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  1. Protective ventilation of preterm lambs exposed to acute chorioamnionitis does not reduce ventilation-induced lung or brain injury.

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    Barton, Samantha K; Moss, Timothy J M; Hooper, Stuart B; Crossley, Kelly J; Gill, Andrew W; Kluckow, Martin; Zahra, Valerie; Wong, Flora Y; Pichler, Gerhard; Galinsky, Robert; Miller, Suzanne L; Tolcos, Mary; Polglase, Graeme R

    2014-01-01

    The onset of mechanical ventilation is a critical time for the initiation of cerebral white matter (WM) injury in preterm neonates, particularly if they are inadvertently exposed to high tidal volumes (VT) in the delivery room. Protective ventilation strategies at birth reduce ventilation-induced lung and brain inflammation and injury, however its efficacy in a compromised newborn is not known. Chorioamnionitis is a common antecedent of preterm birth, and increases the risk and severity of WM injury. We investigated the effects of high VT ventilation, after chorioamnionitis, on preterm lung and WM inflammation and injury, and whether a protective ventilation strategy could mitigate the response. Pregnant ewes (n = 18) received intra-amniotic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) 2 days before delivery, instrumentation and ventilation at 127±1 days gestation. Lambs were either immediately euthanased and used as unventilated controls (LPSUVC; n = 6), or were ventilated using an injurious high VT strategy (LPSINJ; n = 5) or a protective ventilation strategy (LPSPROT; n = 7) for a total of 90 min. Mean arterial pressure, heart rate and cerebral haemodynamics and oxygenation were measured continuously. Lungs and brains underwent molecular and histological assessment of inflammation and injury. LPSINJ lambs had poorer oxygenation than LPSPROT lambs. Ventilation requirements and cardiopulmonary and systemic haemodynamics were not different between ventilation strategies. Compared to unventilated lambs, LPSINJ and LPSPROT lambs had increases in pro-inflammatory cytokine expression within the lungs and brain, and increased astrogliosis (pVentilation after acute chorioamnionitis, irrespective of strategy used, increases haemodynamic instability and lung and cerebral inflammation and injury. Mechanical ventilation is a potential contributor to WM injury in infants exposed to chorioamnionitis.

  2. Positive pressure ventilation with the open lung concept optimizes gas exchange and reduces ventilator-induced lung injury in newborn piglets

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    van Kaam, Anton H.; de Jaegere, Anne; Haitsma, Jack J.; van Aalderen, Wim M.; Kok, Joke H.; Lachmann, Burkhard

    2003-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that high-frequency oscillatory ventilation using the open lung concept (OLC resulted in superior gas exchange and a reduction in ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). We hypothesized that these beneficial effects could also be achieved by applying the OLC during

  3. Dexmedetomidine reduces ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI by inhibiting Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4/nuclear factor (NF-κB signaling pathway

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    Hongli Chen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical ventilation (MV may lead to ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI. Previous research has shown that dexmedetomidine attenuates pulmonary inflammation caused by MV, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Our study aims to test whether dexmedetomidine has a protective effect against VILI and to explore the possible molecular mechanisms using the rat model. Thirty adult male Wistar rats weighing 200-250 g were randomly assigned to 5 groups (n = 6: control, low tidal volume MV (LMV, high tidal volume (HVT MV (HMV, HVT MV + dexmedetomidine (DEX, HVT MV + dexmedetomidine + yohimbine (DEX+Y. Rats were euthanized after being ventilated for 4 hours. Pathological changes, lung wet/dry (W/D weight ratio, lung myeloperoxidase (MPO activity, levels of inflammatory cytokines (i.e., interleukin [IL]-1β, tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α], and IL-6 in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF and lung tissues, expression of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 and nuclear factor (NF-κB, and activation of NF-κB in lung tissues were measured. Compared with HMV, DEX group showed fewer pathological changes, lower W/D ratios and decreased MPO activity of the lung tissues and lower concentrations of the inflammatory cytokines in the BALF and lung tissues. Dexmedetomidine significantly inhibited the expression of TLR4 and NF-κB and activation of NF-κB. Yohimbine partly alleviated the effects of dexmedetomidine. Dexmedetomidine reduced the inflammatory response to HVT-MV and had a protective effect against VILI, with the inhibition of the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway, at least partly via α2-adrenoceptors.

  4. Hydrogen inhalation reduced epithelial apoptosis in ventilator-induced lung injury via a mechanism involving nuclear factor-kappa B activation

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    Huang, Chien-Sheng [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Division of Thoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Taipei-Veterans General Hospital and National Yang-Ming University School of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Kawamura, Tomohiro; Peng, Ximei [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Tochigi, Naobumi [Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, PA (United States); Shigemura, Norihisa [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Billiar, Timothy R. [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Nakao, Atsunori, E-mail: anakao@imap.pitt.edu [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Toyoda, Yoshiya [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2011-05-06

    Highlights: {yields} Hydrogen is a regulatory molecule with antiinflammatory and antiapoptotic protective effects. {yields} There is very limited information on the pathways regulated in vivo by the hydrogen. {yields} Antiapoptotic abilities of hydrogen were explained by upregulation of the antiapoptotic gene. {yields} NF{kappa}B activation during hydrogen treatment was correlated with elevated antiapoptotic protein. {yields} NF{kappa}B activation associated with increase Bcl-2 may contribute to cytoprotection of hydrogen. -- Abstract: We recently demonstrated the inhalation of hydrogen gas, a novel medical therapeutic gas, ameliorates ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI); however, the molecular mechanisms by which hydrogen ameliorates VILI remain unclear. Therefore, we investigated whether inhaled hydrogen gas modulates the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF{kappa}B) signaling pathway. VILI was generated in male C57BL6 mice by performing a tracheostomy and placing the mice on a mechanical ventilator (tidal volume of 30 ml/kg or 10 ml/kg without positive end-expiratory pressure). The ventilator delivered either 2% nitrogen or 2% hydrogen in balanced air. NF{kappa}B activation, as indicated by NF{kappa}B DNA binding, was detected by electrophoretic mobility shift assays and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Hydrogen gas inhalation increased NF{kappa}B DNA binding after 1 h of ventilation and decreased NF{kappa}B DNA binding after 2 h of ventilation, as compared with controls. The early activation of NF{kappa}B during hydrogen treatment was correlated with elevated levels of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 and decreased levels of Bax. Hydrogen inhalation increased oxygen tension, decreased lung edema, and decreased the expression of proinflammatory mediators. Chemical inhibition of early NF{kappa}B activation using SN50 reversed these protective effects. NF{kappa}B activation and an associated increase in the expression of Bcl-2 may contribute, in part, to the

  5. Hydrogen inhalation reduced epithelial apoptosis in ventilator-induced lung injury via a mechanism involving nuclear factor-kappa B activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Chien-Sheng; Kawamura, Tomohiro; Peng, Ximei; Tochigi, Naobumi; Shigemura, Norihisa; Billiar, Timothy R.; Nakao, Atsunori; Toyoda, Yoshiya

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Hydrogen is a regulatory molecule with antiinflammatory and antiapoptotic protective effects. → There is very limited information on the pathways regulated in vivo by the hydrogen. → Antiapoptotic abilities of hydrogen were explained by upregulation of the antiapoptotic gene. → NFκB activation during hydrogen treatment was correlated with elevated antiapoptotic protein. → NFκB activation associated with increase Bcl-2 may contribute to cytoprotection of hydrogen. -- Abstract: We recently demonstrated the inhalation of hydrogen gas, a novel medical therapeutic gas, ameliorates ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI); however, the molecular mechanisms by which hydrogen ameliorates VILI remain unclear. Therefore, we investigated whether inhaled hydrogen gas modulates the nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB) signaling pathway. VILI was generated in male C57BL6 mice by performing a tracheostomy and placing the mice on a mechanical ventilator (tidal volume of 30 ml/kg or 10 ml/kg without positive end-expiratory pressure). The ventilator delivered either 2% nitrogen or 2% hydrogen in balanced air. NFκB activation, as indicated by NFκB DNA binding, was detected by electrophoretic mobility shift assays and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Hydrogen gas inhalation increased NFκB DNA binding after 1 h of ventilation and decreased NFκB DNA binding after 2 h of ventilation, as compared with controls. The early activation of NFκB during hydrogen treatment was correlated with elevated levels of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 and decreased levels of Bax. Hydrogen inhalation increased oxygen tension, decreased lung edema, and decreased the expression of proinflammatory mediators. Chemical inhibition of early NFκB activation using SN50 reversed these protective effects. NFκB activation and an associated increase in the expression of Bcl-2 may contribute, in part, to the cytoprotective effects of hydrogen against apoptotic and inflammatory signaling pathway

  6. Dexamethasone attenuates VEGF expression and inflammation but not barrier dysfunction in a murine model of ventilator-induced lung injury.

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    Maria A Hegeman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI is characterized by vascular leakage and inflammatory responses eventually leading to pulmonary dysfunction. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF has been proposed to be involved in the pathogenesis of VILI. This study examines the inhibitory effect of dexamethasone on VEGF expression, inflammation and alveolar-capillary barrier dysfunction in an established murine model of VILI. METHODS: Healthy male C57Bl/6 mice were anesthetized, tracheotomized and mechanically ventilated for 5 hours with an inspiratory pressure of 10 cmH2O ("lower" tidal volumes of ∼7.5 ml/kg; LVT or 18 cmH2O ("higher" tidal volumes of ∼15 ml/kg; HVT. Dexamethasone was intravenously administered at the initiation of HVT-ventilation. Non-ventilated mice served as controls. Study endpoints included VEGF and inflammatory mediator expression in lung tissue, neutrophil and protein levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, PaO2 to FiO2 ratios and lung wet to dry ratios. RESULTS: Particularly HVT-ventilation led to alveolar-capillary barrier dysfunction as reflected by reduced PaO2 to FiO2 ratios, elevated alveolar protein levels and increased lung wet to dry ratios. Moreover, VILI was associated with enhanced VEGF production, inflammatory mediator expression and neutrophil infiltration. Dexamethasone treatment inhibited VEGF and pro-inflammatory response in lungs of HVT-ventilated mice, without improving alveolar-capillary permeability, gas exchange and pulmonary edema formation. CONCLUSIONS: Dexamethasone treatment completely abolishes ventilator-induced VEGF expression and inflammation. However, dexamethasone does not protect against alveolar-capillary barrier dysfunction in an established murine model of VILI.

  7. Mathematics of Ventilator-induced Lung Injury.

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    Rahaman, Ubaidur

    2017-08-01

    Ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) results from mechanical disruption of blood-gas barrier and consequent edema and releases of inflammatory mediators. A transpulmonary pressure (P L ) of 17 cmH 2 O increases baby lung volume to its anatomical limit, predisposing to VILI. Viscoelastic property of lung makes pulmonary mechanics time dependent so that stress (P L ) increases with respiratory rate. Alveolar inhomogeneity in acute respiratory distress syndrome acts as a stress riser, multiplying global stress at regional level experienced by baby lung. Limitation of stress (P L ) rather than strain (tidal volume [V T ]) is the safe strategy of mechanical ventilation to prevent VILI. Driving pressure is the noninvasive surrogate of lung strain, but its relations to P L is dependent on the chest wall compliance. Determinants of lung stress (V T , driving pressure, positive end-expiratory pressure, and inspiratory flow) can be quantified in terms of mechanical power, and a safe threshold can be determined, which can be used in decision-making between safe mechanical ventilation and extracorporeal lung support.

  8. Effects of positive end-expiratory pressure and recruitment maneuvers in a ventilator-induced injury mouse model.

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    Laura A Cagle

    Full Text Available Positive-pressure mechanical ventilation is an essential therapeutic intervention, yet it causes the clinical syndrome known as ventilator-induced lung injury. Various lung protective mechanical ventilation strategies have attempted to reduce or prevent ventilator-induced lung injury but few modalities have proven effective. A model that isolates the contribution of mechanical ventilation on the development of acute lung injury is needed to better understand biologic mechanisms that lead to ventilator-induced lung injury.To evaluate the effects of positive end-expiratory pressure and recruitment maneuvers in reducing lung injury in a ventilator-induced lung injury murine model in short- and longer-term ventilation.5-12 week-old female BALB/c mice (n = 85 were anesthetized, placed on mechanical ventilation for either 2 hrs or 4 hrs with either low tidal volume (8 ml/kg or high tidal volume (15 ml/kg with or without positive end-expiratory pressure and recruitment maneuvers.Alteration of the alveolar-capillary barrier was noted at 2 hrs of high tidal volume ventilation. Standardized histology scores, influx of bronchoalveolar lavage albumin, proinflammatory cytokines, and absolute neutrophils were significantly higher in the high-tidal volume ventilation group at 4 hours of ventilation. Application of positive end-expiratory pressure resulted in significantly decreased standardized histology scores and bronchoalveolar absolute neutrophil counts at low- and high-tidal volume ventilation, respectively. Recruitment maneuvers were essential to maintain pulmonary compliance at both 2 and 4 hrs of ventilation.Signs of ventilator-induced lung injury are evident soon after high tidal volume ventilation (as early as 2 hours and lung injury worsens with longer-term ventilation (4 hrs. Application of positive end-expiratory pressure and recruitment maneuvers are protective against worsening VILI across all time points. Dynamic compliance can be used guide

  9. Effects of positive end-expiratory pressure and recruitment maneuvers in a ventilator-induced injury mouse model

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    Franzi, Lisa M.; Linderholm, Angela L.; Last, Jerold A.; Adams, Jason Y.; Harper, Richart W.

    2017-01-01

    Background Positive-pressure mechanical ventilation is an essential therapeutic intervention, yet it causes the clinical syndrome known as ventilator-induced lung injury. Various lung protective mechanical ventilation strategies have attempted to reduce or prevent ventilator-induced lung injury but few modalities have proven effective. A model that isolates the contribution of mechanical ventilation on the development of acute lung injury is needed to better understand biologic mechanisms that lead to ventilator-induced lung injury. Objectives To evaluate the effects of positive end-expiratory pressure and recruitment maneuvers in reducing lung injury in a ventilator-induced lung injury murine model in short- and longer-term ventilation. Methods 5–12 week-old female BALB/c mice (n = 85) were anesthetized, placed on mechanical ventilation for either 2 hrs or 4 hrs with either low tidal volume (8 ml/kg) or high tidal volume (15 ml/kg) with or without positive end-expiratory pressure and recruitment maneuvers. Results Alteration of the alveolar-capillary barrier was noted at 2 hrs of high tidal volume ventilation. Standardized histology scores, influx of bronchoalveolar lavage albumin, proinflammatory cytokines, and absolute neutrophils were significantly higher in the high-tidal volume ventilation group at 4 hours of ventilation. Application of positive end-expiratory pressure resulted in significantly decreased standardized histology scores and bronchoalveolar absolute neutrophil counts at low- and high-tidal volume ventilation, respectively. Recruitment maneuvers were essential to maintain pulmonary compliance at both 2 and 4 hrs of ventilation. Conclusions Signs of ventilator-induced lung injury are evident soon after high tidal volume ventilation (as early as 2 hours) and lung injury worsens with longer-term ventilation (4 hrs). Application of positive end-expiratory pressure and recruitment maneuvers are protective against worsening VILI across all time points

  10. Effects of positive end-expiratory pressure and recruitment maneuvers in a ventilator-induced injury mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagle, Laura A; Franzi, Lisa M; Linderholm, Angela L; Last, Jerold A; Adams, Jason Y; Harper, Richart W; Kenyon, Nicholas J

    2017-01-01

    Positive-pressure mechanical ventilation is an essential therapeutic intervention, yet it causes the clinical syndrome known as ventilator-induced lung injury. Various lung protective mechanical ventilation strategies have attempted to reduce or prevent ventilator-induced lung injury but few modalities have proven effective. A model that isolates the contribution of mechanical ventilation on the development of acute lung injury is needed to better understand biologic mechanisms that lead to ventilator-induced lung injury. To evaluate the effects of positive end-expiratory pressure and recruitment maneuvers in reducing lung injury in a ventilator-induced lung injury murine model in short- and longer-term ventilation. 5-12 week-old female BALB/c mice (n = 85) were anesthetized, placed on mechanical ventilation for either 2 hrs or 4 hrs with either low tidal volume (8 ml/kg) or high tidal volume (15 ml/kg) with or without positive end-expiratory pressure and recruitment maneuvers. Alteration of the alveolar-capillary barrier was noted at 2 hrs of high tidal volume ventilation. Standardized histology scores, influx of bronchoalveolar lavage albumin, proinflammatory cytokines, and absolute neutrophils were significantly higher in the high-tidal volume ventilation group at 4 hours of ventilation. Application of positive end-expiratory pressure resulted in significantly decreased standardized histology scores and bronchoalveolar absolute neutrophil counts at low- and high-tidal volume ventilation, respectively. Recruitment maneuvers were essential to maintain pulmonary compliance at both 2 and 4 hrs of ventilation. Signs of ventilator-induced lung injury are evident soon after high tidal volume ventilation (as early as 2 hours) and lung injury worsens with longer-term ventilation (4 hrs). Application of positive end-expiratory pressure and recruitment maneuvers are protective against worsening VILI across all time points. Dynamic compliance can be used guide the frequency

  11. APRV Mode in Ventilator Induced Lung Injury (VILI

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    Ata Mahmoodpoor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury (VILI, being a significant iatrogenic complication in the ICU patients, is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Numerous approaches, protocols and ventilation modes have been introduced and examined to decrease the incidence of VILI in the ICU patients. Airway pressure release ventilation (APRV, firstly introduced by Stock and Downs in 1987, applies higher Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP levels in prolonged periods (P and T high in order to preserve satisfactory lung volume and consequently alveolar recruitment. This mode benefits a time-cycled release phase to a lower set of pressure for a short period of time (P and T low i.e. release time (1,2. While some advantages have been introduced for APRV such as efficiently recruited alveoli over time, more homogeneous ventilation, less volutrauma, probable stabilization of patent alveoli and reduction in atelectrauma, protective effects of APRV on lung damage only seem to be substantial if spontaneous breathing responds to more than 30% of total minute ventilation (3. APRV in ARDS patients should be administered cautiously; T low<0.6 seconds, for recruiting collapsed alveoli; however overstretching of alveoli especially during P high should not be neglected and appropriate sedation considered. The proposed advantages for APRV give the impression of being outstanding; however, APRV, as a non-physiologic inverse ratio mode of ventilation, might result in inflammation mainly due to impaired patient-ventilator interaction explaining the negative or minimally desirable effects of APRV on inflammation (4. Consequently, continuous infusion of neuromuscular blocking drugs during ARDS has been reported to reduce mortality (5. There are insufficient confirming data on the superiority of APRV above other ventilatory methods in regard to oxygenation, hemodynamics, regional blood flow, patient comfort and length of mechanical ventilation. Based on current findings

  12. Sevoflurane posttreatment prevents oxidative and inflammatory injury in ventilator-induced lung injury.

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    Julie Wagner

    Full Text Available Mechanical ventilation is a life-saving clinical treatment but it can induce or aggravate lung injury. New therapeutic strategies, aimed at reducing the negative effects of mechanical ventilation such as excessive production of reactive oxygen species, release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and transmigration as well as activation of neutrophil cells, are needed to improve the clinical outcome of ventilated patients. Though the inhaled anesthetic sevoflurane is known to exert organ-protective effects, little is known about the potential of sevoflurane therapy in ventilator-induced lung injury. This study focused on the effects of delayed sevoflurane application in mechanically ventilated C57BL/6N mice. Lung function, lung injury, oxidative stress, and inflammatory parameters were analyzed and compared between non-ventilated and ventilated groups with or without sevoflurane anesthesia. Mechanical ventilation led to a substantial induction of lung injury, reactive oxygen species production, pro-inflammatory cytokine release, and neutrophil influx. In contrast, sevoflurane posttreatment time dependently reduced histological signs of lung injury. Most interestingly, increased production of reactive oxygen species was clearly inhibited in all sevoflurane posttreatment groups. Likewise, the release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β and MIP-1β and neutrophil transmigration were completely prevented by sevoflurane independent of the onset of sevoflurane administration. In conclusion, sevoflurane posttreatment time dependently limits lung injury, and oxidative and pro-inflammatory responses are clearly prevented by sevoflurane irrespective of the onset of posttreatment. These findings underline the therapeutic potential of sevoflurane treatment in ventilator-induced lung injury.

  13. Relative Tissue Factor Deficiency Attenuates Ventilator-Induced Coagulopathy but Does Not Protect against Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury in Mice

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    Esther K. Wolthuis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Preventing tissue-factor-(TF- mediated systemic coagulopathy improves outcome in models of sepsis. Preventing TF-mediated pulmonary coagulopathy could attenuate ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI. We investigated the effect of relative TF deficiency on pulmonary coagulopathy and inflammation in a murine model of VILI. Heterozygous TF knockout (TF+/− mice and their wild-type (TF+/+ littermates were sedated (controls or sedated, tracheotomized, and mechanically ventilated with either low or high tidal volumes for 5 hours. Mechanical ventilation resulted in pulmonary coagulopathy and inflammation, with more injury after mechanical ventilation with higher tidal volumes. Compared with TF+/+ mice, TF+/− mice demonstrated significantly lower pulmonary thrombin-antithrombin complex levels in both ventilation groups. There were, however, no differences in lung wet-to-dry ratio, BALF total protein levels, neutrophil influx, and lung histopathology scores between TF+/− and TF+/+ mice. Notably, pulmonary levels of cytokines were significantly higher in TF+/− as compared to TF+/+ mice. Systemic levels of cytokines were not altered by the relative absence of TF. TF deficiency is associated with decreased pulmonary coagulation independent of the ventilation strategy. However, relative TF deficiency does not reduce VILI and actually results in higher pulmonary levels of inflammatory mediators.

  14. Nicotinamide exacerbates hypoxemia in ventilator-induced lung injury independent of neutrophil infiltration.

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    Heather D Jones

    Full Text Available Ventilator-induced lung injury is a form of acute lung injury that develops in critically ill patients on mechanical ventilation and has a high degree of mortality. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase is an enzyme that is highly upregulated in ventilator-induced lung injury and exacerbates the injury when given exogenously. Nicotinamide (vitamin B3 directly inhibits downstream pathways activated by Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase and is protective in other models of acute lung injury.We administered nicotinamide i.p. to mice undergoing mechanical ventilation with high tidal volumes to study the effects of nicotinamide on ventilator-induced lung injury. Measures of injury included oxygen saturations and bronchoalveolar lavage neutrophil counts, protein, and cytokine levels. We also measured expression of nicotinamide phosophoribosyltransferase, and its downstream effectors Sirt1 and Cebpa, Cebpb, Cebpe. We assessed the effect of nicotinamide on the production of nitric oxide during ventilator-induced lung injury. We also studied the effects of ventilator-induced lung injury in mice deficient in C/EBPε.Nicotinamide treatment significantly inhibited neutrophil infiltration into the lungs during ventilator-induced lung injury, but did not affect protein leakage or cytokine production. Surprisingly, mice treated with nicotinamide developed significantly worse hypoxemia during mechanical ventilation. This effect was not linked to increases in nitric oxide production or alterations in expression of Nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase, Sirt1, or Cebpa and Cebpb. Cebpe mRNA levels were decreased with either nicotinamide treatment or mechanical ventilation, but mice lacking C/EBPε developed the same degree of hypoxemia and ventilator-induced lung injury as wild-type mice.Nicotinamide treatment during VILI inhibits neutrophil infiltration of the lungs consistent with a strong anti-inflammatory effect, but paradoxically also leads to the

  15. Conservative fluid management prevents age-associated ventilator induced mortality.

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    Herbert, Joseph A; Valentine, Michael S; Saravanan, Nivi; Schneck, Matthew B; Pidaparti, Ramana; Fowler, Alpha A; Reynolds, Angela M; Heise, Rebecca L

    2016-08-01

    Approximately 800 thousand patients require mechanical ventilation in the United States annually with an in-hospital mortality rate of over 30%. The majority of patients requiring mechanical ventilation are over the age of 65 and advanced age is known to increase the severity of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) and in-hospital mortality rates. However, the mechanisms which predispose aging ventilator patients to increased mortality rates are not fully understood. Ventilation with conservative fluid management decreases mortality rates in acute respiratory distress patients, but to date there has been no investigation of the effect of conservative fluid management on VILI and ventilator associated mortality rates. We hypothesized that age-associated increases in susceptibility and incidence of pulmonary edema strongly promote age-related increases in ventilator associated mortality. 2month old and 20month old male C57BL6 mice were mechanically ventilated with either high tidal volume (HVT) or low tidal volume (LVT) for up to 4h with either liberal or conservative fluid support. During ventilation, lung compliance, total lung capacity, and hysteresis curves were quantified. Following ventilation, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was analyzed for total protein content and inflammatory cell infiltration. Wet to dry ratios were used to directly measure edema in excised lungs. Lung histology was performed to quantify alveolar barrier damage/destruction. Age matched non-ventilated mice were used as controls. At 4h, both advanced age and HVT ventilation significantly increased markers of inflammation and injury, degraded pulmonary mechanics, and decreased survival rates. Conservative fluid support significantly diminished pulmonary edema and improved pulmonary mechanics by 1h in advanced age HVT subjects. In 4h ventilations, conservative fluid support significantly diminished pulmonary edema, improved lung mechanics, and resulted in significantly lower mortality rates in

  16. Inhibitor of neuronal nitric oxide synthase improves gas exchange in ventilator-induced lung injury after pneumonectomy

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    Suborov Evgeny V

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mechanical ventilation with high tidal volumes may cause ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI and enhanced generation of nitric oxide (NO. We demonstrated in sheep that pneumonectomy followed by injurious ventilation promotes pulmonary edema. We wished both to test the hypothesis that neuronal NOS (nNOS, which is distributed in airway epithelial and neuronal tissues, could be involved in the pathogenesis of VILI and we also aimed at investigating the influence of an inhibitor of nNOS on the course of VILI after pneumonectomy. Methods Anesthetized sheep underwent right pneumonectomy, mechanical ventilation with tidal volumes (VT of 6 mL/kg and FiO2 0.5, and were subsequently randomized to a protectively ventilated group (PROTV; n = 8 keeping VT and FiO2 unchanged, respiratory rate (RR 25 inflations/min and PEEP 4 cm H2O for the following 8 hrs; an injuriously ventilated group with VT of 12 mL/kg, zero end-expiratory pressure, and FiO2 and RR unchanged (INJV; n = 8 and a group, which additionally received the inhibitor of nNOS, 7-nitroindazole (NI 1.0 mg/kg/h intravenously from 2 hours after the commencement of injurious ventilation (INJV + NI; n = 8. We assessed respiratory, hemodynamic and volumetric variables, including both the extravascular lung water index (EVLWI and the pulmonary vascular permeability index (PVPI. We measured plasma nitrite/nitrate (NOx levels and examined lung biopsies for lung injury score (LIS. Results Both the injuriously ventilated groups demonstrated a 2–3-fold rise in EVLWI and PVPI, with no significant effects of NI. In the INJV group, gas exchange deteriorated in parallel with emerging respiratory acidosis, but administration of NI antagonized the derangement of oxygenation and the respiratory acidosis significantly. NOx displayed no significant changes and NI exerted no significant effect on LIS in the INJV group. Conclusion Inhibition of nNOS improved gas exchange

  17. Inhibitor of neuronal nitric oxide synthase improves gas exchange in ventilator-induced lung injury after pneumonectomy.

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    Suborov, Evgeny V; Smetkin, Alexey A; Kondratiev, Timofey V; Valkov, Andrey Y; Kuzkov, Vsevolod V; Kirov, Mikhail Y; Bjertnaes, Lars J

    2012-06-21

    Mechanical ventilation with high tidal volumes may cause ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) and enhanced generation of nitric oxide (NO). We demonstrated in sheep that pneumonectomy followed by injurious ventilation promotes pulmonary edema. We wished both to test the hypothesis that neuronal NOS (nNOS), which is distributed in airway epithelial and neuronal tissues, could be involved in the pathogenesis of VILI and we also aimed at investigating the influence of an inhibitor of nNOS on the course of VILI after pneumonectomy. Anesthetized sheep underwent right pneumonectomy, mechanical ventilation with tidal volumes (VT) of 6 mL/kg and FiO2 0.5, and were subsequently randomized to a protectively ventilated group (PROTV; n = 8) keeping VT and FiO2 unchanged, respiratory rate (RR) 25 inflations/min and PEEP 4 cm H2O for the following 8 hrs; an injuriously ventilated group with VT of 12 mL/kg, zero end-expiratory pressure, and FiO2 and RR unchanged (INJV; n = 8) and a group, which additionally received the inhibitor of nNOS, 7-nitroindazole (NI) 1.0 mg/kg/h intravenously from 2 hours after the commencement of injurious ventilation (INJV + NI; n = 8). We assessed respiratory, hemodynamic and volumetric variables, including both the extravascular lung water index (EVLWI) and the pulmonary vascular permeability index (PVPI). We measured plasma nitrite/nitrate (NOx) levels and examined lung biopsies for lung injury score (LIS). Both the injuriously ventilated groups demonstrated a 2-3-fold rise in EVLWI and PVPI, with no significant effects of NI. In the INJV group, gas exchange deteriorated in parallel with emerging respiratory acidosis, but administration of NI antagonized the derangement of oxygenation and the respiratory acidosis significantly. NOx displayed no significant changes and NI exerted no significant effect on LIS in the INJV group. Inhibition of nNOS improved gas exchange, but did not reduce lung water extravasation following

  18. Physiology in Medicine: Understanding dynamic alveolar physiology to minimize ventilator-induced lung injury.

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    Nieman, Gary F; Satalin, Josh; Kollisch-Singule, Michaela; Andrews, Penny; Aiash, Hani; Habashi, Nader M; Gatto, Louis A

    2017-06-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains a serious clinical problem with the main treatment being supportive in the form of mechanical ventilation. However, mechanical ventilation can be a double-edged sword: if set improperly, it can exacerbate the tissue damage caused by ARDS; this is known as ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). To minimize VILI, we must understand the pathophysiologic mechanisms of tissue damage at the alveolar level. In this Physiology in Medicine paper, the dynamic physiology of alveolar inflation and deflation during mechanical ventilation will be reviewed. In addition, the pathophysiologic mechanisms of VILI will be reviewed, and this knowledge will be used to suggest an optimal mechanical breath profile (MB P : all airway pressures, volumes, flows, rates, and the duration that they are applied at both inspiration and expiration) necessary to minimize VILI. Our review suggests that the current protective ventilation strategy, known as the "open lung strategy," would be the optimal lung-protective approach. However, the viscoelastic behavior of dynamic alveolar inflation and deflation has not yet been incorporated into protective mechanical ventilation strategies. Using our knowledge of dynamic alveolar mechanics (i.e., the dynamic change in alveolar and alveolar duct size and shape during tidal ventilation) to modify the MB P so as to minimize VILI will reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with ARDS. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Fast detection of vascular plaque in optical coherence tomography images using a reduced feature set

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    Prakash, Ammu; Ocana Macias, Mariano; Hewko, Mark; Sowa, Michael; Sherif, Sherif

    2018-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) images are capable of detecting vascular plaque by using the full set of 26 Haralick textural features and a standard K-means clustering algorithm. However, the use of the full set of 26 textural features is computationally expensive and may not be feasible for real time implementation. In this work, we identified a reduced set of 3 textural feature which characterizes vascular plaque and used a generalized Fuzzy C-means clustering algorithm. Our work involves three steps: 1) the reduction of a full set 26 textural feature to a reduced set of 3 textural features by using genetic algorithm (GA) optimization method 2) the implementation of an unsupervised generalized clustering algorithm (Fuzzy C-means) on the reduced feature space, and 3) the validation of our results using histology and actual photographic images of vascular plaque. Our results show an excellent match with histology and actual photographic images of vascular tissue. Therefore, our results could provide an efficient pre-clinical tool for the detection of vascular plaque in real time OCT imaging.

  20. Brain glucose and lactate levels during ventilator-induced hypo- and hypercapnia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hulst, R. A.; Lameris, T. W.; Haitsma, J. J.; Klein, J.; Lachmann, B.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Levels of glucose and lactate were measured in the brain by means of microdialysis in order to evaluate the effects of ventilator-induced hypocapnia and hypercapnia on brain metabolism in healthy non-brain-traumatized animals. DESIGN AND SETTING: Prospective animal study in a university

  1. Protective effects of ghrelin in ventilator-induced lung injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guang; Liu, Jiao; Xia, Wen-Fang; Zhou, Chen-Liang; Lv, Li-Qiong

    2017-11-01

    Ghrelin has exhibited potent anti-inflammatory effects on various inflammatory diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential effects of ghrelin on a model of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) established in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups: low volume ventilation (LV, Vt=8ml/kg) group, a VILI group (Vt=30ml/kg), and a VILI group pretreated with ghrelin (GH+VILI). For the LV group, for the VILI and GH+VILI groups, the same parameters were applied except the tidal volume was increased to 40ml/kg. After 4h of MV, blood gas, lung elastance, and levels of inflammatory mediators, including tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, and (MIP)-2 and total protein in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were analyzed. Myeloperoxidase (MPO), (TLR)-4, and NF-κB, were detected in lung tissues. Water content (wet-to-dry ratio) and lung morphology were also evaluated. The VILI group had a higher acute lung injury (ALI) score, wet weight to dry ratio, MPO activity, and concentrations of inflammatory mediators (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, and MIP-2) in BALF, as well as higher levels of TLR4 and NF-κB expression than the LV group (Pghrelin pretreatment (PGhrelin pretreatment also decreased TLR4 expression and NF-κB activity compared with the VILI group (PGhrelin pretreatment attenuated VILI in rats by reducing MV-induced pulmonary inflammation and might represent a novel therapeutic candidate for protection against VILI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Endothelial Dll4 overexpression reduces vascular response and inhibits tumor growth and metastasization in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade, Alexandre; Djokovic, Dusan; Gigante, Joana; Mendonça, Liliana; Duarte, António

    2017-03-14

    The inhibition of Delta-like 4 (Dll4)/Notch signaling has been shown to result in excessive, nonfunctional vessel proliferation and significant tumor growth suppression. However, safety concerns emerged with the identification of side effects resulting from chronic Dll4/Notch blockade. Alternatively, we explored the endothelial Dll4 overexpression using different mouse tumor models. We used a transgenic mouse model of endothelial-specific Dll4 overexpression, previously produced. Growth kinetics and vascular histopathology of several types of solid tumors was evaluated, namely Lewis Lung Carcinoma xenografts, chemically-induced skin papillomas and RIP1-Tag2 insulinomas. We found that increased Dll4/Notch signaling reduces tumor growth by reducing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced endothelial proliferation, tumor vessel density and overall tumor blood supply. In addition, Dll4 overexpression consistently improved tumor vascular maturation and functionality, as indicated by increased vessel calibers, enhanced mural cell recruitment and increased network perfusion. Importantly, the tumor vessel normalization is not more effective than restricted vessel proliferation, but was found to prevent metastasis formation and allow for increased delivery to the tumor of concomitant chemotherapy, improving its efficacy. By reducing endothelial sensitivity to VEGF, these results imply that Dll4/Notch stimulation in tumor microenvironment could be beneficial to solid cancer patient treatment by reducing primary tumor size, improving tumor drug delivery and reducing metastization. Endothelial specific Dll4 overexpression thus appears as a promising anti-angiogenic modality that might improve cancer control.

  3. Tributyltin contributes in reducing the vascular reactivity to phenylephrine in isolated aortic rings from female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Samya Mere L; Ximenes, Carolina F; de Batista, Priscila R; Simões, Fabiana V; Coser, Pedro Henrique P; Sena, Gabriela C; Podratz, Priscila L; de Souza, Leticia N G; Vassallo, Dalton V; Graceli, Jones B; Stefanon, Ivanita

    2014-03-21

    Organotin compounds such as tributyltin (TBT) are used as antifouling paints by shipping companies. TBT inhibits the aromatase responsible for the transformation of testosterone into estrogen. Our hypothesis is that TBT modulates the vascular reactivity of female rats. Female Wistar rats were treated daily (Control; CONT) or TBT (100 ng/kg) for 15 days. Rings from thoracic aortas were incubated with phenylephrine (PHE, 10(-10)-10(-4) M) in the presence and absence of endothelium, and in the presence of N(G)-Nitro-L-Arginine Methyl Ester (L-NAME), tetraethylammonium (TEA) and apocynin. TBT decreased plasma levels of estrogen and the vascular response to PHE. In the TBT group, the vascular reactivity was increased in the absence of endothelium, L-NAME and TEA. The decrease in PHE reactivity during incubation with apocynin was more evident in the TBT group. The sensitivity to acetylcholine (ACh) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) was reduced in the TBT group. TBT increased collagen, reduced α1-smooth muscle actin. Female rats treated with TBT for 15 days showed morphology alteration of the aorta and decreased their vascular reactivity, probably due to mechanisms dependent on nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, K(+) channels and an increase in oxidative stress. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Exendin-4, a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist, reduces intimal thickening after vascular injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goto, Hiromasa [Department of Medicine, Metabolism and Endocrinology, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Nomiyama, Takashi, E-mail: tnomiyama@fukuoka-u.ac.jp [Department of Medicine, Metabolism and Endocrinology, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Mita, Tomoya; Yasunari, Eisuke; Azuma, Kosuke; Komiya, Koji; Arakawa, Masayuki; Jin, Wen Long; Kanazawa, Akio [Department of Medicine, Metabolism and Endocrinology, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Kawamori, Ryuzo [Department of Medicine, Metabolism and Endocrinology, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Sportology Center, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Center for Therapeutic Innovations in Diabetes, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Center for Beta Cell Biology and Regeneration, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Fujitani, Yoshio; Hirose, Takahisa [Department of Medicine, Metabolism and Endocrinology, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Center for Therapeutic Innovations in Diabetes, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Watada, Hirotaka, E-mail: hwatada@juntendo.ac.jp [Department of Medicine, Metabolism and Endocrinology, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Sportology Center, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan)

    2011-02-04

    Research highlights: {yields} Exendin-4 reduces neointimal formation after vascular injury in a mouse model. {yields} Exendin-4 dose not alter metabolic parameters in non-diabetic, non-obese mouse model. {yields} Exendin-4 reduces PDGF-induced cell proliferation in cultured SMCs. {yields} Exendin-4 may reduces neointimal formation after vascular injury at least in part through its direct action on SMCs. -- Abstract: Glucagon-like peptide-1 is a hormone secreted by L cells of the small intestine and stimulates glucose-dependent insulin response. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists such as exendin-4 are currently used in type 2 diabetes, and considered to have beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system. To further elucidate the effect of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists on cardiovascular diseases, we investigated the effects of exendin-4 on intimal thickening after endothelial injury. Under continuous infusion of exendin-4 at 24 nmol/kg/day, C57BL/6 mice were subjected to endothelial denudation injury of the femoral artery. Treatment of mice with exendin-4 reduced neointimal formation at 4 weeks after arterial injury without altering body weight or various metabolic parameters. In addition, in vitro studies of isolated murine, rat and human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells showed the expression of GLP-1 receptor. The addition of 10 nM exendin-4 to cultured smooth muscle cells significantly reduced their proliferation induced by platelet-derived growth factor. Our results suggested that exendin-4 reduced intimal thickening after vascular injury at least in part by the suppression of platelet-derived growth factor-induced smooth muscle cells proliferation.

  5. Exendin-4, a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist, reduces intimal thickening after vascular injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Hiromasa; Nomiyama, Takashi; Mita, Tomoya; Yasunari, Eisuke; Azuma, Kosuke; Komiya, Koji; Arakawa, Masayuki; Jin, Wen Long; Kanazawa, Akio; Kawamori, Ryuzo; Fujitani, Yoshio; Hirose, Takahisa; Watada, Hirotaka

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Exendin-4 reduces neointimal formation after vascular injury in a mouse model. → Exendin-4 dose not alter metabolic parameters in non-diabetic, non-obese mouse model. → Exendin-4 reduces PDGF-induced cell proliferation in cultured SMCs. → Exendin-4 may reduces neointimal formation after vascular injury at least in part through its direct action on SMCs. -- Abstract: Glucagon-like peptide-1 is a hormone secreted by L cells of the small intestine and stimulates glucose-dependent insulin response. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists such as exendin-4 are currently used in type 2 diabetes, and considered to have beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system. To further elucidate the effect of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists on cardiovascular diseases, we investigated the effects of exendin-4 on intimal thickening after endothelial injury. Under continuous infusion of exendin-4 at 24 nmol/kg/day, C57BL/6 mice were subjected to endothelial denudation injury of the femoral artery. Treatment of mice with exendin-4 reduced neointimal formation at 4 weeks after arterial injury without altering body weight or various metabolic parameters. In addition, in vitro studies of isolated murine, rat and human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells showed the expression of GLP-1 receptor. The addition of 10 nM exendin-4 to cultured smooth muscle cells significantly reduced their proliferation induced by platelet-derived growth factor. Our results suggested that exendin-4 reduced intimal thickening after vascular injury at least in part by the suppression of platelet-derived growth factor-induced smooth muscle cells proliferation.

  6. The effects of exogenous surfactant administration on ventilation-induced inflammation in mouse models of lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puntorieri, Valeria; Hiansen, Josh Qua; McCaig, Lynda A; Yao, Li-Juan; Veldhuizen, Ruud A W; Lewis, James F

    2013-11-20

    Mechanical ventilation (MV) is an essential supportive therapy for acute lung injury (ALI); however it can also contribute to systemic inflammation. Since pulmonary surfactant has anti-inflammatory properties, the aim of the study was to investigate the effect of exogenous surfactant administration on ventilation-induced systemic inflammation. Mice were randomized to receive an intra-tracheal instillation of a natural exogenous surfactant preparation (bLES, 50 mg/kg) or no treatment as a control. MV was then performed using the isolated and perfused mouse lung (IPML) set up. This model allowed for lung perfusion during MV. In experiment 1, mice were exposed to mechanical ventilation only (tidal volume =20 mL/kg, 2 hours). In experiment 2, hydrochloric acid or air was instilled intra-tracheally four hours before applying exogenous surfactant and ventilation (tidal volume =5 mL/kg, 2 hours). For both experiments, exogenous surfactant administration led to increased total and functional surfactant in the treated groups compared to the controls. Exogenous surfactant administration in mice exposed to MV only did not affect peak inspiratory pressure (PIP), lung IL-6 levels and the development of perfusate inflammation compared to non-treated controls. Acid injured mice exposed to conventional MV showed elevated PIP, lung IL-6 and protein levels and greater perfusate inflammation compared to air instilled controls. Instillation of exogenous surfactant did not influence the development of lung injury. Moreover, exogenous surfactant was not effective in reducing the concentration of inflammatory cytokines in the perfusate. The data indicates that exogenous surfactant did not mitigate ventilation-induced systemic inflammation in our models. Future studies will focus on altering surfactant composition to improve its immuno-modulating activity.

  7. Inhibition of STAT3 phosphorylation by sulforaphane reduces adhesion molecule expression in vascular endothelial cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young S; Kim, Chan H; Ha, Tae S; Ahn, Hee Y

    2015-11-18

    Intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) play key roles in the initiation of vascular inflammation. In this study, we explored whether sulforaphane, a dietary phytochemical, can inhibit the expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and the mechanisms involved. Sulforaphane prevented the LPS-mediated increase in ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression, (P < 0.01) in HUVEC. Sulforaphane also prevented the LPS-mediated increase in the phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) (P < 0.01). Stattic, a STAT3 inhibitor, reduced the LPS-induced expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1, and STAT3 phosphorylation (P < 0.01). STAT3 small interfering RNA treatment reduced the LPS-induced expression of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and STAT3 (P < 0.01). Sulforaphane reduced LPS-mediated THP-1 monocyte adhesion to HUVEC (P < 0.01). In C57BL/6 mice, injection of LPS increased aortic ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression, and this effect was prevented by sulforaphane. These data provide insight into the mechanism through which sulforaphane partly reduces the expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 on the vascular wall by inhibiting STAT3 phosphorylation.

  8. Ventilator-induced mediator release: role of PEEP and surfactant

    OpenAIRE

    Haitsma, Jack

    2002-01-01

    textabstractLung protective ventilation such as the ARDSnet low tidal volumes strategy can reduce mortality in ARDS patients. The lmowledge that an essential therapy such as mechanical ventilation on the intensive care influences patient outcome has given rise to the re-evaluation of current ventilation practices. This review addresses the current state of lung protective strategies and their physiological rationale. Latest knowledge on the instigation and progression of lung injury by mechan...

  9. A Case of Gastric Antral Vascular Ectasia Which Was Aggravated by Acid Reducer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukiomi Nakade

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Gastric antral vascular ectasia (GAVE is known to be characterized by red patches or spots in a diffuse or linear array in the antrum of the stomach. The precise etiology of GAVE remains to be elucidated. Argon plasma laser coagulation (APC has been used to control oozing from GAVE; however, there is no satisfactory long-term effect of APC in the control of oozing from GAVE. An acid reducer is used after APC because even physiological acid exposure might delay post-APC ulcer healing. We describe the case of a patient who had used an acid reducer and experienced repeated gastrointestinal hemorrhage due to GAVE. After ceasing to administer the acid reducer, incidences of hospitalization due to oozing from GAVE stopped. After the administration of the acid reducer was restarted, the patient had tarry stool, and diffuse oozing of blood was seen again. We report a first case of GAVE which was aggravated by acid reducer.

  10. A magnesium based phosphate binder reduces vascular calcification without affecting bone in chronic renal failure rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Neven

    Full Text Available The alternative phosphate binder calcium acetate/magnesium carbonate (CaMg effectively reduces hyperphosphatemia, the most important inducer of vascular calcification, in chronic renal failure (CRF. In this study, the effect of low dose CaMg on vascular calcification and possible effects of CaMg on bone turnover, a persistent clinical controversy, were evaluated in chronic renal failure rats. Adenine-induced CRF rats were treated daily with 185 mg/kg CaMg or vehicle for 5 weeks. The aortic calcium content and area% calcification were measured to evaluate the effect of CaMg. To study the effect of CaMg on bone remodeling, rats underwent 5/6th nephrectomy combined with either a normal phosphorus diet or a high phosphorus diet to differentiate between possible bone effects resulting from either CaMg-induced phosphate deficiency or a direct effect of Mg. Vehicle or CaMg was administered at doses of 185 and 375 mg/kg/day for 8 weeks. Bone histomorphometry was performed. Aortic calcium content was significantly reduced by 185 mg/kg/day CaMg. CaMg ameliorated features of hyperparathyroid bone disease. In CRF rats on a normal phosphorus diet, the highest CaMg dose caused an increase in osteoid area due to phosphate depletion. The high phosphorus diet combined with the highest CaMg dose prevented the phosphate depletion and thus the rise in osteoid area. CaMg had no effect on osteoblast/osteoclast or dynamic bone parameters, and did not alter bone Mg levels. CaMg at doses that reduce vascular calcification did not show any harmful effect on bone turnover.

  11. Both acute and prolonged administration of EPO reduce cerebral and systemic vascular conductance in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter; Kim, Yu-Sok; Krogh-Madsen, Rikke

    2012-01-01

    Administration of erythropoietin (EPO) has been linked to cerebrovascular events. EPO reduces vascular conductance, possibly because of the increase in hematocrit. Whether EPO in itself affects the vasculature remains unknown; here it was evaluated in healthy males by determining systemic...... and cerebrovascular variables following acute (30,000 IU/d for 3 d; n=8) and chronic (5000 IU/week for 13 wk; n=8) administration of EPO, while the responsiveness of the vasculature was challenged during cycling exercise, with and without hypoxia. Prolonged administration of EPO increased hematocrit from 42.5 ± 3...

  12. Cortactin deficiency is associated with reduced neutrophil recruitment but increased vascular permeability in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnoor, Michael; Lai, Frank P L; Zarbock, Alexander; Kläver, Ruth; Polaschegg, Christian; Schulte, Dörte; Weich, Herbert A; Oelkers, J Margit; Rottner, Klemens; Vestweber, Dietmar

    2011-08-01

    Neutrophil extravasation and the regulation of vascular permeability require dynamic actin rearrangements in the endothelium. In this study, we analyzed in vivo whether these processes require the function of the actin nucleation-promoting factor cortactin. Basal vascular permeability for high molecular weight substances was enhanced in cortactin-deficient mice. Despite this leakiness, neutrophil extravasation in the tumor necrosis factor-stimulated cremaster was inhibited by the loss of cortactin. The permeability defect was caused by reduced levels of activated Rap1 (Ras-related protein 1) in endothelial cells and could be rescued by activating Rap1 via the guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) exchange factor EPAC (exchange protein directly activated by cAMP). The defect in neutrophil extravasation was caused by enhanced rolling velocity and reduced adhesion in postcapillary venules. Impaired rolling interactions were linked to contributions of β(2)-integrin ligands, and firm adhesion was compromised by reduced ICAM-1 (intercellular adhesion molecule 1) clustering around neutrophils. A signaling process known to be critical for the formation of ICAM-1-enriched contact areas and for transendothelial migration, the ICAM-1-mediated activation of the GTPase RhoG was blocked in cortactin-deficient endothelial cells. Our results represent the first physiological evidence that cortactin is crucial for orchestrating the molecular events leading to proper endothelial barrier function and leukocyte recruitment in vivo.

  13. Postpartum Vascular Dysfunction in the Reduced Uteroplacental Perfusion Model of Preeclampsia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesley Brennan

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia is a disorder affecting 2-8% of all pregnancies, characterized by gestational hypertension (≥ 140/90 mmHg and proteinuria (≥300 mg over 24 hours diagnosed following the 20th week of pregnancy, and for which there is currently no available treatment. While the precise cause of preeclampsia is unknown, placental ischemia/hypoxia resulting from abnormal trophoblast invasion and maternal endothelial dysfunction are central characteristics. Preeclampsia is a major cause of both maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality in the perinatal period. In addition, women who have experienced preeclampsia are more likely to suffer cardiovascular disease later in life. The cause of this elevation in cardiovascular risk postpartum, however, is unknown. We hypothesize that there may be lasting vascular dysfunction following exposure to reduced uteroplacental perfusion during pregnancy that may contribute to increased cardiovascular risk postpartum. Using the rat reduced utero-placental perfusion pressure (RUPP model of preeclampsia, blood pressure was assessed in dams at gestational day 20, one and three months postpartum. Mesenteric artery and aortic function were assessed using wire myography. We demonstrated hypertension and increased mesenteric artery responses to phenylephrine at gestational day 20, with the latter due to a decreased contribution of nitric oxide without any change in methylcholine-induced relaxation. At one month postpartum, we demonstrated a small but significant vasoconstrictive phenotype that was due to an underlying loss of basal nitric oxide contribution. At three months postpartum, endothelium-dependent relaxation of the aorta demonstrated sensitivity to oxLDL and mesenteric arteries demonstrated decreased nitric oxide bioavailability with impaired methylcholine-induced relaxation; indicative of an early development of endothelial dysfunction. In summary, we have demonstrated impaired vascular function following

  14. Reduced 25-hydroxyvitamin D and risk of Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afzal, Shoaib; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vitamin D deficiency has been implicated as a risk factor for dementia in several cross-sectional studies. We tested the hypothesis that reduced plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) is associated with increased risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia in the general.......28 (95% CI, 1.00-1.64) for 25(OH)D less than 25 nmol/L vs. greater than or equal to 50 nmol/L, and 1.27 (95% CI, 1.01-1.60) for less than the 25th vs. more than the 50th seasonally adjusted 25(OH)D. CONCLUSIONS: We observed an association of reduced plasma 25(OH)D with increased risk of the combined end...

  15. History of Mechanical Ventilation. From Vesalius to Ventilator-induced Lung Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slutsky, Arthur S

    2015-05-15

    Mechanical ventilation is a life-saving therapy that catalyzed the development of modern intensive care units. The origins of modern mechanical ventilation can be traced back about five centuries to the seminal work of Andreas Vesalius. This article is a short history of mechanical ventilation, tracing its origins over the centuries to the present day. One of the great advances in ventilatory support over the past few decades has been the development of lung-protective ventilatory strategies, based on our understanding of the iatrogenic consequences of mechanical ventilation such as ventilator-induced lung injury. These strategies have markedly improved clinical outcomes in patients with respiratory failure.

  16. Vascular resistance of central retinal artery is reduced in postmenopausal women after use of estrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Alice Fátima Melgaço; de Souza, Marco Aurélio Martins; Geber, Selmo

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of estrogen on the vascular resistance of the central retinal artery in postmenopausal women, compared with placebo, using transorbital ultrasound with Doppler velocimetry. We performed a prospective, randomized, triple-blinded placebo-controlled study. A total of 51 healthy postmenopausal women (follicle-stimulating hormone, >40 IU/L) with a mean (SD) age of 53.6 (4.8) years were studied. Participants were randomly allocated into two groups: placebo (n = 23) and estrogen (0.625 mg conjugated estrogens; n = 28). Transorbital Doppler velocimetric ultrasound was performed before and after treatment in sitting and supine positions. The mean age was similar in both groups. The pulsatility index of the central retinal arteries had a significant decrease after the use of estrogen, when women were evaluated in the sitting position. Women who received placebo did not show any difference in pulsatility index of the central retinal arteries after treatment. When the same comparison was done with participants in the supine position, no difference was observed in either group. Our study demonstrates that estrogen reduces the vascular resistance of the central retinal artery in postmenopausal women because of a vasodilatory effect.

  17. Amiloride Improves Endothelial Function and Reduces Vascular Stiffness in Female Mice Fed a Western Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis A. Martinez-Lemus

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Obese premenopausal women lose their sex related cardiovascular disease protection and develop greater arterial stiffening than age matched men. In female mice, we have shown that consumption of a Western diet (WD, high in fat and refined sugars, is associated with endothelial dysfunction and vascular stiffening, which occur via activation of mineralocorticoid receptors and associated increases in epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC activity on endothelial cells (EnNaC. Herein our aim was to determine the effect that reducing EnNaC activity with a very-low-dose of amiloride would have on decreasing endothelial and arterial stiffness in young female mice consuming a WD. To this end, we fed female mice either a WD or control diet and treated them with or without a very-low-dose of the ENaC-inhibitor amiloride (1 mg/kg/day in the drinking water for 20 weeks beginning at 4 weeks of age. Mice consuming a WD were heavier and had greater percent body fat, proteinuria, and aortic stiffness as assessed by pulse-wave velocity than those fed control diet. Treatment with amiloride did not affect body weight, body composition, blood pressure, urinary sodium excretion, or insulin sensitivity, but significantly reduced the development of endothelial and aortic stiffness, aortic fibrosis, aortic oxidative stress, and mesenteric resistance artery EnNaC abundance and proteinuria in WD-fed mice. Amiloride also improved endothelial-dependent vasodilatory responses in the resistance arteries of WD-fed mice. These results indicate that a very-low-dose of amiloride, not affecting blood pressure, is sufficient to improve endothelial function and reduce aortic stiffness in female mice fed a WD, and suggest that EnNaC-inhibition may be sufficient to ameliorate the pathological vascular stiffening effects of WD-induced obesity in females.

  18. REDUCED THROMBOGENICITY OF VASCULAR PROSTHESES BY COATING WITH ADP-ASE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERLEI, B; ROBINSON, PH; BAKKER, WW; Bartels, H.

    1992-01-01

    In this pilot study ADP-ase coated polyurethane (PL) vascular prostheses and noncoated (control) PU vascular prostheses (all vascular prostheses: ID 1.5 mm, length 1,5 cm) were implanted into the carotid artery of the rabbit to test wheter ADP-ase might function as an adequate anti-thrombogenic

  19. A combined strategy to reduce restenosis for vascular tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Hemang J; Su, Shih-Horng; Patterson, Cam; Nguyen, Kytai T

    2006-01-01

    Biodegradable polymers including poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) have been used to develop cardiovascular prostheses such as vascular grafts and stents. However, implant-associated thrombosis, inflammation, and restenosis are still major obstacles for the utility of these devices. The lack of an endothelial cell (EC) lining (endothelialization) on the implants and the responses of the immune systems toward the implants have been associated with these complications. In our research strategy, we have combined the drug delivery principle with the strategies of tissue engineering, the controlled release of anti-inflammation drugs and enhanced endothelialization, to reduce the implant-associated adverse responses. We first integrated curcumin, an anti-inflammatory drug and anti-smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferative drug, with PLLA. This curcumin-loaded PLLA material was then modified using adsorptive coating of adhesive proteins such as fibronectin, collagen-I, vitronectin, laminin, and matrigel to improve the endothelial cell (EC) adhesion and proliferation, and ECs were seeded on top of these modified surfaces. Our results showed steady drug release kinetics over the period of 50 days from curcumin-loaded PLLA materials. Additionally, integration of curcumin in PLLA increased the roughness of the scaffold at the nanometric scale using an atomic force microscopic analysis. Moreover, coating with fibronectin on curcumin-loaded PLLA surfaces gave the highest EC adhesion and proliferation compared to other adhesive proteins using PicoGreen DNA assays. The ability of our strategy to release the curcumin for producing anti-inflammation and anti-proliferation responses and to improve EC adhesion and growth after EC seeding suggests this strategy may reduce implant-associated adverse responses and be a better approach for vascular tissue engineering applications.

  20. Pathogenesis of diabetic vascular disease: evidence for the role of reduced heparan sulfate proteoglycan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tonny Joran

    1997-01-01

    that albuminuria is a marker of widespread vascular dysfunction. Increased transport of macromolecules across the vascular wall, elevated plasma levels of von Willebrand factor, and impaired fibrinolytic capacity have been demonstrated in albuminuric patients. The cause of this vascular vulnerability...... problems. What are the mechanisms of action of glycosaminoglycans at the molecular biology level, and how can we select compounds without anticoagulant activity suitable for long-term use in the prevention and treatment of late diabetic complications?...

  1. [Phrenic nerve stimulation protects against mechanical ventilation-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction through myogenic regulatory factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, G H; Chen, M; Zhan, W F; Hu, B; Zhang, H X

    2018-02-12

    Objective: To explore the protective effect of electrical stimulation of phrenic nerve on diaphragmatic function during mechanical ventilation. Methods: Forty healthy adult SD rats were randomly divided into 5 groups: blank control group (BC), spontaneous breathing group (SB), electrical stimulation group (ES), mechanical ventilation group (MV), and electrical stimulation and mechanical ventilation group (MS). The rats in each group were treated for 18 h except for the BC group. After treatment, the diaphragm muscle tissue was obtained and the diaphragm contractility including peak-to-peak value(Vpp) and maximum rate of contraction(+ dT/dt max) were measured. Expression of MyoD and myogenin were detected. Results: Except for the ES and the MS groups, there was a significant difference for peak-to-peak value (Vpp) between each 2 groups ( P mechanical ventilation induced diaphragmatic function damage, and therefore plays a protective effect on the diaphragm.

  2. Methylene Blue in Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury after Pneumonectomy: an Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. V Suborov

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the expediency and efficiency of using methylene blue (MB on a model of pneumectomy (PE and subsequent ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI in sheep. Materials and methods. The study was conducted at the Research Laboratory of University of Tromse. The experiment included 23 sheep weighing 41.0±4.9 kg. Thoracotomy and right-sided pneumonectomy were performed in the animals under general anesthesia and controlled artificial ventilation. After measurement of the parameters of systemic hemodynamics and extravascular water of the lung (EVWL, the animals were divided into 3 groups: 1 a control group (CG, n=7 with a tidal volume (TV of 6 ml/kg and an end-expiratory positive pressure (PEEP of 2 cm H2O; 2 a VILI group (n=9 with a TV of 12 ml/kg and a PEEP of 0 cm H2O; 3 a group of MB (n=7 that was given in parallel with a damaging ventilation mode. The thermodilution technique (using a Cold Z-021 monitor, (Pulsion, Germany was employed to measure volumetric parameters and EVWL. The parameters of pulmonary hemodynamics, respiratory mechanics, and blood gas composition were recorded. Results: After its reduction at PE, EVWL index increased during damaging ventilation in the VILI and MB groups. In addition, there was an increase in pulmonary artery wedge pressure after PE in the MB and VILI groups. In the latter group, arterial hypoxemia was observed at the end of the experiment. Along with this, after PE pulmonary compliance decreased and airway pressure elevated in the VILI and MB groups. Conclusion: In the presented model of VILI, MB does not prevent the development of postp-neumectomic edema of the lung. Key words: thermochromodilution, acute lung injury, pneumectomy, ventilator-induced lung injury, postpneumectomic edema of the lung, methylene blue.

  3. Aerobic interval training reduces vascular resistances during submaximal exercise in obese metabolic syndrome individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Rodriguez, Ricardo; Fernandez-Elias, V E; Morales-Palomo, F; Pallares, J G; Ramirez-Jimenez, M; Ortega, J F

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of high-intensity aerobic interval training (AIT) on exercise hemodynamics in metabolic syndrome (MetS) volunteers. Thirty-eight, MetS participants were randomly assigned to a training (TRAIN) or to a non-training control (CONT) group. TRAIN consisted of stationary interval cycling alternating bouts at 70-90% of maximal heart rate during 45 min day -1 for 6 months. CONT maintained baseline physical activity and no changes in cardiovascular function or MetS factors were detected. In contrast, TRAIN increased cardiorespiratory fitness (14% in VO 2PEAK ; 95% CI 9-18%) and improved metabolic syndrome (-42% in Z score; 95% CI 83-1%). After TRAIN, the workload that elicited a VO 2 of 1500 ml min -1 increased 15% (95% CI 5-25%; P exercise heart rate (109 ± 15-106 ± 13 beats min -1 ; P exercise in MetS patients. Specifically, it reduces diastolic blood pressure, systemic vascular resistances, and the double product. The reduction in double product, suggests decreased myocardial oxygen demands which could prevent the occurrence of adverse cardiovascular events during exercise in this population. CLINICALTRIALS. NCT03019796.

  4. The effect of low level laser therapy on ventilator-induced lung injury in mice (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabari, Margit V.; Miller, Alyssa J.; Hariri, Lida P.; Hamblin, Michael R.; Musch, Guido; Stroh, Helene; Suter, Melissa J.

    2016-03-01

    Although mechanical ventilation (MV) is necessary to support gas exchange in critically ill patients, it can contribute to the development of lung injury and multiple organ dysfunction. It is known that high tidal volume (Vt) MV can cause ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) in healthy lungs and increase the mortality of patients with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome. Low level laser therapy (LLLT) has demonstrated to have anti-inflammatory effects. We investigated whether LLLT could alleviate inflammation from injurious MV in mice. Adult mice were assigned to 2 groups: VILI+LLLT group (3 h of injurious MV: Vt=25-30 ml/kg, respiratory rate (RR)=50/min, positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP)=0 cmH20, followed by 3 h of protective MV: Vt=9 ml/kg, RR=140/min, PEEP=2 cmH20) and VILI+no LLLT group. LLLT was applied during the first 30 min of the MV (810 nm LED system, 5 J/cm2, 1 cm above the chest). Respiratory impedance was measured in vivo with forced oscillation technique and lung mechanics were calculated by fitting the constant phase model. At the end of the MV, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed and inflammatory cells counted. Lungs were removed en-bloc and fixed for histological evaluation. We hypothesize that LLLT can reduce lung injury and inflammation from VILI. This therapy could be translated into clinical practice, where it can potentially improve outcomes in patients requiring mechanical ventilation in the operating room or in the intensive care units.

  5. Low-Dose Dextromethorphan, a NADPH Oxidase Inhibitor, Reduces Blood Pressure and Enhances Vascular Protection in Experimental Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tao-Cheng; Chao, Chih-Yu; Lin, Shing-Jong; Chen, Jaw-Wen

    2012-01-01

    Background Vascular oxidative stress may be increased with age and aggravate endothelial dysfunction and vascular injury in hypertension. This study aimed to investigate the effects of dextromethorphan (DM), a NADPH oxidase inhibitor, either alone or in combination treatment, on blood pressure (BP) and vascular protection in aged spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHRs). Methodology/Principal Findings Eighteen-week-old WKY rats and SHRs were housed for 2 weeks. SHRs were randomly assigned to one of the 12 groups: untreated; DM monotherapy with 1, 5 or 25 mg/kg/day; amlodipine (AM, a calcium channel blocker) monotherapy with 1 or 5 mg/kg/day; and combination therapy of DM 1, 5 or 25 mg/kg/day with AM 1 or 5 mg/kg/day individually for 4 weeks. The in vitro effects of DM were also examined. In SHRs, AM monotherapy dose-dependently reduced arterial systolic BP. DM in various doses significantly and similarly reduced arterial systolic BP. Combination of DM with AM gave additive effects on BP reduction. DM, either alone or in combination with AM, improved aortic endothelial function indicated by ex vivo acetylcholine-induced relaxation. The combination of low-dose DM with AM gave most significant inhibition on aortic wall thickness in SHRs. Plasma total antioxidant status was significantly increased by all the therapies except for the combination of high-dose DM with high-dose AM. Serum nitrite and nitrate level was significantly reduced by AM but not by DM or the combination of DM with AM. Furthermore, in vitro treatment with DM reduced angiotensin II-induced reactive oxygen species and NADPH oxidase activation in human aortic endothelial cells. Conclusions/Significance Treatment of DM reduced BP and enhanced vascular protection probably by inhibiting vascular NADPH oxidase in aged hypertensive animals with or without AM treatment. It provides the potential rationale to a novel combination treatment with low-dose DM and AM in clinical hypertension. PMID:23049937

  6. Low-dose dextromethorphan, a NADPH oxidase inhibitor, reduces blood pressure and enhances vascular protection in experimental hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao-Cheng Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vascular oxidative stress may be increased with age and aggravate endothelial dysfunction and vascular injury in hypertension. This study aimed to investigate the effects of dextromethorphan (DM, a NADPH oxidase inhibitor, either alone or in combination treatment, on blood pressure (BP and vascular protection in aged spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHRs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Eighteen-week-old WKY rats and SHRs were housed for 2 weeks. SHRs were randomly assigned to one of the 12 groups: untreated; DM monotherapy with 1, 5 or 25 mg/kg/day; amlodipine (AM, a calcium channel blocker monotherapy with 1 or 5 mg/kg/day; and combination therapy of DM 1, 5 or 25 mg/kg/day with AM 1 or 5 mg/kg/day individually for 4 weeks. The in vitro effects of DM were also examined. In SHRs, AM monotherapy dose-dependently reduced arterial systolic BP. DM in various doses significantly and similarly reduced arterial systolic BP. Combination of DM with AM gave additive effects on BP reduction. DM, either alone or in combination with AM, improved aortic endothelial function indicated by ex vivo acetylcholine-induced relaxation. The combination of low-dose DM with AM gave most significant inhibition on aortic wall thickness in SHRs. Plasma total antioxidant status was significantly increased by all the therapies except for the combination of high-dose DM with high-dose AM. Serum nitrite and nitrate level was significantly reduced by AM but not by DM or the combination of DM with AM. Furthermore, in vitro treatment with DM reduced angiotensin II-induced reactive oxygen species and NADPH oxidase activation in human aortic endothelial cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Treatment of DM reduced BP and enhanced vascular protection probably by inhibiting vascular NADPH oxidase in aged hypertensive animals with or without AM treatment. It provides the potential rationale to a novel combination treatment with low-dose DM and AM in clinical hypertension.

  7. Vascular smooth muscle responsiveness to nitric oxide is reduced in healthy adults with increased adiposity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christou, Demetra D; Pierce, Gary L; Walker, Ashley E; Hwang, Moon-Hyon; Yoo, Jeung-Ki; Luttrell, Meredith; Meade, Thomas H; English, Mark; Seals, Douglas R

    2012-09-15

    Vascular smooth muscle responsiveness to nitric oxide, as assessed by nitroglycerin-induced dilation (NID), is impaired in clinical cardiovascular disease, but its relation to adiposity is unknown. We determined the relation of NID to total and abdominal adiposity in healthy adults varying widely in adiposity. In 224 men and women [age, 18-79 years; body mass index (BMI), 16.4-42.2 kg/m(2)], we measured NID (brachial artery dilation to 0.4 mg sublingual nitroglycerin), total body adiposity [BMI and percent body fat (percent BF via dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry)], and indexes of abdominal adiposity [waist circumference (WC) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR)]. In a subgroup (n = 74), we also measured total abdominal fat (TAF), abdominal visceral fat (AVF), and subcutaneous fat (ASF) using computed tomography. Based on multiple linear regression, NID was negatively related to BMI [part correlation coefficient (r(part)) = -0.19, P = 0.004] and abdominal adiposity (WC, r(part) = -0.22; WHR, r(part) = -0.19; TAF, r(part) = -0.36; AVF, r(part) = -0.36; and ASF, r(part) = -0.30; all P ≤ 0.009) independent of sex, but only tended to be related to total percent BF (r(part) = -0.12, P = 0.07). In a subgroup of subjects with the highest compared with the lowest amount of AVF, NID was 35% lower (P = 0.003). Accounting for systolic blood pressure, HDL cholesterol, glucose, insulin resistance, adiponectin, and brachial artery diameter reduced or abolished some of the relations between NID and adiposity. In conclusion, NID is or tends to be negatively associated with measures of total adiposity (BMI and percent BF, respectively) but is consistently and more strongly negatively associated with abdominal adiposity. Adiposity may influence NID in part via other cardiovascular risk factors.

  8. Leptin receptor blockade reduces intrahepatic vascular resistance and portal pressure in an experimental model of rat liver cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, María Gabriela; Gracia-Sancho, Jordi; Marrone, Giusi; Rodríguez-Vilarrupla, Aina; Deulofeu, Ramon; Abraldes, Juan G; Bosch, Jaume; García-Pagán, Juan Carlos

    2013-10-01

    Increased hepatic vascular resistance mainly due to elevated vascular tone and to fibrosis is the primary factor in the development of portal hypertension in cirrhosis. Leptin, a hormone associated with reduction in nitric oxide bioavailability, vascular dysfunction, and liver fibrosis, is increased in patients with cirrhosis. We aimed at evaluating whether leptin influences the increased hepatic resistance in portal hypertension. CCl4-cirrhotic rats received the leptin receptor-blocker ObR antibody, or its vehicle, every other day for 1 wk. Hepatic and systemic hemodynamics were measured in both groups. Hepatic nitric oxide production and bioavailability, together with oxidative stress, nitrotyrosinated proteins, and liver fibrosis, were evaluated. In cirrhotic rats, leptin-receptor blockade significantly reduced portal pressure without modifying portal blood flow, suggesting a reduction in the intrahepatic resistance. Portal pressure reduction was associated with increased nitric oxide bioavailability and with decreased O2(-) levels and nitrotyrosinated proteins. No changes in systemic hemodynamics and liver fibrosis were observed. In conclusion, the present study shows that blockade of the leptin signaling pathway in cirrhosis significantly reduces portal pressure. This effect is probably due to a nitric oxide-mediated reduction in the hepatic vascular tone.

  9. Morpholino-Mediated Isoform Modulation of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-2 (VEGFR2) Reduces Colon Cancer Xenograft Growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stagg, Brian C., E-mail: briancstagg@gmail.com; Uehara, Hironori; Lambert, Nathan; Rai, Ruju; Gupta, Isha; Radmall, Bryce; Bates, Taylor; Ambati, Balamurali K. [John A Moran Eye Center, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, 65 Mario Capecchi Drive, Salt Lake City, UT 84132 (United States)

    2014-11-26

    Angiogenesis plays a key role in tumor growth. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a pro-angiogenic that is involved in tumor angiogenesis. When VEGF binds to membrane-bound vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (mVEGFR2), it promotes angiogenesis. Through alternative polyadenylation, VEGFR2 is also expressed in a soluble form (sVEGFR2). sVEGFR2 sequesters VEGF and is therefore anti-angiogenic. The aim of this study was to show that treatment with a previously developed and reported antisense morpholino oligomer that shifts expression from mVEGFR2 to sVEGFR2 would lead to reduced tumor vascularization and growth in a murine colon cancer xenograft model. Xenografts were generated by implanting human HCT-116 colon cancer cells into the flanks of NMRI nu/nu mice. Treatment with the therapeutic morpholino reduced both tumor growth and tumor vascularization. Because the HCT-116 cells used for the experiments did not express VEGFR2 and because the treatment morpholino targeted mouse rather than human VEGFR2, it is likely that treatment morpholino was acting on the mouse endothelial cells rather than directly on the tumor cells.

  10. Aerobic exercise reduces oxidative stress and improves vascular changes of small mesenteric and coronary arteries in hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roque, Fernanda R; Briones, Ana M; García-Redondo, Ana B; Galán, María; Martínez-Revelles, Sonia; Avendaño, Maria S; Cachofeiro, Victoria; Fernandes, Tiago; Vassallo, Dalton V; Oliveira, Edilamar M; Salaices, Mercedes

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Regular physical activity is an effective non-pharmacological therapy for prevention and control of hypertension. We investigated the effects of aerobic exercise training in vascular remodelling and in the mechanical and functional alterations of coronary and small mesenteric arteries from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Experimental Approach Normotensive Wistar Kyoto (WKY), SHR and SHR trained on a treadmill for 12 weeks were used to evaluate vascular structural, mechanical and functional properties. Key Results Exercise did not affect lumen diameter, wall thickness and wall/lumen ratio but reduced vascular stiffness of coronary and mesenteric arteries from SHR. Exercise also reduced collagen deposition and normalized altered internal elastic lamina organization and expression of MMP-9 in mesenteric arteries from SHR. Exercise did not affect contractile responses of coronary arteries but improved the endothelium-dependent relaxation in SHR. In mesenteric arteries, training normalized the increased contractile responses induced by U46619 and by high concentrations of acetylcholine. In vessels from SHR, exercise normalized the effects of the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin and the NOS inhibitor l-NAME in vasodilator or vasoconstrictor responses, normalized the increased O2− production and the reduced Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase expression and increased NO production. Conclusions and Implications Exercise training of SHR improves endothelial function and vascular stiffness in coronary and small mesenteric arteries. This might be related to the concomitant decrease of oxidative stress and increase of NO bioavailability. Such effects demonstrate the beneficial effects of exercise on the vascular system and could contribute to a reduction in blood pressure. PMID:22994554

  11. Aerobic exercise reduces oxidative stress and improves vascular changes of small mesenteric and coronary arteries in hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roque, Fernanda R; Briones, Ana M; García-Redondo, Ana B; Galán, María; Martínez-Revelles, Sonia; Avendaño, Maria S; Cachofeiro, Victoria; Fernandes, Tiago; Vassallo, Dalton V; Oliveira, Edilamar M; Salaices, Mercedes

    2013-02-01

    Regular physical activity is an effective non-pharmacological therapy for prevention and control of hypertension. We investigated the effects of aerobic exercise training in vascular remodelling and in the mechanical and functional alterations of coronary and small mesenteric arteries from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Normotensive Wistar Kyoto (WKY), SHR and SHR trained on a treadmill for 12 weeks were used to evaluate vascular structural, mechanical and functional properties. Exercise did not affect lumen diameter, wall thickness and wall/lumen ratio but reduced vascular stiffness of coronary and mesenteric arteries from SHR. Exercise also reduced collagen deposition and normalized altered internal elastic lamina organization and expression of MMP-9 in mesenteric arteries from SHR. Exercise did not affect contractile responses of coronary arteries but improved the endothelium-dependent relaxation in SHR. In mesenteric arteries, training normalized the increased contractile responses induced by U46619 and by high concentrations of acetylcholine. In vessels from SHR, exercise normalized the effects of the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin and the NOS inhibitor l-NAME in vasodilator or vasoconstrictor responses, normalized the increased O(2) (-) production and the reduced Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase expression and increased NO production. Exercise training of SHR improves endothelial function and vascular stiffness in coronary and small mesenteric arteries. This might be related to the concomitant decrease of oxidative stress and increase of NO bioavailability. Such effects demonstrate the beneficial effects of exercise on the vascular system and could contribute to a reduction in blood pressure. © 2012 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  12. Mitochondrial Targeted Endonuclease III DNA Repair Enzyme Protects against Ventilator Induced Lung Injury in Mice

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    Masahiro Hashizume

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial targeted DNA repair enzyme, 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1, was previously reported to protect against mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA damage and ventilator induced lung injury (VILI. In the present study we determined whether mitochondrial targeted endonuclease III (EndoIII which cleaves oxidized pyrimidines rather than purines from damaged DNA would also protect the lung. Minimal injury from 1 h ventilation at 40 cmH2O peak inflation pressure (PIP was reversed by EndoIII pretreatment. Moderate lung injury due to ventilation for 2 h at 40 cmH2O PIP produced a 25-fold increase in total extravascular albumin space, a 60% increase in W/D weight ratio, and marked increases in MIP-2 and IL-6. Oxidative mtDNA damage and decreases in the total tissue glutathione (GSH and the GSH/GSSH ratio also occurred. All of these indices of injury were attenuated by mitochondrial targeted EndoIII. Massive lung injury caused by 2 h ventilation at 50 cmH2O PIP was not attenuated by EndoIII pretreatment, but all untreated mice died prior to completing the two hour ventilation protocol, whereas all EndoIII-treated mice lived for the duration of ventilation. Thus, mitochondrial targeted DNA repair enzymes were protective against mild and moderate lung damage and they enhanced survival in the most severely injured group.

  13. Plasma-mediated vascular dysfunction in the reduced uterine perfusion pressure model of preeclampsia: a microvascular characterization.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, Sarah K

    2012-01-31

    Preeclampsia is associated with widespread maternal vascular dysfunction, which is thought to be mediated by circulating factor(s). The aim of the study was to characterize vascular function in the reduced uterine perfusion pressure (RUPP) rat model of preeclampsia and to investigate the role of plasma factors in mediating any observed changes in vascular reactivity. Mean arterial blood pressure and vascular function were measured in RUPP and control rats. Mesenteric vessels from both virgin and pregnant rats were exposed for 1 hour or overnight to plasma from both RUPP and control rats and their vascular function assessed. RUPP rats were characterized by severe hypertension, restricted fetal growth, and reduced placental weight (P<0.001). Vasorelaxation was impaired in resistance vessels from RUPP compared with control rats (acetylcholine: R(max) 70+\\/-3 versus 92+\\/-1 [NP] and 93+\\/-3% [sham], P<0.01; bradykinin: 40+\\/-2 versus 62+\\/-2 [NP] and 59+\\/-4% [sham], P<0.001). Incubation of vessels from pregnant (but not virgin) animals with RUPP plasma overnight resulted in an attenuation of vasorelaxant responses (acetylcholine: 63+\\/-7 versus 86+\\/-2%, P<0.05; bradykinin: 35+\\/-5 versus 55+\\/-6%, P<0.001). The residual relaxant response in RUPP plasma-treated vessels was not further attenuated after treatment with N(omega)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (acetylcholine: 57+\\/-7 versus 63+\\/-7%, ns; bradykinin: 37+\\/-5 versus 35+\\/-5%, ns). The RUPP rat model is characterized by an impaired response to vasodilators which may be attributable to one or more circulating factors. This plasma-mediated endothelial dysfunction appears to be a pregnancy-dependent effect. Furthermore, nitric oxide-mediated vasorelaxation appears to be absent in RUPP plasma-treated vessels.

  14. Microparticle Shedding by Erythrocytes, Monocytes and Vascular Smooth Muscular Cells Is Reduced by Aspirin in Diabetic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiva-Blanch, Gemma; Suades, Rosa; Padró, Teresa; Vilahur, Gemma; Peña, Esther; Ybarra, Juan; Pou, Jose M; Badimon, Lina

    2016-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with an enhanced risk for cardiovascular disease and its prevalence is increasing. Diabetes induces metabolic stress on blood and vascular cells, promoting platelet activation and vascular dysfunction. The level of vascular cell activation can be measured by the number and phenotype of microparticles found in the circulation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a platelet-inhibitory dose of aspirin on the number and type of microparticles shed to the circulation. Forty-three diabetic patients were enrolled in the study and received a daily dose of 100mg of aspirin for 10 days to cover the average platelet life-span in the circulation. Before and after the intervention period, circulating microparticles were characterized and quantified by flow cytometry. Type 1 diabetic patients had about twice the number of tissue factor-positive circulating microparticles (derived both from platelets and monocytes) and endothelial-derived E-selectin positive microparticles than type 2 diabetic patients. Aspirin therapy significantly inhibited platelets since cyclooxygenase 1 derived thromboxane generation levels were reduced by 99%. Microparticles derived from erythrocytes, activated monocytes, and smooth muscle cells were significantly reduced after 10 days of aspirin administration. These results indicate that: a) vascular and blood cells in type 1 diabetic patients are exposed to more sustained stress shown by their specific microparticle origin and levels; b) aspirin therapy inhibits vascular wall cell activation and microparticle shedding, and c) the effects of aspirin are similar in type 1 and 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Citoesqueleto e mecanotransdução na fisiopatologia da lesão pulmonar induzida por ventilador Cytoskeleton and mechanotransduction in the pathophysiology of ventilator-induced lung injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Utino Taniguchi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A ventilação mecânica é uma terapia importante, mas pode resultar em complicações. Uma das mais relevantes é a lesão pulmonar induzida por ventilador. Devido à hiperdistensão alveolar, o pulmão inicia um processo inflamatório, com infiltrado neutrofílico, formação de membrana hialina, fibrogênese e prejuízo de troca gasosa. Nesse processo, a mecanotransdução da hiperdistensão celular é mediada através do citoesqueleto da célula e de suas interações com a matriz extracelular e com as células vizinhas, de modo que o estímulo mecânico da ventilação se traduz em sinalização bioquímica intracelular, desencadeando ativação endotelial, permeabilidade vascular pulmonar, quimiotaxia leucocitária, produção de citocinas e, possivelmente, lesão de órgãos à distância. Estudos clínicos demonstram essa relação entre distensão pulmonar e mortalidade em pacientes com lesão pulmonar induzida por ventilador. Entretanto, apesar de o citoesqueleto ter um papel fundamental na patogênese da lesão pulmonar induzida por ventilador, a literatura carece de estudos utilizando modelos in vivo sobre as alterações do citoesqueleto e de suas proteínas associadas durante esse processo patológico.Although mechanical ventilation is an important therapy, it can result in complications. One major complication is ventilator-induced lung injury, which is caused by alveolar hyperdistension, leading to an inflammatory process, with neutrophilic infiltration, hyaline membrane formation, fibrogenesis and impaired gas exchange. In this process, cellular mechanotransduction of the overstretching stimulus is mediated by means of the cytoskeleton and its cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions, in such a way that the mechanical stimulus of ventilation is translated into an intracellular biochemical signal, inducing endothelial activation, pulmonary vascular permeability, leukocyte chemotaxis, cytokine production and, possibly

  16. Reduced methylation of the thromboxane synthase gene is correlated with its increased vascular expression in preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousa, Ahmad A; Strauss, Jerome F; Walsh, Scott W

    2012-06-01

    Preeclampsia is characterized by increased thromboxane and decreased prostacyclin levels, which predate symptoms, and can explain some of the clinical manifestations of preeclampsia, including hypertension and thrombosis. In this study, we examined DNA methylation of the promoter region of the thromboxane synthase gene (TBXAS1) and the expression of thromboxane synthase in systemic blood vessels of normal pregnant and preeclamptic women. Thromboxane synthase is responsible for the synthesis of thromboxane A(2), a potent vasoconstrictor and activator of platelets. We also examined the effect of experimentally induced DNA hypomethylation on the expression of thromboxane synthase in a neutrophil-like cell line (HL-60 cells) and in cultured vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells. We found that DNA methylation of the TBXAS1 promoter was decreased and thromboxane synthase expression was increased in omental arteries of preeclamptic women as compared with normal pregnant women. Increased thromboxane synthase expression was observed in vascular smooth muscles cells, endothelial cells, and infiltrating neutrophils. Experimentally induced DNA hypomethylation only increased expression of thromboxane synthase in the neutrophil-like cell line, whereas tumor necrosis factor-α, a neutrophil product, increased its expression in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells. Our study suggests that epigenetic mechanisms and release of tumor necrosis factor-α by infiltrating neutrophils could contribute to the increased expression of thromboxane synthase in maternal systemic blood vessels, contributing to the hypertension and coagulation abnormalities associated with preeclampsia.

  17. γ-Oryzanol reduces adhesion molecule expression in vascular endothelial cells via suppression of nuclear factor-κB activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Satoshi; Murata, Takahisa; Tsubosaka, Yoshiki; Ushio, Hideki; Hori, Masatoshi; Ozaki, Hiroshi

    2012-04-04

    γ-Oryzanol (γ-ORZ) is a mixture of phytosteryl ferulates purified from rice bran oil. In this study, we examined whether γ-ORZ represents a suppressive effect on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced adhesion molecule expression on vascular endothelium. Treatment with LPS elevated the mRNA expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), and E-selectin in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs). Pretreatment with γ-ORZ dose-dependently decreased the LPS-mediated expression of these genes. Western blotting also revealed that pretreatment with γ-ORZ dose-dependently inhibited LPS-induced VCAM-1 expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Consistently, pretreatment with γ-ORZ dose-dependently reduced LPS-induced U937 monocyte adhesion to BAECs. In immunofluorescence, LPS caused nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) nuclear translocation in 40% of BAECs, which indicates NF-κB activation. Pretreatment with γ-ORZ, as well as its components (cycloartenyl ferulate, ferulic acid, or cycloartenol), dose-dependently inhibited LPS-mediated NF-κB activation. Collectively, our results suggested that γ-ORZ reduced LPS-mediated adhesion molecule expression through NF-κB inhibition in vascular endothelium.

  18. Effects of sevoflurane on ventilator induced lung injury in a healthy lung experimental model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, A; Moreno, A; García, J; Sánchez, C; Santos, M; García, J

    2016-01-01

    Ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) causes a systemic inflammatory response in tissues, with an increase in IL-1, IL-6 and TNF-α in blood and tissues. Cytoprotective effects of sevoflurane in different experimental models are well known, and this protective effect can also be observed in VILI. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of sevoflurane in VILI. A prospective, randomized, controlled study was designed. Twenty female rats were studied. The animals were mechanically ventilated, without sevoflurane in the control group and sevoflurane 3% in the treated group (SEV group). VILI was induced applying a maximal inspiratory pressure of 35 cmH2O for 20 min without any positive end-expiratory pressure for 20 min (INJURY time). The animals were then ventilated 30 min with a maximal inspiratory pressure of 12 cmH2O and 3 cmH2O positive end-expiratory pressure (time 30 min POST-INJURY), at which time the animals were euthanized and pathological and biomarkers studies were performed. Heart rate, invasive blood pressure, pH, PaO2, and PaCO2 were recorded. The lung wet-to-dry weight ratio was used as an index of lung edema. No differences were found in the blood gas analysis parameters or heart rate between the 2 groups. Blood pressure was statistically higher in the control group, but still within the normal clinical range. The percentage of pulmonary edema and concentrations of TNF-α and IL-6 in lung tissue in the SEV group were lower than in the control group. Sevoflurane attenuates VILI in a previous healthy lung in an experimental subclinical model in rats. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. The role of the acute phase protein PTX3 in the ventilator-induced lung injury

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    JM Real

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The pentraxin 3 (PTX3 is an acute phase proinflammatory protein produced by fibroblasts and alveolar epithelial cells. We have previously demonstrated that PTX3 is a key modulator of inflammation. Mechanical ventilation (MV is a life saving therapeutic approach for patients with acute lung injury that, nevertheless could lead to an inflammatory response and tissue injury (ventilator-induced lung injury: VILI, representing a major cause of iatrogenic lung damage in intensive units. Our objective was to investigate the role of PTX3 in VILI. PTX3 transgenic, knockout and Wt control mice (n = 12/group were ventilated (45ml·kg–1 until respiratory system Elastance increased 50% (Ers150%, an indicator of VILI. Histological analysis demonstrated that using a Ers150% was appropriate for our analysis since identical degrees of inflammation were observed in Tg, KO and Wt mice as assessed by leukocyte infiltration, oedema, alveolar collapse and number of breaks in alveolar septa. However, Tg mice reached Ers150% faster than Wt controls (p = 0.0225. We also showed that the lack of PTX3 does not abolish the occurrence of VILI in KOs. Gene expression profile of PTX3, IL-1beta, IL-6, KC, IFNgamma, TGFbeta and PCIII were investigated by QPCR. MV drastically up modulated PTX3 as well as IL-1beta, IL-6, IFNgamma and KC. Alternatively, mice were ventilated for 20, 40 and 60 min. The faster kinetics of Tg mice to reach Ers150% was accompanied by an earlier augmentation of IL-1b and PTX3 expression. The kinetics of local PTX3 expression in the lungs of ventilated mice strongly suggests the involvement of this pentraxin in the pathogenesis of VILI.

  20. Heliox allows for lower minute volume ventilation in an animal model of ventilator-induced lung injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte J Beurskens

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helium is a noble gas with a low density, allowing for lower driving pressures and increased carbon dioxide (CO2 diffusion. Since application of protective ventilation can be limited by the development of hypoxemia or acidosis, we hypothesized that therefore heliox facilitates ventilation in an animal model of ventilator-induced lung injury. METHODS: Sprague-Dawley rats (N=8 per group were mechanically ventilated with heliox (50% oxygen; 50% helium. Controls received a standard gas mixture (50% oxygen; 50% air. VILI was induced by application of tidal volumes of 15 mL kg(-1; lung protective ventilated animals were ventilated with 6 mL kg(-1. Respiratory parameters were monitored with a pneumotach system. Respiratory rate was adjusted to maintain arterial pCO2 within 4.5-5.5 kPa, according to hourly drawn arterial blood gases. After 4 hours, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF was obtained. Data are mean (SD. RESULTS: VILI resulted in an increase in BALF protein compared to low tidal ventilation (629 (324 vs. 290 (181 μg mL(-1; p<0.05 and IL-6 levels (640 (8.7 vs. 206 (8.7 pg mL(-1; p<0.05, whereas cell counts did not differ between groups after this short course of mechanical ventilation. Ventilation with heliox resulted in a decrease in mean respiratory minute volume ventilation compared to control (123 ± 0.6 vs. 146 ± 8.9 mL min(-1, P<0.001, due to a decrease in respiratory rate (22 (0.4 vs. 25 (2.1 breaths per minute; p<0.05, while pCO2 levels and tidal volumes remained unchanged, according to protocol. There was no effect of heliox on inspiratory pressure, while compliance was reduced. In this mild lung injury model, heliox did not exert anti-inflammatory effects. CONCLUSIONS: Heliox allowed for a reduction in respiratory rate and respiratory minute volume during VILI, while maintaining normal acid-base balance. Use of heliox may be a useful approach when protective tidal volume ventilation is limited by the development of

  1. Increasing the inspiratory time and I:E ratio during mechanical ventilation aggravates ventilator-induced lung injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Redetzky, Holger C; Felten, Matthias; Hellwig, Katharina; Wienhold, Sandra-Maria; Naujoks, Jan; Opitz, Bastian; Kershaw, Olivia; Gruber, Achim D; Suttorp, Norbert; Witzenrath, Martin

    2015-01-28

    Lung-protective ventilation reduced acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) mortality. To minimize ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI), tidal volume is limited, high plateau pressures are avoided, and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) is applied. However, the impact of specific ventilatory patterns on VILI is not well defined. Increasing inspiratory time and thereby the inspiratory/expiratory ratio (I:E ratio) may improve oxygenation, but may also be harmful as the absolute stress and strain over time increase. We thus hypothesized that increasing inspiratory time and I:E ratio aggravates VILI. VILI was induced in mice by high tidal-volume ventilation (HVT 34 ml/kg). Low tidal-volume ventilation (LVT 9 ml/kg) was used in control groups. PEEP was set to 2 cm H2O, FiO2 was 0.5 in all groups. HVT and LVT mice were ventilated with either I:E of 1:2 (LVT 1:2, HVT 1:2) or 1:1 (LVT 1:1, HVT 1:1) for 4 hours or until an alternative end point, defined as mean arterial blood pressure below 40 mm Hg. Dynamic hyperinflation due to the increased I:E ratio was excluded in a separate group of animals. Survival, lung compliance, oxygenation, pulmonary permeability, markers of pulmonary and systemic inflammation (leukocyte differentiation in lung and blood, analyses of pulmonary interleukin-6, interleukin-1β, keratinocyte-derived chemokine, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1), and histopathologic pulmonary changes were analyzed. LVT 1:2 or LVT 1:1 did not result in VILI, and all individuals survived the ventilation period. HVT 1:2 decreased lung compliance, increased pulmonary neutrophils and cytokine expression, and evoked marked histologic signs of lung injury. All animals survived. HVT 1:1 caused further significant worsening of oxygenation, compliance and increased pulmonary proinflammatory cytokine expression, and pulmonary and blood neutrophils. In the HVT 1:1 group, significant mortality during mechanical ventilation was observed. According to the "baby lung

  2. Reduced subclinical carotid vascular disease and arterial stiffness in vegetarian men: The CARVOS Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta-Navarro, Julio; Antoniazzi, Luiza; Oki, Adriana Midori; Bonfim, Maria Carlos; Hong, Valeria; Acosta-Cardenas, Pedro; Strunz, Celia; Brunoro, Eleonora; Miname, Marcio Hiroshi; Filho, Wilson Salgado; Bortolotto, Luiz Aparecido; Santos, Raul D

    2017-03-01

    Dietary habits play an important role in the development of atherosclerosis, the most important cause of morbidity and mortality in the world. The objective of this study was to verify if vegetarian (VEG) diet could be related a better profile of subclinical vascular disease evaluated by arterial stiffness and functional and structural properties of carotid arteries, compared to omnivorous (OMN) diet. In this cross-sectional study, 44 VEG and 44 OMN apparently healthy men ≥35years of age, in order to not have confounding risk factors of subclinical atherosclerosis, were assessed for anthropometric data, blood pressure, blood lipids, glucose, C reactive protein (CRP), and arterial stiffness determined by carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV). Also, carotid intima-media thickness (c-IMT) and distensibility were evaluated. VEG men had lower body mass index, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, fasting serum total cholesterol, LDL and non-HDL-cholesterol, apolipoprotein B, glucose and glycated hemoglobin values in comparison with OMN individuals (all p values <0.05). Markers of vascular structure and function were different between VEG and OMN: PWV 7.1±0.8m/s vs. 7.7±0.9m/s (p<0.001); c-IMT 593±94 vs. 661±128μm (p=0.003); and relative carotid distensibility 6.39±1.7 vs. 5.72±1.8% (p=0.042), respectively. After a multivariate linear regression analysis, a VEG diet was independently and negatively associated with PWV (p value 0.005). A VEG diet is associated with a more favorable cardiovascular diseases biomarker profile and better vascular structural and functional parameters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Vascular smooth muscle responsiveness to nitric oxide is reduced in healthy adults with increased adiposity

    OpenAIRE

    Christou, Demetra D.; Pierce, Gary L.; Walker, Ashley E.; Hwang, Moon-Hyon; Yoo, Jeung-Ki; Luttrell, Meredith; Meade, Thomas H.; English, Mark; Seals, Douglas R.

    2012-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle responsiveness to nitric oxide, as assessed by nitroglycerin-induced dilation (NID), is impaired in clinical cardiovascular disease, but its relation to adiposity is unknown. We determined the relation of NID to total and abdominal adiposity in healthy adults varying widely in adiposity. In 224 men and women [age, 18–79 years; body mass index (BMI), 16.4–42.2 kg/m2], we measured NID (brachial artery dilation to 0.4 mg sublingual nitroglycerin), total body adiposity [BMI...

  4. Overexpression of thrombospondin-1 reduces growth and vascular index but not perfusion in glioblastoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Michael; Quistorff, Bjørn; Tenan, Mirna

    2002-01-01

    Little is known about the effects of antiangiogenic therapy on perfusion of human tumors and the mechanisms by which tumors can adapt to these treatments and recur. Here, we examined the effects of serial passaging of LN-229 human glioma xenografts overexpressing thrombospondin (TSP)-1 on tumor...... vascularity was estimated by noninvasive near infrared spectroscopy measuring blood volume at 800 +/- 10 nm and by histological vessel scores in CD31-immunostained cryosections. The tumor perfusion was assessed by noninvasive laser Doppler flowmetry. Overexpression of TSP-1 significantly inhibited tumor....... Elucidation of the mechanisms that allow this to happen has important consequences for the understanding of tumor recurrence after antiangiogenic therapy....

  5. Repetitive muscle compression reduces vascular mechano-sensitivity and the hyperemic response to muscle contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messere, A; Turturici, M; Millo, G; Roatta, S

    2017-06-01

    Animal studies have shown that the rapid hyperemic response to external muscle compression undergoes inactivation upon repetitive stimulation, but this phenomenon has never been observed in humans. The aim of the present study was to determine whether 1) the vascular mechano-sensitivity underlying muscle compression-induced hyperemia is inactivated in an inter-stimulus interval (ISI)-dependent fashion upon repetitive stimulation, as suggested by animal studies, and 2) whether such inactivation also attenuates contraction-induced hyperemia. Brachial artery blood flow was measured by echo Doppler sonography in 13 healthy adults in response to 1) single and repetitive cuff muscle compression (CMC) of the forearm (20 CMCs, 1 s ISI); 2) a sequence of CMC delivered at decreasing ISI from 120 to 2 s; and 3) electrically-stimulated contraction of the forearm muscles before and after repetitive CMC. The peak amplitude of hyperemia in response to CMC normalized to baseline decreased from 2.2 ± 0.6 to 1.4 ± 0.4 after repetitive CMC and, in general, was decreased at ISI < 240 s. The peak amplitude of contraction-induced hyperemia was attenuated after as compared to before repeated CMC (1.7 ± 0.4 and 2.6 ± 0.6, respectively). Mechano-sensitivity of the vascular network can be conditioned by previous mechanical stimulation, and such preconditioning may substantially decrease contraction-induced hyperemia.

  6. Peripheral vascular disease is associated with reduced glycosuria in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olivarius, Niels de Fine; Holstein-Rathlou, N H; Siersma, V

    2004-01-01

    was 65.2 years. Urinary glucose concentration (UGC) was determined quantitatively in a freshly voided morning urine specimen. RESULTS: The over-all prevalence of peripheral vascular disease (PVD) was 16.5%. Bivariately, high values of UGC were associated with low prevalence of PVD (p...). The predictive value of PVD--together with HbA1c, glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and 10 other possible predictors--was confirmed in a logistic regression analysis with glycosuria (Y/N) as outcome variable (p=0.0004). CONCLUSION: Surprisingly, type 2 diabetic patients with PVD tend not to have glycosuria...... as compared to patients without PVD. PVD may be indicative of generalized atherosclerotic lesions in the major vessels, including the renal arteries. This could lead to a lowering of GFR and thereby of the amount of glucose filtered. Assuming no, or only a minor direct effect of PVD on tubular function...

  7. Early biomarkers and potential mediators of ventilation-induced lung injury in very preterm lambs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davis Peter G

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD is closely associated with ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI in very preterm infants. The greatest risk of VILI may be in the immediate period after birth, when the lungs are surfactant deficient, still partially filled with liquid and not uniformly aerated. However, there have been very few studies that have examined this immediate post-birth period and identified the initial injury-related pathways that are activated. We aimed to determine if the early response genes; connective tissue growth factor (CTGF, cysteine rich-61 (CYR61 and early growth response 1 (EGR1, were rapidly induced by VILI in preterm lambs and whether ventilation with different tidal volumes caused different inflammatory cytokine and early response gene expression. Methods To identify early markers of VILI, preterm lambs (132 d gestational age; GA, term ~147 d were resuscitated with an injurious ventilation strategy (VT 20 mL/kg for 15 min then gently ventilated (5 mL/kg for 15, 30, 60 or 120 min (n = 4 in each. To determine if early response genes and inflammatory cytokines were differentially regulated by different ventilation strategies, separate groups of preterm lambs (125 d GA; n = 5 in each were ventilated from birth with a VT of 5 (VG5 or 10 mL/kg (VG10 for 135 minutes. Lung gene expression levels were compared to levels prior to ventilation in age-matched control fetuses. Results CTGF, CYR61 and EGR1 lung mRNA levels were increased ~25, 50 and 120-fold respectively (p CTGF, CYR61, EGR1, IL1-β, IL-6 and IL-8 mRNA levels compared to control levels. CTGF, CYR61, IL-6 and IL-8 expression levels were higher in VG10 than VG5 lambs; although only the IL-6 and CYR61 mRNA levels reached significance. Conclusion CTGF, CYR61 and EGR1 may be novel early markers of lung injury and mechanical ventilation from birth using relatively low tidal volumes may be less injurious than using higher tidal volumes.

  8. Pre-treatment with dexamethasone attenuates experimental ventilator-induced lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Fernando Fonseca Dos; Reboredo, Maycon de Moura; Lucinda, Leda Marília Fonseca; Bianchi, Aydra Mendes Almeida; Rabelo, Maria Aparecida Esteves; Fonseca, Lídia Maria Carneiro da; Oliveira, Júlio César Abreu de; Pinheiro, Bruno Valle

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effects that administering dexamethasone before the induction of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) has on the temporal evolution of that injury. Wistar rats were allocated to one of three groups: pre-VILI administration of dexamethasone (dexamethasone group); pre-VILI administration of saline (control group); or ventilation only (sham group). The VILI was induced by ventilation at a high tidal volume. Animals in the dexamethasone and control groups were euthanized at 0, 4, 24, and 168 h after VILI induction. We analyzed arterial blood gases, lung edema, cell counts (total and differential) in the BAL fluid, and lung histology. At 0, 4, and 24 h after VILI induction, acute lung injury (ALI) scores were higher in the control group than in the sham group (p grupos: administração de dexametasona pré-LPIVM (grupo dexametasona); administração de salina pré-LPIVM (grupo controle); e somente ventilação (grupo sham). A LPIVM foi realizada por ventilação com volume corrente alto. Os animais dos grupos dexametasona e controle foram sacrificados em 0, 4, 24 e 168 h após LPIVM. Analisamos gasometria arterial, edema pulmonar, contagens de células (totais e diferenciais) no lavado broncoalveolar e histologia de tecido pulmonar. Em 0, 4 e 24 h após LPIVM, os escores de lesão pulmonar aguda (LPA) foram maiores no grupo controle que no grupo sham (p grupo dexametasona não foi significativamente diferente daquele observado no grupo sham e foi menor que o observado no grupo controle (p grupos controle e dexametasona, com pico em 4 h após LPIVM (p grupo dexametasona que no grupo controle em 4 e 24 h após LPIVM (p grupo controle. A administração de dexametasona antes de LPIVM atenua os efeitos da lesão em ratos Wistar. Os mecanismos moleculares dessa lesão e o possível papel clínico dos corticosteroides na LPIVM ainda precisam ser elucidados.

  9. Erythroxylum pungens elicits vasorelaxation by reducing intracellular calcium concentration in vascular smooth muscle cells of rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurylene C. Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The cardiovascular effects elicited by the ethanolic extract obtained from the roots of Erythroxylum pungens O.E. Schulz, Erythroxylaceae (EEEP and the vasorelaxant effect induced by its main tropane alkaloid (pungencine were investigated. In normotensive rats, administration of EEEP (1, 10, 30 and 60 mg/kg i.v., randomly produced dose-dependent hypotension (-2±1, -7±0.5 -17.6±1, -24±1 Δ mmHg, n=5 followed by tachycardia (3±0.5, 7±2, 7.1±1, 10±5 Δ bpm, n=5. In intact phenylephrine (Phe, 10 µM-pre-contracted rings, EEEP (0.01-500 µg/mL induced concentration-dependent vasorelaxation (EC50 13.7±5.5 µg/mL, Maximal Response= 92±2.6%, and this effect was unchanged after the removal of the vascular endothelium (EC50 27.2±4.7 µg/ml, Maximal Response= 88.3±3.3 %. In KCl (80 mM-pre-contracted-endothelium-denuded rings, EEEP elicited concentration-dependent relaxation (EC50= 128.2±11.2 µg/mL, Maximal Response 76.8±3.4%. Vasorelaxation has also been achieved with tonic contractions evoked by the L-type Ca2+ channel agonist Bay K 8644 (EC50 80.2±9.1 µg/mL, Maximal Response 86.3±8.3%. In addition, in a depolarizing medium, EEEP inhibited CaCl2 (30-500 µg/mL induced contractions and caused a concentration-dependent rightward shift of the relaxation curves. Lastly, the tropane alkaloid pungencine caused vasorelaxation in mesenteric arteries resembling to the EEEP responses. These results suggests that EEEP induces hypotension and vasorelaxation, at least in part, due to the reduction in [Ca2+]i in vascular smooth muscle cells.

  10. Novel microspheres reduce the formation of deep venous thrombosis and repair the vascular wall in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Bingyang; Li, Lan; Li, Qiangqiang; Song, Xiaoxiao; Chen, Dongyang; Dai, Jin; Yao, Yao; Yan, Wenjin; Teng, Huajian; Yang, Fang; Xu, Zhihong; Jiang, Qing

    2017-07-01

    : L-Arginine (L-arg), widely known as a substrate for endogenous nitric oxide synthesis, can improve endothelial function associated with the vasculature, inhibit platelet aggregation, and alter the activity of vascular smooth muscle cells. P-selectin is a membrane component of the platelet alpha-granule and the endothelial cell-specific Wiebel-Palade body that plays a central role in mediating interactions between platelets and both leukocytes and the endothelium. The experiment was designed to evaluate the effect of novel microspheres with L-arg targeting P-selectin on the formation of deep vein thrombosis and repair of vascular wall in a rat model. Thrombosis of the inferior vena cava was induced by applying a piece of filter paper (5 mm × 10 mm) saturated with 10% FeCl3 solution for 5 min. Targeted microspheres with L-arg, targeted microspheres with water, and saline were injected into the tail veins of the rats after 30 min of applying the filter paper saturated with 10% FeCl3 solution. The dry weight and length of the thrombus isolated from the inferior vena cava were significantly decreased in the group with L-arg in microsphere after 24 h. No significant differences in prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, thrombin time, and fibrinogen among the groups were indicated. Images revealed that apoptosis in the vascular wall was less in the group injected with targeted microspheres with L-arg than in the other two groups at 1 and 8 d postsurgery. Meanwhile, cell proliferation was considerably excessive in the group injected with L-arg wrapped in targeted microspheres. Therefore, these novel microspheres could decrease the formation of thrombus in the early stages and in the subsequent periods of thrombosis. The microspheres can also enhance the vitality of impaired endothelial cells and reduce cell apoptosis.

  11. Purinergic signalling links mechanical breath profile and alveolar mechanics with the pro-inflammatory innate immune response causing ventilation-induced lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Djo; Blankman, Paul; Nieman, Gary F

    2017-09-01

    Severe pulmonary infection or vigorous cyclic deformation of the alveolar epithelial type I (AT I) cells by mechanical ventilation leads to massive extracellular ATP release. High levels of extracellular ATP saturate the ATP hydrolysis enzymes CD39 and CD73 resulting in persistent high ATP levels despite the conversion to adenosine. Above a certain level, extracellular ATP molecules act as danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) and activate the pro-inflammatory response of the innate immunity through purinergic receptors on the surface of the immune cells. This results in lung tissue inflammation, capillary leakage, interstitial and alveolar oedema and lung injury reducing the production of surfactant by the damaged AT II cells and deactivating the surfactant function by the concomitant extravasated serum proteins through capillary leakage followed by a substantial increase in alveolar surface tension and alveolar collapse. The resulting inhomogeneous ventilation of the lungs is an important mechanism in the development of ventilation-induced lung injury. The high levels of extracellular ATP and the upregulation of ecto-enzymes and soluble enzymes that hydrolyse ATP to adenosine (CD39 and CD73) increase the extracellular adenosine levels that inhibit the innate and adaptive immune responses rendering the host susceptible to infection by invading microorganisms. Moreover, high levels of extracellular adenosine increase the expression, the production and the activation of pro-fibrotic proteins (such as TGF-β, α-SMA, etc.) followed by the establishment of lung fibrosis.

  12. Mercury induces proliferation and reduces cell size in vascular smooth muscle cells through MAPK, oxidative stress and cyclooxygenase-2 pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguado, Andrea; Galán, María; Zhenyukh, Olha; Wiggers, Giulia A.; Roque, Fernanda R. [Departamento de Farmacología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Instituto de Investigación Hospital Universitario La Paz (IdiPAZ), 28029, Madrid (Spain); Redondo, Santiago [Departamento de Farmacología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Complutense, 28040, Madrid (Spain); Peçanha, Franck [Departamento de Farmacología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Instituto de Investigación Hospital Universitario La Paz (IdiPAZ), 28029, Madrid (Spain); Martín, Angela [Departamento de Bioquímica, Fisiología y Genética Molecular, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, 28922, Alcorcón (Spain); Fortuño, Ana [Área de Ciencias Cardiovasculares, Centro de Investigación Médica Aplicada, Universidad de Navarra, 31008, Pamplona (Spain); Cachofeiro, Victoria [Departamento de Fisiología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Complutense, 28040, Madrid (Spain); Tejerina, Teresa [Departamento de Farmacología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Complutense, 28040, Madrid (Spain); Salaices, Mercedes, E-mail: mercedes.salaices@uam.es [Departamento de Farmacología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Instituto de Investigación Hospital Universitario La Paz (IdiPAZ), 28029, Madrid (Spain); and others

    2013-04-15

    Mercury exposure is known to increase cardiovascular risk but the underlying cellular mechanisms remain undetermined. We analyzed whether chronic exposure to HgCl{sub 2} affects vascular structure and the functional properties of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) through oxidative stress/cyclooxygenase-2 dependent pathways. Mesenteric resistance arteries and aortas from Wistar rats treated with HgCl{sub 2} (first dose 4.6 mg kg{sup −1}, subsequent doses 0.07 mg kg{sup −1} day{sup −1}, 30 days) and cultured aortic VSMC stimulated with HgCl{sub 2} (0.05–5 μg/ml) were used. Treatment of rats with HgCl{sub 2} decreased wall thickness of the resistance and conductance vasculature, increased the number of SMC within the media and decreased SMC nucleus size. In VSMCs, exposure to HgCl{sub 2}: 1) induced a proliferative response and a reduction in cell size; 2) increased superoxide anion production, NADPH oxidase activity, gene and/or protein levels of the NADPH oxidase subunit NOX-1, the EC- and Mn-superoxide dismutases and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2); 3) induced activation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK. Both antioxidants and COX-2 inhibitors normalized the proliferative response and the altered cell size induced by HgCl{sub 2}. Blockade of ERK1/2 and p38 signaling pathways abolished the HgCl{sub 2}-induced Nox1 and COX-2 expression and normalized the alterations induced by mercury in cell proliferation and size. In conclusion, long exposure of VSMC to low doses of mercury activates MAPK signaling pathways that result in activation of inflammatory proteins such as NADPH oxidase and COX-2 that in turn induce proliferation of VSMC and changes in cell size. These findings offer further evidence that mercury might be considered an environmental risk factor for cardiovascular disease. - Highlights: ► Chronic HgCl{sub 2} exposure induces vascular remodeling. ► HgCl{sub 2} induces proliferation and decreased cell size in vascular smooth muscle cells. ► HgCl{sub 2} induces

  13. Reduced diaphyseal strength associated with high intracortical vascular porosity within long bones of children with osteogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Carolyne; Jameson, John; Smith, Peter; Harris, Gerald

    2014-09-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta is a genetic disorder resulting in bone fragility. The mechanisms behind this fragility are not well understood. In addition to characteristic bone mass deficiencies, research suggests that bone material properties are compromised in individuals with this disorder. However, little data exists regarding bone properties beyond the microstructural scale in individuals with this disorder. Specimens were obtained from long bone diaphyses of nine children with osteogenesis imperfecta during routine osteotomy procedures. Small rectangular beams, oriented longitudinally and transversely to the diaphyseal axis, were machined from these specimens and elastic modulus, yield strength, and maximum strength were measured in three-point bending. Intracortical vascular porosity, bone volume fraction, osteocyte lacuna density, and volumetric tissue mineral density were determined by synchrotron micro-computed tomography, and relationships among these mechanical properties and structural parameters were explored. Modulus and strength were on average 64-68% lower in the transverse vs. longitudinal beams (Posteogenesis imperfecta. Results confirm that these properties are anisotropic. Elevated vascular porosity was observed in most specimens, and this parameter was associated with reduced bone material strength. These results offer insight toward understanding bone fragility and the role of intracortical porosity on the strength of bone tissue in children with osteogenesis imperfecta. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Natural antioxidant ice cream acutely reduces oxidative stress and improves vascular function and physical performance in healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanguigni, Valerio; Manco, Melania; Sorge, Roberto; Gnessi, Lucio; Francomano, Davide

    2017-01-01

    The formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) contributes to the pathogenesis and progression of several diseases. Polyphenols have been shown to be beneficial against ROS. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a natural antioxidant ice cream on oxidative stress, vascular function, and physical performance. In this controlled, single-blind, crossover study, 14 healthy individuals were randomized to consume 100 g of either antioxidant ice cream containing dark cocoa powder and hazelnut and green tea extracts or milk chocolate ice cream (control ice cream). Participants were studied at baseline and 2 h after ingesting ice cream. Serum polyphenols, antioxidant status (ferric-reducing ability of plasma [FRAP]), nitric oxide (NOx) bioavailability, markers of oxidative stress (determination of reactive oxygen metabolites [d-ROMs] and hydrogen peroxide [H 2 O 2 ]), endothelium function (flow-mediated dilation [FMD] and reactive hyperemia index [RHI]), and exercise tolerance (stress test) were assessed, and the double product was measured. Serum polyphenols (P ice cream ingestion. No changes were found after control ice cream ingestion. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that a natural ice cream rich in polyphenols acutely improved vascular function and physical performance in healthy individuals through a reduction in oxidative stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Kallistatin reduces vascular senescence and aging by regulating microRNA-34a-SIRT1 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Youming; Li, Pengfei; Gao, Lin; Zhang, Jingmei; Yang, Zhirong; Bledsoe, Grant; Chang, Eugene; Chao, Lee; Chao, Julie

    2017-08-01

    Kallistatin, an endogenous protein, protects against vascular injury by inhibiting oxidative stress and inflammation in hypertensive rats and enhancing the mobility and function of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). We aimed to determine the role and mechanism of kallistatin in vascular senescence and aging using cultured EPCs, streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice, and Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). Human kallistatin significantly decreased TNF-α-induced cellular senescence in EPCs, as indicated by reduced senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 expression, and elevated telomerase activity. Kallistatin blocked TNF-α-induced superoxide levels, NADPH oxidase activity, and microRNA-21 (miR-21) and p16 INK 4a synthesis. Kallistatin prevented TNF-α-mediated inhibition of SIRT1, eNOS, and catalase, and directly stimulated the expression of these antioxidant enzymes. Moreover, kallistatin inhibited miR-34a synthesis, whereas miR-34a overexpression abolished kallistatin-induced antioxidant gene expression and antisenescence activity. Kallistatin via its active site inhibited miR-34a, and stimulated SIRT1 and eNOS synthesis in EPCs, which was abolished by genistein, indicating an event mediated by tyrosine kinase. Moreover, kallistatin administration attenuated STZ-induced aortic senescence, oxidative stress, and miR-34a and miR-21 synthesis, and increased SIRT1, eNOS, and catalase levels in diabetic mice. Furthermore, kallistatin treatment reduced superoxide formation and prolonged wild-type C. elegans lifespan under oxidative or heat stress, although kallistatin's protective effect was abolished in miR-34 or sir-2.1 (SIRT1 homolog) mutant C. elegans. Kallistatin inhibited miR-34, but stimulated sir-2.1 and sod-3 synthesis in C. elegans. These in vitro and in vivo studies provide significant insights into the role and mechanism of kallistatin in vascular senescence and aging by regulating miR-34a-SIRT1

  16. Vascular stents: Coupling full 3-D with reduced-order structural models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avdeev, I; Shams, M

    2010-01-01

    Self-expanding nitinol stents are used to treat peripheral arterial disease. The peripheral arteries are subjected to a combination of mechanical forces such as compression, torsion, bending, and contraction. Most commercially available peripheral self-expanding stents are composed of a series of sub-millimeter V-shaped struts, which are laser-cut from a nitinol tube and surface-treated for better fatigue performance. The numerical stent models must accurately predict location and distribution of local stresses and strains caused by large arterial deformations. Full 3-D finite element non-linear analysis of an entire stent is computationally expensive to the point of being prohibitive, especially for longer stents. Reduced-order models based on beam or shell elements are fairly accurate in capturing global deformations, but are not very helpful in predicting stent failure. We propose a mixed approach that combines the full 3-D model and reduced-order models. Several global-local, full 3-D/reduced-order finite element models of a peripheral self-expanding stent were validated and compared with experimental data. The kinematic constraint method used to couple various elements together was found to be very efficient and easily applicable to commercial FEA codes. The proposed mixed models can be used to accurately predict stent failure based on realistic (patient-specific), non-linear kinematic behavior of peripheral arteries.

  17. Reduced cerebral oxygen–carbohydrate index during endotracheal intubation in vascular surgical patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius-Bjerre, Andreas; Overgaard, Anders; Winther-Olesen, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Brain activation reduces balance between cerebral consumption of oxygen versus carbohydrate as expressed by the so-called cerebral oxygen-carbohydrate-index (OCI). We evaluated whether preparation for surgery, anaesthesia including tracheal intubation and surgery affect OCI. In patients undergoing...... aortic surgery, arterial to internal jugular venous (a-v) concentration differences for oxygen versus lactate and glucose were determined from before anaesthesia to when the patient left the recovery room. Intravenous anaesthesia was supplemented with thoracic epidural anaesthesia for open aortic surgery...

  18. An anaesthetic pre-operative assessment clinic reduces pre-operative inpatient stay in patients requiring major vascular surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, D B

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients undergoing major vascular surgery (MVS) require extensive anaesthetic assessment. This can require extended pre-operative stays. AIMS: We investigated whether a newly established anaesthetic pre-operative assessment clinic (PAC) would reduce the pre-operative inpatient stay, avoid unnecessary investigations and facilitate day before surgery (DBS) admissions for patients undergoing MVS. PATIENT AND METHODS: One year following and preceding the establishment of the PAC the records of patients undergoing open or endovascular aortic aneurysm repair, carotid endarterectomy and infra-inguinal bypass were reviewed to measure pre-operative length of stay (LoS). RESULTS: Pre-operative LoS was significantly reduced in the study period (1.85 vs. 4.2 days, respectively, P < 0.0001). Only 12 out of 61 patients in 2007 were admitted on the DBS and this increased to 33 out of 63 patients (P = 0.0002). No procedure was cancelled for medical reasons. CONCLUSION: The PAC has facilitated accurate outpatient anaesthetic assessment for patients requiring MVS. The pre-operative in-patient stay has been significantly reduced.

  19. Subconjunctival Delivery of p75NTR Antagonists Reduces the Inflammatory, Vascular, and Neurodegenerative Pathologies of Diabetic Retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galan, Alba; Barcelona, Pablo F; Nedev, Hinyu; Sarunic, Marinko V; Jian, Yifan; Saragovi, H Uri

    2017-06-01

    The p75NTR is a novel therapeutic target validated in a streptozotocin mouse model of diabetic retinopathy. Intravitreal (IVT) injection of small molecule p75NTR antagonist THX-B was therapeutic and resolved the inflammatory, vascular, and neurodegenerative phases of the retinal pathology. To simplify clinical translation, we sought a superior drug delivery method that circumvents risks associated with IVT injections. We compared the pharmacokinetics of a single 40 μg subconjunctival (SCJ) depot to the reported effective 5 μg IVT injections of THX-B. We quantified therapeutic efficacy, with endpoints of inflammation, edema, and neuronal death. The subconjunctival depot affords retinal exposure equal to IVT injection, without resulting in detectable drug in circulation. At week 2 of diabetic retinopathy, the SCJ depot provided therapeutic efficacy similar to IVT injections, with reduced inflammation, reduced edema, reduced neuronal death, and a long-lasting protection of the retinal structure. Subconjunctival injections are a safe and effective route for retinal delivery of p75NTR antagonists. The subconjunctival route offers an advantageous, less-invasive, more compliant, and nonsystemic method to deliver p75NTR antagonists for the treatment of retinal diseases.

  20. Plasma-derived human C1-esterase inhibitor does not prevent mechanical ventilation-induced pulmonary complement activation in a rat model of Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Beer, F. M.; Aslami, H.; Hoeksma, J.; van Mierlo, G.; Wouters, D.; Zeerleder, S.; Roelofs, J. J. T. H.; Juffermans, N. P.; Schultz, M. J.; Lagrand, W. K.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation has the potential to cause lung injury, and the role of complement activation herein is uncertain. We hypothesized that inhibition of the complement cascade by administration of plasma-derived human C1-esterase inhibitor (C1-INH) prevents ventilation-induced pulmonary

  1. Resveratrol Increases Serum BDNF Concentrations and Reduces Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Contractility via a NOS-3-Independent Mechanism

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    Michał Wiciński

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Resveratrol is a polyphenol that presents both antineuroinflammatory properties and the ability to interact with NOS-3, what contributes to vasorelaxation. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BNDF, a molecule associated with neuroprotection in many neurodegenerative disorders, is considered as an important element of maintaining stable cerebral blood flow. Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs are considered to be an important element in the pathogenesis of neurodegeneration and a potential preventative target by agents which reduce the contractility of the vessels. Our main objectives were to define the relationship between serum and long-term oral resveratrol administration in the rat model, as well as to assess the effect of resveratrol on phenylephrine- (PHE- induced contraction of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs. Moreover, we attempt to define the dependence of contraction mechanisms on endothelial NO synthase. Experiments were performed on Wistar rats (n=17 pretreated with resveratrol (4 weeks; 10 mg/kg p.o. or placebo. Serum BDNF levels were quantified after 2 and 4 weeks of treatment with ELISA. Contraction force was measured on isolated and perfused tail arteries as the increase of perfusion pressure with a constant flow. Values of serum BNDF in week 0 were 1.18±0.12 ng/mL (treated and 1.17±0.13 ng/mL (control (p = ns. After 2 weeks of treatment, BDNF in the treatment group was higher than in controls, 1.52±0.23 ng/mL and 1.24±0.13 ng/mL, respectively. (p=0.02 Following 4 weeks of treatment, BDNF values were higher in the resveratrol group compared to control 1.64±0.31 ng/mL and 1.32±0.26 ng/mL, respectively (p=0.031. EC50 values obtained for PHE in resveratrol pretreated arteries were significantly higher than controls (5.33±1.7 × 10−7 M/L versus 4.53±1.2 × 10−8 M/L, p<0.05. These results show a significant increase in BDNF concentration in the resveratrol pretreated group. The reactivity of resistant

  2. Activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway by mechanical ventilation is associated with ventilator-induced pulmonary fibrosis in healthy lungs.

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    Jesús Villar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mechanical ventilation (MV with high tidal volumes (V(T can cause or aggravate lung damage, so-called ventilator induced lung injury (VILI. The relationship between specific mechanical events in the lung and the cellular responses that result in VILI remains incomplete. Since activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling has been suggested to be central to mechanisms of lung healing and fibrosis, we hypothesized that the Wnt/β-catenin signaling plays a role during VILI. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Prospective, randomized, controlled animal study using adult, healthy, male Sprague-Dawley rats. Animals (n = 6/group were randomized to spontaneous breathing or two strategies of MV for 4 hours: low tidal volume (V(T (6 mL/kg or high V(T (20 mL/kg. Histological evaluation of lung tissue, measurements of WNT5A, total β-catenin, non-phospho (Ser33/37/Thr41 β-catenin, matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP-7, cyclin D1, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, and axis inhibition protein 2 (AXIN2 protein levels by Western blot, and WNT5A, non-phospho (Ser33/37/Thr41 β-catenin, MMP-7, and AXIN2 immunohistochemical localization in the lungs were analyzed. High-V(T MV caused lung inflammation and perivascular edema with cellular infiltrates and collagen deposition. Protein levels of WNT5A, non-phospho (Ser33/37/Thr41 β-catenin, MMP-7, cyclin D1, VEGF, and AXIN2 in the lungs were increased in all ventilated animals although high-V(T MV was associated with significantly higher levels of WNT5A, non-phospho (Ser33/37/Thr41 β-catenin, MMP-7, cyclin D1, VEGF, and AXIN2 levels. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings demonstrate that the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is modulated very early by MV in lungs without preexistent lung disease, suggesting that activation of this pathway could play an important role in both VILI and lung repair. Modulation of this pathway might represent a therapeutic option for prevention and/or management of VILI.

  3. The role of high airway pressure and dynamic strain on ventilator-induced lung injury in a heterogeneous acute lung injury model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Sumeet V; Kollisch-Singule, Michaela; Satalin, Joshua; Searles, Quinn; Dombert, Luke; Abdel-Razek, Osama; Yepuri, Natesh; Leonard, Antony; Gruessner, Angelika; Andrews, Penny; Fazal, Fabeha; Meng, Qinghe; Wang, Guirong; Gatto, Louis A; Habashi, Nader M; Nieman, Gary F

    2017-12-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome causes a heterogeneous lung injury with normal and acutely injured lung tissue in the same lung. Improperly adjusted mechanical ventilation can exacerbate ARDS causing a secondary ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). We hypothesized that a peak airway pressure of 40 cmH 2 O (static strain) alone would not cause additional injury in either the normal or acutely injured lung tissue unless combined with high tidal volume (dynamic strain). Pigs were anesthetized, and heterogeneous acute lung injury (ALI) was created by Tween instillation via a bronchoscope to both diaphragmatic lung lobes. Tissue in all other lobes was normal. Airway pressure release ventilation was used to precisely regulate time and pressure at both inspiration and expiration. Animals were separated into two groups: (1) over-distension + high dynamic strain (OD + H DS , n = 6) and (2) over-distension + low dynamic strain (OD + L DS , n = 6). OD was caused by setting the inspiratory pressure at 40 cmH 2 O and dynamic strain was modified by changing the expiratory duration, which varied the tidal volume. Animals were ventilated for 6 h recording hemodynamics, lung function, and inflammatory mediators followed by an extensive necropsy. In normal tissue (N T ), OD + L DS caused minimal histologic damage and a significant reduction in BALF total protein (p < 0.05) and MMP-9 activity (p < 0.05), as compared with OD + H DS . In acutely injured tissue (ALI T ), OD + L DS resulted in reduced histologic injury and pulmonary edema (p < 0.05), as compared with OD + H DS . Both N T and ALI T are resistant to VILI caused by OD alone, but when combined with a H DS , significant tissue injury develops.

  4. Reducing the data: Analysis of the role of vascular geometry on blood flow patterns in curved vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alastruey, Jordi; Siggers, Jennifer H.; Peiffer, Véronique; Doorly, Denis J.; Sherwin, Spencer J.

    2012-03-01

    Three-dimensional simulations of blood flow usually produce such large quantities of data that they are unlikely to be of clinical use unless methods are available to simplify our understanding of the flow dynamics. We present a new method to investigate the mechanisms by which vascular curvature and torsion affect blood flow, and we apply it to the steady-state flow in single bends, helices, double bends, and a rabbit thoracic aorta based on image data. By calculating forces and accelerations in an orthogonal coordinate system following the centreline of each vessel, we obtain the inertial forces (centrifugal, Coriolis, and torsional) explicitly, which directly depend on vascular curvature and torsion. We then analyse the individual roles of the inertial, pressure gradient, and viscous forces on the patterns of primary and secondary velocities, vortical structures, and wall stresses in each cross section. We also consider cross-sectional averages of the in-plane components of these forces, which can be thought of as reducing the dynamics of secondary flows onto the vessel centreline. At Reynolds numbers between 50 and 500, secondary motions in the directions of the local normals and binormals behave as two underdamped oscillators. These oscillate around the fully developed state and are coupled by torsional forces that break the symmetry of the flow. Secondary flows are driven by the centrifugal and torsional forces, and these are counterbalanced by the in-plane pressure gradients generated by the wall reaction. The viscous force primarily opposes the pressure gradient, rather than the inertial forces. In the axial direction, and depending on the secondary motion, the curvature-dependent Coriolis force can either enhance or oppose the bulk of the axial flow, and this shapes the velocity profile. For bends with little or no torsion, the Coriolis force tends to restore flow axisymmetry. The maximum circumferential and axial wall shear stresses along the centreline

  5. Radiation brain dose to vascular surgeons during fluoroscopically guided interventions is not effectively reduced by wearing lead equivalent surgical caps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkwood, Melissa L; Arbique, Gary M; Guild, Jeffrey B; Zeng, Katie; Xi, Yin; Rectenwald, John; Anderson, Jon A; Timaran, Carlos

    2018-03-12

    Radiation to the interventionalist's brain during fluoroscopically guided interventions (FGIs) may increase the incidence of cerebral neoplasms. Lead equivalent surgical caps claim to reduce radiation brain doses by 50% to 95%. We sought to determine the efficacy of the RADPAD (Worldwide Innovations & Technologies, Lenexa, Kan) No Brainer surgical cap (0.06 mm lead equivalent at 90 kVp) in reducing radiation dose to the surgeon's and trainee's head during FGIs and to a phantom to determine relative brain dose reductions. Optically stimulated, luminescent nanoDot detectors (Landauer, Glenwood, Ill) inside and outside of the cap at the left temporal position were used to measure cap attenuation during FGIs. To check relative brain doses, nanoDot detectors were placed in 15 positions within an anthropomorphic head phantom (ATOM model 701; CIRS, Norfolk, Va). The phantom was positioned to represent a primary operator performing femoral access. Fluorography was performed on a plastic scatter phantom at 80 kVp for an exposure of 5 Gy reference air kerma with or without the hat. For each brain location, the percentage dose reduction with the hat was calculated. Means and standard errors were calculated using a pooled linear mixed model with repeated measurements. Anatomically similar locations were combined into five groups: upper brain, upper skull, midbrain, eyes, and left temporal position. This was a prospective, single-center study that included 29 endovascular aortic aneurysm procedures. The average procedure reference air kerma was 2.6 Gy. The hat attenuation at the temporal position for the attending physician and fellow was 60% ± 20% and 33% ± 36%, respectively. The equivalent phantom measurements demonstrated an attenuation of 71% ± 2.0% (P < .0001). In the interior phantom locations, attenuation was statistically significant for the skull (6% ± 1.4%) and upper brain (7.2% ± 1.0%; P < .0001) but not for the middle brain (1.4% ± 1.0%; P = .15

  6. Increased Circulating Endothelial Microparticles Associated with PAK4 Play a Key Role in Ventilation-Induced Lung Injury Process

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    Shuming Pan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Inappropriate mechanical ventilation (MV can result in ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI. Probing mechanisms of VILI and searching for effective methods are current areas of research focus on VILI. The present study aimed to probe into mechanisms of endothelial microparticles (EMPs in VILI and the protective effects of Tetramethylpyrazine (TMP against VILI. In this study, C57BL/6 and TLR4KO mouse MV models were used to explore the function of EMPs associated with p21 activated kinases-4 (PAK-4 in VILI. Both the C57BL/6 and TLR4 KO groups were subdivided into a mechanical ventilation (MV group, a TMP + MV group, and a control group. After four hours of high tidal volume (20 ml/kg MV, the degree of lung injury and the protective effects of TMP were assessed. VILI inhibited the cytoskeleton-regulating protein of PAK4 and was accompanied by an increased circulating EMP level. The intercellular junction protein of β-catenin was also decreased accompanied by a thickening alveolar wall, increased lung W/D values, and neutrophil infiltration. TMP alleviated VILI via decreasing circulating EMPs, stabilizing intercellular junctions, and alleviating neutrophil infiltration.

  7. Effect of lung-protective ventilation-induced respiratory acidosis on the duration of neuromuscular blockade by rocuronium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Shinya; Ono, Kazumi; Hidaka, Hidekuni; Koyama, Yusuke

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate whether lung-protective ventilation-induced respiratory acidosis increased the duration of neuromuscular blockade by rocuronium. A total of 72 patients were enrolled. After the induction of general anesthesia, rocuronium 0.6 mg/kg real body weight was administered. Tidal volume and positive end-expiratory pressure were randomly assigned as either 10 ml/kg predicted body weight and 0 cmH 2 O (group S) or 6 ml/kg and 5 cmH 2 O (group L), respectively. Respiratory rate was started at 10/min. Neuromuscular blockade was monitored by acceleromyography at the adductor pollicis with train-of-four stimulation. The time from the initial bolus injection of rocuronium to first recovery of the first twitch was defined as DUR1. Immediately, rocuronium 0.15 mg/kg was administered. The time from first recovery of the first twitch to second recovery of the first twitch was defined as DUR2. We also measured arterial pH (pH1 and pH2, respectively). Data from 66 patients (33 each in groups L and S) were eventually available. pH1 and pH2 were significantly lower in group L compared with group S [pH1: 7.308 (7.288-7.334) vs. 7.439 (7.423-7.466); p respiratory acidosis increased the duration of neuromuscular blockade by rocuronium.

  8. Prolonged mechanical ventilation induces cell cycle arrest in newborn rat lung.

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    Andreas A Kroon

    Full Text Available RATIONALE: The molecular mechanism(s by which mechanical ventilation disrupts alveolar development, a hallmark of bronchopulmonary dysplasia, is unknown. OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of 24 h of mechanical ventilation on lung cell cycle regulators, cell proliferation and alveolar formation in newborn rats. METHODS: Seven-day old rats were ventilated with room air for 8, 12 and 24 h using relatively moderate tidal volumes (8.5 mL.kg⁻¹. MEASUREMENT AND MAIN RESULTS: Ventilation for 24 h (h decreased the number of elastin-positive secondary crests and increased the mean linear intercept, indicating arrest of alveolar development. Proliferation (assessed by BrdU incorporation was halved after 12 h of ventilation and completely arrested after 24 h. Cyclin D1 and E1 mRNA and protein levels were decreased after 8-24 h of ventilation, while that of p27(Kip1 was significantly increased. Mechanical ventilation for 24 h also increased levels of p57(Kip2, decreased that of p16(INK4a, while the levels of p21(Waf/Cip1 and p15(INK4b were unchanged. Increased p27(Kip1 expression coincided with reduced phosphorylation of p27(Kip1 at Thr¹⁵⁷, Thr¹⁸⁷ and Thr¹⁹⁸ (p<0.05, thereby promoting its nuclear localization. Similar -but more rapid- changes in cell cycle regulators were noted when 7-day rats were ventilated with high tidal volume (40 mL.kg⁻¹ and when fetal lung epithelial cells were subjected to a continuous (17% elongation cyclic stretch. CONCLUSION: This is the first demonstration that prolonged (24 h of mechanical ventilation causes cell cycle arrest in newborn rat lungs; the arrest occurs in G₁ and is caused by increased expression and nuclear localization of Cdk inhibitor proteins (p27(Kip1, p57(Kip2 from the Kip family.

  9. Overexpression of Mitofusin 2 inhibited oxidized low-density lipoprotein induced vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and reduced atherosclerotic lesion formation in rabbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Yanhong; Chen Kuanghueih; Gao Wei; Li Qian; Chen Li; Wang Guisong; Tang Jian

    2007-01-01

    Our previous studies have implies that Mitofusin 2 (Mfn2), which was progressively reduced in arteries from ApoE -/- mice during the development of atherosclerosis, may take part in pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In this study, we found that overexpression of Mfn2 inhibited oxidized low-density lipoprotein or serum induced vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation by down-regulation of Akt and ERK phosphorylation. Then we investigated the in vivo role of Mfn2 on the development of atherosclerosis in rabbits using adenovirus expressing Mitofusin 2 gene (AdMfn2). By morphometric analysis we found overexpression of Mfn2 inhibited atherosclerotic lesion formation and intima/media ratio by 66.7% and 74.6%, respectively, compared with control group. These results suggest that local Mfn2 treatment suppresses the development of atherosclerosis in vivo in part by attenuating the smooth muscle cell proliferation induced by lipid deposition and vascular injury

  10. Rice bran protein hydrolysates reduce arterial stiffening, vascular remodeling and oxidative stress in rats fed a high-carbohydrate and high-fat diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senaphan, Ketmanee; Sangartit, Weerapon; Pakdeechote, Poungrat; Kukongviriyapan, Veerapol; Pannangpetch, Patchareewan; Thawornchinsombut, Supawan; Greenwald, Stephen E; Kukongviriyapan, Upa

    2018-02-01

    Rice bran protein hydrolysates (RBPH) contain highly nutritional proteins and antioxidant compounds which show benefits against metabolic syndrome (MetS). Increased arterial stiffness and the components of MetS have been shown to be associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. This study aimed to investigate whether RBPH could alleviate the metabolic disorders, arterial stiffening, vascular remodeling, and oxidative stress in rats fed a high-carbohydrate and high-fat (HCHF) diet. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed either a standard chow and tap water or a HCHF diet and 15 % fructose solution for 16 weeks. HCHF rats were treated orally with RBPH (250 or 500 mg/kg/day) for the final 6 weeks of the experimental period. Rats fed with HCHF diet had hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, hypertension, increased aortic pulse wave velocity, aortic wall hypertrophy and vascular remodeling with increased MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression. RBPH supplementation significantly alleviated these alterations (P stress was also alleviated after RBPH treatment by decreasing plasma malondialdehyde, reducing superoxide production and suppressing p47 phox NADPH oxidase expression in the vascular tissues of HCHF rats. RBPH increased plasma nitrate/nitrite level and up-regulated eNOS expression in the aortas of HCHF-diet-fed rats, indicating that RBPH increased NO production. RBPH mitigate the deleterious effects of HCHF through potential mechanisms involving enhanced NO bioavailability, anti-ACE, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. RBPH could be used as dietary supplements to minimize oxidative stress and vascular alterations triggered by MetS.

  11. Dose-reduced 16-slice multidetector-row spiral computed tomography in children with bronchoscopically suspected vascular tracheal stenosis - initial results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honnef, D.; Wildberger, J.E.; Das, M.; Hohl, C.; Mahnken, A.; Guenther, R.W.; Staatz, G.; Schnoering, H.; Vazquez-Jimenez, J.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of contrast-enhanced dose-reduced 16-slice multidetector-row CT (MDCT) in newborns and infants with fiberoptic bronchoscopically suspected vascular-induced tracheal stenosis. Materials and Methods: 12 children (4 days to 3 years, 1.2-13.5 kg body weight) were examined using i.v. contrast-enhanced 16-slice MDCT (SOMATOM Sensation 16, Forchheim, Germany) without breath-hold and under sedation (11/12). All MDCTs were performed with a dose reduction. The beam collimation was 16 x 0.75 mm, except in the case of one child. MPRs along the tracheal axis in the x-, y- and z-directions and volume-rendering-reconstructions (VRTs) were calculated based on a secondary raw data set in addition to conventional axial slices. 2 radiologists used a three-point grade scale to evaluate the image quality, motion, and contrast media artifacts as well as the usefulness of the 2D- and 3D-reconstructions for determining the diagnosis. Statistical analysis was performed on the basis of a Kappa test. Results: In all cases the cause of the fiberoptic bronchoscopically suspected tracheal stenosis was revealed: compression due to the brachiocephalic trunk (n=7), double aortic arch (n=2), lusorian artery (n=1), vascular compression of the left main bronchus (n=2). In 3 patients further thoracic anomalies, such as tracheobronchial (n=2), and vascular (n=2) and vertebral (n=1) anomalies were found. The attenuation in the anomalous vessels was 307±140 HU. The image noise was 9.8±1.9 HU. The mean dose reduction was 82.7±3.2% compared to a standard adult thoracic CT. All examinations were rated as diagnostically good (median 1, range 1, k=1). 3D images did not show any stair artifacts (median 2, range 1-2, k=1). The image noise was minor to moderate and hardly any motion artifacts were seen (median 1, range 1-2, k=0.8). Contrast media artifacts were rated zero to minor (median 1.5, range 1-2, k=0.676). MPRs (median 1, range 1, k=1) and VRTs (median 1

  12. Physical Activity: A Viable Way to Reduce the Risks of Mild Cognitive Impairment, Alzheimer’s Disease, and Vascular Dementia in Older Adults

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    Patrick J. Gallaway

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A recent alarming rise of neurodegenerative diseases in the developed world is one of the major medical issues affecting older adults. In this review, we provide information about the associations of physical activity (PA with major age-related neurodegenerative diseases and syndromes, including Alzheimer’s disease, vascular dementia, and mild cognitive impairment. We also provide evidence of PA’s role in reducing the risks of these diseases and helping to improve cognitive outcomes in older adults. Finally, we describe some potential mechanisms by which this protective effect occurs, providing guidelines for future research.

  13. Impact of Different Tidal Volume Levels at Low Mechanical Power on Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury in Rats

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    Lillian Moraes

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Tidal volume (VT has been considered the main determinant of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI. Recently, experimental studies have suggested that mechanical power transferred from the ventilator to the lungs is the promoter of VILI. We hypothesized that, as long as mechanical power is kept below a safe threshold, high VT should not be injurious. The present study aimed to investigate the impact of different VT levels and respiratory rates (RR on lung function, diffuse alveolar damage (DAD, alveolar ultrastructure, and expression of genes related to inflammation [interleukin (IL-6], alveolar stretch (amphiregulin, epithelial [club cell secretory protein (CC16] and endothelial [intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1] cell injury, and extracellular matrix damage [syndecan-1, decorin, and metalloproteinase (MMP-9] in experimental acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS under low-power mechanical ventilation. Twenty-eight Wistar rats received Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide intratracheally. After 24 h, 21 animals were randomly assigned to ventilation (2 h with low mechanical power at three different VT levels (n = 7/group: (1 VT = 6 mL/kg and RR adjusted to normocapnia; (2 VT = 13 mL/kg; and 3 VT = 22 mL/kg. In the second and third groups, RR was adjusted to yield low mechanical power comparable to that of the first group. Mechanical power was calculated as [(ΔP,L2/Est,L/2]× RR (ΔP,L = transpulmonary driving pressure, Est,L = static lung elastance. Seven rats were not mechanically ventilated (NV and were used for molecular biology analysis. Mechanical power was comparable among groups, while VT gradually increased. ΔP,L and mechanical energy were higher in VT = 22 mL/kg than VT = 6 mL/kg and VT = 13 mL/kg (p < 0.001 for both. Accordingly, DAD score increased in VT = 22 mL/kg compared to VT = 6 mL/kg and VT = 13 mL/kg [23(18.5–24.75 vs. 16(12–17.75 and 16(13.25–18, p < 0.05, respectively]. VT = 22 mL/kg was associated with higher

  14. Reducing atelectasis attenuates bacterial growth and translocation in experimental pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kaam, Anton H.; Lachmann, Robert A.; Herting, Egbert; de Jaegere, Anne; van Iwaarden, Freek; Noorduyn, L. Arnold; Kok, Joke H.; Haitsma, Jack J.; Lachmann, Burkhard

    2004-01-01

    Besides being one of the mechanisms responsible for ventilator-induced lung injury, atelectasis also seems to aggravate the course of experimental pneumonia. In this study, we examined the effect of reducing the degree of atelectasis by natural modified surfactant and/or open lung ventilation on

  15. Common Phenolic Metabolites of Flavonoids, but Not Their Unmetabolized Precursors, Reduce the Secretion of Vascular Cellular Adhesion Molecules by Human Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Emily F; Zhang, Qingzhi; Raheem, K Saki; O'Hagan, David; O'Connell, Maria A; Kay, Colin D

    2016-03-01

    Flavonoids have been implicated in the prevention of cardiovascular disease; however, their mechanisms of action have yet to be elucidated, possibly because most previous in vitro studies have used supraphysiological concentrations of unmetabolized flavonoids, overlooking their more bioavailable phenolic metabolites. We aimed to explore the effects of phenolic metabolites and their precursor flavonoids at physiologically achievable concentrations, in isolation and combination, on soluble vascular cellular adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1). Fourteen phenolic acid metabolites and 6 flavonoids were screened at 1 μM for their relative effects on sVCAM-1 secretion by human umbilical vein endothelial cells stimulated with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). The active metabolites were further studied for their response at different concentrations (0.01 μM-100 μM), structure-activity relationships, and effect on vascular cellular adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 mRNA expression. In addition, the additive activity of the metabolites and flavonoids was investigated by screening 25 unique mixtures at cumulative equimolar concentrations of 1 μM. Of the 20 compounds screened at 1 μM, inhibition of sVCAM-1 secretion was elicited by 4 phenolic metabolites, of which protocatechuic acid (PCA) was the most active (-17.2%, P = 0.05). Investigations into their responses at different concentrations showed that PCA significantly reduced sVCAM-1 15.2-36.5% between 1 and 100 μM, protocatechuic acid-3-sulfate and isovanillic acid reduced sVCAM-1 levels 12.2-54.7% between 10 and 100 μM, and protocatechuic acid-4-sulfate and isovanillic acid-3-glucuronide reduced sVCAM-1 secretion 27.6% and 42.8%, respectively, only at 100 μM. PCA demonstrated the strongest protein response and was therefore explored for its effect on VCAM-1 mRNA, where 78.4% inhibition was observed only after treatment with 100 μM PCA. Mixtures of the metabolites showed no activity toward sVCAM-1, suggesting no additive

  16. Reduced glomerular filtration rate and its association with clinical outcome in older patients at risk of vascular events: secondary analysis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ford, Ian

    2009-01-20

    Reduced glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is associated with increased cardiovascular risk in young and middle aged individuals. Associations with cardiovascular disease and mortality in older people are less clearly established. We aimed to determine the predictive value of the GFR for mortality and morbidity using data from the 5,804 participants randomized in the Prospective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk (PROSPER).

  17. The Role of High-Density Lipoproteins in Reducing the Risk of Vascular Diseases, Neurogenerative Disorders, and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donovan McGrowder

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available High-density lipoprotein (HDL is one of the major carriers of cholesterol in the blood. It attracts particular attention because, in contrast with other lipoproteins, as many physiological functions of HDL influence the cardiovascular system in favourable ways unless HDL is modified pathologically. The functions of HDL that have recently attracted attention include anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant activities. High anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of HDL are associated with protection from cardiovascular disease. Atheroprotective activities, as well as a functional deficiency of HDL, ultimately depend on the protein and lipid composition of HDL. Further, numerous epidemiological studies have shown a protective association between HDL-cholesterol and cognitive impairment. Oxidative stress, including lipid peroxidation, has been shown to be the mediator of the pathologic effects of numerous risk factors of Alzheimer's disease. Lifestyle interventions proven to increase HDL- cholesterol levels including “healthy” diet, regular exercise, weight control, and smoking cessation have also been shown to provide neuro-protective effects. This review will focus on current knowledge of the beneficial effects of HDL-cholesterol as it relates to cardiovascular diseases, breast and lung cancers, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, as well as its neuroprotective potential in reducing the risk of Alzheimer's disease and dementia.

  18. Pioglitazone treatment reduces adipose tissue inflammation through reduction of mast cell and macrophage number and by improving vascularity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Spencer

    Full Text Available Adipose tissue in insulin resistant subjects contains inflammatory cells and extracellular matrix components. This study examined adipose pathology of insulin resistant subjects who were treated with pioglitazone or fish oil.Adipose biopsies were examined from nine insulin resistant subjects before/after treatment with pioglitazone 45 mg/day for 12 weeks and also from 19 subjects who were treated with fish oil (1,860 mg EPA, 1,500 mg DHA daily. These studies were performed in a clinical research center setting.Pioglitazone treatment increased the cross-sectional area of adipocytes by 18% (p = 0.01, and also increased capillary density without affecting larger vessels. Pioglitazone treatment decreased total adipose macrophage number by 26%, with a 56% decrease in M1 macrophages and an increase in M2 macrophages. Mast cells were more abundant in obese versus lean subjects, and were decreased from 24 to 13 cells/mm(2 (p = 0.02 in patients treated with pioglitazone, but not in subjects treated with FO. Although there were no changes in total collagen protein, pioglitazone increased the amount of elastin protein in adipose by 6-fold.The PPARγ agonist pioglitazone increased adipocyte size yet improved other features of adipose, increasing capillary number and reducing mast cells and inflammatory macrophages. The increase in elastin may better permit adipocyte expansion without triggering cell necrosis and an inflammatory reaction.

  19. Safety and effectiveness of a polyvinyl alcohol barrier in reducing risks of vascular tissue damage during anterior spinal revision surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffords, Paul; Li, Jinsheng; Panchal, Deepal; Denoziere, Guilhem; Fetterolf, Donald

    2012-05-01

    This study was conducted as a controlled, prospective investigation to show the safety and efficacy of a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) device in a sheep model. To evaluate the ability of a permanent PVA hydrogel barrier to reduce the risk of potential vessel damage during anterior vertebral revision surgery, to provide a nonadhesive barrier at the surgical site, and to create a surgical revision plane of dissection. The development of scar tissue and adhesions presents a significant postoperative problem in spine surgery, where adhesion involvement of overlying structures can cause pain, neurovascular complications, and present a difficult surgical environment during revisions. The devices were implanted onto the ventral surface of exposed lumbar intervertebral discs using an anterolateral approach. One disc separated from the study site was also exposed to serve as a control. Three sheep each were then evaluated with an explant procedure at 30 and 90 days. Extensive sampling was undertaken to evaluate gross anatomic, micropathologic, and biochemical environments and properties of the device. The structural properties and appearance of the device remained intact at both 30 and 90 days. The material remained flexible, hydrophilic, and soft, without visible resorption or decomposition. The material was well tolerated by the animal, with minimal histologic signs of inflammation or rejection. Tissue planes were easily able to be localized by the surgeon attempting to locate the prior surgical site at the time of resection. The PVA vessel shield effectively protected the structures overlying the sheep spine during revision, providing a clear dissection plane for resection at repeat surgery. The overlying structures separated from the previous surgical site with no adhesion, and allowed safe separation of adjacent tissues without the use of sharp dissection.

  20. Silencing of osteopontin promotes the radiosensitivity of breast cancer cells by reducing the expression of hypoxia inducible factor 1 and vascular endothelial growth factor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Li; ZHAO Wei; ZUO Wen-shu; WEI Ling; SONG Xian-rang; WANG Xing-wu; ZHENG Gang; ZHENG Mei-zhu

    2012-01-01

    Background Osteopontin (OPN) is a secreted phosphoglycoprotein (SSP) that is overexpressed in a variety of tumors and was regarded as a molecular marker of tumors.In this study,we intended to demonstrate the role of OPN in human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231.Methods Recombinant plasmid expressing small interfering RNA (siRNA) specific to OPN mRNA was transfected into MDA-MB-231 cells to generate the stable transfected cell line MDA-MB-343,and the empty plasmid tansfected cells (MDA-MB-neg) or wildtype MDA-MB-231 cells were used as control cells respectively.Expression of OPN,hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) proteins was analyzed by Western blotting analysis.The radiosensitivity of cells was determined by detecting cell apoptosis,cell proliferation and cell senescence.Results HIF-1 and VEGF proteins in MDA-MB-343 cells were significantly downregulated upon the efficient knockdown of OPN expression under either hypoxia or normoxia environment.Moreover,expression of OPN protein was upregualted upon hypoxic culture.Stable OPN-silencing also decreased cell invasion,increased cell apoptosis and cell senescence,as well as reduced clonogenic survival,resulting in increase radiation tolerance.Conclusions Suppression of OPN gene expression can enhance radiosensitivity and affect cell apoptosis in breast cancer cells.OPN seems to be an attractive target for the improvement of radiotherapy.

  1. Oxalomalate reduces expression and secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor in the retinal pigment epithelium and inhibits angiogenesis: Implications for age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Hwan Kim

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Clinical and experimental observations indicate a critical role for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, secreted by the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE, in pathological angiogenesis and the development of choroidal neovascularization (CNV in age-related macular degeneration (AMD. RPE-mediated VEGF expression, leading to angiogenesis, is a major signaling mechanism underlying ocular neovascular disease. Inhibiting this signaling pathway with a therapeutic molecule is a promising anti-angiogenic strategy to treat this disease with potentially fewer side effects. Oxalomalate (OMA is a competitive inhibitor of NADP+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH, which plays an important role in cellular signaling pathways regulated by reactive oxygen species (ROS. Here, we have investigated the inhibitory effect of OMA on the expression of VEGF, and the associated underlying mechanism of action, using in vitro and in vivo RPE cell models of AMD. We found that OMA reduced the expression and secretion of VEGF in RPE cells, and consequently inhibited CNV formation. This function of OMA was linked to its capacity to activate the pVHL-mediated HIF-1α degradation in these cells, partly via a ROS-dependent ATM signaling axis, through inhibition of IDH enzymes. These findings reveal a novel role for OMA in inhibiting RPE-derived VEGF expression and angiogenesis, and suggest unique therapeutic strategies for treating pathological angiogenesis and AMD development.

  2. Major Vascular Neurocognitive Disorder: A Reappraisal to Vascular Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre Kumral

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Major vascular neurocognitive disorder (NCD is the second leading form of dementia after Alzheimer’s disease, accounting for 17-20% of all dementias. Vascular NCD is a progressive disease caused by reduced cerebral blood flow related to multiple large volume or lacunar infarcts that induce a sudden onset and stepwise decline in cognitive abilities. Despite its prevalence and clinical importance, there is still controversy in the terminology of vascular NCD. Only after the release of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-5 (DSM-5 (2013 did the American Psychiatric Association define vascular dementia as “major vascular NCD”. This review includes an overview of risk factors, pathophysiology, types, diagnostic and clinical features of major vascular NCD, and current treatment options of vascular NCD regarding to DSM-5 criteria

  3. Curcumin supplementation improves vascular endothelial function in healthy middle-aged and older adults by increasing nitric oxide bioavailability and reducing oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Parker, Jessica R; Strahler, Talia R; Bassett, Candace J; Bispham, Nina Z; Chonchol, Michel B; Seals, Douglas R

    2017-01-03

    We hypothesized that curcumin would improve resistance and conduit artery endothelial function and large elastic artery stiffness in healthy middle-aged and older adults. Thirty-nine healthy men and postmenopausal women (45-74 yrs) were randomized to 12 weeks of curcumin (2000 mg/day Longvida®; n=20) or placebo (n=19) supplementation. Forearm blood flow response to acetylcholine infusions (FBF ACh ; resistance artery endothelial function) increased 37% following curcumin supplementation (107±13 vs. 84±11 AUC at baseline, P=0.03), but not placebo (P=0.2). Curcumin treatment augmented the acute reduction in FBF ACh induced by the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor NG monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA; P=0.03), and reduced the acute increase in FBF ACh to the antioxidant vitamin C (P=0.02), whereas placebo had no effect (both P>0.6). Similarly, brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (conduit artery endothelial function) increased 36% in the curcumin group (5.7±0.4 vs. 4.4±0.4% at baseline, P=0.001), with no change in placebo (P=0.1). Neither curcumin nor placebo influenced large elastic artery stiffness (aortic pulse wave velocity or carotid artery compliance) or circulating biomarkers of oxidative stress and inflammation (all P>0.1). In healthy middle-aged and older adults, 12 weeks of curcumin supplementation improves resistance artery endothelial function by increasing vascular nitric oxide bioavailability and reducing oxidative stress, while also improving conduit artery endothelial function.

  4. Early detection of ventilation-induced brain injury using magnetic resonance spectroscopy and diffusion tensor imaging: an in vivo study in preterm lambs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Béatrice Skiöld

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIM: High tidal volume (VT ventilation during resuscitation of preterm lambs results in brain injury evident histologically within hours after birth. We aimed to investigate whether magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS and/or diffusion tensor imaging (DTI can be used for early in vivo detection of ventilation-induced brain injury in preterm lambs. METHODS: Newborn lambs (0.85 gestation were stabilized with a "protective ventilation" strategy (PROT, n = 7: prophylactic Curosurf, sustained inflation, VT 7 mL/kg, positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP 5 cmH2O or an initial 15 minutes of "injurious ventilation" (INJ, n = 10: VT 12 mL/kg, no PEEP, late Curosurf followed by PROT ventilation for the remainder of the experiment. At 1 hour, lambs underwent structural magnetic resonance imaging (Siemens, 3 Tesla. For measures of mean/axial/radial diffusivity (MD, AD, RD and fractional anisotropy (FA, 30 direction DTI was performed. Regions of interests encompassed the thalamus, internal capsule, periventricular white matter and the cerebellar vermis. MRS was performed using a localized single-voxel (15×15×20 mm3, echo time 270 ms encompassing suptratentorial deep nuclear grey matter and central white matter. Peak-area ratios for lactate (Lac relative to N-acetylaspartate (NAA, choline (Cho and creatine (Cr were calculated. Groups were compared using 2-way RM-ANOVA, Mann-Whitney U-test and Spearman's correlations. RESULTS: No cerebral injury was seen on structural MR images. Lambs in the INJ group had higher mean FA and lower mean RD in the thalamus compared to PROT lambs, but not in the other regions of interest. Peak-area lactate ratios >1.0 was only seen in INJ lambs. A trend of higher mean peak-area ratios for Lac/Cr and Lac/Cho was seen, which correlated with lower pH in both groups. CONCLUSION: Acute changes in brain diffusion measures and metabolite peak-area ratios were observed after injurious ventilation. Early MRS/DTI is

  5. Systemic and cerebral vascular endothelial growth factor levels increase in murine cerebral malaria along with increased Calpain and caspase activity and can be reduced by erythropoietin treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hempel, Casper; Hoyer, Nils; Kildemoes, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of cerebral malaria (CM) includes compromised microvascular perfusion, increased inflammation, cytoadhesion, and endothelial activation. These events cause blood-brain barrier disruption and neuropathology and associations with the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signal...

  6. Metabolic acidosis may be as protective as hypercapnic acidosis in an ex-vivo model of severe ventilator-induced lung injury: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patsouris Efstratios

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is mounting experimental evidence that hypercapnic acidosis protects against lung injury. However, it is unclear if acidosis per se rather than hypercapnia is responsible for this beneficial effect. Therefore, we sought to evaluate the effects of hypercapnic (respiratory versus normocapnic (metabolic acidosis in an ex vivo model of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI. Methods Sixty New Zealand white rabbit ventilated and perfused heart-lung preparations were used. Six study groups were evaluated. Respiratory acidosis (RA, metabolic acidosis (MA and normocapnic-normoxic (Control - C groups were randomized into high and low peak inspiratory pressures, respectively. Each preparation was ventilated for 1 hour according to a standardized ventilation protocol. Lung injury was evaluated by means of pulmonary edema formation (weight gain, changes in ultrafiltration coefficient, mean pulmonary artery pressure changes as well as histological alterations. Results HPC group gained significantly greater weight than HPMA, HPRA and all three LP groups (P = 0.024, while no difference was observed between HPMA and HPRA groups regarding weight gain. Neither group differ on ultrafiltration coefficient. HPMA group experienced greater increase in the mean pulmonary artery pressure at 20 min (P = 0.0276 and 40 min (P = 0.0012 compared with all other groups. Histology scores were significantly greater in HP vs. LP groups (p Conclusions In our experimental VILI model both metabolic acidosis and hypercapnic acidosis attenuated VILI-induced pulmonary edema implying a mechanism other than possible synergistic effects of acidosis with CO2 for VILI attenuation.

  7. Metabolic acidosis may be as protective as hypercapnic acidosis in an ex-vivo model of severe ventilator-induced lung injury: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, Theodoros; Siempos, Ilias I; Metaxas, Eugenios I; Kopterides, Petros; Agrogiannis, George; Patsouris, Efstratios; Lazaris, Andreas C; Stravodimos, Konstantinos G; Roussos, Charis; Armaganidis, Apostolos

    2011-04-13

    There is mounting experimental evidence that hypercapnic acidosis protects against lung injury. However, it is unclear if acidosis per se rather than hypercapnia is responsible for this beneficial effect. Therefore, we sought to evaluate the effects of hypercapnic (respiratory) versus normocapnic (metabolic) acidosis in an ex vivo model of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Sixty New Zealand white rabbit ventilated and perfused heart-lung preparations were used. Six study groups were evaluated. Respiratory acidosis (RA), metabolic acidosis (MA) and normocapnic-normoxic (Control - C) groups were randomized into high and low peak inspiratory pressures, respectively. Each preparation was ventilated for 1 hour according to a standardized ventilation protocol. Lung injury was evaluated by means of pulmonary edema formation (weight gain), changes in ultrafiltration coefficient, mean pulmonary artery pressure changes as well as histological alterations. HPC group gained significantly greater weight than HPMA, HPRA and all three LP groups (P = 0.024), while no difference was observed between HPMA and HPRA groups regarding weight gain. Neither group differ on ultrafiltration coefficient. HPMA group experienced greater increase in the mean pulmonary artery pressure at 20 min (P = 0.0276) and 40 min (P = 0.0012) compared with all other groups. Histology scores were significantly greater in HP vs. LP groups (p < 0.001). In our experimental VILI model both metabolic acidosis and hypercapnic acidosis attenuated VILI-induced pulmonary edema implying a mechanism other than possible synergistic effects of acidosis with CO2 for VILI attenuation.

  8. VASCULAR SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-06-02

    Jun 2, 2016 ... with the literature from South Africa over the last four decades, and reflects the high rate of interpersonal violence in the country.14,15 As expected, cervical ... via the intact circle of Willis in young patients is the most likely explanation for the lack of strokes. Five patients were referred to the Durban vascular ...

  9. Vascular Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is a Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Vascular Disorders Email to a friend * required fields ...

  10. Topical application of β-radiation to reduce intimal hyperplasia after carotid artery balloon injury in rabbit A possible application for brachytherapy in vascular surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenthal, David; Stevens, Scott L.; Skillern, C.S.; Wellons, Eric D.; Robinson, Keith; Matsuura, John H.; Gannon, Brian J.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Endovascular brachytherapy for the prevention of intimal hyperplasia (IH) and restenosis after balloon/stent angioplasty has proven effective both in animal preparations and clinical trials. A variety of β-emitting isotopes and catheter-based devices have been developed for the delivery of low-dose radiation in clinical coronary and peripheral trials. No platform, however, has yet been developed for brachytherapy in concert with vascular surgical operations. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the vascular histopathologic response following balloon injury to rabbit carotid arteries with and without topically applied low-dose β-radiation. Methods: The β-emitting isotope strontium-90 (Sr-90) was conjugated onto the matrix of polypropylene (PLYP) mesh. Rabbit carotid arteries were balloon-injured with a no. 2 embolectomy catheter. Six carotid arteries were wrapped with nonradioactive PLYP mesh (controls) and Sr-90 (∼90 μCi) PLYP mesh in order to deliver low-dose radiation to the vessel wall from the external (adventitial) surface. Tissue was harvested at 6 weeks and processed for histologic examination. Results: There was consistent blockade of fibrocellular neointima formation with virtually no neointima present in all treated segments, compared to moderate neointima formation in controls. Medial thinning and smooth muscle cell (SMC) necrosis were also associated with topical brachytherapy. Conclusion: β-Radiation applied by an externally wrapped PLYP mesh labeled with Sr-90 markedly suppressed neointima formation in an animal vascular surgical injury model. Further studies, however, are necessary to determine a suitable isotope and dosage for clinical application

  11. Vascular ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilcher, D B; Ricci, M A

    1998-04-01

    Surgeon-interpreted diagnostic ultrasound has become the preferred screening test and often the definitive test for the diagnosis of arterial stenosis, aneurysm, and venous thrombosis. As a modality for surveillance, its noninvasive quality makes it particularly appealing as the test of choice to screen patients for abdominal aortic aneurysms or to perform follow-up examinations on those patients with a carotid endartectomy or in situ bypass grafts. The increasing reliance on intraoperative duplex imaging of vascular procedures demands that the surgeon learn the skills to perform the studies without a technologist or radiologist to interpret the examination.

  12. Portal Vein Embolization Using a Nitinol Plug (Amplatzer Vascular Plug) in Combination with Histoacryl Glue and Iodinized Oil: Adequate Hypertrophy with a Reduced Risk of Nontarget Embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bent, Clare L.; Low, Deborah; Matson, Matthew B.; Renfrew, Ian; Fotheringham, Tim

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess whether portal vein embolization (PVE) using a nitinol vascular plug in combination with histoacryl glue and iodinized oil minimizes the risk of nontarget embolization while obtaining good levels of future liver remnant (FLR) hypertrophy. Between November 2005 and August 2008, 16 patients (8 females, 8 males; mean age, 63 ± 3.6 years), each with a small FLR, underwent right ipsilateral transhepatic PVE prior to major hepatectomy. Proximal PVE was initially performed by placement of a nitinol vascular plug, followed by distal embolization using a mixture of histoacryl glue and iodinized oil. Pre- and 6 weeks postprocedural FLR volumes were calculated using computed tomographic imaging. Selection for surgery required an FLR of 0.5% of the patient's body mass. Clinical course and outcome of surgical resection for all patients were recorded. At surgery, the ease of hepatectomy was subjectively assessed in comparison to previous experience following PVE with alternative embolic agents. PVE was successful in all patients. Mean procedure time was 30.4 ± 2.5 min. Mean absolute increase in FLR volume was 68.9% ± 12.0% (p = 0.00005). There was no evidence of nontarget embolization during the procedure or on subsequent imaging. Nine patients proceeded to extended hepatectomy. Six patients demonstrated disease progression. One patient did not achieve sufficient hypertrophy in relation to body mass to undergo hepatic resection. At surgery, the hepatobiliary surgeons observed less periportal inflammation compared to previous experience with alternative embolic agents, facilitating dissection at extended hepatectomy. In conclusion, ipsilateral transhepatic PVE using a single nitinol plug in combination with histoacryl glue and iodinized oil simplifies the procedure, offering short procedural times with minimal risk of nontarget embolization. Excellent levels of FLR hypertrophy are achieved enabling safe extended hepatectomy.

  13. Vascular disease in cocaine addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachi, Keren; Mani, Venkatesh; Jeyachandran, Devi; Fayad, Zahi A; Goldstein, Rita Z; Alia-Klein, Nelly

    2017-07-01

    Cocaine, a powerful vasoconstrictor, induces immune responses including cytokine elevations. Chronic cocaine use is associated with functional brain impairments potentially mediated by vascular pathology. Although the Crack-Cocaine epidemic has declined, its vascular consequences are increasingly becoming evident among individuals with cocaine use disorder of that period, now aging. Paradoxically, during the period when prevention efforts could make a difference, this population receives psychosocial treatment at best. We review major postmortem and in vitro studies documenting cocaine-induced vascular toxicity. PubMed and Academic Search Complete were used with relevant terms. Findings consist of the major mechanisms of cocaine-induced vasoconstriction, endothelial dysfunction, and accelerated atherosclerosis, emphasizing acute, chronic, and secondary effects of cocaine. The etiology underlying cocaine's acute and chronic vascular effects is multifactorial, spanning hypertension, impaired homeostasis and platelet function, thrombosis, thromboembolism, and alterations in blood flow. Early detection of vascular disease in cocaine addiction by multimodality imaging is discussed. Treatment may be similar to indications in patients with traditional risk-factors, with few exceptions such as enhanced supportive care and use of benzodiazepines and phentolamine for sedation, and avoiding β-blockers. Given the vascular toxicity cocaine induces, further compounded by smoking and alcohol comorbidity, and interacting with aging of the crack generation, there is a public health imperative to identify pre-symptomatic markers of vascular impairments in cocaine addiction and employ preventive treatment to reduce silent disease progression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Exclusion of brown lemmings reduces vascular plant cover and biomass in Arctic coastal tundra: resampling of a 50 + year herbivore exclosure experiment near Barrow, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, D R; Lara, M J; Tweedie, C E; Shaver, G R; Batzli, G O; Shaw, J D

    2011-01-01

    To determine the role lemmings play in structuring plant communities and their contribution to the 'greening of the Arctic', we measured plant cover and biomass in 50 + year old lemming exclosures and control plots in the coastal tundra near Barrow, Alaska. The response of plant functional types to herbivore exclusion varied among land cover types. In general, the abundance of lichens and bryophytes increased with the exclusion of lemmings, whereas graminoids decreased, although the magnitude of these responses varied among land cover types. These results suggest that sustained lemming activity promotes a higher biomass of vascular plant functional types than would be expected without their presence and highlights the importance of considering herbivory when interpreting patterns of greening in the Arctic. In light of the rapid environmental change ongoing in the Arctic and the potential regional to global implications of this change, further exploration regarding the long-term influence of arvicoline rodents on ecosystem function (e.g. carbon and energy balance) should be considered a research priority.

  15. ACCRETA COMPLICATING COMPLETE PLACENTA PREVIA IS CHARACTERIZED BY REDUCED SYSTEMIC LEVELS OF VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH FACTOR AND EPITHELIAL-TO-MESENCHYMAL TRANSITION OF THE INVASIVE TROPHOBLAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrum, Mark J.; Buhimschi, Irina A.; Salafia, Carolyn; Thung, Stephen; Bahtiyar, Mert O.; Werner, Erica F.; Campbell, Katherine H.; Laky, Christine; Sfakianaki, Anna K.; Zhao, Guomao; Funai, Edmund F.; Buhimschi, Catalin S.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To characterize serum angiogenic factor profile of women with complete placenta previa and determine if invasive trophoblast differentiation characteristic of accreta, increta or percreta shares features of epitehelial-mesenchymal-transition (EMT). STUDY DESIGN We analyzed gestational age matched serum samples from 90 pregnant women with either complete placenta previa (n=45) or uncomplicated pregnancies (n=45). Vascular-endothelial-growth-factor (VEGF), placental-growth-factor (PlGF) and soluble fms-like-tyrosine-kinase-1 (sFlt-1) were immunoassayed. VEGF and phosphotyrosine (P-Tyr) immunoreactivity was surveyed in histological specimens relative to expression of vimentin and cytokeratin-7. RESULTS Women with previa and invasive placentation [accreta (n=5); increta (n=6); percreta (n=2)] had lower systemic VEGF (invasive previa: median [IQR]: 0.8[0.02–3.4] vs. control: 6.5[2.7–10.5] pg/mL, P=0.02). VEGF and P-Tyr immunostaining predominated in the invasive extravillous trophoblasts (EVT) which co-expressed vimentin and cytokeratin-7, a EMT feature and tumor-like cell phenotype. CONCLUSIONS Lower systemic free VEGF and a switch of the interstitial EVT to a metastable cell phenotype characterize placenta previa with excessive myometrial invasion. PMID:21316642

  16. Bioprinting for vascular and vascularized tissue biofabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Pallab; Ayan, Bugra; Ozbolat, Ibrahim T

    2017-03-15

    Bioprinting is a promising technology to fabricate design-specific tissue constructs due to its ability to create complex, heterocellular structures with anatomical precision. Bioprinting enables the deposition of various biologics including growth factors, cells, genes, neo-tissues and extra-cellular matrix-like hydrogels. Benefits of bioprinting have started to make a mark in the fields of tissue engineering, regenerative medicine and pharmaceutics. Specifically, in the field of tissue engineering, the creation of vascularized tissue constructs has remained a principal challenge till date. However, given the myriad advantages over other biofabrication methods, it becomes organic to expect that bioprinting can provide a viable solution for the vascularization problem, and facilitate the clinical translation of tissue engineered constructs. This article provides a comprehensive account of bioprinting of vascular and vascularized tissue constructs. The review is structured as introducing the scope of bioprinting in tissue engineering applications, key vascular anatomical features and then a thorough coverage of 3D bioprinting using extrusion-, droplet- and laser-based bioprinting for fabrication of vascular tissue constructs. The review then provides the reader with the use of bioprinting for obtaining thick vascularized tissues using sacrificial bioink materials. Current challenges are discussed, a comparative evaluation of different bioprinting modalities is presented and future prospects are provided to the reader. Biofabrication of living tissues and organs at the clinically-relevant volumes vitally depends on the integration of vascular network. Despite the great progress in traditional biofabrication approaches, building perfusable hierarchical vascular network is a major challenge. Bioprinting is an emerging technology to fabricate design-specific tissue constructs due to its ability to create complex, heterocellular structures with anatomical precision

  17. Activation of GLP-1 receptors on vascular smooth muscle cells reduces the autoregulatory response in afferent arterioles and increases renal blood flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Elisa Pouline; Poulsen, Steen Seier; Kissow, Hannelouise

    2015-01-01

    was to localize renal GLP-1 receptors and describe GLP-1 mediated effects on the renal vasculature. We hypothesized that renal GLP-1 receptors are located in the renal microcirculation and activation of these affects renal autoregulation and increases renal blood flow. In vivo autoradiography using 125I-GLP-1......, 125I-exendin-4 (GLP-1 analog) and 125I-exendin 9-39 (GLP-1 receptor antagonist) was performed in rodents to localize specific GLP-1 receptor binding. GLP-1 mediated effects on blood pressure (BP), renal blood flow (RBF), heart rate (HR), renin secretion, urinary flow rate and Na+ and K+ excretion were...... conclude that GLP-1 receptors are located in the renal vasculature including afferent arterioles. Activation of these receptors reduces the autoregulatory response of afferent arterioles to acute pressure increases and increases renal blood flow in normotensive rats....

  18. Activation of GLP-1 receptors on vascular smooth muscle cells reduces the autoregulatory response in afferent arterioles and increases renal blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Elisa P; Poulsen, Steen S; Kissow, Hannelouise; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Deacon, Carolyn F; Jensen, Boye L; Holst, Jens J; Sorensen, Charlotte M

    2015-04-15

    Glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 has a range of extrapancreatic effects, including renal effects. The mechanisms are poorly understood, but GLP-1 receptors have been identified in the kidney. However, the exact cellular localization of the renal receptors is poorly described. The aim of the present study was to localize renal GLP-1 receptors and describe GLP-1-mediated effects on the renal vasculature. We hypothesized that renal GLP-1 receptors are located in the renal microcirculation and that activation of these affects renal autoregulation and increases renal blood flow. In vivo autoradiography using (125)I-labeled GLP-1, (125)I-labeled exendin-4 (GLP-1 analog), and (125)I-labeled exendin 9-39 (GLP-1 receptor antagonist) was performed in rodents to localize specific GLP-1 receptor binding. GLP-1-mediated effects on blood pressure, renal blood flow (RBF), heart rate, renin secretion, urinary flow rate, and Na(+) and K(+) excretion were investigated in anesthetized rats. Effects of GLP-1 on afferent arterioles were investigated in isolated mouse kidneys. Specific binding of (125)I-labeled GLP-1, (125)I-labeled exendin-4, and (125)I-labeled exendin 9-39 was observed in the renal vasculature, including afferent arterioles. Infusion of GLP-1 increased blood pressure, RBF, and urinary flow rate significantly in rats. Heart rate and plasma renin concentrations were unchanged. Exendin 9-39 inhibited the increase in RBF. In isolated murine kidneys, GLP-1 and exendin-4 significantly reduced the autoregulatory response of afferent arterioles in response to stepwise increases in pressure. We conclude that GLP-1 receptors are located in the renal vasculature, including afferent arterioles. Activation of these receptors reduces the autoregulatory response of afferent arterioles to acute pressure increases and increases RBF in normotensive rats. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Downregulation of Securin by the variant RNF213 R4810K (rs112735431, G>A) reduces angiogenic activity of induced pluripotent stem cell-derived vascular endothelial cells from moyamoya patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hitomi, Toshiaki [Department of Health and Environmental Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Habu, Toshiyuki [Radiation Biology Center, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Kobayashi, Hatasu; Okuda, Hiroko; Harada, Kouji H. [Department of Health and Environmental Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Osafune, Kenji [Center for iPS Cell Research and Application (CiRA), Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Taura, Daisuke; Sone, Masakatsu [Department of Medicine and Clinical Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Asaka, Isao; Ameku, Tomonaga; Watanabe, Akira; Kasahara, Tomoko; Sudo, Tomomi; Shiota, Fumihiko [Center for iPS Cell Research and Application (CiRA), Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Hashikata, Hirokuni; Takagi, Yasushi [Department of Neurosurgery, Kyoto University,Kyoto (Japan); Morito, Daisuke [Faculty of Life Sciences, Kyoto Sangyo University, Kyoto (Japan); Miyamoto, Susumu [Department of Neurosurgery, Kyoto University,Kyoto (Japan); Nakao, Kazuwa [Department of Medicine and Clinical Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Koizumi, Akio, E-mail: koizumi.akio.5v@kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Health and Environmental Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

    2013-08-16

    Highlights: •Angiogenic activities were reduced in iPSECs from MMD patients. •Many mitosis-regulated genes were downregulated in iPSECs from MMD patients. •RNF213 R4810K downregulated Securin and inhibited angiogenic activity. •Securin suppression by siRNA reduced angiogenic activities of iPSECs and HUVECs. -- Abstract: Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a cerebrovascular disease characterized by occlusive lesions in the circle of Willis. The RNF213 R4810K polymorphism increases susceptibility to MMD. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were established from unaffected fibroblast donors with wild-type RNF213 alleles, and from carriers/patients with one or two RNF213 R4810K alleles. Angiogenic activities of iPSC-derived vascular endothelial cells (iPSECs) from patients and carriers were lower (49.0 ± 19.4%) than from wild-type subjects (p < 0.01). Gene expression profiles in iPSECs showed that Securin was down-regulated (p < 0.01) in carriers and patients. Overexpression of RNF213 R4810K downregulated Securin, inhibited angiogenic activity (36.0 ± 16.9%) and proliferation of humanumbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) while overexpression of RNF213 wild type did not. Securin expression was downregulated using RNA interference techniques, which reduced the level of tube formation in iPSECs and HUVECs without inhibition of proliferation. RNF213 R4810K reduced angiogenic activities of iPSECs from patients with MMD, suggesting that it is a promising in vitro model for MMD.

  20. Can mechanical ventilation strategies reduce chronic lung disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donn, Steven M; Sinha, Sunil K

    2003-12-01

    Chronic lung disease (CLD) continues to be a significant complication in newborn infants undergoing mechanical ventilation for respiratory failure. Although the aetiology of CLD is multifactorial, specific factors related to mechanical ventilation, including barotrauma, volutrauma and atelectrauma, have been implicated as important aetiologic mechanisms. This article discusses the ways in which these factors might be manipulated by various mechanical ventilatory strategies to reduce ventilator-induced lung injury. These include continuous positive airway pressure, permissive hypercapnia, patient-triggered ventilation, volume-targeted ventilation, proportional assist ventilation, high-frequency ventilation and real-time monitoring.

  1. Role of Growth Arrest and DNA Damage–inducible α in Akt Phosphorylation and Ubiquitination after Mechanical Stress-induced Vascular Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Sumegha; Sammani, Saad; Wang, Ting; Boone, David L.; Meyer, Nuala J.; Dudek, Steven M.; Moreno-Vinasco, Liliana; Garcia, Joe G. N.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale: The stress-induced growth arrest and DNA damage–inducible α (GADD45a) gene is up-regulated by mechanical stress with GADD45a knockout (GADD45a−/−) mice demonstrating both increased susceptibility to ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) and reduced levels of the cell survival and vascular permeability signaling effector (Akt). However, the functional role of GADD45a in the pathogenesis of VILI is unknown. Objectives: We sought to define the role of GADD45a in the regulation of Akt activation induced by mechanical stress. Methods: VILI-challenged GADD45a−/− mice were administered a constitutively active Akt1 vector and injury was assessed by bronchoalveolar lavage cell counts and protein levels. Human pulmonary artery endothelial cells (EC) were exposed to 18% cyclic stretch (CS) under conditions of GADD45a silencing and used for immunoprecipitation, Western blotting or immunofluoresence. EC were also transfected with mutant ubiquitin vectors to characterize site-specific Akt ubiquitination. DNA methylation was measured using methyl-specific polymerase chain reaction assay. Measurements and Main Results: Studies exploring the linkage of GADD45a with mechanical stress and Akt regulation revealed VILI-challenged GADD45a−/− mice to have significantly reduced lung injury on overexpression of Akt1 transgene. Increased mechanical stress with 18% CS in EC induced Akt phosphorylation via E3 ligase tumor necrosis factor receptor–associated factor 6 (TRAF6)–mediated Akt K63 ubiquitination resulting in Akt trafficking and activation at the membrane. GADD45a is essential to this process because GADD45a-silenced endothelial cells and GADD45a−/− mice exhibited increased Akt K48 ubiquitination leading to proteasomal degradation. These events involve loss of ubiquitin carboxyl terminal hydrolase 1 (UCHL1), a deubiquitinating enzyme that normally removes K48 polyubiquitin chains bound to Akt thus promoting Akt K63 ubiquitination. Loss of GADD45a

  2. Lower limb vascular dysfunction in cyclists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Ayala Melo Di Alencar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Sports-related vascular insufficiency affecting the lower limbs is uncommon, and early signs and symptoms can be confused with musculoskeletal injuries. This is also the case among professional cyclists, who are always at the threshold between endurance and excess training. The aim of this review was to analyze the occurrence of vascular disorders in the lower limbs of cyclists and to discuss possible etiologies. Eighty-five texts, including papers and books, published from 1950 to 2012, were used. According to the literature reviewed, some cyclists receive a late diagnosis of vascular dysfunction due to a lack of familiarity of the medical team with this type of dysfunction. Data revealed that a reduced blood flow in the external iliac artery, especially on the left, is much more common than in the femoral and popliteal arteries, and that vascular impairment is responsible for the occurrence of early fatigue and reduced performance in cycling.

  3. Inhibition of hypoxia inducible factor-1alpha by dihydroxyphenylethanol, a product from olive oil, blocks microsomal prostaglandin-E synthase-1/vascular endothelial growth factor expression and reduces tumor angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzuoli, Erika; Donnini, Sandra; Giachetti, Antonio; Iñiguez, Miguel A; Fresno, Manuel; Melillo, Giovanni; Ziche, Marina

    2010-08-15

    2-(3,4-dihydroxyphenil)-ethanol (DPE), a polyphenol present in olive oil, has been found to attenuate the growth of colon cancer cells, an effect presumably related to its anti-inflammatory activity. To further explore the effects of DPE on angiogenesis and tumor growth we investigated the in vivo efficacy of DPE in a HT-29 xenograft model and in vitro activities in colon cancer cells exposed to interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and prostaglandin E-2 (PGE-2). DPE (10 mg/kg/day for 14 days) inhibited tumor growth, reducing vessel lumina and blood perfusion to tumor, and diminished expression of hypoxia inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and microsomal prostaglandin-E synthase-1 (mPGEs-1). In vitro, DPE (100 mumol/L) neither affected cell proliferation nor induced apoptosis in HT-29 and WiDr cells. DPE prevented the IL-1beta-mediated increase of mPGEs-1 expression and PGE-2 generation, as it did the silencing of HIF-1alpha. Moreover, DPE blocked mPGEs-1-dependent expression of VEGF and inhibited endothelial sprouting induced by tumor cells in a coculture system. PGE-2 triggers a feed-forward loop involving HIF-1alpha, which impinges on mPGEs-1 and VEGF expression, events prevented by DPE via extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2. The reduction of PGE-2 and VEGF levels, caused by DPE, was invariably associated with a marked decrease in HIF-1alpha expression and activity, independent of proteasome activity, indicating that the DPE effects on tumor growth and angiogenesis are dependent on the inhibition of HIF-1alpha translation. We show that the in vivo DPE antitumor effect is associated with anti-inflammatory and antiangiogenic activities resulting from the downregulation of the HIF-1alpha/mPGEs-1/VEGF axis.

  4. Vascular grading of angiogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, S; Grabau, D A; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    2000-01-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of angiogenesis by vascular grading of primary breast tumours, and to evaluate the prognostic impact of adding the vascular grade to the Nottingham Prognostic Index (NPI). The investigation included 836 patients. The median follow-up time was 11...... years and 4 months. The microvessels were immunohistochemically stained by antibodies against CD34. Angiogenesis was graded semiquantitatively by subjective scoring into three groups according to the expected number of microvessels in the most vascular tumour area. The vascular grading between observers...... for 24% of the patients, who had a shift in prognostic group, as compared to NPI, and implied a better prognostic dissemination. We concluded that the angiogenesis determined by vascular grading has independent prognostic value of clinical relevance for patients with breast cancer....

  5. Vascular grading of angiogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, S; Grabau, D A; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    2000-01-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of angiogenesis by vascular grading of primary breast tumours, and to evaluate the prognostic impact of adding the vascular grade to the Nottingham Prognostic Index (NPI). The investigation included 836 patients. The median follow-up time was 11...... years and 4 months. The microvessels were immunohistochemically stained by antibodies against CD34. Angiogenesis was graded semiquantitatively by subjective scoring into three groups according to the expected number of microvessels in the most vascular tumour area. The vascular grading between observers...... impact for 24% of the patients, who had a shift in prognostic group, as compared to NPI, and implied a better prognostic dissemination. We concluded that the angiogenesis determined by vascular grading has independent prognostic value of clinical relevance for patients with breast cancer....

  6. Vascular Access in Children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnamurthy, Ganesh; Keller, Marc S.

    2011-01-01

    Establishment of stable vascular access is one of the essential and most challenging procedures in a pediatric hospital. Many clinical specialties provide vascular service in a pediatric hospital. At the top of the “expert procedural pyramid” is the pediatric interventional radiologist, who is best suited and trained to deliver this service. Growing awareness regarding the safety and high success rate of vascular access using image guidance has led to increased demand from clinicians to provide around-the-clock vascular access service by pediatric interventional radiologists. Hence, the success of a vascular access program, with the pediatric interventional radiologist as the key provider, is challenging, and a coordinated multidisciplinary team effort is essential for success. However, there are few dedicated pediatric interventional radiologists across the globe, and also only a couple of training programs exist for pediatric interventions. This article gives an overview of the technical aspects of pediatric vascular access and provides useful tips for obtaining vascular access in children safely and successfully using image guidance.

  7. Pediatric vascular access

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donaldson, James S.

    2006-01-01

    Pediatric interventional radiologists are ideally suited to provide vascular access services to children because of inherent safety advantages and higher success from using image-guided techniques. The performance of vascular access procedures has become routine at many adult interventional radiology practices, but this service is not as widely developed at pediatric institutions. Although interventional radiologists at some children's hospitals offer full-service vascular access, there is little or none at others. Developing and maintaining a pediatric vascular access service is a challenge. Interventionalists skilled in performing such procedures are limited at pediatric institutions, and institutional support from clerical staff, nursing staff, and technologists might not be sufficiently available to fulfill the needs of such a service. There must also be a strong commitment by all members of the team to support such a demanding service. There is a slippery slope of expected services that becomes steeper and steeper as the vascular access service grows. This review is intended primarily as general education for pediatric radiologists learning vascular access techniques. Additionally, the pediatric or adult interventional radiologist seeking to expand services might find helpful tips. The article also provides education for the diagnostic radiologist who routinely interprets radiographs containing vascular access devices. (orig.)

  8. Extracellular Matrix Molecules Facilitating Vascular Biointegration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin K.C. Ng

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available All vascular implants, including stents, heart valves and graft materials exhibit suboptimal biocompatibility that significantly reduces their clinical efficacy. A range of biomolecules in the subendothelial space have been shown to play critical roles in local regulation of thrombosis, endothelial growth and smooth muscle cell proliferation, making these attractive candidates for modulation of vascular device biointegration. However, classically used biomaterial coatings, such as fibronectin and laminin, modulate only one of these components; enhancing endothelial cell attachment, but also activating platelets and triggering thrombosis. This review examines a subset of extracellular matrix molecules that have demonstrated multi-faceted vascular compatibility and accordingly are promising candidates to improve the biointegration of vascular biomaterials.

  9. Vascular malformations in pediatrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reith, W.; Shamdeen, M.G.

    2003-01-01

    Vascular malformations are the cause of nearly all non-traumatic intracranial hemorrhage in children beyond the neonatal stage. Therefore, any child presenting with spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage should be evaluated for child abuse and for vascular malformations. Intracerebral malformations of the cerebral vasculature include vein of Galen malformations, arteriovenous malformation (AVM), cavernomas, dural arteriovenous fistulas, venous anomalies (DVA), and capillary teleangiectasies. Although a few familial vascular malformation have been reported, the majority are sporadic. Clinical symptoms, diagnostic and therapeutic options are discussed. (orig.) [de

  10. Uterine Vascular Lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, Abhishek; Srinivas, Amruthashree; Chandrashekar, Babitha Moogali; Vijayakumar, Avinash

    2013-01-01

    Vascular lesions of the uterus are rare; most reported in the literature are arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Uterine AVMs can be congenital or acquired. In recent years, there has been an increasing number of reports of acquired vascular lesions of the uterus following pregnancy, abortion, cesarean delivery, and curettage. It can be seen from these reports that there is confusion concerning the terminology of uterine vascular lesions. There is also a lack of diagnostic criteria and management guidelines, which has led to an increased number of unnecessary invasive procedures (eg, angiography, uterine artery embolization, hysterectomy for abnormal vaginal bleeding). This article familiarizes readers with various vascular lesions of the uterus and their management. PMID:24340126

  11. Magnetic resonance vascular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axel, L

    1989-01-01

    The basis principles of MRI are reviewed in order to understand how blood flow effects arise in conventional imaging. Then some of the ways these effects have ben used in MRI techniques specifically designed for vascular imaging, are considered. (author)

  12. Effects of ouabain on vascular reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassallo D.V.

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available Ouabain is an endogenous substance occurring in the plasma in the nanomolar range, that has been proposed to increase vascular resistance and induce hypertension. This substance acts on the a-subunit of Na+,K+-ATPase inhibiting the Na+-pump activity. In the vascular smooth muscle this effect leads to intracellular Na+ accumulation that reduces the activity of the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger and to an increased vascular tone. It was also suggested that circulating ouabain, even in the nanomolar range, sensitizes the vascular smooth muscle to vasopressor substances. We tested the latter hypothesis by studying the effects of ouabain in the micromolar and nanomolar range on phenylephrine (PE-evoked pressor responses. The experiments were performed in normotensive and hypertensive rats in vivo, under anesthesia, and in perfused rat tail vascular beds. The results showed that ouabain pretreatment increased the vasopressor responses to PE in vitro and in vivo. This sensitization after ouabain treatment was also observed in hypertensive animals which presented an enhanced vasopressor response to PE in comparison to normotensive animals. It is suggested that ouabain at nanomolar concentrations can sensitize vascular smooth muscle to vasopressor stimuli possibly contributing to increased tone in hypertension

  13. [Vascular aging, arterial hypertension and physical activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Trucksäss, A; Weisser, B

    2011-11-01

    The present review delineates the significance of intima-media-thickness, arterial stiffness and endothelial function for vascular aging. There is profound evidence for an increase in intima-media-thickness and vascular stiffness not only during healthy aging but induced also by cardiovascular risk factors. There is a central role of arterial hypertension for this progression in both structural factors. In addition, both parameters are strongly associated with cardiovascular risk. Endothelial function measured as postischemic flow-mediated vasodilatation is a functional parameter which is decreased both in healthy aging and by cardiovascular risk factors. Physical activity modifies the influence of aging and risk factors on endothelial function. A positive influence of endurance exercise on vascular stiffness and endothelial function has been demonstrated in numerous studies. In long-term studies, regular physical activity has been shown to reduce the progression of intima-media-thickness. Thus, arterial hypertension accelerates vascular aging, while physical activity has a positive influence on a variety of vascular parameters associated with vascular aging. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Dieta DASH na redução dos níveis de pressão arterial e prevenção do acidente vascular cerebral = DASH diet in reducing blood pressure and preventing stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piper, Vanessa Alves

    2012-01-01

    Conclusões: As evidências disponíveis sugerem que modificações no estilo de vida, incluindo a adoção de uma dieta tipo DASH, são estratégias eficazes no controle da hipertensão arterial e na redução de eventos cardiovasculares, como o acidente vascular cerebral

  15. Overview of vascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisset, G.S. III

    1998-01-01

    Vascular disease in the pediatric population is a poorly understood process which is often underestimated in its incidence. The common beginnings of such ubiquitous diseases as atherosclerosis manifest themselves at a cellular level shortly after birth. Other common systemic disorders, including congestive heart failure and sepsis, are also intricately associated with dysfunctional vasculature. Progress in the understanding of normal and pathophysiologic processes within the vascular system begins with the 'control center' - the endothelial cell. The purpose of this review is to consolidate a body of knowledge on the processes that occur at the cellular level within the blood vessel wall, and to simplify the understanding of how imbalances in these physiologic parameters result in vascular disease. (orig.)

  16. Self-management of vascular risk factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sol-de Rijk, B.G.M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The aim of this thesis was to provide insight into the potential of a self-management approach in treatment of vascular risk factors and to develop a self-management intervention. Furthermore to examine if this intervention, based on self-efficacy promoting theory, is effective in reducing

  17. [Immunologic problems in vascular homografts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Addato, M; Mirelli, M

    2001-01-01

    Fresh arterial homografts are immunogenic, inducing in recipient a strong immune response specifically directed against the antigens of the donor graft. The initial immune response seems to be cellular (lymphocytotoxic) and the late reaction humoral (antibody), even if they are strictly correlated. Immunosuppressive therapy reduce the immune reaction, but this response is dose-related. Implanted arterial homografts induce a donor-specific response similar to chronic reaction, which occurs in the recipients of vascularized solid-organ allografts. Therefore, in arterial transplantation, ABO compatibility and negative crossmatch should be respected. Effort should be made to curb the immune response by prospective cross-matching, immunosuppressive therapy and preoperative manipulation of homografts to reduce their antigenicity.

  18. Genealogy of training in vascular neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhry, Shakeel A; Spetzler, Robert F

    2014-02-01

    Remarkable advances and changes in the landscape of neurovascular disease have occurred recently. Concurrently, a paradigm shift in training and resident education is underway. This crossroad of unique opportunities and pressures necessitates creative change in the training of future vascular neurosurgeons to allow incorporation of surgical advances, new technology, and supplementary treatment modalities in a setting of reduced work hours and increased public scrutiny. This article discusses the changing landscape in neurovascular disease treatment, followed by the recent changes in resident training, and concludes with our view of the future of training in vascular neurosurgery.

  19. Estrogen, vascular estrogen receptor and hormone therapy in postmenopausal vascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Raouf A

    2013-12-15

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is less common in premenopausal women than men of the same age or postmenopausal women, suggesting vascular benefits of estrogen. Estrogen activates estrogen receptors ERα, ERβ and GPR30 in endothelium and vascular smooth muscle (VSM), which trigger downstream signaling pathways and lead to genomic and non-genomic vascular effects such as vasodilation, decreased VSM contraction and growth and reduced vascular remodeling. However, randomized clinical trials (RCTs), such as the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) and Heart and Estrogen/progestin Replacement Study (HERS), have shown little vascular benefits and even adverse events with menopausal hormone therapy (MHT), likely due to factors related to the MHT used, ER profile, and RCT design. Some MHT forms, dose, combinations or route of administration may have inadequate vascular effects. Age-related changes in ER amount, distribution, integrity and post-ER signaling could alter the vascular response to MHT. The subject's age, preexisting CVD, and hormone environment could also reduce the effects of MHT. Further evaluation of natural and synthetic estrogens, phytoestrogens, and selective estrogen-receptor modulators (SERMs), and the design of appropriate MHT combinations, dose, route and 'timing' could improve the effectiveness of conventional MHT and provide alternative therapies in the peri-menopausal period. Targeting ER using specific ER agonists, localized MHT delivery, and activation of specific post-ER signaling pathways could counter age-related changes in ER. Examination of the hormone environment and conditions associated with hormone imbalance such as polycystic ovary syndrome may reveal the causes of abnormal hormone-receptor interactions. Consideration of these factors in new RCTs such as the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study (KEEPS) could enhance the vascular benefits of estrogen in postmenopausal CVD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Renal posttransplant's vascular complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bašić Dragoslav

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Despite high graft and recipient survival figures worldwide today, a variety of technical complications can threaten the transplant in the postoperative period. Vascular complications are commonly related to technical problems in establishing vascular continuity or to damage that occurs during donor nephrectomy or preservation [13]. AIM The aim of the presenting study is to evaluate counts and rates of vascular complications after renal transplantation and to compare the outcome by donor type. MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 463 kidneys (319 from living related donor LD and 144 from cadaveric donor - CD were transplanted during the period between June 1975 and December 1998 at the Urology & Nephrology Institute of Clinical Centre of Serbia in Belgrade. Average recipients' age was 33.7 years (15-54 in LD group and 39.8 (19-62 in CD group. Retrospectively, we analyzed medical records of all recipients. Statistical analysis is estimated using Hi-squared test and Fischer's test of exact probability. RESULTS Major vascular complications including vascular anastomosis thrombosis, internal iliac artery stenosis, internal iliac artery rupture obliterant vasculitis and external iliac vein rupture were analyzed. In 25 recipients (5.4% some of major vascular complications were detected. Among these cases, 22 of them were from CD group vs. three from LD group. Relative rate of these complications was higher in CD group vs. LD group (p<0.0001. Among these complications dominant one was vascular anastomosis thrombosis which occurred in 18 recipients (17 from CD vs. one from LD. Of these recipients 16 from CD lost the graft, while the rest of two (one from each group had lethal outcome. DISCUSSION Thrombosis of renal allograft vascular anastomosis site is the most severe complication following renal transplantation. In the literature, renal allograft thrombosis is reported with different incidence rates, from 0.5-4% [14, 15, 16]. Data from the

  1. Enhanced Recovery after Vascular Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena D. Stojanovic

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The beginnings of the enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS program were first developed for patients in colorectal surgery, and after it was established as the standard of care in this surgical field, it began to be applied in many others surgical areas. This is multimodal, evidence-based approach program and includes simultaneous optimization of preoperative status of patients, adequate selection of surgical procedure and postoperative management. The aim of this program is to reduce complications, the length of hospital stay and to improve the patients outcome. Over the past decades, special attention was directed to the postoperative management in vascular surgery, especially after major vascular surgery because of the great risk of multiorgan failure, such as: respiratory failure, myocardial infarction, hemodynamic instability, coagulopathy, renal failure, neurological disorders, and intra-abdominal complications. Although a lot of effort was put into it, there is no unique acceptable program for ERAS in this surgical field, and there is still a need to point out the factors responsible for postoperative outcomes of these patients. So far, it is known that special attention should be paid to already existing diseases, type and the duration of the surgical intervention, hemodynamic and fluid management, nutrition, pain management, and early mobilization of patients.

  2. Plant Vascular Biology 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Biao

    2014-11-17

    This grant supported the Second International Conference on Plant Vascular Biology (PVB 2010) held July 24-28, 2010 on the campus of Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. Biao Ding (Ohio State University; OSU) and David Hannapel (Iowa State University; ISU) served as co-chairs of this conference. Biao Ding served as the local organizer. PVB is defined broadly here to include studies on the biogenesis, structure and function of transport systems in plants, under conditions of normal plant growth and development as well as of plant interactions with pathogens. The transport systems cover broadly the xylem, phloem, plasmodesmata and vascular cell membranes. The PVB concept has emerged in recent years to emphasize the integrative nature of the transport systems and approaches to investigate them.

  3. Vascular cognitive impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Vakhnina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular pathology of the brain is the second most common cause of cognitive impairment after Alzheimer's disease. The article describes the modern concepts of etiology, pathogenetic mechanisms, clinical features and approaches to diagnosis and therapy of vascular cognitive impairment (VCI. Cerebrovascular accident, chronic cerebral circulatory insufficiency and their combination, sometimes in combination with a concomitant neurodegenerative process, are shown to be the major types of brain lesions leading to VCI. The clinical presentation of VCI is characterized by the neuropsychological status dominated by impairment of the executive frontal functions (planning, control, attention in combination with focal neurological symptoms. The diagnosis is based on comparing of the revealed neuropsychological and neurological features with neuroimaging data. Neurometabolic, acetylcholinergic, glutamatergic, and other vasoactive drugs and non-pharmacological methods are widely used to treat VCI. 

  4. Vascular Surgery and Robotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indrani Sen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of robotics to Vascular surgery has not progressed as rapidly as of endovascular technology, but this is changing with the amalgamation of these two fields. The advent of Endovascular robotics is an exciting field which overcomes many of the limitations of endovascular therapy like vessel tortuosity and operator fatigue. This has much clinical appeal for the surgeon and hold significant promise of better patient outcomes. As with most newer technological advances, it is still limited by cost and availability. However, this field has seen some rapid progress in the last decade with the technology moving into the clinical realm. This review details the development of robotics, applications, outcomes, advantages, disadvantages and current advances focussing on Vascular and Endovascular robotics

  5. Vascular lesions following radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fajardo, L.F.; Berthrong, M.

    1988-01-01

    The special radiation sensitivity of the vascular system is mainly linked to that of endothelial cells, which are perhaps the most radiation-vulnerable elements of mesenchymal tissues. Within the vascular tree, radiation injures most often capillaries, sinusoids, and small arteries, in that order. Lesions of veins are observed less often, but in certain tissues the veins are regularly damaged (e.g., intestine) or are the most affected structures (i.e., liver). Large arteries do suffer the least; however, when significant damage does occur in an elastic artery (e.g., thrombosis or rupture), it tends to be clinically significant and even fatal. Although not always demonstrable in human tissues, radiation vasculopathy generally is dose and time dependent. Like other radiation-induced lesions, the morphology in the vessels is not specific, but it is characteristic enough to be often recognizable. Vascular injury, especially by therapeutic radiation is not just a morphologic marker. It is a mediator of tissue damage; perhaps the most consistent pathogenetic mechanism in delayed radiation injury

  6. Vascular lumen formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammert, Eckhard; Axnick, Jennifer

    2012-04-01

    The vascular system developed early in evolution. It is required in large multicellular organisms for the transport of nutrients, oxygen, and waste products to and from tissues. The vascular system is composed of hollow tubes, which have a high level of complexity in vertebrates. Vasculogenesis describes the de novo formation of blood vessels, e.g., aorta formation in vertebrate embryogenesis. In contrast, angiogenesis is the formation of blood vessels from preexisting ones, e.g., sprouting of intersomitic blood vessels from the aorta. Importantly, the lumen of all blood vessels in vertebrates is lined and formed by endothelial cells. In both vasculogenesis and angiogenesis, lumen formation takes place in a cord of endothelial cells. It involves a complex molecular mechanism composed of endothelial cell repulsion at the cell-cell contacts within the endothelial cell cords, junctional rearrangement, and endothelial cell shape change. As the vascular system also participates in the course of many diseases, such as cancer, stroke, and myocardial infarction, it is important to understand and make use of the molecular mechanisms of blood vessel formation to better understand and manipulate the pathomechanisms involved.

  7. Pulmonary vascular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedullo, P.F.; Shure, D.

    1987-01-01

    A wide range of pulmonary vascular imaging techniques are available for the diagnostic evaluation of patients with suspected pulmonary vascular disease. The characteristics of any ideal technique would include high sensitivity and specificity, safety, simplicity, and sequential applicability. To date, no single technique meets these ideal characteristics. Conventional pulmonary angiography remains the gold standard for the diagnosis of acute thromboembolic disease despite the introduction of newer techniques such as digital subtraction angiography and magnetic resonance imaging. Improved noninvasive lower extremity venous testing methods, particularly impedance plethysmography, and ventilation-perfusion scanning can play significant roles in the noninvasive diagnosis of acute pulmonary emboli when properly applied. Ventilation-perfusion scanning may also be useful as a screening test to differentiate possible primary pulmonary hypertension from chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. And, finally, angioscopy may be a useful adjunctive technique to detect chronic thromboembolic disease and determine operability. Optimal clinical decision-making, however, will continue to require the proper interpretation of adjunctive information obtained from the less-invasive techniques, applied with an understanding of the natural history of the various forms of pulmonary vascular disease and with a knowledge of the capabilities and shortcomings of the individual techniques

  8. Advanced Maternal Age Worsens Postpartum Vascular Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jude S. Morton

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The age at which women experience their first pregnancy has increased throughout the decades. Pregnancy has an important influence on maternal short- and long-term cardiovascular outcomes. Pregnancy at an advanced maternal age increases maternal risk of gestational diabetes, preeclampsia, placenta previa and caesarian delivery; complications which predict worsened cardiovascular health in later years. Aging also independently increases the risk of cardiovascular disease; therefore, combined risk in women of advanced maternal age may lead to detrimental cardiovascular outcomes later in life. We hypothesized that pregnancy at an advanced maternal age would lead to postpartum vascular dysfunction. We used a reproductively aged rat model to investigate vascular function in never pregnant (virgin, previously pregnant (postpartum and previously mated but never delivered (nulliparous rats at approximately 13.5 months of age (3 months postpartum or equivalent. Nulliparous rats, in which pregnancy was spontaneously lost, demonstrated significantly reduced aortic relaxation responses (methylcholine [MCh] Emax: 54.2 ± 12.6% vs. virgin and postpartum rats (MCh Emax: 84.8 ± 3.5% and 84.7 ± 3.2% respectively; suggesting pregnancy loss causes a worsened vascular pathology. Oxidized LDL reduced relaxation to MCh in aorta from virgin and postpartum, but not nulliparous rats, with an increased contribution of the LOX-1 receptor in the postpartum group. Further, in mesenteric arteries from postpartum rats, endothelium-derived hyperpolarization (EDH-mediated vasodilation was reduced and a constrictive prostaglandin effect was apparent. In conclusion, aged postpartum rats exhibited vascular dysfunction, while rats which had pregnancy loss demonstrated a distinct vascular pathology. These data demonstrate mechanisms which may lead to worsened outcomes at an advanced maternal age; including early pregnancy loss and later life cardiovascular dysfunction.

  9. Vascular remodeling and mineralocorticoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, K T; Sun, Y; Campbell, S E; Slight, S H; Ganjam, V K

    1995-01-01

    Circulating mineralocorticoid hormones are so named because of their important homeostatic properties that regulate salt and water balance via their action on epithelial cells. A broader range of functions in nonclassic target cellular sites has been proposed for these steroids and includes their contribution to wound healing following injury. A chronic, inappropriate (relative to intravascular volume and dietary sodium intake) elevation of these circulating hormones evokes a wound healing response in the absence of tissue injury--a wound healing response gone awry. The adverse remodeling of vascularized tissues seen in association with chronic mineralocorticoid excess is the focus of this review.

  10. Vinpocetine Attenuates the Osteoblastic Differentiation of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Yun Ma

    Full Text Available Vascular calcification is an active process of osteoblastic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells; however, its definite mechanism remains unknown. Vinpocetine, a derivative of the alkaloid vincamine, has been demonstrated to inhibit the high glucose-induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells; however, it remains unknown whether vinpocetine can affect the osteoblastic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells. We hereby investigated the effect of vinpocetine on vascular calcification using a beta-glycerophosphate-induced cell model. Our results showed that vinpocetine significantly reduced the osteoblast-like phenotypes of vascular smooth muscle cells including ALP activity, osteocalcin, collagen type I, Runx2 and BMP-2 expression as well as the formation of mineralized nodule. Vinpocetine, binding to translocation protein, induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-related kinase and Akt and thus inhibited the translocation of nuclear factor-kappa B into the nucleus. Silencing of translocator protein significantly attenuated the inhibitory effect of vinpocetine on osteoblastic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells. Taken together, vinpocetine may be a promising candidate for the clinical therapy of vascular calcification.

  11. Double-filter identification of vascular-expressed genes using Arabidopsis plants with vascular hypertrophy and hypotrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ckurshumova, Wenzislava; Scarpella, Enrico; Goldstein, Rochelle S; Berleth, Thomas

    2011-08-01

    Genes expressed in vascular tissues have been identified by several strategies, usually with a focus on mature vascular cells. In this study, we explored the possibility of using two opposite types of altered tissue compositions in combination with a double-filter selection to identify genes with a high probability of vascular expression in early organ primordia. Specifically, we generated full-transcriptome microarray profiles of plants with (a) genetically strongly reduced and (b) pharmacologically vastly increased vascular tissues and identified a reproducible cohort of 158 transcripts that fulfilled the dual requirement of being underrepresented in (a) and overrepresented in (b). In order to assess the predictive value of our identification scheme for vascular gene expression, we determined the expression patterns of genes in two unbiased subsamples. First, we assessed the expression patterns of all twenty annotated transcription factor genes from the cohort of 158 genes and found that seventeen of the twenty genes were preferentially expressed in leaf vascular cells. Remarkably, fifteen of these seventeen vascular genes were clearly expressed already very early in leaf vein development. Twelve genes with published leaf expression patterns served as a second subsample to monitor the representation of vascular genes in our cohort. Of those twelve genes, eleven were preferentially expressed in leaf vascular tissues. Based on these results we propose that our compendium of 158 genes represents a sample that is highly enriched for genes expressed in vascular tissues and that our approach is particularly suited to detect genes expressed in vascular cell lineages at early stages of their inception. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Protein Kinase C Inhibitors as Modulators of Vascular Function and Their Application in Vascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raouf A. Khalil

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Blood pressure (BP is regulated by multiple neuronal, hormonal, renal and vascular control mechanisms. Changes in signaling mechanisms in the endothelium, vascular smooth muscle (VSM and extracellular matrix cause alterations in vascular tone and blood vessel remodeling and may lead to persistent increases in vascular resistance and hypertension (HTN. In VSM, activation of surface receptors by vasoconstrictor stimuli causes an increase in intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i, which forms a complex with calmodulin, activates myosin light chain (MLC kinase and leads to MLC phosphorylation, actin-myosin interaction and VSM contraction. Vasoconstrictor agonists could also increase the production of diacylglycerol which activates protein kinase C (PKC. PKC is a family of Ca2+-dependent and Ca2+-independent isozymes that have different distributions in various blood vessels, and undergo translocation from the cytosol to the plasma membrane, cytoskeleton or the nucleus during cell activation. In VSM, PKC translocation to the cell surface may trigger a cascade of biochemical events leading to activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK and MAPK kinase (MEK, a pathway that ultimately increases the myofilament force sensitivity to [Ca2+]i, and enhances actin-myosin interaction and VSM contraction. PKC translocation to the nucleus may induce transactivation of various genes and promote VSM growth and proliferation. PKC could also affect endothelium-derived relaxing and contracting factors as well as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs in the extracellular matrix further affecting vascular reactivity and remodeling. In addition to vasoactive factors, reactive oxygen species, inflammatory cytokines and other metabolic factors could affect PKC activity. Increased PKC expression and activity have been observed in vascular disease and in certain forms of experimental and human HTN. Targeting of vascular PKC using PKC inhibitors may function in

  13. Interventional vascular radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yune, H.Y.

    1984-01-01

    The papers published during this past year in the area of interventional vascular radiology presented some useful modifications and further experiences both in the area of thromboembolic therapy and in dilation and thrombolysis, but no new techniques. As an introductory subject, an excellent monograph reviewing the current spectrum of pharmacoangiography was presented in Radiographics. Although the presented material is primarily in diagnostic application of various pharmacologic agents used today to facilitate demonstration of certain diagnostic criteria of various disease processes, both vasodilatory and vasoconstrictive reaction to these agents are widely used in various therapeutic vascular procedures. This monograph should be reviewed by every angiographer whether or not he or she performs interventional procedures, and it would be very convenient to have this table available in the angiography suite. In a related subject, Bookstein and co-workers have written an excellent review concerning pharmacologic manipulations of various blood coagulative parameters during angiography. Understanding the proper method of manipulation of the bloodclotting factors during angiography, and especially during interventional angiography, is extremely important. Particularly, the method of manipulating the coagulation with the use of heparin and protamine and modification of the platelet activity by using aspirin and dipyridamole are succinctly reviewed. The systemic and selective thrombolytic activities of streptokianse are also discussed

  14. Vascular dysfunction in preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Lesley J; Morton, Jude S; Davidge, Sandra T

    2014-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a complex disorder which affects an estimated 5% of all pregnancies worldwide. It is diagnosed by hypertension in the presence of proteinuria after the 20th week of pregnancy and is a prominent cause of maternal morbidity and mortality. As delivery is currently the only known treatment, preeclampsia is also a leading cause of preterm delivery. Preeclampsia is associated with maternal vascular dysfunction, leading to serious cardiovascular risk both during and following pregnancy. Endothelial dysfunction, resulting in increased peripheral resistance, is an integral part of the maternal syndrome. While the cause of preeclampsia remains unknown, placental ischemia resulting from aberrant placentation is a fundamental characteristic of the disorder. Poor placentation is believed to stimulate the release of a number of factors including pro- and antiangiogenic factors and inflammatory activators into the maternal systemic circulation. These factors are critical mediators of vascular function and impact the endothelium in distinctive ways, including enhanced endothelial oxidative stress. The mechanisms of action and the consequences on the maternal vasculature will be discussed in this review. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Vascular Remodeling in Experimental Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma R. Risler

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The basic hemodynamic abnormality in hypertension is an increased peripheral resistance that is due mainly to a decreased vascular lumen derived from structural changes in the small arteries wall, named (as a whole vascular remodeling. The vascular wall is an active, flexible, and integrated organ made up of cellular (endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, adventitia cells, and fibroblasts and noncellular (extracellular matrix components, which in a dynamic way change shape or number, or reorganize in response to physiological and pathological stimuli, maintaining the integrity of the vessel wall in physiological conditions or participating in the vascular changes in cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension. Research focused on new signaling pathways and molecules that can participate in the mechanisms of vascular remodeling has provided evidence showing that vascular structure is not only affected by blood pressure, but also by mechanisms that are independent of the increased pressure. This review will provide an overview of the evidence, explaining some of the pathophysiologic mechanisms participating in the development of the vascular remodeling, in experimental models of hypertension, with special reference to the findings in spontaneously hypertensive rats as a model of essential hypertension, and in fructose-fed rats as a model of secondary hypertension, in the context of the metabolic syndrome. The understanding of the mechanisms producing the vascular alterations will allow the development of novel pharmacological tools for vascular protection in hypertensive disease.

  16. Vascular pattern formation in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpella, Enrico; Helariutta, Ykä

    2010-01-01

    Reticulate tissue systems exist in most multicellular organisms, and the principles underlying the formation of cellular networks have fascinated philosophers, mathematicians, and biologists for centuries. In particular, the beautiful and varied arrangements of vascular tissues in plants have intrigued mankind since antiquity, yet the organizing signals have remained elusive. Plant vascular tissues form systems of interconnected cell files throughout the plant body. Vascular cells are aligned with one another along continuous lines, and vascular tissues differentiate at reproducible positions within organ environments. However, neither the precise path of vascular differentiation nor the exact geometry of vascular networks is fixed or immutable. Several recent advances converge to reconcile the seemingly conflicting predictability and plasticity of vascular tissue patterns. A control mechanism in which an apical-basal flow of signal establishes a basic coordinate system for body axis formation and vascular strand differentiation, and in which a superimposed level of radial organizing cues elaborates cell patterns, would generate a reproducible tissue configuration in the context of an underlying robust, self-organizing structure, and account for the simultaneous regularity and flexibility of vascular tissue patterns. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Additive Manufacturing of Vascular Grafts and Vascularized Tissue Constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elomaa, Laura; Yang, Yunzhi Peter

    2017-10-01

    There is a great need for engineered vascular grafts among patients with cardiovascular diseases who are in need of bypass therapy and lack autologous healthy blood vessels. In addition, because of the severe worldwide shortage of organ donors, there is an increasing need for engineered vascularized tissue constructs as an alternative to organ transplants. Additive manufacturing (AM) offers great advantages and flexibility of fabrication of cell-laden, multimaterial, and anatomically shaped vascular grafts and vascularized tissue constructs. Various inkjet-, extrusion-, and photocrosslinking-based AM techniques have been applied to the fabrication of both self-standing vascular grafts and porous, vascularized tissue constructs. This review discusses the state-of-the-art research on the use of AM for vascular applications and the key criteria for biomaterials in the AM of both acellular and cellular constructs. We envision that new smart printing materials that can adapt to their environment and encourage rapid endothelialization and remodeling will be the key factor in the future for the successful AM of personalized and dynamic vascular tissue applications.

  18. Cardiac and vascular malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ley, S.; Ley-Zaporozhan, J.

    2015-01-01

    Malformations of the heart and great vessels show a high degree of variation. There are numerous variants and defects with only few clinical manifestations and are only detected by chance, such as a persistent left superior vena cava or a partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection. Other cardiovascular malformations are manifested directly after birth and need prompt mostly surgical interventions. At this point in time echocardiography is the diagnostic modality of choice for morphological and functional characterization of malformations. Additional imaging using computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is only required in a minority of cases. If so, the small anatomical structures, the physiological tachycardia and tachypnea are a challenge for imaging modalities and strategies. This review article presents the most frequent vascular, cardiac and complex cardiovascular malformations independent of the first line diagnostic imaging modality. (orig.) [de

  19. CIRSE Vascular Closure Device Registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reekers, Jim A.; Müller-Hülsbeck, Stefan; Libicher, Martin; Atar, Eli; Trentmann, Jens; Goffette, Pierre; Borggrefe, Jan; Zeleňák, Kamil; Hooijboer, Pieter; Belli, Anna-Maria

    2011-01-01

    Vascular closure devices are routinely used after many vascular interventional radiology procedures. However, there have been no major multicenter studies to assess the safety and effectiveness of the routine use of closure devices in interventional radiology. The CIRSE registry of closure devices

  20. Dynamic adaption of vascular morphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okkels, Fridolin; Jacobsen, Jens Christian Brings

    2012-01-01

    The structure of vascular networks adapts continuously to meet changes in demand of the surrounding tissue. Most of the known vascular adaptation mechanisms are based on local reactions to local stimuli such as pressure and flow, which in turn reflects influence from the surrounding tissue. Here ...

  1. Diagnostic criteria for vascular dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheltens, P.; Hijdra, A. H.

    1998-01-01

    The term vascular dementia implies the presence of a clinical syndrome (dementia) caused by, or at least assumed to be caused by, a specific disorder (cerebrovascular disease). In this review, the various sets of criteria used to define vascular dementia are outlined. The various sets of criteria

  2. The vascular secret of Klotho

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lewin, Ewa; Olgaard, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Klotho is an evolutionarily highly conserved protein related to longevity. Increasing evidence of a vascular protecting effect of the Klotho protein has emerged and might be important for future treatments of uremic vascular calcification. It is still disputed whether Klotho is locally expressed ...

  3. Social media in vascular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indes, Jeffrey E; Gates, Lindsay; Mitchell, Erica L; Muhs, Bart E

    2013-04-01

    There has been a tremendous growth in the use of social media to expand the visibility of various specialties in medicine. The purpose of this paper is to describe the latest updates on some current applications of social media in the practice of vascular surgery as well as existing limitations of use. This investigation demonstrates that the use of social networking sites appears to have a positive impact on vascular practice, as is evident through the incorporation of this technology at the Cleveland Clinic and by the Society for Vascular Surgery into their approach to patient care and physician communication. Overall, integration of social networking technology has current and future potential to be used to promote goals, patient awareness, recruitment for clinical trials, and professionalism within the specialty of vascular surgery. Copyright © 2013 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Cocoa, Blood Pressure, and Vascular Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludovici, Valeria; Barthelmes, Jens; Nägele, Matthias P.; Enseleit, Frank; Ferri, Claudio; Flammer, Andreas J.; Ruschitzka, Frank; Sudano, Isabella

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) represents the most common cause of death worldwide. The consumption of natural polyphenol-rich foods, and cocoa in particular, has been related to a reduced risk of CVD, including coronary heart disease and stroke. Intervention studies strongly suggest that cocoa exerts a beneficial impact on cardiovascular health, through the reduction of blood pressure (BP), improvement of vascular function, modulation of lipid and glucose metabolism, and reduction of platelet aggregation. These potentially beneficial effects have been shown in healthy subjects as well as in patients with risk factors (arterial hypertension, diabetes, and smoking) or established CVD (coronary heart disease or heart failure). Several potential mechanisms are supposed to be responsible for the positive effect of cocoa; among them activation of nitric oxide (NO) synthase, increased bioavailability of NO as well as antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory properties. It is the aim of this review to summarize the findings of cocoa and chocolate on BP and vascular function. PMID:28824916

  5. Cocoa, Blood Pressure, and Vascular Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Ludovici

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease (CVD represents the most common cause of death worldwide. The consumption of natural polyphenol-rich foods, and cocoa in particular, has been related to a reduced risk of CVD, including coronary heart disease and stroke. Intervention studies strongly suggest that cocoa exerts a beneficial impact on cardiovascular health, through the reduction of blood pressure (BP, improvement of vascular function, modulation of lipid and glucose metabolism, and reduction of platelet aggregation. These potentially beneficial effects have been shown in healthy subjects as well as in patients with risk factors (arterial hypertension, diabetes, and smoking or established CVD (coronary heart disease or heart failure. Several potential mechanisms are supposed to be responsible for the positive effect of cocoa; among them activation of nitric oxide (NO synthase, increased bioavailability of NO as well as antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory properties. It is the aim of this review to summarize the findings of cocoa and chocolate on BP and vascular function.

  6. Vascular Dysfunction in Horses with Endocrinopathic Laminitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth A Morgan

    Full Text Available Endocrinopathic laminitis (EL is a vascular condition of the equine hoof resulting in severe lameness with both welfare and economic implications. EL occurs in association with equine metabolic syndrome and equine Cushing's disease. Vascular dysfunction, most commonly due to endothelial dysfunction, is associated with cardiovascular risk in people with metabolic syndrome and Cushing's syndrome. We tested the hypothesis that horses with EL have vascular, specifically endothelial, dysfunction. Healthy horses (n = 6 and horses with EL (n = 6 destined for euthanasia were recruited. We studied vessels from the hooves (laminar artery, laminar vein and the facial skin (facial skin arteries by small vessel wire myography. The response to vasoconstrictors phenylephrine (10-9-10-5M and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5HT; 10-9-10-5M and the vasodilator acetylcholine (10-9-10-5M was determined. In comparison with healthy controls, acetylcholine-induced relaxation was dramatically reduced in all intact vessels from horses with EL (% relaxation of healthy laminar arteries 323.5 ± 94.1% v EL 90.8 ± 4.4%, P = 0.01, laminar veins 129.4 ± 14.8% v EL 71.2 ± 4.1%, P = 0.005 and facial skin arteries 182.0 ± 40.7% v EL 91.4 ± 4.5%, P = 0.01. In addition, contractile responses to phenylephrine and 5HT were increased in intact laminar veins from horses with EL compared with healthy horses; these differences were endothelium-independent. Sensitivity to phenylephrine was reduced in intact laminar arteries (P = 0.006 and veins (P = 0.009 from horses with EL. Horses with EL exhibit significant vascular dysfunction in laminar vessels and in facial skin arteries. The systemic nature of the abnormalities suggest this dysfunction is associated with the underlying endocrinopathy and not local changes to the hoof.

  7. Accelerated Vascular Aging as a Paradigm for Hypertensive Vascular Disease: Prevention and Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Matthias; Husmann, Marc; Meyer, Matthias R

    2016-05-01

    Aging is considered the most important nonmodifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease and death after age 28 years. Because of demographic changes the world population is expected to increase to 9 billion by the year 2050 and up to 12 billion by 2100, with several-fold increases among those 65 years of age and older. Healthy aging and prevention of aging-related diseases and associated health costs have become part of political agendas of governments around the world. Atherosclerotic vascular burden increases with age; accordingly, patients with progeria (premature aging) syndromes die from myocardial infarctions or stroke as teenagers or young adults. The incidence and prevalence of arterial hypertension also increases with age. Arterial hypertension-like diabetes and chronic renal failure-shares numerous pathologies and underlying mechanisms with the vascular aging process. In this article, we review how arterial hypertension resembles premature vascular aging, including the mechanisms by which arterial hypertension (as well as other risk factors such as diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, or chronic renal failure) accelerates the vascular aging process. We will also address the importance of cardiovascular risk factor control-including antihypertensive therapy-as a powerful intervention to interfere with premature vascular aging to reduce the age-associated prevalence of diseases such as myocardial infarction, heart failure, hypertensive nephropathy, and vascular dementia due to cerebrovascular disease. Finally, we will discuss the implementation of endothelial therapy, which aims at active patient participation to improve primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The effect of lowering LDL cholesterol on vascular access patency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrington, William; Emberson, Jonathan; Staplin, Natalie

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Reducing LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) with statin-based therapy reduces the risk of major atherosclerotic events among patients with CKD, including dialysis patients, but the effect of lowering LDL-C on vascular access patency is unclear. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS...

  9. Vascular inflammatory cells in hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G. Harrison

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is a common disorder with uncertain etiology. In the last several years, it has become evident that components of both the innate and adaptive immune system play an essential role in hypertension. Macrophages and T cells accumulate in the perivascular fat, the heart and the kidney of hypertensive patients and in animals with experimental hypertension. Various immunosuppressive agents lower blood pressure and prevent end-organ damage. Mice lacking lymphocytes are protected against hypertension, and adoptive transfer of T cells, but not B cells in the animals restores their blood pressure response to stimuli such as angiotensin II or high salt. Recent studies have shown that mice lacking macrophages have blunted hypertension in response to angiotensin II and that genetic deletion of macrophages markedly reduces experimental hypertension. Dendritic cells have also been implicated in this disease. Many hypertensive stimuli have triggering effects on the central nervous system and signals arising from the circumventricular organ seem to promote inflammation. Studies have suggested that central signals activate macrophages and T cells, which home to the kidney and vasculature and release cytokines, including IL-6 and IL-17, which in turn cause renal and vascular dysfunction and lead to blood pressure elevation. These recent discoveries provide a new understanding of hypertension and provide novel therapeutic opportunities for treatment of this serious disease.

  10. [The future of vascular medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeger, K; Luther, B

    2014-10-01

    In the future vascular medicine will still have a great impact on health of people. It should be noted that the aging of the population does not lead to a dramatic increase in patient numbers, but will be associated with a changing spectrum of co-morbidities. In addition, vascular medical research has to include the intensive care special features of vascular patients, the involvement of vascular medicine in a holistic concept of fast-track surgery, a geriatric-oriented intensive monitoring and early geriatric rehabilitation. For the future acceptance of vascular medicine as a separate subject area under delimitation of cardiology and radiology is important. On the other hand, the subject is so complex and will become more complex in future specialisations that mixing of surgery and angiology is desirable, with the aim to preserve the vascular surgical knowledge and skills on par with the medical and interventional measures and further develop them. Only large, interdisciplinary guided vascular centres will be able to provide timely diagnosis and therapy, to deal with the growing multi-morbidity of the patient, to perform complex therapies even in an acute emergency and due to sufficient number of cases to present with well-trained and experienced teams. These requirements are mandatory to decrease patients' mortality step by step. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Contemporary vascular smartphone medical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Thomas; O'Neill, Stephen; Johns, Neil; Brady, Richard R W

    2013-08-01

    Use of smartphones and medical mHealth applications (apps) within the clinical environment provides a potential means for delivering elements of vascular care. This article reviews the contemporary availability of apps specifically themed to major vascular diseases and the opportunities and concerns regarding their integration into practice. Smartphone apps relating to major vascular diseases were identified from the app stores for the 6 most popular smartphone platforms, including iPhone, Android, Blackberry, Nokia, Windows, and Samsung. Search terms included peripheral artery (arterial) disease, varicose veins, aortic aneurysm, carotid artery disease, amputation, ulcers, hyperhydrosis, thoracic outlet syndrome, vascular malformation, and lymphatic disorders. Forty-nine vascular-themed apps were identified. Sixteen (33%) were free of charge. Fifteen apps (31%) had customer satisfaction ratings, but only 3 (6%) had greater than 100. Only 13 apps (27%) had documented medical professional involvement in their design or content. The integration of apps into the delivery of care has the potential to benefit vascular health care workers and patients. However, high-quality apps designed by clinicians with vascular expertise are currently lacking and represent an area of concern in the mHealth market. Improvement in the quality and reliability of these apps will require the development of robust regulation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A multifaceted approach to maximize erectile function and vascular health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meldrum, David R; Gambone, Joseph C; Morris, Marge A; Ignarro, Louis J

    2010-12-01

    To review the role of various factors influencing vascular nitric oxide (NO) and cyclic GMP, and consequently, erectile function and vascular health. Pertinent publications are reviewed. Daily moderate exercise stimulates vascular NO production. Maintenance of normal body weight and waist/hip ratio allows NO stimulation by insulin. Decreased intake of fat, sugar, and simple carbohydrates rapidly converted to sugar reduces the adverse effects of fatty acids and sugar on endothelial NO production. Omega-3 fatty acids stimulate endothelial NO release. Antioxidants boost NO production and prevent NO breakdown. Folic acid, calcium, vitamin C, and vitamin E support the biochemical pathways leading to NO release. Cessation of smoking and avoidance of excessive alcohol preserve normal endothelial function. Moderate use of alcohol and certain proprietary supplements may favorably influence erectile and vascular function. Treatment of any remaining testosterone deficit will both increase erectile function and reduce any associated metabolic syndrome. After production of NO and cyclic GMP are improved, use of phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors should result in greater success in treating remaining erectile dysfunction. Recent studies have also suggested positive effects of phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors on vascular function. A multifaceted approach will maximize both erectile function and vascular health. Copyright © 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Development of a clinical prediction rule to improve peripheral intravenous cannulae first attempt success in the emergency department and reduce post insertion failure rates: the Vascular Access Decisions in the Emergency Room (VADER) study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Peter J; Rippey, James C R; Cooke, Marie L; Bharat, Chrianna; Murray, Kevin; Higgins, Niall S; Foale, Aileen; Rickard, Claire M

    2016-02-11

    Peripheral intravenous cannula (PIVC) insertion is one of the most common clinical interventions performed in emergency care worldwide. However, factors associated with successful PIVC placement and maintenance are not well understood. This study seeks to determine the predictors of first time PIVC insertion success in emergency department (ED) and identify the rationale for removal of the ED inserted PIVC in patients admitted to the hospital ward. Reducing failed insertion attempts and improving peripheral intravenous cannulation practice could lead to better staff and patient experiences, as well as improving hospital efficiency. We propose an observational cohort study of PIVC insertions in a patient population presenting to ED, with follow-up observation of the PIVC in subsequent admissions to the hospital ward. We will collect specific PIVC observational data such as; clinician factors, patient factors, device information and clinical practice variables. Trained researchers will gather ED PIVC insertion data to identify predictors of insertion success. In those admitted from the ED, we will determine the dwell time of the ED-inserted PIVC. Multivariate regression analyses will be used to identify factors associated with insertions success and PIVC failure and standard statistical validation techniques will be used to create and assess the effectiveness of a clinical predication rule. The findings of our study will provide new evidence to improve insertion success rates in the ED setting and identify strategies to reduce premature device failure for patients admitted to hospital wards. Results will unravel a complexity of factors that contribute to unsuccessful PIVC attempts such as patient and clinician factors along with the products, technologies and infusates used. ACTRN12615000588594; Pre-results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  14. Constructal vascularized structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetkin, Erdal

    2015-06-01

    Smart features such as self-healing and selfcooling require bathing the entire volume with a coolant or/and healing agent. Bathing the entire volume is an example of point to area (or volume) flows. Point to area flows cover all the distributing and collecting kinds of flows, i.e. inhaling and exhaling, mining, river deltas, energy distribution, distribution of products on the landscape and so on. The flow resistances of a point to area flow can be decreased by changing the design with the guidance of the constructal law, which is the law of the design evolution in time. In this paper, how the flow resistances (heat, fluid and stress) can be decreased by using the constructal law is shown with examples. First, the validity of two assumptions is surveyed: using temperature independent Hess-Murray rule and using constant diameter ducts where the duct discharges fluid along its edge. Then, point to area types of flows are explained by illustrating the results of two examples: fluid networks and heating an area. Last, how the structures should be vascularized for cooling and mechanical strength is documented. This paper shows that flow resistances can be decreased by morphing the shape freely without any restrictions or generic algorithms.

  15. Acceleration of vascularized bone tissue-engineered constructs in a large animal model combining intrinsic and extrinsic vascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigand, Annika; Beier, Justus P; Hess, Andreas; Gerber, Thomas; Arkudas, Andreas; Horch, Raymund E; Boos, Anja M

    2015-05-01

    ingrowth and remodeling processes of the bone substitute. Extrinsic vessels contribute to faster vascularization and finally anastomose with intrinsic vasculature, allowing microvascular transplantation of the bone substitute after a shorter prevascularization time than using the intrinsic method only. It can be reasonably assumed that the usage of perforated chambers can significantly reduce the time until transplantation of bone constructs. Finally, this study paves the way for further preclinical testing for proof of the concept as a basis for early clinical applicability.

  16. Lifestyle and metabolic approaches to maximizing erectile and vascular health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meldrum, D R; Gambone, J C; Morris, M A; Esposito, K; Giugliano, D; Ignarro, L J

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress and inflammation, which disrupt nitric oxide (NO) production directly or by causing resistance to insulin, are central determinants of vascular diseases including ED. Decreased vascular NO has been linked to abdominal obesity, smoking and high intakes of fat and sugar, which all cause oxidative stress. Men with ED have decreased vascular NO and circulating and cellular antioxidants. Oxidative stress and inflammatory markers are increased in men with ED, and all increase with age. Exercise increases vascular NO, and more frequent erections are correlated with decreased ED, both in part due to stimulation of endothelial NO production by shear stress. Exercise and weight loss increase insulin sensitivity and endothelial NO production. Potent antioxidants or high doses of weaker antioxidants increase vascular NO and improve vascular and erectile function. Antioxidants may be particularly important in men with ED who smoke, are obese or have diabetes. Omega-3 fatty acids reduce inflammatory markers, decrease cardiac death and increase endothelial NO production, and are therefore critical for men with ED who are under age 60 years, and/or have diabetes, hypertension or coronary artery disease, who are at increased risk of serious or even fatal cardiac events. Phosphodiesterase inhibitors have recently been shown to improve antioxidant status and NO production and allow more frequent and sustained penile exercise. Some angiotensin II receptor blockers decrease oxidative stress and improve vascular and erectile function and are therefore preferred choices for lowering blood pressure in men with ED. Lifestyle modifications, including physical and penile-specific exercise, weight loss, omega-3 and folic acid supplements, reduced intakes of fat and sugar, and improved antioxidant status through diet and/or supplements should be integrated into any comprehensive approach to maximizing erectile function, resulting in greater overall success and patient

  17. In vivo quantitative evaluation of vascular parameters for angiogenesis based on sparse principal component analysis and aggregated boosted trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Fengjun; Liu, Junting; Qu, Xiaochao; Xu, Xianhui; Chen, Xueli; Yang, Xiang; Liang, Jimin; Tian, Jie; Cao, Feng

    2014-01-01

    To solve the multicollinearity issue and unequal contribution of vascular parameters for the quantification of angiogenesis, we developed a quantification evaluation method of vascular parameters for angiogenesis based on in vivo micro-CT imaging of hindlimb ischemic model mice. Taking vascular volume as the ground truth parameter, nine vascular parameters were first assembled into sparse principal components (PCs) to reduce the multicolinearity issue. Aggregated boosted trees (ABTs) were then employed to analyze the importance of vascular parameters for the quantification of angiogenesis via the loadings of sparse PCs. The results demonstrated that vascular volume was mainly characterized by vascular area, vascular junction, connectivity density, segment number and vascular length, which indicated they were the key vascular parameters for the quantification of angiogenesis. The proposed quantitative evaluation method was compared with both the ABTs directly using the nine vascular parameters and Pearson correlation, which were consistent. In contrast to the ABTs directly using the vascular parameters, the proposed method can select all the key vascular parameters simultaneously, because all the key vascular parameters were assembled into the sparse PCs with the highest relative importance. (paper)

  18. Luteolin Ameliorates Hypertensive Vascular Remodeling through Inhibiting the Proliferation and Migration of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Su

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Preliminary researches showed that luteolin was used to treat hypertension. However, it is still unclear whether luteolin has effect on the hypertensive complication such as vascular remodeling. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of luteolin on the hypertensive vascular remodeling and its molecular mechanism. Method and Results. We evaluated the effect of luteolin on aorta thickening of hypertension in spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHRs and found that luteolin could significantly decrease the blood pressure and media thickness of aorta in vivo. Luteolin could inhibit angiotensin II- (Ang II- induced proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs. Dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA staining result showed that luteolin reduced Ang II-stimulated ROS production in VSMCs. Furthermore, western blot and gelatin zymography results showed that luteolin treatment leaded to a decrease in ERK1/2, p-ERK1/2, p-p38, MMP2, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA protein level. Conclusion. These data support that luteolin can ameliorate hypertensive vascular remodeling by inhibiting the proliferation and migration of Ang II-induced VSMCs. Its mechanism is mediated by the regulation of MAPK signaling pathway and the production of ROS.

  19. Diabetes and Retinal Vascular Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eui Seok Shin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes predominantly affects the microvascular circulation of the retina resulting in a range of structural changes unique to this tissue. These changes ultimately lead to altered permeability, hyperproliferation of endothelial cells and edema, and abnormal vascularization of the retina with resulting loss of vision. Enhanced production of inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress are primary insults with significant contribution to the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy (DR. We have determined the identity of the retinal vascular cells affected by hyperglycemia, and have delineated the cell autonomous impact of high glucose on function of these cells. We discuss some of the high glucose specific changes in retinal vascular cells and their contribution to retinal vascular dysfunction. This knowledge provides novel insight into the molecular and cellular defects contributing to the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy, and will aid in the development of innovative, as well as target specific therapeutic approaches for prevention and treatment of DR.

  20. Vascular graft infections with Mycoplasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levi-Mazloum, Niels Donald; Skov Jensen, J; Prag, J

    1995-01-01

    laboratory techniques, the percentage of culture-negative yet grossly infected vascular grafts seems to be increasing and is not adequately explained by the prior use of antibiotics. We have recently reported the first case of aortic graft infection with Mycoplasma. We therefore suggest the hypothesis...... that the large number of culture-negative yet grossly infected vascular grafts may be due to Mycoplasma infection not detected with conventional laboratory technique....

  1. Limb vascular function in women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellsten, Ylva; Gliemann, Lasse

    2018-01-01

    Throughout life, women are subjected to both acute fluctuations in sex hormones, associated with the menstrual cycle, and chronic changes following the onset of menopause. Female sex hormones, and in particular estrogen, strongly influence cardiovascular function such as the regulation of vascular...... studies. Physical activity should be recommended for women of all ages, but the most essential timing for maintenance of vascular health may be from menopause and onwards....

  2. Facial vascular malformations in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunelle, F.O.; Lallemand, D.; Chaumont, P.; Teillac, D.; Manach, Y.

    1988-01-01

    The authors present their experience with conventional and digital angiography of vascular malformations of the head and neck in children. 22 hemangioendotheliomas, 8 venous angiomas, and 3 arteriovenous fistula were studied. 22 patients were embolised. DSA offers many advantages during the diagnostic as well as during the therapeutic phase of angiography. Embolization appears to have a major role in treatment of such vascular malformations. (orig.)

  3. Angiogenesis, Cancer, and Vascular Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junji Moriya

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Several lines of evidence have revealed that the angiogenic response to ischemic injury declines with age, which might account for the increased morbidity and mortality of cardiovascular disease (CVD among the elderly. While impairment of angiogenesis with aging leads to delayed wound healing or exacerbation of atherosclerotic ischemic diseases, it also inhibits the progression of cancer. Age-related changes of angiogenesis have been considered to at least partly result from vascular aging or endothelial cell senescence. There is considerable evidence supporting the hypothesis that vascular cell senescence contributes to the pathogenesis of age-related CVD, suggesting that vascular aging could be an important therapeutic target. Since therapeutic angiogenesis is now regarded as a promising concept for patients with ischemic CVD, it has become even more important to understand the detailed molecular mechanisms underlying impairment of angiogenesis in older patients. To improve the usefulness of therapeutic angiogenesis, approaches are needed that can compensate for impaired angiogenic capacity in the elderly while not promoting the development or progression of malignancy. In this review, we briefly outline the mechanisms of angiogenesis and vascular aging, followed by a description of how vascular aging leads to impairment of angiogenesis. We also examine potential therapeutic approaches that could enhance angiogenesis and/or vascular function in the elderly, as well as discussing the possibility of anti-senescence therapy or reversal of endothelial cell senescence.

  4. Calcium dynamics in vascular smooth muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Amberg, Gregory C.; Navedo, Manuel F.

    2013-01-01

    Smooth muscle cells are ultimately responsible for determining vascular luminal diameter and blood flow. Dynamic changes in intracellular calcium are a critical mechanism regulating vascular smooth muscle contractility. Processes influencing intracellular calcium are therefore important regulators of vascular function with physiological and pathophysiological consequences. In this review we discuss the major dynamic calcium signals identified and characterized in vascular smooth muscle cells....

  5. Injuries to the vascular endothelium: vascular wall and endothelial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Vascular endothelial injury has multiple elements, and this article focuses on ischemia-related processes that have particular relevance to ischemic stroke. Distinctions between necrotic and apoptotic cell death provide a basic science context in which to better understand the significance of classical core and penumbra concepts of acute stroke, with apoptotic processes particularly prominent in the penumbra. The mitochondria are understood to serve as a reservoir of proteins that mediate apoptosis. Oxidative stress pathways generating reactive oxygen species (ROS) are prominent in endothelial injury, both ischemic and nonischemic, with prominent roles of enzyme- and nonenzymemediated pathways; mitochondria once again have a critical role, particularly in the nonenzymatic pathways generating ROS. Inflammation also contributes to vascular endothelial injury, and endothelial cells have the capacity to rapidly increase expression of inflammatory mediators following ischemic challenge; this leads to enhanced leukocyte-endothelial interactions mediated by selectins and adhesion molecules. Preconditioning consists of a minor version of an injurious event, which in turn may protect vascular endothelium from injury following a more substantial event. Presence of the blood-brain barrier creates unique responses to endothelial injury, with permeability changes due to impairment of endothelial-matrix interactions compounding altered vasomotor tone and tissue perfusion mediated by nitric oxide. Pharmacological protection against vascular endothelial injury can be provided by several of the phosphodiesterases (cilostazol and dipyridamole), along with statins. Optimal clinical responses for protection of brain vascular endothelium may use preconditioning as a model, and will likely require combined protection against apoptosis, ROS, and inflammation.

  6. Non-invasive vascular imaging: assessing tumour vascularity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delorme, S.; Knopp, M.V.

    1998-01-01

    Non-invasive assessment of vascularity is a new diagnostic approach to characterise tumours. Vascular assessment is based on the pathophysiology of tumour angiogenesis and its diagnostic implications for tumour biology, prognosis and therapy response. Two current techniques investigating vascular features in addition to morphology are Doppler ultrasonography and contrast-enhanced MRI. Diagnostic differentiation has been shown to be possible with Doppler, and a high degree of observed vascularity could be linked to an aggressive course of the disease. Dynamic MRI using gadolinium chelates is already used clinically to detect and differentiate tumours. The histological correlation shows that capillary permeability is increased in malignant tumours and is the best criterion for differentiation from benign processes. Permeability and perfusion factors seem to be more diagnostic than overall vessel density. New clinical applications are currently being established for therapy monitoring. Further instrumental developments will bring harmonic imaging in Doppler, and faster imaging techniques, higher spatial resolution and novel pharmacokinetic concepts in MRI. Upcoming contrast agents for both Doppler and MRI will further improve estimation of intratumoural blood volume and vascular permeability. (orig.)

  7. Vascular Remodelling and Mesenchymal Transition in Systemic Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pier Andrea Nicolosi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibrosis of the skin and of internal organs, autoimmunity, and vascular inflammation are hallmarks of Systemic Sclerosis (SSc. The injury and activation of endothelial cells, with hyperplasia of the intima and eventual obliteration of the vascular lumen, are early features of SSc. Reduced capillary blood flow coupled with deficient angiogenesis leads to chronic hypoxia and tissue ischemia, enforcing a positive feed-forward loop sustaining vascular remodelling, further exacerbated by extracellular matrix accumulation due to fibrosis. Despite numerous developments and a growing number of controlled clinical trials no treatment has been shown so far to alter SSc natural history, outlining the need of further investigation in the molecular pathways involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. We review some processes potentially involved in SSc vasculopathy, with attention to the possible effect of sustained vascular inflammation on the plasticity of vascular cells. Specifically we focus on mesenchymal transition, a key phenomenon in the cardiac and vascular development as well as in the remodelling of injured vessels. Recent work supports the role of transforming growth factor-beta, Wnt, and Notch signaling in these processes. Importantly, endothelial-mesenchymal transition may be reversible, possibly offering novel cues for treatment.

  8. Arterial complications of vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagleton, Matthew J

    2016-12-01

    Vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a relatively rare genetic syndrome that occurs owing to disorders in the metabolism of fibrillary collagen. These defects affect the soft connective tissues resulting in abnormalities in the skin, joints, hollow organs, and blood vessels. Patients with these defects frequently present at a young age with spontaneous arterial complications involving the medium-sized arteries. Complications involving the hollow organs, such as spontaneous colonic perforation, are observed as well. Given the fragility of the soft tissue, open and endovascular intervention on patients with vascular EDS is fraught with high complication rates. A PubMed search was performed to identify manuscripts published related to vascular EDS. This search included more than 747 articles. These findings were cross-referenced using key terms, including endovascular, embolization, surgery, genetics, pathophysiology, connective tissue disorders, vascular complications, systematic review, type III collagen, and COL3A1. The references in key articles and review articles were evaluated for additional resources not identified in the PubMed search. Care must be taken to balance the risk of intervention vs the risk of continued observation. Life-threatening hemorrhage, however, mandates intervention. With careful, altered approaches to tissue handling, endovascular approaches may provide a safer option for managing the arterial complications observed in patients with vascular EDS. Additional hope may also be found in the use of pharmacologic agents that reduce the incidence and severity of the arterial complications. Copyright © 2016 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Ftr82 Is Critical for Vascular Patterning during Zebrafish Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsueh-Wei Chang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular components and signaling pathways are required for the proper growth of blood vessels. Here, we report for the first time that a teleost-specific gene ftr82 (finTRIM family, member 82 plays a critical role in vasculature during zebrafish development. To date, there has been no description of tripartite motif proteins (TRIM in vascular development, and the role of ftr82 is unknown. In this study, we found that ftr82 mRNA is expressed during the development of vessels, and loss of ftr82 by morpholino (MO knockdown impairs the growth of intersegmental vessels (ISV and caudal vein plexus (CVP, suggesting that ftr82 plays a critical role in promoting ISV and CVP growth. We showed the specificity of ftr82 MO by analyzing ftr82 expression products and expressing ftr82 mRNA to rescue ftr82 morphants. We further showed that the knockdown of ftr82 reduced ISV cell numbers, suggesting that the growth impairment of vessels is likely due to a decrease of cell proliferation and migration, but not cell death. In addition, loss of ftr82 affects the expression of vascular markers, which is consistent with the defect of vascular growth. Finally, we showed that ftr82 likely interacts with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and Notch signaling. Together, we identify teleost-specific ftr82 as a vascular gene that plays an important role for vascular development in zebrafish.

  10. Oxidative and inflammatory signals in obesity-associated vascular abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reho, John J; Rahmouni, Kamal

    2017-07-15

    Obesity is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in part due to vascular abnormalities such as endothelial dysfunction and arterial stiffening. The hypertension and other health complications that arise from these vascular defects increase the risk of heart diseases and stroke. Prooxidant and proinflammatory signaling pathways as well as adipocyte-derived factors have emerged as critical mediators of obesity-associated vascular abnormalities. Designing treatments aimed specifically at improving the vascular dysfunction caused by obesity may provide an effective therapeutic approach to prevent the cardiovascular sequelae associated with excessive adiposity. In this review, we discuss the recent evidence supporting the role of oxidative stress and cytokines and inflammatory signals within the vasculature as well as the impact of the surrounding perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT) on the regulation of vascular function and arterial stiffening in obesity. In particular, we focus on the highly plastic nature of the vasculature in response to altered oxidant and inflammatory signaling and highlight how weight management can be an effective therapeutic approach to reduce the oxidative stress and inflammatory signaling and improve vascular function. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  11. Laser-assisted vascular anastomosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Race L.; Tsao-Wu, George; Magovern, George J.

    1990-06-01

    The milliwatt CO2 laser and a thermal activated binding compound (20% serum albumin) were used for microvascular anastomoses. Under general anesthesia, the femoral arteries (0.7 to 1.0 mm diameter) of 6 rats were isolated. After the left femoral artery in each rat was clamped and transected, the vessel was held together with 3 equidistant 10-0 Xomed sutures. The cut edges were coated 3 to 4 times with the albumin solution and sealed with the CO2 laser (power density = 120 W/cm2). The binding compound solidified to a translucent tensile substance which supported the anastomosis until self healing and repair were achieved. The right femoral artery was used as sham operated control. Complete hemostasis and patency were observed in every case immediately and at 1, 3, and 6 months following surgery. The binding compound absorbed most of the laser energy thus minimizing thermal injury to the underlying tissue. Mongrel dogs weighing 28 to 33 kg were anesthetized and prepared for sterile surgical procedures. In 5 dogs, the femoral and jugular veins were exposed, transected, and anastomosed using a CO2 laser (Sharplan 1040) with the binding compound. In another 12 dogs, cephalic veins were isolated and used for aortocoronary artery bypass procedures. The Sharplan 1040 CO2 laser and 20% albumin solution were utilized to complete the coronary anastomoses in 6 dogs, and 6 dogs were used as controls by suturing the vessels. Again, hemostasis, patency, and minimal tissue damage were observed immediately and 6 weeks after the procedures. Improved surgical results, reduced operating time, minimized tissue damage, and enhanced anastomotic integrity are the advantages of laser assisted vascular anastomosis with a thermal activated binding compound.

  12. Pediatric interventional radiology: vascular interventions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandasamy, Devasenathipathy; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric interventional radiology (PIR) comprises a range of minimally invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedures that are performed using image guidance. PIR has emerged as an essential adjunct to various surgical and medical conditions. Over the years, technology has undergone dramatic and continuous evolution, making this speciality grow. In this review, the authors will discuss various vascular interventional procedures undertaken in pediatric patients. It is challenging for the interventional radiologist to accomplish a successful interventional procedure. There are many vascular interventional radiology procedures which are being performed and have changed the way the diseases are managed. Some of the procedures are life saving and have become the treatment of choice in those patients. The future is indeed bright for the practice and practitioners of pediatric vascular and non-vascular interventions. As more and more of the procedures that are currently being performed in adults get gradually adapted for use in the pediatric population, it may be possible to perform safe and successful interventions in many of the pediatric vascular lesions that are otherwise being referred for surgery. (author)

  13. Reduced cerebral vascularization in experimental neuronopathic Gaucher disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nicholas Jc; Fuller, Maria; Saville, Jennifer T; Cox, Timothy M

    2018-01-01

    The glycosphingolipidosis, Gaucher disease, in which a range of neurological manifestations occur, results from a deficiency of acid β-glucocerebrosidase, with subsequent accumulation of β-glucocerebroside, its upstream substrates, and the non-acylated congener β-glucosylsphingosine. However, the mechanisms by which end-organ dysfunction arise are poorly understood. Here, we report strikingly diminished cerebral microvascular density in a murine model of disease, and provide a detailed analysis of the accompanying cerebral glycosphingolipidome in these animals, with marked elevations of β-glucosylsphingosine. Further in vitro studies confirmed a concentration-dependent impairment of endothelial cytokinesis upon exposure to quasi-pathological concentrations of β-glucosylsphingosine. These findings support a premise for pathogenic disruption of cerebral angiogenesis as an end-organ effect, with potential for therapeutic modulation in neuronopathic Gaucher disease. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Damage Control for Vascular Trauma from the Prehospital to the Operating Room Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanouil Pikoulis

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Early management of vascular injury, starting at the field, is imperative for survival no less than any operative maneuver. Contemporary prehospital management of vascular trauma, including appropriate fluid and volume infusion, tourniquets, and hemostatic agents, has reversed the historically known limb hemorrhage as a leading cause of death. In this context, damage control (DC surgery has evolved to DC resuscitation (DCR as an overarching concept that draws together preoperative and operative interventions aiming at rapidly reducing bleeding from vascular disruption, optimizing oxygenation, and clinical outcomes. This review addresses contemporary DCR techniques from the prehospital to the surgical setting, focusing on civilian vascular injuries.

  15. Damage Control for Vascular Trauma from the Prehospital to the Operating Room Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikoulis, Emmanouil; Salem, Karim M; Avgerinos, Efthymios D; Pikouli, Anastasia; Angelou, Anastasios; Pikoulis, Antreas; Georgopoulos, Sotirios; Karavokyros, Ioannis

    2017-01-01

    Early management of vascular injury, starting at the field, is imperative for survival no less than any operative maneuver. Contemporary prehospital management of vascular trauma, including appropriate fluid and volume infusion, tourniquets, and hemostatic agents, has reversed the historically known limb hemorrhage as a leading cause of death. In this context, damage control (DC) surgery has evolved to DC resuscitation (DCR) as an overarching concept that draws together preoperative and operative interventions aiming at rapidly reducing bleeding from vascular disruption, optimizing oxygenation, and clinical outcomes. This review addresses contemporary DCR techniques from the prehospital to the surgical setting, focusing on civilian vascular injuries.

  16. The fractionation of adipose tissue procedure to obtain stromal vascular fractions for regenerative purposes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dongen, Joris A.; Stevens, Hieronymus P.; Parvizi, Mojtaba; van der Lei, Berend; Harmsen, Martin C.

    2016-01-01

    Autologous adipose tissue transplantation is clinically used to reduce dermal scarring and to restore volume loss. The therapeutic benefit on tissue damage more likely depends on the stromal vascular fraction of adipose tissue than on the adipocyte fraction. This stromal vascular fraction can be

  17. Fetal origin of vascular aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailesh Pitale

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aging is increasingly regarded as an independent risk factor for development of cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis and hypertension and their complications (e.g. MI and Stroke. It is well known that vascular disease evolve over decades with progressive accumulation of cellular and extracellular materials and many inflammatory processes. Metabolic syndrome, obesity and diabetes are conventionally recognized as risk factors for development of coronary vascular disease (CVD. These conditions are known to accelerate ageing process in general and vascular ageing in particular. Adverse events during intrauterine life may programme organ growth and favour disease later in life, popularly known as, ′Barker′s Hypothesis′. The notion of fetal programming implies that during critical periods of prenatal growth, changes in the hormonal and nutritional milieu of the conceptus may alter the full expression of the fetal genome, leading to permanent effects on a range of physiological.

  18. Imaging after vascular gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manninen, Hannu I.; Yang, Xiaoming

    2005-01-01

    Targets for cardiovascular gene therapy currently include limiting restenosis after balloon angioplasty and stent placement, inhibiting vein bypass graft intimal hyperplasia/stenosis, therapeutic angiogenesis for cardiac and lower-limb ischemia, and prevention of thrombus formation. While catheter angiography is still standard method to follow-up vascular gene transfer, other modern imaging techniques, especially intravascular ultrasound (IVUS), magnetic resonance (MR), and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging provide complementary information about the therapeutic effect of vascular gene transfer in humans. Although molecular imaging of therapeutic gene expression in the vasculatures is still in its technical development phase, it has already offered basic medical science an extremely useful in vivo evaluation tool for non- or minimally invasive imaging of vascular gene therapy

  19. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor gemigliptin protects against vascular calcification in an experimental chronic kidney disease and vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soon-Youn Choi

    Full Text Available Although dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors, a class of antidiabetic drugs, have various pleiotropic effects, it remains undetermined whether gemigliptin has a beneficial effect on vascular calcification. Therefore, this study was performed to evaluate the effect of gemigliptin on vascular calcification in a rat model of adenine-induced chronic kidney disease and in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells. Gemigliptin attenuated calcification of abdominal aorta and expression of RUNX2 in adenine-induced chronic kidney disease rats. In cultured vascular smooth muscle cells, phosphate-induced increase in calcium content was reduced by gemigliptin. Gemigliptin reduced phosphate-induced PiT-1 mRNA expression, reactive oxygen species generation, and NADPH oxidase mRNA expression (p22phox and NOX4. The reduction of oxidative stress by gemigliptin was associated with the downregulation of phospho-PI3K/AKT expression. High phosphate increased the expression of frizzled-3 (FDZ3 and decreased the expression of dickkopf-related protein-1 (DKK-1 in the Wnt pathway. These changes were attenuated by gemigliptin treatment. Gemigliptin restored the decreased expression of vascular smooth muscle cells markers (α-SMA and SM22α and increased expression of osteogenic makers (CBFA1, OSX, E11, and SOST induced by phosphate. In conclusion, gemigliptin attenuated vascular calcification and osteogenic trans-differentiation in vascular smooth muscle cells via multiple steps including downregulation of PiT-1 expression and suppression of reactive oxygen species generation, phospho-PI3K/AKT, and the Wnt signaling pathway.

  20. Vascular Gene Expression: A Hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica Concepción eMartínez-Navarro

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The phloem is the conduit through which photoassimilates are distributed from autotrophic to heterotrophic tissues and is involved in the distribution of signaling molecules that coordinate plant growth and responses to the environment. Phloem function depends on the coordinate expression of a large array of genes. We have previously identified conserved motifs in upstream regions of the Arabidopsis genes, encoding the homologs of pumpkin phloem sap mRNAs, displaying expression in vascular tissues. This tissue-specific expression in Arabidopsis is predicted by the overrepresentation of GA/CT-rich motifs in gene promoters. In this work we have searched for common motifs in upstream regions of the homologous genes from plants considered to possess a primitive vascular tissue (a lycophyte, as well as from others that lack a true vascular tissue (a bryophyte, and finally from chlorophytes. Both lycophyte and bryophyte display motifs similar to those found in Arabidopsis with a significantly low E-value, while the chlorophytes showed either a different conserved motif or no conserved motif at all. These results suggest that these same genes are expressed coordinately in non- vascular plants; this coordinate expression may have been one of the prerequisites for the development of conducting tissues in plants. We have also analyzed the phylogeny of conserved proteins that may be involved in phloem function and development. The presence of CmPP16, APL, FT and YDA in chlorophytes suggests the recruitment of ancient regulatory networks for the development of the vascular tissue during evolution while OPS is a novel protein specific to vascular plants.

  1. Effects of Tranexamic Acid on Death, Vascular Occlusive Events ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Tranexamic acid can reduce bleeding in patients undergoing elective surgery. We assessed the effects of early administration of a short course of tranexamic acid on death, vascular occlusive events, and the receipt of blood transfusion in trauma patients. Methods: This randomised controlled trial was ...

  2. Orchidectomy Ameliorates the Vascular Hypertrophic Effect of A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye Samuel

    testosterone replacement (TR) (10mg/kg sustanon 250® i.m) once in 3 weeks. They were either placed ... hypertrophic effect of a HSD by reducing vascular smooth muscle proliferation and ..... NADPH oxidase plays a role in beta-tissue growth.

  3. [Vascular Calcification - Pathological Mechanism and Clinical Application - . Role of vascular smooth muscle cells in vascular calcification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2015-05-01

    Vascular calcification is commonly seen with aging, chronic kidney disese (CKD), diabetes, and atherosclerosis, and is closely associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Vascular calcification has long been regarded as the final stage of degeneration and necrosis of arterial wall and a passive, unregulated process. However, it is now known to be an active and tightly regulated process involved with phenotypic transition of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) that resembles bone mineralization. Briefly, calcium deposits of atherosclerotic plaque consist of hydroxyapatite and may appear identical to fully formed lamellar bone. By using a genetic fate mapping strategy, VSMC of the vascular media give rise to the majority of the osteochondrogenic precursor- and chondrocyte-like cells observed in the calcified arterial media of MGP (- / -) mice. Osteogenic differentiation of VSMC is characterized by the expression of bone-related molecules including bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) -2, Msx2 and osteopontin, which are produced by osteoblasts and chondrocytes. Our recent findings are that (i) Runx2 and Notch1 induce osteogenic differentiation, and (ii) advanced glycation end-product (AGE) /receptor for AGE (RAGE) and palmitic acid promote osteogenic differentiation of VSMC. To understand of the molecular mechanisms of vascular calcification is now under intensive research area.

  4. Prognostic value of dynamic MRI in assessing post-traumatic femoral head vascularity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaushik, Abhishek; Varghese, Mathew [St Stephen' s Hospital, Department of Orthopaedics, Delhi, New Delhi (India); Sankaran, Balu [St Stephen' s Hospital, Delhi, New Delhi (India)

    2009-06-15

    The vascular status of femoral heads in the post-traumatic period of intracapsular femoral neck fracture (ICFNF) remains uncertain until the patient actually develops avascular necrosis (AVN). Several methods for predicting the viability of femoral head have been reported, that are not effective or widely used because of unreliability, potential complications, and technical difficulties. The present study involved the use of Dynamic MRI (DMRI) in assessing femoral head vascularity to predict AVN. The role of DMRI was studied prospectively in 30 patients with 31 ICFNF. Fractures were divided in to three types (Type A, B, or C) based on the femoral head vascularity shown by dynamic curve patterns on MRI evaluation. Type A was preserved vascularity, Type B was some decrease in vascularity but still viable while Type C was significantly reduced vascularity. These were followed-up for 6 months to 2 years to observe the final outcome in terms of union, non-union, or AVN. We found that Type A curves correlate well with vascular status and Type C curves correlate well with poor vascularity of the femoral heads. No AVN was seen in any of Type A (13/31) or Type B (eight out of 31). Five cases showed AVN and all of them were of Type C dynamic curves. Dynamic MRI is a reliable tool to evaluate vascularity of femoral heads and thus reduces the uncertainty of outcome of treatment of ICFNFs. DMRI can be a useful tool to formulate a treatment algorithm in management of ICFNF. (orig.)

  5. Prognostic value of dynamic MRI in assessing post-traumatic femoral head vascularity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaushik, Abhishek; Varghese, Mathew; Sankaran, Balu

    2009-01-01

    The vascular status of femoral heads in the post-traumatic period of intracapsular femoral neck fracture (ICFNF) remains uncertain until the patient actually develops avascular necrosis (AVN). Several methods for predicting the viability of femoral head have been reported, that are not effective or widely used because of unreliability, potential complications, and technical difficulties. The present study involved the use of Dynamic MRI (DMRI) in assessing femoral head vascularity to predict AVN. The role of DMRI was studied prospectively in 30 patients with 31 ICFNF. Fractures were divided in to three types (Type A, B, or C) based on the femoral head vascularity shown by dynamic curve patterns on MRI evaluation. Type A was preserved vascularity, Type B was some decrease in vascularity but still viable while Type C was significantly reduced vascularity. These were followed-up for 6 months to 2 years to observe the final outcome in terms of union, non-union, or AVN. We found that Type A curves correlate well with vascular status and Type C curves correlate well with poor vascularity of the femoral heads. No AVN was seen in any of Type A (13/31) or Type B (eight out of 31). Five cases showed AVN and all of them were of Type C dynamic curves. Dynamic MRI is a reliable tool to evaluate vascularity of femoral heads and thus reduces the uncertainty of outcome of treatment of ICFNFs. DMRI can be a useful tool to formulate a treatment algorithm in management of ICFNF. (orig.)

  6. Vascular malforma- tions part 1 — normal and abnormal vascular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    to form the primitive vascular plexus. Angiogenesis is the formation of new vessels by sprouting or splitting of ... The differentiation of primitive vessels into arteries, veins or capillaries is determined by flow patterns .... identify, but it is probable that as time progresses further specific genetic defects related to the development ...

  7. Genetic Regulation of Vascular Development: Building the Zebrafish Vascular Tree

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.L.J.M. Herpers (Robert)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe extensive networks of blood and lymphatic vessels within the vertebrate body are essential for the transport and delivery of fluids, gases, macromolecules and cells, and play important roles in facilitating immune responses. The development of the vascular tree requires a highly

  8. CITICOLIN IN THE TREATMENT OF STROKE AND VASCULAR COGNITIVE DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Anatol'evich Parfenov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Citicolin (ceraxon is used as a neuroprotector in the treatment of acute stroke and vascular cognitive disorders. Experimental animal studies have demonstrated that citicolin reduces the extent of cerebral infarct and increases the degree of functional recovery. A few clinical trials have provided evidence for the efficacy of intravenous or oral citicolin used within the first 24 hours of ischemic stroke or cerebral hemorrhage in recovery of neurological functions. Citicolin is effective in memory and behavioral disorders in elderly patients with chronic cerebrovascular diseases. The use of citicolin has been found to be safe in stroke and vascular cognitive disorders

  9. [Vascular access guidelines for hemodialysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Hernández, J A; González Parra, E; Julián Gutiérrez, J M; Segarra Medrano, A; Almirante, B; Martínez, M T; Arrieta, J; Fernández Rivera, C; Galera, A; Gallego Beuter, J; Górriz, J L; Herrero, J A; López Menchero, R; Ochando, A; Pérez Bañasco, V; Polo, J R; Pueyo, J; Ruiz, Camps I; Segura Iglesias, R

    2005-01-01

    Quality of vascular access (VA) has a remarkable influence in hemodialysis patients outcomes. Dysfunction of VA represents a capital cause of morbi-mortality of these patients as well an increase in economical. Spanish Society of Neprhology, aware of the problem, has decided to carry out a revision of the issue with the aim of providing help in comprehensión and treatment related with VA problems, and achieving an homogenization of practices in three mayor aspects: to increase arteriovenous fistula utilization as first vascular access, to increment vascular access monitoring practice and rationalise central catheters use. We present a consensus document elaborated by a multidisciplinar group composed by nephrologists, vascular surgeons, interventional radiologysts, infectious diseases specialists and nephrological nurses. Along six chapters that cover patient education, creation of VA, care, monitoring, complications and central catheters, we present the state of the art and propose guidelines for the best practice, according different evidence based degrees, with the intention to provide help at the professionals in order to make aproppiate decissions. Several quality standars are also included.

  10. Image Quality in Vascular Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanhavere, F.; Struelens, L.

    2005-01-01

    In vascular radiology, the radiologists use the radiological image to diagnose or treat a specific vascular structure. From literature, we know that related doses are high and that large dose variability exists between different hospitals. The application of the optimization principle is therefore necessary and is obliged by the new legislation. So far, very little fieldwork has been performed and no practical instructions are available to do the necessary work. It's indisputable that obtaining quantitative data is of great interest for optimization purposes. In order to gain insight into these doses and the possible measures for dose reduction, we performed a comparative study in 7 hospitals. Patient doses will be measured and calculated for specific procedures in vascular radiology and evaluated against their most influencing parameters. In view of optimization purposes, a protocol for dose audit will be set-up. From the results and conclusions in this study, experimentally based guidelines will be proposed, in order to improve clinical practice in vascular radiology

  11. Vascular aspects of multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'haeseleer, Miguel; Cambron, Melissa; Vanopdenbosch, Ludo; De Keyser, Jacques

    Three types of vascular dysfunction have been described in multiple sclerosis (MS). First, findings from epidemiological studies suggest that patients with MS have a higher risk for ischaemic stroke than people who do not have MS. The underlying mechanism is unknown, but might involve endothelial

  12. Experience of vascular trauma in a tertiary care hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imtiaz, N.

    2010-01-01

    To highlight the presentation and management of various vascular injuries and their outcome. Thirty nine cases of vascular trauma were referred to vascular surgeon CMH Rawalpindi, in the above mentioned period. These cases were evaluated for mechanism of injury, age, gender and time of presentation. Out of these, only thirty cases were found suitable for surgical intervention. These thirty cases were evaluated for site of vascular injury, associated injuries, type of surgery performed and the outcome. Blunt trauma was the predominant cause of vascular injuries in our study 16/39 (41%). Fourteen cases (35.8%) had gun shot wounds. Only thirty patients (76.9 %) underwent various surgical procedures. Primary end to end anastomosis was possible in only 5/30 cases (16.6%) while reversed venous graft was used in 13/30 cases (43.3%). Wound infection occurred in 2/30(6.6%) cases out of which 1 case (3.3%) ultimately had an amputation. The time period between injury and surgical intervention ranged between 1 to 20 hours for most of the vascular injuries while delayed presentation in the form of traumatic arteriovenous fistula or pseudoaneurysm was between 48 hours to 3 months. There are reasonable numbers of vascular trauma cases being referred to a tertiary care hospital. Most of these cases reach us quite late due to unnecessary investigations, delayed referral and transportation. Early intervention and revascularization definitely reduces amputation and complication rate. All gunshot wounds not only require thorough surrounding soft tissue debridement but also liberal excision of traumatised vessel itself, resulting in interposition graft repair. (author)

  13. [Mechanism of losartan suppressing vascular calcification in rat aortic artery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Juan; Wu, Panfeng; Wu, Jiliang; Li, Mincai

    2016-08-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of the angiotensin II receptor 1 (AT1R) blocker losartan on vascular calcification in rat aortic artery and explore the underlying mechanisms. Methods SD rats were divided randomly into control group, vascular calcification model group and treatment group. Vascular calcification models were made by subcutaneous injection of warfarin plus vitamin K1 for two weeks. Rats in the treatment group were subcutaneously injected with losartan (10 mg/kg) at the end of the first week and consecutively for one week. We observed the morphological changes by HE staining and the calcium deposition by Alizarin red staining in the artery vascular wall. The mRNA expressions of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) and Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) were analyzed by reverse transcription PCR. The BMP2 and RUNX2 protein expressions were determined by Western blotting. The apoptosis of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were detected by TUNEL. The AT1R expression was tested by fluorescent immunohistochemistry. Results The aortic vascular calcification was induced by warfarin and vitamin K1. Compared with the vascular calcification model group, the mRNA and protein expressions of BMP2 and RUNX2 were significantly downregulated in the aorta in the losartan treatment group. Furthermore, the apoptosis of SMCs and the AT1R expression obviously decreased. Conclusion AT1R blocker losartan inhibits the apoptosis of SMCs and reduces AT1R expression; it downregulates the BMP2 and RUNX2 expressions in the vascular calcification process.

  14. Kcne4 Deletion Sex-Dependently Alters Vascular Reactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abbott, Geoffrey W; Jepps, Thomas A

    2016-01-01

    transcripts, with no striking sex-specific differences. However, Kv7.4 protein expression in females was twice that in males, and was reduced in both sexes by Kcne4 deletion. Our findings confirm a crucial role for KCNE4 in regulation of Kv7 channel activity to modulate vascular tone, and provide the first......Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels formed by Kv7 (KCNQ) α-subunits are recognized as crucial for vascular smooth muscle function, in addition to their established roles in the heart (Kv7.1) and the brain (Kv7.2-5). In vivo, Kv7 α-subunits are often regulated by KCNE subfamily ancillary (β...... known molecular mechanism for sex-specificity of this modulation that has important implications for vascular reactivity and may underlie sex-specific susceptibility to cardiovascular diseases....

  15. Defibrotide modulates prostaglandin production in the rat mesenteric vascular bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peredo, H A

    2002-10-01

    Defibrotide 1 microM, a polydeoxyribonucleotide extracted from mammalian organs, reduced the contractile responses to noradrenaline (NA) in the rat isolated and perfused mesenteric vascular bed, in intact as well as in de-endothelialized preparations. Defibrotide was without effect on the acetylcholine-induced relaxations of U-46619-precontracted mesenteric vascular beds. Moreover, defibrotide increased 6-keto prostaglandin (PG) F(2alpha) (stable metabolite of prostacyclin) release sixfold in the presence, but not in the absence of the endothelium, with no modification on the release of other prostanoids. Defibrotide also inhibited the NA-induced increase in PGF(2alpha) release, in both intact and de-endothelialized mesenteric vascular beds. In conclusion, the present results show that defibrotide modulates PG production in the mesenteric bed and that the observed inhibition of the contractile responses should be due to the impairment of the NA-induced increase in PGF(2alpha) release.

  16. Benfotiamine counteracts smoking-induced vascular dysfunction in healthy smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirban, Alin; Nandrean, Simona; Kirana, Stanley; Götting, Christian; Veresiu, Ioan Andrei; Tschoepe, Diethelm

    2012-01-01

    Background. Smoking induces endothelial dysfunction (ED) mainly by exacerbating oxidative stress (OS) and inflammation. Benfotiamine, a thiamine prodrug with high bioavailability, prevents nicotine-induced vascular dysfunction in rats. It remained unknown whether this effect also occurs in humans. Methods. Therefore, 20 healthy volunteers (mean age: 38 years) were investigated twice, 7-10 days apart in a randomized, cross-over, and investigator-blinded design. Vascular function was assessed by flow-mediated vasodilatation (FMD) of the brachial artery and by measurements of the soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule (sVCAM)-1. Investigations were performed after an overnight fast as well as 20 minutes after one cigarette smoking. On another day, the same procedure was applied following a 3-day oral therapy with benfotiamine (1050 mg/day). Ten patients were randomized to start with smoking alone, and ten started with benfotiamine. Results. Results are expressed as (mean ± SEM). Smoking acutely induced a decrease in FMD by 50% ((∗∗)P benfotiamine treatment to 25%(∗§) ((∗)P benfotiamine. The endothelium-independent vasodilatation remained unaltered between days. Conclusion. In healthy volunteers, smoking blunts vascular function mirrored by a decrease in FMD and an increase in sVCAM-1. Short-term treatment with benfotiamine significantly reduces these effects, showing protective vascular properties.

  17. Subclinical hypothyroidism after vascular complicated pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zanden, M. van der; Hop-de Groot, R.J.; Sweep, F.C.; Ross, H.A.; Heijer, M. den; Spaanderman, M.E.A.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Women with a history of vascular complicated pregnancy are at risk for developing remote cardiovascular disease. It is associated with underlying cardiovascular risk factors both jeopardizing trophoblast and vascular function. Subclinical hypothyroidism may relate to both conditions.

  18. Pediatric central nervous system vascular malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burch, Ezra A.; Orbach, Darren B.

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric central nervous system (CNS) vascular anomalies include lesions found only in the pediatric population and also the full gamut of vascular lesions found in adults. Pediatric-specific lesions discussed here include infantile hemangioma, vein of Galen malformation and dural sinus malformation. Some CNS vascular lesions that occur in adults, such as arteriovenous malformation, have somewhat distinct manifestations in children, and those are also discussed. Additionally, children with CNS vascular malformations often have associated broader vascular conditions, e.g., PHACES (posterior fossa anomalies, hemangioma, arterial anomalies, cardiac anomalies, eye anomalies and sternal anomalies), hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, and capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation syndrome (related to the RASA1 mutation). The treatment of pediatric CNS vascular malformations has greatly benefited from advances in endovascular therapy, including technical advances in adult interventional neuroradiology. Dramatic advances in therapy are expected to stem from increased understanding of the genetics and vascular biology that underlie pediatric CNS vascular malformations. (orig.)

  19. Pediatric central nervous system vascular malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burch, Ezra A. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Orbach, Darren B. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Neurointerventional Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Pediatric central nervous system (CNS) vascular anomalies include lesions found only in the pediatric population and also the full gamut of vascular lesions found in adults. Pediatric-specific lesions discussed here include infantile hemangioma, vein of Galen malformation and dural sinus malformation. Some CNS vascular lesions that occur in adults, such as arteriovenous malformation, have somewhat distinct manifestations in children, and those are also discussed. Additionally, children with CNS vascular malformations often have associated broader vascular conditions, e.g., PHACES (posterior fossa anomalies, hemangioma, arterial anomalies, cardiac anomalies, eye anomalies and sternal anomalies), hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, and capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation syndrome (related to the RASA1 mutation). The treatment of pediatric CNS vascular malformations has greatly benefited from advances in endovascular therapy, including technical advances in adult interventional neuroradiology. Dramatic advances in therapy are expected to stem from increased understanding of the genetics and vascular biology that underlie pediatric CNS vascular malformations. (orig.)

  20. ESRD QIP - Vascular Access - Payment Year 2018

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This dataset includes facility details, performance rates, vascular access topic measure score, and the state and national average measure scores for the vascular...

  1. Vascular dysfunction in women with a history of preeclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction: insights into future vascular risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yinon, Yoav; Kingdom, John C P; Odutayo, Ayodele; Moineddin, Rahim; Drewlo, Sascha; Lai, Vesta; Cherney, David Z I; Hladunewich, Michelle A

    2010-11-02

    Women with a history of placental disease are at increased risk for the future development of vascular disease. It is unknown whether preexisting endothelial dysfunction underlies both the predisposition to placental disease and the later development of vascular disease. The aim of this study was to assess vascular function in postpartum women and to determine whether differences emerged depending on the presentation of placental disease. Women with a history of early-onset preeclampsia (n=15), late-onset preeclampsia (n=9), intrauterine growth restriction without preeclampsia (n=9), and prior normal pregnancy (n=16) were studied 6 to 24 months postpartum. Flow-mediated vasodilatation and flow-independent (glyceryl trinitrate-induced) vasodilatation were studied through the use of high-resolution vascular ultrasound examination of the brachial artery. Arterial stiffness was assessed by pulse-wave analysis (augmentation index). Laboratory assessment included circulating angiogenic factors (vascular endothelial growth factor, soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1, placental growth factor, and soluble endoglin). Flow-mediated vasodilatation was significantly reduced in women with previous early-onset preeclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction compared with women with previous late-onset preeclampsia and control subjects (3.2±2.7% and 2.1±1.2% versus 7.9±3.8% and 9.1±3.5%, respectively; Pwomen with previous early-onset preeclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction, but not among late preeclamptic women and control subjects (P=0.0105). Circulating angiogenic factors were similar in all groups. Only women with a history of early-onset preeclampsia or intrauterine growth restriction without preeclampsia exhibit impaired vascular function, which might explain their predisposition to placental disease and their higher risk of future vascular disease.

  2. The evolving integrated vascular surgery residency curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brigitte K; Greenberg, Jacob A; Mitchell, Erica L

    2014-10-01

    Since their introduction several years ago, integrated (0 + 5) vascular surgery residency programs are being increasingly developed across the country. To date, however, there is no defined "universal" curriculum for these programs and each program is responsible for creating its own curriculum. The aim of this study was to review the experiences of current 0 + 5 program directors (PDs) to determine what factors contributed to the curricular development within their institution. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 0 + 5 PDs to explore their experiences with program development, factors influencing the latter, and rationale for current curricula. The interview script was loosely structured to explore several factors including time of incoming residents' first exposure to the vascular surgical service, timing and rationale behind the timing of core surgical rotations throughout the 5 year program, educational value of nonsurgical rotations, opportunities for leadership and scholarly activity, and influence the general surgery program and institutional climate had on curricular structure. All interviews were conducted by a single interviewer. All interviews were qualitatively analyzed using emergent theme analysis. Twenty-six 0 + 5 PDs participated in the study. A total of 69% believed establishing professional identity early reduces resident attrition and recommend starting incoming trainees on vascular surgical services. Sixty-two percent spread core surgical rotations over the first 3 years to optimize general surgical exposure and most of the programs have eliminated specific rotations, as they were not considered valuable to the goals of training. Factors considered most important by PDs in curricular development include building on existing institutional opportunities (96%), avoiding rotations considered unsuccessful by "experienced" programs (92%), and maintaining a good working relationship with general surgery (77%). Fifty-eight percent of

  3. Early postmenopausal phase is associated with reduced prostacyclin-induced vasodilation that is reversed by exercise training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyberg, Michael Permin; Egelund, Jon; Mandrup Jensen, Camilla Maria

    2016-01-01

    The postmenopausal phase is associated with an accelerated rate of rise in the prevalence of vascular dysfunction and hypertension; however, the mechanisms underlying these adverse vascular changes and whether exercise training can reverse the decline in vascular function remains unclear. We...... increased (Pphase is associated with a marked reduction in vascular function. Despite of a reduced sensitivity...

  4. Vascular neurocognitive disorders and the vascular risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen V. Albu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Dementias are clinical neurodegenerative diseases characterized by permanent and progressive transformation of cognitive functions such as memory, learning capacity, attention, thinking, language, passing judgments, calculation or orientation. Dementias represent a relatively frequent pathology, encountered at about 10% of the population of 65-year olds and 20% of the population of 80-year olds. This review presents the main etiological forms of dementia, which include Alzheimer form of dementia, vascular dementia, dementia associated with alpha-synucleionopathies, and mixed forms. Regarding vascular dementia, the risk factors are similar to those for an ischemic or hemorrhagic cerebrovascular accident: arterial hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, smoking, obesity, age, alcohol consumption, cerebral atherosclerosis/ arteriosclerosis. Several studies show that efficient management of the vascular risk factors can prevent the expression and/ or progression of dementia. Thus, lifestyle changes such as stress reduction, regular physical exercise, decreasing dietary fat, multivitamin supplementation, adequate control of blood pressure and serum cholesterol, and social integration and mental stimulation in the elderly population are important factors in preventing or limiting the symptoms of dementia, a disease with significant individual, social, and economic implications.

  5. Efficacy of a family practice-based lifestyle intervention program to increase physical activity and reduce clinical and physiological markers of vascular health in patients with high normal blood pressure and/or high normal blood glucose (SNAC: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Overend Tom

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous interventions to increase physical activity and reduce cardiovascular risk factors have been targeted at individuals with established disease; less attention has been given to intervention among individuals with high risk for disease nor has there been determination of the influence of setting in which the intervention is provided. In particular, family practice represents an ideal setting for the provision and long-term maintenance of lifestyle interventions for patients at risk (ie high-normal blood pressure or impaired glucose tolerance. Methods/design The Staged Nutrition and Activity Counseling (SNAC study is a randomized clustered design clinical trial that will investigate the effectiveness and efficacy of a multi-component lifestyle intervention on cardiovascular disease risk factors and vascular function in patients at risk in primary care. Patients will be randomized by practice to either a standard of care lifestyle intervention or a behaviourally-based, matched prescriptive physical activity and diet change program. The primary goal is to increase physical activity and improve dietary intake according to Canada's Guides to Physical Activity Healthy Eating over 24 months. The primary intention to treat analysis will compare behavioral, physiological and metabolic outcomes at 6, 12 and 24 months post-randomization including estimation of incident hypertension and/or diabetes. Discussion The design features of our trial, and the practical problems (and solutions associated with implementing these design features, particularly those that result in potential delay between recruitment, baseline data collection, randomization, intervention, and assessment will be discussed. Results of the SNAC trial will provide scientific rationale for the implementation of this lifestyle intervention in primary care. Trial registration ISRCTN: ISRCTN:42921300

  6. Vascular dynamics aid a coupled neurovascular network learn sparse independent features: A computational model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Thomas Philips

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral vascular dynamics are generally thought to be controlled by neural activity in a unidirectional fashion. However, both computational modeling and experimental evidence point to the feedback effects of vascular dynamics on neural activity. Vascular feedback in the form of glucose and oxygen controls neuronal ATP, either directly or via the agency of astrocytes, which in turn modulates neural firing. Recently, a detailed model of the neuron-astrocyte-vessel system has shown how vasomotion can modulate neural firing. Similarly, arguing from known cerebrovascular physiology, an approach known as `hemoneural hypothesis' postulates functional modulation of neural activity by vascular feedback. To instantiate this perspective, we present a computational model in which a network of `vascular units' supplies energy to a neural network. The complex dynamics of the vascular network, modeled by a network of oscillators, turns neurons ON and OFF randomly. The informational consequence of such dynamics is explored in the context of an auto-encoder network. In the proposed model, each vascular unit supplies energy to a subset of hidden neurons of an autoencoder network, which constitutes its `projective field'. Neurons that receive adequate energy in a given trial have reduced threshold, and thus are prone to fire. Dynamics of the vascular network are governed by changes in the reconstruction error of the auto-encoder network, interpreted as the neuronal demand. Vascular feedback causes random inactivation of a subset of hidden neurons in every trial. We observe that, under conditions of desynchronized vascular dynamics, the output reconstruction error is low and the feature vectors learnt are sparse and independent. Our earlier modeling study highlighted the link between desynchronized vascular dynamics and efficient energy delivery in skeletal muscle. We now show that desynchronized vascular dynamics leads to efficient training in an auto

  7. Interactive effects of vascular risk burden and advanced age on cerebral blood flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine eBangen

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Vascular risk factors and cerebral blood flow (CBF reduction have been linked to increased risk of cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease (AD; however the possible moderating effects of age and vascular risk burden on CBF in late life remain understudied. We examined the relationships among elevated vascular risk burden, age, CBF, and cognition. Seventy-one non-demented older adults completed an arterial spin labeling MR scan, neuropsychological assessment, and medical history interview. Relationships among vascular risk burden, age, and CBF were examined in a priori regions of interest (ROIs previously implicated in aging and AD. Interaction effects indicated that, among older adults with elevated vascular risk burden (i.e., multiple vascular risk factors, advancing age was significantly associated with reduced cortical CBF whereas there was no such relationship for those with low vascular risk burden (i.e., no or one vascular risk factor. This pattern was observed in cortical ROIs including medial temporal (hippocampus, parahippocampal gyrus, uncus, inferior parietal (supramarginal gyrus, inferior parietal lobule, angular gyrus, and frontal (anterior cingulate, middle frontal gyrus, medial frontal gyrus cortices. Furthermore, among those with elevated vascular risk, reduced CBF was associated with poorer cognitive performance. Such findings suggest that older adults with elevated vascular risk burden may be particularly vulnerable to cognitive change as a function of CBF reductions. Findings support the use of CBF as a potential biomarker in preclinical AD and suggest that vascular risk burden and regionally-specific CBF changes may contribute to differential age-related cognitive declines.

  8. Vascularized osseous graft for scaphoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendez Daza, Carlos Hernan; Mathoulin, Cristophe

    2004-01-01

    The most commonly used technique for treatment of pseudo-arthrosis of the scaphoid is osteo-synthesis with Kirschnet wires and cortical sponge grafts. Results reported by different teams using this procedure show no more than 90% osseous consolidation, especially in cases where vascularisation of the proximal fragment of the scaphoid is compromised. Here we present a series of ten cases of pseudo-arthrosis of the scaphoid, treated using a new surgical technique involving a vascularized osseous graft of the distal radius. Using this procedure we obtained 100% consolidation, with no complications either during the procedure or immediately post-operatively. Patients returned to work in week 15 on average. In 4 cases we observed discomfort in the area of the scar, which was successfully treated using local cortisone injection. The results obtained are very similar to those seen in the literature on the different techniques for vascularized osseous grafts for pseudo-arthrosis of the scaphoid

  9. [Menopause: Hypertension and vascular disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilberman, J M

    Hypertension is the main cardiovascular risk factor affecting 25% of women. Hormone changes and hypertension after menopause may lead to higher target organ damage and cardiovascular disease such as increased arterial stiffness, coronary diseases, chronic heart failure and stroke. The physiopathological mechanisms involved in the development of hypertension and cardiovascular diseases in menopausal women are controversial. There are pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic differences in both sexes, the women have more coughing when using the converting-enzyme inhibitors, more cramps when using thiazide diuretics and more oedema in the inferior limbs when using calcium antagonists. The aim of this review is to analyse possible physiopathological mechanisms involved in hypertension after menopause and to gain a better understanding of the biological effects mediated by vascular ageing in women when the level of oestrogen protective effect decreases over the vascular system. Copyright © 2017 SEH-LELHA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Decrease in coronary vascular volume in systole augments cardiac contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemsen, M J; Duncker, D J; Krams, R; Dijkman, M A; Lamberts, R R; Sipkema, P; Westerhof, N

    2001-08-01

    Coronary arterial inflow is impeded and venous outflow is increased as a result of the decrease in coronary vascular volume due to cardiac contraction. We evaluated whether cardiac contraction is influenced by interfering with the changes of the coronary vascular volume over the heart cycle. Length-tension relationships were determined in Tyrode-perfused rat papillary muscle and when coronary vascular volume changes were partly inhibited by filling it with congealed gelatin or perfusing it with a high viscosity dextran buffer. Also, myocyte thickening during contraction was reduced by placing a silicon tube around the muscle. Increasing perfusion pressure from 8 to 80 cmH2O, increased developed tension by approximately 40%. When compared with the low perfusion state, developed tension of the gelatin-filled vasculature was reduced to 43 +/- 6% at the muscle length where the muscle generates the largest developed tension (n = 5, means +/- SE). Dextran reduced developed tension to 73 +/- 6% (n = 6). The silicon tube, in low perfusion state, reduced the developed tension to 83 +/- 7% (n = 4) of control. Time-control and oxygen-lowering experiments show that the findings are based on mechanical effects. Thus interventions to prevent myocyte thickening reduce developed tension. We hypothesize that when myocyte thickening is prevented, intracellular pressure increases and counteracts the force produced by the contractile apparatus. We conclude that emptying of the coronary vasculature serves a physiological purpose by facilitating cardiomyocyte thickening thereby augmenting force development.

  11. Vascular diagnostics for Raynaud's phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinsdale G

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Graham Dinsdale, Ariane L Herrick Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, Institute of Inflammation and Repair, Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester, UK Abstract: Raynaud's phenomenon (RP is common, and in most patients is primary (idiopathic when due to reversible vasospasm and does not progress to irreversible tissue injury. However, in those patients for whom RP is secondary to an underlying disease (eg, systemic sclerosis or atherosclerosis, progression to digital ulceration or critical ischemia can occur. Therefore, the key question for the clinician is “Why does this patient have RP?” Vascular diagnostics play a key role in answering this. In this review, we firstly discuss the different vascular investigations relevant to clinical practice: nail fold capillaroscopy (including the different methodologies for examining the nail fold capillaries, and the role of capillaroscopy in helping to differentiate between primary and systemic sclerosis-related RP, thermography (available in specialist centers, and evaluation of large vessel disease (for example, due to atherosclerosis. We then discuss research tools, mainly laser Doppler methods, including laser Doppler imaging and laser speckle contrast imaging. These are commercially available as complete imaging systems and are (relatively easy to use. The main current goal in vascular imaging research is to validate these novel state-of-the-art techniques as outcome measures of digital vascular disease, and then apply them in early and later phase studies of new treatment approaches, thus facilitating drug development programs. Keywords: Raynaud's phenomenon, systemic sclerosis, nail fold capillaroscopy, thermography, laser Doppler, angiography

  12. Obesity-induced vascular inflammation involves elevated arginase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Lin; Bhatta, Anil; Xu, Zhimin; Chen, Jijun; Toque, Haroldo A; Chen, Yongjun; Xu, Yimin; Bagi, Zsolt; Lucas, Rudolf; Huo, Yuqing; Caldwell, Ruth B; Caldwell, R William

    2017-11-01

    Obesity-induced vascular dysfunction involves pathological remodeling of the visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and increased inflammation. Our previous studies showed that arginase 1 (A1) in endothelial cells (ECs) is critically involved in obesity-induced vascular dysfunction. We tested the hypothesis that EC-A1 activity also drives obesity-related VAT remodeling and inflammation. Our studies utilized wild-type and EC-A1 knockout (KO) mice made obese by high-fat/high-sucrose (HFHS) diet. HFHS diet induced increases in body weight, fasting blood glucose, and VAT expansion. This was accompanied by increased arginase activity and A1 expression in vascular ECs and increased expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), interleukin-10 (IL-10), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) mRNA and protein in both VAT and ECs. HFHS also markedly increased circulating inflammatory monocytes and VAT infiltration by inflammatory macrophages, while reducing reparative macrophages. Additionally, adipocyte size and fibrosis increased and capillary density decreased in VAT. These effects of HFHS, except for weight gain and hyperglycemia, were prevented or reduced in mice lacking EC-A1 or treated with the arginase inhibitor 2-( S )-amino-6-boronohexanoic acid (ABH). In mouse aortic ECs, exposure to high glucose (25 mM) and Na palmitate (200 μM) reduced nitric oxide production and increased A1, TNF-α, VCAM-1, ICAM-1, and MCP-1 mRNA, and monocyte adhesion. Knockout of EC-A1 or ABH prevented these effects. HFHS diet-induced VAT inflammation is mediated by EC-A1 expression/activity. Limiting arginase activity is a possible therapeutic means of controlling obesity-induced vascular and VAT inflammation.

  13. Vascular and renal function in experimental thyroid disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Félix; Moreno, Juan Manuel; Rodríguez-Gómez, Isabel; Wangensteen, Rosemary; Osuna, Antonio; Alvarez-Guerra, Miriam; García-Estañ, Joaquín

    2006-02-01

    This review focuses on the effects of thyroid hormones in vascular and renal systems. Special emphasis is given to the mechanisms by which thyroid hormones affect the regulation of body fluids, vascular resistance and, ultimately, blood pressure. Vascular function is markedly affected by thyroid hormones that produce changes in vascular reactivity and endothelial function in hyper- and hypothyroidism. The hypothyroid state is accompanied by a marked decrease in sensitivity to vasoconstrictors, especially to sympathetic agonists, alteration that may play a role in the reduced blood pressure of hypothyroid rats, as well as in the preventive effects of hypothyroidism on experimental hypertension. Moreover, in hypothyroid rats, the endothelium-dependent and nitric oxide donors vasodilation is reduced. Conversely, the vessels from hyperthyroid rats showed an increased endothelium-dependent responsiveness that may be secondary to the shear-stress induced by the hyperdynamic circulation, and that may contribute to the reduced vascular resistance characteristic of this disease. Thyroid hormones also have important effects in the kidney, affecting renal growth, renal haemodynamics, and salt and water metabolism. In hyperthyroidism, there is a resetting of the pressure-natriuresis relationship related to hyperactivity of the renin-angiotensin system, which contributes to the arterial hypertension associated with this endocrine disease. Moreover, thyroid hormones affect the development and/or maintenance of various forms of arterial hypertension. This review also describes recent advances in our understanding of thyroid hormone action on nitric oxide and oxidative stress in the regulation of cardiovascular and renal function and in the long-term control of blood pressure.

  14. Relaxin as a natural agent for vascular health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Bani

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Daniele BaniDepartment of Anatomy, Histology and Forensic Medicine, Sect. Histology, University of Florence, ItalyAbstract: Hypertension, atherothrombosis, myocardial infarction, stroke, peripheral vascular disease, and renal failure are the main manifestations of cardiovascular disease (CVD, the leading cause of death and disability in developed countries. Continuing insight into the pathophysiology of CVD can allow identification of effective therapeutic strategies to reduce the occurrence of death and/or severe disabilities. In this context, a healthy endothelium is deemed crucial to proper functioning and maintenance of anatomical integrity of the vascular system in many organs. Of note, epidemiologic studies indicate that the incidence of CVD in women is very low until menopause and increases sharply thereafter. The loss of protection against CVD in post-menopausal women has been chiefly attributed to ovarian steroid deficiency. However, besides steroids, the ovary also produces the peptide hormone relaxin (RLX, which provides potent vasoactive effects which render it the most likely candidate as the elusive physiological shield against CVD in fertile women. In particular, RLX has a specific relaxant effect on peripheral and coronary vasculature, exerted by the stimulation of endogenous nitric oxide (NO generation by cells of the vascular wall, and can induce angiogenesis. Moreover, RLX inhibits the activation of inflammatory leukocytes and platelets, which play a key role in CVD. Experimental studies performed in vascular and blood cell in vitro and in animal models of vascular dysfunction, as well as pioneer clinical observations, have provided evidence that RLX can prevent and/or improve CVD, thus offering background to clinical trials aimed at exploring the broad therapeutic potential of human recombinant RLX as a new cardiovascular drug.Keywords: relaxin, blood vessels, endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle, nitric oxide

  15. Protein kinase Cα deletion causes hypotension and decreased vascular contractility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynne, Brandi M; McCarthy, Cameron G; Szasz, Theodora; Molina, Patrick A; Chapman, Arlene B; Webb, R Clinton; Klein, Janet D; Hoover, Robert S

    2018-03-01

    Protein kinase Cα (PKCα) is a critical regulator of multiple cell signaling pathways including gene transcription, posttranslation modifications and activation/inhibition of many signaling kinases. In regards to the control of blood pressure, PKCα causes increased vascular smooth muscle contractility, while reducing cardiac contractility. In addition, PKCα has been shown to modulate nephron ion transport. However, the role of PKCα in modulating mean arterial pressure (MAP) has not been investigated. In this study, we used a whole animal PKCα knock out (PKC KO) to test the hypothesis that global PKCα deficiency would reduce MAP, by a reduction in vascular contractility. Radiotelemetry measurements of ambulatory blood pressure (day/night) were obtained for 18 h/day during both normal chow and high-salt (4%) diet feedings. PKCα mice had a reduced MAP, as compared with control, which was not normalized with high-salt diet (14 days). Metabolic cage studies were performed to determine urinary sodium excretion. PKC KO mice had a significantly lower diastolic, systolic and MAP as compared with control. No significant differences in urinary sodium excretion were observed between the PKC KO and control mice, whether fed normal chow or high-salt diet. Western blot analysis showed a compensatory increase in renal sodium chloride cotransporter expression. Both aorta and mesenteric vessels were removed for vascular reactivity studies. Aorta and mesenteric arteries from PKC KO mice had a reduced receptor-independent relaxation response, as compared with vessels from control. Vessels from PKC KO mice exhibited a decrease in maximal contraction, compared with controls. Together, these data suggest that global deletion of PKCα results in reduced MAP due to decreased vascular contractility.

  16. Improving Technology for Vascular Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Raman

    Neuro-endovascular image guided interventions (Neuro-EIGIs) is a minimally invasive procedure that require micro catheters and endovascular devices be inserted into the vasculature via an incision near the femoral artery and guided under low dose fluoroscopy to the vasculature of the head and neck. However, the endovascular devices used for the purpose are of very small size (stents are of the order of 50mum to 100mum) and the success of these EIGIs depends a lot on the accurate placement of these devices. In order to accurately place these devices inside the patient, the interventionalist should be able to see them clearly. Hence, high resolution capabilities are of immense importance in neuro-EIGIs. The high-resolution detectors, MAF-CCD and MAF-CMOS, at the Toshiba Stroke and Vascular Research Center at the University at Buffalo are capable of presenting improved images for better patient care. Focal spot of an x-ray tube plays an important role in performance of these high resolution detectors. The finite size of the focal spot results into the blurriness around the edges of the image of the object resulting in reduced spatial resolution. Hence, knowledge of accurate size of the focal spot of the x-ray tube is very essential for the evaluation of the total system performance. Importance of magnification and image detector blur deconvolution was demonstrated to carry out the more accurate measurement of x-ray focal spot using a pinhole camera. A 30 micron pinhole was used to obtain the focal spot images using flat panel detector (FPD) and different source to image distances (SIDs) were used to achieve different magnifications (3.16, 2.66 and 2.16). These focal spot images were deconvolved with a 2-D modulation transfer function (MTF), obtained using noise response (NR) method, to remove the detector blur present in the images. Using these corrected images, the accurate size of all the three focal spots were obtained and it was also established that effect of

  17. Ghrelin improves vascular autophagy in rats with vascular calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Mingming; Liu, Lin; Song, Chenfang; Chen, Wei; Gui, Shuyan

    2017-06-15

    This study aimed to investigate whether ghrelin ameliorated vascular calcification (VC) through improving autophagy. VC model was induced by nicotine plus vitamin D 3 in rats and β-glycerophosphate in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC). Calcium deposition was detected by von Kossa staining or alizarin red S staining. ALP activity was also detected. Western blot was used to assess the protein expression. Ghrelin treatment attenuated the elevation of calcium deposition and ALP activity in VC model both in vivo and in vitro. Interesting, the protein levels of autophagy markers, LC3 and beclin1 were significantly upregulated by ghrelin in VC model. An autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine blocks the ameliorative effect of ghrelin on VC. Furthermore, protein expressions of phosphate-AMPK were increased by ghrelin treatment both in calcified aorta and VSMC. The effect of ghrelin on autophagy induction and VC attenuation was prevented by AMPK inhibitor, compound C. Our results suggested that ghrelin improved autophagy through AMPK activation, which was resulted in VC amelioration. These data maybe throw light on prevention and therapy of VC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Benfotiamine Counteracts Smoking-Induced Vascular Dysfunction in Healthy Smokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alin Stirban

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Smoking induces endothelial dysfunction (ED mainly by exacerbating oxidative stress (OS and inflammation. Benfotiamine, a thiamine prodrug with high bioavailability, prevents nicotine-induced vascular dysfunction in rats. It remained unknown whether this effect also occurs in humans. Methods. Therefore, 20 healthy volunteers (mean age: 38 years were investigated twice, 7–10 days apart in a randomized, cross-over, and investigator-blinded design. Vascular function was assessed by flow-mediated vasodilatation (FMD of the brachial artery and by measurements of the soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule (sVCAM-1. Investigations were performed after an overnight fast as well as 20 minutes after one cigarette smoking. On another day, the same procedure was applied following a 3-day oral therapy with benfotiamine (1050 mg/day. Ten patients were randomized to start with smoking alone, and ten started with benfotiamine. Results. Results are expressed as (mean ± SEM. Smoking acutely induced a decrease in FMD by 50% (∗∗P<0.001 versus baseline an effect significantly reduced by benfotiamine treatment to 25%∗§ (∗P<0.05 versus baseline, §P<0.05 versus smoking alone. Smoking-induced elevation in sVCAM-1 was also prevented by benfotiamine. The endothelium-independent vasodilatation remained unaltered between days. Conclusion. In healthy volunteers, smoking blunts vascular function mirrored by a decrease in FMD and an increase in sVCAM-1. Short-term treatment with benfotiamine significantly reduces these effects, showing protective vascular properties.

  19. The primary vascular dysregulation syndrome: implications for eye diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Vascular dysregulation refers to the regulation of blood flow that is not adapted to the needs of the respective tissue. We distinguish primary vascular dysregulation (PVD, formerly called vasospastic syndrome) and secondary vascular dysregulation (SVD). Subjects with PVD tend to have cold extremities, low blood pressure, reduced feeling of thirst, altered drug sensitivity, increased pain sensitivity, prolonged sleep onset time, altered gene expression in the lymphocytes, signs of oxidative stress, slightly increased endothelin-1 plasma level, low body mass index and often diffuse and fluctuating visual field defects. Coldness, emotional or mechanical stress and starving can provoke symptoms. Virtually all organs, particularly the eye, can be involved. In subjects with PVD, retinal vessels are stiffer and more irregular, and both neurovascular coupling and autoregulation capacity are reduced while retinal venous pressure is often increased. Subjects with PVD have increased risk for normal-tension glaucoma, optic nerve compartment syndrome, central serous choroidopathy, Susac syndrome, retinal artery and vein occlusions and anterior ischaemic neuropathy without atherosclerosis. Further characteristics are their weaker blood–brain and blood-retinal barriers and the higher prevalence of optic disc haemorrhages and activated astrocytes. Subjects with PVD tend to suffer more often from tinnitus, muscle cramps, migraine with aura and silent myocardial ischaemic and are at greater risk for altitude sickness. While the main cause of vascular dysregulation is vascular endotheliopathy, dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system is also involved. In contrast, SVD occurs in the context of other diseases such as multiple sclerosis, retrobulbar neuritis, rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia and giant cell arteritis. Taking into consideration the high prevalence of PVD in the population and potentially linked pathologies, in the current article, the authors provide

  20. Vascular dementia: Facts and controversies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlović Aleksandra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular dementia (VaD is the second most frequent dementia after Alzheimer’s disease, and is diagnosed during lifetime in 20% of demented patients. Five­year survival rate in VaD is 39%, while it is estimated to be 75% in healthy persons of the same age. It is therefore important to make correct diagnosis of VaD early in the course of the disease. Risk factors for VaD are identical to stroke risk factors, and there are significant possibilities for the prevention of vascular cognitive decline. Cognitive decline develops acutely or step­by­step within three months after stroke, but more gradual progression of intellectual decline is also possible. Neurological examination can reveal pyramidal and extrapyramidal signs, pseudobulbar palsy, gait disturbance and urinary incontinence. Neuropsychological profile comprises the loss of cognitive set shifting, decline in word fluency, verbal learning difficulties, perseverations, difficulties in complex figure copying, and in patients with cortically located lesions also problems with speech and praxia. The basis of the diagnosis is, besides history, neurological examination and neuropsychological assessment, computed tomography and/ or magnetic resonance brain imaging. Vascular risk factors control is the most important measure in VaD prevention. Modern guidelines for the treatment of cognitive decline in VaD emphasize that donepezil can be useful in the improvement of cognitive status at the level of Class IIa recommendation at the level of evidence A, while memantine may be useful in patients with mixed VaD and Alzheimer’s disease dementia. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175022 i br. 175033

  1. Non-vascular surgical mediastinum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiavon, S.; Trenaghi, P.; Nardini, S.; Pagan, V.

    1989-01-01

    A review was made of the chest X-ray features of 120 patients who underwent surgical treatment for mediastinal non-vascular pathologies over the past 12 years in the Mestre Hospital. A method of analysis is proposed which takes into account not only the differences between the immediate post-operative period and the follow-up, but also the anatomotopographic partition and the surgical practice. Normal and pathological patterns for both of the above periods are described. The ''dimness'' of the arial tracheogram is emphasized as a usefull and early sign of mediastinal recurrence

  2. Vascular comorbidities in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thormann, Anja; Magyari, Melinda; Koch-Henriksen, Nils

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the occurrence of vascular comorbidities before and after the clinical onset of multiple sclerosis. In this combined case-control and cohort study, all Danish born citizens with onset of multiple sclerosis 1980-2005 were identified from the Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry...... and randomly matched with controls regarding year of birth, gender, and municipality on January 1st in the year of multiple sclerosis (MS) onset (index date). Individual-level information on comorbidities was obtained from several independent nationwide registries and linked to the study population by unique...

  3. Heritability of Retinal Vascular Fractals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vergmann, Anna Stage; Broe, Rebecca; Kessel, Line

    2017-01-01

    , the retinal vascular fractal dimension was measured using the box-counting method and compared within monozygotic and dizygotic twin pairs using Pearson correlation coefficients. Falconer's formula and quantitative genetic models were used to determine the genetic component of variation. Results: The mean...... fractal dimension did not differ statistically significantly between monozygotic and dizygotic twin pairs (1.505 vs. 1.495, P = 0.06), supporting that the study population was suitable for quantitative analysis of heritability. The intrapair correlation was markedly higher (0.505, P = 0...

  4. Ventilator induced lung injury (VILI) in acute respiratory distress ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The lung protective ventilation strategy- Low tidal volume ventilation has shown some reduction in mortality in patients with ARDS but mortality is still high in patient with severe ARDS secondary to Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia (PJP) despite of lung protective ventilation strategy. In patients with Severe ARDS due to PJP ...

  5. The skeletal vascular system - Breathing life into bone tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegen, Steve; Carmeliet, Geert

    2017-08-26

    During bone development, homeostasis and repair, a dense vascular system provides oxygen and nutrients to highly anabolic skeletal cells. Characteristic for the vascular system in bone is the serial organization of two capillary systems, each typified by specific morphological and physiological features. Especially the arterial capillaries mediate the growth of the bone vascular system, serve as a niche for skeletal and hematopoietic progenitors and couple angiogenesis to osteogenesis. Endothelial cells and osteoprogenitor cells interact not only physically, but also communicate to each other by secretion of growth factors. A vital angiogenic growth factor is vascular endothelial growth factor and its expression in skeletal cells is controlled by osteogenic transcription factors and hypoxia signaling, whereas the secretion of angiocrine factors by endothelial cells is regulated by Notch signaling, blood flow and possibly hypoxia. Bone loss and impaired fracture repair are often associated with reduced and disorganized blood vessel network and therapeutic targeting of the angiogenic response may contribute to enhanced bone regeneration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Magnesium Counteracts Vascular Calcification: Passive Interference or Active Modulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ter Braake, Anique D; Shanahan, Catherine M; de Baaij, Jeroen H F

    2017-08-01

    Over the last decade, an increasing number of studies report a close relationship between serum magnesium concentration and cardiovascular disease risk in the general population. In end-stage renal disease, an association was found between serum magnesium and survival. Hypomagnesemia was identified as a strong predictor for cardiovascular disease in these patients. A substantial body of in vitro and in vivo studies has identified a protective role for magnesium in vascular calcification. However, the precise mechanisms and its contribution to cardiovascular protection remain unclear. There are currently 2 leading hypotheses: first, magnesium may bind phosphate and delay calcium phosphate crystal growth in the circulation, thereby passively interfering with calcium phosphate deposition in the vessel wall. Second, magnesium may regulate vascular smooth muscle cell transdifferentiation toward an osteogenic phenotype by active cellular modulation of factors associated with calcification. Here, the data supporting these major hypotheses are reviewed. The literature supports both a passive inorganic phosphate-buffering role reducing hydroxyapatite formation and an active cell-mediated role, directly targeting vascular smooth muscle transdifferentiation. However, current evidence relies on basic experimental designs that are often insufficient to delineate the underlying mechanisms. The field requires more advanced experimental design, including determination of intracellular magnesium concentrations and the identification of the molecular players that regulate magnesium concentrations in vascular smooth muscle cells. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Tofacitinib Ameliorates Murine Lupus and Its Associated Vascular Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furumoto, Yasuko; Smith, Carolyne K; Blanco, Luz; Zhao, Wenpu; Brooks, Stephen R; Thacker, Seth G; Abdalrahman, Zarzour; Sciumè, Giuseppe; Tsai, Wanxia L; Trier, Anna M; Nunez, Leti; Mast, Laurel; Hoffmann, Victoria; Remaley, Alan T; O'Shea, John J; Kaplan, Mariana J; Gadina, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Dysregulation of innate and adaptive immune responses contributes to the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and its associated premature vascular damage. No drug to date targets both systemic inflammatory disease and the cardiovascular complications of SLE. Tofacitinib is a JAK inhibitor that blocks signaling downstream of multiple cytokines implicated in lupus pathogenesis. While clinical trials have shown that tofacitinib exhibits significant clinical efficacy in various autoimmune diseases, its role in SLE and the associated vascular pathology remains to be characterized. MRL/lpr lupus-prone mice were administered tofacitinib or vehicle by gavage for 6 weeks (therapeutic arm) or 8 weeks (preventive arm). Nephritis, skin inflammation, serum levels of autoantibodies and cytokines, mononuclear cell phenotype and gene expression, neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) release, endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation, and endothelial differentiation were compared in treated and untreated mice. Treatment with tofacitinib led to significant improvement in measures of disease activity, including nephritis, skin inflammation, and autoantibody production. In addition, tofacitinib treatment reduced serum levels of proinflammatory cytokines and interferon responses in splenocytes and kidney tissue. Tofacitinib also modulated the formation of NETs and significantly increased endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation and endothelial differentiation. The drug was effective in both preventive and therapeutic strategies. Tofacitinib modulates the innate and adaptive immune responses, ameliorates murine lupus, and improves vascular function. These results indicate that JAK inhibitors have the potential to be beneficial in SLE and its associated vascular damage. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  8. Potential benefits of exercise on blood pressure and vascular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Sebely; Radavelli-Bagatini, Simone; Ho, Suleen

    2013-01-01

    Physical activity seems to enhance cardiovascular fitness during the course of the lifecycle, improve blood pressure, and is associated with decreased prevalence of hypertension and coronary heart disease. It may also delay or prevent age-related increases in arterial stiffness. It is unclear if specific exercise types (aerobic, resistance, or combination) have a better effect on blood pressure and vascular function. This review was written based on previous original articles, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses indexed on PubMed from years 1975 to 2012 to identify studies on different types of exercise and the associations or effects on blood pressure and vascular function. In summary, aerobic exercise (30 to 40 minutes of training at 60% to 85% of predicted maximal heart rate, most days of the week) appears to significantly improve blood pressure and reduce augmentation index. Resistance training (three to four sets of eight to 12 repetitions at 10 repetition maximum, 3 days a week) appears to significantly improve blood pressure, whereas combination exercise training (15 minutes of aerobic and 15 minutes of resistance, 5 days a week) is beneficial to vascular function, but at a lower scale. Aerobic exercise seems to better benefit blood pressure and vascular function. Copyright © 2013 American Society of Hypertension. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The Interaction Between IGF-1, Atherosclerosis and Vascular Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Yusuke; Quevedo, Henry C.; Tiwari, Summit; Sukhanov, Sergiy; Shai, Shaw-Yung; Anwar, Asif; Delafontaine, Patrice

    2014-01-01

    The process of vascular aging encompasses alterations in the function of endothelial (EC) and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) via oxidation, inflammation, cell senescence and epigenetic modifications, increasing the probability of atherosclerosis. Aged vessels exhibit decreased endothelial antithrombogenic properties, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and inflammatory signaling, increased migration of VSMCs to the subintimal space, impaired angiogenesis and increased elastin degradation. The key initiating step in atherogenesis is subendothelial accumulation of apolipoprotein-B containing low density lipoproteins resulting in activation of endothelial cells and recruitment of monocytes. Activated endothelial cells secrete “chemokines” that interact with cognate chemokine receptors on monocytes and promote directional migration. Recruitment of immune cells establishes a pro-inflammatory status, further causing elevated oxidative stress, which in turn triggers a series of events including apoptotic or necrotic death of vascular and non-vascular cells. Increased oxidative stress is also considered to be a key factor in mechanisms of aging-associated changes in tissue integrity and function. Experimental evidence indicates that insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) exerts anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and pro-survival effects on the vasculature, reducing atherosclerotic plaque burden and promoting features of atherosclerotic plaque stability. PMID:24943302

  10. CIRSE Vascular Closure Device Registry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reekers, Jim A.; Müller-Hülsbeck, Stefan; Libicher, Martin; Atar, Eli; Trentmann, Jens; Goffette, Pierre; Borggrefe, Jan; Zeleňák, Kamil; Hooijboer, Pieter; Belli, Anna-Maria

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Vascular closure devices are routinely used after many vascular interventional radiology procedures. However, there have been no major multicenter studies to assess the safety and effectiveness of the routine use of closure devices in interventional radiology. Methods: The CIRSE registry of closure devices with an anchor and a plug started in January 2009 and ended in August 2009. A total of 1,107 patients were included in the registry. Results: Deployment success was 97.2%. Deployment failure specified to access type was 8.8% [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 5.0–14.5] for antegrade access and 1.8% (95% CI 1.1–2.9) for retrograde access (P = 0.001). There was no difference in deployment failure related to local PVD at the access site. Calcification was a reason for deployment failure in only 5.9 cm, and two vessel occlusions. Conclusion: The conclusion of this registry of closure devices with an anchor and a plug is that the use of this device in interventional radiology procedures is safe, with a low incidence of serious access site complications. There seems to be no difference in complications between antegrade and retrograde access and other parameters.

  11. Neuroradiological findings in vascular dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guermazi, Ali; Miaux, Yves; Suhy, Joyce; Pauls, Jon; Lopez, Ria [Synarc, Inc., Department of Radiology Services, San Francisco, CA (United States); Rovira-Canellas, Alex [Hospital General Universitari Vall d' Hebron, Unita de Resonancia Magnetica, Barcelona (Spain); Posner, Holly [Eisai, Inc., Teaneck, NJ (United States)

    2007-01-15

    There are multiple diagnostic criteria for vascular dementia (VaD) that may define different populations. Utilizing the criteria of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and Association Internationale pour la Recherche et l'Enseignement en Neurosciences (NINDS-AIREN) has provided improved consistency in the diagnosis of VaD. The criteria include a table listing brain imaging lesions associated with VaD. The different neuroradiological aspects of the criteria are reviewed based on the imaging data from an ongoing large-scale clinical trial testing a new treatment for VaD. The NINDS-AIREN criteria were applied by a centralized imaging rater to determine eligibility for enrollment in 1,202 patients using brain CT or MRI. Based on the above data set, the neuroradiological features that are associated with VaD and that can result from cerebral small-vessel disease with extensive leukoencephalopathy or lacunae (basal ganglia or frontal white matter), or may be the consequence of single strategically located infarcts or multiple infarcts in large-vessel territories, are illustrated. These features may also be the consequence of global cerebral hypoperfusion, intracerebral hemorrhage, or other mechanisms such as genetically determined arteriopathies. Neuroimaging confirmation of cerebrovascular disease in VaD provides information about the topography and severity of vascular lesions. Neuroimaging may also assist with the differential diagnosis of dementia associated with normal pressure hydrocephalus, chronic subdural hematoma, arteriovenous malformation or tumoral diseases. (orig.)

  12. Diffuse and vascular hepatic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreimeyer, S.; Grenacher, L.

    2011-01-01

    In addition to focal liver lesions, diffuse and vascular disorders of the liver represent a wide spectrum of liver diseases which are from the radiological point of view often difficult or nearly impossible to diagnose. Classical diagnostic methods are computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in addition to ultrasound. Diffuse parenchymal damage caused by diseases of various etiologies is therefore difficult to evaluate because it often lacks characteristic morphological features. For hepatic steatosis, hemochromatosis/siderosis as an example of a diffuse storage disease and sarcoidosis and candidiasis as infectious/inflammatory diseases, an image-based diagnosis is appropriate in some cases. For most diffuse liver diseases, however only nonspecific changes are visualized. Vascular pathologies of the liver, such as the Budd-Chiari syndrome and portal vein thrombosis, however, can usually be diagnosed very clearly using radiology and there is also a very effective interventional radiological treatment. Chronic diseases very often culminate in liver cirrhosis which is highly associated with an increased risk of liver cancer. (orig.) [de

  13. CIRSE Vascular Closure Device Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Hülsbeck, Stefan; Libicher, Martin; Atar, Eli; Trentmann, Jens; Goffette, Pierre; Borggrefe, Jan; Zeleňák, Kamil; Hooijboer, Pieter; Belli, Anna-Maria

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Vascular closure devices are routinely used after many vascular interventional radiology procedures. However, there have been no major multicenter studies to assess the safety and effectiveness of the routine use of closure devices in interventional radiology. Methods The CIRSE registry of closure devices with an anchor and a plug started in January 2009 and ended in August 2009. A total of 1,107 patients were included in the registry. Results Deployment success was 97.2%. Deployment failure specified to access type was 8.8% [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 5.0–14.5] for antegrade access and 1.8% (95% CI 1.1–2.9) for retrograde access (P = 0.001). There was no difference in deployment failure related to local PVD at the access site. Calcification was a reason for deployment failure in only 5.9 cm, and two vessel occlusions. Conclusion The conclusion of this registry of closure devices with an anchor and a plug is that the use of this device in interventional radiology procedures is safe, with a low incidence of serious access site complications. There seems to be no difference in complications between antegrade and retrograde access and other parameters. PMID:20981425

  14. Vascular access for home haemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Shakarchi, Julien; Day, C; Inston, N

    2018-03-01

    Home haemodialysis has been advocated due to improved quality of life. However, there are very little data on the optimum vascular access for it. A retrospective cohort study was carried on all patients who initiated home haemodialysis between 2011 and 2016 at a large university hospital. Access-related hospital admissions and interventions were used as primary outcome measures. Our cohort consisted of 74 patients. On initiation of home haemodialysis, 62 individuals were using an arteriovenous fistula as vascular access, while the remaining were on a tunnelled dialysis catheter. Of the 12 patients who started on a tunnelled dialysis catheter, 5 were subsequently converted to either an arteriovenous fistula ( n = 4) or an arteriovenous graft ( n = 1). During the period of home haemodialysis use, four arteriovenous fistula failed or thrombosed with patients continuing on home haemodialysis using an arteriovenous graft ( n = 3) or a tunnelled dialysis catheter ( n = 1). To maintain uninterrupted home haemodialysis, interventional rates were 0.32 per arteriovenous fistula/arteriovenous graft access-year and 0.4 per tunnelled dialysis catheter access-year. Hospital admission rates for patients on home haemodialysis were 0.33 per patient-year. Our study has shown that home haemodialysis can be safely and independently performed at home within a closely managed home haemodialysis programme. The authors also advocate the use of arteriovenous fistulas for this cohort of patients due to both low complication and intervention rates.

  15. Vascular emergencies in liver trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taourel, P. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Lapeyronie, Montpellier (France)], E-mail: p-taourel@chu-montpellier.fr; Vernhet, H. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Arnaud de Villeneuve, Montpellier (France); Suau, A.; Granier, C. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Lapeyronie, Montpellier (France); Lopez, F.M. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Nimes (France); Aufort, S. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Lapeyronie, Montpellier (France)

    2007-10-15

    The use of CT in the diagnosis and management of liver trauma is responsible for the shift from routine surgical versus non-surgical treatment in the management of traumatic liver injuries, even when they are of high grade. The main cause of compli cation and of death in liver trauma is related to vascular injury. The goal of this review focussed on the vascular complications of liver trauma is to describe the elementary lesions shown by CT in liver trauma including laceration, parenchymal hematoma and contusions, partial devascularisation, subcapsular hematomas, hemoperitoneum, active bleeding, pseudoaneurysm of the hepatic artery, bile leak, and periportal oedema, to illustrate the possible pitfalls in CT diagnosis of liver trauma and to underline the key-points which may absolutely be present in a CT report of liver trauma. Then we will remind the grading system based on the CT features and we will analyze the interest and limitations of such grading systems. Last we will discuss the diagnostic strategy at the early phase in patients with suspected liver trauma according to their clinical conditions and underline the conditions of arterial embolization, and then we will discuss the diagnosis strategy at the delayed phase according to the suspected complications.

  16. Vascular emergencies in liver trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taourel, P.; Vernhet, H.; Suau, A.; Granier, C.; Lopez, F.M.; Aufort, S.

    2007-01-01

    The use of CT in the diagnosis and management of liver trauma is responsible for the shift from routine surgical versus non-surgical treatment in the management of traumatic liver injuries, even when they are of high grade. The main cause of compli cation and of death in liver trauma is related to vascular injury. The goal of this review focussed on the vascular complications of liver trauma is to describe the elementary lesions shown by CT in liver trauma including laceration, parenchymal hematoma and contusions, partial devascularisation, subcapsular hematomas, hemoperitoneum, active bleeding, pseudoaneurysm of the hepatic artery, bile leak, and periportal oedema, to illustrate the possible pitfalls in CT diagnosis of liver trauma and to underline the key-points which may absolutely be present in a CT report of liver trauma. Then we will remind the grading system based on the CT features and we will analyze the interest and limitations of such grading systems. Last we will discuss the diagnostic strategy at the early phase in patients with suspected liver trauma according to their clinical conditions and underline the conditions of arterial embolization, and then we will discuss the diagnosis strategy at the delayed phase according to the suspected complications

  17. Vascularized bone transplant chimerism mediated by vascular endothelial growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, Wouter F; Larsen, Mikko; Friedrich, Patricia F; Bishop, Allen T

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) induces angiogenesis and osteogenesis in bone allotransplants. We aim to determine whether bone remodeling in VEGF-treated bone allotransplants results from repopulation with circulation-derived autogenous cells or survival of allogenic transplant-derived cells. Vascularized femoral bone transplants were transplanted from female Dark Agouti rats (DA;RT1(a) ) to male Piebald Viral Glaxo (PVG;RT1(c) ). Arteriovenous bundle implantation and short-term immunosuppression were used to maintain cellular viability. VEGF was encapsulated in biodegradable microspheres and delivered intramedullary in the experimental group (n = 22). In the control group (n = 22), no VEGF was delivered. Rats were sacrificed at 4 or 18 weeks. Laser capture microdissection of bone remodeling areas was performed at the inner and outer cortex. Sex-mismatched genes were quantified with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to determine the amount of male cells to total cells, defined as the relative expression ratio (rER). At 4 weeks, rER was significantly higher at the inner cortex in VEGF-treated transplants as compared to untreated transplants (0.622 ± 0.225 vs. 0.362 ± 0.081, P = 0.043). At 4 weeks, the outer cortex in the control group had a significantly higher rER (P = 0.038), whereas in the VEGF group, the inner cortex had a higher rER (P = 0.015). Over time, in the outer cortex the rER significantly increased to 0.634 ± 0.106 at 18 weeks in VEGF-treated rats (P = 0.049). At 18 weeks, the rER was >0.5 at all cortical areas in both groups. These in vivo findings suggest a chemotactic effect of intramedullary applied VEGF on recipient-derived bone and could imply that more rapid angiogenesis of vascularized allotransplants can be established with microencapsulated VEGF. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Vascular Ageing and Exercise: Focus on Cellular Reparative Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark D. Ross

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ageing is associated with an increased risk of developing noncommunicable diseases (NCDs, such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD. The increased risk can be attributable to increased prolonged exposure to oxidative stress. Often, CVD is preceded by endothelial dysfunction, which carries with it a proatherothrombotic phenotype. Endothelial senescence and reduced production and release of nitric oxide (NO are associated with “vascular ageing” and are often accompanied by a reduced ability for the body to repair vascular damage, termed “reendothelialization.” Exercise has been repeatedly shown to confer protection against CVD and diabetes risk and incidence. Regular exercise promotes endothelial function and can prevent endothelial senescence, often through a reduction in oxidative stress. Recently, endothelial precursors, endothelial progenitor cells (EPC, have been shown to repair damaged endothelium, and reduced circulating number and/or function of these cells is associated with ageing. Exercise can modulate both number and function of these cells to promote endothelial homeostasis. In this review we look at the effects of advancing age on the endothelium and these endothelial precursors and how exercise appears to offset this “vascular ageing” process.

  19. Vascular Ageing and Exercise: Focus on Cellular Reparative Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Mark D; Malone, Eva; Florida-James, Geraint

    2016-01-01

    Ageing is associated with an increased risk of developing noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD). The increased risk can be attributable to increased prolonged exposure to oxidative stress. Often, CVD is preceded by endothelial dysfunction, which carries with it a proatherothrombotic phenotype. Endothelial senescence and reduced production and release of nitric oxide (NO) are associated with "vascular ageing" and are often accompanied by a reduced ability for the body to repair vascular damage, termed "reendothelialization." Exercise has been repeatedly shown to confer protection against CVD and diabetes risk and incidence. Regular exercise promotes endothelial function and can prevent endothelial senescence, often through a reduction in oxidative stress. Recently, endothelial precursors, endothelial progenitor cells (EPC), have been shown to repair damaged endothelium, and reduced circulating number and/or function of these cells is associated with ageing. Exercise can modulate both number and function of these cells to promote endothelial homeostasis. In this review we look at the effects of advancing age on the endothelium and these endothelial precursors and how exercise appears to offset this "vascular ageing" process.

  20. Procyanidins Mitigate Osteoarthritis Pathogenesis by, at Least in Part, Suppressing Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Wang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Procyanidins are a family of plant metabolites that have been suggested to mitigate osteoarthritis pathogenesis in mice. However, the underlying mechanism is largely unknown. This study aimed to determine whether procyanidins mitigate traumatic injury-induced osteoarthritis (OA disease progression, and whether procyanidins exert a chondroprotective effect by, at least in part, suppressing vascular endothelial growth factor signaling. Procyanidins (extracts from pine bark, orally administered to mice subjected to surgery for destabilization of the medial meniscus, significantly slowed OA disease progression. Real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed that procyanidin treatment reduced expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and effectors in OA pathogenesis that are regulated by vascular endothelial growth factor. Procyanidin-suppressed vascular endothelial growth factor expression was correlated with reduced phosphorylation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 in human OA primary chondrocytes. Moreover, components of procyanidins, procyanidin B2 and procyanidin B3 exerted effects similar to those of total procyanidins in mitigating the OA-related gene expression profile in the primary culture of human OA chondrocytes in the presence of vascular endothelial growth factor. Together, these findings suggest procyanidins mitigate OA pathogenesis, which is mediated, at least in part, by suppressing vascular endothelial growth factor signaling.

  1. Proatherogenic pathways leading to vascular calcification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzini, Michael J.; Schulze, P. Christian

    2006-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the western world and atherosclerosis is the major common underlying disease. The pathogenesis of atherosclerosis involves local vascular injury, inflammation and oxidative stress as well as vascular calcification. Vascular calcification has long been regarded as a degenerative process leading to mineral deposition in the vascular wall characteristic for late stages of atherosclerosis. However, recent studies identified vascular calcification in early stages of atherosclerosis and its occurrence has been linked to clinical events in patients with cardiovascular disease. Its degree correlates with local vascular inflammation and with the overall impact and the progression of atherosclerosis. Over the last decade, diverse and highly regulated molecular signaling cascades controlling vascular calcification have been described. Local and circulating molecules such as osteopontin, osteoprogerin, leptin and matrix Gla protein were identified as critical regulators of vascular calcification. We here review the current knowledge on molecular pathways of vascular calcification and their relevance for the progression of cardiovascular disease

  2. World Federation of Vascular Societies: presidential address

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, Henrik Hegaard

    2010-01-01

    The presidential address describes briefly the history of the World Federation for Vascular Societies (WFVS) and its objectives. Vascular Surgery today includes interventional procedures (open surgical and endovascular) in addition to risk factor reduction and medical treatment. It is equally imp...... throughout the world. In addition, for introduction of new treatments, training issues and dissemination of science a global organisation like the WFVS is needed.......The presidential address describes briefly the history of the World Federation for Vascular Societies (WFVS) and its objectives. Vascular Surgery today includes interventional procedures (open surgical and endovascular) in addition to risk factor reduction and medical treatment. It is equally...

  3. Mitochondrial Cyclophilin D in Vascular Oxidative Stress and Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itani, Hana A; Dikalova, Anna E; McMaster, William G; Nazarewicz, Rafal R; Bikineyeva, Alfiya T; Harrison, David G; Dikalov, Sergey I

    2016-06-01

    Vascular superoxide (O˙2 (-)) and inflammation contribute to hypertension. The mitochondria are an important source of O˙2 (-); however, the regulation of mitochondrial O˙2 (-) and the antihypertensive potential of targeting the mitochondria remain poorly defined. Angiotensin II and inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin 17A and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) significantly contribute to hypertension. We hypothesized that angiotensin II and cytokines co-operatively induce cyclophilin D (CypD)-dependent mitochondrial O˙2 (-) production in hypertension. We tested whether CypD inhibition attenuates endothelial oxidative stress and reduces hypertension. CypD depletion in CypD(-/-) mice prevents overproduction of mitochondrial O˙2 (-) in angiotensin II-infused mice, attenuates hypertension by 20 mm Hg, and improves vascular relaxation compared with wild-type C57Bl/6J mice. Treatment of hypertensive mice with the specific CypD inhibitor Sanglifehrin A reduces blood pressure by 28 mm Hg, inhibits production of mitochondrial O˙2 (-) by 40%, and improves vascular relaxation. Angiotensin II-induced hypertension was associated with CypD redox activation by S-glutathionylation, and expression of the mitochondria-targeted H2O2 scavenger, catalase, abolished CypD S-glutathionylation, prevented stimulation mitochondrial O˙2 (-), and attenuated hypertension. The functional role of cytokine-angiotensin II interplay was confirmed by co-operative stimulation of mitochondrial O˙2 (-) by 3-fold in cultured endothelial cells and impairment of aortic relaxation incubated with combination of angiotensin II, interleukin 17A, and tumor necrosis factor-α which was prevented by CypD depletion or expression of mitochondria-targeted SOD2 and catalase. These data support a novel role of CypD in hypertension and demonstrate that targeting CypD decreases mitochondrial O˙2 (-), improves vascular relaxation, and reduces hypertension. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Remodeling the Vascular Microenvironment of Glioblastoma with α-Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behling, Katja; Maguire, William F; Di Gialleonardo, Valentina; Heeb, Lukas E M; Hassan, Iman F; Veach, Darren R; Keshari, Kayvan R; Gutin, Philip H; Scheinberg, David A; McDevitt, Michael R

    2016-11-01

    Tumors escape antiangiogenic therapy by activation of proangiogenic signaling pathways. Bevacizumab is approved for the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma, but patients inevitably develop resistance to this angiogenic inhibitor. We previously investigated targeted α-particle therapy with 225 Ac-E4G10 as an antivascular approach and showed increased survival and tumor control in a high-grade transgenic orthotopic glioblastoma model. Here, we investigated changes in tumor vascular morphology and functionality caused by 225 Ac-E4G10. We investigated remodeling of the tumor microenvironment in transgenic Ntva glioblastoma mice using a therapeutic 7.4-kBq dose of 225 Ac-E4G10. Immunofluorescence and immunohistochemical analyses imaged morphologic changes in the tumor blood-brain barrier microenvironment. Multicolor flow cytometry quantified the endothelial progenitor cell population in the bone marrow. Diffusion-weighted MR imaged functional changes in the tumor vascular network. The mechanism of drug action is a combination of remodeling of the glioblastoma vascular microenvironment, relief of edema, and depletion of regulatory T and endothelial progenitor cells. The primary remodeling event is the reduction of both endothelial and perivascular cell populations. Tumor-associated edema and necrosis were lessened, resulting in increased perfusion and reduced diffusion. Pharmacologic uptake of dasatinib into tumor was enhanced after α-particle therapy. Targeted antivascular α-particle radiation remodels the glioblastoma vascular microenvironment via a multimodal mechanism of action and provides insight into the vascular architecture of platelet-derived growth factor-driven glioblastoma. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  5. Heritability of Retinal Vascular Fractals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vergmann, Anna Stage; Broe, Rebecca; Kessel, Line

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the genetic contribution to the pattern of retinal vascular branching expressed by its fractal dimension. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of 50 monozygotic and 49 dizygotic, same-sex twin pairs aged 20 to 46 years. In 50°, disc-centered fundus photographs, the reti...... fractal dimension did not differ statistically significantly between monozygotic and dizygotic twin pairs (1.505 vs. 1.495, P = 0.06), supporting that the study population was suitable for quantitative analysis of heritability. The intrapair correlation was markedly higher (0.505, P = 0.......0002) in monozygotic twins than in dizygotic twins (0.108, P = 0.46), corresponding to a heritability h2 for the fractal dimension of 0.79. In quantitative genetic models, dominant genetic effects explained 54% of the variation and 46% was individually environmentally determined. Conclusions: In young adult twins...

  6. Vascular anastomosis by Argon Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, O.M.; Macruz, R.; Armelin, E.; Brum, J.M.G.; Ribeiro, M.P.; Mnitentog, J.; Verginelli, G.; Pileggi, F.; Zerbini, E.J.

    1982-01-01

    Twenty four mongrel dogs, wheighing 13 to 24 kilograms were studied. After anesthesia, intubation and controlled ventilation, they were submitted to three types of vascular anastomosis: Group I - eight dogs with saphenous vein inter-carotid arteries by-pass: Group II - eight dogs with left mammary artery - left anterior descending coronary artery by-pass; Group III - eight dogs with venovenous anastomosis. In all groups 0.8 to 15 watts of Argon Laser power was applied to a total time of 90 to 300 seconds. The lower power for venovenous anastomosis and the greater for the arterial ones. The mean valves of resistence of the Laser anastomosis to pressure induced rupture was 730 mmHg in the immediate post operative study, and superior to 2.500 mmHg 30 days after. No signs of occlusion was demonstrated at the anastomosis sites by the angiographic and anathomo-patological study performed. (Author) [pt

  7. Vascular targeting with peptide libraries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasqualini, R. [La Jolla Cancer Research Center The Burnham Inst., La Jolla CA (United States)

    1999-06-01

    The authors have developed an 'in vivo' selection system in which phage capable of selective homing to different tissues are recovered from a phage display peptide library following intravenous administration. Using this strategy, they have isolate several organ and tumor-homing peptides. They have shown that each of those peptides binds of different receptors that are selectively expressed on the vasculature of the target tissue. The tumor-homing peptides bind to receptors that are up regulated in tumor angiogenic vasculature. Targeted delivery of doxorubicin to angiogenic vasculature using these peptides in animals models decrease toxicity and increased the therapeutic efficacy of the drug. Vascular targeting may facilitate the development of other treatment strategies that rely on inhibition of angio genesis and lead to advances to extend the potential for targeting of drugs, genes and radionuclides in the context of many diseases.

  8. Vascular Morphodynamics During Secondary Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Reuille, Pierre Barbier; Ragni, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Quantification of vascular morphodynamics during secondary growth has been hampered by the scale of the process. Even in the tiny model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, the xylem can include more than 2000 cells in a single cross section, rendering manual counting impractical. Moreover, due to its deep location, xylem is an inaccessible tissue, limiting live imaging. A novel method to visualize and measure secondary growth progression has been proposed: "the Quantitative Histology" approach. This method is based on a detailed anatomical atlas, and image segmentation coupled with machine learning to automatically extract cell shapes and identify cell type. Here we present a new version of this approach, with a user-friendly interface implemented in the open source software LithoGraphX.

  9. Adiposity, adipocytokines & microvesicles in the etiology of vascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kanhai, D.A.N.I.S.

    2013-01-01

    Vascular disease, in this thesis the terms vascular and cardiovascular are used interchangeably, is the number 1 cause of death worldwide. In 2008, 30% of all mortality had a vascular origin. Vascular mortality rates after a first manifestation of vascular disease are decreasing in Western society,

  10. FPGA controlled artificial vascular system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laqua D.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring the oxygen saturation of an unborn child is an invasive procedure, so far. Transabdominal fetal pulse oximetry is a promising method under research, used to estimate the oxygen saturation of a fetus noninvasively. Due to the nature of the method, the fetal information needs to be extracted from a mixed signal. To properly evaluate signal processing algorithms, a phantom modeling fetal and maternal blood circuits and tissue layers is necessary. This paper presents an improved hardware concept for an artificial vascular system, utilizing an FPGA based CompactRIO System from National Instruments. The experimental model to simulate the maternal and fetal blood pressure curve consists of two identical hydraulic circuits. Each of these circuits consists of a pre-pressure system and an artificial vascular system. Pulse curves are generated by proportional valves, separating these two systems. The dilation of the fetal and maternal artificial vessels in tissue substitutes is measured by transmissive and reflective photoplethysmography. The measurement results from the pressure sensors and the transmissive optical sensors are visualized to show the functionality of the pulse generating systems. The trigger frequency for the maternal valve was set to 1 per second, the fetal valve was actuated at 0.7 per second for validation. The reflective curve, capturing pulsations of the fetal and maternal circuit, was obtained with a high power LED (905 nm as light source. The results show that the system generates pulse curves, similar to its physiological equivalent. Further, the acquired reflective optical signal is modulated by the alternating diameter of the tubes of both circuits, allowing for tests of signal processing algorithms.

  11. Dynamics of nephron-vascular network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postnov, Dmitry; Postnov, D E; Marsh, D J

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents a modeling study of the spatial dynamics of a nephro-vascular network consisting of individual nephrons connected via a tree-like vascular branching structure. We focus on the effects of nonlinear mechanisms that are responsible for the formation of synchronous patterns in order...

  12. Imaging of the peripheral vascular system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gould, S.A.; Pond, G.D.; Pinsky, S.; Moss, G.S.; Srikantaswamy, S.; Ryo, U.Y.

    1984-01-01

    This book is limited neither to the peripheral vascular system nor to diagnostic imaging techniques. Its 18 chapters cover nonimaging blood-flow techniques (Doppler ultrasound, plethysmography) as well as noninvasive and invasive imaging techniques (ultrasound, computed tomography, radionuclide digital-subtraction angiography, and contrast angiography). These are applied not only to the peripheral vascular system but also to the aorta and vena cava

  13. Biomarkers of drug-induced vascular injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brott, D.; Gould, S.; Jones, H.; Schofield, J.; Prior, H.; Valentin, J.P; Bjurstrom, S.; Kenne, K.; Schuppe-Koistinen, I.; Katein, A.; Foster-Brown, L.; Betton, G.; Richardson, R.; Evans, G.; Louden, C.

    2005-01-01

    In pre-clinical safety studies, drug-induced vascular injury is an issue of concern because there are no obvious diagnostic markers for pre-clinical or clinical monitoring and there is an intellectual gap in our understanding of the pathogenesis of this lesion. While vasodilatation and increased shear stress appear to play a role, the exact mechanism(s) of injury to the primary targets, smooth muscle and endothelial cells are unknown. However, evaluation of novel markers for potential clinical monitoring with a mechanistic underpinning would add value in risk assessment and management. This mini review focuses on the progress to identify diagnostic markers of drug-induced vascular injury. Von Willebrand factor (vWF), released upon perturbation of endothelial cells, is transiently increased in plasma prior to morphological evidence of damage in dogs or rats treated with vascular toxicants. Therefore, vWF might be a predictive biomarker of vascular injury. However, vWF is not an appropriate biomarker of lesion progression or severity since levels return to baseline values when there is morphological evidence of injury. A potential mechanistically linked biomarker of vascular injury is caveolin-1. Expression of this protein, localized primarily to smooth muscle and endothelial cells, decreases with the onset of vascular damage. Since vascular injury involves multiple mediators and cell types, evaluation of a panel rather than a single biomarker may be more useful in monitoring early and severe progressive vascular injury

  14. Reconstructive vascular surgery below the knee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, L B; Jelnes, R; Sager, P

    1986-01-01

    In a series of 38 consecutive patients with advanced peripheral vascular disease (i.e. rest pain) reconstructive vascular surgery was performed with the distal anastomosis below the knee. Ankle/arm pressure index (AAI) was 0.28 (0.11-0.47) preoperatively; accumulated graft patency rate was 0.47 (SD...

  15. Vascular dementia | Connor | African Journal of Psychiatry

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vascular dementia (VaD) is a common but heterogeneous condition in which there is a clear temporal relationship between the dementia and vascular disease. It may result from multiple large or small vessel strokes or a single strategic stroke. Subcortical ischaemic VaD includes multiple lacunes and subcortical ...

  16. Wnt inhibition promotes vascular specification of embryonic cardiac progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichman, David E; Park, Laura; Man, Limor; Redmond, David; Chao, Kenny; Harvey, Richard P; Taketo, Makoto M; Rosenwaks, Zev; James, Daylon

    2018-01-08

    Several studies have demonstrated a multiphasic role for Wnt signaling during embryonic cardiogenesis and developed protocols that enrich for cardiac derivatives during in vitro differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs). However, few studies have investigated the role of Wnt signaling in the specification of cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) toward downstream fates. Using transgenic mice and hPSCs, we tracked endothelial cells (ECs) that originated from CPCs expressing NKX2.5. Analysis of EC-fated CPCs at discrete phenotypic milestones during hPSC differentiation identified reduced Wnt activity as a hallmark of EC specification, and the enforced activation or inhibition of Wnt reduced or increased, respectively, the degree of vascular commitment within the CPC population during both hPSC differentiation and mouse embryogenesis. Wnt5a, which has been shown to exert an inhibitory influence on Wnt signaling during cardiac development, was dynamically expressed during vascular commitment of hPSC-derived CPCs, and ectopic Wnt5a promoted vascular specification of hPSC-derived and mouse embryonic CPCs. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  17. Effect of agmatine on experimental vascular endothelial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nader, M A; Gamiel, N M; El-Kashef, H; Zaghloul, M S

    2016-05-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of agmatine sulfate (AG, CAS2482-00-0) in nicotine (NIC)-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED) in rabbits. NIC was administered to produce VED in rabbits with or without AG for 6 weeks. Serum lipid profile, serum thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, reduced glutathione, superoxide dismutase generation, serum nitrite/nitrate, serum vascular cellular adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and aortic nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) levels were analyzed.Treatment with AG markedly improves lipid profile and prevented NIC-induced VED and oxidative stress. The mechanism of AG in improving NIC-induced VED may be due to the significant reduction in serum VCAM-1 levels and aortic NF-κB. Thus, it may be concluded that AG reduces the oxidative stress, nitric oxide production, VCAM-1 levels, and aortic NF-κB expression, thereby consequently improving the integrity of vascular endothelium. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. PanVascular medicine. 2. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanzer, Peter (ed.) [Health Care Center Bitterfeld (Germany). Division of Cardiovascular Disease

    2015-06-01

    Vascular management and care has become a truly multidisciplinary enterprise as the number of specialists involved in the treatment of patients with vascular diseases has steadily increased. While in the past, treatments were delivered by individual specialists, in the twenty-first century a team approach is without doubt the most effective strategy. In order to promote professional excellence in this dynamic and rapidly evolving field, a shared knowledge base and interdisciplinary standards need to be established. Pan Vascular Medicine, 2nd edition has been designed to offer such an interdisciplinary platform, providing vascular specialists with state-of-the art descriptive and procedural knowledge. Basic science, diagnostics, and therapy are all comprehensively covered. In a series of succinct, clearly written chapters, renowned specialists introduce and comment on the current international guidelines and present up-to-date reviews of all aspects of vascular care.

  19. Using Polymeric Scaffolds for Vascular Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alida Abruzzo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With the high occurrence of cardiovascular disease and increasing numbers of patients requiring vascular access, there is a significant need for small-diameter (<6 mm inner diameter vascular graft that can provide long-term patency. Despite the technological improvements, restenosis and graft thrombosis continue to hamper the success of the implants. Vascular tissue engineering is a new field that has undergone enormous growth over the last decade and has proposed valid solutions for blood vessels repair. The goal of vascular tissue engineering is to produce neovessels and neoorgan tissue from autologous cells using a biodegradable polymer as a scaffold. The most important advantage of tissue-engineered implants is that these tissues can grow, remodel, rebuild, and respond to injury. This review describes the development of polymeric materials over the years and current tissue engineering strategies for the improvement of vascular conduits.

  20. Postoperative radiographic evaluation of vascularized fibular grafts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manaster, B.J.; Coleman, D.A.; Bell, D.A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on thirty-five patients with free vascularized fibular grafts examined postoperatively with plain radiography. Early graft incorporation is seen as a fuzziness of the cortex at the site of its insertion into the host bone. Causes of failure in grafting for bone defects include graft fracture, hardware failure, and infection. A high percentage of complications or at least delayed unions occurred when vascularized fibular grafts were used to fill defects in the lower extremity. Conversely, upper extremity defects bridged by vascularized grafts heal quickly and hypertrophy. Vascularized grafts placed in the femoral head and neck for a vascular necrosis incorporate early on their superior aspect. The osseous tunnel in which they are placed is normally wider than the graft and often becomes sclerotic; this appearance does not represent nonunion

  1. PanVascular medicine. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanzer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Vascular management and care has become a truly multidisciplinary enterprise as the number of specialists involved in the treatment of patients with vascular diseases has steadily increased. While in the past, treatments were delivered by individual specialists, in the twenty-first century a team approach is without doubt the most effective strategy. In order to promote professional excellence in this dynamic and rapidly evolving field, a shared knowledge base and interdisciplinary standards need to be established. Pan Vascular Medicine, 2nd edition has been designed to offer such an interdisciplinary platform, providing vascular specialists with state-of-the art descriptive and procedural knowledge. Basic science, diagnostics, and therapy are all comprehensively covered. In a series of succinct, clearly written chapters, renowned specialists introduce and comment on the current international guidelines and present up-to-date reviews of all aspects of vascular care.

  2. In vitro proliferative capacity of vascular cells irradiated in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer-Dzoga, K.; Dimitrievich, G.S.; Griem, M.L.

    1985-01-01

    Explants were prepared from rabbit vascular aortic layers and irradiated with x-ray doses ranging from 100 cGy-5 cGy. This resulted in a 50% reduction in number of outgrowing cells with doses of 100-125 gy. Doses of 250, 500 and 750 gy resulted in a reduction of 70, 90, and 95% respectively. However, when the rabbit was irradiated in vivo to a narrow mediastinal port immediately before the explantation of vascular tissue, the number of outgrowing cells was comparable to that of the irradiated control for doses up to 250 cGy, while doses of 500 and 750 cGy reduced outgrowth by 60 and 93% respectively. To test for in situ repair, the time interval between irradiation and explantation was prolonged from 1-4 hours in one hour increments. The results were scored as average number of cells/explant and average number of cells/growing culture

  3. Physical Activity Prevents Progression for Cognitive Impairment and Vascular Dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdelho, Ana; Madureira, Sofia; Ferro, José M

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: We aimed to study if physical activity could interfere with progression for cognitive impairment and dementia in older people with white matter changes living independently. METHODS: The LADIS (Leukoaraiosis and Disability) prospective multinational European study evaluates....... Physical activity was recorded during the clinical interview. MRI was performed at entry and at the end of the study. RESULTS: Six hundred thirty-nine subjects were included (74.1±5 years old, 55% women, 9.6±3.8 years of schooling, 64% physically active). At the end of follow-up, 90 patients had dementia...... (vascular dementia, 54; Alzheimer disease with vascular component, 34; frontotemporal dementia, 2), and 147 had cognitive impairment not dementia. Using Cox regression analysis, physical activity reduced the risk of cognitive impairment (dementia and not dementia: β=-0.45, P=0.002; hazard ratio, 0.64; 95...

  4. Decreased distensibility of a passive vascular bed in diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faris, I; Agerskov, K; Henrikson, O

    1982-01-01

    exercise and (b) in a vascular bed locally paralysed by the injection of papaverine. Five normal subjects, six patients with long-standing Type 1 diabetes and six non-diabetic patients with severe atherosclerosis affecting the legs were studied. Blood flow was measured in the anterior tibial muscle......This study was undertaken to determine whether the distensibility of a passive vascular bed is reduced in Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients with microangiopathy. The change in blood flow induced by 45 degrees head-up tilting was studied in two systems: (a) following maximal ischaemic...... by the isotope washout technique. The median increase in blood flow produced by tilting was greater in normal subjects than in diabetic subjects in both the locally-relaxed bed (58% and 14% respectively) and after maximal ischaemic exercise (45% and 4% respectively). In the atherosclerotic subjects, the increase...

  5. Airway Humidification Reduces the Inflammatory Response During Mechanical Ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Min; Song, Jun-Jie; Guo, Xiao-Li; Tang, Yong-Lin; Li, Hai-Bo

    2015-12-01

    Currently, no clinical or animal studies have been performed to establish the relationship between airway humidification and mechanical ventilation-induced lung inflammatory responses. Therefore, an animal model was established to better define this relationship. Rabbits (n = 40) were randomly divided into 6 groups: control animals, sacrificed immediately after anesthesia (n = 2); dry gas group animals, subjected to mechanical ventilation for 8 h without humidification (n = 6); and experimental animals, subjected to mechanical ventilation for 8 h under humidification at 30, 35, 40, and 45°C, respectively (n = 8). Inflammatory cytokines in the bronchi alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were measured. The integrity of the airway cilia and the tracheal epithelium was examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. Peripheral blood white blood cell counts and the wet to dry ratio and lung pathology were determined. Dry gas group animals showed increased tumor necrosis factor alpha levels in BALF compared with control animals (P humidification temperature was increased to 40°C. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed that cilia integrity was maintained in the 40°C groups. Peripheral white blood cell counts were not different among those groups. Compared with control animals, the wet to dry ratio was significantly elevated in the dry gas group (P humidification at 40°C resulted in reduced pathologic injury compared with the other groups based on the histologic score. Pathology and reduced inflammation observed in animals treated at 40°C was similar to that observed in the control animals, suggesting that appropriate humidification reduced inflammatory responses elicited as a consequence of mechanical ventilation, in addition to reducing damage to the cilia and reducing water loss in the airway. Copyright © 2015 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  6. Floral anatomy of Delphinieae (Ranunculaceae: comparing flower organization and vascular patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew V. Novikoff

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Species of the tribe Delphinieae have dorsoventralized flowers; their pentamerous calyx and reduced corolla are dorsally spurred and inner spurs are nectariferous. Based on this common floral scheme, Delphinieae species exhibit a wide diversity of floral structures and morphologies. We present here the first investigation of the floral anatomy in Delphinieae. The organization of the floral vascular system has been studied in species representative of the floral morphological diversity of Delphinieae: Aconitum lasiocarpum, Delphinium elatum, and Consolida regalis. The three species show a similar vascularization of the calyx and of the reproductive organs, but exhibit distinct anatomical features in the corolla where the nectaries are borne. The sepals and the stamens have a trilacunar three-traced and a unilacunar one-traced vascularization, respectively. Three free carpels in D. elatum and A. lasiocarpum are basically supplied by six vascular bundles – three independent dorsal bundles and three fused lateral bundles. In C. regalis the single carpel is supplied by three independent vascular bundles (one dorsal and two ventral. Staminodes are not vascularized. The basic type of petal vascularization is unilacunar one-traced, but in the case of C. regalis the derived bilacunar two-traced type has been observed. This latter state arose as a result of the fusion of the two dorsal petal primordia. The results of this first comparative study of the floral anatomy of Delphinieae are discussed with the recent phylogenetic, morphological, and evo-devo findings concerning the tribe.

  7. [Gastric vascular lesions in cirrhosis: gastropathy and antral vascular ectasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Meritxell; Calvet, Xavier; Vergara, Mercedes; Bella, Maria Rosa; Junquera, Félix; Martinez-Bauer, Eva; Campo, Rafael

    2015-02-01

    Portal hypertensive gastropathy (GHP) is a complication of portal hypertension usually associated with liver cirrhosis. The pathogenesis is unclear but the presence of portal hypertension is an essential factor for its development. GHP may be asymptomatic or present as gastrointestinal bleeding or iron deficiency anemia. Endoscopic lesions vary from a mosaic pattern to diffuse red spots; the most common location is the fundus. Treatment is indicated when there is acute or chronic bleeding, as secondary prophylaxis. There is insufficient evidence to recommend primary prophylaxis in patients who have never bled. Drugs that decrease portal pressure, such as non-cardioselective beta-blockers, and/or endoscopic ablative treatments, such as argon-beam coagulation, may be used. The role of transarterial intrahepatic portosystemic shunt) or bypass surgery has been insufficiently analyzed. Antral vascular ectasia (EVA) is a rare entity in liver cirrhosis, whose pathophysiology is still unknown. Clinical presentation is similar to that of GHP and endoscopy usually shows red spots in the antrum. Biopsy is often required to differentiate EVA from GHP. There is no effective medical therapy, so endoscopic ablative therapy and, in severe cases, antrectomy are recommended. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  8. Vascular elastic photoacoustic tomography in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hai, Pengfei; Zhou, Yong; Liang, Jinyang; Li, Chiye; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-03-01

    Quantification of vascular elasticity can help detect thrombosis and prevent life-threatening conditions such as acute myocardial infarction or stroke. Here, we propose vascular elastic photoacoustic tomography (VE-PAT) to measure vascular elasticity in humans. VE-PAT was developed by incorporating a linear-array-based photoacoustic computed tomography system with a customized compression stage. By measuring the deformation of blood vessels under uniaxial loading, VE-PAT was able to quantify the vascular compliance. We first demonstrated the feasibility of VE-PAT in blood vessel phantoms. In large vessel phantoms, VE-PAT detected a decrease in vascular compliance due to simulated thrombosis, which was validated by a standard compression test. In small blood vessel phantoms embedded 3 mm deep in gelatin, VE-PAT detected elasticity changes at depths that are difficult to image using other elasticity imaging techniques. We then applied VE-PAT to assess vascular compliance in a human subject and detected a decrease in vascular compliance when an occlusion occurred downstream from the measurement point, demonstrating the potential of VE-PAT in clinical applications such as detection of deep venous thrombosis.

  9. [A new specialty is born: Vascular medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laroche, J-P

    2016-05-01

    On the 4th of December 2015, the French authorities officially recognized the birth of a specialty in vascular medicine entitled CO-DES cardiology-vascular/vascular Medicine. France is the 7th country to obtain this specialty after Switzerland, Germany, Austria, Czech Republic, Slovakia and Slovenia, six countries in the EEC. It has taken years to achieve a long but exciting experience: we went from hopes to disappointments, sometimes with the blues, but lobbying helping… with sustained confidence. This article tells the story of 30 years of struggle to achieve this vascular medicine specialty. Gaston Bachelard wrote: "Nothing is obvious, nothing is given, all is built." For the construction of vascular medicine, we had to overcome many obstacles, nothing was given to us, everything was conquered. Beware "The specialist is one who knows more and more things about an increasingly restricted field, up to 'knowing everything about nothing"' recalled Ralph Barton Ferry, philosopher; so there is room for modesty and humility but also convictions. The physical examination will remain the basis of our exercise. But let us recall the contributions of all those vascular physicians who practiced in the past, together with those currently active, who built day after day, year after year, a vascular medicine of quality. It is because of the trust of our colleagues and our patients that we can occupy the place that is ours today. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Diagnosis and management of vascular diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Xindong; Zheng Lianzhou

    2011-01-01

    Vascular disorders mainly include hemangiomas and vascular malformations, and constitute some of the most difficult diagnostic and therapeutic enigmas that can be encountered in the clinical practice. The clinical presentations are extremely variable and can range from an asymptomatic birthmark to life-threatening congestive heart failure. Attributing any of these extremely varied symptoms that a patients may present with to a vascular malformation may be a challenge to the most experienced clinical. This problem is compounded by the extreme rarity of these vascular lesions. If a clinician meets such a patient once every few years, it will be extremely difficult for the physicians to gain a steep learning curve. In such circumstances, it is difficult to formulate a standard of diagnosis and treatment for these vascular disorders. This paper aims to make a comprehensive and detailed description of the classification and diagnosis of the vascular disorders, the common used embolization agents, the concepts of interventional diagnosis and management and the therapies of various hemangiomas and vascular malformations. (authors)

  11. Curcumin Protects against Cadmium-Induced Vascular Dysfunction, Hypertension and Tissue Cadmium Accumulation in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upa Kukongviriyapan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin from turmeric is commonly used worldwide as a spice and has been demonstrated to possess various biological activities. This study investigated the protective effect of curcumin on a mouse model of cadmium (Cd—induced hypertension, vascular dysfunction and oxidative stress. Male ICR mice were exposed to Cd (100 mg/L in drinking water for eight weeks. Curcumin (50 or 100 mg/kg was intragastrically administered in mice every other day concurrently with Cd. Cd induced hypertension and impaired vascular responses to phenylephrine, acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside. Curcumin reduced the toxic effects of Cd and protected vascular dysfunction by increasing vascular responsiveness and normalizing the blood pressure levels. The vascular protective effect of curcumin in Cd exposed mice is associated with up-regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS protein, restoration of glutathione redox ratio and alleviation of oxidative stress as indicated by decreasing superoxide production in the aortic tissues and reducing plasma malondialdehyde, plasma protein carbonyls, and urinary nitrate/nitrite levels. Curcumin also decreased Cd accumulation in the blood and various organs of Cd-intoxicated mice. These findings suggest that curcumin, due to its antioxidant and chelating properties, is a promising protective agent against hypertension and vascular dysfunction induced by Cd.

  12. Pathophysiology of white matter perfusion in Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Rachel; Ashby, Emma L; Wellington, Dannielle; Barrow, Vivienne M; Palmer, Jennifer C; Kehoe, Patrick G; Esiri, Margaret M; Love, Seth

    2014-05-01

    of reduced ratio of myelin-associated glycoprotein to proteolipid protein 1 are likely to be protective physiological responses to reduced white matter perfusion. Further analysis of the Bristol cohort showed that endothelin 1 was reduced in the white matter in Alzheimer's disease (P < 0.05) compared with control subjects, but not in vascular dementia, in which endothelin 1 tended to be elevated, perhaps reflecting abnormal regulation of white matter perfusion in vascular dementia. Our findings demonstrate the potential of post-mortem measurement of myelin proteins and mediators of vascular function, to assess physiological and pathological processes involved in the regulation of cerebral perfusion in Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia.

  13. Vascular ATP-sensitive potassium channels are over-expressed and partially regulated by nitric oxide in experimental septic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, Solène; Sennoun, Nacira; Dron, Anne-Gaëlle; de la Bourdonnaye, Mathilde; Montemont, Chantal; Asfar, Pierre; Lacolley, Patrick; Meziani, Ferhat; Levy, Bruno

    2011-05-01

    To study the activation and expression of vascular (aorta and small mesenteric arteries) potassium channels during septic shock with or without modulation of the NO pathway. Septic shock was induced in rats by peritonitis. Selective inhibitors of vascular K(ATP) (PNU-37883A) or BK(Ca) [iberiotoxin (IbTX)] channels were used to demonstrate their involvement in vascular hyporeactivity. Vascular response to phenylephrine was measured on aorta and small mesenteric arteries mounted on a wire myograph. Vascular expression of potassium channels was studied by PCR and Western blot, in the presence or absence of 1400W, an inducible NO synthase (iNOS) inhibitor. Aortic activation of the transcriptional factor nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) was assessed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Arterial pressure as well as in vivo and ex vivo vascular reactivity were reduced by sepsis and improved by PNU-37883A but not by IbTX. Sepsis was associated with an up-regulation of mRNA and protein expression of vascular K(ATP) channels, while expression of vascular BK(Ca) channels remained unchanged. Selective iNOS inhibition blunted the sepsis-induced increase in aortic NO, decreased NF-κB activation, and down-regulated vascular K(ATP) channel expression. Vascular K(ATP) but not BK(Ca) channels are activated, over-expressed, and partially regulated by NO via NF-κB activation during septic shock. Their selective inhibition restores arterial pressure and vascular reactivity and decreases lactate concentration. The present data suggest that selective vascular K(ATP) channel inhibitors offer potential therapeutic perspectives for septic shock.

  14. Changes in vascularization of internal organs in rabbits with experimental atherosclerosis, treated with protein hydrolysate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demireva, K.; Popdimitrov, I.

    1979-01-01

    The vascularization of the internal organs of rabbits with experimental atherosclerosis was studied by the method of Sapirstein with 86 rubidium. Experiments were carried out on male Chinchilla rabbits, fed cholesterol in a dose of 0,2 g/kg of body weight daily for a period of 90 days. Part of the animals were treated with protein hydrolysate in a dose of 5 ml/kg of body weight subcutaneously and the remaining - with physiologic saline. There was reduced vascularization in the heart, kidneys, intestines, liver, adrenals, pancreas and other internal organs in rabbits fed cholestrol and treated with physiologic saline. Administration of protein hydrolysate had protective effect on organ vascularization. Accumulation of 86 rubidium in a large part of the animals was greater than in control group. It is shown that protein hydrolysate amino acids stabilize the endothelial cells and stimulate the local vascularization. (author)

  15. Imaging evaluation of fetal vascular anomalies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvo-Garcia, Maria A.; Kline-Fath, Beth M.; Koch, Bernadette L.; Laor, Tal; Adams, Denise M.; Gupta, Anita; Lim, Foong-Yen

    2015-01-01

    Vascular anomalies can be detected in utero and should be considered in the setting of solid, mixed or cystic lesions in the fetus. Evaluation of the gray-scale and color Doppler US and MRI characteristics can guide diagnosis. We present a case-based pictorial essay to illustrate the prenatal imaging characteristics in 11 pregnancies with vascular malformations (5 lymphatic malformations, 2 Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome, 1 venous-lymphatic malformation, 1 Parkes-Weber syndrome) and vascular tumors (1 congenital hemangioma, 1 kaposiform hemangioendothelioma). Concordance between prenatal and postnatal diagnoses is analyzed, with further discussion regarding potential pitfalls in identification. (orig.)

  16. Imaging evaluation of fetal vascular anomalies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvo-Garcia, Maria A.; Kline-Fath, Beth M.; Koch, Bernadette L.; Laor, Tal [MLC 5031 Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Adams, Denise M. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics and Hemangioma and Vascular Malformation Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Gupta, Anita [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Lim, Foong-Yen [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Pediatric Surgery and Fetal Center of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Vascular anomalies can be detected in utero and should be considered in the setting of solid, mixed or cystic lesions in the fetus. Evaluation of the gray-scale and color Doppler US and MRI characteristics can guide diagnosis. We present a case-based pictorial essay to illustrate the prenatal imaging characteristics in 11 pregnancies with vascular malformations (5 lymphatic malformations, 2 Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome, 1 venous-lymphatic malformation, 1 Parkes-Weber syndrome) and vascular tumors (1 congenital hemangioma, 1 kaposiform hemangioendothelioma). Concordance between prenatal and postnatal diagnoses is analyzed, with further discussion regarding potential pitfalls in identification. (orig.)

  17. Vascular ring complicates accidental button battery ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Ronald W; Schwartz, Matthew C; Stephany, Joshua; Donnelly, Lane F; Franciosi, James P; Epelman, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Button battery ingestion can lead to dangerous complications, including vasculoesophageal fistula formation. The presence of a vascular ring may complicate battery ingestion if the battery lodges at the level of the ring and its important vascular structures. We report a 4-year-old boy with trisomy 21 who was diagnosed with a vascular ring at the time of button battery ingestion and died 9 days after presentation due to massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding from esophageal erosion and vasculoesophageal fistula formation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Study of the therapeutic benefit of cationic copolymer administration to vascular endothelium under mechanical stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giantsos-Adams, Kristina; Lopez-Quintero, Veronica; Kopeckova, Pavla; Kopecek, Jindrich; Tarbell, John M.; Dull, Randal

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary edema and the associated increases in vascular permeability continue to represent a significant clinical problem in the intensive care setting, with no current treatment modality other than supportive care and mechanical ventilation. Therapeutic compound(s) capable of attenuating changes in vascular barrier function would represent a significant advance in critical care medicine. We have previously reported the development of HPMA-based copolymers, targeted to endothelial glycocalyx that are able to enhance barrier function. In this work, we report the refinement of copolymer design and extend our physiological studies todemonstrate that the polymers: 1) reduce both shear stress and pressure-mediated increase in hydraulic conductivity, 2) reduce nitric oxide production in response to elevated hydrostatic pressure and, 3) reduce the capillary filtration coefficient (Kfc) in an isolated perfused mouse lung model. These copolymers represent an important tool for use in mechanotransduction research and a novel strategy for developing clinically useful copolymers for the treatment of vascular permeability. PMID:20932573

  19. Phosphodiesterase 1 regulation is a key mechanism in vascular aging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niño, Paula K Bautista; Durik, Matej; Danser, A H Jan

    2015-01-01

    Reduced nitric oxide (NO)/cGMP signalling is observed in age-related vascular disease. We hypothesize that this disturbed signalling involves effects of genomic instability, a primary causal factor in aging, on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and that the underlying mechanism plays a role...... in human age-related vascular disease. To test our hypothesis, we combined experiments in mice with genomic instability resulting from the defective nucleotide excision repair gene ERCC1 (Ercc1(d/-) mice), human VSMC cultures and population genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Aortic rings of Ercc1(d...... in lungs was higher in Ercc1(d/-) mice. No differences in activity or levels of cGMP-dependent protein kinase 1 or sGC were observed in Ercc1(d/-) mice compared with WT. Senescent human VSMC showed elevated PDE1A and PDE1C and PDE5 mRNA levels (11.6-, 9- and 2.3-fold respectively), which associated...

  20. Risk factors and prevention of vascular complications in polycythemia vera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbui, T; Finazzi, G

    1997-01-01

    Risk factors for vascular complications in polycythemia vera (PV) include laboratory and clinical findings. Among laboratory values, the hematocrit has been clearly associated with thrombosis, particularly in the cerebral circulation. Platelet count is a possible but not yet clearly established predictor of vascular complications. Platelet function tests are of little help in prognostic evaluation because most attempts to correlate these abnormalities with clinical events have been disappointing. Clinical predictors of thrombosis include increasing age and a previous history of vascular events. Identifying risk factors for thrombosis is important to initiate therapy. Phlebotomy is associated with an increased incidence of thrombosis in the first 3 to 5 years, whereas chemotherapy may induce a higher risk of secondary malignancies after 7 to 10 years of follow-up. New cytoreductive drugs virtually devoid of mutagenic risk include interferon-alpha and anagrelide, but their role in reducing thrombotic complications remains to be demonstrated. Antithrombotic drugs, such as aspirin, are frequently used in PV, despite doubts regarding safety and efficacy. Two recent studies from the Gruppo Italiano Studio Policitemia Vera (GISP) assessed the rate of major thrombosis as well as the tolerability of low-dose aspirin in PV patients. These investigations created a favorable scenario for launching a European collaborative clinical trial (ECLAP study) aimed at testing the efficacy of low-dose aspirin in preventing thrombosis and prolonging survival in patients with PV.

  1. Prevention of cardiac complications in peripheral vascular surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cutler, B.S.

    1986-01-01

    The prevalence of severe coronary artery disease in peripheral vascular patients exceeds 50 per cent. Complications of coronary artery disease are the most common causes of mortality following peripheral vascular operations. To reduce the incidence of cardiac complications, it is first necessary to identify patients at risk through screening tests. Screening methods in current use include risk factor analysis, exercise testing, routine coronary angiography, and dipyridamole thallium-201 scintigraphy. The risk factor approach has the advantage of being widely applicable since it makes use of historical, physical, and electrocardiographic findings that are already familiar to surgeons and anesthesiologists. It is also inexpensive. However, it may overlook the patient who has no symptoms of coronary artery disease, possibly as a result of the sedentary lifestyle imposed by complications of peripheral vascular disease. The electrocardiographically monitored stress test will identify the asymptomatic patient with occult coronary disease and is helpful in predicting operative risk. However, a meaningful test is dependent on the patient's ability to exercise--an activity that is frequently limited by claudication, amputation, or arthritis. Exercise testing also suffers from a lack of sensitivity and specificity when compared with coronary arteriography. Routine preoperative coronary angiography overcomes the exercise limitation of treadmill testing but is not widely applicable as a screening test for reasons of cost and inherent risk. Dipyridamole thallium-201 scanning, on the other hand, is safe and of relatively low cost and does not require exercise

  2. Akita spontaneously type 1 diabetic mice exhibit elevated vascular arginase and impaired vascular endothelial and nitrergic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toque, Haroldo A; Nunes, Kenia P; Yao, Lin; Xu, Zhimin; Kondrikov, Dmitry; Su, Yunchao; Webb, R Clinton; Caldwell, Ruth B; Caldwell, R William

    2013-01-01

    Elevated arginase (Arg) activity is reported to be involved in diabetes-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction. It can reduce L-arginine availability to nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS) and NO production. Akita mice, a genetic non-obese type 1 diabetes model, recapitulate human diabetes. We determined the role of Arg in a time-course of diabetes-associated endothelial dysfunction in aorta and corpora cavernosa (CC) from Akita mice. Endothelium-dependent relaxation, Arg and NOS activity, and protein expression levels of Arg and constitutive NOS were assessed in aortas and CC from Akita and non-diabetic wild type (WT) mice at 4, 12 and 24 wks of age. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was assessed by tail cuff. In aorta and CC, Akita mice exhibited a progressive impairment of vascular endothelial and nitrergic function increased Arg activity and expression (Arg1 in aorta and both Arg1 and Arg2 in CC) compared with that of age-matched WT mice. Treatment of aorta and CC from Akita mice with an Arg inhibitor (BEC or ABH) reduced diabetes-induced elevation of Arg activity and restored endothelial and nitrergic function. Reduced levels of phospho-eNOS at Ser(1177) (in aorta and CC) and nNOS expression (in CC) were observed in Akita mice at 12 and 24 wks. Akita mice also had decreased NOS activity in aorta and CC at 12 and 24 wks that was restored by BEC treatment. Further, Akita mice exhibited moderately increased SBP at 24 wks and increased sensitivity to PE-induced contractions in aorta and sympathetic nerve stimulation in CC at 12 and 24 wks. Over 24 wks of diabetes in Akita mice, both aortic and cavernosal tissues exhibited increased Arg activity/expression, contributing to impaired endothelial and nitrergic function and reduced NO production. Our findings demonstrate involvement of Arg activity in diabetes-induced impairment of vascular function in Akita mouse.

  3. Akita spontaneously type 1 diabetic mice exhibit elevated vascular arginase and impaired vascular endothelial and nitrergic function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haroldo A Toque

    Full Text Available Elevated arginase (Arg activity is reported to be involved in diabetes-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction. It can reduce L-arginine availability to nitric oxide (NO synthase (NOS and NO production. Akita mice, a genetic non-obese type 1 diabetes model, recapitulate human diabetes. We determined the role of Arg in a time-course of diabetes-associated endothelial dysfunction in aorta and corpora cavernosa (CC from Akita mice.Endothelium-dependent relaxation, Arg and NOS activity, and protein expression levels of Arg and constitutive NOS were assessed in aortas and CC from Akita and non-diabetic wild type (WT mice at 4, 12 and 24 wks of age. Systolic blood pressure (SBP was assessed by tail cuff. In aorta and CC, Akita mice exhibited a progressive impairment of vascular endothelial and nitrergic function increased Arg activity and expression (Arg1 in aorta and both Arg1 and Arg2 in CC compared with that of age-matched WT mice. Treatment of aorta and CC from Akita mice with an Arg inhibitor (BEC or ABH reduced diabetes-induced elevation of Arg activity and restored endothelial and nitrergic function. Reduced levels of phospho-eNOS at Ser(1177 (in aorta and CC and nNOS expression (in CC were observed in Akita mice at 12 and 24 wks. Akita mice also had decreased NOS activity in aorta and CC at 12 and 24 wks that was restored by BEC treatment. Further, Akita mice exhibited moderately increased SBP at 24 wks and increased sensitivity to PE-induced contractions in aorta and sympathetic nerve stimulation in CC at 12 and 24 wks.Over 24 wks of diabetes in Akita mice, both aortic and cavernosal tissues exhibited increased Arg activity/expression, contributing to impaired endothelial and nitrergic function and reduced NO production. Our findings demonstrate involvement of Arg activity in diabetes-induced impairment of vascular function in Akita mouse.

  4. Reduced central blood volume in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, F; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Sørensen, T I

    1989-01-01

    than 0.0001). The lowest values (18 ml/kg) were found in patients with gross ascites and a reduced systemic vascular resistance. In patients with cirrhosis central blood volume was inversely correlated to the hepatic venous pressure gradient (r = -0.41, p less than 0.01), and the total blood volume...... was inversely correlated to the systemic vascular resistance (r = -0.49, p less than 0.001), the latter being significantly reduced in the patient group. Patients with cirrhosis apparently are unable to maintain a normal central blood volume. This may be due to arteriolar vasodilation, portosystemic collateral...

  5. [Localized purpura revealing vascular prosthetic graft infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boureau, A S; Lescalie, F; Cassagnau, E; Clairand, R; Connault, J

    2013-07-01

    Prosthetic graft infection after vascular reconstruction is a rare but serious complication. We report a case of infection occurring late after implantation of an iliofemoral prosthetic vascular graft. The Staphylococcus aureus infection was revealed by vascular purpura localized on the right leg 7 years after implantation of a vascular prosthesis. This case illustrates an uncommonly late clinical manifestation presenting as an acute infection 7 years after the primary operation. In this situation, the presentation differs from early infection, which generally occurs within the first four postoperative months. Diagnosis and treatment remain a difficult challenge because prosthetic graft infection is a potentially life-threatening complication. Morbidity and mortality rates are high. Here we detail specific aspects of the clinical and radiological presentation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Vascular function in health, hypertension, and diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyberg, Michael Permin; Gliemann, Lasse; Hellsten, Ylva

    2015-01-01

    muscle, which can affect muscle function. Central aspects in the vascular impairments are alterations in the formation of prostacyclin, the bioavailability of NO and an increased formation of vasoconstrictors and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Regular physical activity effectively improves vascular......, the increase in muscle blood flow required for oxygen supply during exercise is achieved through a substantial increase in vasodilators locally formed in the active muscle tissue that overcome the vasoconstrictor signals. Most of the vasodilator signals are mediated via endothelial cells, which lead...... to the formation of vasodilators such as nitric oxide (NO) and prostacyclin. In essential hypertension and type II diabetes, the endothelial function and regulation of vascular tone is impaired with consequent increases in peripheral vascular resistance and inadequate regulation of oxygen supply to the skeletal...

  7. Human genetics of diabetic vascular complications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Diabetic vascular complications (DVC) affecting several important organ systems of human body such as the ..... cohort with nominal significance, and a recent meta-analysis ..... Whereas it is generally thought that lysine acetylation is.

  8. Incorporating simulation in vascular surgery education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bismuth, Jean; Donovan, Michael A; O'Malley, Marcia K; El Sayed, Hosam F; Naoum, Joseph J; Peden, Eric K; Davies, Mark G; Lumsden, Alan B

    2010-10-01

    The traditional apprenticeship model introduced by Halsted of "learning by doing" may just not be valid in the modern practice of vascular surgery. The model is often criticized for being somewhat unstructured because a resident's experience is based on what comes through the "door." In an attempt to promote uniformity of training, multiple national organizations are currently delineating standard curricula for each trainee to govern the knowledge and cases required in a vascular residency. However, the outcomes are anything but uniform. This means that we graduate vascular specialists with a surprisingly wide spectrum of abilities. Use of simulation may benefit trainees in attaining a level of technical expertise that will benefit themselves and their patients. Furthermore, there is likely a need to establish a simulation-based certification process for graduating trainees to further ascertain minimum technical abilities. Copyright © 2010 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Audit of the Danish national vascular database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levi-Mazloum, Niels Donald; Jensen, L P; Schroeder, T V

    1996-01-01

    The accuracy of data contained in the Danish vascular database was compared with the case notes. A total of 100 case notes were reviewed for 11 pertinent variables in the database. A high error rate ranging from 2 to 34% was found. Also, approximately 10% of patients had never been entered into t...... into the vascular database. Further improvement of the Danish vascular database is necessary for its use as basis for reporting results.......The accuracy of data contained in the Danish vascular database was compared with the case notes. A total of 100 case notes were reviewed for 11 pertinent variables in the database. A high error rate ranging from 2 to 34% was found. Also, approximately 10% of patients had never been entered...

  10. Vascular adaptation to physical inactivity in humans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleeker, M.W.P.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis presents studies on vascular adaptation to physical inactivity and deconditioning. Although it is clear that physical inactivity is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease, the underlying physiological mechanisms have not yet been elucidated. In contrast to physical

  11. Lipidomics in vascular health: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolovou, Genovefa; Kolovou, Vana; Mavrogeni, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Identifying the mechanisms that convert a healthy vascular wall to an atherosclerotic wall is of major importance since the consequences may lead to a shortened lifespan. Classical risk factors (age, smoking, obesity, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and dyslipidemia) may result in the progression of atherosclerotic lesions by processes including inflammation and lipid accumulation. Thus, the evaluation of blood lipids and the full lipid complement produced by cells, organisms, or tissues (lipidomics) is an issue of importance. In this review, we shall describe the recent progress in vascular health research using lipidomic advances. We will begin with an overview of vascular wall biology and lipids, followed by a short analysis of lipidomics. Finally, we shall focus on the clinical implications of lipidomics and studies that have examined lipidomic approaches and vascular health.

  12. Alzheimer and vascular dementia in the elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seetlani, Naresh Kumar; Kumar, Narindar; Imran, Khalid; Ali, Asif; Shams, Nadia; Sheikh, Taha

    2016-01-01

    To find out the frequency of Alzheimer's and Vascular dementia in the elderly patients. This cross sectional descriptive study was conducted in Department of Medicine, Ziauddin Hospital Karachi from 1 st October 2013 to 31 st March 2014. Patients with symptoms of dementia for more than 6 months duration, and Mini Mental State Examination score dementia were assessed for duration of symptoms. Patients underwent CT scan of brain. Patients with generalized atrophy of brain on CT scanning of brain were labeled as Alzheimer's dementia, while patients with ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke on CT scan of brain were labeled as vascular dementia. Four hundred twenty two patients were included in this study. There were 232 (54.98 %) male and 190 (45.02 %) were female. The mean age ± SD of the patients was 72.58±5.34 years (95% CI: 72.07 to 73.09), similarly average duration of symptoms was 10.14±2.85 months. About 18.96% of patients were illiterate, 32.23% were matric, 28.44% were intermediate and 20.33% were graduate and post graduate. Hypertension and diabetes were the commonest co-morbid i.e. 81.3% and 73.7%, hyperlipedimia and smoking were 38.2% and 45% respectively. Frequency of Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia in the elderly was observed in 3.79% (16/422) and 2.61% (11/422) cases. A good number of patients, 27 out of 422, in this hospital based study were suffering from Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia. Early detection and prompt treatment can reduce the burden of the disease in our population.

  13. The vascular surgery workforce: a survey of consultant vascular surgeons in the UK, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkin, D W; Beard, J D; Shearman, C P; Wyatt, M G

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the demographics, training, and practice characteristics of consultant vascular surgeons across the UK to provide an assessment of current, and inform future prediction of workforce needs. A questionnaire was developed using a modified Delphi process to generate questionnaire items. The questionnaire was emailed to all consultant vascular surgeons (n = 450) in the UK who were members of the Vascular Society of Great Britain & Ireland. 352 consultant vascular surgeons from 95 hospital trusts across the UK completed the survey (78% response rate). The mean age was 50.6 years old, the majority (62%) were mid-career, but 24% were above the age of 55. Currently, 92% are men and only 8% women. 93% work full-time, with 60% working >50 hours, and 21% working >60 hours per week. The average team was 5 to 6 (range 2-10) vascular surgeons, with 23% working in a large team of ≥8. 17% still work in small teams of ≤3. Over 90% of consultant vascular surgeons perform the major index vascular surgery procedures (aneurysm repair, carotid endarterectomy, infra-inguinal bypass, amputation). While 84% perform standard endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR), <50% perform more complex endovascular aortic therapy. The majority of vascular surgeons "like their job" (85%) and are "satisfied" (69%) with their job. 34% of consultant vascular surgeons indicated they were "extremely likely" to retire within the next 10 years. This study provides the first detailed analysis of the new specialty of vascular surgery as practiced in the UK. There is a need to plan for a significant expansion in the consultant vascular surgeon workforce in the UK over the next 10 years to maintain the status quo. Copyright © 2014 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Biomimicry, vascular restenosis and coronary stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, R S; van der Giessen, W J; Holmes, D R

    1998-01-01

    Biomimicry is in its earliest stages and is being considered in the realm of tissue engineering. If arterial implants are to limit neointimal thickening, purely passive structures cannot succeed. Bioactivity must be present, either by pharmacologic intervention or by fabricating a 'living stent' that contains active cellular material. As tissue engineering evolves, useful solutions will emerge from applying this knowledge directly to vascular biologic problems resulting from angioplasty, stenting, and vascular prosthesis research.

  15. The current role of vascular stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busquet, J

    1993-09-01

    The limitations of percutaneous balloon angioplasty have favoured the development and the use of vascular endoprostheses or stents. These thin-walled metal devices maintain after expansion, an optimal and constant diameter for the vascular lumen. Restenosis, dissection, abrupt closure, residual stenosis or re-opened total occlusion represent appropriate indications for stenting. A large experience with non-coronary application of stents is currently available in iliac, femoro-popliteal and renal arteries, aorta, large veins.

  16. Vascular colitis: a report of two cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chan Il; Han, Chang Yul; Han, Man Chung; Choo, Dong Woon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1973-04-15

    The authors report two cases of vascular colitis in Korean with a review of literature. Case I, 20 years old male had severe abdominal pain and bloody diarrhea. Case II was 57 years old male and complained severe abdominal pain. Barium enema colon study on each cases disclosed typical thumbprinting appearance of involved segment. Predisposing factor in case I appeared to be anaphylactoid purpura, and in case II distal obstruction due to adenocarcinoma. The mechanism of vascular was briefly discussed.

  17. Robotic vascular resections during Whipple procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Bassan J; Novak, Stephanie M; Hogg, Melissa E; Zeh, Herbert J

    2018-01-01

    Indications for resection of pancreatic cancers have evolved to include selected patients with involvement of peri-pancreatic vascular structures. Open Whipple procedures have been the standard approach for patients requiring reconstruction of the portal vein (PV) or superior mesenteric vein (SMV). Recently, high-volume centers are performing minimally invasive Whipple procedures with portovenous resections. Our institution has performed seventy robotic Whipple procedures with concomitant vascular resections. This report outlines our technique.

  18. 3D bioprinting for vascularized tissue fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Dylan; Jia, Jia; Yost, Michael; Markwald, Roger; Mei, Ying

    2016-01-01

    3D bioprinting holds remarkable promise for rapid fabrication of 3D tissue engineering constructs. Given its scalability, reproducibility, and precise multi-dimensional control that traditional fabrication methods do not provide, 3D bioprinting provides a powerful means to address one of the major challenges in tissue engineering: vascularization. Moderate success of current tissue engineering strategies have been attributed to the current inability to fabricate thick tissue engineering constructs that contain endogenous, engineered vasculature or nutrient channels that can integrate with the host tissue. Successful fabrication of a vascularized tissue construct requires synergy between high throughput, high-resolution bioprinting of larger perfusable channels and instructive bioink that promotes angiogenic sprouting and neovascularization. This review aims to cover the recent progress in the field of 3D bioprinting of vascularized tissues. It will cover the methods of bioprinting vascularized constructs, bioink for vascularization, and perspectives on recent innovations in 3D printing and biomaterials for the next generation of 3D bioprinting for vascularized tissue fabrication. PMID:27230253

  19. Vascular retraction driven by matrix softening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Megan

    We recently discovered we can directly apply physical forces and monitor the downstream responses in a living organism in real time through manipulation of the blood vessels of a marine organism called, Botryllus schlosseri. The extracellular matrix (ECM) plays a key role in regulating vascular growth and homeostasis in Botryllus,a basal chordate which has a large, transparent extracorporeal vascular network that can encompass areas >100 cm2. We have determined that lysyl oxidase 1 (LOX1), which is responsible for cross-linking collagen, is expressed in all vascular cells and is critically important for vascular maintenance. Inhibition of LOX1 activity in vivo by the addition of a specific inhibitor, ß-aminopropionitrile (BAPN), caused a rapid, global regression of the entire vascular bed, with some vessels regressing >10 mm within 16 hrs. In this talk, I will discuss the molecular and cellular origins of this systemic remodeling event, which hinges upon the ability of the vascular cells to sense and respond to mechanical signals, while introducing this exciting new model system for studies of biological physics and mechanobiology. Collaborators: Anthony DeTomaso, Delany Rodriguez, Aimal Khankhel (UCSB).

  20. Vascular Adventitia Calcification and Its Underlying Mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Li

    Full Text Available Previous research on vascular calcification has mainly focused on the vascular intima and media. However, we show here that vascular calcification may also occur in the adventitia. The purpose of this work is to help elucidate the pathogenic mechanisms underlying vascular calcification. The calcified lesions were examined by Von Kossa staining in ApoE-/- mice which were fed high fat diets (HFD for 48 weeks and human subjects aged 60 years and older that had died of coronary heart disease, heart failure or acute renal failure. Explant cultured fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells (SMCswere obtained from rat adventitia and media, respectively. After calcification induction, cells were collected for Alizarin Red S staining. Calcified lesions were observed in the aorta adventitia and coronary artery adventitia of ApoE-/-mice, as well as in the aorta adventitia of human subjects examined. Explant culture of fibroblasts, the primary cell type comprising the adventitia, was successfully induced for calcification after incubation with TGF-β1 (20 ng/ml + mineralization media for 4 days, and the phenotype conversion vascular adventitia fibroblasts into myofibroblasts was identified. Culture of SMCs, which comprise only a small percentage of all cells in the adventitia, in calcifying medium for 14 days resulted in significant calcification.Vascular calcification can occur in the adventitia. Adventitia calcification may arise from the fibroblasts which were transformed into myofibroblasts or smooth muscle cells.

  1. Suppression of complement regulatory protein C1 inhibitor in vascular endothelial activation by inhibiting vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Haimou; Qin, Gangjian; Liang, Gang; Li, Jinan; Chiu, Isaac; Barrington, Robert A.; Liu, Dongxu

    2007-01-01

    Increased expression of adhesion molecules by activated endothelium is a critical feature of vascular inflammation associated with the several diseases such as endotoxin shock and sepsis/septic shock. Our data demonstrated complement regulatory protein C1 inhibitor (C1INH) prevents endothelial cell injury. We hypothesized that C1INH has the ability of an anti-endothelial activation associated with suppression of expression of adhesion molecule(s). C1INH blocked leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cell monolayer in both static assay and flow conditions. In inflammatory condition, C1INH reduced vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) expression associated with its cytoplasmic mRNA destabilization and nuclear transcription level. Studies exploring the underlying mechanism of C1INH-mediated suppression in VCAM-1 expression were related to reduction of NF-κB activation and nuclear translocation in an IκBα-dependent manner. The inhibitory effects were associated with reduction of inhibitor IκB kinase activity and stabilization of the NF-κB inhibitor IκB. These findings indicate a novel role for C1INH in inhibition of vascular endothelial activation. These observations could provide the basis for new therapeutic application of C1INH to target inflammatory processes in different pathologic situations

  2. Evidence for a role of macrophage migration inhibitory factor in vascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhiping; Sakuma, Masashi; Zago, Alexandre C; Zhang, Xiaobin; Shi, Can; Leng, Lin; Mizue, Yuka; Bucala, Richard; Simon, Daniel

    2004-04-01

    Inflammation plays an essential role in atherosclerosis and restenosis. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a proinflammatory cytokine that is widely expressed in vascular cells. However, there is no in vivo evidence that MIF participates directly in vascular injury and repair. Therefore, we investigated the effect of MIF blockade on the response to experimental angioplasty in atherosclerosis-susceptible mice. Carotid artery dilation (2.5 atm) and complete endothelial denudation were performed in male C57BL/6J LDL receptor-deficient mice treated with a neutralizing anti-MIF or isotype control monoclonal antibody. After 7 days and 28 days, intimal and medial sizes were measured and intima/media area ratio (I/M) was calculated. Intimal thickening and I/M were reduced significantly by anti-MIF compared with control antibody. Vascular injury was accompanied by progressive vessel enlargement or "positive remodeling" that was comparable in both treatment groups. MIF blockade was associated with reduced inflammation and cellular proliferation and increased apoptosis after injury. Neutralizing MIF bioactivity after experimental angioplasty in atherosclerosis-susceptible mice reduces vascular inflammation, cellular proliferation, and neointimal thickening. Although the molecular mechanisms responsible for these effects are not yet established, these data prompt further research directed at understanding the role of MIF in vascular disease and suggest novel therapeutic interventions for preventing atherosclerosis and restenosis.

  3. Aerobic exercise and other healthy lifestyle factors that influence vascular aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Parker, Jessica R.; LaRocca, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) remain the leading cause of death in the United States and other modern societies. Advancing age is the major risk factor for CVD, primarily due to stiffening of the large elastic arteries and the development of vascular endothelial dysfunction. In contrast, regular aerobic exercise protects against the development of large elastic artery stiffness and vascular endothelial dysfunction with advancing age. Moreover, aerobic exercise interventions reduce arterial stiffness and restore vascular endothelial function in previously sedentary middle-aged/older adults. Aerobic exercise exerts its beneficial effects on arterial function by modulating structural proteins, reducing oxidative stress and inflammation, and restoring nitric oxide bioavailability. Aerobic exercise may also promote “resistance” against factors that reduce vascular function and increase CVD risk with age. Preventing excessive increases in abdominal adiposity, following healthy dietary practices, maintaining a low CVD risk factor profile, and, possibly, selective use of pharmaceuticals and nutraceuticals also play a major role in preserving vascular function with aging. PMID:25434012

  4. Aerobic exercise and other healthy lifestyle factors that influence vascular aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Parker, Jessica R; LaRocca, Thomas J; Seals, Douglas R

    2014-12-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) remain the leading cause of death in the United States and other modern societies. Advancing age is the major risk factor for CVD, primarily due to stiffening of the large elastic arteries and the development of vascular endothelial dysfunction. In contrast, regular aerobic exercise protects against the development of large elastic artery stiffness and vascular endothelial dysfunction with advancing age. Moreover, aerobic exercise interventions reduce arterial stiffness and restore vascular endothelial function in previously sedentary middle-aged/older adults. Aerobic exercise exerts its beneficial effects on arterial function by modulating structural proteins, reducing oxidative stress and inflammation, and restoring nitric oxide bioavailability. Aerobic exercise may also promote "resistance" against factors that reduce vascular function and increase CVD risk with age. Preventing excessive increases in abdominal adiposity, following healthy dietary practices, maintaining a low CVD risk factor profile, and, possibly, selective use of pharmaceuticals and nutraceuticals also play a major role in preserving vascular function with aging. Copyright © 2014 The American Physiological Society.

  5. Patterns of peripheral vascular diseases at Muhimbili National hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    diseases) and HIV- vasculitis. A total of 97 patients (63%) were surgically treated. Conclusion: Shortage of vascular surgeons and facilities in our. Country needs to be sorted out to save life to these patients with vascular disorders. Key Words: Peripheral Vascular Diseases, and Shortage of Vascular Services in Tanzania.

  6. Lung irradiation induces pulmonary vascular remodelling resembling pulmonary arterial hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghobadi, G.; Bartelds, B.; van der Veen, S. J.; Dickinson, M. G.; Brandenburg, S.; Berger, R. M. F.; Langendijk, J. A.; Coppes, R. P.; van Luijk, P.

    Background Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a commonly fatal pulmonary vascular disease that is often diagnosed late and is characterised by a progressive rise in pulmonary vascular resistance resulting from typical vascular remodelling. Recent data suggest that vascular damage plays an

  7. Vascular associated gene variants in patients with preeclampsia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Jacob A; Bare, Lance A; Olsen, Jørn

    2012-01-01

    Preeclampsia has been linked to subsequent vascular disease with many shared predisposing factors. We investigated the association between severe preeclampsia, and its subtypes, and specific vascular-related polymorphisms.......Preeclampsia has been linked to subsequent vascular disease with many shared predisposing factors. We investigated the association between severe preeclampsia, and its subtypes, and specific vascular-related polymorphisms....

  8. Mechanistic insights into the vascular effects of blueberries: Evidence from recent studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutler, Brett Ronald; Petersen, Chrissa; Anandh Babu, Pon Velayutham

    2017-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. Dietary habits influence a variety of cardiovascular complications such as peripheral artery disease, heart failure, and kidney disease. We along with others have previously reported the cardiovascular beneficial effects of dietary flavonoids. Anthocyanins, one class of flavonoids widely available in berries, have recently drawn wide scientific attention because of their diverse health benefits. Epidemiological, clinical, and animal studies indicate that blueberry anthocyanins exert protection against cardiovascular complications by acting on multiple targets in the vascular system. These include activating endothelial nitric oxide synthase signaling, reducing oxidative stress, improving inflammatory pathways, and ameliorating dyslipidemia. Anthocyanins are extensively metabolized in humans suggesting that their vascular benefits are likely mediated by their circulating metabolites. However, the bioactivities of blueberry metabolites are unknown. Evaluating the bioactivities of metabolites, analyzing their structure-activity relationship, and well-designed human trials are needed to understand the potential vascular effects of blueberries and their metabolites. Understanding the vascular effects will provide a solid scientific foundation to recommend blueberries to improve vascular health. This review highlights the recent developments in the understanding of the vascular effects of blueberries with special emphasis on the molecular mechanisms involved. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Microvascular dysfunction with increased vascular leakage response in mice systemically exposed to arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shih-Chieh; Huang, Shin-Yin; Lu, Chi-Yu; Hsu, Ya-Hung; Wang, Dean-Chuan

    2014-09-01

    The mechanisms underlying cardiovascular disease induced by arsenic exposure are not completely understood. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether arsenic-fed mice have an increased vascular leakage response to vasoactive agents and whether enhanced type-2 protein phosphatase (PP2A) activity is involved in mustard oil-induced leakage. ICR mice were fed water or sodium arsenite (20 mg/kg) for 4 or 8 weeks. The leakage response to vasoactive agents was quantified using the Evans blue (EB) technique or vascular labeling with carbon particles. Increased EB leakage and high density of carbon-labeled microvessels were detected in arsenic-fed mice treated with mustard oil. Histamine induced significantly higher vascular leakage in arsenic-fed mice than in water-fed mice. Pretreatment with the PP2A inhibitor okadaic acid or the neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) blocker RP67580 significantly reduced mustard oil-induced vascular leakage in arsenic-fed mice. The protein levels of PP2Ac and NK1R were similar in both groups. PP2A activity was significantly higher in the arsenic-fed mice compared with the control group. These findings indicate that microvessels generally respond to vasoactive agents, and that the increased PP2A activity is involved in mustard oil-induced vascular leakage in arsenic-fed mice. Arsenic may initiate endothelial dysfunction, resulting in vascular leakage in response to vasoactive agents.

  10. The mitochondrial genome of the lycophyte Huperzia squarrosa: the most archaic form in vascular plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Bin; Cui, Peng; Li, Libo; Xue, Jia-Yu; Yu, Jun; Qiu, Yin-Long

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial genomes have maintained some bacterial features despite their residence within eukaryotic cells for approximately two billion years. One of these features is the frequent presence of polycistronic operons. In land plants, however, it has been shown that all sequenced vascular plant chondromes lack large polycistronic operons while bryophyte chondromes have many of them. In this study, we provide the completely sequenced mitochondrial genome of a lycophyte, from Huperzia squarrosa, which is a member of the sister group to all other vascular plants. The genome, at a size of 413,530 base pairs, contains 66 genes and 32 group II introns. In addition, it has 69 pseudogene fragments for 24 of the 40 protein- and rRNA-coding genes. It represents the most archaic form of mitochondrial genomes of all vascular plants. In particular, it has one large conserved gene cluster containing up to 10 ribosomal protein genes, which likely represents a polycistronic operon but has been disrupted and greatly reduced in the chondromes of other vascular plants. It also has the least rearranged gene order in comparison to the chondromes of other vascular plants. The genome is ancestral in vascular plants in several other aspects: the gene content resembling those of charophytes and most bryophytes, all introns being cis-spliced, a low level of RNA editing, and lack of foreign DNA of chloroplast or nuclear origin.

  11. Experimental Branch Retinal Vein Occlusion Induces Upstream Pericyte Loss and Vascular Destabilization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Dominguez

    Full Text Available Branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO leads to extensive vascular remodeling and is important cause of visual impairment. Although the vascular morphological changes following experimental vein occlusion have been described in a variety of models using angiography, the underlying cellular events are ill defined.We here show that laser-induced experimental BRVO in mice leads to a wave of TUNEL-positive endothelial cell (EC apoptosis in the upstream vascular network associated with a transient edema and hemorrhages. Subsequently, we observe an induction of EC proliferation within the dilated vein and capillaries, detected by EdU incorporation, and the edema resolves. However, the pericytes of the upstream capillaries are severely reduced, which was associated with continuing EC apoptosis and proliferation. The vascular remodeling was associated with increased expression of TGFβ, TSP-1, but also FGF2 expression. Exposure of the experimental animals to hypoxia, when pericyte (PC dropout had occurred, led to a dramatic increase in endothelial cell proliferation, confirming the vascular instability induced by the experimental BRVO.Experimental BRVO leads to acute endothelial cells apoptosis and increased permeability. Subsequently the upstream vascular network remains destabilized, characterized by pericyte dropout, un-physiologically high endothelial cells turnover and sensitivity to hypoxia. These early changes might pave the way for capillary loss and subsequent chronic ischemia and edema that characterize the late stage disease.

  12. Prevention of hemodynamic and vascular albumin filtration changes in diabetic rats by aldose reductase inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tilton, R.G.; Chang, K.; Pugliese, G.; Eades, D.M.; Province, M.A.; Sherman, W.R.; Kilo, C.; Williamson, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    This study investigated hemodynamic changes in diabetic rats and their relationship to changes in vascular albumin permeation and increased metabolism of glucose to sorbitol. The effects of 6 wk of streptozocin-induced diabetes and three structurally different inhibitors of aldose reductase were examined on (1) regional blood flow (assessed with 15-microns 85Sr-labeled microspheres) and vascular permeation by 125I-labeled bovine serum albumin (BSA) and (2) glomerular filtration rate (assessed by plasma clearance of 57Co-labeled EDTA) and urinary albumin excretion (determined by radial immunodiffusion assay). In diabetic rats, blood flow was significantly increased in ocular tissues (anterior uvea, posterior uvea, retina, and optic nerve), sciatic nerve, kidney, new granulation tissue, cecum, and brain. 125I-BSA permeation was increased in all of these tissues except brain. Glomerular filtration rate and 24-h urinary albumin excretion were increased 2- and 29-fold, respectively, in diabetic rats. All three aldose reductase inhibitors completely prevented or markedly reduced these hemodynamic and vascular filtration changes and increases in tissue sorbitol levels in the anterior uvea, posterior uvea, retina, sciatic nerve, and granulation tissue. These observations indicate that early diabetes-induced hemodynamic changes and increased vascular albumin permeation and urinary albumin excretion are aldose reductase-linked phenomena. Discordant effects of aldose reductase inhibitors on blood flow and vascular albumin permeation in some tissues suggest that increased vascular albumin permeation is not entirely attributable to hemodynamic change

  13. Blood cholesterol and vascular mortality by age, sex, and blood pressure: a meta-analysis of individual data from 61 prospective studies with 55,000 vascular deaths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    NN, NN; Jensen, Gorm Boje

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Age, sex, and blood pressure could modify the associations of total cholesterol (and its main two fractions, HDL and LDL cholesterol) with vascular mortality. This meta-analysis combined prospective studies of vascular mortality that recorded both blood pressure and total cholesterol...... pressures, is unexplained, and invites further research. Nevertheless, there is conclusive evidence from randomised trials that statins substantially reduce not only coronary event rates but also total stroke rates in patients with a wide range of ages and blood pressures....... and blood pressure. During nearly 12 million person years at risk between the ages of 40 and 89 years, there were more than 55,000 vascular deaths (34,000 ischaemic heart disease [IHD], 12,000 stroke, 10,000 other). Information about HDL cholesterol was available for 150,000 participants, among whom...

  14. Sirtuins, Cell Senescence, and Vascular Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kida, Yujiro; Goligorsky, Michael S

    2016-05-01

    The sirtuins (SIRTs) constitute a class of proteins with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent deacetylase or adenosine diphosphate-ribosyltransferase activity. Seven SIRT family members have been identified in mammals, from SIRT1, the best studied for its role in vascular aging, to SIRT7. SIRT1 and SIRT2 are localized in the nucleus and cytoplasm. SIRT3, SIRT4, and SIRT5 are mitochondrial, and SIRT6 and SIRT7 are nuclear. Extensive studies have clearly revealed that SIRT proteins regulate diverse cell functions and responses to stressors. Vascular aging involves the aging process (senescence) of endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells. Two types of cell senescence have been identified: (1) replicative senescence with telomere attrition; and (2) stress-induced premature senescence without telomere involvement. Both types of senescence induce vascular cell growth arrest and loss of vascular homeostasis, and contribute to the initiation and progression of cardiovascular diseases. Previous mechanistic studies have revealed in detail that SIRT1, SIRT3, and SIRT6 show protective functions against vascular aging, and definite vascular function of other SIRTs is under investigation. Thus, direct SIRT modulation and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide stimulation of SIRT are promising candidates for cardiovascular disease therapy. A small number of pilot studies have been conducted to assess SIRT modulation in humans. These clinical studies have not yet provided convincing evidence that SIRT proteins alleviate morbidity and mortality in patients with cardiovascular diseases. The outcomes of multiple ongoing clinical trials are awaited to define the efficacy of SIRT modulators and SIRT activators in cardiovascular diseases, along with the potential adverse effects of chronic SIRT modulation. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Progenitor cells in pulmonary vascular remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeager, Michael E.; Frid, Maria G.; Stenmark, Kurt R.

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is characterized by cellular and structural changes in the walls of pulmonary arteries. Intimal thickening and fibrosis, medial hypertrophy and fibroproliferative changes in the adventitia are commonly observed, as is the extension of smooth muscle into the previously non-muscularized vessels. A majority of these changes are associated with the enhanced presence of α-SM-actin+ cells and inflammatory cells. Atypical abundances of functionally distinct endothelial cells, particularly in the intima (plexiform lesions), and also in the perivascular regions, are also described. At present, neither the origin(s) of these cells nor the molecular mechanisms responsible for their accumulation, in any of the three compartments of the vessel wall, have been fully elucidated. The possibility that they arise from either resident vascular progenitors or bone marrow–derived progenitor cells is now well established. Resident vascular progenitor cells have been demonstrated to exist within the vessel wall, and in response to certain stimuli, to expand and express myofibroblastic, endothelial or even hematopoietic markers. Bone marrow–derived or circulating progenitor cells have also been shown to be recruited to sites of vascular injury and to assume both endothelial and SM-like phenotypes. Here, we review the data supporting the contributory role of vascular progenitors (including endothelial progenitor cells, smooth muscle progenitor cells, pericytes, and fibrocytes) in vascular remodeling. A more complete understanding of the processes by which progenitor cells modulate pulmonary vascular remodeling will undoubtedly herald a renaissance of therapies extending beyond the control of vascular tonicity and reduction of pulmonary artery pressure. PMID:22034593

  16. Congenital vascular malformations in scintigraphic evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilecki, Stanisław; Gierach, Marcin; Gierach, Joanna; Świętaszczyk, Cyprian; Junik, Roman; Lasek, Władysław

    2014-01-01

    Congenital vascular malformations are tumour-like, non-neoplastic lesions caused by disorders of vascular tissue morphogenesis. They are characterised by a normal cell replacement cycle throughout all growth phases and do not undergo spontaneous involution. Here we present a scintigraphic image of familial congenital vascular malformations in two sisters. A 17-years-old young woman with a history of multiple hospitalisations for foci of vascular anomalies appearing progressively in the upper and lower right limbs, chest wall and spleen. A Parkes Weber syndrome was diagnosed based on the clinical picture. Due to the occurrence of new foci of malformations, a whole-body scintigraphic examination was performed. A 12-years-old girl reported a lump in the right lower limb present for approximately 2 years, which was clinically identified as a vascular lesion in the area of calcaneus and talus. Phleboscintigraphy visualized normal radiomarker outflow from the feet via the deep venous system, also observed in the superficial venous system once the tourniquets were released. In static and whole-body examinations vascular malformations were visualised in the area of the medial cuneiform, navicular and talus bones of the left foot, as well as in the projection of right calcaneus and above the right talocrural joint. People with undiagnosed disorders related to the presence of vascular malformations should undergo periodic follow-up to identify lesions that may be the cause of potentially serious complications and to assess the results of treatment. Presented scintigraphic methods may be used for both diagnosing and monitoring of disease progression

  17. Gene transfer therapy in vascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, M J; Gaballa, M A

    2001-01-01

    Somatic gene therapy of vascular diseases is a promising new field in modern medicine. Recent advancements in gene transfer technology have greatly evolved our understanding of the pathophysiologic role of candidate disease genes. With this knowledge, the expression of selective gene products provides the means to test the therapeutic use of gene therapy in a multitude of medical conditions. In addition, with the completion of genome sequencing programs, gene transfer can be used also to study the biologic function of novel genes in vivo. Novel genes are delivered to targeted tissue via several different vehicles. These vectors include adenoviruses, retroviruses, plasmids, plasmid/liposomes, and oligonucleotides. However, each one of these vectors has inherent limitations. Further investigations into developing delivery systems that not only allow for efficient, targeted gene transfer, but also are stable and nonimmunogenic, will optimize the clinical application of gene therapy in vascular diseases. This review further discusses the available mode of gene delivery and examines six major areas in vascular gene therapy, namely prevention of restenosis, thrombosis, hypertension, atherosclerosis, peripheral vascular disease in congestive heart failure, and ischemia. Although we highlight some of the recent advances in the use of gene therapy in treating vascular disease discovered primarily during the past two years, many excellent studies published during that period are not included in this review due to space limitations. The following is a selective review of practical uses of gene transfer therapy in vascular diseases. This review primarily covers work performed in the last 2 years. For earlier work, the reader may refer to several excellent review articles. For instance, Belalcazer et al. (6) reviewed general aspects of somatic gene therapy and the different vehicles used for the delivery of therapeutic genes. Gene therapy in restenosis and stimulation of

  18. Vascular endothelial dysfunction in β-thalassemia occurs despite increased eNOS expression and preserved vascular smooth muscle cell reactivity to NO.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekatherina Stoyanova

    Full Text Available The hereditary β-thalassemia major condition requires regular lifelong blood transfusions. Transfusion-related iron overloading has been associated with the onset of cardiovascular complications, including cardiac dysfunction and vascular anomalies. By using an untransfused murine model of β-thalassemia major, we tested the hypothesis that vascular endothelial dysfunction, alterations of arterial structure and of its mechanical properties would occur despite the absence of treatments.Vascular function and structure were evaluated ex vivo. Compared to the controls, endothelium-dependent vasodilation with acetylcholine was blunted in mesenteric resistance arteries of β-thalassemic mice while the endothelium-independent vasodilator (sodium nitroprusside produced comparable vessel dilation, indicating endothelial cell impairment with preserved smooth muscle cell reactivity to nitric oxide (NO. While these findings suggest a decrease in NO bioavailability, Western blotting showed heightened expression of aortic endothelial NO synthase (eNOS in β-thalassemia. Vascular remodeling of the common carotid arteries revealed increased medial elastin content. Under isobaric conditions, the carotid arteries of β-thalassemic mice exhibited decreased wall stress and softening due to structural changes of the vessel wall.A complex vasculopathy was identified in untransfused β-thalassemic mice characterized by altered carotid artery structure and endothelial dysfunction of resistance arterioles, likely attributable to reduced NO bioavailability despite enhanced vascular eNOS expression.

  19. Expression of lung vascular and airway ICAM-1 after exposure to bacterial lipopolysaccharide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck-Schimmer, B; Schimmer, R C; Warner, R L

    1997-01-01

    model. This increase was reduced by 81% after treatment of animals with anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) antibody and by 37% after treatment with anti-interleukin-1 (IL-1) antibody. The same interventions reduced whole-lung ICAM-1 protein by 85% and 25%, respectively. The studies were...... extended to assess the locale in lung of ICAM-I upregulation. Lung vascular ICAM-1 content, which was assessed by vascular fixation of [125I]anti-ICAM-1, rose 4-fold after airway instillation of LPS. This rise was also TNF-alpha-dependent. Under the same experimental conditions, fixation of [125I...... lavage fluids (BALFs) of animals after intratracheal instillation of LPS. Retrieved alveolar macrophages showed a small, significant, and transient increase in surface expression of ICAM-1. These data indicate, at the very least, a dual compartmentalized (vascular and airway) upregulation of ICAM-1 after...

  20. Agreement and repeatability of vascular reactivity estimates based on a breath-hold task and a resting state scan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipp, Ilona; Murphy, Kevin; Caseras, Xavier; Wise, Richard G

    2015-06-01

    FMRI BOLD responses to changes in neural activity are influenced by the reactivity of the vasculature. By complementing a task-related BOLD acquisition with a vascular reactivity measure obtained through breath-holding or hypercapnia, this unwanted variance can be statistically reduced in the BOLD responses of interest. Recently, it has been suggested that vascular reactivity can also be estimated using a resting state scan. This study aimed to compare three breath-hold based analysis approaches (block design, sine-cosine regressor and CO2 regressor) and a resting state approach (CO2 regressor) to measure vascular reactivity. We tested BOLD variance explained by the model and repeatability of the measures. Fifteen healthy participants underwent a breath-hold task and a resting state scan with end-tidal CO2 being recorded during both. Vascular reactivity was defined as CO2-related BOLD percent signal change/mmHg change in CO2. Maps and regional vascular reactivity estimates showed high repeatability when the breath-hold task was used. Repeatability and variance explained by the CO2 trace regressor were lower for the resting state data based approach, which resulted in highly variable measures of vascular reactivity. We conclude that breath-hold based vascular reactivity estimations are more repeatable than resting-based estimates, and that there are limitations with replacing breath-hold scans by resting state scans for vascular reactivity assessment. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Adiposity, adipocytokines & microvesicles in the etiology of vascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kanhai, D.A.N.I.S.

    2013-01-01

    Vascular disease, in this thesis the terms vascular and cardiovascular are used interchangeably, is the number 1 cause of death worldwide. In 2008, 30% of all mortality had a vascular origin. Vascular mortality rates after a first manifestation of vascular disease are decreasing in Western society, which is attributable to better disease awareness, better preventive strategies and better healthcare systems. As mortality rates are decreasing, the number of patients surviving their first vascul...

  2. Influence of Androgen Receptor in Vascular Cells on Reperfusion following Hindlimb Ischaemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junxi Wu

    Full Text Available Studies in global androgen receptor knockout (G-ARKO and orchidectomised mice suggest that androgen accelerates reperfusion of the ischaemic hindlimb by stimulating angiogenesis. This investigation used novel, vascular cell-specific ARKO mice to address the hypothesis that the impaired hindlimb reperfusion in G-ARKO mice was due to loss of AR from cells in the vascular wall.Mice with selective deletion of AR (ARKO from vascular smooth muscle cells (SM-ARKO, endothelial cells (VE-ARKO, or both (SM/VE-ARKO were compared with wild type (WT controls. Hindlimb ischaemia was induced in these mice by ligation and removal of the femoral artery. Post-operative reperfusion was reduced in SM-ARKO and SM/VE-ARKO mice. Immunohistochemistry indicated that this was accompanied by a reduced density of smooth muscle actin-positive vessels but no change in the density of isolectin B4-positive vessels in the gastrocnemius muscle. Deletion of AR from the endothelium (VE-ARKO did not alter post-operative reperfusion or vessel density. In an ex vivo (aortic ring culture model of angiogenesis, AR was not detected in vascular outgrowths and angiogenesis was not altered by vascular ARKO or by exposure to dihydrotestosterone (DHT 10-10-10-7M; 6 days.These results suggest that loss of AR from vascular smooth muscle, but not from the endothelium, contributes to impaired reperfusion in the ischaemic hindlimb of G-ARKO. Impaired reperfusion was associated with reduced collateral formation rather than reduced angiogenesis.

  3. Open and endovascular aneurysm repair in the Society for Vascular Surgery Vascular Quality Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, Emily L; Beck, Adam W

    2017-12-01

    The Society for Vascular Surgery Vascular Quality Initiative is a patient safety organization and a collection of procedure-based registries that can be utilized for quality improvement initiatives and clinical outcomes research. The Vascular Quality Initiative consists of voluntary participation by centers to collect data prospectively on all consecutive cases within specific registries which physicians and centers elect to participate. The data capture extends from preoperative demographics and risk factors (including indications for operation), through the perioperative period, to outcomes data at up to 1-year of follow-up. Additionally, longer-term follow-up can be achieved by matching with Medicare claims data, providing long-term longitudinal follow-up for a majority of patients within the Vascular Quality Initiative registries. We present the unique characteristics of the Vascular Quality Initiative registries and highlight important insights gained specific to open and endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Preparation and features of polycaprolactone vascular grafts with the incorporated vascular endothelial growth factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevostyanova, V. V., E-mail: sevostyanova.victoria@gmail.com; Khodyrevskaya, Y. I.; Glushkova, T. V.; Antonova, L. V.; Kudryavtseva, Y. A.; Barbarash, O. L.; Barbarash, L. S. [Research Institute for Complex Issues of Cardiovascular Diseases, Kemerovo (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    The development of tissue-engineered small-diameter vascular grafts is an urgent issue in cardiovascular surgery. In this study, we assessed how the incorporation of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) affects morphological and mechanical properties of polycaprolactone (PCL) vascular grafts along with its release kinetics. Vascular grafts were prepared using two-phase electrospinning. In pursuing our aims, we performed scanning electron microscopy, mechanical testing, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Our results demonstrated the preservation of a highly porous structure and improvement of PCL/VEGF scaffold mechanical properties as compared to PCL grafts. A prolonged VEGF release testifies the use of this construct as a scaffold for tissue-engineered vascular grafts.

  5. Effects of PPARγ ligands on vascular tone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomone, Salvatore; Drago, Filippo

    2012-06-01

    Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ (PPARγ), originally described as a transcription factor for genes of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, has been more recently studied in the context of cardiovascular pathophysiology. Here, we review the available data on PPARγ ligands as modulator of vascular tone. PPARγ ligands include: thiazolidinediones (used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus), glitazars (bind and activate both PPARγ and PPARα), and other experimental drugs (still in development) that exploit the chemistry of thiazolidinediones as a scaffold for PPARγ-independent pharmacological properties. In this review, we examine both short (mostly from in vitro data)- and long (mostly from in vivo data)-term effects of PPARγ ligands that extend from PPARγ-independent vascular effects to PPARγ-dependent gene expression. Because endothelium is a master regulator of vascular tone, we have attempted to differentiate between endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent effects of PPARγ ligands. Based on available data, we conclude that PPARγ ligands appear to influence vascular tone in different experimental paradigms, most often in terms of vasodilatation (potentially increasing blood flow to some tissues). These effects on vascular tone, although potentially beneficial, must be weighed against specific cardiovascular warnings that may apply to some drugs, such as rosiglitazone.

  6. Insulin resistance: vascular function and exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moon-Hyon Hwang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance associated with metabolic syndrome and Type 2 diabetes mellitus is an epidemic metabolic disorder, which increases the risk of cardiovascular complications. Impaired vascular endothelial function is an early marker for atherosclerosis, which causes cardiovascular complications. Both experimental and clinical studies indicate that endothelial dysfunction in vasculatures occurs with insulin resistance. The associated physiological mechanisms are not fully appreciated yet, however, it seems that augmented oxidative stress, a physiological imbalance between oxidants and antioxidants, in vascular cells is a possible mechanism involved in various vascular beds with insulin resistance and hyperglycemia. Regardless of the inclusion of resistance exercise, aerobic exercise seems to be beneficial for vascular endothelial function in both large conduit and small resistance vessels in both clinical and experimental studies with insulin resistance. In clinical cases, aerobic exercise over 8 weeks with higher intensity seems more beneficial than the cases with shorter duration and lower intensity. However, more studies are needed in the future to elucidate the physiological mechanisms by which vascular endothelial function is impaired in insulin resistance and improved with aerobic exercise.

  7. Vascular trauma: selected historical reflections from the

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rich Norman M

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】In the spirit of international exchanges of knowledge with colleagues from all over the world, who are interested in the care and treatment of vascular trauma, we offer selected historical reflections from the western world on vascular trauma. Whereas there are a number of key individuals and a variety of events that are important to us in our writing, we know essentially nothing about what is written by other cultures and, particularly, the Chinese. It is well recognized around the world that Chinese surgeons are among the first to be highly successful in re-plantation of severed extremities, repairing both injured arteries and veins. Also, we recognize that there are contributions in other parts of the world, which are not well known to us collectively. Contributions from the Arabic speaking part of the world come to mind because there is periodic brief reference. We offer our perspective hoping that there will be one or more Chinese surgeons who will offer us the benefit of sharing their perspective on important historical contributions to the managing of vascular trauma outside of the western world, and, particularly, the English speaking literature. Once again, we encourage our colleagues in the Arabic speaking world to provide us with their perspective of the development and management of vascular trauma. Key words: Vascular system injuries; History; Western world; International educational exchange

  8. Arteriographic evaluation, in the perispheric vascular trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patino, Jairo Hernando; Granados, Ana Maria; Lopera B, Jorge; Prada W, Angela Maria

    1993-01-01

    136 patients were angiographically studied under the suspicion of perispheric vascular lesion submitted to the radiology department of the San Vicente de Paul University Hospital (H.U.S.VP.) Medellin Colombia. The majority of the patients were young with wounds caused by gunshots (79.4%). the must frequent angiographic indication was the proximity of the wound to a vascular path (44.5%). 63% of the patients with angiography indicative of abnormality needed surgery from which 21% were because of the proximity of the wound to a vascular path and 76% because of the mayor findings when admitted to the hospital. the possible complications as a result of the angiographic procedure were revised only find inc two mayor reactions to the contrast media. there were no late complications. Angiography is highlighting sensitive (100%) specific (98.5%) and secure in the evaluation of patients with perispheric vascular trauma. Due to the high number of false negatives when the physical examination is performed, every patient with a wound near a vascular path must be evaluated angiographically

  9. Endothelial dysfunction in metabolic and vascular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polovina, Marija M; Potpara, Tatjana S

    2014-03-01

    Vascular endothelium has important regulatory functions in the cardiovascular system and a pivotal role in the maintenance of vascular health and metabolic homeostasis. It has long been recognized that endothelial dysfunction participates in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis from early, preclinical lesions to advanced, thrombotic complications. In addition, endothelial dysfunction has been recently implicated in the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Considering that states of insulin resistance (eg, metabolic syndrome, impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance, and T2DM) represent the most prevalent metabolic disorders and risk factors for atherosclerosis, it is of considerable scientific and clinical interest that both metabolic and vascular disorders have endothelial dysfunction as a common background. Importantly, endothelial dysfunction has been associated with adverse outcomes in patients with established cardiovascular disease, and a growing body of evidence indicates that endothelial dysfunction also imparts adverse prognosis in states of insulin resistance. In this review, we discuss the association of insulin resistance and T2DM with endothelial dysfunction and vascular disease, with a focus on the underlying mechanisms and prognostic implications of the endothelial dysfunction in metabolic and vascular disorders. We also address current therapeutic strategies for the improvement of endothelial dysfunction.

  10. Nanomedicine approaches in vascular disease: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Anirban Sen

    2011-12-01

    Nanomedicine approaches have revolutionized the treatment of cancer and vascular diseases, where the limitations of rapid nonspecific clearance, poor biodistribution and harmful side effects associated with direct systemic drug administration can be overcome by packaging the agents within sterically stabilized, long-circulating nanovehicles that can be further surface-modified with ligands to actively target cellular/molecular components of the disease. With significant advancements in genetics, proteomics, cellular and molecular biology and biomaterials engineering, the nanomedicine strategies have become progressively refined regarding the modulation of surface and bulk chemistry of the nanovehicles, control of drug release kinetics, manipulation of nanoconstruct geometry and integration of multiple functionalities on single nanoplatforms. The current review aims to capture the various nanomedicine approaches directed specifically toward vascular diseases during the past two decades. Analysis of the promises and limitations of these approaches will help identify and optimize vascular nanomedicine systems to enhance their efficacy and clinical translation in the future. Nanomedicine-based approaches have had a major impact on the treatment and diagnosis of malignancies and vascular diseases. This review discusses various nanomedicine approaches directed specifically toward vascular diseases during the past two decades, highlighting their advantages, limitations and offering new perspectives on future applications. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Modulation of vascular function by diet and exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, G L; Chin-Dusting, J P; Kingwell, B A; Dart, A M; Cameron, J; Esler, M; Lewis, T V

    1997-01-01

    Clinical research is conducted in free living individuals who are always subject to the influences on vascular function and the major cardiovascular regulators of their lifestyle. The purpose of this paper is to review some lifestyle influences on cardiovascular function, particularly the sympathetic nervous system and endothelially mediated vasodilatation. There are highly differentiated sympathetic responses to feeding, and to acute exercise. Over a longer period obesity has a typical pattern of sympathetic activity. Reduced dietary salt intake elicits profound localised increases in sympathetic activity to the kidney. Marine oil supplementation attenuates the sympathetic responses to psychological stress and improves endothelially mediated vasodilatation in hypercholesterolaemics. Exercise training reduced total noradrenaline spillover, the major beds affected being the renal and skeletal muscle. These examples illustrate the dynamic nature of vascular dilatation and that, like the sympathetic nervous system, it is modulated by short, medium and long term influences. In both cases there is regulation both at a local and systemic level. Habitual, and recent, lifestyle can exert important cardiovascular effects which must be taken into account in clinical and epidemiological research.

  12. The vascular pattern in the flower of some Mesembryanthemaceae: Aptenia cordifolia and Dorotheanthus bellidiformis. The effect of an ontogenetical shifting on the vascular pattern and vascular conservatism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulen-Bruijns, van der C.

    1976-01-01

    1. The vascular pattern in the flower at various stages of maturity of Aptenia cordifolia and Dorotheanthus bellidiformis is examined. 2. The vascular pattern of Dorotheanthus has been compared with that of Aptenia: typologically, Dorotheanthus is derived from Aptenia. 3. The vascular pattern of

  13. Vascular training and endovascular practice in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liapis, C.D.; Avgerinos, E.D.; Sillesen, H.

    2009-01-01

    specialties was distributed to a VS educator within 14 European countries. European Vascular and Endovascular Monitor (EVEM) data also were processed to correlate endovascular practice with training models. RESULTS: Fourteen questionnaires were gathered. Vascular training in Europe appears in 3 models: 1....... Mono-specialty (independence): 7 countries, 2. Subspecialty: 5 countries, 3. An existing specialty within general surgery: 2 countries. Independent compared to non-independent certification shortens overall training length (5.9 vs 7.9 years, p=0.006), while increasing overall training devoted......% respectively. Countries with independent vascular certification, despite their lower average endovascular index (procedures per 100,000 population), reported a higher growth rate of aortic endovascular procedures (VS independent 132% vs VS non-independent 87%), within a four-year period (2003-2007). Peripheral...

  14. Intraoperative digital angiography: Peripheral vascular applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, K.; Reifsteck, J.E.; Binet, E.F.; Fleisher, H.J.

    1986-01-01

    Intraoperative digital angiography is the procedure of choice for the peripheral vascular surgeon who wishes to evaluate his results before terminating anesthesia. Two operating suites at the John L. McClellan Memorial Veterans Hospital are equipped with permanent ceiling-mounted Philips C-arm fluoroscopes and share an ADAC 4100 digital angiographic system. In the last 18 months, 40 peripheral vascular intraoperative digital angiographic procedures have been performed, in all but two cases using direct arterial puncture. In 65% of cases, the intraoperative study showed no significant abnormality. In 12.5%, minor abnormalities not requiring reoperation were seen. In 22.5% of cases, the intraoperative digital angiogram revealed a significant abnormality requiring immediate operative revision. None of the patients who underwent reoperation experienced postoperative sequelae. Intraoperative digital angiography is useful in identifying complications of peripheral vascular operations

  15. Viral haemorrhagic fever and vascular alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrowicz, P; Wolf, K; Falzarano, D; Feldmann, H; Seebach, J; Schnittler, H

    2008-02-01

    Pathogenesis of viral haemorrhagic fever (VHF) is closely associated with alterations of the vascular system. Among the virus families causing VHF, filoviruses (Marburg and Ebola) are the most fatal, and will be focused on here. After entering the body, Ebola primarily targets monocytes/macrophages and dendritic cells. Infected dendritic cells are largely impaired in their activation potency, likely contributing to the immune suppression that occurs during filovirus infection. Monocytes/macrophages, however, immediately activate after viral contact and release reasonable amounts of cytokines that target the vascular system, particularly the endothelial cells. Some underlying molecular mechanisms such as alteration of the vascular endothelial cadherin/catenin complex, tyrosine phosphorylation, expression of cell adhesion molecules, tissue factor and the effect of soluble viral proteins released from infected cells to the blood stream will be discussed.

  16. Endothelial mechanotransduction proteins and vascular function are altered by dietary sucrose supplementation in healthy young male subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gliemann, Lasse; Rytter, Nicolai; Lindskrog, Mads

    2017-01-01

    Endothelial mechanotransduction is important for vascular function but alterations and activation of vascular mechanosensory proteins have not been investigated in humans. In endothelial cell culture, simple sugars effectively impair mechanosensor proteins. To study mechanosensor- and vascular...... by ultrasound doppler. A muscle biopsy was obtained from the thigh muscle before and after acute passive leg movement, to asses the protein amount and phosphorylation status of mechanosensory proteins and NADPH oxidase. The sucrose intervention led to a reduced flow response to passive movement (by 17 ± 2...... %) and to 12 watts of active exercise (by 9 ± 1 %), indicating impaired vascular function. Reduced flow response to passive and active exercise was paralleled by a significant upregulation of Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM-1), endothelial nitric oxide synthase, NADPH oxidase and the Rho...

  17. Vacuum assisted closure in vascular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beno, M; Martin, J; Sager, P

    2011-01-01

    Vacuum assisted closure (VAC-therapy) is a well established method in nearly all surgical disciplines. The aim is to present the efficiency of vacuum assisted closure in the treatment of acute and chronic wounds in patients admitted in the department of vascular surgery. Within the year 2008 there were 59 patients (44 men, 15 women) treated with VAC therapy in our Department of Vascular surgery (Landshut, Germany). VAC was used 22x (37.28 %) in therapy of ulcus cruris (venous, arterial, mixed genesis), 15x (25.42%) in patients with diabetic foot syndrome, 12x (20.33%) in secondary healing wounds and infected wounds, 5x (8.47%) in wounds after several injuries and soft skin tissue infections and 5x (8.47%) in wound infections connected with vascular graft infections after vascular revascularization. VAC therapy seems to be very effective in the management of patients with venous ulcers, especially after a proper surgical treatment (100%), patients with soft skin tissue infections (100%) and secondary healing wounds (100%) especially in combination with MESH-Grafting. In patients with diabetic foot syndrome (80%) and peripheral arterial occlusive disease (72.7%), an evaluation of peripheral blood perfusion and revascularization prior to VAC therapy is often necessary. Although VAC was used 5x in the therapy of infected vascular grafts, successful preservation of infected graft material was observed in only one case (infection of PTFE femoro-popliteal bypass graft). Vacuum assisted closure in vascular surgery proved to be simple and efficient method in therapy of acute and chronic wounds. The efficiency of VAC systems in therapy of infected graft material after revascularization needs further studies (Tab. 3, Ref. 10).

  18. The pathology and pathophysiology of vascular dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaria, Raj N

    2017-12-19

    Vascular dementia (VaD) is widely recognised as the second most common type of dementia. Consensus and accurate diagnosis of clinically suspected VaD relies on wide-ranging clinical, neuropsychological and neuroimaging measures in life but more importantly pathological confirmation. Factors defining subtypes of VaD include the nature and extent of vascular pathologies, degree of involvement of extra and intracranial vessels and the anatomical location of tissue changes as well as time after the initial vascular event. Atherosclerotic and cardioembolic diseases combined appear the most common subtypes of vascular brain injury. In recent years, cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) has gained prominence worldwide as an important substrate of cognitive impairment. SVD is characterised by arteriolosclerosis, lacunar infarcts and cortical and subcortical microinfarcts and diffuse white matter changes, which involve myelin loss and axonal abnormalities. Global brain atrophy and focal degeneration of the cerebrum including medial temporal lobe atrophy are also features of VaD similar to Alzheimer's disease. Hereditary arteriopathies have provided insights into the mechanisms of dementia particularly how arteriolosclerosis, a major contributor of SVD promotes cognitive impairment. Recently developed and validated neuropathology guidelines indicated that the best predictors of vascular cognitive impairment were small or lacunar infarcts, microinfarcts, perivascular space dilation, myelin loss, arteriolosclerosis and leptomeningeal cerebral amyloid angiopathy. While these substrates do not suggest high specificity, VaD is likely defined by key neuronal and dendro-synaptic changes resulting in executive dysfunction and related cognitive deficits. Greater understanding of the molecular pathology is needed to clearly define microvascular disease and vascular substrates of dementia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. RGB imaging system for monitoring of skin vascular malformation's laser therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakovels, Dainis; Kuzmina, Ilona; Berzina, Anna; Spigulis, Janis

    2012-06-01

    A prototype RGB imaging system for mapping of skin chromophores consists of a commercial RGB CMOS sensor, RGB LEDs ring-light illuminator and orthogonally orientated polarizers for reducing specular reflectance. The system was used for monitoring of vascular malformations (hemagiomas and telangiectasias) therapy.

  20. Perioperative smoking cessation in vascular surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, M.; Heesemann, Sabine; Tonnesen, H.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The effect of intensive smoking cessation programs on postoperative complications has never before been assessed in soft tissue surgery when smoking cessation is initiated on the day of surgery. Methods: A single-blinded randomized clinical trial conducted at two vascular surgery...... departments in Denmark. The intervention group was offered the Gold Standard Program (GSP) for smoking cessation intervention. The control group was offered the departments' standard care. Inclusion criteria were patients with planned open peripheral vascular surgery and who were daily smokers. According...

  1. Vascularized Composite Allografts: Procurement, Allocation, and Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmel, Axel

    Vascularized composite allotransplantation is a continuously evolving area of modern transplant medicine. Recently, vascularized composite allografts (VCAs) have been formally classified as 'organs'. In this review, key aspects of VCA procurement are discussed, with a special focus on interaction with the procurement of classical solid organs. In addition, options for a matching and allocation system that ensures VCA donor organs are allocated to the best-suited recipients are looked at. Finally, the different steps needed to promote VCA transplantation in society in general and in the medical community in particular are highlighted.

  2. Early vascular plants in the Czech Republic

    OpenAIRE

    Uhlířová, Monika

    2017-01-01

    Vascular plants are characterized as a group of plants, which are already fully adapted to live on the land. Their evolution is a result of a set of adaptations that have required the necessary changes at anatomical and morphological level. Some evidences about the rise of vascular plants appear in the fossil record from the Middle Ordovician in the form of spores and later also from the Early Silurian in the form of megafossils. The aim of the thesis is to briefly describe and discuss the mo...

  3. Radiological study of cerebro-vascular accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misri, H.T.; Kabawe, Bassam

    1991-01-01

    The role of computerized tomography scanner in studying the cerebro-vascular accidents has been discussed. One hundred fifty patients with cerebro-vascular accidents were studied at Aleppo University Hospital between 1989-1990. Clinical history and physical examination were recorded, as well as, computerized tomography scanning in all cases without using the contrast media mostly. Relationship between the density of the lesion (inforctionor hemorrhage) and the time has been found. This relationship can help in forensic medicine. (author). 29 refs., 5 tabs., 2 figs

  4. Angiogenesis and vascular targeting: Relevance for hyperthermia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horsman, Michael R

    2008-01-01

    The creation of a functional blood supply from the normal tissue vasculature via the process of angiogenesis is critical for the continued growth and development of solid tumours. This importance has led to the concept of targeting the tumour vasculature as a therapeutic strategy, and two major...... types of vascular targeting agents (VTAs) have developed; those that inhibit the angiogenic process-angiogenesis inhibiting agents (AIAs)-and those that specifically damage the already established neovasculature-vascular disrupting agents (VDAs). The tumour vasculature also plays a critical role...

  5. Age related changes in tumor vascularity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loerelius, L.E.; Stridbeck, H.

    1984-01-01

    VX 2 tumors in the rabbit hind leg were investigated at one, two and three weeks of age. Angiograms were compared with vascular casts. The tumors grew rapidly the first two weeks of age. Large variations in vascularity were noted between tumors of different ages. With increasing age arteriovenous shunts at the tumor periphery and areas of avascularity of necrosis in the tumor center increased in size. Possible reasons for tumor necrosis are increased tissue pressure, anoxia caused by arteriovenous shunts and elevation in venous pressure. The natural history of the VX 2 tumor must be considered in every experimental study of the effect of any treatment. (orig.)

  6. Vascularized fibular graft in infected tibial bone loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Cheriyan Kovoor

    2011-01-01

    union occurred in all patients in a mean time of 3.3 months, at both ends. At a minimum followup of 24 months the mean hypertrophy noted was 63.6% (30 - 136% in the vascularized fibular graft. Ten stress fractures occurred in seven patients. The mean duration of the occurrence of a stress fracture in the graft was 11.1 months (2.5 - 18 months postoperatively. The highest incidence of stress fractures was when the graft hypertrophy was less than 20%. The incidence of stress fractures reduced significantly after the graft hypertrophy exceeded 20%. Conclusion : In most cases hypertrophy of the vascularized fibular graft occurs in response to mechanical loading by protected weight bearing, and the amount of hypertrophy is variable. The presence or absence of an intact fibula has no bearing on the hypertrophy or incidence of stress fracture. The length of the fibular graft has no bearing on the hypertrophy or stress fracture.

  7. Effect of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell transplantation on vascular calcification in rats with adenine-induced kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Yokote, Shinya; Katsuoka, Yuichi; Yamada, Akifumi; Ohkido, Ichiro; Yokoo, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have investigated the use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to treat damaged kidneys. However, the effect of adipose-derived MSCs (ASCs) on vascular calcification in chronic kidney disease (CKD) is still poorly understood. In the present study, we explored the potential of ASCs for the treatment of CKD and vascular calcification. CKD was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats by feeding them a diet containing 0.75% adenine for 4 weeks. ASCs transplantation significantly reduced s...

  8. Vascular alterations in PDAPP mice after anti-Aβ immunotherapy: Implications for amyloid-related imaging abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zago, Wagner; Schroeter, Sally; Guido, Teresa; Khan, Karen; Seubert, Peter; Yednock, Ted; Schenk, Dale; Gregg, Keith M; Games, Dora; Bard, Frédérique; Kinney, Gene G

    2013-10-01

    Clinical studies of β-amyloid (Aβ) immunotherapy in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients have demonstrated reduction of central Aβ plaque by positron emission tomography (PET) imaging and the appearance of amyloid-related imaging abnormalities (ARIA). To better understand the relationship between ARIA and the pathophysiology of AD, we undertook a series of studies in PDAPP mice evaluating vascular alterations in the context of central Aβ pathology and after anti-Aβ immunotherapy. We analyzed PDAPP mice treated with either 3 mg/kg/week of 3D6, the murine form of bapineuzumab, or isotype control antibodies for periods ranging from 1 to 36 weeks and evaluated the vascular alterations in the context of Aβ pathology and after anti-Aβ immunotherapy. The number of mice in each treatment group ranged from 26 to 39 and a total of 345 animals were analyzed. The central vasculature displayed morphological abnormalities associated with vascular Aβ deposits. Treatment with 3D6 antibody induced clearance of vascular Aβ that was spatially and temporally associated with a transient increase in microhemorrhage and in capillary Aβ deposition. Microhemorrhage resolved over a time period that was associated with a recovery of vascular morphology and a decrease in capillary Aβ accumulation. These data suggest that vascular leakage events, such as microhemorrhage, may be related to the removal of vascular Aβ. With continued treatment, this initial susceptibility period is followed by restoration of vascular morphology and reduced vulnerability to further vascular leakage events. The data collectively suggested a vascular amyloid clearance model of ARIA, which accounts for the currently known risk factors for the incidence of ARIA in clinical studies. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Engineering the mechanical and biological properties of nanofibrous vascular grafts for in situ vascular tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Jeffrey J D; Yu, Jian; Wang, Aijun; Lee, Randall; Fang, Jun; Li, Song

    2017-08-17

    Synthetic small diameter vascular grafts have a high failure rate, and endothelialization is critical for preventing thrombosis and graft occlusion. A promising approach is in situ tissue engineering, whereby an acellular scaffold is implanted and provides stimulatory cues to guide the in situ remodeling into a functional blood vessel. An ideal scaffold should have sufficient binding sites for biomolecule immobilization and a mechanical property similar to native tissue. Here we developed a novel method to blend low molecular weight (LMW) elastic polymer during electrospinning process to increase conjugation sites and to improve the mechanical property of vascular grafts. LMW elastic polymer improved the elasticity of the scaffolds, and significantly increased the amount of heparin conjugated to the micro/nanofibrous scaffolds, which in turn increased the loading capacity of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and prolonged the release of VEGF. Vascular grafts were implanted into the carotid artery of rats to evaluate the in vivo performance. VEGF treatment significantly enhanced endothelium formation and the overall patency of vascular grafts. Heparin coating also increased cell infiltration into the electrospun grafts, thus increasing the production of collagen and elastin within the graft wall. This work demonstrates that LMW elastic polymer blending is an approach to engineer the mechanical and biological property of micro/nanofibrous vascular grafts for in situ vascular tissue engineering.

  10. Vascular plugs - A key companion to Interventionists - 'Just Plug it'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Sivasubramanian

    2015-01-01

    Vascular plugs are ideally suited to close extra-cardiac, high flowing vascular communications. The family of vascular plugs has expanded. Vascular plugs in general have a lower profile and the newer variants can be delivered even through a diagnostic catheter. These features make them versatile and easy to use. The Amplatzer vascular plugs are also used for closing intracardiac defects including coronary arterio-venous fistula and paravalvular leakage in an off-label fashion. In this review, the features of currently available vascular plugs are reviewed along with tips and tricks of using them in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Oscillation of Angiogenesis and Vascular Dropout in Progressive Human Vascular Disease. [Vascular Pattern as Useful Read-Out of Complex Molecular Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons-Wingerter, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    When analyzed by VESsel GENeration Analysis (VESGEN) software, vascular patterns provide useful integrative read-outs of complex, interacting molecular signaling pathways. Using VESGEN, we recently discovered and published our innovative, surprising findings that angiogenesis oscillated with vascular dropout throughout progression of diabetic retinopathy, a blinding vascular disease. Our findings provide a potential paradigm shift in the current prevailing view on progression and treatment of this disease, and a new early-stage window of regenerative therapeutic opportunities. The findings also suggest that angiogenesis may oscillate with vascular disease in a homeostatic-like manner during early stages of other inflammatory progressive diseases such as cancer and coronary vascular disease.

  12. Vascular plasticity in cerebrovascular disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edvinsson, Lars I H; Povlsen, Gro Klitgaard

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality with little advancement in subacute treatment options. This review aims to cover and discuss novel insight obtained during the last decade into plastic changes in the vasoconstrictor receptor profiles of cerebral arteries and micr......Cerebral ischemia remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality with little advancement in subacute treatment options. This review aims to cover and discuss novel insight obtained during the last decade into plastic changes in the vasoconstrictor receptor profiles of cerebral arteries...... therapeutic target for prevention of vasoconstrictor receptor upregulation after stroke. Together, those findings provide new perspectives on the pathophysiology of ischemic stroke and point toward a novel way of reducing vasoconstriction, neuronal cell death, and thus neurologic deficits after stroke....

  13. Vascular plasticity in cerebrovascular disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edvinsson, Lars I H; Povlsen, Gro Klitgaard

    2011-01-01

    and microvessels that takes place after different types of stroke. Receptors like the endothelin type B, angiotensin type 1, and 5-hydroxytryptamine type 1B/1D receptors are upregulated in the smooth muscle layer of cerebral arteries after different types of ischemic stroke as well as after subarachnoid hemorrhage......Cerebral ischemia remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality with little advancement in subacute treatment options. This review aims to cover and discuss novel insight obtained during the last decade into plastic changes in the vasoconstrictor receptor profiles of cerebral arteries...... therapeutic target for prevention of vasoconstrictor receptor upregulation after stroke. Together, those findings provide new perspectives on the pathophysiology of ischemic stroke and point toward a novel way of reducing vasoconstriction, neuronal cell death, and thus neurologic deficits after stroke....

  14. Intrauterine nutrition: long-term consequences for vascular health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szostak-Wegierek D

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Dorota Szostak-WegierekDepartment of Human Nutrition, Medical University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland Abstract: There is a growing body of evidence that improper intrauterine nutrition may negatively influence vascular health in later life. Maternal malnutrition may result in intrauterine growth retardation and, in turn, metabolic disorders such as insulin resistance, diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidemia, and also enhanced risk of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular death in the offspring. Energy and/or protein restriction is the most critical determinant for fetal programming. However, it has also been proposed that intrauterine n-3 fatty acid deficiency may be linked to later higher blood pressure levels and reduced insulin sensitivity. Moreover, it has been shown that inadequate supply of micronutrients such as folate, vitamin B12, vitamin A, iron, magnesium, zinc, and calcium may contribute to impaired vascular health in the progeny. In addition, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy that are linked to impaired placental blood flow and suboptimal fetal nutrition may also contribute to intrauterine growth retardation and aggravated cardiovascular risk in the offspring. On the other hand, maternal overnutrition, which often contributes to obesity and/or diabetes, may result in macrosomia and enhanced cardiometabolic risk in the offspring. Progeny of obese and/or diabetic mothers are relatively more prone to develop obesity, insulin resistance, diabetes, and hypertension. It was demonstrated that they may have permanently enhanced appetites. Their atheromatous lesions are usually more pronounced. It seems that, particularly, a maternal high-fat/junk food diet may be detrimental for vascular health in the offspring. Fetal exposure to excessive levels of saturated fatty and/or n-6 fatty acids, sucrose, fructose and salt, as well as a maternal high glycemic index diet, may also contribute to later enhanced cardiometabolic risk. Keywords: maternal

  15. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells for retinal vascular injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin-Da; An, Ying; Zhang, Jing-Shang; Wan, Xiu-Hua; Jonas, Jost B; Xu, Liang; Zhang, Wei

    2017-09-01

    To examine the potential of intravitreally implanted human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) to affect vascular repair and the blood-retina barrier in mice and rats with oxygen-induced retinopathy, diabetic retinopathy or retinal ischaemia-reperfusion damage. Three study groups (oxygen-induced retinopathy group: 18 C57BL/6J mice; diabetic retinopathy group: 15 rats; retinal ischaemia-reperfusion model: 18 rats) received BMSCs injected intravitreally. Control groups (oxygen-induced retinopathy group: 12 C57BL/6J mice; diabetic retinopathy group: 15 rats; retinal ischaemia-reperfusion model: 18 rats) received an intravitreal injection of phosphate-buffered saline. We applied immunohistological techniques to measure retinal vascularization, spectroscopic measurements of intraretinally extravasated fluorescein-conjugated dextran to quantify the blood-retina barrier breakdown, and histomorphometry to assess retinal thickness and retinal ganglion cell count. In the oxygen-induced retinopathy model, the study group with intravitreally injected BMSCs as compared with the control group showed a significantly (p = 0.001) smaller area of retinal neovascularization. In the diabetic retinopathy model, study group and control group did not differ significantly in the amount of intraretinally extravasated dextran. In the retinal ischaemia-reperfusion model, on the 7th day after retina injury, the retina was significantly thicker in the study group than in the control group (p = 0.02), with no significant difference in the retinal ganglion cell count (p = 0.36). Intravitreally implanted human BMSCs were associated with a reduced retinal neovascularization in the oxygen-induced retinopathy model and with a potentially cell preserving effect in the retinal ischaemia-reperfusion model. Intravitreal BMSCs may be of potential interest for the therapy of retinal vascular disorders. © 2016 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley

  16. Vascular risk factors, cognitve decline, and dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Duron

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available E Duron, Olivier HanonBroca Hospital, Paris, FranceAbstract: Dementia is one of the most important neurological disorders in the elderly. Aging is associated with a large increase in the prevalence and incidence of degenerative (Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia, leading to a devastating loss of autonomy. In view of the increasing longevity of populations worldwide, prevention of dementia has turned into a major public health challenge. In the past decade, several vascular risk factors have been found to be associated with vascular dementia but also Alzheimer’s disease. Some longitudinal studies, have found significant associations between hypertension, diabetus mellitus, and metabolic syndrome, assessed at middle age, and dementia. Studies assessing the link between hypercholesterolemia, atrial fibrillation, smoking, and dementia have given more conflicting results. Furthermore, some studies have highlighted the possible protective effect of antihypertensive therapy on cognition and some trials are evaluating the effects of statins and treatments for insulin resistance. Vascular risk factors and their treatments are a promising avenue of research for prevention of dementia, and further long-term, placebo-controlled, randomized studies, need to be performed.Keywords: dementia, hypertension, diabetus mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, metabolic syndrome

  17. Vascular anatomy in angiography for magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charry Lopez, Marco Luciano; Rivera Gomez, Juan Enrique

    1998-01-01

    A review of basic anatomical concepts and main variants, as well as some anatomical anomalies of the central nervous system vascularity, these concepts are considered essential for the interpretation of magnetic resonance angiography with time-of-flight (TOF) and phase-contrast (PC) methods

  18. CT imaging of cervical spinal vascular malformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Takashi; Iwamoto, Munehisa; Miyamoto, Etsuo; Kuriyama, Tsuyoshi; Hayama, Tsuneto

    1982-01-01

    The patient had a history of the onset of motor paralysis of the right upper and lower extremities. Eight years later, numbness of the right upper extremity and a severe neck pain developed, and transverse paralysis of the lower extremities appeared in about 10 hours. CT demonstrated the presence of spinal vascular abnormality. Angiography suggested arteriovenous malformation of glomus type. (Chiba, N.)

  19. NEURO-VASCULAR INJURIES ASSOCIATED WITH LIMB ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2000-12-01

    Dec 1, 2000 ... Subjects: Forty three patients with bone fractures associated with vascular and peripheral nerve injury seen at the Emergency Room of Assir Central Hospital from 1990 to 1999. There were 39 males and four females. Thirty five of these patients (81.4%) were Saudi nationals and the rest were non-Saudi.

  20. B vitamins influence vascular cognitive impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    As the number of elderly in the USA and globally continues to increase, age-related neurological disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia, are a growing concern. The loss of memory, emotional changes, and impairments in general cognitive functioning frequently result in social is...

  1. Quality Estimation for Vascular Pattern Recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartung, Daniel; Martin, Sophie; Busch, Christoph

    2011-01-01

    The quality of captured samples is a critical aspect in biometric systems. In this paper we present a quality estimation algorithm for vascular images, which uses global and local features based on a Grey Level Co-Occurrence Matrix (GLCM) and optionally available metadata. An evaluation of the al...

  2. Human genetics of diabetic vascular complications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Diabetic vascular complications (DVC) affecting several important organ systems of human body such as the cardiovascular system constitute a major public health problem. There is evidence demonstrating that genetic factors contribute to the risk of DVC genetic variants, structural variants, and epigenetic changes play ...

  3. CT imaging of cervical spinal vascular malformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, Takashi; Iwamoto, Munehisa; Miyamoto, Etsuo; Kuriyama, Tsuyoshi; Hayama, Tsuneto [Wakayama Red Cross Hospital, Wakayama (Japan)

    1982-05-01

    The patient had a history of the onset of motor paralysis of the right upper and lower extremities. Eight years later, numbness of the right upper extremity and a severe neck pain developed, and transverse paralysis of the lower extremities appeared in about 10 hours. CT demonstrated the presence of spinal vascular abnormality. Angiography suggested arteriovenous malformation of glomus type.

  4. Warfarin accelerated vascular calcification and worsened cardiac dysfunction in remnant kidney mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Tsun Tsai

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vascular calcification is highly prevalent in end-stage renal disease (ESRD and is a significant risk factor for future cardiovascular events and death. Warfarin use results in dysfunction of matrix Gla protein, an inhibitor of vascular calcification. However, the effect of warfarin on vascular calcification in patients with ESRD is still not well characterized. Thus we investigated whether arterial calcification can be accelerated by warfarin treatment both in vitro and in vivo using a mouse remnant kidney model. Methods: Human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMC were cultured in medium supplemented with warfarin and phosphate to investigate the potential role of this drug in osteoblast transdifferentiation. For in vivo study, adult male C57BL/6 mice underwent 5/6 nephrectomy were treated with active vitamin D3 plus warfarin to determine the extent of vascular calcification and parameters of cardiovascular function. Results: We found that the expressions of Runx2 and osteocalcin in HASMC were markedly enhanced in the culture medium containing warfarin and high phosphate concentration. Warfarin induced calcification of cultured HASMC in the presence of high phosphate levels, and this effect is inhibited by vitamin K2. Severe aortic calcification and reduced left ventricular ejection fractions were also noted in 5/6 nephrectomy mice treated with warfarin and active vitamin D3. Conclusion: Warfarin treatment contributes to the accelerated vascular calcification in animal models of advanced chronic kidney disease. Clinicians should therefore be aware of the profound risk of warfarin use on vascular calcification and cardiac dysfunction in patients with ESRD and atrial fibrillation. Keywords: Left ventricular dysfunction, Uremia, Vascular calcification, Warfarin

  5. Differences in intramuscular vascular connections of human and dog latissimus dorsi muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, D; Morris, S F

    1999-02-01

    Distal ischemia and necrosis of the dog latissimus dorsi muscle flap used in experimental cardiomyoplasty have been reported. However, little information on the intramuscular vascular anatomy of the dog latissimus dorsi is available. It is unclear whether there are any anatomic factors relating to the muscle flap ischemia and necrosis, and whether the dog latissimus dorsi is a suitable experimental model. To study the intramuscular vascular territories in the dog latissimus dorsi muscle, and to compare the intramuscular vasculature of the dog with that of the human, 5 fresh dog cadavers and 7 fresh human cadavers were injected with a mixture of lead oxide, gelatin, and water (200 mL/kg) through the carotid artery. Both the dog and the human latissimus dorsi muscles and neurovascular pedicles were dissected and radiographed. The intramuscular vascular anatomy of the latissimus dorsi muscles was compared. Radiographs demonstrate clearly that the pattern of latissimus dorsi intramuscular anastomoses between branches of the thoracodorsal artery and the perforators of posterior intercostal arteries in the proximal half of the muscle are different between the dog and the human. In the dog muscle, vascular connections between the thoracodorsal artery and the posterior intercostal arteries are formed by reduced-caliber choke arteries, whereas four to six true anastomoses without a change in caliber between them are found in the human muscle. The portion of the latissimus dorsi muscle supplied by the dominant thoracodorsal vascular territory was 25.9% +/- 0.3% in the dog and 23.9% +/- 0.5% in the human. For further comparison, an extended vascular territory in the latissimus dorsi muscle was demonstrated, including both the thoracodorsal territory and the posterior intercostal territories. The area of the extended vascular territory was 52% +/- 0.5% of the total muscle. The dog latissimus dorsi model may not be a perfect predictor of the behavior of the human latissimus

  6. Uric acid promotes vascular stiffness, maladaptive inflammatory responses and proteinuria in western diet fed mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroor, Annayya R; Jia, Guanghong; Habibi, Javad; Sun, Zhe; Ramirez-Perez, Francisco I; Brady, Barron; Chen, Dongqing; Martinez-Lemus, Luis A; Manrique, Camila; Nistala, Ravi; Whaley-Connell, Adam T; Demarco, Vincent G; Meininger, Gerald A; Sowers, James R

    2017-09-01

    Aortic vascular stiffness has been implicated in the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) in obese individuals. However, the mechanism promoting these adverse effects are unclear. In this context, promotion of obesity through consumption of a western diet (WD) high in fat and fructose leads to excess circulating uric acid. There is accumulating data implicating elevated uric acid in the promotion of CVD and CKD. Accordingly, we hypothesized that xanthine oxidase(XO) inhibition with allopurinol would prevent a rise in vascular stiffness and proteinuria in a translationally relevant model of WD-induced obesity. Four-week-old C57BL6/J male mice were fed a WD with excess fat (46%) and fructose (17.5%) with or without allopurinol (125mg/L in drinking water) for 16weeks. Aortic endothelial and extracellular matrix/vascular smooth muscle stiffness was evaluated by atomic force microscopy. Aortic XO activity, 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) and aortic endothelial sodium channel (EnNaC) expression were evaluated along with aortic expression of inflammatory markers. In the kidney, expression of toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) and fibronectin were assessed along with evaluation of proteinuria. XO inhibition significantly attenuated WD-induced increases in plasma uric acid, vascular XO activity and oxidative stress, in concert with reductions in proteinuria. Further, XO inhibition prevented WD-induced increases in aortic EnNaC expression and associated endothelial and subendothelial stiffness. XO inhibition also reduced vascular pro-inflammatory and maladaptive immune responses induced by consumption of a WD. XO inhibition also decreased WD-induced increases in renal TLR4 and fibronectin that associated proteinuria. Consumption of a WD leads to elevations in plasma uric acid, increased vascular XO activity, oxidative stress, vascular stiffness, and proteinuria all of which are attenuated with allopurinol administration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc

  7. Vitamin K status and vascular calcification: evidence from observational and clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, M Kyla; Holden, Rachel M

    2012-03-01

    Vascular calcification occurs when calcium accumulates in the intima (associated with atherosclerosis) and/or media layers of the vessel wall. Coronary artery calcification (CAC) reflects the calcium burden within the intima and media of the coronary arteries. In population-based studies, CAC independently predicts cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality. A preventive role for vitamin K in vascular calcification has been proposed based on its role in activating matrix Gla protein (MGP), a calcification inhibitor that is expressed in vascular tissue. Although animal and in vitro data support this role of vitamin K, overall data from human studies are inconsistent. The majority of population-based studies have relied on vitamin K intake to measure status. Phylloquinone is the primary dietary form of vitamin K and available supplementation trials, albeit limited, suggest phylloquinone supplementation is relevant to CAC. Yet observational studies have found higher dietary menaquinone, but not phylloquinone, to be associated with less calcification. Vascular calcification is highly prevalent in certain patient populations, especially in those with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and it is plausible vitamin K may contribute to reducing vascular calcification in patients at higher risk. Subclinical vitamin K deficiency has been reported in CKD patients, but studies linking vitamin K status to calcification outcomes in CKD are needed to clarify whether or not improving vitamin K status is associated with improved vascular health in CKD. This review summarizes the available evidence of vitamin K and vascular calcification in population-based studies and clinic-based studies, with a specific focus on CKD patients.

  8. LASER TREATMENT OF BENIGN CUTANEOUS VASCULAR LESIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uroš Ahčan

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Congenital and acquired vascular lesions of the skin and subcutis are a common health problem from aesthetic and also from psycho-social point of view. However, recent advances in laser technology have enabled an efficient and safe treatment. This study presents our experience with treatment of cutaneous vascular lesions using modern laser systems. Most common benign cutaneous vascular lesions are described.Patients and methods. In years 2002 and 2003, 109 patients, 4 to 80 (mean 39 years old, Fitzpatrick skin type 1–4, with 210 benign cutaneous vascular lesions were treated using the Dualis VP® laser system (Fotona, Slovenia which incorporates the KTP and Nd:YAG lasers. Vascular lesions in the upper layers of the skin with diameter up to 1 mm were treated with the KTP laser (wavelength 532 nm. For larger vessels in deeper layer we used the Nd:YAG laser (wavelength 1064 nm. Patients graded the pain during treatment on a scale of 1–10. Clinical outcomes were evaluated 1–3 months after the last treatment: according to the percentage of clearance of the lesion compared to the adjacent normal skin and for the presence of adverse effects. According to these criteria each lesion was assigned a score: poor (0–25%, fair (26–50%, good (51–75%, excellent (76–100%.Results. Immediate response after application of a laser beam with proper characteristics was whitish-grey discoloration of treated area. Treatment results after 1–3 months were excellent in 48.1%, good 40.9%, fair in 8.6% and poor in 2.4%. Patients without prior anaesthesia graded pain during treatment from 1 to 8 (mean 4.0 and patients with EMLA® anaesthesia from 1 to 6 (mean 2.6. Side effects were frequent but minimal and transient. Erythema disappeared in several days after treatment while crusting persisted for 14 days. 3 permanent hyperpigmentations, 2 permanent hypopigmentations, 2 hypertrophic scars and 1 beam sized atrophic scar were detected at last follow

  9. Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelick, Philip B.; Scuteri, Angelo; Black, Sandra E.; DeCarli, Charles; Greenberg, Steven M.; Iadecola, Costantino; Launer, Lenore J.; Laurent, Stephane; Lopez, Oscar L.; Nyenhuis, David; Petersen, Ronald C.; Schneider, Julie A.; Tzourio, Christophe; Arnett, Donna K.; Bennett, David A.; Chui, Helena C.; Higashida, Randall T.; Lindquist, Ruth; Nilsson, Peter M.; Roman, Gustavo C.; Sellke, Frank W.; Seshadri, Sudha

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose This scientific statement provides an overview of the evidence on vascular contributions to cognitive impairment and dementia. Vascular contributions to cognitive impairment and dementia of later life are common. Definitions of vascular cognitive impairment (VCI), neuropathology, basic science and pathophysiological aspects, role of neuroimaging and vascular and other associated risk factors, and potential opportunities for prevention and treatment are reviewed. This statement serves as an overall guide for practitioners to gain a better understanding of VCI and dementia, prevention, and treatment. Methods Writing group members were nominated by the writing group co-chairs on the basis of their previous work in relevant topic areas and were approved by the American Heart Association Stroke Council Scientific Statement Oversight Committee, the Council on Epidemiology and Prevention, and the Manuscript Oversight Committee. The writing group used systematic literature reviews (primarily covering publications from 1990 to May 1, 2010), previously published guidelines, personal files, and expert opinion to summarize existing evidence, indicate gaps in current knowledge, and, when appropriate, formulate recommendations using standard American Heart Association criteria. All members of the writing group had the opportunity to comment on the recommendations and approved the final version of this document. After peer review by the American Heart Association, as well as review by the Stroke Council leadership, Council on Epidemiology and Prevention Council, and Scientific Statements Oversight Committee, the statement was approved by the American Heart Association Science Advisory and Coordinating Committee. Results The construct of VCI has been introduced to capture the entire spectrum of cognitive disorders associated with all forms of cerebral vascular brain injury—not solely stroke—ranging from mild cognitive impairment through fully developed

  10. Coexistence of pheochromocytoma with uncommon vascular lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar Kota

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pheochromocytoma/paragangliomas have been described to be associated with rare vascular abnormalities like renal artery stenosis. Coexistence of physiologically significant renal artery lesions is a compounding factor that alters management and prognosis of pheochromocytoma patients. Apart from individual case reports, data on such association in Indian population is not available. The aim of this study is to find the nature and prevalence of associated vascular abnormalities. Materials and Methods: From 1990 to 2010, a total of 50 patients were diagnosed with pheochromocytoma/paragangliomas. Hospital charts of these patients were reviewed retrospectively to identify those with unusual vascular abnormalities. Available literature was also reviewed. Results: Of the 50 patients with pheochromocytoma, 7 (14% had coexisting vascular lesions including renal artery stenosis in 4, aortoarteritis in 1, aortic aneurysm in 1 and inferior vena cava thrombosis in 1. Pheochromocytoma was adrenal in 42 and extra adrenal in 8. Laparoscopic adrenalectomy was done in the patients. One patient with renal artery stenosis due to intimal fibrosis was subjected to percutaneous balloon angioplasty; the other three improved after adrenalectomy and lysis of fibrous adhesive bands. The patient with aortoarteritos was treated with oral steroids. Inferior vena cava thrombosis was reversed with anticoagulants. The patient with abdominal aortic aneurysm was advised for annual follow-up on account of its size of 4.5 cm and asymptomatic presentation. Conclusion: There are multiple mechanisms that can lead to renal artery stenosis and other vascular abnormalities in a case of pheochromocytoma. A high index of suspicion is necessary to enable both entities to be diagnosed preoperatively and allow proper planning of surgical therapy. Incomplete diagnosis may lead to persistent hypertension postoperatively in a case of associated renal artery stenosis.

  11. The making of indigenous vascular prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madathipat Unnikrishnan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Vascular illnesses are on the rise in India, due to increase in lifestyle diseases and demographic transition, requiring intervention to save life, organ or limbs using vascular prosthesis. The aim of this study was to develop indigenous large diameter vascular graft for treatment of patients with vascular pathologies. Methods: The South India Textile Research Association, at Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, India, developed seamless woven polyester (Polyethylene terephthalate graft at its research wing. Further characterization and testing followed by clinical trials were conducted at Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India. Fifteen in vivo experiments were carried out in 1992-1994 in pigs as animal model. Controlled (phase I clinical trial in ten patients was performed along with control graft. Thereafter, phase II trial involved 22 patients who underwent multi-centre clinical trial in four centres across India. Results: Laboratory testing showed that polyester graft was non-toxic, non-leeching and non-haemolytic with preserved long-term quality, further confirming in pigs by implanting in thoracic aorta, comparable to control Dacron grafts. Perigraft incorporation and smooth neointima formation which are prime features of excellent healing characteristics, were noted at explantation at planned intervals. Subsequently in the phase I and II clinical trials, all patients had excellent recovery without mortality or device-related adverse events. Patients receiving the test graft were followed up for 10 and 5 years, respectively. Serial clinical, duplex scans and CT angiograms performed periodically confirmed excellent graft performance. Interpretation & conclusions: Indigenously developed Chitra vascular graft was comparable to commercially available Dacron graft, ready for clinical use at affordable cost to patients as against costly imported grafts.

  12. A biodegradable vascularizing membrane: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushiva, Anchal; Turzhitsky, Vladimir M; Darmoc, Marissa; Backman, Vadim; Ameer, Guillermo A

    2007-09-01

    Regenerative medicine and in vivo biosensor applications require the formation of mature vascular networks for long-term success. This study investigated whether biodegradable porous membranes could induce the formation of a vascularized fibrous capsule and, if so, the effect of degradation kinetics on neovascularization. Poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) and poly(dl-lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) membranes were created by a solvent casting/salt leaching method. Specifically, PLLA, PLGA 75:25 and PLGA 50:50 polymers were used to vary degradation kinetics. The membranes were designed to have an average 60mum pore diameter, as this pore size has been shown to be optimal for inducing blood vessel formation around nondegradable polymer materials. Membrane samples were imaged by scanning electron microscopy at several time points during in vitro degradation to assess any changes in pore structure. The in vivo performance of the membranes was assessed in Sprague-Dawley rats by measuring vascularization within the fibrous capsule that forms adjacent to implants. The vascular density within 100microm of the membranes was compared with that seen in normal tissue, and to that surrounding the commercially available vascularizing membrane TheraCyte. The hemoglobin content of tissue containing the membranes was measured by four-dimensional elastic light scattering as a novel method to assess tissue perfusion. Results from this study show that slow-degrading membranes induce greater amounts of neovascularization and a thinner fibrous capsule relative to fast degrading membranes. These results may be due both to an initially increased number of macrophages surrounding the slower degrading membranes and to the maintenance of their initial pore structure.

  13. Vascular low-flow malformations in children: current concepts for classification, diagnosis and therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puig, Stefan; Casati, Bettina; Staudenherz, Anton; Paya, Kurosh

    2005-01-01

    Congenital vascular malformations (CVM) are made of dysplastic vessels with no cellular proliferation. Low- or slow-flow malformations (LFM) consist predominantly of venous and/or lymphatic vessels. Correct terminology is necessary for differentiating vascular malformations from tumours such as haemangiomas, in order to prevent ineffective or even adverse therapy. The role of the radiologist in the management of patients is two-fold: making the diagnosis with the use of ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging, and performing sclerotherapy, which is the treatment of choice. Prior to sclerotherapy, percutaneous phlebography is necessary to visualize the dynamic situation inside the lesion and the flow into the adjacent vascular system. The double-needle technique is a useful therapy option reducing the risk of embolisation of the sclerosing agent. Large lesions might need subsequent surgical treatment. A multidisciplinary approach is substantial for optimal patient management

  14. Adipokines: Potential Therapeutic Targets for Vascular Dysfunction in Type II Diabetes Mellitus and Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Wanees Ahmed El husseny

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Adipokines are bioactive molecules that regulate several physiological functions such as energy balance, insulin sensitization, appetite regulation, inflammatory response, and vascular homeostasis. They include proinflammatory cytokines such as adipocyte fatty acid binding protein (A-FABP and anti-inflammatory cytokines such as adiponectin, as well as vasodilator and vasoconstrictor molecules. In obesity and type II diabetes mellitus (DM, insulin resistance causes impairment of the endocrine function of the perivascular adipose tissue, an imbalance in the secretion of vasoconstrictor and vasodilator molecules, and an increased production of reactive oxygen species. Recent studies have shown that targeting plasma levels of adipokines or the expression of their receptors can increase insulin sensitivity, improve vascular function, and reduce the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Several reviews have discussed the potential of adipokines as therapeutic targets for type II DM and obesity; however, this review is the first to focus on their therapeutic potential for vascular dysfunction in type II DM and obesity.

  15. Role of Renin-Angiotensin system and oxidative stress on vascular inflammation in insulin resistence model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renna, N F; Lembo, C; Diez, E; Miatello, R M

    2013-01-01

    (1) This study aims to demonstrate the causal involvement of renin angiotensin system (RAS) and oxidative stress (OS) on vascular inflammation in an experimental model of metabolic syndrome (MS) achieved by fructose administration to spontaneously hypertensive rats (FFHR) during 12 weeks. (2) Chronic treatment with candesartan (C) (10 mg/kg per day for the last 6 weeks) or 4OH-Tempol (T) (10(-3) mmol/L in drinking water for the last 6 weeks) reversed the increment in metabolic variables and systolic blood pressure. In addition, chronic C treatment reverted cardiovascular remodeling but not T. (3) Furthermore, chronic treatment with C was able to completely reverse the expression of NF-κB and VCAM-1, but T only reduced the expression. C reduced the expression of proatherogenic cytokines as CINC2, CINC3, VEGF, Leptin, TNF-alpha, and MCP-1 and also significantly reduced MIP-3, beta-NGF, and INF-gamma in vascular tissue in this experimental model. T was not able to substantially modify the expression of these cytokines. (4) The data suggest the involvement of RAS in the expression of inflammatory proteins at different vascular levels, allowing the creation of a microenvironment suitable for the creation, perpetuation, growth, and destabilization of vascular injury.

  16. Role of Renin-Angiotensin System and Oxidative Stress on Vascular Inflammation in Insulin Resistence Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. F. Renna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available (1 This study aims to demonstrate the causal involvement of renin angiotensin system (RAS and oxidative stress (OS on vascular inflammation in an experimental model of metabolic syndrome (MS achieved by fructose administration to spontaneously hypertensive rats (FFHR during 12 weeks. (2 Chronic treatment with candesartan (C (10 mg/kg per day for the last 6 weeks or 4OH-Tempol (T (10−3 mmol/L in drinking water for the last 6 weeks reversed the increment in metabolic variables and systolic blood pressure. In addition, chronic C treatment reverted cardiovascular remodeling but not T. (3 Furthermore, chronic treatment with C was able to completely reverse the expression of NF-κB and VCAM-1, but T only reduced the expression. C reduced the expression of proatherogenic cytokines as CINC2, CINC3, VEGF, Leptin, TNF-alpha, and MCP-1 and also significantly reduced MIP-3, beta-NGF, and INF-gamma in vascular tissue in this experimental model. T was not able to substantially modify the expression of these cytokines. (4 The data suggest the involvement of RAS in the expression of inflammatory proteins at different vascular levels, allowing the creation of a microenvironment suitable for the creation, perpetuation, growth, and destabilization of vascular injury.

  17. Effects of Swimming and Cycling Exercise Intervention on Vascular Function in Patients With Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkatan, Mohammed; Machin, Daniel R; Baker, Jeffrey R; Akkari, Amanda S; Park, Wonil; Tanaka, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    Swimming exercise is an ideal and excellent form of exercise for patients with osteoarthritis (OA). However, there is no scientific evidence that regular swimming reduces vascular dysfunction and inflammation and elicits similar benefits compared with land-based exercises such as cycling in terms of reducing vascular dysfunction and inflammation in patients with OA. Forty-eight middle-aged and older patients with OA were randomly assigned to swimming or cycling training groups. Cycling training was included as a non-weight-bearing land-based comparison group. After 12 weeks of supervised exercise training, central arterial stiffness, as determined by carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, and carotid artery stiffness, through simultaneous ultrasound and applanation tonometry, decreased significantly after both swimming and cycling training. Vascular endothelial function, as determined by brachial flow-mediated dilation, increased significantly after swimming but not after cycling training. Both swimming and cycling interventions reduced interleukin-6 levels, whereas no changes were observed in other inflammatory markers. In conclusion, these results indicate that regular swimming exercise can exert similar or even superior effects on vascular function and inflammatory markers compared with land-based cycling exercise in patients with OA who often has an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. In-depth evaluation of commercially available human vascular smooth muscle cells phenotype: Implications for vascular tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timraz, Sara B.H.; Farhat, Ilyas A.H.; Alhussein, Ghada; Christoforou, Nicolas; Teo, Jeremy C.M.

    2016-01-01

    In vitro research on vascular tissue engineering has extensively used isolated primary human or animal smooth muscle cells (SMC). Research programs that lack such facilities tend towards commercially available primary cells sources. Here, we aim to evaluate the capacity of commercially available human SMC to maintain their contractile phenotype, and determine if dedifferentiation towards the synthetic phenotype occurs in response to conventional cell culture and passaging without any external biochemical or mechanical stimuli. Lower passage SMC adopted a contractile phenotype marked by a relatively slower proliferation rate, higher expression of proteins of the contractile apparatus and smoothelin, elongated morphology, and reduced deposition of collagen types I and III. As the passage number increased, migratory capacity was enhanced, average cell speed, total distance and net distance travelled increased up to passage 8. Through the various assays, corroborative evidence pinpoints SMC at passage 7 as the transition point between the contractile and synthetic phenotypes, while passage 8 distinctly and consistently exhibited characteristics of synthetic phenotype. This knowledge is particularly useful in selecting SMC of appropriate passage number for the target vascular tissue engineering application, for example, a homeostatic vascular graft for blood vessel replacement versus recreating atherosclerotic blood vessel model in vitro. - Highlights: • Ability of human smooth muscle cells to alter phenotype in culture is evaluated. • Examined the effect of passaging human smooth muscle cells on phenotype. • Phenotype is assessed based on morphology, proliferation, markers, and migration. • Multi-resolution assessment methodology, single-cell and cell-population. • Lower and higher passages than P7 adopted a contractile and synthetic phenotype respectively.

  19. In-depth evaluation of commercially available human vascular smooth muscle cells phenotype: Implications for vascular tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timraz, Sara B.H., E-mail: sara.timraz@kustar.ac.ae [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Khalifa University, PO Box 127788, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Farhat, Ilyas A.H., E-mail: ilyas.farhat@outlook.com [Department of Applied Mathematics and Sciences, Khalifa University, PO Box 127788, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Alhussein, Ghada, E-mail: ghada.alhussein@kustar.ac.ae [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Khalifa University, PO Box 127788, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Christoforou, Nicolas, E-mail: nicolas.christoforou@kustar.ac.ae [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Khalifa University, PO Box 127788, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Teo, Jeremy C.M., E-mail: jeremy.teo@kustar.ac.ae [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Khalifa University, PO Box 127788, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

    2016-05-01

    In vitro research on vascular tissue engineering has extensively used isolated primary human or animal smooth muscle cells (SMC). Research programs that lack such facilities tend towards commercially available primary cells sources. Here, we aim to evaluate the capacity of commercially available human SMC to maintain their contractile phenotype, and determine if dedifferentiation towards the synthetic phenotype occurs in response to conventional cell culture and passaging without any external biochemical or mechanical stimuli. Lower passage SMC adopted a contractile phenotype marked by a relatively slower proliferation rate, higher expression of proteins of the contractile apparatus and smoothelin, elongated morphology, and reduced deposition of collagen types I and III. As the passage number increased, migratory capacity was enhanced, average cell speed, total distance and net distance travelled increased up to passage 8. Through the various assays, corroborative evidence pinpoints SMC at passage 7 as the transition point between the contractile and synthetic phenotypes, while passage 8 distinctly and consistently exhibited characteristics of synthetic phenotype. This knowledge is particularly useful in selecting SMC of appropriate passage number for the target vascular tissue engineering application, for example, a homeostatic vascular graft for blood vessel replacement versus recreating atherosclerotic blood vessel model in vitro. - Highlights: • Ability of human smooth muscle cells to alter phenotype in culture is evaluated. • Examined the effect of passaging human smooth muscle cells on phenotype. • Phenotype is assessed based on morphology, proliferation, markers, and migration. • Multi-resolution assessment methodology, single-cell and cell-population. • Lower and higher passages than P7 adopted a contractile and synthetic phenotype respectively.

  20. Construction of a fucoidan/laminin functional multilayer to direction vascular cell fate and promotion hemocompatibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, Changrong; Wang, Yan; Su, Hong; Yang, Ping; Huang, Nan; Maitz, Manfred F.; Zhao, Anshan

    2016-01-01

    Surface biofunctional modification of cardiovascular stents is a versatile approach to reduce the adverse effects after implantation. In this work, a novel multifunctional coating was fabricated by coimmobilization of the sulfated polysaccharide of brown algae fucoidan and laminin to biomimic the vascular intimal conditions in order to support rapid endothelialization, prevent restenosis and improve hemocompatibility. The surface properties of the coating such as hydrophilicity, bonding density of biomolecules and stability were evaluated and optimized. According to the biocompatibility tests, the fucoidan/laminin multilayer coated surface displayed less platelet adhesion with favorable anticoagulant property. In addition, the fucoidan/laminin complex showed function to selectively regulate vascular cells growth behavior. The proliferation of endothelial cells (ECs) on the fucoidan/laminin biofunctional coating was significantly promoted. For the smooth muscle cells (SMCs), inhibitory effects on cell adhesion and proliferation were observed. In conclusion, the fucoidan/laminin biofunctional coating was successfully fabricated with desirable anticoagulant and endothelialization properties which show a promising application in the vascular devices such as vascular stents or grafts surface modification. - Highlights: • Construction of fucoidan/laminin functional multilayer to biomimic the basement membrane of vascular • The fucoidan/laminin complex demonstrates anti-coagulation property. • The fucoidan/laminin complex can selectively regulate EC and SMC growth behavior to prevent restenosis.

  1. Cortical Cerebral Microinfarcts on 3 Tesla MRI in Patients with Vascular Cognitive Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Doeschka A; van Veluw, Susanne J; Koek, Huiberdina L; Exalto, Lieza G; Biessels, Geert Jan

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral microinfarcts (CMIs) are small ischemic lesions that are a common neuropathological finding in patients with stroke or dementia. CMIs in the cortex can now be detected in vivo on 3 Tesla MRI. To determine the occurrence of CMIs and associated clinical features in patients with possible vascular cognitive impairment (VCI). 182 memory-clinic patients (mean age 71.4±10.6, 55% male) with vascular injury on brain MRI (i.e., possible VCI) underwent a standardized work-up including 3 Tesla MRI and cognitive assessment. A control group consisted of 70 cognitively normal subjects (mean age 70.6±4.7, 60% male). Cortical CMIs and other neuroimaging markers of vascular brain injury were rated according to established criteria. Occurrence of CMIs was higher (20%) in patients compared to controls (10%). Among patients, the presence of CMIs was associated with male sex, history of stroke, infarcts, and white matter hyperintensities. CMI presence was also associated with a diagnosis of vascular dementia and reduced performance in multiple cognitive domains. CMIs on 3 Tesla MRI are common in patients with possible VCI and co-occur with imaging markers of small and large vessel disease, likely reflecting a heterogeneous etiology. CMIs are associated with worse cognitive performance, independent of other markers of vascular brain injury.

  2. Construction of a fucoidan/laminin functional multilayer to direction vascular cell fate and promotion hemocompatibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Changrong; Wang, Yan; Su, Hong; Yang, Ping; Huang, Nan [Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials Technology of Ministry of Education, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Maitz, Manfred F. [Leibniz Institute of Polymer Research Dresden, Max Bergmann Center of Biomaterials Dresden, Dresden 01069 (Germany); Zhao, Anshan [Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials Technology of Ministry of Education, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China)

    2016-07-01

    Surface biofunctional modification of cardiovascular stents is a versatile approach to reduce the adverse effects after implantation. In this work, a novel multifunctional coating was fabricated by coimmobilization of the sulfated polysaccharide of brown algae fucoidan and laminin to biomimic the vascular intimal conditions in order to support rapid endothelialization, prevent restenosis and improve hemocompatibility. The surface properties of the coating such as hydrophilicity, bonding density of biomolecules and stability were evaluated and optimized. According to the biocompatibility tests, the fucoidan/laminin multilayer coated surface displayed less platelet adhesion with favorable anticoagulant property. In addition, the fucoidan/laminin complex showed function to selectively regulate vascular cells growth behavior. The proliferation of endothelial cells (ECs) on the fucoidan/laminin biofunctional coating was significantly promoted. For the smooth muscle cells (SMCs), inhibitory effects on cell adhesion and proliferation were observed. In conclusion, the fucoidan/laminin biofunctional coating was successfully fabricated with desirable anticoagulant and endothelialization properties which show a promising application in the vascular devices such as vascular stents or grafts surface modification. - Highlights: • Construction of fucoidan/laminin functional multilayer to biomimic the basement membrane of vascular • The fucoidan/laminin complex demonstrates anti-coagulation property. • The fucoidan/laminin complex can selectively regulate EC and SMC growth behavior to prevent restenosis.

  3. Endovascular Management of Vascular Injury during Transsphenoidal Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Çinar, C.; Bozkaya, H.; Parildar, M.; Oran, I.

    2013-01-01

    Vascular injury is an unusual and serious complication of transsphenoidal surgery. We aimed to define the role of angiography and endovascular treatment in patients with vascular injuries occurring during transsphenoidal surgery.

  4. Vascular effects of a single high salt meal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Abdel Kader Abdel Wahab

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: High salt intake may acutely impair vascular function in different vascular beds independent of the increase of blood pressure. Plasma sodium increase may be one of the underlying mechanisms.

  5. Vascular surgery research in the Gulf Cooperation Council countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Jawas

    2014-04-01

    Conclusion: The quality and quantity of vascular surgery research in the GCC countries should be improved to answer important local questions related to vascular diseases. This needs better strategic planning and more collaboration between various institutions.

  6. Cell sheet engineering using the stromal vascular fraction of adipose tissue as a vascularization strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, M.; Cerqueira, Mariana Teixeira; Santos, T. C.; Marques, Belém Sampaio; Ludovico, Paula; Marques, A. P.; Pirraco, Rogério P.; Reis, R. L.

    2017-01-01

    Current vascularization strategies for Tissue Engineering constructs, in particular cell sheet-based, are limited by time-consuming and expensive endothelial cell isolation and/or by the complexity of using extrinsic growth factors. Herein, we propose an alternative strategy using angiogenic cell sheets (CS) obtained from the stromal vascular fraction (SVF) of adipose tissue that can be incorporated into more complex constructs. Cells from the SVF were cultured in normoxic and hypoxic conditi...

  7. Anti-TNF-α activity of Portulaca oleracea in vascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, An Sook; Kim, Jin Sook; Lee, Yun Jung; Kang, Dae Gill; Lee, Ho Sub

    2012-01-01

    Vascular inflammation plays a key role in the pathogenesis and progression of atherosclerosis, a main complication of diabetes. The present study investigated whether an aqueous extract of Portulaca oleracea (AP) prevents the TNF-α-induced vascular inflammatory process in the human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC). The stimulation of TNF-α induced overexpression of adhesion molecules affects vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1, intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 and E-selectin for example. However, AP significantly suppressed TNF-α-induced over-expression of these adhesion molecules in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, pretreatment with AP dose-dependently reduced an increase of the adhesion of HL-60 cells to TNF-α-induced HUVEC. Furthermore, we observed that stimulation of TNF-α significantly increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. However, pretreatment with AP markedly blocked TNF-α-induced ROS production in a dose-dependent manner. The western blot and immunofluorescence analysis showed that AP inhibited the translocation of p65 NF-κB to the nucleus. In addition, AP suppressed the TNF-α-induced degradation of IκB-α and attenuated the TNF-α-induced NF-κB binding. AP also effectively reduced TNF-α-induced mRNA expressions of monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 and interleukin (IL)-8 in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, AP prevents the vascular inflammatory process through the inhibition of intracellular ROS production and NF-κB activation as well as the reduction of adhesion molecule expression in TNF-α-induced HUVEC. These results suggested that AP might have a potential therapeutic effect by inhibiting the vascular inflammation process in vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis.

  8. Deficiency of superoxide dismutase promotes cerebral vascular hypertrophy and vascular dysfunction in hyperhomocysteinemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjana Dayal

    Full Text Available There is an emerging consensus that hyperhomocysteinemia is an independent risk factor for cerebral vascular disease and that homocysteine-lowering therapy protects from ischemic stroke. However, the mechanisms by which hyperhomocysteinemia produces abnormalities of cerebral vascular structure and function remain largely undefined. Our objective in this study was to define the mechanistic role of superoxide in hyperhomocysteinemia-induced cerebral vascular dysfunction and hypertrophy. Unlike previous studies, our experimental design included a genetic approach to alter superoxide levels by using superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1-deficient mice fed a high methionine/low folate diet to produce hyperhomocysteinemia. In wild-type mice, the hyperhomocysteinemic diet caused elevated superoxide levels and impaired responses to endothelium-dependent vasodilators in cerebral arterioles, and SOD1 deficiency compounded the severity of these effects. The cross-sectional area of the pial arteriolar wall was markedly increased in mice with SOD1 deficiency, and the hyperhomocysteinemic diet sensitized SOD1-deficient mice to this hypertrophic effect. Analysis of individual components of the vascular wall demonstrated a significant increase in the content of smooth muscle and elastin. We conclude that superoxide is a key driver of both cerebral vascular hypertrophy and vasomotor dysfunction in this model of dietary hyperhomocysteinemia. These findings provide insight into the mechanisms by which hyperhomocysteinemia promotes cerebral vascular disease and ischemic stroke.

  9. Using biplanar fluoroscopy to guide radiopaque vascular injections: a new method for vascular imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haley D O'Brien

    Full Text Available Studying vascular anatomy, especially in the context of relationships with hard tissues, is of great interest to biologists. Vascular studies have provided significant insight into physiology, function, phylogenetic relationships, and evolutionary patterns. Injection of resin or latex into the vascular system has been a standard technique for decades. There has been a recent surge in popularity of more modern methods, especially radiopaque latex vascular injection followed by CT scanning and digital "dissection." This technique best displays both blood vessels and bone, and allows injections to be performed on cadaveric specimens. Vascular injection is risky, however, because it is not a standardizable technique, as each specimen is variable with regard to injection pressure and timing. Moreover, it is not possible to view the perfusion of injection medium throughout the vascular system of interest. Both data and rare specimens can therefore be lost due to poor or excessive perfusion. Here, we use biplanar video fluoroscopy as a technique to guide craniovascular radiopaque latex injection. Cadaveric domestic pigs (Sus scrofa domestica and white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus were injected with radiopaque latex under guidance of fluoroscopy. This method was found to enable adjustments, in real-time, to the rate, location, and pressure at which latex is injected in order to avoid data and specimen loss. In addition to visualizing the injection process, this technique can be used to determine flow patterns, and has facilitated the development of consistent markers for complete perfusion.

  10. Vascular thermal adaptation in tumors and normal tissue in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nah, Byung Sik; Choi, Ihl-Bohng; Oh, Won Young; Osborn, James L.; Song, Chang W.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: The vascular thermal adaptation in the R3230 adenocarcinoma, skin and muscle in the legs of Fischer rats was studied. Methods and Materials: The legs of Fischer rats bearing the R3230 AC adenocarcinoma (subcutaneously) were heated once or twice with a water bath, and the blood flow in the tumor, skin and muscle of the legs was measured with the radioactive microsphere method. Results: The blood flow in control R3230 AC tumors was 23.9 ml/100 g/min. The tumor blood flow increased about 1.5 times in 30 min and then markedly decreased upon heating at 44.5 deg. C for 90 min. In the tumors preheated 16 h earlier at 42.5 deg. C for 60 min, reheating at 44.5 deg. C increased the tumor blood flow by 2.5-fold in 30 min. Contrary to the decline in blood flow following an initial increase during the 44.5 deg. C heating without preheating, the tumor blood flow remained elevated throughout the 90 min reheating at 44.5 deg. C. These results indicated that thermal adaptation or thermotolerance developed in the tumor vasculatures after the preheating at 42.5 deg. C for 60 min. The magnitude of vascular thermal adaptation in the tumors 24 h and 48 h after the preheating, as judged from the changes in blood flow, were smaller than that 16 h after the preheating. Heating at 42.5 deg. C for 60 min induced vascular thermal adaptation also in the skin and muscle, which peaked in 48 h and 24 h, respectively, after the heating. Conclusion: Heating at 42.5 deg. C for 1 h induced vascular thermal adaptation in the R3230 AC tumor, skin, and muscle of rats that peaked 16-48 h after the heating. When the tumor blood vessels were thermally adapted, the tumor blood flow increased upon heating at temperatures that would otherwise reduce the tumor blood flow. Such an increase in tumor blood flow may hinder raising the tumor temperature while it may increase tumor oxygenation.

  11. Gap junction protein connexin43 exacerbates lung vascular permeability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J O'Donnell

    Full Text Available Increased vascular permeability causes pulmonary edema that impairs arterial oxygenation and thus contributes to morbidity and mortality associated with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and sepsis. Although components of intercellular adhesive and tight junctions are critical for maintaining the endothelial barrier, there has been limited study of the roles of gap junctions and their component proteins (connexins. Since connexins can modulate inflammatory signaling in other systems, we hypothesized that connexins may also regulate pulmonary endothelial permeability. The relationships between connexins and the permeability response to inflammatory stimuli were studied in cultured human pulmonary endothelial cells. Prolonged treatment with thrombin, lipopolysaccharide, or pathological cyclic stretch increased levels of mRNA and protein for the major connexin, connexin43 (Cx43. Thrombin and lipopolysaccharide both increased intercellular communication assayed by transfer of microinjected Lucifer yellow. Although thrombin decreased transendothelial resistance in these cells, the response was attenuated by pretreatment with the connexin inhibitor carbenoxolone. Additionally, the decreases of transendothelial resistance produced by either thrombin or lipopolysaccharide were attenuated by reducing Cx43 expression by siRNA knockdown. Both carbenoxolone and Cx43 knockdown also abrogated thrombin-induced phosphorylation of myosin light chain. Taken together, these data suggest that increased lung vascular permeability induced by inflammatory conditions may be amplified via increased expression of Cx43 and intercellular communication among pulmonary endothelial cells.

  12. Vascular adrenergic receptor responses in skeletal muscle in myotonic dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechler, F.; Mastaglia, F.L.

    1981-01-01

    The pharmacological responses of vascular adrenergic receptors to intravenously administered epinephrine, phentolamine, and propranolol were assessed by measuring muscle blood flow (MBF) changes in the tibialis anterior muscle using the xenon 133 clearance technique and were compared in 8 normal subjects and 11 patients with myotonic dystrophy. In cases with advanced involvement of the muscle, the resting MBF was reduced and was not significantly altered by epinephrine before or after alpha- or beta-receptor blockade. In patients in whom the tibialis anterior muscle was normal or only minimally affected clinically, a paradoxical reduction in the epinephrine-induced increase in MBF was found after alpha blockade by phentolamine, and the epinephrine-induced MBF increase was not completely blocked by propranolol as in the normal subjects. These findings point to functional alteration in the properties of vascular adrenergic receptors in muscle in myotonic dystrophy. While this may be another manifestation of a widespread cell membrane defect in the disease, the possibility that the changes are secondary to the myotonic state cannot be excluded

  13. Joint Global War on Terror (GWOT) Vascular Injury Study 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    acquired in Iraq and Afghanistan, Society for Trauma Nurse, 2-4 April 2014, poster presentation o Vascular discharge education and follow-up care...eventual quality of limb and psychological recovery or well-being. 15. SUBJECT TERMS extremity vascular injury, extremity, vascular injury, vascular... psychological recovery or well-being. Finally, this program aims to characterize and compare the physical and emotional burden in large cohorts of US

  14. Effects of Mild Blast Traumatic Brain Injury on Cerebral Vascular, Histopathological, and Behavioral Outcomes in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yaping; Deyo, Donald; Parsley, Margaret A.; Hawkins, Bridget E.; Prough, Donald S.; DeWitt, Douglas S.

    2018-01-01

    Abstract To determine the effects of mild blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI), several groups of rats were subjected to blast injury or sham injury in a compressed air-driven shock tube. The effects of bTBI on relative cerebral perfusion (laser Doppler flowmetry [LDF]), and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) cerebral vascular resistance were measured for 2 h post-bTBI. Dilator responses to reduced intravascular pressure were measured in isolated middle cerebral arterial (MCA) segments, ex vivo, 30 and 60 min post-bTBI. Neuronal injury was assessed (Fluoro-Jade C [FJC]) 24 and 48 h post-bTBI. Neurological outcomes (beam balance and walking tests) and working memory (Morris water maze [MWM]) were assessed 2 weeks post-bTBI. Because impact TBI (i.e., non-blast TBI) is often associated with reduced cerebral perfusion and impaired cerebrovascular function in part because of the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species such as peroxynitrite (ONOO−), the effects of the administration of the ONOO− scavenger, penicillamine methyl ester (PenME), on cerebral perfusion and cerebral vascular resistance were measured for 2 h post-bTBI. Mild bTBI resulted in reduced relative cerebral perfusion and MCA dilator responses to reduced intravascular pressure, increases in cerebral vascular resistance and in the numbers of FJC-positive cells in the brain, and significantly impaired working memory. PenME administration resulted in significant reductions in cerebral vascular resistance and a trend toward increased cerebral perfusion, suggesting that ONOO− may contribute to blast-induced cerebral vascular dysfunction. PMID:29160141

  15. Phenylephrine Decreases Vascular Tension in Goat Arteries in Specific Circumstances.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renu R Raj

    Full Text Available Phenylephrine (PE causes vasoconstriction through alpha adrenergic receptors. PE-induced vasodilatation has also been reported earlier in pre-constricted vessels. Here we demonstrate in spiral strips of goat arteries that addition of PE can decrease tone even from base-line levels (i.e. not pre-constricted and show that this process requires nitric oxide (NO and alpha adrenergic stimulation, but is cGMP-independent. Under control conditions, PE caused vasoconstriction, but under conditions where NO levels are higher, as with L-Arginine or sodium nitroprusside, PE decreased vessel tension. L-Arginine/PE combination was not able to decrease tension when alpha adrenoceptors were blocked with Phentolamine or endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS was blocked with Nω-Nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA. Propranolol, a beta blocker, was unable to prevent the reduction in tension by the L-Arginine/PE combination. Adrenaline and noradrenaline (and not isoproterenol also reduced vessel tension in the presence of L-Arginine. Even when NO levels were not enhanced, relieving NO from having to stimulate the enzyme soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC (either by using sGC blockers, namely ODQ or methylene blue, or by enhancing cGMP levels (with sildenafil which by negative feedback probably inhibits sGC led to PE-induced reduction of vascular tension. PMA-phorbol myristate acetate-an agonist which stimulates Protein Kinase C was able to prevent the ability of PE to reduce vascular tension in a high NO environment. Our conclusion is that PE reduces vascular tension through alpha adrenoceptors if there is excess NO availability to activate a putative pathway. Though the reduction of vessel tone by PE is dependent on NO, it is independent of cGMP. Prior treatment with PMA or PE itself can prevent further PE-induced reduction of tension in a high NO environment. The results here suggest, counter-intuitively, that alpha blockers may be of help in the treatment of septic shock

  16. Childhood Vascular Tumors Treatment (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childhood vascular tumors form from cells that make blood vessels or lymph vessels. They can be benign (not cancer) or malignant (cancer). Get information about the symptoms, tests to diagnose, prognosis, and treatment of the most common type of vascular tumor, infantile hemangioma, and other vascular tumors in this expert-reviewed summary.

  17. The evolution of development of vascular cambia and secondary growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew Groover; Rachel Spicer

    2010-01-01

    Secondary growth from vascular cambia results in radial, woody growth of stems. The innovation of secondary vascular development during plant evolution allowed the production of novel plant forms ranging from massive forest trees to flexible, woody lianas. We present examples of the extensive phylogenetic variation in secondary vascular growth and discuss current...

  18. Development of the Australasian vascular surgical audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke, Bernie M; Beiles, Charles Barry; Thomson, Ian A; Grigg, Michael J; Fitridge, Rob

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the development of the Australasian Vascular Audit that was created to unify audit activities under the umbrella of the Australian and New Zealand Society for Vascular Surgery as a Web-based application. Constitutional change in late 2008 deemed participation in this audit compulsory for Society members. The Web-based application was developed and tested during 2009. Data for all open vascular surgery and for all endovascular procedures are collected at two points in the admission episode: at the time of operation and at discharge, and entered into the application. Data are analyzed to produce risk-adjusted outcomes. An algorithm has been developed to deal with outliers according to natural justice and to comply with the requirements of regulatory bodies. The Audit is protected by legislated privilege and is officially endorsed and indemnified by the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons. Confidentiality of surgeons and patients alike is ensured by a legally protected coding system and computer encryption system. Validation is by a verification process of 5% of members per year who are randomly selected. The application is completely funded by the Society. Data entry commenced on January 1, 2010. Over 40,000 vascular procedures were entered in the first year. The Audit application allows instantaneous on-line access to individual data and to deidentified group data and specific reports. It also allows real-time instantaneous production of log books for vascular trainees. The Audit has already gained recognition in the Australasian public arena during its first year of operation as an important benchmark of correct professional surgical behavior. Compliance has been extremely high in public hospitals but less so in private hospitals such that only 60% of members received a certificate of complete participation at the end of its first year of operation. An Internet-based compulsory audit of complete surgical practice is

  19. Management of vascular trauma from dog bites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akingba, A George; Robinson, Eric A; Jester, Andrea L; Rapp, Brian M; Tsai, Anthony; Motaganahalli, Raghu L; Dalsing, Michael C; Murphy, Michael P

    2013-11-01

    Vascular trauma from large-dog bites present with a combination of crush and lacerating injuries to the vessel, as well as significant adjacent soft tissue injury and a high potential for wound complications. This retrospective case series evaluates our 15 years of experience in managing this uncommonly seen injury into suggested treatment recommendations. From our database, 371 adult patients presented with dog bites between July 1997 and June 2012. Twenty (5.4%) of those patients had vascular injuries requiring surgical intervention. Patient demographics, anatomic location of injury, clinical presentation, imaging modality, method of repair, and complication rates were reviewed to assess efficacy in preserving limb function. Pediatric patients were managed at the regional children's hospital and, therefore, not included in this study. Among the 20 surgically treated vascular injuries, there were 13 arterial-only injuries, two venous-only injuries, and five combination arterial and venous injuries. Seventeen patients (85%) had upper extremity injuries; three patients had lower extremity injuries (15%). The axillobrachial artery was the most commonly injured single vessel (n = 9/20; 45%), followed by the radial artery (n = 4/20; 20%). Surgical repair of vascular injuries consisted of resection and primary anastomosis (four), interposition bypass of artery with autogenous vein (13), and ligation (two), with (one) being a combination of bypass and ligation. All patients had debridement of devitalized tissue combined with pulse lavage irrigation and perioperative antibiotics. Associated injuries requiring repair included muscle and skin (n = 10/20; 50%), bone (n = 1/20; 5%), nerve (n = 1/20; 5%), and combinations of the three (n = 5/20; 25%). Postoperative antibiotic therapy was administered for 14.7 ± 8.2 days in all 20 patients. Four patients (20%) developed postoperative wound infections, although this did not compromise their vascular repair. Of the patients

  20. Hypertonic saline reduces inflammation and enhances the resolution of oleic acid induced acute lung injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costello Joseph F

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypertonic saline (HTS reduces the severity of lung injury in ischemia-reperfusion, endotoxin-induced and ventilation-induced lung injury. However, the potential for HTS to modulate the resolution of lung injury is not known. We investigated the potential for hypertonic saline to modulate the evolution and resolution of oleic acid induced lung injury. Methods Adult male Sprague Dawley rats were used in all experiments. Series 1 examined the potential for HTS to reduce the severity of evolving oleic acid (OA induced acute lung injury. Following intravenous OA administration, animals were randomized to receive isotonic (Control, n = 12 or hypertonic saline (HTS, n = 12, and the extent of lung injury assessed after 6 hours. Series 2 examined the potential for HTS to enhance the resolution of oleic acid (OA induced acute lung injury. Following intravenous OA administration, animals were randomized to receive isotonic (Control, n = 6 or hypertonic saline (HTS, n = 6, and the extent of lung injury assessed after 6 hours. Results In Series I, HTS significantly reduced bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL neutrophil count compared to Control [61.5 ± 9.08 versus 102.6 ± 11.89 × 103 cells.ml-1]. However, there were no between group differences with regard to: A-a O2 gradient [11.9 ± 0.5 vs. 12.0 ± 0.5 KPa]; arterial PO2; static lung compliance, or histologic injury. In contrast, in Series 2, hypertonic saline significantly reduced histologic injury and reduced BAL neutrophil count [24.5 ± 5.9 versus 46.8 ± 4.4 × 103 cells.ml-1], and interleukin-6 levels [681.9 ± 190.4 versus 1365.7 ± 246.8 pg.ml-1]. Conclusion These findings demonstrate, for the first time, the potential for HTS to reduce pulmonary inflammation and enhance the resolution of oleic acid induced lung injury.

  1. Cholesterol is necessary both for the toxic effect of Abeta peptides on vascular smooth muscle cells and for Abeta binding to vascular smooth muscle cell membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subasinghe, Supundi; Unabia, Sharon; Barrow, Colin J; Mok, Su San; Aguilar, Marie-Isabel; Small, David H

    2003-02-01

    Accumulation of beta amyloid (Abeta) in the brain is central to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Abeta can bind to membrane lipids and this binding may have detrimental effects on cell function. In this study, surface plasmon resonance technology was used to study Abeta binding to membranes. Abeta peptides bound to synthetic lipid mixtures and to an intact plasma membrane preparation isolated from vascular smooth muscle cells. Abeta peptides were also toxic to vascular smooth muscle cells. There was a good correlation between the toxic effect of Abeta peptides and their membrane binding. 'Ageing' the Abeta peptides by incubation for 5 days increased the proportion of oligomeric species, and also increased toxicity and the amount of binding to lipids. The toxicities of various Abeta analogs correlated with their lipid binding. Significantly, binding was influenced by the concentration of cholesterol in the lipid mixture. Reduction of cholesterol in vascular smooth muscle cells not only reduced the binding of Abeta to purified plasma membrane preparations but also reduced Abeta toxicity. The results support the view that Abeta toxicity is a direct consequence of binding to lipids in the membrane. Reduction of membrane cholesterol using cholesterol-lowering drugs may be of therapeutic benefit because it reduces Abeta-membrane binding.

  2. Multinephron dynamics on the renal vascular network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, Donald J; Wexler, Anthony S; Brazhe, Alexey

    2012-01-01

    Tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) and the myogenic mechanism combine in each nephron to regulate blood flow and glomerular filtration rate. Both mechanisms are non-linear, generate self-sustained oscillations, and interact as their signals converge on arteriolar smooth muscle, forming a regulatory...... clusters. In-phase synchronization predominated among nephrons separated by 1 or 3 vascular nodes, and anti-phase synchronization for 5 or 7 nodes of separation. Nephron dynamics were irregular and contained low frequency fluctuations. Results are consistent with simultaneous blood flow measurements...... of both mechanisms in the regulatory ensemble, to examine the effects of network structure on nephron synchronization. Symmetry, as a property of a network, facilitates synchronization. Nephrons received blood from a symmetric electrically conductive vascular tree. Symmetry was created by using identical...

  3. Vascular anatomy of the spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thron, A.K.

    1988-01-01

    The book summarizes the anatomic guidelines of external blood supply to the spinal cord. The basic principles of arterial supply and venous drainage are illustrated by explicit schemes for quick orientation. In the first part of the book, systematic radiologic-anatomic investigations of the superficial and deep vessels of all segments of the spinal cord are introduced. The microvascular morphology is portrayed by numerous microradiographic sections in all three dimensions without overshadowing. The three-dimensional representation of the vascular architecture illustrates elementary outlines and details of arterial territories, anastomotic cross-linking as well as the capillary system, particularly the hitherto unknown structure of the medullary venous system with its functionally important anastomoses and varying regional structures. These often now radiologic-anatomic findings are discussed as to their functional and pathophysiologic impact and constitute the basic on which to improve one's understanding of vascular syndromes of the spinal cord

  4. Features and selection of vascular access devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansivero, Gail Egan

    2010-05-01

    To review venous anatomy and physiology, discuss assessment parameters before vascular access device (VAD) placement, and review VAD options. Journal articles, personal experience. A number of VAD options are available in clinical practice. Access planning should include comprehensive assessment, with attention to patient participation in the planning and selection process. Careful consideration should be given to long-term access needs and preservation of access sites. Oncology nurses are uniquely suited to perform a key role in VAD planning and placement. With knowledge of infusion therapy, anatomy and physiology, device options, and community resources, nurses can be key leaders in preserving vascular access and improving the safety and comfort of infusion therapy. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Ample spectrum of vascular hepatic disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camacho, Juan C; Marquez Adriana; Romero, Javier; Aguirre Diego

    2010-01-01

    Hepatic vascular diseases (HVD) are a broad spectrum of entities of low prevalence but with different clinical manifestations that may even lead to death. Its early detection and timely treatment may change the prognosis. Diagnostic imaging plays a key role and imaging findings may be typical. However, in most cases, radiologists must take into account a wide range of differential diagnosis. Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen is one of the most useful tools for the diagnosis of HVD taking also into account the value of other imaging methods such as Doppler Ultrasound and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). HVD can be classified according to the compromised vascular structure and can be divided into venous, portal, arterial, sinusoidal and others disorders. The objective of this review is to describe the most common presentation HVD. The major imaging findings and differential diagnosis recognizing its correlation with the pathophysiological mechanisms.

  6. Cocoa, blood pressure, and vascular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudano, Isabella; Flammer, Andreas J; Roas, Susanne; Enseleit, Frank; Ruschitzka, Frank; Corti, Roberto; Noll, Georg

    2012-08-01

    The consumption of a high amount of fruits and vegetables was found to be associated with a lower risk of coronary heart disease and stroke. Epidemiologically, a similar relationship has been found with cocoa, a naturally polyphenol-rich food. Obviously, double blind randomized studies are difficult to perform with cocoa and chocolate, respectively. However, intervention studies strongly suggest that cocoa has several beneficial effects on cardiovascular health, including the lowering of blood pressure, the improvement of vascular function and glucose metabolism, and the reduction of platelet aggregation and adhesion. Several potential mechanisms through which cocoa might exert its positive effects have been proposed, among them activation of nitric oxide synthase, increased bioavailability of nitric oxide as well as antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory properties. It is the aim of this review to summarize the findings of cocoa and chocolate on blood pressure and vascular function.

  7. Vascularization of soft tissue engineering constructs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pimentel Carletto, Rodrigo

    nanotechnology-based paradigm for engineering vascularised liver tissue for transplantation”) and the Danish National Research Foundation and Villum Foundation’s Center for Intelligent Drug delivery and sensing Using microcontainers and Nanomechanics (Danish National Research Foundation (DNRF122).......Vascularization is recognized to be the biggest challenge for the fabrication of tissues and finally, organs in vitro. So far, several fabrication techniques have been proposed to create a perfusable vasculature within hydrogels, however, the vascularization and perfusion of hydrogels...... with mechanical properties in the range of soft tissues has not been fully achieved. My project focused on the fabrication and the active perfusion of hydrogel constructs with multi-dimensional vasculature and controlled mechanical properties targeting soft tissues. Specifically, the initial part of the research...

  8. Noninvasive studies of peripheral vascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, J.S.T.

    1987-01-01

    Plethysmography probably is the oldest method for measuring blood flow. In this method, measurements are made of changes in volume of an organ or region of tissue. In the modern practice of vascular surgery, the use of plethysmography has been expanded to include detection of not only arterial occlusive disease but also carotid artery disease and venous problems. Several types of plethysmographs are now available for clinical use in the evaluation of arterial occlusions. These are volume, strain-gauge, and photoelectric plethysmographs. The water-filled volume recorder, popular in the early use of plethysmography, is now obsolete and has been replaced by the air-filled volume plethysmograph, notably, the pulse-volume recorder. For clinical application, the newer plethysmographs, such as the strain-gauge, photopletyhsmograph, and pulse-volume recorder, are now standard equipment in many vascular laboratories. They are discussed in this article

  9. Biophysical Regulation of Vascular Differentiation and Assembly

    CERN Document Server

    Gerecht, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    The ability to grow stem cells in the laboratory and to guide their maturation to functional cells allows us to study the underlying mechanisms that govern vasculature differentiation and assembly in health and disease. Accumulating evidence suggests that early stages of vascular growth are exquisitely tuned by biophysical cues from the microenvironment, yet the scientific understanding of such cellular environments is still in its infancy. Comprehending these processes sufficiently to manipulate them would pave the way to controlling blood vessel growth in therapeutic applications. This book assembles the works and views of experts from various disciplines to provide a unique perspective on how different aspects of its microenvironment regulate the differentiation and assembly of the vasculature. In particular, it describes recent efforts to exploit modern engineering techniques to study and manipulate various biophysical cues. Biophysical Regulation of Vascular Differentiation and Assembly provides an inter...

  10. Vascular endothelium receptors and transduction mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Gillis, C; Ryan, Una; Proceedings of the Advanced Studies Institute on "Vascular Endothelium: Receptors and Transduction Mechanisms"

    1989-01-01

    Beyond their obvious role of a barrier between blood and tissue, vascular endothelial cells are now firmly established as active and essential participants in a host of crucial physiological and pathophysiological functions. Probably the two most important factors responsible for promoting the current knowledge of endothelial functions are 1) observations in the late sixties-early seventies that many non-ventilatory properties of the lung could be attributed to the pulmonary endothelium and 2) the establishment, in the early and mid-seventies of procedures for routine culture of vascular endothelial cells. Many of these endothelial functions require the presence of receptors on the surface of the plasma membrane. There is now evidence for the existence among others of muscarinic, a-and /3-adrenergic, purine, insulin, histamine, bradykinin, lipoprotein, thrombin, paf, fibronectin, vitronectin, interleukin and albumin receptors. For some of these ligands, there is evidence only for the existence of endothelial ...

  11. Vascular anomalies of the cerebellopontine angle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papanagiotou, P.; Grunwald, I.Q.; Politi, M.; Struffert, T.; Ahlhelm, F.; Reith, W.

    2006-01-01

    Vascular anomalies of the cerebellopontine angle are rare compared to tumors in this area. Irritation of the trigeminal, facial, or vestibulocochlear nerve may cause trigeminal neuralgia, hemifacial spasm and vertigo, or tinnitus accordingly. Vessel loops in the cerebellopontine cisterns may cause compression at the root entry or exit zone of the cranial nerves V, VII, and VIII, a phenomenon which is called ''vascular loop syndrome.'' Megadolichobasilar artery and aneurysms of the vertebrobasilar system can also lead to dislocation and compression of the cranial nerves and brain stem. Three-dimensional CISS MR imaging and MR angiography are useful in the detection of neurovascular compression. Microvascular decompression is an effective surgical procedure in the management of compression syndromes of the cranial nerves V, VII, and VIII. (orig.) [de

  12. Molecular parallels between neural and vascular development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichmann, Anne; Thomas, Jean-Léon

    2013-01-01

    The human central nervous system (CNS) features a network of ~400 miles of blood vessels that receives >20% of the body's cardiac output and uses most of its blood glucose. Many human diseases, including stroke, retinopathy, and cancer, are associated with the biology of CNS blood vessels. These vessels originate from extrinsic cell populations, including endothelial cells and pericytes that colonize the CNS and interact with glia and neurons to establish the blood-brain barrier and control cerebrovascular exchanges. Neurovascular interactions also play important roles in adult neurogenic niches, which harbor a unique population of neural stem cells that are intimately associated with blood vessels. We here review the cellular and molecular mechanisms required to establish the CNS vascular network, with a special focus on neurovascular interactions and the functions of vascular endothelial growth factors.

  13. Treatment of hemobilia by transcatheter vascular occlusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaughan, R.; Roesch, J.; Keller, F.S.; Antonovic, R.; Veterans Administration Medical Center, Portland, OR

    1984-01-01

    Four cases of hemobilia treated by transcatheter arterial occlusion are presented and reviewed with 30 similar cases reported in the literature. Transcatheter vascular occlusion successfully controlled hemorrhage in all 34 patients. No obvious liver parenchymal damage appeared in 26 patients; transient elevation of liver enzymes occurred in 6 patients (18%) including one in our series; two of the patients reviewed died of acute hepatic insufficiency following nonselective hepatic artery embolization. Hemobilia should be considered when gastrointestinal hemorrhage occurs after abdominal trauma, liver biopsy or other manipulative liver procedures. Hepatic angiography establishes the diagnosis and selective vascular occlusion is the treatment of choice for control of intractable or recurrent hemorrhage. Techniques and precautions for the diagnosis and transcatheter therapy of hemobilia are discussed. (orig.)

  14. Prediction of Major Vascular Events after Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ovbiagele, Bruce; Goldstein, Larry B.; Amarenco, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Identifying patients with recent stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) at high risk of major vascular events (MVEs; stroke, myocardial infarction, or vascular death) may help optimize the intensity of secondary preventive interventions. We evaluated the relationships between...... the baseline Framingham Coronary Risk Score (FCRS) and a novel risk prediction model and with the occurrence of MVEs after stroke or TIA in subjects enrolled in the Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Level (SPARCL) trial. METHODS: Data from the 4731 subjects enrolled in the SPARCL study...... were analyzed. Hazard ratios (HRs) from Cox regression models were used to determine the risk of subsequent MVEs based on the FCRS predicting 20% or more 10-year coronary heart disease risk. The novel risk model was derived based on multivariable modeling with backward selection. Model discrimination...

  15. Vascular lesions of the vocal fold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gökcan, Kürşat Mustafa; Dursun, Gürsel

    2009-04-01

    The aim of the study was to present symptoms, laryngological findings, clinical course, management modalities, and consequences of vascular lesions of vocal fold. This study examined 162 patients, the majority professional voice users, with vascular lesions regarding their presenting symptoms, laryngological findings, clinical courses and treatment results. The most common complaint was sudden hoarseness with hemorrhagic polyp. Microlaryngoscopic surgery was performed in 108 cases and the main indication of surgery was the presence of vocal fold mass or development of vocal polyp during clinical course. Cold microsurgery was utilized for removal of vocal fold masses and feeding vessels cauterized using low power, pulsed CO(2) laser. Acoustic analysis of patients revealed a significant improvement of jitter, shimmer and harmonics/noise ratio values after treatment. Depending on our clinical findings, we propose treatment algorithm where voice rest and behavioral therapy is the integral part and indications of surgery are individualized for each patient.

  16. Improved vascularization of planar membrane diffusion devices following continuous infusion of vascular endothelial growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, N; Steil, G M; Colton, C K; Bonner-Weir, S; Weir, G C

    2000-01-01

    Improving blood vessel formation around an immunobarrier device should improve the survival of the encapsulated tissue. In the present study we investigated the formation of new blood vessels around a planar membrane diffusion device (the Baxter Theracyte System) undergoing a continuous infusion of vascular endothelial growth factor through the membranes and into the surrounding tissue. Each device (20 microl) had both an inner immunoisolation membrane and an outer vascularizing membrane. Human recombinant vascular endothelial growth factor-165 was infused at 100 ng/day (low dose: n = 6) and 500 ng/day (high dose: n = 7) for 10 days into devices implanted s.c. in Sprague-Dawley rats; noninfused devices transplanted for an identical period were used as controls (n = 5). Two days following the termination of VEGF infusion, devices were loaded with 20 microl of Lispro insulin (1 U/kg) and the kinetics of insulin release from the lumen of the device was assessed. Devices were then explanted and the number of blood vessels (capillary and noncapillary) was quantified using morphometry. High-dose vascular endothelial growth factor infusion resulted in two- to threefold more blood vessels around the device than that obtained with the noninfused devices and devices infused with low-dose vascular endothelial growth factor. This increase in the number of blood vessels was accompanied by a modest increase in insulin diffusion from the device in the high-dose vascular endothelial growth factor infusion group. We conclude that vascular endothelial growth factor can be used to improve blood vessel formation adjacent to planar membrane diffusion devices.

  17. In Vivo FRET Imaging of Tumor Endothelial Cells Highlights a Role of Low PKA Activity in Vascular Hyperpermeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Fumio; Kamioka, Yuji; Yano, Tetsuya; Matsuda, Michiyuki

    2016-09-15

    Vascular hyperpermeability is a pathological hallmark of cancer. Previous in vitro studies have elucidated roles of various signaling molecules in vascular hyperpermeability; however, the activities of such signaling molecules have not been examined in live tumor tissues for technical reasons. Here, by in vivo two-photon excitation microscopy with transgenic mice expressing biosensors based on Förster resonance energy transfer, we examined the activity of protein kinase A (PKA), which maintains endothelial barrier function. The level of PKA activity was significantly lower in the intratumoral endothelial cells than the subcutaneous endothelial cells. PKA activation with a cAMP analogue alleviated the tumor vascular hyperpermeability, suggesting that the low PKA activity in the endothelial cells may be responsible for the tumor-tissue hyperpermeability. Because the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor is a canonical inducer of vascular hyperpermeability and a molecular target of anticancer drugs, we examined the causality between VEGF receptor activity and the PKA activity. Motesanib, a kinase inhibitor for VEGF receptor, activated tumor endothelial PKA and reduced the vascular permeability in the tumor. Conversely, subcutaneous injection of VEGF decreased endothelial PKA activity and induced hyperpermeability of subcutaneous blood vessels. Notably, in cultured human umbilical vascular endothelial cells, VEGF activated PKA rather than decreasing its activity, highlighting the remarkable difference between its actions in vitro and in vivo These data suggested that the VEGF receptor signaling pathway increases vascular permeability, at least in part, by reducing endothelial PKA activity in the live tumor tissue. Cancer Res; 76(18); 5266-76. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. NF1 Signal Transduction and Vascular Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    microenvironment that promotes much of the pathology associated with the disease . Moreover we hypothesize that a mechanistic consequence of the loss...obliteration of the normal red pulp architecture. In addition, we found significant peri-aveolar and peri-vascular inflammatory infiltrates in the lung...the mouse model of NF1 disease in the endothelium we proposed and have done experiments investigating the loss of endothelial NF1 in the adult

  19. Role of endovascular treatment in vascular injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahir, M.M.; Haq, T.U.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate retrospectively the results, complications and follow-up of patients after endovascular treatment of vascular injuries. Methods: Fifty transcatheter embolisation procedures (TCE) were performed in 46 patients between 1999 and 2008 at the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi. Injuries in 14 (30.4%) patients were due to road traffic accident; iatrogenic in 13 (28%); accidental in 6 (13%). Firearms, bomb blasts and earthquake contributed to injuries in 8(17%), 4(8.8%) and 1(2.2%) patients respectively. All patients underwent angiography and had evidence of either active haemorrhage, pseudo-aneurysm, abnormal vascularity or arteriovenous fistula. Follow-up ranged from 1 day to 6 years with mean of 10.5 months. Medical record files, lab results and imaging reports were utilised for the study. Procedure was declared as technically successful when there was cessation of extravasation, occlusion of fistula or exclusion of pseudo-aneurysm in the post-embolisation angiograms. Treatment was deemed clinically successful if there was resolution of the indication for which the procedure was done. Results: Transcatheter embolisation was technically successful in occluding vascular lesions in all 46 (100%) patients. Lesions recurred in 4 (9%) patients who underwent initially successful TCE. These patients were treated effectively with repeated TCE. Three patients died during the same hospital stay and 3 patients died after being discharged from the hospital. All these patients were treated successfully with TCE and had factors other then TCE contributing to their mortality. Conclusion: Transcatheter embolisation for vascular injuries was found to be a satisfactory procedure, with low morbidity and mortality rates. (author)

  20. Vascular access: the impact of ultrasonography

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Carlos Eduardo Saldanha

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vascular punctures are often necessary in critically ill patients. They are secure, but not free of complications. Ultrasonography enhances safety of the procedure by decreasing puncture attempts, complications and costs. This study reviews important publications and the puncture technique using ultrasound, bringing part of the experience of the intensive care unit of the Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo (SP), Brazil, and discussing issues that should be considered in future studies. PMID:28076607

  1. Role of vascular physiology in hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, C.W.

    1987-01-01

    The rate of blood supply to tumors significantly varies depending on the tumor type, site of tumor growth, and the stage of tumor growth. Even in the same tumor, blood flow is rather heterogeneous. The peripheral area of the tumors where the tissue pressure is relatively low is usually well perfused. Blood flow in the tumors may or may not be greater than that in the adjacent normal tissues. The response of newly formed tumor blood vessels to external stress, such as heat, it different from that in the normal tissues. Blood flow in the experimental rodent tumors initially increases up to twofold of control when heated at relatively low temperatures but tends to decrease when heated at temperatures above 42 0 -43 0 C. On the contrary, blood flow in the skin and muscle of rodents increases up to 20-fold before vascular damage occurs on heating at 43 0 -45 0 C. It thus appears that the vascular beds in tumors are more vulnerable to heat than those in normal tissues. Because of the large increase in blood flow in normal tissue on heating, heat dissipation by blood flow is usually greater in normal tissues than that in tumors during heating. Consequently, the temperature of tumors may rise higher than that in normal tissues. Preferential heating of tumors, however, may not be achieved all the time because the relative blood perfusion in some tumors or in parts of a tumor remains greater than that in the surrounding normal tissues. The intrinsically acidic intratumor environment becomes further acidic on heating owing to an increase in the synthesis of acidic metabolites and retarded removal of them as a result of heat-induced vascular damage. The intratumor environment also becomes hypoxic as a result of retardation of blood flow and vascular damage after heating

  2. Analgesics and sedatives in vascular interventionist radiologic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregorio, M.A. de; Opta, J.M.; Pulido, J.M.; Encarnacion, C.E.; Arino, I., Fernandez, J.A.; Alfonso, E.R.

    1993-01-01

    Interventionist radiology routinely requires the use of different drugs (analgesics and sedatives) in the course of a procedure. Aside from their therapeutic action, these drugs can produce secondary or undesirable effects, making necessary an in-depth knowledge of them to assure their safe and efficient management. The aim of this work is to provide the vascular interventionist radiologist with additional information on the management of those drugs that contribute to minimizing patient discomfort and pain in interventionist procedures. Author

  3. Robotic vascular resections during Whipple procedure

    OpenAIRE

    Allan, Bassan J.; Novak, Stephanie M.; Hogg, Melissa E.; Zeh, Herbert J.

    2018-01-01

    Indications for resection of pancreatic cancers have evolved to include selected patients with involvement of peri-pancreatic vascular structures. Open Whipple procedures have been the standard approach for patients requiring reconstruction of the portal vein (PV) or superior mesenteric vein (SMV). Recently, high-volume centers are performing minimally invasive Whipple procedures with portovenous resections. Our institution has performed seventy robotic Whipple procedures with concomitant vas...

  4. Endothelial microparticles: Sophisticated vesicles modulating vascular function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Anne M; Edelberg, Jay; Jonas, Rebecca; Rogers, Wade T; Moore, Jonni S; Syed, Wajihuddin; Mohler, Emile R

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial microparticles (EMPs) belong to a family of extracellular vesicles that are dynamic, mobile, biological effectors capable of mediating vascular physiology and function. The release of EMPs can impart autocrine and paracrine effects on target cells through surface interaction, cellular fusion, and, possibly, the delivery of intra-vesicular cargo. A greater understanding of the formation, composition, and function of EMPs will broaden our understanding of endothelial communication and may expose new pathways amenable for therapeutic manipulation. PMID:23892447

  5. New molecular probes of vascular inflammation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular Cardiovascular Imaging, Westfälische Wilhelms University Münster, Münster, (Germany))" data-affiliation=" (Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Münster, Münster, and DFG CRC 656 Molecular Cardiovascular Imaging, Westfälische Wilhelms University Münster, Münster, (Germany))" >VRACHIMIS, Alexis; HONOLD, Lisa; Cells in Motion Cluster of Excellence, Westfälische Wilhelms University Münster, Münster, (Germany))" data-affiliation=" (European Institute of Molecular Imaging, Westfälische Wilhelms University Münster, Münster, and DFG EXC 1003 Cells in Motion Cluster of Excellence, Westfälische Wilhelms University Münster, Münster, (Germany))" >FAUST, Andreas; Cells in Motion Cluster of Excellence, Westfälische Wilhelms University Münster, Münster, (Germany))" data-affiliation=" (European Institute of Molecular Imaging, Westfälische Wilhelms University Münster, Münster, and DFG EXC 1003 Cells in Motion Cluster of Excellence, Westfälische Wilhelms University Münster, Münster, (Germany))" >HERMANN, Sven; SCHÄFERS, Michael

    2016-01-01

    New molecular imaging approaches featuring the assessment of inflammatory processes in the vascular wall on top of existing anatomic and functional vessel imaging procedures could emerge as decisive tools for the understanding and prevention of cardiovascular events. In this respect imaging approaches addressing specific molecular and cellular targets in atherosclerosis are of high interest. This review summarizes the rationale and current status of nuclear imaging probes which possess high translational potential.

  6. Obesity-induced vascular dysfunction and arterial stiffening requires endothelial cell arginase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatta, Anil; Yao, Lin; Xu, Zhimin; Toque, Haroldo A; Chen, Jijun; Atawia, Reem T; Fouda, Abdelrahman Y; Bagi, Zsolt; Lucas, Rudolf; Caldwell, Ruth B; Caldwell, Robert W

    2017-11-01

    Elevation of arginase activity has been linked to vascular dysfunction in diabetes and hypertension by a mechanism involving decreased nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability due to L-arginine depletion. Excessive arginase activity also can drive L-arginine metabolism towards the production of ornithine, polyamines, and proline, promoting proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells and collagen formation, leading to perivascular fibrosis. We hypothesized that there is a specific involvement of arginase 1 expression within the vascular endothelial cells in this pathology. To test this proposition, we used models of type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Studies were performed using wild type (WT), endothelial-specific arginase 1 knockout (EC-A1-/-) and littermate controls(A1con) mice fed high fat-high sucrose (HFHS) or normal diet (ND) for 6 months and isolated vessels exposed to palmitate-high glucose (PA/HG) media. Some WT mice or isolated vessels were treated with an arginase inhibitor, ABH [2-(S)-amino-6-boronohexanoic acid. In WT mice, the HFHS diet promoted increases in body weight, fasting blood glucose, and post-prandial insulin levels along with arterial stiffening and fibrosis, elevated blood pressure, decreased plasma levels of L-arginine, and elevated L-ornithine. The HFHS diet or PA/HG treatment also induced increases in vascular arginase activity along with oxidative stress, reduced vascular NO levels, and impaired endothelial-dependent vasorelaxation. All of these effects except obesity and hypercholesterolemia were prevented or significantly reduced by endothelial-specific deletion of arginase 1 or ABH treatment. Vascular dysfunctions in diet-induced obesity are prevented by deletion of arginase 1 in vascular endothelial cells or arginase inhibition. These findings indicate that upregulation of arginase 1 expression/activity in vascular endothelial cells has an integral role in diet-induced cardiovascular dysfunction and metabolic syndrome. Published

  7. Effects of gamma rays on rat vascular smooth muscle fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghassan, A [Radio-Biology and Health Dept. Syrian Atomic Energy Commission, (Syrian Arab Republic)

    1995-10-01

    Modifications of the Vasomotoricity induced by gamma rays have been investigated. Vascular smooth muscle fibres (VSMF) of rat portal vein have been used in this study. Irradiation procedures using a {sup 60} Co source have been carried out as follows: - Whole body irradiation. - Irradiation of isolated portal vein and isolated VSMF. Our results show that : 1-irradiation reduces the functional competition between Mg{sup 2+} and Ca{sup 2+}, thus hyper magnetic Krebs solutions have a negligible effect on irradiated VSMF. 2- irradiation activates Ca{sup 2+} influx into the VSMF. Thus the effect of hypocalcemic solutions on irradiated VSMF is minor compared with control. 3- Hyperpotassic solutions provoke titanic contractions with high amplitude on the irradiated VSMF compared with control. 5 figs.

  8. The surrounding tissue modifies the placental stem villous vascular responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøgger, Torbjørn; Forman, Axel; Aalkjær, Christian

    2014-01-01

    is available. In-depth understanding of the mechanisms involved in control of placental vascular tone are needed to develop new tissue targets for therapeutic intervention. Method: From fresh born placentas segments of stem villous arteries were carefully dissected. The artery branches were divided....... The surrounding trophoblast was removed from one end and left intact in the other, and the segment was divided to give two ring preparations, with or without trophoblast. The preparations were mounted in wire myographs and responses to vasoactive agents were compared. Results: pD2values for PGF2α, Tx-analog U...... or endotheline-1. These differences partly disappeared in the presence of L-NAME. Conclusion: The perivascular tissue significantly reduces sensitivity and force development of stem villous arteries, partly due to release of NO This represents a new mechanism for control of human stem villous artery tone....

  9. Early Vascular Ageing - A Concept in Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M Nilsson, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a prevalent condition in the elderly, often associated with metabolic disturbance and type 2 diabetes. For a number of years, research dedicated to understand atherosclerosis dominated, and for many good reasons, this pathophysiological process being proximal to the CVD events. In recent years, research has been devoted to an earlier stage of vascular pathology named arteriosclerosis (arterial stiffness) and the new concept of early vascular ageing (EVA), developed by a group of mostly European researchers. This overview describes recent developments in research dedicated to EVA and new emerging aspects found in studies of families at high cardiovascular risk. There are new aspects related to genetics, telomere biology and the role of gut microbiota. However, there is still no unifying definition available of EVA and no direct treatment, but rather only recommendations for conventional cardiovascular risk factor control. New interventions are being developed - not only new antihypertensive drugs, but also new drugs for vascular protection - the selective angiotensin-II (AT2) agonist Compound 21 (C21). Human studies are eagerly awaited. Even new functional food products could have the potential to positively influence cardiometabolic regulation, to be confirmed.

  10. Altos custos financeiros do trauma vascular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Costa-Val

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Demonstrar o custo e impacto financeiro referente à primeira abordagem cirúrgica das lesões vasculares em pacientes admitidos no Hospital João XXIII/FHEMIG, entre os anos de 2004 a 2006. MéTODOS: Trata-se de um estudo com aprovação ética, retrospectivo, de coorte e descritivo realizado a partir da auditoria de contas hospitalares referentes a 70 prontuários catalogados pelo Serviço de Trauma Cardiovascular. RESULTADOS: Cinco (7,14% prontuários foram excluídos por má qualidade técnica. O valor monetário repassado pelo Sistema Único de Saúde e pelo setor privado foram de R$ 103.614,96 (US$ 60.949,97 e de R$ 185.888,21 (US$ 109.346,0, respectivamente, implicando em defasagem potencial de 44%. Houve correlação direta entre custos e topografia anatômica das lesões e exponencial em relação às variáveis hemoderivados e próteses vasculares. CONCLUSÃO: Este estudo corrobora os altos custos do trauma vascular e fortalece a importância da auditoria de contas para as tomadas de decisões médicas.

  11. Pancreatic transplantation: Radiologic evaluation of vascular complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snider, J.F.; Hunter, D.W.; Kuni, C.C.; Castaneda-Zuniga, W.R.; Letourneau, J.G.

    1991-01-01

    Transplantation of the pancreas is an increasingly common therapeutic option for preventing or delaying complications of type I diabetes mellitus. The authors studied the relative roles of various radiologic examinations in diagnosing vascular complications in these grafts including arterial and venous thrombosis, stenosis, and anastomotic leak (the most common vascular factors that necessitate pancreatectomy of the transplant), as defined with pathologic or arteriographic data. The results of 78 scintigraphic flow studies, 40 abdominal and pelvic computed tomographic (CT) scans, 27 sonograms, and eight color Doppler studies were evaluated in 52 patients who received a total of 27 cadaveric and 26 living-donor grafts over a 12-year period. These results were correlated with the data from 45 gross and microscopic pathologic studies and 37 arteriograms to determine their relative value in enabling detection of graft thrombosis and other vascular complications. Scintigraphy, CT, sonography, and color Doppler were all sensitive in detection of generalized graft abnormalities but lacked specificity in defining the underlying etiologic factors

  12. Pancreatic transplantation: Radiologic evaluation of vascular complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snider, J.F.; Hunter, D.W.; Kuni, C.C.; Castaneda-Zuniga, W.R.; Letourneau, J.G. (Univ. of Minnesota Hospital and Clinic, Minneapolis (USA))

    1991-03-01

    Transplantation of the pancreas is an increasingly common therapeutic option for preventing or delaying complications of type I diabetes mellitus. The authors studied the relative roles of various radiologic examinations in diagnosing vascular complications in these grafts including arterial and venous thrombosis, stenosis, and anastomotic leak (the most common vascular factors that necessitate pancreatectomy of the transplant), as defined with pathologic or arteriographic data. The results of 78 scintigraphic flow studies, 40 abdominal and pelvic computed tomographic (CT) scans, 27 sonograms, and eight color Doppler studies were evaluated in 52 patients who received a total of 27 cadaveric and 26 living-donor grafts over a 12-year period. These results were correlated with the data from 45 gross and microscopic pathologic studies and 37 arteriograms to determine their relative value in enabling detection of graft thrombosis and other vascular complications. Scintigraphy, CT, sonography, and color Doppler were all sensitive in detection of generalized graft abnormalities but lacked specificity in defining the underlying etiologic factors.

  13. Arterial vascularization of the pineal gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahilogullari, Gokmen; Ugur, Hasan Caglar; Comert, Ayhan; Brohi, Recep Ali; Ozgural, Onur; Ozdemir, Mevci; Karahan, Suleyman Tuna

    2013-10-01

    The arterial vascularization of the pineal gland (PG) remains a debatable subject. This study aims to provide detailed information about the arterial vascularization of the PG. Thirty adult human brains were obtained from routine autopsies. Cerebral arteries were separately cannulated and injected with colored latex. The dissections were carried out using a surgical microscope. The diameters of the branches supplying the PG at their origin and vascularization areas of the branches of the arteries were investigated. The main artery of the PG was the lateral pineal artery, and it originated from the posterior circulation. The other arteries included the medial pineal artery from the posterior circulation and the rostral pineal artery mainly from the anterior circulation. Posteromedial choroidal artery was an important artery that branched to the PG. The arterial supply to the PG was studied comprehensively considering the debate and inadequacy of previously published studies on this issue available in the literature. This anatomical knowledge may be helpful for surgical treatment of pathologies of the PG, especially in children who develop more pathology in this region than adults.

  14. VASCULAR REMODELING IN HYPERTENSION: ANGIOGENESIS FEATURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Haisheva

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim — cross-sectional study of changes in various segments of the vascular bed in arterial hypertension (AH, defining the role of inducers and inhibitors of angiogenesis in these processes.Materials and methods. The study included 99 patients with arterial hypertension of I–II degree, average age of 63.2 ± 2.6 years, diseaseduration 9.2 ± 7.2 years.Results. It was found that patients with arterial hypertension have disorders in all segments of vascular bed: endothelial dysfunction (highvWF, microcirculatory disorders, and increased pulse wave velocity (PWV of elastic-type vessels. The level of angioginesis factors doesnot depend on such parameters as gender, age, body mass index. Smoking and duration of hypertension influence on vascular endothelialgrowth factor raise and endostatin levels are higher in patients with family history of cardiovascular diseases. Duration of disease is directlycorrelated with microcirculatory disorders and the PWV, correlation between microcirculatory disorders and pulse wave velocity indicatetheir common processes.

  15. Amplatzer vascular plugs in congenital cardiovascular malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barwad, Parag; Ramakrishnan, Sivasubramanian; Kothari, Shyam S; Saxena, Anita; Gupta, Saurabh K; Juneja, Rajnish; Gulati, Gurpreet Singh; Jagia, Priya; Sharma, Sanjiv

    2013-01-01

    Amplatzer vascular plugs (AVPs) are devices ideally suited to close medium-to-large vascular communications. There is limited published literature regarding the utility of AVPs in congenital cardiovascular malformations (CCVMs). To describe the use of AVPs in different CCVMs and to evaluate their safety and efficacy. All patients who required an AVP for the closure of CCVM were included in this retrospective review of our catheterization laboratory data. The efficacy and safety of AVPs are reported. A total of 39 AVPs were implanted in 31 patients. Thirteen (33%) were AVP type I and 23 (59%) were AVP type II. AVP type III were implanted in two patients and type IV in one patient. The major indications for their use included closure of pulmonary arteriovenous malformation (AVM) (n = 7), aortopulmonary collaterals (n = 7), closure of a patent Blalock-Taussig shunt (n = 5), systemic AVM (n = 5), coronary AVM (n = 4), patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) (n = 3), pulmonary artery aneurysms (n = 3), and venovenous collaterals (n = 2). Deployment of the AVP was done predominantly via the 5 – 7F Judkin's right coronary guide catheter. Overall 92% of the AVPs could be successfully deployed and resulted in occlusion of the target vessel in all cases, within 10 minutes. No procedure-related or access site complication occurred. AVPs are versatile, easy to use, and effective devices to occlude the vascular communications in a variety of settings. AVP II is especially useful in the closure of tubular structures with a high flow

  16. Vascular development in the vertebrate pancreas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizoglu, D. Berfin; Chong, Diana C.; Villasenor, Alethia; Magenheim, Judith; Barry, David M.; Lee, Simon; Marty-Santos, Leilani; Fu, Stephen; Dor, Yuval; Cleaver, Ondine

    2016-01-01

    The vertebrate pancreas is comprised of a highly branched tubular epithelium, which is intimately associated with an extensive and specialized vasculature. While we know a great deal about basic vascular anatomy of the adult pancreas, as well as islet capillaries, surprisingly little is known about the ontogeny of its blood vessels. Here, we analyze development of the pancreatic vasculature in the mouse embryo. We show that pancreatic epithelial branches intercalate with the fine capillary plexus of the surrounding pancreatic mesenchyme. Endothelial cells (ECs) within this mesenchyme are heterogeneous from the onset of organogenesis. Pancreatic arteries take shape before veins, in a manner analogous to early embryonic vessels. The main central artery forms during mid-gestation, as a result of vessel coalescence and remodeling of a vascular plexus. In addition, we show that vessels in the forming pancreas display a predictable architecture that is dependent on VEGF signaling. Over-expression of VEGF disrupts vascular patterning and arteriovenous differentiation within the developing pancreas. This study constitutes a first-time cellular and molecular characterization of pancreatic blood vessels, as they coordinately grow along with the pancreatic epithelium. PMID:27789228

  17. Vascularized nerve grafts: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donzelli, Renato; Capone, Crescenzo; Sgulò, Francesco Giovanni; Mariniello, Giuseppe; Maiuri, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to define an experimental model in order to promote the functional recovery of the nerves using grafts with vascular support (Vascular Nerve Grafts - VNG). The aim of this study is to define, on an experimental model in normal recipient bed, whether the functional recovery with VNG is superior to that obtained non-vascularized graft (NNG). Twenty male rabbits, which underwent dissection of sciatic nerve, were later treated by reinnervation through an autograft. In 10 animals the reconstruction of sciatic nerve was realized with VNG; in 10 control animals the reconstruction of sciatic nerve was realized with NNG. The VNG group showed a better axonal organization and a significantly higher number of regenerated axons in the early phases (after 30 days) than the NNG group, whereas the difference in the axonal number at day 90 was less significant; besides, the axon diameter and the myelin thickness were not significantly improved by VNG group. Our data suggests that the use of VNG leads to a faster regeneration process and a better functional recovery, although the final results are comparable to those of the NNG. VNG improve the quality of the axonal regeneration (axonal diameter and Schwann cells), although the increase in the axonal number is not significant and does not improve the long-term functional outcome.

  18. Vascular nitric oxide: Beyond eNOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingzi Zhao

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available As the first discovered gaseous signaling molecule, nitric oxide (NO affects a number of cellular processes, including those involving vascular cells. This brief review summarizes the contribution of NO to the regulation of vascular tone and its sources in the blood vessel wall. NO regulates the degree of contraction of vascular smooth muscle cells mainly by stimulating soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC to produce cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP, although cGMP-independent signaling [S-nitrosylation of target proteins, activation of sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA or production of cyclic inosine monophosphate (cIMP] also can be involved. In the blood vessel wall, NO is produced mainly from l-arginine by the enzyme endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS but it can also be released non-enzymatically from S-nitrosothiols or from nitrate/nitrite. Dysfunction in the production and/or the bioavailability of NO characterizes endothelial dysfunction, which is associated with cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension and atherosclerosis.

  19. Vascular development in the vertebrate pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizoglu, D Berfin; Chong, Diana C; Villasenor, Alethia; Magenheim, Judith; Barry, David M; Lee, Simon; Marty-Santos, Leilani; Fu, Stephen; Dor, Yuval; Cleaver, Ondine

    2016-12-01

    The vertebrate pancreas is comprised of a highly branched tubular epithelium, which is intimately associated with an extensive and specialized vasculature. While we know a great deal about basic vascular anatomy of the adult pancreas, as well as islet capillaries, surprisingly little is known about the ontogeny of its blood vessels. Here, we analyze development of the pancreatic vasculature in the mouse embryo. We show that pancreatic epithelial branches intercalate with the fine capillary plexus of the surrounding pancreatic mesenchyme. Endothelial cells (ECs) within this mesenchyme are heterogeneous from the onset of organogenesis. Pancreatic arteries take shape before veins, in a manner analogous to early embryonic vessels. The main central artery forms during mid-gestation, as a result of vessel coalescence and remodeling of a vascular plexus. In addition, we show that vessels in the forming pancreas display a predictable architecture that is dependent on VEGF signaling. Over-expression of VEGF disrupts vascular patterning and arteriovenous differentiation within the developing pancreas. This study constitutes a first-time in-depth cellular and molecular characterization of pancreatic blood vessels, as they coordinately grow along with the pancreatic epithelium. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Electrotonic vascular signal conduction and nephron synchronization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, D.J.; Toma, I.; Sosnovtseva, Olga

    2009-01-01

    Marsh DJ, Toma I, Sosnovtseva OV, Peti-Peterdi J, Holstein-Rathlou NH. Electrotonic vascular signal conduction and nephron synchronization. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 296: F751-F761, 2009. First published December 30, 2008; doi:10.1152/ajprenal.90669.2008.-Tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) and the ......Marsh DJ, Toma I, Sosnovtseva OV, Peti-Peterdi J, Holstein-Rathlou NH. Electrotonic vascular signal conduction and nephron synchronization. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 296: F751-F761, 2009. First published December 30, 2008; doi:10.1152/ajprenal.90669.2008.-Tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF......) and the myogenic mechanism control afferent arteriolar diameter in each nephron and regulate blood flow. Both mechanisms generate self-sustained oscillations, the oscillations interact, TGF modulates the frequency and amplitude of the myogenic oscillation, and the oscillations synchronize; a 5: 1 frequency ratio...... is the most frequent. TGF oscillations synchronize in nephron pairs supplied from a common cortical radial artery, as do myogenic oscillations. We propose that electrotonic vascular signal propagation from one juxtaglomerular apparatus interacts with similar signals from other nephrons to produce...

  1. Neuronal changes after chronic high blood pressure in animal models and its implication for vascular dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Gonzalo; Flores-Gómez, Gabriel D; de Jesús Gomez-Villalobos, Ma

    2016-05-01

    Vascular dementia is a devastating disorder not only for the patient, but also for the family because this neurocognitive disorder breaks the patient's independence, and leads to family care of the patient with a high cost for the family. This complex disorder alters memory, learning, judgment, emotional control and social behavior and affects 4% of the elderly world population. The high blood pressure or arterial hypertension is a major risk factor for cerebrovascular disease, which in most cases leads to vascular dementia. Interestingly, this neurocognitive disorder starts after long lasting hypertension, which is associated with reduced cerebral blood flow or hypoperfusion, and complete or incomplete ischemia with cortical thickness. Animal models have been generated to elucidate the pathophysiology of this disorder. It is known that dendritic complexity determines the receptive synaptic contacts, and the loss of dendritic spine and arbor stability are strongly associated with dementia in humans. This review evaluates relevant data of human and animal models that have investigated the link between long-lasting arterial hypertension and neural morphological changes in the context of vascular dementia. We examined the effect of chronic arterial hypertension and aged in vascular dementia. Neural dendritic morphology in the prefrontal cortex and the dorsal hippocampus and nucleus accumbens after chronic hypertension was diskussed in the animal models of hypertension. Chronic hypertension reduced the dendritic length and spine density in aged rats. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Nitric oxide (NO) in normal and hypoxic vascular regulation of the spiny dogfish, Squalus acanthias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, Kai E; Eveland, Randy L; Gladwin, Mark T; Swenson, Erik R

    2005-02-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a potent vasodilator in terrestrial vertebrates, but whether vascular endothelial-derived NO plays a role in vascular regulation in fish remains controversial. To explore this issue, a study was made of spiny dogfish sharks (Squalus acanthias) in normoxia and acute hypoxia (60 min exposure to seawater equilibrated with 3% oxygen) with various agents known to alter NO metabolism or availability. In normoxia, nitroprusside (a NO donor) reduced blood pressure by 20%, establishing that vascular smooth muscle responds to NO. L-arginine, the substrate for NO synthase, had no hemodynamic effect. Acetylcholine, which stimulates endothelial NO and prostaglandin production in mammals, reduced blood pressure, but also caused marked bradycardia. L-NAME, an inhibitor of all NO synthases, caused a small 10% rise in blood pressure, but cell-free hemoglobin (a potent NO scavenger and hypertensive agent in mammals) had no effect. Acute hypoxia caused a 15% fall in blood pressure, which was blocked by L-NAME and cell-free hemoglobin. Serum nitrite, a marker of NO production, rose with hypoxia, but not with L-NAME. Results suggest that NO is not an endothelial-derived vasodilator in the normoxic elasmobranch. The hypertensive effect of L-NAME may represent inhibition of NO production in the CNS and nerves regulating blood pressure. In acute hypoxia, there is a rapid up-regulation of vascular NO production that appears to be responsible for hypoxic vasodilation.

  3. Novel cellular bouton structure activated by ATP in the vascular wall of porcine retinal arterioles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misfeldt, Mikkel Wölck; Aalkjaer, Christian; Simonsen, Ulf; Bek, Toke

    2010-12-01

    The retinal blood flow is regulated by the tone of resistance arterioles, which is influenced by purinergic compounds such as adenosine and adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) released from the retinal tissue. However, it is unknown what cellular elements in the perivascular retina are responsible for the effect of purines on the tone of retinal arterioles. Porcine retinal arterioles were loaded with the calcium-sensitive fluorophore Oregon green. The vessels were mounted in a confocal myograph for simultaneous recordings of tone and calcium activity in cells of the vascular wall during stimulation with ATP and adenosine, with and without modifiers of these compounds. Additionally, immunohistochemistry was used to localize elements with calcium activity in the vascular wall. Hyperfluorescence indicating calcium activity was recorded in a population of abundant round boutons interspersed in a network of vimentin-positive processes located immediately external to the smooth muscle cell layer but internal to the perivascular glial cells. These structures showed calcium activity when the vessel was relaxed with ATP but not when it was relaxed with adenosine. Ryanodine reduced calcium activity in the boutons, whereas the ATP antagonist adenosine-5'-O-(α, β- methylene diphosphate) reduced calcium activity in both the boutons and vascular tone. The vasodilating effect of purines in porcine retinal tissue involves ATP-dependent calcium activity in a layer of cellular boutons located external to the vascular smooth muscle cells and internal to the perivascular glial cells.

  4. Role of platelets in maintenance of pulmonary vascular permeability to protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo, S.K.; Burhop, K.E.; Kaplan, J.E.; Malik, A.B.

    1988-01-01

    The authors examined the role of platelets in maintenance of pulmonary vascular integrity by inducing thrombocytopenia in sheep using antiplatelet serum (APS). A causal relationship between thrombocytopenia and increase in pulmonary vascular permeability was established by platelet repletion using platelet-rich plasma (PRP). Sheep were chronically instrumented and lung lymph fistulas prepared to monitor pulmonary lymph flow (Q lym ). A balloon catheter was positioned in the left atrium to assess pulmonary vascular permeability to protein after raising the left atrial pressure (P la ). Thrombocytopenia was maintained for 3 days by daily intramuscular APS injections. In studies using cultured bovine pulmonary artery endothelial monolayers, transendothelia permeability of 125 I-labeled albumin was reduced 50 and 95%, respectively, when 2.5 x 10 7 or 5 x 10 7 platelets were added onto endothelial monolayers. However, addition of 5 x 10 6 platelets or 5 x 10 7 red blood cells did not reduce endothelial monolayer albumin permeability. Results indicate that platelets are required for the maintenance of pulmonary vascular permeability. Reduction in permeability appears to involve an interaction of platelets with the endothelium

  5. Massage Therapy Restores Peripheral Vascular Function following Exertion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Nina C.; Ali, Mohamed M.; Robinson, Austin T.; Norkeviciute, Edita; Phillips, Shane A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine if lower extremity exercise-induced muscle injury (EMI) reduces vascular endothelial function of the upper extremity and if massage therapy (MT) improves peripheral vascular function after EMI. Design Randomized, blinded trial with evaluations at 90 minutes, 24 hours, 48 hours, and 72 hours. Setting Clinical research center at an academic medical center and laboratory Participants Thirty-six sedentary young adults were randomly assigned to one of three groups: 1) EMI + MT (n=15; mean age ± standard error (SE): 26.6±0.3), 2) EMI only (n=10; mean age ± SE: 23.6±0.4), and 3) MT only (n=11; mean age ± SE: 25.5 ± 0.4). Intervention Participants were assigned to either EMI only (a single bout of bilateral, eccentric leg-press exercise), MT only (30-minute lower extremity massage using Swedish technique), or EMI + MT. Main outcome measures Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) was determined by ultrasound at each time point. Nitroglycerin-induced dilation was also assessed (NTG; 0.4 mg). Results Brachial FMD increased from baseline in the EMI + MT group and the MT only group (7.38±0.18 to 9.02±0.28%, p<0.05 and 7.77±0.25 to 10.20±0.22%, p < 0.05, respectively) at 90 minutes remaining elevated until 72 hrs. In the EMI only group FMD was reduced from baseline at 24 and 48 hrs (7.78±0.14 to 6.75±0.11%, p<0.05 and 6.53±0.11, p<0.05, respectively) returning to baseline after 72 hrs. Dilations to NTG were similar over time. Conclusions Our results suggest that MT attenuates impairment of upper extremity endothelial function resulting from lower extremity EMI in sedentary young adults. PMID:24583315

  6. Non-invasive stem cell therapy in a rat model for retinal degeneration and vascular pathology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaomei Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Retinitis pigmentosa (RP is characterized by progressive night blindness, visual field loss, altered vascular permeability and loss of central vision. Currently there is no effective treatment available except gene replacement therapy has shown promise in a few patients with specific gene defects. There is an urgent need to develop therapies that offer generic neuro-and vascular-protective effects with non-invasive intervention. Here we explored the potential of systemic administration of pluripotent bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs to rescue vision and associated vascular pathology in the Royal College Surgeons (RCS rat, a well-established animal model for RP. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Animals received syngeneic MSCs (1x10(6 cells by tail vein at an age before major photoreceptor loss. PRINCIPAL RESULTS: both rod and cone photoreceptors were preserved (5-6 cells thick at the time when control animal has a single layer of photoreceptors remained; Visual function was significantly preserved compared with controls as determined by visual acuity and luminance threshold recording from the superior colliculus; The number of pathological vascular complexes (abnormal vessels associated with migrating pigment epithelium cells and area of vascular leakage that would ordinarily develop were dramatically reduced; Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis indicated there was upregulation of growth factors and immunohistochemistry revealed that there was an increase in neurotrophic factors within eyes of animals that received MSCs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results underscore the potential application of MSCs in treating retinal degeneration. The advantages of this non-invasive cell-based therapy are: cells are easily isolated and can be expanded in large quantity for autologous graft; hypoimmunogenic nature as allogeneic donors; less controversial in nature than other stem cells; can be readministered with minor discomfort

  7. Expression of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptors in Benign Vascular Lesions of the Orbit: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atchison, Elizabeth A; Garrity, James A; Castillo, Francisco; Engman, Steven J; Couch, Steven M; Salomão, Diva R

    2016-01-01

    Vascular lesions of the orbit, although not malignant, can cause morbidity because of their location near critical structures in the orbit. For the same reason, they can be challenging to remove surgically. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) drugs are increasingly being used to treat diseases with prominent angiogenesis. Our study aimed to determine to what extent VEGF receptors and their subtypes are expressed on selected vascular lesions of the orbit. Retrospective case series of all orbital vascular lesions removed by one of the authors (JAG) at the Mayo Clinic. A total of 52 patients who underwent removal of vascular orbital lesions. The pathology specimens from the patients were retrieved, their pathologic diagnosis was confirmed, demographic and clinical information were gathered, and sections from vascular tumors were stained with vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR), vascular endothelial growth factor receptor type 1 (VEGFR1), vascular endothelial growth factor receptor type 2 (VEGFR2), and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor type 3 (VEGFR3). The existence and pattern of staining with VEGF and its subtypes on these lesions. There were 28 specimens of venous malformations, 4 capillary hemangiomas, 7 lymphatic malformations, and 6 lymphaticovenous malformations. All samples stained with VEGF, 55% stained with VEGFR1, 98% stained with VEGFR2, and 96% stained with VEGFR3. Most (94%) of the VEGFR2 staining was diffuse. Most orbital vascular lesions express VEGF receptors, which may suggest a future target for nonsurgical treatment. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Reducing Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindell, Johanna

    care may influence decisions on antibiotic use. Based on video-and audio recordings of physician-patient consultations it is investigated how treatment recommendations are presented, can be changed, are forecast and explained, and finally, how they seemingly meet resistance and how this resistance......Antibiotic resistance is a growing public health problem both nationally and internationally, and efficient strategies are needed to reduce unnecessary use. This dissertation presents four research studies, which examine how communication between general practitioners and patients in Danish primary...... is responded to.The first study in the dissertation suggests that treatment recommendations on antibiotics are often done in a way that encourages patient acceptance. In extension of this, the second study of the dissertation examines a case, where acceptance of such a recommendation is changed into a shared...

  9. Involvement of the VEP1 gene in vascular strand development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Ji Hyung; Ha, Chan Man; Nam, Hong Gil

    2002-03-01

    A dominant mutant line characterized by abnormal leaf venation pattern was isolated from a transgenic Arabidopsis plant pool that was generated with Agrobacterium culture harboring an Arabidopsis antisense cDNA library. In the mutant line, the phenotype was due to antisense suppression of a gene we named VEP1 (Vein Patterning). The predicted amino acid sequence of the gene contained a motif related to the mammalian death domain that is found in the apoptotic machinery. Reduced expression of the VEP1 gene resulted in the reduced complexity of the venation pattern of the cotyledons and foliar leaves, which was mainly due to the reduced number of the minor veins and their incomplete connection. The analysis of mutant embryos indicated that the phenotype was originated, at least in part, from a defect in the procambium patterning. In the mutant, the stem and root were thinner than those in wild type. This phenotype was associated with reduced vascular development. The promoter activity of the VEP1 gene was detected preferentially in the vascular regions. We propose that the death domain-containing protein VEP1 functions as a positive element required for vascular strand development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

  10. Retinal vascular segmentation using superpixel-based line operator and its application to vascular topology estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Tong; Xie, Jianyang; Zhao, Yitian; Zhao, Yifan; Liu, Yue; Wang, Yongtian; Liu, Jiang

    2018-05-09

    Automatic methods of analyzing of retinal vascular networks, such as retinal blood vessel detection, vascular network topology estimation, and arteries/veins classification are of great assistance to the ophthalmologist in terms of diagnosis and treatment of a wide spectrum of diseases. We propose a new framework for precisely segmenting retinal vasculatures, constructing retinal vascular network topology, and separating the arteries and veins. A nonlocal total variation inspired Retinex model is employed to remove the image intensity inhomogeneities and relatively poor contrast. For better generalizability and segmentation performance, a superpixel-based line operator is proposed as to distinguish between lines and the edges, thus allowing more tolerance in the position of the respective contours. The concept of dominant sets clustering is adopted to estimate retinal vessel topology and classify the vessel network into arteries and veins. The proposed segmentation method yields competitive results on three public data sets (STARE, DRIVE, and IOSTAR), and it has superior performance when compared with unsupervised segmentation methods, with accuracy of 0.954, 0.957, and 0.964, respectively. The topology estimation approach has been applied to five public databases (DRIVE,STARE, INSPIRE, IOSTAR, and VICAVR) and achieved high accuracy of 0.830, 0.910, 0.915, 0.928, and 0.889, respectively. The accuracies of arteries/veins classification based on the estimated vascular topology on three public databases (INSPIRE, DRIVE and VICAVR) are 0.90.9, 0.910, and 0.907, respectively. The experimental results show that the proposed framework has effectively addressed crossover problem, a bottleneck issue in segmentation and vascular topology reconstruction. The vascular topology information significantly improves the accuracy on arteries/veins classification. © 2018 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  11. Revascularization of diaphyseal bone segments by vascular bundle implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagi, O N

    2005-11-01

    Vascularized bone transfer is an effective, established treatment for avascular necrosis and atrophic or infected nonunions. However, limited donor sites and technical difficulty limit its application. Vascular bundle transplantation may provide an alternative. However, even if vascular ingrowth is presumed to occur in such situations, its extent in aiding revascularization for ultimate graft incorporation is not well understood. A rabbit tibia model was used to study and compare vascularized, segmental, diaphyseal, nonvascularized conventional, and vascular bundle-implanted grafts with a combination of angiographic, radiographic, histopathologic, and bone scanning techniques. Complete graft incorporation in conventional grafts was observed at 6 months, whereas it was 8 to 12 weeks with either of the vascularized grafts. The pattern of radionuclide uptake and the duration of graft incorporation between vascular segmental bone grafts (with intact endosteal blood supply) and vascular bundle-implanted segmental grafts were similar. A vascular bundle implanted in the recipient bone was found to anastomose extensively with the intraosseous circulation at 6 weeks. Effective revascularization of bone could be seen when a simple vascular bundle was introduced into a segment of bone deprived of its normal blood supply. This simple technique offers promise for improvement of bone graft survival in clinical circumstances.

  12. mTOR drives cerebral blood flow and memory deficits in LDLR-/- mice modeling atherosclerosis and vascular cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahrling, Jordan B; Lin, Ai-Ling; DeRosa, Nicholas; Hussong, Stacy A; Van Skike, Candice E; Girotti, Milena; Javors, Martin; Zhao, Qingwei; Maslin, Leigh Ann; Asmis, Reto; Galvan, Veronica

    2018-01-01

    We recently showed that mTOR attenuation blocks progression and abrogates established cognitive deficits in Alzheimer's disease (AD) mouse models. These outcomes were associated with the restoration of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and brain vascular density (BVD) resulting from relief of mTOR inhibition of NO release. Recent reports suggested a role of mTOR in atherosclerosis. Because mTOR drives aging and vascular dysfunction is a universal feature of aging, we hypothesized that mTOR may contribute to brain vascular and cognitive dysfunction associated with atherosclerosis. We measured CBF, BVD, cognitive function, markers of inflammation, and parameters of cardiovascular disease in LDLR -/- mice fed maintenance or high-fat diet ± rapamycin. Cardiovascular pathologies were proportional to severity of brain vascular dysfunction. Aortic atheromas were reduced, CBF and BVD were restored, and cognitive dysfunction was attenuated potentially through reduction in systemic and brain inflammation following chronic mTOR attenuation. Our studies suggest that mTOR regulates vascular integrity and function and that mTOR attenuation may restore neurovascular function and cardiovascular health. Together with our previous studies in AD models, our data suggest mTOR-driven vascular damage may be a mechanism shared by age-associated neurological diseases. Therefore, mTOR attenuation may have promise for treatment of cognitive impairment in atherosclerosis.

  13. The vacuum-assisted closure (V.A.C®) system for surgical site infection with involved vascular grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saziye, Karaca; Afksendiyos, Kalangos

    2015-04-01

    In vascular surgery, surgical site infection is the most common postoperative morbidity, occurring in 5-10% of vascular patients. The optimal management of surgical site infection with involved lower limb vascular grafts remains controversial. We present our 6-year results of using the V.A.C.® system in surgical site infection with involved vascular grafts. A retrospective 6-year review of patient who underwent a VAC® therapy for postoperative surgical site infection in lower limb with involved vascular grafts in our department between January 2006 and December 2011. V.A.C therapy was used in 40 patients. All patients underwent surgical wound revision with VAC® therapy and antibiotics. The mean time of use of the V.A.C. system was 14.2 days. After mean of 12 days in 34 of 40 patients, in whom the use of VAC® therapy resulted in delayed primary closure or healing by secondary intention. The mean postoperative follow-up time was 61.67 months, during which 3 patients died. We showed that the V.A.C.® system is valuable for managing specifically surgical site infection with involved vascular grafts. Using the V.A.C.® system, reoperation rates are reduced; 85% of patients avoided graft replacement. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  14. Melatonin Decreases Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling and Oxygen Sensitivity in Pulmonary Hypertensive Newborn Lambs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian R. Astorga

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic hypoxia and oxidative stress during gestation lead to pulmonary hypertension of the neonate (PHN, a condition characterized by abnormal pulmonary arterial reactivity and remodeling. Melatonin has strong antioxidant properties and improves pulmonary vascular function. Here, we aimed to study the effects of melatonin on the function and structure of pulmonary arteries from PHN lambs.Methods: Twelve lambs (Ovis aries gestated and born at highlands (3,600 m were instrumented with systemic and pulmonary catheters. Six of them were assigned to the control group (CN, oral vehicle and 6 were treated with melatonin (MN, 1 mg.kg−1.d−1 during 10 days. At the end of treatment, we performed a graded oxygenation protocol to assess cardiopulmonary responses to inspired oxygen variations. Further, we obtained lung and pulmonary trunk samples for histology, molecular biology, and immunohistochemistry determinations.Results: Melatonin reduced the in vivo pulmonary pressor response to oxygenation changes. In addition, melatonin decreased cellular density of the media and diminished the proliferation marker KI67 in resistance vessels and pulmonary trunk (p < 0.05. This was associated with a decreased in the remodeling markers α-actin (CN 1.28 ± 0.18 vs. MN 0.77 ± 0.04, p < 0.05 and smoothelin-B (CN 2.13 ± 0.31 vs. MN 0.88 ± 0.27, p < 0.05. Further, melatonin increased vascular density by 134% and vascular luminal surface by 173% (p < 0.05. Finally, melatonin decreased nitrotyrosine, an oxidative stress marker, in small pulmonary vessels (CN 5.12 ± 0.84 vs. MN 1.14 ± 0.34, p < 0.05.Conclusion: Postnatal administration of melatonin blunts the cardiopulmonary response to hypoxia, reduces the pathological vascular remodeling, and increases angiogenesis in pulmonary hypertensive neonatal lambs.These effects improve the pulmonary vascular structure and function in the neonatal period under chronic hypoxia.

  15. Impact of Hydroxychloroquine on Atherosclerosis and Vascular Stiffness in the Presence of Chronic Kidney Disease.

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    Ashutosh M Shukla

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the largest cause of morbidity and mortality among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD and end-stage kidney disease, with nearly half of all deaths attributed to cardiovascular disease. Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ, an anti-inflammatory drug, has been shown to have multiple pleiotropic actions relevant to atherosclerosis. We conducted a proof-of-efficacy study to evaluate the effects of hydroxychloroquine in an animal model of atherosclerosis in ApoE knockout mice with and without chronic kidney disease. Forty male, 6-week-old mice were divided into four groups in a 2 x 2 design: sham placebo group; sham treatment group; CKD placebo group; and CKD treatment group. CKD was induced by a two-step surgical procedure. All mice received a high-fat diet through the study duration and were sacrificed after 16 weeks of therapy. Mice were monitored with ante-mortem ultrasonic echography (AUE for atherosclerosis and vascular stiffness and with post-mortem histology studies for atherosclerosis. Therapy with HCQ significantly reduced the severity of atherosclerosis in CKD mice and sham treated mice. HCQ reduced the area of aortic atherosclerosis on en face examination by approximately 60% in HCQ treated groups compared to the non-treated groups. Additionally, therapy with HCQ resulted in significant reduction in vascular endothelial dysfunction with improvement in vascular elasticity and flow patterns and better-preserved vascular wall thickness across multiple vascular beds. More importantly, we found that presence of CKD had no mitigating effect on HCQ's anti-atherosclerotic and vasculoprotective effects. These beneficial effects were not due to any significant effect of HCQ on inflammation, renal function, or lipid profile at the end of 16 weeks of therapy. This study, which demonstrates structural and functional protection against atherosclerosis by HCQ, provides a rationale to evaluate its use in CKD patients. Further studies

  16. Melatonin Decreases Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling and Oxygen Sensitivity in Pulmonary Hypertensive Newborn Lambs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astorga, Cristian R.; González-Candia, Alejandro; Candia, Alejandro A.; Figueroa, Esteban G.; Cañas, Daniel; Ebensperger, Germán; Reyes, Roberto V.; Llanos, Aníbal J.; Herrera, Emilio A.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Chronic hypoxia and oxidative stress during gestation lead to pulmonary hypertension of the neonate (PHN), a condition characterized by abnormal pulmonary arterial reactivity and remodeling. Melatonin has strong antioxidant properties and improves pulmonary vascular function. Here, we aimed to study the effects of melatonin on the function and structure of pulmonary arteries from PHN lambs. Methods: Twelve lambs (Ovis aries) gestated and born at highlands (3,600 m) were instrumented with systemic and pulmonary catheters. Six of them were assigned to the control group (CN, oral vehicle) and 6 were treated with melatonin (MN, 1 mg.kg−1.d−1) during 10 days. At the end of treatment, we performed a graded oxygenation protocol to assess cardiopulmonary responses to inspired oxygen variations. Further, we obtained lung and pulmonary trunk samples for histology, molecular biology, and immunohistochemistry determinations. Results: Melatonin reduced the in vivo pulmonary pressor response to oxygenation changes. In addition, melatonin decreased cellular density of the media and diminished the proliferation marker KI67 in resistance vessels and pulmonary trunk (p < 0.05). This was associated with a decreased in the remodeling markers α-actin (CN 1.28 ± 0.18 vs. MN 0.77 ± 0.04, p < 0.05) and smoothelin-B (CN 2.13 ± 0.31 vs. MN 0.88 ± 0.27, p < 0.05). Further, melatonin increased vascular density by 134% and vascular luminal surface by 173% (p < 0.05). Finally, melatonin decreased nitrotyrosine, an oxidative stress marker, in small pulmonary vessels (CN 5.12 ± 0.84 vs. MN 1.14 ± 0.34, p < 0.05). Conclusion: Postnatal administration of melatonin blunts the cardiopulmonary response to hypoxia, reduces the pathological vascular remodeling, and increases angiogenesis in pulmonary hypertensive neonatal lambs.These effects improve the pulmonary vascular structure and function in the neonatal period under chronic hypoxia. PMID:29559926

  17. Osteonecrosis of femoral head: Treatment by core decompression and vascular pedicle grafting

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    Babhulkar Sudhir

    2009-01-01

    grafting reduces the intraosseous tension to achieve early revascularization of ischemic femoral head. The high percentage of marrow and osteogenic cells survive within a vascularized pedicle graft, which helps in early vascularization and we have been able to achieve good outcome.

  18. Vascular Variations Associated with Intracranial Aneurysms.

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    Orakdogen, Metin; Emon, Selin Tural; Somay, Hakan; Engin, Taner; Is, Merih; Hakan, Tayfun

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the vascular variations in patients with intracranial aneurysm in circle of Willis. We used the data on 128 consecutive intracranial aneurysm cases. Cerebral angiography images were analyzed retrospectively. Arteries were grouped as anterior cerebral arterial system (ACS), posterior cerebral arterial system (PCS) and middle cerebral arterial system (MCS) for grouping vascular variations. Lateralization, being single/multiple, gender; and also any connection with accompanying aneurysms" number, localization, dimension, whether bleeding/incidental aneurysm has been inspected. Variations were demonstrated in 57.8% of the cases. The most common variation was A1 variation (34.4%). The rate of variations was 36.7%, 24.2% and 10.2% respectively in ACS, PCS and MCS. MCS variations were significantly higher in males. Anterior communicating artery (ACoA) aneurysm observance rates were significantly higher and posterior communicating artery (PCoA) aneurysm and middle cerebral artery (MCA) aneurysm observance rates were significantly lower when compared to "no ACS variation detected" cases. In "PCS variation detected" cases, PCoA aneurysm observance rates and coexistence of multiple variations were significantly higher. The rate of vascular variations in patients with aneurysms was 57.8%. Arterial hypoplasia and aplasia were the most common variations. ACS was the most common region that variations were located in; they were mostly detected on the right side. Coexistence of ACoA aneurysm was higher than PCoA and MCA aneurysms. In the PCS variations group, PCoA aneurysms were the most common aneurysms that accompanying the variation and multiple variations were more common than in the other two groups. The variations in MCS were most common in males.

  19. T cells in vascular inflammatory diseases

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    Lucas L Lintermans

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation of the human vasculature is a manifestation of many different diseases ranging from systemic autoimmune diseases to chronic inflammatory diseases, in which multiple types of immune cells are involved. For both autoimmune diseases and chronic inflammatory diseases several observations support a key role for T lymphocytes in these disease pathologies, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Previous studies in several autoimmune diseases have demonstrated a significant role for a specific subset of CD4+ T cells termed effector memory T cells. This expanded population of effector memory T cells may contribute to tissue injury and disease progression. These cells exert multiple pro-inflammatory functions through the release of effector cytokines. Many of these cytokines have been detected in the inflammatory lesions and participate in the vasculitic reaction, contributing to recruitment of macrophages, neutrophils, dendritic cells, NK cells, B cells and T cells. In addition, functional impairment of regulatory T cells paralyzes anti-inflammatory effects in vasculitic disorders. Interestingly, activation of effector memory T cells in uniquely dependent on the voltage-gated Kv1.3 potassium channel providing an anchor for specific drug targeting. In this review, we focus on the CD4+ T cells in the context of vascular inflammation and describe the evidence supporting the role of different T cell subsets in vascular inflammation. Selective targeting of pathogenic effector memory T cells might enable a more tailored therapeutic approach that avoids unwanted adverse side effects of generalized immunosuppression by modulating the effector functions of T cell responses to inhibit the development of vascular inflammation.

  20. Extraglandular and intraglandular vascularization of canine prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanov, Miroslav

    2004-03-01

    The literature on the vascularization of the canine prostate is reviewed and the clinical significance of prostate morphology is described. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), combined with improved corrosion casting methods, reveal new morphological details that promise better diagnostics and treatment but also require expansion of clinical nomenclature. A proposal is made for including two previously unnamed veins in Nomina Anatomica Veterinaria (NAV). The canine prostate has two lobes with independent vascularization. Each lobe is supplied through the left and right a. prostatica, respectively. The a. prostatica sprouts three small vessels (cranial, middle, and caudal) towards the prostate gland. A. prostatica is a small-size artery whose wall structure is similar to the arteries of the muscular type. V. prostatica is a small-size valved vein. The canine prostate has capsular, parenchymal, and urethral vascular zones. The surface vessels of the capsule are predominantly veins and the diameter of arterial vessels is larger than that of the veins. The trabecular vessels are of two types: direct and branched. The prostate parenchyma is supplied by branches of the trabecular vessels. The periacinary capillaries are fenestrated and form a net in a circular pattern. The processes of the myoepithelial cells embrace both the acins and the periacinar capillaries. In the prostate ductal system. there are spermatozoa. The prostatic part of the urethra is supplied by an independent branch of a. prostatica. The prostatic urethral part is drained by v. prostatica, the vein of the urethral bulb and the ventral prostate veins. M. urethralis begins as early as the urethral prostatic part. The greater part of the white muscle fibers in m. urethralis suggest an enhanced anaerobic metabolism. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Management of bleeding in vascular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Y E; Liu, S E; Irwin, M G

    2016-09-01

    Management of acute coagulopathy and blood loss during major vascular procedures poses a significant haemostatic challenge to anaesthetists. The acute coagulopathy is multifactorial in origin with tissue injury and hypotension as the precipitating factors, followed by dilution, hypothermia, acidemia, hyperfibrinolysis and systemic inflammatory response, all acting as a self-perpetuating spiral of events. The problem is confounded by the high prevalence of antithrombotic agent use in these patients and intraoperative heparin administration. Trials specifically examining bleeding management in vascular surgery are lacking, and much of the literature and guidelines are derived from studies on patients with trauma. In general, it is recommended to adopt permissive hypotension with a restrictive fluid strategy, using a combination of crystalloid and colloid solutions up to one litre during the initial resuscitation, after which blood products should be administered. A restrictive transfusion trigger for red cells remains the mainstay of treatment except for the high-risk patients, where the trigger should be individualized. Transfusion of blood components should be initiated by clinical evidence of coagulopathy such as diffuse microvascular bleeding, and then guided by either laboratory or point-of-care coagulation testing. Prophylactic antifibrinolytic use is recommended for all surgery where excessive bleeding is anticipated. Fibrinogen and prothrombin complex concentrates administration are recommended during massive transfusion, whereas rFVIIa should be reserved until all means have failed. While debates over the ideal resuscitative strategy continue, the approach to vascular haemostasis should be scientific, rational, and structured. As far as possible, therapy should be monitored and goal directed. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. BOLD Granger causality reflects vascular anatomy.

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    J Taylor Webb

    Full Text Available A number of studies have tried to exploit subtle phase differences in BOLD time series to resolve the order of sequential activation of brain regions, or more generally the ability of signal in one region to predict subsequent signal in another region. More recently, such lag-based measures have been applied to investigate directed functional connectivity, although this application has been controversial. We attempted to use large publicly available datasets (FCON 1000, ADHD 200, Human Connectome Project to determine whether consistent spatial patterns of Granger Causality are observed in typical fMRI data. For BOLD datasets from 1,240 typically developing subjects ages 7-40, we measured Granger causality between time series for every pair of 7,266 spherical ROIs covering the gray matter and 264 seed ROIs at hubs of the brain's functional network architecture. Granger causality estimates were strongly reproducible for connections in a test and replication sample (n=620 subjects for each group, as well as in data from a single subject scanned repeatedly, both during resting and passive video viewing. The same effect was even stronger in high temporal resolution fMRI data from the Human Connectome Project, and was observed independently in data collected during performance of 7 task paradigms. The spatial distribution of Granger causality reflected vascular anatomy with a progression from Granger causality sources, in Circle of Willis arterial inflow distributions, to sinks, near large venous vascular structures such as dural venous sinuses and at the periphery of the brain. Attempts to resolve BOLD phase differences with Granger causality should consider the possibility of reproducible vascular confounds, a problem that is independent of the known regional variability of the hemodynamic response.

  3. Cell lineage in vascularized bone transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, Wouter F; Larsen, Mikko; Friedrich, Patricia F; Bishop, Allen T

    2014-01-01

    The biology behind vascularized bone allotransplantation remains largely unknown. We aim to study cell traffic between donor and recipient following bone auto-, and allografting. Vascularized femoral transplantation was performed with arteriovenous bundle implantation and short-term immunosuppression. Twenty male Piebald Virol Glaxo (PVG; RT1(c) ) rats received isotransplants from female PVG (RT1(c) ) rats and 22 male PVG rats received allografts from female Dark Agouti rats (DA, RT1(a) ), representing a major histocompatibility mismatch. Both groups were randomly analyzed at 4 or 18 weeks. Bone remodeling areas (inner and outer cortical samples) were labeled and laser capture microdissected. Analysis of sex-mismatch genes by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction provided the relative Expression Ratio (rER) of donor (female) to recipient (male) cells. The rER was 0.456 ± 0.266 at 4 weeks and 0.749 ± 0.387 at 18 weeks (p = 0.09) in allotransplants. In isotransplants, the rER was 0.412 ± 0.239 and 0.467 ± 0.252 at 4 and 18 weeks, respectively (p = 0.21). At 4 weeks, the rER at the outer cortical area of isotransplants was significantly lower in isotransplants as compared with allotransplants (0.247 ± 0.181 vs. 0.549 ± 0.184, p = 0.007). Cells in the inner and outer cortical bone remodeling areas in isotransplants were mainly donor derived (rER 0.5) at 18 weeks. Applying novel methodology, we describe detailed cell traffic in vascularized bone transplants, elaborating our comprehension on bone transplantation. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Amplatzer vascular plugs in congenital cardiovascular malformations

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    Parag Barwad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Amplatzer vascular plugs (AVPs are devices ideally suited to close medium-to-large vascular communications. There is limited published literature regarding the utility of AVPs in congenital cardiovascular malformations (CCVMs. Aims: To describe the use of AVPs in different CCVMs and to evaluate their safety and efficacy. Materials and Methods: All patients who required an AVP for the closure of CCVM were included in this retrospective review of our catheterization laboratory data. The efficacy and safety of AVPs are reported. Results: A total of 39 AVPs were implanted in 31 patients. Thirteen (33% were AVP type I and 23 (59% were AVP type II. AVP type III were implanted in two patients and type IV in one patient. The major indications for their use included closure of pulmonary arteriovenous malformation (AVM (n = 7, aortopulmonary collaterals (n = 7, closure of a patent Blalock-Taussig shunt (n = 5, systemic AVM (n = 5, coronary AVM (n = 4, patent ductus arteriosus (PDA (n = 3, pulmonary artery aneurysms (n = 3, and venovenous collaterals (n = 2. Deployment of the AVP was done predominantly via the 5 - 7F Judkin′s right coronary guide catheter. Overall 92% of the AVPs could be successfully deployed and resulted in occlusion of the target vessel in all cases, within 10 minutes. No procedure-related or access site complication occurred. Conclusions: AVPs are versatile, easy to use, and effective devices to occlude the vascular communications in a variety of settings. AVP II is especially useful in the closure of tubular structures with a high flow.

  5. Percutaneous Cryotherapy of Vascular Malformation: Initial Experience

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    Cornelis, F., E-mail: francoiscornelis@hotmail.com [Institut Bergonie, Department of Radiology (France); Neuville, A. [Institut Bergonie, Department of Pathology (France); Labreze, C. [Pellegrin Hospital, Department of Pediatric Dermatology (France); Kind, M. [Institut Bergonie, Department of Radiology (France); Bui, B. [Institut Bergonie, Department of Oncology (France); Midy, D. [Pellegrin Hospital, Department of Vascular Surgery (France); Palussiere, J. [Institut Bergonie, Department of Radiology (France); Grenier, N. [Pellegrin Hospi