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Sample records for reduced scale metal

  1. Structural evaluation of spent nuclear fuel storage facilities under aircraft crash impact (2). Horizontal impact test onto reduced scale metal cask due to aircraft engine missile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namba, Kosuke; Shirai, Koji; Saegusa, Toshiari

    2009-01-01

    In this study, to confirm the sealing performance of a metal cask subjected to impact force due to possible commercial aircraft crash against a spent fuel storage facility, the horizontal impact test was carried out. In the test, an aircraft engine missile with a speed of 57.3 m/s attacked the reduced scale metal cask containing helium gas, which stands vertically. Then the leak rate and sliding displacement of the lid were measured. The leak rate increased rapidly and reached to 4.0 x 10 -6 Pa·m 3 /sec. After that, the leak rate decreased slowly and converged to 1.0x10 -6 Pa·m 3 /sec after 20 hours from the impact test. The leak rate of a full scale cask was evaluated using that of reduced scale cask obtained by the test. Then the leak rate of the full scale cask was 3.5x10 -5 Pa·m 3 /sec. This result showed that the sealing performance of the full scale metal cask would not be affected immediately by the horizontal impact of the aircraft engine with a speed of 57.3 m/s. (author)

  2. Using proteomic data to assess a genome-scale "in silico" model of metal reducing bacteria in the simulation of field-scale uranium bioremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabusaki, S.; Fang, Y.; Wilkins, M. J.; Long, P.; Rifle IFRC Science Team

    2011-12-01

    A series of field experiments in a shallow alluvial aquifer at a former uranium mill tailings site have demonstrated that indigenous bacteria can be stimulated with acetate to catalyze the conversion of hexavalent uranium in a groundwater plume to immobile solid-associated uranium in the +4 oxidation state. While this bioreduction of uranium has been shown to lower groundwater concentrations below actionable standards, a viable remediation methodology will need a mechanistic, predictive and quantitative understanding of the microbially-mediated reactions that catalyze the reduction of uranium in the context of site-specific processes, properties, and conditions. At the Rifle IFRC site, we are investigating the impacts on uranium behavior of pulsed acetate amendment, acetate-oxidizing iron and sulfate reducing bacteria, seasonal water table variation, spatially-variable physical (hydraulic conductivity, porosity) and geochemical (reactive surface area) material properties. The simulation of three-dimensional, variably saturated flow and biogeochemical reactive transport during a uranium bioremediation field experiment includes a genome-scale in silico model of Geobacter sp. to represent the Fe(III) terminal electron accepting process (TEAP). The Geobacter in silico model of cell-scale physiological metabolic pathways is comprised of hundreds of intra-cellular and environmental exchange reactions. One advantage of this approach is that the TEAP reaction stoichiometry and rate are now functions of the metabolic status of the microorganism. The linkage of in silico model reactions to specific Geobacter proteins has enabled the use of groundwater proteomic analyses to assess the accuracy of the model under evolving hydrologic and biogeochemical conditions. In this case, the largest predicted fluxes through in silico model reactions generally correspond to high abundances of proteins linked to those reactions (e.g. the condensation reaction catalyzed by the protein

  3. Hidden scale invariance of metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hummel, Felix; Kresse, Georg; Dyre, Jeppe C.

    2015-01-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations of 58 liquid elements at their triple point show that most metals exhibit near proportionality between the thermal fluctuations of the virial and the potential energy in the isochoric ensemble. This demonstrates a general “hidden” scale invariance...... of metals making the condensed part of the thermodynamic phase diagram effectively one dimensional with respect to structure and dynamics. DFT computed density scaling exponents, related to the Grüneisen parameter, are in good agreement with experimental values for the 16 elements where reliable data were...... available. Hidden scale invariance is demonstrated in detail for magnesium by showing invariance of structure and dynamics. Computed melting curves of period three metals follow curves with invariance (isomorphs). The experimental structure factor of magnesium is predicted by assuming scale invariant...

  4. Characteristic test results of reduced-scale lead and 3D laminated rubber bearings for seismic isolation design of liquid metal reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, B.; Lee, Jae Han; Kwon, H. S.

    1999-06-01

    Through the fabrications and the tests of reduced scale rubber bearing by several times since 1995, the technology related to the bearings has been improved. In this report, several lead rubber bearings (LLRB) with different lead plug diameters, high damping rubber bearing (HLRB), and 3D-LRB made of UNISON NR (natural rubber) compounds are tested to get the hysteretic characteristics of rubber bearings. Specially, the HLRB and 3D-LRB are tested for the vertical deformation characteristics. All the test data are plotted and analyzed to be compared with design target values such as equivalent horizontal stiffness and equivalent damping ration. The variations of the equivalent horizontal stiffness and damping for the lead and the 3D-LRB are evaluated from test data in the range of 25% to 150% of shear strain in horizontal direction. As increasing the lead plug diameter up to 48 mm, the values of yield load, equivalent stiffness, and equivalent damping are increased, and the maximum damping of 31 % are horizontal performance during compression and shear tests. Through the vertical performance tests of HLRB and 3D-LRB, it is reveal that the vertical stiffness of HLRB is 15.57 ton/mm, which is much lower than target value by 1/4, and the vertical stiffness of 3D-LRB show in the range of 2.17 ton/mm to 4.4 ton/mm, which are higher than the design target 1.25 ton/mm by about 2 times. The vertical equivalent damping of HLRB is 11.48%, but the ones of 3D-LRB show large variations between 8 % and 54%. There are no difference between the first and after curves of the vertical hysteresis of 3D-LRB and no dependency of test speed because the dish springs take the vertical behaviors of 3D-LRB. (author). 8 refs., 38 tabs., 47 figs

  5. Chemically reducing decontamination method for radioactive metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Akio; Onuma, Tsutomu; Sato, Hitoshi.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention concerns a decontamination method of electrolytically reducing radioactive metal wastes, then chemically dissolving the surface thereof with a strong acid decontaminating solution. This method utilizes dissolving characteristics of stainless steels in the strong acid solution. That is, in the electrolytic reduction operation, a portion of the metal wastes is brought into contact with a strong acid decontaminating solution, and voltage and current are applied to the portion and keep it for a long period of time so as to make the potential of the immersed portion of the metal wastes to an active soluble region. Then, the electrolytic reduction operation is stopped, and the metal wastes are entirely immersed in the decontaminating solution to decontaminate by chemical dissolution. As the decontaminating solution, strong acid such as sulfuric acid, nitric acid is used. Since DC current power source capacity required for causing reaction in the active soluble region can be decreased, the decontamination facility can be minimized and simplified, and necessary electric power can be saved even upon decontamination of radioactive metal wastes made of stainless steels and having a great area. Further, chemical dissolution can be conducted without adding an expensive oxidizing agent. (N.H.)

  6. Role of Bioadsorbents in Reducing Toxic Metals

    OpenAIRE

    Mathew, Blessy Baby; Jaishankar, Monisha; Biju, Vinai George; Krishnamurthy Nideghatta Beeregowda

    2016-01-01

    Industrialization and urbanization have led to the release of increasing amounts of heavy metals into the environment. Metal ion contamination of drinking water and waste water is a serious ongoing problem especially with high toxic metals such as lead and cadmium and less toxic metals such as copper and zinc. Several biological materials have attracted many researchers and scientists as they offer both cheap and effective removal of heavy metals from waste water. Therefore it is urgent to st...

  7. Scaling behavior of heavy fermion metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaginyan, V.R., E-mail: vrshag@thd.pnpi.spb.r [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, RAS, Gatchina, 188300 (Russian Federation); CTSPS, Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta, GA 30314 (United States); Amusia, M.Ya. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, RAS, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Msezane, A.Z. [CTSPS, Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta, GA 30314 (United States); Popov, K.G. [Komi Science Center, Ural Division, RAS, 3a, Chernova str. Syktyvkar, 167982 (Russian Federation)

    2010-07-15

    Strongly correlated Fermi systems are fundamental systems in physics that are best studied experimentally, which until very recently have lacked theoretical explanations. This review discusses the construction of a theory and the analysis of phenomena occurring in strongly correlated Fermi systems such as heavy-fermion (HF) metals and two-dimensional (2D) Fermi systems. It is shown that the basic properties and the scaling behavior of HF metals can be described within the framework of a fermion condensation quantum phase transition (FCQPT) and an extended quasiparticle paradigm that allow us to explain the non-Fermi liquid behavior observed in strongly correlated Fermi systems. In contrast to the Landau paradigm stating that the quasiparticle effective mass is a constant, the effective mass of new quasiparticles strongly depends on temperature, magnetic field, pressure, and other parameters. Having analyzed the collected facts on strongly correlated Fermi systems with quite a different microscopic nature, we find these to exhibit the same non-Fermi liquid behavior at FCQPT. We show both analytically and using arguments based entirely on the experimental grounds that the data collected on very different strongly correlated Fermi systems have a universal scaling behavior, and materials with strongly correlated fermions can unexpectedly be uniform in their diversity. Our analysis of strongly correlated systems such as HF metals and 2D Fermi systems is in the context of salient experimental results. Our calculations of the non-Fermi liquid behavior, the scales and thermodynamic, relaxation and transport properties are in good agreement with experimental facts.

  8. Combustion of Metals in Reduced-Gravity and Extraterrestrial Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbud-Madrid, A.; Omaly, P.; Branch, M. C.; Daily, J. W.

    1999-01-01

    As a result of the ongoing exploration of Mars and the several unmanned and manned missions planned for the future, increased attention has been given to the use of the natural resources of the planet for rocket propellant production and energy generation. Since the atmosphere of Mars consists of approximately 95% carbon dioxide (CO2), this gas is the resource of choice to be employed for these purposes. Unfortunately, CO2 is also a final product in most combustion reactions, requiring further processing to extract useful reactants such as carbon monoxide (CO), oxygen (O2), and hydrocarbons. An exception is the use Of CO2 as an oxidizer reacting directly with metal fuel. Since many metals burn vigorously with CO2, these may be used as an energy source and as propellants for an ascent/descent vehicle in sample-collection missions on Mars. In response to NASA's Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) Enterprise to search for appropriate in-situ resource utilization techniques, this investigation will study the burning characteristics of promising metal/CO2 combinations. The use of reduced gravity is essential to eliminate the intrusive buoyant flows that plague the high-temperature metal reactions, to remove the destructive effect of gravity on the shape of molten metal samples, and to study the influence of radiative heat transfer from solid oxides undisturbed by natural convection. In studies with large metal specimens, the burning process is invariably influenced by strong convective currents that accelerate the reaction and shorten the burning times. Although these currents are nearly absent from small burning particles, the high emissivity of the flames, rapid reaction, small length scales, and intermittent explosions make the gathering of any useful information on burning rates and flame structure very difficult. This investigation has the ultimate goal of providing a careful probing of flame structure and dynamics by taking advantage of large, free

  9. The prospects of transition metal dichalcogenides for ultimately scaled CMOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, S.; Kinberger, W.; Granzner, R.; Fiori, G.; Schwierz, F.

    2018-05-01

    MOSFET gate length scaling has been a main source of progress in digital electronics for decades. Today, researchers still spend considerable efforts on reducing the gate length and on developing ultimately scaled MOSFETs, thereby exploring both new device architectures and alternative channel materials beyond Silicon such as two-dimensional TMDs (transition metal dichalcogenide). On the other hand, the envisaged scaling scenario for the next 15 years has undergone a significant change recently. While the 2013 ITRS edition required a continuation of aggressive gate length scaling for at least another 15 years, the 2015 edition of the ITRS suggests a deceleration and eventually a levelling off of gate length scaling and puts more emphasis on alternative options such as pitch scaling to keep Moore's Law alive. In the present paper, future CMOS scaling is discussed in the light of emerging two-dimensional MOSFET channel, in particular two-dimensional TMDs. To this end, the scaling scenarios of the 2013 and 2015 ITRS editions are considered and the scaling potential of TMD MOSFETs is investigated by means of quantum-mechanical device simulations. It is shown that for ultimately scaled MOSFETs as required in the 2013 ITRS, the heavy carrier effective masses of the Mo- and W-based TMDs are beneficial for the suppression of direct source-drain tunneling, while to meet the significantly relaxed scaling targets of the 2016 ITRS heavy-effective-mass channels are not needed.

  10. Role of Bioadsorbents in Reducing Toxic Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blessy Baby Mathew

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Industrialization and urbanization have led to the release of increasing amounts of heavy metals into the environment. Metal ion contamination of drinking water and waste water is a serious ongoing problem especially with high toxic metals such as lead and cadmium and less toxic metals such as copper and zinc. Several biological materials have attracted many researchers and scientists as they offer both cheap and effective removal of heavy metals from waste water. Therefore it is urgent to study and explore all possible sources of agrobased inexpensive adsorbents for their feasibility in the removal of heavy metals. The objective was to study inexpensive adsorbents like various agricultural wastes such as sugarcane bagasse, rice husk, oil palm shell, coconut shell, and coconut husk in eliminating heavy metals from waste water and their utilization possibilities based on our research and literature survey. It also shows the significance of developing and evaluating new potential biosorbents in the near future with higher adsorption capacity and greater reusable options.

  11. Role of Bioadsorbents in Reducing Toxic Metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Blessy Baby; Jaishankar, Monisha; Biju, Vinai George; Krishnamurthy Nideghatta Beeregowda

    2016-01-01

    Industrialization and urbanization have led to the release of increasing amounts of heavy metals into the environment. Metal ion contamination of drinking water and waste water is a serious ongoing problem especially with high toxic metals such as lead and cadmium and less toxic metals such as copper and zinc. Several biological materials have attracted many researchers and scientists as they offer both cheap and effective removal of heavy metals from waste water. Therefore it is urgent to study and explore all possible sources of agrobased inexpensive adsorbents for their feasibility in the removal of heavy metals. The objective was to study inexpensive adsorbents like various agricultural wastes such as sugarcane bagasse, rice husk, oil palm shell, coconut shell, and coconut husk in eliminating heavy metals from waste water and their utilization possibilities based on our research and literature survey. It also shows the significance of developing and evaluating new potential biosorbents in the near future with higher adsorption capacity and greater reusable options.

  12. Role of Bioadsorbents in Reducing Toxic Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaishankar, Monisha; Biju, Vinai George; Krishnamurthy Nideghatta Beeregowda

    2016-01-01

    Industrialization and urbanization have led to the release of increasing amounts of heavy metals into the environment. Metal ion contamination of drinking water and waste water is a serious ongoing problem especially with high toxic metals such as lead and cadmium and less toxic metals such as copper and zinc. Several biological materials have attracted many researchers and scientists as they offer both cheap and effective removal of heavy metals from waste water. Therefore it is urgent to study and explore all possible sources of agrobased inexpensive adsorbents for their feasibility in the removal of heavy metals. The objective was to study inexpensive adsorbents like various agricultural wastes such as sugarcane bagasse, rice husk, oil palm shell, coconut shell, and coconut husk in eliminating heavy metals from waste water and their utilization possibilities based on our research and literature survey. It also shows the significance of developing and evaluating new potential biosorbents in the near future with higher adsorption capacity and greater reusable options. PMID:28090207

  13. Hydroponics reducing effluent's heavy metals discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rababah, Abdellah; Al-Shuha, Ahmad

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the capacity of Nutrient Film Technique (NFT) to control effluent's heavy metals discharge. A commercial hydroponic system was adapted to irrigate lettuces with primary treated wastewater for studying the potential heavy metals removal. A second commercial hydroponic system was used to irrigate the same type of lettuces with nutrient solution and this system was used as a control. Results showed that lettuces grew well when irrigated with primary treated effluent in the commercial hydroponic system. The NFT-plant system heavy metals removal efficiency varied amongst the different elements, The system's removal efficiency for Cr was more than 92%, Ni more than 85%, in addition to more than 60% reduction of B, Pb, and Zn. Nonetheless, the NFT-plants system removal efficiencies for As, Cd and Cu were lower than 30%. Results show that lettuces accumulated heavy metals in leaves at concentrations higher than the maximum acceptable European and Australian levels. Therefore, non-edible plants such as flowers or pyrethrum are recommended as value added crops for the proposed NFT.

  14. ENVIRONMENTALLY REDUCING OF COOLANTS IN METAL CUTTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veijo KAUPPINEN

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Strained environment is a global problem. In metal industries the use of coolant has become more problematic in terms of both employee health and environmental pollution. It is said that the use of coolant forms approximately 8 - 16 % of the total production costs.The traditional methods that use coolants are now obviously becoming obsolete. Hence, it is clear that using a dry cutting system has great implications for resource preservation and waste reduction. For this purpose, a new cooling system is designed for dry cutting. This paper presents the new eco-friendly cooling innovation and the benefits gained by using this method. The new cooling system relies on a unit for ionising ejected air. In order to compare the performance of using this system, cutting experiments were carried out. A series of tests were performed on a horizontal turning machine and on a horizontal machining centre.

  15. Two-phase alkali-metal experiments in reduced gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antoniak, Z.I.

    1986-06-01

    Future space missions envision the use of large nuclear reactors utilizing either a single or a two-phase alkali-metal working fluid. The design and analysis of such reactors require state-of-the-art computer codes that can properly treat alkali-metal flow and heat transfer in a reduced-gravity environment. A literature search of relevant experiments in reduced gravity is reported on here, and reveals a paucity of data for such correlations. The few ongoing experiments in reduced gravity are noted. General plans are put forth for the reduced-gravity experiments which will have to be performed, at NASA facilities, with benign fluids. A similar situation exists regarding two-phase alkali-metal flow and heat transfer, even in normal gravity. Existing data are conflicting and indequate for the task of modeling a space reactor using a two-phase alkali-metal coolant. The major features of past experiments are described here. Data from the reduced-gravity experiments with innocuous fluids are to be combined with normal gravity data from the two-phase alkali-metal experiments. Analyses undertaken here give every expectation that the correlations developed from this data base will provide a valid representation of alkali-metal heat transfer and pressure drop in reduced gravity

  16. Metal radomes for reduced RCS performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahid, M.; Morris, S. B.

    A frequency selective surface (FSS) comprising a square grid and a hexagonal array of disks is proposed as a means of reducing the Radar Cross Section (RCS) of a radar bay over a wide (2 GHz to 14.6 GHz) frequency bandwidth. Results are presented in terms of transmission loss for an 'A'-type sandwich radome consisting of two FSS layers for normal and non-normal incidence. A single FSS layer on a GRP flat panel is also considered. Good agreement is found between the predicted and measured results. The proposed FSS shows good performance and is relatively insensitive to angle of incidence between 3.8 GHz and 10.1 GHz. Predicted Insertion Phase Delay (IPD) and cross-polar performances are also given. Parametric studies have indicated the versatility of the proposed structure.

  17. Reduced Voltage Scaling in Clock Distribution Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khader Mohammad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel circuit technique to generate a reduced voltage swing (RVS signals for active power reduction on main buses and clocks. This is achieved without performance degradation, without extra power supply requirement, and with minimum area overhead. The technique stops the discharge path on the net that is swinging low at a certain voltage value. It reduces active power on the target net by as much as 33% compared to traditional full swing signaling. The logic 0 voltage value is programmable through control bits. If desired, the reduced-swing mode can also be disabled. The approach assumes that the logic 0 voltage value is always less than the threshold voltage of the nMOS receivers, which eliminate the need of the low to high voltage translation. The reduced noise margin and the increased leakage on the receiver transistors using this approach have been addressed through the selective usage of multithreshold voltage (MTV devices and the programmability of the low voltage value.

  18. Approaches to reducing photon dose calculation errors near metal implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Jessie Y.; Followill, David S.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Mirkovic, Dragan; Kry, Stephen F., E-mail: sfkry@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 and Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Liu, Xinming [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 and Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Stingo, Francesco C. [Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 and Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Purpose: Dose calculation errors near metal implants are caused by limitations of the dose calculation algorithm in modeling tissue/metal interface effects as well as density assignment errors caused by imaging artifacts. The purpose of this study was to investigate two strategies for reducing dose calculation errors near metal implants: implementation of metal-based energy deposition kernels in the convolution/superposition (C/S) dose calculation method and use of metal artifact reduction methods for computed tomography (CT) imaging. Methods: Both error reduction strategies were investigated using a simple geometric slab phantom with a rectangular metal insert (composed of titanium or Cerrobend), as well as two anthropomorphic phantoms (one with spinal hardware and one with dental fillings), designed to mimic relevant clinical scenarios. To assess the dosimetric impact of metal kernels, the authors implemented titanium and silver kernels in a commercial collapsed cone C/S algorithm. To assess the impact of CT metal artifact reduction methods, the authors performed dose calculations using baseline imaging techniques (uncorrected 120 kVp imaging) and three commercial metal artifact reduction methods: Philips Healthcare’s O-MAR, GE Healthcare’s monochromatic gemstone spectral imaging (GSI) using dual-energy CT, and GSI with metal artifact reduction software (MARS) applied. For the simple geometric phantom, radiochromic film was used to measure dose upstream and downstream of metal inserts. For the anthropomorphic phantoms, ion chambers and radiochromic film were used to quantify the benefit of the error reduction strategies. Results: Metal kernels did not universally improve accuracy but rather resulted in better accuracy upstream of metal implants and decreased accuracy directly downstream. For the clinical cases (spinal hardware and dental fillings), metal kernels had very little impact on the dose calculation accuracy (<1.0%). Of the commercial CT artifact

  19. Approaches to reducing photon dose calculation errors near metal implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Jessie Y.; Followill, David S.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Mirkovic, Dragan; Kry, Stephen F.; Liu, Xinming; Stingo, Francesco C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Dose calculation errors near metal implants are caused by limitations of the dose calculation algorithm in modeling tissue/metal interface effects as well as density assignment errors caused by imaging artifacts. The purpose of this study was to investigate two strategies for reducing dose calculation errors near metal implants: implementation of metal-based energy deposition kernels in the convolution/superposition (C/S) dose calculation method and use of metal artifact reduction methods for computed tomography (CT) imaging. Methods: Both error reduction strategies were investigated using a simple geometric slab phantom with a rectangular metal insert (composed of titanium or Cerrobend), as well as two anthropomorphic phantoms (one with spinal hardware and one with dental fillings), designed to mimic relevant clinical scenarios. To assess the dosimetric impact of metal kernels, the authors implemented titanium and silver kernels in a commercial collapsed cone C/S algorithm. To assess the impact of CT metal artifact reduction methods, the authors performed dose calculations using baseline imaging techniques (uncorrected 120 kVp imaging) and three commercial metal artifact reduction methods: Philips Healthcare’s O-MAR, GE Healthcare’s monochromatic gemstone spectral imaging (GSI) using dual-energy CT, and GSI with metal artifact reduction software (MARS) applied. For the simple geometric phantom, radiochromic film was used to measure dose upstream and downstream of metal inserts. For the anthropomorphic phantoms, ion chambers and radiochromic film were used to quantify the benefit of the error reduction strategies. Results: Metal kernels did not universally improve accuracy but rather resulted in better accuracy upstream of metal implants and decreased accuracy directly downstream. For the clinical cases (spinal hardware and dental fillings), metal kernels had very little impact on the dose calculation accuracy (<1.0%). Of the commercial CT artifact

  20. Reduced work function of graphene by metal adatoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legesse, Merid; Mellouhi, Fedwa El; Bentria, El Tayeb; Madjet, Mohamed E. [Qatar Environment and Energy Research Institute, Hamad Bin Khalifa University, Doha (Qatar); Fisher, Timothy S. [School of Mechanical Engineering and Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Kais, Sabre [Qatar Environment and Energy Research Institute, Hamad Bin Khalifa University, Doha (Qatar); Department of Chemistry and Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 46323 (United States); College of Science and Engineering, Hamad Bin Khalifa University, Doha (Qatar); Alharbi, Fahhad H., E-mail: falharbi@qf.org.qa [Qatar Environment and Energy Research Institute, Hamad Bin Khalifa University, Doha (Qatar); College of Science and Engineering, Hamad Bin Khalifa University, Doha (Qatar)

    2017-02-01

    Highlights: • Using DFT, the maximum reduction of graphene workfunction is investigated. This is important for many applications. • The calculations show that the adatoms prefer to relax at hollow sites. • The transfer of electrons from the adatoms to graphene shifts up the Fermi level. So, graphene becomes metallic. • For those dopants that have been used experimentally, the calculations agree with the experimental data. • We found that 8% doping by Cs reduces the work function to 2.05 eV. - Abstract: In this paper, the work function of graphene doped by different metal adatoms and at different concentrations is investigated. Density functional theory is used to maximize the reduction of the work function. In general, the work function drops significantly before reaching saturation. For example in the case of Cs doping, the work function saturates at 2.05 eV with a modest 8% doping. The adsorption of different concentrations on metal adatoms on graphene is also studied. Our calculations show that the adatoms prefer to relax at hollow sites. The transfer of electron from metallic dopants to the graphene for all the studied systems shifts the Fermi energy levels above the Dirac-point and the doped graphenes become metallic. The value of Fermi energy shifts depends on the type of metallic dopants and its concentrations. A detail analysis of the electronic structure in terms of band structure and density of states, absorption energy, and charge transfer for each adatom-graphene system is presented.

  1. Reduced work function of graphene by metal adatoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legesse, Merid; Mellouhi, Fedwa El; Bentria, El Tayeb; Madjet, Mohamed E.; Fisher, Timothy S.; Kais, Sabre; Alharbi, Fahhad H.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Using DFT, the maximum reduction of graphene workfunction is investigated. This is important for many applications. • The calculations show that the adatoms prefer to relax at hollow sites. • The transfer of electrons from the adatoms to graphene shifts up the Fermi level. So, graphene becomes metallic. • For those dopants that have been used experimentally, the calculations agree with the experimental data. • We found that 8% doping by Cs reduces the work function to 2.05 eV. - Abstract: In this paper, the work function of graphene doped by different metal adatoms and at different concentrations is investigated. Density functional theory is used to maximize the reduction of the work function. In general, the work function drops significantly before reaching saturation. For example in the case of Cs doping, the work function saturates at 2.05 eV with a modest 8% doping. The adsorption of different concentrations on metal adatoms on graphene is also studied. Our calculations show that the adatoms prefer to relax at hollow sites. The transfer of electron from metallic dopants to the graphene for all the studied systems shifts the Fermi energy levels above the Dirac-point and the doped graphenes become metallic. The value of Fermi energy shifts depends on the type of metallic dopants and its concentrations. A detail analysis of the electronic structure in terms of band structure and density of states, absorption energy, and charge transfer for each adatom-graphene system is presented.

  2. Dermatitis in small-scale metal industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coenraads, P J; Foo, S C; Phoon, W O; Lun, K C

    1985-03-01

    A survey in 21 small metal factories in Singapore revealed that 6.6% of 751 workers (530 male, 221 female) had a skin disorder on their hands and arms. Dermatitis accounted for 4.5% (34 cases) and follicular rashes for 1% (8 cases). Positive patch tests were found in 23% (8 cases) of those with dermatitis and in 9.8% (21 workers) of a control group without any skin problem. Dermatitis was found to be associated with exposure to solvents. Simultaneous analysis of various exposure/risk factors by multiple logistic regression indicated a significant effect of combined exposure to oils and solvents (interaction). Being over 35 years of age was also a significant risk factor, whereas the role of contact allergy, detected by patch testing, was less pronounced.

  3. Multi Scale Models for Flexure Deformation in Sheet Metal Forming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Pasquale Edmondo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the application of multi scale techniques to the simulation of sheet metal forming using the one-step method. When a blank flows over the die radius, it undergoes a complex cycle of bending and unbending. First, we describe an original model for the prediction of residual plastic deformation and stresses in the blank section. This model, working on a scale about one hundred times smaller than the element size, has been implemented in SIMEX, one-step sheet metal forming simulation code. The utilisation of this multi-scale modeling technique improves greatly the accuracy of the solution. Finally, we discuss the implications of this analysis on the prediction of springback in metal forming.

  4. Channel length scaling and the impact of metal gate work function ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    As the channel length is reduced from one transistor generation to the next, ... As CMOS technology continues to scale, metal gate electrodes need to be intro .... in the z-direction, q is the electron charge, h is the Planck's constant, Ψ(x, z) is the.

  5. STUDY ON REDUCING AND MELTING BEHAVIOR OF MILL SCALE/PETROLEUM COKE BLEND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Deves Flores

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Self-reducing tests were carried out under isothermal and non-isothermal condition in a muffle furnace, aiming to assess the reduction and melting of a self-reducing blend of mill scale and petroleum coke (85-15% in weight. The products obtained were analyzed by mass loss and wet analysis. Further investigations for the products from the non-isothermal condition were done by X-ray diffraction, nude eye inspection and carbon analyzer. It was observed that mass loss fraction and metallization degree are directly related and both increase with time and temperature. In the non-isothermal maximum mass loss was achieved in 8 minutes, reaching metallization degrees above 90%. It was observed that the reduction of iron oxide occurs mainly in solid state and the smelting of the samples is directly related to the iron carburization process. Thus, the use of self-reducing mixtures shows a possible way to recycle mill scale.

  6. Performance evaluation of pilot scale sulfur-oxidizing denitrification for treatment of metal plating wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Angel S P; Gwon, Eun-Mi; Sim, Dong-Min; Nisola, Grace; Galera, Melvin M; Chon, Seung-Se; Chung, Wook-Jin; Pak, Dae-Won; Ahn, Zou Sam

    2006-01-01

    A full-scale and two pilot-scale upflow sulfur-oxidizing denitrification (SOD) columns were evaluated using metal plating wastewater as feed. The sludge was autotrophically enriched, and inoculated in the SOD columns attached to the effluent line of three metal plating wastewater treatment facilities. The effects of activated carbon and aeration were also studied, and found effective for the removal of suspended solids and ammonia, respectively. The results showed that the constituents, such as the total nitrogen, nitrates, nitrites, ammonia, chemical oxygen demand (COD), and heavy metals, were effectively removed. The pH was observed to be maintained at 7-8 due to the alkalinity supplied by the sulfur-calcium carbonate (SC) pellet. The denitrification efficiency and start-up period were observed to be affected by the influent quality. Chromium, iron, nickel, copper, and zinc--the major heavy metal components of the influent--were effectively reduced at certain concentrations. Other metal ions were also detected and reduced to undetectable concentrations, but no trends in the comparison with denitrification were observed. From the results it can be concluded that SOD is effective for the removal of nitrogen, particularly nitrates, without a drastic pH change, and can effectively remove minute concentrations of heavy metals and COD in metal plating wastewaters.

  7. Effects of sulfate on heavy metal release from iron corrosion scales in drinking water distribution system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Huifang; Shi, Baoyou; Yang, Fan; Wang, Dongsheng

    2017-05-01

    Trace heavy metals accumulated in iron corrosion scales within a drinking water distribution system (DWDS) could potentially be released to bulk water and consequently deteriorate the tap water quality. The objective of this study was to identify and evaluate the release of trace heavy metals in DWDS under changing source water conditions. Experimental pipe loops with different iron corrosion scales were set up to simulate the actual DWDS. The effects of sulfate levels on heavy metal release were systemically investigated. Heavy metal releases of Mn, Ni, Cu, Pb, Cr and As could be rapidly triggered by sulfate addition but the releases slowly decreased over time. Heavy metal release was more severe in pipes transporting groundwater (GW) than in pipes transporting surface water (SW). There were strong positive correlations (R 2  > 0.8) between the releases of Fe and Mn, Fe and Ni, Fe and Cu, and Fe and Pb. When switching to higher sulfate water, iron corrosion scales in all pipe loops tended to be more stable (especially in pipes transporting GW), with a larger proportion of stable constituents (mainly Fe 3 O 4 ) and fewer unstable compounds (β-FeOOH, γ-FeOOH, FeCO 3 and amorphous iron oxides). The main functional iron reducing bacteria (IRB) communities were favorable for the formation of Fe 3 O 4 . The transformation of corrosion scales and the growth of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) accounted for the gradually reduced heavy metal release with time. The higher metal release in pipes transporting GW could be due to increased Fe 6 (OH) 12 CO 3 content under higher sulfate concentrations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Similar star formation rate and metallicity variability time-scales drive the fundamental metallicity relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrey, Paul; Vogelsberger, Mark; Hernquist, Lars; McKinnon, Ryan; Marinacci, Federico; Simcoe, Robert A.; Springel, Volker; Pillepich, Annalisa; Naiman, Jill; Pakmor, Rüdiger; Weinberger, Rainer; Nelson, Dylan; Genel, Shy

    2018-06-01

    The fundamental metallicity relation (FMR) is a postulated correlation between galaxy stellar mass, star formation rate (SFR), and gas-phase metallicity. At its core, this relation posits that offsets from the mass-metallicity relation (MZR) at a fixed stellar mass are correlated with galactic SFR. In this Letter, we use hydrodynamical simulations to quantify the time-scales over which populations of galaxies oscillate about the average SFR and metallicity values at fixed stellar mass. We find that Illustris and IllustrisTNG predict that galaxy offsets from the star formation main sequence and MZR oscillate over similar time-scales, are often anticorrelated in their evolution, evolve with the halo dynamical time, and produce a pronounced FMR. Our models indicate that galaxies oscillate about equilibrium SFR and metallicity values - set by the galaxy's stellar mass - and that SFR and metallicity offsets evolve in an anticorrelated fashion. This anticorrelated variability of the metallicity and SFR offsets drives the existence of the FMR in our models. In contrast to Illustris and IllustrisTNG, we speculate that the SFR and metallicity evolution tracks may become decoupled in galaxy formation models dominated by feedback-driven globally bursty SFR histories, which could weaken the FMR residual correlation strength. This opens the possibility of discriminating between bursty and non-bursty feedback models based on the strength and persistence of the FMR - especially at high redshift.

  9. Heavy metals adsorption on rolling mill scale; Adsorcion de metales pesados sobre cascarill de laminacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, F. A.; Martin, M. I.; Perez, C.; Lopez-Delgado, A.; Alguacil, E. J.

    2003-07-01

    A great quantity of industries are responsible for contaminating the environment with the heavy metals which are containing in their wastewaters. The recovery of these metals is both from an environmental and economical points of view of the upmost interest. A study is made of the use of mill scale-originating in the hot rolling of steel-as an adsorbent for the removal of heavy metals from liquid effluents. The adsorption of Zn''2+, Cd''2+ y Pb''2+ on the rolling mill scale was investigated by determination of adsorption isotherms. The effect of time, equilibrium temperature and concentration of metal solution on mill scale adsorption efficiency was evaluated. The adsorption process was analysed using the theories of Langmuir and Freundlich. Desorption process of metals from loaded mill scales was also studied using several doser bent at different experimental conditions. It has been proved that the mill scale is an effective adsorbent for the cations studies in aqueous solutions within the range of the working concentrations. (Author) 32 refs.

  10. Nuclear Reactions in Micro/Nano-Scale Metal Particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y. E.

    2013-01-01

    Low-energy nuclear reactions in micro/nano-scale metal particles are described based on the theory of Bose-Einstein condensation nuclear fusion (BECNF). The BECNF theory is based on a single basic assumption capable of explaining the observed LENR phenomena; deuterons in metals undergo Bose-Einstein condensation. The BECNF theory is also a quantitative predictive physical theory. Experimental tests of the basic assumption and theoretical predictions are proposed. Potential application to energy generation by ignition at low temperatures is described. Generalized theory of BECNF is used to carry out theoretical analyses of recently reported experimental results for hydrogen-nickel system. (author)

  11. Nuclear Reactions in Micro/Nano-Scale Metal Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y. E.

    2013-03-01

    Low-energy nuclear reactions in micro/nano-scale metal particles are described based on the theory of Bose-Einstein condensation nuclear fusion (BECNF). The BECNF theory is based on a single basic assumption capable of explaining the observed LENR phenomena; deuterons in metals undergo Bose-Einstein condensation. The BECNF theory is also a quantitative predictive physical theory. Experimental tests of the basic assumption and theoretical predictions are proposed. Potential application to energy generation by ignition at low temperatures is described. Generalized theory of BECNF is used to carry out theoretical analyses of recently reported experimental results for hydrogen-nickel system.

  12. Using different amendments to reduce heavy metals movement in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salmasi, R.; Tavassoli, A.

    2005-01-01

    With long-term use of sewage waste, heavy metals can accumulate to phyto toxic levels and resulted in reduced plant growth and/or enhanced metal concentrations in plants, as a result food chain. If these metals penetrate too rapidly in a particular soil, especially with high water table, they can pollute ground water supplies. The aim of this research is prevention of movement of waste water-borne heavy metals in soils of southern parts of Tehran. These waste waters are used for irrigation of agricultural lands at regions since many years ago. For this purpose, 6 soil samples from southern parts of Tehran city and 2 ones Zanjan city without lime and organic matter were selected. In laboratory, sorption capacities of the soils for Ni, Cd and Pb were compared with those of calcite, Na-bentonite, Zeolite, illite and hematite amendments. The method was carried out by equilibration of known quantities of these adsorbents and soils with solutions containing these elements. The results showed that among the 5 amendments, Calcite and Na-bentonite had the greatest sorption percentages of the 3 elements and illite had the least one. The retention capacity of calcite and Na-bentonite for Cd was highest in all 8 soils. However, retention capacities of these 2 minerals for Pb and Ni were higher than those of loamy soils without lime and organic matter and also sandy soils. Because of abundance and low price of calcite, this amendment is preferred to Na-bentonite. Therefore, calcite is recommended for adding to soils with low sorption capacity of Ni, Cd and Pb

  13. Reducing Plasma Perturbations with Segmented Metal Shielding on Electrostatic Probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staack, D.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N.J.

    2002-01-01

    Electrostatic probes are widely used to measure spatial plasma parameters in the quasi-neutral plasma created in Hall thrusters and similar E x B electric discharge devices. Significant perturbations of the plasma, induced by such probes, can mask the actual physics involved in operation of these devices. In an attempt to reduce these perturbations in Hall thrusters, the perturbations were examined by varying the component material, penetration distance, and residence time of various probe designs. This study leads us to a conclusion that secondary electron emission from insulator ceramic tubes of the probe can affect local changes of the plasma parameters causing plasma perturbations. A probe design, which consists of a segmented metal shielding of the probe insulator, is suggested to reduce these perturbations. This new probe design can be useful for plasma applications in which the electron temperature is sufficient to produce secondary electron emission by interaction of plasma electrons with dielectric materials

  14. Reduced scale PWR passive safety system designing by genetic algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha, Joao J. da; Alvim, Antonio Carlos M.; Lapa, Celso Marcelo Franklin

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the concept of 'Design by Genetic Algorithms (DbyGA)', applied to a new reduced scale system problem. The design problem of a passive thermal-hydraulic safety system, considering dimensional and operational constraints, has been solved. Taking into account the passive safety characteristics of the last nuclear reactor generation, a PWR core under natural circulation is used in order to demonstrate the methodology applicability. The results revealed that some solutions (reduced scale system DbyGA) are capable of reproducing, both accurately and simultaneously, much of the physical phenomena that occur in real scale and operating conditions. However, some aspects, revealed by studies of cases, pointed important possibilities to DbyGA methodological performance improvement

  15. Integrated simulation of continuous-scale and discrete-scale radiative transfer in metal foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xin-Lin; Li, Yang; Sun, Chuang; Ai, Qing; Tan, He-Ping

    2018-06-01

    A novel integrated simulation of radiative transfer in metal foams is presented. It integrates the continuous-scale simulation with the direct discrete-scale simulation in a single computational domain. It relies on the coupling of the real discrete-scale foam geometry with the equivalent continuous-scale medium through a specially defined scale-coupled zone. This zone holds continuous but nonhomogeneous volumetric radiative properties. The scale-coupled approach is compared to the traditional continuous-scale approach using volumetric radiative properties in the equivalent participating medium and to the direct discrete-scale approach employing the real 3D foam geometry obtained by computed tomography. All the analyses are based on geometrical optics. The Monte Carlo ray-tracing procedure is used for computations of the absorbed radiative fluxes and the apparent radiative behaviors of metal foams. The results obtained by the three approaches are in tenable agreement. The scale-coupled approach is fully validated in calculating the apparent radiative behaviors of metal foams composed of very absorbing to very reflective struts and that composed of very rough to very smooth struts. This new approach leads to a reduction in computational time by approximately one order of magnitude compared to the direct discrete-scale approach. Meanwhile, it can offer information on the local geometry-dependent feature and at the same time the equivalent feature in an integrated simulation. This new approach is promising to combine the advantages of the continuous-scale approach (rapid calculations) and direct discrete-scale approach (accurate prediction of local radiative quantities).

  16. Additive Manufacturing of Metal Structures at the Micrometer Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirt, Luca; Reiser, Alain; Spolenak, Ralph; Zambelli, Tomaso

    2017-05-01

    Currently, the focus of additive manufacturing (AM) is shifting from simple prototyping to actual production. One driving factor of this process is the ability of AM to build geometries that are not accessible by subtractive fabrication techniques. While these techniques often call for a geometry that is easiest to manufacture, AM enables the geometry required for best performance to be built by freeing the design process from restrictions imposed by traditional machining. At the micrometer scale, the design limitations of standard fabrication techniques are even more severe. Microscale AM thus holds great potential, as confirmed by the rapid success of commercial micro-stereolithography tools as an enabling technology for a broad range of scientific applications. For metals, however, there is still no established AM solution at small scales. To tackle the limited resolution of standard metal AM methods (a few tens of micrometers at best), various new techniques aimed at the micrometer scale and below are presently under development. Here, we review these recent efforts. Specifically, we feature the techniques of direct ink writing, electrohydrodynamic printing, laser-assisted electrophoretic deposition, laser-induced forward transfer, local electroplating methods, laser-induced photoreduction and focused electron or ion beam induced deposition. Although these methods have proven to facilitate the AM of metals with feature sizes in the range of 0.1-10 µm, they are still in a prototype stage and their potential is not fully explored yet. For instance, comprehensive studies of material availability and material properties are often lacking, yet compulsory for actual applications. We address these items while critically discussing and comparing the potential of current microscale metal AM techniques. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Winter Maintenance Wash-Water Heavy Metal Removal Pilot Scale Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M. Miller

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To encourage sustainable engineering practices, departments of transportation are interested in reusing winter maintenance truck wash water as part of their brine production and future road application. Traffic-related metals in the wash water, however, could limit this option. The objective of this work was to conduct a pilot scale evaluation of heavy metal (copper, zinc, iron, and lead removal in a filtration unit (maximum flow rate of 45 L/minute containing proprietary (MAR Systems Sorbster® media. Three different trials were conducted and approximately 10,000 L of wash water collected from a winter maintenance facility in Ohio was treated with the pilot unit. Lab studies were also performed on six wash-water samples from multiple facilities to assess particle size removal and estimate settling time as a potential removal mechanism during wash-water storage. Pilot unit total metal removal efficiencies were 79%, 77%, 63%, and 94% for copper, zinc, iron, and lead, respectively. Particle settling calculation estimates for copper and zinc show that 10 hours in storage can also effectively reduce heavy metal concentrations in winter maintenance wash water in excess of 70%. These pilot scale results show promise for reducing heavy metal concentrations to an acceptable level for reuse.

  18. Effect of hydraulic retention time on metal precipitation in sulfate reducing inverse fluidized bed reactors

    KAUST Repository

    Villa-Gó mez, Denys Kristalia; Enright, Anne Marie; Rini, Eki Listya; Buttice, Audrey L.; Kramer, Herman J M; Lens, Piet Nl L

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Metal sulfide recovery in sulfate reducing bioreactors is a challenge due to the formation of small precipitates with poor settling properties. The size of the metal sulfide precipitates with the change in operational parameters

  19. TESTING THE ASTEROSEISMIC MASS SCALE USING METAL-POOR STARS CHARACTERIZED WITH APOGEE AND KEPLER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epstein, Courtney R.; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Tayar, Jamie; Pinsonneault, Marc [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 W. 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Elsworth, Yvonne P.; Chaplin, William J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston Park Road, West Midlands, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Shetrone, Matthew [McDonald Observatory, The University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C1400, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); Mosser, Benoît [LESIA, CNRS, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Université Denis Diderot, Observatoire de Paris, F-92195 Meudon Cedex (France); Hekker, Saskia [Max-Planck-Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Harding, Paul [Department of Astronomy, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106-7215 (United States); Silva Aguirre, Víctor [Stellar Astrophysics Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Basu, Sarbani [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Beers, Timothy C. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719, USA and JINA: Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics (United States); Bizyaev, Dmitry [Apache Point Observatory, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Bedding, Timothy R. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy (SIfA), School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Frinchaboy, Peter M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas Christian University, TCU Box 298840, Fort Worth, TX 76129 (United States); García, Rafael A. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS, Universit Paris 7 Diderot, IRFU/SAp, Centre de Saclay, F-91191, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Pérez, Ana E. García; Hearty, Fred R., E-mail: epstein@astronomy.ohio-state.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); and others

    2014-04-20

    Fundamental stellar properties, such as mass, radius, and age, can be inferred using asteroseismology. Cool stars with convective envelopes have turbulent motions that can stochastically drive and damp pulsations. The properties of the oscillation frequency power spectrum can be tied to mass and radius through solar-scaled asteroseismic relations. Stellar properties derived using these scaling relations need verification over a range of metallicities. Because the age and mass of halo stars are well-constrained by astrophysical priors, they provide an independent, empirical check on asteroseismic mass estimates in the low-metallicity regime. We identify nine metal-poor red giants (including six stars that are kinematically associated with the halo) from a sample observed by both the Kepler space telescope and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III APOGEE spectroscopic survey. We compare masses inferred using asteroseismology to those expected for halo and thick-disk stars. Although our sample is small, standard scaling relations, combined with asteroseismic parameters from the APOKASC Catalog, produce masses that are systematically higher (<ΔM > =0.17 ± 0.05 M {sub ☉}) than astrophysical expectations. The magnitude of the mass discrepancy is reduced by known theoretical corrections to the measured large frequency separation scaling relationship. Using alternative methods for measuring asteroseismic parameters induces systematic shifts at the 0.04 M {sub ☉} level. We also compare published asteroseismic analyses with scaling relationship masses to examine the impact of using the frequency of maximum power as a constraint. Upcoming APOKASC observations will provide a larger sample of ∼100 metal-poor stars, important for detailed asteroseismic characterization of Galactic stellar populations.

  20. Can treatment and disposal costs be reduced through metal recovery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kathleen S.; Figueroa, Linda; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a framework to conduct a “metal-recovery feasibility assessment” for mining influenced water (MIW) and associated treatment sludge. There are multiple considerations in such a determination, including the geologic/geochemical feasibility, market feasibility, technical feasibility, economic feasibility, and administrative feasibility. Each of these considerations needs to be evaluated to determine the practicality of metal recovery from a particular MIW.

  1. An analysis of harmful factors to storage stability of the reduced metallic spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Z. S.; Yoo, K. S.; Cho, I. J.; Kook, D. H.; Lee, J. C.; Lee, E. P.

    2002-01-01

    To analyze harmful factors for the reduced uranium metal, which was mainly composed of uranium, several basic properties such as microstructure, immiscibility, thermal, fission product effects were surveyed. And the oxidation properties of metal uranium and uranium alloys were also studied to select alloying elements for producing a stable uranium metal

  2. Synthesis and characterization of some reduced ternary and quaternary molybdenum oxide phases with strong metal-metal bonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lii, K.H.

    1985-10-01

    In the course of our research on reduced ternary and quaternary molybdenum oxides, very interesting compounds with strong metal-metal bonds were discovered. Among these solid-state materials are found discrete cluster arrays and structures with extended metal-metal bonding. Further study in this system has revealed that many new structures exist in this new realm. The synthesis, structures, bonding, and properties of these new oxides, which are briefly summarized in tabular form, are presented in this thesis. 144 refs., 63 figs., 79 tabs

  3. Heavy metals detoxification in soil performed by sulfate - reducing bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pado, R.; Pawlowska-Cwiek, L.; Szwagrzyk, J.

    1994-01-01

    The process of sulfate reduction carried out by mixed bacteria cultures in the presence of heavy cations (Fe 2+ , Pb 2+ , Cd 2+ , Zn 2+ , Cu 2+ ) was investigated. The range of harmful metals concentrations responded to the acceptable levels in soil and their multiplications (10-100 times) in contaminated soil. The results show the possibility of detoxicating these metals, especially lead. In the highest lead concentrations (3950 and 7500 ppm), only after one month of activities conducted by bacteria dissimilating hydrogen sulfide, between about 73 and 81 per cent of lead was converted into practically insoluble PbS. It was found that detoxication process with the presence of bacteria from this group prolonged with the increase of metal concentration (Zn 2+ and Cd 2+ in particular. (author). 30 refs, 5 figs, 3 tabs

  4. Multi-scale modeling of ductile failure in metallic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardoen, Th.; Scheyvaerts, F.; Simar, A.; Tekoglu, C.; Onck, P.R.

    2010-01-01

    Micro-mechanical models for ductile failure have been developed in the seventies and eighties essentially to address cracking in structural applications and complement the fracture mechanics approach. Later, this approach has become attractive for physical metallurgists interested by the prediction of failure during forming operations and as a guide for the design of more ductile and/or high-toughness microstructures. Nowadays, a realistic treatment of damage evolution in complex metallic microstructures is becoming feasible when sufficiently sophisticated constitutive laws are used within the context of a multilevel modelling strategy. The current understanding and the state of the art models for the nucleation, growth and coalescence of voids are reviewed with a focus on the underlying physics. Considerations are made about the introduction of the different length scales associated with the microstructure and damage process. Two applications of the methodology are then described to illustrate the potential of the current models. The first application concerns the competition between intergranular and transgranular ductile fracture in aluminum alloys involving soft precipitate free zones along the grain boundaries. The second application concerns the modeling of ductile failure in friction stir welded joints, a problem which also involves soft and hard zones, albeit at a larger scale. (authors)

  5. Metal scarcity and sustainability, analyzing the necessity to reduce the extraction of scarce metals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henckens, M. L C M; Driessen, P. P J; Worrell, E.

    2014-01-01

    There is debate whether or not further growth of metal extraction from the earth's crust will be sustainable in connection with geologic scarcity. Will future generations possibly face a depletion of specific metals? We study whether, for which metals and to what extent the extraction rate would

  6. Workshop Report on Additive Manufacturing for Large-Scale Metal Components - Development and Deployment of Metal Big-Area-Additive-Manufacturing (Large-Scale Metals AM) System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Manufacturing Demonstration Facility; Love, Lonnie J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Manufacturing Demonstration Facility; Peter, William H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Manufacturing Demonstration Facility; Dehoff, Ryan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Manufacturing Demonstration Facility

    2016-05-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is considered an emerging technology that is expected to transform the way industry can make low-volume, high value complex structures. This disruptive technology promises to replace legacy manufacturing methods for the fabrication of existing components in addition to bringing new innovation for new components with increased functional and mechanical properties. This report outlines the outcome of a workshop on large-scale metal additive manufacturing held at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on March 11, 2016. The charter for the workshop was outlined by the Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Manufacturing Office program manager. The status and impact of the Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) for polymer matrix composites was presented as the background motivation for the workshop. Following, the extension of underlying technology to low-cost metals was proposed with the following goals: (i) High deposition rates (approaching 100 lbs/h); (ii) Low cost (<$10/lbs) for steel, iron, aluminum, nickel, as well as, higher cost titanium, (iii) large components (major axis greater than 6 ft) and (iv) compliance of property requirements. The above concept was discussed in depth by representatives from different industrial sectors including welding, metal fabrication machinery, energy, construction, aerospace and heavy manufacturing. In addition, DOE’s newly launched High Performance Computing for Manufacturing (HPC4MFG) program was reviewed. This program will apply thermo-mechanical models to elucidate deeper understanding of the interactions between design, process, and materials during additive manufacturing. Following these presentations, all the attendees took part in a brainstorming session where everyone identified the top 10 challenges in large-scale metal AM from their own perspective. The feedback was analyzed and grouped in different categories including, (i) CAD to PART software, (ii) selection of energy source, (iii

  7. Invasive lionfish reduce native fish abundance on a regional scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballew, Nicholas G.; Bacheler, Nathan M.; Kellison, G. Todd; Schueller, Amy M.

    2016-08-01

    Invasive lionfish pose an unprecedented threat to biodiversity and fisheries throughout Atlantic waters off of the southeastern United States, the Caribbean, and the Gulf of Mexico. Here, we employ a spatially replicated Before-After-Control-Impact analysis with temporal pairing to quantify for the first time the impact of the lionfish invasion on native fish abundance across a broad regional scale and over the entire duration of the lionfish invasion (1990-2014). Our results suggest that 1) lionfish-impacted areas off of the southeastern United States are most prevalent off-shore near the continental shelf-break but are also common near-shore and 2) in impacted areas, lionfish have reduced tomtate (a native forage fish) abundance by 45% since the invasion began. Tomtate served as a model native fish species in our analysis, and as such, it is likely that the lionfish invasion has had similar impacts on other species, some of which may be of economic importance. Barring the development of a control strategy that reverses the lionfish invasion, the abundance of lionfish in the Atlantic, Caribbean, and Gulf of Mexico will likely remain at or above current levels. Consequently, the effect of lionfish on native fish abundance will likely continue for the foreseeable future.

  8. Fatigue of 1 {mu}m-scale gold by vibration with reduced resonant frequency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumigawa, Takashi, E-mail: sumigawa@cyber.kues.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Science, Kyoto University, Yoshidahommachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Matsumoto, Kenta [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Science, Kyoto University, Yoshidahommachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Tsuchiya, Toshiyuki [Department of Micro Engineering, Kyoto University, Yoshidahommachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Kitamura, Takayuki [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Science, Kyoto University, Yoshidahommachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2012-10-30

    In order to investigate the fatigue strength of micro-metal (1 {mu}m-scale), a testing method using resonant vibration is developed. Although the loading by vibration can solve the difficulties associated with the fatigue experiment of micro-specimen (e.g., specimen gripping and high-cycle loading under tension-compression), it inherently has an excessively high resonance frequency (more than several GHz at least) in a 1 {mu}m-scale metal specimen. For control of the fatigue cycle, the resonance frequency must be reduced to several hundreds of kHz by tuning the specimen shape. We design a cantilever specimen of 1 {mu}m scale gold with a weight at the tip, which reduces the resonant frequency to about 330 kHz. The unique specimen with the test section of 1.26 {mu}m Multiplication-Sign 0.94 {mu}m Multiplication-Sign 1.52 {mu}m is successfully fabricated by a novel technique using a focused ion beam and the tension-compression fatigue cycle is applied to it by means of a piezoelectric actuator. The test section breaks at about 1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} cycles under {Delta}{sigma}/2=230 MPa, which is within the targeted range of this project. It is easy to extend this method to high-cycle fatigue for actual use (including the failure cycles of over 10{sup 8} cycles). The slip bands observed on the surface, which have concavity and convexity similar to the intrusions/extrusions of PSBs, indicate that the failure is induced by the fatigue.

  9. Insights into the photochemical disproportionation of transition metal dimers on the picosecond time scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomont, Justin P; Nguyen, Son C; Harris, Charles B

    2013-05-09

    The reactivity of five transition metal dimers toward photochemical, in-solvent-cage disproportionation has been investigated using picosecond time-resolved infrared spectroscopy. Previous ultrafast studies on [CpW(CO)3]2 established the role of an in-cage disproportionation mechanism involving electron transfer between 17- and 19-electron radicals prior to diffusion out of the solvent cage. New results from time-resolved infrared studies reveal that the identity of the transition metal complex dictates whether the in-cage disproportionation mechanism can take place, as well as the more fundamental issue of whether 19-electron intermediates are able to form on the picosecond time scale. Significantly, the in-cage disproportionation mechanism observed previously for the tungsten dimer does not characterize the reactivity of four out of the five transition metal dimers in this study. The differences in the ability to form 19-electron intermediates are interpreted either in terms of differences in the 17/19-electron equilibrium or of differences in an energetic barrier to associative coordination of a Lewis base, whereas the case for the in-cage vs diffusive disproportionation mechanisms depends on whether the 19-electron reducing agent is genuinely characterized by 19-electron configuration at the metal center or if it is better described as an 18 + δ complex. These results help to better understand the factors that dictate mechanisms of radical disproportionation and carry implications for radical chain mechanisms.

  10. Dissolution of metallic uranium and its alloys. Part 1. Review of analytical and process-scale metallic uranium dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laue, C.A.; Gates-Anderson, D.; Fitch, T.E.

    2004-01-01

    This review focuses on dissolution/reaction systems capable of treating uranium metal waste to remove its pyrophoric properties. The primary emphasis is the review of literature describing analytical and production-scale dissolution methods applied to either uranium metal or uranium alloys. A brief summary of uranium's corrosion behavior is included since the corrosion resistance of metals and alloys affects their dissolution behavior. Based on this review, dissolution systems were recommended for subsequent screening studies designed to identify the best system to treat depleted uranium metal wastes at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). (author)

  11. Wafer-scale laser lithography. I. Pyrolytic deposition of metal microstructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, I.P.; Hyde, R.A.; McWilliams, B.M.; Weisberg, A.H.; Wood, L.L.

    1982-01-01

    Mechanisms for laser-driven pyrolytic deposition of micron-scale metal structures on crystalline silicon have been studied. Models have been developed to predict temporal and spatial propeties of laser-induced pyrolytic deposition processes. An argon ion laser-based apparatus has been used to deposit metal by pyrolytic decomposition of metal alkyl and carbonyl compounds, in order to evaluate the models. These results of these studies are discussed, along with their implications for the high-speed creation of micron-scale metal structures in ultra-large scale integrated circuit systems. 4 figures

  12. Critical masses of bare metal spheres using SCALE/XSDRN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, R.Q.; Jordan, W.C.; Westfall, R.M.

    2000-01-01

    minimum critical masses. The minimum critical masses of metal spheres using the SCALE/XSDRN program have been calculated and are given in Sec. II of this paper. Results for reflected spheres are also available. Results for 28 actinides are included in Table 1; only 1 nuclide, 232 Pa (T 1/2 = 1.31 day), has a half-life <40 days

  13. Globular cluster metallicity scale: evidence from stellar models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demarque, P.; King, C.R.; Diaz, A.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical giant branches have been constructed to determine their relative positions for metallicities in the range -2.3 0 )/sub 0,g/ based on these models is presented which yields good agreement over the observed range of metallicities for galactic globular clusters and old disk clusters. The metallicity of 47 Tuc and M71 given by this calibration is about -0.8 dex. Subject headings: clusters, globular: stars: abundances: stars: interiors

  14. Plasma immersion ion implantation for reducing metal ion release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, C.; Garcia, J. A.; Maendl, S.; Pereiro, R.; Fernandez, B.; Rodriguez, R. J. [Centro de Ingenieria Avanzada de Superficies AIN, 31191, Cordovilla-Pamplona (Spain); Leibniz-Institut fuer Oberflaechenmodifizierung, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Universidad de Oviedo, Departamento Quimica Fisica y Analitica (Spain); Centro de Ingenieria Avanzada de Superficies AIN, 31191, Cordovilla-Pamplona (Spain)

    2012-11-06

    Plasma immersion ion implantation of Nitrogen and Oxygen on CoCrMo alloys was carried out to improve the tribological and corrosion behaviors of these biomedical alloys. In order to optimize the implantation results we were carried experiments at different temperatures. Tribocorrosion tests in bovine serum were used to measure Co, Cr and Mo releasing by using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry analysis after tests. Also, X-ray Diffraction analysis were employed in order to explain any obtained difference in wear rate and corrosion tests. Wear tests reveals important decreases in rate of more than one order of magnitude for the best treatment. Moreover decreases in metal release were found for all the implanted samples, preserving the same corrosion resistance of the unimplanted samples. Finally this paper gathers an analysis, in terms of implantation parameters and achieved properties for industrial implementation of these treatments.

  15. Field-scale assessment of phytotreatment of soil contaminated with weathered hydrocarbons and heavy metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmroth, M.R.T.; Koskinen, P.E.P.; Tuhkanen, T.A.; Puhakka, J.A. [Inst. of Environmental Engineering and Biotechnology, Tampere Univ. of Tech., Tampere (Finland); Pichtel, J. [Natural Resources and Environmental Management, Ball State Univ., Muncie, IN (United States); Vaajasaari, K. [Pirkanmaa Regional Environment Centre, Tampere (Finland); Joutti, A. [Finnish Environment Inst., Helsinki (Finland)

    2006-08-15

    Background, Aims, and Scope. Phytoremediation is remediation method which uses plants to remove, contain or detoxify environmental contaminants. Phytoremediation has successfully been applied for the removal of fresh hydrocarbon contamination, but removal of aged hydrocarbons has proven more difficult. Biodegradation of hydrocarbons in the subsurface can be enhanced by the presence of plant roots, i.e. the rhizosphere effect. Phytostabilization reduces heavy metal availability via immobilization in the rhizosphere. Soils contaminated by both hydrocarbons and heavy metals are abundant and may be difficult to treat. Heavy metal toxicity can inhibit the activity of hydrocarbon-degrading micro-organisms and decrease the metabolic diversity of soil bacteria. In this experiment, weathered hydrocarbon- and heavy metal-contaminated soil was treated using phytoremediation in a 39-month field study in attempts to achieve both hydrocarbon removal and heavy metal stabilization. Methods. A combination of hydrocarbon degradation and heavy metal stabilization was evaluated in a field-scale phytoremediation study of weathered contaminants. Soil had been contaminated over several years with hydrocarbons (11,400{+-}4,300 mg kg dry soil){sup -1} and heavy metals from bus maintenance activities and was geologically characterized as till. Concentrations of soil copper, lead and zinc were 170{+-}50 mgkg{sup -1}, 1,100{+-}1,500 mg kg{sup -1} and 390{+-} 340 mg kg{sup -1}, respectively. The effect of contaminants, plant species and soil amendment (NPK fertilizer or biowaste compost) on metabolic activity of soil microbiota was determined. Phytostabilization performance was investigated by analyses of metal concentrations in plants, soil and site leachate as well as acute toxicity to Vibrio fischeri and Enchtraeus albidus. Results. Over 39 months hydrocarbon concentrations did not decrease significantly (P=0.05) in non-amended soil, although 30% of initial hydrocarbon concentrations were

  16. Six-kilogram-scale electrorefining of plutonium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullins, L.J.; Morgan, A.N.; Apgar, S.A. III; Christensen, D.C.

    1982-09-01

    The electrorefining of metallic plutonium scrap to produce high purity metal has been an established procedure at Los Alamos since 1964. This is a batch process and was limited to 4-kg plutonium because of criticality safety considerations. Improvements in critical mass measurements have permitted us to develop a process for 6-kg plutonium. The 6-kg process is now operational. The increased size of the process, together with other improvements which have been made, makes plutonium electrorefining the principal industrial tool for processing and purifying metallic plutonium scrap

  17. SCALING ANALYSIS OF REPOSITORY HEAT LOAD FOR REDUCED DIMENSIONALITY MODELS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MICHAEL T. ITAMUA AND CLIFFORD K. HO

    1998-01-01

    The thermal energy released from the waste packages emplaced in the potential Yucca Mountain repository is expected to result in changes in the repository temperature, relative humidity, air mass fraction, gas flow rates, and other parameters that are important input into the models used to calculate the performance of the engineered system components. In particular, the waste package degradation models require input from thermal-hydrologic models that have higher resolution than those currently used to simulate the T/H responses at the mountain-scale. Therefore, a combination of mountain- and drift-scale T/H models is being used to generate the drift thermal-hydrologic environment

  18. Causal inference between bioavailability of heavy metals and environmental factors in a large-scale region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yuqiong; Du, Qingyun; Wang, Qi; Yu, Huanyun; Liu, Jianfeng; Tian, Yu; Chang, Chunying; Lei, Jing

    2017-01-01

    The causation between bioavailability of heavy metals and environmental factors are generally obtained from field experiments at local scales at present, and lack sufficient evidence from large scales. However, inferring causation between bioavailability of heavy metals and environmental factors across large-scale regions is challenging. Because the conventional correlation-based approaches used for causation assessments across large-scale regions, at the expense of actual causation, can result in spurious insights. In this study, a general approach framework, Intervention calculus when the directed acyclic graph (DAG) is absent (IDA) combined with the backdoor criterion (BC), was introduced to identify causation between the bioavailability of heavy metals and the potential environmental factors across large-scale regions. We take the Pearl River Delta (PRD) in China as a case study. The causal structures and effects were identified based on the concentrations of heavy metals (Zn, As, Cu, Hg, Pb, Cr, Ni and Cd) in soil (0–20 cm depth) and vegetable (lettuce) and 40 environmental factors (soil properties, extractable heavy metals and weathering indices) in 94 samples across the PRD. Results show that the bioavailability of heavy metals (Cd, Zn, Cr, Ni and As) was causally influenced by soil properties and soil weathering factors, whereas no causal factor impacted the bioavailability of Cu, Hg and Pb. No latent factor was found between the bioavailability of heavy metals and environmental factors. The causation between the bioavailability of heavy metals and environmental factors at field experiments is consistent with that on a large scale. The IDA combined with the BC provides a powerful tool to identify causation between the bioavailability of heavy metals and environmental factors across large-scale regions. Causal inference in a large system with the dynamic changes has great implications for system-based risk management. - Causation between the

  19. Effect of hydraulic retention time on metal precipitation in sulfate reducing inverse fluidized bed reactors

    KAUST Repository

    Villa-Gómez, Denys Kristalia

    2014-02-13

    BACKGROUND: Metal sulfide recovery in sulfate reducing bioreactors is a challenge due to the formation of small precipitates with poor settling properties. The size of the metal sulfide precipitates with the change in operational parameters such as pH, sulfide concentration and reactor configuration has been previously studied. The effect of the hydraulic retention time (HRT) on the metal precipitate characteristics such as particle size for settling has not yet been addressed. RESULTS: The change in size of the metal (Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd) sulfide precipitates as a function of the HRT was studied in two sulfate reducing inversed fluidized bed (IFB) reactors operating at different chemical oxygen demand concentrations to produce high and low sulfide concentrations. The decrease of the HRT from 24 to 9h in both IFB reactors affected the contact time of the precipitates formed, thus making differences in aggregation and particle growth regardless of the differences in sulfide concentration. Further HRT decrease to 4.5h affected the sulfate reducing activity for sulfide production and hence, the supersaturation level and solid phase speciation. Metal sulfide precipitates affected the sulfate reducing activity and community in the biofilm, probably because of the stronger local supersaturation causing metal sulfides accumulation in the biofilm. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that the HRT is an important factor determining the size and thus the settling rate of the metal sulfides formed in bioreactors.

  20. Modeling Ethanol Decomposition on Transition Metals: A Combined Application of Scaling and Bronsted-Evans-Polanyi Relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferrin, P.; Simonetti, D.; Kandoi, S.

    2009-01-01

    calculations necessary to describe trends in activity and selectivity across metal and alloy surfaces, thus extending the reach of DFT to more complex systems. In-this work, the well-known family of Bronsted-Evans-Polanyi (BEP) correlations, connecting minima with maxima in the potential energy surface...... on a subset of these surfaces are calculated. Experiments on supported catalysts verify that this simple model is reasonably accurate in describing reactivity trends across metals, suggesting that the combination of BEP and scaling relations may substantially reduce the cost of DFT calculations required...

  1. Invasive lionfish reduce native fish abundance on a regional scale

    OpenAIRE

    Ballew, Nicholas G.; Bacheler, Nathan M.; Kellison, G. Todd; Schueller, Amy M.

    2016-01-01

    Invasive lionfish pose an unprecedented threat to biodiversity and fisheries throughout Atlantic waters off of the southeastern United States, the Caribbean, and the Gulf of Mexico. Here, we employ a spatially replicated Before-After-Control-Impact analysis with temporal pairing to quantify for the first time the impact of the lionfish invasion on native fish abundance across a broad regional scale and over the entire duration of the lionfish invasion (1990?2014). Our results suggest that 1) ...

  2. Microbiological-enhanced mixing across scales during in-situ bioreduction of metals and radionuclides at Department of Energy Sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valocchi, Albert; Werth, Charles; Liu, Wen-Tso; Sanford, Robert; Nakshatrala, Kalyan

    2015-01-01

    Bioreduction is being actively investigated as an effective strategy for subsurface remediation and long-term management of DOE sites contaminated by metals and radionuclides (i.e. U(VI)). These strategies require manipulation of the subsurface, usually through injection of chemicals (e.g., electron donor) which mix at varying scales with the contaminant to stimulate metal reducing bacteria. There is evidence from DOE field experiments suggesting that mixing limitations of substrates at all scales may affect biological growth and activity for U(VI) reduction. Although current conceptual models hold that biomass growth and reduction activity is limited by physical mixing processes, a growing body of literature suggests that reaction could be enhanced by cell-to-cell interaction occurring over length scales extending tens to thousands of microns. Our project investigated two potential mechanisms of enhanced electron transfer. The first is the formation of single- or multiple-species biofilms that transport electrons via direct electrical connection such as conductive pili (i.e. nanowire) through biofilms to where the electron acceptor is available. The second is through diffusion of electron carriers from syntrophic bacteria to dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria (DMRB). The specific objectives of this work are (i) to quantify the extent and rate that electrons are transported between microorganisms in physical mixing zones between an electron donor and electron acceptor (e.g. U(IV)), (ii) to quantify the extent that biomass growth and reaction are enhanced by interspecies electron transport, and (iii) to integrate mixing across scales (e.g., microscopic scale of electron transfer and macroscopic scale of diffusion) in an integrated numerical model to quantify these mechanisms on overall U(VI) reduction rates. We tested these hypotheses with five tasks that integrate microbiological experiments, unique micro-fluidics experiments, flow cell experiments, and multi-scale

  3. Microbiological-enhanced mixing across scales during in-situ bioreduction of metals and radionuclides at Department of Energy Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valocchi, Albert [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Werth, Charles [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Liu, Wen-Tso [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Sanford, Robert [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Nakshatrala, Kalyan [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-10-20

    Bioreduction is being actively investigated as an effective strategy for subsurface remediation and long-term management of DOE sites contaminated by metals and radionuclides (i.e. U(VI)). These strategies require manipulation of the subsurface, usually through injection of chemicals (e.g., electron donor) which mix at varying scales with the contaminant to stimulate metal reducing bacteria. There is evidence from DOE field experiments suggesting that mixing limitations of substrates at all scales may affect biological growth and activity for U(VI) reduction. Although current conceptual models hold that biomass growth and reduction activity is limited by physical mixing processes, a growing body of literature suggests that reaction could be enhanced by cell-to-cell interaction occurring over length scales extending tens to thousands of microns. Our project investigated two potential mechanisms of enhanced electron transfer. The first is the formation of single- or multiple-species biofilms that transport electrons via direct electrical connection such as conductive pili (i.e. ‘nanowires’) through biofilms to where the electron acceptor is available. The second is through diffusion of electron carriers from syntrophic bacteria to dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria (DMRB). The specific objectives of this work are (i) to quantify the extent and rate that electrons are transported between microorganisms in physical mixing zones between an electron donor and electron acceptor (e.g. U(IV)), (ii) to quantify the extent that biomass growth and reaction are enhanced by interspecies electron transport, and (iii) to integrate mixing across scales (e.g., microscopic scale of electron transfer and macroscopic scale of diffusion) in an integrated numerical model to quantify these mechanisms on overall U(VI) reduction rates. We tested these hypotheses with five tasks that integrate microbiological experiments, unique micro-fluidics experiments, flow cell experiments, and

  4. Scale effects in metal-forming friction and lubrication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Søe; Paldan, Nikolas Aulin; Calaon, Matteo

    2011-01-01

    Downscaling of metal-forming operations from macro-to microscale implies significant changes caused by size effects. Among these, the friction increases as reported by researchers using indirect test methods such as the ring-compression test and double-cup-extrusion test. In this study, a new test...... equipment is developed for studies of the size effect in metal-forming friction in the range from macro-to microscale. Investigations confirm a significant friction increase when downscaling. Visual inspection of the workpieces shows this to be explained by the amount of open and closed lubricant pockets....

  5. Biogeochemistry of a Field-Scale Sulfate Reducing Bioreactor Treating Mining Influenced Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drennan, D.; Lee, I.; Landkamer, L.; Figueroa, L. A.; Webb, S.; Sharp, J. O.

    2012-12-01

    Acidity, metal release, and toxicity may be environmental health concerns in areas influenced by mining. Mining influenced waters (MIW) can be remediated through the establishment of Sulfate Reducing Bioreactors (SRBRs) as part of engineered passive treatment systems. The objective of our research is an enhanced understanding of the biogeochemistry in SRBRs by combining molecular biological and geochemical techniques. Bioreactor reactive substrate, settling pond water, and effluent (from the SRBR) were collected from a field scale SRBR in Arizona, which has been in operation for approximately 3 years. Schematically, the water passes through the SRBR; combines with flow that bypasses the SRBR into the and goes into the mixing pond, and finally is released as effluent to aerobic polishing cells. High throughput sequencing of extracted DNA revealed that Proteobacteria dominated the reactive substrate (61%), settling pond (93%), and effluent (50%), with the next most abundant phylum in all samples (excluding uncultured organisms) being Bacteriodes (1-17%). However, at the superclass level, the three samples were more variable. Gammaproteobacteria dominated the reactive substrate (35%), Betaproteobacteria in the settling pond (63%) and finally the effluent was dominated by Epsilonproteobacteria (Helicobacteraceae) (43%). Diversity was most pronounced in association with the reactor matrix, and least diverse in the settling pond. Putative functional analysis revealed a modest presence of sulfate/sulfur reducing bacteria (SRB) (>5%) in both the matrix and settling pond but a much higher abundance (43%) of sulfur reducing bacteria in the effluent. Interestingly this effluent population was composed entirely of the family Helicobacteraceae (sulfur reduction II via polysulfide pathway). Other putative functions of interest include metal reduction in the matrix (3%) and effluent (3%), as well as polysaccharide degradation, which was largely abundant in all samples (21

  6. Causal inference between bioavailability of heavy metals and environmental factors in a large-scale region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuqiong; Du, Qingyun; Wang, Qi; Yu, Huanyun; Liu, Jianfeng; Tian, Yu; Chang, Chunying; Lei, Jing

    2017-07-01

    The causation between bioavailability of heavy metals and environmental factors are generally obtained from field experiments at local scales at present, and lack sufficient evidence from large scales. However, inferring causation between bioavailability of heavy metals and environmental factors across large-scale regions is challenging. Because the conventional correlation-based approaches used for causation assessments across large-scale regions, at the expense of actual causation, can result in spurious insights. In this study, a general approach framework, Intervention calculus when the directed acyclic graph (DAG) is absent (IDA) combined with the backdoor criterion (BC), was introduced to identify causation between the bioavailability of heavy metals and the potential environmental factors across large-scale regions. We take the Pearl River Delta (PRD) in China as a case study. The causal structures and effects were identified based on the concentrations of heavy metals (Zn, As, Cu, Hg, Pb, Cr, Ni and Cd) in soil (0-20 cm depth) and vegetable (lettuce) and 40 environmental factors (soil properties, extractable heavy metals and weathering indices) in 94 samples across the PRD. Results show that the bioavailability of heavy metals (Cd, Zn, Cr, Ni and As) was causally influenced by soil properties and soil weathering factors, whereas no causal factor impacted the bioavailability of Cu, Hg and Pb. No latent factor was found between the bioavailability of heavy metals and environmental factors. The causation between the bioavailability of heavy metals and environmental factors at field experiments is consistent with that on a large scale. The IDA combined with the BC provides a powerful tool to identify causation between the bioavailability of heavy metals and environmental factors across large-scale regions. Causal inference in a large system with the dynamic changes has great implications for system-based risk management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All

  7. Dynamic modelling of heavy metals - time scales and target loads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Posch, M.; Vries, de W.

    2009-01-01

    Over the past decade steady-state methods have been developed to assess critical loads of metals avoiding long-term risks in view of food quality and eco-toxicological effects on organisms in soils and surface waters. However, dynamic models are needed to estimate the times involved in attaining a

  8. Contrasting levels of heavy metals in the feathers of urban pigeons from close habitats suggest limited movements at a restricted scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frantz, Adrien; Pottier, Marie-Anne; Karimi, Battle; Corbel, Hélène; Aubry, Emmanuel; Haussy, Claudy; Gasparini, Julien; Castrec-Rouelle, Maryse

    2012-01-01

    Despite restrictions in emissions, heavy metals may remain a major environmental issue due to their numerous sources and their persistence. Here, we assessed current levels of 4 metals (Copper, Cadmium, Lead, Zinc) in the feathers of 91 feral pigeons (Columba livia) from 7 sites in the urbanized region of Paris. Elements were detected in all pigeons, indicating that metals persist in urbanized areas. The ratio between metal concentrations in the feathers vs. in the environment calculated using data from other studies was 2–90 times higher for cadmium than for other metals, underlying its ecological importance. Concentrations in the feathers depended on locality, suggesting that pigeons remain in local habitats at this restricted scale, as expected from previous observations. Overall, our study suggests that urban feral pigeons may represent a good model system for metal biomonitoring. Highlights: ► We measured the concentrations of 4 heavy metals in pigeon feathers through Paris. ► Cadmium, Copper, Lead and Zinc were present in pigeons from all 7 sites. ► Metals thus still persist in the city though their emissions have been reduced. ► Metal concentrations in the feathers depended on the local origin of the pigeons. ► These differences suggest limited pigeon movements at a very restricted scale. - Concentrations of metals in the feathers of Parisian feral pigeons (Columba livia) strongly differ at a restricted spatial scale, suggesting limited movements in urban areas.

  9. Reducing the leachability of nitrate, phosphorus and heavy metals from soil using waste material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faridullah

    Full Text Available Abstract Contaminants like nitrate (NO3, phosphorus (P and heavy metals in water are often associated with agricultural activities. Various soil and water remediation techniques have been employed to reduce the risk associated with these contaminants. A study was conducted to examine the extent of leaching of heavy metals (Cd, Ni, Pb and Cr, NO3 and P. For this purpose sandy and silt loam soils were amended with different waste materials, namely wood ash, solid waste ash, vegetable waste, charcoal, and sawdust. The soils were saturated with wastewater. Irrespective of the waste applied, the pH and EC of the amended soils were found to be greater than the control. Charcoal, sawdust and wood ash significantly decreased heavy metals, nitrate and phosphorus concentrations in the leachate. Treatments were more efficient for reducing Ni than other heavy metals concentrations. Waste amendments differed for heavy metals during the process of leaching. Heavy metals in the soil were progressively depleted due to the successive leaching stages. This research suggests that waste material may act as an adsorbent for the above contaminants and can reduce their leachability in soils.

  10. Wafer-Scale Aluminum Nanoplasmonic Resonators with Optimized Metal Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-04

    Because the plasma frequency of aluminum is at significantly higher energies than that of gold or silver, aluminum holds promise for UV sensing and...plasmonics. Unlike plasmonic devices based on coinage metals, such as gold and silver, which are effectively banned from silicon semiconductor fabrication... hydroxide -based developer. Finally, samples were plasma etched using a 1200 W plasma with a 145 W bias and a 12 mTorr chamber pressure. The flow

  11. Scaling Relationships for Adsorption Energies of C2 Hydrocarbons on Transition Metal Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, G

    2011-08-18

    Using density functional theory calculations we show that the adsorption energies for C{sub 2}H{sub x}-type adsorbates on transition metal surfaces scale with each other according to a simple bond order conservation model. This observation generalizes some recently recognized adsorption energy scaling laws for AH{sub x}-type adsorbates to unsaturated hydrocarbons and establishes a coherent simplified description of saturated as well as unsaturated hydrocarbons adsorbed on transition metal surfaces. A number of potential applications are discussed. We apply the model to the dehydrogenation of ethane over pure transition metal catalysts. Comparison with the corresponding full density functional theory calculations shows excellent agreement.

  12. Metal supplementation to UASB bioreactors: from cell-metal interactions to full-scale application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fermoso, Fernando G.; Bartacek, Jan; Jansen, Stefan; Lens, Piet N.L.

    2009-01-01

    Upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) bioreactors are commonly used for anaerobic wastewater treatment. Trace metals need to be dosed to these bioreactors to maintain microbial metabolism and growth. The dosing needs to balance the supply of a minimum amount of micronutrients to support a desired microbial activity or growth rate with a maximum level of micronutrient supply above which the trace metals become inhibitory or toxic. In studies on granular sludge reactors, the required micronutrients are undefined and different metal formulations with differences in composition, concentration and species are used. Moreover, an appropriate quantification of the required nutrient dosing and suitable ranges during the entire operational period has been given little attention. This review summarizes the state-of-the-art knowledge of the interactions between trace metals and cells growing in anaerobic granules, which is the main type of biomass retention in anaerobic wastewater treatment reactors. The impact of trace metal limitation as well as overdosing (toxicity) on the biomass is overviewed and the consequences for reactor performance are detailed. Special attention is given to the influence of metal speciation in the liquid and solid phase on bioavailability. The currently used methods for trace metal dosing into wastewater treatment reactors are overviewed and ways of optimization are suggested.

  13. Metal supplementation to UASB bioreactors: from cell-metal interactions to full-scale application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fermoso, Fernando G. [Sub-department of Environmental Technology, Wageningen University, ' Biotechnion' -Bomenweg 2, P.O. Box 8129, 6700 EV Wageningen (Netherlands); Bartacek, Jan [Sub-department of Environmental Technology, Wageningen University, ' Biotechnion' -Bomenweg 2, P.O. Box 8129, 6700 EV Wageningen (Netherlands); Pollution Prevention and Control core, UNESCO-IHE, P.O. Box 3015, 2601 DA Delft (Netherlands); Jansen, Stefan [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry and Colloid Science, Wageningen University, Dreijenplein 6, 6703 HB Wageningen (Netherlands); Lens, Piet N.L., E-mail: Piet.Lens@wur.nl [Sub-department of Environmental Technology, Wageningen University, ' Biotechnion' -Bomenweg 2, P.O. Box 8129, 6700 EV Wageningen (Netherlands); Pollution Prevention and Control core, UNESCO-IHE, P.O. Box 3015, 2601 DA Delft (Netherlands)

    2009-06-01

    Upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) bioreactors are commonly used for anaerobic wastewater treatment. Trace metals need to be dosed to these bioreactors to maintain microbial metabolism and growth. The dosing needs to balance the supply of a minimum amount of micronutrients to support a desired microbial activity or growth rate with a maximum level of micronutrient supply above which the trace metals become inhibitory or toxic. In studies on granular sludge reactors, the required micronutrients are undefined and different metal formulations with differences in composition, concentration and species are used. Moreover, an appropriate quantification of the required nutrient dosing and suitable ranges during the entire operational period has been given little attention. This review summarizes the state-of-the-art knowledge of the interactions between trace metals and cells growing in anaerobic granules, which is the main type of biomass retention in anaerobic wastewater treatment reactors. The impact of trace metal limitation as well as overdosing (toxicity) on the biomass is overviewed and the consequences for reactor performance are detailed. Special attention is given to the influence of metal speciation in the liquid and solid phase on bioavailability. The currently used methods for trace metal dosing into wastewater treatment reactors are overviewed and ways of optimization are suggested.

  14. Beneficial of Coriander Leaves (Coriandrum sativum L.) to Reduce Heavy Metals Contamination in Rod Shellfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winarti, S.; Pertiwi, C. N.; Hanani, A. Z.; Mujamil, S. I.; Putra, K. A.; Herlambang, K. C.

    2018-01-01

    Contamination of heavy metals in certain levels of food can disrupt human health. Heavy metals have toxic properties, cannot be overhauled or destroyed by living organisms, can accumulate in the body of organisms including humans, either directly or indirectly. Heavy metal Hg, Cd, Cr is a very toxic metals (can result in death or health problems that are not recovered in a short time), while heavy metal Co, Pb, Cu toxicity is moderate (can lead to both recoverable and non-recoverable health problems in a relatively long time). Hence the heavy metal contaminating the food must be eliminated or reduced to a safe level. One effort was use coriander leaves to reduce the contamination of heavy metals in fish/shellfish. The objective of the research was to prove the extract of coriander leaves can reduce heavy metal contamination of Pb, Hg and Cu in rod shellfish (lorjuk). The treatment of this research was long soaking in coriander leaves extract that were 0, 30, 60 and 90 minutes. The results showed that the longer time of soaking can decrease Pb level from 4.4 ± 0.424 ppb to 1.7 ± 0.5 ppb, Hg level from 4.11± 0.07 to 1.12± 0.6 ppb, and Cu level from 433.7 ± 0.1 ppb to 117 ± 0.78 ppb. Protein content not significant decrease in rod shellfish (lorjuk) after 90 minutes soaking time, that was from 28.56 ± 0.403% to 26,625 ± 0.19%.

  15. Reducing beam hardening effects and metal artefacts using Medipix3RX: With applications from biomaterial science

    CERN Document Server

    Rajendran, K; de Ruiter, N J A; Chernoglazov, A I; Panta, R K; Butler, A P H; Butler, P H; Bell, S T; Anderson, N G; Woodfield, T B F; Tredinnick, S J; Healy, J L; Bateman, C J; Aamir, R; Doesburg, R M N; Renaud, P F; Gieseg, S P; Smithies, D J; Mohr, J L; Mandalika, V B H; Opie, A M T; Cook, N J; Ronaldson, J P; Nik, S J; Atharifard, A; Clyne, M; Bones, P J; Bartneck, C; Grasset, R; Schleich, N; Billinghurst, M

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses methods for reducing beam hardening effects using spectral data for biomaterial applications. A small-animal spectral scanner operating in the diagnostic energy range was used. We investigate the use of photon-processing features of the Medipix3RX ASIC in reducing beam hardening and associated artefacts. A fully operational charge summing mode was used during the imaging routine. We present spectral data collected for metal alloy samples, its analysis using algebraic 3D reconstruction software and volume visualisation using a custom volume rendering software. Narrow high energy acquisition using the photon-processing detector revealed substantial reduction in beam hardening effects and metal artefacts.

  16. FULL-SCALE TREATMENT WETLANDS FOR METAL REMOVAL FROM INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, E; John Gladden, J

    2007-01-01

    The A-01 NPDES outfall at the Savannah River Site receives process wastewater discharges and stormwater runoff from the Savannah River National Laboratory. Routine monitoring indicated that copper concentrations were regularly higher than discharge permit limit, and water routinely failed toxicity tests. These conditions necessitated treatment of nearly one million gallons of water per day plus storm runoff. Washington Savannah River Company personnel explored options to bring process and runoff waters into compliance with the permit conditions, including source reduction, engineering solutions, and biological solutions. A conceptual design for a constructed wetland treatment system (WTS) was developed and the full-scale system was constructed and began operation in 2000. The overall objective of our research is to better understand the mechanisms of operation of the A-01 WTS in order to provide better input to design of future systems. The system is a vegetated surface flow wetland with a hydraulic retention time of approximately 48 hours. Copper, mercury, and lead removal efficiencies are very high, all in excess of 80% removal from water passing through the wetland system. Zinc removal is 60%, and nickel is generally unaffected. Dissolved organic carbon in the water column is increased by the system and reduces toxicity of the effluent. Concentrations of metals in the A-01 WTS sediments generally decrease with depth and along the flow path through the wetland. Sequential extraction results indicate that most metals are tightly bound to wetland sediments

  17. FULL-SCALE TREATMENT WETLANDS FOR METAL REMOVAL FROM INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, E; John Gladden, J

    2007-03-22

    The A-01 NPDES outfall at the Savannah River Site receives process wastewater discharges and stormwater runoff from the Savannah River National Laboratory. Routine monitoring indicated that copper concentrations were regularly higher than discharge permit limit, and water routinely failed toxicity tests. These conditions necessitated treatment of nearly one million gallons of water per day plus storm runoff. Washington Savannah River Company personnel explored options to bring process and runoff waters into compliance with the permit conditions, including source reduction, engineering solutions, and biological solutions. A conceptual design for a constructed wetland treatment system (WTS) was developed and the full-scale system was constructed and began operation in 2000. The overall objective of our research is to better understand the mechanisms of operation of the A-01 WTS in order to provide better input to design of future systems. The system is a vegetated surface flow wetland with a hydraulic retention time of approximately 48 hours. Copper, mercury, and lead removal efficiencies are very high, all in excess of 80% removal from water passing through the wetland system. Zinc removal is 60%, and nickel is generally unaffected. Dissolved organic carbon in the water column is increased by the system and reduces toxicity of the effluent. Concentrations of metals in the A-01 WTS sediments generally decrease with depth and along the flow path through the wetland. Sequential extraction results indicate that most metals are tightly bound to wetland sediments.

  18. The challenge of screen printed Ag metallization on nano-scale poly-silicon passivated contacts for silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lin; Song, Lixin; Yan, Li; Becht, Gregory; Zhang, Yi; Hoerteis, Matthias

    2017-08-01

    Passivated contacts can be used to reduce metal-induced recombination for higher energy conversion efficiency for silicon solar cells, and are obtained increasing attentions by PV industries in recent years. The reported thicknesses of passivated contact layers are mostly within tens of nanometer range, and the corresponding metallization methods are realized mainly by plating/evaporation technology. This high cost metallization cannot compete with the screen printing technology, and may affect its market potential comparing with the presently dominant solar cell technology. Very few works have been reported on screen printing metallization on passivated contact solar cells. Hence, there is a rising demand to realize screen printing metallization technology on this topic. In this work, we investigate applying screen printing metallization pastes on poly-silicon passivated contacts. The critical challenge for us is to build low contact resistance that can be competitive to standard technology while restricting the paste penetrations within the thin nano-scale passivated contact layers. The contact resistivity of 1.1mohm-cm2 and the open circuit voltages > 660mV are achieved, and the most appropriate thickness range is estimated to be around 80 150nm.

  19. Delta ferrite in the weld metal of reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sam, Shiju, E-mail: shiju@ipr.res.in [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382 428 (India); Das, C.R.; Ramasubbu, V.; Albert, S.K.; Bhaduri, A.K.; Jayakumar, T. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Rajendra Kumar, E. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382 428 (India)

    2014-12-15

    Formation of delta(δ)-ferrite in the weld metal, during autogenous bead-on-plate welding of Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic (RAFM) steel using Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) process, has been studied. Composition of the alloy is such that delta-ferrite is not expected in the alloy; but examination of the weld metal revealed presence of delta-ferrite in the weld metal. Volume fraction of delta-ferrite is found to be higher in the weld interface than in the rest of the fusion zone. Decrease in the volume fraction of delta-ferrite, with an increase in preheat temperature or with an increase in heat input, is observed. Results indicate that the cooling rate experienced during welding affects the volume fraction of delta-ferrite retained in the weld metal and variation in the delta-ferrite content with cooling rate is explained with variation in the time that the weld metal spends in various temperature regimes in which delta-ferrite is stable for the alloy during its cooling from the liquid metal to the ambient temperature. This manuscript will discuss the effect of welding parameters on formation of delta-ferrite and its retention in the weld metal of RAFM steel.

  20. Use of configuration management to reduce development costs in metal parts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalsoom, T.; Ahmad, S.

    2005-01-01

    In development and manufacturing phases of metal parts, design efforts are converted in set of engineering data pack under the given guidelines of Configuration Management (CM). These engineering documents define Configuration Management of metal parts production in a local industry. The development phase is normally less structured and open to Engineering Change Proposals. In our local engineering organizations most of the work done is normally not well documented for future revisions and modernization. This leads to delays in development and increase in production costs of metal parts. This becomes more pronounced if any member of the design team disassociates and leaves the organization. The Configuration Management helps to reduce development costs by providing infrastructure for product identification, documentation, change control, interface control and technical reviews and product audits. Automated or Computer-Assisted CM activities can also be used to shorten response time and increase accuracy and reliability of the produced metal components. (author)

  1. The efficacy of noble metal alloy urinary catheters in reducing catheter-associated urinary tract infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alanood Ahmed Aljohi

    2016-01-01

    Results: A 90% relative risk reduction in the rate of CAUTI was observed with the noble metal alloy catheter compared to the standard catheter (10 vs. 1 cases, P = 0.006. When considering both catheter-associated asymptomatic bacteriuria and CAUTI, the relative risk reduction was 83% (12 vs. 2 cases, P = 0.005. In addition to CAUTI, the risk of acquiring secondary bacteremia was lower (100% for the patients using noble metal alloy catheters (3 cases in the standard group vs. 0 case in the noble metal alloy catheter group, P = 0.24. No adverse events related to any of the used catheters were recorded. Conclusion: Results from this study revealed that noble metal alloy catheters are safe to use and significantly reduce CAUTI rate in ICU patients after 3 days of use.

  2. A reduced scale two loop PWR core designed with particle swarm optimization technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima Junior, Carlos A. Souza; Pereira, Claudio M.N.A; Lapa, Celso M.F.; Cunha, Joao J.; Alvim, Antonio C.M.

    2007-01-01

    Reduced scale experiments are often employed in engineering projects because they are much cheaper than real scale testing. Unfortunately, designing reduced scale thermal-hydraulic circuit or equipment, with the capability of reproducing, both accurately and simultaneously, all physical phenomena that occur in real scale and at operating conditions, is a difficult task. To solve this problem, advanced optimization techniques, such as Genetic Algorithms, have been applied. Following this research line, we have performed investigations, using the Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) Technique, to design a reduced scale two loop Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) core, considering 100% of nominal power and non accidental operating conditions. Obtained results show that the proposed methodology is a promising approach for forced flow reduced scale experiments. (author)

  3. A new approach to designing reduced scale thermal-hydraulic experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapa, Celso M.F.; Sampaio, Paulo A.B. de; Pereira, Claudio M.N.A.

    2004-01-01

    Reduced scale experiments are often employed in engineering because they are much cheaper than real scale testing. Unfortunately, though, it is difficult to design a thermal-hydraulic circuit or equipment in reduced scale capable of reproducing, both accurately and simultaneously, all the physical phenomena that occur in real scale and operating conditions. This paper presents a methodology to designing thermal-hydraulic experiments in reduced scale based on setting up a constrained optimization problem that is solved using genetic algorithms (GAs). In order to demonstrate the application of the methodology proposed, we performed some investigations in the design of a heater aimed to simulate the transport of heat and momentum in the core of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) at 100% of nominal power and non-accident operating conditions. The results obtained show that the proposed methodology is a promising approach for designing reduced scale experiments

  4. System and method for making metallic iron with reduced CO.sub.2 emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiesel, Richard F; Englund, David J; Schlichting, Mark; Meehan, John; Crouch, Jeremiah; Wilson, Logan

    2014-10-14

    A method and system for making metallic iron nodules with reduced CO.sub.2 emissions is disclosed. The method includes: assembling a linear hearth furnace having entry and exit portions, at least a conversion zone and a fusion zone, and a moving hearth adapted to move reducible iron bearing material through the furnace on contiguous hearth sections; assembling a shrouded return substantially free of air ingress extending adjacent at least the conversion and fusion zones of the furnace through which hearth sections can move from adjacent the exit portion to adjacent the entry portion of the furnace; transferring the hearth sections from the furnace to the shrouded return adjacent the exit portion; reducing reducible material in the linear hearth furnace to metallic iron nodules; and transporting gases from at least the fusion zone to the shrouded return to heat the hearth sections while in the shrouded return.

  5. Reducing beam hardening effects and metal artefacts using Medipix3RX: With applications from biomaterial science

    OpenAIRE

    Rajendran, K.; Walsh, M. F.; de Ruiter, N. J. A.; Chernoglazov, A. I.; Panta, R. K.; Butler, A. P. H.; Butler, P. H.; Bell, S. T.; Anderson, N. G.; Woodfield, T. B. F.; Tredinnick, S. J.; Healy, J. L.; Bateman, C. J.; Aamir, R.; Doesburg, R. M. N.

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses methods for reducing beam hardening effects using spectral data for biomaterial applications. A small-animal spectral scanner operating in the diagnostic energy range was used. We investigate the use of photon-processing features of the Medipix3RX ASIC in reducing beam hardening and associated artefacts. A fully operational charge summing mode was used during the imaging routine. We present spectral data collected for metal alloy samples, its analysis using algebraic 3D r...

  6. Scaling of compression strength in disordered solids: metallic foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kováčik

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The scaling of compression strength with porosity for aluminium foams was investigated. The Al 99.96, AlMg1Si0.6 and AlSi11Mg0.6 foams of various porosity, sample size with and without surface skin were tested in compression. It was observed that the compression strength of aluminium foams scales near the percolation threshold with Tf ≈ 1.9 - 2.0 almost independently on the matrix alloy, sample size and presence of surface skin. The difference of the obtained values of Tf to the theoretical estimate of Tf = 2.64 ± 0.3 by Arbabi and Sahimi and to Ashby estimate of 1.5 was explained using an analogy with the Daoud and Coniglio approach to the scaling of the free energy of sol-gel transition. It leads to the finding that, there are two different universality classes for the critical exponent Tf: when the stretching forces dominate Tf = f = 2.1, respectively when bending forces prevail Tf = .d = 2.64 seems to be valid. Another possibility is the validity of relation Tf ≤ f which varies only according to the universality class of modulus of elasticity in foam.

  7. Evaluation of two iterative techniques for reducing metal artifacts in computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boas, F Edward; Fleischmann, Dominik

    2011-06-01

    To evaluate two methods for reducing metal artifacts in computed tomography (CT)--the metal deletion technique (MDT) and the selective algebraic reconstruction technique (SART)--and compare these methods with filtered back projection (FBP) and linear interpolation (LI). The institutional review board approved this retrospective HIPAA-compliant study; informed patient consent was waived. Simulated projection data were calculated for a phantom that contained water, soft tissue, bone, and iron. Clinical projection data were obtained retrospectively from 11 consecutively identified CT scans with metal streak artifacts, with a total of 178 sections containing metal. Each scan was reconstructed using FBP, LI, SART, and MDT. The simulated scans were evaluated quantitatively by calculating the average error in Hounsfield units for each pixel compared with the original phantom. Two radiologists who were blinded to the reconstruction algorithms used qualitatively evaluated the clinical scans, ranking the overall severity of artifacts for each algorithm. P values for comparisons of the image quality ranks were calculated from the binomial distribution. The simulations showed that MDT reduces artifacts due to photon starvation, beam hardening, and motion and does not introduce new streaks between metal and bone. MDT had the lowest average error (76% less than FBP, 42% less than LI, 17% less than SART). Blinded comparison of the clinical scans revealed that MDT had the best image quality 100% of the time (95% confidence interval: 72%, 100%). LI had the second best image quality, and SART and FBP had the worst image quality. On images from two CT scans, as compared with images generated by the scanner, MDT revealed information of potential clinical importance. For a wide range of scans, MDT yields reduced metal streak artifacts and better-quality images than does FBP, LI, or SART. http://radiology.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/radiol.11101782/-/DC1. RSNA, 2011

  8. Combustion of Metals in Reduced-Gravity and Extra Terrestrial Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branch, M.C.; Abbud-Madrid, A.; Daily, J. W.

    1999-01-01

    The combustion of metals is a field with important practical applications in rocket propellants, high-temperature flames, and material synthesis. Also, the safe operation of metal containers in high-pressure oxygen systems and with cryogenic fuels and oxidizers remains an important concern in industry. The increasing use of metallic components in spacecraft and space structures has also raised concerns about their flammability properties and fire suppression mechanisms. In addition, recent efforts to embark on unmanned and manned planetary exploration, such as on Mars, have also renewed the interest in metal/carbon-dioxide combustion as an effective in situ resource utilization technology. In spite of these practical applications, the understanding of the combustion properties of metals remains far behind that of the most commonly used fuels such as hydrocarbons. The lack of understanding is due to the many problems unique to metal- oxidizer reactions such as: low-temperature surface oxidation prior to ignition, heterogeneous reactions, very high combustion temperatures, product condensation, high emissivity of products, and multi-phase interactions. Very few analytical models (all neglecting the influence of gravity) have been developed to predict the burning characteristics and the flame structure details. Several experimental studies attempting to validate these models have used small metal particles to recreate gravity-free conditions. The high emissivity of the flames, rapid reaction, and intermittent explosions experienced by these particles have made the gathering of any useful information on burning rates and flame structure very difficult. The use of a reduced gravity environment is needed to clarify some of the complex interactions among the phenomena described above. First, the elimination of the intrusive buoyant flows that plague all combustion phenomena is of paramount importance in metal reactions due to the much higher temperatures reached during

  9. A new rapid chemical route to prepare reduced graphene oxide using copper metal nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Tao; Gao Jianping; Xu Xiaoyang; Qiu Haixia; Wang Wei; Gao Chunjuan

    2013-01-01

    Copper metal nanoparticles were used as a reducing agent to reduce graphene oxide (GO). The reaction was complete in about 10 min and did not involve the use of any toxic reagents or acids that are typically used in the reduction of GO by Zn and Fe powders. The high reduction activity of the Cu nanoparticles, compared to Cu powder, may be the result of the formation of Cu 2 O nanoparticles. The effect of the mass ratio of the metal to GO for this reduction was also investigated. The reduction of the GO was verified by ultraviolet–visible absorption spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, Raman spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. After reduction, Cu 2 O supported on reduced GO was formed and showed superior catalytic ability for the degradation of a model dye pollutant, methylene blue. (paper)

  10. Interfacial transport phenomena and stability in liquid-metal/water systems: scaling considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdulla, S.; Liu, X.; Anderson, M.; Bonazza, R.; Corradini, M.; Cho, D.

    2001-01-01

    One concept being considered for steam generation in innovative nuclear reactor applications, involves water coming into direct contact with a circulating molten metal. The vigorous agitation of the two fluids, the direct liquid-liquid contact and the consequent large interfacial area give rise to very high heat transfer coefficients and rapid steam generation. For an optimum design of such direct contact heat exchange and vaporization systems, detailed knowledge is necessary of the various flow regimes, interfacial transport phenomena, heat transfer and operational stability. In this paper we describe current results from the first year of this research that studies the transport phenomena involved with the injection of water into molten metals (e.g., lead alloys). In particular, this work discusses scaling considerations related to direct contact heat exchange, our experimental plans for investigation and a test plan for the important experimental parameters; i.e., the water and liquid metal mass flow rates, the liquid metal pool temperature and the ambient pressure of the direct contact heat exchanger. Past experimental work and initial scaling results suggest that our experiments can directly represent the proper liquid metal pool temperature and the water subcooling. The experimental variation in water and liquid metal flow rates and system pressure (1-10 bar), although smaller than the current conceptual system designs, is sufficient to verify the expected scale effects to demonstrate the phenomena. (authors)

  11. Using scaling relations to understand trends in the catalytic activity of transition metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, G; Bligaard, T; Abild-Pedersen, F; Noerskov, J K

    2008-01-01

    A method is developed to estimate the potential energy diagram for a full catalytic reaction for a range of late transition metals on the basis of a calculation (or an experimental determination) for a single metal. The method, which employs scaling relations between adsorption energies, is illustrated by calculating the potential energy diagram for the methanation reaction and ammonia synthesis for 11 different metals on the basis of results calculated for Ru. It is also shown that considering the free energy diagram for the reactions, under typical industrial conditions, provides additional insight into reactivity trends

  12. Remediation of contaminated subsurface materials by a metal-reducing bacterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorby, Y.A.; Amonette, J.E.; Fruchter, J.S.

    1994-11-01

    A biotic approach for remediating subsurface sediments and groundwater contaminated with carbon tetrachloride (CT) and chromium was evaluated. Cells of the Fe(iii)-reducing bacterium strain BrY were added to sealed, anoxic flasks containing Hanford groundwater, natural subsurface sediments, and either carbon tetrachloride, CT, or oxidized chromium, Cr(VI). With lactate as the electron donor, BrY transformed CT to chloroform (CF), which accumulated to about 1 0 % of the initial concentration of CT. The remainder of the CT was transformed to unidentified, nonvolatile compounds. Transformation of CT by BrY was an indirect process Cells reduced solid phase Fe(ill) to chemically reactive FE(II) that chemically transformed the chlorinated contaminant. Cr(VI), in contrast, was reduced by a direct enzymatic reaction in the presence or absence of Fe(III)-bearing sediments. These results demonstrate that Fe(ill)-reducing bacteria provide potential for transforming CT and for reducing CR(VI) to less toxic Cr(III). Technologies for stimulating indigenous populations of metal-reducing bacteria or for introducing specific metal-reducing bacteria to the subsurface are being investigated

  13. Large Scale Hierarchical K-Means Based Image Retrieval With MapReduce

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    flat vocabulary on MapReduce. In 2013, Moise and Shestakov [32, 40], have been researching large scale indexing and search with MapReduce. They...time will be greatly reduced, however image retrieval performance will almost certainly suffer. Moise and Shestakov ran tests with 100M images on 108...43–72, 2005. [32] Diana Moise , Denis Shestakov, Gylfi Gudmundsson, and Laurent Amsaleg. Indexing and searching 100m images with map-reduce. In

  14. Physics design of experimental metal fuelled fast reactor cores for full scale demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devan, K.; Bachchan, Abhitab; Riyas, A.; Sathiyasheela, T.; Mohanakrishnan, P.; Chetal, S.C.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → In this study we made physics designs of experimental metal fast reactor cores. → Aim is for full-scale demonstration of fuel assemblies in a commercial power reactor. → Minimum power with adequate safety is considered. → In addition, fuel sustainability is also considered in the design. → Sodium bonded U-Pu-6%Zr and mechanically bonded U-Pu alloys are used. - Abstract: Fast breeder reactors based on metal fuel are planned to be in operation for the year beyond 2025 to meet the growing energy demand in India. A road map is laid towards the development of technologies required for launching 1000 MWe commercial metal breeder reactors with closed fuel cycle. Construction of a test reactor with metallic fuel is also envisaged to provide full-scale testing of fuel sub-assemblies planned for a commercial power reactor. Physics design studies have been carried out to arrive at a core configuration for this experimental facility. The aim of this study is to find out minimum power of the core to meet the requirements of safety as well as full-scale demonstration. In addition, fuel sustainability is also a consideration in the design. Two types of metallic fuel pins, viz. a sodium bonded ternary (U-Pu-6% Zr) alloy and a mechanically bonded binary (U-Pu) alloy with 125 μm thickness zirconium liner, are considered for this study. Using the European fast reactor neutronics code system, ERANOS 2.1, four metallic fast reactor cores are optimized and estimated their important steady state parameters. The ABBN-93 system is also used for estimating the important safety parameters. Minimum achievable power from the converter metallic core is 220 MWt. A 320 MWt self-sustaining breeder metal core is recommended for the test facility.

  15. Conceptual assessment and thermal hydraulic analysis of MVDS system for the dry storage of reduced metal fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. C.; Bang, K. S.; Shin, H. S.; Joo, J. S.; Su, K. S.; Kim, H. D.

    2003-01-01

    Conceptual assessment and thermal hydraulic analysis of MVDS storage system have been carried out for application of reduced metal fuel. The storage concept was established considering the optimum weight, storage volume and thermal efficiency. The capacity of MVDS system for loading the reduced metal fuel has four times as compared with existing PWR fuel storage system. In the results of thermal analysis, the maximum temperature of metal fuel was estimated to be 110 .deg. C which is lower than the allowable value under normal operation condition. Therefore, it is shown that the MVDS system can feasibly accomodate the reduced metal fuel in aspect of thermal safety

  16. Reduced scaling of thermal-hydraulic circuits for studies of PWR reactors natural circulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botelho, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    The Ishii et al. hydrodynamic similarity criteria for natural circulation were used for scaling reduced models of prototype passive residual heat removal system of a 600 M We PWR. The physical scales of the thermohydraulic parameters obtained presented a reasonable agreement when compared with simplified analytic models of the systems. (author)

  17. Micro-scale metallization on flexible polyimide substrate by Cu electroplating using SU-8 photoresist mask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, S.H.; Kim, S.H.; Lee, N.-E.; Kim, H.M.; Nam, Y.W.

    2005-01-01

    Technologies for flexible electronics have been developed to make electronic or microelectromechanical (MEMS) devices on inexpensive and flexible organic substrates. In order to fabricate the interconnect lines between device elements or layers in flexible electronic devices, metallization on the flexible substrate is essential. In this case, the width and conductivity of metallization line are very important for minimizing the size of device. Therefore, the realization of metallization process with the scale of a few micrometers on the flexible substrate is required. In this work, micro-scale metallization lines of Cu were fabricated on the flexible substrate by electroplating using the patterned mask of a negative-tone SU-8 photoresist. Polyimide surface was treated by O 2 /Ar atmospheric plasma for the improvement in adhesion between Cr layer and polyimide and in situ sputter deposition of 100-nm-thick Cu seed layers on the sputter-deposited 50-nm-thick Cr adhesion layer was followed. SU-8 photoresist was spin-coated and patterned by photolithography. Electroplating of Cu line, removal of SU-8, and selective wet etch of Cr adhesion and Cu seed layers were carried out. Gap between the Cu lines was successfully filled by spin-coating of polyimide. Micro-scale Cu metal lines with gap filling on the polyimide substrate with a thickness of 6-12 μm and an aspect ratio of 1-3 were successfully fabricated

  18. Mineral transformations during the dissolution of uranium ore minerals by dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasauer, S.; Weidler, P.; Fakra, S.; Tyliszczak, T.; Shuh, D.

    2011-12-01

    Carnotite minerals [X2(UO2)2(VO4)2]; X = K, Ca, Ba, Mn, Na, Cu or Pb] form the major ore of uranium in the Colorado Plateau. These deposits are highly oxidized and contain U(VI) and V(IV). The biotransformation of U(VI) bound in carnotite by bacteria during dissimilatory metal reduction presents a complex puzzle in mineral chemistry. Both U(VI) and V(V) can be respired by metal reducing bacteria, and the mineral structure can change depending on the associated counterion. We incubated anaerobic cultures of S. putrefaciens CN32 with natural carnotite minerals from southeastern Utah in a nutrient-limited defined medium. Strain CN32 is a gram negative bacterium and a terrestrial isolate from New Mexico. The mineral and metal transformations were compared to a system that contained similar concentrations of soluble U(VI) and V(V). Electron (SEM, TEM) microscopies and x-ray spectromicroscopy (STXM) were used in conjunction with XRD to track mineral changes, and bacterial survival was monitored throughout the incubations. Slow rates of metal reduction over 10 months for the treatment with carnotite minerals revealed distinct biotic and abiotic processes, providing insight on mineral transformation and bacteria-metal interactions. The bacteria existed as small flocs or individual cells attached to the mineral phase, but did not adsorb soluble U or V, and accumulated very little of the biominerals. Reduction of mineral V(V) necessarily led to a dismantling of the carnotite structure. Bioreduction of V(V) by CN32 contributed small but profound changes to the mineral system, resulting in new minerals. Abiotic cation exchange within the carnotite group minerals induced the rearrangement of the mineral structures, leading to further mineral transformation. In contrast, bacteria survival was poor for treatments with soluble U(VI) and V(V), although both metals were reduced completely and formed solid UO2 and VO2; we also detected V(III). For these treatments, the bacteria

  19. Impact of scaling on the performance and reliability degradation of metal-contacts in NEMS devices

    KAUST Repository

    Dadgour, Hamed F.

    2011-04-01

    Nano-electro-mechanical switches (NEMS) offer new possibilities for the design of ultra energy-efficient systems; however, thus far, all the fabricated NEMS devices require high supply voltages that limit their applicability for logic designs. Therefore, research is being conducted to lower the operating voltages by scaling down the physical dimensions of these devices. However, the impact of device scaling on the electrical and mechanical properties of metal contacts in NEMS devices has not been thoroughly investigated in the literature. Such a study is essential because metal contacts play a critical role in determining the overall performance and reliability of NEMS. Therefore, the comprehensive analytical study presented in this paper highlights the performance and reliability degradations of such metal contacts caused by scaling. The proposed modeling environment accurately takes into account the impact of roughness of contact surfaces, elastic/plastic deformation of contacting asperities, and various inter-molecular forces between mating surfaces (such as Van der Waals and capillary forces). The modeling results are validated and calibrated using available measurement data. This scaling analysis indicates that the key contact properties of gold contacts (resistance, stiction and wear-out) deteriorate "exponentially" with scaling. Simulation results demonstrate that reliable (stiction-free) operation of very small contact areas (≈ 6nm x 6nm) will be a daunting task due to the existence of strong surface forces. Hence, contact degradation is identified as a major problem to the scaling of NEMS transistors. © 2011 IEEE.

  20. Development of indigenous laboratory scale gas atomizer for producing metal powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, K.K.; Qasim, A.M.; Ahmed, P.

    2011-01-01

    Gas atomization is one of the methods for production of clean metal powders at relatively moderate cost. A laboratory scale gas atomizer was designed and fabricated indigenously to produce metal powders with a batch capacity of 500 g of copper (Cu). The design includes several features regarding fabrication and operation to provide optimum conditions for atomization. The inner diameter of atomizing chamber is 440 mm and its height is 1200 mm. The atomizing nozzle is of annular confined convergent type with an angle of 25 degree. Argon gas at desired pressure has been used for atomizing the metals to produce relatively clean powders. A provision has also been made to view the atomization process. The indigenous laboratory scale gas atomizer was used to produce tin (Sn) and copper (Cu) powders with different atomizing gas pressures ranging from 2 to 10 bar. The particle size of different powders produced ranges from 40 to 400 im. (author)

  1. Scaling properties of adsorption energies for hydrogen-containing molecules on transition-metal surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Greeley, Jeffrey Philip; Studt, Felix

    2007-01-01

    Density functional theory calculations are presented for CHx, x=0,1,2,3, NHx, x=0,1,2, OHx, x=0,1, and SHx, x=0,1 adsorption on a range of close-packed and stepped transition-metal surfaces. We find that the adsorption energy of any of the molecules considered scales approximately with the adsorp...

  2. Direct testing of scale effects in metal forming friction and lubrication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Søe; Calaon, Matteo; Paldan, Nikolas Aulin

    2010-01-01

    Downscaling of metal forming operations from macro to micro scale implies significant changes caused by size effects, among these the friction increase, which has been reported by researchers using indirect test methods such as ring-compression test and double-cup-extrusion test. In the present w...

  3. Large scale metal-free synthesis of graphene on sapphire and transfer-free device fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hyun Jae; Son, Minhyeok; Park, Chibeom; Lim, Hyunseob; Levendorf, Mark P; Tsen, Adam W; Park, Jiwoong; Choi, Hee Cheul

    2012-05-21

    Metal catalyst-free growth of large scale single layer graphene film on a sapphire substrate by a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process at 950 °C is demonstrated. A top-gated graphene field effect transistor (FET) device is successfully fabricated without any transfer process. The detailed growth process is investigated by the atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies.

  4. Scaling of two-phase flow transients using reduced pressure system and simulant fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocamustafaogullari, G.; Ishii, M.

    1987-01-01

    Scaling criteria for a natural circulation loop under single-phase flow conditions are derived. Based on these criteria, practical applications for designing a scaled-down model are considered. Particular emphasis is placed on scaling a test model at reduced pressure levels compared to a prototype and on fluid-to-fluid scaling. The large number of similarty groups which are to be matched between modell and prototype makes the design of a scale model a challenging tasks. The present study demonstrates a new approach to this clasical problen using two-phase flow scaling parameters. It indicates that a real time scaling is not a practical solution and a scaled-down model should have an accelerated (shortened) time scale. An important result is the proposed new scaling methodology for simulating pressure transients. It is obtained by considerung the changes of the fluid property groups which appear within the two-phase similarity parameters and the single-phase to two-phase flow transition prameters. Sample calculations are performed for modeling two-phase flow transients of a high pressure water system by a low-pressure water system or a Freon system. It is shown that modeling is possible for both cases for simulation pressure transients. However, simulation of phase change transitions is not possible by a reduced pressure water system without distortion in either power or time. (orig.)

  5. Water-Based Automobile Paints Potentially Reduce the Exposure of Refinish Painters to Toxic Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Der-Jen Hsu

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to lead-containing dusts is a global public health concern. This work addresses an important issue of whether eco-friendly water-based paints reduce the exposure potential of auto-repainting workers to metals. With this aim, metal levels in automobile paints and worker metal exposure were measured using both solvent- and water-based paints. The levels of metals, and particularly Pb, Cr (total, Fe, and Cu, in solvent-based paints varied greatly among colors and brands. Lead concentrations ranged from below the detection limit (~0.25 μg/g to 107,928 μg/g (dry film across all samples. In water-based paints, the concentrations of Pb and Cr (total were generally two to three orders of magnitude lower, but the concentrations of Al and Cu exceeded those in some solvent-based paints. The personal short-term exposure of workers who applied water-based paints of popular colors, such as black and white, were generally low, with Pb levels of less than <4 µg/m3 and Cr (total levels of less than 1 µg/m3. Conversely, mean short-term exposure to Pb during the painting of a yellow cab using solvent-based paints were 2028 µg/m3, which was ~14 times the Taiwan short-term permissible exposure limit, while the mean level of exposure to Cr (total was 290 µg/m3, which was well below the exposure limit. This study demonstrates that water-based paints reduce the exposure potential to lead, and highlights the importance of source control in limiting the toxic metals in paints.

  6. Potential for electropositive metal to reduce the interactions of Atlantic sturgeon with fishing gear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouyoucos, Ian; Bushnell, Peter; Brill, Richard

    2014-02-01

    Atlantic sturgeon (Acipenser oxyrhynchus) populations have been declared either endangered or threatened under the U.S. Endangered Species Act. Effective measures to repel sturgeon from fishing gear would be beneficial to both fish and fishers because they could reduce both fishery-associated mortality and the need for seasonal and area closures of specific fisheries. Some chondrostean fishes (e.g., sturgeons and paddlefishes) can detect weak electric field gradients (possibly as low as 5 Μv/cm) due to arrays of electroreceptors (ampullae of Lorenzini) on their snout and gill covers. Weak electric fields, such as those produced by electropositive metals (typically mixtures of the lanthanide elements), could therefore potentially be used as a deterrent. To test this idea, we recorded the behavioral responses of juvenile Atlantic sturgeon (31-43 cm fork length) to electropositive metal (primarily a mixture of the lanthanide elements neodymium and praseodymium) both in the presence and absence of food stimuli. Trials were conducted in an approximately 2.5 m diameter × 0.3 m deep tank, and fish behaviors were recorded with an overhead digital video camera. Video records were subsequently digitized (x, y coordinate system), the distance between the fish and the electropositive metal calculated, and data summarized by compiling frequency distributions with 5-cm bins. Juvenile sturgeon showed clear avoidance of electropositive metal but only when food was present. On the basis of our results, we conclude that the electropositive metals, or other sources of weak electric fields, may eventually be used to reduce the interactions of Atlantic sturgeon with fishing gear, but further investigation is needed. © 2013 Society for Conservation Biology.

  7. Synthesis and Antibacterial Activity of Metal(loid Nanostructures by Environmental Multi-Metal(loid Resistant Bacteria and Metal(loid-Reducing Flavoproteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximiliano Figueroa

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Microbes are suitable candidates to recover and decontaminate different environments from soluble metal ions, either via reduction or precipitation to generate insoluble, non-toxic derivatives. In general, microorganisms reduce toxic metal ions generating nanostructures (NS, which display great applicability in biotechnological processes. Since the molecular bases of bacterial reduction are still unknown, the search for new -environmentally safe and less expensive- methods to synthesize NS have made biological systems attractive candidates. Here, 47 microorganisms isolated from a number of environmental samples were analyzed for their tolerance or sensitivity to 19 metal(loids. Ten of them were highly tolerant to some of them and were assessed for their ability to reduce these toxicants in vitro. All isolates were analyzed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, fatty acids composition, biochemical tests and electron microscopy. Results showed that they belong to the Enterobacter, Staphylococcus, Acinetobacter, and Exiguobacterium genera. Most strains displayed metal(loid-reducing activity using either NADH or NADPH as cofactor. While Acinetobacter schindleri showed the highest tellurite (TeO32- and tetrachloro aurate (AuCl4- reducing activity, Staphylococcus sciuri and Exiguobacterium acetylicum exhibited selenite (SeO32- and silver (Ag+ reducing activity, respectively. Based on these results, we used these bacteria to synthetize, in vivo and in vitro Te, Se, Au, and Ag-containing nanostructures. On the other hand, we also used purified E. cloacae glutathione reductase to synthesize in vitro Te-, Ag-, and Se-containing NS, whose morphology, size, composition, and chemical composition were evaluated. Finally, we assessed the putative anti-bacterial activity exhibited by the in vitro synthesized NS: Te-containing NS were more effective than Au-NS in inhibiting Escherichia coli and Listeria monocytogenes growth. Aerobically synthesized TeNS using MF09 crude

  8. Chemically reduced graphene contains inherent metallic impurities present in parent natural and synthetic graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosi, Adriano; Chua, Chun Kiang; Khezri, Bahareh; Sofer, Zdeněk; Webster, Richard D.; Pumera, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Graphene-related materials are in the forefront of nanomaterial research. One of the most common ways to prepare graphenes is to oxidize graphite (natural or synthetic) to graphite oxide and exfoliate it to graphene oxide with consequent chemical reduction to chemically reduced graphene. Here, we show that both natural and synthetic graphite contain a large amount of metallic impurities that persist in the samples of graphite oxide after the oxidative treatment, and chemically reduced graphene after the chemical reduction. We demonstrate that, despite a substantial elimination during the oxidative treatment of graphite samples, a significant amount of impurities associated to the chemically reduced graphene materials still remain and alter their electrochemical properties dramatically. We propose a method for the purification of graphenes based on thermal treatment at 1,000 °C in chlorine atmosphere to reduce the effect of such impurities on the electrochemical properties. Our findings have important implications on the whole field of graphene research. PMID:22826262

  9. Chemically reduced graphene contains inherent metallic impurities present in parent natural and synthetic graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosi, Adriano; Chua, Chun Kiang; Khezri, Bahareh; Sofer, Zdeněk; Webster, Richard D; Pumera, Martin

    2012-08-07

    Graphene-related materials are in the forefront of nanomaterial research. One of the most common ways to prepare graphenes is to oxidize graphite (natural or synthetic) to graphite oxide and exfoliate it to graphene oxide with consequent chemical reduction to chemically reduced graphene. Here, we show that both natural and synthetic graphite contain a large amount of metallic impurities that persist in the samples of graphite oxide after the oxidative treatment, and chemically reduced graphene after the chemical reduction. We demonstrate that, despite a substantial elimination during the oxidative treatment of graphite samples, a significant amount of impurities associated to the chemically reduced graphene materials still remain and alter their electrochemical properties dramatically. We propose a method for the purification of graphenes based on thermal treatment at 1,000 °C in chlorine atmosphere to reduce the effect of such impurities on the electrochemical properties. Our findings have important implications on the whole field of graphene research.

  10. The Application of Sulphate-Reducing Bacteria for the Heavy Metals Elimination from Acid Mine Drainage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alena Luptáková

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important problems affecting mining companies around the world is the treatment of acid mine drainage (AMD. AMD is characterised by its high acidity, high concentration of metals (Cu, Zn, Cd,… and high concentration of dissolved sulphates. The techniques traditionally used for the treatment of AMD have been based on chemical methods of neutralization and precipitation. A possible alternative to the chemical treatment of AMD is bioremediation using anaerobic sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB. The treatment of AMD by SRB is based on the ability of SRB to reduce sulphates to hydrogen sulphide, which binds readily with metals to form sparingly soluble precipitates. In this study we have attempted to investigate the feasibility of anaerobic biotreatment of the copper contaminated model solution and a real effluent AMD from the shaft Pech (the locality Smolnik using SRB. This method involves three stages: The H2S production by sulphate-reducing bacteria, the metals precipitation by the biologically produced H2S and the metal sulphides filtration. The studies confirm that copper was effectively recovered from the solution using bacterial produced H2S. An initial copper concentration 10 mg.l-1 was decreased to less than 0.05 mg.l-1 after 3 hours. The most adequate pH value for cooper precipitation was 2.5. Results of the copper precipitation from the areal effluent indicates that the optimal pH value for the copper precipitation is 3.5, but the created precipitates contain a mixture of copper and iron sulphides.

  11. Impact of incomplete metal coverage on the electrical properties of metal-CNT contacts: A large-scale ab initio study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fediai, Artem, E-mail: artem.fediai@nano.tu-dresden.de; Ryndyk, Dmitry A. [Institute for Materials Science and Max Bergman Center of Biomaterials, TU Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Center for Advancing Electronics Dresden, TU Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Seifert, Gotthard [Theoretical Chemistry, TU Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Center for Advancing Electronics Dresden, TU Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Dresden Center for Computational Materials Science, TU Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Mothes, Sven; Schroter, Michael; Claus, Martin [Chair for Electron Devices and Integrated Circuits, TU Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Center for Advancing Electronics Dresden, TU Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Cuniberti, Gianaurelio [Institute for Materials Science and Max Bergman Center of Biomaterials, TU Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Center for Advancing Electronics Dresden, TU Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Dresden Center for Computational Materials Science, TU Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2016-09-05

    Using a dedicated combination of the non-equilibrium Green function formalism and large-scale density functional theory calculations, we investigated how incomplete metal coverage influences two of the most important electrical properties of carbon nanotube (CNT)-based transistors: contact resistance and its scaling with contact length, and maximum current. These quantities have been derived from parameter-free simulations of atomic systems that are as close as possible to experimental geometries. Physical mechanisms that govern these dependences have been identified for various metals, representing different CNT-metal interaction strengths from chemisorption to physisorption. Our results pave the way for an application-oriented design of CNT-metal contacts.

  12. Preparation of metal-resistant immobilized sulfate reducing bacteria beads for acid mine drainage treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingliang; Wang, Haixia; Han, Xuemei

    2016-07-01

    Novel immobilized sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) beads were prepared for the treatment of synthetic acid mine drainage (AMD) containing high concentrations of Fe, Cu, Cd and Zn using up-flow anaerobic packed-bed bioreactor. The tolerance of immobilized SRB beads to heavy metals was significantly enhanced compared with that of suspended SRB. High removal efficiencies of sulfate (61-88%) and heavy metals (>99.9%) as well as slightly alkaline effluent pH (7.3-7.8) were achieved when the bioreactor was fed with acidic influent (pH 2.7) containing high concentrations of multiple metals (Fe 469 mg/L, Cu 88 mg/L, Cd 92 mg/L and Zn 128 mg/L), which showed that the bioreactor filled with immobilized SRB beads had tolerance to AMD containing high concentrations of heavy metals. Partially decomposed maize straw was a carbon source and stabilizing agent in the initial phase of bioreactor operation but later had to be supplemented by a soluble carbon source such as sodium lactate. The microbial community in the bioreactor was characterized by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and sequencing of partial 16S rDNA genes. Synergistic interaction between SRB (Desulfovibrio desulfuricans) and co-existing fermentative bacteria could be the key factor for the utilization of complex organic substrate (maize straw) as carbon and nutrients source for sulfate reduction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Metal porphyrin intercalated reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite utilized for electrocatalytic oxygen reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyan Wang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we report a simple and facile self-assembly method to successfully fabricate cationic metal porphyrin –MtTMPyP (Mt= Cobalt (II, Manganese (III, or Iron (III; TMPyP = 5, 10, 15, 20-tetrakis (N-methylpyridinium-4-yl porphyrin intercalated into the layer of graphene oxide (GO by the cooperative effects of electrostatic and π–π stacking interaction between positively charged metal porphyrin and negatively charged GO sheets. Followed by reduction with hydrazine vapor, a series of novel 2D MtTMPyP/rGOn were fabricated. The as-prepared 2D hybrids were fully characterized and tested as non-noble metal catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR in an alkaline medium. The MtTMPyP/rGOn hybrids, especially CoTMPyP/rGO5, demonstrated an improved electrocatalytic activity for ORR and a number of exchanged electrons close to 4-electron reaction, increased stability and excellent tolerance to methanol, showing a potential alternative catalyst for ORR in fuel cells and air batteries. Keywords: Metal porphyrin, Reduced graphene oxide, Intercalation, Oxygen reduction reaction, Catalyst

  14. Component analysis and heavy metal adsorption ability of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from sulfate reducing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Zheng-Bo; Li, Qing; Li, Chuan-chuan; Chen, Tian-hu; Wang, Jin

    2015-10-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) play an important role in the treatment of acid mine drainage (AMD) by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). In this paper, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans was used as the test strain to explore the effect of heavy metals on the components and adsorption ability of EPS. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy analysis results showed that heavy metals did not influence the type of functional groups of EPS. Potentiometric titration results indicated that the acidic constants (pKa) of the EPS fell into three ranges of 3.5-4.0, 5.9-6.7, and 8.9-9.8. The adsorption site concentrations of the surface functional groups also increased. Adsorption results suggested that EPS had a specific binding affinity for the dosed heavy metal, and that EPS extracted from the Zn(2+)-dosed system had a higher binding affinity for all heavy metals. Additionally, Zn(2+) decreased the inhibitory effects of Cd(2+) and Cu(2+) on the SRB. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A watershed-scale approach to tracing metal contamination in the environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Stanley E

    1996-01-01

    IntroductionPublic policy during the 1800's encouraged mining in the western United States. Mining on Federal lands played an important role in the growing economy creating national wealth from our abundant and diverse mineral resource base. The common industrial practice from the early days of mining through about 1970 in the U.S. was for mine operators to dispose of the mine wastes and mill tailings in the nearest stream reach or lake. As a result of this contamination, many stream reaches below old mines, mills, and mining districts and some major rivers and lakes no longer support aquatic life. Riparian habitats within these affected watersheds have also been impacted. Often, the water from these affected stream reaches is generally not suitable for drinking, creating a public health hazard. The recent Department of Interior Abandoned Mine Lands (AML) Initiative is an effort on the part of the Federal Government to address the adverse environmental impact of these past mining practices on Federal lands. The AML Initiative has adopted a watershed approach to determine those sites that contribute the majority of the contaminants in the watershed. By remediating the largest sources of contamination within the watershed, the impact of metal contamination in the environment within the watershed as a whole is reduced rather than focusing largely on those sites for which principal responsible parties can be found.The scope of the problem of metal contamination in the environment from past mining practices in the coterminous U.S. is addressed in a recent report by Ferderer (1996). Using the USGS1:2,000,000-scale hydrologic drainage basin boundaries and the USGS Minerals Availability System (MAS) data base, he plotted the distribution of 48,000 past-producing metal mines on maps showing the boundaries of lands administered by the various Federal Land Management Agencies (FLMA). Census analysis of these data provided an initial screening tool for prioritization of

  16. A flexible metallic actuator using reduced graphene oxide as a multifunctional component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Junxing; Mu, Jiuke; Hou, Chengyi; Zhang, Qinghong; Li, Yaogang; Wang, Hongzhi

    2017-09-14

    Flexible actuators are widely in demand for many real-life applications. Considering that existing actuators based on polymers, low-dimensional materials and pore-rich materials are mostly limited by slow response rate, high driving voltage and poor stability, we report here a novel metal based flexible actuator which is fabricated simply through partial oxidation and nano-function of copper foil with the assistance of reduced graphene oxide. The obtained asymmetric metallic actuator is (electric-)thermally driven and exhibits fast response rate (∼2 s) and large curvature (2.4 cm -1 ) under a low voltage (∼1 V) with a sustainable operation of up to ∼50 000 cycles. The actuator can also be triggered by infrared irradiation and direct-heating under various conditions including air, water, and vacuum.

  17. Quantum criticality and emergence of the T/B scaling in strongly correlated metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Shinji; Miyake, Kazumasa

    2016-01-01

    A new type of scaling observed in heavy-electron metal β-YbAlB_4, where the magnetic susceptibility is expressed as a single scaling function of the ratio of temperature T and magnetic field B over four decades, is examined theoretically. We develop the mode-coupling theory for critical Yb-valence fluctuations under a magnetic field, verifying that the T/B scaling behavior appears near the QCP of the valence transition. Emergence of the T/B scaling indicates the presence of the small characteristic temperature of the critical Yb-valence fluctuation due to the strong local correlation effect. It is discussed that the T/B scaling as well as the unconventional criticality is explained from the viewpoint of the quantum valence criticality in a unified way.

  18. Quantum criticality and emergence of the T/B scaling in strongly correlated metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Shinji [Department of Basic Sciences, Kyushu Institute of Technology, Kitakyushu (Japan); Miyake, Kazumasa [Toyota Physical and Chemical Research Institute, Nagakute (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    A new type of scaling observed in heavy-electron metal β-YbAlB{sub 4}, where the magnetic susceptibility is expressed as a single scaling function of the ratio of temperature T and magnetic field B over four decades, is examined theoretically. We develop the mode-coupling theory for critical Yb-valence fluctuations under a magnetic field, verifying that the T/B scaling behavior appears near the QCP of the valence transition. Emergence of the T/B scaling indicates the presence of the small characteristic temperature of the critical Yb-valence fluctuation due to the strong local correlation effect. It is discussed that the T/B scaling as well as the unconventional criticality is explained from the viewpoint of the quantum valence criticality in a unified way.

  19. Comparison of void strengthening in fcc and bcc metals: Large-scale atomic-level modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osetsky, Yu.N.; Bacon, D.J.

    2005-01-01

    Strengthening due to voids can be a significant radiation effect in metals. Treatment of this by elasticity theory of dislocations is difficult when atomic structure of the obstacle and dislocation is influential. In this paper, we report results of large-scale atomic-level modelling of edge dislocation-void interaction in fcc (copper) and bcc (iron) metals. Voids of up to 5 nm diameter were studied over the temperature range from 0 to 600 K. We demonstrate that atomistic modelling is able to reveal important effects, which are beyond the continuum approach. Some arise from features of the dislocation core and crystal structure, others involve dislocation climb and temperature effects

  20. Packaging a liquid metal ESD with micro-scale Mercury droplet.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnard, Casey Anderson

    2011-08-01

    A liquid metal ESD is being developed to provide electrical switching at different acceleration levels. The metal will act as both proof mass and electric contact. Mercury is chosen to comply with operation parameters. There are many challenges surrounding the deposition and containment of micro scale mercury droplets. Novel methods of micro liquid transfer are developed to deliver controllable amounts of mercury to the appropriate channels in volumes under 1 uL. Issues of hermetic sealing and avoidance of mercury contamination are also addressed.

  1. Atomic-scale simulations of the mechanical deformation of nanocrystalline metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiøtz, Jakob; Vegge, Tejs; Di Tolla, Francesco

    1999-01-01

    that the main deformation mode is sliding in the grain boundaries through a large number of uncorrelated events, where a few atoms (or a few tens of atoms) slide with respect to each other. Little dislocation activity is seen in the grain interiors. The localization of the deformation to the grain boundaries......Nanocrystalline metals, i.e., metals in which the grain size is in the nanometer range, have a range of technologically interesting properties including increased hardness and yield strength. We present atomic-scale simulations of the plastic behavior of nanocrystalline copper. The simulations show...

  2. Effectiveness of stress release geometries on reducing residual stress in electroforming metal microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chang; Du, Liqun; Zhao, Wenjun; Zhu, Heqing; Zhao, Wen; Wang, Weitai

    2018-04-01

    Micro electroforming, as a mature micromachining technology, is widely used to fabricate metal microdevices in micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS). However, large residual stress in the local positions of the micro electroforming layer often leads to non-uniform residual stress distributions, dimension accuracy defects and reliability issues during fabrication of the metal microdevice. To solve this problem, a novel design method of presetting stress release geometries in the topological structure of the metal microstructure is proposed in this paper. First, the effect of stress release geometries (circular shape, annular groove shape and rivet shape) on the residual stress in the metal microstructure was investigated by finite element modeling (FEM) analysis. Two evaluation parameters, stress concentration factor K T and stress non-uniformity factor δ were calculated. The simulation results show that presetting stress release geometries can effectively reduce and homogenize the residual stress in the metal microstructures were measured metal microstructure. By combined use with stress release geometries of annular groove shape and rivet shape, the stress concentration factor K T and the stress non-uniformity factor δ both decreased at a maximum of 49% and 53%, respectively. Meanwhile, the average residual stress σ avg decreased at a maximum of 20% from  -292.4 MPa to  -232.6 MPa. Then, micro electroforming experiments were carried out corresponding to the simulation models. The residual stresses in the metal microstructures were measured by micro Raman spectroscopy (MRS) method. The results of the experiment proved that the stress non-uniformity factor δ and the average residual stress σ avg also decreased at a maximum with the combination use of annular groove shape and rivet shape stress release geometries, which is in agreement with the results of FEM analysis. The stress non-uniformity factor δ has a maximum decrease of 49% and the

  3. Some reduced ternary and quaternary oxides of molybdenum. A family of compounds with strong metal-metal bonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torardi, C.C.; McCarley, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    Several new, reduced ternary and quaternary oxides of molybdenum are reported, each containing molybdenum in an average oxidation state 2 sealed in Mo tubes held at 1100 0 C for ca. 7 days. Refinement of the substructure of the new compound Ba 0 62 Mo 4 O 6 was based on an orthorhombic cells, with a = 9.509(2), b = 9.825(2), c = 2.853(1) A, Z = 2 in space group Pbam; weak supercell reflections indicate the true structure has c = 8(2.853) A. The chief structural feature is closely related to that of NaMo 4 O 6 which consists of infinite chains of Mo 6 octahedral clusters fused on opposite edges, bridged on the outer edges by O atoms and crosslinked by Mo-O-Mo bonding to create four-sided tunnels in which the Ba 2+ ions are located. The structure of Ba 1 13 Mo 8 O 16 is triclinic, a = 7.311(1), b = 7.453(1), c = 5.726(1) A, α = 101.49(2), β = 99.60(2), γ = 89.31(2) 0 , Z = 1, space group P1. It is a low-symmetry, metal-metal bonded variant of the hollandite structure, in which two different infinite chains, built up from Mo 4 O 8 2- and Mo 4 O 8 0 26- cluster units, respectively, are interlinked via Mo-O-Mo bridge bonding to create again four-sided tunnels in which the Ba 2+ ions reside. Other compounds prepared and characterized by analyses and x-ray powder diffraction data are Pb/sub x/Mo 4 O 6 (x approx. 0.6), LiZn 2 Mo 3 O 8 , , CaMo 5 O 8 , K 2 Mo 12 O 19 , and Na 2 Mo 12 O 19

  4. Plasma parameter estimations for the Large Helical Device based on the gyro-reduced Bohm scaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Masao; Nakajima, Noriyoshi; Sugama, Hideo.

    1991-10-01

    A model of gyro-reduced Bohm scaling law is incorporated into a one-dimensional transport code to predict plasma parameters for the Large Helical Device (LHD). The transport code calculations reproduce well the LHD empirical scaling law and basic parameters and profiles of the LHD plasma are calculated. The amounts of toroidal currents (bootstrap current and beam-driven current) are also estimated. (author)

  5. Improvements in or relating to processes for reducing the oxygen content of metal oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, R.H.; Spooner, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    A process is described for reducing the oxygen content of a metal oxide material (such as an intimate mixture of uranium and plutonium oxides or a mixed oxide of uranium and plutonium) by contacting the material with a hydrogen-containing gas at an elevated temperature, wherein the material is contained in a plurality of carbon crucibles, each crucible having apertured ends and being otherwise a closed vessel, the crucibles being moved through a heated zone in end-to-end contact and thereby forming a duct through which the gas is passed counter-current to the direction of movement of the crucibles. (author)

  6. Multiple plasmonically induced transparency for chip-scale bandpass filters in metallic nanowaveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hua; Yue, Zengqi; Zhao, Jianlin

    2018-05-01

    We propose and investigate a new kind of bandpass filters based on the plasmonically induced transparency (PIT) effect in a special metal-insulator-metal (MIM) waveguide system. The finite element method (FEM) simulations illustrate that the obvious PIT response can be generated in the metallic nanostructure with the stub and coupled cavities. The lineshape and position of the PIT peak are particularly dependent on the lengths of the stub and coupled cavities, the waveguide width, as well as the coupling distance between the stub and coupled cavities. The numerical simulations are in accordance with the results obtained by the temporal coupled-mode theory. The multi-peak PIT effect can be achieved by integrating multiple coupled cavities into the plasmonic waveguide. This PIT response contributes to the flexible realization of chip-scale multi-channel bandpass filters, which could find crucial applications in highly integrated optical circuits for signal processing.

  7. Heavy metal pollution in soil associated with a large-scale cyanidation gold mining region in southeast of Jilin, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mo; Lu, Wenxi; Hou, Zeyu; Zhang, Yu; Jiang, Xue; Wu, Jichun

    2017-01-01

    Different gold mining and smelting processes can lead to distinctive heavy metal contamination patterns and results. This work examined heavy metal pollution from a large-scale cyanidation gold mining operation, which is distinguished from artisanal and small-scale amalgamation gold mining, in Jilin Province, China. A total of 20 samples including one background sample were collected from the surface of the mining area and the tailings pond in June 2013. These samples were analyzed for heavy metal concentrations and degree of pollution as well as sources of Cr, Cu, Zn, Pb, Ni, Cd, As, and Hg. The mean concentrations of Pb, Hg, and Cu (819.67, 0.12, and 46.92 mg kg -1 , respectively) in soil samples from the gold mine area exceeded local background values. The mean Hg content was less than the first-class standard of the Environmental Quality for Soils, which suggested that the cyanidation method is helpful for reducing Hg pollution. The geochemical accumulation index and enrichment factor results indicated clear signs that enrichment was present for Pb, Cu, and Hg, with the presence of serious Pb pollution and moderate presence to none of Hg and Cu pollution. Multivariate statistical analysis showed that there were three metal sources: (1) Pb, Cd, Cu, and As came from anthropogenic sources; (2) Cr and Zn were naturally occurring; whereas (3) Hg and Ni had a mix of anthropogenic and natural sources. Moreover, the tailings dam plays an important role in intercepting the tailings. Furthermore, the potential ecological risk assessment results showed that the study area poses a potentially strong risk to the ecological health. Furthermore, Pb and Hg (due to high concentration and high toxicity, respectively) are major pollutants on the risk index, and both Pb and Hg pollution should be of great concern at the Haigou gold mines in Jilin, China.

  8. Strategies to Reduce Tin and Other Metals in Electronic Cigarette Aerosol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Williams

    Full Text Available Metals are present in electronic cigarette (EC fluid and aerosol and may present health risks to users.The objective of this study was to measure the amounts of tin, copper, zinc, silver, nickel and chromium in the aerosol from four brands of EC and to identify the sources of these metals by examining the elemental composition of the atomizer components.Four brands of popular EC were dissected and the cartomizers were examined microscopically. Elemental composition of cartomizer components was determined using integrated energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis, and the concentrations of the tin, copper, zinc silver, nickel, and chromium in the aerosol were determined for each brand using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy.All filaments were made of nickel and chromium. Thick wires were copper coated with either tin or silver. Wires were joined to each other by tin solder, brazing, or by brass clamps. High concentrations of tin were detected in the aerosol when tin solder joints were friable. Tin coating on copper wires also contributed to tin in the aerosol.Tin concentrations in EC aerosols varied both within and between brands. Tin in aerosol was reduced by coating the thick wire with silver rather than tin, placing stable tin solder joints outside the atomizing chamber, joining wires with brass clamps or by brazing rather than soldering wires. These data demonstrate the feasibility of removing tin and other unwanted metals from EC aerosol by altering designs and using materials of suitable quality.

  9. Strategies to Reduce Tin and Other Metals in Electronic Cigarette Aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Monique; To, An; Bozhilov, Krassimir; Talbot, Prue

    2015-01-01

    Background Metals are present in electronic cigarette (EC) fluid and aerosol and may present health risks to users. Objective The objective of this study was to measure the amounts of tin, copper, zinc, silver, nickel and chromium in the aerosol from four brands of EC and to identify the sources of these metals by examining the elemental composition of the atomizer components. Methods Four brands of popular EC were dissected and the cartomizers were examined microscopically. Elemental composition of cartomizer components was determined using integrated energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis, and the concentrations of the tin, copper, zinc silver, nickel, and chromium in the aerosol were determined for each brand using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. Results All filaments were made of nickel and chromium. Thick wires were copper coated with either tin or silver. Wires were joined to each other by tin solder, brazing, or by brass clamps. High concentrations of tin were detected in the aerosol when tin solder joints were friable. Tin coating on copper wires also contributed to tin in the aerosol. Conclusions Tin concentrations in EC aerosols varied both within and between brands. Tin in aerosol was reduced by coating the thick wire with silver rather than tin, placing stable tin solder joints outside the atomizing chamber, joining wires with brass clamps or by brazing rather than soldering wires. These data demonstrate the feasibility of removing tin and other unwanted metals from EC aerosol by altering designs and using materials of suitable quality. PMID:26406602

  10. Development of a production scale purification of Ge-68 from irradiated gallium metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzsimmons, Jonathan M.; Mausner, Leonard [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Germanium-68 (Ge-68) is produced by proton irradiation of a gallium metal target and purified by organic extraction. The Ge-68 can be used in a medical isotope generator to produce Gallium-68 (Ga-68) which can be used to radiolabel PET imaging agents. The emerging use of Ge-68 in the Ga-68 medical isotope generator has caused us to develop a new purification method for Ge-68 that does not use toxic solvents. The purpose of this work was to develop a production scale separation of Ge-68 that utilizes a leaching step to remove a bulk of the gallium metal, followed by purification with Sephadex {sup copyright} G25. Production scale (300 mCi) purification was performed with the new method. The purified Ge-68 contained the highest radioactivity concentration of Ge-68 produced at BNL; the sample meet Department of Energy specifications and the method had an excellent recovery of Ge-68.

  11. Noise-induced hearing loss in small-scale metal industry in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, J D; Robinson, T; Acharya, A; Singh, D; Smith, M

    2014-10-01

    There has been no previous research to demonstrate the risk of noise-induced hearing loss in industry in Nepal. Limited research on occupational noise-induced hearing loss has been conducted within small-scale industry worldwide, despite it being a substantial and growing cause of deafness in the developing world. The study involved a cross-sectional audiometric assessment, with questionnaire-based examinations of noise and occupational history, and workplace noise level assessment. A total of 115 metal workers and 123 hotel workers (control subjects) were recruited. Noise-induced hearing loss prevalence was 30.4 per cent in metal workers and 4.1 per cent in hotel workers, with a significant odds ratio of 10.3. Except for age and time in occupation, none of the demographic factors were significant in predicting outcomes in regression analyses. When adjusted for this finding, and previous noise-exposed occupations, the odds ratio was 13.8. Workplace noise was significantly different between the groups, ranging from 65.3 to 84.7 dBA in metal worker sites, and from 51.4 to 68.6 dBA in the control sites. Metal workers appear to have a greater risk of noise-induced hearing loss than controls. Additional research on occupational noise-induced hearing loss in Nepal and small-scale industry globally is needed.

  12. A three-dimensional meso-scale modeling for helium bubble growth in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzudo, T.; Kaburaki, H.; Wakai, E.

    2007-01-01

    A three-dimensional meso-scale computer model using a Monte-Carlo simulation method has been proposed to simulate the helium bubble growth in metals. The primary merit of this model is that it enables the visual comparison between the microstructure observed by the TEM imaging and those by calculations. The modeling is so simple that one can control easily the calculation by tuning parameters. The simulation results are confirmed by the ideal gas law and the capillary relation. helium bubble growth, meso-scale modeling, Monte-Carlo simulation, the ideal gas law and the capillary relation. (authors)

  13. RESOLVING IONIZATION AND METALLICITY ON PARSEC SCALES ACROSS MRK 71 WITH HST-WFC3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, Bethan L.; Auger, Matthew [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Aloisi, Alessandra [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Calzetti, Daniela [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Kewley, Lisa, E-mail: bjames@ast.cam.ac.uk [RSAA, Australian National University, Cotter Road, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia)

    2016-01-01

    Blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxies in the nearby universe provide a means for studying feedback mechanisms and star formation processes in low-metallicity environments in great detail. Owing to their vicinity, these local analogs to primordial young galaxies are well suited for high-resolution studies that are unfeasible for high-redshift galaxies. Here we present Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 observations of one such BCD, Mrk 71, one of the most powerful local starbursts known, in the light of [O ii], He ii, Hβ, [O iii], Hα, and [S ii]. At D ≃ 3.44 Mpc, this extensive suite of emission-line images enables us to explore the chemical and physical conditions of Mrk 71 on ∼2 pc scales. We use emission-line diagnostics to distinguish ionization mechanisms on a pixel-by-pixel basis and show that despite the previously reported hypersonic gas and superbubble blowout, the gas in Mrk 71 is photoionized, with no sign of shock-excited emission. He ii emission line images are used to identify up to six Wolf-Rayet stars, three of which lie on the edge of a blowout region. Using strong-line metallicity diagnostics, we present the first “metallicity image” of a galaxy, revealing chemical inhomogeneity on scales of <50 pc. We additionally demonstrate that while chemical structure can be lost at large scales, metallicity diagnostics can break down on spatial scales smaller than an H ii region. This study highlights not only the benefits of high-resolution spatially resolved observations in assessing the effects of feedback mechanisms but also the potential limitations when employing emission-line diagnostics; these results are particularly relevant as we enter the era of extremely large telescopes.

  14. An ultra-thin waveguide twist constructed using fish-scale metallic wires

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Jin; Li, Hongqiang; Fan, Yuancheng; Wei, Zeyong; Wu, Chao; Cao, Yang; Yu, Xing; Li, Fang; Wang, Zhanshan

    2011-01-01

    This study theoretically and experimentally investigates the transmission properties of a metamaterial slab comprised of two layers of metallic fish-scale structure arrays and a sandwiched dielectric layer. Calculations show that the asymmetric transmission can be tuned by varying the slab thickness, due to evanescent interlayer coupling. The spatial evolution of the local field inside the structure indicates that the slab functions as a perfect polarization transformer at certain frequencies...

  15. Photocatalytic properties of zinc sulfide nanocrystals biofabricated by metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Xiang; Ma, Xiao-Bo; Yuan, Hang; Liu, Peng-Cheng; Lei, Yu-Bin; Xu, Hui; Du, Dao-Lin; Sun, Jian-Fan; Feng, Yu-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • S. oneidensis MR-1 biofabricated ZnS nanocrystals using artificial wastewater. • ZnS nanocrystals were 5 nm in diameter and aggregated extracellularly. • ZnS had good catalytic activity in the degradation of RHB under UV irradiation. • Photogenerated holes mainly contributed to the degradation of RhB. - Abstract: Accumulation and utilization of heavy metals from wastewater by biological treatment system has aroused great interest. In the present study, a metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was used to explore the biofabrication of ZnS nanocrystals from the artificial wastewater. The biogenic H 2 S produced via the reduction of thiosulfate precipitated the Zn(II) as sulfide extracellularly. Characterization by X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) confirmed the precipitates as ZnS nanocrystals. The biogenic ZnS nanocrystals appeared spherical in shape with an average diameter of 5 nm and mainly aggregated in the medium and cell surface of S. oneidensis MR-1. UV–vis DRS spectra showed ZnS nanoparticles appeared a strong absorption below 360 nm. Thus, the photocatalytic activity of ZnS was evaluated by the photodegradation of rhodamine B (RhB) under UV irradiation. The biogenic ZnS nanocrystals showed a high level of photodegradation efficiency to RhB coupled with a significant blue-shift of maximum adsorption peak. A detailed analysis indicated the photogenerated holes, rather than hydroxyl radicals, contributed to the photocatalytic decolorization of RhB. This approach of coupling biosynthesis of nanoparticles with heavy metal removal may offer a potential avenue for efficient bioremediation of heavy metal wastewater

  16. Photocatalytic properties of zinc sulfide nanocrystals biofabricated by metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Xiang [School of The Environment and Safety Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Ma, Xiao-Bo [School of The Environment and Safety Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Yuan, Hang [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Technical Biology & Agriculture Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Liu, Peng-Cheng; Lei, Yu-Bin; Xu, Hui [School of The Environment and Safety Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Du, Dao-Lin, E-mail: ddl@ujs.edu.cn [School of The Environment and Safety Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Sun, Jian-Fan [School of The Environment and Safety Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Feng, Yu-Jie, E-mail: yujief@hit.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • S. oneidensis MR-1 biofabricated ZnS nanocrystals using artificial wastewater. • ZnS nanocrystals were 5 nm in diameter and aggregated extracellularly. • ZnS had good catalytic activity in the degradation of RHB under UV irradiation. • Photogenerated holes mainly contributed to the degradation of RhB. - Abstract: Accumulation and utilization of heavy metals from wastewater by biological treatment system has aroused great interest. In the present study, a metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was used to explore the biofabrication of ZnS nanocrystals from the artificial wastewater. The biogenic H{sub 2}S produced via the reduction of thiosulfate precipitated the Zn(II) as sulfide extracellularly. Characterization by X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) confirmed the precipitates as ZnS nanocrystals. The biogenic ZnS nanocrystals appeared spherical in shape with an average diameter of 5 nm and mainly aggregated in the medium and cell surface of S. oneidensis MR-1. UV–vis DRS spectra showed ZnS nanoparticles appeared a strong absorption below 360 nm. Thus, the photocatalytic activity of ZnS was evaluated by the photodegradation of rhodamine B (RhB) under UV irradiation. The biogenic ZnS nanocrystals showed a high level of photodegradation efficiency to RhB coupled with a significant blue-shift of maximum adsorption peak. A detailed analysis indicated the photogenerated holes, rather than hydroxyl radicals, contributed to the photocatalytic decolorization of RhB. This approach of coupling biosynthesis of nanoparticles with heavy metal removal may offer a potential avenue for efficient bioremediation of heavy metal wastewater.

  17. Two-scale characterization of deformation-induced anisotropy of polycrystalline metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Ikumu; Terada, Kenjiro

    2004-01-01

    The anisotropic macro-scale mechanical behavior of polycrystalline metals is characterized by incorporating the micro-scale constitutive model of single crystal plasticity into the two-scale modeling based on the mathematical homogenization theory. The two-scale simulations are conducted to analyze the macro-scale anisotropy induced by micro-scale plastic deformation of the polycrystalline aggregate. In the simulations, the micro-scale representative volume element (RVE) of a polycrystalline aggregate is uniformly loaded in one direction, unloaded to macroscopically zero stress in a certain stage of deformation and then re-loaded in the different directions. The last re-loading calculations provide different macro-scale responses of the RVE, which can be the appearance of material anisotropy. We then try to examine the effects of the intergranular and intragranular behaviors on the anisotropy by means of various illustrations of plastic deformation process in stead of the use of pole figures for the change of crystallographic orientations

  18. Combining Nitrilotriacetic Acid and Permeable Barriers for Enhanced Phytoextraction of Heavy Metals from Municipal Solid Waste Compost by and Reduced Metal Leaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shulan; Jia, Lina; Duo, Lian

    2016-05-01

    Phytoextraction has the potential to remove heavy metals from contaminated soil, and chelants can be used to improve the capabilities of phytoextraction. However, environmentally persistent chelants can cause metal leaching and groundwater pollution. A column experiment was conducted to evaluate the viability of biodegradable nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) to increase the uptake of heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Ni, Pb, Cu, and Zn) by L. in municipal solid waste (MSW) compost and to evaluate the effect of two permeable barrier materials, bone meal and crab shell, on metal leaching. The application of NTA significantly increased the concentrations and uptake of heavy metals in . The enhancement was more pronounced at higher dosages of NTA. In the 15 mmol kg NTA treatment using a crab shell barrier, the Cr and Ni concentrations in the plant shoots increased by approximately 8- and 10-fold, respectively, relative to the control. However, the addition of NTA also caused significant heavy metal leaching from the MSW compost. Bone meal and crab shell barriers positioned between the compost and the subsoil were effective in preventing metal leaching down through the soil profile by the retention of metals in the barrier. The application of a biodegradable chelant and the use of permeable barriers is a viable form of enhanced phytoextraction to increase the removal of metals and to reduce possible leaching. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  19. Bioassessment of heavy metal toxicity and enhancement of heavy metal removal by sulfate-reducing bacteria in the presence of zero valent iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jing; Kang, Yong; Feng, Ying

    2017-12-01

    A simple and valid toxicity evaluation of Zn 2+ , Mn 2+ and Cr 6+ on sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and heavy metal removal were investigated using the SRB system and SRB+Fe 0 system. The heavy metal toxicity coefficient (β) and the heavy metal concentration resulting in 50% inhibition of sulfate reduction (I) from a modeling process were proposed to evaluate the heavy metal toxicity and nonlinear regression was applied to search for evaluation indices β and I. The heavy metal toxicity order was Cr 6+  > Mn 2+  > Zn 2+ . Compared with the SRB system, the SRB+Fe 0 system exhibited a better capability for sulfate reduction and heavy metal removal. The heavy metal removal was above 99% in the SRB+Fe 0 system, except for Mn 2+ . The energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) analysis showed that the precipitates were removed primarily as sulfide for Zn 2+ and hydroxide for Mn 2+ and Cr 6+ .The method of evaluating the heavy metal toxicity on SRB was of great significance to understand the fundamentals of the heavy metal toxicity and inhibition effects on the microorganism and regulate the process of microbial sulfate reduction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. High aspect ratio 10-nm-scale nanoaperture arrays with template-guided metal dewetting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying Min; Lu, Liangxing; Srinivasan, Bharathi Madurai; Asbahi, Mohamed; Zhang, Yong Wei; Yang, Joel K W

    2015-04-10

    We introduce an approach to fabricate ordered arrays of 10-nm-scale silica-filled apertures in a metal film without etching or liftoff. Using low temperature (dewetting of metal films guided by nano-patterned templates, apertures with aspect ratios up to 5:1 are demonstrated. Apertures form spontaneously during the thermal process without need for further processing. Although the phenomenon of dewetting has been well studied, this is the first demonstration of its use in the fabrication of nanoapertures in a spatially controllable manner. In particular, the achievement of 10-nm length-scale patterning at high aspect ratio with thermal dewetting is unprecedented. By varying the nanotemplate design, we show its strong influence over the positions and sizes of the nanoapertures. In addition, we construct a three-dimensional phase field model of metal dewetting on nano-patterned substrates. The simulation data obtained closely corroborates our experimental results and reveals new insights to template dewetting at the nanoscale. Taken together, this fabrication method and simulation model form a complete toolbox for 10-nm-scale patterning using template-guided dewetting that could be extended to a wide range of material systems and geometries.

  1. Bioleaching of arsenic in contaminated soil using metal-reducing bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, So-Ra; Lee, Jong-Un; Chon, Hyo-Taek

    2014-05-01

    A study on the extraction of arsenic in the contaminated soil collected from an old smelting site in Korea was carried out using metal-reducing bacteria. Two types of batch-type experiments, biostimulation and bioaugmentation, were conducted for 28 days under anaerobic conditions. The biostimulation experiments were performed through activation of indigenous bacteria by supply with glucose or lactate as a carbon source. The contaminated, autoclaved soil was inoculated with metal-reducing bacteria, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and S. algae BrY, in the bioaugmentation experiments. The results indicated that the maximum concentration of the extracted As was 11.2 mg/L at 4 days from the onset of the experiment when 20 mM glucose was supplied and the extraction efficiency of As ranged 60~63% in the biostimulation experiments. In the case of bioaugmentation, the highest dissolved As concentration was 24.4 mg/L at 2 days, though it dramatically decreased over time through re-adsorption onto soil particles. After both treatments, mode of As occurrence in the soil appeared to be changed to readily extractable fractions. This novel technique of bioleaching may be practically applied for remediation of As-contaminated soil after determination of optimum operational conditions such as operation time and proper carbon source and its concentration.

  2. Supplementation of soft drinks with metallic ions reduces dissolution of bovine enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloisa Aparecida Barbosa da Silva Pereira

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the addition of metallic ions to carbonated drinks on their erosive potential. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Powdered enamel was added to carbonated beverages (Coca-ColaTM or Sprite ZeroTM and shaken for 30 s. The samples were then immediately centrifuged and the supernatant removed. This procedure was repeated 5 times with the beverages containing Cu2+, Mg2+, Mn2+ or Zn2+ (1.25-60 mmol/L. For Coca-ColaTM, the concentration of each ion that exhibited the highest protection was also evaluated in combination with Fe2+. The phosphate or calcium released were analyzed spectrophotometrically. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test (p<0.05. RESULTS: For Coca-ColaTM, the best protective effect was observed for Zn2+ alone (10 mmol/L or in combination (1 mmol/L with other ions (12% and 27%, respectively, when compared with the control. Regarding Sprite ZeroTM, the best protective effect was observed for Cu2+ at 15 and 30 mmol/L, which decreased the dissolution by 22-23%. Zn2+ at 2.5 mmol/L also reduced the dissolution of powdered enamel by 8%. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that the combination of metallic ions can be an alternative to reduce the erosive potential of Coca-ColaTM. Regarding Sprite ZeroTM, the addition of Cu2+ seems to be the best alternative.

  3. How can poverty be reduced among small-scale farmers in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The article discusses, on the basis of the situation of small-scale farmers in the western highlands of Cameroon, strategies that may reduce their poverty. Background information about Cameroon is given in order to situate the study and discussion in an empirical context that may facilitate a better understanding of the plight ...

  4. Surface changes of metal alloys and high-strength ceramics after ultrasonic scaling and intraoral polishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyung-In; Noh, Hyo-Mi; Park, Eun-Jin

    2017-06-01

    This study was to evaluate the effect of repeated ultrasonic scaling and surface polishing with intraoral polishing kits on the surface roughness of three different restorative materials. A total of 15 identical discs were fabricated with three different materials. The ultrasonic scaling was conducted for 20 seconds on the test surfaces. Subsequently, a multi-step polishing with recommended intraoral polishing kit was performed for 30 seconds. The 3D profiler and scanning electron microscopy were used to investigate surface integrity before scaling (pristine), after scaling, and after surface polishing for each material. Non-parametric Friedman and Wilcoxon signed rank sum tests were employed to statistically evaluate surface roughness changes of the pristine, scaled, and polished specimens. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Surface roughness values before scaling (pristine), after scaling, and polishing of the metal alloys were 3.02±0.34 µm, 2.44±0.72 µm, and 3.49±0.72 µm, respectively. Surface roughness of lithium disilicate increased from 2.35±1.05 µm (pristine) to 28.54±9.64 µm (scaling), and further increased after polishing (56.66±9.12 µm, P scaling (from 1.65±0.42 µm to 101.37±18.75 µm), while its surface roughness decreased after polishing (29.57±18.86 µm, P scaling significantly changed the surface integrities of lithium disilicate and zirconia. Surface polishing with multi-step intraoral kit after repeated scaling was only effective for the zirconia, while it was not for lithium disilicate.

  5. The potential for Probiotic Bacteria from milkfish intestine in reducing mercury metals in skimmed milk media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyana, Zaraswati; Priosambodo, D.; Haedar, N.; Erviani, A. E.; Djabura, A. K.; Sukma, R.

    2018-03-01

    Mercury (Hg) is one of the heavy metals that is harmful to humans. The accumulation of mercury in the body is generally derived from food. Several types of bacteria from intestine of milkfish are known to reduce mercury concentration. People can take advantage of this bacterial ability by eating it through probiotic foods. This research conducted to figure out the potential for probiotic bacteria from milkfish intestine in reducing mercury. Isolation from probiotic bacteria from milkfish intestine conducted with grown the isolates in MRSA medium with addition of 1% CaCO3. Twelve isolate were obtained from milkfish intestine. Mercury resistance tested was performed by measuring cell density using a spectrophotometer at concentrations of 10, 15 and 20 ppm respectively in skim milk media. Probiotic tests (gastric acid, bile salts and antimicrobial activity) for MRSB media was also conducted. Results showed that seven isolate were resistant to mercury in all concentrations and potential as probiotics. All resistant isolate then tested for skim milk media with addition of 5, 10, 20 ppm mercury acetate respectively. Result showed that only one isolated was able to reduce the concentration of mercury (Hg) in all variations on concentration and potential as mercury reducer probiotic bacteria.

  6. Numerical study on similarity of plume infrared radiation between reduced-scale solid rocket motors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xiaoying

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study seeks to determine the similarities in plume radiation between reduced and full-scale solid rocket models in ground test conditions through investigation of flow and radiation for a series of scale ratios ranging from 0.1 to 1. The radiative transfer equation (RTE considering gas and particle radiation in a non-uniform plume has been adopted and solved by the finite volume method (FVM to compute the three dimensional, spectral and directional radiation of a plume in the infrared waveband 2–6 μm. Conditions at wavelengths 2.7 μm and 4.3 μm are discussed in detail, and ratios of plume radiation for reduced-scale through full-scale models are examined. This work shows that, with increasing scale ratio of a computed rocket motor, area of the high-temperature core increases as a 2 power function of the scale ratio, and the radiation intensity of the plume increases with 2–2.5 power of the scale ratio. The infrared radiation of plume gases shows a strong spectral dependency, while that of Al2O3 particles shows spectral continuity of gray media. Spectral radiation intensity of a computed solid rocket plume’s high temperature core increases significantly in peak radiation spectra of plume gases CO and CO2. Al2O3 particles are the major radiation component in a rocket plume. There is good similarity between contours of plume spectral radiance from different scale models of computed rockets, and there are two peak spectra of radiation intensity at wavebands 2.7–3.0 μm and 4.2–4.6 μm. Directed radiation intensity of the entire plume volume will rise with increasing elevation angle.

  7. Residual salts separation from metal reduced electrolytically in a LiCl-Li2O molten salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hur, Jin Mok; Oh, Seung Chul; Hong, Sun Seok; Seo, Chung Seok; Park, Seong Won

    2005-01-01

    The PWR spent oxide fuel can be reduced electrolytically in a hot molten salt for the conditioning and the preparation of a metallic fuel. Then the metal product is smelted into an ingot to be treated in the post process. Incidentally, the residual salt which originated from the molten salt and spent fuel elements should be separated from the metal product during the smelting. In this work, we constructed a surrogate material system to simulate the salt separation from the reduced spent fuel and studied the vaporization behaviors of the salts

  8. The Universal Patient Centredness Questionnaire: scaling approaches to reduce positive skew

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjertnaes O

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Oyvind Bjertnaes, Hilde Hestad Iversen, Andrew M Garratt Unit for Patient-Reported Quality, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway Purpose: Surveys of patients’ experiences typically show results that are indicative of positive experiences. Unbalanced response scales have reduced positive skew for responses to items within the Universal Patient Centeredness Questionnaire (UPC-Q. The objective of this study was to compare the unbalanced response scale with another unbalanced approach to scaling to assess whether the positive skew might be further reduced. Patients and methods: The UPC-Q was included in a patient experience survey conducted at the ward level at six hospitals in Norway in 2015. The postal survey included two reminders to nonrespondents. For patients in the first month of inclusion, UPC-Q items had standard scaling: poor, fairly good, good, very good, and excellent. For patients in the second month, the scaling was more positive: poor, good, very good, exceptionally good, and excellent. The effect of scaling on UPC-Q scores was tested with independent samples t-tests and multilevel linear regression analysis, the latter controlling for the hierarchical structure of data and known predictors of patient-reported experiences. Results: The response rate was 54.6% (n=4,970. Significantly lower scores were found for all items of the more positively worded scale: UPC-Q total score difference was 7.9 (P<0.001, on a scale from 0 to 100 where 100 is the best possible score. Differences between the four items of the UPC-Q ranged from 7.1 (P<0.001 to 10.4 (P<0.001. Multivariate multilevel regression analysis confirmed the difference between the response groups, after controlling for other background variables; UPC-Q total score difference estimate was 8.3 (P<0.001. Conclusion: The more positively worded scaling significantly lowered the mean scores, potentially increasing the sensitivity of the UPC-Q to identify differences over

  9. A Two-Scale Reduced Model for Darcy Flow in Fractured Porous Media

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Huangxin

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we develop a two-scale reduced model for simulating the Darcy flow in two-dimensional porous media with conductive fractures. We apply the approach motivated by the embedded fracture model (EFM) to simulate the flow on the coarse scale, and the effect of fractures on each coarse scale grid cell intersecting with fractures is represented by the discrete fracture model (DFM) on the fine scale. In the DFM used on the fine scale, the matrix-fracture system are resolved on unstructured grid which represents the fractures accurately, while in the EFM used on the coarse scale, the flux interaction between fractures and matrix are dealt with as a source term, and the matrix-fracture system can be resolved on structured grid. The Raviart-Thomas mixed finite element methods are used for the solution of the coupled flows in the matrix and the fractures on both fine and coarse scales. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed model for simulation of flow in fractured porous media.

  10. Bioleaching of heavy metals from soil using fungal-organic acids : bench scale testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cathum, S.J.; Ousmanova, D.; Somers, A.; Punt, M. [SAIC Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Brown, C.E. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Emergencies Engineering Division]|[Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Environmental Technology Centre

    2006-07-01

    The ability of fungi to solubilize metals from solid materials may present new opportunities in environmental remediation. This paper presented details of a bench scale experiment that evaluated the leaching of heavy metals from contaminated soil using in situ fungal-generated organic acids. Rice was used as the growing media for organic acid production by A. foetidus. The cultivated fungus was placed on large pieces of potato-dextrose agar (PDA) plates and suspended in 5 L of sterilized water. The cooked rice was inoculated by pouring the 5 L spore suspension over the rice layer. Soil was obtained from a soil pile impacted with heavy metals at a private industrial site and augmented with Pb-contaminated soil. A polyethylene tub was used with a drain pipe leading to a leachate vessel. Crushed stone was spread over the bottom of the tub to assist leachate drainage. Approximately 45 kg of the contaminated soil was spread evenly over the stone layer to a depth of 10 cm. The concentrated spore suspension was sprinkled over the rice. Each week the leachate collection vessel was removed from the bioleaching system and the fine soil particles were allowed to settle. A control was run using the contaminated soil and solid substrate without fungus. Growth of A. foetidus was observed in both control experiment and test experiment after a period of 35 days. The pH of the leachate was measured as the fungal growth progressed. The process was assessed using ICP Mass Spectroscopy and electron spectroscopy, which showed that approximately 65 g of heavy metals were mobilized from 45 kg of soil, and that the biological leaching process resulted in greater mobilization of heavy metals relative to the control experiment. It was concluded that organic acids generated by A. foetidus were capable of leaching heavy metals from the soil. 30 refs., 4 tabs., 15 figs.

  11. Vitrification of noble metals containing NCAW simulant with an engineering scale melter (ESM): Campaign report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunewald, W.; Roth, G.; Tobie, W.; Weisenburger, S.; Weiss, K.; Elliott, M.; Eyler, L.L.

    1996-03-01

    ESM has been designed as a 10th-scale model of the DWPF-type melter, currently the reference melter for nitrification of Hanford double shell tankwaste. ESM and related equipment have been integrated to the existing mockup vitrification plant VA-WAK at KfK. On June 2-July 10, 1992, a shakedown test using 2.61 m{sup 3} of NCAW (neutralized current acid waste) simulant without noble metals was performed. On July 11-Aug. 30, 1992, 14.23 m{sup 3} of the same simulant with nominal concentrations of Ru, Rh, and Pd were vitrified. Objective was to investigate the behavior of such a melter with respect to discharge of noble metals with routine glass pouring via glass overflow. Results indicate an accumulation of noble metals in the bottom area of the flat-bottomed ESM. About 65 wt% of the noble metals fed to the melter could be drained out, whereas 35 wt% accumulated in the melter, based on analysis of glass samples from glass pouring stream in to the canisters. After the melter was drained at the end of the campaign through a bottom drain valve, glass samples were taken from the residual bottom layer. The samples had significantly increased noble metals content (factor of 20-45 to target loading). They showed also a significant decrease of the specific electric resistance compared to bulk glass (factor of 10). A decrease of 10- 15% of the resistance between he power electrodes could be seen at the run end, but the total amount of noble metals accumulated was not yet sufficient enough to disturb the Joule heating of the glass tank severely.

  12. A landscape-scale approach to examining the fate of atmospherically derived industrial metals in the surficial environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stromsoe, Nicola; Marx, Samuel K; McGowan, Hamish A; Callow, Nikolaus; Heijnis, Henk; Zawadzki, Atun

    2015-02-01

    of atmospherically derived metals is complex, and depends upon metal behaviour and geomorphic processes operating at landscape scales. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Centimetre-scale micropore alignment in oriented polycrystalline metal-organic framework films via heteroepitaxial growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcaro, Paolo; Okada, Kenji; Hara, Takaaki; Ikigaki, Ken; Tokudome, Yasuaki; Thornton, Aaron W; Hill, Anita J; Williams, Timothy; Doonan, Christian; Takahashi, Masahide

    2017-03-01

    The fabrication of oriented, crystalline films of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) is a critical step toward their application to advanced technologies such as optics, microelectronics, microfluidics and sensing. However, the direct synthesis of MOF films with controlled crystalline orientation remains a significant challenge. Here we report a one-step approach, carried out under mild conditions, that exploits heteroepitaxial growth for the rapid fabrication of oriented polycrystalline MOF films on the centimetre scale. Our methodology employs crystalline copper hydroxide as a substrate and yields MOF films with oriented pore channels on scales that primarily depend on the dimensions of the substrate. To demonstrate that an anisotropic crystalline morphology can translate to a functional property, we assembled a centimetre-scale MOF film in the presence of a dye and showed that the optical response could be switched 'ON' or 'OFF' by simply rotating the film.

  14. Synthesis of metal-fluoride nanoparticles supported on thermally reduced graphite oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexa Schmitz

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Metal-fluoride nanoparticles, (MFx-NPs with M = Fe, Co, Pr, Eu, supported on different types of thermally reduced graphite oxide (TRGO were obtained by microwave-assisted thermal decomposition of transition-metal amidinates, (M{MeC[N(iPr]2}n or [M(AMDn] with M = Fe(II, Co(II, Pr(III, and tris(2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedionatoeuropium, Eu(dpm3, in the presence of TRGO in the ionic liquid (IL 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([BMIm][BF4]. The crystalline phases of the metal fluorides synthesized in [BMIm][BF4] were identified by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD to be MF2 for M = Fe, Co and MF3 for M = Eu, Pr. The diameters and size distributions of MFx@TRGO were from (6 ± 2 to (102 ± 41 nm. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS were used for further characterization of the MFx-NPs. Electrochemical investigations of the FeF2-NPs@TRGO as cathode material for lithium-ion batteries were evaluated by galvanostatic charge/discharge profiles. The results indicate that the FeF2-NPs@TRGO as cathode material can present a specific capacity of 500 mAh/g at a current density of 50 mA/g, including a significant interfacial charge storage contribution. The obtained nanomaterials show a good rate capacity as well (220 mAh/g and 130 mAh/g at a current density of 200 and 500 mA/g, respectively.

  15. Development of Multi-Scale Finite Element Analysis Codes for High Formability Sheet Metal Generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nnakamachi, Eiji; Kuramae, Hiroyuki; Ngoc Tam, Nguyen; Nakamura, Yasunori; Sakamoto, Hidetoshi; Morimoto, Hideo

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the dynamic- and static-explicit multi-scale finite element (F.E.) codes are developed by employing the homogenization method, the crystalplasticity constitutive equation and SEM-EBSD measurement based polycrystal model. These can predict the crystal morphological change and the hardening evolution at the micro level, and the macroscopic plastic anisotropy evolution. These codes are applied to analyze the asymmetrical rolling process, which is introduced to control the crystal texture of the sheet metal for generating a high formability sheet metal. These codes can predict the yield surface and the sheet formability by analyzing the strain path dependent yield, the simple sheet forming process, such as the limit dome height test and the cylindrical deep drawing problems. It shows that the shear dominant rolling process, such as the asymmetric rolling, generates ''high formability'' textures and eventually the high formability sheet. The texture evolution and the high formability of the newly generated sheet metal experimentally were confirmed by the SEM-EBSD measurement and LDH test. It is concluded that these explicit type crystallographic homogenized multi-scale F.E. code could be a comprehensive tool to predict the plastic induced texture evolution, anisotropy and formability by the rolling process and the limit dome height test analyses

  16. Heavy metal remediation with Ficus microcarpa through transplantation and its environmental risks through field scale experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jie; Cai, Limei; Qi, Shihua; Wu, Jian; Gu, Xiaowen Sophie

    2018-02-01

    The phytoremediation efficiency of various metals by Ficus microcarpa was evaluated through a real scale experiment in the present study. The root biomass production of the species varied significantly from 3.68 to 5.43 g because of the spatial heterogeneity of different metals. It would take 4-93 years to purify the excess Cd of the experimental site. Mercury was the most inflexible element which can barely be phytoremediated by F. microcarpa. After the species transplanted from the polluted soil to the clean site, Cd and Cu were transferred to the rhizosphere soil to different extent while the bulk soil was barely influenced. Relative to Cd and Cu, significantly fewer amounts of Pb and Hg were released. The highest concentrations of Cd, Cu, Hg and Pb in the clean soil were far below their corresponding safe thresholds for agricultural land after 3 months of the polluted plants were cultivated and metal concentrations of plant leaves were negligible, both indicated the low ecological risk of transplantation. Results from this study suggested a feasible disposal method for metal rich plants after phytoremediation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Role of reducing agent in extraction of arsenic and heavy metals from soils by use of EDTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Jung; Jeon, Eun-Ki; Baek, Kitae

    2016-06-01

    Although many metal-contaminated sites contain both anionic arsenic and cationic heavy metals, the current remediation technologies are not effective for the simultaneous removal of both anionic and cationic elements from the contaminated sites due to their different characteristics. In this study, the role of reducing agent in simultaneous extraction of As, Cu, Pb, and Zn from contaminated soils was investigated using EDTA. The addition of reducing agents, which includes sodium oxalate (Na2C2O4), ascorbic acid (C6H8O6) and sodium dithionite (Na2S2O4), greatly enhanced the EDTA extraction of both As and heavy metals from the contaminated soils due to the increased mobility of the metals under the reduced conditions. The extent of the enhancement of the EDTA extraction was greatly affected by the reducing conditions. Strong reducing conditions (0.1 M of dithionite) were required for the extraction of metals strongly bound to the soil, while weak reducing conditions (0.01 M of dithionite or 0.1 M of oxalate/ascorbic acid) were sufficient for extraction of metals that were relatively weakly bound to the soil. An almost 90% extraction efficiency of total metals (As, Cu, Zn, and Pb) was obtained from the contaminated soils using the combination of dithionite and EDTA. Our results clearly showed that the combination of dithionite and EDTA can effectively extract As and heavy metals simultaneously from soils under a wide range of pH conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Phytoremediation Reduces Dust Emissions from Metal(loid)-Contaminated Mine Tailings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Loaiza, Juliana; Field, Jason P; White, Scott A; Csavina, Janae; Felix, Omar; Betterton, Eric A; Sáez, A Eduardo; Maier, Raina M

    2018-04-27

    Environmental and health risk concerns relating to airborne particles from mining operations have focused primarily on smelting activities. However, there are only three active copper smelters and less than a dozen smelters for other metals compared to an estimated 500000 abandoned and unreclaimed hard rock mine tailings in the US that have the potential to generate dust. The problem can also extend to modern tailings impoundments, which may take decades to build and remain barren for the duration before subsequent reclamation. We examined the impact of vegetation cover and irrigation on dust emissions and metal(loid) transport from mine tailings during a phytoremediation field trial at the Iron King Mine and Humboldt Smelter Superfund (IKMHSS) site. Measurements of horizontal dust flux following phytoremediation reveals that vegetated plots with 16% and 32% canopy cover enabled an average dust deposition of 371.7 and 606.1 g m -2 y -1 , respectively, in comparison to the control treatment which emitted dust at an average rate of 2323 g m -2 y -1 . Horizontal dust flux and dust emissions from the vegetated field plots are comparable to emission rates in undisturbed grasslands. Further, phytoremediation was effective at reducing the concentration of fine particulates, including PM 1 , PM 2.5 , and PM 4 , which represent the airborne particulates with the greatest health risks and the greatest potential for long-distance transport. This study demonstrates that phytoremediation can substantially decrease dust emissions as well as the transport of windblown contaminants from mine tailings.

  19. Numerical Study on Similarity of Plume’s Infrared Radiation from Reduced Scaling Solid Rocket

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoying Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Similarity of plume radiation between reduced scaling solid rocket models and full scale ones in ground conditions has been taken for investigation. Flow and radiation of plume from solid rockets with scaling ratio from 0.1 to 1 have been computed. The radiative transfer equation (RTE is solved by the finite volume method (FVM in infrared band 2~6 μm. The spectral characteristics of plume gases have been calculated with the weighted-sum-of-gray-gas (WSGG model, and those of the Al2O3 particles have been solved by the Mie scattering model. Our research shows that, with the decreasing scaling ratio of the rocket engine, the radiation intensity of the plume decreases with 1.5~2.5 power of the scaling ratio. The infrared radiation of the plume gases shows a strong spectral dependency, while that of the Al2O3 particles shows grey property. Spectral radiation intensity of the high temperature core of the solid rocket plume increases greatly in the peak absorption spectrum of plume gases. Al2O3 particle is the major radiation composition in the rocket plume, whose scattering coefficient is much larger than its absorption coefficient. There is good similarity between spectral variations of plumes from different scaling solid rockets. The directional plume radiation rises with the increasing azimuth angle.

  20. Genome-scale comparison and constraint-based metabolic reconstruction of the facultative anaerobic Fe(III-reducer Rhodoferax ferrireducens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daugherty Sean

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rhodoferax ferrireducens is a metabolically versatile, Fe(III-reducing, subsurface microorganism that is likely to play an important role in the carbon and metal cycles in the subsurface. It also has the unique ability to convert sugars to electricity, oxidizing the sugars to carbon dioxide with quantitative electron transfer to graphite electrodes in microbial fuel cells. In order to expand our limited knowledge about R. ferrireducens, the complete genome sequence of this organism was further annotated and then the physiology of R. ferrireducens was investigated with a constraint-based, genome-scale in silico metabolic model and laboratory studies. Results The iterative modeling and experimental approach unveiled exciting, previously unknown physiological features, including an expanded range of substrates that support growth, such as cellobiose and citrate, and provided additional insights into important features such as the stoichiometry of the electron transport chain and the ability to grow via fumarate dismutation. Further analysis explained why R. ferrireducens is unable to grow via photosynthesis or fermentation of sugars like other members of this genus and uncovered novel genes for benzoate metabolism. The genome also revealed that R. ferrireducens is well-adapted for growth in the subsurface because it appears to be capable of dealing with a number of environmental insults, including heavy metals, aromatic compounds, nutrient limitation and oxidative stress. Conclusion This study demonstrates that combining genome-scale modeling with the annotation of a new genome sequence can guide experimental studies and accelerate the understanding of the physiology of under-studied yet environmentally relevant microorganisms.

  1. In-bed accountability of tritium in production scale metal hydride storage beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, J.E.

    1995-01-01

    An ''in-bed accountability'' (IBA) flowing gas calorimetric measurement method has been developed and implemented to eliminate the need to remove tritium from production scale metal hydride storage beds for inventory measurement purposes. Six-point tritium IBA calibration curves have been completed for two, 390 gram tritium metal hydride storage beds. The calibration curves for the two tritium beds are similar to those obtained from the ''cold'' test program. Tritium inventory errors at the 95 percent confidence level ranged from ± 7.3 to 8.6 grams for the cold test results compared to ± 4.2 to 7.5 grams obtained for the two tritium calibrated beds

  2. Small-Scale Metal Tanks for High Pressure Storage of Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, Adam (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Small scale metal tanks for high-pressure storage of fluids having tank factors of more than 5000 meters and volumes of ten cubic inches or less featuring arrays of interconnected internal chambers having at least inner walls thinner than gage limitations allow. The chambers may be arranged as multiple internal independent vessels. Walls of chambers that are also portions of external tank walls may be arcuate on the internal and/or external surfaces, including domed. The tanks may be shaped adaptively and/or conformally to an application, including, for example, having one or more flat outer walls and/or having an annular shape. The tanks may have dual-purpose inlet/outlet conduits of may have separate inlet and outlet conduits. The tanks are made by fusion bonding etched metal foil layers patterned from slices of a CAD model of the tank. The fusion bonded foil stack may be further machined.

  3. Characterization of Co(III) EDTA-Reducing Bacteria in Metal- and Radionuclide-Contaminated Groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Weimin [Arizona State University; Gentry, Terry J [ORNL; Mehlhorn, Tonia L [ORNL; Carroll, Sue L [ORNL; Jardine, Philip M [ORNL; Zhou, Jizhong [University of Oklahoma, Norman

    2010-01-01

    The Waste Area Grouping 5 (WAG5) site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has a potential to be a field site for evaluating the effectiveness of various bioremediation approaches and strategies. The site has been well studied in terms of its geological and geochemical properties over the past decade. However, despite the importance of microorganisms in bioremediation processes, the microbiological populations at the WAG5 site and their potential in bioremediation have not been similarly evaluated. In this study, we initiated research to characterize the microbial populations in WAG5 groundwater. Approximately 100 isolates from WAG5 groundwater were isolated and selected based on colony morphology. Fifty-five unique isolates were identified by BOX-PCR and subjected to further characterization. 16S rRNA sequences indicated that these isolates belong to seventeen bacterial genera including Alcaligenes (1 isolate), Aquamonas (1), Aquaspirillum (1), Bacillus (10), Brevundimonas (5), Caulobacter (7), Dechloromonas (2), Janibacter (1), Janthinobacterium (2), Lactobacillus (1), Paenibacillus (4), Pseudomonas (9), Rhodoferax (1), Sphingomonas (1), Stenotrophomonas (6), Variovorax (2), and Zoogloea (1). Metal respiration assays identified several isolates, which phylogenically belong or are close to Caulobacter, Stenotrophomonas, Bacillus, Paenibacillus and Pseudomonas, capable of reducing Co(III)EDTA- to Co(II)EDTA{sup 2-} using the defined M1 medium under anaerobic conditions. In addition, using WAG5 groundwater directly as the inoculants, we found that organisms associated with WAG5 groundwater can reduce both Fe(III) and Co(III) under anaerobic conditions. Further assays were then performed to determine the optimal conditions for Co(III) reduction. These assays indicated that addition of various electron donors including ethanol, lactate, methanol, pyruvate, and acetate resulted in metal reduction. These experiments will provide useful background information for future

  4. Plastic deformation and failure mechanisms in nano-scale notched metallic glass specimens under tensile loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Tanmay; Chauniyal, Ashish; Singh, I.; Narasimhan, R.; Thamburaja, P.; Ramamurty, U.

    2018-02-01

    In this work, numerical simulations using molecular dynamics and non-local plasticity based finite element analysis are carried out on tensile loading of nano-scale double edge notched metallic glass specimens. The effect of acuteness of notches as well as the metallic glass chemical composition or internal material length scale on the plastic deformation response of the specimens are studied. Both MD and FE simulations, in spite of the fundamental differences in their nature, indicate near-identical deformation features. Results show two distinct transitions in the notch tip deformation behavior as the acuity is increased, first from single shear band dominant plastic flow localization to ligament necking, and then to double shear banding in notches that are very sharp. Specimens with moderately blunt notches and composition showing wider shear bands or higher material length scale characterizing the interaction stress associated with flow defects display profuse plastic deformation and failure by ligament necking. These results are rationalized from the role of the interaction stress and development of the notch root plastic zones.

  5. Multi-scale simulation of single crystal hollow turbine blade manufactured by liquid metal cooling process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuewei Yan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Liquid metal cooling (LMC process as a powerful directional solidification (DS technique is prospectively used to manufacture single crystal (SC turbine blades. An understanding of the temperature distribution and microstructure evolution in LMC process is required in order to improve the properties of the blades. For this reason, a multi-scale model coupling with the temperature field, grain growth and solute diffusion was established. The temperature distribution and mushy zone evolution of the hollow blade was simulated and discussed. According to the simulation results, the mushy zone might be convex and ahead of the ceramic beads at a lower withdrawal rate, while it will be concave and laggard at a higher withdrawal rate, and a uniform and horizontal mushy zone will be formed at a medium withdrawal rate. Grain growth of the blade at different withdrawal rates was also investigated. Single crystal structures were all selected out at three different withdrawal rates. Moreover, mis-orientation of the grains at 8 mm/min reached ~30°, while it was ~5° and ~15° at 10 mm/min and 12 mm/min, respectively. The model for predicting dendritic morphology was verified by corresponding experiment. Large scale for 2D dendritic distribution in the whole sections was investigated by experiment and simulation, and they presented a well agreement with each other. Keywords: Hollow blade, Single crystal, Multi-scale simulation, Liquid metal cooling

  6. Pyrolysis as a technique for separating heavy metals from hyperaccumulators. Part II: Lab-scale pyrolysis of synthetic hyperaccumulator biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koppolu, Lakshmi; Agblevor, F.A.; Clements, L.D.

    2003-01-01

    Synthetic hyperaccumulator biomass (SHB) impregnated with Ni, Zn, Cu, Co or Cr was used to conduct 11 experiments in a lab-scale fluidized bed reactor. Two runs with blank corn stover, with no metal added, were also conducted. The reactor was operated in an entrained mode in a oxygen-free (N 2 ) environment at 873 K and 1 atm. The apparent gas residence time through the lab-scale reactor was 0.6 s at 873 K. The material balance for the lab-scale experiments on N 2 -free basis varied between 81% and 98%. The presence of a heavy metal in the SHB decreased the char yield and increased the tar yield, compared to the blank. The char and gas yields appeared to depend on the form of the metal salt used to prepare the SHB. However, the metal distribution in the product streams did not seem to be influenced by the chemical form of the metal salt used to prepare the SHB. Greater than 98.5% of the metal in the product stream was concentrated in the char formed by pyrolyzing and gasifying the SHB in the reactor. The metal concentration in the char varied between 0.7 and 15.3% depending on the type of metal in the SHB. However, the metal concentration was increased 4 to 6 times in the char compared to the feed

  7. Reducibility mill scale industrial waste via coke breeze at 850-950ºC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaballah N.M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mill scale is a very attractive industrial waste due to its elevated iron content (about = 69.33% Fe besides being suiTab. for direct recycling to the blast furnace via sintering plant. In this paper the characteristics of raw materials and the briquettes produced from this mill scale were studied by different methods of analyses. The produced briquettes were reduced with different amounts of coke breeze at varying temperatures, and the reduction kinetics was determined. The activation energy of this reaction ≈ 61.5 kJ/mole for reduction of mill scale with coke breeze in the form of briquettes with 2% molasses where the chemical reaction interface model is applicable.

  8. Seismic tests on a reduced scale mock-up of a reprocessing plant cooling pond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queval, J.C.; Gantenbein, F.; Lebelle, M.

    1995-01-01

    In conjunction with COGEMA and SGN, CEA has launched an important research program to validate the reprocessing plant cooling pond calculation mainly for the effect of the racks on the fluid-pond interaction. The paper presents the tests performed on a reduced scale mock-up (scale 1/5). The tests are composed by: -random excitations at very low excitation level to measure the natural frequencies, especially the first sloshing mode frequency; -sinusoidal tests to measure the damping; -seismic tests performed with 3 different time reduction scales (1, 1/5, 1/√5) and 3 different synthetic accelerograms. Two types of simplified model with added masses and finite element model were developed. Comparisons of measured and calculated pressure fields against the panels will be presented. The measured frequencies, obtained during tests, are in good agreement with Housner's results. (authors). 2 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs

  9. A Fuel-Sensitive Reduced-Order Model (ROM) for Piston Engine Scaling Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-29

    of high Reynolds number nonreacting and reacting JP-8 sprays in a constant pressure flow vessel with a detailed chemistry approach . J Energy Resour...for rapid grid generation applied to in-cylinder diesel engine simulations. Society of Automotive Engineers ; 2007 Apr. SAE Technical Paper No.: 2007...ARL-TR-8172 ● Sep 2017 US Army Research Laboratory A Fuel-Sensitive Reduced-Order Model (ROM) for Piston Engine Scaling Analysis

  10. Removal heavy metals and sulphate from waste waters by sulphate-reducing bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kušnierová Mária

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available This article is devoted to the process of bacterial sulphate reduction, which is used to removal of heavy metals and sulphate ions from waste waters.The life of animals and plants depends on the existence of microscopic organisms – microorganisms (MO, which play an important role in cycle changes of biogenic elements on the earth. The sulphur cycle in the nature is considered as one of the oldest and most significant biological systems (Fig. 1. The sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB miss the assimilatory part of the cycle and produce sulphides. The microbial population of this dissimilatory part is called “sulfuretum”. The SRB can be found in anaerobic mud and sediments of freshwater, thermal or non-thermal sulphur springs, mining waters from sulphide deposits, oil deposits, sea and ocean beds, and in the gastrointestinal tract of man and animals. The SRB represent a group of chemoorganotrophic, strictly anaerobic and gramnegative bacteria, which exhibit a great morphological and physiological diversity. Despite of their considerable morphological variety, they have one property in common, which is the ability to utilise preferentially sulphates (occasionally sulphites, thiosulphates, tetrathionates as electron acceptors, which are reduced to sulphides, during anaerobic respiration. The electron donors in these processes are simple organic compounds as lactate, malate, etc.,(heterotrophically reduction or gaseous hydrogen (autotrophically reduction. SRB can produce a considerable amount of hydrogen sulphide, which reacts easily in aqueous solution with the cations of heavy metals, forming metal sulphides that have low solubility. The bacterial sulphate reduction can be used for the treatment of acid mine drainage waters, which is considered to be the major problem associated with mining activities.In order to remove heavy metals from waste waters, e.g., from galvanizing plants, mine waters (Smolnik, Šobov locality and metallurgic plants (works

  11. Characterization of the surfaceome of the metal-reducing bacterium Desulfotomaculum reducens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena eDalla Vecchia

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Desulfotomaculum reducens strain MI-1 is a Gram-positive, sulfate-reducing bacterium also capable of reducing Fe(III. Metal reduction in Gram-positive bacteria is poorly understood. Here, we investigated Fe(III reduction with lactate, a non-fermentable substrate, as the electron donor. Lactate consumption is concomitant to Fe(III reduction, but does not support significant growth, suggesting that little energy can be conserved from this process and that it may occur fortuitously. D. reducens can reduce both soluble (Fe(III-citrate and insoluble (hydrous ferric oxide, HFO Fe(III. Because physically inaccessible HFO was not reduced, we concluded that reduction requires direct contact under these experimental conditions. This implies the presence of a surface exposed reductase capable of transferring electrons from the cell to the extracellular electron acceptor. With the goal of characterizing the role of surface proteins in D. reducens and of identifying candidate Fe(III reductases, we carried out an investigation of the surface proteome (surfaceome of D. reducens. Cell surface exposed proteins were extracted by trypsin cell shaving or by lysozyme treatment, and analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. This investigation revealed that the surfaceome fulfills many functions, including solute transport, protein export, maturation and hydrolysis, peptidoglycan synthesis and modification, and chemotaxis. Furthermore, a few redox-active proteins were identified. Among these, three are putatively involved in Fe(III reduction, i.e., a membrane-bound hydrogenase 4Fe-4S cluster subunit (Dred_0462, a heterodisulfide reductase subunit A (Dred_0143 and a protein annotated as alkyl hydroperoxide reductase but likely functioning as a thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase (Dred_1533.

  12. Mechanical deformation of atomic-scale metallic contacts: Structure and mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mads Reinholdt; Brandbyge, Mads; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel

    1998-01-01

    We have simulated the mechanical deformation of atomic-scale metallic contacts under tensile strain using molecular dynamics and effective medium theory potentials. The evolution of the structure of the contacts and the underlying deformation mechanisms are described along with the calculated......, but vacancies can be permanently present. The transition states and energies for slip mechanisms have been determined using the nudged elastic band method, and we find a size-dependent crossover from a dislocation-mediated slip to a homogeneous slip when the contact diameter becomes less than a few nm. We show...

  13. FDTD method for laser absorption in metals for large scale problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Chun; Ki, Hyungson

    2013-10-21

    The FDTD method has been successfully used for many electromagnetic problems, but its application to laser material processing has been limited because even a several-millimeter domain requires a prohibitively large number of grids. In this article, we present a novel FDTD method for simulating large-scale laser beam absorption problems, especially for metals, by enlarging laser wavelength while maintaining the material's reflection characteristics. For validation purposes, the proposed method has been tested with in-house FDTD codes to simulate p-, s-, and circularly polarized 1.06 μm irradiation on Fe and Sn targets, and the simulation results are in good agreement with theoretical predictions.

  14. Multiple metals exposure in a small-scale artisanal gold mining community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Niladri; Nam, Dong-Ha; Kwansaa-Ansah, Edward; Renne, Elisha P; Nriagu, Jerome O

    2011-04-01

    Urinary metals were characterized in 57 male residents of a small-scale gold mining community in Ghana. Chromium and arsenic exceeded health guideline values for 52% and 34%, respectively, of all participants. About 10-40% of the participants had urinary levels of aluminum, copper, manganese, nickel, selenium, and zinc that fell outside the U.S. reference range. Exposures appear ubiquitous across the community as none of the elements were associated with occupation, age, and diet. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Atomic scale modeling of defect production and microstructure evolution in irradiated metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz de la Rubia, T.; Soneda, N.; Shimomura, Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Irradiation effects in materials depend in a complex way on the form of the as-produced primary damage state and its spatial and temporal evolution. Thus, while collision cascades produce defects on a time scale of tens of picosecond, diffusion occurs over much longer time scales, of the order of seconds, and microstructure evolution over even longer time scales. In this report the authors present work aimed at describing damage production and evolution in metals across all the relevant time and length scales. They discuss results of molecular dynamics simulations of displacement cascades in Fe and V. They show that interstitial clusters are produced in cascades above 5 keV, but not vacancy clusters. Next, they discuss the development of a kinetic Monte Carlo model that enables calculations of damage evolution over much longer time scales (1000`s of s) than the picosecond lifetime of the cascade. They demonstrate the applicability of the method by presenting predictions on the fraction of freely migrating defects in {alpha}Fe during irradiation at 600 K.

  16. Atomic scale modeling of defect production and microstructure evolution in irradiated metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz de la Rubia, T.; Soneda, N.; Shimomura, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Irradiation effects in materials depend in a complex way on the form of the as-produced primary damage state and its spatial and temporal evolution. Thus, while collision cascades produce defects on a time scale of tens of picosecond, diffusion occurs over much longer time scales, of the order of seconds, and microstructure evolution over even longer time scales. In this report the authors present work aimed at describing damage production and evolution in metals across all the relevant time and length scales. They discuss results of molecular dynamics simulations of displacement cascades in Fe and V. They show that interstitial clusters are produced in cascades above 5 keV, but not vacancy clusters. Next, they discuss the development of a kinetic Monte Carlo model that enables calculations of damage evolution over much longer time scales (1000's of s) than the picosecond lifetime of the cascade. They demonstrate the applicability of the method by presenting predictions on the fraction of freely migrating defects in αFe during irradiation at 600 K

  17. Reduced Fracture Finite Element Model Analysis of an Efficient Two-Scale Hybrid Embedded Fracture Model

    KAUST Repository

    Amir, Sahar Z.

    2017-06-09

    A Hybrid Embedded Fracture (HEF) model was developed to reduce various computational costs while maintaining physical accuracy (Amir and Sun, 2016). HEF splits the computations into fine scale and coarse scale. Fine scale solves analytically for the matrix-fracture flux exchange parameter. Coarse scale solves for the properties of the entire system. In literature, fractures were assumed to be either vertical or horizontal for simplification (Warren and Root, 1963). Matrix-fracture flux exchange parameter was given few equations built on that assumption (Kazemi, 1968; Lemonnier and Bourbiaux, 2010). However, such simplified cases do not apply directly for actual random fracture shapes, directions, orientations …etc. This paper shows that the HEF fine scale analytic solution (Amir and Sun, 2016) generates the flux exchange parameter found in literature for vertical and horizontal fracture cases. For other fracture cases, the flux exchange parameter changes according to the angle, slop, direction, … etc. This conclusion rises from the analysis of both: the Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) and the HEF schemes. The behavior of both schemes is analyzed with exactly similar fracture conditions and the results are shown and discussed. Then, a generalization is illustrated for any slightly compressible single-phase fluid within fractured porous media and its results are discussed.

  18. Reduced Fracture Finite Element Model Analysis of an Efficient Two-Scale Hybrid Embedded Fracture Model

    KAUST Repository

    Amir, Sahar Z.; Chen, Huangxin; Sun, Shuyu

    2017-01-01

    A Hybrid Embedded Fracture (HEF) model was developed to reduce various computational costs while maintaining physical accuracy (Amir and Sun, 2016). HEF splits the computations into fine scale and coarse scale. Fine scale solves analytically for the matrix-fracture flux exchange parameter. Coarse scale solves for the properties of the entire system. In literature, fractures were assumed to be either vertical or horizontal for simplification (Warren and Root, 1963). Matrix-fracture flux exchange parameter was given few equations built on that assumption (Kazemi, 1968; Lemonnier and Bourbiaux, 2010). However, such simplified cases do not apply directly for actual random fracture shapes, directions, orientations …etc. This paper shows that the HEF fine scale analytic solution (Amir and Sun, 2016) generates the flux exchange parameter found in literature for vertical and horizontal fracture cases. For other fracture cases, the flux exchange parameter changes according to the angle, slop, direction, … etc. This conclusion rises from the analysis of both: the Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) and the HEF schemes. The behavior of both schemes is analyzed with exactly similar fracture conditions and the results are shown and discussed. Then, a generalization is illustrated for any slightly compressible single-phase fluid within fractured porous media and its results are discussed.

  19. Nucleate pool boiling: High gravity to reduced gravity; liquid metals to cryogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merte, Herman, Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Requirements for the proper functioning of equipment and personnel in reduced gravity associated with space platforms and future space station modules introduce unique problems in temperature control; power generation; energy dissipation; the storage, transfer, control and conditioning of fluids; and liquid-vapor separation. The phase change of boiling is significant in all of these. Although both pool and flow boiling would be involved, research results to date include only pool boiling because buoyancy effects are maximized for this case. The effective application of forced convection boiling heat transfer in the microgravity of space will require a well grounded and cogent understanding of the mechanisms involved. Experimental results are presented for pool boiling from a single geometrical configuration, a flat surface, covering a wide range of body forces from a/g = 20 to 1 to a/g = 0 to -1 for a cryogenic liquid, and from a/g = 20 to 1 for water and a liquid metal. Similarities in behavior are noted for these three fluids at the higher gravity levels, and may reasonably be expected to continue at reduced gravity levels.

  20. Initial chemical transport of reducing elements and chemical reactions in oxide cathode base metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roquais, J.M.; Poret, F.; Doze, R. le; Dufour, P.; Steinbrunn, A.

    2002-01-01

    In the present work, the formation of compounds associated to the diffusion of reducing elements (Mg and Al) to the nickel surface of a one-piece oxide cathode has been studied. Those compounds have been evidenced after the annealing steps at high temperature performed on cathode base metal prior to the emitting coating deposition. Therefore, they form the ''initial'' interface between the nickel and the coating, in other words, the interface existing at the beginning of cathode life. Extensive analysis to characterize the nickel base prior to coating deposition has been performed by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES). TEM and AES analysis have allowed to identify for the first time a spinel compound of MgAl 2 O 4 . The preferential distribution of the different compounds on the nickel surface has been studied by EDX mapping. Experimental profiles of diffusion of the reducing elements in the nickel have been obtained over the entire thickness of the material by GDOES. The mechanism of formation of these compounds together with a related diffusion model are proposed

  1. FULL SCALE REGENERABLE HEPA FILTER DESIGN USING SINTERED METAL FILTER ELEMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil Ramos; Kenneth Rubow; Ronald Sekellick

    2002-01-01

    A Department of Energy funded contract involved the development of porous metal as a HEPA filter, and the subsequent design of a full-scale regenerable HEPA filtration system (RHFS). This RHFS could replace the glass fiber HEPA filters currently being used on the high level waste (HLW) tank ventilation system with a system that would be moisture tolerant, durable, and cleanable in place. The origins of the contract are a 1996 investigation at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) regarding the use of porous metal as a HEPA filter material. This contract was divided into Phases I, IIA and IIB. Phase I of the contract evaluated simple filter cylinders in a simulated High Level Waste (HLW) environment and the ability to clean and regenerate the filter media after fouling. Upon the successful completion of Phase I, Phase IIA was conducted, which included lab scale prototype testing and design of a full-scale system. The work completed under Phase IIA included development of a full-scale system design, development of a filter media meeting the HEPA filtration efficiency that would also be regenerable using prescribed cleaning procedures, and the testing of a single element system prototype at Savannah River. All contract objectives were met. The filter media selected was a nickel material already under development at Mott, which met the HEPA filtration efficiency standard. The Mott nickel media met and exceeded the HEPA requirement, providing 99.99% removal against a requirement of 99.97%. Double open-ended elements of this media were provided to the Savannah River Test Center for HLW simulation testing in the single element prototype filter. These elements performed well and further demonstrated the practicality of a metallic media regenerable HEPA filter system. An evaluation of the manufacturing method on many elements demonstrated the reproducibility to meet the HEPA filtration requirement. The full-scale design of the Mott RHFS incorporated several important

  2. What scaling means in wind engineering: Complementary role of the reduced scale approach in a BLWT and the full scale testing in a large climatic wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flamand, Olivier

    2017-12-01

    Wind engineering problems are commonly studied by wind tunnel experiments at a reduced scale. This introduces several limitations and calls for a careful planning of the tests and the interpretation of the experimental results. The talk first revisits the similitude laws and discusses how they are actually applied in wind engineering. It will also remind readers why different scaling laws govern in different wind engineering problems. Secondly, the paper focuses on the ways to simplify a detailed structure (bridge, building, platform) when fabricating the downscaled models for the tests. This will be illustrated by several examples from recent engineering projects. Finally, under the most severe weather conditions, manmade structures and equipment should remain operational. What “recreating the climate” means and aims to achieve will be illustrated through common practice in climatic wind tunnel modelling.

  3. USE OF HYDROGEN RESPIROMETRY TO DETERMINE METAL TOXICITY TO SULFATE REDUCING BACTERIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acid mine drainage (AMD), an acidic metal-bearing wastewater poses a severe pollution problem attributed to post-mining activities. The metals (metal sulfates) encountered in AMD and considered of concern for risk assessment are: arsenic, cadmium, aluminum, manganese, iron, zinc ...

  4. Toward a sustainable energy supply with reduced environmental burden. Development of metal fuel fast reactor cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, Tadafumi; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Kinoshita, Kensuke

    2009-01-01

    CRIEPI has been studying the metal fuel fast reactor cycle as an outstanding alternative for the future energy sources. In this paper, development of the metal fuel cycle is reviewed in the view point of technological feasibility and material balance. Preliminary estimation of reduction of the waste burden due to introduction of the metal fuel cycle technology is also reported. (author)

  5. Microbial impact on metallic corrosion processes: case of iron reducing bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esnault, Loic; Jullien, Michel; Libert, Marie; Mustin, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. French concept of deep disposal of nuclear waste is based on a multi-barrier system with a metal container and a clayey host rock as last natural barrier for radionuclides confinement and to avoid their migration in the environment. One of the most important criteria for the safety assessment concerns the life time of metal containers. In this deep environment (elevated pressure and temperature, low water content) many factors may induce an alteration and modification of metal containers properties through corrosion processes. Two types of reactions are currently studied First, the anaerobic aqueous corrosion (a) which is depending on the amount of water available and the second is clayey corrosion (b) by an oxidation of structural Iron(III) or clay's H + on Fe(0) of metal containers. - Fe 0 + 2H 2 O → Fe 2+ + 2OH - + H 2 (a) - Fe 0 + 2H + argile → Fe 2+ solution + H 2 (b) - Fe 0 + Fe 3+ argile → Fe 2+ solution + Fe 2+ argile (b) These processes will entail different reaction products: first, we observe formation of corrosion products like aqueous Fe(II) and magnetite, hematite like mineral. These new minerals inhibit aqueous corrosion by the formation of a passivation process. For the second process, we observe a transformation of smectites into iron-rich serpentine-type minerals. These phenomenons will be responsible for a potential loss of confinement properties such as release of radionuclides, swelling and capacity to cations exchange. Moreover, since the discovery of microorganisms in deep clayey environment or in bentonite used as swelling clay. A new corrosion parameter 'biological one inducing bio-corrosion process' must be taken into account and has to be investigated to improve geochemical prediction on the sustainability of containers in geological disposal. - Impact of microorganisms has to be focused in term of bio-corrosion and more precisely on an indirect corrosion through the

  6. Probing galaxy growth through metallicity scaling relations over the past 12 Gyr of cosmic history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Ryan; MOSDEF team

    2018-01-01

    A primary goal of galaxy evolution studies is to understand the processes governing the growth of the baryonic content of galaxies over cosmic history. Observations of galaxy metallicity scaling relations and their evolution with redshift, in combination with chemical evolution models, provide unique insight into the interplay between star formation, gas accretion, and feedback/outflows. I present measurements of the stellar mass-gas phase metallicity relation and its evolution over the past 12 Gyr from z~0 to z~3.5, utilizing data from the Mosfire Deep Evolution Field survey that uniquely provides rest-frame optical spectra of >1000 uniformly-selected galaxies at z=1.3-3.8. We find evolution towards lower metallicity at fixed stellar mass with increasing redshift that is consistent with current cosmological simulations including chemical evolution, with a large evolution of ~0.3 dex from z~0 to z~2.5 and minor evolution of 2, and discuss the potential of current and next-generation observational facilities to obtain statistical auroral-line samples at high redshifts.

  7. DETERMINING THE LARGE-SCALE ENVIRONMENTAL DEPENDENCE OF GAS-PHASE METALLICITY IN DWARF GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglass, Kelly A.; Vogeley, Michael S.

    2017-01-01

    We study how the cosmic environment affects galaxy evolution in the universe by comparing the metallicities of dwarf galaxies in voids with dwarf galaxies in more dense regions. Ratios of the fluxes of emission lines, particularly those of the forbidden [O iii] and [S ii] transitions, provide estimates of a region’s electron temperature and number density. From these two quantities and the emission line fluxes [O ii] λ 3727, [O iii] λ 4363, and [O iii] λλ 4959, 5007, we estimate the abundance of oxygen with the direct T e  method. We estimate the metallicity of 42 blue, star-forming void dwarf galaxies and 89 blue, star-forming dwarf galaxies in more dense regions using spectroscopic observations from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7, as reprocessed in the MPA-JHU value-added catalog. We find very little difference between the two sets of galaxies, indicating little influence from the large-scale environment on their chemical evolution. Of particular interest are a number of extremely metal-poor dwarf galaxies that are less prevalent in voids than in the denser regions.

  8. Multi-Scale Modeling of Microstructural Evolution in Structural Metallic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lei

    Metallic alloys are a widely used class of structural materials, and the mechanical properties of these alloys are strongly dependent on the microstructure. Therefore, the scientific design of metallic materials with superior mechanical properties requires the understanding of the microstructural evolution. Computational models and simulations offer a number of advantages over experimental techniques in the prediction of microstructural evolution, because they can allow studies of microstructural evolution in situ, i.e., while the material is mechanically loaded (meso-scale simulations), and bring atomic-level insights into the microstructure (atomistic simulations). In this thesis, we applied a multi-scale modeling approach to study the microstructural evolution in several metallic systems, including polycrystalline materials and metallic glasses (MGs). Specifically, for polycrystalline materials, we developed a coupled finite element model that combines phase field method and crystal plasticity theory to study the plasticity effect on grain boundary (GB) migration. Our model is not only coupled strongly (i.e., we include plastic driving force on GB migration directly) and concurrently (i.e., coupled equations are solved simultaneously), but also it qualitatively captures such phenomena as the dislocation absorption by mobile GBs. The developed model provides a tool to study the microstructural evolution in plastically deformed metals and alloys. For MGs, we used molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the nucleation kinetics in the primary crystallization in Al-Sm system. We calculated the time-temperature-transformation curves for low Sm concentrations, from which the strong suppressing effect of Sm solute on Al nucleation and its influencing mechanism are revealed. Also, through the comparative analysis of both Al attachment and Al diffusion in MGs, it has been found that the nucleation kinetics is controlled by interfacial attachment of Al, and that

  9. Synthesis, fabrication, and spectroscopy of nano-scale photonic noble metal materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egusa, Shunji

    Nanometer is an interesting scale for physicists, chemists, and materials scientists, in a sense that it lies between the macroscopic and the atomic scales. In this regime, materials exhibit distinct physical and chemical properties that are clearly different from those of atoms or macroscopic bulk. This thesis is concerned about both physics and chemistry of noble metal nano-structures. Novel chemical syntheses and physical fabrications of various noble metal nano-structures, and the development of spectroscopic techniques for nano-structures are presented. Scanning microscopy/spectroscopy techniques inherently perturbs the true optical responses of the nano-structures. However, by using scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip as the nanometer-confined excitation source of surface plasmons in the samples, and subsequently collecting the signals in the Fourier space, it is shown that the tip-perturbed part of the signals can be deconvoluted. As a result, the collected signal in this approach is the pure response of the sample. Coherent light is employed to study the optical response of nano-structures, in order to avoid complication from tip-perturbation as discussed above. White-light super-continuum excites the nano-structure, the monolayer of Au nanoparticles self-assembled on silicon nitride membrane substrates. The coherent excitation reveals asymmetric surface plasmon resonance in the nano-structures. One of the most important issues in nano-scale science is to gain control over the shape, size, and assembly of nanoparticles. A novel method is developed to chemically synthesize ligand-passivated atomic noble metal clusters in solution phase. The method, named thermal decomposition method, enables facile yet robust synthesis of fluorescent atomic clusters. Thus synthesized atomic clusters are very stable, and show behaviors of quantum dots. A novel and versatile approach for creation of nanoparticle arrays is developed. This method is different from the

  10. High-resolution LES of the rotating stall in a reduced scale model pump-turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacot, Olivier; Avellan, François; Kato, Chisachi

    2014-01-01

    Extending the operating range of modern pump-turbines becomes increasingly important in the course of the integration of renewable energy sources in the existing power grid. However, at partial load condition in pumping mode, the occurrence of rotating stall is critical to the operational safety of the machine and on the grid stability. The understanding of the mechanisms behind this flow phenomenon yet remains vague and incomplete. Past numerical simulations using a RANS approach often led to inconclusive results concerning the physical background. For the first time, the rotating stall is investigated by performing a large scale LES calculation on the HYDRODYNA pump-turbine scale model featuring approximately 100 million elements. The computations were performed on the PRIMEHPC FX10 of the University of Tokyo using the overset Finite Element open source code FrontFlow/blue with the dynamic Smagorinsky turbulence model and the no-slip wall condition. The internal flow computed is the one when operating the pump-turbine at 76% of the best efficiency point in pumping mode, as previous experimental research showed the presence of four rotating cells. The rotating stall phenomenon is accurately reproduced for a reduced Reynolds number using the LES approach with acceptable computing resources. The results show an excellent agreement with available experimental data from the reduced scale model testing at the EPFL Laboratory for Hydraulic Machines. The number of stall cells as well as the propagation speed corroborates the experiment

  11. High-resolution LES of the rotating stall in a reduced scale model pump-turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacot, Olivier; Kato, Chisachi; Avellan, François

    2014-03-01

    Extending the operating range of modern pump-turbines becomes increasingly important in the course of the integration of renewable energy sources in the existing power grid. However, at partial load condition in pumping mode, the occurrence of rotating stall is critical to the operational safety of the machine and on the grid stability. The understanding of the mechanisms behind this flow phenomenon yet remains vague and incomplete. Past numerical simulations using a RANS approach often led to inconclusive results concerning the physical background. For the first time, the rotating stall is investigated by performing a large scale LES calculation on the HYDRODYNA pump-turbine scale model featuring approximately 100 million elements. The computations were performed on the PRIMEHPC FX10 of the University of Tokyo using the overset Finite Element open source code FrontFlow/blue with the dynamic Smagorinsky turbulence model and the no-slip wall condition. The internal flow computed is the one when operating the pump-turbine at 76% of the best efficiency point in pumping mode, as previous experimental research showed the presence of four rotating cells. The rotating stall phenomenon is accurately reproduced for a reduced Reynolds number using the LES approach with acceptable computing resources. The results show an excellent agreement with available experimental data from the reduced scale model testing at the EPFL Laboratory for Hydraulic Machines. The number of stall cells as well as the propagation speed corroborates the experiment.

  12. Nitrogen rate strategies for reducing yield-scaled nitrous oxide emissions in maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xu; Nafziger, Emerson D.; Pittelkow, Cameron M.

    2017-12-01

    Mitigating nitrogen (N) losses from agriculture without negatively impacting crop productivity is a pressing environmental and economic challenge. Reductions in N fertilizer rate are often highlighted as a solution, yet the degree to which crop yields and economic returns may be impacted at the field-level remains unclear, in part due to limited data availability. Farmers are risk averse and potential yield losses may limit the success of voluntary N loss mitigation protocols, thus understanding field-level yield tradeoffs is critical to inform policy development. Using a case study of soil N2O mitigation in the US Midwest, we conducted an ex-post assessment of two economic and two environmental N rate reduction strategies to identify promising practices for maintaining maize yields and economic returns while reducing N2O emissions per unit yield (i.e. yield-scaled emissions) compared to an assumed baseline N input level. Maize yield response data from 201 on-farm N rate experiments were combined with an empirical equation predicting N2O emissions as a function of N rate. Results indicate that the economic strategy aimed at maximizing returns to N (MRTN) led to moderate but consistent reductions in yield-scaled N2O emissions with small negative impacts on yield and slight increases in median returns. The economic optimum N rate strategy reduced yield-scaled N2O emissions in 75% of cases but increased them otherwise, challenging the assumption that this strategy will automatically reduce environmental impacts per unit production. Both environmental strategies, one designed to increase N recovery efficiency and one to balance N inputs with grain N removal, further reduced yield-scaled N2O emissions but were also associated with negative yield penalties and decreased returns. These results highlight the inherent tension between achieving agronomic and economic goals while reducing environmental impacts which is often overlooked in policy discussions. To enable the

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of Alkaliphilus metalliredigens Strain QYMF, an Alkaliphilic and Metal-Reducing Bacterium Isolated from Borax-Contaminated Leachate Ponds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, C; Copeland, A; Lucas, S; Lapidus, A; Barry, K; Detter, J C; Glavina Del Rio, T; Hammon, N; Israni, S; Dalin, E; Tice, H; Pitluck, S; Chertkov, O; Brettin, T; Bruce, D; Han, C; Schmutz, J; Larimer, F; Land, M L; Hauser, L; Kyrpides, N; Mikhailova, N; Ye, Q; Zhou, J; Richardson, P; Fields, M W

    2016-11-03

    Alkaliphilus metalliredigens strain QYMF is an anaerobic, alkaliphilic, and metal-reducing bacterium associated with phylum Firmicutes QYMF was isolated from alkaline borax leachate ponds. The genome sequence will help elucidate the role of metal-reducing microorganisms under alkaline environments, a capability that is not commonly observed in metal respiring-microorganisms. Copyright © 2016 Hwang et al.

  14. Using Moss to Detect Fine-Scaled Deposition of Heavy Metals in Urban Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovan, S.; Donovan, G.; Demetrios, G.; Monleon, V. J.; Amacher, M. C.

    2017-12-01

    Mosses are commonly used as bio-indicators of heavy metal deposition to forests. Their application in urban airsheds is relatively rare. Our objective was to develop fine-scaled, city-wide maps for heavy metals in Portland, Oregon, to identify pollution "hotspots" and serve as a screening tool for more effective placement of air quality monitoring instruments. In 2013 we measured twenty-two elements in epiphytic moss sampled on a 1km x1km sampling grid (n = 346). We detected large hotspots of cadmium and arsenic in two neighborhoods associated with stained glass manufacturers. Air instruments deployed by local regulators measured cadmium concentrations 49 times and arsenic levels 155 times the state health benchmarks. Moss maps also detected a large nickel hotspot in a neighborhood near a forge where air instruments later measured concentrations 4 times the health benchmark. In response, the facilities implemented new pollution controls, air quality improved in all three affected neighborhoods, revision of regulations for stained glass furnace emissions are underway, and Oregon's governor launched an initiative to develop health-based (vs technology-based) regulations for air toxics in the state. The moss maps also indicated a couple dozen smaller hotspots of heavy metals, including lead, chromium, and cobalt, in Portland neighborhoods. Ongoing follow-up work includes: 1) use of moss sampling by local regulators to investigate source and extent of the smaller hotspots, 2) use of lead isotopes to determine origins of higher lead levels observed in moss collected from the inner city, and 3) co-location of air instruments and moss sampling to determine accuracy, timeframe represented, and seasonality of heavy metals in moss.

  15. Isolation and dispersion of reduced metal particles using the surface dipole moment of F-terminated diamond electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, M.; Tanaka, Y.; Furuta, M. [Department of Chemistry and Earth Sciences, School of Science, Yamaguchi University, 1677-1 Yoshida, Yamaguchi-shi, Yamaguchi 753-8512 (Japan); Kondo, T. [Department of Industrial Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering, Tokyo University of Science, 1-3 Kagurazaka, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8601 (Japan); Fujishima, A. [Kanagawa Advanced Science and Technology (KAST), 3-2-1, Sakato, Takastu-ku, Kawasaki-shi, Kanagawa 213-0012 (Japan); Honda, K. [Department of Chemistry and Earth Sciences, School of Science, Yamaguchi University, 1677-1 Yoshida, Yamaguchi-shi, Yamaguchi 753-8512 (Japan)], E-mail: khonda@yamaguchi-u.ac.jp

    2009-04-30

    Cu particles that have been reductively generated at the oxidized surface of a boron-doped diamond electrode (O-BDD) can be removed from the electrode's surface by the repulsive electrostatic force of the surface dipole moment during a potential cycle of a solution of Cu{sup 2+} ions. The objective of this study was to isolate various metal particles other than Cu by use of a fluorine-terminated BDD surface (F-BDD) with a stronger surface dipole moment than O-BDD, and to clarify the mechanism of the metal particles' separation from the electrode. During the potential cycle treatment of Cu{sup 2+} ions using F-BDD, the reionization of the reduced Cu could be suppressed in the presence of dissolved oxygen, and the Cu particles were separated from the electrode surface as CuO. A similar result was seen with O-BDD. The degree of separation of the Cu particles could be drastically enhanced by raising the upper potential limit in the potential cycle from +0.2 to +0.8 V. By setting the upper potential to a potential greater than the metal-metal oxide equilibrium line in the potential-pH equilibrium diagram of the Cu-water system (Pourbaix Diagram), oxidation of the reduced metal surface by reaction with dissolved oxygen could be accelerated and the surface of metal particles could be insulated. The Cu particles were forced from the BDD surface by the electrostatic repulsion from the surface dipole moment of F-BDD. Also, it turned out that the physical adsorption of chloride ions (Cl{sup -}) on the electrode surface intensified the electrostatic repulsive force between the F- or O-BDD surface and the metal particles, and thus increased the degree of the metal particles' separation. For Zn with a metal-metal oxide equilibrium potential of approximately -0.8 V at pH 7, complete separation of the Zn particles was achieved with F-BDD by setting the upper potential limit to +0.8 V (vs. Ag/AgCl), decreasing the Zn{sup 2+} concentration (1/10 that of Cu{sup 2

  16. Reduced fine-scale spatial genetic structure in grazed populations of Dianthus carthusianorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico, Y; Wagner, H H

    2016-11-01

    Strong spatial genetic structure in plant populations can increase homozygosity, reducing genetic diversity and adaptive potential. The strength of spatial genetic structure largely depends on rates of seed dispersal and pollen flow. Seeds without dispersal adaptations are likely to be dispersed over short distances within the vicinity of the mother plant, resulting in spatial clustering of related genotypes (fine-scale spatial genetic structure, hereafter spatial genetic structure (SGS)). However, primary seed dispersal by zoochory can promote effective dispersal, increasing the mixing of seeds and influencing SGS within plant populations. In this study, we investigated the effects of seed dispersal by rotational sheep grazing on the strength of SGS and genetic diversity using 11 nuclear microsatellites for 49 populations of the calcareous grassland forb Dianthus carthusianorum. Populations connected by rotational sheep grazing showed significantly weaker SGS and higher genetic diversity than populations in ungrazed grasslands. Independent of grazing treatment, small populations showed significantly stronger SGS and lower genetic diversity than larger populations, likely due to genetic drift. A lack of significant differences in the strength of SGS and genetic diversity between populations that were recently colonized and pre-existing populations suggested that populations colonized after the reintroduction of rotational sheep grazing were likely founded by colonists from diverse source populations. We conclude that dispersal by rotational sheep grazing has the potential to considerably reduce SGS within D. carthusianorum populations. Our study highlights the effectiveness of landscape management by rotational sheep grazing to importantly reduce genetic structure at local scales within restored plant populations.

  17. Reducing Agricultural Water Footprints at the Farm Scale: A Case Study in the Beijing Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Huang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Beijing is one of the most water-stressed regions in the world. Reducing agricultural water use has long been the basis of local policy for sustainable water use. In this article, the potential to reduce the life cycle (cradle to gate water footprints of wheat and maize that contribute to 94% of the local cereal production was assessed. Following ISO 14046, consumptive and degradative water use for the wheat-maize rotation system was modeled under different irrigation and nitrogen (N application options. Reducing irrigation water volume by 33.3% compared to current practice did not cause a significant yield decline, but the water scarcity footprint and water eutrophication footprint were decreased by 27.5% and 23.9%, respectively. Similarly, reducing the N application rate by 33.3% from current practice did not cause a significant yield decline, but led to a 52.3% reduction in water eutrophication footprint while maintaining a similar water scarcity footprint. These results demonstrate that improving water and fertilizer management has great potential for reducing the crop water footprints at the farm scale. This situation in Beijing is likely to be representative of the challenge facing many of the water-stressed regions in China, where a sustainable means of agricultural production must be found.

  18. Using glucosamine as a reductant to prepare reduced graphene oxide and its nanocomposites with metal nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Chuanbao; Wang Xingrui; Liu Yu; Wang Wei; Wynn, Jeanne; Gao Jianping

    2012-01-01

    A green and facile approach of producing reduced graphene oxide (RGO) by the reduction of graphene oxide (GO) with a monosaccharide medicine glucosamine (GL) was developed. The effect of several factors on the GO reduction, including pH, the weight ratio of GL/GO, and the reaction temperature was studied. The deoxygenation process was monitored with UV–Vis absorption spectroscopy, and the reducing degree of GO was determined with X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermo-gravimetric analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Au nanoparticles (about 3.3–4.2 nm) (AuNPs)/RGO and Ag nanoparticles (about 6 nm) (AgNPs)/RGO materials were prepared in two different ways using the above reduction method. They were then used to catalyze the Suzuki–Miyaura coupling reaction of phenyl halide and phenylboronic acid to produce biphenyl, and the highest yield of biphenyl for AuNPs/RGO was 99 %. In addition, the AgNPs/RGO materials exhibited a surface-enhanced Raman scattering effect, and some RGO peaks were enhanced. This approach opens up a new, practical, and green reducing method to prepare RGO for large-scale practical application.

  19. Large-Scale Ocean Circulation-Cloud Interactions Reduce the Pace of Transient Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trossman, D. S.; Palter, J. B.; Merlis, T. M.; Huang, Y.; Xia, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Changes to the large scale oceanic circulation are thought to slow the pace of transient climate change due, in part, to their influence on radiative feedbacks. Here we evaluate the interactions between CO2-forced perturbations to the large-scale ocean circulation and the radiative cloud feedback in a climate model. Both the change of the ocean circulation and the radiative cloud feedback strongly influence the magnitude and spatial pattern of surface and ocean warming. Changes in the ocean circulation reduce the amount of transient global warming caused by the radiative cloud feedback by helping to maintain low cloud coverage in the face of global warming. The radiative cloud feedback is key in affecting atmospheric meridional heat transport changes and is the dominant radiative feedback mechanism that responds to ocean circulation change. Uncertainty in the simulated ocean circulation changes due to CO2 forcing may contribute a large share of the spread in the radiative cloud feedback among climate models.

  20. Transport losses in single and assembled coated conductors with textured-metal substrate with reduced magnetism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amemiya, N.; Jiang, Z.; Li, Z.; Nakahata, M.; Kato, T.; Ueyama, M.; Kashima, N.; Nagaya, S.; Shiohara, S.

    2008-01-01

    Transport losses in a coated conductor with a textured-metal substrate with reduced magnetism were studied experimentally. The substrate is with a clad structure, and HoBCO superconductor layer is deposited on the substrate with buffer layers. The measured transport loss of a sample whose critical current is 126.0 A falls between Norris's strip value and Norris's ellipse value. The increase in the measured transport loss from Norris's strip value can be attributed to its non-uniform lateral J c distribution. The same buffered clad tape was placed under an IBAD-MOCVD coated conductor with a non-magnetic substrate, and its transport loss was measured. The comparison between the measured transport loss of this sample and that of the identical IBAD-MOCVD coated conductor without the buffered clad tape indicates that the increase in the transport loss due to this buffered clad tape is small. The transport losses of hexagonal assemblies of IBAD-MOCVD coated conductors, whose structure simulates that of superconducting power transmission cables, were also measured where the buffered clad tapes were under-lied or over-lied on the coated conductors. The increase in the transport loss of hexagonal assemblies of coated conductors due to the buffered clad tapes is at an allowable level

  1. Catalytic properties of graphene–metal nanoparticle hybrid prepared using an aromatic amino acid as the reducing agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adhikari, Bimalendu; Banerjee, Arindam

    2013-01-01

    An easy and single step process of making reduced graphene oxide nanosheet from graphene oxide (GO) in water medium has been demonstrated by using a naturally occurring non-proteinaceous amino acid (2,4-dihydroxy phenyl alanine, Dopa) as a new reducing agent and stabilizing agent. This amino acid has also been used to reduce the noble metal salt (AuCl 3 /AgNO 3 ) to produce the corresponding noble metal nanoparticles (MNP) without using any external reducing and stabilizing agents. So, this amino acid has been used to reduce simultaneously GO to RGO and noble metal salts to produce corresponding MNP to form RGO–MNP nanohybrid system in a single step in water medium and also in absence of any external toxic reducing and stabilizing agents. Different techniques UV–Visible absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and others have been used to characterize the reduction of GO to RGO, metal salts to produce corresponding MNPs and the formation of RGO–MNP nanohybrid systems. Moreover, this metal nanoparticle containing RGO–MNP nanohybrid system acts as a potential catalyst for the reduction of aromatic nitro to aromatic amino group. - Graphical abstract: This study demonstrates an easy, single step and eco-friendly method to make RGO and Au/AgNP simultaneously from respective precursors to form a RGO–Au/AgNP nanohybrid system using an aromatic amino acid (2,4-dihydroxy phenyl alanine, Dopa) as a new reducing agent as well as stabilizing agent in water medium. Highlights: ► Synthesis of reduced graphene oxide (RGO) nanosheet using an amino acid. ► The amino acid (Dopa) can reduce noble metal salt (Au 3+ /Ag + ) to metal nanoparticle (MNP). ► Single step and eco-friendly synthesis of RGO-MNP nanohybrid using Dopa. ► Characterization of RGO, MNP and RGO–MNP nanohybrid. ► RGO-MNP nanohybrid acts as a catalyst for the reduction of aromatic nitro

  2. Ignition and combustion of bulk metals under elevated, normal and reduced gravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbud-Madrid, Angel; Branch, Melvyn C.; Daily, John W.

    1995-01-01

    This research effort is aimed at providing further insight into this multi-variable dependent phenomena by looking at the effects of gravity on the ignition and combustion behavior of metals. Since spacecraft are subjected to higher-than-1g gravity loads during launch and reentry and to zero-gravity environments while in orbit, the study of ignition and combustion of bulk metals at different gravitational potentials is of great practical concern. From the scientific standpoint, studies conducted under microgravity conditions provide simplified boundary conditions since buoyancy is removed, and make possible the identification of fundamental ignition mechanisms. The effect of microgravity on the combustion of bulk metals has been investigated by Steinberg, et al. on a drop tower simulator. However, no detailed quantitative work has been done on ignition phenomena of bulk metals at lower or higher-than-normal gravitational fields or on the combustion characteristics of metals at elevated gravity. The primary objective of this investigation is the development of an experimental system capable of providing fundamental physical and chemical information on the ignition of bulk metals under different gravity levels. The metals used in the study, iron (Fe), titanium (Ti), zirconium (Zr), magnesium (Mg), zinc (Zn), and copper (Cu) were selected because of their importance as elements of structural metals and their simple chemical composition (pure metals instead of multi-component alloys to avoid complication in morphology and spectroscopic studies). These samples were also chosen to study the two different combustion modes experienced by metals: heterogeneous or surface oxidation, and homogeneous or gas-phase reaction. The experimental approach provides surface temperature profiles, spectroscopic measurements, surface morphology, x-ray spectrometry of metals specimens and their combustion products, and high-speed cinematography of the heating, ignition and combustion

  3. Determination of pollutant elements and heavy metals in petroleum sludge and scale at Heglig field Sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amir, N. T.

    2012-02-01

    The release of pollutant metals from petroleum industry in to ecosystems represents a serious hazard for the biosphere, because of their toxicity. The objective of this study was to determine the levels of some elements in petroleum sludge and scales collected from petroleum production area in Heglig oil field located in South Kordofan State. The concentration of Ca, Fe, V, Mn,Ni, Cu, Zn, Cs, Sr, Zr, Y and Pb in sludge and scale samples have been determined using energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) equipped with a point source of 1 09C d. The concentration of Ca and Fe in scale samples were found to fall in range of 15,49-23.28% and 0.98-5.13%, respectively. The a verge elemental concentrations of Ti, Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, Sr,Y, and Pb in scale samples were 2917.8, 567.74, 23.21, 23.05, 101.67, 31.38, 177.06 and 24.12 (mg/kg), respectively. The concentrations of Ca and Fe in sludge samples ranged from 1.98-8.82% and 0.71-5.19%, respectively and the a verge elemental concentrations of Cs, V, Mn,Cu, Zn, Pb, Sr, Y and Zr were 7.44, 92,59, 557.36, 7.67, 162.72,28.67, 65.02, 45.64 and 52.15 (mg/kg), respectively. Correlation analysis revealed lock of any significant correlation between elemental concentrations in sludge and scales. (Author)

  4. Flow analysis of heavy metals in a pilot-scale incinerator for residues from waste electrical and electronic equipment dismantling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Yu-Yang; Feng, Yi-Jian; Cai, Si-Shi; Ding, Wei-Xu; Shen, Dong-Sheng, E-mail: shends@zju.edu.cn

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Cu, Zn, Pb, and Ni are enriched in bottom ash from WEEE dismantling residues. • The heavy metal residual fraction restricts transfer in the incinerator. • Pre-treatment to remove heavy metals from WEEE residues would reduce emissions. -- Abstract: The large amount of residues generated from dismantling waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) results in a considerable environmental burden. We used material flow analysis to investigate heavy metal behavior in an incineration plant in China used exclusively to incinerate residues from WEEE dismantling. The heavy metals tested were enriched in the bottom and fly ashes after incineration. However, the contents of heavy metals in the bottom ash, fly ash and exhaust gas do not have a significant correlation with that of the input waste. The evaporation and recondensation behavior of heavy metals caused their contents to differ with air pollution control equipment because of the temperature difference during gas venting. Among the heavy metals tested, Cd had the strongest tendency to transfer during incineration (T{sub Cd} = 69.5%) because it had the lowest melting point, followed by Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn. The exchangeable and residual fractions of heavy metals increased substantially in the incineration products compared with that of the input residues. Although the mass of residues from WEEE dismantling can be reduced by 70% by incineration, the safe disposal of the metal-enriched bottom and fly ashes is still required.

  5. Flow analysis of heavy metals in a pilot-scale incinerator for residues from waste electrical and electronic equipment dismantling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, Yu-Yang; Feng, Yi-Jian; Cai, Si-Shi; Ding, Wei-Xu; Shen, Dong-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Cu, Zn, Pb, and Ni are enriched in bottom ash from WEEE dismantling residues. • The heavy metal residual fraction restricts transfer in the incinerator. • Pre-treatment to remove heavy metals from WEEE residues would reduce emissions. -- Abstract: The large amount of residues generated from dismantling waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) results in a considerable environmental burden. We used material flow analysis to investigate heavy metal behavior in an incineration plant in China used exclusively to incinerate residues from WEEE dismantling. The heavy metals tested were enriched in the bottom and fly ashes after incineration. However, the contents of heavy metals in the bottom ash, fly ash and exhaust gas do not have a significant correlation with that of the input waste. The evaporation and recondensation behavior of heavy metals caused their contents to differ with air pollution control equipment because of the temperature difference during gas venting. Among the heavy metals tested, Cd had the strongest tendency to transfer during incineration (T Cd = 69.5%) because it had the lowest melting point, followed by Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn. The exchangeable and residual fractions of heavy metals increased substantially in the incineration products compared with that of the input residues. Although the mass of residues from WEEE dismantling can be reduced by 70% by incineration, the safe disposal of the metal-enriched bottom and fly ashes is still required

  6. The cavitation erosion of ultrasonic sonotrode during large-scale metallic casting: Experiment and simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yang; Liu, Zhilin; Li, Xiaoqian; Zhang, Lihua; Li, Ruiqing; Jiang, Ripeng; Dong, Fang

    2018-05-01

    Ultrasonic sonotrodes play an essential role in transmitting power ultrasound into the large-scale metallic casting. However, cavitation erosion considerably impairs the in-service performance of ultrasonic sonotrodes, leading to marginal microstructural refinement. In this work, the cavitation erosion behaviour of ultrasonic sonotrodes in large-scale castings was explored using the industry-level experiments of Al alloy cylindrical ingots (i.e. 630 mm in diameter and 6000 mm in length). When introducing power ultrasound, severe cavitation erosion was found to reproducibly occur at some specific positions on ultrasonic sonotrodes. However, there is no cavitation erosion present on the ultrasonic sonotrodes that were not driven by electric generator. Vibratory examination showed cavitation erosion depended on the vibration state of ultrasonic sonotrodes. Moreover, a finite element (FE) model was developed to simulate the evolution and distribution of acoustic pressure in 3-D solidification volume. FE simulation results confirmed that significant dynamic interaction between sonotrodes and melts only happened at some specific positions corresponding to severe cavitation erosion. This work will allow for developing more advanced ultrasonic sonotrodes with better cavitation erosion-resistance, in particular for large-scale castings, from the perspectives of ultrasonic physics and mechanical design. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Using ensemble models to identify and apportion heavy metal pollution sources in agricultural soils on a local scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Qi; Xie, Zhiyi; Li, Fangbai

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to identify and apportion multi-source and multi-phase heavy metal pollution from natural and anthropogenic inputs using ensemble models that include stochastic gradient boosting (SGB) and random forest (RF) in agricultural soils on the local scale. The heavy metal pollution sources were quantitatively assessed, and the results illustrated the suitability of the ensemble models for the assessment of multi-source and multi-phase heavy metal pollution in agricultural soils on the local scale. The results of SGB and RF consistently demonstrated that anthropogenic sources contributed the most to the concentrations of Pb and Cd in agricultural soils in the study region and that SGB performed better than RF. - Highlights: • Ensemble models including stochastic gradient boosting and random forest are used. • The models were verified by cross-validation and SGB performed better than RF. • Heavy metal pollution sources on a local scale are identified and apportioned. • Models illustrate good suitability in assessing sources in local-scale agricultural soils. • Anthropogenic sources contributed most to soil Pb and Cd pollution in our case. - Multi-source and multi-phase pollution by heavy metals in agricultural soils on a local scale were identified and apportioned.

  8. Bio-oil Stabilization by Hydrogenation over Reduced Metal Catalysts at Low Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Huamin; Lee, Suh-Jane; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Zacher, Alan H.

    2016-08-30

    Biomass fast pyrolysis integrated with bio-oil upgrading represents a very attractive approach for converting biomass to hydrocarbon transportation fuels. However, the thermal and chemical instability of bio-oils presents significant problems when they are being upgraded, and development of effective approaches for stabilizing bio-oils is critical to the success of the technology. Catalytic hydrogenation to remove reactive species in bio-oil has been considered as one of the most efficient ways to stabilize bio-oil. This paper provides a fundamental understanding of hydrogenation of actual bio-oils over a Ru/TiO2 catalyst under conditions relevant to practical bio-oil hydrotreating processes. Bio-oil feed stocks, bio-oils hydrogenated to different extents, and catalysts have been characterized to provide insights into the chemical and physical properties of these samples and to understand the correlation of the properties with the composition of the bio-oil and catalysts. The results indicated hydrogenation of various components of the bio-oil, including sugars, aldehydes, ketones, alkenes, aromatics, and carboxylic acids, over the Ru/TiO2 catalyst and 120 to 160oC. Hydrogenation of these species significantly changed the chemical and physical properties of the bio-oil and overall improved its thermal stability, especially by reducing the carbonyl content, which represented the content of the most reactive species (i.e., sugar, aldehydes, and ketones). The change of content of each component in response to increasing hydrogen additions suggests the following bio-oil hydrogenation reaction sequence: sugar conversion to sugar alcohols, followed by ketone and aldehyde conversion to alcohols, followed by alkene and aromatic hydrogenation, and then followed by carboxylic acid hydrogenation to alcohols. Hydrogenation of bio-oil samples with different sulfur contents or inorganic material contents suggested that sulfur poisoning of the reduced Ru metal catalysts was

  9. Usefulness of IDEAL T2-weighted FSE and SPGR imaging in reducing metallic artifacts in the postoperative ankles with metallic hardware

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung Bin; Cha, Jang Gyu; Lee, Min Hee; Lee, Eun Hye; Lee, Young Koo; Jeon, Chan Hong

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work is to prospectively compare the effectiveness of iterative decomposition of water and fat with echo asymmetry and least-squares estimation (IDEAL), T2-weighted fast spin-echo (FSE), and spoiled gradient-echo (SPGR) MR imaging to frequency selective fat suppression (FSFS) protocols for minimizing metallic artifacts in postoperative ankles with metallic hardware. The T2-weighted and SPGR imaging with IDEAL and FSFS were performed on 21 ankles of 21 patients with metallic hardware. Two musculoskeletal radiologists independently analyzed techniques for visualization of ankle ligaments and articular cartilage, uniformity of fat saturation, and relative size of the metallic artifacts. A paired t test was used for statistical comparisons of MR images between IDEAL and FSFS groups. IDEAL T2-weighted FSE and SPGR images enabled significantly improved visualization of articular cartilage (p < 0.05), the size of metallic artifact (p < 0.05), and the uniformity of fat saturation (p < 0.05). However, no significant improvement was found in the visibility of ligaments. IDEAL T2-weighted FSE and SPGR imaging effectively reduces the degree of tissue-obscuring artifacts produced by fixation hardware in ankle joints and improves image quality compared to FSFS T2-weighted FSE and SPGR imaging. However, visibility of ligaments was not improved using IDEAL imaging. (orig.)

  10. Prediction of a Francis turbine prototype full load instability from investigations on the reduced scale model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alligné, S.; Maruzewski, P.; Dinh, T.; Wang, B.; Fedorov, A.; Iosfin, J.; Avellan, F.

    2010-08-01

    The growing development of renewable energies combined with the process of privatization, lead to a change of economical energy market strategies. Instantaneous pricings of electricity as a function of demand or predictions, induces profitable peak productions which are mainly covered by hydroelectric power plants. Therefore, operators harness more hydroelectric facilities at full load operating conditions. However, the Francis Turbine features an axi-symmetric rope leaving the runner which may act under certain conditions as an internal energy source leading to instability. Undesired power and pressure fluctuations are induced which may limit the maximum available power output. BC Hydro experiences such constraints in a hydroelectric power plant consisting of four 435 MW Francis Turbine generating units, which is located in Canada's province of British Columbia. Under specific full load operating conditions, one unit experiences power and pressure fluctuations at 0.46 Hz. The aim of the paper is to present a methodology allowing prediction of this prototype's instability frequency from investigations on the reduced scale model. A new hydro acoustic vortex rope model has been developed in SIMSEN software, taking into account the energy dissipation due to the thermodynamic exchange between the gas and the surrounding liquid. A combination of measurements, CFD simulations and computation of eigenmodes of the reduced scale model installed on test rig, allows the accurate calibration of the vortex rope model parameters at the model scale. Then, transposition of parameters to the prototype according to similitude laws is applied and stability analysis of the power plant is performed. The eigenfrequency of 0.39 Hz related to the first eigenmode of the power plant is determined to be unstable. Predicted frequency of the full load power and pressure fluctuations at the unit unstable operating point is found to be in general agreement with the prototype measurements.

  11. Prediction of a Francis turbine prototype full load instability from investigations on the reduced scale model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alligne, S; Maruzewski, P; Avellan, F; Dinh, T; Wang, B; Fedorov, A; Iosfin, J

    2010-01-01

    The growing development of renewable energies combined with the process of privatization, lead to a change of economical energy market strategies. Instantaneous pricings of electricity as a function of demand or predictions, induces profitable peak productions which are mainly covered by hydroelectric power plants. Therefore, operators harness more hydroelectric facilities at full load operating conditions. However, the Francis Turbine features an axi-symmetric rope leaving the runner which may act under certain conditions as an internal energy source leading to instability. Undesired power and pressure fluctuations are induced which may limit the maximum available power output. BC Hydro experiences such constraints in a hydroelectric power plant consisting of four 435 MW Francis Turbine generating units, which is located in Canada's province of British Columbia. Under specific full load operating conditions, one unit experiences power and pressure fluctuations at 0.46 Hz. The aim of the paper is to present a methodology allowing prediction of this prototype's instability frequency from investigations on the reduced scale model. A new hydro acoustic vortex rope model has been developed in SIMSEN software, taking into account the energy dissipation due to the thermodynamic exchange between the gas and the surrounding liquid. A combination of measurements, CFD simulations and computation of eigenmodes of the reduced scale model installed on test rig, allows the accurate calibration of the vortex rope model parameters at the model scale. Then, transposition of parameters to the prototype according to similitude laws is applied and stability analysis of the power plant is performed. The eigenfrequency of 0.39 Hz related to the first eigenmode of the power plant is determined to be unstable. Predicted frequency of the full load power and pressure fluctuations at the unit unstable operating point is found to be in general agreement with the prototype measurements.

  12. Reduced risk insecticides to control scale insects and protect natural enemies in the production and maintenance of urban landscape plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Steven D

    2012-04-01

    Armored scale insects are among the most difficult to manage and economically important arthropod pests in the production and maintenance of urban landscape plants. This is because of morphological traits that protect them from contact insecticides. I compared initial and season-long control of euonymus scale, Unaspis euonymi Comstock (Hemiptera: Diaspidae), by reduced-risk insecticides (insect growth regulators [IGRs], neonicotinoids, spirotetramat) to determine if they controlled scale as well as more toxic insecticides such as the organophosphate, acephate, and pyrethroid, bifenthrin. I also evaluated how these insecticides affected natural enemy abundance on experimental plants and survival when exposed to insecticide residue. All insecticides tested reduced first generation euonymus scale abundance. In 2009, reinfestation by second generation euonymus scale was highest on plants treated with acetamiprid and granular dinotefuran. In 2010, systemic neonicotinoids and spirotetramat prevented cottony cushion scale infestation 133 d after treatment whereas scale readily infested plants treated with bifenthrin and horticultural oil. Encarsia spp. and Cybocephalus spp. abundance was related to scale abundance. These natural enemies were generally less abundant than predicted by scale abundance on granular dinotefuran treated plants and more abundant on granular thiamethoxam treated plants. Bifenthrin residue killed 90-100% of O. insidiosus and E. citrina within 24 h. My results indicate that reduced risk insecticides can provide season-long scale control with less impact on natural enemies than conventional insecticides. This could have economic and environmental benefits by reducing the number of applications necessary to protect nursery and landscape plants from scale.

  13. A novel nonlinear nano-scale wear law for metallic brake pads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Sandeep P; Chilakamarri, Sri Harsha; Markert, Bernd

    2018-05-03

    In the present work, molecular dynamics simulations were carried out to investigate the temperature distribution as well as the fundamental friction characteristics such as the coefficient of friction and wear in a disc-pad braking system. A wide range of constant velocity loadings was applied on metallic brake pads made of aluminium, copper and iron with different rotating speeds of a diamond-like carbon brake disc. The average temperature of Newtonian atoms and the coefficient of friction of the brake pad were investigated. The resulting relationship of the average temperature with the speed of the disc as well as the applied loading velocity can be described by power laws. The quantitative description of the volume lost from the brake pads was investigated, and it was found that the volume lost increases linearly with the sliding distance. Our results show that Archard's linear wear law is not applicable to a wide range of normal loads, e.g., in cases of low normal load where the wear rate was increased considerably and in cases of high load where there was a possibility of severe wear. In this work, a new formula for the brake pad wear in a disc brake assembly is proposed, which displays a power law relationship between the lost volume of the metallic brake pads per unit sliding distance and the applied normal load with an exponent of 0.62 ± 0.02. This work provides new insights into the fundamental understanding of the wear mechanism at the nano-scale leading to a new bottom-up wear law for metallic brake pads.

  14. High frequency measurements of shot noise suppression in atomic-scale metal contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Patrick J.; Evans, Kenneth; Russom, Jeffrey; King, Nicholas; Natelson, Douglas

    2009-03-01

    Shot noise provides a means of assessing the number and transmission coefficients of transmitting channels in atomic- and molecular-scale junctions. Previous experiments at low temperatures in metal and semiconductor point contacts have demonstrated the expected suppression of shot noise when junction conductance is near an integer multiple of the conductance quantum, G0≡2e^2/h. Using high frequency techniques, we demonstrate the high speed acquisition of such data at room temperature in mechanical break junctions. In clean Au contacts conductance histograms with clear peaks at G0, 2G0, and 3G0 are acquired within hours, and histograms of simultaneous measurements of the shot noise show clear suppression at those conductance values. We describe the dependence of the noise on bias voltage and analyze the noise vs. conductance histograms in terms of a model that averages over transmission coefficients.

  15. Synthetically chemical-electrical mechanism for controlling large scale reversible deformation of liquid metal objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Sheng, Lei; Liu, Jing

    2014-11-01

    Reversible deformation of a machine holds enormous promise across many scientific areas ranging from mechanical engineering to applied physics. So far, such capabilities are still hard to achieve through conventional rigid materials or depending mainly on elastomeric materials, which however own rather limited performances and require complicated manipulations. Here, we show a basic strategy which is fundamentally different from the existing ones to realize large scale reversible deformation through controlling the working materials via the synthetically chemical-electrical mechanism (SCHEME). Such activity incorporates an object of liquid metal gallium whose surface area could spread up to five times of its original size and vice versa under low energy consumption. Particularly, the alterable surface tension based on combination of chemical dissolution and electrochemical oxidation is ascribed to the reversible shape transformation, which works much more flexible than many former deformation principles through converting electrical energy into mechanical movement. A series of very unusual phenomena regarding the reversible configurational shifts are disclosed with dominant factors clarified. This study opens a generalized way to combine the liquid metal serving as shape-variable element with the SCHEME to compose functional soft machines, which implies huge potential for developing future smart robots to fulfill various complicated tasks.

  16. Large-scale synthesis of coiled-like shaped carbon nanotubes using bi-metal catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Vemula Mohana; Somanathan, T.; Manikandan, E.; Umar, Ahmad; Maaza, M.

    2018-02-01

    Carbon nanomaterials (CNMs), especially carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with coiled structure exhibit scientifically fascinating. They may be projected as an innovative preference to future technological materials. Coiled carbon nanotubes (c-CNTs) on a large-scale were successfully synthesized with the help of bi-metal substituted α-alumina nanoparticles catalyst via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique. Highly spring-like carbon nanostructures were observed by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) examination. Furthermore, the obtained material has high purity, which correlates the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis. Raman spectroscopy reveals that the carbon multi layers are well graphitized and crystalline, even if they have defects in its structure due to coiled morphology. High-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) describes internal structure and dia of the product. Ultimately, results support the activity of bi-metal impregnated α-alumina nanoparticles catalyst to determine the high yield, graphitization and internal structure of the material. We have also studied the purified c-CNTs magnetic properties at room temperature and will be an added advantage in several applications.

  17. Deduction and Analysis of the Interacting Stress Response Pathways of Metal/Radionuclide-reducing Bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jizhong [University of Oklahoma; He, Zhili [University of Oklahoma

    2010-02-28

    Project Title: Deduction and Analysis of the Interacting Stress Response Pathways of Metal/Radionuclide-reducing Bacteria DOE Grant Number: DE-FG02-06ER64205 Principal Investigator: Jizhong (Joe) Zhou (University of Oklahoma) Key members: Zhili He, Aifen Zhou, Christopher Hemme, Joy Van Nostrand, Ye Deng, and Qichao Tu Collaborators: Terry Hazen, Judy Wall, Adam Arkin, Matthew Fields, Aindrila Mukhopadhyay, and David Stahl Summary Three major objectives have been conducted in the Zhou group at the University of Oklahoma (OU): (i) understanding of gene function, regulation, network and evolution of Desulfovibrio vugaris Hildenborough in response to environmental stresses, (ii) development of metagenomics technologies for microbial community analysis, and (iii) functional characterization of microbial communities with metagenomic approaches. In the past a few years, we characterized four CRP/FNR regulators, sequenced ancestor and evolved D. vulgaris strains, and functionally analyzed those mutated genes identified in salt-adapted strains. Also, a new version of GeoChip 4.0 has been developed, which also includes stress response genes (StressChip), and a random matrix theory-based conceptual framework for identifying functional molecular ecological networks has been developed with the high throughput functional gene array hybridization data as well as pyrosequencing data from 16S rRNA genes. In addition, GeoChip and sequencing technologies as well as network analysis approaches have been used to analyze microbial communities from different habitats. Those studies provide a comprehensive understanding of gene function, regulation, network, and evolution in D. vulgaris, and microbial community diversity, composition and structure as well as their linkages with environmental factors and ecosystem functioning, which has resulted in more than 60 publications.

  18. Potential value of phosphate compounds in enhancing immobilization and reducing bioavailability of mixed heavy metal contaminants in shooting range soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seshadri, B; Bolan, N S; Choppala, G; Kunhikrishnan, A; Sanderson, P; Wang, H; Currie, L D; Tsang, Daniel C W; Ok, Y S; Kim, G

    2017-10-01

    Shooting range soils contain mixed heavy metal contaminants including lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), and zinc (Zn). Phosphate (P) compounds have been used to immobilize these metals, particularly Pb, thereby reducing their bioavailability. However, research on immobilization of Pb's co-contaminants showed the relative importance of soluble and insoluble P compounds, which is critical in evaluating the overall success of in situ stabilization practice in the sustainable remediation of mixed heavy metal contaminated soils. Soluble synthetic P fertilizer (diammonium phosphate; DAP) and reactive (Sechura; SPR) and unreactive (Christmas Island; CPR) natural phosphate rocks (PR) were tested for Cd, Pb and Zn immobilization and later their mobility and bioavailability in a shooting range soil. The addition of P compounds resulted in the immobilization of Cd, Pb and Zn by 1.56-76.2%, 3.21-83.56%, and 2.31-74.6%, respectively. The reactive SPR significantly reduced Cd, Pb and Zn leaching while soluble DAP increased their leachate concentrations. The SPR reduced the bioaccumulation of Cd, Pb and Zn in earthworms by 7.13-23.4% and 14.3-54.6% in comparison with earthworms in the DAP and control treatment, respectively. Bioaccessible Cd, Pb and Zn concentrations as determined using a simplified bioaccessibility extraction test showed higher long-term stability of P-immobilized Pb and Zn than Cd. The differential effect of P-induced immobilization between P compounds and metals is due to the variation in the solubility characteristics of P compounds and nature of metal phosphate compounds formed. Therefore, Pb and Zn immobilization by P compounds is an effective long-term remediation strategy for mixed heavy metal contaminated soils. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Reduced material model for closed cell metal foam infiltrated with phase change material based on high resolution numerical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohsenbrügge, Christoph; Marth, Wieland; Navarro y de Sosa, Iñaki; Drossel, Welf-Guntram; Voigt, Axel

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Closed cell metal foam sandwich structures were investigated. • High resolution numerical studies were conducted using CT scan data. • A reduced model for use in commercial FE software reduces needed degrees of freedom. • Thermal inertia is increased about 4 to 5 times in PCM filled structures. • The reduced material model was verified using experimental data. - Abstract: The thermal behaviour of closed cell metal foam infiltrated with paraffin wax as latent heat storage for application in high precision tool machines was examined. Aluminium foam sandwiches with metallically bound cover layers were prepared in a powder metallurgical process and cross-sectional images of the structures were generated with X-ray computed tomography. Based on the image data a three dimensional highly detailed model was derived and prepared for simulation with the adaptive FE-library AMDiS. The pores were assumed to be filled with paraffin wax. The thermal conductivity and the transient thermal behaviour in the phase-change region were investigated. Based on the results from the highly detailed simulations a reduced model for use in commercial FE-software (ANSYS) was derived. It incorporates the properties of the matrix and the phase change material into a homogenized material. A sandwich-structure with and without paraffin was investigated experimentally under constant thermal load. The results were used to verify the reduced material model in ANSYS.

  20. Inhomogeneous thermal expansion of metallic glasses in atomic-scale studied by in-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taghvaei, Amir Hossein, E-mail: amirtaghvaei@gmail.com [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Shiraz University of Technology, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shakur Shahabi, Hamed [IFW Dresden, Institute for Complex Materials, Helmholtzstr. 20, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Bednarčik, Jozef [Photon Science DESY, Notkestraße 85, 22603 Hamburg (Germany); Eckert, Jürgen [IFW Dresden, Institute for Complex Materials, Helmholtzstr. 20, 01069 Dresden (Germany); TU Dresden, Institute of Materials Science, 01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-01-28

    Numerous investigations have demonstrated that the elastic strain in metallic glasses subjected to mechanical loading could be inhomogeneous in the atomic-scale and it increases with distance from an average atom and eventually reaches the macroscopic strain at larger inter-atomic distances. We have observed a similar behavior for the thermal strain imposed by heating of Co{sub 40}Fe{sub 22}Ta{sub 8}B{sub 30} glassy particles below the glass transition temperature by analysis of the scattering data obtained by in-situ high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results imply that the volumetric thermal strains calculated from the shift in position of the principal diffraction maximum and reduced pair correlation function (PDF) peaks are in good agreement for the length scales beyond 0.6 nm, corresponding to the atoms located over the third near-neighbor shell. However, smaller and even negative volumetric thermal strains have been calculated based on the shifts in the positions of the second and first PDF peaks, respectively. The structural changes of Co{sub 40}Fe{sub 22}Ta{sub 8}B{sub 30} glassy particles are accompanied by decreasing the average coordination number of the first near-neighbor shell, which manifests the occurrence of local changes in the short-range order upon heating. It is believed that the detected length-scale dependence of the volumetric thermal strain is correlated with the local atomic rearrangements taking place in the topologically unstable regions of the glass governed by variations in the atomic-level stresses.

  1. Basic investigation of particle swarm optimization performance in a reduced scale PWR passive safety system design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha, Joao J. da; Lapa, Celso Marcelo F.; Alvim, Antonio Carlos M.; Lima, Carlos A. Souza; Pereira, Claudio Marcio do N.A.

    2010-01-01

    This work presents a methodology to investigate the viability of using particle swarm optimization technique to obtain the best combination of physical and operational parameters that lead to the best adjusted dimensionless groups, calculated by similarity laws, that are able to simulate the most relevant physical phenomena in single-phase flow under natural circulation and to offer an appropriate alternative reduced scale design for reactor primary loops with this flow characteristics. A PWR reactor core, under natural circulation, based on LOFT test facility, was used as the case study. The particle swarm optimization technique was applied to a problem with these thermo-hydraulics conditions and results demonstrated the viability and adequacy of the method to design similar systems with these characteristics.

  2. Basic investigation of particle swarm optimization performance in a reduced scale PWR passive safety system design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, Joao J. da [Eletronuclear Eletrobras Termonuclear, Gerencia de Analise de Seguranca Nuclear, Rua da Candelaria, 65, 7o andar. Centro, Rio de Janeiro 20091-906 (Brazil); Lapa, Celso Marcelo F., E-mail: lapa@ien.gov.b [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear, Divisao de Reatores/PPGIEN, P.O. Box 68550, Rua Helio de Almeida 75 Cidade Universitaria, Ilha do Fundao, Rio de Janeiro 21941-972 (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia de Reatores Nucleares Inovadores (Brazil); Alvim, Antonio Carlos M. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, COPPE/Nuclear, P.O. Box 68509, Cidade Universitaria, Ilha do Fundao s/n, Rio de Janeiro 21945-970 (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia de Reatores Nucleares Inovadores (Brazil); Lima, Carlos A. Souza [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear, Divisao de Reatores/PPGIEN, P.O. Box 68550, Rua Helio de Almeida 75 Cidade Universitaria, Ilha do Fundao, Rio de Janeiro 21941-972 (Brazil); Instituto Politecnico, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Pos-Graduacao em Modelagem Computacional, Rua Alberto Rangel, s/n, Vila Nova, Nova Friburgo 28630-050 (Brazil); Pereira, Claudio Marcio do N.A. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear, Divisao de Reatores/PPGIEN, P.O. Box 68550, Rua Helio de Almeida 75 Cidade Universitaria, Ilha do Fundao, Rio de Janeiro 21941-972 (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia de Reatores Nucleares Inovadores (Brazil)

    2010-03-15

    This work presents a methodology to investigate the viability of using particle swarm optimization technique to obtain the best combination of physical and operational parameters that lead to the best adjusted dimensionless groups, calculated by similarity laws, that are able to simulate the most relevant physical phenomena in single-phase flow under natural circulation and to offer an appropriate alternative reduced scale design for reactor primary loops with this flow characteristics. A PWR reactor core, under natural circulation, based on LOFT test facility, was used as the case study. The particle swarm optimization technique was applied to a problem with these thermo-hydraulics conditions and results demonstrated the viability and adequacy of the method to design similar systems with these characteristics.

  3. Pilot scale ion exchange column study for reducing radioactivity discharges to environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kore, S.G.; Yadav, V.K.; Sonar, N.L.; Valsala, T.P.; Narayan, J.; Sharma, S.P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Dani, U.; Vishwaraj, I.

    2013-01-01

    Low level liquid waste (LLW) is generated during operation of Tarapur Atomic Power Station (TAPS). Chemical co-precipitation is the treatment method used for decontamination of this waste with respect to radionuclide prior to discharge to environment. Further polishing of effluent from the treated LLW was planned using ion exchange column to reduce the discharges to the environment In view of this ion exchange column study was carried out in the laboratory using in-house prepared cobalt ferrocyanide (COFC) based composite resin. Based on the encouraging results obtained in the lab studies, pilot scale study was carried out in the plant. Decontamination factor (DF) of 14-15 was obtained with respect to Cs isotopes and overall DF of 2-5 was obtained with respect to gross beta activity. (author)

  4. Laser coupling to reduced-scale targets at Nif Early Light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinkel, D.E.; Schneider, M.B.; Young, B.K.; Holder, J.P.; Langdon, A.B.; Bonanno, G.; Bower, D.E.; Bruns, H.C.; Campbell, K.M.; Celeste, J.R.; Compton, S.; Costa, R.L.; Dewald, E.L.; Dixit, S.N.; Eckart, M.J.; Eder, D.C.; Edwards, M.J.; Ellis, A.D.; Emig, J.A.; Froula, D.H.; Glenzer, S.H.; Hargrove, D.; Haynam, C.A.; Heeter, R.F.; Henesian, M.A.; Holtmeier, G.; James, D.L.; Jancaitis, K.S.; Kalantar, K.H.; Kamperschroer, J.H.; Kauffman, R.L.; Kimbrough, J.; Kirkwood, R.K.; Koniges, A.E.; Landen, O.L.; Landon, M.; Lee, F.D.; MacGowan, B.J.; Mackinnon, A.J.; Manes, K.R.; Marshall, C.; May, M.J.; McDonald, J.W.; Menapace, J.; Moses, S.E.I.; Munro, D.H.; Murray, J.R.; Niemann, C.; Power, G.D.; Rekow, V.; Ruppe, J.A.; Schein, J.; Shepherd, R.; Singh, M.S.; Springer, P.T.; Still, C.H.; Suter, L.J.; Tietbohl, G.L.; Turner, R.E.; VanWonterghem, B.M.; Wallace, R.J.; Warrick, A.; Weber, F.; Wegner, P.J.; Williams, E.A.; Young, P.E. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Baldis, H.A. [California at Davis Univ., CA (United States); Pellinen, D.; Watts, P. [Bechtel Nevada Corporation, Livermore, CA (United States)

    2006-06-15

    Deposition of maximum laser energy into a small, high-Z enclosure in a short laser pulse creates a hot environment. Such targets were recently included in an experimental campaign using the first four of the 192 beams of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) under construction at the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. These targets demonstrate good laser coupling, reaching a radiation temperature of 340 eV. In addition, the Raman backscatter spectrum contains features consistent with Brillouin backscatter of Raman forward scatter. Also, NIF Early Light diagnostics indicate that 20% of the direct backscatter from these reduced-scale targets is in the polarization orthogonal to that of the incident light. (authors)

  5. Laser coupling to reduced-scale targets at NIF Early Light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinkel, D E; Schneider, M B; Young, B K; Holder, J P; Langdon, A B; Baldis, H A; Bonanno, G; Bower, D E; Bruns, H C; Campbell, K M; Celeste, J R; Compton, S; Costa, R L; Dewald, E L; Dixit, S N; Eckart, M J; Eder, D C; Edwards, M J; Ellis, A D; Emig, J A; Froula, D H; Glenzer, S H; Hargrove, D; Haynam, C A; Heeter, R F; Henesian, M A; Holtmeier, G; James, D L; Jancaitis, K S; Kalantar, D H; Kamperschroer, J H; Kauffman, R L; Kimbrough, J; Kirkwood, R K; Koniges, A E; Landen, O L; Landon, M; Lee, F D; MacGowan, B J; Mackinnon, A J; Manes, K R; Marshall, C; May, M J; McDonald, J W; Menapace, J; Moses, S I; Munro, D H; Murray, J R; Niemann, C; Pellinen, D; Power, G D; Rekow, V; Ruppe, J A; Schein, J; Shepherd, R; Singh, M S; Springer, P; Still, C H; Suter, L J; Tietbohl, G L; Turner, R E; VanWonterghem, B M; Wallace, R J; Warrick, A; Watts, P; Weber, F; Wegner, P J; Williams, E A; Young, P E

    2005-01-01

    Deposition of maximum laser energy into a small, high-Z enclosure in a short laser pulse creates a hot environment. Such targets were recently included in an experimental campaign using the first four of the 192 beams of the National Ignition Facility [J. A. Paisner, E. M. Campbell, and W. J. Hogan, Fusion Technology 26 26, 755 (1994)], under construction at the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. These targets demonstrate good laser coupling, reaching a radiation temperature of 340 eV. In addition, the Raman backscatter spectrum contains features consistent with Brillouin backscatter of Raman forward scatter [A. B. Langdon and D. E. Hinkel, Physical Review Letters 89, 015003 (2002)]. Also, NIF Early Light diagnostics indicate that 20% of the direct backscatter from these reduced-scale targets is in the polarization orthogonal to that of the incident light

  6. Gradient plasticity for thermo-mechanical processes in metals with length and time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voyiadjis, George Z.; Faghihi, Danial

    2013-03-01

    A thermodynamically consistent framework is developed in order to characterize the mechanical and thermal behavior of metals in small volume and on the fast transient time. In this regard, an enhanced gradient plasticity theory is coupled with the application of a micromorphic approach to the temperature variable. A physically based yield function based on the concept of thermal activation energy and the dislocation interaction mechanisms including nonlinear hardening is taken into consideration in the derivation. The effect of the material microstructural interface between two materials is also incorporated in the formulation with both temperature and rate effects. In order to accurately address the strengthening and hardening mechanisms, the theory is developed based on the decomposition of the mechanical state variables into energetic and dissipative counterparts which endowed the constitutive equations to have both energetic and dissipative gradient length scales for the bulk material and the interface. Moreover, the microstructural interaction effect in the fast transient process is addressed by incorporating two time scales into the microscopic heat equation. The numerical example of thin film on elastic substrate or a single phase bicrystal under uniform tension is addressed here. The effects of individual counterparts of the framework on the thermal and mechanical responses are investigated. The model is also compared with experimental results.

  7. Novel Base Metal-Palladium Catalytic Diesel Filter Coating with NO2 Reducing Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, K.; Dahl, S.; Mogensen, G.

    2007-01-01

    A novel alternative base metal/palladium coat has been developed that has limited NO2 formation and which even removes NO2 in a wide temperature range.Soot combustion, HC conversion and CO conversion properties are comparable to current platinum based solutions but the coating has a more attracti...... solutions. Furthermore, durability results from base metal/Pd coated DPFs installed on operating taxis and related tests cycle data is given....

  8. Validated Feasibility Study of Integrally Stiffened Metallic Fuselage Panels for Reducing Manufacturing Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettit, R. G.; Wang, J. J.; Toh, C.

    2000-01-01

    The continual need to reduce airframe cost and the emergence of high speed machining and other manufacturing technologies has brought about a renewed interest in large-scale integral structures for aircraft applications. Applications have been inhibited, however, because of the need to demonstrate damage tolerance, and by cost and manufacturing risks associated with the size and complexity of the parts. The Integral Airframe Structures (IAS) Program identified a feasible integrally stiffened fuselage concept and evaluated performance and manufacturing cost compared to conventional designs. An integral skin/stiffener concept was produced both by plate hog-out and near-net extrusion. Alloys evaluated included 7050-T7451 plate, 7050-T74511 extrusion, 6013-T6511 extrusion, and 7475-T7351 plate. Mechanical properties, structural details, and joint performance were evaluated as well as repair, static compression, and two-bay crack residual strength panels. Crack turning behavior was characterized through panel tests and improved methods for predicting crack turning were developed. Manufacturing cost was evaluated using COSTRAN. A hybrid design, made from high-speed machined extruded frames that are mechanically fastened to high-speed machined plate skin/stringer panels, was identified as the most cost-effective manufacturing solution. Recurring labor and material costs of the hybrid design are up to 61 percent less than the current technology baseline.

  9. Resuspension of trace metals in Belgrade under conditions of drastically reduced emission levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vukmirovic, Z; Marendic-Miljkovic, J; Rajsic, S; Tasic, M; Novakovic, V [Institute of Physics, Belgrade-Zemun (Yugoslavia)

    1997-01-01

    Deposition rates of trace metals (Pb, Cu, Zn, Cd) were determined at the Meteorological Station in New Belgrade (H{sub s} = 74 m; {psi} = 44{degree}49{prime}N and {lambda} = 20{degree}24{prime}E) in the hydrological year 1992/93 (1 November-31 October). The dominant characteristics of the observation period were strong drought and drastically reduced pollutant emissions. Traffic and local sources operated at 0-10% of their capacities. Samples of dry and wet precipitation were taken by an automatic collector at a height of 2 m at weekly intervals. Two petri polycarbonate dishes of 93.5 mm diameter, facing upward, and one facing downward, were used for dry precipitation sampling. Determination in a `clean room` by differential pulse stripping voltammetry provided the low detection thresholds of 0.1, 1.0, 0.5 and 2.0 ng mL{sup -1}, i.e. the measurement of minimal dry deposition rates of 0.02, 0.2, 0.1 and 0.4 {mu}gm{sup -2}d{sup -1} for Cd, Pb, Cu and Zn, respectively. The mean annual deposition rates, expressed in {mu}g m{sup -2}d{sup -1}, were found to be as follows: 4.5 (down), 26 (up) and 37 (wet) for Pb, 2.1 (down), 13 (up) and 36(wet) for Cu, and 3.1 (down), 26 (up) and 95 (wet) for Zn. No values above 0.2 {mu}g m{sup -2}d{sup -1} were found for the Cd dry deposition rate and no Cd concentration higher than 1 ng mL{sup -1} for precipitation with an amount {gt} 0.5 mm at the weekly interval was detected. Using the XREDS method with a scanning electron microscope, Si, Al, Fe matrix elements and Mg, Ca, S, K, P, Cu, Zn, W, were identified as minor constituents of the single spherical particles and of the agglomerates present. Pb could not be categorized as a minor constituent of the coarse particles suspended in the air of New Belgrade on the basis of the previous analysis. Results of the analysis are given. 44 refs., 14 fig., 4 tabs.

  10. Large scale 2D/3D hybrids based on gallium nitride and transition metal dichalcogenides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kehao; Jariwala, Bhakti; Li, Jun; Briggs, Natalie C; Wang, Baoming; Ruzmetov, Dmitry; Burke, Robert A; Lerach, Jordan O; Ivanov, Tony G; Haque, Md; Feenstra, Randall M; Robinson, Joshua A

    2017-12-21

    Two and three-dimensional (2D/3D) hybrid materials have the potential to advance communication and sensing technologies by enabling new or improved device functionality. To date, most 2D/3D hybrid devices utilize mechanical exfoliation or post-synthesis transfer, which can be fundamentally different from directly synthesized layers that are compatible with large scale industrial needs. Therefore, understanding the process/property relationship of synthetic heterostructures is priority for industrially relevant material architectures. Here we demonstrate the scalable synthesis of molybdenum disulfide (MoS 2 ) and tungsten diselenide (WSe 2 ) via metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on gallium nitride (GaN), and elucidate the structure, chemistry, and vertical transport properties of the 2D/3D hybrid. We find that the 2D layer thickness and transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) choice plays an important role in the transport properties of the hybrid structure, where monolayer TMDs exhibit direct tunneling through the layer, while transport in few layer TMDs on GaN is dominated by p-n diode behavior and varies with the 2D/3D hybrid structure. Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM), low energy electron microscopy (LEEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) reveal a strong intrinsic dipole and charge transfer between n-MoS 2 and p-GaN, leading to a degraded interface and high p-type leakage current. Finally, we demonstrate integration of heterogeneous 2D layer stacks of MoS 2 /WSe 2 on GaN with atomically sharp interface. Monolayer MoS 2 /WSe 2 /n-GaN stacks lead to near Ohmic transport due to the tunneling and non-degenerated doping, while few layer stacking is Schottky barrier dominated.

  11. Quantum resonance of nanometre-scale metal-ZnO-metal structure and its application in sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijie Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of the thickness dependence of the potential profile of the metal-ZnO-metal (MZM structure has been conducted based on Poisson’s equation and Schottky theory. Quantum scattering theory is then used to calculate the transmission probability of an electron passing through the MZM structure. Results show that the quantum resonance (QR effect becomes pronounced when the thickness of the ZnO film reaches to around 6 nm. Strain induced piezopotentials are considered as biases to the MZM, which significantly changes the QR according to the analysis. This effect can be potentially employed as nanoscale strain sensors.

  12. Enhanced biological stabilization of heavy metals in sediment using immobilized sulfate reducing bacteria beads with inner cohesive nutrient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xin, E-mail: hgxlixin@hnu.edu.cn [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control (Hunan University), Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Dai, Lihua; Zhang, Chang; Zeng, Guangming; Liu, Yunguo [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control (Hunan University), Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Zhou, Chen [Swette Center for Environmental Biotechnology, Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University (United States); Xu, Weihua; Wu, Youe; Tang, Xinquan; Liu, Wei; Lan, Shiming [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control (Hunan University), Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Nutrient beads of immobilized SRB were more effective in transforming heavy metals into the more stable bound phases. • Inner cohesive nutrient effectively promoted the stabilization process of heavy metals. • The excellent removal efficiencies of Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd were 76.3%, 95.6%, 100% and 91.2%, respectively. • Easy to recycle and avoid secondary pollution. - Abstract: A series of experiments were conducted for treating heavy metals contaminated sediments sampled from Xiangjiang River, which combined polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and immobilized sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) into beads. The sodium lactate was served as the inner cohesive nutrient. Coupling the activity of the SRB with PVA, along with the porous structure and huge specific surface area, provided a convenient channel for the transmission of matter and protected the cells against the toxicity of metals. This paper systematically investigated the stability of Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd and its mechanisms. The results revealed the performance of leaching toxicity was lower and the removal efficiencies of Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd were 76.3%, 95.6%, 100% and 91.2%, respectively. Recycling experiments showed the beads could be reused 5 times with superbly efficiency. These results were also confirmed by continuous extraction at the optimal conditions. Furthermore, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy-dispersive spectra (EDS) analysis indicated the heavy metals could be transformed into stable crystal texture. The stabilization of heavy metals was attributed to the carbonyl and acyl amino groups. Results presented that immobilized bacteria with inner nutrient were potentially and practically applied to multi-heavy-metal-contamination sediment.

  13. Large-scale geographical variation in eggshell metal and calcium content in a passerine bird (Ficedula hypoleuca).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruuskanen, Suvi; Laaksonen, Toni; Morales, Judith; Moreno, Juan; Mateo, Rafael; Belskii, Eugen; Bushuev, Andrey; Järvinen, Antero; Kerimov, Anvar; Krams, Indrikis; Morosinotto, Chiara; Mänd, Raivo; Orell, Markku; Qvarnström, Anna; Slate, Fred; Tilgar, Vallo; Visser, Marcel E; Winkel, Wolfgang; Zang, Herwig; Eeva, Tapio

    2014-03-01

    Birds have been used as bioindicators of pollution, such as toxic metals. Levels of pollutants in eggs are especially interesting, as developing birds are more sensitive to detrimental effects of pollutants than adults. Only very few studies have monitored intraspecific, large-scale variation in metal pollution across a species' breeding range. We studied large-scale geographic variation in metal levels in the eggs of a small passerine, the pied flycatcher (Ficedula hypoleuca), sampled from 15 populations across Europe. We measured 10 eggshell elements (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn, Se, Sr, and Ca) and several shell characteristics (mass, thickness, porosity, and color). We found significant variation among populations in eggshell metal levels for all metals except copper. Eggshell lead, zinc, and chromium levels decreased from central Europe to the north, in line with the gradient in pollution levels over Europe, thus suggesting that eggshell can be used as an indicator of pollution levels. Eggshell lead levels were also correlated with soil lead levels and pH. Most of the metals were not correlated with eggshell characteristics, with the exception of shell mass, or with breeding success, which may suggest that birds can cope well with the current background exposure levels across Europe.

  14. Solid polymer electrolyte composite membrane comprising a porous support and a solid polymer electrolyte including a dispersed reduced noble metal or noble metal oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Han; Mittelsteadt, Cortney K; Norman, Timothy J; Griffith, Arthur E; LaConti, Anthony B

    2015-02-24

    A solid polymer electrolyte composite membrane and method of manufacturing the same. According to one embodiment, the composite membrane comprises a thin, rigid, dimensionally-stable, non-electrically-conducting support, the support having a plurality of cylindrical, straight-through pores extending perpendicularly between opposing top and bottom surfaces of the support. The pores are unevenly distributed, with some or no pores located along the periphery and more pores located centrally. The pores are completely filled with a solid polymer electrolyte, the solid polymer electrolyte including a dispersed reduced noble metal or noble metal oxide. The solid polymer electrolyte may also be deposited over the top and/or bottom surfaces of the support.

  15. Enhancing the use of waste activated sludge as bio-fuel through selectively reducing its heavy metal content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewil, Raf; Baeyens, Jan; Appels, Lise

    2007-06-18

    Power plant or cement kiln co-incineration are important disposal routes for the large amounts of waste activated sludge (WAS) which are generated annually. The presence of significant amounts of heavy metals in the sludge however poses serious problems since they are partly emitted with the flue gases (and collected in the flue gas dedusting) and partly incorporated in the ashes of the incinerator: in both cases, the disposal or reuse of the fly ash and bottom ashes can be jeopardized since subsequent leaching in landfill disposal can occur, or their "pozzolanic" incorporation in cement cannot be applied. The present paper studies some physicochemical methods for reducing the heavy metal content of WAS. The used techniques include acid and alkaline thermal hydrolysis and Fenton's peroxidation. By degrading the extracellular polymeric substances, binding sites for a large amount of heavy metals, the latter are released into the sludge water. The behaviour of several heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Pb, Ni, Zn) was assessed in laboratory tests. Results of these show a significant reduction of most heavy metals.

  16. A Two-Scale Reduced Model for Darcy Flow in Fractured Porous Media

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Huangxin; Sun, Shuyu

    2016-01-01

    scale, and the effect of fractures on each coarse scale grid cell intersecting with fractures is represented by the discrete fracture model (DFM) on the fine scale. In the DFM used on the fine scale, the matrix-fracture system are resolved

  17. Testing the effectiveness of certainty scales, cheap talk, and dissonance-minimization in reducing hypothetical bias in contingent valuation studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark Morrison; Thomas C. Brown

    2009-01-01

    Stated preference methods such as contingent valuation and choice modeling are subject to various biases that may lead to differences between actual and hypothetical willingness to pay. Cheap talk, follow-up certainty scales, and dissonance minimization are three techniques for reducing this hypothetical bias. Cheap talk and certainty scales have received considerable...

  18. Competitive adsorption of heavy metal by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) extracted from sulfate reducing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin; Li, Qing; Li, Ming-Ming; Chen, Tian-Hu; Zhou, Yue-Fei; Yue, Zheng-Bo

    2014-07-01

    Competitive adsorption of heavy metals by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) extracted from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans was investigated. Chemical analysis showed that different EPS compositions had different capacities for the adsorption of heavy metals which was investigated using Cu(2+) and Zn(2+). Batch adsorption tests indicated that EPS had a higher combined ability with Zn(2+) than Cu(2+). This was confirmed and explained by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy analysis. FTIR analysis showed that both polysaccharides and protein combined with Zn(2+) while only protein combined with Cu(2+). EEM spectra further revealed that tryptophan-like substances were the main compositions reacted with the heavy metals. Moreover, Zn(2+) had a higher fluorescence quenching ability than Cu(2+). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Using ensemble models to identify and apportion heavy metal pollution sources in agricultural soils on a local scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Xie, Zhiyi; Li, Fangbai

    2015-11-01

    This study aims to identify and apportion multi-source and multi-phase heavy metal pollution from natural and anthropogenic inputs using ensemble models that include stochastic gradient boosting (SGB) and random forest (RF) in agricultural soils on the local scale. The heavy metal pollution sources were quantitatively assessed, and the results illustrated the suitability of the ensemble models for the assessment of multi-source and multi-phase heavy metal pollution in agricultural soils on the local scale. The results of SGB and RF consistently demonstrated that anthropogenic sources contributed the most to the concentrations of Pb and Cd in agricultural soils in the study region and that SGB performed better than RF. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Metal removal efficiency and ecotoxicological assessment of field-scale passive treatment biochemical reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaerobic biochemical reactors (BCRs) are useful for removing metals from mining-impacted water (MIW) at remote sites. Removal processes include sorption and precipitation of metal sulfides, carbonates and hydroxides. A question of interest is whether BCRs remove aquatic toxicit...

  1. Scaling laws for dislocation microstructures in monotonic and cyclic deformation of fcc metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubin, L.P.; Sauzay, M.

    2011-01-01

    This work reviews and critically discusses the current understanding of two scaling laws, which are ubiquitous in the modeling of monotonic plastic deformation in face-centered cubic metals. A compilation of the available data allows extending the domain of application of these scaling laws to cyclic deformation. The strengthening relation tells that the flow stress is proportional to the square root of the average dislocation density, whereas the similitude relation assumes that the flow stress is inversely proportional to the characteristic wavelength of dislocation patterns. The strengthening relation arises from short-range reactions of non-coplanar segments and applies all through the first three stages of the monotonic stress vs. strain curves. The value of the proportionality coefficient is calculated and simulated in good agreement with the bulk of experimental measurements published since the beginning of the 1960's. The physical origin of what is called similitude is not understood and the related coefficient is not predictable. Its value is determined from a review of the experimental literature. The generalization of these scaling laws to cyclic deformation is carried out on the base of a large collection of experimental results on single and polycrystals of various materials and on different microstructures. Surprisingly, for persistent slip bands (PSBs), both the strengthening and similitude coefficients appear to be more than two times smaller than the corresponding monotonic values, whereas their ratio is the same as in monotonic deformation. The similitude relation is also checked in cell structures and in labyrinth structures. Under low cyclic stresses, the strengthening coefficient is found even lower than in PSBs. A tentative explanation is proposed for the differences observed between cyclic and monotonic deformation. Finally, the influence of cross-slip on the temperature dependence of the saturation stress of PSBs is discussed in some detail

  2. Large-scale geographical variation in eggshell heavy metal and calcium content in a passerine bird (Ficedula hypoleuca)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruuskanen, S.; Morales, J.; Laaksonen, T.; Moreno, J.; Mateo, R.; Belskii, E.; Bushuev, A.; Jarvinen, A.; Kerimov, A.; Krams, I.; Morosinotto, C.; Mand, R.; Orell, M.; Qvarnstrom, A.; Slater, F.M.; Siitari, H.; Tilgar, V.; Visser, M.E.; Winkel, W.; Zang, H.; Eeva, T.

    2014-01-01

    Birds have been used as bioindicators of pollution, such as toxic metals. Levels of pollutants in eggs are especially interesting, as developing birds are more sensitive to detrimental effects of pollutants than adults. Only very few studies have monitored intraspecific, large-scale variation in

  3. Comparison between XAS, AWAXS and DAFS applied to nanometer scale supported metallic clusters. Pt.1; monometallic clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazin, D.C.; Sayers, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    The structural information found using three techniques related to synchrotron radiation are compared. XAS (X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy), AWAXS (Anomalous Wide Angle X-ray Scattering) and DAFS (Diffraction Anomalous Fine Structure) are applied to nanometer scale metallic clusters. (author)

  4. RECYCLING A NONIONIC AQUEOUS-BASED METAL-CLEANING SOLUTION WITH A CERAMIC MEMBRANE: PILOT SCALE EVALUATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effectiveness of a zirconium dioxide (ZrO2) membrane filter was evaluated for recycling a nonionic aqueous metal cleaning bath under real-world conditions. The pilot-scale study consisted of four 7- to 16-day filtration runs, each processed a portion of the cleaning bath duri...

  5. Deformation of Ordinary Chondrite Under Very Reducing Conditons: Implications for Liquid Metal Compositions, HSE Partitioning and Enstatite Chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushmer, T.; Corgne, A.

    2008-12-01

    One important method in which to gain insight into metallic liquid compositions and their ability to control HSE (highly siderophile element) distribution is through experimentation. Deformation experiments can additionally provide information into mechanisms and chemical consequences of dynamic liquid metal segregation under a variety of conditions. We report results on metallic liquid HSE compositions and their distribution from a set of deformation experiments on a natural H6 ordinary chondrite, performed under very reducing conditions and a series of phase equilibria experiments focused on HSE partitioning between Si-rich and S-rich Fe molten alloys. The deformation experiments were conducted at temperatures between 925°C and 950°C, at 1.3 GPa confining pressure with a strain rate of 10-4/s. Major element analyses of both silicate and metal phases show that they are considerably reduced and the typically lithophile elements are behaving like siderophiles. Fe-Ni-Si compositions are found in the shear zones produced during the deformation experiment. Metallic compositions also include (Mg,Fe,Ca)S, Fe-Ni-Si, FeP, and Fe-Ni-S quench metal. Silicate phases include forsterite (Fo92-96) and enstatite (En98). Highly siderophile element (HSE) concentrations have been measured in the sulphide ((Fe,Mg,Ca)S) and metal (Fe- Ni-Si) phases by LA-ICPMS and compared with results from an earlier set of experiments on the same material but which were not performed under reducing conditions. The partitioning of the PGE is modified by the changing conditions with elements such as Ir and Os having higher DMetal/Sulphide values under reducing conditions. Partitioning experiments between molten FeS and Ni-, Si-bearing molten Fe were performed at 1.5-5.0 GPa and 1500-1750° to further investigate this observation. The starting material is synthetic, doped with a range of trace and HSE elements. The results confirm the preference of the HSE for the metallic phase with DMetal

  6. Transparent and conductive electrodes by large-scale nano-structuring of noble metal thin-films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linnet, Jes; Runge Walther, Anders; Wolff, Christian

    2018-01-01

    grid, and nano-wire thin-films. The indium and carbon films do not match the chemical stability nor the electrical performance of the noble metals, and many metal films are not uniform in material distribution leading to significant surface roughness and randomized transmission haze. We demonstrate...... solution-processed masks for physical vapor-deposited metal electrodes consisting of hexagonally ordered aperture arrays with scalable aperture-size and spacing in an otherwise homogeneous noble metal thin-film that may exhibit better electrical performance than carbon nanotube-based thin-films...... for equivalent optical transparency. The fabricated electrodes are characterized optically and electrically by measuring transmittance and sheet resistance. The presented methods yield large-scale reproducible results. Experimentally realized thin-films with very low sheet resistance, Rsh = 2.01 ± 0.14 Ω...

  7. Mass and metallicity scaling relations of high-redshift star-forming galaxies selected by GRBs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arabsalmani, M.; Møller, P.; Perley, D.~A.

    2018-01-01

    -metallicity relation of the general population. It is hard to decide whether this relatively small offset is due to systematic effects or the intrinsic nature of GRB hosts. We also investigate the possibility of using absorption-line metallicity measurements of GRB hosts to study the mass-metallicity relation at high...

  8. A Multi-Scale Study on the Role of Trace Metals on Physiological and Pathological Mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rammelkamp, Derek

    The work in this thesis provides mulit-scale contributions towards understanding the effects of trace metals on the pathological mineralization process relating to both the development of healthy bone tissue, the diseased state of osteoporosis, and microcalcifications which develop in breast cancers. A protein level study was performed on ECM protein fibronectin, which plays a role in cell adhesion. The protein studies showed zinc interactions with fibronectin and its fragment, anastellin, to influence protein structure. Zinc is also shown to decrease cell migration in vitro, which may be influenced by changes in fibronectin ECM structure. The effects of osteoporosis on micronutrient composition in vivo were examined using the technique of x-ray fluorescence (XRF) in an ovariectomized rat model. Compared to healthy bone, subtle difference are observed in zinc and iron in osteoporotic rat bones, showing micronutrients may play an important role in healthy bone regulation. Effects of micronutrient zinc was used to inhibit microcalcification formation in breast cancers. Microcalcifications have been linked malignancy of breast cancers, but the process of microcalcification formation has yet to be well understood. In this work, exogenous zinc is used to inhibit microcalcification formation, and metastatic potential in both a 2D and 3D spheroid environment. A novel in vitro self-assembled three dimensional multi-cellular tumor spheroid (MCTS) model for the study of breast cancer microcalcifications was developed for this experiment. A MCTS model for studying breast cancer microcalcifications has potential to be used in drug discovery, or for basic research applications studying mechanisms of microcalcification formation, which are still not fully understood. Taken together this study uses a multi-scale approach to gain a better understanding of micronutrients involved in pathological mineralization.

  9. Heavy metal pollution caused by small-scale metal ore mining activities: A case study from a polymetallic mine in South China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zehang; Xie, Xiande; Wang, Ping; Hu, Yuanan; Cheng, Hefa

    2018-05-19

    Although metal ore mining activities are well known as an important source of heavy metals, soil pollution caused by small-scale mining activities has long been overlooked. This study investigated the pollution of surface soils in an area surrounding a recently abandoned small-scale polymetallic mining district in Guangdong province of south China. A total of 13 tailing samples, 145 surface soil samples, and 29 water samples were collected, and the concentrations of major heavy metals, including Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, Pb, and Se, were determined. The results show that the tailings contained high levels of heavy metals, with Cu, Zn, As, Cd, and Pb occurring in the ranges of 739-4.15 × 10 3 , 1.81 × 10 3 -5.00 × 10 3 , 118-1.26 × 10 3 , 8.14-57.7, and 1.23 × 10 3 -6.99 × 10 3  mg/kg, respectively. Heavy metals also occurred at high concentrations in the mine drainages (15.4-17.9 mg/L for Cu, 21.1-29.3 mg/L for Zn, 0.553-0.770 mg/L for Cd, and 1.17-2.57 mg/L for Pb), particularly those with pH below 3. The mean contents of Cu, Zn, As, Cd, and Pb in the surface soils of local farmlands were up to 7 times higher than the corresponding background values, and results of multivariate statistical analysis clearly indicate that Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb were largely contributed by the mining activities. The surface soils from farmlands surrounding the mining district were moderately to seriously polluted, while the potential ecological risk of heavy metal pollution was extremely high. It was estimated that the input fluxes from the mining district to the surrounding farmlands were approximately 17.1, 59.2, 0.311, and 93.8 kg/ha/yr for Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb, respectively, which probably occurred through transport of fine tailings by wind and runoff, and mine drainage as well. These findings indicate the significant need for proper containment of the mine tailings at small-scale metal ore mines. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier

  10. Geo-referenced modelling of metal concentrations in river basins at the catchment scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüffmeyer, N.; Berlekamp, J.; Klasmeier, J.

    2009-04-01

    used to demonstrate the effect of specific mitigation strategies such as improved treatment of rainwater, reduction of metal products exposed to rain or reduced input from mine drainage. The model can thus be a valuable tool for setting up management plans as required in the Water Framework Directive with a special emphasis on promising mitigation strategies in case of exceedance of target values. 4. References [1] Directive 2000/60/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council (EU Water Framework Directive) [2] Feijtel T.C.J., Boeije G., Matthies M., Young A., Morris G., Gandolfi C., Hansen B., Fox K., Holt M., Koch V., Schröder R., Cassani G., Schowanek D., Rosenblom J. and Niessen H.; Chemosphere 34, 2351-2374, 1997. Acknowledgement - We would like to thank the International Zinc Association (IZA) and the European Copper Insitute (ECI) for financial support.

  11. Performance of a full-scale ITER metal hydride storage bed in comparison with requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beloglazov, S.; Glugla, M.; Fanghaenel, E.; Perevezentsev, A.; Wagner, R.

    2008-01-01

    The storage of hydrogen isotopes as metal hydride is the technique chosen for the ITER Tritium Plant Storage and Delivery System (SDS). A prototype storage bed of a full-scale has been designed, manufactured and intensively tested at the Tritium Laboratory, addressing main performance parameters specified for the ITER application. The main requirements for the hydrogen storage bed are a strict physical limitation of the tritium storage capacity (currently 70 g T 2 ), a high supply flow rate of hydrogen isotopes, in-situ calorimetry capabilities with an accuracy of 1 g and a fully tritium compatible design. The pressure composition isotherm of the ZrCo hydrogen system, as a reference material for ITER, is characterised by significant slope. As a result technical implementation of the ZrCo hydride bed in the SDS system requires further considerations. The paper presents the experience from the operation of ZrCo getter bed including loading/de-loading operation, calorimetric loop performance, and active gas cooling of the bed for fast absorption operation. The implications of hydride material characteristics on the SDS system configuration and design are discussed. (authors)

  12. Metal Hall sensors for the new generation fusion reactors of DEMO scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolshakova, I.; Bulavin, M.; Kargin, N.; Kost, Ya.; Kuech, T.; Kulikov, S.; Radishevskiy, M.; Shurygin, F.; Strikhanov, M.; Vasil'evskii, I.; Vasyliev, A.

    2017-11-01

    For the first time, the results of on-line testing of metal Hall sensors based on nano-thickness (50-70) nm gold films, which was conducted under irradiation by high-energy neutrons up to the high fluences of 1 · 1024 n · m-2, are presented. The testing has been carried out in the IBR-2 fast pulsed reactor in the neutron flux with the intensity of 1.5 · 1017 n · m-2 · s-1 at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research. The energy spectrum of neutron flux was very close to that expected for the ex-vessel sensors locations in the ITER experimental reactor. The magnetic field sensitivity of the gold sensors was stable within the whole fluence range under research. Also, sensitivity values at the start and at the end of irradiation session were equal within the measurement error (<1%). The results obtained make it possible to recommend gold sensors for magnetic diagnostics in the new generation fusion reactors of DEMO scale.

  13. (99)Tc(VII) Retardation, Reduction, and Redox Rate Scaling in Naturally Reduced Sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuanyuan; Liu, Chongxuan; Kukkadapu, Ravi K; McKinley, James P; Zachara, John; Plymale, Andrew E; Miller, Micah D; Varga, Tamas; Resch, Charles T

    2015-11-17

    An experimental and modeling study was conducted to investigate pertechnetate (Tc(VII)O4(-)) retardation, reduction, and rate scaling in three sediments from Ringold formation at U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford site, where (99)Tc is a major contaminant in groundwater. Tc(VII) was reduced in all the sediments in both batch reactors and diffusion columns, with a faster rate in a sediment containing a higher concentration of HCl-extractable Fe(II). Tc(VII) migration in the diffusion columns was reductively retarded with retardation degrees correlated with Tc(VII) reduction rates. The reduction rates were faster in the diffusion columns than those in the batch reactors, apparently influenced by the spatial distribution of redox-reactive minerals along transport paths that supplied Tc(VII). X-ray computed tomography and autoradiography were performed to identify the spatial locations of Tc(VII) reduction and transport paths in the sediments, and results generally confirmed the newly found behavior of reaction rate changes from batch to column. The results from this study implied that Tc(VII) migration can be reductively retarded at Hanford site with a retardation degree dependent on reactive Fe(II) content and its distribution in sediments. This study also demonstrated that an effective reaction rate may be faster in transport systems than that in well-mixed reactors.

  14. Rapid Large Scale Reprocessing of the ODI Archive using the QuickReduce Pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopu, A.; Kotulla, R.; Young, M. D.; Hayashi, S.; Harbeck, D.; Liu, W.; Henschel, R.

    2015-09-01

    The traditional model of astronomers collecting their observations as raw instrument data is being increasingly replaced by astronomical observatories serving standard calibrated data products to observers and to the public at large once proprietary restrictions are lifted. For this model to be effective, observatories need the ability to periodically re-calibrate archival data products as improved master calibration products or pipeline improvements become available, and also to allow users to rapidly calibrate their data on-the-fly. Traditional astronomy pipelines are heavily I/O dependent and do not scale with increasing data volumes. In this paper, we present the One Degree Imager - Portal, Pipeline and Archive (ODI-PPA) calibration pipeline framework which integrates the efficient and parallelized QuickReduce pipeline to enable a large number of simultaneous, parallel data reduction jobs - initiated by operators AND/OR users - while also ensuring rapid processing times and full data provenance. Our integrated pipeline system allows re-processing of the entire ODI archive (˜15,000 raw science frames, ˜3.0 TB compressed) within ˜18 hours using twelve 32-core compute nodes on the Big Red II supercomputer. Our flexible, fast, easy to operate, and highly scalable framework improves access to ODI data, in particular when data rates double with an upgraded focal plane (scheduled for 2015), and also serve as a template for future data processing infrastructure across the astronomical community and beyond.

  15. Experimental results of the SMART ECC injection performance with reduced scale of test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Young Il; Cho, Seok; Ko, Yung Joo; Shin, Yong Cheol; Kwon, Tae Soon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    SMART pressurized water reactor type is different from the existing integral NSSS commercial pressurized water reactor system which is equipped with the main features. In addition, RCS piping is removed and the feature of the SBLOCA is a major design break accident. SWAT (SMART ECC Water Asymmetric Two-phase choking test facility) test facility is to simulate the 2 inch SBLOCA of the SMART using with reduced scale. The Test was performed to produce experimental data for the validation of the TASS/SMR-S thermal hydraulic analysis code, and to investigate the related thermal hydraulic phenomena in the down-comer region during the 2 inch SBLOCA of the safety inject line. The particular phenomena for the observation are ECC bypass and multi-dimensional flow characteristics to verify the effectiveness and performance of the safety injection system. In this paper, the corresponding steady state test conditions, including initial and boundary conditions along with major measuring parameters, and related experimental results were described

  16. Control of molten salt corrosion of reduced activation steel for fusion applications by metallic beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calderoni, P.; Sharpe, P.; Nishimura, H.; Terai, T.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: In 2001 the INL started a research program as a part of the 2. Japan/US Program on Irradiation Tests for Fusion Energy Research (JUPITER-II collaboration) aimed at the characterization of the 2LiF-BeF2 (Flibe) molten salt as a breeder and coolant material for fusion applications. A key objective of the work was to demonstrate chemical compatibility between Flibe and potential fusion structural materials once suitable fluoride potential control methods are established. A series of tests performed at INL demonstrated that this can be achieved by contacting the salt with metallic beryllium, and the results have been published in recent years. A further step was to expose two specimens of low activation ferritic/martensitic steel 9Cr-2W JLF-1 to static corrosion tests that include an active corrosion agent (hydrofluoric gas) and fluoride potential control (metallic Be) at 530 C, and the results of the tests are presented in this paper. The specimen and a beryllium rod were simultaneously immersed in the molten salt through gas tight fittings mounted on risers extending from the top lid of the test vessel; the beryllium rod was extracted after 5 hours, while the sample was left in the salt for 250 hours during which salt samples were withdrawn from the melt at fixed intervals. A diagnostic system based on the measurement of reacting HF through on-line titration was coupled with the analysis of metallic components in the salt samples that were dissolved and analyzed using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). Impurity levels of oxygen, nitrogen and carbon were determined from pieces of the solidified melt using Leco analytical systems. The results confirmed the expected correlation of the HF recovery with the concentration of metallic elements dissolved in the salt because of specimen corrosion. The metals concentration falls below the detectable limit when the beryllium rod is inserted and increases when the

  17. Pyrolysis as a technique for separating heavy metals from hyperaccumulators. Part III: pilot-scale pyrolysis of synthetic hyperaccumulator biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koppolu, Lakshmi; Prasad, Ramakrishna; Davis Clements, L.

    2004-01-01

    Synthetic hyperaccumulator biomass (SHB) feed impregnated with Ni, Zn or Cu was used to conduct six experiments in a pilot-scale, spouted bed gasifier. Two runs each using corn stover with no metal added (blank runs) were also conducted. The reactor was operated in an entrained mode in an oxygen free (N 2 ) environment at 873 K and 1 atm. The apparent gas residence time in the heated zone of the pilot-scale reactor was 1.4 s at 873 K. The material balance closure for the eight experiments on an N 2 -free basis varied between 79% and 92%. Nearly 99% of the metal recovered in the product stream was concentrated in the char formed by pyrolyzing the SHB in the reactor. The metal concentration in the char varied between 6.6% and 16.6%, depending on the type of metal and whether the char was collected in the cyclone or ashbox. The metal component was concentrated by 3.2-6 times in the char, compared to the feed

  18. Multi-Scale Modeling for Predicting the Stiffness and Strength of Hollow-Structured Metal Foams with Structural Hierarchy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Yi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This work was inspired by previous experiments which managed to establish an optimal template-dealloying route to prepare ultralow density metal foams. In this study, we propose a new analytical–numerical model of hollow-structured metal foams with structural hierarchy to predict its stiffness and strength. The two-level model comprises a main backbone and a secondary nanoporous structure. The main backbone is composed of hollow sphere-packing architecture, while the secondary one is constructed of a bicontinuous nanoporous network proposed to describe the nanoscale interactions in the shell. Firstly, two nanoporous models with different geometries are generated by Voronoi tessellation, then the scaling laws of the mechanical properties are determined as a function of relative density by finite volume simulation. Furthermore, the scaling laws are applied to identify the uniaxial compression behavior of metal foams. It is shown that the thickness and relative density highly influence the Young’s modulus and yield strength, and vacancy defect determines the foams being self-supported. The present study provides not only new insights into the mechanical behaviors of both nanoporous metals and metal foams, but also a practical guide for their fabrication and application.

  19. Recovery of valuable metals from electroplating sludge with reducing additives via vitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ruth; Huang, Kuo-Lin; Lin, Zih-Yi; Wang, Jian-Wen; Lin, Chitsan; Kuo, Yi-Ming

    2013-11-15

    In this study, vitrification was applied to treat Ni-Cu electroplating sludge. The sludge was mixed with additives (limestone:cullet = 4:6) and then heated to 1450 °C. The cooled product could be separated into slag and ingot. An atomic absorption spectrometer was used to determine the metal levels of specimens and toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) tests, whereas the crystalline and surface characteristics were examined using quantitative X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. With a glassy structure, the slag was mainly composed of Ca, Si, and Mg. The TCLP results of slags met the Taiwan regulated standards, suggesting that slag can be used for recycling purposes. With the aid of additives, the crystalline phase of slag was transformed form CaMgSiO4 into CsSiO3. The ingots were mainly composed of Ni (563,000-693,800 mg/kg), Cu (79,900-87,400 mg/kg), and Fe (35,000-43,600 mg/kg) (target metals) due the gravity separation during vitrification. At appropriate additives/sludge ratios (>0.2), >95% of target metals gathered in the ingot as a recoverable form (Ni-Fe alloy). The high Ni level of slag suggests that the ingot can be used as the raw materials for smelters or the additives for steel making. Therefore, the vitrification approach of this study is a promising technology to recover valuable metals from Ni-Cu electroplating sludge. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Performance of waste-based amendments to reduce metal release from mine tailings: One-year leaching behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Luis; Gómez, Rocío; Sánchez, Virtudes; Villaseñor, José; Alonso-Azcárate, Jacinto

    2018-03-01

    A one-year leaching experiment has been conducted in order to assess the effectiveness of several amendments on metal immobilization in mine tailings from an old Pb/Zn mining area of Central Spain (San Quintín mine). Demineralized water was used as leaching solution, selecting doses equivalent to the annual rainfall conditions of the studied area. Columns with mine tailings without any amendment and others treated with 10% of sugar foam (SF), 15% of drinking water treatment sludge (DWS), 30% of paper mill sludge (PMS) and 15% of olive mill waste (OMW) were used. SF, DWS and PMS amendments increased the pH of leachates from values of approximately 4 to around neutrality. Additionally, the release of sulfate ions from the oxidation of pyritic residues was decreased in some extent by SF and DWS amendments. Metal leaching was effectively reduced by the amendments reaching overall decreases with respect to the unamended columns of 79-96% for Pb, 36-100% for Zn, 50-99% for Cu and 44-100% for Cd. The effect of the amendments in leachate pH, sulfate concentration and metal release from mine tailings was kept throughout the whole experimental period. Our results showed that the application of different organic and inorganic amendments based on by-products and waste materials may be a feasible alternative for the restoration of soils around abandoned metal mines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Considerations for reducing food system energy demand while scaling up urban agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohareb, Eugene; Heller, Martin; Novak, Paige; Goldstein, Benjamin; Fonoll, Xavier; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2017-12-01

    There is an increasing global interest in scaling up urban agriculture (UA) in its various forms, from private gardens to sophisticated commercial operations. Much of this interest is in the spirit of environmental protection, with reduced waste and transportation energy highlighted as some of the proposed benefits of UA; however, explicit consideration of energy and resource requirements needs to be made in order to realize these anticipated environmental benefits. A literature review is undertaken here to provide new insight into the energy implications of scaling up UA in cities in high-income countries, considering UA classification, direct/indirect energy pressures, and interactions with other components of the food-energy-water nexus. This is followed by an exploration of ways in which these cities can plan for the exploitation of waste flows for resource-efficient UA. Given that it is estimated that the food system contributes nearly 15% of total US energy demand, optimization of resource use in food production, distribution, consumption, and waste systems may have a significant energy impact. There are limited data available that quantify resource demand implications directly associated with UA systems, highlighting that the literature is not yet sufficiently robust to make universal claims on benefits. This letter explores energy demand from conventional resource inputs, various production systems, water/energy trade-offs, alternative irrigation, packaging materials, and transportation/supply chains to shed light on UA-focused research needs. By analyzing data and cases from the existing literature, we propose that gains in energy efficiency could be realized through the co-location of UA operations with waste streams (e.g. heat, CO2, greywater, wastewater, compost), potentially increasing yields and offsetting life cycle energy demands relative to conventional approaches. This begs a number of energy-focused UA research questions that explore the

  2. Chip-scale fluorescence microscope based on a silo-filter complementary metal-oxide semiconductor image sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ah Lee, Seung; Ou, Xiaoze; Lee, J Eugene; Yang, Changhuei

    2013-06-01

    We demonstrate a silo-filter (SF) complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor for a chip-scale fluorescence microscope. The extruded pixel design with metal walls between neighboring pixels guides fluorescence emission through the thick absorptive filter to the photodiode of a pixel. Our prototype device achieves 13 μm resolution over a wide field of view (4.8 mm × 4.4 mm). We demonstrate bright-field and fluorescence longitudinal imaging of living cells in a compact, low-cost configuration.

  3. A city scale study on the effects of intensive groundwater heat pump systems on heavy metal contents in groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Gil, Alejandro; Epting, Jannis; Garrido, Eduardo; Vázquez-Suñé, Enric; Lázaro, Jesús Mateo; Sánchez Navarro, José Ángel; Huggenberger, P; Calvo, Miguel Ángel Marazuela

    2016-12-01

    As a result of the increasing use of shallow geothermal resources, hydraulic, thermal and chemical impacts affecting groundwater quality can be observed with ever increasing frequency (Possemiers et al., 2014). To overcome the uncertainty associated with chemical impacts, a city scale study on the effects of intensive geothermal resource use by groundwater heat pump systems on groundwater quality, with special emphasis on heavy metal contents was performed. Statistical analysis of geochemical data obtained from several field campaigns has allowed studying the spatiotemporal relationship between temperature anomalies in the aquifer and trace element composition of groundwater. The relationship between temperature and the concentrations of trace elements resulted in weak correlations, indicating that temperature changes are not the driving factor in enhancing heavy metal contaminations. Regression models established for these correlations showed a very low reactivity or response of heavy metal contents to temperature changes. The change rates of heavy metal contents with respect to temperature changes obtained indicate a low risk of exceeding quality threshold values by means of the exploitation regimes used, neither producing nor enhancing contamination significantly. However, modification of pH, redox potential, electrical conductivity, dissolved oxygen and alkalinity correlated with the concentrations of heavy metals. In this case, the change rates of heavy metal contents are higher, with a greater risk of exceeding threshold values. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Fe3O4/Reduced Graphene Oxide Nanocomposite: Synthesis and Its Application for Toxic Metal Ion Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Thi Vuong Hoan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of reduced graphene oxide modified by magnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4/rGO and its application for heavy metals removal were demonstrated. The obtained samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherms, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, and magnetic measurement. The results showed that the obtained graphene oxide (GO contains a small part of initial graphite as well as reduced oxide graphene. GO exhibits very high surface area in comparison with initial graphite. The morphology of Fe3O4/rGO consists of very fine spherical iron nanooxide particles in nanoscale. The formal kinetics and adsorption isotherms of As(V, Ni(II, and Pb(II over obtained Fe3O4/rGO have been investigated. Fe3O4/rGO exhibits excellent heavy metal ions adsorption indicating that it is a potential adsorbent for water sources contaminated by heavy metals.

  5. Studies on reducing the scale of a double focusing mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chambers, D.M.; Gregg, H.R.; Andresen, B.D.

    1993-05-01

    Several groups have developed miniaturized sector mass spectrometers with the goal of remote sensing in confined spaces or portability. However, these achievements have been overshadowed by more successful development of man-portable quadrupole and ion trap mass spectrometers. Despite these accomplishments the development of a reduced-scale sector mass spectrometer remains attractive as a potentially low-cost, robust instrument requiring very simple electronics and low power. Previous studies on miniaturizing sector instruments include the use of a Mattauch-Herzog design for a portable mass spectrograph weighing less than 10 kg. Other work has included the use of a Nier-Johnson design in spacecraft-mountable gas chromatography mass spectrometers for the Viking spacecraft as well as miniature sector-based MS/MS instrument. Although theory for designing an optimized system with high resolution and mass accuracy is well understood, such specifications have not yet been achieved in a miniaturized instrument. To proceed further toward the development of a miniaturized sector mass spectrometer, experiments were conducted to understand and optimize a practical, yet nonideal instrument configuration. The sector mass spectrometer studied in this work is similar to the ones developed for the Viking project, but was further modified to be low cost, simple and robust. Characteristics of this instrument that highlight its simplicity include the use of a modified Varian leak detector ion source, source ion optics that use one extraction voltage, and an unshunted fixed nonhomogeneous magnetic sector. The effects of these design simplifications on ion trajectory were studied by manipulating the ion beam along with the magnetic sector position. This latter feature served as an aid to study ion focusing amidst fringing fields as well as nonhomogeneous forces and permitted empirical realignment of the instrument

  6. Modal behavior of a reduced scale pump-turbine impeller. Part 1: Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escaler, X; Huetter, J K; Egusquiza, E; Farhat, M; Avellan, F

    2010-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been carried out to quantify the effects of surrounding fluid on the modal behavior of a reduced scale pump-turbine impeller. The modal properties of the fluid-structure system have been obtained by Experimental Modal Analysis (EMA) with the impeller suspended in air and inside a water reservoir. The impeller has been excited with an instrumented hammer and the response has been measured by means of miniature accelerometers. The Frequency Response Functions (FRF's) have been obtained from a large number of impacting positions in order to ensure the identification of the main mode shapes. As a result, the main modes of vibration have been well characterized both in air and in water in terms of natural frequency, damping ratio and mode shape. The first mode is the 2 Nodal Diameter (ND), the second one is the 0ND and the following ones are the 3ND coupled with the 1ND. The visual observation of the animated mode shapes and the level of the Modal Assurance Criterion (MAC) have permitted to correlate the homologous modes of vibration of the fluid-structure system in air and in water. From this comparison the added mass effect on the natural frequencies and the fluid effect on the damping ratios have been quantified for the most significant modes. With the surrounding water, the natural frequencies decrease in average by 10%. On the other hand, the damping ratios increase in average by 0.5%. In any case, the damping ratio appears to decrease with the frequency value of the mode.

  7. Integrated GIS and multivariate statistical analysis for regional scale assessment of heavy metal soil contamination: A critical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, Deyi; O'Connor, David; Nathanail, Paul; Tian, Li; Ma, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Heavy metal soil contamination is associated with potential toxicity to humans or ecotoxicity. Scholars have increasingly used a combination of geographical information science (GIS) with geostatistical and multivariate statistical analysis techniques to examine the spatial distribution of heavy metals in soils at a regional scale. A review of such studies showed that most soil sampling programs were based on grid patterns and composite sampling methodologies. Many programs intended to characterize various soil types and land use types. The most often used sampling depth intervals were 0–0.10 m, or 0–0.20 m, below surface; and the sampling densities used ranged from 0.0004 to 6.1 samples per km 2 , with a median of 0.4 samples per km 2 . The most widely used spatial interpolators were inverse distance weighted interpolation and ordinary kriging; and the most often used multivariate statistical analysis techniques were principal component analysis and cluster analysis. The review also identified several determining and correlating factors in heavy metal distribution in soils, including soil type, soil pH, soil organic matter, land use type, Fe, Al, and heavy metal concentrations. The major natural and anthropogenic sources of heavy metals were found to derive from lithogenic origin, roadway and transportation, atmospheric deposition, wastewater and runoff from industrial and mining facilities, fertilizer application, livestock manure, and sewage sludge. This review argues that the full potential of integrated GIS and multivariate statistical analysis for assessing heavy metal distribution in soils on a regional scale has not yet been fully realized. It is proposed that future research be conducted to map multivariate results in GIS to pinpoint specific anthropogenic sources, to analyze temporal trends in addition to spatial patterns, to optimize modeling parameters, and to expand the use of different multivariate analysis tools beyond principal component

  8. Novel cost effective full scale mussel shell bioreactors for metal removal and acid neutralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiLoreto, Z A; Weber, P A; Olds, W; Pope, J; Trumm, D; Chaganti, S R; Heath, D D; Weisener, C G

    2016-12-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) impacted waters are a worldwide concern for the mining industry and countries dealing with this issue; both active and passive technologies are employed for the treatment of such waters. Mussel shell bioreactors (MSB) represent a passive technology that utilizes waste from the shellfish industry as a novel substrate. The aim of this study is to provide insight into the biogeochemical dynamics of a novel full scale MSB for AMD treatment. A combination of water quality data, targeted geochemical extractions, and metagenomic analyses were used to evaluate MSB performance. The MSB raised the effluent pH from 3.4 to 8.3 while removing up to ∼99% of the dissolved Al, and Fe and >90% Ni, Tl, and Zn. A geochemical gradient was observed progressing from oxidized to reduced conditions with depth. The redox conditions helped define the microbial consortium that consists of a specialized niche of organisms that influence elemental cycling (i.e. complex Fe and S cycling). MSB technology represents an economic and effective means of full scale, passive AMD treatment that is an attractive alternative for developing economies due to its low cost and ease of implementation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Large-scale decontamination and decommissioning technology demonstration project at a former uranium metal production facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martineit, R.A.; Borgman, T.D.; Peters, M.S.; Stebbins, L.L.

    1997-01-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science and Technology Decontamination and Decommissioning (D ampersand D) Focus Area, led by the Federal Energy Technology Center, has been charged with improving upon baseline D ampersand D technologies with the goal of demonstrating and validating more cost-effective and safer technologies to characterize, deactivate, survey, decontaminate, dismantle, and dispose of surplus structures, buildings, and their contents at DOE sites. The D ampersand D Focus Area's approach to verifying the benefits of the improved D ampersand D technologies is to use them in large-scale technology demonstration (LSTD) projects at several DOE sites. The Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) was selected to host one of the first three LSTD's awarded by the D ampersand D Focus Area. The FEMP is a DOE facility near Cincinnati, Ohio, that was formerly engaged in the production of high quality uranium metal. The FEMP is a Superfund site which has completed its RUFS process and is currently undergoing environmental restoration. With the FEMP's selection to host an LSTD, the FEMP was immediately faced with some challenges. The primary challenge was that this LSTD was to be integrated into the FEMP's Plant 1 D ampersand D Project which was an ongoing D ampersand D Project for which a firm fixed price contract had been issued to the D ampersand D Contractor. Thus, interferences with the baseline D ampersand D project could have significant financial implications. Other challenges include defining and selecting meaningful technology demonstrations, finding/selecting technology providers, and integrating the technology into the baseline D ampersand D project. To date, twelve technologies have been selected, and six have been demonstrated. The technology demonstrations have yielded a high proportion of open-quotes winners.close quotes All demonstrated, technologies will be evaluated for incorporation into the FEMP's baseline D ampersand D

  10. Evaluation of the reconstruction of image acquired from CT simulator to reduce metal artifact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Ji Hun; Park, Jin Hong; Choi, Byung Don; Won, Hui Su; Chang, Nam Jun; Goo, Jang Hyun; Hong, Joo Wan

    2014-01-01

    This study presents the usefulness assessment of metal artifact reduction for orthopedic implants(O-MAR) to decrease metal artifacts from materials with high density when acquired CT images. By CT simulator, original CT images were acquired from Gammex and Rando phantom and those phantoms inserted with high density materials were scanned for other CT images with metal artifacts and then O-MAR was applied to those images, respectively. To evaluate CT images using Gammex phantom, 5 regions of interest(ROIs) were placed at 5 organs and 3 ROIs were set up at points affected by artifacts. The averages of standard deviation(SD) and CT numbers were compared with a plan using original image. For assessment of variations in dose of tissue around materials with high density, the volume of a cylindrical shape was designed at 3 places in images acquired from Rando phantom by Eclipse. With 6 MV, 7-fields, 15x15cm 2 and 100 cGy per fraction, treatment planning was created and the mean dose were compared with a plan using original image. In the test with the Gammex phantom, CT numbers had a few difference at established points and especially 3 points affected by artifacts had most of the same figures. In the case of O-MAR image, the more reduction in SD appeared at all of 8 points than non O-MAR image. In the test using the Rando Phantom, the variations in dose of tissue around high density materials had a few difference between original CT image and CT image with O-MAR. The CT images using O-MAR were acquired clearly at the boundary of tissue around high density materials and applying O-MAR was useful for correcting CT numbers

  11. Energy conservation in reheating furnaces by reducing scrap and scale formation; Kuumamuokkauksen energiasaeaestoet romun maeaeraeae ja hilseilyae vaehentaemaellae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kivivuori, S; Savolainen, P; Fredriksson, J; Paavola, J [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Lab. of Materials Processing and Powder Metallurgy

    1997-12-31

    The main objective of the project `Energy Savings in Reheating Furnaces by Reducing Scrap and Scale Formation` is to reduce energy consumption and environmental harms in reheating and rolling of steel. This was done by analysing the different atmospheres in reheating furnaces of the steel companies participating in this project. These atmospheres were then simulated in a laboratory furnace. Scale formation tests with different steel grades were then carried out in these atmospheres. Scale removal tests were done to some steel grades too. The results showed that lower oxygen content - as expected - decreases oxidation despite the even higher carbondioxide content in the atmosphere. Lower oxygen content may cause difficulties in scale removal. This however is highly dependent on the steel grade. Heat treatment tests showed the effect of increased temperature and furnace time on decarburization. Some energy savings was obtained in fuel consumption by optimising the operation parameters and the atmosphere steadier in different reheating furnaces. (orig.)

  12. Energy conservation in reheating furnaces by reducing scrap and scale formation; Kuumamuokkauksen energiasaeaestoet romun maeaeraeae ja hilseilyae vaehentaemaellae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kivivuori, S.; Savolainen, P.; Fredriksson, J.; Paavola, J. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Lab. of Materials Processing and Powder Metallurgy

    1996-12-31

    The main objective of the project `Energy Savings in Reheating Furnaces by Reducing Scrap and Scale Formation` is to reduce energy consumption and environmental harms in reheating and rolling of steel. This was done by analysing the different atmospheres in reheating furnaces of the steel companies participating in this project. These atmospheres were then simulated in a laboratory furnace. Scale formation tests with different steel grades were then carried out in these atmospheres. Scale removal tests were done to some steel grades too. The results showed that lower oxygen content - as expected - decreases oxidation despite the even higher carbondioxide content in the atmosphere. Lower oxygen content may cause difficulties in scale removal. This however is highly dependent on the steel grade. Heat treatment tests showed the effect of increased temperature and furnace time on decarburization. Some energy savings was obtained in fuel consumption by optimising the operation parameters and the atmosphere steadier in different reheating furnaces. (orig.)

  13. Transparent and conductive electrodes by large-scale nanostructuring of noble metal thin-films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linnet, Jes; Runge Walther, Anders; Wolff, Christian

    grid, and nano-wire thin-films [1]. The indium and carbon films do not match the chemical stability nor the electrical performance of the noble metals, and many metal films are not uniform in material distribution leading to significant surface roughness and randomized transmission haze. We demonstrate...

  14. Multi-scale contact modeling of coated steels for sheet metal forming applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shisode, Meghshyam; Hazrati Marangalou, Javad; Mishra, Tanmaya; De Rooij, Matthijn; Van Den Boogaard, Ton; Bay, Niels; Nielsen, Chris V.

    2018-01-01

    Friction in sheet metal forming is a local phenomenon which depends on continuously evolving contact conditions during the forming process. This is mainly influenced by local contact pressure, surface textures of the sheet metal as well as the forming tool surface profile and material behavior. The

  15. Y-12 product improvements expected to reduce metal production costs and decrease fabrication losses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, Elaine; Hassler, Morris

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The Y-12 National Security Complex supplies uranium metal and uranium oxide feed material that is then fabricated into fuel for research reactors around the world. Over the past two to three years, Y-12 has learned a great deal about its Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) product. The LEU is produced by taking U.S. surplus Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) and blending it with depleted or natural uranium. The surplus HEU comes from dismantled U.S. weapons parts that have been declared as surplus. Those research reactors that use LEU from Y-12 are making important contributions to international nuclear non-proliferation by using LEU rather than HEU, and by helping to disposition former weapons material. We clearly understand that our customers want to keep fuel costs as low as possible. We at Y-12 are making every effort to improve efficiencies in producing the uranium through standardizing the chemical specifications as well as the product mass and dimensional qualities. This paper will discuss the new standard specification that we have proposed to existing LEU metal customers and fuel fabricators. It will also cover Y-12's progress on a new mold-design that will result in a more uniform, higher quality product that is less expensive to produce. This new product is expected to decrease overall fabrication losses by 5-10%, depending on the fabricator's process. The paper will include planned activities and the schedule associated with implementation of the new specification and product form. (author)

  16. Natural reducing agents for electroless nanoparticle deposition: Mild synthesis of metal/carbon nanostructured microspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffy, Paul; Reynolds, Lyndsey A.; Sanders, Stephanie E.; Metz, Kevin M.; Colavita, Paula E.

    2013-01-01

    Composite materials are of interest because they can potentially combine the properties of their respective components in a manner that is useful for specific applications. Here, we report on the use of coffee as a low-cost, green reductant for the room temperature formation of catalytically active, supported metal nanoparticles. Specifically, we have leveraged the reduction potential of coffee in order to grow Pd and Ag nanoparticles at the surface of porous carbon microspheres synthesized via ultraspray pyrolysis. The metal nanoparticle-on-carbon microsphere composites were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). To demonstrate the catalytic activity of Pd/C and Ag/C materials, Suzuki coupling reactions and nitroaromatic reduction reactions were employed, respectively. - Highlights: • Natural reductants were used as green electroless deposition reagents. • Room temperature synthesis of supported Ag and Pd nanoparticles was achieved. • Carbon porous microspheres were used as supports. • Synthesis via natural reductants yielded catalytically active nanoparticles.

  17. Heavy metal contaminant remediation study of western Xiamen Bay sediment, China: laboratory bench scale testing results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Luoping; Feng, Huan; Li, Xiaoxia; Ye, Xin; Jing, Youhai; Ouyang, Tong; Yu, Xingtian; Liang, Rongyuan; Chen, Weiqi

    2009-12-15

    A surface sediment sample (metal removal, whereas agitation, aeration and rotation of the samples in chemical complexation solutions yield much better metal removal efficiency (up to 90%). A low pH condition (e.g., pHliquid ratio (e.g., S:L=1:50) could increase metal removal efficiency. The experimental results suggest that 0.20 M (NH4)2C2O4+0.025 M EDTA combination with solid:liquid ratio=1:50 and 0.50 M ammonium acetate (NH4Ac)+0.025 M EDTA combination with solid:liquid ratio=1:50 are the most effective methods for metal removal from the contaminated sediments. This research provides additional useful information for sediment metal remediation technology development.

  18. Metal accumulation by submerged macrophytes in eutrophic lakes at the watershed scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Wei; Wu, Haoping; Hao, Beibei; Liu, Guihua

    2013-10-01

    Metal concentrations (Al, Ba, Ca, K, Li, Mg, Na, Se, Sr and Ti) in submerged macrophytes and corresponding water and sediments were studied in 24 eutrophic lakes along the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River (China). Results showed that these eutrophic lakes have high metal concentrations in both water and sediments because of human activities. Average concentrations of Al and Na in tissues of submerged macrophytes were very high in sampled eutrophic lakes. By comparison, Ceratophyllum demersum and Najas marina accumulated more metals (e.g. Ba, Ca, K, Mg, Na, Sr and Ti). Strong positive correlations were found between metal concentrations in tissues of submerged macrophytes, probably because of co-accumulation of metals. The concentrations of Li, Mg, Na and Sr in tissues of submerged macrophytes significantly correlated with their corresponding water values, but not sediment values.

  19. Integrated GIS and multivariate statistical analysis for regional scale assessment of heavy metal soil contamination: A critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Deyi; O'Connor, David; Nathanail, Paul; Tian, Li; Ma, Yan

    2017-12-01

    Heavy metal soil contamination is associated with potential toxicity to humans or ecotoxicity. Scholars have increasingly used a combination of geographical information science (GIS) with geostatistical and multivariate statistical analysis techniques to examine the spatial distribution of heavy metals in soils at a regional scale. A review of such studies showed that most soil sampling programs were based on grid patterns and composite sampling methodologies. Many programs intended to characterize various soil types and land use types. The most often used sampling depth intervals were 0-0.10 m, or 0-0.20 m, below surface; and the sampling densities used ranged from 0.0004 to 6.1 samples per km 2 , with a median of 0.4 samples per km 2 . The most widely used spatial interpolators were inverse distance weighted interpolation and ordinary kriging; and the most often used multivariate statistical analysis techniques were principal component analysis and cluster analysis. The review also identified several determining and correlating factors in heavy metal distribution in soils, including soil type, soil pH, soil organic matter, land use type, Fe, Al, and heavy metal concentrations. The major natural and anthropogenic sources of heavy metals were found to derive from lithogenic origin, roadway and transportation, atmospheric deposition, wastewater and runoff from industrial and mining facilities, fertilizer application, livestock manure, and sewage sludge. This review argues that the full potential of integrated GIS and multivariate statistical analysis for assessing heavy metal distribution in soils on a regional scale has not yet been fully realized. It is proposed that future research be conducted to map multivariate results in GIS to pinpoint specific anthropogenic sources, to analyze temporal trends in addition to spatial patterns, to optimize modeling parameters, and to expand the use of different multivariate analysis tools beyond principal component analysis

  20. Soft Coulomb gap and asymmetric scaling towards metal-insulator quantum criticality in multilayer MoS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Byoung Hee; Bae, Jung Jun; Joo, Min-Kyu; Choi, Homin; Han, Gang Hee; Lim, Hanjo; Lee, Young Hee

    2018-05-24

    Quantum localization-delocalization of carriers are well described by either carrier-carrier interaction or disorder. When both effects come into play, however, a comprehensive understanding is not well established mainly due to complexity and sparse experimental data. Recently developed two-dimensional layered materials are ideal in describing such mesoscopic critical phenomena as they have both strong interactions and disorder. The transport in the insulating phase is well described by the soft Coulomb gap picture, which demonstrates the contribution of both interactions and disorder. Using this picture, we demonstrate the critical power law behavior of the localization length, supporting quantum criticality. We observe asymmetric critical exponents around the metal-insulator transition through temperature scaling analysis, which originates from poor screening in insulating regime and conversely strong screening in metallic regime due to free carriers. The effect of asymmetric scaling behavior is weakened in monolayer MoS 2 due to a dominating disorder.

  1. Enhanced rice production but greatly reduced carbon emission following biochar amendment in a metal-polluted rice paddy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Afeng; Bian, Rongjun; Li, Lianqing; Wang, Xudong; Zhao, Ying; Hussain, Qaiser; Pan, Genxing

    2015-12-01

    Soil amendment of biochar (BSA) had been shown effective for mitigating greenhouse gas (GHG) emission and alleviating metal stress to plants and microbes in soil. It has not yet been addressed if biochar exerts synergy effects on crop production, GHG emission, and microbial activity in metal-polluted soils. In a field experiment, biochar was amended at sequential rates at 0, 10, 20, and 40 t ha(-1), respectively, in a cadmium- and lead-contaminated rice paddy from the Tai lake Plain, China, before rice cropping in 2010. Fluxes of soil carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O) were monitored using a static chamber method during the whole rice growing season (WRGS) of 2011. BSA significantly reduced soil CaCl2 extractable pool of Cd, and DTPA extractable pool of Cd and Pb. As compared to control, soil CO2 emission under BSA was observed to have no change at 10 t ha(-1) but decreased by 16-24% at 20 and 40 t ha(-1). In a similar trend, BSA at 20 and 40 t ha(-1) increased rice yield by 25-26% and thus enhanced ecosystem CO2 sequestration by 47-55% over the control. Seasonal total N2O emission was reduced by 7.1, 30.7, and 48.6% under BSA at 10, 20, and 40 t ha(-1), respectively. Overall, a net reduction in greenhouse gas balance (NGHGB) by 53.9-62.8% and in greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI) by 14.3-28.6% was observed following BSA at 20 and 40 t ha(-1). The present study suggested a great potential of biochar to enhancing grain yield while reducing carbon emission in metal-polluted rice paddies.

  2. Evaluation of a prototype correction algorithm to reduce metal artefacts in flat detector computed tomography of scaphoid fixation screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filli, Lukas; Marcon, Magda; Scholz, Bernhard; Calcagni, Maurizio; Finkenstädt, Tim; Andreisek, Gustav; Guggenberger, Roman

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a prototype correction algorithm to reduce metal artefacts in flat detector computed tomography (FDCT) of scaphoid fixation screws. FDCT has gained interest in imaging small anatomic structures of the appendicular skeleton. Angiographic C-arm systems with flat detectors allow fluoroscopy and FDCT imaging in a one-stop procedure emphasizing their role as an ideal intraoperative imaging tool. However, FDCT imaging can be significantly impaired by artefacts induced by fixation screws. Following ethical board approval, commercially available scaphoid fixation screws were inserted into six cadaveric specimens in order to fix artificially induced scaphoid fractures. FDCT images corrected with the algorithm were compared to uncorrected images both quantitatively and qualitatively by two independent radiologists in terms of artefacts, screw contour, fracture line visibility, bone visibility, and soft tissue definition. Normal distribution of variables was evaluated using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. In case of normal distribution, quantitative variables were compared using paired Student's t tests. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used for quantitative variables without normal distribution and all qualitative variables. A p value of < 0.05 was considered to indicate statistically significant differences. Metal artefacts were significantly reduced by the correction algorithm (p < 0.001), and the fracture line was more clearly defined (p < 0.01). The inter-observer reliability was "almost perfect" (intra-class correlation coefficient 0.85, p < 0.001). The prototype correction algorithm in FDCT for metal artefacts induced by scaphoid fixation screws may facilitate intra- and postoperative follow-up imaging. Flat detector computed tomography (FDCT) is a helpful imaging tool for scaphoid fixation. The correction algorithm significantly reduces artefacts in FDCT induced by scaphoid fixation screws. This may facilitate intra

  3. A method for apportionment of natural and anthropogenic contributions to heavy metal loadings in the surface soils across large-scale regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuanan; Cheng, Hefa

    2016-07-01

    Quantification of the contributions from anthropogenic sources to soil heavy metal loadings on regional scales is challenging because of the heterogeneity of soil parent materials and high variability of anthropogenic inputs, especially for the species that are primarily of lithogenic origin. To this end, we developed a novel method for apportioning the contributions of natural and anthropogenic sources by combining sequential extraction and stochastic modeling, and applied it to investigate the heavy metal pollution in the surface soils of the Pearl River Delta (PRD) in southern China. On the average, 45-86% of Zn, Cu, Pb, and Cd were present in the acid soluble, reducible, and oxidizable fractions of the surface soils, while only 12-24% of Ni, Cr, and As were partitioned in these fractions. The anthropogenic contributions to the heavy metals in the non-residual fractions, even the ones dominated by natural sources, could be identified and quantified by conditional inference trees. Combination of sequential extraction, Kriging interpolation, and stochastic modeling reveals that approximately 10, 39, 6.2, 28, 7.1, 15, and 46% of the As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn, respectively, in the surface soils of the PRD were contributed by anthropogenic sources. These results were in general agreements with those obtained through subtraction of regional soil metal background from total loadings, and the soil metal inputs through atmospheric deposition as well. In the non-residual fractions of the surface soils, the anthropogenic contributions to As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn, were 48, 42, 50, 51, 49, 24, and 70%, respectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Liquid metal fast breeder reactor steam generator survey of the consequences of large scale sodium water reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vambenepe, G.

    1978-01-01

    The ''Retona'' three-dimensional hydrodynamic computing code is being developed by Electricity de France to survey the consequences, on the very plant, of a large scale sodium water reaction in liquid metal steam generators. In this communication, the heat-exchanger geometry is schematized and the problem solving process briefly described under assumed simplifying hypotheses. The application of the results to the Creusot-Loire steam generator selected for Super-Phenix are given as an example. (author)

  5. Eliminating Cyanide, Reducing Heavy Metals, and Harvesting Gold from Mining Waste with Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2001-01-01

    : All plants (as far as known) have an enzyme to detoxify cyanide by binding it to an amino acid. Cyanide in the appropriate dose can be used by plants as nitrogen source. Compared to other organisms, plants can tolerate high doses of free and complexed cyanidess. Using plants for detoxifying mining......Large amounts of cyanides are used in gold mining. The application is open and generates environmental problems. Regulators therefore insist on detoxifying cyanide-contaminated wastewater. There are existing technologies to remove cyanides, but none uses plants. Here, a new technology is introduced...... wastewater combines several benefits: cyanide is removed, plants are irrigated and fertilised. Heavy metals (including gold) are extracted by plants. Plants can be harvested and used, e.g., for energy production by burning. The ash of the plants is probaly rich in gold and a resource for further gold...

  6. Y-12 product improvements expected to reduce metal production costs and decrease fabrication losses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassler, Morris E.

    2005-01-01

    The Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) supplies uranium metal and uranium oxide feed material for fabrication into fuel for research reactors around the world. Over the past few years, Y-12 has continued to improve its Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) product. The LEU is produced by taking U.S. surplus Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) and blending it with depleted or natural uranium. The surplus HEU comes from dismantled U.S. weapons parts. Those research reactors that use LEU from Y-12 are making important contributions to international nuclear nonproliferation by using LEU rather than HEU, and helping to disposition former U.S. weapons material. It is clearly understood that the research reactor community must keep fuel costs as low as possible and Y-12 is making every effort to improve efficiencies in producing the uranium through standardizing the chemical specifications as well as the product mass and dimensional qualities. These production cost reductions allows for the U.S. to keep the LEU product price low even with the dramatic increase in the uranium enrichment and feed component market prices in the last few years. This paper will discuss a new standard specification that has been proposed to existing LEU metal customers and fuel fabricators. It will also cover Y-12's progress on a new mold-design that will result in a more uniform, higher quality product and eliminates two steps of the production process. This new product is expected to decrease fabrication losses by 5-10%, depending on the fabricator's process. The paper will include planned activities and the schedule associated with implementation of the new specification and product form. (author)

  7. Residual Salt Separation from the Metal Products Reduced in a LiCl-Li2O Molten Salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hur, Jin Mok; Hong, Sun Seok; Kang, Dae Seung; Jeong, Meong Soo; Seo, Chung Seok

    2006-02-01

    The electrochemical reduction of spent nuclear fuel in a LiCl-Li 2 O molten salt for the conditioning of spent nuclear fuel requires the separation of the residual salts from a reduced metal product after the reduction process. Considering the behavior of spent nuclear fuel during the electrochemical reduction process, a surrogate material matrix was constructed and inactive tests on a salt separation were carried out to produce the data required for the active tests. Fresh uranium metal prepared from the electrochemical reduction of U 3 O 8 powder was used as the surrogates of the spent nuclear fuel components which might be metallized by the electrochemical reduction process. LiCl, Li 2 O, Y 2 O 3 and SrCl 2 were selected as the components of the residual salts. Interactions between the salts and their influence on the separation of the residual salts were analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetry (TG). Eutectic melting of LiCl-Li 2 O and LiCl-SrCl 2 led to a melting point which was lower than that of a LiCl molten salt was observed. Residual salts were separated by a vaporization method. Co-vaporization of LiCl-Li 2 O and LiCl-SrCl 2 was achieved below temperatures which could make the uranium metal oxidation by Li 2 O possible. The salt vaporization rates at 950 .deg. C were measured as follows: LiCl-8 wt% Li 2 O > LiCl > LiCl-8 wt% SrCl 2 > SrCl 2

  8. Residual Salt Separation from the Metal Products Reduced in a LiCl-Li{sub 2}O Molten Salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hur, Jin Mok; Hong, Sun Seok; Kang, Dae Seung; Jeong, Meong Soo; Seo, Chung Seok

    2006-02-15

    The electrochemical reduction of spent nuclear fuel in a LiCl-Li{sub 2}O molten salt for the conditioning of spent nuclear fuel requires the separation of the residual salts from a reduced metal product after the reduction process. Considering the behavior of spent nuclear fuel during the electrochemical reduction process, a surrogate material matrix was constructed and inactive tests on a salt separation were carried out to produce the data required for the active tests. Fresh uranium metal prepared from the electrochemical reduction of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} powder was used as the surrogates of the spent nuclear fuel components which might be metallized by the electrochemical reduction process. LiCl, Li{sub 2}O, Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SrCl{sub 2} were selected as the components of the residual salts. Interactions between the salts and their influence on the separation of the residual salts were analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetry (TG). Eutectic melting of LiCl-Li{sub 2}O and LiCl-SrCl{sub 2} led to a melting point which was lower than that of a LiCl molten salt was observed. Residual salts were separated by a vaporization method. Co-vaporization of LiCl-Li{sub 2}O and LiCl-SrCl{sub 2} was achieved below temperatures which could make the uranium metal oxidation by Li{sub 2}O possible. The salt vaporization rates at 950 .deg. C were measured as follows: LiCl-8 wt% Li{sub 2}O > LiCl > LiCl-8 wt% SrCl{sub 2} > SrCl{sub 2}.

  9. Impact of scaling on the performance and reliability degradation of metal-contacts in NEMS devices

    KAUST Repository

    Dadgour, Hamed F.; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa; Cassell, Alan M.; Singh, Navab R.; Banerjee, Kaustav

    2011-01-01

    thoroughly investigated in the literature. Such a study is essential because metal contacts play a critical role in determining the overall performance and reliability of NEMS. Therefore, the comprehensive analytical study presented in this paper highlights

  10. Strongly reduced band gap in a correlated insulator in close proximity to a metal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hesper, R.; Tjeng, L.H; Sawatzky, G.A

    1997-01-01

    Using a combination of photoelectron and inverse photoelectron spectroscopy, we show that the band gap in a monolayer of C-60 on a Ag surface is strongly reduced from the solid C-60 surface value. We argue that this is a result of the reduction of the on-site molecular Coulomb interaction due to the

  11. Extreme robustness of scaling in sample space reducing processes explains Zipf’s law in diffusion on directed networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corominas-Murtra, Bernat; Hanel, Rudolf; Thurner, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown recently that a specific class of path-dependent stochastic processes, which reduce their sample space as they unfold, lead to exact scaling laws in frequency and rank distributions. Such sample space reducing processes offer an alternative new mechanism to understand the emergence of scaling in countless processes. The corresponding power law exponents were shown to be related to noise levels in the process. Here we show that the emergence of scaling is not limited to the simplest SSRPs, but holds for a huge domain of stochastic processes that are characterised by non-uniform prior distributions. We demonstrate mathematically that in the absence of noise the scaling exponents converge to −1 (Zipf’s law) for almost all prior distributions. As a consequence it becomes possible to fully understand targeted diffusion on weighted directed networks and its associated scaling laws in node visit distributions. The presence of cycles can be properly interpreted as playing the same role as noise in SSRPs and, accordingly, determine the scaling exponents. The result that Zipf’s law emerges as a generic feature of diffusion on networks, regardless of its details, and that the exponent of visiting times is related to the amount of cycles in a network could be relevant for a series of applications in traffic-, transport- and supply chain management. (paper)

  12. Evaluation of a prototype correction algorithm to reduce metal artefacts in flat detector computed tomography of scaphoid fixation screws

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filli, Lukas; Finkenstaedt, Tim; Andreisek, Gustav; Guggenberger, Roman [University Hospital of Zurich, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Marcon, Magda [University Hospital of Zurich, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Udine, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Department of Medical and Biological Sciences, Udine (Italy); Scholz, Bernhard [Imaging and Therapy Division, Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Forchheim (Germany); Calcagni, Maurizio [University Hospital of Zurich, Division of Plastic Surgery and Hand Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-12-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a prototype correction algorithm to reduce metal artefacts in flat detector computed tomography (FDCT) of scaphoid fixation screws. FDCT has gained interest in imaging small anatomic structures of the appendicular skeleton. Angiographic C-arm systems with flat detectors allow fluoroscopy and FDCT imaging in a one-stop procedure emphasizing their role as an ideal intraoperative imaging tool. However, FDCT imaging can be significantly impaired by artefacts induced by fixation screws. Following ethical board approval, commercially available scaphoid fixation screws were inserted into six cadaveric specimens in order to fix artificially induced scaphoid fractures. FDCT images corrected with the algorithm were compared to uncorrected images both quantitatively and qualitatively by two independent radiologists in terms of artefacts, screw contour, fracture line visibility, bone visibility, and soft tissue definition. Normal distribution of variables was evaluated using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. In case of normal distribution, quantitative variables were compared using paired Student's t tests. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used for quantitative variables without normal distribution and all qualitative variables. A p value of < 0.05 was considered to indicate statistically significant differences. Metal artefacts were significantly reduced by the correction algorithm (p < 0.001), and the fracture line was more clearly defined (p < 0.01). The inter-observer reliability was ''almost perfect'' (intra-class correlation coefficient 0.85, p < 0.001). The prototype correction algorithm in FDCT for metal artefacts induced by scaphoid fixation screws may facilitate intra- and postoperative follow-up imaging. (orig.)

  13. Evaluation of a prototype correction algorithm to reduce metal artefacts in flat detector computed tomography of scaphoid fixation screws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filli, Lukas; Finkenstaedt, Tim; Andreisek, Gustav; Guggenberger, Roman; Marcon, Magda; Scholz, Bernhard; Calcagni, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a prototype correction algorithm to reduce metal artefacts in flat detector computed tomography (FDCT) of scaphoid fixation screws. FDCT has gained interest in imaging small anatomic structures of the appendicular skeleton. Angiographic C-arm systems with flat detectors allow fluoroscopy and FDCT imaging in a one-stop procedure emphasizing their role as an ideal intraoperative imaging tool. However, FDCT imaging can be significantly impaired by artefacts induced by fixation screws. Following ethical board approval, commercially available scaphoid fixation screws were inserted into six cadaveric specimens in order to fix artificially induced scaphoid fractures. FDCT images corrected with the algorithm were compared to uncorrected images both quantitatively and qualitatively by two independent radiologists in terms of artefacts, screw contour, fracture line visibility, bone visibility, and soft tissue definition. Normal distribution of variables was evaluated using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. In case of normal distribution, quantitative variables were compared using paired Student's t tests. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used for quantitative variables without normal distribution and all qualitative variables. A p value of < 0.05 was considered to indicate statistically significant differences. Metal artefacts were significantly reduced by the correction algorithm (p < 0.001), and the fracture line was more clearly defined (p < 0.01). The inter-observer reliability was ''almost perfect'' (intra-class correlation coefficient 0.85, p < 0.001). The prototype correction algorithm in FDCT for metal artefacts induced by scaphoid fixation screws may facilitate intra- and postoperative follow-up imaging. (orig.)

  14. Reducing Heavy Metal Element from Coal Bottom Ash by Using Citric Acid Leaching Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya Ahmad Asyari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Coal ash is the residue that is produced during coal combustion for instance fly ash, bottom ash or boiler slag which was primarily produced from the combustion of coal. With growth in coal burning power station, huge amount of coal bottom ash (CBA considered as hazardous material which are normally disposed in an on-site disposal system without any commercialization purpose. Previous researchers have studied the extraction of silica from agricultural wastes such as palm ash and rice husk ash (RHA and CBA by using leaching treatment method. In this study, the weaker acid, citric acid solution was used to replace the strong acid in leaching treatment process. Result showed that the heavy metal content such as Copper (Cu, Zinc (Zn and Lead (Pb can be decrease. Meanwhile the silica can be extracted up to 44% from coal bottom ash using citric acid leaching treatment under the optimum reaction time of 60 minutes with solution temperature of 60°C and concentration of citric acid more than 2%.

  15. Molecular Basis for Electron Flow Within Metal-and Electrode-Reducing Biofilms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, Daniel R. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Electrochemical, spectral, genetic, and biochemical techniques were developed to reveal that a diverse suite of redox proteins and structural macromolecules outside the cell work together to move electrons long distances between Geobacter cells to metals and electrodes. In this project, we greatly expanded the known participants in the electron transfer pathway of Geobacter. For example, in addition to well-studied pili, polysaccharides contribute to anchoring, different cytochromes are required under different conditions, strategies change with redox potential, and the localization of these components can change depending on where cells are located in a biofilm. By inventing new electrodes compatible with real-time spectral measurements, we were able to visualize the redox status of biofilms in action, leading to a hypothesis that long-distance electron transfer is ultimately limiting in these systems and redox potentials change within biofilms. The goals of this project were met, as we were able to 1) identify new elements crucial to the expression, assembly and function of the extracellular electron transfer phenotype 2) expand spectral and electrochemical techniques to define the mechanism and route of electron transfer through the matrix, and 3) combine this knowledge to build the next generation of genetic tools for study of this complex process.

  16. Water Splitting over Epitaxially Grown InGaN Nanowires on-Metallic Titanium/Silicon Template: Reduced Interfacial Transfer Resistance and Improved Stability

    KAUST Repository

    Ebaid, Mohamed; Min, Jungwook; Zhao, Chao; Ng, Tien Khee; Idriss, Hicham; Ooi, Boon S.

    2018-01-01

    grown on Si substrate. The interfacial transfer resistance was also reduced significantly after introducing the metallic Ti interlayer. An applied-bias-photon-to-current conversion efficiency of 2.2% and almost unity Faradic efficiency for hydrogen

  17. Comparative Analysis of GF-1 and HJ-1 Data to Derive the Optimal Scale for Monitoring Heavy Metal Stress in Rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongmin; Liu, Xiangnan

    2018-03-06

    Remote sensing can actively monitor heavy metal contamination in crops, but with the increase of satellite sensors, the optimal scale for monitoring heavy metal stress in rice is still unknown. This study focused on identifying the optimal scale by comparing the ability to detect heavy metal stress in rice at various spatial scales. The 2 m, 8 m, and 16 m resolution GF-1 (China) data and the 30 m resolution HJ-1 (China) data were used to invert leaf area index (LAI). The LAI was the input parameter of the World Food Studies (WOFOST) model, and we obtained the dry weight of storage organs (WSO) and dry weight of roots (WRT) through the assimilation method; then, the mass ratio of rice storage organs and roots (SORMR) was calculated. Through the comparative analysis of SORMR at each spatial scale of data, we determined the optimal scale to monitor heavy metal stress in rice. The following conclusions were drawn: (1) SORMR could accurately and effectively monitor heavy metal stress; (2) the 8 m and 16 m images from GF-1 were suitable for monitoring heavy metal stress in rice; (3) 16 m was considered the optimal scale to assess heavy metal stress in rice.

  18. Aided phytostabilisation reduces metal toxicity, improves soil fertility and enhances microbial activity in Cu-rich mine tailings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touceda-González, M; Álvarez-López, V; Prieto-Fernández, Á; Rodríguez-Garrido, B; Trasar-Cepeda, C; Mench, M; Puschenreiter, M; Quintela-Sabarís, C; Macías-García, F; Kidd, P S

    2017-01-15

    (Aided) phytostabilisation has been proposed as a suitable technique to decrease the environmental risks associated with metal(loid)-enriched mine tailings. Field scale evaluations are needed for demonstrating their effectiveness in the medium- to long-term. A field trial was implemented in spring 2011 in Cu-rich mine tailings in the NW of Spain. The tailings were amended with composted municipal solid wastes and planted with Salix spp., Populus nigra L. or Agrostis capillaris L. cv. Highland. Plant growth, nutritive status and metal accumulation, and soil physico- and bio-chemical properties, were monitored over three years (four years for plant growth). The total bacterial community, α- and β-Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Streptomycetaceae were studied by DGGE of 16s rDNA fragments. Compost amendment improved soil properties such as pH, CEC and fertility, and decreased soil Cu availability, leading to the establishment of a healthy vegetation cover. Both compost-amendment and plant root activity stimulated soil enzyme activities and induced important shifts in the bacterial community structure over time. The woody plant, S. viminalis, and the grassy species, A. capillaris, showed the best results in terms of plant growth and biomass production. The beneficial effects of the phytostabilisation process were maintained at least three years after treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Reducing Mercury Pollution from Artisanal and Small-Scale Gold Mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    To reduce airborne mercury emissions from these Gold Shops, EPA and the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) have partnered to design a low cost, easily constructible technology called the Gold Shop Mercury Capture System (MCS).

  20. A climate-change adaptation framework to reduce continental-scale vulnerability across conservation reserves

    Science.gov (United States)

    D.R. Magness; J.M. Morton; F. Huettmann; F.S. Chapin; A.D. McGuire

    2011-01-01

    Rapid climate change, in conjunction with other anthropogenic drivers, has the potential to cause mass species extinction. To minimize this risk, conservation reserves need to be coordinated at multiple spatial scales because the climate envelopes of many species may shift rapidly across large geographic areas. In addition, novel species assemblages and ecological...

  1. WebPIE : A web-scale parallel inference engine using MapReduce

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Urbani, Jacopo; Kotoulas, Spyros; Maassen, Jason; Van Harmelen, Frank; Bal, Henri

    2012-01-01

    The large amount of Semantic Web data and its fast growth pose a significant computational challenge in performing efficient and scalable reasoning. On a large scale, the resources of single machines are no longer sufficient and we are required to distribute the process to improve performance. The

  2. Can reduced size of metals induce hydrogen absorption: ZrAl{sub 2} case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob, I., E-mail: izi@bgu.ac.il [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel); Deledda, S. [Physics Department, Institute for Energy Technology, P.O. Box 40, NO-2027 Kjeller (Norway); Bereznitsky, M. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel); Yeheskel, O. [Nuclear Research Center - Negev, P.O. Box 9001, Beer Sheva 84190 (Israel); Filipek, S.M. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland); Mogilyanski, D.; Kimmel, G. [Institute for Applied Research, P.O. Box 653, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel); Hauback, B.C. [Physics Department, Institute for Energy Technology, P.O. Box 40, NO-2027 Kjeller (Norway)

    2011-09-15

    Research highlights: > 15 nm particles of ZrAl{sub 2} and Zr(Al{sub 0.5}Co{sub 0.5}){sub 2} are obtained by attrition and cryomilling. > ZrAl{sub 2} nanoparticles remain inert to hydrogen absorption up to pressure of {approx}2 GPa. > Zr(Al{sub 0.5}Co{sub 0.5}){sub 2} nanoparticles exhibit reduced hydrogen absorption as compared to the corresponding bulk compounds. - Abstract: The hydrogen absorption ability of the non-absorbing Al-rich ZrAl{sub 2} compound was examined after reducing its particles-size to the nanometer regime. The hydrogen abstinence of bulk ZrAl{sub 2} has been previously related to its excessive elastic shear stiffening. The particle size of ZrAl{sub 2} was reduced by attrition milling and cryomilling. The minimal average particle size was estimated from powder X-ray diffraction analysis to be in the range of 10-20 nm. The hydrogen absorption of the milled compounds was measured in different hydrogenation systems at hydrogen pressures between {approx}6 MPa and {approx}2 GPa. In all the cases the hydrogen absorption was negligible. In addition, there was a reduction of the hydrogen absorption capacity of nanosized Zr(Al{sub 0.5}Co{sub 0.5}){sub 2} as compared to the corresponding bulk compound at the same conditions. We suggest, in view of our and other results, that no significant improvement of the thermodynamics (unlike the kinetics) of the hydrogen absorption can be achieved via the nanoparticle avenue.

  3. Can reduced size of metals induce hydrogen absorption: ZrAl2 case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, I.; Deledda, S.; Bereznitsky, M.; Yeheskel, O.; Filipek, S.M.; Mogilyanski, D.; Kimmel, G.; Hauback, B.C.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → 15 nm particles of ZrAl 2 and Zr(Al 0.5 Co 0.5 ) 2 are obtained by attrition and cryomilling. → ZrAl 2 nanoparticles remain inert to hydrogen absorption up to pressure of ∼2 GPa. → Zr(Al 0.5 Co 0.5 ) 2 nanoparticles exhibit reduced hydrogen absorption as compared to the corresponding bulk compounds. - Abstract: The hydrogen absorption ability of the non-absorbing Al-rich ZrAl 2 compound was examined after reducing its particles-size to the nanometer regime. The hydrogen abstinence of bulk ZrAl 2 has been previously related to its excessive elastic shear stiffening. The particle size of ZrAl 2 was reduced by attrition milling and cryomilling. The minimal average particle size was estimated from powder X-ray diffraction analysis to be in the range of 10-20 nm. The hydrogen absorption of the milled compounds was measured in different hydrogenation systems at hydrogen pressures between ∼6 MPa and ∼2 GPa. In all the cases the hydrogen absorption was negligible. In addition, there was a reduction of the hydrogen absorption capacity of nanosized Zr(Al 0.5 Co 0.5 ) 2 as compared to the corresponding bulk compound at the same conditions. We suggest, in view of our and other results, that no significant improvement of the thermodynamics (unlike the kinetics) of the hydrogen absorption can be achieved via the nanoparticle avenue.

  4. A composite structure based on reduced graphene oxide and metal oxide nanomaterials for chemical sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galstyan, Vardan; Comini, Elisabetta; Kholmanov, Iskandar; Ponzoni, Andrea; Sberveglieri, Veronica; Poli, Nicola; Faglia, Guido; Sberveglieri, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    A hybrid nanostructure based on reduced graphene oxide and ZnO has been obtained for the detection of volatile organic compounds. The sensing properties of the hybrid structure have been studied for different concentrations of ethanol and acetone. The response of the hybrid material is significantly higher compared to pristine ZnO nanostructures. The obtained results have shown that the nanohybrid is a promising structure for the monitoring of environmental pollutants and for the application of breath tests in assessment of exposure to volatile organic compounds.

  5. A composite structure based on reduced graphene oxide and metal oxide nanomaterials for chemical sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vardan Galstyan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A hybrid nanostructure based on reduced graphene oxide and ZnO has been obtained for the detection of volatile organic compounds. The sensing properties of the hybrid structure have been studied for different concentrations of ethanol and acetone. The response of the hybrid material is significantly higher compared to pristine ZnO nanostructures. The obtained results have shown that the nanohybrid is a promising structure for the monitoring of environmental pollutants and for the application of breath tests in assessment of exposure to volatile organic compounds.

  6. Reducing work disability in Ankylosing Spondylitis – development of a work instability scale for AS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helliwell Philip

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Work Instability Scale for Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA-WIS is established and is used by physicians to identify patients at risk of job loss for rapid intervention. The study objective was to explore the concept of Work Instability (a mismatch between an individual's abilities and job demands in Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS and develop a Work Instability Scale specific to this population. Methods New items generated from qualitative interviews were combined with items from the RA-WIS to form a draft AS-WIS. Rasch analysis was used to examine the scaling properties of the AS-WIS using data generated through a postal survey. The scale was validated against a gold standard of expert assessment, a test-retest survey examined reliability. Results Fifty-seven participants who were in work returned the postal survey. Of the original 55 items 38 were shown to fit the Rasch model (χ2 37.5; df 38; p 0.494 and free of bias for gender and disease duration. Following analysis for discrimination against the gold standard assessments 20 items remained with good fit to the model (χ2 24.8; df 20; p 0.21. Test-retest reliability was 0.94. Conclusion The AS-WIS is a self-administered scale which meets the stringent requirements of modern measurement. Used as a screening tool it can identify those experiencing a mismatch at work who are at risk of job retention problems and work disability. Work instability is emerging as an important indication for the use of biologics, thus the AS-WIS has the potential to become an important outcome measure.

  7. Core Sulphate-Reducing Microorganisms in Metal-Removing Semi-Passive Biochemical Reactors and the Co-Occurrence of Methanogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Rezadehbashi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Biochemical reactors (BCRs based on the stimulation of sulphate-reducing microorganisms (SRM are emerging semi-passive remediation technologies for treatment of mine-influenced water. Their successful removal of metals and sulphate has been proven at the pilot-scale, but little is known about the types of SRM that grow in these systems and whether they are diverse or restricted to particular phylogenetic or taxonomic groups. A phylogenetic study of four established pilot-scale BCRs on three different mine sites compared the diversity of SRM growing in them. The mine sites were geographically distant from each other, nevertheless the BCRs selected for similar SRM types. Clostridia SRM related to Desulfosporosinus spp. known to be tolerant to high concentrations of copper were members of the core microbial community. Members of the SRM family Desulfobacteraceae were dominant, particularly those related to Desulfatirhabdium butyrativorans. Methanogens were dominant archaea and possibly were present at higher relative abundances than SRM in some BCRs. Both hydrogenotrophic and acetoclastic types were present. There were no strong negative or positive co-occurrence correlations of methanogen and SRM taxa. Knowing which SRM inhabit successfully operating BCRs allows practitioners to target these phylogenetic groups when selecting inoculum for future operations.

  8. Alternative strategies to reduce cost and waste volume in HEPA filtration using metallic filter media - 59348

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chadwick, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Document available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The disposal costs of contaminated HEPA and THE filter elements have been proved to be disproportionately high compared with the cost of the elements themselves. Work published elsewhere (Moore, et el 1992; Bergman et al 1997) suggests that the cost of use of traditional, panel type, glass fibre HEPA filtration trains to the DOE was, during that period, $29.5 million, based on a five year life cycle, and including installation, testing, removal and disposal life cycle costs being based on estimates dating from 1987-1990. Within that cost estimate, $300 was the value given to the filter and $4, 450 was given to the peripheral activity. Clearly, if the $4, 450 component could be reduced, tremendous saving could ensue, in addition to the reduction of the legacy burden of waste volume. This issue exists for operators in both the US and in Europe. If HEPA filters could be cleaned to a condition where they could either be re-used or decontaminated to the extent that they could be stored as a lower cost wasteform or if HEPA/THE filter elements were available without any organic content likely to give rise to flammable or explosive decomposition gases during long term storage this would also reduce the costs and monitoring necessary in storage. (author)

  9. Metal-Carbon Interactions on Reduced Graphene Oxide under Facile Thermal Treatment: Microbiological and Cell Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. L. V. Carreño

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Silver-functionalized reduced graphene oxide (Ag-rGO nanosheets were prepared by single chemical and thermal processes, with very low concentration of silver. The resulting carbon framework consists of reduced graphene oxide (rGO sheets or 3D networks, decorated with anchored silver nanoparticles. The Ag-rGO nanosheets were dispersed into a polymer matrix and the composites evaluated for use as biological scaffolds. The rGO material in poly(dimethylsiloxane (PDMS has been tested for antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus (S. Aureus bacteria, after exposure times of 24 and 120 hours, as well as in the determination of cell viability on cultures of fibroblast cells (NIH/3T3. Using 1 mL of Ag-rGO in PDMS the antibacterial effectiveness against Staphylococcus aureus was limited, showing an increased amount of Colony Forming Units (CFU, after 24 hours of contact. In the cell viability assay, after 48 hours of contact, the group of 1 mL of Ag-rGO with PDMS was the only group that increased cell viability when compared to the control group. In this context, it is believed these behaviors are due to the increase in cell adhesion capacity promoted by the rGO. Thus, the Ag-rGO/PDMS hybrid nanocomposite films can be used as scaffolds for tissue engineering, as they limit antimicrobial activity.

  10. Assessment of heavy metal tolerance and hexavalent chromium reducing potential of Corynebacterium paurometabolum SKPD 1204 isolated from chromite mine seepage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal Kanti Paul

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Corynebacterium paurometabolum SKPD 1204 (MTCC 8730, a heavy metal tolerant and chromate reducing bacterium isolated from chromite mine seepage of Odisha, India has been evaluated for chromate reduction under batch culture. The isolate was found to tolerate metals like Co(II, Cu(II, Ni(II, Mn(II, Zn(II, Fe(III and Hg(II along with Cr(VI and was resistant to different antibiotics as evaluated by disc-diffusion method. The isolate, SKPD 1204 was found to reduce 62.5% of 2 mM Cr(VI in Vogel Bonner broth within 8 days of incubation. Chromate reduction capability of SKPD 1204 decreased with increase in Cr(VI concentration, but increased with increase in cell density and attained its maximum at 1010 cells/mL. Chromate reducing efficiency of SKPD 1204 was promoted in the presence of glycerol and glucose, while the highest reduction was recorded at pH 7.0 and 35 °C. The reduction process was inhibited by divalent cations Zn(II, Cd(II, Cu(II, and Ni(II, but not by Mn(II. Anions like nitrate, phosphate, sulphate and sulphite was found to be inhibitory to the process of Cr(VI reduction. Similarly, sodium fluoride, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, sodium azide and N, N,-Di cyclohexyl carboiimide were inhibitory to chromate reduction, while 2,4-dinitrophenol appeared to be neither promotive nor inhibitory to the process.

  11. Performances of low-dose dual-energy CT in reducing artifacts from implanted metallic orthopedic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filograna, Laura [Catholic University of Rome, School of Medicine, University Hospital ' ' A. Gemelli' ' , Department of Radiological Sciences, Institute of Radiology, Rome (Italy); University of Zurich, Department of Forensic Medicine and Imaging, Institute of Forensic Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); Magarelli, Nicola; Leone, Antonio; Bonomo, Lorenzo [Catholic University of Rome, School of Medicine, University Hospital ' ' A. Gemelli' ' , Department of Radiological Sciences, Institute of Radiology, Rome (Italy); De Waure, Chiara; Calabro, Giovanna Elisa [Catholic University of Rome, School of Medicine, University Hospital ' ' A. Gemelli' ' , Research Centre for Health Technology Assessment, Department of Public Health, Section of Hygiene, Rome (Italy); Finkenstaedt, Tim [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Thali, Michael John [University of Zurich, Department of Forensic Medicine and Imaging, Institute of Forensic Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2016-07-15

    The objective was to evaluate the performances of dose-reduced dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) in decreasing metallic artifacts from orthopedic devices compared with dose-neutral DECT, dose-neutral single-energy computed tomography (SECT), and dose-reduced SECT. Thirty implants in 20 consecutive cadavers underwent both SECT and DECT at three fixed CT dose indexes (CTDI): 20.0, 10.0, and 5.0 mGy. Extrapolated monoenergetic DECT images at 64, 69, 88, 105, 120, and 130 keV, and individually adjusted monoenergy for optimized image quality (OPTkeV) were generated. In each group, the image quality of the seven monoenergetic images and of the SECT image was assessed qualitatively and quantitatively by visually rating and by measuring the maximum streak artifact respectively. The comparison between SECT and OPTkeV evaluated overall within all groups showed a significant difference (p <0.001), with OPTkeV images providing better images. Comparing OPTkeV with the other DECT images, a significant difference was shown (p <0.001), with OPTkeV and 130-keV images providing the qualitatively best results. The OPTkeV images of 5.0-mGy acquisitions provided percentages of images with scores 1 and 2 of 36 % and 30 % respectively, compared with 0 % and 33.3 % of the corresponding SECT images of 10- and 20-mGy acquisitions. Moreover, DECT reconstructions at the OPTkeV of the low-dose group showed higher CT numbers than the SECT images of dose groups 1 and 2. This study demonstrates that low-dose DECT permits a reduction of artifacts due to metallic implants to be obtained in a similar manner to neutral-dose DECT and better than reduced or neutral-dose SECT. (orig.)

  12. Effect of surface oxidation on the nm-scale wear behavior of a metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caron, A.; Louzguine-Luzguin, D. V.; Sharma, P.; Inoue, A.; Shluger, A.; Fecht, H.-J.

    2011-01-01

    Metallic glasses are good candidates for applications in micromechanical systems. With size reduction of mechanical components into the micrometer and submicrometer range, the native surface oxide layer starts playing an important role in contact mechanical applications of metallic glasses. We use atomic force microscopy to investigate the wear behavior of the Ni 62 Nb 38 metallic glass with a native oxide layer and with an oxide grown after annealing in air. After the annealing, the wear rate is found to have significantly decreased. Also the dependency of the specific wear on the velocity is found to be linear in the case of the as spun sample while it follows a power law in the case of the sample annealed in air. We discuss these results in relation to the friction behavior and properties of the surface oxide layer obtained on the same alloy.

  13. Technology demonstration for reducing mercury emissions from small-scale gold refining facilities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habegger, L. J.; Fernandez, L. E.; Engle, M.; Bailey, J. L.; Peterson, D. P.; MacDonell, M. M.; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

    2008-06-30

    Gold that is brought from artisanal and small-scale gold mining areas to gold shops for processing and sale typically contains 5-40% mercury. The uncontrolled removal of the residual mercury in gold shops by using high-temperature evaporation can be a significant source of mercury emissions in urban areas where the shops are located. Emissions from gold shop hoods during a burn can exceed 1,000 mg/m{sup 3}. Because the saturation concentration of mercury vapor at operating temperatures at the hood exhaust is less than 100 mg/m{sup 3}, the dominant component of the exhaust is in the form of aerosol or liquid particles. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), with technical support from Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne), has completed a project to design and test a technology to remove the dominant aerosol component in the emissions from gold shops. The objective was to demonstrate a technology that could be manufactured at low cost and by using locally available materials and manufacturing capabilities. Six prototypes designed by Argonne were locally manufactured, installed, and tested in gold shops in Itaituba and Creporizao, Brazil. The initial prototype design incorporated a pebble bed as the media for collecting the mercury aerosols, and a mercury collection efficiency of over 90% was demonstrated. Though achieving high efficiencies, the initial prototype was determined to have practical disadvantages such as excessive weight, a somewhat complex construction, and high costs (>US$1,000). To further simplify the construction, operation, and associated costs, a second prototype design was developed in which the pebble bed was replaced with slotted steel baffle plates. The system was designed to have flexibility for installation in various hood configurations. The second prototype with the baffle plate design was installed and tested in several different hood/exhaust systems to determine the optimal installation configuration. The significance of

  14. Reduced linear noise approximation for biochemical reaction networks with time-scale separation: The stochastic tQSSA+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herath, Narmada; Del Vecchio, Domitilla

    2018-03-01

    Biochemical reaction networks often involve reactions that take place on different time scales, giving rise to "slow" and "fast" system variables. This property is widely used in the analysis of systems to obtain dynamical models with reduced dimensions. In this paper, we consider stochastic dynamics of biochemical reaction networks modeled using the Linear Noise Approximation (LNA). Under time-scale separation conditions, we obtain a reduced-order LNA that approximates both the slow and fast variables in the system. We mathematically prove that the first and second moments of this reduced-order model converge to those of the full system as the time-scale separation becomes large. These mathematical results, in particular, provide a rigorous justification to the accuracy of LNA models derived using the stochastic total quasi-steady state approximation (tQSSA). Since, in contrast to the stochastic tQSSA, our reduced-order model also provides approximations for the fast variable stochastic properties, we term our method the "stochastic tQSSA+". Finally, we demonstrate the application of our approach on two biochemical network motifs found in gene-regulatory and signal transduction networks.

  15. Reduced-scale experimental investigation on ventilation performance of a local exhaust hood in an industrial plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Yanqiu; Wang, Yi; Liu, Li

    2015-01-01

    stratification in the working areas of industrial plants. Investigated factors were confined airflow boundaries, flow rates of the exhaust hoods, source strengths, airflow obstacles and distances between sources and exhaust hoods. Reduced-scale experiments were conducted with a geometric scale of 1...... efficiency. Hood performance was also evaluated by thermal stratification heights in the plants. This study could help improve the capture efficiency of local ventilation systems used in industrial plants. Safe operation heights are recommended in the upper space of industrial plants based on the thermal...

  16. An updated survey of globular clusters in M 31. III. A spectroscopic metallicity scale for the Revised Bologna Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galleti, S.; Bellazzini, M.; Buzzoni, A.; Federici, L.; Fusi Pecci, F.

    2009-12-01

    Aims. We present a new homogeneous set of metallicity estimates based on Lick indices for the old globular clusters of the M 31 galaxy. The final aim is to add homogeneous spectroscopic metallicities to as many entries as possible of the Revised Bologna Catalog of M 31 clusters, by reporting Lick index measurements from any source (literature, new observations, etc.) on the same scale. Methods: New empirical relations of [Fe/H] as a function of [MgFe] and Mg2 indices are based on the well-studied galactic globular clusters, complemented with theoretical model predictions for -0.2≤ [Fe/H]≤ +0.5. Lick indices for M 31 clusters from various literature sources (225 clusters) and from new observations by our team (71 clusters) have been transformed into the Trager et al. system, yielding new metallicity estimates for 245 globular clusters of M 31. Results: Our values are in good agreement with recent estimates based on detailed spectral fitting and with those obtained from color magnitude diagrams of clusters imaged with the Hubble Space Telescope. The typical uncertainty on individual estimates is ≃±0.25 dex, as resulted from the comparison with metallicities derived from color magnitude diagrams of individual clusters. Conclusions: The metallicity distribution of M 31 globular cluster is briefly discussed and compared with that of the Milky Way. Simple parametric statistical tests suggest that the distribution is probably not unimodal. The strong correlation between metallicity and kinematics found in previous studies is confirmed. The most metal-rich GCs tend to be packed into the center of the system and to cluster tightly around the galactic rotation curve defined by the HI disk, while the velocity dispersion about the curve increases with decreasing metallicity. However, also the clusters with [Fe/H]<-1.0 display a clear rotation pattern, at odds with their Milky Way counterparts. Based on observations made at La Palma, at the Spanish Observatorio del Roque

  17. Multi-scale path planning for reduced environmental impact of aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Scot Edward

    A future air traffic management system capable of rerouting aircraft trajectories in real-time in response to transient and evolving events would result in increased aircraft efficiency, better utilization of the airspace, and decreased environmental impact. Mixed-integer linear programming (MILP) is used within a receding horizon framework to form aircraft trajectories which mitigate persistent contrail formation, avoid areas of convective weather, and seek a minimum fuel solution. Areas conducive to persistent contrail formation and areas of convective weather occur at disparate temporal and spatial scales, and thereby require the receding horizon controller to be adaptable to multi-scale events. In response, a novel adaptable receding horizon controller was developed to account for multi-scale disturbances, as well as generate trajectories using both a penalty function approach for obstacle penetration and hard obstacle avoidance constraints. A realistic aircraft fuel burn model based on aircraft data and engine performance simulations is used to form the cost function in the MILP optimization. The performance of the receding horizon algorithm is tested through simulation. A scalability analysis of the algorithm is conducted to ensure the tractability of the path planner. The adaptable receding horizon algorithm is shown to successfully negotiate multi-scale environments with performance exceeding static receding horizon solutions. The path planner is applied to realistic scenarios involving real atmospheric data. A single flight example for persistent contrail mitigation shows that fuel burn increases 1.48% when approximately 50% of persistent contrails are avoided, but 6.19% when 100% of persistent contrails are avoided. Persistent contrail mitigating trajectories are generated for multiple days of data, and the research shows that 58% of persistent contrails are avoided with a 0.48% increase in fuel consumption when averaged over a year.

  18. Evaluation of Two Biosorbents in the Removal of Metal Ions in Aqueous Using a Pilot Scale Fixed-bed System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Gadelha Oliveira

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work was to investigate the adsorption of toxic metal ions copper, nickel and zinc from aqueous solutions using low cost natural biomass (sugar cane bagasse and green coconut fiber in pilot scale fixed-bed system. The Hydraulic retention time (HRT was 229 minutes and the lowest adsorbent usage rate (AUR found was 0.10 g.L-1 for copper using green coconut fibers. The highest values of adsorption capacities founded were 1.417 and 2.772 mg.g-1 of Cu(II ions for sugarcane bagasse and green coconut fibers, respectively. The results showed that both sugarcane bagasse and green coconut fiber presented potential in the removal of metal ions copper, nickel and zinc ions from aqueous solution and the possible use in wastewater treatment station.

  19. Sub-micrometer-scale patterning on Zr-based metallic glass using focused ion beam irradiation and chemical etching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawasegi, Noritaka [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, University of Toyama, 3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Morita, Noboru [Graduate School of Science and Engineering for Research, University of Toyama, 3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Yamada, Shigeru [Graduate School of Science and Engineering for Research, University of Toyama, 3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Takano, Noboru [Graduate School of Science and Engineering for Research, University of Toyama, 3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Oyama, Tatsuo [Department of Mechanical and Intellectual Systems Engineering, University of Toyama, 3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Ashida, Kiwamu [Advanced Manufacturing Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-2-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8564 (Japan); Momota, Sadao [Department of Intelligent Mechanical Systems Engineering, Kochi University of Technology, 185 Tosayamada, Kochi 782-8502 (Japan); Taniguchi, Jun [Department of Applied Electronics, Tokyo University of Science, 2641 Yamazaki, Noda, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan); Miyamoto, Iwao [Department of Applied Electronics, Tokyo University of Science, 2641 Yamazaki, Noda, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan); Ofune, Hitoshi [YKK Corporation, 200 Yoshida, Kurobe, Toyama 938-8601 (Japan)

    2007-09-19

    This report describes a method of sub-micrometer-scale rapid patterning on a Zr-based metallic glass surface using a combination of focused ion beam irradiation and wet chemical etching. We found that a Zr-based metallic glass surface irradiated with Ga{sup +} ions could be selectively etched; a concave structure with a width and depth of several tens to hundreds of nanometers rapidly formed in the irradiated area. Moreover, we determined that the etching was enhanced by the presence of Ga{sup +} ions rather than a change in the crystal structure, and the structure could be fabricated while the substrate remained amorphous. The shape of the structure was principally a function of the dose and the etch time.

  20. Scaling behaviors of magnetoconductivity in amorphous indium oxide near the metal-insulator transition

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Y J; Kim, Y S

    2000-01-01

    Magnetoconductivity is measured in an amorphous indium-oxide sample which is in the microscopic region. Two different scaling behaviors are observed for the magnetoconductivity The scaling behavior is determined by either the localization or the electron correlation effects, whichever becomes stronger more rapidly at a given temperature and magnetic field. Qualitative explanations are given for the observed scaling behaviors. A curve of a function of H/T sup 2 sup / sup 3 exists on which all our magnetoconductivity data lie.

  1. Lack of cross-scale linkages reduces robustness of community-based fisheries management.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Cudney-Bueno

    Full Text Available Community-based management and the establishment of marine reserves have been advocated worldwide as means to overcome overexploitation of fisheries. Yet, researchers and managers are divided regarding the effectiveness of these measures. The "tragedy of the commons" model is often accepted as a universal paradigm, which assumes that unless managed by the State or privatized, common-pool resources are inevitably overexploited due to conflicts between the self-interest of individuals and the goals of a group as a whole. Under this paradigm, the emergence and maintenance of effective community-based efforts that include cooperative risky decisions as the establishment of marine reserves could not occur. In this paper, we question these assumptions and show that outcomes of commons dilemmas can be complex and scale-dependent. We studied the evolution and effectiveness of a community-based management effort to establish, monitor, and enforce a marine reserve network in the Gulf of California, Mexico. Our findings build on social and ecological research before (1997-2001, during (2002 and after (2003-2004 the establishment of marine reserves, which included participant observation in >100 fishing trips and meetings, interviews, as well as fishery dependent and independent monitoring. We found that locally crafted and enforced harvesting rules led to a rapid increase in resource abundance. Nevertheless, news about this increase spread quickly at a regional scale, resulting in poaching from outsiders and a subsequent rapid cascading effect on fishing resources and locally-designed rule compliance. We show that cooperation for management of common-pool fisheries, in which marine reserves form a core component of the system, can emerge, evolve rapidly, and be effective at a local scale even in recently organized fisheries. Stakeholder participation in monitoring, where there is a rapid feedback of the systems response, can play a key role in reinforcing

  2. Multi-scale Modelling of Fracture in Open-Cell Metal Foams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mangipudi, K. R.; Onck, P. R.; Ganghoffer, JF; Pastrone, F

    2010-01-01

    Metal foams possess attractive mechanical properties like high stiffness to weight ratio.When used to build light-weight structures they require a good combination of strength and ductility. They are ductile under compression but rather brittle in tension with a few percent of overall strain to

  3. Channel length scaling and the impact of metal gate work function ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Further- more, quantum effects on the performance of DG-MOSFETs are addressed and discussed. We also study the influence of metal gate work function on the performance of nanoscale MOSFETs. We use a self-consistent Poisson–Schrödinger solver in two dimensions over the entire device. A good agreement with ...

  4. Scaling relationships for adsorption energies of C2 hydrocarbons on transition metal surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Glenn; Studt, Felix; Abild-Pedersen, Frank

    2011-01-01

    for AHx-type adsorbates to unsaturated hydrocarbons and establishes a coherent simplified description of saturated as well as unsaturated hydrocarbons adsorbed on transition metal surfaces. A number of potential applications are discussed. We apply the model to the dehydrogenation of ethane over pure...

  5. Global direct pressures on biodiversity by large-scale metal mining: Spatial distribution and implications for conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murguía, Diego I; Bringezu, Stefan; Schaldach, Rüdiger

    2016-09-15

    Biodiversity loss is widely recognized as a serious global environmental change process. While large-scale metal mining activities do not belong to the top drivers of such change, these operations exert or may intensify pressures on biodiversity by adversely changing habitats, directly and indirectly, at local and regional scales. So far, analyses of global spatial dynamics of mining and its burden on biodiversity focused on the overlap between mines and protected areas or areas of high value for conservation. However, it is less clear how operating metal mines are globally exerting pressure on zones of different biodiversity richness; a similar gap exists for unmined but known mineral deposits. By using vascular plants' diversity as a proxy to quantify overall biodiversity, this study provides a first examination of the global spatial distribution of mines and deposits for five key metals across different biodiversity zones. The results indicate that mines and deposits are not randomly distributed, but concentrated within intermediate and high diversity zones, especially bauxite and silver. In contrast, iron, gold, and copper mines and deposits are closer to a more proportional distribution while showing a high concentration in the intermediate biodiversity zone. Considering the five metals together, 63% and 61% of available mines and deposits, respectively, are located in intermediate diversity zones, comprising 52% of the global land terrestrial surface. 23% of mines and 20% of ore deposits are located in areas of high plant diversity, covering 17% of the land. 13% of mines and 19% of deposits are in areas of low plant diversity, comprising 31% of the land surface. Thus, there seems to be potential for opening new mines in areas of low biodiversity in the future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Antibiotic Resistance Genes and Correlations with Microbial Community and Metal Resistance Genes in Full-Scale Biogas Reactors As Revealed by Metagenomic Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Gang; Li, Bing; Li, Li-Guan

    2017-01-01

    resistance genes (MRGs). The total abundance of ARGs in all the samples varied from 7 × 10-3 to 1.08 × 10-1 copy of ARG/copy of 16S-rRNA gene, and the samples obtained from thermophilic biogas reactors had a lower total abundance of ARGs, indicating the superiority of thermophilic anaerobic digestion......Digested residues from biogas plants are often used as biofertilizers for agricultural crops cultivation. The antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in digested residues pose a high risk to public health due to their potential spread to the disease-causing microorganisms and thus reduce...... the susceptibility of disease-causing microorganisms to antibiotics in medical treatment. A high-throughput sequencing (HTS)-based metagenomic approach was used in the present study to investigate the variations of ARGs in full-scale biogas reactors and the correlations of ARGs with microbial communities and metal...

  7. Microbial deposition of gold nanoparticles by the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, Y.; Tsukiyama, T.; Tachimi, T.; Saitoh, N.; Nomura, T.; Nagamine, S.

    2007-01-01

    Microbial reduction and deposition of gold nanoparticles was achieved at 25 deg. C over the pH range 2.0-7.0 using the mesophilic bacterium Shewanella algae in the presence of H 2 as the electron donor. The reductive deposition of gold by the resting cells of S. algae was a fast process: 1 mM AuCl 4 - ions were completely reduced to elemental gold within 30 min. At a solution pH of 7, gold nanoparticles 10-20 nm in size were deposited in the periplasmic space of S. algae cells. At pH 2.8, gold nanoparticles 15-200 nm in size were deposited on the bacterial cells, and the biogenic nanoparticles exhibited a variety of shapes that included nanotriangles: in particular, single crystalline gold nanotriangles 100-200 nm in size were microbially deposited. At a solution pH of 2.0, gold nanoparticles about 20 nm in size were deposited intracellularly, and larger gold particles approximately 350 nm in size were deposited extracellularly. The solution pH was an important factor in controlling the morphology of the biogenic gold particles and the location of gold deposition. Microbial deposition of gold nanoparticles is potentially attractive as an environmentally friendly alternative to conventional methods

  8. Reducing weight precision of convolutional neural networks towards large-scale on-chip image recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Zhengping; Ovsiannikov, Ilia; Wang, Yibing; Shi, Lilong; Zhang, Qiang

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we develop a server-client quantization scheme to reduce bit resolution of deep learning architecture, i.e., Convolutional Neural Networks, for image recognition tasks. Low bit resolution is an important factor in bringing the deep learning neural network into hardware implementation, which directly determines the cost and power consumption. We aim to reduce the bit resolution of the network without sacrificing its performance. To this end, we design a new quantization algorithm called supervised iterative quantization to reduce the bit resolution of learned network weights. In the training stage, the supervised iterative quantization is conducted via two steps on server - apply k-means based adaptive quantization on learned network weights and retrain the network based on quantized weights. These two steps are alternated until the convergence criterion is met. In this testing stage, the network configuration and low-bit weights are loaded to the client hardware device to recognize coming input in real time, where optimized but expensive quantization becomes infeasible. Considering this, we adopt a uniform quantization for the inputs and internal network responses (called feature maps) to maintain low on-chip expenses. The Convolutional Neural Network with reduced weight and input/response precision is demonstrated in recognizing two types of images: one is hand-written digit images and the other is real-life images in office scenarios. Both results show that the new network is able to achieve the performance of the neural network with full bit resolution, even though in the new network the bit resolution of both weight and input are significantly reduced, e.g., from 64 bits to 4-5 bits.

  9. Geminal-spanning orbitals make explicitly correlated reduced-scaling coupled-cluster methods robust, yet simple

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavošević, Fabijan; Neese, Frank; Valeev, Edward F.

    2014-08-01

    We present a production implementation of reduced-scaling explicitly correlated (F12) coupled-cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) method based on pair-natural orbitals (PNOs). A key feature is the reformulation of the explicitly correlated terms using geminal-spanning orbitals that greatly reduce the truncation errors of the F12 contribution. For the standard S66 benchmark of weak intermolecular interactions, the cc-pVDZ-F12 PNO CCSD F12 interaction energies reproduce the complete basis set CCSD limit with mean absolute error cost compared to the conventional CCSD F12.

  10. One-step synthesis of in situ reduced metal Bi decorated bismuth molybdate hollow microspheres with enhancing photocatalytic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Meng [College of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Lu, Shiyu [Institute for Clean Energy & Advanced Materials, Faculty of Materials and Energy, Southwest University, Chongqing, 400715 (China); Ma, Li, E-mail: mlsys607@126.com [College of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Gan, Mengyu [College of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • Metal Bi decorated Bi{sub 2-x}MoOy was synthesised by a simple and one-step. • Bi{sup 3+} could be in situ reduced to Bi{sup 0} gradually and dispersed uniform in Bi{sub 2-x}MoOy. • It shows excellent photocatalytic activity due to special structure and composition. - Abstract: In this feature work, in situ metal Bi are successfully modified bismuth molybdate hollow spheres using an effective one-pot solvthermal reduction without any temple. In order to deeply understand the influence of reduction conditions on the texture, surface state, and photocatalytic performance of the resulting samples, a series of products were synthesized by tuning the temperatures. The similar morphology, surface area of photocatalysis (BMO-160 and BMO-170) were synthesized, only with the different composition. The detailed characterization and analysis distinctly suggested that increasing solvothermal reduction temperature led to Bi{sup 3+} was in situ reduced to elementary substance Bi{sup 0} by ethylene glycol gradually and dispersed very uniform in bismuth molybdate. Benefiting from the enhanced charge separation, transfer, and donor density resulting from the formation of Bi decorated bismuth molybdate where Bi as cocatalyst, the photocatalytic performance of the reductive Bi/Bi{sub 2-x}MoO{sub y} hollow spheres (BMO-170) is higher than that of the untreated Bi{sub 2-x}MoO{sub y} hollow spheres (BMO-160) for Rh6G degradation under visible light irradiation. Additionally, the reductive BMO-170 has a superior stability after five cycles.

  11. Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scales are a visible peeling or flaking of outer skin layers. These layers are called the stratum ... Scales may be caused by dry skin, certain inflammatory skin conditions, or infections. Examples of disorders that ...

  12. Formation of x-ray Newton’s rings from nano-scale spallation shells of metals in laser ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaharu Nishikino

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The initial stages of the femtosecond (fs laser ablation process of gold, platinum, and tungsten were observed by single-shot soft x-ray imaging technique. The formation and evolution of soft x-ray Newton’s rings (NRs were found for the first time. The soft x-ray NRs are caused by the interference between the bulk ablated surface and nanometer-scale thin spallation layer; they originate from the metal surface at pump energy fluence of around 1 J/cm2 and work as a flying soft x-ray beam splitter.

  13. State of the art and prospective of large scale applications of YBCO thick films grown on metallic substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boffa, Vincenzo

    1997-09-01

    In the framework of the high temperature superconducting materials, YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 (YBCO) shows very interesting intrinsic superconducting transport properties at temperature higher than the liquid nitrogen temperature. These properties are very important in large scale applications: transport of energy, magnets, transformers, etc. Unfortunately the potential of this material cannot be achieved today, since it is very difficult to manufacture YBCO based tapes or cables. In the last years several groups have tried to overcome the problems with new fabrication techniques. In the present report the state of the art and the prospective in the field of YBCO film fabrication on metallic substrates are presented

  14. Large-scale synthesis of reduced graphene oxides with uniformly coated polyaniline for supercapacitor applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salunkhe, Rahul R; Hsu, Shao-Hui; Wu, Kevin C W; Yamauchi, Yusuke

    2014-06-01

    We report an effective route for the preparation of layered reduced graphene oxide (rGO) with uniformly coated polyaniline (PANI) layers. These nanocomposites are synthesized by chemical oxidative polymerization of aniline monomer in the presence of layered rGO. SEM, TEM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), FTIR, and Raman spectroscopy analysis results demonstrated that reduced graphene oxide-polyaniline (rGO-PANI) nanocomposites are successfully synthesized. Because of synergistic effects, rGO-PANI nanocomposites prepared by this approach exhibit excellent capacitive performance with a high specific capacitance of 286 F g(-1) and high cycle reversibility of 94 % after 2000 cycles. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. MapReduce Based Parallel Neural Networks in Enabling Large Scale Machine Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Artificial neural networks (ANNs have been widely used in pattern recognition and classification applications. However, ANNs are notably slow in computation especially when the size of data is large. Nowadays, big data has received a momentum from both industry and academia. To fulfill the potentials of ANNs for big data applications, the computation process must be speeded up. For this purpose, this paper parallelizes neural networks based on MapReduce, which has become a major computing model to facilitate data intensive applications. Three data intensive scenarios are considered in the parallelization process in terms of the volume of classification data, the size of the training data, and the number of neurons in the neural network. The performance of the parallelized neural networks is evaluated in an experimental MapReduce computer cluster from the aspects of accuracy in classification and efficiency in computation.

  16. MapReduce Based Parallel Neural Networks in Enabling Large Scale Machine Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Yang, Jie; Huang, Yuan; Xu, Lixiong; Li, Siguang; Qi, Man

    2015-01-01

    Artificial neural networks (ANNs) have been widely used in pattern recognition and classification applications. However, ANNs are notably slow in computation especially when the size of data is large. Nowadays, big data has received a momentum from both industry and academia. To fulfill the potentials of ANNs for big data applications, the computation process must be speeded up. For this purpose, this paper parallelizes neural networks based on MapReduce, which has become a major computing model to facilitate data intensive applications. Three data intensive scenarios are considered in the parallelization process in terms of the volume of classification data, the size of the training data, and the number of neurons in the neural network. The performance of the parallelized neural networks is evaluated in an experimental MapReduce computer cluster from the aspects of accuracy in classification and efficiency in computation.

  17. Reduced wear of enamel with novel fine and nano-scale leucite glass-ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theocharopoulos, Antonios; Chen, Xiaohui; Hill, Robert; Cattell, Michael J

    2013-06-01

    Leucite glass-ceramics used to produce all-ceramic restorations can suffer from brittle fracture and wear the opposing teeth. High strength and fine crystal sized leucite glass-ceramics have recently been reported. The objective of this study is to investigate whether fine and nano-scale leucite glass-ceramics with minimal matrix microcracking are associated with a reduction in in vitro tooth wear. Human molar cusps (n=12) were wear tested using a Bionix-858 testing machine (300,000 simulated masticatory cycles) against experimental fine crystal sized (FS), nano-scale crystal sized (NS) leucite glass-ceramics and a commercial leucite glass-ceramic (Ceramco-3, Dentsply, USA). Wear was imaged using Secondary Electron Imaging (SEI) and quantified using white-light profilometry. Both experimental groups were found to produce significantly (pceramic) loss than the FS group. Increased waviness and damage was observed on the wear surfaces of the Ceramco-3 glass-ceramic disc/tooth group in comparison to the experimental groups. This was also indicated by higher surface roughness values for the Ceramco-3 glass-ceramic disc/tooth group. Fine and nano-sized leucite glass-ceramics produced a reduction in in vitro tooth wear. The high strength low wear materials of this study may help address the many problems associated with tooth enamel wear and restoration failure. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Preliminary Study on a Reduced Scaled Model Regarding the Air Diffusion inside a Crew Quarter on Board of the ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandu, Mihnea; Nastase, Ilinca; Bode, Florin; Croitoru, CristianaVerona; Tacutu, Laurentiu

    2018-02-01

    The paper focus on the air quality inside the Crew Quarters on board of the International Space Station. Several issues to improve were recorded by NASA and ESA and most important of them are the following: noise level reduction, CO2 accumulation reduction and dust accumulation reduction. The study in this paper is centred on a reduced scaled model used to provide simulations related to the air diffusion inside the CQ. It is obvious that a new ventilation system is required to achieve the three issues mentioned above, and the solutions obtained by means of numerical simulation need to be validated by experimental approach. First of all we have built a reduced scaled physical model to simulate the flow pattern inside the CQ and the equipment inside the CQ has been reproduced using a geometrical scale ratio. The flow pattern was considered isothermal and incompressible. The similarity criteria used was the Reynolds number to characterize the flow pattern and the length scale was set at value 1/4. Water has been used inside the model to simulate air. Velocity magnitude vectors have been obtained using PIV measurement techniques.

  19. Preliminary Study on a Reduced Scaled Model Regarding the Air Diffusion inside a Crew Quarter on Board of the ISS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandu Mihnea

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper focus on the air quality inside the Crew Quarters on board of the International Space Station. Several issues to improve were recorded by NASA and ESA and most important of them are the following: noise level reduction, CO2 accumulation reduction and dust accumulation reduction. The study in this paper is centred on a reduced scaled model used to provide simulations related to the air diffusion inside the CQ. It is obvious that a new ventilation system is required to achieve the three issues mentioned above, and the solutions obtained by means of numerical simulation need to be validated by experimental approach. First of all we have built a reduced scaled physical model to simulate the flow pattern inside the CQ and the equipment inside the CQ has been reproduced using a geometrical scale ratio. The flow pattern was considered isothermal and incompressible. The similarity criteria used was the Reynolds number to characterize the flow pattern and the length scale was set at value 1/4. Water has been used inside the model to simulate air. Velocity magnitude vectors have been obtained using PIV measurement techniques.

  20. Sparse maps—A systematic infrastructure for reduced-scaling electronic structure methods. II. Linear scaling domain based pair natural orbital coupled cluster theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riplinger, Christoph; Pinski, Peter; Becker, Ute; Neese, Frank; Valeev, Edward F.

    2016-01-01

    Domain based local pair natural orbital coupled cluster theory with single-, double-, and perturbative triple excitations (DLPNO-CCSD(T)) is a highly efficient local correlation method. It is known to be accurate and robust and can be used in a black box fashion in order to obtain coupled cluster quality total energies for large molecules with several hundred atoms. While previous implementations showed near linear scaling up to a few hundred atoms, several nonlinear scaling steps limited the applicability of the method for very large systems. In this work, these limitations are overcome and a linear scaling DLPNO-CCSD(T) method for closed shell systems is reported. The new implementation is based on the concept of sparse maps that was introduced in Part I of this series [P. Pinski, C. Riplinger, E. F. Valeev, and F. Neese, J. Chem. Phys. 143, 034108 (2015)]. Using the sparse map infrastructure, all essential computational steps (integral transformation and storage, initial guess, pair natural orbital construction, amplitude iterations, triples correction) are achieved in a linear scaling fashion. In addition, a number of additional algorithmic improvements are reported that lead to significant speedups of the method. The new, linear-scaling DLPNO-CCSD(T) implementation typically is 7 times faster than the previous implementation and consumes 4 times less disk space for large three-dimensional systems. For linear systems, the performance gains and memory savings are substantially larger. Calculations with more than 20 000 basis functions and 1000 atoms are reported in this work. In all cases, the time required for the coupled cluster step is comparable to or lower than for the preceding Hartree-Fock calculation, even if this is carried out with the efficient resolution-of-the-identity and chain-of-spheres approximations. The new implementation even reduces the error in absolute correlation energies by about a factor of two, compared to the already accurate

  1. Low temperature sulfur and sodium metal battery for grid-scale energy storage application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gao; Wang, Dongdong

    2018-03-27

    A re-chargeable battery comprising a non-dendrite forming sodium (Na)/potassium (K) liquid metal alloy anode, a sulfur and polyacrylonitrile (PAN) conductive polymer composite cathode, a polyethyleneoxide (PEO) solid electrolyte, a solid electrolyte interface (SEI) formed on the PEO solid electrolyte; and a cell housing, wherein the anode, cathode, and electrolyte are assembled into the cell housing with the PEO solid electrolyte disposed between the cathode and anode.

  2. MR imaging with metal artifact-reducing sequences and gadolinium contrast agent in a case-control study of periprosthetic abnormalities in patients with metal-on-metal hip prostheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Gunilla M.; Mueller, Markus F.; Ekberg, Olle [Lund University, Skaane University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Malmoe (Sweden); Maansson, Sven [Lund University, Skaane University Hospital, Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Malmoe (Sweden); Schewelov, Thord von [Lund University, Skaane University Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Malmoe (Sweden); Nittka, Mathias [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Erlangen (Germany); Lundin, Bjoern [Lund University, Skaane University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Lund (Sweden)

    2014-08-15

    To apply and compare magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) metal artifact reducing sequences (MARS) including subtraction imaging after contrast application in patients with metal-on-metal (MoM) hip prostheses, investigate the prevalence and characteristics of periprosthetic abnormalities, as well as their relation with pain and risk factors. Fifty-two MoM prostheses (35 cases with pain and or risk factors, and 17 controls) in 47 patients were examined in a 1.5-T MR scanner using MARS: turbo spin echo (TSE) with high readout bandwidth with and without view angle tilting (VAT), TSE with VAT and slice encoding for metal artifact correction (SEMAC), short tau inversion recovery (STIR) with matched RF pulses, and post-contrast imaging. The relations of MRI findings to pain and risk factors were analyzed and in five revised hips findings from operation, histology, and MRI were compared. TSE VAT detected the highest number of osteolyses. Soft tissue mass, effusion, and capsular thickening were common, whereas osteolysis in acetabulum and femur were less frequent. Contrast enhancement occurred in bone, synovia, joint capsule, and the periphery of soft tissue mass. There was no significant relation between MRI findings and pain or risk factors. MARS and gadolinium subtraction imaging are useful for evaluation of complications to MoM prosthesis. TSE VAT had the highest sensitivity for osteolysis. Contrast enhancement might indicate activation of aseptic lymphocyte-dominated vasculitis-associated lesion (ALVAL). Pain, small head, or steep prosthesis inclination angle are not useful predictors of periprosthetic abnormalities, and wide indications for MR follow-up are warranted. (orig.)

  3. Heavy-metal toxicity phenomena in laboratory-scale ANFLOW bioreactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera, A.L.

    1982-04-01

    An energy-conserving wastewater treatment system was developed based on an anaerobic, upflow (ANFLOW) bioreactor. Since many applications of the ANFLOW process could involve the treatment of wastewaters containing heavy metals, the potentially toxic effects of these metals on the biological processes occurring in ANFLOW columns (primarily acetogenesis and methanogenesis) were investigated. Both step and pulse inputs of zinc ranging from 100 to 1000 mg/L were added to synthetic wastewaters being treated in ANFLOW columns with 0.057-m/sup 3/ volumes. Column responses were used to develop descriptive models for toxicity phenomena in such systems. It was found that an inhibition function could be defined and used to modify a model based on plugflow with axial dispersion and first-order kinetics for soluble substrate removal. The inhibitory effects of zinc on soluble substrate removal were found to be predominantly associated with its sorption by biosolids. Sorption initially occurred in the lower regions of the column, but was gradually observed in higher regions as the sorption capacity of the lower regions was exhausted. Sorption phenomena could be described with the Freundlich equation. Sorption processes were accompanied by shifts of biological processes to regions higher in the columns. A regenerative process was observed when feeding of wastewaters without zinc was resumed. It was postulated that regeneration could be based on sloughing of layers of biofilms, or other biosolids involved in zinc sorption, followed by continued growth of lower layers of biofilms not involved in heavy-metal sorption.

  4. Source of Global Scale Variations in the Midday Vertical Content of Ionospheric Metal Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joiner, J.; Grebowsky, J. M.; Pesnell, W. D.; Aikin, A. C.; Goldberg, Richard A.

    1999-01-01

    An analysis of long baseline NIMBUS 7 SBUV (Solar Backscatter UV Spectrometer) observations of the latitudinal variation of the noontime vertical Mg' content above approx. 70 km have revealed seasonal, solar activity and magnetic activity dependencies in the Mg+ content. The distributions were categorized in terms of magnetic coordinates partially because transport processes lifting metallic ions from the main meteor ionization layer below 100 km up into the F- region and down again are controlled by electrodynamical processes. Alternatively, the Nimbus Mg+ distributions may simply be a result of ion/neutral chemistry changes resulting from atmospheric changes and not dynamics. In such a case magnetic control would not dominate the distributions. Using in situ satellite measurements of metal ions from the Atmosphere Explorer satellites in the region above the main meteor layer and published sounding rocket measurements of the main metallic ion layers, the effects of the dynamics on the vertical content are delineated. The consequences of atmospheric changes on the vertical content are explored by separating the Nimbus measurements in a geodetic frame of reference.

  5. Pilot-scale continuous ultrasonic cleaning equipment reduces Listeria monocytogenes levels on conveyor belts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolvanen, Riina; Lundén, Janne; Hörman, Ari; Korkeala, Hannu

    2009-02-01

    Ultrasonic cleaning of a conveyor belt was studied by building a pilot-scale conveyor with an ultrasonic cleaning bath. A piece of the stainless steel conveyor belt was contaminated with meat-based soil and Listeria monocytogenes strains (V1, V3, and B9) and incubated for 72 h to allow bacteria to attach to the conveyor belt surfaces. The effect of ultrasound with a potassium hydroxide-based cleaning detergent was determined by using the cleaning bath at 45 and 50 degrees C for 30 s with and without ultrasound. The detachment of L. monocytogenes from the conveyor belt caused by the ultrasonic treatment was significantly greater at 45 degrees C (independent samples t test, P conveyor belt is effective even with short treatment times.

  6. Considerations for reducing food system energy demand while scaling up urban agriculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohareb, Eugene; Heller, Martin; Novak, Paige

    2017-01-01

    -income countries, considering UA classification, direct/indirect energy pressures, and interactions with other components of the food-energy-water nexus. This is followed by an exploration of ways in which these cities can plan for the exploitation of waste flows for resource-efficient UA...... with UA systems, highlighting that the literature is not yet sufficiently robust to make universal claims on benefits. This letter explores energy demand from conventional resource inputs, various production systems, water/energy trade-offs, alternative irrigation, packaging materials, and transportation...... of the proposed benefits of UA; however, explicit consideration of energy and resource requirements needs to be made in order to realize these anticipated environmental benefits. A literature review is undertaken here to provide new insight into the energy implications of scaling up UA in cities in high...

  7. Controlling the length scale and distribution of the ductile phase in metallic glass composites through friction stir processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Harpreet Singh; Mridha, Sanghita; Grewal, Harpreet Singh; Singh, Harpreet; Hofmann, Douglas C; Mukherjee, Sundeep

    2014-06-01

    We demonstrate the refinement and uniform distribution of the crystalline dendritic phase by friction stir processing (FSP) of titanium based in situ ductile-phase reinforced metallic glass composite. The average size of the dendrites was reduced by almost a factor of five (from 24 μ m to 5 μ m) for the highest tool rotational speed of 900 rpm. The large inter-connected dendrites become more fragmented with increased circularity after processing. The changes in thermal characteristics were measured by differential scanning calorimetry. The reduction in crystallization enthalpy after processing suggests partial devitrification due to the high strain plastic deformation. FSP resulted in increased hardness and modulus for both the amorphous matrix and the crystalline phase. This is explained by interaction of shear bands in amorphous matrix with the strain-hardened dendritic phase. Our approach offers a new strategy for microstructural design in metallic glass composites.

  8. Coupling scales for modelling heavy metal vaporization from municipal solid waste incineration in a fluid bed by CFD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soria, José, E-mail: jose.soria@probien.gob.ar [Institute for Research and Development in Process Engineering, Biotechnology and Alternative Energies (PROBIEN, CONICET – UNCo), 1400 Buenos Aires St., 8300 Neuquén (Argentina); Gauthier, Daniel; Flamant, Gilles [Processes, Materials and Solar Energy Laboratory (PROMES-CNRS, UPR 8521), 7 Four Solaire Street, Odeillo, 66120 Font-Romeu (France); Rodriguez, Rosa [Chemical Engineering Institute, National University of San Juan, 1109 Libertador (O) Avenue, 5400 San Juan (Argentina); Mazza, Germán [Institute for Research and Development in Process Engineering, Biotechnology and Alternative Energies (PROBIEN, CONICET – UNCo), 1400 Buenos Aires St., 8300 Neuquén (Argentina)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • A CFD two-scale model is formulated to simulate heavy metal vaporization from waste incineration in fluidized beds. • MSW particle is modelled with the macroscopic particle model. • Influence of bed dynamics on HM vaporization is included. • CFD predicted results agree well with experimental data reported in literature. • This approach may be helpful for fluidized bed reactor modelling purposes. - Abstract: Municipal Solid Waste Incineration (MSWI) in fluidized bed is a very interesting technology mainly due to high combustion efficiency, great flexibility for treating several types of waste fuels and reduction in pollutants emitted with the flue gas. However, there is a great concern with respect to the fate of heavy metals (HM) contained in MSW and their environmental impact. In this study, a coupled two-scale CFD model was developed for MSWI in a bubbling fluidized bed. It presents an original scheme that combines a single particle model and a global fluidized bed model in order to represent the HM vaporization during MSW combustion. Two of the most representative HM (Cd and Pb) with bed temperatures ranging between 923 and 1073 K have been considered. This new approach uses ANSYS FLUENT 14.0 as the modelling platform for the simulations along with a complete set of self-developed user-defined functions (UDFs). The simulation results are compared to the experimental data obtained previously by the research group in a lab-scale fluid bed incinerator. The comparison indicates that the proposed CFD model predicts well the evolution of the HM release for the bed temperatures analyzed. It shows that both bed temperature and bed dynamics have influence on the HM vaporization rate. It can be concluded that CFD is a rigorous tool that provides valuable information about HM vaporization and that the original two-scale simulation scheme adopted allows to better represent the actual particle behavior in a fluid bed incinerator.

  9. Coupling scales for modelling heavy metal vaporization from municipal solid waste incineration in a fluid bed by CFD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soria, José; Gauthier, Daniel; Flamant, Gilles; Rodriguez, Rosa; Mazza, Germán

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A CFD two-scale model is formulated to simulate heavy metal vaporization from waste incineration in fluidized beds. • MSW particle is modelled with the macroscopic particle model. • Influence of bed dynamics on HM vaporization is included. • CFD predicted results agree well with experimental data reported in literature. • This approach may be helpful for fluidized bed reactor modelling purposes. - Abstract: Municipal Solid Waste Incineration (MSWI) in fluidized bed is a very interesting technology mainly due to high combustion efficiency, great flexibility for treating several types of waste fuels and reduction in pollutants emitted with the flue gas. However, there is a great concern with respect to the fate of heavy metals (HM) contained in MSW and their environmental impact. In this study, a coupled two-scale CFD model was developed for MSWI in a bubbling fluidized bed. It presents an original scheme that combines a single particle model and a global fluidized bed model in order to represent the HM vaporization during MSW combustion. Two of the most representative HM (Cd and Pb) with bed temperatures ranging between 923 and 1073 K have been considered. This new approach uses ANSYS FLUENT 14.0 as the modelling platform for the simulations along with a complete set of self-developed user-defined functions (UDFs). The simulation results are compared to the experimental data obtained previously by the research group in a lab-scale fluid bed incinerator. The comparison indicates that the proposed CFD model predicts well the evolution of the HM release for the bed temperatures analyzed. It shows that both bed temperature and bed dynamics have influence on the HM vaporization rate. It can be concluded that CFD is a rigorous tool that provides valuable information about HM vaporization and that the original two-scale simulation scheme adopted allows to better represent the actual particle behavior in a fluid bed incinerator

  10. Gold ions bio-released from metallic gold particles reduce inflammation and apoptosis and increase the regenerative responses in focal brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Agnete; Kolind, Kristian; Pedersen, Dan Sonne

    2008-01-01

    neural stem cell response. We conclude that bio-liberated gold ions possess pronounced anti-inflammatory and neuron-protective capacities in the brain and suggest that metallic gold has clinical potentials. Intra-cerebral application of metallic gold as a pharmaceutical source of gold ions represents......Traumatic brain injury results in loss of neurons caused as much by the resulting neuroinflammation as by the injury. Gold salts are known to be immunosuppressive, but their use are limited by nephrotoxicity. However, as we have proven that implants of pure metallic gold release gold ions which do...... not spread in the body, but are taken up by cells near the implant, we hypothesize that metallic gold could reduce local neuroinflammation in a safe way. Bio-liberation, or dissolucytosis, of gold ions from metallic gold surfaces requires the presence of disolycytes i.e. macrophages and the process...

  11. Facile and large-scale preparation of sandwich-structured graphene-metal oxide composites as anode materials for Li-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Hongmei; Zhao, Li; Yue, Wenbo; Wang, Yuan; Jiang, Yang; Zhang, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Graphene-based metal oxides are desirable as potential anode materials for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) owing to their superior electrochemical properties. In this work, sandwich-structured graphene-metal oxide (ZnO, NiO) composites are facilely synthesized on a large scale through self-assembly of graphene oxide nanosheets and metal ammine complexes, and then thermal decomposition of the self-assembled products. ZnO or NiO nanoparticles with diameters of 5∼10 nm are immobilized between the layers of graphene nanosheets, which may provide the space for accommodating the volume change of metal oxides during cycles, and highly improve the electronic conductivity of the composites. Accordingly, these sandwich-structured composites exhibit enhanced electrochemical performances compared to metal oxide particles or stacked graphene nanosheets. This facile synthesis method is very suitable for the large-scale production of three-dimensional graphene-based composites as high-performance anodes for LIBs.

  12. Process for reducing the pertechnetate anion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruddock, C.F.

    1980-01-01

    Process for reducing the 'pertechnetate' ion TcO 4 - , whereby an aqueous solution of 'pertechnetate' is mixed with tin metal or a tin alloy as 'pertechnetate' reducing agent, and a soluble salt of a metal below tin in the electro-chemical tension scale, as activator for the reducing tin. This reduced 'pertechnetate' is used for forming usable complexes in medical diagnosis exploration [fr

  13. Reducing tool wear by partial cladding of critical zones in hot form tool by laser metal deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, Robert; Sommitsch, Christof

    2017-10-01

    This paper points out a production method to reduce tool wear in hot stamping applications. Usually tool wear can be observed at locally strongly stressed areas superimposed with gliding movement between blank and tool surface. The shown solution is based on a partial laser cladding of the tool surface with a wear resistant coating to increase the lifespan of tool inserts. Preliminary studies showed good results applying a material combination of tungsten carbide particles embedded in a metallic matrix. Different Nickel based alloys welded on hot work tool steel (1.2343) were tested mechanically in the interface zone. The material with the best bonding characteristic is chosen and reinforced with spherical tungsten carbide particles in a second laser welding step. Since the machining of tungsten carbides is very elaborate a special manufacturing strategy is developed to reduce the milling effort as much as possible. On special test specimens milling tests are carried out to proof the machinability. As outlook a tool insert of a b-pillar is coated to perform real hot forming tests.

  14. New methodologies for calculation of flight parameters on reduced scale wings models in wind tunnel =

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Mosbah, Abdallah

    In order to improve the qualities of wind tunnel tests, and the tools used to perform aerodynamic tests on aircraft wings in the wind tunnel, new methodologies were developed and tested on rigid and flexible wings models. A flexible wing concept is consists in replacing a portion (lower and/or upper) of the skin with another flexible portion whose shape can be changed using an actuation system installed inside of the wing. The main purpose of this concept is to improve the aerodynamic performance of the aircraft, and especially to reduce the fuel consumption of the airplane. Numerical and experimental analyses were conducted to develop and test the methodologies proposed in this thesis. To control the flow inside the test sections of the Price-Paidoussis wind tunnel of LARCASE, numerical and experimental analyses were performed. Computational fluid dynamics calculations have been made in order to obtain a database used to develop a new hybrid methodology for wind tunnel calibration. This approach allows controlling the flow in the test section of the Price-Paidoussis wind tunnel. For the fast determination of aerodynamic parameters, new hybrid methodologies were proposed. These methodologies were used to control flight parameters by the calculation of the drag, lift and pitching moment coefficients and by the calculation of the pressure distribution around an airfoil. These aerodynamic coefficients were calculated from the known airflow conditions such as angles of attack, the mach and the Reynolds numbers. In order to modify the shape of the wing skin, electric actuators were installed inside the wing to get the desired shape. These deformations provide optimal profiles according to different flight conditions in order to reduce the fuel consumption. A controller based on neural networks was implemented to obtain desired displacement actuators. A metaheuristic algorithm was used in hybridization with neural networks, and support vector machine approaches and their

  15. Comprehensive study and design of scaled metal/high-k/Ge gate stacks with ultrathin aluminum oxide interlayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asahara, Ryohei; Hideshima, Iori; Oka, Hiroshi; Minoura, Yuya; Hosoi, Takuji, E-mail: hosoi@mls.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp; Shimura, Takayoshi; Watanabe, Heiji [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ogawa, Shingo [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Toray Research Center Inc., 3-3-7 Sonoyama, Otsu, Shiga 520-8567 (Japan); Yoshigoe, Akitaka; Teraoka, Yuden [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)

    2015-06-08

    Advanced metal/high-k/Ge gate stacks with a sub-nm equivalent oxide thickness (EOT) and improved interface properties were demonstrated by controlling interface reactions using ultrathin aluminum oxide (AlO{sub x}) interlayers. A step-by-step in situ procedure by deposition of AlO{sub x} and hafnium oxide (HfO{sub x}) layers on Ge and subsequent plasma oxidation was conducted to fabricate Pt/HfO{sub 2}/AlO{sub x}/GeO{sub x}/Ge stacked structures. Comprehensive study by means of physical and electrical characterizations revealed distinct impacts of AlO{sub x} interlayers, plasma oxidation, and metal electrodes serving as capping layers on EOT scaling, improved interface quality, and thermal stability of the stacks. Aggressive EOT scaling down to 0.56 nm and very low interface state density of 2.4 × 10{sup 11 }cm{sup −2}eV{sup −1} with a sub-nm EOT and sufficient thermal stability were achieved by systematic process optimization.

  16. Can large-scale oblique undulations on a solid wall reduce the turbulent drag?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghebali, Sacha; Chernyshenko, Sergei I.; Leschziner, Michael A.

    2017-10-01

    Direct numerical simulations of fully developed turbulent channel flows with wavy walls are undertaken. The wavy walls, skewed with respect to the mean flow direction, are introduced as a means of emulating a Spatial Stokes Layer (SSL) induced by in-plane wall motion. The transverse shear strain above the wavy wall is shown to be similar to that of a SSL, thereby affecting the turbulent flow and leading to a reduction in the turbulent skin-friction drag. However, some important differences with respect to the SSL case are brought to light too. In particular, the phase variations of the turbulent properties are accentuated and, unlike in the SSL case, there is a region of increased turbulence production over a portion of the wall, above the leeward side of the wave, thus giving rise to a local increase in dissipation. The pressure- and friction-drag levels are carefully quantified for various flow configurations, exhibiting a combined maximum overall-drag reduction of about 0.6%. The friction-drag reduction is shown to behave approximately quadratically for small wave slopes and then linearly for higher slopes, whilst the pressure-drag penalty increases quadratically. The transverse shear-strain layer is shown to be approximately Reynolds-number independent when the wave geometry is scaled in wall units.

  17. Improved Image Quality in Head and Neck CT Using a 3D Iterative Approach to Reduce Metal Artifact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuest, W; May, M S; Brand, M; Bayerl, N; Krauss, A; Uder, M; Lell, M

    2015-10-01

    Metal artifacts from dental fillings and other devices degrade image quality and may compromise the detection and evaluation of lesions in the oral cavity and oropharynx by CT. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of iterative metal artifact reduction on CT of the oral cavity and oropharynx. Data from 50 consecutive patients with metal artifacts from dental hardware were reconstructed with standard filtered back-projection, linear interpolation metal artifact reduction (LIMAR), and iterative metal artifact reduction. The image quality of sections that contained metal was analyzed for the severity of artifacts and diagnostic value. A total of 455 sections (mean ± standard deviation, 9.1 ± 4.1 sections per patient) contained metal and were evaluated with each reconstruction method. Sections without metal were not affected by the algorithms and demonstrated image quality identical to each other. Of these sections, 38% were considered nondiagnostic with filtered back-projection, 31% with LIMAR, and only 7% with iterative metal artifact reduction. Thirty-three percent of the sections had poor image quality with filtered back-projection, 46% with LIMAR, and 10% with iterative metal artifact reduction. Thirteen percent of the sections with filtered back-projection, 17% with LIMAR, and 22% with iterative metal artifact reduction were of moderate image quality, 16% of the sections with filtered back-projection, 5% with LIMAR, and 30% with iterative metal artifact reduction were of good image quality, and 1% of the sections with LIMAR and 31% with iterative metal artifact reduction were of excellent image quality. Iterative metal artifact reduction yields the highest image quality in comparison with filtered back-projection and linear interpolation metal artifact reduction in patients with metal hardware in the head and neck area. © 2015 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  18. In situ capping for size control of monochalcogenide (ZnS, CdS and SnS) nanocrystals produced by anaerobic metal-reducing bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Gyoung Gug; Datskos, Panos G; Jacobs, Christopher B; Ivanov, Ilia N; Joshi, Pooran C; Meyer, Harry M III; Armstrong, Beth L; Kidder, Michelle; Graham, David E; Moon, Ji-Won

    2015-01-01

    Metal monochalcogenide quantum dot nanocrystals of ZnS, CdS and SnS were prepared by anaerobic, metal-reducing bacteria using in situ capping by oleic acid or oleylamine. The capping agent preferentially adsorbs on the surface of the nanocrystal, suppressing the growth process in the early stages, thus leading to production of nanocrystals with a diameter of less than 5 nm. (paper)

  19. Electrochemical and Friction Characteristics of Metallic Glass Composites at the Microstructural Length-scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayyagari, Aditya; Hasannaeimi, Vahid; Arora, Harpreet; Mukherjee, Sundeep

    2018-01-17

    Metallic glass composites represent a unique alloy design strategy comprising of in situ crystalline dendrites in an amorphous matrix to achieve damage tolerance unseen in conventional structural materials. They are promising for a range of advanced applications including spacecraft gears, high-performance sporting goods and bio-implants, all of which demand high surface degradation resistance. Here, we evaluated the phase-specific electrochemical and friction characteristics of a Zr-based metallic glass composite, Zr 56.2 Ti 13.8 Nb 5.0 Cu 6.9 Ni 5.6 Be 12.5 , which comprised roughly of 40% by volume crystalline dendrites in an amorphous matrix. The amorphous matrix showed higher hardness and friction coefficient compared to the crystalline dendrites. But sliding reciprocating tests for the composite revealed inter-phase delamination rather than preferred wearing of one phase. Pitting during potentiodynamic polarization in NaCl solution was prevalent at the inter-phase boundary, confirming that galvanic coupling was the predominant corrosion mechanism. Scanning vibration electrode technique demonstrated that the amorphous matrix corroded much faster than the crystalline dendrites due to its unfavorable chemistry. Relative work function values measured using scanning kelvin probe showed the amorphous matrix to be more electropositive, which explain its preferred corrosion over the crystalline dendrites as well as its characteristic friction behavior. This study paves the way for careful partitioning of elements between the two phases in a metallic glass composite to tune its surface degradation behavior for a range of advanced applications.

  20. The large-scale structure of the halo of the Andromeda galaxy. I. Global stellar density, morphology and metallicity properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Martin, Nicolas F. [Observatoire astronomique de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, UMR 7550, 11 rue de lUniversité, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Lewis, Geraint F. [Institute of Astronomy, School of Physics A28, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); McConnachie, Alan W. [NRC Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC, V9E 2E7 (Canada); Irwin, Michael J. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Bernard, Edouard J.; Peñarrubia, Jorge [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Babul, Arif; Navarro, Julio [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, 3800 Finnerty Road, Victoria, British Columbia V8P 5C2 (Canada); Chapman, Scott C. [Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, 6310 Coburg Road, Halifax NS B3H 4R2 (Canada); Collins, Michelle [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Fardal, Mark [University of Massachusetts, Department of Astronomy, LGRT 619-E, 710 North Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA 01003-9305 (United States); Mackey, A. D. [RSAA, The Australian National University, Mount Stromlo Observatory, Cotter Road, Weston Creek ACT 2611 (Australia); Rich, R. Michael [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, PAB, 430 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Tanvir, Nial [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Widrow, Lawrence, E-mail: rodrigo.ibata@astro.unistra.fr [Department of Physics, Engineering Physics, and Astronomy Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6 (Canada)

    2014-01-10

    We present an analysis of the large-scale structure of the halo of the Andromeda galaxy, based on the Pan-Andromeda Archeological Survey (PAndAS), currently the most complete map of resolved stellar populations in any galactic halo. Despite the presence of copious substructures, the global halo populations follow closely power-law profiles that become steeper with increasing metallicity. We divide the sample into stream-like populations and a smooth halo component (defined as the population that cannot be resolved into spatially distinct substructures with PAndAS). Fitting a three-dimensional halo model reveals that the most metal-poor populations ([Fe/H]<−1.7) are distributed approximately spherically (slightly prolate with ellipticity c/a = 1.09 ± 0.03), with only a relatively small fraction residing in discernible stream-like structures (f {sub stream} = 42%). The sphericity of the ancient smooth component strongly hints that the dark matter halo is also approximately spherical. More metal-rich populations contain higher fractions of stars in streams, with f {sub stream} becoming as high as 86% for [Fe/H]>−0.6. The space density of the smooth metal-poor component has a global power-law slope of γ = –3.08 ± 0.07, and a non-parametric fit shows that the slope remains nearly constant from 30 kpc to ∼300 kpc. The total stellar mass in the halo at distances beyond 2° is ∼1.1 × 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉}, while that of the smooth component is ∼3 × 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉}. Extrapolating into the inner galaxy, the total stellar mass of the smooth halo is plausibly ∼8 × 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉}. We detect a substantial metallicity gradient, which declines from ([Fe/H]) = –0.7 at R = 30 kpc to ([Fe/H]) = –1.5 at R = 150 kpc for the full sample, with the smooth halo being ∼0.2 dex more metal poor than the full sample at each radius. While qualitatively in line with expectations from cosmological simulations, these observations are of great importance as

  1. Analysis of fluid lubrication mechanisms in metal forming at mesoscopic scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dubar, L.; Hubert, C.; Christiansen, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The lubricant entrapment and escape phenomena in metal forming are studied experimentally as well as numerically. Experiments are carried out in strip reduction of aluminium sheet applying a transparent die to study the fluid flow between mesoscopic cavities. The numerical analysis involves two...... computation steps. The first one is a fully coupled fluid-structure Finite Element computation, where pockets in the surface are plastically deformed leading to the pressurization of the entrapped fluid. The second step computes the fluid exchange between cavities through the plateaus of asperity contacts...

  2. Acute toxicity of heavy metals to acetate-utilizing mixed cultures of sulfate-reducing bacteria: EC100 and EC50.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utgikar, V P; Chen, B Y; Chaudhary, N; Tabak, H H; Haines, J R; Govind, R

    2001-12-01

    Acid mine drainage from abandoned mines and acid mine pit lakes is an important environmental concern and usually contains appreciable concentrations of heavy metals. Because sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are involved in the treatment of acid mine drainage, knowledge of acute metal toxicity levels for SRB is essential for the proper functioning of the treatment system for acid mine drainage. Quantification of heavy metal toxicity to mixed cultures of SRB is complicated by the confounding effects of metal hydroxide and sulfide precipitation, biosorption, and complexation with the constituents of the reaction matrix. The objective of this paper was to demonstrate that measurements of dissolved metal concentrations could be used to determine the toxicity parameters for mixed cultures of sulfate-reducing bacteria. The effective concentration, 100% (EC100), the lowest initial dissolved metal concentrations at which no sulfate reduction is observed, and the effective concentration, 50% (EC50), the initial dissolved metal concentrations resulting in a 50% decrease in sulfate reduction, for copper and zinc were determined in the present study by means of nondestructive, rapid physical and chemical analytical techniques. The reaction medium used in the experiments was designed specifically (in terms of pH and chemical composition) to provide the nutrients necessary for the sulfidogenic activity of the SRB and to preclude chemical precipitation of the metals under investigation. The toxicity-mitigating effects of biosorption of dissolved metals were also quantified. Anaerobic Hungate tubes were set up (at least in triplicate) and monitored for sulfate-reduction activity. The onset of SRB activity was detected by the blackening of the reaction mixture because of formation of insoluble ferrous sulfide. The EC100 values were found to be 12 mg/L for copper and 20 mg/L for zinc. The dissolved metal concentration measurements were effective as the indicators of the effect of the

  3. Effects of halogens on interactions between a reduced TiO{sub 2} (110) surface and noble metal atoms: A DFT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tada, Kohei, E-mail: k-tada@aist.go.jp [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1, Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka, 560-0043 (Japan); Research Institute of Electrochemical Energy, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-8-31, Midorigaoka, Ikeda, Osaka, 563-8577 (Japan); Koga, Hiroaki [Element Strategy Initiative for Catalysts and Batteries (ESICB), Kyoto University, 1-30 Goryo Ohara, Nishikyo, Kyoto, 615-8245 (Japan); Hayashi, Akihide; Kondo, Yudai; Kawakami, Takashi; Yamanaka, Shusuke [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1, Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka, 560-0043 (Japan); Okumura, Mitsutaka [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1, Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka, 560-0043 (Japan); Element Strategy Initiative for Catalysts and Batteries (ESICB), Kyoto University, 1-30 Goryo Ohara, Nishikyo, Kyoto, 615-8245 (Japan)

    2017-07-31

    Highlights: • We investigated the halogen effect on the interactions of noble metals with TiO{sub 2}. • Halogen atoms inhibit electron transfer from TiO{sub 2} to noble metals. • Iodine stabilizes the adsorption of noble metals especially for Ag and Cu. • Electron transfer from the TiO{sub 2} is effective in anchoring Au and Pt atoms. • Covalent interaction with the support is effective in anchoring Ag and Cu atoms. - Abstract: Using DFT calculation, we investigate the effects of halogens on the interactions between rutile TiO{sub 2} (110) and noble metal atoms (Au, Ag, Cu, Pt, and Pd). Fluorine, chlorine, and bromine atoms occupy the oxygen defect sites of TiO{sub 2}, decreasing the stability of noble metal atoms on the surface. This decrease occurs because the halogens inhibit electron transfer from TiO{sub 2} to the noble metal atoms; the electron transfer from reduced TiO{sub 2} to the noble metal atom stabilizes the noble metal atom adsorption. In contrast, iodine strengthens the interactions between TiO{sub 2} and some noble metal atoms, namely Ag and Cu. This stabilization occurs because of the covalent interaction between iodine-doped TiO{sub 2} and the noble metal atom. Therefore, the stabilization is explained well by chemical hardness. This result suggests that iodine-doping of a TiO{sub 2} surface would be an effective method for the preparation of highly stabilized noble metal clusters.

  4. Endoscopic suture fixation is associated with reduced migration of esophageal fully covered self-expandable metal stents (FCSEMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Andrew; Chang, Andrew; Bedi, Aarti Oza; Wamsteker, Erik-Jan; Elta, Grace; Kwon, Richard S; Carrott, Phillip; Elmunzer, B Joseph; Law, Ryan

    2017-09-01

    Esophageal fully covered self-expandable metal stents (FCSEMS) are indicated for the management of benign and malignant conditions of the esophagus including perforations, leaks, and strictures. FCSEMS are resistant to tissue ingrowth and are removable; however, stent migration occurs in 30-55% of cases. Endoscopic suture fixation of FCSEMS has been utilized to decrease the risk of stent migration though data supporting this practice remain limited. The primary aim of this study was to compare clinical outcomes and migration rate of patients who underwent placement of esophageal FCSEMS with and without endoscopic suture fixation. Our single-center, retrospective, cohort study includes patients who underwent esophageal FCSEMS placement with and without endoscopic suture fixation between January 1, 2012, and November 11, 2015. Baseline patient characteristics, procedural details, and clinical outcomes were abstracted. Logistic regression was performed to identify clinical and technical factors associated with outcomes and stent migration. A total of 51 patients underwent 62 FCSEMS placements, including 21 procedures with endoscopic suture fixation and 41 without. Suture fixation was associated with reduced risk of stent migration (OR 0.13, 95% CI 0.03-0.47). Prior stent migration was associated with significantly higher risk of subsequent migration (OR 6.4, 95% CI 1.6-26.0). Stent migration was associated with lower likelihood of clinical success (OR 0.21, 95% CI 0.06-0.69). There was a trend toward higher clinical success among patients undergoing suture fixation (85.7 vs. 60.9%, p = 0.07). Endoscopic suture fixation of FCSEMS was associated with a reduced stent migration rate. Appropriate patient selection for suture fixation of FCSEMS may lead to reduced migration in high-risk patients.

  5. Nanoscale heterostructures with molecular-scale single-crystal metal wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Paromita; Halder, Aditi; Viswanath, B; Kundu, Dipan; Ramanath, Ganpati; Ravishankar, N

    2010-01-13

    Creating nanoscale heterostructures with molecular-scale (synthesis of nanoscale heterostructures with single-crystal molecular-scale Au nanowires attached to different nanostructure substrates. Our method involves the formation of Au nanoparticle seeds by the reduction of rocksalt AuCl nanocubes heterogeneously nucleated on the substrates and subsequent nanowire growth by oriented attachment of Au nanoparticles from the solution phase. Nanoscale heterostructures fabricated by such site-specific nucleation and growth are attractive for many applications including nanoelectronic device wiring, catalysis, and sensing.

  6. Buckling Response of a Large-Scale, Seamless, Orthogrid-Stiffened Metallic Cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudd, Michelle Tillotson; Hilburger, Mark W.; Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Lindell, Michael C.; Gardner, Nathaniel W.; Schultz, Marc R.

    2018-01-01

    Results from the buckling test of a compression-loaded 8-ft-diameter seamless (i.e., without manufacturing joints), orthogrid-stiffened metallic cylinder are presented. This test was used to assess the buckling response and imperfection sensitivity characteristics of a seamless cylinder. In addition, the test article and test served as a technology demonstration to show the application of the flow forming manufacturing process to build more efficient buckling-critical structures by eliminating the welded joints that are traditionally used in the manufacturing of large metallic barrels. Pretest predictions of the cylinder buckling response were obtained using a finite-element model that included measured geometric imperfections. The buckling load predicted using this model was 697,000 lb, and the test article buckled at 743,000 lb (6% higher). After the test, the model was revised to account for measured variations in skin and stiffener geometry, nonuniform loading, and material properties. The revised model predicted a buckling load of 754,000 lb, which is within 1.5% of the tested buckling load. In addition, it was determined that the load carrying capability of the seamless cylinder is approximately 28% greater than a corresponding cylinder with welded joints.

  7. Quantifying heavy metals sequestration by sulfate-reducing bacteria in an acid mine drainage-contaminated wetland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W Moreau

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Bioremediation strategies that depend on bacterial sulfate reduction for heavy metals remediation harness the reactivity of these metals with biogenic aqueous sulfide. Quantitative knowledge of the degree to which specific toxic metals are partitioned into various sulfide, oxide, or other phases is important for predicting the long-term mobility of these metals under environmental conditions. Here we report the quantitative partitioning into sedimentary biogenic sulfides of a suite of metals and metalloids associated with acid mine drainage contamination of a natural estuarine wetland for over a century.

  8. Scaling cost-sharing to wages: how employers can reduce health spending and provide greater economic security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Christopher T

    2014-01-01

    In the employer-sponsored insurance market that covers most Americans; many workers are "underinsured." The evidence shows onerous out-of-pocket payments causing them to forgo needed care, miss work, and fall into bankruptcies and foreclosures. Nonetheless, many higher-paid workers are "overinsured": the evidence shows that in this domain, surplus insurance stimulates spending and price inflation without improving health. Employers can solve these problems together by scaling cost-sharing to wages. This reform would make insurance better protect against risk and guarantee access to care, while maintaining or even reducing insurance premiums. Yet, there are legal obstacles to scaled cost-sharing. The group-based nature of employer health insurance, reinforced by federal law, makes it difficult for scaling to be achieved through individual choices. The Affordable Care Act's (ACA) "essential coverage" mandate also caps cost-sharing even for wealthy workers that need no such cap. Additionally, there is a tax distortion in favor of highly paid workers purchasing healthcare through insurance rather than out-of-pocket. These problems are all surmountable. In particular, the ACA has expanded the applicability of an unenforced employee-benefits rule that prohibits "discrimination" in favor of highly compensated workers. A novel analysis shows that this statute gives the Internal Revenue Service the authority to require scaling and to thereby eliminate the current inequities and inefficiencies caused by the tax distortion. The promise is smarter insurance for over 150 million Americans.

  9. Multi-scale friction modeling for sheet metal forming: the boundary lubrication regime

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hol, J.D.; Meinders, Vincent T.; de Rooij, Matthias B.; van den Boogaard, Antonius H.

    2015-01-01

    A physical based friction model is presented to describe friction in full-scale forming simulations. The advanced friction model accounts for the change in surface topography and the evolution of friction in the boundary lubrication regime. The implementation of the friction model in FE software

  10. Dislocations and elementary processes of plasticity in FCC metals: atomic scale simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodney, D.

    2000-01-01

    We present atomic-scale simulations of two elementary processes of FCC crystal plasticity. The first study consists in the simulation by molecular dynamics, in a nickel crystal, of the interactions between an edge dislocation and glissile interstitial loops of the type that form under irradiation in displacement cascades. The simulations show various atomic-scale interaction processes leading to the absorption and drag of the loops by the dislocation. These reactions certainly contribute to the formation of the 'clear bands' observed in deformed irradiated materials. The simulations also allow to study quantitatively the role of the glissile loops in irradiation hardening. In particular, dislocation unpinning stresses for certain pinning mechanisms are evaluated from the simulations. The second study consists first in the generalization in three dimensions of the quasi-continuum method (QCM), a multi-scale simulation method which couples atomistic techniques and the finite element method. In the QCM, regions close to dislocation cores are simulated at the atomic-scale while the rest of the crystal is simulated with a lower resolution by means of a discretization of the displacement fields using the finite element method. The QCM is then tested on the simulation of the formation and breaking of dislocation junctions in an aluminum crystal. Comparison of the simulations with an elastic model of dislocation junctions shows that the structure and strength of the junctions are dominated by elastic line tension effects, as is assumed in classical theories. (author)

  11. E-SCAPE: A scale facility for liquid-metal, pool-type reactor thermal hydraulic investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Tichelen, Katrien, E-mail: kvtichel@sckcen.be [SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Mirelli, Fabio, E-mail: fmirelli@sckcen.be [SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Greco, Matteo, E-mail: mgreco@sckcen.be [SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Viviani, Giorgia, E-mail: giorgiaviviani@gmail.com [University of Pisa, Lungarno Pacinotti 43, 56126 Pisa (Italy)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • The E-SCAPE facility is a thermal hydraulic scale model of the MYRRHA fast reactor. • The focus is on mixing and stratification in liquid-metal pool-type reactors. • Forced convection, natural convection and the transition are investigated. • Extensive instrumentation allows validation of computational models. • System thermal hydraulic and CFD models have been used for facility design. - Abstract: MYRRHA (Multi-purpose hYbrid Research Reactor for High-tech Applications) is a flexible fast-spectrum research reactor under design at SCK·CEN. MYRRHA is a pool-type reactor with lead bismuth eutectic (LBE) as primary coolant. The proper understanding of the thermal hydraulic phenomena occurring in the reactor pool is an important issue in the design and licensing of the MYRRHA system and liquid-metal cooled reactors by extension. Model experiments are necessary for understanding the physics, for validating experimental tools and to qualify the design for the licensing. The E-SCAPE (European SCAled Pool Experiment) facility at SCK·CEN is a thermal hydraulic 1/6-scale model of the MYRRHA reactor, with an electrical core simulator, cooled by LBE. It provides experimental feedback to the designers on the forced and natural circulation flow patterns. Moreover, it enables to validate the computational methods for their use with LBE. The paper will elaborate on the design of the E-SCAPE facility and its main parameters. Also the experimental matrix and the pre-test analysis using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and system thermal hydraulics codes will be described.

  12. The tensor hypercontracted parametric reduced density matrix algorithm: coupled-cluster accuracy with O(r(4)) scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenvi, Neil; van Aggelen, Helen; Yang, Yang; Yang, Weitao; Schwerdtfeger, Christine; Mazziotti, David

    2013-08-07

    Tensor hypercontraction is a method that allows the representation of a high-rank tensor as a product of lower-rank tensors. In this paper, we show how tensor hypercontraction can be applied to both the electron repulsion integral tensor and the two-particle excitation amplitudes used in the parametric 2-electron reduced density matrix (p2RDM) algorithm. Because only O(r) auxiliary functions are needed in both of these approximations, our overall algorithm can be shown to scale as O(r(4)), where r is the number of single-particle basis functions. We apply our algorithm to several small molecules, hydrogen chains, and alkanes to demonstrate its low formal scaling and practical utility. Provided we use enough auxiliary functions, we obtain accuracy similar to that of the standard p2RDM algorithm, somewhere between that of CCSD and CCSD(T).

  13. Cu-Hemin Metal-Organic-Frameworks/Chitosan-Reduced Graphene Oxide Nanocomposites with Peroxidase-Like Bioactivity for Electrochemical Sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Li; Yang, Han; He, Juan; Zhang, Yayun; Yu, Jie; Song, Yonghai

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A simple, sensitive and effective method to detect hydrogen peroxide based on a hybrid Cu-hemin metal-organic-frameworks (MOFs)/chitosan-functionalized reduced graphene oxide (CS-rGO) nanocomposite was achieved via Cu-hemin MOFs constructing with CS-rGO in room temperature. The Cu-hemin MOFs/CS-rGO nanomaterials exhibited a unique peroxidase-like activity and good electrical conductivity as well as some novel properties. And the as-prepared electrode resulted in a perfect electrochemical performance towards reduction of hydrogen peroxide which was superior to natural enzymes and some inorganic mimic enzymes. - Highlights: • A hybrid Cu-hemin MOF/CS-rGO with a unique peroxidase-like activity was prepared. • The CS-rGO improved electrical conductivity of the nanocomposites greatly. • The 3D porous structure enhanced the catalytic activity of hemin for H 2 O 2 . • A novel sensitive electrochemical biosensing for H 2 O 2 detection was achieved. - Abstract: Herein, a Cu-hemin metal-organic-frameworks (MOFs)/chitosan (CS)-reduced graphene oxide (CS-rGO) nanocomposite with unique peroxidase-like bioactivity and good electrical conductivity was prepared for electrochemical H 2 O 2 sensing for the first time. The prepared Cu-hemin MOFs/CS-rGO nanocomposites were well characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, UV–vis spectroscopy and electrochemical techniques. The results showed that after the Cu-hemin MOFs were formed on the CS-rGO surface, the crystalline structure of the Cu-hemin MOFs was kept while the size of Cu-hemin MOFs was decreased and the electrical conductivity of the nanocomposites was enhanced greatly as compared with that of Cu-hemin MOFs. The unique peroxidase-like bioactivity and good electrical conductivity as well as some novel properties of Cu-hemin MOFs/CS-rGO nanocomposites resulted in

  14. Test and Analysis Correlation of a Large-Scale, Orthogrid-Stiffened Metallic Cylinder without Weld Lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudd, Michelle T.; Hilburger, Mark W.; Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Lindell, Michael C.; Gardner, Nathaniel W.; Schultz, Marc R.

    2018-01-01

    The NASA Engineering Safety Center (NESC) Shell Buckling Knockdown Factor Project (SBKF) was established in 2007 by the NESC with the primary objective to develop analysis-based buckling design factors and guidelines for metallic and composite launch-vehicle structures.1 A secondary objective of the project is to advance technologies that have the potential to increase the structural efficiency of launch-vehicles. The SBKF Project has determined that weld-land stiffness discontinuities can significantly reduce the buckling load of a cylinder. In addition, the welding process can introduce localized geometric imperfections that can further exacerbate the inherent buckling imperfection sensitivity of the cylinder. Therefore, single-piece barrel fabrication technologies can improve structural efficiency by eliminating these weld-land issues. As part of this effort, SBKF partnered with the Advanced Materials and Processing Branch (AMPB) at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), the Mechanical and Fabrication Branch at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), and ATI Forged Products to design and fabricate an 8-ft-diameter orthogrid-stiffened seamless metallic cylinder. The cylinder was subjected to seven subcritical load sequences (load levels that are not intended to induce test article buckling or material failure) and one load sequence to failure. The purpose of this test effort was to demonstrate the potential benefits of building cylindrical structures with no weld lands using the flow-formed manufacturing process. This seamless barrel is the ninth 8-ft-diameter metallic barrel and the first single-piece metallic structure to be tested under this program.

  15. Two-scale homogenization to determine effective parameters of thin metallic-structured films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marigo, Jean-Jacques

    2016-01-01

    We present a homogenization method based on matched asymptotic expansion technique to derive effective transmission conditions of thin structured films. The method leads unambiguously to effective parameters of the interface which define jump conditions or boundary conditions at an equivalent zero thickness interface. The homogenized interface model is presented in the context of electromagnetic waves for metallic inclusions associated with Neumann or Dirichlet boundary conditions for transverse electric or transverse magnetic wave polarization. By comparison with full-wave simulations, the model is shown to be valid for thin interfaces up to thicknesses close to the wavelength. We also compare our effective conditions with the two-sided impedance conditions obtained in transmission line theory and to the so-called generalized sheet transition conditions. PMID:27616916

  16. Scaling from single molecule to macroscopic adhesion at polymer/metal interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utzig, Thomas; Raman, Sangeetha; Valtiner, Markus

    2015-03-10

    Understanding the evolution of macroscopic adhesion based on fundamental molecular interactions is crucial to designing strong and smart polymer/metal interfaces that play an important role in many industrial and biomedical applications. Here we show how macroscopic adhesion can be predicted on the basis of single molecular interactions. In particular, we carry out dynamic single molecule-force spectroscopy (SM-AFM) in the framework of Bell-Evans' theory to gain information about the energy barrier between the bound and unbound states of an amine/gold junction. Furthermore, we use Jarzynski's equality to obtain the equilibrium ground-state energy difference of the amine/gold bond from these nonequilibrium force measurements. In addition, we perform surface forces apparatus (SFA) experiments to measure macroscopic adhesion forces at contacts where approximately 10(7) amine/gold bonds are formed simultaneously. The SFA approach provides an amine/gold interaction energy (normalized by the number of interacting molecules) of (36 ± 1)k(B)T, which is in excellent agreement with the interaction free energy of (35 ± 3)k(B)T calculated using Jarzynski's equality and single-molecule AFM experiments. Our results validate Jarzynski's equality for the field of polymer/metal interactions by measuring both sides of the equation. Furthermore, the comparison of SFA and AFM shows how macroscopic interaction energies can be predicted on the basis of single molecular interactions, providing a new strategy to potentially predict adhesive properties of novel glues or coatings as well as bio- and wet adhesion.

  17. Reduced Order Modeling for Prediction and Control of Large-Scale Systems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalashnikova, Irina [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Computational Mathematics; Arunajatesan, Srinivasan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Aerosciences Dept.; Barone, Matthew Franklin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Aerosciences Dept.; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Uncertainty Quantification and Optimization Dept.; Fike, Jeffrey A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Component Science and Mechanics Dept.

    2014-05-01

    This report describes work performed from June 2012 through May 2014 as a part of a Sandia Early Career Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project led by the first author. The objective of the project is to investigate methods for building stable and efficient proper orthogonal decomposition (POD)/Galerkin reduced order models (ROMs): models derived from a sequence of high-fidelity simulations but having a much lower computational cost. Since they are, by construction, small and fast, ROMs can enable real-time simulations of complex systems for onthe- spot analysis, control and decision-making in the presence of uncertainty. Of particular interest to Sandia is the use of ROMs for the quantification of the compressible captive-carry environment, simulated for the design and qualification of nuclear weapons systems. It is an unfortunate reality that many ROM techniques are computationally intractable or lack an a priori stability guarantee for compressible flows. For this reason, this LDRD project focuses on the development of techniques for building provably stable projection-based ROMs. Model reduction approaches based on continuous as well as discrete projection are considered. In the first part of this report, an approach for building energy-stable Galerkin ROMs for linear hyperbolic or incompletely parabolic systems of partial differential equations (PDEs) using continuous projection is developed. The key idea is to apply a transformation induced by the Lyapunov function for the system, and to build the ROM in the transformed variables. It is shown that, for many PDE systems including the linearized compressible Euler and linearized compressible Navier-Stokes equations, the desired transformation is induced by a special inner product, termed the “symmetry inner product”. Attention is then turned to nonlinear conservation laws. A new transformation and corresponding energy-based inner product for the full nonlinear compressible Navier

  18. Investigation on the special Smith-Purcell radiation from a nano-scale rectangular metallic grating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Weiwei; Liu, Weihao; Jia, Qika

    2016-01-01

    The special Smith-Purcell radiation (S-SPR), which is from the radiating eigen modes of a grating, has remarkable higher intensity than the ordinary Smith-Purcell radiation. Yet in previous studies, the gratings were treated as perfect conductor without considering the surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) which are of significance for the nano-scale gratings especially in the optical region. In present paper, the rigorous theoretical investigations on the S-SPR from a nano-grating with SPPs taken into consideration are carried out. The dispersion relations and radiation characteristics are obtained, and the results are verified by simulations. According to the analyses, the tunable light radiation can be achieved by the S-SPR from a nano-grating, which offers a new prospect for developing the nano-scale light sources.

  19. Multi-Scale Texturing of Metallic Surfaces for High Performance Military Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-17

    AISI 440C stainless steel balls of 3 mm radius and 690 HV hardness. The sliding time (20 min), amplitude (10.5 mm), frequency (1.5 Hz) and normal...texture form (e. g., micro-scale topography) on surface integrity measures and tribological wear performance were quantified. The ensuing results are... Tribological Applications, Submitted for publication (08 2015) TOTAL: 2 Books Number of Manuscripts: Patents Submitted Patents Awarded Awards Graduate Students

  20. Magneto-Induced ac Electrical Permittivity of Metal-Dielectric Composites with a Two Characteristic Length Scales Periodic Microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strelniker, Y.M.; Bergman, D.J.

    1998-01-01

    A new effect was recently predicted in conducting composites that have a periodic microstructure: an induced strongly anisotropic dc magneto-resistance. This phenomenon is already verified on high mobility n-GaAs films. Here we discuss the possibility of observing analogous behavior in the ac electric permittivity of a metal-dielectric composite with a periodic microstructure in the presence of a strong magnetic field. We developed new analytical and numerical methods to treat the low-frequency magneto-optical properties in composite media with both disordered and periodic conducting micro-structures. Those methods allow us to study composites with inclusions of arbitrary shape (and arbitrary volume fraction) at arbitrarily strong magnetic field. This is exploited in order to calculate an effective dielectric tensor for this system as a function of applied magnetic field and ac frequency. We show that in a non-dilute metal-dielectric composite medium the magneto-plasma resonance and the cyclotron resonance depend upon both the applied magnetic field as well as on the geometric shape of the inclusion. Near such a resonance, it is possible to achieve large values for the ratio of the off-diagonal-to-diagonal electric permittivity tensor components, ε xy /ε xx , (since ε xx →0, while ε xy ≠0), which is analogous to similar ratio of the resistivity tensor components, ρ xy /ρ xx , in the case of dc magneto-transport problem. Motivated by this observation and by results of previous studies of dc magneto-transport in composite conductors, we then performed a numerical study of the ac magneto-electric properties of a particular metal-dielectric composite film with a periodic columnar microstructure which has a two characteristic length scales. The unit cell of such composite is prepared as follows: We placed the conducting square (in cross section) rods (first characteristic length scale) along the perimeter of the unit cell in order to create a dielectric host

  1. Measurement of the thermophysical properties of industrial liquid metallic alloys by non-contact calorimetry under reduced gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wunderlich, R.K.; Fecht, H.-J.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text: The numerical modeling of casting and solidification is becoming of increased importance in industrial process design. While the numerical algorithms have made large progress towards real process design and optimization, there is a pronounced lack of precise thermophysical input data. This lack is caused by the high chemical reactivity of many metallic alloys in the liquid phase making conventional measurement techniques such as differential thermal analysis difficult if at all possible to apply. In this contribution we report about a project planning to use containerless electromagnetic processing under reduced gravity conditions for thermophysical property measurement of industrially relevant alloys. Alloys of interest are, among others, Ti-alloys, Ni-base superalloys, and steels. In preparation of this project, a survey among leading European industries was conducted revealing properties such as melting range, fraction solid/liquid, specific heat capacity, enthalpy, as well as density, viscosity and surface tension as properties most in need. Non-contact calorimetry of electromagnetically levitated specimens was developed for an investigation of the thermophysical properties of Zr-alloys in the liquid phase. These methods have been applied successfully under reduced gravity conditions on board spacelab to the measurement of the specific heat capacity by modulation calorimetry, the enthalpy of fusion, the total hemispherical emissivity and for an effective thermal conductivity. Specific examples from these experiments demonstrating the applicability of these methods for quantitative calorimetry as well as application at higher Biot numbers will be discussed. New developments include modulation calorimetry in the two phase region for the measurement of the fraction solid. (author)

  2. Surface stress and large-scale self-organization at organic-metal interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollinger, Florian

    2009-01-22

    The role of elastic interactions, particularly for the self-organized formation of periodically faceted interfaces, was investigated in this thesis for archetype organic-metal interfaces. The cantilever bending technique was applied to study the change of surface stress upon formation of the interface between 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic-dianhydride (PTCDA) and Ag(111). The main focus of this work was on the investigation of the formation of the long-range ordered, self-organized faceted PTCDA/Ag(10 8 7) interface. Reciprocal space maps of this interface were recorded both by spot profile analysis low energy electron diffraction (SPA-LEED) and low energy electron microscopy (LEEM) in selected area LEED mode. Complementary to the reciprocal data, also microscopic real-space LEEM data were used to characterize the morphology of this interface. Six different facet faces ((111), (532), (743), (954), (13 9 5), and (542)) were observed for the preparation path of molecular adsorption on the substrate kept at 550 K. Facet-sensitive dark-field LEEM localized these facets to grow in homogeneous areas of microscopic extensions. The temperature-dependence of the interface formation was studied in a range between 418 K and 612 K in order to learn more about the kinetics of the process. Additional steeper facets of 27 inclination with respect to the (111) surface were observed in the low temperature regime. Furthermore, using facet-sensitive dark-field LEEM, spatial and size distributions of specific facets were studied for the different temperatures. Moreover, the facet dimensions were statistically analyzed. The total island size of the facets follows an exponential distribution, indicating a random growth mode in absence of any mutual facet interactions. While the length distribution of the facets also follows an exponential distribution, the width distribution is peaked, reflecting the high degree of lateral order. This anisotropy is temperature-dependent and occurs

  3. Heavy metal speciation in solid-phase materials from a bacterial sulfate reducing bioreactor using sequential extraction procedure combined with acid volatile sulfide analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jong, Tony; Parry, David L

    2004-04-01

    Heavy metal mobility, bioavailability and toxicity depends largely on the chemical form of metals and ultimately determines potential for environmental pollution. For this reason, determining the chemical form of heavy metals and metalloids, immobilized in sludges by biological mediated sulfate reduction, is important to evaluate their mobility and bioavailability. A modified Tessier sequential extraction procedure (SEP), complemented with acid volatile sulfide (AVS) and simultaneous extracted metals (SEM) measurements, were applied to determine the partitioning of five heavy metals (defined as Fe, Ni, Zn and Cu, and the metalloid As) in anoxic solid-phase material (ASM) from an anaerobic, sulfate reducing bioreactor into six operationally defined fractions. These fractions were water soluble, exchangeable, bound to carbonates (acid soluble), bound to Fe-Mn oxides (reducible), bound to organic matter and sulfides (oxidizable) and residual. It was found that the distribution of Fe, Ni, Zn, Cu and As in ASM was strongly influenced by its association with the above solid fractions. The fraction corresponding to organic matter and sulfides appeared to be the most important scavenging phases of As, Fe, Ni, Zn and Cu in ASM (59.8-86.7%). This result was supported by AVS and SEM (Sigma Zn, Ni and Cu) measurements, which indicated that the heavy metals existed overwhelmingly as sulfides in the organic matter and sulfide fraction. A substantial amount of Fe and Ni at 16.4 and 20.1%, respectively, were also present in the carbonate fraction, while an appreciable portion of As (18.3%) and Zn (19.4%) was bound to Fe-Mn oxides. A significant amount of heavy metals was also associated with the residual fraction, ranging from 2.1% for Zn to 18.8% for As. Based on the average total extractable heavy metal (TEHM) values, the concentration of heavy metals in the ASM was in the order of Cu > Ni > Zn > Fe > As. If the mobility and bioavailability of heavy metals are assumed to be

  4. Influence of PCMs on thermal behavior of building walls: experimental study using the walls of a reduced scale room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gounni Ayoub

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Using Phase-Change Materials (PCM for lightweight building applications can increase equivalent thermal mass and provide energy savings. In the present experimental work, the heat transfer performance testing of some building walls, with or without PCM, is carried out using a reduced-scale cubic room (the test-cell. The cubic cell is heated by an incandescent bulb placed on its centre, and it is housed in an air-conditioned large-scale room that allows to control the ambient air temperature. The effect of the double PCM layer and of its location relatively to the outside surface of the wall is tested and discussed in terms of overall transmitted heat flux and in terms of reduction of the inside and outside surface temperatures. Findings shows that the additional inertia introduced by the PCM leads to a reduced overall heat flux transmission by the wall and to a lesser daily temperature amplitude on the surface of the wall that enhances the thermal comfort inside the building. In the next step of this work, the case of sandwich walls with air gap, and with wood and PCM layers will be considered.

  5. Influence of PCMs on thermal behavior of building walls: experimental study using the walls of a reduced scale room

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gounni, Ayoub; Tahar Mabrouk, Mohamed; Kheiri, Abdelhamid; El alami, Mustapha

    2017-11-01

    Using Phase-Change Materials (PCM) for lightweight building applications can increase equivalent thermal mass and provide energy savings. In the present experimental work, the heat transfer performance testing of some building walls, with or without PCM, is carried out using a reduced-scale cubic room (the test-cell). The cubic cell is heated by an incandescent bulb placed on its centre, and it is housed in an air-conditioned large-scale room that allows to control the ambient air temperature. The effect of the double PCM layer and of its location relatively to the outside surface of the wall is tested and discussed in terms of overall transmitted heat flux and in terms of reduction of the inside and outside surface temperatures. Findings shows that the additional inertia introduced by the PCM leads to a reduced overall heat flux transmission by the wall and to a lesser daily temperature amplitude on the surface of the wall that enhances the thermal comfort inside the building. In the next step of this work, the case of sandwich walls with air gap, and with wood and PCM layers will be considered.

  6. Communication: A reduced scaling J-engine based reformulation of SOS-MP2 using graphics processing units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurer, S. A.; Kussmann, J.; Ochsenfeld, C., E-mail: Christian.Ochsenfeld@cup.uni-muenchen.de [Chair of Theoretical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Munich (LMU), Butenandtstr. 7, D-81377 München (Germany); Center for Integrated Protein Science (CIPSM) at the Department of Chemistry, University of Munich (LMU), Butenandtstr. 5–13, D-81377 München (Germany)

    2014-08-07

    We present a low-prefactor, cubically scaling scaled-opposite-spin second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (SOS-MP2) method which is highly suitable for massively parallel architectures like graphics processing units (GPU). The scaling is reduced from O(N{sup 5}) to O(N{sup 3}) by a reformulation of the MP2-expression in the atomic orbital basis via Laplace transformation and the resolution-of-the-identity (RI) approximation of the integrals in combination with efficient sparse algebra for the 3-center integral transformation. In contrast to previous works that employ GPUs for post Hartree-Fock calculations, we do not simply employ GPU-based linear algebra libraries to accelerate the conventional algorithm. Instead, our reformulation allows to replace the rate-determining contraction step with a modified J-engine algorithm, that has been proven to be highly efficient on GPUs. Thus, our SOS-MP2 scheme enables us to treat large molecular systems in an accurate and efficient manner on a single GPU-server.

  7. Communication: A reduced scaling J-engine based reformulation of SOS-MP2 using graphics processing units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, S A; Kussmann, J; Ochsenfeld, C

    2014-08-07

    We present a low-prefactor, cubically scaling scaled-opposite-spin second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (SOS-MP2) method which is highly suitable for massively parallel architectures like graphics processing units (GPU). The scaling is reduced from O(N⁵) to O(N³) by a reformulation of the MP2-expression in the atomic orbital basis via Laplace transformation and the resolution-of-the-identity (RI) approximation of the integrals in combination with efficient sparse algebra for the 3-center integral transformation. In contrast to previous works that employ GPUs for post Hartree-Fock calculations, we do not simply employ GPU-based linear algebra libraries to accelerate the conventional algorithm. Instead, our reformulation allows to replace the rate-determining contraction step with a modified J-engine algorithm, that has been proven to be highly efficient on GPUs. Thus, our SOS-MP2 scheme enables us to treat large molecular systems in an accurate and efficient manner on a single GPU-server.

  8. Estimating soil emissions and toxicity impacts from the application of livestock manure: application to heavy metals at national scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leclerc, Alexandra Segolene Corinne; Laurent, Alexis

    2017-01-01

    Aiming for a more efficient use of resources, the European Commission encourages the use of animal manure as a fertilizer providing nutrients and organic matter to improve crop productivity and soil fertility [1,2]. However livestock manure contains traces from pathogens, veterinary medicines...... and feed additives (e.g. antibiotics and heavy metals), which may cause damages to ecosystems and human health. To prevent large damages from happening, tools such as Environmental risk assessment (ERA) and life cycle assessment (LCA) are used to evaluate the environmental risks and impacts...... on the use of such substances in livestock production, large-scale assessments are required. To date, the total emissions of harmful substances resulting from the application of manure at country level have however been rarely quantified. We therefore developed a framework to estimate these releases to soil...

  9. Comparative Assessment of Heavy Metals in Drinking Water Sources in Two Small-Scale Mining Communities in Northern Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobbina, Samuel J.; Duwiejuah, Abudu B.; Quansah, Reginald; Obiri, Samuel; Bakobie, Noel

    2015-01-01

    The study assessed levels of heavy metals in drinking water sources in two small-scale mining communities (Nangodi and Tinga) in northern Ghana. Seventy-two (72) water samples were collected from boreholes, hand dug wells, dug-out, and a stream in the two mining communities. The levels of mercury (Hg), arsenic (As), lead (Pb), zinc (Zn), and cadmium (Cd) were determined using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS). Mean levels (mg/l) of heavy metals in water samples from Nangodi and Tinga communities were 0.038 and 0.064 (Hg), 0.031 and 0.002 (As), 0.250 and 0.031 (Pb), 0.034 and 0.002 (Zn), and 0.534 and 0.023 (Cd), respectively, for each community. Generally, levels of Hg, As, Pb, Zn, and Cd in water from Nangodi exceeded the World Health Organisation (WHO) stipulated limits of 0.010 for Hg, As, and Pb, 3.0 for Zn and 0.003 for Cd for drinking water, and levels of Hg, Pb, and Cd recorded in Tinga, exceeded the stipulated WHO limits. Ingestion of water, containing elevated levels of Hg, As, and Cd by residents in these mining communities may pose significant health risks. Continuous monitoring of the quality of drinking water sources in these two communities is recommended. PMID:26343702

  10. The atomic-scale nucleation mechanism of NiTi metallic glasses upon isothermal annealing studied via molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Li, JiaHao; Liu, BaiXin

    2015-10-28

    Nucleation is one of the most essential transformation paths in phase transition and exerts a significant influence on the crystallization process. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the atomic-scale nucleation mechanisms of NiTi metallic glasses upon devitrification at various temperatures (700 K, 750 K, 800 K, and 850 K). Our simulations reveal that at 700 K and 750 K, nucleation is polynuclear with high nucleation density, while at 800 K it is mononuclear. The underlying nucleation mechanisms have been clarified, manifesting that nucleation can be induced either by the initial ordered clusters (IOCs) or by the other precursors of nuclei evolved directly from the supercooled liquid. IOCs and other precursors stem from the thermal fluctuations of bond orientational order in supercooled liquids during the quenching process and during the annealing process, respectively. The simulation results not only elucidate the underlying nucleation mechanisms varied with temperature, but also unveil the origin of nucleation. These discoveries offer new insights into the devitrification mechanism of metallic glasses.

  11. Comparative Assessment of Heavy Metals in Drinking Water Sources in Two Small-Scale Mining Communities in Northern Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel J. Cobbina

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The study assessed levels of heavy metals in drinking water sources in two small-scale mining communities (Nangodi and Tinga in northern Ghana. Seventy-two (72 water samples were collected from boreholes, hand dug wells, dug-out, and a stream in the two mining communities. The levels of mercury (Hg, arsenic (As, lead (Pb, zinc (Zn, and cadmium (Cd were determined using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS. Mean levels (mg/l of heavy metals in water samples from Nangodi and Tinga communities were 0.038 and 0.064 (Hg, 0.031 and 0.002 (As, 0.250 and 0.031 (Pb, 0.034 and 0.002 (Zn, and 0.534 and 0.023 (Cd, respectively, for each community. Generally, levels of Hg, As, Pb, Zn, and Cd in water from Nangodi exceeded the World Health Organisation (WHO stipulated limits of 0.010 for Hg, As, and Pb, 3.0 for Zn and 0.003 for Cd for drinking water, and levels of Hg, Pb, and Cd recorded in Tinga, exceeded the stipulated WHO limits. Ingestion of water, containing elevated levels of Hg, As, and Cd by residents in these mining communities may pose significant health risks. Continuous monitoring of the quality of drinking water sources in these two communities is recommended.

  12. Comparative Assessment of Heavy Metals in Drinking Water Sources in Two Small-Scale Mining Communities in Northern Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobbina, Samuel J; Duwiejuah, Abudu B; Quansah, Reginald; Obiri, Samuel; Bakobie, Noel

    2015-08-28

    The study assessed levels of heavy metals in drinking water sources in two small-scale mining communities (Nangodi and Tinga) in northern Ghana. Seventy-two (72) water samples were collected from boreholes, hand dug wells, dug-out, and a stream in the two mining communities. The levels of mercury (Hg), arsenic (As), lead (Pb), zinc (Zn), and cadmium (Cd) were determined using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS). Mean levels (mg/l) of heavy metals in water samples from Nangodi and Tinga communities were 0.038 and 0.064 (Hg), 0.031 and 0.002 (As), 0.250 and 0.031 (Pb), 0.034 and 0.002 (Zn), and 0.534 and 0.023 (Cd), respectively, for each community. Generally, levels of Hg, As, Pb, Zn, and Cd in water from Nangodi exceeded the World Health Organisation (WHO) stipulated limits of 0.010 for Hg, As, and Pb, 3.0 for Zn and 0.003 for Cd for drinking water, and levels of Hg, Pb, and Cd recorded in Tinga, exceeded the stipulated WHO limits. Ingestion of water, containing elevated levels of Hg, As, and Cd by residents in these mining communities may pose significant health risks. Continuous monitoring of the quality of drinking water sources in these two communities is recommended.

  13. Atomic scale modeling of twinning in hexagonal metals: germination and migration of disconnections in zirconium, titanium and magnesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackain, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    We perform an atomic scale study of twinning in three hexagonal close packed metals: zirconium, titanium and magnesium. For that, we use two energetic models, an empirical potential suited for the study of zirconium and ab initio calculations in order to compare the three metals. The study of perfect twin boundaries shows that their surface energies are not relevant to predict which twin system is going to activate experimentally. We study nucleation and then migration of disconnections, that is to say interfacial dislocations whose glide along twin plane leads to twin thickening. We show that disconnections nucleation, rather than their migration, is the rate limiting step of twin thickening. In particular, by developing a coupling with elastic theory, we extract the core energies of each disconnection. With this method we prove that for a given twin system, the disconnection with the lowest formation energy is always the one compatible with twin mode observed experimentally, even if its elastic energy is higher. Finally, we construct the preliminary elements of a model considering the effect of stress on nucleation of disconnection. (author) [fr

  14. All-solid-state lithium-ion and lithium metal batteries - paving the way to large-scale production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, Joscha; Günther, Till; Knoche, Thomas; Vieider, Christoph; Köhler, Larissa; Just, Alexander; Keller, Marlou; Passerini, Stefano; Reinhart, Gunther

    2018-04-01

    Challenges and requirements for the large-scale production of all-solid-state lithium-ion and lithium metal batteries are herein evaluated via workshops with experts from renowned research institutes, material suppliers, and automotive manufacturers. Aiming to bridge the gap between materials research and industrial mass production, possible solutions for the production chains of sulfide and oxide based all-solid-state batteries from electrode fabrication to cell assembly and quality control are presented. Based on these findings, a detailed comparison of the production processes for a sulfide based all-solid-state battery with conventional lithium-ion cell production is given, showing that processes for composite electrode fabrication can be adapted with some effort, while the fabrication of the solid electrolyte separator layer and the integration of a lithium metal anode will require completely new processes. This work identifies the major steps towards mass production of all-solid-state batteries, giving insight into promising manufacturing technologies and helping stakeholders, such as machine engineering, cell producers, and original equipment manufacturers, to plan the next steps towards safer batteries with increased storage capacity.

  15. Testing Metallic Iron Filtration Systems for Decentralized Water Treatment at Pilot Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raoul Tepong-Tsindé

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available There are many factors to consider for the design of appropriate water treatment systems including: cost, the concentration and type of biological and/or chemical contamination, concentration limits at which contaminant(s are required to be removed, required flow rate, level of local expertise for on-going maintenance, and social acceptance. An ideal technology should be effective at producing clean, potable water; however it must also be low-cost, low-energy (ideally energy-free and require low-maintenance. The use of packed beds containing metallic iron (Fe0 filters has the potential to become a cheap widespread technology for both safe drinking water provision and wastewater treatment. Fe0 filters have been intensively investigated over the past two decades, however, sound design criteria are still lacking. This article presents an overview of the design of Fe0 filters for decentralized water treatment particularly in the developing world. A design for safe drinking water to a community of 100 people is also discussed as starting module. It is suggested that Fe0 filters have the potential for significant worldwide applicability, but particularly in the developing world. The appropriate design of Fe0 filters, however, is site-specific and dependent upon the availability of local expertise/materials.

  16. Preparation of Nano-Scale Biopolymer Extracted from Coconut Residue and Its Performance as Drag Reducing Agent (DRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Muhammad Luqman Bin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Drag or frictional force is defined as force that acts opposite to the object’s relative motion through a fluid which then will cause frictional pressure loss in the pipeline. Drag Reducing Agent (DRA is used to solve this issue and most of the DRAs are synthetic polymers but has some environmental issues. Therefore for this study, biopolymer known as Coconut Residue (CR is selected as the candidate to replace synthetic polymers DRA. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of Nano-scale biopolymer DRA on the application of water injection system. Carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC is extracted by synthesizing the cellulose extracted from CR under the alkali-catalyzed reaction using monochloroacetic acid. The synthesize process is held in controlled condition whereby the concentration of NaOH is kept at 60%wt, 60 °C temperature and the reaction time is 4 hours. For every 25 g of dried CR used, the mass of synthesized CMC yield is at an average of 23.8 g. The synthesized CMC is then grinded in controlled parameters using the ball milling machine to get the Nano-scale size. The particle size obtained from this is 43.32 Nm which is in range of Nano size. This study proved that Nano-size CMC has higher percentage of drag reduction (%DR and flow increase (%FI if compared to normal-size CMC when tested in high and low flow rate; 44% to 48% increase in %DR and %FI when tested in low flow rate, and 16% to 18% increase in %DR and %FI when tested in high flow rate. The success of this research shows that Nano-scale DRA can be considered to be used to have better performance in reducing drag.

  17. Effectiveness of Devices to Monitor Biofouling and Metals Deposition on Plumbing Materials Exposed to a Full-Scale Drinking Water Distribution System

    OpenAIRE

    Ginige, Maneesha P.; Garbin, Scott; Wylie, Jason; Krishna, K. C. Bal

    2017-01-01

    A Modified Robbins Device (MRD) was installed in a full-scale water distribution system to investigate biofouling and metal depositions on concrete, high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and stainless steel surfaces. Bulk water monitoring and a KIWA monitor (with glass media) were used to offline monitor biofilm development on pipe wall surfaces. Results indicated that adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and metal concentrations on coupons increased with time. However, bacterial diversities decreased. Th...

  18. Atomic-scale structural signature of dynamic heterogeneities in metallic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasturel, Alain; Jakse, Noel

    2017-08-01

    With sufficiently high cooling rates, liquids will cross their equilibrium melting temperatures and can be maintained in a metastable undercooled state before solidifying. Studies of undercooled liquids reveal several intriguing dynamic phenomena and because explicit connections between liquid structure and liquids dynamics are difficult to identify, it remains a major challenge to capture the underlying structural link to these phenomena. Ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations are yet especially powerful in providing atomic-scale details otherwise not accessible in experiments. Through the AIMD-based study of Cr additions in Al-based liquids, we evidence for the first time a close relationship between the decoupling of component diffusion and the emergence of dynamic heterogeneities in the undercooling regime. In addition, we demonstrate that the origin of both phenomena is related to a structural heterogeneity caused by a strong interplay between chemical short-range order (CSRO) and local fivefold topology (ISRO) at the short-range scale in the liquid phase that develops into an icosahedral-based medium-range order (IMRO) upon undercooling. Finally, our findings reveal that this structural signature is also captured in the temperature dependence of partial pair-distribution functions which opens up the route to more elaborated experimental studies.

  19. Ignition dynamics and activation energies of metallic thermites: From nano- to micron-scale particulate composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Emily M.; Pantoya, Michelle L.

    2005-08-01

    Ignition behaviors associated with nano- and micron-scale particulate composite thermites were studied experimentally and modeled theoretically. The experimental analysis utilized a CO2 laser ignition apparatus to ignite the front surface of compacted nickel (Ni) and aluminum (Al) pellets at varying heating rates. Ignition delay time and ignition temperature as a function of both Ni and Al particle size were measured using high-speed imaging and microthermocouples. The apparent activation energy was determined from this data using a Kissinger isoconversion method. This study shows that the activation energy is significantly lower for nano- compared with micron-scale particulate media (i.e., as low as 17.4 compared with 162.5kJ /mol, respectively). Two separate Arrhenius-type mathematical models were developed that describe ignition in the nano- and the micron-composite thermites. The micron-composite model is based on a heat balance while the nanocomposite model incorporates the energy of phase transformation in the alumina shell theorized to be an initiating step in the solid-solid diffusion reaction and uniquely appreciable in nanoparticle media. These models were found to describe the ignition of the Ni /Al alloy for a wide range of heating rates.

  20. A NEW SCALING RELATION FOR H II REGIONS IN SPIRAL GALAXIES: UNVEILING THE TRUE NATURE OF THE MASS-METALLICITY RELATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosales-Ortega, F. F.; Díaz, A. I.; Sánchez, S. F.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Vílchez, J. M.; Mast, D.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Husemann, B.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate the existence of a local mass, metallicity, star formation relation using spatially resolved optical spectroscopy of H II regions in the local universe. One of the projections of this distribution—the local mass-metallicity relation—extends over a wide range in this parameter space: three orders of magnitude in mass and a factor of eight in metallicity. We explain the new relation as the combined effect of the differential distributions of mass and metallicity in the disks of galaxies, and a selective star formation efficiency. We use this local relation to reproduce—with a noticeable agreement—the mass-metallicity relation seen in galaxies, and conclude that the latter is a scale-up integrated effect of a local relation, supporting the inside-out growth and downsizing scenarios of galaxy evolution.

  1. A NEW SCALING RELATION FOR H II REGIONS IN SPIRAL GALAXIES: UNVEILING THE TRUE NATURE OF THE MASS-METALLICITY RELATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosales-Ortega, F. F.; Diaz, A. I. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Sanchez, S. F.; Iglesias-Paramo, J.; Vilchez, J. M.; Mast, D. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (CSIC), Camino Bajo de Huetor s/n, Aptdo. 3004, E-18080 Granada (Spain); Bland-Hawthorn, J. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics A28, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Husemann, B., E-mail: frosales@cantab.net [Leibniz-Institut fuer Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP), An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany)

    2012-09-10

    We demonstrate the existence of a local mass, metallicity, star formation relation using spatially resolved optical spectroscopy of H II regions in the local universe. One of the projections of this distribution-the local mass-metallicity relation-extends over a wide range in this parameter space: three orders of magnitude in mass and a factor of eight in metallicity. We explain the new relation as the combined effect of the differential distributions of mass and metallicity in the disks of galaxies, and a selective star formation efficiency. We use this local relation to reproduce-with a noticeable agreement-the mass-metallicity relation seen in galaxies, and conclude that the latter is a scale-up integrated effect of a local relation, supporting the inside-out growth and downsizing scenarios of galaxy evolution.

  2. Reduced egfr, elevated urine protein and low level of personal protective equipment compliance among artisanal small scale gold miners at Bibiani-Ghana: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrifa, Justice; Essien-Baidoo, Samuel; Ephraim, Richard K D; Nkrumah, Daniel; Dankyira, Daniel Osei

    2017-06-27

    Mercury is a toxic metal with its effects on human health ranging from acute to chronic in a very short time of exposure. Artisanal and small-scale gold mining (ASGM) is the main source of direct human exposure to mercury. To access the effect of mercury exposure on the renal function and level of personal protective equipment (PPE) compliance among small-scale gold miners in Bibiani District of the Western Region of Ghana METHOD: 110 consenting male gold miners were purposively recruited for this study. A structured questionnaire was used to collect socio-demographic information from the participants. Work place assessment and interviews were conducted. Urine samples were analysed for protein; blood was analysed for mercury and creatinine. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated using the chronic kidney disease-epidemiology collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation. Of the 110 participants, 61(55.5%) exceeded the occupational exposure threshold (blood mercury <5μg/L). Urine protein (41.72±68.34, P<0.0001), serum creatinine (2.24±1.19, P<0.0001) and blood mercury (18.37±10.47, P<0.0001) were significantly elevated among the exposed group compared to the non-exposed group. However, the exposed group had a significantly reduced eGFR (P<0.0001). There was a significant correlation (r=0.7338, p<0.0001) between blood mercury concentration and urine protein concentration. An increase in blood mercury correlated negatively (r = -0.8233, P<0.0001) with eGFR among the exposed group. High urine protein (P< 0.0001) and high serum creatinine (P< 0.0001) were significantly associated with increased mercury exposure. Increased mercury exposure was significantly associated with burning of amalgam (P=0.0196), sucking of excess mercury (P=0.0336), longer work duration (P=0.0314) and low educational background (P=0.0473). Small scale miners at the Bibiani work site are exposed to excess mercury. Proteinuria and reduced eGFR is common in mine workers exposed to excess

  3. Modelling the ability of source control measures to reduce inundation risk in a community-scale urban drainage system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Chao; Liu, Jiahong; Wang, Hao; Shao, Weiwei; Xia, Lin; Xiang, Chenyao; Zhou, Jinjun

    2018-06-01

    Urban inundation is a serious challenge that increasingly confronts the residents of many cities, as well as policymakers, in the context of rapid urbanization and climate change worldwide. In recent years, source control measures (SCMs) such as green roofs, permeable pavements, rain gardens, and vegetative swales have been implemented to address flood inundation in urban settings, and proven to be cost-effective and sustainable. In order to investigate the ability of SCMs on reducing inundation in a community-scale urban drainage system, a dynamic rainfall-runoff model of a community-scale urban drainage system was developed based on SWMM. SCMs implementing scenarios were modelled under six design rainstorm events with return period ranging from 2 to 100 years, and inundation risks of the drainage system were evaluated before and after the proposed implementation of SCMs, with a risk-evaluation method based on SWMM and analytic hierarchy process (AHP). Results show that, SCMs implementation resulting in significantly reduction of hydrological indexes that related to inundation risks, range of reduction rates of average flow, peak flow, and total flooded volume of the drainage system were 28.1-72.1, 19.0-69.2, and 33.9-56.0 %, respectively, under six rainfall events with return periods ranging from 2 to 100 years. Corresponding, the inundation risks of the drainage system were significantly reduced after SCMs implementation, the risk values falling below 0.2 when the rainfall return period was less than 10 years. Simulation results confirm the effectiveness of SCMs on mitigating inundation, and quantified the potential of SCMs on reducing inundation risks in the urban drainage system, which provided scientific references for implementing SCMs for inundation control of the study area.

  4. How could the family-scale photovoltaic module help the poor farmer out of poverty and reduce CO2 emission?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xu; Jin, Ran

    2016-04-01

    China, the world's most populous country, is facing great opportunities and challenges. On the one hand, China's increasing economy is raising hundreds of millions of people out of poverty. On the other hand, there are still 100 million of whose daily income is less than 1 US dollar. In addition, China is the world's largest solar panel producer and also the largest emitter of greenhouse gases. Could we find a feasible way to use solar panels to help the poor and meanwhile reduce CO2 emissions? To do this, we reviewed the literature and investigated the related field sites and institutions in China. Results show that the extension of family-scale photovoltaic modules to countryside could help. The 3 kW-module is recommended for widely distribution because its technology is mature and the cost is relatively low (3500 US dollars). Besides their own use to improve their living standard, farmers can sell the excess electricity to the grid at the price of 0.17 UD/kWh. The farmer's annual income could be increased by 460-615 US dollars by selling electricity, and this is equivalent to half of their annual income in many rural regions. The photovoltaic module can be used for 25 years and the payback period is 7 years. In addition to its economic benefit, the photovoltaic module can reduce CO2 emissions by 0.93 kg/kWh. This is equivalent to annual reduction of 3000-4000 kg CO2 per family. Therefore, it is concluded that the family-scale photovoltaic module not only can help the farmers out of poverty but also can reduce CO2 emissions significantly. To promote its sustainable development, it is worthwhile to further investigations its business models as well as the effects of long-term support policies under different social and nature conditions.

  5. Allergen sanitation in the food industry: a systematic industrial scale approach to reduce hazelnut cross-contamination of cookies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röder, Martin; Baltruweit, Iris; Gruyters, Helwig; Ibach, Anja; Mücke, Ingo; Matissek, Reinhard; Vieths, Stefan; Holzhauser, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    Recently, we investigated the impact of shared equipment on cross-contamination of cookies at a pilot plant scale. Based on those findings, this study investigated the extent and subsequent sanitation of hazelnut cross-contamination (HNCC) of cookies at the industrial scale. Similarly, a product change from cookies with hazelnut ingredient to cookies without hazelnut was performed on standard equipment. HNCC in the hazelnut-free follow-up product was quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for each production device and the applied cleaning procedure. All experiments were repeated in duplicate. The highest HNCC was found in concordance with previous studies after mere mechanical scraping: more than 1,000 mg of hazelnut protein per kg was quantified in the follow-up product after processing by a cookie machine. Additional cleaning with hot water decreased the HNCC irrespective of the processing device to levels at or below 1 mg of hazelnut protein per kg. Furthermore, raw materials for cookie production were monitored over a period of 24 months for unwanted preloads of hazelnut and peanut: hazelnut was quantified in 16% of the investigated raw materials as being between 0.26 and 90 mg/kg. Further critical control points at the industrial scale, where cross-contamination might occur, were identified but did not display noteworthy sources of cross-contamination. In conclusion, the quantitative monitoring of the cleaning efficiency at the industrial scale confirmed the procedure of manual scraping plus wet cleaning as a qualified sanitation procedure to effectively reduce the hazelnut protein cross-contamination down to a level at which severe hazelnut-related allergic reactions are unlikely to occur.

  6. Red mud (RM)-Induced enhancement of iron plaque formation reduces arsenic and metal accumulation in two wetland plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J X; Guo, Q J; Yang, J; Zhou, X Y; Ren, H Y; Zhang, H Z; Xu, R X; Wang, X D; Peters, M; Zhu, G X; Wei, R F; Tian, L Y; Han, X K

    2016-01-01

    Human activities have resulted in arsenic (As) and heavy metals accumulation in paddy soils in China. Phytoremediation has been suggested as an effective and low-cost method to clean up contaminated soils. A combined soil-sand pot experiment was conducted to investigate the influence of red mud (RM) supply on iron plaque formation and As and heavy metal accumulation in two wetland plant species (Cyperus alternifolius Rottb., Echinodorus amazonicus Rataj), using As and heavy metals polluted paddy soil combined with three rates of RM application (0, 2%, 5%). The results showed that RM supply significantly decreased As and heavy metals accumulation in shoots of the two plants due to the decrease of As and heavy metal availability and the enhancement of the formation of iron plaque on the root surface and in the rhizosphere. Both wetland plants supplied with RM tended to have more Fe plaque, higher As and heavy metals on roots and in their rhizospheres, and were more tolerant of As and heavy metal toxicity. The results suggest that RM-induced enhancement of the formation of iron plaque on the root surface and in the rhizosphere of wetland plants may be significant for remediation of soils contaminated with As and heavy metals.

  7. Resistivity scaling due to electron surface scattering in thin metal layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tianji; Gall, Daniel

    2018-04-01

    The effect of electron surface scattering on the thickness-dependent electrical resistivity ρ of thin metal layers is investigated using nonequilibrium Green's function density functional transport simulations. Cu(001) thin films with thickness d =1 -2 nm are used as a model system, employing a random one-monolayer-high surface roughness and frozen phonons to cause surface and bulk scattering, respectively. The zero-temperature resistivity increases from 9.7 ±1.0 μ Ω cm at d =1.99 nm to 18.7 ±2.6 μ Ω cm at d =0.9 0 nm, contradicting the asymptotic T =0 prediction from the classical Fuchs-Sondheimer model. At T =9 00 K, ρ =5.8 ±0.1 μ Ω cm for bulk Cu and ρ =13.4 ±1.1 and 22.5 ±2.4 μ Ω cm for layers with d =1.99 and 0.90 nm, respectively, indicating an approximately additive phonon contribution which, however, is smaller than for bulk Cu or atomically smooth layers. The overall data indicate that the resistivity contribution from surface scattering is temperature-independent and proportional to 1 /d , suggesting that it can be described using a surface-scattering mean-free path λs for 2D transport which is channel-independent and proportional to d . Data fitting indicates λs=4 ×d for the particular simulated Cu(001) surfaces with a one-monolayer-high surface roughness. The 1 /d dependence deviates considerably from previous 1 /d2 predictions from quantum models, indicating that the small-roughness approximation in these models is not applicable to very thin (<2 nm) layers, where the surface roughness is a considerable fraction of d .

  8. Large-scale synthesis of Tellurium nanostructures via galvanic displacement of metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, Kuan-Ying; Choo, Thye-Foo; Ubaidah Saidin, Nur; Rahman, Che Zuraini Che Ab

    2018-01-01

    Tellurium (Te) is an attractive semiconductor material for a wide range of applications in various functional devices including, radiation dosimeters, optical storage materials, thermoelectric or piezoelectric generators. In this work, large scale synthesis of tellurium (Te) nanostructures have been successfully carried out in different concentrations of aqueous solutions containing TeO2 and NaOH, by galvanic displacements of Zn and Al which served as the sacrificial materials. Galvanic displacement process is cost-effective and it requires no template or surfactant for the synthesis of nanostructures. By varying the concentrations of TeO2 and NaOH, etching temperatures and etching times, Te nanostructures of various forms of nanostructures were successfully obtained, ranging from one-dimensional needles and rod-like structures to more complex hierarchical structures. Microscopy examinations on the nanostructures obtained have shown that both the diameters and lengths of the Te nanostructures increased with increasing etching temperature and etching time.

  9. Application of Bacillus sp. TAT105 to reduce ammonia emissions during pilot-scale composting of swine manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Kazutaka; Tanaka, Akihiro; Furuhashi, Kenich; Nakasaki, Kiyohiko

    2017-12-01

    Thermophilic ammonium-tolerant bacterium Bacillus sp. TAT105 grows and reduces ammonia (NH 3 ) emissions by assimilating ammonium nitrogen during composting of swine feces. To evaluate the efficacy of a biological additive containing TAT105 at reducing NH 3 emissions, composting tests of swine manure on a pilot scale (1.8 m 3 ) were conducted. In the TAT105-added treatment, NH 3 emissions and nitrogen loss were lower than those in the control treatment without TAT105. No significant difference was detected in losses in the weight and volatile solids between the treatments. Concentration of thermophilic ammonium-tolerant bacteria in the compost increased in both treatments at the initial stage of composting. In the TAT105-added treatment, bacterial concentration reached ~10 9 colony-forming units per gram of dry matter, several-fold higher than that in the control and stayed at the same level until the end. These results suggest that TAT105 grows during composting and reduces NH 3 emissions in TAT105-added treatment.

  10. Experimental evaluation of a self-powered smart damping system in reducing vibrations of a full-scale stay cable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, In-Ho; Jung, Hyung-Jo; Koo, Jeong-Hoi

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the effectiveness of a self-powered smart damping system consisting of a magnetorheological (MR) damper and an electromagnetic induction (EMI) device in reducing cable vibrations. The proposed smart damping system incorporates an EMI device, which is capable of converting vibration energy into useful electrical energy. Thus, the incorporated EMI device can be used as an alternative power source for the MR damper, making it a self-powering system. The primary goal of this experimental study is to evaluate the performance of the proposed smart damping system using a full-scale, 44.7 m long, high-tension cable. To this end, an EMI part and an MR damper were designed and manufactured. Using a cable test setup in a laboratory setting, a series of tests were performed to evaluate the effectiveness of the self-powered smart damping system in reducing free vibration responses of the cable. The performances of the proposed smart damping system are compared with those of an equivalent passive system. Moreover, the damping characteristics of the smart damping system and the passive system are compared. The experimental results show that the self-powered smart damping system outperforms the passive control cases in reducing the vibrations of the cable. The results also show that the EMI can operate the smart damping system as a sole power source, demonstrating the feasibility of the self-powering capability of the system

  11. Large scale simulations of the mechanical properties of layered transition metal ternary compounds for fossil energy power system applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ching, Wai-Yim [Univ. of Missouri, Kansas City, MO (United States)

    2014-12-31

    Advanced materials with applications in extreme conditions such as high temperature, high pressure, and corrosive environments play a critical role in the development of new technologies to significantly improve the performance of different types of power plants. Materials that are currently employed in fossil energy conversion systems are typically the Ni-based alloys and stainless steels that have already reached their ultimate performance limits. Incremental improvements are unlikely to meet the more stringent requirements aimed at increased efficiency and reduce risks while addressing environmental concerns and keeping costs low. Computational studies can lead the way in the search for novel materials or for significant improvements in existing materials that can meet such requirements. Detailed computational studies with sufficient predictive power can provide an atomistic level understanding of the key characteristics that lead to desirable properties. This project focuses on the comprehensive study of a new class of materials called MAX phases, or Mn+1AXn (M = a transition metal, A = Al or other group III, IV, and V elements, X = C or N). The MAX phases are layered transition metal carbides or nitrides with a rare combination of metallic and ceramic properties. Due to their unique structural arrangements and special types of bonding, these thermodynamically stable alloys possess some of the most outstanding properties. We used a genomic approach in screening a large number of potential MAX phases and established a database for 665 viable MAX compounds on the structure, mechanical and electronic properties and investigated the correlations between them. This database if then used as a tool for materials informatics for further exploration of this class of intermetallic compounds.

  12. Separation of Metal Binding and Electron Transfer Sites as a Strategy To Stabilize the Ligand-Reduced and Metal-Oxidized Form of [Mo(CO)4L

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bulak, E.; Varnali, T.; Schwederski, B.; Bubrin, D.; Fiedler, Jan; Kaim, W.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 23 (2011), s. 6441-6445 ISSN 0276-7333 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/0705 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : Electron Transfer Sites * [Mo(CO)4L] * metal carbonyl complexes Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.963, year: 2011

  13. The Performance of Chrome-Coated Copper as Metallic Catalytic Converter to Reduce Exhaust Gas Emissions from Spark-Ignition Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warju; Harto, S. P.; Soenarto

    2018-01-01

    One of the automotive technologies to reduce exhaust gas emissions from the spark-ignition engine (SIE) is by using a catalytic converter. The aims of this research are firstly to conduct a metallic catalytic converter, secondly to find out to what extend chrome-coated copper plate (Cu+Cr) as a catalyst is efficient. To measure the concentration of carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrocarbon (HC) on the frame there are two conditions required. First is when the standard condition, and second is when Cu+Cr metallic catalytic converter is applied using exhaust gas analyzer. Exhaust gas emissions from SIE are measured by using SNI 19-7118.1-2005. The testing of CO and HC emissions were conducted with variable speed to find the trend of exhaust gas emissions from idle speed to high speed. This experiment results in the fact that the use of Cu+Cr metallic catalytic converter can reduce the production of CO and HC of a four-stroke gasoline engine. The reduction of CO and HC emission are 95,35% and 79,28%. Using active metal catalyst in form of metallic catalytic converter, it is gained an optimum effective surface of a catalyst which finally is able to decrease the amount of CO and HC emission significantly in every spinning happened in the engine. Finally, this technology can be applied to the spark ignition engine both car and motorcycle to support blue sky program in Indonesia.

  14. Self-assembled large scale metal alloy grid patterns as flexible transparent conductive layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohl, Melinda; Dombovari, Aron; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Kordas, Krisztian

    2015-09-01

    The development of scalable synthesis techniques for optically transparent, electrically conductive coatings is in great demand due to the constantly increasing market price and limited resources of indium for indium tin oxide (ITO) materials currently applied in most of the optoelectronic devices. This work pioneers the scalable synthesis of transparent conductive films (TCFs) by exploiting the coffee-ring effect deposition coupled with reactive inkjet printing and subsequent chemical copper plating. Here we report two different promising alternatives to replace ITO, palladium-copper (PdCu) grid patterns and silver-copper (AgCu) fish scale like structures printed on flexible poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) substrates, achieving sheet resistance values as low as 8.1 and 4.9 Ω/sq, with corresponding optical transmittance of 79% and 65% at 500 nm, respectively. Both films show excellent adhesion and also preserve their structural integrity and good contact with the substrate for severe bending showing less than 4% decrease of conductivity even after 105 cycles. Transparent conductive films for capacitive touch screens and pixels of microscopic resistive electrodes are demonstrated.

  15. Application of the Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) technique to the thermal-hydraulics project of a PWR reactor core in reduced scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima Junior, Carlos Alberto de Souza

    2008-09-01

    The reduced scale models design have been employed by engineers from several different industries fields such as offshore, spatial, oil extraction, nuclear industries and others. Reduced scale models are used in experiments because they are economically attractive than its own prototype (real scale) because in many cases they are cheaper than a real scale one and most of time they are also easier to build providing a way to lead the real scale design allowing indirect investigations and analysis to the real scale system (prototype). A reduced scale model (or experiment) must be able to represent all physical phenomena that occurs and further will do in the real scale one under operational conditions, e.g., in this case the reduced scale model is called similar. There are some different methods to design a reduced scale model and from those two are basic: the empiric method based on the expert's skill to determine which physical measures are relevant to the desired model; and the differential equation method that is based on a mathematical description of the prototype (real scale system) to model. Applying a mathematical technique to the differential equation that describes the prototype then highlighting the relevant physical measures so the reduced scale model design problem may be treated as an optimization problem. Many optimization techniques as Genetic Algorithm (GA), for example, have been developed to solve this class of problems and have also been applied to the reduced scale model design problem as well. In this work, Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) technique is investigated as an alternative optimization tool for such problem. In this investigation a computational approach, based on particle swarm optimization technique (PSO), is used to perform a reduced scale two loop Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) core, considering 100% of nominal power operation on a forced flow cooling circulation and non-accidental operating conditions. A performance comparison

  16. Do wood mice (Apodemus sylvaticus L.) use food selection as a means to reduce heavy metal intake?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beernaert, Joke; Scheirs, Jan; Brande, Greet Van Den

    2008-01-01

    Food preference of wood mice from two with heavy metals polluted sites and two unpolluted sites was tested under laboratory and field conditions with two-way choice experiments. In the laboratory, wood mice preferred to eat acorns from unpolluted sites over acorns from polluted sites. Previous...... experience with polluted food had no influence on food choice. Preference was negatively related to acorn metal content. Furthermore, the nutrient content of the acorn endosperm was consistently lower in polluted sites. We therefore conclude that wood mice used absolute metal concentration in the acorn...... selectively. Wood mice prefer unpolluted food items over polluted food items in laboratory trials but not in field situations....

  17. Stability and dewetting of metal nanoparticle filled thin polymer films: control of instability length scale and dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Rabibrata; Das, Soma; Das, Anindya; Sharma, Satinder K; Raychaudhuri, Arup K; Sharma, Ashutosh

    2010-07-27

    We investigate the influence of gold nanoparticle addition on the stability, dewetting, and pattern formation in ultrathin polymer-nanoparticle (NP) composite films by examining the length and time scales of instability, morphology, and dynamics of dewetting. For these 10-50 nm thick (h) polystyrene (PS) thin films containing uncapped gold nanoparticles (diameter approximately 3-4 nm), transitions from complete dewetting to arrested dewetting to absolute stability were observed depending on the concentration of the particles. Experiments show the existence of three distinct stability regimes: regime 1, complete dewetting leading to droplet formation for nanoparticle concentration of 2% (w/w) or below; regime 2, partial dewetting leading to formation of arrested holes for NP concentrations in the range of 3-6%; and regime 3, complete inhibition of dewetting for NP concentrations of 7% and above. Major results are (a) length scale of instability, where lambdaH approximately hn remains unchanged with NP concentration in regime 1 (n approximately 2) but increases in regime 2 with a change in the scaling relation (n approximately 3-3.5); (b) dynamics of instability and dewetting becomes progressively sluggish with an increase in the NP concentration; (c) there are distinct regimes of dewetting velocity at low NP concentrations; (d) force modulation AFM, as well as micro-Raman analysis, shows phase separation and aggregation of the gold nanoparticles within each dewetted polymer droplet leading to the formation of a metal core-polymer shell morphology. The polymer shell could be removed by washing in a selective solvent, thus exposing an array of bare gold nanoparticle aggregates.

  18. Coupling scales for modelling heavy metal vaporization from municipal solid waste incineration in a fluid bed by CFD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, José; Gauthier, Daniel; Flamant, Gilles; Rodriguez, Rosa; Mazza, Germán

    2015-09-01

    Municipal Solid Waste Incineration (MSWI) in fluidized bed is a very interesting technology mainly due to high combustion efficiency, great flexibility for treating several types of waste fuels and reduction in pollutants emitted with the flue gas. However, there is a great concern with respect to the fate of heavy metals (HM) contained in MSW and their environmental impact. In this study, a coupled two-scale CFD model was developed for MSWI in a bubbling fluidized bed. It presents an original scheme that combines a single particle model and a global fluidized bed model in order to represent the HM vaporization during MSW combustion. Two of the most representative HM (Cd and Pb) with bed temperatures ranging between 923 and 1073K have been considered. This new approach uses ANSYS FLUENT 14.0 as the modelling platform for the simulations along with a complete set of self-developed user-defined functions (UDFs). The simulation results are compared to the experimental data obtained previously by the research group in a lab-scale fluid bed incinerator. The comparison indicates that the proposed CFD model predicts well the evolution of the HM release for the bed temperatures analyzed. It shows that both bed temperature and bed dynamics have influence on the HM vaporization rate. It can be concluded that CFD is a rigorous tool that provides valuable information about HM vaporization and that the original two-scale simulation scheme adopted allows to better represent the actual particle behavior in a fluid bed incinerator. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Smoke flow temperature beneath tunnel ceiling for train fire at subway station: Reduced-scale experiments and correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, Na; Wang, Qiang; Liu, Zhaoxia; Li, Xiao; Yang, He

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Reduced-scale experiments on train fire at subway station. • Smoke flow temperature beneath tunnel ceiling measured and correlated. • Effect of platform-tunnel conjunction door type on smoke temperature is clarified. - Abstract: This paper is to investigate the smoke flow temperature beneath tunnel ceiling for a train on fire stopping besides a subway station. Experiments were carried out in a reduced-scale (1:10) subway station model to study the maximum smoke temperature and the longitudinal temperature distribution beneath the tunnel ceiling by considering platform-tunnel conjunction doors of two types: the full-seal platform screen door (PSD) and the full-height safety door. For the maximum temperature beneath the tunnel ceiling, it is found to be well correlated non-dimensionally with heat release rate by a 3.65 and a 2.92 power law function for the full-seal platform screen door and the full-height safety door, respectively. For the longitudinal temperature distribution along the tunnel ceiling, it can be well correlated by an exponential function for both types of platform-tunnel conjunction doors. Concerning the effect of the door type, the maximum temperature is lower and the longitudinal temperature decays faster for full-height safety door than that for full-seal PSD. This is due to that with the full-height safety door, the effective width of the tunnel ceiling is widened, which results in more heat losses from the smoke flow to the ceiling.

  20. Sediment filtration can reduce the N load of the waste water discharge - a full-scale lake experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalto, Sanni L.; Saarenheimo, Jatta; Karvinen, Anu; Rissanen, Antti J.; Ropponen, Janne; Juntunen, Janne; Tiirola, Marja

    2016-04-01

    European commission has obliged Baltic states to reduce nitrate load, which requires high investments on the nitrate removal processes and may increase emissions of greenhouse gases, e.g. N2O, in the waste water treatment plants. We used ecosystem-scale experimental approach to test a novel sediment filtration method for economical waste water N removal in Lake Keurusselkä, Finland between 2014 and 2015. By spatially optimizing the waste water discharge, the contact area and time of nitrified waste water with the reducing microbes of the sediment was increased. This was expected to enhance microbial-driven N transformation and to alter microbial community composition. We utilized 15N isotope pairing technique to follow changes in the actual and potential denitrification rates, nitrous oxide formation and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) in the lake sediments receiving nitrate-rich waste water input and in the control site. In addition, we investigated the connections between observed process rates and microbial community composition and functioning by using next generation sequencing and quantitative PCR. Furthermore, we estimated the effect of sediment filtration method on waste water contact time with sediment using the 3D hydrodynamic model. We sampled one year before the full-scale experiment and observed strong seasonal patterns in the process rates, which reflects the seasonal variation in the temperature-related mixing patterns of the waste water within the lake. During the experiment, we found that spatial optimization enhanced both actual and potential denitrification rates of the sediment. Furthermore, it did not significantly promote N2O emissions, or N retention through DNRA. Overall, our results indicate that sediment filtration can be utilized as a supplemental or even alternative method for the waste water N removal.

  1. Basin-scale transport of hydrothermal dissolved metals across the South Pacific Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resing, Joseph A; Sedwick, Peter N; German, Christopher R; Jenkins, William J; Moffett, James W; Sohst, Bettina M; Tagliabue, Alessandro

    2015-07-09

    Hydrothermal venting along mid-ocean ridges exerts an important control on the chemical composition of sea water by serving as a major source or sink for a number of trace elements in the ocean. Of these, iron has received considerable attention because of its role as an essential and often limiting nutrient for primary production in regions of the ocean that are of critical importance for the global carbon cycle. It has been thought that most of the dissolved iron discharged by hydrothermal vents is lost from solution close to ridge-axis sources and is thus of limited importance for ocean biogeochemistry. This long-standing view is challenged by recent studies which suggest that stabilization of hydrothermal dissolved iron may facilitate its long-range oceanic transport. Such transport has been subsequently inferred from spatially limited oceanographic observations. Here we report data from the US GEOTRACES Eastern Pacific Zonal Transect (EPZT) that demonstrate lateral transport of hydrothermal dissolved iron, manganese, and aluminium from the southern East Pacific Rise (SEPR) several thousand kilometres westward across the South Pacific Ocean. Dissolved iron exhibits nearly conservative (that is, no loss from solution during transport and mixing) behaviour in this hydrothermal plume, implying a greater longevity in the deep ocean than previously assumed. Based on our observations, we estimate a global hydrothermal dissolved iron input of three to four gigamoles per year to the ocean interior, which is more than fourfold higher than previous estimates. Complementary simulations with a global-scale ocean biogeochemical model suggest that the observed transport of hydrothermal dissolved iron requires some means of physicochemical stabilization and indicate that hydrothermally derived iron sustains a large fraction of Southern Ocean export production.

  2. A COMPACT HIGH VELOCITY CLOUD NEAR THE MAGELLANIC STREAM: METALLICITY AND SMALL-SCALE STRUCTURE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumari, Nimisha [Ecole Polytechnique, Route de Saclay, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Fox, Andrew J.; Tumlinson, Jason; Thom, Christopher; Ely, Justin [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Westmeier, Tobias [ICRAR, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley WA 6009 (Australia)

    2015-02-10

    The Magellanic Stream (MS) is a well-resolved gaseous tail originating from the Magellanic Clouds. Studies of its physical properties and chemical composition are needed to understand its role in Galactic evolution. We investigate the properties of a compact HVC (CHVC 224.0-83.4-197) lying close on the sky to the MS to determine whether it is physically connected to the Stream and to examine its internal structure. Our study is based on analysis of HST/COS spectra of three QSOs (Ton S210, B0120-28, and B0117-2837) all of which pass through this single cloud at small angular separation (≲0.°72), allowing us to compare physical conditions on small spatial scales. No significant variation is detected in the ionization structure from one part of the cloud to the other. Using Cloudy photoionization models, toward Ton S210 we derive elemental abundances of [C/H] = –1.21 ± 0.11, [Si/H] = –1.16 ± 0.11, [Al/H] = –1.19 ± 0.17, and [O/H] = –1.12 ± 0.22, which agree within 0.09 dex. The CHVC abundances match the 0.1 solar abundances measured along the main body of the Stream. This suggests that the CHVC (and by extension the extended network of filaments to which it belongs) has an origin in the MS. It may represent a fragment that has been removed from the Stream as it interacts with the gaseous Galactic halo.

  3. An Experimental Study on Burning Characteristics of n-Heptane/Ethanol Mixture Pool Fires in a Reduced Scaled Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yozgatligil, Ahmet; Shafee, Sina

    2016-11-01

    Fire accidents in recent decades have drawn attention to safety issues associated with the design, construction and maintenance of tunnels. A reduced scale tunnel model constructed based on Froude scaling technique is used in the current work. Mixtures of n-heptane and ethanol are burned with ethanol volumetric fraction up to 30 percent and the longitudinal ventilation velocity varying from 0.5 to 2.5 m/s. The burning rates of the pool fires are measured using a precision load cell. The heat release rates of the fires are calculated according to oxygen calorimetry method and the temperature distributions inside the tunnel are also measured. Results of the experiments show that the ventilation velocity variation has a significant effect on the pool fire burning rate, smoke temperature and the critical ventilation velocity. With increased oxygen depletion in case of increased ethanol content of blended pool fires, the quasi-steady heat release rate values tend to increase as well as the ceiling temperatures while the combustion duration decreases.

  4. Nano-scale simulation based study of creep behavior of bimodal nanocrystalline face centered cubic metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meraj, Md; Pal, Snehanshu

    2017-10-11

    In this paper, the creep behavior of nanocrystalline Ni having bimodal grain structure is investigated using molecular dynamics simulation. Analysis of structural evolution during the creep process has also been performed. It is observed that an increase in size of coarse grain causes improvement in creep properties of bimodal nanocrystalline Ni. Influence of bimodality (i.e., size difference between coarse and fine grains) on creep properties are found to be reduced with increasing creep temperature. The dislocation density is observed to decrease exponentially with progress of creep deformation. Grain boundary diffusion controlled creep mechanism is found to be dominant at the primary creep region and the initial part of the secondary creep region. After that shear diffusion transformation mechanism is found to be significantly responsible for deformation as bimodal nanocrystalline Ni transforms to amorphous structure with further progress of the creep process. The presence of , , and  distorted icosahedra has a significant influence on creep rate in the tertiary creep regime according to Voronoi cluster analysis.

  5. Understanding Antipsychotic Drug Treatment Effects: A Novel Method to Reduce Pseudospecificity of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Seth C; Ogirala, Ajay; Loebel, Antony; Koblan, Kenneth S

    2017-12-01

    The Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) is the most widely used efficacy measure in acute treatment studies of schizophrenia. However, interpretation of the efficacy of antipsychotics in improving specific symptom domains is confounded by moderate-to-high correlations among standard (Marder) PANSS factors. The authors review the results of an uncorrelated PANSS score matrix (UPSM) transform designed to reduce pseudospecificity in assessment of symptom change in patients with schizophrenia. Based on a factor analysis of five pooled, placebo-controlled lurasidone clinical trials (N=1,710 patients), a UPSM transform was identified that generated PANSS factors with high face validity (good correlation with standard Marder PANSS factors), and high specificity/orthogonality (low levels of between-factor correlation measuring change during treatment). Between-factor correlations were low at baseline for both standard (Marder) PANSS factors and transformed PANSS factors. However, when measured change in symptom severity was measured during treatment (in a pooled 5-study analysis), there was a notable difference for standard PANSS factors, where changes across factors were found to be highly correlated (factors exhibited pseudospecificity), compared to transformed PANSS factors, where factor change scores exhibited the same low levels of between-factor correlation observed at baseline. At Week 6-endpoint, correlations among PANSS factor severity scores were moderate-to-high for standard factors (0.34-0.68), but continued to be low for the transformed factors (-0.22-0.20). As an additional validity check, we analyzed data from one of the original five pooled clinical trials that included other well-validated assessment scales (MADRS, Negative Symptom Assessment scale [NSA]). In this baseline analysis, UPSM-transformed PANSS factor severity scores (negative and depression factors) were found to correlate well with the MADRS and NSA. The availability of transformed

  6. Appraising options to reduce shallow groundwater tables and enhance flow conditions over regional scales in an irrigated alluvial aquifer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morway, Eric D.; Gates, Timothy K.; Niswonger, Richard G.

    2013-01-01

    Some of the world’s key agricultural production systems face big challenges to both water quantity and quality due to shallow groundwater that results from long-term intensive irrigation, namely waterlogging and salinity, water losses, and environmental problems. This paper focuses on water quantity issues, presenting finite-difference groundwater models developed to describe shallow water table levels, non-beneficial groundwater consumptive use, and return flows to streams across two regions within an irrigated alluvial river valley in southeastern Colorado, USA. The models are calibrated and applied to simulate current baseline conditions in the alluvial aquifer system and to examine actions for potentially improving these conditions. The models provide a detailed description of regional-scale subsurface unsaturated and saturated flow processes, thereby enabling detailed spatiotemporal description of groundwater levels, recharge to infiltration ratios, partitioning of ET originating from the unsaturated and saturated zones, and groundwater flows, among other variables. Hybrid automated and manual calibration of the models is achieved using extensive observations of groundwater hydraulic head, groundwater return flow to streams, aquifer stratigraphy, canal seepage, total evapotranspiration, the portion of evapotranspiration supplied by upflux from the shallow water table, and irrigation flows. Baseline results from the two regional-scale models are compared to model predictions under variations of four alternative management schemes: (1) reduced seepage from earthen canals, (2) reduced irrigation applications, (3) rotational lease fallowing (irrigation water leased to municipalities, resulting in temporary dry-up of fields), and (4) combinations of these. The potential for increasing the average water table depth by up to 1.1 and 0.7 m in the two respective modeled regions, thereby reducing the threat of waterlogging and lowering non-beneficial consumptive use

  7. Ultra-pure soft water ameliorates atopic skin disease by preventing metallic soap deposition in NC/Tnd mice and reduces skin dryness in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Akane; Matsuda, Akira; Jung, Kyungsook; Jang, Hyosun; Ahn, Ginnae; Ishizaka, Saori; Amagai, Yosuke; Oida, Kumiko; Arkwright, Peter D; Matsuda, Hiroshi

    2015-09-01

    Mineral ions in tap water react with fatty acids in soap, leading to the formation of insoluble precipitate (metallic soap) on skin during washing. We hypothesised that metallic soap might negatively alter skin conditions. Application of metallic soap onto the skin of NC/Tnd mice with allergic dermatitis further induced inflammation with elevation of plasma immunoglobulin E and proinflammatory cytokine expression. Pruritus and dryness were ameliorated when the back of mice was washed with soap in Ca2+- and Mg2+-free ultra-pure soft water (UPSW). Washing in UPSW, but not tap water, also protected the skin of healthy volunteers from the soap deposition. Furthermore, 4 weeks of showering with UPSW reduced dryness and pruritus of human subjects with dry skin. Washing with UPSW may be therapeutically beneficial in patients with skin troubles.

  8. Test of electrodialytic upgrading of MSWI APC residue in pilot scale: focus on reduced metal and salt leaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkelund, Gunvor Marie; Jensen, Pernille Erland; Villumsen, Arne

    2010-01-01

    that is adapted from conventional electrodialysis, e.g. used in desalination of solutions. The APC residue was treated in a suspension (8 kg APC residue and 80 L tap water) and circulated through an electrodialytic (ED) stack consisting of 50 cell pairs separated by ion exchange membranes. A direct current...

  9. Formation of metal agglomerates during carbonisation of chromated copper arsenate (CCA) treated wood waste: Comparison between a lab scale and an industrial plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helsen, Lieve [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Division of Applied Mechanics and Energy Conversion, Celestijnenlaan 300A, B-3001 Leuven (Heverlee) (Belgium)]. E-mail: lieve.helsen@mech.kuleuven.be; Hacala, Amelie [Company Thermya, 1 rue Nicolas Appert, 33140 Villenave d' Ornon (France)]. E-mail: hacala@thermya.com

    2006-10-11

    This paper compares the results obtained by scanning electron microscopy coupled to X-ray analysis (SEM-EDXA) of the solid product after carbonisation of treated wood waste in a lab scale and in an industrial installation. These setups (lab scale and industrial) are characterized by different operating conditions of the carbonisation process. Moreover, the wood waste input to the processes differs significantly. From this study, it is clear that some similarities but also some differences exist between the lab scale study and the study with the industrial Chartherm plant. In both reactors, a metal (and mineral) agglomeration process takes place, even in the case of untreated wood. The agglomerates initially present in the wood input may serve as a seed for the metal agglomeration process during 'chartherisation'. The industrial setup leads to a broader range of agglomerates' size (0.1-50 {mu}m) and composition (all possible combinations of Cu, Cr, As and wood minerals). Some agglomerates contain the three metals but the major part is a combination of wood minerals and one or two of the three preservative metals, while all agglomerates analysed in the lab scale product contain the three metals. The separate influence of wood input characteristics and process conditions cannot be derived from these experiments, but the observations suggest that the higher the CCA retention in the wood input is, the easier is the metal agglomeration process during chartherisation of CCA treated wood waste. From the analyses performed in this study it seems that copper behaves differently in the sense that it agglomerates easily, but the resulting particles are small (<1 {mu}m)

  10. Formation of metal agglomerates during carbonisation of chromated copper arsenate (CCA) treated wood waste: Comparison between a lab scale and an industrial plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helsen, Lieve; Hacala, Amelie

    2006-01-01

    This paper compares the results obtained by scanning electron microscopy coupled to X-ray analysis (SEM-EDXA) of the solid product after carbonisation of treated wood waste in a lab scale and in an industrial installation. These setups (lab scale and industrial) are characterized by different operating conditions of the carbonisation process. Moreover, the wood waste input to the processes differs significantly. From this study, it is clear that some similarities but also some differences exist between the lab scale study and the study with the industrial Chartherm plant. In both reactors, a metal (and mineral) agglomeration process takes place, even in the case of untreated wood. The agglomerates initially present in the wood input may serve as a seed for the metal agglomeration process during 'chartherisation'. The industrial setup leads to a broader range of agglomerates' size (0.1-50 μm) and composition (all possible combinations of Cu, Cr, As and wood minerals). Some agglomerates contain the three metals but the major part is a combination of wood minerals and one or two of the three preservative metals, while all agglomerates analysed in the lab scale product contain the three metals. The separate influence of wood input characteristics and process conditions cannot be derived from these experiments, but the observations suggest that the higher the CCA retention in the wood input is, the easier is the metal agglomeration process during chartherisation of CCA treated wood waste. From the analyses performed in this study it seems that copper behaves differently in the sense that it agglomerates easily, but the resulting particles are small (<1 μm)

  11. Experimental study of the large-scale axially heterogeneous liquid-metal fast breeder reactor at the fast critical assembly: Power distribution measurements and their analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iijima, S.; Obu, M.; Hayase, T.; Ohno, A.; Nemoto, T.; Okajima, S.

    1988-01-01

    Power distributions of the large-scale axially heterogeneous liquid-metal fast breeder reactor were studied by using the experiment results of fast critical assemblies XI, XII, and XIII and the results of their analyses. The power distributions were examined by the gamma-scanning method and fission rate measurements using /sup 239/Pu and /sup 238/U fission counters and the foil irradiation method. In addition to the measurements in the reference core, the power distributions were measured in the core with a control rod inserted and in a modified core where the shape of the internal blanket was determined by the radial boundary. The calculation was made by using JENDL-2 and the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute's standard calculation system for fast reactor neutronics. The power flattening trend, caused by the decrease of the fast neutron flux, was observed in the axial and radial power distributions. The effect of the radial boundary shape of the internal blanket on the power distribution was determined in the core. The thickness of the internal blanket was reduced at its radial boundary. The influence of the internal blanket was observed in the power distributions in the core with a control rod inserted. The calculation predicted the neutron spectrum harder in the internal blanket. In the radial distributions of /sup 239/Pu fission rates, the space dependency of the calculated-to-experiment values was found at the active core close to the internal blanket

  12. Removal of Arsenic Using Acid/Metal-Tolerant Sulfate Reducing Bacteria: A New Approach for Bioremediation of High-Arsenic Acid Mine Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennyfer Serrano

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Fluvial sediments, soils, and natural waters in northern Chile are characterized by high arsenic (As content. Mining operations in this area are potential sources of As and other metal contaminants, due to acid mine drainage (AMD generation. Sulfate Reducing Bacteria (SRB has been used for the treatment of AMD, as they allow for the reduction of sulfate, the generation of alkalinity, and the removal of dissolved heavy metals and metalloids by precipitation as insoluble metal sulfides. Thus, SRB could be used to remove As and other heavy metals from AMD, however the tolerance of SRB to high metal concentrations and low pH is limited. The present study aimed to quantify the impact of SRB in As removal under acidic and As-Fe-rich conditions. Our results show that SRB tolerate low pH (up to 3.5 and high concentrations of As (~3.6 mg·L−1. Batch experiments showed As removal of up to 73%, Iron (Fe removal higher than 78% and a neutralization of pH from acidic to circum-neutral conditions (pH 6–8. In addition, XRD analysis showed the dominance of amorphous minerals, while Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (SEM-EDX analysis showed associations between As, Fe, and sulfur, indicating the presence of Fe-S-As compounds or interaction of As species with amorphous and/or nanocrystalline phases by sorption processes. These results indicate that the As removal was mediated by acid/metal-tolerant SRB and open the potential for the application of new strains of acid/metal-tolerant SRB for the remediation of high-As acid mine waters.

  13. Reducing metal alloy powder costs for use in powder bed fusion additive manufacturing: Improving the economics for production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Fransisco

    Titanium and its associated alloys have been used in industry for over 50 years and have become more popular in the recent decades. Titanium has been most successful in areas where the high strength to weight ratio provides an advantage over aluminum and steels. Other advantages of titanium include biocompatibility and corrosion resistance. Electron Beam Melting (EBM) is an additive manufacturing (AM) technology that has been successfully applied in the manufacturing of titanium components for the aerospace and medical industry with equivalent or better mechanical properties as parts fabricated via more traditional casting and machining methods. As the demand for titanium powder continues to increase, the price also increases. Titanium spheroidized powder from different vendors has a price range from 260/kg-450/kg, other spheroidized alloys such as Niobium can cost as high as $1,200/kg. Alternative titanium powders produced from methods such as the Titanium Hydride-Dehydride (HDH) process and the Armstrong Commercially Pure Titanium (CPTi) process can be fabricated at a fraction of the cost of powders fabricated via gas atomization. The alternative powders can be spheroidized and blended. Current sectors in additive manufacturing such as the medical industry are concerned that there will not be enough spherical powder for production and are seeking other powder options. It is believed the EBM technology can use a blend of spherical and angular powder to build fully dense parts with equal mechanical properties to those produced using traditional powders. Some of the challenges with angular and irregular powders are overcoming the poor flow characteristics and the attainment of the same or better packing densities as spherical powders. The goal of this research is to demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing alternative and lower cost powders in the EBM process. As a result, reducing the cost of the raw material to reduce the overall cost of the product produced with

  14. Do wood mice (Apodemus sylvaticus L.) use food selection as a means to reduce heavy metal intake?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beernaert, Joke; Scheirs, Jan; Brande, Greet van den; Leirs, Herwig; Blust, Ronny; Meulenaer, Bruno de; Camp, John van; Verhagen, Ron

    2008-01-01

    Food preference of wood mice from two with heavy metals polluted sites and two unpolluted sites was tested under laboratory and field conditions with two-way choice experiments. In the laboratory, wood mice preferred to eat acorns from unpolluted sites over acorns from polluted sites. Previous experience with polluted food had no influence on food choice. Preference was negatively related to acorn metal content. Furthermore, the nutrient content of the acorn endosperm was consistently lower in polluted sites. We therefore conclude that wood mice used absolute metal concentration in the acorn, nutrient content, or both as a food selection cue. The results of the laboratory experiment could not be confirmed under field conditions. We hypothesized that search time constraints due to the presence of predators, competitors and/or other stress factors in the field have prevented the mice to forage selectively. - Wood mice prefer unpolluted food items over polluted food items in laboratory trials but not in field situations

  15. Probing and Manipulating the Interfacial Defects of InGaAs Dual-Layer Metal Oxides at the Atomic Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xing; Luo, Chen; Hao, Peng; Sun, Tao; Wang, Runsheng; Wang, Chaolun; Hu, Zhigao; Li, Yawei; Zhang, Jian; Bersuker, Gennadi; Sun, Litao; Pey, Kinleong

    2018-01-01

    The interface between III-V and metal-oxide-semiconductor materials plays a central role in the operation of high-speed electronic devices, such as transistors and light-emitting diodes. The high-speed property gives the light-emitting diodes a high response speed and low dark current, and they are widely used in communications, infrared remote sensing, optical detection, and other fields. The rational design of high-performance devices requires a detailed understanding of the electronic structure at this interface; however, this understanding remains a challenge, given the complex nature of surface interactions and the dynamic relationship between the morphology evolution and electronic structures. Herein, in situ transmission electron microscopy is used to probe and manipulate the structural and electrical properties of ZrO 2 films on Al 2 O 3 and InGaAs substrate at the atomic scale. Interfacial defects resulting from the spillover of the oxygen-atom conduction-band wavefunctions are resolved. This study unearths the fundamental defect-driven interfacial electric structure of III-V semiconductor materials and paves the way to future high-speed and high-reliability devices. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Origin of two time-scale regimes in potentiometric titration of metal oxides. A replica kinetic Monte Carlo study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarzycki, Piotr P.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2009-01-01

    Replica Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations were used to study the characteristic time scales of potentiometric titration of the metal oxides and (oxy)hydroxides. The effect of surface heterogeneity and surface transformation on the titration kinetics were also examined. Two characteristic relaxation times are often observed experimentally, with the trailing slower part attributed to surface non-uniformity, porosity, polymerization, amorphization, and other dynamic surface processes induced by unbalanced surface charge. However, our simulations show that these two characteristic relaxation times are intrinsic to the proton binding reaction for energetically homogeneous surfaces, and therefore surface heterogeneity or transformation do not necessarily need to be invoked. However, all such second-order surface processes are found to intensify the separation and distinction of the two kinetic regimes. The effect of surface energetic-topographic non-uniformity, as well dynamic surface transformation, interface roughening/smoothing were described in a statistical fashion. Furthermore, our simulations show that a shift in the point-of-zero charge is expected from increased titration speed and the pH-dependence of the titration measurement error is in excellent agreement with experimental studies.

  17. Origin of two time-scale regimes in potentiometric titration of metal oxides. A replica kinetic Monte Carlo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarzycki, Piotr; Rosso, Kevin M

    2009-06-16

    Replica kinetic Monte Carlo simulations were used to study the characteristic time scales of potentiometric titration of the metal oxides and (oxy)hydroxides. The effect of surface heterogeneity and surface transformation on the titration kinetics were also examined. Two characteristic relaxation times are often observed experimentally, with the trailing slower part attributed to surface nonuniformity, porosity, polymerization, amorphization, and other dynamic surface processes induced by unbalanced surface charge. However, our simulations show that these two characteristic relaxation times are intrinsic to the proton-binding reaction for energetically homogeneous surfaces, and therefore surface heterogeneity or transformation does not necessarily need to be invoked. However, all such second-order surface processes are found to intensify the separation and distinction of the two kinetic regimes. The effect of surface energetic-topographic nonuniformity, as well dynamic surface transformation, interface roughening/smoothing were described in a statistical fashion. Furthermore, our simulations show that a shift in the point-of-zero charge is expected from increased titration speed, and the pH-dependence of the titration measurement error is in excellent agreement with experimental studies.

  18. An in Situ method for establishing the presence and predicting the activity of heavy metal-reducing microbes in the subsurface. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatfield, K.

    2003-01-01

    Tracer method to establish presence and distribution of chromium reducing microbes. The primary objective of this research was to establish an in situ tracer method for detecting the presence. distribution. and activity of subsurface heavy metal-reducing microorganisms. Research focused on microbial systems responsible for the reduction of chromium and a suite of biotracers coupled to the reduction process. The tracer method developed may be used to characterize sites contaminated with chromium or expedite bioremediation: and although research focused on chromium. the method can be easily extended to other metals, organics, and radionuclides. This brief final report contains three major sections. The first identifies specific products of the research effort such as students supported and publications. The second section briefly presents major research findings, while the last section summarizes the overall research effort

  19. Occurrence of sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB associated with biocorrosion on metallic surfaces in a hydroelectric power station in Ibirama (SC - Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto Dantas Marangoni

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was evaluate, two methods for the detection and identification of sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB: ML medium and PCR with specific primers for SRB groups. SRB were detected through the selective medium only on carbon steel, which showed corrosion. Employing specific PCR primer, SBR were detected from all the metallic components assayed, even those that did not present visible corrosion spots, such stainless steel and copper alloys. Despite the presence or absence of corrosion at the later stages effectively by using the selective medium,, the initial stages of the corrosion could only be detected by the amplification of total DNA with SRB specific primers. The early detection of SRB could be employed for preventing the damages on metal surfaces before the installation of corrosion processes. Strategies for reducing the time spent on SRB isolation and identification could be auxiliary tools for controlling the corrosion of materials.

  20. In Situ Tracer method for establishing the presence and predicting the activity of heavy metal-reducing microbes in the subsurface. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatfield, K.

    2003-07-01

    Tracer method to establish presence and distribution of chromium reducing microbes. The primary objective of this research was to establish an in situ tracer method for detecting the presence. distribution. and activity of subsurface heavy metal-reducing microorganisms. Research focused on microbial systems responsible for the reduction of chromium and a suite of biotracers coupled to the reduction process. The tracer method developed may be used to characterize sites contaminated with chromium or expedite bioremediation: and although research focused on chromium. the method can be easily extended to other metals, organics, and radionuclides. This brief final report contains three major sections. The first identifies specific products of the research effort such as students supported and publications. The second section briefly presents major research findings, while the last section summarizes the overall research effort.

  1. Crossing Science-Policy-Societal Boundaries to Reduce Scientific and Institutional Uncertainty in Small-Scale Fisheries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Abigail M.; Rudd, Murray A.

    2016-10-01

    The governance of small-scale fisheries (SSF) is challenging due to the uncertainty, complexity, and interconnectedness of social, political, ecological, and economical processes. Conventional SSF management has focused on a centralized and top-down approach. A major criticism of conventional management is the over-reliance on `expert science' to guide decision-making and poor consideration of fishers' contextually rich knowledge. That is thought to exacerbate the already low governance potential of SSF. Integrating scientific knowledge with fishers' knowledge is increasingly popular and is often assumed to help reduce levels of biophysical and institutional uncertainties. Many projects aimed at encouraging knowledge integration have, however, been unsuccessful. Our objective in this research was to assess factors that influence knowledge integration and the uptake of integrated knowledge into policy-making. We report results from 54 semi-structured interviews with SSF researchers and practitioners from around the globe. Our analysis is framed in terms of scientific credibility, societal legitimacy, and policy saliency, and we discuss cases that have been partially or fully successful in reducing uncertainty via push-and-pull-oriented boundary crossing initiatives. Our findings suggest that two important factors affect the science-policy-societal boundary: a lack of consensus among stakeholders about what constitutes credible knowledge and institutional uncertainty resulting from shifting policies and leadership change. A lack of training for scientific leaders and an apparent `shelf-life' for community organizations highlight the importance of ongoing institutional support for knowledge integration projects. Institutional support may be enhanced through such investments, such as capacity building and specialized platforms for knowledge integration.

  2. Crossing Science-Policy-Societal Boundaries to Reduce Scientific and Institutional Uncertainty in Small-Scale Fisheries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Abigail M; Rudd, Murray A

    2016-10-01

    The governance of small-scale fisheries (SSF) is challenging due to the uncertainty, complexity, and interconnectedness of social, political, ecological, and economical processes. Conventional SSF management has focused on a centralized and top-down approach. A major criticism of conventional management is the over-reliance on 'expert science' to guide decision-making and poor consideration of fishers' contextually rich knowledge. That is thought to exacerbate the already low governance potential of SSF. Integrating scientific knowledge with fishers' knowledge is increasingly popular and is often assumed to help reduce levels of biophysical and institutional uncertainties. Many projects aimed at encouraging knowledge integration have, however, been unsuccessful. Our objective in this research was to assess factors that influence knowledge integration and the uptake of integrated knowledge into policy-making. We report results from 54 semi-structured interviews with SSF researchers and practitioners from around the globe. Our analysis is framed in terms of scientific credibility, societal legitimacy, and policy saliency, and we discuss cases that have been partially or fully successful in reducing uncertainty via push-and-pull-oriented boundary crossing initiatives. Our findings suggest that two important factors affect the science-policy-societal boundary: a lack of consensus among stakeholders about what constitutes credible knowledge and institutional uncertainty resulting from shifting policies and leadership change. A lack of training for scientific leaders and an apparent 'shelf-life' for community organizations highlight the importance of ongoing institutional support for knowledge integration projects. Institutional support may be enhanced through such investments, such as capacity building and specialized platforms for knowledge integration.

  3. Occurrence of sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB) associated with biocorrosion on metallic surfaces in a hydroelectric power station in Ibirama (SC) - Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Paulo Roberto Dantas Marangoni; Diogo Robl; Marcos Antonio Coelho Berton; Carlos Mario Garcia; Angela Bozza; Mariana Vieira Porsani; Patricia do Rocio Dalzoto; Vânia Aparecida Vicente; Ida Chapaval Pimentel

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was evaluate, two methods for the detection and identification of sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB): ML medium and PCR with specific primers for SRB groups. SRB were detected through the selective medium only on carbon steel, which showed corrosion. Employing specific PCR primer, SBR were detected from all the metallic components assayed, even those that did not present visible corrosion spots, such stainless steel and copper alloys. Despite the presence or absence of cor...

  4. The role of tailored biochar in increasing plant growth, and reducing bioavailability, phytotoxicity, and uptake of heavy metals in contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Badr A; Ellis, Naoko; Kim, Chang Soo; Bi, Xiaotao

    2017-11-01

    Microwave-assisted catalytic pyrolysis was investigated using K 3 PO 4 and clinoptilolite to enhance biochar sorption affinity for heavy metals. The performance of resulting biochar samples was characterized through their effects on plant growth, bioavailability, phytotoxicity, and uptake of heavy metals in a sandy soil contaminated with Pb, Ni, and Co. The produced biochars have high cation-exchange capacity (CEC) and surface area, and rich in plant nutrients, which not only reduced heavy metals (Pb, Ni, and Co), bioavailability and phytotoxicity, but also increased plant growth rate by up to 145%. The effectiveness of biochar in terms of reduced phytotoxicity and plant uptake of heavy metals was further improved by mixing K 3 PO 4 and clinoptilolite with biomass through microwave pyrolysis. This may be due to the predominance of different mechanisms as 10KP/10Clino biochar has the highest micropore surface area (405 m 2 /g), high concentrations of K (206 g/kg), Ca (26.5 g/kg), Mg (6.2 g/kg) and Fe (11.9 g/kg) for ion-exchange and high phosphorus content (79.8 g/kg) for forming insoluble compounds with heavy metals. The largest wheat shoot length (143 mm) and lowest extracted amounts of Pb (107 mg/kg), Ni (2.4 mg/kg) and Co (63.9 mg/kg) were also obtained by using 10KP/10Clino biochar at 2 wt% load; while the smallest shoot length (68 mm) and highest extracted amounts of heavy metals (Pb 408 mg/kg, Ni 15 mg/kg and Co 148 mg/kg) for the samples treated with biochars were observed for soils mixed with 1 wt% 10Clino biochar. Strong negative correlations were also observed between biochar micropore surface area, CEC and the extracted amounts of heavy metals. Microwave-assisted catalytic pyrolysis of biomass has a great potential for producing biochar with high sorption affinity for heavy metals and rich nutrient contents using properly selected catalysts/additives that can increase microwave heating rate and improve biochar and bio-oil properties

  5. A virtual sinogram method to reduce dental metallic implant artefacts in computed tomography-based attenuation correction for PET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdoli, Mehrsima; Ay, Mohammad Reza; Ahmadian, Alireza; Zaidi, Habib

    Objective Attenuation correction of PET data requires accurate determination of the attenuation map (mu map), which represents the spatial distribution of linear attenuation coefficients of different tissues at 511 keV. The presence of high-density metallic dental filling material in head and neck

  6. Reduced α-stable dynamics for multiple time scale systems forced with correlated additive and multiplicative Gaussian white noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, William F.; Kuske, Rachel A.; Monahan, Adam H.

    2017-11-01

    Stochastic averaging problems with Gaussian forcing have been the subject of numerous studies, but far less attention has been paid to problems with infinite-variance stochastic forcing, such as an α-stable noise process. It has been shown that simple linear systems driven by correlated additive and multiplicative (CAM) Gaussian noise, which emerge in the context of reduced atmosphere and ocean dynamics, have infinite variance in certain parameter regimes. In this study, we consider the stochastic averaging of systems where a linear CAM noise process in the infinite variance parameter regime drives a comparatively slow process. We use (semi)-analytical approximations combined with numerical illustrations to compare the averaged process to one that is forced by a white α-stable process, demonstrating consistent properties in the case of large time-scale separation. We identify the conditions required for the fast linear CAM process to have such an influence in driving a slower process and then derive an (effectively) equivalent fast, infinite-variance process for which an existing stochastic averaging approximation is readily applied. The results are illustrated using numerical simulations of a set of example systems.

  7. Quantum interference between two phonon paths and reduced heat transport in diamond lattice with atomic-scale planar defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosevich, Yu. A.; Strelnikov, I. A.

    2018-02-01

    Destructive quantum interference between the waves propagating through laterally inhomogeneous layer can result in their total reflection, which in turn reduces energy flux carried by these waves. We consider the systems of Ge atoms, which fully or partly, in the chequer-wise order, fill a crystal plane in diamond-like Si lattice. We have revealed that a single type of the atomic defects, which are placed in identical positions in different unit cells in the defect crystal plane, can result in double transmission antiresonances of phonon wave packets. This new effect we relate with the complex structure of the diamond-like unit cell, which comprises two atoms in different positions and results in two distinct vibration resonances in two interfering phonon paths. We also consider the propagation of phonon wave packets in the superlatticies made of the defect planes, half-filled in the chequer-wise order with Ge atoms. We have revealed relatively broad phonon stop bands with center frequencies at the transmission antiresonances. We elaborate the equivalent analytical quasi-1D lattice model of the two phonon paths through the complex planar defect in the diamond-like lattice and describe the reduction of phonon heat transfer through the atomic-scale planar defects.

  8. Inorganic phosphorus fertilizer ameliorates maize growth by reducing metal uptake, improving soil enzyme activity and microbial community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wencheng; Wu, Jiahui; Liu, Xiaowen; Chen, Xianbin; Wu, Yingxin; Yu, Shixiao

    2017-09-01

    Recently, several studies have showed that both organic and inorganic fertilizers are effective in immobilizing heavy metals at low cost, in comparison to other remediation strategies for heavy metal-contaminated farmlands. A pot trial was conducted in this study to examine the effects of inorganic P fertilizer and organic fertilizer, in single application or in combination, on growth of maize, heavy metal availabilities, enzyme activities, and microbial community structure in metal-contaminated soils from an electronic waste recycling region. Results showed that biomass of maize shoot and root from the inorganic P fertilizer treatments were respectively 17.8 and 10.0 folds higher than the un-amended treatments (CK), while the biomass in the organic fertilizer treatments was only comparable to the CK. In addition, there were decreases of 85.0% in Cd, 74.3% in Pb, 66.3% in Cu, and 91.9% in Zn concentrations in the roots of maize grown in inorganic P fertilizer amended soil. Consistently, urease and catalase activities in the inorganic P fertilizer amended soil were 3.3 and 2.0 times higher than the CK, whereas no enhancement was observed in the organic fertilizer amended soil. Moreover, microbial community structure was improved by the application of inorganic P fertilizer, but not by organic fertilizer; the beneficial microbial groups such as Kaistobacter and Koribacter were most frequently detected in the inorganic P fertilizer amended soil. The negligible effect from the organic fertilizer might be ascribed to the decreased pH value in soils. The results suggest that the application of inorganic P fertilizer (or in combination with organic fertilizer) might be a promising strategy for the remediation of heavy metals contaminated soils in electronic waste recycling region. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Multi-Scale Modification of Metallic Implants With Pore Gradients, Polyelectrolytes and Their Indirect Monitoring In vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Vrana, Nihal E.; Dupret-Bories, Agnes; Chaubaroux, Christophe; Rieger, Elisabeth; Debry, Christian; Vautier, Dominique; Metz-Boutigue, Marie-Helene; Lavalle, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Metallic implants, especially titanium implants, are widely used in clinical applications. Tissue in-growth and integration to these implants in the tissues are important parameters for successful clinical outcomes. In order to improve tissue integration, porous metallic implants have being developed. Open porosity of metallic foams is very advantageous, since the pore areas can be functionalized without compromising the mechanical properties of the whole structure. Here we describe such modi...

  10. A system approach for reducing the environmental impact of manufacturing and sustainability improvement of nano-scale manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yingchun

    This dissertation develops an effective and economical system approach to reduce the environmental impact of manufacturing. The system approach is developed by using a process-based holistic method for upstream analysis and source reduction of the environmental impact of manufacturing. The system approach developed consists of three components of a manufacturing system: technology, energy and material, and is useful for sustainable manufacturing as it establishes a clear link between manufacturing system components and its overall sustainability performance, and provides a framework for environmental impact reductions. In this dissertation, the system approach developed is applied for environmental impact reduction of a semiconductor nano-scale manufacturing system, with three case scenarios analyzed in depth on manufacturing process improvement, clean energy supply, and toxic chemical material selection. The analysis on manufacturing process improvement is conducted on Atomic Layer Deposition of Al2O3 dielectric gate on semiconductor microelectronics devices. Sustainability performance and scale-up impact of the ALD technology in terms of environmental emissions, energy consumption, nano-waste generation and manufacturing productivity are systematically investigated and the ways to improve the sustainability of the ALD technology are successfully developed. The clean energy supply is studied using solar photovoltaic, wind, and fuel cells systems for electricity generation. Environmental savings from each clean energy supply over grid power are quantitatively analyzed, and costs for greenhouse gas reductions on each clean energy supply are comparatively studied. For toxic chemical material selection, an innovative schematic method is developed as a visual decision tool for characterizing and benchmarking the human health impact of toxic chemicals, with a case study conducted on six chemicals commonly used as solvents in semiconductor manufacturing. Reliability of

  11. Chemical and plant tests to assess the viability of amendments to reduce metal availability in mine soils and tailings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Luis; Gómez, Rocío; Sánchez, Virtudes; Alonso-Azcárate, Jacinto

    2016-04-01

    The goal of this research was to assess the potential of several industrial wastes to immobilise metals in two polluted soils deriving from an old Pb/Zn mine. Two different approaches were used to assess the performance of different amendments: a chemical one, using extraction by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and a biological one, using Lupinus albus as a bio-indicator. Four amendments were used: inorganic sugar production waste (named 'sugar foam', SF), sludge from a drinking water treatment sludge (DWS), organic waste from olive mill waste (OMW) and paper mill sludge (PMS). Amendment to soil ratios ranged from 0.1 to 0.3 (w/w). All the amendments were capable of significantly decreasing (p mine soils as it led to a decrease in the availability and toxicity of metals and, thus, facilitated the growth of a vegetation layer.

  12. Impact of reducing sodium void worth on the severe accident response of metallic-fueled sodium-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wigeland, R.A.; Turski, R.B.; Pizzica, P.A.

    1994-01-01

    Analyses have performed on the severe accident response of four 90 MWth reactor cores, all designed using the metallic fuel of the Integrated Fast Reactor (IFR) concept. The four core designs have different sodium void worth, in the range of -3$ to 5$. The purpose of the investigation is to determine the improvement in safety, as measured by the severe accident consequences, that can be achieved from a reduction in the sodium void worth for reactor cores designed using the IFR concept

  13. Reducing surface water pollution through the assessment of the cost-effectiveness of BMPs at different spatial scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagopoulos, Y; Makropoulos, C; Mimikou, M

    2011-10-01

    Two kinds of agricultural Best Management Practices (BMPs) were examined with respect to cost-effectiveness (CE) in reducing sediment, nitrates-nitrogen (NO(3)-N) and total phosphorus (TP) losses to surface waters of the Arachtos catchment in Western Greece. The establishment of filter strips at the edge of fields and a non-structural measure, namely fertilization reduction in alfalfa, combined with contour farming and zero-tillage in corn and reduction of animal numbers in pastureland, were evaluated. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model was used as the non-point-source (NPS) estimator, while a simple economic component was developed estimating BMP implementation cost as the mean annual expenses needed to undertake and operate the practice for a 5-year period. After each BMP implementation, the ratio of their CE in reducing pollution was calculated for each Hydrologic Response Unit (HRU) separately, for each agricultural land use type entirely and for the whole catchment. The results at the HRU scale are presented comprehensively on a map, demonstrating the spatial differentiation of CE ratios across the catchment that enhances the identification of locations where each BMP is most advisable for implementation. Based on the analysis, a catchment management solution of affordable total cost would include the expensive measure of filter strips in corn and only in a small number of pastureland fields, in combination with the profitable measure of reducing fertilization to alfalfa fields. When examined for its impact on river loads at the outlet, the latter measure led to a 20 tn or 8% annual decrease of TP from the baseline with savings of 15€/kg of pollutant reduction. Filter strips in corn fields reduced annual sediments by 66 Ktn or 5%, NO(3)-N by 71 tn or 9.5% and TP by 27 tn or 10%, with an additional cost of 3.1 €/tn, 3.3 €/kg and 8.1 €/kg of each pollutant respectively. The study concludes that considerable reductions of several

  14. Virtual Institute of Microbial Stress and Survival: Deduction of Stress Response Pathways in Metal and Radionuclide Reducing Microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2004-04-17

    The projects application goals are to: (1) To understand bacterial stress-response to the unique stressors in metal/radionuclide contamination sites; (2) To turn this understanding into a quantitative, data-driven model for exploring policies for natural and biostimulatory bioremediation; (3) To implement proposed policies in the field and compare results to model predictions; and (4) Close the experimental/computation cycle by using discrepancies between models and predictions to drive new measurements and construction of new models. The projects science goals are to: (1) Compare physiological and molecular response of three target microorganisms to environmental perturbation; (2) Deduce the underlying regulatory pathways that control these responses through analysis of phenotype, functional genomic, and molecular interaction data; (3) Use differences in the cellular responses among the target organisms to understand niche specific adaptations of the stress and metal reduction pathways; (4) From this analysis derive an understanding of the mechanisms of pathway evolution in the environment; and (5) Ultimately, derive dynamical models for the control of these pathways to predict how natural stimulation can optimize growth and metal reduction efficiency at field sites.

  15. The Study of Reducing Krypton-85 Activity in Metal Halide Lamp%降低金卤灯内氪-85活度的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶碧君

    2012-01-01

    通过测试及分析不同氪-85活度填充气体的同规格金卤灯的各项性能参数,研究了在确保金卤灯各项性能的前提下,降低金卤灯中氪-85活度的可行性及金卤灯中氪-85存在的必要性,可以为今后确定金卤灯中需添加的最低氪-85活度提供参考。%By analyzing the parameters of metal halide lamps which are filled with gas with different activity of krypton-85, the paper studies the feasibility of reducing krypton-85 activity in metal halide lamp while ensuring the lamp performance, and proves the necessity of its existence of krypton-85 in metal halide lamp. it can provide us a reference to determine the minimum krypton-85 activity to he added in metal halide lamps.

  16. Water Splitting over Epitaxially Grown InGaN Nanowires on-Metallic Titanium/Silicon Template: Reduced Interfacial Transfer Resistance and Improved Stability

    KAUST Repository

    Ebaid, Mohamed

    2018-03-09

    Water splitting using InGaN-based photocatalysts may have a great contribution in future renewable energy production systems. Among the most important parameters to solve are those related to substrate lattice-matching compatibility. Here, we directly grow InGaN nanowires (NWs) on a metallic Ti/Si template, for improving water splitting performance compared to a bare Si substrate. The open circuit potential of the epitaxially grown InGaN NWs on metallic Ti was almost two times that of those grown on Si substrate. The interfacial transfer resistance was also reduced significantly after introducing the metallic Ti interlayer. An applied-bias-photon-to-current conversion efficiency of 2.2% and almost unity Faradic efficiency for hydrogen generation were achieved using this approach. The InGaN NWs grown on Ti showed improved stability of hydrogen generation under continuous operation conditions, when compared to those grown on Si, emphasizing the role of the semiconductor-on-metal approach in enhancing the overall efficiency of water splitting catalysts.

  17. A study on influence of heat input variation on microstructure of reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel weld metal produced by GTAW process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arivazhagan, B.; Srinivasan, G.; Albert, S.K.; Bhaduri, A.K.

    2011-01-01

    Reduced activation ferritic martensitic (RAFM) steel is a major structural material for test blanket module (TBM) to be incorporated in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) programme to study the breeding of tritium in fusion reactors. This material has been mainly developed to achieve significant reduction in the induced radioactivity from the structural material used. Fabrication of TBM involves extensive welding, and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process is one of the welding processes being considered for this purpose. In the present work, the effect of heat input on microstructure of indigenously developed RAFM steel weld metal produced by GTAW process has been studied. Autogenous bead-on-plate welding, autogenous butt-welding, butt-welding with filler wire addition, and pulsed welding on RAFMS have been carried out using GTAW process respectively. The weld metal is found to contain δ-ferrite and its volume fraction increased with increase in heat input. This fact suggests that δ-ferrite content in the weld metal is influenced by the cooling rate during welding. It was also observed that the hardness of the weld metal decreased with increase in δ-ferrite content. This paper highlights the effect of heat input and PWHT duration on microstructure and hardness of welds.

  18. Evaluation of Factors Influencing Lab-Scale Studies to Determine Heavy Metal Removal by Six Sorbents for Stormwater Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximilian Huber

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available For the development of decentralized treatment systems for road runoff, the determination of pollutant removal capacities is essential. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of boundary conditions on the simultaneous removal of copper, nickel, and zinc by six sorbents used for urban stormwater treatment (i.e., granular activated alumina, anthracite, granular reactivated carbon, granular ferric hydroxide, calcium carbonate, and granular activated lignite. For batch experiments, capacities were determined at initial concentrations within the range of 2.5–180 mg/L with a rotary shaker. Further influences were investigated: the use of a horizontal shaker for concentrations of up to 1080 mg/L, a variation of the initial pH value (5 and 7, and the presence of a buffer. Furthermore, the influences of the filtration process on the capacities were studied. Kinetic experiments were conducted for contact times between 5 min and 120 min. Lab-scale column experiments with inflow concentrations of 2.5 mg/L (copper and nickel and 5.0 mg/L (zinc at an initial pH of 5 and a contact time of 11 min were performed for comparison. Selected experiments were subsequently carried out with changes in initial concentrations and contact time. One result is that it is essential to conduct batch experiments with the metals of interest. The capacities determined by column experiments deviated from batch experiments. Batch experiments under well-defined conditions can be used to evaluate different production batches. Column experiments give a more faithful capacity by considering realistic boundary conditions and should be preferred to determine efficiencies and service lives.

  19. Dissimilatory nitrogen reduction in intertidal sediments of a temperate estuary: small scale heterogeneity and novel nitrate-to-ammonium reducers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen eDecleyre

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The estuarine nitrogen cycle can be substantially altered due to anthropogenic activities resulting in increased amounts of inorganic nitrogen (mainly nitrate. In the past, denitrification was considered to be the main ecosystem process removing reactive nitrogen from the estuarine ecosystem. However, recent reports on the contribution of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA to nitrogen removal in these systems indicated a similar or higher importance, although the ratio between both processes remains ambiguous. Compared to denitrification, DNRA has been underexplored for the last decades and the key organisms carrying out the process in marine environments are largely unknown. Hence, as a first step to better understand the interplay between denitrification, DNRA and reduction of nitrate to nitrite in estuarine sediments, nitrogen reduction potentials were determined in sediments of the Paulina polder mudflat (Westerschelde estuary. We observed high variability in dominant nitrogen removing processes over a short distance (1.6 m, with nitrous oxide, ammonium and nitrite production rates differing significantly between all sampling sites. Denitrification occurred at all sites, DNRA was either the dominant process (two out of five sites or absent, while nitrate reduction to nitrite was observed in most sites but never dominant. In addition, novel nitrate-to-ammonium reducers assigned to Thalassospira, Celeribacter and Halomonas, for which DNRA was thus far unreported, were isolated, with DNRA phenotype reconfirmed through nrfA gene amplification. This study demonstrates high small scale heterogeneity among dissimilatory nitrate reduction processes in estuarine sediments and provides novel marine DNRA organisms that represent valuable alternatives to the current model organisms.

  20. Dissimilatory nitrogen reduction in intertidal sediments of a temperate estuary: small scale heterogeneity and novel nitrate-to-ammonium reducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decleyre, Helen; Heylen, Kim; Van Colen, Carl; Willems, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The estuarine nitrogen cycle can be substantially altered due to anthropogenic activities resulting in increased amounts of inorganic nitrogen (mainly nitrate). In the past, denitrification was considered to be the main ecosystem process removing reactive nitrogen from the estuarine ecosystem. However, recent reports on the contribution of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) to nitrogen removal in these systems indicated a similar or higher importance, although the ratio between both processes remains ambiguous. Compared to denitrification, DNRA has been underexplored for the last decades and the key organisms carrying out the process in marine environments are largely unknown. Hence, as a first step to better understand the interplay between denitrification, DNRA and reduction of nitrate to nitrite in estuarine sediments, nitrogen reduction potentials were determined in sediments of the Paulina polder mudflat (Westerschelde estuary). We observed high variability in dominant nitrogen removing processes over a short distance (1.6 m), with nitrous oxide, ammonium and nitrite production rates differing significantly between all sampling sites. Denitrification occurred at all sites, DNRA was either the dominant process (two out of five sites) or absent, while nitrate reduction to nitrite was observed in most sites but never dominant. In addition, novel nitrate-to-ammonium reducers assigned to Thalassospira, Celeribacter, and Halomonas, for which DNRA was thus far unreported, were isolated, with DNRA phenotype reconfirmed through nrfA gene amplification. This study demonstrates high small scale heterogeneity among dissimilatory nitrate reduction processes in estuarine sediments and provides novel marine DNRA organisms that represent valuable alternatives to the current model organisms.

  1. Isolation and characterization of a mesophilic heavy-metals-tolerant sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfomicrobium sp. from an enrichment culture using phosphogypsum as a sulfate source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azabou, Samia; Mechichi, Tahar; Patel, Bharat K.C.; Sayadi, Sami

    2007-01-01

    A sulfate-reducing bacterium, was isolated from a 6 month trained enrichment culture in an anaerobic media containing phosphogypsum as a sulfate source, and, designated strain SA2. Cells of strain SA2 were rod-shaped, did not form spores and stained Gram-negative. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence of the isolate revealed that it was related to members of the genus Desulfomicrobium (average sequence similarity of 98%) with Desulfomicrobium baculatum being the most closely related (sequence similarity of 99%). Strain SA2 used thiosulfate, sulfate, sulfite and elemental sulfur as electron acceptors and produced sulfide. Strain SA2 reduced sulfate contained in 1-20 g/L phosphogypsum to sulfide with reduction of sulfate contained in 2 g/L phosphogypsum being the optimum concentration. Strain SA2 grew with metalloid, halogenated and non-metal ions present in phosphogypsum and with added high concentrations of heavy metals (125 ppm Zn and 100 ppm Ni, W, Li and Al). The relative order for the inhibitory metal concentrations, based on the IC 50 values, was Cu, Te > Cd > Fe, Co, Mn > F, Se > Ni, Al, Li > Zn

  2. Biochar-enhanced composts reduce the potential leaching of nutrients and heavy metals and suppress plant-parasitic nematodes in excessively fertilized cucumber soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yune; Gao, Yanming; Qi, Yanbin; Li, Jianshe

    2018-03-01

    Excessive fertilization is a common agricultural practice that has largely reduced soil nutrient retention capacity and led to nutrient leaching in China. To reduce nutrient leaching, in this study, we evaluated the application of biochar, compost, and biochar-compost on soil properties, leaching water quality, and cucumber plant growth in soils with different nutrient levels. In general, the concentrations of nutrients and heavy metals in leaching water were higher under high-nutrient conditions than under low-nutrient conditions. Both biochar and compost efficiently enhanced soil cation exchange capacity (CEC), water holding capacity (WHC), and microbial biomass carbon (MBC), nitrogen (MBN), and phosphorus (MBP), reduced the potential leaching of nutrients and heavy metals, and improved plant growth. The efficiency of biochar and compost in soil CEC, WHC, MBC, MBN, and MBP and plant growth was enhanced when applied jointly. In addition, biochar and biochar-enhanced compost efficiently suppressed plant-parasitic nematode infestation in a soil with high levels of both N and P. Our results suggest that biochar-enhanced compost can reduce the potential environmental risks in excessively fertilized vegetable soils.

  3. Effectiveness of Devices to Monitor Biofouling and Metals Deposition on Plumbing Materials Exposed to a Full-Scale Drinking Water Distribution System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginige, Maneesha P; Garbin, Scott; Wylie, Jason; Krishna, K C Bal

    2017-01-01

    A Modified Robbins Device (MRD) was installed in a full-scale water distribution system to investigate biofouling and metal depositions on concrete, high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and stainless steel surfaces. Bulk water monitoring and a KIWA monitor (with glass media) were used to offline monitor biofilm development on pipe wall surfaces. Results indicated that adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and metal concentrations on coupons increased with time. However, bacterial diversities decreased. There was a positive correlation between increase of ATP and metal deposition on pipe surfaces of stainless steel and HDPE and no correlation was observed on concrete and glass surfaces. The shared bacterial diversity between bulk water and MRD was less than 20% and the diversity shared between the MRD and KIWA monitor was only 10%. The bacterial diversity on biofilm of plumbing material of MRD however, did not show a significant difference suggesting a lack of influence from plumbing material during early stage of biofilm development.

  4. Effectiveness of Devices to Monitor Biofouling and Metals Deposition on Plumbing Materials Exposed to a Full-Scale Drinking Water Distribution System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maneesha P Ginige

    Full Text Available A Modified Robbins Device (MRD was installed in a full-scale water distribution system to investigate biofouling and metal depositions on concrete, high-density polyethylene (HDPE and stainless steel surfaces. Bulk water monitoring and a KIWA monitor (with glass media were used to offline monitor biofilm development on pipe wall surfaces. Results indicated that adenosine triphosphate (ATP and metal concentrations on coupons increased with time. However, bacterial diversities decreased. There was a positive correlation between increase of ATP and metal deposition on pipe surfaces of stainless steel and HDPE and no correlation was observed on concrete and glass surfaces. The shared bacterial diversity between bulk water and MRD was less than 20% and the diversity shared between the MRD and KIWA monitor was only 10%. The bacterial diversity on biofilm of plumbing material of MRD however, did not show a significant difference suggesting a lack of influence from plumbing material during early stage of biofilm development.

  5. Transparent and conductive electrodes by large-scale nano-structuring of noble metal thin-films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linnet, Jes; Runge Walther, Anders; Wolff, Christian

    2018-01-01

    grid, and nano-wire thin-films. The indium and carbon films do not match the chemical stability nor the electrical performance of the noble metals, and many metal films are not uniform in material distribution leading to significant surface roughness and randomized transmission haze. We demonstrate...

  6. Local to regional scale industrial heavy metal pollution recorded in sediments of large freshwater lakes in central Europe (lakes Geneva and Lucerne) over the last centuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevenon, Florian; Graham, Neil D; Chiaradia, Massimo; Arpagaus, Philippe; Wildi, Walter; Poté, John

    2011-12-15

    This research first focuses on the spatial and temporal patterns of heavy metals from contrasting environments (highly polluted to deepwater sites) of Lake Geneva. The mercury (Hg) and lead (Pb) records from two deepwater sites show that the heavy metal variations before the industrial period are primarily linked to natural weathering input of trace elements. By opposition, the discharge of industrial treated wastewaters into Vidy Bay of Lake Geneva during the second part of the 20th century, involved the sedimentation of highly metal-contaminated sediments in the area surrounding the WWTP outlet pipe discharge. Eventually, a new Pb isotope record of sediments from Lake Lucerne identifies the long-term increasing anthropogenic lead pollution after ca. 1500, probably due to the development of metallurgical activities during the High Middle Ages. These data furthermore allows to compare the recent anthropogenic sources of water pollution from three of the largest freshwater lakes of Western Europe (lakes Geneva, Lucerne, and Constance). High increases in Pb and Hg highlight the regional impact of industrial pollution after ca. 1750-1850, and the decrease of metal pollution in the 1980s due to the effects of remediation strategies such as the implementation of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). However, at all the studied sites, the recent metal concentrations remain higher than pre-industrial levels. Moreover, the local scale pollution data reveal two highly contaminated sites (>100 μg Pb/g dry weight sediment) by industrial activities, during the late-19th and early-20th centuries (Lake Lucerne) and during the second part of the 20th century (Vidy Bay of Lake Geneva). Overall, the regional scale pollution history inferred from the three large and deep perialpine lakes points out at the pollution of water systems by heavy metals during the last two centuries due to the discharge of industrial effluents. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Metallic gold treatment reduces proliferation of inflammatory cells, increases expression of VEGF and FGF, and stimulates cell proliferation in the subventricular zone following experimental traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mie Østergaard; Larsen, Agnete; Pedersen, Dan Sonne

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury represents a leading cause of morbidity in young individuals and there is an imperative need for neuroprotective treatments limiting the neurologic impairment following such injury. It has recently been demonstrated that bio-liberated gold ions liberated from small metallic...... gold implants reduce inflammation and neuronal apoptosis, while generating an increased neuronal stem cell response following focal brain damage. In this study mice were subjected to a unilateral traumatic cryo-lesion with concomitant injection of 25-45 microm gold particles near the lesion. Placebo...... increase in cell proliferation in both the ipsilateral and the contralateral subventricular zone was found in response to gold-treatment. In conclusion: we confirmed the previously demonstrated anti-inflammatory effect of bio-liberated gold ions, and further show that metallic gold increases growth factor...

  8. Residual stress determination in oxide layers at different length scales combining Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction: Application to chromia-forming metallic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerain, Mathieu; Grosseau-Poussard, Jean-Luc; Geandier, Guillaume; Panicaud, Benoit; Tamura, Nobumichi; Kunz, Martin; Dejoie, Catherine; Micha, Jean-Sebastien; Thiaudière, Dominique; Goudeau, Philippe

    2017-11-01

    In oxidizing environments, the protection of metals and alloys against further oxidation at high temperature is provided by the oxide film itself. This protection is efficient only if the formed film adheres well to the metal (substrate), i.e., without microcracks and spalls induced by thermomechanical stresses. In this study, the residual stresses at both macroscopic and microscopic scales in the oxide film adhering to the substrate and over the damaged areas have been rigorously determined on the same samples for both techniques. Ni-30Cr and Fe-47Cr alloys have been oxidized together at 900 and 1000 °C, respectively, to create films with a thickness of a few microns. A multi-scale approach was adopted: macroscopic stress was determined by conventional X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy, while microscopic residual stress mappings were performed over different types of bucklings using Raman micro-spectroscopy and synchrotron micro-diffraction. A very good agreement is found at macro- and microscales between the residual stress values obtained with both techniques, giving confidence on the reliability of the measurements. In addition, relevant structural information at the interface between the metallic substrate and the oxide layer was collected by micro-diffraction, a non-destructive technique that allows mapping through the oxide layer, and both the grain size and the crystallographic orientation of the supporting polycrystalline metal located either under a buckling or not were measured.

  9. Metallic gold reduces TNFalpha expression, oxidative DNA damage and pro-apoptotic signals after experimental brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mie Ostergaard; Larsen, Agnete; Pedersen, Dan Sonne

    2009-01-01

    Brain injury represents a major health problem and may result in chronic inflammation and neurodegeneration. Due to antiinflammatory effects of gold, we have investigated the cerebral effects of metallic gold particles following a focal brain injury (freeze-lesion) in mice. Gold particles 20......-45 microm in size or the vehicle (placebo) were implanted in the cortical tissue followed by a cortical freeze-lesioning. At 1-2 weeks post-injury, brains were analyzed by using immunohistochemistry and markers of inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis. This study shows that gold treatment...

  10. Reactivity of a reduced metal oxide surface: hydrogen, water and carbon monoxide adsorption on oxygen defective rutile TiO 2( 1 1 0 )

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menetrey, M.; Markovits, A.; Minot, C.

    2003-02-01

    The reactivity at reduced surface differs from that on the stoichiometric perfect surfaces. This does not originate uniquely from the modification of the coordination; electron count also is determining. The general trend is a decrease of the heat of adsorption on the metal cations. The reactivity decreases at sites in the vicinity of the defects due to the reduction induced by the O vacancies. At the defect site the decrease is less pronounced for H, H 2, CO and molecular H 2O. In the case of H 2O dissociative adsorption, the defect site is more reactive than the perfect surface. Thus, a hydration converting the defective-reduced TiO 2 to the hydrogenated non-defective-reduced surface is easy. The resulting structure possesses surface hydroxyl groups. It is probably the easiest way to form the hydrogenated non-defective surface. On TiO 2, the defective surface requires very anhydrous conditions.

  11. Lattice Boltzmann Pore-Scale Investigation of Coupled Physical-electrochemical Processes in C/Pt and Non-Precious Metal Cathode Catalyst Layers in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Li; Wu, Gang; Holby, Edward F; Zelenay, Piotr; Tao, Wen-Quan; Kang, Qinjun

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Nanoscale structures of catalyst layer are reconstructed. • Pore-scale simulation is performed to predict macroscopic transport properties. • Reactive transport in catalyst layer with non-precious metal and Pt catalysts is studied. • Mesopores rather than micropores are required to enhance mass transport. - Abstract: High-resolution porous structures of catalyst layers (CLs) including non-precious metal catalysts (NPMCs) or Pt for proton exchange membrane fuel cells are reconstructed using the quartet structure generation set. The nanoscale structures are analyzed in terms of pore size distribution, specific surface area, and phase connectivity. Pore-scale simulation methods based on the lattice Boltzmann method are developed to predict the macroscopic transport properties in CLs. The non-uniform distribution of ionomer in CL generates more tortuous pathways for reactant transport, greatly reducing the effective diffusivity. The tortuosity of CLs is much higher than that adopted by the Bruggeman equation. Knudsen diffusion plays a significant role in oxygen diffusion and significantly reduces the effective diffusivity. Reactive transport inside the CLs is also investigated. Although the reactive surface area