WorldWideScience

Sample records for reduced tca flux

  1. Reduced TCA Flux in Diabetic Myotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaster, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The diabetic phenotype is complex, requiring elucidation of key initiating defects. Diabetic myotubes express a primary reduced tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle flux but at present it is unclear in which part of the TCA cycle the defect is localised. In order to localise the defect we studied ATP...... production in isolated mitochondria from substrates entering the TCA cycle at various points. ATP production was measured by luminescence with or without concomitant ATP utilisation by hexokinase in mitochondria isolated from myotubes established from eight lean and eight type 2 diabetic subjects. The ATP...... production of investigated substrate combinations was significantly reduced in mitochondria isolated from type 2 diabetic subjects compared to lean. However, when ATP synthesis rates at different substrate combinations were normalized to the corresponding individual pyruvate-malate rate...

  2. Reduced TCA Flux in Diabetic Myotubes: Determined by Single Defects?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Gaster

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The diabetic phenotype is complex, requiring elucidation of key initiating defects. Diabetic myotubes express a primary reduced tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle flux but at present it is unclear in which part of the TCA cycle the defect is localised. In order to localise the defect we studied ATP production in isolated mitochondria from substrates entering the TCA cycle at various points. ATP production was measured by luminescence with or without concomitant ATP utilisation by hexokinase in mitochondria isolated from myotubes established from eight lean and eight type 2 diabetic subjects. The ATP production of investigated substrate combinations was significantly reduced in mitochondria isolated from type 2 diabetic subjects compared to lean. However, when ATP synthesis rates at different substrate combinations were normalized to the corresponding individual pyruvate-malate rate, there was no significant difference between groups. These results show that the primary reduced TCA cycle flux in diabetic myotubes is not explained by defects in specific part of the TCA cycle but rather results from a general downregulation of the TCA cycle.

  3. Reduced TCA flux in diabetic myotubes: A governing influence on the diabetic phenotype?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaster, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The diabetic phenotype is complex, requiring elucidation of key initiating defects. It is unknown whether the reduced tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) flux in skeletal muscle of obese and obese type 2 diabetic (T2D) subjects is of primary origin. Acetate oxidation (measurement of TCA......, lipid uptake, glycogen synthesis, ATP content and increased glucose uptake, while glucose oxidation was unaffected. Acute TCA inhibition did not induce insulin resistance. Thus the reduced TCA cycle flux in T2D skeletal muscle may be of primary origin. The diabetic phenotype of increased basal glucose...... uptake and glucose oxidation, the reduced complete lipid oxidation and increased respiratory quotient, are likely to be adaptive responses to the reduced TCA cycle flux....

  4. A primary reduced TCA flux governs substrate oxidation in T2D skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaster, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Our current knowledge on substrate oxidation in skeletal muscle in relation to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D) originate mainly from in vivo studies. The oxidative capacity of skeletal muscle is highly influenced by physical activity, ageing, hormonal status, and fiber type composition...... further regulatory mechanism to our understanding of substrate oxidation in human skeletal muscle during normo- an pathophysiological conditions, focusing especially on the governing influence of a primary reduced TCA flux for the diabetic phenotype in skeletal muscle....

  5. Impaired TCA cycle flux in mitochondria in skeletal muscle from type 2 diabetic subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaster, Michael; Nehlin, Jan O; Minet, Ariane D

    2012-01-01

    The diabetic phenotype is complex, requiring elucidation of key initiating defects. Recent research has shown that diabetic myotubes express a primary reduced tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle flux. A reduced TCA cycle flux has also been shown both in insulin resistant offspring of T2D patients and ...

  6. Main: TCA1MOTIF [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available TCA1MOTIF S000159 17-May-1998 (last modified) kehi TCA-1 (tobacco nuclear protein 1...) binding site; Related to salicylic acid-inducible expression of many genes; Found in barley beta-1,3-gluca...nase and over 30 different plant genes which are known to be induced by one or more forms of stress; A similar sequence (TCA... et al., 1997); SA; salicylic acid; stress; TCA-1; barley (Hordeum vulgare); tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum); TCATCTTCTT ...

  7. Reference: TCA1MOTIF [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available TCA1MOTIF Goldsbrough AP, Albrecht H, Stratford R Salicylic acid-inducible binding ...of a tobacco nuclear protein to a 10 bp sequence which is highly conserved amongst stress-inducible genes. Plant J 3:563-571 (1993) PubMed: 8220463; ...

  8. Educational reactor-physics experiments with the critical assemble TCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsutsui, Hiroaki; Okubo, Masaaki; Igashira, Masayuki [Tokyo Inst. of Tech. (Japan); Horiki, Oichiro; Suzaki, Takenori

    1997-10-01

    The Tank-Type Critical Assembly (TCA) of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute is research equipment for light water reactor physics. In the present report, the lectures given to the graduate students of Tokyo Institute of Technology who participated in the educational experiment course held on 26-30 August at TCA are rearranged to provide useful information for those who will implement educational basic experiments with TCA in the future. This report describes the principles, procedures, and data analyses for (1) Critical approach and Exponential experiment, (2) Measurement of neutron flux distribution, (3) Measurement of power distribution, (4) Measurement of fuel rod worth distribution, and (5) Measurement of safety plate worth by the rod drop method. (author)

  9. Equilibrium reconstruction in the TCA/Br tokamak; Reconstrucao do equilibrio no tokamak TCA/BR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sa, Wanderley Pires de

    1996-12-31

    The accurate and rapid determination of the Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium configuration in tokamaks is a subject for the magnetic confinement of the plasma. With the knowledge of characteristic plasma MHD equilibrium parameters it is possible to control the plasma position during its formation using feed-back techniques. It is also necessary an on-line analysis between successive discharges to program external parameters for the subsequent discharges. In this work it is investigated the MHD equilibrium configuration reconstruction of the TCA/BR tokamak from external magnetic measurements, using a method that is able to fast determine the main parameters of discharge. The thesis has two parts. Firstly it is presented the development of an equilibrium code that solves de Grad-Shafranov equation for the TCA/BR tokamak geometry. Secondly it is presented the MHD equilibrium reconstruction process from external magnetic field and flux measurements using the Function Parametrization FP method. this method. This method is based on the statistical analysis of a database of simulated equilibrium configurations, with the goal of obtaining a simple relationship between the parameters that characterize the equilibrium and the measurements. The results from FP are compared with conventional methods. (author) 68 refs., 31 figs., 16 tabs.

  10. Reducing measurement scale mismatch to improve surface energy flux estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwema, Joost; Rosolem, Rafael; Rahman, Mostaquimur; Blyth, Eleanor; Wagener, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    Soil moisture importantly controls land surface processes such as energy and water partitioning. A good understanding of these controls is needed especially when recognizing the challenges in providing accurate hyper-resolution hydrometeorological simulations at sub-kilometre scales. Soil moisture controlling factors can, however, differ at distinct scales. In addition, some parameters in land surface models are still often prescribed based on observations obtained at another scale not necessarily employed by such models (e.g., soil properties obtained from lab samples used in regional simulations). To minimize such effects, parameters can be constrained with local data from Eddy-Covariance (EC) towers (i.e., latent and sensible heat fluxes) and Point Scale (PS) soil moisture observations (e.g., TDR). However, measurement scales represented by EC and PS still differ substantially. Here we use the fact that Cosmic-Ray Neutron Sensors (CRNS) estimate soil moisture at horizontal footprint similar to that of EC fluxes to help answer the following question: Does reduced observation scale mismatch yield better soil moisture - surface fluxes representation in land surface models? To answer this question we analysed soil moisture and surface fluxes measurements from twelve COSMOS-Ameriflux sites in the USA characterized by distinct climate, soils and vegetation types. We calibrated model parameters of the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES) against PS and CRNS soil moisture data, respectively. We analysed the improvement in soil moisture estimation compared to uncalibrated model simulations and then evaluated the degree of improvement in surface fluxes before and after calibration experiments. Preliminary results suggest that a more accurate representation of soil moisture dynamics is achieved when calibrating against observed soil moisture and further improvement obtained with CRNS relative to PS. However, our results also suggest that a more accurate

  11. Application of citrate as a tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle intermediate, prevents diabetic-induced heart damages in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianqian Liang

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Results indicate that application of citrate, a tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle intermediate, might alleviate cardiac dysfunction by reducing cardiac inflammation, apoptosis, and increasing cardiac EC.

  12. Flux analysis of central metabolic pathways in the Fe(III)-reducing organism Geobacter metallireducens via 13C isotopiclabeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Chakraborty, Romy; Martin, Hector Garcia; Chu,Jeannie; Hazen, Terry C.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2007-08-13

    We analyzed the carbon fluxes in the central metabolism ofGeobacter metallireducens strain GS-15 using 13C isotopomer modeling.Acetate labeled in the 1st or 2nd position was the sole carbon source,and Fe-NTA was the sole terminal electron acceptor. The measured labeledacetate uptake rate was 21 mmol/gdw/h in the exponential growth phase.The resulting isotope labeling pattern of amino acids allowed an accuratedetermination of the in vivo global metabolic reaction rates (fluxes)through the central metabolic pathways using a computational isotopomermodel. The model indicated that over 90 percent of the acetate wascompletely oxidized to CO2 via a complete tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cyclewhile reducing iron. Pyruvate carboxylase and phosphoenolpyruvatecarboxykinase were present under these conditions, but enzymes in theglyoxylate shunt and malic enzyme were absent. Gluconeogenesis and thepentose phosphate pathway were mainly employed for biosynthesis andaccounted for less than 3 percent of total carbon consumption. The modelalso indicated surprisingly high reversibility in the reaction betweenoxoglutarate and succinate. This step operates close to the thermodynamicequilibrium possibly because succinate is synthesized via a transferasereaction, and its product, acetyl-CoA, inhibits the conversion ofoxoglutarate to succinate. These findings enable a better understandingof the relationship between genome annotation and extant metabolicpathways in G. metallireducens.

  13. PIE Nacelle Flow Analysis and TCA Inlet Flow Quality Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shieh, C. F.; Arslan, Alan; Sundaran, P.; Kim, Suk; Won, Mark J.

    1999-01-01

    This presentation includes three topics: (1) Analysis of isolated boattail drag; (2) Computation of Technology Concept Airplane (TCA)-installed nacelle effects on aerodynamic performance; and (3) Assessment of TCA inlet flow quality.

  14. Crystallization of Reduced Strontium and Barium Niobate Perovskites from Borate Fluxes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hessen, B.; Sunshine, S.A.; Siegrist, T.; Jimenez, R.

    1991-01-01

    Single crystals of three AxNbO3 (A = Sr, Ba) reduced niobate cubic perovskites have been obtained by recrystallization of reduced ternary ceramic precursors from borate fluxes under high-vacuum. Product formation could be influenced by variation of the alkaline-earth metal oxide content of the flux,

  15. The TCA pathway is an important player in the regulatory network governing Vibrio alginolyticus adhesion under adversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lixing eHuang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Adhesion is a critical step in the initial stage of Vibrio alginolyticus infection; therefore, it is important to understand the underlying mechanisms governing the adhesion of V. alginolyticus and determine if environmental factors have any effect. A greater understanding of this process may assist in developing preventive measures for reducing infection. In our previous research, we presented the first RNA-seq data from V. alginolyticus cultured under stress conditions that resulted in reduced adhesion. Based on the RNA-seq data, we found that the Tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA pathway might be closely related to adhesion. Environmental interactions with the TCA pathway might alter adhesion. To validate this, bioinformatics analysis, qPCR, RNAi and in vitro adhesion assays were performed, while V. alginolyticus was treated with various stresses including temperature, pH, salinity and starvation. The expression of genes involved in the TCA pathway was confirmed by qPCR, which reinforced the reliability of the sequencing data. Silencing of these genes was capable of reducing the adhesion ability of V. alginolyticus. Adhesion of V. alginolyticus is influenced substantially by environmental factors and the TCA pathway is sensitive to some environmental stresses, especially changes in pH and starvation. Our results indicated that 1 the TCA pathway plays a key role in V. alginolyticus adhesion: 2 the TCA pathway is sensitive to environmental stresses.

  16. Commissioning of CMS Forward Hadron Calorimeters with Upgraded Multi-anode PMTs and {\\mu}TCA Readout

    CERN Document Server

    Tiras, Emrah; Onel, Yasar

    2016-01-01

    The high flux of charged particles interacting with the CMS Forward Hadron Calorimeter PMT windows introduced a significant background for the trigger and offline data analysis. During Long Shutdown 1, all of the original PMTs were replaced with multi-anode, thin window photomultiplier tubes. At the same time, the back-end electronic readout system was upgraded to {\\mu}TCA readout. The experience with commissioning and calibration of the Forward Hadron Calorimeter is described as well as the {\\mu}TCA system. The upgrade was successful and provided quality data for Run 2 data-analysis at 13 TeV.

  17. Commissioning of CMS Forward Hadron Calorimeters with Upgraded Multi-anode PMTs and uTCA Readout

    CERN Document Server

    Tiras, Emrah; Onel, Yasar

    2016-01-01

    The high flux of charged particles interacting with the CMS Forward Hadron Calorimeter PMT windows introduced a significant background for the trigger and offline data analysis. During Long Shutdown 1, all of the original PMTs were replaced with multi-anode, thin window photomultiplier tubes. At the same time, the back-end electronic readout system was upgraded to uTCA readout. The experience with commissioning and calibration of the Forward Hadron Calorimeter is described as well as the uTCA system. The upgrade was successful and provided quality data for Run 2 data-analysis at 13 TeV.

  18. Prebiotic Metabolisms: Photo catalysis of the rTCA cycle by sphalerite colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangiante, D. M.; Bowen, B.; Northen, T.; Banfield, J. F.

    2010-12-01

    Explorations of mineral catalyzed reverse tricarboxylic acid (rTCA) cycle reactions provide a window into possible mechanisms for prebiotic metabolisms and the origins of life. The excitation of nano-scale semiconducting sphalerite minerals by ultra-violate light results in reducing electrons capable of catalyzing the reduction reactions present in the rTCA cycle. Current literature has utilized ion chromatography methods to characterize catalysis of two of the five redox active rTCA cycle compounds with high yield. This technique is unable to produce the untargeted analysis required to anticipate the myriad side reactions driven by excited photoelectrons and their ensuing radicals. By employing liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC-MS) we can examine the complete range of metabolites present across a reaction time series. The three dimensional LC-MS data set allows for the qualitative determination of individual metabolite features, while the comparison of intensities yields quantitative rates. These results allow us to describe the complete set of reactions resultant from a single rTCA cycle organic acid on a photo-activated sphalerite surface and provide a possible mechanism for how metabolic pathways could operate in enzyme free environments.

  19. TCA Cycle Defects and Cancer: When Metabolism Tunes Redox State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Cardaci

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Inborn defects of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle enzymes have been known for more than twenty years. Until recently, only recessive mutations were described which, although resulted in severe multisystem syndromes, did not predispose to cancer onset. In the last ten years, a causal role in carcinogenesis has been documented for inherited and acquired alterations in three TCA cycle enzymes, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH, fumarate hydratase (FH, and isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH, pointing towards metabolic alterations as the underlying hallmark of cancer. This paper summarizes the neoplastic alterations of the TCA cycle enzymes focusing on the generation of pseudohypoxic phenotype and the alteration of epigenetic homeostasis as the main tumor-promoting effects of the TCA cycle affecting defects. Moreover, we debate on the ability of these mutations to affect cellular redox state and to promote carcinogenesis by impacting on redox biology.

  20. Metabolic Engineering of TCA Cycle for Production of Chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuoristo, Kiira S; Mars, Astrid E; Sanders, Johan P M; Eggink, Gerrit; Weusthuis, Ruud A

    2016-03-01

    The tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle has been used for decades in the microbial production of chemicals such as citrate, L-glutamate, and succinate. Maximizing yield is key for cost-competitive production. However, for most TCA cycle products, the maximum pathway yield is lower than the theoretical maximum yield (Y(E)). For succinate, this was solved by creating two pathways to the product, using both branches of the TCA cycle, connected by the glyoxylate shunt (GS). A similar solution cannot be applied directly for production of compounds from the oxidative branch of the TCA cycle because irreversible reactions are involved. Here, we describe how this can be overcome and what the impact is on the yield.

  1. 2-Oxoglutarate: linking TCA cycle function with amino acid, glucosinolate, flavonoid, alkaloid and gibberellin biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner L. Araújo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle intermediate 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG is used as an obligatory substrate in a range of oxidative reactions catalyzed by 2-OG-dependent dioxygenases. These enzymes are widespread in nature being involved in several important biochemical processes. We have recently demonstrated that tomato plants in which the TCA cycle enzyme 2-OG dehydrogenase (2-ODD was antisense inhibited were characterized by early senescence and modified fruit ripening associated with differences in the levels of bioactive gibberellin (GA. Accordingly, there is now compelling evidence that the TCA cycle plays an important role in modulating the rate of flux from 2-OG to amino acid metabolism. Here we discuss recent advances in the biochemistry and molecular biology of 2-OG metabolism occurring in different biological systems indicating the importance of 2-OG and 2-OG dependent dioxygenases not only in glucosinolate, flavonoid and alkaloid metabolism but also in GA and amino acid metabolism. We additionally summarize recent findings regarding the impact of modification of 2-OG metabolism on biosynthetic pathways involving 2-ODDs.

  2. Yersinia enterocolitica infection and tcaA-dependent killing of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanier, Britta; Starke, Mandy; Higel, Fabian; Scherer, Siegfried; Fuchs, Thilo M

    2010-09-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans is a validated model to study bacterial pathogenicity. We report that Yersinia enterocolitica strains W22703 (biovar 2, serovar O:9) and WA314 (biovar 1B, serovar O:8) kill C. elegans when feeding on the pathogens for at least 15 min before transfer to the feeding strain Escherichia coli OP50. The killing by Yersinia enterocolitica requires viable bacteria and, in contrast to that by Yersinia pestis and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis strains, is biofilm independent. The deletion of tcaA encoding an insecticidal toxin resulted in an OP50-like life span of C. elegans, indicating an essential role of TcaA in the nematocidal activity of Y. enterocolitica. TcaA alone is not sufficient for nematocidal activity because E. coli DH5alpha overexpressing TcaA did not result in a reduced C. elegans life span. Spatial-temporal analysis of C. elegans infected with green fluorescent protein-labeled Y. enterocolitica strains showed that Y. enterocolitica colonizes the nematode intestine, leading to an extreme expansion of the intestinal lumen. By low-dose infection with W22703 or DH5alpha followed by transfer to E. coli OP50, proliferation of Y. enterocolitica, but not E. coli, in the intestinal lumen of the nematode was observed. The titer of W22703 cells within the worm increased to over 10(6) per worm 4 days after infection while a significantly lower number of a tcaA knockout mutant was recovered. A strong expression of tcaA was observed during the first 5 days of infection. Y. enterocolitica WA314 (biovar 1B, serovar O:8) mutant strains lacking the yadA, inv, yopE, and irp1 genes known to be important for virulence in mammals were not attenuated or only slightly attenuated in their toxicity toward the nematode, suggesting that these factors do not play a significant role in the colonization and persistence of this pathogen in nematodes. In summary, this study supports the hypothesis that C. elegans is a natural host and nutrient source of Y. enterocolitica.

  3. Structure and Properties of Reduced Barium Niobium Oxide Single Crystals Obtained from Borate Fluxes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hessen, B.; Sunshine, S.A.; Siegrist, T.; Fiory, A.T.; Waszczak, J.V.

    1991-01-01

    Single crystals of the reduced niobate Ba2Nb15O32 are produced by heating NbO2 in BaO·3B2O3 under high-vacuum conditions. The borate acts both as a source of BaO and as a flux for crystallization. The compound Ba2Nb15O32 crystallizes in space group R3 (a = 7.777 (1) Å, c = 35.518 (6) Å) and contains

  4. Reduced Heat Flux Through Preferential Surface Reactions Leading to Vibrationally and Electronically Excited Product States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-04

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0124 Reduced Heat Flux Through Preferential Surface Reactions Leading to Vibrationally and Electronically Excited Product...Reactions Leading to Vibrationally and Electronically Excited Product States 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA9550-12-1-0486 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM... Leading to Vibrationally and Electronically Excited Product States FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT: Grant #FA9550-12-1-0486 2013 Basic Research Initiative (BRI

  5. Design of an AdvancedTCA board management controller (IPMC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, J.; Bobillier, V.; Haas, S.; Joos, M.; Mico, S.; Vasey, F.

    2017-03-01

    The AdvancedTCA (ATCA) standard has been selected as the hardware platform for the upgrade of the back-end electronics of the CMS and ATLAS experiments of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) . In this context, the electronic systems for experiments group at CERN is running a project to evaluate, specify, design and support xTCA equipment. As part of this project, an Intelligent Platform Management Controller (IPMC) for ATCA blades, based on a commercial solution, has been designed to be used on existing and future ATCA blades. This paper reports on the status of this project presenting the hardware and software developments.

  6. Power Effects on High Lift, Stability and Control Characteristics of the TCA Model Tested in the LaRC 14 x 22 Ft Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glessner, Paul T.

    1999-01-01

    The TCA-2 wind-tunnel test was the second in a series of planned tests utilizing the 5% Technology Concept Airplane (TCA) model. Each of the tests was planned to utilize the unique capabilities of the NASA Langley 14'x22' and the NASA Ames 12' test facilities, in order to assess specific aspects of the high lift and stability and control characteristics of the TCA configuration. However, shortly after the completion of the TCA-1 test, an early projection of the Technology Configuration (TC) identified the need for several significant changes to the baseline TCA configuration. These changes were necessary in order to meet more stringent noise certification levels, as well as, to provide a means to control dynamic structural modes. The projected changes included a change to the outboard wing (increased aspect ratio and lower sweep) and a reconfiguration of the longitudinal control surfaces to include a medium size canard and a reduced horizontal tail. The impact of these proposed changes did not affect the TCA-2 test, because it was specifically planned to address power effects on the empennage and a smaller horizontal tail was in the plan to be tested. However, the focus of future tests was reevaluated and the emphasis was shifted away from assessment of TCA specific configurations to a more general assessment of configurations that encompass the projected design space for the TC.

  7. Formal TCA cycle description based on elementary actions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pierre Mazière; Nicolas Parisey; Marie Beurton-Aimar; Franck Molina

    2007-01-01

    Many databases propose their own structure and format to provide data describing biological processes. This heterogeneity contributes to the difficulty of large systematic and automatic functional comparisons. To overcome these problems, we have used the BioΨ formal description scheme which allows multi-level representations of biological process information. Applied to the description of the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA), we show that BioΨ allows the formal integration of functional information existing in current databases and make them available for further automated analysis. In addition such a formal TCA cycle process description leads to a more accurate biological process annotation which takes in account the biological context. This enables us to perform an automated comparison of the TCA cycles for seven different species based on processes rather than protein sequences. From current databases, BioΨ is able to unravel information that are already known by the biologists but are not available for automated analysis tools and simulation software, because of the lack of formal process descriptions. This use of the BioΨ description scheme to describe the TCA cycle was a key step of the MitoScop project that aims to describe and simulate mitochondrial metabolism in silico.

  8. Glycation inhibits trichloroacetic acid (TCA)-induced whey protein precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Four different WPI saccharide conjugates were successfully prepared to test whether glycation could inhibit WPI precipitation induced by trichloroacetic acid (TCA). Conjugates molecular weights after glycation were analyzed with SDS-PAGE. No significant secondary structure change due to glycation wa...

  9. The role of mega dams in reducing sediment fluxes: A case study of large Asian rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Harish; Kao, Shuh-Ji; Dai, Minhan

    2012-09-01

    SummaryIn order to sustain the ever growing population and to meet water and energy requirements of the rapidly growing economies, most of the large rivers draining through East, Southern and Southeast (ESSE) Asian region have been regulated all along their courses, over the past few decades. For instance, ESSE Asian countries (China, Taiwan, Vietnam, Myanmar, Thailand, India, Pakistan and Bangladesh) host about 250 mega dams and several tens of thousands of large and small reservoirs. The present study provides a revised estimate on annual suspended sediment fluxes of the large rivers draining through ESSE region, including the latest data of the Indian peninsula rivers. In the last 50 years, the combined annual sediment flux of the large Chinese rivers has been reduced from 1800 million tons (Mt) to about 370 Mt. We estimate that at present the Indian peninsular rivers collectively transport about 83 Mt of sediment annually. The Ganga-Brahmaputra and the Indus, contribute 850 and 13 Mt of sediments, respectively to the oceans. Our revised estimates suggest that at present the large rivers of ESSE region, collectively delivering ∼2150 Mt of sediment annually to the oceans. We show that at decadal scale, decline in sediment fluxes of the large Asian rivers are proportional to the number of mega dams present in the respective catchments. We also demonstrate that storage of sediment-laden water of major flood events (major-event), led to huge sediment trapping behind mega dams. Thus, ongoing and planned dam constructions activities across ESSE Asia may further reduce the annual sediment fluxes.

  10. ¹³C-based metabolic flux analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with a reduced Crabtree effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajihata, Shuichi; Matsuda, Fumio; Yoshimi, Mika; Hayakawa, Kenshi; Furusawa, Chikara; Kanda, Akihisa; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae shows a Crabtree effect that produces ethanol in a high glucose concentration even under fully aerobic condition. For efficient production of cake yeast or compressed yeast for baking, ethanol by-production is not desired since glucose limited chemostat or fed-batch cultivations are performed to suppress the Crabtree effect. In this study, the (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) was performed for the S288C derived S. cerevisiae strain to characterize a metabolic state under the reduced Crabtree effect. S. cerevisiae cells were cultured at a low dilution rate (0.1 h(-1)) under the glucose-limited chemostat condition. The estimated metabolic flux distribution showed that the acetyl-CoA in mitochondria was mainly produced from pyruvate by pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) reaction and that the level of the metabolic flux through the pentose phosphate pathway was much higher than that of the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway, which contributes to high biomass yield at low dilution rate by supplying NADPH required for cell growth.

  11. Metabolism: Part II. The Tricarboxylic Acid (TCA), Citric Acid, or Krebs Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodner, George M.

    1986-01-01

    Differentiates the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle (or Krebs cycle) from glycolysis, and describes the bridge between the two as being the conversion of pyruvate into acetyl coenzyme A. Discusses the eight steps in the TCA cycle, the results of isotopic labeling experiments, and the net effects of the TCA cycle. (TW)

  12. Metabolism: Part II. The Tricarboxylic Acid (TCA), Citric Acid, or Krebs Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodner, George M.

    1986-01-01

    Differentiates the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle (or Krebs cycle) from glycolysis, and describes the bridge between the two as being the conversion of pyruvate into acetyl coenzyme A. Discusses the eight steps in the TCA cycle, the results of isotopic labeling experiments, and the net effects of the TCA cycle. (TW)

  13. [Construction and fermentation control of reductive TCA pathway for malic acid production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Daojiang; Wang, Caixia; Zhou, Jiemin; Liu, Yilan; Yang, Maohua; Xing, Jianmin

    2013-10-01

    Malic acid is widely used in food, and chemical industries. Through overexpressing pyruvate carboxylase and malate dehydrogenase in pdc1-deficient Saccharomyces cerevisiae, malic acid was successfully produced through the reductive TCA pathway. No malic acid was detected in wild type Saccharomyces cerevisiae, however, 45 mmol/L malic acid was produced in engineered strain, and the concentration of byproduct ethanol also reduced by 18%. The production of malic acid enhanced 6% by increasing the concentration of Ca2+. In addition, the final concentration reached 52.5 mmol/L malic acid by addition of biotin. The increasing is almost 16% higher than that of the original strain.

  14. Efficacy of modified Jessner′s peel and 20% TCA versus 20% TCA peel alone for the treatment of acne scars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neerja Puri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is a paucity of studies on the use of chemical peels for acne scars among the Asian population. A trichloroacetic acid (TCA and Jessner′s combination chemical peel, originally described by Monheit, is said to be better than a TCA peel alone. Aims: The aim of the study was to compare the efficacy of 20% TCA and Jessner′s solution versus 20% TCA alone for the treatment of acne scars. Materials and Methods : The patients were divided into two groups of 25 patients each. Chemical peeling was done in both the groups. In Group I, chemical peeling with Jessner′s peel followed by 20% TCA was done and in Group II patients chemical peeling with 20% TCA peel alone was done. Results: In Group I (Jessner′s peel and 20% TCA, mild improvement of acne scars was seen in 8% cases, moderate improvement in 32% cases and marked improvement of acne scars was seen in 60% patients. In Group II (20% TCA, mild improvement of acne scars was seen in 32% cases, moderate improvement in 40% cases and marked improvement of acne scars was seen in 28% patients. But, the difference in improvement of acne scars was not statistically significant in both the groups (P value > 0.05.

  15. Dysfunctional TCA-Cycle Metabolism in Glutamate Dehydrogenase Deficient Astrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Jakob D; Pajęcka, Kamilla; Stridh, Malin H

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes take up glutamate in the synaptic area subsequent to glutamatergic transmission by the aid of high affinity glutamate transporters. Glutamate is converted to glutamine or metabolized to support intermediary metabolism and energy production. Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and aspartate...... synthesis of aspartate via pyruvate carboxylation. In the absence of glucose, lactate production from glutamate via malic enzyme was lower in GDH deficient astrocytes. In conclusions, our studies reveal that metabolism via GDH serves an important anaplerotic role by adding net carbon to the TCA cycle...

  16. A Novel Flux Focusing Magnetically Geared Machine with Reduced Eddy Current Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Liu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel flux focusing magnetically geared (MG machine for wind power generation, considering the permanent magnets (PMs eddy current loss and the balance between the pull-out torque of MG machine and the back-electromotive force (EMFof the PM brushless machine. The PM eddy current loss in the two rotors of the conventional surface-mounted MG machine is calculated and analyzed by using finite-element method. By adopting serial-spoke structure in the inner rotor, a novel rotor structure for a MG machine is proposed to reduce the PM eddy current loss. Moreover, in order to balance the pull-out torque and the back-EMF, several serial-spoke structures and the main design parameters are investigated. Then, a quantitative comparison between the proposed topology and the conventional surface-mounted MG machine is performed. The analysis results indicate that the PM eddy current loss of the proposed MG machine can be significantly reduced and its pull-out torque and back-EMF can be balanced well.

  17. Spur gears: Optimal geometry, methods for generation and Tooth Contact Analysis (TCA) program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvin, Faydor L.; Zhang, Jiao

    1988-01-01

    The contents of this report include the following: (1) development of optimal geometry for crowned spur gears; (2) methods for their generation; and (3) tooth contact analysis (TCA) computer programs for the analysis of meshing and bearing contact on the crowned spur gears. The method developed for synthesis is used for the determination of the optimal geometry for crowned pinion surface and is directed to reduce the sensitivity of the gears to misalignment, localize the bearing contact, and guarantee the favorable shape and low level of the transmission errors. A new method for the generation of the crowned pinion surface has been proposed. This method is based on application of the tool with a surface of revolution that slightly deviates from a regular cone surface. The tool can be used as a grinding wheel or as a shaver. The crowned pinion surface can also be generated by a generating plane whose motion is provided by an automatic grinding machine controlled by a computer. The TCA program simulates the meshing and bearing contact of the misaligned gears. The transmission errors are also determined.

  18. Partial Safety Analysis for a Reduced Uranium Enrichment Core for the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Primm, Trent [ORNL; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL

    2009-04-01

    A computational model of the reactor core of the High Flux Isotope Rector (HFIR) was developed in order to analyze non-destructive accidents caused by transients during reactor operation. The reactor model was built for the latest version of the nuclear analysis software package called Program for the Analysis of Reactor Transients (PARET). Analyses performed with the model constructed were compared with previous data obtained with other tools in order to benchmark the code. Finally, the model was used to analyze the behavior of the reactor under transients using a different nuclear fuel with lower enrichment of uranium (LEU) than the fuel currently used, which has a high enrichment of uranium (HEU). The study shows that the presence of fertile isotopes in LEU fuel, which increases the neutron resonance absorption, reduces the impact of transients on the fuel and enhances the negative reactivity feedback, thus, within the limitations of this study, making LEU fuel appear to be a safe alternative fuel for the reactor core.

  19. Phosphoethanolamine Modification of Neisseria gonorrhoeae Lipid A Reduces Autophagy Flux in Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susu M Zughaier

    Full Text Available Autophagy, an ancient homeostasis mechanism for macromolecule degradation, performs an important role in host defense by facilitating pathogen elimination. To counteract this host defense strategy, bacterial pathogens have evolved a variety of mechanisms to avoid or otherwise dysregulate autophagy by phagocytic cells so as to enhance their survival during infection. Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a strictly human pathogen that causes the sexually transmitted infection, gonorrhea. Phosphoethanolamine (PEA addition to the 4' position of the lipid A (PEA-lipid A moiety of the lipooligosaccharide (LOS produced by gonococci performs a critical role in this pathogen's ability to evade innate defenses by conferring decreased susceptibility to cationic antimicrobial (or host-defense peptides, complement-mediated killing by human serum and intraleukocytic killing by human neutrophils compared to strains lacking this PEA decoration. Heretofore, however, it was not known if gonococci can evade autophagy and if so, whether PEA-lipid A contributes to this ability. Accordingly, by using murine macrophages and human macrophage-like phagocytic cell lines we investigated if PEA decoration of gonococcal lipid A modulates autophagy formation. We report that infection with PEA-lipid A-producing gonococci significantly reduced autophagy flux in murine and human macrophages and enhanced gonococcal survival during their association with macrophages compared to a PEA-deficient lipid A mutant. Our results provide further evidence that PEA-lipid A produced by gonococci is a critical component in the ability of this human pathogen to evade host defenses.

  20. Phosphoethanolamine Modification of Neisseria gonorrhoeae Lipid A Reduces Autophagy Flux in Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zughaier, Susu M; Kandler, Justin L; Balthazar, Jacqueline T; Shafer, William M

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy, an ancient homeostasis mechanism for macromolecule degradation, performs an important role in host defense by facilitating pathogen elimination. To counteract this host defense strategy, bacterial pathogens have evolved a variety of mechanisms to avoid or otherwise dysregulate autophagy by phagocytic cells so as to enhance their survival during infection. Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a strictly human pathogen that causes the sexually transmitted infection, gonorrhea. Phosphoethanolamine (PEA) addition to the 4' position of the lipid A (PEA-lipid A) moiety of the lipooligosaccharide (LOS) produced by gonococci performs a critical role in this pathogen's ability to evade innate defenses by conferring decreased susceptibility to cationic antimicrobial (or host-defense) peptides, complement-mediated killing by human serum and intraleukocytic killing by human neutrophils compared to strains lacking this PEA decoration. Heretofore, however, it was not known if gonococci can evade autophagy and if so, whether PEA-lipid A contributes to this ability. Accordingly, by using murine macrophages and human macrophage-like phagocytic cell lines we investigated if PEA decoration of gonococcal lipid A modulates autophagy formation. We report that infection with PEA-lipid A-producing gonococci significantly reduced autophagy flux in murine and human macrophages and enhanced gonococcal survival during their association with macrophages compared to a PEA-deficient lipid A mutant. Our results provide further evidence that PEA-lipid A produced by gonococci is a critical component in the ability of this human pathogen to evade host defenses.

  1. Exploring lysine riboswitch for metabolic flux control and improvement of L-lysine synthesis in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li-Bang; Zeng, An-Ping

    2015-06-19

    Riboswitch, a regulatory part of an mRNA molecule that can specifically bind a metabolite and regulate gene expression, is attractive for engineering biological systems, especially for the control of metabolic fluxes in industrial microorganisms. Here, we demonstrate the use of lysine riboswitch and intracellular l-lysine as a signal to control the competing but essential metabolic by-pathways of lysine biosynthesis. To this end, we first examined the natural lysine riboswitches of Eschericia coli (ECRS) and Bacillus subtilis (BSRS) to control the expression of citrate synthase (gltA) and thus the metabolic flux in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle in E. coli. ECRS and BSRS were then successfully used to control the gltA gene and TCA cycle activity in a lysine producing strain Corynebacterium glutamicum LP917, respectively. Compared with the strain LP917, the growth of both lysine riboswitch-gltA mutants was slower, suggesting a reduced TCA cycle activity. The lysine production was 63% higher in the mutant ECRS-gltA and 38% higher in the mutant BSRS-gltA, indicating a higher metabolic flux into the lysine synthesis pathway. This is the first report on using an amino acid riboswitch for improvement of lysine biosynthesis. The lysine riboswitches can be easily adapted to dynamically control other essential but competing metabolic pathways or even be engineered as an "on-switch" to enhance the metabolic fluxes of desired metabolic pathways.

  2. Reducing fluxes of faecal indicator compliance parameters to bathing waters from diffuse agricultural sources: the Brighouse Bay study, Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, D; Aitken, M; Crowther, J; Dickson, I; Edwards, A C; Francis, C; Hopkins, M; Jeffrey, W; Kay, C; McDonald, A T; McDonald, D; Stapleton, C M; Watkins, J; Wilkinson, J; Wyer, M D

    2007-05-01

    The European Water Framework Directive requires the integrated management of point and diffuse pollution to achieve 'good' water quality in 'protected areas'. These include bathing waters, which are regulated using faecal indicator organisms as compliance parameters. Thus, for the first time, European regulators are faced with the control of faecal indicator fluxes from agricultural sources where these impact on bathing water compliance locations. Concurrently, reforms to the European Union (EU) Common Agricultural Policy offer scope for supporting on-farm measures producing environmental benefits through the new 'single farm payments' and the concept of 'cross-compliance'. This paper reports the first UK study involving remedial measures, principally stream bank fencing, designed to reduce faecal indicator fluxes at the catchment scale. Considerable reduction in faecal indicator flux was observed, but this was insufficient to ensure bathing water compliance with either Directive 76/160/EEC standards or new health-evidence-based criteria proposed by WHO and the European Commission.

  3. A Method to Assess Flux Hazards at CSP Plants to Reduce Avian Mortality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Clifford K.; Wendelin, Timothy; Horstman, Luke; Yellowhair, Julius

    2017-06-27

    A method to evaluate avian flux hazards at concentrating solar power plants (CSP) has been developed. A heat-transfer model has been coupled to simulations of the irradiance in the airspace above a CSP plant to determine the feather temperature along prescribed bird flight paths. Probabilistic modeling results show that the irradiance and assumed feather properties (thickness, absorptance, heat capacity) have the most significant impact on the simulated feather temperature, which can increase rapidly (hundreds of degrees Celsius in seconds) depending on the parameter values. The avian flux hazard model is being combined with a plant performance model to identify alternative heliostat standby aiming strategies that minimize both avian flux hazards and negative impacts on plant performance.

  4. Online hemodiafiltration reduces systemic inflammation compared to low-flux hemodialysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoedt, C.H. den; Bots, M.L.; Grooteman, M.P.; Weerd, N.C. van der; Mazairac, A.H.; Penne, E.L.; Levesque, R.; Wee, P.M. ter; Nube, M.J.; Blankestijn, P.J.; Dorpel, M.A. van den; Hamersvelt, H.W. van

    2014-01-01

    Online hemodiafiltration may diminish inflammatory activity through amelioration of the uremic milieu. However, impurities in water quality might provoke inflammatory responses. We therefore compared the long-term effect of low-flux hemodialysis to hemodiafiltration on the systemic inflammatory acti

  5. Chronic elevation of pulmonary microvascular pressure in chronic heart failure reduces bi-directional pulmonary fluid flux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Dani-Louise; Mayne, George C; Griggs, Kim M; De Pasquale, Carmine G; Bersten, Andrew D

    2013-04-01

    Chronic heart failure leads to pulmonary vascular remodelling and thickening of the alveolar-capillary barrier. We examined whether this protective effect may slow resolution of pulmonary oedema consistent with decreased bi-directional fluid flux. Seven weeks following left coronary artery ligation, we measured both fluid flux during an acute rise in left atrial pressure (n = 29) and intrinsic alveolar fluid clearance (n = 45) in the isolated rat lung. Chronic elevation of pulmonary microvascular pressure prevented pulmonary oedema and decreased lung compliance when left atrial pressure was raised to 20 cmH2O, and was associated with reduced expression of endothelial aquaporin 1 (P = 0.03). However, no other changes were found in mediators of fluid flux or cellular fluid channels. In isolated rat lungs, chronic LV dysfunction (LV end-diastolic pressure and infarct circumference) was also inversely related to alveolar fluid clearance (P ≤ 0.001). The rate of pulmonary oedema reabsorption was estimated by plasma volume expansion in eight patients with a previous clinical history of chronic heart failure and eight without, who presented with acute pulmonary oedema. Plasma volume expansion was reduced at 24 h in those with chronic heart failure (P = 0.03). Chronic elevation of pulmonary microvascular pressure in CHF leads to decreased intrinsic bi-directional fluid flux at the alveolar-capillary barrier. This adaptive response defends against alveolar flooding, but may delay resolution of alveolar oedema.

  6. Summer drought leads to reduced net CO2 uptake and CH4 fluxes in a New Zealand peatland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, J. P.; Campbell, D.; Schipper, L. A.; Clearwater, M.

    2013-12-01

    Global climate change is likely to influence the frequency and severity of drought events in many regions. This has implications for changing carbon (C) storage in peatland ecosystems, which provide an important global sink for atmospheric C. However, the relative impacts on ecosystem respiration (ER), gross primary productivity (GPP), and CH4 efflux are not well understood and may alter the C balance differently depending on peatland type, vegetation, and timing of drought. We measured CO2 and CH4 fluxes using eddy covariance in a New Zealand peatland during two contrasting years capturing the impact of an historically extreme drought on these two major components of the net ecosystem C balance. Kopuatai bog is a 96 km2 ombrotrophic raised bog dominated by the endemic peat-forming rush species, Empodisma robustum. The drought impacted the growing season period from January to May, 2013. Net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE) during the drought was approximately half that of the previous relatively wet summer. From January 1 to May 1, cumulative NEE was -133.3 gC m-2 in 2012 and -66.7 gC m-2 in 2013. Increases in ER during the drought were responsible for up to 88% of the difference in NEE, while differences in GPP were comparatively small. For April, mean daily CH4 fluxes during the drought (25 mgCH4 m-2 day-1) reduced to approximately one third of the mean flux measured in April 2012 (80 mgCH4 m-2 day-1). CH4 fluxes remained low for several months following water table recharge, suggesting a substantial lag in the recovery of the methanogenic population. Despite the magnitude of respiration enhancement, the relatively consistent GPP and reduced CH4 flux led to net storage of C during drought, albeit significantly smaller than the previous wet year.

  7. Organic carbon mass accumulation rate regulates the flux of reduced substances from the sediments of deep lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinsberger, Thomas; Schmid, Martin; Wüest, Alfred; Schwefel, Robert; Wehrli, Bernhard; Müller, Beat

    2017-07-01

    The flux of reduced substances, such as methane and ammonium, from the sediment to the bottom water (Fred) is one of the major factors contributing to the consumption of oxygen in the hypolimnia of lakes and thus crucial for lake oxygen management. This study presents fluxes based on sediment porewater measurements from different water depths of five deep lakes of differing trophic states. In meso- to eutrophic lakes Fred was directly proportional to the total organic carbon mass accumulation rate (TOC-MAR) of the sediments. TOC-MAR and thus Fred in eutrophic lakes decreased systematically with increasing mean hypolimnion depth (zH), suggesting that high oxygen concentrations in the deep waters of lakes were essential for the extent of organic matter mineralization leaving a smaller fraction for anaerobic degradation and thus formation of reduced compounds. Consequently, Fred was low in the 310 m deep meso-eutrophic Lake Geneva, with high O2 concentrations in the hypolimnion. By contrast, seasonal anoxic conditions enhanced Fred in the deep basin of oligotrophic Lake Aegeri. As TOC-MAR and zH are based on more readily available data, these relationships allow estimating the areal O2 consumption rate by reduced compounds from the sediments where no direct flux measurements are available.

  8. Effects of continuous casting mould fluxes on reducing longitudinal and star cracks on a slab surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qian; WANG Yu; CHI Jinghao; XIE Bing; HE Yuming; ZHU Bing; CHEN Wenman

    2004-01-01

    In the continuous casting production of medium carbon steel (whose mass fraction of carbon is 0.09 % to 0.16 %)and high strength Iow alloy steel (whose mass fraction of Mn is 0.90 % to 1.40 %), flecks occurring the most often are usually longitudinal and star cracks. In additional to the employment of a galvanized plate mould, two kinds; of fluxes with special properties were studied and used to harmonize the conflicts between the function of heat transfer and lubrication. An industrial application revealed that the crystallizing temperature (To) and crystal ratio (R) of fluxes have a crucible effect on impeding the occurrence of above defects on a slab surface. In the case of slab section (180 to 240) mm×(1000 to 1400) mm and casting speed Vc of (0.7 to 1.2) m/min, the optimized parameters of fluxes are Tc of (1170 to 1190) ℃, R of 80 % to 95 % for medium carbon steel, and Tc of (1100 to 1150) ℃, plus R of 40 % to 60 % for high strength Iow alloy steel.

  9. Purifying fluoride-contaminated water by a novel forward osmosis design with enhanced flux under reduced concentration polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Madhubonti; Chakrabortty, Sankha; Pal, Parimal; Linnanen, Lassi

    2015-08-01

    For purifying fluoride-contaminated water, a new forward osmosis scheme in horizontal flat-sheet cross flow module was designed and investigated. Effects of pressure, cross flow rate, draw solution and alignment of membrane module on separation and flux were studied. Concentration polarization and reverse salt diffusion got significantly reduced in the new hydrodynamic regime. This resulted in less membrane fouling, better solute separation and higher pure water flux than in a conventional module. The entire scheme was completed in two stages-an upstream forward osmosis for separating pure water from contaminated water and a downstream nanofiltration operation for continuous recovery and recycle of draw solute. Synchronization of these two stages of operation resulted in a continuous, steady-state process. From a set of commercial membranes, two polyamide composite membranes were screened out for the upstream and downstream filtrations. A 0.3-M NaCl solution was found to be the best one for forward osmosis draw solution. Potable water with less than 1% residual fluoride could be produced at a high flux of 60-62 L m(-2) h(-1) whereas more than 99% draw solute could be recovered and recycled in the downstream nanofiltration stage from where flux was 62-65 L m(-2) h(-1).

  10. Quantifying and reducing uncertainties in estimated soil CO2 fluxes with hierarchical data-model integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogle, Kiona; Ryan, Edmund; Dijkstra, Feike A.; Pendall, Elise

    2016-12-01

    Nonsteady state chambers are often employed to measure soil CO2 fluxes. CO2 concentrations (C) in the headspace are sampled at different times (t), and fluxes (f) are calculated from regressions of C versus t based on a limited number of observations. Variability in the data can lead to poor fits and unreliable f estimates; groups with too few observations or poor fits are often discarded, resulting in "missing" f values. We solve these problems by fitting linear (steady state) and nonlinear (nonsteady state, diffusion based) models of C versus t, within a hierarchical Bayesian framework. Data are from the Prairie Heating and CO2 Enrichment study that manipulated atmospheric CO2, temperature, soil moisture, and vegetation. CO2 was collected from static chambers biweekly during five growing seasons, resulting in >12,000 samples and >3100 groups and associated fluxes. We compare f estimates based on nonhierarchical and hierarchical Bayesian (B versus HB) versions of the linear and diffusion-based (L versus D) models, resulting in four different models (BL, BD, HBL, and HBD). Three models fit the data exceptionally well (R2 ≥ 0.98), but the BD model was inferior (R2 = 0.87). The nonhierarchical models (BL and BD) produced highly uncertain f estimates (wide 95% credible intervals), whereas the hierarchical models (HBL and HBD) produced very precise estimates. Of the hierarchical versions, the linear model (HBL) underestimated f by 33% relative to the nonsteady state model (HBD). The hierarchical models offer improvements upon traditional nonhierarchical approaches to estimating f, and we provide example code for the models.

  11. Fluxes of oxidised and reduced nitrogen above a mixed coniferous forest exposed to various nitrogen emission sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neirynck, J. [Research Institute for Nature and Forest, Gaverstraat 4, B-9500 Geraardsbergen (Belgium)]. E-mail: johan.neirynck@inbo.be; Kowalski, A.S. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicida, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Granada, Calle Fuentenueva, SP-18071 Granada (Spain); Carrara, A. [Fundacion CEAM, Parque Technologico, Calle Charles H. Darwin 14, SP-46980 Paterna (Valencia) (Spain); Genouw, G. [Research Institute for Nature and Forest, Gaverstraat 4, B-9500 Geraardsbergen (Belgium); Berghmans, P. [Flemish Institute for Technological Research, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Ceulemans, R. [Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Wilrijk (Antwerp) (Belgium)

    2007-09-15

    Concentrations of nitrogen gases (NH{sub 3}, NO{sub 2}, NO, HONO and HNO{sub 3}) and particles (pNH{sub 4} and pNO{sub 3}) were measured over a mixed coniferous forest impacted by high nitrogen loads. Nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) represented the main nitrogen form, followed by nitric oxide (NO) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}). A combination of gradient method (NH{sub 3} and NO {sub x} ) and resistance modelling techniques (HNO{sub 3}, HONO, pNH{sub 4} and pNO{sub 3}) was used to calculate dry deposition of nitrogen compounds. Net flux of NH{sub 3} amounted to -64 ng N m{sup -2} s{sup -1} over the measuring period. Net fluxes of NO {sub x} were upward (8.5 ng N m{sup -2} s{sup -1}) with highest emission in the morning. Fluxes of other gases or aerosols substantially contributed to dry deposition. Total nitrogen deposition was estimated at -48 kg N ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1} and consisted for almost 80% of NH {sub x} . Comparison of throughfall nitrogen with total deposition suggested substantial uptake of reduced N ({+-}15 kg N ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1}) within the canopy. - Reduced nitrogen was found to be the main contributor to total deposition which was predominantly governed by dry deposition.

  12. Reducing the allowable kinetic space by constructing ensemble of dynamic models with the same steady-state flux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yikun; Rivera, Jimmy G Lafontaine; Contador, Carolina A; Asenjo, Juan A; Liao, James C

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic models of metabolism are instrumental for gaining insight and predicting possible outcomes of perturbations. Current approaches start from the selection of lumped enzyme kinetics and determine the parameters within a large parametric space. However, kinetic parameters are often unknown and obtaining these parameters requires detailed characterization of enzyme kinetics. In many cases, only steady-state fluxes are measured or estimated, but these data have not been utilized to construct dynamic models. Here, we extend the previously developed Ensemble Modeling methodology by allowing various kinetic rate expressions and employing a more efficient solution method for steady states. We show that anchoring the dynamic models to the same flux reduces the allowable parameter space significantly such that sampling of high dimensional kinetic parameters becomes meaningful. The methodology enables examination of the properties of the model's structure, including multiple steady states. Screening of models based on limited steady-state fluxes or metabolite profiles reduces the parameter space further and the remaining models become increasingly predictive. We use both succinate overproduction and central carbon metabolism in Escherichia coli as examples to demonstrate these results. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Mitochondrial engineering of the TCA cycle for fumarate production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiulai; Dong, Xiaoxiang; Wang, Yuancai; Zhao, Zihao; Liu, Liming

    2015-09-01

    Microbial fumarate production from renewable feedstock is a promising and sustainable alternative to petroleum-based chemical synthesis. Here, mitochondrial engineering was used to construct the oxidative pathway for fumarate production starting from the TCA cycle intermediate α-ketoglutarate in Candida glabrata. Accordingly, α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGD), succinyl-CoA synthetase (SUCLG), and succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) were selected to be manipulated for strengthening the oxidative pathway, and the engineered strain T.G-K-S-S exhibited increased fumarate biosynthesis (1.81 g L(-1)). To further improve fumarate production, the oxidative route was optimized. First, three fusion proteins KGD2-SUCLG2, SUCLG2-SDH1 and KGD2-SDH1 were constructed, and KGD2-SUCLG2 led to improved fumarate production (4.24 g L(-1)). In addition, various strengths of KGD2-SUCLG2 and SDH1 expression cassettes were designed by combinations of promoter strengths and copy numbers, resulting in a large increase in fumarate production (from 4.24 g L(-1) to 8.24 g L(-1)). Then, through determining intracellular amino acids and its related gene expression levels, argininosuccinate lyase in the urea cycle was identified as the key factor for restricting higher fumarate production. Correspondingly, after overexpression of it, the fumarate production was further increased to 9.96 g L(-1). Next, two dicarboxylic acids transporters facilitated an improvement of fumarate production, and, as a result, the final strain T.G-KS(H)-S(M)-A-2S reached fumarate titer of 15.76 g L(-1). This strategy described here paves the way to the development of an efficient pathway for microbial production of fumarate.

  14. Urban Fluxes Monitoring and Development of Planning Strategies to Reduce Ghg Emissions in AN European City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marras, S.; Sirca, C.; Bellucco, V.; Falk, M.; Pyles, R. D.; Snyder, R. L.; Paw U, K.; Duce, P.; Blecic, I.; Trunfio, G. A.; Cecchini, A.; Spano, D.

    2013-12-01

    Cities and human settlements in general are a primary source of emissions that contribute to human-induced climate change. To investigate the impact of an urbanized area on urban metabolism components, an eddy covariance (EC) tower will be set up in a city (Sassari) located in the center of the Mediterranean basin (Sardinia, Italy). The EC tower, as well as a meteorological station and radiometers, will be set up to monitor energy, water, and carbon fluxes in the city center. A GHG emissions inventory will be also compiled to identify the main emission sources. In addition, a modeling framework will be used to study the impact of different urban planning strategies on carbon emission rates. The modeling framework consists of four models to analyze fluxes both at local and municipality scale: (i) a land surface model ACASA (Advanced Canopy-Atmosphere-Soil Algorithm, ACASA) to simulate the urban metabolism components at local scale; (ii) a Cellular Automata model to simulate the urban land-use dynamics in the near future (20-30 years); (iii) a transportation model to estimate the variation of the transportation network load, and (iv) the coupled model WRF-ACASA will be finally used to simulate the urban metabolism components at municipality scale. The participation of local stakeholders will allow the definition of future planning strategies with the aim to identify low carbon emissions strategies. The projects activities, methodologies applied, as well as the preliminary results will be reported here.

  15. SET overexpression in HEK293 cells regulates mitochondrial uncoupling proteins levels within a mitochondrial fission/reduced autophagic flux scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Luciana O; Goto, Renata N; Neto, Marinaldo P C; Sousa, Lucas O; Curti, Carlos; Leopoldino, Andréia M

    2015-03-01

    We hypothesized that SET, a protein accumulated in some cancer types and Alzheimer disease, is involved in cell death through mitochondrial mechanisms. We addressed the mRNA and protein levels of the mitochondrial uncoupling proteins UCP1, UCP2 and UCP3 (S and L isoforms) by quantitative real-time PCR and immunofluorescence as well as other mitochondrial involvements, in HEK293 cells overexpressing the SET protein (HEK293/SET), either in the presence or absence of oxidative stress induced by the pro-oxidant t-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP). SET overexpression in HEK293 cells decreased UCP1 and increased UCP2 and UCP3 (S/L) mRNA and protein levels, whilst also preventing lipid peroxidation and decreasing the content of cellular ATP. SET overexpression also (i) decreased the area of mitochondria and increased the number of organelles and lysosomes, (ii) increased mitochondrial fission, as demonstrated by increased FIS1 mRNA and FIS-1 protein levels, an apparent accumulation of DRP-1 protein, and an increase in the VDAC protein level, and (iii) reduced autophagic flux, as demonstrated by a decrease in LC3B lipidation (LC3B-II) in the presence of chloroquine. Therefore, SET overexpression in HEK293 cells promotes mitochondrial fission and reduces autophagic flux in apparent association with up-regulation of UCP2 and UCP3; this implies a potential involvement in cellular processes that are deregulated such as in Alzheimer's disease and cancer.

  16. SET overexpression in HEK293 cells regulates mitochondrial uncoupling proteins levels within a mitochondrial fission/reduced autophagic flux scenario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Luciana O.; Goto, Renata N. [Department of Clinical Analyses, Toxicology and Food Sciences, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Neto, Marinaldo P.C. [Department of Physics and Chemistry, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Sousa, Lucas O. [Department of Clinical Analyses, Toxicology and Food Sciences, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Curti, Carlos [Department of Physics and Chemistry, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Leopoldino, Andréia M., E-mail: andreiaml@usp.br [Department of Clinical Analyses, Toxicology and Food Sciences, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2015-03-06

    We hypothesized that SET, a protein accumulated in some cancer types and Alzheimer disease, is involved in cell death through mitochondrial mechanisms. We addressed the mRNA and protein levels of the mitochondrial uncoupling proteins UCP1, UCP2 and UCP3 (S and L isoforms) by quantitative real-time PCR and immunofluorescence as well as other mitochondrial involvements, in HEK293 cells overexpressing the SET protein (HEK293/SET), either in the presence or absence of oxidative stress induced by the pro-oxidant t-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP). SET overexpression in HEK293 cells decreased UCP1 and increased UCP2 and UCP3 (S/L) mRNA and protein levels, whilst also preventing lipid peroxidation and decreasing the content of cellular ATP. SET overexpression also (i) decreased the area of mitochondria and increased the number of organelles and lysosomes, (ii) increased mitochondrial fission, as demonstrated by increased FIS1 mRNA and FIS-1 protein levels, an apparent accumulation of DRP-1 protein, and an increase in the VDAC protein level, and (iii) reduced autophagic flux, as demonstrated by a decrease in LC3B lipidation (LC3B-II) in the presence of chloroquine. Therefore, SET overexpression in HEK293 cells promotes mitochondrial fission and reduces autophagic flux in apparent association with up-regulation of UCP2 and UCP3; this implies a potential involvement in cellular processes that are deregulated such as in Alzheimer's disease and cancer. - Highlights: • SET, UCPs and autophagy prevention are correlated. • SET action has mitochondrial involvement. • UCP2/3 may reduce ROS and prevent autophagy. • SET protects cell from ROS via UCP2/3.

  17. Glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase enables anaplerotic refilling of TCA cycle intermediates in stroke-affected brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rink, Cameron; Gnyawali, Surya; Stewart, Richard; Teplitsky, Seth; Harris, Hallie; Roy, Sashwati; Sen, Chandan K; Khanna, Savita

    2017-04-01

    Ischemic stroke results in excessive release of glutamate, which contributes to neuronal cell death. Here, we test the hypothesis that otherwise neurotoxic glutamate can be productively metabolized by glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT) to maintain cellular energetics and protect the brain from ischemic stroke injury. The GOT-dependent metabolism of glutamate was studied in primary neural cells and in stroke-affected C57-BL6 mice using magnetic resonance spectroscopy and GC-MS. Extracellular Glu sustained cell viability under hypoglycemic conditions and increased GOT-mediated metabolism in vitro Correction of stroke-induced hypoxia using supplemental oxygen in vivo lowered Glu levels as measured by (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy. GOT knockdown abrogated this effect and caused ATP loss in the stroke-affected brain. GOT overexpression increased anaplerotic refilling of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates in mouse brain during ischemic stroke. Furthermore, GOT overexpression not only reduced ischemic stroke lesion volume but also attenuated neurodegeneration and improved poststroke sensorimotor function. Taken together, our results support a new paradigm that GOT enables metabolism of otherwise neurotoxic extracellular Glu through a truncated tricarboxylic acid cycle under hypoglycemic conditions.-Rink, C., Gnyawali, S., Stewart, R., Teplitsky, S., Harris, H., Roy, S., Sen, C. K., Khanna, S. Glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase enables anaplerotic refilling of TCA cycle intermediates in stroke-affected brain. © FASEB.

  18. A new method for the automated age-at-death evaluation by tooth-cementum annulation (TCA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czermak, Andrea; Czermak, Adrian; Ernst, Hartmut; Grupe, Gisela

    2006-03-01

    A valid age at death estimation is required in historical and also forensic anthropology. Tooth cementum annulation (TCA) is a method for age at death estimation of adult individuals. The method is based on light microscope images taken from tooth-root cross sections. The age is then estimated by manually counting the cementum incremental lines and adding this to the chronological age at the assumed point of tooth eruption. Manual line counting, however, is time consuming, potentially subjective and the number of individual counts is insufficient for statistical evaluations. Software developed for the automated evaluation of TCA images, that uses Fourier analysis and algorithms for image analysis and pattern recognition is presented here. It involves "line-by-line" scanning and the counting of gray scale peaks within a selected region-of-interest (ROI). Each scanning process of a particular ROI yields up to 400 counts that are subsequently statistically evaluated. This simple and time saving program seeks to substitute manual counting and supply consistent and reproducible results as well as reduce the demand of human error by eliminating unavoidable factors such as subjectivity and fatigue.

  19. Tropospheric ozone reduces carbon assimilation in trees: estimates from analysis of continuous flux measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fares, Silvano; Vargas, Rodrigo; Detto, Matteo; Goldstein, Allen H; Karlik, John; Paoletti, Elena; Vitale, Marcello

    2013-08-01

    High ground-level ozone concentrations are typical of Mediterranean climates. Plant exposure to this oxidant is known to reduce carbon assimilation. Ozone damage has been traditionally measured through manipulative experiments that do not consider long-term exposure and propagate large uncertainty by up-scaling leaf-level observations to ecosystem-level interpretations. We analyzed long-term continuous measurements (>9 site-years at 30 min resolution) of environmental and eco-physiological parameters at three Mediterranean ecosystems: (i) forest site dominated by Pinus ponderosa in the Sierra Mountains in California, USA; (ii) forest site composed of a mixture of Quercus spp. and P. pinea in the Tyrrhenian sea coast near Rome, Italy; and (iii) orchard site of Citrus sinensis cultivated in the California Central Valley, USA. We hypothesized that higher levels of ozone concentration in the atmosphere result in a decrease in carbon assimilation by trees under field conditions. This hypothesis was tested using time series analysis such as wavelet coherence and spectral Granger causality, and complemented with multivariate linear and nonlinear statistical analyses. We found that reduction in carbon assimilation was more related to stomatal ozone deposition than to ozone concentration. The negative effects of ozone occurred within a day of exposure/uptake. Decoupling between carbon assimilation and stomatal aperture increased with the amount of ozone pollution. Up to 12-19% of the carbon assimilation reduction in P. ponderosa and in the Citrus plantation was explained by higher stomatal ozone deposition. In contrast, the Italian site did not show reductions in gross primary productivity either by ozone concentration or stomatal ozone deposition, mainly due to the lower ozone concentrations in the periurban site over the shorter period of investigation. These results highlight the importance of plant adaptation/sensitivity under field conditions, and the importance of

  20. Chironomus plumosus larvae increase fluxes of denitrification products and diversity of nitrate-reducing bacteria in freshwater sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Morten; W. V. Kofoed, Michael; H. Larsen, Lone

    2014-01-01

    Benthic invertebrates affect microbial processes and communities in freshwater sediment by enhancing sediment-water solute fluxes and by grazing on bacteria. Using microcosms, the effects of larvae of thewidespread midge Chironomus plumosus on the efflux of denitrification products (N2O and N2+ N2O......, respectively, which was mostly due to stimulation of sedimentary denitrification; incomplete denitrification in the guts accounted for up to 20% of the N2O efflux. Phylotype richness of the nitrate reductase gene narG was significantly higher in sediment with than without larvae. In the gut, 47 narG phylotypes...... nosZ wasdifferent in sediments with and without larvae. Hence, C. plumosus increases activity and diversity, but not overall abundance of nitrate-reducing bacteria, probably by providing additional ecological niches in its burrow and gut....

  1. Turbulent Pumping of Magnetic Flux Reduces Solar Cycle Memory and thus Impacts Predictability of the Sun's Activity

    CERN Document Server

    Karak, Bidya Binay

    2012-01-01

    Prediction of the Sun's magnetic activity is important because of its effect on space environmental conditions and climate. However, recent efforts to predict the amplitude of the solar cycle have resulted in diverging forecasts with no consensus. It is understood that the dynamical memory of the solar dynamo mechanism governs predictability and this memory is different for advection- and diffusion-dominated solar convection zones. By utilizing stochastically forced, kinematic dynamo simulations, we demonstrate that the inclusion of downward turbulent pumping of magnetic flux reduces the memory of both advection- and diffusion-dominated solar dynamos to only one cycle; stronger pumping degrades this memory further. We conclude that reliable predictions for the maximum of solar activity can be made only at the preceding minimum and for more accurate predictions, sequential data assimilation would be necessary in forecasting models to account for the Sun's short memory.

  2. The Tribolium castaneum cell line TcA: a new tool kit for cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Kristopher; Jiang, Hongbo; Fu, Jinping; Phillips, Thomas W; Beeman, Richard W; Park, Yoonseong

    2014-10-30

    The red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, is an agriculturally important insect pest that has been widely used as a model organism. Recently, an adherent cell line (BCIRL-TcA-CLG1 or TcA) was developed from late pupae of the red flour beetle. Next generation transcriptome sequencing of TcA cells demonstrated expression of a wide variety of genes associated with specialized functions in chitin metabolism, immune responses and cellular and systemic RNAi pathways. Accordingly, we evaluated the sensitivity of TcA cells to dsRNA to initiate an RNAi response. TcA cells were highly sensitive to minute amounts of dsRNA, with a minimum effective dose of 100 pg/mL resulting in significant suppression of gene expression. We have also developed a plasmid containing two TcA-specific promoters, the promoter from the 40S ribosomal protein subunit (TC006550) and a bi-directional heat shock promoter (TcHS70) from the intergenic space between heat shock proteins 68a and b. These promoters have been employed to provide high levels of either constitutive (TC006550) or inducible (TcHS70) gene expression of the reporter proteins. Our results show that the TcA cell line, with its sensitivity to RNAi and functional TcA-specific promoters, is an invaluable resource for studying basic molecular and physiological questions.

  3. Deciphering flux adjustments of engineered E. coli cells during fermentation with changing growth conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Lian [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Xiu, Yu [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States); Beijing Univ. of Chemical Technology (China); Jones, J. Andrew [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States); Hamilton College, Clinton, NY (United States); Baidoo, Edward E. K. [Joint BioEnergy Inst. (JBEI), Emeryville, CA (United States); Keasling, Jay D. [Joint BioEnergy Inst. (JBEI), Emeryville, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark); Tang, Yinjie J. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Koffas, Mattheos A. G. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States)

    2016-12-23

    Microbial fermentation conditions are dynamic, due to transcriptional induction, nutrient consumption, or changes to incubation conditions. In this paper, 13C-metabolic flux analysis was used to characterize two violacein-producing E. coli strains with vastly different productivities, and to profile their metabolic adjustments resulting from external perturbations during fermentation. The two strains were first grown at 37 °C in stage 1, and then the temperature was transitioned to 20 °C in stage 2 for the optimal expression of the violacein synthesis pathway. After induction, violacein production was minimal in stage 3, but accelerated in stage 4 (early production phase) and 5 (late production phase) in the high producing strain, reaching a final concentration of 1.5 mmol/L. On the contrary, ~0.02 mmol/L of violacein was obtained from the low producing strain. To have a snapshot of the temporal metabolic changes in each stage, we performed 13C-MFA via isotopomer analysis of fast-turnover free metabolites. The results indicate strikingly stable flux ratios in the central metabolism throughout the early growth stages. In the late stages, however, the high producer rewired its flux distribution significantly, which featured an upregulated pentose phosphate pathway and TCA cycle, reflux from acetate utilization, negligible anabolic fluxes, and elevated maintenance loss, to compensate for nutrient depletion and drainage of some building blocks due to violacein overproduction. The low producer with stronger promoters shifted its relative fluxes in stage 5 by enhancing the flux through the TCA cycle and acetate overflow, while exhibiting a reduced biomass growth and a minimal flux towards violacein synthesis. Finally, interestingly, the addition of the violacein precursor (tryptophan) in the medium inhibited high producer but enhanced low producer's productivity, leading to hypotheses of unknown pathway regulations (such as metabolite

  4. Comparative study of 15% TCA peel versus 35% glycolic acid peel for the treatment of melasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Neerja

    2012-01-01

    Background: Chemical peels are the mainstay of a cosmetic practitioner's armamentarium because they can be used to treat some skin disorders and can provide aesthetic benefit. Objectives: To compare 15% TCA peel and 35% glycolic acid peel for the treatment of melasma. Material and Methods: We selected 30 participants of melasma aged between 20 and 50 years from the dermatology outpatient department and treated equal numbers with 15% TCA and 35% glycolic acid. Results: Subjective response as graded by the patient showed good or very good response in 70% participants in the glycolic acid group and 64% in the TCA group. Conclusions: There was statistically insignificant difference in the efficacy between the two groups for the treatment of melasma. PMID:23130283

  5. A comparative study on 100% tca versus 88% phenol for the treatment of vitiligo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neerja Puri

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available There are various medical and surgical modalities for the treatment of vitiligo. Surgical modalities are used in the patients who fail to respond to medical therapy. We selected thirty patients of stable vitiligo from the department of dermatology for the study. The patients were divided into two groups of 15 patients each. In Group I patients application of 100% TCA was done on the vitiliginous sites and in Group II patients 88% phenol was applied on the affected sites. Comparing the results of repigmentation in both the groups it was seen that marked pigmentation was seen in 66.6% patients in the TCA group and 80% in the Phenol group. Moderate pigmentation was seen in 13.3% patients in both the groups and mild pigmentation was seen in 20% patients in the TCA group and 6.6% in the Phenol group.

  6. Comparative study of 15% TCA peel versus 35% glycolic acid peel for the treatment of melasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neerja Puri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chemical peels are the mainstay of a cosmetic practitioner′s armamentarium because they can be used to treat some skin disorders and can provide aesthetic benefit. Objectives: To compare 15% TCA peel and 35% glycolic acid peel for the treatment of melasma. Material and Methods: We selected 30 participants of melasma aged between 20 and 50 years from the dermatology outpatient department and treated equal numbers with 15% TCA and 35% glycolic acid. Results: Subjective response as graded by the patient showed good or very good response in 70% participants in the glycolic acid group and 64% in the TCA group. Conclusions: There was statistically insignificant difference in the efficacy between the two groups for the treatment of melasma.

  7. Assessment of the TCA functional in computational chemistry and solid-state physics

    CERN Document Server

    Fabiano, E; Terentjevs, A; Della Sala, F; Cortona, P

    2015-01-01

    We assess the Tognetti-Cortona-Adamo (TCA) generalized gradient approximation correlation functional [J. Chem. Phys. 128:034101 (2008)] for a variety of electronic systems. We find that, even if the TCA functional is not exact for the uniform electron gas, it is very accurate for the jellium surface correlation energies and it gives a realistic description of the quantum oscillations and surface effects of various jellium clusters, that are important model systems in computational chemistry and solid-state physics. When the TCA correlation is combined with the non-empirical PBEint, Wu-Cohen, and PBEsol$_b$ exchange functionals, the resulting exchange-correlation approximations provide good performances for a broad palette of systems and properties, being reasonably accurate for thermochemistry and geometry of molecules, transition metal complexes, non-covalent interactions,equilibrium lattice constants, bulk moduli, and cohesive energies of solids.

  8. ELECTRONMICORSCOPIC SURVEY OF EXOSOMES GRAINULATIONS EXCRETED BY Tca8113 CELLS%Tca8113细胞分泌的exosomes小体的电镜研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张树标; 王敬旭; 王丽萍

    2006-01-01

    目的 通过透射电镜方法观察Tca8113细胞分泌的exosomes小体,为舌鳞癌免疫逃逸中的作用机理研究以及寻找舌鳞癌细胞新抗原提供实验材料.方法 采用离心超滤和蔗糖密度梯度离心等方法分离出Tca8113细胞释放的exosomes小体,经透射电镜观察其超微结构.结果 Tca8113细胞分泌的exosomes小体为直径50~100nm的膜性微囊结构,圆形或椭圆形,腔内为低电子密度成分.结论 离心超滤和蔗糖密度梯度离心法纯化小量exosomes小体方法可行.

  9. Reduced fine sediment flux and channel change in response to the managed diversion of an upland river channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perks, Matthew Thomas; Warburton, Jeff

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes the implementation of a novel mitigation approach and subsequent adaptive management, designed to reduce the transfer of fine sediment (post-diversion periods in order to assess the impact of the channel reconfiguration scheme on the fluvial suspended sediment dynamics. Analysis of the river response demonstrates that the fluvial sediment system has become more restrictive with reduced fine sediment transfer. This is characterized by reductions in flow-weighted mean suspended sediment concentrations from 77.93 mg L-1 prior to mitigation, to 74.36 mg L-1 following the diversion. A Mann-Whitney U test found statistically significant differences (p post-monitoring median suspended sediment concentrations (SSCs). Whilst application of one-way analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) on the coefficients of sediment rating curves developed before and after the diversion found statistically significant differences (p model over-predicting sediment concentrations as the channel stabilizes. However, the channel is continuing to adjust to the reconfigured morphology, with evidence of a headward propagating knickpoint which has migrated 120 m at an exponentially decreasing rate over the last 7 years since diversion. The study demonstrates that channel reconfiguration can be effective in mitigating fine sediment flux in headwater streams but the full value of this may take many years to achieve whilst the fluvial system slowly readjusts.

  10. The Effect of Walterinnesia aegyptia Venom Proteins on TCA Cycle Activity and Mitochondrial NAD+-Redox State in Cultured Human Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazem K. Ghneim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblast cultures were used to study the effects of crude Walterinnesia aegyptia venom and its F1–F7 protein fractions on TCA cycle enzyme activities and mitochondrial NAD-redox state. Confluent cells were incubated with 10 μg of venom proteins for 4 hours at 37°C. The activities of all studied TCA enzymes and the non-TCA mitochondrial NADP+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase underwent significant reductions of similar magnitude (50–60% of control activity upon incubation of cells with the crude venom and fractions F4, F5, and F7 and 60–70% for fractions F3 and F6. In addition, the crude and fractions F3–F7 venom proteins caused a drop in mitochondrial NAD+ and NADP+ levels equivalent to around 25% of control values. Whereas the crude and fractions F4, F5, and F7 venom proteins caused similar magnitude drops in NADH and NADPH (around 55% of control levels, fractions F3 and F6 caused a more drastic drop (60–70% of control levels of both reduced coenzymes. Results indicate that the effects of venom proteins could be directed at the mitochondrial level and/or the rates of NAD+ and NADP+ biosynthesis.

  11. Systematic engineering of TCA cycle for optimal production of a four-carbon platform chemical 4-hydroxybutyric acid in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sol; Kim, Hyun Uk; Kim, Tae Yong; Lee, Sang Yup

    2016-11-01

    To address climate change and environmental problems, it is becoming increasingly important to establish biorefineries for the production of chemicals from renewable non-food biomass. Here we report the development of Escherichia coli strains capable of overproducing a four-carbon platform chemical 4-hybroxybutyric acid (4-HB). Because 4-HB production is significantly affected by aeration level, genome-scale metabolic model-based engineering strategies were designed under aerobic and microaerobic conditions with emphasis on oxidative/reductive TCA branches and glyoxylate shunt. Several different metabolic engineering strategies were employed to develop strains suitable for fermentation both under aerobic and microaerobic conditions. It was found that microaerobic condition was more efficient than aerobic condition in achieving higher titer and productivity of 4-HB. The final engineered strain produced 103.4g/L of 4-HB by microaerobic fed-batch fermentation using glycerol. The aeration-dependent optimization strategy of TCA cycle will be useful for developing microbial strains producing other reduced derivative chemicals of TCA cycle intermediates.

  12. Pu-erh tea has in vitro anticancer activity in TCA8113 cells and preventive effects on buccal mucosa cancer in U14 cells injected mice in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin; Qian, Yu; Zhou, Ya-Lin; Wang, Rui; Wang, Qiang; Li, Gui-Jie

    2014-01-01

    Pu-erh tea is a functional tea production in China. The functional effects should be proved. The oral cancer preventive and antimetastatic effects of Pu-erh tea in vitro and in vivo have been studied respectively. Pu-erh tea showed an inhibitory effect on human tongue carcinoma TCA8113 cells proliferation tested by 3-(4,5-Dimethyl-2-Thiazolyl)-2,5-Diphenyltetrazolium Bromide assay and induced TCA8113 apoptosis shown anticancer effect. The antimetastatic effect of Pu-erh tea in TCA8113 cells was proved by the decreasing of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and increasing of tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) mRNA transcription. In the animal experiments, the tumor volumes and lymph node metastasis rates of Pu-erh tea-treated mice were smaller than control mice. Pu-erh tea reduced the levels of the serum proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-6, IL-12, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interferon-γ to a greater extent compared with the control mice, and the levels of 200 μg/mL treatment was more close to the normal mice than 100 μg/mL treated mice. Pu-erh tea also significantly induced apoptosis in tissues of mice (P Pu-erh tea has cancer preventive and anti-metastatic effects on buccal mucosa cancer, the higher concentration get better efficiency.

  13. Multi-model analysis of terrestrial carbon cycles in Japan: reducing uncertainties in model outputs among different terrestrial biosphere models using flux observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Ichii

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial biosphere models show large uncertainties when simulating carbon and water cycles, and reducing these uncertainties is a priority for developing more accurate estimates of both terrestrial ecosystem statuses and future climate changes. To reduce uncertainties and improve the understanding of these carbon budgets, we investigated the ability of flux datasets to improve model simulations and reduce variabilities among multi-model outputs of terrestrial biosphere models in Japan. Using 9 terrestrial biosphere models (Support Vector Machine-based regressions, TOPS, CASA, VISIT, Biome-BGC, DAYCENT, SEIB, LPJ, and TRIFFID, we conducted two simulations: (1 point simulations at four flux sites in Japan and (2 spatial simulations for Japan with a default model (based on original settings and an improved model (based on calibration using flux observations. Generally, models using default model settings showed large deviations in model outputs from observation with large model-by-model variability. However, after we calibrated the model parameters using flux observations (GPP, RE and NEP, most models successfully simulated seasonal variations in the carbon cycle, with less variability among models. We also found that interannual variations in the carbon cycle are mostly consistent among models and observations. Spatial analysis also showed a large reduction in the variability among model outputs, and model calibration using flux observations significantly improved the model outputs. These results show that to reduce uncertainties among terrestrial biosphere models, we need to conduct careful validation and calibration with available flux observations. Flux observation data significantly improved terrestrial biosphere models, not only on a point scale but also on spatial scales.

  14. IPbus A flexible Ethernet-based control system for xTCA hardware

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Thomas Stephen

    2014-01-01

    The ATCA and uTCA standards include industry-standard data pathway technologies such as Gigabit Ethernet which can be used for control communication, but no specific hardware control protocol is defined. The IPbus suite of software and firmware implements a reliable high-performance control link for particle physics electronics, and has successfully replaced VME control in several large projects. In this paper, we outline the IPbus system architecture, and describe recent developments in the reliability, scalability and performance of IPbus systems, carried out in preparation for deployment of uTCA-based CMS upgrades before the LHC 2015 run. We also discuss plans for future development of the IPbus suite.SUMMARY IPbus will be used for controlling the uTCA electronics in the CMS HCAL, TCDS, Pixel and Level-1 trigger upgrades. IPbus control has already been extensively used in the work of these upgrade projects so far, and final uTCA systems will be deployed in the experiment starting from Autumn 2014. IPbus is...

  15. Isolation and identification of exosomes secreted from cell line Tca8113 in tongue cancer%舌癌Tca8113细胞来源exosomes的制备及鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李金; 廖贵清; 陈巨峰; 刘海潮; 苏宇雄; 冯炼强; 骆晓枫

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aims to verify whether Tca8113 can secrete exosomes, and to identify a new method for oral tumor immunotherapy. Methods Exosomes were isolated and purified from the culture supernatant of Tca8113 by ultraspeed centrifugation and density gradient centrifugation, and were subsequently confirmed using transmission electron microscopy and Western blot. Results Exosomes were successfully isolated and purified from the culture supernatant of Tca8113. Tca8113 contained protein and had a structure similar to other cells, as reported in previous studies. Conclusion Tca8113 can secrete exosomes, and contains numerous types of proteins that are associated with tumor immunity.%目的:探讨舌癌Tca8113细胞能否分泌exosomes,为舌癌的免疫治疗寻找新方法。方法采用超速离心及差异密度梯度离心法,从Tca8113细胞中分离并纯化exosomes,通过透射电子显微镜观察其超微结构,蛋白质印迹法分析其表面蛋白成分。结果从Tca8113细胞中成功分离并纯化出exosomes,其结构及携带蛋白与其他细胞来源的相似,并发现其分泌的exosomes还携带有肿瘤抗原。结论舌癌Tca8113细胞能分泌exosomes,而且其携带多种与肿瘤免疫相关的蛋白可能具有抗肿瘤作用。

  16. Status report on a MicroTCA card for HCAL trigger and readout at SLHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mans, J; Frahm, E, E-mail: frahm@physics.umn.edu [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    We present recent measurements performed using a prototype MicroTCA card for CMS-HCAL Trigger and Readout at SLHC. Our second generation prototype uses a Xilinx XC5VFX70T FPGA to perform the high-speed communication and data processing for up to eight Readout Module fibers that are streaming data at 4.8 Gbps each. The FPGA also uses two SFP+ optical interfaces at 6.4 Gbps each for data transfer to the Trigger System. A local DAQ interface in the FPGA communicates via Gigabit Ethernet with the MicroTCA MCH. Bit Error Rate Test (BERT) results and data integrity analyses are presented in challenging clocking environments including a legacy TTC system. In addition, the status of the IPbus concept for control of deeply embedded devices is presented.

  17. Status report on a MicroTCA card for HCAL trigger and readout at SLHC

    CERN Document Server

    Mans, J; 10.1088/1748-0221/5/12/C12027

    2010-01-01

    We present recent measurements performed using a prototype MicroTCA card for CMS-HCAL Trigger and Readout at SLHC. Our second generation prototype uses a Xilinx XC5VFX70T FPGA to perform the high-speed communication and data processing for up to eight Readout Module fibers that are streaming data at 4.8 Gbps each. The FPGA also uses two SFP+ optical interfaces at 6.4 Gbps each for data transfer to the Trigger System. A local DAQ interface in the FPGA communicates via Gigabit Ethernet with the MicroTCA MCH. Bit Error Rate Test (BERT) results and data integrity analyses are presented in challenging clocking environments including a legacy TTC system. In addition, the status of the IPbus concept for control of deeply embedded devices is presented

  18. IPbus: a flexible Ethernet-based control system for xTCA hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghabrous Larrea, C.; Harder, K.; Newbold, D.; Sankey, D.; Rose, A.; Thea, A.; Williams, T.

    2015-02-01

    The ATCA and μTCA standards include industry-standard data pathway technologies such as Gigabit Ethernet which can be used for control communication, but no specific hardware control protocol is defined. The IPbus suite of software and firmware implements a reliable high-performance control link for particle physics electronics, and has successfully replaced VME control in several large projects. In this paper, we outline the IPbus control system architecture, and describe recent developments in the reliability, scalability and performance of IPbus systems, carried out in preparation for deployment of μTCA-based CMS upgrades before the LHC 2015 run. We also discuss plans for future development of the IPbus suite.

  19. Adsorption calorimetry during metal vapor deposition on single crystal surfaces: Increased flux, reduced optical radiation, and real-time flux and reflectivity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, Jason R. V.; James, Trevor E.; Hemmingson, Stephanie L.; Farmer, Jason A.; Campbell, Charles T.

    2013-12-01

    Thin films of metals and other materials are often grown by physical vapor deposition. To understand such processes, it is desirable to measure the adsorption energy of the deposited species as the film grows, especially when grown on single crystal substrates where the structure of the adsorbed species, evolving interface, and thin film are more homogeneous and well-defined in structure. Our group previously described in this journal an adsorption calorimeter capable of such measurements on single-crystal surfaces under the clean conditions of ultrahigh vacuum [J. T. Stuckless, N. A. Frei, and C. T. Campbell, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 69, 2427 (1998)]. Here we describe several improvements to that original design that allow for heat measurements with ˜18-fold smaller standard deviation, greater absolute accuracy in energy calibration, and, most importantly, measurements of the adsorption of lower vapor-pressure materials which would have previously been impossible. These improvements are accomplished by: (1) using an electron beam evaporator instead of a Knudsen cell to generate the metal vapor at the source of the pulsed atomic beam, (2) changing the atomic beam design to decrease the relative amount of optical radiation that accompanies evaporation, (3) adding an off-axis quartz crystal microbalance for real-time measurement of the flux of the atomic beam during calorimetry experiments, and (4) adding capabilities for in situ relative diffuse optical reflectivity determinations (necessary for heat signal calibration). These improvements are not limited to adsorption calorimetry during metal deposition, but also could be applied to better study film growth of other elements and even molecular adsorbates.

  20. Pharmacokinetics of C-1027 in mice as determined by TCA-RA method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    You-Ping Liu; Quan-Sheng Li; Yu-Rong Huang; Mao-Jin Zhou; Chang-Xiao Liu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To validate a radioactivity assay, the TCA-RA method,for the measurement of C-1027 in serum and to evaluate its application in determination of pharmacokinetics of C-1027 in mice.METHODS: 125I-C-1027 was prepared by the Iodogen method and separated by HPLC. The radioactivity assay was established and used to determine 125I-C-1027 in mice at doses of 10, 50 and 100 μg/kg after precipitation with20% trichloroacetic acid (TCA-RA method). Severalpharmacokinetic parameters were determined after intravenous injection of 125I-C-1027 to mice.RESULTS: After intravenous injection of 125I-C-1027 to mice,at doses of 10, 50 and 100 μg/kg; the apparent distribution volumes (Vd) were 0.26, 0.31 and 0.33 L/kg; the biological half-lives (T1/2) were 3.10, 3.40 and 3.90 h; the areas under curve (AUC) were 18.41, 103.69 and 202.74 ng/h/mL; the elimination rate constants (K) were 1.04, 1.26 and 0.58/h;and the total body clearance (Cl) were 0.54, 0.48 and0.49 L/kg/h, respectively.CONCLUSION: TCA-RA is a sensitive, reliable and suitable method for the determination of 125I-C-1027 in mouse serum.

  1. Development of uTCA Hardware for BAM system at FLASH and XFEL

    CERN Document Server

    Habib, S B; Szewinski, J; Korolczuk, S

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the design of a uTCA modular card system suited for conversion, sampling and processing of optical pulses. The system consists of a uTCA carrier card along with a double width FPGA Mezzanine Card (FMC) with a changeable optical frontend. The cards were designed for the needs of the BAM system of the FLASH and XFEL accelerators at the DESY facility in Hamburg. The carrier board contains a very powerful FPGA, all required uTCA circuits along with digital interfaces. The FMC card mainly contains four 16-bit fast Analog-to-digital converters (up to 250 MSPS), ADC clock generation and distribution modules, two SFP connectors and a specialized dual RS-485 connection. This paper describes such issues as system organization into universal digital circuits and specialized analog and clock circuits to allow high speed real-time analysis of the properties of thehigh-bandwidth optical signals of the BAM system and better control of the accelerator beam.

  2. Metabolic flux rearrangement in the amino acid metabolism reduces ammonia stress in the α1-antitrypsin producing human AGE1.HN cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priesnitz, Christian; Niklas, Jens; Rose, Thomas; Sandig, Volker; Heinzle, Elmar

    2012-03-01

    This study focused on metabolic changes in the neuronal human cell line AGE1.HN upon increased ammonia stress. Batch cultivations of α(1)-antitrypsin (A1AT) producing AGE1.HN cells were carried out in media with initial ammonia concentrations ranging from 0mM to 5mM. Growth, A1AT production, metabolite dynamics and finally metabolic fluxes calculated by metabolite balancing were compared. Growth and A1AT production decreased with increasing ammonia concentration. The maximum A1AT concentration decreased from 0.63g/l to 0.51g/l. Central energy metabolism remained relatively unaffected exhibiting only slightly increased glycolytic flux at high initial ammonia concentration in the medium. However, the amino acid metabolism was significantly changed. Fluxes through transaminases involved in amino acid degradation were reduced concurrently with a reduced uptake of amino acids. On the other hand fluxes through transaminases working in the direction of amino acid synthesis, i.e., alanine and phosphoserine, were increased leading to increased storage of excess nitrogen in extracellular alanine and serine. Glutamate dehydrogenase flux was reversed increasingly fixing free ammonia with increasing ammonia concentration. Urea production additionally observed was associated with arginine uptake by the cells and did not increase at high ammonia stress. It was therefore not used as nitrogen sink to remove excess ammonia. The results indicate that the AGE1.HN cell line can adapt to ammonia concentrations usually present during the cultivation process to a large extent by changing metabolism but with slightly reduced A1AT production and growth.

  3. Metabolic flux analysis of Escherichia coli MG1655 under octanoic acid (C8) stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yanfen; Yoon, Jong Moon; Jarboe, Laura; Shanks, Jacqueline V

    2015-05-01

    Systems metabolic engineering has made the renewable production of industrial chemicals a feasible alternative to modern operations. One major example of a renewable process is the production of carboxylic acids, such as octanoic acid (C8), from Escherichia coli, engineered to express thioesterase enzymes. C8, however, is toxic to E. coli above a certain concentration, which limits the final titer. (13)C metabolic flux analysis of E. coli was performed for both C8 stress and control conditions using NMR2Flux with isotopomer balancing. A mixture of labeled and unlabeled glucose was used as the sole carbon source for bacterial growth for (13)C flux analysis. By comparing the metabolic flux maps of the control condition and C8 stress condition, pathways that were altered under the stress condition were identified. C8 stress was found to reduce carbon flux in several pathways: the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, the CO2 production, and the pyruvate dehydrogenase pathway. Meanwhile, a few pathways became more active: the pyruvate oxidative pathway, and the extracellular acetate production. These results were statistically significant for three biological replicates between the control condition and C8 stress. As a working hypothesis, the following causes are proposed to be the main causes for growth inhibition and flux alteration for a cell under stress: membrane disruption, low activity of electron transport chain, and the activation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase regulator (PdhR).

  4. Analysis of Metabolic Pathways and Fluxes in a Newly Discovered Thermophilic and Ethanol-Tolerant Geobacillus Strain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Sapra, Rajat; Joyner, Dominique; Hazen, Terry C.; Myers, Samuel; Reichmuth, David; Blanch, Harvey; Keasling, Jay D.

    2009-01-20

    A recently discovered thermophilic bacterium, Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius M10EXG, ferments a range of C5 (e.g., xylose) and C6 sugars (e.g., glucose) and istolerant to high ethanol concentrations (10percent, v/v). We have investigated the central metabolism of this bacterium using both in vitro enzyme assays and 13C-based flux analysis to provide insights into the physiological properties of this extremophile and explore its metabolism for bio-ethanol or other bioprocess applications. Our findings show that glucose metabolism in G. thermoglucosidasius M10EXG proceeds via glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway, and the TCA cycle; the Entner?Doudoroff pathway and transhydrogenase activity were not detected. Anaplerotic reactions (including the glyoxylate shunt, pyruvate carboxylase, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase) were active, but fluxes through those pathways could not be accuratelydetermined using amino acid labeling. When growth conditions were switched from aerobic to micro-aerobic conditions, fluxes (based on a normalized glucose uptake rate of 100 units (g DCW)-1 h-1) through the TCA cycle and oxidative pentose phosphate pathway were reduced from 64+-3 to 25+-2 and from 30+-2 to 19+-2, respectively. The carbon flux under micro-aerobic growth was directed formate. Under fully anerobic conditions, G. thermoglucosidasius M10EXG used a mixed acid fermentation process and exhibited a maximum ethanol yield of 0.38+-0.07 mol mol-1 glucose. In silico flux balance modeling demonstrates that lactate and acetate production from G. thermoglucosidasius M10EXG reduces the maximum ethanol yieldby approximately threefold, thus indicating that both pathways should be modified to maximize ethanol production.

  5. Functional studies of ssDNA binding ability of MarR family protein TcaR from Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ming Chang

    Full Text Available The negative transcription regulator of the ica locus, TcaR, regulates proteins involved in the biosynthesis of poly-N-acetylglucosamine (PNAG. Absence of TcaR increases PNAG production and promotes biofilm formation in Staphylococci. Previously, the 3D structure of TcaR in its apo form and its complex structure with several antibiotics have been analyzed. However, the detailed mechanism of multiple antibiotic resistance regulator (MarR family proteins such as TcaR is unclear and only restricted on the binding ability of double-strand DNA (dsDNA. Here we show by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA, electron microscopy (EM, circular dichroism (CD, and Biacore analysis that TcaR can interact strongly with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA, thereby identifying a new role in MarR family proteins. Moreover, we show that TcaR preferentially binds 33-mer ssDNA over double-stranded DNA and inhibits viral ssDNA replication. In contrast, such ssDNA binding properties were not observed for other MarR family protein and TetR family protein, suggesting that the results from our studies are not an artifact due to simple charge interactions between TcaR and ssDNA. Overall, these results suggest a novel role for TcaR in regulation of DNA replication. We anticipate that the results of this work will extend our understanding of MarR family protein and broaden the development of new therapeutic strategies for Staphylococci.

  6. Ditch blocking, water chemistry and organic carbon flux: evidence that blanket bog restoration reduces erosion and fluvial carbon loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Lorraine; Wilson, Jared; Holden, Joseph; Johnstone, Ian; Armstrong, Alona; Morris, Michael

    2011-05-01

    The potential for restoration of peatlands to deliver benefits beyond habitat restoration is poorly understood. There may be impacts on discharge water quality, peat erosion, flow rates and flood risk, and nutrient fluxes. This study aimed to assess the impact of drain blocking, as a form of peatland restoration, on an upland blanket bog, by measuring water chemistry and colour, and loss of both dissolved (DOC) and particulate organic carbon (POC). The restoration work was designed to permit the collection of a robust experimental dataset over a landscape scale, with data covering up to 3 years pre-restoration and up to 3 years post-restoration. An information theoretic approach to data analyses provided evidence of a recovery of water chemistry towards more 'natural' conditions, and showed strong declines in the production of water colour. Drain blocking led to increases in the E4:E6 ratio, and declines in specific absorbance, suggesting that DOC released from blocked drains consisted of lighter, less humic and less decomposed carbon. Whilst concentrations of DOC showed slight increases in drains and streams after blocking, instantaneous yields of both DOC and POC declined markedly in streams over the first year post-restoration. Attempts were made to estimate total annual fluvial organic carbon fluxes for the study site, and although errors around these estimates remain considerable, there is strong evidence of a large reduction in aquatic organic carbon flux from the peatland following drain-blocking. Potential mechanisms for the observed changes in water chemistry and organic carbon release are discussed, and we highlight the need for more detailed information, from more sites, to better understand the full impacts of peatland restoration on carbon storage and release.

  7. Mitochondria-Translocated PGK1 Functions as a Protein Kinase to Coordinate Glycolysis and the TCA Cycle in Tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinjian; Jiang, Yuhui; Meisenhelder, Jill; Yang, Weiwei; Hawke, David H; Zheng, Yanhua; Xia, Yan; Aldape, Kenneth; He, Jie; Hunter, Tony; Wang, Liwei; Lu, Zhimin

    2016-03-01

    It is unclear how the Warburg effect that exemplifies enhanced glycolysis in the cytosol is coordinated with suppressed mitochondrial pyruvate metabolism. We demonstrate here that hypoxia, EGFR activation, and expression of K-Ras G12V and B-Raf V600E induce mitochondrial translocation of phosphoglycerate kinase 1 (PGK1); this is mediated by ERK-dependent PGK1 S203 phosphorylation and subsequent PIN1-mediated cis-trans isomerization. Mitochondrial PGK1 acts as a protein kinase to phosphorylate pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDHK1) at T338, which activates PDHK1 to phosphorylate and inhibit the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex. This reduces mitochondrial pyruvate utilization, suppresses reactive oxygen species production, increases lactate production, and promotes brain tumorigenesis. Furthermore, PGK1 S203 and PDHK1 T338 phosphorylation levels correlate with PDH S293 inactivating phosphorylation levels and poor prognosis in glioblastoma patients. This work highlights that PGK1 acts as a protein kinase in coordinating glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, which is instrumental in cancer metabolism and tumorigenesis.

  8. MicroTCA implementation of synchronous Ethernet-Based DAQ systems for large scale experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Girerd, C; Carlus, B; Gardien, S; Marteau, J; Tromeur, W

    2009-01-01

    Large LAr TPCs are among the most powerful detectors to address open problems in particle and astro-particle physics, such as CP violation in leptonic sector, neutrino properties and their astrophysical implications, proton decay search etc. The scale of such detector implies severe constraints on their readout and DAQ system. In this article we describe a data acquisition scheme for this new generation of large detectors. The main challenge is to propose a scalable and easy to use solution able to manage a large number of channels at the lowest cost. It is interesting to note that these constraints are very similar to those existing in Network Telecommunication Industry. We propose to study how emerging technologies like ATCA and $\\mu$TCA could be used in neutrino experiments. We describe the design of an Advanced Mezzanine Board (AMC) including 32 ADC channels. This board receives 32 analogical channels at the front panel and sends the formatted data through the $\\mu$TCA backplane using a Gigabit Ethernet l...

  9. Effects of intermediate metabolite carboxylic acids of TCA cycle on Microcystis with overproduction of phycocyanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Shijie; Dai, Jingcheng; Xia, Ming; Ruan, Jing; Wei, Hehong; Yu, Dianzhen; Li, Ronghui; Jing, Hongmei; Tian, Chunyuan; Song, Lirong; Qiu, Dongru

    2015-04-01

    Toxic Microcystis species are the main bloom-forming cyanobacteria in freshwaters. It is imperative to develop efficient techniques to control these notorious harmful algal blooms (HABs). Here, we present a simple, efficient, and environmentally safe algicidal way to control Microcystis blooms, by using intermediate carboxylic acids from the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. The citric acid, alpha-ketoglutaric acid, succinic acid, fumaric acid, and malic acid all exhibited strong algicidal effects, and particularly succinic acid could cause the rapid lysis of Microcystis in a few hours. It is revealed that the Microcystis-lysing activity of succinic acid and other carboxylic acids was due to their strong acidic activity. Interestingly, the acid-lysed Microcystis cells released large amounts of phycocyanin, about 27-fold higher than those of the control. On the other hand, the transcription of mcyA and mcyD of the microcystin biosynthesis operon was not upregulated by addition of alpha-ketoglutaric acid and other carboxylic acids. Consider the environmental safety of intermediate carboxylic acids. We propose that administration of TCA cycle organic acids may not only provide an algicidal method with high efficiency and environmental safety but also serve as an applicable way to produce and extract phycocyanin from cyanobacterial biomass.

  10. Vol.27 - MicroTCA based Platform for advanced particle accelerators diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Juszczyk, Bartłomiej

    2014-01-01

    All over the world there are many research centers that are conducting researches with use of particle accelerators. Thanks to various experiments we could better understand surrounding world. But, there are still a lot of unknowns to explore which science needs better instruments. One of these tools are measurement systems. Unfortunately currently used solutions do not provide sufficient performance to satisfy growing needs. This implies the search for new solutions. One of such solution is a modern uTCA architecture. In this document an open source project of a base card (AFC -AMC to FMC carrier board) based on this standard has been described. This card is equipped with two FMC connectors, which allow to connect wide variety of extension cards. In combination with a powerful FPGA device this card is an universal base circuit for variety of projects. Among the others it allows to implement algorithms which are collecting data from fast ADCs and to process these data. Moreover the applied uTCA architecture p...

  11. Is reduced benthic flux related to the Diporeia decline? Analysis of spring blooms and whiting events in Lake Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, James M.; Rudstam, Lars G.; Crabtree, Darran L.; Walsh, Maureen

    2013-01-01

    Benthic monitoring by USGS off the southern shore of Lake Ontario from October 1993 to October 1995 provides a detailed view of the early stages of the decline of the native amphipod Diporeia. A loss of the 1994 and 1995 year classes of Diporeia preceded the disappearance of the native amphipod at sites near Oswego and Rochester at depths from 55 to 130 m. In succeeding years, Diporeia populations continued to decline in Lake Ontario and were nearly extirpated by 2008. Explanations for Diporeia 's decline in the Great Lakes include several hypotheses often linked to the introduction and expansion of exotic zebra and quagga mussels (Dreissena sp.). We compare the timeline of the Diporeia decline in Lake Ontario with trends in two sources of organic matter to the sediments — spring diatom blooms and late summer whiting events. The 1994–95 decline of Diporeia coincided with localized dreissenid effects on phytoplankton in the nearshore and a year (April 1994 to May 1995) of decreased flux of organic carbon recorded by sediment traps moored offshore of Oswego. Later declines of profundal (> 90 m) Diporeia populations in 2003 were poorly associated with trends in spring algal blooms and late summer whiting events. Lake Ontario/Diporeia/Dreissena/remote sensing.

  12. Glutamate availability is important in intramuscular amino acid metabolism and TCA cycle intermediates but does not affect peak oxidative metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mourtzakis, M.; Graham, T.E.; Gonzalez-Alonso, J.;

    2008-01-01

    Muscle glutamate is central to reactions producing 2-oxoglutarate, a tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediate that essentially expands the TCA cycle intermediate pool during exercise. Paradoxically, muscle glutamate drops approximately 40-80% with the onset of exercise and 2-oxoglutarate...... declines in early exercise. To investigate the physiological relationship between glutamate, oxidative metabolism, and TCA cycle intermediates (i.e., fumarate, malate, 2-oxoglutarate), healthy subjects trained (T) the quadriceps of one thigh on the single-legged knee extensor ergometer (1 h/day at 70......% maximum workload for 5 days/wk), while their contralateral quadriceps remained untrained (UT). After 5 wk of training, peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak) in the T thigh was greater than that in the UT thigh (Pglutamate infusion. Peak...

  13. TCA/丙酮沉淀法对尿液标本中微量蛋白效果分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨左钱

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the TCA / acetone precipitation method for detection of trace protein in urine specimens effects. Methods: 150 patients with urine specimens were randomly divided into group A, group B and group C, respectively, the line TCA / acetone precipitation, CAN / TFA precipitation, acetone precipitation assay. Results: The three groups protein recovery and the resulting protein spots mean comparison: TCA / acetone precipitation was highest, acetone precipitation was the lowest among the three groups were pairwise comparison shows, TCA / acetone precipitation and CAN / TFA precipitation , TCA / acetone precipitation and acetone precipitation, between CAN / TFA precipitation with acetone precipitation method group differences were statistical y significant. Conclusion: TCA / acetone precipitation method for detecting trace protein in urine specimens sensitivity, high accuracy.%目的:探讨TCA/丙酮沉淀法对尿液标本中微量蛋白检出的效果。方法:患者尿液标本150份随机均分为A组、B组和C组,分别行TCA/丙酮沉淀法、CAN/TFA沉淀法、丙酮沉淀法检测。结果:三组间蛋白回收率和所得蛋白点数均值比较:TCA/丙酮沉淀法组最高,丙酮沉淀法组最低,三组间均数两两比较显示,TCA/丙酮沉淀法与CAN/TFA沉淀法、TCA/丙酮沉淀法与丙酮沉淀法、CAN/TFA沉淀法与丙酮沉淀法组间差异均有统计学意义。结论:TCA/丙酮沉淀法对尿液标本中微量蛋白检测敏感性强,准确性高。

  14. Metabolic flux analysis of CHO cells at growth and non-growth phases using isotopic tracers and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Woo Suk; Antoniewicz, Maciek R

    2011-09-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are the main platform for production of biotherapeutics in the biopharmaceutical industry. However, relatively little is known about the metabolism of CHO cells in cell culture. In this work, metabolism of CHO cells was studied at the growth phase and early stationary phase using isotopic tracers and mass spectrometry. CHO cells were grown in fed-batch culture over a period of six days. On days 2 and 4, [1,2-(13)C] glucose was introduced and the labeling of intracellular metabolites was measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) at 6, 12 and 24h following the introduction of tracer. Intracellular metabolic fluxes were quantified from measured extracellular rates and (13)C-labeling dynamics of intracellular metabolites using non-stationary (13)C-metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA). The flux results revealed significant rewiring of intracellular metabolic fluxes in the transition from growth to non-growth, including changes in energy metabolism, redox metabolism, oxidative pentose phosphate pathway and anaplerosis. At the exponential phase, CHO cell metabolism was characterized by a high flux of glycolysis from glucose to lactate, anaplerosis from pyruvate to oxaloacetate and from glutamate to α-ketoglutarate, and cataplerosis though malic enzyme. At the stationary phase, the flux map was characterized by a reduced flux of glycolysis, net lactate uptake, oxidative pentose phosphate pathway flux, and reduced rate of anaplerosis. The fluxes of pyruvate dehydrogenase and TCA cycle were similar at the exponential and stationary phase. The results presented here provide a solid foundation for future studies of CHO cell metabolism for applications such as cell line development and medium optimization for high-titer production of recombinant proteins.

  15. Mitochondrial TCA cycle intermediates regulate body fluid and acid-base balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peti-Peterdi, János

    2013-07-01

    Intrarenal control mechanisms play an important role in the maintenance of body fluid and electrolyte balance and pH homeostasis. Recent discoveries of new ion transport and regulatory pathways in the distal nephron and collecting duct system have helped to better our understanding of these critical kidney functions and identified new potential therapeutic targets and approaches. In this issue of the JCI, Tokonami et al. report on the function of an exciting new paracrine mediator, the mitochondrial the citric acid(TCA) cycle intermediate α-ketoglutarate (αKG), which via its OXGR1 receptor plays an unexpected, nontraditional role in the adaptive regulation of renal HCO(3⁻) secretion and salt reabsorption.

  16. Compression module for the BCM1F microTCA raw data readout

    CERN Document Server

    Dostanic, Milica

    2017-01-01

    BCM1F is a diamond based detector and one of the luminometers and background monitors operated by the BRIL group, part of the CMS experiment. BCM1F's front-end produces analog signals which are digitized in a new microTCA back-end. An FPGA in the back-end part takes care of signal processing and stores raw data. The raw data readout has been improved by implementing a data compression module in the firmware. This module has allowed storing larger amount of data in short time intervals. The module has been implemented in VHDL, using a zero suppression algorithm: only data above a defined threshold is stored into memory, while the samples around the base line are discarded. Thanks to metadata, describing the suppressed data, the shape of input signals and time information are preserved. Tests with simulations and a pulse generator showed good results and proved that the module can achieve large compression factor.

  17. A new MicroTCA-based waveform digitizer for the Muon g-2 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweigart, David A. [Cornell U.

    2016-12-15

    We present the design of a new $\\mu$TCA-based waveform digitizer, which will be deployed in the Muon g-2 experiment at Fermilab and will allow our pileup identification requirement to be met. This digitizer features five independent channels, each with 12-bit, 800-MSPS digitization and a 1-Gbit memory buffer. The data storage and readout along with configuration are handled by six Xilinx Kintex-7 FPGAs. In addition, the digitizer is equipped with a mezzanine card for analog signal conditioning prior to digitization, further widening its range of possible applications. The performance results of this design are also presented, highlighting its $0.51 \\pm 0.13$ mV intrinsic noise level and $< 22$ ps intrinsic timing resolution between channels. We believe that its performance, together with its flexible design, could be of interest to future experiments in search of a cost-effective waveform digitizer.

  18. Mono-Heteromeric Configurations of Gap Junction Channels Formed by Connexin43 and Connexin45 Reduce Unitary Conductance and Determine both Voltage Gating and Metabolic Flux Asymmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqiang Zhong

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In cardiac tissues, the expression of multiple connexins (Cx40, Cx43, Cx45, and Cx30.2 is a requirement for proper development and function. Gap junctions formed by these connexins have distinct permeability and gating mechanisms. Since a single cell can express more than one connexin isoform, the formation of hetero-multimeric gap junction channels provides a tissue with an enormous repertoire of combinations to modulate intercellular communication. To study further the perm-selectivity and gating properties of channels containing Cx43 and Cx45, we studied two monoheteromeric combinations in which a HeLa cell co-transfected with Cx43 and Cx45 was paired with a cell expressing only one of these connexins. Macroscopic measurements of total conductance between cell pairs indicated a drastic reduction in total conductance for mono-heteromeric channels. In terms of Vj dependent gating, Cx43 homomeric connexons facing heteromeric connexons only responded weakly to voltage negativity. Cx45 homomeric connexons exhibited no change in Vj gating when facing heteromeric connexons. The distributions of unitary conductances (γj for both mono-heteromeric channels were smaller than predicted, and both showed low permeability to the fluorescent dyes Lucifer yellow and Rhodamine123. For both mono-heteromeric channels, we observed flux asymmetry regardless of dye charge: flux was higher in the direction of the heteromeric connexon for MhetCx45 and in the direction of the homomeric Cx43 connexon for MhetCx43. Thus, our data suggest that co-expression of Cx45 and Cx43 induces the formation of heteromeric connexons with greatly reduced permeability and unitary conductance. Furthermore, it increases the asymmetry for voltage gating for opposing connexons, and it favors asymmetric flux of molecules across the junction that depends primarily on the size (not the charge of the crossing molecules.

  19. The renormalization-group flux of the conformally reduced quantum gravity; Der Renormierungsgruppen-Fluss der konform-reduzierten Quantengravitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weyer, Holger

    2010-12-17

    We analyze the conceptual role of background independence in the application of the effective average action to quantum gravity. Insisting on a background independent nonperturbative renormalization group (RG) flow the coarse graining operation must be defined in terms of an unspecified variable metric since no rigid metric of a fixed background spacetime is available. This leads to an extra field dependence in the functional RG equation and a significantly different RG ow in comparison to the standard flow equation with a rigid metric in the mode cutoff. The background independent RG flow can possess a non-Gaussian fixed point, for instance, even though the corresponding standard one does not. We demonstrate the importance of this universal, essentially kinematical effect by computing the RG flow of Quantum Einstein Gravity (QEG) in the ''conformally reduced'' theory which discards all degrees of freedom contained in the metric except the conformal one. The conformally reduced Einstein-Hilbert approximation has exactly the same qualitative properties as in the full Einstein-Hilbert truncation. In particular it possesses the non-Gaussian fixed point which is necessary for asymptotic safety. Without the extra field dependence the resulting RG flow is that of a simple {phi}{sup 4}-theory. We employ the Local Potential Approximation for the conformal factor to generalize the RG flow on an infinite dimensional theory space. Again we find a Gaussian as well as a non-Gaussian fixed point which provides further evidence for the viability of the asymptotic safety scenario. The analog of the invariant cubic in the curvature which spoils perturbative renormalizability is seen to be unproblematic for the asymptotic safety of the conformally reduced theory. The scaling fields and dimensions of both fixed points are obtained explicitly and possible implications for the predictivity of the theory are discussed. Since the RG flow depends on the topology of the

  20. An innovative method to reduce count loss from pulse pile-up in a photon-counting pixel for high flux X-ray applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D.; Lim, K.; Park, K.; Lee, C.; Alexander, S.; Cho, G.

    2017-03-01

    In this study, an innovative fast X-ray photon-counting pixel for high X-ray flux applications is proposed. A computed tomography system typically uses X-ray fluxes up to 108 photons/mm2/sec at the detector and thus a fast read-out is required in order to process individual X-ray photons. Otherwise, pulse pile-up can occur at the output of the signal processing unit. These superimposed signals can distort the number of incident X-ray photons leading to count loss. To minimize such losses, a cross detection method was implemented in the photon-counting pixel. A maximum count rate under X-ray tube voltage of 90 kV was acquired which reflect electrical test results of the proposed photon counting pixel. A maximum count of 780 kcps was achieved with a conventional photon-counting pixel at the pulse processing time of 500 ns, which is the time for a pulse to return to the baseline from the initial rise. In contrast, the maximum count of about 8.1 Mcps was achieved with the proposed photon-counting pixel. From these results, it was clear that the maximum count rate was increased by approximately a factor 10 times by adopting the cross detection method. Therefore, it is an innovative method to reduce count loss from pulse pile-up in a photon-counting pixel while maintaining the pulse processing time.

  1. Extraction-less, rapid assay for the direct detection of 2,4,6-trichloroanisole (TCA) in cork samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolou, Theofylaktos; Pascual, Nuria; Marco, M-Pilar; Moschos, Anastassios; Petropoulos, Anastassios; Kaltsas, Grigoris; Kintzios, Spyridon

    2014-07-01

    2,4,6-trichloroanisole (TCA), the cork taint molecule, has been the target of several analytical approaches over the few past years. In spite of the development of highly efficient and sensitive tools for its detection, ranging from advanced chromatography to biosensor-based techniques, a practical breakthrough for routine cork screening purposes has not yet been realized, in part due to the requirement of a lengthy extraction of TCA in organic solvents, mostly 12% ethanol and the high detectability required. In the present report, we present a modification of a previously reported biosensor system based on the measurement of the electric response of cultured fibroblast cells membrane-engineered with the pAb78 TCA-specific antibody. Samples were prepared by macerating cork tissue and mixing it directly with the cellular biorecognition elements, without any intervening extraction process. By using this novel approach, we were able to detect TCA in just five minutes at extremely low concentrations (down to 0.2 ppt). The novel biosensor offers a number of practical benefits, including a very considerable reduction in the total assay time by one day, and a full portability, enabling its direct employment for on-site, high throughput screening of cork in the field and production facilities, without requiring any type of supporting infrastructure.

  2. Enzymatic mechanism of oxalate production in the TCA and glyoxylate pathways using various isolates of Antrodia radiculosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    K.M. Jenkins; S.V. Diehl; C.A. Clausen; F. Green

    2011-01-01

    Brown-rot fungi produce oxalate in large amounts; however, levels of accumulation and function vary by species. Copper-tolerant fungi, like Antrodia radiculosa, produce and accumulate high levels of oxalate in response to copper. Oxalate biosynthesis in copper-tolerant fungi has been linked to the glyoxylate and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycles. Within these two cycles...

  3. Impacts of reduced wind speed on physiology and ecosystem carbon flux of a semi-arid steppe ecosystem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DongYan Jin; Qiong Gao; YaLin Wang; Li Xu

    2014-01-01

    Decreasing wind speed is one aspect of global climate change as well as global warming, and has become a new research orientation in recent decades. The decrease is especially evident in places with frequent perennially high wind speeds. We simulated decreased wind speed by using a steel-sheet wind shield in a temperate grassland in Inner Mongolia to examine the changes in physical environmental variables, as well as their impacts on the photosynthesis of grass leaves and net ecosystem exchange (NEE). We then used models to calculate the variation of boundary layer conductance (BLC) and its impact on leaf photosynthesis, and this allowed us to separate the direct effects of wind speed reduction on leaf photo-synthesis (BLC) from the indirect ones (via soil moisture balance). The results showed that reduced wind speed primarily resulted in higher moisture and temperature in soil, and indirectly affected net assimilation and water use efficiency of the prevalent bunch grass Stipa krylovii. Moreover, the wind-sheltered plant community had a stronger ability to sequester carbon than did the wind-exposed community during the growing season.

  4. Oxygen flux reduces Cux1 positive neurons and cortical growth in a gestational rodent model of growth restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Elaine; Wade, Jean; Georgala, Petrina A; Gillespie, Trudi L; Price, David J; Pilley, Elizabeth; Becher, Julie-Clare

    2017-03-01

    The mammalian cerebral cortex forms in an inside-out manner, establishing deep cortical layers before superficial layers and is regulated by transcription factors which influence cell differentiation. Preterm birth interrupts the trajectory of normal neurodevelopment and adverse perinatal exposures have been implicated in cortical injury. We hypothesise that growth restriction (GR) and fluctuating hyperoxia (ΔO2) impair cortical laminar development. Sprague-Dawley rats received 18% (non-restricted, NR) or 9% (growth restricted, GR) protein diet from E15-P7. Litters were reared in air or fluctuating hyperoxia (circa 10kPa) from P0 to P7. Cortical laminae were stained and measured. Neuronal subtypes were quantified using immunofluorescence for subtype-specific transcription factors (Satb2, Cux1, Ctip2, Tbr1). ΔO2 did not affect brain weight at P7 but reduced cortical thickness in both NR (pdevelopment in a rodent model with preferential disadvantage to superficial neurons. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Flux balance analysis reveals acetate metabolism modulates cyclic electron flow and alternative glycolytic pathways in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Stephen P; Paget, Caroline M; Johnson, Giles N; Schwartz, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Cells of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cultured in the presence of acetate perform mixotrophic growth, involving both photosynthesis and organic carbon assimilation. Under such conditions, cells exhibit a reduced capacity for photosynthesis but a higher growth rate, compared to phototrophic cultures. Better understanding of the down regulation of photosynthesis would enable more efficient conversion of carbon into valuable products like biofuels. In this study, Flux Balance Analysis (FBA) and Flux Variability Analysis (FVA) have been used with a genome scale model of C. reinhardtii to examine changes in intracellular flux distribution in order to explain their changing physiology. Additionally, a reaction essentiality analysis was performed to identify which reaction subsets are essential for a given growth condition. Our results suggest that exogenous acetate feeds into a modified tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, which bypasses the CO2 evolution steps, explaining increases in biomass, consistent with experimental data. In addition, reactions of the oxidative pentose phosphate and glycolysis pathways, inactive under phototrophic conditions, show substantial flux under mixotrophic conditions. Importantly, acetate addition leads to an increased flux through cyclic electron flow (CEF), but results in a repression of CO2 fixation via Rubisco, explaining the down regulation of photosynthesis. However, although CEF enhances growth on acetate, it is not essential-impairment of CEF results in alternative metabolic pathways being increased. We have demonstrated how the reactions of photosynthesis interconnect with carbon metabolism on a global scale, and how systems approaches play a viable tool in understanding complex relationships at the scale of the organism.

  6. Mussel-Inspired Architecture of High-Flux Loose Nanofiltration Membrane Functionalized with Antibacterial Reduced Graphene Oxide-Copper Nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Junyong; Wang, Jing; Uliana, Adam Andrew; Tian, Miaomiao; Zhang, Yiming; Zhang, Yatao; Volodin, Alexander; Simoens, Kenneth; Yuan, Shushan; Li, Jian; Lin, Jiuyang; Bernaerts, Kristel; Van der Bruggen, Bart

    2017-08-30

    Graphene-based nanocomposites have a vast potential for wide-ranging antibacterial applications due to the inherently strong biocidal activity and versatile compatibility of such nanocomposites. Therefore, graphene-based functional nanomaterials can introduce enhanced antibiofouling and antimicrobial properties to polymeric membrane surfaces. In this study, reduced graphene oxide-copper (rGOC) nanocomposites were synthesized as newly robust biocides via in situ reduction. Inspired by the emerging method of bridging ultrafiltration membrane surface cavities, loose nanofiltration (NF) membranes were designed using a rapid (2 h) bioinspired strategy in which rGOC nanocomposites were firmly codeposited with polydopamine (PDA) onto an ultrafiltration support. A series of analyses (SEM, EDS, XRD, XPS, TEM, and AFM) confirmed the successful synthesis of the rGO-Cu nanocomposites. The secure loading of rGOC composites onto the membrane surfaces was also confirmed by SEM and AFM images. Water contact angle results display a high surface hydrophilicity of the modified membranes. The PDA-rGOC functionalization layer facilitated a high water permeability (22.8 L m(-2) h(-1) bar(-1)). The PDA-rGOC modification additionally furnished the membrane with superior separation properties advantageous for various NF applications such as dye purification or desalination, as ultrahigh (99.4% for 0.5 g L(-1) reactive blue 2) dye retention and high salt permeation (7.4% for 1.0 g L(-1) Na2SO4, 2.5% for 1.0 g L(-1) NaCl) was achieved by the PDA-rGOC-modified membranes. Furthermore, after 3 h of contact with Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria, the rGOC-functionalized membranes exhibited a strong antibacterial performance with a 97.9% reduction in the number of live E. coli. This study highlights the use of rGOC composites for devising loose NF membranes with strong antibacterial and separation performance.

  7. Inhibitory effect of celecoxib combined with cisplatin on growth of human tongue squamous carcinoma Tca8113 cell xenograft tumor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weizhong Li; Xiaoyan Wang; Zuguo Li; Yanqing Ding

    2010-01-01

    Objective:The aim of this study was to observe the inhibitory effect of application of COX-2 inhibitor,celecoxib,combined with cisplatin on the growth of human tongue squamous carcinoma Tca8113 cell xenograft by animal experiment.Methods:The nude mice were transplanted subcutaneously with Tca 8113 cells,and then were administrated with celecoxib,cisplatin or celecoxib combined with cisplatin respectively,and were sacrificed after 35 days.The weight of xenograft was measured to calculate the tumor inhibition rate.The histological change was studied under light and electron microscope.The COX-2 protein expression was observed by immunohistological staining.And the COX-2 mRNA expression was determined by RT-PCR.Results:Celecoxib,the COX-2 inhibitor,could not only inhibit the growth of Tca8113 cell xenograft tumor and COX-2 protein expression,but also enhance the inhibitory effect cisplatin on xenograft tumor growth significantly.The tumor inhibition rates of celecoxib group,cisplatin group and celecoxib plus cisplatin group were 15.63%,37.50% and 82.81%respectively that was statistically significant compared to control group(P < 0.01).The combined application of celecoxib and dsplatin could inhibit tumor growth more significantly than that of separated application(P < 0.01).The inhibitory effect of celecoxib on COX-2 mRNA expression of Tca 8113 cell was weaker and not significant(P= 0.073).Conclusion:Celecoxib can not only inhibit xenograft tumor growth in nude mice,but also enhance the inhibitory effect of CDDP on Tca 8113 trans planted tumor growth in nude mice.The mechanism maybe related to inhibition of COX-2 protein expression,which offers beneficial reference to further explore the mechanism between inhibition of COX-2 enzyme activity and prevention of head and neck tumor.

  8. Coordination polymers of Fe(iii) and Al(iii) ions with TCA ligand: distinctive fluorescence, CO2 uptake, redox-activity and oxygen evolution reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhara, Barun; Sappati, Subrahmanyam; Singh, Santosh K; Kurungot, Sreekumar; Ghosh, Prasenjit; Ballav, Nirmalya

    2016-04-28

    Fe and Al belong to different groups in the periodic table, one from the p-block and the other from the d-block. In spite of their different groups, they have the similarity of exhibiting a stable 3+ oxidation state. Here we have prepared Fe(iii) and Al(iii) based coordination polymers in the form of metal-organic gels with the 4,4',4''-tricarboxyltriphenylamine (TCA) ligand, namely Fe-TCA and Al-TCA, and evaluated some important physicochemical properties. Specifically, the electrical conductivity, redox-activity, porosity, and electrocatalytic activity (oxygen evolution reaction) of the Fe-TCA system were noted to be remarkably higher than those of the Al-TCA system. As for the photophysical properties, almost complete quenching of the fluorescence originating from TCA was observed in case of the Fe-TCA system, whereas for the Al-TCA system a significant retention of fluorescence with red-shifted emission was observed. Quantum mechanical calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) were performed to unravel the origin of such discriminative behaviour of these coordination polymer systems.

  9. Optimal Design of an Axial-Flux Permanent-Magnet Middle Motor Integrated in a Cycloidal Reducer for a Pedal Electric Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yee-Pien Yang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an optimal design of a middle motor integrated into a mid-drive unit for pedal electric cycles. This middle motor is an axial-flux permanent magnet brushless DC motor with a stator plate. Facing this plate is a rotor plate that acts as an eccentric component of a cycloidal reducer next to the stator. Both the middle motor and cycloidal reducer are easily installed on the same axle of the bike crankset. In the preliminary design, driving requirements are used to make the middle motor specifications. The numbers of stator slots and magnet poles on the rotor were chosen to achieve the best winding factor, and the winding layout was determined accordingly. A one-dimensional magnetic circuit model of the middle motor was built, and its shape was optimized utilizing a multifunctional optimization system tool. Finally, the resulting design was verified and refined by a finite element analysis. A prototype of the middle motor was fabricated with a stator made of a soft magnetic composite and integrated with a cycloidal reducer. Experimental results show that the motor has a sinusoidal back electromotive force. Additionally, it is easily controlled by sinusoidal currents with acceptable torque and speed curves.

  10. FMC-based Neutron and Gamma Radiation Monitoring Module for xTCA Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kozak, T; Napieralski, A

    2012-01-01

    The machines used in High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments, such as accelerators or tokamaks, are sources of gamma and neutron radiation fields. The radiation has a negative influence on electronics and can lead to the incorrect functioning of complex control and diagnostic system designed for HEP machines. Therefore, in most cases the electronic equipments is installed in radiation-safe areas, but in some cases this rule is omitted to decrease costs of the project. The European X-ray Free Electron Laser (E-XFEL), being under construction at DESY research center, is a good example. The E-XFEL uses single tunnel and part of the electronic system will be installed next to main beam pipe and exposed to radiation. The modern Advanced/Micro Telecommunications Computing Architecture (ATCA/μTCA) standards are foreseen as a base for control and diagnostic system for this new project. These flexible standards provide high reliability, availability and usability for the system which can be decreased by negative influe...

  11. The CMS Fast Beams Condition Monitor Backend Electronics based on MicroTCA technology

    CERN Document Server

    Zagozdzinska, Agnieszka Anna

    2015-01-01

    The Fast Beams Condition Monitor (BCM1F), upgraded for LHC Run II, is one sub-system of the Beam Radiation Instrumentation and Luminosity Project of the CMS experiment. It is based on 24 single crystal CVD diamond sensors. Each sensor is metallised with two pads, being read out by a dedicated fast frontend chip produced in 130 nm CMOS technology. Signals for real time monitoring are processed by custom-made back-end electronics to measure separately rates corresponding to LHC collision products, machine induced background and residual activation exploiting different arrival times. The system is built in MicroTCA technology and uses high speed analog-to-digital converters. The data processing module designed for the FPGA allows a distinguishing of collision and machine induced background, both synchronous to the LHC clock, from the residual activation products. In operational modes of high rates, consecutive events, spaced in time by less than 12.5 ns, may partially overlap. Hence, novel signal processing tec...

  12. Engineering rTCA pathway and C4-dicarboxylate transporter for L-malic acid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiulai; Wang, Yuancai; Dong, Xiaoxiang; Hu, Guipeng; Liu, Liming

    2017-05-01

    L-Malic acid is an important component of a vast array of food additives, antioxidants, disincrustants, pharmaceuticals, and cosmetics. Here, we presented a pathway optimization strategy and a transporter modification approach to reconstruct the L-malic acid biosynthesis pathway and transport system, respectively. First, pyruvate carboxylase (pyc) and malate dehydrogenase (mdh) from Aspergillus flavus and Rhizopus oryzae were combinatorially overexpressed to construct the reductive tricarboxylic acid (rTCA) pathway for L-malic acid biosynthesis. Second, the L-malic acid transporter (Spmae) from Schizosaccharomyces pombe was engineered by removing the ubiquitination motification to enhance the L-malic acid efflux system. Finally, the L-malic acid pathway was optimized by controlling gene expression levels, and the final L-malic acid concentration, yield, and productivity were up to 30.25 g L(-1), 0.30 g g(-1), and 0.32 g L(-1) h(-1) in the resulting strain W4209 with CaCO3 as a neutralizing agent, respectively. In addition, these corresponding parameters of pyruvic acid remained at 30.75 g L(-1), 0.31 g g(-1), and 0.32 g L(-1) h(-1), respectively. The metabolic engineering strategy used here will be useful for efficient production of L-malic acid and other chemicals.

  13. Reduced graphene oxide-NH2 modified low pressure nanofiltration composite hollow fiber membranes with improved water flux and antifouling capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xipeng; Zhao, Changwei; Yang, Mei; Yang, Bin; Hou, Deyin; Wang, Tao

    2017-10-01

    Reduced graphene oxide-NH2 (R-GO-NH2), a kind of amino graphene oxide, was embedded into the polyamide (PA) layer of nanofiltration (NF) composite hollow fiber membranes via interfacial polymerization to enhance the permeate flux and antifouling properties of NF membranes under low pressure conditions. In addition, it could mitigate the poor compatibility issue between graphene oxide materials and PA layer. To evaluate the influence of R-GO-NH2 on the performance of the NF composite hollow fiber membrane, SEM, AFM, FTIR, XPS and Zeta potentials were used to characterize the membranes. The results indicated that the compatibility and interactions between R-GO-NH2 and PA layer were enhanced, which was mainly due to the polymerization reaction between amino groups of R-GO-NH2 and acyl chloride groups of TMC. Therefore, salts rejection of the current membranes was improved significantly, and the modified membranes with 50 mg/L R-GO-NH2 demonstrated highest performance in terms of the rejections, which were 26.9%, 98.5%, 98.1%, and 96.1%, for NaCl, Na2SO4, MgSO4, and CaCl2 respectively. It was found that with the R-GO-NH2 contents rasing from 0 to 50 mg/L, pure water flux increased from 30.44 ± 1.71 to 38.57 ± 2.01 L/(m2.h) at 2 bar. What's more, the membrane demonstrated improved antifouling properties.

  14. Disrupted cell cycle arrest and reduced proliferation in corneal fibroblasts from GCD2 patients: A potential role for altered autophagy flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Seung-il; Dadakhujaev, Shorafidinkhuja; Maeng, Yong-Sun; Ahn, So-yeon; Kim, Tae-im [Department of Ophthalmology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Corneal Dystrophy Research Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eung Kweon, E-mail: eungkkim@yuhs.ac [Department of Ophthalmology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Corneal Dystrophy Research Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); BK21 Plus Project for Medical Science and Severance Biomedical Science Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • Reduced cell proliferation in granular corneal dystrophy type 2. • Abnormal cell cycle arrest by defective autophagy. • Decreased Cyclin A1, B1, and D1 in Atg7 gene knockout cells. • Increase in p16 and p27 expressions were observed in Atg7 gene knockout cells. - Abstract: This study investigates the role of impaired proliferation, altered cell cycle arrest, and defective autophagy flux of corneal fibroblasts in granular corneal dystrophy type 2 (GCD2) pathogenesis. The proliferation rates of homozygous (HO) GCD2 corneal fibroblasts at 72 h, 96 h, and 120 h were significantly lower (1.102 ± 0.027, 1.397 ± 0.039, and 1.527 ± 0.056, respectively) than those observed for the wild-type (WT) controls (1.441 ± 0.029, 1.758 ± 0.043, and 2.003 ± 0.046, respectively). Flow cytometry indicated a decreased G{sub 1} cell cycle progression and the accumulation of cells in the S and G{sub 2}/M phases in GCD2 cells. These accumulations were associated with decreased levels of Cyclin A1, B1, and E1, and increased expression of p16 and p27. p21 and p53 expression was also significantly lower in GCD2 cells compared to the WT. Interestingly, treatment with the autophagy flux inhibitor, bafilomycin A{sub 1}, resulted in similarly decreased Cyclin A1, B1, D1, and p53 expression in WT fibroblasts. Furthermore, similar findings, including a decrease in Cyclin A1, B1, and D1 and an increase in p16 and p27 expression were observed in autophagy-related 7 (Atg7; known to be essential for autophagy) gene knockout cells. These data provide new insight concerning the role of autophagy in cell cycle arrest and cellular proliferation, uncovering a number of novel therapeutic possibilities for GCD2 treatment.

  15. Construction of the recombinant vector carrying herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase and cytokine genes expressed in cell line Tca8113

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Guang-hui; ZOU Jing-zhi; QU Le; YUE Ying; KUAI Jian-ke

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To construct expression vector containing fusion genes of herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase(Hsv-tk), Interleukin-2(IL-2) with internal ribosome entry sites(IRES), and to assess their expression in cell lineTca8113. Methods: IL-2 cDNA was obtained by reverse transcription. Hsv-tk, IL-2 and IRES genes were amplified by PCR. The purified amplification products were inserted into pGEM-T-Easy, and transformed into E. coli JM109. The purified recombinant plasmids were identified by restriction endonucleases. The recombinant plasmids were digested and pEGFPN3 were linearized, DNA fragments of Hsv-tk, IRES and IL-2 were ligated into linearized pEGFP-N3, and then transferred into E. coli JM109. The recombinant tk-IL-2 genes were cloned separately and introduced into the expression vector pEGFPN3 containing GFP. The recombinant vectors were identified by their restriction sites through PCR. The plasmids pEGFP-TI was also transfected into Tca8113 cells by calcium phosphate method for the expression of fusion proteins. Fusion genes expressing vector PL(TI)SN was generated by the fusion of HSV-tk, IRES and IL-2 with the use of DNA recombination technology. The recombinant retroviruses were transferred into Tca8113 cells by lipofectamine. The positive clones were obtained after G418 selection and named Tca/TI respectively. Results: The pEGFP-TI pasmid was identified respectively by restriction endonucleases, and their fragment sizes were 1 120 bp and 450 bp. The pEGFP-TI pasmid as templates were amplified respectively by PCR, and their PCR products were 1 120 bp and 450 bp. The pEGFP-TI vectors were used to transfect Tca8113 cell, and the cells with fluorescence accounted for 60 % of the total amount. Conclusion: pFGFP- tk- IRES- IL-2 expressing vector is easy to assess the expression of tk-IRES-IL-2-GFP fusion protein localization in transfected cells. The successful construction of expressing vector containing fusion genes of Hsv-tk, IRES and IL-2 may be

  16. Comparative Metabolic Flux Profiling of Melanoma Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, David A.; Richardson, Adam D.; Filipp, Fabian V.; Knutzen, Christine A.; Chiang, Gary G.; Ronai, Ze'ev A.; Osterman, Andrei L.; Smith, Jeffrey W.

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic rewiring is an established hallmark of cancer, but the details of this rewiring at a systems level are not well characterized. Here we acquire this insight in a melanoma cell line panel by tracking metabolic flux using isotopically labeled nutrients. Metabolic profiling and flux balance analysis were used to compare normal melanocytes to melanoma cell lines in both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. All melanoma cells exhibited the Warburg phenomenon; they used more glucose and produced more lactate than melanocytes. Other changes were observed in melanoma cells that are not described by the Warburg phenomenon. Hypoxic conditions increased fermentation of glucose to lactate in both melanocytes and melanoma cells (the Pasteur effect). However, metabolism was not strictly glycolytic, as the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle was functional in all melanoma lines, even under hypoxia. Furthermore, glutamine was also a key nutrient providing a substantial anaplerotic contribution to the TCA cycle. In the WM35 melanoma line glutamine was metabolized in the “reverse” (reductive) direction in the TCA cycle, particularly under hypoxia. This reverse flux allowed the melanoma cells to synthesize fatty acids from glutamine while glucose was primarily converted to lactate. Altogether, this study, which is the first comprehensive comparative analysis of metabolism in melanoma cells, provides a foundation for targeting metabolism for therapeutic benefit in melanoma. PMID:21998308

  17. Prompt atmospheric neutrino flux

    CERN Document Server

    Jeong, Yu Seon; Enberg, Rikard; Kim, C S; Reno, Mary Hall; Sarcevic, Ina; Stasto, Anna

    2016-01-01

    We evaluate the prompt atmospheric neutrino flux including nuclear correction and $B$ hadron contribution in the different frameworks: NLO perturbative QCD and dipole models. The nuclear effect is larger in the prompt neutrino flux than in the total charm production cross section, and it reduces the fluxes by $10\\% - 30\\%$ depending on the model. We also investigate the uncertainty using the QCD scales allowed by the charm cross section data from RHIC and LHC experiments.

  18. Synergizing metabolic flux analysis and nucleotide sugar metabolism to understand the control of glycosylation of recombinant protein in CHO cells

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burleigh, Susan C

    2011-10-18

    Abstract Background The glycosylation of recombinant proteins can be altered by a range of parameters including cellular metabolism, metabolic flux and the efficiency of the glycosylation process. We present an experimental set-up that allows determination of these key processes associated with the control of N-linked glycosylation of recombinant proteins. Results Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO) were cultivated in shake flasks at 0 mM glutamine and displayed a reduced growth rate, glucose metabolism and a slower decrease in pH, when compared to other glutamine-supplemented cultures. The N-linked glycosylation of recombinant human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG) was also altered under these conditions; the sialylation, fucosylation and antennarity decreased, while the proportion of neutral structures increased. A continuous culture set-up was subsequently used to understand the control of HCG glycosylation in the presence of varied glutamine concentrations; when glycolytic flux was reduced in the absence of glutamine, the glycosylation changes that were observed in shake flask culture were similarly detected. The intracellular content of UDP-GlcNAc was also reduced, which correlated with a decrease in sialylation and antennarity of the N-linked glycans attached to HCG. Conclusions The use of metabolic flux analysis illustrated a case of steady state multiplicity, where use of the same operating conditions at each steady state resulted in altered flux through glycolysis and the TCA cycle. This study clearly demonstrated that the control of glycoprotein microheterogeneity may be examined by use of a continuous culture system, metabolic flux analysis and assay of intracellular nucleotides. This system advances our knowledge of the relationship between metabolic flux and the glycosylation of biotherapeutics in CHO cells and will be of benefit to the bioprocessing industry.

  19. Synergizing metabolic flux analysis and nucleotide sugar metabolism to understand the control of glycosylation of recombinant protein in CHO cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudd Pauline M

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The glycosylation of recombinant proteins can be altered by a range of parameters including cellular metabolism, metabolic flux and the efficiency of the glycosylation process. We present an experimental set-up that allows determination of these key processes associated with the control of N-linked glycosylation of recombinant proteins. Results Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO were cultivated in shake flasks at 0 mM glutamine and displayed a reduced growth rate, glucose metabolism and a slower decrease in pH, when compared to other glutamine-supplemented cultures. The N-linked glycosylation of recombinant human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG was also altered under these conditions; the sialylation, fucosylation and antennarity decreased, while the proportion of neutral structures increased. A continuous culture set-up was subsequently used to understand the control of HCG glycosylation in the presence of varied glutamine concentrations; when glycolytic flux was reduced in the absence of glutamine, the glycosylation changes that were observed in shake flask culture were similarly detected. The intracellular content of UDP-GlcNAc was also reduced, which correlated with a decrease in sialylation and antennarity of the N-linked glycans attached to HCG. Conclusions The use of metabolic flux analysis illustrated a case of steady state multiplicity, where use of the same operating conditions at each steady state resulted in altered flux through glycolysis and the TCA cycle. This study clearly demonstrated that the control of glycoprotein microheterogeneity may be examined by use of a continuous culture system, metabolic flux analysis and assay of intracellular nucleotides. This system advances our knowledge of the relationship between metabolic flux and the glycosylation of biotherapeutics in CHO cells and will be of benefit to the bioprocessing industry.

  20. Effectiveness of Haemodiafiltration with Heat Sterilized High-Flux Polyphenylene HF Dialyzer in Reducing Free Light Chains in Patients with Myeloma Cast Nephropathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Rousseau-Gagnon

    Full Text Available In cases of myeloma cast nephropathy in need of haemodialysis (HD, reduction of free light chains using HD with High-Cut-Off filters (HCO-HD, in combination with chemotherapy, may be associated with better renal recovery. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the effectiveness of haemodiafiltration (HDF in reducing free light chain levels using a less expensive heat sterilized high-flux polyphenylene HF dialyzer (HF-HDF.In a single-centre prospective cohort study, 327 dialysis sessions were performed using a 2.2 m2 heat sterilized high-flux polyphenylene HF dialyzer (Phylther HF22SD, a small (1.1m2 or large (2.1 m2 high-cut-off (HCO dialyzer (HCOS and HCOL in a cohort of 16 patients presenting with dialysis-dependent acute cast nephropathy and elevated free light chains (10 kappa, 6 lambda. The outcomes of the study were the mean reduction ratio (RR of kappa and lambda, the proportion of treatments with an RR of at least 0.65, albumin loss and the description of patient outcomes. Statistical analysis was performed using linear and logistic regression through generalized estimating equation analysis so as to take into account repeated observation within subjects and adjust for session duration.There were no significant differences in the estimated marginal mean of kappa RR, which were respectively 0.67, 0.69 and 0.70 with HCOL-HD, HCOS-HDF and HF-HDF (P = 0.950. The estimated marginal mean of the proportions of treatments with a kappa RR ≥0.65 were 68%, 63% and 71% with HCOL-HD, HCOS-HDF and HF-HDF, respectively (P = 0.913. The estimated marginal mean of lambda RR were higher with HCOL-HDF (0.78, compared to HCOL-HD and HF-HDF (0.62, and 0.61 respectively. The estimated marginal mean proportion of treatments with a lambda RR ≥0.65 were higher with HCOL-HDF (81%, compared to 57% in HF-HDF (P = 0.042. The median albumin loss were 7, 21 and 63 g/session with HF-HDF, HCOL-HD and HCOL-HDF respectively (P = 0.044. Among survivors, 9 out of 10

  1. The Flux-Flux Correlation Function for Anharmonic Barriers

    CERN Document Server

    Goussev, Arseni; Waalkens, Holger; Wiggins, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    The flux-flux correlation function formalism is a standard and widely used approach for the computation of reaction rates. In this paper we introduce a method to compute the classical and quantum flux-flux correlation functions for anharmonic barriers essentially analytically through the use of the classical and quantum normal forms. In the quantum case we show that the quantum normal form reduces the computation of the flux-flux correlation function to that of an effective one dimensional anharmonic barrier. The example of the computation of the quantum flux-flux correlation function for a fourth order anharmonic barrier is worked out in detail, and we present an analytical expression for the quantum mechanical microcanonical flux-flux correlation function. We then give a discussion of the short-time and harmonic limits.

  2. Oxygen dependence of metabolic fluxes and energy generation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae CEN.PK113-1A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiebe Marilyn

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is able to adjust to external oxygen availability by utilizing both respirative and fermentative metabolic modes. Adjusting the metabolic mode involves alteration of the intracellular metabolic fluxes that are determined by the cell's multilevel regulatory network. Oxygen is a major determinant of the physiology of S. cerevisiae but understanding of the oxygen dependence of intracellular flux distributions is still scarce. Results Metabolic flux distributions of S. cerevisiae CEN.PK113-1A growing in glucose-limited chemostat cultures at a dilution rate of 0.1 h-1 with 20.9%, 2.8%, 1.0%, 0.5% or 0.0% O2 in the inlet gas were quantified by 13C-MFA. Metabolic flux ratios from fractional [U-13C]glucose labelling experiments were used to solve the underdetermined MFA system of central carbon metabolism of S. cerevisiae. While ethanol production was observed already in 2.8% oxygen, only minor differences in the flux distribution were observed, compared to fully aerobic conditions. However, in 1.0% and 0.5% oxygen the respiratory rate was severely restricted, resulting in progressively reduced fluxes through the TCA cycle and the direction of major fluxes to the fermentative pathway. A redistribution of fluxes was observed in all branching points of central carbon metabolism. Yet only when oxygen provision was reduced to 0.5%, was the biomass yield exceeded by the yields of ethanol and CO2. Respirative ATP generation provided 59% of the ATP demand in fully aerobic conditions and still a substantial 25% in 0.5% oxygenation. An extensive redistribution of fluxes was observed in anaerobic conditions compared to all the aerobic conditions. Positive correlation between the transcriptional levels of metabolic enzymes and the corresponding fluxes in the different oxygenation conditions was found only in the respirative pathway. Conclusion 13C-constrained MFA enabled quantitative determination of

  3. Water-saving ground cover rice production system reduces net greenhouse gas fluxes in an annual rice-based cropping system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Yao

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available To safeguard food security and preserve precious water resources, the technology of water-saving ground cover rice production system (GCRPS is being increasingly adopted for the rice cultivation. However, changes in soil water status and temperature under GCRPS may affect soil biogeochemical processes that control the biosphere–atmosphere exchanges of methane (CH4, nitrous oxide (N2O and carbon dioxide (CO2. The overall goal of this study is to better understand how net ecosystem greenhouse gas exchanges (NEGE and grain yields are affected by GCRPS in an annual rice-based cropping system. Our evaluation was based on measurements of the CH4 and N2O fluxes and soil heterotrophic respiration (CO2 emission over a complete year, as well as the estimated soil carbon sequestration intensity for six different fertilizer treatments for conventional paddy and GCRPS. The fertilizer treatments included urea application and no N fertilization for both conventional paddy (CUN and CNN and GCRPS (GUN and GNN, solely chicken manure (GCM and combined urea and chicken manure applications (GUM for GCRPS. Averaging across all the fertilizer treatments, GCRPS increased annual N2O emission and grain yield by 40% and 9%, respectively, and decreased annual CH4 emission by 69%, while GCRPS did not affect soil CO2 emissions relative to the conventional paddy. The annual direct emission factors of N2O were 4.01, 0.087 and 0.50% for GUN, GCM and GUM, respectively, and 1.52% for the conventional paddy (CUN. The annual soil carbon sequestration intensity under GCRPS was estimated to be an average of −1.33 Mg C ha−1 yr−1, which is approximately 44% higher than the conventional paddy. The annual NEGE were 10.80–11.02 Mg CO2-eq ha−1 yr−1 for the conventional paddy and 3.05–9.37 Mg CO2-eq ha−1 yr−1 for the GCRPS, suggesting the potential feasibility of GCRPS in reducing net greenhouse effect from rice cultivation. Using organic fertilizers for GCRPS

  4. Greenhouse gas flux and crop productivity after 10 years of reduced and no tillage in a wheat-maize cropping system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Shenzhong; Wang, Yu; Ning, Tangyuan; Zhao, Hongxiang; Wang, Bingwen; Li, Na; Li, Zengjia; Chi, Shuyun

    2013-01-01

    Appropriate tillage plays an important role in mitigating the emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG) in regions with higher crop yields, but the emission situations of some reduced tillage systems such as subsoiling, harrow tillage and rotary tillage are not comprehensively studied. The objective of this study was to evaluate the emission characteristics of GHG (CH4 and N2O) under four reduced tillage systems from October 2007 to August 2009 based on a 10-yr tillage experiment in the North China Plain, which included no-tillage (NT) and three reduced tillage systems of subsoil tillage (ST), harrow tillage (HT) and rotary tillage (RT), with the conventional tillage (CT) as the control. The soil under the five tillage systems was an absorption sink for CH4 and an emission source for N2O. The soil temperature positive impacted on the CH4 absorption by the soils of different tillage systems, while a significant negative correlation was observed between the absorption and soil moisture. The main driving factor for increased N2O emission was not the soil temperature but the soil moisture and the content of nitrate. In the two rotation cycle of wheat-maize system (10/2007-10/2008 and 10/2008-10/2009), averaged cumulative uptake fluxes of CH4 under CT, ST, HT, RT and NT systems were approximately 1.67, 1.72, 1.63, 1.77 and 1.17 t ha(-1) year(-1), respectively, and meanwhile, approximately 4.43, 4.38, 4.47, 4.30 and 4.61 t ha(-1) year(-1) of N2O were emitted from soil of these systems, respectively. Moreover, they also gained 33.73, 34.63, 32.62, 34.56 and 27.54 t ha(-1) yields during two crop-rotation periods, respectively. Based on these comparisons, the rotary tillage and subsoiling mitigated the emissions of CH4 and N2O as well as improving crop productivity of a wheat-maize cropping system.

  5. Experimental warming in a dryland community reduced plant photosynthesis and soil CO2 efflux although the relationship between the fluxes remained unchanged

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertin, Timothy M.; Belnap, Jayne; Reed, Sasha C.

    2016-01-01

    1.Drylands represent our planet's largest terrestrial biome and, due to their extensive area, maintain large stocks of carbon (C). Accordingly, understanding how dryland C cycling will respond to climate change is imperative for accurately forecasting global C cycling and future climate. However, it remains difficult to predict how increased temperature will affect dryland C cycling, as substantial uncertainties surround the potential responses of the two main C fluxes: plant photosynthesis and soil CO2 efflux. In addition to a need for an improved understanding of climate effects on individual dryland C fluxes, there is also notable uncertainty regarding how climate change may influence the relationship between these fluxes.

  6. Parametric Flutter Analysis of the TCA Configuration and Recommendation for FFM Design and Scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Myles; Lenkey, Peter

    1997-01-01

    The current HSR Aeroelasticity plan to design, build, and test a full span, free flying transonic flutter model in the TDT has many technical obstacles that must be overcome for a successful program. One technical obstacle is the determination of a suitable configuration and point in the sky to use in setting the scaling point for the ASE models program. Determining this configuration and point in the sky requires balancing several conflicting requirements, including model buildability, tunnel test safety, and the ability of the model to represent the flutter mechanisms of interest. As will be discussed in detail in subsequent sections, the current TCA design exhibits several flutter mechanisms of interest. It has been decided that the ASE models program will focus on the low frequency symmetric flutter mechanism, and will make no attempt to investigate high frequency flutter mechanisms. There are several reasons for this choice. First, it is believed that the high frequency flutter mechanisms are similar in nature to classical wing bending/torsion flutter, and therefore there is more confidence that this mechanism can be predicted using current techniques. The low frequency mode, on the other hand, is a highly coupled mechanism involving wing, body, tail, and engine motion which may be very difficult to predict. Second, the high frequency flutter modes result in very small weight penalties (several hundred pounds), while suppression of the low frequency mechanism inside the flight envelope causes thousands of pounds to be added to the structure. In order to successfully test the low frequency flutter mode of interest, a suitable starting configuration and point in the sky must be identified. The configuration and point in the sky must result in a wind tunnel model that (1) represents the low-frequency wing/body/engine/empennage flutter mechanisms that are unique to HSCT configurations, (2) flutters at an acceptably low frequency in the tunnel, (3) flutters at an

  7. Relevancia de Factores de Riesgo, Psicopatología Alimentaria, Insatisfacción Corporal y Funcionamiento Psicológico en Pacientes con TCA

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anna Carretero García; Luís Sánchez Planell; Jordi Rusiñol Estragués; Rosa M.ª Raich Escursell; David Sánchez Carracedo

    2009-01-01

    Objetivo: El primer objetivo del estudio es evaluar restrospectivamente, la relevancia de factores de riesgo en pacientes con Trastorno de la Conducta Alimentaria (TCA) en función de la categoría diagnóstica...

  8. Flux-coupled genes and their use in metabolic flux analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Uk; Kim, Won Jun; Lee, Sang Yup

    2013-09-01

    As large volumes of omics data have become available, systems biology is playing increasingly important roles in elucidating new biological phenomena, especially through genome-scale metabolic network modeling and simulation. Much effort has been exerted on integrating omics data with metabolic flux simulation, but further development is necessary for more accurate flux estimation. To move one step forward, we adopted the concept of flux-coupled genes (FCGs), which show that their expression transition patterns upon perturbations are correlated with their corresponding flux values, as additional constraints in metabolic flux analysis. It was found that gnd, pfkB, rpe, sdhB, sdhD, sucA, and zwf genes, mostly associated with pentose phosphate pathway and TCA cycle, were the most consistent FCGs in Escherichia coli based on its transcriptome and (13) C-flux data obtained from the chemostat cultivation at five different dilution rates. Consequently, constraints-based flux analyses with FCGs as additional constraints were conducted for the seven single-gene knockout mutants, compared with those obtained without using FCGs. This strategy of constraining the metabolic flux analysis with FCGs is expected to be useful due to the relative ease in obtaining transcriptional information in the functional genomics era.

  9. Reduced uncertainty of regional scale CLM predictions of net carbon fluxes and leaf area indices with estimated plant-specific parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Hanna; Hendricks Franssen, Harrie-Jan; Han, Xujun; Baatz, Roland; Montzka, Carsten; Schmidt, Marius; Vereecken, Harry

    2016-04-01

    Reliable estimates of carbon fluxes and states at regional scales are required to reduce uncertainties in regional carbon balance estimates and to support decision making in environmental politics. In this work the Community Land Model version 4.5 (CLM4.5-BGC) was applied at a high spatial resolution (1 km2) for the Rur catchment in western Germany. In order to improve the model-data consistency of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and leaf area index (LAI) for this study area, five plant functional type (PFT)-specific CLM4.5-BGC parameters were estimated with time series of half-hourly NEE data for one year in 2011/2012, using the DiffeRential Evolution Adaptive Metropolis (DREAM) algorithm, a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach. The parameters were estimated separately for four different plant functional types (needleleaf evergreen temperate tree, broadleaf deciduous temperate tree, C3-grass and C3-crop) at four different sites. The four sites are located inside or close to the Rur catchment. We evaluated modeled NEE for one year in 2012/2013 with NEE measured at seven eddy covariance sites in the catchment, including the four parameter estimation sites. Modeled LAI was evaluated by means of LAI derived from remotely sensed RapidEye images of about 18 days in 2011/2012. Performance indices were based on a comparison between measurements and (i) a reference run with CLM default parameters, and (ii) a 60 instance CLM ensemble with parameters sampled from the DREAM posterior probability density functions (pdfs). The difference between the observed and simulated NEE sum reduced 23% if estimated parameters instead of default parameters were used as input. The mean absolute difference between modeled and measured LAI was reduced by 59% on average. Simulated LAI was not only improved in terms of the absolute value but in some cases also in terms of the timing (beginning of vegetation onset), which was directly related to a substantial improvement of the NEE estimates in

  10. R8 GNSS、TCA2003和SPRINTER 200M测定动挠度的试验分析%TEST ANALYSIS ON DETERMINING DYNAMIC DEFLECTION BY USING R8 GNSS, TCA2003 AND SPRINTER 200M

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖中平; 华赛男; 刘宁; 王正军

    2013-01-01

    为了调查常规测量技术在动力荷载试验中的检测能力,分别应用Trimble R8 GNSS/RTK、TCA2003测量机器人自动跟踪三维坐标测量和SPRINTER 200M数字水准仪视线高程法,对试验中设计的频率为0.5 Hz的毫米级欠阻尼振荡的动挠度进行同步监测;基于FFT算法,提取各类观测数据的频谱信息,结合挠度时程曲线进行对比分析.结果表明,TCA2003自动跟踪测量技术可准确测量动态变形特征;SPRINTER 200M视线高程法,可精确测定动挠度变化趋势,但只获取某一谐频;GNSS/RTK技术仅能获取某一谐频.

  11. Video Meteor Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell-Brown, M. D.; Braid, D.

    2011-01-01

    The flux of meteoroids, or number of meteoroids per unit area per unit time, is critical for calibrating models of meteoroid stream formation and for estimating the hazard to spacecraft from shower and sporadic meteors. Although observations of meteors in the millimetre to centimetre size range are common, flux measurements (particularly for sporadic meteors, which make up the majority of meteoroid flux) are less so. It is necessary to know the collecting area and collection time for a given set of observations, and to correct for observing biases and the sensitivity of the system. Previous measurements of sporadic fluxes are summarized in Figure 1; the values are given as a total number of meteoroids striking the earth in one year to a given limiting mass. The Gr n et al. (1985) flux model is included in the figure for reference. Fluxes for sporadic meteoroids impacting the Earth have been calculated for objects in the centimeter size range using Super-Schmidt observations (Hawkins & Upton, 1958); this study used about 300 meteors, and used only the physical area of overlap of the cameras at 90 km to calculate the flux, corrected for angular speed of meteors, since a large angular speed reduces the maximum brightness of the meteor on the film, and radiant elevation, which takes into account the geometric reduction in flux when the meteors are not perpendicular to the horizontal. They bring up corrections for both partial trails (which tends to increase the collecting area) and incomplete overlap at heights other than 90 km (which tends to decrease it) as effects that will affect the flux, but estimated that the two effects cancelled one another. Halliday et al. (1984) calculated the flux of meteorite-dropping fireballs with fragment masses greater than 50 g, over the physical area of sky accessible to the MORP fireball cameras, counting only observations in clear weather. In the micron size range, LDEF measurements of small craters on spacecraft have been used to

  12. Flux analysis of central metabolic pathways in Geobactermetallireducens during reduction of solubleFe(III)-NTA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Chakraborty, Romy; Garcia-Martin, Hector; Chu,Jeannie; Hazen, Terry C.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2007-01-01

    We analyzed the carbon fluxes in the central metabolism ofGeobacter metallireducens strain GS-15 using 13C isotopomer modeling.Acetate labeled in the 1st or 2nd position was the sole carbon source,and Fe-NTA was the sole terminal electron acceptor. The measured labeledacetate uptake rate was 21 mmol/gdw/h in the exponential growth phase.The resulting isotope labeling pattern of amino acids allowed an accuratedetermination of the in vivo global metabolic reaction rates (fluxes)through the central metabolic pathways using a computational isotopomermodel. The tracer experiments showed that G. metallireducens containedcomplete biosynthesis pathways for essential metabolism, and this strainmight also have an unusual isoleucine biosynthesis route (usingacetyl-CoA and pyruvate as the precursors). The model indicated that over90 percent of the acetate was completely oxidized to CO2 via a completetricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle while reducing iron. Pyruvate carboxylaseand phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase were present under theseconditions, but enzymes in the glyoxylate shunt and malic enzyme wereabsent. Gluconeogenesis and the pentose phosphate pathway were mainlyemployed for biosynthesis and accounted for less than 3 percent of totalcarbon consumption. The model also indicated surprisingly highreversibility in the reaction between oxoglutarate and succinate. Thisstep operates close to the thermodynamic equilibrium possibly becausesuccinate is synthesized via a transferase reaction, and the conversionof oxoglutarate to succinate is a rate limiting step for carbonmetabolism. These findings enable a better understanding of therelationship between genome annotation and extant metabolic pathways inG. metallireducens.

  13. Unstructured Grid Euler Method Assessment for Aerodynamics Performance Prediction of the Complete TCA Configuration at Supersonic Cruise Speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffari, Farhad

    1999-01-01

    Unstructured grid Euler computations, performed at supersonic cruise speed, are presented for a proposed high speed civil transport configuration, designated as the Technology Concept Airplane (TCA) within the High Speed Research (HSR) Program. The numerical results are obtained for the complete TCA cruise configuration which includes the wing, fuselage, empennage, diverters, and flow through nacelles at Mach 2.4 for a range of angles-of-attack and sideslip. The computed surface and off-surface flow characteristics are analyzed and the pressure coefficient contours on the wing lower surface are shown to correlate reasonably well with the available pressure sensitive paint results, particularly, for the complex shock wave structures around the nacelles. The predicted longitudinal and lateral/directional performance characteristics are shown to correlate very well with the measured data across the examined range of angles-of-attack and sideslip. The results from the present effort have been documented into a NASA Controlled-Distribution report which is being presently reviewed for publication.

  14. Quantitative Metabolomics and Instationary 13C-Metabolic Flux Analysis Reveals Impact of Recombinant Protein Production on Trehalose and Energy Metabolism in Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordà, Joel; Rojas, Hugo Cueto; Carnicer, Marc; Wahl, Aljoscha; Ferrer, Pau; Albiol, Joan

    2014-05-05

    Pichia pastoris has been recognized as an effective host for recombinant protein production. In this work, we combine metabolomics and instationary 13C metabolic flux analysis (INST 13C-MFA) using GC-MS and LC-MS/MS to evaluate the potential impact of the production of a Rhizopus oryzae lipase (Rol) on P. pastoris central carbon metabolism. Higher oxygen uptake and CO2 production rates and slightly reduced biomass yield suggest an increased energy demand for the producing strain. This observation is further confirmed by 13C-based metabolic flux analysis. In particular, the flux through the methanol oxidation pathway and the TCA cycle was increased in the Rol-producing strain compared to the reference strain. Next to changes in the flux distribution, significant variations in intracellular metabolite concentrations were observed. Most notably, the pools of trehalose, which is related to cellular stress response, and xylose, which is linked to methanol assimilation, were significantly increased in the recombinant strain.

  15. Quantitative Metabolomics and Instationary 13C-Metabolic Flux Analysis Reveals Impact of Recombinant Protein Production on Trehalose and Energy Metabolism in Pichia pastoris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Jordà

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Pichia pastoris has been recognized as an effective host for recombinant protein production. In this work, we combine metabolomics and instationary 13C metabolic flux analysis (INST 13C-MFA using GC-MS and LC-MS/MS to evaluate the potential impact of the production of a Rhizopus oryzae lipase (Rol on P. pastoris central carbon metabolism. Higher oxygen uptake and CO2 production rates and slightly reduced biomass yield suggest an increased energy demand for the producing strain. This observation is further confirmed by 13C-based metabolic flux analysis. In particular, the flux through the methanol oxidation pathway and the TCA cycle was increased in the Rol-producing strain compared to the reference strain. Next to changes in the flux distribution, significant variations in intracellular metabolite concentrations were observed. Most notably, the pools of trehalose, which is related to cellular stress response, and xylose, which is linked to methanol assimilation, were significantly increased in the recombinant strain.

  16. Direct assessment of hepatic mitochondrial oxidative and anaplerotic fluxes in humans using dynamic 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Befroy, Douglas E; Perry, Rachel J; Jain, Nimit

    2014-01-01

    that rates of mitochondrial oxidation and anaplerosis in human liver can be directly determined noninvasively. Using this approach, we found the mean rates of hepatic tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle flux (VTCA) and anaplerotic flux (VANA) to be 0.43 ± 0.04 μmol g(-1) min(-1) and 0.60 ± 0.11 μmol g(-1) min(-1...

  17. Elucidating the role of copper in CHO cell energy metabolism using (13)C metabolic flux analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nargund, Shilpa; Qiu, Jinshu; Goudar, Chetan T

    2015-01-01

    (13)C-metabolic flux analysis was used to understand copper deficiency-related restructuring of energy metabolism, which leads to excessive lactate production in recombinant protein-producing CHO cells. Stationary-phase labeling experiments with U-(13)C glucose were conducted on CHO cells grown under high and limiting copper in 3 L fed-batch bioreactors. The resultant labeling patterns of soluble metabolites were measured by GC-MS and used to estimate metabolic fluxes in the central carbon metabolism pathways using OpenFlux. Fluxes were evaluated 300 times from stoichiometrically feasible random guess values and their confidence intervals calculated by Monte Carlo simulations. Results from metabolic flux analysis exhibited significant carbon redistribution throughout the metabolic network in cells under Cu deficiency. Specifically, glycolytic fluxes increased (25%-79% relative to glucose uptake) whereas fluxes through the TCA and pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) were lower (15%-23% and 74%, respectively) compared with the Cu-containing condition. Furthermore, under Cu deficiency, 33% of the flux entering TCA via the pyruvate node was redirected to lactate and malate production. Based on these results, we hypothesize that Cu deficiency disrupts the electron transport chain causing ATP deficiency, redox imbalance, and oxidative stress, which in turn drive copper-deficient CHO cells to produce energy via aerobic glycolysis, which is associated with excessive lactate production, rather than the more efficient route of oxidative phosphorylation.

  18. Exposure of clinical MRSA heterogeneous strains to β-lactams redirects metabolism to optimize energy production through the TCA cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mignon A Keaton

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA has emerged as one of the most important pathogens both in health care and community-onset infections. The prerequisite for methicillin resistance is mecA, which encodes a β-lactam-insensitive penicillin binding protein PBP2a. A characteristic of MRSA strains from hospital and community associated infections is their heterogeneous expression of resistance to β-lactam (HeR in which only a small portion (≤ 0.1% of the population expresses resistance to oxacillin (OXA ≥ 10 µg/ml, while in other isolates, most of the population expresses resistance to a high level (homotypic resistance, HoR. The mechanism associated with heterogeneous expression requires both increase expression of mecA and a mutational event that involved the triggering of a β-lactam-mediated SOS response and related lexA and recA genes. In the present study we investigated the cellular physiology of HeR-MRSA strains during the process of β-lactam-mediated HeR/HoR selection at sub-inhibitory concentrations by using a combinatorial approach of microarray analyses and global biochemical profiling employing gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS to investigate changes in metabolic pathways and the metabolome associated with β-lactam-mediated HeR/HoR selection in clinically relevant heterogeneous MRSA. We found unique features present in the oxacillin-selected SA13011-HoR derivative when compared to the corresponding SA13011-HeR parental strain that included significant increases in tricarboxyl citric acid (TCA cycle intermediates and a concomitant decrease in fermentative pathways. Inactivation of the TCA cycle enzyme cis-aconitase gene in the SA13011-HeR strain abolished β-lactam-mediated HeR/HoR selection demonstrating the significance of altered TCA cycle activity during the HeR/HoR selection. These results provide evidence of both the metabolic cost and the

  19. Methane Flux

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Methane (CH4) flux is the net rate of methane exchange between an ecosystem and the atmosphere. Data of this variable were generated by the USGS LandCarbon project...

  20. ROCK inhibitor Y-27632 inhibits the growth, migration, and invasion of Tca8113 and CAL-27 cells in tongue squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Ming; Yang, Dong-Sheng; Liu, Jie; Liu, Hong-Bo; Ye, Ming; Zhang, Yu-Fei

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the effects of Rho-associated coiled-coil containing protein kinase (ROCK) inhibitor Y-27632 on the growth, invasion, and migration of Tca8113 and CAL-27 cells in tongue squamous cell carcinoma (TSCC). The methods of the study are as follows: After being routinely cultured for 24 h, Tca8113 and CAL-27 cells were treated with Y-27632 solution. The morphological change of Y-27632-treated cells was observed under an optical microscope and an inverted microscope; MTT assay was performed to measure the optical density (OD) of cells and calculate cell growth inhibition rate; the change of apoptosis was detected by AnnexinV-FITC/PI assay; cell invasion and migration were measured by Transwell assay. The results were as follows: (1) With increasing concentration of Y-27632, cell morphology changed and cell apoptosis appeared; (2) MTT assay showed that inhibition effect of Y-27632 on Tca8113 and CAL-27 cells was enhanced with increasing concentrations and time (all P Y-27632; (4) Transwell assay showed, after a treatment with Y-27632, the number of migrated and invaded Tca8113 and CAL-27 cells in each group was statistically different (all P Y-27632 was decreased and less Tca8113 and CAL-27 cells in experimental groups passed through polycarbonate membrane (all P Y-27632 can inhibit the growth, invasion, and migration of Tca8113 and CAL-27 cells, suggesting that Y-27632 may be therapeutically useful in TSCC.

  1. Simulation of reactor noise analysis measurement for light-water critical assembly TCA using MCNP-DSP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Sakurai, Kiyoshi; Tonoike, Kotaro; Miyoshi, Yoshinori [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-01-01

    Reactor noise analysis methods using Monte Carlo technique have been proposed and developed in the field of nuclear criticality safety. The Monte Carlo simulation for noise analysis can be made by simulating physical phenomena in the course of neutron transport in a nuclear fuel as practically as possible. MCNP-DSP was developed by T. Valentine of ORNL for this purpose and it is a modified version of MCNP-4A. The authors applied this code to frequency analysis measurements performed in light-water critical assembly TCA. Prompt neutron generation times for critical and subcritical cores were measured by doing the frequency analysis of detector signals. The Monte Carlo simulations for these experiments were carried out using MCNP-DSP, and prompt neutron generation times were calculated. (author)

  2. Systems-level metabolic flux profiling elucidates a complete, bifurcated tricarboxylic acid cycle in Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amador-Noguez, Daniel; Feng, Xiao-Jiang; Fan, Jing; Roquet, Nathaniel; Rabitz, Herschel; Rabinowitz, Joshua D

    2010-09-01

    Obligatory anaerobic bacteria are major contributors to the overall metabolism of soil and the human gut. The metabolic pathways of these bacteria remain, however, poorly understood. Using isotope tracers, mass spectrometry, and quantitative flux modeling, here we directly map the metabolic pathways of Clostridium acetobutylicum, a soil bacterium whose major fermentation products include the biofuels butanol and hydrogen. While genome annotation suggests the absence of most tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzymes, our results demonstrate that this bacterium has a complete, albeit bifurcated, TCA cycle; oxaloacetate flows to succinate both through citrate/alpha-ketoglutarate and via malate/fumarate. Our investigations also yielded insights into the pathways utilized for glucose catabolism and amino acid biosynthesis and revealed that the organism's one-carbon metabolism is distinct from that of model microbes, involving reversible pyruvate decarboxylation and the use of pyruvate as the one-carbon donor for biosynthetic reactions. This study represents the first in vivo characterization of the TCA cycle and central metabolism of C. acetobutylicum. Our results establish a role for the full TCA cycle in an obligatory anaerobic organism and demonstrate the importance of complementing genome annotation with isotope tracer studies for determining the metabolic pathways of diverse microbes.

  3. A comprehensive metabolic profile of cultured astrocytes using isotopic transient metabolic flux analysis and 13C-labeled glucose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana I Amaral

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic models have been used to elucidate important aspects of brain metabolism in recent years. This work applies for the first time the concept of isotopic transient 13C metabolic flux analysis (MFA to estimate intracellular fluxes of cultured astrocytes. This methodology comprehensively explores the information provided by 13C labeling time-courses of intracellular metabolites after administration of a 13C labeled substrate. Cells were incubated with medium containing [1-13C]glucose for 24 h and samples of cell supernatant and extracts collected at different time-points were then analyzed by mass spectrometry and/or HPLC. Metabolic fluxes were estimated by fitting a carbon labeling network model to isotopomer profiles experimentally determined. Both the fast isotopic equilibrium of glycolytic metabolite pools and the slow labeling dynamics of TCA cycle intermediates are described well by the model. The large pools of glutamate and aspartate which are linked to the TCA cycle via reversible aminotransferase reactions are likely to be responsible for the observed delay in equilibration of TCA cycle intermediates. Furthermore, it was estimated that 11% of the glucose taken up by astrocytes was diverted to the pentose phosphate pathway. In addition, considerable fluxes through pyruvate carboxylase (PC (PC/pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH ratio = 0.5, malic enzyme (5% of the total pyruvate production and catabolism of branched-chained amino acids (contributing with ~40% to total acetyl-CoA produced confirmed the significance of these pathways to astrocytic metabolism. Consistent with the need of maintaining cytosolic redox potential, the fluxes through the malate-aspartate shuttle and the PDH pathway were comparable. Finally, the estimated glutamate/α-ketoglutarate exchange rate (~0.7 µmol.mg prot-1.h-1 was similar to the TCA cycle flux. In conclusion, this work demonstrates the potential of isotopic transient MFA for a comprehensive analysis of

  4. Expression of long non-coding RNA-HOTAIR in oral squamous cell carcinoma Tca8113 cells and its associated biological behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huawei; Li, Zhiyong; Wang, Chao; Feng, Lin; Huang, Haitao; Liu, Changkui; Li, Fengxia

    2016-01-01

    As a long noncoding RNA, HOX transcript antisense intergenic RNA (HOTAIR) is highly expressed in many types of tumors. However, its expression and function in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells and tissues remains largely unknown. We herein studied the biological functions of HOTAIR in OSCC Tca8113 cells. Real-time quantitative PCR showed that HOTAIR, p21 and p53 mRNA expressions in doxorubicin (DOX)-treated or γ-ray-irradiated Tca8113 cells were up-regulated. Knockdown of p53 expression inhibited DOX-induced HOTAIR up-regulation, suggesting that DNA damage-induced HOTAIR expression may be associated with p53. Transfection and CCK-8 assays showed that compared with the control group, overexpression of HOTAIR promoted the proliferation of Tca8113 cells, while interfering with its expression played an opposite role. Flow cytometry exhibited that HOTAIR overexpression decreased the rate of DOX-induced apoptosis. When HOTAIR expression was inhibited by siRNA, the proportions of cells in G2/M and S phases increased and decreased respectively. Meanwhile, the rate of DOX-induced apoptosis rose. DNA damage-induced HOTAIR expression facilitated the proliferation of Tca8113 cells and decreased their apoptosis. However, whether the up-regulation depends on p53 still needs in-depth studies. PMID:27904675

  5. Continuous taurocholic acid exposure promotes esophageal squamous cell carcinoma progression due to reduced cell loss resulting from enhanced vascular development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sho Sato

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Refluxogenic effects of smoking and alcohol abuse may be related to the risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC. The present study attempts to clarify the effects of continuous taurocholic acid (TCA exposure, which is neither mutagenic nor genotoxic, on ESCC progression. METHODS: A squamous carcinoma cell line (ESCC-DR was established from a tumor induced in a rat model of gastroduodenal reflux. ESCC-DR cells were incubated with 2 mM TCA for ≥2 months. The effects of continuous TCA exposure were evaluated in vitro on cell morphology, growth, and invasion and in vivo on xenograft tumor growth in nude mice. Moreover, the mean level of secreted transforming growth factor (TGF-β1 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF proteins in cell culture supernatants and mRNA synthesis of TGF-β1 and VEGF-A of ESCC cells were measured. The angiogenic potential was further examined by a migration assay using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. RESULTS: Continuous TCA exposure induced marked formation of filopodia in vitro. Expression levels of angiogenic factors were significantly higher in the cells treated with TCA than in control cells. Tumor xenografts derived from cells pre-exposed to TCA were larger and more vascularized than those derived from control cells. In addition, TCA exposure increased HUVEC migration. CONCLUSION: Continuous TCA exposure enhanced ESCC progression due to reduced cell loss in vivo. Cell loss was inhibited by TCA-induced vascular endothelial cell migration, which was mediated by TGF-β1 and VEGF-A released from ESCC cells.

  6. 缺氧对Tca83细胞中HIF-1α与MMP-9表达的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘长富; 王稚英; 于涛

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨缺氧对体外培养的人舌癌Tca83细胞中缺氧诱导因子(hypoxia inducible factor,HIF)1 α及基质金属蛋白酶(matrix metaloproteinases)-9表达的影响.方法 以CoCl2浓度为150 mmol/L的DMEM培养基体外培养Tca83细胞,分别为4、8、12、24h,以未含CoC12的培养基作空白对照组,采用免疫荧光染色检测Tca83细胞中HIF-1α及MMP-9的表达,分析缺氧时间不同对两种蛋白表达的影响.结果 常氧条件下,HIF-1α与MMP-9的表达较弱.而缺氧条件下,HIF-1 α与MMP-9表达明显增强,且随缺氧时间的延长,HIF-1 α与MMP-9表达逐渐增强.结论 应用浓度为150 mmol/L的CoCl2可以诱导Tca83细胞发生缺氧,缺氧可诱导Tca83细胞中HIF-1 α与MMP-9表达增强,且HIF-1 α与MMP-9表达水平随缺氧时间的延长而增强.

  7. Novel Switched Flux Permanent Magnet Machine Topologies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    诸自强

    2012-01-01

    This paper overviews various switched flux permanent magnet machines and their design and performance features,with particular emphasis on machine topologies with reduced magnet usage or without using magnet,as well as with variable flux capability.

  8. Hybrid metabolic flux analysis: combining stoichiometric and statistical constraints to model the formation of complex recombinant products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alves Paula M

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stoichiometric models constitute the basic framework for fluxome quantification in the realm of metabolic engineering. A recurrent bottleneck, however, is the establishment of consistent stoichiometric models for the synthesis of recombinant proteins or viruses. Although optimization algorithms for in silico metabolic redesign have been developed in the context of genome-scale stoichiometric models for small molecule production, still rudimentary knowledge of how different cellular levels are regulated and phenotypically expressed prevents their full applicability for complex product optimization. Results A hybrid framework is presented combining classical metabolic flux analysis with projection to latent structures to further link estimated metabolic fluxes with measured productivities. We first explore the functional metabolic decomposition of a baculovirus-producing insect cell line from experimental data, highlighting the TCA cycle and mitochondrial respiration as pathways strongly associated with viral replication. To reduce uncertainty in metabolic target identification, a Monte Carlo sampling method was used to select meaningful associations with the target, from which 66% of the estimated fluxome had to be screened out due to weak correlations and/or high estimation errors. The proposed hybrid model was then validated using a subset of preliminary experiments to pinpoint the same determinant pathways, while predicting the productivity of independent cultures. Conclusions Overall, the results indicate our hybrid metabolic flux analysis framework is an advantageous tool for metabolic identification and quantification in incomplete or ill-defined metabolic networks. As experimental and computational solutions for constructing comprehensive global cellular models are in development, the contribution of hybrid metabolic flux analysis should constitute a valuable complement to current computational platforms in bridging the

  9. Effect of iclR and arcA knockouts on biomass formation and metabolic fluxes in Escherichia coli K12 and its implications on understanding the metabolism of Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlier Daniel

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression is regulated through a complex interplay of different transcription factors (TFs which can enhance or inhibit gene transcription. ArcA is a global regulator that regulates genes involved in different metabolic pathways, while IclR as a local regulator, controls the transcription of the glyoxylate pathway genes of the aceBAK operon. This study investigates the physiological and metabolic consequences of arcA and iclR deletions on E. coli K12 MG1655 under glucose abundant and limiting conditions and compares the results with the metabolic characteristics of E. coli BL21 (DE3. Results The deletion of arcA and iclR results in an increase in the biomass yield both under glucose abundant and limiting conditions, approaching the maximum theoretical yield of 0.65 c-mole/c-mole glucose under glucose abundant conditions. This can be explained by the lower flux through several CO2 producing pathways in the E. coli K12 ΔarcAΔiclR double knockout strain. Due to iclR gene deletion, the glyoxylate pathway is activated resulting in a redirection of 30% of the isocitrate molecules directly to succinate and malate without CO2 production. Furthermore, a higher flux at the entrance of the TCA was noticed due to arcA gene deletion, resulting in a reduced production of acetate and less carbon loss. Under glucose limiting conditions the flux through the glyoxylate pathway is further increased in the ΔiclR knockout strain, but this effect was not observed in the double knockout strain. Also a striking correlation between the glyoxylate flux data and the isocitrate lyase activity was observed for almost all strains and under both growth conditions, illustrating the transcriptional control of this pathway. Finally, similar central metabolic fluxes were observed in E. coli K12 ΔarcA ΔiclR compared to the industrially relevant E. coli BL21 (DE3, especially with respect to the pentose pathway, the glyoxylate pathway, and the TCA

  10. Reducing the specific energy consumption of 1st-pass SWRO by application of high-flux membranes fed with high-pH, decarbonated seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ophek, Liron; Birnhack, Liat; Nir, Oded; Binshtein, Eitan; Lahav, Ori

    2015-11-15

    A new operational approach is presented, which has the potential to substantially cut down on the energy and cost demand associated with seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) desalination, without changing the currently-installed infrastructure. The approach comprises acidification/decarbonation of the feed seawater followed by high-pH single RO pass using high-flux membranes. Since the limitation imposed by CaCO3(s) precipitation is overcome, the recovery ratio can be significantly increased. This work presents a new operational concept aimed at maximizing the benefits that can be obtained from new low-energy RO membranes available on the market. Results obtained from operating a pilot RO system revealed that following an acidification and decarbonation step, recovery ratio of 56% could be practically attained, along with effluent TDS and boron concentrations of 375 and 0.3 mg/l, respectively (feed water pH was adjusted to pH9.53 following the decarbonation step). The specific energy consumption (SEC) of this operation was calculated to be 5%-10% lower than the SEC typically associated with "conventional" SWRO operation. Two further scenarios were theoretically considered, under which the limiting operational parameter became Mg(OH)2(s) and BaSO4(s) precipitation. It was concluded that despite the fact that higher recovery ratios could be obtained, the high pressure required in these scenarios made them less appealing from both the SEC and cost standpoints. The normalized cost of the suggested approach was found to be ∼$0.07 ± 0.02/m(3) cheaper than the currently-practiced SWRO approach for obtaining product water characterized by TDS < 500 and B < 0.5 mg/l.

  11. The HIV-1 associated protein, Tat1–86, impairs dopamine transporters and interacts with cocaine to reduce nerve terminal function: a no-net-flux microdialysis study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, Mark J.; Frederick-Duus, Danielle; Fadel, Jim; Mactutus, Charles F.; Booze, Rosemarie M.

    2009-01-01

    Injection drug use accounts for approximately one-third of HIV-infections in the United States. HIV associated proteins have been shown to interact with various drugs of abuse to incite concerted neurotoxicity. One common area for their interaction is the nerve terminal, including dopamine transporter (DAT) systems. However, results regarding DAT function and regulation in HIV-infection, regardless of drug use, are mixed. Thus, the present experiments were designed to explicitly control Tat and cocaine administration in an in vivo model in order to reconcile differences that exist in the literature to date. We examined Tat plus cocaine-induced alterations using no-net-flux microdialysis, which is sensitive to alterations in DAT function, in order to test the potential for DAT as an early mediator of HIV-induced oxidative stress and neurodegeneration in vivo. Within 5 hours of intra-accumbal administration of the HIV-associated protein, Tat, we noted a significant reduction in local DAT efficiency with little change in DA overflow/release dynamics. Further, at 48 hrs post-Tat administration, we demonstrated a concerted effect of the HIV-protein Tat with cocaine on both uptake and release function. Finally, we discuss the extent to which DAT dysfunction may be considered a predecessor to generalized nerve terminal dysfunction. Characterization of DAT dysfunction in vivo may provide an early pharamacotherapeutic target, which in turn may prevent or attenuate downstream mediators of neurotoxicity (i.e., reactive species) to DA systems occurring in NeuroAIDS. PMID:19344635

  12. Fibroblast growth factor-23 negates 1,25(OH)2D3-induced intestinal calcium transport by reducing the transcellular and paracellular calcium fluxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuituan, Pissared; Wongdee, Kannikar; Jantarajit, Walailuk; Suntornsaratoon, Panan; Krishnamra, Nateetip; Charoenphandhu, Narattaphol

    2013-08-01

    The calciotropic hormone 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3] has been known to stimulate intestinal calcium transport via both transcellular and paracellular pathways. Recently, we reported that the 1,25(OH)2D3-enhanced calcium transport in the mouse duodenum could be abolished by fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-23, but the targeted calcium transport pathway has been elusive. Herein, the 1,25(OH)2D3-enhanced calcium transport was markedly inhibited by FGF-23 and inhibitors of the basolateral calcium transporters, NCX1 and PMCA1b, suggesting the negative effect of FGF-23 on the transcellular calcium transport. Similar results could be observed in the intestinal epithelium-like Caco-2 monolayer. Although the Arrhenius plot indicated that FGF-23 decreased the potential barrier (e.g., activation energy) of the paracellular calcium movement, FGF-23 was found to modestly decrease the 1,25(OH)2D3-enhanced paracellular calcium transport and calcium permeability. Moreover, FGF-23 affected the 1,25(OH)2D3-induced change in duodenal water permeability as determined by tritiated water, but both 1,25(OH)2D3 and FGF-23 were without effects on the transepithelial fluxes of paracellular markers, (3)H-mannitol and (14)C-polyethylene glycol. It could be concluded that FGF-23 diminished the 1,25(OH)2D3-enhanced calcium absorption through the transcellular and paracellular pathways. Our findings have thus corroborated the presence of a bone-kidney-intestinal axis of FGF-23/vitamin D system in the regulation of calcium homeostasis.

  13. Imagen corporal, IMC, afrontamiento, depresión y riesgo de TCA en jóvenes universitarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina-María Hernández-Cortés

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available El presente estudio descriptivo correlacional pretendió determinar la relación entre estilo de afrontamiento, historia psiquiátrica familiar, salud percibida, IMC, género, percepción de la figura y depresión y el riesgo de padecer un trastorno de conducta alimentaria. Participaron 417 estudiantes universitarios que se seleccionaron de manera no aleatorizada estratificada con grupos de conveniencia. Para obtener los datos se utilizó la Ficha de Registro de Información General, la Escala Abreviada de las actitudes alimentarias EAT -26-M, el Cuestionario de Formas de Afrontamiento, el Inventario de Depresión de Beck, la Prueba de Optimismo Disposicional y el Registro de Percepción de la Figura. El análisis de datos se llevo a cabo mediante el uso de ecuaciones estructurales. Se concluyó que la interacción de las variables antecedentes psicológicos familiares, género, deseo de disminución del peso, satisfacción con la imagen corporal, estilo de afrontamiento evitativo y depresión en conjunto predicen el riesgo de padecer un TCA, se discuten los hallazgos y se evidencian las limitaciones del presente estudio.

  14. Operation and Performance of a new microTCA-based CMS Calorimeter Trigger in LHC Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    Klabbers, Pamela Renee

    2016-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is currently increasing the instantaneous luminosity for p-p collisions. In LHC Run 2, the center-of-mass energy has gone from 8 to 13 TeV and the instantaneous luminosity will approximately double for proton collisions. This will make it even more challenging to trigger on interesting events since the number of interactions per crossing (pileup) and the overall trigger rate will be significantly larger than in LHC Run 1. The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment has installed the second stage of a two-stage upgrade to the Calorimeter Trigger to ensure that the trigger rates can be controlled and the thresholds kept low, so that physics data will not be compromised. The stage-1, which replaced the original CMS Global Calorimeter Trigger, operated successfully in 2015. The completely new stage-2 has replaced the entire calorimeter trigger in 2016 with AMC form-factor boards and optical links operating in a microTCA chassis. It required that updates to the calorimet...

  15. Partial reverse of the TCA cycle is enhanced in Taenia crassiceps experimental neurocysticercosis after in vivo treatment with anthelminthic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida Leandro, Leticia; Fraga, Carolina Miguel; de Souza Lino, Ruy; Vinaud, Marina Clare

    2014-04-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is the most common helminthic infection and neglected disease of the central nervous system. It is the leading cause of acquired epilepsy and seizures worldwide. Therefore, to study this important neglected disease, it is important to use experimental models. There is no report in the literature on how the parasite's metabolism reacts to antihelminthic treatment when it is still within the central nervous system of the host. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the energetic metabolism of cysticerci experimentally inoculated in the encephala of BALB/c mice after treatment with low dosages (not sufficient to kill the parasite) of albendazole (ABDZ) and praziquantel (PZQ). BALB/c mice were intracranially inoculated with Taenia crassiceps cysticerci and, after 30 days, received treatment with low dosages of ABDZ and PZQ. After 24 h of treatment, the mice were euthanized, and the cysticerci were removed and analyzed through high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to quantify the organic acids related to the energetic metabolism of the parasite. The partial reverse of the TCA cycle was enhanced by the ABDZ and PZQ treatments both with the higher dosage, as the organic acids of this pathway were significantly increased when compared to the control group and to the other dosages. In conclusion, it was possible to detect the increase of this pathway in the parasites that were exposed to low dosages of ABDZ and PZQ, as it is a mechanism that would amplify the energy production in a hostile environment.

  16. The CMS fast beams condition monitor back-end electronics based on MicroTCA technology: status and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagozdzinska, Agnieszka A.; Dabrowski, Anne E.; Pozniak, Krzysztof T.

    2015-09-01

    The Fast Beams Condition Monitor (BCM1F), upgraded for LHC Run II, is used to measure the online luminosity and machine induced background for the CMS experiment. The detector consists of 24 single-crystal CVD diamond sensors that are read out with a custom fast front-end chip fabricated in 130 nm CMOS technology. Since the signals from the sensors are used for real time monitoring of the LHC conditions they are processed by dedicated back-end electronics to measure separately rates corresponding to LHC collision products, machine induced background and residual activation exploiting different arrival times. The system is built in MicroTCA technology and uses high speed analog-to-digital converters. In operational modes of high rates, consecutive events, spaced in time by less than 12.5 ns, may cause partially overlapping events. Hence, novel signal processing techniques are deployed to resolve overlapping peaks. The high accuracy qualification of the signals is crucial to determine the luminosity and the machine induced background rates for the CMS experiment and the LHC.

  17. Extraction, purification, methylation and GC-MS analysis of short-chain carboxylic acids for metabolic flux analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tivendale, Nathan D; Jewett, Erin M; Hegeman, Adrian D; Cohen, Jerry D

    2016-08-15

    Dynamic metabolic flux analysis requires efficient and effective methods for extraction, purification and analysis of a plethora of naturally-occurring compounds. One area of metabolism that would be highly informative to study using metabolic flux analysis is the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, which consists of short-chain carboxylic acids. Here, we describe a newly-developed method for extraction, purification, derivatization and analysis of short-chain carboxylic acids involved in the TCA cycle. The method consists of snap-freezing the plant material, followed by maceration and a 12-15h extraction at -80 °C. The extracts are then subject to reduction (to stabilize β-keto acids), purified by strong anion exchange solid phase extraction and methylated with methanolic HCl. This method could also be readily adapted to quantify many other short-chain carboxylic acids.

  18. Critical flux determination by flux-stepping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beier, Søren; Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil

    2010-01-01

    In membrane filtration related scientific literature, often step-by-step determined critical fluxes are reported. Using a dynamic microfiltration device, it is shown that critical fluxes determined from two different flux-stepping methods are dependent upon operational parameters such as step......, such values are more or less useless in itself as critical flux predictors, and constant flux verification experiments have to be conducted to check if the determined critical fluxes call predict sustainable flux regimes. However, it is shown that using the step-by-step predicted critical fluxes as start...

  19. Overcoming the metabolic burden of protein secretion in Schizosaccharomyces pombe--a quantitative approach using 13C-based metabolic flux analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Tobias; Lange, Sabrina; Wilhelm, Nadine; Bureik, Matthias; Yang, Tae-Hoon; Heinzle, Elmar; Schneider, Konstantin

    2014-01-01

    Protein secretion in yeast is generally associated with a burden to cellular metabolism. To investigate this metabolic burden in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, we constructed a set of strains secreting the model protein maltase in different amounts. We quantified the influence of protein secretion on the metabolism applying (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis in chemostat cultures. Analysis of the macromolecular biomass composition revealed an increase in cellular lipid content at elevated levels of protein secretion and we observed altered metabolic fluxes in the pentose phosphate pathway, the TCA cycle, and around the pyruvate node including mitochondrial NADPH supply. Supplementing acetate to glucose or glycerol minimal media was found to improve protein secretion, accompanied by an increased cellular lipid content and carbon flux through the TCA cycle as well as increased mitochondrial NADPH production. Thus, systematic metabolic analyses can assist in identifying factors limiting protein secretion and in deriving strategies to overcome these limitations.

  20. An assessment of the efficacy and safety of cross technique with 100% TCA in the management of ice pick acne scars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepali Bhardwaj

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Chemical reconstruction of skin scars (CROSS is a technique using high concentrations of trichloroacetic acid (TCA focally on atrophic acne scars to induce inflammation followed by collagenisation. This can lead to reduction in the appearance of scars and cosmetic improvement. Aims : The aim of this pilot study is to investigate the safety of the CROSS technique, using 100% TCA, for atrophic ice pick acne scars. Settings and Design : Open prospective study. Materials and Methods : Twelve patients with predominant atrophic ice pick post acne scars were treated with the CROSS technique, using 100% TCA, applied with a wooden toothpick, at two weekly intervals for four sittings. Efficacy was assessed on the basis of the physician′s clinical assessment, photographic evaluation at each sitting and patient′s feedback after the fourth treatment, and at the three-month and six-month follow-up period, after the last treatment. Results : More than 70% improvement was seen in eight out of ten patients evaluated and good results (50 - 70% improvement were observed in the remaining two patients. No significant side effects were noted. Transient hypopigmentation and hyperpigmentation was observed in one patient each. Physician′s findings were in conformity with the patient′s assessment. Three months after the last treatment, one patient noted a decrease in improvement with no further improvement even at the six-month follow-up period. Conclusion : The CROSS technique with 100% TCA is a safe, efficacious, cost-effective and minimally invasive technique for the management of ice pick acne scars that are otherwise generally difficult to treat. In few patients the improvement may not be sustained, probably due to inadequate or delayed collagenisation.

  1. Surface modification and deuterium retention in reduced-activation steels under low-energy deuterium plasma exposure. Part II: steels pre-damaged with 20 MeV W ions and high heat flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogorodnikova, O. V.; Zhou, Z.; Sugiyama, K.; Balden, M.; Pintsuk, G.; Gasparyan, Yu.; Efimov, V.

    2017-03-01

    The reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels including Eurofer (9Cr) and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels by the addition of Y2O3 particles investigated in Part I were pre-damaged either with 20 MeV W ions at room temperature at IPP (Garching) or with high heat flux at FZJ (Juelich) and subsequently exposed to low energy (~20-200 eV per D) deuterium (D) plasma up to a fluence of 2.9  ×  1025 D m-2 in the temperature range from 290 K to 700 K. The pre-irradiation with 20 MeV W ions at room temperature up to 1 displacement per atom (dpa) has no noticeable influence on the steel surface morphology before and after the D plasma exposure. The pre-irradiation with W ions leads to the same concentration of deuterium in all kinds of investigated steels, regardless of the presence of nanoparticles and Cr content. It was found that (i) both kinds of irradiation with W ions and high heat flux increase the D retention in steels compared to undamaged steels and (ii) the D retention in both pre-damaged and undamaged steels decreases with a formation of surface roughness under the irradiation of steels with deuterium ions with incident energy which exceeds the threshold of sputtering. The increase in the D retention in RAFM steels pre-damaged either with W ions (damage up to ~3 µm) or high heat flux (damage up to ~10 µm) diminishes with increasing the temperature. It is important to mention that the near surface modifications caused by either implantation of high energy ions or a high heat flux load, significantly affect the total D retention at low temperatures or low fluences but have a negligible impact on the total D retention at elevated temperatures and high fluences because, in these cases, the D retention is mainly determined by bulk diffusion.

  2. Effects of rAAV-CD151 and rAAV-antiCD151 on the Migration of Human Tongue Squamous Carcinoma Cell Line Tca8113

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蓝荣芳; 刘正湘; 宋玉娥; 张欣

    2004-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the effects of the recombinant adeno-associated virus vector containing sense CD151 gene (rAAV-CD151) and antisense CD151 gene (rAAVantiCD151) on the migration of Tca8113 cell. Functional fragment of CD151 gene was amplified by RT-PCR, and inserted into the vector pAAV in the sense direction and antisense direction, respectively. The rAAV-CD151 and rAAV-antiCD151 were produced and the titers were determined by dot blot. The CD151, at protein level, was detected by Western blot. The Transwell chamber was used to detect the effects of the rAAV-CD151 and rAAV-antiCD151 on the tumor cell migration.The titers of the rAAV-CD151 and rAAV-antiCD151 were 2× 1011 pfu/ml and 1.0× 1011 pfu/ml,respectively. The expression of CD151 was increased by 108 % in the cells transfected with rAAVCD151 and decreased by 79 % in the cells transfected with rAAV-antiCD151, as compared with non-transfected cells, respectively. The number of the migrating cells was significantly increased in the cells transfected with rAAV-CD151 (93. 56±11.59) and decreased in the cells transfeoted with rAAV-antiCD151 (24.00 ± 4.36) as compared with non-transfected and rAAV-GFP transfected cells (53.00±6.56 and 46.00±7.00, P<0.05). It is an important molecular mechanism of the tumor metastasis that the overexpression of CD151 promotes the migration of the tumor cells. The rAAV-antiCD151 is a novel tool, which can reduce the expression of CD151 and inhibit the migration of the tumor cells, and brings us a new approach of anti-sene gene therapy targeted at CD151 in human carcinoma.

  3. Fermentation of Xylose Causes Inefficient Metabolic State Due to Carbon/Energy Starvation and Reduced Glycolytic Flux in Recombinant Industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushika, Akinori; Nagashima, Atsushi; Goshima, Tetsuya; Hoshino, Tamotsu

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, comprehensive, quantitative metabolome analysis was carried out on the recombinant glucose/xylose-cofermenting S. cerevisiae strain MA-R4 during fermentation with different carbon sources, including glucose, xylose, or glucose/xylose mixtures. Capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry was used to determine the intracellular pools of metabolites from the central carbon pathways, energy metabolism pathways, and the levels of twenty amino acids. When xylose instead of glucose was metabolized by MA-R4, glycolytic metabolites including 3- phosphoglycerate, 2- phosphoglycerate, phosphoenolpyruvate, and pyruvate were dramatically reduced, while conversely, most pentose phosphate pathway metabolites such as sedoheptulose 7- phosphate and ribulose 5-phosphate were greatly increased. These results suggest that the low metabolic activity of glycolysis and the pool of pentose phosphate pathway intermediates are potential limiting factors in xylose utilization. It was further demonstrated that during xylose fermentation, about half of the twenty amino acids declined, and the adenylate/guanylate energy charge was impacted due to markedly decreased adenosine triphosphate/adenosine monophosphate and guanosine triphosphate/guanosine monophosphate ratios, implying that the fermentation of xylose leads to an inefficient metabolic state where the biosynthetic capabilities and energy balance are severely impaired. In addition, fermentation with xylose alone drastically increased the level of citrate in the tricarboxylic acid cycle and increased the aromatic amino acids tryptophan and tyrosine, strongly supporting the view that carbon starvation was induced. Interestingly, fermentation with xylose alone also increased the synthesis of the polyamine spermidine and its precursor S-adenosylmethionine. Thus, differences in carbon substrates, including glucose and xylose in the fermentation medium, strongly influenced the dynamic metabolism of MA-R4

  4. Reduced urea flux across the blood-testis barrier and early maturation in the male reproductive system in UT-B-null mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lirong; Zhao, Dan; Song, Yuanlin; Meng, Yan; Zhao, Huashan; Zhao, Xuejian; Yang, Baoxue

    2007-07-01

    A urea-selective urine-concentrating defect was found in transgenic mice deficient in urea transporter (UT)-B. To determine the role of facilitated urea transport in extrarenal organs expressing UT-B, we studied the kinetics of [(14)C]urea distribution in UT-B-null mice versus wild-type mice. After renal blood flow was disrupted, [(14)C]urea distribution was selectively reduced in testis in UT-B-null mice. Under basal conditions, total testis urea content was 335.4 +/- 43.8 microg in UT-B-null mice versus 196.3 +/- 18.2 microg in wild-type mice (P UT-B-null mice (6.6 +/- 0.8 mg/g body wt) was significantly greater than in wild-type mice (4.2 +/- 0.8 mg/g body wt). Elongated spermatids were observed earlier in UT-B-null mice compared with wild type mice on day 24 versus day 32, respectively. First breeding ages in UT-B knockout males (48 +/- 3 days) were also significantly earlier than that in wild-type males (56 +/- 2 days). In competing mating tests with wild-type males and UT-B-null males, all pups carried UT-B-targeted genes, which indicates that all pups were produced from breeding of UT-B-null males. Experiments of the expression of follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) and androgen binding protein (ABP) indicated that the development of Sertoli cells was also earlier in UT-B-null mice than that in wild-type mice. These results suggest that UT-B plays an important role in eliminating urea produced by Sertoli cells and that UT-B deletion causes both urea accumulation in the testis and early maturation of the male reproductive system. The UT-B knockout mouse may be a useful experimental model to define the molecular mechanisms of early puberty.

  5. Metabolic network reconstruction, growth characterization and 13C-metabolic flux analysis of the extremophile Thermus thermophilus HB8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarup, Aditi; Lu, Jing; DeWoody, Kathleen C; Antoniewicz, Maciek R

    2014-07-01

    Thermus thermophilus is an extremely thermophilic bacterium with significant biotechnological potential. In this work, we have characterized aerobic growth characteristics of T. thermophilus HB8 at temperatures between 50 and 85°C, constructed a metabolic network model of its central carbon metabolism and validated the model using (13)C-metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA). First, cells were grown in batch cultures in custom constructed mini-bioreactors at different temperatures to determine optimal growth conditions. The optimal temperature for T. thermophilus grown on defined medium with glucose was 81°C. The maximum growth rate was 0.25h(-1). Between 50 and 81°C the growth rate increased by 7-fold and the temperature dependence was described well by an Arrhenius model with an activation energy of 47kJ/mol. Next, we performed a (13)C-labeling experiment with [1,2-(13)C] glucose as the tracer and calculated intracellular metabolic fluxes using (13)C-MFA. The results provided support for the constructed network model and highlighted several interesting characteristics of T. thermophilus metabolism. We found that T. thermophilus largely uses glycolysis and TCA cycle to produce biosynthetic precursors, ATP and reducing equivalents needed for cells growth. Consistent with its proposed metabolic network model, we did not detect any oxidative pentose phosphate pathway flux or Entner-Doudoroff pathway activity. The biomass precursors erythrose-4-phosphate and ribose-5-phosphate were produced via the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, and largely via transketolase, with little contribution from transaldolase. The high biomass yield on glucose that was measured experimentally was also confirmed independently by (13)C-MFA. The results presented here provide a solid foundation for future studies of T. thermophilus and its metabolic engineering applications.

  6. Consequences of phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotranferase system and pyruvate kinase isozymes inactivation in central carbon metabolism flux distribution in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meza Eugenio

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Escherichia coli phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP is a key central metabolism intermediate that participates in glucose transport, as precursor in several biosynthetic pathways and it is involved in allosteric regulation of glycolytic enzymes. In this work we generated W3110 derivative strains that lack the main PEP consumers PEP:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS- and pyruvate kinase isozymes PykA and PykF (PTS-pykA- and PTS-pykF-. To characterize the effects of these modifications on cell physiology, carbon flux distribution and aromatics production capacity were determined. Results When compared to reference strain W3110, strain VH33 (PTS- displayed lower specific rates for growth, glucose consumption and acetate production as well as a higher biomass yield from glucose. These phenotypic effects were even more pronounced by the additional inactivation of PykA or PykF. Carbon flux analysis revealed that PTS inactivation causes a redirection of metabolic flux towards biomass formation. A cycle involving PEP carboxylase (Ppc and PEP carboxykinase (Pck was detected in all strains. In strains W3110, VH33 (PTS- and VH35 (PTS-, pykF-, the net flux in this cycle was inversely correlated with the specific rate of glucose consumption and inactivation of Pck in these strains caused a reduction in growth rate. In the PTS- background, inactivation of PykA caused a reduction in Ppc and Pck cycling as well as a reduction in flux to TCA, whereas inactivation of PykF caused an increase in anaplerotic flux from PEP to OAA and an increased flux to TCA. The wild-type and mutant strains were modified to overproduce L-phenylalanine. In resting cells experiments, compared to reference strain, a 10, 4 and 7-fold higher aromatics yields from glucose were observed as consequence of PTS, PTS PykA and PTS PykF inactivation. Conclusions Metabolic flux analysis performed on strains lacking the main activities generating pyruvate from PEP revealed the high

  7. (13)C-metabolic flux analysis in S-adenosyl-L-methionine production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Kenshi; Kajihata, Shuichi; Matsuda, Fumio; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    S-Adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) is a major biological methyl group donor, and is used as a nutritional supplement and prescription drug. Yeast is used for the industrial production of SAM owing to its high intracellular SAM concentrations. To determine the regulation mechanisms responsible for such high SAM production, (13)C-metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) was conducted to compare the flux distributions in the central metabolism between Kyokai no. 6 (high SAM-producing) and S288C (control) strains. (13)C-MFA showed that the levels of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle flux in SAM-overproducing strain were considerably increased compared to those in the S228C strain. Analysis of ATP balance also showed that a larger amount of excess ATP was produced in the Kyokai 6 strain because of increased oxidative phosphorylation. These results suggest that high SAM production in Kyokai 6 strains could be attributed to enhanced ATP regeneration with high TCA cycle fluxes and respiration activity. Thus, maintaining high respiration efficiency during cultivation is important for improving SAM production.

  8. The study of the expression of the Cx43 in the oral squamous cell carcinoma and Tca8113%间隙连接蛋白43在口腔颌面部鳞癌组织及舌癌细胞株(Tca8113)中表达的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋娟; 张汉东

    2012-01-01

    目的:探讨间隙连接蛋白43(Cx43)在口腔鳞癌组织(oscc)和舌鳞癌细胞株(Tca8113)中的表达及其生物学行为的关系:细胞分化诱导剂全反式维甲酸(ATRA)对人舌鳞癌细胞株(Tca8113)中Cx43表达的影响.方法:应用免疫组织、细胞化学、免疫荧光及结合免疫印迹技术,观察OSCC组织中以及ATRA对Tca8113细胞株进行培养及分化诱导后Cx43在蛋白水平的变化.结果:Cx43在正常口腔鳞状上皮主要表达于相邻细胞间相互接触的细胞膜上,而在OSCC组织中,Cx43细胞膜表达与组织的分化程度、转移之间有显著性差异(Cx43:x2=7.42、12.43,P<0.05、P<0.01).免疫细胞化学检测可见舌癌细胞中Cx43异常定位于细胞浆中和/或细胞膜不与邻近细胞接触的游离缘上.Tca8113经ATRA诱导后,Cx43蛋白表达增加.结论:Cx43表达的改变与OSCC的发生和发展有关.ATRA可以通过上调Cx43表达,实现对肿瘤生长的抑制%Objective: To investigate the expression of connexin 43 and its relationship with the biological behavior in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and Tca8113;to investigate the effects of connexin 43 in tongue carcinoma cell line (Tca8113) by all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA). Method: Immunohistochemical and immunofluorescence was used to detect the expressions of Cx43 in oral squamous carcinoma. Western blot was adopted to examine the expressions of Cx43 in tongue carcinoma cell line (Tca8113) by all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA). Result: In normal oral squamous epithelium the expression of Cx43 was typically shown in the membrane at intercellular contact,but in OSCC they were aberrantly expressed in cytoplasm.The significant difference was observed between low Cx43 expression and differentiation,metastasis (Cx43:X2= 7.42,12.43,P <0.05,P <0.01).In Tca8113 cell line Cx43 was detected mainly either intracytoplas-mically or in plasma membrane free from contact with other cells by immunocytochemistry and immunofluorescence

  9. Flux-P: Automating Metabolic Flux Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Ebert, Birgitta E.; Anna-Lena Lamprecht; Bernhard Steffen; Blank, Lars M.

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative knowledge of intracellular fluxes in metabolic networks is invaluable for inferring metabolic system behavior and the design principles of biological systems. However, intracellular reaction rates can not often be calculated directly but have to be estimated; for instance, via 13C-based metabolic flux analysis, a model-based interpretation of stable carbon isotope patterns in intermediates of metabolism. Existing software such as FiatFlux, OpenFLUX or 13CFLUX supports experts in ...

  10. Measurement of annexin V uptake and lactadherin labeling for the quantification of apoptosis in adherent Tca8113 and ACC-2 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Hu

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Phosphatidylserine (PS exposure occurs during the cell death program and fluorescein-labeled lactadherin permits the detection of PS exposure earlier than annexin V in suspended cell lines. Adherent cell lines were studied for this apoptosis-associated phenomenon to determine if PS probing methods are reliable because specific membrane damage may occur during harvesting. Apoptosis was induced in the human tongue squamous carcinoma cell line (Tca8113 and the adenoid cystic carcinoma cell line (ACC-2 by arsenic trioxide. Cells were harvested with a modified procedure and labeled with lactadherin and/or annexin V. PS exposure was localized by confocal microscopy and apoptosis was quantified by flow cytometry. The detachment procedure without trypsinization did not induce cell damage. In competition binding experiments, phospholipid vesicles competed for more than 95 and 90% of lactadherin but only about 75 and 70% of annexin V binding to Tca8113 and ACC-2 cells. These data indicate that PS exposure occurs in three stages during the cell death program and that fluorescein-labeled lactadherin permitted the detection of early PS exposure. A similar pattern of PS exposure has been observed in two malignant cell lines with different adherence, suggesting that this pattern of PS exposure is common in adherent cells. Both lactadherin and annexin V could be used in adherent Tca8113 and ACC-2 cell lines when an appropriate harvesting procedure was used. Lactadherin is more sensitive than annexin V for the detection of PS exposure as the physical structure of PS in these blebs and condensed apoptotic cell surface may be more conducive to binding lactadherin than annexin V.

  11. Expression of the human isoform of glutamate dehydrogenase, hGDH2, augments TCA cycle capacity and oxidative metabolism of glutamate during glucose deprivation in astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissen, Jakob D; Lykke, Kasper; Bryk, Jaroslaw; Stridh, Malin H; Zaganas, Ioannis; Skytt, Dorte M; Schousboe, Arne; Bak, Lasse K; Enard, Wolfgang; Pääbo, Svante; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2017-03-01

    A key enzyme in brain glutamate homeostasis is glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) which links carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism mediating glutamate degradation to CO2 and expanding tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle capacity with intermediates, i.e. anaplerosis. Humans express two GDH isoforms, GDH1 and 2, whereas most other mammals express only GDH1. hGDH1 is widely expressed in human brain while hGDH2 is confined to astrocytes. The two isoforms display different enzymatic properties and the nature of these supports that hGDH2 expression in astrocytes potentially increases glutamate oxidation and supports the TCA cycle during energy-demanding processes such as high intensity glutamatergic signaling. However, little is known about how expression of hGDH2 affects the handling of glutamate and TCA cycle metabolism in astrocytes. Therefore, we cultured astrocytes from cerebral cortical tissue of hGDH2-expressing transgenic mice. We measured glutamate uptake and metabolism using [(3) H]glutamate, while the effect on metabolic pathways of glutamate and glucose was evaluated by use of (13) C and (14) C substrates and analysis by mass spectrometry and determination of radioactively labeled metabolites including CO2 , respectively. We conclude that hGDH2 expression increases capacity for uptake and oxidative metabolism of glutamate, particularly during increased workload and aglycemia. Additionally, hGDH2 expression increased utilization of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) during aglycemia and caused a general decrease in oxidative glucose metabolism. We speculate, that expression of hGDH2 allows astrocytes to spare glucose and utilize BCAAs during substrate shortages. These findings support the proposed role of hGDH2 in astrocytes as an important fail-safe during situations of intense glutamatergic activity. GLIA 2017;65:474-488.

  12. Relevancia de Factores de Riesgo, Psicopatología Alimentaria, Insatisfacción Corporal y Funcionamiento Psicológico en Pacientes con TCA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Carretero García

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: El primer objetivo del estudio es evaluar restrospectivamente, la relevancia de factores de riesgo en pacientes con Trastorno de la Conducta Alimentaria (TCA en función de la categoría diagnóstica. El segundo objetivo, es evaluar la psicopatología alimentaria, la insatisfacción corporal y el funcionamiento psicológico en cada grupo diagnóstico. Método: Se evalúa en el momento previo al tratamiento de TCA, un total de 73 pacientes con diferentes criterios diagnósticos: Bulimia Nerviosa Purgativa (BN-P; n=29, la provisional forma diagnóstica del Trastorno por Atracón (TA; n=6, el Trastorno de la Conducta Alimentaria No Especificado tipo Purgativo (TCANE-P; n=17 y el Trastorno de la Conducta Alimentaria No Especificado tipo Restrictivo (TCANE-R; n=21. Resultados: Se hallan como factores de riesgo de consistencia el antecedente de obesidad y el inicio del TCA en la adolescencia. El inicio de la menarquia en la edad temprana no resulta ser un factor de riesgo. El Índice de Masa Corporal (IMC refleja la sintomatología alimentaria de cada cuadro diagnóstico. El grupo BN-P, se caracteriza por presentar mayor severidad en la sintomatología alimentaria. La mayoría de grupos presenta larga duración de la enfermedad, dificultades en la imagen corporal, el funcionamiento psicosocial y características de personalidad. El sentimiento de ineficacia no fue una característica clínica en casos de TA. Conclusiones: El que los antecedentes de obesidad se hayan mostrado como un factor de riesgo de consistencia en los TCA es un argumento más a favor de la necesidad de su prevención. Las dificultades en el funcionamiento psicosocial encontradas en casos clínicos con TA, avalarían la necesidad de líneas de intervención de tipo más interpersonal en este tipo de pacientes.

  13. Data Corrections and Wind-Tunnel Data Comparisons of a 5% TCA Model in the NASA Ames 12-ft Pressure Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuniga, Fanny A.

    1999-01-01

    The objectives of this research are: 1) To determine the effect of geometric variations near the inboard leading-edge flap on high-lift and stability and control performance data; 2) To determine Re effects on TCA (Technology Concept Aircraft) high-lift configuration for optimum high-lift and stability and control performance at takeoff, climbout, approach and landing conditions; and 3) To obtain flow-visualization data on upper surface of wing for CFD validations. This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  14. Identification of active elementary flux modes in mitochondria using selectively permeabilized CHO cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolae, Averina; Wahrheit, Judith; Nonnenmacher, Yannic; Weyler, Christian; Heinzle, Elmar

    2015-11-01

    Metabolic compartmentation is a key feature of mammalian cells. Mitochondria are the powerhouse of eukaryotic cells, responsible for respiration and the TCA cycle. We accessed the mitochondrial metabolism of the economically important Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells using selective permeabilization. We tested key substrates without and with addition of ADP. Based on quantified uptake and production rates, we could determine the contribution of different elementary flux modes to the metabolism of a substrate or substrate combination. ADP stimulated the uptake of most metabolites, directly by serving as substrate for the respiratory chain, thus removing the inhibitory effect of NADH, or as allosteric effector. Addition of ADP favored substrate metabolization to CO2 and did not enhance the production of other metabolites. The controlling effect of ADP was more pronounced when we supplied metabolites to the first part of the TCA cycle: pyruvate, citrate, α-ketoglutarate and glutamine. In the second part of the TCA cycle, the rates were primarily controlled by the concentrations of C4-dicarboxylates. Without ADP addition, the activity of the pyruvate carboxylase-malate dehydrogenase-malic enzyme cycle consumed the ATP produced by oxidative phosphorylation, preventing its accumulation and maintaining metabolic steady state conditions. Aspartate was taken up only in combination with pyruvate, whose uptake also increased, a fact explained by complex regulatory effects. Isocitrate dehydrogenase and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase were identified as the key regulators of the TCA cycle, confirming existent knowledge from other cells. We have shown that selectively permeabilized cells combined with elementary mode analysis allow in-depth studying of the mitochondrial metabolism and regulation.

  15. Specification of ROP flux shape

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Byung Joo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Gray, A. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    1997-06-01

    The CANDU 9 480/SEU core uses 0.9% SEU (Slightly Enriched Uranium) fuel. The use f SEU fuel enables the reactor to increase the radial power form factor from 0.865, which is typical in current natural uranium CANDU reactors, to 0.97 in the nominal CANDU 9 480/SEU core. The difference is a 12% increase in reactor power. An additional 5% increase can be achieved due to a reduced refuelling ripple. The channel power limits were also increased by 3% for a total reactor power increase of 20%. This report describes the calculation of neutron flux distributions in the CANDU 9 480/SEU core under conditions specified by the C and I engineers. The RFSP code was used to calculate of neutron flux shapes for ROP analysis. Detailed flux values at numerous potential detector sites were calculated for each flux shape. (author). 6 tabs., 70 figs., 4 refs.

  16. Kaempferol ameliorates aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) induced hepatocellular carcinoma through modifying metabolizing enzymes, membrane bound ATPases and mitochondrial TCA cycle enzymes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kulanthaivel Langeswaran; Rajendran Revathy; Subbaraj Gowtham Kumar; Shanmugam Vijayaprakash

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The present study was aimed to scrutinize the anticancer consequence of kaempferol against aflatoxin B1 induced hepatocarcinogenesis. Epidemiological studies of the incidence of liver cancer in the population, where dietary aflatoxin exposure is high, have provided much circumstantial evidence for the development of aflatoxin B1 induced primary liver cancer in humans. Methods:In the present investigation, aflatoxin B1 (2 mg/kg body weight i.p) was used as a hepatocarcinogen to induce hepatocellular carcinoma in experimental animals. Results: In the present analysis, on treatment with bioflavonoid kaempferol (100 mg/kg body weight p.o) the nucleic acids levels were brought back to normal and also the altered levels of biological enzymes such as membrane bound ATPase, carbohydrate metabolizing enzymes and mitochondrial TCA cycle enzymes levels (P<0.01).Conclusions:Membrane bound ATPase, carbohydrate metabolizing enzymes and mitochondrial TCA cycle enzymes were modulated by kaempferol evaluated on aflatoxin B1 induced primary liver carcinogenesis.

  17. A phylogenetic approach to the early evolution of autotrophy: the case of the reverse TCA and the reductive acetyl-CoA pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra, Arturo; Rivas, Mario; García-Ferris, Carlos; Lazcano, Antonio; Peretó, Juli

    2014-06-01

    In recent decades, a number of hypotheses on the autotrophic origin of life have been presented. These proposals invoke the emergence of reaction networks leading from CO or CO₂ to the organic molecules required for life. It has also been suggested that the last (universal) common ancestor (LCA or LUCA) of all extant cell lineages was a chemolitho-autotrophic thermophilic anaerobe. The antiquity of some carbon fixation pathways, the phylogenetic basal distribution of some autotrophic organisms, and the catalytic properties of iron-sulfur minerals have been advanced in support of these ideas. Here we critically examine the phylogenetic distribution and evolution of enzymes that are essential for two of the most ancient autotrophic means of metabolism: the reductive tricarboxylic acid (rTCA) cycle and the reductive acetyl-CoA pathway. Phylogenetic analysis of citryl-CoA synthetase and of citryl-CoA lyase, key enzymatic components of the rTCA cycle, and of CO dehydrogenase/acetyl-CoA synthase, a key enzyme in the reductive acetyl-CoA pathway, revealed that all three enzymes have undergone major lateral transfer events and therefore cannot be used as proof of the LCA's metabolic abilities nor as evidence of an autotrophic origin of life. Copyright© by the Spanish Society for Microbiology and Institute for Catalan Studies.

  18. A micro-TCA based data acquisition system for the Triple-GEM detectors for the upgrade of the CMS forward muon spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Lenzi, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We will present the electronic and DAQ system being developed for TripleGEM detectors which will be installed in the CMS muon spectrometer. The microTCA system uses an Advanced Mezzanine Card equipped with an FPGA and the Versatile Link with the GBT chipset to link the front and back-end. On the detector an FPGA mezzanine board, the OptoHybrid, has to collect the data from the detector readout chips to transmit them optically to the microTCA boards using the GBT protocol. We will describe the hardware architecture, report on the status of the developments, and present results obtained with the system.In this contribution we will report on the progress of the design of the electronic readout and data acquisition (DAQ) system being developed for Triple-GEM detectors which will be installed in the forward region (1.5 < eta < 2.2) of the CMS muon spectrometer during the 2nd long shutdown of the LHC, planed for the period 2018-2019. The architecture of the Triple-GEM readout system is based on the use of th...

  19. Inactivation of spkD, encoding a Ser/Thr kinase, affects the pool of the TCA cycle metabolites in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Sophie; Jang, Jichan; Janicki, Annick; Zhang, Cheng-Cai; Bédu, Sylvie

    2008-07-01

    The inactivation of sll0776 (spkD), a gene encoding a protein Ser/Thr kinase in Synechocystis PCC 6803, led to a pleiotropic phenotype of the SpkD null mutant. This mutant is impaired in its growth ability under low concentration of inorganic carbon (C(i)), though its C(i)-uptake system is not affected. Addition of glucose, phosphoglyceraldehyde or pyruvate does not allow the mutant to grow under low-C(i) conditions. In contrast, this growth defect can be restored when the low-C(i) culture medium is supplemented with metabolites of the TCA cycle. Growth of the mutant is also inhibited when ammonium is provided as nitrogen source, whatever the carbon regime of the cells, due to the high demand for 2-oxoglutarate, which is the carbon skeleton for ammonium assimilation. When mutant cells are cultured under standard growth conditions, the intracellular concentration of 2-oxoglutarate is 20 % lower than is observed in the wild-type strain. However, this decrease of 2-oxoglutarate level only slightly affects the phosphorylation state of PII, a protein that regulates nitrogen and carbon metabolism according to the intracellular levels of 2-oxoglutarate. Properties of the SpkD mutant suggest that the Ser/Thr kinase SpkD could be involved in adjusting the pool of the TCA cycle metabolites according to C(i) supply in the culture medium.

  20. TCA cycle-mediated generation of ROS is a key mediator for HeR-MRSA survival under β-lactam antibiotic exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto R Rosato

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is a major multidrug resistant pathogen responsible for several difficult-to-treat infections in humans. Clinical Hetero-resistant (HeR MRSA strains, mostly associated with persistent infections, are composed of mixed cell populations that contain organisms with low levels of resistance (hetero-resistant HeR and those that display high levels of drug resistance (homo-resistant HoR. However, the full understanding of β-lactam-mediated HeR/HoR selection remains to be completed. In previous studies we demonstrated that acquisition of the HoR phenotype during exposure to β-lactam antibiotics depended on two key elements: (1 activation of the SOS response, a conserved regulatory network in bacteria that is induced in response to DNA damage, resulting in increased mutation rates, and (2 adaptive metabolic changes redirecting HeR-MRSA metabolism to the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle in order to increase the energy supply for cell-wall synthesis. In the present work, we identified that both main mechanistic components are associated through TCA cycle-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS production, which temporally affects DNA integrity and triggers activation of the SOS response resulting in enhanced mutagenesis. The present work brings new insights into a role of ROS generation on the development of resistance to β-lactam antibiotics in a model of natural occurrence, emphasizing the cytoprotective role in HeR-MRSA survival mechanism.

  1. Correlation of risk area and reverse redistribution of {sup 99m}Tc-steamboat`s SPECT in acute myocardial infarction following direct P TCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Ryou; Itoh, Noriaki [Kushiroshi Ishikai Hospital, Hokkaido (Japan); Fujimori, Kenji [and others

    1999-04-01

    Redistribution of {sup 99m}Tc-steamboat`s is negligible in usual circumstances, but recent reports demonstrated reverse redistribution is detectable in acute myocardial patients. Correlation of risk area, observed in {sup 99m}Tc-steamboat`s ``frizzed` SPECT image at onset, and delayed images at 5-25 days after onset (post-P TCA image) is evaluated in 19 acute myocardial infarction patients treated with direct P TCA. Reverse redistribution was observed in 85% of reperfused area. Linear relationship of %uptake in each SPECT segment between onset and post-PTCA images (taken at 0.5, 4, and 6 hours after injection) is evaluated and the relationship improves over time course. The correlation coefficient between onset and 6 hours-delayed image is 0.88, and the visual concordance shows 77% of score matching. Delayed {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi SPECT image on reperfused AMI seems to represent risk area with some underestimation. It may be useful to estimate both risk and salvaged areas on early and delayed SPECT with a single {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi injection. (author)

  2. Correlation of risk area and reverse redistribution of [sup 99m]Tc-steamboat's SPECT in acute myocardial infarction following direct P TCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Ryou; Itoh, Noriaki (Kushiroshi Ishikai Hospital, Hokkaido (Japan)); Fujimori, Kenji (and others)

    1999-04-01

    Redistribution of [sup 99m]Tc-steamboat's is negligible in usual circumstances, but recent reports demonstrated reverse redistribution is detectable in acute myocardial patients. Correlation of risk area, observed in [sup 99m]Tc-steamboat's ''frizzed' SPECT image at onset, and delayed images at 5-25 days after onset (post-P TCA image) is evaluated in 19 acute myocardial infarction patients treated with direct P TCA. Reverse redistribution was observed in 85% of reperfused area. Linear relationship of %uptake in each SPECT segment between onset and post-PTCA images (taken at 0.5, 4, and 6 hours after injection) is evaluated and the relationship improves over time course. The correlation coefficient between onset and 6 hours-delayed image is 0.88, and the visual concordance shows 77% of score matching. Delayed [sup 99m]Tc-sestamibi SPECT image on reperfused AMI seems to represent risk area with some underestimation. It may be useful to estimate both risk and salvaged areas on early and delayed SPECT with a single [sup 99m]Tc-sestamibi injection. (author)

  3. In vivo cardiac glucose metabolism in the high-fat fed mouse: Comparison of euglycemic–hyperinsulinemic clamp derived measures of glucose uptake with a dynamic metabolomic flux profiling approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalski, Greg M., E-mail: greg.kowalski@deakin.edu.au [Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition Research, School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, Burwood, Victoria 3125 (Australia); De Souza, David P. [Metabolomics Australia, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Bio21 Institute of Molecular Science and Biotechnology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Risis, Steve [Cellular and Molecular Metabolism Laboratory, Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, Victoria 3004 (Australia); Burch, Micah L. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Department of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Hamley, Steven [Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition Research, School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, Burwood, Victoria 3125 (Australia); Kloehn, Joachim [Metabolomics Australia, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Bio21 Institute of Molecular Science and Biotechnology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Selathurai, Ahrathy [Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition Research, School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, Burwood, Victoria 3125 (Australia); Lee-Young, Robert S. [Cellular and Molecular Metabolism Laboratory, Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, Victoria 3004 (Australia); Tull, Dedreia; O' Callaghan, Sean; McConville, Malcolm J. [Metabolomics Australia, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Bio21 Institute of Molecular Science and Biotechnology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Bruce, Clinton R. [Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition Research, School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, Burwood, Victoria 3125 (Australia)

    2015-08-07

    Rationale: Cardiac metabolism is thought to be altered in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Our understanding of the regulation of cardiac substrate metabolism and insulin sensitivity has largely been derived from ex vivo preparations which are not subject to the same metabolic regulation as in the intact heart in vivo. Studies are therefore required to examine in vivo cardiac glucose metabolism under physiologically relevant conditions. Objective: To determine the temporal pattern of the development of cardiac insulin resistance and to compare with dynamic approaches to interrogate cardiac glucose and intermediary metabolism in vivo. Methods and results: Studies were conducted to determine the evolution of cardiac insulin resistance in C57Bl/6 mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) for between 1 and 16 weeks. Dynamic in vivo cardiac glucose metabolism was determined following oral administration of [U-{sup 13}C] glucose. Hearts were collected after 15 and 60 min and flux profiling was determined by measuring {sup 13}C mass isotopomers in glycolytic and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates. Cardiac insulin resistance, determined by euglycemic–hyperinsulinemic clamp, was evident after 3 weeks of HFD. Despite the presence of insulin resistance, in vivo cardiac glucose metabolism following oral glucose administration was not compromised in HFD mice. This contrasts our recent findings in skeletal muscle, where TCA cycle activity was reduced in mice fed a HFD. Similar to our report in muscle, glucose derived pyruvate entry into the TCA cycle in the heart was almost exclusively via pyruvate dehydrogenase, with pyruvate carboxylase mediated anaplerosis being negligible after oral glucose administration. Conclusions: Under experimental conditions which closely mimic the postprandial state, the insulin resistant mouse heart retains the ability to stimulate glucose metabolism. - Highlights: • Insulin clamp was used to determine the evolution of cardiac

  4. Genome-scale metabolic flux analysis of Streptomyces lividans growing on a complex medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Huys, Pieter-Jan; Lule, Ivan; Vercammen, Dominique; Anné, Jozef; Van Impe, Jan F; Bernaerts, Kristel

    2012-09-15

    Constraint-based metabolic modeling comprises various excellent tools to assess experimentally observed phenotypic behavior of micro-organisms in terms of intracellular metabolic fluxes. In combination with genome-scale metabolic networks, micro-organisms can be investigated in much more detail and under more complex environmental conditions. Although complex media are ubiquitously applied in industrial fermentations and are often a prerequisite for high protein secretion yields, such multi-component conditions are seldom investigated using genome-scale flux analysis. In this paper, a systematic and integrative approach is presented to determine metabolic fluxes in Streptomyces lividans TK24 grown on a nutritious and complex medium. Genome-scale flux balance analysis and randomized sampling of the solution space are combined to extract maximum information from exometabolome profiles. It is shown that biomass maximization cannot predict the observed metabolite production pattern as such. Although this cellular objective commonly applies to batch fermentation data, both input and output constraints are required to reproduce the measured biomass production rate. Rich media hence not necessarily lead to maximum biomass growth. To eventually identify a unique intracellular flux vector, a hierarchical optimization of cellular objectives is adopted. Out of various tested secondary objectives, maximization of the ATP yield per flux unit returns the closest agreement with the maximum frequency in flux histograms. This unique flux estimation is hence considered as a reasonable approximation for the biological fluxes. Flux maps for different growth phases show no active oxidative part of the pentose phosphate pathway, but NADPH generation in the TCA cycle and NADPH transdehydrogenase activity are most important in fulfilling the NADPH balance. Amino acids contribute to biomass growth by augmenting the pool of available amino acids and by boosting the TCA cycle, particularly

  5. Revealing Differences in Metabolic Flux Distributions between a Mutant Strain and Its Parent Strain Gluconacetobacter xylinus CGMCC 2955

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Miao; Yang, Xiao-Ning; Zhu, Hui-Xia; Jia, Yuan-Yuan; Jia, Shi-Ru; Piergiovanni, Luciano

    2014-01-01

    A better understanding of metabolic fluxes is important for manipulating microbial metabolism toward desired end products, or away from undesirable by-products. A mutant strain, Gluconacetobacter xylinus AX2-16, was obtained by combined chemical mutation of the parent strain (G. xylinus CGMCC 2955) using DEC (diethyl sulfate) and LiCl. The highest bacterial cellulose production for this mutant was obtained at about 11.75 g/L, which was an increase of 62% compared with that by the parent strain. In contrast, gluconic acid (the main byproduct) concentration was only 5.71 g/L for mutant strain, which was 55.7% lower than that of parent strain. Metabolic flux analysis indicated that 40.1% of the carbon source was transformed to bacterial cellulose in mutant strain, compared with 24.2% for parent strain. Only 32.7% and 4.0% of the carbon source were converted into gluconic acid and acetic acid in mutant strain, compared with 58.5% and 9.5% of that in parent strain. In addition, a higher flux of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle was obtained in mutant strain (57.0%) compared with parent strain (17.0%). It was also indicated from the flux analysis that more ATP was produced in mutant strain from pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) and TCA cycle. The enzymatic activity of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), which is one of the key enzymes in TCA cycle, was 1.65-fold higher in mutant strain than that in parent strain at the end of culture. It was further validated by the measurement of ATPase that 3.53–6.41 fold higher enzymatic activity was obtained from mutant strain compared with parent strain. PMID:24901455

  6. Revealing differences in metabolic flux distributions between a mutant strain and its parent strain Gluconacetobacter xylinus CGMCC 2955.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Zhong

    Full Text Available A better understanding of metabolic fluxes is important for manipulating microbial metabolism toward desired end products, or away from undesirable by-products. A mutant strain, Gluconacetobacter xylinus AX2-16, was obtained by combined chemical mutation of the parent strain (G. xylinus CGMCC 2955 using DEC (diethyl sulfate and LiCl. The highest bacterial cellulose production for this mutant was obtained at about 11.75 g/L, which was an increase of 62% compared with that by the parent strain. In contrast, gluconic acid (the main byproduct concentration was only 5.71 g/L for mutant strain, which was 55.7% lower than that of parent strain. Metabolic flux analysis indicated that 40.1% of the carbon source was transformed to bacterial cellulose in mutant strain, compared with 24.2% for parent strain. Only 32.7% and 4.0% of the carbon source were converted into gluconic acid and acetic acid in mutant strain, compared with 58.5% and 9.5% of that in parent strain. In addition, a higher flux of tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle was obtained in mutant strain (57.0% compared with parent strain (17.0%. It was also indicated from the flux analysis that more ATP was produced in mutant strain from pentose phosphate pathway (PPP and TCA cycle. The enzymatic activity of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH, which is one of the key enzymes in TCA cycle, was 1.65-fold higher in mutant strain than that in parent strain at the end of culture. It was further validated by the measurement of ATPase that 3.53-6.41 fold higher enzymatic activity was obtained from mutant strain compared with parent strain.

  7. Experiment and numerical method study of optimization of gas stream distribution in TCA%湍球塔内气流分布优化的数值计算及试验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘英杰; 刘忠; 胡满银; 王淑勤

    2001-01-01

    Calculated the threedimension flow field i n Turbulent Contact Absorber(TCA) by using the numerical method,founded the bett er distribution structure parameters.The experiment results coincide with that o f the calculation.The calculation program can provide some theoretical bases for the design and long,safe,operation of TCA.%通过对湍球塔(TCA)内三维流场的数值计算,找到了较佳的结构参数,在此基础上进行的试验表明,计算结果与试验结果相吻合。计算程序可为TCA的设计及保证其长期安全经济运行提供理论依据。

  8. Flux-P: Automating Metabolic Flux Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgitta E. Ebert

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative knowledge of intracellular fluxes in metabolic networks is invaluable for inferring metabolic system behavior and the design principles of biological systems. However, intracellular reaction rates can not often be calculated directly but have to be estimated; for instance, via 13C-based metabolic flux analysis, a model-based interpretation of stable carbon isotope patterns in intermediates of metabolism. Existing software such as FiatFlux, OpenFLUX or 13CFLUX supports experts in this complex analysis, but requires several steps that have to be carried out manually, hence restricting the use of this software for data interpretation to a rather small number of experiments. In this paper, we present Flux-P as an approach to automate and standardize 13C-based metabolic flux analysis, using the Bio-jETI workflow framework. Exemplarily based on the FiatFlux software, it demonstrates how services can be created that carry out the different analysis steps autonomously and how these can subsequently be assembled into software workflows that perform automated, high-throughput intracellular flux analysis of high quality and reproducibility. Besides significant acceleration and standardization of the data analysis, the agile workflow-based realization supports flexible changes of the analysis workflows on the user level, making it easy to perform custom analyses.

  9. Quantitative importance of the pentose phosphate pathway determined by incorporation of 13C from [2-13C]- and [3-13C]glucose into TCA cycle intermediates and neurotransmitter amino acids in functionally intact neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brekke, Eva Marie; Walls, Anne Byriel; Schousboe, Arne

    2012-01-01

    of (13)C-labeled glucose via the PPP does not appear to contribute to the production of releasable lactate, it contributes to labeling of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates and related amino acids. Based on glutamate isotopomers, it was calculated that PPP activity accounts for ~6% of glucose...... metabolism in cortical neurons and ~4% in cerebellar neurons. This is the first demonstration that pyruvate generated from glucose via the PPP contributes to the synthesis of acetyl CoA for oxidation in the TCA cycle. Moreover, the fact that (13)C labeling from glucose is incorporated into glutamate proves...

  10. Real-time cell analysis and heat shock protein gene expression in the TcA Tribolium castaneum cell line in response to environmental stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Reina, Andrés; Rodríguez-García, María Juliana; Ramis, Guillermo; Galián, José

    2015-12-17

    The rust red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum (Herbst, 1797) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), is a pest of stored grain and one of the most studied insect model species. Some of the previous studies involved heat response studies in terms of survival and heat shock protein expression, which are regulated to protect other proteins against environmental stress conditions. In the present study, we characterize the impedance profile with the xCELLigence Real-Time Cell Analyzer and study the effect of increased temperature in cell growth and viability in the cell line BCIRL-TcA-CLG1 (TcA) of T. castaneum. This novel system measures cells behavior in real time and is applied for the first time to insect cells. Additionally, cells are exposed to heat shock, increased salinity, acidic pH and UV-A light with the aim of measuring the expression levels of Hsp27, Hsp68a and Hsp83 genes. Results show a high thermotolerance of TcA in terms of cell growth and viability. This result is likely related to gene expression results in which a significant up-regulation of all studied Hsp genes is observed after one hour of exposure to 40 ºC and UV light. All three genes show similar expression patterns, but Hsp27 seems to be the most affected. The results of this study validate the RTCA method and reveal the utility of insect cell lines, real-time analysis and gene expression studies to better understand the physiological response of insect cells, with potential applications in different fields of biology such as conservation biology and pest management. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Contribution of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and the glyoxylate shunt in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to succinic acid production during dough fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Mohammad N; Aslankoohi, Elham; Verstrepen, Kevin J; Courtin, Christophe M

    2015-07-02

    Succinic acid produced by yeast during bread dough fermentation can significantly affect the rheological properties of the dough. By introducing mutations in the model S288C yeast strain, we show that the oxidative pathway of the TCA cycle and the glyoxylate shunt contribute significantly to succinic acid production during dough fermentation. More specifically, deletion of ACO1 and double deletion of ACO1 and ICL1 resulted in a 36 and 77% decrease in succinic acid levels in fermented dough, respectively. Similarly, double deletion of IDH1 and IDP1 decreased succinic acid production by 85%, while also affecting the fermentation rate. By contrast, double deletion of SDH1 and SDH2 resulted in a two-fold higher succinic acid accumulation compared to the wild-type. Deletion of fumarate reductase activity (FRD1 and OSM1) in the reductive pathway of the TCA cycle did not affect the fermentation rate and succinic acid production. The changes in the levels of succinic acid produced by mutants Δidh1Δidp1 (low level) and Δsdh1Δsdh2 (high level) in fermented dough only resulted in small pH differences, reflecting the buffering capacity of dough at a pH of around 5.1. Moreover, Rheofermentometer analysis using these mutants revealed no difference in maximum dough height and gas retention capacity with the dough prepared with S288C. The impact of the changed succinic acid profile on the organoleptic or antimicrobial properties of bread remains to be demonstrated.

  12. Transcript abundance on its own cannot be used to infer fluxes in central metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg eSchwender

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available An attempt has been made to define the extent to which metabolic flux in central plant metabolism is reflected by changes in the transcriptome and metabolome, based on an analysis of in vitro cultured immature embryos of two oilseed rape (Brassica napus accessions which contrast for seed lipid accumulation. Metabolic flux analysis was used to constrain a flux balance metabolic model which included 671 biochemical and transport reactions within the central metabolism. This highly confident flux information was eventually used for comparative analysis of flux versus transcript (metabolite. Metabolite profiling succeeded in identifying 79 intermediates within the central metabolism, some of which differed quantitatively between the two accessions and displayed a significant shift corresponding to flux. An RNA-Seq based transcriptome analysis revealed a large number of genes which were differentially transcribed in the two accessions, including some enzymes/proteins active in major metabolic pathways. With a few exceptions, differential activity in the major pathways (glycolysis, TCA cycle, amino acid and fatty acid synthesis was not reflected in contrasting abundances of the relevant transcripts. The conclusion was that transcript abundance on its own cannot be used to infer metabolic activity/fluxes in central plant metabolism. This limitation needs to be borne in mind in evaluating transcriptome data and designing metabolic engineering experiments.

  13. Clustering of Emerging Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzmaikin, A.

    1997-01-01

    Observations show that newly emerging flux tends to appear on the Solar surface at sites where there is flux already. This results in clustering of solar activity. Standard dynamo theories do not predict this effect.

  14. FLUXES FOR MECHANIZED ELECTRIC WELDING,

    Science.gov (United States)

    WELDING FLUXES, WELDING ), (* WELDING , WELDING FLUXES), ARC WELDING , WELDS, STABILITY, POROSITY, WELDING RODS, STEEL, CERAMIC MATERIALS, FLUXES(FUSION), TITANIUM ALLOYS, ALUMINUM ALLOYS, COPPER ALLOYS, ELECTRODEPOSITION

  15. Patterns of Flux Emergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Title, A.; Cheung, M.

    2008-05-01

    The high spatial resolution and high cadence of the Solar Optical Telescope on the JAXA Hinode spacecraft have allowed capturing many examples of magnetic flux emergence from the scale of granulation to active regions. The observed patterns of emergence are quite similar. Flux emerges as a array of small bipoles on scales from 1 to 5 arc seconds throughout the region that the flux eventually condenses. Because the fields emerging from the underlying flux rope my appear many in small segments and the total flux (absolute sum) is not a conserved quantity the amount of total flux on the surface may vary significantly during the emergence process. Numerical simulations of flux emergence exhibit patterns similar to observations. Movies of both observations and numerical simulations will be presented.

  16. The CC chemokine thymus-derived chemotactic agent 4 (TCA-4, secondary lymphoid tissue chemokine, 6Ckine, exodus-2) triggers lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1-mediated arrest of rolling T lymphocytes in peripheral lymph node high endothelial venules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, J V; Rot, A; Luo, Y; Narasimhaswamy, M; Nakano, H; Gunn, M D; Matsuzawa, A; Quackenbush, E J; Dorf, M E; von Andrian, U H

    2000-01-03

    T cell homing to peripheral lymph nodes (PLNs) is defined by a multistep sequence of interactions between lymphocytes and endothelial cells in high endothelial venules (HEVs). After initial tethering and rolling via L-selectin, firm adhesion of T cells requires rapid upregulation of lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) adhesiveness by a previously unknown pathway that activates a Galpha(i)-linked receptor. Here, we used intravital microscopy of murine PLNs to study the role of thymus-derived chemotactic agent (TCA)-4 (secondary lymphoid tissue chemokine, 6Ckine, Exodus-2) in homing of adoptively transferred T cells from T-GFP mice, a transgenic strain that expresses green fluorescent protein (GFP) selectively in naive T lymphocytes (T(GFP) cells). TCA-4 was constitutively presented on the luminal surface of HEVs, where it was required for LFA-1 activation on rolling T(GFP) cells. Desensitization of the TCA-4 receptor, CC chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7), blocked T(GFP) cell adherence in wild-type HEVs, whereas desensitization to stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1alpha (the ligand for CXC chemokine receptor 4 [CXCR4]) did not affect T(GFP) cell behavior. TCA-4 protein was not detected on the luminal surface of PLN HEVs in plt/plt mice, which have a congenital defect in T cell homing to PLNs. Accordingly, T(GFP) cells rolled but did not arrest in plt/plt HEVs. When TCA-4 was injected intracutaneously into plt/plt mice, the chemokine entered afferent lymph vessels and accumulated in draining PLNs. 2 h after intracutaneous injection, luminal presentation of TCA-4 was detectable in a subset of HEVs, and LFA-1-mediated T(GFP) cell adhesion was restored in these vessels. We conclude that TCA-4 is both required and sufficient for LFA-1 activation on rolling T cells in PLN HEVs. This study also highlights a hitherto undocumented role for chemokines contained in afferent lymph, which may modulate leukocyte recruitment in draining PLNs.

  17. Metabolic flux analysis of the halophilic archaeon Haladaptatus paucihalophilus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Guangxiu; Zhang, Manxiao [Key Laboratory of Desert and Desertification, Cold and Arid Regions Environmental and Engineering Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou, 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Extreme Environmental Microbial Resources and Engineering, Gansu Province, Lanzhou, 730000 (China); Mo, Tianlu [Department of Chemistry, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200433 (China); He, Lian [Key Laboratory of Combinatory Biosynthesis and Drug Discovery (Ministry of Education), School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430071 (China); Zhang, Wei [Key Laboratory of Desert and Desertification, Cold and Arid Regions Environmental and Engineering Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou, 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Extreme Environmental Microbial Resources and Engineering, Gansu Province, Lanzhou, 730000 (China); Yu, Yi, E-mail: yu_yi@whu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Combinatory Biosynthesis and Drug Discovery (Ministry of Education), School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430071 (China); Zhang, Qi, E-mail: qizhang@sioc.ac.cn [Department of Chemistry, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200433 (China); Ding, Wei, E-mail: dingw@lzu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Desert and Desertification, Cold and Arid Regions Environmental and Engineering Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou, 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Extreme Environmental Microbial Resources and Engineering, Gansu Province, Lanzhou, 730000 (China); Department of Chemistry, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200433 (China)

    2015-11-27

    This work reports the {sup 13}C-assisted metabolic flux analysis of Haladaptatus paucihalophilus, a halophilic archaeon possessing an intriguing osmoadaption mechanism. We showed that the carbon flow is through the oxidative tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle whereas the reductive TCA cycle is not operative in H. paucihalophilus. In addition, both threonine and the citramalate pathways contribute to isoleucine biosynthesis, whereas lysine is synthesized through the diaminopimelate pathway and not through the α-aminoadipate pathway. Unexpected, the labeling patterns of glycine from the cells grown on [1-{sup 13}C]pyruvate and [2-{sup 13}C]pyruvate suggest that, unlike all the organisms investigated so far, in which glycine is produced exclusively from the serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT) pathway, glycine biosynthesis in H. paucihalophilus involves different pathways including SHMT, threonine aldolase (TA) and the reverse reaction of glycine cleavage system (GCS), demonstrating for the first time that other pathways instead of SHMT can also make a significant contribution to the cellular glycine pool. Transcriptional analysis confirmed that both TA and GCS genes were transcribed in H. paucihalophilus, and the transcriptional level is independent of salt concentrations in the culture media. This study expands our understanding of amino acid biosynthesis and provides valuable insights into the metabolism of halophilic archaea. - Highlights: • Serine hydroxymethyltransferase, threonine aldolase, and glycine cleavage system all contribute to the glycine pool of H. paucihalophilus. • Threonine and the citramalate pathways contribute equally to the isoleucine biosynthesis in H. paucihalophilus. • Lysine in H. paucihalophilus is synthesized through the diaminopimelate pathway and not through the α-aminoadipate pathway. • Glycine biosynthesis is likely unrelated to the cell osmoadaption mechanism.

  18. Flux balance analysis in the production of clavulanic acid by Streptomyces clavuligerus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Claudia; Quintero, Juan Carlos; Ochoa, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    In this work, in silico flux balance analysis is used for predicting the metabolic behavior of Streptomyces clavuligerus during clavulanic acid production. To choose the best objective function for use in the analysis, three different optimization problems are evaluated inside the flux balance analysis formulation: (i) maximization of the specific growth rate, (ii) maximization of the ATP yield, and (iii) maximization of clavulanic acid production. Maximization of ATP yield showed the best predictions for the cellular behavior. Therefore, flux balance analysis using ATP as objective function was used for analyzing different scenarios of nutrient limitations toward establishing the effect of limiting the carbon, nitrogen, phosphorous, and oxygen sources on the growth and clavulanic acid production rates. Obtained results showed that ammonia and phosphate limitations are the ones most strongly affecting clavulanic acid biosynthesis. Furthermore, it was possible to identify the ornithine flux from the urea cycle and the α-ketoglutarate flux from the TCA cycle as the most determinant internal fluxes for promoting clavulanic acid production.

  19. Highly selective solid-phase extraction and large volume injection for the robust gas chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis of TCA and TBA in wines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insa, S; Anticó, E; Ferreira, V

    2005-09-30

    A reliable solid-phase extraction (SPE) method for the simultaneous determination of 2,4,6-trichloroanisole (TCA) and 2,4,6-tribromoanisole (TBA) in wines has been developed. In the proposed procedure 50 mL of wine are extracted in a 1 mL cartridge filled with 50 mg of LiChrolut EN resins. Most wine volatiles are washed up with 12.5 mL of a water:methanol solution (70%, v/v) containing 1% of NaHCO3. Analytes are further eluted with 0.6 mL of dichloromethane. A 40 microL aliquot of this extract is directly injected into a PTV injector operated in the solvent split mode, and analysed by gas chromatography (GC)-ion trap mass spectrometry using the selected ion storage mode. The solid-phase extraction, including sample volume and rinsing and elution solvents, and the large volume GC injection have been carefully evaluated and optimized. The resulting method is precise (RSD (%) extract is clean, simple and free from non-volatiles).

  20. Exposure of ELF-EMF and RF-EMF Increase the Rate of Glucose Transport and TCA Cycle in Budding Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kang-Wei; Yang, Chuan-Jun; Lian, Hui-Yong; Cai, Peng

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the transcriptional response to 50 Hz extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) and 2.0 GHz radio frequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) exposure by Illumina sequencing technology using budding yeast as the model organism. The transcription levels of 28 genes were upregulated and those of four genes were downregulated under ELF-EMF exposure, while the transcription levels of 29 genes were upregulated and those of 24 genes were downregulated under RF-EMF exposure. After validation by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), a concordant direction of change both in differential gene expression (DGE) and RT-qPCR was demonstrated for nine genes under ELF-EMF exposure and for 10 genes under RF-EMF exposure. The RT-qPCR results revealed that ELF-EMF and RF-EMF exposure can upregulate the expression of genes involved in glucose transportation and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, but not the glycolysis pathway. Energy metabolism is closely related with the cell response to environmental stress including EMF exposure. Our findings may throw light on the mechanism underlying the biological effects of EMF. PMID:27630630

  1. Efeito da precipitação pelo ácido tricloroacético (TCA e da ultrafiltração sobre o perfil peptídico de hidrolisados de caseína Influence of precipitation and ultrafiltration on the peptide profile of casein hydrolysates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Linhares Carreira

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho, estudou-se a influência da ultrafiltração e da precipitação pelo ácido tricloroacético (TCA sobre o perfil peptídico de hidrolisados de caseína. Após esses tratamentos, os hidrolisados foram fracionados pela CLAE-EM (cromatografia líquida de alta eficiência - exclusão molecular, seguida da quantificação dos peptídeos nas frações cromatográficas pelo método rápido da Área Corrigida da Fração (ACF. Observou-se que esses tratamentos alteraram o perfil peptídico, tendo reduzido os teores de di- e tripeptídeos da maioria das preparações enzimáticas. Algumas considerações relacionadas às condições operacionais e à influência da hidrofobicidade dos peptídeos foram feitas, no intuito de explicar os resultados obtidos.The effect of ultrafiltration and precipitation by TCA on the peptide profile of casein hydrolysates was studied. After these treatments, the hydrolysates were fractionated by size-exclusion HPLC and the rapid Correct Fraction Area method was used for quantifying the peptides. These treatments changed the peptide profile having reduced the di- and tripeptide content of some enzymatic preparations. In order to explain these results, some considerations concerning operational conditions and peptide hydrophobicity were made.

  2. Surface Flux Modeling for Air Quality Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Limei Ran

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available For many gasses and aerosols, dry deposition is an important sink of atmospheric mass. Dry deposition fluxes are also important sources of pollutants to terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The surface fluxes of some gases, such as ammonia, mercury, and certain volatile organic compounds, can be upward into the air as well as downward to the surface and therefore should be modeled as bi-directional fluxes. Model parameterizations of dry deposition in air quality models have been represented by simple electrical resistance analogs for almost 30 years. Uncertainties in surface flux modeling in global to mesoscale models are being slowly reduced as more field measurements provide constraints on parameterizations. However, at the same time, more chemical species are being added to surface flux models as air quality models are expanded to include more complex chemistry and are being applied to a wider array of environmental issues. Since surface flux measurements of many of these chemicals are still lacking, resistances are usually parameterized using simple scaling by water or lipid solubility and reactivity. Advances in recent years have included bi-directional flux algorithms that require a shift from pre-computation of deposition velocities to fully integrated surface flux calculations within air quality models. Improved modeling of the stomatal component of chemical surface fluxes has resulted from improved evapotranspiration modeling in land surface models and closer integration between meteorology and air quality models. Satellite-derived land use characterization and vegetation products and indices are improving model representation of spatial and temporal variations in surface flux processes. This review describes the current state of chemical dry deposition modeling, recent progress in bi-directional flux modeling, synergistic model development research with field measurements, and coupling with meteorological land surface models.

  3. Electron heat flux instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Sundas; Sarfraz, M.; Yoon, P. H.; Lazar, M.; Qureshi, M. N. S.

    2017-02-01

    The heat flux instability is an electromagnetic mode excited by a relative drift between the protons and two-component core-halo electrons. The most prominent application may be in association with the solar wind where drifting electron velocity distributions are observed. The heat flux instability is somewhat analogous to the electrostatic Buneman or ion-acoustic instability driven by the net drift between the protons and bulk electrons, except that the heat flux instability operates in magnetized plasmas and possesses transverse electromagnetic polarization. The heat flux instability is also distinct from the electrostatic counterpart in that it requires two electron species with relative drifts with each other. In the literature, the heat flux instability is often called the 'whistler' heat flux instability, but it is actually polarized in the opposite sense to the whistler wave. This paper elucidates all of these fundamental plasma physical properties associated with the heat flux instability starting from a simple model, and gradually building up more complexity towards a solar wind-like distribution functions. It is found that the essential properties of the instability are already present in the cold counter-streaming electron model, and that the instability is absent if the protons are ignored. These instability characteristics are highly reminiscent of the electron firehose instability driven by excessive parallel temperature anisotropy, propagating in parallel direction with respect to the ambient magnetic field, except that the free energy source for the heat flux instability resides in the effective parallel pressure provided by the counter-streaming electrons.

  4. Magnetic Flux Controllers for Induction Heating Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Valentin Nemkov; Robert Goldstein; Robert Ruffini

    2004-01-01

    Application of magnetic flux controllers/concentrators to induction heating coils can drastically improve the process efficiency and heat pattern control. Presentation includes: benefits provided by flux controllers, materials available for controllers, application techniques, computer assisted design of induction coils with concentrators, examples of applications. Depending on induction system design, magnetic flux controllers can concentrate heating in a specified area,change heat source distribution and shield a particular part zone or external area preventing unintended eddy current heating.Besides of the coil efficiency improvement and optimal power distribution, magnetic flux controllers reduce the coil current demand from a supplying circuitry thus strongly reducing losses in busswork, cables, transformers and inverter components.Improvement that can be achieved due to magnetic flux controllers is case dependable. 2D and 3D computer simulation allows the designer to predict accurately effect of controllers on the coil parameters and temperature distribution and optimize the whole electromagnetic system. Special attention in presentation is paid to new magnetodielectric materials optimized for induction heating conditions. These materials have high magnetic permeability and saturation flux density,excellent machinability, good chemical and temperature resistance. Concentrators from these materials can work in a wide range of frequencies and specific powers. Examples of magnetic flux controller application include surface hardening of shafts and gears, induction surface hardfacing and brazing.

  5. Construction of differentially expressed cDNA libraries of aldehyde dehydrogenase with high and low activity from tongue squamous carcinoma Tca8113 cell line%基于舌鳞癌Tca8113细胞醛脱氢酶活性不同构建差异表达基因cDNA文库

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙守娟; 季平; 邓诚; 李颖; 邹波; 漆小娟

    2012-01-01

    Objective To construct the differentially expressed cDNA libraries of aldehyde dehydro genase with high and low activity (ALDHhigh/ALDHlow) from tongue squamous carcinoma Tca8113 cell line. Methods Expression of stem cell marker ALDH was detected, and ALDHhighand ALDHlow cells were collected by Aldefluor assay combined with flow cytometry. Differentially expressed genes of total RNA that was extracted from the two cell subpopulations by Trizol were screened and amplified by suppressing subtractive hybridization ( SSH) , and the PCR products were connected with pMD18-T vector and then transfected into E. Coli DH5a for amplification. Enzyme digestion, gene sequencing and homology analysis were performed in 24 positive clones that were randomly picked from each library. Results Two subproportions of ALDHhigh and ALDHlowwere " screened out, and ALDHhigh cells in Tca8113 cells accounted for 2. 5%. RNA D(260)/D(280) of ALDHhigh and ALDHlow were 1. 93 and 1. 92, respectively. Two-directional subtractive cDNA libraries of ALDHhigh and ALDHlow were constructed, and each library comprised 500 clones. PCR analysis of 24 clones randomly picked from each library showed that insert-fragments distributed in 200 - 700 bp, and no false positive clones were detected. Gene sequencing result that was analyzed and indexed by PubMed showed that cancer related genes included SLC25A13, KLHL2, NPC1, WAPL, BARD1, Notch2 and EEF2K. Conclusion Two-directional subtractive cDNA libraries of ALDHhigh and ALDHlow cells were successfully constructed.%目的 构建舌鳞癌Tca8113细胞系中高、低醛脱氢酶活性(high/low aldehyde dehydrogenase activity,ALDHhigh/ALDHlow)细胞差异表达基因cDNA文库.方法 用流式细胞仪检测ALDEFLUOR(R)染色的Tca8113细胞中干细胞标志物ALDH的表达,并收集ALDHhigh和ALDHlow细胞;用Trizol分别提取两亚群细胞的总RNA;用抑制性消减杂交(SSH)对2组RNA进行差异基因筛选和扩增,扩增产物与pMD18-T载体

  6. (13)C Metabolic Flux Analysis of acetate conversion to lipids by Yarrowia lipolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nian; Qiao, Kangjian; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2016-11-01

    Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) are an inexpensive and renewable carbon source that can be generated from gas fermentation and anaerobic digestion of fermentable wastes. The oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica is a promising biocatalyst that can utilize VFAs and convert them into triacylglycerides (TAGs). However, currently there is limited knowledge on the metabolism of Y. lipolytica when cultured on VFAs. To develop a better understanding, we used acetate as the sole carbon source to culture two strains, a control strain and a previously engineered strain for lipid overaccumulation. For both strains, metabolism during the growth phase and lipid production phase were investigated by metabolic flux analysis using two parallel sodium acetate tracers. The resolved flux distributions demonstrate that the glyoxylate shunt pathway is constantly active and the flux through gluconeogenesis varies depending on strain and phase. In particular, by regulating the activities of malate transport and pyruvate kinase, the cells divert only a portion of the glyoxylate shunt flux required to satisfy the needs for anaplerotic reactions and NADPH production through gluconeogenesis and the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). Excess flux flows back to the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle for energy production. As with the case of glucose as the substrate, the primary source for lipogenic NADPH is derived from the oxidative PPP.

  7. (13)C-metabolic flux analysis for mevalonate-producing strain of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Keisuke; Toya, Yoshihiro; Banno, Satomi; Yoshikawa, Katsunori; Matsuda, Fumio; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2017-02-01

    Mevalonate (MVA) is used to produce various useful products such as drugs, cosmetics and food additives. An MVA-producing strain of Escherichia coli (engineered) was constructed by introducing mvaES genes from Enterococcus faecalis. The engineered strain produced 1.84 mmol/gDCW/h yielding 22% (C-mol/C-mol) of MVA from glucose in the aerobic exponential growth phase. The mass balance analysis revealed that the MVA yield of the engineered strain was close to the upper limit at the biomass yield. Since MVA is synthesized from acetyl-CoA using NADPH as a cofactor, the production of MVA affects central metabolism in terms of carbon utilization and NADPH requirements. The reason for this highly efficient MVA production was investigated based on (13)C-metabolic flux analysis. The estimated flux distributions revealed that the fluxes of acetate formation and the TCA cycle in the engineered strain were lower than those in the control strain. Although the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway is considered as the NADPH generating pathway in E. coli, no difference of the flux was observed between the control and engineered strains. The production/consumption balance of NADPH suggested that additional requirement of NADPH for MVA synthesis was obtained from the transhydrogenase reaction in the engineered strain. Comparison between the measured flux distribution and the ideal values for MVA production proposes a strategy for further engineering to improve the MVA production in E. coli.

  8. Exo-MFA - A 13C metabolic flux analysis framework to dissect tumor microenvironment-secreted exosome contributions towards cancer cell metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achreja, Abhinav; Zhao, Hongyun; Yang, Lifeng; Yun, Tae Hyun; Marini, Juan; Nagrath, Deepak

    2017-09-01

    Dissecting the pleiotropic roles of tumor micro-environment (TME) on cancer progression has been brought to the foreground of research on cancer pathology. Extracellular vesicles such as exosomes, transport proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids, to mediate intercellular communication between TME components and have emerged as candidates for anti-cancer therapy. We previously reported that cancer-associated fibroblast (CAF) derived exosomes (CDEs) contain metabolites in their cargo that are utilized by cancer cells for central carbon metabolism and promote cancer growth. However, the metabolic fluxes involved in donor cells towards packaging of metabolites in extracellular vesicles and exosome-mediated metabolite flux upregulation in recipient cells are still not known. Here, we have developed a novel empirical and computational technique, exosome-mediated metabolic flux analysis (Exo-MFA) to quantify flow of cargo from source cells to recipient cells via vesicular transport. Our algorithm, which is based on (13)C metabolic flux analysis, successfully predicts packaging fluxes to metabolite cargo in CAFs, dynamic changes in rate of exosome internalization by cancer cells, and flux of cargo release over time. We find that cancer cells internalize exosomes rapidly leading to depletion of extracellular exosomes within 24h. However, metabolite cargo significantly alters intracellular metabolism over the course of 24h by regulating glycolysis pathway fluxes via lactate supply. Furthermore, it can supply up to 35% of the TCA cycle fluxes by providing TCA intermediates and glutamine. Our algorithm will help gain insight into (i) metabolic interactions in multicellular systems (ii) biogenesis of extracellular vesicles and their differential packaging of cargo under changing environments, and (iii) regulation of cancer cell metabolism by its microenvironment. Copyright © 2017 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Integrating flux balance analysis into kinetic models to decipher the dynamic metabolism of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueyang Feng

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 sequentially utilizes lactate and its waste products (pyruvate and acetate during batch culture. To decipher MR-1 metabolism, we integrated genome-scale flux balance analysis (FBA into a multiple-substrate Monod model to perform the dynamic flux balance analysis (dFBA. The dFBA employed a static optimization approach (SOA by dividing the batch time into small intervals (i.e., ∼400 mini-FBAs, then the Monod model provided time-dependent inflow/outflow fluxes to constrain the mini-FBAs to profile the pseudo-steady-state fluxes in each time interval. The mini-FBAs used a dual-objective function (a weighted combination of "maximizing growth rate" and "minimizing overall flux" to capture trade-offs between optimal growth and minimal enzyme usage. By fitting the experimental data, a bi-level optimization of dFBA revealed that the optimal weight in the dual-objective function was time-dependent: the objective function was constant in the early growth stage, while the functional weight of minimal enzyme usage increased significantly when lactate became scarce. The dFBA profiled biologically meaningful dynamic MR-1 metabolisms: 1. the oxidative TCA cycle fluxes increased initially and then decreased in the late growth stage; 2. fluxes in the pentose phosphate pathway and gluconeogenesis were stable in the exponential growth period; and 3. the glyoxylate shunt was up-regulated when acetate became the main carbon source for MR-1 growth.

  10. Tissue-specific metabolic reprogramming drives nutrient flux in diabetic complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sas, Kelli M.; Kayampilly, Pradeep; Byun, Jaeman; Nair, Viji; Hinder, Lucy M.; Zhang, Hongyu; Lin, Chengmao; Qi, Nathan R.; Michailidis, George; Groop, Per-Henrik; Nelson, Robert G.; Darshi, Manjula; Sharma, Kumar; Schelling, Jeffrey R.; Sedor, John R.; Pop-Busui, Rodica; Weinberg, Joel M.; Soleimanpour, Scott A.; Abcouwer, Steven F.; Gardner, Thomas W.; Burant, Charles F.; Feldman, Eva L.; Kretzler, Matthias; Brosius, Frank C.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with altered cellular metabolism, but how altered metabolism contributes to the development of diabetic complications is unknown. We used the BKS db/db diabetic mouse model to investigate changes in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in kidney cortex, peripheral nerve, and retina. A systems approach using transcriptomics, metabolomics, and metabolic flux analysis identified tissue-specific differences, with increased glucose and fatty acid metabolism in the kidney, a moderate increase in the retina, and a decrease in the nerve. In the kidney, increased metabolism was associated with enhanced protein acetylation and mitochondrial dysfunction. To confirm these findings in human disease, we analyzed diabetic kidney transcriptomic data and urinary metabolites from a cohort of Southwestern American Indians. The urinary findings were replicated in 2 independent patient cohorts, the Finnish Diabetic Nephropathy and the Family Investigation of Nephropathy and Diabetes studies. Increased concentrations of TCA cycle metabolites in urine, but not in plasma, predicted progression of diabetic kidney disease, and there was an enrichment of pathways involved in glycolysis and fatty acid and amino acid metabolism. Our findings highlight tissue-specific changes in metabolism in complication-prone tissues in diabetes and suggest that urinary TCA cycle intermediates are potential prognostic biomarkers of diabetic kidney disease progression. PMID:27699244

  11. Purple bamboo salt has anticancer activity in TCA8113 cells in vitro and preventive effects on buccal mucosa cancer in mice in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin; Deng, Xiaoxiao; Park, Kun-Young; Qiu, Lihua; Pang, Liang

    2013-02-01

    Bamboo salt is a traditional healthy salt known in Korea. The in vitro anticancer effects of the salt were evaluated using a 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay in TCA8113 human tongue carcinoma cells. At 1% concentration, the growth inhibitory rate of purple bamboo salt was 61% higher than that of sea salt (27%). Apoptosis analysis of the cancer cells was carried out using 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining to investigate the mechanism of the anticancer effects in tongue carcinoma cells. Purple bamboo salt induced a stronger apoptotic effect than sea salt. An Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) mouse buccal mucosa cancer model was established by injecting mice with U14 squamous cell carcinoma cells. Following injection, the wound at the injection site was smeared with salt samples. It was observed that the tumor volumes for the group treated with purple bamboo salt were smaller than those from the sea salt treatment and control groups. The sections of buccal mucosa cancer tissue showed that canceration in the purple bamboo salt group was weaker compared with that in the sea salt group. Similar results were observed in the lesion section of the cervical lymph. Using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blotting, the purple bamboo salt group demonstrated an increase in Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) and a decrease in B cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression, compared with the sea salt and control groups. The results demonstrated that purple bamboo salt had improved in vivo buccal mucosa cancer preventive activity compared with sea salt in mice.

  12. 13C metabolic flux analysis at a genome-scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnan, Saratram; Maranas, Costas D

    2015-11-01

    Metabolic models used in 13C metabolic flux analysis generally include a limited number of reactions primarily from central metabolism. They typically omit degradation pathways, complete cofactor balances, and atom transition contributions for reactions outside central metabolism. This study addresses the impact on prediction fidelity of scaling-up mapping models to a genome-scale. The core mapping model employed in this study accounts for (75 reactions and 65 metabolites) primarily from central metabolism. The genome-scale metabolic mapping model (GSMM) (697 reaction and 595 metabolites) is constructed using as a basis the iAF1260 model upon eliminating reactions guaranteed not to carry flux based on growth and fermentation data for a minimal glucose growth medium. Labeling data for 17 amino acid fragments obtained from cells fed with glucose labeled at the second carbon was used to obtain fluxes and ranges. Metabolic fluxes and confidence intervals are estimated, for both core and genome-scale mapping models, by minimizing the sum of square of differences between predicted and experimentally measured labeling patterns using the EMU decomposition algorithm. Overall, we find that both topology and estimated values of the metabolic fluxes remain largely consistent between core and GSM model. Stepping up to a genome-scale mapping model leads to wider flux inference ranges for 20 key reactions present in the core model. The glycolysis flux range doubles due to the possibility of active gluconeogenesis, the TCA flux range expanded by 80% due to the availability of a bypass through arginine consistent with labeling data, and the transhydrogenase reaction flux was essentially unresolved due to the presence of as many as five routes for the inter-conversion of NADPH to NADH afforded by the genome-scale model. By globally accounting for ATP demands in the GSMM model the unused ATP decreased drastically with the lower bound matching the maintenance ATP requirement. A non

  13. Net Ecosystem Carbon Flux

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Net Ecosystem Carbon Flux is defined as the year-over-year change in Total Ecosystem Carbon Stock, or the net rate of carbon exchange between an ecosystem and the...

  14. Aeronet Solar Flux

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SolRad-Net (Solar Radiation Network) is an established network of ground-based sensors providing high-frequency solar flux measurements in quasi-realtime to the...

  15. Flux in Tallinn

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2004-01-01

    Rahvusvahelise elektroonilise kunsti sümpoosioni ISEA2004 klubiõhtu "Flux in Tallinn" klubis Bon Bon. Eestit esindasid Ropotator, Ars Intel Inc., Urmas Puhkan, Joel Tammik, Taavi Tulev (pseud. Wochtzchee). Klubiõhtu koordinaator Andres Lõo

  16. Flux in Tallinn

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2004-01-01

    Rahvusvahelise elektroonilise kunsti sümpoosioni ISEA2004 klubiõhtu "Flux in Tallinn" klubis Bon Bon. Eestit esindasid Ropotator, Ars Intel Inc., Urmas Puhkan, Joel Tammik, Taavi Tulev (pseud. Wochtzchee). Klubiõhtu koordinaator Andres Lõo

  17. Nitrous Oxide Flux

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Nitrous Oxide (N20) flux is the net rate of nitrous oxide exchange between an ecosystem and the atmosphere. Data of this variable were generated by the USGS...

  18. Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems

    Data.gov (United States)

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory — The Southern Great Plains (SGP) carbon dioxide flux (CO2 flux) measurement systems provide half-hour average fluxes of CO2, H2O (latent heat), and sensible heat. The...

  19. Flux Emergence (Theory)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Mark C. M.; Isobe, Hiroaki

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic flux emergence from the solar convection zone into the overlying atmosphere is the driver of a diverse range of phenomena associated with solar activity. In this article, we introduce theoretical concepts central to the study of flux emergence and discuss how the inclusion of different physical effects (e.g., magnetic buoyancy, magnetoconvection, reconnection, magnetic twist, interaction with ambient field) in models impact the evolution of the emerging field and plasma.

  20. Theoretical magnetic flux emergence

    OpenAIRE

    MacTaggart, David

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic flux emergence is the subject of how magnetic fields from the solar interior can rise and expand into the atmosphere to produce active regions. It is the link that joins dynamics in the convection zone with dynamics in the atmosphere. In this thesis, we study many aspects of magnetic flux emergence through mathematical modelling and computer simulations. Our primary aim is to understand the key physical processes that lie behind emergence. The first chapter intro...

  1. Flux Emergence (Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark C. M. Cheung

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic flux emergence from the solar convection zone into the overlying atmosphere is the driver of a diverse range of phenomena associated with solar activity. In this article, we introduce theoretical concepts central to the study of flux emergence and discuss how the inclusion of different physical effects (e.g., magnetic buoyancy, magnetoconvection, reconnection, magnetic twist, interaction with ambient field in models impact the evolution of the emerging field and plasma.

  2. The invasion of non-native grasses into California grasslands has caused a shift in energy partitioning between latent and sensible heat flux, reduced albedo and higher surface temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koteen, L. E.; Harte, J.; Baldocchi, D. D.

    2012-12-01

    In California, native grasses have been largely displaced across millions of acres of grassland habitat by the invasion of non-native grasses from Mediterranean Europe. Although seemingly subtle, this shift in grass species composition has altered the water and energy cycles in these ecosystems due to a shift in life cycle strategy. Native California grasses are perennial and long-lived. To survive California's long summer drought, they possess deep roots to harvest moisture along the full depth of the soil profile. Aboveground, most California perennial grasses are bunchy and dense, covering the ground and restricting soil evaporation. Their growing season extends over most of the year, thus maintaining an unbroken interaction along the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum, and enabling the plants to draw water from deep soil layers well into the dry summer. In contrast, the now-dominant non-native grasses are annuals. They grow from seed each year when Autumn rains begin, and die with the onset of summer drought. Aboveground, non-native annuals are sparse relative to native perennials, and possess a shallow root system with the large majority of root biomass above 20 cm depth. To determine the impact of this land cover shift on ecosystem water and energy cycles, we measured the components of the surface energy balance at a grassland site in northern coastal California where remnant perennial grasses are found growing alongside regions that have undergone non-native invasion. Specifically, in locations dominated by each grass type, we measured net radiation and ground and canopy heat flux through the surface renewal method. We also measured midday PAR albedo to determine the impact of grassland invasion on energy capture. In three years of measurements, corresponding to average, wet and dry years, we found that energy partitioning during the growing season is similar between grass types. However, once non-native annual grasses senesce in mid to late spring, the ratio

  3. 外周血DC-CIK对人舌鳞癌细胞系Tca8113的抑瘤作用%The anti-tumor effect of co-cultured DC-CIK from peripheral blood to human tongue SCC cell line Tca8113in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李思毅; 张尚权; 张陈平; 陈万涛

    2011-01-01

    目的:探讨体外致敏成熟树突状细胞(DC)与细胞因子诱导杀伤细胞(CIK)共培养细胞群对人舌鳞癌细胞系Tca8113移植瘤裸鼠的体内抑瘤效果.方法:人舌鳞癌外周血分离培养DC,体外诱导培养CIK细胞,将致敏成熟的DC与CIK体外扩增获得共培养细胞群DC-CIK细胞;于裸鼠单侧腋下接种Tca8113,将实验动物分为对照组A、实验组B和实验组C;接种后24h,A组移植瘤区注射生理盐水,B组于对侧腋下注射DC-CIK,C组同侧腋下注射DC-CIK,饲养4周;观察移植瘤的成瘤时间、成瘤率、生长曲线及组织学观察,采用SAS 6.12软件包对数据进行t检验、方差分析和x2检验.结果:A组平均成瘤时间为7.63d,B组为9.5d,C组为12d,A、C组有显著差异(P=-0.0132);注射后2周,A组成瘤率为100%,B组为87.5%,C组为62.5%,P>O.05;观察期内,从移植瘤生长曲线观察,A组瘤体增长最快,B组其次,C组最慢,A、B组无显著差异(P>0.05),A、C组差异显著(P=0.036).结论:致敏DC-CIK共培养细胞对Tca8113移植瘤裸鼠有一定的体内抑瘤效应.%PURPOSE: To evaluate the anti-tumor effect of co-cultured sensitized dendritic cell (DC) and cytokine-induced killer cell (CIK) separated from peripheral blood to human tongue SCC nude mice cancer model in vivo. METHOD: Both DC and CIK were separated and cultured in vitro from peripheral blood of oral tongue cancer patients. The sensitized DC was co-cultured with CIK. Tca8113 cells were injected into the right oxter of 24 BALB/c nude mice which were divided into control group A, experiment group B and group C. 24 hours later, group A received normal saline injection in one site with Tea 8113 transplantation, group B were injected DC-CIK in opposite side, group C were injected the same dose of DC-CIK in right oxter. The number and size of induced tumors were observed in the next 4 weeks.The data was analyzed with SAS 6.12 software package for student's t test, ANOVA and Chi-square test

  4. Spheromak reactor with poloidal flux-amplifying transformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furth, Harold P.; Janos, Alan C.; Uyama, Tadao; Yamada, Masaaki

    1987-01-01

    An inductive transformer in the form of a solenoidal coils aligned along the major axis of a flux core induces poloidal flux along the flux core's axis. The current in the solenoidal coil is then reversed resulting in a poloidal flux swing and the conversion of a portion of the poloidal flux to a toroidal flux in generating a spheromak plasma wherein equilibrium approaches a force-free, minimum Taylor state during plasma formation, independent of the initial conditions or details of the formation. The spheromak plasma is sustained with the Taylor state maintained by oscillating the currents in the poloidal and toroidal field coils within the plasma-forming flux core. The poloidal flux transformer may be used either as an amplifier stage in a moving plasma reactor scenario for initial production of a spheromak plasma or as a method for sustaining a stationary plasma and further heating it. The solenoidal coil embodiment of the poloidal flux transformer can alternately be used in combination with a center conductive cylinder aligned along the length and outside of the solenoidal coil. This poloidal flux-amplifying inductive transformer approach allows for a relaxation of demanding current carrying requirements on the spheromak reactor's flux core, reduces plasma contamination arising from high voltage electrode discharge, and improves the efficiency of poloidal flux injection.

  5. Flux pinning in superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Matsushita, Teruo

    2014-01-01

    The book covers the flux pinning mechanisms and properties and the electromagnetic phenomena caused by the flux pinning common for metallic, high-Tc and MgB2 superconductors. The condensation energy interaction known for normal precipitates or grain boundaries and the kinetic energy interaction proposed for artificial Nb pins in Nb-Ti, etc., are introduced for the pinning mechanism. Summation theories to derive the critical current density are discussed in detail. Irreversible magnetization and AC loss caused by the flux pinning are also discussed. The loss originally stems from the ohmic dissipation of normal electrons in the normal core driven by the electric field induced by the flux motion. The readers will learn why the resultant loss is of hysteresis type in spite of such mechanism. The influence of the flux pinning on the vortex phase diagram in high Tc superconductors is discussed, and the dependencies of the irreversibility field are also described on other quantities such as anisotropy of supercondu...

  6. Flux Pinning in Superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Matsushita, Teruo

    2007-01-01

    The book covers the flux pinning mechanisms and properties and the electromagnetic phenomena caused by the flux pinning common for metallic, high-Tc and MgB2 superconductors. The condensation energy interaction known for normal precipitates or grain boundaries and the kinetic energy interaction proposed for artificial Nb pins in Nb-Ti, etc., are introduced for the pinning mechanism. Summation theories to derive the critical current density are discussed in detail. Irreversible magnetization and AC loss caused by the flux pinning are also discussed. The loss originally stems from the ohmic dissipation of normal electrons in the normal core driven by the electric field induced by the flux motion. The readers will learn why the resultant loss is of hysteresis type in spite of such mechanism. The influence of the flux pinning on the vortex phase diagram in high Tc superconductors is discussed, and the dependencies of the irreversibility field are also described on other quantities such as anisotropy of supercondu...

  7. A dynamic metabolic flux balance based model of fed-batch fermentation of Bordetella pertussis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budman, Hector; Patel, Nilesh; Tamer, Melih; Al-Gherwi, Walid

    2013-01-01

    A mathematical model based on a dynamic metabolic flux balance (DMFB) is developed for a process of fed-batch fermentation of Bordetella pertussis. The model is based on the maximization of growth rate at each time interval subject to stoichiometric constraints. The model is calibrated and verified with experimental data obtained in two different bioreactor experimental systems. It was found that the model calibration was mostly sensitive to the consumption or production rates of tyrosine and, for high supplementation rates, to the consumption rate of glutamate. Following this calibration the model correctly predicts biomass and by-products concentrations for different supplementation rates. Comparisons of model predictions to oxygen uptake and carbon emission rates measurements indicate that the TCA cycle is fully functional.

  8. Protected Flux Pairing Qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Matthew; Zhang, Wenyuan; Ioffe, Lev; Gershenson, Michael

    2014-03-01

    We have studied the coherent flux tunneling in a qubit containing two submicron Josephson junctions shunted by a superinductor (a dissipationless inductor with an impedance much greater than the resistance quantum). The two low energy quantum states of this device, " open="|"> 0 and " open="|"> 1, are represented by even and odd number of fluxes in the loop, respectively. This device is dual to the charge pairing Josephson rhombi qubit. The spectrum of the device, studied by microwave spectroscopy, reflects the interference between coherent quantum phase slips in the two junctions (the Aharonov-Casher effect). The time domain measurements demonstrate the suppression of the qubit's energy relaxation in the protected regime, which illustrates the potential of this flux pairing device as a protected quantum circuit. Templeton Foundation, NSF, and ARO.

  9. Solar Magnetic Flux Ropes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Boris Filippov; Olesya Martsenyuk; Abhishek K. Srivastava; Wahab Uddin

    2015-03-01

    In the early 1990s, it was found that the strongest disturbances of the space–weather were associated with huge ejections of plasma from the solar corona, which took the form of magnetic clouds when moved from the Sun. It is the collisions of the magnetic clouds with the Earth's magnetosphere that lead to strong, sometimes catastrophic changes in space–weather. The onset of a coronal mass ejection (CME) is sudden and no reliable forerunners of CMEs have been found till date. The CME prediction methodologies are less developed compared to the methods developed for the prediction of solar flares. The most probable initial magnetic configuration of a CME is a flux rope consisting of twisted field lines which fill the whole volume of a dark coronal cavity. The flux ropes can be in stable equilibrium in the coronal magnetic field for weeks and even months, but suddenly they lose their stability and erupt with high speed. Their transition to the unstable phase depends on the parameters of the flux rope (i.e., total electric current, twist, mass loading, etc.), as well as on the properties of the ambient coronal magnetic field. One of the major governing factors is the vertical gradient of the coronal magnetic field, which is estimated as decay index (). Cold dense prominence material can be collected in the lower parts of the helical flux tubes. Filaments are, therefore, good tracers of the flux ropes in the corona, which become visible long before the beginning of the eruption. The perspectives of the filament eruptions and following CMEs can be estimated by a comparison of observed filament heights with calculated decay index distributions. The present paper reviews the formation of magnetic flux ropes, their stable and unstable phases, eruption conditions, and also discusses their physical implications in the solar corona.

  10. Flux expulsion variation in SRF cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Posen, S; Romanenko, A; Melnychuk, O; Sergatskov, D A; Martinello, M; Checchin, M; Crawford, A C

    2015-01-01

    Treating a cavity with nitrogen doping significantly increases $Q_0$ at medium fields, reducing cryogenic costs for high duty factor linear accelerators such as LCLS II. N-doping also makes cavities more sensitive to increased residual resistance due to trapped magnetic flux, making it critical to either have extremely effective magnetic shielding, or to prevent flux from being trapped in the cavity during cooldown. In this paper, we report on results of a study of flux expulsion. We discuss possible ways in which flux can be pinned in the inner surface, outer surface, or bulk of a cavity, and we present experimental results studying these mechanisms. We show that grain structure appears to play a key role and that a cavity that expelled flux poorly changed to expelling flux well after a high temperature furnace treatment. We further show that after furnace treatment, this cavity exhibited a significant improvement in quality factor when cooled in an external magnetic field. We conclude with implications for ...

  11. Muon and neutrino fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, P. G.; Protheroe, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    The result of a new calculation of the atmospheric muon and neutrino fluxes and the energy spectrum of muon-neutrinos produced in individual extensive air showers (EAS) initiated by proton and gamma-ray primaries is reported. Also explained is the possibility of detecting atmospheric nu sub mu's due to gamma-rays from these sources.

  12. Coupled superconducting flux qubits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantenberg, J.H.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis presents results of theoretical and experimental work on superconducting persistent-current quantum bits. These qubits offer an attractive route towards scalable solid-state quantum computing. The focus of this work is on the gradiometer flux qubit which has a special geometric design, t

  13. Generic flux coupling analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reimers, A.C.; Goldstein, Y.; Bockmayr, A.

    2015-01-01

    Flux coupling analysis (FCA) has become a useful tool for aiding metabolic reconstructions and guiding genetic manipulations. Originally, it was introduced for constraint-based models of metabolic networks that are based on the steady-state assumption. Recently, we have shown that the steady-state a

  14. Lobotomy of flux compactifications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dibitetto, Giuseppe; Guarino, Adolfo; Roest, Diederik

    2014-01-01

    We provide the dictionary between four-dimensional gauged supergravity and type II compactifications on (6) with metric and gauge fluxes in the absence of supersymmetry breaking sources, such as branes and orientifold planes. Secondly, we prove that there is a unique isotropic compactification

  15. Disconnecting Solar Magnetic Flux

    CERN Document Server

    DeForest, C E; McComas, D J

    2011-01-01

    Disconnection of open magnetic flux by reconnection is required to balance the injection of open flux by CMEs and other eruptive events. Making use of recent advances in heliospheric background subtraction, we have imaged many abrupt disconnection events. These events produce dense plasma clouds whose distinctie shape can now be traced from the corona across the inner solar system via heliospheric imaging. The morphology of each initial event is characteristic of magnetic reconnection across a current sheet, and the newly-disconnected flux takes the form of a "U"-shaped loop that moves outward, accreting coronal and solar wind material. We analyzed one such event on 2008 December 18 as it formed and accelerated at 20 m/s^2 to 320 km/s, expanding self-similarly until it exited our field of view 1.2 AU from the Sun. From acceleration and photometric mass estimates we derive the coronal magnetic field strength to be 8uT, 6 Rs above the photosphere, and the entrained flux to be 1.6x10^11 Wb (1.6x10^19 Mx). We mod...

  16. Coupled superconducting flux qubits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantenberg, J.H.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis presents results of theoretical and experimental work on superconducting persistent-current quantum bits. These qubits offer an attractive route towards scalable solid-state quantum computing. The focus of this work is on the gradiometer flux qubit which has a special geometric design, t

  17. Study of the Intercellular Transfer of the Oncogenic Factors by exosome from Tca8113%舌癌细胞 exosome 中致癌因素的细胞间转移研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董超; 姜山; 胡温庭; 吴正华; 孙学辉

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the intercellular transfer of the oncogenic factors by exosome derived from Tca8113 tumor cells and to explore whether the exosomes are able to target oral mucosa epithelial cell .Methods Firstly eukaryotic expression vector of pEGFP-N1-EGFRvⅢ was constructed and recombinant plasmid was transfected intoT-ca8113 instantly.Tca8113 transfected -derived exosomes were isolated and purified from the culture supernatants by seri-al ultracentrifugation and sugar density ultracentrifugation .Exosomes were observed with transmission electronic micro-scope.Incubated exosome with oral mucosa epithelial cell to observe whether green signal exosomes could be uptaken by the cells.Results Some Tca8113 transfected could be seen bright green signal under the fluorescence microscope .The exosomes were exhibited heterogenous round or elliptic microvesicles ranging from 30nm to 100nm in diameter with intact membrane.The HOK cell incubated with exosome coule seen green signal .Conclusion This study successfully isolate exosomes of Tca8113 and prove that oral mucosa epithelial cells are the biological targets of such exosomes .Exosome can contribute to a horizontal propagation of oncogenic factors among cells .%目的:观察人舌癌细胞Tca8113来源exosome与人正常口腔黏膜上皮细胞间进行致癌因素的细胞间转移,探索正常口腔黏膜上皮细胞是否是舌癌细胞exosome的靶细胞。方法构建含有EGFRvⅢ绿色荧光蛋白表达载体,用脂质体转染入舌癌细胞Tca8113,倒置荧光显微镜下观察转染情况;采用超滤离心结合蔗糖密度梯度超速离心的方法从已转染舌癌细胞的培养上清液中分离出exosome,在透射电子显微镜下观察确认;将ex-osome与人正常口腔黏膜上皮细胞共培养,倒置荧光显微镜下观察人正常口腔黏膜上皮细胞是否能摄取exo-some。结果重组质粒pEGFP-N1-EGFRvⅢ转染的舌癌细胞在倒置荧光显微镜下呈现绿色荧

  18. Parallel labeling experiments validate Clostridium acetobutylicum metabolic network model for (13)C metabolic flux analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Jennifer; Choi, Jungik; Jones, Shawn W; Venkataramanan, Keerthi P; Antoniewicz, Maciek R

    2014-11-01

    In this work, we provide new insights into the metabolism of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 obtained using a systematic approach for quantifying fluxes based on parallel labeling experiments and (13)C-metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA). Here, cells were grown in parallel cultures with [1-(13)C]glucose and [U-(13)C]glucose as tracers and (13)C-MFA was used to quantify intracellular metabolic fluxes. Several metabolic network models were compared: an initial model based on current knowledge, and extended network models that included additional reactions that improved the fits of experimental data. While the initial network model did not produce a statistically acceptable fit of (13)C-labeling data, an extended network model with five additional reactions was able to fit all data with 292 redundant measurements. The model was subsequently trimmed to produce a minimal network model of C. acetobutylicum for (13)C-MFA, which could still reproduce all of the experimental data. The flux results provided valuable new insights into the metabolism of C. acetobutylicum. First, we found that TCA cycle was effectively incomplete, as there was no measurable flux between α-ketoglutarate and succinyl-CoA, succinate and fumarate, and malate and oxaloacetate. Second, an active pathway was identified from pyruvate to fumarate via aspartate. Third, we found that isoleucine was produced exclusively through the citramalate synthase pathway in C. acetobutylicum and that CAC3174 was likely responsible for citramalate synthase activity. These model predictions were confirmed in several follow-up tracer experiments. The validated metabolic network model established in this study can be used in future investigations for unbiased (13)C-flux measurements in C. acetobutylicum. Copyright © 2014 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. (Hybrid) Baryons in the Flux-Tube Model

    CERN Document Server

    Page, P R

    1999-01-01

    We construct baryons and hybrid baryons in the non-relativistic flux-tube model of Isgur and Paton. The motion of the flux-tube with the three quark positions fixed, except for centre of mass corrections, is discussed. It is shown that the problem can to an excellent approximation be reduced to the independent motion of a junction and strings.

  20. Integrated 13C-metabolic flux analysis of 14 parallel labeling experiments in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crown, Scott B; Long, Christopher P; Antoniewicz, Maciek R

    2015-03-01

    The use of parallel labeling experiments for (13)C metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) has emerged in recent years as the new gold standard in fluxomics. The methodology has been termed COMPLETE-MFA, short for complementary parallel labeling experiments technique for metabolic flux analysis. In this contribution, we have tested the limits of COMPLETE-MFA by demonstrating integrated analysis of 14 parallel labeling experiments with Escherichia coli. An effort on such a massive scale has never been attempted before. In addition to several widely used isotopic tracers such as [1,2-(13)C]glucose and mixtures of [1-(13)C]glucose and [U-(13)C]glucose, four novel tracers were applied in this study: [2,3-(13)C]glucose, [4,5,6-(13)C]glucose, [2,3,4,5,6-(13)C]glucose and a mixture of [1-(13)C]glucose and [4,5,6-(13)C]glucose. This allowed us for the first time to compare the performance of a large number of isotopic tracers. Overall, there was no single best tracer for the entire E. coli metabolic network model. Tracers that produced well-resolved fluxes in the upper part of metabolism (glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathways) showed poor performance for fluxes in the lower part of metabolism (TCA cycle and anaplerotic reactions), and vice versa. The best tracer for upper metabolism was 80% [1-(13)C]glucose+20% [U-(13)C]glucose, while [4,5,6-(13)C]glucose and [5-(13)C]glucose both produced optimal flux resolution in the lower part of metabolism. COMPLETE-MFA improved both flux precision and flux observability, i.e. more independent fluxes were resolved with smaller confidence intervals, especially exchange fluxes. Overall, this study demonstrates that COMPLETE-MFA is a powerful approach for improving flux measurements and that this methodology should be considered in future studies that require very high flux resolution.

  1. Triples, Fluxes, and Strings

    CERN Document Server

    De Boer, J; Hori, K; Keurentjes, A; Morgan, J; Morrison, Douglas Robert Ogston; Sethi, S K; Boer, Jan de; Dijkgraaf, Robbert; Hori, Kentaro; Keurentjes, Arjan; Morgan, John; Morrison, David R.; Sethi, Savdeep

    2002-01-01

    We study string compactifications with sixteen supersymmetries. The moduli space for these compactifications becomes quite intricate in lower dimensions, partly because there are many different irreducible components. We focus primarily, but not exclusively, on compactifications to seven or more dimensions. These vacua can be realized in a number ways: the perturbative constructions we study include toroidal compactifications of the heterotic/type I strings, asymmetric orbifolds, and orientifolds. In addition, we describe less conventional M and F theory compactifications on smooth spaces. The last class of vacua considered are compactifications on singular spaces with non-trivial discrete fluxes. We find a number of new components in the string moduli space. Contained in some of these components are M theory compactifications with novel kinds of ``frozen'' singularities. We are naturally led to conjecture the existence of new dualities relating spaces with different singular geometries and fluxes. As our stu...

  2. Atmospheric lepton fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaisser Thomas K.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This review of atmospheric muons and neutrinos emphasizes the high energy range relevant for backgrounds to high-energy neutrinos of astrophysical origin. After a brief historical introduction, the main distinguishing features of atmospheric νμ and νe are discussed, along with the implications of the muon charge ratio for the νµ / ν̅µ ratio. Methods to account for effects of the knee in the primary cosmic-ray spectrum and the energy-dependence of hadronic interactions on the neutrino fluxes are discussed and illustrated in the context of recent results from IceCube. A simple numerical/analytic method is proposed for systematic investigation of uncertainties in neutrino fluxes arising from uncertainties in the primary cosmic-ray spectrum/composition and hadronic interactions.

  3. Lobotomy of flux compactifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibitetto, Giuseppe; Guarino, Adolfo; Roest, Diederik

    2014-05-01

    We provide the dictionary between four-dimensional gauged supergravity and type II compactifications on 6 with metric and gauge fluxes in the absence of supersymmetry breaking sources, such as branes and orientifold planes. Secondly, we prove that there is a unique isotropic compactification allowing for critical points. It corresponds to a type IIA background given by a product of two 3-tori with SO(3) twists and results in a unique theory (gauging) with a non-semisimple gauge algebra. Besides the known four AdS solutions surviving the orientifold projection to = 4 induced by O6-planes, this theory contains a novel AdS solution that requires non-trivial orientifold-odd fluxes, hence being a genuine critical point of the = 8 theory.

  4. Lobotomy of flux compactifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dibitetto, Giuseppe [Institutionen för fysik och astronomi, University of Uppsala,Box 803, SE-751 08 Uppsala (Sweden); Guarino, Adolfo [Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Institute for Theoretical Physics,Bern University, Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland); Roest, Diederik [Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Groningen,Nijenborgh 4 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands)

    2014-05-15

    We provide the dictionary between four-dimensional gauged supergravity and type II compactifications on T{sup 6} with metric and gauge fluxes in the absence of supersymmetry breaking sources, such as branes and orientifold planes. Secondly, we prove that there is a unique isotropic compactification allowing for critical points. It corresponds to a type IIA background given by a product of two 3-tori with SO(3) twists and results in a unique theory (gauging) with a non-semisimple gauge algebra. Besides the known four AdS solutions surviving the orientifold projection to N=4 induced by O6-planes, this theory contains a novel AdS solution that requires non-trivial orientifold-odd fluxes, hence being a genuine critical point of the N=8 theory.

  5. Estimating biological elementary flux modes that decompose a flux distribution by the minimal branching property

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, Siu Hung Joshua; Solem, Christian; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal;

    2014-01-01

    MOTIVATION: Elementary flux mode (EFM) is a useful tool in constraint-based modeling of metabolic networks. The property that every flux distribution can be decomposed as a weighted sum of EFMs allows certain applications of EFMs to studying flux distributions. The existence of biologically...... infeasible EFMs and the non-uniqueness of the decomposition, however, undermine the applicability of such methods. Efforts have been made to find biologically feasible EFMs by incorporating information from transcriptional regulation and thermodynamics. Yet, no attempt has been made to distinguish...... reduced the solution space in which the decomposition is often unique. An experimental flux distribution from a previous study on mouse cardiomyocyte was decomposed using MBD. Comparison with decomposition by a minimum number of EFMs showed that MBD found EFMs more consistent with established biological...

  6. Flux calculations in an inhomogeneous Universe: weighting a flux-limited galaxy sample

    CERN Document Server

    Koers, Hylke B J

    2009-01-01

    Many astrophysical problems arising within the context of ultra-high energy cosmic rays, very-high energy gamma rays or neutrinos, require calculation of the flux produced by sources tracing the distribution of galaxies in the Universe. We discuss a simple weighting scheme, an application of the method introduced by Lynden-Bell in 1971, that allows the calculation of the flux sky map directly from a flux-limited galaxy catalog without cutting a volume-limited subsample. Using this scheme, the galaxy distribution can be modeled up to large scales while representing the distribution in the nearby Universe with maximum accuracy. We consider fluctuations in the flux map arising from the finiteness of the galaxy sample. We show how these fluctuations are reduced by the weighting scheme and discuss how the remaining fluctuations limit the applicability of the method.

  7. Effect of chamber enclosure time on soil respiration flux: A comparison of linear and non-linear flux calculation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, Tanka P.; Lærke, Poul Erik; Elsgaard, Lars

    2016-09-01

    One of the shortcomings of closed chamber methods for soil respiration (SR) measurements is the decreased CO2 diffusion rate from soil to chamber headspace that may occur due to increased chamber CO2 concentrations. This feedback on diffusion rate may lead to underestimation of pre-deployment fluxes by linear regression techniques. Thus, usually the cumulative flux curve becomes downward concave due to the decreased gas diffusion rate. Non-linear models based on biophysical theory usually fit to such curvatures and may reduce the underestimation of fluxes. In this study, we examined the effect of increasing chamber enclosure time on SR flux rates calculated using a linear, an exponential and a revised Hutchinson and Mosier model (HMR). Soil respiration rates were measured with a closed chamber in combination with an infrared gas analyzer. During SR flux measurements the chamber was placed on fixed collars, and CO2 concentration in the chamber headspace were recorded at 1-s intervals for 45 min. Fluxes were measured in different soil types (sandy, sandy loam and organic soils), and for various manipulations (tillage, rain and drought) and soil conditions (temperature and moisture) to obtain a range of fluxes with different shapes of flux curves. The linear method provided more stable flux results during short enclosure times (few min) but underestimated initial fluxes by 15-300% after 45 min deployment time. Non-linear models reduced the underestimation as average underestimation was only about 10% after 45 min for regular flux curves. For irregular flux curves with a rapid increase in CO2 concentration immediately after chamber deployment it was shown that short enclosure times were prone to overestimation of pre-deployment fluxes, but this was mitigated by longer enclosure times (>10-15 min).

  8. High Flux Calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-05-05

    These approaches are based on proven principles which have served the thermal test community well for years. Other concepts hold promise of being able to...8217. --......- - ... .... - - The thermal test community has developed instrumentation which is quite suitable for the moderate, and relatively constant, flux...on the maximum phase II system fluence of 400 cal/cm2 . Second, the present thermal test community will have confidence in the performance of an

  9. Lobotomy of Flux Compactifications

    OpenAIRE

    Giuseppe Dibitetto; Adolfo Guarino(Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Bern University, Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland); Diederik Roest

    2014-01-01

    We provide the dictionary between four-dimensional gauged supergravity and type II compactifications on $ \\mathbb{T} $ 6 with metric and gauge fluxes in the absence of supersymmetry breaking sources, such as branes and orientifold planes. Secondly, we prove that there is a unique isotropic compactification allowing for critical points. It corresponds to a type IIA background given by a product of two 3-tori with SO(3) twists and results in a unique theory (gauging) with a non-semisimple gauge...

  10. The transient transpiration heat flux meter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, N. [Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica-DEM, Universidade de Aveiro, Campus Universitario de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)]. E-mail: nmartins@mec.ua.pt; Calisto, H. [Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica-DEM, Universidade de Aveiro, Campus Universitario de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Afgan, N. [Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Leontiev, A.I. [Moscow State Technical University, 2nd Baumanskaya Str. 5, Moscow 107005 (Russian Federation)

    2006-10-15

    A new heat flux measurement principle, based on the transient response of a transpiration radiometer, is proposed. The measurement principle of current transpiration radiometers is based on a steady-state temperature measurement in a porous element. Since it may typically take several seconds to reach these conditions, there are obvious benefits in reducing the instrument response time. This can be achieved through the analysis of its transient response in order to predict the incident heat flux. In addition, the proposed methodology enables the separate measurement of the radiative and convective components of incident heat fluxes, without compromising the known advantages of transpiration radiometers. The availability of such an instrument may enable the development of advanced monitoring, diagnostic and control systems for thermal equipment.

  11. Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory — The eddy correlation (ECOR) flux measurement system provides in situ, half-hour measurements of the surface turbulent fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, latent heat,...

  12. First-order chemistry in the surface-flux layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, L.; Andersen, C.E.; Ejsing Jørgensen, Hans

    1997-01-01

    process, The analytic flux solution showed a clear deviation from the constant flux, characterizing a conserved scalar in the surface-flux layer. It decreases with height and is reduced by an order of magnitude of the surface flux at a height equal to about the typical mean distance a molecule can travel...... before destruction. The predicted mean concentration profile, however, shows only a small deviation from the logarithmic behavior of a conserved scalar. The solution is consistent with assuming a flux-gradient relationship with a turbulent diffusivity corrected by the Damkohler ratio, the ratio...... of a characteristic turbulent time scale and the scalar mean lifetime. We show that if we use only first-order closure and neglect the effect of the Damkohler ratio on the turbulent diffusivity we obtain another analytic solution for the profiles of the flux and the mean concentration which, from an experimental...

  13. Real Time Flux Control in PM Motors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otaduy, P.J.

    2005-09-27

    Significant research at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center (PEEMRC) is being conducted to develop ways to increase (1) torque, (2) speed range, and (3) efficiency of traction electric motors for hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) within existing current and voltage bounds. Current is limited by the inverter semiconductor devices' capability and voltage is limited by the stator wire insulation's ability to withstand the maximum back-electromotive force (emf), which occurs at the upper end of the speed range. One research track has been to explore ways to control the path and magnitude of magnetic flux while the motor is operating. The phrase, real time flux control (RTFC), refers to this mode of operation in which system parameters are changed while the motor is operating to improve its performance and speed range. RTFC has potential to meet an increased torque demand by introducing additional flux through the main air gap from an external source. It can augment the speed range by diverting flux away from the main air gap to reduce back-emf at high speeds. Conventional RTFC technology is known as vector control [1]. Vector control decomposes the stator current into two components; one that produces torque and a second that opposes (weakens) the magnetic field generated by the rotor, thereby requiring more overall stator current and reducing the efficiency. Efficiency can be improved by selecting a RTFC method that reduces the back-emf without increasing the average current. This favors methods that use pulse currents or very low currents to achieve field weakening. Foremost in ORNL's effort to develop flux control is the work of J. S. Hsu. Early research [2,3] introduced direct control of air-gap flux in permanent magnet (PM) machines and demonstrated it with a flux-controlled generator. The configuration eliminates the problem of demagnetization because it diverts all the flux from the

  14. [The flux of historiography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzolini, R G

    2001-01-01

    The author places Grmek's editorial within the flux of the historiographical debate which, since the middle of the 1970s, has concentrated on two major crises due to the end of social science-oriented 'scientific history' and to the 'linguistic turn'. He also argues that Grmek's historiographical work of the 1980s and 1990s was to some extent an alternative to certain observed changes in historical fashion and has achieved greater intelligibility because of its commitment to a rational vision of science and historiography.

  15. Critical heat flux thermodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collado, F.J. E-mail: fjk@posta.unizar.es

    2002-11-01

    Convective boiling in subcooled water flowing through a heated channel is essential in many engineering applications where high heat flux need to be accommodated, such as in the divertor plates of fusion reactors. There are many available correlations for predicting heat transfer in the individual regimes of the empirical Nukiyama boiling curve, although unfortunately there is no physical fundamentals of such curve. Recently, the author has shown that the classical entropy balance could contain key information about boiling heat transfer. So, it was found that the average thermal gap in the heated channel (the wall temperature minus the average temperature of the coolant fluid) was strongly correlated with the efficiency of a theoretical reversible engine placed in this thermal gap. In this work and from the new proposed correlation, a new expression of the wall temperature in function of the average fluid temperature is derived and successfully checked against experimental data from General Electric. This expression suggests a new and simple definition of the critical heat flux (CHF), a key parameter of the thermal-hydraulic design of fusion reactors. Finally, based on the new definition, the CHF trends are commented.

  16. Flux frequency analysis of seasonally dry ecosystem fluxes in two unique biomes of Sonora Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verduzco, V. S.; Yepez, E. A.; Robles-Morua, A.; Garatuza, J.; Rodriguez, J. C.; Watts, C.

    2013-05-01

    Complex dynamics from the interactions of ecosystems processes makes difficult to model the behavior of ecosystems fluxes of carbon and water in response to the variation of environmental and biological drivers. Although process oriented ecosystem models are critical tools for studying land-atmosphere fluxes, its validity depends on the appropriate parameterization of equations describing temporal and spatial changes of model state variables and their interactions. This constraint often leads to discrepancies between model simulations and observed data that reduce models reliability especially in arid and semiarid ecosystems. In the semiarid north western Mexico, ecosystem processes are fundamentally controlled by the seasonality of water and the intermittence of rain pulses which are conditions that require calibration of specific fitting functions to describe the response of ecosystem variables (i.e. NEE, GPP, ET, respiration) to these wetting and drying periods. The goal is to find functions that describe the magnitude of ecosystem fluxes during individual rain pulses and the seasonality of the ecosystem. Relaying on five years of eddy covariance flux data of a tropical dry forest and a subtropical shrubland we present a flux frequency analysis that describe the variation of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO2 to highlight the relevance of pulse driven dynamics controlling this flux. Preliminary results of flux frequency analysis of NEE indicate that these ecosystems are strongly controlled by the frequency distribution of rain. Also, the output of fitting functions for NEE, GPP, ET and respiration using semi-empirical functions applied at specific rain pulses compared with season-long statistically generated simulations do not agree. Seasonality and the intrinsic nature of individual pulses have different effects on ecosystem flux responses. This suggests that relationships between the nature of seasonality and individual pulses can help improve the

  17. Flux variability scanning based on enforced objective flux for identifying gene amplification targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Jong

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to reduce time and efforts to develop microbial strains with better capability of producing desired bioproducts, genome-scale metabolic simulations have proven useful in identifying gene knockout and amplification targets. Constraints-based flux analysis has successfully been employed for such simulation, but is limited in its ability to properly describe the complex nature of biological systems. Gene knockout simulations are relatively straightforward to implement, simply by constraining the flux values of the target reaction to zero, but the identification of reliable gene amplification targets is rather difficult. Here, we report a new algorithm which incorporates physiological data into a model to improve the model’s prediction capabilities and to capitalize on the relationships between genes and metabolic fluxes. Results We developed an algorithm, flux variability scanning based on enforced objective flux (FVSEOF with grouping reaction (GR constraints, in an effort to identify gene amplification targets by considering reactions that co-carry flux values based on physiological omics data via “GR constraints”. This method scans changes in the variabilities of metabolic fluxes in response to an artificially enforced objective flux of product formation. The gene amplification targets predicted using this method were validated by comparing the predicted effects with the previous experimental results obtained for the production of shikimic acid and putrescine in Escherichia coli. Moreover, new gene amplification targets for further enhancing putrescine production were validated through experiments involving the overexpression of each identified targeted gene under condition-controlled batch cultivation. Conclusions FVSEOF with GR constraints allows identification of gene amplification targets for metabolic engineering of microbial strains in order to enhance the production of desired bioproducts. The algorithm

  18. Superconductor films with improved flux pinning and reduced AC losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Amit

    2011-04-05

    The present invention relates to a method for producing a defect-containing superconducting film, the method comprising (a) depositing a phase-separable layer epitaxially onto a biaxially-textured substrate, wherein the phase-separable layer includes at least two phase-separable components; (b) achieving nanoscale phase separation of the phase-separable layer such that a phase-separated layer including at least two phase-separated components is produced; and (c) depositing a superconducting film epitaxially onto said phase-separated components of the phase-separated layer such that nanoscale features of the phase-separated layer are propagated into the superconducting film.

  19. Dynamic flux balancing elucidates NAD(P)H production as limiting response to furfural inhibition in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pornkamol, Unrean; Franzen, Carl J

    2015-08-01

    Achieving efficient and economical lignocellulose-based bioprocess requires a robust organism tolerant to furfural, a major inhibitory compound present in lignocellulosic hydrolysate. The aim of this study was to develop a model that could generate quantitative descriptions of cell metabolism for elucidating the cell's adaptive response to furfural. Such a modelling tool could provide strategies for the design of more robust cells. A dynamic flux balance (dFBA) model of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was created by coupling a kinetic fermentation model with a previously published genome-scale stoichiometric model. The dFBA model was used for studying intracellular and extracellular flux responses to furfural perturbations under steady state and dynamic conditions. The predicted effects of furfural on dynamic flux profiles agreed well with previously published experimental results. The model showed that the yeast cell adjusts its metabolism in response to furfural challenge by increasing fluxes through the pentose phosphate pathway, TCA cycle, and proline and serine biosynthesis in order to meet the high demand of NAD(P)H cofactors. The model described here can be used to aid in systematic optimization of the yeast, as well as of the fermentation process, for efficient lignocellulosic ethanol production.

  20. Permanent magnet flux-biased magnetic actuator with flux feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groom, Nelson J. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The invention is a permanent magnet flux-biased magnetic actuator with flux feedback for adjustably suspending an element on a single axis. The magnetic actuator includes a pair of opposing electromagnets and provides bi-directional forces along the single axis to the suspended element. Permanent magnets in flux feedback loops from the opposing electromagnets establish a reference permanent magnet flux-bias to linearize the force characteristics of the electromagnets to extend the linear range of the actuator without the need for continuous bias currents in the electromagnets.

  1. Method for determining transport critical current densities and flux penetration depth in bulk superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israelsson, Ulf E. (Inventor); Strayer, Donald M. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A contact-less method for determining transport critical current density and flux penetration depth in bulk superconductor material. A compressor having a hollow interior and a plunger for selectively reducing the free space area for distribution of the magnetic flux therein are formed of superconductor material. Analytical relationships, based upon the critical state model, Maxwell's equations and geometrical relationships define transport critical current density and flux penetration depth in terms of the initial trapped magnetic flux density and the ratio between initial and final magnetic flux densities whereby data may be reliably determined by means of the simple test apparatus for evaluating the current density and flux penetration depth.

  2. Braneworld Flux Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Kanno, S; Wands, D; Kanno, Sugumi; Soda, Jiro; Wands, David

    2005-01-01

    We propose a geometrical model of brane inflation where inflation is driven by the flux generated by opposing brane charges and terminated by the collision of the branes, with charge annihilation. We assume the collision process is completely inelastic and the kinetic energy is transformed into the thermal energy after collision. Thereafter the two branes coalesce together and behave as a single brane universe with zero effective cosmological constant. In the Einstein frame, the 4-dimensional effective theory changes abruptly at the collision point. Therefore, our inflationary model is necessarily 5-dimensional in nature. As the collision process has no singularity in 5-dimensional gravity, we can follow the evolution of fluctuations during the whole history of the universe. It turns out that the radion field fluctuations have a steeply tilted, red spectrum, while the primordial gravitational waves have a flat spectrum. Instead, primordial density perturbations could be generated by a curvaton mechanism.

  3. Optimal fluxes and Reynolds stresses

    CERN Document Server

    Jimenez, Javier

    2016-01-01

    It is remarked that fluxes in conservation laws, such as the Reynolds stresses in the momentum equation of turbulent shear flows, or the spectral energy flux in isotropic turbulence, are only defined up to an arbitrary solenoidal field. While this is not usually significant for long-time averages, it becomes important when fluxes are modelled locally in large-eddy simulations, or in the analysis of intermittency and cascades. As an example, a numerical procedure is introduced to compute fluxes in scalar conservation equations in such a way that their total integrated magnitude is minimised. The result is an irrotational vector field that derives from a potential, thus minimising sterile flux `circuits'. The algorithm is generalised to tensor fluxes and applied to the transfer of momentum in a turbulent channel. The resulting instantaneous Reynolds stresses are compared with their traditional expressions, and found to be substantially different.

  4. Heat Flux Apportionment to Heterogeneous Surfaces Using Flux Footprint Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Heat flux data collected from the Baiyangdian Heterogeneous Field Experiment were analyzed using the footprint method. High resolution (25 m) Landsat-5 satellite imaging was used to determine the land cover as one of four surface types: farmland, lake, wetland, or village. Data from two observation sites in September 2005 were used. One site (Wangjiazhai) was characterized by highly heterogeneous surfaces in the central area of the Baiyangdian: lake/wetland. The other site (Xiongxian) was on land with more uniform surface cover. An improved Eulerian analytical flux footprint model was used to determine "source areas" of the heat fluxes measured at towers located at each site from surrounding landscapes of mixed surface types.In relative terms results show that wetland and lake areas generally contributed most to the observed heat flux at Wangjiazhai, while farmland contributed most at Xiongxian. Given the areal distribution of surface type contributions, calculations were made to obtain the magnitudes of the heat flux from lake, wetland and farmland to the total observed flux and apportioned contributions of each surface type to the sensible and latent heat fluxes. Results show that on average the sensible heat flux from wetland and farmland were comparable over the diurnal cycle, while the latent heat flux from farmland was somewhat larger by about 30-50 W m-2 during daytime. The latent and sensible fluxes from the lake source in daytime were about 50 W m-2 and 100 W m-2 less, respectively, than from wetland and farmland. The results are judged reasonable and serve to demonstrate the potential for flux apportionment over heterogeneous surfaces.

  5. Statistics of Flux Vacua for Particle Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Watari, Taizan

    2015-01-01

    Supersymmetric flux compactification of F-theory in the geometric phase yields numerous vacua, and provides an ensemble of low-energy effective theories with different symmetry, matter multiplicity and Lagrangian parameters. Theoretical tools have already been developed so that we can study how the statistics of flux vacua depend on the choice of symmetry and some of Lagrangian parameters. In this article, we estimate the fraction of i) vacua that have a U(1) symmetry for spontaneous R-parity violation, and ii) those that realise ideas which achieve hierarchical eigenvalues of the Yukawa matrices. We also learn a lesson that the number of flux vacua is reduced very much when the unbroken $U(1)_Y$ symmetry is obtained from a non-trivial Mordell--Weil group, while it is not when $U(1)_Y$ is in SU(5) unification. It also turns out that vacua with an approximate U(1) symmetry forms a locus of accumulation points of the flux vacua distribution.

  6. New Examples of Flux Vacua

    CERN Document Server

    Maxfield, Travis; Robbins, Daniel; Sethi, Savdeep

    2013-01-01

    Type IIB toroidal orientifolds are among the earliest examples of flux vacua. By applying T-duality, we construct the first examples of massive IIA flux vacua with Minkowski space-times, along with new examples of type IIA flux vacua. The backgrounds are surprisingly simple with no four-form flux at all. They serve as illustrations of the ingredients needed to build type IIA and massive IIA solutions with scale separation. To check that these backgrounds are actually solutions, we formulate the complete set of type II supergravity equations of motion in a very useful form that treats the R-R fields democratically.

  7. Heat Flux Instrumentation Laboratory (HFIL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description: The Heat Flux Instrumentation Laboratory is used to develop advanced, flexible, thin film gauge instrumentation for the Air Force Research Laboratory....

  8. Glucose-methanol co-utilization in Pichia pastoris studied by metabolomics and instationary ¹³C flux analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordà, Joel; Suarez, Camilo; Carnicer, Marc; ten Pierick, Angela; Heijnen, Joseph J; van Gulik, Walter; Ferrer, Pau; Albiol, Joan; Wahl, Aljoscha

    2013-02-28

    the glucose uptake rate; ii) the reversibility of glycolytic/gluconeogenesis, TCA cycle and pentose phosphate pathways reactions was estimated, revealing a significant gluconeogenic flux from the dihydroxyacetone phosphate/glyceraldehydes phosphate pool to glucose-6P. The origin of this finding could be carbon recycling from the methanol assimilatory pathway to the pentose phosphate pool. Additionally, high exchange fluxes of oxaloacetate with aspartate as well as malate indicated amino acid pool buffering and the activity of the malate/Asp shuttle; iii) the ratio of methanol oxidation vs utilization appeared to be lower (54 vs 79% assimilated methanol directly oxidized to CO₂). In summary, the application of instationary ¹³C-based metabolic flux analysis to P. pastoris provides an experimental framework with improved capabilities to explore the regulation of the carbon and energy metabolism of this yeast, particularly for the case of methanol and multicarbon source metabolism.

  9. Rates of insulin secretion in INS-1 cells are enhanced by coupling to anaplerosis and Kreb's cycle flux independent of ATP synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cline, Gary W., E-mail: gary.cline@yale.edu [The Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Department of Surgery, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Pongratz, Rebecca L.; Zhao, Xiaojian [The Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Papas, Klearchos K. [Department of Surgery, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2011-11-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We studied media effects on mechanisms of insulin secretion of INS-1 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Insulin secretion was higher in DMEM than KRB despite identical ATP synthesis rates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Insulin secretion rates correlated with rates of anaplerosis and TCA cycle. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mitochondria metabolism and substrate cycles augment secretion signal of ATP. -- Abstract: Mechanistic models of glucose stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) established in minimal media in vitro, may not accurately describe the complexity of coupling metabolism with insulin secretion that occurs in vivo. As a first approximation, we have evaluated metabolic pathways in a typical growth media, DMEM as a surrogate in vivo medium, for comparison to metabolic fluxes observed under the typical experimental conditions using the simple salt-buffer of KRB. Changes in metabolism in response to glucose and amino acids and coupling to insulin secretion were measured in INS-1 832/13 cells. Media effects on mitochondrial function and the coupling efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation were determined by fluorometrically measured oxygen consumption rates (OCRs) combined with {sup 31}P NMR measured rates of ATP synthesis. Substrate preferences and pathways into the TCA cycle, and the synthesis of mitochondrial 2nd messengers by anaplerosis were determined by {sup 13}C NMR isotopomer analysis of the fate of [U-{sup 13}C] glucose metabolism. Despite similar incremental increases in insulin secretion, the changes of OCR in response to increasing glucose from 2.5 to 15 mM were blunted in DMEM relative to KRB. Basal and stimulated rates of insulin secretion rates were consistently higher in DMEM, while ATP synthesis rates were identical in both DMEM and KRB, suggesting greater mitochondrial uncoupling in DMEM. The relative rates of anaplerosis, and hence synthesis and export of 2nd messengers from the mitochondria were found

  10. (13) C-metabolic flux analysis of human adenovirus infection: Implications for viral vector production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carinhas, Nuno; Koshkin, Alexey; Pais, Daniel A M; Alves, Paula M; Teixeira, Ana P

    2017-01-01

    Adenoviruses are human pathogens increasingly used as gene therapy and vaccination vectors. However, their impact on cell metabolism is poorly characterized. We performed carbon labeling experiments with [1,2-(13) C]glucose or [U-(13) C]glutamine to evaluate metabolic alterations in the amniocyte-derived, E1-transformed 1G3 cell line during production of a human adenovirus type 5 vector (AdV5). Nonstationary (13) C-metabolic flux analysis revealed increased fluxes of glycolysis (17%) and markedly PPP (over fourfold) and cytosolic AcCoA formation (nearly twofold) following infection of growing cells. Interestingly, infection of growth-arrested cells increased overall carbon flow even more, including glutamine anaplerosis and TCA cycle activity (both over 1.5-fold), but was unable to stimulate the PPP and was associated with a steep drop in AdV5 replication (almost 80%). Our results underscore the importance of nucleic and fatty acid biosynthesis for adenovirus replication. Overall, we portray a metabolic blueprint of human adenovirus infection, highlighting similarities with other viruses and cancer, and suggest strategies to improve AdV5 production. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 195-207. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Insights into pH-induced metabolic switch by flux balance analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivarsson, Marija; Noh, Heeju; Morbidelli, Massimo; Soos, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Lactate accumulation in mammalian cell culture is known to impede cellular growth and productivity. The control of lactate formation and consumption in a hybridoma cell line was achieved by pH alteration during the early exponential growth phase. In particular, lactate consumption was induced even at high glucose concentrations at pH 6.8, whereas highly increased production of lactate was obtained at pH 7.8. Consequently, constraint-based metabolic flux analysis was used to examine pH-induced metabolic states in the same growth state. We demonstrated that lactate influx at pH 6.8 led cells to maintain high fluxes in the TCA cycle and malate-aspartate shuttle resulting in a high ATP production rate. In contrast, under increased pH conditions, less ATP was generated and different ATP sources were utilized. Gene expression analysis led to the conclusion that lactate formation at high pH was enabled by gluconeogenic pathways in addition to facilitated glucose uptake. The obtained results provide new insights into the influence of pH on cellular metabolism, and are of importance when considering pH heterogeneities typically present in large scale industrial bioreactors.

  12. Yeast dynamic metabolic flux measurement in nutrient-rich media by HPLC and accelerator mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Benjamin J; Navid, Ali; Turteltaub, Kenneth W; Bench, Graham

    2010-12-01

    Metabolic flux, the flow of metabolites through networks of enzymes, represents the dynamic productive output of cells. Improved understanding of intracellular metabolic fluxes will enable targeted manipulation of metabolic pathways of medical and industrial importance to a greater degree than is currently possible. Flux balance analysis (FBA) is a constraint-based approach to modeling metabolic fluxes, but its utility is limited by a lack of experimental measurements. Incorporation of experimentally measured fluxes as system constraints will significantly improve the overall accuracy of FBA. We applied a novel, two-tiered approach in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to measure nutrient consumption rates (extracellular fluxes) and a targeted intracellular flux using a (14)C-labeled precursor with HPLC separation and flux quantitation by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The use of AMS to trace the intracellular fate of (14)C-glutamine allowed the calculation of intracellular metabolic flux through this pathway, with glutathione as the metabolic end point. Measured flux values provided global constraints for the yeast FBA model which reduced model uncertainty by more than 20%, proving the importance of additional constraints in improving the accuracy of model predictions and demonstrating the use of AMS to measure intracellular metabolic fluxes. Our results highlight the need to use intracellular fluxes to constrain the models. We show that inclusion of just one such measurement alone can reduce the average variability of model predicted fluxes by 10%.

  13. From elementary flux modes to elementary flux vectors: Metabolic pathway analysis with arbitrary linear flux constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klamt, Steffen; Regensburger, Georg; Gerstl, Matthias P; Jungreuthmayer, Christian; Schuster, Stefan; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan; Zanghellini, Jürgen; Müller, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    Elementary flux modes (EFMs) emerged as a formal concept to describe metabolic pathways and have become an established tool for constraint-based modeling and metabolic network analysis. EFMs are characteristic (support-minimal) vectors of the flux cone that contains all feasible steady-state flux vectors of a given metabolic network. EFMs account for (homogeneous) linear constraints arising from reaction irreversibilities and the assumption of steady state; however, other (inhomogeneous) linear constraints, such as minimal and maximal reaction rates frequently used by other constraint-based techniques (such as flux balance analysis [FBA]), cannot be directly integrated. These additional constraints further restrict the space of feasible flux vectors and turn the flux cone into a general flux polyhedron in which the concept of EFMs is not directly applicable anymore. For this reason, there has been a conceptual gap between EFM-based (pathway) analysis methods and linear optimization (FBA) techniques, as they operate on different geometric objects. One approach to overcome these limitations was proposed ten years ago and is based on the concept of elementary flux vectors (EFVs). Only recently has the community started to recognize the potential of EFVs for metabolic network analysis. In fact, EFVs exactly represent the conceptual development required to generalize the idea of EFMs from flux cones to flux polyhedra. This work aims to present a concise theoretical and practical introduction to EFVs that is accessible to a broad audience. We highlight the close relationship between EFMs and EFVs and demonstrate that almost all applications of EFMs (in flux cones) are possible for EFVs (in flux polyhedra) as well. In fact, certain properties can only be studied with EFVs. Thus, we conclude that EFVs provide a powerful and unifying framework for constraint-based modeling of metabolic networks.

  14. Magnetic flux concentration and zonal flows in magnetorotational instability turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Xue-Ning [Institute for Theory and Computation, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-51, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Stone, James M., E-mail: xbai@cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Peyton Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2014-11-20

    Accretion disks are likely threaded by external vertical magnetic flux, which enhances the level of turbulence via the magnetorotational instability (MRI). Using shearing-box simulations, we find that such external magnetic flux also strongly enhances the amplitude of banded radial density variations known as zonal flows. Moreover, we report that vertical magnetic flux is strongly concentrated toward low-density regions of the zonal flow. Mean vertical magnetic field can be more than doubled in low-density regions, and reduced to nearly zero in high-density regions in some cases. In ideal MHD, the scale on which magnetic flux concentrates can reach a few disk scale heights. In the non-ideal MHD regime with strong ambipolar diffusion, magnetic flux is concentrated into thin axisymmetric shells at some enhanced level, whose size is typically less than half a scale height. We show that magnetic flux concentration is closely related to the fact that the turbulent diffusivity of the MRI turbulence is anisotropic. In addition to a conventional Ohmic-like turbulent resistivity, we find that there is a correlation between the vertical velocity and horizontal magnetic field fluctuations that produces a mean electric field that acts to anti-diffuse the vertical magnetic flux. The anisotropic turbulent diffusivity has analogies to the Hall effect, and may have important implications for magnetic flux transport in accretion disks. The physical origin of magnetic flux concentration may be related to the development of channel flows followed by magnetic reconnection, which acts to decrease the mass-to-flux ratio in localized regions. The association of enhanced zonal flows with magnetic flux concentration may lead to global pressure bumps in protoplanetary disks that helps trap dust particles and facilitates planet formation.

  15. 13C-metabolic flux ratio and novel carbon path analyses confirmed that Trichoderma reesei uses primarily the respirative pathway also on the preferred carbon source glucose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saloheimo Markku

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei is an important host organism for industrial enzyme production. It is adapted to nutrient poor environments where it is capable of producing large amounts of hydrolytic enzymes. In its natural environment T. reesei is expected to benefit from high energy yield from utilization of respirative metabolic pathway. However, T. reesei lacks metabolic pathway reconstructions and the utilization of the respirative pathway has not been investigated on the level of in vivo fluxes. Results The biosynthetic pathways of amino acids in T. reesei supported by genome-level evidence were reconstructed with computational carbon path analysis. The pathway reconstructions were a prerequisite for analysis of in vivo fluxes. The distribution of in vivo fluxes in both wild type strain and cre1, a key regulator of carbon catabolite repression, deletion strain were quantitatively studied by performing 13C-labeling on both repressive carbon source glucose and non-repressive carbon source sorbitol. In addition, the 13C-labeling on sorbitol was performed both in the presence and absence of sophorose that induces the expression of cellulase genes. Carbon path analyses and the 13C-labeling patterns of proteinogenic amino acids indicated high similarity between biosynthetic pathways of amino acids in T. reesei and yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In contrast to S. cerevisiae, however, mitochondrial rather than cytosolic biosynthesis of Asp was observed under all studied conditions. The relative anaplerotic flux to the TCA cycle was low and thus characteristic to respiratory metabolism in both strains and independent of the carbon source. Only minor differences were observed in the flux distributions of the wild type and cre1 deletion strain. Furthermore, the induction of the hydrolytic gene expression did not show altered flux distributions and did not affect the relative amino acid requirements or relative anabolic

  16. Earth's surface heat flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Davies

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a revised estimate of Earth's surface heat flux that is based upon a heat flow data-set with 38 347 measurements, which is 55% more than used in previous estimates. Our methodology, like others, accounts for hydrothermal circulation in young oceanic crust by utilising a half-space cooling approximation. For the rest of Earth's surface, we estimate the average heat flow for different geologic domains as defined by global digital geology maps; and then produce the global estimate by multiplying it by the total global area of that geologic domain. The averaging is done on a polygon set which results from an intersection of a 1 degree equal area grid with the original geology polygons; this minimises the adverse influence of clustering. These operations and estimates are derived accurately using methodologies from Geographical Information Science. We consider the virtually un-sampled Antarctica separately and also make a small correction for hot-spots in young oceanic lithosphere. A range of analyses is presented. These, combined with statistical estimates of the error, provide a measure of robustness. Our final preferred estimate is 47±2 TW, which is greater than previous estimates.

  17. Estimating Metabolic Fluxes Using a Maximum Network Flexibility Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megchelenbrink, Wout; Rossell, Sergio; Huynen, Martijn A.

    2015-01-01

    Motivation Genome-scale metabolic networks can be modeled in a constraint-based fashion. Reaction stoichiometry combined with flux capacity constraints determine the space of allowable reaction rates. This space is often large and a central challenge in metabolic modeling is finding the biologically most relevant flux distributions. A widely used method is flux balance analysis (FBA), which optimizes a biologically relevant objective such as growth or ATP production. Although FBA has proven to be highly useful for predicting growth and byproduct secretion, it cannot predict the intracellular fluxes under all environmental conditions. Therefore, alternative strategies have been developed to select flux distributions that are in agreement with experimental “omics” data, or by incorporating experimental flux measurements. The latter, unfortunately can only be applied to a limited set of reactions and is currently not feasible at the genome-scale. On the other hand, it has been observed that micro-organisms favor a suboptimal growth rate, possibly in exchange for a more “flexible” metabolic network. Instead of dedicating the internal network state to an optimal growth rate in one condition, a suboptimal growth rate is used, that allows for an easier switch to other nutrient sources. A small decrease in growth rate is exchanged for a relatively large gain in metabolic capability to adapt to changing environmental conditions. Results Here, we propose Maximum Metabolic Flexibility (MMF) a computational method that utilizes this observation to find the most probable intracellular flux distributions. By mapping measured flux data from central metabolism to the genome-scale models of Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae we show that i) indeed, most of the measured fluxes agree with a high adaptability of the network, ii) this result can be used to further reduce the space of feasible solutions iii) this reduced space improves the quantitative predictions

  18. Estimating Metabolic Fluxes Using a Maximum Network Flexibility Paradigm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wout Megchelenbrink

    Full Text Available Genome-scale metabolic networks can be modeled in a constraint-based fashion. Reaction stoichiometry combined with flux capacity constraints determine the space of allowable reaction rates. This space is often large and a central challenge in metabolic modeling is finding the biologically most relevant flux distributions. A widely used method is flux balance analysis (FBA, which optimizes a biologically relevant objective such as growth or ATP production. Although FBA has proven to be highly useful for predicting growth and byproduct secretion, it cannot predict the intracellular fluxes under all environmental conditions. Therefore, alternative strategies have been developed to select flux distributions that are in agreement with experimental "omics" data, or by incorporating experimental flux measurements. The latter, unfortunately can only be applied to a limited set of reactions and is currently not feasible at the genome-scale. On the other hand, it has been observed that micro-organisms favor a suboptimal growth rate, possibly in exchange for a more "flexible" metabolic network. Instead of dedicating the internal network state to an optimal growth rate in one condition, a suboptimal growth rate is used, that allows for an easier switch to other nutrient sources. A small decrease in growth rate is exchanged for a relatively large gain in metabolic capability to adapt to changing environmental conditions.Here, we propose Maximum Metabolic Flexibility (MMF a computational method that utilizes this observation to find the most probable intracellular flux distributions. By mapping measured flux data from central metabolism to the genome-scale models of Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae we show that i indeed, most of the measured fluxes agree with a high adaptability of the network, ii this result can be used to further reduce the space of feasible solutions iii this reduced space improves the quantitative predictions made by FBA and

  19. Data Acquisition and Flux Calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebmann, C.; Kolle, O; Heinesch, B;

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter, the basic theory and the procedures used to obtain turbulent fluxes of energy, mass, and momentum with the eddy covariance technique will be detailed. This includes a description of data acquisition, pretreatment of high-frequency data and flux calculation....

  20. Modeling flux noise in SQUIDs due to hyperfine interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiansheng; Yu, Clare C

    2012-06-15

    Recent experiments implicate spins on the surface of metals as the source of flux noise in superconducting quantum interference devices and indicate that these spins are able to relax without conserving total magnetization. We present a model of 1/f flux noise in which electron spins on the surface of metals can relax via hyperfine interactions. Our results indicate that flux noise would be significantly reduced in superconducting materials where the most abundant isotopes do not have nuclear moments, such as zinc and lead.

  1. Superconducting wires and fractional flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá de Melo, C. A. R.

    1996-05-01

    The quantization of flux quanta in superconductors is revisited and analyzed in a new geometry. The system analyzed is a superconducting wire. The geometry is such that the superconducting wire winds N times around an insulating cylinder and that the wire has its end connected back to its beginning, thus producing an N-loop short circuited solenoid. The winding number N acts as a topological index that controls flux quantization. In this case, fractional flux quanta can be measured through the center of the insulating cylinder, provided that the cylinder radius is small enough. The Little-Parks experiment for an identical geometry is discussed. The period of oscillation of the transition temperature of the wire is found to vary as 1/N in units of flux Φ relative to the flux quantum Φ0. When a SQUID is made in such a geometry the maximal current through the SQUID varies with period Φ0/N.

  2. Interpreting Flux from Broadband Photometry

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Peter J; Roming, Peter W A; Siegel, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the transformation of observed photometry into flux for the creation of spectral energy distributions and the computation of bolometric luminosities. We do this in the context of supernova studies, particularly as observed with the Swift spacecraft, but the concepts and techniques should be applicable to many other types of sources and wavelength regimes. Traditional methods of converting observed magnitudes to flux densities are not very accurate when applied to UV photometry. Common methods for extinction and the integration of pseudo-bolometric fluxes can also lead to inaccurate results. The sources of inaccuracy, though, also apply to other wavelengths. Because of the complicated nature of translating broad-band photometry into monochromatic flux densities, comparison between observed photometry and a spectroscopic model is best done by comparing in the natural units of the observations. We recommend that integrated flux measurements be made using a spectrum or spectral energy distribution whic...

  3. VOC removal from contaminated groundwater through membrane pervaporation. (Ⅱ): 1,1,1-trichloroethane- SDS surfactant solution system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Ming; Sean LIU

    2003-01-01

    The conventional "pump-and-treat" technology for subsurface remediation of groundwater contaminated with volatile organic compounds(VOCs) such as 1,1,1-trichloroethane(TCA), a common chlorinated organic solvent, has limitation of prohibitively long treatment time due to extremely low water solubility of the VOCs. Surfactant-based soil remediation has emerged as the effective technology that substantially reduces the treatment time. In order to make the whole process economical, the surfactant used in soil washing has to be recovered and reused. This study examined the recovery of anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), from soil remediation fluids containing TCA, using a bench-scale membrane pervaporation unit. The effects of high TCA concentration, surfactant dosage, and flow rate on permeation flux and selectivity( α value) of the process were evaluated. In general, higher surfactant concentration yielded lower TCA flux and constant water flux, resulting in declining α values; higher flow rate of TCA feed stream results in higher VOC flux and selectivity, an indication of the effect of concentration polarization; higher TCA feed concentration produces higher TCA permeation across the membrane, however, the selectivity was virtually unchanged unless the total TCA concentration exceeded 2000 ppm.

  4. Interpreting Flux from Broadband Photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Peter J.; Breeveld, Alice; Roming, Peter W. A.; Siegel, Michael

    2016-10-01

    We discuss the transformation of observed photometry into flux for the creation of spectral energy distributions (SED) and the computation of bolometric luminosities. We do this in the context of supernova studies, particularly as observed with the Swift spacecraft, but the concepts and techniques should be applicable to many other types of sources and wavelength regimes. Traditional methods of converting observed magnitudes to flux densities are not very accurate when applied to UV photometry. Common methods for extinction and the integration of pseudo-bolometric fluxes can also lead to inaccurate results. The sources of inaccuracy, though, also apply to other wavelengths. Because of the complicated nature of translating broadband photometry into monochromatic flux densities, comparison between observed photometry and a spectroscopic model is best done by forward modeling the spectrum into the count rates or magnitudes of the observations. We recommend that integrated flux measurements be made using a spectrum or SED which is consistent with the multi-band photometry rather than converting individual photometric measurements to flux densities, linearly interpolating between the points, and integrating. We also highlight some specific areas where the UV flux can be mischaracterized.

  5. Controlling the feed rate of glucose and propanol for the enhancement of erythromycin production and exploration of propanol metabolism fate by quantitative metabolic flux analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong; Huang, Mingzhi; Wang, Zejian; Chu, Ju; Zhuang, Yingping; Zhang, Siliang

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, several different fermentation experiments were designed to address whether modulating glucose and propanol feeds could benefit the production level of erythromycin during pilot plant (30 L) fermentation. Results showed that glucose feed rate (determined by a set high or low culture pH) had no effect on erythromycin production, indicating that glucose was not the limiting factor for erythromycin biosynthesis under these conditions. It was found that decreasing glucose feed could stimulate the consumption of propanol, and the high erythromycin production (12.49 ± 0.50 mg ml⁻¹) was achieved by controlling the feed rates of glucose and propanol. The quantitative metabolic flux analysis disclosed that high propanol consumption increased the pool size of propionyl-CoA (~2.147 mmol g⁻¹ day⁻¹) and methylmalonyl-CoA (~1.708 mmol g⁻¹ day⁻¹). It was also found that 45-77 % of the propanol went into the TCA cycle which strengthened the conclusion that blocking the propionate pathway to TCA cycle could lead to a significant increase in erythromycin production in carbohydrate-based media (Reeves et al. Ind Microbiol Biotechnol 7:600-609, 2006). In addition, the results also suggested that a relative low intracellular ATP level resulting from low glucose feed did not limit the erythromycin biosynthesis, and a relatively high NADPH should be beneficial for erythromycin biosynthesis.

  6. A Reconnecting Flux Rope Dynamo

    OpenAIRE

    Baggaley, Andrew W.; Barenghi, Carlo F.; Shukurov, Anvar; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2009-01-01

    We develop a new model of the fluctuation dynamo in which the magnetic field is confined in thin flux ropes advected by a multi-scale flow modeling turbulence. Magnetic dissipation occurs only via reconnection of the flux ropes. We investigate the kinetic energy release into heat, mediated by the dynamo action, both in our model and by solving the induction equation with the same flow. We find that a flux rope dynamo is an order of magnitude more efficient at converting mechanical energy into...

  7. Generalised Geometry and Flux Vacua

    CERN Document Server

    Larfors, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    This note discusses the connection between generalised geometry and flux compactifications of string theory. Firstly, we explain in a pedestrian manner how the supersymmetry constraints of type II ${\\mathcal{N}}=1$ flux compactifications can be restated as integrability constraints on certain generalised complex structures. This reformulation uses generalised complex geometry, a mathematical framework that geometrizes the B-field. Secondly, we discuss how exceptional generalised geometry may provide a similar geometrization of the RR fields. Thirdly, we examine the connection between generalised geometry and non-geometry, and finally we present recent developments where generalised geometry is used to construct explicit examples of flux compactifications to flat space.

  8. What the flux? Deriving empirical estimates of riverine Mo fluxes over Earth history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaniello, S. J.; Ostrander, C. M.; Johnson, A.; Planavsky, N.; Anbar, A. D.

    2016-12-01

    Molybdenum (Mo) is a key micronutrient in the marine nitrogen cycle and thus plays an important role in regulating global marine primary productivity and biogeochemistry. At present, Mo is the most abundant transition metal in seawater, despite being one of the least abundant transition metals in crustal rocks. This counterintuitive behavior is the result of the high solubility and mobile nature of the molybdate anion under oxidizing conditions. However, previous studies have pointed out that the oxidative weathering flux of Mo to the ocean was likely much lower under Archean conditions, and that when coupled with reduced solubility of Mo in anoxic seawater, portions of the ocean may have been Mo starved. With few exceptions, riverine fluxes of elements have been only poorly constrained over geologic time. In the absence of strong empirical constraints, fluxes are either imagined to have been similar to today, or radically different, depending primarily on the chemistry of the element and model implored by the authors. Based on large variations of Mo concentrations in shales, several authors have invoked models where riverine Mo fluxes vary in response to atmospheric O2 availability but it has been difficult to provide independent constraints to support or refute these models. Here we demonstrate a novel approach for constraining riverine Mo fluxes from the Archean to present by independently estimating the seawater Mo inventory from Mo/TOC ratios and the Mo residence time from Mo isotope ratios. At steady state, the riverine flux is then the ratio of these parameters. Surprisingly, despite strong secular evolution of seawater Mo concentrations and residence time, this approach suggests the overall rate of Mo supply to the ocean was probably relatively constant within one order of magnitude over most of Earth history. This result provides new insights into both the processes controlling Mo availability to the oceans and, more broadly, the controls on oxidative

  9. Trapped flux reduction in a spherical niobium shell at 1 mG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumley, Robert W.; Buchman, Saps; Xiao, Yueming

    1994-02-01

    We have developed a method to reduce flux trapped in a superconducting spherical shell. A normal spot on the shell sweeps flux lines until they close in on themselves. Using this technique the dipole moment corresponding to a trapped field of 1 mG has been reduced to about 6% of its original level.

  10. Physics of Magnetic Flux Ropes

    CERN Document Server

    Priest, E R; Lee, L C

    1990-01-01

    The American Geophysical Union Chapman Conference on the Physics of Magnetic Flux Ropes was held at the Hamilton Princess Hotel, Hamilton, Bermuda on March 27–31, 1989. Topics discussed ranged from solar flux ropes, such as photospheric flux tubes, coronal loops and prominences, to flux ropes in the solar wind, in planetary ionospheres, at the Earth's magnetopause, in the geomagnetic tail and deep in the Earth's magnetosphere. Papers presented at that conference form the nucleus of this book, but the book is more than just a proceedings of the conference. We have solicited articles from all interested in this topic. Thus, there is some material in the book not discussed at the conference. Even in the case of papers presented at the conference, there is generally a much more detailed and rigorous presentation than was possible in the time allowed by the oral and poster presentations.

  11. High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The HFIR at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a light-water cooled and moderated reactor that is the United States’ highest flux reactor-based neutron source. HFIR...

  12. What is flux balance analysis?

    OpenAIRE

    Orth, Jeffrey D.; Thiele, Ines; Palsson, Bernhard Ø

    2010-01-01

    Flux balance analysis is a mathematical approach for analyzing the flow of metabolites through a metabolic network. This primer covers the theoretical basis of the approach, several practical examples and a software toolbox for performing the calculations.

  13. Conical electromagnetic radiation flux concentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, E. R.

    1972-01-01

    Concentrator provides method of concentrating a beam of electromagnetic radiation into a smaller beam, presenting a higher flux density. Smaller beam may be made larger by sending radiation through the device in the reverse direction.

  14. Flux Emergence at the Photosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, M. C. M.; Schüssler, M.; Moreno-Insertis, F.

    2006-12-01

    To model the emergence of magnetic fields at the photosphere, we carried out 3D magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD) simulations using the MURaM code. Our simulations take into account the effects of compressibility, energy exchange via radiative transfer and partial ionization in the equation of state. All these physical ingredients are essential for a proper treatment of the problem. In the simulations, an initially buoyant magnetic flux tube is embedded in the upper layers of the convection zone. We find that the interaction between the flux tube and the external flow field has an important influence on the emergent morphology of the magnetic field. Depending on the initial properties of the flux tube (e.g. field strength, twist, entropy etc.), the emergence process can also modify the local granulation pattern. The inclusion of radiative transfer allows us to directly compare the simulation results with real observations of emerging flux.

  15. Periodicities in photospheric magnetic flux

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG; Wenbin; WANG; Jingxiu

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic field plays an important role in solar structure and activity. In principle, the determination of magnetic flux would provide the best general-purpose index of solar activity. Currently, the periodicity studies corresponding to photospheric magnetic flux (PMF) are very few possibly due to the absence of a uniform flux sequence. In this paper, by using 383 NSO/Kitt Peak magnetic synoptic charts we reconstruct a flux sequence from February 1975 to August 2003 and perform a relatively systemic periodicity analysis with two methods of the Scargle periodogram and the Morlet wavelet transform. As a result, four periods are found at around 1050, 500, 300 and 160 days. We analyze these periods' temporal variabilities in detail and discuss their respective origins briefly.

  16. Galactic dynamos supported by magnetic helicity fluxes

    CERN Document Server

    Sur, S; Subramanian, K; Sur, Sharanya; Shukurov, Anvar; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2006-01-01

    We present a simple semi-analytical model of nonlinear, mean-field galactic dynamos and use it to study the effects of various magnetic helicity fluxes. The dynamo equations are reduced using the `no-$z$' approximation to a nonlinear system of ordinary differential equations in time; we demonstrate that the model reproduces accurately earlier results, including those where nonlinear behaviour is driven by a magnetic helicity flux. We discuss the implications and interplay of two types of magnetic helicity flux, one produced by advection (e.g., due to the galactic fountain or wind) and the other, arising from anisotropy of turbulence as suggested by Vishniac & Cho(2001). We argue that the latter is significant if the galactic differential rotation is strong enough: in our model, for $\\Rw\\la-10$ in terms of the corresponding turbulent magnetic Reynolds number. We confirm that the intensity of gas outflow from the galactic disc optimal for the dynamo action is close to that expected for normal spiral galaxie...

  17. MAGNETIC FLUX TUBE INTERCHANGE AT THE HELIOPAUSE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Florinski, V., E-mail: vaf0001@uah.edu [Department of Space Science and Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The magnetic field measured by Voyager 1 prior to its heliocliff encounter on 2012.65 showed an unexpectedly complex transition from the primarily azimuthal inner-heliosheath field to the draped interstellar field tilted by some 20° to the nominal azimuthal direction. Most prominent were two regions of enhanced magnetic field strength depleted in energetic charged particles of heliospheric origin. These regions were interpreted as magnetic flux tubes connected to the outer heliosheath that provided a path for the particles to escape. Despite large increases in strength, the field’s direction did not change appreciably at the boundaries of these flux tubes. Rather, the field’s direction changed gradually over several months prior to the heliocliff crossing. It is shown theoretically that the heliopause, as a pressure equilibrium layer, can become unstable to interchange of magnetic fields between the inner and the outer heliosheaths. The curvature of magnetic field lines and the anti-sunward gradient in plasma kinetic pressure provide conditions favorable for an interchange. Magnetic shear between the heliosheath and the interstellar fields reduces the growth rates, but does not fully stabilize the heliopause against perturbations propagating in the latitudinal direction. The instability could create a transition layer permeated by magnetic flux tubes, oriented parallel to each other and alternately connected to the heliosheath or the interstellar regions.

  18. UVIS G280 Flux Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushouse, Howard

    2009-07-01

    Flux calibration, image displacement, and spectral trace of the UVIS G280 grism will be established using observations of the HST flux standard start GD71. Accompanying direct exposures will provide the image displacement measurements and wavelength zeropoints for dispersed exposures. The calibrations will be obtained at the central position of each CCD chip and at the center of the UVIS field. No additional field-dependent variations will be derived.

  19. Boundary fluxes for nonlocal diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortazar, Carmen; Elgueta, Manuel; Rossi, Julio D.; Wolanski, Noemi

    We study a nonlocal diffusion operator in a bounded smooth domain prescribing the flux through the boundary. This problem may be seen as a generalization of the usual Neumann problem for the heat equation. First, we prove existence, uniqueness and a comparison principle. Next, we study the behavior of solutions for some prescribed boundary data including blowing up ones. Finally, we look at a nonlinear flux boundary condition.

  20. Effect of Flux Adjustments on Temperature Variability in Climate Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffy, P.; Bell, J.; Covey, C.; Sloan, L.

    1999-12-27

    It has been suggested that ''flux adjustments'' in climate models suppress simulated temperature variability. If true, this might invalidate the conclusion that at least some of observed temperature increases since 1860 are anthropogenic, since this conclusion is based in part on estimates of natural temperature variability derived from flux-adjusted models. We assess variability of surface air temperatures in 17 simulations of internal temperature variability submitted to the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project. By comparing variability in flux-adjusted vs. non-flux adjusted simulations, we find no evidence that flux adjustments suppress temperature variability in climate models; other, largely unknown, factors are much more important in determining simulated temperature variability. Therefore the conclusion that at least some of observed temperature increases are anthropogenic cannot be questioned on the grounds that it is based in part on results of flux-adjusted models. Also, reducing or eliminating flux adjustments would probably do little to improve simulations of temperature variability.

  1. P fluxes and exotic branes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Davide M.; Riccioni, Fabio; Risoli, Stefano

    2016-12-01

    We consider the N = 1 superpotential generated in type-II orientifold models by non-geometric fluxes. In particular, we focus on the family of P fluxes, that are related by T-duality transformations to the S-dual of the Q flux. We determine the general rule that transforms a given flux in this family under a single T-duality transformation. This rule allows to derive a complete expression for the superpotential for both the IIA and the IIB theory for the particular case of a {T}^6/[{Z}_2× {Z}_2] orientifold. We then consider how these fluxes modify the generalised Bianchi identities. In particular, we derive a fully consistent set of quadratic constraints coming from the NS-NS Bianchi identities. On the other hand, the P flux Bianchi identities induce tadpoles, and we determine a set of exotic branes that can be consistently included in order to cancel them. This is achieved by determining a universal transformation rule under T-duality satisfied by all the branes in string theory.

  2. $P$ fluxes and exotic branes

    CERN Document Server

    Lombardo, Davide M; Risoli, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    We consider the ${\\cal N}=1$ superpotential generated in type-II orientifold models by non-geometric fluxes. In particular, we focus on the family of $P$ fluxes, that are related by T-duality transformations to the S-dual of the $Q$ flux. We determine the general rule that transforms a given flux in this family under a single T-duality transformation. This rule allows to derive a complete expression for the superpotential for both the IIA and the IIB theory for the particular case of a $T^6/[\\mathbb{Z}_2 \\times \\mathbb{Z}_2 ]$ orientifold. We then consider how these fluxes modify the generalised Bianchi identities. In particular, we derive a fully consistent set of quadratic constraints coming from the NS-NS Bianchi identities. On the other hand, the $P$ flux Bianchi identities induce tadpoles, and we determine a set of exotic branes that can be consistently included in order to cancel them. This is achieved by determining a universal transformation rule under T-duality satisfied by all the branes in string t...

  3. Fermion confinement by a relativistic flux tube

    CERN Document Server

    Olsson, M G; Williams, K; Olsson, M G; Veseli, S; Williams, K

    1996-01-01

    We formulate the description of the dynamic confinement of a single fermion by a flux tube. The range of validity extends from the relativistic corrections of a slowly moving quark to the ultra-relativistic motion in a heavy-light meson. The reduced Salpeter equation, also known as the no-pair equation, provides the framework for our discussion. The Regge structure is that of a Nambu string with one end fixed. Numerical solutions are found giving very good fits to heavy-light meson masses. The Isgur-Wise function with a zero recoil slope of \\xi'(1)\\simeq -1.23 is obtained.

  4. Magnetic Flux in Toroidal Type I Compactification

    CERN Document Server

    Blumenhagen, R; Körs, B; Lüst, Dieter; Blumenhagen, Ralph; Goerlich, Lars; Kors, Boris; Lust, Dieter

    2001-01-01

    We discuss the compactification of type I strings on a torus with additional background gauge flux on the D9-branes. The solutions to the cancellation of the RR tadpoles display various phenomenologically attractive features: supersymmetry breaking, chiral fermions and the opportunity to reduce the rank of the gauge group as desired. We also point out the equivalence of the concept of various different background fields and noncommutative deformations of the geometry on the individual D9-branes by constructing the relevant boundary states to describe such objects.

  5. Magnetic flux reconstruction methods for shaped tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsui, Chi-Wa

    1993-12-01

    The use of a variational method permits the Grad-Shafranov (GS) equation to be solved by reducing the problem of solving the 2D non-linear partial differential equation to the problem of minimizing a function of several variables. This high speed algorithm approximately solves the GS equation given a parameterization of the plasma boundary and the current profile (p` and FF` functions). The author treats the current profile parameters as unknowns. The goal is to reconstruct the internal magnetic flux surfaces of a tokamak plasma and the toroidal current density profile from the external magnetic measurements. This is a classic problem of inverse equilibrium determination. The current profile parameters can be evaluated by several different matching procedures. Matching of magnetic flux and field at the probe locations using the Biot-Savart law and magnetic Green`s function provides a robust method of magnetic reconstruction. The matching of poloidal magnetic field on the plasma surface provides a unique method of identifying the plasma current profile. However, the power of this method is greatly compromised by the experimental errors of the magnetic signals. The Casing Principle provides a very fast way to evaluate the plasma contribution to the magnetic signals. It has the potential of being a fast matching method. The performance of this method is hindered by the accuracy of the poloidal magnetic field computed from the equilibrium solver. A flux reconstruction package has been implemented which integrates a vacuum field solver using a filament model for the plasma, a multi-layer perception neural network as an interface, and the volume integration of plasma current density using Green`s functions as a matching method for the current profile parameters. The flux reconstruction package is applied to compare with the ASEQ and EFIT data. The results are promising.

  6. Metabolic fluxes in the central carbon metabolism of Dinoroseobacter shibae and Phaeobacter gallaeciensis, two members of the marine Roseobacter clade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabus Ralf

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the present work the central carbon metabolism of Dinoroseobacter shibae and Phaeobacter gallaeciensis was studied at the level of metabolic fluxes. These two strains belong to the marine Roseobacter clade, a dominant bacterial group in various marine habitats, and represent surface-associated, biofilm-forming growth (P. gallaeciensis and symbiotic growth with eukaryotic algae (D. shibae. Based on information from recently sequenced genomes, a rich repertoire of pathways has been identified in the carbon core metabolism of these organisms, but little is known about the actual contribution of the various reactions in vivo. Results Using 13C labelling techniques in specifically designed experiments, it could be shown that glucose-grown cells of D. shibae catabolise the carbon source exclusively via the Entner-Doudoroff pathway, whereas alternative routes of glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway are obviously utilised for anabolic purposes only. Enzyme assays confirmed this flux pattern and link the lack of glycolytic flux to the absence of phosphofructokinase activity. The previously suggested formation of phosphoenolpyruvate from pyruvate during mixotrophic CO2 assimilation was found to be inactive under the conditions studied. Moreover, it could be shown that pyruvate carboxylase is involved in CO2 assimilation and that the cyclic respiratory mode of the TCA cycle is utilised. Interestingly, the use of intracellular pathways was highly similar for P. gallaeciensis. Conclusion The present study reveals the first insight into pathway utilisation within the Roseobacter group. Fluxes through major intracellular pathways of the central carbon metabolism, which are closely linked to the various important traits found for the Roseobacter clade, could be determined. The close similarity of fluxes between the two physiologically rather different species might provide the first indication of more general key properties among

  7. Solar Model Parameters and Direct Measurements of Solar Neutrino Fluxes

    CERN Document Server

    Bandyopadhyay, A; Goswami, S; Petcov, S T; Bandyopadhyay, Abhijit; Choubey, Sandhya; Goswami, Srubabati

    2006-01-01

    We explore a novel possibility of determining the solar model parameters, which serve as input in the calculations of the solar neutrino fluxes, by exploiting the data from direct measurements of the fluxes. More specifically, we use the rather precise value of the $^8B$ neutrino flux, $\\phi_B$ obtained from the global analysis of the solar neutrino and KamLAND data, to derive constraints on each of the solar model parameters on which $\\phi_B$ depends. We also use more precise values of $^7Be$ and $pp$ fluxes as can be obtained from future prospective data and discuss whether such measurements can help in reducing the uncertainties of one or more input parameters of the Standard Solar Model.

  8. STATOR FLUX OPTIMIZATION ON DIRECT TORQUE CONTROL WITH FUZZY LOGIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Korkmaz

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The Direct Torque Control (DTC is well known as an effective control technique for high performance drives in a wide variety of industrial applications and conventional DTC technique uses two constant reference value: torque and stator flux. In this paper, fuzzy logic based stator flux optimization technique for DTC drives that has been proposed. The proposed fuzzy logic based stator flux optimizer self-regulates the stator flux reference using induction motor load situation without need of any motor parameters. Simulation studies have been carried out with Matlab/Simulink to compare the proposed system behaviors at vary load conditions. Simulation results show that the performance of the proposed DTC technique has been improved and especially at low-load conditions torque ripple are greatly reduced with respect to the conventional DTC.

  9. Calibration of Ocean Forcing with satellite Flux Estimates (COFFEE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Charlie; Jan, Dastugue; Jackie, May; Rowley, Clark; Smith, Scott; Spence, Peter; Gremes-Cordero, Silvia

    2016-04-01

    Predicting the evolution of ocean temperature in regional ocean models depends on estimates of surface heat fluxes and upper-ocean processes over the forecast period. Within the COFFEE project (Calibration of Ocean Forcing with satellite Flux Estimates, real-time satellite observations are used to estimate shortwave, longwave, sensible, and latent air-sea heat flux corrections to a background estimate from the prior day's regional or global model forecast. These satellite-corrected fluxes are used to prepare a corrected ocean hindcast and to estimate flux error covariances to project the heat flux corrections for a 3-5 day forecast. In this way, satellite remote sensing is applied to not only inform the initial ocean state but also to mitigate errors in surface heat flux and model representations affecting the distribution of heat in the upper ocean. While traditional assimilation of sea surface temperature (SST) observations re-centers ocean models at the start of each forecast cycle, COFFEE endeavors to appropriately partition and reduce among various surface heat flux and ocean dynamics sources. A suite of experiments in the southern California Current demonstrates a range of COFFEE capabilities, showing the impact on forecast error relative to a baseline three-dimensional variational (3DVAR) assimilation using operational global or regional atmospheric forcing. Experiment cases combine different levels of flux calibration with assimilation alternatives. The cases use the original fluxes, apply full satellite corrections during the forecast period, or extend hindcast corrections into the forecast period. Assimilation is either baseline 3DVAR or standard strong-constraint 4DVAR, with work proceeding to add a 4DVAR expanded to include a weak constraint treatment of the surface flux errors. Covariance of flux errors is estimated from the recent time series of forecast and calibrated flux terms. While the California Current examples are shown, the approach is

  10. Non-stationary (13)C-metabolic flux ratio analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörl, Manuel; Schnidder, Julian; Sauer, Uwe; Zamboni, Nicola

    2013-12-01

    (13)C-metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) has become a key method for metabolic engineering and systems biology. In the most common methodology, fluxes are calculated by global isotopomer balancing and iterative fitting to stationary (13)C-labeling data. This approach requires a closed carbon balance, long-lasting metabolic steady state, and the detection of (13)C-patterns in a large number of metabolites. These restrictions mostly reduced the application of (13)C-MFA to the central carbon metabolism of well-studied model organisms grown in minimal media with a single carbon source. Here we introduce non-stationary (13)C-metabolic flux ratio analysis as a novel method for (13)C-MFA to allow estimating local, relative fluxes from ultra-short (13)C-labeling experiments and without the need for global isotopomer balancing. The approach relies on the acquisition of non-stationary (13)C-labeling data exclusively for metabolites in the proximity of a node of converging fluxes and a local parameter estimation with a system of ordinary differential equations. We developed a generalized workflow that takes into account reaction types and the availability of mass spectrometric data on molecular ions or fragments for data processing, modeling, parameter and error estimation. We demonstrated the approach by analyzing three key nodes of converging fluxes in central metabolism of Bacillus subtilis. We obtained flux estimates that are in agreement with published results obtained from steady state experiments, but reduced the duration of the necessary (13)C-labeling experiment to less than a minute. These results show that our strategy enables to formally estimate relative pathway fluxes on extremely short time scale, neglecting cellular carbon balancing. Hence this approach paves the road to targeted (13)C-MFA in dynamic systems with multiple carbon sources and towards rich media.

  11. Critical, sustainable and threshold fluxes for membrane filtration with water industry applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Robert W; Pearce, Graeme K

    2011-05-11

    Critical flux theory evolved as a description of the upper bound in the operating envelope for controlled steady state environments such as cross-flow systems. However, in the application of UF membranes in the water industry, dead-end (direct-flow) designs are used. Direct-flow is a pseudo steady state operation with different fouling characteristics to cross-flow, and thus the critical flux concept has limited applicability. After a review of recent usage of the critical flux theory, an alternative concept for providing design guidelines for direct-flow systems namely that of the threshold flux is introduced. The concept of threshold flux can also be applicable to cross-flow systems. In more general terms the threshold flux can be taken to be the flux that divides a low fouling region from a high fouling region. This may be linked both to the critical flux concept and to the concept of a sustainable flux. The sustainable flux is the one at which a modest degree of fouling occurs, providing a compromise between capital expenditure (which is reduced by using high flux) and operating costs (which are reduced by restricting the fouling rate). Whilst the threshold flux can potentially be linked to physical phenomena alone, the sustainable flux also depends upon economic factors and is thus of a different nature to the critical and threshold fluxes. This distinction will be illustrated using some MBR data. Additionally the utility of the concept of a threshold flux will be illustrated using pilot plant data obtained for UF treatment of four sources of water. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Advanced divertor configurations with large flux expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soukhanovskii, V.A., E-mail: vlad@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Bell, R.E.; Diallo, A.; Gerhardt, S.; Kaye, S.; Kolemen, E.; LeBlanc, B.P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ (United States); McLean, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Menard, J.E.; Paul, S.F.; Podesta, M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ (United States); Raman, R. [University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Ryutov, D.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Scotti, F.; Kaita, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ (United States); Maingi, R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mueller, D.M.; Roquemore, A.L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ (United States); Reimerdes, H.; Canal, G.P. [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Association Euratom Confédération Suisse, Lausanne (Switzerland); and others

    2013-07-15

    Experimental studies of the novel snowflake divertor concept (D. Ryutov, Phys. Plasmas 14 (2007) 064502) performed in the NSTX and TCV tokamaks are reviewed in this paper. The snowflake divertor enables power sharing between divertor strike points, as well as the divertor plasma-wetted area, effective connection length and divertor volumetric power loss to increase beyond those in the standard divertor, potentially reducing heat flux and plasma temperature at the target. It also enables higher magnetic shear inside the separatrix, potentially affecting pedestal MHD stability. Experimental results from NSTX and TCV confirm the predicted properties of the snowflake divertor. In the NSTX, a large spherical tokamak with a compact divertor and lithium-coated graphite plasma-facing components (PFCs), the snowflake divertor operation led to reduced core and pedestal impurity concentration, as well as re-appearance of Type I ELMs that were suppressed in standard divertor H-mode discharges. In the divertor, an otherwise inaccessible partial detachment of the outer strike point with an up to 50% increase in divertor radiation and a peak divertor heat flux reduction from 3–7 MW/m{sup 2} to 0.5–1 MW/m{sup 2} was achieved. Impulsive heat fluxes due to Type-I ELMs were significantly dissipated in the high magnetic flux expansion region. In the TCV, a medium-size tokamak with graphite PFCs, several advantageous snowflake divertor features (cf. the standard divertor) have been demonstrated: an unchanged L–H power threshold, enhanced stability of the peeling–ballooning modes in the pedestal region (and generally an extended second stability region), as well as an H-mode pedestal regime with reduced (×2–3) Type I ELM frequency and slightly increased (20–30%) normalized ELM energy, resulting in a favorable average energy loss comparison to the standard divertor. In the divertor, ELM power partitioning between snowflake divertor strike points was demonstrated. The NSTX

  13. Physics of magnetic flux tubes

    CERN Document Server

    Ryutova, Margarita

    2015-01-01

    This book is the first account of the physics of magnetic flux tubes from their fundamental properties to collective phenomena in an ensembles of flux tubes. The physics of magnetic flux tubes is absolutely vital for understanding fundamental physical processes in the solar atmosphere shaped and governed by magnetic fields. High-resolution and high cadence observations from recent space and  ground-based instruments taken simultaneously at different heights and temperatures not only show the ubiquity of filamentary structure formation but also allow to study how various events are interconnected by system of magnetic flux tubes. The book covers both theory and observations. Theoretical models presented in analytical and phenomenological forms are tailored for practical applications. These are welded with state-of-the-art observations from early decisive ones to the most recent data that open a new phase-space for exploring the Sun and sun-like stars. Concept of magnetic flux tubes is central to various magn...

  14. A Reconnecting Flux Rope Dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Baggaley, Andrew W; Shukurov, Anvar; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2009-01-01

    We develop a new model of the fluctuation dynamo in which the magnetic field is confined in thin flux ropes advected by a multi-scale flow modeling turbulence. Magnetic dissipation occurs only via reconnection of the flux ropes. We investigate the kinetic energy release into heat, mediated by the dynamo action, both in our model and by solving the induction equation with the same flow. We find that a flux rope dynamo is an order of magnitude more efficient at converting mechanical energy into heat. The probability density of the magnetic energy release in reconnections has a power-law form with the slope -3, consistent with the Solar corona heating by nanoflares.

  15. Reconnecting flux-rope dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggaley, Andrew W.; Barenghi, Carlo F.; Shukurov, Anvar; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2009-11-01

    We develop a model of the fluctuation dynamo in which the magnetic field is confined to thin flux ropes advected by a multiscale model of turbulence. Magnetic dissipation occurs only via reconnection of the flux ropes. This model can be viewed as an implementation of the asymptotic limit Rm→∞ for a continuous magnetic field, where magnetic dissipation is strongly localized to small regions of strong-field gradients. We investigate the kinetic-energy release into heat mediated by the dynamo action, both in our model and by solving the induction equation with the same flow. We find that a flux-rope dynamo is an order of magnitude more efficient at converting mechanical energy into heat. The probability density of the magnetic energy release in reconnections has a power-law form with the slope -3 , consistent with the solar corona heating by nanoflares.

  16. Reconnecting flux-rope dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggaley, Andrew W; Barenghi, Carlo F; Shukurov, Anvar; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2009-11-01

    We develop a model of the fluctuation dynamo in which the magnetic field is confined to thin flux ropes advected by a multiscale model of turbulence. Magnetic dissipation occurs only via reconnection of the flux ropes. This model can be viewed as an implementation of the asymptotic limit R_{m}-->infinity for a continuous magnetic field, where magnetic dissipation is strongly localized to small regions of strong-field gradients. We investigate the kinetic-energy release into heat mediated by the dynamo action, both in our model and by solving the induction equation with the same flow. We find that a flux-rope dynamo is an order of magnitude more efficient at converting mechanical energy into heat. The probability density of the magnetic energy release in reconnections has a power-law form with the slope -3 , consistent with the solar corona heating by nanoflares.

  17. BVOC fluxes above mountain grassland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Bamberger

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Grasslands comprise natural tropical savannah over managed temperate fields to tundra and cover one quarter of the Earth's land surface. Plant growth, maintenance and decay result in volatile organic compound (VOCs emissions to the atmosphere. Furthermore, biogenic VOCs (BVOCs are emitted as a consequence of various environmental stresses including cutting and drying during harvesting. Fluxes of BVOCs were measured with a proton-transfer-reaction-mass-spectrometer (PTR-MS over temperate mountain grassland in Stubai Valley (Tyrol, Austria over one growing season (2008. VOC fluxes were calculated from the disjunct PTR-MS data using the virtual disjunct eddy covariance method and the gap filling method. Methanol fluxes obtained with the two independent flux calculation methods were highly correlated (y = 0.95×−0.12, R2 = 0.92. Methanol showed strong daytime emissions throughout the growing season – with maximal values of 9.7 nmol m−2 s−1, methanol fluxes from the growing grassland were considerably higher at the beginning of the growing season in June compared to those measured during October (2.5 nmol m−2 s−1. Methanol was the only component that exhibited consistent fluxes during the entire growing periods of the grass. The cutting and drying of the grass increased the emissions of methanol to up to 78.4 nmol m−2 s−1. In addition, emissions of acetaldehyde (up to 11.0 nmol m−2 s−1, and hexenal (leaf aldehyde, up to 8.6 nmol m−2 s−1 were detected during/after harvesting.

  18. Where is the Open Flux?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linker, Jon A.; Downs, Cooper; Caplan, Ronald M.; Lionello, Roberto; Mikic, Zoran; Riley, Pete; Henney, Carl John; Arge, Charles; Owens, Matthew

    2017-08-01

    The Sun’s magnetic field has been observed in the photosphere from ground- and space-based observatories for many years. Global maps of the solar magnetic field based on full disk magnetograms (either built up over a solar rotation, or evolved using flux transport models) are commonly used as boundary conditions for coronal and solar wind models. Maps from different observatories typically agree qualitatively but often disagree quantitatively. Estimation of the coronal/solar wind physics can range from potential field source surface (PFSS) models with empirical prescriptions to magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models with realistic energy transport and sub-grid scale descriptions of heating and acceleration. Two primary observational constraints on the models are (1) The open field regions in the model should approximately correspond to coronal holes observed in emission, and (2) the magnitude of the open magnetic flux in the model should match that inferred from in situ spacecraft measurements. We have investigated the July 2010 time period, using PFSS and MHD models computed using several available magnetic maps, coronal hole boundaries detected from STEREO and SDO EUV observations, and estimates of the interplanetary magnetic flux from in situ ACE measurements. We show that for all the model/map combinations, models that agree for (1) underestimate the interplanetary magnetic flux, or, conversely, for models to match (2), the modeled open field regions are larger than observed coronal holes. Alternatively, we estimate the open magnetic flux entirely from solar observations by combining detected coronal hole boundaries with observatory synoptic magnetic maps, and show that this method also underestimates the interplanetary magnetic flux. We discuss possible resolutions.Research supported by NASA, AFOSR, and NSF.

  19. Flux attenuation at NREL's High-Flux Solar Furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Carl E.; Scholl, Kent L.; Lewandowski, Allan A.

    1994-10-01

    The High-Flux Solar Furnace (HFSF) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has a faceted primary concentrator and a long focal-length-to-diameter ratio (due to its off-axis design). Each primary facet can be aimed individually to produce different flux distributions at the target plane. Two different types of attenuators are used depending on the flux distribution. A sliding-plate attenuator is used primarily when the facets are aimed at the same target point. The alternate attenuator resembles a venetian blind. Both attenuators are located between the concentrator and the focal point. The venetian-blind attenuator is primarily used to control the levels of sunlight failing on a target when the primary concentrators are not focused to a single point. This paper will demonstrate the problem of using the sliding-plate attenuator with a faceted concentrator when the facets are not aimed at the same target point. We will show that although the alternate attenuator necessarily blocks a certain amount of incoming sunlight, even when fully open, it provides a more even attenuation of the flux for alternate aiming strategies.

  20. Metabolic flux balance analysis and the in silico analysis of Escherichia coli K-12 gene deletions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwards Jeremy S

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome sequencing and bioinformatics are producing detailed lists of the molecular components contained in many prokaryotic organisms. From this 'parts catalogue' of a microbial cell, in silico representations of integrated metabolic functions can be constructed and analyzed using flux balance analysis (FBA. FBA is particularly well-suited to study metabolic networks based on genomic, biochemical, and strain specific information. Results Herein, we have utilized FBA to interpret and analyze the metabolic capabilities of Escherichia coli. We have computationally mapped the metabolic capabilities of E. coli using FBA and examined the optimal utilization of the E. coli metabolic pathways as a function of environmental variables. We have used an in silico analysis to identify seven gene products of central metabolism (glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, TCA cycle, electron transport system essential for aerobic growth of E. coli on glucose minimal media, and 15 gene products essential for anaerobic growth on glucose minimal media. The in silico tpi-, zwf, and pta- mutant strains were examined in more detail by mapping the capabilities of these in silico isogenic strains. Conclusions We found that computational models of E. coli metabolism based on physicochemical constraints can be used to interpret mutant behavior. These in silica results lead to a further understanding of the complex genotype-phenotype relation. Supplementary information: http://gcrg.ucsd.edu/supplementary_data/DeletionAnalysis/main.htm

  1. Flux balance analysis of cyanobacterial metabolism: the metabolic network of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henning Knoop

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria are versatile unicellular phototrophic microorganisms that are highly abundant in many environments. Owing to their capability to utilize solar energy and atmospheric carbon dioxide for growth, cyanobacteria are increasingly recognized as a prolific resource for the synthesis of valuable chemicals and various biofuels. To fully harness the metabolic capabilities of cyanobacteria necessitates an in-depth understanding of the metabolic interconversions taking place during phototrophic growth, as provided by genome-scale reconstructions of microbial organisms. Here we present an extended reconstruction and analysis of the metabolic network of the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Building upon several recent reconstructions of cyanobacterial metabolism, unclear reaction steps are experimentally validated and the functional consequences of unknown or dissenting pathway topologies are discussed. The updated model integrates novel results with respect to the cyanobacterial TCA cycle, an alleged glyoxylate shunt, and the role of photorespiration in cellular growth. Going beyond conventional flux-balance analysis, we extend the computational analysis to diurnal light/dark cycles of cyanobacterial metabolism.

  2. Flux Balance Analysis of Cyanobacterial Metabolism: The Metabolic Network of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoop, Henning; Gründel, Marianne; Zilliges, Yvonne; Lehmann, Robert; Hoffmann, Sabrina; Lockau, Wolfgang; Steuer, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are versatile unicellular phototrophic microorganisms that are highly abundant in many environments. Owing to their capability to utilize solar energy and atmospheric carbon dioxide for growth, cyanobacteria are increasingly recognized as a prolific resource for the synthesis of valuable chemicals and various biofuels. To fully harness the metabolic capabilities of cyanobacteria necessitates an in-depth understanding of the metabolic interconversions taking place during phototrophic growth, as provided by genome-scale reconstructions of microbial organisms. Here we present an extended reconstruction and analysis of the metabolic network of the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Building upon several recent reconstructions of cyanobacterial metabolism, unclear reaction steps are experimentally validated and the functional consequences of unknown or dissenting pathway topologies are discussed. The updated model integrates novel results with respect to the cyanobacterial TCA cycle, an alleged glyoxylate shunt, and the role of photorespiration in cellular growth. Going beyond conventional flux-balance analysis, we extend the computational analysis to diurnal light/dark cycles of cyanobacterial metabolism. PMID:23843751

  3. Charm production in flux tubes

    CERN Document Server

    Aguiar, C E; Nazareth, R A M S; Pech, G

    1996-01-01

    We argue that the non-perturbative Schwinger mechanism may play an important role in the hadronic production of charm. We present a flux tube model which assumes that the colliding hadrons become color charged because of gluon exchange, and that a single non-elementary flux tube is built up as they recede. The strong chromoelectric field inside this tube creates quark pairs (including charmed ones) and the ensuing color screening breaks the tube into excited hadronic clusters. On their turn these clusters, or `fireballs', decay statistically into the final hadrons. The model is able to account for the soft production of charmed, strange and lighter hadrons within a unified framework.

  4. Charm production in flux tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, C. E.; Kodama, T.; Nazareth, R. A. M. S.; Pech, G.

    1996-01-01

    We argue that the nonperturbative Schwinger mechanism may play an important role in the hadronic production of charm. We present a flux tube model which assumes that the colliding hadrons become color charged because of gluon exchange, and that a single nonelementary flux tube is built up as they recede. The strong chromoelectric field inside this tube creates quark pairs (including charmed ones) and the ensuing color screening breaks the tube into excited hadronic clusters. In their turn these clusters, or ``fireballs,'' decay statistically into the final hadrons. The model is able to account for the soft production of charmed, strange, and lighter hadrons within a unified framework.

  5. Initiation of CMEs by Magnetic Flux Emergence

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Govind Dubey; Bart van der Holst; Stefaan Poedts

    2006-06-01

    The initiation of solar Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) is studied in the framework of numerical magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). The initial CME model includes a magnetic flux rope in spherical, axisymmetric geometry. The initial configuration consists of a magnetic flux rope embedded in a gravitationally stratified solar atmosphere with a background dipole magnetic field. The flux rope is in equilibrium due to an image current below the photosphere. An emerging flux triggering mechanism is used to make this equilibrium system unstable. When the magnetic flux emerges within the filament below the flux rope, this results in a catastrophic behavior similar to previous models. As a result, the flux rope rises and a current sheet forms below it. It is shown that the magnetic reconnection in the current sheet below the flux rope in combination with the outward curvature forces results in a fast ejection of the flux rope as observed for solar CMEs.We have done a parametric study of the emerging flux rate.

  6. Experiment on Dust Flux During Duststorm Periods over Desert Area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hongsheng; ZHU hao; PENG Yan; KANG Ling; CHEN Jiayi; Soon-Ung PARK

    2008-01-01

    The present study investigates the characteristics of turbulent transfer and the conditions for dust emis- sion and transport using the dust concentration and micrometeorological data obtained during dust events occurring in the spring of 2004 over the Hunshandake desert area. The turbulent exchange coefficients and turbulent fluxes of momentum and heat are calculated. The relationships between dust flux, friction velocity,and wind speed are also explored. The results show that thermal turbulence is dominant during daytime of non-dusty days. The dynamic turbulence increases obviously and the sensible heat flux reduces by different degrees during dust events. There is an efficient downward transfer of momentum before duststorm occur- rence, and both the dynamic turbulence and the thermal turbulence are important in the surface layer. The dynamic turbulence even exceeds the thermal turbulence during severe duststorm events. The values of dust flux vary in the range of -5-5, -30-30, and -200-300 μg m-2 s-1 during non-dusty days, blowing dust, and duststorm events, respectively. A slight upward transport of dust is observed during non-dusty days. The dust flux gradually varies from positive to negative during duststorm periods, which indicates the time evolution of dust events from dust rising to stably suspending and then deposition. The dust flux is found to be proportional to u3*. The threshold values of wind speed and friction velocity are about 6 and 0.4 m s-1, respectively.

  7. Metabolic flux profiling of recombinant protein secreting Pichia pastoris growing on glucose:methanol mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordà Joel

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris has emerged as one of the most promising yeast hosts for the production of heterologous proteins. Mixed feeds of methanol and a multicarbon source instead of methanol as sole carbon source have been shown to improve product productivities and alleviate metabolic burden derived from protein production. Nevertheless, systematic quantitative studies on the relationships between the central metabolism and recombinant protein production in P. pastoris are still rather limited, particularly when growing this yeast on mixed carbon sources, thus hampering future metabolic network engineering strategies for improved protein production. Results The metabolic flux distribution in the central metabolism of P. pastoris growing on a mixed feed of glucose and methanol was analyzed by Metabolic Flux Analysis (MFA using 13C-NMR-derived constraints. For this purpose, we defined new flux ratios for methanol assimilation pathways in P. pastoris cells growing on glucose:methanol mixtures. By using this experimental approach, the metabolic burden caused by the overexpression and secretion of a Rhizopus oryzae lipase (Rol in P. pastoris was further analyzed. This protein has been previously shown to trigger the unfolded protein response in P. pastoris. A series of 13C-tracer experiments were performed on aerobic chemostat cultivations with a control and two different Rol producing strains growing at a dilution rate of 0.09 h−1 using a glucose:methanol 80:20 (w/w mix as carbon source. The MFA performed in this study reveals a significant redistristribution of carbon fluxes in the central carbon metabolism when comparing the two recombinant strains vs the control strain, reflected in increased glycolytic, TCA cycle and NADH regeneration fluxes, as well as higher methanol dissimilation rates. Conclusions Overall, a further 13C-based MFA development to characterise the central metabolism of methylotrophic

  8. Metabolic flux profiling of recombinant protein secreting Pichia pastoris growing on glucose:methanol mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordà, Joel; Jouhten, Paula; Cámara, Elena; Maaheimo, Hannu; Albiol, Joan; Ferrer, Pau

    2012-05-08

    The methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris has emerged as one of the most promising yeast hosts for the production of heterologous proteins. Mixed feeds of methanol and a multicarbon source instead of methanol as sole carbon source have been shown to improve product productivities and alleviate metabolic burden derived from protein production. Nevertheless, systematic quantitative studies on the relationships between the central metabolism and recombinant protein production in P. pastoris are still rather limited, particularly when growing this yeast on mixed carbon sources, thus hampering future metabolic network engineering strategies for improved protein production. The metabolic flux distribution in the central metabolism of P. pastoris growing on a mixed feed of glucose and methanol was analyzed by Metabolic Flux Analysis (MFA) using 13C-NMR-derived constraints. For this purpose, we defined new flux ratios for methanol assimilation pathways in P. pastoris cells growing on glucose:methanol mixtures. By using this experimental approach, the metabolic burden caused by the overexpression and secretion of a Rhizopus oryzae lipase (Rol) in P. pastoris was further analyzed. This protein has been previously shown to trigger the unfolded protein response in P. pastoris. A series of 13C-tracer experiments were performed on aerobic chemostat cultivations with a control and two different Rol producing strains growing at a dilution rate of 0.09 h(-1) using a glucose:methanol 80:20 (w/w) mix as carbon source.The MFA performed in this study reveals a significant redistribution of carbon fluxes in the central carbon metabolism when comparing the two recombinant strains vs the control strain, reflected in increased glycolytic, TCA cycle and NADH regeneration fluxes, as well as higher methanol dissimilation rates. Overall, a further 13C-based MFA development to characterise the central metabolism of methylotrophic yeasts when growing on mixed methanol:multicarbon sources has been

  9. APPROCHE THEORIQUE ET EXPERIMENTALE DE LA FILTRATION TANGENTIELLE DE COLLOÏDES : FLUX CRITIQUE ET COLMATAGE

    OpenAIRE

    Espinasse, Benjamin

    2003-01-01

    Though the problems raised by membrane fouling are old, prediction of fouling and the adaptation of filtration conditions to reduce fouling remain essential for a better control of the process. Because it represents the flux beyond which irreversible fouling appears on the membrane surface, the critical flux can be a key parameter in this control. In this study, we try to relate the osmotic pressure of a colloidal suspension to the experimental values of critical flux by modelling the process...

  10. Reconstruction and flux analysis of coupling between metabolic pathways of astrocytes and neurons: application to cerebral hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akιn Ata

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is a daunting task to identify all the metabolic pathways of brain energy metabolism and develop a dynamic simulation environment that will cover a time scale ranging from seconds to hours. To simplify this task and make it more practicable, we undertook stoichiometric modeling of brain energy metabolism with the major aim of including the main interacting pathways in and between astrocytes and neurons. Model The constructed model includes central metabolism (glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, TCA cycle, lipid metabolism, reactive oxygen species (ROS detoxification, amino acid metabolism (synthesis and catabolism, the well-known glutamate-glutamine cycle, other coupling reactions between astrocytes and neurons, and neurotransmitter metabolism. This is, to our knowledge, the most comprehensive attempt at stoichiometric modeling of brain metabolism to date in terms of its coverage of a wide range of metabolic pathways. We then attempted to model the basal physiological behaviour and hypoxic behaviour of the brain cells where astrocytes and neurons are tightly coupled. Results The reconstructed stoichiometric reaction model included 217 reactions (184 internal, 33 exchange and 216 metabolites (183 internal, 33 external distributed in and between astrocytes and neurons. Flux balance analysis (FBA techniques were applied to the reconstructed model to elucidate the underlying cellular principles of neuron-astrocyte coupling. Simulation of resting conditions under the constraints of maximization of glutamate/glutamine/GABA cycle fluxes between the two cell types with subsequent minimization of Euclidean norm of fluxes resulted in a flux distribution in accordance with literature-based findings. As a further validation of our model, the effect of oxygen deprivation (hypoxia on fluxes was simulated using an FBA-derivative approach, known as minimization of metabolic adjustment (MOMA. The results show the power of the

  11. Easy regulation of metabolic flux in Escherichia coli using an endogenous type I-E CRISPR-Cas system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yizhao; Su, Tianyuan; Qi, Qingsheng; Liang, Quanfeng

    2016-11-15

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats interference (CRISPRi) is a recently developed powerful tool for gene regulation. In Escherichia coli, the type I CRISPR system expressed endogenously shall be easy for internal regulation without causing metabolic burden in compared with the widely used type II system, which expressed dCas9 as an additional plasmid. By knocking out cas3 and activating the expression of CRISPR-associated complex for antiviral defense (Cascade), we constructed a native CRISPRi system in E. coli. Downregulation of the target gene from 6 to 82% was demonstrated using green fluorescent protein. Regulation of the citrate synthase gene (gltA) in the TCA cycle affected host metabolism. The effect of metabolic flux regulation was demonstrated by the poly-3-hydroxbutyrate (PHB) accumulation in vivo. By regulating native gltA in E. coli using an engineered endogenous type I-E CRISPR system, we redirected metabolic flux from the central metabolic pathway to the PHB synthesis pathway. This study demonstrated that the endogenous type I-E CRISPR-Cas system is an easy and effective method for regulating internal metabolic pathways, which is useful for product synthesis.

  12. Black branes in flux compactifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torroba, Gonzalo; Wang, Huajia

    2013-10-01

    We construct charged black branes in type IIA flux compactifications that are dual to (2 + 1)-dimensional field theories at finite density. The internal space is a general Calabi-Yau manifold with fluxes, with internal dimensions much smaller than the AdS radius. Gauge fields descend from the 3-form RR potential evaluated on harmonic forms of the Calabi-Yau, and Kaluza-Klein modes decouple. Black branes are described by a four-dimensional effective field theory that includes only a few light fields and is valid over a parametrically large range of scales. This effective theory determines the low energy dynamics, stability and thermodynamic properties. Tools from flux compactifications are also used to construct holographic CFTs with no relevant scalar operators, that can lead to symmetric phases of condensed matter systems stable to very low temperatures. The general formalism is illustrated with simple examples such as toroidal compactifications and manifolds with a single size modulus. We initiate the classification of holographic phases of matter described by flux compactifications, which include generalized Reissner-Nordstrom branes, nonsupersymmetric AdS2×R2 and hyperscaling violating solutions.

  13. (13)C metabolic flux analysis of the extremely thermophilic, fast growing, xylose-utilizing Geobacillus strain LC300.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordova, Lauren T; Antoniewicz, Maciek R

    2016-01-01

    Thermophiles are increasingly used as versatile hosts in the biotechnology industry. One of the key advantages of thermophiles is the potential to achieve high rates of feedstock conversion at elevated temperatures. The recently isolated Geobacillus strain LC300 grows extremely fast on xylose, with a doubling time of less than 30 min. In the accompanying paper, the genome of Geobacillus LC300 was sequenced and annotated. In this work, we have experimentally validated the metabolic network model using parallel (13)C-labeling experiments and applied (13)C-metabolic flux analysis to quantify precise metabolic fluxes. Specifically, the complete set of singly labeled xylose tracers, [1-(13)C], [2-(13)C], [3-(13)C], [4-(13)C], and [5-(13)C]xylose, was used for the first time. Isotopic labeling of biomass amino acids was measured by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Isotopic labeling of carbon dioxide in the off-gas was also measured by an on-line mass spectrometer. The (13)C-labeling data was then rigorously integrated for flux elucidation using the COMPLETE-MFA approach. The results provided important new insights into the metabolism of Geobacillus LC300, its efficient xylose utilization pathways, and the balance between carbon, redox and energy fluxes. The pentose phosphate pathway, glycolysis and TCA cycle were found to be highly active in Geobacillus LC300. The oxidative pentose phosphate pathway was also active and contributed significantly to NADPH production. No transhydrogenase activity was detected. Results from this work provide a solid foundation for future studies of this strain and its metabolic engineering and biotechnological applications.

  14. Quantification of natural vapor fluxes of trichloroethene in the unsaturated zone at Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James A.; Tisdale, Amy K.; Cho, H. Jean

    1996-01-01

    The upward flux of trichloroethene (TCE) vapor through the unsaturated zone above a contaminated, water-table aquifer at Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey, has been studied under natural conditions over a 12-month period. Vertical gas-phase diffusion fluxes were estimated indirectly by measuring the TCE vapor concentration gradient in the unsaturated zone and using Fick's law to calculate the flux. The total gas-phase flux (e.g., the sum of diffusion and advection fluxes) was measured directly with a vertical flux chamber (VFC). In many cases, the upward TCE vapor flux was several orders of magnitude greater than the upward TCE diffusion flux, suggesting that mechanisms other than steady-state vapor diffusion are contributing to the vertical transport of TCE vapors through the unsaturated zone. The measured total flux of TCE vapor from the subsurface to the atmosphere is approximately 50 kg/yr and is comparable in magnitude to the removal rate of TCE from the aquifer by an existing pump-and-treat system and by discharge into a nearby stream. The net upward flux of TCE is reduced significantly during a storm event, presumably due to the mass transfer of TCE from the soil gas to the infiltrating rainwater and its subsequent downward advection. Several potential problems associated with the measurement of total gas-phase fluxes are discussed.

  15. Spatial and temporal variations in percolation fluxes in a tropical Andosol influenced by banana cropping patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattan, P.; Voltz, M.; Cabidoche, Y.-M.; Lacas, J.-G.; Sansoulet, J.

    2007-03-01

    SummarySpatial variability in percolation fluxes was studied in field plots cropped with banana plants, which induce very heterogeneous rainfall partitioning at the soil surface, with high subsequent infiltration in Andosols. Percolation fluxes were measured for just over a year at 1-7 day intervals in eight wick (WL) and gravity lysimeters (GL) that had been buried in the soil at a depth of 60 cm. The results revealed that WL captured unsaturated fluxes while GL only functioned after ponding occurred. The percolation flux measurements were highly biased with both systems, i.e. overpercolation with WL and underpercolation with GL. Percolation fluxes seemed, however, to be mainly unsaturated in the soil types studied. High percolation flux variability was noted on a plot scale, which could be explained by the vegetation structure: total percolation flux (WL) was 2.1-fold higher under banana plants; saturated percolation flux (GL) was 7-fold higher under banana plants and almost absent between banana plants. Eighty-eight per cent of the total variance in percolation flux could be explained by the rainfall intensity under the banana canopy, calculated while taking the rainfall partitioning by the vegetation and the initial water status into account. The number of lysimeters required for assessing percolation flux in a field plot can be reduced by taking the spatial patterns of the flux boundary conditions into account.

  16. Quantitative method for measuring heat flux emitted from a cryogenic object

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Robert V.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention is a quantitative method for measuring the total heat flux, and of deriving the total power dissipation, of a heat-fluxing object which includes the steps of placing an electrical noise-emitting heat-fluxing object in a liquid helium bath and measuring the superfluid transition temperature of the bath. The temperature of the liquid helium bath is thereafter reduced until some measurable parameter, such as the electrical noise, exhibited by the heat-fluxing object or a temperature-dependent resistive thin film in intimate contact with the heat-fluxing object, becomes greatly reduced. The temperature of the liquid helum bath is measured at this point. The difference between the superfluid transition temperature of the liquid helium bath surrounding the heat-fluxing object, and the temperature of the liquid helium bath when the electrical noise emitted by the heat-fluxing object becomes greatly reduced, is determined. The total heat flux from the heat-fluxing object is determined as a function of this difference between these temperatures. In certain applications, the technique can be used to optimize thermal design parameters of cryogenic electronics, for example, Josephson junction and infra-red sensing devices.

  17. External trabeculectomy with T-Flux implant.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Jungkim, S

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of T-Flux implant in nonpenetrating glaucoma surgery. METHODS: This clinical interventional case series study included 35 eyes of 35 patients with medically uncontrolled primary open angle glaucoma. External trabeculectomy with T-Flux (ETTF) is a technique of nonpenetrating glaucoma surgery, in which after removing deep scleral tissue and un-roofing the canal of Schlemn (CS) the external trabecular tissue is peeled off to enhance the aqueous drainage without opening the anterior chamber. A non-absorbable T-Flux implant (IOL TECH Laboratories, France) was sutured in deep intrascleral space to keep it patent. Snellen\\'s best-corrected visual acuity, slit lamp biomicroscopy, intraocular pressure (IOP), gonioscopy, funduscopy, and optic disc assessment were performed preoperatively and postoperatively at 1 day, 1 week, and 1, 3 , 6, and 12 months. Visual field testing was performed preoperatively and at 6 and 12 months postoperatively. RESULTS: For three eyes, surgery was converted to standard trabeculectomy owing to the perforation of trabeculo-Descemet\\'s membrane and iris prolapse and excluded from the study. The results of the remaining 32 eyes were included in the study. Preoperative IOP (mean +\\/- SD) of 32.88 +\\/- 5.7 mmHg decreased to 15.44 +\\/- 1.6 mmHg after 12 months. Ten eyes (28.6%) had microhyphema that resolved spontaneously; 3 eyes (8.6%) had microperforation without iris prolapse so ETTF was proceeded routinely. The preoperative number of antiglaucoma medications per patient reduced from (mean +\\/- SD) 2.74 +\\/- 0.61 to 0.11 +\\/- 0.32 postoperatively at 12 months. Visual acuity and visual fields remained stable. CONCLUSIONS: ETTF appears to provide significant control of IOP and have low incidence of complications.

  18. Quantification of Metabolic Rearrangements During Neural Stem Cells Differentiation into Astrocytes by Metabolic Flux Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá, João V; Kleiderman, Susanne; Brito, Catarina; Sonnewald, Ursula; Leist, Marcel; Teixeira, Ana P; Alves, Paula M

    2017-01-01

    Proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells (NSCs) have a crucial role to ensure neurogenesis and gliogenesis in the mammalian brain throughout life. As there is growing evidence for the significance of metabolism in regulating cell fate, knowledge on the metabolic programs in NSCs and how they evolve during differentiation into somatic cells may provide novel therapeutic approaches to address brain diseases. In this work, we applied a quantitative analysis to assess how the central carbon metabolism evolves upon differentiation of NSCs into astrocytes. Murine embryonic stem cell (mESC)-derived NSCs and astrocytes were incubated with labelled [1-(13)C]glucose and the label incorporation into intracellular metabolites was followed by GC-MS. The obtained (13)C labelling patterns, together with uptake/secretion rates determined from supernatant analysis, were integrated into an isotopic non-stationary metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) model to estimate intracellular flux maps. Significant metabolic differences between NSCs and astrocytes were identified, with a general downregulation of central carbon metabolism during astrocytic differentiation. While glucose uptake was 1.7-fold higher in NSCs (on a per cell basis), a high lactate-secreting phenotype was common to both cell types. Furthermore, NSCs consumed glutamine from the medium; the highly active reductive carboxylation of alpha-ketoglutarate indicates that this was converted to citrate and used for biosynthetic purposes. In astrocytes, pyruvate entered the TCA cycle mostly through pyruvate carboxylase (81%). This pathway supported glutamine and citrate secretion, recapitulating well described metabolic features of these cells in vivo. Overall, this fluxomics study allowed us to quantify the metabolic rewiring accompanying astrocytic lineage specification from NSCs.

  19. STUDY OF UREMIC TOXIN FLUXES ACROSS NANOFABRICATED HEMODIALYSIS MEMBRANES USING IRREVERSIBLE THERMODYNAMICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assem Hedayat

    2013-03-01

    Conclusions: Nanofabricated hemodialysis membranes with a reduced thickness and an applied electric potential can enhance the effective diffusivity and electro-migration flux of the respective uremic toxins by 3 orders of magnitude as compared to those passing through the high flux hemodialyzer.

  20. Reduced Baroclinicity During Martian Global Dust Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battalio, Joseph; Szunyogh, Istvan; Lemmon, Mark

    2015-11-01

    The eddy kinetic energy equation is applied to the Mars Analysis Correction Data Assimilation (MACDA) dataset during the pre-winter solstice period for the northern hemisphere of Mars. Traveling waves are triggered by geopotential flux convergence, grow baroclinically, and decay barotropically. Higher optical depth increases the static stability, which reduces vertical and meridional heat fluxes. Traveling waves during a global dust storm year develop a mixed baroclinic/barotropic growth phase before decaying barotropically. Baroclinic energy conversion is reduced during the global dust storm, but eddy intensity is undiminished. Instead, the frequency of storms is reduced due to a stabilized vertical profile.

  1. Determination of Energy Fluxes Over Agricultural Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Josefina Argete

    1994-01-01

    An energy budget was conducted over two kinds if surfaces: grass and corn canopy. The net radiative flux and the soil heat flux were directly measured while the latent and sensible heat flux were calculated from the vertical profiles if wet and dry-bulb temperature and wind speed. The crop storage flux was also estimated. Using the gradient or aerodynamic equations, the calculated fluxes when compared to the measured fluxes in the context of an energy budget gave an SEE = 63 Wm-2 over grass a...

  2. Soil carbonyl sulfide fluxes in a Mediterranean ecosystem: insights from model-data fusion analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, W.; Seibt, U. H.; Maseyk, K. S.; Lett, C.

    2013-12-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) is linked to biosphere components of the carbon cycle, due in large part to its hydrolysis by the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA). Stomatal diffusion models and observations at leaf and ecosystem scales have demonstrated the potential of COS as a tracer for Gross Primary Production (GPP). Although considered small relative to canopy COS fluxes, accurate knowledge of soil COS fluxes is required for the use of net ecosystem COS fluxes in carbon flux partitioning. However, extensive field measurements of soil COS fluxes are rare and process-based modeling is limited. Here we report continuous chamber measurements of soil COS fluxes in a Mediterranean ecosystem in the Santa Monica Mountains, California during April and early May 2013. Both COS uptake and emissions were observed, but the soil acted as a net sink in most conditions and was a net source only when soil temperatures were above 22 C. COS sink fluxes were positively correlated with soil water content and CO2 fluxes. COS uptake had a maximum at a temperature around 15 C. However, no single environmental variable could be correlated to COS fluxes with an r-square > 0.6. COS fluxes from soil chambers ranged from -9 to 2.5 pmol m-2 s-1. Leaf litter appeared to increase soil COS metabolic activity. We observed huge bursts of soil COS uptake induced by a precipitation event, probably due to enhanced soil microbial activity resulting from alleviated water limitation and a decrease in soil temperature towards the optimum. We used a soil gas exchange model coupled with CA enzyme kinetics to simulate the soil COS fluxes. Micrometeorological and soil data were used to drive the soil flux model. Model simulations indicated that diurnal and synoptic variations of COS fluxes were driven by soil temperature and water content, controlling both CA activity and diffusion. We suggest that multiple parameters need to be optimized to reduce uncertainties in models of soil COS fluxes at larger scales.

  3. Constrained Allocation Flux Balance Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Mori, Matteo; Martin, Olivier C; De Martino, Andrea; Marinari, Enzo

    2016-01-01

    New experimental results on bacterial growth inspire a novel top-down approach to study cell metabolism, combining mass balance and proteomic constraints to extend and complement Flux Balance Analysis. We introduce here Constrained Allocation Flux Balance Analysis, CAFBA, in which the biosynthetic costs associated to growth are accounted for in an effective way through a single additional genome-wide constraint. Its roots lie in the experimentally observed pattern of proteome allocation for metabolic functions, allowing to bridge regulation and metabolism in a transparent way under the principle of growth-rate maximization. We provide a simple method to solve CAFBA efficiently and propose an "ensemble averaging" procedure to account for unknown protein costs. Applying this approach to modeling E. coli metabolism, we find that, as the growth rate increases, CAFBA solutions cross over from respiratory, growth-yield maximizing states (preferred at slow growth) to fermentative states with carbon overflow (preferr...

  4. Holonomy-flux spinfoam amplitude

    CERN Document Server

    Perini, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a holomorphic representation for the Lorentzian EPRL spinfoam on arbitrary 2-complexes. The representation is obtained via the Ashtekar-Lewandowski-Marolf-Mour\\~ao-Thiemann heat kernel coherent state transform. The new variables are classical holonomy-flux phase space variables $(h,X)\\simeq \\mathcal T^*SU(2)$ of Hamiltonian loop quantum gravity prescribing the holonomies of the Ashtekar connection $A=\\Gamma + \\gamma K$, and their conjugate gravitational fluxes. For small heat kernel `time' the spinfoam amplitude is peaked on classical space-time geometries, where at most countably many curvatures are allowed for non-zero Barbero-Immirzi parameter. We briefly comment on the possibility to use the alternative flipped classical limit.

  5. Flavor mixings in flux compactifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchmuller, Wilfried; Schweizer, Julian

    2017-04-01

    A multiplicity of quark-lepton families can naturally arise as zero modes in flux compactifications. The flavor structure of quark and lepton mass matrices is then determined by the wave function profiles of the zero modes. We consider a supersymmetric S O (10 )×U (1 ) model in six dimensions compactified on the orbifold T2/Z2 with Abelian magnetic flux. A bulk 16 -plet charged under the U (1 ) provides the quark-lepton generations whereas two uncharged 10 -plets yield two Higgs doublets. Bulk anomaly cancellation requires the presence of additional 16 - and 10 -plets. The corresponding zero modes form vectorlike split multiplets that are needed to obtain a successful flavor phenomenology. We analyze the pattern of flavor mixings for the two heaviest families of the Standard Model and discuss possible generalizations to three and more generations.

  6. Structural control of metabolic flux.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Sajitz-Hermstein

    Full Text Available Organisms have to continuously adapt to changing environmental conditions or undergo developmental transitions. To meet the accompanying change in metabolic demands, the molecular mechanisms of adaptation involve concerted interactions which ultimately induce a modification of the metabolic state, which is characterized by reaction fluxes and metabolite concentrations. These state transitions are the effect of simultaneously manipulating fluxes through several reactions. While metabolic control analysis has provided a powerful framework for elucidating the principles governing this orchestrated action to understand metabolic control, its applications are restricted by the limited availability of kinetic information. Here, we introduce structural metabolic control as a framework to examine individual reactions' potential to control metabolic functions, such as biomass production, based on structural modeling. The capability to carry out a metabolic function is determined using flux balance analysis (FBA. We examine structural metabolic control on the example of the central carbon metabolism of Escherichia coli by the recently introduced framework of functional centrality (FC. This framework is based on the Shapley value from cooperative game theory and FBA, and we demonstrate its superior ability to assign "share of control" to individual reactions with respect to metabolic functions and environmental conditions. A comparative analysis of various scenarios illustrates the usefulness of FC and its relations to other structural approaches pertaining to metabolic control. We propose a Monte Carlo algorithm to estimate FCs for large networks, based on the enumeration of elementary flux modes. We further give detailed biological interpretation of FCs for production of lactate and ATP under various respiratory conditions.

  7. Flux tubes at Finite Temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Bicudo, Pedro; Cardoso, Marco

    2016-01-01

    We show the flux tubes produced by static quark-antiquark, quark-quark and quark-gluon charges at finite temperature. The sources are placed in the lattice with fundamental and adjoint Polyakov loops. We compute the square densities of the chromomagnetic and chromoelectric fields above and below the phase transition. Our results are gauge invariant and produced in pure gauge SU(3). The codes are written in CUDA and the computations are performed with GPUs.

  8. Classical Transitions for Flux Vacua

    CERN Document Server

    Deskins, J Tate; Yang, I-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    We present the simplest model for classical transitions in flux vacua. A complex field with a spontaneously broken U(1) symmetry is embedded in $M_2\\times S_1$. We numerically construct different winding number vacua, the vortices interpolating between them, and simulate the collisions of these vortices. We show that classical transitions are generic at large boosts, independent of whether or not vortices miss each other in the compact $S_1$.

  9. Pathway confirmation and flux analysis of central metabolicpathways in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough using GasChromatography-Mass Spectrometry and Fourier Transform-Ion CyclotronResonance Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yinjie; Pingitore, Francesco; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Phan,Richard; Hazen, Terry C.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2007-03-15

    Flux distribution in central metabolic pathways ofDesulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough was examined using 13C tracerexperiments. Consistent with the current genome annotation andindependent evidence from enzyme activity assays, the isotopomer resultsfrom both GC-MS and Fourier Transform-Ion Cyclotron Resonance massspectrometry (FT-ICR MS) indicate the lack of oxidatively functional TCAcycle and an incomplete pentose phosphate pathway. Results from thisstudy suggest that fluxes through both pathways are limited tobiosynthesis. The data also indicate that>80 percent of the lactatewas converted to acetate and the reactions involved are the primary routeof energy production (NAD(P)H and ATP production). Independent of the TCAcycle, direct cleavage of acetyl-CoA to CO and 5,10-methyl-THF also leadsto production of NADH and ATP. Although the genome annotation implicatesa ferredoxin-dependentoxoglutarate synthase, isotopic evidence does notsupport flux through this reaction in either the oxidative or reductivemode; therefore, the TCA cycle is incomplete. FT-ICR MS was used tolocate the labeled carbon distribution in aspartate and glutamate andconfirmed the presence of an atypical enzyme for citrate formationsuggested in previous reports (the citrate synthesized by this enzyme isthe isotopic antipode of the citrate synthesized by the (S)-citratesynthase). These findings enable a better understanding of the relationbetween genome annotation and actual metabolic pathways in D. vulgaris,and also demonstrate FT-ICR MS as a powerful tool for isotopomeranalysis, overcoming problems in both GC-MS and NMRspectroscopy.

  10. Surface fluxes in heterogeneous landscape

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bay Hasager, C.

    1997-01-01

    The surface fluxes in homogeneous landscapes are calculated by similarity scaling principles. The methodology is well establish. In heterogeneous landscapes with spatial changes in the micro scale range, i e from 100 m to 10 km, advective effects are significant. The present work focus on these effects in an agricultural countryside typical for the midlatitudes. Meteorological and satellite data from a highly heterogeneous landscape in the Rhine Valley, Germany was collected in the large-scale field experiment TRACT (Transport of pollutants over complex terrain) in 1992. Classified satellite images, Landsat TM and ERS SAR, are used as basis for roughness maps. The roughnesses were measured at meteorological masts in the various cover classes and assigned pixel by pixel to the images. The roughness maps are aggregated, i e spatially averaged, into so-called effective roughness lengths. This calculation is performed by a micro scale aggregation model. The model solves the linearized atmospheric flow equations by a numerical (Fast Fourier Transform) method. This model also calculate maps of friction velocity and momentum flux pixel wise in heterogeneous landscapes. It is indicated how the aggregation methodology can be used to calculate the heat fluxes based on the relevant satellite data i e temperature and soil moisture information. (au) 10 tabs., 49 ills., 223 refs.

  11. Development activities of the high heat flux scraper element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boscary, J., E-mail: jean.boscary@ipp.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Garching (Germany); Lore, J.; Lumsdaine, A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Maier, M. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Garching (Germany); McGinnis, D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Peacock, A.; Tretter, J. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Garching (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    The function of the high heat flux scraper element is to reduce the heat loads on the element ends of the actively cooled divertor of Wendelstein 7-X. The scraper element is actively water cooled to remove up to 550 kW steady state power load, with localized heat fluxes as high as 20 MW/m{sup 2}. Its surface area, 0.17 m{sup 2}, is contoured to optimally intercept both upstream and downstream particle fluxes. The plasma facing surface is made of 24 individual scraper fingers based on the monoblock technology. Each scraper finger is 247 mm long and 28 mm wide and has 13 monoblocks made of CFC NB31 bonded by hot isostatic pressing onto a CuCrZr cooling tube equipped with a copper twisted tape. Development activities, described here, include the design and fabrication of prototypes to validate the different technologies selected for the scraper element design to prepare a possible production.

  12. Powder Flux Regulation in the Laser Material Deposition Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrizubieta, Jon Iñaki; Wegener, Maximiliam; Arntz, Kristian; Lamikiz, Aitzol; Ruiz, Jose Exequiel

    In the present research work a powder flux regulation system has been designed, developed and validated with the aim of improving the Laser Material Deposition (LMD) process. In this process, the amount of deposited material per substrate surface unit area depends on the real feed rate of the nozzle. Therefore, a regulation system based on a solenoid valve has been installed at the nozzle entrance in order to control the powder flux. The powder flux control has been performed based on the machine real feed rate, which is compared with the programmed feed rate. An instantaneous velocity error is calculated and the powder flow is controlled as a function of this variation using Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) signals. Thereby, in zones where the Laser Material Deposition machine reduces the feed rate due to a trajectory change, powder accumulation can be avoided and the generated clads would present a homogeneous shape.

  13. Angular dependence models for radiance to flux conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Richard N.; Suttles, John T.; Wielicki, Bruce A.

    1990-01-01

    Angular dependence models (ADM) used for converting the measured radiance to flux at the top of the atmosphere are reviewed, and emphasis is placed on the measure of their effectiveness and the implications of requiring the ADMs to satisfy reciprocity. The overall significance of the ADMs is figured out by analyzing the same satellite data with a single Lambertian model, single mean model, and the 12 Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) ADMs. It is shown that the Lambertian ADM is inadequate, while the mean ADM results in nearly unbiased fluxes but creates substantial differences for individual pixel fluxes. The standard ERBE ADM works well except for a 10-pct to 15-pct albedo growth across the scan; a modified ADM based on the standard ERBE ADM but forced to satisfy the principle of reciprocity increases the limb brightening and reduces the albedo growth but does not improve the scanner and nonscanner intercomparison.

  14. Spatial Transport of Magnetic Flux Surfaces in Strongly Anisotropic Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthaeus, W. H.; Servidio, S.; Wan, M.; Ruffolo, D. J.; Rappazzo, A. F.; Oughton, S.

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic flux surfaces afford familiar descriptions of spatial structure, dynamics, and connectivity of magnetic fields, with particular relevance in contexts such as solar coronal flux tubes, magnetic field connectivity in the interplanetary and interstellar medium, as well as in laboratory plasmas and dynamo problems [1-4]. Typical models assume that field-lines are orderly, and flux tubes remain identifiable over macroscopic distances; however, a previous study has shown that flux tubes shred in the presence of fluctuations, typically losing identity after several correlation scales [5]. Here, the structure of magnetic flux surfaces is numerically investigated in a reduced magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) model of homogeneous turbulence. Short and long-wavelength behavior is studied statistically by propagating magnetic surfaces along the mean field. At small scales magnetic surfaces become complex, experiencing an exponential thinning. At large scales, instead, the magnetic flux undergoes a diffusive behavior. The link between the diffusion of the coarse-grained flux and field-line random walk is established by means of a multiple scale analysis. Both large and small scales limits are controlled by the Kubo number. These results have consequences for understanding and interpreting processes such as magnetic reconnection and field-line diffusion in plasmas [6]. [1] E. N. Parker, Cosmical Magnetic Fields (Oxford Univ. Press, New York, 1979). [2] J. R. Jokipii and E. N. Parker, Phys. Rev. Lett. 21, 44 (1968). [3] R. Bruno et al., Planet. Space Sci. 49, 1201 (2001). [4] M. N. Rosenbluth et al., Nuclear Fusion 6, 297 (1966). [5] W. H. Matthaeus et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 2136 (1995). [6] S. Servidio et al., submitted (2013).

  15. Determination of Energy Fluxes Over Agricultural Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefina Argete

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available An energy budget was conducted over two kinds if surfaces: grass and corn canopy. The net radiative flux and the soil heat flux were directly measured while the latent and sensible heat flux were calculated from the vertical profiles if wet and dry-bulb temperature and wind speed. The crop storage flux was also estimated. Using the gradient or aerodynamic equations, the calculated fluxes when compared to the measured fluxes in the context of an energy budget gave an SEE = 63 Wm-2 over grass and SEE = 81 Wm-2 over corn canopy. The calculated fluxes compared reasonably well with those obtained using the Penman equations.For an energy budget research with limited instrumentation, the aerodynamic method performed satisfactorily in estimating the daytime fluxes, when atmospheric conditions are fully convective, but failed when conditions were stably stratified as during nighttime.

  16. Flux Tracking Control of Induction Motors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LanLin; XiaowuMu; ChunxiaBu

    2004-01-01

    This paper deals with flux tracking control of induction motors. Firstly,we analyze convergency of non-homogeneous linear time-varying systems and a sufficient condition is given. Finally, the flux regulator of induction motors is discussed.

  17. Flux distribution in single phase, Si-Fe, wound transformer cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loizos, George [SchneiderElectric, 55th km Athens-Lamia N.R., Gr-32011 Inofyta (Greece)], E-mail: georgios.loizos@gr.schneider-electric.com; Kefalas, Themistoklis; Kladas, Antonios [Laboratory of Electrical Machines, Faculty of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, 9 Iroon Polytechneiou Street, 15780 Athens (Greece); Souflaris, Thanassis; Paparigas, Dimitris [SchneiderElectric, 55th km Athens-Lamia N.R., Gr-32011 Inofyta (Greece)

    2008-10-15

    This paper shows experimental results of longitudinal flux density and its harmonics at the limb, the yoke and the corner as well as normal flux in the step lap joint of a single phase, Si-Fe, wound transformer core. Results show that the flux density as well as the harmonics content is higher in the inner (window) side of the core and reduces gradually towards the outer side. Variations of flux density distribution between the limb and the corner or the yoke of the core were observed. A full record of normal flux around the step lap region of the model core was also obtained. Longitudinal and normal flux findings will enable the development of more accurate numerical models that describe the magnetic behavior of magnetic cores.

  18. Hypermoduli Stabilization, Flux Attractors, and Generating Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Larsen, Finn; Robbins, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    We study stabilization of hypermoduli with emphasis on the effects of generalized fluxes. We find a class of no-scale vacua described by ISD conditions even in the presence of geometric flux. The associated flux attractor equations can be integrated by a generating function with the property that the hypermoduli are determined by a simple extremization principle. We work out several orbifold examples where all vector moduli and many hypermoduli are stabilized, with VEVs given explicitly in terms of fluxes.

  19. Flux-dependent graphs for metabolic networks

    OpenAIRE

    Beguerisse-Díaz, Mariano; Bosque, Gabriel; Oyarzún, Diego; Picó, Jesús; Barahona, Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    Cells adapt their metabolic fluxes in response to changes in the environment. We present a systematic flux-based framework for the construction of graphs to represent organism-wide metabolic networks. Our graphs encode the directionality of metabolic fluxes via links that represent the flow of metabolites from source to target reactions. The methodology can be applied in the absence of a specific biological context by modelling fluxes as probabilities, or tailored to different environmental c...

  20. Magnetic flux emergence in fast rotating stars

    OpenAIRE

    Holzwarth, V.

    2007-01-01

    Fast rotating cool stars are characterised by high magnetic activity levels and frequently show dark spots up to polar latitudes. Their distinctive surface distributions of magnetic flux are investigated in the context of the solar-stellar connection by applying the solar flux eruption and surface flux transport models to stars with different rotation rates, mass, and evolutionary stage. The rise of magnetic flux tubes through the convection zone is primarily buoyancy-driven, though their evo...

  1. Force sensor using changes in magnetic flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickens, Herman L. (Inventor); Richard, James A. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A force sensor includes a magnetostrictive material and a magnetic field generator positioned in proximity thereto. A magnetic field is induced in and surrounding the magnetostrictive material such that lines of magnetic flux pass through the magnetostrictive material. A sensor positioned in the vicinity of the magnetostrictive material measures changes in one of flux angle and flux density when the magnetostrictive material experiences an applied force that is aligned with the lines of magnetic flux.

  2. Flux balance analysis accounting for metabolite dilution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benyamini, Tomer; Folger, Ori; Ruppin, Eytan; Shlomi, Tomer

    2010-01-01

    Flux balance analysis is a common method for predicting steady-state flux distributions within metabolic networks, accounting for the growth demand for the synthesis of a predefined set of essential biomass precursors. Ignoring the growth demand for the synthesis of intermediate metabolites required for balancing their dilution leads flux balance analysis to false predictions in some cases. Here, we present metabolite dilution flux balance analysis, which addresses this problem, resulting in improved metabolic phenotype predictions.

  3. Ozone Flux Measurement and Modelling on Leaf/Shoot and Canopy Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo Gerosa

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The quantitative study of the ozone effects on agricultural and forest vegetation requires the knowledge of the pollutant dose absorbed by plants via leaf stomata, i.e. the stomatal flux. Nevertheless, the toxicologically effective dose can differ from the stomatal flux because a pool of scavenging and detoxification processes reduce the amount of pollutant responsible of the expression of the harmful effects. The measurement of the stomatal flux is not immediate and the quantification of the effective dose is still troublesome. The paper examines the conceptual aspects of ozone flux measurement and modelling in agricultural and ecological research. The ozone flux paradigm is conceptualized into a toxicological frame and faced at two different scales: leaf/shoot and canopy scales. Leaf and shoot scale flux measurements require gas-exchange enclosure techniques, while canopy scale flux measurements need a micrometeorological approach including techniques such as eddy covariance and the aerodynamical gradient. At both scales, not all the measured ozone flux is stomatal flux. In fact, a not negligible amount of ozone is destroyed on external plant surfaces, like leaf cuticles, or by gas phase reaction with biogenic volatile compounds. The stomatal portion of flux can be calculated from concurrent measurements of water vapour fluxes at both scales. Canopy level flux measurements require very fast sensors and the fulfilment of many conditions to ensure that the measurements made above the canopy really reflect the canopy fluxes (constant flux hypothesis. Again, adjustments are necessary in order to correct for air density fluctuations and sensor-surface alignment break. As far as regards flux modelling, at leaf level the stomatal flux is simply obtained by multiplying the ozone concentration on the leaf with the stomatal conductance predicted by means of physiological models fed by meteorological parameter. At canopy level the stomatal flux is

  4. Ozone Flux Measurement and Modelling on Leaf/Shoot and Canopy Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludger Grünhage

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The quantitative study of the ozone effects on agricultural and forest vegetation requires the knowledge of the pollutant dose absorbed by plants via leaf stomata, i.e. the stomatal flux. Nevertheless, the toxicologically effective dose can differ from the stomatal flux because a pool of scavenging and detoxification processes reduce the amount of pollutant responsible of the expression of the harmful effects. The measurement of the stomatal flux is not immediate and the quantification of the effective dose is still troublesome. The paper examines the conceptual aspects of ozone flux measurement and modelling in agricultural and ecological research. The ozone flux paradigm is conceptualized into a toxicological frame and faced at two different scales: leaf/shoot and canopy scales. Leaf and shoot scale flux measurements require gas-exchange enclosure techniques, while canopy scale flux measurements need a micrometeorological approach including techniques such as eddy covariance and the aerodynamical gradient. At both scales, not all the measured ozone flux is stomatal flux. In fact, a not negligible amount of ozone is destroyed on external plant surfaces, like leaf cuticles, or by gas phase reaction with biogenic volatile compounds. The stomatal portion of flux can be calculated from concurrent measurements of water vapour fluxes at both scales. Canopy level flux measurements require very fast sensors and the fulfilment of many conditions to ensure that the measurements made above the canopy really reflect the canopy fluxes (constant flux hypothesis. Again, adjustments are necessary in order to correct for air density fluctuations and sensor-surface alignment break. As far as regards flux modelling, at leaf level the stomatal flux is simply obtained by multiplying the ozone concentration on the leaf with the stomatal conductance predicted by means of physiological models fed by meteorological parameter. At canopy level the stomatal flux is

  5. Flux dependence of deuterium retention in single crystal tungsten

    CERN Document Server

    Poon, M; Davis, J W; Haasz, A A

    2002-01-01

    The retention of deuterium in single crystal tungsten has been measured as a function of the incident ion flux in the range of 1x10 sup 1 sup 7 -5x10 sup 1 sup 9 D sup + /m sup 2 s at 300 K. Incident D sub 3 sup + ions were implanted to fluences of 10 sup 2 sup 1 , 10 sup 2 sup 2 , and 10 sup 2 sup 3 D sup + /m sup 2 with ion energies (500 eV/D sup +) below the threshold energy for elastic collision damage. Above 3x10 sup 1 sup 8 D sup + /m sup 2 s, little or no flux dependence is seen. However, a rapid decrease in retention is seen for incident fluxes below 10 sup 1 sup 8 D sup + /m sup 2 s at the 10 sup 2 sup 1 D sup + /m sup 2 fluence, suggesting a threshold value below which retention is strongly reduced. Flux dependence at the higher fluences show a smaller decrease in retention with decreasing flux. The observed results are consistent with trapping and trap evolution by cluster and cavity formation. The effect of specimen surface preparation has proved to be very significant, especially for the lower fl...

  6. Physical controls of oxygen fluxes at pelagic and benthic oxyclines in a lake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreling, Julika; Bravidor, Jenny; McGinnis, Daniel F.;

    2014-01-01

    from the epilimnion; chemical oxygen consumption associated with the upward flux of reduced substances is negligible. Our findings indicate that under such conditions, dissolved oxygen consumption and therewith mineralization within the oxycline can be comparable with the corresponding rates occurring...

  7. Flux pinning effect of cubic equiaxed morphology and its Ti stabilizing in Nb3Sn superconductors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG ChaoWu; ZHOU Lian; Andre SULPICE; Jean-Louis SOUBEYROUX; TANG XianDe; Christophe VERWAERDE; Gia Ky HOANG

    2009-01-01

    zes the cubic equiaxed phase at lower temperature so that heat reaction temperature is effectively reduced,the flux pinning performance is largely reinforced and the transport critical current density Jc is substantially promoted.

  8. Calibration of soil heat flux sensors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, van W.K.P.; Bastings, H.M.H.; Moors, E.J.

    1998-01-01

    Soil heat flux is difficult to measure accurately and soil heat flux plates are difficult to calibrate. In this research the reference heat flux was calculated from the temperature gradient and independent thermal conductivity measurements. Reference conductivities, as measured by the non-steady sta

  9. Intensification of the electro slag process exothermic mixtures (fluxеs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. Ф. Власов

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available It is established that an effective way to improve performance is to use the electro slag processes exothermic mixture (mechanical mixture scaling of aluminum powder and а standard flux or flux exothermic (mechanical scaling mixtures, alloys, aluminum powder and a flux standard in amounts sufficient for the exothermal reaction. Experimentally is defined the presence of the electrically conductive layer exothermic flux, allowing to carry out the electro slag process mono, bifilar or three-phase circuit using a "solid" start. The influence of the exothermic metal-flux mixtures to hold electro slag processes. Submitted exothermic flux composition consisting of a mixture of dross and aluminum powder, the alloying additives are calculations of thermal effects, and the optimal ratios and electrode coating formulation with the exothermic mixture. The results of investigation of influence of particle size distribution of ferroalloys on solubility in reducing metal when the exothermic reaction and the chemical composition of electro-metal. The dependence of the electro-chemical composition of the metal particle size distribution of ferroalloys and method of melting exothermic flux. The optimum particle size. When the exothermic process and the mixture of aluminum dross occurs to change the chemical composition of the slag at the expense of additional content of aluminum oxide formed, but it does not reduce the ability of fluoride desulfurizing flux used in the electro slag processes. The results of studies of formation of the metal structure using ekzosmesi content of nonmetallic inclusions. The results of technical and economic parameters ways start ESR. It is proved that the use of exothermic alloyed flux does not affect the quality of melted metal. The use of exothermic alloyed flux allows more efficient use flux melting furnace and put them in the manufacture of parts for various purposes. Introduction exothermic mixture or exothermic flux can

  10. Using Empirical Mode Decomposition to Filter Out Non-turbulent Contributions to Air-Sea Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Luís Gustavo N.; Miller, Scott D.; Acevedo, Otávio C.

    2017-04-01

    A methodology based on Empirical mode decomposition (EMD) was used to filter out non-turbulent motions from measurements of atmospheric turbulence over the sea, aimed at reducing their contribution to eddy-covariance (EC) estimates of turbulent fluxes. The proposed methodology has two main objectives: (1) to provide more robust estimates of the fluxes of momentum, heat and CO_2; and (2) to reduce the number of flux intervals rejected due to non-stationarity criteria when using traditional EC data processing techniques. The method was applied to measurements from a 28-day cruise (HALOCAST 2010) in the Eastern Pacific region. Empirical mode decomposition was applied to 4-h long time series data and used to determine the cospectral gap time scale, T_{gap}. Intrinsic modes of oscillation with characteristic periods longer than the gap scale due to non-turbulent motions were assumed and filtered out. Turbulent fluxes were then calculated for sub-intervals of length T_{gap} from the filtered 4-h time series. In the HALOCAST data, the gap scale was successfully identified in 89% of the 4-h periods and had a mean of 37 s. The EMD approach resulted in the rejection of 11% of the flux intervals, which was much less than the 68% rejected when using standard filtering methods based on data non-stationarity. For momentum and sensible heat fluxes, the averaged difference in flux magnitude between the traditional and EMD approaches was small (3 and 1%, respectively). For the CO_2 flux, the magnitude of EMD flux estimates was on average 16% less than fluxes estimated from linear detrended 10-min time series. These results provide evidence that the EMD method can be used to reduce the effects of non-turbulent correlations from flux estimates.

  11. Operation REDWING. Project 2.51, Neutron-Flux Measurements. Extracted Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-05-15

    The attenuation of the thermal -neutron flux is increased by adding borax. The neutron dose was reduced by a factor of approximately four by a...the thermal -neutron flux is increased by adding borax. The neutron dose was reduced by a factor of approximately four by a concrete box three feet on a...the ,, eutrons and their spatial distribution is of basic importance to the assessment of the effects of the neutrons from a device. Measurements of this

  12. Neutron flux reduction programs for reactor pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, C.S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst. KAERI, 150 Deogjin-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, B.C. [Korea Reactor Integrity Surveillance Technology KRIST, 150 Deogjin-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this work is to implement various fast neutron flux reduction programs on the belt-line region of the reactor pressure vessel to reduce the increasing rate of reference temperature for pressurized thermal shock (RT PTS) for Korea Nuclear Unit 1. A pressurized thermal shock (PTS) event is an event or transient in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) causing severe overcooling (thermal shock) concurrent with or followed by significant pressure in the reactor vessel. A PTS concern arises if one of these transients acts in the belt-line region of a reactor vessel where a reduced fracture resistance exists because of neutron irradiation. Generally, the RT PTS value is continuously increasing according to the fast neutron irradiation during the reactor operation, and it can reach the screening criterion prior to the expiration of the operating license. To reduce the increasing rate of RT PTS, various neutron flux reduction programs can be implemented, which are focused on license renewal. In this paper, neutron flux reduction programs, such as low leakage loading pattern strategy, loading of neutron absorber rods, and dummy fuel assembly loading are considered for Korea Nuclear Unit 1, of which the RT PTS value of the leading material (circumferential weld) is going to reach the screening criterion in the near future. To evaluate the effects of the neutron flux reduction programs, plant and cycle specific forward neutron transport calculations for the various neutron flux reduction programs were carried out. For the analysis, all transport calculations were carried out by using the DORT 3.1 discrete ordinate code and BUGLE-96 cross-section library. (authors)

  13. Accounting for urban biogenic fluxes in regional carbon budgets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardiman, Brady S; Wang, Jonathan A; Hutyra, Lucy R; Gately, Conor K; Getson, Jackie M; Friedl, Mark A

    2017-08-15

    Many ecosystem models incorrectly treat urban areas as devoid of vegetation and biogenic carbon (C) fluxes. We sought to improve estimates of urban biomass and biogenic C fluxes using existing, nationally available data products. We characterized biogenic influence on urban C cycling throughout Massachusetts, USA using an ecosystem model that integrates improved representation of urban vegetation, growing conditions associated with urban heat island (UHI), and altered urban phenology. Boston's biomass density is 1/4 that of rural forests, however 87% of Massachusetts' urban landscape is vegetated. Model results suggest that, kilogram-for-kilogram, urban vegetation cycles C twice as fast as rural forests. Urban vegetation releases (RE) and absorbs (GEE) the equivalent of 11 and 14%, respectively, of anthropogenic emissions in the most urban portions of the state. While urban vegetation in Massachusetts fully sequesters anthropogenic emissions from smaller cities in the region, Boston's UHI reduces annual C storage by >20% such that vegetation offsets only 2% of anthropogenic emissions. Asynchrony between temporal patterns of biogenic and anthropogenic C fluxes further constrains the emissions mitigation potential of urban vegetation. However, neglecting to account for biogenic C fluxes in cities can impair efforts to accurately monitor, report, verify, and reduce anthropogenic emissions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Flux-Vortex Pinning and Neutron Star Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpar, M. Ali

    2017-09-01

    G. Srinivasan et al. (1990) proposed a simple and elegant explanation for the reduction of the neutron star magnetic dipole moment during binary evolution leading to low mass X-ray binaries and eventually to millisecond pulsars: Quantized vortex lines in the neutron star core superfluid will pin against the quantized flux lines of the proton superconductor. As the neutron star spins down in the wind accretion phase of binary evolution, outward motion of vortex lines will reduce the dipole magnetic moment in proportion to the rotation rate. The presence of a toroidal array of flux lines makes this mechanism inevitable and independent of the angle between the rotation and magnetic axes. The incompressibility of the flux-line array (Abrikosov lattice) determines the epoch when the mechanism will be effective throughout the neutron star. Flux vortex pinning will not be effective during the initial young radio pulsar phase. It will, however, be effective and reduce the dipole moment in proportion with the rotation rate during the epoch of spindown by wind accretion as proposed by Srinivasan et al. The mechanism operates also in the presence of vortex creep.

  15. Some consequences of shear on galactic dynamos with helicity fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongzhe; Blackman, Eric G.

    2017-08-01

    Galactic dynamo models sustained by supernova (SN) driven turbulence and differential rotation have revealed that the sustenance of large-scale fields requires a flux of small-scale magnetic helicity to be viable. Here we generalize a minimalist analytic version of such galactic dynamos to explore some heretofore unincluded contributions from shear on the total turbulent energy and turbulent correlation time, with the helicity fluxes maintained by either winds, diffusion or magnetic buoyancy. We construct an analytic framework for modelling the turbulent energy and correlation time as a function of SN rate and shear. We compare our prescription with previous approaches that include only rotation. The solutions depend separately on the rotation period and the eddy turnover time and not just on their ratio (the Rossby number). We consider models in which these two time-scales are allowed to be independent and also a case in which they are mutually dependent on radius when a radial-dependent SN rate model is invoked. For the case of a fixed rotation period (or a fixed radius), we show that the influence of shear is dramatic for low Rossby numbers, reducing the correlation time of the turbulence, which, in turn, strongly reduces the saturation value of the dynamo compared to the case when the shear is ignored. We also show that even in the absence of winds or diffusive fluxes, magnetic buoyancy may be able to sustain sufficient helicity fluxes to avoid quenching.

  16. A multiscale mortar multipoint flux mixed finite element method

    KAUST Repository

    Wheeler, Mary Fanett

    2012-02-03

    In this paper, we develop a multiscale mortar multipoint flux mixed finite element method for second order elliptic problems. The equations in the coarse elements (or subdomains) are discretized on a fine grid scale by a multipoint flux mixed finite element method that reduces to cell-centered finite differences on irregular grids. The subdomain grids do not have to match across the interfaces. Continuity of flux between coarse elements is imposed via a mortar finite element space on a coarse grid scale. With an appropriate choice of polynomial degree of the mortar space, we derive optimal order convergence on the fine scale for both the multiscale pressure and velocity, as well as the coarse scale mortar pressure. Some superconvergence results are also derived. The algebraic system is reduced via a non-overlapping domain decomposition to a coarse scale mortar interface problem that is solved using a multiscale flux basis. Numerical experiments are presented to confirm the theory and illustrate the efficiency and flexibility of the method. © EDP Sciences, SMAI, 2012.

  17. Calculated Electron Fluxes at Airplane Altitudes

    CERN Document Server

    Schaefer, R K; Stanev, T

    1993-01-01

    A precision measurement of atmospheric electron fluxes has been performed on a Japanese commercial airliner (Enomoto, {\\it et al.}, 1991). We have performed a monte carlo calculation of the cosmic ray secondary electron fluxes expected in this experiment. The monte carlo uses the hadronic portion of our neutrino flux cascade program combined with the electromagnetic cascade portion of the CERN library program GEANT. Our results give good agreement with the data, provided we boost the overall normalization of the primary cosmic ray flux by 12\\% over the normalization used in the neutrino flux calculation.

  18. Methane Fluxes from Subtropical Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLucia, N.; Gomez-Casanovas, N.; Bernacchi, C.

    2013-12-01

    It is well documented that green house gas concentrations have risen at unequivocal rates since the industrial revolution but the disparity between anthropogenic sources and natural sources is uncertain. Wetlands are one example of a natural ecosystem that can be a substantial source or sink for methane (CH4) depending on climate conditions. Due to strict anaerobic conditions required for CH4-generating microorganisms, natural wetlands are one of the main sources for biogenic CH4. Although wetlands occupy less than 5% of total land surface area, they contribute approximately 20% of total CH4 emissions to the atmosphere. The processes regulating CH4 emissions are sensitive to land use and management practices of areas surrounding wetlands. Variation in adjacent vegetation or grazing intensity by livestock can, for example, alter CH4 fluxes from wetland soils by altering nutrient balance, carbon inputs and hydrology. Therefore, understanding how these changes will affect wetland source strength is essential to understand the impact of wetland management practices on the global climate system. In this study we quantify wetland methane fluxes from subtropical wetlands on a working cattle ranch in central Florida near Okeechobee Lake (27o10'52.04'N, 81o21'8.56'W). To determine differences in CH4 fluxes associated with land use and management, a replicated (n = 4) full factorial experiment was designed for wetlands where the surrounding vegetation was (1) grazed or un-grazed and (2) composed of native vegetation or improved pasture. Net exchange of CH4 and CO2 between the land surface and the atmosphere were sampled with a LICOR Li-7700 open path CH4 analyzer and Li-7500A open path CO2/H20 analyzer mounted in a 1-m3 static gas-exchange chamber. Our results showed and verified that CH4 emissions from subtropical wetlands were larger when high soil moisture was coupled with high temperatures. The presence of cattle only amplified these results. These results help quantify

  19. Flux Sampling Errors for Aircraft and Towers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahrt, Larry

    1998-01-01

    Various errors and influences leading to differences between tower- and aircraft-measured fluxes are surveyed. This survey is motivated by reports in the literature that aircraft fluxes are sometimes smaller than tower-measured fluxes. Both tower and aircraft flux errors are larger with surface heterogeneity due to several independent effects. Surface heterogeneity may cause tower flux errors to increase with decreasing wind speed. Techniques to assess flux sampling error are reviewed. Such error estimates suffer various degrees of inapplicability in real geophysical time series due to nonstationarity of tower time series (or inhomogeneity of aircraft data). A new measure for nonstationarity is developed that eliminates assumptions on the form of the nonstationarity inherent in previous methods. When this nonstationarity measure becomes large, the surface energy imbalance increases sharply. Finally, strategies for obtaining adequate flux sampling using repeated aircraft passes and grid patterns are outlined.

  20. SEP flux mapping with PHOEBUS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimani, C [Universita di Urbino and INFN Florence, Urbino (Italy); Bagni, G [Universita di Urbino and INFN Florence, Urbino (Italy); Fabi, M [Universita di Urbino and INFN Florence, Urbino (Italy); Vicere, A [Universita di Urbino and INFN Florence, Urbino (Italy); Marconi, L [Universita di Pisa and INFN Florence, Pisa (Italy); Stanga, R [Universita and INFN, Florence (Italy); Bosi, L [Universita and INFN Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Vocca, H [Universita and INFN Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Araujo, H [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Shaul, D [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Sumner, T [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Wass, P [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Boatella, C [IEEC, Barcelona (Spain); Lobo, A [ICE/CSIC and IEEC, Barcelona (Spain); Chmeissani, M [IFAE, Barcelona (Spain); Martinez, I [IFAE, Barcelona (Spain)

    2006-03-02

    We report about PHOEBUS (PHysics Of Events BUrsted by the Sun): a proposal for solar physics and space weather investigation with LISA (Laser Interferometer Space Antenna). Galactic and solar cosmic-ray particles with energies larger than 100 MeV(/n) penetrate and charge the LISA test masses. Spurious forces occur between the test masses and the surrounding electrodes mimicking gravitational wave signals. This process constitutes one of the major sources of acceleration noise for LISA. Silicon particle detectors will be placed on board the LISA-PF and LISA missions to monitor the overall energetic incident cosmic-ray fluxes. These telescopes can be also used to carry out a map of shock accelerated Solar Energetic Particle (SEPs) fluxes associated with evolving Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) at different steps in longitude. We discuss the role of protons, helium nuclei, galactic heavy nuclei and solar ions. We aim to contribute to the COST724 (European CO-operation in the field of Scientific and Technical Research) action inside WG1/WP13000 developing appropriate simulations of the dynamics of CMEs by using space-based data and theoretical models.

  1. SEP flux mapping with PHOEBUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimani, C.; Bagni, G.; Fabi, M.; Vicerè, A.; Marconi, L.; Stanga, R.; Bosi, L.; Vocca, H.; Araújo, H.; Shaul, D.; Sumner, T.; Wass, P.; Boatella, C.; Lobo, A.; Chmeissani, M.; Martinez, I.

    2006-03-01

    We report about PHOEBUS (PHysics Of Events BUrsted by the Sun): a proposal for solar physics and space weather investigation with LISA (Laser Interferometer Space Antenna). Galactic and solar cosmic-ray particles with energies larger than 100 MeV(/n) penetrate and charge the LISA test masses. Spurious forces occur between the test masses and the surrounding electrodes mimicking gravitational wave signals. This process constitutes one of the major sources of acceleration noise for LISA. Silicon particle detectors will be placed on board the LISA-PF and LISA missions to monitor the overall energetic incident cosmic-ray fluxes. These telescopes can be also used to carry out a map of shock accelerated Solar Energetic Particle (SEPs) fluxes associated with evolving Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) at different steps in longitude. We discuss the role of protons, helium nuclei, galactic heavy nuclei and solar ions. We aim to contribute to the COST724 (European CO-operation in the field of Scientific and Technical Research) action inside WG1/WP13000 developing appropriate simulations of the dynamics of CMEs by using space-based data and theoretical models.

  2. Constrained Allocation Flux Balance Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Matteo; Hwa, Terence; Martin, Olivier C.

    2016-01-01

    New experimental results on bacterial growth inspire a novel top-down approach to study cell metabolism, combining mass balance and proteomic constraints to extend and complement Flux Balance Analysis. We introduce here Constrained Allocation Flux Balance Analysis, CAFBA, in which the biosynthetic costs associated to growth are accounted for in an effective way through a single additional genome-wide constraint. Its roots lie in the experimentally observed pattern of proteome allocation for metabolic functions, allowing to bridge regulation and metabolism in a transparent way under the principle of growth-rate maximization. We provide a simple method to solve CAFBA efficiently and propose an “ensemble averaging” procedure to account for unknown protein costs. Applying this approach to modeling E. coli metabolism, we find that, as the growth rate increases, CAFBA solutions cross over from respiratory, growth-yield maximizing states (preferred at slow growth) to fermentative states with carbon overflow (preferred at fast growth). In addition, CAFBA allows for quantitatively accurate predictions on the rate of acetate excretion and growth yield based on only 3 parameters determined by empirical growth laws. PMID:27355325

  3. Reducing Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindell, Johanna

    care may influence decisions on antibiotic use. Based on video-and audio recordings of physician-patient consultations it is investigated how treatment recommendations are presented, can be changed, are forecast and explained, and finally, how they seemingly meet resistance and how this resistance......Antibiotic resistance is a growing public health problem both nationally and internationally, and efficient strategies are needed to reduce unnecessary use. This dissertation presents four research studies, which examine how communication between general practitioners and patients in Danish primary...... is responded to.The first study in the dissertation suggests that treatment recommendations on antibiotics are often done in a way that encourages patient acceptance. In extension of this, the second study of the dissertation examines a case, where acceptance of such a recommendation is changed into a shared...

  4. Micrometeorological flux measurements of aerosol and gases above Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemitz, Eiko; Langford, Ben; Mullinger, Neil; Cowan, Nicholas; Coyle, Mhairi; Acton, William Joe; Lee, James; Fu, Pingqing

    2017-04-01

    less sensitive to transport effects. However, not only fluxes, but also these CO2-ratioed fluxes are highly variable in both space and time, indicating a complex mix of sources, which will be further investigated. The organic aerosol fluxes were the largest we have recorded to date at any urban measurement site. Nitrate, sulphate, chloride and ammonium all showed emissions that followed a similar diurnal cycle as the organic aerosol. Much of this aerosol is likely to have been formed by chemistry below the measurement height, but it nevertheless indicates significant sources of the precursor gases within the footprint. Comparing the measured fluxes of gas-phase NH3 and aerosol NH4+, at 102 m the aerosol phase makes a significant contribution to the reduced nitrogen emission.

  5. ANALYSIS OF METABOLIC FLUXES IN BATCH CULTURES OF INOSINE-OVERPRODUCING Bacillus subtillis%肌苷产生菌枯草芽孢杆菌分批发酵的代谢流分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张蓓; 张克旭; 陈宁; 徐咏全

    2003-01-01

    It is well recognized that metabolic fluxes are the key variables that must be determined in orderto understand metabolic regulation and patterns. However, owing to difficulties in measuring the flux values,evaluation of metabolic fluxes has not been an integral part of the most metabolic studies. Flux values formetabolites of glycolysis (EMP), tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and hexose monophosphate (HMP) pathwaywas obtained for batch cultures of inosine overproducing Bacilus subtilis by combining the information from thestoichiometry of key biosynthetic reactions with the experimental data on uptake rate of glucose and formationrates of metabolic product and byproducts.%为了更好地掌握代谢规律和代谢方式,代谢流作为一个关键而重要的变量需要测定.然而,由于代谢流测定的困难,在许多代谢研究中代谢流并没有被完全应用.在肌苷高产菌枯草芽孢杆菌中,利用得到的实验数据包括葡萄糖的消耗速率和代谢主产物以及副产物的形成速率,利用代谢通量平衡模型,得到糖酵解、三羟酸循环及磷酸戊糖途径的代谢流,并对其进行了分析.

  6. Quench cooling under reduced gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Chatain, D; Nikolayev, V S; Beysens, D

    2013-01-01

    We report the quench cooling experiments performed with liquid O2 under different levels of gravity simulated with the magnetic gravity compensation. A copper disk is quenched from 270K to 90K. It is found that the cooling time in microgravity is very long in comparison with any other gravity level. This phenomenon is explained by the isolation effect of the gas surrounding the disk. The liquid subcooling is shown to drastically improuve the heat exchange thus reducing the cooling time (about 20 times). The effect of subcooling on the heat transfer is analyzed at different gravity levels. It is shown that such type of experiments cannot be used for the analysis of the critical heat flux (CHF) of the boiling crisis. The minimum heat flux (MHF) of boiling is analyzed instead.

  7. Uncertainty of calorimeter measurements at NREL's high flux solar furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, C. E.

    1991-12-01

    The uncertainties of the calorimeter and concentration measurements at the High Flux Solar Furnace (HFSF) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are discussed. Two calorimeter types have been used to date. One is an array of seven commercially available circular foil calorimeters (gardon or heat flux gages) for primary concentrator peak flux (up to 250 W/sq cm). The second is a cold-water calorimeter designed and built by the University of Chicago to measure the average exit power of the reflective compound parabolic secondary concentrator used at the HFSF (over 3.3 kW across a 1.6/sq cm) exit aperture, corresponding to a flux of about 2 kW/sq cm. This paper discussed the uncertainties of the calorimeter and pyrheliometer measurements and resulting concentration calculations. The measurement uncertainty analysis is performed according to the ASME/ANSI standard PTC 19.1 (1985). Random and bias errors for each portion of the measurement are analyzed. The results show that as either the power or the flux is reduced, the uncertainties increase. Another calorimeter is being designed for a new, refractive secondary which will use a refractive material to produce a higher average flux (5 kW/sq cm) than the reflective secondary. The new calorimeter will use a time derivative of the fluid temperature as a key measurement of the average power out of the secondary. A description of this calorimeter and test procedure is also presented, along with a pre-test estimate of major sources of uncertainty.

  8. Uncertainty of calorimeter measurements at NREL's high flux solar furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bingham, C.E.

    1991-12-01

    The uncertainties of the calorimeter and concentration measurements at the High Flux Solar Furnace (HFSF) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are discussed. Two calorimeter types have been used to date. One is an array of seven commercially available circular foil calorimeters (gardon or heat flux gages) for primary concentrator peak flux (up to 250 W/cm{sup 2}). The second is a cold-water calorimeter designed and built by the University of Chicago to measure the average exit power of the reflective compound parabolic secondary concentrator used at the HFSF (over 3.3 kW across a 1.6cm{sup {minus}2} exit aperture, corresponding to a flux of about 2 kW/cm{sup 2}). This paper discussed the uncertainties of the calorimeter and pyrheliometer measurements and resulting concentration calculations. The measurement uncertainty analysis is performed according to the ASME/ANSI standard PTC 19.1 (1985). Random and bias errors for each portion of the measurement are analyzed. The results show that as either the power or the flux is reduced, the uncertainties increase. Another calorimeter is being designed for a new, refractive secondary which will use a refractive material to produce a higher average flux (5 kW/cm{sup 2}) than the reflective secondary. The new calorimeter will use a time derivative of the fluid temperature as a key measurement of the average power out of the secondary. A description of this calorimeter and test procedure is also presented, along with a pre-test estimate of major sources of uncertainty. 8 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Magnetic flux density in the heliosphere through several solar cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdős, G. [Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Balogh, A., E-mail: erdos.geza@wigner.mta.hu [The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-20

    We studied the magnetic flux density carried by solar wind to various locations in the heliosphere, covering a heliospheric distance range of 0.3-5.4 AU and a heliolatitudinal range from 80° south to 80° north. Distributions of the radial component of the magnetic field, B{sub R} , were determined over long intervals from the Helios, ACE, STEREO, and Ulysses missions, as well as from using the 1 AU OMNI data set. We show that at larger distances from the Sun, the fluctuations of the magnetic field around the average Parker field line distort the distribution of B{sub R} to such an extent that the determination of the unsigned, open solar magnetic flux density from the average (|B{sub R} |) is no longer justified. We analyze in detail two methods for reducing the effect of fluctuations. The two methods are tested using magnetic field and plasma velocity measurements in the OMNI database and in the Ulysses observations, normalized to 1 AU. It is shown that without such corrections for the fluctuations, the magnetic flux density measured by Ulysses around the aphelion phase of the orbit is significantly overestimated. However, the matching between the in-ecliptic magnetic flux density at 1 AU (OMNI data) and the off-ecliptic, more distant, normalized flux density by Ulysses is remarkably good if corrections are made for the fluctuations using either method. The main finding of the analysis is that the magnetic flux density in the heliosphere is fairly uniform, with no significant variations having been observed either in heliocentric distance or heliographic latitude.

  10. High flux inductors for the rapid heating of steel products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierret, R.; Griffay, G.; Galbrun, F. [Institut de Recherches de la Siderurgie Francaise (IRSID), 78 - Saint-Germain-en-Laye (France); Hellegouaec`h, J.; Prost, G.

    1995-03-01

    To reduce investment and operating costs of electroheating processes of long products by induction, we developed a new multilayed inductor with high flux density which represents a real technological step in regard of conventional technics: 4 MV/m{sup 2} instead of 1MW/m{sup 2}, efficiency of 85% instead of 55%, compacity and low costs of maintenance. The new technology can also be used with success in flat products plants. (authors). 10 figs., 1 tab.

  11. High Flux, Fouling Resistant Membranes for RO Pretreatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-31

    improved flux and fouling resistance . This in turn will lead to more compact and efficient filtration systems that reduce maintenance and downtime...size, and resistance to protein fouling by BSA filtration . Hollow Fiber Development and Testing Hollow fibers were produced by a generally...layer during dead- end filtration . The shear forces in cross-flow operation can impact the effective particle size in the feed and compact the cake

  12. A quantitative method for silica flux evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonewille, R. H.; O'Connell, G. J.; Toguri, J. M.

    1993-02-01

    In the smelting of copper and copper/nickel concentrates, the role of silica flux is to aid in the removal of iron by forming a slag phase. Alternatively, the role of flux may be regarded as a means of controlling the formation of magnetite, which can severely hinder the operation of a furnace. To adequately control the magnetite level, the flux must react rapidly with all of the FeO within the bath. In the present study, a rapid method for silica flux evaluation that can be used directly in the smelter has been developed. Samples of flux are mixed with iron sulfide and magnetite and then smelted at a temperature of 1250 °C. Argon was swept over the reaction mixture and analyzed continuously for sulfur dioxide. The sulfur dioxide concentration with time was found to contain two peaks, the first one being independent of the flux content of the sample. A flux quality parameter has been defined as the height-to-time ratio of the second peak. The value of this parameter for pure silica is 5100 ppm/min. The effects of silica content, silica particle size, and silicate mineralogy were investigated. It was found that a limiting flux quality is achieved for particle sizes less than 0.1 mm in diameter and that fluxes containing feldspar are generally of a poorer quality. The relative importance of free silica and melting point was also studied using synthetic flux mixtures, with free silica displaying the strongest effect.

  13. Regulation of the interplanetary magnetic flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McComas, D.J.; Gosling, J.T.; Phillips, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    In this study we use a recently developed technique for measuring the 2-D magnetic flux in the ecliptic plane to examine (1) the long term variation of the magnetic flux in interplanetary space and (2) the apparent rate at which coronal mass ejections (CMEs) may be opening new flux from the Sun. Since there is a substantial variation ({approximately}50%) of the flux in the ecliptic plane over the solar cycle, we conclude that there must be some means whereby new flux can be opened from the Sun and previously open magnetic flux can be closed off. We briefly describe recently discovered coronal disconnections events which could serve to close off previously open magnetic flux. CMEs appear to retain at least partial magnetic connection to the Sun and hence open new flux, while disconnections appear to be likely signatures of the process that returns closed flux to the Sun; the combination of these processes could regulate the amount of open magnetic flux in interplanetary space. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Partitioning evapotranspiration fluxes using atmometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsag, Matej; Fischer, Milan; Trnka, Miroslav; Kucera, Jiri; Zalud, Zdenek

    2013-04-01

    This effort is aimed to derive a simple tool for separating soil evaporation and transpiration from evapotranspiration, measured by Bowen ration energy balance method (BREB) in short rotation coppice (SRC). The main idea is to utilize daily data of actual evapotranspiration (ETa) measured above bare soil (spring 2010 - first year following harvest), reference evapotranspiration (ETo) measured by atmometer ETgage and precipitation data, in order to create an algorithm for estimation evaporation from bare soil. This approach is based on the following assumption: evaporation of wetted bare soil same as the ETo from atmometer is assumed to be identical in days with rain. In first and further days with no rain (and e.g. high evaporative demand) the easily evaporable soil water depletes and ETa so as crop coefficient of bare soil (Kcb) decreases in a way similar to decreasing power function. The algorithm represents a parameterized function of daily cumulated ETo (ETc) measured by atmometer in days elapsed from last rain event (Kcb = a*ETc^b). After each rain event the accumulation of ETo starts again till next rain event (e. g. only days with no rain are cumulated). The function provides decreasing Kcb for each day without rain. The bare soil evaporation can be estimated when the atmometer-recorded value is multiplied by Kcb for particular day without rain. In days with rain Kcb is assumed to be back at 1. This method was successfully tested for estimating evaporation from bare soil under closed canopy of poplar-based SRC. When subtracting the estimated soil evaporation from total ETa flux, measured above the canopy using BREB method, it is possible to obtain transpiration flux of the canopy. There is also possibility to test this approach on the contrary - subtracting transpiration derived from sap-flow measurement from total ETa flux is possible to get soil evaporation as well. Acknowledgements: The present experiment is made within the frame of project Inter

  15. Reduced dielectric response in spatially varying electric fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper Schmidt

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the dynamical equation for polarization is derived. From this the dielectric response to a spatially varying electric field is analyzed showing a reduced response due to flux of polarization in the material. This flux is modeled as a diffusive process through linear constitutive...... relations between the flux and the gradient of the polarization. Comparison between the theory and molecular dynamics simulations confirms this effect. The effect is significant for small length scale electric field variations and the inclusion of the flux is thus important in nanoscale modeling...

  16. Insects, infestations and nutrient fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalzik, B.

    2012-04-01

    Forest ecosystems are characterized by a high temporal and spatial variability in the vertical transfer of energy and matter within the canopy and the soil compartment. The mechanisms and controlling factors behind canopy processes and system-internal transfer dynamics are imperfectly understood at the moment. Seasonal flux diversities and inhomogeneities in throughfall composition have been reported from coniferous and deciduous forests, and in most cases leaf leaching has been considered as principle driver for differences in the amount and quality of nutrients and organic compounds (Tukey and Morgan 1963). Since herbivorous insects and the processes they initiate received less attention in past times, ecologists now emphasize the need for linking biological processes occurring in different ecosystem strata to explain rates and variability of nutrient cycling (Bardgett et al. 1998, Wardle et al. 2004). Consequently, herbivore insects in the canopies of forests are increasingly identified to play an important role for the (re)cycling and availability of nutrients, or, more generally, for the functioning of ecosystems not only in outbreak situations but also at endemic (non-outbreak) density levels (Stadler et al. 2001, Hunter et al. 2003). Before, little attention was paid to insect herbivores when quantifying element and energy fluxes through ecosystems, although the numerous and different functions insects fulfill in ecosystems (e.g. as pollinators, herbivores or detritivores) were unanimously recognized (Schowalter 2000). Amongst the reasons for this restraint was the argument that the total biomass of insects tends to be relatively low compared to the biomass of trees or the pool of soil organic matter (Ohmart et al. 1983). A second argument which was put forward to justify the inferior role of insects in nutrient cycling were the supposed low defoliation losses between 5-10% of the annual leaf biomass, or net primary production, due to insect herbivory under

  17. Warped branches of flux compactifications

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Yen-Kheng

    2012-01-01

    We consider Freund-Rubin-type compactifications which are described by (p+q)-dimensional Einstein gravity with a positive cosmological constant and a q-form flux. Using perturbative expansions of Kinoshita's ansatz for warped dS_pxS^q and AdS_pxS^q spacetimes, we obtain analytical solutions describing the warped branches and their respective phase spaces. These equations are given by inhomogeneous Gegenbauer differential equations which can be solved by the Green's function method. The requirement that the Green's functions are regular provides constraints which determine the structure of the phase space of the warped branches. We apply the perturbation results to calculate the thermodynamic variables for the warped dS_pxS^q branch. In particular, the first law of thermodynamics can be reproduced using this method.

  18. Metamaterial anisotropic flux concentrators and magnetic arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Bjørk, R; Bahl, C R H

    2014-01-01

    A metamaterial magnetic flux concentrator is investigated in detail in combination with a Halbach cylinder of infinite length. A general analytical solution to the field is determined and the magnetic figure of merit is determined for a Halbach cylinder with a flux concentrator. It is shown that an ideal flux concentrator will not change the figure of merit of a given magnet design, while the non-ideal will always lower it. The geometric parameters producing maximum figure of merit, i.e. the most efficient devices, are determined. The force and torque between two concentric Halbach cylinders with flux concentrators is determined and the maximum torque is found. Finally, the effect of non-ideal flux concentrators and the practical use of flux concentrators, as well as demagnetization issues, is discussed.

  19. A comparison of new measurements of total monoterpene flux with improved measurements of speciated monoterpene flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lee

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Many monoterpenes have been identified in forest emissions using gas chromatography (GC. Until now, it has been impossible to determine whether all monoterpenes are appropriately measured using GC techniques. We used a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS coupled with the eddy covariance (EC technique to measure mixing ratios and fluxes of total monoterpenes above a ponderosa pine plantation. We compared PTR-MS-EC results with simultaneous measurements of eight speciated monoterpenes, β-pinene, α-pinene, 3-carene, d-limonene, β-phellandrene, α-terpinene, camphene, and terpinolene, made with an automated, in situ gas chromatograph with flame ionization detectors (GC-FID, coupled to a relaxed eddy accumulation system (REA. Monoterpene mixing ratios and fluxes measured by PTR-MS averaged 30±2.3% and 31±9.2% larger than by GC-FID, with larger differences at night than during the day. Four unidentified peaks that correlated with β-pinene were resolved in the chromatograms and completely accounted for the daytime difference and reduced the nighttime difference to 19±3.4%. Measurements of total monoterpenes by PTR-MS-EC indicated that GC-FID-REA measured the common, longer-lived monoterpenes well, but that additional monoterpenes were emitted from the ecosystem that represented an important contribution to the total mixing ratio above the forest at night, and that must have been oxidized during the day before they escaped the forest canopy.

  20. A comparison of new measurements of total monoterpene flux with improved measurements of speciated monoterpene flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lee

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Many monoterpenes have been identified in forest emissions using gas chromatography (GC. Until now, it has been impossible to determine whether all monoterpenes are appropriately measured using GC techniques. We used a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS coupled with the eddy covariance (EC technique to measure mixing ratios and fluxes of total monoterpenes above a ponderosa pine plantation. We compared PTR-MS-EC results with simultaneous measurements of eight speciated monoterpenes, β-pinene, α-pinene, 3-carene, d-limonene, β-phellandrene, α-terpinene, camphene, and terpinolene, made with an automated, in situ gas chromatograph with flame ionization detectors (GC-FID, coupled to a relaxed eddy accumulation system (REA. Monoterpene mixing ratios and fluxes measured by PTR-MS averaged 30±2.3% and 31±9.2% larger than by GC-FID, with larger mixing ratio discrepancies between the two techniques at night than during the day. Two unidentified peaks that correlated with β-pinene were resolved in the chromatograms and completely accounted for the daytime difference and reduced the nighttime mixing ratio difference to 20±2.9%. Measurements of total monoterpenes by PTR-MS-EC indicated that GC-FID-REA measured the common, longer-lived monoterpenes well, but that additional terpenes were emitted from the ecosystem that represented an important contribution to the total mixing ratio above the forest at night.

  1. Statistics of F-theory flux vacua for particle physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watari, Taizan [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe,University of Tokyo, Kashiwa-no-ha 5-1-5, 277-8583 (Japan)

    2015-11-10

    Supersymmetric flux compactification of F-theory in the geometric phase yields numerous vacua, and provides an ensemble of low-energy effective theories with a variety of symmetry, matter multiplicity and Lagrangian parameters. Theoretical tools have already been developed so that we can study how the statistics of those flux vacua depend on the choice of symmetry and some of the Lagrangian parameters. In this article, we estimate the fraction of i) vacua that have a U(1) symmetry for spontaneous R-parity violation, and ii) those that realise ideas which achieve hierarchical eigenvalues of the Yukawa matrices. We also learn a lesson that the number of flux vacua is reduced very much when the unbroken U(1){sub Y} symmetry is obtained from a non-trivial Mordell-Weil group, while it is not, when U(1){sub Y} is in SU(5) unification. It also turns out to be likely that vacua with an approximate U(1) symmetry form a locus of accumulation points of the flux vacua distribution.

  2. Flux-freezing breakdown in high-conductivity magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyink, Gregory; Vishniac, Ethan; Lalescu, Cristian; Aluie, Hussein; Kanov, Kalin; Bürger, Kai; Burns, Randal; Meneveau, Charles; Szalay, Alexander

    2013-05-23

    The idea of 'frozen-in' magnetic field lines for ideal plasmas is useful to explain diverse astrophysical phenomena, for example the shedding of excess angular momentum from protostars by twisting of field lines frozen into the interstellar medium. Frozen-in field lines, however, preclude the rapid changes in magnetic topology observed at high conductivities, as in solar flares. Microphysical plasma processes are a proposed explanation of the observed high rates, but it is an open question whether such processes can rapidly reconnect astrophysical flux structures much greater in extent than several thousand ion gyroradii. An alternative explanation is that turbulent Richardson advection brings field lines implosively together from distances far apart to separations of the order of gyroradii. Here we report an analysis of a simulation of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence at high conductivity that exhibits Richardson dispersion. This effect of advection in rough velocity fields, which appear non-differentiable in space, leads to line motions that are completely indeterministic or 'spontaneously stochastic', as predicted in analytical studies. The turbulent breakdown of standard flux freezing at scales greater than the ion gyroradius can explain fast reconnection of very large-scale flux structures, both observed (solar flares and coronal mass ejections) and predicted (the inner heliosheath, accretion disks, γ-ray bursts and so on). For laminar plasma flows with smooth velocity fields or for low turbulence intensity, stochastic flux freezing reduces to the usual frozen-in condition.

  3. Reactive oxygen species production by forward and reverse electron fluxes in the mitochondrial respiratory chain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitaly A Selivanov

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS produced in the mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC are primary signals that modulate cellular adaptation to environment, and are also destructive factors that damage cells under the conditions of hypoxia/reoxygenation relevant for various systemic diseases or transplantation. The important role of ROS in cell survival requires detailed investigation of mechanism and determinants of ROS production. To perform such an investigation we extended our rule-based model of complex III in order to account for electron transport in the whole RC coupled to proton translocation, transmembrane electrochemical potential generation, TCA cycle reactions, and substrate transport to mitochondria. It fits respiratory electron fluxes measured in rat brain mitochondria fueled by succinate or pyruvate and malate, and the dynamics of NAD(+ reduction by reverse electron transport from succinate through complex I. The fitting of measured characteristics gave an insight into the mechanism of underlying processes governing the formation of free radicals that can transfer an unpaired electron to oxygen-producing superoxide and thus can initiate the generation of ROS. Our analysis revealed an association of ROS production with levels of specific radicals of individual electron transporters and their combinations in species of complexes I and III. It was found that the phenomenon of bistability, revealed previously as a property of complex III, remains valid for the whole RC. The conditions for switching to a state with a high content of free radicals in complex III were predicted based on theoretical analysis and were confirmed experimentally. These findings provide a new insight into the mechanisms of ROS production in RC.

  4. Quantifying streambed advection and conduction heat fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caissie, Daniel; Luce, Charles H.

    2017-02-01

    Groundwater and accompanying heat fluxes are particularly relevant for aquatic habitats as they influence living conditions both within the river and streambed. This study focuses on the theory and the development of new equations to estimate conduction and advection heat fluxes into and out of the bed, correcting some earlier misunderstandings and adding parameterizations that extend our understanding of timing of heat fluxes. The new heat flux equations are illustrated using Catamaran Brook (New Brunswick, Canada) stream/streambed temperature data. We show important relationships between fluxes when the surface water temperature (1) follows a sinusoidal function superimposed on a steady state condition (constant deep streambed temperature) and (2) when sinusoidal variations in stream temperature at two frequencies (annual and diel) are superimposed. When the stream temperature is used as a prescribed boundary condition, the contribution of bed fluid fluxes to stream temperature occurs through the effects of conductive thermal gradients, not through direct contribution/mixing of cold/warm water. Boundary conditions can be modified, however, to account for direct contribution of cold/warm water (e.g., localized upwelling) and consequences for the conduction heat flux. Equations developed allow for prediction of conductive fluxes to the bed during summer driven by diel and annual temperature fluctuations of the stream water and good agreement was observed between analytic solutions and field data. Results from this study provide a better insight into groundwater and heat fluxes which will ultimately result in better stream temperature models and a better management of fisheries resources.

  5. Investigating the Dynamics of Canonical Flux Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    von der Linden, Jens; Sears, Jason; Intrator, Thomas; You, Setthivoine

    2016-10-01

    Canonical flux tubes are flux tubes of the circulation of a species' canonical momentum. They provide a convenient generalization of magnetic flux tubes to regimes beyond magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). We hypothesize that hierarchies of instabilities which couple disparate scales could transfer magnetic pitch into helical flows and vice versa while conserving the total canonical helicity. This work first explores the possibility of a sausage instability existing on top of a kink as mechanism for coupling scales, then presents the evolution of canonical helicity in a gyrating kinked flux rope. Analytical and numerical stability spaces derived for magnetic flux tubes with core and skin currents indicate that, as a flux tube lengthens and collimates, it may become kink unstable with a sausage instability developing on top of the kink. A new analysis of 3D magnetic field and ion flow data on gyrating kinked magnetic flux ropes from the Reconnection Scaling Experiment tracks the evolution of canonical flux tubes and their helicity. These results and methodology are being developed as part of the Mochi experiment specifically designed to observe the dynamics of canonical flux tubes. This work is supported by DOE Grant DE-SC0010340 and the DOE Office of Science Graduate Student Research Program and prepared in part by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-697161.

  6. OptFlux: an open-source software platform for in silico metabolic engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rocha, I.; Maia, P.; Evangelista, P.

    2010-01-01

    software aimed at being the reference computational application in the field. It is the first tool to incorporate strain optimization tasks, i.e., the identification of Metabolic Engineering targets, using Evolutionary Algorithms/Simulated Annealing metaheuristics or the previously proposed Opt......, computing the admissible flux space given a set of measured fluxes, and (iii) pathway analysis through the calculation of Elementary Flux Modes. OptFlux also contemplates several methods for model simplification and other pre-processing operations aimed at reducing the search space for optimization...... algorithms. The software supports importing/exporting to several flat file formats and it is compatible with the SBML standard. OptFlux has a visualization module that allows the analysis of the model structure that is compatible with the layout information of Cell Designer, allowing the superimposition...

  7. Numerical simulations of multiple scattering of the $f-$mode by flux tubes

    CERN Document Server

    Felipe, T; Birch, A C

    2013-01-01

    We use numerial simulations to study the absorption and phase shift of surface-gravity waves caused by groups of magnetic flux tubes. The dependence of the scattering coefficients with the distance between the tubes and their positions is analyzed for several cases with two or three flux tubes embedded in a quiet Sun atmosphere. The results are compared with those obtained neglecting completely or partially multiple scattering effects. We show that multiple scattering has a significant impact on the absorption measurements and tends to reduce the phase shift. We also consider more general cases of ensembles of randomly distributed flux tubes, and we have evaluated the effects on the scattering measurements of changing the number of tubes included in the bundle and the average distance between flux tubes. We find that for the longest wavelength incoming waves multiple scattering enhances the absorption, and its efficiency increases with the number of flux tubes and the reduction of the distance between them.

  8. Confusing the extragalactic neutrino flux limit with a neutrino propagation limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barranco, Juan [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de México, Mexico, DF 04510 (Mexico); Miranda, Omar G. [Departamento de Física, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Apdo. Postal 14-740 07000 México, D.F. (Mexico); Moura, Celio A. [Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, Rua Santa Adélia, 166, 09210-170 Santo André, SP (Brazil); Rashba, Timur I. [Max-Planck-Institute for Solar System Research, Katlenburg-Lindau, 37191 (Germany); Rossi-Torres, Fernando, E-mail: barranco@astroscu.unam.mx, E-mail: Omar.Miranda@fis.cinvestav.mx, E-mail: celio.moura@ufabc.edu.br, E-mail: timur@mppmu.mpg.de, E-mail: ftorres@ifi.unicamp.br [Instituto de Física Teórica, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Rua Dr. Bento Teobaldo Ferraz, 271 - Bl. II, 01140-070, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-10-01

    We study the possible suppression of the extragalactic neutrino flux due to a nonstandard interaction during its propagation. In particular, we study neutrino interaction with an ultra-light scalar field dark matter. It is shown that the extragalactic neutrino flux may be suppressed by such an interaction, leading to a new mechanism to reduce the ultra-high energy neutrino flux. We study both the cases of non-self-conjugate as well as self-conjugate dark matter. In the first case, the suppression is independent of the neutrino and dark matter masses. We conclude that care must be taken when explaining limits on the neutrino flux through source acceleration mechanisms only, since there could be other mechanisms for the reduction of the neutrino flux.

  9. The stretching of magnetic flux tubes in the convective overshoot region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, George H.; Mcclymont, Alexander N.; Chou, Dean-Yi

    1991-01-01

    The present study examines the fate of a magnetic flux tube initially lying at the bottom of the solar convective overshoot region. Stretching of the flux tube, e.g., by differential rotation, reduces its density, causing it to rise quasi-statically (a process referred to as vertical flux drift) until it reaches the top of the overshoot region and enters the buoyantly unstable convection region, from which a portion of it may ultimately protrude to form an active region on the surface. It is suggested that vertical flux drift and flux destabilization are inevitable consequences of field amplification, and it is surmised that these phenomena should be considered in self-consistent models of solar and stellar dynamos operating in the overshoot region.

  10. Discharge Flux Variability in Stored Thermal Energy Cookstoves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Michael James

    A thermal analysis and test is performed to determine flux and temperature variability for Phase change thermal energy to investigation feasibility of use in a Stored Thermal Energy Cookstove (STEC). The phase change material (PCM) NaNO3-KNO3 Eutectic (52:48) Solar Salt is identified for energy storage in STEC due to a melting temperature of 222°C which is deemed appropriate for use in cooking up to temperatures of 200°C +/- 20°C. 1-D planar and cylindrical analytical multiphase solutions are correlated with a transient non-linear ANSYS Finite Element Model (FEM). 1-D idealized models of planar and cylindrical analytical multiphase solutions show the flux stability of cylindrical solidification is twice that of planar solidification. Flux drops a linear average of 0.5%/min in the last half hour of a one hour cooking session in cylindrical solidification vs 1%/min in planar solidification under a constant temperature (dirichlet) boundary condition of 42°C below the melting point of the PCM. Solidification progresses more quickly in the planar case yielding a solid PCM thickness of 3.3 cm after one hour vs 2.4 cm in the cylindrical case. A test is performed on a simplified simple STEC apparatus to investigate cooling rates of the cooking surface while boiling water. 0.5L of water is brought to boil from room temperature with a linear average cooking surface flux of 21,000 W/m2 and a cooking surface cooling rate of 3.8°C/min. Results show increasing the thermal conductivity of the PCM and reducing the total thickness of the solidifying PCM layer before and after discharge will reduce cooling rates, improve stability of the flux delivery device, and increase feasibility of use. Pursuing lower flux cooking and non-cooking applications may increase likelihood of adoption by reducing thermal gradients during discharge. A proposal to explore further development of STEC to aid adoption is discussed.

  11. Self-organization in magnetic flux ropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukin, Vyacheslav S.

    2014-06-01

    This cross-disciplinary special issue on 'Self-organization in magnetic flux ropes' follows in the footsteps of another collection of manuscripts dedicated to the subject of magnetic flux ropes, a volume on 'Physics of magnetic flux ropes' published in the American Geophysical Union's Geophysical Monograph Series in 1990 [1]. Twenty-four years later, this special issue, composed of invited original contributions highlighting ongoing research on the physics of magnetic flux ropes in astrophysical, space and laboratory plasmas, can be considered an update on our state of understanding of this fundamental constituent of any magnetized plasma. Furthermore, by inviting contributions from research groups focused on the study of the origins and properties of magnetic flux ropes in a variety of different environments, we have attempted to underline both the diversity of and the commonalities among magnetic flux ropes throughout the solar system and, indeed, the universe. So, what is a magnetic flux rope? The answer will undoubtedly depend on whom you ask. A flux rope can be as narrow as a few Larmor radii and as wide as the Sun (see, e.g., the contributions by Heli Hietala et al and by Angelous Vourlidas). As described below by Ward Manchester IV et al , they can stretch from the Sun to the Earth in the form of interplanetary coronal mass ejections. Or, as in the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment described by David Schaffner et al , they can fit into a meter-long laboratory device tended by college students. They can be helical and line-tied (see, e.g., Walter Gekelman et al or J Sears et al ), or toroidal and periodic (see, e.g., John O'Bryan et al or Philippa Browning et al ). They can form in the low plasma beta environment of the solar corona (Tibor Török et al ), the order unity beta plasmas of the solar wind (Stefan Eriksson et al ) and the plasma pressure dominated stellar convection zones (Nicholas Nelson and Mark Miesch). In this special issue, Setthivoine You

  12. Sediment Diagenesis and Benthic Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, S.; Hedges, J.

    2003-12-01

    Chemical reactions in marine sediments and the resulting fluxes across the sediment-water interface influence the global carbon cycle and the pH of the sea and affect the abundance of CaCO3 and opal-forming plankton in the ocean. On very long timescales these diagenetic reactions control carbon burial in sedimentary rocks and the oxygen content of the atmosphere. Sedimentary deposits that remain after diagenesis are the geochemical artifacts used for interpreting past changes in ocean circulation, biogeochemical cycles, and climate. This chapter is about the processes of diagenesis and burial of the chemical elements that make up the bulk of the particulate matter that reaches the seafloor (organic matter, CaCO3, SiO2, Fe, Mn, and aluminosilicates).Understanding of sediment diagenesis and benthic fluxes has evolved with advances in both experimental methods and modeling. Measurements of chemical concentrations in sediments, their associated pore waters and fluxes at the sediment-water interface have been used to identify the most important reactions. Because transport in pore waters is usually by molecular diffusion, this medium is conducive to interpretation by models of heterogeneous chemical equilibrium and kinetics. Large chemical changes and manageable transport mechanisms have led to elegant models of sediment diagenesis and great advances in understanding of diagenetic processes.We shall see, though, that the environment does not yield totally to simple models of chemical equilibrium and chemical kinetics, and laboratory determined constants often cannot explain the field observations. For example, organic matter degradation rate constants determined from modeling are so variable that there are essentially no constraints on these values from laboratory experiments. In addition, reaction rates of CaCO3 and opal dissolution determined from modeling pore waters usually cannot be reproduced in laboratory experiments of these reactions. The inability to

  13. Comparison of the high temperature heat flux sensor to traditional heat flux gages under high heat flux conditions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchat, Thomas K.; Hanks, Charles R.

    2013-04-01

    Four types of heat flux gages (Gardon, Schmidt-Boelter, Directional Flame Temperature, and High Temperature Heat Flux Sensor) were assessed and compared under flux conditions ranging between 100-1000 kW/m2, such as those seen in hydrocarbon fire or propellant fire conditions. Short duration step and pulse boundary conditions were imposed using a six-panel cylindrical array of high-temperature tungsten lamps. Overall, agreement between all gages was acceptable for the pulse tests and also for the step tests. However, repeated tests with the HTHFS with relatively long durations at temperatures approaching 1000ÀC showed a substantial decrease (10-25%) in heat flux subsequent to the initial test, likely due to the mounting technique. New HTHFS gages have been ordered to allow additional tests to determine the cause of the flux reduction.

  14. Magnetic Flux Compression in Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velikovich, A. L.

    2012-10-01

    Magnetic flux compression (MFC) as a method for producing ultra-high pulsed magnetic fields had been originated in the 1950s by Sakharov et al. at Arzamas in the USSR (now VNIIEF, Russia) and by Fowler et al. at Los Alamos in the US. The highest magnetic field produced by explosively driven MFC generator, 28 MG, was reported by Boyko et al. of VNIIEF. The idea of using MFC to increase the magnetic field in a magnetically confined plasma to 3-10 MG, relaxing the strict requirements on the plasma density and Lawson time, gave rise to the research area known as MTF in the US and MAGO in Russia. To make a difference in ICF, a magnetic field of ˜100 MG should be generated via MFC by a plasma liner as a part of the capsule compression scenario on a laser or pulsed power facility. This approach was first suggested in mid-1980s by Liberman and Velikovich in the USSR and Felber in the US. It has not been obvious from the start that it could work at all, given that so many mechanisms exist for anomalously fast penetration of magnetic field through plasma. And yet, many experiments stimulated by this proposal since 1986, mostly using pulsed-power drivers, demonstrated reasonably good flux compression up to ˜42 MG, although diagnostics of magnetic fields of such magnitude in HED plasmas is still problematic. The new interest of MFC in plasmas emerged with the advancement of new drivers, diagnostic methods and simulation tools. Experiments on MFC in a deuterium plasma filling a cylindrical plastic liner imploded by OMEGA laser beam led by Knauer, Betti et al. at LLE produced peak fields of 36 MG. The novel MagLIF approach to low-cost, high-efficiency ICF pursued by Herrmann, Slutz, Vesey et al. at Sandia involves pulsed-power-driven MFC to a peak field of ˜130 MG in a DT plasma. A review of the progress, current status and future prospects of MFC in plasmas is presented.

  15. Dual active surface heat flux gage probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebert, Curt H.; Kolodziej, Paul

    1995-02-01

    A unique plug-type heat flux gage probe was tested in the NASA Ames Research Center 2x9 turbulent flow duct facility. The probe was fabricated by welding a miniature dual active surface heat flux gage body to the end of a hollow metal cylindrical bolt containing a metal inner tube. Cooling air flows through the inner tube, impinges onto the back of the gage body and then flows out through the annulus formed between the inner tube and the hollow bolt wall. Heat flux was generated in the duct facility with a Huels arc heater. The duct had a rectangular cross section and one wall was fabricated from 2.54 centimeter thick thermal insulation rigid surface material mounted onto an aluminum plate. To measure heat flux, the probe was inserted through the plate and insulating materials with the from of the gage located flush with the hot gas-side insulation surface. Absorbed heat fluxes measured with the probe were compared with absorbed heat fluxes measured with six water-cooled reference calorimeters. These calorimeters were located in a water-cooled metal duct wall which was located across from the probe position. Correspondence of transient and steady heat fluxes measured with the reference calorimeters and heat flux gage probe was generally within a satisfactory plus or minus 10 percent. This good correspondence was achieved even though the much cooler probe caused a large surface temperature disruption of 1000K between the metal gage and the insulation. However, this temperature disruption did not seriously effect the accuracy of the heat flux measurement. A current application for dual active surface heat flux gages is for transient and steady absorbed heat flux, surface temperature and heat transfer coefficient measurements on the surface of an oxidizer turbine inlet deflector operating in a space shuttle test bed engine.

  16. Numerical investigation of the influence of cooling flux on the generation of dislocations in cylindrical mono-like silicon growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, B.; Kakimoto, K.

    2013-12-01

    To effectively reduce dislocations during seeded growth of cylindrical monocrystalline-like silicon by controlling the cooling flux, the relationship between the generation of dislocations and cooling flux has been numerically studied. The results show that the generation of dislocations is determined by the cooling flux difference, not by the cooling flux inside the crystal. Good control of the input and output cooling fluxes during practical crystal growth is essential to reduce the generation of dislocations. Further analysis shows that the cooling flux difference in the radial or axial direction is linearly related to the square root of the maximum dislocation density. In other words, a linear decrease of the cooling flux difference in the radial or axial direction results in a quadratic decrease of the maximum dislocation density. Therefore, the most effective method to reduce dislocations during the cooling process is to decrease the cooling flux difference between the input and output fluxes, i.e., to decrease the energy accumulation or dissipation rate inside the whole crystal.

  17. Zintl and intermetallic phases grown from calcium/lithium flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankenship, Trevor

    Metal flux synthes is a useful alternative method to high temperature solid state synthesis; it allows easy diffusion of reactants at lower temperatures, and presents favorable conditions for crystal growth. A mixed flux of calcium and lithium in a 1:1 ratio was explored in this work; this mixture melts at 300°C and is an excellent solvent for main group elements and CaH 2. Reactions of p-block elements in a 1:1 Ca/Li flux have produced several new intermetallic and Zintl phases. Electronegative elements from groups 14 and 15 are reduced to anions in this flux, yielding charge-balanced products. More electropositive metals from group 13 are not fully reduced; the resulting products are complex intermetallics. The reactions of tin or lead and carbon in Ca/Li flux produced the analogous phases Ca11Tt3C8 (Tt = Sn, Pb) in the monoclinic C21/c space group (a = 13.2117(8) A, b =10.7029(7) A, c = 14.2493(9) A, beta = 105.650(1)° for the Sn analog). These compounds are carbide Zintl phases that includes the rare combination of C3 4- and C22- units as well as Sn4- or Pb4- anions. Ca/Li flux reactions of CaH2 and arsenic have produced the Zintl phases LiCa3As 2H in orthorhombic Pnma (a = 11.4064(7), b = 4.2702(3), c = 11.8762(8) A), and Ca 13As6C0.46N1.155H6.045in tetragonal P4/mbm (a = 15.7493(15), c = 9.1062(9) A). The complex stoichiometry of the latter phase was caused by incorporation of light element contaminants and was studied by neutron diffraction, showing mixing of anionic sites to achieve charge balance. Ca/Li flux reactions with group 13 metals have resulted in several new intermetallic phases. Reactions of indium and CaH2 in the Ca/Li flux (with or without boron) formed Ca53In13B4-x H23+x(2.4 < x < 4.0) in cubic space group Im-3 (a = 16.3608(6) A) which features metallic indium atoms and ionic hydride sites. The electronic properties of this "subhydride" were confirmed by 1H and 115In NMR spectroscopy. Attempts to replace boron with carbon yielded Ca12InC13-x

  18. FiatFlux--a software for metabolic flux analysis from 13C-glucose experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamboni, Nicola; Fischer, Eliane; Sauer, Uwe

    2005-08-25

    Quantitative knowledge of intracellular fluxes is important for a comprehensive characterization of metabolic networks and their functional operation. In contrast to direct assessment of metabolite concentrations, in vivo metabolite fluxes must be inferred indirectly from measurable quantities in 13C experiments. The required experience, the complicated network models, large and heterogeneous data sets, and the time-consuming set-up of highly controlled experimental conditions largely restricted metabolic flux analysis to few expert groups. A conceptual simplification of flux analysis is the analytical determination of metabolic flux ratios exclusively from MS data, which can then be used in a second step to estimate absolute in vivo fluxes. Here we describe the user-friendly software package FiatFlux that supports flux analysis for non-expert users. In the first module, ratios of converging fluxes are automatically calculated from GC-MS-detected 13C-pattern in protein-bound amino acids. Predefined fragmentation patterns are automatically identified and appropriate statistical data treatment is based on the comparison of redundant information in the MS spectra. In the second module, absolute intracellular fluxes may be calculated by a 13C-constrained flux balancing procedure that combines experimentally determined fluxes in and out of the cell and the above flux ratios. The software is preconfigured to derive flux ratios and absolute in vivo fluxes from [1-13C] and [U-13C]glucose experiments and GC-MS analysis of amino acids for a variety of microorganisms. FiatFlux is an intuitive tool for quantitative investigations of intracellular metabolism by users that are not familiar with numerical methods or isotopic tracer experiments. The aim of this open source software is to enable non-specialists to adapt the software to their specific scientific interests, including other 13C-substrates, labeling mixtures, and organisms.

  19. FiatFlux – a software for metabolic flux analysis from 13C-glucose experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fischer Eliane

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantitative knowledge of intracellular fluxes is important for a comprehensive characterization of metabolic networks and their functional operation. In contrast to direct assessment of metabolite concentrations, in vivo metabolite fluxes must be inferred indirectly from measurable quantities in 13C experiments. The required experience, the complicated network models, large and heterogeneous data sets, and the time-consuming set-up of highly controlled experimental conditions largely restricted metabolic flux analysis to few expert groups. A conceptual simplification of flux analysis is the analytical determination of metabolic flux ratios exclusively from MS data, which can then be used in a second step to estimate absolute in vivo fluxes. Results Here we describe the user-friendly software package FiatFlux that supports flux analysis for non-expert users. In the first module, ratios of converging fluxes are automatically calculated from GC-MS-detected 13C-pattern in protein-bound amino acids. Predefined fragmentation patterns are automatically identified and appropriate statistical data treatment is based on the comparison of redundant information in the MS spectra. In the second module, absolute intracellular fluxes may be calculated by a 13C-constrained flux balancing procedure that combines experimentally determined fluxes in and out of the cell and the above flux ratios. The software is preconfigured to derive flux ratios and absolute in vivo fluxes from [1-13C] and [U-13C]glucose experiments and GC-MS analysis of amino acids for a variety of microorganisms. Conclusion FiatFlux is an intuitive tool for quantitative investigations of intracellular metabolism by users that are not familiar with numerical methods or isotopic tracer experiments. The aim of this open source software is to enable non-specialists to adapt the software to their specific scientific interests, including other 13C-substrates, labeling mixtures

  20. An assessment of air-sea heat fluxes from ocean and coupled reanalyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivieso, Maria; Haines, Keith; Balmaseda, Magdalena; Chang, You-Soon; Drevillon, Marie; Ferry, Nicolas; Fujii, Yosuke; Köhl, Armin; Storto, Andrea; Toyoda, Takahiro; Wang, Xiaochun; Waters, Jennifer; Xue, Yan; Yin, Yonghong; Barnier, Bernard; Hernandez, Fabrice; Kumar, Arun; Lee, Tong; Masina, Simona; Andrew Peterson, K.

    2017-08-01

    Sixteen monthly air-sea heat flux products from global ocean/coupled reanalyses are compared over 1993-2009 as part of the Ocean Reanalysis Intercomparison Project (ORA-IP). Objectives include assessing the global heat closure, the consistency of temporal variability, comparison with other flux products, and documenting errors against in situ flux measurements at a number of OceanSITES moorings. The ensemble of 16 ORA-IP flux estimates has a global positive bias over 1993-2009 of 4.2 ± 1.1 W m-2. Residual heat gain (i.e., surface flux + assimilation increments) is reduced to a small positive imbalance (typically, +1-2 W m-2). This compensation between surface fluxes and assimilation increments is concentrated in the upper 100 m. Implied steady meridional heat transports also improve by including assimilation sources, except near the equator. The ensemble spread in surface heat fluxes is dominated by turbulent fluxes (>40 W m-2 over the western boundary currents). The mean seasonal cycle is highly consistent, with variability between products mostly cooling caused by differences in surface winds imposed in ORA-IP.

  1. Increase of mycorrhizal C flux in Siberian temperate forests during the extreme drought of 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menyailo, Oleg; Matvienko, Anastasia; Cheng, Chih-Hsin

    2015-04-01

    Extreme climatic events have strong effect on the terrestrial carbon cycle. The soil C flux is the major uncertainty in the global C budget. Autotrophic (roots and mycorrhizae) component and heterotrophic microorganisms respond differently to altered precipitation and temperature, however their responses might vary in different ecosystems. We studied mycorrhizal, heterotrohic and total soil CO2 fluxes using in-growth mesh collars in forest soils under different tree species. The fluxes were measured between May and October of 2010-2012. The summer of 2012 was extremely hot and dry in Siberia, breaking records for the past 70 years of meteorological monitoring. The drought reduced soil surface CO2 flux for 20-30 % depending on the tree species. It is very surprising that the mycorrhizal flux in 2012 was under most species similar to the flux in a wetter years (2010-2011), under birch the mycorrhizal flux was even 1.5 times higher during the drought. Thus, decline in overall soil surface CO2 flux was mainly due to reduction of heterotrophic activities. Since the proportion of heterotrophic and autrophic activities is related to soil C sequestration, we conclude that under the most tree species in Siberia soil C will be accumulated during the drought. The most positive effect of the drought for soil carbon accrual is to be expected under birch.

  2. Anthropogenic heat flux estimation from space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chrysoulakis, Nektarios; Marconcini, Mattia; Gastellu-Etchegorry, Jean Philippe; Grimmond, C.S.B.; Feigenwinter, Christian; Lindberg, Fredrik; Frate, Del Fabio; Klostermann, Judith; Mitraka, Zina; Esch, Thomas; Landier, Lucas; Gabey, Andy; Parlow, Eberhard; Olofson, Frans

    2016-01-01

    H2020-Space project URBANFLUXES (URBan ANthrpogenic heat FLUX from Earth observation Satellites) investigates the potential of Copernicus Sentinels to retrieve anthropogenic heat flux, as a key component of the Urban Energy Budget (UEB). URBANFLUXES advances the current knowledge of the impacts o

  3. Anthropogenic heat flux estimation from space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chrysoulakis, Nektarios; Marconcini, Mattia; Gastellu-Etchegorry, Jean Philippe; Grimmond, C.S.B.; Feigenwinter, Christian; Lindberg, Fredrik; Frate, Del Fabio; Klostermann, Judith; Mitraka, Zina; Esch, Thomas; Landier, Lucas; Gabey, Andy; Parlow, Eberhard; Olofson, Frans

    2016-01-01

    H2020-Space project URBANFLUXES (URBan ANthrpogenic heat FLUX from Earth observation Satellites) investigates the potential of Copernicus Sentinels to retrieve anthropogenic heat flux, as a key component of the Urban Energy Budget (UEB). URBANFLUXES advances the current knowledge of the impacts o

  4. ANthropogenic heat FLUX estimation from Space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chrysoulakis, Nektarios; Marconcini, Mattia; Gastellu-Etchegorry, Jean Philippe; Grimmong, C.S.B.; Feigenwinter, Christian; Lindberg, Fredrik; Frate, Del Fabio; Klostermann, Judith; Mi, Zina; Esch, Thomas; Landier, Lucas; Gabey, Andy; Parlow, Eberhard; Olofson, Frans

    2017-01-01

    The H2020-Space project URBANFLUXES (URBan ANthrpogenic heat FLUX from Earth observation Satellites) investigates the potential of Copernicus Sentinels to retrieve anthropogenic heat flux, as a key component of the Urban Energy Budget (UEB). URBANFLUXES advances the current knowledge of the impac

  5. Flux Modulation in the Electrodynamic Loudspeaker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halvorsen, Morten; Tinggaard, Carsten; Agerkvist, Finn T.

    2015-01-01

    . Measurements of the generated AC flux modulation shows, that eddy currents are the main source to magnetic losses in form of phase lag and amplitude changes. Use of a copper cap shows a decrease in flux modulation amplitude at the expense of increased power losses. Finally, simulations show...

  6. Magnetic Flux Emergence in the Solar Photosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, M. C. M.; Schüssler, M.; Moreno-Insertis, F.

    2008-04-01

    The most prominent magnetic structures on the surface of the Sun are bipolar active regions. These magnetic complexes are comprised of a hierarchy of magnetic structures of different sizes, the largest of which are sunspots. Observations indicate that the appearance of active regions on the solar surface result from the emergence of bundles of magnetic flux from the underlying convection zone. We study the emergence process by means of 3D radiation MHD simulations. In the simulations, an initially buoyant magnetic flux tube is introduced into the near-surface layers of the convection zone. Subject to the buoyancy force, the flux tube rises towards the photosphere. Our simulations highlight the importance of magneto-convection on the evolution of the magnetic flux tube. The external convective flow field has an important influence on the emergence morphology of the emerging magnetic field. Depending on the initial properties of the magnetic flux tube (e.g. field strength, twist, entropy etc.), flux emergence may lead to a disturbance of the local granulation pattern. The observational signatures associated with emerging magnetic flux in our simulations are in qualitative and quantitative agreement with observational studies of emerging flux regions on the Sun.

  7. Effects of Crop Growth and Development on Land Surface Fluxes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Feng; XIE Zhenghui

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the Crop Estimation through Resource and Environment Synthesis model (CERES3.0) was coupled into the Biosphere-Atmosphere Transfer Scheme (BATS), which is called BATS_CERES, to represent interactions between the land surface and crop growth processes. The effects of crop growth and development on land surface processes were then studied based on numerical simulations using the land surface models. Six sensitivity experiments by BATS show that the land surface fluxes underwent substantial changes when the leaf area index was changed from 0 to 6 n2 m-2. Numerical experiments for Yucheng and Taoyuan stations reveal that the coupled model could capture not only the responses of crop growth and development to environmental conditions, but also the feedbacks to land surface processes.For quantitative evaluation of the effects of crop growth and development on surface fluxes in China, two numerical experiments were conducted over continental China: one by BATS_CERES and one by the original BATS. Comparison of the two runs shows decreases of leaf area index and fractional vegetation cover when incorporating dynamic crops in land surface simulation, which lead to less canopy interception, vegetation transpiration, total evapotranspiration, top soil moisture, and more soil evaporation, surface runoff, and root zone soil moisture. These changes are accompanied by decreasing latent heat flux and increasing sensible heat flux in the cropland region. In addition, the comparison between the simulations and observations proved that incorporating the crop growth and development process into the land surface model could reduce the systematic biases of the simulated leaf area index and top soil moisture, hence improve the simulation of land surface fluxes.

  8. Understanding alternative fluxes/effluxes through comparative metabolic pathway analysis of phylum actinobacteria using a simplified approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Mansi; Lal, Devi; Saxena, Anjali; Anand, Shailly; Kaur, Jasvinder; Kaur, Jaspreet; Lal, Rup

    2013-12-01

    Actinobacteria are known for their diverse metabolism and physiology. Some are dreadful human pathogens whereas some constitute the natural flora for human gut. Therefore, the understanding of metabolic pathways is a key feature for targeting the pathogenic bacteria without disturbing the symbiotic ones. A big challenge faced today is multiple drug resistance by Mycobacterium and other pathogens that utilize alternative fluxes/effluxes. With the availability of genome sequence, it is now feasible to conduct the comparative in silico analysis. Here we present a simplified approach to compare metabolic pathways so that the species specific enzyme may be traced and engineered for future therapeutics. The analyses of four key carbohydrate metabolic pathways, i.e., glycolysis, pyruvate metabolism, tri carboxylic acid cycle and pentose phosphate pathway suggest the presence of alternative fluxes. It was found that the upper pathway of glycolysis was highly variable in the actinobacterial genomes whereas lower glycolytic pathway was highly conserved. Likewise, pentose phosphate pathway was well conserved in contradiction to TCA cycle, which was found to be incomplete in majority of actinobacteria. The clustering based on presence and absence of genes of these metabolic pathways clearly revealed that members of different genera shared identical pathways and, therefore, provided an easy method to identify the metabolic similarities/differences between pathogenic and symbiotic organisms. The analyses could identify isoenzymes and some key enzymes that were found to be missing in some pathogenic actinobacteria. The present work defines a simple approach to explore the effluxes in four metabolic pathways within the phylum actinobacteria. The analysis clearly reflects that actinobacteria exhibit diverse routes for metabolizing substrates. The pathway comparison can help in finding the enzymes that can be used as drug targets for pathogens without effecting symbiotic organisms

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF THE CONTROL METHODOLOGY OF THE GIANT MAGNETOSTRICTIVE ACTUATOR BASED ON MAGNETIC FLUX DENSITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia Zhenyuan; Yang Xing; Shi Chun; Guo Dongming

    2003-01-01

    According to the principle of the magnetostriction generating mechanism, the control model of giant magnetostriction material based on magnetic field and the control method with magnetic flux density are developed. Furthermore, this control method is used to develop a giant magnetostrictive micro-displacement actuator (GMA) and its driving system. Two control methods whose control variables are current intensity and magnetic flux density are compared with each other by experimental studies. Finally, effective methods on improving the linearity and control precision of micro-displacement actuator and reducing the hysteresis based on the controlling magnetic flux density are obtained.

  10. Flux change in viscous laminar flow under oscillating boundary condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, R.; Mikada, H.; Goto, T.; Takekawa, J.

    2012-12-01

    of a horizontal porous tube. The vertical oscillation perpendicular to the flow direction could accelerate the flux. On the other hand, the horizontal oscillation parallel to the flow direction could either reduce or increase the flux depending on the amplitude of the oscillation. We also found that one of the important parameters in the variation of the flux would be the radius of the pore throat, i.e., the spatial scale of the model that has significant influence to the oscillating boundary condition.

  11. Autophagic flux is highly active in early mitosis and differentially regulated throughout the cell cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Zhiyuan; Ji, Xinmiao; Wang, Dongmei; Liu, Juanjuan; Zhang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Mitosis is a fast process that involves dramatic cellular remodeling and has a high energy demand. Whether autophagy is active or inactive during the early stages of mitosis in a naturally dividing cell is still debated. Here we aimed to use multiple assays to resolve this apparent discrepancy. Although the LC3 puncta number was reduced in mitosis, the four different cell lines we tested all have active autophagic flux in both interphase and mitosis. In addition, the autophagic flux was highl...

  12. Flux-weakening control methods for hybrid excitation synchronous motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingming Huang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The hybrid excitation synchronous motor (HESM, which aim at combining the advantages of permanent magnet motor and wound excitation motor, have the characteristics of low-speed high-torque hill climbing and wide speed range. Firstly, a new kind of HESM is presented in the paper, and its structure and mathematical model are illustrated. Then, based on a space voltage vector control, a novel flux-weakening method for speed adjustment in the high speed region is presented. The unique feature of the proposed control method is that the HESM driving system keeps the q-axis back-EMF components invariable during the flux-weakening operation process. Moreover, a copper loss minimization algorithm is adopted to reduce the copper loss of the HESM in the high speed region. Lastly, the proposed method is validated by the simulation and the experimental results.

  13. OpenFLUX: efficient modelling software for 13C-based metabolic flux analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nielsen Lars K

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The quantitative analysis of metabolic fluxes, i.e., in vivo activities of intracellular enzymes and pathways, provides key information on biological systems in systems biology and metabolic engineering. It is based on a comprehensive approach combining (i tracer cultivation on 13C substrates, (ii 13C labelling analysis by mass spectrometry and (iii mathematical modelling for experimental design, data processing, flux calculation and statistics. Whereas the cultivation and the analytical part is fairly advanced, a lack of appropriate modelling software solutions for all modelling aspects in flux studies is limiting the application of metabolic flux analysis. Results We have developed OpenFLUX as a user friendly, yet flexible software application for small and large scale 13C metabolic flux analysis. The application is based on the new Elementary Metabolite Unit (EMU framework, significantly enhancing computation speed for flux calculation. From simple notation of metabolic reaction networks defined in a spreadsheet, the OpenFLUX parser automatically generates MATLAB-readable metabolite and isotopomer balances, thus strongly facilitating model creation. The model can be used to perform experimental design, parameter estimation and sensitivity analysis either using the built-in gradient-based search or Monte Carlo algorithms or in user-defined algorithms. Exemplified for a microbial flux study with 71 reactions, 8 free flux parameters and mass isotopomer distribution of 10 metabolites, OpenFLUX allowed to automatically compile the EMU-based model from an Excel file containing metabolic reactions and carbon transfer mechanisms, showing it's user-friendliness. It reliably reproduced the published data and optimum flux distributions for the network under study were found quickly ( Conclusion We have developed a fast, accurate application to perform steady-state 13C metabolic flux analysis. OpenFLUX will strongly facilitate and

  14. Effects of the Process Parameters on Austenitic Stainless Steel by TIG-Flux Welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Heryueh HUANG; Shengwen SHYU; Kuanghung TSENG; Changpin CHOU

    2006-01-01

    The effects of the process parameters of TIG (tungsten inset gas)-flux welding on the welds morphology,angular distortion, ferrite content and hot cracking in austenitic stainless steel were investigated. Autogenous TIG welding process was applied to the type 304 stainless steel through a thin layer of activating flux to produce a bead on plate welded joint. TiO2, SiO2, Fe2O3, Cr2O3, ZnO and MnO2 were used as the activating fluxes. The experimental results indicated that the TIG-flux welding can increase the weld depth/width ratio and reduce the HAZ (heat affected zone) range, and therefore the angular distortion of the weldment can be reduced. It was also found that the retained ferrite content within the TIG-flux welds is increased, and has a beneficial effect in reducing hot cracking tendency for stainless steels of the austenitic type weld metals. A plasma column constriction increases the current density at the anode spot and then a substantial increase in penetration of the TIG-flux welds can be obtained.

  15. Monitoring Energy and Carbon Fluxes in a Mediterranean City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marras, S.; Sirca, C.; Bellucco, V.; Arca, A.; Ventura, A.; Duce, P.; Spano, D.

    2015-12-01

    Cities and the surrounding areas play an important role in altering and/or contributing to the natural processes of the Earth system. Specifically, cities affect the amount and partitioning of energy fluxes, as well as the carbon budget. It is recognized that increased greenhouse gases (GHG) concentration (mainly carbon dioxide) and air temperature values are typically experienced by cities, due to their structural and morphological characteristics and to human activities in urban areas (such as traffic, domestic heating/cooling, etc.). This will impact the urban climate. Reducing the impact of urbanization on climate requires the knowledge of the interactions and links between human activities and the land-atmosphere system. Each city has different characteristics and conditions, so planning strategies helping in reducing carbon emissions should take into account local features. In this contest, monitoring activities are crucial to study the exchange of energy, water, and carbon over the city, evaluate their impact on human livability, and understand the role of the city on climate. A research activity is carried out in the Mediterranean city of Sassari, in the North of Sardinia island (Italy) to monitor urban fluxes and distinguish the main sources of GHG emissions, which could help the municipality to identify possible actions for reducing them. An Eddy Covariance tower was set up in the city center to directly monitor energy and carbon exchanges at half-hourly time step. Even if the measurement period only consists of few months, the daily trend of urban fluxes clearly shows that traffic is one of the main carbon emission sources, while the contribution of vegetation in sequestering carbon is low due to the reduced amount of green areas in the measurements footprint (< 20%). In addition, differences between working days and holiday periods can be distinguished.

  16. Topology of magnetic flux ropes and formation of fossil flux transfer events and boundary layer plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, L. C.; Ma, Z. W.; Fu, Z. F.; Otto, A.

    1993-01-01

    A mechanism for the formation of fossil flux transfer events and the low-level boundary layer within the framework of multiple X-line reconnection is proposed. Attention is given to conditions for which the bulk of magnetic flux in a flux rope of finite extent has a simple magnetic topology, where the four possible connections of magnetic field lines are: IMF to MSP, MSP to IMF, IMF to IMF, and MSP to MSP. For a sufficient relative shift of the X lines, magnetic flux may enter a flux rope from the magnetosphere and exit into the magnetosphere. This process leads to the formation of magnetic flux ropes which contain a considerable amount of magnetosheath plasma on closed magnetospheric field lines. This process is discussed as a possible explanation for the formation of fossil flux transfer events in the magnetosphere and the formation of the low-latitude boundary layer.

  17. CO2 flux geothermometer for geothermal exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, M. C.; Rowland, J. V.; Chiodini, G.; Rissmann, C. F.; Bloomberg, S.; Fridriksson, T.; Oladottir, A. A.

    2017-09-01

    A new geothermometer (TCO2 Flux) is proposed based on soil diffuse CO2 flux and shallow temperature measurements made on areas of steam heated, thermally altered ground above active geothermal systems. This CO2 flux geothermometer is based on a previously reported CO2 geothermometer that was designed for use with fumarole analysis. The new geothermometer provides a valuable additional exploration tool for estimating subsurface temperatures in high-temperature geothermal systems. Mean TCO2 Flux estimates fall within the range of deep drill hole temperatures at Wairakei (New Zealand), Tauhara (New Zealand), Rotokawa (New Zealand), Ohaaki (New Zealand), Reykjanes (Iceland) and Copahue (Argentina). The spatial distribution of geothermometry estimates is consistent with the location of major upflow zones previously reported at the Wairakei and Rotokawa geothermal systems. TCO2 Flux was also evaluated at White Island (New Zealand) and Reporoa (New Zealand), where limited sub-surface data exists. Mode TCO2 Flux at White Island is high (320 °C), the highest of the systems considered in this study. However, the geothermometer relies on mineral-water equilibrium in neutral pH reservoir fluids, and would not be reliable in such an active and acidic environment. Mean TCO2 Flux at Reporoa (310 °C) is high, which indicates Reporoa has a separate upflow from the nearby Waiotapu geothermal system; an outflow from Waiotapu would not be expected to have such high temperature.

  18. Magnetic Flux Cancellation and Formation of Prominence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miley, George; Kim, Mun Song; Chon Nam, Sok; Kim, Kyong Chol

    2015-08-01

    Magnetic flux cancellation appears to be closely related to various kinds of solar activities such as flares, microflares/surges/jets, X-ray bright points, erupting mini-filaments, transition region explosive events, filament formation, filament activation and eruption, and coronal mass ejections. It is commonly believed that magnetic reconnections in the low atmosphere are responsible for canceling magnetic features, and magnetic fragments are observed to originate as bipoles. According to the Sweet-Parker type reconnection model, the inflow speed closely corresponds to the converging speed of each pole in a canceling magnetic feature and the rate of flux cancellation must be explained by the observed converging speed. As distinct from the corona, the efficiency of photospheric magnetic reconnection may be due to the small Cowling conductivity, instead of the Spitzer, of weakly ionized and magnetized plasma in the low atmosphere of the sun. Using the VAL-C atmospheric model and Cowling conductivity, we have computed the parameters describing Sweet-Parker type reconnecting current sheets in the plasma of the solar photosphere and chromosphere, and particularly for the phenomena of magnetic flux cancellation and dark filament formation which occurred on July 2, 1994 we have estimated the rate of flux cancellation, the inflow speed(the converging speed) and the upward mass flux to compare with the observation. The results show that when taking account of the Cowling conductivity in the low atmosphere, large flux cancellation rates(>1019Mxhr-1) in solar active regions are better explained than by the Spitzer conductivity-considered reconnection model. Particularly for the flux cancellation event on July 2, 1994, the inflow speed(0.26kms-1)is almost similar to the converging speed(0.22kms-1)and the upward mass flux(3.3X1012gs-1) in the model is sufficient for the large dark filament formation in a time of several hours through magnetic flux cancellation process.

  19. Flux Control in a Defense Pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana Is Robust to Environmental Perturbations and Controls Variation in Adaptive Traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson-Manning, Carrie F; Strock, Christopher F; Mitchell-Olds, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    The connections leading from genotype to fitness are not well understood, yet they are crucial for a diverse set of disciplines. Uncovering the general properties of biochemical pathways that influence ecologically important traits is an effective way to understand these connections. Enzyme flux control (or, control over pathway output) is one such pathway property. The flux-controlling enzyme in the antiherbivory aliphatic glucosinolate pathway of Arabidopsis thaliana has majority flux control under benign greenhouse conditions and has evidence of nonneutral evolution. However, it is unknown how patterns of flux control may change in different environments, or if insect herbivores respond to differences in pathway flux. We test this, first through genetic manipulation of the loci that code for the aliphatic glucosinolate pathway enzymes under a variety of environments (reduced water, reduced soil nutrients, leaf wounding and methyl jasmonate treatments), and find that flux control is consistently in the first enzyme of the pathway. We also find that a generalist herbivore, Trichoplusia ni, modifies its feeding behavior depending on the flux through the glucosinolate pathway. The influence over herbivore behavior combined with the consistency of flux control suggests that genes controlling flux might be repeatedly targeted by natural selection in diverse environments and species.

  20. Twisted versus braided magnetic flux ropes in coronal geometry. II. Comparative behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, C.; Yeates, A. R.

    2016-06-01

    Aims: Sigmoidal structures in the solar corona are commonly associated with magnetic flux ropes whose magnetic field lines are twisted about a mutual axis. Their dynamical evolution is well studied, with sufficient twisting leading to large-scale rotation (writhing) and vertical expansion, possibly leading to ejection. Here, we investigate the behaviour of flux ropes whose field lines have more complex entangled/braided configurations. Our hypothesis is that this internal structure will inhibit the large-scale morphological changes. Additionally, we investigate the influence of the background field within which the rope is embedded. Methods: A technique for generating tubular magnetic fields with arbitrary axial geometry and internal structure, introduced in part I of this study, provides the initial conditions for resistive-MHD simulations. The tubular fields are embedded in a linear force-free background, and we consider various internal structures for the tubular field, including both twisted and braided topologies. These embedded flux ropes are then evolved using a 3D MHD code. Results: Firstly, in a background where twisted flux ropes evolve through the expected non-linear writhing and vertical expansion, we find that flux ropes with sufficiently braided/entangled interiors show no such large-scale changes. Secondly, embedding a twisted flux rope in a background field with a sigmoidal inversion line leads to eventual reversal of the large-scale rotation. Thirdly, in some cases a braided flux rope splits due to reconnection into two twisted flux ropes of opposing chirality - a phenomenon previously observed in cylindrical configurations. Conclusions: Sufficiently complex entanglement of the magnetic field lines within a flux rope can suppress large-scale morphological changes of its axis, with magnetic energy reduced instead through reconnection and expansion. The structure of the background magnetic field can significantly affect the changing morphology of a

  1. Eutrophication effects on greenhouse gas fluxes from shallow-lake mesocosms override those of climate warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Thomas A; Audet, Joachim; Svenning, Jens-Christian; Lauridsen, Torben L; Søndergaard, Martin; Landkildehus, Frank; Larsen, Søren E; Jeppesen, Erik

    2015-12-01

    Fresh waters make a disproportionately large contribution to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, with shallow lakes being particular hot spots. Given their global prevalence, how GHG fluxes from shallow lakes are altered by climate change may have profound implications for the global carbon cycle. Empirical evidence for the temperature dependence of the processes controlling GHG production in natural systems is largely based on the correlation between seasonal temperature variation and seasonal change in GHG fluxes. However, ecosystem-level GHG fluxes could be influenced by factors, which while varying seasonally with temperature are actually either indirectly related (e.g. primary producer biomass) or largely unrelated to temperature, for instance nutrient loading. Here, we present results from the longest running shallow-lake mesocosm experiment which demonstrate that nutrient concentrations override temperature as a control of both the total and individual GHG flux. Furthermore, testing for temperature treatment effects at low and high nutrient levels separately showed only one, rather weak, positive effect of temperature (CH4 flux at high nutrients). In contrast, at low nutrients, the CO2 efflux was lower in the elevated temperature treatments, with no significant effect on CH4 or N2 O fluxes. Further analysis identified possible indirect effects of temperature treatment. For example, at low nutrient levels, increased macrophyte abundance was associated with significantly reduced fluxes of both CH4 and CO2 for both total annual flux and monthly observation data. As macrophyte abundance was positively related to temperature treatment, this suggests the possibility of indirect temperature effects, via macrophyte abundance, on CH4 and CO2 flux. These findings indicate that fluxes of GHGs from shallow lakes may be controlled more by factors indirectly related to temperature, in this case nutrient concentration and the abundance of primary producers. Thus, at ecosystem

  2. Wave heating in magnetic flux tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkofen, Wolfgang

    1990-01-01

    The bright chromosphere in the quiet sun is confined to magnetic elements (flux tubes), which are located in the interior of the supergranulation cells and within the network that surrounds the cells. The paper discusses the heating of the gas in the magnetic elements of the cell interior. These intranetwork flux tubes are closely associated with bright points, which are heated by large-amplitude compressive waves with periods near the acoustic cutoff that travel outward from the photosphere and dissipate their energy in the chromosphere. The energy flux of these long-period waves appears to be sufficient for the heating of the low and middle chromosphere in the bright points.

  3. Open flux in Saturn’s magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badman, Sarah V.; Jackman, Caitriona M.; Nichols, Jonathan D.; Clarke, John T.; Gérard, Jean-Claude

    2014-03-01

    We characterise the interaction between the solar wind and Saturn’s magnetosphere by evaluating the amount of ‘open’ magnetic flux connected to the solar wind. This is deduced from a large set of Hubble Space Telescope images of the ultraviolet aurora, using the poleward boundary of the main aurora as a proxy for the open-closed field line boundary in the ionosphere. The amount of open flux is found to be 10-50 GWb, with a mean of 35 GWb. The typical change in open flux between consecutive observations separated by 10-60 h is -5 or +7 GWb. These changes are a result of imbalance between open flux creation at the dayside magnetopause and its closure in the magnetotail. The 5 GWb typical decrease in open flux is consistent with in situ measurements of the flux transported following a reconnection event. Estimates of average, net reconnection rates are found to be typically a few tens of kV, with some extreme examples of unbalanced magnetopause or tail reconnection occurring at ∼300 kV. The range of values determined suggest that Saturn’s magnetosphere does not generally achieve a steady state between flux opening at the magnetopause and flux closure in the magnetotail. The percentage of magnetic flux which is open in Saturn’s magnetosphere is similar to that measured at the Earth (2-11%), but the typical percentage that is closed between observations is significantly lower (13% compared to 40-70%). Therefore, open flux is usually closed in smaller (few GWb) events in Saturn’s magnetosphere. The exception to this behaviour is large, rapid flux closure events which are associated with solar wind compressions. While the rates of flux opening and closure should be equal over long timescales, they are evidently different on shorter (up to tens of hours) timescales. The relative independence of the magnetopause and tail reconnection rates can be attributed to the long loading timescales required to transport open field lines into the tail.

  4. YAG laser welding with surface activating flux

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊丁; 张瑞华; 田中学; 中田一博; 牛尾诚夫

    2003-01-01

    YAG laser welding with surface activating flux has been investigated, and the influencing factors and mechanism are discussed. The results show that both surface activating flux and surface active element S have fantastic effects on the YAG laser weld shape, that is to obviously increase the weld penetration and D/W ratio in various welding conditions. The mechanism is thought to be the change of weld pool surface tension temperature coefficient, thus, the change of fluid flow pattern in weld pool due to the flux.

  5. Metamaterial anisotropic flux concentrators and magnetic arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørk, Rasmus; Smith, Anders; Bahl, Christian R.H.

    2013-01-01

    A metamaterial magnetic flux concentrator is investigated in detail in combination with a Halbach cylinder of infinite length. A general analytical solution to the field is determined and the magnetic figure of merit is determined for a Halbach cylinder with a flux concentrator. It is shown...... that an ideal flux concentrator will not change the figure of merit of a given magnet design, while the non-ideal will always lower it. The geometric parameters producing maximum figure of merit, i.e., the most efficient devices, are determined. The force and torque between two concentric Halbach cylinders...

  6. Controlled decoherence of floating flux qubits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji Ying-Hua; Xu Lin

    2010-01-01

    In Born-Markov approximation, this paper calculates the energy relaxation time T1 and the decoherence time T2 of a floating flux qubit by solving the set of Bloch-Redfield equations. It shows that there are two main factors influencing the floating flux qubits: coupling capacitor in the circuit and the environment resistor. It also discusses how to improvethe quantum coherence time of a qubit. Through shunt connecting/series connecting inductive elements, an inductive environment resistor is obtained and further the reactance component of the environment resistor is improved, which is beneficial to the enhancement of decoherence time of floating flux qubits.

  7. Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System (ECOR) Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, DR

    2011-01-31

    The eddy correlation (ECOR) flux measurement system provides in situ, half-hour measurements of the surface turbulent fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, latent heat, and carbon dioxide (CO2) (and methane at one Southern Great Plains extended facility (SGP EF) and the North Slope of Alaska Central Facility (NSA CF). The fluxes are obtained with the eddy covariance technique, which involves correlation of the vertical wind component with the horizontal wind component, the air temperature, the water vapor density, and the CO2 concentration.

  8. Warped K\\"ahler potentials and fluxes

    CERN Document Server

    Martucci, Luca

    2016-01-01

    The four-dimensional effective theory for type IIB warped flux compactifications proposed in [1] is completed by taking into account the backreaction of the K\\"ahler moduli on the three-form fluxes. The only required modification consists in a flux-dependent contribution to the chiral fields parametrising the K\\"ahler moduli. The resulting supersymmetric effective theory satisfies the no-scale condition and consistently combines previous partial results present in the literature. Similar results hold for M-theory warped compactifications on Calabi-Yau fourfolds, whose effective field theory and K\\"ahler potential are also discussed.

  9. A time-varying magnetic flux concentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibret, B.; Premaratne, M.; Lewis, P. M.; Thomson, R.; Fitzgerald, P. B.

    2016-08-01

    It is known that diverse technological applications require the use of focused magnetic fields. This has driven the quest for controlling the magnetic field. Recently, the principles in transformation optics and metamaterials have allowed the realization of practical static magnetic flux concentrators. Extending such progress, here, we propose a time-varying magnetic flux concentrator cylindrical shell that uses electric conductors and ferromagnetic materials to guide magnetic flux to its center. Its performance is discussed based on finite-element simulation results. Our proposed design has potential applications in magnetic sensors, medical devices, wireless power transfer, and near-field wireless communications.

  10. Flux compactifications, gauge algebras and De Sitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dibitetto, Giuseppe, E-mail: g.dibitetto@rug.n [Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands); Linares, Roman, E-mail: lirr@xanum.uam.m [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana Iztapalapa, San Rafael Atlixco 186, C.P. 09340, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Roest, Diederik, E-mail: d.roest@rug.n [Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands)

    2010-04-26

    The introduction of (non-)geometric fluxes allows for N=1 moduli stabilisation in a De Sitter vacuum. The aim of this Letter is to assess to what extent this is true in N=4 compactifications. First we identify the correct gauge algebra in terms of gauge and (non-)geometric fluxes. We then show that this algebra does not lead to any of the known gaugings with De Sitter solutions. In particular, the gaugings that one obtains from flux compactifications involve non-semi-simple algebras, while the known gaugings with De Sitter solutions consist of direct products of (semi-)simple algebras.

  11. A framework to utilize turbulent flux measurements for mesoscale models and remote sensing applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Babel

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Meteorologically measured fluxes of energy and matter between the surface and the atmosphere originate from a source area of certain extent, located in the upwind sector of the device. The spatial representativeness of such measurements is strongly influenced by the heterogeneity of the landscape. The footprint concept is capable of linking observed data with spatial heterogeneity. This study aims at upscaling eddy covariance derived fluxes to a grid size of 1 km edge length, which is typical for mesoscale models or low resolution remote sensing data.

    Here an upscaling strategy is presented, utilizing footprint modelling and SVAT modelling as well as observations from a target land-use area. The general idea of this scheme is to model fluxes from adjacent land-use types and combine them with the measured flux data to yield a grid representative flux according to the land-use distribution within the grid cell. The performance of the upscaling routine is evaluated with real datasets, which are considered to be land-use specific fluxes in a grid cell. The measurements above rye and maize fields stem from the LITFASS experiment 2003 in Lindenberg, Germany and the respective modelled timeseries were derived by the SVAT model SEWAB. Contributions from each land-use type to the observations are estimated using a forward lagrangian stochastic model. A representation error is defined as the error in flux estimates made when accepting the measurements unchanged as grid representative flux and ignoring flux contributions from other land-use types within the respective grid cell.

    Results show that this representation error can be reduced up to 56 % when applying the spatial integration. This shows the potential for further application of this strategy, although the absolute differences between flux observations from rye and maize were so small, that the spatial integration would be rejected in a real situation. Corresponding thresholds for

  12. Interactive effects of elevated CO2 and drought on nocturnal water fluxes in Eucalyptus saligna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeppel, Melanie J B; Lewis, James D; Medlyn, Belinda; Barton, Craig V M; Duursma, Remko A; Eamus, Derek; Adams, Mark A; Phillips, Nathan; Ellsworth, David S; Forster, Michael A; Tissue, David T

    2011-09-01

    Nocturnal water flux has been observed in trees under a variety of environmental conditions and can be a significant contributor to diel canopy water flux. Elevated atmospheric CO(2) (elevated [CO(2)]) can have an important effect on day-time plant water fluxes, but it is not known whether it also affects nocturnal water fluxes. We examined the effects of elevated [CO(2)] on nocturnal water flux of field-grown Eucalyptus saligna trees using sap flux through the tree stem expressed on a sapwood area (J(s)) and leaf area (E(t)) basis. After 19 months growth under well-watered conditions, drought was imposed by withholding water for 5 months in the summer, ending with a rain event that restored soil moisture. Reductions in J(s) and E(t) were observed during the severe drought period in the dry treatment under elevated [CO(2)], but not during moderate- and post-drought periods. Elevated [CO(2)] affected night-time sap flux density which included the stem recharge period, called 'total night flux' (19:00 to 05:00, J(s,r)), but not during the post-recharge period, which primarily consisted of canopy transpiration (23:00 to 05:00, J(s,c)). Elevated [CO(2)] wet (EW) trees exhibited higher J(s,r) than ambient [CO(2)] wet trees (AW) indicating greater water flux in elevated [CO(2)] under well-watered conditions. However, under drought conditions, elevated [CO(2)] dry (ED) trees exhibited significantly lower J(s,r) than ambient [CO(2)] dry trees (AD), indicating less water flux during stem recharge under elevated [CO(2)]. J(s,c) did not differ between ambient and elevated [CO(2)]. Vapour pressure deficit (D) was clearly the major influence on night-time sap flux. D was positively correlated with J(s,r) and had its greatest impact on J(s,r) at high D in ambient [CO(2)]. Our results suggest that elevated [CO(2)] may reduce night-time water flux in E. saligna when soil water content is low and D is high. While elevated [CO(2)] affected J(s,r), it did not affect day-time water

  13. Seasonal variability of turbulent heat fluxes in the tropical Atlantic Ocean based on WHOI flux product

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The mean seasonal variability of turbulent heat fluxes in the tropical Atlantic Ocean is examined using the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) flux product. The most turbulent heat fluxes occur during winter seasons in the two hemispheres, whose centers are located at 10°~20°N and 5°~15°S respectively. In climatological ITCZ, the turbulent heat fluxes are the greatest from June to August, and in equatorial cold tongue the turbulent heat fluxes are the greatest from March to May. Seasonal variability of sensible heat flux is smaller than that of latent heat flux and mainly is dominated by the variations of air-sea temperature difference. In the region with larger climatological mean wind speed (air-sea humidity difference), the variations of air-sea humidity difference (wind speed) dominate the variability of latent heat flux. The characteristics of turbulent heat flux yielded from theory analysis and WHOI dataset is consistent in physics which turns out that WHOI's flux data are pretty reliable in the tropical Atlantic Ocean.

  14. Reconciling heat-flux and salt-flux estimates at a melting ice-ocean interface

    CERN Document Server

    Keitzl, Thomas; Notz, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    The ratio of heat and salt flux is employed in ice-ocean models to represent ice-ocean interactions. In this study, this flux ratio is determined from direct numerical simulations of free convection beneath a melting, horizontal, smooth ice-ocean interface. We find that the flux ratio at the interface is three times as large as previously assessed based on turbulent-flux measurements in the field. As a consequence, interface salinities and melt rates are overestimated by up to 40\\% if they are based on the three-equation formulation. We also find that the interface flux ratio depends only very weakly on the far-field conditions of the flow. Lastly, our simulations indicate that estimates of the interface flux ratio based on direct measurements of the turbulent fluxes will be difficult because at the interface the diffusivities alone determine the mixing and the flux ratio varies with depth. As an alternative, we present a consistent evaluation of the flux ratio based on the total heat and salt fluxes across t...

  15. Localized fast neutron flux enhancement for damage experiments in a research reactor; Accroissement local du flux rapide pour des experiences de dommages dans un reacteur de recherche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malouch, F

    2003-06-01

    In irradiation experiments on materials in the core of the Osiris reactor (CEA-Saclay) we seek to increase damage in irradiated samples and to reduce the duration of their stay in the core. Damage is essentially caused by fast neutrons (E {>=} 1 MeV); we have therefore pursued the possibility of a localized increase of their level in an irradiation experiment by using a flux converter device made up of fissile material arranged according to a suitable geometry that allows the converter to receive experiments. We have studied several parameters that are influential in the increase of fast neutron flux within the converter. We have also considered the problem of the converter's cooling in the core and its effect on the operation of the reactor. We have carried out a specific neutron calculation scheme based on the modular 2D-transport code APOLLO2 using a two-level transport method. Experimental validation of the flux calculation scheme was carried out in the ISIS reactor, the mock-up of OSIRIS, by optimizing the loading of fuel elements in the core. The experimental results show that the neutron calculation scheme computes the fluxes in close agreement with the measurements especially the fast flux. This study allows us to master the essential physical parameters needed for the design of a flux converter in an MTR reactor. (author)

  16. Reduced mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase activity has a strong effect on photorespiratory metabolism as revealed by 13C labelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindén, Pernilla; Keech, Olivier; Stenlund, Hans; Gardeström, Per; Moritz, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (mMDH) catalyses the interconversion of malate and oxaloacetate (OAA) in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Its activity is important for redox control of the mitochondrial matrix, through which it may participate in regulation of TCA cycle turnover. In Arabidopsis, there are two isoforms of mMDH. Here, we investigated to which extent the lack of the major isoform, mMDH1 accounting for about 60% of the activity, affected leaf metabolism. In air, rosettes of mmdh1 plants were only slightly smaller than wild type plants although the fresh weight was decreased by about 50%. In low CO2 the difference was much bigger, with mutant plants accumulating only 14% of fresh weight as compared to wild type. To investigate the metabolic background to the differences in growth, we developed a (13)CO2 labelling method, using a custom-built chamber that enabled simultaneous treatment of sets of plants under controlled conditions. The metabolic profiles were analysed by gas- and liquid- chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry to investigate the metabolic adjustments between wild type and mmdh1 The genotypes responded similarly to high CO2 treatment both with respect to metabolite pools and (13)C incorporation during a 2-h treatment. However, under low CO2 several metabolites differed between the two genotypes and, interestingly most of these were closely associated with photorespiration. We found that while the glycine/serine ratio increased, a concomitant altered glutamine/glutamate/α-ketoglutarate relation occurred. Taken together, our results indicate that adequate mMDH activity is essential to shuttle reductants out from the mitochondria to support the photorespiratory flux, and strengthen the idea that photorespiration is tightly intertwined with peripheral metabolic reactions.

  17. Study of decoherence in a system of superconducting flux-qubits interacting with an ensemble of electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reboiro, M., E-mail: reboiro@fisica.unlp.edu.ar [IFLP, CONICET-Department of Physics, University of La Plata, c.c. 67 1900, La Plata (Argentina); Civitarese, O., E-mail: osvaldo.civitarese@fisica.unlp.edu.ar [IFLP, CONICET-Department of Physics, University of La Plata, c.c. 67 1900, La Plata (Argentina); Ramírez, R. [IFLP, CONICET-Department of Mathematics, University of La Plata (Argentina)

    2017-03-15

    The degree of coherence in a hybrid system composed of superconducting flux-qubits and an electron ensemble is analysed. Both, the interactions among the electrons and among the superconducting flux-qubits are taken into account. The time evolution of the hybrid system is solved exactly, and discussed in terms of the reduced density matrix of each subsystem. It is seen that the inclusion of a line width, for the electrons and for the superconducting flux-qubits, influences the pattern of spin-squeezing and the coherence of the superconducting flux qubits. - Highlights: • The degree of coherence in a hybrid system, composed of superconducting flux qubits and an electron ensemble, is analysed. • The time evolution of the hybrid system is solved exactly and discussed in terms of the reduced density matrix of each subsystem. • It is shown that the initial state of the system evolves to a stationary squeezed state.

  18. 400 Area/Fast Flux Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The 400 Area at Hanford is home primarily to the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), a DOE-owned, formerly operating, 400-megawatt (thermal) liquid-metal (sodium)-cooled...

  19. Fractional flux quanta in superconducting solenoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá de Melo, C. A. R.

    1996-03-01

    The quantization of flux quanta in superconductors is revisited and analyzed in a new topology. The topology is that of a superconducting wire that winds N times around a fixed axis and has its end connected back to its beginning, thus producing an N-loop short circuited solenoid. In this case, fractional flux quanta can be measured through the center of the solenoid, provided that its cross-section radius is small enough. The Little-Parks experiment for an identical topology is discussed. The period of oscillation of the transition temperature of the wire is found to vary as 1/N in units of flux Φ relative to the flux quantum Φ0.

  20. Obtaining evapotranspiration and surface energy fluxes with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... energy fluxes with remotely sensed data to improve agricultural water management. ... Remote sensing based energy balance models are presently most suited for ... concern the validation of the used model for spatial distribution analysis of

  1. Muon Fluxes From Dark Matter Annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Erkoca, Arif Emre; Sarcevic, Ina

    2009-01-01

    We calculate the muon flux from annihilation of the dark matter in the core of the Sun, in the core of the Earth and from cosmic diffuse neutrinos produced in dark matter annihilation in the halos. We consider model-independent direct neutrino production and secondary neutrino production from the decay of taus produced in the annihilation of dark matter. We illustrate how muon energy distribution from dark matter annihilation has a very different shape than muon flux from atmospheric neutrinos. We consider both the upward muon flux, when muons are created in the rock below the detector, and the contained flux when muons are created in the (ice) detector. We contrast our results to the ones previously obtained in the literature, illustrating the importance of properly treating muon propagation and energy loss. We comment on neutrino flavor dependence and their detection.

  2. Observations on fluxes near anti-branes

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen-Maldonado, Diego; Van Riet, Thomas; Vercnocke, Bert

    2015-01-01

    We revisit necessary conditions for gluing local (anti)-D3 throats into flux throats with opposite charge. These consistency conditions typically reveal singularities in the 3-form fluxes whose meaning is being debated. In this note we prove, under well-motivated assumptions, that singularities remain even when the anti-D3 branes are puffed up into spherical NS5 branes. It does not seem possible to ascribe the singular flux to the self-energy of the 5-branes but rather to the singular clumping of the background fluxes. We furthermore comment on the gluing conditions at finite temperature and point out that one specific assumption of a recent no-go theorem can be broken if anti-branes are to polarise into spherical NS5 branes at zero temperature. Our first result, however, casts some doubt on whether this gap in the no-go theorem can be successfully employed to construct finite temperature solutions.

  3. On the Taxonomy of Flux Vacua

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giryavets, Alexander

    2004-04-25

    We investigate several predictions about the properties of IIB flux vacua on Calabi-Yau orientifolds, by constructing and characterizing a very large set of vacua in a specific example, an orientifold of the Calabi-Yau hypersurface in WP{sub 1,1,1,1,4}{sup 4}. We find support for the prediction of Ashok and Douglas that the density of vacua on moduli space is governed by det(-R-{omega}) where R and {omega} are curvature and Kaehler forms on the moduli space. The conifold point {psi} = 1 on moduli space therefore serves as an attractor, with a significant fraction of the flux vacua contained in a small neighborhood surrounding {psi} = 1. We also study the functional dependence of the number of flux vacua on the D3 charge in the fluxes, finding simple power law growth.

  4. Cool and hot flux ropes, their helicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nindos, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    We will review recent indirect and direct evidence for the existence of magnetic flux ropes in the solar atmosphere. Magnetic flux ropes may appear as S-shaped or reverse S-shaped (sigmoidal) structures in regions that are likely to erupt, and may also show in nonlinear force-free field extrapolations that use data from photospheric vector magnetograms as boundary condition. The availability of high sensitivity data recorded with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution in hot EUV wavelengths by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) has revealed the existence of coherent structures identified as hot flux ropes. In this presentation, we will review the properties of both cool and hot flux ropes with an emphasis on the frequency of their occurrence in large flares and on their magnetic helicity content.

  5. A Brazilian network of carbon flux stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberti, Débora R.; Acevedo, Otávio C.; Moraes, Osvaldo L. L.

    2012-05-01

    First Brasflux Workshop; Santa Maria, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, 14-15 November 2011 Last November, 33 researchers participated in a workshop to establish Brasflux, the Brazilian network of carbon flux stations, with the objective of integrating previous efforts and planning for the future. Among the participants were those leading ongoing flux observation projects and others planning to establish flux stations in the near future. International scientists also participated to share the experiences gained with other networks. The need to properly characterize terrestrial ecosystems for their roles in the global carbon, water, and energy budgets has motivated the implementation of hundreds of micrometeorological research sites throughout the world in recent years. The eddy covariance (EC) technique for turbulent flux determination is the preferred method to provide integral information on ecosystematmosphere exchanges. Integrating the observations regionally and globally has proven to be an effective approach to maximizing the usefulness of this technique for carbon cycle studies at multiple scales.

  6. Maintenance metabolism and carbon fluxes in Bacillus species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Decasper Seraina

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Selection of an appropriate host organism is crucial for the economic success of biotechnological processes. A generally important selection criterion is a low maintenance energy metabolism to reduce non-productive consumption of substrate. We here investigated, whether various bacilli that are closely related to Bacillus subtilis are potential riboflavin production hosts with low maintenance metabolism. Results While B. subtilis exhibited indeed the highest maintenance energy coefficient, B. licheniformis and B. amyloliquefaciens exhibited only statistically insignificantly reduced maintenance metabolism. Both B. pumilus and B. subtilis (natto exhibited irregular growth patterns under glucose limitation such that the maintenance metabolism could not be determined. The sole exception with significantly reduced maintenance energy requirements was the B. licheniformis strain T380B. The frequently used spo0A mutation significantly increased the maintenance metabolism of B. subtilis. At the level of 13C-detected intracellular fluxes, all investigated bacilli exhibited a significant flux through the pentose phosphate pathway, a prerequisite for efficient riboflavin production. Different from all other species, B. subtilis featured high respiratory tricarboxylic acid cycle fluxes in batch and chemostat cultures. In particular under glucose-limited conditions, this led to significant excess formation of NADPH of B. subtilis, while anabolic consumption was rather balanced with catabolic NADPH formation in the other bacilli. Conclusion Despite its successful commercial production of riboflavin, B. subtilis does not seem to be the optimal cell factory from a bioenergetic point of view. The best choice of the investigated strains is the sporulation-deficient B. licheniformis T380B strain. Beside a low maintenance energy coefficient, this strain grows robustly under different conditions and exhibits only moderate acetate overflow, hence

  7. Neutron flux measurements around PLT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zankl, G.; Strachan, J.D.; Lewis, R.; Pettus, W.; Schmotzer, J.

    1980-09-01

    Using Indium activation foils, the toroidal and poloidal neutron emission patterns were determined for PLT plasmas which include ICRF and neutral beam heating. The activities produced the /sup 115/In (n,n') /sup 115m/In reaction were determined by counting the 336 keV ..gamma.. line of the /sup 115m/In decay. This activation cross section falls just below 2.5 MeV so that the influence of scattered neutrons of degraded energies is reduced. From the magnitude of the activity, the absolute calibration of the PLT fusion neutron emission is obtained with less than or equal to 40% accuracy.

  8. On the Tensorial Nature of Fluxes in Continuous Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Vijay Kumar; Ramkrishna, Doraiswami

    1982-01-01

    Argues that mass and energy fluxes in a fluid are vectors. Topics include the stress tensor, theorem for tensor fields, mass flux as a vector, stress as a second order tensor, and energy flux as a tensor. (SK)

  9. Magnetic flux generator for balanced membrane loudspeaker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehder, Jörg; Rombach, Pirmin; Hansen, Ole

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports the development of a magnetic flux generator with an application in a hearing aid loudspeaker produced in microsystem technology (MST). The technology plans for two different designs for the magnetic flux generator utilizing a softmagnetic substrate or electroplated NiCoFe as c......CoFe as core material are presented and the production and characterization of four different mono- and double-layer planar coil types are reported....

  10. Anisotropic flux pinning in high Tc superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koleśnik, S.; Igalson, J.; Skośkiewicz, T.; Szymczak, R.; Baran, M.; Pytel, K.; Pytel, B.

    1995-02-01

    In this paper we present a comparison of the results of FC magnetization measurements on several PbSr(Y,Ca)CuO crystals representing various levels of flux pinning. The pinning centers in our crystals have been set up during the crystal growth process or introduced by neutron irradiation. Some possible explanations of the observed effects, including surface barrier, flux-center distribution and sample-shape effects, are discussed.

  11. Solar Intranetwork Magnetic Elements: bipolar flux appearance

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Jingxiu; Zhou, Guiping; Jin, Chunlan; Li, Hui

    2012-01-01

    The current study aims to quantify characteristic features of bipolar flux appearance of solar intranetwork (IN) magnetic elements. To attack such a problem, we use the Narrow-band Filter Imager (NFI) magnetograms from the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) on board \\emph{Hinode}; these data are from quiet and an enhanced network areas. Cluster emergence of mixed polarities and IN ephemeral regions (ERs) are the most conspicuous forms of bipolar flux appearance within the network. Each of the clus...

  12. Recurrence Analysis of Eddy Covariance Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Holger; Flach, Milan; Foken, Thomas; Hauhs, Michael

    2015-04-01

    The eddy covariance (EC) method is one key method to quantify fluxes in biogeochemical cycles in general, and carbon and energy transport across the vegetation-atmosphere boundary layer in particular. EC data from the worldwide net of flux towers (Fluxnet) have also been used to validate biogeochemical models. The high resolution data are usually obtained at 20 Hz sampling rate but are affected by missing values and other restrictions. In this contribution, we investigate the nonlinear dynamics of EC fluxes using Recurrence Analysis (RA). High resolution data from the site DE-Bay (Waldstein-Weidenbrunnen) and fluxes calculated at half-hourly resolution from eight locations (part of the La Thuile dataset) provide a set of very long time series to analyze. After careful quality assessment and Fluxnet standard gapfilling pretreatment, we calculate properties and indicators of the recurrent structure based both on Recurrence Plots as well as Recurrence Networks. Time series of RA measures obtained from windows moving along the time axis are presented. Their interpretation is guided by three different questions: (1) Is RA able to discern periods where the (atmospheric) conditions are particularly suitable to obtain reliable EC fluxes? (2) Is RA capable to detect dynamical transitions (different behavior) beyond those obvious from visual inspection? (3) Does RA contribute to an understanding of the nonlinear synchronization between EC fluxes and atmospheric parameters, which is crucial for both improving carbon flux models as well for reliable interpolation of gaps? (4) Is RA able to recommend an optimal time resolution for measuring EC data and for analyzing EC fluxes? (5) Is it possible to detect non-trivial periodicities with a global RA? We will demonstrate that the answers to all five questions is affirmative, and that RA provides insights into EC dynamics not easily obtained otherwise.

  13. Magnetic flux biasing of magnetostrictive sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhangxian; Dapino, Marcelo J.

    2017-05-01

    The performance of magnetostrictive materials, especially those with high initial magnetic permeability and associated low magnetic reluctance, is sensitive to not just the amount of magnetic bias but also how the bias is applied. Terfenol-D and Galfenol have been characterized under constant magnetic field and constant magnetomotive force, which require active control. The application of a magnetic flux bias utilizing permanent magnets allows for robust magnetostrictive systems that require no active control. However, this biasing configuration has not been thoroughly investigated. This study presents flux density versus stress major loops of Terfenol-D and Galfenol at various magnetic flux biases. A new piezomagnetic coefficient {d}33φ is defined as the locally-averaged slope of flux density versus stress. Considering the materials alone, the maximum {d}33φ is 18.42 T GPa-1 and 19.53 T GPa-1 for Terfenol-D and Galfenol, respectively. Compared with the peak piezomagnetic coefficient {d}33* measured under controlled magnetic fields, the piezomagnetic coefficient {d}33φ is 26% and 74% smaller for Terfenol-D and Galfenol, respectively. This study shows that adding parallel magnetic flux paths to low-reluctance magnetostrictive components can partially compensate for the performance loss. With a low carbon steel flux path in parallel to the Galfenol specimen, the maximum {d}33φ increased to 28.33 T GPa-1 corresponding to a 45% improvement compared with the case without a flux path. Due to its low magnetic permeability, Terfenol-D does not benefit from the addition of a parallel flux path.

  14. ASTRA Spectrophotometer: Reduction and Flux Calibrations

    CERN Document Server

    Smalley, B; Adelman, S J; Smalley, Barry; Gulliver, Austin F.; Adelman, Saul J.

    2006-01-01

    The ASTRA Cassegrain Spectrophotometer and its automated 0.5-m telescope at Fairborn Observatory in Arizona will produce a large quantity of high precision stellar flux distributions. A separate paper (Adelman et al. 2007) presented a review of the design criteria for the system and an overview of its operation. This paper discusses the techniques used in the data reduction to final flux calibrations.

  15. Magnetic Flux Emergence on Different Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagenaar, M.; Cheung, M.

    2009-12-01

    Magnetic flux emerges on the Sun on many different scales, from weak intranetwork to network concentrations and (ephemeral) active regions. Methods previously developed to recognize regions of magnetic emergence on MDI Full Disk magnetograms fail when applied to Hinode/SOT Stokes maps: the resolution is so much higher that simple bipoles on MDI are observed as collections of fragments. We present a new method for the automatic detection and characterization of flux emergence on a range of scales.

  16. Nitrogen trace gas fluxes from a semiarid subtropical savanna under woody legume encroachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soper, Fiona M.; Boutton, Thomas W.; Groffman, Peter M.; Sparks, Jed P.

    2016-05-01

    Savanna ecosystems are a major source of nitrogen (N) trace gases that influence air quality and climate. These systems are experiencing widespread encroachment by woody plants, frequently associated with large increases in soil N, with no consensus on implications for trace gas emissions. We investigated the impact of encroachment by N-fixing tree Prosopis glandulosa on total reactive N gas flux (Nt = NO + N2O + NOy + NH3) from south Texas savanna soils over 2 years. Contrary to expectations, upland Prosopis groves did not have greater Nt fluxes than adjacent unencroached grasslands. However, abiotic conditions (temperature, rainfall, and topography) were strong drivers. Emissions from moist, low-lying Prosopis playas were up to 3 times higher than from Prosopis uplands. Though NO dominated emissions, NH3 and NOy (non-NO oxidized N) comprised 12-16% of the total summer N flux (up to 7.9 µg N m-2 h-1). Flux responses to soil wetting were temperature dependent for NO, NH3, and NOy: a 15 mm rainfall event increased flux 3-fold to 22-fold after 24 h in summer but had no effect in winter. Repeated soil wetting reduced N flux responses, indicating substrate depletion as a likely control. Rapid (soils suggested that abiotic chemodenitrification contributes to pulse emissions. We conclude that temperature and wetting dynamics, rather than encroachment, are primary drivers of N flux from these upland savannas, with implications for future emission patterns under altered precipitation regimes.

  17. Flux control-based design of furfural-resistance strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for lignocellulosic biorefinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unrean, Pornkamol

    2017-04-01

    We have previously developed a dynamic flux balance analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for elucidation of genome-wide flux response to furfural perturbation (Unrean and Franzen, Biotechnol J 10(8):1248-1258, 2015). Herein, the dynamic flux distributions were analyzed by flux control analysis to identify target overexpressed genes for improved yeast robustness against furfural. The flux control coefficient (FCC) identified overexpressing isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH1), a rate-controlling flux for ethanol fermentation, and dicarboxylate carrier (DIC1), a limiting flux for cell growth, as keys of furfural-resistance phenotype. Consistent with the model prediction, strain characterization showed 1.2- and 2.0-fold improvement in ethanol synthesis and furfural detoxification rates, respectively, by IDH1 overexpressed mutant compared to the control. DIC1 overexpressed mutant grew at 1.3-fold faster and reduced furfural at 1.4-fold faster than the control under the furfural challenge. This study hence demonstrated the FCC-based approach as an effective tool for guiding the design of robust yeast strains.

  18. Assessing FPAR Source and Parameter Optimization Scheme in Application of a Diagnostic Carbon Flux Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, D P; Ritts, W D; Wharton, S; Thomas, C; Monson, R; Black, T A

    2009-02-26

    The combination of satellite remote sensing and carbon cycle models provides an opportunity for regional to global scale monitoring of terrestrial gross primary production, ecosystem respiration, and net ecosystem production. FPAR (the fraction of photosynthetically active radiation absorbed by the plant canopy) is a critical input to diagnostic models, however little is known about the relative effectiveness of FPAR products from different satellite sensors nor about the sensitivity of flux estimates to different parameterization approaches. In this study, we used multiyear observations of carbon flux at four eddy covariance flux tower sites within the conifer biome to evaluate these factors. FPAR products from the MODIS and SeaWiFS sensors, and the effects of single site vs. cross-site parameter optimization were tested with the CFLUX model. The SeaWiFs FPAR product showed greater dynamic range across sites and resulted in slightly reduced flux estimation errors relative to the MODIS product when using cross-site optimization. With site-specific parameter optimization, the flux model was effective in capturing seasonal and interannual variation in the carbon fluxes at these sites. The cross-site prediction errors were lower when using parameters from a cross-site optimization compared to parameter sets from optimization at single sites. These results support the practice of multisite optimization within a biome for parameterization of diagnostic carbon flux models.

  19. Impact of temporal resolution on estimating capillary RBC-flux with optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baoqiang; Wang, Hui; Fu, Buyin; Wang, Ruopeng; Sakadžić, Sava; Boas, David A.

    2017-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been used to measure capillary red blood cell (RBC) flux. However, one important technical issue is that the accuracy of this method is subject to the temporal resolution (Δt) of the repeated RBC-passage B-scans. A ceiling effect arises due to an insufficient Δt limiting the maximum RBC-flux that can be measured. In this letter, we first present simulations demonstrating that Δt=1.5 ms permits measuring RBC-flux up to 150 RBCs/s with an underestimation of 9%. The simulations further show that measurements with Δt=3 and 4.5 ms provide relatively less accurate estimates for typical physiological fluxes. We provide experimental data confirming the simulation results showing that reduced temporal resolution (i.e., a longer Δt) results in an underestimation of mean flux and compresses the distribution of measured fluxes, which potentially confounds physiological interpretation of the results. The results also apply to RBC-passage measurements made with confocal and two-photon microscopy for estimating capillary RBC-flux.

  20. Use of barium-strontium carbonatite for flux welding and surfacing of mining machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryukov, R. E.; Kozyrev, N. A.; Usoltsev, A. A.

    2017-09-01

    The results of application of barium-strontium carbonatite for modifying and refining iron-carbon alloys, used for welding and surfacing in ore mining and smelting industry, are generalized. The technology of manufacturing a flux additive containing 70 % of barium-strontium carbonatite and 30 % of liquid glass is proposed. Several compositions of welding fluxes based on silicomanganese slag were tested. The flux additive was introduced in an amount of 1, 3, 5 %. Technological features of welding with the application of the examined fluxes are determined. X-ray spectral analysis of the chemical composition of examined fluxes, slag crusts and weld metal was carried out, as well as metallographic investigations of welded joints. The principal possibility of applying barium-strontium carbonatite as a refining and gas-protective additive for welding fluxes is shown. The use of barium-strontium carbonatite reduces the contamination of the weld seam with nonmetallic inclusions: non-deforming silicates, spot oxides and brittle silicates, and increases the desulfurizing capacity of welding fluxes.

  1. Ecosystem fluxes of hydrogen: a comparison of flux-gradient methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. K. Meredith

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding of biosphere-atmosphere exchange has been considerably enhanced by eddy-covariance measurements, however there remain many trace gases, such as molecular hydrogen (H2, for which there are no suitable analytical methods to measure their fluxes by eddy covariance. In such cases, flux-gradient methods can be used to calculate ecosystem-scale fluxes from vertical concentration gradients. The budget of atmospheric H2 is poorly constrained by the limited available observations, thus the ability to quantify and characterize the sources and sinks of H2 by flux-gradient methods in various ecosystems is important. We developed an approach to make nonintrusive, automated measurements of ecosystem-scale H2 fluxes both above and below the forest canopy at the Harvard Forest in Petersham, MA for over a year. We used three flux-gradient methods to calculate the fluxes: two similarity methods that do not rely on a micrometeorological determination of the eddy diffusivity, K, based on (1 trace gases or (2 sensible heat and one flux-gradient method that (3 parameterizes K. We quantitatively assessed the flux-gradient methods on CO2 and H2O by comparison to their simultaneous independent flux measurements via eddy covariance and chambers. All three flux-gradient methods performed well in certain locations, seasons, and times of day, and the best methods were trace gas similarity above and K parameterization below the canopy. Sensible heat similarity required several independent measurements and the results were more variable, in part because those data were only available in the winter when heat fluxes and temperature gradients were small and difficult to measure. Biases were often observed between flux-gradient methods and the independent flux measurements, including at least a 26% difference in nocturnal eddy-derived Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE and soil chamber measurements. All flux-gradient methods used to calculate above and below canopy H2

  2. Metabolic flux analysis on arachidonic acid fermentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Mingjie; HUANG He; ZHANG Kun; YAN Jie; GAO Zhen

    2007-01-01

    The analysis of flux distributions in metabolic networks has become an important approach for understanding the fermentation characteristics of the process.A model of metabolic flux analysis of arachidonic acid (AA) synthesis in Mortierella alpina ME-1 was established and carbon flux distributions were estimated in different fermentation phases with different concentrations of N-source.During the exponential,decelerating and stationary phase,carbon fluxes to AA were 3.28%,8.80% and 6.97%,respectively,with sufficient N-source broth based on the flux of glucose uptake,and those were increased to 3.95%,19.21% and 39.29%,respectively,by regulating the shifts of carbon fluxes via fermentation with limited N-source broth and adding 0.05%NaNO3 at 96 h.Eventually AA yield was increased from 1.3 to 3.5 g.L-1.These results suggest a way to improve AA fermentation,that is,fermentation with limited N-source broth and adding low concentration N-source during the stationary phase.

  3. Cosmic string formation by flux trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Blanco-Pillado, Jose J; Vilenkin, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    We study the formation of cosmic strings by confining a stochastic magnetic field into flux tubes in a numerical simulation. We use overdamped evolution in a potential that is minimized when the flux through each face in the simulation lattice is a multiple of the fundamental flux quantum. When the typical number of flux quanta through a correlation-length-sized region is initially about 1, we find a string network similar to that generated by the Kibble-Zurek mechanism. With larger initial flux, the loop distribution and the Brownian shape of the infinite strings remain unchanged, but the fraction of length in infinite strings is increased. A 2D slice of the network exhibits bundles of strings pointing in the same direction, as in earlier 2D simulations. We find, however, that strings belonging to the same bundle do not stay together in 3D for much longer than the correlation length. As the initial flux per correlation length is decreased, there is a point at which infinite strings disappear, as in the Haged...

  4. Vertical eddy heat fluxes from model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Peter H.; Yao, Mao-Sung

    1991-01-01

    Vertical eddy fluxes of heat are calculated from simulations with a variety of climate models, ranging from three-dimensional GCMs to a one-dimensional radiative-convective model. The models' total eddy flux in the lower troposphere is found to agree well with Hantel's analysis from observations, but in the mid and upper troposphere the models' values are systematically 30 percent to 50 percent smaller than Hantel's. The models nevertheless give very good results for the global temperature profile, and the reason for the discrepancy is unclear. The model results show that the manner in which the vertical eddy flux is carried is very sensitive to the parameterization of moist convection. When a moist adiabatic adjustment scheme with a critical value for the relative humidity of 100 percent is used, the vertical transports by large-scale eddies and small-scale convection on a global basis are equal: but when a penetrative convection scheme is used, the large-scale flux on a global basis is only about one-fifth to one-fourth the small-scale flux. Comparison of the model results with observations indicates that the results with the latter scheme are more realistic. However, even in this case, in mid and high latitudes the large and small-scale vertical eddy fluxes of heat are comparable in magnitude above the planetary boundary layer.

  5. Turbulent fluxes by "Conditional Eddy Sampling"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebicke, Lukas

    2015-04-01

    Turbulent flux measurements are key to understanding ecosystem scale energy and matter exchange, including atmospheric trace gases. While the eddy covariance approach has evolved as an invaluable tool to quantify fluxes of e.g. CO2 and H2O continuously, it is limited to very few atmospheric constituents for which sufficiently fast analyzers exist. High instrument cost, lack of field-readiness or high power consumption (e.g. many recent laser-based systems requiring strong vacuum) further impair application to other tracers. Alternative micrometeorological approaches such as conditional sampling might overcome major limitations. Although the idea of eddy accumulation has already been proposed by Desjardin in 1972 (Desjardin, 1977), at the time it could not be realized for trace gases. Major simplifications by Businger and Oncley (1990) lead to it's widespread application as 'Relaxed Eddy Accumulation' (REA). However, those simplifications (flux gradient similarity with constant flow rate sampling irrespective of vertical wind velocity and introduction of a deadband around zero vertical wind velocity) have degraded eddy accumulation to an indirect method, introducing issues of scalar similarity and often lack of suitable scalar flux proxies. Here we present a real implementation of a true eddy accumulation system according to the original concept. Key to our approach, which we call 'Conditional Eddy Sampling' (CES), is the mathematical formulation of conditional sampling in it's true form of a direct eddy flux measurement paired with a performant real implementation. Dedicated hardware controlled by near-real-time software allows full signal recovery at 10 or 20 Hz, very fast valve switching, instant vertical wind velocity proportional flow rate control, virtually no deadband and adaptive power management. Demonstrated system performance often exceeds requirements for flux measurements by orders of magnitude. The system's exceptionally low power consumption is ideal

  6. Characterizing In Situ Uranium and Groundwater Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, J.; Newman, M. A.; Stucker, V.; Peacock, A.; Ranville, J.; Cabaniss, S.; Hatfield, K.; Annable, M. D.; Klammler, H.; Perminova, I. V.

    2010-12-01

    The goal of this project is to develop a new sensor that incorporates the field-tested concepts of the passive flux meter to provide direct in situ measures of uranium and groundwater fluxes. The sensor uses two sorbents and resident tracers to measure uranium flux and specific discharge directly; but, sensor principles and design should also apply to fluxes of other radionuclides. Flux measurements will assist with obtaining field-scale quantification of subsurface processes affecting uranium transport (e.g., advection) and transformation (e.g., uranium attenuation) and further advance conceptual and computational models for field scale simulations. Project efforts will expand our current understanding of how field-scale spatial variations in uranium fluxes and those for salient electron donor/acceptors, and groundwater are coupled to spatial variations in measured microbial biomass/community composition, effective field-scale uranium mass balances, attenuation, and stability. The new sensor uses an anion exchange resin to measure uranium fluxes and activated carbon with resident tracers to measure water fluxes. Several anion-exchange resins including Dowex 21K and 21K XLT, Purolite A500, and Lewatit S6328 were tested as sorbents for capturing uranium on the sensor and Lewatit S6328 was determined to be the most effective over the widest pH range. Four branched alcohols proved useful as resident tracers for measuring groundwater flows using activated carbon for both laboratory and field conditions. The flux sensor was redesigned to prevent the discharge of tracers to the environment, and the new design was tested in laboratory box aquifers and the field. Geochemical modeling of equilibrium speciation using Visual Minteq and an up-to-date thermodynamic data base suggested Ca-tricarbonato-uranyl complexes predominate under field conditions, while calculated uranyl ion activities were sensitive to changes in pH, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and alkaline earth

  7. OzFlux data: network integration from collection to curation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, Peter; Cleverly, James; McHugh, Ian; van Gorsel, Eva; Ewenz, Cacilia; Beringer, Jason

    2017-06-01

    Measurement of the exchange of energy and mass between the surface and the atmospheric boundary-layer by the eddy covariance technique has undergone great change in the last 2 decades. Early studies of these exchanges were confined to brief field campaigns in carefully controlled conditions followed by months of data analysis. Current practice is to run tower-based eddy covariance systems continuously over several years due to the need for continuous monitoring as part of a global effort to develop local-, regional-, continental- and global-scale budgets of carbon, water and energy. Efficient methods of processing the increased quantities of data are needed to maximise the time available for analysis and interpretation. Standardised methods are needed to remove differences in data processing as possible contributors to observed spatial variability. Furthermore, public availability of these data sets assists with undertaking global research efforts. The OzFlux data path has been developed (i) to provide a standard set of quality control and post-processing tools across the network, thereby facilitating inter-site integration and spatial comparisons; (ii) to increase the time available to researchers for analysis and interpretation by reducing the time spent collecting and processing data; (iii) to propagate both data and metadata to the final product; and (iv) to facilitate the use of the OzFlux data by adopting a standard file format and making the data available from web-based portals. Discovery of the OzFlux data set is facilitated through incorporation in FLUXNET data syntheses and the publication of collection metadata via the RIF-CS format. This paper serves two purposes. The first is to describe the data sets, along with their quality control and post-processing, for the other papers of this Special Issue. The second is to provide an example of one solution to the data collection and curation challenges that are encountered by similar flux tower networks

  8. Latent and sensible heat fluxes overestimated and net heat flux underestimated in Lake Victoria

    CERN Document Server

    Verburg, Piet

    2014-01-01

    Cozar et al. (2012) used remotely-sensed data to link phytoplankton growth to the net heat flux in both the northern and southern parts of Lake Victoria. However, the latent and sensible heat fluxes were overestimated by ~26% by assuming a constant air density of 1.3 kg m-3. As a result, the net heat flux was underestimated, bringing into question conclusions regarding the convective circulation.

  9. Research Advances of Effects of Land Use Pattern on Greenhouse Gas Fluxes in Grassland Ecosystem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng; Leixing; Chen; Kelong; Wang; Shiping

    2014-01-01

    The grassland is the largest terrestrial ecosystem in China,and greenhouse gas fluxes such as CO2,CH4 and N2O play an important role in the global climate change. The differences in grazing,cultivation and management measures will affect greenhouse gas emissions in grassland ecosystem. Studies suggest that reclamation will lead to increased CO2 fluxes,and fertilization will lead to increased N2 O fluxes; no grazing in summer can reduce greenhouse gas emissions,but impacts of grazing and management measures on greenhouse gas fluxes have not yet reached the same conclusion. The different results may be related to local natural conditions,management measures and research methods. Future research should be focused on unity and standardization in these areas,making the results scientific and comparable,and finally providing the basis for emission reduction of greenhouse gases in grassland ecosystem.

  10. Gas-Kinetic Theory Based Flux Splitting Method for Ideal Magnetohydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kun

    1998-01-01

    A gas-kinetic solver is developed for the ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equations. The new scheme is based on the direct splitting of the flux function of the MHD equations with the inclusion of "particle" collisions in the transport process. Consequently, the artificial dissipation in the new scheme is much reduced in comparison with the MHD Flux Vector Splitting Scheme. At the same time, the new scheme is compared with the well-developed Roe-type MHD solver. It is concluded that the kinetic MHD scheme is more robust and efficient than the Roe- type method, and the accuracy is competitive. In this paper the general principle of splitting the macroscopic flux function based on the gas-kinetic theory is presented. The flux construction strategy may shed some light on the possible modification of AUSM- and CUSP-type schemes for the compressible Euler equations, as well as to the development of new schemes for a non-strictly hyperbolic system.

  11. A Method to improve line flux and redshift measurements with narrowband filters

    CERN Document Server

    Zabl, J; Møller, P; Milvang-Jensen, B; Nilsson, K K; Fynbo, J P U; Fèvre, O Le; Tasca, L A M

    2016-01-01

    High redshift star-forming galaxies are discovered routinely through a flux excess in narrowband filters (NB) caused by an emission line. In most cases, the width of such filters is broad compared to typical line widths, and the throughput of the filters varies substantially within the bandpass. This leads to substantial uncertainties in redshifts and fluxes that are derived from the observations with one specific NB. In this work we demonstrate that the uncertainty in measured line parameters can be sharply reduced by using repeated observations of the same target field with filters that have slightly different transmittance curves. Such data are routinely collected with some large field imaging cameras that use multiple detectors and a separate filter for each of the detectors. An example is the NB118 data from ESO's VISTA InfraRed CAMera (VIRCAM). We carefully developed and characterized this method to determine more accurate redshift and line flux estimates from the ratio of apparent fluxes measured from ...

  12. Estimating effects from trapped magnetic fluxes in superconducting magnetic levitation measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masakazu Nakanishi

    2008-01-01

    Superconducting magnetic levitation measurement is one of the most promising approaches to define mass standard based on the fundamental physical constants. However, the present system has unknown factors causing error larger than 50 ppm. We examined the effects of magnetic fluxes trapped in the superconducting coil and the superconducting floating body. When fluxes were trapped in either coil or floating body, their effects were able to be cancelled by reversing polarities of current and magnetic field, as had been believed. However, fluxes trapped in both coil and body induced an attractive force between them and caused error. In order to reduce the fluxes, the coil and the floating body should be cooled in low magnetic field in magnetic and electromagnetic shields.

  13. A Basic Study of Controlled Closing for Transformers with Residual Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutada, Hiroyuki; Hirai, Takashi; Kohyama, Haruhiko; Ito, Hiroki

    Energizing of transformers generates high amplitude inrush currents that reduce power quality and can potentially damage the transformers. Controlled closing for transformers taking account of the residual flux is studied to eliminate the inrush current. Since the residual flux must be precisely acquired before controlled closing to determine the optimum instant for energizing, a new method of estimating the residual flux by using the measured transformer voltage is proposed. The optimum closing target taking account of the dielectric and mechanical characteristics of a gas circuit breaker is also studied. The verification using a single phase transformer showed that the maximum error of the estimated residual flux was less than 10%, and the controlled closing using the proposed method eliminated the inrush current to less than 15% of random closing.

  14. Effects of CeF3 on properties of self-shielded flux cored wire

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Ping; Tian Zhiling; Pan Chuan; Xue Jin

    2006-01-01

    Effects of CeF3 on properties of self-shielded flux cored wire including welding process, inclusions in weld metal and mechanical properties are systematically studied. Welding smoke and spatter are reduced with the addition of CeF3. The main non-metallic inclusions in weld metal are AlN and Al2 O3. CeF3 can refine non-metallic inclusions and reduce the amount of large size inclusions, which is attributed to the inclusion floating behavior during the solidification of weld metal. The low temperature impact toughness is improved by adding suitable amount of CeF3 in the flux.

  15. Flux pinning in superconductors. 2. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsushita, Teruo [Kyushu Institute of Technology, Iizuka, Fukuoka (Japan). Dept. of Computer Science and Electronics

    2014-04-01

    Ideal for graduate students studying superconductivity and experts alike. Written by a researcher with more than 30 years experience in the field. All chapters are completely revised. The book covers the flux pinning mechanisms and properties and the electromagnetic phenomena caused by the flux pinning common for metallic, high-Tc and MgB2 superconductors. The condensation energy interaction known for normal precipitates or grain boundaries and the kinetic energy interaction proposed for artificial Nb pins in Nb-Ti, etc., are introduced for the pinning mechanism. Summation theories to derive the critical current density are discussed in detail. Irreversible magnetization and AC loss caused by the flux pinning are also discussed. The loss originally stems from the ohmic dissipation of normal electrons in the normal core driven by the electric field induced by the flux motion. The readers will learn why the resultant loss is of hysteresis type in spite of such mechanism. The influence of the flux pinning on the vortex phase diagram in high Tc superconductors is discussed, and the dependencies of the irreversibility field are also described on other quantities such as anisotropy of superconductor, specimen size and electric field strength. Recent developments of critical current properties in various high-Tc superconductors and MgB2 are introduced. Other topics are: singularity in the case of transport current in a parallel magnetic field such as deviation from the Josephson relation, reversible flux motion inside pinning potentials which causes deviation from the critical state model prediction, the concept of the minimization of energy dissipation in the flux pinning phenomena which gives the basis for the critical state model, etc. Significant reduction in the AC loss in AC wires with very fine filaments originates from the reversible flux motion which is dominant in the two-dimensional pinning. The concept of minimum energy dissipation explains also the behavior

  16. Numerical Simulations of a Flux Rope Ejection

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P. Pagano; D. H. Mackay; S. Poedts

    2015-03-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the most violent phenomena observed on the Sun. One of the most successful models to explain CMEs is the flux rope ejection model, where a magnetic flux rope is expelled from the solar corona after a long phase along which the flux rope stays in equilibrium while magnetic energy is being accumulated. However, still many questions are outstanding on the detailed mechanism of the ejection and observations continuously provide new data to interpret and put in the context. Currently, extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO) are providing new insights into the early phase of CME evolution. In particular, observations show the ejection of magnetic flux ropes from the solar corona and how they evolve into CMEs. However, these observations are difficult to interpret in terms of basic physical mechanisms and quantities, thus, we need to compare equivalent quantities to test and improve our models. In our work, we intend to bridge the gap between models and observations with our model of flux rope ejection where we consistently describe the full life span of a flux rope from its formation to ejection. This is done by coupling the global non-linear force-free model (GNLFFF) built to describe the slow low- formation phase, with a full MHD simulation run with the software MPI-AMRVAC, suitable to describe the fast MHD evolution of the flux rope ejection that happens in a heterogeneous regime. We also explore the parameter space to identify the conditions upon which the ejection is favoured (gravity stratification and magnetic field intensity) and we produce synthesised AIA observations (171 Å and 211 Å). To carry this out, we run 3D MHD simulation in spherical coordinates where we include the role of thermal conduction and radiative losses, both of which are important for determining the temperature distribution of the solar corona during a CME. Our model of flux

  17. An automatic flux chamber for investigating gas flux at water - air interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duc, N. T.; Silverstein, S.; Lundmark, L.; Reyier, H.; Crill, P. M.; Bastviken, D.

    2011-12-01

    Aquatic ecosystems are major sources of greenhouse gases (GHG) and representative measurements of GHG fluxes from aquatic ecosystems to the atmosphere are vital in climate related biogeochemistry. One of the most important fluxes, ebullition (bubble flux) of methane (CH4) is episodic, with large fluxes during short time periods. To properly capture such fluxes long term measurement approaches are necessary which is labor intensive for manual flux chamber based methods, or require expensive equipment with e.g. eddy correlation methods. An inexpensive and easily mobile automatic flux chamber for long-term measurements has been designed to approach these drawbacks. This device includes a flux chamber, with a controller/datalogger, valves, a pump, a 12 V battery and a solar cell. Sensors used so far record CH4 concentration in the chamber headspace, temperature in water and air, barometric pressure. Other sensors for e.g. CO2 and weather variables can be attached. The unit can be programmed to measure in situ accumulation of gas in the chamber and also to collect gas samples in an array of sample bottles for subsequent analysis in the laboratory. Simultaneous deployment of many such units represent a cost efficient and easily managed solution for local long term flux monitoring.

  18. An introduction to the Australian and New Zealand flux tower network – OzFlux

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    OzFlux is the regional Australian and New Zealand flux tower network that aims to provide a continental-scale national research facility to monitor and assess trends, and improve predictions, of Australia’s terrestrial biosphere and climate. This paper describes the evolution, design and current status of OzFlux as well as an overview of data processing. We analyse measurements from the Australian portion of the OzFlux network and found that the response of Australian biomes to climate was ...

  19. An introduction to the Australian and New Zealand flux tower network – OzFlux

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    OzFlux is the regional Australian and New Zealand flux tower network that aims to provide a continental-scale national research facility to monitor and assess trends, and improve predictions, of Australia's terrestrial biosphere and climate. This paper describes the evolution, design, and current status of OzFlux as well as provides an overview of data processing. We analyse measurements from all sites within the Australian portion of the OzFlux network and two sites from New Zealand. The res...

  20. The SeaFlux Turbulent Flux Dataset Version 1.0 Documentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayson, Carol Anne; Roberts, J. Brent; Bogdanoff, Alec S.

    2012-01-01

    Under the auspices of the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) Global Energy and Water cycle EXperiment (GEWEX) Data and Assessment Panel (GDAP), the SeaFlux Project was created to investigate producing a high-resolution satellite-based dataset of surface turbulent fluxes over the global oceans. The most current release of the SeaFlux product is Version 1.0; this represents the initial release of turbulent surface heat fluxes, associated near-surface variables including a diurnally varying sea surface temperature.