WorldWideScience

Sample records for reduced scale metal

  1. Test of electrodialytic upgrading of MSWI APC residue in pilot scale: focus on reduced metal and salt leaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkelund, Gunvor Marie; Jensen, Pernille Erland; Villumsen, Arne

    2010-01-01

    In this study a pilot plant for electrodialytic treatment of municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) air pollution control (APC) residue was tested and proposed as a treatment method which can lead to reuse of this otherwise hazardous waste. The pilot plant was developed based on a design...... was carbonated by reaction with CO2 under moist conditions prior to electrodialytic treatment. The carbonation alone reduced the leaching of some heavy metals. However, it was not sufficient to reduce the heavy metal or salt leaching to meet the Danish Category 3 guideline levels for waste material reuse...... and could not stand as a treatment method alone. Leaching of both heavy metals and salts were significantly reduced by the electrodialytic treatment for both the raw and carbonated APC residue. In the electrodialytically treated carbonated APC residue only Cr exceeded the Category 3 levels while...

  2. Using proteomic data to assess a genome-scale "in silico" model of metal reducing bacteria in the simulation of field-scale uranium bioremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabusaki, S.; Fang, Y.; Wilkins, M. J.; Long, P.; Rifle IFRC Science Team

    2011-12-01

    A series of field experiments in a shallow alluvial aquifer at a former uranium mill tailings site have demonstrated that indigenous bacteria can be stimulated with acetate to catalyze the conversion of hexavalent uranium in a groundwater plume to immobile solid-associated uranium in the +4 oxidation state. While this bioreduction of uranium has been shown to lower groundwater concentrations below actionable standards, a viable remediation methodology will need a mechanistic, predictive and quantitative understanding of the microbially-mediated reactions that catalyze the reduction of uranium in the context of site-specific processes, properties, and conditions. At the Rifle IFRC site, we are investigating the impacts on uranium behavior of pulsed acetate amendment, acetate-oxidizing iron and sulfate reducing bacteria, seasonal water table variation, spatially-variable physical (hydraulic conductivity, porosity) and geochemical (reactive surface area) material properties. The simulation of three-dimensional, variably saturated flow and biogeochemical reactive transport during a uranium bioremediation field experiment includes a genome-scale in silico model of Geobacter sp. to represent the Fe(III) terminal electron accepting process (TEAP). The Geobacter in silico model of cell-scale physiological metabolic pathways is comprised of hundreds of intra-cellular and environmental exchange reactions. One advantage of this approach is that the TEAP reaction stoichiometry and rate are now functions of the metabolic status of the microorganism. The linkage of in silico model reactions to specific Geobacter proteins has enabled the use of groundwater proteomic analyses to assess the accuracy of the model under evolving hydrologic and biogeochemical conditions. In this case, the largest predicted fluxes through in silico model reactions generally correspond to high abundances of proteins linked to those reactions (e.g. the condensation reaction catalyzed by the protein

  3. Hidden scale invariance of metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hummel, Felix; Kresse, Georg; Dyre, Jeppe C.

    2015-01-01

    available. Hidden scale invariance is demonstrated in detail for magnesium by showing invariance of structure and dynamics. Computed melting curves of period three metals follow curves with invariance (isomorphs). The experimental structure factor of magnesium is predicted by assuming scale invariant...... of metals making the condensed part of the thermodynamic phase diagram effectively one dimensional with respect to structure and dynamics. DFT computed density scaling exponents, related to the Grüneisen parameter, are in good agreement with experimental values for the 16 elements where reliable data were......Density functional theory (DFT) calculations of 58 liquid elements at their triple point show that most metals exhibit near proportionality between the thermal fluctuations of the virial and the potential energy in the isochoric ensemble. This demonstrates a general “hidden” scale invariance...

  4. [Hybrid interpolation for CT metal artifact reducing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao-e; Li, Chan-juan; Chen, Wu-fan

    2009-01-01

    Numerous interpolation-based methods have been described for reducing metal artifacts in CT images, but due to the limit of the interpolation methods, interpolation alone often fails to meet the clinical demands. In this paper, we describe the use of quartic polynomial interpolation in reconstruction of the images of the metal implant followed by linear interpolation to eliminate the streaks. The two interpolation methods are combined according to their given weights to achieve good results.

  5. Large Scale Metal Additive Techniques Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nycz, Andrzej [ORNL; Adediran, Adeola I [ORNL; Noakes, Mark W [ORNL; Love, Lonnie J [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    In recent years additive manufacturing made long strides toward becoming a main stream production technology. Particularly strong progress has been made in large-scale polymer deposition. However, large scale metal additive has not yet reached parity with large scale polymer. This paper is a review study of the metal additive techniques in the context of building large structures. Current commercial devices are capable of printing metal parts on the order of several cubic feet compared to hundreds of cubic feet for the polymer side. In order to follow the polymer progress path several factors are considered: potential to scale, economy, environment friendliness, material properties, feedstock availability, robustness of the process, quality and accuracy, potential for defects, and post processing as well as potential applications. This paper focuses on current state of art of large scale metal additive technology with a focus on expanding the geometric limits.

  6. Determination of heavy metals in fish scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Nováková

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The outcomes from measurements of amount of selected elements in the fish scales of common carp are presented. Concentrations in the scales were identified and differences between storage of heavy metals in exposed and covered part of scale were studied. The spatial distribution of elements on the fish scale´s surface layer was measured by Laser Ablation–Inductively Coupled Plasma–Mass Spectrometry (LA–ICP–MS. The average amount of elements in the dissolved scales was quantified by ICP–MS. The fine structure of fish scales was visualized by phase–contrast Synchrotron radiation (SR microradiography.

  7. Bacteriophage Infection of Model Metal Reducing Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, K. A.; Bender, K. S.; Gandhi, K.; Coates, J. D.

    2008-12-01

    Microbially-mediated metal reduction plays a significant role controlling contaminant mobility in aqueous, soil, and sedimentary environments. From among environmentally relevant microorganisms mediating metal reduction, Geobacter spp. have been identified as predominant metal-reducing bacteria under acetate- oxidizing conditions. Due to the significance of these bacteria in environmental systems, it is necessary to understand factors influencing their metabolic physiology. Examination of the annotated finished genome sequence of G. sulfurreducens PCA, G. uraniumreducens Rf4, G. metallireduceans GS-15 as well as a draft genome sequence of Geobacter sp. FRC-32 have identified gene sequences of putative bacteriophage origin. Presence of these sequences indicates that these bacteria are susceptible to phage infection. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primer sets designed tested for the presence of 12 of 25 annotated phage-like sequences in G. sulfurreducens PCA and 9 of 17 phage-like sequences in FRC- 32. The following genes were successfully amplified in G. sulfurreducens PCA: prophage type transcription regulator, phage-induced endonuclease, phage tail sheath, 2 phage tail proteins, phage protein D, phage base plate protein, phage-related DNA polymerase, integrase, phage transcriptional regulator, and Cro-like transcription regulator. Nine of the following sequences were present in FRC-32: 4 separate phage- related proteins, phage-related tail component, viron core protein, phage Mu protein, phage base plate, and phage tail sheath. In addition to the bioinformatics evidence, incubation of G. sulfurreducens PCA with 1 μg mL-1 mytomycin C (mutagen stimulating prophage induction) during mid-log phase resulted in significant cell lysis relative to cultures that remained unamended. Cell lysis was concurrent with an increase in viral like particles enumerated using epifluorescent microscopy. In addition, samples collected following this lytic event (~44hours) were

  8. Role of Bioadsorbents in Reducing Toxic Metals

    OpenAIRE

    Blessy Baby Mathew; Monisha Jaishankar; Vinai George Biju; Krishnamurthy Nideghatta Beeregowda,

    2016-01-01

    Industrialization and urbanization have led to the release of increasing amounts of heavy metals into the environment. Metal ion contamination of drinking water and waste water is a serious ongoing problem especially with high toxic metals such as lead and cadmium and less toxic metals such as copper and zinc. Several biological materials have attracted many researchers and scientists as they offer both cheap and effective removal of heavy metals from waste water. Therefore it is urgent to st...

  9. FGK Benchmark Stars A new metallicity scale

    CERN Document Server

    Jofre, Paula; Soubiran, C; Blanco-Cuaresma, S; Pancino, E; Bergemann, M; Cantat-Gaudin, T; Hernandez, J I Gonzalez; Hill, V; Lardo, C; de Laverny, P; Lind, K; Magrini, L; Masseron, T; Montes, D; Mucciarelli, A; Nordlander, T; Recio-Blanco, A; Sobeck, J; Sordo, R; Sousa, S G; Tabernero, H; Vallenari, A; Van Eck, S; Worley, C C

    2013-01-01

    In the era of large spectroscopic surveys of stars of the Milky Way, atmospheric parameter pipelines require reference stars to evaluate and homogenize their values. We provide a new metallicity scale for the FGK benchmark stars based on their corresponding fundamental effective temperature and surface gravity. This was done by analyzing homogeneously with up to seven different methods a spectral library of benchmark stars. Although our direct aim was to provide a reference metallicity to be used by the Gaia-ESO Survey, the fundamental effective temperatures and surface gravities of benchmark stars of Heiter et al. 2013 (in prep) and their metallicities obtained in this work can also be used as reference parameters for other ongoing surveys, such as Gaia, HERMES, RAVE, APOGEE and LAMOST.

  10. Combustion of Metals in Reduced-Gravity and Extraterrestrial Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbud-Madrid, A.; Omaly, P.; Branch, M. C.; Daily, J. W.

    1999-01-01

    As a result of the ongoing exploration of Mars and the several unmanned and manned missions planned for the future, increased attention has been given to the use of the natural resources of the planet for rocket propellant production and energy generation. Since the atmosphere of Mars consists of approximately 95% carbon dioxide (CO2), this gas is the resource of choice to be employed for these purposes. Unfortunately, CO2 is also a final product in most combustion reactions, requiring further processing to extract useful reactants such as carbon monoxide (CO), oxygen (O2), and hydrocarbons. An exception is the use Of CO2 as an oxidizer reacting directly with metal fuel. Since many metals burn vigorously with CO2, these may be used as an energy source and as propellants for an ascent/descent vehicle in sample-collection missions on Mars. In response to NASA's Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) Enterprise to search for appropriate in-situ resource utilization techniques, this investigation will study the burning characteristics of promising metal/CO2 combinations. The use of reduced gravity is essential to eliminate the intrusive buoyant flows that plague the high-temperature metal reactions, to remove the destructive effect of gravity on the shape of molten metal samples, and to study the influence of radiative heat transfer from solid oxides undisturbed by natural convection. In studies with large metal specimens, the burning process is invariably influenced by strong convective currents that accelerate the reaction and shorten the burning times. Although these currents are nearly absent from small burning particles, the high emissivity of the flames, rapid reaction, small length scales, and intermittent explosions make the gathering of any useful information on burning rates and flame structure very difficult. This investigation has the ultimate goal of providing a careful probing of flame structure and dynamics by taking advantage of large, free

  11. Role of Bioadsorbents in Reducing Toxic Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blessy Baby Mathew

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Industrialization and urbanization have led to the release of increasing amounts of heavy metals into the environment. Metal ion contamination of drinking water and waste water is a serious ongoing problem especially with high toxic metals such as lead and cadmium and less toxic metals such as copper and zinc. Several biological materials have attracted many researchers and scientists as they offer both cheap and effective removal of heavy metals from waste water. Therefore it is urgent to study and explore all possible sources of agrobased inexpensive adsorbents for their feasibility in the removal of heavy metals. The objective was to study inexpensive adsorbents like various agricultural wastes such as sugarcane bagasse, rice husk, oil palm shell, coconut shell, and coconut husk in eliminating heavy metals from waste water and their utilization possibilities based on our research and literature survey. It also shows the significance of developing and evaluating new potential biosorbents in the near future with higher adsorption capacity and greater reusable options.

  12. Role of Bioadsorbents in Reducing Toxic Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaishankar, Monisha; Biju, Vinai George; Krishnamurthy Nideghatta Beeregowda

    2016-01-01

    Industrialization and urbanization have led to the release of increasing amounts of heavy metals into the environment. Metal ion contamination of drinking water and waste water is a serious ongoing problem especially with high toxic metals such as lead and cadmium and less toxic metals such as copper and zinc. Several biological materials have attracted many researchers and scientists as they offer both cheap and effective removal of heavy metals from waste water. Therefore it is urgent to study and explore all possible sources of agrobased inexpensive adsorbents for their feasibility in the removal of heavy metals. The objective was to study inexpensive adsorbents like various agricultural wastes such as sugarcane bagasse, rice husk, oil palm shell, coconut shell, and coconut husk in eliminating heavy metals from waste water and their utilization possibilities based on our research and literature survey. It also shows the significance of developing and evaluating new potential biosorbents in the near future with higher adsorption capacity and greater reusable options. PMID:28090207

  13. Role of Bioadsorbents in Reducing Toxic Metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Blessy Baby; Jaishankar, Monisha; Biju, Vinai George; Krishnamurthy Nideghatta Beeregowda

    2016-01-01

    Industrialization and urbanization have led to the release of increasing amounts of heavy metals into the environment. Metal ion contamination of drinking water and waste water is a serious ongoing problem especially with high toxic metals such as lead and cadmium and less toxic metals such as copper and zinc. Several biological materials have attracted many researchers and scientists as they offer both cheap and effective removal of heavy metals from waste water. Therefore it is urgent to study and explore all possible sources of agrobased inexpensive adsorbents for their feasibility in the removal of heavy metals. The objective was to study inexpensive adsorbents like various agricultural wastes such as sugarcane bagasse, rice husk, oil palm shell, coconut shell, and coconut husk in eliminating heavy metals from waste water and their utilization possibilities based on our research and literature survey. It also shows the significance of developing and evaluating new potential biosorbents in the near future with higher adsorption capacity and greater reusable options.

  14. Plants Role in Reducing Heavy Metals from Polluted Soil Leachate

    OpenAIRE

    Amouei A.1 PhD,; Tashakkorian H.1 PhD,; Naghipour D.2 PhD,; Mohammadi P.3 MSc

    2015-01-01

    Aims In the past few decades, more attention has been paid to clean up soils polluted with heavy metals by plants. A serious problem in this way is the amount of heavy metals uptake by plants. This study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of 3 local plants of Mazandaran province, Iran, in reducing and controlling the soil’s heavy metals. Instrument & Methods The removal amount of three heavy metals (lead, zinc and cadmium) by native plants (maize, velvetleaf and wild a...

  15. Hydroponics reducing effluent's heavy metals discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rababah, Abdellah; Al-Shuha, Ahmad

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the capacity of Nutrient Film Technique (NFT) to control effluent's heavy metals discharge. A commercial hydroponic system was adapted to irrigate lettuces with primary treated wastewater for studying the potential heavy metals removal. A second commercial hydroponic system was used to irrigate the same type of lettuces with nutrient solution and this system was used as a control. Results showed that lettuces grew well when irrigated with primary treated effluent in the commercial hydroponic system. The NFT-plant system heavy metals removal efficiency varied amongst the different elements, The system's removal efficiency for Cr was more than 92%, Ni more than 85%, in addition to more than 60% reduction of B, Pb, and Zn. Nonetheless, the NFT-plants system removal efficiencies for As, Cd and Cu were lower than 30%. Results show that lettuces accumulated heavy metals in leaves at concentrations higher than the maximum acceptable European and Australian levels. Therefore, non-edible plants such as flowers or pyrethrum are recommended as value added crops for the proposed NFT.

  16. ENVIRONMENTALLY REDUCING OF COOLANTS IN METAL CUTTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veijo KAUPPINEN

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Strained environment is a global problem. In metal industries the use of coolant has become more problematic in terms of both employee health and environmental pollution. It is said that the use of coolant forms approximately 8 - 16 % of the total production costs.The traditional methods that use coolants are now obviously becoming obsolete. Hence, it is clear that using a dry cutting system has great implications for resource preservation and waste reduction. For this purpose, a new cooling system is designed for dry cutting. This paper presents the new eco-friendly cooling innovation and the benefits gained by using this method. The new cooling system relies on a unit for ionising ejected air. In order to compare the performance of using this system, cutting experiments were carried out. A series of tests were performed on a horizontal turning machine and on a horizontal machining centre.

  17. Two-phase alkali-metal experiments in reduced gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoniak, Z.I.

    1986-06-01

    Future space missions envision the use of large nuclear reactors utilizing either a single or a two-phase alkali-metal working fluid. The design and analysis of such reactors require state-of-the-art computer codes that can properly treat alkali-metal flow and heat transfer in a reduced-gravity environment. A literature search of relevant experiments in reduced gravity is reported on here, and reveals a paucity of data for such correlations. The few ongoing experiments in reduced gravity are noted. General plans are put forth for the reduced-gravity experiments which will have to be performed, at NASA facilities, with benign fluids. A similar situation exists regarding two-phase alkali-metal flow and heat transfer, even in normal gravity. Existing data are conflicting and indequate for the task of modeling a space reactor using a two-phase alkali-metal coolant. The major features of past experiments are described here. Data from the reduced-gravity experiments with innocuous fluids are to be combined with normal gravity data from the two-phase alkali-metal experiments. Analyses undertaken here give every expectation that the correlations developed from this data base will provide a valid representation of alkali-metal heat transfer and pressure drop in reduced gravity.

  18. Reducing hazardous heavy metal ions using mangium bark waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khabibi, Jauhar; Syafii, Wasrin; Sari, Rita Kartika

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the characteristics of mangium bark and its biosorbent ability to reduce heavy metal ions in standard solutions and wastewater and to assess changes in bark characteristics after heavy metal absorption. The experiments were conducted to determine heavy metal absorption from solutions of heavy metals alone and in mixtures as well as from wastewater. The results show that mangium bark can absorb heavy metals. Absorption percentages and capacities from single heavy metal solutions showed that Cu(2+) > Ni(2+) > Pb(2+) > Hg(2+), while those from mixture solutions showed that Hg(2+) > Cu(2+) > Pb(2+) > Ni(2+). Wastewater from gold mining only contained Cu, with an absorption percentage and capacity of 42.87 % and 0.75 mg/g, respectively. The highest absorption percentage and capacity of 92.77 % and 5.18 mg/g, respectively, were found for Hg(2+) in a mixture solution and Cu(2+) in single-metal solution. The Cu(2+) absorption process in a single-metal solution changed the biosorbent characteristics of the mangium bark, yielding a decreased crystalline fraction; changed transmittance on hydroxyl, carboxyl, and carbonyl groups; and increased the presence of Cu. In conclusion, mangium bark biosorbent can reduce hazardous heavy metal ions in both standard solutions and wastewater.

  19. Corrosion behavior of some transition metals and 4340 steel metals exposed to sulfate-reducing bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natishan, P.M.; Jones-Meehan, J.; Loeb, G.I.; Little, B.J.; Ray, R.; Beard, M.

    1999-11-01

    Microbial colonization of metals (zirconium, chromium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, tungsten, and type 4340 steel [UNS G43400]) and susceptibility of these metals to microbiologically influenced corrosion by sulfate-reducing bacteria was investigated. Environmental scanning electron microscopy characterization after 12 months and 21 months showed patchy biofilms on all metals except tungsten. Weight loss after 24 months for zirconium and niobium were either nonexistent or negligible, indicating that these metals did not experience MIC under the test conditions.

  20. Reduced Voltage Scaling in Clock Distribution Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khader Mohammad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel circuit technique to generate a reduced voltage swing (RVS signals for active power reduction on main buses and clocks. This is achieved without performance degradation, without extra power supply requirement, and with minimum area overhead. The technique stops the discharge path on the net that is swinging low at a certain voltage value. It reduces active power on the target net by as much as 33% compared to traditional full swing signaling. The logic 0 voltage value is programmable through control bits. If desired, the reduced-swing mode can also be disabled. The approach assumes that the logic 0 voltage value is always less than the threshold voltage of the nMOS receivers, which eliminate the need of the low to high voltage translation. The reduced noise margin and the increased leakage on the receiver transistors using this approach have been addressed through the selective usage of multithreshold voltage (MTV devices and the programmability of the low voltage value.

  1. Plants Role in Reducing Heavy Metals from Polluted Soil Leachate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amouei A.* PhD,

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aims In the past few decades, more attention has been paid to clean up soils polluted with heavy metals by plants. A serious problem in this way is the amount of heavy metals uptake by plants. This study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of 3 local plants of Mazandaran province, Iran, in reducing and controlling the soil’s heavy metals. Instrument & Methods The removal amount of three heavy metals (lead, zinc and cadmium by native plants (maize, velvetleaf and wild amaranth was investigated in alkaline (pH=8 and acidic (pH=5 soils and also using three substances such as EDTA, ammonium citrate and phosphate. The concentrations of these metals in leachate were measured by using atomic absorption spectrometry method. Findings Lead, cadmium and zinc levels in leachate in treatments with plants were less than unplanted ones. The concentrations of these metals in the produced leachate of treatments with acidic soils were higher than those with alkaline soils. In the treatments of soil polluted with additives, treatments containing ammonium phosphate and EDTA had the lowest and highest concentrations of heavy metals, respectively. Concentrations of these metals in treatments without plants were higher than those with plants. Conclusion Increasing of soil pH is effective on stabilization of heavy metals in soil. Ammonium phosphate plays an important role in stabilizing and EDTA and ammonium citrate increase the mobility of lead, zinc and cadmium in soil and groundwater.

  2. Fractional Scaling Analysis for IRIS pressurizer reduced scale experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezerra da Silva, Mario Augusto, E-mail: mabs500@gmail.co [Departamento de Energia Nuclear - Centro de Tecnologia e Geociencias, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Av. Prof. Luiz Freire, 1000, 50740-540 Recife, PE (Brazil); Brayner de Oliveira Lira, Carlos Alberto, E-mail: cabol@ufpe.b [Departamento de Energia Nuclear - Centro de Tecnologia e Geociencias, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Av. Prof. Luiz Freire, 1000, 50740-540 Recife, PE (Brazil); Oliveira Barroso, Antonio Carlos de, E-mail: barroso@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2242, 05508-900 Cidade Universitaria, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2010-10-15

    About twenty organizations joined in a consortium led by Westinghouse to develop an integral, modular and medium size pressurized water reactor (PWR), known as international reactor innovative and secure (IRIS), which is characterized by having most of its components inside the pressure vessel, eliminating or minimizing the probability of severe accidents. The pressurizer is responsible for pressure control in PWRs. A small continuous flow is maintained by the spray system in conventional pressurizers. This mini-flow allows a mixing between the reactor coolant and the pressurizer water, warranting acceptable limits for occasional differences in boron concentrations. There are neither surge lines nor spray in IRIS pressurizer, but surge and recirculation orifices that promote a circulation flow between primary system and pressurizer, avoiding power transients whether outsurges occur. The construction of models is a routine practice in engineering, being supported by similarity rules. A new method of scaling systems, Fractional Scaling Analysis, has been successfully used to analyze pressure variations, considering the most relevant agents of change. The aim of this analysis is to obtain the initial boron concentration ratio and the volumetric flows that ensure similar behavior for boron dispersion in a prototype and its model.

  3. Metal-Ion Additives Reduce Thermal Expansion Of Polyimides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoakley, Diane M.; St. Clair, Anne K.; Emerson, Burt R., Jr.; Willis, George L.

    1994-01-01

    Polyimides widely used as high-performance polymers because of their excellent thermal stability and toughness. However, their coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE's) greater than those of metals, ceramics, and glasses. Decreasing CTE's of polyimides increase usefulness for aerospace and electronics applications in which dimensional stability required. Additives containing metal ions reduce coefficients of thermal expansion of polyimides. Reductions range from 11 to over 100 percent.

  4. Multi-scale friction modeling for sheet metal forming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hol, Johan

    2013-01-01

    Finite element (FE) formability analyses are everyday practice in the metal-forming industry to reduce costs and lead time of new metal products. Although the predictive capabilities of FE software codes have improved significantly over the years, unfortunately, the experimental trial-and-error proc

  5. Single-step preparation and consolidation of reduced early-transition-metal oxide/metal n-type thermoelectric composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael W. Gaultois

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Reduced early transition metal oxides/metal composites have been identified here as interesting thermoelectric materials. Numerous compositions in the Nb-rich portion of the WO3–Nb2O5 system have been studied, in composite formulations with elemental W. Spark plasma sintering (SPS has been employed to achieve rapid preparation and consolidation of composite materials containing W metal precipitates with characteristic length scales that range from under 20 nm to a few microns, that exhibit thermal conductivities that are constant from 300 K to 1000 K, approximately 2.5 W m−1 K−1. Thermoelectric properties of these n-type materials were measured, and the highest-performing compositions were found to reach figure of merit zT values close to 0.1 at 950 K. The measurements point to higher zT values at yet-higher temperatures.

  6. STUDY ON REDUCING AND MELTING BEHAVIOR OF MILL SCALE/PETROLEUM COKE BLEND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Deves Flores

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Self-reducing tests were carried out under isothermal and non-isothermal condition in a muffle furnace, aiming to assess the reduction and melting of a self-reducing blend of mill scale and petroleum coke (85-15% in weight. The products obtained were analyzed by mass loss and wet analysis. Further investigations for the products from the non-isothermal condition were done by X-ray diffraction, nude eye inspection and carbon analyzer. It was observed that mass loss fraction and metallization degree are directly related and both increase with time and temperature. In the non-isothermal maximum mass loss was achieved in 8 minutes, reaching metallization degrees above 90%. It was observed that the reduction of iron oxide occurs mainly in solid state and the smelting of the samples is directly related to the iron carburization process. Thus, the use of self-reducing mixtures shows a possible way to recycle mill scale.

  7. Univerality, Scaling, and Stability of Metallic Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafford, Charles

    2001-03-01

    A remarkably quantitative understanding of the electrical and mechanical properties of simple metal nanowires has been obtained within the free-electron model.^2-4 The force required to pull a gold wire apart exhibits steps of approximately 1nN, which are synchronized with steps of order G_0=2e^2/h in the wire's electrical conductance. Using a Gutzwiller sum over classical periodic orbits,(C. A. Stafford, F. Kassubek, J. Bürki, and H. Grabert, Phys. Rev. Lett. 83), 4836 (1999). we were able to explain why the characteristic size of the force steps is universal, i.e., insensitive to the size and shape of the wire, and of order \\varepsilon_F/λ_F. The statistics of conductance and shot noise in gold nanowires can also be understood quantitatively using a model of quantum-confined electrons including disorder.(J. Bürki, C. A. Stafford, X. Zotos, and D. Baeriswyl, Phys. Rev. B 60), 5000 (1999); J. Bürki and C. A. Stafford, Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 3342 (1999). A linear stability analysis(F. Kassubek, C. A. Stafford, H. Grabert, and R. E. Goldstein, Nonlinearity 14), 167 (2001). shows that the classical instability of a long wire under surface tension can be completely suppressed by quantum effects, leading to stable cylindrical configurations whose electrical conductance is a magic number 1, 3, 5, 6,... times G_0, providing a possible theoretical explanation for the remarkable stability of long chains of gold atoms, and for the supershell structure observed in the conductance statistics of alkali metal nanowires.

  8. Effects of sulfate on heavy metal release from iron corrosion scales in drinking water distribution system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Huifang; Shi, Baoyou; Yang, Fan; Wang, Dongsheng

    2017-05-01

    Trace heavy metals accumulated in iron corrosion scales within a drinking water distribution system (DWDS) could potentially be released to bulk water and consequently deteriorate the tap water quality. The objective of this study was to identify and evaluate the release of trace heavy metals in DWDS under changing source water conditions. Experimental pipe loops with different iron corrosion scales were set up to simulate the actual DWDS. The effects of sulfate levels on heavy metal release were systemically investigated. Heavy metal releases of Mn, Ni, Cu, Pb, Cr and As could be rapidly triggered by sulfate addition but the releases slowly decreased over time. Heavy metal release was more severe in pipes transporting groundwater (GW) than in pipes transporting surface water (SW). There were strong positive correlations (R(2) > 0.8) between the releases of Fe and Mn, Fe and Ni, Fe and Cu, and Fe and Pb. When switching to higher sulfate water, iron corrosion scales in all pipe loops tended to be more stable (especially in pipes transporting GW), with a larger proportion of stable constituents (mainly Fe3O4) and fewer unstable compounds (β-FeOOH, γ-FeOOH, FeCO3 and amorphous iron oxides). The main functional iron reducing bacteria (IRB) communities were favorable for the formation of Fe3O4. The transformation of corrosion scales and the growth of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) accounted for the gradually reduced heavy metal release with time. The higher metal release in pipes transporting GW could be due to increased Fe6(OH)12CO3 content under higher sulfate concentrations.

  9. Impact of reduced scale free network on wireless sensor network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshri, Neha; Gupta, Anurag; Mishra, Bimal Kumar

    2016-12-01

    In heterogeneous wireless sensor network (WSN) each data-packet traverses through multiple hops over restricted communication range before it reaches the sink. The amount of energy required to transmit a data-packet is directly proportional to the number of hops. To balance the energy costs across the entire network and to enhance the robustness in order to improve the lifetime of WSN becomes a key issue of researchers. Due to high dimensionality of an epidemic model of WSN over a general scale free network, it is quite difficult to have close study of network dynamics. To overcome this complexity, we simplify a general scale free network by partitioning all of its motes into two classes: higher-degree motes and lower-degree motes, and equating the degrees of all higher-degree motes with lower-degree motes, yielding a reduced scale free network. We develop an epidemic model of WSN based on reduced scale free network. The existence of unique positive equilibrium is determined with some restrictions. Stability of the system is proved. Furthermore, simulation results show improvements made in this paper have made the entire network have a better robustness to the network failure and the balanced energy costs. This reduced model based on scale free network theory proves more applicable to the research of WSN.

  10. Scaled Jump in Gravity-Reduced Virtual Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, MyoungGon; Cho, Sunglk; Tran, Tanh Quang; Kim, Seong-Pil; Kwon, Ohung; Han, JungHyun

    2017-04-01

    The reduced gravity experienced in lunar or Martian surfaces can be simulated on the earth using a cable-driven system, where the cable lifts a person to reduce his or her weight. This paper presents a novel cable-driven system designed for the purpose. It is integrated with a head-mounted display and a motion capture system. Focusing on jump motion within the system, this paper proposes to scale the jump and reports the experiments made for quantifying the extent to which a jump can be scaled without the discrepancy between physical and virtual jumps being noticed by the user. With the tolerable range of scaling computed from these experiments, an application named retargeted jump is developed, where a user can jump up onto virtual objects while physically jumping in the real-world flat floor. The core techniques presented in this paper can be extended to develop extreme-sport simulators such as parasailing and skydiving.

  11. Reducing Plasma Perturbations with Segmented Metal Shielding on Electrostatic Probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staack, D.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch N.J.

    2002-10-02

    Electrostatic probes are widely used to measure spatial plasma parameters in the quasi-neutral plasma created in Hall thrusters and similar E x B electric discharge devices. Significant perturbations of the plasma, induced by such probes, can mask the actual physics involved in operation of these devices. In an attempt to reduce these perturbations in Hall thrusters, the perturbations were examined by varying the component material, penetration distance, and residence time of various probe designs. This study leads us to a conclusion that secondary electron emission from insulator ceramic tubes of the probe can affect local changes of the plasma parameters causing plasma perturbations. A probe design, which consists of a segmented metal shielding of the probe insulator, is suggested to reduce these perturbations. This new probe design can be useful for plasma applications in which the electron temperature is sufficient to produce secondary electron emission by interaction of plasma electrons with dielectric materials.

  12. Heavy metals adsorption on rolling mill scale; Adsorcion de metales pesados sobre cascarill de laminacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, F. A.; Martin, M. I.; Perez, C.; Lopez-Delgado, A.; Alguacil, E. J.

    2003-07-01

    A great quantity of industries are responsible for contaminating the environment with the heavy metals which are containing in their wastewaters. The recovery of these metals is both from an environmental and economical points of view of the upmost interest. A study is made of the use of mill scale-originating in the hot rolling of steel-as an adsorbent for the removal of heavy metals from liquid effluents. The adsorption of Zn''2+, Cd''2+ y Pb''2+ on the rolling mill scale was investigated by determination of adsorption isotherms. The effect of time, equilibrium temperature and concentration of metal solution on mill scale adsorption efficiency was evaluated. The adsorption process was analysed using the theories of Langmuir and Freundlich. Desorption process of metals from loaded mill scales was also studied using several doser bent at different experimental conditions. It has been proved that the mill scale is an effective adsorbent for the cations studies in aqueous solutions within the range of the working concentrations. (Author) 32 refs.

  13. Scaling in light scattering by sharp conical metal tips

    CERN Document Server

    Pors, Anders; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I

    2016-01-01

    Using the electrostatic approximation, we analyze electromagnetic fields scattered by sharp conical metal tips, which are illuminated with light polarized along the tip axis. We establish scaling relations for the scattered field amplitude and phase, whose validity is verified with numerical simulations. Analytic expressions for the wavelength, at which the scattered field near the tip changes its direction, and field decay near the tip extremity are obtained, relating these characteristics to the cone angle and metal permittivity. The results obtained have important implications to various tip-enhanced phenomena, ranging from Raman and scattering near-field imaging to photoemission spectroscopy and nano-optical trapping.

  14. Reducing measurement scale mismatch to improve surface energy flux estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwema, Joost; Rosolem, Rafael; Rahman, Mostaquimur; Blyth, Eleanor; Wagener, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    Soil moisture importantly controls land surface processes such as energy and water partitioning. A good understanding of these controls is needed especially when recognizing the challenges in providing accurate hyper-resolution hydrometeorological simulations at sub-kilometre scales. Soil moisture controlling factors can, however, differ at distinct scales. In addition, some parameters in land surface models are still often prescribed based on observations obtained at another scale not necessarily employed by such models (e.g., soil properties obtained from lab samples used in regional simulations). To minimize such effects, parameters can be constrained with local data from Eddy-Covariance (EC) towers (i.e., latent and sensible heat fluxes) and Point Scale (PS) soil moisture observations (e.g., TDR). However, measurement scales represented by EC and PS still differ substantially. Here we use the fact that Cosmic-Ray Neutron Sensors (CRNS) estimate soil moisture at horizontal footprint similar to that of EC fluxes to help answer the following question: Does reduced observation scale mismatch yield better soil moisture - surface fluxes representation in land surface models? To answer this question we analysed soil moisture and surface fluxes measurements from twelve COSMOS-Ameriflux sites in the USA characterized by distinct climate, soils and vegetation types. We calibrated model parameters of the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES) against PS and CRNS soil moisture data, respectively. We analysed the improvement in soil moisture estimation compared to uncalibrated model simulations and then evaluated the degree of improvement in surface fluxes before and after calibration experiments. Preliminary results suggest that a more accurate representation of soil moisture dynamics is achieved when calibrating against observed soil moisture and further improvement obtained with CRNS relative to PS. However, our results also suggest that a more accurate

  15. Scientific and Technological Foundations for Scaling Production of Nanostructured Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Terry C.; Davis, Casey F.; Rovira, Peter M.; Hayne, Mathew L.; Campbell, Gordon S.; Grzenia, Joel E.; Stock, Paige J.; Meagher, Rilee C.; Rack, Henry J.

    2017-05-01

    Severe Plastic Deformation (SPD) has been explored in a wide range of metals and alloys. However, there are only a few industrial scale implementations of SPD for commercial alloys. To demonstrate and evolve technology for producing ultrafine grain metals by SPD, a Nanostructured Metals Manufacturing Testbed (NMMT) has been established in Golden, Colorado. Machines for research scale and pilot scale Equal Channel Angular Pressing-Conform (ECAP-C) technology have been configured in the NMMT to systematically evaluate and evolve SPD processing and advance the foundational science and technology for manufacturing. We highlight the scientific and technological areas that are critical for scale up of continuous SPD of aluminum, copper, magnesium, titanium, and iron-based alloys. Key areas that we will address in this presentation include the need for comprehensive analysis of starting microstructures, data on operating deformation mechanisms, high pressure thermodynamics and phase transformation kinetics, tribological behaviors, temperature dependence of lubricant properties, adaptation of tolerances and shear intensity to match viscoplastic behaviors, real-time process monitoring, and mechanics of billet/tooling interactions.

  16. Aerosol synthesis of nano and micro-scale zero valent metal particles from oxide precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Jonathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Luhrs, Claudia [UNM; Lesman, Zayd [UNM; Soliman, Haytham [UNM; Zea, Hugo [UNM

    2010-01-01

    In this work a novel aerosol method, derived form the batch Reduction/Expansion Synthesis (RES) method, for production of nano / micro-scale metal particles from oxides and hydroxides is presented. In the Aerosol-RES (A-RES) method, an aerosol, consisting of a physical mixture of urea and metal oxide or hydroxides, is passed through a heated oven (1000 C) with a residence time of the order of 1 second, producing pure (zero valent) metal particles. It appears that the process is flexible regarding metal or alloy identity, allows control of particle size and can be readily scaled to very large throughput. Current work is focused on creating nanoparticles of metal and metal alloy using this method. Although this is primarily a report on observations, some key elements of the chemistry are clear. In particular, the reducing species produced by urea decomposition are the primary agents responsible for reduction of oxides and hydroxides to metal. It is also likely that the rapid expansion that takes place when solid/liquid urea decomposes to form gas species influences the final morphology of the particles.

  17. Spatially distributed modeling of sediment and associated heavy metal transport on regional and catchment scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindewolf, Marcus; Schmidt, Jürgen; Käpermann, Philipp

    2013-04-01

    Achievements of new legislations, as EU-Water Framework Directive (EU-WFD), require great efforts in order to reduce the yields of sediment and sediment attached heavy metals of surface water bodies. In this regard planning authorities strongly need comparable assessments on regional scale, which enables predictions on the level of measures. The study aims to identify the main sediment delivery areas in the German federal state of Saxony (18400 km²) and to locate pass over points of sediment and associated heavy metals into surface waters. Applying the process based EROSION 3D simulation model spatially distributed (20 m grid cell) estimates of sediment and particle attached heavy metal inputs are realized on regional and catchment scale related to three land use scenarios and a 10years rainfall event. Concerning these calculations it has to be considered, that this substances are predominantly attached to the fine-grained soil particles. The selective nature of soil erosion causes a preferentially transport of this fine particles while less contaminated larger particles remain on site. Consequently heavy metals are enriched in the eroded sediment compared to the origin soil. Hence it is essential that EROSION 3D provides the particle size distribution (clay, silt and sand) of transported sediments. Regarding heavy metal input calculations from sediment inputs, heavy metal contents of particle size classes has to be known. For this purpose particle size separates of erosion susceptible soils are analyzed. Comprehensive heavy metal contents of origin top soils are interpolated via kriging using available monitoring data. The regional scaled simulations identify the Saxon loess belt as the main affected region of sediment inputs. Since particle attached heavy metal transport to surface waters is strongly related to sediment delivery, the streams of this region suffer from considerable inputs. Compared to empirical estimates, the results of this study suggest that

  18. Electron-scale reduced fluid models with gyroviscous effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passot, T.; Sulem, P. L.; Tassi, E.

    2017-08-01

    Reduced fluid models for collisionless plasmas including electron inertia and finite Larmor radius corrections are derived for scales ranging from the ion to the electron gyroradii. Based either on pressure balance or on the incompressibility of the electron fluid, they respectively capture kinetic Alfvén waves (KAWs) or whistler waves (WWs), and can provide suitable tools for reconnection and turbulence studies. Both isothermal regimes and Landau fluid closures permitting anisotropic pressure fluctuations are considered. For small values of the electron beta parameter e$ , a perturbative computation of the gyroviscous force valid at scales comparable to the electron inertial length is performed at order e)$ , which requires second-order contributions in a scale expansion. Comparisons with kinetic theory are performed in the linear regime. The spectrum of transverse magnetic fluctuations for strong and weak turbulence energy cascades is also phenomenologically predicted for both types of waves. In the case of moderate ion to electron temperature ratio, a new regime of KAW turbulence at scales smaller than the electron inertial length is obtained, where the magnetic energy spectrum decays like \\bot -13/3$ , thus faster than the \\bot -11/3$ spectrum of WW turbulence.

  19. Additive Manufacturing of Metal Structures at the Micrometer Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirt, Luca; Reiser, Alain; Spolenak, Ralph; Zambelli, Tomaso

    2017-01-04

    Currently, the focus of additive manufacturing (AM) is shifting from simple prototyping to actual production. One driving factor of this process is the ability of AM to build geometries that are not accessible by subtractive fabrication techniques. While these techniques often call for a geometry that is easiest to manufacture, AM enables the geometry required for best performance to be built by freeing the design process from restrictions imposed by traditional machining. At the micrometer scale, the design limitations of standard fabrication techniques are even more severe. Microscale AM thus holds great potential, as confirmed by the rapid success of commercial micro-stereolithography tools as an enabling technology for a broad range of scientific applications. For metals, however, there is still no established AM solution at small scales. To tackle the limited resolution of standard metal AM methods (a few tens of micrometers at best), various new techniques aimed at the micrometer scale and below are presently under development. Here, we review these recent efforts. Specifically, we feature the techniques of direct ink writing, electrohydrodynamic printing, laser-assisted electrophoretic deposition, laser-induced forward transfer, local electroplating methods, laser-induced photoreduction and focused electron or ion beam induced deposition. Although these methods have proven to facilitate the AM of metals with feature sizes in the range of 0.1-10 µm, they are still in a prototype stage and their potential is not fully explored yet. For instance, comprehensive studies of material availability and material properties are often lacking, yet compulsory for actual applications. We address these items while critically discussing and comparing the potential of current microscale metal AM techniques.

  20. Universal Scaling Law for Atomic Diffusion and Viscosity in Liquid Metals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Guang-Xu; LIU Chang-Song; ZHU Zhen-Gang

    2004-01-01

    @@ The recently proposed scaling law relating the diffusion coefficient and the excess entropy of liquid[Samanta A et al. 2004 Phys. Rev. Lett. 92 145901; Dzugutov M 1996 Nature 381 137], and a quasi-universal relationship between the transport coefficients and excess entropy of dense fluids [Rosenfeld Y 1977 Phys. Rev. A 15 2545],are tested for diverse liquid metals using molecular dynamics simulations. Interatomic potentials derived from the glue potential and second-moment approximation of tight-binding scheme are used to study liquid metals.Our simulation results give sound support to the above-mentioned universal scaling laws. Following Dzugutov,we have also reached a new universal scaling relationship between the viscosity coefficient and excess entropy. The simulation results suggest that the reduced transport coefficients can be expressed approximately in terms of the corresponding packing density.

  1. Metallic nanoparticles reduce the migration of human fibroblasts in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Larissa Fernanda de Araújo; Lins, Marvin Paulo; Viana, Iana Mayane Mendes Nicácio; dos Santos, Jeniffer Estevão; Smaniotto, Salete; Reis, Maria Danielma dos Santos

    2017-03-01

    Nanoparticles have extremely wide applications in the medical and biological fields. They are being used in biosensors, local drug delivery, diagnostics, and medical therapy. However, the potential effects of nanoparticles on target cell and tissue function, apart from cytotoxicity, are not completely understood. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro effects of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on human fibroblasts with respect to their interaction with the extracellular matrix and in cell migration. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that treatment with AgNPs or AuNPs decreased collagen and laminin production at all the concentrations tested (0.1, 1, and 10 μg/mL). Furthermore, cytofluorometric analysis showed that treatment with AgNPs reduced the percentage of cells expressing the collagen receptor very late antigen 2, α2β1 integrin (VLA-2) and the laminin receptor very late antigen 6, α6β1 integrin (VLA-6). In contrast, AuNP treatment increased and decreased the percentages of VLA-2-positive and VLA-6-positive cells, respectively, as compared to the findings for the controls. Analysis of cytoskeletal reorganization showed that treatment with both types of nanoparticles increased the formation of stress fibres and number of cell protrusions and impaired cell polarity. Fibroblasts exposed to different concentrations of AuNPs and AgNPs showed reduced migration through transwell chambers in the functional chemotaxis assay. These results demonstrated that metal nanoparticles may influence fibroblast function by negatively modulating the deposition of extracellular matrix molecules (ECM) and altering the expression of ECM receptors, cytoskeletal reorganization, and cell migration.

  2. Atomic scale modelling of hexagonal structured metallic fission product alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleburgh, S C; King, D M; Lumpkin, G R

    2015-04-01

    Noble metal particles in the Mo-Pd-Rh-Ru-Tc system have been simulated on the atomic scale using density functional theory techniques for the first time. The composition and behaviour of the epsilon phases are consistent with high-entropy alloys (or multi-principal component alloys)-making the epsilon phase the only hexagonally close packed high-entropy alloy currently described. Configurational entropy effects were considered to predict the stability of the alloys with increasing temperatures. The variation of Mo content was modelled to understand the change in alloy structure and behaviour with fuel burnup (Mo molar content decreases in these alloys as burnup increases). The predicted structures compare extremely well with experimentally ascertained values. Vacancy formation energies and the behaviour of extrinsic defects (including iodine and xenon) in the epsilon phase were also investigated to further understand the impact that the metallic precipitates have on fuel performance.

  3. High pressure sheet metal forming of large scale body structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trompeter, M.; Krux, R.; Homberg, W.; Kleiner, M. [Dortmund Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Forming Technology and Lightweight Construction

    2005-07-01

    An important trend in the automotive industry is the weight reduction of car bodies by lightweight construction. One approach to realise lightweight structures is the use of load optimised sheet metal parts (e.g. tailored blanks), especially for crash relevant car body structures. To form such parts which are mostly complex and primarily made of high strength steels, the use of working media based forming processes is favorable. The paper presents the manufacturing of a large scale structural component made of tailor rolled blanks (TRB) by high pressure sheet metal forming (HBU). The paper focuses mainly on the tooling system, which is integrated into a specific 100 MN hydroform press at the IUL. The HBU tool basically consists of a multipoint blankholder, a specially designed flange draw-in sensor, which is necessary to determine the material flow, and a sealing system. Furthermore, the paper presents a strategy for an effective closed loop flange draw-in control. (orig.)

  4. Nanoparticles reduce nickel allergy by capturing metal ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vemula, Praveen Kumar; Anderson, R. Rox; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2011-05-01

    Approximately 10% of the population in the USA suffer from nickel allergy, and many are unable to wear jewellery or handle coins and other objects that contain nickel. Many agents have been developed to reduce the penetration of nickel through skin, but few formulations are safe and effective. Here, we show that applying a thin layer of glycerine emollient containing nanoparticles of either calcium carbonate or calcium phosphate on an isolated piece of pig skin (in vitro) and on the skin of mice (in vivo) prevents the penetration of nickel ions into the skin. The nanoparticles capture nickel ions by cation exchange, and remain on the surface of the skin, allowing them to be removed by simple washing with water. Approximately 11-fold fewer nanoparticles by mass are required to achieve the same efficacy as the chelating agent ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid. Using nanoparticles with diameters smaller than 500 nm in topical creams may be an effective way to limit the exposure to metal ions that can cause skin irritation.

  5. Electrostimulation to reduce synaptic scaling driven progression of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, Mark S; Neymotin, Samuel A; Lytton, William W

    2014-01-01

    Cell death and synapse dysfunction are two likely causes of cognitive decline in AD. As cells die and synapses lose their drive, remaining cells suffer an initial decrease in activity. Neuronal homeostatic synaptic scaling then provides a feedback mechanism to restore activity. This homeostatic mechanism is believed to sense levels of activity-dependent cytosolic calcium within the cell and to adjust neuronal firing activity by increasing the density of AMPA synapses at remaining synapses to achieve balance. The scaling mechanism increases the firing rates of remaining cells in the network to compensate for decreases in network activity. However, this effect can itself become a pathology, as it produces increased imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory circuits, leading to greater susceptibility to further cell loss via calcium-mediated excitotoxicity. Here, we present a mechanistic explanation of how directed brain stimulation might be expected to slow AD progression based on computational simulations in a 470-neuron biomimetic model of a neocortical column. The simulations demonstrate that the addition of low-intensity electrostimulation (neuroprosthesis) to a network undergoing AD-like cell death can raise global activity and break this homeostatic-excitotoxic cascade. The increase in activity within the remaining cells in the column results in lower scaling-driven AMPAR upregulation, reduced imbalances in excitatory and inhibitory circuits, and lower susceptibility to ongoing damage.

  6. Electrostimulation to reduce synaptic scaling driven progression of Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark eRowan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cell death and synapse dysfunction are two likely causes of cognitive decline in AD. As cells die and synapses lose their drive, remaining cells suffer an initial decrease in activity. Neuronal homeostatic synaptic scaling then provides a feedback mechanism to restore activity. This homeostatic mechanism is believed to sense levels of activity-dependent cytosolic calcium within the cell and to adjust neuronal firing activity by increasing the density of AMPA synapses at remaining synapses to achieve balance. The scaling mechanism increases the firing rates of remaining cells in the network to compensate for decreases in network activity. However, this effect can itself become a pathology, as it produces increased imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory circuits, leading to greater susceptibility to further cell loss via calcium-mediated excitotoxicity.Here, we present a mechanistic explanation of how directed brain stimulation might be expected to slow AD progression based on computational simulations in a 470-neuron biomimetic model of a neocortical column. The simulations demonstrate that the addition of low-intensity electrostimulation (neuroprosthesis to a network undergoing AD-like cell death can raise global activity and break this homeostatic-excitotoxic cascade. The increase in activity within the remaining cells in the column results in lower scaling-driven AMPAR upregulation, reduced imbalances in excitatory and inhibitory circuits, and lower susceptibility to ongoing damage.

  7. Depositing aluminum as sacrificial metal to reduce metal-graphene contact resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da-cheng, Mao; Zhi, Jin; Shao-qing, Wang; Da-yong, Zhang; Jing-yuan, Shi; Song-ang, Peng; Xuan-yun, Wang

    2016-07-01

    Reducing the contact resistance without degrading the mobility property is crucial to achieve high-performance graphene field effect transistors. Also, the idea of modifying the graphene surface by etching away the deposited metal provides a new angle to achieve this goal. We exploit this idea by providing a new process method which reduces the contact resistance from 597 Ω·μm to sub 200 Ω·μm while no degradation of mobility is observed in the devices. This simple process method avoids the drawbacks of uncontrollability, ineffectiveness, and trade-off with mobility which often exist in the previously proposed methods. Project by the National Science and Technology Major Project, China (Grant No. 2011ZX02707.3), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61136005), the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. KGZD-EW-303), and the Project of Beijing Municipal Science and Technology Commission, China (Grant No. Z151100003515003).

  8. Scaling Laws and Critical Properties for fcc and hcp Metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desgranges, Caroline; Widhalm, Leanna; Delhommelle, Jerome

    2016-06-16

    The determination of the critical parameters of metals has remained particularly challenging both experimentally, because of the very large temperatures involved, and theoretically, because of the many-body interactions that take place in metals. Moreover, experiments have shown that these systems exhibit an unusually strong asymmetry of their binodal. Recent theoretical work has led to new similarity laws, based on the calculation of the Zeno line and of the underlying Boyle parameters, which provided results for the critical properties of atomic and molecular systems in excellent agreement with experiments. Using the recently developed expanded Wang-Landau (EWL) simulation method, we evaluate the grand-canonical partition function, over a wide range of conditions, for 11 fcc and hcp metals (Ag, Al, Au, Be, Cu, Ir, Ni, Pb, Pd, Pt, and Rh), modeled with a many-body interaction potential. This allows us to calculate the binodal, Zeno line, and Boyle parameters and, in turn, obtain the critical properties for these systems. We also propose two scaling laws for the enthalpy and entropy of vaporization, and identify critical exponents of 0.4 and 1.22 for these two laws, respectively.

  9. Reducing Waste in Extreme Scale Systems through Introspective Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bautista-Gomez, Leonardo [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Gainaru, Ana [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, National Center for Supercomputing Applications; Perarnau, Swann [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Tiwari, Devesh [ORNL; Gupta, Saurabh [ORNL; Engelmann, Christian [ORNL; Cappello, Franck [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Snir, Marc [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)

    2016-01-01

    Resilience is an important challenge for extreme- scale supercomputers. Today, failures in supercomputers are assumed to be uniformly distributed in time. However, recent studies show that failures in high-performance computing systems are partially correlated in time, generating periods of higher failure density. Our study of the failure logs of multiple supercomputers show that periods of higher failure density occur with up to three times more than the average. We design a monitoring system that listens to hardware events and forwards important events to the runtime to detect those regime changes. We implement a runtime capable of receiving notifications and adapt dynamically. In addition, we build an analytical model to predict the gains that such dynamic approach could achieve. We demonstrate that in some systems, our approach can reduce the wasted time by over 30%.

  10. Diverse metal reduction and nano- mineral formation by metal-reducing bacteria enriched from inter-tidal flat sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y.; Park, B.; Seo, H.; Roh, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria utilize diverse metal oxides as electron acceptors and couple this microbial metal reduciton to growth. However, the microbe-metal interactions playing important roles in the metal geochemistry and organic matter degradation in the tidal flat sediments have not been uncovered enough to employ in various environmental and industrial applications. The objective of this study was to examine biomineralization and bioremediation by the facultative metal-reducing bacteria isolated from the inter-tidal flat sediments in southwestern of Korea. 16S-rRNA analysis showed bacterial consortium mainly consists of genus of Clostridium sp. The enriched bacteria were capable of reducing diverse metals such as iron oxide, maganese oxide, Cr(VI) and Se(VI) during glucose fermentation process at room temperature. The bacteria reduced highly toxic and reactive elements such as Cr(VI) and Se(VI) to Cr(III) and Se(0). The results showed that microbial processes induced transformation from toxic states of heavy metals to less toxic and mobile states in natural environments. Andthe bacteria also reduced iron oxyhydroxide such as ferrihydrite and akaganeite (β-FeOOH) and formed nanometer-sized magnetite (Fe3O4). This study indicates microbial processes not only can be used for bioremediation of inorganic contaminants existing in the marine environments, but also form the magnetite nanoparticles which are exhibit superparamagnetic properties that can be useful for relevant medical and industrial applications.

  11. TESTING THE ASTEROSEISMIC MASS SCALE USING METAL-POOR STARS CHARACTERIZED WITH APOGEE AND KEPLER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epstein, Courtney R.; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Tayar, Jamie; Pinsonneault, Marc [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 W. 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Elsworth, Yvonne P.; Chaplin, William J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston Park Road, West Midlands, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Shetrone, Matthew [McDonald Observatory, The University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C1400, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); Mosser, Benoît [LESIA, CNRS, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Université Denis Diderot, Observatoire de Paris, F-92195 Meudon Cedex (France); Hekker, Saskia [Max-Planck-Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Harding, Paul [Department of Astronomy, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106-7215 (United States); Silva Aguirre, Víctor [Stellar Astrophysics Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Basu, Sarbani [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Beers, Timothy C. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719, USA and JINA: Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics (United States); Bizyaev, Dmitry [Apache Point Observatory, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Bedding, Timothy R. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy (SIfA), School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Frinchaboy, Peter M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas Christian University, TCU Box 298840, Fort Worth, TX 76129 (United States); García, Rafael A. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS, Universit Paris 7 Diderot, IRFU/SAp, Centre de Saclay, F-91191, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Pérez, Ana E. García; Hearty, Fred R., E-mail: epstein@astronomy.ohio-state.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); and others

    2014-04-20

    Fundamental stellar properties, such as mass, radius, and age, can be inferred using asteroseismology. Cool stars with convective envelopes have turbulent motions that can stochastically drive and damp pulsations. The properties of the oscillation frequency power spectrum can be tied to mass and radius through solar-scaled asteroseismic relations. Stellar properties derived using these scaling relations need verification over a range of metallicities. Because the age and mass of halo stars are well-constrained by astrophysical priors, they provide an independent, empirical check on asteroseismic mass estimates in the low-metallicity regime. We identify nine metal-poor red giants (including six stars that are kinematically associated with the halo) from a sample observed by both the Kepler space telescope and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III APOGEE spectroscopic survey. We compare masses inferred using asteroseismology to those expected for halo and thick-disk stars. Although our sample is small, standard scaling relations, combined with asteroseismic parameters from the APOKASC Catalog, produce masses that are systematically higher (<ΔM > =0.17 ± 0.05 M {sub ☉}) than astrophysical expectations. The magnitude of the mass discrepancy is reduced by known theoretical corrections to the measured large frequency separation scaling relationship. Using alternative methods for measuring asteroseismic parameters induces systematic shifts at the 0.04 M {sub ☉} level. We also compare published asteroseismic analyses with scaling relationship masses to examine the impact of using the frequency of maximum power as a constraint. Upcoming APOKASC observations will provide a larger sample of ∼100 metal-poor stars, important for detailed asteroseismic characterization of Galactic stellar populations.

  12. Apparatus and method to reduce wear and friction between CMC-to-metal attachment and interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cairo, Ronald Ralph; Parolini, Jason Robert; Delvaux, John McConnell

    2016-11-22

    An apparatus to reduce wear and friction between CMC-to-metal attachment and interface, including a metal layer configured for insertion between a surface interface between a CMC component and a metal component. The surface interface of the metal layer is compliant relative to asperities of the surface interface of the CMC component. A coefficient of friction between the surface interface of the CMC component and the metal component is about 1.0 or less at an operating temperature between about 300.degree. C. to about 325.degree. C. and a limiting temperature of the metal component.

  13. Reduced work function of graphene by metal adatoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legesse, Merid; Mellouhi, Fedwa El; Bentria, El Tayeb; Madjet, Mohamed E.; Fisher, Timothy S.; Kais, Sabre; Alharbi, Fahhad H.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, the work function of graphene doped by different metal adatoms and at different concentrations is investigated. Density functional theory is used to maximize the reduction of the work function. In general, the work function drops significantly before reaching saturation. For example in the case of Cs doping, the work function saturates at 2.05 eV with a modest 8% doping. The adsorption of different concentrations on metal adatoms on graphene is also studied. Our calculations show that the adatoms prefer to relax at hollow sites. The transfer of electron from metallic dopants to the graphene for all the studied systems shifts the Fermi energy levels above the Dirac-point and the doped graphenes become metallic. The value of Fermi energy shifts depends on the type of metallic dopants and its concentrations. A detail analysis of the electronic structure in terms of band structure and density of states, absorption energy, and charge transfer for each adatom-graphene system is presented.

  14. Reduced Fracture Toughness of Metallic Glass at Cryogenic Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yihao Zhou

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The effects of cryogenic temperature on the toughness of a Zr-based metallic glass are investigated. Based on three-dimensional fracture morphologies at different temperatures, the crack formation and propagation are analyzed. Through the calculation of the shear transformation zone volume, the shear modulus and bulk modulus of the metallic glass at different temperatures and the crack formation mechanism associated with the temperature is discussed. Once the crack commences propagation, the hyperelasticity model is used to elucidate the fractographic evolution of crack propagation.

  15. Metal scarcity and sustainability, analyzing the necessity to reduce the extraction of scarce metals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henckens, M. L C M; Driessen, P. P J; Worrell, E.

    2014-01-01

    There is debate whether or not further growth of metal extraction from the earth's crust will be sustainable in connection with geologic scarcity. Will future generations possibly face a depletion of specific metals? We study whether, for which metals and to what extent the extraction rate would nee

  16. Metal scarcity and sustainability, analyzing the necessity to reduce the extraction of scarce metals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henckens, M. L C M; Driessen, P. P J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/069081417; Worrell, E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/106856715

    2014-01-01

    There is debate whether or not further growth of metal extraction from the earth's crust will be sustainable in connection with geologic scarcity. Will future generations possibly face a depletion of specific metals? We study whether, for which metals and to what extent the extraction rate would

  17. Tailoring capping layers to reduce stress gradients in copper metallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Conal E.; Priyadarshini, Deepika; Nguyen, Son; Ryan, E. Todd

    2016-12-01

    Capping layers for back-end-of-line metallization, which primarily serve as diffusion barriers to prevent contamination, also play a role in mitigating electromigration in the underlying conductive material. Stress gradients can be generated in copper metallization due to the conditions associated with the capping process. To study the effects of deposition and subsequent annealing on the mechanical response of copper films with various capping schemes, we employed a combination of conventional and glancing incidence X-ray diffraction techniques to quantify the stress gradient maxima. The Cu films with dielectric caps, such as silicon nitride, can exhibit large gradients that decrease slightly with thermal cycling. However, Co and TaN-based metallic capping layers create significantly lower stress gradient maxima in copper features both before and after annealing. The different evolution of stress gradients in Cu films with dielectric and metallic caps due to thermal cycling reveals the interaction of dislocation-mediated, plastic deformation with the cap/Cu interface.

  18. The Atomic scale structure of liquid metal-electrolyte interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, B. M.; Festersen, S.; Magnussen, O. M.

    2016-07-01

    Electrochemical interfaces between immiscible liquids have lately received renewed interest, both for gaining fundamental insight as well as for applications in nanomaterial synthesis. In this feature article we demonstrate that the atomic scale structure of these previously inaccessible interfaces nowadays can be explored by in situ synchrotron based X-ray scattering techniques. Exemplary studies of a prototypical electrochemical system - a liquid mercury electrode in pure NaCl solution - reveal that the liquid metal is terminated by a well-defined atomic layer. This layering decays on length scales of 0.5 nm into the Hg bulk and displays a potential and temperature dependent behaviour that can be explained by electrocapillary effects and contributions of the electronic charge distribution on the electrode. In similar studies of nanomaterial growth, performed for the electrochemical deposition of PbFBr, a complex nucleation and growth behaviour is found, involving a crystalline precursor layer prior to the 3D crystal growth. Operando X-ray scattering measurements provide detailed data on the processes of nanoscale film formation.

  19. Characterization of nano-scale protective oxide films: application on metal chemical mechanical planarization

    OpenAIRE

    Karagöz, Ayşe; Craciun, V.; Başım, Gül Bahar

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on the characterization of nano-scale metal oxide films for chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) applications. The protective nature of the self-grown metal oxide layers in the CMP slurry environment enable topographic selectivity required for metallization of interconnects. Tungsten was selected as the model metal film to study the formation and characteristics of the metal oxide nano-layers since tungsten CMP is very well-established in conventional semiconductor manuf...

  20. Enhanced anaerobic digestion of food waste by trace metal elements supplementation and reduced metals dosage by green chelating agent [S, S]-EDDS via improving metals bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wanli; Zhang, Lei; Li, Aimin

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed at investigating the effects of trace metals on methane production from food waste and examining the feasibility of reducing metals dosage by ethylenediamine-N,N'-disuccinic acid (EDDS) via improving metals bioavailability. The results indicated that the effects of metal elements highly depended on the supplemental concentrations. Trace metals supplemented under moderate concentrations greatly enhanced the methane yield. However, the excessive supplementation of Fe (1000 mg/L) and Ni (50 mg/L) exhibited the obvious toxicity to methanogens. The combinations of trace metals exhibited remarkable synergistic effects. The supplementation of Fe (100 mg/L) + Co (1 mg/L) + Mo (5 mg/L) + Ni (5 mg/L) obtained the greatest methane yield of 504 mL/g VSadded and the highest increment of 35.5% compared to the reactor without metals supplementation (372 mL/g VSadded). The changes of metals speciation showed the reduction of metals bioavailability during anaerobic digestion, which might weaken the stimulative effects of trace metals. However, the addition of EDDS improved metals bioavailability for microbial uptake and stimulated the activity of methanogens, and therefore, strengthened the stimulative effects of metals on anaerobic digestion of food waste. The batch and semi-continuous experiments confirmed that the addition of EDDS (20 mg/L) bonded to trace metals prior to their supplementation could obtain a 50% reduction of optimal metals dosage. This study provided a feasible method to reduce trace metals dosage without the degeneration of process performance of anaerobic digestion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Workshop Report on Additive Manufacturing for Large-Scale Metal Components - Development and Deployment of Metal Big-Area-Additive-Manufacturing (Large-Scale Metals AM) System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Manufacturing Demonstration Facility; Love, Lonnie J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Manufacturing Demonstration Facility; Peter, William H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Manufacturing Demonstration Facility; Dehoff, Ryan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Manufacturing Demonstration Facility

    2016-05-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is considered an emerging technology that is expected to transform the way industry can make low-volume, high value complex structures. This disruptive technology promises to replace legacy manufacturing methods for the fabrication of existing components in addition to bringing new innovation for new components with increased functional and mechanical properties. This report outlines the outcome of a workshop on large-scale metal additive manufacturing held at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on March 11, 2016. The charter for the workshop was outlined by the Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Manufacturing Office program manager. The status and impact of the Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) for polymer matrix composites was presented as the background motivation for the workshop. Following, the extension of underlying technology to low-cost metals was proposed with the following goals: (i) High deposition rates (approaching 100 lbs/h); (ii) Low cost (<$10/lbs) for steel, iron, aluminum, nickel, as well as, higher cost titanium, (iii) large components (major axis greater than 6 ft) and (iv) compliance of property requirements. The above concept was discussed in depth by representatives from different industrial sectors including welding, metal fabrication machinery, energy, construction, aerospace and heavy manufacturing. In addition, DOE’s newly launched High Performance Computing for Manufacturing (HPC4MFG) program was reviewed. This program will apply thermo-mechanical models to elucidate deeper understanding of the interactions between design, process, and materials during additive manufacturing. Following these presentations, all the attendees took part in a brainstorming session where everyone identified the top 10 challenges in large-scale metal AM from their own perspective. The feedback was analyzed and grouped in different categories including, (i) CAD to PART software, (ii) selection of energy source, (iii

  2. Plasma immersion ion implantation for reducing metal ion release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, C.; Garcia, J. A.; Maendl, S.; Pereiro, R.; Fernandez, B.; Rodriguez, R. J. [Centro de Ingenieria Avanzada de Superficies AIN, 31191, Cordovilla-Pamplona (Spain); Leibniz-Institut fuer Oberflaechenmodifizierung, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Universidad de Oviedo, Departamento Quimica Fisica y Analitica (Spain); Centro de Ingenieria Avanzada de Superficies AIN, 31191, Cordovilla-Pamplona (Spain)

    2012-11-06

    Plasma immersion ion implantation of Nitrogen and Oxygen on CoCrMo alloys was carried out to improve the tribological and corrosion behaviors of these biomedical alloys. In order to optimize the implantation results we were carried experiments at different temperatures. Tribocorrosion tests in bovine serum were used to measure Co, Cr and Mo releasing by using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry analysis after tests. Also, X-ray Diffraction analysis were employed in order to explain any obtained difference in wear rate and corrosion tests. Wear tests reveals important decreases in rate of more than one order of magnitude for the best treatment. Moreover decreases in metal release were found for all the implanted samples, preserving the same corrosion resistance of the unimplanted samples. Finally this paper gathers an analysis, in terms of implantation parameters and achieved properties for industrial implementation of these treatments.

  3. Avoiding metallic walls: Use of modal superposition in plasmonic waveguides to reduce propagation loss

    CERN Document Server

    Rodríguez-Fortuño, Francisco J

    2011-01-01

    We theoretically explore the possibility of reducing the propagation loss in a metal-insulator-metal (MIM) waveguide, using mode combinations to achieve wall-avoiding field distributions along a certain propagation length. We present analytical results for several waveguides showing notable loss reduction, and we discuss the tradeoffs between low loss and high confinement present in this technique.

  4. Approaches for reducing the insulator-metal transition pressure in hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, A. E.; Ashcroft, N. W.

    1983-01-01

    Two possible techniques for reducing the external pressure required to induce the insulator-metal transition in solid hydrogen are described. One uses impurities to lower the energy of the metallic phase relative to that of the insulating phase. The other utilizes a negative pressure induced in the insulating phase by electron-hole pairs, created either with laser irradiation or pulsed synchrotron sources.

  5. Phase diagrams of microemulsions containing reducing agents and metal salts as bases for the synthesis of metallic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najjar, Reza; Stubenrauch, Cosima

    2009-03-01

    We studied the phase diagrams of microemulsions with a view to using these systems for the synthesis of metallic Pt, Pb, and Bi nanoparticles as well as of intermetallic Pt/Pb and Pt/Bi nanoparticles. The microemulsions consisted of H(2)O/salt-n-decane-SDS-1-butanol. The salt was either one metal precursor (H(2)PtCl(6) x 6 H(2)O, Pb(NO(3))(2), or Bi(NO(3))(3) x 5 H(2)O), a mixture of two metal precursors (H(2)PtCl(6) x 6 H(2)O + Pb(NO(3))(2) or H(2)PtCl(6) x 6 H(2)O + Bi(NO(3))(3) x 5 H(2)O), or the reducing agent (NaBH(4)). In addition, other salts needed to be added in order to solubilize the metal precursors, to stabilize the reducing agent, and to adjust the ionic strength. Combining the microemulsion (mu e1) that contains the metal precursor(s) with the microemulsion (mu e2) that contains the reducing agent leads to metallic nanoparticles. To study systematically how the shape and size of the synthesized metallic nanoparticles depend on the size and shape of the respective microemulsion droplets, first of all one has to find those conditions under which mu e1 and mu e2 have the same structure. For that purpose we determined the water emulsification failure boundary (wefb) of each microemulsion as it is at the wefb where the water droplets are known to be spherical. We found that the ionic strength (I) of the aqueous phase as well as the hard acid and hard base properties of the ions are the key tuning parameters for the location of the wefb.

  6. Metal contact effect on the performance and scaling behavior of carbon nanotube thin film transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jiye; Dong, Guodong; Tian, Boyuan; Yan, Qiuping; Zhang, Han; Liang, Xuelei; Peng, Lianmao

    2016-05-01

    Metal-tube contact is known to play an important role in carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNT-FETs) which are fabricated on individual CNTs. Less attention has been paid to the contact effect in network type carbon nanotube thin film transistors (CNT-TFTs). In this study, we demonstrate that contact plays an even more important role in CNT-TFTs than in CNT-FETs. Although the Schottky barrier height at the metal-tube contact can be tuned by the work function of the metal, similar to the case in CNT-FETs, the contact resistance (Rc) forms a much higher proportion of the total resistance in CNT-TFTs. Interestingly, the contact resistivity was found to increase with channel length, which is a consequence of the percolating nature of the transport in CNT films, and this behavior does not exist in CNT-FETs and normal 2D Ohmic conductors. Electrical transport in CNT-TFTs has been predicted to scale with channel length by stick percolation theory. However, the scaling behavior is also impacted, or even covered up by the effect of Rc. Once the contact effect is excluded, the covered scaling behavior can be revealed correctly. A possible way of reducing Rc in CNT-TFTs was proposed. We believe the findings in this paper will strengthen our understanding of CNT-TFTs, and even accelerate the commercialization of CNT-TFT technology.Metal-tube contact is known to play an important role in carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNT-FETs) which are fabricated on individual CNTs. Less attention has been paid to the contact effect in network type carbon nanotube thin film transistors (CNT-TFTs). In this study, we demonstrate that contact plays an even more important role in CNT-TFTs than in CNT-FETs. Although the Schottky barrier height at the metal-tube contact can be tuned by the work function of the metal, similar to the case in CNT-FETs, the contact resistance (Rc) forms a much higher proportion of the total resistance in CNT-TFTs. Interestingly, the contact

  7. Experimental study of compatibility of reduced metal oxides with thermal energy storage lining materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Leathy, Abdelrahman; Danish, Syed Noman; Al-Ansary, Hany; Jeter, Sheldon; Al-Suhaibani, Zeyad

    2016-05-01

    Solid particles have been shown to be able to operate at temperatures higher than 1000 °C in concentrated solar power (CSP) systems with thermal energy storage (TES). Thermochemical energy storage (TCES) using metal oxides have also found to be advantageous over sensible and latent heat storage concepts. This paper investigates the compatibility of the inner lining material of a TES tank with the reduced metal oxide. Two candidate metal oxides are investigated against six candidate lining materials. XRD results for both the materials are investigated and compared before and after the reduction of metal oxide at 1000°C in the presence of lining material. It is found that the lining material rich in zirconia is suitable for such application. Silicon Carbide is also found non-reacting with one of the metal oxides so it needs to be further investigated with other candidate metal oxides.

  8. Effect of hydraulic retention time on metal precipitation in sulfate reducing inverse fluidized bed reactors

    KAUST Repository

    Villa-Gómez, Denys Kristalia

    2014-02-13

    BACKGROUND: Metal sulfide recovery in sulfate reducing bioreactors is a challenge due to the formation of small precipitates with poor settling properties. The size of the metal sulfide precipitates with the change in operational parameters such as pH, sulfide concentration and reactor configuration has been previously studied. The effect of the hydraulic retention time (HRT) on the metal precipitate characteristics such as particle size for settling has not yet been addressed. RESULTS: The change in size of the metal (Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd) sulfide precipitates as a function of the HRT was studied in two sulfate reducing inversed fluidized bed (IFB) reactors operating at different chemical oxygen demand concentrations to produce high and low sulfide concentrations. The decrease of the HRT from 24 to 9h in both IFB reactors affected the contact time of the precipitates formed, thus making differences in aggregation and particle growth regardless of the differences in sulfide concentration. Further HRT decrease to 4.5h affected the sulfate reducing activity for sulfide production and hence, the supersaturation level and solid phase speciation. Metal sulfide precipitates affected the sulfate reducing activity and community in the biofilm, probably because of the stronger local supersaturation causing metal sulfides accumulation in the biofilm. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that the HRT is an important factor determining the size and thus the settling rate of the metal sulfides formed in bioreactors.

  9. Biogeochemistry of a Field-Scale Sulfate Reducing Bioreactor Treating Mining Influenced Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drennan, D.; Lee, I.; Landkamer, L.; Figueroa, L. A.; Webb, S.; Sharp, J. O.

    2012-12-01

    Acidity, metal release, and toxicity may be environmental health concerns in areas influenced by mining. Mining influenced waters (MIW) can be remediated through the establishment of Sulfate Reducing Bioreactors (SRBRs) as part of engineered passive treatment systems. The objective of our research is an enhanced understanding of the biogeochemistry in SRBRs by combining molecular biological and geochemical techniques. Bioreactor reactive substrate, settling pond water, and effluent (from the SRBR) were collected from a field scale SRBR in Arizona, which has been in operation for approximately 3 years. Schematically, the water passes through the SRBR; combines with flow that bypasses the SRBR into the and goes into the mixing pond, and finally is released as effluent to aerobic polishing cells. High throughput sequencing of extracted DNA revealed that Proteobacteria dominated the reactive substrate (61%), settling pond (93%), and effluent (50%), with the next most abundant phylum in all samples (excluding uncultured organisms) being Bacteriodes (1-17%). However, at the superclass level, the three samples were more variable. Gammaproteobacteria dominated the reactive substrate (35%), Betaproteobacteria in the settling pond (63%) and finally the effluent was dominated by Epsilonproteobacteria (Helicobacteraceae) (43%). Diversity was most pronounced in association with the reactor matrix, and least diverse in the settling pond. Putative functional analysis revealed a modest presence of sulfate/sulfur reducing bacteria (SRB) (>5%) in both the matrix and settling pond but a much higher abundance (43%) of sulfur reducing bacteria in the effluent. Interestingly this effluent population was composed entirely of the family Helicobacteraceae (sulfur reduction II via polysulfide pathway). Other putative functions of interest include metal reduction in the matrix (3%) and effluent (3%), as well as polysaccharide degradation, which was largely abundant in all samples (21

  10. Use of fly ash in reducing heavy metal toxicity to plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shende, A.; Juwarkar, A.S; Dara, S.S. (National Environmental Engineering Research Institute, Nagpur (India))

    1994-11-01

    An alkaline fly ash was used to reduce metal toxicity of contaminated soil through immobilization of heavy metals. Pot culture studies were carried out with maize (Zea mays) crop grown in acidic sandy loam (pH 4.9) and calcareous silty clay (pH 7.9) soils treated with known concentrations of heavy metals (viz, cadmium, copper, nickel and zinc). Fly ash was mixed in metal-treated soil at the rate of 0%, 2%, 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%. The possible variation in metal toxicity to the plants due to fly ash treatment was ascertained through changes in growth patterns. Application of 2% and 5% of fly ash to the calcareous soil shows better growth response as compared to control soil. However, when the fly ash application exceeds 5%, the crop growth was significantly reduced. On the contrary, acidic soil shows positive response with a fly ash addition up to 20% but the resultant crop growth was lesser as compared to growth of plants in the virgin soil (i.e. soil as such, without fly ash and metal treatment). Fly ash addition effectively raised the pH of acidic soil and thus helped to reduce the metal solubility and availability to plants. 14 refs., 6 tabs.

  11. Mechanical deformation of atomic-scale metallic contacts: Structure and mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mads Reinholdt; Brandbyge, Mads; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel

    1998-01-01

    We have simulated the mechanical deformation of atomic-scale metallic contacts under tensile strain using molecular dynamics and effective medium theory potentials. The evolution of the structure of the contacts and the underlying deformation mechanisms are described along with the calculated ele...... that the results measured in a nanocontact experiment depend significantly on the elastic stiffness of the experimental apparatus. For a soft setup, some of the atomic rearrangements might not be detected, whereas others are amplified.......We have simulated the mechanical deformation of atomic-scale metallic contacts under tensile strain using molecular dynamics and effective medium theory potentials. The evolution of the structure of the contacts and the underlying deformation mechanisms are described along with the calculated...... electronic conductance. Various defects such as intersecting stacking faults, local disorder, and vacancies are created during the deformation. Disordered regions act as weak spots that reduce the strength of the contacts. The disorder tends to anneal out again during the subsequent atomic rearrangements...

  12. Modeling Ethanol Decomposition on Transition Metals: A Combined Application of Scaling and Bronsted-Evans-Polanyi Relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferrin, P.; Simonetti, D.; Kandoi, S.

    2009-01-01

    calculations necessary to describe trends in activity and selectivity across metal and alloy surfaces, thus extending the reach of DFT to more complex systems. In-this work, the well-known family of Bronsted-Evans-Polanyi (BEP) correlations, connecting minima with maxima in the potential energy surface...... on a subset of these surfaces are calculated. Experiments on supported catalysts verify that this simple model is reasonably accurate in describing reactivity trends across metals, suggesting that the combination of BEP and scaling relations may substantially reduce the cost of DFT calculations required...

  13. Microbiological-enhanced mixing across scales during in-situ bioreduction of metals and radionuclides at Department of Energy Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valocchi, Albert [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Werth, Charles [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Liu, Wen-Tso [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Sanford, Robert [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Nakshatrala, Kalyan [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-10-20

    Bioreduction is being actively investigated as an effective strategy for subsurface remediation and long-term management of DOE sites contaminated by metals and radionuclides (i.e. U(VI)). These strategies require manipulation of the subsurface, usually through injection of chemicals (e.g., electron donor) which mix at varying scales with the contaminant to stimulate metal reducing bacteria. There is evidence from DOE field experiments suggesting that mixing limitations of substrates at all scales may affect biological growth and activity for U(VI) reduction. Although current conceptual models hold that biomass growth and reduction activity is limited by physical mixing processes, a growing body of literature suggests that reaction could be enhanced by cell-to-cell interaction occurring over length scales extending tens to thousands of microns. Our project investigated two potential mechanisms of enhanced electron transfer. The first is the formation of single- or multiple-species biofilms that transport electrons via direct electrical connection such as conductive pili (i.e. ‘nanowires’) through biofilms to where the electron acceptor is available. The second is through diffusion of electron carriers from syntrophic bacteria to dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria (DMRB). The specific objectives of this work are (i) to quantify the extent and rate that electrons are transported between microorganisms in physical mixing zones between an electron donor and electron acceptor (e.g. U(IV)), (ii) to quantify the extent that biomass growth and reaction are enhanced by interspecies electron transport, and (iii) to integrate mixing across scales (e.g., microscopic scale of electron transfer and macroscopic scale of diffusion) in an integrated numerical model to quantify these mechanisms on overall U(VI) reduction rates. We tested these hypotheses with five tasks that integrate microbiological experiments, unique micro-fluidics experiments, flow cell experiments, and

  14. Mechanisms of Electron Transfer in Two Decaheme Cytochromes from a Metal-Reducing Bacterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wigginton, Nicholas S.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Hochella, Michael F.

    2007-11-08

    Single-molecule current-voltage (I–V) spectra were collected using a scanning tunneling microscope for two decaheme c-type cytochromes, OmcA and MtrC, which are outer-membrane proteins from the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis. Although the two cytochromes are similar in heme count, charge-carrying amino-acid content, and molecular mass, their I–V spectra are significantly different. The I–V spectra for OmcA show smoothly varying symmetric exponential behavior. These spectra are well fit by a coherent tunneling model that is based on a simple square barrier description of the tunneling junction. In contrast, the I–V spectra for MtrC have pronounced breaks in slope in the positive tip bias range. Two large peaks in the normalized differential conductance spectra of MtrC were fit to a tunneling model that accounts for the possibility of transient population of empty states stabilized by vibrational relaxation. Reorganization energies deduced for the two features are similar to those normally assigned to metal centers in other metalloproteins. Work function measurements of the cytochrome films were used to convert the energies of these two spectral features to the normal hydrogen electrode scale for comparison with the midpoint potential measured using protein film voltammetry, which showed good correspondence. We conclude that MtrC mediates tunneling current by heme orbital participation. The difference in tunneling behavior between OmcA and MtrC suggests distinct physiological functions for the two cytochromes; in contrast to OmcA, MtrC appears to be tuned to a specific operating potential.

  15. Slow pyrolysis enhances the recovery and reuse of phosphorus and reduces metal leaching from biosolids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, David A; Cole, Andrew J; Whelan, Anna; de Nys, Rocky; Paul, Nicholas A

    2017-03-16

    In this study, biochar is produced from biosolids with and without alum at a range of temperatures and simulated oxidative aging of the biochars is conducted to quantify the long-term leaching of P and metals. While biosolids containing alum had negligible amounts of plant-available P, after pyrolysis >90% of the P became immediately available for plant growth. When biosolids with no alum were converted into biochar there was a small increase in the availability of P but a larger pool was available after oxidation. Both of the biosolids leached significant amounts of metals after oxidation. In contrast, the biochars had a very low available metal content and this did not increase with oxidation, demonstrating a stable metal content. Pyrolysis is an effective waste management strategy for biosolids that can simultaneously reduce the leaching of metals and increase the efficiency of recycling of P for beneficial re-use.

  16. Instruments to reduce the leaching of heavy metals from building materials in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Breemen, A J H; Vermij, P H M

    2007-01-01

    In the Netherlands the leaching of heavy metals from metal building and constructing materials results in serious contamination problems in the water system. The most common sources of these heavy metals in construction materials are copper waterworks and roofs, zinc roofs, gutters and rain pipes, zinced steel, stainless steel, and lead sealing material. In urban waters the surface water and sediment standards are often exceeded. Although building and construction materials are certainly not the only source of heavy metals, they are an important part of the problem. This article focuses on six instruments that are in use in the Netherlands to try to reduce impact on the surface waters. In addition to this, national as well as international, a reconsideration of the risks and surface water standards for several heavy metals is considered. A balanced use of instruments can be considered as the application of a best practice.

  17. [An adaptive scaling hybrid algorithm for reduction of CT artifacts caused by metal objects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Luo, Hai; Zhou, He-qin

    2009-03-01

    A new adaptively hybrid filtering algorithm is proposed to reduce the artifacts caused by metal in CT image. Firstly, the method is used to preprocess the projection data of metal region and is reconstruct by filtered back projection (FBP) method. Then the expectation maximization algorithm (EM) is performed on the iterative original metal project data. Finally, a compensating procedure is applied to the reconstructed metal region. The simulation result has demonstrated that the proposed algorithm can remove the metal artifacts and keep the structure information of metal object effectively. It ensures that the tissues around the metal will not be distorted. The method is also computational efficient and effective for the CT images which contains several metal objects.

  18. Scale effects in metal-forming friction and lubrication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Søe; Paldan, Nikolas Aulin; Calaon, Matteo

    2011-01-01

    equipment is developed for studies of the size effect in metal-forming friction in the range from macro-to microscale. Investigations confirm a significant friction increase when downscaling. Visual inspection of the workpieces shows this to be explained by the amount of open and closed lubricant pockets....

  19. Reducing beam hardening effects and metal artefacts using Medipix3RX: With applications from biomaterial science

    CERN Document Server

    Rajendran, K; de Ruiter, N J A; Chernoglazov, A I; Panta, R K; Butler, A P H; Butler, P H; Bell, S T; Anderson, N G; Woodfield, T B F; Tredinnick, S J; Healy, J L; Bateman, C J; Aamir, R; Doesburg, R M N; Renaud, P F; Gieseg, S P; Smithies, D J; Mohr, J L; Mandalika, V B H; Opie, A M T; Cook, N J; Ronaldson, J P; Nik, S J; Atharifard, A; Clyne, M; Bones, P J; Bartneck, C; Grasset, R; Schleich, N; Billinghurst, M

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses methods for reducing beam hardening effects using spectral data for biomaterial applications. A small-animal spectral scanner operating in the diagnostic energy range was used. We investigate the use of photon-processing features of the Medipix3RX ASIC in reducing beam hardening and associated artefacts. A fully operational charge summing mode was used during the imaging routine. We present spectral data collected for metal alloy samples, its analysis using algebraic 3D reconstruction software and volume visualisation using a custom volume rendering software. Narrow high energy acquisition using the photon-processing detector revealed substantial reduction in beam hardening effects and metal artefacts.

  20. Biostimulation of Metal-Reducing Microbes at a Former Uranium Mill Tailings Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, A. D.; Anderson, R. T.; Chang, J.; Long, P. E.; White, D. C.

    2002-12-01

    In situ biological treatment strategies are currently being used or considered to address groundwater contamination at hundreds and perhaps thousands of sites in the United States. A key to demonstrating the effectiveness of biological treatment strategies at a site is establishing cause and effect relationships, which provide evidence that the desired bioprocesses are occurring, or are likely to occur. These methods involve directly measuring various biochemical constituents of the bacteria themselves (i.e. "biomarkers"), which are indicative of their metabolic processes, and therefore provide direct, relevant information regarding the environment in which they are growing. These biomarkers include the presence and viability of biomass, the ability of the organisms to degrade or transform target contaminant(s), the presence of nutrients to promote bacterial growth and activity, and the oxidation/reduction (redox) status of the system. Using these tools we monitored an in situ biostimulation test at the field scale at the Old Rifle Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site, a former uranium ore processing facility located approximately 0.3 mile east of the city of Rifle in Garfield County, Colorado. The purpose of the study was to investigate if the addition of low concentrations of acetate (approx. 1 millimolar) as an electron donor into the subsurface would create anaerobic conditions that would stimulate growth of metal reducing bacteria capable of reducing soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV). Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA), respiratory quinone, and DNA data showed that addition of acetate into the subsurface increased the microbial biomass and altered the microbial community structure to one that contained more anaerobic microorganisms (i.e. Geobacter sp.) capable of the reduction of U(VI).

  1. Scaling Relationships for Adsorption Energies of C2 Hydrocarbons on Transition Metal Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, G

    2011-08-18

    Using density functional theory calculations we show that the adsorption energies for C{sub 2}H{sub x}-type adsorbates on transition metal surfaces scale with each other according to a simple bond order conservation model. This observation generalizes some recently recognized adsorption energy scaling laws for AH{sub x}-type adsorbates to unsaturated hydrocarbons and establishes a coherent simplified description of saturated as well as unsaturated hydrocarbons adsorbed on transition metal surfaces. A number of potential applications are discussed. We apply the model to the dehydrogenation of ethane over pure transition metal catalysts. Comparison with the corresponding full density functional theory calculations shows excellent agreement.

  2. Delta ferrite in the weld metal of reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sam, Shiju; Das, C. R.; Ramasubbu, V.; Albert, S. K.; Bhaduri, A. K.; Jayakumar, T.; Rajendra Kumar, E.

    2014-12-01

    Formation of delta(δ)-ferrite in the weld metal, during autogenous bead-on-plate welding of Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic (RAFM) steel using Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) process, has been studied. Composition of the alloy is such that delta-ferrite is not expected in the alloy; but examination of the weld metal revealed presence of delta-ferrite in the weld metal. Volume fraction of delta-ferrite is found to be higher in the weld interface than in the rest of the fusion zone. Decrease in the volume fraction of delta-ferrite, with an increase in preheat temperature or with an increase in heat input, is observed. Results indicate that the cooling rate experienced during welding affects the volume fraction of delta-ferrite retained in the weld metal and variation in the delta-ferrite content with cooling rate is explained with variation in the time that the weld metal spends in various temperature regimes in which delta-ferrite is stable for the alloy during its cooling from the liquid metal to the ambient temperature. This manuscript will discuss the effect of welding parameters on formation of delta-ferrite and its retention in the weld metal of RAFM steel.

  3. The efficacy of noble metal alloy urinary catheters in reducing catheter-associated urinary tract infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alanood Ahmed Aljohi

    2016-01-01

    Results: A 90% relative risk reduction in the rate of CAUTI was observed with the noble metal alloy catheter compared to the standard catheter (10 vs. 1 cases, P = 0.006. When considering both catheter-associated asymptomatic bacteriuria and CAUTI, the relative risk reduction was 83% (12 vs. 2 cases, P = 0.005. In addition to CAUTI, the risk of acquiring secondary bacteremia was lower (100% for the patients using noble metal alloy catheters (3 cases in the standard group vs. 0 case in the noble metal alloy catheter group, P = 0.24. No adverse events related to any of the used catheters were recorded. Conclusion: Results from this study revealed that noble metal alloy catheters are safe to use and significantly reduce CAUTI rate in ICU patients after 3 days of use.

  4. Liquid lubrication in sheet metal forming at mesoscopic scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hubert, C.; Dubar, L.; Bay, Niels

    2012-01-01

    The lubricant entrapment and escape phenomena in metal forming are studied experimentally as well as numerically. Experiments are carried out in strip reduction of aluminium sheet applying a transparent die to study the fluid flow between mesoscopic cavities. The numerical strategy is based...... on a weak fluid/structure coupling involving the Finite Element Method and analytical calculations. It allows to quantify the final shape of the lubricant pockets...

  5. System and method for making metallic iron with reduced CO.sub.2 emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiesel, Richard F; Englund, David J; Schlichting, Mark; Meehan, John; Crouch, Jeremiah; Wilson, Logan

    2014-10-14

    A method and system for making metallic iron nodules with reduced CO.sub.2 emissions is disclosed. The method includes: assembling a linear hearth furnace having entry and exit portions, at least a conversion zone and a fusion zone, and a moving hearth adapted to move reducible iron bearing material through the furnace on contiguous hearth sections; assembling a shrouded return substantially free of air ingress extending adjacent at least the conversion and fusion zones of the furnace through which hearth sections can move from adjacent the exit portion to adjacent the entry portion of the furnace; transferring the hearth sections from the furnace to the shrouded return adjacent the exit portion; reducing reducible material in the linear hearth furnace to metallic iron nodules; and transporting gases from at least the fusion zone to the shrouded return to heat the hearth sections while in the shrouded return.

  6. Solid hydrocarbon assisted reduction: a new process of generating micron scale metal particles

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan M McCabe

    2015-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited The goal of this research is to test a central hypothesis: that gas species generated by the thermal and/or catalytically assisted decomposition of hydrocarbons in an inert atmosphere can reduce metal oxides to a metallic state. It is postulated that the decomposition releases gas phase radicals that can bind with oxygen in the metal oxides, forming volatile, stable oxides such as CO2 and water. This research consisted of thermally dec...

  7. FULL-SCALE TREATMENT WETLANDS FOR METAL REMOVAL FROM INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, E; John Gladden, J

    2007-03-22

    The A-01 NPDES outfall at the Savannah River Site receives process wastewater discharges and stormwater runoff from the Savannah River National Laboratory. Routine monitoring indicated that copper concentrations were regularly higher than discharge permit limit, and water routinely failed toxicity tests. These conditions necessitated treatment of nearly one million gallons of water per day plus storm runoff. Washington Savannah River Company personnel explored options to bring process and runoff waters into compliance with the permit conditions, including source reduction, engineering solutions, and biological solutions. A conceptual design for a constructed wetland treatment system (WTS) was developed and the full-scale system was constructed and began operation in 2000. The overall objective of our research is to better understand the mechanisms of operation of the A-01 WTS in order to provide better input to design of future systems. The system is a vegetated surface flow wetland with a hydraulic retention time of approximately 48 hours. Copper, mercury, and lead removal efficiencies are very high, all in excess of 80% removal from water passing through the wetland system. Zinc removal is 60%, and nickel is generally unaffected. Dissolved organic carbon in the water column is increased by the system and reduces toxicity of the effluent. Concentrations of metals in the A-01 WTS sediments generally decrease with depth and along the flow path through the wetland. Sequential extraction results indicate that most metals are tightly bound to wetland sediments.

  8. Conocarpus biochar as a soil amendment for reducing heavy metal availability and uptake by maize plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Wabel, Mohammad I; Usman, Adel R A; El-Naggar, Ahmed H; Aly, Anwar A; Ibrahim, Hesham M; Elmaghraby, Salem; Al-Omran, Abdulrasoul

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the use of Concarpus biochar as a soil amendment for reducing heavy metal accessibility and uptake by maize plants (Zea mays L.). The impacts of biochar rates (0.0, 1.0, 3.0, and 5.0% w/w) and two soil moisture levels (75% and 100% of field capacity, FC) on immobilization and availability of Fe, Mn, Zn, Cd, Cu and Pb to maize plants as well as its application effects on soil pH, EC, bulk density, and moisture content were evaluated using heavy metal-contaminated soil collected from mining area. The biochar addition significantly decreased the bulk density and increased moisture content of soil. Applying biochar significantly reduced NH4OAc- or AB-DTPA-extractable heavy metal concentrations of soils, indicating metal immobilization. Conocarpus biochar increased shoot dry biomass of maize plants by 54.5-102% at 75% FC and 133-266% at 100% FC. Moreover, applying biochar significantly reduced shoot heavy metal concentrations in maize plants (except for Fe at 75% FC) in response to increasing application rates, with a highest decrease of 51.3% and 60.5% for Mn, 28% and 21.2% for Zn, 60% and 29.5% for Cu, 53.2% and 47.2% for Cd at soil moisture levels of 75% FC and 100% FC, respectively. The results suggest that biochar may be effectively used as a soil amendment for heavy metal immobilization and in reducing its phytotoxicity.

  9. Doping of graphite by an alkaline-earth metal to reduce the work function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baturin, AS; Nikolski, KN; Knyazev, AI; Tchesov, RG; Sheshin, EP

    2004-01-01

    A technique for reducing the work function of a field-emission graphite cathode by doping it by an alkaline-earth metal (barium) is suggested. A model of formation of a barium monolayer on the cathode surface is proposed. Field-emission tests show that the operating voltage of the doped cathode is l

  10. Scaling relationships for adsorption energies of C2 hydrocarbons on transition metal surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Glenn; Studt, Felix; Abild-Pedersen, Frank;

    2011-01-01

    Using density functional theory calculations we show that the adsorption energies for C2Hx-type adsorbates on transition metal surfaces scale with each other according to a simple bond order conservation model. This observation generalizes some recently recognized adsorption energy scaling laws f...

  11. Large-scale screening of hypothetical metal-organic frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmer, Christopher E.; Leaf, Michael; Lee, Chang Yeon; Farha, Omar K.; Hauser, Brad G.; Hupp, Joseph T.; Snurr, Randall Q.

    2012-02-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are porous materials constructed from modular molecular building blocks, typically metal clusters and organic linkers. These can, in principle, be assembled to form an almost unlimited number of MOFs, yet materials reported to date represent only a tiny fraction of the possible combinations. Here, we demonstrate a computational approach to generate all conceivable MOFs from a given chemical library of building blocks (based on the structures of known MOFs) and rapidly screen them to find the best candidates for a specific application. From a library of 102 building blocks we generated 137,953 hypothetical MOFs and for each one calculated the pore-size distribution, surface area and methane-storage capacity. We identified over 300 MOFs with a predicted methane-storage capacity better than that of any known material, and this approach also revealed structure-property relationships. Methyl-functionalized MOFs were frequently top performers, so we selected one such promising MOF and experimentally confirmed its predicted capacity.

  12. Large-scale screening of hypothetical metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmer, Christopher E; Leaf, Michael; Lee, Chang Yeon; Farha, Omar K; Hauser, Brad G; Hupp, Joseph T; Snurr, Randall Q

    2011-11-06

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are porous materials constructed from modular molecular building blocks, typically metal clusters and organic linkers. These can, in principle, be assembled to form an almost unlimited number of MOFs, yet materials reported to date represent only a tiny fraction of the possible combinations. Here, we demonstrate a computational approach to generate all conceivable MOFs from a given chemical library of building blocks (based on the structures of known MOFs) and rapidly screen them to find the best candidates for a specific application. From a library of 102 building blocks we generated 137,953 hypothetical MOFs and for each one calculated the pore-size distribution, surface area and methane-storage capacity. We identified over 300 MOFs with a predicted methane-storage capacity better than that of any known material, and this approach also revealed structure-property relationships. Methyl-functionalized MOFs were frequently top performers, so we selected one such promising MOF and experimentally confirmed its predicted capacity.

  13. A new rapid chemical route to prepare reduced graphene oxide using copper metal nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tao; Gao, Jianping; Xu, Xiaoyang; Wang, Wei; Gao, Chunjuan; Qiu, Haixia

    2013-05-31

    Copper metal nanoparticles were used as a reducing agent to reduce graphene oxide (GO). The reaction was complete in about 10 min and did not involve the use of any toxic reagents or acids that are typically used in the reduction of GO by Zn and Fe powders. The high reduction activity of the Cu nanoparticles, compared to Cu powder, may be the result of the formation of Cu₂O nanoparticles. The effect of the mass ratio of the metal to GO for this reduction was also investigated. The reduction of the GO was verified by ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, Raman spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. After reduction, Cu₂O supported on reduced GO was formed and showed superior catalytic ability for the degradation of a model dye pollutant, methylene blue.

  14. Combustion of Metals in Reduced-Gravity and Extra Terrestrial Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branch, M.C.; Abbud-Madrid, A.; Daily, J. W.

    1999-01-01

    The combustion of metals is a field with important practical applications in rocket propellants, high-temperature flames, and material synthesis. Also, the safe operation of metal containers in high-pressure oxygen systems and with cryogenic fuels and oxidizers remains an important concern in industry. The increasing use of metallic components in spacecraft and space structures has also raised concerns about their flammability properties and fire suppression mechanisms. In addition, recent efforts to embark on unmanned and manned planetary exploration, such as on Mars, have also renewed the interest in metal/carbon-dioxide combustion as an effective in situ resource utilization technology. In spite of these practical applications, the understanding of the combustion properties of metals remains far behind that of the most commonly used fuels such as hydrocarbons. The lack of understanding is due to the many problems unique to metal- oxidizer reactions such as: low-temperature surface oxidation prior to ignition, heterogeneous reactions, very high combustion temperatures, product condensation, high emissivity of products, and multi-phase interactions. Very few analytical models (all neglecting the influence of gravity) have been developed to predict the burning characteristics and the flame structure details. Several experimental studies attempting to validate these models have used small metal particles to recreate gravity-free conditions. The high emissivity of the flames, rapid reaction, and intermittent explosions experienced by these particles have made the gathering of any useful information on burning rates and flame structure very difficult. The use of a reduced gravity environment is needed to clarify some of the complex interactions among the phenomena described above. First, the elimination of the intrusive buoyant flows that plague all combustion phenomena is of paramount importance in metal reactions due to the much higher temperatures reached during

  15. Scaling of compression strength in disordered solids: metallic foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kováčik

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The scaling of compression strength with porosity for aluminium foams was investigated. The Al 99.96, AlMg1Si0.6 and AlSi11Mg0.6 foams of various porosity, sample size with and without surface skin were tested in compression. It was observed that the compression strength of aluminium foams scales near the percolation threshold with Tf ≈ 1.9 - 2.0 almost independently on the matrix alloy, sample size and presence of surface skin. The difference of the obtained values of Tf to the theoretical estimate of Tf = 2.64 ± 0.3 by Arbabi and Sahimi and to Ashby estimate of 1.5 was explained using an analogy with the Daoud and Coniglio approach to the scaling of the free energy of sol-gel transition. It leads to the finding that, there are two different universality classes for the critical exponent Tf: when the stretching forces dominate Tf = f = 2.1, respectively when bending forces prevail Tf = .d = 2.64 seems to be valid. Another possibility is the validity of relation Tf ≤ f which varies only according to the universality class of modulus of elasticity in foam.

  16. Heavy metals mobility in full-scale bioreactor landfill: initial stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Xian; He, Pin-Jing; Shao, Li-Ming; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2008-01-01

    Selected heavy metals (HMs) including Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn initially released from a full-scale bioreactor landfill were monitored over the first 20 months of operation. At the initial landfill stage, the leachate exhibited high HMs release, high organic matter content (27000-43000gl(-1) of TOC) and low pH (5-6). By the fifth month of landfilling, the methanogenic stage had been established, and HMs release was reduced below the Chinese National Standards. Total released HMs accounted for less than 1% of landfill deposited during the investigated period. Most landfill HMs were inorganic. Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra data and model calculations using Visual MINTEQ indicated that humic substances strongly affected the mobility of organic fractions of HMs in the methanogenic landfill. The initial rates of HMs release could be enhanced by recycling the leachate back to bioreactor landfill, but the total quantity released may be reduced by early establishment of methanogenic stage in bioreactor landfill.

  17. Reducing topological defects in self-organizing maps using multiple scale neighborhood functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakoshi, Kazushi; Sato, Yuichi

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a method of reducing topological defects in self-organizing maps (SOMs) using multiple scale neighborhood functions. The multiple scale neighborhood functions are inspired by multiple scale channels in the human visual system. To evaluate the proposed method, we applied it to the traveling salesman problem (TSP), and examined two indexes: the tour length of the solution and the number of kinks in the solution. Consequently, the two indexes are lower for the proposed method. These results indicate that our proposed method has the ability to reduce topological defects.

  18. Small-scale star formation at low metallicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccall, Marshall L.; Hill, Robert; English, Jayanne

    1990-01-01

    Massive star formation in a low metallicity environment is investigated by studying the morphology of small HII regions in the Small Magellanic Cloud. A classification scheme based upon the symmetry of form in the light of H-alpha is proposed to make possible an examination of the properties of blister candidates with respect to nebulas embedded in a more uniform medium. A new diagnostic of size is developed to derive quantitative information about the ionized gas and ionizing stars. The asymmetrical surface-brightness distribution of many HII regions demonstrates that massive stars often form at the edge of dense neutral clouds. However, the existence of many symmetrical nebulas with similar sizes, luminosities, and surface brightnesses shows that massive star formation often occurs within these clouds. Nevertheless, the statistics of the two different forms indicate that the rate of massive star formation declines less steeply with radius across host clouds than in the Milky Way, suggesting that external triggering may play a larger role in initiating star formation.

  19. Nanometer-scale metal dispersions in polymeric matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shull, K.R.; Cole, D.H. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Rehn, L.E.; Baldo, P.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Rutherford backscattering spectrometry was used to measure the depth distribution of gold nanoparticles within thin layers of poly(t-butyl acrylate)(PTBA). The gold nanoparticles were created by evaporation of a discontinuous gold layer onto a thin film of PTBA. A second PTBA film was placed onto these samples to create ``sandwiches`` in which the gold existed between two PTBA films. Gold particle diffusion coefficients were measured from gold particle depth distributions in annealed samples for which the molecular weights of the two PTBA layers were identical. The experiments revealed that particle mobility was decreased by 2 to 3 orders of magnitude compared with predictions of the Stokes-Einstein model of particle diffusion. This is attributed to bridging interactions between particles arising from slow exchange kinetics of polymer segments at the polymer/metal interface. Experiments for which the molecular weights of the two polymer films are different, are sensitive to the ability of polymer molecules to pass through the gold particle layer. Experiments done with thermally evaporated particles are consistent with a picture in which polymer molecules are able to freely pass through the gold particle layer. Results with gold deposited by electron-beam evaporation are different: the gold is not able to diffuse and polymer molecules not able to penetrate the gold layer. These results, combined with optical absorption experiments, indicate that much smaller particles are obtained by electron-beam evaporation than by thermal evaporation.

  20. Dual energy CT: How well can pseudo-monochromatic imaging reduce metal artifacts?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuchenbecker, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.kuchenbecker@dkfz.de; Faby, Sebastian; Sawall, Stefan; Kachelrieß, Marc [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Lell, Michael [Friedrich-Alexander-University (FAU), Erlangen 91054 (Germany)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Dual Energy CT (DECT) provides so-called monoenergetic images based on a linear combination of the original polychromatic images. At certain patient-specific energy levels, corresponding to certain patient- and slice-dependent linear combination weights, e.g., E = 160 keV corresponds to α = 1.57, a significant reduction of metal artifacts may be observed. The authors aimed at analyzing the method for its artifact reduction capabilities to identify its limitations. The results are compared with raw data-based processing. Methods: Clinical DECT uses a simplified version of monochromatic imaging by linearly combining the low and the high kV images and by assigning an energy to that linear combination. Those pseudo-monochromatic images can be used by radiologists to obtain images with reduced metal artifacts. The authors analyzed the underlying physics and carried out a series expansion of the polychromatic attenuation equations. The resulting nonlinear terms are responsible for the artifacts, but they are not linearly related between the low and the high kV scan: A linear combination of both images cannot eliminate the nonlinearities, it can only reduce their impact. Scattered radiation yields additional noncanceling nonlinearities. This method is compared to raw data-based artifact correction methods. To quantify the artifact reduction potential of pseudo-monochromatic images, they simulated the FORBILD abdomen phantom with metal implants, and they assessed patient data sets of a clinical dual source CT system (100, 140 kV Sn) containing artifacts induced by a highly concentrated contrast agent bolus and by metal. In each case, they manually selected an optimal α and compared it to a raw data-based material decomposition in case of simulation, to raw data-based material decomposition of inconsistent rays in case of the patient data set containing contrast agent, and to the frequency split normalized metal artifact reduction in case of the metal

  1. Fano Resonance of the Symmetry-Reduced Metal Bar Grating Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suxia Xie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate that Fano resonance and even multipole Fano resonance can be obtained in a symmetry-reduced structure composed of gold bars with different bar sizes or bar shapes on a layer of dielectric. There is a transparency window opened within the frequency region of the absorptive dipole resonance by metallic bars, as long as the narrow grating waveguide mode induced by reducing symmetry is coincided in spectrum with the dipole resonance such that a destructive interference happens between these two resonant modes. Line shape of the transmission spectra of the nanostructure can be modulated effectively by changing the size or shape of the series of metal bars. The results found can be useful in the design of novel optical device.

  2. Atomic-Scale Tuning of Layered Binary Metal Oxides for High Temperature Moving Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0166 Atomic -Scale Tuning of Layered Binary Metal OxideS ASHLIE MARTINI UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA MERCED Final Report 06/01/2015...COVERED (From - To)      01-05-2012 to 30-04-2015 4.  TITLE AND SUBTITLE Atomic -Scale Tuning of Layered Binary Metal Oxides for High Temperature Moving...understand, at an atomic level, the material properties that influence the thermal, mechanical and tribological behavior of intrinsically layered binary

  3. Scaling at the Mott-Hubbard metal-insulator transition in yttrium hydride

    CERN Document Server

    Hoekstra, A F T; Rosenbaum, T F

    2003-01-01

    A single yttrium hydride thin film is conveniently driven through the T 0 metal-insulator transition by fine-tuning the charge carrier density n via persistent photoconductivity at low temperature. Simultaneously, electrical conductivity and Hall measurements are performed for temperatures T down to 350 mK and magnetic fields up to 14 T. A scaling analysis is applied and critical exponents, resolved separately on the metallic and insulating sides of the critical region, are determined consistently. We introduce corrections to scaling to invoke collapse of the data onto a single master curve over an extended region of the (n, T) phase diagram.

  4. Measurement of electrical conductivity of micron-scale metallic wires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JU Bing-feng; JU Yang

    2006-01-01

    Electrical conductivities of micron-scale aluminum wires were quantitatively measured by a four-point atomic force microscope (AFM) probe. This technique is a combination of the principles of the four-point probe method and standard AFM. This technique was applied to the 99.999% aluminum wires with 350 nm thickness and different widths of 5.0,25.0 and 50.0 μm. Since the small dimensions of the wires,the geometrical effects were discussed in details. Experiment results show that the four-point AFM probe is mechanically flexible and robust. The four-point AFM probe technique is capable of measuring surface topography together with local electrical conductivity simultaneously. The repeatable measurements indicate that this technique could be used for fast in-situ electrical properties characterization of sensors and microelectromechanical system devices.

  5. Microbial community succession during lactate amendment and electron acceptor limitation reveals a predominance of metal-reducing Pelosinus spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosher, Jennifer J; Phelps, Tommy J; Podar, Mircea; Hurt, Richard A; Campbell, James H; Drake, Meghan M; Moberly, James G; Schadt, Christopher W; Brown, Steven D; Hazen, Terry C; Arkin, Adam P; Palumbo, Anthony V; Faybishenko, Boris A; Elias, Dwayne A

    2012-04-01

    The determination of the success of in situ bioremediation strategies is complex. By using controlled laboratory conditions, the influence of individual variables, such as U(VI), Cr(VI), and electron donors and acceptors on community structure, dynamics, and the metal-reducing potential can be studied. Triplicate anaerobic, continuous-flow reactors were inoculated with Cr(VI)-contaminated groundwater from the Hanford, WA, 100-H area, amended with lactate, and incubated for 95 days to obtain stable, enriched communities. The reactors were kept anaerobic with N(2) gas (9 ml/min) flushing the headspace and were fed a defined medium amended with 30 mM lactate and 0.05 mM sulfate with a 48-h generation time. The resultant diversity decreased from 63 genera within 12 phyla to 11 bacterial genera (from 3 phyla) and 2 archaeal genera (from 1 phylum). Final communities were dominated by Pelosinus spp. and to a lesser degree, Acetobacterium spp., with low levels of other organisms, including methanogens. Four new strains of Pelosinus were isolated, with 3 strains being capable of Cr(VI) reduction while one also reduced U(VI). Under limited sulfate, it appeared that the sulfate reducers, including Desulfovibrio spp., were outcompeted. These results suggest that during times of electron acceptor limitation in situ, organisms such as Pelosinus spp. may outcompete the more-well-studied organisms while maintaining overall metal reduction rates and extents. Finally, lab-scale simulations can test new strategies on a smaller scale while facilitating community member isolation, so that a deeper understanding of community metabolism can be revealed.

  6. Mineral transformations during the dissolution of uranium ore minerals by dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasauer, S.; Weidler, P.; Fakra, S.; Tyliszczak, T.; Shuh, D.

    2011-12-01

    Carnotite minerals [X2(UO2)2(VO4)2]; X = K, Ca, Ba, Mn, Na, Cu or Pb] form the major ore of uranium in the Colorado Plateau. These deposits are highly oxidized and contain U(VI) and V(IV). The biotransformation of U(VI) bound in carnotite by bacteria during dissimilatory metal reduction presents a complex puzzle in mineral chemistry. Both U(VI) and V(V) can be respired by metal reducing bacteria, and the mineral structure can change depending on the associated counterion. We incubated anaerobic cultures of S. putrefaciens CN32 with natural carnotite minerals from southeastern Utah in a nutrient-limited defined medium. Strain CN32 is a gram negative bacterium and a terrestrial isolate from New Mexico. The mineral and metal transformations were compared to a system that contained similar concentrations of soluble U(VI) and V(V). Electron (SEM, TEM) microscopies and x-ray spectromicroscopy (STXM) were used in conjunction with XRD to track mineral changes, and bacterial survival was monitored throughout the incubations. Slow rates of metal reduction over 10 months for the treatment with carnotite minerals revealed distinct biotic and abiotic processes, providing insight on mineral transformation and bacteria-metal interactions. The bacteria existed as small flocs or individual cells attached to the mineral phase, but did not adsorb soluble U or V, and accumulated very little of the biominerals. Reduction of mineral V(V) necessarily led to a dismantling of the carnotite structure. Bioreduction of V(V) by CN32 contributed small but profound changes to the mineral system, resulting in new minerals. Abiotic cation exchange within the carnotite group minerals induced the rearrangement of the mineral structures, leading to further mineral transformation. In contrast, bacteria survival was poor for treatments with soluble U(VI) and V(V), although both metals were reduced completely and formed solid UO2 and VO2; we also detected V(III). For these treatments, the bacteria

  7. Potential for electropositive metal to reduce the interactions of Atlantic sturgeon with fishing gear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouyoucos, Ian; Bushnell, Peter; Brill, Richard

    2014-02-01

    Atlantic sturgeon (Acipenser oxyrhynchus) populations have been declared either endangered or threatened under the U.S. Endangered Species Act. Effective measures to repel sturgeon from fishing gear would be beneficial to both fish and fishers because they could reduce both fishery-associated mortality and the need for seasonal and area closures of specific fisheries. Some chondrostean fishes (e.g., sturgeons and paddlefishes) can detect weak electric field gradients (possibly as low as 5 Μv/cm) due to arrays of electroreceptors (ampullae of Lorenzini) on their snout and gill covers. Weak electric fields, such as those produced by electropositive metals (typically mixtures of the lanthanide elements), could therefore potentially be used as a deterrent. To test this idea, we recorded the behavioral responses of juvenile Atlantic sturgeon (31-43 cm fork length) to electropositive metal (primarily a mixture of the lanthanide elements neodymium and praseodymium) both in the presence and absence of food stimuli. Trials were conducted in an approximately 2.5 m diameter × 0.3 m deep tank, and fish behaviors were recorded with an overhead digital video camera. Video records were subsequently digitized (x, y coordinate system), the distance between the fish and the electropositive metal calculated, and data summarized by compiling frequency distributions with 5-cm bins. Juvenile sturgeon showed clear avoidance of electropositive metal but only when food was present. On the basis of our results, we conclude that the electropositive metals, or other sources of weak electric fields, may eventually be used to reduce the interactions of Atlantic sturgeon with fishing gear, but further investigation is needed.

  8. Chemically reduced graphene contains inherent metallic impurities present in parent natural and synthetic graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosi, Adriano; Chua, Chun Kiang; Khezri, Bahareh; Sofer, Zdeněk; Webster, Richard D; Pumera, Martin

    2012-08-07

    Graphene-related materials are in the forefront of nanomaterial research. One of the most common ways to prepare graphenes is to oxidize graphite (natural or synthetic) to graphite oxide and exfoliate it to graphene oxide with consequent chemical reduction to chemically reduced graphene. Here, we show that both natural and synthetic graphite contain a large amount of metallic impurities that persist in the samples of graphite oxide after the oxidative treatment, and chemically reduced graphene after the chemical reduction. We demonstrate that, despite a substantial elimination during the oxidative treatment of graphite samples, a significant amount of impurities associated to the chemically reduced graphene materials still remain and alter their electrochemical properties dramatically. We propose a method for the purification of graphenes based on thermal treatment at 1,000 °C in chlorine atmosphere to reduce the effect of such impurities on the electrochemical properties. Our findings have important implications on the whole field of graphene research.

  9. Chemically reduced graphene contains inherent metallic impurities present in parent natural and synthetic graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosi, Adriano; Chua, Chun Kiang; Khezri, Bahareh; Sofer, Zdeněk; Webster, Richard D.; Pumera, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Graphene-related materials are in the forefront of nanomaterial research. One of the most common ways to prepare graphenes is to oxidize graphite (natural or synthetic) to graphite oxide and exfoliate it to graphene oxide with consequent chemical reduction to chemically reduced graphene. Here, we show that both natural and synthetic graphite contain a large amount of metallic impurities that persist in the samples of graphite oxide after the oxidative treatment, and chemically reduced graphene after the chemical reduction. We demonstrate that, despite a substantial elimination during the oxidative treatment of graphite samples, a significant amount of impurities associated to the chemically reduced graphene materials still remain and alter their electrochemical properties dramatically. We propose a method for the purification of graphenes based on thermal treatment at 1,000 °C in chlorine atmosphere to reduce the effect of such impurities on the electrochemical properties. Our findings have important implications on the whole field of graphene research. PMID:22826262

  10. The Application of Sulphate-Reducing Bacteria for the Heavy Metals Elimination from Acid Mine Drainage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alena Luptáková

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important problems affecting mining companies around the world is the treatment of acid mine drainage (AMD. AMD is characterised by its high acidity, high concentration of metals (Cu, Zn, Cd,… and high concentration of dissolved sulphates. The techniques traditionally used for the treatment of AMD have been based on chemical methods of neutralization and precipitation. A possible alternative to the chemical treatment of AMD is bioremediation using anaerobic sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB. The treatment of AMD by SRB is based on the ability of SRB to reduce sulphates to hydrogen sulphide, which binds readily with metals to form sparingly soluble precipitates. In this study we have attempted to investigate the feasibility of anaerobic biotreatment of the copper contaminated model solution and a real effluent AMD from the shaft Pech (the locality Smolnik using SRB. This method involves three stages: The H2S production by sulphate-reducing bacteria, the metals precipitation by the biologically produced H2S and the metal sulphides filtration. The studies confirm that copper was effectively recovered from the solution using bacterial produced H2S. An initial copper concentration 10 mg.l-1 was decreased to less than 0.05 mg.l-1 after 3 hours. The most adequate pH value for cooper precipitation was 2.5. Results of the copper precipitation from the areal effluent indicates that the optimal pH value for the copper precipitation is 3.5, but the created precipitates contain a mixture of copper and iron sulphides.

  11. Wafer-scale two-dimensional semiconductors from printed oxide skin of liquid metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Benjamin J.; Ou, Jian Zhen; Clark, Rhiannon M.; Berean, Kyle J.; Zavabeti, Ali; Chesman, Anthony S. R.; Russo, Salvy P.; Lau, Desmond W. M.; Xu, Zai-Quan; Bao, Qiaoliang; Kevehei, Omid; Gibson, Brant C.; Dickey, Michael D.; Kaner, Richard B.; Daeneke, Torben; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh

    2017-02-01

    A variety of deposition methods for two-dimensional crystals have been demonstrated; however, their wafer-scale deposition remains a challenge. Here we introduce a technique for depositing and patterning of wafer-scale two-dimensional metal chalcogenide compounds by transforming the native interfacial metal oxide layer of low melting point metal precursors (group III and IV) in liquid form. In an oxygen-containing atmosphere, these metals establish an atomically thin oxide layer in a self-limiting reaction. The layer increases the wettability of the liquid metal placed on oxygen-terminated substrates, leaving the thin oxide layer behind. In the case of liquid gallium, the oxide skin attaches exclusively to a substrate and is then sulfurized via a relatively low temperature process. By controlling the surface chemistry of the substrate, we produce large area two-dimensional semiconducting GaS of unit cell thickness (~1.5 nm). The presented deposition and patterning method offers great commercial potential for wafer-scale processes.

  12. Impact of scaling on the performance and reliability degradation of metal-contacts in NEMS devices

    KAUST Repository

    Dadgour, Hamed F.

    2011-04-01

    Nano-electro-mechanical switches (NEMS) offer new possibilities for the design of ultra energy-efficient systems; however, thus far, all the fabricated NEMS devices require high supply voltages that limit their applicability for logic designs. Therefore, research is being conducted to lower the operating voltages by scaling down the physical dimensions of these devices. However, the impact of device scaling on the electrical and mechanical properties of metal contacts in NEMS devices has not been thoroughly investigated in the literature. Such a study is essential because metal contacts play a critical role in determining the overall performance and reliability of NEMS. Therefore, the comprehensive analytical study presented in this paper highlights the performance and reliability degradations of such metal contacts caused by scaling. The proposed modeling environment accurately takes into account the impact of roughness of contact surfaces, elastic/plastic deformation of contacting asperities, and various inter-molecular forces between mating surfaces (such as Van der Waals and capillary forces). The modeling results are validated and calibrated using available measurement data. This scaling analysis indicates that the key contact properties of gold contacts (resistance, stiction and wear-out) deteriorate "exponentially" with scaling. Simulation results demonstrate that reliable (stiction-free) operation of very small contact areas (≈ 6nm x 6nm) will be a daunting task due to the existence of strong surface forces. Hence, contact degradation is identified as a major problem to the scaling of NEMS transistors. © 2011 IEEE.

  13. Preparation of metal-resistant immobilized sulfate reducing bacteria beads for acid mine drainage treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingliang; Wang, Haixia; Han, Xuemei

    2016-07-01

    Novel immobilized sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) beads were prepared for the treatment of synthetic acid mine drainage (AMD) containing high concentrations of Fe, Cu, Cd and Zn using up-flow anaerobic packed-bed bioreactor. The tolerance of immobilized SRB beads to heavy metals was significantly enhanced compared with that of suspended SRB. High removal efficiencies of sulfate (61-88%) and heavy metals (>99.9%) as well as slightly alkaline effluent pH (7.3-7.8) were achieved when the bioreactor was fed with acidic influent (pH 2.7) containing high concentrations of multiple metals (Fe 469 mg/L, Cu 88 mg/L, Cd 92 mg/L and Zn 128 mg/L), which showed that the bioreactor filled with immobilized SRB beads had tolerance to AMD containing high concentrations of heavy metals. Partially decomposed maize straw was a carbon source and stabilizing agent in the initial phase of bioreactor operation but later had to be supplemented by a soluble carbon source such as sodium lactate. The microbial community in the bioreactor was characterized by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and sequencing of partial 16S rDNA genes. Synergistic interaction between SRB (Desulfovibrio desulfuricans) and co-existing fermentative bacteria could be the key factor for the utilization of complex organic substrate (maize straw) as carbon and nutrients source for sulfate reduction.

  14. Component analysis and heavy metal adsorption ability of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from sulfate reducing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Zheng-Bo; Li, Qing; Li, Chuan-chuan; Chen, Tian-hu; Wang, Jin

    2015-10-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) play an important role in the treatment of acid mine drainage (AMD) by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). In this paper, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans was used as the test strain to explore the effect of heavy metals on the components and adsorption ability of EPS. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy analysis results showed that heavy metals did not influence the type of functional groups of EPS. Potentiometric titration results indicated that the acidic constants (pKa) of the EPS fell into three ranges of 3.5-4.0, 5.9-6.7, and 8.9-9.8. The adsorption site concentrations of the surface functional groups also increased. Adsorption results suggested that EPS had a specific binding affinity for the dosed heavy metal, and that EPS extracted from the Zn(2+)-dosed system had a higher binding affinity for all heavy metals. Additionally, Zn(2+) decreased the inhibitory effects of Cd(2+) and Cu(2+) on the SRB.

  15. Layered reduced graphene oxide with nanoscale interlayer gaps as a stable host for lithium metal anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Dingchang; Liu, Yayuan; Liang, Zheng; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Sun, Jie; Wang, Haotian; Yan, Kai; Xie, Jin; Cui, Yi

    2016-07-01

    Metallic lithium is a promising anode candidate for future high-energy-density lithium batteries. It is a light-weight material, and has the highest theoretical capacity (3,860 mAh g-1) and the lowest electrochemical potential of all candidates. There are, however, at least three major hurdles before lithium metal anodes can become a viable technology: uneven and dendritic lithium deposition, unstable solid electrolyte interphase and almost infinite relative dimension change during cycling. Previous research has tackled the first two issues, but the last is still mostly unsolved. Here we report a composite lithium metal anode that exhibits low dimension variation (˜20%) during cycling and good mechanical flexibility. The anode is composed of 7 wt% ‘lithiophilic’ layered reduced graphene oxide with nanoscale gaps that can host metallic lithium. The anode retains up to ˜3,390 mAh g-1 of capacity, exhibits low overpotential (˜80 mV at 3 mA cm-2) and a flat voltage profile in a carbonate electrolyte. A full-cell battery with a LiCoO2 cathode shows good rate capability and flat voltage profiles.

  16. Testing the Asteroseismic Mass Scale Using Metal-Poor Stars Characterized with APOGEE and Kepler

    CERN Document Server

    Epstein, Courtney R; Johnson, Jennifer A; Shetrone, Matthew; Mosser, Benoît; Hekker, Saskia; Tayar, Jamie; Harding, Paul; Pinsonneault, Marc; Aguirre, Víctor Silva; Basu, Sarbani; Beers, Timothy C; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Bedding, Timothy R; Chaplin, William J; Frinchaboy, Peter M; García, Rafael A; Pérez, Ana E García; Hearty, Fred R; Huber, Daniel; Ivans, Inese I; Majewski, Steven R; Mathur, Savita; Nidever, David; Serenelli, Aldo; Schiavon, Ricardo P; Schneider, Donald P; Schönrich, Ralph; Sobeck, Jennifer S; Stassun, Keivan G; Stello, Dennis; Zasowski, Gail

    2014-01-01

    Fundamental stellar properties, such as mass, radius, and age, can be inferred using asteroseismology. Cool stars with convective envelopes have turbulent motions that can stochastically drive and damp pulsations. The properties of the oscillation frequency power spectrum can be tied to mass and radius through solar-scaled asteroseismic relations. Stellar properties derived using these scaling relations need verification over a range of metallicities. Because the age and mass of halo stars are well-constrained by astrophysical priors, they provide an independent, empirical check on asteroseismic mass estimates in the low-metallicity regime. We identify nine metal-poor red giants (including six stars that are kinematically associated with the halo) from a sample observed by both the Kepler space telescope and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III APOGEE spectroscopic survey. We compare masses inferred using asteroseismology to those expected for halo and thick-disk stars. Although our sample is small, standard scal...

  17. Role of reducing agent in extraction of arsenic and heavy metals from soils by use of EDTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Jung; Jeon, Eun-Ki; Baek, Kitae

    2016-06-01

    Although many metal-contaminated sites contain both anionic arsenic and cationic heavy metals, the current remediation technologies are not effective for the simultaneous removal of both anionic and cationic elements from the contaminated sites due to their different characteristics. In this study, the role of reducing agent in simultaneous extraction of As, Cu, Pb, and Zn from contaminated soils was investigated using EDTA. The addition of reducing agents, which includes sodium oxalate (Na2C2O4), ascorbic acid (C6H8O6) and sodium dithionite (Na2S2O4), greatly enhanced the EDTA extraction of both As and heavy metals from the contaminated soils due to the increased mobility of the metals under the reduced conditions. The extent of the enhancement of the EDTA extraction was greatly affected by the reducing conditions. Strong reducing conditions (0.1 M of dithionite) were required for the extraction of metals strongly bound to the soil, while weak reducing conditions (0.01 M of dithionite or 0.1 M of oxalate/ascorbic acid) were sufficient for extraction of metals that were relatively weakly bound to the soil. An almost 90% extraction efficiency of total metals (As, Cu, Zn, and Pb) was obtained from the contaminated soils using the combination of dithionite and EDTA. Our results clearly showed that the combination of dithionite and EDTA can effectively extract As and heavy metals simultaneously from soils under a wide range of pH conditions.

  18. Charge transfer and formation of reduced Ce{sup 3+} upon adsorption of metal atoms at the ceria (110) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nolan, Michael [Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Lee Maltings, Prospect Row, Cork (Ireland)

    2012-04-07

    The modification of cerium dioxide with nanoscale metal clusters is intensely researched for catalysis applications, with gold, silver, and copper having been particularly well studied. The interaction of the metal cluster with ceria is driven principally by a localised interaction between a small number of metal atoms (as small as one) and the surface and understanding the fundamentals of the interaction of metal atoms with ceria surfaces is therefore of great interest. Much attention has been focused on the interaction of metals with the (111) surface of ceria, since this is the most stable surface and can be grown as films, which are probed experimentally. However, nanostructures exposing other surfaces such as (110) show high activity for reactions including CO oxidation and require further study; these nanostructures could be modified by deposition of metal atoms or small clusters, but there is no information to date on the atomic level details of metal-ceria interactions involving the (110) surface. This paper presents the results of density functional theory (DFT) corrected for on-site Coulomb interactions (DFT+U) calculations of the adsorption of a number of different metal atoms at an extended ceria (110) surface; the metals are Au, Ag, Cu, Al, Ga, In, La, Ce, V, Cr, and Fe. Upon adsorption all metals are oxidised, transferring electron(s) to the surface, resulting in localised surface distortions. The precise details depend on the identity of the metal atom. Au, Ag, Cu each transfer one electron to the surface, reducing one Ce ion to Ce{sup 3+}, while of the trivalent metals, Al and La are fully oxidised, but Ga and In are only partially oxidised. Ce and the transition metals are also partially oxidised, with the number of reduced Ce ions possible in this surface no more than three per adsorbed metal atom. The predicted oxidation states of the adsorbed metal atoms should be testable in experiments on ceria nanostructures modified with metal atoms.

  19. A Reduced Basis Framework: Application to large scale non-linear multi-physics problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daversin C.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present applications of the reduced basis method (RBM to large-scale non-linear multi-physics problems. We first describe the mathematical framework in place and in particular the Empirical Interpolation Method (EIM to recover an affine decomposition and then we propose an implementation using the open-source library Feel++ which provides both the reduced basis and finite element layers. Large scale numerical examples are shown and are connected to real industrial applications arising from the High Field Resistive Magnets development at the Laboratoire National des Champs Magnétiques Intenses.

  20. A flexible metallic actuator using reduced graphene oxide as a multifunctional component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Junxing; Mu, Jiuke; Hou, Chengyi; Zhang, Qinghong; Li, Yaogang; Wang, Hongzhi

    2017-09-14

    Flexible actuators are widely in demand for many real-life applications. Considering that existing actuators based on polymers, low-dimensional materials and pore-rich materials are mostly limited by slow response rate, high driving voltage and poor stability, we report here a novel metal based flexible actuator which is fabricated simply through partial oxidation and nano-function of copper foil with the assistance of reduced graphene oxide. The obtained asymmetric metallic actuator is (electric-)thermally driven and exhibits fast response rate (∼2 s) and large curvature (2.4 cm(-1)) under a low voltage (∼1 V) with a sustainable operation of up to ∼50 000 cycles. The actuator can also be triggered by infrared irradiation and direct-heating under various conditions including air, water, and vacuum.

  1. Scaling properties of adsorption energies for hydrogen-containing molecules on transition-metal surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Greeley, Jeffrey Philip; Studt, Felix

    2007-01-01

    with the adsorption energy of the central, C, N, O, or S atom, the scaling constant depending only on x. A model is proposed to understand this behavior. The scaling model is developed into a general framework for estimating the reaction energies for hydrogenation and dehydrogenation reactions.......Density functional theory calculations are presented for CHx, x=0,1,2,3, NHx, x=0,1,2, OHx, x=0,1, and SHx, x=0,1 adsorption on a range of close-packed and stepped transition-metal surfaces. We find that the adsorption energy of any of the molecules considered scales approximately...

  2. Impact of incomplete metal coverage on the electrical properties of metal-CNT contacts: A large-scale ab initio study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fediai, Artem, E-mail: artem.fediai@nano.tu-dresden.de; Ryndyk, Dmitry A. [Institute for Materials Science and Max Bergman Center of Biomaterials, TU Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Center for Advancing Electronics Dresden, TU Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Seifert, Gotthard [Theoretical Chemistry, TU Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Center for Advancing Electronics Dresden, TU Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Dresden Center for Computational Materials Science, TU Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Mothes, Sven; Schroter, Michael; Claus, Martin [Chair for Electron Devices and Integrated Circuits, TU Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Center for Advancing Electronics Dresden, TU Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Cuniberti, Gianaurelio [Institute for Materials Science and Max Bergman Center of Biomaterials, TU Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Center for Advancing Electronics Dresden, TU Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Dresden Center for Computational Materials Science, TU Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2016-09-05

    Using a dedicated combination of the non-equilibrium Green function formalism and large-scale density functional theory calculations, we investigated how incomplete metal coverage influences two of the most important electrical properties of carbon nanotube (CNT)-based transistors: contact resistance and its scaling with contact length, and maximum current. These quantities have been derived from parameter-free simulations of atomic systems that are as close as possible to experimental geometries. Physical mechanisms that govern these dependences have been identified for various metals, representing different CNT-metal interaction strengths from chemisorption to physisorption. Our results pave the way for an application-oriented design of CNT-metal contacts.

  3. Impact of incomplete metal coverage on the electrical properties of metal-CNT contacts: A large-scale ab initio study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fediai, Artem; Ryndyk, Dmitry A.; Seifert, Gotthard; Mothes, Sven; Schroter, Michael; Claus, Martin; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2016-09-01

    Using a dedicated combination of the non-equilibrium Green function formalism and large-scale density functional theory calculations, we investigated how incomplete metal coverage influences two of the most important electrical properties of carbon nanotube (CNT)-based transistors: contact resistance and its scaling with contact length, and maximum current. These quantities have been derived from parameter-free simulations of atomic systems that are as close as possible to experimental geometries. Physical mechanisms that govern these dependences have been identified for various metals, representing different CNT-metal interaction strengths from chemisorption to physisorption. Our results pave the way for an application-oriented design of CNT-metal contacts.

  4. Characterization of macroscopic tensile strength of polycrystalline metals with two-scale finite element analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Ikumu; Terada, Kenjiro; Neto, Eduardo Alberto de Souza; Perić, Djordje

    The objective of this contribution is to develop an elastic-plastic-damage constitutive model for crystal grain and to incorporate it with two-scale finite element analyses based on mathematical homogenization method, in order to characterize the macroscopic tensile strength of polycrystalline metals. More specifically, the constitutive model for single crystal is obtained by combining hyperelasticity, a rate-independent single crystal plasticity and a continuum damage model. The evolution equations, stress update algorithm and consistent tangent are derived within the framework of standard elastoplasticity at finite strain. By employing two-scale finite element analysis, the ductile behaviour of polycrystalline metals and corresponding tensile strength are evaluated. The importance of finite element formulation is examined by comparing performance of several finite elements and their convergence behaviour is assessed with mesh refinement. Finally, the grain size effect on yield and tensile strength is analysed in order to illustrate the versatility of the proposed two-scale model.

  5. Combustion of Metals in Carbon Dioxide and Reduced-Gravity Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branch, M. C.; Abbud-Madrid, A.; Modak, A.; Dreyer, C. B.; Daily, J. W.

    2001-01-01

    Ongoing exploration and future mission2001110444 s to Mars have given impetus to research on the use of natural resources of the planet. Since carbon dioxide (CO2) constitutes approximately 95% of the Mars atmosphere and since it reacts directly and vigorously with several metals, this investigation focuses on metal-CO2 reactions as a possible combination for rocket-propellant production and energy generation. Magnesium (Mg) has been initially selected as the metal fuel owing to its low ignition temperature and high specific impulse and burning rate in CO2. Our studies in this field started with low gravity (g) combustion tests of Mg in O2, CO2, and CO. Reduced gravity provided a clear picture of the burning phenomena by eliminating the intrusive buoyant flows in high-temperature metal reactions and by removing the destructive effect of gravity on the shape of molten metal samples. Suspended cylindrical metal samples of 2, 3, and 4-mm in diameter and length were radiatively ignited in low-g to generate free-floating samples exhibiting a spherically symmetric flame with increasing metal-oxide accumulation in an outer shell. For the Mg-CO2 combination, burning times twice as long as in normal-g and five times longer than in Mg-O2 flames were observed, revealing a diffusion-controlled reaction. The burning time is proportional to the square of the sample diameter. In tests conducted with pure CO, combustion was not possible without constant heating of the sample due to the formation of a thick carbon-containing coating around the Mg sample generated by surface reactions. The following work presents two new studies that attempt to explain some of the low-g experimental observations. First, a simplified one-dimensional, quasi-steady numerical model is developed to obtain temperature, species concentrations, and burning rates of the spherically symmetric diffusion flame around the Mg sample burning in O2 and CO2. Second, a Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF

  6. The spread of computer viruses over a reduced scale-free network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lu-Xing; Yang, Xiaofan

    2014-02-01

    Due to the high dimensionality of an epidemic model of computer viruses over a general scale-free network, it is difficult to make a close study of its dynamics. In particular, it is extremely difficult, if not impossible, to prove the global stability of its viral equilibrium, if any. To overcome this difficulty, we suggest to simplify a general scale-free network by partitioning all of its nodes into two classes: higher-degree nodes and lower-degree nodes, and then equating the degrees of all higher-degree nodes and all lower-degree nodes, respectively, yielding a reduced scale-free network. We then propose an epidemic model of computer viruses over a reduced scale-free network. A theoretical analysis reveals that the proposed model is bound to have a globally stable viral equilibrium, implying that any attempt to eradicate network viruses would prove unavailing. As a result, the next best thing we can do is to restrain virus prevalence. Based on an analysis of the impact of different model parameters on virus prevalence, some practicable measures are recommended to contain virus spreading. The work in this paper adequately justifies the idea of reduced scale-free networks.

  7. Improving catchment scale water quality modelling with continuous high resolution monitoring of metals in runoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saari, Markus; Rossi, Pekka; Blomberg von der Geest, Kalle; Mäkinen, Ari; Postila, Heini; Marttila, Hannu

    2017-04-01

    High metal concentrations in natural waters is one of the key environmental and health problems globally. Continuous in-situ analysis of metals from runoff water is technically challenging but essential for the better understanding of processes which lead to pollutant transport. Currently, typical analytical methods for monitoring elements in liquids are off-line laboratory methods such as ICP-OES (Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectroscopy) and ICP-MS (ICP combined with a mass spectrometer). Disadvantage of the both techniques is time consuming sample collection, preparation, and off-line analysis at laboratory conditions. Thus use of these techniques lack possibility for real-time monitoring of element transport. We combined a novel high resolution on-line metal concentration monitoring with catchment scale physical hydrological modelling in Mustijoki river in Southern Finland in order to study dynamics of processes and form a predictive warning system for leaching of metals. A novel on-line measurement technique based on micro plasma emission spectroscopy (MPES) is tested for on-line detection of selected elements (e.g. Na, Mg, Al, K, Ca, Fe, Ni, Cu, Cd and Pb) in runoff waters. The preliminary results indicate that MPES can sufficiently detect and monitor metal concentrations from river water. Water and Soil Assessment Tool (SWAT) catchment scale model was further calibrated with high resolution metal concentration data. We show that by combining high resolution monitoring and catchment scale physical based modelling, further process studies and creation of early warning systems, for example to optimization of drinking water uptake from rivers, can be achieved.

  8. A reduced scale EM Calorimeter prototype for the AMS-02 experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Cervelli, F; Coignet, G; Di Falco, S; Falchini, E; Lorntadze, T; Liu, Z; Maestro, P; Marrocchesi, P S; Paoletti, R; Pilo, F; Turini, N; Valle, G D; Vannini, C; Venanzoni, G; Yu, Z

    2002-01-01

    A reduced scale prototype of the Pb-SciFi sampling EM calorimeter for the AMS-02 experiment was tested at CERN SPS beam line X5 at energies from 5 to 250 GeV. The detector was equalized with minimum ionizing particles and calibrated with electron beams. The effective sampling thickness, linearity and energy resolution were measured. (7 refs).

  9. Packaging a liquid metal ESD with micro-scale Mercury droplet.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnard, Casey Anderson

    2011-08-01

    A liquid metal ESD is being developed to provide electrical switching at different acceleration levels. The metal will act as both proof mass and electric contact. Mercury is chosen to comply with operation parameters. There are many challenges surrounding the deposition and containment of micro scale mercury droplets. Novel methods of micro liquid transfer are developed to deliver controllable amounts of mercury to the appropriate channels in volumes under 1 uL. Issues of hermetic sealing and avoidance of mercury contamination are also addressed.

  10. Atomic-scale simulations of the mechanical deformation of nanocrystalline metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiøtz, Jakob; Vegge, Tejs; Di Tolla, Francesco

    1999-01-01

    Nanocrystalline metals, i.e., metals in which the grain size is in the nanometer range, have a range of technologically interesting properties including increased hardness and yield strength. We present atomic-scale simulations of the plastic behavior of nanocrystalline copper. The simulations show...... leads to a hardening as the grain size is increased (reverse Hall-Fetch effect), implying a maximum in hardness for a grain size above the ones studied here. We investigate the effects of varying temperature, strain rate, and porosity, and discuss the relation to recent experiments. At increasing...

  11. Strategies to Reduce Tin and Other Metals in Electronic Cigarette Aerosol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Williams

    Full Text Available Metals are present in electronic cigarette (EC fluid and aerosol and may present health risks to users.The objective of this study was to measure the amounts of tin, copper, zinc, silver, nickel and chromium in the aerosol from four brands of EC and to identify the sources of these metals by examining the elemental composition of the atomizer components.Four brands of popular EC were dissected and the cartomizers were examined microscopically. Elemental composition of cartomizer components was determined using integrated energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis, and the concentrations of the tin, copper, zinc silver, nickel, and chromium in the aerosol were determined for each brand using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy.All filaments were made of nickel and chromium. Thick wires were copper coated with either tin or silver. Wires were joined to each other by tin solder, brazing, or by brass clamps. High concentrations of tin were detected in the aerosol when tin solder joints were friable. Tin coating on copper wires also contributed to tin in the aerosol.Tin concentrations in EC aerosols varied both within and between brands. Tin in aerosol was reduced by coating the thick wire with silver rather than tin, placing stable tin solder joints outside the atomizing chamber, joining wires with brass clamps or by brazing rather than soldering wires. These data demonstrate the feasibility of removing tin and other unwanted metals from EC aerosol by altering designs and using materials of suitable quality.

  12. THE FUNDAMENTAL METALLICITY RELATION REDUCES TYPE Ia SN HUBBLE RESIDUALS MORE THAN HOST MASS ALONE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayden, Brian T.; Garnavich, Peter M. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Gupta, Ravi R.; Sako, Masao [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Mannucci, Filippo [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Nichol, Robert C. [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, Portsmouth University, Dennis Sciama Building, Po1 3FX Portsmouth (United Kingdom)

    2013-02-20

    Type Ia supernova Hubble residuals have been shown to correlate with host galaxy mass, imposing a major obstacle for their use in measuring dark energy properties. Here, we calibrate the fundamental metallicity relation (FMR) of Mannucci et al. for host mass and star formation rates measured from broadband colors alone. We apply the FMR to the large number of hosts from the SDSS-II sample of Gupta et al. and find that the scatter in the Hubble residuals is significantly reduced when compared with using only stellar mass (or the mass-metallicity relation) as a fit parameter. Our calibration of the FMR is restricted to only star-forming galaxies and in the Hubble residual calculation we include only hosts with log(SFR) > - 2. Our results strongly suggest that metallicity is the underlying source of the correlation between Hubble residuals and host galaxy mass. Since the FMR is nearly constant between z = 2 and the present, use of the FMR along with light-curve width and color should provide a robust distance measurement method that minimizes systematic errors.

  13. The evolution of galaxy metallicity scaling relations in cosmological hydrodynamical simulations

    CERN Document Server

    De Rossi, Maria E; Font, Andreea S; McCarthy, Ian G

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of the metal content of galaxies and its relations to other global properties [such as total stellar mass (M*), circular velocity, star formation rate (SFR), halo mass, etc.] provides important constraints on models of galaxy formation. Here we examine the evolution of metallicity scaling relations of simulated galaxies in the Galaxies-Intergalactic Medium Interaction Calculation suite of cosmological simulations. We make comparisons to observations of the correlation of gas-phase abundances with M* (the mass-metallicity relation, MZR), as well as with both M* and SFR or gas mass fraction (the so-called 3D fundamental metallicity relations, FMRs). The simulated galaxies follow the observed local MZR and FMRs over an order of magnitude in M*, but overpredict the metallicity of massive galaxies (log M* > 10.5), plausibly due to inefficient feedback in this regime. We discuss the origin of the MZR and FMRs in the context of galactic outflows and gas accretion. We examine the evolution of mass-metal...

  14. Speckle-reducing scale-invariant feature transform match for synthetic aperture radar image registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianmin; Li, Bo; Xu, Qizhi

    2016-07-01

    The anisotropic scale space (ASS) is often used to enhance the performance of a scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT) algorithm in the registration of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. The existing ASS-based methods usually suffer from unstable keypoints and false matches, since the anisotropic diffusion filtering has limitations in reducing the speckle noise from SAR images while building the ASS image representation. We proposed a speckle reducing SIFT match method to obtain stable keypoints and acquire precise matches for the SAR image registration. First, the keypoints are detected in a speckle reducing anisotropic scale space constructed by the speckle reducing anisotropic diffusion, so that speckle noise is greatly reduced and prominent structures of the images are preserved, consequently the stable keypoints can be derived. Next, the probabilistic relaxation labeling approach is employed to establish the matches of the keypoints then the correct match rate of the keypoints is significantly increased. Experiments conducted on simulated speckled images and real SAR images demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  15. Photocatalytic properties of zinc sulfide nanocrystals biofabricated by metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Xiang [School of The Environment and Safety Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Ma, Xiao-Bo [School of The Environment and Safety Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Yuan, Hang [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Technical Biology & Agriculture Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Liu, Peng-Cheng; Lei, Yu-Bin; Xu, Hui [School of The Environment and Safety Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Du, Dao-Lin, E-mail: ddl@ujs.edu.cn [School of The Environment and Safety Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Sun, Jian-Fan [School of The Environment and Safety Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Feng, Yu-Jie, E-mail: yujief@hit.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • S. oneidensis MR-1 biofabricated ZnS nanocrystals using artificial wastewater. • ZnS nanocrystals were 5 nm in diameter and aggregated extracellularly. • ZnS had good catalytic activity in the degradation of RHB under UV irradiation. • Photogenerated holes mainly contributed to the degradation of RhB. - Abstract: Accumulation and utilization of heavy metals from wastewater by biological treatment system has aroused great interest. In the present study, a metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was used to explore the biofabrication of ZnS nanocrystals from the artificial wastewater. The biogenic H{sub 2}S produced via the reduction of thiosulfate precipitated the Zn(II) as sulfide extracellularly. Characterization by X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) confirmed the precipitates as ZnS nanocrystals. The biogenic ZnS nanocrystals appeared spherical in shape with an average diameter of 5 nm and mainly aggregated in the medium and cell surface of S. oneidensis MR-1. UV–vis DRS spectra showed ZnS nanoparticles appeared a strong absorption below 360 nm. Thus, the photocatalytic activity of ZnS was evaluated by the photodegradation of rhodamine B (RhB) under UV irradiation. The biogenic ZnS nanocrystals showed a high level of photodegradation efficiency to RhB coupled with a significant blue-shift of maximum adsorption peak. A detailed analysis indicated the photogenerated holes, rather than hydroxyl radicals, contributed to the photocatalytic decolorization of RhB. This approach of coupling biosynthesis of nanoparticles with heavy metal removal may offer a potential avenue for efficient bioremediation of heavy metal wastewater.

  16. Numerical study on similarity of plume infrared radiation between reduced-scale solid rocket motors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Xiaoying; Chen Huandong

    2016-01-01

    This study seeks to determine the similarities in plume radiation between reduced and full-scale solid rocket models in ground test conditions through investigation of flow and radiation for a series of scale ratios ranging from 0.1 to 1. The radiative transfer equation (RTE) considering gas and particle radiation in a non-uniform plume has been adopted and solved by the finite volume method (FVM) to compute the three dimensional, spectral and directional radiation of a plume in the infrared waveband 2–6μm. Conditions at wavelengths 2.7μm and 4.3μm are discussed in detail, and ratios of plume radiation for reduced-scale through full-scale models are examined. This work shows that, with increasing scale ratio of a computed rocket motor, area of the high-temperature core increases as a 2 power function of the scale ratio, and the radiation intensity of the plume increases with 2–2.5 power of the scale ratio. The infrared radiation of plume gases shows a strong spectral dependency, while that of Al2O3 particles shows spectral continuity of gray media. Spectral radiation intensity of a computed solid rocket plume’s high temperature core increases sig-nificantly in peak radiation spectra of plume gases CO and CO2. Al2O3 particles are the major radi-ation component in a rocket plume. There is good similarity between contours of plume spectral radiance from different scale models of computed rockets, and there are two peak spectra of radi-ation intensity at wavebands 2.7–3.0μm and 4.2–4.6μm. Directed radiation intensity of the entire plume volume will rise with increasing elevation angle.

  17. Reducing aeration energy consumption in a large-scale membrane bioreactor: Process simulation and engineering application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jianyu; Liang, Peng; Yan, Xiaoxu; Zuo, Kuichang; Xiao, Kang; Xia, Junlin; Qiu, Yong; Wu, Qing; Wu, Shijia; Huang, Xia; Qi, Meng; Wen, Xianghua

    2016-04-15

    Reducing the energy consumption of membrane bioreactors (MBRs) is highly important for their wider application in wastewater treatment engineering. Of particular significance is reducing aeration in aerobic tanks to reduce the overall energy consumption. This study proposed an in situ ammonia-N-based feedback control strategy for aeration in aerobic tanks; this was tested via model simulation and through a large-scale (50,000 m(3)/d) engineering application. A full-scale MBR model was developed based on the activated sludge model (ASM) and was calibrated to the actual MBR. The aeration control strategy took the form of a two-step cascaded proportion-integration (PI) feedback algorithm. Algorithmic parameters were optimized via model simulation. The strategy achieved real-time adjustment of aeration amounts based on feedback from effluent quality (i.e., ammonia-N). The effectiveness of the strategy was evaluated through both the model platform and the full-scale engineering application. In the former, the aeration flow rate was reduced by 15-20%. In the engineering application, the aeration flow rate was reduced by 20%, and overall specific energy consumption correspondingly reduced by 4% to 0.45 kWh/m(3)-effluent, using the present practice of regulating the angle of guide vanes of fixed-frequency blowers. Potential energy savings are expected to be higher for MBRs with variable-frequency blowers. This study indicated that the ammonia-N-based aeration control strategy holds promise for application in full-scale MBRs.

  18. A Two-Scale Reduced Model for Darcy Flow in Fractured Porous Media

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Huangxin

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we develop a two-scale reduced model for simulating the Darcy flow in two-dimensional porous media with conductive fractures. We apply the approach motivated by the embedded fracture model (EFM) to simulate the flow on the coarse scale, and the effect of fractures on each coarse scale grid cell intersecting with fractures is represented by the discrete fracture model (DFM) on the fine scale. In the DFM used on the fine scale, the matrix-fracture system are resolved on unstructured grid which represents the fractures accurately, while in the EFM used on the coarse scale, the flux interaction between fractures and matrix are dealt with as a source term, and the matrix-fracture system can be resolved on structured grid. The Raviart-Thomas mixed finite element methods are used for the solution of the coupled flows in the matrix and the fractures on both fine and coarse scales. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed model for simulation of flow in fractured porous media.

  19. Heavy metal pollution in soil associated with a large-scale cyanidation gold mining region in southeast of Jilin, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mo; Lu, Wenxi; Hou, Zeyu; Zhang, Yu; Jiang, Xue; Wu, Jichun

    2017-01-01

    Different gold mining and smelting processes can lead to distinctive heavy metal contamination patterns and results. This work examined heavy metal pollution from a large-scale cyanidation gold mining operation, which is distinguished from artisanal and small-scale amalgamation gold mining, in Jilin Province, China. A total of 20 samples including one background sample were collected from the surface of the mining area and the tailings pond in June 2013. These samples were analyzed for heavy metal concentrations and degree of pollution as well as sources of Cr, Cu, Zn, Pb, Ni, Cd, As, and Hg. The mean concentrations of Pb, Hg, and Cu (819.67, 0.12, and 46.92 mg kg(-1), respectively) in soil samples from the gold mine area exceeded local background values. The mean Hg content was less than the first-class standard of the Environmental Quality for Soils, which suggested that the cyanidation method is helpful for reducing Hg pollution. The geochemical accumulation index and enrichment factor results indicated clear signs that enrichment was present for Pb, Cu, and Hg, with the presence of serious Pb pollution and moderate presence to none of Hg and Cu pollution. Multivariate statistical analysis showed that there were three metal sources: (1) Pb, Cd, Cu, and As came from anthropogenic sources; (2) Cr and Zn were naturally occurring; whereas (3) Hg and Ni had a mix of anthropogenic and natural sources. Moreover, the tailings dam plays an important role in intercepting the tailings. Furthermore, the potential ecological risk assessment results showed that the study area poses a potentially strong risk to the ecological health. Furthermore, Pb and Hg (due to high concentration and high toxicity, respectively) are major pollutants on the risk index, and both Pb and Hg pollution should be of great concern at the Haigou gold mines in Jilin, China.

  20. Supplementation of soft drinks with metallic ions reduces dissolution of bovine enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloisa Aparecida Barbosa da Silva Pereira

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the addition of metallic ions to carbonated drinks on their erosive potential. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Powdered enamel was added to carbonated beverages (Coca-ColaTM or Sprite ZeroTM and shaken for 30 s. The samples were then immediately centrifuged and the supernatant removed. This procedure was repeated 5 times with the beverages containing Cu2+, Mg2+, Mn2+ or Zn2+ (1.25-60 mmol/L. For Coca-ColaTM, the concentration of each ion that exhibited the highest protection was also evaluated in combination with Fe2+. The phosphate or calcium released were analyzed spectrophotometrically. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test (p<0.05. RESULTS: For Coca-ColaTM, the best protective effect was observed for Zn2+ alone (10 mmol/L or in combination (1 mmol/L with other ions (12% and 27%, respectively, when compared with the control. Regarding Sprite ZeroTM, the best protective effect was observed for Cu2+ at 15 and 30 mmol/L, which decreased the dissolution by 22-23%. Zn2+ at 2.5 mmol/L also reduced the dissolution of powdered enamel by 8%. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that the combination of metallic ions can be an alternative to reduce the erosive potential of Coca-ColaTM. Regarding Sprite ZeroTM, the addition of Cu2+ seems to be the best alternative.

  1. Supplementation of soft drinks with metallic ions reduces dissolution of bovine enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    PEREIRA, Heloisa Aparecida Barbosa da Silva; LEITE, Aline de Lima; ITALIANI, Flávia de Moraes; KATO, Melissa Thiemi; PESSAN, Juliano Pelim; BUZALAF, Marília Afonso Rabelo

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the addition of metallic ions to carbonated drinks on their erosive potential. Material and Methods Powdered enamel was added to carbonated beverages (Coca-ColaTM or Sprite ZeroTM and shaken for 30 s. The samples were then immediately centrifuged and the supernatant removed. This procedure was repeated 5 times with the beverages containing Cu2+, Mg2+, Mn2+ or Zn2+ (1.25-60 mmol/L). For Coca-ColaTM, the concentration of each ion that exhibited the highest protection was also evaluated in combination with Fe2+. The phosphate or calcium released were analyzed spectrophotometrically. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test (p<0.05). Results For Coca-ColaTM, the best protective effect was observed for Zn2+ alone (10 mmol/L) or in combination (1 mmol/L) with other ions (12% and 27%, respectively, when compared with the control). Regarding Sprite ZeroTM, the best protective effect was observed for Cu2+ at 15 and 30 mmol/L, which decreased the dissolution by 22-23%. Zn2+ at 2.5 mmol/L also reduced the dissolution of powdered enamel by 8%. Conclusions The results suggest that the combination of metallic ions can be an alternative to reduce the erosive potential of Coca-ColaTM. Regarding Sprite ZeroTM, the addition of Cu2+ seems to be the best alternative. PMID:24037077

  2. Reduced metals concentrations of water, sediment and hyalella azteca from lakes in the vicinity of the sudbury metal smelters, Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuhaimi-Othman, M; Pascoe, D; Borgmann, U; Norwood, W P

    2006-06-01

    Hyalella azteca (Crustacea: Amphipoda), water and sediments from 12 circum-neutral lakes between Sudbury and North Bay in Ontario, Canada were sampled in August 1998 and analyzed for 10 metals including Cu, Zn, Cd, Ni, Pb, Co, Mo, V, Ba and Ti. Statistical analyses showed that concentrations of the metals in H. azteca, water and sediment differed significantly (ANOVA, Pazteca and Mo in water). There was a trend of declining metal concentration, especially for Cu, Ni and Co (in water, Hyalella and sediment), with distance from the smelters indicating the reduced impact of atmospheric pollution. Metal concentrations of lakes (water) in the Sudbury area were found to be lower compared to data from the 1970s and 1980s indicating an improvement in water quality. Metal concentrations in field-collected amphipods compared favorably with those measured in the laboratory in animals exposed to deep-water sediments, provided metal concentrations were not extremely low (e.g., Pb) and that water chemistry differences (e.g., pH) were taken into account for some metals (especially Cd). In general bioaccumulation of metals in H. azteca was predicted better from surface water than from sediment total metal.

  3. Combining Nitrilotriacetic Acid and Permeable Barriers for Enhanced Phytoextraction of Heavy Metals from Municipal Solid Waste Compost by and Reduced Metal Leaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shulan; Jia, Lina; Duo, Lian

    2016-05-01

    Phytoextraction has the potential to remove heavy metals from contaminated soil, and chelants can be used to improve the capabilities of phytoextraction. However, environmentally persistent chelants can cause metal leaching and groundwater pollution. A column experiment was conducted to evaluate the viability of biodegradable nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) to increase the uptake of heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Ni, Pb, Cu, and Zn) by L. in municipal solid waste (MSW) compost and to evaluate the effect of two permeable barrier materials, bone meal and crab shell, on metal leaching. The application of NTA significantly increased the concentrations and uptake of heavy metals in . The enhancement was more pronounced at higher dosages of NTA. In the 15 mmol kg NTA treatment using a crab shell barrier, the Cr and Ni concentrations in the plant shoots increased by approximately 8- and 10-fold, respectively, relative to the control. However, the addition of NTA also caused significant heavy metal leaching from the MSW compost. Bone meal and crab shell barriers positioned between the compost and the subsoil were effective in preventing metal leaching down through the soil profile by the retention of metals in the barrier. The application of a biodegradable chelant and the use of permeable barriers is a viable form of enhanced phytoextraction to increase the removal of metals and to reduce possible leaching.

  4. Development of a production scale purification of Ge-68 from irradiated gallium metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzsimmons, Jonathan M.; Mausner, Leonard [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Germanium-68 (Ge-68) is produced by proton irradiation of a gallium metal target and purified by organic extraction. The Ge-68 can be used in a medical isotope generator to produce Gallium-68 (Ga-68) which can be used to radiolabel PET imaging agents. The emerging use of Ge-68 in the Ga-68 medical isotope generator has caused us to develop a new purification method for Ge-68 that does not use toxic solvents. The purpose of this work was to develop a production scale separation of Ge-68 that utilizes a leaching step to remove a bulk of the gallium metal, followed by purification with Sephadex {sup copyright} G25. Production scale (300 mCi) purification was performed with the new method. The purified Ge-68 contained the highest radioactivity concentration of Ge-68 produced at BNL; the sample meet Department of Energy specifications and the method had an excellent recovery of Ge-68.

  5. Origin of sample size effect: Stochastic dislocation formation in crystalline metals at small scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guan-Rong; Huang, J. C.; Tsai, W. Y.

    2016-12-01

    In crystalline metals at small scales, the dislocation density will be increased by stochastic events of dislocation network, leading to a universal power law for various material structures. In this work, we develop a model obeyed by a probability distribution of dislocation density to describe the dislocation formation in terms of a chain reaction. The leading order terms of steady-state of probability distribution gives physical and quantitative insight to the scaling exponent n values in the power law of sample size effect. This approach is found to be consistent with experimental n values in a wide range.

  6. Availability of radium isotopes and heavy metals from scales and tailings of Polish hard coal mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karsten Leopold; Boguslaw Michalik; Jens Wiegand [University Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany). Geology Department

    2007-05-15

    Radium and heavy metal contaminated tailings and scales resulting from Polish hard coal mining were investigated for their mobilisation potential by using leaching methods. The main focus is set on a three-step extraction procedure proposed by BCR (Bureau Communautaire de Reference, now Standards Measurements and Testing Programme) of the European Union, which was used for investigating the availability of radium isotopes. In addition, the results of a Polish extraction procedure for the heavy metals' water solubility are presented for rough comparison. After a special treatment, the BCR-reagents were measured by gamma-spectrometry to define their radium activity concentrations; the heavy metal content in the water soluble fractions was determined by ICP-AES. The samples were collected at two different sites influenced by the discharge of pit water from hard coal mining. The tailings were taken from a former tailing pond, which now is no longer in use, but the settled material is still present. At another abandoned and meanwhile flooded tailing pond, the scales were scraped from the inside of a discharge tube. The results obtained show that there is different leaching behaviour between the radium isotopes. The tailings being characterised by surface adsorbed radium provide up to 25% of the initial {sup 226}Ra content, {sup 228}Ra is altogether leached up to 15%. The scales comprise stable radiobaryte and can be considered as being unable to provide radium isotopes, since no trace of radium dissolution was observed. The leaching behaviour of heavy metals is similar to that of radium. Mn, Ni and Zn are dissolved by water from the tailings; the scales do not provide any.

  7. Availability of radium isotopes and heavy metals from scales and tailings of Polish hard coal mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karsten Leopold; Boguslaw Michalik; Jens Wiegand [University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany)

    2007-02-15

    Radium and heavy metal contaminated tailings and scales resulting from Polish hard coal mining were investigated for their mobilisation potential by using leaching methods. The main focus is set on a three-step extraction procedure proposed by BCR (Bureau Communautaire de Reference, now Standards Measurements and Testing Programme) of the European Union, which was used for investigating the availability of radium isotopes. In addition, the results of a Polish extraction procedure for the heavy metals' water solubility are presented for rough comparison. After a special treatment, the BCR-reagents were measured by gamma-spectrometry to define their radium activity concentrations; the heavy metal content in the water soluble fractions was determined by ICP-AES. The samples were collected at two different sites influenced by the discharge of pit water from hard coal mining. The tailings were taken from a former tailing pond, which now is no longer in use, but the settled material is still present. At another abandoned and meanwhile flooded tailing pond, the scales were scraped from the inside of a discharge tube. The results obtained show that there is different leaching behaviour between the radium isotopes. The tailings being characterised by surface adsorbed radium provide up to 25% of the initial 226Ra content, 228Ra is altogether leached up to 15%. The scales comprise stable radiobaryte (Ba(Ra)SO{sub 4}) and can be considered as being unable to provide radium isotopes, since no trace of radium dissolution was observed. The leaching behaviour of heavy metals is similar to that of radium. Mn, Ni and Zn are dissolved by water from the tailings; the scales do not provide any.

  8. Availability of radium isotopes and heavy metals from scales and tailings of Polish hard coal mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leopold, Karsten [University Duisburg-Essen, Geology Department, Universitaetsstrasse 5, D-45117 Essen (Germany)]. E-mail: karsten.leopold@uni-due.de; Michalik, Boguslaw [Central Mining Institute, Laboratory of Radiometry, Pl. Gwarkow 1, 40-166 Katowice (Poland)]. E-mail: b.michalik@gig.katowice.pl; Wiegand, Jens [University of Wuerzburg, Geological Institute, Pleicherwall 1, D-97070 Wuerzburg (Germany)]. E-mail: jens.wiegand@geologie.uni-wuerzburg.de

    2007-05-15

    Radium and heavy metal contaminated tailings and scales resulting from Polish hard coal mining were investigated for their mobilisation potential by using leaching methods. The main focus is set on a three-step extraction procedure proposed by BCR (Bureau Communautaire de Reference, now Standards Measurements and Testing Programme) of the European Union, which was used for investigating the availability of radium isotopes. In addition, the results of a Polish extraction procedure for the heavy metals' water solubility are presented for rough comparison. After a special treatment, the BCR-reagents were measured by gamma-spectrometry to define their radium activity concentrations; the heavy metal content in the water soluble fractions was determined by ICP-AES. The samples were collected at two different sites influenced by the discharge of pit water from hard coal mining. The tailings were taken from a former tailing pond, which now is no longer in use, but the settled material is still present. At another abandoned and meanwhile flooded tailing pond, the scales were scraped from the inside of a discharge tube. The results obtained show that there is different leaching behaviour between the radium isotopes. The tailings being characterised by surface adsorbed radium provide up to 25% of the initial {sup 226}Ra content, {sup 228}Ra is altogether leached up to 15%. The scales comprise stable radiobaryte (Ba[Ra]SO{sub 4}) and can be considered as being unable to provide radium isotopes, since no trace of radium dissolution was observed. The leaching behaviour of heavy metals is similar to that of radium. Mn, Ni and Zn are dissolved by water from the tailings; the scales do not provide any.

  9. RESOLVING IONIZATION AND METALLICITY ON PARSEC SCALES ACROSS MRK 71 WITH HST-WFC3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, Bethan L.; Auger, Matthew [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Aloisi, Alessandra [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Calzetti, Daniela [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Kewley, Lisa, E-mail: bjames@ast.cam.ac.uk [RSAA, Australian National University, Cotter Road, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia)

    2016-01-01

    Blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxies in the nearby universe provide a means for studying feedback mechanisms and star formation processes in low-metallicity environments in great detail. Owing to their vicinity, these local analogs to primordial young galaxies are well suited for high-resolution studies that are unfeasible for high-redshift galaxies. Here we present Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 observations of one such BCD, Mrk 71, one of the most powerful local starbursts known, in the light of [O ii], He ii, Hβ, [O iii], Hα, and [S ii]. At D ≃ 3.44 Mpc, this extensive suite of emission-line images enables us to explore the chemical and physical conditions of Mrk 71 on ∼2 pc scales. We use emission-line diagnostics to distinguish ionization mechanisms on a pixel-by-pixel basis and show that despite the previously reported hypersonic gas and superbubble blowout, the gas in Mrk 71 is photoionized, with no sign of shock-excited emission. He ii emission line images are used to identify up to six Wolf-Rayet stars, three of which lie on the edge of a blowout region. Using strong-line metallicity diagnostics, we present the first “metallicity image” of a galaxy, revealing chemical inhomogeneity on scales of <50 pc. We additionally demonstrate that while chemical structure can be lost at large scales, metallicity diagnostics can break down on spatial scales smaller than an H ii region. This study highlights not only the benefits of high-resolution spatially resolved observations in assessing the effects of feedback mechanisms but also the potential limitations when employing emission-line diagnostics; these results are particularly relevant as we enter the era of extremely large telescopes.

  10. Genome-scale comparison and constraint-based metabolic reconstruction of the facultative anaerobic Fe(III-reducer Rhodoferax ferrireducens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daugherty Sean

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rhodoferax ferrireducens is a metabolically versatile, Fe(III-reducing, subsurface microorganism that is likely to play an important role in the carbon and metal cycles in the subsurface. It also has the unique ability to convert sugars to electricity, oxidizing the sugars to carbon dioxide with quantitative electron transfer to graphite electrodes in microbial fuel cells. In order to expand our limited knowledge about R. ferrireducens, the complete genome sequence of this organism was further annotated and then the physiology of R. ferrireducens was investigated with a constraint-based, genome-scale in silico metabolic model and laboratory studies. Results The iterative modeling and experimental approach unveiled exciting, previously unknown physiological features, including an expanded range of substrates that support growth, such as cellobiose and citrate, and provided additional insights into important features such as the stoichiometry of the electron transport chain and the ability to grow via fumarate dismutation. Further analysis explained why R. ferrireducens is unable to grow via photosynthesis or fermentation of sugars like other members of this genus and uncovered novel genes for benzoate metabolism. The genome also revealed that R. ferrireducens is well-adapted for growth in the subsurface because it appears to be capable of dealing with a number of environmental insults, including heavy metals, aromatic compounds, nutrient limitation and oxidative stress. Conclusion This study demonstrates that combining genome-scale modeling with the annotation of a new genome sequence can guide experimental studies and accelerate the understanding of the physiology of under-studied yet environmentally relevant microorganisms.

  11. Reducibility mill scale industrial waste via coke breeze at 850-950ºC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaballah N.M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mill scale is a very attractive industrial waste due to its elevated iron content (about = 69.33% Fe besides being suiTab. for direct recycling to the blast furnace via sintering plant. In this paper the characteristics of raw materials and the briquettes produced from this mill scale were studied by different methods of analyses. The produced briquettes were reduced with different amounts of coke breeze at varying temperatures, and the reduction kinetics was determined. The activation energy of this reaction ≈ 61.5 kJ/mole for reduction of mill scale with coke breeze in the form of briquettes with 2% molasses where the chemical reaction interface model is applicable.

  12. Z-dependent barriers in multifragmentation from poissonian reducibility and thermal scaling

    CERN Document Server

    Beaulieu, L; Moretto, L G; Wozniak, G J

    1998-01-01

    We explore the natural limit of binomial reducibility in nuclear multifragmentation by constructing excitation functions for intermediate mass fragments (IMF) of a given element Z. The resulting multiplicity distributions for each window of transverse energy are Poissonian. Thermal scaling is observed in the linear Arrhenius plots made from the average multiplicity of each element. ``Emission barriers'' are extracted from the slopes of the Arrhenius plots and their possible origin is discussed.

  13. Large-scale, three-dimensional, free-standing, and mesoporous metal oxide networks for high-performance photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Hua; Li, Xinshi; Hu, Chao; Zhang, Xuan; Li, Junfang; Yan, Yan; Xi, Guangcheng

    2013-01-01

    Mesoporous nanostructures represent a unique class of photocatalysts with many applications, including splitting of water, degradation of organic contaminants, and reduction of carbon dioxide. In this work, we report a general Lewis acid catalytic template route for the high-yield producing single- and multi-component large-scale three-dimensional (3D) mesoporous metal oxide networks. The large-scale 3D mesoporous metal oxide networks possess large macroscopic scale (millimeter-sized) and mesoporous nanostructure with huge pore volume and large surface exposure area. This method also can be used for the synthesis of large-scale 3D macro/mesoporous hierarchical porous materials and noble metal nanoparticles loaded 3D mesoporous networks. Photocatalytic degradation of Azo dyes demonstrated that the large-scale 3D mesoporous metal oxide networks enable high photocatalytic activity. The present synthetic method can serve as the new design concept for functional 3D mesoporous nanomaterials.

  14. Large-Scale, Three-Dimensional, Free-Standing, and Mesoporous Metal Oxide Networks for High-Performance Photocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Hua; Li, Xinshi; Hu, Chao; Zhang, Xuan; Li, Junfang; Yan, Yan; Xi, Guangcheng

    2013-07-01

    Mesoporous nanostructures represent a unique class of photocatalysts with many applications, including splitting of water, degradation of organic contaminants, and reduction of carbon dioxide. In this work, we report a general Lewis acid catalytic template route for the high-yield producing single- and multi-component large-scale three-dimensional (3D) mesoporous metal oxide networks. The large-scale 3D mesoporous metal oxide networks possess large macroscopic scale (millimeter-sized) and mesoporous nanostructure with huge pore volume and large surface exposure area. This method also can be used for the synthesis of large-scale 3D macro/mesoporous hierarchical porous materials and noble metal nanoparticles loaded 3D mesoporous networks. Photocatalytic degradation of Azo dyes demonstrated that the large-scale 3D mesoporous metal oxide networks enable high photocatalytic activity. The present synthetic method can serve as the new design concept for functional 3D mesoporous nanomaterials.

  15. Reduced enthalpy of metal hydride formation for Mg-Ti nanocomposites produced by spark discharge generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasopol, Anca; Pfeiffer, Tobias V; Middelkoop, Joost; Lafont, Ugo; Canales-Perez, Roger J; Schmidt-Ott, Andreas; Mulder, Fokko M; Eijt, Stephan W H

    2013-05-29

    Spark discharge generation was used to synthesize Mg-Ti nanocomposites consisting primarily of a metastable body-centered-cubic (bcc) alloy of Mg and Ti. The bcc Mg-Ti alloy transformed upon hydrogenation into the face-centered-cubic fluorite Mg1-yTiyHx phase with favorable hydrogen storage properties. Both metal and metal hydride nanocomposites showed a fractal-like porous morphology, with a primary particle size of 10-20 nm. The metal content of 70 atom % (at %) Mg and 30 at % Ti, consistently determined by XRD, TEM-EDS, and ICP-OES, was distributed uniformly across the as-prepared sample. Pressure-composition isotherms for the Mg-Ti-H nanocomposites revealed large differences in the thermodynamics relative to bulk MgH2, with a much less negative enthalpy of formation of the hydride as small as -45 ± 3 kJ/molH2 as deduced from van't Hoff plots. The plateau pressures of hydrogenation were substantially higher than those for bulk MgH2 in the low temperature range from 150 to 250 °C. The reaction entropy was simultaneously reduced to values down to 84 ± 5 J/K mol H2, following a linear relationship between the enthalpy and entropy. Plausible mechanisms for the modified thermodynamics are discussed, including the effect of lattice strains, the presence of interfaces and hydrogen vacancies, and the formation of excess free volume due to local deformations. These mechanisms all rely on the finely interdispersed nanocomposite character of the samples which is maintained by grain refinement.

  16. Structural state scale-dependent physical characteristics and endurance of cermet composite for cutting metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ovcharenko, V. E., E-mail: ovcharenko.ove45@mail.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055, Russia and Institute of Heavy-Current Electronics SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Ivanov, Yu. F., E-mail: ivanov.yufi55@mail.ru [Institute of Heavy-Current Electronics SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055, Russia and National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Mohovikov, A. A., E-mail: mohovikov.maa28@rambler.ru [Institute of Heavy-Current Electronics SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Baohai, Yu, E-mail: baohai.bhyu@imr.ac.cn, E-mail: yanhui.yhzhao@imr.ac.cn; Zhao, Yanhui, E-mail: baohai.bhyu@imr.ac.cn, E-mail: yanhui.yhzhao@imr.ac.cn [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wenhua Road 72, 110016 (China)

    2014-11-14

    A structural-phase state developed on the surface of a TiC/Ni–Cr–Al cermet alloy under superfast heating and cooling produced by pulse electron beam melting has been presented. The effect of the surface’s structural state multimodality on the temperature dependencies of the friction and endurance of the cermet tool in cutting metal has been investigated. The high-energy flux treatment of subsurface layers by electron beam pulses in argon-containing gas discharge plasma serves to improve the endurance of metal cutting tools manifold (by a factor of 6), to reduce the friction via precipitation of secondary 200 nm carbides in binder interlayers. It is possible to improve the cermet tool endurance for cutting metal by a factor of 10–12 by irradiating the cermet in a reactive nitrogen-containing atmosphere with the ensuing precipitation of nanosize 50 nm AlN particles in the binder interlayers.

  17. Watershed-Scale Cover Crops Reduce Nutrient Export From Agricultural Landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tank, J. L.; Hanrahan, B.; Christopher, S. F.; Trentman, M. T.; Royer, T. V.; Prior, K.

    2016-12-01

    The Midwestern US has undergone extensive land use change as forest, wetlands, and prairies have been converted to agroecosystems. Today, excess fertilizer nutrients from farm fields enter Midwestern agricultural streams, which degrades both local and downstream water quality, resulting in algal blooms and subsequent hypoxic "dead zones" far from the nutrient source. We are quantifying the benefits of watershed-scale conservation practices that may reduce nutrient runoff from adjacent farm fields. Specifically, research is lacking on whether the planting of winter cover crops in watersheds currently dominated by row-crop agriculture can significantly reduce nutrient inputs to adjacent streams. Since 2013, farmers have planted cover crops on 70% of croppable acres in the Shatto Ditch Watershed (IN), and "saturation level" implementation of this conservation practice has been sustained for 3 years. Every 14 days, we have quantified nutrient loss from fields by sampling nutrient fluxes from multiple subsurface tile drains and longitudinally along the stream channel throughout the watershed. Cover crops improved stream water quality by reducing dissolved inorganic nutrients exported downstream; nitrate-N and DRP concentrations and fluxes were significantly lower in tiles draining fields with cover crops compared to those without. Annual watershed nutrient export also decreased, and reductions in N and P loss ( 30-40%) exceeded what we expected based on only a 6-10% reduction in runoff due to increased watershed water holding capacity. We are also exploring the processes responsible for increased nutrient retention, where they are occurring (terrestrial vs. aquatic) and when (baseflow vs. storms). For example, whole-stream metabolism also responded to cover crop planting, showing reduced variation in primary production and respiration in years after watershed-scale planting of cover crops. In summary, widespread land cover change, through cover crop planting, can

  18. Flexible polymer solar cells based on Ag metallic grids and functional reduced graphene oxide composite electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qiao; Cheng, Shuying; Jia, Hongjie; Zhang, Hong; Liu, Si; Lai, Yunfeng; Yu, Jinling; Zhou, Haifang

    2017-10-01

    By combining the appropriate Ag metallic grids with a thin functional reduced graphene oxide (MGs/F-rGO) film, a suitable photoelectric flexible electrode of the polymer solar cells (PSCs) is obtained. The conductivity and transmission of the MGs/F-rGO composited films can be improved by HNO3 modified. The optimized sheet resistance and transmission of the flexible electrode achieve to 25 Ω □‑1 and 83% at 550 nm wavelength. Flexible PSCs with the MGs/F-rGO electrode show 5.63% power conversion efficiency. The photoelectric properties of the MGs/F-rGO film comparable with that of ITO substrates guarantee a high short current and an enhanced PCE of the solar cells. This method provides a feasible way for fabricating low-cost and flexible PSCs.

  19. Schottky diode via dielectrophoretic assembly of reduced graphene oxide sheets between dissimilar metal contacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islam, Muhammad R; Joung, Daeha; Khondaker, Saiful I, E-mail: saiful@mail.ucf.edu [Nanoscience Technology Center, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32826 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    We demonstrate the fabrication of reduced graphene oxide (RGO) Schottky diodes via dielectrophoretic (DEP) assembly of RGO between two dissimilar metal contacts. Titanium (Ti) was used to make a Schottky contact, while palladium (Pd) was used to make an Ohmic contact. From the current-voltage characteristics, we obtain rectifying behavior with a rectification ratio of up to 600. The ideality factor was high (4.9), possibly due to the presence of a large number of defects in the RGO sheets. The forward biased turn-on voltage was 1 V, whereas the reverse biased breakdown voltage was -3.1 V, which improved further upon mild annealing at 200 deg. C and can be attributed to an increase in the work function of RGO due to annealing.

  20. Reduced Fracture Finite Element Model Analysis of an Efficient Two-Scale Hybrid Embedded Fracture Model

    KAUST Repository

    Amir, Sahar Z.

    2017-06-09

    A Hybrid Embedded Fracture (HEF) model was developed to reduce various computational costs while maintaining physical accuracy (Amir and Sun, 2016). HEF splits the computations into fine scale and coarse scale. Fine scale solves analytically for the matrix-fracture flux exchange parameter. Coarse scale solves for the properties of the entire system. In literature, fractures were assumed to be either vertical or horizontal for simplification (Warren and Root, 1963). Matrix-fracture flux exchange parameter was given few equations built on that assumption (Kazemi, 1968; Lemonnier and Bourbiaux, 2010). However, such simplified cases do not apply directly for actual random fracture shapes, directions, orientations …etc. This paper shows that the HEF fine scale analytic solution (Amir and Sun, 2016) generates the flux exchange parameter found in literature for vertical and horizontal fracture cases. For other fracture cases, the flux exchange parameter changes according to the angle, slop, direction, … etc. This conclusion rises from the analysis of both: the Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) and the HEF schemes. The behavior of both schemes is analyzed with exactly similar fracture conditions and the results are shown and discussed. Then, a generalization is illustrated for any slightly compressible single-phase fluid within fractured porous media and its results are discussed.

  1. Characterization of Co(III) EDTA-Reducing Bacteria in Metal- and Radionuclide-Contaminated Groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Weimin [Arizona State University; Gentry, Terry J [ORNL; Mehlhorn, Tonia L [ORNL; Carroll, Sue L [ORNL; Jardine, Philip M [ORNL; Zhou, Jizhong [University of Oklahoma, Norman

    2010-01-01

    The Waste Area Grouping 5 (WAG5) site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has a potential to be a field site for evaluating the effectiveness of various bioremediation approaches and strategies. The site has been well studied in terms of its geological and geochemical properties over the past decade. However, despite the importance of microorganisms in bioremediation processes, the microbiological populations at the WAG5 site and their potential in bioremediation have not been similarly evaluated. In this study, we initiated research to characterize the microbial populations in WAG5 groundwater. Approximately 100 isolates from WAG5 groundwater were isolated and selected based on colony morphology. Fifty-five unique isolates were identified by BOX-PCR and subjected to further characterization. 16S rRNA sequences indicated that these isolates belong to seventeen bacterial genera including Alcaligenes (1 isolate), Aquamonas (1), Aquaspirillum (1), Bacillus (10), Brevundimonas (5), Caulobacter (7), Dechloromonas (2), Janibacter (1), Janthinobacterium (2), Lactobacillus (1), Paenibacillus (4), Pseudomonas (9), Rhodoferax (1), Sphingomonas (1), Stenotrophomonas (6), Variovorax (2), and Zoogloea (1). Metal respiration assays identified several isolates, which phylogenically belong or are close to Caulobacter, Stenotrophomonas, Bacillus, Paenibacillus and Pseudomonas, capable of reducing Co(III)EDTA- to Co(II)EDTA{sup 2-} using the defined M1 medium under anaerobic conditions. In addition, using WAG5 groundwater directly as the inoculants, we found that organisms associated with WAG5 groundwater can reduce both Fe(III) and Co(III) under anaerobic conditions. Further assays were then performed to determine the optimal conditions for Co(III) reduction. These assays indicated that addition of various electron donors including ethanol, lactate, methanol, pyruvate, and acetate resulted in metal reduction. These experiments will provide useful background information for future

  2. Centimetre-scale micropore alignment in oriented polycrystalline metal-organic framework films via heteroepitaxial growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcaro, Paolo; Okada, Kenji; Hara, Takaaki; Ikigaki, Ken; Tokudome, Yasuaki; Thornton, Aaron W.; Hill, Anita J.; Williams, Timothy; Doonan, Christian; Takahashi, Masahide

    2016-12-01

    The fabrication of oriented, crystalline films of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) is a critical step toward their application to advanced technologies such as optics, microelectronics, microfluidics and sensing. However, the direct synthesis of MOF films with controlled crystalline orientation remains a significant challenge. Here we report a one-step approach, carried out under mild conditions, that exploits heteroepitaxial growth for the rapid fabrication of oriented polycrystalline MOF films on the centimetre scale. Our methodology employs crystalline copper hydroxide as a substrate and yields MOF films with oriented pore channels on scales that primarily depend on the dimensions of the substrate. To demonstrate that an anisotropic crystalline morphology can translate to a functional property, we assembled a centimetre-scale MOF film in the presence of a dye and showed that the optical response could be switched `ON’ or `OFF’ by simply rotating the film.

  3. Centimetre-scale micropore alignment in oriented polycrystalline metal-organic framework films via heteroepitaxial growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcaro, Paolo; Okada, Kenji; Hara, Takaaki; Ikigaki, Ken; Tokudome, Yasuaki; Thornton, Aaron W.; Hill, Anita J.; Williams, Timothy; Doonan, Christian; Takahashi, Masahide

    2017-03-01

    The fabrication of oriented, crystalline films of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) is a critical step toward their application to advanced technologies such as optics, microelectronics, microfluidics and sensing. However, the direct synthesis of MOF films with controlled crystalline orientation remains a significant challenge. Here we report a one-step approach, carried out under mild conditions, that exploits heteroepitaxial growth for the rapid fabrication of oriented polycrystalline MOF films on the centimetre scale. Our methodology employs crystalline copper hydroxide as a substrate and yields MOF films with oriented pore channels on scales that primarily depend on the dimensions of the substrate. To demonstrate that an anisotropic crystalline morphology can translate to a functional property, we assembled a centimetre-scale MOF film in the presence of a dye and showed that the optical response could be switched `ON’ or `OFF’ by simply rotating the film.

  4. Vitrification of noble metals containing NCAW simulant with an engineering scale melter (ESM): Campaign report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunewald, W.; Roth, G.; Tobie, W.; Weisenburger, S.; Weiss, K.; Elliott, M.; Eyler, L.L.

    1996-03-01

    ESM has been designed as a 10th-scale model of the DWPF-type melter, currently the reference melter for nitrification of Hanford double shell tankwaste. ESM and related equipment have been integrated to the existing mockup vitrification plant VA-WAK at KfK. On June 2-July 10, 1992, a shakedown test using 2.61 m{sup 3} of NCAW (neutralized current acid waste) simulant without noble metals was performed. On July 11-Aug. 30, 1992, 14.23 m{sup 3} of the same simulant with nominal concentrations of Ru, Rh, and Pd were vitrified. Objective was to investigate the behavior of such a melter with respect to discharge of noble metals with routine glass pouring via glass overflow. Results indicate an accumulation of noble metals in the bottom area of the flat-bottomed ESM. About 65 wt% of the noble metals fed to the melter could be drained out, whereas 35 wt% accumulated in the melter, based on analysis of glass samples from glass pouring stream in to the canisters. After the melter was drained at the end of the campaign through a bottom drain valve, glass samples were taken from the residual bottom layer. The samples had significantly increased noble metals content (factor of 20-45 to target loading). They showed also a significant decrease of the specific electric resistance compared to bulk glass (factor of 10). A decrease of 10- 15% of the resistance between he power electrodes could be seen at the run end, but the total amount of noble metals accumulated was not yet sufficient enough to disturb the Joule heating of the glass tank severely.

  5. Current Progress of Mechanical Properties of Metals with Nano-scale Twins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei LU

    2008-01-01

    Focus on face-centered cubic (fcc) metals with nano-scale twins lamellar structure, this paper presents a brief overview of the recent progress made in improving mechanical properties, including strength, ductility, work hardening, strain rate sensitivities, and in mechanistically understanding the underling deformation mechanisms. Significant developments have been achieved in nano-twinned fcc metals with a combination of high strength and considerable ductility at the same time, enhanced work hardening ability and enhanced rate sensitivity. The findings elucidate the role of interactions between dislocations and twin boundaries (TBs) and their contribution to the origin of outstanding properties. The computer simulation analysis accounts for high plastic anisotropy and rate sensitivity anisotropy by treating TBs as internal interfaces and allowing special slip geometry arrangements that involve soft and hard modes of deformation. Parallel to the novel mechanical behaviors of the nano-twinned materials, the investigation and developments of nanocrystalline materials are also discussed in this overview for comparing the contribution of grain boundaries/TBs and grain size/twin lamellar spacing to the properties. The recent advances in the experimental and computational studies of plastic deformation of the fcc metals with nano-scale twin lamellar structures provide insights into the possible means of optimizing comprehensive mechanical properties through interfacial engineering.

  6. Removal heavy metals and sulphate from waste waters by sulphate-reducing bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kušnierová Mária

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available This article is devoted to the process of bacterial sulphate reduction, which is used to removal of heavy metals and sulphate ions from waste waters.The life of animals and plants depends on the existence of microscopic organisms – microorganisms (MO, which play an important role in cycle changes of biogenic elements on the earth. The sulphur cycle in the nature is considered as one of the oldest and most significant biological systems (Fig. 1. The sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB miss the assimilatory part of the cycle and produce sulphides. The microbial population of this dissimilatory part is called “sulfuretum”. The SRB can be found in anaerobic mud and sediments of freshwater, thermal or non-thermal sulphur springs, mining waters from sulphide deposits, oil deposits, sea and ocean beds, and in the gastrointestinal tract of man and animals. The SRB represent a group of chemoorganotrophic, strictly anaerobic and gramnegative bacteria, which exhibit a great morphological and physiological diversity. Despite of their considerable morphological variety, they have one property in common, which is the ability to utilise preferentially sulphates (occasionally sulphites, thiosulphates, tetrathionates as electron acceptors, which are reduced to sulphides, during anaerobic respiration. The electron donors in these processes are simple organic compounds as lactate, malate, etc.,(heterotrophically reduction or gaseous hydrogen (autotrophically reduction. SRB can produce a considerable amount of hydrogen sulphide, which reacts easily in aqueous solution with the cations of heavy metals, forming metal sulphides that have low solubility. The bacterial sulphate reduction can be used for the treatment of acid mine drainage waters, which is considered to be the major problem associated with mining activities.In order to remove heavy metals from waste waters, e.g., from galvanizing plants, mine waters (Smolnik, Šobov locality and metallurgic plants (works

  7. Structure and Function of Metal- and Nitrate-reducing Microbial Communities in the FRC Subsurface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akob, Denise M.; Mills, Heath J.; Kerkhof, Lee; Gihring, Thomas M.; Kostk, Joel E.

    2006-04-05

    The overall goal of this study is to evaluate structure-function relationships of sedimentary microbial communities likely to regulate U(VI) reduction and immobilization in the subsurface of Area 2 at the Field Research Center (FRC), Oak Ridge, TN. Microcosm experiments were conducted under near in situ conditions with FRC subsurface materials cocontaminated with high levels of U(VI) and nitrate. The activity, abundance, and community composition of microorganisms was determined in microcosm samples, stimulated with ethanol or glucose, and compared to those from sediment cores and unamended controls. Activity was assessed by monitoring terminal electron accepting processes (TEAPs; nitrate, sulfate, uranium, and iron reduction) as well as electron donor utilization. Microbial functional groups, nitrate- and iron(III)-reducing bacteria, were enumerated during the nitrate- and metal-reduction phases of the incubation and in sediment core samples using a most probable number (MPN) serial dilution assay. U(VI) and Fe(III) were reduced concurrently in the glucose but not the ethanol treatments. In ethanol-amended microcosms, U(VI) was reduced during a 4-day lag phase between nitrate- and Fe(III)-reduction phases. Biostimulation resulted in 3 to 5 orders of magnitude higher counts of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, whereas populations of nitrate-reducers were enhanced by 1 to 3 orders of magnitude. One to 2 orders of magnitude more Fe(III)-reducers were observed in ethanol- as compared to glucose-amended treatments in parallel with enhanced U(VI) removal in ethanol treatments. Cultivatable Fe(III)-reducing bacteria in the ethanol treatments were dominated by Geobacter sp. while those cultured on glucose were dominated by fermentative organisms, i.e., Tolumonas sp. Currently, carbon substrate utilization is being examined through HPLC analysis of microcosm porewaters. In addition, changes in the overall microbial community composition are being assessed using cultivation

  8. Characterization of the surfaceome of the metal-reducing bacterium Desulfotomaculum reducens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena eDalla Vecchia

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Desulfotomaculum reducens strain MI-1 is a Gram-positive, sulfate-reducing bacterium also capable of reducing Fe(III. Metal reduction in Gram-positive bacteria is poorly understood. Here, we investigated Fe(III reduction with lactate, a non-fermentable substrate, as the electron donor. Lactate consumption is concomitant to Fe(III reduction, but does not support significant growth, suggesting that little energy can be conserved from this process and that it may occur fortuitously. D. reducens can reduce both soluble (Fe(III-citrate and insoluble (hydrous ferric oxide, HFO Fe(III. Because physically inaccessible HFO was not reduced, we concluded that reduction requires direct contact under these experimental conditions. This implies the presence of a surface exposed reductase capable of transferring electrons from the cell to the extracellular electron acceptor. With the goal of characterizing the role of surface proteins in D. reducens and of identifying candidate Fe(III reductases, we carried out an investigation of the surface proteome (surfaceome of D. reducens. Cell surface exposed proteins were extracted by trypsin cell shaving or by lysozyme treatment, and analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. This investigation revealed that the surfaceome fulfills many functions, including solute transport, protein export, maturation and hydrolysis, peptidoglycan synthesis and modification, and chemotaxis. Furthermore, a few redox-active proteins were identified. Among these, three are putatively involved in Fe(III reduction, i.e., a membrane-bound hydrogenase 4Fe-4S cluster subunit (Dred_0462, a heterodisulfide reductase subunit A (Dred_0143 and a protein annotated as alkyl hydroperoxide reductase but likely functioning as a thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase (Dred_1533.

  9. Surface changes of metal alloys and high-strength ceramics after ultrasonic scaling and intraoral polishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyung-In; Noh, Hyo-Mi; Park, Eun-Jin

    2017-06-01

    This study was to evaluate the effect of repeated ultrasonic scaling and surface polishing with intraoral polishing kits on the surface roughness of three different restorative materials. A total of 15 identical discs were fabricated with three different materials. The ultrasonic scaling was conducted for 20 seconds on the test surfaces. Subsequently, a multi-step polishing with recommended intraoral polishing kit was performed for 30 seconds. The 3D profiler and scanning electron microscopy were used to investigate surface integrity before scaling (pristine), after scaling, and after surface polishing for each material. Non-parametric Friedman and Wilcoxon signed rank sum tests were employed to statistically evaluate surface roughness changes of the pristine, scaled, and polished specimens. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Surface roughness values before scaling (pristine), after scaling, and polishing of the metal alloys were 3.02±0.34 µm, 2.44±0.72 µm, and 3.49±0.72 µm, respectively. Surface roughness of lithium disilicate increased from 2.35±1.05 µm (pristine) to 28.54±9.64 µm (scaling), and further increased after polishing (56.66±9.12 µm, Pscaling (from 1.65±0.42 µm to 101.37±18.75 µm), while its surface roughness decreased after polishing (29.57±18.86 µm, Pscaling significantly changed the surface integrities of lithium disilicate and zirconia. Surface polishing with multi-step intraoral kit after repeated scaling was only effective for the zirconia, while it was not for lithium disilicate.

  10. Quantification and distribution of heavy metals from small-scale industrial areas of Kanpur city, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawat, Manju; Ramanathan, Al; Subramanian, V

    2009-12-30

    Kanpur city has large number of small-scale industries (SSIs), primarily comprising of textile and leather industries. This study inventorises the presence of heavy metals in the samples collected from Panki and Jajmau Industrial Areas of Kanpur city. The bulk concentration of heavy metals found in solid waste samples was Fe as 1885 and 2340 mg/kg, Mn 173 and 445 mg/kg, Zn 233 and 132 mg/kg, Cu 20 and 28 mg/kg, Cd 1.4 and 1.1mg/kg, Ni 26 and 397 mg/kg, Pb 107 and 19 mg/kg, Cr 1323 and 734 mg/kg, respectively. Heavy metal concentration was also found to be high in soil and road dust samples viz. Ni and Pb were in higher concentration in few samples, whereas Cr was found in higher concentration in all samples than the recommended values of USEPA and specifications for compost quality contained in the Indian Municipal Solid Wastes (Management and Handling) Rules, 2000. The heavy metal pollution so detected is indicative of contamination in ground and surface water and food chain. This raises concerns pertaining to adverse consequences to environment and human health.

  11. Nucleate pool boiling: High gravity to reduced gravity; liquid metals to cryogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merte, Herman, Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Requirements for the proper functioning of equipment and personnel in reduced gravity associated with space platforms and future space station modules introduce unique problems in temperature control; power generation; energy dissipation; the storage, transfer, control and conditioning of fluids; and liquid-vapor separation. The phase change of boiling is significant in all of these. Although both pool and flow boiling would be involved, research results to date include only pool boiling because buoyancy effects are maximized for this case. The effective application of forced convection boiling heat transfer in the microgravity of space will require a well grounded and cogent understanding of the mechanisms involved. Experimental results are presented for pool boiling from a single geometrical configuration, a flat surface, covering a wide range of body forces from a/g = 20 to 1 to a/g = 0 to -1 for a cryogenic liquid, and from a/g = 20 to 1 for water and a liquid metal. Similarities in behavior are noted for these three fluids at the higher gravity levels, and may reasonably be expected to continue at reduced gravity levels.

  12. Initial chemical transport of reducing elements and chemical reactions in oxide cathode base metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roquais, J.M.; Poret, F.; Doze, R. le; Dufour, P.; Steinbrunn, A

    2002-11-30

    In the present work, the formation of compounds associated to the diffusion of reducing elements (Mg and Al) to the nickel surface of a one-piece oxide cathode has been studied. Those compounds have been evidenced after the annealing steps at high temperature performed on cathode base metal prior to the emitting ing deposition. Therefore, they form the ''initial'' interface between the nickel and the coating, in other words, the interface existing at the beginning of cathode life. Extensive analysis to characterize the nickel base prior to coating deposition has been performed by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES). TEM and AES analysis have allowed to identify for the first time a spinel compound of MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}. The preferential distribution of the different compounds on the nickel surface has been studied by EDX mapping. Experimental profiles of diffusion of the reducing elements in the nickel have been obtained over the entire thickness of the material by GDOES. The mechanism of formation of these compounds together with a related diffusion model are proposed.

  13. Strength and scales of itinerant spin fluctuations in 3 d paramagnetic metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysocki, Aleksander L.; Kutepov, Andrey; Antropov, Vladimir P.

    2016-10-01

    The full spin density fluctuations (SDF) spectra in 3 d paramagnetic metals are analyzed from first principles using the linear response technique. Using the calculated complete wave vector and energy dependence of the dynamic spin susceptibility, we obtain the most important, but elusive, characteristic of SDF in solids: on-site spin correlator (SC). We demonstrate that the SDF have a mixed character consisting of interacting collective and single-particle excitations of similar strength spreading continuously over the entire Brillouin zone and a wide energy range up to femtosecond time scales. These excitations cannot be adiabatically separated and their intrinsically multiscale nature should always be taken into account for a proper description of metallic systems. Overall, in all studied systems, despite the lack of local moment, we found a very large SC resulting in an effective fluctuating moment of the order of several Bohr magnetons.

  14. Small-Scale Metal Tanks for High Pressure Storage of Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, Adam (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Small scale metal tanks for high-pressure storage of fluids having tank factors of more than 5000 meters and volumes of ten cubic inches or less featuring arrays of interconnected internal chambers having at least inner walls thinner than gage limitations allow. The chambers may be arranged as multiple internal independent vessels. Walls of chambers that are also portions of external tank walls may be arcuate on the internal and/or external surfaces, including domed. The tanks may be shaped adaptively and/or conformally to an application, including, for example, having one or more flat outer walls and/or having an annular shape. The tanks may have dual-purpose inlet/outlet conduits of may have separate inlet and outlet conduits. The tanks are made by fusion bonding etched metal foil layers patterned from slices of a CAD model of the tank. The fusion bonded foil stack may be further machined.

  15. Reliability and Validity of the Reduced Spanish Version of the Iowa Infant Feeding Attitude Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomás-Almarcha, Rosa; Oliver-Roig, Antonio; Richart-Martinez, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    To translate the Iowa Infant Feeding Scale (IIFAS) into Spanish, to test its psychometric properties, and to explore item reduction for the Spanish version. Instrumental study. Six hospitals in eastern Spain. A convenience sample of 1,354 pregnant women was recruited. The IIFAS was translated using forward and back translation. Dimensional structure, internal consistency, and construct validity of the Spanish IIFAS version were assessed. Criteria to improve the reliability of the scale and the predictive power of the items were used to reduce the scale. Statistics on the psychometric properties suggested the need for item reduction. Cronbach's alpha coefficient of the nine-item final version of the Spanish IIFAS (IIFAS-S) was 0.792. The confirmatory factor analysis showed a unidimensional structure. Demographic response patterns and correlations with the IIFAS-S scale provided further evidence of construct validity. Pregnancy IIFAS-S scores significantly predicted breastfeeding rates and exclusivity. The results of this study indicated that the Spanish translation of the IIFAS is a valid and reliable measure of women's attitudes toward breastfeeding. Copyright © 2016 AWHONN, the Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Reducing biases in regional climate downscaling by applying Bayesian model averaging on large-scale forcing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hongwei [APEC Climate Center, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Wang, Bin [University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Meteorology, Honolulu, HI (United States); University of Hawaii at Manoa, International Pacific Research Center, Honolulu, HI (United States); Wang, Bin [Chinese Academy of Sciences, LASG, Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Beijing (China)

    2012-11-15

    Reduction of uncertainty in large-scale lateral-boundary forcing in regional climate modeling is a critical issue for improving the performance of regional climate downscaling. Numerical simulations of 1998 East Asian summer monsoon were conducted using the Weather Research and Forecast model forced by four different reanalysis datasets, their equal-weight ensemble, and Bayesian model averaging (BMA) ensemble means. Large discrepancies were found among experiments forced by the four individual reanalysis datasets mainly due to the uncertainties in the moisture field of large-scale forcing over ocean. We used satellite water-vapor-path data as observed truth-and-training data to determine the posterior probability (weight) for each forcing dataset using the BMA method. The experiment forced by the equal-weight ensemble reduced the circulation biases significantly but reduced the precipitation biases only moderately. However, the experiment forced by the BMA ensemble outperformed not only the experiments forced by individual reanalysis datasets but also the equal-weight ensemble experiment in simulating the seasonal mean circulation and precipitation. These results suggest that the BMA ensemble method is an effective method for reducing the uncertainties in lateral-boundary forcing and improving model performance in regional climate downscaling. (orig.)

  17. Treatment of acid mine drainage by sulfate reducing bacteria with iron in bench scale runs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, He; Kang, Yong; Quan, Hongen; Han, Yang; Sun, Jiao; Feng, Ying

    2013-01-01

    In order to treat acid mine drainage (AMD) effectively using sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) at high concentration of sulfate and heavy metals, Fe(0) was added to enhance the activity of SRB. When AMD was treated by SRB and Fe(0) at 25 °C, more than 61% of sulfate was removed and the effluent pH was improved from 2.75 to 6.20 during the operation. Cu(2+) was removed effectively with the removal efficiency at 99%, while only 86% of Fe(2+) was removed during the AMD treatment, without conspicuous change of Mn(2+) in the effluent in the process. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Reducing Agricultural Water Footprints at the Farm Scale: A Case Study in the Beijing Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Huang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Beijing is one of the most water-stressed regions in the world. Reducing agricultural water use has long been the basis of local policy for sustainable water use. In this article, the potential to reduce the life cycle (cradle to gate water footprints of wheat and maize that contribute to 94% of the local cereal production was assessed. Following ISO 14046, consumptive and degradative water use for the wheat-maize rotation system was modeled under different irrigation and nitrogen (N application options. Reducing irrigation water volume by 33.3% compared to current practice did not cause a significant yield decline, but the water scarcity footprint and water eutrophication footprint were decreased by 27.5% and 23.9%, respectively. Similarly, reducing the N application rate by 33.3% from current practice did not cause a significant yield decline, but led to a 52.3% reduction in water eutrophication footprint while maintaining a similar water scarcity footprint. These results demonstrate that improving water and fertilizer management has great potential for reducing the crop water footprints at the farm scale. This situation in Beijing is likely to be representative of the challenge facing many of the water-stressed regions in China, where a sustainable means of agricultural production must be found.

  19. A Study of Maglev Vehicle Dynamics Using a Reduced-Scale Vehicle Model Experiment Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Erimitsu; Watanabe, Ken; Hoshino, Hironori; Yonezu, Takenori; Nagai, Masao

    An experiment apparatus using a 1/12 scale model of a train car body was constructed to study the characteristics of vehicle dynamics of magnetically levitated high speed surface transport (Maglev) systems that differ from conventional railway systems. Consisting of six-axis parallel link motion bases to reproduce bogie motions, an aluminum car body, and secondary suspension units, this apparatus is expected to be useful in examinations of control methods to reduce vehicle vibrations and to generate data useful in eventually improving the precision of computer simulations. This report provides an overview of the Maglev vehicle model experiment apparatus and results of initial tests examining its fundamental characteristics.

  20. Differential metallothionein, reduced glutathione and metal levels in Perna perna mussels in two environmentally impacted tropical bays in southeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavradas, Raquel T; Rocha, Rafael C C; Bordon, Isabella C A C; Saint'Pierre, Tatiana D; Godoy, José M; Hauser-Davis, Rachel A

    2016-07-01

    Mussel farming is an important economic activity in Brazil, and these organisms are consumed by the majority of the population in most coastal zones in the country. However, despite the increasing pollution of aquatic ecosystems in Brazil, little is known about the biochemical activity in mussels in response to metal exposure. In this context, the aim of the present study was to investigate metal and metalloid exposure effects in Perna perna mussels, by determining metal levels, the induction of metallothionein (MT) synthesis, and oxidative stress, in the form of reduced glutathione (GSH) in 3 contaminated areas from the Guanabara Bay in comparison to a reference site, Ilha Grande Bay, both in summer and winter. Metal and metalloid concentrations were also compared to Brazilian and international guidelines, to verify potential health risks to human consumers. Mussels from all sampling sites were shown to be improper for human consumption due to metal contamination, including Ilha Grande Bay, which has previously been considered a reference site. Several statistically significant correlations and seasonal differences were observed between MT, GSH and metals and metalloids in both analyzed tissues. A Discriminant Canonical Analysis indicated that the digestive gland is a better bioindicator for environmental contamination by metals and metalloids in this species and offers further proof that MT variations observed are due to metal exposure and not oxidative stress, since GSH influence for both muscle tissue and the digestive glands was non-significant in this analysis. These results show that P. perna mussels are an adequate sentinel species for metal contamination with significant effects on oxidative stress and metal exposure biomarkers. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to report metals, metalloids, MT and GSH levels in the muscle tissue of this species.

  1. Atomic scale modeling of defect production and microstructure evolution in irradiated metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz de la Rubia, T.; Soneda, N.; Shimomura, Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Irradiation effects in materials depend in a complex way on the form of the as-produced primary damage state and its spatial and temporal evolution. Thus, while collision cascades produce defects on a time scale of tens of picosecond, diffusion occurs over much longer time scales, of the order of seconds, and microstructure evolution over even longer time scales. In this report the authors present work aimed at describing damage production and evolution in metals across all the relevant time and length scales. They discuss results of molecular dynamics simulations of displacement cascades in Fe and V. They show that interstitial clusters are produced in cascades above 5 keV, but not vacancy clusters. Next, they discuss the development of a kinetic Monte Carlo model that enables calculations of damage evolution over much longer time scales (1000`s of s) than the picosecond lifetime of the cascade. They demonstrate the applicability of the method by presenting predictions on the fraction of freely migrating defects in {alpha}Fe during irradiation at 600 K.

  2. Process metallurgy simulation for metal drawing process optimization by using two-scale finite element method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamachi, Eiji; Yoshida, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Toshihiko; Morita, Yusuke [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Doshisha Univ., Kyotanabe, Kyoto, 610-0394 (Japan); Kuramae, Hiroyuki [Dept. of Technol. Management, Osaka Institute of Technol., Asahiku, Osaka, 535-8585 (Japan); Morimoto, Hideo [Furukawa Electric Co. Ltd., Okano, Nishiku, Yokohama, Kanagawa, 220-0073 (Japan)

    2014-10-06

    We developed two-scale FE analysis procedure based on the crystallographic homogenization method by considering the hierarchical structure of poly-crystal aluminium alloy metal. It can be characterized as the combination of two-scale structure, such as the microscopic polycrystal structure and the macroscopic elastic plastic continuum. Micro polycrystal structure can be modeled as a three dimensional representative volume element (RVE). RVE is featured as by 3×3×3 eight-nodes solid finite elements, which has 216 crystal orientations. This FE analysis code can predict the deformation, strain and stress evolutions in the wire drawing processes in the macro- scales, and further the crystal texture and hardening evolutions in the micro-scale. In this study, we analyzed the texture evolution in the wire drawing processes by our two-scale FE analysis code under conditions of various drawing angles of dice. We evaluates the texture evolution in the surface and center regions of the wire cross section, and to clarify the effects of processing conditions on the texture evolution.

  3. Process metallurgy simulation for metal drawing process optimization by using two-scale finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamachi, Eiji; Yoshida, Takashi; Kuramae, Hiroyuki; Morimoto, Hideo; Yamaguchi, Toshihiko; Morita, Yusuke

    2014-10-01

    We developed two-scale FE analysis procedure based on the crystallographic homogenization method by considering the hierarchical structure of poly-crystal aluminium alloy metal. It can be characterized as the combination of two-scale structure, such as the microscopic polycrystal structure and the macroscopic elastic plastic continuum. Micro polycrystal structure can be modeled as a three dimensional representative volume element (RVE). RVE is featured as by 3×3×3 eight-nodes solid finite elements, which has 216 crystal orientations. This FE analysis code can predict the deformation, strain and stress evolutions in the wire drawing processes in the macro- scales, and further the crystal texture and hardening evolutions in the micro-scale. In this study, we analyzed the texture evolution in the wire drawing processes by our two-scale FE analysis code under conditions of various drawing angles of dice. We evaluates the texture evolution in the surface and center regions of the wire cross section, and to clarify the effects of processing conditions on the texture evolution.

  4. An ultra-thin waveguide twist constructed using fish-scale metallic wires

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Jin; Fan, Yuancheng; Wei, Zeyong; Wu, Chao; Cao, Yang; Yu, Xing; Li, Fang; Wang, Zhanshan

    2011-01-01

    This study theoretically and experimentally investigates the transmission properties of a metamaterial slab comprised of two layers of metallic fish-scale structure arrays and a sandwiched dielectric layer. Calculations show that the asymmetric transmission can be tuned by varying the slab thickness, due to evanescent interlayer coupling. The spatial evolution of the local field inside the structure indicates that the slab functions as a perfect polarization transformer at certain frequencies in the manner of a waveguide twist. Measured transmission spectra are in good agreement with calculated results when material dissipation is considered.

  5. MapReduce Based Personalized Locality Sensitive Hashing for Similarity Joins on Large Scale Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingjing; Lin, Chen

    2015-01-01

    Locality Sensitive Hashing (LSH) has been proposed as an efficient technique for similarity joins for high dimensional data. The efficiency and approximation rate of LSH depend on the number of generated false positive instances and false negative instances. In many domains, reducing the number of false positives is crucial. Furthermore, in some application scenarios, balancing false positives and false negatives is favored. To address these problems, in this paper we propose Personalized Locality Sensitive Hashing (PLSH), where a new banding scheme is embedded to tailor the number of false positives, false negatives, and the sum of both. PLSH is implemented in parallel using MapReduce framework to deal with similarity joins on large scale data. Experimental studies on real and simulated data verify the efficiency and effectiveness of our proposed PLSH technique, compared with state-of-the-art methods.

  6. Using Variational Inference and MapReduce to Scale Topic Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Zhai, Ke; Asadi, Nima

    2011-01-01

    Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) is a popular topic modeling technique for exploring document collections. Because of the increasing prevalence of large datasets, there is a need to improve the scalability of inference of LDA. In this paper, we propose a technique called ~\\emph{MapReduce LDA} (Mr. LDA) to accommodate very large corpus collections in the MapReduce framework. In contrast to other techniques to scale inference for LDA, which use Gibbs sampling, we use variational inference. Our solution efficiently distributes computation and is relatively simple to implement. More importantly, this variational implementation, unlike highly tuned and specialized implementations, is easily extensible. We demonstrate two extensions of the model possible with this scalable framework: informed priors to guide topic discovery and modeling topics from a multilingual corpus.

  7. REDUCING FIBER LOSS IN LABORATORY-AND MILL-SCALE FLOTATION DEINKING USING SURFACTANT SPRAY TECHNOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Greg.DeLozier; YulinZhao; YulinDeng; DavidWhite; JunyongZhu; MarkPrein

    2004-01-01

    As the cost of quality waste paper continues to escalate in response tofor the finite resource,an increased global demand loss of saleable fiber within flotation rejects becomes both environmentally and economically unacceptable. The ability of surfactant spray technology to reduce yield loss without detriment to pulp brightness gains has been demonstrated during both laboratory-and pilot-scale flotation deinking investigations. This paper documents the successful transfer of this technology to a single flotation unit within the deinking line of a mill producing newsprint from 100% secondary fiber. Initial results suggest that the loss of fiber across the unit may be reduced by more than 50% without obvious detriment to final pulp quality.

  8. REDUCING FIBER LOSS IN LABORATORY- AND MILL-SCALE FLOTATION DEINKING USING SURFACTANT SPRAY TECHNOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Greg. DeLozier; Yulin Zhao; Yulin Deng; David White; Junyong Zhu; Mark Prein

    2004-01-01

    As the cost of quality waste paper continues to escalate in response to an increased global demand for the finite resource, loss of saleable fiber within flotation rejects becomes both environmentally and economically unacceptable. The ability of surfactant spray technology to reduce yield loss without detriment to pulp brightness gains has been demonstrated during both laboratory- and pilot-scale flotation deinking investigations. This paper documents the successful transfer of this technology to a single flotation unit within the deinking line of a mill producing newsprint from 100% secondary fiber. Initial results suggest that the loss of fiber across the unit may be reduced by more than 50%without obvious detriment to final pulp quality.

  9. Motion of Fullerenes around Topological Defects on Metals: Implications for the Progress of Molecular Scale Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirmalraj, Peter; Daly, Ronan; Martin, Nazario; Thompson, Damien

    2017-03-08

    Research on motion of molecules in the presence of thermal noise is central for progress in two-terminal molecular scale electronic devices. However, it is still unclear what influence imperfections in bottom metal electrode surface can have on molecular motion. Here, we report a two-layer crowding study, detailing the early stages of surface motion of fullerene molecules on Au(111) with nanoscale pores in a n-tetradecane chemical environment. The motion of the fullerenes is directed by crowding of the underlying n-tetradecane molecules around the pore fringes at the liquid-solid interface. We observe in real-space the growth of molecular populations around different pore geometries. Supported by atomic-scale modeling, our findings extend the established picture of molecular crowding by revealing that trapped solvent molecules serve as prime nucleation sites at nanopore fringes.

  10. Capturing recrystallization of metals with a multi-scale materials model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. A. Hughes; D. J. Bammann; A. Godfrey; V. C. Prantil; E. A. Holm; M. A. Miodownik; D. C. Chrzan; M. T. Lusk

    2000-04-01

    The final report for a Laboratory Directed Research and Development project entitled, ``Capturing Recrystallization of Metals in a Multiscale Materials Model'' is presented. In this project, deformation and recrystallization processes have been followed experimentally and theoretically in order to incorporate essential mechanisms from the defect (dislocation) and grain size length scales. A nonlinear rotational gradient theory has been developed which enables the incorporation of microstructural parameters. The evolution of these parameters during deformation and recrystallization has been characterized qualitatively and quantitatively, applying various electron optic techniques ranging over several length scales. The theoretical and experimental framework developed is general. It has been exemplified by an application to recrystallization in single crystals and bicrystals of aluminum. The recrystallization process has been modeled using a 3-D model for the changes in key structural parameters during recrystallization.

  11. Reducing Capsule Based on Electron Programming: Versatile Synthesizer for Size-Controlled Ultra-Small Metal Clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambe, Tetsuya; Imaoka, Takane; Yamamoto, Kimihisa

    2016-11-07

    Controlled reducing capsules with a specific number of reducing electrons were achieved by appropriately placed BH3 units in the dendritic polyphenylazomethines (DPAs). Using the 1:1 coordination fashion on their basic branches with radius affinity gradient, the 4th generation DPA (DPAG4) possessing four BH3 units in the central positions was prepared as a template synthesizer for size-controlled ultra-small metal clusters. This was well-demonstrated by reduction of Ag, Pt, and other metal ions resulting in monodispersed ultra-small clusters.

  12. A Map-Reduce-enabled SOLAP cube for large-scale remotely sensed data aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiyuan; Meng, Lingkui; Wang, Frank Z.; Zhang, Wen; Cai, Yang

    2014-09-01

    Spatial On-Line Analytical Processing (SOLAP) is a powerful decision support systems tool for exploring the multidimensional perspective of spatial data. In recent years, remotely sensed data have been integrated into SOLAP cubes, and this improvement has advantages in spatio-temporal analysis for environment monitoring. However, the performance of aggregations in SOLAP still faces a considerable challenge from the large-scale dataset generated by Earth observation. From the perspective of data parallelism, a tile-based SOLAP cube model, the so-called Tile Cube, is presented in this paper. The novel model implements Roll-Up/Drill-Across operations in the SOLAP environment based on Map-Reduce, a popular data-intensive computing paradigm, and improves the throughput and scalability of raster aggregation. Therefore, the long time-series, wide-range and multi-view analysis of remotely sensed data can be processed in a short time. The Tile Cube prototype was built on Hadoop/Hbase, and drought monitoring is used as an example to illustrate the aggregations in the model. The performance testing indicated the model can be scaled along with both the data growth and node growth. It is applicable and natural to integrate the SOLAP cube with Map-Reduce. Factors that influence the performance are also discussed, and the balance of them will be considered in future works to make full use of data locality for model optimisation.

  13. Occurence of methanogenesis during start-up of a full-scale synthesis gas-fed reactor treating sulfate and metal-rich wastewater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houten, van B.H.G.W.; Roest, C.; Tzeneva, V.A.; Dijkman, H.; Smidt, H.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    The start-up of a full-scale synthesis gas-fed gas-lift reactor treating metal and sulfate-rich wastewater was investigated. Sludge from a pilot-scale reactor was used to seed the full-scale reactor. The main difference in design between the pilot- and full-scale reactor was that metal precipitation

  14. Reducing uncertainty in calibrating aquifer flow model with multiple scales of heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye

    2014-01-01

    Modeling and calibration of natural aquifers with multiple scales of heterogeneity is a challenging task due to limited subsurface access. While computer modeling plays an essential role in aquifer studies, large uncertainty exists in developing a conceptual model of an aquifer and in calibrating the model for decision making. Due to uncertainties such as a lack of understanding of subsurface processes and a lack of techniques to parameterize the subsurface environment (including hydraulic conductivity, source/sink rate, and aquifer boundary conditions), existing aquifer models often suffer nonuniqueness in calibration, leading to poor predictive capability. A robust calibration methodology is needed that can address the simultaneous estimations of aquifer parameters, source/sink, and boundary conditions. In this paper, we propose a multistage and multiscale approach that addresses subsurface heterogeneity at multiple scales, while reducing uncertainty in estimating the model parameters and model boundary conditions. The key to this approach lies in the appropriate development, verification, and synthesis of existing and new techniques of static and dynamic data integration. In particular, based on a given set of observation data, new inversion techniques can be first used to estimate aquifer large-scale effective parameters and smoothed boundary conditions, based on which parameter and boundary condition estimation can be refined at increasing detail using standard or highly parameterized estimation techniques.

  15. Reduced risk insecticides to control scale insects and protect natural enemies in the production and maintenance of urban landscape plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Steven D

    2012-04-01

    Armored scale insects are among the most difficult to manage and economically important arthropod pests in the production and maintenance of urban landscape plants. This is because of morphological traits that protect them from contact insecticides. I compared initial and season-long control of euonymus scale, Unaspis euonymi Comstock (Hemiptera: Diaspidae), by reduced-risk insecticides (insect growth regulators [IGRs], neonicotinoids, spirotetramat) to determine if they controlled scale as well as more toxic insecticides such as the organophosphate, acephate, and pyrethroid, bifenthrin. I also evaluated how these insecticides affected natural enemy abundance on experimental plants and survival when exposed to insecticide residue. All insecticides tested reduced first generation euonymus scale abundance. In 2009, reinfestation by second generation euonymus scale was highest on plants treated with acetamiprid and granular dinotefuran. In 2010, systemic neonicotinoids and spirotetramat prevented cottony cushion scale infestation 133 d after treatment whereas scale readily infested plants treated with bifenthrin and horticultural oil. Encarsia spp. and Cybocephalus spp. abundance was related to scale abundance. These natural enemies were generally less abundant than predicted by scale abundance on granular dinotefuran treated plants and more abundant on granular thiamethoxam treated plants. Bifenthrin residue killed 90-100% of O. insidiosus and E. citrina within 24 h. My results indicate that reduced risk insecticides can provide season-long scale control with less impact on natural enemies than conventional insecticides. This could have economic and environmental benefits by reducing the number of applications necessary to protect nursery and landscape plants from scale.

  16. Large-scale environmental dependence of gas-phase metallicity in dwarf galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Douglass, Kelly A

    2016-01-01

    We study how the cosmic environment affects galaxy evolution in the Universe by comparing the metallicities of dwarf galaxies in voids with dwarf galaxies in more dense regions. Ratios of the fluxes of emission lines, particularly those of the forbidden [OIII] and [SII] transitions, provide estimates of a region's electron temperature and number density. From these two quantities and the emission line fluxes [OII] 3727, [OIII] 4363, and [OIII] 4959,5007, we estimate the abundance of oxygen with the Direct Te method. We estimate the metallicity of 37 void dwarf galaxies and 75 dwarf galaxies in more dense regions using spectroscopic observations from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7, as re-processed in the MPA-JHU value-added catalog. We find very little difference between the two sets of galaxies, indicating little influence from the large-scale environment on their chemical evolution. Of particular interest are a number of extremely metal-poor dwarf galaxies that are equally abundant in both voids...

  17. Limits to metallic conduction in atomic-scale quasi-one-dimensional silicon wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Bent; Ryu, Hoon; Tan, Y-H Matthias; Klimeck, Gerhard; Simmons, Michelle Y

    2014-12-12

    The recent observation of ultralow resistivity in highly doped, atomic-scale silicon wires has sparked interest in what limits conduction in these quasi-1D systems. Here we present electron transport measurements of gated Si:P wires of widths 4.6 and 1.5 nm. At 4.6 nm we find an electron mobility, μ(el)≃60  cm²/V s, in excellent agreement with that of macroscopic Hall bars. Metallic conduction persists to millikelvin temperatures where we observe Gaussian conductance fluctuations of order δG∼e²/h. In thinner wires (1.5 nm), metallic conduction breaks down at G≲e²/h, where localization of carriers leads to Coulomb blockade. Metallic behavior is explained by the large carrier densities in Si:P δ-doped systems, allowing the occupation of all six valleys of the silicon conduction band, enhancing the number of 1D channels and hence the localization length.

  18. Reducing maternal mortality on a countrywide scale: The role of emergency obstetric training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Neil F; Naidoo, Mergan; Moodley, Jagidesa

    2015-11-01

    Training programmes to improve health worker skills in managing obstetric emergencies have been introduced in various countries with the aim of reducing maternal mortality through these interventions. In South Africa, based on an ongoing confidential enquiry system started in 1997, detailed information about maternal deaths is published in the form of regular 'Saving Mothers' reports. This article tracks the recommendations made in successive Saving Mothers reports with regard to emergency obstetric training, and it assesses the impact of these recommendations on reducing maternal mortality. Since 2009, South Africa has had its own training package, Essential Steps in the Management of Obstetric Emergencies (ESMOE), which the last three Saving Mothers reports have specifically recommended for all doctors and midwives working in maternity units. A special emphasis has been placed on the need for the simulation training component of ESMOE, also called obstetric 'fire drills', to be integrated into the clinical routines of all maternity units. The latest Saving Mothers report (2011-2013) suggests there has been little progress so far in improving emergency obstetric skills, indicating a need for further scale-up of ESMOE training in the country. The example of the KwaZulu-Natal province of South Africa is used to illustrate the process of scale-up and factors likely to facilitate that scale-up, including the introduction of ESMOE into the undergraduate medical training curriculum. Additional factors in the health system that are required to convert improved skills levels into improved quality of care and a reduction in maternal mortality are discussed. These include intelligent government health policies, formulated with input from clinical experts; strong clinical leadership to ensure that doctors and nurses apply the skills they have learnt appropriately, and work professionally and ethically; and a culture of clinical governance.

  19. Structuring of metal-organic frameworks at the mesoscopic/macroscopic scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Shuhei; Reboul, Julien; Diring, Stéphane; Sumida, Kenji; Kitagawa, Susumu

    2014-08-21

    The assembly of metal ions with organic ligands through the formation of coordination bonds gives crystalline framework materials, known as metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), which recently emerged as a new class of porous materials. Besides the structural designability of MOFs at the molecular length scale, the researchers in this field very recently made important advances in creating more complex architectures at the mesoscopic/macroscopic scale, in which MOF nanocrystals are used as building units to construct higher-order superstructures. The structuring of MOFs in such a hierarchical order certainly opens a new opportunity to improve the material performance via design of the physical form rather than altering the chemical component. This review highlights these superstructures and their applications by categorizing them into four dimensionalities, zero-dimensional (0D), one-dimensional (1D), two-dimensional (2D), and three-dimensional (3D) superstructures. Because the key issue for structuring of MOFs is to spatially control the nucleation process in desired locations, this review conceptually categorizes the available synthetic methodologies from the viewpoint of the reaction system.

  20. Meso-scale analysis of deformation wave heating in metalized solid explosive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonthier K.A.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Deformation induced heating of reactive solids is a physically complex process. As such, the effects of meso-structure, component thermomechanical properties, component mass fractions, and porosity on their impact response is not well-understood. In this study, an explicit, 2-D, Lagrangian finite and discrete element technique is used to examine thermomechanical fields in metal-explosive (aluminum-HMX particle mixtures due to piston supported uniaxial deformation waves. The meso-scale description uses a plane strain, thermoelastic-viscoplastic and friction constitutive theory to describe the motion and deformation of individual particles, and an energy consistent, penalty based method to describe inter-particle contact. The deformation response of material having an initial solid volume fraction of ΦS0 = 0.835 is characterized for different metal mass fractions and wave strengths. Predictions indicate that the response can be classified into strength dominated and pressure dominated regions depending on wave strength. Average thermomechanical fields that define the macro-scale wave structure are found to differ both qualitatively and quantitatively between the two regions.

  1. Bio-oil Stabilization by Hydrogenation over Reduced Metal Catalysts at Low Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Huamin; Lee, Suh-Jane; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Zacher, Alan H.

    2016-08-30

    Biomass fast pyrolysis integrated with bio-oil upgrading represents a very attractive approach for converting biomass to hydrocarbon transportation fuels. However, the thermal and chemical instability of bio-oils presents significant problems when they are being upgraded, and development of effective approaches for stabilizing bio-oils is critical to the success of the technology. Catalytic hydrogenation to remove reactive species in bio-oil has been considered as one of the most efficient ways to stabilize bio-oil. This paper provides a fundamental understanding of hydrogenation of actual bio-oils over a Ru/TiO2 catalyst under conditions relevant to practical bio-oil hydrotreating processes. Bio-oil feed stocks, bio-oils hydrogenated to different extents, and catalysts have been characterized to provide insights into the chemical and physical properties of these samples and to understand the correlation of the properties with the composition of the bio-oil and catalysts. The results indicated hydrogenation of various components of the bio-oil, including sugars, aldehydes, ketones, alkenes, aromatics, and carboxylic acids, over the Ru/TiO2 catalyst and 120 to 160oC. Hydrogenation of these species significantly changed the chemical and physical properties of the bio-oil and overall improved its thermal stability, especially by reducing the carbonyl content, which represented the content of the most reactive species (i.e., sugar, aldehydes, and ketones). The change of content of each component in response to increasing hydrogen additions suggests the following bio-oil hydrogenation reaction sequence: sugar conversion to sugar alcohols, followed by ketone and aldehyde conversion to alcohols, followed by alkene and aromatic hydrogenation, and then followed by carboxylic acid hydrogenation to alcohols. Hydrogenation of bio-oil samples with different sulfur contents or inorganic material contents suggested that sulfur poisoning of the reduced Ru metal catalysts was

  2. Instability identification on large scale underground mined-out area in the metal mine based on the improved FRBFNN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luo Zhouquan; Zuo Hongyan; Jia Nan; Wang Yiwei

    2013-01-01

    To identify the instability on large scale underground mined-out area in the metal mine effectively, the parameters of radial basis function were determined through clustering method and the improved fuzzy radial basis function neural network (FRBFNN) model of instability identification model about large scale underground mined-out area in the metal mine was built. The improved FRBFNN model was trained and tested. The results show that the improved FRBFNN model has high training accuracy and generalization ability. Parameters such as pillar area ratio, filling level and the value of rock quality designation have strong influence on instability of large scale underground mined-out area. Correctness of analysis about the improved FRBFNN model was proved by the practical application results about instability discrimi-nation of surrounding rock in large-scale underground mined-out area of a metal mine in south China.

  3. Reducing Errors in Satellite Simulated Views of Clouds with an Improved Parameterization of Unresolved Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, B. R.; Marchand, R.; Ackerman, T. P.

    2016-12-01

    Satellite instrument simulators have emerged as a means to reduce errors in model evaluation by producing simulated or psuedo-retrievals from model fields, which account for limitations in the satellite retrieval process. Because of the mismatch in resolved scales between satellite retrievals and large-scale models, model cloud fields must first be downscaled to scales consistent with satellite retrievals. This downscaling is analogous to that required for model radiative transfer calculations. The assumption is often made in both model radiative transfer codes and satellite simulators that the unresolved clouds follow maximum-random overlap with horizontally homogeneous cloud condensate amounts. We examine errors in simulated MISR and CloudSat retrievals that arise due to these assumptions by applying the MISR and CloudSat simulators to cloud resolving model (CRM) output generated by the Super-parameterized Community Atmosphere Model (SP-CAM). Errors are quantified by comparing simulated retrievals performed directly on the CRM fields with those simulated by first averaging the CRM fields to approximately 2-degree resolution, applying a "subcolumn generator" to regenerate psuedo-resolved cloud and precipitation condensate fields, and then applying the MISR and CloudSat simulators on the regenerated condensate fields. We show that errors due to both assumptions of maximum-random overlap and homogeneous condensate are significant (relative to uncertainties in the observations and other simulator limitations). The treatment of precipitation is particularly problematic for CloudSat-simulated radar reflectivity. We introduce an improved subcolumn generator for use with the simulators, and show that these errors can be greatly reduced by replacing the maximum-random overlap assumption with the more realistic generalized overlap and incorporating a simple parameterization of subgrid-scale cloud and precipitation condensate heterogeneity. Sandia National Laboratories is a

  4. Scaling properties in the adsorption of ionic polymeric surfactants on generic nanoparticles of metallic oxides by mesoscopic simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Mayoral, E

    2014-01-01

    We study the scaling of adsorption isotherms of polyacrylic dispersants on generic surfaces of metallic oxides $XnOm$ as a function of the number of monomeric units, using Electrostatic Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulations. The simulations show how the scaling properties in these systems emerge and how the isotherms rescale to a universal curve, reproducing reported experimental results. The critical exponent for these systems is also obtained, in perfect agreement with the scaling theory of deGennes. Some important applications are mentioned.

  5. Soil Amendments to Reduce Bioavailability of Metals in Soils: Experimental Studies and Spectroscopic Verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    concentrations in the plant tissue are a direct reflection of total metal content. The plant species also could be excellent bioindicators of the efficacy of...phytotoxicity makes them effective hyperaccumulators but will also make them intriguing bioindicators of metal lability. Objective The overall

  6. Integration of Genome-Scale Metabolic Nodels of Iron-Reducing Bacteria With Subsurface Flow and Geochemical Reactive Transport Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheibe, T. D.; Mahadevan, R.; Fang, Y.; Garg, S.; Long, P. E.; Lovley, D. M.

    2008-12-01

    Several field and laboratory experiments have demonstrated that the growth and activity of iron-reducing bacteria can be stimulated in many subsurface environments by amendment of groundwater with a soluble electron donor. Under strong iron-reducing conditions, these organisms mediate reactions that can impact a wide range of subsurface contaminants including chlorinated hydrocarbons, metals, and radionuclides. Therefore there is strong interest in in-situ bioremediation as a potential technology for cleanup of contaminated aquifers. To evaluate and design bioremediation systems, as well as to evaluate the viability of monitored natural attenuation as an alternative, quantitative models of biogeochemically reactive transport are needed. To date, most such models represent microbial activity in terms of kinetic rate (e.g., Monod- type) formulations. Such models do not account for fundamental changes in microbial functionality (such as utilization of alternative respiratory pathways) that occur as the result of spatial and temporal variations in the geochemical environment experienced by microorganisms. Constraint-based genome-scale in silico models of microbial metabolism present an alternative to simplified rate formulations that provide flexibility to account for changes in microbial function in response to local geochemical conditions. We have developed and applied a methodology for coupling a constraint-based in silico model of Geobacter sulfurreducens with a conventional model of groundwater flow, transport, and geochemical reaction. Two uses of the in silico model are tested: 1) incorporation of modified microbial growth yield coefficients based on the in silico model, and 2) variation of reaction rates in a reactive transport model based on in silico modeling of a range of local geochemical conditions. Preliminary results from this integrated model will be presented.

  7. DETERMINATION OF THERMODYNAMIC AND KINETIC PARAMETERS OF LARGE SCALE CHROMATOGRAPHIC SEPARATION OF SUGAR AND REDUCING SUGAR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiZhong; ShuWenli; 等

    1996-01-01

    The parameter identification model of large scale chromatography separation process is proposed.The phase equilibrium constants and lumped mass transfer coefficients of sugar and reducing sugar adsorption on D1,D2 and D3 resins as well as the axial dispersion coefficients of the fluid through packed columns are determined by means of the pulse-response experiment technique with an inert substance as a tracer and the chromatography measuring technique.The elution curve calculated from these parameters is good agreement with the experimental elution curve.The sensitivity analysis of these parameters is carried out ,and the result shows that the elution curves of chromatography separation are more sensitive to the variations of the phase equilibrium relationship than to the variation of the axial dispersion as well as the lumped mass transfer coefficients.

  8. Study of HF behaviour of railway power substation in reduced scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouaddi, H.; Baranowski, S.; Nottet, G.; Demoulin, B.; Koné, L.

    2011-03-01

    The study presented in this paper is a first step of an EMC (Electromagnetic Compatibility) analysis of the behaviour of a railway power substation at high frequency. Before on site intensive experimentation, the approach is performed with a reduced scale model. The mock-up of the substation is powered by a 220 V three-phase voltage supplied by a 15 kV A power transformer, a rectifier and loads. The study consists in designing an equivalent electrical circuit of power transformer in high frequency, available over a large panel of loads. The model of power transformer was deduced from measurements in frequency domain within the range 40 Hz to 30 MHz.

  9. Speciation and Fate of Trace Metals in Estuarine Sediments Under Reduced and Oxidized Conditions, Seaplane Lagoon, Alameda Naval Air Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, S A; Day, P A; Esser, B; Randall, S

    2002-10-18

    We have identified important chemical reactions that control the fate of metal-contaminated estuarine sediments if they are left undisturbed (in situ) or if they are dredged. We combined information on the molecular bonding of metals in solids from X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) with thermodynamic and kinetic driving forces obtained from dissolved metal concentrations to deduce the dominant reactions under reduced and oxidized conditions. We evaluated the in situ geochemistry of metals (cadmium, chromium, iron, lead, manganese and zinc) as a function of sediment depth (to 100 cm) from a 60-year record of contamination at the Alameda Naval Air Station, California. Results from XAS and thermodynamic modeling of porewaters show that cadmium and most of the zinc form stable sulfide phases, and that lead and chromium are associated with stable carbonate, phosphate, phyllosilicate, or oxide minerals. Therefore, there is minimal risk associated with the release of these trace metals from the deeper sediments contaminated prior to the Clean Water Act (1975) as long as reducing conditions are maintained. Increased concentrations of dissolved metals with depth were indicative of the formation of metal HS- complexes. The sediments also contain zinc, chromium, and manganese associated with detrital iron-rich phyllosilicates and/or oxides. These phases are recalcitrant at near-neutral pH and do not undergo reductive dissolution within the 60-year depositional history of sediments at this site. The fate of these metals during dredging was evaluated by comparing in situ geochemistry with that of sediments oxidized by seawater in laboratory experiments. Cadmium and zinc pose the greatest hazard from dredging because their sulfides were highly reactive in seawater. However, their dissolved concentrations under oxic conditions were limited eventually by sorption to or co-precipitation with an iron (oxy)hydroxide. About 50% of the reacted CdS and 80% of the reacted ZnS were

  10. Deduction and Analysis of the Interacting Stress Response Pathways of Metal/Radionuclide-reducing Bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jizhong [University of Oklahoma; He, Zhili [University of Oklahoma

    2010-02-28

    Project Title: Deduction and Analysis of the Interacting Stress Response Pathways of Metal/Radionuclide-reducing Bacteria DOE Grant Number: DE-FG02-06ER64205 Principal Investigator: Jizhong (Joe) Zhou (University of Oklahoma) Key members: Zhili He, Aifen Zhou, Christopher Hemme, Joy Van Nostrand, Ye Deng, and Qichao Tu Collaborators: Terry Hazen, Judy Wall, Adam Arkin, Matthew Fields, Aindrila Mukhopadhyay, and David Stahl Summary Three major objectives have been conducted in the Zhou group at the University of Oklahoma (OU): (i) understanding of gene function, regulation, network and evolution of Desulfovibrio vugaris Hildenborough in response to environmental stresses, (ii) development of metagenomics technologies for microbial community analysis, and (iii) functional characterization of microbial communities with metagenomic approaches. In the past a few years, we characterized four CRP/FNR regulators, sequenced ancestor and evolved D. vulgaris strains, and functionally analyzed those mutated genes identified in salt-adapted strains. Also, a new version of GeoChip 4.0 has been developed, which also includes stress response genes (StressChip), and a random matrix theory-based conceptual framework for identifying functional molecular ecological networks has been developed with the high throughput functional gene array hybridization data as well as pyrosequencing data from 16S rRNA genes. In addition, GeoChip and sequencing technologies as well as network analysis approaches have been used to analyze microbial communities from different habitats. Those studies provide a comprehensive understanding of gene function, regulation, network, and evolution in D. vulgaris, and microbial community diversity, composition and structure as well as their linkages with environmental factors and ecosystem functioning, which has resulted in more than 60 publications.

  11. Flow analysis of heavy metals in a pilot-scale incinerator for residues from waste electrical and electronic equipment dismantling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Yu-Yang; Feng, Yi-Jian; Cai, Si-Shi; Ding, Wei-Xu; Shen, Dong-Sheng, E-mail: shends@zju.edu.cn

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Cu, Zn, Pb, and Ni are enriched in bottom ash from WEEE dismantling residues. • The heavy metal residual fraction restricts transfer in the incinerator. • Pre-treatment to remove heavy metals from WEEE residues would reduce emissions. -- Abstract: The large amount of residues generated from dismantling waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) results in a considerable environmental burden. We used material flow analysis to investigate heavy metal behavior in an incineration plant in China used exclusively to incinerate residues from WEEE dismantling. The heavy metals tested were enriched in the bottom and fly ashes after incineration. However, the contents of heavy metals in the bottom ash, fly ash and exhaust gas do not have a significant correlation with that of the input waste. The evaporation and recondensation behavior of heavy metals caused their contents to differ with air pollution control equipment because of the temperature difference during gas venting. Among the heavy metals tested, Cd had the strongest tendency to transfer during incineration (T{sub Cd} = 69.5%) because it had the lowest melting point, followed by Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn. The exchangeable and residual fractions of heavy metals increased substantially in the incineration products compared with that of the input residues. Although the mass of residues from WEEE dismantling can be reduced by 70% by incineration, the safe disposal of the metal-enriched bottom and fly ashes is still required.

  12. An opposite view data replacement approach for reducing artifacts due to metallic dental objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yazdi, Mehran; Lari, Meghdad Asadi; Bernier, Gaston; Beaulieu, Luc [Department of Electrical Engineering, School of Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz 7134851154 (Iran, Islamic Republic of) and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Ho circumflex tel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, 11 Cote du Palais, Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Department of Electrical Engineering, School of Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz 7134851154 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Ho circumflex tel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, 11 Cote du Palais, Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et D' optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec (Canada) and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, 11 Cote du Palais, Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada)

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: To present a conceptually new method for metal artifact reduction (MAR) that can be used on patients with multiple objects within the scan plane that are also of small sized along the longitudinal (scanning) direction, such as dental fillings. Methods: The proposed algorithm, named opposite view replacement, achieves MAR by first detecting the projection data affected by metal objects and then replacing the affected projections by the corresponding opposite view projections, which are not affected by metal objects. The authors also applied a fading process to avoid producing any discontinuities in the boundary of the affected projection areas in the sinogram. A skull phantom with and without a variety of dental metal inserts was made to extract the performance metric of the algorithm. A head and neck case, typical of IMRT planning, was also tested. Results: The reconstructed CT images based on this new replacement scheme show a significant improvement in image quality for patients with metallic dental objects compared to the MAR algorithms based on the interpolation scheme. For the phantom, the authors showed that the artifact reduction algorithm can efficiently recover the CT numbers in the area next to the metallic objects. Conclusions: The authors presented a new and efficient method for artifact reduction due to multiple small metallic objects. The obtained results from phantoms and clinical cases fully validate the proposed approach.

  13. Anchoring noble metal nanoparticles on CeO2 modified reduced graphene oxide nanosheets and their enhanced catalytic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Zhenyuan; Shen, Xiaoping; Xu, Yuling; Zhu, Guoxing; Chen, Kangmin

    2014-10-15

    The strategy of structurally integrating noble metal, metal oxide, and graphene is expected to offer prodigious opportunities toward emerging functions of graphene-based nanocomposites. In this study, we develop a facile two-step approach to disperse noble metal (Pt and Au) nanoparticles on the surface of CeO2 functionalized reduced graphene oxide (RGO) nanosheets. It is shown that Pt and Au with particle sizes of about 5 and 2nm are well dispersed on the surface of RGO/CeO2. The reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) to 4-aminophenol (4-AP) by NaBH4 was used as a model reaction to quantitatively evaluate the catalytic properties of the as-synthesized RGO/Pt/CeO2 and RGO/Au/CeO2 ternary nanocomposites. In such triple-component catalysts, CeO2 nanocrystals provide unique and critical roles for optimizing the catalytic performance of noble metallic Pt and Au, allowing them to express enhanced catalytic activities in comparison with RGO/Pt and RGO/Au catalysts. In addition, a possible mechanism for the enhanced catalytic activities of the RGO/Pt/CeO2 and RGO/Au/CeO2 ternary catalysts in the reduction of 4-NP is proposed. It is expected that our prepared graphene-based triple-component composites, which inherit peculiar properties of graphene, metal oxide, and noble metal, are attractive candidates for catalysis and other applications.

  14. Modal behavior of a reduced scale pump turbine impeller. Part II: Numerical simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valero, C; Huang, X; Egusquiza, E [Center for Industrial Diagnostics, Technical University of Catalonia, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Farhat, M; Avellan, F, E-mail: egusquiza@mf.upc.ed [Laboratory for Hydraulic Machines, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne Av. De Cour 33 bis, CH-1007 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2010-08-15

    A numerical simulation has been carried out to analyze the modal behavior of a reduced scale pump-turbine impeller. The simulation has been done using FEM method, in air and in water. The same boundary conditions than in the experiment were considered: free body in air and free body submerged in a reservoir of water. A sensitivity analysis to determine the influence of the number of elements was done. The influence of the input parameters was also taken into account. Finally, a mesh with 165000 elements for the impeller in air and of 508676 for the impeller in water was used. The results obtained with the simulation have been compared with the experimental ones (paper 1). Both the natural frequency values and the mode-shapes were compared. The numerical results showed small deviation from experiment in the first modes in modes with low modal density. In some coupled modes been found. With the updated model the mode-shapes have been analyzed. Some modes with high modal density have been found. As indicated in the experiment, the effect of the added mass reduces the natural frequencies and also changes the characteristics of the coupled modes.

  15. Liquid-metal pumps for large-scale breeder-reactor plant (prototype pump)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsay, M. (comp.)

    1976-07-01

    This report presents the recommended pump design for use in Large Scale Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor plants. The base design for the pump will circulate 127,000 GPM of liquid sodium at temperatures up to 850/sup 0/F and with a total discharge head at the design point of 500 feet Na with an impeller that is 40 feet below the sodium seal. The pump design is predicated on developing an impeller design which will have a suction specific speed (S/sub n/) of about 20,000 with 20 feet NPSH available, which will result in a pump speed of 530 RPM at design conditions. The design is based on the technology developed in the design and fabrication of FFTF pumps, the design efforts for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Pump design study and other technology.

  16. Flow characteristics and micro-scale metallic particle formation in the laser supersonic heating technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Lung; Lin, Jehnming

    2007-02-01

    The characteristics of the supersonic flow of the laser heating technique for producing micro-scale metallic particles were investigated in this study. A numerical model was established to predict the flow fields and particle trajectories leaving a spray nozzle with shock wave effects. The compressible flow of the shock waves and the trajectories of particles in diameters of 1-20 μm were simulated and compared with the flow visualization. In the experiment, a pulsed Nd-YAG laser was used as heat source on a carbon steel target within the nozzle, and the carbon steel particles were ejected by high-pressure air. The result shows that the shock wave structures were generated at various entrance pressures, and there is a significant increase in the amount of carbon steel particles and the spraying angles by increasing the entrance air pressure.

  17. Production scale purification of Ge-68 and Zn-65 from irradiated gallium metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzsimmons, Jonathan M; Mausner, Leonard

    2015-07-01

    Germanium-68 (Ge-68) is produced by proton irradiation of a gallium metal target, purified by organic extraction and used in a medical isotope generator to produce Gallium-68 PET imaging agents. The purpose of this work was to implement a production scale separation of Ge-68 and Zn-65 that does not use organic solvents and uses a limited number of columns. The current separation approach was modified to use AG1 resin and/or Sephadex(©) G25 with zinc spikes to purify Ge-68 with near quantitative recovery. The purified Ge-68 meets DOE specifications. Methods utilizing zinc spikes resulted in the purist Ge-68 produced at Brookhaven National Lab with no other impurities by ICP-OES. During process optimization approximately 2.5 Ci of Ge-68 was purified utilizing the different processing methods, and the material was sold to the Nuclear Medicine community between 2012-2013. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Challenges in Atomic-Scale Characterization of High-k Dielectrics and Metal Gate Electrodes for Advanced CMOS Gate Stacks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinhua Zhu; Jianmin Zhu; Aidong Li; Zhiguo Liu; Naiben Ming

    2009-01-01

    The decreasing feature sizes in complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) transistor technology will require the replacement of SiO2 with gate dielectrics that have a high dielectric constant (high-k) because as the SiO2 gate thickness is reduced below 1.4 nm, electron tunnelling effects and high leakage currents occur in SiO2, which present serious obstacles to future device reliability.In recent years significant progress has been made on the screening and selection of high-k gate dielectrics, understanding their physical properties, and their integration into CMOS technology.Now the family of hafnium oxide-based materials has emerged as the leading candidate for high-k gate dielectrics due to their excellent physical properties.It is also realized that the high-k oxides must be implemented in conjunction with metal gate electrodes to get sufficient potential for CMOS continue scaling.In the advanced nanoscale Si-based CMOS devices, the composition and thickness of interfacial layers in the gate stacks determine the critical performance of devices.Therefore, detailed atomicscale understandings of the microstructures and interfacial structures built in the advanced CMOS gate stacks,are highly required.In this paper, several high-resolution electron, ion, and photon-based techniques currently used to characterize the high-k gate dielectrics and interfaces at atomic-scale, are reviewed.Particularly, we critically review the research progress on the characterization of interface behavior and structural evolution in the high-k gate dielectrics by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and the related techniques based on scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), including high-angle annular darkfield (HAADF) imaging (also known as Z-contrast imaging), electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), due to that HRTEM and STEM have become essential metrology tools for characterizing the dielectric

  19. Fact Sheets: Final Rules to Reduce Toxic Air Pollutants from Surface Coating of Metal Cans

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains the August 2003 final rule fact sheet and the December 2005 final rule fact sheet that contain information on the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) for Surface Coating of Metal Cans.

  20. Linking microstructural evolution and macro-scale friction behavior in metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argibay, N.; Chandross, M.; Cheng, S.; Michael, J. R.

    2017-03-01

    A correlation is established between the macro-scale friction regimes of metals and a transition between two dominant atomistic mechanisms of deformation. Metals tend to exhibit bi-stable friction behavior -- low and converging or high and diverging. These general trends in behavior are shown to be largely explained using a simplified model based on grain size evolution, as a function of contact stress and temperature, and are demonstrated for pure copper and gold. Specifically, the low friction regime is linked to the formation of ultra-nanocrystalline surface films (10 to 20 nm), driving toward shear accommodation by grain boundary sliding. Above a critical combination of stress and temperature -- demonstrated to be a material property -- shear accommodation transitions to dislocation dominated plasticity and high friction. We utilize a combination of experimental and computational methods to develop and validate the proposed structure-property relationship. This quantitative framework provides a shift from phenomenological to mechanistic and predictive fundamental understanding of friction for crystalline materials, including engineering alloys.

  1. Novel Base Metal-Palladium Catalytic Diesel Filter Coating with NO2 Reducing Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, K.; Dahl, S.; Mogensen, G.

    2007-01-01

    A novel alternative base metal/palladium coat has been developed that has limited NO2 formation and which even removes NO2 in a wide temperature range.Soot combustion, HC conversion and CO conversion properties are comparable to current platinum based solutions but the coating has a more attracti...... solutions. Furthermore, durability results from base metal/Pd coated DPFs installed on operating taxis and related tests cycle data is given....

  2. Reducing contraband in a psychiatric hospital through the use of a metal detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustin, Terry A

    2007-05-01

    A private, free-standing, nonprofit psychiatric hospital installed a metal detector and a screening procedure to prevent weapons and other proscribed items from being carried into the hospital by visitors. A wide variety of metal objects was discovered, including knives, ammunition, and hand tools. Visitors did not object to the procedure. As an unexpected benefit of the screening, unauthorized smoking in the hospital decreased.

  3. Responses to reduced industrial metal emissions : An ecotoxicological study on Pied Flycatcher (Ficedula hypoleuca, Aves)

    OpenAIRE

    Berglund, Åsa

    2010-01-01

    Metals have been used by humans for thousands of years, and this has resulted in increased concentrations in the biosphere. The environment around point-sources, such as mines and smelters, are of particular concern, as metals may accumulate to high concentrations, and potentially reach levels toxic to the local flora and fauna. This thesis focuses on the effects on pied flycatcher populations of two such point-sources, a lead mine and enrichment plant, and a sulfide ore smelter. Mining activ...

  4. Combine the soil water assessment tool (SWAT) with sediment geochemistry to evaluate diffuse heavy metal loadings at watershed scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Wei; Ouyang, Wei; Hao, Fanghua; Huang, Haobo; Shan, Yushu; Geng, Xiaojun

    2014-09-15

    Assessing the diffuse pollutant loadings at watershed scale has become increasingly important when formulating effective watershed water management strategies, but the process was seldom achieved for heavy metals. In this study, the overall temporal-spatial variability of particulate Pb, Cu, Cr and Ni losses within an agricultural watershed was quantitatively evaluated by combining SWAT with sediment geochemistry. Results showed that the watershed particulate heavy metal loadings displayed strong variability in the simulation period 1981-2010, with an obvious increasing trend in recent years. The simulated annual average loadings were 20.21 g/ha, 21.75 g/ha, 47.35 g/ha and 21.27 g/ha for Pb, Cu, Cr and Ni, respectively. By comparison, these annual average values generally matched the estimated particulate heavy metal loadings at field scale. With spatial interpolation of field loadings, it was found that the diffuse heavy metal pollution mainly came from the sub-basins dominated with cultivated lands, accounting for over 70% of total watershed loadings. The watershed distribution of particulate heavy metal losses was very similar to that of soil loss but contrary to that of heavy metal concentrations in soil, highlighting the important role of sediment yield in controlling the diffuse heavy metal loadings.

  5. Enhanced biological stabilization of heavy metals in sediment using immobilized sulfate reducing bacteria beads with inner cohesive nutrient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xin, E-mail: hgxlixin@hnu.edu.cn [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control (Hunan University), Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Dai, Lihua; Zhang, Chang; Zeng, Guangming; Liu, Yunguo [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control (Hunan University), Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Zhou, Chen [Swette Center for Environmental Biotechnology, Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University (United States); Xu, Weihua; Wu, Youe; Tang, Xinquan; Liu, Wei; Lan, Shiming [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control (Hunan University), Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Nutrient beads of immobilized SRB were more effective in transforming heavy metals into the more stable bound phases. • Inner cohesive nutrient effectively promoted the stabilization process of heavy metals. • The excellent removal efficiencies of Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd were 76.3%, 95.6%, 100% and 91.2%, respectively. • Easy to recycle and avoid secondary pollution. - Abstract: A series of experiments were conducted for treating heavy metals contaminated sediments sampled from Xiangjiang River, which combined polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and immobilized sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) into beads. The sodium lactate was served as the inner cohesive nutrient. Coupling the activity of the SRB with PVA, along with the porous structure and huge specific surface area, provided a convenient channel for the transmission of matter and protected the cells against the toxicity of metals. This paper systematically investigated the stability of Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd and its mechanisms. The results revealed the performance of leaching toxicity was lower and the removal efficiencies of Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd were 76.3%, 95.6%, 100% and 91.2%, respectively. Recycling experiments showed the beads could be reused 5 times with superbly efficiency. These results were also confirmed by continuous extraction at the optimal conditions. Furthermore, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy-dispersive spectra (EDS) analysis indicated the heavy metals could be transformed into stable crystal texture. The stabilization of heavy metals was attributed to the carbonyl and acyl amino groups. Results presented that immobilized bacteria with inner nutrient were potentially and practically applied to multi-heavy-metal-contamination sediment.

  6. Influence of transition metals on Streptomyces coelicolor and S. sioyaensis and generation of chromate-reducing mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gren, Tetiana; Ostash, Bohdan; Hrubskyy, Yaroslav; Tistechok, Stepan; Fedorenko, Victor

    2014-03-01

    Bacteria-assisted bioremediation is widely recognized as a low-cost method to minimize the consequences of soil pollution with toxic metals originating from industrial sites. Strains used in bioremediation have to deal with high metal load via biosorption, reduction, bioprecipitation, metal sequestration, and/or chelation. Actinobacteria, and streptomycetes in particular, are considered a perspective group for bioremediation as natural soil inhabitants with extensive secondary metabolism. Nevertheless, there is no reference information on survival of the model streptomycetes in the presence of the most abundant metal pollutants. Also, there are no reports describing the selection approaches towards improvement of bioremediation properties. In this work, the resistance of Streptomyces coelicolor M145 and Streptomyces sioyaensis Lv81 to certain transition metals and their growth under different pH values are described for the first time. Spontaneous chromate-resistant S. sioyaensis Lv81-138 strain was selected in the course of this work. Strain Lv81-138 is the most efficient actinobacterial Cr(VI) reducer reported so far, capable of converting 12 mmol/L of Cr(VI) into Cr(III) in a medium supplemented with 50 mmol/L K2CrO4.

  7. Enhancing the use of waste activated sludge as bio-fuel through selectively reducing its heavy metal content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewil, Raf; Baeyens, Jan; Appels, Lise

    2007-06-18

    Power plant or cement kiln co-incineration are important disposal routes for the large amounts of waste activated sludge (WAS) which are generated annually. The presence of significant amounts of heavy metals in the sludge however poses serious problems since they are partly emitted with the flue gases (and collected in the flue gas dedusting) and partly incorporated in the ashes of the incinerator: in both cases, the disposal or reuse of the fly ash and bottom ashes can be jeopardized since subsequent leaching in landfill disposal can occur, or their "pozzolanic" incorporation in cement cannot be applied. The present paper studies some physicochemical methods for reducing the heavy metal content of WAS. The used techniques include acid and alkaline thermal hydrolysis and Fenton's peroxidation. By degrading the extracellular polymeric substances, binding sites for a large amount of heavy metals, the latter are released into the sludge water. The behaviour of several heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Pb, Ni, Zn) was assessed in laboratory tests. Results of these show a significant reduction of most heavy metals.

  8. Competitive adsorption of heavy metal by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) extracted from sulfate reducing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin; Li, Qing; Li, Ming-Ming; Chen, Tian-Hu; Zhou, Yue-Fei; Yue, Zheng-Bo

    2014-07-01

    Competitive adsorption of heavy metals by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) extracted from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans was investigated. Chemical analysis showed that different EPS compositions had different capacities for the adsorption of heavy metals which was investigated using Cu(2+) and Zn(2+). Batch adsorption tests indicated that EPS had a higher combined ability with Zn(2+) than Cu(2+). This was confirmed and explained by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy analysis. FTIR analysis showed that both polysaccharides and protein combined with Zn(2+) while only protein combined with Cu(2+). EEM spectra further revealed that tryptophan-like substances were the main compositions reacted with the heavy metals. Moreover, Zn(2+) had a higher fluorescence quenching ability than Cu(2+).

  9. Effect of micrometer-scale metallic fillers on the mechanical and corrosion resistance properties of alternative materials for conservative dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luponio, C; Causa, F; Angelini, E; Pinasco, M R; Ambrosio, L

    2006-01-01

    In conservative dentistry, glass-ionomer cements (GICs) have been proposed as substitutes for composite resins. This is because the latter, although widely used over the last 10 yrs, exhibit inadequate physico-chemical properties. Although the performance of a typical commercial GIC is not yet optimal for restorative dentistry, the addition of metallic filler could improve this. In this study, a series of commercially available GICs were incorporated in trial dental amalgams, whose mechanical and calorimetric properties and morphologies, were examined. The metallic component of these amalgams comprised one of three metallic fillers, each including micrometer-scale metal particles of a different shape. The corrosion resistance of the amalgams, in fluids simulating the oral cavity environment, was also studied. The addition of metallic filler to GIC produced a general improvement in mechanical properties. Of particular note were increases in the elastic modulus, up to around sixfold, with the addition of Valiant metallic filler to the GIC Fuji II, and of the stress at break, up to around fourfold, for the New Gen metallic filler/GIC Fuji II amalgam. In these cases, the mechanical properties of dentine were studied. Micrographic observations showed a highly compact structure of the added GICs, thus reflecting a reduction in shrinkage. Calorimetric and dilatometric analyses further confirmed the suitability for applications in preservative dentistry. Finally, with respect to corrosion resistance, the effect of the introduction of the metallic filler was beneficial in samples with low porosity.

  10. Solid polymer electrolyte composite membrane comprising a porous support and a solid polymer electrolyte including a dispersed reduced noble metal or noble metal oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Han; Mittelsteadt, Cortney K; Norman, Timothy J; Griffith, Arthur E; LaConti, Anthony B

    2015-02-24

    A solid polymer electrolyte composite membrane and method of manufacturing the same. According to one embodiment, the composite membrane comprises a thin, rigid, dimensionally-stable, non-electrically-conducting support, the support having a plurality of cylindrical, straight-through pores extending perpendicularly between opposing top and bottom surfaces of the support. The pores are unevenly distributed, with some or no pores located along the periphery and more pores located centrally. The pores are completely filled with a solid polymer electrolyte, the solid polymer electrolyte including a dispersed reduced noble metal or noble metal oxide. The solid polymer electrolyte may also be deposited over the top and/or bottom surfaces of the support.

  11. A stabilized proper orthogonal decomposition reduced-order model for large scale quasigeostrophic ocean circulation

    CERN Document Server

    San, Omer

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a stabilized proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) reduced-order model (ROM) is presented for the barotropic vorticity equation. We apply the POD-ROM model to mid-latitude simplified oceanic basins, which are standard prototypes of more realistic large-scale ocean dynamics. A mode dependent eddy viscosity closure scheme is used to model the effects of the discarded POD modes. A sensitivity analysis with respect to the free eddy viscosity stabilization parameter is performed for various POD-ROMs with different numbers of POD modes. The POD-ROM results are validated against the Munk layer resolving direct numerical simulations using a fully conservative fourth-order Arakawa scheme. A comparison with the standard Galerkin POD-ROM without any stabilization is also included in our investigation. Significant improvements in the accuracy over the standard Galerkin model are shown for a four-gyre ocean circulation problem. This first step in the numerical assessment of the POD-ROM shows that it could r...

  12. 99Tc(VII) Retardation, Reduction, and Redox Rate Scaling in Naturally Reduced Sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yuanyuan; Liu, Chongxuan; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; McKinley, James P.; Zachara, John M.; Plymale, Andrew E.; Miller, Micah D.; Varga, Tamas; Resch, Charles T.

    2015-10-15

    Abstract: An experimental and modeling study was conducted to investigate pertechnetate (Tc(VII)) retardation, reduction, and rate scaling in three sediments from Ringold formation at U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford site, where 99Tc is a major contaminant in groundwater. Tc(VII) was reduced in all the sediments in both batch reactors and diffusion columns, with a faster rate in a sediment containing a higher concentration of HCl-extractable Fe(II). Tc(VII) migration in the diffusion columns was reductively retarded with retardation degrees correlated with Tc(VII) reduction rates. The reduction rates were faster in the diffusion columns than those in the batch reactors, apparently influenced by the spatial distribution of redox-reactive minerals along transport paths that supplied Tc(VII). X-ray computed tomography and autoradiography were performed to identify the spatial locations of Tc(VII) reduction and transport paths in the sediments, and results generally confirmed the newly found behavior of reaction rate changes from batch to column. The results from this study implied that Tc(VII) migration can be reductively retarded at Hanford site with a retardation degree dependent on reactive Fe(II) content and its distribution in sediments. This study also demonstrated that an effective reaction rate may be faster in transport systems than that in well-mixed reactors.

  13. Rapid Large Scale Reprocessing of the ODI Archive using the QuickReduce Pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopu, A.; Kotulla, R.; Young, M. D.; Hayashi, S.; Harbeck, D.; Liu, W.; Henschel, R.

    2015-09-01

    The traditional model of astronomers collecting their observations as raw instrument data is being increasingly replaced by astronomical observatories serving standard calibrated data products to observers and to the public at large once proprietary restrictions are lifted. For this model to be effective, observatories need the ability to periodically re-calibrate archival data products as improved master calibration products or pipeline improvements become available, and also to allow users to rapidly calibrate their data on-the-fly. Traditional astronomy pipelines are heavily I/O dependent and do not scale with increasing data volumes. In this paper, we present the One Degree Imager - Portal, Pipeline and Archive (ODI-PPA) calibration pipeline framework which integrates the efficient and parallelized QuickReduce pipeline to enable a large number of simultaneous, parallel data reduction jobs - initiated by operators AND/OR users - while also ensuring rapid processing times and full data provenance. Our integrated pipeline system allows re-processing of the entire ODI archive (˜15,000 raw science frames, ˜3.0 TB compressed) within ˜18 hours using twelve 32-core compute nodes on the Big Red II supercomputer. Our flexible, fast, easy to operate, and highly scalable framework improves access to ODI data, in particular when data rates double with an upgraded focal plane (scheduled for 2015), and also serve as a template for future data processing infrastructure across the astronomical community and beyond.

  14. Reduced hydrogen sulfide from crude oil using metal nanoparticles produced by electrochemical deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar Safarkhani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide is one of the most dangerous contaminants in crude oil and natural gas that must be removed before transport and refining. It has multiple effects on the environment and the industry is bad that these effects include acid rain, cancer, corrosion of pipelines, poison catalytic converters in car exhaust. In this study, to eliminate H2S crude oil Nano emulsion used ionic liquid. Ionic liquids also with metal nanoparticles (MNPs have been modified. Improve and reform the electrochemical deposition of metal salts is done. Ionic liquid 1 - Hydro One Atyl2- methyl imidazolium de cyanimide [HEMIM] [DCA] is inherently hydrophilic as Scavenger H2S was added to the crude oil. Two types of metal salts of Fe (acac 3 and Cu (SO4 electrochemical deposition method for producing metal nanoparticles in the ionic liquid [HEMIM] [DCA] was used. Suitable concentrations of ionic liquids for the complete removal of hydrogen sulfide from crude oil were determined by two methods: static and dynamic methods. Dynamic method to determine the required dose used to remove H2S. Static method using response surface and through statistical experimental design for modeling and assessment CCD H2S was removed parameters. Three factors, namely Scavengerdose, contact time and the reaction temperature were studied. The interaction between these factors on the concentration of H2S in the crude oil was studied. 3 important statistical models for ionic liquids and ionic liquid containing two types of metal nanoparticles were developed. This model has an index of noncompliance was not important. The ionic liquid modified with nanoparticles , activity and H2S removal capacity is significantly increased , to the extent that the effect of one or two major factors were considered too small or unimportant . Copper metal nanoparticles showed better performance for the removal of H2S to iron

  15. Subcascade formation and defect cluster size scaling in high-energy collision events in metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Backer, A.; Sand, A. E.; Nordlund, K.; Luneville, L.; Simeone, D.; Dudarev, S. L.

    2016-07-01

    It has been recently established that the size of the defects created under ion irradiation follows a scaling law (Sand A. E. et al., EPL, 103 (2013) 46003; Yi X. et al., EPL, 110 (2015) 36001). A critical constraint associated with its application to phenomena occurring over a broad range of irradiation conditions is the limitation on the energy of incident particles. Incident neutrons or ions, with energies exceeding a certain energy threshold, produce a complex hierarchy of collision subcascade events, which impedes the use of the defect cluster size scaling law derived for an individual low-energy cascade. By analyzing the statistics of subcascade sizes and energies, we show that defect clustering above threshold energies can be described by a product of two scaling laws, one for the sizes of subcascades and the other for the sizes of defect clusters formed in subcascades. The statistics of subcascade sizes exhibits a transition at a threshold energy, where the subcascade morphology changes from a single domain below the energy threshold, to several or many sub-domains above the threshold. The number of sub-domains then increases in proportion to the primary knock-on atom energy. The model has been validated against direct molecular-dynamics simulations and applied to W, Fe, Be, Zr and sixteen other metals, enabling the prediction of full statistics of defect cluster sizes with no limitation on the energy of cascade events. We find that populations of defect clusters produced by the fragmented high-energy cascades are dominated by individual Frenkel pairs and relatively small defect clusters, whereas the lower-energy non-fragmented cascades produce a greater proportion of large defect clusters.

  16. Novel Base Metal-Palladium Catalytic Diesel Filter Coating with NO2 Reducing Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, K.; Dahl, S.; Mogensen, G.

    2007-01-01

    A novel alternative base metal/palladium coat has been developed that has limited NO2 formation and which even removes NO2 in a wide temperature range.Soot combustion, HC conversion and CO conversion properties are comparable to current platinum based solutions but the coating has a more attractive...... price structure. The novel base metal/palladium catalytic coat has been applied on commercial silicon carbide wall flow diesel filters and tested in an engine test bench. Results from engine bench tests concerning soot combustion, HC-, CO-, NO2- removal with the novel coat will are compared to present...

  17. A Fully Integrated and Miniaturized Heavy-metal-detection Sensor Based on Micro-patterned Reduced Graphene Oxide

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    For this paper, a fully integrated and highly miniaturized electrochemical sensor was designed and fabricated on a silicon substrate. A solvothermal-assisted reduced graphene oxide named “TRGO” was then successfully micro-patterned using a lithography technique, followed by the electrodeposition of bismuth (Bi) on the surface of the micro-patterned TRGO for the electrochemical detection of heavy metal ions. The fully integrated electrochemical micro-sensor was then measured and evaluated for ...

  18. Eliminating Cyanide, Reducing Heavy Metals, and Harvesting Gold from Mining Waste with Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2001-01-01

    wastewater combines several benefits: cyanide is removed, plants are irrigated and fertilised. Heavy metals (including gold) are extracted by plants. Plants can be harvested and used, e.g., for energy production by burning. The ash of the plants is probaly rich in gold and a resource for further gold...

  19. Improved lumen visualization in metallic vascular implants by reducing RF artifacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartels, LW; Bakker, CJG; Viergever, MA

    2002-01-01

    In this study, a method is proposed for MRI of the lumen of metallic vascular implants, like stents or vena cava filters. The method is based on the reduction of artifacts caused by flow, susceptibility, and RIF eddy currents. Whereas both flow artifacts and susceptibility artifacts are well underst

  20. Eliminating Cyanide, Reducing Heavy Metals, and Harvesting Gold from Mining Waste with Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2001-01-01

    wastewater combines several benefits: cyanide is removed, plants are irrigated and fertilised. Heavy metals (including gold) are extracted by plants. Plants can be harvested and used, e.g., for energy production by burning. The ash of the plants is probaly rich in gold and a resource for further gold...

  1. Stainless steel corrosion scale formed in reclaimed water: Characteristics, model for scale growth and metal element release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yong; Liu, Shuming; Smith, Kate; Hu, Hongying; Tang, Fusheng; Li, Yuhong; Yu, Kanghua

    2016-10-01

    Stainless steels generally have extremely good corrosion resistance, but are still susceptible to pitting corrosion. As a result, corrosion scales can form on the surface of stainless steel after extended exposure to aggressive aqueous environments. Corrosion scales play an important role in affecting water quality. These research results showed that interior regions of stainless steel corrosion scales have a high percentage of chromium phases. We reveal the morphology, micro-structure and physicochemical characteristics of stainless steel corrosion scales. Stainless steel corrosion scale is identified as a podiform chromite deposit according to these characteristics, which is unlike deposit formed during iron corrosion. A conceptual model to explain the formation and growth of stainless steel corrosion scale is proposed based on its composition and structure. The scale growth process involves pitting corrosion on the stainless steel surface and the consecutive generation and homogeneous deposition of corrosion products, which is governed by a series of chemical and electrochemical reactions. This model shows the role of corrosion scales in the mechanism of iron and chromium release from pitting corroded stainless steel materials. The formation of corrosion scale is strongly related to water quality parameters. The presence of HClO results in higher ferric content inside the scales. Cl(-) and SO4(2-) ions in reclaimed water play an important role in corrosion pitting of stainless steel and promote the formation of scales. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Using ensemble models to identify and apportion heavy metal pollution sources in agricultural soils on a local scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Xie, Zhiyi; Li, Fangbai

    2015-11-01

    This study aims to identify and apportion multi-source and multi-phase heavy metal pollution from natural and anthropogenic inputs using ensemble models that include stochastic gradient boosting (SGB) and random forest (RF) in agricultural soils on the local scale. The heavy metal pollution sources were quantitatively assessed, and the results illustrated the suitability of the ensemble models for the assessment of multi-source and multi-phase heavy metal pollution in agricultural soils on the local scale. The results of SGB and RF consistently demonstrated that anthropogenic sources contributed the most to the concentrations of Pb and Cd in agricultural soils in the study region and that SGB performed better than RF.

  3. Large-scale geographical variation in eggshell heavy metal and calcium content in a passerine bird (Ficedula hypoleuca)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruuskanen, S.; Morales, J.; Laaksonen, T.; Moreno, J.; Mateo, R.; Belskii, E.; Bushuev, A.; Jarvinen, A.; Kerimov, A.; Krams, I.; Morosinotto, C.; Mand, R.; Orell, M.; Qvarnstrom, A.; Slater, F.M.; Siitari, H.; Tilgar, V.; Visser, M.E.; Winkel, W.; Zang, H.; Eeva, T.

    2014-01-01

    Birds have been used as bioindicators of pollution, such as toxic metals. Levels of pollutants in eggs are especially interesting, as developing birds are more sensitive to detrimental effects of pollutants than adults. Only very few studies have monitored intraspecific, large-scale variation in

  4. Quantum resonance of nanometre-scale metal-ZnO-metal structure and its application in sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lijie, E-mail: L.Li@swansea.ac.uk; Rees, Paul [College of Engineering, Swansea University, Swansea, Wales SA2 8PP (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-15

    Analysis of the thickness dependence of the potential profile of the metal-ZnO-metal (MZM) structure has been conducted based on Poisson’s equation and Schottky theory. Quantum scattering theory is then used to calculate the transmission probability of an electron passing through the MZM structure. Results show that the quantum resonance (QR) effect becomes pronounced when the thickness of the ZnO film reaches to around 6 nm. Strain induced piezopotentials are considered as biases to the MZM, which significantly changes the QR according to the analysis. This effect can be potentially employed as nanoscale strain sensors.

  5. Low pressure hand made PVD system for high crystalline metal thin film preparation in micro-nanometer scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosikhin, Ahmad, E-mail: a.rosikhin86@yahoo.co.id; Hidayat, Aulia Fikri; Marimpul, Rinaldo; Syuhada, Ibnu; Winata, Toto, E-mail: toto@fi.itb.ac.id [Department of physics, physics of electronic materials research division Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132, Jawa Barat – Indonesia (Indonesia)

    2016-02-08

    High crystalline metal thin film preparation in application both for catalyst substrate or electrode in any electronic devices always to be considered in material functional material research and development. As a substrate catalyst, this metal take a role as guidance for material growth in order to resulted in proper surface structure although at the end it will be removed via etching process. Meanwhile as electrodes, it will dragging charges to be collected inside. This brief discussion will elaborate general fundamental principle of physical vapor deposition (PVD) system for metal thin film preparation in micro-nanometer scale. The influence of thermodynamic parameters and metal characteristic such as melting point and particle size will be elucidated. Physical description of deposition process in the chamber can be simplified by schematic evaporation phenomena which is supported by experimental measurement such as SEM and XRD.

  6. Facile and Gram-scale Synthesis of Metal-free Catalysts: Toward Realistic Applications for Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ok-Hee; Cho, Yong-Hun; Chung, Dong Young; Kim, Min Jeong; Yoo, Ji Mun; Park, Ji Eun; Choe, Heeman; Sung, Yung-Eun

    2015-03-01

    Although numerous reports on nonprecious metal catalysts for replacing expensive Pt-based catalysts have been published, few of these studies have demonstrated their practical application in fuel cells. In this work, we report graphitic carbon nitride and carbon nanofiber hybrid materials synthesized by a facile and gram-scale method via liquid-based reactions, without the use of toxic materials or a high pressure-high temperature reactor, for use as fuel cell cathodes. The resulting materials exhibited remarkable methanol tolerance, selectivity, and stability even without a metal dopant. Furthermore, these completely metal-free catalysts exhibited outstanding performance as cathode materials in an actual fuel cell device: a membrane electrode assembly with both acidic and alkaline polymer electrolytes. The fabrication method and remarkable performance of the single cell produced in this study represent progressive steps toward the realistic application of metal-free cathode electrocatalysts in fuel cells.

  7. Facile and gram-scale synthesis of metal-free catalysts: toward realistic applications for fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ok-Hee; Cho, Yong-Hun; Chung, Dong Young; Kim, Min Jeong; Yoo, Ji Mun; Park, Ji Eun; Choe, Heeman; Sung, Yung-Eun

    2015-03-02

    Although numerous reports on nonprecious metal catalysts for replacing expensive Pt-based catalysts have been published, few of these studies have demonstrated their practical application in fuel cells. In this work, we report graphitic carbon nitride and carbon nanofiber hybrid materials synthesized by a facile and gram-scale method via liquid-based reactions, without the use of toxic materials or a high pressure-high temperature reactor, for use as fuel cell cathodes. The resulting materials exhibited remarkable methanol tolerance, selectivity, and stability even without a metal dopant. Furthermore, these completely metal-free catalysts exhibited outstanding performance as cathode materials in an actual fuel cell device: a membrane electrode assembly with both acidic and alkaline polymer electrolytes. The fabrication method and remarkable performance of the single cell produced in this study represent progressive steps toward the realistic application of metal-free cathode electrocatalysts in fuel cells.

  8. Modal behavior of a reduced scale pump-turbine impeller. Part 1: Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escaler, X; Huetter, J K; Egusquiza, E [Center for Industrial Diagnostics, Technical University of Catalonia, Av. Diagonal 647, Barcelona, 08028 (Spain); Farhat, M; Avellan, F, E-mail: escaler@mf.upc.ed [Laboratory for Hydraulic Machines, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Av. de Cour 33 bis, Lausanne, CH-1007 (Switzerland)

    2010-08-15

    An experimental investigation has been carried out to quantify the effects of surrounding fluid on the modal behavior of a reduced scale pump-turbine impeller. The modal properties of the fluid-structure system have been obtained by Experimental Modal Analysis (EMA) with the impeller suspended in air and inside a water reservoir. The impeller has been excited with an instrumented hammer and the response has been measured by means of miniature accelerometers. The Frequency Response Functions (FRF's) have been obtained from a large number of impacting positions in order to ensure the identification of the main mode shapes. As a result, the main modes of vibration have been well characterized both in air and in water in terms of natural frequency, damping ratio and mode shape. The first mode is the 2 Nodal Diameter (ND), the second one is the 0ND and the following ones are the 3ND coupled with the 1ND. The visual observation of the animated mode shapes and the level of the Modal Assurance Criterion (MAC) have permitted to correlate the homologous modes of vibration of the fluid-structure system in air and in water. From this comparison the added mass effect on the natural frequencies and the fluid effect on the damping ratios have been quantified for the most significant modes. With the surrounding water, the natural frequencies decrease in average by 10%. On the other hand, the damping ratios increase in average by 0.5%. In any case, the damping ratio appears to decrease with the frequency value of the mode.

  9. Biochar reduces yield-scaled emissions of reactive nitrogen gases from vegetable soils across China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Changhua; Chen, Hao; Li, Bo; Xiong, Zhengqin

    2017-06-01

    Biochar amendment to soil has been proposed as a strategy for sequestering carbon, mitigating climate change and enhancing crop productivity. However, few studies have compared the general effect of different feedstock-derived biochars on the various gaseous reactive nitrogen emissions (GNrEs) of N2O, NO and NH3 simultaneously across the typical vegetable soils in China. A greenhouse pot experiment with five consecutive vegetable crops was conducted to investigate the effects of two contrasting biochars, namely wheat straw biochar (Bw) and swine manure biochar (Bm) on GNrEs, vegetable yield and gaseous reactive nitrogen intensity (GNrI) in four typical soils which are representative of the intensive vegetable cropping systems across mainland China: an Acrisol from Hunan Province, an Anthrosol from Shanxi Province, a Cambisol from Shandong Province and a Phaeozem from Heilongjiang Province. Results showed that remarkable GNrE mitigation induced by biochar occurred in Anthrosol and Phaeozem, whereas enhancement of yield occurred in Cambisol and Phaeozem. Additionally, both biochars decreased GNrI through reducing N2O and NO emissions by 36.4-59.1 and 37.0-49.5 % for Bw (except for Cambisol), respectively, and by improving yield by 13.5-30.5 % for Bm (except for Acrisol and Anthrosol). Biochar amendments generally stimulated the NH3 emissions with greater enhancement from Bm than Bw. We can infer that the biochar's effects on the GNrEs and vegetable yield strongly depend on the attributes of the soil and biochar. Therefore, in order to achieve the maximum benefits under intensive greenhouse vegetable agriculture, both soil type and biochar characteristics should be seriously considered before conducting large-scale biochar applications.

  10. Energy conservation in reheating furnaces by reducing scrap and scale formation; Kuumamuokkauksen energiasaeaestoet romun maeaeraeae ja hilseilyae vaehentaemaellae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kivivuori, S.; Savolainen, P.; Fredriksson, J.; Paavola, J. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Lab. of Materials Processing and Powder Metallurgy

    1996-12-31

    The main objective of the project `Energy Savings in Reheating Furnaces by Reducing Scrap and Scale Formation` is to reduce energy consumption and environmental harms in reheating and rolling of steel. This was done by analysing the different atmospheres in reheating furnaces of the steel companies participating in this project. These atmospheres were then simulated in a laboratory furnace. Scale formation tests with different steel grades were then carried out in these atmospheres. Scale removal tests were done to some steel grades too. The results showed that lower oxygen content - as expected - decreases oxidation despite the even higher carbondioxide content in the atmosphere. Lower oxygen content may cause difficulties in scale removal. This however is highly dependent on the steel grade. Heat treatment tests showed the effect of increased temperature and furnace time on decarburization. Some energy savings was obtained in fuel consumption by optimising the operation parameters and the atmosphere steadier in different reheating furnaces. (orig.)

  11. Reduced hydrogen sulfide from crude oil using metal nanoparticles produced by electrochemical deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Sahar Safarkhani; Ali Akbar MiranBeigi; Amir Vahi; Abolghasem Mirhoseini

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is one of the most dangerous contaminants in crude oil and natural gas that must be removed before transport and refining. It has multiple effects on the environment and the industry is bad that these effects include acid rain, cancer, corrosion of pipelines, poison catalytic converters in car exhaust. In this study, to eliminate H2S crude oil Nano emulsion used ionic liquid. Ionic liquids also with metal nanoparticles (MNPs) have been modified. Improve and reform the electro...

  12. Recovery of valuable metals from electroplating sludge with reducing additives via vitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ruth; Huang, Kuo-Lin; Lin, Zih-Yi; Wang, Jian-Wen; Lin, Chitsan; Kuo, Yi-Ming

    2013-11-15

    In this study, vitrification was applied to treat Ni-Cu electroplating sludge. The sludge was mixed with additives (limestone:cullet = 4:6) and then heated to 1450 °C. The cooled product could be separated into slag and ingot. An atomic absorption spectrometer was used to determine the metal levels of specimens and toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) tests, whereas the crystalline and surface characteristics were examined using quantitative X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. With a glassy structure, the slag was mainly composed of Ca, Si, and Mg. The TCLP results of slags met the Taiwan regulated standards, suggesting that slag can be used for recycling purposes. With the aid of additives, the crystalline phase of slag was transformed form CaMgSiO4 into CsSiO3. The ingots were mainly composed of Ni (563,000-693,800 mg/kg), Cu (79,900-87,400 mg/kg), and Fe (35,000-43,600 mg/kg) (target metals) due the gravity separation during vitrification. At appropriate additives/sludge ratios (>0.2), >95% of target metals gathered in the ingot as a recoverable form (Ni-Fe alloy). The high Ni level of slag suggests that the ingot can be used as the raw materials for smelters or the additives for steel making. Therefore, the vitrification approach of this study is a promising technology to recover valuable metals from Ni-Cu electroplating sludge.

  13. Deep learning methods to guide CT image reconstruction and reduce metal artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjesteby, Lars; Yang, Qingsong; Xi, Yan; Zhou, Ye; Zhang, Junping; Wang, Ge

    2017-03-01

    The rapidly-rising field of machine learning, including deep learning, has inspired applications across many disciplines. In medical imaging, deep learning has been primarily used for image processing and analysis. In this paper, we integrate a convolutional neural network (CNN) into the computed tomography (CT) image reconstruction process. Our first task is to monitor the quality of CT images during iterative reconstruction and decide when to stop the process according to an intelligent numerical observer instead of using a traditional stopping rule, such as a fixed error threshold or a maximum number of iterations. After training on ground truth images, the CNN was successful in guiding an iterative reconstruction process to yield high-quality images. Our second task is to improve a sinogram to correct for artifacts caused by metal objects. A large number of interpolation and normalization-based schemes were introduced for metal artifact reduction (MAR) over the past four decades. The NMAR algorithm is considered a state-of-the-art method, although residual errors often remain in the reconstructed images, especially in cases of multiple metal objects. Here we merge NMAR with deep learning in the projection domain to achieve additional correction in critical image regions. Our results indicate that deep learning can be a viable tool to address CT reconstruction challenges.

  14. A Fully Integrated and Miniaturized Heavy-metal-detection Sensor Based on Micro-patterned Reduced Graphene Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Xing; Hossain, Md. Faruk; Park, Jae Yeong

    2016-09-01

    For this paper, a fully integrated and highly miniaturized electrochemical sensor was designed and fabricated on a silicon substrate. A solvothermal-assisted reduced graphene oxide named “TRGO” was then successfully micro-patterned using a lithography technique, followed by the electrodeposition of bismuth (Bi) on the surface of the micro-patterned TRGO for the electrochemical detection of heavy metal ions. The fully integrated electrochemical micro-sensor was then measured and evaluated for the detection of cadmium and lead-heavy metal ions in an acetic-acid buffered solution using the square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV) technique. The fabricated micro-sensor exhibited a linear detection range of 1.0 μg L-1 to 120.0 μg L-1 for both of the metal ions, and detection limits of 0.4 μg L-1 and 1.0 μg L-1 were recorded for the lead and cadmium (S/N = 3), respectively. Drinking-water samples were used for the practical assessment of the fabricated micro-sensor, and it showed an acceptable detection performance regarding the metal ions.

  15. Plant diversity reduces the effect of multiple heavy metal pollution on soil enzyme activities and microbial community structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang GAO; Chiyuan MIAO; Jun XIA; Liang MAO; Yafeng WANG; Pei ZHOU

    2012-01-01

    It is unclear whether certain plant species and plant diversity could reduce the impacts of multiple heavy metal pollution on soil microbial structure and soil enzyme activities. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) was used to analyze the genetic diversity and microbial similarity in planted and unplanted soil under combined cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) pollution. A metal hyper- accumulator, Brassica juncea, and a common plant, Festuca arundinacea Schreb, were used in this research. The results showed that microorganism quantity in planted soil significantly increased, compared with that in unplanted soil with Cd and Pb pollution. The order of microbial community sensitivity in response to Cd and Pb stress was as follows: actinomycetes 〉 bacteria 〉 fungi. Respiration, phosphatase, urease and dehydrogenase activity were significantly inhibited due to Cd and Pb stress. Compared with unplanted soil, planted soils have frequently been reported to have higher rates of microbial activity due to the presence of additional surfaces for microbial colonization and organic compounds released by the plant roots. Two coexisting plants could increase microbe population and the activity of phosphatases, dehydrogenases and, in particular, ureases. Soil enzyme activity was higher in B. juncea phytoremediated soil than in F. arundinacea planted soil in this study. Heavy metal pollution decreased the richness of the soil microbial community, but plant diversity increased DNA sequence diversity and maintained DNA sequence diversity at highlevels. The genetic polymorphism under heavy metal stress was higher in B. juncea phytoremediated soil than in F. arundinacea planted soil.

  16. An intelligent system for calculating the scale of rational, enlarged production of an underground non-ferrous metal mine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Ming-gui; CAI Si-jing

    2008-01-01

    The enlarged production scale of underground non-ferrous metal mines is affected by many uncertain factors difficult to describe mathematically with any level of accuracy. The problem can be solved by a synthesis of artificial intelligence. Based on the analysis of the major factors affecting the scale of enlarged production, we first interpreted in detail the design principles and structure of the intelligent system. Secondly, we introduced an ANN subsystem. In order to ensure technological and scale efficiencies of the training samples for ANN, we filtrated the samples with a DEA method. Finally, we trained the intelligent system, which was proved to be very efficient.

  17. Influence of Mg2+ on Initial Stages of CaCO3 Scale Formed on Metal Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Tao; Anne Neville; YUAN Ming-dong

    2004-01-01

    Magnesium ions, which exist in formation water and injection water under downhole conditions in the oil and gas production industry, are a key determinant in the CaCO3 scale formation. Many studies have focused their attention on the effect of magnesium on the kinetics, the morphology and the content of Mg in the CaCOs scale. Little attention has been paid to the effect of Mg2+ on the initial stages of CaCO3 formation on a metal surface. In this study, an electrochemical technique was used to study the influence of Mg2+ on the initial stages of CaCO3 scale formed on a metal surface. With this electrochemical technique, the reduction of the dissolved oxygen in an analysis solution is considered on the surface of a rotating disk electrode (RDE) under potentiostatic control. The rate of oxygen reduction on the surface of the RDE enables the extent of surface coverage of scale to be assessed. With this electrochemical technique, a new insight into the effect of Mg2+ on CaCO3 scale formed on a metal surface is given.

  18. Geo-referenced modelling of metal concentrations in river basins at the catchment scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüffmeyer, N.; Berlekamp, J.; Klasmeier, J.

    2009-04-01

    used to demonstrate the effect of specific mitigation strategies such as improved treatment of rainwater, reduction of metal products exposed to rain or reduced input from mine drainage. The model can thus be a valuable tool for setting up management plans as required in the Water Framework Directive with a special emphasis on promising mitigation strategies in case of exceedance of target values. 4. References [1] Directive 2000/60/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council (EU Water Framework Directive) [2] Feijtel T.C.J., Boeije G., Matthies M., Young A., Morris G., Gandolfi C., Hansen B., Fox K., Holt M., Koch V., Schröder R., Cassani G., Schowanek D., Rosenblom J. and Niessen H.; Chemosphere 34, 2351-2374, 1997. Acknowledgement - We would like to thank the International Zinc Association (IZA) and the European Copper Insitute (ECI) for financial support.

  19. Fe3O4/Reduced Graphene Oxide Nanocomposite: Synthesis and Its Application for Toxic Metal Ion Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Thi Vuong Hoan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of reduced graphene oxide modified by magnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4/rGO and its application for heavy metals removal were demonstrated. The obtained samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherms, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, and magnetic measurement. The results showed that the obtained graphene oxide (GO contains a small part of initial graphite as well as reduced oxide graphene. GO exhibits very high surface area in comparison with initial graphite. The morphology of Fe3O4/rGO consists of very fine spherical iron nanooxide particles in nanoscale. The formal kinetics and adsorption isotherms of As(V, Ni(II, and Pb(II over obtained Fe3O4/rGO have been investigated. Fe3O4/rGO exhibits excellent heavy metal ions adsorption indicating that it is a potential adsorbent for water sources contaminated by heavy metals.

  20. RECYCLING BLENDS OF WASTE PLASTICS AND BIOMASS AS REDUCING AGENT FOR THE PRODUCTION OF METALLIC IRON FROM IRON OXIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JAMES RANSFORD DANKWAH

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory studies on the production of metallic iron from iron oxide using blends of palm nut shells (Elaes Guineanses and waste plastics as reducing agent have been performed through experiments conducted in a horizontal tube furnace. Composite pellets were formed from mixtures of iron oxide and carbonaceous materials consisting of chars of palm nut shells (PNS, high density polyethylene (HDPE and two blends of PNS with HDPE. Two sources of iron oxide were utilised in this investigation; reagent grade iron oxide (96.89 % Fe2O3 and EAF slag (47.1 % FeO. The iron oxide-carbonaceous material composites were heated rapidly at 1500°C in a continuous stream of argon and the off gas was analysed continuously using an infrared (IR gas analyser and a gas chromatographic (GC analyser. Elemental analyses of samples of the reduced metal were performed chemically for its carbon and oxygen contents using a LECO carbon/sulphur and oxygen/nitrogen analysers, respectively. The extent of reduction (after ten and fifteen minutes for reagent grade iron oxide and EAF slag, respectively and the level of carburisation were determined for each carbonaceous reductant. The results indicate that carburised metallic iron can be produced effectively from iron oxide using PNS, HDPE and blends of these carbonaceous materials as reductants. The extent of reduction improved significantly when PNS was blended with HDPE.

  1. Removal of SO42-, uranium and other heavy metal ions from simulated solution by sulfate reducing bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qing-liang; DING De-xin; HU E-ming; YU RUN-lan; QIU Guan-zhou

    2008-01-01

    In the case of in-situ leaching of uranium,the primitive geochemical environment for groundwater is changed since leachant is injected into the water bearing uranium deposit.This increases the concentration of SO42-,uranium and other heavy metal ions and results in the groundwater contamination.The effects of pH values of the simulated solution on the reduction of SO42- and the removal of uranium and other heavy metal ions by sulfate reducing bacteria(SRB) were studied.The results show that,when the pH value of the simulated solution is about 8,the reduction rate of SO42- by SRB and the removal rate of uranium,Mn2+,Zn2+,Pb2+ and Fe2+ will reach their highest values.A bioremediation technique for remediation of groundwater in in-situ leaching uranium mine can be developed.

  2. Evaluation of the reconstruction of image acquired from CT simulator to reduce metal artifact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Ji Hun; Park, Jin Hong; Choi, Byung Don; Won, Hui Su; Chang, Nam Jun; Goo, Jang Hyun; Hong, Joo Wan [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul national university bundang hospital, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    This study presents the usefulness assessment of metal artifact reduction for orthopedic implants(O-MAR) to decrease metal artifacts from materials with high density when acquired CT images. By CT simulator, original CT images were acquired from Gammex and Rando phantom and those phantoms inserted with high density materials were scanned for other CT images with metal artifacts and then O-MAR was applied to those images, respectively. To evaluate CT images using Gammex phantom, 5 regions of interest(ROIs) were placed at 5 organs and 3 ROIs were set up at points affected by artifacts. The averages of standard deviation(SD) and CT numbers were compared with a plan using original image. For assessment of variations in dose of tissue around materials with high density, the volume of a cylindrical shape was designed at 3 places in images acquired from Rando phantom by Eclipse. With 6 MV, 7-fields, 15x15cm{sup 2} and 100 cGy per fraction, treatment planning was created and the mean dose were compared with a plan using original image. In the test with the Gammex phantom, CT numbers had a few difference at established points and especially 3 points affected by artifacts had most of the same figures. In the case of O-MAR image, the more reduction in SD appeared at all of 8 points than non O-MAR image. In the test using the Rando Phantom, the variations in dose of tissue around high density materials had a few difference between original CT image and CT image with O-MAR. The CT images using O-MAR were acquired clearly at the boundary of tissue around high density materials and applying O-MAR was useful for correcting CT numbers.

  3. Atomic Scale Understanding of Poly-Si/SiO2/c-Si Passivated Contacts: Passivation Degradation Due to Metallization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguiar, Jeffery A.; Young, David; Lee, Benjamin; Nemeth, William; Harvey, Steve; Aoki, Toshihiro; Al-Jassim, Mowafak; Stradins, Paul

    2016-11-21

    The key attributes for achieving high efficiency crystalline silicon solar cells include class leading developments in the ability to approach the theoretical limits of silicon solar technology (29.4% efficiency). The push for high efficiency devices is further compounded with the clear need for passivation to reduce recombination at the metal contacts. At the same time there is stringent requirement to retain the same material device quality, surface passivation, and performance characteristics following subsequent processing. The development of passivated silicon cell structures that retain active front and rear surface passivation and overall material cell quality is therefore a relevant and active area of development. To address the potential outcomes of metallization on passivated silicon stack, we report on some common microstructural features of degradation due to metallization for a series of silicon device stacks. A fundamental materials understanding of the metallization process on retaining high-efficiency passivated Si devices is therefore gained over these series of results.

  4. Reduced Iron Powder from Mill Scale%由轧钢铁鳞制取还原铁粉

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩凤麟

    2001-01-01

    系统地介绍了由铁鳞制取还原铁粉的工艺过程,原理,及各种牌号还原铁粉的性能对比。%The process and production mechanism of reduced iron powder from mill scale and iron ore was described. Finally, it was compared the characters of different grades of reduced iron powder.

  5. A city scale study on the effects of intensive groundwater heat pump systems on heavy metal contents in groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Gil, Alejandro; Epting, Jannis; Garrido, Eduardo; Vázquez-Suñé, Enric; Lázaro, Jesús Mateo; Sánchez Navarro, José Ángel; Huggenberger, P; Calvo, Miguel Ángel Marazuela

    2016-12-01

    As a result of the increasing use of shallow geothermal resources, hydraulic, thermal and chemical impacts affecting groundwater quality can be observed with ever increasing frequency (Possemiers et al., 2014). To overcome the uncertainty associated with chemical impacts, a city scale study on the effects of intensive geothermal resource use by groundwater heat pump systems on groundwater quality, with special emphasis on heavy metal contents was performed. Statistical analysis of geochemical data obtained from several field campaigns has allowed studying the spatiotemporal relationship between temperature anomalies in the aquifer and trace element composition of groundwater. The relationship between temperature and the concentrations of trace elements resulted in weak correlations, indicating that temperature changes are not the driving factor in enhancing heavy metal contaminations. Regression models established for these correlations showed a very low reactivity or response of heavy metal contents to temperature changes. The change rates of heavy metal contents with respect to temperature changes obtained indicate a low risk of exceeding quality threshold values by means of the exploitation regimes used, neither producing nor enhancing contamination significantly. However, modification of pH, redox potential, electrical conductivity, dissolved oxygen and alkalinity correlated with the concentrations of heavy metals. In this case, the change rates of heavy metal contents are higher, with a greater risk of exceeding threshold values. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Efficiencies of metal separation and recovery in ash-melting of municipal solid waste under non-oxidative atmospheres with different reducing abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Takashi; Tomikawa, Hiroki

    2016-01-15

    Ash-melting of municipal solid waste produces molten metal that contains Fe and Cu, and melting furnace fly ash (MFA) that contains Pb and Zn. To recover the metal from the fly ash, Pb and Zn are extracted from the ash by water or enriched in the ash by washing out salts; this separation depends on their leachability. In this study, we investigated the effects of the reducing ability of the atmosphere on the efficiencies of metal separation during melting and metal recovery in water treatment. Different feedstocks (incineration residues) were melted under N2 or CO + N2 atmospheres. In some of the feedstock materials, volatilization of metallic Cu into MFA was promoted under the atmosphere with greater reducing ability (CO + N2). This increased volatilization inhibited the metal separation in the ash-melting process. Moreover, the higher reducing ability inhibited the formation of water-soluble lead chlorides and decreased the efficiency of metal recovery from the MFA because of the water leaching of the lead compounds. The reducing ability of the atmosphere is difficult to control uniformly in actual ash-melting plants, and we investigated appropriate melting conditions under which the effect of the reducing ability was minimized to promote metal separation and recovery. This minimization was achieved by melting incineration fly ash without additives with Cl gas treatment at 1400 °C.

  7. Metal Reduction and Iron Biomineralization by a Psychrotolerant Fe(III)-Reducing Bacterium, Shewanella sp. Strain PV-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roh, Yul; Gao, Haichun; Vali, Hojatollah; Kennedy, David W.; Yang, Zamin; Gao, Weimin; Dohnalkova, Alice; Stapleton, Raymond D.; Moon, Ji-Won; Phelps, T. J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2006-05-01

    A marine psychrotolerant, dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium, Shewanella sp. strain PV-4, from the microbial mat at a hydrothermal vent of Loihi Seamount in the Pacific Ocean has been further characterized, with emphases on metal reduction and iron biomineralization. The strain is able to reduce metals such as Fe(III), Co(III), Cr(VI), Mn(IV), and U(VI) as electron acceptors while using lactate, formate, pyruvate, or hydrogen as an electron donor. Growth during iron reduction occurred over the pH range of 7.0 to 8.9, a sodium chloride range of 0.05 to 5%, and a temperature range of 0 to 37°C, with an optimum growth temperature of 18°C. Unlike mesophilic dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, which produce mostly superparamagnetic magnetite (<35 nm), this psychrotolerant bacterium produces well-formed single-domain magnetite (>35 nm) at temperatures from 18 to 37°C. The genome size of this strain is about 4.5 Mb. Strain PV-4 is sensitive to a variety of commonly used antibiotics except ampicillin and can acquire exogenous DNA (plasmid pCM157) through conjugation.

  8. Metal Reduction and Iron Biomineralization by a Psychrotolerant Fe(III)-Reducing Bacterium, Shewanella sp. Strain PV-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roh, Yul; Gao, Haichun; Vali, Hojatollah; Kennedy, David W.; Yang, Zamin; Gao, Weimin; Dohnalkova, Alice; Stapleton, Raymond D.; Moon, Ji-Won; Phelps, Tommy J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2006-09-01

    A marine psychrotolerant, dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium, Shewanella sp. strain PV-4, from the microbial mat at a hydrothermal vent of Loihi Seamount in the Pacific Ocean has been further characterized, with emphases on metal reduction and iron biomineralization. The strain is able to reduce metals such as Fe(III), Co(III), Cr(VI), Mn(IV), and U(VI) as electron acceptors while using lactate, formate, pyruvate, or hydrogen as an electron donor. Growth during iron reduction occurred over the pH range of 7.0 to 8.9, a sodium chloride range of 0.05 to 5%, and a temperature range of 0 to 37 C, with an optimum growth temperature of 18 C. Unlike mesophilic dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, which produce mostly superparamagnetic magnetite (<35 nm), this psychrotolerant bacterium produces well-formed single-domain magnetite (>35 nm) at temperatures from 18 to 37 C. The genome size of this strain is about 4.5 Mb. Strain PV-4 is sensitive to a variety of commonly used antibiotics except ampicillin and can acquire exogenous DNA (plasmid pCM157) through conjugation.

  9. A self-reducible and alcohol-soluble copper-based metal-organic decomposition ink for printed electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong-Hun; Woo, Seunghee; Yem, Hyesuk; Cha, Minjeong; Cho, Sanghun; Kang, Mingyu; Jeong, Sooncheol; Kim, Yoonhyun; Kang, Kyungtae; Piao, Yuanzhe

    2014-03-12

    We report a novel method for the synthesis of a self-reducible (thermally reducible without a reducing atmosphere) and alcohol-soluble copper-based metal-organic decomposition (MOD) ink for printed electronics. Alcohol-solvent-based conductive inks are necessary for commercial printing processes such as reverse offset printing. We selected copper(II) formate as a precursor and alkanolamine (2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol) as a ligand to make an alcohol-solvent-based conductive ink and to assist in the reduction reaction of copper(II) formate. In addition, a co-complexing agent (octylamine) and a sintering helper (hexanoic acid) were introduced to improve the metallic copper film. The specific resistivity of copper-based MOD ink (Cuf-AMP-OH ink) after heat treatment at 350 °C is 9.46 μΩ·cm, which is 5.5 times higher than the specific resistivity of bulk copper. A simple stamping transfer was conducted to demonstrate the potential of our ink for commercial printing processes.

  10. Metal concentrations of simulated aerobic and anaerobic pilot scale landfill reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinan Bilgili, M. [Yildiz Technical University, Environmental Engineering Department, 34349 Yildiz, Besiktas, Istanbul (Turkey)]. E-mail: mbilgili@yildiz.edu.tr; Demir, Ahmet [Yildiz Technical University, Environmental Engineering Department, 34349 Yildiz, Besiktas, Istanbul (Turkey)]. E-mail: ahmetd@yildiz.edu.tr; Ince, Mahir [Department of Environmental Engineering, Gebze Institute of Technology, 41400 Gebze (Turkey)]. E-mail: mahirince@gyte.edu.tr; Ozkaya, Bestamin [Yildiz Technical University, Environmental Engineering Department, 34349 Yildiz, Besiktas, Istanbul (Turkey)]. E-mail: bozkaya@yildiz.edu.tr

    2007-06-25

    Leachate and solid waste samples from aerobic and anaerobic simulated landfill reactors operated with and without leachate recirculation were characterized in terms of metals such as Fe, Ca, K, Na, Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Ni, and Zn. Metal concentrations of aerobic landfill reactor leachate samples are always below the regulation limits. The higher concentrations in anaerobic landfill leachate samples decreased to regulation limits after the landfill becomes methanogenic. The effect of leachate recirculation is determined in anaerobic landfills more clearly than aerobic landfills. Metal precipitation resulted in a decrease in leachate metal content and an increase in solid waste metal content as expected. Result of the study show that the metal content of landfill leachate samples is not a major concern for both aerobic and anaerobic landfills.

  11. Extreme robustness of scaling in sample space reducing processes explains Zipf’s law in diffusion on directed networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corominas-Murtra, Bernat; Hanel, Rudolf; Thurner, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    It has been shown recently that a specific class of path-dependent stochastic processes, which reduce their sample space as they unfold, lead to exact scaling laws in frequency and rank distributions. Such sample space reducing processes offer an alternative new mechanism to understand the emergence of scaling in countless processes. The corresponding power law exponents were shown to be related to noise levels in the process. Here we show that the emergence of scaling is not limited to the simplest SSRPs, but holds for a huge domain of stochastic processes that are characterised by non-uniform prior distributions. We demonstrate mathematically that in the absence of noise the scaling exponents converge to -1 (Zipf’s law) for almost all prior distributions. As a consequence it becomes possible to fully understand targeted diffusion on weighted directed networks and its associated scaling laws in node visit distributions. The presence of cycles can be properly interpreted as playing the same role as noise in SSRPs and, accordingly, determine the scaling exponents. The result that Zipf’s law emerges as a generic feature of diffusion on networks, regardless of its details, and that the exponent of visiting times is related to the amount of cycles in a network could be relevant for a series of applications in traffic-, transport- and supply chain management.

  12. Thermal decomposition of silver acetate in silver paste for solar cell metallization: An effective route to reduce contact resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun Kim, Suk; Yun Kim, Se; Man Park, Jin; Hwan Park, Keum; Ho Lee, Jun; Mock Lee, Sang; Taek Han, In; Hyang Kim, Do; Ram Lim, Ka; Tae Kim, Won; Cheol Park, Ju; Soo Jee, Sang; Lee, Eun-Sung

    2013-08-01

    A screen printed silver/metallic glass (MG) paste formulated with Ag acetate resulted in a specific contact resistance in the range of 0.6-0.7 mΩ.cm2 on both the n- and p-type Si emitters of interdigitated back-contact solar cells. Silver nanocrystallites resulting from thermally decomposed Ag acetate prevented the Al MG frits from directly interacting with the Si emitter, thus reducing the amount of Al diffused into the Si emitters, and subsequently, the contact resistance. A photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 20.3% was achieved using this technique.

  13. Geminal-spanning orbitals make explicitly correlated reduced-scaling coupled-cluster methods robust, yet simple

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavošević, Fabijan; Neese, Frank; Valeev, Edward F.

    2014-08-01

    We present a production implementation of reduced-scaling explicitly correlated (F12) coupled-cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) method based on pair-natural orbitals (PNOs). A key feature is the reformulation of the explicitly correlated terms using geminal-spanning orbitals that greatly reduce the truncation errors of the F12 contribution. For the standard S66 benchmark of weak intermolecular interactions, the cc-pVDZ-F12 PNO CCSD F12 interaction energies reproduce the complete basis set CCSD limit with mean absolute error <0.1 kcal/mol, and at a greatly reduced cost compared to the conventional CCSD F12.

  14. Large-scale decontamination and decommissioning technology demonstration project at a former uranium metal production facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martineit, R.A.; Borgman, T.D.; Peters, M.S.; Stebbins, L.L. [and others

    1997-03-05

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Science and Technology Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Focus Area, led by the Federal Energy Technology Center, has been charged with improving upon baseline D&D technologies with the goal of demonstrating and validating more cost-effective and safer technologies to characterize, deactivate, survey, decontaminate, dismantle, and dispose of surplus structures, buildings, and their contents at DOE sites. The D&D Focus Area`s approach to verifying the benefits of the improved D&D technologies is to use them in large-scale technology demonstration (LSTD) projects at several DOE sites. The Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) was selected to host one of the first three LSTD`s awarded by the D&D Focus Area. The FEMP is a DOE facility near Cincinnati, Ohio, that was formerly engaged in the production of high quality uranium metal. The FEMP is a Superfund site which has completed its RUFS process and is currently undergoing environmental restoration. With the FEMP`s selection to host an LSTD, the FEMP was immediately faced with some challenges. The primary challenge was that this LSTD was to be integrated into the FEMP`s Plant 1 D&D Project which was an ongoing D&D Project for which a firm fixed price contract had been issued to the D&D Contractor. Thus, interferences with the baseline D&D project could have significant financial implications. Other challenges include defining and selecting meaningful technology demonstrations, finding/selecting technology providers, and integrating the technology into the baseline D&D project. To date, twelve technologies have been selected, and six have been demonstrated. The technology demonstrations have yielded a high proportion of {open_quotes}winners.{close_quotes} All demonstrated, technologies will be evaluated for incorporation into the FEMP`s baseline D&D strategy.

  15. Technology demonstration for reducing mercury emissions from small-scale gold refining facilities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habegger, L. J.; Fernandez, L. E.; Engle, M.; Bailey, J. L.; Peterson, D. P.; MacDonell, M. M.; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

    2008-06-30

    Gold that is brought from artisanal and small-scale gold mining areas to gold shops for processing and sale typically contains 5-40% mercury. The uncontrolled removal of the residual mercury in gold shops by using high-temperature evaporation can be a significant source of mercury emissions in urban areas where the shops are located. Emissions from gold shop hoods during a burn can exceed 1,000 mg/m{sup 3}. Because the saturation concentration of mercury vapor at operating temperatures at the hood exhaust is less than 100 mg/m{sup 3}, the dominant component of the exhaust is in the form of aerosol or liquid particles. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), with technical support from Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne), has completed a project to design and test a technology to remove the dominant aerosol component in the emissions from gold shops. The objective was to demonstrate a technology that could be manufactured at low cost and by using locally available materials and manufacturing capabilities. Six prototypes designed by Argonne were locally manufactured, installed, and tested in gold shops in Itaituba and Creporizao, Brazil. The initial prototype design incorporated a pebble bed as the media for collecting the mercury aerosols, and a mercury collection efficiency of over 90% was demonstrated. Though achieving high efficiencies, the initial prototype was determined to have practical disadvantages such as excessive weight, a somewhat complex construction, and high costs (>US$1,000). To further simplify the construction, operation, and associated costs, a second prototype design was developed in which the pebble bed was replaced with slotted steel baffle plates. The system was designed to have flexibility for installation in various hood configurations. The second prototype with the baffle plate design was installed and tested in several different hood/exhaust systems to determine the optimal installation configuration. The significance of

  16. Technology demonstration for reducing mercury emissions from small-scale gold refining facilities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habegger, L. J.; Fernandez, L. E.; Engle, M.; Bailey, J. L.; Peterson, D. P.; MacDonell, M. M.; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

    2008-06-30

    Gold that is brought from artisanal and small-scale gold mining areas to gold shops for processing and sale typically contains 5-40% mercury. The uncontrolled removal of the residual mercury in gold shops by using high-temperature evaporation can be a significant source of mercury emissions in urban areas where the shops are located. Emissions from gold shop hoods during a burn can exceed 1,000 mg/m{sup 3}. Because the saturation concentration of mercury vapor at operating temperatures at the hood exhaust is less than 100 mg/m{sup 3}, the dominant component of the exhaust is in the form of aerosol or liquid particles. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), with technical support from Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne), has completed a project to design and test a technology to remove the dominant aerosol component in the emissions from gold shops. The objective was to demonstrate a technology that could be manufactured at low cost and by using locally available materials and manufacturing capabilities. Six prototypes designed by Argonne were locally manufactured, installed, and tested in gold shops in Itaituba and Creporizao, Brazil. The initial prototype design incorporated a pebble bed as the media for collecting the mercury aerosols, and a mercury collection efficiency of over 90% was demonstrated. Though achieving high efficiencies, the initial prototype was determined to have practical disadvantages such as excessive weight, a somewhat complex construction, and high costs (>US$1,000). To further simplify the construction, operation, and associated costs, a second prototype design was developed in which the pebble bed was replaced with slotted steel baffle plates. The system was designed to have flexibility for installation in various hood configurations. The second prototype with the baffle plate design was installed and tested in several different hood/exhaust systems to determine the optimal installation configuration. The significance of

  17. Effects of landscape heterogeneity on the elevated trace metal concentrations in agricultural soils at multiple scales in the Pearl River Delta, South China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng; Li, Fangbai; Wu, Zhifeng; Cheng, Jiong

    2015-11-01

    Based on multiple geo-accumulation indices and correlation and partial redundancy analyses, we examined the spatial patterns of agricultural soil contaminations for As, Pb, Cd, Cr, and Ni in the Pearl River Delta, South China and their relations with landscape heterogeneity at small, medium and large spatial scales. We found that the concentrations of trace elements were slightly elevated, and most trace metals had a geogenic origin. Landscape variables explained 21-53% of the variation of elevated trace metal concentrations with an increasing explanatory power from the small to the large scale. The three variable groups representing parent materials, distance density characteristics and land use had different contributions to the elevated trace metals among scales. Both the distance density variables and land use pattern had a stronger influences on trace metal concentrations at a small scale than at a larger scale, while the parent materials was important at all the scales.

  18. Estimating riverine nutrient concentrations in agricultural catchments - Do we reduce uncertainty by using local scale data?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capell, Rene; Hankin, Barry; Strömqvist, Johan; Lamb, Rob; Arheimer, Berit

    2017-04-01

    Nutrient transport models are important tools for large scale assessments of macro-nutrient fluxes (nitrate, phosphate) and thus can serve as support tool for environmental assessment and management. Results from model applications over large areas, i.e. on major river basin to continental scales can fill a gap where monitoring data is not available. However, both phosphate and nitrate transport are highly complex processes, and nutrient models must balance data requirements and process simplification. Data typically become increasingly sparse and less detailed with increasing spatial scale. Here, we compare model estimates of riverine nitrate concentrations in the Weaver-Dane basin (UK) and to evaluate the role of available environmental data sources for model performance by using (a) open environmental data sources available at European scale and (b) closed data sources which are more localised and typically not openly available. In particular, we aim to evaluate, how model structure, spatial model resolution, climate forcing products, and land use and management information impact on model-estimated nitrate concentrations. We use the European rainfall-runoff and nutrient model E-HYPE (http://hypeweb.smhi.se/europehype/about/) as a baseline large-scale model built on open data sources, and compare with more detailed model set-ups in different configurations using local data. Nitrate estimates are compared using a GLUE uncertainty framework.

  19. Studies on potential of Portland cement mortar for binding of waterworks sludge to reduce heavy metal leaching

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PARAMALINGGAM THANALECHUMI; ABDULL RAHIM MOHD YUSOFF; MOHANADOSS PONRAJ; HANIM AWAB

    2016-03-01

    The investigation of heavy metal leaching and physicochemical properties of cement-solidified waterworks sludge (CMWWS) formed by incorporating waterworks sludge (WWS) into cement mortar was carried out. The chemical composition, compressive strength and other physicochemical properties of the CMWWS cube specimens were determined using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The major type of chemical components present in CMWWS was found to be Al and Fe. The increasing amount of WWS added to cement mortar resulted in the increasing of organic matter, urchin-like morphology and clear peak intensity. At the end of 28 days of curing, the soaking solution became strongly basic and CMWWS cube specimens leached out higher amount of heavy metals. The compressive strength of CMWWS increased up to a WWS percentage of 10%, and basic (pH [ 7) curing solution was found to be better than water for curing purposes. It is concluded that solidification–stabilisation (S/S) technique is able to effectively reduce the leaching of heavy metals from the WWS and CMWWS containing up to 10% WWS can be used as construction material.

  20. Electronic properties of conductive pili of the metal-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens probed by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veazey, Joshua P.; Reguera, Gemma; Tessmer, Stuart H.

    2011-12-01

    The metal-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens produces conductive protein appendages known as “pilus nanowires” to transfer electrons to metal oxides and to other cells. These processes can be harnessed for the bioremediation of toxic metals and the generation of electricity in bioelectrochemical cells. Key to these applications is a detailed understanding of how these nanostructures conduct electrons. However, to the best of our knowledge, their mechanism of electron transport is not known. We used the capability of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to probe conductive materials with higher spatial resolution than other scanning probe methods to gain insights into the transversal electronic behavior of native, cell-anchored pili. Despite the presence of insulating cellular components, the STM topography resolved electronic molecular substructures with periodicities similar to those reported for the pilus shaft. STM spectroscopy revealed electronic states near the Fermi level, consistent with a conducting material, but did not reveal electronic states expected for cytochromes. Furthermore, the transversal conductance was asymmetric, as previously reported for assemblies of helical peptides. Our results thus indicate that the Geobacter pilus shaft has an intrinsic electronic structure that could play a role in charge transport.

  1. Role of Interface Charges on High-k Based Poly-Si and Metal Gate Nano-Scale MOSFETs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Shashank

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of typical sub-100 nm high K gate dielectrics MOSFET with different gate materials are simulated by two dimensional device simulators (ATLAS and ATHENA. The impact of interface charges on the characteristics of Poly-Si and TiN metal gate MOSFETs are investigated. The simulation results shows that, at high interface charge densities, the devices with Poly-Si gate degrade much compared to metal gate MOSFET structures. Emphasis is given to study the mobility degradation which stands as a major hurdle with the implementation of high-k dielectrics in nano-scale devices. The advantages of using Watt model over other models for the extraction of channel mobility is also clearly explained. The performance of the high-k MOSFET with metal electrode and poly-silicon electrode is also compared for various interface state charges.

  2. Integrated GIS and multivariate statistical analysis for regional scale assessment of heavy metal soil contamination: A critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Deyi; O'Connor, David; Nathanail, Paul; Tian, Li; Ma, Yan

    2017-09-19

    Heavy metal soil contamination is associated with potential toxicity to humans or ecotoxicity. Scholars have increasingly used a combination of geographical information science (GIS) with geostatistical and multivariate statistical analysis techniques to examine the spatial distribution of heavy metals in soils at a regional scale. A review of such studies showed that most soil sampling programs were based on grid patterns and composite sampling methodologies. Many programs intended to characterize various soil types and land use types. The most often used sampling depth intervals were 0-0.10 m, or 0-0.20 m, below surface; and the sampling densities used ranged from 0.0004 to 6.1 samples per km(2), with a median of 0.4 samples per km(2). The most widely used spatial interpolators were inverse distance weighted interpolation and ordinary kriging; and the most often used multivariate statistical analysis techniques were principal component analysis and cluster analysis. The review also identified several determining and correlating factors in heavy metal distribution in soils, including soil type, soil pH, soil organic matter, land use type, Fe, Al, and heavy metal concentrations. The major natural and anthropogenic sources of heavy metals were found to derive from lithogenic origin, roadway and transportation, atmospheric deposition, wastewater and runoff from industrial and mining facilities, fertilizer application, livestock manure, and sewage sludge. This review argues that the full potential of integrated GIS and multivariate statistical analysis for assessing heavy metal distribution in soils on a regional scale has not yet been fully realized. It is proposed that future research be conducted to map multivariate results in GIS to pinpoint specific anthropogenic sources, to analyze temporal trends in addition to spatial patterns, to optimize modeling parameters, and to expand the use of different multivariate analysis tools beyond principal component analysis

  3. Enviro-Friendly Hydrogen Generation from Steel Mill-Scale via Metal-Steam Reforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, Abdul-Majeed; Kesavan, Sathees

    2006-01-01

    An economically viable and environmental friendly method of generating hydrogen for fuel cells is by the reaction of certain metals with steam, called metal-steam reforming (MSR). This technique does not generate any toxic by-products nor contributes to the undesirable greenhouse effect. From the standpoint of favorable thermodynamics, total…

  4. Anchoring semiconductor and metal nanoparticles on a two-dimensional catalyst mat. Storing and shuttling electrons with reduced graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightcap, Ian V; Kosel, Thomas H; Kamat, Prashant V

    2010-02-10

    Using reduced graphene oxide (RGO) as a two-dimensional support, we have succeeded in selective anchoring of semiconductor and metal nanoparticles at separate sites. Photogenerated electrons from UV-irradiated TiO(2) are transported across RGO to reduce silver ions into silver nanoparticles at a location distinct from the TiO(2) anchored site. The ability of RGO to store and shuttle electrons, as visualized via a stepwise electron transfer process, demonstrates its capability to serve as a catalyst nanomat and transfer electrons on demand to adsorbed species. These findings pave the way for the development of next generation catalyst systems and can spur advancements in graphene-based composites for chemical and biological sensors.

  5. Current-driven flow instabilities in large-scale liquid metal batteries, and how to tame them

    CERN Document Server

    Weber, Norbert; Stefani, Frank; Weier, Tom

    2013-01-01

    The use of liquid metal batteries is considered as one promising option for electric grid stabilisation. While large versions of such batteries are preferred in view of the economies of scale, they are susceptible to various magnetohydrodynamic instabilities which imply a risk of short-circuiting the battery due to the triggered fluid flow. Here we focus on the current driven Tayler instability and give critical electrical currents for its onset as well as numerical estimates for the appearing flow structures and speeds. Scaling laws for different materials, battery sizes and geometries are found. We further discuss and compare various means for preventing the instability.

  6. A climate-change adaptation framework to reduce continental-scale vulnerability across conservation reserves

    Science.gov (United States)

    D.R. Magness; J.M. Morton; F. Huettmann; F.S. Chapin; A.D. McGuire

    2011-01-01

    Rapid climate change, in conjunction with other anthropogenic drivers, has the potential to cause mass species extinction. To minimize this risk, conservation reserves need to be coordinated at multiple spatial scales because the climate envelopes of many species may shift rapidly across large geographic areas. In addition, novel species assemblages and ecological...

  7. Reducing the Runtime Acceptance Costs of Large-Scale Distributed Component-Based Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalez, A.; Piel, E.; Gross, H.G.

    2008-01-01

    Software Systems of Systems (SoS) are large-scale distributed component-based systems in which the individual components are elaborate and complex systems in their own right. Distinguishing characteristics are their short expected integration and deployment time, and the need to modify their archite

  8. How can poverty be reduced among small-scale farmers in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    poverty line is usually equal to one loaf but in Cameroon wheat (and rice) is subsidized by the state. This is obviously not ..... It is common for small-scale farmers in the South to experience a triple price squeeze. ..... The bottom billion. Why the ...

  9. Reducing the Runtime Acceptance Costs of Large-Scale Distributed Component-Based Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalez, A.; Piel, E.; Gross, H.G.

    2008-01-01

    Software Systems of Systems (SoS) are large-scale distributed component-based systems in which the individual components are elaborate and complex systems in their own right. Distinguishing characteristics are their short expected integration and deployment time, and the need to modify their

  10. Reducing Mercury Pollution from Artisanal and Small-Scale Gold Mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    To reduce airborne mercury emissions from these Gold Shops, EPA and the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) have partnered to design a low cost, easily constructible technology called the Gold Shop Mercury Capture System (MCS).

  11. Evaluation of a prototype correction algorithm to reduce metal artefacts in flat detector computed tomography of scaphoid fixation screws

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filli, Lukas; Finkenstaedt, Tim; Andreisek, Gustav; Guggenberger, Roman [University Hospital of Zurich, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Marcon, Magda [University Hospital of Zurich, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Udine, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Department of Medical and Biological Sciences, Udine (Italy); Scholz, Bernhard [Imaging and Therapy Division, Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Forchheim (Germany); Calcagni, Maurizio [University Hospital of Zurich, Division of Plastic Surgery and Hand Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-12-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a prototype correction algorithm to reduce metal artefacts in flat detector computed tomography (FDCT) of scaphoid fixation screws. FDCT has gained interest in imaging small anatomic structures of the appendicular skeleton. Angiographic C-arm systems with flat detectors allow fluoroscopy and FDCT imaging in a one-stop procedure emphasizing their role as an ideal intraoperative imaging tool. However, FDCT imaging can be significantly impaired by artefacts induced by fixation screws. Following ethical board approval, commercially available scaphoid fixation screws were inserted into six cadaveric specimens in order to fix artificially induced scaphoid fractures. FDCT images corrected with the algorithm were compared to uncorrected images both quantitatively and qualitatively by two independent radiologists in terms of artefacts, screw contour, fracture line visibility, bone visibility, and soft tissue definition. Normal distribution of variables was evaluated using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. In case of normal distribution, quantitative variables were compared using paired Student's t tests. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used for quantitative variables without normal distribution and all qualitative variables. A p value of < 0.05 was considered to indicate statistically significant differences. Metal artefacts were significantly reduced by the correction algorithm (p < 0.001), and the fracture line was more clearly defined (p < 0.01). The inter-observer reliability was ''almost perfect'' (intra-class correlation coefficient 0.85, p < 0.001). The prototype correction algorithm in FDCT for metal artefacts induced by scaphoid fixation screws may facilitate intra- and postoperative follow-up imaging. (orig.)

  12. Metallic corrosion processes reactivation sustained by iron-reducing bacteria: Implication on long-term stability of protective layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esnault, L.; Jullien, M.; Mustin, C.; Bildstein, O.; Libert, M.

    In deep geological environments foreseen for the disposal of radioactive waste, metallic containers will undergo anaerobic corrosion. In this context, the formation of corrosion products such as magnetite may reduce the rate of corrosion processes through the formation of a protective layer. This study aims at determining the direct impact of iron-reducing bacteria (IRB) activity on the stability of corrosion protective layers. Batch experiments investigating iron corrosion processes including the formation of secondary magnetite and its subsequent alteration in the presence of IRB show the bacteria ability to use structural Fe(III) for respiration which leads to the sustainment of a high corrosion rate. With the bio-reduction of corrosion products such as magnetite, and H 2 as electron donor, IRB promote the reactivation of corrosion processes in corrosive environments by altering the protective layer. This phenomenon could have a major impact on the long-term stability of metallic compounds involved in multi-barrier system for high-level radioactive waste containment.

  13. Reducing work disability in Ankylosing Spondylitis – development of a work instability scale for AS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helliwell Philip

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Work Instability Scale for Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA-WIS is established and is used by physicians to identify patients at risk of job loss for rapid intervention. The study objective was to explore the concept of Work Instability (a mismatch between an individual's abilities and job demands in Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS and develop a Work Instability Scale specific to this population. Methods New items generated from qualitative interviews were combined with items from the RA-WIS to form a draft AS-WIS. Rasch analysis was used to examine the scaling properties of the AS-WIS using data generated through a postal survey. The scale was validated against a gold standard of expert assessment, a test-retest survey examined reliability. Results Fifty-seven participants who were in work returned the postal survey. Of the original 55 items 38 were shown to fit the Rasch model (χ2 37.5; df 38; p 0.494 and free of bias for gender and disease duration. Following analysis for discrimination against the gold standard assessments 20 items remained with good fit to the model (χ2 24.8; df 20; p 0.21. Test-retest reliability was 0.94. Conclusion The AS-WIS is a self-administered scale which meets the stringent requirements of modern measurement. Used as a screening tool it can identify those experiencing a mismatch at work who are at risk of job retention problems and work disability. Work instability is emerging as an important indication for the use of biologics, thus the AS-WIS has the potential to become an important outcome measure.

  14. Reducing work disability in Ankylosing Spondylitis: development of a work instability scale for AS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilworth, Gill; Emery, Paul; Barkham, Nick; Smyth, M Glyn; Helliwell, Philip; Tennant, Alan

    2009-06-16

    The Work Instability Scale for Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA-WIS) is established and is used by physicians to identify patients at risk of job loss for rapid intervention. The study objective was to explore the concept of Work Instability (a mismatch between an individual's abilities and job demands) in Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS) and develop a Work Instability Scale specific to this population. New items generated from qualitative interviews were combined with items from the RA-WIS to form a draft AS-WIS. Rasch analysis was used to examine the scaling properties of the AS-WIS using data generated through a postal survey. The scale was validated against a gold standard of expert assessment, a test-retest survey examined reliability. Fifty-seven participants who were in work returned the postal survey. Of the original 55 items 38 were shown to fit the Rasch model (chi(2) 37.5; df 38; p 0.494) and free of bias for gender and disease duration. Following analysis for discrimination against the gold standard assessments 20 items remained with good fit to the model (chi(2) 24.8; df 20; p 0.21). Test-retest reliability was 0.94. The AS-WIS is a self-administered scale which meets the stringent requirements of modern measurement. Used as a screening tool it can identify those experiencing a mismatch at work who are at risk of job retention problems and work disability. Work instability is emerging as an important indication for the use of biologics, thus the AS-WIS has the potential to become an important outcome measure.

  15. Molecular Basis for Electron Flow Within Metal-and Electrode-Reducing Biofilms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, Daniel R. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Electrochemical, spectral, genetic, and biochemical techniques were developed to reveal that a diverse suite of redox proteins and structural macromolecules outside the cell work together to move electrons long distances between Geobacter cells to metals and electrodes. In this project, we greatly expanded the known participants in the electron transfer pathway of Geobacter. For example, in addition to well-studied pili, polysaccharides contribute to anchoring, different cytochromes are required under different conditions, strategies change with redox potential, and the localization of these components can change depending on where cells are located in a biofilm. By inventing new electrodes compatible with real-time spectral measurements, we were able to visualize the redox status of biofilms in action, leading to a hypothesis that long-distance electron transfer is ultimately limiting in these systems and redox potentials change within biofilms. The goals of this project were met, as we were able to 1) identify new elements crucial to the expression, assembly and function of the extracellular electron transfer phenotype 2) expand spectral and electrochemical techniques to define the mechanism and route of electron transfer through the matrix, and 3) combine this knowledge to build the next generation of genetic tools for study of this complex process.

  16. Reducing Heavy Metal Element from Coal Bottom Ash by Using Citric Acid Leaching Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya Ahmad Asyari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Coal ash is the residue that is produced during coal combustion for instance fly ash, bottom ash or boiler slag which was primarily produced from the combustion of coal. With growth in coal burning power station, huge amount of coal bottom ash (CBA considered as hazardous material which are normally disposed in an on-site disposal system without any commercialization purpose. Previous researchers have studied the extraction of silica from agricultural wastes such as palm ash and rice husk ash (RHA and CBA by using leaching treatment method. In this study, the weaker acid, citric acid solution was used to replace the strong acid in leaching treatment process. Result showed that the heavy metal content such as Copper (Cu, Zinc (Zn and Lead (Pb can be decrease. Meanwhile the silica can be extracted up to 44% from coal bottom ash using citric acid leaching treatment under the optimum reaction time of 60 minutes with solution temperature of 60°C and concentration of citric acid more than 2%.

  17. Icosahedral medium-range order formed in Mg70Zn30 metallic glass: a larger-scale molecular dynamics simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hou Zhao-Yang; Liu Rang-Su; Tian Ze-An; Wang Jin-Guo

    2011-01-01

    A larger-scale Mg70Zn30 alloy system including 100000 atoms has been simulated by using the molecular dynamics method to investigate the icosahedral medium-range order (IMRO) formed in the Mg70Zn30 metallic glass. It is found that the simulated pair distribution function of Mg70Zn30 metallic glass is in good agreement with the experimental results. The glass transition temperature Tg is near 450 K under the cooling rate of 1×1012 K/s. The icosahedral local structures play a critical role in the formation of metallic glass, and they are the dominant local configurations in the Mg70Zn30 metallic glass. The IMRO in the Mg70Zn30 metallic glass is characterized by certain types of extended icosahedral clusters combined by intercross-sharing atoms in the form of chains or dendrites. The size distributions of these IMRO clusters present a magic number sequence of 19, 23, 25, 27, 29, 31, 33, 35, 37, 39,..., and the magic clusters can be classified into three types according to their compactness. The IMRO clusters grow rapidly in a low-dimensional way with cooling, but this growth is limited near Tg.

  18. Extreme robustness of scaling in sample space reducing processes explains Zipf's law in diffusion on directed networks

    CERN Document Server

    Corominas-Murtra, Bernat; Thurner, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Sample Space Reducing processes (SSRP) offer an alternative new mechanism to understand the emergence of scaling in countless phenomena. We demonstrate that the scaling exponents associated to the dynamics of SSRPs converge to Zipf's law for a large class of systems. We show that Zipf's law emerges as a generic feature of diffusion on directed networks, regardless of its details, and that the exponent of the visiting time distribution is related to the amount of cycles in the network. These results are relevant for a series of applications in traffic, transport, and supply chain management.

  19. Metal contamination budget at the river basin scale: a critical analysis based on the Seine River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Lestel

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Material flow analysis and environmental contamination analysis are merged into a flux-flow analysis (F2A as illustrated for the metal circulation in the Seine River catchment. F2A combines about 30 metal flows in the anthroposphere (14 million people and/or metal fluxes in the environment (atmosphere, soils, and aquatic system originating from two dozens of sources. The nature and quality of data is very heterogeneous going from downscaled national economic statistics to upscaled daily environmental surveys.

    A triple integration is performed: space integration over the catchment (65000 km2, time integration for the 1950–2000 trend analysed at 5 year resolution, and a conceptual integration resulting in two F2A indicators.

    Despite the various data sources an average metal circulation is established for the 1994–2003 period and illustrated for zinc: (i metal circulation in the anthroposphere is now two orders of magnitude higher than river outputs, (ii long term metal storage, and their potential leaks, in soils, wastedumps and structures is also orders of magnitude higher than present river fluxes. Trend analysis is made through two F2A indicators, the per capita excess load at the river outlet and the leakage ratio (excess fluxes/metal demand. From 1950 to 2000, they both show a ten fold improvement of metal recycling while the metal demand has increased by 2.5 to 5 for Cd, Cu, Cr, Pb and Zn, and the population by 50%.

  20. Scaling Task Management in Space and Time: Reducing User Overhead in Ubiquitous-Computing Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-03-28

    limitation of this approach is that it does not easily scale to large numbers of tasks over extended periods. Busy users may intermittently touch on...RETSINA framework, with applications in domains such as financial portfolio management, ecommerce and military logistics [88]; and more recently Carnegie...complex tasks. Examples can be found in the workflow modeling of business processes, and in some agent-based systems, where the description of the

  1. Poissonian reducibility and thermal scaling within the lattice gas model and molecular dynamics model

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Y.G.

    2000-01-01

    The emission of clusters in the nuclear disassembly is investigated within the framework of isospin dependent lattice gas model and classical molecular dynamics model. As observed in the recent experimental data, it is found that the emission of individual cluster is poissonian and thermal scaling is observed in the linear Arrhenius plots made from the average multiplicity of each cluster. The mass, isotope and charge dependent "emission barriers" are extracted from the slopes of the Arrheniu...

  2. A scale of metal ion binding strengths correlating with ionic charge, Pauling electronegativity, toxicity, and other physiological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinraide, Thomas B; Yermiyahu, Uri

    2007-09-01

    Equilibrium constants for binding to plant plasma membranes have been reported for several metal ions, based upon adsorption studies and zeta-potential measurements. LogK values for the ions are these: Al(3+), 4.30; La(3+), 3.34; Cu(2+), 2.60; Ca(2+) and Mg(2+), 1.48; Na(+) and K(+), 0 M(-1). These values correlate well with logK values for ion binding to many organic and inorganic ligands. LogK values for metal ion binding to 12 ligands were normalized and averaged to produce a scale for the binding of 49 ions. The scale correlates well with the values presented above (R(2)=0.998) and with ion binding to cell walls and other biomass. The scale is closely related to the charge (Z) and Pauling electronegativity (PE) of 48 ions (all but Hg(2+)); R(2)=0.969 for the equation (Scale values)=-1.68+Z(1.22+0.444PE). Minimum rhizotoxicity of metal ions appears to be determined by binding strengths: log a(PM,M)=1.60-2.41exp[0.238(Scale values)] determines the value of ion activities at the plasma membrane surface (a(PM,M)) that will ensure inhibition of root elongation. Additional toxicity appears to be related to softness, accounting for the great toxicity of Ag(+), for example. These binding-strength values correlate with additional physiological effects and are suitable for the computation of cell-surface electrical potentials.

  3. Validation of the Narcissistic Grandiosity Scale and creation of reduced item variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Michael; Carter, Nathan T; Campbell, W Keith; Miller, Joshua D

    2016-12-01

    The Narcissistic Grandiosity Scale (NGS) is a short adjective-based measure of narcissistic grandiosity (Rosenthal, Hooley, & Steshenko, 2007). The NGS has already shown promise as a measure of grandiose narcissism, but it has never been the subject of a formal validation study. In the current study (N = 870 across 3 samples), the factor structure of NGS was examined and item response theory analyses were used to generate abbreviated versions of the scale. The NGS scales' relations to measures of grandiose and vulnerable narcissism, the five-factor model (FFM), the interpersonal circumplex, self-esteem, and the Personality Inventory of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders-Fifth Edition (DSM-5, PID-5) were assessed. The correlation profile of the NGS was also correlated with expert ratings of prototypical cases of narcissistic personality disorder using both the FFM and PID-5 trait profiles. Overall, the NGS was found to be a unidimensional measure of narcissistic grandiosity with good convergent, discriminant, and criterion validity. The abbreviated versions of the NGS manifested strong reliability and associations entirely consistent with the full version. (PsycINFO Database Record

  4. A composite structure based on reduced graphene oxide and metal oxide nanomaterials for chemical sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vardan Galstyan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A hybrid nanostructure based on reduced graphene oxide and ZnO has been obtained for the detection of volatile organic compounds. The sensing properties of the hybrid structure have been studied for different concentrations of ethanol and acetone. The response of the hybrid material is significantly higher compared to pristine ZnO nanostructures. The obtained results have shown that the nanohybrid is a promising structure for the monitoring of environmental pollutants and for the application of breath tests in assessment of exposure to volatile organic compounds.

  5. Large Scale Hierarchical K-Means Based Image Retrieval With MapReduce

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    version of Hadoop at the time of this research. Hadoop is the open-source implementation of MapReduce and HDFS. • OpenCV [10]: C++ library for Computer...Boost.Python[1]: Allows for wrapping C++ code to create Python modules. Exposes full C++ OpenCV libraries, as well as native speeds for computation intensive...Yield (′0′, (ImageName, f eature)) end for end function Figure 3.3: MapReduce Feature Extraction Algorithm C++ using the OpenCV libraby. The C

  6. Lack of cross-scale linkages reduces robustness of community-based fisheries management.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Cudney-Bueno

    Full Text Available Community-based management and the establishment of marine reserves have been advocated worldwide as means to overcome overexploitation of fisheries. Yet, researchers and managers are divided regarding the effectiveness of these measures. The "tragedy of the commons" model is often accepted as a universal paradigm, which assumes that unless managed by the State or privatized, common-pool resources are inevitably overexploited due to conflicts between the self-interest of individuals and the goals of a group as a whole. Under this paradigm, the emergence and maintenance of effective community-based efforts that include cooperative risky decisions as the establishment of marine reserves could not occur. In this paper, we question these assumptions and show that outcomes of commons dilemmas can be complex and scale-dependent. We studied the evolution and effectiveness of a community-based management effort to establish, monitor, and enforce a marine reserve network in the Gulf of California, Mexico. Our findings build on social and ecological research before (1997-2001, during (2002 and after (2003-2004 the establishment of marine reserves, which included participant observation in >100 fishing trips and meetings, interviews, as well as fishery dependent and independent monitoring. We found that locally crafted and enforced harvesting rules led to a rapid increase in resource abundance. Nevertheless, news about this increase spread quickly at a regional scale, resulting in poaching from outsiders and a subsequent rapid cascading effect on fishing resources and locally-designed rule compliance. We show that cooperation for management of common-pool fisheries, in which marine reserves form a core component of the system, can emerge, evolve rapidly, and be effective at a local scale even in recently organized fisheries. Stakeholder participation in monitoring, where there is a rapid feedback of the systems response, can play a key role in reinforcing

  7. Assessment of heavy metal tolerance and hexavalent chromium reducing potential of Corynebacterium paurometabolum SKPD 1204 isolated from chromite mine seepage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal Kanti Paul

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Corynebacterium paurometabolum SKPD 1204 (MTCC 8730, a heavy metal tolerant and chromate reducing bacterium isolated from chromite mine seepage of Odisha, India has been evaluated for chromate reduction under batch culture. The isolate was found to tolerate metals like Co(II, Cu(II, Ni(II, Mn(II, Zn(II, Fe(III and Hg(II along with Cr(VI and was resistant to different antibiotics as evaluated by disc-diffusion method. The isolate, SKPD 1204 was found to reduce 62.5% of 2 mM Cr(VI in Vogel Bonner broth within 8 days of incubation. Chromate reduction capability of SKPD 1204 decreased with increase in Cr(VI concentration, but increased with increase in cell density and attained its maximum at 1010 cells/mL. Chromate reducing efficiency of SKPD 1204 was promoted in the presence of glycerol and glucose, while the highest reduction was recorded at pH 7.0 and 35 °C. The reduction process was inhibited by divalent cations Zn(II, Cd(II, Cu(II, and Ni(II, but not by Mn(II. Anions like nitrate, phosphate, sulphate and sulphite was found to be inhibitory to the process of Cr(VI reduction. Similarly, sodium fluoride, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, sodium azide and N, N,-Di cyclohexyl carboiimide were inhibitory to chromate reduction, while 2,4-dinitrophenol appeared to be neither promotive nor inhibitory to the process.

  8. Performances of low-dose dual-energy CT in reducing artifacts from implanted metallic orthopedic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filograna, Laura [Catholic University of Rome, School of Medicine, University Hospital ' ' A. Gemelli' ' , Department of Radiological Sciences, Institute of Radiology, Rome (Italy); University of Zurich, Department of Forensic Medicine and Imaging, Institute of Forensic Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); Magarelli, Nicola; Leone, Antonio; Bonomo, Lorenzo [Catholic University of Rome, School of Medicine, University Hospital ' ' A. Gemelli' ' , Department of Radiological Sciences, Institute of Radiology, Rome (Italy); De Waure, Chiara; Calabro, Giovanna Elisa [Catholic University of Rome, School of Medicine, University Hospital ' ' A. Gemelli' ' , Research Centre for Health Technology Assessment, Department of Public Health, Section of Hygiene, Rome (Italy); Finkenstaedt, Tim [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Thali, Michael John [University of Zurich, Department of Forensic Medicine and Imaging, Institute of Forensic Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2016-07-15

    The objective was to evaluate the performances of dose-reduced dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) in decreasing metallic artifacts from orthopedic devices compared with dose-neutral DECT, dose-neutral single-energy computed tomography (SECT), and dose-reduced SECT. Thirty implants in 20 consecutive cadavers underwent both SECT and DECT at three fixed CT dose indexes (CTDI): 20.0, 10.0, and 5.0 mGy. Extrapolated monoenergetic DECT images at 64, 69, 88, 105, 120, and 130 keV, and individually adjusted monoenergy for optimized image quality (OPTkeV) were generated. In each group, the image quality of the seven monoenergetic images and of the SECT image was assessed qualitatively and quantitatively by visually rating and by measuring the maximum streak artifact respectively. The comparison between SECT and OPTkeV evaluated overall within all groups showed a significant difference (p <0.001), with OPTkeV images providing better images. Comparing OPTkeV with the other DECT images, a significant difference was shown (p <0.001), with OPTkeV and 130-keV images providing the qualitatively best results. The OPTkeV images of 5.0-mGy acquisitions provided percentages of images with scores 1 and 2 of 36 % and 30 % respectively, compared with 0 % and 33.3 % of the corresponding SECT images of 10- and 20-mGy acquisitions. Moreover, DECT reconstructions at the OPTkeV of the low-dose group showed higher CT numbers than the SECT images of dose groups 1 and 2. This study demonstrates that low-dose DECT permits a reduction of artifacts due to metallic implants to be obtained in a similar manner to neutral-dose DECT and better than reduced or neutral-dose SECT. (orig.)

  9. Inactivation of two newly identified tobacco heavy metal ATPases leads to reduced Zn and Cd accumulation in shoots and reduced pollen germination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermand, Victor; Julio, Emilie; Dorlhac de Borne, François; Punshon, Tracy; Ricachenevsky, Felipe K; Bellec, Arnaud; Gosti, Françoise; Berthomieu, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a non-essential heavy metal, which is classified as a “known human carcinogen” by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Understanding the mechanisms controlling Cd distribution in planta is essential to develop phytoremediation approaches as well as for food safety. Unlike most other plants, tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants translocate most of the Cd taken up from the soil, out of the roots and into the shoots, leading to high Cd accumulation in tobacco shoots. Two orthologs to the Arabidopsis thaliana HMA2 and HMA4 Zn and Cd ATPases that are responsible for zinc (Zn) and Cd translocation from roots to shoots were identified in tobacco and sequenced. These genes, named NtHMAα and NtHMAβ, were more highly expressed in roots than in shoots. NtHMAα was expressed in the vascular tissues of both roots and leaves as well as in anthers. No visual difference was observed between wild-type plants and plants in which the NtHMAα and NtHMAβ genes were either mutated or silenced. These mutants showed reduced Zn and Cd accumulation in shoots as well as increased Cd tolerance. When both NtHMA genes were silenced, plant development was altered and pollen germination was severely impaired due to Zn deficiency. Interestingly, seeds from these lines also showed decreased Zn concentration but increased iron (Fe) concentration. PMID:24760325

  10. NONMONOTONIC REDUCED PROJECTED HESSIAN METHOD VIA AN AFFINE SCALING INTERIOR MODIFIED GRADIENT PATH FOR BOUNDED-CONSTRAINED OPTIMIZATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peihua GUO; Detong ZHU

    2008-01-01

    The authors propose an affine scaling modified gradient path method in association with reduced projective Hessian and nonmonotonic interior backtracking line search techniques for solving the linear equality constrained optimization subject to bounds on variables. By employing the QR decomposition of the constraint matrix and the eigensystem decomposition of reduced projective Hes-sian matrix in the subproblem, the authors form affine scaling modified gradient curvilinear path very easily. By using interior backtracking line search technique, each iterate switches to trial step of strict interior feasibility. The global convergence and fast local superlinear/quadratical convergence rates of the proposed algorithm are established under some reasonable conditions. A nonmonotonic criterion should bring about speeding up the convergence progress in some ill-conditioned cases. The results of numerical experiments are reported to show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  11. A Multi-scale Friction Model for Sheet Metal Forming Simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hol, J.; Cid Alfaro, M.V.; Meinders, Vincent T.; Huetink, Han; Chang, K; Nam Han, H; Huh, H; Barlat, F; Lee, M

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a multi-scale friction model for large-scale forming simulations based on the surface changes on the micro-scale. The surface texture of a material changes when it is subjected to normal loading and stretching. Consequently, the frictional behavior between contacting surfaces,

  12. MapReduce Based Parallel Neural Networks in Enabling Large Scale Machine Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Yang, Jie; Huang, Yuan; Xu, Lixiong; Li, Siguang; Qi, Man

    2015-01-01

    Artificial neural networks (ANNs) have been widely used in pattern recognition and classification applications. However, ANNs are notably slow in computation especially when the size of data is large. Nowadays, big data has received a momentum from both industry and academia. To fulfill the potentials of ANNs for big data applications, the computation process must be speeded up. For this purpose, this paper parallelizes neural networks based on MapReduce, which has become a major computing model to facilitate data intensive applications. Three data intensive scenarios are considered in the parallelization process in terms of the volume of classification data, the size of the training data, and the number of neurons in the neural network. The performance of the parallelized neural networks is evaluated in an experimental MapReduce computer cluster from the aspects of accuracy in classification and efficiency in computation.

  13. Identification of Metals (Heavy and Radioactive in Drinking Water by an Indirect Analysis Method Based on Scale Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasa Jovanic

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of water quality, regarding the content of metals, especially heavy and radioactive ones, has been carried out in an indirect way, by testing scale formed in a hot-water heater, using water from the water-supply network of the city of Belgrade – the district of New Belgrade. The determination of the composition and the structure of the scale has resulted in its complete identification, and its crystallochemical formula has been defined. It has unequivocally been established that the obtained results are within the tolerance boundary with the results acquired by a conventional analysis of water, when it is a matter of very low concentrations. The presence of radioactive elements of uranium and strontium in a scale sample has been found and the way of their penetrating its composition and structure has been explained. Applying the fractional extraction method, uranium has been established to be of an anthropogenic origin.

  14. Chemical and plant tests to assess the viability of amendments to reduce metal availability in mine soils and tailings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Luis; Gómez, Rocío; Sánchez, Virtudes; Alonso-Azcárate, Jacinto

    2016-04-01

    The goal of this research was to assess the potential of several industrial wastes to immobilise metals in two polluted soils deriving from an old Pb/Zn mine. Two different approaches were used to assess the performance of different amendments: a chemical one, using extraction by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and a biological one, using Lupinus albus as a bio-indicator. Four amendments were used: inorganic sugar production waste (named 'sugar foam', SF), sludge from a drinking water treatment sludge (DWS), organic waste from olive mill waste (OMW) and paper mill sludge (PMS). Amendment to soil ratios ranged from 0.1 to 0.3 (w/w). All the amendments were capable of significantly decreasing (p soils used, with decreases in ranges 21-100, 25-100 and 2-100 % for Pb, Zn and Cu, respectively. The amendments tested were also effective in reducing the bioavailability of Pb and Zn for L. albus, which gave rise to a decrease in shoot metal accumulation by the lupine plants compared to that found in the control soil. That decrease reached up to 5.6 and 2.8 times for Pb and Zn, respectively, being statistically significant in most cases. Moreover, application of the OMW, DWS and SF amendments led to higher average values of plant biomass (up to 71%) than those obtained in the control soil. The results obtained showed the technology put forward to be a viable means of remediating mine soils as it led to a decrease in the availability and toxicity of metals and, thus, facilitated the growth of a vegetation layer.

  15. MapReduce Based Parallel Neural Networks in Enabling Large Scale Machine Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Yang Liu; Jie Yang; Yuan Huang; Lixiong Xu; Siguang Li; Man Qi

    2015-01-01

    Artificial neural networks (ANNs) have been widely used in pattern recognition and classification applications. However, ANNs are notably slow in computation especially when the size of data is large. Nowadays, big data has received a momentum from both industry and academia. To fulfill the potentials of ANNs for big data applications, the computation process must be speeded up. For this purpose, this paper parallelizes neural networks based on MapReduce, which has become a major computing mo...

  16. Reduced survival and body size in the terrestrial isopod Porcellio scaber from a metal-polluted environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, D T; Hopkin, S P

    1998-01-01

    Terrestrial isopods (woodlice) may show trade-offs in life history parameters when exposed to toxins. We have shown previously [Jones and Hopkin (1996) Functional Ecology 10, 741-750] that woodlice which survive to reproduce in sites heavily polluted with metals from an industrial smelting works do not alter their reproductive allocation. This study investigates whether there are differences in the survival and body size of Porcellio scaber from these same populations. Specimens were collected from eight sites at different distances from the Avonmouth smelter, UK. The sites represented a gradient of concentrations of Zn, Cd, Pb and Cu in the woodlice, from background levels to a grossly contaminated sites close to the smelter. In laboratory trials, the number of days survived by starved males showed a significant decline with increased concentrations of Zn in those animals. The maximum size of both sexes declined significantly from the least to the most polluted sites. The most polluted sites had significantly fewer large animals. The cost of detoxifying assimilated metals appears to be reduced energy reserves and smaller body size.

  17. The Proteome of Dissimilatory Metal-reducing Microorganism Geobacter Sulfurreducens under Various Growth Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Y-H R.; Hixson, Kim K.; Giometti, Carol S.; Stanley, A; Esteve-Nunez, A; Khare, Tripti; Tollaksen, Sandra L.; Zhu, Wenhong; Adkins, Joshua N.; Lipton, Mary S.; Smith, Richard D.; Mester, Tunde; Lovley, Derek R.

    2006-05-16

    The global protein analysis of Geobacter sulfurreducens, a model for the Geobacter species that predominate in many Fe(III)-reducing subsurface environments, was characterized with ultra high pressure liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry using accurate mass and time (AMT) tags as well as with more traditional two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE). Cells were grown under eight different growth conditions in order to enhance the potential that genes would be expressed. Over 3,187 gene products, representing about 92% of the total predicted gene products in the genome, were detected. The AMT approach was able to identify a much higher number of proteins than could be detected with the 2-D PAGE approach. A high proportion of predicted proteins in most protein role categories were detected with the highest number of proteins identified in the hypothetical protein role category. Furthermore, 91 c-type cytochromes of 111 predicted genes in the G. sulfurreducens genome were identified. Localization studies indicated that computational predictions of cytochrome location were limited. Differences in the abundance of cytochromes and other proteins under different growth conditions provided information for future functional analysis of these proteins. These results demonstrate that a high percentage of the predicted proteins in the G. sulfurreducens genome are produced and that the AMT approach provides a rapid method for comparing differential expression of proteins under different growth conditions in this organism.

  18. The proteome of dissimilatory metal-reducing microorganism Geobacter sulfurreducens under various growth conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yan-Huai R; Hixson, Kim K; Giometti, Carol S; Stanley, Ann; Esteve-Núñez, Abraham; Khare, Tripti; Tollaksen, Sandra L; Zhu, Wenhong; Adkins, Joshua N; Lipton, Mary S; Smith, Richard D; Mester, Tünde; Lovley, Derek R

    2006-07-01

    The proteome of Geobacter sulfurreducens, a model for the Geobacter species that predominate in many Fe(III)-reducing subsurface environments, was characterized with ultra high-pressure liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry using accurate mass and time (AMT) tags as well as with more traditional two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE). Cells were grown under six different growth conditions in order to enhance the potential that a wide range of genes would be expressed. The AMT tag approach was able to identify a much greater number of proteins than could be detected with the 2-D PAGE approach. With the AMT approach over 3,000 gene products were identified, representing about 90% of the total predicted gene products in the genome. A high proportion of predicted proteins in most protein role categories were detected; the highest number of proteins was identified in the hypothetical protein role category. Furthermore, 91 c-type cytochromes of 111 predicted genes in the G. sulfurreducens genome were identified. Differences in the abundance of cytochromes and other proteins under different growth conditions provided information for future functional analysis of these proteins. These results demonstrate that a high percentage of the predicted proteins in the G. sulfurreducens genome are produced and that the AMT tag approach provides a rapid method for comparing differential expression of proteins under different growth conditions in this organism.

  19. Reducing Ice Adhesion on Nonsmooth Metallic Surfaces: Wettability and Topography Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Edwin Jee Yang; Uong, Victor; Renault-Crispo, Jean-Sébastien; Kietzig, Anne-Marie; Servio, Phillip

    2016-04-06

    The effects of ice formation and accretion on external surfaces range from being mildly annoying to potentially life-threatening. Ice-shedding materials, which lower the adhesion strength of ice to its surface, have recently received renewed research attention as a means to circumvent the problem of icing. In this work, we investigate how surface wettability and surface topography influence the ice adhesion strength on three different surfaces: (i) superhydrophobic laser-inscribed square pillars on copper, (ii) stainless steel 316 Dutch-weave meshes, and (iii) multiwalled carbon nanotube-covered steel meshes. The finest stainless steel mesh displayed the best performance with a 93% decrease in ice adhesion relative to polished stainless steel, while the superhydrophobic square pillars exhibited an increase in ice adhesion by up to 67% relative to polished copper. Comparisons of dynamic contact angles revealed little correlation between surface wettability and ice adhesion. On the other hand, by considering the ice formation process and the fracture mechanics at the ice-substrate interface, we found that two competing mechanisms governing ice adhesion strength arise on nonplanar surfaces: (i) mechanical interlocking of the ice within the surface features that enhances adhesion, and (ii) formation of microcracks that act as interfacial stress concentrators, which reduce adhesion. Our analysis provides insight toward new approaches for the design of ice-releasing materials through the use of surface topographies that promote interfacial crack propagation.

  20. Evaluating the accuracy of finite element models at reduced length scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Connor

    Finite element models are used frequently in both engineering and scientific research. While they can provide useful information as to the performance of materials, as length scales are decreased more sophisticated model descriptions are required. It is also important to develop methods by which existing models may be verified against experimental findings. The present study evaluates the ability of various finite element models to predict materials behaviour at length scales ranging from several microns to tens of nanometers. Considering this motivation, this thesis is provided in manuscript form with the bulk of material coming from two case studies. Following an overview of relevant literature in Chapter 2, Chapter 3 considers the nucleation of delta-zirconium hydrides in a Zircaloy-2 matrix. Zirconium hydrides are an important topic in the nuclear industry as they form a brittle phase which leads to delayed hydride cracking during reactor start-up and shut-down. Several FE models are used to compare present results with literature findings and illustrate the weaknesses of standard FE approaches. It is shown that standard continuum techniques do not sufficiently capture the interfacial effects of an inclusion-matrix system. By using nano-scale material descriptions, nucleation lattice strains are obtained which are in good agreement with previous experimental studies. The motivation for Chapter 4 stems from a recognized need to develop a method for modeling corrosion behaviour of materials. Corrosion is also an issue for reactor design and an ability to predict failure points is needed. Finite element models could be used for this purpose, provided model accuracy is verified first. In Chapter 4 a technique is developed which facilitates the extraction of sub-micron resolution strain data from correlation images obtained during in-situ tensile deformation. By comparing image correlation results with a crystal plasticity finite element code it is found that good

  1. Sparse maps—A systematic infrastructure for reduced-scaling electronic structure methods. II. Linear scaling domain based pair natural orbital coupled cluster theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riplinger, Christoph; Pinski, Peter; Becker, Ute; Neese, Frank, E-mail: frank.neese@cec.mpg.de, E-mail: evaleev@vt.edu [Max Planck Institute for Chemical Energy Conversion, Stiftstr. 34-36, D-45470 Mülheim an der Ruhr (Germany); Valeev, Edward F., E-mail: frank.neese@cec.mpg.de, E-mail: evaleev@vt.edu [Department of Chemistry, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)

    2016-01-14

    Domain based local pair natural orbital coupled cluster theory with single-, double-, and perturbative triple excitations (DLPNO-CCSD(T)) is a highly efficient local correlation method. It is known to be accurate and robust and can be used in a black box fashion in order to obtain coupled cluster quality total energies for large molecules with several hundred atoms. While previous implementations showed near linear scaling up to a few hundred atoms, several nonlinear scaling steps limited the applicability of the method for very large systems. In this work, these limitations are overcome and a linear scaling DLPNO-CCSD(T) method for closed shell systems is reported. The new implementation is based on the concept of sparse maps that was introduced in Part I of this series [P. Pinski, C. Riplinger, E. F. Valeev, and F. Neese, J. Chem. Phys. 143, 034108 (2015)]. Using the sparse map infrastructure, all essential computational steps (integral transformation and storage, initial guess, pair natural orbital construction, amplitude iterations, triples correction) are achieved in a linear scaling fashion. In addition, a number of additional algorithmic improvements are reported that lead to significant speedups of the method. The new, linear-scaling DLPNO-CCSD(T) implementation typically is 7 times faster than the previous implementation and consumes 4 times less disk space for large three-dimensional systems. For linear systems, the performance gains and memory savings are substantially larger. Calculations with more than 20 000 basis functions and 1000 atoms are reported in this work. In all cases, the time required for the coupled cluster step is comparable to or lower than for the preceding Hartree-Fock calculation, even if this is carried out with the efficient resolution-of-the-identity and chain-of-spheres approximations. The new implementation even reduces the error in absolute correlation energies by about a factor of two, compared to the already accurate

  2. Quantifying Heavy Metals Sequestration by Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria in an Acid Mine Drainage-Contaminated Natural Wetland

    OpenAIRE

    Moreau, John W.; Fournelle, John H.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2013-01-01

    Bioremediation strategies that depend on bacterial sulfate reduction for heavy metals remediation harness the reactivity of these metals with biogenic aqueous sulfide. Quantitative knowledge of the degree to which specific toxic metals are partitioned into various sulfide, oxide, or other phases is important for predicting the long-term mobility of these metals under environmental conditions. Here we report the quantitative partitioning into sedimentary biogenic sulfides of a suite of metals ...

  3. Recognization of Satellite Images of Large Scale Data Based on Map- Reduce Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidya Jadhav,

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Today in the world of cloud and grid computing integration of data from heterogeneous databases is inevitable.This will become complex when size of the database is very large. M-R is a new framework specifically designed for processing huge datasets on distributed sources. Apache’s Hadoop is an implementation of M-R.Currently Hadoop has been applied successfully for file based datasets. This project proposes to utilize the parallel and distributed processing capability of Hadoop M-R for handling Images on large datasets.The presented methodology of land-cover recognition provides a scalable solution for automatic satellite imagery analysis, especially when GIS data is not readily available, or surface change may occur due to catastrophic events such as flooding, hurricane, and snow storm, etc.Here,we are using algorithms such as Image Differentiation,Image Duplication,Zoom-In,Gray-Scale.

  4. Cost-effective methods for reducing nitrogen load at a catchment scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankinen, Katri; Kinnunen, Pekka; Huotari, Jussi; Granlund, Kirsti

    2017-04-01

    Croplands and forests of the boreal region supply a wide range of ecosystem services. The properties and processes of these ecosystems regulate water flow and climate, and retain nutrients and store carbon. The functioning of the ecosystem processes depends on ambient temperatures and precipitation patterns, which are likely to continue changing in the boreal zone. MONIMET (LIFE12 ENV/FI/000409, 9/2013 - 9/2017) is an EU Life funded project about Climate Change Indicators and Vulnerability of Boreal Zone Applying Innovative Observation and Modeling Techniques. In this project, we calculated future changes of carbon storage in soil, and nutrient loading from soil to surface waters and drinking water supplies. We calculated the carbon storage of forests and croplands using the dynamic YASSO litter and soil carbon model. The simulated carbon budget estimates were upscaled to the river basin by combining them with gridded data of land cover. We simulated nutrient loading from two boreal catchments to the receiving waters using the dynamic, catchment scale model INCA. We calculated land use specific loading values for these two well monitored catchments that belong to the LTER (The Long Term Ecological Research) monitoring network, and upscaled these results to the larger river basin based on grid-scaled data of land cover. We used population projections as proxies for the societal demand for the services of climate regulation and water purification, and assessed thereby the vulnerability of society to climate-induced changes in these services. In this poster we present the technical frame of combining models and data.

  5. Layer-type palladium phosphosulphide and its reduced graphene oxide composite as electrode materials for metal-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Sujoy; Mukherjee, Debdyuti; Sampath, Srinivasan

    2017-09-01

    Ternary, layer-type, transition metal phosphosulphide, PdPS, is synthesized by vapour transport method and used as battery electrode for lithium-ion battery. The performance of the electrode in bulk form is enhanced when it is made into a composite with reduced graphene oxide (rGO). The specific capacity, capacity retention and cycling behaviour at different current densities have been investigated. Relatively stable capacities of ∼350 mAh g-1 at a current density of 25 mA g-1 and ∼200 mAh g-1 at 100 mA g-1 are observed. The composite electrode is found to be active for sodium-ion battery as well.

  6. Surface nano-patterning in realizing large-scale ordered arrays of metallic nanoshells with controllable structures and properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Shikuan; Xu, Feng; Winkler, Nina; Zhao, Huaping; Lei, Yong [Institute of Materials Physics, University of Muenster (Germany); Center for Nanotechnology (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Surface patterns of metallic nanostructure arrays play an important role in many application areas such as surface-enhanced Raman scattering sensors, lithium-ion batteries, solar cells, and optical devices. Here we present an innovative surface nano-patterning technique in our group for realizing large-scale ordered arrays of metallic spherical nanoshells with well-defined structures. Silver nanoshell arrays are synthesized using polystyrene sphere templates by an electrophoretic process. The fabricated Ag nanoshell arrays have a high controllability of the structural parameters, including the diameter, the surface roughness, and the inter-shell spacing. And the properties of the synthesized nanoshell arrays can be controlled based on the adjustment of the structural parameters. As an example, tunable surface-enhanced Raman scattering and localized surface plasmon resonance of the nanoshell arrays are demonstrated by controlling the structural parameters. The presented surface nano-patterning technique is a general fabrication process in achieving not only metallic nanoshell arrays, but also nanoshell arrays of other materials, such as semiconductors and metallic oxides.

  7. Study of Adherent Oxide Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-14

    oxide scale-metal interface, thereby improving scale adherence. Because the reactive elements which improve scale adherence (yttrium, hafnium , etc...temperature range, the chromium in the alloy lowers the sulfur activity greater than that of aluminium . Despite this ability of chromium to reduce sulfur

  8. A simple model for large-scale simulations of fcc metals with explicit treatment of electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, D. R.; Foulkes, W. M. C.; Sutton, A. P.

    2010-01-01

    The continuing advance in computational power is beginning to make accurate electronic structure calculations routine. Yet, where physics emerges through the dynamics of tens of thousands of atoms in metals, simplifications must be made to the electronic Hamiltonian. We present the simplest extension to a single s-band model [A.P. Sutton, T.N. Todorov, M.J. Cawkwell and J. Hoekstra, Phil. Mag. A 81 (2001) p.1833.] of metallic bonding, namely, the addition of a second s-band. We show that this addition yields a reasonable description of the density of states at the Fermi level, the cohesive energy, formation energies of point defects and elastic constants of some face-centred cubic (fcc) metals.

  9. Alkaline textile wastewater biotreatment: A sulfate-reducing granular sludge based lab-scale study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qian; Hao, Tianwei; Mackey, Hamish Robert; Wei, Li; Guo, Gang; Chen, Guanghao

    2017-06-15

    In this study the feasibility of treating dyeing wastewater with sulfate reducing granular sludge was explored, focusing on decolorization/degradation of azo dye (Procion Red HE-7B) and the performance of microbial consortia under alkaline conditions (pH=11). Efficiency of HE-7B degradation was influenced strongly by the chemical oxygen demand (COD) concentration which was examined in the range of 500-3000mg/L. COD removal efficiency was reduced at high COD concentration, while specific removal rate was enhanced to 17.5 mg-COD/gVSSh(-1). HE-7B removal was also improved at higher organic strength with more than 90% removal efficiency and a first-rate removal constant of 5.57h(-1) for dye degradation. Three dye-degradation metabolites were identified by HPLC-MS. The granular structure provided enhanced removal performance for HE-7B and COD in comparison to a near-identical floc SRB system and the key functional organisms were identified by high throughput sequencing. This study demonstrates an example of a niche application where SRB granules can be applied for high efficient and cost-effective treatment of a wastewater under adverse environmental conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparison of metal accumulation in mussels at different local and global scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmore, Graham; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2003-02-01

    Cadmium and zinc uptake from the dissolved phase, assimilation efficiency (AE) from the dietary phase, and body burden as well as clearance rate were measured in green mussels, Perna viridis, and blue mussels Mytilus edulis, M. galloprovincialis and Mytilus trossulus. Perna viridis was collected from four sites differentially enriched with trace metals in Hong Kong and blue mussels were collected from different climatic zones, i.e., subarctic and temperate, to allow comparisons with the more tropical green mussels. Despite similar shell length, the dry weight of mussels varied significantly between sites and species and this had a large effect on Cd and Zn accumulation, clearance rate, and metal body burden. All data were, therefore, weight adjusted to allow comparison without this confounding factor. Trace-metal body concentrations were significantly different between sites, and P. viridis collected from Tsing Yi, Hong Kong, had the highest levels of all measured metals when compared with other Hong Kong sites. There was, however, no relationship between the degree of metal enrichment and the Cd and Zn uptake (both from dissolved and particulate sources) and clearance rates. Furthermore, Cd and Zn uptake (dissolved and particulate) and clearance rate varied little between species or climatic zones of collection. Thus, over the range of body trace-metal concentrations measured and between mussel species over large geographical distances and climatic zones, the uptake rates, AEs, and clearance rates are similar when measured under the same laboratory conditions after body-size correction. When other factors such as salinity are also corrected, biomonitoring data from different areas and even utilizing different mussel species may be directly comparable. This study therefore provides important evidence in support of Mussel Watch Programs.

  11. An updated survey of globular clusters in M 31. III. A spectroscopic metallicity scale for the Revised Bologna Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galleti, S.; Bellazzini, M.; Buzzoni, A.; Federici, L.; Fusi Pecci, F.

    2009-12-01

    Aims. We present a new homogeneous set of metallicity estimates based on Lick indices for the old globular clusters of the M 31 galaxy. The final aim is to add homogeneous spectroscopic metallicities to as many entries as possible of the Revised Bologna Catalog of M 31 clusters, by reporting Lick index measurements from any source (literature, new observations, etc.) on the same scale. Methods: New empirical relations of [Fe/H] as a function of [MgFe] and Mg2 indices are based on the well-studied galactic globular clusters, complemented with theoretical model predictions for -0.2≤ [Fe/H]≤ +0.5. Lick indices for M 31 clusters from various literature sources (225 clusters) and from new observations by our team (71 clusters) have been transformed into the Trager et al. system, yielding new metallicity estimates for 245 globular clusters of M 31. Results: Our values are in good agreement with recent estimates based on detailed spectral fitting and with those obtained from color magnitude diagrams of clusters imaged with the Hubble Space Telescope. The typical uncertainty on individual estimates is ≃±0.25 dex, as resulted from the comparison with metallicities derived from color magnitude diagrams of individual clusters. Conclusions: The metallicity distribution of M 31 globular cluster is briefly discussed and compared with that of the Milky Way. Simple parametric statistical tests suggest that the distribution is probably not unimodal. The strong correlation between metallicity and kinematics found in previous studies is confirmed. The most metal-rich GCs tend to be packed into the center of the system and to cluster tightly around the galactic rotation curve defined by the HI disk, while the velocity dispersion about the curve increases with decreasing metallicity. However, also the clusters with [Fe/H]<-1.0 display a clear rotation pattern, at odds with their Milky Way counterparts. Based on observations made at La Palma, at the Spanish Observatorio del Roque

  12. Evaluation of Two Biosorbents in the Removal of Metal Ions in Aqueous Using a Pilot Scale Fixed-bed System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Gadelha Oliveira

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work was to investigate the adsorption of toxic metal ions copper, nickel and zinc from aqueous solutions using low cost natural biomass (sugar cane bagasse and green coconut fiber in pilot scale fixed-bed system. The Hydraulic retention time (HRT was 229 minutes and the lowest adsorbent usage rate (AUR found was 0.10 g.L-1 for copper using green coconut fibers. The highest values of adsorption capacities founded were 1.417 and 2.772 mg.g-1 of Cu(II ions for sugarcane bagasse and green coconut fibers, respectively. The results showed that both sugarcane bagasse and green coconut fiber presented potential in the removal of metal ions copper, nickel and zinc ions from aqueous solution and the possible use in wastewater treatment station.

  13. Process nano scale mechanical properties measurement of thin metal films using a novel paddle cantilever test structure

    CERN Document Server

    Tong, Chi-Jia

    2008-01-01

    A new technique was developed for studying the mechanical behavior of nano-scale thin metal films on substrate is presented. The test structure was designed on a novel "paddle" cantilever beam specimens with dimensions as few hundred nanometers to less than 10 nanometers. This beam is in triangle shape in order to provide uniform plane strain distribution. Standard clean room processing was used to prepare the paddle sample. The experiment can be operated by using the electrostatic deflection on the paddle uniform distributed stress cantilever beam and then measure the deposited thin metal film materials on top of it. A capacitance technique was used to measurement on the other side of the deflected plate to measure its deflection with respect to the force. The measured strain was converted through the capacitance measurement for the deflection of the cantilever. System performance on the residual stress measurement of thin films are calculated with three different forces on the "paddle" cantilever beam, incl...

  14. Full-scale simulation and reduced-order modeling of a thermoacoustic engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalo, Carlo; Lin, Jeff; Lele, Sanjiva; Hesselink, Lambertus

    2013-11-01

    We have carried out the first three-dimensional numerical simulation of a thermoacoustic Stirling heat-engine. The goal is to lay the groundwork for full-scale Navier-Stokes simulations to advance the state-of-the-art low-order modeling and design of such devices. The model adopted is a long resonator with a heat-exchanger/regenerator (HX/REG) unit on one end - the only component not directly resolved. A temperature difference across the HX/REG unit of 200 K is sufficient to initiate the thermoacoustic instability. The latter is a Lagrangian process that only intensifies acoustic waves traveling in the direction of the imposed temperature gradient. An acoustic network of traveling waves is thus obtained and compared against low-order prediction tools such as DeltaEC. Non-linear effects such as system-wide streaming flow patterns are rapidly established. These are responsible for the mean advection of hot fluid away from the HX/REG (i.e. thermal leakage). This unwanted effect is contained by the introduction of a second ambient heat-exchanger allowing for the establishment of a dynamical thermal equilibrium in the system. A limit cycle is obtained at +178 dB.

  15. Evidence from a large-scale meta-analysis indicates eczema reduces the incidence of glioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chao; Dong, Jing; Chu, Yudong; He, Guijuan; Xu, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between eczema and the risk of primary glioma. Relevant studies were selected through electronic searches of PubMed and EMBASE. A meta-analysis of 12 case-control studies and one cohort study was performed. A fixed effect model was applied to analyze 13 studies consisting of 10,897 glioma cases and 56,081 controls. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to assess the strength of the associations. The data demonstrate that eczema significantly reduces the risk of glioma (OR = 0.69, 95% CI = 0.61–0.78, P < 0.001). Additional studies with larger patient cohorts are required to validate our findings. PMID:27566584

  16. Ferromagnetic inks facilitate large scale paper recycling and reduce bleach chemical consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeltner, Martin; Toedtli, Laura M; Hild, Nora; Fuhrer, Roland; Rossier, Michaël; Gerber, Lukas C; Raso, Renzo A; Grass, Robert N; Stark, Wendelin J

    2013-04-23

    Deinking is a fundamental part of paper recycling. As the global paper consumption rises and exceeds even the annual paper production, recycling of this raw material is of high importance. Magnetic ink based on carbon coated magnetic nanoparticles enables an alternative approach to state of the art paper deinking. Magnetic deinking comprises three steps (preselection, washing, and magnetic separation of fibers). Preseparation of printed from nonprinted scraps of paper is feasible and reduces the paper mass which has to be fed into a deinking process. A consecutive washing process removes surficial magnetic ink that can be collected by application of a permanent magnet. Still, printed parts are subjected to a further continuous magnetic deinking step, where magnetic and nonmagnetic paper fibers can be separated. Magnetic deinking of a model print allows recovery of more than 80% of bright fibers without any harsh chemical treatment and the re-collection of more than 82% of magnetic ink.

  17. Multi-scale Modelling of Fracture in Open-Cell Metal Foams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mangipudi, K. R.; Onck, P. R.; Ganghoffer, JF; Pastrone, F

    2010-01-01

    Metal foams possess attractive mechanical properties like high stiffness to weight ratio.When used to build light-weight structures they require a good combination of strength and ductility. They are ductile under compression but rather brittle in tension with a few percent of overall strain to

  18. Electrochemical capacitance of Ni-doped metal organic framework and reduced graphene oxide composites: more than the sum of its parts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Parama Chakraborty; Lobo, Derrek E; Middag, Rick; Ng, Woo Kan; Shaibani, Mahdokht E; Majumder, Mainak

    2015-02-18

    Composites of a Ni-doped metal organic framework (MOF) with reduced graphene oxide (rGO) are synthesized in bulk (gram scale) quantities. The composites are composed of rGO sheets, which avoid restacking from the physical presence of MOF crystals. At larger concentration of rGO, the MOF crystals are distributed on the overlapping and continuous rGO sheets. Ni in Ni-doped MOF is found to engage in a two-electron, reversible, efficient, redox reaction shuttling between Ni and Ni(OH)2 in aqueous potassium hydroxide (KOH) electrolyte. The reaction is rather unique as Ni-based supercapacitors use a one-electron transfer Faradaic redox reaction between Ni(OH)2 and NiO(OH). Employing electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, we determined the charge transfer resistance to be 184 mΩ for MOF, 74 mΩ for a Ni-doped MOF and 6 mΩ for a rGO-Ni-doped MOF composite, but these modifications do not affect the mass transfer resistance. This novel redox reaction in conjunction with the lowered charge transfer resistance from the introduction of rGO underpins the synergy that dramatically increases the capacitance to 758 F/g in the rGO-Ni-doped MOF composite, when the parent MOF could store only 100 F/g and a physical composite of rGO and Ni-doped MOF could algebraically achieve about 240 F/g. A generic approach of doping MOFs with a redox active metal and forming a composite with rGO transforms an electro-inactive MOF to high capacity energy storage material with energy density of 37.8 Wh/kg at a power density of 227 W/kg. These results can promote the development of high-performance energy storage materials from the wide family of MOFs available.

  19. Gold ions bio-released from metallic gold particles reduce inflammation and apoptosis and increase the regenerative responses in focal brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Agnete; Kolind, Kristian; Pedersen, Dan Sonne

    2008-01-01

    neural stem cell response. We conclude that bio-liberated gold ions possess pronounced anti-inflammatory and neuron-protective capacities in the brain and suggest that metallic gold has clinical potentials. Intra-cerebral application of metallic gold as a pharmaceutical source of gold ions represents......Traumatic brain injury results in loss of neurons caused as much by the resulting neuroinflammation as by the injury. Gold salts are known to be immunosuppressive, but their use are limited by nephrotoxicity. However, as we have proven that implants of pure metallic gold release gold ions which do...... not spread in the body, but are taken up by cells near the implant, we hypothesize that metallic gold could reduce local neuroinflammation in a safe way. Bio-liberation, or dissolucytosis, of gold ions from metallic gold surfaces requires the presence of disolycytes i.e. macrophages and the process...

  20. Scaling cost-sharing to wages: how employers can reduce health spending and provide greater economic security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Christopher T

    2014-01-01

    In the employer-sponsored insurance market that covers most Americans; many workers are "underinsured." The evidence shows onerous out-of-pocket payments causing them to forgo needed care, miss work, and fall into bankruptcies and foreclosures. Nonetheless, many higher-paid workers are "overinsured": the evidence shows that in this domain, surplus insurance stimulates spending and price inflation without improving health. Employers can solve these problems together by scaling cost-sharing to wages. This reform would make insurance better protect against risk and guarantee access to care, while maintaining or even reducing insurance premiums. Yet, there are legal obstacles to scaled cost-sharing. The group-based nature of employer health insurance, reinforced by federal law, makes it difficult for scaling to be achieved through individual choices. The Affordable Care Act's (ACA) "essential coverage" mandate also caps cost-sharing even for wealthy workers that need no such cap. Additionally, there is a tax distortion in favor of highly paid workers purchasing healthcare through insurance rather than out-of-pocket. These problems are all surmountable. In particular, the ACA has expanded the applicability of an unenforced employee-benefits rule that prohibits "discrimination" in favor of highly compensated workers. A novel analysis shows that this statute gives the Internal Revenue Service the authority to require scaling and to thereby eliminate the current inequities and inefficiencies caused by the tax distortion. The promise is smarter insurance for over 150 million Americans.

  1. MR imaging with metal artifact-reducing sequences and gadolinium contrast agent in a case-control study of periprosthetic abnormalities in patients with metal-on-metal hip prostheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Gunilla M.; Mueller, Markus F.; Ekberg, Olle [Lund University, Skaane University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Malmoe (Sweden); Maansson, Sven [Lund University, Skaane University Hospital, Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Malmoe (Sweden); Schewelov, Thord von [Lund University, Skaane University Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Malmoe (Sweden); Nittka, Mathias [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Erlangen (Germany); Lundin, Bjoern [Lund University, Skaane University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Lund (Sweden)

    2014-08-15

    To apply and compare magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) metal artifact reducing sequences (MARS) including subtraction imaging after contrast application in patients with metal-on-metal (MoM) hip prostheses, investigate the prevalence and characteristics of periprosthetic abnormalities, as well as their relation with pain and risk factors. Fifty-two MoM prostheses (35 cases with pain and or risk factors, and 17 controls) in 47 patients were examined in a 1.5-T MR scanner using MARS: turbo spin echo (TSE) with high readout bandwidth with and without view angle tilting (VAT), TSE with VAT and slice encoding for metal artifact correction (SEMAC), short tau inversion recovery (STIR) with matched RF pulses, and post-contrast imaging. The relations of MRI findings to pain and risk factors were analyzed and in five revised hips findings from operation, histology, and MRI were compared. TSE VAT detected the highest number of osteolyses. Soft tissue mass, effusion, and capsular thickening were common, whereas osteolysis in acetabulum and femur were less frequent. Contrast enhancement occurred in bone, synovia, joint capsule, and the periphery of soft tissue mass. There was no significant relation between MRI findings and pain or risk factors. MARS and gadolinium subtraction imaging are useful for evaluation of complications to MoM prosthesis. TSE VAT had the highest sensitivity for osteolysis. Contrast enhancement might indicate activation of aseptic lymphocyte-dominated vasculitis-associated lesion (ALVAL). Pain, small head, or steep prosthesis inclination angle are not useful predictors of periprosthetic abnormalities, and wide indications for MR follow-up are warranted. (orig.)

  2. Effectiveness of online silt traps in reducing localised and catchment scale flood risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twohig, Sarah; Pattison, Ian; Sander, Graham

    2017-04-01

    Geomorphological drivers are often neglected when proposing methods to reduce flood risk. Understanding the connections between hydrology, geomorphology and engineering is fundamental to predicating sediment transfer within river catchments and thus successfully implementing sustainable flood management. Fine sediment erosion is a continuing concern in the River Eye, Leicestershire. The predominately rural catchment has a history of flooding within the town of Melton Mowbray. Fine sediment connectivity has been recognised by stakeholders as a contributing factor to flood risk and the degradation of the SSSI. In response, two online silt traps were installed to inhibit sediment connectivity within the channel and prevent loss of channel capacity. The artificially widened and deepened areas of the channel have been excavated once since there installation in 2002. Time integrated mass suspended sediment samplers have been installed upstream and downstream of both silt traps to quantify the reduction in suspended sediment over a 12 month period. The sediment has been subjected to laboratory analysis to determine the size of suspended sediment particles and organic content, providing an estimate in distance travelled from the source. Due to their rarity, the silt traps provide a unique opportunity to explore their impact on local hydrology. Four monitoring stations have been installed above the largest silt trap to record river stage and to ascertain whether flood risk is locally increased as a result of their placement. These results have been combined to determine the overall success of the natural flood management scheme.

  3. The metallic contamination of the Loire River Basin (France): Spatial and temporal evolution with a multi-scale approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhivert, Elie; Grosbois, Cécile; Desmet, Marc; Curie, Florence; Moatar, Florentina; Meybeck, Michel; Bourrain, Xavier

    2013-04-01

    Since the early 19th century, important agricultural, mining and industrial development has been active in Western Europe. The Loire River Basin (117,800 km2, total population of 8.4 Mp) presents a long history of human pressures, reflecting temporal evolution of technological and urban activities (Grosbois et al, 2012). Hence, sediments of the Loire River and its tributaries have recorded partially and/or totally organic, nutrients and trace element contamination. Nowadays, can we determine history of metallic emissions in sediment records and what is the part of these past inputs relative to the actual contamination? Can we point out historical sources of contamination? To answer these questions, two approaches were used in this study. Firstly, in four coring sites in the Loire River Basin, a temporal re-enacting of metallic contamination trapped in sediments was carried out. Based on age-model and inter-element correlations in each core, trace element signals were deconvoluted and compared to actual and specific chemical signatures of anthropogenic inputs (300 bed sediment samples collected downstream of former and current industrial sites like mines, smelters, planting/coating plants, glassware and car industries, metal recycling plants and waste water treatment plants). The second approach was at a larger basin scale, comparing location of these former and actual contamination sources with explanatory factors such as geology, evolution of population density, of industrial activities and of land use. This was done in the main stream of the Loire River and its major tributaries and locally at a smaller scale (0-500 km²). All these approaches emphasized three temporal periods of metallic contamination: (i) the first period begins with the 20th century until 1950, it corresponds to the first increase of major contaminants like Ag, As, Cd, Cr, Hg, Pb, Sb, Sn and Zn; some trace elements like Hg and Sn seem to be present in the Loire sediments much earlier as they

  4. Formation of x-ray Newton’s rings from nano-scale spallation shells of metals in laser ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaharu Nishikino

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The initial stages of the femtosecond (fs laser ablation process of gold, platinum, and tungsten were observed by single-shot soft x-ray imaging technique. The formation and evolution of soft x-ray Newton’s rings (NRs were found for the first time. The soft x-ray NRs are caused by the interference between the bulk ablated surface and nanometer-scale thin spallation layer; they originate from the metal surface at pump energy fluence of around 1 J/cm2 and work as a flying soft x-ray beam splitter.

  5. Formation of x-ray Newton's rings from nano-scale spallation shells of metals in laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikino, Masaharu; Hasegawa, Noboru; Tomita, Takuro; Minami, Yasuo; Eyama, Takashi; Kakimoto, Naoya; Izutsu, Rui; Baba, Motoyoshi; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Suemoto, Tohru

    2017-01-01

    The initial stages of the femtosecond (fs) laser ablation process of gold, platinum, and tungsten were observed by single-shot soft x-ray imaging technique. The formation and evolution of soft x-ray Newton's rings (NRs) were found for the first time. The soft x-ray NRs are caused by the interference between the bulk ablated surface and nanometer-scale thin spallation layer; they originate from the metal surface at pump energy fluence of around 1 J/cm2 and work as a flying soft x-ray beam splitter.

  6. Identifying Opportunities to Reduce Uncertainty in a National-Scale Forest Carbon Accounting Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, C. H.; Metsaranta, J. M.; Kurz, W.; Hilger, A.

    2013-12-01

    Assessing the quality of forest carbon budget models used for national and international reporting of greenhouse gas emissions is essential, but model evaluations are rarely conducted mainly because of lack of appropriate, independent ground plot data sets. Ecosystem carbon stocks for all major pools estimated from data collected for 696 ground plots from Canada's new National Forest Inventory (NFI) were used to assess plot-level carbon stocks predicted by the Carbon Budget Model of the Canadian Forest Sector 3 (CBM-CFS3) -- a model compliant with the most complex (Tier-3) approach in the reporting guidelines of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. The model is the core of Canada's National Forest Carbon Monitoring, Accounting, and Reporting System. At the landscape scale, a major portion of total uncertainty in both C stock and flux estimation is associated with biomass productivity, turnover, and soil and dead organic matter modelling parameters, which can best be further evaluated using plot-level data. Because the data collected for the ground plots were comprehensive we were able to compare carbon stock estimates for 13 pools also estimated by the CBM-CFS3 (all modelled pools excepting coarse and fine root biomass) using the classical comparison statistics of mean difference and correlation. Using a Monte Carlo approach we were able to determine the contribution of aboveground biomass, deadwood and soil pool error to modeled ecosystem total error, as well as the contribution of pools that are summed to estimate aboveground biomass, deadwood and soil, to the error of these three subtotal pools. We were also able to assess potential sources of error propagation in the computational sequence of the CBM-CFS3. Analysis of the data grouped by the 16 dominant tree species allowed us to isolate the leading species where further research would lead to the greatest reductions in uncertainty for modeling of carbon stocks using the CBM-CFS3. This analysis

  7. The tensor hypercontracted parametric reduced density matrix algorithm: coupled-cluster accuracy with O(r^4) scaling

    CERN Document Server

    Shenvi, Neil; Yang, Yang; Yang, Weitao; Schwerdtfeger, Christine; Mazziotti, David

    2013-01-01

    Tensor hypercontraction is a method that allows the representation of a high-rank tensor as a product of lower-rank tensors. In this paper, we show how tensor hypercontraction can be applied to both the electron repulsion integral (ERI) tensor and the two-particle excitation amplitudes used in the parametric reduced density matrix (pRDM) algorithm. Because only O(r) auxiliary functions are needed in both of these approximations, our overall algorithm can be shown to scale as O(r4), where r is the number of single-particle basis functions. We apply our algorithm to several small molecules, hydrogen chains, and alkanes to demonstrate its low formal scaling and practical utility. Provided we use enough auxiliary functions, we obtain accuracy similar to that of the traditional pRDM algorithm, somewhere between that of CCSD and CCSD(T).

  8. The tensor hypercontracted parametric reduced density matrix algorithm: coupled-cluster accuracy with O(r(4)) scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenvi, Neil; van Aggelen, Helen; Yang, Yang; Yang, Weitao; Schwerdtfeger, Christine; Mazziotti, David

    2013-08-07

    Tensor hypercontraction is a method that allows the representation of a high-rank tensor as a product of lower-rank tensors. In this paper, we show how tensor hypercontraction can be applied to both the electron repulsion integral tensor and the two-particle excitation amplitudes used in the parametric 2-electron reduced density matrix (p2RDM) algorithm. Because only O(r) auxiliary functions are needed in both of these approximations, our overall algorithm can be shown to scale as O(r(4)), where r is the number of single-particle basis functions. We apply our algorithm to several small molecules, hydrogen chains, and alkanes to demonstrate its low formal scaling and practical utility. Provided we use enough auxiliary functions, we obtain accuracy similar to that of the standard p2RDM algorithm, somewhere between that of CCSD and CCSD(T).

  9. An analysis of harmful factors to storage stability of the reduced metallic fuel produced by the advanced spent fuel management process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, J. S.; You, G. S.; Cho, I. J.; Kook, D. H.; Lee, J. C.; Seo, G. S.; Lee, E. P.; Seo, H. S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2002-03-01

    This study was performed for the selection of alloying elements to make the metallic fuel alloys having a good stability to oxidation. Harmful factors on oxidation were also analyzed. Several basic properties such as microstructure, immiscibility, thermal and fission product effects were surveyed. The oxidation properties of metal uranium and uranium alloys were also studied. The results from this study are applicable to the selection of the alloying elements to stabilize the reduced uranium metal in the 2nd year research in phase 2, and also do an important role to increase the storage temperature. 29 refs., 37 figs., 5 tabs. (Author)

  10. Effective Work Function Engineering for Aggressively Scaled Planar and Multi-Gate Fin Field-Effect Transistor-Based Devices with High-k Last Replacement Metal Gate Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veloso, Anabela; Aik Chew, Soon; Higuchi, Yuichi; Ragnarsson, Lars-Åke; Simoen, Eddy; Schram, Tom; Witters, Thomas; Van Ammel, Annemie; Dekkers, Harold; Tielens, Hilde; Devriendt, Katia; Heylen, Nancy; Sebaai, Farid; Brus, Stephan; Favia, Paola; Geypen, Jef; Bender, Hugo; Phatak, Anup; Chen, Michael S.; Lu, Xinliang; Ganguli, Seshadri; Lei, Yu; Tang, Wei; Fu, Xinyu; Gandikota, Srinivas; Noori, Atif; Brand, Adam; Yoshida, Naomi; Thean, Aaron; Horiguchi, Naoto

    2013-04-01

    This work reports on aggressively scaled replacement metal gate, high-k last devices (RMG-HKL), exploring several options for effective work function (EWF) engineering, and targeting logic high-performance and low-power applications. Tight low-threshold voltage (VT) distributions for scaled NMOS devices are obtained by controlled TiN/TiAl-alloying, either by using RF-physical vapor deposition (RF-PVD) or atomic layer deposition (ALD) for TiN growth. The first technique allows optimization of the TiAl/TiN thicknesses at the bottom of gate trenches while maximizing the space to be filled with a low-resistance metal; using ALD minimizes the occurrence of preferential paths, at gate sidewalls, for Al diffusion into the high-k dielectric, reducing gate leakage (JG). For multi-gate fin field-effect transistors (FinFETs) which require smaller EWF shifts from mid-gap for low-VT: 1) conformal, lower-JG ALD-TiN/TaSiAl; and 2) Al-rich ALD-TiN by controlled Al diffusion from the fill-metal are demonstrated to be promising candidates. Comparable bias temperature instability (BTI), improved noise behavior, and slightly reduced equivalent oxide thickness (EOT) are measured on Al-rich EWF-metal stacks.

  11. Scale-invariant hyperscaling-violating holographic theories and the resistivity of strange metals with random-field disorder

    CERN Document Server

    Lucas, Andrew; Schalm, Koenraad

    2014-01-01

    We compute the direct current resistivity of a scale-invariant, $d$-dimensional strange metal with dynamic critical exponent $z$ and hyperscaling-violating exponent $\\theta$, weakly perturbed by a scalar operator coupled to random-field disorder that locally breaks a $\\mathbb{Z}_2$ symmetry. Independent calculations via Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton holography and memory matrix methods lead to the same results. We show that random field disorder has a strong effect on resistivity: charge carriers in the infrared are easily depleted, as the relaxation time for momentum is surprisingly small. In the course of our holographic calculation we introduce a non-trivial dilaton coupling to the disordered scalar, allowing us to study a strongly-coupled scale invariant theory with $\\theta \

  12. Determining the quantum-coherent to semiclassical transition in atomic-scale quasi-one-dimensional metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Bent; Simmons, Michelle Y.

    2016-08-01

    Atomic-scale silicon wires, patterned by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and degenerately doped with phosphorus (P), have attracted significant interest owing to their exceptionally low resistivity and semiclassical Ohmic conduction at temperatures as low as T =4.2 K . Here, we investigate the transition from semiclassical diffusive to quantum-coherent conduction in a 4.6 nm wide wire as we decrease the measurement temperature. By analyzing the temperature dependence of universal conductance fluctuations (UCFs) and one-dimensional (1D) weak localization (WL)—fundamental manifestations of quantum-coherent transport in quasi-1D metals—we show that transport evolves from quantum coherent to semiclassical at T ˜4 K . Remarkably, our study confirms that universal concepts of mesoscopic physics such as UCF and 1D WL retain their validity in quasi-1D metallic conductors down to the atomic scale.

  13. Endoscopic suture fixation is associated with reduced migration of esophageal fully covered self-expandable metal stents (FCSEMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Andrew; Chang, Andrew; Bedi, Aarti Oza; Wamsteker, Erik-Jan; Elta, Grace; Kwon, Richard S; Carrott, Phillip; Elmunzer, B Joseph; Law, Ryan

    2016-12-07

    Esophageal fully covered self-expandable metal stents (FCSEMS) are indicated for the management of benign and malignant conditions of the esophagus including perforations, leaks, and strictures. FCSEMS are resistant to tissue ingrowth and are removable; however, stent migration occurs in 30-55% of cases. Endoscopic suture fixation of FCSEMS has been utilized to decrease the risk of stent migration though data supporting this practice remain limited. The primary aim of this study was to compare clinical outcomes and migration rate of patients who underwent placement of esophageal FCSEMS with and without endoscopic suture fixation. Our single-center, retrospective, cohort study includes patients who underwent esophageal FCSEMS placement with and without endoscopic suture fixation between January 1, 2012, and November 11, 2015. Baseline patient characteristics, procedural details, and clinical outcomes were abstracted. Logistic regression was performed to identify clinical and technical factors associated with outcomes and stent migration. A total of 51 patients underwent 62 FCSEMS placements, including 21 procedures with endoscopic suture fixation and 41 without. Suture fixation was associated with reduced risk of stent migration (OR 0.13, 95% CI 0.03-0.47). Prior stent migration was associated with significantly higher risk of subsequent migration (OR 6.4, 95% CI 1.6-26.0). Stent migration was associated with lower likelihood of clinical success (OR 0.21, 95% CI 0.06-0.69). There was a trend toward higher clinical success among patients undergoing suture fixation (85.7 vs. 60.9%, p = 0.07). Endoscopic suture fixation of FCSEMS was associated with a reduced stent migration rate. Appropriate patient selection for suture fixation of FCSEMS may lead to reduced migration in high-risk patients.

  14. Chemical Cartography with APOGEE: Large-scale Mean Metallicity Maps of the Milky Way

    CERN Document Server

    Hayden, Michael R; Bovy, Jo; Majewski, Steven R; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Beers, Timothy C; Cunha, Katia; Frinchaboy, Peter M; Pérez, Ana E García; Girardi, Léo; Hearty, Fred R; Johnson, Jennifer A; Lee, Young Sun; Nidever, David; Schiavon, Ricardo P; Schlesinger, Katharine J; Schneider, Donald P; Schultheis, Mathias; Shetrone, Matthew; Smith, Verne V; Zasowski, Gail; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Feuillet, Diane; Hasselquist, Sten; Kinemuchi, Karen; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; O'Connell, Robert; Pan, Kaike; Stassun, Keivan

    2013-01-01

    We present Galactic mean metallicity maps derived from the first year of the SDSS-III APOGEE experiment. Mean abundances in different zones of Galactocentric radius (0 6 kpc, the gradient flattens as one moves off of the plane, and is flatter at all heights for high-[{\\alpha}/M] stars than for low-[{\\alpha}/M] stars. Alternatively, these gradients can be described as vertical gradients that flatten at larger Galactocentric radius; these vertical gradients are similar for both low and high-[{\\alpha}/M] populations. Stars with higher [{\\alpha}/M] appear to have a flatter radial gradient than stars with lower [{\\alpha}/M]. This could suggest that the metallicity gradient has grown steeper with time or, alternatively, that gradients are washed out over time by migration of stars.

  15. Atomic scale characterization and surface chemistry of metal modified titanate nanotubes and nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukovecz, Ákos; Kordás, Krisztián; Kiss, János; Kónya, Zoltán

    2016-10-01

    Titanates are salts of polytitanic acid that can be synthesized as nanostructures in a great variety concerning crystallinity, morphology, size, metal content and surface chemistry. Titanate nanotubes (open-ended hollow cylinders measuring up to 200 nm in length and 15 nm in outer diameter) and nanowires (solid, elongated rectangular blocks with length up to 1500 nm and 30-60 nm diameter) are the most widespread representatives of the titanate nanomaterial family. This review covers the properties and applications of these two materials from the surface science point of view. Dielectric, vibrational, electron and X-ray spectroscopic results are comprehensively discussed first, then surface modification methods including covalent functionalization, ion exchange and metal loading are covered. The versatile surface chemistry of one-dimensional titanates renders them excellent candidates for heterogeneous catalytic, photocatalytic, photovoltaic and energy storage applications, therefore, these fields are also reviewed.

  16. The Effect of Soil Properties on Metal Bioavailability: Field Scale Validation to Support Regulatory Acceptance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    speciation of the metals in the soil with the use of X-ray absorption spectroscopy including synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microprobe mapping, microbeam X...its chemical speciation and IVBA solubility will depend on the mining waste mineral not soil property. The ability of soil properties (i.e...by soil properties was found for the Cherry Point soil . Differences in Cr chemical speciation in soil may offer an explanation. Water or wastewater

  17. Coupling scales for modelling heavy metal vaporization from municipal solid waste incineration in a fluid bed by CFD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soria, José, E-mail: jose.soria@probien.gob.ar [Institute for Research and Development in Process Engineering, Biotechnology and Alternative Energies (PROBIEN, CONICET – UNCo), 1400 Buenos Aires St., 8300 Neuquén (Argentina); Gauthier, Daniel; Flamant, Gilles [Processes, Materials and Solar Energy Laboratory (PROMES-CNRS, UPR 8521), 7 Four Solaire Street, Odeillo, 66120 Font-Romeu (France); Rodriguez, Rosa [Chemical Engineering Institute, National University of San Juan, 1109 Libertador (O) Avenue, 5400 San Juan (Argentina); Mazza, Germán [Institute for Research and Development in Process Engineering, Biotechnology and Alternative Energies (PROBIEN, CONICET – UNCo), 1400 Buenos Aires St., 8300 Neuquén (Argentina)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • A CFD two-scale model is formulated to simulate heavy metal vaporization from waste incineration in fluidized beds. • MSW particle is modelled with the macroscopic particle model. • Influence of bed dynamics on HM vaporization is included. • CFD predicted results agree well with experimental data reported in literature. • This approach may be helpful for fluidized bed reactor modelling purposes. - Abstract: Municipal Solid Waste Incineration (MSWI) in fluidized bed is a very interesting technology mainly due to high combustion efficiency, great flexibility for treating several types of waste fuels and reduction in pollutants emitted with the flue gas. However, there is a great concern with respect to the fate of heavy metals (HM) contained in MSW and their environmental impact. In this study, a coupled two-scale CFD model was developed for MSWI in a bubbling fluidized bed. It presents an original scheme that combines a single particle model and a global fluidized bed model in order to represent the HM vaporization during MSW combustion. Two of the most representative HM (Cd and Pb) with bed temperatures ranging between 923 and 1073 K have been considered. This new approach uses ANSYS FLUENT 14.0 as the modelling platform for the simulations along with a complete set of self-developed user-defined functions (UDFs). The simulation results are compared to the experimental data obtained previously by the research group in a lab-scale fluid bed incinerator. The comparison indicates that the proposed CFD model predicts well the evolution of the HM release for the bed temperatures analyzed. It shows that both bed temperature and bed dynamics have influence on the HM vaporization rate. It can be concluded that CFD is a rigorous tool that provides valuable information about HM vaporization and that the original two-scale simulation scheme adopted allows to better represent the actual particle behavior in a fluid bed incinerator.

  18. An incremental and distributed inference method for large-scale ontologies based on MapReduce paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Huang, Keman; Li, Jianqiang; Zhou, MengChu

    2015-01-01

    With the upcoming data deluge of semantic data, the fast growth of ontology bases has brought significant challenges in performing efficient and scalable reasoning. Traditional centralized reasoning methods are not sufficient to process large ontologies. Distributed reasoning methods are thus required to improve the scalability and performance of inferences. This paper proposes an incremental and distributed inference method for large-scale ontologies by using MapReduce, which realizes high-performance reasoning and runtime searching, especially for incremental knowledge base. By constructing transfer inference forest and effective assertional triples, the storage is largely reduced and the reasoning process is simplified and accelerated. Finally, a prototype system is implemented on a Hadoop framework and the experimental results validate the usability and effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  19. Nanochemistry at the atomic scale revealed in hydrogen-induced semiconductor surface metallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derycke, Vincent; Soukiassian, Patrick G.; Amy, Fabrice; Chabal, Yves J.; D'Angelo, Marie D.; Enriquez, Hanna B.; Silly, Mathieu G.

    2003-04-01

    Passivation of semiconductor surfaces against chemical attack can be achieved by terminating the surface-dangling bonds with a monovalent atom such as hydrogen. Such passivation invariably leads to the removal of all surface states in the bandgap, and thus to the termination of non-metallic surfaces. Here we report the first observation of semiconductor surface metallization induced by atomic hydrogen. This result, established by using photo-electron and photo-absorption spectroscopies and scanning tunnelling techniques, is achieved on a Si-terminated cubic silicon carbide (SiC) surface. It results from competition between hydrogen termination of surface-dangling bonds and hydrogen-generated steric hindrance below the surface. Understanding the ingredient for hydrogen-stabilized metallization directly impacts the ability to eliminate electronic defects at semiconductor interfaces critical for microelectronics, provides a means to develop electrical contacts on high-bandgap chemically passive materials, particularly for interfacing with biological systems, and gives control of surfaces for lubrication, for example of nanomechanical devices.

  20. Chemical cartography with apogee: Large-scale mean metallicity maps of the Milky Way disk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayden, Michael R.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Lee, Young Sun [New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Bovy, Jo [Institute for Advanced Study, Einstein Drive, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Majewski, Steven R.; García Pérez, Ana E. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Johnson, Jennifer A. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Allende Prieto, Carlos [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Beers, Timothy C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and JINA, Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, E. Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Cunha, Katia [Observatório Nacional, São Cristóvão, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Frinchaboy, Peter M. [Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, TX 76129 (United States); Girardi, Léo [Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova-INAF, Vicolo dell' Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Hearty, Fred R. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Nidever, David [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Schiavon, Ricardo P. [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Twelve Quays House, Egerton Wharf, Birkenhead CH41 ILD (United Kingdom); Schlesinger, Katharine J. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Mt. Stromlo Observatory, Cotter Road, Weston, ACT 2611 (Australia); Schneider, Donald P. [Laboratório Interinstitucional de e-Astronomia-LIneA, Rua Gal. José Cristino 77, Rio de Janeiro, RJ - 20921-400 (Brazil); Schultheis, Mathias, E-mail: mrhayden@nmsu.edu, E-mail: holtz@nmsu.edu, E-mail: yslee@nmsu.edu, E-mail: feuilldk@nmsu.edu [Observatoire de la Cote d' Azur, Boulevard de l' Observatoire, B.P. 4229, F-06304 NICE Cedex 4 (France); and others

    2014-05-01

    We present Galactic mean metallicity maps derived from the first year of the SDSS-III APOGEE experiment. Mean abundances in different zones of projected Galactocentric radius (0 < R < 15 kpc) at a range of heights above the plane (0 < |z| < 3 kpc), are derived from a sample of nearly 20,000 giant stars with unprecedented coverage, including stars in the Galactic mid-plane at large distances. We also split the sample into subsamples of stars with low- and high-[α/M] abundance ratios. We assess possible biases in deriving the mean abundances, and find that they are likely to be small except in the inner regions of the Galaxy. A negative radial metallicity gradient exists over much of the Galaxy; however, the gradient appears to flatten for R < 6 kpc, in particular near the Galactic mid-plane and for low-[α/M] stars. At R > 6 kpc, the gradient flattens as one moves off the plane, and is flatter at all heights for high-[α/M] stars than for low-[α/M] stars. Alternatively, these gradients can be described as vertical gradients that flatten at larger Galactocentric radius; these vertical gradients are similar for both low- and high-[α/M] populations. Stars with higher [α/M] appear to have a flatter radial gradient than stars with lower [α/M]. This could suggest that the metallicity gradient has grown steeper with time or, alternatively, that gradients are washed out over time by migration of stars.

  1. Reducing Data Center Loads for a Large-Scale, Net Zero Office Building (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-12-01

    Case study highlighting the design, implementation strategies, and continuous performance monitoring of NREL's Research Support Facility data center. In constructing a new research facility for its campus, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) project team identified the opportunity to design a world-class, energy-efficient data center to support its operations. NREL's efforts resulted in a highly efficient data center that demonstrated considerable energy savings in its first 11 months of operations. Using legacy data center performance as a baseline, the new facility cut energy use by nearly 1,450,000 kWh, delivering cost savings of approximately $82,000. The data center's average total load was 165 kW less than the legacy center's average total load, resulting in a 60% reduction in overall power. Finally, the limited use of cooling and fan energy enabled the new data center to achieve a 1.16 average power utilization effectiveness (PUE) rating, compared to the legacy data center's PUE of 2.28. The laboratory had been relying on individual servers with an energy utilization rate of less than 5%. NREL employed building best practices, innovative design techniques and energy-efficient technologies to support its energy goals for the new data center. To counteract the extensive heat generated by data center equipment, the laboratory implemented a cooling system using outdoor air and evaporative cooling to meet most of the center's needs. Inside the data center, NREL replaced much of its legacy equipment with new, energy-efficient technology. By exchanging this infrastructure for virtualized blade servers, NREL reduced its server energy footprint by 96%. Additionally, NREL replaced its 80%-efficient uninterruptible power supply (UPS) with a UPS that is 95% efficient; deployed ultra efficient power distribution units (PDU) to handle higher UPS voltages; and implemented vacancy sensors to drive down lighting loads. Using best

  2. Reduced Order Modeling for Prediction and Control of Large-Scale Systems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalashnikova, Irina [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Computational Mathematics; Arunajatesan, Srinivasan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Aerosciences Dept.; Barone, Matthew Franklin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Aerosciences Dept.; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Uncertainty Quantification and Optimization Dept.; Fike, Jeffrey A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Component Science and Mechanics Dept.

    2014-05-01

    This report describes work performed from June 2012 through May 2014 as a part of a Sandia Early Career Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project led by the first author. The objective of the project is to investigate methods for building stable and efficient proper orthogonal decomposition (POD)/Galerkin reduced order models (ROMs): models derived from a sequence of high-fidelity simulations but having a much lower computational cost. Since they are, by construction, small and fast, ROMs can enable real-time simulations of complex systems for onthe- spot analysis, control and decision-making in the presence of uncertainty. Of particular interest to Sandia is the use of ROMs for the quantification of the compressible captive-carry environment, simulated for the design and qualification of nuclear weapons systems. It is an unfortunate reality that many ROM techniques are computationally intractable or lack an a priori stability guarantee for compressible flows. For this reason, this LDRD project focuses on the development of techniques for building provably stable projection-based ROMs. Model reduction approaches based on continuous as well as discrete projection are considered. In the first part of this report, an approach for building energy-stable Galerkin ROMs for linear hyperbolic or incompletely parabolic systems of partial differential equations (PDEs) using continuous projection is developed. The key idea is to apply a transformation induced by the Lyapunov function for the system, and to build the ROM in the transformed variables. It is shown that, for many PDE systems including the linearized compressible Euler and linearized compressible Navier-Stokes equations, the desired transformation is induced by a special inner product, termed the “symmetry inner product”. Attention is then turned to nonlinear conservation laws. A new transformation and corresponding energy-based inner product for the full nonlinear compressible Navier

  3. Quantifying heavy metals sequestration by sulfate-reducing bacteria in an acid mine drainage-contaminated wetland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W Moreau

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Bioremediation strategies that depend on bacterial sulfate reduction for heavy metals remediation harness the reactivity of these metals with biogenic aqueous sulfide. Quantitative knowledge of the degree to which specific toxic metals are partitioned into various sulfide, oxide, or other phases is important for predicting the long-term mobility of these metals under environmental conditions. Here we report the quantitative partitioning into sedimentary biogenic sulfides of a suite of metals and metalloids associated with acid mine drainage contamination of a natural estuarine wetland for over a century.

  4. Quantifying heavy metals sequestration by sulfate-reducing bacteria in an Acid mine drainage-contaminated natural wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, John W; Fournelle, John H; Banfield, Jillian F

    2013-01-01

    Bioremediation strategies that depend on bacterial sulfate reduction for heavy metals remediation harness the reactivity of these metals with biogenic aqueous sulfide. Quantitative knowledge of the degree to which specific toxic metals are partitioned into various sulfide, oxide, or other phases is important for predicting the long-term mobility of these metals under environmental conditions. Here we report the quantitative partitioning into sedimentary biogenic sulfides of a suite of metals and metalloids associated with acid mine drainage contamination of a natural estuarine wetland for over a century.

  5. Assessment of released heavy metals from electrical and electronic equipment (EEE) existing in shipwrecks through laboratory-scale simulation reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahladakis, John N; Stylianos, Michailakis; Gidarakos, Evangelos

    2013-04-15

    In a passenger ship, the existence of EEE is obvious. In time, under shipwreck's conditions, all these materials will undergo an accelerated severe corrosion, due to salt water, releasing, consequently, heavy metals and other hazardous substances in the aquatic environment. In this study, a laboratory-scale reactor was manufactured in order to simulate the conditions under which the "Sea Diamond" shipwreck lies (14 bars of pressure and 16°C of temperature) and remotely observe and assess any heavy metal release that would occur, from part of the EEE present in the ship, into the sea. Ten metals were examined and the results showed that zinc, mercury and copper were abundant in the water samples taken from the reactor and in significantly higher concentrations compared to the US EPA CMC (criterion maximum concentration) criterion. Moreover, nickel and lead were found in concentrations higher than the CCC (criterion constant concentration) criterion set by the US EPA for clean seawater. The rest of the elements were measured in concentrations within the permissible limits. It is therefore of environmental benefit to salvage the wreck and recycle all the WEEE found in it.

  6. Ceramic barrier layers for flexible thin film solar cells on metallic substrates: a laboratory scale study for process optimization and barrier layer properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Sanchez, Jose-Maria; Guilera, Nuria; Francesch, Laia; Alba, Maria D; Lopez, Laura; Sanchez, Emilio

    2014-11-12

    Flexible thin film solar cells are an alternative to both utility-scale and building integrated photovoltaic installations. The fabrication of these devices over electrically conducting low-cost foils requires the deposition of dielectric barrier layers to flatten the substrate surface, provide electrical isolation between the substrate and the device, and avoid the diffusion of metal impurities during the relatively high temperatures required to deposit the rest of the solar cell device layers. The typical roughness of low-cost stainless-steel foils is in the hundred-nanometer range, which is comparable or larger than the thin film layers comprising the device and this may result in electrical shunts that decrease solar cell performance. This manuscript assesses the properties of different single-layer and bilayer structures containing ceramics inks formulations based on Al2O3, AlN, or Si3N4 nanoparticles and deposited over stainless-steel foils using a rotogravure printing process. The best control of the substrate roughness was achieved for bilayers of Al2O3 or AlN with mixed particle size, which reduced the roughness and prevented the diffusion of metals impurities but AlN bilayers exhibited as well the best electrical insulation properties.

  7. Comprehensive study and design of scaled metal/high-k/Ge gate stacks with ultrathin aluminum oxide interlayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asahara, Ryohei; Hideshima, Iori; Oka, Hiroshi; Minoura, Yuya; Hosoi, Takuji, E-mail: hosoi@mls.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp; Shimura, Takayoshi; Watanabe, Heiji [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ogawa, Shingo [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Toray Research Center Inc., 3-3-7 Sonoyama, Otsu, Shiga 520-8567 (Japan); Yoshigoe, Akitaka; Teraoka, Yuden [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)

    2015-06-08

    Advanced metal/high-k/Ge gate stacks with a sub-nm equivalent oxide thickness (EOT) and improved interface properties were demonstrated by controlling interface reactions using ultrathin aluminum oxide (AlO{sub x}) interlayers. A step-by-step in situ procedure by deposition of AlO{sub x} and hafnium oxide (HfO{sub x}) layers on Ge and subsequent plasma oxidation was conducted to fabricate Pt/HfO{sub 2}/AlO{sub x}/GeO{sub x}/Ge stacked structures. Comprehensive study by means of physical and electrical characterizations revealed distinct impacts of AlO{sub x} interlayers, plasma oxidation, and metal electrodes serving as capping layers on EOT scaling, improved interface quality, and thermal stability of the stacks. Aggressive EOT scaling down to 0.56 nm and very low interface state density of 2.4 × 10{sup 11 }cm{sup −2}eV{sup −1} with a sub-nm EOT and sufficient thermal stability were achieved by systematic process optimization.

  8. FFT-PT: Reducing the 2-loop large-scale structure power spectrum to one-dimensional, radial integrals

    CERN Document Server

    Schmittfull, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    Modeling the large-scale structure of the universe on nonlinear scales has the potential to substantially increase the science return of upcoming surveys by increasing the number of modes available for model comparisons. One way to achieve this is to model nonlinear scales perturbatively. Unfortunately, this involves high-dimensional loop integrals that are cumbersome to evaluate. Trying to simplify this, we show how all 2-loop (next-to-next-to-leading order) corrections to the density power spectrum can be reduced to one-dimensional, radial integrals. Each of those can be evaluated with a one-dimensional Fast Fourier Transform. This provides a way to evaluate the 2-loop power spectrum using only one-dimensional Fast Fourier Transforms, which is significantly faster than the five-dimensional Monte-Carlo integrals that are needed otherwise. The general idea of this FFT-PT method is to change between Fourier and position space to avoid convolutions, integrate over orientations, and evaluate the remaining radial...

  9. Deriving the Characteristic Scale for Effectively Monitoring Heavy Metal Stress in Rice by Assimilation of GF-1 Data with the WOFOST Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhi; Liu, Xiangnan; Jin, Ming; Ding, Chao; Jiang, Jiale; Wu, Ling

    2016-03-07

    Accurate monitoring of heavy metal stress in crops is of great importance to assure agricultural productivity and food security, and remote sensing is an effective tool to address this problem. However, given that Earth observation instruments provide data at multiple scales, the choice of scale for use in such monitoring is challenging. This study focused on identifying the characteristic scale for effectively monitoring heavy metal stress in rice using the dry weight of roots (WRT) as the representative characteristic, which was obtained by assimilation of GF-1 data with the World Food Studies (WOFOST) model. We explored and quantified the effect of the important state variable LAI (leaf area index) at various spatial scales on the simulated rice WRT to find the critical scale for heavy metal stress monitoring using the statistical characteristics. Furthermore, a ratio analysis based on the varied heavy metal stress levels was conducted to identify the characteristic scale. Results indicated that the critical threshold for investigating the rice WRT in monitoring studies of heavy metal stress was larger than 64 m but smaller than 256 m. This finding represents a useful guideline for choosing the most appropriate imagery.

  10. The large-scale structure of the halo of the Andromeda galaxy. I. Global stellar density, morphology and metallicity properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Martin, Nicolas F. [Observatoire astronomique de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, UMR 7550, 11 rue de lUniversité, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Lewis, Geraint F. [Institute of Astronomy, School of Physics A28, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); McConnachie, Alan W. [NRC Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC, V9E 2E7 (Canada); Irwin, Michael J. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Bernard, Edouard J.; Peñarrubia, Jorge [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Babul, Arif; Navarro, Julio [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, 3800 Finnerty Road, Victoria, British Columbia V8P 5C2 (Canada); Chapman, Scott C. [Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, 6310 Coburg Road, Halifax NS B3H 4R2 (Canada); Collins, Michelle [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Fardal, Mark [University of Massachusetts, Department of Astronomy, LGRT 619-E, 710 North Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA 01003-9305 (United States); Mackey, A. D. [RSAA, The Australian National University, Mount Stromlo Observatory, Cotter Road, Weston Creek ACT 2611 (Australia); Rich, R. Michael [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, PAB, 430 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Tanvir, Nial [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Widrow, Lawrence, E-mail: rodrigo.ibata@astro.unistra.fr [Department of Physics, Engineering Physics, and Astronomy Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6 (Canada)

    2014-01-10

    We present an analysis of the large-scale structure of the halo of the Andromeda galaxy, based on the Pan-Andromeda Archeological Survey (PAndAS), currently the most complete map of resolved stellar populations in any galactic halo. Despite the presence of copious substructures, the global halo populations follow closely power-law profiles that become steeper with increasing metallicity. We divide the sample into stream-like populations and a smooth halo component (defined as the population that cannot be resolved into spatially distinct substructures with PAndAS). Fitting a three-dimensional halo model reveals that the most metal-poor populations ([Fe/H]<−1.7) are distributed approximately spherically (slightly prolate with ellipticity c/a = 1.09 ± 0.03), with only a relatively small fraction residing in discernible stream-like structures (f {sub stream} = 42%). The sphericity of the ancient smooth component strongly hints that the dark matter halo is also approximately spherical. More metal-rich populations contain higher fractions of stars in streams, with f {sub stream} becoming as high as 86% for [Fe/H]>−0.6. The space density of the smooth metal-poor component has a global power-law slope of γ = –3.08 ± 0.07, and a non-parametric fit shows that the slope remains nearly constant from 30 kpc to ∼300 kpc. The total stellar mass in the halo at distances beyond 2° is ∼1.1 × 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉}, while that of the smooth component is ∼3 × 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉}. Extrapolating into the inner galaxy, the total stellar mass of the smooth halo is plausibly ∼8 × 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉}. We detect a substantial metallicity gradient, which declines from ([Fe/H]) = –0.7 at R = 30 kpc to ([Fe/H]) = –1.5 at R = 150 kpc for the full sample, with the smooth halo being ∼0.2 dex more metal poor than the full sample at each radius. While qualitatively in line with expectations from cosmological simulations, these observations are of great importance as

  11. Preparation of Nano-Scale Biopolymer Extracted from Coconut Residue and Its Performance as Drag Reducing Agent (DRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Muhammad Luqman Bin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Drag or frictional force is defined as force that acts opposite to the object’s relative motion through a fluid which then will cause frictional pressure loss in the pipeline. Drag Reducing Agent (DRA is used to solve this issue and most of the DRAs are synthetic polymers but has some environmental issues. Therefore for this study, biopolymer known as Coconut Residue (CR is selected as the candidate to replace synthetic polymers DRA. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of Nano-scale biopolymer DRA on the application of water injection system. Carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC is extracted by synthesizing the cellulose extracted from CR under the alkali-catalyzed reaction using monochloroacetic acid. The synthesize process is held in controlled condition whereby the concentration of NaOH is kept at 60%wt, 60 °C temperature and the reaction time is 4 hours. For every 25 g of dried CR used, the mass of synthesized CMC yield is at an average of 23.8 g. The synthesized CMC is then grinded in controlled parameters using the ball milling machine to get the Nano-scale size. The particle size obtained from this is 43.32 Nm which is in range of Nano size. This study proved that Nano-size CMC has higher percentage of drag reduction (%DR and flow increase (%FI if compared to normal-size CMC when tested in high and low flow rate; 44% to 48% increase in %DR and %FI when tested in low flow rate, and 16% to 18% increase in %DR and %FI when tested in high flow rate. The success of this research shows that Nano-scale DRA can be considered to be used to have better performance in reducing drag.

  12. Full Scale Tests on a Thin Metal Propeller at Various Tip Speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weick, Fred E

    1929-01-01

    This report describes an investigation made in order to determine the effect of tip speed on the characteristics of a thin-bladed metal propeller. The propeller was mounted on a VE-7 airplane with a 180-HP E-2 engine, and tested in the 20-foot propeller research tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. It was found that the effect of tip speed on the propulsive efficiency was negligible within the range of the tests, which was from 600 to 1,000 feet per second (about 0.5 to 0.9 the velocity of sound in air). (author)

  13. Atomic-Scale Mechanisms of the Glass-Forming Ability in Metallic Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, L.; Guo, G. Q.; Chen, L. Y.; Huang, C. L.; Ge, T.; Chen, D.; Liaw, P. K.; Saksl, K.; Ren, Y.; Zeng, Q. S.; LaQua, B.; Chen, F. G.; Jiang, J. Z.

    2012-09-01

    The issue, composition dependence of glass-forming ability (GFA) in metallic glasses (MG), has been investigated by systematic experimental measurements coupled with theoretical calculations in Cu-Zr and Ni-Nb alloy systems. It is found that the atomic-level packing efficiency strongly relates to their GFA. The best GFA is located at the largest difference in the packing efficiency of the solute-centered clusters between the glassy and crystal alloys in both MG systems. This work provides an understanding of GFA from atomic level and will shed light on the development of new MGs with larger critical sizes.

  14. Analysis of fluid lubrication mechanisms in metal forming at mesoscopic scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dubar, L.; Hubert, C.; Christiansen, Peter;

    2012-01-01

    The lubricant entrapment and escape phenomena in metal forming are studied experimentally as well as numerically. Experiments are carried out in strip reduction of aluminium sheet applying a transparent die to study the fluid flow between mesoscopic cavities. The numerical analysis involves two...... computation steps. The first one is a fully coupled fluid-structure Finite Element computation, where pockets in the surface are plastically deformed leading to the pressurization of the entrapped fluid. The second step computes the fluid exchange between cavities through the plateaus of asperity contacts...

  15. One-step synthesis of in situ reduced metal Bi decorated bismuth molybdate hollow microspheres with enhancing photocatalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Meng; Lu, Shiyu; Ma, Li; Gan, Mengyu

    2017-02-01

    In this feature work, in situ metal Bi are successfully modified bismuth molybdate hollow spheres using an effective one-pot solvthermal reduction without any temple. In order to deeply understand the influence of reduction conditions on the texture, surface state, and photocatalytic performance of the resulting samples, a series of products were synthesized by tuning the temperatures. The similar morphology, surface area of photocatalysis (BMO-160 and BMO-170) were synthesized, only with the different composition. The detailed characterization and analysis distinctly suggested that increasing solvothermal reduction temperature led to Bi3+ was in situ reduced to elementary substance Bi0 by ethylene glycol gradually and dispersed very uniform in bismuth molybdate. Benefiting from the enhanced charge separation, transfer, and donor density resulting from the formation of Bi decorated bismuth molybdate where Bi as cocatalyst, the photocatalytic performance of the reductive Bi/Bi2-xMoOy hollow spheres (BMO-170) is higher than that of the untreated Bi2-xMoOy hollow spheres (BMO-160) for Rh6G degradation under visible light irradiation. Additionally, the reductive BMO-170 has a superior stability after five cycles.

  16. Final Report Construction of Whole Genome Microarrays, and Expression Analysis of Desulfovibrio vulgaris cells in Metal-Reducing Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.W. Fields; J.D. Wall; J. Keasling; J. Zhou

    2008-05-15

    We continue to utilize the oligonucleotide microarrays that were constructed through funding with this project to characterize growth responses of Desulfovibrio vulgaris relevant to metal-reducing conditions. To effectively immobilize heavy metals and radionuclides via sulfate-reduction, it is important to understand the cellular responses to adverse factors observed at contaminated subsurface environments (e.g., nutrients, pH, contaminants, growth requirements and products). One of the major goals of the project is to construct whole-genome microarrays for Desulfovibrio vulgaris. First, in order to experimentally establish the criteria for designing gene-specific oligonucleotide probes, an oligonucleotide array was constructed that contained perfect match (PM) and mismatch (MM) probes (50mers and 70mers) based upon 4 genes. The effects of probe-target identity, continuous stretch, mismatch position, and hybridization free energy on specificity were examined. Little hybridization was observed at a probe-target identity of <85% for both 50mer and 70mer probes. 33 to 48% of the PM signal intensities were detected at a probe-target identity of 94% for 50mer oligonucleotides, and 43 to 55% for 70mer probes at a probe-target identity of 96%. When the effects of sequence identity and continuous stretch were considered independently, a stretch probe (>15 bases) contributed an additional 9% of the PM signal intensity compared to a non-stretch probe (< 15 bases) at the same identity level. Cross-hybridization increased as the length of continuous stretch increased. A 35-base stretch for 50mer probes or a 50-base stretch for 70mer probes had approximately 55% of the PM signal. Mismatches should be as close to the middle position of an oligonucleotide probe as possible to minimize cross-hybridization. Little cross-hybridization was observed for probes with a minimal binding free energy greater than -30 kcal/mol for 50mer probes or -40 kcal/mol for 70mer probes. Based on the

  17. Allergen sanitation in the food industry: a systematic industrial scale approach to reduce hazelnut cross-contamination of cookies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röder, Martin; Baltruweit, Iris; Gruyters, Helwig; Ibach, Anja; Mücke, Ingo; Matissek, Reinhard; Vieths, Stefan; Holzhauser, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    Recently, we investigated the impact of shared equipment on cross-contamination of cookies at a pilot plant scale. Based on those findings, this study investigated the extent and subsequent sanitation of hazelnut cross-contamination (HNCC) of cookies at the industrial scale. Similarly, a product change from cookies with hazelnut ingredient to cookies without hazelnut was performed on standard equipment. HNCC in the hazelnut-free follow-up product was quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for each production device and the applied cleaning procedure. All experiments were repeated in duplicate. The highest HNCC was found in concordance with previous studies after mere mechanical scraping: more than 1,000 mg of hazelnut protein per kg was quantified in the follow-up product after processing by a cookie machine. Additional cleaning with hot water decreased the HNCC irrespective of the processing device to levels at or below 1 mg of hazelnut protein per kg. Furthermore, raw materials for cookie production were monitored over a period of 24 months for unwanted preloads of hazelnut and peanut: hazelnut was quantified in 16% of the investigated raw materials as being between 0.26 and 90 mg/kg. Further critical control points at the industrial scale, where cross-contamination might occur, were identified but did not display noteworthy sources of cross-contamination. In conclusion, the quantitative monitoring of the cleaning efficiency at the industrial scale confirmed the procedure of manual scraping plus wet cleaning as a qualified sanitation procedure to effectively reduce the hazelnut protein cross-contamination down to a level at which severe hazelnut-related allergic reactions are unlikely to occur.

  18. How could the family-scale photovoltaic module help the poor farmer out of poverty and reduce CO2 emission?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xu; Jin, Ran

    2016-04-01

    China, the world's most populous country, is facing great opportunities and challenges. On the one hand, China's increasing economy is raising hundreds of millions of people out of poverty. On the other hand, there are still 100 million of whose daily income is less than 1 US dollar. In addition, China is the world's largest solar panel producer and also the largest emitter of greenhouse gases. Could we find a feasible way to use solar panels to help the poor and meanwhile reduce CO2 emissions? To do this, we reviewed the literature and investigated the related field sites and institutions in China. Results show that the extension of family-scale photovoltaic modules to countryside could help. The 3 kW-module is recommended for widely distribution because its technology is mature and the cost is relatively low (3500 US dollars). Besides their own use to improve their living standard, farmers can sell the excess electricity to the grid at the price of 0.17 UD/kWh. The farmer's annual income could be increased by 460-615 US dollars by selling electricity, and this is equivalent to half of their annual income in many rural regions. The photovoltaic module can be used for 25 years and the payback period is 7 years. In addition to its economic benefit, the photovoltaic module can reduce CO2 emissions by 0.93 kg/kWh. This is equivalent to annual reduction of 3000-4000 kg CO2 per family. Therefore, it is concluded that the family-scale photovoltaic module not only can help the farmers out of poverty but also can reduce CO2 emissions significantly. To promote its sustainable development, it is worthwhile to further investigations its business models as well as the effects of long-term support policies under different social and nature conditions.

  19. An Effective and Efficient MapReduce Algorithm for Computing BFS-Based Traversals of Large-Scale RDF Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Cuzzocrea

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, a leading instance of big data is represented by Web data that lead to the definition of so-called big Web data. Indeed, extending beyond to a large number of critical applications (e.g., Web advertisement, these data expose several characteristics that clearly adhere to the well-known 3V properties (i.e., volume, velocity, variety. Resource Description Framework (RDF is a significant formalism and language for the so-called Semantic Web, due to the fact that a very wide family of Web entities can be naturally modeled in a graph-shaped manner. In this context, RDF graphs play a first-class role, because they are widely used in the context of modern Web applications and systems, including the emerging context of social networks. When RDF graphs are defined on top of big (Web data, they lead to the so-called large-scale RDF graphs, which reasonably populate the next-generation Semantic Web. In order to process such kind of big data, MapReduce, an open source computational framework specifically tailored to big data processing, has emerged during the last years as the reference implementation for this critical setting. In line with this trend, in this paper, we present an approach for efficiently implementing traversals of large-scale RDF graphs over MapReduce that is based on the Breadth First Search (BFS strategy for visiting (RDF graphs to be decomposed and processed according to the MapReduce framework. We demonstrate how such implementation speeds-up the analysis of RDF graphs with respect to competitor approaches. Experimental results clearly support our contributions.

  20. Nitrogen deposition reduces plant diversity and alters ecosystem functioning: field-scale evidence from a nationwide survey of UK heathlands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgina E Southon

    Full Text Available Findings from nitrogen (N manipulation studies have provided strong evidence of the detrimental impacts of elevated N deposition on the structure and functioning of heathland ecosystems. Few studies, however, have sought to establish whether experimentally observed responses are also apparent under natural, field conditions. This paper presents the findings of a nationwide field-scale evaluation of British heathlands, across broad geographical, climatic and pollution gradients. Fifty two heathlands were selected across an N deposition gradient of 5.9 to 32.4 kg ha(-1 yr(-1. The diversity and abundance of higher and lower plants and a suite of biogeochemical measures were evaluated in relation to climate and N deposition indices. Plant species richness declined with increasing temperature and N deposition, and the abundance of nitrophilous species increased with increasing N. Relationships were broadly similar between upland and lowland sites, with the biggest reductions in species number associated with increasing N inputs at the low end of the deposition range. Both oxidised and reduced forms of N were associated with species declines, although reduced N appears to be a stronger driver of species loss at the functional group level. Plant and soil biochemical indices were related to temperature, rainfall and N deposition. Litter C:N ratios and enzyme (phenol-oxidase and phosphomonoesterase activities had the strongest relationships with site N inputs and appear to represent reliable field indicators of N deposition. This study provides strong, field-scale evidence of links between N deposition--in both oxidised and reduced forms--and widespread changes in the composition, diversity and functioning of British heathlands. The similarity of relationships between upland and lowland environments, across broad spatial and climatic gradients, highlights the ubiquity of relationships with N, and suggests that N deposition is contributing to biodiversity

  1. E-SCAPE: A scale facility for liquid-metal, pool-type reactor thermal hydraulic investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Tichelen, Katrien, E-mail: kvtichel@sckcen.be [SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Mirelli, Fabio, E-mail: fmirelli@sckcen.be [SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Greco, Matteo, E-mail: mgreco@sckcen.be [SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Viviani, Giorgia, E-mail: giorgiaviviani@gmail.com [University of Pisa, Lungarno Pacinotti 43, 56126 Pisa (Italy)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • The E-SCAPE facility is a thermal hydraulic scale model of the MYRRHA fast reactor. • The focus is on mixing and stratification in liquid-metal pool-type reactors. • Forced convection, natural convection and the transition are investigated. • Extensive instrumentation allows validation of computational models. • System thermal hydraulic and CFD models have been used for facility design. - Abstract: MYRRHA (Multi-purpose hYbrid Research Reactor for High-tech Applications) is a flexible fast-spectrum research reactor under design at SCK·CEN. MYRRHA is a pool-type reactor with lead bismuth eutectic (LBE) as primary coolant. The proper understanding of the thermal hydraulic phenomena occurring in the reactor pool is an important issue in the design and licensing of the MYRRHA system and liquid-metal cooled reactors by extension. Model experiments are necessary for understanding the physics, for validating experimental tools and to qualify the design for the licensing. The E-SCAPE (European SCAled Pool Experiment) facility at SCK·CEN is a thermal hydraulic 1/6-scale model of the MYRRHA reactor, with an electrical core simulator, cooled by LBE. It provides experimental feedback to the designers on the forced and natural circulation flow patterns. Moreover, it enables to validate the computational methods for their use with LBE. The paper will elaborate on the design of the E-SCAPE facility and its main parameters. Also the experimental matrix and the pre-test analysis using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and system thermal hydraulics codes will be described.

  2. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF NANO-SCALE PROCESSES OF INJECTION-BASED PROTECTION OF METALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlyuchko Anatoliy Ivanovich

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors have employed methods of molecular dynamics to complete their analysis of the physical phenomena that occur in the process of spattering of nanoparticles over the metal surface. The contact between moving nanoparticles and the surface contemplates several simultaneous physical processes: transformation of the kinetic energy of motion into the thermal energy, partial or complete melting and partial melting of nanoparticles in contact with the surface, rapid cooling of nanoparticles and the surface, and crystallization of the melted portion of nanoparticles and the surface. The intensity of these physical processes is substantially dependent on the sizes of nanoparticles, their initial temperature and velocity. Therefore, the final state of the metal surface strongly depends on the process parameters. Numerical methods of molecular dynamics were employed to identify the quantitative and qualitative characteristics of the process depending on the size, shape, chemical nature, velocity and temperature of nanoparticles. The authors have demonstrated that by changing the technological parameters of solenoid injection nanoparticles (by changing the composition of nanoparticles, their size, shape, temperature and initial velocity, nano-crystalline and amorphous states of the surface may be changed, and the surface strength may be improved.

  3. Solidification analysis of micro-scale metallic particles in the laser supersonic heating technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Lung; Lin, Jehnming

    2004-04-01

    In this paper, the authors analysed the solidification phenomenon in the laser supersonic heating technique used for producing metallic particles. A mathematical model was established to predict the velocity, temperature and solidification situation of metallic particles leaving a spray nozzle. The numerical analysis method was used to simulate the flow field structure of shock waves and to proceed with related experiment. In the experiment, a pulsed Nd-YAG laser was used as the heat source on a carbon steel target within the nozzle, and carbon steel particles were ejected by high pressure air. The solidification problem of carbon steel particles with radii of 1-50 µm in the compressible flow field was calculated and compared with experimental results. The result shows that the shock wave flow fields are generated at different entrance pressures (3-7 bar), and there is no significant difference in the radii of carbon steel particles produced by a fixed laser energy; however, in the flow field without the shock wave effect, the cooling effect is less evident in the solidification process.

  4. Direct testing of scale effects in metal forming friction and lubrication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Søe; Calaon, Matteo; Paldan, Nikolas Aulin

    2010-01-01

    work a new test equipment is developed for direct friction measurements in the range from macro to micro scale. Investigations confirm a significant friction increase when downscaling. Visual inspection of the work pieces show this to be explained by the amount of open and closed lubricant pockets....

  5. Scale-up of Metal Hexacyanoferrate Cathode Material for Sodium Ion Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzwiniel, Trevor L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Pupek, Krzysztof Z. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Krumdick, Gregory K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-10-04

    Sharp Laboratories of America (SLA) approached Argonne National Laboratory with a bench-scale process to produce material for a sodium-ion battery, referred to as Prussian Blue, and a request to produce 1 kg of material for their ARPA-E program. The target performance criteria was an average capacity of >150 mAh/g.

  6. Multi-Scale Computational Modeling of Two-Phased Metal Using GMC Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddam, Masoud Ghorbani; Achuthan, A.; Bednacyk, B. A.; Arnold, S. M.; Pineda, E. J.

    2014-01-01

    A multi-scale computational model for determining plastic behavior in two-phased CMSX-4 Ni-based superalloys is developed on a finite element analysis (FEA) framework employing crystal plasticity constitutive model that can capture the microstructural scale stress field. The generalized method of cells (GMC) micromechanics model is used for homogenizing the local field quantities. At first, GMC as stand-alone is validated by analyzing a repeating unit cell (RUC) as a two-phased sample with 72.9% volume fraction of gamma'-precipitate in the gamma-matrix phase and comparing the results with those predicted by finite element analysis (FEA) models incorporating the same crystal plasticity constitutive model. The global stress-strain behavior and the local field quantity distributions predicted by GMC demonstrated good agreement with FEA. High computational saving, at the expense of some accuracy in the components of local tensor field quantities, was obtained with GMC. Finally, the capability of the developed multi-scale model linking FEA and GMC to solve real life sized structures is demonstrated by analyzing an engine disc component and determining the microstructural scale details of the field quantities.

  7. Roughness controlled superhydrophobicity on single nanometer length scale with metal nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Brink, Gert H.; Foley, Nolan; Zwaan, Darin; Kooi, Bart J.; Palasantzas, Georgios

    2015-01-01

    Here we demonstrate high water pinning nanostructures and trapping of water droplets onto surfaces via control of roughness on a single nanometer length-scale generated by deposition of preformed gas phase distinct copper nanoparticles on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces. It was found that the c

  8. Roughness controlled superhydrophobicity on single nanometer length scale with metal nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Brink, Gert H.; Foley, Nolan; Zwaan, Darin; Kooi, Bart J.; Palasantzas, Georgios

    2015-01-01

    Here we demonstrate high water pinning nanostructures and trapping of water droplets onto surfaces via control of roughness on a single nanometer length-scale generated by deposition of preformed gas phase distinct copper nanoparticles on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces. It was found that the

  9. Factorial kriging and stepwise regression approach to identify environmental factors influencing spatial multi-scale variability of heavy metals in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Jianshu; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Zulu; Dai, Jierui

    2013-10-15

    The knowledge about spatial variations of heavy metals in soils and their relationships with environmental factors is important for human impact assessment and soil management. Surface soils from Rizhao city, Eastern China with rapid urbanization and industrialization were analyzed for six key heavy metals and characterized by parent material and land use using GIS-based data. Factorial kriging analysis and stepwise multiple regression were applied to examine the scale-dependent relationships among heavy metals and to identify environmental factors affecting spatial variability at each spatial scale. Linear model of coregionalization fitting showed that spatial multi-scale variation of heavy metals in soils consisted of nugget effect, an exponential structure with the range of 12 km (short-range scale), as well as a spherical structure with the range of 36 km (long-range scale). The short-range variation of Cd, Pb and Zn were controlled by land use, with higher values in urban areas as well as cultivated land in mountain area, and were related to human influence; while parent material dominated the long structure variations of these elements. Spatial variations of Cr and Ni were associated with natural geochemical sources at short- and long-range scales. At both two scales, Hg dominated by land use, corresponded well to spatial distributions of urban areas, and was attributed to anthropic emissions and atmosphere deposition.

  10. Development of a Model, Metal-reducing Microbial Community for a System Biology Level Assessment of Desulfovibrio vulgaris as part of a Community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias, Dwayne; Schadt, Christopher; Miller, Lance; Phelps, Tommy; Brown, S. D.; Arkin, Adam; Hazen, Terry; Drake, Megin; Yang, Z.K.; Podar, Mircea

    2010-05-17

    One of the largest experimental gaps is between the simplicity of pure cultures and the complexity of open environmental systems, particularly in metal-contaminated areas. These microbial communities form ecosystem foundations, drive biogeochemical processes, and are relevant for biotechnology and bioremediation. A model, metal-reducing microbial community was constructed as either syntrophic or competitive to study microbial cell to cell interactions, cell signaling and competition for resources. The microbial community was comprised of the metal-reducing Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough and Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA. Additionally, Methanococcus maripaludis S2 was added to study complete carbon reduction and maintain a low hydrogen partial pressure for syntrophism to occur. Further, considerable work has been published on D. vulgaris and the D. vulgaris/ Mc. maripaludis co-culture both with and without stress. We are extending this work by conducting the same stress conditions on the model community. Additionally, this comprehensive investigation includes physiological and metabolic analyses as well as specially designed mRNA microarrays with the genes for all three organisms on one slide so as to follow gene expression changes in the various cultivation conditions as well as being comparable to the co- and individual cultures. Further, state-of -the-art comprehensive AMT tag proteomics allows for these comparisons at the protein level for a systems biology assessment of a model, metal-reducing microbial community. Preliminary data revealed that lactate oxidation by D. vulgaris was sufficient to support both G. sulfurreducens and M. maripaludis via the excretion of H2 and acetate. Fumarate was utilized by G. sulfurreducens and reduced to succinate since neither of the other two organisms can reduce fumarate. Methane was quantified, suggesting acetate and H2 concentrations were sufficient for M. maripaludis. Steady state community cultivation will allow for

  11. Investigation on the special Smith-Purcell radiation from a nano-scale rectangular metallic grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weiwei; Liu, Weihao; Jia, Qika

    2016-03-01

    The special Smith-Purcell radiation (S-SPR), which is from the radiating eigen modes of a grating, has remarkable higher intensity than the ordinary Smith-Purcell radiation. Yet in previous studies, the gratings were treated as perfect conductor without considering the surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) which are of significance for the nano-scale gratings especially in the optical region. In present paper, the rigorous theoretical investigations on the S-SPR from a nano-grating with SPPs taken into consideration are carried out. The dispersion relations and radiation characteristics are obtained, and the results are verified by simulations. According to the analyses, the tunable light radiation can be achieved by the S-SPR from a nano-grating, which offers a new prospect for developing the nano-scale light sources.

  12. Tension assisted metal transfer of graphene for Schottky diodes onto wafer scale substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jooho; Lee, Su Chan; Kim, Yongsung; Heo, Jinseong; Lee, Kiyoung; Lee, Dongwook; Kim, Jaekwan; Lee, Sunghee; Lee, Chang Seung; Nam, Min Sik; Jun, Seong Chan

    2016-02-19

    We developed an effective graphene transfer method for graphene/silicon Schottky diodes on a wafer as large as 6 inches. Graphene grown on a large scale substrate was passivated and sealed with a gold layer, protecting graphene from any possible contaminant and keeping good electrical contact. The Au/graphene was transferred by the tension-assisted transfer process without polymer residues. The gold film itself was used directly as the electrodes of a Schottky diode. We demonstrated wafer-scale integration of graphene/silicon Schottky diode using the proposed transfer process. The transmission electron microscopy analysis and relatively low ideality factor of the diodes indicated fewer defects on the interface than those obtained using the conventional poly(methyl methacrylate)-assisted transfer method. We further demonstrated gas sensors as an application of graphene Schottky diodes.

  13. Tension assisted metal transfer of graphene for Schottky diodes onto wafer scale substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jooho; Lee, Su Chan; Kim, Yongsung; Heo, Jinseong; Lee, Kiyoung; Lee, Dongwook; Kim, Jaekwan; Lee, Sunghee; Lee, Chang Seung; Nam, Min Sik; Jun, Seong Chan

    2016-02-01

    We developed an effective graphene transfer method for graphene/silicon Schottky diodes on a wafer as large as 6 inches. Graphene grown on a large scale substrate was passivated and sealed with a gold layer, protecting graphene from any possible contaminant and keeping good electrical contact. The Au/graphene was transferred by the tension-assisted transfer process without polymer residues. The gold film itself was used directly as the electrodes of a Schottky diode. We demonstrated wafer-scale integration of graphene/silicon Schottky diode using the proposed transfer process. The transmission electron microscopy analysis and relatively low ideality factor of the diodes indicated fewer defects on the interface than those obtained using the conventional poly(methyl methacrylate)-assisted transfer method. We further demonstrated gas sensors as an application of graphene Schottky diodes.

  14. Resistive switching memories based on metal oxides: mechanisms, reliability and scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ielmini, Daniele

    2016-06-01

    With the explosive growth of digital data in the era of the Internet of Things (IoT), fast and scalable memory technologies are being researched for data storage and data-driven computation. Among the emerging memories, resistive switching memory (RRAM) raises strong interest due to its high speed, high density as a result of its simple two-terminal structure, and low cost of fabrication. The scaling projection of RRAM, however, requires a detailed understanding of switching mechanisms and there are potential reliability concerns regarding small device sizes. This work provides an overview of the current understanding of bipolar-switching RRAM operation, reliability and scaling. After reviewing the phenomenological and microscopic descriptions of the switching processes, the stability of the low- and high-resistance states will be discussed in terms of conductance fluctuations and evolution in 1D filaments containing only a few atoms. The scaling potential of RRAM will finally be addressed by reviewing the recent breakthroughs in multilevel operation and 3D architecture, making RRAM a strong competitor among future high-density memory solutions.

  15. Synthesis of Supported Ultrafine Non-noble Subnanometer-Scale Metal Particles Derived from Metal-Organic Frameworks as Highly Efficient Heterogeneous Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Xinchen; Liu, Huizhen; Hou, Minqiang; Sun, Xiaofu; Han, Hongling; Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Zhaofu; Han, Buxing

    2016-01-18

    The properties of supported non-noble metal particles with a size of less than 1 nm are unknown because their synthesis is a challenge. A strategy has now been created to immobilize ultrafine non-noble metal particles on supports using metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) as metal precursors. Ni/SiO2 and Co/SiO2 catalysts were synthesized with an average metal particle size of 0.9 nm. The metal nanoparticles were immobilized uniformly on the support with a metal loading of about 20 wt%. Interestingly, the ultrafine non-noble metal particles exhibited very high activity for liquid-phase hydrogenation of benzene to cyclohexane even at 80 °C, while Ni/SiO2 with larger Ni particles fabricated by a conventional method was not active under the same conditions.

  16. Red mud (RM)-Induced enhancement of iron plaque formation reduces arsenic and metal accumulation in two wetland plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J X; Guo, Q J; Yang, J; Zhou, X Y; Ren, H Y; Zhang, H Z; Xu, R X; Wang, X D; Peters, M; Zhu, G X; Wei, R F; Tian, L Y; Han, X K

    2016-01-01

    Human activities have resulted in arsenic (As) and heavy metals accumulation in paddy soils in China. Phytoremediation has been suggested as an effective and low-cost method to clean up contaminated soils. A combined soil-sand pot experiment was conducted to investigate the influence of red mud (RM) supply on iron plaque formation and As and heavy metal accumulation in two wetland plant species (Cyperus alternifolius Rottb., Echinodorus amazonicus Rataj), using As and heavy metals polluted paddy soil combined with three rates of RM application (0, 2%, 5%). The results showed that RM supply significantly decreased As and heavy metals accumulation in shoots of the two plants due to the decrease of As and heavy metal availability and the enhancement of the formation of iron plaque on the root surface and in the rhizosphere. Both wetland plants supplied with RM tended to have more Fe plaque, higher As and heavy metals on roots and in their rhizospheres, and were more tolerant of As and heavy metal toxicity. The results suggest that RM-induced enhancement of the formation of iron plaque on the root surface and in the rhizosphere of wetland plants may be significant for remediation of soils contaminated with As and heavy metals.

  17. Full-scale tests of reflective noise-reducing devices for balconies on high-rise buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizuka, Takashi; Fujiwara, Kyoji

    2013-08-01

    In the present report, the noise-shielding efficiency of balconies with ceiling-mounted reflectors on the façades of high-rise buildings is examined through full-scale field measurements. The reflectors are designed to reflect direct and diffracted waves incident on the balcony ceiling outside the balcony. Field measurements are conducted to investigate the performance of the reflectors on intermediate floors of a high-rise dwelling adjacent to a railway. The reflectors reduce railway noise by approximately 5 dB, in A-weighted sound pressure level, compared to an ordinary balcony. The noise-shielding efficiency of a balcony equipped with reflectors is greater than that of an absorbing balcony.

  18. Laser Coupling to Reduced-Scale Targets at the Early Light Program of the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinkel, D E; Schneider, M B; Baldis, H A; Bower, D; Campbell, K M; Celeste, J R; Compton, S; Costa, R; Dewald, E L; Dixit, S; Eckart, M J; Eder, D C; Edwards, M J; Ellis, A; Emig, J; Froula, D H; Glenzer, S H; Hargrove, D; Haynam, C A; Heeter, R F; Holder, J P; Holtmeier, G; James, L; Jancaitis, K S; Kalantar, D H; Kauffman, R L; Kimbrough, J; Kirkwood, R K; Koniges, A E; Kamperschroer, J; Landen, O L; Landon, M; Langdon, A B; Lee, F D; MacGowan, B J; MacKinnon, A J; Manes, K R; May, M J; McDonald, J W; Munro, D H; Murray, J R; Niemann, C; Pellinen, D; Rekow, V; Ruppe, J A; Schein, J; Shepherd, R; Singh, M S; Springer, P T; Still, C H; Suter, L J; Turner, R E; Wallace, R J; Warrick, A; Watts, P; Weber, F; Williams, E A; Young, B K; Young, P E

    2004-11-18

    A platform for analysis of material properties under extreme conditions, where a sample is bathed in radiation with a high temperature, is under development. This hot environment is produced with a laser by depositing maximum energy into a small, high-Z can. Such targets were recently included in an experimental campaign using the first four of the 192 beams of the National Ignition Facility, under construction at the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. These targets demonstrate good laser coupling, reaching a radiation temperature of 340 eV. In addition, there is a unique wavelength dependence of the Raman backscattered light that is consistent with Brillouin backscatter of Raman forward scatter [A. B. Langdon and D. E. Hinkel, Physical Review Letters 89, 015003 (2002)]. Finally, novel diagnostic capabilities indicate that 20% of the direct backscatter from these reduced-scale targets is in the polarization orthogonal to that of the incident light.

  19. Sediment filtration can reduce the N load of the waste water discharge - a full-scale lake experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalto, Sanni L.; Saarenheimo, Jatta; Karvinen, Anu; Rissanen, Antti J.; Ropponen, Janne; Juntunen, Janne; Tiirola, Marja

    2016-04-01

    European commission has obliged Baltic states to reduce nitrate load, which requires high investments on the nitrate removal processes and may increase emissions of greenhouse gases, e.g. N2O, in the waste water treatment plants. We used ecosystem-scale experimental approach to test a novel sediment filtration method for economical waste water N removal in Lake Keurusselkä, Finland between 2014 and 2015. By spatially optimizing the waste water discharge, the contact area and time of nitrified waste water with the reducing microbes of the sediment was increased. This was expected to enhance microbial-driven N transformation and to alter microbial community composition. We utilized 15N isotope pairing technique to follow changes in the actual and potential denitrification rates, nitrous oxide formation and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) in the lake sediments receiving nitrate-rich waste water input and in the control site. In addition, we investigated the connections between observed process rates and microbial community composition and functioning by using next generation sequencing and quantitative PCR. Furthermore, we estimated the effect of sediment filtration method on waste water contact time with sediment using the 3D hydrodynamic model. We sampled one year before the full-scale experiment and observed strong seasonal patterns in the process rates, which reflects the seasonal variation in the temperature-related mixing patterns of the waste water within the lake. During the experiment, we found that spatial optimization enhanced both actual and potential denitrification rates of the sediment. Furthermore, it did not significantly promote N2O emissions, or N retention through DNRA. Overall, our results indicate that sediment filtration can be utilized as a supplemental or even alternative method for the waste water N removal.

  20. Speciation and fate of trace metals in estuarine sediments under reduced and oxidized conditions, Seaplane Lagoon, Alameda Naval Air Station (USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esser Brad

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available We have identified important chemical reactions that control the fate of metal-contaminated estuarine sediments if they are left undisturbed (in situ or if they are dredged. We combined information on the molecular bonding of metals in solids from X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS with thermodynamic and kinetic driving forces obtained from dissolved metal concentrations to deduce the dominant reactions under reduced and oxidized conditions. We evaluated the in situ geochemistry of metals (cadmium, chromium, iron, lead, manganese and zinc as a function of sediment depth (to 100 cm from a 60 year record of contamination at the Alameda Naval Air Station, California. Results from XAS and thermodynamic modeling of porewaters show that cadmium and most of the zinc form stable sulfide phases, and that lead and chromium are associated with stable carbonate, phosphate, phyllosilicate, or oxide minerals. Therefore, there is minimal risk associated with the release of these trace metals from the deeper sediments contaminated prior to the Clean Water Act (1975 as long as reducing conditions are maintained. Increased concentrations of dissolved metals with depth were indicative of the formation of metal HS- complexes. The sediments also contain zinc, chromium, and manganese associated with detrital iron-rich phyllosilicates and/or oxides. These phases are recalcitrant at near-neutral pH and do not undergo reductive dissolution within the 60 year depositional history of sediments at this site. The fate of these metals during dredging was evaluated by comparing in situ geochemistry with that of sediments oxidized by seawater in laboratory experiments. Cadmium and zinc pose the greatest hazard from dredging because their sulfides were highly reactive in seawater. However, their dissolved concentrations under oxic conditions were limited eventually by sorption to or co-precipitation with an iron (oxyhydroxide. About 50% of the reacted CdS and 80% of the reacted

  1. Wafer-scale high-resolution patterning of reduced graphene oxide films for detection of low concentration biomarkers in plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinsik; Chae, Myung-Sic; Lee, Sung Min; Jeong, Dahye; Lee, Byung Chul; Lee, Jeong Hoon; Kim, Youngsoo; Chang, Suk Tai; Hwang, Kyo Seon

    2016-08-01

    Given that reduced graphene oxide (rGO)-based biosensors allow disposable and repeatable biomarker detection at the point of care, we developed a wafer-scale rGO patterning method with mass productivity, uniformity, and high resolution by conventional micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) techniques. Various rGO patterns were demonstrated with dimensions ranging from 5 μm up to several hundred μm. Manufacture of these patterns was accomplished through the optimization of dry etching conditions. The axis-homogeneity and uniformity were also measured to verify the uniform patternability in 4-inch wafer with dry etching. Over 66.2% of uniform rGO patterns, which have deviation of resistance within range of ±10%, formed the entire wafer. We selected amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides in the plasma of APP/PS1 transgenic mice as a study model and measured the peptide level by resistance changes of highly uniform rGO biosensor arrays. Aβ is a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease and its plasma concentration is in the pg mL-1 range. The sensor detected the Aβ peptides with ultra-high sensitivity; the LOD was at levels as low as 100 fg mL-1. Our results provide biological evidences that this wafer-scale high-resolution patterning method can be used in rGO-based electrical diagnostic devices for detection of low-level protein biomarkers in biofluids.

  2. An Experimental Study on Burning Characteristics of n-Heptane/Ethanol Mixture Pool Fires in a Reduced Scaled Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yozgatligil, Ahmet; Shafee, Sina

    2016-11-01

    Fire accidents in recent decades have drawn attention to safety issues associated with the design, construction and maintenance of tunnels. A reduced scale tunnel model constructed based on Froude scaling technique is used in the current work. Mixtures of n-heptane and ethanol are burned with ethanol volumetric fraction up to 30 percent and the longitudinal ventilation velocity varying from 0.5 to 2.5 m/s. The burning rates of the pool fires are measured using a precision load cell. The heat release rates of the fires are calculated according to oxygen calorimetry method and the temperature distributions inside the tunnel are also measured. Results of the experiments show that the ventilation velocity variation has a significant effect on the pool fire burning rate, smoke temperature and the critical ventilation velocity. With increased oxygen depletion in case of increased ethanol content of blended pool fires, the quasi-steady heat release rate values tend to increase as well as the ceiling temperatures while the combustion duration decreases.

  3. Validation of the electrical design of the W7-X ICRF antenna on a reduced-scale mock-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumortier, Pierre, E-mail: pierre.dumortier@rma.ac.be; Křivská, Alena; Messiaen, André; Vervier, Michel; Louche, Fabrice; Ongena, Jozef

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • The electrical design of the W7X ICRF antenna is validated on a reduced-scale mock-up. • High dieletric constant materials are needed for the dummy load to mimic the plasma load. • Salted water and a mix of ferroelectric BaTiO{sub 3} and salted water are used as loads. • A comparison is made between experimental measurements and numerical simulations by 3 codes: Antiter II, CST MWS and Topica. • The best agreement is obtained with the BaTiO{sub 3} mix load for all phasings. • The dependence of the coupled power estimate on the dielectric load properties is given. - Abstract: A scaled mock-up (1/4) of the proposed W7-X ICRF antenna has been constructed and placed in front of dielectric dummy loads. It allows comparing measured and predicted coupling performances and hence validating the electrical design of the antenna. High dielectric constant materials are needed for the dummy load to mimic the plasma. Salted water and a mix of the ferroelectric BaTiO{sub 3} and salted water are used. The measurements are compared with the expectations of 3 codes: ANTITER II, MWS and TOPICA. The best agreement is obtained with the BaTiO{sub 3} load for all phasings.

  4. Extraction of Channel Length Independent Series Resistance for Deeply Scaled Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li-Juan; Ji, Xiao-Li; Chen, Yuan-Cong; Xia, Hao-Guang; Zhu, Chen-Xin; Guo, Qiang; Yan, Feng

    2014-09-01

    The recently developed four Rsd extraction methods from a single device, involving the constant-mobility method, the direct Id—Vgs method, the conductance method and the Y-function method, are evaluated on 32 nm n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (nMOSFETs). It is found that Rsd achieved from the constant-mobility method exhibits the channel length independent characteristics. The L-dependent Rsd extracted from the other three methods is proven to be associated with the gate-voltage-induced mobility degradation in the extraction procedures. Based on L-dependent behaviors of Rsd, a new method is proposed for accurate series resistance extraction on deeply scaled MOSFETs.

  5. Surface stress and large-scale self-organization at organic-metal interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollinger, Florian

    2009-01-22

    The role of elastic interactions, particularly for the self-organized formation of periodically faceted interfaces, was investigated in this thesis for archetype organic-metal interfaces. The cantilever bending technique was applied to study the change of surface stress upon formation of the interface between 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic-dianhydride (PTCDA) and Ag(111). The main focus of this work was on the investigation of the formation of the long-range ordered, self-organized faceted PTCDA/Ag(10 8 7) interface. Reciprocal space maps of this interface were recorded both by spot profile analysis low energy electron diffraction (SPA-LEED) and low energy electron microscopy (LEEM) in selected area LEED mode. Complementary to the reciprocal data, also microscopic real-space LEEM data were used to characterize the morphology of this interface. Six different facet faces ((111), (532), (743), (954), (13 9 5), and (542)) were observed for the preparation path of molecular adsorption on the substrate kept at 550 K. Facet-sensitive dark-field LEEM localized these facets to grow in homogeneous areas of microscopic extensions. The temperature-dependence of the interface formation was studied in a range between 418 K and 612 K in order to learn more about the kinetics of the process. Additional steeper facets of 27 inclination with respect to the (111) surface were observed in the low temperature regime. Furthermore, using facet-sensitive dark-field LEEM, spatial and size distributions of specific facets were studied for the different temperatures. Moreover, the facet dimensions were statistically analyzed. The total island size of the facets follows an exponential distribution, indicating a random growth mode in absence of any mutual facet interactions. While the length distribution of the facets also follows an exponential distribution, the width distribution is peaked, reflecting the high degree of lateral order. This anisotropy is temperature-dependent and occurs

  6. An Extreme Metallicity, Large-Scale Outflow from a Star-Forming Galaxy at z ~ 0.4

    CERN Document Server

    Muzahid, Sowgat; Churchil, Christopher W; Charlton, Jane C; Nielsen, Nikole M; Mathes, Nigel L; Trujillo-Gomez, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of a large-scale galactic outflow in the CGM of a massive (M_h ~ 10^12.5 Msun), star-forming (6.9 Msun/yr), sub-L* (0.5 L_B*) galaxy at z=0.39853 that exhibits a wealth of metal-line absorption in the spectra of the background quasar Q 0122-003 at an impact parameter of 163 kpc. The galaxy inclination angle (i=63 degree) and the azimuthal angle (Phi=73 degree) imply that the QSO sightline is passing through the projected minor-axis of the galaxy. The absorption system shows a multiphase, multicomponent structure with ultra-strong, wide velocity spread OVI (logN = 15.16\\pm0.04, V_{90} = 419 km/s) and NV (logN = 14.69\\pm0.07, V_{90} = 285 km/s) lines that are extremely rare in the literature. The highly ionized absorption components are well explained as arising in a low density (10^{-4.2} cm^{-3}), diffuse (10 kpc), cool (10^4 K) photoionized gas with a super-solar metallicity ([X/H] > 0.3). From the observed narrowness of the Lyb profile, the non-detection of SIV absorption, and...

  7. Comparative Assessment of Heavy Metals in Drinking Water Sources in Two Small-Scale Mining Communities in Northern Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel J. Cobbina

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The study assessed levels of heavy metals in drinking water sources in two small-scale mining communities (Nangodi and Tinga in northern Ghana. Seventy-two (72 water samples were collected from boreholes, hand dug wells, dug-out, and a stream in the two mining communities. The levels of mercury (Hg, arsenic (As, lead (Pb, zinc (Zn, and cadmium (Cd were determined using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS. Mean levels (mg/l of heavy metals in water samples from Nangodi and Tinga communities were 0.038 and 0.064 (Hg, 0.031 and 0.002 (As, 0.250 and 0.031 (Pb, 0.034 and 0.002 (Zn, and 0.534 and 0.023 (Cd, respectively, for each community. Generally, levels of Hg, As, Pb, Zn, and Cd in water from Nangodi exceeded the World Health Organisation (WHO stipulated limits of 0.010 for Hg, As, and Pb, 3.0 for Zn and 0.003 for Cd for drinking water, and levels of Hg, Pb, and Cd recorded in Tinga, exceeded the stipulated WHO limits. Ingestion of water, containing elevated levels of Hg, As, and Cd by residents in these mining communities may pose significant health risks. Continuous monitoring of the quality of drinking water sources in these two communities is recommended.

  8. Friction-reducing and antiwear behavior of metal halide-stabilized linear phosphazene derivatives as lubricants for a steel-on-steel contact

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU; Jiamei; LIU; Weimin; LIANG; Yongmin

    2005-01-01

    A series of novel metal halide-stabilized linear phosphazene derivatives were synthesized. The friction-reducing and antiwear abilities of the resulting products as the lubricants for a steel-on-steel contact were comparatively investigated on an Optimol SRV oscillating friction and wear tester. The morphology of the worn steel surface was observed on a scanning electron microscope, while the chemical states of some typical elements on the worn steel surface were examined by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It was found that both the side branch structures and central metals influenced the friction-reducing and antiwear behaviors of the synthetic derivatives as the lubricants, which was related to the different adsorption activities of the organic compounds composed of different organic ingredients and metallic ions on a nascent metal surface. All the synthetic lubricants except for the iron (III) derivative showed increased antiwear abilities with increasing metallic ionic radius. A protective layer originated from the tribochemical reaction together with the adsorbed boundary lubricating layer containing organic fluorine compounds, nitrogen oxide, and Fe3(PO4)2 plays an important role in improving the friction and wear behavior of the steel-on-steel system.

  9. Self-healing Li-Bi liquid metal battery for grid-scale energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ning, XH; Phadke, S; Chung, B; Yin, HY; Burke, P; Sadoway, DR

    2015-02-01

    In an assessment of the performance of a Li vertical bar LiCl-LiF vertical bar Bi liquid metal battery, increasing the current density from 200 to 1250 mA cm(-2) results in a less than 30% loss in specific discharge capacity at 550 degrees C. The charge and discharge voltage profiles exhibit two distinct regions: one corresponding to a Li-Bi liquid alloy and one corresponding to the two-phase mixture of Li-Bi liquid alloy and the intermetallic solid compound, Li3Bi. Full cell prototypes of 0.1 Ah nameplate capacity have been assembled and cycled at 3 C rate for over a 1000 cycles with only 0.004% capacity fade per cycle. This is tantamount to retention of over 85% of original capacity after 10 years of daily cycling. With minimal changes in design, cells of 44.8 Ah and 134 Ah capacity have been fabricated and cycled at C/3 rate. After a hundred cycles and over a month of testing, no capacity fade is observed. The coulombic efficiency of 99% and energy efficiency of 70% validate the ease of scalability of this battery chemistry. Post mortem cross sections of the cells in various states of charge demonstrate the total reversibility of the Li3Bi solid phase formed at high degrees of lithiation. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Testing Metallic Iron Filtration Systems for Decentralized Water Treatment at Pilot Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raoul Tepong-Tsindé

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available There are many factors to consider for the design of appropriate water treatment systems including: cost, the concentration and type of biological and/or chemical contamination, concentration limits at which contaminant(s are required to be removed, required flow rate, level of local expertise for on-going maintenance, and social acceptance. An ideal technology should be effective at producing clean, potable water; however it must also be low-cost, low-energy (ideally energy-free and require low-maintenance. The use of packed beds containing metallic iron (Fe0 filters has the potential to become a cheap widespread technology for both safe drinking water provision and wastewater treatment. Fe0 filters have been intensively investigated over the past two decades, however, sound design criteria are still lacking. This article presents an overview of the design of Fe0 filters for decentralized water treatment particularly in the developing world. A design for safe drinking water to a community of 100 people is also discussed as starting module. It is suggested that Fe0 filters have the potential for significant worldwide applicability, but particularly in the developing world. The appropriate design of Fe0 filters, however, is site-specific and dependent upon the availability of local expertise/materials.

  11. Atomic Scale Imaging of the Electronic Structure and Chemistry of Graphene and Its Precursors on Metal Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flynn, George W [Columbia University

    2015-02-16

    Executive Summary of Final Report for Award DE-FG02-88ER13937 Project Title: Atomic Scale Imaging of the Electronic Structure and Chemistry of Graphene and its Precursors on Metal Surfaces Applicant/Institution: Columbia University Principal Investigator: George W. Flynn Objectives: The objectives of this project were to reveal the mechanisms and reaction processes that solid carbon materials undergo when combining with gases such as oxygen, water vapor and hydrocarbons. This research was focused on fundamental chemical events taking place on single carbon sheets of graphene, a two-dimensional, polycyclic carbon material that possesses remarkable chemical and electronic properties. Ultimately, this work is related to the role of these materials in mediating the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH’s), their reactions at interfaces, and the growth of soot particles. Our intent has been to contribute to a fundamental understanding of carbon chemistry and the mechanisms that control the formation of PAH’s, which eventually lead to the growth of undesirable particulates. We expect increased understanding of these basic chemical mechanisms to spur development of techniques for more efficient combustion of fossil fuels and to lead to a concomitant reduction in the production of undesirable solid carbon material. Project Description: Our work treated specifically the surface chemistry aspects of carbon reactions by using proximal probe (atomic scale imaging) techniques to study model systems of graphene that have many features in common with soot forming reactions of importance in combustion flames. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) is the main probe technique that we used to study the interfacial structure and chemistry of graphene, mainly because of its ability to elucidate surface structure and dynamics with molecular or even atomic resolution. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS), which measures the local density of quantum states over a single

  12. Heavy metal distribution between contaminated soil and Paulownia tomentosa, in a pilot-scale assisted phytoremediation study: influence of different complexing agents.

    OpenAIRE

    S. Doumett; L.Lamperi; L.Checchini; Azzarello, E.; Mugnai, S.; Mancuso, S.; G.Petruzzelli; M. Del Bubba

    2008-01-01

    he distribution of Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn between a contaminated soil and the tree species Paulownia tomentosa was investigated in a pilot-scale assisted phytoremediation study. The influence of the addition of EDTA, tartrate and glutamate at 1, 5 and 10mM concentrations on metal accumulation by the plant and on metal mobilization in soil was evaluated. Root/shoot metal concentration ratios were in the range of 3-5 for Zn, 7-17 for Cu, 9-18 for Cd and 11-39 for Pb, depending on the type and concen...

  13. Appraising options to reduce shallow groundwater tables and enhance flow conditions over regional scales in an irrigated alluvial aquifer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morway, Eric D.; Gates, Timothy K.; Niswonger, Richard G.

    2013-01-01

    Some of the world’s key agricultural production systems face big challenges to both water quantity and quality due to shallow groundwater that results from long-term intensive irrigation, namely waterlogging and salinity, water losses, and environmental problems. This paper focuses on water quantity issues, presenting finite-difference groundwater models developed to describe shallow water table levels, non-beneficial groundwater consumptive use, and return flows to streams across two regions within an irrigated alluvial river valley in southeastern Colorado, USA. The models are calibrated and applied to simulate current baseline conditions in the alluvial aquifer system and to examine actions for potentially improving these conditions. The models provide a detailed description of regional-scale subsurface unsaturated and saturated flow processes, thereby enabling detailed spatiotemporal description of groundwater levels, recharge to infiltration ratios, partitioning of ET originating from the unsaturated and saturated zones, and groundwater flows, among other variables. Hybrid automated and manual calibration of the models is achieved using extensive observations of groundwater hydraulic head, groundwater return flow to streams, aquifer stratigraphy, canal seepage, total evapotranspiration, the portion of evapotranspiration supplied by upflux from the shallow water table, and irrigation flows. Baseline results from the two regional-scale models are compared to model predictions under variations of four alternative management schemes: (1) reduced seepage from earthen canals, (2) reduced irrigation applications, (3) rotational lease fallowing (irrigation water leased to municipalities, resulting in temporary dry-up of fields), and (4) combinations of these. The potential for increasing the average water table depth by up to 1.1 and 0.7 m in the two respective modeled regions, thereby reducing the threat of waterlogging and lowering non-beneficial consumptive use

  14. Metal-rich Scales in the Reykjanes Geothermal System, SW Iceland: Sulfide Minerals in a Seawater-dominated Hydrothermal Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardardottir, Vigdis

    Downhole sampling of unboiled liquid at 1350 and 1500 m depth in the seawater-dominated Reykjanes high-temperature geothermal system in Iceland shows that metal concentrations measured at surface are minimum values due to mineral precipitation in the wells; by analogy of similar tectonic setting, host rocks and fluid composition, the metal concentrations measured in many black smoker vents at the seafloor are also minima. Fluids in the Reykjanes geothermal system react with mid-ocean ridge basalt at temperatures as high as 346°C and contain Fe 9-140 ppm, Cu 14-17 ppm, Zn 5-27 ppm, Pb 120-290 ppb, 1-6 ppb Au, and 28-107 ppb Ag. Fluids discharged at surface from the same wells have orders of magnitude lower metal concentrations due to precipitation caused by boiling and vapor loss during depressurization. Upstream of the orifice plate at high pressure (40 bar, 252°C) the precipitates consist mainly of sphalerite and chalcopyrite with a trace of galena and bornite. At the orifice plate of old wells, the pressure decreased sharply to 11 bar (188°C), resulting in abundant deposition of amorphous silica together with minor sphalerite and traces of chalcopyrite. In new wells the pressure at the orifice plate decreases to 22 bar (220°C); this pressure decrease and concomitant boiling causes deposition of fine-grained bornite-digenite solid solution together with sphalerite and galena on the fluid flow control valve. In high-pressure wells (average wellhead pressure 45-35 bar) most metals (mainly as sphalerite) are deposited downstream of the orifice plate, with up to 950 ppm Au and 2.5 wt.% Ag. Bulk concentrations in the scales vary between 15-60 wt.% upstream and downstream of the orifice plate and diminish from there. Iron increases up well from 8 to ˜20 wt.% and decreases downstream of the orifice plate from 6 to 2 wt.% at the separation station; Cu downhole is ˜3 wt.% but increases to 25 wt.% on the fluid flow control valve and then decreases; Pb downhole 100s

  15. Spores of sulphite-reducing clostridia (SSRC) as surrogate for verification of the inactivation capacity of full-scale ozonation for Cryptosporidium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hijnen, W.A.M.; Veer, A.J. van der; Beveren, J. van; Medema, Gerriet Jan

    2002-01-01

    The inactivation of C. parvum and spores of C. perfringens by ozone treatment in natural water was compared in a lab-scale continuous-flow system. In addition the inactivation of the natural occurring spores of sulphite-reducing clostridia (SSRC) in this water was monitored in one of the lab-scale s

  16. Liquid alkali metals - Equation of state and reduced-pressure, bulk-modulus, sound-velocity, and specific-heat functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlosser, Herbert; Ferrante, John

    1989-01-01

    The previous work of Schlosser and Ferrante (1988) on universality in solids is extended to the study of liquid metals. As in the case of solids, to a good approximation, in the absence of phase transitions, plots of the logarithm of the reduced-pressure function H, of the reduced-isothermal-bulk-modulus function b, and of the reduced-sound-velocity function v are all linear in 1-X. Finally, it is demonstrated that ln(Cp/C/v) is also linear in 1-X, where X = (V/V/0/)exp 1/3), and V(0) is the volume at zero pressure.

  17. Fact Sheet: Final Rule to Reduce Toxic Air Pollutants from Surface Coating of Miscellaneous Metal Parts and Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains an August 2003 fact sheet with information regarding the National Emission Standards for Miscellaneous Metal Parts and Products Surface Coating Operations. This document provides a summary of the information for this regulation.

  18. A Fully Integrated and Miniaturized Heavy-metal-detection Sensor Based on Micro-patterned Reduced Graphene Oxide

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xuan, Xing; Hossain, Md Faruk; Park, Jae Yeong

    2016-01-01

    .... The fully integrated electrochemical micro-sensor was then measured and evaluated for the detection of cadmium and lead-heavy metal ions in an acetic-acid buffered solution using the square wave...

  19. Large scale simulations of the mechanical properties of layered transition metal ternary compounds for fossil energy power system applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ching, Wai-Yim [Univ. of Missouri, Kansas City, MO (United States)

    2014-12-31

    Advanced materials with applications in extreme conditions such as high temperature, high pressure, and corrosive environments play a critical role in the development of new technologies to significantly improve the performance of different types of power plants. Materials that are currently employed in fossil energy conversion systems are typically the Ni-based alloys and stainless steels that have already reached their ultimate performance limits. Incremental improvements are unlikely to meet the more stringent requirements aimed at increased efficiency and reduce risks while addressing environmental concerns and keeping costs low. Computational studies can lead the way in the search for novel materials or for significant improvements in existing materials that can meet such requirements. Detailed computational studies with sufficient predictive power can provide an atomistic level understanding of the key characteristics that lead to desirable properties. This project focuses on the comprehensive study of a new class of materials called MAX phases, or Mn+1AXn (M = a transition metal, A = Al or other group III, IV, and V elements, X = C or N). The MAX phases are layered transition metal carbides or nitrides with a rare combination of metallic and ceramic properties. Due to their unique structural arrangements and special types of bonding, these thermodynamically stable alloys possess some of the most outstanding properties. We used a genomic approach in screening a large number of potential MAX phases and established a database for 665 viable MAX compounds on the structure, mechanical and electronic properties and investigated the correlations between them. This database if then used as a tool for materials informatics for further exploration of this class of intermetallic compounds.

  20. Metal-related artifacts in instrumented spine. Techniques for reducing artifacts in CT and MRI: state of the art

    OpenAIRE

    Stradiotti, P.; Curti, A.; G. Castellazzi; Zerbi, A.

    2009-01-01

    The projectional nature of radiogram limits its amount of information about the instrumented spine. MRI and CT imaging can be more helpful, using cross-sectional view. However, the presence of metal-related artifacts at both conventional CT and MRI imaging can obscure relevant anatomy and disease. We reviewed the literature about overcoming artifacts from metallic orthopaedic implants at high-field strength MRI imaging and multi-detector CT. The evolution of multichannel CT has made available...

  1. Metal-related artifacts in instrumented spine. Techniques for reducing artifacts in CT and MRI: state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stradiotti, P; Curti, A; Castellazzi, G; Zerbi, A

    2009-06-01

    The projectional nature of radiogram limits its amount of information about the instrumented spine. MRI and CT imaging can be more helpful, using cross-sectional view. However, the presence of metal-related artifacts at both conventional CT and MRI imaging can obscure relevant anatomy and disease. We reviewed the literature about overcoming artifacts from metallic orthopaedic implants at high-field strength MRI imaging and multi-detector CT. The evolution of multichannel CT has made available new techniques that can help minimizing the severe beam-hardening artifacts. The presence of artifacts at CT from metal hardware is related to image reconstruction algorithm (filter), tube current (in mA), X-ray kilovolt peak, pitch, hardware composition, geometry (shape), and location. MRI imaging has been used safely in patients with orthopaedic metallic implants because most of these implants do not have ferromagnetic properties and have been fixed into position. However, on MRI imaging metallic implants may produce geometric distortion, the so-called susceptibility artifact. In conclusion, although 140 kV and high milliamperage second exposures are recommended for imaging patients with hardware, caution should always be exercised, particularly in children, young adults, and patients undergoing multiple examinations. MRI artifacts can be minimized by positioning optimally and correctly the examined anatomy part with metallic implants in the magnet and by choosing fast spin-echo sequences, and in some cases also STIR sequences, with an anterior to posterior frequency-encoding direction and the smallest voxel size.

  2. Self-assembled large scale metal alloy grid patterns as flexible transparent conductive layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohl, Melinda; Dombovari, Aron; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Kordas, Krisztian

    2015-09-03

    The development of scalable synthesis techniques for optically transparent, electrically conductive coatings is in great demand due to the constantly increasing market price and limited resources of indium for indium tin oxide (ITO) materials currently applied in most of the optoelectronic devices. This work pioneers the scalable synthesis of transparent conductive films (TCFs) by exploiting the coffee-ring effect deposition coupled with reactive inkjet printing and subsequent chemical copper plating. Here we report two different promising alternatives to replace ITO, palladium-copper (PdCu) grid patterns and silver-copper (AgCu) fish scale like structures printed on flexible poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) substrates, achieving sheet resistance values as low as 8.1 and 4.9 Ω/sq, with corresponding optical transmittance of 79% and 65% at 500 nm, respectively. Both films show excellent adhesion and also preserve their structural integrity and good contact with the substrate for severe bending showing less than 4% decrease of conductivity even after 10(5) cycles. Transparent conductive films for capacitive touch screens and pixels of microscopic resistive electrodes are demonstrated.

  3. Self-assembled large scale metal alloy grid patterns as flexible transparent conductive layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohl, Melinda; Dombovari, Aron; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Kordas, Krisztian

    2015-01-01

    The development of scalable synthesis techniques for optically transparent, electrically conductive coatings is in great demand due to the constantly increasing market price and limited resources of indium for indium tin oxide (ITO) materials currently applied in most of the optoelectronic devices. This work pioneers the scalable synthesis of transparent conductive films (TCFs) by exploiting the coffee-ring effect deposition coupled with reactive inkjet printing and subsequent chemical copper plating. Here we report two different promising alternatives to replace ITO, palladium-copper (PdCu) grid patterns and silver-copper (AgCu) fish scale like structures printed on flexible poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) substrates, achieving sheet resistance values as low as 8.1 and 4.9 Ω/sq, with corresponding optical transmittance of 79% and 65% at 500 nm, respectively. Both films show excellent adhesion and also preserve their structural integrity and good contact with the substrate for severe bending showing less than 4% decrease of conductivity even after 105 cycles. Transparent conductive films for capacitive touch screens and pixels of microscopic resistive electrodes are demonstrated. PMID:26333520

  4. Self-assembled large scale metal alloy grid patterns as flexible transparent conductive layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohl, Melinda; Dombovari, Aron; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Kordas, Krisztian

    2015-09-01

    The development of scalable synthesis techniques for optically transparent, electrically conductive coatings is in great demand due to the constantly increasing market price and limited resources of indium for indium tin oxide (ITO) materials currently applied in most of the optoelectronic devices. This work pioneers the scalable synthesis of transparent conductive films (TCFs) by exploiting the coffee-ring effect deposition coupled with reactive inkjet printing and subsequent chemical copper plating. Here we report two different promising alternatives to replace ITO, palladium-copper (PdCu) grid patterns and silver-copper (AgCu) fish scale like structures printed on flexible poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) substrates, achieving sheet resistance values as low as 8.1 and 4.9 Ω/sq, with corresponding optical transmittance of 79% and 65% at 500 nm, respectively. Both films show excellent adhesion and also preserve their structural integrity and good contact with the substrate for severe bending showing less than 4% decrease of conductivity even after 105 cycles. Transparent conductive films for capacitive touch screens and pixels of microscopic resistive electrodes are demonstrated.

  5. Ultra-pure soft water ameliorates atopic skin disease by preventing metallic soap deposition in NC/Tnd mice and reduces skin dryness in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Akane; Matsuda, Akira; Jung, Kyungsook; Jang, Hyosun; Ahn, Ginnae; Ishizaka, Saori; Amagai, Yosuke; Oida, Kumiko; Arkwright, Peter D; Matsuda, Hiroshi

    2015-09-01

    Mineral ions in tap water react with fatty acids in soap, leading to the formation of insoluble precipitate (metallic soap) on skin during washing. We hypothesised that metallic soap might negatively alter skin conditions. Application of metallic soap onto the skin of NC/Tnd mice with allergic dermatitis further induced inflammation with elevation of plasma immunoglobulin E and proinflammatory cytokine expression. Pruritus and dryness were ameliorated when the back of mice was washed with soap in Ca2+- and Mg2+-free ultra-pure soft water (UPSW). Washing in UPSW, but not tap water, also protected the skin of healthy volunteers from the soap deposition. Furthermore, 4 weeks of showering with UPSW reduced dryness and pruritus of human subjects with dry skin. Washing with UPSW may be therapeutically beneficial in patients with skin troubles.

  6. Physics-based animation of large-scale splashing liquids, elastoplastic solids, and model-reduced flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerszewski, Daniel James

    Physical simulation has become an essential tool in computer animation. As the use of visual effects increases, the need for simulating real-world materials increases. In this dissertation, we consider three problems in physics-based animation: large-scale splashing liquids, elastoplastic material simulation, and dimensionality reduction techniques for fluid simulation. Fluid simulation has been one of the greatest successes of physics-based animation, generating hundreds of research papers and a great many special effects over the last fifteen years. However, the animation of large-scale, splashing liquids remains challenging. We show that a novel combination of unilateral incompressibility, mass-full FLIP, and blurred boundaries is extremely well-suited to the animation of large-scale, violent, splashing liquids. Materials that incorporate both plastic and elastic deformations, also referred to as elastioplastic materials, are frequently encountered in everyday life. Methods for animating such common real-world materials are useful for effects practitioners and have been successfully employed in films. We describe a point-based method for animating elastoplastic materials. Our primary contribution is a simple method for computing the deformation gradient for each particle in the simulation. Given the deformation gradient, we can apply arbitrary constitutive models and compute the resulting elastic forces. Our method has two primary advantages: we do not store or compare to an initial rest configuration and we work directly with the deformation gradient. The first advantage avoids poor numerical conditioning and the second naturally leads to a multiplicative model of deformation appropriate for finite deformations. One of the most significant drawbacks of physics-based animation is that ever-higher fidelity leads to an explosion in the number of degrees of freedom. This problem leads us to the consideration of dimensionality reduction techniques. We present

  7. Determining which land management practices reduce catchment scale flood risk and where to implement them for optimum effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattison, Ian; Lane, Stuart; Hardy, Richard; Reaney, Sim

    2010-05-01

    The theoretical basis for why changes in land management might increase flood risk are well known, but proving them through numerical modelling still remains a challenge. In large catchments, like the River Eden in Cumbria, NW England, one of the reasons for this is that it is unfeasible to test multiple scenarios in all their possible locations. We have developed two linked approaches to refine the number of scenarios and locations using 1) spatial downscaling and 2) participatory decision making, which potentially should increase the likelihood of finding a link between land use and downstream flooding. Firstly, land management practices can have both flood reducing and flood increasing effects, depending on their location. As a result some areas of the catchment are more important in determining downstream flood risk than others, depending on the land use and hydrological connectivity. We apply a downscaling approach to identify which sub-catchments are most important in explaining downstream flooding. This is important because it is in these areas that management options are most likely to have a positive and detectable effect. Secondly, once the dominant sub-catchment has been identified, the land management scenarios that are both feasible and likely to impact flood risk need to be determined. This was done through active stakeholder engagement. The stakeholder group undertook a brainstorming exercise, which suggested about 30 different rural land management scenarios, which were mapped on to a literature-based conceptual framework of hydrological processes. Then these options were evaluated based on five criteria: relevance to catchment, scientific effectiveness, testability, robustness/uncertainty and feasibility of implementation. The suitability of each scenario was discussed and prioritised by the stakeholder group based on scientific needs and expectations and local suitability and feasibility. The next stage of the participatory approach was a mapping

  8. Crossing Science-Policy-Societal Boundaries to Reduce Scientific and Institutional Uncertainty in Small-Scale Fisheries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Abigail M.; Rudd, Murray A.

    2016-10-01

    The governance of small-scale fisheries (SSF) is challenging due to the uncertainty, complexity, and interconnectedness of social, political, ecological, and economical processes. Conventional SSF management has focused on a centralized and top-down approach. A major criticism of conventional management is the over-reliance on `expert science' to guide decision-making and poor consideration of fishers' contextually rich knowledge. That is thought to exacerbate the already low governance potential of SSF. Integrating scientific knowledge with fishers' knowledge is increasingly popular and is often assumed to help reduce levels of biophysical and institutional uncertainties. Many projects aimed at encouraging knowledge integration have, however, been unsuccessful. Our objective in this research was to assess factors that influence knowledge integration and the uptake of integrated knowledge into policy-making. We report results from 54 semi-structured interviews with SSF researchers and practitioners from around the globe. Our analysis is framed in terms of scientific credibility, societal legitimacy, and policy saliency, and we discuss cases that have been partially or fully successful in reducing uncertainty via push-and-pull-oriented boundary crossing initiatives. Our findings suggest that two important factors affect the science-policy-societal boundary: a lack of consensus among stakeholders about what constitutes credible knowledge and institutional uncertainty resulting from shifting policies and leadership change. A lack of training for scientific leaders and an apparent `shelf-life' for community organizations highlight the importance of ongoing institutional support for knowledge integration projects. Institutional support may be enhanced through such investments, such as capacity building and specialized platforms for knowledge integration.

  9. Reducing the ambiguity of karst aquifer models by pattern matching of flow and transport on catchment scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Oehlmann

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Assessing the hydraulic parameters of karst aquifers is a challenge due to their high degree of heterogeneity. The unknown parameter field generally leads to a high ambiguity for flow and transport calibration in numerical models of karst aquifers. In this study, a distributive numerical model was built for the simulation of groundwater flow and solute transport in a highly heterogeneous karst aquifer in south western Germany. Therefore, an interface for the simulation of solute transport in one-dimensional pipes was implemented into the software Comsol Multiphysics® and coupled to the three-dimensional solute transport interface for continuum domains. For reducing model ambiguity, the simulation was matched for steady-state conditions to the hydraulic head distribution in the model area, the spring discharge of several springs and the transport velocities of two tracer tests. Furthermore, other measured parameters such as the hydraulic conductivity of the fissured matrix and the maximal karst conduit volume were available for model calibration. Parameter studies were performed for several karst conduit geometries to analyse the influence of the respective geometric and hydraulic parameters and develop a calibration approach in a large-scale heterogeneous karst system. Results show that it is not only possible to derive a consistent flow and transport model for a 150 km2 karst area, but that the combined use of groundwater flow and transport parameters greatly reduces model ambiguity. The approach provides basic information about the conduit network not accessible for direct geometric measurements. The conduit network volume for the main karst spring in the study area could be narrowed down to approximately 100 000 m3.

  10. Crossing Science-Policy-Societal Boundaries to Reduce Scientific and Institutional Uncertainty in Small-Scale Fisheries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Abigail M; Rudd, Murray A

    2016-10-01

    The governance of small-scale fisheries (SSF) is challenging due to the uncertainty, complexity, and interconnectedness of social, political, ecological, and economical processes. Conventional SSF management has focused on a centralized and top-down approach. A major criticism of conventional management is the over-reliance on 'expert science' to guide decision-making and poor consideration of fishers' contextually rich knowledge. That is thought to exacerbate the already low governance potential of SSF. Integrating scientific knowledge with fishers' knowledge is increasingly popular and is often assumed to help reduce levels of biophysical and institutional uncertainties. Many projects aimed at encouraging knowledge integration have, however, been unsuccessful. Our objective in this research was to assess factors that influence knowledge integration and the uptake of integrated knowledge into policy-making. We report results from 54 semi-structured interviews with SSF researchers and practitioners from around the globe. Our analysis is framed in terms of scientific credibility, societal legitimacy, and policy saliency, and we discuss cases that have been partially or fully successful in reducing uncertainty via push-and-pull-oriented boundary crossing initiatives. Our findings suggest that two important factors affect the science-policy-societal boundary: a lack of consensus among stakeholders about what constitutes credible knowledge and institutional uncertainty resulting from shifting policies and leadership change. A lack of training for scientific leaders and an apparent 'shelf-life' for community organizations highlight the importance of ongoing institutional support for knowledge integration projects. Institutional support may be enhanced through such investments, such as capacity building and specialized platforms for knowledge integration.

  11. Basin-scale transport of hydrothermal dissolved metals across the South Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resing, Joseph A.; Sedwick, Peter N.; German, Christopher R.; Jenkins, William J.; Moffett, James W.; Sohst, Bettina M.; Tagliabue, Alessandro

    2015-07-01

    Hydrothermal venting along mid-ocean ridges exerts an important control on the chemical composition of sea water by serving as a major source or sink for a number of trace elements in the ocean. Of these, iron has received considerable attention because of its role as an essential and often limiting nutrient for primary production in regions of the ocean that are of critical importance for the global carbon cycle. It has been thought that most of the dissolved iron discharged by hydrothermal vents is lost from solution close to ridge-axis sources and is thus of limited importance for ocean biogeochemistry. This long-standing view is challenged by recent studies which suggest that stabilization of hydrothermal dissolved iron may facilitate its long-range oceanic transport. Such transport has been subsequently inferred from spatially limited oceanographic observations. Here we report data from the US GEOTRACES Eastern Pacific Zonal Transect (EPZT) that demonstrate lateral transport of hydrothermal dissolved iron, manganese, and aluminium from the southern East Pacific Rise (SEPR) several thousand kilometres westward across the South Pacific Ocean. Dissolved iron exhibits nearly conservative (that is, no loss from solution during transport and mixing) behaviour in this hydrothermal plume, implying a greater longevity in the deep ocean than previously assumed. Based on our observations, we estimate a global hydrothermal dissolved iron input of three to four gigamoles per year to the ocean interior, which is more than fourfold higher than previous estimates. Complementary simulations with a global-scale ocean biogeochemical model suggest that the observed transport of hydrothermal dissolved iron requires some means of physicochemical stabilization and indicate that hydrothermally derived iron sustains a large fraction of Southern Ocean export production.

  12. A COMPACT HIGH VELOCITY CLOUD NEAR THE MAGELLANIC STREAM: METALLICITY AND SMALL-SCALE STRUCTURE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumari, Nimisha [Ecole Polytechnique, Route de Saclay, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Fox, Andrew J.; Tumlinson, Jason; Thom, Christopher; Ely, Justin [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Westmeier, Tobias [ICRAR, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley WA 6009 (Australia)

    2015-02-10

    The Magellanic Stream (MS) is a well-resolved gaseous tail originating from the Magellanic Clouds. Studies of its physical properties and chemical composition are needed to understand its role in Galactic evolution. We investigate the properties of a compact HVC (CHVC 224.0-83.4-197) lying close on the sky to the MS to determine whether it is physically connected to the Stream and to examine its internal structure. Our study is based on analysis of HST/COS spectra of three QSOs (Ton S210, B0120-28, and B0117-2837) all of which pass through this single cloud at small angular separation (≲0.°72), allowing us to compare physical conditions on small spatial scales. No significant variation is detected in the ionization structure from one part of the cloud to the other. Using Cloudy photoionization models, toward Ton S210 we derive elemental abundances of [C/H] = –1.21 ± 0.11, [Si/H] = –1.16 ± 0.11, [Al/H] = –1.19 ± 0.17, and [O/H] = –1.12 ± 0.22, which agree within 0.09 dex. The CHVC abundances match the 0.1 solar abundances measured along the main body of the Stream. This suggests that the CHVC (and by extension the extended network of filaments to which it belongs) has an origin in the MS. It may represent a fragment that has been removed from the Stream as it interacts with the gaseous Galactic halo.

  13. Reducing metal alloy powder costs for use in powder bed fusion additive manufacturing: Improving the economics for production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Fransisco

    Titanium and its associated alloys have been used in industry for over 50 years and have become more popular in the recent decades. Titanium has been most successful in areas where the high strength to weight ratio provides an advantage over aluminum and steels. Other advantages of titanium include biocompatibility and corrosion resistance. Electron Beam Melting (EBM) is an additive manufacturing (AM) technology that has been successfully applied in the manufacturing of titanium components for the aerospace and medical industry with equivalent or better mechanical properties as parts fabricated via more traditional casting and machining methods. As the demand for titanium powder continues to increase, the price also increases. Titanium spheroidized powder from different vendors has a price range from 260/kg-450/kg, other spheroidized alloys such as Niobium can cost as high as $1,200/kg. Alternative titanium powders produced from methods such as the Titanium Hydride-Dehydride (HDH) process and the Armstrong Commercially Pure Titanium (CPTi) process can be fabricated at a fraction of the cost of powders fabricated via gas atomization. The alternative powders can be spheroidized and blended. Current sectors in additive manufacturing such as the medical industry are concerned that there will not be enough spherical powder for production and are seeking other powder options. It is believed the EBM technology can use a blend of spherical and angular powder to build fully dense parts with equal mechanical properties to those produced using traditional powders. Some of the challenges with angular and irregular powders are overcoming the poor flow characteristics and the attainment of the same or better packing densities as spherical powders. The goal of this research is to demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing alternative and lower cost powders in the EBM process. As a result, reducing the cost of the raw material to reduce the overall cost of the product produced with

  14. Do wood mice (Apodemus sylvaticus L.) use food selection as a means to reduce heavy metal intake?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beernaert, Joke [Evolutionary Biology Group, Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium)], E-mail: joke.beernaert@ua.ac.be; Scheirs, Jan; Brande, Greet van den; Leirs, Herwig [Evolutionary Biology Group, Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Blust, Ronny [Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology Group, Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Meulenaer, Bruno de; Camp, John van [Research Group Food Chemistry and Human Nutrition, Department of Food Safety and Food Quality, University of Ghent, Coupure Links 653, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Verhagen, Ron [Evolutionary Biology Group, Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium)

    2008-02-15

    Food preference of wood mice from two with heavy metals polluted sites and two unpolluted sites was tested under laboratory and field conditions with two-way choice experiments. In the laboratory, wood mice preferred to eat acorns from unpolluted sites over acorns from polluted sites. Previous experience with polluted food had no influence on food choice. Preference was negatively related to acorn metal content. Furthermore, the nutrient content of the acorn endosperm was consistently lower in polluted sites. We therefore conclude that wood mice used absolute metal concentration in the acorn, nutrient content, or both as a food selection cue. The results of the laboratory experiment could not be confirmed under field conditions. We hypothesized that search time constraints due to the presence of predators, competitors and/or other stress factors in the field have prevented the mice to forage selectively. - Wood mice prefer unpolluted food items over polluted food items in laboratory trials but not in field situations.

  15. High-performance ab initio density matrix renormalization group method: Applicability to large-scale multireference problems for metal compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurashige, Yuki; Yanai, Takeshi

    2009-06-01

    This article presents an efficient and parallelized implementation of the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm for quantum chemistry calculations. The DMRG method as a large-scale multireference electronic structure model is by nature particularly efficient for one-dimensionally correlated systems, while the present development is oriented toward applications for polynuclear transition metal compounds, in which the macroscopic one-dimensional structure of electron correlation is absent. A straightforward extension of the DMRG algorithm is proposed with further improvements and aggressive optimizations to allow its application with large multireference active space, which is often demanded for metal compound calculations. Special efficiency is achieved by making better use of sparsity and symmetry in the operator and wave function representations. By accomplishing computationally intensive DMRG calculations, the authors have found that a large number of renormalized basis states are required to represent high entanglement of the electron correlation for metal compound applications, and it is crucial to adopt auxiliary perturbative correction to the projected density matrix during the DMRG sweep optimization in order to attain proper convergence to the solution. Potential energy curve calculations for the Cr2 molecule near the known equilibrium precisely predicted the full configuration interaction energies with a correlation space of 24 electrons in 30 orbitals [denoted by (24e,30o)]. The energies are demonstrated to be accurate to 0.6mEh (the error from the extrapolated best value) when as many as 10 000 renormalized basis states are employed for the left and right DMRG block representations. The relative energy curves for [Cu2O2]2+ along the isomerization coordinate were obtained from DMRG and other correlated calculations, for which a fairly large orbital space (32e,62o) is modeled as a full correlation space. The DMRG prediction nearly overlaps

  16. Understanding and improving mitigation strategies for reducing catchment scale nutrient loads using high resolution observations and uncertainty analysis approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, A.; Lloyd, C.; Freer, J. E.; Johnes, P.; Stirling, M.

    2012-12-01

    One of the biggest challenges in catchment water quality management is tackling the problem of reducing water pollution from agriculture whilst ensuring food security nationally. Improvements to catchment management plans are needed if we are to enhance biodiversity and maintain good ecological status in freshwater ecosystems, while producing enough food to support a growing global population. In order to plan for a more sustainable and secure future, research needs to quantify the uncertainties and understand the complexities in the source-mobilisation-delivery-impact continuum of pollution and nutrients at all scales. In the UK the Demonstration Test Catchment (DTC) project has been set up to improve water quality specifically from diffuse pollution from agriculture by enhanced high resolution monitoring and targeted mitigation experiments. The DTC project aims to detect shifts in the baseline trend of the most ecologically-significant pollutants resulting from targeted on-farm measures at field to farm scales and assessing their effects on ecosystem function. The DTC programme involves three catchments across the UK that are indicative of three different typologies and land uses. This paper will focus on the Hampshire Avon DTC, where a total of 12 parameters are monitored by bank-side stations at two sampling sites, including flow, turbidity, phosphate and nitrate concentrations at 30 min resolution. This monitoring is supported by daily resolution sampling at 5 other sites and storm sampling at all locations. Part of the DTC project aims to understand how observations of water quality within river systems at different temporal resolutions and types of monitoring strategies enable us to understand and detect changes over and above the natural variability. Baseline monitoring is currently underway and early results show that high-resolution data is essential at this sub-catchment scale to understand important process dynamics. This is critical if we are to design

  17. Do wood mice (Apodemus sylvaticus L.) use food selection as a means to reduce heavy metal intake?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beernaert, Joke; Scheirs, Jan; Brande, Greet Van Den

    2008-01-01

    experience with polluted food had no influence on food choice. Preference was negatively related to acorn metal content. Furthermore, the nutrient content of the acorn endosperm was consistently lower in polluted sites. We therefore conclude that wood mice used absolute metal concentration in the acorn......, nutrient content, or both as a food selection cue. The results of the laboratory experiment could not be confirmed under field conditions. We hypothesized that search time constraints due to the presence of predators, competitors and/or other stress factors in the field have prevented the mice to forage...

  18. Occurrence of sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB associated with biocorrosion on metallic surfaces in a hydroelectric power station in Ibirama (SC - Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto Dantas Marangoni

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was evaluate, two methods for the detection and identification of sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB: ML medium and PCR with specific primers for SRB groups. SRB were detected through the selective medium only on carbon steel, which showed corrosion. Employing specific PCR primer, SBR were detected from all the metallic components assayed, even those that did not present visible corrosion spots, such stainless steel and copper alloys. Despite the presence or absence of corrosion at the later stages effectively by using the selective medium,, the initial stages of the corrosion could only be detected by the amplification of total DNA with SRB specific primers. The early detection of SRB could be employed for preventing the damages on metal surfaces before the installation of corrosion processes. Strategies for reducing the time spent on SRB isolation and identification could be auxiliary tools for controlling the corrosion of materials.

  19. Synchrotron micro-scale measurement of metal distributions in Phragmites australis and Typha latifolia root tissue from an urban brownfield site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Huan; Qian, Yu; Gallagher, Frank J; Zhang, Weiguo; Yu, Lizhong; Liu, Changjun; Jones, Keith W; Tappero, Ryan

    2016-03-01

    Liberty State Park in New Jersey, USA, is a "brownfield" site containing various levels of contaminants. To investigate metal uptake and distributions in plants on the brownfield site, Phragmites australis and Typha latifolia were collected in Liberty State Park during the growing season (May-September) in 2011 at two sites with the high and low metal loads, respectively. The objective of this study was to understand the metal (Fe, Mn, Cu, Pb and Zn) concentration and spatial distributions in P. australis and T. latifolia root systems with micro-meter scale resolution using synchrotron X-ray microfluorescence (μXRF) and synchrotron X-ray computed microtomography (μCMT) techniques. The root structure measurement by synchrotron μCMT showed that high X-ray attenuation substance appeared in the epidermis. Synchrotron μXRF measurement showed that metal concentrations and distributions in the root cross-section between epidermis and vascular tissue were statistically different. Significant correlations were found between metals (Cu, Mn, Pb and Zn) and Fe in the epidermis, implying that metals were scavenged by Fe oxides. The results from this study suggest that the expression of metal transport and accumulation within the root systems may be element specific. The information derived from this study can improve our current knowledge of the wetland plant ecological function in brownfield remediation. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Reducing risk and increasing confidence of decision making at a lower cost: In-situ pXRF assessment of metal-contaminated sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouillon, Marek; Taylor, Mark P; Dong, Chenyin

    2017-10-01

    This study evaluates the in-situ use of field portable X-ray Fluorescence (pXRF) for metal-contaminated site assessments, and assesses the advantages of increased sampling to reduce risk, and increase confidence of decision making at a lower cost. Five metal-contaminated sites were assessed using both in-situ pXRF and ex-situ inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analyses at various sampling resolutions. Twenty second in-situ pXRF measurements of Mn, Zn and Pb were corrected using a subset of parallel ICP-MS measurements taken at each site. Field and analytical duplicates revealed sampling as the major contributor (>95% variation) to measurement uncertainties. This study shows that increased sampling led to several benefits including more representative site characterisation, higher soil-metal mapping resolution, reduced uncertainty around the site mean, and reduced sampling uncertainty. Real time pXRF data enabled efficient, on-site decision making for further judgemental sampling, without the need to return to the site. Additionally, in-situ pXRF was more cost effective than the current approach of ex-situ sampling and ICP-MS analysis, even with higher sampling at each site. Lastly, a probabilistic site assessment approach was applied to demonstrate the advantages of integrating estimated measurement uncertainties into site reporting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A virtual sinogram method to reduce dental metallic implant artefacts in computed tomography-based attenuation correction for PET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdoli, Mehrsima; Ay, Mohammad Reza; Ahmadian, Alireza; Zaidi, Habib

    2010-01-01

    Objective Attenuation correction of PET data requires accurate determination of the attenuation map (mu map), which represents the spatial distribution of linear attenuation coefficients of different tissues at 511 keV. The presence of high-density metallic dental filling material in head and neck X

  2. Effect of the selective pressure of sub-lethal level of heavy metals on the fate and distribution of ARGs in the catchment scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan; Xu, Jian; Mao, Daqing; Luo, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that high levels of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in the Haihe River were directly attributed to the excessive use of antibiotics in animal agriculture. The antibiotic residues of the Xiangjiang River determined in this study were much lower than those of the Haihe River, but the relative abundance of 16 detected ARGs (sul1, sul2 and sul3, qepA, qnrA, qnrB, qnrD and qnrS, tetA, tetB, tetW, tetM, tetQ and tetO, ermB and ermC), were as high as the Haihe River particularly in the downstream of the Xiangjiang River which is close to the extensive metal mining. The ARGs discharged from the pharmaceutical wastewater treatment plant (PWWTP) are a major source of ARGs in the upstream of the Xiangjiang River. In the downstream, selective stress of heavy metals rather than source release had a significant influence on the distinct distribution pattern of ARGs. Some heavy metals showed a positive correlation with certain ARG subtypes. Additionally, there is a positive correlation between individual ARG subtypes and heavy metal resistance genes, suggesting that heavy metals may co select the ARGs on the same plasmid of antibiotic resistant bacteria. The co-selection mechanism between specific metal and antibiotic resistance was further confirmed by these isolations encoding the resistance genotypes to antibiotics and metals. To our knowledge, this is the first study on the fate and distribution of ARGs under the selective pressure exerted by heavy metals in the catchment scale. These results are beneficial to understand the fate, and to discern the contributors of ARGs from either the source release or the selective pressure by sub-lethal levels of environmental stressors during their transport on a river catchment scale. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The slow-scale linear noise approximation: an accurate, reduced stochastic description of biochemical networks under timescale separation conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Philipp

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is well known that the deterministic dynamics of biochemical reaction networks can be more easily studied if timescale separation conditions are invoked (the quasi-steady-state assumption. In this case the deterministic dynamics of a large network of elementary reactions are well described by the dynamics of a smaller network of effective reactions. Each of the latter represents a group of elementary reactions in the large network and has associated with it an effective macroscopic rate law. A popular method to achieve model reduction in the presence of intrinsic noise consists of using the effective macroscopic rate laws to heuristically deduce effective probabilities for the effective reactions which then enables simulation via the stochastic simulation algorithm (SSA. The validity of this heuristic SSA method is a priori doubtful because the reaction probabilities for the SSA have only been rigorously derived from microscopic physics arguments for elementary reactions. Results We here obtain, by rigorous means and in closed-form, a reduced linear Langevin equation description of the stochastic dynamics of monostable biochemical networks in conditions characterized by small intrinsic noise and timescale separation. The slow-scale linear noise approximation (ssLNA, as the new method is called, is used to calculate the intrinsic noise statistics of enzyme and gene networks. The results agree very well with SSA simulations of the non-reduced network of elementary reactions. In contrast the conventional heuristic SSA is shown to overestimate the size of noise for Michaelis-Menten kinetics, considerably under-estimate the size of noise for Hill-type kinetics and in some cases even miss the prediction of noise-induced oscillations. Conclusions A new general method, the ssLNA, is derived and shown to correctly describe the statistics of intrinsic noise about the macroscopic concentrations under timescale separation conditions

  4. Resolving Ionisation and Metallicity on Parsec Scales Across Mrk 71 (NGC2363) with HST-WFC3

    CERN Document Server

    James, Bethan L; Aloisi, Alessandra; Calzetti, Daniela; Kewley, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Blue Compact Dwarf (BCD) Galaxies in the nearby Universe provide a means for studying feedback mechanisms and star-formation processes in low-metallicity environments in great detail. Due to their vicinity, these local analogues to young galaxies are well suited for high-resolution studies that would be unfeasible for primordial galaxies in the high-redshift universe. Here we present HST-WFC3 observations of one such BCD, Mrk 71 (NGC 2363), one of the most powerful local starbursts known, in the light of [O II], He II, Hb, [O III], Ha, and [S II]. At D=3.44 Mpc, this extensive suite of emission line images enables us to explore the chemical and physical conditions of Mrk 71 on ~2 pc scales. Using these high spatial-resolution observations, we use emission line diagnostics to distinguish ionisation mechanisms on a pixel-by-pixel basis and show that despite the previously reported hypersonic gas and super-bubble blow out, the gas in Mrk 71 is photoionised, with no sign of shock-excited emission. Using strong-li...

  5. Gram-scale, high-yield synthesis of a robust metal-organic framework for storing methane and other gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilmer, CE; Farha, OK; Yildirim, T; Eryazici, I; Krungleviciute, V; Sarjeant, AA; Snurr, RQ; Hupp, JT

    2013-04-01

    We have synthesized and characterized a new metal-organic framework (MOF) material, NU-125, that, in the single-crystal limit, achieves a methane storage density at 58 bar (840 psi) and 298 K corresponding to 86% of that obtained with compressed natural gas tanks (CNG) used in vehicles today, when the latter are pressurized to 248 bar (3600 psi). More importantly, the deliverable capacity (58 bar to 5.8 bar) for NU-125 is 67% of the deliverable capacity of a CNG tank that starts at 248 bar. (For crystalline granules or powders, particle packing inefficiencies will yield densities and deliverable capacities lower than 86% and 67% of high-pressure CNG.) This material was synthesized in high yield on a gram-scale in a single-batch synthesis. Methane adsorption isotherms were measured over a wide pressure range (0.1-58 bar) and repeated over twelve cycles on the same sample, which showed no detectable degradation. Adsorption of CO2 and H-2 over a broad range of pressures and temperatures are also reported and agree with our computational findings.

  6. A Comparison of Three Approaches to the Reduced-Scaling Coupled Cluster Treatment of Non-Resonant Molecular Response Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlexander, Harley R; Crawford, T Daniel

    2016-01-12

    We have investigated the performance of the reduced-scaling coupled cluster method based on projected atomic orbitals (PAOs), pair natural orbitals (PNOs), and orbital specific virtuals (OSVs) for the prediction of linear response properties. These methods introduce different degrees of controllable sparsity in the ground-state and perturbed coupled cluster wave functions, leading to localization errors in properties such as dynamic polarizabilities and specific optical rotations. Using a series of chiral test compounds, we find that the inherent costs associated with computing response properties are significantly greater than those for determining the ground-state energy. As the dimensionality of the molecular system increases-from (pseudo)linear structures, such as fluoroalkanes, to cagelike structures, such as β-pinene-the crossover point between canonical-orbital and localized-orbital algorithms increases substantially. Furthermore, both the OSV and PNO methods provide greater reduction in cost (as measured by the size of the double-excitation space) than do PAOs, and PNOs provide the greatest level of sparsity for the systems examined here. Single-excitation truncation induces much larger errors than corresponding doubles truncation due to the fact that the first-order contribution to the one-electron perturbed wave function appears in the singles amplitudes. Both the PNO and OSV methods perform reasonably well for frequency-dependent polarizabilities provided appropriate thresholds are used for the occupation-number and weak-pair cutoffs on which each method depends. Specific rotations, however, are very sensitive to wave function truncation, to the extent that aggressive thresholds can yield the incorrect sign of the rotation, due to the delicate balance of positive and negative wave function contributions to the mixed electric-/magnetic-field response.

  7. Enhancing Extracellular Electron Transfer of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 through Coupling Improved Flavin Synthesis and Metal-Reducing Conduit for Pollutant Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Di; Cheng, Lei; Zhang, Feng; Huang, Xue-Na; Li, Dao-Bo; Liu, Dong-Feng; Lau, Tai-Chu; Mu, Yang; Yu, Han-Qing

    2017-05-02

    Dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria (DMRB) are capable of extracellular electron transfer (EET) to insoluble metal oxides, which are used as external electron acceptors by DMRB for their anaerobic respiration. The EET process has important contribution to environmental remediation mineral cycling, and bioelectrochemical systems. However, the low EET efficiency remains to be one of the major bottlenecks for its practical applications for pollutant degradation. In this work, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a model DMRB, was used to examine the feasibility of enhancing the EET and its biodegradation capacity through genetic engineering. A flavin biosynthesis gene cluster ribD-ribC-ribBA-ribE and metal-reducing conduit biosynthesis gene cluster mtrC-mtrA-mtrB were coexpressed in S. oneidensis MR-1. Compared to the control strain, the engineered strain was found to exhibit an improved EET capacity in microbial fuel cells and potentiostat-controlled electrochemical cells, with an increase in maximum current density by approximate 110% and 87%, respectively. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) analysis showed that the current increase correlated with the lower interfacial charge-transfer resistance of the engineered strain. Meanwhile, a three times more rapid removal rate of methyl orange by the engineered strain confirmed the improvement of its EET and biodegradation ability. Our results demonstrate that coupling of improved synthesis of mediators and metal-reducing conduits could be an efficient strategy to enhance EET in S. oneidensis MR-1, which is essential to the applications of DMRB for environmental remediation, wastewater treatment, and bioenergy recovery from wastes.

  8. Optimizing the structure of metal load in order to reduce electricity consumption in the production of steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pǎcurar, Cristina; Hepuť, Teodor; Ardelean, Marius

    2016-06-01

    As the basic units in the preparation of steel, in industrial practice is used oxygen converters and electric arc furnaces. In research carried out has been taken into account structure analysis load electric arc furnaces of the specific consumption of electricity (kWh/t). Data to be achieved for a number of 96 batches, have been taken into account load holding metal of each assortment of scrap metal, these varieties being considered as independent parameters, and electricity consumption is considered dependent parameter. By processing the data in the EXCEL spreadsheet programs and MATLAB have been obtained correlations between parameters analyze, analytical results being presented and the graph. On the basis of an analysis of these correlations to choose optimal structure of the load in order to obtain an acceptable energy consumption from technical and economic point of view.

  9. Virtual Institute of Microbial Stress and Survival: Deduction of Stress Response Pathways in Metal and Radionuclide Reducing Microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2004-04-17

    The projects application goals are to: (1) To understand bacterial stress-response to the unique stressors in metal/radionuclide contamination sites; (2) To turn this understanding into a quantitative, data-driven model for exploring policies for natural and biostimulatory bioremediation; (3) To implement proposed policies in the field and compare results to model predictions; and (4) Close the experimental/computation cycle by using discrepancies between models and predictions to drive new measurements and construction of new models. The projects science goals are to: (1) Compare physiological and molecular response of three target microorganisms to environmental perturbation; (2) Deduce the underlying regulatory pathways that control these responses through analysis of phenotype, functional genomic, and molecular interaction data; (3) Use differences in the cellular responses among the target organisms to understand niche specific adaptations of the stress and metal reduction pathways; (4) From this analysis derive an understanding of the mechanisms of pathway evolution in the environment; and (5) Ultimately, derive dynamical models for the control of these pathways to predict how natural stimulation can optimize growth and metal reduction efficiency at field sites.

  10. Tinv Scaling and Gate Leakage Reduction for n-Type Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor with HfSix/HfO2 Gate Stack by Interfacial Layer Formation Using Ozone-Water-Last Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshiyama, Itaru; Tai, Kaori; Hirano, Tomoyuki; Yamaguchi, Shinpei; Tanaka, Kazuaki; Hagimoto, Yoshiya; Uemura, Takayuki; Ando, Takashi; Watanabe, Koji; Yamamoto, Ryo; Kanda, Saori; Wang, Junli; Tateshita, Yasushi; Wakabayashi, Hitoshi; Tagawa, Yukio; Tsukamoto, Masanori; Iwamoto, Hayato; Saito, Masaki; Oshima, Masaharu; Toyoda, Satoshi; Nagashima, Naoki; Kadomura, Shingo

    2008-04-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a wet treatment for the HfSix/HfO2 gate stack of n-type metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (nMOSFET) fabricated by a gate-last process in order to scale down the electrical thickness at inversion state Tinv value and reduce the gate leakage Jg. As a result, we succeeded in scaling down Tinv to 1.41 nm without mobility or Jg degradation by ozone-water-last treatment. We found that a high-density interfacial layer (IFL) is formed owing to the ozone-water-last treatment, and Hf diffusion to the IFL is suppressed, which was analyzed by high-resolution angle-resolved spectroscopy.

  11. Isolation and characterization of a mesophilic heavy-metals-tolerant sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfomicrobium sp. from an enrichment culture using phosphogypsum as a sulfate source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azabou, Samia; Mechichi, Tahar; Patel, Bharat K C; Sayadi, Sami

    2007-02-09

    A sulfate-reducing bacterium, was isolated from a 6 month trained enrichment culture in an anaerobic media containing phosphogypsum as a sulfate source, and, designated strain SA2. Cells of strain SA2 were rod-shaped, did not form spores and stained Gram-negative. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence of the isolate revealed that it was related to members of the genus Desulfomicrobium (average sequence similarity of 98%) with Desulfomicrobium baculatum being the most closely related (sequence similarity of 99%). Strain SA2 used thiosulfate, sulfate, sulfite and elemental sulfur as electron acceptors and produced sulfide. Strain SA2 reduced sulfate contained in 1-20g/L phosphogypsum to sulfide with reduction of sulfate contained in 2g/L phosphogypsum being the optimum concentration. Strain SA2 grew with metalloid, halogenated and non-metal ions present in phosphogypsum and with added high concentrations of heavy metals (125ppm Zn and 100ppm Ni, W, Li and Al). The relative order for the inhibitory metal concentrations, based on the IC(50) values, was Cu, Te>Cd>Fe, Co, Mn>F, Se>Ni, Al, Li>Zn.

  12. Metal concentration in water, sediment and four fish species from Lake Titicaca reveals a large-scale environmental concern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroy, Mario; Maceda-Veiga, Alberto; de Sostoa, Adolfo

    2014-07-15

    Although intensive mining activity and urban sewage discharge are major sources of metal inputs to Lake Titicaca, the risk posed by metal pollution to wildlife and human populations has been poorly studied. In this study we compared the concentrations of Cu, Zn, Cd, Hg, Pb, Co, and Fe in water, sediment, and two tissues (liver and muscle) of four fish species (Odontesthes bonariensis, Orestias luteus, Orestias agassii, and Trichomycterus rivulatus) across important fishery areas in Lake Titicaca. The concentration of Pb in water at the discharge sites of the main rivers and of most elements, with the exception of Co and Fe, in all fish collected in this study exceeded the safety thresholds established by international legislation. The highest metal concentrations were observed in benthopelagic species, and liver tissue was identified as the main depository for all metals with the exception of mercury. The metal bioaccumulation pattern in fish was weakly related to the metal concentrations in the environment with the exception of Hg at the most polluted location, partly explained by the different metabolic role of essential and non-essential elements and the influence of other factors such as species' ecology and individual traits in the bioaccumulation of most metals. As metal pollution extended across the study area and high metal concentrations were detected in all four fish species, we urge the authorities to enforce legislation for water and fish consumption and to evaluate the effects of metal pollution on fish health.

  13. Metallic gold reduces TNFalpha expression, oxidative DNA damage and pro-apoptotic signals after experimental brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mie Ostergaard; Larsen, Agnete; Pedersen, Dan Sonne;

    2009-01-01

    -45 microm in size or the vehicle (placebo) were implanted in the cortical tissue followed by a cortical freeze-lesioning. At 1-2 weeks post-injury, brains were analyzed by using immunohistochemistry and markers of inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis. This study shows that gold treatment......Brain injury represents a major health problem and may result in chronic inflammation and neurodegeneration. Due to antiinflammatory effects of gold, we have investigated the cerebral effects of metallic gold particles following a focal brain injury (freeze-lesion) in mice. Gold particles 20...

  14. Heavy metal distribution between contaminated soil and Paulownia tomentosa, in a pilot-scale assisted phytoremediation study: influence of different complexing agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doumett, S; Lamperi, L; Checchini, L; Azzarello, E; Mugnai, S; Mancuso, S; Petruzzelli, G; Del Bubba, M

    2008-08-01

    The distribution of Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn between a contaminated soil and the tree species Paulownia tomentosa was investigated in a pilot-scale assisted phytoremediation study. The influence of the addition of EDTA, tartrate and glutamate at 1, 5 and 10mM concentrations on metal accumulation by the plant and on metal mobilization in soil was evaluated. Root/shoot metal concentration ratios were in the range of 3-5 for Zn, 7-17 for Cu, 9-18 for Cd and 11-39 for Pb, depending on the type and concentration of complexing agent. A significant enhancement of metal uptake in response to complexing agent application was mainly obtained in roots for Pb (i.e. 359 mg kg(-1) for EDTA 10mM and 128 mg kg(-1) for the control), Cu (i.e. 594 mg kg(-1) for glutamate 10mM and 146 mg kg(-1) for the control) and, with the exception of glutamate, also for Zn (i.e. 670 mg kg(-1) for tartrate 10mM and 237 mg kg(-1) for the control). Despite its higher metal mobilization capacity, EDTA produced a metal accumulation in plants quite similar to those obtained with tartrate and glutamate. Consequently the concentration gradient between soil pore water and plant tissues does not seem to be the predominant mechanism for metal accumulation in Paulownia tomentosa and a role of the plant should be invoked in the selection of the chemical species taken up. Metal bioavailability in soil at the end of the experiment was higher in the trials treated with EDTA than in those treated with tartrate and glutamate, the latter not being significantly different from the control. These findings indicated the persistence of a leaching risk associated to the use of this chelator, while an increase of the environmental impact is not expected when glutamate and tartrate are applied.

  15. Large-scale Manufacturing of Nanoparticulate-based Lubrication Additives for Improved Energy Efficiency and Reduced Emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdemir, Ali [Argonne National Laboratory

    2013-09-26

    This project was funded under the Department of Energy (DOE) Lab Call on Nanomanufacturing for Energy Efficiency and was directed toward the development of novel boron-based nanocolloidal lubrication additives for improving the friction and wear performance of machine components in a wide range of industrial and transportation applications. Argonne's research team concentrated on the scientific and technical aspects of the project, using a range of state-of-the art analytical and tribological test facilities. Argonne has extensive past experience and expertise in working with boron-based solid and liquid lubrication additives, and has intellectual property ownership of several. There were two industrial collaborators in this project: Ashland Oil (represented by its Valvoline subsidiary) and Primet Precision Materials, Inc. (a leading nanomaterials company). There was also a sub-contract with the University of Arkansas. The major objectives of the project were to develop novel boron-based nanocolloidal lubrication additives and to optimize and verify their performance under boundary-lubricated sliding conditions. The project also tackled problems related to colloidal dispersion, larger-scale manufacturing and blending of nano-additives with base carrier oils. Other important issues dealt with in the project were determination of the optimum size and concentration of the particles and compatibility with various base fluids and/or additives. Boron-based particulate additives considered in this project included boric acid (H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}), hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), boron oxide, and borax. As part of this project, we also explored a hybrid MoS{sub 2} + boric acid formulation approach for more effective lubrication and reported the results. The major motivation behind this work was to reduce energy losses related to friction and wear in a wide spectrum of mechanical systems and thereby reduce our dependence on imported oil. Growing concern over greenhouse

  16. Reduced water vapor transmission rates of low-temperature solution-processed metal oxide barrier films via ultraviolet annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seonuk; Jeong, Yong Jin; Baek, Yonghwa; Kim, Lae Ho; Jang, Jin Hyuk; Kim, Yebyeol; An, Tae Kyu; Nam, Sooji; Kim, Se Hyun; Jang, Jaeyoung; Park, Chan Eon

    2017-08-01

    Here, we report the fabrication of low-temperature sol-gel-derived aluminum oxide (AlOx) films via ultraviolet (UV) annealing and the investigation of their water vapor blocking properties by measuring the water vapor transmission rates (WVTRs). The UV annealing process induced the formation of a dense metal-oxygen-metal bond (Al-O-Al structure) at low temperatures (99%) and good electrical insulating properties (∼10-7 A/cm2 at 2 MV/cm). Finally, we confirmed that a dense AlOx thin film was successfully deposited onto the plastic substrate via UV annealing at low temperatures, leading to a substantial reduction in the WVTRs. The Ca corrosion test was used to measure the WVTRs of AlOx thin films deposited onto polyethylene naphthalate or polyimide substrates, determined to be 0.0095 g m-2 day-1 (25 °C, 50% relative humidity) and 0.26 g m-2 day-1, respectively.

  17. Effectiveness of Devices to Monitor Biofouling and Metals Deposition on Plumbing Materials Exposed to a Full-Scale Drinking Water Distribution System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbin, Scott; Wylie, Jason; Krishna, K. C. Bal

    2017-01-01

    A Modified Robbins Device (MRD) was installed in a full-scale water distribution system to investigate biofouling and metal depositions on concrete, high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and stainless steel surfaces. Bulk water monitoring and a KIWA monitor (with glass media) were used to offline monitor biofilm development on pipe wall surfaces. Results indicated that adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and metal concentrations on coupons increased with time. However, bacterial diversities decreased. There was a positive correlation between increase of ATP and metal deposition on pipe surfaces of stainless steel and HDPE and no correlation was observed on concrete and glass surfaces. The shared bacterial diversity between bulk water and MRD was less than 20% and the diversity shared between the MRD and KIWA monitor was only 10%. The bacterial diversity on biofilm of plumbing material of MRD however, did not show a significant difference suggesting a lack of influence from plumbing material during early stage of biofilm development. PMID:28060947

  18. Effectiveness of Devices to Monitor Biofouling and Metals Deposition on Plumbing Materials Exposed to a Full-Scale Drinking Water Distribution System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginige, Maneesha P; Garbin, Scott; Wylie, Jason; Krishna, K C Bal

    2017-01-01

    A Modified Robbins Device (MRD) was installed in a full-scale water distribution system to investigate biofouling and metal depositions on concrete, high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and stainless steel surfaces. Bulk water monitoring and a KIWA monitor (with glass media) were used to offline monitor biofilm development on pipe wall surfaces. Results indicated that adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and metal concentrations on coupons increased with time. However, bacterial diversities decreased. There was a positive correlation between increase of ATP and metal deposition on pipe surfaces of stainless steel and HDPE and no correlation was observed on concrete and glass surfaces. The shared bacterial diversity between bulk water and MRD was less than 20% and the diversity shared between the MRD and KIWA monitor was only 10%. The bacterial diversity on biofilm of plumbing material of MRD however, did not show a significant difference suggesting a lack of influence from plumbing material during early stage of biofilm development.

  19. Preparation of pre-reduced pellet using pyrite cinder containing nonferrous metals with high temperature chloridizingreduction roasting technology—Effect of CaCl2additive

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈栋; 朱德庆; 洪澜; 陈瑶; 许继芳; 伍凌

    2015-01-01

    The role of CaCl2 during the high temperature chloridizing-reduction roasting process was investigated, aiming at acquiring high strength blast furnace burden with high iron grade and low nonferrous metals content. The effects of CaCl2 dosage on pelletizing, preheating and reduction were investigated. The results show that CaCl2 can improve the wet drop strength but reduces the thermostability of pyrite cinder green balls. When the dosage of CaCl2 exceeds 1%, the compressive strength of preheated pellets decreases while the growth of iron oxide particles is improved. Furthermore, the compressive strength of pre-reduced pellets increases but the metallization degree of pre-reduced pellets decreases with CaCl2 additive. The removal tests indicate that Zn can be removed completely without CaCl2 additive, Cu is removed only under the condition with CaCl2 additive and part of Pb must be removed by CaCl2 additive.

  20. Preparation of pre-reduced pellet using pyrite cinder containing nonferrous metals with high temperature chloridizing- reduction roasting technology-Effect of CaCl2 additive

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈栋; 朱德庆; 洪澜; 陈瑶; 许继芳; 伍凌

    2015-01-01

    The role of CaCl2 during the high temperature chloridizing-reduction roasting process was investigated, aiming at acquiring high strength blast furnace burden with high iron grade and low nonferrous metals content. The effects of CaCl2 dosage on pelletizing, preheating and reduction were investigated. The results show that CaCl2 can improve the wet drop strength but reduces the thermostability of pyrite cinder green balls. When the dosage of CaCl2 exceeds 1%, the compressive strength of preheated pellets decreases while the growth of iron oxide particles is improved. Furthermore, the compressive strength of pre-reduced pellets increases but the metallization degree of pre-reduced pellets decreases with CaCl2 additive. The removal tests indicate that Zn can be removed completely without CaCl2 additive, Cu is removed only under the condition with CaCl2 additive and part of Pb must be removed by CaCl2 additive.

  1. Removal of sulphite-reducing clostridia spores by full-scale water treatment processes as a surrogate for protozoan (oo)cysts removal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hijnen, W.A.M.; Willemsen-Zwaagstra, J.; Hiemstra, P.; Medema, Gerriet Jan; Kooij, D. van der

    2000-01-01

    At eight full-scale water treatment plants in the Netherlands the removal of spores of sulphite-reducing clostridia (SSRC) was determined. By sampling and processing large volumes of water (1 up to 500 litres) SSRC were detected after each stage of the treatment. This enabled the assessment of the

  2. Large-scale field application of RNAi technology reducing Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus Disease in honey bees (Apis mellifera, Hymenoptera; Apidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    We present the first successful use of RNAi under a large-scale real-world application for disease control. Israeli acute paralysis virus, IAPV, has been linked as a contributing factor in coolly collapse, CCD, of honey bees. IAPV specific homologous dsRNA were designed to reduce impacts from IAPV i...

  3. Local to regional scale industrial heavy metal pollution recorded in sediments of large freshwater lakes in central Europe (lakes Geneva and Lucerne) over the last centuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevenon, Florian; Graham, Neil D; Chiaradia, Massimo; Arpagaus, Philippe; Wildi, Walter; Poté, John

    2011-12-15

    This research first focuses on the spatial and temporal patterns of heavy metals from contrasting environments (highly polluted to deepwater sites) of Lake Geneva. The mercury (Hg) and lead (Pb) records from two deepwater sites show that the heavy metal variations before the industrial period are primarily linked to natural weathering input of trace elements. By opposition, the discharge of industrial treated wastewaters into Vidy Bay of Lake Geneva during the second part of the 20th century, involved the sedimentation of highly metal-contaminated sediments in the area surrounding the WWTP outlet pipe discharge. Eventually, a new Pb isotope record of sediments from Lake Lucerne identifies the long-term increasing anthropogenic lead pollution after ca. 1500, probably due to the development of metallurgical activities during the High Middle Ages. These data furthermore allows to compare the recent anthropogenic sources of water pollution from three of the largest freshwater lakes of Western Europe (lakes Geneva, Lucerne, and Constance). High increases in Pb and Hg highlight the regional impact of industrial pollution after ca. 1750-1850, and the decrease of metal pollution in the 1980s due to the effects of remediation strategies such as the implementation of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). However, at all the studied sites, the recent metal concentrations remain higher than pre-industrial levels. Moreover, the local scale pollution data reveal two highly contaminated sites (>100 μg Pb/g dry weight sediment) by industrial activities, during the late-19th and early-20th centuries (Lake Lucerne) and during the second part of the 20th century (Vidy Bay of Lake Geneva). Overall, the regional scale pollution history inferred from the three large and deep perialpine lakes points out at the pollution of water systems by heavy metals during the last two centuries due to the discharge of industrial effluents.

  4. De facto methodologies toward the synthesis and scale-up production of UiO-66-type metal-organic frameworks and membrane materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhigang; Zhao, Dan

    2015-11-28

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are architected via coordination bonds between inorganic metal nodes and organic ligands. They have become emerging advanced porous materials and gained ever-increasing attention in the past decade. In particular, overwhelming studies have been devoted to those hydrostable MOFs which are suggested to be highly promising for industrial applications. UiO-66 is such a unique MOF because of its superior thermal/chemical stability and structural tunability. However, its repeatable, green, and scale-up synthesis remains a challenge for its commercialization and implementation in industrial applications. This perspective mainly summarises the recent development in the synthesis of UiO-66-type MOFs and their related composites. From a scale-up viewpoint, we also present some important advances in the batch and continuous reactor synthesis toward their massive production (226 references).

  5. Reach Scale Studies of Trace Metal Transport in Mountain Streams: Do Wetlands Act as a Sink or a Source?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKnight, D. M.; August, E.; Duren, S.; Wong, J.

    2007-12-01

    In the Rocky Mountains, there are many watersheds containing streams impacted by acid rock and acid mine drainage. These streams typically have high concentrations of dissolved metals and copious amounts of iron and aluminum oxides deposited on the streambed. Remediation of these contaminated streams is challenging because of the remote locations of the abandoned mines and the large amounts of metal oxides potentially generated in treatment of the drainage. Wetlands have the potential to attenuate trace metal transport. We examined retention of metals in an iron-oxide rich wetland near Leadville, CO, which had been receiving mine drainage for almost a century. We found that in the summer, the wetland did have a net retentive effect for most metals studied, limiting input into the adjacent stream, whereas, the wetland was a net source of metals during the winter. Furthermore, during spring snowmelt, the wetland did not retain the large pulse of zinc and iron leached by melting snow on the surrounding tailings piles. In another stream system receiving acid rock drainage, we found that riparian wetlands become sources of metals to the stream under drought conditions, which further exacerbated the metal enrichment associated with lesser snowmelt dilution.

  6. Pneumatic device of the preload and dynamic loads balancing to reduce the intensity of thermal processes in the metal cutting process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilin, A. N.; Moyzes, B. B.; Cherkasov, A. I.; Ditenberg, I. A.; Khairullin, A. R.; Glinenko, E. V.

    2017-01-01

    Improved reliability of the technological system «machine-tool-instrument-detail» is an important current task. Backlashes and insufficient stiffness of technological system lead to intensive wear of the cutting tool, increasing the heat in the cutting zone. Due to high temperature in the thin surface layers of the workpiece and tool thermal processes may occur which are similar to release and can cause the structural changes of the material. The current article presents the final design of the device which has been developed to reduce the intensity of thermal processes in metal cutting.

  7. Decoration of TiO2 nanotubes with metal nanoparticles using polyoxometalate as a UV-switchable reducing agent for enhanced visible and solar light photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Andrew; Zheng, Haidong; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh; Bhargava, Suresh K; Bansal, Vipul

    2012-10-09

    We present the employment of the Keggin ion 12-phosphotungstic acid as a UV-switchable reducing agent for the decoration of Au, Ag, Pt, and Cu nanoparticles onto the surface of TiO(2) nanotubes synthesized by electrochemical anodization. The synthesized composites were studied using SEM, GADDS XRD, and EDX, and the photocatalytic activity of the composites was examined by measuring the photodegradation of the organic dye "Congo red" under simulated solar light. Decoration with metal nanoparticles was observed to enhance the activity of the photocatalytic process by upward of 100% with respect to unmodified TiO(2) nanotubes.

  8. An updated survey of globular clusters in M 31. III. A spectroscopic metallicity scale for the Revised Bologna Catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Galleti, S; Buzzoni, A; Federici, L; Pecci, F Fusi

    2009-01-01

    We present a new homogeneous set of metallicity estimates based on Lick indices for 245 old globular clusters of the M31 galaxy comprised in the Revised Bologna Catalog. The metallicity distribution of the M31 globular clusters is briefly discussed and compared with that of the Milky Way. Simple parametric statistics suggests that the [Fe/H] distribution is likely not unimodal. The strong correlation between metallicity and kinematics found in previous studies is confirmed. The most metal-rich GCs tend to be packed at the center of the system and share the galactic rotation as traced by the HI disk. Although the velocity dispersion around the curve increases with decreasing metallicity, also clusters with [Fe/H]<-1.0 display a clear rotational pattern, at odds with their Milky Way counterparts.

  9. Metal-based superoxide dismutase and catalase mimics reduce oxidative stress biomarkers and extend life span of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Thales de P; Fonseca, Fernanda L; de Carvalho, Mariana D C; Godinho, Rodrigo M da C; de Almeida, Fernando Pereira; Saint'Pierre, Tatiana D; Rey, Nicolás A; Fernandes, Christiane; Horn, Adolfo; Pereira, Marcos D

    2017-01-15

    Aging is a natural process characterized by several biological changes. In this context, oxidative stress appears as a key factor that leads cells and organisms to severe dysfunctions and diseases. To cope with reactive oxygen species and oxidative-related damage, there has been increased use of superoxide dismutase (SOD)/catalase (CAT) biomimetic compounds. Recently, we have shown that three metal-based compounds {[Fe(HPClNOL)Cl2]NO3, [Cu(HPClNOL)(CH3CN)](ClO4)2 and Mn(HPClNOL)(Cl)2}, harboring in vitro SOD and/or CAT activities, were critical for protection of yeast cells against oxidative stress. In this work, treating Saccharomyces cerevisiae with these SOD/CAT mimics (25.0 µM/1 h), we highlight the pivotal role of these compounds to extend the life span of yeast during chronological aging. Evaluating lipid and protein oxidation of aged cells, it becomes evident that these mimics extend the life expectancy of yeast mainly due to the reduction in oxidative stress biomarkers. In addition, the treatment of yeast cells with these mimics regulated the amounts of lipid droplet occurrence, consistent with the requirement and protection of lipids for cell integrity during aging. Concerning SOD/CAT mimics uptake, using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, we add new evidence that these complexes, besides being bioabsorbed by S. cerevisiae cells, can also affect metal homeostasis. Finally, our work presents a new application for these SOD/CAT mimics, which demonstrate a great potential to be employed as antiaging agents. Taken together, these promising results prompt future studies concerning the relevance of administration of these molecules against the emerging aging-related diseases such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and Huntington's.

  10. Monitoring of ground water quality and heavy metals in soil during large scale bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated waste in India: case studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajoy Kumar Mandal

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Bioremediation using microbes has been well accepted as an environmentally friendly and economical treatment method for disposal of hazardous petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated waste (oily waste and this type of bioremediation has been successfully conducted in laboratory and on a pilot scale in various countries, including India. Presently there are no federal regulatory guidelines available in India for carrying out field-scale bioremediation of oily waste using microbes. The results of the present study describe the analysis of ground water quality as well as selected heavy metals in oily waste in some of the large-scale field case studies on bioremediation of oily waste (solid waste carried out at various oil installations in India. The results show that there was no contribution of oil and grease and selected heavy metals to the ground water in the nearby area due to adoption of this bioremediation process. The results further reveal that there were no changes in pH and EC of the groundwater due to bioremediation. In almost all cases the selected heavy metals in residual oily waste were within the permissible limits as per Schedule – II of Hazardous Waste Management, Handling and Transboundary Movement Act, Amendment 2008, (HWM Act 2008, by the Ministry of Environment and Forests (MoEF, Government of India (GoI.

  11. Orenia metallireducens sp. nov. strain Z6, a Novel Metal-reducing Firmicute from the Deep Subsurface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Yiran; Sanford, Robert A.; Boyanov, Maxim I.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Flynn, Theodore M.; O' Loughlin, Edward J.; Chang, Yun-juan; Locke, Randall A.; Weber, Joseph R.; Egan, Sheila M.; Mackie, Roderick I.; Cann, Isaac; Fouke, Bruce W.

    2016-08-26

    A novel halophilic and metal-reducing bacterium,Orenia metallireducensstrain Z6, was isolated from briny groundwater extracted from a 2.02 km-deep borehole in the Illinois Basin, IL. This organism shared 96% 16S rRNA gene similarity withOrenia marismortui, but demonstrated physiological properties previously unknown for this genus. In addition to exhibiting a fermentative metabolism typical of genusOrenia, strain Z6 reduces various metal oxides [Fe(III), Mn(IV), Co(III), and Cr(VI)] using H2as the electron donor. Strain Z6 actively reduced ferrihydrite over broad ranges of pH (6-9.6), salinity (0.4-3.5 M NaCl) and temperature (20-60 °C). At pH 6.5, strain Z6 also reduced more crystalline iron oxides such as lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH), goethite (α-FeOOH) and hematite (α-Fe2O3). Analysis of X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) following Fe(III) reduction by strain Z6 revealed spectra from ferrous secondary mineral phases consistent with the precipitation of vivianite [Fe3(PO4)2] and siderite (FeCO3). The draft genome assembled for strain Z6 is 3.47 Mb in size and contains 3,269 protein-coding genes. Unlike the well understood iron-reducingShewanellaandGeobacterspecies, this organism lacks thec-type cytochromes for typical Fe(III) reduction. Strain Z6 represents the first bacterial species in the genusOrenia(orderHalanaerobiales) reported to reduce ferric iron minerals and other metal oxides. This microbe expands both the phylogenetic and physiological scope of iron-reducing microorganisms known to inhabit the deep subsurface and suggests new mechanisms for microbial iron reduction. These distinctions from otherOreniaspp. support the designation of strain Z6 as a new species,Orenia metallireducenssp. nov.

  12. Large-scale Manufacturing of Nanoparticulate-based Lubrication Additives for Improved Energy Efficiency and Reduced Emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdemir, Ali [Argonne National Laboratory

    2013-09-26

    This project was funded under the Department of Energy (DOE) Lab Call on Nanomanufacturing for Energy Efficiency and was directed toward the development of novel boron-based nanocolloidal lubrication additives for improving the friction and wear performance of machine components in a wide range of industrial and transportation applications. Argonne's research team concentrated on the scientific and technical aspects of the project, using a range of state-of-the art analytical and tribological test facilities. Argonne has extensive past experience and expertise in working with boron-based solid and liquid lubrication additives, and has intellectual property ownership of several. There were two industrial collaborators in this project: Ashland Oil (represented by its Valvoline subsidiary) and Primet Precision Materials, Inc. (a leading nanomaterials company). There was also a sub-contract with the University of Arkansas. The major objectives of the project were to develop novel boron-based nanocolloidal lubrication additives and to optimize and verify their performance under boundary-lubricated sliding conditions. The project also tackled problems related to colloidal dispersion, larger-scale manufacturing and blending of nano-additives with base carrier oils. Other important issues dealt with in the project were determination of the optimum size and concentration of the particles and compatibility with various base fluids and/or additives. Boron-based particulate additives considered in this project included boric acid (H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}), hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), boron oxide, and borax. As part of this project, we also explored a hybrid MoS{sub 2} + boric acid formulation approach for more effective lubrication and reported the results. The major motivation behind this work was to reduce energy losses related to friction and wear in a wide spectrum of mechanical systems and thereby reduce our dependence on imported oil. Growing concern over greenhouse

  13. Influence of oxide and alloy formation on the Electrochemistry of Ti deposition from the NaCl-KCl-NaF-K-2 TiF6 melt reduced by metallic Ti

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barner, Jens H. Von; Precht Noyé, Pernille; Barhoun, A

    2005-01-01

    The redox reactions in KCl-NaCl-NaF-K2TiF6 melts reduced by titanium metal have been studied by cyclic voltammetry and chronopotentiommetry. At platinum and nickel electrodes waves due to alloy formation were seen preceding the Ti(III) --> Ti metal deposition wave. The presence of oxide species...

  14. Noble metal-free reduced graphene oxide-ZnxCd₁-xS nanocomposite with enhanced solar photocatalytic H₂-production performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Yu, Jiaguo; Jaroniec, Mietek; Gong, Jian Ru

    2012-09-12

    Design and preparation of efficient artificial photosynthetic systems for harvesting solar energy by production of hydrogen from water splitting is of great importance from both theoretical and practical viewpoints. ZnS-based solid solutions have been fully proved to be an efficient visible-light driven photocatalysts, however, the H(2)-production rate observed for these solid solutions is far from exciting and sometimes an expensive Pt cocatalyst is still needed in order to achieve higher quantum efficiency. Here, for the first time we report the high solar photocatalytic H(2)-production activity over the noble metal-free reduced graphene oxide (RGO)-Zn(x)Cd(1-x)S nanocomposite prepared by a facile coprecipitation-hydrothermal reduction strategy. The optimized RGO-Zn(0.8)Cd(0.2)S photocatalyst has a high H(2)-production rate of 1824 μmol h(-1) g(-1) at the RGO content of 0.25 wt % and the apparent quantum efficiency of 23.4% at 420 nm (the energy conversion efficiency is ca. 0.36% at simulated one-sun (AM 1.5G) illumination). The results exhibit significantly improved photocatalytic hydrogen production by 450% compared with that of the pristine Zn(0.8)Cd(0.2)S, and are better than that of the optimized Pt-Zn(0.8)Cd(0.2)S under the same reaction conditions, showing that the RGO-Zn(0.8)Cd(0.2)S nanocomposite represents one of the most highly active metal sulfide photocatalyts in the absence of noble metal cocatalysts. This work creates a green and simple way for using RGO as a support to enhance the photocatalytic H(2)-production activity of Zn(x)Cd(1-x)S, and also demonstrates that RGO is a promising substitute for noble metals in photocatalytic H(2)-production.

  15. The identification of 'hotspots' of heavy metal pollution in soil-rice systems at a regional scale in eastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wanlu; Xu, Binbin; Song, Qiujin; Liu, Xingmei; Xu, Jianming; Brookes, Philip C

    2014-02-15

    Chinese agricultural soils and crops are suffering from increasing damage from heavy metals, which are introduced from various pollution sources including agriculture, traffic, mining and especially the flourishing private metal recycling industry. In this study, 219 pairs of rice grain and corresponding soil samples were collected from Wenling in Zhejiang Province to identify the spatial relationship and pollution hotspots of Cd, Cu, Ni and Zn in the soil-rice system. The mean soil concentrations of heavy metals were 0.316 mg kg(-1) for Cd, 47.3 mg kg(-1) for Cu, 31.7 mg kg(-1) for Ni and 131 mg kg(-1) for Zn, and the metal concentrations in rice grain were 0.132 mg kg(-1) for Cd, 2.46 mg kg(-1) for Cu, 0.223 mg kg(-1) for Ni and 17.4 mg kg(-1) for Zn. The coefficient of variability (CV) of soil Cd, Cu and rice Cd were 147%, 146% and 180%, respectively, indicating an extensive variability. While the CVs of other metals ranged from 23.4% to 84.3% with a moderate variability. Kriging interpolation procedure and the Local Moran's I index detected the locations of pollution hotspots of these four metals. Cd and Cu had a very similar spatial pattern, with contamination hotspots located simultaneously in the northwestern part of the study area, and there were obvious hotspots for soil Zn in the north area, while in the northeast for soil Ni. The existence of hotspots may be due to industrialization and other anthropogenic activities. An Enrichment Index (EI) was employed to measure the uptake of heavy metals by rice. The results indicated that the accumulation and availability of heavy metals in the soil-rice system may be influenced by both soil heavy metal concentrations and soil physico-chemical properties. Cross-correlograms quantitatively illustrated that EIs were significantly correlated with soil properties. Soil pH and organic matter were the most important factors controlling the uptake of heavy metals by rice. As results, positive measures should be taken into

  16. Full-scale prototyping of the Hitachi dual-purpose metal cask and verification of its heat transfer characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumagai, N.; Ishida, N.; Ootsuka, M.; Kamoshida, M.; Hiranuma, T.; Doumori, S.; Hoshikawa, T.; Shimizu, M.; Kashiwakura, J.; Hayashi, M. [Hitachi, Ltd., Hitachi (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    Hitachi has been developing dual-purpose metal casks for transport and storage of spent nuclear fuels. The Hitachi cask, HDP69B can store 69 BWR fuel assemblies. The cask features are as follows. 1) The fuel basket is assembled mainly with plates of borated stainless steel. The plates are not welded, but cross-inserted into each other like the dividers in an egg carton. Since the borated stainless steel has relatively low heat conductivity, aluminum alloy plates are inserted along with some stainless steel plates to enhance heat removal ability. 2) Cured resin blocks are fitted into the inner shell of the cask for neutron shielding of the cask body. The resin blocks are surrounded by an aluminum casing which transfers heat of stored fuel from the inner shell to the outer shell of the cask. The block type shield structure eliminates the need for welding the heat transfer fins to the inner and outer shells. The weldless structures of the HDP69B lead to its enhanced manufacturability, but they complicate the heat transfer characteristics because there are gaps between such components as the aluminum casing and inner/outer shells. We carried out full-scale prototyping of the HDP69B and ran a heat transfer test using the prototype. The purposes of the heat transfer test were to check the heat removal ability of the HDP69B and to verify the safety analysis model for heat removal. Results of the heat transfer test and optimized analysis model for heat transfer characteristics of the HDP69B are the focus of this paper. The heat transfer test is summarized as follows. Sixty nine heaters simulating the shape and heat power of spent fuel assemblies were inserted into the fuel basket. After replacing the inner atmosphere with 0.1 MPa of helium, the heat transfer test was started. About 7 days were required to equilibrate the temperature distribution. The temperature at the center of the basket was 194 C. The results confirmed the HDP69B had sufficient heat removal ability. The

  17. Increasing light capture in silicon solar cells with encapsulants incorporating air prisms to reduce metallic contact losses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fu-Hao; Pathreeker, Shreyas; Kaur, Jaspreet; Hosein, Ian D

    2016-10-31

    Silicon solar cells are the most widely deployed modules owing to their low-cost manufacture, large market, and suitable efficiencies for residential and commercial use. Methods to increase their solar energy collection must be easily integrated into module fabrication. We perform a theoretical and experimental study on the light collection properties of an encapsulant that incorporates a periodic array of air prisms, which overlay the metallic front contacts of silicon solar cells. We show that the light collection efficiency induced by the encapsulant depends on both the shape of the prisms and angle of incidence of incoming light. We elucidate the changes in collection efficiency in terms of the ray paths and reflection mechanisms in the encapsulant. We fabricated the encapsulant from a commercial silicone and studied the change in the external quantum efficiency (EQE) on an encapsulated, standard silicon solar cell. We observe efficiency enhancements, as compared to a uniform encapsulant, over the visible to near infrared region for a range of incident angles. This work demonstrates exactly how a periodic air prism architecture increases light collection, and how it may be designed to maximize light collection over the widest range of incident angles.

  18. The success of Fermi gas model for overall scaling of 2D metal-to-insulator transition data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheremisin, M. V.

    2017-03-01

    The melting condition for two-dimensional Wigner solid (Platzman and Fukuyama, 1974) [14] is shown to contain an error of a factor of π. The analysis of experimental data for apparent 2D metal-to-insulator transition shows that the Wigner solidification (Tanatar and Ceperley, 1989) [16] has been never achieved. Within routine Fermi gas model both the metallic and insulating behavior of different 2D system for actual range of carrier densities and temperatures is explained.

  19. Developing Design Criteria and Scale Up Methods for Water-Stable Metal-Organic Frameworks for Adsorption Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-08

    COBALT, NICKEL, COPPER , AND ZINC- BASED WATER STABLE PILLARED METAL-ORGANIC FRAMEWORKS 121 6.1 Introduction 121 6.2 Experimental Section 126...SYNTHESIS OF NOVEL COBALT, NICKEL, COPPER , AND ZINC- BASED WATER STABLE PILLARED METAL-ORGANIC FRAMEWORKS This work was conducted in collaboration with...by synthesizing cobalt, nickel, copper , and zinc-based new water stable pillared MOFs of similar topology (Figure 6.1b, Appendix D, Figure D.1

  20. Metal enrichment in Semi-Analytical Model, fundamental scaling relations and the case of Milky Way galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Cousin, Morgane; Boissier, Samuel; Béthermin, Matthieu; Roehlly, Yannick; Génois, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Gas flows and star formation processes play a fundamental role in the galaxy formation. These mechanisms leave an imprint in the amount of heavy elements. The analyse of the metallicity signature provide additional constrain on the galaxy formation scenario. We aim to discriminate between four different galaxy formation models based on two accretion scenarios and two different star formation recipes. We address the impact of a bimodal accretion scenario and a strong regulated star formation recipe onto the metal enrichment process of galaxies. We present a new extension of the eGalICS model which allows to track the metal enrichment process. Our new chemodynamical model is applicable for situations ranging metal-free primordial accretion to very-enriched interstellar gas contents. We use this new tool to predict the metallicity evolution of both the stellar populations and the gas-phase. We also address the evolution of the gas metallicity with the star formation rate. We then focus on a sub sample of Milky W...

  1. MapReduce implementation of a hybrid spectral library-database search method for large-scale peptide identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyanaraman, Ananth; Cannon, William R; Latt, Benjamin; Baxter, Douglas J

    2011-11-01

    A MapReduce-based implementation called MR-MSPolygraph for parallelizing peptide identification from mass spectrometry data is presented. The underlying serial method, MSPolygraph, uses a novel hybrid approach to match an experimental spectrum against a combination of a protein sequence database and a spectral library. Our MapReduce implementation can run on any Hadoop cluster environment. Experimental results demonstrate that, relative to the serial version, MR-MSPolygraph reduces the time to solution from weeks to hours, for processing tens of thousands of experimental spectra. Speedup and other related performance studies are also reported on a 400-core Hadoop cluster using spectral datasets from environmental microbial communities as inputs. The source code along with user documentation are available on http://compbio.eecs.wsu.edu/MR-MSPolygraph. ananth@eecs.wsu.edu; william.cannon@pnnl.gov. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  2. A method for the construction of strongly reduced representations of ATLAS experimental uncertainties and the application thereof to the jet energy scale

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    A method is presented for the reduction of large sets of related uncertainty sources into strongly reduced representations which retain a suitable level of correlation information for use in many cases. So long as the search or measurement is not sensitive to the details of the correlations associated with the uncertainty source, this procedure can be used to reduce the complexity of the analysis. The method provides a self-consistent means of determining whether a given analysis is sensitive to the loss of correlation information arising from the reduction procedure. The method is applied to the ATLAS Jet Energy Scale (JES) uncertainty, demonstrating that the set of 67 independent sources can be strongly reduced to form a representation constructed of 3 nuisance parameters. By forming a set of four such representations, it is shown that JES correlation information is retained or probed over the full parameter space to within an average of 1%. This procedure is expected to significantly reduce the computation...

  3. Channel length scaling and the impact of metal gate work function on the performance of double gate-metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D Rechem; S Latreche; C Gontrand

    2009-03-01

    In this paper, we study the effects of short channel on double gate MOSFETs. We evaluate the variation of the threshold voltage, the subthreshold slope, the leakage current and the drain-induced barrier lowering when channel length CH decreases. Further- more, quantum effects on the performance of DG-MOSFETs are addressed and discussed. We also study the influence of metal gate work function on the performance of nanoscale MOSFETs. We use a self-consistent Poisson–Schrödinger solver in two dimensions over the entire device. A good agreement with numerical simulation results is obtained.

  4. A breakthrough biosorbent in removing heavy metals: Equilibrium, kinetic, thermodynamic and mechanism analyses in a lab-scale study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdolali, Atefeh [Centre for Technology in Water and Wastewater, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Technology Sydney, Broadway, NSW 2007 (Australia); Ngo, Huu Hao, E-mail: h.ngo@uts.edu.au [Centre for Technology in Water and Wastewater, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Technology Sydney, Broadway, NSW 2007 (Australia); Guo, Wenshan [Centre for Technology in Water and Wastewater, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Technology Sydney, Broadway, NSW 2007 (Australia); Lu, Shaoyong [Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Science, Beijing 100012 (China); Chen, Shiao-Shing; Nguyen, Nguyen Cong [Institute of Environmental Engineering and Management, National Taipei University of Technology, No. 1, Sec. 3, Chung-Hsiao E. Rd, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Zhang, Xinbo [Department of Environmental and Municipal Engineering, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Aquatic Science and Technology, Tianjin Chengjian University, Jinjing Road 26, Tianjin 300384 (China); Wang, Jie; Wu, Yun [School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300387 (China)

    2016-01-15

    A breakthrough biosorbent namely multi-metal binding biosorbent (MMBB) made from a combination of tea wastes, maple leaves and mandarin peels, was prepared to evaluate their biosorptive potential for removal of Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II) from multi-metal aqueous solutions. FTIR and SEM were conducted, before and after biosorption, to explore the intensity and position of the available functional groups and changes in adsorbent surface morphology. Carboxylic, hydroxyl and amine groups were found to be the principal functional groups for the sorption of metals. MMBB exhibited best performance at pH 5.5 with maximum sorption capacities of 31.73, 41.06, 76.25 and 26.63 mg/g for Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II), respectively. Pseudo-first and pseudo-second-order models represented the kinetic experimental data in different initial metal concentrations very well. Among two-parameter adsorption isotherm models, the Langmuir equation gave a better fit of the equilibrium data. For Cu(II) and Zn(II), the Khan isotherm describes better biosorption conditions while for Cd(II) and Pb(II), the Sips model was found to provide the best correlation of the biosorption equilibrium data. The calculated thermodynamic parameters indicated feasible, spontaneous and exothermic biosorption process. Overall, this novel MMBB can effectively be utilized as an adsorbent to remove heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions. - Highlights: • A novel multi-metal binding biosorbent (MMBB) was studied. • The biosorption of Cd{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Pb{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+} on MMBB was evaluated. • Hydroxyl, carbonyl and amine groups are involved in metal binding of MMBB. • Equilibrium data were presented and the best fitting models were identified. • The obtained results recommend this MMBB as potentially low-cost biosorbent.

  5. Vermicomposting as a technology for reducing nitrogen losses and greenhouse gas emissions from small-scale composting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nigussie, Abebe; Kuijper, Thomas; Bruun, Sander; Neergaard, de Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Thermophilic composting produces a significant amount of greenhouse gases. The objectives of this study were (i) to evaluate the effectiveness of vermicomposting to reduce nitrogen losses and greenhouse gases emissions compared to thermophilic composting, and (ii) to determine the effect of

  6. Effect of oxygen on the electrical conductivity of some metal oxides in inert and reducing atmospheres at high temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, T.A.; Firth, J.G.; Mann, B.

    1985-12-01

    An investigation has been carried out on the electrical behaviour at 900/sup 0/C of some ceramic oxides as a function of oxygen pressure. Measurements have been made in an inert (N/sub 2/) atmosphere and in an inert atmosphere containing reducing gases (CO, H/sub 2/ and CH/sub 4/). The oxides for which data are presented are Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/, Nb/sub 2/O/sub 5/, CeO/sub 2/, ThO/sub 2/ and Ga/sub 2/O/sub 3/. The factors affecting the electrical conductivities of these materials are briefly reviewed. The conductivities of Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/, Nb/sub 2/O/sub 5/ and CeO/sub 2/ showed a switch-like behaviour at the stoichiometric mixture of oxygen and reducing gas. Ga/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and ThO/sub 2/ do not exhibit this type of behaviour, the conductivities changing monotonically with increasing oxygen pressure. The possible reasons for this difference in behaviour are discussed. Data are also presented showing the behaviour of a sensor based on Ga/sub 2/O/sub 3/ in a vehicle exhaust. This shows its potential as a means of monitoring exhaust emissions with a view to controlling the air/fuel ratios at around the stoichiometric mixture.

  7. Phosphate conversion coating reduces the degradation rate and suppresses side effects of metallic magnesium implants in an animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, Muhammad Imran; Tavares, Ana; Evertz, Florian; Kieke, Marc; Seitz, Jan-Marten; Eifler, Rainer; Weizbauer, Andreas; Willbold, Elmar; Jürgen Maier, Hans; Glasmacher, Birgit; Behrens, Peter; Hauser, Hansjörg; Mueller, Peter P

    2016-05-06

    Magnesium alloys have promising mechanical and biological properties for the development of degradable implants. However, rapid implant corrosion and gas accumulations in tissue impede clinical applications. With time, the implant degradation rate is reduced by a highly biocompatible, phosphate-containing corrosion layer. To circumvent initial side effects after implantation it was attempted to develop a simple in vitro procedure to generate a similarly protective phosphate corrosion layer. To this end magnesium samples were pre-incubated in phosphate solutions. The resulting coating was well adherent during routine handling procedures. It completely suppressed the initial burst of corrosion and it reduced the average in vitro magnesium degradation rate over 56 days almost two-fold. In a small animal model phosphate coatings on magnesium implants were highly biocompatible and abrogated the appearance of gas cavities in the tissue. After implantation, the phosphate coating was replaced by a layer with an elemental composition that was highly similar to the corrosion layer that had formed on plain magnesium implants. The data demonstrate that a simple pre-treatment could improve clinically relevant properties of magnesium-based implants. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2016.

  8. Mercury use in artisanal small-scale gold mining threatens human health: measures to describe and reduce the health risk

    OpenAIRE

    Steckling, Nadine

    2016-01-01

    **Background:** Mercury is used in more than 70 countries to extract gold in artisanal small-scale gold mining (ASGM). The application of mercury is simple and plays a key role in the livelihood for more than 16 million gold miners. Mercury is added to the crushed ore and builds an amalgam with the gold it contains. The amalgam is then smelted, the mercury evaporates, and gold remains. The amalgam smelting is the main source of mercury exposure in ASGM. ASGM is the largest anthropogenic sourc...