluated by behavioural tests (n = 6-8) and mitochondrial assessments (n = 3) of brain and cardiac tissues. Results We found that juvenile SIS induced behavioural abnormalities and mitochondrial dysfunction in adulthood. We showed that juvenile SIS was associated with impaired respiratory chain complex, which leads to reactive oxygen species formation, oxidative damage and ATP abatement in both brain and heart. Administration of FLX (7.5 mg/kg/day) during the isolation period attenuated the effects of SIS on the brain mitochondria and behavioural abnormalities, but had little or no effect on SIS-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in cardiac tissue. Conclusions This suggests that juvenile SIS predisposes the co-occurrence of depression and cardiovascular disease through mitochondrial dysfunction and that therapeutic effect of fluoxetine is partly mediated by its effect on mitochondrial function.

  14. Shortwave UV-induced damage as part of the solar damage spectrum is not a major contributor to mitochondrial dysfunction.

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    Gebhard, Daniel; Matt, Katja; Burger, Katharina; Bergemann, Jörg

    2014-06-01

    Because of the absence of a nucleotide excision repair in mitochondria, ultraviolet (UV)-induced bulky mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) lesions persist for several days before they would eventually be removed by mitophagy. Long persistence of this damage might disturb mitochondrial functions, thereby contributing to skin ageing. In this study, we examined the influence of shortwave UV-induced damage on mitochondrial parameters in normal human skin fibroblasts. We irradiated cells with either sun-simulating light (SSL) or with ultraviolet C to generate bulky DNA lesions. At equivalent antiproliferative doses, both irradiation regimes induced gene expression of mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) and matrix metallopeptidase 1 (MMP-1). Only irradiation with SSL, however, caused significant changes in mtDNA copy number and a decrease in mitochondrial respiration. Our results indicate that shortwave UV-induced damage as part of the solar spectrum is not a major contributor to mitochondrial dysfunction.

  15. Protective effect of bacoside A on cigarette smoking-induced brain mitochondrial dysfunction in rats.

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    Anbarasi, Kothandapani; Vani, Ganapathy; Devi, Chennam Srinivasulu Shyamala

    2005-01-01

    Chronic exposure to cigarette smoke affects the structure and function of mitochondria, which may account for the pathogenesis of smoking-related diseases. Bacopa monniera Linn., used in traditional Indian medicine for various neurological disorders, was shown to possess mitrochondrial membrane-stabilizing properties in the rat brain during exposure to morphine. We investigated the protective effect of bacoside A, the active principle of Bacopa monniera, against mitochondrial dysfunction in rat brain induced by cigarette smoke. Male Wistar albino rats were exposed to cigarette smoke and administered bacoside A for a period of 12 weeks. The mitochondrial damage in the brain was assessed by examining the levels of lipid peroxides, cholesterol, phospholipid, cholesterol/phospholipid (C/P) ratio, and the activities of isocitrate dehydrogenase, alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase, NADH dehydrogenase, and cytochrome C oxidase. The oxidative phosphorylation (rate of succinate oxidation, respiratory control ratio and ADP/O ratio, and the levels of ATP) was evaluated for the assessment of mitochondrial functional capacity. We found significantly elevated levels of lipid peroxides, cholesterol, and C/P ratio, and decreased levels of phospholipids and mitochondrial enzymes in the rats exposed to cigarette smoke. Measurement of oxidative phosphorylation revealed a marked depletion in all the variables studied. Administration of bacoside A prevented the structural and functional impairment of mitochondria upon exposure to cigarette smoke. From the results, we suggest that chronic cigarette smoke exposure induces damage to the mitochondria and that bacoside A protects the brain from this damage by maintaining the structural and functional integrity of the mitochondrial membrane.

  16. Age-related differences in experimental stroke: possible involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage.

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    Li, Nanlin; Kong, Xiangwei; Ye, Ruidong; Yang, Qianzi; Han, Junliang; Xiong, Lize

    2011-06-01

    Age is the single most important risk factor for cerebral stroke. Unfortunately, the effect of age on ischemic brain damage is less clear. In this study, we sought to examine the potential influence of aging on the histologic and functional outcomes after ischemia. Juvenile (4 weeks of age), young adult (4 months of age), mid-aged (11-12 months of age), and aged (18-19 months of age) mice were subjected to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion. There was no remarkable difference of infarct volume on postoperative days 1 and 3. However, on postoperative day 7, aged mice exhibited significantly worsened infarct volume compared with juvenile and young mice. Intriguingly, the increase of infarct volume was most prominent in the striatal area rather than in cortex. Accordingly, aged mice displayed a slower and incomplete functional recovery after stroke. We further evaluated the effects of aging on the oxidative damage and mitochondrial dysfunction following ischemia. Brain tissues were assayed for lipid, DNA, and protein peroxidation products, mitochondrial enzyme activities, mitochondrial membrane potential, production of reactive oxygen species, and antioxidant activities. Aging was associated with declined mitochondrial function and antioxidant detoxification following ischemia, thereby inducing a deteriorated oxidative damage. Regional subanalyses demonstrated that, in accordance with infarct area, the pro-oxidant/antioxidant imbalance occurred more prominently in subcortical areas. Collectively, these findings suggest mitochondria-mediated oxidative damage may be involved in the age-related aggravated injury in subcortical areas. Mitochondrial protection could be a promising target for neuroprotective therapy, especially in the aged population.

  17. Combination of angiotensin II and l-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester exacerbates mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress to cause heart failure.

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    Hamilton, Dale J; Zhang, Aijun; Li, Shumin; Cao, Tram N; Smith, Jessie A; Vedula, Indira; Cordero-Reyes, Andrea M; Youker, Keith A; Torre-Amione, Guillermo; Gupte, Anisha A

    2016-03-15

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated as a cause of energy deprivation in heart failure (HF). Herein, we tested individual and combined effects of two pathogenic factors of nonischemic HF, inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis [with l-N(G)-nitroarginine methyl ester (l-NAME)] and hypertension [with angiotensin II (AngII)], on myocardial mitochondrial function, oxidative stress, and metabolic gene expression. l-NAME and AngII were administered individually and in combination to mice for 5 wk. Although all treatments increased blood pressure and reduced cardiac contractile function, the l-NAME + AngII group was associated with the most severe HF, as characterized by edema, hypertrophy, oxidative stress, increased expression of Nppa and Nppb, and decreased expression of Atp2a2 and Camk2b. l-NAME + AngII-treated mice exhibited robust deterioration of cardiac mitochondrial function, as observed by reduced respiratory control ratios in subsarcolemmal mitochondria and reduced state 3 levels in interfibrillar mitochondria for complex I but not for complex II substrates. Cardiac myofibrils showed reduced ADP-supported and oligomycin-inhibited oxygen consumption. Mitochondrial functional impairment was accompanied by reduced mitochondrial DNA content and activities of pyruvate dehydrogenase and complex I but increased H2O2 production and tissue protein carbonyls in hearts from AngII and l-NAME + AngII groups. Microarray analyses revealed the majority of the gene changes attributed to the l-NAME + AngII group. Pathway analyses indicated significant changes in metabolic pathways, such as oxidative phosphorylation, mitochondrial function, cardiac hypertrophy, and fatty acid metabolism in l-NAME + AngII hearts. We conclude that l-NAME + AngII is associated with impaired mitochondrial respiratory function and increased oxidative stress compared with either l-NAME or AngII alone, resulting in nonischemic HF.

  18. Cause and Consequence: Mitochondrial Dysfunction Initiates and Propagates Neuronal Dysfunction, Neuronal Death and Behavioral Abnormalities in Age Associated Neurodegenerative Diseases

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    Gibson, Gary E.; Starkov, Anatoly; Blass, John P.; Ratan, Rajiv R.; Beal, M. Flint

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Age-related neurodegenerative diseases are associated with mild impairment of oxidative metabolism and accumulation of abnormal proteins. Within the cell, the mitochondria appears to be a dominant site for initiation and propagation of disease processes. Shifts in metabolism in response to mild metabolic perturbations may decrease the threshold for irreversible injury in response to ordinarily sub lethal metabolic insults. Mild impairment of metabolism accrue from and lead to increased reactive oxygen species (ROS). Increased ROS change cell signaling via post transcriptional and transcriptional changes. The cause and consequences of mild impairment of mitochondrial metabolism is one focus of this review. Many experiments in tissues from humans support the notion that oxidative modification of the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGDHC) compromises neuronal energy metabolism and enhance ROS production in Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). These data suggest that cognitive decline in AD derives from the selective tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle abnormalities. By contrast in Huntington’s Disease (HD), a movement disorder with cognitive features distinct form AD, complex II + III abnormalities may dominate. These distinct mitochondrial abnormalities culminate in oxidative stress, energy dysfunction, and aberrant homeostasis of cytosolic calcium. Cytosolic calcium, elevations even only transiently, leads to hyperactivity of a number of enzymes. One calcium activated enzyme with demonstrated pathophysiological import in HD and AD is transglutaminase (TGase). TGase is a cross linking enzymes that can modulate transcrption, inactivate metabolic enzymes, and cause aggregation of critical proteins. Recent data indicate that TGase can silence expression of genes involved in compensating for metabolic stress. Altogether, our results suggest that increasing KGDHC via inhibition of TGase or via a host of other strategies to be described would be effective therapeutic

  19. Tempol, a superoxide dismutase mimetic agent, ameliorates cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity through alleviation of mitochondrial dysfunction in mice.

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    Lamiaa A Ahmed

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction is a crucial mechanism by which cisplatin, a potent chemotherapeutic agent, causes nephrotoxicity where mitochondrial electron transport complexes are shifted mostly toward imbalanced reactive oxygen species versus energy production. In the present study, the protective role of tempol, a membrane-permeable superoxide dismutase mimetic agent, was evaluated on mitochondrial dysfunction and the subsequent damage induced by cisplatin nephrotoxicity in mice.Nephrotoxicity was assessed 72 h after a single i.p. injection of cisplatin (25 mg/kg with or without oral administration of tempol (100 mg/kg/day. Serum creatinine and urea as well as glucosuria and proteinuria were evaluated. Both kidneys were isolated for estimation of oxidative stress markers, adenosine triphosphate (ATP content and caspase-3 activity. Moreover, mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation capacity, complexes I-IV activities and mitochondrial nitric oxide synthase (mNOS protein expression were measured along with histological examinations of renal tubular damage and mitochondrial ultrastructural changes. Tempol was effective against cisplatin-induced elevation of serum creatinine and urea as well as glucosuria and proteinuria. Moreover, pretreatment with tempol notably inhibited cisplatin-induced oxidative stress and disruption of mitochondrial function by restoring mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, complexes I and III activities, mNOS protein expression and ATP content. Tempol also provided significant protection against apoptosis, tubular damage and mitochondrial ultrastructural changes. Interestingly, tempol did not interfere with the cytotoxic effect of cisplatin against the growth of solid Ehrlich carcinoma.This study highlights the potential role of tempol in inhibiting cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity without affecting its antitumor activity via amelioration of oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction.

  20. Effects of reduced mitochondrial DNA content on secondary mitochondrial toxicant exposure in Caenorhabditis elegans.

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    Luz, Anthony L; Meyer, Joel N

    2016-09-01

    The mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) is intimately linked to cellular and organismal health, as demonstrated by the fact that mutations in and depletion of mtDNA result in severe mitochondrial disease in humans. However, cells contain hundreds to thousands of copies of mtDNA, which provides genetic redundancy, and creates a threshold effect in which a large percentage of mtDNA must be lost prior to clinical pathogenesis. As certain pharmaceuticals and genetic mutations can result in depletion of mtDNA, and as many environmental toxicants target mitochondria, it is important to understand whether reduced mtDNA will sensitize an individual to toxicant exposure. Here, using ethidium bromide (EtBr), which preferentially inhibits mtDNA replication, we reduced mtDNA 35-55% in the in vivo model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. Chronic, lifelong, low-dose EtBr exposure did not disrupt nematode development or lifespan, and induced only mild alterations in mitochondrial respiration, while having no effect on steady-state ATP levels. Next, we exposed nematodes with reduced mtDNA to the known and suspected mitochondrial toxicants aflatoxin B1, arsenite, paraquat, rotenone or ultraviolet C radiation (UVC). EtBr pre-exposure resulted in mild sensitization of nematodes to UVC and arsenite, had no effect on AfB1 and paraquat, and provided some protection from rotenone toxicity. These mixed results provide a first line of evidence suggesting that reduced mtDNA content may sensitize an individual to certain environmental exposures.

  1. Differential NMDA receptor-dependent calcium loading and mitochondrial dysfunction in CA1 vs. CA3 hippocampal neurons.

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    Stanika, Ruslan I; Winters, Christine A; Pivovarova, Natalia B; Andrews, S Brian

    2010-02-01

    Hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons are selectively vulnerable to ischemia, while adjacent CA3 neurons are relatively resistant. Although glutamate receptor-mediated mitochondrial Ca(2+) overload and dysfunction is a major component of ischemia-induced neuronal death, no direct relationship between selective neuronal vulnerability and mitochondrial dysfunction has been demonstrated in intact brain preparations. Here, we show that in organotypic slice cultures NMDA induces much larger Ca(2+) elevations in vulnerable CA1 neurons than in resistant CA3. Consequently, CA1 mitochondria exhibit stronger calcium accumulation, more extensive swelling and damage, stronger depolarization of their membrane potential, and a significant increase in ROS generation. NMDA-induced Ca(2+) and ROS elevations were abolished in Ca(2+)-free medium or by NMDAR antagonists, but not by zinc chelation. We conclude that Ca(2)(+) overload-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction is a determining factor in the selective vulnerability of CA1 neurons.

  2. Mitochondrial dysfunction and defective autophagy in the pathogenesis of collagen VI muscular dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Paolo; Bonaldo, Paolo

    2013-05-01

    Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy (UCMD), Bethlem Myopathy (BM), and Congenital Myosclerosis are diseases caused by mutations in the genes encoding the extracellular matrix protein collagen VI. A dystrophic mouse model, where collagen VI synthesis was prevented by targeted inactivation of the Col6a1 gene, allowed the investigation of pathogenesis, which revealed the existence of a Ca(2+)-mediated dysfunction of mitochondria and sarcoplasmic reticulum, and of defective autophagy. Key events are dysregulation of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, an inner membrane high-conductance channel that for prolonged open times causes mitochondrial dysfunction, and inadequate removal of defective mitochondria, which amplifies the damage. Consistently, the Col6a1(-/-) myopathic mice could be cured through inhibition of cyclophilin D, a matrix protein that sensitizes the pore to opening, and through stimulation of autophagy. Similar defects contribute to disease pathogenesis in patients irrespective of the genetic lesion causing the collagen VI defect. These studies indicate that permeability transition pore opening and defective autophagy represent key elements for skeletal muscle fiber death, and provide a rationale for the use of cyclosporin A and its nonimmunosuppressive derivatives in patients affected by collagen VI myopathies, a strategy that holds great promise for treatment.

  3. Gene expression profiling in equine polysaccharide storage myopathy revealed inflammation, glycogenesis inhibition, hypoxia and mitochondrial dysfunctions

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    Benech Philippe

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several cases of myopathies have been observed in the horse Norman Cob breed. Muscle histology examinations revealed that some families suffer from a polysaccharide storage myopathy (PSSM. It is assumed that a gene expression signature related to PSSM should be observed at the transcriptional level because the glycogen storage disease could also be linked to other dysfunctions in gene regulation. Thus, the functional genomic approach could be conducted in order to provide new knowledge about the metabolic disorders related to PSSM. We propose exploring the PSSM muscle fiber metabolic disorders by measuring gene expression in relationship with the histological phenotype. Results Genotypying analysis of GYS1 mutation revealed 2 homozygous (AA and 5 heterozygous (GA PSSM horses. In the PSSM muscles, histological data revealed PAS positive amylase resistant abnormal polysaccharides, inflammation, necrosis, and lipomatosis and active regeneration of fibers. Ultrastructural evaluation revealed a decrease of mitochondrial number and structural disorders. Extensive accumulation of an abnormal polysaccharide displaced and partially replaced mitochondria and myofibrils. The severity of the disease was higher in the two homozygous PSSM horses. Gene expression analysis revealed 129 genes significantly modulated (p Conclusion The main disorders observed in PSSM muscles could be related to mitochondrial dysfunctions, glycogenesis inhibition and the chronic hypoxia of the PSSM muscles.

  4. Evidence linking oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and inflammation in the brain of individuals with autism

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    Daniel eRossignol

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs are a heterogeneous group of neurodevelopmental disorders that are defined solely on the basis of behavioral observations. Therefore, ASD has traditionally been framed as a behavioral disorder. However, evidence is accumulating that ASD is characterized by certain physiological abnormalities, including oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and immune dysregulation/inflammation. While these abnormalities have been reported in studies that have examined peripheral biomarkers such as blood and urine, more recent studies have also reported these abnormalities in brain tissue derived from individuals diagnosed with ASD as compared to brain tissue derived from control individuals. A majority of these brain tissue studies have been published since 2010. The brain regions found to contain these physiological abnormalities in individuals with ASD are involved in speech and auditory processing, social behavior, memory, and sensory and motor coordination. This manuscript examines the evidence linking oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and immune dysregulation/inflammation in the brain of ASD individuals, suggesting that ASD has a clear biological basis with features of known medical disorders. This understanding may lead to new testing and treatment strategies in individuals with ASD.

  5. Melanocytes--a novel tool to study mitochondrial dysfunction in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

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    Pellegrini, Camilla; Zulian, Alessandra; Gualandi, Francesca; Manzati, Elisa; Merlini, Luciano; Michelini, Maria E; Benassi, Luisa; Marmiroli, Sandra; Ferlini, Alessandra; Sabatelli, Patrizia; Bernardi, Paolo; Maraldi, Nadir M

    2013-06-01

    Dystrophin is a subsarcolemmal protein that, by linking the actin cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix via dystroglycans, is critical for the integrity of muscle fibers. Here, we report that epidermal melanocytes, obtained from conventional skin biopsy, express dystrophin with a restricted localization to the plasma membrane facing the dermal-epidermal junction. In addition the full-length muscle isoform mDp427 was clearly detectable in melanocyte cultures as assessed by immunohistochemistry, RNA, and Western blot analysis. Melanocytes of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients did not express dystrophin, and the ultrastructural analysis revealed typical mitochondrial alterations similar to those occurring in myoblasts from the same patients. Mitochondria of melanocytes from DMD patients readily accumulated tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester, indicating that they are energized irrespective of the presence of dystrophin but, at variance from mitochondria of control donors, depolarized upon the addition of oligomycin, suggesting that they are affected by a latent dysfunction unmasked by inhibition of the ATP synthase. Pure melanocyte cultures can be readily obtained by conventional skin biopsies and may be a feasible and reliable tool alternative to muscle biopsy for functional studies in dystrophinopathies. The mitochondrial dysfunction occurring in DMD melanocytes could represent a promising cellular biomarker for monitoring dystrophinopathies also in response to pharmacological treatments.

  6. [Higher Brain Dysfunction in Mitochondrial Myopathy, Encephalopathy, Lactic Acidosis and Stroke-Like Episodes (MELAS)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Hiroo

    2016-02-01

    Stroke-like episodes are one of the cardinal features of mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), and occur in 84-99% of the patients. The affected areas detected on neuroimaging do not have classical vascular distribution, and involve predominantly the temporal, parietal and occipital lobes. Thus, the neurological symptoms including higher brain dysfunction correlate with this topographical distribution. In association with the occipital lobe involvement, the most frequent symptom is cortical blindness. Other symptoms have been occasionally reported in case reports: visual agnosia, prosopagnosia, cortical deafness, auditory agnosia, topographical disorientation, various types of aphasia, hemispatial neglect, and so on. On the other hand, cognitive decline associated with more diffuse brain impairment rather than with focal stroke-like lesions has been postulated. This condition is also known as mitochondrial dementia. Domains of cognitive dysfunction include abstract reasoning, verbal memory, visual memory, language (naming and fluency), executive or constructive functions, attention, and visuospatial function. Cognitive functions and intellectual abilities may decline from initially minimal cognitive impairment to dementia. To date, the neuropsychological and neurologic impairment has been reported to be associated with cerebral lactic acidosis as estimated by ventricular spectroscopic lactate levels.

  7. A Syntenic Cross Species Aneuploidy Genetic Screen Links RCAN1 Expression to β-Cell Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiris, Heshan; Duffield, Michael D.; Fadista, Joao; Kashmir, Vinder; Genders, Amanda J.; McGee, Sean L.; Martin, Alyce M.; Saiedi, Madiha; Morton, Nicholas; Carter, Roderick; Cousin, Michael A.; Oskolkov, Nikolay; Volkov, Petr; Hough, Tertius A.; Fisher, Elizabeth M. C.; Tybulewicz, Victor L. J.; Busciglio, Jorge; Coskun, Pinar E.; Becker, Ann; Belichenko, Pavel V.; Mobley, William C.; Ryan, Michael T.; Chan, Jeng Yie; Laybutt, D. Ross; Coates, P. Toby; Yang, Sijun; Ling, Charlotte; Groop, Leif; Pritchard, Melanie A.; Keating, Damien J.

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a complex metabolic disease associated with obesity, insulin resistance and hypoinsulinemia due to pancreatic β-cell dysfunction. Reduced mitochondrial function is thought to be central to β-cell dysfunction. Mitochondrial dysfunction and reduced insulin secretion are also observed in β-cells of humans with the most common human genetic disorder, Down syndrome (DS, Trisomy 21). To identify regions of chromosome 21 that may be associated with perturbed glucose homeostasis we profiled the glycaemic status of different DS mouse models. The Ts65Dn and Dp16 DS mouse lines were hyperglycemic, while Tc1 and Ts1Rhr mice were not, providing us with a region of chromosome 21 containing genes that cause hyperglycemia. We then examined whether any of these genes were upregulated in a set of ~5,000 gene expression changes we had identified in a large gene expression analysis of human T2D β-cells. This approach produced a single gene, RCAN1, as a candidate gene linking hyperglycemia and functional changes in T2D β-cells. Further investigations demonstrated that RCAN1 methylation is reduced in human T2D islets at multiple sites, correlating with increased expression. RCAN1 protein expression was also increased in db/db mouse islets and in human and mouse islets exposed to high glucose. Mice overexpressing RCAN1 had reduced in vivo glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and their β-cells displayed mitochondrial dysfunction including hyperpolarised membrane potential, reduced oxidative phosphorylation and low ATP production. This lack of β-cell ATP had functional consequences by negatively affecting both glucose-stimulated membrane depolarisation and ATP-dependent insulin granule exocytosis. Thus, from amongst the myriad of gene expression changes occurring in T2D β-cells where we had little knowledge of which changes cause β-cell dysfunction, we applied a trisomy 21 screening approach which linked RCAN1 to β-cell mitochondrial dysfunction in T2D

  8. A Syntenic Cross Species Aneuploidy Genetic Screen Links RCAN1 Expression to β-Cell Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Type 2 Diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heshan Peiris

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes (T2D is a complex metabolic disease associated with obesity, insulin resistance and hypoinsulinemia due to pancreatic β-cell dysfunction. Reduced mitochondrial function is thought to be central to β-cell dysfunction. Mitochondrial dysfunction and reduced insulin secretion are also observed in β-cells of humans with the most common human genetic disorder, Down syndrome (DS, Trisomy 21. To identify regions of chromosome 21 that may be associated with perturbed glucose homeostasis we profiled the glycaemic status of different DS mouse models. The Ts65Dn and Dp16 DS mouse lines were hyperglycemic, while Tc1 and Ts1Rhr mice were not, providing us with a region of chromosome 21 containing genes that cause hyperglycemia. We then examined whether any of these genes were upregulated in a set of ~5,000 gene expression changes we had identified in a large gene expression analysis of human T2D β-cells. This approach produced a single gene, RCAN1, as a candidate gene linking hyperglycemia and functional changes in T2D β-cells. Further investigations demonstrated that RCAN1 methylation is reduced in human T2D islets at multiple sites, correlating with increased expression. RCAN1 protein expression was also increased in db/db mouse islets and in human and mouse islets exposed to high glucose. Mice overexpressing RCAN1 had reduced in vivo glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and their β-cells displayed mitochondrial dysfunction including hyperpolarised membrane potential, reduced oxidative phosphorylation and low ATP production. This lack of β-cell ATP had functional consequences by negatively affecting both glucose-stimulated membrane depolarisation and ATP-dependent insulin granule exocytosis. Thus, from amongst the myriad of gene expression changes occurring in T2D β-cells where we had little knowledge of which changes cause β-cell dysfunction, we applied a trisomy 21 screening approach which linked RCAN1 to β-cell mitochondrial

  9. A Syntenic Cross Species Aneuploidy Genetic Screen Links RCAN1 Expression to β-Cell Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiris, Heshan; Duffield, Michael D; Fadista, Joao; Jessup, Claire F; Kashmir, Vinder; Genders, Amanda J; McGee, Sean L; Martin, Alyce M; Saiedi, Madiha; Morton, Nicholas; Carter, Roderick; Cousin, Michael A; Kokotos, Alexandros C; Oskolkov, Nikolay; Volkov, Petr; Hough, Tertius A; Fisher, Elizabeth M C; Tybulewicz, Victor L J; Busciglio, Jorge; Coskun, Pinar E; Becker, Ann; Belichenko, Pavel V; Mobley, William C; Ryan, Michael T; Chan, Jeng Yie; Laybutt, D Ross; Coates, P Toby; Yang, Sijun; Ling, Charlotte; Groop, Leif; Pritchard, Melanie A; Keating, Damien J

    2016-05-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a complex metabolic disease associated with obesity, insulin resistance and hypoinsulinemia due to pancreatic β-cell dysfunction. Reduced mitochondrial function is thought to be central to β-cell dysfunction. Mitochondrial dysfunction and reduced insulin secretion are also observed in β-cells of humans with the most common human genetic disorder, Down syndrome (DS, Trisomy 21). To identify regions of chromosome 21 that may be associated with perturbed glucose homeostasis we profiled the glycaemic status of different DS mouse models. The Ts65Dn and Dp16 DS mouse lines were hyperglycemic, while Tc1 and Ts1Rhr mice were not, providing us with a region of chromosome 21 containing genes that cause hyperglycemia. We then examined whether any of these genes were upregulated in a set of ~5,000 gene expression changes we had identified in a large gene expression analysis of human T2D β-cells. This approach produced a single gene, RCAN1, as a candidate gene linking hyperglycemia and functional changes in T2D β-cells. Further investigations demonstrated that RCAN1 methylation is reduced in human T2D islets at multiple sites, correlating with increased expression. RCAN1 protein expression was also increased in db/db mouse islets and in human and mouse islets exposed to high glucose. Mice overexpressing RCAN1 had reduced in vivo glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and their β-cells displayed mitochondrial dysfunction including hyperpolarised membrane potential, reduced oxidative phosphorylation and low ATP production. This lack of β-cell ATP had functional consequences by negatively affecting both glucose-stimulated membrane depolarisation and ATP-dependent insulin granule exocytosis. Thus, from amongst the myriad of gene expression changes occurring in T2D β-cells where we had little knowledge of which changes cause β-cell dysfunction, we applied a trisomy 21 screening approach which linked RCAN1 to β-cell mitochondrial dysfunction in T2D.

  10. p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} deficiency induces mitochondrial dysfunction in HCT116 colon cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ae Jeong; Jee, Hye Jin; Song, Naree; Kim, Minjee [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Mitochondria Hub Regulation Center, College of Medicine, Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Seon-Young [Mitochondria Hub Regulation Center, College of Medicine, Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Department of Medical Genetics, Ajou University School of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Jeanho, E-mail: yunj@dau.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Mitochondria Hub Regulation Center, College of Medicine, Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p21{sup -/-} HCT116 cells exhibited an increase in mitochondrial mass. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The expression levels of PGC-1{alpha} and AMPK were upregulated in p21{sup -/-} HCT116 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The proliferation of p21{sup -/-} HCT116 cells in galactose medium was significantly impaired. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p21 may play a role in maintaining proper mitochondrial mass and respiratory function. -- Abstract: p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} is a critical regulator of cell cycle progression. However, the role of p21 in mitochondrial function remains poorly understood. In this study, we examined the effect of p21 deficiency on mitochondrial function in HCT116 human colon cancer cells. We found that there was a significant increase in the mitochondrial mass of p21{sup -/-} HCT116 cells, as measured by 10-N-nonyl-acridine orange staining, as well as an increase in the mitochondrial DNA content. In contrast, p53{sup -/-} cells had a mitochondrial mass comparable to that of wild-type HCT116 cells. In addition, the expression levels of the mitochondrial biogenesis regulators PGC-1{alpha} and TFAM and AMPK activity were also elevated in p21{sup -/-} cells, indicating that p21 deficiency induces the rate of mitochondrial biogenesis through the AMPK-PGC-1{alpha} axis. However, the increase in mitochondrial biogenesis in p21{sup -/-} cells did not accompany an increase in the cellular steady-state level of ATP. Furthermore, p21{sup -/-} cells exhibited significant proliferation impairment in galactose medium, suggesting that p21 deficiency induces a defect in the mitochondrial respiratory chain in HCT116 cells. Taken together, our results suggest that the loss of p21 results in an aberrant increase in the mitochondrial mass and in mitochondrial dysfunction in HCT116 cells, indicating that p21 is required to maintain proper mitochondrial mass and respiratory function.

  11. Mitochondrial Dysfunction: A Basic Mechanism in Inflammation-Related Non-Communicable Diseases and Therapeutic Opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Hernández-Aguilera

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is not necessarily a predisposing factor for disease. It is the handling of fat and/or excessive energy intake that encompasses the linkage of inflammation, oxidation, and metabolism to the deleterious effects associated with the continuous excess of food ingestion. The roles of cytokines and insulin resistance in excessive energy intake have been studied extensively. Tobacco use and obesity accompanied by an unhealthy diet and physical inactivity are the main factors that underlie noncommunicable diseases. The implication is that the management of energy or food intake, which is the main role of mitochondria, is involved in the most common diseases. In this study, we highlight the importance of mitochondrial dysfunction in the mutual relationships between causative conditions. Mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles that fuse and divide in response to environmental stimuli, developmental status, and energy requirements. These organelles act to supply the cell with ATP and to synthesise key molecules in the processes of inflammation, oxidation, and metabolism. Therefore, energy sensors and management effectors are determinants in the course and development of diseases. Regulating mitochondrial function may require a multifaceted approach that includes drugs and plant-derived phenolic compounds with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities that improve mitochondrial biogenesis and act to modulate the AMPK/mTOR pathway.

  12. Cyclosporin A corrects mitochondrial dysfunction and muscle apoptosis in patients with collagen VI myopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlini, Luciano; Angelin, Alessia; Tiepolo, Tania; Braghetta, Paola; Sabatelli, Patrizia; Zamparelli, Alessandra; Ferlini, Alessandra; Maraldi, Nadir M; Bonaldo, Paolo; Bernardi, Paolo

    2008-04-01

    Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy and Bethlem myopathy are skeletal muscle diseases that are due to mutations in the genes encoding collagen VI, an extracellular matrix protein forming a microfibrillar network that is particularly prominent in the endomysium of skeletal muscle. Myoblasts from patients affected by Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy display functional and ultrastructural mitochondrial alterations and increased apoptosis due to inappropriate opening of the permeability transition pore, a mitochondrial inner membrane channel. These alterations could be normalized by treatment with cyclosporin A, a widely used immunosuppressant that desensitizes the permeability transition pore independently of calcineurin inhibition. Here, we report the results of an open pilot trial with cyclosporin A in five patients with collagen VI myopathies. Before treatment, all patients displayed mitochondrial dysfunction and increased frequency of apoptosis, as determined in muscle biopsies. Both of these pathologic signs were largely normalized after 1 month of oral cyclosporin A administration, which also increased muscle regeneration. These findings demonstrate that collagen VI myopathies can be effectively treated with drugs acting on the pathogenic mechanism downstream of the genetic lesion, and they represent an important proof of principle for the potential therapy of genetic diseases.

  13. Melatonin prevents mitochondrial dysfunction and promotes neuroprotection by inducing autophagy during oxaliplatin-evoked peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Areti, Aparna; Komirishetty, Prashanth; Akuthota, Manasaveena; Malik, Rayaz A; Kumar, Ashutosh

    2017-04-01

    Oxaliplatin, an organoplatinum compound, is used in the treatment of colorectal cancer, but its clinical use can be limited due to the development of peripheral neuropathy. Whilst mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated as a major pathomechanism for oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity, the prevention of autophagy may also aggravate neuronal cell death. Melatonin, a well-known mitoprotectant and autophagy inducer, was used to examine its neuroprotective role in oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy (OIPN). Melatonin prevented the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (Ψm) and promoted neuritogenesis in oxaliplatin-challenged neuro-2a cells. It did not interfere with the cytotoxic activity of oxaliplatin in human colon cancer cell line, HT-29. Melatonin treatment significantly alleviated oxaliplatin-induced pain behavior and neuropathic deficits in rats. It also ameliorated nitro-oxidative stress mediated by oxaliplatin, thus prevented nitrosylation of proteins and loss of antioxidant enzymes, and therefore, it improved mitochondrial electron transport chain function and maintained cellular bioenergetics by improving the ATP levels. The protective effects of melatonin were attributed to preventing oxaliplatin-induced neuronal apoptosis by increasing the autophagy pathway (via LC3A/3B) in peripheral nerves and dorsal root ganglion (DRG). Hence, it preserved the epidermal nerve fiber density in oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic rats. Taken together, we provide detailed molecular mechanisms for the neuroprotective effect of melatonin and suggest it has translational potential for oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy.

  14. Mitochondrial dysfunction in diabetic neuropathy: a series of unfortunate metabolic events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernyhough, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is a dying back neurodegenerative disease of the peripheral nervous system where mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated as an etiological factor. Diabetes (type 1 or type 2) invokes an elevation of intracellular glucose concentration simultaneously with impaired growth factor support by insulin, and this dual alteration triggers a maladaptation in metabolism of adult sensory neurons. The energy sensing pathway comprising the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)/sirtuin (SIRT)/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator α (PGC-1α) signaling axis is the target of these damaging changes in nutrient levels, e.g., induction of nutrient stress, and loss of insulin-dependent growth factor support and instigates an aberrant metabolic phenotype characterized by a suppression of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and shift to anaerobic glycolysis. There is discussion of how this loss of mitochondrial function and transition to overreliance on glycolysis contributes to the diminishment of collateral sprouting and axon regeneration in diabetic neuropathy in the context of the highly energy-consuming nerve growth cone.

  15. Benzaldehyde thiosemicarbazone derived from limonene complexed with copper induced mitochondrial dysfunction in Leishmania amazonensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizandra Aparecida Britta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leishmaniasis is a major health problem that affects more than 12 million people. Treatment presents several problems, including high toxicity and many adverse effects, leading to the discontinuation of treatment and emergence of resistant strains. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We evaluated the in vitro antileishmanial activity of benzaldehyde thiosemicarbazone derived from limonene complexed with copper, termed BenzCo, against Leishmania amazonensis. BenzCo inhibited the growth of the promastigote and axenic amastigote forms, with IC(50 concentrations of 3.8 and 9.5 µM, respectively, with 72 h of incubation. Intracellular amastigotes were inhibited by the compound, with an IC(50 of 10.7 µM. BenzCo altered the shape, size, and ultrastructure of the parasites. Mitochondrial membrane depolarization was observed in protozoa treated with BenzCo but caused no alterations in the plasma membrane. Additionally, BenzCo induced lipoperoxidation and the production of mitochondrial superoxide anion radicals in promastigotes and axenic amastigotes of Leishmania amazonensis. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our studies indicated that the antileishmania activity of BenzCo might be associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage, leading to parasite death.

  16. Synergism of ochratoxin B and calcium-channel antagonist verapamil caused mitochondrial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatopadhyay, Pronobesh; Tariang, Banlumlang; Agnihotri, Amit; Veer, Vijay

    2014-09-01

    We examined the mechanism by which the ochratoxin B induced interaction with calcium-channel antagonist verapamil and mitochondrial dysfunction of the rat trachea in vitro experiment. The tracheas were cut into 2-3 mm wide rings and suspended in a tissue bath. Isometric tension was continuously measured with an isometric force transducer connected to a computer-based data acquisition system. Verapamil (1 × 10(-6) M) produced a concentration-dependent contraction response in rat's tracheal rings pre-contracted by acetylcholine. Incubation of rat's tracheal rings with the ochratoxin B significantly potentiated the contraction responses of verapamil. Verapamil and OTB accelerate the overloading of Ca(2+) in tracheal smooth muscle contributes the tissue toxicity as shown in electron microscopy and mitochondrial enzymes, through a mechanism that could involve perturbations of Ca(2+) homeostasis. These results proved that ochratoxin B is a potential vasoconstrictor mycotoxin with the presence of calcium-channel antagonist. In conclusion, disturbance of Ca(2+) homeostasis caused by OTA and plays a significant role in produces toxicity through mitochondrial enzyme inhibition.

  17. Mechanisms of MDMA (ecstasy)-induced oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and organ damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Byoung-Joon; Moon, Kwan-Hoon; Upreti, Vijay V; Eddington, Natalie D; Lee, Insong J

    2010-08-01

    Despite numerous reports about the acute and sub-chronic toxicities caused by MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, ecstasy), the underlying mechanism of organ damage is poorly understood. The aim of this review is to present an update of the mechanistic studies on MDMA-mediated organ damage partly caused by increased oxidative/nitrosative stress. Because of the extensive reviews on MDMA-mediated oxidative stress and tissue damage, we specifically focus on the mechanisms and consequences of oxidative-modifications of mitochondrial proteins, leading to mitochondrial dysfunction. We briefly describe a method to systematically identify oxidatively-modified mitochondrial proteins in control and MDMA-exposed rats by using biotin-N-maleimide (biotin-NM) as a sensitive probe for oxidized proteins. We also describe various applications and advantages of this Cys-targeted proteomics method and alternative approaches to overcome potential limitations of this method in studying oxidized proteins from MDMA-exposed tissues. Finally we discuss the mechanism of synergistic drug-interaction between MDMA and other abused substances including alcohol (ethanol) as well as application of this redox-based proteomics method in translational studies for developing effective preventive and therapeutic agents against MDMA-induced organ damage.

  18. Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in Naturally-Occurring Feline Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Liselotte Bruun

    Background: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a primary myocardial disease, characterized by unexplained hypertrophy of the left ventricle. HCM features similar clinical and pathological characteristics in human beings and cats and is a common cause of sudden death and heart failure. Mitochond......Background: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a primary myocardial disease, characterized by unexplained hypertrophy of the left ventricle. HCM features similar clinical and pathological characteristics in human beings and cats and is a common cause of sudden death and heart failure....... Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are well known to play a role in the development of various cardiovascular diseases. However, their roles in HCM remain unexplored. Objectives Methods: Cardiac muscle was obtained from eight cats diagnosed with naturally-occuring HCM (5 males; 2-10 years old, 6.......3 ± 2.4 (mean ± SD)) and from nine age-matched control cats (CON) (3 males; 2-11 years, 4.9 ± 3.1). High-resolution respirometry was used to measure mitochondrial function in permeabilized, cardiac muscle fibres. Oxidative stress was assessed by measurements of mitochondrial H2O2 generation...

  19. Mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction in muscle from patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crugnola, Veronica; Lamperti, Costanza; Lucchini, Valeria; Ronchi, Dario; Peverelli, Lorenzo; Prelle, Alessandro; Sciacco, Monica; Bordoni, Andreina; Fassone, Elisa; Fortunato, Francesco; Corti, Stefania; Silani, Vincenzo; Bresolin, Nereo; Di Mauro, Salvatore; Comi, Giacomo Pietro; Moggio, Maurizio

    2010-07-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a major cause of neurological disability and its pathogenesis remains elusive despite a multitude of studies. Although defects of the mitochondrial respiratory chain have been described in several ALS patients, their pathogenic significance is unclear. To review systematically the muscle biopsy specimens from patients with typical sporadic ALS to search for possible mitochondrial oxidative impairment. Retrospective histochemical, biochemical, and molecular studies of muscle specimens. Tertiary care university. Subjects Fifty patients with typical sporadic ALS (mean age, 55 years). Main Outcome Measure Number of patients showing a clear muscle mitochondrial dysfunction assessed through histochemical and biochemical muscle analysis. Histochemical data showed cytochrome c oxidase (COX)-negative fibers in 46% patients. Based on COX histochemical activity, patients fell into 4 groups: 27 had normal COX activity; and 8 had mild (2-4 COX-negative fibers of 100 fibers), 8 had moderate (5-10 COX-negative fibers of 100), and 7 had severe (>10 COX-negative fibers of 100) COX deficiency. Spectrophotometric measurement of respiratory chain activities showed that 3 patients with severe histochemical COX deficiency also showed combined enzyme defects. In 1 patient, COX deficiency worsened in a second biopsy taken 9 months after the first. Among the patients with severe COX deficiency, one had a new mutation in the SOD1 gene, another a mutation in the TARDBP gene, and a third patient with biochemically confirmed COX deficiency had multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions detectable by Southern blot analysis. Our data confirm that the histochemical finding of COX-negative fibers is common in skeletal muscle from patients with sporadic ALS. We did not find a correlation between severity of the oxidative defect and age of the patients or duration of the disease. However, the only patient who underwent a second muscle biopsy did show a correlation

  20. Inactivation of brain mitochondrial Lon protease by peroxynitrite precedes electron transport chain dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stanyer, Lee; Jørgensen, Wenche; Hori, Osamu;

    2008-01-01

    more sensitive than basal Lon protease activity. Furthermore, supplementation of mitochondrial matrix extracts with reduced glutathione, following ONOO(-) exposure, resulted in partial restoration of basal and ATP-stimulated activity, thus suggesting possible redox regulation of this enzyme complex....... Taken together these findings suggest that Lon protease may be particularly vulnerable to inactivation in conditions associated with GSH depletion and elevated oxidative stress....

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Metabolic Activity, Accompanied by Overproduction of Superoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakalova, Rumiana; Georgieva, Ekaterina; Ivanova, Donika; Zhelev, Zhivko; Aoki, Ichio; Saga, Tsuneo

    2015-12-16

    This study shows that a mitochondria-penetrating nitroxide probe (mito-TEMPO) allows detection of superoxide and visualization of mitochondrial dysfunction in living cells due to the effect of T1 shortening in MRI. Mitochondrial dysfunction was induced by treatment of cells with rotenone and 2-methoxyestradiol (2-ME/Rot). The MRI measurements were performed on 7T MRI. The 2-ME/Rot-treated cells were characterized by overproduction of superoxide, which was confirmed by a conventional dihydroethidium test. In the presence of mito-TEMPO, the intensity of MRI signal in 2-ME/Rot-treated cells was ∼30-40% higher, in comparison with that in untreated cells or culture media. In model (cell-free) systems, we observed that superoxide, but not hydrogen peroxide, increased the intensity of T1-weighted MRI signal of mito-TEMPO. Moreover, the superoxide restores the T1-weighted MRI contrast of mito-TEMPOH, a noncontrast (diamagnetic) analogue of mito-TEMPO. This was also confirmed by using EPR spectroscopy. The results demonstrate that superoxide radical is involved in the enhancement of T1-weighted MRI contrast in living cells, in the absence and presence of mito-TEMPO. This report gives a direction for discovering new opportunities for functional MRI, for detection of metabolic activity, accompanied by overproduction of superoxide, as well as by disturbance of the balance between superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, a very important approach to clarify the fine molecular mechanisms in the regulation of many pathologies. The visualization of mitochondrial activity in real-time can be crucial to clarify the molecular mechanism of the functional MRI in its commonly accepted definition, as a method for detection of neurovascular coupling.

  2. Beneficial effects of a pyrroloquinolinequinone-containing dietary formulation on motor deficiency, cognitive decline and mitochondrial dysfunction in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darrell Sawmiller

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD, a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, is linked to oxidative stress, altered amyloid precursor protein (APP proteolysis, tau hyperphosphorylation and the accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ plaques and neurofibrillary tangles (NFT. A growing body of evidence suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction can be a key promoter of all of these pathologies and predicts that restoration of mitochondrial function might be a potential therapeutic strategy for AD. Therefore, in the present study, we tested the beneficial effect of a nutraceutical formulation Nutrastem II (Nutra II, containing NT020 (a mitochondrial restorative and antioxidant proprietary formulation and pyrroloquinolinequinone (PQQ, a stimulator of mitochondria biogenesis in 5XFAD transgenic mice. Animals were fed Nutra II for 12 weeks, starting at 3 months of age, after which behavioral and neuropathological endpoints were determined. The data from behavioral test batteries clearly revealed that dietary supplementation of Nutra II effectively ameliorated the motor deficiency and cognitive impairment of 5XFAD mice. In addition, Nutra II also protected mitochondrial function in 5XFAD mice brain, as evidenced by declined ROS levels and membrane hyperpolarization, together with elevated ATP levels and respiratory states. Interestingly, while Nutra II treatment only slightly reduced soluble Aβ42 levels, this formulation significantly impacted tau metabolism, as shown by reduced total and phosphorylated tau levels of 5XFAD mouse brain. Taken together, these preclinical findings confirm that mitochondrial function may be a key treatment target for AD and that Nutra II should be further investigated as a potential candidate for AD therapy.

  3. Acetylsalicylic acid-induced oxidative stress, cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and mitochondrial dysfunction in human hepatoma HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Haider; John, Annie; Benedict, Sheela

    2011-10-01

    It is widely accepted that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including aspirin, reduce the risk of cancer. The anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory effects of NSAIDs are associated with the inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis and cyclooxygenase-2 activity. Several other mechanisms which contribute to the anti-cancer effect of these drugs in different cancer models both in vivo and in vitro are also presumed to be involved. The precise molecular mechanism, however, is still not clear. We investigated, therefore, the effects of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, aspirin) on multiple cellular and functional targets, including mitochondrial bioenergetics, using human hepatoma HepG2 cancer cells in culture. Our results demonstrate that ASA induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in HepG2 cells. ASA increased the production of reactive oxygen species, reduced the cellular glutathione (GSH) pool and inhibited the activities of the mitochondrial respiratory enzyme complexes, NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I), cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV) and the mitochondrial matrix enzyme, aconitase. Apoptosis was triggered by alteration in mitochondrial permeability transition, inhibition of ATP synthesis, decreased expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2, release of cytochrome c and activation of pro-apoptotic caspase-3 and the DNA repairing enzyme, poly (-ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). These findings strongly suggest that ASA-induced toxicity in human hepatoma HepG2 cells is mediated by increased metabolic and oxidative stress, accompanied by mitochondrial dysfunction which result in apoptosis.

  4. Exercise efficiency is reduced by mitochondrial uncoupling in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Kevin E; Jubrias, Sharon A; Cress, M Elaine; Esselman, Peter

    2013-03-01

    A reduction in exercise efficiency accompanies ageing in humans. Here we evaluated the impact of changes in the contractile-coupling and mitochondrial-coupling efficiencies on the reduction in exercise efficiency in the elderly. Nine adult (mean, 38.8 years old) and 40 elderly subjects (mean, 68.8 years old) performed a cycle ergometer test to measure O2 uptake and leg power output up to the aerobic limit ( ). Reduced leg power output per unit O2 uptake was reflected in a drop in delta efficiency (εD) from 0.27 ± 0.01 (mean ± SEM) in adults to 0.22 ± 0.01 in the elderly group. Similar declines with age were apparent for both the leg power output at and the ATP generation capacity (ATPmax) determined in vivo using (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy. These similar declines resulted in unchanged contractile-coupling efficiency values (εC) in the adult (0.50 ± 0.05) versus the elderly group (0.58 ± 0.04) and agreed with independent measures of muscle contractile-coupling efficiency in human quadriceps (0.5). The mitochondrial-coupling efficiency calculated from the ratio of delta to contractile-coupling efficiencies in the adults (εD/εC = 0.58 ± 0.08) corresponded to values for well-coupled mitochondria (0.6); however, εD/εC was significantly lower in the elderly subjects (0.44 ± 0.03). Conversion of ATPmax per mitochondrial volume (ATPmax/Vv[mt,f]) reported in these groups into thermodynamic units confirmed this drop in mitochondrial-coupling efficiency from 0.57 ± 0.08 in adults to 0.41 ± 0.03 in elderly subjects. Thus, two independent methods revealed that reduced mitochondrial-coupling efficiency was a key part of the drop in exercise efficiency in these elderly subjects and may be an important part of the loss of exercise performance with age.

  5. Skeletal Muscle and Lymphocyte Mitochondrial Dysfunctions in Septic Shock Trigger ICU-Acquired Weakness and Sepsis-Induced Immunoparalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quentin Maestraggi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fundamental events driving the pathological processes of septic shock-induced multiorgan failure (MOF at the cellular and subcellular levels remain debated. Emerging data implicate mitochondrial dysfunction as a critical factor in the pathogenesis of sepsis-associated MOF. If macrocirculatory and microcirculatory dysfunctions undoubtedly participate in organ dysfunction at the early stage of septic shock, an intrinsic bioenergetic failure, sometimes called “cytopathic hypoxia,” perpetuates cellular dysfunction. Short-term failure of vital organs immediately threatens patient survival but long-term recovery is also severely hindered by persistent dysfunction of organs traditionally described as nonvital, such as skeletal muscle and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs. In this review, we will stress how and why a persistent mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscles and PBMC could impair survival in patients who overcome the first acute phase of their septic episode. First, muscle wasting protracts weaning from mechanical ventilation, increases the risk of mechanical ventilator-associated pneumonia, and creates a state of ICU-acquired muscle weakness, compelling the patient to bed. Second, failure of the immune system (“immunoparalysis” translates into its inability to clear infectious foci and predisposes the patient to recurrent nosocomial infections. We will finally emphasize how mitochondrial-targeted therapies could represent a realistic strategy to promote long-term recovery after sepsis.

  6. Skeletal Muscle and Lymphocyte Mitochondrial Dysfunctions in Septic Shock Trigger ICU-Acquired Weakness and Sepsis-Induced Immunoparalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestraggi, Quentin; Lebas, Benjamin; Clere-Jehl, Raphaël; Ludes, Pierre-Olivier; Chamaraux-Tran, Thiên-Nga; Schneider, Francis; Diemunsch, Pierre; Geny, Bernard; Pottecher, Julien

    2017-01-01

    Fundamental events driving the pathological processes of septic shock-induced multiorgan failure (MOF) at the cellular and subcellular levels remain debated. Emerging data implicate mitochondrial dysfunction as a critical factor in the pathogenesis of sepsis-associated MOF. If macrocirculatory and microcirculatory dysfunctions undoubtedly participate in organ dysfunction at the early stage of septic shock, an intrinsic bioenergetic failure, sometimes called "cytopathic hypoxia," perpetuates cellular dysfunction. Short-term failure of vital organs immediately threatens patient survival but long-term recovery is also severely hindered by persistent dysfunction of organs traditionally described as nonvital, such as skeletal muscle and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). In this review, we will stress how and why a persistent mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscles and PBMC could impair survival in patients who overcome the first acute phase of their septic episode. First, muscle wasting protracts weaning from mechanical ventilation, increases the risk of mechanical ventilator-associated pneumonia, and creates a state of ICU-acquired muscle weakness, compelling the patient to bed. Second, failure of the immune system ("immunoparalysis") translates into its inability to clear infectious foci and predisposes the patient to recurrent nosocomial infections. We will finally emphasize how mitochondrial-targeted therapies could represent a realistic strategy to promote long-term recovery after sepsis.

  7. Reducing RBM20 activity improves diastolic dysfunction and cardiac atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinze, Florian; Dieterich, Christoph; Radke, Michael H; Granzier, Henk; Gotthardt, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Impaired diastolic filling is a main contributor to heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), a syndrome with increasing prevalence and no treatment. Both collagen and the giant sarcomeric protein titin determine diastolic function. Since titin's elastic properties can be adjusted physiologically, we evaluated titin-based stiffness as a therapeutic target. We adjusted RBM20-dependent cardiac isoform expression in the titin N2B knockout mouse with increased ventricular stiffness. A ~50 % reduction of RBM20 activity does not only maintain cardiac filling in diastole but also ameliorates cardiac atrophy and thus improves cardiac function in the N2B-deficient heart. Reduced RBM20 activity partially normalized gene expression related to muscle development and fatty acid metabolism. The adaptation of cardiac growth was related to hypertrophy signaling via four-and-a-half lim-domain proteins (FHLs) that translate mechanical input into hypertrophy signals. We provide a novel link between cardiac isoform expression and trophic signaling via FHLs and suggest cardiac splicing as a therapeutic target in diastolic dysfunction. Increasing the length of titin isoforms improves ventricular filling in heart disease. FHL proteins are regulated via RBM20 and adapt cardiac growth. RBM20 is a therapeutic target in diastolic dysfunction.

  8. Overexpression of TFAM protects 3T3-L1 adipocytes from NYGGF4 (PID1) overexpression-induced insulin resistance and mitochondrial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chun-Mei; Xu, Guang-Feng; Yang, Lei; Fu, Zi-Yi; Chen, Ling; Fu, Hai-Long; Shen, Ya-Hui; Zhu, Lu; Ji, Chen-Bo; Guo, Xi-Rong

    2013-07-01

    NYGGF4, also known as phosphotyrosine interaction domain containing 1(PID1), is a recently discovered gene which is involved in obesity-related insulin resistance (IR) and mitochondrial dysfunction. We aimed to further elucidate the effects and mechanisms underlying NYGGF4-induced IR by investigating the effect of overexpressing mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), which is essential for mitochondrial DNA transcription and replication, on NYGGF4-induced IR and mitochondrial abnormalities in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Overexpression of TFAM increased the mitochondrial copy number and ATP content in both control 3T3-L1 adipocytes and NYGGF4-overexpressing adipocytes. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was enhanced in NYGGF4-overexpressing adipocytes and reduced in TFAM-overexpressing adipocytes; co-overexpression of TFAM significantly attenuated ROS production in NYGGF4-overexpressing adipocytes. However, overexpression of TFAM did not affect the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm) in control 3T3-L1 adipocytes or NYGGF4-overexpressing adipocytes. In addition, co-overexpression of TFAM-enhanced insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by increasing Glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4) translocation to the PM in NYGGF4-overexpressing adipocytes. Overexpression of NYGGF4 significantly inhibited tyrosine phosphorylation of Insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) and serine phosphorylation of Akt, whereas overexpression of TFAM strongly induced phosphorylation of IRS-1 and Akt in NYGGF4-overexpressing adipocytes. This study demonstrates that NYGGF4 plays a role in IR by impairing mitochondrial function, and that overexpression of TFAM can restore mitochondrial function to normal levels in NYGGF4-overexpressing adipocytes via activation of the IRS-1/PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

  9. Mitochondrial dysfunction leads to deconjugation of quercetin glucuronides in inflammatory macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akari Ishisaka

    Full Text Available Dietary flavonoids, such as quercetin, have long been recognized to protect blood vessels from atherogenic inflammation by yet unknown mechanisms. We have previously discovered the specific localization of quercetin-3-O-glucuronide (Q3GA, a phase II metabolite of quercetin, in macrophage cells in the human atherosclerotic lesions, but the biological significance is poorly understood. We have now demonstrated the molecular basis of the interaction between quercetin glucuronides and macrophages, leading to deconjugation of the glucuronides into the active aglycone. In vitro experiments showed that Q3GA was bound to the cell surface proteins of macrophages through anion binding and was readily deconjugated into the aglycone. It is of interest that the macrophage-mediated deconjugation of Q3GA was significantly enhanced upon inflammatory activation by lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Zymography and immunoblotting analysis revealed that β-glucuronidase is the major enzyme responsible for the deglucuronidation, whereas the secretion rate was not affected after LPS treatment. We found that extracellular acidification, which is required for the activity of β-glucuronidase, was significantly induced upon LPS treatment and was due to the increased lactate secretion associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. In addition, the β-glucuronidase secretion, which is triggered by intracellular calcium ions, was also induced by mitochondria dysfunction characterized using antimycin-A (a mitochondrial inhibitor and siRNA-knockdown of Atg7 (an essential gene for autophagy. The deconjugated aglycone, quercetin, acts as an anti-inflammatory agent in the stimulated macrophages by inhibiting the c-Jun N-terminal kinase activation, whereas Q3GA acts only in the presence of extracellular β-glucuronidase activity. Finally, we demonstrated the deconjugation of quercetin glucuronides including the sulfoglucuronides in vivo in the spleen of mice challenged with LPS. These results

  10. The neuroprotective effects of taurine against nickel by reducing oxidative stress and maintaining mitochondrial function in cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shangcheng; He, Mindi; Zhong, Min; Li, Li; Lu, Yonghui; Zhang, Yanwen; Zhang, Lei; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou

    2015-03-17

    Previous studies have indicated that oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are involved in the toxicity of nickel. Taurine is recognized as an efficient antioxidant and is essential for mitochondrial function. To investigate whether taurine could protect against the neurotoxicity of nickel, we exposed primary cultured cortical neurons to various concentrations of nickel chloride (NiCl2; 0.5mM, 1mM and 2mM) for 24h or to 1mM NiCl2 for various periods (0 h, 12h, 24h and 48 h). Our results showed that taurine efficiently reduced lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release induced by NiCl2. Along with this protective effect, taurine pretreatment not only significantly reversed the increase of ROS production and mitochondrial superoxide concentration, but also attenuated the decrease of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and glutathione (GSH) concentration in neurons exposed to NiCl2 for 24h. Moreover, nickel exposure reduced ATP production, disrupted the mitochondrial membrane potential and decreased mtDNA content. These types of oxidative damage in the mitochondria were efficiently ameliorated by taurine pretreatment. Taken together, our results indicate that the neuroprotective effects of taurine against the toxicity of nickel might largely depend on its roles in reducing oxidative stress and improving mitochondrial function. Taurine may have great pharmacological potential in treating the adverse effects of nickel in the nervous system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. In vitro treatment of HepG2 cells with saturated fatty acids reproduces mitochondrial dysfunction found in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inmaculada García-Ruiz

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Activity of the oxidative phosphorylation system (OXPHOS is decreased in humans and mice with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Nitro-oxidative stress seems to be involved in its pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to determine whether fatty acids are implicated in the pathogenesis of this mitochondrial defect. In HepG2 cells, we analyzed the effect of saturated (palmitic and stearic acids and monounsaturated (oleic acid fatty acids on: OXPHOS activity; levels of protein expression of OXPHOS complexes and their subunits; gene expression and half-life of OXPHOS complexes; nitro-oxidative stress; and NADPH oxidase gene expression and activity. We also studied the effects of inhibiting or silencing NADPH oxidase on the palmitic-acid-induced nitro-oxidative stress and subsequent OXPHOS inhibition. Exposure of cultured HepG2 cells to saturated fatty acids resulted in a significant decrease in the OXPHOS activity. This effect was prevented in the presence of a mimic of manganese superoxide dismutase. Palmitic acid reduced the amount of both fully-assembled OXPHOS complexes and of complex subunits. This reduction was due mainly to an accelerated degradation of these subunits, which was associated with a 3-tyrosine nitration of mitochondrial proteins. Pretreatment of cells with uric acid, an antiperoxynitrite agent, prevented protein degradation induced by palmitic acid. A reduced gene expression also contributed to decrease mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA-encoded subunits. Saturated fatty acids induced oxidative stress and caused mtDNA oxidative damage. This effect was prevented by inhibiting NADPH oxidase. These acids activated NADPH oxidase gene expression and increased NADPH oxidase activity. Silencing this oxidase abrogated totally the inhibitory effect of palmitic acid on OXPHOS complex activity. We conclude that saturated fatty acids caused nitro-oxidative stress, reduced OXPHOS complex half-life and activity, and decreased gene expression of mt

  12. Targeting prolyl-isomerase Pin1 prevents mitochondrial oxidative stress and vascular dysfunction: insights in patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paneni, Francesco; Costantino, Sarah; Castello, Lorenzo; Battista, Rodolfo; Capretti, Giuliana; Chiandotto, Sergio; D'Amario, Domenico; Scavone, Giuseppe; Villano, Angelo; Rustighi, Alessandra; Crea, Filippo; Pitocco, Dario; Lanza, Gaetano; Volpe, Massimo; Del Sal, Giannino; Lüscher, Thomas F; Cosentino, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    Diabetes is a major driver of cardiovascular disease, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Prolyl-isomerase Pin1 recognizes specific peptide bonds and modulates function of proteins altering cellular homoeostasis. The present study investigates Pin1 role in diabetes-induced vascular disease. In human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) exposed to high glucose, up-regulation of Pin1-induced mitochondrial translocation of pro-oxidant adaptor p66(Shc) and subsequent organelle disruption. In this setting, Pin1 recognizes Ser-116 inhibitory phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) leading to eNOS-caveolin-1 interaction and reduced NO availability. Pin1 also mediates hyperglycaemia-induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65, triggering VCAM-1, ICAM-1, and MCP-1 expression. Indeed, gene silencing of Pin1 in HAECs suppressed p66(Shc)-dependent ROS production, restored NO release and blunted NF-kB p65 nuclear translocation. Consistently, diabetic Pin1(-/-) mice were protected against mitochondrial oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, and vascular inflammation. Increased expression and activity of Pin1 were also found in peripheral blood monocytes isolated from diabetic patients when compared with age-matched healthy controls. Interestingly, enough, Pin1 up-regulation was associated with impaired flow-mediated dilation, increased urinary 8-iso-prostaglandin F2α and plasma levels of adhesion molecules. Pin1 drives diabetic vascular disease by causing mitochondrial oxidative stress, eNOS dysregulation as well as NF-kB-induced inflammation. These findings provide molecular insights for novel mechanism-based therapeutic strategies in patients with diabetes. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Mitochondrial dysfunction induced by Bisphenol A is a factor of its hepatotoxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Somaira; Beigh, Saba; Chaudhari, Bhushan P; Sharma, Shikha; Aliul Hasan Abdi, Sayed; Ahmad, Shahzad; Ahmad, Firoz; Parvez, Suhel; Raisuddin, Sheikh

    2015-10-09

    Bisphenol A (BPA), an estrogenic and endocrine disrupting agent, is widely used in manufacturing of polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins. BPA and other endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) act via multiple mechanisms including interference with mitochondrial functions. Mitochondria are the hub of cellular energy pool and hence are the target of many EDCs. We studied perturbation of activities of mitochondrial enzymes by BPA and its possible role in hepatotoxicity in Wistar rats. Rats were exposed to BPA (150 mg/kg, 250 mg/kg, 500 mg/kg per os, for 14 days) and activities of enzymes of mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) were measured. Besides, other biochemical parameters such as superoxide generation, protein oxidation, and lipid peroxidation (LPO) were also measured. Our results indicated a significant decrease in the activities of enzymes of mitochondrial ETC complexes, i.e., complex I, II, III, IV, and V along with significant increase in LPO and protein oxidation. Additionally, a significant increase in mitochondrial superoxide generation was also observed. All these findings could be attributed to enhanced oxidative stress, decrease in reduced glutathione level, and decrease in the activity of superoxide dismutase in rat liver mitochondria isolated from BPA-treated rats. BPA treatment also caused a significant increase in serum alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, and lactate dehydrogenase indicating its potential hepatotoxicity. Furthermore, histopathological findings revealed marked edema formation, hepatocellular degeneration, and necrosis of liver tissue in BPA-exposed rats. In conclusion, this study provides an evidence of impaired mitochondrial bioenergetics and liver toxicity after high-dose BPA exposure in rats. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol, 2015.

  14. Low Dose Acetaminophen Induces Reversible Mitochondrial Dysfunction Associated with Transient c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase Activation in Mouse Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiangting; Ramshesh, Venkat K; McGill, Mitchell R; Jaeschke, Hartmut; Lemasters, John J

    2016-03-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose causes hepatotoxicity involving mitochondrial dysfunction and c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation. Because the safe limit of APAP dosing is controversial, our aim was to evaluate the role of the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) and JNK in mitochondrial dysfunction after APAP dosing considered nontoxic by criteria of serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) release and histological necrosis in vivo. C57BL/6 mice were given APAP with and without the MPT inhibitor, N-methyl-4-isoleucine cyclosporin (NIM811), or the JNK inhibitor, SP600125. Fat droplet formation, cell viability, and mitochondrial function in vivo were monitored by intravital multiphoton microscopy. Serum ALT, liver histology, total JNK, and activated phospho(p)JNK were also assessed. High APAP (300 mg/kg) caused ALT release, necrosis, irreversible mitochondrial dysfunction, and hepatocellular death. By contrast, lower APAP (150 mg/kg) caused reversible mitochondrial dysfunction and fat droplet formation in hepatocytes without ALT release or necrosis. Mitochondrial protein N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine adducts correlated with early JNK activation, but irreversible mitochondrial depolarization and necrosis at high dose were associated with sustained JNK activation and translocation to mitochondria. NIM811 prevented cell death and/or mitochondrial depolarization after both high and low dose APAP. After low dose, SP600125 decreased mitochondrial depolarization. In conclusion, low dose APAP produces reversible MPT-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction and steatosis in hepatocytes without causing ALT release or necrosis, whereas high dose leads to irreversible mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death associated with sustained JNK activation. Thus, nontoxic APAP has the potential to cause transient mitochondrial dysfunction that may synergize with other stresses to promote liver damage and steatosis.

  15. Mitochondrial protein adducts formation and mitochondrial dysfunction during N-acetyl-m-aminophenol (AMAP)-induced hepatotoxicity in primary human hepatocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yuchao; McGill, Mitchell R.; Du, Kuo; Dorko, Kenneth; Kumer, Sean C.; Schmitt, Timothy M.; Ding, Wen-Xing; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    3′-Hydroxyacetanilide or N-acetyl-meta-aminophenol (AMAP) is generally regarded as a non-hepatotoxic analog of acetaminophen (APAP). Previous studies demonstrated absence of toxicity after AMAP in mice, hamsters, primary mouse hepatocytes and several cell lines. In contrast, experiments with liver slices suggested that it may be toxic to human hepatocytes; however, the mechanism of toxicity is unclear. To explore this, we treated primary human hepatocytes (PHH) with AMAP or APAP for up to 48 h and measured several parameters to assess metabolism and injury. Although less toxic than APAP, AMAP dose-dependently triggered cell death in PHH as indicated by alanine aminotransferase (ALT) release and propidium iodide (PI) staining. Similar to APAP, AMAP also significantly depleted glutathione (GSH) in PHH and caused mitochondrial damage as indicated by glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) release and the JC-1 assay. However, unlike APAP, AMAP treatment did not cause relevant c-jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation in the cytosol or phospho-JNK translocation to mitochondria. To compare, AMAP toxicity was assessed in primary mouse hepatocytes (PMH). No cytotoxicity was observed as indicated by the lack of lactate dehydrogenase release and no PI staining. Furthermore, there was no GSH depletion or mitochondrial dysfunction after AMAP treatment in PMH. Immunoblotting for arylated proteins suggested that AMAP treatment caused extensive mitochondrial protein adducts formation in PHH but not in PMH. In conclusion, AMAP is hepatotoxic in PHH and the mechanism involves formation of mitochondrial protein adducts and mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:26431796

  16. Subunits Rip1p and Cox9p of the respiratory chain contribute to diclofenac-induced mitochondrial dysfunction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, J.S.; Orij, R.; Luttik, M.A.H.; Smits, G.J.; Vermeulen, N.P.E.; Vos, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    The widely used drug diclofenac can cause serious heart, liver and kidney injury, which may be related to its ability to cause mitochondrial dysfunction. Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system, we studied the mechanisms of diclofenac toxicity and the role of mitochondria therein. We found

  17. Dysfunctional mitochondrial respiration in the striatum of the Huntington's disease transgenic R6/2 mouse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aidt, Frederik Heurlin; Nielsen, Signe Marie Borch; Kanters, Jørgen;

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic dysfunction and mitochondrial involvement are recognised as part of the pathology in Huntington's Disease (HD). Post-mortem examinations of the striatum from end-stage HD patients have shown a decrease in the in vitro activity of complexes II, III and IV of the electron transport system...

  18. Biochemical indications of cerebral ischaemia and mitochondrial dysfunction in severe brain trauma analysed with regard to type of lesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordström, Carl-Henrik; Nielsen, Troels Halfeld; Schalén, Wilhelm

    2016-01-01

    ), cerebral haemorrhagic contusion (CHC) and no mass lesion (NML). Altogether about 150,000 biochemical analyses were performed during the initial 96 h after trauma. Compromised aerobic metabolism occurred during 38 % of the study period. The biochemical pattern indicating mitochondrial dysfunction was more...

  19. Abnormal mitochondrial bioenergetics and heart rate dysfunction in mice lacking very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Exil, VJ; Gardner, CD; Rottman, JN; Sims, H; Bartelds, B; Khuchua, Z; Sindhal, R; Ni, GM; Strauss, AW

    2006-01-01

    Mitochondrial very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase ( VLCAD) deficiency is associated with severe hypoglycemia, cardiac dysfunction, and sudden death in neonates and children. Sudden death is common, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. We report on a mouse model of VLCAD deficie

  20. Obesity, diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis and chronic periodontitis: a shared pathology via oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullon, Pedro; Newman, Hubert N; Battino, Maurizio

    2014-02-01

    As many diseases have been shown to have several or indirect causes (i.e. are multifactorial) the question is what is the relative importance of each factor in a given disease? Also, what happens when some diseases, although apparently disparate, share causative factors and/or tissue pathologies? Host inflammation response mechanisms are largely shared by the body's different tissues and systems and only recently has special attention been paid to the possible linkages among chronic periodontitis and other chronic systemic diseases. The aim of this review was to consider and discuss the mounting evidence that the basis for the inter-relationships between chronic periodontitis and atheromatous disease and diabetes lie at a fundamental intracellular level, namely oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction, as a meeting background among such chronic diseases and periodontitis. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Mitochondrial Dysfunction and α-Synuclein Synaptic Pathology in Parkinson’s Disease: Who’s on First?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Zaltieri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is the most common neurodegenerative movement disorder. Its characteristic neuropathological features encompass the loss of dopaminergic neurons of the nigrostriatal system and the presence of Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites. These are intraneuronal and intraneuritic proteinaceous insoluble aggregates whose main constituent is the synaptic protein α-synuclein. Compelling lines of evidence indicate that mitochondrial dysfunction and α-synuclein synaptic deposition may play a primary role in the onset of this disorder. However, it is not yet clear which of these events may come first in the sequel of processes leading to neurodegeneration. Here, we reviewed data supporting either that α-synuclein synaptic deposition precedes and indirectly triggers mitochondrial damage or that mitochondrial deficits lead to neuronal dysfunction and α-synuclein synaptic accumulation. The present overview shows that it is still difficult to establish the exact temporal sequence and contribution of these events to PD.

  2. Hypobaric Treatment Effects on Chilling Injury, Mitochondrial Dysfunction, and the Ascorbate-Glutathione (AsA-GSH) Cycle in Postharvest Peach Fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lili; Wang, Jinhua; Shafi, Mohammad; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Jie; Wu, Jiasheng; Wu, Aimin

    2016-06-08

    In this study, hypobaric treatment effects were investigated on chilling injury, mitochondrial dysfunction, and the ascorbate-glutathione (AsA-GSH) cycle in peach fruit stored at 0 °C. Internal browning of peaches was dramatically reduced by applying 10-20 kPa pressure. Hypobaric treatment markedly inhibited membrane fluidity increase, whereas it kept mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) concentration and cytochrome C oxidase (CCO) and succinic dehydrogenase (SDH) activity relatively high in mitochondria. Similarly, 10-20 kPa pressure treatment reduced the level of decrease observed in AsA and GSH concentrations, while it enhanced ascorbate peroxidase (APX), glutathione reductase (GR), and monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR) activities related to the AsA-GSH cycle. Furthermore, comparative transcriptomic analysis showed that differentially expressed genes (DEGs) associated with the metabolism of glutathione, ascorbate, and aldarate were up-regulated in peaches treated with 10-20 kPa for 30 days at 0 °C. Genes encoding GR, MDHAR, and APX were identified and exhibited higher expression in fruits treated with low pressure than in fruits treated with normal atmospheric pressure. Our findings indicate that the alleviation of chilling injury by hypobaric treatment was associated with preventing mitochondrial dysfunction and triggering the AsA-GSH cycle by the transcriptional up-regulation of related enzymes.

  3. Inhibition of leukotriene B4 receptor 1 attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced cardiac dysfunction: role of AMPK-regulated mitochondrial function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Meng; Wang, Rui; Han, Qinghua

    2017-01-01

    Leukotriene B4 (LTB4)-mediated leukocyte recruitment and inflammatory cytokine production make crucial contributions to chronic inflammation and sepsis; however, the role of LTB4 in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cardiac dysfunction remains unclear. Therefore, the present study addressed this issue using an LTB4 receptor 1 (BLT1) inhibitor. Administration of LPS to mice resulted in decreased cardiovascular function. Inhibition of LTB4/BLT1 with the BLT1 inhibitor U75302 significantly improved survival and attenuated the LPS-induced acute cardiac dysfunction. During LPS challenge, the phosphorylated AMPK/ACC signaling pathway was slightly activated, and this effect was enhanced by U75302. Additionally, pNF-κB, Bax and cleaved caspase-3 were upregulated by LPS, and Bcl-2, IκB-α, mitochondrial complex I, complex II, and OPA1 were downregulated; however, these effects were reversed by U75302. The results indicated that the BLT1 antagonist suppressed cardiac apoptosis, inflammation, and mitochondrial impairment. Furthermore, the protection provided by the BLT1 inhibitor against LPS-induced cardiac dysfunction was significantly reversed by the AMPK inhibitor Compound C. In conclusion, inhibiting the LTB4/BLT1 signaling pathway via AMPK activation is a potential treatment strategy for septic cardiac dysfunction because it efficiently attenuates cardiac apoptosis, which may occur via the inhibition of inflammation and mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:28290498

  4. Mitochondrial dysfunction increases oxidative stress and decreases chronological life span in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Zuin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Oxidative stress is a probable cause of aging and associated diseases. Reactive oxygen species (ROS originate mainly from endogenous sources, namely the mitochondria. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed the effect of aerobic metabolism on oxidative damage in Schizosaccharomyces pombe by global mapping of those genes that are required for growth on both respiratory-proficient media and hydrogen-peroxide-containing fermentable media. Out of a collection of approximately 2700 haploid yeast deletion mutants, 51 were sensitive to both conditions and 19 of these were related to mitochondrial function. Twelve deletion mutants lacked components of the electron transport chain. The growth defects of these mutants can be alleviated by the addition of antioxidants, which points to intrinsic oxidative stress as the origin of the phenotypes observed. These respiration-deficient mutants display elevated steady-state levels of ROS, probably due to enhanced electron leakage from their defective transport chains, which compromises the viability of chronologically-aged cells. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Individual mitochondrial dysfunctions have often been described as the cause of diseases or aging, and our global characterization emphasizes the primacy of oxidative stress in the etiology of such processes.

  5. Shikonin Directly Targets Mitochondria and Causes Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Wiench

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy is a mainstay of cancer treatment. Due to increased drug resistance and the severe side effects of currently used therapeutics, new candidate compounds are required for improvement of therapy success. Shikonin, a natural naphthoquinone, was used in traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of different inflammatory diseases and recent studies revealed the anticancer activities of shikonin. We found that shikonin has strong cytotoxic effects on 15 cancer cell lines, including multidrug-resistant cell lines. Transcriptome-wide mRNA expression studies showed that shikonin induced genetic pathways regulating cell cycle, mitochondrial function, levels of reactive oxygen species, and cytoskeletal formation. Taking advantage of the inherent fluorescence of shikonin, we analyzed its uptake and distribution in live cells with high spatial and temporal resolution using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Shikonin was specifically accumulated in the mitochondria, and this accumulation was associated with a shikonin-dependent deregulation of cellular Ca2+ and ROS levels. This deregulation led to a breakdown of the mitochondrial membrane potential, dysfunction of microtubules, cell-cycle arrest, and ultimately induction of apoptosis. Seeing as both the metabolism and the structure of mitochondria show marked differences between cancer cells and normal cells, shikonin is a promising candidate for the next generation of chemotherapy.

  6. Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Insulin Resistance: The Contribution of Dioxin-Like Substances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Kyu Lee

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Persistent organic pollutants (POPs are known to cause mitochondrial dysfunction and this in turn is linked to insulin resistance, a key biochemical abnormality underlying the metabolic syndrome. To establish the cause and effect relationship between exposure to POPs and the development of the metabolic syndrome, Koch's postulates were considered. Problems arising from this approach were discussed and possible solutions were suggested. In particular, the difficulty of establishing a cause and effect relationship due to the vagueness of the metabolic syndrome as a disease entity was discussed. Recently a bioassay, aryl-hydrocarbon receptor (AhR trans-activation activity using a cell line expressing AhR-luciferase, showed that its activity is linearly related with the parameters of the metabolic syndrome in a population. This finding suggests the possible role of bioassays in the analysis of multiple pollutants of similar kinds in the pathogenesis of several closely related diseases, such as type 2 diabetes and the metabolic syndrome. Understanding the effects of POPs on mitochondrial function will be very useful in understanding the integration of various factors involved in this process, such as genes, fetal malnutrition and environmental toxins and their protectors, as mitochondria act as a unit according to the metabolic scaling law.

  7. Mitochondrial dysfunction induced by frataxin deficiency is associated with cellular senescence and abnormal calcium metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arantxa eBolinches-Amorós

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Friedreich ataxia is considered a neurodegenerative disorder involving both the peripheral and central nervous systems. Dorsal root ganglia (DRG are the major target tissue structures. This neuropathy is caused by mutations in the FXN gene that encodes frataxin. Here, we investigated the mitochondrial and cell consequences of frataxin depletion in a cellular model based on frataxin silencing in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells, a cell line that has been used widely as in vitro models for studies on neurological diseases. We showed that the reduction of frataxin induced mitochondrial dysfunction due to a bioenergetic deficit and abnormal Ca2+ homeostasis in the mitochondria that were associated with oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stresses. The depletion of frataxin did not cause cell death but increased autophagy, which may have a cytoprotective effect against cellular insults such as oxidative stress. Frataxin silencing provoked slow cell growth associated with cellular senescence, as demonstrated by increased SA-βgal activity and cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase. We postulate that cellular senescence might be related to a hypoplastic defect in the DRG during neurodevelopment, as suggested by necropsy studies.

  8. Exploiting mitochondrial dysfunction for effective elimination of imatinib-resistant leukemic cells.

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    Jérome Kluza

    Full Text Available Challenges today concern chronic myeloid leukemia (CML patients resistant to imatinib. There is growing evidence that imatinib-resistant leukemic cells present abnormal glucose metabolism but the impact on mitochondria has been neglected. Our work aimed to better understand and exploit the metabolic alterations of imatinib-resistant leukemic cells. Imatinib-resistant cells presented high glycolysis as compared to sensitive cells. Consistently, expression of key glycolytic enzymes, at least partly mediated by HIF-1α, was modified in imatinib-resistant cells suggesting that imatinib-resistant cells uncouple glycolytic flux from pyruvate oxidation. Interestingly, mitochondria of imatinib-resistant cells exhibited accumulation of TCA cycle intermediates, increased NADH and low oxygen consumption. These mitochondrial alterations due to the partial failure of ETC were further confirmed in leukemic cells isolated from some imatinib-resistant CML patients. As a consequence, mitochondria generated more ROS than those of imatinib-sensitive cells. This, in turn, resulted in increased death of imatinib-resistant leukemic cells following in vitro or in vivo treatment with the pro-oxidants, PEITC and Trisenox, in a syngeneic mouse tumor model. Conversely, inhibition of glycolysis caused derepression of respiration leading to lower cellular ROS. In conclusion, these findings indicate that imatinib-resistant leukemic cells have an unexpected mitochondrial dysfunction that could be exploited for selective therapeutic intervention.

  9. Mitochondrial Dysfunctions and Altered Metals Homeostasis: New Weapons to Counteract HCV-Related Oxidative Stress

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    Mario Arciello

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The hepatitis C virus (HCV infection produces several pathological effects in host organism through a wide number of molecular/metabolic pathways. Today it is worldwide accepted that oxidative stress actively participates in HCV pathology, even if the antioxidant therapies adopted until now were scarcely effective. HCV causes oxidative stress by a variety of processes, such as activation of prooxidant enzymes, weakening of antioxidant defenses, organelle damage, and metals unbalance. A focal point, in HCV-related oxidative stress onset, is the mitochondrial failure. These organelles, known to be the “power plants” of cells, have a central role in energy production, metabolism, and metals homeostasis, mainly copper and iron. Furthermore, mitochondria are direct viral targets, because many HCV proteins associate with them. They are the main intracellular free radicals producers and targets. Mitochondrial dysfunctions play a key role in the metal imbalance. This event, today overlooked, is involved in oxidative stress exacerbation and may play a role in HCV life cycle. In this review, we summarize the role of mitochondria and metals in HCV-related oxidative stress, highlighting the need to consider their deregulation in the HCV-related liver damage and in the antiviral management of patients.

  10. Imbalance of mitochondrial-nuclear cross talk in isocyanate mediated pulmonary endothelial cell dysfunction

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    Hariom Panwar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanistic investigations coupled with epidemiology, case-control, cohort and observational studies have increasingly linked isocyanate exposure (both chronic and acute with pulmonary morbidity and mortality. Though ascribed for impairment in endothelial cell function, molecular mechanisms of these significant adverse pulmonary outcomes remains poorly understood. As preliminary studies conducted in past have failed to demonstrate a cause-effect relationship between isocyanate toxicity and compromised pulmonary endothelial cell function, we hypothesized that direct exposure to isocyanate may disrupt endothelial structural lining, resulting in cellular damage. Based on this premise, we comprehensively evaluated the molecular repercussions of methyl isocyanate (MIC exposure on human pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (HPAE-26. We examined MIC-induced mitochondrial oxidative stress, pro-inflammatory cytokine response, oxidative DNA damage response and apoptotic index. Our results demonstrate that exposure to MIC, augment mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production, depletion in antioxidant defense enzymes, elevated pro-inflammatory cytokine response and induced endothelial cell apoptosis via affecting the balance of mitochondrial-nuclear cross talk. We herein delineate the first and direct molecular cascade of isocyanate-induced pulmonary endothelial cell dysfunction. The results of our study might portray a connective link between associated respiratory morbidities with isocyanate exposure, and indeed facilitate to discern the exposure-phenotype relationship in observed deficits of pulmonary endothelial cell function. Further, understanding of inter- and intra-cellular signaling pathways involved in isocyanate-induced endothelial damage would not only aid in biomarker identification but also provide potential new avenues to target specific therapeutic interventions.

  11. Mitochondrial dysfunction: the missing link between aging and sporadic Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Amandine; Friedland, Kristina; Eckert, Anne

    2016-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that represents the most common form of dementia among the elderly. Despite the fact that AD was studied for decades, the underlying mechanisms that trigger this neuropathology remain unresolved. Since the onset of cognitive deficits occurs generally within the 6th decade of life, except in rare familial case, advancing age is the greatest known risk factor for AD. To unravel the pathogenesis of the disease, numerous studies use cellular and animal models based on genetic mutations found in rare early onset familial AD (FAD) cases that represent less than 1 % of AD patients. However, the underlying process that leads to FAD appears to be distinct from that which results in late-onset AD. As a genetic disorder, FAD clearly is a consequence of malfunctioning/mutated genes, while late-onset AD is more likely due to a gradual accumulation of age-related malfunction. Normal aging and AD are both marked by defects in brain metabolism and increased oxidative stress, albeit to varying degrees. Mitochondria are involved in these two phenomena by controlling cellular bioenergetics and redox homeostasis. In the present review, we compare the common features observed in both brain aging and AD, placing mitochondrial in the center of pathological events that separate normal and pathological aging. We emphasize a bioenergetic model for AD including the inverse Warburg hypothesis which postulates that AD is a consequence of mitochondrial deregulation leading to metabolic reprogramming as an initial attempt to maintain neuronal integrity. After the failure of this compensatory mechanism, bioenergetic deficits may lead to neuronal death and dementia. Thus, mitochondrial dysfunction may represent the missing link between aging and sporadic AD, and represent attractive targets against neurodegeneration.

  12. NOX2 amplifies acetaldehyde-mediated cardiomyocyte mitochondrial dysfunction in alcoholic cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Moritz; Garlapati, Venkata; Oelze, Matthias; Sotiriou, Efthymios; Knorr, Maike; Kröller-Schön, Swenja; Kossmann, Sabine; Schönfelder, Tanja; Morawietz, Henning; Schulz, Eberhard; Schultheiss, Heinz-Peter; Daiber, Andreas; Münzel, Thomas; Wenzel, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Alcoholic cardiomyopathy (ACM) resulting from excess alcohol consumption is an important cause of heart failure (HF). Although it is assumed that the cardiotoxicity of the ethanol (EtOH)-metabolite acetaldehyde (ACA) is central for its development and progression, the exact mechanisms remain obscure. Murine cardiomyocytes (CMs) exposed to ACA or EtOH showed increased superoxide (O2•−) levels and decreased mitochondrial polarization, both being normalized by NADPH oxidase (NOX) inhibition. C57BL/6 mice and mice deficient for the ACA-degrading enzyme mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH-2−/−) were fed a 2% EtOH diet for 5 weeks creating an ACA-overload. 2% EtOH-fed ALDH-2−/− mice exhibited a decreased cardiac function, increased heart-to-body and lung-to-body weight ratios, increased cardiac levels of the lipid peroxidation product malondialdehyde (MDA) as well as increased NOX activity and NOX2/glycoprotein 91phox (NOX2/gp91phox) subunit expression compared to 2% EtOH-fed C57BL/6 mice. Echocardiography revealed that ALDH-2−/−/gp91phox−/− mice were protected from ACA-overload-induced HF after 5 weeks of 2% EtOH-diet, demonstrating that NOX2-derived O2•− contributes to the development of ACM. Translated to human pathophysiology, we found increased gp91phox expression in endomyocardial biopsies of ACM patients. In conclusion, ACM is promoted by ACA-driven mitochondrial dysfunction and can be improved by ablation of NOX2/gp91phox. NOX2/gp91phox therefore might be a potential pharmacological target to treat ACM. PMID:27624556

  13. Mitochondrial electron transport chain dysfunction during development does not extend lifespan in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rera, Michael; Monnier, Véronique; Tricoire, Hervé

    2010-02-01

    Since the initial identification of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as the major factor in aging, many studies have provided evidence for the central role of mitochondria in longevity. A few years ago, an unexpected finding showed that the inactivation of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) in Caenorhabditis elegans, during the developmental stages only, extended lifespan. Activation of this mitochondrial pathway affecting aging (MIT) is associated with several phenotypic features: increased longevity, increased time of development, decreased fertility/fecundity and reduced adult size. Here, we investigated this pathway in another model organism, Drosophila melanogaster. To assess the role of mitochondrial activity in the Drosophila aging process, we partially inactivated the MRC using RNA interference (RNAi) during larval stages. Developmental perturbation of the respiratory process prolonged development, increased lethality during developmental stage, reduced both fecundity and fertility and slightly reduced individual weight. However, in contrast to the nematode, this genetic intervention either shortened or had no effect on lifespan, depending on the level of gene inactivation. Thus, the effects of MRC disruption during development on aging differ between species. We discuss the possible origins of such differences.

  14. Reduced calcium responsiveness characterizes contractile dysfunction following coronary microembolization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skyschally, Andreas; Gres, Petra; van Caster, Patrick; van de Sand, Anita; Boengler, Kerstin; Schulz, Rainer; Heusch, Gerd

    2008-11-01

    We addressed calcium responsiveness in microembolized myocardium at 6 h after coronary microembolization (ME). In anesthetized pigs calcium responsiveness was determined as the increase of a myocardial work index (WI; LV pressure development vs. wall thickening) in response to a graded intracoronary infusion of CaCl(2) at baseline and at 6 h after ME or placebo, respectively. At baseline, CaCl(2 )infusion increased WI in both groups (ME: 296 +/- 22 to 468 +/- 47 mmHg*mm; placebo: 324 +/- 24 to 485 +/- 38 mmHg*mm; mean +/- SEM). At 6 h after ME, WI was decreased by 159 +/- 16 mmHg*mm (P < 0.05 vs. baseline) and remained reduced at any calcium concentration, whereas it was unchanged with placebo. The calcium concentration in coronary blood necessary to achieve the half maximal increase in WI remained unchanged from baseline to 6 h and did not differ between placebo and ME. The ME-induced myocardial dysfunction is not related to an altered calcium sensitivity, but is characterized by a reduced maximal contractile force.

  15. The Yeast Retrograde Response as a Model of Intracellular Signaling of Mitochondrial Dysfunction

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    S. Michal eJazwinski

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction activates intracellular signaling pathways that impact yeast longevity, and the best known of these pathways is the retrograde response. More recently, similar responses have been discerned in other systems, from invertebrates to human cells. However, the identity of the signal transducers is either unknown or apparently diverse, contrasting with the well-established signaling module of the yeast retrograde response. On the other hand, it has become equally clear that several other pathways and processes interact with the retrograde response, embedding it in a network responsive to a variety of cellular states. An examination of this network supports the notion that the master regulator NFkB aggregated a variety of mitochondria-related cellular responses at some point in evolution and has become the retrograde transcription factor. This has significant consequences for how we view some of the deficits associated with aging, such as inflammation. The support for NFkB as the retrograde response transcription factor is not only based on functional analyses. It is bolstered by the fact that NFkB can regulate Myc-Max, which is activated in human cells with dysfunctional mitochondria and impacts cellular metabolism. Myc-Max is homologous to the yeast retrograde response transcription factor Rtg1-Rtg3. Further research will be needed to disentangle the pro-aging from the anti-aging effects of NFkB. Interestingly, this is also a challenge for the complete understanding of the yeast retrograde response.

  16. Mitochondrial dysfunction in the APP/PSEN1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease and a novel protective role for ascorbate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Shilpy; Fessel, Joshua P; Harrison, Fiona E

    2017-08-31

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is elevated in very early stages of Alzheimer's disease and exacerbates oxidative stress, which contributes to disease pathology. Mitochondria were isolated from 4-month-old wild-type mice, transgenic mice carrying the APPSWE and PSEN1dE9 mutations, mice with decreased brain and mitochondrial ascorbate (vitamin C) via heterozygous knockout of the sodium dependent vitamin C transporter (SVCT2(+/-)) and transgenic APP/PSEN1 mice with heterozygous SVCT2 expression. Mitochondrial isolates from SVCT2(+/-) mice were observed to consume less oxygen using high-resolution respirometry, and also exhibited decreased mitochondrial membrane potential compared to wild type isolates. Conversely, isolates from young (4 months) APP/PSEN1 mice consumed more oxygen, and exhibited an increase in mitochondrial membrane potential, but had a significantly lower ATP/ADP ratio compared to wild type isolates. Greater levels of reactive oxygen species were also produced in mitochondria isolated from both APP/PSEN1 and SVCT2(+/-) mice compared to wild type isolates. Acute administration of ascorbate to mitochondria isolated from wild-type mice increased oxygen consumption compared with untreated mitochondria suggesting ascorbate may support energy production. This study suggests that both presence of amyloid and ascorbate deficiency can contribute to mitochondrial dysfunction, even at an early, prodromal stage of Alzheimer's disease, although occurring via different pathways. Ascorbate may, therefore, provide a useful preventative strategy against neurodegenerative disease, particularly in populations most at risk for Alzheimer's disease in which stores are often depleted through mitochondrial dysfunction and elevated oxidative stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Proteinopathy, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction: cross talk in Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease

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    Ganguly G

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Gargi Ganguly,1 Sasanka Chakrabarti,2 Uttara Chatterjee,1 Luciano Saso3 1Department of Pathology, Institute of Post Graduate Medical Education and Research, Kolkata, 2Department of Biochemistry, ICARE Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Haldia, West Bengal, India; 3Department of Physiology and Pharmacology “Vittorio Erspamer”, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy Abstract: Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease are two common neurodegenerative diseases of the elderly people that have devastating effects in terms of morbidity and mortality. The predominant form of the disease in either case is sporadic with uncertain etiology. The clinical features of Parkinson’s disease are primarily motor deficits, while the patients of Alzheimer’s disease present with dementia and cognitive impairment. Though neuronal death is a common element in both the disorders, the postmortem histopathology of the brain is very characteristic in each case and different from each other. In terms of molecular pathogenesis, however, both the diseases have a significant commonality, and proteinopathy (abnormal accumulation of misfolded proteins, mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are the cardinal features in either case. These three damage mechanisms work in concert, reinforcing each other to drive the pathology in the aging brain for both the diseases; very interestingly, the nature of interactions among these three damage mechanisms is very similar in both the diseases, and this review attempts to highlight these aspects. In the case of Alzheimer’s disease, the peptide amyloid beta (Aβ is responsible for the proteinopathy, while α-synuclein plays a similar role in Parkinson’s disease. The expression levels of these two proteins and their aggregation processes are modulated by reactive oxygen radicals and transition metal ions in a similar manner. In turn, these proteins – as oligomers or in aggregated forms – cause

  18. Dietary nitrate does not reduce oxygen cost of exercise or improve muscle mitochondrial function in mitochondrial myopathy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabben, Miranda; Schmitz, Joep P J; Ciapaite, Jolita; Le Clercq, Carlijn M P; van Riel, Natal A; Haak, Harm R; Nicolay, Klaas; de Coo, Irenaeus F; Smeets, Hubert J M; Praet, Stephan F; van Loon, Luc J C; Prompers, Jeanine J

    2017-02-08

    Muscle weakness and exercise intolerance negatively affect the quality of life of mitochondrial myopathy patients. Short-term dietary nitrate supplementation has been shown to improve exercise performance and reduce oxygen cost of exercise in healthy humans and trained athletes. We investigated if 1 week of dietary inorganic nitrate supplementation decreases the oxygen cost of exercise and improves mitochondrial function in mitochondrial myopathy patients. Ten mitochondrial myopathy patients (40 ± 5 years, maximal whole-body oxygen uptake = 21.2 ± 3.2 mL/min/kg body weight, maximal workload = 122 ± 26 W) received 8.5 mg/kg body weight/day of inorganic nitrate (~7 mmol) for 8 days. Whole-body oxygen consumption at 50% of the maximal workload, in vivo skeletal muscle oxidative capacity (evaluated from post-exercise phosphocreatine recovery using (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy) and ex vivo mitochondrial oxidative capacity in permeabilized skinned muscle fibers (measured with high-resolution respirometry) were determined before and after nitrate supplementation. Despite a 6-fold increase in plasma nitrate levels, nitrate supplementation did not affect whole-body oxygen cost during submaximal exercise. Additionally, no beneficial effects of nitrate were found on in vivo or ex vivo muscle mitochondrial oxidative capacity. This is the first time that the therapeutic potential of dietary nitrate for mitochondrial myopathy patients was evaluated. We conclude that 1 week of dietary nitrate supplementation does not reduce oxygen cost of exercise or improve mitochondrial function in the group of patients tested.

  19. Mitochondrial dysfunction due to Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy as a cause of visual loss during assessment for epilepsy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehusmann, Pitt; Surges, Rainer; von Wrede, Randi D; Elger, Christian E; Wellmer, Jörg; Reimann, Jens; Urbach, Horst; Vielhaber, Stefan; Bien, Christian G; Kunz, Wolfram S

    2011-01-01

    Assessment for epilepsy surgery may require invasive measures such as implantation of intracranial electrodes or the Wada test. These investigations are commonly well tolerated. However, complications, including visual disturbances of various etiologies, have been reported. Here we describe two patients with pharmacoresistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) who displayed loss of vision in the context of presurgical assessment and in whom mutations associated with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) were detected. Genetic analysis revealed in one patient the frequent mitochondrial G11778A LHON mutation in ND4. In the second patient, the mitochondrial C4640A mutation in ND2 was detected. This rare LHON mutation enhanced the sensitivity of the patient's muscle and brain tissue to amobarbital, a known blocker of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been reported in epilepsy. Thus, the presence of LHON mutations can be a rare cause of visual disturbances in patients with epilepsy and may have predisposed to development of epilepsy.

  20. Parkin overexpression during aging reduces proteotoxicity, alters mitochondrial dynamics, and extends lifespan

    OpenAIRE

    Rana, Anil; Rera, Michael; Walker, David W.

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant protein aggregation and mitochondrial dysfunction have each been linked to aging and a number of age-onset neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson disease. Loss-of-function mutations in parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase that functions to promote the ubiquitin–proteasome system of protein degradation and also in mitochondrial quality control, have been implicated in heritable forms of Parkinson disease. The question of whether parkin can modulate aging or positively impact longe...

  1. Induction of mitochondrial dysfunction as a strategy for targeting tumour cells in metabolically compromised microenvironments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaonan; Fryknäs, Mårten; Hernlund, Emma; Fayad, Walid; De Milito, Angelo; Olofsson, Maria Hägg; Gogvadze, Vladimir; Dang, Long; Påhlman, Sven; Schughart, Leoni A Kunz; Rickardson, Linda; D'Arcy, Padraig; Gullbo, Joachim; Nygren, Peter; Larsson, Rolf; Linder, Stig

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal vascularization of solid tumours results in the development of microenvironments deprived of oxygen and nutrients that harbour slowly growing and metabolically stressed cells. Such cells display enhanced resistance to standard chemotherapeutic agents and repopulate tumours after therapy. Here we identify the small molecule VLX600 as a drug that is preferentially active against quiescent cells in colon cancer 3-D microtissues. The anticancer activity is associated with reduced mitochondrial respiration, leading to bioenergetic catastrophe and tumour cell death. VLX600 shows enhanced cytotoxic activity under conditions of nutrient starvation. Importantly, VLX600 displays tumour growth inhibition in vivo. Our findings suggest that tumour cells in metabolically compromised microenvironments have a limited ability to respond to decreased mitochondrial function, and suggest a strategy for targeting the quiescent populations of tumour cells for improved cancer treatment.

  2. Scutellarin Reduces Endothelium Dysfunction through the PKG-I Pathway

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    Xiaohua Du

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. In this report, we investigated the protective mechanism of scutellarin (SCU in vitro and in vivo which could be involved in endothelial cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG, vasodilator stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP pathway, and vascular endothelium dysfunction (EtD. Method. Human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs with hypoxia reoxygenation (HR treatment and rats with cerebral ischemia reperfusion (CIR treatment were applied. Protein and mRNA expression of PKG, VASP, and p-VASP were evaluated by Western blot and RT-PCR methods. Vascular EtD was assessed by using wire myography to determine endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation in isolated rat basilar artery (BA. Result. In cultured HBMECs, SCU (0.1, 1, and 10 μM increased cell viability, mRNA, protein level, and phosphorylative activity of PKG and VASP against HR injury. In HR model of BA, SCU increased protein level of P-VASP. In rat CIR model, wire myography demonstrated that SCU (45 and 90 mg/kg, i.v. significantly reduced ischemic size by partially restoring the endothelium dependent vasodilation of BA; PKG inhibitor Rp-8-Br-cGMPS (50 μg/kg, i.v. reversed this protection of SCU in CIR rats. Conclusion. SCU protects against cerebral vascular EtD through endothelial PKG pathway activation.

  3. MitoTEMPO Prevents Oxalate Induced Injury in NRK-52E Cells via Inhibiting Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Modulating Oxidative Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao; Liu, Jihong

    2017-01-01

    As one of the major risks for urolithiasis, hyperoxaluria can be caused by genetic defect or dietary intake. And high oxalate induced renal epithelial cells injury is related to oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Here, we investigated whether MitoTEMPO, a mitochondria-targeted antioxidant, could protect against oxalate mediated injury in NRK-52E cells via inhibiting mitochondrial dysfunction and modulating oxidative stress. MitoSOX Red was used to determine mitochondrial ROS (mtROS) production. Mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) and quantification of ATP synthesis were measured to evaluate mitochondrial function. The protein expression of Nox4, Nox2, and p22 was also detected to explore the effect of oxalate and MitoTEMPO on NADPH oxidase. Our results revealed that pretreatment with MitoTEMPO significantly inhibited oxalate induced lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and malondialdehyde (MDA) release and decreased oxalate induced mtROS generation. Further, MitoTEMPO pretreatment restored disruption of Δψm and decreased ATP synthesis mediated by oxalate. In addition, MitoTEMPO altered the protein expression of Nox4 and p22 and decreased the protein expression of IL-6 and osteopontin (OPN) induced by oxalate. We concluded that MitoTEMPO may be a new candidate to protect against oxalate induced kidney injury as well as urolithiasis.

  4. Human biallelic MFN2 mutations induce mitochondrial dysfunction, upper body adipose hyperplasia, and suppression of leptin expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rocha, Nuno; Bulger, David A; Frontini, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    body adipose overgrowth. We describe similar massive adipose overgrowth with suppressed leptin expression in four further patients with biallelic MFN2 mutations and at least one p.Arg707Trp allele. Overgrown tissue was composed of normal-sized, UCP1-negative unilocular adipocytes, with mitochondrial...... normal in skin fibroblasts. These findings suggest that specific MFN2 mutations cause tissue-selective mitochondrial dysfunction with increased adipocyte proliferation and survival, confirm a novel form of excess adiposity with paradoxical suppression of leptin expression, and suggest potential targeted...

  5. Methoxychlor causes mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage in the mouse ovary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, R K; Schuh, R A; Fiskum, G; Flaws, J A

    2006-11-01

    Methoxychlor (MXC) is an organochlorine pesticide that reduces fertility in female rodents by causing ovarian atrophy, persistent estrous cyclicity, and antral follicle atresia (apoptotic cell death). Oxidative damage resulting from reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation has been demonstrated to lead to toxicant-induced cell death. Thus, this work tested the hypothesis that MXC causes oxidative damage to the mouse ovary and affects mitochondrial respiration in a manner that stimulates ROS production. For the in vitro experiments, mitochondria were collected from adult cycling mouse ovaries, treated with vehicle (dimethyl sulfoxide; DMSO) or MXC, and subjected to polarographic measurements of respiration. For the in vivo experiments, adult cycling CD-1 mice were dosed with either vehicle (sesame oil) or MXC for 20 days. After treatment, ovarian mitochondria were isolated and subjected to measurements of respiration and fluorimetric measurements of H2O2 production. Some ovaries were also fixed and processed for immunohistochemistry using antibodies for ROS production markers: nitrotyrosine and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHG). Ovaries from in vivo experiments were also used to measure the mRNA expression and activity of antioxidants such as Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), and catalase (CAT). The results indicate that MXC significantly impairs mitochondrial respiration, increases production of H2O2, causes more staining for nitrotyrosine and 8-OHG in antral follicles, and decreases the expression and activity of SOD1, GPX, and CAT as compared to controls. Collectively, these data indicate that MXC inhibits mitochondrial respiration, causes ROS production, and decreases antioxidant expression and activity in the ovary, specifically in the antral follicles. Therefore, it is possible that MXC causes atresia of ovarian antral follicles by inducing oxidative stress through mitochondrial production of ROS.

  6. Acrolein cytotoxicity in hepatocytes involves endoplasmic reticulum stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Mohammad K; Avila, Diana; Zhang, Jingwen; Barve, Shirish; Arteel, Gavin; McClain, Craig; Joshi-Barve, Swati

    2012-11-15

    Acrolein is a common environmental, food and water pollutant and a major component of cigarette smoke. Also, it is produced endogenously via lipid peroxidation and cellular metabolism of certain amino acids and drugs. Acrolein is cytotoxic to many cell types including hepatocytes; however the mechanisms are not fully understood. We examined the molecular mechanisms underlying acrolein hepatotoxicity in primary human hepatocytes and hepatoma cells. Acrolein, at pathophysiological concentrations, caused a dose-dependent loss of viability of hepatocytes. The death was apoptotic at moderate and necrotic at high concentrations of acrolein. Acrolein exposure rapidly and dramatically decreased intracellular glutathione and overall antioxidant capacity, and activated the stress-signaling MAP-kinases JNK, p42/44 and p38. Our data demonstrate for the first time in human hepatocytes, that acrolein triggered endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and activated eIF2α, ATF-3 and -4, and Gadd153/CHOP, resulting in cell death. Notably, the protective/adaptive component of ER stress was not activated, and acrolein failed to up-regulate the protective ER-chaperones, GRP78 and GRP94. Additionally, exposure to acrolein disrupted mitochondrial integrity/function, and led to the release of pro-apoptotic proteins and ATP depletion. Acrolein-induced cell death was attenuated by N-acetyl cysteine, phenyl-butyric acid, and caspase and JNK inhibitors. Our data demonstrate that exposure to acrolein induces a variety of stress responses in hepatocytes, including GSH depletion, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and ER stress (without ER-protective responses) which together contribute to acrolein toxicity. Our study defines basic mechanisms underlying liver injury caused by reactive aldehyde pollutants such as acrolein.

  7. Proteomic Profiling of Human Liver Biopsies: Hepatitis C Virus-Induced Fibrosis and Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond, Deborah L.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Paeper, Bryan; Proll, Sean; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Carithers, Jr., Robert L.; Larson , Anne M.; Yeh, Matthew M.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Katze, Michael G.

    2007-09-01

    Liver biopsies from HCV-infected patients offer the unique opportunity to study human liver biology and disease in vivo. However, the low protein yields associated with these small samples present a significant challenge for proteomic analysis. In this study we describe the application of an ultra-sensitive proteomics platform for performing robust quantitative proteomic studies on microgram amounts of HCV-infected human liver tissue from 15 patients at different stages of fibrosis. A high quality liver protein data base containing 5,920 unique protein identifications supported high throughput quantitative studies using 16O:18O stable isotope labeling in combination with the accurate mass and time (AMT) tag approach. A total of 1,641 liver biopsy proteins were quantified and ANOVA identified 210 proteins exhibiting statistically significant differences associated with fibrosis stage. Hierarchical clustering revealed that biopsies representative of later fibrosis stages (e.g. Batts-Ludwig stages 3-4) exhibited a distinct protein expression profile indicating an apparent down-regulation of many proteins when compared to samples from earlier fibrosis stages (e.g. Batts-Ludwig stages 0-2). Functional analysis of these signature proteins suggests that impairment of key mitochondrial processes including fatty acid oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation, and response to oxidative stress and reactive oxygen species occurs during advanced stage 3-4 fibrosis. In conclusion, the results reported here represent a significant advancement in clinical proteomics providing to our knowledge, the first demonstration of global proteomic alterations accompanying liver disease progression in patients chronically infected with HCV. Our findings contribute to a generally emerging theme associating oxidative stress and hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction with HCV pathogenesis.

  8. Mitochondrial Polymorphisms Significantly Reduce the Risk of Parkinson Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Walt, Joelle M.; Nicodemus, Kristin K.; Martin, Eden R.; Scott, William K.; Nance, Martha A.; Watts, Ray L.; Hubble, Jean P.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Koller, William C.; Lyons, Kelly; Pahwa, Rajesh; Stern, Matthew B.; Colcher, Amy; Hiner, Bradley C.; Jankovic, Joseph; Ondo, William G.; Allen Jr., Fred H.; Goetz, Christopher G.; Small, Gary W.; Mastaglia, Frank; Stajich, Jeffrey M.; McLaurin, Adam C.; Middleton, Lefkos T.; Scott, Burton L.; Schmechel, Donald E.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Vance, Jeffery M.

    2003-01-01

    Mitochondrial (mt) impairment, particularly within complex I of the electron transport system, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease (PD). More than half of mitochondrially encoded polypeptides form part of the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase (NADH) complex I enzyme. To test the hypothesis that mtDNA variation contributes to PD expression, we genotyped 10 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that define the European mtDNA haplogroups in 609 white patients with PD and 340 unaffected white control subjects. Overall, individuals classified as haplogroup J (odds ratio [OR] 0.55; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.34–0.91; P=.02) or K (OR 0.52; 95% CI 0.30–0.90; P=.02) demonstrated a significant decrease in risk of PD versus individuals carrying the most common haplogroup, H. Furthermore, a specific SNP that defines these two haplogroups, 10398G, is strongly associated with this protective effect (OR 0.53; 95% CI 0.39–0.73; P=.0001). SNP 10398G causes a nonconservative amino acid change from threonine to alanine within the NADH dehydrogenase 3 (ND3) of complex I. After stratification by sex, this decrease in risk appeared stronger in women than in men (OR 0.43; 95% CI 0.27–0.71; P=.0009). In addition, SNP 9055A of ATP6 demonstrated a protective effect for women (OR 0.45; 95% CI 0.22–0.93; P=.03). Our results suggest that ND3 is an important factor in PD susceptibility among white individuals and could help explain the role of complex I in PD expression. PMID:12618962

  9. Large Scale 7436-bp Deletions in Human Sperm Mitochondrial DNA with Spermatozoa Dysfunction and Male Infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambulkar, Prafulla S; Waghmare, Jwalant E; Chaudhari, Ajay R; Wankhede, Vandana R; Tarnekar, Aaditya M; Shende, Moreshwar R; Pal, Asoke K

    2016-11-01

    Mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA are essential to sperm motility and fertility. It controls growth, development and differentiation through oxidation energy supply. Mitochondrial (mtDNA) deletions or mutation are frequently attributed to defects of sperm motility and finally these deletions lead to sperm dysfunction and causes infertility in male. To investigate the correlation between large scale 7436-bp deletions in sperm mtDNA and non-motility of sperm in asthenozoospermia and Oligoasthenoteratozoospermia (OAT) infertile men. The present prospective study was carried out in Human Genetic Division, Department of Anatomy, Mahatma Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences, Sevagram from June 2014 to July 2016. We have studied 110 asthenozoospermia and OAT infertile men whose semen profile indicated abnormal motility and 50 normal fertile controls. Of 110 infertile men, 70 had asthenozoospermia and 40 had OAT. Fractionations of spermatozoa were done in each semen sample on the basis of their motility by percoll gradients discontinuous technique. Long-range PCR was used for detection of 7436-bp deletions in sperm mtDNA and was confirmed by primer shift technique. Overall eight subjects (8/110; 7.2%) of which six (6/70; 8.57%) asthenozoospermia and two (2/40; 5%) OAT had shown deletions of 7436-bp. In 40% percoll fraction had more non-motile spermatozoa than 80% percoll fraction. The non-motile spermatozoa in 40% percoll fractions showed more mtDNA deletions (7.2%) than the motile spermatozoa in 80% percoll fraction (2.7%). The sequencing of flanking regions of deleted mtDNA confirmed 7436-bp deletions. Interestingly, no deletions were found in control subjects. Though, the frequency of 7436-bp deletions in sperm mtDNA was low in infertile cases but meaningful indications were there when results were compared with controls. It is indicated that large scale deletions 7436-bp of mtDNA is associated with abnormal sperm motility. The 7436-bp deletions of mtDNA in spermatozoa

  10. Large Scale 7436-bp Deletions in Human Sperm Mitochondrial DNA with Spermatozoa Dysfunction and Male Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambulkar, Prafulla S.; Waghmare, Jwalant E.; Chaudhari, Ajay R.; Wankhede, Vandana R.; Tarnekar, Aaditya M.; Shende, Moreshwar R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA are essential to sperm motility and fertility. It controls growth, development and differentiation through oxidation energy supply. Mitochondrial (mtDNA) deletions or mutation are frequently attributed to defects of sperm motility and finally these deletions lead to sperm dysfunction and causes infertility in male. Aim To investigate the correlation between large scale 7436-bp deletions in sperm mtDNA and non-motility of sperm in asthenozoospermia and Oligoasthenoteratozoospermia (OAT) infertile men. Materials and Methods The present prospective study was carried out in Human Genetic Division, Department of Anatomy, Mahatma Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences, Sevagram from June 2014 to July 2016. We have studied 110 asthenozoospermia and OAT infertile men whose semen profile indicated abnormal motility and 50 normal fertile controls. Of 110 infertile men, 70 had asthenozoospermia and 40 had OAT. Fractionations of spermatozoa were done in each semen sample on the basis of their motility by percoll gradients discontinuous technique. Long-range PCR was used for detection of 7436-bp deletions in sperm mtDNA and was confirmed by primer shift technique. Results Overall eight subjects (8/110; 7.2%) of which six (6/70; 8.57%) asthenozoospermia and two (2/40; 5%) OAT had shown deletions of 7436-bp. In 40% percoll fraction had more non-motile spermatozoa than 80% percoll fraction. The non-motile spermatozoa in 40% percoll fractions showed more mtDNA deletions (7.2%) than the motile spermatozoa in 80% percoll fraction (2.7%). The sequencing of flanking regions of deleted mtDNA confirmed 7436-bp deletions. Interestingly, no deletions were found in control subjects. Conclusion Though, the frequency of 7436-bp deletions in sperm mtDNA was low in infertile cases but meaningful indications were there when results were compared with controls. It is indicated that large scale deletions 7436-bp of mtDNA is associated with abnormal

  11. Clonal expansion of early to mid-life mitochondrial DNA point mutations drives mitochondrial dysfunction during human ageing.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greaves, L.C.; Nooteboom, M.; Elson, J.L.; Tuppen, H.A.; Taylor, G.A.; Commane, D.M.; Arasaradnam, R.P.; Khrapko, K.; Taylor, R.W.; Kirkwood, T.B.; Mathers, J.C.; Turnbull, D.M.

    2014-01-01

    Age-related decline in the integrity of mitochondria is an important contributor to the human ageing process. In a number of ageing stem cell populations, this decline in mitochondrial function is due to clonal expansion of individual mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) point mutations within single cells. Ho

  12. Ac-cel, a novel antioxidant, protects against hydrogen peroxide-induced injury in PC12 cells via attenuation of mitochondrial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xianjun; Chen, Yuting; Liu, Qunfang; Wu, Jian; Wang, Luoyi; Tang, Xican; Zhao, Weimin; Zhang, Haiyan

    2013-07-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in pathophysiology of many neurodegenerative diseases (ND) and increased oxidative stress is closely associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. As a result, looking for potent antioxidants, especially those targeting mitochondria, has become an attractive strategy in ND therapy. In this study, we explored protective effects and potential mechanism of Ac-cel, a novel compound, against hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))-induced injury in PC12 cells. Pretreatment of PC12 cells with Ac-cel prior to 24 h of H(2)O(2) exposure markedly attenuated cytotoxicity induced by H(2)O(2) as evidenced by morphological changes and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Ac-cel also exhibited potent antiapoptotic effect demonstrated by results of annexin V and PI staining. The above beneficial effects of Ac-cel were accompanied by improved mitochondrial function, reduced caspase-3 cleavage as well as upregulated ratio of Bcl-2/Bax protein expression. Moreover, Ac-cel pretreatment markedly reversed intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation following 30 min of H(2)O(2) exposure in PC12 cells. Further, subcellular investigation indicated that Ac-cel significantly reduced production of mitochondrial ROS in isolated rat cortical mitochondria. Taken together, the present study, for the first time, reports that Ac-cel pretreatment inhibits H(2)O(2)-stimulated early accumulation of intracellular ROS possibly via reducing mitochondrial ROS production directly and leads to subsequent preservation of mitochondrial function. These results indicate that Ac-cel is a potential drug candidate for treatment of oxidative stress-associated ND.

  13. A polyphenol extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. ameliorates acetaminophen-induced hepatic steatosis by attenuating the mitochondrial dysfunction in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chao-Hsin; Kuo, Chih-Yi; Wang, Chau-Jong; Wang, Chi-Ping; Lee, Yi-Ru; Hung, Chi-Nan; Lee, Huei-Jane

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress is the major contributor to acetaminophen (AAP)-caused liver damage. It promotes mitochondrial oxidative stress and collapses the mitochondrial membrane potential to cause cell death. We have previously shown that a polyphenol extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. (HPE) potentiated the antioxidative effect. We further examined in this study the possible mechanism of HPE against AAP-caused liver damage. BABL/c mice were orally fed with HPE (100, 200 or 300 mg/kg) for two weeks prior to an i.p. injection of 1000 mg/kg of AAP. The mice were decapitated 6 h after the AAP injection to collect the blood and liver for further determination. The results show that pretreating with HPE increased the level of glutathione (GSH), decreased the level of lipid peroxidation, and increased catalase activity in the liver. A histopathological evaluation shows that HPE could decrease AAP-induced liver sterosis accompanied by a decreased expression of AIF, Bax, Bid, and p-JNK in the liver. An in vitro assay revealed that HPE could reduce AAP-induced death of BABL/c normal liver cells (BNLs), reverse the lost mitochondrial potency and improve the antioxidative status, similarly to the results of the in vivo assay. We show in this study that HPE possessed the ability to protect the liver from AAP-caused injury. The protective mechanism might be regulated by decreasing oxidative stress and attenuating the mitochondrial dysfunction.

  14. Oxygen glucose deprivation in rat hippocampal slice cultures results in alterations in carnitine homeostasis and mitochondrial dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas F Rau

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction characterized by depolarization of mitochondrial membranes and the initiation of mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis are pathological responses to hypoxia-ischemia (HI in the neonatal brain. Carnitine metabolism directly supports mitochondrial metabolism by shuttling long chain fatty acids across the inner mitochondrial membrane for beta-oxidation. Our previous studies have shown that HI disrupts carnitine homeostasis in neonatal rats and that L-carnitine can be neuroprotective. Thus, this study was undertaken to elucidate the molecular mechanisms by which HI alters carnitine metabolism and to begin to elucidate the mechanism underlying the neuroprotective effect of L-carnitine (LCAR supplementation. Utilizing neonatal rat hippocampal slice cultures we found that oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD decreased the levels of free carnitines (FC and increased the acylcarnitine (AC: FC ratio. These changes in carnitine homeostasis correlated with decreases in the protein levels of carnitine palmitoyl transferase (CPT 1 and 2. LCAR supplementation prevented the decrease in CPT1 and CPT2, enhanced both FC and the AC∶FC ratio and increased slice culture metabolic viability, the mitochondrial membrane potential prior to OGD and prevented the subsequent loss of neurons during later stages of reperfusion through a reduction in apoptotic cell death. Finally, we found that LCAR supplementation preserved the structural integrity and synaptic transmission within the hippocampus after OGD. Thus, we conclude that LCAR supplementation preserves the key enzymes responsible for maintaining carnitine homeostasis and preserves both cell viability and synaptic transmission after OGD.

  15. Role of mitochondrial dysfunction in genesis of severe shock%线粒体功能不全在重症休克发生中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王兴民; 赵克森

    2013-01-01

    The high mortality is a leading element of human health that follows severe shock even after blood transfusion and other anti - shock thERαpy. Therefore, to find out the mechanism of high mortality in severe shock is very critical. As a hotspot in recent years, mitochondrial function has important value in the genesis of many diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus, Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and so on. Mitochondrial dysfunction often takes place in relation to the opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore with in-tracellular low ATP content in severe shock. The consequence of intracellular low ATP content may lead to the dysfunction of various organs with difficult treatment of severe shock. Therefore, protection against mitochondrial damage is a novel approach for treatment of severe shock. This article summarizes the concept, pathogenesis, detection variables and treatment of mitochondrial dysfunction in severe shock.

  16. Norcantharidin induced DU145 cell apoptosis through ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction and energy depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Bo; He, Pei-Jie; Shao, Chun-Lin

    2013-01-01

    Norcantharidin (NCTD), a demethylated analog of cantharidin derived from blister beetles, has attracted considerable attentions in recent years due to their definitely toxic properties and the noteworthy advantages in stimulating bone marrow and increasing the peripheral leukocytes. Hence, it is worth studying the anti-tumor effect of NCTD on human prostate cancer cells DU145. It was found that after the treatment of NCTD with different concentrations (25-100 μM), the cell proliferation was significantly inhibited, which led to the appearance of micronucleus (MN). Moreover, the cells could be killed in a dose-/time-dependent manner along with the reduction of PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen) expression, destruction of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), down-regulation of MnSOD, induction of ROS, depletion of ATP, and activation of AMPK (Adenosine 5'-monophosphate -activated protein kinase) . In addition, a remarkable release of cytochrome c was found in the cells exposed to 100 μM NCTD and exogenous SOD-PEG could eliminate the generation of NCTD-induced MN. In conclusion, our studies indicated that NCTD could induce the collapse of MMP and mitochondria dysfunction. Accumulation of intercellular ROS could eventually switch on the apoptotic pathway by causing DNA damage and depleting ATP.

  17. Norcantharidin induced DU145 cell apoptosis through ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction and energy depletion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Shen

    Full Text Available Norcantharidin (NCTD, a demethylated analog of cantharidin derived from blister beetles, has attracted considerable attentions in recent years due to their definitely toxic properties and the noteworthy advantages in stimulating bone marrow and increasing the peripheral leukocytes. Hence, it is worth studying the anti-tumor effect of NCTD on human prostate cancer cells DU145. It was found that after the treatment of NCTD with different concentrations (25-100 μM, the cell proliferation was significantly inhibited, which led to the appearance of micronucleus (MN. Moreover, the cells could be killed in a dose-/time-dependent manner along with the reduction of PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression, destruction of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, down-regulation of MnSOD, induction of ROS, depletion of ATP, and activation of AMPK (Adenosine 5'-monophosphate -activated protein kinase . In addition, a remarkable release of cytochrome c was found in the cells exposed to 100 μM NCTD and exogenous SOD-PEG could eliminate the generation of NCTD-induced MN. In conclusion, our studies indicated that NCTD could induce the collapse of MMP and mitochondria dysfunction. Accumulation of intercellular ROS could eventually switch on the apoptotic pathway by causing DNA damage and depleting ATP.

  18. Loss of COX5B inhibits proliferation and promotes senescence via mitochondrial dysfunction in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shui-Ping; Sun, He-Fen; Jiang, Hong-Lin; Li, Liang-Dong; Hu, Xin; Xu, Xiao-En; Jin, Wei

    2015-12-22

    COX5B, a peripheral subunit of the cytochrome c oxidase complex, has previously been reported to maintain the stability of this complex. However, its functions and mechanisms involved in breast cancer progression remain unclear. Here, by performing SILAC assays in breast cancer cell models and detecting COX5B expression in tissues, we found that COX5B expression was elevated in breast cancer. Down-regulation of COX5B in breast cancer cell lines can suppress cell proliferation and induced cell senescence which was accompanied by elevating production of IL-8 and other cytokines. Interestingly, conditioned medium from COX5B knockdown cells could promote breast cancer cell migration. Mechanistic studies reveal that COX5B silence induces an increase in production of ROS, depolarization of MMP and a decrease in ATP. What's more, silence of COX5B leads to metabolic disorders, such as increased glucose uptake and decreased lactate secretion. Collectively, our study shows that loss of COX5B induces mitochondrial dysfunction and subsequently leads to cell growth suppression and cell senescence. Cytokines such as IL-8 secreted by senescent cells may in turn alter the microenvironment which could enhance cell migration. These findings may provide a novel paradigm for the treatment which combined anti-cancer drugs with particular cytokine inhibitors such as IL-8 blockers.

  19. Dysfunctional cardiac mitochondrial bioenergetic, lipidomic, and signaling in a murine model of Barth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiebish, Michael A; Yang, Kui; Liu, Xinping; Mancuso, David J; Guan, Shaoping; Zhao, Zhongdan; Sims, Harold F; Cerqua, Rebekah; Cade, W Todd; Han, Xianlin; Gross, Richard W

    2013-05-01

    Barth syndrome is a complex metabolic disorder caused by mutations in the mitochondrial transacylase tafazzin. Recently, an inducible tafazzin shRNA knockdown mouse model was generated to deconvolute the complex bioenergetic phenotype of this disease. To investigate the underlying cause of hemodynamic dysfunction in Barth syndrome, we interrogated the cardiac structural and signaling lipidome of this mouse model as well as its myocardial bioenergetic phenotype. A decrease in the distribution of cardiolipin molecular species and robust increases in monolysocardiolipin and dilysocardiolipin were demonstrated. Additionally, the contents of choline and ethanolamine glycerophospholipid molecular species containing precursors for lipid signaling at the sn-2 position were altered. Lipidomic analyses revealed specific dysregulation of HETEs and prostanoids, as well as oxidized linoleic and docosahexaenoic metabolites. Bioenergetic interrogation uncovered differential substrate utilization as well as decreases in Complex III and V activities. Transgenic expression of cardiolipin synthase or iPLA2γ ablation in tafazzin-deficient mice did not rescue the observed phenotype. These results underscore the complex nature of alterations in cardiolipin metabolism mediated by tafazzin loss of function. Collectively, we identified specific lipidomic, bioenergetic, and signaling alterations in a murine model that parallel those of Barth syndrome thereby providing novel insights into the pathophysiology of this debilitating disease.

  20. Trihalomethanes in liver pathology: Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faustino-Rocha, Ana I; Rodrigues, D; da Costa, R Gil; Diniz, C; Aragão, S; Talhada, D; Botelho, M; Colaço, A; Pires, M J; Peixoto, F; Oliveira, P A

    2016-08-01

    Trihalomethanes (THMs) are disinfection byproducts found in chlorinated water, and are associated with several different kinds of cancer in human populations and experimental animal models. Metabolism of THMs proceeds through enzymes such as GSTT1 and CYP2E1 and gives rise to reactive intermediates, which form the basis for their toxic activities. The aim of this study was to assess the mitochondrial dysfunction caused by THMs at low levels, and the resulting hepatic histological and biochemical changes in the mouse. Male ICR mice were administered with two THMs: dibromochloromethane (DBCM) and bromodichloromethane (BDCM); once daily, by gavage, to a total of four administrations. Animals were sacrificed four weeks after DBCM and BDCM administrations. Blood biochemistry was performed for alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), total bilirubin (TB), albumin (Alb), total protein (TP), creatinine, and urea. Animals exposed to DBCM and BDCM showed elevated ALT and TB levels (p stress (glutathione S-transferase (GST)) in hepatic tissues (p stress in liver toxicity caused by DBCM and BDCM. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 1009-1016, 2016.

  1. Autophagy and mitochondrial dysfunction in adjuvant-arthritis rats treatment with resveratrol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junqiang; Song, Xianbin; Cao, Wei; Lu, Jinseng; Wang, Xiaoqing; Wang, Gaoyuan; Wang, Zhicheng; Chen, Xiaoyu

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol is a polyphenol derivatives which exhibits a pro-apoptotic effect in a variety of human cancers by triggering mitochondria apoptosis pathway and autophagy. However, there are scarcely reports on its apoptosis-promoting effect in abnormal proliferation fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs). In this study, we investigated the underlying mechanism and apoptosis-inducing effects of resveratrol on the abnormal proliferation of FLSs in adjuvant-arthritis (AA) rats. Since using resveratrol for 12 days resulted in a significant decreasing the swelling degree of the paw, reducing malondialdehyde (MDA) content and enhancing superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, antioxidant capacity, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase ratio in AA rats. Moreover, we found that 5 μMH2O2 could increase cells viability, Beclin1, LC3A/B, MnSOD, SIRT3 protein expression in FLSs. But, resveratrol could reverse these effects by changing mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) to promote mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) generation in 5 μMH2O2-treatment FLSs. These results suggest that oxidative stress existed in AA rats. Resveratrol could suppress oxidative stress in AA rats and increase mtROS production by reducing autophagy protein Beclin1, LC3A/B and oxidative stress protein MnSOD to promoted the apoptosis of FLSs. Thus, targeting of mtROS may be a crucial mechanism of resveratrol confers patients with rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:27611176

  2. Effect of DHA and CoenzymeQ10 Against Aβ- and Zinc-Induced Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Human Neuronal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Sadli

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Beta-amyloid (Aβ protein is a key factor in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD and it has been reported that mitochondria is involved in the biochemical pathway by which Aβ can lead to neuronal dysfunction. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 is an essential cofactor involved in the mitochondrial electron transport chain and has been suggested as a potential therapeutic agent in AD. Zinc toxicity also affects cellular energy production by decreasing oxygen consumption rate (OCR and ATP turnover in human neuronal cells, which can be restored by the neuroprotective effect of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA. Method: In the present study, using Seahorse XF-24 Metabolic Flux Analysis we investigated the effect of DHA and CoQ10 alone and in combination against Aβ- and zinc-mediated changes in the mitochondrial function of M17 neuroblastoma cell line. Results: Here, we observed that DHA is specifically neuroprotective against zinc-triggered mitochondrial dysfunction, but does not directly affect Aβ neurotoxicity. CoQ10 has shown to be protective against both Aβ- and zinc-induced alterations in mitochondrial function. Conclusion: Our results indicate that DHA and CoQ10 may be useful for the prevention, treatment and management of neurodegenerative diseases such as AD.

  3. Mitochondrial aerobic respiration is activated during hair follicle stem cell differentiation, and its dysfunction retards hair regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Tang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. Emerging research revealed the essential role of mitochondria in regulating stem/progenitor cell differentiation of neural progenitor cells, mesenchymal stem cells and other stem cells through reactive oxygen species (ROS, Notch or other signaling pathway. Inhibition of mitochondrial protein synthesis results in hair loss upon injury. However, alteration of mitochondrial morphology and metabolic function during hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs differentiation and how they affect hair regeneration has not been elaborated upon. Methods. We compared the difference in mitochondrial morphology and activity between telogen bulge cells and anagen matrix cells. Expression levels of mitochondrial ROS and superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2 were measured to evaluate redox balance. In addition, the level of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH were estimated to present the change in energetic metabolism during differentiation. To explore the effect of the mitochondrial metabolism on regulating hair regeneration, hair growth was observed after application of a mitochondrial respiratory inhibitor upon hair plucking. Results. During HFSCs differentiation, mitochondria became elongated with more abundant organized cristae and showed higher activity in differentiated cells. SOD2 was enhanced for redox balance with relatively stable ROS levels in differentiated cells. PDK increased in HFSCs while differentiated cells showed enhanced PDH, indicating that respiration switched from glycolysis to oxidative phosphorylation during differentiation. Inhibiting mitochondrial respiration in differentiated hair follicle cells upon hair plucking repressed hair regeneration in vivo. Conclusions. Upon HFSCs differentiation, mitochondria are elongated with more abundant cristae and show higher activity, accompanying with activated aerobic respiration in differentiated cells for higher energy supply. Also, dysfunction of mitochondrial

  4. UCP2 overexpression worsens mitochondrial dysfunction and accelerates disease progression in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixoto, Pablo M; Kim, Hyun-Jeong; Sider, Brittany; Starkov, Anatoly; Horvath, Tamas L; Manfredi, Giovanni

    2013-11-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction leading to deficits in energy production, Ca(2+) uptake capacity, and free radical generation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) caused by mutations in Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1). Numerous studies link UCP2, a member of the uncoupling protein family, to protection of neurons from mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage in various mouse models of acute stress and neurodegeneration, including Parkinson's disease. Here, we tested the potential neuroprotective effects of UCP2 and its ability to modulate mitochondrial function, in the G93A mutant SOD1 mouse model of familial ALS. Disease phenotype, mitochondrial bioenergetics, and Ca(2+) uptake capacity were investigated in the central nervous system of double transgenic mice, expressing both human mutant G93A SOD1 and human UCP2 (hUCP2). Unexpectedly, hUCP2 expression accelerated the disease course of SOD1 mutant mice. In addition, we did not observe a classical uncoupling effect of hUCP2 in G93A brain mitochondria, although we did detect a decrease in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production from mitochondria challenged with the respiratory chain inhibitors rotenone and antimycin A. We also found that mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake capacity was decreased in the double transgenic mice, as compared to G93A mice. In summary, our results indicate that the neuroprotective role of UCP2 in neurodegeneration is disease-specific and that, while a mild uncoupling by UCP2 in brain mitochondria may protect against neurodegeneration in some injury paradigms, the mitochondrial damage and the disease caused by mutant SOD1 cannot be ameliorated by UCP2 overexpression. © 2013.

  5. Permeabilized myocardial fibers as model to detect mitochondrial dysfunction during sepsis and melatonin effects without disruption of mitochondrial network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerrier, Carolina; García, José A; Volt, Huayqui; Díaz-Casado, María E; Luna-Sánchez, Marta; Fernández-Gil, Beatriz; Escames, Germaine; López, Luis C; Acuña-Castroviejo, Darío

    2016-03-01

    Analysis of mitochondrial function is crucial to understand their involvement in a given disease. High-resolution respirometry of permeabilized myocardial fibers in septic mice allows the evaluation of the bioenergetic system, maintaining mitochondrial ultrastructure and intracellular interactions, which are critical for an adequate functionality. OXPHOS and electron transport system (ETS) capacities were assessed using different substrate combinations. Our findings show a severe septic-dependent impairment in OXPHOS and ETS capacities with mitochondrial uncoupling at early and late phases of sepsis. Moreover, sepsis triggers complex III (CIII)-linked alterations in supercomplexes structure, and loss of mitochondrial density. In these conditions, melatonin administration to septic mice prevented sepsis-dependent mitochondrial injury in mitochondrial respiration. Likewise, melatonin improved cytochrome b content and ameliorated the assembly of CIII in supercomplexes. These results support the use of permeabilized fibers to identify properly the respiratory deficits and specific melatonin effects in sepsis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  6. Defective mitochondrial respiration, altered dNTP pools and reduced AP endonuclease 1 activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of Alzheimer's disease patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maynard, Scott; Hejl, Anne-Mette; Dinh, Tran Thuan Son;

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Accurate biomarkers for early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are badly needed. Recent reports suggest that dysfunctional mitochondria and DNA damage are associated with AD development. In this report, we measured various cellular parameters, related to mitochondrial bioenergetics...... as possible. We measured glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration fluxes using the Seahorse Bioscience flux analyzer, mitochondrial ROS production using flow cytometry, dNTP levels by way of a DNA polymerization assay, DNA strand breaks using the Fluorometric detection of Alkaline DNA Unwinding (FADU) assay...... on adjustments for gender and/or age. CONCLUSIONS: This study reveals impaired mitochondrial respiration, altered dNTP pools and reduced DNA repair activity in PBMCs of AD patients, thus suggesting that these biochemical activities may be useful as biomarkers for AD....

  7. Defective mitochondrial respiration, altered dNTP pools and reduced AP endonuclease 1 activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of Alzheimer's disease patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maynard, Scott; Hejl, Anne-Mette; Dinh, Tran Thuan Son

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Accurate biomarkers for early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are badly needed. Recent reports suggest that dysfunctional mitochondria and DNA damage are associated with AD development. In this report, we measured various cellular parameters, related to mitochondrial bioenergetics...... as possible. We measured glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration fluxes using the Seahorse Bioscience flux analyzer, mitochondrial ROS production using flow cytometry, dNTP levels by way of a DNA polymerization assay, DNA strand breaks using the Fluorometric detection of Alkaline DNA Unwinding (FADU) assay...... on adjustments for gender and/or age. CONCLUSIONS: This study reveals impaired mitochondrial respiration, altered dNTP pools and reduced DNA repair activity in PBMCs of AD patients, thus suggesting that these biochemical activities may be useful as biomarkers for AD....

  8. Resveratrol ameliorates mitochondrial dysfunction but increases the risk of hypoglycemia following hemorrhagic shock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Widlund, Anne Lykkegaard; Wang, H.; Guan, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hemorrhagic shock (HS) may contribute to organ failure, by profoundly altering mitochondrial function. Resveratrol (RSV), a naturally occurring polyphenol, has been shown to promote mitochondrial function and regulate glucose homeostasis in diabetes. We hypothesized that RSV during...

  9. Acrolein cytotoxicity in hepatocytes involves endoplasmic reticulum stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammad, Mohammad K. [Department of Medicine, University of Louisville (United States); Alcohol Research Center, University of Louisville (United States); Avila, Diana [Department of Medicine, University of Louisville (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Louisville (United States); Alcohol Research Center, University of Louisville (United States); Zhang, Jingwen [Department of Medicine, University of Louisville (United States); Alcohol Research Center, University of Louisville (United States); Barve, Shirish [Department of Medicine, University of Louisville (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Louisville (United States); Alcohol Research Center, University of Louisville (United States); Arteel, Gavin [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Louisville (United States); Alcohol Research Center, University of Louisville (United States); McClain, Craig [Department of Medicine, University of Louisville (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Louisville (United States); Alcohol Research Center, University of Louisville (United States); Robley Rex VAMC, Louisville, KY (United States); Joshi-Barve, Swati, E-mail: s0josh01@louisville.edu [Department of Medicine, University of Louisville (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Louisville (United States); Alcohol Research Center, University of Louisville (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Acrolein is a common environmental, food and water pollutant and a major component of cigarette smoke. Also, it is produced endogenously via lipid peroxidation and cellular metabolism of certain amino acids and drugs. Acrolein is cytotoxic to many cell types including hepatocytes; however the mechanisms are not fully understood. We examined the molecular mechanisms underlying acrolein hepatotoxicity in primary human hepatocytes and hepatoma cells. Acrolein, at pathophysiological concentrations, caused a dose-dependent loss of viability of hepatocytes. The death was apoptotic at moderate and necrotic at high concentrations of acrolein. Acrolein exposure rapidly and dramatically decreased intracellular glutathione and overall antioxidant capacity, and activated the stress-signaling MAP-kinases JNK, p42/44 and p38. Our data demonstrate for the first time in human hepatocytes, that acrolein triggered endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and activated eIF2α, ATF-3 and -4, and Gadd153/CHOP, resulting in cell death. Notably, the protective/adaptive component of ER stress was not activated, and acrolein failed to up-regulate the protective ER-chaperones, GRP78 and GRP94. Additionally, exposure to acrolein disrupted mitochondrial integrity/function, and led to the release of pro-apoptotic proteins and ATP depletion. Acrolein-induced cell death was attenuated by N-acetyl cysteine, phenyl-butyric acid, and caspase and JNK inhibitors. Our data demonstrate that exposure to acrolein induces a variety of stress responses in hepatocytes, including GSH depletion, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and ER stress (without ER-protective responses) which together contribute to acrolein toxicity. Our study defines basic mechanisms underlying liver injury caused by reactive aldehyde pollutants such as acrolein. -- Highlights: ► Human primary hepatocytes and cultured cell lines are used. ► Multiple cell death signaling pathways are activated by acrolein. ► Novel finding of

  10. Hepatoprotective Effects of Vitamin E Against Malathion-Induced Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Rat Liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjbar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Malathion is an insecticide of the grouping of organophosphate pesticides (OPs, which shows strong insecticidal effects. In addition, vitamin E reacting to cell membrane site may prevent OP-induced oxidative injury. Objectives The aim of this study was to examine the protective function of vitamin E on toxicity of malathion, by measuring the activities of liver and liver mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT,lipid peroxidation (LPO,and glutathione peroxidase (GPx in rats. Materials and Methods The mitochondrial viability was determined in liver. ‎Effective doses of malathion(200 mg/kg/day and vitamin E (alpha-tocopherylacetate [AT]; 15 mg/kg/day were administered alone or in combination for 14 days. At the end of the experiment, the liver tissue and liver mitochondria of the animals were harvested and examined. Results In liver tissue, the activity of LPO and CAT was higher in the malathion group in comparison to controls. AT reduced malathion-induced LPO, SOD, CAT, and GPx in rat liver. Coadministration of AT with malathion improved LPO, SOD, and CAT levels in liver as well as CAT and GPx in liver mitochondria. Malathion-induced mitochondria toxicity was recovered by AT. Conclusions In conclusion, AT measurement can be beneficial for the safety or recovery of malathion-induced toxic injury in liver tissue and liver mitochondria.

  11. Reduction of Mitochondrial Function by FCCP During Mouse Cleavage Stage Embryo Culture Reduces Birth Weight and Impairs the Metabolic Health of Offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zander-Fox, Deirdre L; Fullston, Tod; McPherson, Nicole O; Sandeman, Lauren; Kang, Wan Xian; Good, Suzanne B; Spillane, Marni; Lane, Michelle

    2015-05-01

    The periconceptual environment represents a critical window for programming fetal growth trajectories and susceptibility to disease; however, the underlying mechanism responsible for programming remains elusive. This study demonstrates a causal link between reduction of precompaction embryonic mitochondrial function and perturbed offspring growth trajectories and subsequent metabolic dysfunction. Incubation of embryos with carbonyl cyanide 4-(trifluoromethoxy) phenylhydrazone (FCCP), which uncouples mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, significantly reduced mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP production in 8-cell embryos and the number of inner cell mass cells within blastocysts; however, blastocyst development was unchanged. This perturbed embryonic mitochondrial function was concomitant with reduced birth weight in female offspring following embryo transfer, which persisted until weaning. FCCP-treated females also exhibited increased adiposity at 4 wk, increased adiposity gain between 4 and 14 wk, glucose intolerance at 8 wk, and insulin resistance at 14 wk. Although FCCP-treated males also exhibited reduced glucose tolerance, but their insulin sensitivity and adiposity gain between 4 and 14 wk was unchanged. To our knowledge, this is one of the first studies to demonstrate that reducing mitochondrial function and, thus, decreasing ATP output in the precompacting embryo can influence offspring phenotype. This is of great significance as a large proportion of patients requiring assisted reproductive technologies are of advanced maternal age or have a high body mass index, both of which have been independently linked with perturbed early embryonic mitochondrial function.

  12. Tetrahydrocannabinol Induces Brain Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Dysfunction and Increases Oxidative Stress: A Potential Mechanism Involved in Cannabis-Related Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Wolff

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cannabis has potential therapeutic use but tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, its main psychoactive component, appears as a risk factor for ischemic stroke in young adults. We therefore evaluate the effects of THC on brain mitochondrial function and oxidative stress, key factors involved in stroke. Maximal oxidative capacities Vmax (complexes I, III, and IV activities, Vsucc (complexes II, III, and IV activities, Vtmpd (complex IV activity, together with mitochondrial coupling (Vmax/V0, were determined in control conditions and after exposure to THC in isolated mitochondria extracted from rat brain, using differential centrifugations. Oxidative stress was also assessed through hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 production, measured with Amplex Red. THC significantly decreased Vmax (−71%; P<0.0001, Vsucc (−65%; P<0.0001, and Vtmpd (−3.5%; P<0.001. Mitochondrial coupling (Vmax/V0 was also significantly decreased after THC exposure (1.8±0.2 versus 6.3±0.7; P<0.001. Furthermore, THC significantly enhanced H2O2 production by cerebral mitochondria (+171%; P<0.05 and mitochondrial free radical leak was increased from 0.01±0.01 to 0.10±0.01% (P<0.001. Thus, THC increases oxidative stress and induces cerebral mitochondrial dysfunction. This mechanism may be involved in young cannabis users who develop ischemic stroke since THC might increase patient’s vulnerability to stroke.

  13. Role of mitochondrial dysfunction in neurotoxicity of MPP+: partial protection of PC12 cells by acetyl-L-carnitine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virmani, Ashraf; Gaetani, Franco; Binienda, Zbigniew; Xu, Alex; Duhart, Helen; Ali, Syed F

    2004-10-01

    The damage to the central nervous system that is observed after administration of either methamphetamine (METH) or 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+), the neurotoxic metabolite of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), is known to be linked to dopamine (DA). The underlying neurotoxicity mechanism for both METH and MPP+ seem to involve free radical formation and impaired mitochondrial function. The MPP+ is thought to selectively kill nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons by inhibiting mitochondrial complex I, with cell death being attributed to oxidative stress damage to these vulnerable DA neurons. In the present study, MPP+ was shown to significantly inhibit the response to MTT by cultured PC12 cells. This inhibitory action of MPP+ could be partially reversed by the co-incubation of the cells with the acetylated form of carnitine, acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC). Since at least part of the toxic action of MPP+ is related to mitochondrial inhibition, the partial reversal of the inhibition of MTT response by ALC could involve a partial restoration of mitochondrial function. The role carnitine derivatives, such as ALC, play in attenuating MPP+ and METH-evoked toxicity is still under investigation to elucidate the contribution of mitochondrial dysfunction in mechanisms of neurotoxicity.

  14. Carnitine supplementation in high-fat diet-fed rats does not ameliorate lipid-induced skeletal muscle mitochondrial dysfunction in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessels, Bart; van den Broek, Nicole M A; Ciapaite, Jolita; Houten, Sander M; Wanders, Ronald J A; Nicolay, Klaas; Prompers, Jeanine J

    2015-10-01

    Muscle lipid overload and the associated accumulation of lipid intermediates play an important role in the development of insulin resistance. Carnitine insufficiency is a common feature of insulin-resistant states and might lead to incomplete fatty acid oxidation and impaired export of lipid intermediates out of the mitochondria. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that carnitine supplementation reduces high-fat diet-induced lipotoxicity, improves muscle mitochondrial function, and ameliorates insulin resistance. Wistar rats were fed either normal chow or a high-fat diet for 15 wk. One group of high-fat diet-fed rats was supplemented with 300 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) L-carnitine during the last 8 wk. Muscle mitochondrial function was measured in vivo by (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and ex vivo by high-resolution respirometry. Muscle lipid status was determined by (1)H MRS (intramyocellular lipids) and tandem mass spectrometry (acylcarnitines). High-fat diet feeding induced insulin resistance and was associated with decreases in muscle and blood free carnitine, elevated levels of muscle lipids and acylcarnitines, and an increased number of muscle mitochondria that showed an improved capacity to oxidize fat-derived substrates when tested ex vivo. This was, however, not accompanied by an increase in muscle oxidative capacity in vivo, indicating that in vivo mitochondrial function was compromised. Despite partial normalization of muscle and blood free carnitine content, carnitine supplementation did not induce improvements in muscle lipid status, in vivo mitochondrial function, or insulin sensitivity. Carnitine insufficiency, therefore, does not play a major role in high-fat diet-induced muscle mitochondrial dysfunction in vivo.

  15. AMPK activation by isorhamnetin protects hepatocytes against oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Guang-Zhi; Lee, Ju-Hee; Ki, Sung Hwan; Yang, Ji Hye; Cho, Il Je; Kang, Seung Ho; Zhao, Rong Jie; Kim, Sang Chan; Kim, Young Woo

    2014-10-05

    Arachidonic acid (AA) is a ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid that is found in the phospholipids of membranes and released from the cellular membrane lipid bilayer by phospholipase A2. During this process, AA could produce excess reactive oxygen species and induce apoptosis and mitochondrial dysfunction by selectively inhibiting complexes I and III. Isorhamnetin, an O-methylated flavonol aglycone, has been shown to have cardio-protective, anti-adipogenic, anti-tumor, and anti-inflammatory effects. In the present study, we investigated the effects of isorhamnetin on hepatotoxicity and the underlying mechanisms involved. Our in vitro experiments showed that isorhamnetin dose-dependently blocked the hepatotoxicity induced by treatment with AA plus iron in HepG2 cells. Furthermore, isorhamnetin inhibited the AA+iron induced generation of reactive oxygen species and reduction of glutathione, and subsequently maintained mitochondria membrane potential in AA+iron treated HepG2 cells. In addition, isorhamnetin activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) by Thr-172 phosphorylation of AMPKα, and this was mediated with Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase-2 (CaMKK2), but not liver kinase B1. Experiments using CaMKK2 siRNA or its selective inhibitor, STO-609, revealed the role of CaMKK2 in the isorhamnetin-induced activation of AMPK in HepG2 cells. These results indicate isorhamnetin protects against the hepatotoxic effect of AA plus iron, and suggest that the AMPK pathway is involved in the mechanism underlying the beneficial effect of isorhamnetin in the liver.

  16. Barth Syndrome:From mitochondrial dysfunctions associated with aberrant production of reactive oxygen species to pluripotent stem cell studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana eSaric

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the gene encoding the enzyme tafazzin, TAZ, cause Barth syndrome (BTHS. Individuals with this X-linked multisystem disorder present cardiomyopathy (often dilated, skeletal muscle weakness, neutropenia, growth retardation and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria. Biopsies of the heart, liver and skeletal muscle of patients have revealed mitochondrial malformations and dysfunctions. It is the purpose of this review to summarize recent results of studies on various animal or cell models of Barth syndrome, which have characterized biochemically the strong cellular defects associated with TAZ mutations. Tafazzin is a mitochondrial phospholipid-lysophospholipid transacylase that shuttles acyl groups between phospholipids and regulates the remodeling of cardiolipin (CL, a unique inner mitochondrial membrane phospholipid dimer consisting of two phosphatidyl residues linked by a glycerol bridge. After their biosynthesis, the acyl chains of CLs may be modified in remodeling processes involving up to three different enzymes. Their characteristic acyl chain composition depends on the function of tafazzin, although the enzyme itself surprisingly lacks acyl specificity. CLs are crucial for correct mitochondrial structure and function. In addition to their function in the basic mitochondrial function of ATP production, CLs play essential roles in cardiac function, apoptosis, autophagy, cell cycle regulation and Fe-S cluster biosynthesis. Recent developments in tafazzin research have provided strong insights into the link between mitochondrial dysfunction and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. An important tool has been the generation of BTHS-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs from BTHS patients. In a complementary approach, disease-specific mutations have been introduced into wild-type iPSC lines enabling direct comparison with isogenic controls. iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes were then characterized using biochemical and classical

  17. Advanced glycation end products receptor RAGE controls myocardial dysfunction and oxidative stress in high-fat fed mice by sustaining mitochondrial dynamics and autophagy-lysosome pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yichi; Wang, Lei; Delguste, Florian; Durand, Arthur; Guilbaud, Axel; Rousselin, Clementine; Schmidt, Ann Marie; Tessier, Frédéric; Boulanger, Eric; Neviere, Remi

    2017-08-19

    Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are recognized as major contributors of cardiovascular damage in diabetes and high fat diet (HFD) fed mice. Blockade of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) attenuates vascular oxidative stress and development of atherosclerosis. We tested whether HFD-induced myocardial dysfunction would be reversed in RAGE deficiency mice, in association with changes in oxidative stress damage, mitochondrial respiration, mitochondrial fission and autophagy-lysosomal pathway. Cardiac antioxidant capacity was upregulated in RAGE(-)/(-) mice under normal diet as evidenced by increased superoxide dismutase and sirtuin mRNA expressions. Mitochondrial fragmentation and mitochondrial fission protein Drp1 and Fis1 expressions were increased in RAGE(-)/(-) mice. Autophagy-related protein expressions and cathepsin-L activity were increased in RAGE(-)/(-) mice suggesting sustained autophagy-lysosomal flux. HFD induced mitochondrial respiration defects, cardiac contractile dysfunction, disrupted mitochondrial dynamics and autophagy inhibition, which were partially prevented in RAGE(-)/(-) mice. Our results suggest that cardioprotection against HFD in RAGE(-)/(-) mice include reactivation of autophagy, as inhibition of autophagic flux by chloroquine fully abrogated beneficial myocardial effects and its stimulation by rapamycin improved myocardial function in HFD wild type mice. As mitochondrial fission is necessary to mitophagy, increased fragmentation of mitochondrial network in HFD RAGE(-)/(-) mice may have facilitated removal of damaged mitochondria leading to better mitochondrial quality control. In conclusion, modulation of RAGE pathway may improve mitochondrial damage and myocardial dysfunction in HFD mice. Attenuation of cardiac oxidative stress and maintenance of healthy mitochondria population ensuring adequate energy supply may be involved in myocardial protection against HFD. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. SET overexpression in HEK293 cells regulates mitochondrial uncoupling proteins levels within a mitochondrial fission/reduced autophagic flux scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Luciana O; Goto, Renata N; Neto, Marinaldo P C; Sousa, Lucas O; Curti, Carlos; Leopoldino, Andréia M

    2015-03-01

    We hypothesized that SET, a protein accumulated in some cancer types and Alzheimer disease, is involved in cell death through mitochondrial mechanisms. We addressed the mRNA and protein levels of the mitochondrial uncoupling proteins UCP1, UCP2 and UCP3 (S and L isoforms) by quantitative real-time PCR and immunofluorescence as well as other mitochondrial involvements, in HEK293 cells overexpressing the SET protein (HEK293/SET), either in the presence or absence of oxidative stress induced by the pro-oxidant t-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP). SET overexpression in HEK293 cells decreased UCP1 and increased UCP2 and UCP3 (S/L) mRNA and protein levels, whilst also preventing lipid peroxidation and decreasing the content of cellular ATP. SET overexpression also (i) decreased the area of mitochondria and increased the number of organelles and lysosomes, (ii) increased mitochondrial fission, as demonstrated by increased FIS1 mRNA and FIS-1 protein levels, an apparent accumulation of DRP-1 protein, and an increase in the VDAC protein level, and (iii) reduced autophagic flux, as demonstrated by a decrease in LC3B lipidation (LC3B-II) in the presence of chloroquine. Therefore, SET overexpression in HEK293 cells promotes mitochondrial fission and reduces autophagic flux in apparent association with up-regulation of UCP2 and UCP3; this implies a potential involvement in cellular processes that are deregulated such as in Alzheimer's disease and cancer.

  19. Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel 1(VDAC1) Participates the Apoptosis of the Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Desminopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Yanqing; Gong, Qi; Jiang, Aihua; Zhao, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Desminopathies caused by the mutation in the gene coding for desmin are genetically protein aggregation myopathies. Mitochondrial dysfunction is one of pathological changes in the desminopathies at the earliest stage. The molecular mechanisms of mitochondria dysfunction in desminopathies remain exclusive. VDAC1 regulates mitochondrial uptake across the outer membrane and mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP). Relationships between desminopathies and Voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1) remain unclear. Here we successfully constructed the desminopathy rat model, evaluated with conventional stains, containing hematoxylin and eosin (HE), Gomori Trichrome (MGT), (PAS), red oil (ORO), NADH-TR, SDH staining and immunohistochemistry. Immunofluorescence results showed that VDAC1 was accumulated in the desmin highly stained area of muscle fibers of desminopathy patients or desminopathy rat model compared to the normal ones. Meanwhile apoptosis related proteins bax and ATF2 were involved in desminopathy patients and desminopathy rat model, but not bcl-2, bcl-xl or HK2.VDAC1 and desmin are closely relevant in the tissue splices of deminopathies patients and rats with desminopathy at protein lever. Moreover, apoptotic proteins are also involved in the desminopathies, like bax, ATF2, but not bcl-2, bcl-xl or HK2. This pathological analysis presents the correlation between VDAC1 and desmin, and apoptosis related proteins are correlated in the desminopathy. Furthermore, we provide a rat model of desminopathy for the investigation of desmin related myopathy. PMID:27941998

  20. Tanshinone IIA induces intrinsic apoptosis in osteosarcoma cells both in vivo and in vitro associated with mitochondrial dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sheng-Teng; Huang, Chao-Chun; Huang, Wen-Liang; Lin, Tsu-Kung; Liao, Pei-Lin; Wang, Pei-Wen; Liou, Chia-Wei; Chuang, Jiin-Haur

    2017-01-01

    Tanshinone IIA (Tan IIA), a phytochemical derived from the roots of Salvia miltiorrhiza, has been shown to inhibit growth and induce apoptosis in various cancer cells. The association of its inhibitory effect on the primary malignant bone tumor, osteosarcoma, with mitochondrial dysfunction remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate the anti-proliferative effects of Tan IIA on human osteosarcoma 143B cells both in vitro and in vivo. Administration of Tan IIA to NOD-SCID mice implanted with 143B cells led to significant inhibition of tumor development. The inhibition of proliferation, migration, and invasion was observed in 143B cells treated with Tan IIA. The tumor proliferation markers, Ki67 and PCNA, were suppressed and apoptosis by TUNEL assay was activated respectively. Apoptosis in the Tan IIA-treated 143B cells and xerograft mice was associated with the activation of caspase cascade via the modulation of Bcl-2 family. The CD31 was inhibited in Tan IIA-treated xenografts to indicate anti-neovasculization. Tan IIA administration resulted in a significant decrease in the mitochondrial fusion proteins, Mfn1/2 and Opa1, as well as an increase in the fission protein Drp1. We concluded that mitochondrial dysfunction associated with dynamic change was involved in apoptosis and anti-angiogenesis elicited by Tan IIA. PMID:28106052

  1. K-rasG12V transformation leads to mitochondrial dysfunction and a metabolic switch from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yumin Hu; Helene Pelicano; Paul J Chiao; Michael J Keating; Guillermo Garcia-Manero; Peng Huang; Weiqin Lu; Gang Chen; Peng Wang; Zhao Chen; Yan Zhou; Marcia Ogasawara; Dunyaporn Trachootham; Li Feng

    2012-01-01

    Increased aerobic glycolysis and oxidative stress are important features of cancer cell metabolism,but the underlying biochemical and molecular mechanisms remain elusive.Using a tetracycline inducible model,we show that activation of K-rasG12V causes mitochondrial dysfunction,leading to decreased respiration,elevated glycolysis,and increased generation of reactive oxygen species.The K-RAS protein is associated with mitochondria,and induces a rapid suppression of respiratory chain complex-I and a decrease in mitochondrial transmembrane potential by affecting the cyclosporin-sensitive permeability transition pore.Furthermore,pre-induction of K-rasG12V expression in vitro to allow metabolic adaptation to high glycolytic metabolism enhances the ability of the transformed cells to form tumor in vivo.Our study suggests that induction of mitochondrial dysfunction is an important mechanism by which K-rasG12V causes metabolic changes and ROS stress in cancer cells,and promotes tumor development.

  2. Ornithine and Homocitrulline Impair Mitochondrial Function, Decrease Antioxidant Defenses and Induce Cell Death in Menadione-Stressed Rat Cortical Astrocytes: Potential Mechanisms of Neurological Dysfunction in HHH Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanatta, Ângela; Rodrigues, Marília Danyelle Nunes; Amaral, Alexandre Umpierrez; Souza, Débora Guerini; Quincozes-Santos, André; Wajner, Moacir

    2016-09-01

    Hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria (HHH) syndrome is caused by deficiency of ornithine translocase leading to predominant tissue accumulation and high urinary excretion of ornithine (Orn), homocitrulline (Hcit) and ammonia. Although affected patients commonly present neurological dysfunction manifested by cognitive deficit, spastic paraplegia, pyramidal and extrapyramidal signs, stroke-like episodes, hypotonia and ataxia, its pathogenesis is still poorly known. Although astrocytes are necessary for neuronal protection. Therefore, in the present study we investigated the effects of Orn and Hcit on cell viability (propidium iodide incorporation), mitochondrial function (thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide-MTT-reduction and mitochondrial membrane potential-ΔΨm), antioxidant defenses (GSH) and pro-inflammatory response (NFkB, IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α) in unstimulated and menadione-stressed cortical astrocytes that were previously shown to be susceptible to damage by neurotoxins. We first observed that Orn decreased MTT reduction, whereas both amino acids decreased GSH levels, without altering cell viability and the pro-inflammatory factors in unstimulated astrocytes. Furthermore, Orn and Hcit decreased cell viability and ΔΨm in menadione-treated astrocytes. The present data indicate that the major compounds accumulating in HHH syndrome impair mitochondrial function and reduce cell viability and the antioxidant defenses in cultured astrocytes especially when stressed by menadione. It is presumed that these mechanisms may be involved in the neuropathology of this disease.

  3. SET overexpression in HEK293 cells regulates mitochondrial uncoupling proteins levels within a mitochondrial fission/reduced autophagic flux scenario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Luciana O.; Goto, Renata N. [Department of Clinical Analyses, Toxicology and Food Sciences, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Neto, Marinaldo P.C. [Department of Physics and Chemistry, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Sousa, Lucas O. [Department of Clinical Analyses, Toxicology and Food Sciences, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Curti, Carlos [Department of Physics and Chemistry, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Leopoldino, Andréia M., E-mail: andreiaml@usp.br [Department of Clinical Analyses, Toxicology and Food Sciences, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2015-03-06

    We hypothesized that SET, a protein accumulated in some cancer types and Alzheimer disease, is involved in cell death through mitochondrial mechanisms. We addressed the mRNA and protein levels of the mitochondrial uncoupling proteins UCP1, UCP2 and UCP3 (S and L isoforms) by quantitative real-time PCR and immunofluorescence as well as other mitochondrial involvements, in HEK293 cells overexpressing the SET protein (HEK293/SET), either in the presence or absence of oxidative stress induced by the pro-oxidant t-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP). SET overexpression in HEK293 cells decreased UCP1 and increased UCP2 and UCP3 (S/L) mRNA and protein levels, whilst also preventing lipid peroxidation and decreasing the content of cellular ATP. SET overexpression also (i) decreased the area of mitochondria and increased the number of organelles and lysosomes, (ii) increased mitochondrial fission, as demonstrated by increased FIS1 mRNA and FIS-1 protein levels, an apparent accumulation of DRP-1 protein, and an increase in the VDAC protein level, and (iii) reduced autophagic flux, as demonstrated by a decrease in LC3B lipidation (LC3B-II) in the presence of chloroquine. Therefore, SET overexpression in HEK293 cells promotes mitochondrial fission and reduces autophagic flux in apparent association with up-regulation of UCP2 and UCP3; this implies a potential involvement in cellular processes that are deregulated such as in Alzheimer's disease and cancer. - Highlights: • SET, UCPs and autophagy prevention are correlated. • SET action has mitochondrial involvement. • UCP2/3 may reduce ROS and prevent autophagy. • SET protects cell from ROS via UCP2/3.

  4. Low molecular weight guluronate prevents TNF-α-induced oxidative damage and mitochondrial dysfunction in C2C12 skeletal muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dun, Yun-lou; Zhou, Xiao-lin; Guan, Hua-shi; Yu, Guang-li; Li, Chun-xia; Hu, Ting; Zhao, Xia; Cheng, Xiao-lei; He, Xiao-xi; Hao, Jie-jie

    2015-09-01

    Muscle wasting is associated with a variety of chronic or inflammatory disorders. Evidence suggests that inflammatory cytokines play a vital role in muscle inflammatory pathology and this may result in oxidative damage and mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle. In our study, we used microwave degradation to prepare a water-soluble low molecular weight guluronate (LMG) of 3000 Da from Fucus vesiculosus obtained from Canada, the Atlantic Ocean. We demonstrated the structural characteristics, using HPLC, FTIR and NMR of LMG and investigated its effects on oxidative damage and mitochondrial dysfunction in C2C12 skeletal muscle cells induced by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), a cell inflammatory cytokine. The results indicated that LMG could alleviate mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, increase the activities of antioxidant enzymes (GSH and SOD), promote mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and upregulate the expression of mitochondrial respiratory chain protein in TNF-α-induced C2C12 cells. LMG supplement also increased the mitochondrial DNA copy number and mitochondrial biogenesis related genes in TNF-α-induced C2C12 cells. LMG may exert these protective effects through the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) signaling pathway. These suggest that LMG is capable of protecting TNF-α-induced C2C12 cells against oxidative damage and mitochondrial dysfunction.

  5. The Potential Role of the NLRP3 Inflammasome as a Link between Mitochondrial Complex I Dysfunction and Inflammation in Bipolar Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Kyunghee Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction and activation of the inflammatory system are two of the most consistently reported findings in bipolar disorder (BD. More specifically, altered levels of inflammatory cytokines and decreased levels of mitochondrial complex I subunits have been found in the brain and periphery of patients with BD, which could lead to increased production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS. Recent studies have shown that mitochondrial production of ROS and inflammation may be closely linked through a redox sensor known as nod-like receptor pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3. Upon sensing mitochondrial release of ROS, NLRP3 assembles the NLRP3 inflammasome, which releases caspase 1 to begin the inflammatory cascade. In this review, we discuss the potential role of the NLRP3 inflammasome as a link between complex I dysfunction and inflammation in BD and its therapeutic implications.

  6. Prevention of Trauma/Hemorrhagic Shock-Induced Mortality, Apoptosis, Inflammation and Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-11-2-0018 TITLE:“Prevention of Trauma/Hemorrhagic Shock-Induced Mortality, Apoptosis, Inflammation and Mitochondrial ...3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 05 Nov 2010 – 04 Nov 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Inflammation and Mitochondrial Dysfunction” 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...W81XWH-11-2-0018 “Prevention of Trauma/Hemor hagic Shock-Induced Mortality, Apoptosis,Inflammation and Mitochondrial Dysfunction” 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  7. Role of Pterocarpus santalinus against mitochondrial dysfunction and membrane lipid changes induced by ulcerogens in rat gastric mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Shoba; Devi, R S; Devi, C S Shyamala

    2007-11-20

    Free radicals produced by ulcerogenic agents affect the TCA cycle enzymes located in the outer membrane of the mitochondria. Upon induction with ulcerogens, peroxidation of membrane lipids bring about alterations in the mitochondrial enzyme activity. This indicates an increase in the permeability levels of the mitochondrial membrane. The ability of PSE to scavenge the reactive oxygen species results in restoration of activities of TCA cycle enzymes. NSAIDs interfere with the mitochondrial beta-oxidation of fatty acids in vitro and in vivo, resulting in uncoupling of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation process. This usually results in diminished cellular ATP production. The recovery of gastric mucosal barrier function through maintenance of energy metabolism results in maintenance of ATP levels, as observed in this study upon treatment with PSE. Membrane integrity altered by peroxidation is known to have a modified fatty acid composition, a disruption of permeability, a decrease in electrical resistance, and increase in flip-flopping between monolayers and inactivated cross-linked proteins. The severe depletion of arachidonic acid in ulcer induced groups was prevented upon treatment with PSE. The acid inhibitory property of the herbal extract enables the maintenance of GL activity upon treatment with PSE. The ability to prevent membrane peroxidation has been traced to the presence of active constituents in the PSE. In essence, PSE has been found to prevent mitochondrial dysfunction, provide mitochondrial cell integrity, through the maintenance of lipid bilayer by its ability to provide a hydrophobic character to the gastric mucosa, further indicating its ability to reverse the action of NSAIDs and mast cell degranulators in gastric mucosa.

  8. Peripheral Blood Mitochondrial DNA as a Biomarker of Cerebral Mitochondrial Dysfunction following Traumatic Brain Injury in a Porcine Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd J Kilbaugh

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI has been shown to activate the peripheral innate immune system and systemic inflammatory response, possibly through the central release of damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs. Our main purpose was to gain an initial understanding of the peripheral mitochondrial response following TBI, and how this response could be utilized to determine cerebral mitochondrial bioenergetics. We hypothesized that TBI would increase peripheral whole blood relative mtDNA copy number, and that these alterations would be associated with cerebral mitochondrial bioenergetics triggered by TBI.Blood samples were obtained before, 6 h after, and 25 h after focal (controlled cortical impact injury: CCI and diffuse (rapid non-impact rotational injury: RNR TBI. PCR primers, unique to mtDNA, were identified by aligning segments of nuclear DNA (nDNA to mtDNA, normalizing values to nuclear 16S rRNA, for a relative mtDNA copy number. Three unique mtDNA regions were selected, and PCR primers were designed within those regions, limited to 25-30 base pairs to further ensure sequence specificity, and measured utilizing qRT-PCR.Mean relative mtDNA copy numbers increased significantly at 6 and 25 hrs after following both focal and diffuse traumatic brain injury. Specifically, the mean relative mtDNA copy number from three mitochondrial-specific regions pre-injury was 0.84 ± 0.05. At 6 and 25 h after diffuse non-impact TBI, mean mtDNA copy number was significantly higher: 2.07 ± 0.19 (P < 0.0001 and 2.37 ± 0.42 (P < 0.001, respectively. Following focal impact TBI, relative mtDNA copy number was also significantly higher, 1.35 ± 0.12 (P < 0.0001 at 25 hours. Alterations in mitochondrial respiration in the hippocampus and cortex post-TBI correlated with changes in the relative mtDNA copy number measured in peripheral blood.Alterations in peripheral blood relative mtDNA copy numbers may be a novel biosignature of cerebral mitochondrial bioenergetics

  9. Drosophila ref(2)P is required for the parkin-mediated suppression of mitochondrial dysfunction in pink1 mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro, I P; Costa, A C; Celardo, I; Tufi, R; Dinsdale, D; Loh, S H Y; Martins, L M

    2013-10-24

    Autophagy is a critical regulator of organellar homeostasis, particularly of mitochondria. Upon the loss of membrane potential, dysfunctional mitochondria are selectively removed by autophagy through recruitment of the E3 ligase Parkin by the PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1) and subsequent ubiquitination of mitochondrial membrane proteins. Mammalian sequestrome-1 (p62/SQSTM1) is an autophagy adaptor, which has been proposed to shuttle ubiquitinated cargo for autophagic degradation downstream of Parkin. Here, we show that loss of ref(2)P, the Drosophila orthologue of mammalian P62, results in abnormalities, including mitochondrial defects and an accumulation of mitochondrial DNA with heteroplasmic mutations, correlated with locomotor defects. Furthermore, we show that expression of Ref(2)P is able to ameliorate the defects caused by loss of Pink1 and that this depends on the presence of functional Parkin. Finally, we show that both the PB1 and UBA domains of Ref(2)P are crucial for mitochondrial clustering. We conclude that Ref(2)P is a crucial downstream effector of a pathway involving Pink1 and Parkin and is resp