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Sample records for reduce malaria morbidity

  1. Intermittent preventive treatment using artemisinin-based combination therapy reduces malaria morbidity among school-aged children in Mali

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    Barger, Breanna; Maiga, Hamma; Traore, Oumar Bila; Tekete, Mamadou; Tembine, Intimbeye; Dara, Antoine; Traore, Zoumana Isaac; Gantt, Soren; Doumbo, Ogobara K.; Djimde, Abdoulaye A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary OBJECTIVE To assess the efficacy of intermittent preventive treatment (IPT) against malaria in school-aged children. METHODS This was an open randomized controlled trial of seasonal IPT among school children (IPTsc) aged 6–13 years in Kollé, Mali. The study began in September 2007 and completed follow-up in May 2008. Students were randomized to one of three study arms: Sulfadoxine–pyrimethamine plus artesunate (SP/AS), amodiaquine plus artesunate (AQ/AS) or vitamin C. All students received two full treatment doses, given 2 months apart during the season of high transmission from September to December. Groups were compared with respect to incidence of clinical malaria, asymptomatic parasitemia and haemoglobin concentration. RESULTS A total of 296 students were randomized, and retention in the study was 99.3%. Clinical malaria incidence in the SP/AS and AQ/AS arms was reduced by 66.6% and 46.5%, respectively, vs. vitamin C (P < 0.001). There were fewer clinic visits for any cause among the children receiving SP/AS or AQ/AS (P = 0.024). The prevalence of asymptomatic parasitemia was fivefold higher in the vitamin C arm than either SP/AS or AQ/AS at each post-treatment evaluation (P < 0.001). At the end of the transmission period, children treated with IPT had lower rates of anaemia (SP/AS, 17.7%; AQ/AS, 16.0%; vitamin C, 29.6%; P = 0.039). CONCLUSION IPT among school children reduced the rates of clinical malaria, all-cause acute clinic visits, asymptomatic parasitemia and anaemia among school-aged children. PMID:19497079

  2. Malaria morbidity and mortality trends in Manicaland province, Zimbabwe, 2005-2014.

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    Mutsigiri, Faith; Mafaune, Patron Trish; Mungati, More; Shambira, Gerald; Bangure, Donewell; Juru, Tsitsi; Gombe, Notion Tafara; Tshimanga, Mufuta

    2017-01-01

    Zimbabwe targets reducing malaria incidence from 22/1000 in 2012 to 10/1000 by 2017, and malaria deaths to near zero by 2017. As the country moves forward with the malaria elimination efforts, it is crucial to monitor trends in malaria morbidity and mortality in the affected areas. In 2013, Manicaland Province contributed 51% of all malaria cases and 35% of all malaria deaths in Zimbabwe. This analysis describes the trends in malaria incidence, case fatality and malaria outpatient workload compared to the general outpatient workload. We analyzed routinely captured malaria data in Manicaland Province for the period 2005 to 2014. Epi Info version 7 was used to calculate chi-square trends for significance and Microsoft Excel was used to generate graphs. Permission to analyze the data was sought and granted by the Provincial Medical Directorate Institutional Review Board of Manicaland and the Health Studies office. Malaria morbidity data for the period 2005-2014 was reviewed and a total of 947,462 cases were confirmed during this period. However, malaria mortality data was only available for the period 2011-2014 and cumulatively 696 deaths were reported. Malaria incidence increased from 4.4/1,000 persons in 2005 to 116.3/1,000 persons in 2014 (pmalaria cases increased 30 fold from 0.3% in 2005 to 9.1% in 2014 (p-trendmalaria control strategies, the morbidity and mortality of malaria increased over the period under review. There is need for further strengthening of malaria control interventions to reduce the burden of the disease.

  3. The use of insecticide-treated nets for reducing malaria morbidity among children aged 6-59 months, in an area of high malaria transmission in central Côte d'Ivoire

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    Nsanzabana Christian

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs are an important tool for controlling malaria. Much attention has been devoted to determine both the effect of LLINs on the reduction of Plasmodium infection rate and on clinically-confirmed malaria cases in sub-Saharan Africa. We carried out an epidemiological study to investigate whether LLINs impact on Plasmodium prevalence rate and the proportion of clinically-confirmed malaria cases, in five villages in the district of Toumodi, central Côte d'Ivoire. Methods From April 2007 to November 2008, a community-based malaria control programme was implemented in the study villages, which involved large-scale distribution of LLINs, and training and sensitization activities within the community. We determined the effect of this programme on Plasmodium prevalence rate, clinically-confirmed malaria cases and proportion of high parasitaemia rates in children aged 6-59 months through a series of cross-sectional surveys starting in April 2007 and repeated once every 6 months. Results We observed a significant decrease in the mean P. falciparum prevalence rate from April 2007 to April 2008 (p = 0.029. An opposite trend was observed from November 2007 to November 2008 when P. falciparum prevalence rate increased significantly (p = 0.003. Highly significant decreases in the proportions of clinical malaria cases were observed between April 2007 and April 2008 (p Conclusions Large-scale distribution of LLINs, accompanied by training and sensitization activities, significantly reduced Plasmodium prevalence rates among young children in the first year of the project, whereas overall clinical malaria rates dropped over the entire 18-month project period. A decrease in community motivation to sleep under bed nets, perhaps along with changing patterns of malaria transmission, might explain the observed increase in the Plasmodium prevalence rate between November 2007 and November 2008.

  4. Use of integrated malaria management reduces malaria in Kenya.

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    Bernard A Okech

    owning and using an insecticide treated bed net and 81% reported buying the nets within the last 5 years. The community also used mosquito reduction measures including, in order of preference, environmental management (35%, mosquito repellent and smoke (31% insecticide canister sprays (11%, and window and door screens (6%. These methods used by the community comprise an integrated malaria management (IMM package. Over the last 4 years prior to this study, the malaria cases in the community hospital reduced from about 40% in 2000 to less than 10% by 2004 and by the year 2007 malaria cases decreased to zero. In addition, a one time cross-sectional malaria parasite survey detected no Plasmodium infection in 300 primary school children in the area. Mosquito vector populations were variable in the six villages but were generally lower in villages that did not engage in irrigation activities. The malaria risk as estimated by EIR remained low and varied by village and proximity to irrigation areas. The average EIR in the area was estimated at 0.011 infectious bites per person per day. CONCLUSIONS: The usage of a combination of malaria control tools in an integrated fashion by residents of Mwea division might have influenced the decreased malaria cases in the district hospital and in the school children. A vigorous campaign emphasizing IMM should be adopted and expanded in Mwea division and in other areas with different eco-epidemiological patterns of malaria transmission. With sustained implementation and support from community members integrated malaria management can reduce malaria significantly in affected communities in Africa.

  5. Assessing temporal associations between environmental factors and malaria morbidity at varying transmission settings in Uganda

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    Ruth Kigozi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Environmental factors play a major role in transmission of malaria given their relationship to both the development and survival of the mosquito and parasite. The associations between environmental factors and malaria can be used to inform the development of early warning systems for increases in malaria burden. The objective of this study was to assess temporal relationships between rainfall, temperature and vegetation with malaria morbidity across three different transmission settings in Uganda. Methods Temporal relationships between environmental factors (weekly total rainfall, mean day time temperature and enhanced vegetation index series and malaria morbidity (weekly malaria case count data and test positivity rate series over the period January 2010–May 2013 in three sites located in varying malaria transmission settings in Uganda was explored using cross-correlation with pre-whitening. Sites included Kamwezi (low transmission, Kasambya (moderate transmission and Nagongera (high transmission. Results Nagongera received the most rain (30.6 mm and experienced, on average, the highest daytime temperatures (29.8 °C per week. In the study period, weekly TPR and number of malaria cases were highest at Kasambya and lowest at Kamwezi. The largest cross-correlation coefficients between environmental factors and malaria morbidity for each site was 0.27 for Kamwezi (rainfall and cases, 0.21 for Kasambya (vegetation and TPR, and −0.27 for Nagongera (daytime temperature and TPR. Temporal associations between environmental factors (rainfall, temperature and vegetation with malaria morbidity (number of malaria cases and TPR varied by transmission setting. Longer time lags were observed at Kamwezi and Kasambya compared to Nagongera in the relationship between rainfall and number of malaria cases. Comparable time lags were observed at Kasambya and Nagongera in the relationship between temperature and malaria morbidity. Temporal

  6. Morbidity and mortality due to malaria in Est Mono district, Togo, from 2005 to 2010: a times series analysis

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    Landoh Essoya D

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2004, Togo adopted a regional strategy for malaria control that made use of insecticide-treated nets (ITNs, followed by the use of rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs, artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT. Community health workers (CHWs became involved in 2007. In 2010, the impact of the implementation of these new malaria control strategies had not yet been evaluated. This study sought to assess the trends of malaria incidence and mortality due to malaria in Est Mono district from 2005 to 2010. Methods Secondary data on confirmed and suspected malaria cases reported by health facilities from 2005 to 2010 were obtained from the district health information system. Rainfall and temperature data were provided by the national Department of Meteorology. Chi square test or independent student’s t-test were used to compare trends of variables at a 95% confidence interval. An interrupted time series analysis was performed to assess the effect of meteorological factors and the use of ACT and CHWs on morbidity and mortality due to malaria. Results From January 2005 to December 2010, 114,654 malaria cases (annual mean 19,109 ± 6,622 were reported with an increase of all malaria cases from 10,299 in 2005 to 26,678 cases in 2010 (p Conclusion This study showed an increase of malaria prevalence despite the implementation of the use of ACT and CHW strategies. Multicentre data analysis over longer periods should be carried out in similar settings to assess the impact of malaria control strategies on the burden of the disease. Integrated malaria vector control management should be implemented in Togo to reduce malaria transmission.

  7. Assessing the risk of self-diagnosed malaria in urban informal settlements of Nairobi using self-reported morbidity survey

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    Mugisha Frederick

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because of the belief that Nairobi is a low risk zone for malaria, little empirical data exists on malaria risk in the area. The aim of this study was to explore the risk of perceived malaria and some associated factors in Nairobi informal settlements using self-reported morbidity survey. Methods The survey was conducted from May to August 2004 on 7,288 individuals in two informal settlements of Nairobi. Participants were asked to report illnesses they experienced in the past 14 days. Logistic regression was used to estimate the odds of perceived-malaria. The model included variables such as site of residence, age, ethnicity and number of reported symptoms. Results Participants reported 165 illnesses among which malaria was the leading cause (28.1%. The risk of perceived-malaria was significantly higher in Viwandani compared to Korogocho (OR 1.61, 95%CI: 1.10–2.26. Participants in age group 25–39 years had significantly higher odds of perceived-malaria compared to those under-five years (OR 2.07, 95%CI: 1.43–2.98. The Kikuyu had reduced odds of perceived-malaria compared to other ethnic groups. Individuals with five and more symptoms had higher odds compared to those with no symptoms (OR 23.69, 95%CI: 12.98–43.23. Conclusion Malaria was the leading cause of illness as perceived by the residents in the two informal settlements. This was rational as the number of reported symptoms was highly associated with the risk of reporting the illness. These results highlight the need for a more comprehensive assessment of malaria epidemiology in Nairobi to be able to offer evidence-based guidance to policy on malaria in Kenya and particularly in Nairobi.

  8. Cross-sectional study defines difference in malaria morbidity in two Yanomami communities on Amazonian boundary between Brazil and Venezuela

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    Teodardo José Marcano

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that immunity to malaria is short-lived and is maintained by the continuous contact with the parasite. We now show that the stable transmission of malaria in Yanomami Amerindian communities maintains a degree of immunity in the exposed population capable to reduce prevalence and morbidity of malaria. We examined 508 Yanomami Amerindians living along Orinoco (407 and Mucajaí (101 rivers, on the Venezuelan and Brazilian Amazon region, respectively. At Orinoco villages, malaria was hyperendemic and presented stable transmission, while at Mucajaí villages it was mesoendemic and showed unstable transmission. The frequency of Plasmodium vivax and P. falciparum was roughly comparable in Venezuelan and Brazilian communities. Malaria presented different profiles at Orinoco and Mucajaí villages. In the former communities, malaria showed a lower prevalence (16% x 40.6%, particularly among those over 10 years old (5.2% x 34.8%, a higher frequency of asymptomatic cases (38.5% x 4.9%, and a lower frequency of cases of severe malaria (9.2% x 36.5%. Orinoco villagers also showed a higher reactivity of the immune system, measured by the frequency of splenomegaly (72.4% x 29.7% and by the splenic index (71.4% over level 1 x 28.6, and higher prevalence (91.1% x 72.1% and mean titer (1243 x 62 of antiplasmodial IgG antibodies, as well as a higher prevalence (77.4% x 24.7% and mean titer (120 x 35 of antiplasmodial IgM antibodies. Our findings show that in isolated Yanomami communities the stability of malaria transmission, and the consequent continuous activation of the immune system of the exposed population, leads to the reduction of malaria prevalence and morbidity.

  9. Assessment of Pregnancy Status, Malaria Knowledge and Malaria Fever Morbidity among Women of Reproductive Ages in Nigeria.

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    Abayomi Samuel Oyekale

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is one the major health problem in Nigeria. During pregnancy, it poses serious threat to the survival of both unborn foetus and the mothers. This study determined the effect of adequate malaria knowledge and pregnancy status of women on use of mosquito nets and reported malaria fever morbidity.The data were collected during the Malaria Indicator Survey (MIS from 4632 women. Data analyses were carried out with descriptive statistics and Seemingly Unrelated Bivariate Probit regression.Results show that 13.19% of the women were pregnant, of which about one-third slept under mosquito nets. Also, 25.26% reported malaria associated fever in the previous two weeks to the time of interview, while 78.28% correctly answered that mosquitoes are responsible for malaria. Knowledge on malaria prevention was low with 55.70% and 14.93% indicating sleeping under mosquito nets and ITN, respectively. Probability of sleeping under mosquito nets significantly increased with knowing that sleeping under mosquito nets and ITN could prevent malaria while it decreased with having fever, age, urban residence and knowing that use of mosquito spray and coil can prevent malaria. The probability of having fever increased significantly with household size, being pregnant and age at first birth but decreased with age, knowing that sleeping under ITN, cutting grasses and closing door/windows would prevent malaria.Use of mosquito nets among the women was low. Also, efforts to enhance their knowledge on malaria prevention and ensuring adequate access to mosquito nets especially for pregnant women would curtail the impact of malaria.

  10. Does Measles Immunization Reduce Diarrhoeal Morbidity

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    Reddaiah V.P

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Research question: 1. Will measles vaccination reduce the incidence and during of diarrhoeal episodes in children? 2. Will measles vaccination reduce the morbidity load because of diarrhoea? Objectives: 1. To provide measles immunization to rural children 9 to 24 months of age. 2. to study the occurrence of diarrhoeal episodes by domicillary visits every month for a period of 1 year. Design: Longitudinal study. Setting: Rural area in the state of Haryana. Participants: Children between the ages of 9 and 24 months with parental informed consent. Study variables: diarrhoeal episodes per child/year, duration of diarrhoea. Outcome Variable: the difference between the two groups (immunized and non- immunized of attack rate and duration of diarrhoeal episodes. Statistical Analysis: Chi square test. Results: immunization coverage was 75%. Attack rates of diarrhoea in immunized children (1.6/child/year was no different to that in the non- immunized (1.5/child/year. The mean duration of diarrhoea in both groups was 2.3 days. The prevalence diarrhoea in immunized and non-immunized was 3.85 and 3.67 respectively. Conclusion: Measles vaccination has no impact on diarrhoeal morbidity.

  11. Reducing empiricism in malaria vaccine design.

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    Moorthy, Vasee S; Kieny, Marie Paule

    2010-03-01

    Gains in the control of malaria and the promising progress of a malaria vaccine that is partly efficacious do not reduce the need for a high-efficacy vaccine in the longer term. Evidence supports the feasibility of developing a highly efficacious malaria vaccine. However, design of candidate malaria vaccines remains empirical and is necessarily based on many unproven assumptions because much of the knowledge needed to design vaccines and to predict efficacy is not available. Data to inform key questions of vaccine science might allow the design of vaccines to progress to a less empirical stage, for example through availability of assay results associated with vaccine efficacy. We discuss six strategic gaps in knowledge that contribute to empiricism in the design of vaccines. Comparative evaluation, assay and model standardisation, greater sharing of information, collaboration and coordination between groups, and rigorous evaluation of existing datasets are steps that can be taken to enable reductions in empiricism over time. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Malaria morbidity and temperature variation in a low risk Kenyan district: a case of overdiagnosis?

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    Njuguna, John; Muita, James; Mundia, George

    2009-05-01

    Diagnosis of malaria using only clinical means leads to overdiagnosis. This has implications due to safety concerns and the recent introduction of more expensive drugs. Temperature is a major climatic factor influencing the transmission dynamics of malaria. This study looked at trends in malaria morbidity in the low risk Kenyan district of Nyandarua, coupled with data on temperature and precipitation for the years 2003-2006. July had the highest number of cases (12.2% of all cases) followed by August (10.2% of all cases). July and August also had the lowest mean maximum temperatures, 20.1 and 20.2 °C respectively. April, July and August had the highest rainfall, with daily means of 4.0, 4.3 and 4.9 mm, respectively. Observation showed that the coldest months experienced the highest number of cases of malaria. Despite the high rainfall, transmission of malaria tends to be limited by low temperatures due to the long duration required for sporogony, with fewer vectors surviving. These cold months also tend to have the highest number of cases of respiratory infections. There is a possibility that some of these were misdiagnosed as malaria based on the fact that only a small proportion of malaria cases were diagnosed using microscopy or rapid diagnostic tests. We conclude that overdiagnosis may be prevalent in this district and there may be a need to design an intervention to minimise it.

  13. Malaria morbidity in high and seasonal malaria transmission area of Burkina Faso.

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    Alphonse Ouédraogo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Malariometric parameters are often primary endpoints of efficacy trials of malaria vaccine candidates. This study aims to describe the epidemiology of malaria prior to the conduct of a series of drug and vaccine trials in a rural area of Burkina Faso. METHODS: Malaria incidence was prospectively evaluated over one year follow-up among two cohorts of children aged 0-5 years living in the Saponé health district. The parents of 1089 children comprising a passive case detection cohort were encouraged to seek care from the local health clinic at any time their child felt sick. Among this cohort, 555 children were randomly selected for inclusion in an active surveillance sub-cohort evaluated for clinical malaria during twice weekly home visits. Malaria prevalence was evaluated by cross-sectional survey during the low and high transmission seasons. RESULTS: Number of episodes per child ranged from 0 to 6 per year. Cumulative incidence was 67.4% in the passive and 86.2% in the active cohort and was highest among children 0-1 years. Clinical malaria prevalence was 9.8% in the low and 13.0% in the high season (p>0.05. Median days to first malaria episode ranged from 187 (95% CI 180-193 among children 0-1 years to 228 (95% CI 212, 242 among children 4-5 years. The alternative parasite thresholds for the malaria case definition that achieved optimal sensitivity and specificity (70-80% were 3150 parasites/µl in the high and 1350 parasites/µl in the low season. CONCLUSION: Clinical malaria burden was highest among the youngest age group children, who may represent the most appropriate target population for malaria vaccine candidate development. The pyrogenic threshold of parasitaemia varied markedly by season, suggesting a value for alternative parasitaemia levels in the malaria case defintion. Regional epidemiology of malaria described, Sapone area field centers are positioned for future conduct of malaria vaccine trials.

  14. Malaria prevalence and morbidity among children reporting at health facilities in Nouakchott, Mauritania.

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    Lekweiry, Khadijetou Mint; Basco, Leonardo K; Salem, Mohamed Salem O Ahmedou; Hafid, Jamal Eddine; Marin-Jauffre, Adeline; Weddih, Abdallahi O; Briolant, Sébastien; Bogreau, Hervé; Pradines, Bruno; Rogier, Christophe; Trape, Jean-François; Boukhary, Ali O Mohamed Salem O

    2011-12-01

    Although malaria has become a serious public health problem in Mauritania since the late 1990s, few documented data on its epidemiology exist. The objective of this study was to assess the morbidity of clinical malaria among children in Nouakchott. Three hundred and one febrile children, consulting at three health facilities of Nouakchott, were screened for malaria in 2009 (n=216) and 2010 (n=85). Plasmodium species identification and parasite density were determined by microscopic examination of Giemsa-stained thin and thick films and confirmed by rapid diagnostic test and nested PCR. Of 301 febrile children, 105 (34.9%) were malaria-positive by nested PCR and 87 (28.9%) by microscopy. Plasmodium vivax represented 97.1% (102/105) and P. falciparum accounted for 2.9% (3/105) of positive cases. All positive children under five years old were infected with P. vivax. The highest numbers of malaria positives were found during or shortly after the rainy season and the lowest during the dry season. Fifty-four of 105 (51.4%) malaria cases, all with P. vivax, had never travelled outside Nouakchott. Individuals belonging to the Moors ethnic group represented 97.0% of P. vivax cases. Results of the present study indicate that malaria is endemic in Nouakchott and that P. vivax is the principal causative agent. Regular surveillance is required to monitor malaria prevalence and incidence, and further measures are needed to counter the possible spread of malaria in the country. Copyright © 2011 Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Indoor residual spraying of insecticide and malaria morbidity in a high transmission intensity area of Uganda.

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    Ruth Kigozi

    Full Text Available Recently the use of indoor residual spraying of insecticide (IRS has greatly increased in Africa; however, limited data exist on the quantitative impacts of IRS on health outcomes in highly malaria endemic areas.Routine data were collected on more than 90,000 patient visits at a single health facility over a 56 month period covering five rounds of IRS using three different insecticides. Temporal associations between the timing of IRS and the probability of a patient referred for microscopy having laboratory confirmed malaria were estimated controlling for seasonality and age. Considering patients less than five years of age there was a modest decrease in the odds of malaria following the 1(st round of IRS using DDT (OR = 0.76, p<0.001 and the 2(nd round using alpha-cypermethrin (OR = 0.83, p = 0.002. Following rounds 3-5 using bendiocarb there was a much greater decrease in the odds of malaria (ORs 0.34, 0.16, 0.17 respectively, p<0.001 for all comparisons. Overall, the impact of IRS was less pronounced among patients 5 years or older.IRS was associated with a reduction in malaria morbidity in an area of high transmission intensity in Uganda and the benefits appeared to be greatest after switching to a carbamate class of insecticide.

  16. Morbidity from malaria and immune responses to defined Plasmodium falciparum antigens in children with sickle cell trait in The Gambia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allen, S J; Bennett, S; Riley, E M

    1993-01-01

    Morbidity from Plasmodium falciparum malaria and humoral and in vitro cellular immune responses to defined malaria antigens were measured in rural Gambian children with haemoglobin phenotype AS (HbAS) and in those with a normal haemoglobin (HbAA). In a survey undertaken during the dry season, HbA...

  17. A 20-year longitudinal study of Plasmodium ovale and Plasmodium malariae prevalence and morbidity in a West African population.

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    Clémentine Roucher

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plasmodium ovale and Plasmodium malariae have long been reported to be widely distributed in tropical Africa and in other major malaria-endemic areas of the world. However, little is known about the burden caused by these two malaria species. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We did a longitudinal study of the inhabitants of Dielmo village, Senegal, between June, 1990, and December, 2010. We monitored the inhabitants for fever during this period and performed quarterly measurements of parasitemia. We analyzed parasitological and clinical data in a random-effect logistic regression model to investigate the relationship between the level of parasitemia and the risk of fever and to establish diagnostic criteria for P. ovale and P. malariae clinical attacks. The prevalence of P. ovale and P. malariae infections in asymptomatic individuals were high during the first years of the project but decreased after 2004 and almost disappeared in 2010 in relation to changes in malaria control policies. The average incidence densities of P. ovale and P. malariae clinical attacks were 0.053 and 0.093 attacks per person per year in children <15 years and 0.024 and 0.009 attacks per person per year in adults ≥ 15 years, respectively. These two malaria species represented together 5.9% of the malaria burden. CONCLUSIONS: P. ovale and P. malariae were a common cause of morbidity in Dielmo villagers until the recent dramatic decrease of malaria that followed the introduction of new malaria control policies. P. ovale and P. malariae may constitute an important cause of morbidity in many areas of tropical Africa.

  18. Insecticide Resistance Reducing Effectiveness of Malaria Control

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-01-24

    Malaria prevention is increasingly insecticide based. Dr. John Gimnig, an entomologist with the Division of Parasitic Diseases, CDC, discusses evidence that mosquito resistance to insecticides, which is measured in the laboratory, could compromise malaria prevention in the field.  Created: 1/24/2007 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 3/13/2007.

  19. Reduced Hsp70 and Glutamine in Pediatric Severe Malaria Anemia

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    Kempaiah, Prakasha; Dokladny, Karol; Karim, Zachary

    2016-01-01

    Severe malarial anemia [SMA, hemoglobin (Hb) SMA was characterized...... in malaria pathogenesis is unexplored, we investigated Hsp70 and molecular pathways in children with SMA. Validation experiments revealed that leukocytic HSP70 transcripts were reduced in SMA relative to non-severe malaria, and that intraleukocytic hemozoin (PfHz) was associated with lower HSP70. HSP70...... was correlated with reticulocyte production and Hb. Since glutamine (Gln) up-regulates Hsp70, modulates NF-κB activation, and attenuates over-expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, circulating Gln was measured in children with malaria. Reduced Gln was associated with increased risk of developing SMA...

  20. Reduced social morbidity of laparoscopic appendectomy in children.

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    Tantoco, Joselito G; Levitt, Marc A; Hollands, Celeste M; Brisseau, Guy F; Caty, Michael G; Glick, Philip L

    2004-09-01

    Laparoscopic appendectomy has not been uniformly adopted by pediatric surgeons. Our children's hospital adopted laparoscopic appendectomy due to perceived benefits to patients and their families. We hypothesized that laparoscopic appendectomy in children resulted in less social morbidity than those undergoing open appendectomy. A questionnaire focused on a set of postoperative variables affecting the patient's and the family's return to normal activities. Families expressed their answers as a range of days. Five different ranges were assigned a numerical value for 10 different social morbidity variables. The numerical values were analyzed using Pearson chi2 test; statistical significance was defined as P appendicitis. Children undergoing laparoscopic appendectomy had shorter hospital stays and earlier resumption of feeding, return to school, return to pain-free walking and stair climbing, and resumption of normal activities including gym. Additionally, they had fewer wound problems, shorter duration of oral pain medication usage, and their parents returned to work quicker than the open group. All these were statistically significant. Laparoscopic appendectomy results in significantly reduced social morbidity for children and their families.

  1. EFFECT OF DEXAMETHASONE FOR REDUCING POST - TONSILLECTOMY MORBIDITY

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    Hiremath

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND SURVEY: Vital healthcare resources are devoted to caring patients with prolonged hospitalization after routine, moderate risk surgery. Complications are assessed using a postoperative morbidity. Methods for reducing pain, nausea and vomiting after tonsillectomy are important to improve the standard of care our patients receive. OBJECTIVE: To determine the effects of a single dose of dexamethasone on post operative morbidity in patients undergoing tonsillectomy/adenotonsillectomy. DESIGN: It is a prospective double - blind randomized placebo controlled clinical investigation with ethical approval. METHODS : 60 patients (41 male and 19 female aged between 4 - 15 years of ASA I - II undergoing tonsillectomy /adenotonsillectomy were the participants in this study. Patients were randomized to receive a single dose of IV dexamethasone or Placebo (saline. Post operative pain was assessed using either objective pain scale (OPS or visual analogue scale (VAS. Ane sthetic and surgical techniques were standardized. RESULTS : Statistically significant relative decrease in incidence of post operative pain, nausea and vomiting was seen in those treated with dexamethasone. Even statistically significant differences were s een in tolerance to oral fluids and discharge from the hospital between two groups. Tramadol 1 mg/kg n the first 6 hours and oral paracetamol 10ug/kg in the next 6 - 24 hours were administered. If OPS > 6 or VAS> 40 occurred. Incidence of nausea, vomiting an d tonsillar bed oedema was noted. Pain scores were significantly less in dexamethasone group compared to control group. CONCLUSION : Dexamethasone given as a single dose of 0.15mg/kg at the time of induction of anesthesia is an effective safe and inexpensiv e method of reducing morbidity in tonsillectomy.

  2. Reduced risk for placental malaria in iron deficient women

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    Senga, E.L.; Harper, G.; Koshy, G.; Kazembe, P.N.; Brabin, B.J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Nutritional iron deficiency may limit iron availability to the malaria parasite reducing infection risk, and/or impair host immunity thereby increasing this risk. In pregnant women, there is evidence of an adverse effect with iron supplementation, but the few reported studies are strongl

  3. Antibiotics do not reduce post-tonsillectomy morbidity in children.

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    Al-Layla, Abdulmonem; Mahafza, Tareq M

    2013-01-01

    The objectives are to assess the efficacy of antibiotics in reducing post-tonsillectomy morbidities in children. This is a clinical trial study that was undertaken at the Jordan University Hospital during the period from June 2008 to July 2009. All patients undergoing tonsillectomy were randomly divided into two matched groups on alternating basis: group A included patients who received antibiotics (amoxicillin with clavulanic acid) for 5 days in the post-tonsillectomy period and group B included patients who received none. The two groups were compared with respect to fever, secondary bleeding, throat pain, and the time to resume to normal diet. Bleeding was more common in group A (5.5 %) than in group B (2 %). The average duration of throat pain was 4.2 days in group A, while it was 3.9 days in group B. The average time to resume normal diet was 5.7 days in group A, whereas it was 5.3 days in group B. Fever was noted in 17 (31 %) patients from group A, while it was observed in 15 (30 %) patients from group B. The use of antibiotics in the post-tonsillectomy period does not reduce post-operative morbidity in children and therefore it is advised to use antibiotics on an individual basis rather than routinely for patients undergoing tonsillectomy.

  4. Reduced erythrocyte deformability associated with hypoargininemia during Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

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    Rey, Juliana; Buffet, Pierre A; Ciceron, Liliane; Milon, Geneviève; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Safeukui, Innocent

    2014-01-20

    The mechanisms underlying reduced red blood cell (RBC) deformability during Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) malaria remain poorly understood. Here, we explore the possible involvement of the L-arginine and nitric oxide (NO) pathway on RBC deformability in Pf-infected patients and parasite cultures. RBC deformability was reduced during the acute attack (day0) and returned to normal values upon convalescence (day28). Day0 values correlated with plasma L-arginine levels (r = 0.69; p = 0.01) and weakly with parasitemia (r = -0.38; p = 0.006). In vitro, day0 patient's plasma incubated with ring-stage cultures at 41°C reduced RBC deformability, and this effect correlated strongly with plasma L-arginine levels (r = 0.89; p falciparum malaria may altogether impair NO production and reduce RBC deformability, particularly at febrile temperature.

  5. Malaria prevention with IPTp during pregnancy reduces neonatal mortality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Menéndez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the global context of a reduction of under-five mortality, neonatal mortality is an increasingly relevant component of this mortality. Malaria in pregnancy may affect neonatal survival, though no strong evidence exists to support this association. METHODS: In the context of a randomised, placebo-controlled trial of intermittent preventive treatment (IPTp with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP in 1030 Mozambican pregnant women, 997 newborns were followed up until 12 months of age. There were 500 live borns to women who received placebo and 497 to those who received SP. FINDINGS: There were 58 infant deaths; 60.4% occurred in children born to women who received placebo and 39.6% to women who received IPTp (p = 0.136. There were 25 neonatal deaths; 72% occurred in the placebo group and 28% in the IPTp group (p = 0.041. Of the 20 deaths that occurred in the first week of life, 75% were babies born to women in the placebo group and 25% to those in the IPTp group (p = 0.039. IPTp reduced neonatal mortality by 61.3% (95% CI 7.4%, 83.8%; p = 0.024]. CONCLUSIONS: Malaria prevention with SP in pregnancy can reduce neonatal mortality. Mechanisms associated with increased malaria infection at the end of pregnancy may explain the excess mortality in the malaria less protected group. Alternatively, SP may have reduced the risk of neonatal infections. These findings are of relevance to promote the implementation of IPTp with SP, and provide insights into the understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms through which maternal malaria affects fetal and neonatal health. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00209781.

  6. A Research Agenda for Malaria Eradication: Vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    ,

    2011-01-01

    Vaccines could be a crucial component of efforts to eradicate malaria. Current attempts to develop malaria vaccines are primarily focused on Plasmodium falciparum and are directed towards reducing morbidity and mortality. Continued support for these efforts is essential, but if malaria vaccines are to be used as part of a repertoire of tools for elimination or eradication of malaria, they will need to have an impact on malaria transmission. We introduce the concept of “vaccines that interrupt...

  7. Time-series analysis on the malaria morbidity affected by meteorological factors in Guangdong province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗圆

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the associations between malaria risk and meteorological factors. Methods A negative binomial distribution regression analysis was built between the temperature,relative humidity,rainfall capacity and the monthly incidence of malaria,based on the temperature information

  8. Malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quartan malaria; Falciparum malaria; Biduoterian fever; Blackwater fever; Tertian malaria; Plasmodium ... now only suggested for use in areas where Plasmodium vivax , P. ... is becoming increasingly resistant to anti-malarial medications ...

  9. Plasmodium falciparum multiple infections in Mozambique, its relation to other malariological indices and to prospective risk of malaria morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayor, Alfredo; Saute, Francisco; Aponte, John J; Almeda, Jesús; Gómez-Olivé, F Xavier; Dgedge, Martinho; Alonso, Pedro L

    2003-01-01

    We describe the frequency of Plasmodium falciparum clones infecting individuals living in a rural area of southern Mozambique and analyse the relationship between multiplicity of infection, age and other malariometric indices, including prospective risk of clinical malaria. The genotyping was based on the use of restriction fragment length polymorphism-polymerase chain reaction (RFLP-PCR) analysis of P. falciparum merozoite surface protein 2 (msp2). We analysed 826 samples collected during five cross-sectional surveys from residents of Manhiça ranging in age from 4 months to 83 years. We also determined the multiplicity of infection in samples obtained from 6-month-old infants (n = 79) and children <10 years (n = 158) who were then treated and followed prospectively for 1 year or 75 weeks, respectively. Multiplicity of infection did not vary significantly during the first year of life, but increased thereafter, and decreased during adulthood to the levels found in infants. With increasing multiplicity of infection, there was a statistically significant decrease in the risk of submicroscopic infections. There was also a significant correlation between multiplicity of infection and parasite density in infants, children <4 years of age and adults, suggesting that high densities increase the probability of discriminating more clones in complex infections. We found that the relationship between multiple infections and malaria morbidity is age-dependent. In infants, the risk of subsequent episodes of clinical malaria was related to the parasite density but not to baseline multiplicity of infection. In older children, however, the more clones a child carried, the more likely they were to have a clinical malaria episode, and this was true after adjusting for parasite densities. This change in the association between multiplicity and risk of clinical malaria may indicate a shift in the host response to P. falciparum.

  10. The role of vitamin A in reducing child mortality and morbidity and improving growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RAMAKRISHNAN USHA

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available This is an update of knowledge on the role of the vitamin A status in determining child mortality, morbidity and growth. Recent information confirms the earlier conclusion of Beaton et al. that a 23% reduction in young child mortality results following improvements in the vitamin A status. Studies show that the mortality effect is primarily due to reductions in deaths due to acute gastroenteritis and measles but not acute respiratory infections (ARI and malaria. While improvement of the vitamin A status enhances the survival of older preschool children, it remains unclear whether it benefits infants (i.e. <6 months. Vitamin A supplementation does not reduce the overall incidence and prevalence of common childhood illness; however, it reduces the incidence of more severe episodes of diarrhea. Also, vitamin A supplementation either during and/or immediately after the illness does not improve its symptomatology. Finally, contrary to earlier expectations, recently completed, placebo-controlled randomized interventions have failed to detect improvements in child growth.

  11. Screening for reducing morbidity and mortality in malignant melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Minna; Brodersen, John; Gøtzsche, Peter C.

    2016-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To assess the effects on morbidity and mortality of screening for malignant melanoma in the general population.......This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To assess the effects on morbidity and mortality of screening for malignant melanoma in the general population....

  12. Pengendalian Malaria dalam Upaya Percepatan Pencapaian Target Millennium Development Goals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tri Rini Puji Lestari

    2012-08-01

    health official Malaria Center, and community leaders who observe malaria. Retrieval of data time is 10 – 16 April 2011 by in-depth interviews. It was found that malaria control programs have been implemented by the Departement of Health North Maluku Province, but have not been able to effectively reduce malaria morbidity. This is because malaria control is performed is not comprehensive. Handling is more directed to break the chain transmission to human, their habitats have not been touched up. Key words: Control of malaria, millennium development goals, malaria morbidity

  13. Effect of preventive supplementation with zinc and other micronutrients on malaria and diarrhoeal morbidity in African children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenemans, J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Zinc is important for innate and adaptive immune responses to infection. Preventive zinc supplementation has been shown to reduce the incidence of acute diarrhoea by 20%. Few trials have evaluated its effect against malaria. Because trial results for both outcomes are inconsistent,

  14. Malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and can even be fatal. SymptomsWhat are the symptoms of malaria?The symptoms of malaria include:High fever (can often be 104° F ... give someone else malaria?If I do get malaria, should I travel while I have symptoms? Other organizationsInternational Society of Travel MedicineCenters for Disease ...

  15. Trends in malaria morbidity following the introduction of artesunate plus amodiaquine combination in M'lomp village dispensary, south-western Senegal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesran Jean

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Thailand, South Africa and Zanzibar, a decrease in malaria morbidity was observed following the introduction of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT. In Senegal, therapeutic trials supervised the in vivo efficacy of artesunate plus amodiaquine from 1999 to 2005 at the M'lomp village dispensary. The trends in malaria morbidity in this village were evaluated from 2000 to 2002. Methods Each year, between July and December inclusive, fevers treated with antimalarials and slide-proven, uncomplicated malaria cases were collected from dispensary health records. Data were also collected in 1998, just prior to ACT introduction. Pearson's chi square tests and Student tests were used to compare two percentages or two means respectively (α = 0.05. Results Between 1998 and 2002, the total number of fevers treated with antimalarials and their repetitiveness progressively decreased: From 2824 to 945 fevers and from 17.6% to 9.7% (RR1998–2002 = 0.55; [0.44–0.69]; p 2000–2002 = 0.51; [0.35–0.72]; p = 0.0001. Conclusion The percentage of uncomplicated malaria cases treated with ACT increased, from 18.9% in 2000 to 64.0% in 2002, making it tempting to conclude an impact on malaria morbidity. Nonetheless, the decline in incidence rate of uncomplicated malaria was slight and a lower recorded rainfall was reported in 2002 which could also explain this decline. The context in which ACT is introduced affects the impact on malaria morbidity. In M'lomp, in contrast to studies in Thailand, South Africa and Zanzibar, ACT coverage of malaria cases was low and no vector control measure was deployed. Moreover, the malaria transmission level is higher. In sub-Saharan countries, in order to optimize the impact on malaria morbidity, ACT deployment must be supported, on the one hand, by a strengthening of public health system to ensure a high ACT coverage and, on the other hand, by others measures, such vector control measures.

  16. Routine delivery of artemisinin-based combination treatment at fixed health facilities reduces malaria prevalence in Tanzania: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khatib Rashid A

    2012-04-01

    fixed health facilities only modestly reduced asexual parasitaemia prevalence. ACT is effective for treatment of uncomplicated malaria and should have substantial public health impact on morbidity and mortality, but is unlikely to reduce malaria transmission substantially in much of sub-Saharan Africa where individuals are rapidly re-infected.

  17. Malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupasquier, Isabelle

    1989-01-01

    Malaria, the greatest pandemia in the world, claims an estimated one million lives each year in Africa alone. While it may still be said that for the most part malaria is found in what is known as the world's poverty belt, cases are now frequently diagnosed in western countries. Due to resistant strains of malaria which have developed because of…

  18. Malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupasquier, Isabelle

    1989-01-01

    Malaria, the greatest pandemia in the world, claims an estimated one million lives each year in Africa alone. While it may still be said that for the most part malaria is found in what is known as the world's poverty belt, cases are now frequently diagnosed in western countries. Due to resistant strains of malaria which have developed because of…

  19. Reducing microscopy-based malaria misdiagnosis in a low ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    treatment, but potentially the acceleration of the spread of drug resistance in ... a valuable and sustainable change in malaria diagnosis at the local hospital. ... The 2010 World Health Organization (WHO) Guidelines for the Treatment of Malaria ... resources on drug purchase, over-medication of children, drug shortages, and ...

  20. Laparoscopic colectomy reduces morbidity and mortality in obese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardiman, Karin; Chang, Eric T; Diggs, Brian S; Lu, Kim C

    2013-08-01

    Obesity is a growing epidemic in the US and increases the difficulty of laparoscopic surgery. Randomized, controlled trials of laparoscopic vs. open colectomy have shown equivalence but often exclude obese patients thus not answering whether obese patients may specifically benefit from laparoscopy. We hypothesized that obese patients would benefit from use of laparoscopy for colectomy. We used the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database from 2005 to 2009 and chose elective laparoscopic and open segmental colectomy and ileocecal resections. We compared patients' demographics, comorbidities, and outcomes. We used multivariate models to assess for predictors of complications in obese patients. These models included demographics, comorbidities, and outcomes. 35,998 patients were identified who underwent elective colectomy with primary anastomosis. Forty-four percent of the included cases were laparoscopic and 31 % of patients had a BMI greater than 30 (obese). Obese patients were more likely to have diabetes, hypertension, prior percutaneous coronary intervention, and dyspnea on exertion. We constructed a new variable called any complication that included all complications except 30-day mortality. In our multivariate analysis, laparoscopic approach in obese patients independently decreased the relative risk of superficial (odds ratio (OR) 0.72, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.63-0.82) and deep (OR 0.44, CI 0.31-0.61) surgical site infections, intra-abdominal infection (OR 0.61, CI 0.49-0.78), dehiscence (OR 0.50, CI 0.35-0.69), pneumonia (OR 0.60, CI 0.44-0.81), failure to wean from the ventilator (OR 0.64, CI 0.47-0.87), renal failure (OR 0.58, CI 0.35-0.96), urinary tract infection (OR 0.62, CI 0.49-0.79), sepsis (OR 0.53, CI 0.43-0.66), septic shock (OR 0.65, CI 0.47-0.90), any complication (OR 0.61, CI 0.55-0.67) and 30-day mortality (OR 0.56, CI 0.31-0.98). Due to the significant decrease in the risk of morbidity and mortality, laparoscopic

  1. Elevated Blood Lead Levels Are Associated with Reduced Risk of Malaria in Beninese Infants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violeta Moya-Alvarez

    Full Text Available Elevated blood lead levels (BLL and malaria carry an important burden of disease in West Africa. Both diseases might cause anemia and they might entail long-term consequences for the development and the health status of the child. Albeit the significant impact of malaria on lead levels described in Nigeria, no evaluation of the effect of elevated BLL on malaria risk has been investigated so far.Between 2010 and 2012, blood lead levels of 203 Beninese infants from Allada, a semi-rural area 50km North from Cotonou, were assessed at 12 months of age. To assess lead levels, blood samples were analyzed by mass spectrometry. In parallel, clinical, microbiological and hematological data were collected. More precisely, hemoglobin, serum ferritin, CRP, vitamin B12, folate levels, and Plasmodium falciparum parasitemia were assessed and stool samples were also analyzed.At 12 months, the mean BLL of infants was 7.41 μg/dL (CI: 65.2; 83, and 128 infants (63% had elevated blood lead levels, defined by the CDC as BLL>5 μg/dL. Lead poisoning, defined as BLL>10 μg/dL, was found in 39 infants (19%. Twenty-five infants (12.5% had a positive blood smear at 12 months and 144 infants were anemic (71%, hemoglobin<110 g/L. Elevated blood lead levels were significantly associated with reduced risk of a positive blood smear (AOR = 0.38, P-value = 0.048 and P. falciparum parasite density (beta-estimate = -1.42, P-value = 0.03 in logistic and negative binomial regression multivariate models, respectively, adjusted on clinical and environmental indicators.Our study shows for the first time that BLL are negatively associated with malarial risk considering other risk factors. Malaria is one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality in infants under 5 years worldwide, and lead poisoning is the 6th most important contributor to the global burden of diseases measured in disability adjusted life years (DALYs according to the Institute of Health Metrics. In conclusion, due

  2. Impact of mass distribution of free long-lasting insecticidal nets on childhood malaria morbidity: The Togo National Integrated Child Health Campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sodahlon Yao K

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An evaluation of the short-term impact on childhood malaria morbidity of mass distribution of free long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs to households with children aged 9-59 months as part of the Togo National Integrated Child Health Campaign. Methods The prevalence of anaemia and malaria in children aged zero to 59 months was measured during two cross-sectional household cluster-sample surveys conducted during the peak malaria transmission, three months before (Sept 2004, n = 2521 and nine months after the campaign (Sept 2005, n = 2813 in three districts representative of Togo's three epidemiological malaria transmission regions: southern tropical coastal plains (Yoto, central fertile highlands (Ogou and northern semi-arid savannah (Tone. Results In households with children 65% in all 3 districts. Reported ITN use by children during the previous night was 35.9%, 43.8% and 80.6% in Yoto, Ogou and Tone, respectively. Rainfall patterns were comparable in both years. The overall prevalence of moderate to severe anaemia (Hb The effect was predominantly seen in children aged 18-59 months and in the two southern districts: PR (95% CI for moderate to severe anaemia and clinical malaria: Yoto 0.62 (0.44-0.88 and 0.49 (0.35-0.75; Ogou 0.54 (0.37-0.79 and 0.85 (0.57-1.27, respectively. Similar reductions occurred in children Conclusions A marked reduction in childhood malaria associated morbidity was observed in the year following mass distribution of free LLINs in two of the three districts in Togo. Sub-national level impact evaluations will contribute to a better understanding of the impact of expanding national malaria control efforts.

  3. A prospective study of the influence of a thalassaemia on morbidity from malaria and immune responses to defined Plasmodium falciparum antigens in Gambian children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allen, S J; Rowe, P; Allsopp, C E

    1993-01-01

    and morbidity from malaria determined by weekly surveillance were similar in children with alpha thalassaemia and in those with a normal alpha-globin genotype. However, the small number of children who carried both alpha thalassaemia and the sickle cell trait had fewer clinical episodes of malaria than children...... with the sickle cell trait alone. Specific antibody responses and cell-mediated immune responses in vitro to defined Plasmodium falciparum antigens were measured in children participating in the study. In general, there was no evidence of an increased prevalence or intensity of humoral or cell-mediated immune...

  4. Malaria Parasitemia in Children Aged less than 5 Years Presenting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Malaria is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in sub Saharan Africa. ... An appraisal of this disease among these children is important to reducing ... and September 2011, were examined for presence of malaria parasites. ... Anti-malaria Combination Therapy (ACT) drugs were the commonest drugs ...

  5. [WHO's malaria program Roll Back Malaria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrvang, B; Godal, T

    2000-05-30

    Malaria is one of the main health problems in the world with 300-500 millions cases yearly and about one million deaths, mainly children in Sub-Saharan Africa. In the 1990s the malaria problem in Africa has increased, although we have methods to control the disease. In 1998 the new secretary general of WHO, Gro Harlem Brundtland, established the Roll Back Malaria programme, with the aim to markedly reduce malaria morbidity and mortality. Governments in malaria-affected countries have to take the lead in Roll Back Malaria. Their health systems must be improved and malaria control integrated into the general health system, and the methods available for prevention and treatment have to be intensified and improved. At the same time, Roll Back Malaria will encourage and promote malaria research which hopefully will result in new medicines, vaccines and other tools which will improve the chances of reducing malaria-related deaths and suffering. Roll Back Malaria is a cabinet project within the WHO, and the organisation has a key role as manager, co-ordinator and monitor of the project. However, it depends for resources on international support and commitment from other UN bodies, the World Bank, governments in the western world, pharmaceutical industry, philanthropists and other sources. At present an optimistic view prevails, and the preliminary aim, to halve the malaria mortality by the year 2010, seems realistic even with the control methods of today. However, if research efforts result in new and better tools to combat the disease, the task will definitely be easier.

  6. Malaria vaccine: a step toward elimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jindal, Harashish; Bhatt, Bhumika; Malik, Jagbir S; Sk, Shashikantha; Mehta, Bharti

    2014-01-01

    Malaria has long been recognized as a public health problem. At the community level, vector control, and antimalarial medicines are the main means for reducing incidence, morbidity, and mortality of malaria. A vaccine not only would bring streamlining in the prevention of morbidity and mortality from malaria but also would be more accessible if integrated with Expanded Programme of Immunization (EPI). Globally, an estimated 3.4 billion people are at risk of malaria. Most cases (80%) and deaths (90%) occurred in Africa, and most deaths (77%) are in children under 5 years of age. An effective vaccine has long been envisaged as a valuable addition to the available tools for malaria control. Although research toward the development of malaria vaccines has been pursued since the 1960s, there are no licensed malaria vaccines. The RTS,S/AS01 vaccine, which targets P. falciparum, has reached phase 3 clinical trials and results are promising. Malaria Vaccine Technology Road Map 2013 has envisaged the world aiming for a licensed vaccine by 2030 that would reduce malaria cases by 75% and be capable of eliminating malaria. It will not only fill the gaps of today's interventions but also be a cost-effective method of decreasing morbidity and mortality from malaria.

  7. A research agenda for malaria eradication: vaccines.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdulla, S.; Agre, P.; Alonso, P.L.; Arevalo-Herrera, M.; Bassat, Q.; Binka, F.; Chitnis, C.; Corradin, G.; Cowman, A. F.; Culpepper, J.; Portillo, H. del; Dinglasan, R.R.; Duffy, P.; Gargallo, D.; Greenwood, B.; Guinovart, C.; Hall, B.F.; Herrera, S.; Hoffman, S.; Lanzavecchia, A.; Leroy, O.; Levine, M.M.; Loucq, C.; Mendis, K.; Milman, J.; Moorthy, V.S.; Pleuschke, G.; Plowe, C.V.; Reed, S.; Sauerwein, R.W.; Saul, A.; Schofield, L.; Sinden, R.R.; Stubbs, J.; Villafana, T.; Wirth, D.; Yadav, P.; Ballou, R.; Brown, G.; Birkett, A.; Brandt, W.; Brooks, A.; Carter, T.; Golden, A.; Lee, C.; Nunes, J.; Puijalon, O.; Raphael, T.; Richards, H.; Warren, C.; Woods, C.

    2011-01-01

    Vaccines could be a crucial component of efforts to eradicate malaria. Current attempts to develop malaria vaccines are primarily focused on Plasmodium falciparum and are directed towards reducing morbidity and mortality. Continued support for these efforts is essential, but if mal

  8. Malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, J E

    1991-03-01

    Human malaria is caused by four species of the genus plasmodium. The sexual stage of the parasite occurs in the mosquito and asexual reproduction occurs in man. Symptoms of fever, chills, headache, and myalgia result from the invasion and rupture of erythrocytes. Merozoites are released from erythrocytes and invade other cells, thus propagating the infection. The most vulnerable hosts are nonimmune travelers, young children living in the tropics, and pregnant women. P. falciparum causes the most severe infections because it infects RBCs of all ages and has the propensity to develop resistance to antimalarials. Rapid diagnosis can be made with a malarial smear, and treatment should be initiated promptly. In some regions (Mexico, Central America except Panama, and North Africa) chloroquine phosphate is effective therapy. In subsaharan Africa, South America, and Southeast Asia, chloroquine resistance has become widespread, and other antimalarials are necessary. The primary care physician should have a high index of suspicion for malaria in the traveler returning from the tropics. Malaria should also be suspected in the febrile transfusion recipient and newborns of mothers with malaria.

  9. General health checks in adults for reducing morbidity and mortality from disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsbøll, Lasse T; Jørgensen, Karsten Juhl; Grønhøj Larsen, Christian

    2012-01-01

    General health checks are common elements of health care in some countries. These aim to detect disease and risk factors for disease with the purpose of reducing morbidity and mortality. Most of the commonly used screening tests offered in general health checks have been incompletely studied. Also...

  10. Malaria prevention reduces in-hospital mortality among severely ill tuberculosis patients: a three-step intervention in Bissau, Guinea-Bissau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vieira Fina

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria and Tuberculosis (TB are important causes of morbidity and mortality in Africa. Malaria prevention reduces mortality among HIV patients, pregnant women and children, but its role in TB patients is not clear. In the TB National Reference Center in Guinea-Bissau, admitted patients are in severe clinical conditions and mortality during the rainy season is high. We performed a three-step malaria prevention program to reduce mortality in TB patients during the rainy season. Methods Since 2005 Permethrin treated bed nets were given to every patient. Since 2006 environmental prevention with permethrin derivates was performed both indoor and outdoor during the rainy season. In 2007 cotrimoxazole prophylaxis was added during the rainy season. Care was without charge; health education on malaria prevention was performed weekly. Primary outcomes were death, discharge, drop-out. Results 427, 346, 549 patients were admitted in 2005, 2006, 2007, respectively. Mortality dropped from 26.46% in 2005 to 18.76% in 2007 (p-value 0.003, due to the significant reduction in rainy season mortality (death/discharge ratio: 0.79, 0.55 and 0.26 in 2005, 2006 and 2007 respectively; p-value 0.001 while dry season mortality remained constant (0.39, 0.37 and 0.32; p-value 0.647. Costs of malaria prevention were limited: 2€/person. No drop-outs were observed. Health education attendance was 96-99%. Conclusions Malaria prevention in African tertiary care hospitals seems feasible with limited costs. Vector control, personal protection and cotrimoxazole prophylaxis seem to reduce mortality in severely ill TB patients. Prospective randomized trials are needed to confirm our findings in similar settings. Trial registration number Current Controlled Trials: ISRCTN83944306

  11. Malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    ceived the Nobel prize in 1902. Grassi et al later proved that anopheline mosquitoes transmit malaria to humans.2 In 2002, researchers sequenced the...Malarial pigment is the end product of hemoglobin diges- tion into a porphyrin conjugated with a protein derived from the globin portion of...location, parasite strain, and the patient’s age, immune status, and treatment.27 Investigating the patient’s travel history may provide clues to the spe

  12. Model variations in predicting incidence of Plasmodium falciparum malaria using 1998-2007 morbidity and meteorological data from south Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Malaria transmission is complex and is believed to be associated with local climate changes. However, simple attempts to extrapolate malaria incidence rates from averaged regional meteorological conditions have proven unsuccessful. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine if variations in specific meteorological factors are able to consistently predict P. falciparum malaria incidence at different locations in south Ethiopia. Methods Retrospective data from 42 locations were collected including P. falciparum malaria incidence for the period of 1998-2007 and meteorological variables such as monthly rainfall (all locations), temperature (17 locations), and relative humidity (three locations). Thirty-five data sets qualified for the analysis. Ljung-Box Q statistics was used for model diagnosis, and R squared or stationary R squared was taken as goodness of fit measure. Time series modelling was carried out using Transfer Function (TF) models and univariate auto-regressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) when there was no significant predictor meteorological variable. Results Of 35 models, five were discarded because of the significant value of Ljung-Box Q statistics. Past P. falciparum malaria incidence alone (17 locations) or when coupled with meteorological variables (four locations) was able to predict P. falciparum malaria incidence within statistical significance. All seasonal AIRMA orders were from locations at altitudes above 1742 m. Monthly rainfall, minimum and maximum temperature was able to predict incidence at four, five and two locations, respectively. In contrast, relative humidity was not able to predict P. falciparum malaria incidence. The R squared values for the models ranged from 16% to 97%, with the exception of one model which had a negative value. Models with seasonal ARIMA orders were found to perform better. However, the models for predicting P. falciparum malaria incidence varied from location to location, and among

  13. Utility of health facility-based malaria data for malaria surveillance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaw A Afrane

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Currently, intensive malaria control programs are being implemented in Africa to reduce the malaria burden. Clinical malaria data from hospitals are valuable for monitoring trends in malaria morbidity and for evaluating the impacts of these interventions. However, the reliability of hospital-based data for true malaria incidence is often questioned because of diagnosis accuracy issues and variation in access to healthcare facilities among sub-groups of the population. This study investigated how diagnosis and treatment practices of malaria cases in hospitals affect reliability of hospital malaria data. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The study was undertaken in health facilities in western Kenya. A total of 3,569 blood smears were analyzed after being collected from patients who were requested by clinicians to go to the hospital's laboratory for malaria testing. We applied several quality control measures for clinical malaria diagnosis. We compared our slide reading results with those from the hospital technicians. Among the 3,390 patients whose diagnoses were analyzed, only 36% had clinical malaria defined as presence of any level of parasitaemia and fever. Sensitivity and specificity of clinicians' diagnoses were 60.1% (95% CI: 61.1-67.5 and 75.0% (95% CI: 30.8-35.7, respectively. Among the 980 patients presumptively treated with an anti-malarial by the clinicians without laboratory diagnosis, only 47% had clinical malaria. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings revealed substantial over-prescription of anti-malarials and misdiagnosis of clinical malaria. More than half of the febrile cases were not truly clinical malaria, but were wrongly diagnosed and treated as such. Deficiency in malaria diagnosis makes health facility data unreliable for monitoring trends in malaria morbidity and for evaluating impacts of malaria interventions. Improving malaria diagnosis should be a top priority in rural African health centers.

  14. The history of 20th century malaria control in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffing, Sean M; Gamboa, Dionicia; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam

    2013-08-30

    Malaria has been part of Peruvian life since at least the 1500s. While Peru gave the world quinine, one of the first treatments for malaria, its history is pockmarked with endemic malaria and occasional epidemics. In this review, major increases in Peruvian malaria incidence over the past hundred years are described, as well as the human factors that have facilitated these events, and concerted private and governmental efforts to control malaria. Political support for malaria control has varied and unexpected events like vector and parasite resistance have adversely impacted morbidity and mortality. Though the ready availability of novel insecticides like DDT and efficacious medications reduced malaria to very low levels for a decade after the post eradication era, malaria reemerged as an important modern day challenge to Peruvian public health. Its reemergence sparked collaboration between domestic and international partners towards the elimination of malaria in Peru.

  15. Malaria control in Malawi: are the poor being served?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper analyses ... and anemia—in the pregnant woman and to reduce the risk of low birth weight in ... This study analyses the inequalities in access to malaria inter- ventions .... ly reduce malaria morbidity and mortality in children, and to.

  16. Economic evaluation of the benefits of reducing acute cardiorespiratory morbidity associated with air pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anis Aslam H

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few assessments of the costs and benefits of reducing acute cardiorespiratory morbidity related to air pollution have employed a comprehensive, explicit approach to capturing the full societal value of reduced morbidity. Methods We used empirical data on the duration and severity of episodes of cardiorespiratory disease as inputs to complementary models of cost of treatment, lost productivity, and willingness to pay to avoid acute cardiorespiratory morbidity outcomes linked to air pollution in epidemiological studies. A Monte Carlo estimation procedure was utilized to propagate uncertainty in key inputs and model parameters. Results Valuation estimates ranged from $13 (1997, Canadian (95% confidence interval, $0–28 for avoidance of an acute respiratory symptom day to $5,200 ($4,000–$6,400 for avoidance of a cardiac hospital admission. Cost of treatment accounted for the majority of the overall value of cardiac and respiratory hospital admissions as well as cardiac emergency department visits, while lost productivity generally represented a small proportion of overall value. Valuation estimates for days of restricted activity, asthma symptoms and acute respiratory symptoms were sensitive to alternative assumptions about level of activity restriction. As an example of the application of these values, we estimated that the observed decrease in particulate sulfate concentrations in Toronto between 1984 and 1999 resulted in annual benefits of $1.4 million (95% confidence interval $0.91–1.8 million in relation to reduced emergency department visits and hospital admissions for cardiorespiratory disease. Conclusion Our approach to estimating the value of avoiding a range of acute morbidity effects of air pollution addresses a number of limitations of the current literature, and is applicable to future assessments of the benefits of improving air quality.

  17. Field Evaluation of a Push-Pull System to Reduce Malaria Transmission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menger, D.J.; Omusula, P.; Holdinga, M.R.; Homan, T.; Carreira, A.S.; Vandendaele, P.; Derycke, J.L.; Mweresa, C.K.; Mukabana, W.R.; Loon, van J.J.A.; Takken, W.

    2015-01-01

    Malaria continues to place a disease burden on millions of people throughout the tropics, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. Although efforts to control mosquito populations and reduce human-vector contact, such as long-lasting insecticidal nets and indoor residual spraying, have led to significant d

  18. Field Evaluation of a Push-Pull System to Reduce Malaria Transmission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menger, D.J.; Omusula, P.; Holdinga, M.R.; Homan, T.; Carreira, A.S.; Vandendaele, P.; Derycke, J.L.; Mweresa, C.K.; Mukabana, W.R.; Loon, van J.J.A.; Takken, W.

    2015-01-01

    Malaria continues to place a disease burden on millions of people throughout the tropics, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. Although efforts to control mosquito populations and reduce human-vector contact, such as long-lasting insecticidal nets and indoor residual spraying, have led to significant

  19. Field Evaluation of a Push-Pull System to Reduce Malaria Transmission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menger, D.J.; Omusula, P.; Holdinga, M.R.; Homan, T.; Carreira, A.S.; Vandendaele, P.; Derycke, J.L.; Mweresa, C.K.; Mukabana, W.R.; Loon, van J.J.A.; Takken, W.

    2015-01-01

    Malaria continues to place a disease burden on millions of people throughout the tropics, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. Although efforts to control mosquito populations and reduce human-vector contact, such as long-lasting insecticidal nets and indoor residual spraying, have led to significant d

  20. Putting the "M" back in the Maternal and Child Health Bureau: reducing maternal mortality and morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Michael C; Highsmith, Keisher; de la Cruz, David; Atrash, Hani K

    2015-07-01

    Maternal mortality and severe morbidity are on the rise in the United States. A significant proportion of these events are preventable. The Maternal Health Initiative (MHI), coordinated by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau at the Health Resources and Services Administration, is intensifying efforts to reduce maternal mortality and severe morbidity in the U.S. Through a public-private partnership, MHI is taking a comprehensive approach to improving maternal health focusing on five priority areas: improving women's health before, during and beyond pregnancy; improving the quality and safety of maternity care; improving systems of maternity care including both clinical and public health systems; improving public awareness and education; and improving surveillance and research.

  1. A Study of Malaria – Related Paediatric Morbidity and Mortality in Ahmedabad, Gujarat State, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talsania NJ, Vani SN

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Malaria is one of the foremost public health problems in India. Aims: To assess the syndromic diagnosis of fever in pediatrics patients. Method: The longitudinal hospital – based study was conducted in Pediatric ward of New Civil Hospital, Ahmedabad .Information was collected on a pretested semi structured schedule. After collection, the whole data was compiled; analyzed and appropriate statistical tests like simple proportions and chi-square (x2 test were applied. Result: A total of 4,515 children were admitted to the three Paediatric wards in New Civil Hospital from August 2009 to July 2010, of whom 584 (12.94 % had three clinical symptoms. males were 2.5 times more brought than females, but the malaria rate was almost same in both sexes. Of the 584 clinical malaria admission, 15 died (C.F.R.: 2.6 %. The case fatality rate of males 9 (3 % did not differ significantly from that of females (2.11 %. Conclusion the children presenting with a sequence of the symptoms of malaria, have been given radical treatment at home, 84-100% would have been correctly treated, 0-16% may have been false positive and unnecessarily treated

  2. World Malaria Report: time to acknowledge Plasmodium knowlesi malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Bridget E; Rajahram, Giri S; Grigg, Matthew J; William, Timothy; Anstey, Nicholas M

    2017-03-31

    The 2016 World Health Organization (WHO) World Malaria Report documents substantial progress towards control and elimination of malaria. However, major challenges remain. In some regions of Southeast Asia, the simian parasite Plasmodium knowlesi has emerged as an important cause of human malaria, and the authors believe this species warrants regular inclusion in the World Malaria Report. Plasmodium knowlesi is the most common cause of malaria in Malaysia, and cases have also been reported in nearly all countries of Southeast Asia. Outside of Malaysia, P. knowlesi is frequently misdiagnosed by microscopy as Plasmodium falciparum or Plasmodium vivax. Thus, P. knowlesi may be underdiagnosed in affected regions and its true incidence underestimated. Acknowledgement in the World Malaria Report of the regional importance of P. knowlesi will facilitate efforts to improve surveillance of this emerging parasite. Furthermore, increased recognition will likely lead to improved delivery of effective treatment for this potentially fatal infection, as has occurred in Malaysia where P. knowlesi case-fatality rates have fallen despite rising incidence. In a number of knowlesi-endemic countries, substantial progress has been made towards the elimination of P. vivax and P. falciparum. However, efforts to eliminate these human-only species should not preclude efforts to reduce human malaria from P. knowlesi. The regional importance of knowlesi malaria was recognized by the WHO with its recent Evidence Review Group meeting on knowlesi malaria to address strategies for prevention and mitigation. The WHO World Malaria Report has an appropriate focus on falciparum and vivax malaria, the major causes of global mortality and morbidity. However, the authors hope that in future years this important publication will also incorporate data on the progress and challenges in reducing knowlesi malaria in regions where transmission occurs.

  3. Effect of preoperative vaginal cleansing with an antiseptic solution to reduce post caesarean infectious morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memon, Shahneela; Qazi, Roshan Ara; Bibi, Seema; Parveen, Naheed

    2011-12-01

    To determine the effectiveness of pre operative vaginal cleansing with an antiseptic solution to reduce post caesarean infectious morbidity. An observational case control study was conducted at Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Unit-III, Liaquat University Hospital, Hyderabad from February to July 2010. The 100 women in control group received the standard abdominal preparation only, while the 100 subjects in interventional group also received preoperative vaginal cleansing with 10% pyodine along with the usual abdominal scrub. All subjects received prophylactic antibiotic cover during the surgery. Maternal demographics, surgical parameters and infectious outcome were collected and data compiled on a pre-designed proforma and analysis was done using SPSS 15. The comparison between two groups did not show a significant difference in patient's demographics, labour and surgical variables. Post caesarean endometritis occurred in 1% of case group and 7% of controls (p value: fever and wound infection However, statistically significant reduction in overall composite morbidity i.e. p value: post caesarean infectious morbidities.

  4. Field evaluation of a push-pull system to reduce malaria transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menger, David J; Omusula, Philemon; Holdinga, Maarten; Homan, Tobias; Carreira, Ana S; Vandendaele, Patrice; Derycke, Jean-Luc; Mweresa, Collins K; Mukabana, Wolfgang Richard; van Loon, Joop J A; Takken, Willem

    2015-01-01

    Malaria continues to place a disease burden on millions of people throughout the tropics, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. Although efforts to control mosquito populations and reduce human-vector contact, such as long-lasting insecticidal nets and indoor residual spraying, have led to significant decreases in malaria incidence, further progress is now threatened by the widespread development of physiological and behavioural insecticide-resistance as well as changes in the composition of vector populations. A mosquito-directed push-pull system based on the simultaneous use of attractive and repellent volatiles offers a complementary tool to existing vector-control methods. In this study, the combination of a trap baited with a five-compound attractant and a strip of net-fabric impregnated with micro-encapsulated repellent and placed in the eaves of houses, was tested in a malaria-endemic village in western Kenya. Using the repellent delta-undecalactone, mosquito house entry was reduced by more than 50%, while the traps caught high numbers of outdoor flying mosquitoes. Model simulations predict that, assuming area-wide coverage, the addition of such a push-pull system to existing prevention efforts will result in up to 20-fold reductions in the entomological inoculation rate. Reductions of such magnitude are also predicted when mosquitoes exhibit a high resistance against insecticides. We conclude that a push-pull system based on non-toxic volatiles provides an important addition to existing strategies for malaria prevention.

  5. Field evaluation of a push-pull system to reduce malaria transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Menger

    Full Text Available Malaria continues to place a disease burden on millions of people throughout the tropics, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. Although efforts to control mosquito populations and reduce human-vector contact, such as long-lasting insecticidal nets and indoor residual spraying, have led to significant decreases in malaria incidence, further progress is now threatened by the widespread development of physiological and behavioural insecticide-resistance as well as changes in the composition of vector populations. A mosquito-directed push-pull system based on the simultaneous use of attractive and repellent volatiles offers a complementary tool to existing vector-control methods. In this study, the combination of a trap baited with a five-compound attractant and a strip of net-fabric impregnated with micro-encapsulated repellent and placed in the eaves of houses, was tested in a malaria-endemic village in western Kenya. Using the repellent delta-undecalactone, mosquito house entry was reduced by more than 50%, while the traps caught high numbers of outdoor flying mosquitoes. Model simulations predict that, assuming area-wide coverage, the addition of such a push-pull system to existing prevention efforts will result in up to 20-fold reductions in the entomological inoculation rate. Reductions of such magnitude are also predicted when mosquitoes exhibit a high resistance against insecticides. We conclude that a push-pull system based on non-toxic volatiles provides an important addition to existing strategies for malaria prevention.

  6. Intravenous artesunate reduces parasite clearance time, duration of intensive care, and hospital treatment in patients with severe malaria in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurth, Florian; Develoux, Michel; Mechain, Matthieu;

    2015-01-01

    Intravenous artesunate improves survival in severe malaria, but clinical trial data from nonendemic countries are scarce. The TropNet severe malaria database was analyzed to compare outcomes of artesunate vs quinine treatment. Artesunate reduced parasite clearance time and duration of intensive...

  7. Community responses to malaria: interventions in sub-Saharan Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.L. Pell

    2014-01-01

    This thesis presents data from two multi-site programmes of research that have examined the social responses to malaria interventions in sub -Saharan Africa. The first dealt specifically with the attitudes and behaviours linked to a single intervention aimed at reducing malaria morbidity and mortali

  8. New architectural design of delivery room reduces morbidity in preterm neonates: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrin, Gianluca; Conte, Francesca; Scipione, Antonella; Aleandri, Vincenzo; Di Chiara, Maria; Bacchio, Erica; Messina, Francesco; De Curtis, Mario

    2016-03-23

    A multidisciplinary committee composed of a panel of experts, including a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics and American Institute of Architects, has suggested that the delivery room (DR) and the neonatal intensive care units (NICU) room should be directly interconnected. We aimed to investigate the impact of the architectural design of the DR and the NICU on neonatal outcome. Two cohorts of preterm neonates born at architectural renovation of the DR realized in accordance with specific standards (Cohort 2: "new concept of DR"). In Cohort 1, neonates were initially cared for a conventional resuscitation area, situated in the DR, and then transferred to the NICU, located on a separate floor of the same hospital. In Cohort 2 neonates were assisted at birth directly in the NICU room, which was directly connected to the DR via a pass-through door. The primary outcome of the study was morbidity, defined by the proportion of neonates with at least one complication of prematurity (i.e., late-onset sepsis, patent ductus arteriosus, intraventricular hemorrhage, periventricular leukomalacia, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, retinopathy of prematurity and necrotizing enterocolitis). Secondary outcomes were mortality and duration of hospitalization. Statistical analysis was performed using standard methods by SPSS software. We enrolled 106 neonates (56 in Cohort 1 and 50 in Cohort 2). The main clinical and demographic characteristics of the 2 cohorts were similar. Moderate hypothermia (body temperature ≤ 35.9 °C) was more frequent in Cohort 1 (57%) compared with Cohort 2 (24%, p = 0.001). Morbidity was increased in Cohort 1 (73%) compared with Cohort 2 (44%, p = 0.002). No statistically significant differences in mortality and median duration of hospitalization were observed between the 2 cohorts of the study. If realized according to the proposed architectural standards, renovation of DR and NICU may represent an opportunity to reduce morbidity in preterm neonates.

  9. Significantly reduced hypoxemic events in morbidly obese patients undergoing gastrointestinal endoscopy: Predictors and practice effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basavana Gouda Goudra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Providing anesthesia for gastrointestinal (GI endoscopy procedures in morbidly obese patients is a challenge for a variety of reasons. The negative impact of obesity on the respiratory system combined with a need to share the upper airway and necessity to preserve the spontaneous ventilation, together add to difficulties. Materials and Methods: This retrospective cohort study included patients with a body mass index (BMI >40 kg/m 2 that underwent out-patient GI endoscopy between September 2010 and February 2011. Patient data was analyzed for procedure, airway management technique as well as hypoxemic and cardiovascular events. Results: A total of 119 patients met the inclusion criteria. Our innovative airway management technique resulted in a lower rate of intraoperative hypoxemic events compared with any published data available. Frequency of desaturation episodes showed statistically significant relation to previous history of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA. These desaturation episodes were found to be statistically independent of increasing BMI of patients. Conclusion: Pre-operative history of OSA irrespective of associated BMI values can be potentially used as a predictor of intra-procedural desaturation. With suitable modification of anesthesia technique, it is possible to reduce the incidence of adverse respiratory events in morbidly obese patients undergoing GI endoscopy procedures, thereby avoiding the need for endotracheal intubation.

  10. Significantly reduced hypoxemic events in morbidly obese patients undergoing gastrointestinal endoscopy: Predictors and practice effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudra, Basavana Gouda; Singh, Preet Mohinder; Penugonda, Lakshmi C; Speck, Rebecca M; Sinha, Ashish C

    2014-01-01

    Providing anesthesia for gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy procedures in morbidly obese patients is a challenge for a variety of reasons. The negative impact of obesity on the respiratory system combined with a need to share the upper airway and necessity to preserve the spontaneous ventilation, together add to difficulties. This retrospective cohort study included patients with a body mass index (BMI) >40 kg/m(2) that underwent out-patient GI endoscopy between September 2010 and February 2011. Patient data was analyzed for procedure, airway management technique as well as hypoxemic and cardiovascular events. A total of 119 patients met the inclusion criteria. Our innovative airway management technique resulted in a lower rate of intraoperative hypoxemic events compared with any published data available. Frequency of desaturation episodes showed statistically significant relation to previous history of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). These desaturation episodes were found to be statistically independent of increasing BMI of patients. Pre-operative history of OSA irrespective of associated BMI values can be potentially used as a predictor of intra-procedural desaturation. With suitable modification of anesthesia technique, it is possible to reduce the incidence of adverse respiratory events in morbidly obese patients undergoing GI endoscopy procedures, thereby avoiding the need for endotracheal intubation.

  11. Malaria successes and challenges in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Rajesh; Rastogi, Rakesh Mani; Ortega, Leonard

    2013-12-01

    Asia ranks second to Africa in terms of malaria burden. In 19 countries of Asia, malaria is endemic and 2.31 billion people or 62% of the total population in these countries are at risk of malaria. In 2010, WHO estimated around 34.8 million cases and 45,600 deaths due to malaria in Asia. In 2011, 2.7 million cases and > 2000 deaths were reported. India, Indonesia, Myanmar and Pakistan are responsible for >85% of the reported cases (confirmed) and deaths in Asia. In last 10 yr, due to availability of donor's fund specially from Global fund, significant progress has been made by the countries in Asia in scaling-up malaria control interventions which were instrumental in reducing malaria morbidity and mortality significantly. There is a large heterogeneity in malaria epidemiology in Asia. As a result, the success in malaria control/elimination is also diverse. As compared to the data of the year 2000, out of 19 malaria endemic countries, 12 countries were able to reduce malaria incidence (microscopically confirmed cases only) by 75%. Two countries, namely Bangladesh and Malaysia are projected to reach 75% reduction by 2015 while India is projected to reach 50-75% only by 2015. The trend could not be assessed in four countries, namely Indonesia, Myanmar, Pakistan and Timor-Leste due to insufficient consistent data. Numerous key challenges need to be addressed to sustain the gains and eliminate malaria in most parts of Asia. Some of these are to control the spread of resistance in Plasmodium falciparum to artemisinin, control of outdoor transmission, control of vivax malaria and ensuring universal coverage of key interventions. Asia has the potential to influence the malaria epidemiology all over the world as well as to support the global efforts in controlling and eliminating malaria through production of quality-assured ACTs, RDTs and long-lasting insecticidal nets.

  12. Antibody-dependent cellular inhibition is associated with reduced risk against febrile malaria in a longitudinal cohort study involving Ghanaian children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiendrebeogo, Regis W; Adu, Bright; Singh, Susheel K;

    2015-01-01

    studies (LCS). We investigated the relationship between ADCI activity of immunoglobulin G before malaria season and risk of malaria in a LCS involving Ghanaian children. High ADCI activity was significantly associated with reduced risk against malaria. Findings here suggest a potential usefulness...

  13. Weight loss reduces circulating asymmetrical dimethylarginine concentrations in morbidly obese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzyzanowska, Katarzyna; Mittermayer, Friedrich; Kopp, Hans-Peter; Wolzt, Michael; Schernthaner, Guntram

    2004-12-01

    The endogenous nitric oxide-synthase inhibitor asymmetrical dimethyl-L-arginine (ADMA) is elevated in patients with increased risk for arteriosclerosis. Obesity is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. We measured plasma ADMA concentrations in morbidly obese women before and after weight loss following gastroplastic surgery. ADMA and symmetrical dimethyl-L-arginine concentrations were analyzed by HPLC from 34 female patients (age 41 +/- 7 yr) with a body mass index (BMI) of 49 +/- 1 kg/m2 before and 14 months after vertical ring gastroplasty. Age-matched healthy women (BMI < 25 kg/m2; n = 24) were studied as controls. After gastroplastic surgery, BMI decreased to 34 +/- 1 kg/m2 in obese women (P < 0.00001), and ADMA concentrations were reduced from 1.06 +/- 0.06 micromol/liter at baseline to 0.81 +/- 0.04 micromol/liter after weight loss (P < 0.00001). Symmetrical dimethyl-L-arginine plasma levels were not affected. ADMA correlated with high-sensitivity C-reactive protein at baseline (r = 0.42; P < 0.05) and after weight loss (r = 0.56; P < 0.005). No association with blood pressure or plasma lipids could be observed. ADMA concentrations were lower in controls (0.68 +/- 0.04 micromol/liter; P < 0.05) compared with obese patients before or after weight reduction. The decrease of highly elevated ADMA concentrations in morbidly obese patients is paralleled by improvement of parameters associated with the metabolic syndrome after weight loss.

  14. Treatment of asymptomatic carriers with artemether-lumefantrine: an opportunity to reduce the burden of malaria?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gbadoé Adama

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased investment and commitment to malaria prevention and treatment strategies across Africa has produced impressive reductions in the incidence of this disease. Nevertheless, it is clear that further interventions will be necessary to meet the international target of a reversal in the incidence of malaria by 2015. This article discusses the prospective role of an innovative malaria control strategy - the community-based treatment of asymptomatic carriers of Plasmodium falciparum, with artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT. The potential of this intervention was considered by key scientists in the field at an Advisory Board meeting held in Basel, in April 2009. This article summarizes the discussions that took place among the participants. Presentation of the hypothesis Asymptomatic carriers do not seek treatment for their infection and, therefore, constitute a reservoir of parasites and thus a real public-health risk. The systematic identification and treatment of individuals with asymptomatic P. falciparum as part of a surveillance intervention strategy should reduce the parasite reservoir, and if this pool is greatly reduced, it will impact disease transmission. Testing the hypothesis This article considers the populations that could benefit from such a strategy and examines the ethical issues associated with the treatment of apparently healthy individuals, who represent a neglected public health risk. The potential for the treatment of asymptomatic carriers to impair the development of protective immunity, resulting in a 'rebound' and age escalation of malaria incidence, is also discussed. For policymakers to consider the treatment of asymptomatic carriers with ACT as a new tool in their malaria control programmes, it will be important to demonstrate that such a strategy can produce significant benefits, without having a negative impact on the efficacy of ACT and the health of the target population. Implications

  15. A single intervention for cockroach control reduces cockroach exposure and asthma morbidity in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabito, Felicia A; Carlson, John C; He, Hua; Werthmann, Derek; Schal, Coby

    2017-08-01

    Exposure to cockroaches is an important asthma trigger, particularly for children with asthma living in inner cities. Integrated pest management is the recommended approach to cockroach abatement; however, it is costly and difficult to implement. The impact of reducing cockroach exposure on asthma outcomes is not known. We sought to test the use of a single intervention, insecticidal bait, to reduce cockroach exposure in the home of children with asthma in New Orleans and to examine the impact of cockroach reduction on asthma outcomes. One hundred two children aged 5 to 17 years with moderate to severe asthma were enrolled in a 12-month randomized controlled trial testing the use of insecticidal bait on cockroach counts and asthma morbidity. Homes were visited 6 times and asthma symptoms were assessed every 2 months. After adjustment, intervention homes had significantly fewer cockroaches than did control homes (mean change in cockroaches trapped, 13.14; 95% CI, 6.88-19.39; P Children in control homes had more asthma symptoms and unscheduled health care utilization in the previous 2 weeks (1.82, 95% CI, 0.14-3.50, P = .03; 1.17, 95% CI, 0.11-2.24, P = .03, respectively) and a higher proportion of children with FEV1 of less than 80% predicted (odds ratio, 5.74; 95% CI, 1.60-20.57; P = .01) compared with children living in intervention homes. Previous research has demonstrated improvement in asthma health outcomes using multifaceted interventions. The strategic placement of insecticidal bait, which is inexpensive, has low toxicity, and is widely available, resulted in sustained cockroach elimination over 12 months and was associated with improved asthma outcomes. This single intervention may be an alternative to multifaceted interventions currently recommended to improve asthma morbidity. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. General health checks in adults for reducing morbidity and mortality from disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsbøll, Lasse T; Jørgensen, Karsten Juhl; Grønhøj Larsen, Christian;

    2012-01-01

    To quantify the benefits and harms of general health checks in adults with an emphasis on patient-relevant outcomes such as morbidity and mortality rather than on surrogate outcomes.......To quantify the benefits and harms of general health checks in adults with an emphasis on patient-relevant outcomes such as morbidity and mortality rather than on surrogate outcomes....

  17. Association of Community Led Total Sanitation to Reduced Household Morbidity in Nyando District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Makotsi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to investigate the association of CLTS to the reduced household morbidity in Nyando District. Descriptive statistics was used to assess the diarrhea prevalence, knowledge, uptake and practices on CLTS;Chi-square test was used to compare proportions between control and intervention sites. Association between CLTS and diarrhea occurrence was done using binary logistic regression where diarrhea occurrence was the outcome and CLTS or non CLTS sites were the independent variables. Odds ratio with 95% confidence intervals was used to measure the risk of diarrhea morbidity, P value < 0.05 denoted significant results. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS version 16. The study adopted a comparative cross sectional study design comparing the disease prevalence of households within intervention sub location of Kochogo Central where CLTS was implemented and the disease prevalence of households within non intervention sub location of Wang’ang’a where CLTS has not been implemented. A total of 305 household heads or proxies (102 interventions and 203 non interventions were interviewed and data on number of cases of diarrhea, cholera and bilharzia that any member of the household had experienced in the prior 6 months before the survey was collected. A total of 224 household heads (90 interventions and 134 non interventions were interviewed with a total population of 1367 persons (563 in the intervention and 804 in the control site and data on number of cases of diarrhea cases that members of the household had experienced in the prior 14 days before the survey was collected. Overall 47.3%of household members still defecated in the open the previous day (6.7% in intervention site compared to 74.6% in the control site, p<0.0001. Although all households in the intervention sites were aware of CLTS program, only 20.9% were aware of CLTS in the control sites. Overall two-week prevalence of diarrhea was 17.4% with 11.1% in the

  18. Does topical ropivacaine reduce the post-tonsillectomy morbidity in pediatric patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oghan, Fatih; Harputluoglu, Ugur; Guclu, Ender; Kocaman, Buket; Ozturk, Ozcan

    2008-03-01

    To determine whether post-operative administration of topical ropivacaine hydrochloride decreases morbidity following adenotonsillectomy. Prospective, randomized, double-blind clinical trial. University referral center; ENT Department. Fourty one children, aged 4-16 years, undergoing tonsillectomy. Patients received 1.0% ropivacaine hydrochloride soaked swabs packed in their tonsillar fossae while the control group received saline-soaked swabs. Mc Grath's face scale was used to compare the two groups in respect of pain control. Chi-square and two-tailed unpaired Student's t-tests or Mann-Whitney-U-tests were used to compare the two independent groups. As 10 we made 11 comparison between groups, for Bonferroni correction, p0.05). The other hours and days there were statistically significance between the two groups (ppost-operative parameters such as nausea, fever, vomiting, odor, bleeding, otalgia and trismus were not statistically different between the two groups. There were no complications associated with ropivacaine hydrochloride. No patients in this study suffered systemic side effects related to the use of this medication. Locally 1.0% ropivacaine administration significantly relieves the pain of pediatric tonsillectomy and, it is a safe and effective method. High concentrations of ropivaciane may produce clinically significant pain relief. It is more effective to reduce of post-operative analgesic requirement after first hour.

  19. Reduced in-hospital mortality after improved management of children under 5 years admitted to hospital with malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biai, Sidu; Rodrigues, Amabelia; Gomes, Melba

    2007-01-01

    in the use of the standardised guidelines for the management of malaria, including strict follow-up procedures. Nurses and doctors were randomised to work on intervention or control wards. Personnel in the intervention ward received a small financial incentive ($50 (25 pounds sterling; 35 euros......OBJECTIVE: To test whether strict implementation of a standardised protocol for the management of malaria and provision of a financial incentive for health workers reduced mortality. DESIGN: Randomised controlled intervention trial. SETTING: Paediatric ward at the national hospital in Guinea......-Bissau. All children admitted to hospital with severe malaria received free drug kits. PARTICIPANTS: 951 children aged 3 months to 5 years admitted to hospital with a diagnosis of malaria randomised to normal or intervention wards. INTERVENTIONS: Before the start of the study, all personnel were trained...

  20. Conservation efforts may increase malaria burden in the Brazilian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Denis; Clark, James

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale forest conservation projects are underway in the Brazilian Amazon but little is known regarding their public health impact. Current literature emphasizes how land clearing increases malaria incidence, leading to the conclusion that forest conservation decreases malaria burden. Yet, there is also evidence that proximity to forest fringes increases malaria incidence, which implies the opposite relationship between forest conservation and malaria. We compare the effect of these environmental factors on malaria and explore its implications. Using a large malaria dataset (~1,300,000 positive malaria tests collected over ~4.5 million km(2)), satellite imagery, permutation tests, and hierarchical Bayesian regressions, we show that greater forest cover (as a proxy for proximity to forest fringes) tends to be associated with higher malaria incidence, and that forest cover effect was 25 times greater than the land clearing effect, the often cited culprit of malaria in the region. These findings have important implications for land use/land cover (LULC) policies in the region. We find that cities close to protected areas (PA's) tend to have higher malaria incidence than cities far from PA's. Using future LULC scenarios, we show that avoiding 10% of deforestation through better governance might result in an average 2-fold increase in malaria incidence by 2050 in urban health posts. Our results suggest that cost analysis of reduced carbon emissions from conservation efforts in the region should account for increased malaria morbidity, and that conservation initiatives should consider adopting malaria mitigation strategies. Coordinated actions from disparate science fields, government ministries, and global initiatives (e.g., Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation; Millenium Development Goals; Roll Back Malaria; and Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria), will be required to decrease malaria toll in the region while preserving these

  1. Rapid onset of transmission-reducing antibodies in javanese migrants exposed to malaria in papua, indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousema, J Teun; Roeffen, Will; van der Kolk, Mike; de Vlas, Sake J; van de Vegte-Bolmer, Marga; Bangs, Michael J; Teelen, Karina; Kurniawan, Liliana; Maguire, Jason D; Baird, J Kevin; Sauerwein, Robert W

    2006-03-01

    Transmission of Plasmodium falciparum malaria is initiated by sexual stages in the mosquito. Anti-Pfs48/45 and anti-Pfs230 sexual stage antibodies that are ingested together with parasites can reduce parasite development and subsequently malaria transmission. Acquisition of sexual stage immunity was studied in a cohort of 102 non-immune Javanese individuals migrating to hyperendemic Papua Indonesia. Seroprevalence of antibodies against Pfs48/45 and Pfs230 and functional transmission-reducing activity (TRA) were measured upon arrival and at 6, 12, and 24 months. Asexual parasitemia and gametocytemia were assessed every two weeks. The TRA and seroreactivity increased with the number of P. falciparum infections. The longitudinally sustained association between TRA and antibodies against Pfs48/45 (odds ratio [OR] = 3.74, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.51-9.29) and Pfs230 (OR = 3.72, 95% CI = 1.36-10.17) suggests that functional transmission reducing immunity is acquired after limited exposure to infection.

  2. The winding road to developing a malaria vaccine. Study hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomons, Hilary Denis; Joubert, Chris Gerhardus; Beichter, Bonnie; Haefele, Zelda

    2012-09-01

    In Africa, a child dies every 30 seconds from malaria, a vector-borne parasitic disease caused by Plasmodium spp, with higher mortality and severe forms of disease more frequently associated with Plasmodium falciparum infection. By looking at the natural resistance to malaria conferred by sickle cell trait, we hypothesize that a malaria therapeutical vaccine targeting the erythrocyte stage of the parasite through erythrocyte sickling could reduce parasite density and control the progression and severity of disease, thus decreasing the morbidity and mortality associated with severe forms of malaria.

  3. Melatonin reduces cardiac morbidity and markers of myocardial ischemia after elective abdominal aortic aneurism repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gögenür, Ismail; Kücükakin, Bülent; Panduro Jensen, Leif

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to examine the effect of perioperative melatonin treatment on clinical cardiac morbidity and markers of myocardial ischemia in patients undergoing elective surgery for abdominal aortic aneurism. Reperfusion injury results in increased cardiac morbidity in patients undergoing surgery...... for abdominal aortic aneurisms (AAA). A randomized, placebo-controlled, clinical trial including patients undergoing surgery for AAA was performed. The patients received by infusion over a 2-hr period either, 50 mg melatonin or placebo intra-operatively, and 10 mg melatonin or placebo orally, the first three...... by Holter monitoring. A total of 26 patients received melatonin, while 24 received placebo. A significant reduction in cardiac morbidity was seen in the melatonin-treated patients compared with those given placebo [4% versus 29% (P = 0.02)]. Five patients (19%) who received melatonin had increased Tp...

  4. Prenatal detection of transposition of the great arteries reduces mortality and morbidity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Velzen, C. L.; Haak, M. C.; Reijnders, G.; Rijlaarsdam, M. E. B.; Bax, C. J.; Pajkrt, E.; Hruda, J.; Galindo-Garre, F.; Bilardo, C. M.; de Groot, C. J. M.; Blom, N. A.; Clur, S. A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the prenatal detection of transposition of the great arteries (TGA), after the introduction of a Dutch screening program in 2007, as well as the effect of prenatal detection on pre- and postsurgical mortality and morbidity. Methods In a geographical cohort study, all infants w

  5. Complement binding to erythrocytes is associated with macrophage activation and reduced haemoglobin in Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goka, B Q; Kwarko, H; Kurtzhals, J A

    2001-01-01

    We have examined IgG and complement factor C3d deposition on erythrocytes by means of the direct Coombs' test (DAT) and looked for an association with the anaemia seen in falciparum malaria in children living in an area of hyperendemic malaria transmission (in Ghana). In one study (in 1997), 53 out....... The studies support the role of complement activation and erythrophagocytosis in the pathogenesis of anaemia in falciparum malaria in African children....

  6. Chronic malaria infections increase family inequalities and reduce parental fitness: experimental evidence from a wild bird population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, S C L; Palinauskas, V; Sheldon, B C

    2010-03-01

    Avian malaria parasites (Plasmodium) occur commonly in wild birds and are an increasingly popular model system for understanding host-parasite co-evolution. However, whether these parasites have fitness consequences for hosts in endemic areas is much debated, particularly since wild-caught individuals almost always harbour chronic infections of very low parasite density. We used the anti-malarial drug Malarone to test experimentally for fitness effects of chronic malaria infection in a wild population of breeding blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus). Medication caused a pronounced reduction in Plasmodium infection intensity, usually resulting in complete clearance of these parasites from the blood, as revealed by quantitative PCR. Positive effects of medication on malaria-infected birds were found at multiple stages during breeding, with medicated females showing higher hatching success, provisioning rates and fledging success compared to controls. Most strikingly, we found that treatment of maternal malaria infections strongly altered within-family differences, with reduced inequality in hatching probability and fledging mass within broods reared by medicated females. These within-brood effects appear to explain higher fledging success among medicated females and are consistent with a model of parental optimism in which smaller (marginal) offspring can be successfully raised to independence if additional resources become available during the breeding attempt. Overall, these results demonstrate that chronic avian malaria infections, far from being benign, can have significant effects on host fitness and may thus constitute an important selection pressure in wild bird populations.

  7. A research agenda for malaria eradication: vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-25

    Vaccines could be a crucial component of efforts to eradicate malaria. Current attempts to develop malaria vaccines are primarily focused on Plasmodium falciparum and are directed towards reducing morbidity and mortality. Continued support for these efforts is essential, but if malaria vaccines are to be used as part of a repertoire of tools for elimination or eradication of malaria, they will need to have an impact on malaria transmission. We introduce the concept of "vaccines that interrupt malaria transmission" (VIMT), which includes not only "classical" transmission-blocking vaccines that target the sexual and mosquito stages but also pre-erythrocytic and asexual stage vaccines that have an effect on transmission. VIMT may also include vaccines that target the vector to disrupt parasite development in the mosquito. Importantly, if eradication is to be achieved, malaria vaccine development efforts will need to target other malaria parasite species, especially Plasmodium vivax, where novel therapeutic vaccines against hypnozoites or preventive vaccines with effect against multiple stages could have enormous impact. A target product profile (TPP) for VIMT is proposed and a research agenda to address current knowledge gaps and develop tools necessary for design and development of VIMT is presented.

  8. Malaria in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohee, Lauren M; Laufer, Miriam K

    2017-08-01

    Malaria is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in endemic areas, leading to an estimated 438,000 deaths in 2015. Malaria is also an important health threat to travelers to endemic countries and should be considered in evaluation of any traveler returning from a malaria-endemic area who develops fever. Considering the diagnosis of malaria in patients with potential exposure is critical. Prompt provision of effective treatment limits the complications of malaria and can be life-saving. Understanding Plasmodium species variation, epidemiology, and drug-resistance patterns in the geographic area where infection was acquired is important for determining treatment choices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Reducing maternal morbidity and mortality in the developing world: a simple, cost-effective example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Browning A

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Andrew Browning,1,2 Birhanu Menber21Maternity Africa, Arusha, Tanzania; 2Vision Maternity Care, Barhirdar, Ethiopia Objectives: To determine the impact of volunteer obstetricians and midwife teams on obstetric services in a rural hospital in Ethiopia.Methods: The intervention was undertaken in Mota district hospital, a rural hospital in the Amhara region of Ethiopia, which is the only hospital for 1.2 million people. Before the placement of volunteer teams it had a rudimentary basic obstetric service, no blood transfusion service, and no operative delivery. The study prospectively analyzed delivery data before, during, and after the placement of volunteer obstetrician and midwife teams. The volunteers established emergency obstetric care, and trained and supervised local staff over a 3-year period. Measurable outcomes consisted of the number of women delivering, the number of referrals of pregnant women, the number of maternal deaths, and the number of referrals of obstetric fistula patients.Results: With the establishment of the service the number of women attending hospital for delivery increased by 40%. In the hospital maternal mortality decreased from 7.1% to <0.5%, and morbidity, as measured by number of obstetric fistulae, decreased from 1.5% deliveries to 0.5% over the 3-year intervention period. The improvements were sustained after handing the project back to the government.Conclusion: The placement of volunteer teams was an effective method of decreasing maternal mortality and morbidity. Keywords: emergency obstetric care, volunteers, obstetric fistula, emergency obstetric care

  10. Elective cholecystectomy reduces morbidity of cholelithiasis in pediatric sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Emily F; Partain, Paige I; Lebensburger, Jeffrey D; Fineberg, Naomi S; Howard, Thomas H

    2017-01-01

    Cholelithiasis is a frequent complication in pediatric sickle cell disease (SCD). Though it is standard practice to perform a cholecystectomy in pediatric SCD patients with symptoms of cholelithiasis, the use of elective cholecystectomy for asymptomatic patients remains controversial. Records of 191 pediatric sickle cell patients with cholelithiasis who underwent cholecystectomy were retrospectively reviewed. Patients classified as follows: (i) elective-no preoperative symptoms, cholelithiasis on screening ultrasound, comprehensive preoperative plan; (ii) symptomatic-preoperative symptoms of cholelithiasis on diagnostic ultrasound, comprehensive preoperative plan; or (iii) emergent-hospitalization for acute cholecystitis symptoms, cholelithiasis on diagnostic ultrasound, limited preoperative preparation. We compared the morbidity of cholecystectomy by examining pre- and post-cholecystectomy hospital admission days, length of stay for cholecystectomy, and surgical complications. Patients with SCD underwent a total of 191 cholecystectomies over a 10-year period: 51 elective, 110 symptomatic, and 30 emergent. Patients who required emergent cholecystectomy had a longer postoperative hospitalization time than elective or symptomatic cholecystectomy (7.3 vs 4.3, P cholelithiasis and cholecystectomy in SCD to date. These data strongly suggest that elective cholecystectomy decreases morbidity associated with emergent cholecystectomy. The overall outcomes for symptomatic and elective patients are favorable. However, our study indicates the need for prospective studies to identify clinical indicators for those emergent patients. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Placental Malaria is associated with reduced early life weight development of affected children independent of low birth weight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palmero Melba S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infection with Plasmodium falciparum during pregnancy contributes substantially to the disease burden in both mothers and offspring. Placental malaria may lead to intrauterine growth restriction or preterm delivery resulting in low birth weight (LBW, which, in general, is associated with increased infant morbidity and mortality. However, little is known about the possible direct impact of the specific disease processes occurring in PM on longer term outcomes such as subsequent retarded growth development independent of LBW. Methods In an existing West-African cohort, 783 healthy infants with a birth weight of at least 2,000 g were followed up during their first year of life. The aim of the study was to investigate if Plasmodium falciparum infection of the placenta, assessed by placental histology, has an impact on several anthropometric parameters, measured at birth and after three, six and 12 months using generalized estimating equations models adjusting for moderate low birth weight. Results Independent of LBW, first to third born infants who were exposed to either past, chronic or acute placental malaria during pregnancy had significantly lower weight-for-age (-0.43, 95% CI: -0.80;-0.07, weight-for-length (-0.47, 95% CI: -0.84; -0.10 and BMI-for-age z-scores (-0.57, 95% CI: -0.84; -0.10 compared to infants born to mothers who were not diagnosed with placental malaria (p = 0.019, 0.013, and 0.012, respectively. Interestingly, the longitudinal data on histology-based diagnosis of PM also document a sharp decline of PM prevalence in the Sukuta cohort from 16.5% in 2002 to 5.4% in 2004. Conclusions It was demonstrated that PM has a negative impact on the infant's subsequent weight development that is independent of LBW, suggesting that the longer term effects of PM have been underestimated, even in areas where malaria transmission is declining.

  12. Malaria and anaemia in pregnancy in Enugu, south east Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekejindu, I M; Udigwe, G O; Chijioke, I R C

    2006-03-01

    Malaria and anaemia contribute tremendously to maternal and prenatal morbidity and mortality. This study was carried out to document the magnitude of the problem in pregnancy with a view to identifying areas of intervention. The subjects were 108 consecutive pregnant women aged 18 to 44 years recruited from the antenatal clinics. 23 (21.3%) had malaria, 35 (32.4%) had anaemia while 20(18.5%) had both malaria and anaemia. The highest incidence of malaria occurred in the second trimester, while anaemia was most prevalent in the third trimester (62.86%) and among primigravidae (37.14%). All the cases of malaria were due to plasmodium falciparum. Six out of the 20 women with both anemia and malaria were admitted and treated. Two low birth weight babies were delivered among the malaria and anaemia group. The incidence rates of malaria and anaemia were 215 and 327 per 1000 pregnant women respectively while the incidence rate of anaemia due to malaria was 571 per 1000 infected pregnant women. There is a need for a more effective intervention to reduce the incidence of both malaria and anaemia in pregnancy.

  13. House design modifications reduce indoor resting malaria vector densities in rice irrigation scheme area in western Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Githeko Andrew

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Simple modifications of typical rural house design can be an effective and relatively inexpensive method of reducing indoor mosquito vector densities and consequently decreasing malaria transmission. Public health scientists have shown the potential for house design to protect people against malaria, yet this type of intervention remains virtually ignored. A randomized-controlled study was, therefore, undertaken to determine the effects of this method of vector control on the density of indoor resting malaria vectors in a rice irrigation scheme area in lowlands of western Kenya. Methods Ten treatment houses were modified with ceilings of papyrus mats and insecticide-treated netting (ITN and tested against ten control houses without papyrus ceilings. To determine densities of mosquitoes resting in homes, the pyrethrum spray method was used to simultaneously collect indoor resting malaria vectors in intervention and control houses. Each house was sampled a total of eight times over a period of four months, resulting in a total of 80 sampling efforts for each treatment. Community response to such intervention was investigated by discussions with residents. Results Papyrus mats ceiling modification reduced house entry by Anopheles gambiae s.l and Anopheles funestus densities by between 78–80% and 86% respectively compared to unmodified houses. Geometric mean density of Anopheles gambiae s.l. and Anopheles funestus in modified houses were significantly lower (t18 = 7.174, P 18 = 2.52, P = 0.02, respectively compared to controls. Unmodified houses were associated with relatively higher densities of malaria vectors. There was a 84% (OR 0.16, 95% CI 0.07–0.39, P Anopheles gambiae s.l. and Anopheles funestus presence in modified houses, respectively, compared with unmodified houses. Residents responded favourably to this mode of vector control. Conclusion House modifications involving insect screen ceilings made from locally

  14. Effectiveness of combined intermittent preventive treatment for children and timely home treatment for malaria control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seakey Atsu K

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whiles awaiting for the arrival of an effective and affordable malaria vaccine, there is a need to make use of the available control tools to reduce malaria risk, especially in children under five years and pregnant women. Intermittent preventive treatment (IPT has recently been accepted as an important component of the malaria control strategy. This study explored the potential of a strategy of intermittent preventive treatment for children (IPTC and timely treatment of malaria-related febrile illness in the home in reducing the parasite prevalence and malaria morbidity in young children in a coastal village in Ghana. Methods The study combined home-based delivery of IPTC among six to 60 months old and home treatment of suspected febrile malaria illness within 24 hours. All children between six and 60 months of age received intermittent preventive treatment using amodiaquine and artesunate, delivered by community assistants every four months (three times in 12 months. Malaria parasite prevalence surveys were conducted before the first and after the third dose of IPTC. Results Parasite prevalence was reduced from 25% to 3% (p Conclusion The evaluation result indicates that IPTC given three times in a year combined with timely treatment of febrile malaria illness, impacts significantly on the parasite prevalence. The marked reduction in the parasite prevalence with this strategy points to the potential for reducing malaria-related childhood morbidity and mortality, and this should be explored by control programme managers.

  15. Does the national health insurance scheme in Ghana reduce household cost of treating malaria in the Kassena-Nankana districts?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxwell Ayindenaba Dalaba

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Government of Ghana introduced the National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS in 2003 to replace out-of-pocket (OOP payment for health services with the inherent aim of reducing the direct cost of treating illness to households. Objective: To assess the effects of the NHIS in reducing cost of treating malaria to households in the Kassena-Nankana districts of northern Ghana. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional survey between October 2009 and October 2011 in the Kassena-Nankana districts. A sample of 4,226 households was randomly drawn from the Navrongo Health and Demographic Surveillance System household database and administered a structured interview. The costs of malaria treatment were collected from the patient perspective. Results: Of the 4,226 households visited, a total of 1,324 (31% household members reported fever and 51% (675 reported treatment for malaria and provided information on where they sought care. Most respondents sought malaria treatment from formal health facilities 63% (424, with the remainder either self-medicating with drugs from chemical shops 32% (217 or with leftover drugs or herbs 5% (34. Most of those who sought care from formal health facilities were insured 79% (334. The average direct medical cost of treating malaria was GH¢3.2 (US$2.1 per case with the insured spending less (GH¢2.6/US$1.7 per case than the uninsured (GH¢3.2/US$2.1. The overall average cost (direct and indirect incurred by households per malaria treatment was GH¢20.9 (US$13.9. Though the insured accounted for a larger proportion of admissions at health facilities 76% (31 than the uninsured 24% (10, the average amount households spent on the insured was less (GH¢4/US$2.7 than their uninsured counterparts (GH¢6.4/US$4.3. The difference was not statistically significant (p=0.2330. Conclusion: Even though some insured individuals made OOP payments for direct medical care, there is evidence that the NHIS has a protective effect

  16. Ivermectin to reduce malaria transmission: a research agenda for a promising new tool for elimination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaccour, C.J.; Kobylinski, K.C.; Bassat, Q.; Bousema, T.; Drakeley, C.; Alonso, P.; Foy, B.D.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The heterogeneity of malaria transmission makes widespread elimination a difficult goal to achieve. Most of the current vector control measures insufficiently target outdoor transmission. Also, insecticide resistance threatens to diminish the efficacy of the most prevalent measures, indo

  17. Recombinant human erythropoietin increases survival and reduces neuronal apoptosis in a murine model of cerebral malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hempel Casper

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cerebral malaria (CM is an acute encephalopathy with increased pro-inflammatory cytokines, sequestration of parasitized erythrocytes and localized ischaemia. In children CM induces cognitive impairment in about 10% of the survivors. Erythropoietin (Epo has – besides of its well known haematopoietic properties – significant anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anti-apoptotic effects in various brain disorders. The neurobiological responses to exogenously injected Epo during murine CM were examined. Methods Female C57BL/6j mice (4–6 weeks, infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA, were treated with recombinant human Epo (rhEpo; 50–5000 U/kg/OD, i.p. at different time points. The effect on survival was measured. Brain pathology was investigated by TUNEL (Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate (dUTP-digoxigenin nick end labelling, as a marker of apoptosis. Gene expression in brain tissue was measured by real time PCR. Results Treatment with rhEpo increased survival in mice with CM in a dose- and time-dependent manner and reduced apoptotic cell death of neurons as well as the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the brain. This neuroprotective effect appeared to be independent of the haematopoietic effect. Conclusion These results and its excellent safety profile in humans makes rhEpo a potential candidate for adjunct treatment of CM.

  18. Strategies to reduce mortality and morbidity due to AIDS-related cryptococcal meningitis in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose E. Vidal

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Latin America is the region with the third most AIDS-related cryptococcal meningitis infections globally. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has reduced the number of infections; however, the number of deaths and the case-fatality rate continues to be unacceptable. In this review, we focus on the burden of AIDS-related cryptococcosis in Latin America and discuss potential strategies to reduce early mortality from Cryptococcus. In this review, we highlight the importance of: (1 earlier HIV diagnosis and HAART initiation with retention-in-care to avoid AIDS; (2 pre-HAART cryptococcal antigen (CRAG screening with preemptive fluconazole treatment; (3 better diagnostics (e.g. CRAG testing; and (4 optimal treatment with aggressive management of intracranial pressure and induction therapy with antifungal combination. Implementation of these strategies can reduce cryptococcal-related deaths, improve care, and reduce healthcare costs.

  19. Do antenatal corticosteroids in term elective cesarean sections reduce neonatal respiratory morbidity?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Petour Gazitúa, Felipe; Pérez Velásquez, Javiera

    2015-01-01

    .... To find the best evidence available to determine whether the use of antenatal corticosteroids reduces the incidence of respiratory distress syndrome in term babies born by elective caesarean section...

  20. Malaria morbidity and immunity among residents of villages with different Plasmodium falciparum transmission intensity in North-Eastern Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lusingu, John P A; Vestergaard, Lasse S; Mmbando, Bruno P;

    2004-01-01

    and febrile malaria episodes was conducted among individuals aged below 20 years, residing in three villages of different altitude in areas of high, moderate and low malaria transmission intensity in North-Eastern Tanzania. RESULTS: The burden of anaemia and malarial fever fell mainly on the youngest children...... and was highest in the village with high transmission intensity. Although a considerable percentage of individuals in all villages carried intestinal worms, logistic regression models indicated that Plasmodium falciparum was the only significant parasitic determinant of anaemia. Interestingly, children who...... carried low-density parasitaemia at the start of the study had a lower risk of contracting a febrile malaria episode but a higher risk of anaemia during the study period, than children who were slide negative at this point in time. CONCLUSION: Young children living in the high transmission village carried...

  1. [Do antenatal corticosteroids in term elective cesarean sections reduce neonatal respiratory morbidity?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petour Gazitúa, Felipe; Pérez Velásquez, Javiera

    2015-10-07

    Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome is closely related to gestational age and mode of birth. Lowest gestational ages and caesarean section are associated with higher risk of developing respiratory distress syndrome. The efficacy of antenatal corticosteroids is well established in the induction of lung maturation in premature births. Its use could be a beneficial intervention in term fetuses that will be born by elective caesarean section. To find the best evidence available to determine whether the use of antenatal corticosteroids reduces the incidence of respiratory distress syndrome in term babies born by elective caesarean section. We searched the available medical literature in different databases: PubMed, LILACS, UpToDate, Trip database, SciELO and Cochrane. We considered controlled, randomized therapeutic studies, performed on humans, in which the intervention included corticosteroids as a treatment in elective term cesareans. We selected two studies. In both, the intervention was two doses of 12 mg of dexamethasone before the caesarean section. The primary objective in both studies was to analyze the incidence of respiratory distress syndrome and the admission of the newborn into intensive care units. In both studies, there was less incidence of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, with statistically significant results. We concluded that the use of corticosteroids in elective term caesarean section reduces the incidence of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome and the admission into intensive care units. However, we evidenced certain weaknesses that could modify the internal validity of both studies, so it is necessary to develop new studies that could support these findings in order to modify clinical protocols in term elective caesarean sections.

  2. Reduced subcutaneous tissue distribution of cefazolin in morbidly obese versus non-obese patients determined using clinical microdialysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brill, M.J.; Houwink, A.P.; Schmidt, S.; Dongen, E.P. Van; Hazebroek, E.J.; Ramshorst, B. van; Deneer, V.H.; Mouton, J.W.; Knibbe, C.A.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: As morbidly obese patients are prone to surgical site infections, adequate blood and subcutaneous tissue concentrations of prophylactic antibiotic agents during surgery are imperative. In this study we evaluated cefazolin subcutaneous adipose tissue distribution in morbidly obese and non

  3. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency and reduced haemoglobin levels in African children with severe malaria

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nguetse, Christian N; Meyer, Christian G; Adegnika, Ayola Akim; Agbenyega, Tsiri; Ogutu, Bernhards R; Kremsner, Peter G; Velavan, Thirumalaisamy P

    2016-01-01

    .... A total of 301 Gabonese, Ghanaian, and Kenyan children aged 6-120 months with severe malaria recruited in a multicentre trial on artesunate were included in this sub-study. G6PD normal (type B), heterozygous (type A(+)) and deficient (type...

  4. A push-pull system to reduce house entry of malaria mosquitoes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menger, D.J.; Otieno, B.; Rijk, de M.; Mukabana, W.R.; Loon, van J.J.A.; Takken, W.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Mosquitoes are the dominant vectors of pathogens that cause infectious diseases such as malaria, dengue, yellow fever and filariasis. Current vector control strategies often rely on the use of pyrethroids against which mosquitoes are increasingly developing resistance. Here, a push-pull

  5. A push-pull system to reduce house entry of malaria mosquitoes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menger, D.J.; Otieno, B.; Rijk, de M.; Mukabana, W.R.; Loon, van J.J.A.; Takken, W.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Mosquitoes are the dominant vectors of pathogens that cause infectious diseases such as malaria, dengue, yellow fever and filariasis. Current vector control strategies often rely on the use of pyrethroids against which mosquitoes are increasingly developing resistance. Here, a push-pull

  6. Behavioral change communication strategy vital in malaria prevention interventions in rural communities: Nakasongola district, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugisa, Margaret; Muzoora, Abel

    2012-01-01

    Malaria is a leading killer disease in Uganda and it accounts for significant morbidity in pregnant women and children. Pregnant women are more susceptible to malaria, which causes adverse effects including abortion, low birth weight and maternal anaemia. Children with severe malaria frequently develop one of these symptoms including: severe anaemia, respiratory distress, Prostration, convulsions and cerebral malaria. Due to the severity of the disease there is need for multiple interventions to reduce the disease burden. African Medical and Research Foundation (AMREF) adopted community based approaches to improve malaria prevention. Behavioral change communication (BCC) was fundamental at every process of Project implementation. This paper shares AMREF's experience in using BCC strategies amidst other interventions in malaria prevention approaches involving use of insecticide treated nets and environment management. AMREF through a Malaria project (2007-2010) in Nakasongola district supported BCC activities through training, community mobilization, mass media, health promotion and advocacy. Program performance was measured through baseline and evaluation surveys in 2007 and 2010. The final project evaluation indicated improvement from baseline values as follows: knowledge on prevention of malaria among school children from 76.6% to 90%, under five children sleeping under bed net the previous night from 51% to 74.7%, and from 24% to 78% among pregnant women. Mobilization of malaria prevention interventions can be successful once BCC approaches are adequately planned and coordinated. Malaria prevention through BCC strategies are likely to be more effective with integration of other malaria interventions, and involvement of community based structures.

  7. [Physiopathology of cerebral malaria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringwald, P

    1995-01-01

    Physiopathology of severe malaria is extremely complex and misappreciated. Sequestration of parasited red cells and role of cytokines are now accepted but we still have to discover why only a few people develop a severe malaria. A better knowledge of that physiopathology would allow the conception of new therapeutic strategies to reduce malaria mortality.

  8. STUDY OF RENAL FAILURE IN MALARIA

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    Girish Pamappa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal failure is a serious complication of malaria, with a mortality of 14 to 33%. In view of the significant morbidity and mortality due to acute renal failure in malaria, there is need to identify patients at an early stage and to intensify care given to reduce morbidity and mortality. AIMS  To evaluate the clinical profile of Acute Renal Failure (ARF in malaria.  To evaluate the factors associated with adverse outcome, relation of severity of renal impairment on final outcome in patients with ARF due to malaria. MATERIAL AND METHODS This study was conducted at a tertiary care hospital over a period of 12 months. STUDY DESIGN  Type of study: Prospective Analytical, Observational Study.  Sample Size: 50 patients admitted to ICU, Kidney Unit, and the Medicine Wards with Malaria and ARF. Inclusion Criteria Clinically screened patients with evidence of malarial parasites in the blood smears or by antigen detection with clinical features or biochemical evidence of acute renal failure. Exclusion Criteria  Presence of any disease or condition leading to ARF or affecting the outcome of malarial ARF.  Other causes of Fever, Jaundice and Oliguria, like Leptospirosis, Dengue. METHODOLOGY Fifty patients who fulfilled the inclusion criteria were interrogated with regards to the complaints, clinical signs. Blood tests were sent on admission. Details were recorded as per the clinical proforma. The patients were followed until their discharge/death. RESULTS Oliguria was present in only 30% of patients. 30% of patients received haemodialysis. The mortality was 12% for severe renal failure. On Univariate analysis, Acidosis and Cerebral malaria were highly significant predictors of mortality. Other significant predictors were Renal failure, Oliguria, Shock, DIC, Hyperparasitemia, Leukocytosis (TLC. On Multivariate analysis, Oliguria, Cerebral malaria, Acidosis, Shock and two or more complications were the independent predictors of mortality

  9. Prevention, Policies and Priorities to Reduce the Impact of Malaria on US Military Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    results obtained with the BinaxNOW® malaria rapid diagnostic test (per U.S.  Food  and Drug  Administration (FDA) labeling) to ensure cases of malaria are...medical officer ( GMO ), infectious disease specialist, laboratory  18  technician, researcher, professional microscopist).  This blood collection program...physicians (e.g., non‐ specialists,  GMOs ), line leadership, and deployed personnel.  However, greater than 80% of survey  respondents also specified

  10. Malaria: Global progress 2000 - 2015 and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibulskis, Richard E; Alonso, Pedro; Aponte, John; Aregawi, Maru; Barrette, Amy; Bergeron, Laurent; Fergus, Cristin A; Knox, Tessa; Lynch, Michael; Patouillard, Edith; Schwarte, Silvia; Stewart, Saira; Williams, Ryan

    2016-06-09

    only reduce malaria morbidity and mortality, thereby contributing to the health targets of the Sustainable Development Goals, but they can also transform the well-being and livelihood of some of the poorest communities across the globe.

  11. A push-pull system to reduce house entry of malaria mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menger, David J; Otieno, Bruno; de Rijk, Marjolein; Mukabana, W Richard; van Loon, Joop J A; Takken, Willem

    2014-03-27

    Mosquitoes are the dominant vectors of pathogens that cause infectious diseases such as malaria, dengue, yellow fever and filariasis. Current vector control strategies often rely on the use of pyrethroids against which mosquitoes are increasingly developing resistance. Here, a push-pull system is presented, that operates by the simultaneous use of repellent and attractive volatile odorants. Experiments were carried out in a semi-field set-up: a traditional house which was constructed inside a screenhouse. The release of different repellent compounds, para-menthane-3,8-diol (PMD), catnip oil e.o. and delta-undecalactone, from the four corners of the house resulted in significant reductions of 45% to 81.5% in house entry of host-seeking malaria mosquitoes. The highest reductions in house entry (up to 95.5%), were achieved by simultaneously repelling mosquitoes from the house (push) and removing them from the experimental set-up using attractant-baited traps (pull). The outcome of this study suggests that a push-pull system based on attractive and repellent volatiles may successfully be employed to target mosquito vectors of human disease. Reductions in house entry of malaria vectors, of the magnitude that was achieved in these experiments, would likely affect malaria transmission. The repellents used are non-toxic and can be used safely in a human environment. Delta-undecalactone is a novel repellent that showed higher effectiveness than the established repellent PMD. These results encourage further development of the system for practical implementation in the field.

  12. Deletion of a malaria invasion gene reduces death and anemia, in model hosts.

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    Noé D Gómez

    Full Text Available Malaria parasites induce complex cellular and clinical phenotypes, including anemia, cerebral malaria and death in a wide range of mammalian hosts. Host genes and parasite 'toxins' have been implicated in malarial disease, but the contribution of parasite genes remains to be fully defined. Here we assess disease in BALB/c mice and Wistar rats infected by the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium berghei with a gene knock out for merozoite surface protein (MSP 7. MSP7 is not essential for infection but in P. falciparum, it enhances erythrocyte invasion by 20%. In vivo, as compared to wild type, the P. berghei Δmsp7 mutant is associated with an abrogation of death and a decrease from 3% to 2% in peak, circulating parasitemia. The Δmsp7 mutant is also associated with less anemia and modest increase in the size of follicles in the spleen. Together these data show that deletion of a single parasite invasion ligand modulates blood stage disease, as measured by death and anemia. This work is the first to assess the contribution of a gene present in all plasmodial species in severe disease.

  13. In Ovo Delivery of CpG DNA Reduces Avian Infectious Laryngotracheitis Virus Induced Mortality and Morbidity

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    Simrika Thapa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Endosomal toll-like receptor-21 and -9 sense CpG DNA activating production of pro-inflammatory mediators with antimicrobial effects. Here, we investigated the induction of antiviral response of in ovo delivered CpG DNA against infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV infection. We found that in ovo delivered CpG DNA significantly reduces ILTV infection pre-hatch correlating with the expression of IL-1β and increase of macrophages in lungs. As assessed in vitro, CpG DNA stimulated avian macrophages could be a potential source of IL-1β and other pro-inflammatory mediators. Since we also found that in ovo CpG DNA delivery maintains increased macrophages in the lungs post-hatch, we infected the chickens on the day of hatch with ILTV. We found that in ovo delivered CpG DNA significantly reduces mortality and morbidity resulting from ILTV infection encountered post-hatch. Thus, CpG DNA can be a candidate innate immune stimulant worthy of further investigation for the control of ILTV infection in chickens.

  14. Morbidity situation of imported falciparum malaria in Hubei%湖北省输入性恶性疟发病态势分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄光全; 袁方玉; 胡乐群; 李凯杰; 林文; 孙凌聪; 张华勋; 裴速建; 董小蓉; 刘井元

    2012-01-01

    Objective To understand the situation and disposal of imported falciparum malaria, and explore countermeasures for prevention and control. Method The data of imported falciparum malaria of Hubei province in 2010 was analyzed for the epidemic-stricken places and disposal of material, for cases gender, age, and vocational distribution, both the onset and diagnose time. Results There was 28 cases of inported falciparum malaria and death 1 cases in 2010, with an increase of 64.71% when compared with 2009, showing a peak in July. The Patients were men and at the age of 21 ~ 54 years old, in which the migrant workers accounted for 46.43%, workers accounted for 25.0%, engineering and technical personnel account for 14.29%. There were 11 new cases (39.29%), 16 cases of recurrent (57.14%), and 1 healthy carrier (3.57%). The time for patients showing clinical symptoms to visit clinics was 3.22 days in average, to confirm diagnose was 5.96 days in average. Patients were infected in 11 countries such as Burma, Indonesia and Mali. Conclusions Imported falciparum malaria cases were increased year by year, the patients were workers had been abroad and mainly migrant workers in rural area. The patients were not promptly consulted doctors and there were threats of secondary cases. Propaganda of the malaria knowledge, improvement of the diagnosis and treatment, and the improvement of surveillance of the disease should be strengthened.%目的 掌握输入性恶性疟发病态势和处置现状,探索防控对策.方法 收集2010年湖北省输人性恶性疟疫情、个案调查及疫点处置资料,对病例性别、年龄及职业分布,发病初诊及确诊时间进行计数统计与分析.结果 2010年全省报告输入性恶性疟28例,比2009年上升64.71%,死亡1例,发病高峰在7月.患者均为男性,年龄在21~54岁,农民工占46.43%、工人占25.0%、工程技术人员占14.29%.输入初发11例,占39.29%,复发16例,占57.14%,健康带虫1例,占3

  15. Remotely Sensed Environmental Conditions and Malaria Mortality in Three Malaria Endemic Regions in Western Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewe, Maquins Odhiambo; Ahlm, Clas; Rocklöv, Joacim

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in malaria endemic countries. The malaria mosquito vectors depend on environmental conditions, such as temperature and rainfall, for reproduction and survival. To investigate the potential for weather driven early warning systems to prevent disease occurrence, the disease relationship to weather conditions need to be carefully investigated. Where meteorological observations are scarce, satellite derived products provide new opportunities to study the disease patterns depending on remotely sensed variables. In this study, we explored the lagged association of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NVDI), day Land Surface Temperature (LST) and precipitation on malaria mortality in three areas in Western Kenya. The lagged effect of each environmental variable on weekly malaria mortality was modeled using a Distributed Lag Non Linear Modeling approach. For each variable we constructed a natural spline basis with 3 degrees of freedom for both the lag dimension and the variable. Lag periods up to 12 weeks were considered. The effect of day LST varied between the areas with longer lags. In all the three areas, malaria mortality was associated with precipitation. The risk increased with increasing weekly total precipitation above 20 mm and peaking at 80 mm. The NDVI threshold for increased mortality risk was between 0.3 and 0.4 at shorter lags. This study identified lag patterns and association of remote- sensing environmental factors and malaria mortality in three malaria endemic regions in Western Kenya. Our results show that rainfall has the most consistent predictive pattern to malaria transmission in the endemic study area. Results highlight a potential for development of locally based early warning forecasts that could potentially reduce the disease burden by enabling timely control actions.

  16. Fighting malaria in Madhya Pradesh (Central India: Are we loosing the battle?

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    Thimasarn Krongthong

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Malaria control in Madhya Pradesh is complex because of vast tracts of forest with tribal settlement. Fifty four million individuals of various ethnic origins, accounting for 8% of the total population of India, contributed 30% of total malaria cases, 60% of total falciparum cases and 50% of malaria deaths in the country. Ambitious goals to control tribal malaria by launching "Enhanced Malaria Control Project" (EMCP by the National Vector Borne Disease Control Programme (NVBDCP, with the World Bank assistance, became effective in September 1997 in eight north Indian states. Under EMCP, the programme used a broader mix of new interventions, i.e. insecticide-treated bed nets, spraying houses with effective residual insecticides, use of larvivorous fishes, rapid diagnostic tests for prompt diagnosis, treatment of the sick with effective radical treatment and increased public awareness and IEC. However, the challenge is to scale up these services. A retrospective analysis of data on malaria morbidity and associated mortality reported under the existing surveillance system of the Madhya Pradesh (Central India for the years 1996–2007 was carried out to determine the impact of EMCP on malaria morbidity and associated mortality. Analysis revealed that despite the availability of effective intervention tools for the prevention and control of malaria, falciparum malaria remains uncontrolled and deaths due to malaria have increased. Precisely, the aim of this epidemiological analysis is to draw lessons applicable to all international aid efforts, bureaucracy, policy makers and programme managers in assessing its project performance as a new Global Malaria Action Plan is launched with ambitious goal of reducing malaria and its elimination by scaling up the use of existing tools.

  17. Macrophage preconditioning with synthetic malaria pigment reduces cytokine production via heme iron-dependent oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taramelli, D; Recalcati, S; Basilico, N; Olliaro, P; Cairo, G

    2000-12-01

    Hemozoin (malaria pigment), a polymer of hematin (ferri-protoporphyrin IX) derived from hemoglobin ingested by intraerythrocytic plasmodia, modulates cytokine production by phagocytes. Mouse peritoneal macrophages (PM) fed with synthetic beta-hematin (BH), structurally identical to native hemozoin, no longer produce tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) and nitric oxide (NO) in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Impairment of NO synthesis is due to inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) production. BH-mediated inhibition of PM functions cannot be ascribed to iron release from BH because neither prevention by iron chelators nor down-regulation of iron-regulatory protein activity was detected. Inhibition appears to be related to pigment-induced oxidative stress because (a) thiol compounds partially restored PM functions, (b) heme oxygenase (HO-1) and catalase mRNA levels were up-regulated, and (c) free radicals production increased in BH-treated cells. The antioxidant defenses of the cells determine the response to BH: microglia cells, which show a lower extent of induction of HO-1 and catalase mRNAs and lower accumulation of oxygen radicals, are less sensitive to the inhibitory effect of BH on cytokine production. Results indicate that BH is resistant to degradation by HO-1 and that heme-iron mediated oxidative stress may contribute to malaria-induced immunosuppression. This study may help correlate the different clinical manifestations of malaria, ranging from uncomplicated to severe disease, with dysregulation of phagocyte functions and promote better therapeutic strategies to counteract the effects of hemozoin accumulation.

  18. Enhancing the application of effective malaria interventions in Africa through training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijumba, Jasper N; Kitua, Andrew Y

    2004-08-01

    Africa bears more than 90% of the entire global malaria disease burden. Surprisingly, even with the current renewed interest in malaria prevention and control and the enabling environment resulting from the Roll Back Malaria initiative and the political commitment made by the African Presidents at the Abuja Summit, there are still no significant initiatives for strengthening capacity for malaria control through training within the African continent itself. The Center for Enhancement of Effective Malaria Interventions (CEEMI) has been established in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania for results-oriented training. It is intended to provide the needed skills for identifying and solving malaria control problems and providing incentives to malaria control workers in their work performance. The intention is to produce implementers with leadership skills for planning and managing malaria control activities and who can use strategic thinking in improving their work performance. To sustain political commitment and support and to sensitize the community on malaria issues, the CEEMI, in collaboration with the Ministry of Health (National Malaria Control Program), the Institute of Journalism and Mass Communication of the University of Dar es Salaam, and the Commonwealth Broadcasting Association have already conducted malaria seminars for Tanzanian Members of Parliament and journalists from Kenya, Malawi, Tanzania, and Uganda. Additionally, a diploma course in health communication is being developed for journalists and for the same purpose. Also being developed is a training module for "Council Malaria Focal Person." This is aimed at complementing the Roll Back Malaria initiative to meet the Abuja targets of reducing morbidity and mortality due to malaria by 50% by 2010.

  19. CD36 selection of 3D7 Plasmodium falciparum associated with severe childhood malaria results in reduced VAR4 expression

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    Hviid Lars

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A subset of the Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1SM is involved in the cytoadherence of P. falciparum-infected red blood cells (iRBC contributing to the pathogenesis of severe disease among young children in malaria endemic areas. The PfEMP1SM are encoded by group A var genes that are composed of a more constrained range of amino acid sequences than groups B and C var genes encoding PfEMP1UM associated with uncomplicated malaria. Also, unlike var genes from groups B and C, those from group A do not have sequences consistent with CD36 binding – a major cytoadhesion phenotype of P. falciparum isolates. Methods A 3D7 PfEMP1SM sub-line (3D7SM expressing VAR4 (PFD1235w/MAL8P1.207 was selected for binding to CD36. The protein expression of this parasite line was monitored by surface staining of iRBC using VAR4-specific antibodies. The serological phenotype of the 3D7SM parasites was determined by flow cytometry using malaria semi-immune and immune plasma and transcription of the 59 var genes in 3D7 were analysed by real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR using var-specific primers. Results A selection-induced increased adhesion of 3D7SM iRBC to CD36 resulted in a reduced var4 transcription and VAR4 surface expression. Conclusion VAR4 is not involved in CD36 adhesion. The current findings are consistent with the notion that CD36 adhesion is not associated with particular virulent parasite phenotypes, such as those believed to be exhibited by VAR4 expressing parasites.

  20. A Low Mortality, High Morbidity Reduced Intensity Status Epilepticus (RISE) Model of Epilepsy and Epileptogenesis in the Rat

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    Pérès, Isabelle A. A.; Hadid, Rebecca D.; Amada, Naoki; Hill, Charlotte; Williams, Claire; Stanford, Ian M.; Morris, Christopher M.; Jones, Roland S. G.; Whalley, Benjamin J.; Woodhall, Gavin L.

    2016-01-01

    Animal models of acquired epilepsies aim to provide researchers with tools for use in understanding the processes underlying the acquisition, development and establishment of the disorder. Typically, following a systemic or local insult, vulnerable brain regions undergo a process leading to the development, over time, of spontaneous recurrent seizures. Many such models make use of a period of intense seizure activity or status epilepticus, and this may be associated with high mortality and/or global damage to large areas of the brain. These undesirable elements have driven improvements in the design of chronic epilepsy models, for example the lithium-pilocarpine epileptogenesis model. Here, we present an optimised model of chronic epilepsy that reduces mortality to 1% whilst retaining features of high epileptogenicity and development of spontaneous seizures. Using local field potential recordings from hippocampus in vitro as a probe, we show that the model does not result in significant loss of neuronal network function in area CA3 and, instead, subtle alterations in network dynamics appear during a process of epileptogenesis, which eventually leads to a chronic seizure state. The model’s features of very low mortality and high morbidity in the absence of global neuronal damage offer the chance to explore the processes underlying epileptogenesis in detail, in a population of animals not defined by their resistance to seizures, whilst acknowledging and being driven by the 3Rs (Replacement, Refinement and Reduction of animal use in scientific procedures) principles. PMID:26909803

  1. [Improved Blood Pressure Control to Reduce Cardiovascular Disease Morbidity and Mortality: The Standardized Hypertension Treatment and Prevention Project].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Pragna; Ordunez, Pedro; DiPette, Donald; Escobar, María Cristina; Hassell, Trevor; Wyss, Fernando; Hennis, Anselm; Asma, Samira; Angell, Sonia

    2017-06-08

    Hypertension is the leading remediable risk factor for cardiovascular disease, affecting more than 1 billion people worldwide, and is responsible for more than 10 million preventable deaths globally each year. While hypertension can be successfully diagnosed and treated, only one in seven persons with hypertension have controlled blood pressure. To meet the challenge of improving the control of hypertension, particularly in low- and middle-income countries, the authors developed the Standardized Hypertension Treatment and Prevention Project, which involves a health systems-strengthening approach that advocates for standardized hypertension management using evidence-based interventions. These interventions include the use of standardized treatment protocols, a core set of medications along with improved procurement mechanisms to increase the availability and affordability of these medications, registries for cohort monitoring and evaluation, patient empowerment, team-based care (task shifting), and community engagement. With political will and strong partnerships, this approach provides the groundwork to reduce high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease-related morbidity and mortality.

  2. Factors determining anti-malarial drug use in a peri-urban population from malaria holoendemic region of western Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watsierah, Carren A; Jura, Walter G Z O; Oyugi, Henry; Abong'o, Benard; Ouma, Collins

    2010-10-26

    Interventions to reverse trends in malaria-related morbidity and mortality in Kenya focus on preventive strategies and drug efficacy. However, the pattern of use of anti-malarials in malaria-endemic populations, such as in western Kenya, is still poorly understood. It is critical to understand the patterns of anti-malarial drug use to ascertain that the currently applied new combination therapy to malaria treatment, will achieve sustained cure rates and protection against parasite resistance. Therefore, this cross-sectional study was designed to determine the patterns of use of anti-malarial drugs in households (n = 397) in peri-urban location of Manyatta-B sub-location in Kisumu in western Kenya. Household factors, associated with the pattern of anti-malarials use, were evaluated. Using clusters, questionnaire was administered to a particular household member who had the most recent malaria episode (within malaria care and decrease malaria-related morbidity and mortality by increasing drug affordability, ensuring that the recommended anti-malarial drugs are easily available in all government approved drug outlets and educates the local shopkeepers on the symptoms and appropriate treatment of malaria. Following a switch to ACT in national drug policy, education on awareness and behaviour change is recommended, since the efficacy of ACT alone is not sufficient to reduce morbidity and mortality due to malaria.

  3. Malaria Facts

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    ... CDC Malaria Branch clinician. malaria@cdc.gov Malaria Facts Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Malaria in ... to determine definitively which species are involved. Other Facts Five times, the Nobel Prize in Physiology or ...

  4. Malaria investigation and treatment of children admitted to county hospitals in western Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amboko, Beatrice I; Ayieko, Philip; Ogero, Morris; Julius, Thomas; Irimu, Grace; English, Mike

    2016-10-18

    Up to 90 % of the global burden of malaria morbidity and mortality occurs in sub-Saharan Africa and children under-five bear a disproportionately high malaria burden. Effective inpatient case management can reduce severe malaria mortality and morbidity, but there are few reports of how successfully international and national recommendations are adopted in management of inpatient childhood malaria. A descriptive cross-sectional study of inpatient malaria case management practices was conducted using data collected over 24 months in five hospitals from high malaria risk areas participating in the Clinical Information Network (CIN) in Kenya. This study describes documented clinical features, laboratory investigations and treatment of malaria in children (2-59 months) and adherence to national guidelines. A total of 13,014 children had a malaria diagnosis on admission to the five hospitals between March, 2014 and February, 2016. Their median age was 24 months (IQR 12-36 months). The proportion with a diagnostic test for malaria requested was 11,981 (92.1 %). Of 10,388 patients with malaria test results documented, 8050 (77.5 %) were positive and anti-malarials were prescribed in 6745 (83.8 %). Malaria treatment was prescribed in 1613/2338 (69.0 %) children with a negative malaria result out of which only 52 (3.2 %) had a repeat malaria test done as recommended in national guidelines. Documentation of clinical features was good across all hospitals, but quinine remained the most prescribed malaria drug (47.2 % of positive cases) although a transition to artesunate (46.1 %) was observed. Although documented clinical features suggested approximately half of positive malaria patients were not severe cases artemether-lumefantrine was prescribed on admission in only 3.7 % cases. Despite improvements in inpatient malaria care, high rates of presumptive treatment for test negative children and likely over-use of injectable anti-malarial drugs were observed. Three

  5. Malaria investigation and treatment of children admitted to county hospitals in western Kenya

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    Beatrice I. Amboko

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Up to 90 % of the global burden of malaria morbidity and mortality occurs in sub-Saharan Africa and children under-five bear a disproportionately high malaria burden. Effective inpatient case management can reduce severe malaria mortality and morbidity, but there are few reports of how successfully international and national recommendations are adopted in management of inpatient childhood malaria. Methods A descriptive cross-sectional study of inpatient malaria case management practices was conducted using data collected over 24 months in five hospitals from high malaria risk areas participating in the Clinical Information Network (CIN in Kenya. This study describes documented clinical features, laboratory investigations and treatment of malaria in children (2–59 months and adherence to national guidelines. Results A total of 13,014 children had a malaria diagnosis on admission to the five hospitals between March, 2014 and February, 2016. Their median age was 24 months (IQR 12–36 months. The proportion with a diagnostic test for malaria requested was 11,981 (92.1 %. Of 10,388 patients with malaria test results documented, 8050 (77.5 % were positive and anti-malarials were prescribed in 6745 (83.8 %. Malaria treatment was prescribed in 1613/2338 (69.0 % children with a negative malaria result out of which only 52 (3.2 % had a repeat malaria test done as recommended in national guidelines. Documentation of clinical features was good across all hospitals, but quinine remained the most prescribed malaria drug (47.2 % of positive cases although a transition to artesunate (46.1 % was observed. Although documented clinical features suggested approximately half of positive malaria patients were not severe cases artemether-lumefantrine was prescribed on admission in only 3.7 % cases. Conclusions Despite improvements in inpatient malaria care, high rates of presumptive treatment for test negative children and likely

  6. Role of information and communication networks in malaria survival

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    Marathe Achla

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quite often symptoms of malaria go unrecognized or untreated. According to the Multilateral Initiative on Malaria, 70% of the malaria cases that are treated at home are mismanaged. Up to 82% of all malaria episodes in sub-Saharan Africa are treated outside the formal health sector. Fast and appropriate diagnosis and treatment of malaria is extremely important in reducing morbidity and mortality. Method Data from 70 different countries is pooled together to construct a panel dataset of health and socio-economic variables for a time span of (1960–2004. The generalized two-stage least squares and panel data models are used to investigate the impact of information and communication network (ICN variables on malaria death probability. The intensity of ICN is represented by the number of telephone main lines per 1,000 people and the number of television sets per 1,000 people. Results The major finding is that the intensity of ICN is associated with reduced probability of deaths of people that are clinically identified as malaria infected. The results are robust for both indicators i.e. interpersonal and mass communication networks and for all model specifications examined. Conclusion The results suggest that information and communication networks can substantially scale up the effectiveness of the existing resources for malaria prevention. Resources spent in preventing malaria are far less than needed. Expanded information and communication networks will widen the avenues for community based "participatory development", that encourages the use of local information, knowledge and decision making. Timely information, immediate care and collective knowledge based treatment can be extremely important in reducing child mortality and achieving the millennium development goal.

  7. Mortality, Morbidity, and Developmental Outcomes in Infants Born to Women Who Received Either Mefloquine or Sulfadoxine-Pyrimethamine as Intermittent Preventive Treatment of Malaria in Pregnancy: A Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupérez, María; González, Raquel; Mombo-Ngoma, Ghyslain; Kabanywanyi, Abdunoor M.; Sevene, Esperança; Ouédraogo, Smaïla; Kakolwa, Mwaka A.; Vala, Anifa; Accrombessi, Manfred; Briand, Valérie; Aponte, John J.; Manego Zoleko, Rella; Adegnika, Ayôla A.; Cot, Michel; Kremsner, Peter G.; Massougbodji, Achille; Abdulla, Salim; Ramharter, Michael; Macete, Eusébio; Menéndez, Clara

    2016-01-01

    Background Little is known about the effects of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy (IPTp) on the health of sub-Saharan African infants. We have evaluated the safety of IPTp with mefloquine (MQ) compared to sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) for important infant health and developmental outcomes. Methods and Findings In the context of a multicenter randomized controlled trial evaluating the safety and efficacy of IPTp with MQ compared to SP in pregnancy carried out in four sub-Saharan countries (Mozambique, Benin, Gabon, and Tanzania), 4,247 newborns, 2,815 born to women who received MQ and 1,432 born to women who received SP for IPTp, were followed up until 12 mo of age. Anthropometric parameters and psychomotor development were assessed at 1, 9, and 12 mo of age, and the incidence of malaria, anemia, hospital admissions, outpatient visits, and mortality were determined until 12 mo of age. No significant differences were found in the proportion of infants with stunting, underweight, wasting, and severe acute malnutrition at 1, 9, and 12 mo of age between infants born to women who were on IPTp with MQ versus SP. Except for three items evaluated at 9 mo of age, no significant differences were observed in the psychomotor development milestones assessed. Incidence of malaria, anemia, hospital admissions, outpatient visits, and mortality were similar between the two groups. Information on the outcomes at 12 mo of age was unavailable in 26% of the infants, 761 (27%) from the MQ group and 377 (26%) from the SP group. Reasons for not completing the study were death (4% of total study population), study withdrawal (6%), migration (8%), and loss to follow-up (9%). Conclusions No significant differences were found between IPTp with MQ and SP administered in pregnancy on infant mortality, morbidity, and nutritional outcomes. The poorer performance on certain psychomotor development milestones at 9 mo of age in children born to women in the MQ group compared

  8. A description of malaria sentinel surveillance: a case study in Oromia Regional State, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yukich, Joshua O; Butts, Jessica; Miles, Melody; Berhane, Yemane; Nahusenay, Honelgn; Malone, Joseph L; Dissanayake, Gunawardena; Reithinger, Richard; Keating, Joseph

    2014-03-11

    In the context of the massive scale up of malaria interventions, there is increasing recognition that the current capacity of routine malaria surveillance conducted in most African countries through integrated health management information systems is inadequate. The timeliness of reporting to higher levels of the health system through health management information systems is often too slow for rapid action on focal infectious diseases such as malaria. The purpose of this paper is to: 1) describe the implementation of a malaria sentinel surveillance system in Ethiopia to help fill this gap; 2) describe data use for epidemic detection and response as well as programmatic decision making; and 3) discuss lessons learned in the context of creating and running this system. As part of a comprehensive strategy to monitor malaria trends in Oromia Regional State, Ethiopia, a system of ten malaria sentinel sites was established to collect data on key malaria morbidity and mortality indicators. To ensure the sentinel surveillance system provides timely, actionable data, the sentinel facilities send aggregate data weekly through short message service (SMS) to a central database server. Bland-Altman plots and Poisson regression models were used to investigate concordance of malaria indicator reports and malaria trends over time, respectively. This paper describes three implementation challenges that impacted system performance in terms of: 1) ensuring a timely and accurate data reporting process; 2) capturing complete and accurate patient-level data; and 3) expanding the usefulness and generalizability of the system's data to monitor progress towards the national malaria control goals of reducing malaria deaths and eventual elimination of transmission. The use of SMS for reporting surveillance data was identified as a promising practice for accurately tracking malaria trends in Oromia. The rapid spread of this technology across Africa offers promising opportunities to collect

  9. Community screening and treatment of asymptomatic carriers of Plasmodium falciparum with artemether-lumefantrine to reduce malaria disease burden: a modelling and simulation analysis

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    Ubben David

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Asymptomatic carriers of Plasmodium falciparum serve as a reservoir of parasites for malaria transmission. Identification and treatment of asymptomatic carriers within a region may reduce the parasite reservoir and influence malaria transmission in that area. Methods Using computer simulation, this analysis explored the impact of community screening campaigns (CSC followed by systematic treatment of P. falciparum asymptomatic carriers (AC with artemether-lumefantrine (AL on disease transmission. The model created by Okell et al (originally designed to explore the impact of the introduction of treatment with artemisinin-based combination therapy on malaria endemicity was modified to represent CSC and treatment of AC with AL, with the addition of malaria vector seasonality. The age grouping, relative distribution of age in a region, and degree of heterogeneity in disease transmission were maintained. The number and frequency of CSC and their relative timing were explored in terms of their effect on malaria incidence. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to determine the factors with the greatest impact on the model predictions. Results The simulation showed that the intervention that had the largest effect was performed in an area with high endemicity (entomological inoculation rate, EIR > 200; however, the rate of infection returned to its normal level in the subsequent year, unless the intervention was repeated. In areas with low disease burden (EIR Conclusions Community screening and treatment of asymptomatic carriers with AL may reduce malaria transmission significantly. The initial level of disease intensity has the greatest impact on the potential magnitude and duration of malaria reduction. When combined with other interventions (e.g. long-lasting insecticide-treated nets, rapid diagnostic tests, prompt diagnosis and treatment, and, where appropriate, indoor residual spraying the effect of this intervention can be

  10. Towards the elimination of malaria in South Africa: a review of surveillance data in Mutale Municipality, Limpopo Province, 2005 to 2010

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    Khosa Ester

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background South Africa has targeted to eliminate malaria by the year 2018. Constant monitoring of malaria morbidity and mortality trends in affected subpopulations is therefore crucial in guiding and refining control interventions. Mutale Municipality in Limpopo Province is one of the areas with the highest risk of malaria in the country. This paper describes trends in malaria incidence, case fatality and household indoor residual spraying (IRS coverage in Mutale Municipality, during the period 2005 to 2010. Methods A retrospective descriptive analysis was conducted on malaria data routinely collected through the Limpopo provincial malaria information system between July 2005 and June 2010. Five malaria seasons were defined. Annualized malaria incidence rates, case fatality rates (CFR and IRS coverage rates were calculated. Results Cumulatively, 4,663 malaria cases and 21 malaria deaths were reported in Mutale between July 2005 and June 2010. Investigation of likely origin of the malaria in 3,517 patients revealed that 6.6% were imported cases, mostly from neighbouring Zimbabwe (222/231. Malaria incidence rates fell from 13.6 cases per 1,000 person-years in the 2005–2006 season to 2.7 cases per 1,000 person-years in the 2009–2010 season. The mean malaria CFR was stable between 0.3 and 0.6% during the first four seasons, and increased sharply to 2.1% in the 2009–2010 season. The median age of the 21 malaria deaths was 34 years (range: 16 to 60 years. CFRs were 0% in children below 15 years and above 0.5% in patients more than 24 years old. Regular IRS achieved coverage above 80% in all five seasons. Conclusion Malaria control interventions implemented in Mutale significantly reduced the incidence of malaria in the population. In order to accurately monitor progress towards the elimination goal, the malaria control programme should strengthen the reporting and capturing of the data in the provincial malaria information system; all

  11. Study of clinical presentation of malaria and the associated liver profile changes in various species of plasmodia

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    Siddanagouda M. Biradar

    2016-12-01

    Conclusions: Malaria is a potential cause of morbidity and mortality in the tropical countries. Jaundice is one of the common presentations of falciparum malaria. The raised serum bilirubin could be due to both hemolysis and hepatocellular dysfunction. Early diagnosis and treatment will help in reducing further complications like severe anaemia, hepatic encephalopathy, acute renal failure and disseminated intravascular coagulation. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(12.000: 5447-5451

  12. HIV treatments reduce malaria liver stage burden in a non-human primate model of malaria infection at clinically relevant concentrations in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte V Hobbs

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that the HIV protease inhibitor lopinavir-ritonavir (LPV-RTV and the antibiotic trimethoprim sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX inhibit Plasmodium liver stages in rodent malarias and in vitro in P. falciparum. Since clinically relevant levels are better achieved in the non-human-primate model, and since Plasmodium knowlesi is an accepted animal model for the study of liver stages of malaria as a surrogate for P. falciparum infection, we investigated the antimalarial activity of these drugs on Plasmodium knowlesi liver stages in rhesus macaques. We demonstrate that TMP-SMX and TMP-SMX+LPV-RTV (in combination, but not LPV-RTV alone, inhibit liver stage parasite development. Because drugs that inhibit the clinically silent liver stages target parasites when they are present in lower numbers, these results may have implications for eradication efforts.

  13. Reduced risk of malaria parasitemia following household screening and treatment: a cross-sectional and longitudinal cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine G Sutcliffe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In regions of declining malaria transmission, new strategies for control are needed to reduce transmission and achieve elimination. Artemisinin-combination therapy (ACT is active against immature gametocytes and can reduce the risk of transmission. We sought to determine whether household screening and treatment of infected individuals provides protection against infection for household members. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The study was conducted in two areas in Southern Province, Zambia in 2007 and 2008/2009. To determine the impact of proactive case detection, households were randomly selected either to join a longitudinal cohort, in which participants were repeatedly screened throughout the year and those infected treated with artemether-lumefantrine, or a cross-sectional survey, in which participants were visited only once. Cross-sectional surveys were conducted throughout the year. The prevalence of RDT positivity was compared between the longitudinal and cross-sectional households at baseline and during follow-up using multilevel logistic regression. In the 2007 study area, 174 and 156 participants enrolled in the cross-sectional and longitudinal groups, respectively. In the 2008/2009 study area, 917 and 234 participants enrolled in the cross-sectional and longitudinal groups, respectively. In both study areas, participants and households in the longitudinal and cross-sectional groups were similar on demographic characteristics and prevalence of RDT positivity at baseline (2007: OR = 0.97; 95% CI:0.46, 2.03 | 2008/2009: OR = 1.28; 95% CI:0.44, 3.79. After baseline, the prevalence of RDT positivity was significantly lower in longitudinal compared to cross-sectional households in both study areas (2007: OR = 0.44; 95% CI:0.20, 0.96 | 2008/2009: OR = 0.16; 95% CI:0.05, 0.55. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Proactive case detection, consisting of screening household members with an RDT and treating those positive with

  14. Hematological indices in febrile neonates with malaria parasitaemia in Calabar

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    Callistus O. A Enyuma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Normal hematological indices has been determined in Nigerian newborns and found to be lower compared to their Caucasian counterparts. This was attributed to genetic factors. Malaria is endemic in Nigeria and is one of the major causes of ill health and death. Anemia is an important manifestation of malaria. Resistance by malaria parasites to antimalarial drug exacerbates the situation by continuous hemolysis. Aim: To determine the hematological indices in febrile newborn with malaria parasitemia. Materials and Methods: One-hundred fifty neonates (0-28 days with fever admitted into the Newborn Unit of University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, over a 6 months period, were recruited consecutively. Blood film for malaria parasites and samples for full blood count were obtained and sent to the laboratory before commencement of the treatment. Data analysis was with SPSS version 14. Results: One-hundred fifty babies were recruited into the study. Most (85.3% of the babies were aged ≤7 days. Six babies (4% had malaria parasitemia. Plasmodium falciparum was the only species identified. All the babies that had parasitemia were anemic (mean hemoglobin [Hb] concentration of 12.6 g/dl even when parasite count was low (average of 30.6/µl though this could not be attributed solely to malaria. None of these neonates was transfused. All the other hematological indices were within the normal range of healthy newborn population irrespective of parasitization. Conclusion: Neonatal malaria does occur in our environment. While it does not affect the white blood indices, it lowers neonatal Hb. It is recommended that Hb concentration be estimated in newborns with malaria to reduce infant morbidity and mortality in our environment.

  15. Malaria in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E E Okpere

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaria remains one of the highest contributors to the precarious maternal mortality figures in sub-Saharan Africa. At least 6 million women worldwide are at risk of malaria infection in pregnancy. Malaria contributes to at least 10, 000 maternal deaths and to at least 200, 000 newborn deaths annually. Malaria is a contributor or aetiologic factor in pregnancy complications including anaemia, spontaneous abortion, prematurity and stillbirths. Pregnancy results in increased incidence and severity of malaria. Cerebral malaria, acute renal failure and severe anaemia, rare complications in adults living in malaria endemic areas, may complicate malaria in pregnancy. Research implicate reduced maternal immunity from increased steroid levels in pregnancy, increased attractiveness of pregnant women to mosquito bites and increased adherence of parasitized erythrocytes to Chondroitin sulphate A expressed in the placentae. This is worse in the first and second pregnancies. With infection with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus [HIV], the effects of malaria in pregnancy are even worse. Over the decades, there have been concerted worldwide collaborative efforts, spearheaded by the World Health Organization [WHO] and including governments and allied agencies to tackle the scourge of malaria in pregnancy. The main thrusts of such efforts have been: to increase the use of insecticide treated mosquito bed nets [ITN]; intermittent preventive treatment of malaria [IPT]; and adequate case treatment of acute malaria attacks in pregnancy. While for IPT, Sulfadoxine-Pyrimethamine [SP] combination has been proven to be of benefit in preventing acute and latent malaria in pregnancy and its associated complications, the WHO has introduced the use of Artemisinin-Combination Therapy [ACT] for the first-line treatment of uncomplicated malaria in pregnancy, the need to confirm malaria before treatment and the enforcement of completion of therapy once started. The Roll Back

  16. Rapid, non-invasive imaging of alphaviral brain infection: Reducing animal numbers and morbidity to identify efficacy of potential vaccines and antivirals

    OpenAIRE

    Patterson, Michael; Poussard, Allison; Taylor, Katherine; Seregin, Alexey; Smith, Jeanon; Peng, Bi-Hung; Walker, Aida; Linde, Jenna; Smith, Jennifer; Salazar, Milagros; Paessler, Slobodan

    2011-01-01

    Rapid and accurate identification of disease progression are key factors in testing novel vaccines and antivirals against encephalitic alphaviruses. Typical efficacy studies utilize a large number of animals and severe morbidity or mortality as an endpoint. New technologies provide a means to reduce and refine the animal use as proposed in Hume’s 3Rs (replacement, reduction, refinement) described by Russel and Burch. In vivo imaging systems (IVIS) and bioluminescent enzyme technologies accomp...

  17. Thirty years after Alma-Ata: a systematic review of the impact of community health workers delivering curative interventions against malaria, pneumonia and diarrhoea on child mortality and morbidity in sub-Saharan Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewin Simon

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over thirty years have passed since the Alma-Ata Declaration on primary health care in 1978. Many governments in the first decade following the declaration responded by developing national programmes of community health workers (CHWs, but evaluations of these often demonstrated poor outcomes. As many CHW programmes have responded to the HIV/AIDS pandemic, international interest in them has returned and their role in the response to other diseases should be examined carefully so that lessons can be applied to their new roles. Over half of the deaths in African children under five years of age are due to malaria, diarrhoea and pneumonia - a situation which could be addressed through the use of cheap and effective interventions delivered by CHWs. However, to date there is very little evidence from randomised controlled trials of the impacts of CHW programmes on child mortality in Africa. Evidence from non-randomised controlled studies has not previously been reviewed systematically. Methods We searched databases of published and unpublished studies for RCTs and non-randomised studies evaluating CHW programmes delivering curative treatments, with or without preventive components, for malaria, diarrhoea or pneumonia, in children in sub-Saharan Africa from 1987 to 2007. The impact of these programmes on morbidity or mortality in children under six years of age was reviewed. A descriptive analysis of interventional and contextual factors associated with these impacts was attempted. Results The review identified seven studies evaluating CHWs, delivering a range of interventions. Limited descriptive data on programmes, contexts or process outcomes for these CHW programmes were available. CHWs in national programmes achieved large mortality reductions of 63% and 36% respectively, when insecticide-treated nets and anti-malarial chemoprophylaxis were delivered, in addition to curative interventions. Conclusions CHW programmes could

  18. High Plasmodium falciparum longitudinal prevalence is associated with high multiclonality and reduced clinical malaria risk in a seasonal transmission area of Mali

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adomako-Ankomah, Yaw; Chenoweth, Matthew S.; Durfee, Katelyn; Doumbia, Saibou; Konate, Drissa; Doumbouya, Mory; Keita, Abdoul S.; Nikolaeva, Daria; Tullo, Gregory S.; Anderson, Jennifer M.; Fairhurst, Rick M.; Daniels, Rachel; Volkman, Sarah K.; Diakite, Mahamadou; Long, Carole A.

    2017-01-01

    The effects of persistent Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) infection and multiclonality on subsequent risk of clinical malaria have been reported, but the relationship between these 2 parameters and their relative impacts on the clinical outcome of infection are not understood. A longitudinal cohort study was conducted in a seasonal and high-transmission area of Mali, in which 500 subjects aged 1–65 years were followed for 1 year. Blood samples were collected every 2 weeks, and incident malaria cases were diagnosed and treated. Pf infection in each individual at each time point was assessed by species-specific nested-PCR, and Pf longitudinal prevalence per person (PfLP, proportion of Pf-positive samples over 1 year) was calculated. Multiclonality of Pf infection was measured using a 24-SNP DNA barcoding assay at 4 time-points (two in wet season, and two in dry season) over one year. PfLP was positively correlated with multiclonality at each time point (all r≥0.36; all P≤0.011). When host factors (e.g., age, gender), PfLP, and multiclonality (at the beginning of the transmission season) were analyzed together, only increasing age and high PfLP were associated with reduced clinical malaria occurrence or reduced number of malaria episodes (for both outcomes, P<0.001 for age, and P = 0.005 for PfLP). When age, PfLP and baseline Pf positivity were analyzed together, the effect of high PfLP remained significant even after adjusting for the other two factors (P = 0.001 for malaria occurrence and P<0.001 for number of episodes). In addition to host age and baseline Pf positivity, both of which have been reported as important modifiers of clinical malaria risk, our results demonstrate that persistent parasite carriage, but not baseline multiclonality, is associated with reduced risk of clinical disease in this population. Our study emphasizes the importance of considering repeated parasite exposure in future studies that evaluate clinical malaria risk. PMID:28158202

  19. Can topical insect repellents reduce malaria? A cluster-randomised controlled trial of the insect repellent N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide (DEET in Lao PDR.

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    Vanessa Chen-Hussey

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mosquito vectors of malaria in Southeast Asia readily feed outdoors making malaria control through indoor insecticides such as long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs and indoor residual spraying more difficult. Topical insect repellents may be able to protect users from outdoor biting, thereby providing additional protection above the current best practice of LLINs. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A double blind, household randomised, placebo-controlled trial of insect repellent to reduce malaria was carried out in southern Lao PDR to determine whether the use of repellent and long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs could reduce malaria more than LLINs alone. A total of 1,597 households, including 7,979 participants, were recruited in June 2009 and April 2010. Equal group allocation, stratified by village, was used to randomise 795 households to a 15% DEET lotion and the remainder were given a placebo lotion. Participants, field staff and data analysts were blinded to the group assignment until data analysis had been completed. All households received new LLINs. Participants were asked to apply their lotion to exposed skin every evening and sleep under the LLINs each night. Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax cases were actively identified by monthly rapid diagnostic tests. Intention to treat analysis found no effect from the use of repellent on malaria incidence (hazard ratio: 1.00, 95% CI: 0.99-1.01, p = 0.868. A higher socio-economic score was found to significantly decrease malaria risk (hazard ratio: 0.72, 95% CI: 0.58-0.90, p = 0.004. Women were also found to have a reduced risk of infection (hazard ratio: 0.59, 95% CI: 0.37-0.92, p = 0.020. According to protocol analysis which excluded participants using the lotions less than 90% of the time found similar results with no effect from the use of repellent. CONCLUSIONS: This randomised controlled trial suggests that topical repellents are not a suitable intervention in addition to

  20. Reduced risk of uncomplicated malaria episodes in children with a+-thalassemia in northeastern Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enevold, Anders; Lusingu, John P; Mmbando, Bruno

    2008-01-01

    the susceptibility to uncomplicated malaria. We compared the risk of suffering from febrile, uncomplicated malaria between individuals carrying three common RBC polymorphisms (sickle cell trait, alpha(+)-thalassemia, and glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase deficiency) and controls. The study was performed in an area......The prevalence of human red blood cell (RBC) polymorphisms is high in areas of intense Plasmodium falciparum transmission, and individuals carrying these genetic traits are believed to be partially protected against severe malaria. However, it remains uncertain how RBC polymorphisms affect...

  1. Malaria: Antimalarial resistance and policy ramificationsand challenges

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    Kshirsagar N

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available ′The National health Policy 2002" of India and the "Roll Back Malaria" policy makers have set up an ambitious goal of reducing malaria mortality and morbidity by 25% by 2007, and by 50% by 2010. To achieve these goals, problems should be identified, available evidence analyzed and policy should be changed early. Infection with drug resistant malarial parasites has a tremendous impact on health (prolonged recurrent illness, increased hospital admissions and death, health system (higher cost of treatment and socioeconomics of the region. In view of the evidence of the economic burden of malaria, it has been suggested that second line treatment could be considered at 10% failure instead of 25%. Effective schizonticidal drugs will not only reduce morbidity and mortality but will also reduce transmission. Studies have shown that prevalence of viable (as tested by exflagellation test gametocytes is considerably more after the Chloroquine or Chloroquine + Sulphadoxine-Pyrimethamine treatment compared to Quinine. Unfortunately, the only gametocytocidal drug for Plasmodium falciparum, primaquine, is also loosing its efficacy. 45 mg Primaquine reduces gametocyte prevalence by 50% while a new drug, 75 mg bulaquine or 60 mg primaquine reduces it by 90%. Plasmodium vivax forms 60-70% of malaria cases in India. Relapses which occur in 10-20% of cases adds to the burden. Efficacy, as confirmed by Polymerase Chain Reaction-Single Strand Conformational Polymorphism (PCRSSCP to differentiate relapse and re-infection, of standard dose of primaquine (15 mg/day for 5 days, even 15 mg/day for 14 days for vivax malaria is reducing. Fourteen day treatment is also impractical as compliance is poor. Newer drugs, newer drug delivery systems are thus needed. Slow release formulations with blood levels maintained for one week may be useful. Rationale of giving primaquine in higher doses and different timing need to be considered. The genome of Plasmodium falciparum and

  2. The burden of malaria in post-emergency refugee sites: A retrospective study

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    Spiegel Paul

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Almost two-thirds of refugees, internally displaced persons, returnees and other persons affected by humanitarian emergencies live in malaria endemic regions. Malaria remains a significant threat to the health of these populations. Methods Data on malaria incidence and mortality were analyzed from January 2006 to December 2009 from the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees Health Information System database collected at sites in Burundi, Chad, Cameroon, Ethiopia, Kenya, Sudan, Tanzania, Thailand, and Uganda. Data from three countries during 2006 and 2007, and all nine countries from 2008 to 2009, were used to describe trends in malaria incidence and mortality. Monthly counts of malaria morbidity and mortality were aggregated into an annual country rate averaged over the study period. Results An average of 1.18 million refugees resided in 60 refugee sites within nine countries with at least 50 cases of malaria per 1000 refugees during the study period 2008-2009. The highest incidence of malaria was in refugee sites in Tanzania, where the annual incidence of malaria was 399 confirmed cases per 1,000 refugees and 728 confirmed cases per 1,000 refugee children younger than five years. Malaria incidence in children younger than five years of age, based on the sum of confirmed and suspected cases, declined substantially at sites in two countries between 2006 and 2009, but a slight increase was reported at sites within four of seven countries between 2008 and 2009. Annual malaria mortality rates were highest in sites in Sudan (0.9 deaths per 1,000 refugees, Uganda and Tanzania (0.7 deaths per 1000 refugees each. Malaria was the cause of 16% of deaths in refugee children younger than five years of age in all study sites. Conclusions These findings represent one of the most extensive reports on malaria among refugees in post-emergency sites. Despite declines in malaria incidence among refugees in several countries, malaria

  3. Colorectal stenting as a bridge to surgery reduces morbidity and mortality in left-sided malignant obstruction: a predictive risk score-based comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cennamo, Vincenzo; Luigiano, Carmelo; Manes, Gianpiero; Zagari, Rocco Maurizio; Ansaloni, Luca; Fabbri, Carlo; Ceroni, Liza; Catena, Fausto; Pinna, Antonio Daniele; Fuccio, Lorenzo; Mussetto, Alessandro; Casetti, Tino; Coccolini, Federico; D'Imperio, Nicola; Bazzoli, Franco

    2012-06-01

    The Physiological and Operative Severity Score for the enUmeration of Mortality and morbidity model, and its Portsmouth and colorectal modifications are used to predict postoperative mortality and morbidity after colorectal surgery. To compare stent placement as a bridge to surgery vs. emergency surgical resection in patients with acute left-sided colorectal cancer obstruction using P-POSSUM and CR-POSSUM. From January 2008 to December 2009, the physiological and operative scores, morbidity and mortality predicted by the P-POSSUM and CR-POSSUM scores were collected in all consecutive patients with LCCO who underwent surgical resection directly (Group A) or after stent placement (Group B). Eighty-six patients were enrolled (Group A-41 and Group B-45). The observed 30-day mortality rate was 9.8% (4/41) in Group A and 2.4% (1/45) in Group B. The 30-day morbidity rate was 61% (25/41) in Group A and 29% (13/45) in Group B. The mean values of P-POSSUM morbidity (A=70.5% vs. B=34.3%; p=0.001), P-POSSUM mortality (A=13.6% vs. B=2.4%; p=0.001) and CR-POSSUM mortality (A=15.1% vs. B=4.9%; p=0.001) were significantly lower in the Group B patients than in the Group A patients. Bridge to surgery strategy reduces the surgical risks in LCCO, and P-POSSUM and CR-POSSUM scores represent a good tool for comparing the two strategies. Copyright © 2012 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Fats & Fakes : Towards improved control of malaria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, B.J.

    2017-01-01

    Effective malaria control reduced the malaria burden worldwide tremendously. Simultaneously, the epidemiology of malaria is changing and has become more complex. To continue the progress of the last decade, this thesis addressed several areas of importance in the field of malaria. Since effective ma

  5. Fats & Fakes : Towards improved control of malaria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, B.J.

    2017-01-01

    Effective malaria control reduced the malaria burden worldwide tremendously. Simultaneously, the epidemiology of malaria is changing and has become more complex. To continue the progress of the last decade, this thesis addressed several areas of importance in the field of malaria. Since effective

  6. Fats & Fakes : Towards improved control of malaria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, B.J.

    2017-01-01

    Effective malaria control reduced the malaria burden worldwide tremendously. Simultaneously, the epidemiology of malaria is changing and has become more complex. To continue the progress of the last decade, this thesis addressed several areas of importance in the field of malaria. Since effective ma

  7. Did the first Global Fund grant (2003–2006 contribute to malaria control and health system strengthening in Timor-Leste?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins João

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2003, Timor-Leste successfully obtained its first Global Fund grant for a three-year programme for malaria control. The grant aimed to reduce malaria-related morbidity and mortality by 30 % by the end of the implementation. Methods A mixed-methods approach was used to assess the impact of the grant implementation. Fifty-eight in-depth interviews, eight group interviews, 16 focus group discussions, and on-site observations were used. Morbidity data reported to the Ministry of Health were also examined to assess trends. Results The National Malaria Programme with funding support from the Global Fund grant and other development partners contributed considerably to strengthening malaria control and the general health system. It also brought direct and indirect benefits to pregnant women and to the community at large. However, it failed to achieve the stated objective of reducing malaria morbidity and mortality by 30 %. The implementation was hampered by inadequate human resources, the rigidity of Global Fund rules, weak project management and coordination, and inadequate support from external stakeholders. Conclusion Despite limitations, the grant was implemented until the agreed closing date. Considerable contributions to malaria control, health system, and the community have been made and the malaria programme was sustained.

  8. Artemisinin resistance or tolerance in human malaria patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jerapan Krungkrai; Waranya Imprasittichai; Sumintra Otjungreed; Sawirasagee Pongsabut; Sudaratana R Krungkrai

    2010-01-01

    Malaria is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the developing world. This situation is mainly due to emergence of resistance to most antimalarial drugs currently available. Artemisinin-based combination treatments are now first-line drugs forPlasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) malaria. Artemisinin (qinghaosu) and its derivatives are the most rapid acting and efficacious antimalarial drugs. This review highlights most recent investigations into the emergence of artemisinin resistance in falciparum malaria patients on the Thai-Cambodian border, a historical epicenter for multidrug resistance spread spanning over50 years. The study presents the first evidence that highlights the parasites reduced susceptibility to artemisinin treatment by prolonged parasite-clearance times, raising considerable concern on resistance development. Although the exact mechanism of action remains unresolved, development of resistance was proposed based from bothin vitro experiments and human patients. Lines of evidence suggested that the parasites in the patients are in dormant forms, presumably tolerate to the drug pressure. The World Health Organization has launched for prevention and/or containment of the artemisinin-resistant malaria parasites. Taken together, the emergence of artemisinin resistance to the most potent antidote for falciparum malaria, poses a serious threat to global malaria control and prompts renewed efforts for urgent development of new antimalarial weapons.

  9. Bariatric bypasses contribute to loss of bone mineral density but reduce axial back pain in morbidly obese patients considering spine surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Many spine surgeons recommend stringent weight loss, including bariatric bypass procedures, prior to “elective” spine surgery (should not be for axial back pain alone) in morbidly obese patients (defined by a body mass index (BMI) of >40 mg/kg2 or >35 mg/kg2 with two or more major comorbidities) to reduce their greater risk for major perioperative complications. Although bypasses typically lead to marked weight reduction and even reduced axial back pain, they also promote unrecognized and often insufficiently treated vitamin D deficiency and loss of bone mineral density. Methods: Morbidly obese patients who are under consideration for “elective” spine operations (other than for back pain alone) are often told to lose weight. Some choose to undergo bariatric bypass procedures, but are unaware of the potential risks/complications of these procedures. Results: Within the first 2 years following most bariatric bypass procedures, patients experience not only marked loss of weight and muscle mass, but also significant vitamin D deficiency and loss of bone mineral density, increasing their susceptibility to fractures. Nevertheless, some patients also experience a sufficient reduction of axial back pain to avoid spinal surgery. Conclusions: Morbidly obese patients under consideration for “elective” spine surgery may undergo bariatric bypass procedures that lead to a significant reduction of vitamin D levels and loss of bone mineral density. However, potential benefits may include a sufficient reduction of axial back pain to avoid surgery in a select subset of patients altogether. PMID:28217392

  10. Malaria in India: Challenges and opportunities

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A P Dash; Neena Valecha; A R Anvikar; A Kumar

    2008-11-01

    India contributes about 70% of malaria in the South East Asian Region of WHO. Although annually India reports about two million cases and 1000 deaths attributable to malaria, there is an increasing trend in the proportion of Plasmodium falciparum as the agent. There exists heterogeneity and variability in the risk of malaria transmission between and within the states of the country as many ecotypes/paradigms of malaria have been recognized. The pattern of clinical presentation of severe malaria has also changed and while multi-organ failure is more frequently observed in falciparum malaria, there are reports of vivax malaria presenting with severe manifestations. The high burden populations are ethnic tribes living in the forested pockets of the states like Orissa, Jharkhand, Madhya Pradesh, Chhattisgarh and the North Eastern states which contribute bulk of morbidity and mortality due to malaria in the country. Drug resistance, insecticide resistance, lack of knowledge of actual disease burden along with new paradigms of malaria pose a challenge for malaria control in the country. Considering the existing gaps in reported and estimated morbidity and mortality, need for estimation of true burden of malaria has been stressed. Administrative, financial, technical and operational challenges faced by the national programme have been elucidated. Approaches and priorities that may be helpful in tackling serious issues confronting malaria programme have been outlined.

  11. Iron Deficiency Protects Against Severe Plasmodium falciparum Malaria and Death in Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwamaka, Moses; Kurtis, Jonathan D.; Sorensen, Bess E.; Holte, Sarah; Morrison, Robert; Mutabingwa, Theonest K.; Fried, Michal

    2012-01-01

    (See the Editorial Commentary by Awah and Kaneko, on pages 1145–7.) Background. Iron supplementation may increase malaria morbidity and mortality, but the effect of naturally occurring variation in iron status on malaria risk is not well studied. Methods. A total of 785 Tanzanian children living in an area of intense malaria transmission were enrolled at birth, and intensively monitored for parasitemia and illness including malaria for up to 3 years, with an average of 47 blood smears. We assayed plasma samples collected at routine healthy-child visits, and evaluated the impact of iron deficiency (ID) on future malaria outcomes and mortality. Results. ID at routine, well-child visits significantly decreased the odds of subsequent parasitemia (23% decrease, P iron status assays/child), ID reduced the prevalence of parasitemia (6.6-fold), hyperparasitemia (24.0-fold), and severe malaria (4.0-fold) at the time of sample collection (all P iron status, and therefore iron supplementation may have adverse effects even among children with ID. Future interventional studies should assess whether treatment for ID coupled with effective malaria control can mitigate the risks of iron supplementation for children in areas of malaria transmission. PMID:22354919

  12. PENGOBATAN MALARIA DENGAN KOMBINASI ARTEMISININ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilianan Tjitra

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous approaches in malaria treatment fail to reduce the morbidity and mortality of malaria. Widespread overuse of antimalarial treatment of clinical malaria may have contributed to increase drug resistance. Moreover, poor compliance or inadequate dosage also selects for parasite resistance. The paradigm of radical treatment using drug combinations may improve the cure rate and compliance, thereby preventing or delaying the emergence of parasites resistant to antimalarial drugs. The ideal combined antimalarial regimen in Indonesia should be safe and tolerated by all age groups, effective and rapidly acting for both P.falciparum and P.vivax malaria, short course, good compliance and acceptable, without resistance and/or cross-resistance or , not widely spread use, cost-effective and affordable. Artemisinin derivatives are the best partner drug for combination, with advantages that include: well absorbed, safe and well tolerated, rapidly converted to active metabolite, having very short half-life, broad specificity of action, and extremely potent. Current artemisinin-based combinations which are suitable for Indonesia include: amodiaquine plus artesunate given as single daily dose for 3 days (AQ3+ATS3, mefloquine plus artesunate given as single daily dose for 3 days (MQ3+ATS3, lumefantrine/benflumetol plus artemether given as twice daily dose for 3 days (COARTEMETHER, piperaquine plus dihydroartemisinin given as single daily dose for 2-3 days (PPQ2-3+DHA2-3, and piperaquine plus artemisinin given as single daily dose for 2 days (PPQ2+ATM2. Given the imbalance between rapid development of parasite resistance and slow availability of new effective antimalarial drugs, research and development of antimalarial drugs must be encouraged.

  13. PENGOBATAN MALARIA DENGAN KOMBINASI ARTEMISININ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilianan Tjitra

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous approaches in malaria treatment fail to reduce the morbidity and mortality of malaria. Widespread overuse of antimalarial treatment of clinical malaria may have contributed to increase drug resistance. Moreover, poor compliance or inadequate dosage also selects for parasite resistance. The paradigm of radical treatment using drug combinations may improve the cure rate and compliance, thereby preventing or delaying the emergence of parasites resistant to antimalarial drugs. The ideal combined antimalarial regimen in Indonesia should be safe and tolerated by all age groups, effective and rapidly acting for both P.falciparum and P.vivax malaria, short course, good compliance and acceptable, without resistance and/or cross-resistance or , not widely spread use, cost-effective and affordable. Artemisinin derivatives are the best partner drug for combination, with advantages that include: well absorbed, safe and well tolerated, rapidly converted to active metabolite, having very short half-life, broad specificity of action, and extremely potent. Current artemisinin-based combinations which are suitable for Indonesia include: amodiaquine plus artesunate given as single daily dose for 3 days (AQ3+ATS3, mefloquine plus artesunate given as single daily dose for 3 days (MQ3+ATS3, lumefantrine/benflumetol plus artemether given as twice daily dose for 3 days (COARTEMETHER, piperaquine plus dihydroartemisinin given as single daily dose for 2-3 days (PPQ2-3+DHA2-3, and piperaquine plus artemisinin given as single daily dose for 2 days (PPQ2+ATM2. Given the imbalance between rapid development of parasite resistance and slow availability of new effective antimalarial drugs, research and development of antimalarial drugs must be encouraged.

  14. Second-hand tobacco smoke in Oklahoma: a preventable cause of morbidity and mortality and means of reducing exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miner, Robert N; Crutcher, James M

    2002-03-01

    Evidence has mounted in recent years establishing second-hand tobacco smoke exposure as a cause of morbidity and mortality in nonsmokers. The ratio of deaths is approximately one nonsmoker dying from illness caused by second-hand smoke exposure for every eight smokers who die from diseases caused by tobacco use. This is equivalent to about 750 nonsmoker deaths each year in Oklahoma caused by exposure to second-hand smoke. This article reviews the components of second-hand smoke, its health effects, its prevalence in Oklahoma, and the means of protecting children and nonsmoking adults from exposure. Oklahoma physicians are encouraged to advise their patients about the harmful effects of second-hand smoke and to actively support public policies that decrease exposure to second-hand smoke in public places and workplaces.

  15. Zinc supplementation reduces morbidity and mortality in very-low-birth-weight preterm neonates: a hospital-based randomized, placebo-controlled trial in an industrialized country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrin, Gianluca; Berni Canani, Roberto; Passariello, Annalisa; Messina, Francesco; Conti, Maria Giulia; Caoci, Stefano; Smaldore, Antonella; Bertino, Enrico; De Curtis, Mario

    2013-12-01

    Zinc plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of many diseases and in body growth. Preterm neonates have high zinc requirements. The objective of the study was to investigate the efficacy of zinc supplementation in reducing morbidity and mortality in preterm neonates and to promote growth. This was a prospective, double-blind, randomized controlled study of very-low-birth-weight preterm neonates randomly allocated on the seventh day of life to receive (zinc group) or not receive (control group) oral zinc supplementation. Total prescribed zinc intake ranged from 9.7 to 10.7 mg/d in the zinc group and from 1.3 to 1.4 mg/d in the placebo control group. The main endpoint was the rate of neonates with ≥ 1 of the following morbidities: late-onset sepsis, necrotizing enterocolitis, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, periventricular leucomalacia, and retinopathy of prematurity. Secondary outcomes were mortality and body growth. We enrolled 97 neonates in the zinc group and 96 in the control group. Morbidities were significantly lower in the zinc group (26.8% compared with 41.7%; P = 0.030). The occurrence of necrotizing enterocolitis was significantly higher in the control group (6.3% compared with 0%; P = 0.014). Mortality risk was higher in the placebo control group (RR: 2.37; 95% CI: 1.08, 5.18; P = 0.006). Daily weight gain was similar in the zinc (18.2 ± 5.6 g · kg⁻¹ · d⁻¹) and control (17.0 ± 8.7 g · kg⁻¹ · d⁻¹) groups (P = 0.478). Oral zinc supplementation given at high doses reduces morbidities and mortality in preterm neonates. This trial was registered in the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trial Register as ACTRN12612000823875.

  16. Hyperthyroidism and psychiatric morbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Frans; Thvilum, Marianne; Pedersen, Dorthe Almind

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormones are essential for the normal development of the fetal brain, while hyperthyroidism in adults is associated with mood symptoms and reduced quality of life. We aimed to investigate the association and temporal relation between hyperthyroidism and psychiatric morbidity....

  17. Eradication of malaria through genetic engineering:the current situation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wing-Chui Chong; Rusliza Basir; Yam Mun Fei

    2013-01-01

    Malaria is an intra-cellular parasitic protozoon responsible for millions of deaths annually.Host and parasite genetic factors are crucial in affecting susceptibility to malaria and progression of the disease.Recent increased deployment of vector controls and new artemisinin combination therapies have dramatically reduced the mortality and morbidity of malaria worldwide.However, the gradual emergence of parasite and mosquito resistance has raised alarm regarding the effectiveness of current artemisinin-based therapies.In this review, mechanisms of anti-malarial drug resistance in thePlasmodium parasite and new genetically engineered tools of research priorities are discussed.The complexity of the parasite lifecycle demands novel interventions to achieve global eradication.However, turning laboratory discovered transgenic interventions into functional products entails multiple experimental phases in addition to ethical and safety hurdles.Uncertainty over the regulatory status and public acceptance further discourage the implementation of genetically modified organisms.

  18. Assessment of severe malaria in a multicenter, phase III, RTS, S/AS01 malaria candidate vaccine trial: case definition, standardization of data collection and patient care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vekemans Johan

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An effective malaria vaccine, deployed in conjunction with other malaria interventions, is likely to substantially reduce the malaria burden. Efficacy against severe malaria will be a key driver for decisions on implementation. An initial study of an RTS, S vaccine candidate showed promising efficacy against severe malaria in children in Mozambique. Further evidence of its protective efficacy will be gained in a pivotal, multi-centre, phase III study. This paper describes the case definitions of severe malaria used in this study and the programme for standardized assessment of severe malaria according to the case definition. Methods Case definitions of severe malaria were developed from a literature review and a consensus meeting of expert consultants and the RTS, S Clinical Trial Partnership Committee, in collaboration with the World Health Organization and the Malaria Clinical Trials Alliance. The same groups, with input from an Independent Data Monitoring Committee, developed and implemented a programme for standardized data collection. The case definitions developed reflect the typical presentations of severe malaria in African hospitals. Markers of disease severity were chosen on the basis of their association with poor outcome, occurrence in a significant proportion of cases and on an ability to standardize their measurement across research centres. For the primary case definition, one or more clinical and/or laboratory markers of disease severity have to be present, four major co-morbidities (pneumonia, meningitis, bacteraemia or gastroenteritis with severe dehydration are excluded, and a Plasmodium falciparum parasite density threshold is introduced, in order to maximize the specificity of the case definition. Secondary case definitions allow inclusion of co-morbidities and/or allow for the presence of parasitaemia at any density. The programmatic implementation of standardized case assessment included a clinical

  19. Assessment of severe malaria in a multicenter, phase III, RTS, S/AS01 malaria candidate vaccine trial: case definition, standardization of data collection and patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vekemans, Johan; Marsh, Kevin; Greenwood, Brian; Leach, Amanda; Kabore, William; Soulanoudjingar, Solange; Asante, Kwaku Poku; Ansong, Daniel; Evans, Jennifer; Sacarlal, Jahit; Bejon, Philip; Kamthunzi, Portia; Salim, Nahya; Njuguna, Patricia; Hamel, Mary J; Otieno, Walter; Gesase, Samwel; Schellenberg, David

    2011-08-04

    An effective malaria vaccine, deployed in conjunction with other malaria interventions, is likely to substantially reduce the malaria burden. Efficacy against severe malaria will be a key driver for decisions on implementation. An initial study of an RTS, S vaccine candidate showed promising efficacy against severe malaria in children in Mozambique. Further evidence of its protective efficacy will be gained in a pivotal, multi-centre, phase III study. This paper describes the case definitions of severe malaria used in this study and the programme for standardized assessment of severe malaria according to the case definition. Case definitions of severe malaria were developed from a literature review and a consensus meeting of expert consultants and the RTS, S Clinical Trial Partnership Committee, in collaboration with the World Health Organization and the Malaria Clinical Trials Alliance. The same groups, with input from an Independent Data Monitoring Committee, developed and implemented a programme for standardized data collection.The case definitions developed reflect the typical presentations of severe malaria in African hospitals. Markers of disease severity were chosen on the basis of their association with poor outcome, occurrence in a significant proportion of cases and on an ability to standardize their measurement across research centres. For the primary case definition, one or more clinical and/or laboratory markers of disease severity have to be present, four major co-morbidities (pneumonia, meningitis, bacteraemia or gastroenteritis with severe dehydration) are excluded, and a Plasmodium falciparum parasite density threshold is introduced, in order to maximize the specificity of the case definition. Secondary case definitions allow inclusion of co-morbidities and/or allow for the presence of parasitaemia at any density. The programmatic implementation of standardized case assessment included a clinical algorithm for evaluating seriously sick children

  20. Recombinant human erythropoietin increases survival and reduces neuronal apoptosis in a murine model of cerebral malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiese, Lothar; Hempel, Casper; Penkowa, Milena;

    2008-01-01

    with recombinant human Epo (rhEpo; 50-5000 U/kg/OD, i.p.) at different time points. The effect on survival was measured. Brain pathology was investigated by TUNEL (Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate (dUTP)-digoxigenin nick end labelling), as a marker of apoptosis. Gene...... expression in brain tissue was measured by real time PCR. RESULTS: Treatment with rhEpo increased survival in mice with CM in a dose- and time-dependent manner and reduced apoptotic cell death of neurons as well as the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the brain. This neuroprotective effect...

  1. Mini-invasive surgical repair of the Achilles tendon--does it reduce post-operative morbidity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Mayukh; Gerber, Bruno

    2009-02-01

    The surgical benefit of minimally invasive tendo Achilles repair (n = 25) with early weight-bearing mobilisation after rupture of the tendo Achilles was compared with operative treatment using an open technique (n = 34) with full weight-bearing after 8 weeks of surgical repair. The minimally invasive technique provided no evidence of wound problems and a functional benefit from early weight-bearing mobilisation. However, we noted that increased post-operative morbidity in terms of wound infection (n = 7) leading to delayed wound healing and wound pain requiring opiate-based analgesia post-operatively in the open repair group may have an additional impact on the patients and health care providers. This study showed that the mini-invasive open surgical repair of the Achilles tendon with the Achillon instrument and early weight-bearing mobilisation in an orthosis for the accelerated rehabilitation may offer cost-effectiveness and less financial burden on the health care provider in terms of associated nursing and physiotherapy costs.

  2. Malaria in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seal, Subrata Lall; Mukhopadhay, Sima; Ganguly, Rajendra Prasad

    2010-08-01

    Malaria during pregnancy is a recognised risk factor for maternal and foetal complications and it is endemic in certain areas of our country. Pregnancy also enhances the severity of malaria particularly with P falciparum infestation. The outcome of effects of malaria in pregnancy on the mother and foetus is studied here. This is a prospective observational study conducted in the department of obstetrics and gynaecology of RG Kar Medical College during the period from 1st January 2001 to 31st December 2006. Forty pregnant women with malaria in pregnancy were studied. Another 40 non- pregnant women during the same period were served as control. The maternal complications were compared with the controls and the outcome of pregnancy was studied. There was statistically significant (p renal failure, hepatic failure, hypoglycaemia, hypotension and death in the pregnant women in comparison to non-pregnant women. P falciparum infection was also more during pregnancy. There was also increased incidence of abqrtion, preterm labour, intra-uterine growth restriction and intra-uterine foetal death. Treatment with antimalarial drugs particularly in cerebral malaria does not give good results as there were 12 maternal deaths in this series. Every attempt should be made to prevent malaria during pregnancy by various measures as it is associated with high maternal morbidity and mortality and adversely affects the neonatal outcome.

  3. STUDY OF CLINICAL AND LABORATORY PROFILE OF MALARIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishwanath

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Malaria is a major health concern across the world and is endemic in our country. It is imperative for us to know the varied manifestations and lab features both classically described and rare features for early detection of this disease and further treatment. This study was undertaken to study the clinical features, lab features and complications of malaria in a tertiary care centre. METHODOLOGY: It is a retrospective study done on 75 cases of confirmed and treated cases of malaria for a period of one year in KIMS hospital, Bangalore. Detailed history examination and lab features of these patients were recorded and analyzed. RESULTS: A total of 75 cases of confirmed malaria were treated during study period of which 57[76%] were males Out of 75 cases 46[61%] had vivax malaria infection, 10[13%] had falciparum infection and 19[26%] had mixed infections of falciparum and vivax. In all 3 groups more number of cases was seen in age group of 18 – 40 years. fever was the major presentation (100% in the patients and Pain abdomen along with fever seen in 15 [20%] patients. Head ache was another predominant complaint in 35[46.6%] On examination Icterus was seen in 11 [14.6%] patients Pallor was seen in 13[17.3%] patients Systolic BP of 2ULN was seen in 9[12%] patients Out of these 6[8%] patients had severe malaria as defined by WHO category of severe malaria. CONCLUSIONS: Being more vigilant and well versed with the varied presentations/lab features of malaria and anticipating complications early, effective treatment can be instituted thus reducing the morbidity and mortality of this endemic disease.

  4. A review of malarial retinopathy in severe malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. L. Sithole

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The ocular manifestations of severe malaria in patients with cerebral malaria (CM include retinal whitening, vessel discolouration, retinal haemorrhages and papilloedema. A large prospective study of Malawian children with CM found that the severity of retinal signs, including the number of retinal haemorrhages, was related to the outcome and length of coma in survivors of malaria. In a smaller number of Kenyan children with cerebral malaria, retinal haemorrhages were associated with deep coma and severe anaemia. A study on the effect of malarial retinopathy on vision found no detectable effect on visual acuity (VA but where malaria isaggravated by failure to receive treatment this may possibly affect VA. The failure to receive treatment may be directly linked to the socio-economic status (SES of those affected and this may occur in the KwaZulu-Natal, Mpumalanga and Limpopo provinces of South Africa where malaria is endemic. This suggests the need for effective health education and health promotion amongst those affected by malaria especially in severely affected provinces of South Africa. Also, in view of the direct ocular consequences of severe malaria, optometrists should engage communities in health education and health promotion. This is particularly relevant because in some communities, a large majority of those suffering from malarial infections do not visit formal health facilities for treatment. In so doing, optometrists in South Africa will be contributing positively to the Millennium Development Goals which seek, amongst others, to reduce unwarranted sources of morbidity worldwide. (S Afr Optom 2011 70(3 129-135 

  5. A randomised controlled double-blind clinical trial of 17-hydroxyprogesterone caproate for the prevention of preterm birth in twin gestation (PROGESTWIN): evidence for reduced neonatal morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awwad, J; Usta, I M; Ghazeeri, G; Yacoub, N; Succar, J; Hayek, S; Saasouh, W; Nassar, A H

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone caproate (17OHPC) prolongs gestation beyond 37 weeks of gestation (primary outcome) and reduces neonatal morbidity (secondary outcome) in twin pregnancy. Randomised controlled double-blind clinical trial. Tertiary-care university medical centre. Unselected women with twin pregnancies. Participants received weekly injections of 250 mg 17OHPC (n = 194) or placebo (n = 94), from 16-20 to 36 weeks of gestation. Randomisation was performed using the permuted-block randomisation method. Data were analysed on an intention-to-treat basis. Preterm birth (PTB) rate before 37 weeks of gestation. There were no significant differences in the average gestational age at delivery, or in the rates of PTB before 37, 32, and 28 weeks of gestation, between the two groups. The proportion of very-low-birthweight neonates (<1500 g) was significantly lower in the 17OHPC group (7.6%) compared with placebo (14.3%) (relative risk, RR 0.5; 95% confidence interval, 95% CI 0.3-0.9; P = 0.01). Progestogen-treated neonates had a significantly lower composite neonatal morbidity (19.1%) compared with placebo (30.9%) (odds ratio, OR 0.53; 95% CI 0.31-0.90; P = 0.02), with significantly lower odds for respiratory distress syndrome (14.4 versus 23.4%; OR 0.55; 95% CI 0.31-0.98; P = 0.04), retinopathy of prematurity (1.1 versus 4.6%; OR 0.21; 95% CI 0.05-0.96; P = 0.04), and culture-confirmed sepsis (3.4 versus 12.8%; OR 0.24; 95% CI 0.10-0.57; P = 0.00). Intramuscular 17OHPC therapy did not reduce PTB before 37 weeks of gestation in unselected twin pregnancies. Nonetheless, 17OHPC significantly reduced neonatal morbidity parameters and increased birthweight. © 2014 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  6. Keeping health staff healthy: evaluation of a workplace initiative to reduce morbidity and mortality from HIV/AIDS in Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bemelmans Marielle

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Malawi, the dramatic shortage of human resources for health is negatively impacted by HIV-related morbidity and mortality among health workers and their relatives. Many staff find it difficult to access HIV care through regular channels due to fear of stigma and discrimination. In 2006, two workplace initiatives were implemented in Thyolo District: a clinic at the district hospital dedicated to all district health staff and their first-degree relatives, providing medical services, including HIV care; and a support group for HIV-positive staff. Methods Using routine programme data, we evaluated the following outcomes up to the end of 2009: uptake and outcome of HIV testing and counselling among health staff and their dependents; uptake and outcomes of antiretroviral therapy (ART among health staff; and membership and activities of the support group. In addition, we included information from staff interviews and a job satisfaction survey to describe health workers' opinions of the initiatives. Results Almost two-thirds (91 of 144, 63% of health workers and their dependents undergoing HIV testing and counselling at the staff clinic tested HIV positive. Sixty-four health workers had accessed ART through the staff clinic, approximately the number of health workers estimated to be in need of ART. Of these, 60 had joined the support group. Cumulative ART outcomes were satisfactory, with more than 90% alive on treatment as of June 2009 (the end of the study observation period. The availability, confidentiality and quality of care in the staff clinic were considered adequate by beneficiaries. Conclusions Staff clinic and support group services successfully provided care and support to HIV-positive health workers. Similar initiatives should be considered in other settings with a high HIV prevalence.

  7. The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine: a new century of malaria research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riley Eleanor M

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The global malaria situation has scarcely improved in the last 100 years, despite major advances in our knowledge of the basic biology, epidemiology and clinical basis of the disease. Effective malaria control, leading to a significant decrease in the morbidity and mortality attributable to malaria, will require a multidisciplinary approach. New tools - drugs, vaccine and insecticides - are needed but there is also much to be gained by better use of existing tools: using drugs in combination in order to slow the development of drug resistance; targeting resources to areas of greatest need; using geographic information systems to map the populations at risk and more sophisticated marketing techniques to distribute bed nets and insecticides. Sustainable malaria control may require the deployment of a highly effective vaccine, but there is much that can be done in the meantime to reduce the burden of disease.

  8. 合肥市1999~2009年间日疟与气象因素关系研究%Relationship between morbidity of Plasmodium vivax malaria infection and meteorological factors in Hefei City of Anhui Province in 1999-2009

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊雯婧; 陆群; 仰凤桃; 王波; 贾皓旻; 马尔健; 武松; 翟金霞

    2012-01-01

    Objective To discuss the correlation between the morbidity of Plasmodium vivax malaria and meteorological factors in Hefei.Methods A total of 717 confirmed Plasmodium vivax malaria cases were enrolled in Hefei between January 1999 and December 2009.The centralization and circular distribution method were applied to analyze the seasonal characteristics of the morbidity of Plasmodium vivax malaria.The correlation analysis and the linear stepwise regression analysis were applied to discover the relationship between the morbidity of Plasmodium vivax malaria and meteorological factors.Results The incidence of Plasmodium vivax malaria in Hefei during 1999-2009 showed an obvious seasonal distribution feature(P<0.01).In addition to the 2000,there were obvious peak day and crest time of Plasmodium vivax malaria(P2001<0.05,P其余<0.01),and the peak day of Plasmodium vivax malaria in each year was different or partly different(F=13.8946,P<0.01).August 19 was the average peak morbidity day with yearly variation.The peak day appeared earlier in July 12,1999 and later in September 17,2002 with time gap of 67 days.The morbidity of Plasmodium vivax malaria was negatively corelatedto to average temperature,highest temperature,lowest tempcrature,the average monthly temperature before one or two months,relative humidity,rainfall,the average monthly rainfall before one or two months and sunlight,but positiverly corelated to the average monthly atmospheric pres-sure.Regression equation Y=-0.03+5.018×10-4X1+4.968×10-4X2(Y=monthly morbidity of Plasmodium vivax malaria,X1=month-ly lowest temperature,X2=the average monthly temperature before two months),R2=0.465.ConclUSions The morbidity of Plasmodium vivax malaria displayed an obvious seasonal trend and meteorological factors could affect the morbidity of Plasmodium vivax malaria in Hefei,particularly the average monthly temperature and minimum temperature.%目的 探讨合肥市1999-2009年度间日疟发病的季节性及其

  9. CpG Oligodeoxynucleotide and Montanide ISA 51 Adjuvant Combination Enhanced the Protective Efficacy of a Subunit Malaria Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-02-01

    resistance by the parasite and mosquito resistance to commonly used insecticides. A vaccine that would reduce malaria-related mortality and morbidity of- fers...2002. A recombinant vaccine expressed in the milk of transgenic mice pro- tects Aotus monkeys from a lethal challenge with Plasmodium falciparum. Proc

  10. Preoperative infrarenal abdominal aorta balloon catheter occlusion combined with Bakri tamponade reduced maternal morbidity of placenta increta/percreta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Chanjuan; Yang, Mengyuan; Ding, Yiling; Yu, Ling; Deng, Wen; Hu, Yu; Gong, Xiujuan

    2017-09-01

    Placenta increta/percreta is an increasingly common and life-threatening obstetric complication. It poses a management challenge to clinicians. The present study aimed to evaluate efficacy and safety of preoperative placement of infrarenal abdominal aorta balloon catheter (IAABC) alone or combined with Bakri tamponade for the management of cases with placenta increta/percreta. We retrospectively analyzed all cases with placenta increta/percreta at a tertiary referral teaching hospital in China between the year 2014 and 2017. Statistical analysis considered the individual subgroups: IAABC placed group and control group (without IAABC), and compared their maternal-fetal outcomes. The study covered 86 cases with placenta increta. For cases in the IAABC placed group (n = 48), significant reductions were noted in maternal morbidity including estimated blood loss (EBL), EBL ≥ 2000 mL, blood products transfusions, postpartum hemorrhage, operative time, intensive care unit admission, and postoperative days (P tamponade. In the control group, 10 cases were successful in preserving uterus by Bakri tamponade. Four cases failed and needed reoperation (3 uterine arterial embolism, 1 hysterectomy). There were no differences in fetal outcomes between the 2 groups. Eighteen cases were diagnosed with placenta percreta. Almost all the cases (17/18) inevitably underwent caesarean hysterectomy. Only 1 case was treated with a combination of IAABC and Bakri tamponade, and successfully reserved uterus. No differences were observed in any other outcomes, except for a significant less mean operative time (P = .017) in cases with IAABC placed (n = 10), compared with those without IAABC (n = 8). Only 1 case had a femoral artery thrombosis directly related to IAABC placement and recovered after conservative treatment. There was no maternal or neonatal death in this study. Prophylactic insertion of IAABC alone or combined with Bakri tamponade should be safe and

  11. Malaria cerebral Cerebral malaria

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Hugo Zapata Zapata; Silvia Blair Trujillo

    2003-01-01

    La malaria Cerebral (MC) es la complicación más frecuente de la malaria por P. falciparum; aproximadamente el 90% de las personas que la han padecido se recuperan completamente sin secuelas neurológicas. Aún no se conoce con claridad su patogénesis pero se han postulado cuatro hipótesis o mecanismos posibles: 1) citoadherencia y secuestro de glóbulos rojos parasitados en la microvasculatura cerebral; 2) formación de rosetas y aglutinación de glóbulos rojos parasitados; 3) producción de citoqu...

  12. Development of a New Mosquito Retention System for the BG-Malaria Trap To Reduce The Damage To Mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Moreno S; Silva, Ivoneide M; Leal, Leandro B; Dos Santos, Carlos A C; Eiras, Álvaro E

    2014-09-01

    The BG-Malaria trap was recently modified from the BioGents BG-Sentinel trap to collect Anopheles species, including Anopheles darlingi. However, the captured mosquitoes often lose their hind legs in the collector bag, making them difficult to identify. To develop a new collector system that is capable of maintaining the integrity of the mosquitoes collected in the BG-Malaria trap, we conducted a study in the municipalities of Belém (Pará State [PA]) and Porto Velho (Rondônia State [RO]), Brazil, using carbon dioxide-baited BG-Malaria traps with 4 different mosquito collector systems: standard, no bag, rigid short, and rigid long. Results indicated significant differences among the numbers of mosquitoes captured in the 4 different collectors (P < 0.05). Additionally, significantly fewer insects (P < 0.05) were damaged using the rigid short and rigid long collectors than by using the standard and no-bag collectors. We observed that the longer the insects remained in the collector, the higher the number of damaged insects; this effect was the greatest in the standard collector. The results of this study indicate that rigid long collectors were the best suited for use in the BG-Malaria trap.

  13. Infection of the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae with the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae reduces blood feeding and fecundity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholte, E.J.; Knols, B.G.J.; Takken, W.

    2006-01-01

    The entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae is being considered as a biocontrol agent against adult African malaria vectors. In addition to causing significant mortality, this pathogen is known to cause reductions in feeding and fecundity in a range of insects. In the present study we investi

  14. Inflammation-associated alterations to the intestinal microbiota reduce colonization resistance against non-typhoidal Salmonella during concurrent malaria parasite infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Jason P; Lokken, Kristen L; Byndloss, Mariana X; George, Michael D; Velazquez, Eric M; Faber, Franziska; Butler, Brian P; Walker, Gregory T; Ali, Mohamed M; Potts, Rashaun; Tiffany, Caitlin; Ahmer, Brian M M; Luckhart, Shirley; Tsolis, Renée M

    2015-10-05

    Childhood malaria is a risk factor for disseminated infections with non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) in sub-Saharan Africa. While hemolytic anemia and an altered cytokine environment have been implicated in increased susceptibility to NTS, it is not known whether malaria affects resistance to intestinal colonization with NTS. To address this question, we utilized a murine model of co-infection. Infection of mice with Plasmodium yoelii elicited infiltration of inflammatory macrophages and T cells into the intestinal mucosa and increased expression of inflammatory cytokines. These mucosal responses were also observed in germ-free mice, showing that they are independent of the resident microbiota. Remarkably, P. yoelii infection reduced colonization resistance of mice against S. enterica serotype Typhimurium. Further, 16S rRNA sequence analysis of the intestinal microbiota revealed marked changes in the community structure. Shifts in the microbiota increased susceptibility to intestinal colonization by S. Typhimurium, as demonstrated by microbiota reconstitution of germ-free mice. These results show that P. yoelii infection, via alterations to the microbial community in the intestine, decreases resistance to intestinal colonization with NTS. Further they raise the possibility that decreased colonization resistance may synergize with effects of malaria on systemic immunity to increase susceptibility to disseminated NTS infections.

  15. Does the Use of Dihydroartemisinin-Piperaquine in Treating Patients with Uncomplicated falciparum Malaria Reduce the Risk for Recurrent New falciparum Infection More Than Artemether-Lumefantrine?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wisdom Akpaloo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaria contributes significantly to the global disease burden. The World Health Organization recommended the use of artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs for treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria a decade ago in response to problems of drug resistance. This review compared two of the ACTs—Dihydroartemisinin-Piperaquine (DP and Artemether-Lumefantrine (AL to provide evidence which one has the ability to offer superior posttreatment prophylaxis at 28 and 42 days posttreatment. Four databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Database and Global Health were searched on June 2, 2013 and a total of seven randomized controlled trials conducted in sub-Sahara Africa were included. Results involving 2, 340 participants indicates that reduction in risk for recurrent new falciparum infections (RNIs was 79% at day 28 in favour of DP [RR, 0.21; 95% CI: 0.14 to 0.32, P<0.001], and at day 42 was 44% favouring DP [RR, 0.56; 95% CI: 0.34 to 0.90; P=0.02]. No significant difference was seen in treatment failure rates between the two drugs at days 28 and 42. It is concluded that use of DP offers superior posttreatment prophylaxis compared to AL in the study areas. Hence DP can help reduce malaria cases in such areas more than AL.

  16. Incidence and risk factors for Malaria, pneumonia and diarrhea in children under 5 in UNHCR refugee camps: A retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hershey Christine L

    2011-10-01

    stable settings, pneumonia and diarrhea are important causes of mortality among refugee children. Malaria remains a significant cause of child mortality in refugee camps in Africa and will need to be addressed as part of regional malaria control and elimination efforts. Little is known of neonatal morbidity and mortality in refugee settings, and neonatal deaths are likely to be under-reported. Global measles control efforts have reduced the incidence of measles among refugee children.

  17. A case control study on determinants of diarrheal morbidity among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2mikitser

    among under-five children in Wolaita Soddo Town, Southern. Ethiopia ... Objective: The aim was to assess potential determinant factors associated with diarrheal morbidity among under-five children in ... Malaria, tuberculosis, malnutrition.

  18. The effect of antiemetics and reduced radiation fields on acute gastrointestinal morbidity of adjuvant radiotherapy in Stage I seminoma of the testis: a randomized pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khoo, V.S.; Rainford, K.; Horwich, A.; Dearnaley, D.P. [Royal Marsden NHS Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom)

    1997-12-31

    The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the acute gastrointestinal morbidity of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for Stage I seminoma of the testis. Ten Stage I patients receiving para-aortic and ipsilateral pelvic nodal (dog-leg) RT provided a toxicity baseline (group A). Twenty Stage I patients randomized to dog-let RT or para-aortic RT (10 per group) were further randomized to received prophylactic ondansetron or expectant therapy with metoclopramide (group B). Daily patient-completed questionnaires evaluated acute toxicity. Dog-leg RT for Stage I seminomas is associated with readily demonstrable gastrointestinal tract (GIT) toxicity. The number of patients in this study is too small to produce definitive results, but there appears to be reduced GIT toxicity with prophylactic antiemetics. The effect of reduced RT fields has been assessed further in the MRC randomized tiral of field sizes (TE10). (Author).

  19. Influences of intermittent preventive treatment and persistent multiclonal Plasmodium falciparum infections on clinical malaria risk.

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    Anne Liljander

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intermittent preventive treatment (IPT of malaria involves administration of curative doses of antimalarials at specified time points to vulnerable populations in endemic areas, regardless whether a subject is known to be infected. The effect of this new intervention on the development and maintenance of protective immunity needs further understanding. We have investigated how seasonal IPT affects the genetic diversity of Plasmodium falciparum infections and the risk of subsequent clinical malaria. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study included 2227 Ghanaian children (3-59 months who were given sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP bimonthly, artesunate plus amodiaquine (AS+AQ monthly or bimonthly, or placebo monthly for six months spanning the malaria transmission season. Blood samples collected at three post-interventional surveys were analysed by genotyping of the polymorphic merozoite surface protein 2 gene. Malaria morbidity and anaemia was monitored during 12 months follow-up. RESULTS: Monthly IPT with AS+AQ resulted in a marked reduction in number of concurrent clones and only children parasite negative just after the intervention period developed clinical malaria during follow-up. In the placebo group, children without parasites as well as those infected with ≥2 clones had a reduced risk of subsequent malaria. The bimonthly SP or AS+AQ groups had similar number of clones as placebo after intervention; however, diversity and parasite negativity did not predict the risk of malaria. An interaction effect showed that multiclonal infections were only associated with protection in children without intermittent treatment. CONCLUSION: Molecular typing revealed effects of the intervention not detected by ordinary microscopy. Effective seasonal IPT temporarily reduced the prevalence and genetic diversity of P. falciparum infections. The reduced risk of malaria in children with multiclonal infections only seen in untreated children suggests that

  20. MALARIA IN CHILDREN

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    Richard-Fabian Schumacher

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    This review is focused on childhood specific aspects of malaria, especially in resource-poor settings. We summarise the actual knowledge in the field of epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, management and prevention.

    These aspects are important as malaria is responsible for almost a quarter of all child death in sub-Saharan Africa. Malaria control is thus one key intervention to reduce childhood mortality, especially as malaria is also an important risk factor for other severe infections, namely bacteraemia.

    In children symptoms are more varied and often mimic other common childhood illness, particularly gastroenteritis, meningitis/encephalitis, or pneumonia. Fever is the key symptom, but the characteristic regular tertian and quartan patterns are rarely observed. There are no pathognomonic features for severe malaria in this age group. The well known clinical (fever, impaired consciousness, seizures, vomiting, respiratory distress and laboratory (severe anaemia, thrombocytopenia, hypoglycaemia, metabolic acidosis, and hyperlactataemia features of severe falciparum malaria in children, are equally typical for severe sepsis.

    Appropriate therapy (considering species, resistance patterns and individual patient factors – possibly a drug combination of an artemisinin derivative with a long-acting antimalarial drug - reduces treatment duration to only three days and should be urgently started.

    While waiting for the results of ongoing vaccine trials, all effort should be made to better implement other malaria-control measures like the use of treated bed-nets and new chemoprophylaxis regimens.

  1. MALARIA IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard-Fabian Schumacher

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This review is focused on childhood specific aspects of malaria, especially in resource-poor settings. We summarise the actual knowledge in the field of epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, management and prevention. These aspects are important as malaria is responsible for almost a quarter of all child death in sub-Saharan Africa. Malaria control is thus one key intervention to reduce childhood mortality, especially as malaria is also an important risk factor for other severe infections, namely bacteraemia. In children symptoms are more varied and often mimic other common childhood illness, particularly gastroenteritis, meningitis/encephalitis, or pneumonia. Fever is the key symptom, but the characteristic regular tertian and quartan patterns are rarely observed. There are no pathognomonic features for severe malaria in this age group. The well known clinical (fever, impaired consciousness, seizures, vomiting, respiratory distress and laboratory (severe anaemia, thrombocytopenia, hypoglycaemia, metabolic acidosis, and hyperlactataemia features of severe falciparum malaria in children, are equally typical for severe sepsis. Appropriate therapy (considering species, resistance patterns and individual patient factors – possibly a drug combination of an artemisinin derivative with a long-acting antimalarial drug - reduces treatment duration to only three days and should be urgently started. While waiting for the results of ongoing vaccine trials, all effort should be made to better implement other malaria-control measures like the use of treated bed-nets and new chemoprophylaxis regimens.

  2. Effectiveness of a federal healthy start program in reducing the impact of particulate air pollutants on feto-infant morbidity outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salihu, Hamisu M; August, Euna M; Mbah, Alfred K; Alio, Amina P; de Cuba, Raymond; Jaward, Foday M; Berry, Estrellita Lo

    2012-11-01

    We sought to assess (1) the relationship between air particulate pollutants and feto-infant morbidity outcomes and (2) the impact of a Federal Healthy Start program on this relationship. This is a retrospective cohort study using de-identified hospital discharge information linked to vital records, and air pollution data from 2000 through 2007 for the zip codes served by the Central Hillsborough Federal Healthy Start Project in Tampa, Florida. Mathematical modeling was employed to compute minimal Euclidean distances to capture exposure to ambient air particulate matter. The outcomes of interest were low birth weight (LBW), very low birth weight (VLBW), small for gestational age, preterm (PTB), and very preterm birth. We used odds ratios to approximate relative risks. A total of 12,356 live births were analyzed. Overall, women exposed to air particulate pollutants were at elevated risk for LBW (AOR = 1.24; 95% CI = 1.07-1.43), VLBW (AOR = 1.58; 95% CI = 1.09-2.29) and PTB (AOR = 1.18; 95% CI = 1.03-1.34). Analysis by race/ethnicity revealed that the adverse effects of air particulate pollutants were most profound among black infants. Infants of women who received services provided by the Central Hillsborough Federal Healthy Start Project experienced improved feto-infant morbidity outcomes despite exposure to air particulate pollutants. Environmental air pollutants represent important risk factors for adverse birth outcomes, particularly among black women. Multi-level interventional approaches implemented by the Central Hillsborough Federal Healthy Start were found to be associated with reduced likelihood for feto-infant morbidities triggered by exposure to ambient air particulate pollutants.

  3. [Study of morbidity in Libreville (Gabon) in 2008].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makita-Ikouaya, E; Mombo, J B; Milleliri, J M; Rudant, J P

    2013-01-01

    We studied population morbidity in three neighborhoods in Libreville (Gabon), selected to represent the city center, the areas bordering the suburbs, and the areas in between. We surveyed 601 households and found that at least one resident was ill in 35% of the households. Malaria remains the leading cause of morbidity in all three districts, followed by fevers and diarrhea. Thus, the causes of morbidity in the general population with Libreville in 2008 matched those of hospital morbidity at the national level, where malaria remains the leading cause of medical visits.

  4. MIGRATION AND MALARIA IN EUROPE

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    Begoña Monge-Maillo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The proportion of imported malaria cases due to immigrants in Europe has increased during the lasts decades, being the higher rates for those settled immigrants who travel to visit friends and relatives (VFRs at their country of origin. Cases are mainly due to P. falciparum and Sub-Saharan Africa is the most common origin. Clinically, malaria in immigrants is characterized by a mild clinical presentation with even asymptomatic o delayed malaria cases and low parasitemic level. These characteristics may be explained by a semi-immunity acquired after long periods of time exposed to stable transmission of malaria. Malaria cases among immigrants, even those asymptomatic patients with sub-microscopic parasitemia, could increase the risk of transmission and reintroduction of malaria in certain areas with the adequate vectors and climate conditions. Moreover imported malaria cases by immigrants can also play an important role in the non-vectorial transmission out of endemic area, by blood transfusions, organ transplantation or congenital or occupational exposures. Probably, out of endemic areas, screening of malaria among recent arrived immigrants coming from malaria endemic countries should be performed. These aim to reduce the risk of clinical malaria in the individual as well as to prevent autochthonous transmission of malaria in areas where it had been eradicated.

  5. Malaria Epidemiology in Mersin Province, Turkey from 2002 to 2011

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    M F AYDIN

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Malaria is an infectious disease caused by Plasmodium spp. with high morbidity and mortality in human in tropical and subtropical regions. In recent years, number of malaria cases has been significantly reduced because of fight with the disease in Turkey. This study intended to investigate the malaria epidemiology in Mersin Province from 2002 to 2011 using data from the provincial Public Health Directorate.Methods: Over ten years, 303573 blood samples were taken from the people by active and passive surveillance methods and blood smears were prepared. Smears were stained with Giemsa and examined under the microscope.Results: Totally, 73 people including 44 male and 29 female were positive in terms of Plasmodium spp. It was determined that P. vivax observed in 67 cases while P. falciparum in 6 cases. Cases were mainly observed in 15 to 44 years old range, showed an increase between June-September periods and a significant decrease after 2006. Out of the 73 malaria cases, 54 cases were from Mersin Province and 13 cases were imported from another province of Turkey. Six cases were transmitted from abroad.Conclusion: These results provide information about malaria epidemiology in an endemic area in Turkey and contribute its prevention in Mersin Province

  6. A case of cerebral malaria and dengue concurrent infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anwar Alam; Md Dm

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral malaria and dengue are the common infections which cause higher mortality and morbidities in every part of the world especially in India. Concurrent infection of cerebral malaria and dengue is rare entity due to different habitat of vectors and it was reported rarely from Southeast Asia. In this case report, the authors reported a case of concurrent cerebral malaria and dengue which was recovered after eight days of admission with increase in morbidity.

  7. Modelling the influence of temperature and rainfall on malaria incidence in four endemic provinces of Zambia using semiparametric Poisson regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimaponda-Mataa, Nzooma M; Tembo-Mwase, Enala; Gebreslasie, Michael; Achia, Thomas N O; Mukaratirwa, Samson

    2017-02-01

    Although malaria morbidity and mortality are greatly reduced globally owing to great control efforts, the disease remains the main contributor. In Zambia, all provinces are malaria endemic. However, the transmission intensities vary mainly depending on environmental factors as they interact with the vectors. Generally in Africa, possibly due to the varying perspectives and methods used, there is variation on the relative importance of malaria risk determinants. In Zambia, the role climatic factors play on malaria case rates has not been determined in combination of space and time using robust methods in modelling. This is critical considering the reversal in malaria reduction after the year 2010 and the variation by transmission zones. Using a geoadditive or structured additive semiparametric Poisson regression model, we determined the influence of climatic factors on malaria incidence in four endemic provinces of Zambia. We demonstrate a strong positive association between malaria incidence and precipitation as well as minimum temperature. The risk of malaria was 95% lower in Lusaka (ARR=0.05, 95% CI=0.04-0.06) and 68% lower in the Western Province (ARR=0.31, 95% CI=0.25-0.41) compared to Luapula Province. North-western Province did not vary from Luapula Province. The effects of geographical region are clearly demonstrated by the unique behaviour and effects of minimum and maximum temperatures in the four provinces. Environmental factors such as landscape in urbanised places may also be playing a role.

  8. Reduced Systemic Levels of IL-10 Are Associated with the Severity of Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Insulin Resistance in Morbidly Obese Humans

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    Sonia Leon-Cabrera

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA has been related to elevation of inflammatory cytokines and development of insulin resistance in morbidly obese (MO subjects. However, it is still unclear whether the systemic concentration of anti-inflammatory mediators is also affected in MO subjects directly related to the severity of OSA and level of insulin resistance. Normal weight and MO subjects were subjected to overnight polysomnography in order to establish the severity of OSA, according to the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI. Blood samples were obtained for estimation of total cholesterol and triglycerides, insulin, glucose, insulin resistance, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, interleukin 12 (IL12, and interleukin 10 (IL-10. Serum levels of IL-10 were significantly lower in MO subjects with OSA than in MO and control individuals without OSA. Besides being inversely associated with serum TNF-α and IL-12, decreased IL-10 levels were significantly related to increased AHI, hyperinsulinemia, and insulin resistance. Serum IL-10 is significantly reduced in morbidly obese subjects with severe OSA while also showing a clear relationship with a state of hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance probably regardless of obesity in the present sample. It may be of potential clinical interest to identify the stimulatory mechanisms of IL-10 in obese individuals with OSA.

  9. Reduced Systemic Levels of IL-10 Are Associated with the Severity of Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Insulin Resistance in Morbidly Obese Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon-Cabrera, Sonia; Arana-Lechuga, Yoaly; Esqueda-León, Enrique; Terán-Pérez, Guadalupe; Gonzalez-Chavez, Antonio; Velázquez Moctezuma, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been related to elevation of inflammatory cytokines and development of insulin resistance in morbidly obese (MO) subjects. However, it is still unclear whether the systemic concentration of anti-inflammatory mediators is also affected in MO subjects directly related to the severity of OSA and level of insulin resistance. Normal weight and MO subjects were subjected to overnight polysomnography in order to establish the severity of OSA, according to the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI). Blood samples were obtained for estimation of total cholesterol and triglycerides, insulin, glucose, insulin resistance, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 12 (IL12), and interleukin 10 (IL-10). Serum levels of IL-10 were significantly lower in MO subjects with OSA than in MO and control individuals without OSA. Besides being inversely associated with serum TNF-α and IL-12, decreased IL-10 levels were significantly related to increased AHI, hyperinsulinemia, and insulin resistance. Serum IL-10 is significantly reduced in morbidly obese subjects with severe OSA while also showing a clear relationship with a state of hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance probably regardless of obesity in the present sample. It may be of potential clinical interest to identify the stimulatory mechanisms of IL-10 in obese individuals with OSA. PMID:25944984

  10. The Effect of Long Lasting Insecticide Bed Net Use on Malaria Prevalence in the Tombel Health District, South West Region-Cameroon

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    Eric B. Fokam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaria remains a major public health problem in Africa, and its prevalence in Cameroon stands at 29%. Long Lasting Insecticide Nets (LLINs were distributed in 2011 to reduce malaria mortality and morbidity; however, assessment of this intervention is scanty. The present study in the Tombel health district (THD investigated the impact of this distribution on malaria prevalence. A total of 31,657 hospital records from 3 health facilities in 3 health areas for 2010–2013 were examined. Records for 2010 and 2011 provided predistribution baseline data, while those of 2012 and 2013 represented postdistribution data. 8,679 (27.4% patients were positive for malaria. Children below 5 years had the highest prevalence (40.7%. The number of confirmed cases was highest from June to August (peak rainy season. Malaria prevalence was higher in males (25.3% than in females (23.2%. Malaria prevalence increased in THD from 26.7% in 2010 to 30.7% in 2011 but dropped to 22.7% in 2012 and then increased in 2013 to 29.5%. There was an overall drop in the total number of confirmed malaria cases in 2012; this decrease was significant in Ebonji (p<0.001 and Nyasoso (p<0.015 health areas. The distribution of LLINs led to a short lived reduction in malaria prevalence in THD. LLIN distribution and other control activities should be reinforced to keep malaria prevalence low especially among the 0–5-year group.

  11. Deployment of early diagnosis and mefloquine-artesunate treatment of falciparum malaria in Thailand: the Tak Malaria Initiative.

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    Verena Ilona Carrara

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Early diagnosis and treatment with artesunate-mefloquine combination therapy (MAS have reduced the transmission of falciparum malaria dramatically and halted the progression of mefloquine resistance in camps for displaced persons along the Thai-Burmese border, an area of low and seasonal transmission of multidrug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum. We extended the same combination drug strategy to all other communities (estimated population 450,000 living in five border districts of Tak province in northwestern Thailand. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Existing health structures were reinforced. Village volunteers were trained to use rapid diagnostic tests and to treat positive cases with MAS. Cases of malaria, hospitalizations, and malaria-related deaths were recorded in the 6 y before, during, and after the Tak Malaria Initiative (TMI intervention. Cross-sectional surveys were conducted before and during the TMI period. P. falciparum malaria cases fell by 34% (95% confidence interval [CI], 33.5-34.4 and hospitalisations for falciparum malaria fell by 39% (95% CI, 37.0-39.9 during the TMI period, while hospitalisations for P. vivax malaria remained constant. There were 32 deaths attributed to malaria during, and 22 after the TMI, a 51.5% (95% CI, 39.0-63.9 reduction compared to the average of the previous 3 y. Cross-sectional surveys indicated that P. vivax had become the predominant species in Thai villages, but not in populations living on the Myanmar side of the border. In the displaced persons population, where the original deployment took place 7 y before the TMI, the transmission of P. falciparum continued to be suppressed, the incidence of falciparum malaria remained low, and the in vivo efficacy of the 3-d MAS remained high. CONCLUSIONS: In the remote malarious north western border area of Thailand, the early detection of malaria by trained village volunteers, using rapid diagnostic tests and treatment with mefloquine-artesunate was

  12. [Malaria and intestinal protozoa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojo-Marcos, Gerardo; Cuadros-González, Juan

    2016-03-01

    Malaria is life threatening and requires urgent diagnosis and treatment. Incidence and mortality are being reduced in endemic areas. Clinical features are unspecific so in imported cases it is vital the history of staying in a malarious area. The first line treatments for Plasmodium falciparum are artemisinin combination therapies, chloroquine in most non-falciparum and intravenous artesunate if any severity criteria. Human infections with intestinal protozoa are distributed worldwide with a high global morbid-mortality. They cause diarrhea and sometimes invasive disease, although most are asymptomatic. In our environment populations at higher risk are children, including adopted abroad, immune-suppressed, travelers, immigrants, people in contact with animals or who engage in oral-anal sex. Diagnostic microscopic examination has low sensitivity improving with antigen detection or molecular methods. Antiparasitic resistances are emerging lately. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  13. Optimal Population-Level Infection Detection Strategies for Malaria Control and Elimination in a Spatial Model of Malaria Transmission.

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    Jaline Gerardin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mass campaigns with antimalarial drugs are potentially a powerful tool for local elimination of malaria, yet current diagnostic technologies are insufficiently sensitive to identify all individuals who harbor infections. At the same time, overtreatment of uninfected individuals increases the risk of accelerating emergence of drug resistance and losing community acceptance. Local heterogeneity in transmission intensity may allow campaign strategies that respond to index cases to successfully target subpatent infections while simultaneously limiting overtreatment. While selective targeting of hotspots of transmission has been proposed as a strategy for malaria control, such targeting has not been tested in the context of malaria elimination. Using household locations, demographics, and prevalence data from a survey of four health facility catchment areas in southern Zambia and an agent-based model of malaria transmission and immunity acquisition, a transmission intensity was fit to each household based on neighborhood age-dependent malaria prevalence. A set of individual infection trajectories was constructed for every household in each catchment area, accounting for heterogeneous exposure and immunity. Various campaign strategies-mass drug administration, mass screen and treat, focal mass drug administration, snowball reactive case detection, pooled sampling, and a hypothetical serological diagnostic-were simulated and evaluated for performance at finding infections, minimizing overtreatment, reducing clinical case counts, and interrupting transmission. For malaria control, presumptive treatment leads to substantial overtreatment without additional morbidity reduction under all but the highest transmission conditions. Compared with untargeted approaches, selective targeting of hotspots with drug campaigns is an ineffective tool for elimination due to limited sensitivity of available field diagnostics. Serological diagnosis is potentially an

  14. Cerebral malaria Malaria cerebral

    OpenAIRE

    Silvia Blair Trujillo; Carlos Hugo Zapata Zapata

    2003-01-01

    Is the most common complication of P. falciparum malaria; nearly 90% of people who have suffered CM can recover without neurological problems. Currently there are four hypotheses that explain pathogenesis of CM: cytoadherence and sequestering of parasitized red blood cells to cerebral capillaries; rosette formation and parasitized red blood cells agglutination; production of cytokines and activation of second messengers and opening of the blood-brain barrier. However the main question remains...

  15. Optimized Blanching Reduces the Host Cell Protein Content and Substantially Enhances the Recovery and Stability of Two Plant-Derived Malaria Vaccine Candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, Stephan; Holland, Tanja; Boes, Alexander; Spiegel, Holger; Bolzenius, Johanna; Fischer, Rainer; Buyel, Johannes F

    2016-01-01

    Plants provide an advantageous expression platform for biopharmaceutical proteins because of their low pathogen burden and potential for inexpensive, large-scale production. However, the purification of target proteins can be challenging due to issues with extraction, the removal of host cell proteins (HCPs), and low expression levels. The heat treatment of crude extracts can reduce the quantity of HCPs by precipitation thus increasing the purity of the target protein and streamlining downstream purification. In the overall context of downstream process (DSP) development for plant-derived malaria vaccine candidates, we applied a design-of-experiments approach to enhance HCP precipitation from Nicotiana benthamiana extracts generated after transient expression, using temperatures in the 20-80°C range, pH values of 3.0-8.0 and incubation times of 0-60 min. We also investigated the recovery of two protein-based malaria vaccine candidates under these conditions and determined their stability in the heat-treated extract while it was maintained at room temperature for 24 h. The heat precipitation of HCPs was also carried out by blanching intact plants in water or buffer prior to extraction in a blender. Our data show that all the heat precipitation methods reduced the amount of HCP in the crude plant extracts by more than 80%, simplifying the subsequent DSP steps. Furthermore, when the heat treatment was performed at 80°C rather than 65°C, both malaria vaccine candidates were more stable after extraction and the recovery of both proteins increased by more than 30%.

  16. Optimized blanching reduces the host cell protein content and substantially enhances the recovery and stability of two plant derived malaria vaccine candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan eMenzel

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Plants provide an advantageous expression platform for biopharmaceutical proteins because of their low pathogen burden and potential for inexpensive, large-scale production. However, the purification of target proteins can be challenging due to issues with extraction, the removal of host cell proteins (HCPs, and low expression levels. The heat treatment of crude extracts can reduce the quantity of HCPs by precipitation thus increasing the purity of the target protein and streamlining downstream purification. In the overall context of downstream process development for plant-derived malaria vaccine candidates, we applied a design-of-experiments approach to enhance HCP precipitation from Nicotiana benthamiana extracts generated after transient expression, using temperatures in the 20−80°C range, pH values of 3.0−8.0 and incubation times of 0−60 min. We also investigated the recovery of two protein-based malaria vaccine candidates under these conditions and determined their stability in the heat-treated extract while it was maintained at room temperature for 24 h. The heat precipitation of HCPs was also carried out by blanching intact plants in water or buffer prior to extraction in a blender. Our data show that all the heat precipitation methods reduced the amount of HCP in the crude plant extracts by more than 80%, simplifying the subsequent downstream processing steps. Furthermore, when the heat treatment was performed at 80°C rather than 65°C, both malaria vaccine candidates were more stable after extraction and the recovery of both proteins increased by more than 30%.

  17. Rural-Urban Differences in Household Treatment-Seeking Behaviour for Suspected Malaria in Children at Bata District, Equatorial Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romay-Barja, Maria; Jarrin, Inma; Ncogo, Policarpo; Nseng, Gloria; Sagrado, Maria Jose; Santana-Morales, Maria A.; Aparcio, Pilar; Valladares, Basilio; Riloha, Matilde; Benito, Agustin

    2015-01-01

    Background Malaria remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality among children under five years old in Equatorial Guinea. However, little is known about the community management of malaria and treatment-seeking patterns. We aimed to assess symptoms of children with reported malaria and treatment-seeking behaviour of their caretakers in rural and urban areas in the Bata District. Methodology A cross-sectional study was conducted in the district of Bata and 440 houses were selected from 18 rural villages and 26 urban neighbourhoods. Differences between rural and urban caregivers and children with reported malaria were assessed through the chi-squared test for independence of categorical variables and the t-Student or the non-parametric Mann-Whitney test for normally or not-normally distributed continuous variables, respectively. Results Differences between rural and urban households were observed in caregiver treatment-seeking patterns. Fever was the main symptom associated with malaria in both areas. Malaria was treated first at home, particularly in rural areas. The second step was to seek treatment outside the home, mainly at hospital and Health Centre for rural households and at hospital and private clinic for urban ones. Artemether monotherapy was the antimalarial treatment prescribed most often. Households waited for more than 24 hours before seeking treatment outside and delays were longest in rural areas. The total cost of treatment was higher in urban than in rural areas in Bata. Conclusions The delays in seeking treatment, the type of malaria therapy received and the cost of treatment are the principal problems found in Bata District. Important steps for reducing malaria morbidity and mortality in this area are to provide sufficient supplies of effective antimalarial drugs and to improve malaria treatment skills in households and in both public and private sectors. PMID:26284683

  18. Rural-Urban Differences in Household Treatment-Seeking Behaviour for Suspected Malaria in Children at Bata District, Equatorial Guinea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Romay-Barja

    Full Text Available Malaria remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality among children under five years old in Equatorial Guinea. However, little is known about the community management of malaria and treatment-seeking patterns. We aimed to assess symptoms of children with reported malaria and treatment-seeking behaviour of their caretakers in rural and urban areas in the Bata District.A cross-sectional study was conducted in the district of Bata and 440 houses were selected from 18 rural villages and 26 urban neighbourhoods. Differences between rural and urban caregivers and children with reported malaria were assessed through the chi-squared test for independence of categorical variables and the t-Student or the non-parametric Mann-Whitney test for normally or not-normally distributed continuous variables, respectively.Differences between rural and urban households were observed in caregiver treatment-seeking patterns. Fever was the main symptom associated with malaria in both areas. Malaria was treated first at home, particularly in rural areas. The second step was to seek treatment outside the home, mainly at hospital and Health Centre for rural households and at hospital and private clinic for urban ones. Artemether monotherapy was the antimalarial treatment prescribed most often. Households waited for more than 24 hours before seeking treatment outside and delays were longest in rural areas. The total cost of treatment was higher in urban than in rural areas in Bata.The delays in seeking treatment, the type of malaria therapy received and the cost of treatment are the principal problems found in Bata District. Important steps for reducing malaria morbidity and mortality in this area are to provide sufficient supplies of effective antimalarial drugs and to improve malaria treatment skills in households and in both public and private sectors.

  19. Value of pelvic suction-irrigation in reducing morbidity of low anterior resection of the rectum--a ten-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingold, B S; Jagelman, D G

    1982-04-01

    Resection of the rectosigmoid colon with anastomosis below the peritoneal reflection carries appreciable mortality and morbidity rates particularly because of leakage and resulting sepsis, Protecting the anastomosis with a transverse colostomy does not prevent this complication although it does reduce the catastrophic sequelae that often occur. Anastomotic leakage rates have been reported to be as high as 69% and fecal fistula rates as high as 27% following this type of surgery. A pelvic. A pelvic hematoma may act as a culture medium should sepsis occur and may interfere with anastomotic healing. A method of removing accumulated blood and serum from the pelvis following low anterior resection has been employed with the aim of reducing anastomotic leakage, and a 10-year experience has been compiled. Sixty consecutive patients were studied from July 1970 to June 1980. All underwent barium enema examination and/or proctosigmoidoscopy following low anterior resection with concomitant or previous transverse colostomy. There were four subclinical leaks seen at 6 weeks for an incidence of 6.8%. All resolved spontaneously within 6 additional weeks. No fecal fistulas or pelvic abscesses were encountered. Contaminated blood and serum are significant contributing factors to low anterior anastomotic breakdown. By removing such material before it can become infected, this complication can be significantly reduced.

  20. CLINICAL ASPECTS OF UNCOMPLICATED AND SEVERE MALARIA

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    Alessandro Bartoloni

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The first symptoms of malaria, common to all the different malaria species, are nonspecific and mimic a flu-like syndrome. Although fever represents the cardinal feature, clinical findings in malaria are extremely diverse and may range in severity from mild headache to serious complications leading to death, particularly in falciparum malaria. As the progression to these complications can be rapid, any malaria patient must be assessed and treated rapidly, and frequent observations are needed to look for early signs of systemic complications. In fact, severe malaria is a life threatening but treatable disease.  The protean and nonspecific clinical findings occurring in malaria (fever, malaise, headache, myalgias, jaundice and sometimes gastrointestinal symptoms of nausea, vomiting and diarrhoea may lead physicians who see malaria infrequently to a wrong diagnosis, such as influenza (particularly during the seasonal epidemic flu, dengue, gastroenteritis, typhoid fever, viral hepatitis, encephalitis. Physicians should be aware that malaria is not a clinical diagnosis but must be diagnosed, or excluded, by performing microscopic examination of blood films. Prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment are then crucial to prevent morbidity and fatal outcomes. Although Plasmodium falciparum malaria is the major cause of severe malaria and death, increasing evidence has recently emerged that Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium knowlesi can also be severe and even fatal.

  1. Epidemiological and clinical features of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in united nations personnel in Western Bahr el Ghazal State, South Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Dengming; Zhang, Yuqi; Liu, Xiaofeng; Guo, Shimin; Zhao, Donghong; Zhu, Yunjie; Li, Huaidong; Kong, Li

    2013-01-01

    Western Bahr el Ghazal State is located in northwestern South Sudan, which is a tropical area subject to Plasmodium falciparum malaria epidemics. The aim of this study is to explore the epidemiological and clinical features of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in United Nations personnel stationed in this area. From July 2006 to June 2009, epidemiological data and medical records of 678 patients with Plasmodium falciparum malaria at the U.N. level 2 hospital were analyzed. The U.N. personnel were divided into individuals not immune to Plasmodium falciparum and individuals semi-immune to Plasmodium falciparum. The patients were divided into a chemoprophylaxis group (non-immune individuals who complied with the chemoprophylaxis regimen, 582 cases) and a no/incomplete chemoprophylaxis group (non-immune individuals who either did not fully comply with chemoprophylaxis or did not use it at all and semi-immune individuals who did not use chemoprophylaxis, 96 cases). Overall morbidity was about 11.3%. There was a significant difference in the morbidity of semi-immune and non-immune individuals (1.3% vs. 15.1%, PPlasmodium falciparum malaria mainly occurred in rainy season. Gastrointestinal symptoms are an important precursor of malaria. Blood smears and rapid diagnostic tests should be performed after the onset of gastrointestinal symptoms. Appropriate chemoprophylaxis is necessary for reducing the severity of malaria.

  2. Malaria (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Malaria KidsHealth > For Parents > Malaria A A A What's ... Prevention Diagnosis and Treatment en español Malaria About Malaria Malaria is a common infection in hot, tropical ...

  3. Chromobacterium Csp_P Reduces Malaria and Dengue Infection in Vector Mosquitoes and Has Entomopathogenic and In Vitro Anti-pathogen Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahia, Ana C.; Saraiva, Raul G.; Dong, Yuemei; Kang, Seokyoung; Tripathi, Abhai; Mlambo, Godfree; Dimopoulos, George

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium and dengue virus, the causative agents of the two most devastating vector-borne diseases, malaria and dengue, are transmitted by the two most important mosquito vectors, Anopheles gambiae and Aedes aegypti, respectively. Insect-bacteria associations have been shown to influence vector competence for human pathogens through multi-faceted actions that include the elicitation of the insect immune system, pathogen sequestration by microbes, and bacteria-produced anti-pathogenic factors. These influences make the mosquito microbiota highly interesting from a disease control perspective. Here we present a bacterium of the genus Chromobacterium (Csp_P), which was isolated from the midgut of field-caught Aedes aegypti. Csp_P can effectively colonize the mosquito midgut when introduced through an artificial nectar meal, and it also inhibits the growth of other members of the midgut microbiota. Csp_P colonization of the midgut tissue activates mosquito immune responses, and Csp_P exposure dramatically reduces the survival of both the larval and adult stages. Ingestion of Csp_P by the mosquito significantly reduces its susceptibility to Plasmodium falciparum and dengue virus infection, thereby compromising the mosquito's vector competence. This bacterium also exerts in vitro anti-Plasmodium and anti-dengue activities, which appear to be mediated through Csp_P -produced stable bioactive factors with transmission-blocking and therapeutic potential. The anti-pathogen and entomopathogenic properties of Csp_P render it a potential candidate for the development of malaria and dengue control strategies. PMID:25340821

  4. Cognitive dysfunction is sustained after rescue therapy in experimental cerebral malaria, and is reduced by additive antioxidant therapy.

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    Patricia A Reis

    Full Text Available Neurological impairments are frequently detected in children surviving cerebral malaria (CM, the most severe neurological complication of infection with Plasmodium falciparum. The pathophysiology and therapy of long lasting cognitive deficits in malaria patients after treatment of the parasitic disease is a critical area of investigation. In the present study we used several models of experimental malaria with differential features to investigate persistent cognitive damage after rescue treatment. Infection of C57BL/6 and Swiss (SW mice with Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA or a lethal strain of Plasmodium yoelii XL (PyXL, respectively, resulted in documented CM and sustained persistent cognitive damage detected by a battery of behavioral tests after cure of the acute parasitic disease with chloroquine therapy. Strikingly, cognitive impairment was still present 30 days after the initial infection. In contrast, BALB/c mice infected with PbA, C57BL6 infected with Plasmodium chabaudi chabaudi and SW infected with non lethal Plasmodium yoelii NXL (PyNXL did not develop signs of CM, were cured of the acute parasitic infection by chloroquine, and showed no persistent cognitive impairment. Reactive oxygen species have been reported to mediate neurological injury in CM. Increased production of malondialdehyde (MDA and conjugated dienes was detected in the brains of PbA-infected C57BL/6 mice with CM, indicating high oxidative stress. Treatment of PbA-infected C57BL/6 mice with additive antioxidants together with chloroquine at the first signs of CM prevented the development of persistent cognitive damage. These studies provide new insights into the natural history of cognitive dysfunction after rescue therapy for CM that may have clinical relevance, and may also be relevant to cerebral sequelae of sepsis and other disorders.

  5. Caregivers’ Malaria Knowledge, Beliefs and Attitudes, and Related Factors in the Bata District, Equatorial Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ncogo, Policarpo; Nseng, Gloria; Santana-Morales, Maria A.; Herrador, Zaida; Berzosa, Pedro; Valladares, Basilio; Riloha, Matilde; Benito, Agustin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Adequate community knowledge about malaria is crucial in order to improve prevention by reducing exposure to the disease. Malaria is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among children of less than five years of age in Equatorial Guinea. However, information concerning the accuracy of community knowledge is insufficient. This study aimed at assessing the depth of caregivers’ knowledge of malaria, their beliefs and attitudes about this disease, and their socioeconomic determinants in the Bata district of Equatorial Guinea. Methodology A cross-sectional study was conducted in the district of Bata, involving 440 houses selected from 18 rural villages and 26 urban neighbourhoods. A combined "Malaria Knowledge Score" was generated based on caregivers’ knowledge about transmission, symptoms, prevention, the treatment of children, and best place to seek treatment. Multivariate logistic regressions analyses were performed to assess those factors that are associated with knowledge about malaria. Results A total of 428 caregivers were interviewed; 255 (59.6%) and 173 (40.4%) lived in urban and rural areas respectively. Significant differences between rural and urban households were observed in caregivers’ malaria knowledges and beliefs. Almost 42% of urban and 65% of rural caregivers were unaware as to how malaria is transmitted (OR = 2.69; 95% CI: 1.78–4.05). Together with rurality, the factors most significantly associated with the Malaria Knowledge were the level of education of the caregiver and the socioeconomic status of the household. Conclusions Improvements in educational programs are needed to empower the most vulnerable households such that they can pro-actively implement malaria control measures. This could be achieved by a comprehensive communication strategy aimed at changing individual and community behaviours, and delivered by suitably trained community health workers and indoor residual spraying personnel. PMID:28036341

  6. Lipid-based nutrient supplements do not affect the risk of malaria or respiratory morbidity in 6- to 18-month-old Malawian children in a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is evidence to support the use of lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNSs) to promote child growth and development in low-income countries, but there is also a concern regarding the safety of using iron-fortified products in malaria-endemic areas. The objective of this study was to test the hyp...

  7. Changing malaria transmission and implications in China towards National Malaria Elimination Programme between 2010 and 2012.

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    Jian-hai Yin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Towards the implementation of national malaria elimination programme in China since 2010, the epidemiology of malaria has changed dramatically, and the lowest malaria burden was achieved yearly. It is time to analyze the changes of malaria situation based on surveillance data from 2010 to 2012 to reconsider the strategies for malaria elimination. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Malaria epidemiological data was extracted from the provincial annual reports in China between 2010 and 2012. The trends of the general, autochthonous and imported malaria were analyzed, and epidemic areas were reclassified according to Action Plan of China Malaria Elimination (2010-2020. As a result, there reported 2743 malaria cases with a continued decline in 2012, and around 7% autochthonous malaria cases accounted. Three hundred and fifty-three individual counties from 19 provincial regions had autochthonous malaria between 2010 and 2012, and only one county was reclassified into Type I (local infections detected in 3 consecutive years and the annual incidences ≥ 1/10,000 again. However, the imported malaria cases reported of each year were widespread, and 598 counties in 29 provinces were suffered in 2012. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Malaria was reduced significantly from 2010 to 2012 in China, and malaria importation became an increasing challenge. It is necessary to adjust or update the interventions for subsequent malaria elimination planning and resource allocation.

  8. [Malaria websites].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genton, B

    2007-05-16

    One click on google.com, key-word "Malaria", 24,900,000 entries. How to choose among this jungle of websites? Ten sites are proposed to meet the needs of the general practitioner They are categorized by focus of interest, namely 1) detailed information on pre- and post-travel advice and management of travelers with illness upon return, 2) the essential on the parasite, the diagnosis and the treatment, 3) the malaria problem worldwide and 4) malaria maps.

  9. Effect of artemether-lumefantrine policy and improved vector control on malaria burden in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

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    Karen I Barnes

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Between 1995 and 2000, KwaZulu-Natal province, South Africa, experienced a marked increase in Plasmodium falciparum malaria, fuelled by pyrethroid and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine resistance. In response, vector control was strengthened and artemether-lumefantrine (AL was deployed in the first Ministry of Health artemisinin-based combination treatment policy in Africa. In South Africa, effective vector and parasite control had historically ensured low-intensity malaria transmission. Malaria is diagnosed definitively and treatment is provided free of charge in reasonably accessible public-sector health-care facilities.We reviewed four years of malaria morbidity and mortality data at four sentinel health-care facilities within KwaZulu-Natal's malaria-endemic area. In the year following improved vector control and implementation of AL treatment, malaria-related admissions and deaths both declined by 89%, and outpatient visits decreased by 85% at the sentinel facilities. By 2003, malaria-related outpatient cases and admissions had fallen by 99%, and malaria-related deaths had decreased by 97%. There was a concomitant marked and sustained decline in notified malaria throughout the province. No serious adverse events were associated causally with AL treatment in an active sentinel pharmacovigilance survey. In a prospective study with 42 d follow up, AL cured 97/98 (99% and prevented gametocyte developing in all patients. Consistent with the findings of focus group discussions, a household survey found self-reported adherence to the six-dose AL regimen was 96%.Together with concurrent strengthening of vector control measures, the antimalarial treatment policy change to AL in KwaZulu-Natal contributed to a marked and sustained decrease in malaria cases, admissions, and deaths, by greatly improving clinical and parasitological cure rates and reducing gametocyte carriage.

  10. The effectiveness of a nationwide universal coverage campaign of insecticide-treated bed nets on childhood malaria in Malawi

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    Collins O. F. Zamawe

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the universal coverage campaign of insecticide-treated mosquito bed nets (ITNs has been associated with improved malaria outcomes, recent reports indicate that the campaign is losing its sparkle in some countries. In Malawi, the universal coverage campaign was implemented in 2012, but its impacts are yet to be ascertained. Thus, this study examined the effects of the campaign on malaria morbidity among children in Malawi. Methods This is a repeated cross-sectional study. The study used nationally-representative malaria indicator survey (MIS data collected in 2012 and 2014. In total, the analysis included 4193 children between the ages of 6 and 59 months (2171 from 2012 MIS and 2022 from 2014 MIS. ITNs coverage and malaria morbidity before (2012 = pre-test/control and after (2014 = post-test/treated the universal coverage campaign of ITNs were compared. The treated and control samples were matched on measured relevant covariates using propensity scores. Results The mean number of ITNs per household improved significantly from 1.1 (SD 1.0 in 2012 to 1.4 (SD 1.1 in 2014 (p < 0.001. Nonetheless, the prevalence of malaria among children increased considerably from 27.7 % (2012 to 32.0 % (2014 (p = 0.002. The risk of malaria was also significantly higher in 2014 compared to 2012 (RR = 1.14; 95 % CI 1.01–1.29. Besides, the use of bed nets was not significantly associated with malaria morbidity in 2014 (RR = 0.92; 95 % CI 0.76–1.12, but it was in 2012 (RR = 0.83; 95 % CI 0.70–1.00. Conclusions The universal coverage campaign of ITNs was not associated with a reduced burden of malaria among children in Malawi. This was likely due to increased insecticide resistance, inconsistent use of bed nets and under-utilization of other methods of malaria control. This calls for a multifaceted approach in the fight against malaria instead of simple dependence on ITNs. In particular, local or community level

  11. Malaria hotspot areas in a highland Kenya site are consistent in epidemic and non-epidemic years and are associated with ecological factors

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    Ernst Kacey C

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria epidemics in highland areas of East Africa have caused considerable morbidity and mortality in the past two decades. Knowledge of "hotspot" areas of high malaria incidence would allow for focused preventive interventions in resource-poor areas, particularly if the hotspot areas can be discerned during non-epidemic periods and predicted by ecological factors. Methods To address this issue, spatial distribution of malaria incidence and the relationship of ecological factors to malaria incidence were assessed in the highland area of Kipsamoite, Kenya, from 2001–2004. Results Clustering of disease in a single geographic "hotspot" area occurred in epidemic and non-epidemic years, with a 2.6 to 3.2-fold increased risk of malaria inside the hotspot, as compared to outside the area (P Conclusion In this highland area, areas of high malaria risk are consistent in epidemic and non-epidemic years and are associated with specific ecological risk factors. Ongoing interventions in areas of ecological risk factors could be a cost-effective method of significantly reducing malaria incidence and blunting or preventing epidemics, even in the absence of malaria early warning systems. Further studies should be conducted to see if these findings hold true in varied highland settings.

  12. Predictors of knowledge about malaria in India

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    Arun Kumar Sharma, Sanjeev Bhasin , S. Chaturvedi

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Reduction of malarial morbidity and mortality is important to meet theoverall objectives of reducing poverty and has been included in the Millennium Development Goals.To achieve these targets it is imperative to have active community participation to control malaria.Community participation in turn depends on people’s knowledge and attitude towards the disease.Thisstudy was conducted to examine the factors that predict the knowledge of Indian population regardingmalaria. A questionnaire based cross-sectional survey was conducted for data collection.Results: Data were collected from 15,750 adult respondents using a pre-tested questionnairerepresenting urban, rural, tribal and slum population from 21 states. Knowledge about various aspectsof malaria was tested using a structured questionnaire. Logistic regression analysis was applied todetermine predictors of knowledge about etiology, clinical features, mode of transmission, preventionand control.Interpretation & conclusion: Common predictors of correct knowledge about etiology and clinicalfeatures of malaria were male sex and college education. Female sex, illiteracy and tribal populationwere more likely to have been associated with wrong beliefs about fatality of malaria. Being tribalrespondent was the single most important predictor of inadequate knowledge. Similarly, use of smokefor killing of adult mosquito was predicted by rural or slum residence and illiteracy. All findingswere based on logistic regression analysis. Geographical variations also influenced knowledge aboutmalaria. It may be inferred that improvement in knowledge, attitude and practices related to malariamay be attained only after looking at its predictors at micro level. However, a strategic framework atnational level is certainly needed to provide directions at local level.

  13. Reduced erythrocyte susceptibility and increased host clearance of young parasites slows Plasmodium growth in a murine model of severe malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, David S.; Cromer, Deborah; Best, Shannon E.; James, Kylie R.; Sebina, Ismail; Haque, Ashraful; Davenport, Miles P.

    2015-05-01

    The best correlate of malaria severity in human Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) infection is the total parasite load. Pf-infected humans could control parasite loads by two mechanisms, either decreasing parasite multiplication, or increasing parasite clearance. However, few studies have directly measured these two mechanisms in vivo. Here, we have directly quantified host clearance of parasites during Plasmodium infection in mice. We transferred labelled red blood cells (RBCs) from Plasmodium infected donors into uninfected and infected recipients, and tracked the fate of donor parasites by frequent blood sampling. We then applied age-based mathematical models to characterise parasite clearance in the recipient mice. Our analyses revealed an increased clearance of parasites in infected animals, particularly parasites of a younger developmental stage. However, the major decrease in parasite multiplication in infected mice was not mediated by increased clearance alone, but was accompanied by a significant reduction in the susceptibility of RBCs to parasitisation.

  14. Cerebral malaria Malaria cerebral

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    Silvia Blair Trujillo

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Is the most common complication of P. falciparum malaria; nearly 90% of people who have suffered CM can recover without neurological problems. Currently there are four hypotheses that explain pathogenesis of CM: cytoadherence and sequestering of parasitized red blood cells to cerebral capillaries; rosette formation and parasitized red blood cells agglutination; production of cytokines and activation of second messengers and opening of the blood-brain barrier. However the main question remains to be answered; how the host-parasite interaction in the vascular space interferes transiently with cerebral function? Recently, the beta amyloid precursor peptide has been employed as marker of neural injury in CM. It is expected that the beta amyloid precursor peptide will help to understand the pathogenesis of CM in complicated patients of endemic areas of Colombia. La malaria Cerebral (MC es la complicación más frecuente de la malaria por P. falciparum; aproximadamente el 90% de las personas que la han padecido se recuperan completamente sin secuelas neurológicas. Aún no se conoce con claridad su patogénesis pero se han postulado cuatro hipótesis o mecanismos posibles: 1 citoadherencia y secuestro de glóbulos rojos parasitados en la microvasculatura cerebral; 2 formación de rosetas y aglutinación de glóbulos rojos parasitados; 3 producción de citoquinas y activación de segundos mensajeros y, 4 apertura de la barrera hematoencefálica. Sin embargo, queda un interrogante sin resolver aún: ¿qué proceso se lleva a cabo para que el parásito, desde el espacio microvascular, pueda interferir transitoriamente con la función cerebral? Recientemente se ha utilizado el precursor de la proteína b-Amiloide como un marcador de daño neuronal en MC; este precursor será de gran ayuda en futuras investigaciones realizadas en nuestro medio que aporten información para comprender la patogénesis de la MC.

  15. The effectiveness of a nationwide universal coverage campaign of insecticide-treated bed nets on childhood malaria in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamawe, Collins O F; Nakamura, Kanan; Shibanuma, Akira; Jimba, Masamine

    2016-10-18

    Although the universal coverage campaign of insecticide-treated mosquito bed nets (ITNs) has been associated with improved malaria outcomes, recent reports indicate that the campaign is losing its sparkle in some countries. In Malawi, the universal coverage campaign was implemented in 2012, but its impacts are yet to be ascertained. Thus, this study examined the effects of the campaign on malaria morbidity among children in Malawi. This is a repeated cross-sectional study. The study used nationally-representative malaria indicator survey (MIS) data collected in 2012 and 2014. In total, the analysis included 4193 children between the ages of 6 and 59 months (2171 from 2012 MIS and 2022 from 2014 MIS). ITNs coverage and malaria morbidity before (2012 = pre-test/control) and after (2014 = post-test/treated) the universal coverage campaign of ITNs were compared. The treated and control samples were matched on measured relevant covariates using propensity scores. The mean number of ITNs per household improved significantly from 1.1 (SD 1.0) in 2012 to 1.4 (SD 1.1) in 2014 (p universal coverage campaign of ITNs was not associated with a reduced burden of malaria among children in Malawi. This was likely due to increased insecticide resistance, inconsistent use of bed nets and under-utilization of other methods of malaria control. This calls for a multifaceted approach in the fight against malaria instead of simple dependence on ITNs. In particular, local or community level malaria interventions should go hand in hand with the universal coverage campaign.

  16. Malaria Matters

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-04-18

    This podcast gives an overview of malaria, including prevention and treatment, and what CDC is doing to help control and prevent malaria globally.  Created: 4/18/2008 by National Center for Zoonotic, Vector-Borne, and Enteric Diseases (NCZVED).   Date Released: 4/18/2008.

  17. The immunological balance between host and parasite in malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deroost, Katrien; Pham, Thao-Thy; Opdenakker, Ghislain; Van den Steen, Philippe E

    2016-03-01

    Coevolution of humans and malaria parasites has generated an intricate balance between the immune system of the host and virulence factors of the parasite, equilibrating maximal parasite transmission with limited host damage. Focusing on the blood stage of the disease, we discuss how the balance between anti-parasite immunity versus immunomodulatory and evasion mechanisms of the parasite may result in parasite clearance or chronic infection without major symptoms, whereas imbalances characterized by excessive parasite growth, exaggerated immune reactions or a combination of both cause severe pathology and death, which is detrimental for both parasite and host. A thorough understanding of the immunological balance of malaria and its relation to other physiological balances in the body is of crucial importance for developing effective interventions to reduce malaria-related morbidity and to diminish fatal outcomes due to severe complications. Therefore, we discuss in this review the detailed mechanisms of anti-malarial immunity, parasite virulence factors including immune evasion mechanisms and pathogenesis. Furthermore, we propose a comprehensive classification of malaria complications according to the different types of imbalances.

  18. Shifting suitability for malaria vectors across Africa with warming climates

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    Peterson A Townsend

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Climates are changing rapidly, producing warm climate conditions globally not previously observed in modern history. Malaria is of great concern as a cause of human mortality and morbidity, particularly across Africa, thanks in large part to the presence there of a particularly competent suite of mosquito vector species. Methods I derive spatially explicit estimates of human populations living in regions newly suitable climatically for populations of two key Anopheles gambiae vector complex species in Africa over the coming 50 years, based on ecological niche model projections over two global climate models, two scenarios of climate change, and detailed spatial summaries of human population distributions. Results For both species, under all scenarios, given the changing spatial distribution of appropriate conditions and the current population distribution, the models predict a reduction of 11.3–30.2% in the percentage of the overall population living in areas climatically suitable for these vector species in coming decades, but reductions and increases are focused in different regions: malaria vector suitability is likely to decrease in West Africa, but increase in eastern and southern Africa. Conclusion Climate change effects on African malaria vectors shift their distributional potential from west to east and south, which has implications for overall numbers of people exposed to these vector species. Although the total is reduced, malaria is likely to pose novel public health problems in areas where it has not previously been common.

  19. Assessing malaria control in the Kassena-Nankana district of northern Ghana through repeated surveys using the RBM tools

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    Adjuik Martin

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The goal of Roll Back Malaria (RBM is to reduce malaria morbidity and mortality by 50% by the year 2010, and still further thereafter until the disease becomes no more a threat to public health. To contribute to the monitoring and evaluation process of this goal, two surveys were carried out in 2000 and 2003 in households and health facilities in the Kassena-Nankana district, northern Ghana using the RBM-WHO/AFRO monitoring and evaluation tools for malaria control activities. Methods Data were collected from mothers/caretakers on signs/symptoms of the most recent malaria attack for their under five year old children; the management actions that they took and their perception of health services provided at the health facilities, bednet use, antenatal attendance and place of delivery for the most recent pregnancy, malaria prophylaxis during their last pregnancy. Community health workers and herbalist/traditional healers were also interviewed about the types of health services they provide to community members. Results The results revealed a significant improvement in knowledge among mothers/caretakers over the three-year period; this affected caretakers' initial management of illnesses of their young children. The management in terms of the type and dosage of drugs used also improved significantly (p The intensification of malaria control activities and awareness creation in this district over a three year period had started demonstrating positive results towards reducing malaria disease burden. Conclusion Periodic performance assessments through surveys as described and prompt feedback of results to stakeholders in the locality serves as a catalyst to improving malaria control in malaria-endemic countries.

  20. Reducing malaria misdiagnosis: the importance of correctly interpreting Paracheck Pf® "faint test bands" in a low transmission area of Tanzania

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    Allen Lisa K

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs have been extensively evaluated since their introduction in the early 1990's, sensitivity and specificity vary widely limiting successful integration into clinical practice. This paper reviews specific issues surrounding RDT use in field settings and presents results of research investigating how to interpret "faint test bands" on ParaCheck Pf® in areas of low transmission in order to reduce malaria misdiagnosis. Methods A multi-phase cross-sectional study was conducted at a remote hospital in the northern Tanzanian highlands. Capillary blood samples were taken from consenting participants (n = 319 for blood smear and ParaCheck Pf® testing. Primary outcome variables were sensitivity, specificity and proportion misdiagnosed by ParaCheck Pf® and local microscopy. ParaCheck Pf® "faint bands" were classified as both true positives or true negatives during evaluation to determine appropriate clinical interpretation. Multivariate logistic regression adjusted for age and gender was conducted to determine odds of misdiagnosis for local microscopy and ParaCheck Pf®. Results Overall, 23.71% of all ParaCheck Pf® tests resulted in a "faint band" and 94.20% corresponded with true negatives. When ParaCheck Pf® "faint bands" were classified as positive, specificity was 75.5% (95% CI = 70.3% - 80.6% as compared to 98.9% (95% CI = 97.0% - 99.8% when classified as negative. The odds of misdiagnosis by local microscopy for those > 5 years as compared to those ≤ 5 years are 0.370 (95% CI = 0.1733 - 0.7915, p = 0.010. In contrast, even when ParaCheck Pf® faint bands are considered positive, the odds of misdiagnosis by ParaCheck Pf® for those > 5 years as compared to those ≤ 5 years are 0.837 (95% CI = 0.459 - 1.547, p = 0.5383. Conclusions We provide compelling evidence that in areas of low transmission, "faint bands" should be considered a negative test when used to inform clinical

  1. Impact of artemisinin-based combination therapy and insecticide-treated nets on malaria burden in Zanzibar.

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    Achuyt Bhattarai

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Roll Back Malaria strategy recommends a combination of interventions for malaria control. Zanzibar implemented artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT for uncomplicated malaria in late 2003 and long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs from early 2006. ACT is provided free of charge to all malaria patients, while LLINs are distributed free to children under age 5 y ("under five" and pregnant women. We investigated temporal trends in Plasmodium falciparum prevalence and malaria-related health parameters following the implementation of these two malaria control interventions in Zanzibar. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Cross-sectional clinical and parasitological surveys in children under the age of 14 y were conducted in North A District in May 2003, 2005, and 2006. Survey data were analyzed in a logistic regression model and adjusted for complex sampling design and potential confounders. Records from all 13 public health facilities in North A District were analyzed for malaria-related outpatient visits and admissions. Mortality and demographic data were obtained from District Commissioner's Office. P. falciparum prevalence decreased in children under five between 2003 and 2006; using 2003 as the reference year, odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs were, for 2005, 0.55 (0.28-1.08, and for 2006, 0.03 (0.00-0.27; p for trend < 0.001. Between 2002 and 2005 crude under-five, infant (under age 1 y, and child (aged 1-4 y mortality decreased by 52%, 33%, and 71%, respectively. Similarly, malaria-related admissions, blood transfusions, and malaria-attributed mortality decreased significantly by 77%, 67% and 75%, respectively, between 2002 and 2005 in children under five. Climatic conditions favorable for malaria transmission persisted throughout the observational period. CONCLUSIONS: Following deployment of ACT in Zanzibar 2003, malaria-associated morbidity and mortality decreased dramatically within two years. Additional distribution

  2. Climate change and the global malaria recession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gething, Peter W; Smith, David L; Patil, Anand P; Tatem, Andrew J; Snow, Robert W; Hay, Simon I

    2010-05-20

    The current and potential future impact of climate change on malaria is of major public health interest. The proposed effects of rising global temperatures on the future spread and intensification of the disease, and on existing malaria morbidity and mortality rates, substantively influence global health policy. The contemporary spatial limits of Plasmodium falciparum malaria and its endemicity within this range, when compared with comparable historical maps, offer unique insights into the changing global epidemiology of malaria over the last century. It has long been known that the range of malaria has contracted through a century of economic development and disease control. Here, for the first time, we quantify this contraction and the global decreases in malaria endemicity since approximately 1900. We compare the magnitude of these changes to the size of effects on malaria endemicity proposed under future climate scenarios and associated with widely used public health interventions. Our findings have two key and often ignored implications with respect to climate change and malaria. First, widespread claims that rising mean temperatures have already led to increases in worldwide malaria morbidity and mortality are largely at odds with observed decreasing global trends in both its endemicity and geographic extent. Second, the proposed future effects of rising temperatures on endemicity are at least one order of magnitude smaller than changes observed since about 1900 and up to two orders of magnitude smaller than those that can be achieved by the effective scale-up of key control measures. Predictions of an intensification of malaria in a warmer world, based on extrapolated empirical relationships or biological mechanisms, must be set against a context of a century of warming that has seen marked global declines in the disease and a substantial weakening of the global correlation between malaria endemicity and climate.

  3. Inhaled nitric oxide for the adjunctive therapy of severe malaria: Protocol for a randomized controlled trial

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    Lavery James V

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe malaria remains a major cause of global morbidity and mortality. Despite the use of potent anti-parasitic agents, the mortality rate in severe malaria remains high. Adjunctive therapies that target the underlying pathophysiology of severe malaria may further reduce morbidity and mortality. Endothelial activation plays a central role in the pathogenesis of severe malaria, of which angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2 has recently been shown to function as a key regulator. Nitric oxide (NO is a major inhibitor of Ang-2 release from endothelium and has been shown to decrease endothelial inflammation and reduce the adhesion of parasitized erythrocytes. Low-flow inhaled nitric oxide (iNO gas is a US FDA-approved treatment for hypoxic respiratory failure in neonates. Methods/Design This prospective, parallel arm, randomized, placebo-controlled, blinded clinical trial compares adjunctive continuous inhaled nitric oxide at 80 ppm to placebo (both arms receiving standard anti-malarial therapy, among Ugandan children aged 1-10 years of age with severe malaria. The primary endpoint is the longitudinal change in Ang-2, an objective and quantitative biomarker of malaria severity, which will be analysed using a mixed-effects linear model. Secondary endpoints include mortality, recovery time, parasite clearance and neurocognitive sequelae. Discussion Noteworthy aspects of this trial design include its efficient sample size supported by a computer simulation study to evaluate statistical power, meticulous attention to complex ethical issues in a cross-cultural setting, and innovative strategies for safety monitoring and blinding to treatment allocation in a resource-constrained setting in sub-Saharan Africa. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01255215

  4. Insecticide-treated net (ITN) ownership, usage, and malaria transmission in the highlands of western Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atieli, Harrysone E; Zhou, Guofa; Afrane, Yaw; Lee, Ming-Chieh; Mwanzo, Isaac; Githeko, Andrew K; Yan, Guiyun

    2011-06-18

    Insecticide-treated bed nets (ITNs) are known to be highly effective in reducing malaria morbidity and mortality. However, usage varies among households, and such variations in actual usage may seriously limit the potential impact of nets and cause spatial heterogeneity on malaria transmission. This study examined ITN ownership and underlying factors for among-household variation in use, and malaria transmission in two highland regions of western Kenya. Cross-sectional surveys were conducted on ITN ownership (possession), compliance (actual usage among those who own ITNs), and malaria infections in occupants of randomly sampled houses in the dry and the rainy seasons of 2009. Despite ITN ownership reaching more than 71%, compliance was low at 56.3%. The compliance rate was significantly higher during the rainy season compared with the dry season (62% vs. 49.6%). Both malaria parasite prevalence (11.8% vs. 5.1%) and vector densities (1.0 vs.0.4 female/house/night) were significantly higher during the rainy season than during the dry season. Other important factors affecting the use of ITNs include: a household education level of at least primary school level, significantly high numbers of nuisance mosquitoes, and low indoor temperatures. Malaria prevalence in the rainy season was about 30% lower in ITN users than in non-ITN users, but this percentage was not significantly different during the dry season. In malaria hypo-mesoendemic highland regions of western Kenya, the gap between ITNownership and usage is generally high with greater usage recorded during the high transmission season. Because of the low compliance among those who own ITNs, there is a need to sensitize households on sustained use of ITNs in order to optimize their role as a malaria control tool.

  5. Response to diazepam in children with malaria-induced seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikumi, M L; Muchohi, S N; Ohuma, E O; Kokwaro, G O; Newton, C R J C

    2008-12-01

    Malaria infection reduces the binding capacity of benzodiazepine receptors in mice. We studied the efficacy of diazepam terminating seizures in children with falciparum malaria. Diazepam stopped seizures in fewer patients with malaria parasitaemia (chi(2)=3.93, P=0.047) and those with clinical diagnosis of malaria (chi(2)=9.84, P=0.002) compared to those without. However malaria was not identified as an independent risk factor for diazepam's failure to stop seizures in children.

  6. Malaria, anaemia and under-nutrition: three frequently co-existing conditions among preschool children in rural Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kateera, Fredrick; Ingabire, Chantal M; Hakizimana, Emmanuel; Kalinda, Parfait; Mens, Petra F; Grobusch, Martin P; Mutesa, Leon; van Vugt, Michèle

    2015-11-05

    Malaria, anaemia and under-nutrition are three highly prevalent and frequently co-existing diseases that cause significant morbidity and mortality particularly among children aged less than 5 years. Currently, there is paucity of conclusive studies on the burden of and associations between malaria, anaemia and under-nutrition in Rwanda and comparable sub-Saharan and thus, this study measured the prevalence of malaria parasitaemia, anaemia and under-nutrition among preschool age children in a rural Rwandan setting and evaluated for interactions between and risk determinants for these three conditions. A cross-sectional household (HH) survey involving children aged 6-59 months was conducted. Data on malaria parasitaemia, haemoglobin densities, anthropometry, demographics, socioeconomic status (SES) and malaria prevention knowledge and practices were collected. The prevalences of malaria parasitaemia and anaemia were 5.9 and 7.0 %, respectively, whilst the prevalence of stunting was 41.3 %. Malaria parasitaemia risk differed by age groups with odds ratio (OR) = 2.53; P = 0.04 for age group 24-35 months, OR = 3.5; P = 0.037 for age group 36-47 months, and OR = 3.03; P = 0.014 for age group 48-60 months, whilst a reduced risk was found among children living in high SES HHs (OR = 0.37; P = 0.029). Risk of anaemia was high among children aged ≥12 months, those with malaria parasitaemia (OR = 3.86; P ≤ 0.0001) and children living in HHs of lower SES. Overall, under-nutrition was not associated with malaria parasitaemia. Underweight was higher among males (OR = 1.444; P = 0.019) and children with anaemia (OR = 1.98; P = 0.004). In this study group, four in 10 and one in 10 children were found stunted and underweight, respectively, in an area of low malaria transmission. Under-nutrition was not associated with malaria risk. While the high prevalence of stunting requires urgent response, reductions in malaria parasitaemia and anaemia rates may require, in addition to

  7. UK malaria treatment guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalloo, David G; Shingadia, Delane; Pasvol, Geoffrey; Chiodini, Peter L; Whitty, Christopher J; Beeching, Nicholas J; Hill, David R; Warrell, David A; Bannister, Barbara A

    2007-02-01

    ); quinine is highly effective but poorly tolerated in prolonged dosage and is always supplemented by additional treatment, usually with oral doxycycline. ALL patients treated for P. falciparum malaria should be admitted to hospital for at least 24 h, since patients can deteriorate suddenly, especially early in the course of treatment. Severe falciparum malaria, or infections complicated by a relatively high parasite count (more than 2% of red blood cells parasitized), should be treated with intravenous therapy until the patient is well enough to continue with oral treatment. In the UK, the treatment of choice for severe or complicated malaria is currently an infusion of intravenous quinine. This may exacerbate hypoglycaemia that can occur in malaria; patients treated with intravenous quinine therefore require careful monitoring. Intravenous artesunate reduces high parasite loads more rapidly than quinine and is more effective in treating severe malaria in selected situations. It can also be used in patients with contra-indications to quinine. Intravenous artesunate is unlicensed in the EU. Assistance in obtaining artesunate may be sought from specialist tropical medicine centres, on consultation, for named patients. Patients with severe or complicated malaria should be managed in a high dependency or intensive care environment. They may require haemodynamic support and management of acute respiratory distress syndrome, disseminated intravascular coagulation, renal impairment/failure, seizures, and severe intercurrent infections including gram-negative bacteraemia/septicaemia. Falciparum malaria in pregnancy is more likely to be severe and complicated: the placenta contains high levels of parasites. Stillbirth or early delivery may occur and diagnosis can be difficult if parasites are concentrated in the placenta and scanty in the blood. The treatment of choice for falciparum malaria in pregnancy is quinine; doxycycline is contraindicated in pregnancy but clindamycin can be

  8. Malaria and Travelers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a CDC Malaria Branch clinician. malaria@cdc.gov Malaria and Travelers Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... may be at risk for infection. Determine if malaria transmission occurs at the destinations Obtain a detailed ...

  9. Malaria Treatment (United States)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a CDC Malaria Branch clinician. malaria@cdc.gov Malaria Treatment (United States) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Treatment of Malaria: Guidelines For Clinicians (United States) Download PDF version ...

  10. Malaria elimination in Malawi: research needs in highly endemic, poverty-stricken contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Mark L; Walker, Edward D; Mzilahowa, Themba; Mathanga, Don P; Taylor, Terrie E

    2012-03-01

    Malaria control in the impoverished, highly endemic settings of sub-Saharan Africa remains a major public health challenge. Successes have been achieved only where sustained, concerted, multi-pronged interventions have been instituted. As one of the world's poorest countries, Malawi experiences malaria incidence rates that have remained high despite a decade of gradually expanding and more intensive prevention efforts. The Malawi International Center for Excellence in Malaria Research (ICEMR) is beginning work to augment the knowledge base for reducing Plasmodium transmission and malaria morbidity and mortality. Among ICEMR goals, we intend to better assess patterns of infection and disease, and analyze transmission by Anopheles vector species in both urban and rural ecological settings. We will evaluate parasite population genetics and dynamics, transmission intensities and vector ecologies, social and environmental determinants of disease patterns and risk, and human-vector-parasite dynamics. Such context-specific information will help to focus appropriate prevention and treatment activities on efforts to control malaria in Malawi. In zones of intense and stable transmission, like Malawi, elimination poses particularly thorny challenges - and these challengers are different from those of traditional control and prevention activities. Working toward elimination will require knowledge of how various interventions impact on transmission as it approaches very low levels. At present, Malawi is faced with immediate, context-specific problems of scaling-up prevention and control activities simply to begin reducing infection and disease to tolerable levels. The research required to support these objectives is critically evaluated here.

  11. Mosquito larval source management for controlling malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tusting, Lucy S; Thwing, Julie; Sinclair, David; Fillinger, Ulrike; Gimnig, John; Bonner, Kimberly E; Bottomley, Christian; Lindsay, Steven W

    2013-08-29

    quality evidence). The interventions in these five trials included dam construction to reduce larval habitats, flushing of streams, removal of domestic water containers, and larviciding. In the randomized cross-over trial in the flood plains of the Gambia River, larviciding by ground teams did not significantly reduce parasite prevalence (2039 participants, one trial). In Africa and Asia, LSM is another policy option, alongside LLINs and IRS, for reducing malaria morbidity in both urban and rural areas where a sufficient proportion of larval habitats can be targeted. Further research is needed to evaluate whether LSM is appropriate or feasible in parts of rural Africa where larval habitats are more extensive.

  12. Mosquito larval source management for controlling malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tusting, Lucy S; Thwing, Julie; Sinclair, David; Fillinger, Ulrike; Gimnig, John; Bonner, Kimberly E; Bottomley, Christian; Lindsay, Steven W

    2015-01-01

    around two-thirds (RR 0.32, 95% CI 0.19 to 0.55, 8041 participants, five trials, moderate quality evidence). The interventions in these five trials included dam construction to reduce larval habitats, flushing of streams, removal of domestic water containers, and larviciding. In the randomized cross-over trial in the flood plains of the Gambia River, larviciding by ground teams did not significantly reduce parasite prevalence (2039 participants, one trial). Authors’ conclusions In Africa and Asia, LSM is another policy option, alongside LLINs and IRS, for reducing malaria morbidity in both urban and rural areas where a sufficient proportion of larval habitats can be targeted. Further research is needed to evaluate whether LSM is appropriate or feasible in parts of rural Africa where larval habitats are more extensive. PMID:23986463

  13. A novel approach for measuring the burden of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria: application to data from Zambia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie Crowell

    Full Text Available Measurement of malaria burden is fraught with complexity, due to the natural history of the disease, delays in seeking treatment or failure of case management. Attempts to establish an appropriate case definition for a malaria episode has often resulted in ambiguities and challenges because of poor information about treatment seeking, patterns of infection, recurrence of fever and asymptomatic infection. While the primary reason for treating malaria is to reduce disease burden, the effects of treatment are generally ignored in estimates of the burden of malaria morbidity, which are usually presented in terms of numbers of clinical cases or episodes, with the main data sources being reports from health facilities and parasite prevalence surveys. The use of burden estimates that do not consider effects of treatment, leads to under-estimation of the impact of improvements in case management. Official estimates of burden very likely massively underestimate the impact of the roll-out of ACT as first-line therapy across Africa. This paper proposes a novel approach for estimating burden of disease based on the point prevalence of malaria attributable disease, or equivalently, the days with malaria fever in unit time. The technique makes use of data available from standard community surveys, analyses of fever patterns in malaria therapy patients, and data on recall bias. Application of this approach to data from Zambia for 2009-2010 gave an estimate of 2.6 (95% credible interval: 1.5-3.7 malaria attributable fever days per child-year. The estimates of recall bias, and of the numbers of days with illness contributing to single illness recalls, could be applied more generally. To obtain valid estimates of the overall malaria burden using these methods, there remains a need for surveys to include the whole range of ages of hosts in the population and for data on seasonality patterns in confirmed case series.

  14. The impact of hotspot-targeted interventions on malaria transmission: study protocol for a cluster-randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bousema Teun

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria transmission is highly heterogeneous in most settings, resulting in the formation of recognizable malaria hotspots. Targeting these hotspots might represent a highly efficacious way of controlling or eliminating malaria if the hotspots fuel malaria transmission to the wider community. Methods/design Hotspots of malaria will be determined based on spatial patterns in age-adjusted prevalence and density of antibodies against malaria antigens apical membrane antigen-1 and merozoite surface protein-1. The community effect of interventions targeted at these hotspots will be determined. The intervention will comprise larviciding, focal screening and treatment of the human population, distribution of long-lasting insecticide-treated nets and indoor residual spraying. The impact of the intervention will be determined inside and up to 500 m outside the targeted hotspots by PCR-based parasite prevalence in cross-sectional surveys, malaria morbidity by passive case detection in selected facilities and entomological monitoring of larval and adult Anopheles populations. Discussion This study aims to provide direct evidence for a community effect of hotspot-targeted interventions. The trial is powered to detect large effects on malaria transmission in the context of ongoing malaria interventions. Follow-up studies will be needed to determine the effect of individual components of the interventions and the cost-effectiveness of a hotspot-targeted approach, where savings made by reducing the number of compounds that need to receive interventions should outweigh the costs of hotspot-detection. Trial registration NCT01575613. The protocol was registered online on 20 March 2012; the first community was randomized on 26 March 2012.

  15. Concurrent malaria and dengue infection:a brief summary and comment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Viroj Wiwanitkit

    2011-01-01

    There are several tropical mosquito borne infections. Malaria and dengue are the two common mosquito infections that are very important and cause high morbidity and mortality for many patients around the world. Concurrent malaria and dengue infection is an important condition that is seldom reported. In this specific article, the author hereby summarizes on the topic of concurrent malaria and dengue infection.

  16. PATTERNS OF SEVEN AND COMPLICATED MALARIA IN CHILDREN

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    2015-10-04

    Oct 4, 2015 ... ABSTRACT. BACKGROUND: Malaria is endemic in Nigeria, with significant records of mortality and morbidity. ... lectures, health education and practical demonstration sessions. .... In stage two, the training attendance sheet.

  17. Ongoing challenges in the management of malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokwaro, Gilbert

    2009-10-12

    This article gives an overview of some of the ongoing challenges that are faced in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of malaria. Malaria causes approximately 881,000 deaths every year, with nine out of ten deaths occurring in sub-Saharan Africa. In addition to the human burden of malaria, the economic burden is vast. It is thought to cost African countries more than US$12 billion every year in direct losses. However, great progress in malaria control has been made in some highly endemic countries. Vector control is assuming a new importance with the significant reductions in malaria burden achieved using combined malaria control interventions in countries such as Zanzibar, Zambia and Rwanda. The proportion of patients treated for malaria who have a confirmed diagnosis is low in Africa compared with other regions of the world, with the result that anti-malarials could be used to treat patients without malaria, especially in areas where progress has been made in reducing the malaria burden and malaria epidemiology is changing. Inappropriate administration of anti-malarials could contribute to the spread of resistance and incurs unnecessary costs. Parasite resistance to almost all commonly used anti-malarials has been observed in the most lethal parasite species, Plasmodium falciparum. This has presented a major barrier to successful disease management in malaria-endemic areas. ACT (artemisinin-based combination therapy) has made a significant contribution to malaria control and to reducing disease transmission through reducing gametocyte carriage. Administering ACT to infants and small children can be difficult and time consuming. Specially formulating anti-malarials for this vulnerable population is vital to ease administration and help ensure that an accurate dose is received. Education of healthworkers and communities about malaria prevention, diagnosis and treatment is a vital component of effective case management, especially as diagnostic policies change

  18. Malaria, anaemia and antimalarial drug resistance in African children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Obonyo, C.O.

    2006-01-01

    Malaria-associated anaemia is a potentially preventable cause of severe morbidity and mortality in children < 5years of age, in areas of high malaria transmission in sub-Saharan Africa. In a cross-sectional study of 3586 children, 80% were anaemic (haemoglobin [Hb]<11g/dL) and 3% had severe anaemia

  19. Malaria Parasitemia and Anaemia among Pregnant Women in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study on the prevalence of malaria parasitaemia and anaemia among ... Maternity and Child-Care (NMCCD) Ihie in Umuahia metropolis in Abia State ... Data were collected and analyzed statistically using chisquare test. ... Reduction and prevention of morbidity and mortality due to malaria and anaemia were discussed.

  20. Malaria, anaemia and antimalarial drug resistance in African children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Obonyo, C.O.

    2006-01-01

    Malaria-associated anaemia is a potentially preventable cause of severe morbidity and mortality in children < 5years of age, in areas of high malaria transmission in sub-Saharan Africa. In a cross-sectional study of 3586 children, 80% were anaemic (haemoglobin [Hb]<11g/dL) and 3% had severe anaemia

  1. Feasibility of Adapting Multisystemic Therapy to Improve Illness Management Behaviors and Reduce Asthma Morbidity in High Risk African American Youth: A Case Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naar-King, Sylvie; Ellis, Deborah; Kolmodin, Karen; Cunningham, Phillippe; Secord, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    African-American adolescents have the highest rates of asthma morbidity and mortality, yet there are few successful behavioral interventions to improve illness management for this group. Mental health providers have an opportunity to expand their services and impact by targeting adolescents with poor asthma management. We describe the adaptation…

  2. Seasonal intermittent preventive treatment for the prevention of anaemia and malaria in Ghanaian children: a randomized, placebo controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Kweku

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Malaria and anaemia are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in children in sub-Saharan Africa. We have investigated the effect of intermittent preventive treatment with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine or artesunate plus amodiaquine on anaemia and malaria in children in an area of intense, prolonged, seasonal malaria transmission in Ghana. METHODS: 2451 children aged 3-59 months from 30 villages were individually randomised to receive placebo or artesunate plus amodiaquine (AS+AQ monthly or bimonthly, or sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP bimonthly over a period of six months. The primary outcome measures were episodes of anaemia (Hb1 year old when they received IPTc compared to the placebo group. However the incidence of malaria in the post intervention period was higher in children who were <1 year old when they received AS+AQ monthly compared to the placebo group. INTERPRETATION: IPTc is safe and efficacious in reducing the burden of malaria in an area of Ghana with a prolonged, intense malaria transmission season. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00119132.

  3. Loss of Toll-like receptor 7 alters cytokine production and protects against experimental cerebral malaria

    OpenAIRE

    Baccarella, Alyssa; Huang, Brian W; Fontana, Mary F.; Kim, Charles C

    2014-01-01

    Background Malaria, caused by Plasmodium sp. parasites, is a leading cause of global morbidity and mortality. Cerebral malaria, characterized by neurological symptoms, is a life-threatening complication of malaria affecting over 500,000 young children in Africa every year. Because of the prevalence and severity of cerebral malaria, a better understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms of its pathology is desirable and could inform future development of therapeutics. This study sought ...

  4. PERILAKU PENDLDUK DALAM PENANGGULANGAN PENYAKIT MALARIA DI DESA BERAKIT PROPINSI RIAU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Sapardiyah Santoso

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Berakit Village was a hyperendemic malaria area according to the first year malariometric survey carried out in 1982/1983 with a spleen rate between 52.5 - 56.0%, and a parasite rate between 27.1 - 33.3%. An. sundaicus was the potential vector. Sociological studies have never been conducted in this area. The objective of this study was to reduce the malaria morbidity in Berakit Village through sociological intervention with health education about malaria using a learning module, distributed among the households, and followed by weekly mass chemoprophylaxis with chloroquine. Data collections were carried out with questionnaires and observations. After one year intervention the results showed improvement in the knowledge about malaria : the majority of the respondents knew about signs and symptoms, cause of the disease and the breeding places of the vectors. But only half of them were of the opinion that health education about malaria with a learning module was very useful. A change in attitude of the majority of the respondents was observed from their statements about control of vectors, prevention of transmission and with repellents prevention of the disease with regidar drug intake. About the practice of the respondents and key persons, improvement was also observed from the high percentage (93.7% of the villagers who took the chemoprophylactic drug regidarly because of the active involvement of the key persons. A minority of the respondents however, remained passive until the end of the study. In conclusion, through the learning module the knowledge of the villagers was improved. With this improvement they were motivated to enhance community participation to control malaria. Key persons were needed to control malaria and coordinate the community with the supervision of the local health center physician.

  5. Epidemiology of forest malaria in central Vietnam: a large scale cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhart, Annette; Ngo, Duc Thang; Phan, Van Ky; Ta, Thi Tinh; Van Overmeir, Chantal; Speybroeck, Niko; Obsomer, Valerie; Le, Xuan Hung; Le, Khanh Thuan; Coosemans, Marc; D'alessandro, Umberto

    2005-01-01

    In Vietnam, a large proportion of all malaria cases and deaths occurs in the central mountainous and forested part of the country. Indeed, forest malaria, despite intensive control activities, is still a major problem which raises several questions about its dynamics.A large-scale malaria morbidity survey to measure malaria endemicity and identify important risk factors was carried out in 43 villages situated in a forested area of Ninh Thuan province, south central Vietnam. Four thousand three hundred and six randomly selected individuals, aged 10-60 years, participated in the survey. Rag Lays (86%), traditionally living in the forest and practising "slash and burn" cultivation represented the most common ethnic group. The overall parasite rate was 13.3% (range [0-42.3] while Plasmodium falciparum seroprevalence was 25.5% (range [2.1-75.6]). Mapping of these two variables showed a patchy distribution, suggesting that risk factors other than remoteness and forest proximity modulated the human-vector interactions. This was confirmed by the results of the multivariate-adjusted analysis, showing that forest work was a significant risk factor for malaria infection, further increased by staying in the forest overnight (OR= 2.86; 95%CI [1.62; 5.07]). Rag Lays had a higher risk of malaria infection, which inversely related to education level and socio-economic status. Women were less at risk than men (OR = 0.71; 95%CI [0.59; 0.86]), a possible consequence of different behaviour. This study confirms that malaria endemicity is still relatively high in this area and that the dynamics of transmission is constantly modulated by the behaviour of both humans and vectors. A well-targeted intervention reducing the "vector/forest worker" interaction, based on long-lasting insecticidal material, could be appropriate in this environment.

  6. Epidemiology of forest malaria in central Vietnam: a large scale cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung Le

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In Vietnam, a large proportion of all malaria cases and deaths occurs in the central mountainous and forested part of the country. Indeed, forest malaria, despite intensive control activities, is still a major problem which raises several questions about its dynamics. A large-scale malaria morbidity survey to measure malaria endemicity and identify important risk factors was carried out in 43 villages situated in a forested area of Ninh Thuan province, south central Vietnam. Four thousand three hundred and six randomly selected individuals, aged 10–60 years, participated in the survey. Rag Lays (86%, traditionally living in the forest and practising "slash and burn" cultivation represented the most common ethnic group. The overall parasite rate was 13.3% (range [0–42.3] while Plasmodium falciparum seroprevalence was 25.5% (range [2.1–75.6]. Mapping of these two variables showed a patchy distribution, suggesting that risk factors other than remoteness and forest proximity modulated the human-vector interactions. This was confirmed by the results of the multivariate-adjusted analysis, showing that forest work was a significant risk factor for malaria infection, further increased by staying in the forest overnight (OR= 2.86; 95%CI [1.62; 5.07]. Rag Lays had a higher risk of malaria infection, which inversely related to education level and socio-economic status. Women were less at risk than men (OR = 0.71; 95%CI [0.59; 0.86], a possible consequence of different behaviour. This study confirms that malaria endemicity is still relatively high in this area and that the dynamics of transmission is constantly modulated by the behaviour of both humans and vectors. A well-targeted intervention reducing the "vector/forest worker" interaction, based on long-lasting insecticidal material, could be appropriate in this environment.

  7. The complexities of malaria disease manifestations with a focus on asymptomatic malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Malaria is a serious parasitic disease in the developing world, causing high morbidity and mortality. The pathogenesis of malaria is complex, and the clinical presentation of disease ranges from severe and complicated, to mild and uncomplicated, to asymptomatic malaria. Despite a wealth of studies on the clinical severity of disease, asymptomatic malaria infections are still poorly understood. Asymptomatic malaria remains a challenge for malaria control programs as it significantly influences transmission dynamics. A thorough understanding of the interaction between hosts and parasites in the development of different clinical outcomes is required. In this review, the problems and obstacles to the study and control of asymptomatic malaria are discussed. The human and parasite factors associated with differential clinical outcomes are described and the management and treatment strategies for the control of the disease are outlined. Further, the crucial gaps in the knowledge of asymptomatic malaria that should be the focus of future research towards development of more effective malaria control strategies are highlighted. PMID:22289302

  8. Impact of combining intermittent preventive treatment with home management of malaria in children less than 10 years in a rural area of Senegal: a cluster randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tine Roger CK

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current malaria control strategies recommend (i early case detection using rapid diagnostic tests (RDT and treatment with artemisinin combination therapy (ACT, (ii pre-referral rectal artesunate, (iii intermittent preventive treatment and (iv impregnated bed nets. However, these individual malaria control interventions provide only partial protection in most epidemiological situations. Therefore, there is a need to investigate the potential benefits of integrating several malaria interventions to reduce malaria prevalence and morbidity. Methods A randomized controlled trial was carried out to assess the impact of combining seasonal intermittent preventive treatment in children (IPTc with home-based management of malaria (HMM by community health workers (CHWs in Senegal. Eight CHWs in eight villages covered by the Bonconto health post, (South Eastern part of Senegal were trained to diagnose malaria using RDT, provide prompt treatment with artemether-lumefantrine for uncomplicated malaria cases and pre-referral rectal artesunate for complicated malaria occurring in children under 10 years. Four CHWs were randomized to also administer monthly IPTc as single dose of sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP plus three doses of amodiaquine (AQ in the malaria transmission season, October and November 2010. Primary end point was incidence of single episode of malaria attacks over 8 weeks of follow up. Secondary end points included prevalence of malaria parasitaemia, and prevalence of anaemia at the end of the transmission season. Primary analysis was by intention to treat. The study protocol was approved by the Senegalese National Ethical Committee (approval 0027/MSP/DS/CNRS, 18/03/2010. Results A total of 1,000 children were enrolled. The incidence of malaria episodes was 7.1/100 child months at risk [95% CI (3.7-13.7] in communities with IPTc + HMM compared to 35.6/100 child months at risk [95% CI (26.7-47.4] in communities with only HMM (a

  9. The role of vitamin A in reducing child mortality and morbidity and improving growth El papel de la vitamina A en la reducción de la mortalidad y morbilidad infantiles y en la mejoría del crecimiento

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    USHA RAMAKRISHNAN

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available This is an update of knowledge on the role of the vitamin A status in determining child mortality, morbidity and growth. Recent information confirms the earlier conclusion of Beaton et al. that a 23% reduction in young child mortality results following improvements in the vitamin A status. Studies show that the mortality effect is primarily due to reductions in deaths due to acute gastroenteritis and measles but not acute respiratory infections (ARI and malaria. While improvement of the vitamin A status enhances the survival of older preschool children, it remains unclear whether it benefits infants (i.e. La presente es una revisión del conocimiento actual sobre el papel de la vitamina A en la mortalidad, morbilidad y crecimiento infantiles. Recientemente, algunas investigaciones han confirmado la conclusión de Beaton y colaboradores (1993 que indica que se puede reducir la mortalidad infantil en un 23% mejorando el estado de la vitamina A. Se ha demostrado que este efecto se debe a la reducción de la mortalidad por gastroenteritis aguda y sarampión y no por infecciones respiratorias agudas y paludismo. Queda claro que el mejoramiento del estado de la vitamina A favorece la sobrevivencia de los niños prescolares mayores; sin embargo, no se ha definido si también beneficia a los infantes (<6 meses. El suplemento de vitamina A no reduce la incidencia total ni la prevalencia de enfermedades comunes de la niñez; sin embargo, sí reduce la incidencia de episodios graves de diarrea. Asimismo, tal suplementación, ya sea durante o inmediatamente después de la enfermedad, no mejora la sintomatología. Finalmente, en contra de lo esperado, estudios recientes con asignación aleatoria a grupos que reciben vitamina A o un placebo indican que la vitamina A no mejora el crecimiento de los niños.

  10. falciparum malaria?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wassermann reactions and then lupus anticoagu- lant are now known ... ACA levels in the patient group, or between the ... bral malaria could lead to more effective therapy and an improved ... each patient and a physical examination performed. Particular .... a thrombotic subset of SLE: distinct profiles for epitope specificiry.

  11. Kompliceret malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønn, A M; Bygbjerg, Ib Christian; Jacobsen, E

    1989-01-01

    An increasing number of cases of malaria, imported to Denmark, are caused by Plasmodium falciparum and severe and complicated cases are more often seen. In the Department of Infectious Diseases, Rigshospitalet, 23 out of 32 cases, hospitalized from 1.1-30.6.1988, i.e. 72%, were caused by P...

  12. Lymphocyte Perturbations in Malawian Children with Severe and Uncomplicated Malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandala, Wilson L; Msefula, Chisomo L; Gondwe, Esther N; Gilchrist, James J; Graham, Stephen M; Pensulo, Paul; Mwimaniwa, Grace; Banda, Meraby; Taylor, Terrie E; Molyneux, Elizabeth E; Drayson, Mark T; Ward, Steven A; Molyneux, Malcolm E; MacLennan, Calman A

    2015-11-18

    Lymphocytes are implicated in immunity and pathogenesis of severe malaria. Since lymphocyte subsets vary with age, assessment of their contribution to different etiologies can be difficult. We immunophenotyped peripheral blood from Malawian children presenting with cerebral malaria, severe malarial anemia, and uncomplicated malaria (n = 113) and healthy aparasitemic children (n = 42) in Blantyre, Malawi, and investigated lymphocyte subset counts, activation, and memory status. Children with cerebral malaria were older than those with severe malarial anemia. We found panlymphopenia in children presenting with cerebral malaria (median lymphocyte count, 2,100/μl) and uncomplicated malaria (3,700/μl), which was corrected in convalescence and was absent in severe malarial anemia (5,950/μl). Median percentages of activated CD69(+) NK (73%) and γδ T (60%) cells were higher in cerebral malaria than in other malaria types. Median ratios of memory to naive CD4(+) lymphocytes were higher in cerebral malaria than in uncomplicated malaria and low in severe malarial anemia. The polarized lymphocyte subset profiles of different forms of severe malaria are independent of age. In conclusion, among Malawian children cerebral malaria is characterized by lymphocyte activation and increased memory cells, consistent with immune priming. In contrast, there are reduced memory cells and less activation in severe malaria anemia. Further studies are required to understand whether these immunological profiles indicate predisposition of some children to one or another form of severe malaria. Copyright © 2016 Mandala et al.

  13. Placental Malaria: From Infection to Malfunction

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Malaria during pregnancy is a major factor in infant morbidity and mortality. In this issue of Cell Host and Microbe, Conroy et al. (2013) propose that C5a, a product of complement cascade activation, counteracts the placental vascular remodeling response induced by Plasmodium infection and contributes to fetal growth restriction. Fundação para a Ciência e Tecnologia.

  14. The immuno-epidemiology of pregnancy-associated Plasmodium falciparum malaria: a variant surface antigen-specific perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, L

    2004-01-01

    Women living in areas of intense P. falciparum transmission have acquired substantial protective immunity to malaria when they reach childbearing age. Nevertheless, pregnancies in such areas are associated with substantial malaria-related morbidity and mortality, particularly among women of low p...... understanding of how protective immunity to P. falciparum malaria operates and is acquired, have provided important insights into this enigma....

  15. Plasmodium falciparum malaria in infants under 5 kg: retrospective surveillance of hospital records in five sub-saharan African countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alao, Maroufou J; Gbadoé, Adama D; Meremikwu, Martin; Tshefu, Antoinette; Tiono, Alfred B; Cousin, Marc; Hamed, Kamal

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the disease burden, clinical features, treatment and outcomes of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in neonates and infants weighing Plasmodium falciparum malaria exists in this subpopulation. Further epidemiological data are needed to estimate malaria morbidity and mortality in young infants. Moreover, clinical evidence on the efficacy and safety of artemisinin-based combination therapies in this subpopulation is warranted.

  16. Malaria prevention and control in Bhutan: successes and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobgay, Tashi; Torres, Cristina E; Na-Bangchang, Kesara

    2011-03-01

    This paper highlights on the current malaria situations in Bhutan and its challenges for future prevention and control strategies. In Bhutan, malaria affects more than half of the entire population, mostly residing in the southern districts bordering with Indian states of Assam and West Bengal. Over the past ten years, due to concerted efforts, the morbidity and mortality due to malaria has significantly declined. These preventive and control measures focused on the mass distribution of long lasting insecticidal treated nets, focal indoor residual spray and use of artemisinin-based combination therapies. However, considerable challenge lies ahead and research is needed to generate local evidence for sustainable elimination of malaria from Bhutan. The article should be of value and interest to planners, malaria programs and for future researchers on malaria in Bhutan.

  17. Decreasing asthma morbidity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1994-12-12

    Dec 12, 1994 ... Table IV. Different morbidity scores as a percentage of total visits. Morbidity score ... to bronchodilators with or without antibiotics (no intravenous therapy or .... admissions needed surgery; almost 50% needed more than one ...

  18. Perceptions and Attitudes of Resident Doctors about Malaria Treatment as Per National Drug Policy on Malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanshyam Ahir, D V Bala

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The involvement of public and private health care providers in malaria treatment, particularly understanding their knowledge and practices will aid in devising strategies to increase the rational use of antimalarial drugs. They should be aware about rationale and implement national drug policy on malaria to prevent morbidity and mortality of malaria as well as development of antimalarial drug resistance. Therefore, a study was planned on the same issue among resident doctors of a tertiary care teaching hospital. Objective: To study the perceptions and attitudes of resident doctors regarding use of anti malarial drugs for treatment of all types of malaria cases in accordance with national drug policy on malaria-2010. Methodology: This cross-sectional study was conducted at tertiary care teaching hospital with sixty four (64 resident doctors of medicine (24, pediatrics (24 and obstetrics (16 departments with the help of pre tested; semi-structured questionnaire based on national drug policy on malaria-2010 from 15th July to 30th August 2010. Results: Only 12 (18.8% residents were aware about drug policy. Dose and duration and indication of primaquine was known to 21 (32.8% of resident doctors. Artesunate (49.2% and Arteether (16.9% were commonly prescribed in case of uncomplicated P.falciparum and P.vivax malaria. Conclusion: It was noticeable that knowledge and awareness regarding drug policy among resident doctors was unsatisfactory. Regular sensitization programme on malaria drug policy should be conducted.

  19. Factors impeding the acceptability and use of malaria preventive measures: implications for malaria elimination in eastern Rwanda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingabire, C.M.; Rulisa, A.; Kempen, van L.; Muvunyi, C.; Koenraadt, C.J.M.; Vugt, van M.; Mutesa, L.; Borne, van den B.; Alaii, J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLIN), indoor residual spraying (IRS) and malaria case treatment with artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) have been proven to significantly reduce malaria, but may not necessarily lead to malaria elimination. This study explored factors hindering th

  20. Factors impeding the acceptability and use of malaria preventive measures: implications for malaria elimination in eastern Rwanda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingabire, C.; Rulisa, A.; Kempen, L.A.C.M. van; Muvunyi, C.; Koenraadt, C.J.M.; Vugt, M. van; Mutesa, L.; Borne, B. Van Den; Alaii, J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLIN), indoor residual spraying (IRS) and malaria case treatment with artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) have been proven to significantly reduce malaria, but may not necessarily lead to malaria elimination. This study explored factors hindering

  1. Morbidity and GH deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochholm, Kirstine; Laursen, Torben; Green, Anders;

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate morbidity in Denmark in all patients with GH deficiency (GHD). DESIGN: Morbidity was analyzed in 1794 GHD patients and 8014 controls matched on age and gender. All records in the GHD patients were studied and additional morbidity noted. Diagnoses and dates of admissions were...

  2. Identifying the Educational Needs Regarding Malaria Prophylaxis in Expatriates in Zambia%居住在赞比亚的侨民对疟疾预防教育的需求

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Therese Maarschalk; M.H Ross

    2002-01-01

    @@ Falciparum malaria is a major cause of mortality and morbidity amongst the indigenous as well as the expatriate population in Atica. Malaria prevention is based on health education regarding the seriousness of malaria, the several previous studies have however indicated that expatriates seem to ignore this advice in spite of being aware of the threat of malaria.

  3. High proportion of subclinical Plasmodium falciparum infections in an area of seasonal and unstable malaria in Sudan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elhassan, I M; Hviid, L; Jakobsen, P H;

    1995-01-01

    In the present longitudinal study, a cohort (n = 98) of children and adults 5-30 years of age living in an area of highly seasonal and unstable malaria transmission were followed for malaria morbidity during several successive transmission seasons. Based on morbidity surveillance during 1993...

  4. A trial of intermittent preventive treatment and home-based management of malaria in a rural area of The Gambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Webb Emily L

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Individual malaria interventions provide only partial protection in most epidemiological situations. Thus, there is a need to investigate whether combining interventions provides added benefit in reducing mortality and morbidity from malaria. The potential benefits of combining IPT in children (IPTc with home management of malaria (HMM was investigated. Methods During the 2008 malaria transmission season, 1,277 children under five years of age resident in villages within the rural Farafenni demographic surveillance system (DSS in North Bank Region, The Gambia were randomized to receive monthly IPTc with a single dose of sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine (SP plus three doses of amodiaquine (AQ or SP and AQ placebos given by village health workers (VHWs on three occasions during the months of September, October and November, in a double-blind trial. Children in all study villages who developed an acute febrile illness suggestive of malaria were treated by VHWs who had been taught how to manage malaria with artemether-lumefantrine (Coartem™. The primary aims of the project were to determine whether IPTc added significant benefit to HMM and whether VHWs could effectively combine the delivery of both interventions. Results The incidence of clinical attacks of malaria was very low in both study groups. The incidence rate of malaria in children who received IPTc was 0.44 clinical attacks per 1,000 child months at risk while that for control children was 1.32 per 1,000 child months at risk, a protective efficacy of 66% (95% CI -23% to 96%; p = 0.35. The mean (standard deviation haemoglobin concentration at the end of the malaria transmission season was similar in the two treatment groups: 10.2 (1.6 g/dL in the IPTc group compared to 10.3 (1.5 g/dL in the placebo group. Coverage with IPTc was high, with 94% of children receiving all three treatments during the study period. Conclusion Due to the very low incidence of malaria, no firm

  5. Analysis of Implementation The Policy on Malaria Elimination in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betty Roosihermiatie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: As a tropic country Indonesia still faces malaria problems. In Asean, indonesia is one of three countries with the highest malaria morbidity. In 2007, 396 (80% of 495 districts/municipalities in indonesia are malaria. In 2009 the government issued a decree of the minister of health No 293 on malaria elimination. The study aimed to analyze the implementation decree of Ministry of Health No. 293/2009 on malaria elimination. Methods: It was a descriptive study. The study was conducted in 4 provinces, and 4 districts based on malaria elimination stages as in Bali province and Karangasem district, Riau islands province and Bintan district, West Nusa Tenggara province and west Lombok district, and Maluku province and South Halmahera district. The stakeholders were Heads and malaria programmers at province/district Health Offices and the related programs. Data were collected by focus group discussion and secondary data were taken. Data were collected by focus group discussion and secondary data. Analysis for Ministry of Health decree No.293 year 2009 on 1 Comphrehend, 2 Implementation, and, 3 Comittment, 4 Innovation intervension to support malaria elimination, 5 Sustainability of activity community empowerment, 6 Proportion of budget. Results: showed there was district that had not issued local policy on malaria elimination, the implementation with comittment especially that health centers in areas under study corfi rm diagnose by laboratory examination and malaria treatment by Artemisin Combined Therapy (ACT, although there were still treatment to clinical malaria, innovation activities were of bersifat local spesifi c, and reward for Juru Malaria Desa or malaria cadre to increase malaria suspect case detection, and with district budget for malaria program ranged 0,95-5,6% of the total budget. Recomendations: It suggested to advocate all malaria endemic areas to issue local policy on malaria elimination, decide intervension of the

  6. Heritability of malaria in Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret J Mackinnon

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available While many individual genes have been identified that confer protection against malaria, the overall impact of host genetics on malarial risk remains unknown.We have used pedigree-based genetic variance component analysis to determine the relative contributions of genetic and other factors to the variability in incidence of malaria and other infectious diseases in two cohorts of children living on the coast of Kenya. In the first, we monitored the incidence of mild clinical malaria and other febrile diseases through active surveillance of 640 children 10 y old or younger, living in 77 different households for an average of 2.7 y. In the second, we recorded hospital admissions with malaria and other infectious diseases in a birth cohort of 2,914 children for an average of 4.1 y. Mean annual incidence rates for mild and hospital-admitted malaria were 1.6 and 0.054 episodes per person per year, respectively. Twenty-four percent and 25% of the total variation in these outcomes was explained by additively acting host genes, and household explained a further 29% and 14%, respectively. The haemoglobin S gene explained only 2% of the total variation. For nonmalarial infections, additive genetics explained 39% and 13% of the variability in fevers and hospital-admitted infections, while household explained a further 9% and 30%, respectively.Genetic and unidentified household factors each accounted for around one quarter of the total variability in malaria incidence in our study population. The genetic effect was well beyond that explained by the anticipated effects of the haemoglobinopathies alone, suggesting the existence of many protective genes, each individually resulting in small population effects. While studying these genes may well provide insights into pathogenesis and resistance in human malaria, identifying and tackling the household effects must be the more efficient route to reducing the burden of disease in malaria-endemic areas.

  7. Heritability of Malaria in Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: While many individual genes have been identified that confer protection against malaria, the overall impact of host genetics on malarial risk remains unknown. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We have used pedigree-based genetic variance component analysis to determine the relative contributions of genetic and other factors to the variability in incidence of malaria and other infectious diseases in two cohorts of children living on the coast of Kenya. In the first, we monitored the incidence of mild clinical malaria and other febrile diseases through active surveillance of 640 children 10 y old or younger, living in 77 different households for an average of 2.7 y. In the second, we recorded hospital admissions with malaria and other infectious diseases in a birth cohort of 2,914 children for an average of 4.1 y. Mean annual incidence rates for mild and hospital-admitted malaria were 1.6 and 0.054 episodes per person per year, respectively. Twenty-four percent and 25% of the total variation in these outcomes was explained by additively acting host genes, and household explained a further 29% and 14%, respectively. The haemoglobin S gene explained only 2% of the total variation. For nonmalarial infections, additive genetics explained 39% and 13% of the variability in fevers and hospital-admitted infections, while household explained a further 9% and 30%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Genetic and unidentified household factors each accounted for around one quarter of the total variability in malaria incidence in our study population. The genetic effect was well beyond that explained by the anticipated effects of the haemoglobinopathies alone, suggesting the existence of many protective genes, each individually resulting in small population effects. While studying these genes may well provide insights into pathogenesis and resistance in human malaria, identifying and tackling the household effects must be the more efficient route to reducing the burden

  8. Clinico-epidemiological profile of malaria: Analysis from a primary health centre in Karnataka, Southern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandra Kamath

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaria continues to be a major public health problem in India and worldwide. The present study was based on records from a primary health centre in Karnataka. Morbidity patterns and important features of malaria transmission specific to Udupi district were investigated. The incidence of malaria and various morbidity patterns during 2010 and 2011 were compared and analyzed. Factors such as rapid urbanization, increased construction activities and influx of migratory workers were highlighted as the leading causes for the advent of malaria in the area. Recommendations have been provided for implementation in the near future.

  9. Comparison of Microscopy, Nested-PCR, and Real-Time-PCR Assays Using High-Throughput Screening of Pooled Samples for Diagnosis of Malaria in Asymptomatic Carriers from Areas of Endemicity in Myanmar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Han, Soe-Soe; Cho, Cho; Han, Jin-Hee; Cheng, Yang; Lee, Seong-Kyun; Galappaththy, Gawrie N. L; Thimasarn, Krongthong; Soe, Myat Thu; Oo, Htet Wai; Kyaw, Myat Phone

    2014-01-01

    Asymptomatic infection is an important obstacle for controlling disease in countries where malaria is endemic. Because asymptomatic carriers do not seek treatment for their infections, they can have high levels of gametocytes and constitute a reservoir available for new infection. We employed a sample pooling/PCR-based molecular detection strategy for screening malaria infection in residents from areas of Myanmar where malaria is endemic. Blood samples (n = 1,552) were collected from residents in three areas of malaria endemicity (Kayin State, Bago, and Tanintharyi regions) of Myanmar. Two nested PCR and real-time PCR assays showed that asymptomatic infection was detected in about 1.0% to 9.4% of residents from the surveyed areas. The sensitivities of the two nested PCR and real-time PCR techniques were higher than that of microscopy examination (sensitivity, 100% versus 26.4%; kappa values, 0.2 to 0.5). Among the three regions, parasite-positive samples were highly detected in subjects from the Bago and Tanintharyi regions. Active surveillance of residents from regions of intense malaria transmission would reduce the risk of morbidity and mitigate transmission to the population in these areas of endemicity. Our data demonstrate that PCR-based molecular techniques are more efficient than microscopy for nationwide surveillance of malaria in countries where malaria is endemic. PMID:24648557

  10. Hemoglobinopathies: slicing the Gordian knot of Plasmodium falciparum malaria pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Steve M; Cerami, Carla; Fairhurst, Rick M

    2013-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria kills over 500,000 children every year and has been a scourge of humans for millennia. Owing to the co-evolution of humans and P. falciparum parasites, the human genome is imprinted with polymorphisms that not only confer innate resistance to falciparum malaria, but also cause hemoglobinopathies. These genetic traits--including hemoglobin S (HbS), hemoglobin C (HbC), and α-thalassemia--are the most common monogenic human disorders and can confer remarkable degrees of protection from severe, life-threatening falciparum malaria in African children: the risk is reduced 70% by homozygous HbC and 90% by heterozygous HbS (sickle-cell trait). Importantly, this protection is principally present for severe disease and largely absent for P. falciparum infection, suggesting that these hemoglobinopathies specifically neutralize the parasite's in vivo mechanisms of pathogenesis. These hemoglobin variants thus represent a "natural experiment" to identify the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which P. falciparum produces clinical morbidity, which remain partially obscured due to the complexity of interactions between this parasite and its human host. Multiple lines of evidence support a restriction of parasite growth by various hemoglobinopathies, and recent data suggest this phenomenon may result from host microRNA interference with parasite metabolism. Multiple hemoglobinopathies mitigate the pathogenic potential of parasites by interfering with the export of P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) to the surface of the host red blood cell. Few studies have investigated their effects upon the activation of the innate and adaptive immune systems, although recent murine studies suggest a role for heme oxygenase-1 in protection. Ultimately, the identification of mechanisms of protection and pathogenesis can inform future therapeutics and preventive measures. Hemoglobinopathies slice the "Gordian knot" of host and parasite

  11. Hemoglobinopathies: Slicing the Gordian Knot of Plasmodium falciparum Malaria Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Steve M.; Cerami, Carla; Fairhurst, Rick M.

    2013-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria kills over 500,000 children every year and has been a scourge of humans for millennia. Owing to the co-evolution of humans and P. falciparum parasites, the human genome is imprinted with polymorphisms that not only confer innate resistance to falciparum malaria, but also cause hemoglobinopathies. These genetic traits—including hemoglobin S (HbS), hemoglobin C (HbC), and α-thalassemia—are the most common monogenic human disorders and can confer remarkable degrees of protection from severe, life-threatening falciparum malaria in African children: the risk is reduced 70% by homozygous HbC and 90% by heterozygous HbS (sickle-cell trait). Importantly, this protection is principally present for severe disease and largely absent for P. falciparum infection, suggesting that these hemoglobinopathies specifically neutralize the parasite's in vivo mechanisms of pathogenesis. These hemoglobin variants thus represent a “natural experiment” to identify the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which P. falciparum produces clinical morbidity, which remain partially obscured due to the complexity of interactions between this parasite and its human host. Multiple lines of evidence support a restriction of parasite growth by various hemoglobinopathies, and recent data suggest this phenomenon may result from host microRNA interference with parasite metabolism. Multiple hemoglobinopathies mitigate the pathogenic potential of parasites by interfering with the export of P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) to the surface of the host red blood cell. Few studies have investigated their effects upon the activation of the innate and adaptive immune systems, although recent murine studies suggest a role for heme oxygenase-1 in protection. Ultimately, the identification of mechanisms of protection and pathogenesis can inform future therapeutics and preventive measures. Hemoglobinopathies slice the “Gordian knot” of host and parasite

  12. Hemoglobinopathies: slicing the Gordian knot of Plasmodium falciparum malaria pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve M Taylor

    Full Text Available Plasmodium falciparum malaria kills over 500,000 children every year and has been a scourge of humans for millennia. Owing to the co-evolution of humans and P. falciparum parasites, the human genome is imprinted with polymorphisms that not only confer innate resistance to falciparum malaria, but also cause hemoglobinopathies. These genetic traits--including hemoglobin S (HbS, hemoglobin C (HbC, and α-thalassemia--are the most common monogenic human disorders and can confer remarkable degrees of protection from severe, life-threatening falciparum malaria in African children: the risk is reduced 70% by homozygous HbC and 90% by heterozygous HbS (sickle-cell trait. Importantly, this protection is principally present for severe disease and largely absent for P. falciparum infection, suggesting that these hemoglobinopathies specifically neutralize the parasite's in vivo mechanisms of pathogenesis. These hemoglobin variants thus represent a "natural experiment" to identify the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which P. falciparum produces clinical morbidity, which remain partially obscured due to the complexity of interactions between this parasite and its human host. Multiple lines of evidence support a restriction of parasite growth by various hemoglobinopathies, and recent data suggest this phenomenon may result from host microRNA interference with parasite metabolism. Multiple hemoglobinopathies mitigate the pathogenic potential of parasites by interfering with the export of P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1 to the surface of the host red blood cell. Few studies have investigated their effects upon the activation of the innate and adaptive immune systems, although recent murine studies suggest a role for heme oxygenase-1 in protection. Ultimately, the identification of mechanisms of protection and pathogenesis can inform future therapeutics and preventive measures. Hemoglobinopathies slice the "Gordian knot" of host and

  13. Malaria treatment services in Nigeria: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin SC Uzochukwu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaria remains a major Public Health problem in Nigeria and causes death and illness in children and adults, especially pregnant women. Malaria case management remains a vital component of the malaria control strategies. This entails early diagnosis and prompt treatment with effective antimalarial medicines. The objectives of this review is to enable health professionals to understand the magnitude of malaria treatment services in Nigeria, to improve knowledge for rational malaria management within different health system contexts with a view to improving access to malaria treatment. The review therefore looks at the following areas: clinical disease and epidemiology; the burden of malaria in Nigeria; objectives of treatment; antimalarial treatment policy; malaria diagnosis, treatment strategies/ National responses; treatment sources. The review concludes that for improved malaria treatment services in Nigeria, there is an urgent need to develop adequate strategies that will ensure better access to medicines by getting evidence-based and effective medicines to the people who need them, whether by reducing their costs, promoting equity in access, improving their distribution, increasing their efficacy and acceptability, or slowing down the development of antimicrobial resistance.

  14. Malaria transmission in Tripura: Disease distribution & determinants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vas Dev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Malaria is a major public health problem in Tripura and focal disease outbreaks are of frequent occurrence. The s0 tate is co-endemic for both Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax and transmission is perennial and persistent. The present study was aimed to review data on disease distribution to prioritize high-risk districts, and to study seasonal prevalence of disease vectors and their bionomical characteristics to help formulate vector species-specific interventions for malaria control. Methods: Data on malaria morbidity in the State were reviewed retrospectively (2008-2012 for understanding disease distribution and transmission dynamics. Cross-sectional mass blood surveys were conducted in malaria endemic villages of South Tripura district to ascertain the prevalence of malaria and proportions of parasite species. Mosquito collections were made in human dwellings of malaria endemic villages aiming at vector incrimination and to study relative abundance, resting and feeding preferences, and their present susceptibility status to DDT. Results: The study showed that malaria was widely prevalent and P. falciparum was the predominant infection (>90%, the remaining were P. vivax cases. The disease distribution, however, was uneven with large concentration of cases in districts of South Tripura and Dhalai coinciding with vast forest cover and tribal populations. Both Anopheles minimus s.s. and An. baimaii were recorded to be prevalent and observed to be highly anthropophagic and susceptible to DDT. Of these, An. minimus was incriminated (sporozoite infection rate 4.92%, and its bionomical characteristics revealed this species to be largely indoor resting and endophagic. Interpretation & conclusions: For effective control of malaria in the s0 tate, it is recommended that diseases surveillance should be robust, and vector control interventions including DDT spray coverage, mass distribution of insecticide-treated nets/ long

  15. Malaria in penguins - current perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grilo, M L; Vanstreels, R E T; Wallace, R; García-Párraga, D; Braga, É M; Chitty, J; Catão-Dias, J L; Madeira de Carvalho, L M

    2016-08-01

    Avian malaria is a mosquito-borne disease caused by protozoans of the genus Plasmodium, and it is considered one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality in captive penguins, both in zoological gardens and rehabilitation centres. Penguins are known to be highly susceptible to this disease, and outbreaks have been associated with mortality as high as 50-80% of affected captive populations within a few weeks. The disease has also been reported in wild penguin populations, however, its impacts on the health and fitness of penguins in the wild is not clear. This review provides an overview of the aetiology, life cycle and epidemiology of avian malaria, and provides details on the strategies that can be employed for the diagnostic, treatment and prevention of this disease in captive penguins, discussing possible directions for future research.

  16. Tying malaria and microRNAs: from the biology to future diagnostic perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, Mercedes; Bassat, Quique; Estivill, Xavier; Mayor, Alfredo

    2016-03-15

    Symptoms caused by bacterial, viral and malarial infections usually overlap and aetiologic diagnosis is difficult. Patient management in low-resource countries with limited laboratory services has been based predominantly on clinical evaluation and syndromic approaches. However, such clinical assessment has limited accuracy both for identifying the likely aetiological cause and for the early recognition of patients who will progress to serious or fatal disease. Plasma-detectable biomarkers that rapidly and accurately diagnose severe infectious diseases could reduce morbidity and decrease the unnecessary use of usually scarce therapeutic drugs. The discovery of microRNAs (miRNAs) has opened exciting new avenues to identify blood biomarkers of organ-specific injury. This review assesses current knowledge on the relationship between malaria disease and miRNAs, and evaluates how future research might lead to the use of these small molecules for identifying patients with severe malaria disease and facilitate treatment decisions.

  17. Surgical treatment of morbid obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brane Breznikar

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the article we present a morbid obesity and treatment options. We describe instructions for patients before operation and our results for operation with adjustable band.Patients and methods: Between May and December 2005 we operated 10 morbidly obese patients, 7 female and 3 male, aged 23 to 56, body mass index (BMI between 38 and 48.5 (laparoscopically inserted adjustable band. Two had comorbidity (diabetes.Results: We followed the patients’ status between 1 and 8 months. They reduced their body weight from 5 to 28 kg, on average 4.3 kg per month.Conclusions: Bariatric surgery is successful method for morbid obesity treatment. It demands multidisciplinary approach. Beside surgeon, endocrinologist, gastroenterologist, psychologist and others take part in the decision for the operation. During subsequent treatment dietetics and general physician play an important role.

  18. Alcohol abuse and postoperative morbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønnesen, Hanne

    2003-01-01

    precise identification of alcohol abuse. However, the inability of the questionnaires to detect short-term changes in intake and abuse without dependence, the inconsistent predictive values of the biological markers, and the lack of evidence of an association to postoperative morbidity reduces......Patients who drink too much have more complications after surgery. The aim of this thesis was to evaluate the evidence, possible mechanisms, and prevention of the increased postoperative morbidity in alcohol abusers, defined by a consumption of at least five drinks per day. The literature could...... be criticised for several methodological flaws. Nevertheless, the results are in agreement showing moderate to strong evidence of increased postoperative morbidity after surgical procedures on alcohol abusers. There is weak to moderate evidence of increased postoperative mortality, hospital stay, and re...

  19. Antibody levels against GLURP R2, MSP1 block 2 hybrid and AS202.11 and the risk of malaria in children living in hyperendemic (Burkina Faso) and hypo-endemic (Ghana) areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adu, Bright; Cherif, Mariama K; Bosomprah, Samuel;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Differences in parasite transmission intensity influence the process of acquisition of host immunity to Plasmodium falciparum malaria and ultimately, the rate of malaria related morbidity and mortality. Potential vaccines being designed to complement current intervention efforts there...

  20. Incidence, severity, prognostic significance of thrombocytopenia in malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bezwada Srinivasa Rao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Malaria is an infectious disease caused by plasmodium parasite. P. falciparum account for majority of morbidity and mortality. Thrombocytopenia and anaemia are the most frequently associated hematological complications in malaria. The low platelet count together with acute febrile syndrome emerged as the strongest predictor of malaria a finding that is frequent and present even before anemia and splenomegaly sets in. Severe thrombocytopenia is a good predictor of poor prognosis than mild and moderate thrombocytopenia. The aim is to study the incidence, severity, prognostic significance of thrombocytopenia in malaria. Methods: This was an observational and prospective study. The study enrolled 100 patients with thrombocytopenia and fever who were proven to have malaria either by peripheral smear or Quantitative Buffy Coat (QBC test or malarial antigen assay were included in the study and patients with thrombocytopenia due to other causes were excluded from the study. Platelet count was estimated on a fully automated quantitative analyzer. All the 100 patients were followed during the hospital stay and upto discharge or till the outcome. Results: The incidence of thrombocytopenia was 73% indicating a common association in malaria. Complicated malaria was observed in 58.80% of P. falciparum infection whereas 66% of P. vivax infection was associated with uncomplicated malaria. Severe thrombocytopenia showed positive correlation with severity of malaria. Thrombocytopenic patients with effective anti-malarial treatment showed 95.90% recovery and 3 patients 4.10% had mortality. Patients with severe thrombocytopenia were 8.5 times more likely to have complicated malaria with P <0.001 according to student and lsquo;t' test. Conclusion: Thrombocytopenia is the most common hematological finding in malaria. Severe thrombocytopenia showed positive correlation with complicated malaria and a good predictor of poor prognosis. Patients with classical

  1. Reducing stock-outs of life saving malaria commodities using mobile phone text-messaging: SMS for life study in Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Githinji

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Health facility stock-outs of life saving malaria medicines are common across Africa. Innovative ways of addressing this problem are urgently required. We evaluated whether SMS based reporting of stocks of artemether-lumefantrine (AL and rapid diagnostic tests (RDT can result in reduction of stock-outs at peripheral facilities in Kenya. METHODS/FINDINGS: All 87 public health facilities in five Kenyan districts were included in a 26 week project. Weekly facility stock counts of four AL packs and RDTs were sent via structured incentivized SMS communication process from health workers' personal mobile phones to a web-based system accessed by district managers. The mean health facility response rate was 97% with a mean formatting error rate of 3%. Accuracy of stock count reports was 79% while accuracy of stock-out reports was 93%. District managers accessed the system 1,037 times at an average of eight times per week. The system was accessed in 82% of the study weeks. Comparing weeks 1 and 26, stock-out of one or more AL packs declined by 38 percentage-points. Total AL stock-out declined by 5 percentage-points and was eliminated by the end of the project. Stock-out declines of individual AL packs ranged from 14 to 32 percentage-points while decline in RDT stock-outs was 24 percentage-points. District managers responded to 44% of AL and 73% of RDT stock-out signals by redistributing commodities between facilities. In comparison with national trends, stock-out declines in study areas were greater, sharper and more sustained. CONCLUSIONS: Use of simple SMS technology ensured high reporting rates of reasonably accurate, real-time facility stock data that were used by district managers to undertake corrective actions to reduce stock-outs. Future work on stock monitoring via SMS should focus on assessing response rates without use of incentives and demonstrating effectiveness of such interventions on a larger scale.

  2. Successful treatment of malaria tropica with acute renal failure and cerebral involvement by plasmapheresis and hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuby, U; Kaiser, W; Biesenbach, G; Zazgornik, J

    1988-01-01

    A non-immune, 31-year-old woman developed an acute infection with Plasmodium falciparum after travelling to Kenia. The parasites proved resistant to chloroquine and sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine. The course of the disease was complicated by acute renal failure, hepatocellular damage, disorders of blood coagulation, thrombocytopenia, hemolysis and cerebral involvement. Despite a very high level of parasitemia (50% parasitized erythrocytes) a rapid clinical improvement was achieved by plasmapheresis and hemodialysis. Our experience shows that plasmapheresis and hemodialysis are excellent additive methods which rapidly improve clinical symptoms and may reduce morbidity and mortality in severe malaria tropica.

  3. Efficacy and safety of the mosquitocidal drug ivermectin to prevent malaria transmission after treatment: a double-blind, randomized, clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouedraogo, A.L.; Bastiaens, G.J.H.; Tiono, A.B.; Guelbeogo, W.M.; Kobylinski, K.C.; Ouedraogo, A.; Barry, A.; Bougouma, E.C.; Nebie, I.; Ouattara, M.S.; Lanke, K.H.W.; Fleckenstein, L.; Sauerwein, R.W.; Slater, H.C.; Churcher, T.S.; Sirima, S.B.; Drakeley, C.; Bousema, T.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Artemisinin combination therapy effectively clears asexual malaria parasites and immature gametocytes but does not prevent posttreatment malaria transmission. Ivermectin (IVM) may reduce malaria transmission by killing mosquitoes that take blood meals from IVM-treated humans. METHODS: In

  4. Artemether-lumefantrine to treat malaria in pregnancy is associated with reduced placental haemozoin deposition compared to quinine in a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muehlenbachs Atis

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Data on efficacy of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT to treat Plasmodium falciparum during pregnancy in sub-Saharan Africa is scarce. A recent open label, randomized controlled trial in Mbarara, Uganda demonstrated that artemether-lumefantrine (AL is not inferior to quinine to treat uncomplicated malaria in pregnancy. Haemozoin can persist in the placenta following clearance of parasites, however there is no data whether ACT can influence the amount of haemozoin or the dynamics of haemozoin clearance. Methods Women attending antenatal clinics with weekly screening and positive blood smears by microscopy were eligible to participate in the trial and were followed to delivery. Placental haemozoin deposition and inflammation were assessed by histology. To determine whether AL was associated with increased haemozoin clearance, population haemozoin clearance curves were calculated based on the longitudinal data. Results Of 152 women enrolled in each arm, there were 97 and 98 placental biopsies obtained in the AL and quinine arms, respectively. AL was associated with decreased rates of moderate to high grade haemozoin deposition (13.3% versus 25.8%, which remained significant after correcting for gravidity, time of infection, re-infection, and parasitaemia. The amount of haemozoin proportionately decreased with the duration of time between treatment and delivery and this decline was greater in the AL arm. Haemozoin was not detected in one third of biopsies and the prevalence of inflammation was low, reflecting the efficacy of antenatal care with early detection and prompt treatment of malaria. Conclusions Placental haemozoin deposition was decreased in the AL arm demonstrating a relationship between pharmacological properties of drug to treat antenatal malaria and placental pathology at delivery. Histology may be considered an informative outcome for clinical trials to evaluate malaria control in pregnancy. Trial

  5. Intermittent preventive sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine treatment of primigravidae reduces levels of plasma immunoglobulin G, which protects against pregnancy-associated Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staalsoe, Trine; Shulman, Caroline E; Dorman, Edgar K;

    2004-01-01

    Pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM) is an important cause of maternal and neonatal suffering. It is caused by Plasmodium falciparum capable of inhabiting the placenta through expression of particular variant surface antigens (VSA) with affinity for proteoglycans such as chondroitin sulfate A....... Protective immunity to PAM develops following exposure to parasites inhabiting the placenta, and primigravidae are therefore particularly susceptible to PAM. The adverse consequences of PAM in primigravidae are preventable by intermittent preventive treatment (IPTp), where women are given antimalarials...

  6. Intravenous artesunate for severe malaria in travelers, Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoller, Thomas; Junghanss, Thomas; Kapaun, Annette

    2011-01-01

    Multicenter trials in Southeast Asia have shown better survival rates among patients with severe malaria, particularly those with high parasitemia levels, treated with intravenous (IV) artesunate than among those treated with quinine. In Europe, quinine is still the primary treatment for severe...... malaria. We conducted a retrospective analysis for 25 travelers with severe malaria who returned from malaria-endemic regions and were treated at 7 centers in Europe. All patients survived. Treatment with IV artesunate rapidly reduced parasitemia levels. In 6 patients at 5 treatment centers, a self...... of malaria patients in Europe. Patients should be monitored for signs of hemolysis, especially after parasitologic cure....

  7. Response to diazepam in children with malaria induced seizures

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Summary Malaria infection reduces the binding capacity of benzodiazepine receptors in mice. We studied the efficacy of diazepam terminating seizures in children with falciparum malaria. Diazepam stopped seizures in fewer patients with malaria parasitaemia (χ 2 = 3.93, P = 0.047) and those with clinical diagnosis of malaria (χ 2 = 9.84, P = 0.002) compared to those without. However malaria was not identified as an independent risk factor for diazepam's failure to stop seizures in children....

  8. Climate, environment and transmission of malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossati, Antonella; Bargiacchi, Olivia; Kroumova, Vesselina; Zaramella, Marco; Caputo, Annamaria; Garavelli, Pietro Luigi

    2016-06-01

    Malaria, the most common parasitic disease in the world, is transmitted to the human host by mosquitoes of the genus Anopheles. The transmission of malaria requires the interaction between the host, the vector and the parasite.The four species of parasites responsible for human malaria are Plasmodium falciparum, Plasmodium ovale, Plasmodium malariae and Plasmodium vivax. Occasionally humans can be infected by several simian species, like Plasmodium knowlesi, recognised as a major cause of human malaria in South-East Asia since 2004. While P. falciparum is responsible for most malaria cases, about 8% of estimated cases globally are caused by P. vivax. The different Plasmodia are not uniformly distributed although there are areas of species overlap. The life cycle of all species of human malaria parasites is characterised by an exogenous sexual phase in which multiplication occurs in several species of Anopheles mosquitoes, and an endogenous asexual phase in the vertebrate host. The time span required for mature oocyst development in the salivary glands is quite variable (7-30 days), characteristic of each species and influenced by ambient temperature. The vector Anopheles includes 465 formally recognised species. Approximately 70 of these species have the capacity to transmit Plasmodium spp. to humans and 41 are considered as dominant vector capable of transmitting malaria. The intensity of transmission is dependent on the vectorial capacity and competence of local mosquitoes. An efficient system for malaria transmission needs strong interaction between humans, the ecosystem and infected vectors. Global warming induced by human activities has increased the risk of vector-borne diseases such as malaria. Recent decades have witnessed changes in the ecosystem and climate without precedent in human history although the emphasis in the role of temperature on the epidemiology of malaria has given way to predisposing conditions such as ecosystem changes, political

  9. Reviewing the literature on access to prompt and effective malaria treatment in Kenya: implications for meeting the Abuja targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetteh Gladys

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Effective case management is central to reducing malaria mortality and morbidity worldwide, but only a minority of those affected by malaria, have access to prompt effective treatment. In Kenya, the Division of Malaria Control is committed to ensuring that 80 percent of childhood fevers are treated with effective anti-malarial medicines within 24 hours of fever onset, but this target is largely unmet. This review aimed to document evidence on access to effective malaria treatment in Kenya, identify factors that influence access, and make recommendations on how to improve prompt access to effective malaria treatment. Since treatment-seeking patterns for malaria are similar in many settings in sub-Saharan Africa, the findings presented in this review have important lessons for other malaria endemic countries. Methods Internet searches were conducted in PUBMED (MEDLINE and HINARI databases using specific search terms and strategies. Grey literature was obtained by soliciting reports from individual researchers working in the treatment-seeking field, from websites of major organizations involved in malaria control and from international reports. Results The review indicated that malaria treatment-seeking occurs mostly in the informal sector; that most fevers are treated, but treatment is often ineffective. Irrational drug use was identified as a problem in most studies, but determinants of this behaviour were not documented. Availability of non-recommended medicines over-the-counter and the presence of substandard anti-malarials in the market are well documented. Demand side determinants of access include perception of illness causes, severity and timing of treatment, perceptions of treatment efficacy, simplicity of regimens and ability to pay. Supply side determinants include distance to health facilities, availability of medicines, prescribing and dispensing practices and quality of medicines. Policy level factors are around

  10. CD36 selection of 3D7 Plasmodium falciparum associated with severe childhood malaria results in reduced VAR4 expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magistrado, Pamela; Staalsoe, Trine; Theander, Thor

    2008-01-01

    are encoded by group A var genes that are composed of a more constrained range of amino acid sequences than groups B and C var genes encoding PfEMP1UM associated with uncomplicated malaria. Also, unlike var genes from groups B and C, those from group A do not have sequences consistent with CD36 binding......ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: A subset of the Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1SM) is involved in the cytoadherence of P. falciparum-infected red blood cells (iRBC) contributing to the pathogenesis of severe disease among young children in malaria endemic areas. The PfEMP1SM...... phenotype of the 3D7SM parasites was determined by flow cytometry using malaria semi-immune and immune plasma and transcription of the 59 var genes in 3D7 were analysed by real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using var-specific primers. RESULTS: A selection...

  11. Malaria and National Vector Borne Disease Control Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rajni; Dutta, Ashok Kumar

    2011-12-01

    Malaria is a major vector borne disease in India with significant morbidity and mortality. The official figure of 1.5 million cases annually is a gross under-estimation of the true incidence and the actual figures are estimated to be 10-100 times higher. The National Vector Borne Disease Control Programme (NVBDCP) directorate is the main body responsible for malaria control in India. Newer strategies including insecticide treated bednets, longlasting insecticidal bednets and rapid diagnostic tests have been used for malaria control in the last decade. Global assistance has come from the World Bank and Global fund in the form of Enhanced Malaria Control Programme(EMCP) and Intensified Malaria Control Programme(IMCP) respectively. Despite years of concerted global and national efforts, control of malaria continues to be a challenge. The emergence of drug resistance to anti-malarial drugs has been a major hurdle in its control. The NVBDCP has formulated new treatment guidelines for malaria in 2010 which recommend artemisinin based combination therapy (ACT) as the first-line drugs for P. falciparum malaria in the country. The article discusses the recent national drug policy for malaria and the rationale for its use.

  12. Perceptions of malaria and vaccines in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojakaa, David; Yamo, Emmanuel; Collymore, Yvette; Ba-Nguz, Antoinette; Bingham, Allison

    2011-10-01

    Malaria is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in Kenya. To confront malaria, the Government of Kenya has been implementing and coordinating three approaches - vector control by distributing insecticide-treated bed nets and indoor residual spraying, case management, and the management of malaria during pregnancy. Immunization is recognized as one of the most cost-effective public health interventions. Efforts are underway to develop a malaria vaccine. The most advanced (RTS,S), is currently going through phase 3 trials. Although recent studies show the overwhelming support in the community for the introduction of a malaria vaccine, two issues - culture and the delivery of child immunization services - need to be considered. Alongside the modern methods of malaria control described above, traditional methods coexist and act as barriers to attainment of universal immunization. The gender dimension of the immunization programme (where women are the main child caretakers) will also need to be addressed. There is an age dimension to child immunization programmes. Two age cohorts of parents, caregivers, or family members deserve particular attention. These are the youth who are about to initiate childbearing, and the elderly (particularly mother-in-laws who often play a role in child-rearing). Mothers who are less privileged and socially disadvantaged need particular attention when it comes to child immunization. Access to immunization services is often characterized in some Kenyan rural communities in terms of living near the main road, or in the remote inaccessible areas. Should a malaria vaccine become available in the future, a strategy to integrate it into the immunization programme in Kenya should take into account at least two issues. First, it must address the fact that alongside the formal approach in malaria control, there exist the informal traditional practices among communities. Secondly, it must address particular issues in the delivery of

  13. Molecular approaches to epidemiology and clinical aspects of malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, G V; Beck, H P; Molyneux, M; Marsh, K

    2000-10-01

    Malaria is a problem of global importance, responsible for 1-2 million deaths per year, mainly in African children, as well as considerable morbidity manifested as severe anaemia and encephalopathy in young children. Fundamental to the development of new tools for malaria control in humans is an increased understanding of key features of malaria infection, such as the diversity of outcome in different individuals, the understanding of different manifestations of the disease and of the mechanisms of immunity that allow clinical protection in the face of ongoing low-grade infection (concomitant immunity or premunition). Here, Graham Brown and colleagues review some of the ways in which molecular approaches might be used to increase our understanding of the epidemiology and clinical manifestations of malaria, as discussed at the Molecular Approaches to Malaria conference (MAM2000), Lorne, Australia, 2-5 February 2000.

  14. Clustering of malaria treatment failure (TF) in Daraweesh: hints for host genetic susceptibility to TF with emphasis on immune-modulating SNPs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giha, Hayder A; ElGhazali, Gehad; Nasr, Amre

    2010-01-01

    In malaria, drug resistance and treatment failure (TF) are not synonymous, although are escalating together. Over 9 years of surveillances for malaria morbidity and TF in Daraweesh village in eastern Sudan (1991-2004), 136 donors (15-78 years) from 43 households, treated for 278 malaria episodes ...

  15. Potential Impact of Seasonal Malaria Chemoprevention on the Acquisition of Antibodies Against Glutamate-Rich Protein and Apical Membrane Antigen 1 in Children Living in Southern Senegal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ndiaye, Magatte; Sylla, Khadime; Sow, Doudou;

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal malaria chemoprevention (SMC) is defined as the intermittent administration of full treatment courses of an antimalarial drug to children during the peak of malaria transmission season with the aim of preventing malaria-associated mortality and morbidity. SMC using sulfadoxine-pyrimetham...

  16. 2015: The beginning of the end of the war against malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Tjan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In May 2015 the 62th World Health Assembly formulated a global malaria strategy for 2016-2030 aiming to “reduce the global disease burden by 40% by 2020, and by at least 90% by 2030. It also aims to eliminate malaria in at least 35 new countries by 2030”.(1 As a reminder, it was 60 years ago that the Eighth World Health Assembly decided in 1955 to shift from malaria control to malaria eradication, with the aim to make many areas of free of malaria “within 10 to 15 years”.(2 This has yet to be accomplished in many malaria endemic countries such as Indonesia, where the earliest program was the malaria eradication program of 1959, evolving into the malaria control program, the roll-back malaria program, and finally in 2012 into the malaria elimination program.(3 In view of the ever-present insecticideresistance

  17. Impact assessment of malaria vector control using routine surveillance data in Zambia: implications for monitoring and evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanda Emmanuel

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria vector control using long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs and indoor residual spraying (IRS, with pyrethroids and DDT, to reduce malaria transmission has been expansively implemented in Zambia. The impact of these interventions on malaria morbidity and mortality has not previously been formally assessed at the population level in Zambia. Methods The impact of IRS (15 urban districts and LLINs (15 rural districts implementation on severe malaria cases, deaths and case fatality rates in children below the age of five years were compared. Zambian national Health Management Information System data from 2007 to 2008 were retrospectively analysed to assess the epidemiological impact of the two interventions using odds ratios to compare the pre-scaling up year 2007 with the scaling-up year 2008. Results Overall there were marked reductions in morbidity and mortality, with cases, deaths and case fatality rates (CFR of severe malaria decreasing by 31%, 63% and 62%, respectively between 2007 and 2008. In urban districts with IRS introduction there was a significant reduction in mortality (Odds Ratio [OR] = 0.37, 95% CI = 0.31-0.43, P = 0.015, while the reduction in mortality in rural districts with LLINs implementation was not significant (OR = 0.83, 95% CI = 0.67-1.04, P = 0.666. A similar pattern was observed for case fatality rates with a significant reduction in urban districts implementing IRS (OR = 0.34, 95% CI = 0.33-0.36, P = 0.005, but not in rural districts implementing LLINs (OR = 0.96, 95% CI = 0.91-1.00, P = 0.913. No substantial difference was detected in overall reduction of malaria cases between districts implementing IRS and LLINs (P = 0.933. Conclusion Routine surveillance data proved valuable for determining the temporal effects of malaria control with two strategies, IRS and LLINs on severe malaria disease in different types of Zambian districts. However, this analysis did not take into account the effect

  18. Prevention and treatment practices and implications for malaria control in Mukono District Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Mbonye, A K; Bygbjerg, I C; Magnussen, P

    2008-01-01

    Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Mar Available data in Uganda indicate a resurgence of malaria morbidity and mortality countrywide. This study assessed the burden of malaria, treatment and prevention practices in order initiate a policy debate on the scaling-up of current interventions. A triangulation of methods using a cross-sectional survey and key informant interviews was used to assess self-reported malaria at a household level in Mukono District, Uganda. A total of 5583 households were surveyed,...

  19. Two-stage sample-to-answer system based on nucleic acid amplification approach for detection of malaria parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing; Nam, Jeonghun; Kim, Sangho; Lim, Chwee Teck; Park, Mi Kyoung; Shin, Yong

    2016-08-15

    Rapid, early, and accurate diagnosis of malaria is essential for effective disease management and surveillance, and can reduce morbidity and mortality associated with the disease. Although significant advances have been achieved for the diagnosis of malaria, these technologies are still far from ideal, being time consuming, complex and poorly sensitive as well as requiring separate assays for sample processing and detection. Therefore, the development of a fast and sensitive method that can integrate sample processing with detection of malarial infection is desirable. Here, we report a two-stage sample-to-answer system based on nucleic acid amplification approach for detection of malaria parasites. It combines the Dimethyl adipimidate (DMA)/Thin film Sample processing (DTS) technique as a first stage and the Mach-Zehnder Interferometer-Isothermal solid-phase DNA Amplification (MZI-IDA) sensing technique as a second stage. The system can extract DNA from malarial parasites using DTS technique in a closed system, not only reducing sample loss and contamination, but also facilitating the multiplexed malarial DNA detection using the fast and accurate MZI-IDA technique. Here, we demonstrated that this system can deliver results within 60min (including sample processing, amplification and detection) with high sensitivity (malaria in low-resource settings.

  20. Creatine supplementation during pregnancy: summary of experimental studies suggesting a treatment to improve fetal and neonatal morbidity and reduce mortality in high-risk human pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Hayley; Ellery, Stacey; Ireland, Zoe; LaRosa, Domenic; Snow, Rodney; Walker, David W

    2014-04-27

    While the use of creatine in human pregnancy is yet to be fully evaluated, its long-term use in healthy adults appears to be safe, and its well documented neuroprotective properties have recently been extended by demonstrations that creatine improves cognitive function in normal and elderly people, and motor skills in sleep-deprived subjects. Creatine has many actions likely to benefit the fetus and newborn, because pregnancy is a state of heightened metabolic activity, and the placenta is a key source of free radicals of oxygen and nitrogen. The multiple benefits of supplementary creatine arise from the fact that the creatine-phosphocreatine [PCr] system has physiologically important roles that include maintenance of intracellular ATP and acid-base balance, post-ischaemic recovery of protein synthesis, cerebral vasodilation, antioxidant actions, and stabilisation of lipid membranes. In the brain, creatine not only reduces lipid peroxidation and improves cerebral perfusion, its interaction with the benzodiazepine site of the GABAA receptor is likely to counteract the effects of glutamate excitotoxicity - actions that may protect the preterm and term fetal brain from the effects of birth hypoxia. In this review we discuss the development of creatine synthesis during fetal life, the transfer of creatine from mother to fetus, and propose that creatine supplementation during pregnancy may have benefits for the fetus and neonate whenever oxidative stress or feto-placental hypoxia arise, as in cases of fetal growth restriction, premature birth, or when parturition is delayed or complicated by oxygen deprivation of the newborn.

  1. Community perceptions of malaria and vaccines in two districts of Mozambique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingham Allison

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in Mozambique, with nearly three-quarters of the country’s malaria-related deaths occurring in children younger than five years. A malaria vaccine is not yet available, but planning is underway for a possible introduction, as soon as one becomes available. In an effort to inform the planning process, this study explored sociocultural and health communications issues among individuals at the community level who are both responsible for decisions about vaccine use and who are likely to influence decisions about vaccine use. Methods Researchers conducted a qualitative study in two malaria-endemic districts in southern Mozambique. Using criterion-based sampling, they conducted 23 focus group discussions and 26 in-depth interviews. Implementation was guided by the engagement of community stakeholders. Results Community members recognize that malaria contributes to high death rates and affects the workforce, school attendance, and the economy. Vaccines are seen as a means to reduce the threat of childhood illnesses and to keep children and the rest of the community healthy. Perceived constraints to accessing vaccine services include long queues, staff shortages, and a lack of resources at health care facilities. Local leaders play a significant role in motivating caregivers to have their children vaccinated. Participants generally felt that a vaccine could help to prevent malaria, although some voiced concern that the focus was only on young children and not on older children, pregnant women, and the elderly. Probed on their understanding of vaccine efficacy, participants voiced various views, including the perception that while some vaccines did not fully prevent disease they still had important benefits. Overall, it would be essential for local leaders to be involved in the design of specific messages for a future malaria vaccine communications strategy, and for those

  2. Community perceptions of malaria and vaccines in two districts of Mozambique

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Malaria is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in Mozambique, with nearly three-quarters of the country’s malaria-related deaths occurring in children younger than five years. A malaria vaccine is not yet available, but planning is underway for a possible introduction, as soon as one becomes available. In an effort to inform the planning process, this study explored sociocultural and health communications issues among individuals at the community level who are both responsible for decisions about vaccine use and who are likely to influence decisions about vaccine use. Methods Researchers conducted a qualitative study in two malaria-endemic districts in southern Mozambique. Using criterion-based sampling, they conducted 23 focus group discussions and 26 in-depth interviews. Implementation was guided by the engagement of community stakeholders. Results Community members recognize that malaria contributes to high death rates and affects the workforce, school attendance, and the economy. Vaccines are seen as a means to reduce the threat of childhood illnesses and to keep children and the rest of the community healthy. Perceived constraints to accessing vaccine services include long queues, staff shortages, and a lack of resources at health care facilities. Local leaders play a significant role in motivating caregivers to have their children vaccinated. Participants generally felt that a vaccine could help to prevent malaria, although some voiced concern that the focus was only on young children and not on older children, pregnant women, and the elderly. Probed on their understanding of vaccine efficacy, participants voiced various views, including the perception that while some vaccines did not fully prevent disease they still had important benefits. Overall, it would be essential for local leaders to be involved in the design of specific messages for a future malaria vaccine communications strategy, and for those messages to be translated into

  3. Development of vaccines for Plasmodium vivax malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Ivo; Shakri, Ahmad Rushdi; Chitnis, Chetan E

    2015-12-22

    Plasmodium vivax continues to cause significant morbidity outside Africa with more than 50% of malaria cases in many parts of South and South-east Asia, Pacific islands, Central and South America being attributed to P. vivax infections. The unique biology of P. vivax, including its ability to form latent hypnozoites that emerge months to years later to cause blood stage infections, early appearance of gametocytes before clinical symptoms are apparent and a shorter development cycle in the vector makes elimination of P. vivax using standard control tools difficult. The availability of an effective vaccine that provides protection and prevents transmission would be a valuable tool in efforts to eliminate P. vivax. Here, we review the latest developments related to P. vivax malaria vaccines and discuss the challenges as well as directions toward the goal of developing highly efficacious vaccines against P. vivax malaria.

  4. To Screen or not to Screen: Low Dose Computed Tomography in Comparison to Chest Radiography or Usual Care in Reducing Morbidity and Mortality from Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamdar, Jay; Moats, Austin; Nguyen, Brenda

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer has the highest mortality rate of all cancers. This paper seeks to address the question: Can the mortality of lung cancer be decreased by screening with low-dose computerized tomography (LDCT) in higher risk patients compared to chest X-rays (CXR) or regular patient care? Currently, CXR screening is recommended for certain high-risk patients. Several recent trials have examined the effectiveness of LDCT versus chest radiography or usual care as a control. These trials include National Lung Screening Trial (NLST), Detection And screening of early lung cancer with Novel imaging TEchnology (DANTE), Lung Screening Study (LSS), Depiscan, Italian Lung (ITALUNG), and Dutch-Belgian Randomized Lung Cancer Screening Trial (Dutch acronym: NELSON study). NLST, the largest trial (n=53, 454), demonstrated a decrease in mortality from lung cancer in the LDCT group (RRR=20%, P=0.004). LSS demonstrated a greater sensitivity in detecting both early stage and any stage of lung cancer in comparison to traditional CXR. Although the DANTE trial yielded data consistent with findings in LSS, it also showed that via LDCT screening a greater proportion of patients were placed under unnecessary surgical procedures. The Depiscan trial yielded a high nodule detection rate at the cost of a high false-positive rate compared to CXR screening. The ITALUNG and NELSON trials demonstrated the early detection capabilities of LDCT for lung cancers compared to usual care without surveillance imaging. False-positive findings with unnecessary workup, intervention, and radiation exposure remain significant concerns for routine LDCT screening. However, current data suggests LDCT may provide a highly sensitive and specific means for detecting lung cancers and reducing mortality. PMID:27375974

  5. Omission of the bladder flap at caesarean section reduces delivery time without increased morbidity: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Heidi A; Egan, Grace; Walsh, Colin A; Cotter, Amanda M; Walsh, Stewart R

    2014-03-01

    Caesarean section (CS) is the most common major surgical procedure performed worldwide. Traditionally, creation of a bladder flap (BF) has been a routine surgical step at CS although recent randomised controlled trials (RCTs) have begun to question its value. We performed a meta-analysis of RCTs examining the benefits of BF formation at CS. Pubmed, Medline, Embase, CINAHL Plus(®), Web of Science Reference and Cochrane Databases online were searched in March 2012 using combinations of the terms "c(a)esarean", "bladder", "flap" and "technique". Citations identified in the primary search were screened for eligibility. Online clinical registries (www.clinicaltrials.gov, www.controlled-trials.com and www.ukcrc.org.) were also searched. The primary outcome was bladder injury. Secondary outcomes were skin incision-delivery interval, total operating time, blood loss and duration of hospitalisation. Pooled outcome measures (odds ratio [OR] and weighted mean difference [WMD]) were calculated using a random effects model. Three published RCTs and one unpublished trial identified from an online trial registry were included (n=581 women). All four trials excluded very preterm and emergency CS. Omission of the BF step at CS reduced the skin incision-delivery interval (WMD 1.27min; p=0.0001). No differences were found for bladder injury (pooled OR 0.96), total operating time (WMD 3.5min), blood loss (WMD 42ml) or duration of hospitalisation (WMD 0.07 days). Omission of the BF at elective CS does not appear to increase the rate of peri-operative complications and improves the skin incision-delivery interval. The role of BF formation in very preterm procedures and emergency intrapartum CS needs further study. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The efficiency of malaria chemoprophylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasiliki Pappa

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Malaria is a highly contagious disease. According to WHO, malaria cases are expected to increase due to climate changes. Despite the eradication efforts, malaria still remains one of the most significant causes of morbidity and mortality in tropical and subtropical regions. Many different antimalarial regimens are used , however resistance is emerging to many of themPurpose: This critical review was conducted, in order to respond to the following questions. A Which antimalarial regimen is most effective? B Which regimen is the safest for travelers in endemic regions? C Which regimen is best tolerated?Methodology: The literature research was conducted through the Internet. The Medline and Cinahl databases were used, as well as the search engines google, altavista and lycos. The research included articles that described clinical trials. The material was selected based on the aforementioned research questions and the chronological time limits.Results: Atovaquone/proguanil, tafenoquine, primaquine were the most effective regimens. Tafenoquine, as well as, primaquine have been related to hemolytic events in individuals with G6PD deficiency, gastrointestinal disorders, backache and flue-like syndrome. Doxycycline and mefloquine were related to gastrointestinal and neurological disorders. Those were the less tolerated regimens.Conclusions: Atovaquone/proguanil, tafenoquine, primaquine were the most effective regimens. As far as safety is concerned, tafenoquine and primaquine should not be prescribed to individuals with G6PD deficiency. All the regimens were considered well tolerated, however, in doxycycline and mefloquine trials were the most withdrawals due to adverse effects.

  7. Tafenoquine treatment of Plasmodium vivax malaria: suggestive evidence that CYP2D6 reduced metabolism is not associated with relapse in the Phase 2b DETECTIVE trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Jean, Pamela L; Xue, Zhengyu; Carter, Nick; Koh, Gavin C K W; Duparc, Stephan; Taylor, Maxine; Beaumont, Claire; Llanos-Cuentas, Alejandro; Rueangweerayut, Ronnatrai; Krudsood, Srivicha; Green, Justin A; Rubio, Justin P

    2016-02-18

    Tafenoquine (TQ) and primaquine (PQ) are 8-aminoquinolines (8-AQ) with anti-hypnozoite activity against vivax malaria. PQ is the only FDA-approved medicine for preventing relapsing Plasmodium vivax infection and TQ is currently in phase 3 clinical trials for the same indication. Recent studies have provided evidence that cytochrome P450 (CYP) metabolism via CYP2D6 plays a role in PQ efficacy against P. vivax and have suggested that this effect may extend to other 8-AQs, including TQ. Here, a retrospective pharmacogenetic (PGx) investigation was performed to assess the impact of CYP2D6 metabolism on TQ and PQ efficacy in the treatment of P. vivax in the DETECTIVE study (TAF112582), a recently completed, randomized, phase 2b dose-ranging clinical trial. The impact of CYP2D6 on TQ pharmacokinetics (PK) was also investigated in TAF112582 TQ-treated subjects and in vitro CYP metabolism of TQ was explored. A limitation of the current study is that TAF112582 was not designed to be well powered for PGx, thus our findings are based on TQ or PQ efficacy in CYP2D6 intermediate metabolizers (IM), as there were insufficient poor metabolizers (PM) to draw any conclusion on the impact of the PM phenotype on efficacy. The impact of genetically-predicted CYP2D6 reduced metabolism on relapse-free efficacy six months post-dosing of TQ or PQ, both administered in conjunction with chloroquine (CQ), was assessed using exact statistical methods in 198 P. vivax-infected study participants comparing IM to extensive metabolizers (EM). The influence of CYP2D6 metabolizer phenotypes on TQ PK was assessed comparing median TQ area under the curve (AUC). In vitro metabolism of TQ was investigated using recombinant, over-expressed human CYP enzymes and human hepatocytes. Metabolite identification experiments were performed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Reduction of CYP2D6 activity was not associated with an increase in relapse-rate in TQ-treated subjects (p = 0.57). In contrast

  8. Socio-demographics and the development of malaria elimination strategies in the low transmission setting.

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    Chuquiyauri, Raul; Paredes, Maribel; Peñataro, Pablo; Torres, Sonia; Marin, Silvia; Tenorio, Alexander; Brouwer, Kimberly C; Abeles, Shira; Llanos-Cuentas, Alejandro; Gilman, Robert H; Kosek, Margaret; Vinetz, Joseph M

    2012-03-01

    This analysis presents a comprehensive description of malaria burden and risk factors in Peruvian Amazon villages where malaria transmission is hypoendemic. More than 9000 subjects were studied in contrasting village settings within the Department of Loreto, Peru, where most malaria occurs in the country. Plasmodium vivax is responsible for more than 75% of malaria cases; severe disease from any form of malaria is uncommon and death rare. The association between lifetime malaria episodes and individual and household covariates was studied using polychotomous logistic regression analysis, assessing effects on odds of some vs. no lifetime malaria episodes. Malaria morbidity during lifetime was strongly associated with age, logging, farming, travel history, and living with a logger or agriculturist. Select groups of adults, particularly loggers and agriculturists acquire multiple malaria infections in transmission settings outside of the main domicile, and may be mobile human reservoirs by which malaria parasites move within and between micro-regions within malaria endemic settings. For example, such individuals might well be reservoirs of transmission by introducing or reintroducing malaria into their home villages and their own households, depending on vector ecology and the local village setting. Therefore, socio-demographic studies can identify people with the epidemiological characteristic of transmission risk, and these individuals would be prime targets against which to deploy transmission blocking strategies along with insecticide treated bednets and chemoprophylaxis.

  9. Socio-Demographics and the Development of Malaria Elimination Strategies in the Low Transmission Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuquiyauri, Raul; Paredes, Maribel; Peñataro, Pablo; Torres, Sonia; Marin, Silvia; Tenorio, Alexander; Brouwer, Kimberly C.; Abeles, Shira; Llanos-Cuentas, Alejandro; Gilman, Robert H.; Kosek, Margaret; Vinetz, Joseph M.

    2011-01-01

    This analysis presents a comprehensive description of malaria burden and risk factors in Peruvian Amazon villages where malaria transmission is hypoendemic. More than 9,000 subjects were studied in contrasting village settings within the Department of Loreto, Peru, where most malaria occurs in the country. Plasmodium vivax is responsible for more than 75% of malaria cases; severe disease from any form of malaria is uncommon and death rare. The association between lifetime malaria episodes and individual and household covariates was studied using polychotomous logistic regression analysis, assessing effects on odds of some vs. no lifetime malaria episodes. Malaria morbidity during lifetime was strongly associated with age, logging, farming, travel history, and living with a logger or agriculturist. Select groups of adults, particularly loggers and agriculturists acquire multiple malaria infections in transmission settings outside of the main domicile, and may be mobile human reservoirs by which malaria parasites move within and between micro-regions within malaria endemic settings. For example, such individuals might well be reservoirs of transmission by introducing or reintroducing malaria into their home villages and their own households, depending on vector ecology and the local village setting. Therefore, socio-demographic studies can identify people with the epidemiological characteristic of transmission risk, and these individuals would be prime targets against which to deploy transmission blocking strategies along with insecticide treated bednets and chemoprophylaxis. PMID:22100446

  10. Effective coverage and systems effectiveness for malaria case management in sub-Saharan African countries.

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    Katya Galactionova

    Full Text Available Scale-up of malaria preventive and control interventions over the last decade resulted in substantial declines in mortality and morbidity from the disease in sub-Saharan Africa and many other parts of the world. Sustaining these gains will depend on the health system performance. Treatment provides individual benefits by curing infection and preventing progression to severe disease as well as community-level benefits by reducing the infectious reservoir and averting emergence and spread of drug resistance. However many patients with malaria do not access care, providers do not comply with treatment guidelines, and hence, patients do not necessarily receive the correct regimen. Even when the correct regimen is administered some patients will not adhere and others will be treated with counterfeit or substandard medication leading to treatment failures and spread of drug resistance. We apply systems effectiveness concepts that explicitly consider implications of health system factors such as treatment seeking, provider compliance, adherence, and quality of medication to estimate treatment outcomes for malaria case management. We compile data for these indicators to derive estimates of effective coverage for 43 high-burden Sub-Saharan African countries. Parameters are populated from the Demographic and Health Surveys and other published sources. We assess the relative importance of these factors on the level of effective coverage and consider variation in these health systems indicators across countries. Our findings suggest that effective coverage for malaria case management ranges from 8% to 72% in the region. Different factors account for health system inefficiencies in different countries. Significant losses in effectiveness of treatment are estimated in all countries. The patterns of inter-country variation suggest that these are system failures that are amenable to change. Identifying the reasons for the poor health system performance and

  11. Effective coverage and systems effectiveness for malaria case management in sub-Saharan African countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galactionova, Katya; Tediosi, Fabrizio; de Savigny, Don; Smith, Thomas; Tanner, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    Scale-up of malaria preventive and control interventions over the last decade resulted in substantial declines in mortality and morbidity from the disease in sub-Saharan Africa and many other parts of the world. Sustaining these gains will depend on the health system performance. Treatment provides individual benefits by curing infection and preventing progression to severe disease as well as community-level benefits by reducing the infectious reservoir and averting emergence and spread of drug resistance. However many patients with malaria do not access care, providers do not comply with treatment guidelines, and hence, patients do not necessarily receive the correct regimen. Even when the correct regimen is administered some patients will not adhere and others will be treated with counterfeit or substandard medication leading to treatment failures and spread of drug resistance. We apply systems effectiveness concepts that explicitly consider implications of health system factors such as treatment seeking, provider compliance, adherence, and quality of medication to estimate treatment outcomes for malaria case management. We compile data for these indicators to derive estimates of effective coverage for 43 high-burden Sub-Saharan African countries. Parameters are populated from the Demographic and Health Surveys and other published sources. We assess the relative importance of these factors on the level of effective coverage and consider variation in these health systems indicators across countries. Our findings suggest that effective coverage for malaria case management ranges from 8% to 72% in the region. Different factors account for health system inefficiencies in different countries. Significant losses in effectiveness of treatment are estimated in all countries. The patterns of inter-country variation suggest that these are system failures that are amenable to change. Identifying the reasons for the poor health system performance and intervening to tackle

  12. Role of CR1 Knops polymorphism in the pathophysiology of malaria: Indian scenario

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    Monika Gandhi, Arpita Singh, Vas Dev, T. Adak, A.P. Dash & Hema Joshi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Plasmodium falciparum is the leading cause of mortality and causescerebral malaria associated with sequestration caused by cytoadherence of the trophozoite andschizont-infected erythrocytes to the endothelial cells of the deep vascular beds in the brain.Pathophysiology of malaria is complicated by rosetting. Rosetting is a process of binding ofuninfected erythrocytes to the erythrocytes infected with mature asexual parasites and is controlledby expression of complement receptor 1 (CR1 on RBC surface. Various polymorphic forms ofCR1 are known including molecular weight polymorphism, red blood cell expression levels/densitypolymorphism and Knops (KN polymorphism. The Knops blood group includes several allelicpairs; Knops a and b (Kna and Knb, McCoy a and b (McCa, McCb, Swain-Langley (Sla, andVillien (Vil. Knops phenotype Sl (a– has been found to rosette less effectively than Sl (a+ andhence suggested to be more protective. P. falciparum cases have not reduced much as compared tothe reduction in the total number of malaria cases in the past few years. In addition, P. falciparumis the leading cause for all mortality and most of the morbidity in India. We, therefore, investigatedthe role of CR1 Knops polymorphism in the pathophysiology of malaria in Indian population.Methods: A case control approach was used for this study. CAPS (Cleaved amplified polymorphicsequence methodology was adopted. A total of 100 normal individuals (free from any ailmentand 100 individuals suffering from P. falciparum infection (uncomplicated malaria were recruitedfor this study.Results: We found that in Indian population (normal individuals and P. falciparum-infectedindividuals, only the wild type allele is present.Interpretation & conclusion: We concluded that the process of rosetting in the Indian contextcould be occurring independently of the effect of Knops polymorphism and in part could be controlledby other polymorphisms of the CR1 gene

  13. Whole cowpea meal fortified with NaFeEDTA reduces iron deficiency among Ghanaian school children in a malaria endemic area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abizari, Abdul-Razak; Moretti, Diego; Zimmermann, Michael B; Armar-Klemesu, Margaret; Brouwer, Inge D

    2012-10-01

    Cowpeas, like other legumes, contain high amounts of native iron but are rich in phytic acid (PA) and polyphenols (PP) that inhibit iron absorption. NaFeEDTA may overcome the combined inhibitory effect of PA and PP. Our objective was to test the efficacy of NaFeEDTA-fortified cowpea meal in improving iron status of school children in a malaria endemic area. We conducted a double-blind, controlled trial with 5- to 12-y-old school children from 2 rural communities in northern Ghana (n = 241). Eligible children were randomly assigned to 2 treatment groups to receive either cowpea meal fortified with 10 mg Fe/meal as NaFeEDTA, or an identical but nonfortified cowpea meal. Meals were provided 3 d/wk for a period of ~7 mo under strict supervision. Mass deworming and malaria antigenemia screening and treatment were carried out at baseline and 3.5 mo into the trial. Consumption of cowpea flour fortified with NaFeEDTA resulted in improvement of hemoglobin (P iron stores (P iron deficiency (ID) and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) (P rural northern Ghana.

  14. Ten year trend analysis of malaria prevalence in Kola Diba, North Gondar, Northwest Ethiopia

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    Alemu Abebe

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria is caused by protozoan parasites of the genus Plasmodium. It is one of the leading causes of illness and death in the world. It is a major public health problem in Ethiopia. Over the past years, the disease has been consistently reported as the first leading cause of outpatient visits, hospitalization and death in health facilities across the country. Methods A retrospective study was conducted to determine the prevalence of malaria from peripheral blood smear examinations from the Kola Diba Health Center of Ethiopia. The case notes of all malaria cases reported between 2002–2011 were carefully reviewed and analyzed. Additionally, any malaria intervention activities that had been taken to control malaria were collected using a well-prepared checklist from the study area. Results Within the last decade (2002–2011 a total of 59, 208 blood films were requested for malaria diagnosis in Kola Diba health center and 23,473 (39.6% microscopically confirmed malaria cases were reported in the town with a fluctuating trend. Regarding the identified plasmodium species, Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax accounted for 75% and 25% of malaria morbidity, respectively. Malaria was reported in all age groups and both sexes, but the 15–44 year age group and males were more affected. Despite the apparent fluctuation of malaria trends in the area, the highest peak of malaria cases was reported during spring seasons. Conclusion Comparatively, after the introduction of the current malaria control strategies, the morbidity and mortality by malaria is decreasing but malaria is still a major health problem and the deadly species P. falciparium is predominant. Therefore, control activities should be continued in a strengthened manner in the study area considering both P. falciparium and P. vivax.

  15. Epidemiology and control of malaria in Colombia

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    Julio Cesar Padilla Rodríguez

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is currently one of the most serious public health problems in Colombia with an endemic/epidemic transmission pattern that has maintained endemic levels and an average of 105,000 annual clinical cases being reported over the last five years. Plasmodium vivax accounts for approximately 70% of reported cases with the remainder attributed almost exclusively to Plasmodium falciparum. A limited number of severe and complicated cases have resulted in mortality, which is a downward trend that has been maintained over the last few years. More than 90% of the malaria cases in Colombia are confined to 70 municipalities (about 7% of the total municipalities of Colombia, with high predominance (85% in rural areas. The purpose of this paper is to review the progress of malaria-eradication activities and control measures over the past century within the eco-epidemiologic context of malaria transmission together with official consolidated morbidity and mortality reports. This review may contribute to the formulation of new antimalarial strategies and policies intended to achieve malaria elimination/eradication in Colombia and in the region.

  16. Process and effects of a community intervention on malaria in rural Burkina Faso: randomized controlled trial

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    Gustafsson Lars

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the rural areas of sub-Saharan Africa, the majority of young children affected by malaria have no access to formal health services. Home treatment through mothers of febrile children supported by mother groups and local health workers has the potential to reduce malaria morbidity and mortality. Methods A cluster-randomized controlled effectiveness trial was implemented from 2002–2004 in a malaria endemic area of rural Burkina Faso. Six and seven villages were randomly assigned to the intervention and control arms respectively. Febrile children from intervention villages were treated with chloroquine (CQ by their mothers, supported by local women group leaders. CQ was regularly supplied through a revolving fund from local health centres. The trial was evaluated through two cross-sectional surveys at baseline and after two years of intervention. The primary endpoint of the study was the proportion of moderate to severe anaemia in children aged 6–59 months. For assessment of the development of drug efficacy over time, an in vivo CQ efficacy study was nested into the trial. The study is registered under http://www.controlled-trials.com (ISRCTN 34104704. Results The intervention was shown to be feasible under program conditions and a total of 1.076 children and 999 children were evaluated at baseline and follow-up time points respectively. Self-reported CQ treatment of fever episodes at home as well as referrals to health centres increased over the study period. At follow-up, CQ was detected in the blood of high proportions of intervention and control children. Compared to baseline findings, the prevalence of anaemia (29% vs 16%, p P. falciparum parasitaemia, fever and palpable spleens was lower at follow-up but there were no differences between the intervention and control group. CQ efficacy decreased over the study period but this was not associated with the intervention. Discussion The decreasing prevalence of malaria

  17. APPROACHING THE TARGET: THE PATH TOWARDS AN EFFECTIVE MALARIA VACCINE

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    Alberto L. García-Basteiro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Eliciting an effective malaria vaccine has been the goal of the scientific community for many years. A malaria vaccine, added to existing tools and strategies, would further prevent and decrease the unacceptable malaria morbidity and mortality burden. Great progress has been made over the last decade, with some vaccine candidates in the clinical phases of development. The RTS,S malaria vaccine candidate, based on a recombinant P. falciparum protein, is the most advanced of such candidates, currently undergoing a large phase III trial. RTS,S has consistently shown an efficacy of around 50% against the first clinical episode of malaria, with protection in some cases extending up to 4 years of duration. Thus, it is hoped that this candidate vaccine will eventually become the first licensed malaria vaccine. This first vaccine against a human parasite is a groundbreaking achievement, but improved malaria vaccines conferring higher protection will be needed if the aspiration of malaria eradication is to be achieved

  18. Protective efficacy of malaria case management and intermittent preventive treatment for preventing malaria mortality in children: a systematic review for the Lives Saved Tool

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    Steketee Richard W

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Lives Saved Tool (LiST model was developed to estimate the impact of the scale-up of child survival interventions on child mortality. New advances in antimalarials have improved their efficacy of treating uncomplicated and severe malaria. Artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs for uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria and parenteral or rectal artemisinin or quinine for severe malaria syndromes have been shown to be very effective for the treatment of malaria in children. These interventions are now being considered for inclusion in the LiST model. However, for obvious ethical reasons, their protective efficacy (PE compared to placebo is unknown and their impact on reducing malaria-attributable mortality has not been quantified. Methods We performed systematic literature reviews of published studies in P. falciparum endemic settings to determine the protective efficacy (PE of ACT treatment against malaria deaths among children with uncomplicated malaria, as well as the PE of effective case management including parenteral quinine against malaria deaths among all hospitalized children. As no randomized placebo-controlled trials of malaria treatment have been conducted, we used multiple data sources to ascertain estimates of PE, including a previously performed Delphi estimate for treatment of uncomplicated malaria. Results Based on multiple data sources, we estimate the PE of ACT treatment of uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria on reducing malaria mortality in children 1–23 months to be 99% (range: 94-100%, and in children 24-59 months to be 97% (range: 86-99%. We estimate the PE of treatment of severe P. falciparum malaria with effective case management including intravenous quinine on reducing malaria mortality in children 1-59 months to be 82% (range: 63-94% compared to no treatment. Conclusions This systematic review quantifies the PE of ACT used for treating uncomplicated malaria and effective case

  19. A nation-wide malaria knowledge, attitudes and practices survey in Malawi: introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirima, J J

    1994-03-01

    In Malawi malaria is the most frequent cause of morbidity and mortality in children and pertinent hospitalizations have been increasing annually since 1982. In 1990, malaria and malaria-associated anemia constituted the leading cause of outpatient visits for all age groups and the leading cause of pediatric hospitalizations, and pediatric inpatient deaths. The Ministry of Health in Malawi has had a National Malaria Control Plan since 1985. This plan calls for improvement in: 1) awareness of malaria in the population; 2) accurate diagnosis; (3) effective and affordable treatment nationwide; 4) effective prevention for high risk groups; 5) clarification of feasibility of alternative methods of vector control; 6) improved training in diagnosis and management; 7) accurate reporting; 8) effective management at national, regional, and district levels; 9) improved ability to monitor and evaluate progress; and 10) increased government and donor investment in malaria control. The Ministry of Health undertook a national baseline survey to explore deficiencies in current malaria control practices, and also included a cost assessment of household expenditure on malaria. A number of articles document the results of this effort highlighting characteristics of malaria in Malawi and current control methods by the population. These aspects include: 1) malaria is perceived as a very important health problem: 2) prompt treatment with a full dosage of the recommended antimalarials occurs in less than 10% of febrile children; 3) a malaria prevention program based in antenatal clinics could provide affordable malaria prevention for most pregnant women; 4) few households use measures to prevent malaria which is largely associated with poverty: and 5) a high proportion of available household income is spent on malaria treatment or is lost to malaria illness. The Malawian situation is similar to that of neighboring nations, and it is hoped that they also embark on malaria control in their

  20. Malaria-induced renal damage: facts and myths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrich, Jochen H H; Eke, Felicia U

    2007-05-01

    Malaria infections repeatedly have been reported to induce nephrotic syndrome and acute renal failure. Questions have been raised whether the association of a nephrotic syndrome with quartan malaria was only coincidental, and whether the acute renal failure was a specific or unspecific consequence of Plasmodium falciparum infection. This review attempts to answer questions about "chronic quartan malaria nephropathy" and "acute falciparum malaria nephropathy". The literature review was performed on all publications on kidney involvement in human and experimental malarial infections accessible in PubMed or available at the library of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. The association of a nephrotic syndrome with quartan malaria was mostly described before 1975 in children and rarely in adult patients living in areas endemic for Plasmodium malariae. The pooled data on malaria-induced acute renal failure included children and adults acquiring falciparum malaria in endemic areas either as natives or as travellers from non-tropical countries. Non-immunes (not living in endemic areas) had a higher risk of developing acute renal failure than semi-immunes (living in endemic areas). Children with cerebral malaria had a higher rate and more severe course of acute renal failure than children with mild malaria. Today, there is no evidence of a dominant role of steroid-resistant and chronic "malarial glomerulopathies" in children with a nephrotic syndrome in Africa. Acute renal failure was a frequent and serious complication of falciparum malaria in non-immune adults. However, recently it has been reported more often in semi-immune African children with associated morbidity and mortality.

  1. Ocular morbidity in leprosy patients with lagophthalmos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandpur, S; Robertson, S J; Rao, P S S

    2009-01-01

    Lagophthalmos is a well known complication in leprosy due to the involvement of seventh cranial nerve resulting in incomplete closure of the eyelids. The real magnitude of ocular morbidity as a consequence of lagophthalmos is unknown, as several ocular complications can occur independently due to involvement of the fifth (trigeminal) nerve or due to secondary infection. Therefore, a study was designed to carefully examine the eyes of 100 consecutive leprosy patients with lagophthalmos seeking treatment at a leprosy referral centre in Delhi. Among the eyes examined, 145 had lagophthalmos. The symptomatology and anterior-posterior chamber morbidity in eyes with lagophthalmos were significantly higher as compared to unaffected eyes. Significantly, higher morbidity was seen regardless of sex or type of leprosy or deformity. Capacity building of the health professionals regarding ocular morbidity and increased emphasis on the importance of self care among patients can significantly reduce ocular morbidity.

  2. Malaria Modeling and Surveillance for the Greater Mekong Subregion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiang, Richard; Adimi, Farida; Soika, Valerii; Nigro, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    At 4,200 km, the Mekong River is the tenth longest river in the world. It directly and indirectly influences the lives of hundreds of millions of inhabitants in its basin. The riparian countries - Thailand, Myanmar, Cambodia, Laos, Vietnam, and a small part of China - form the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS). This geographical region has the misfortune of being the world's epicenter of falciparum malaria, which is the most severe form of malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum. Depending on the country, approximately 50 to 90% of all malaria cases are due to this species. In the Malaria Modeling and Surveillance Project, we have been developing techniques to enhance public health's decision capability for malaria risk assessments and controls. The main objectives are: 1) Identifying the potential breeding sites for major vector species; 2) Implementing a malaria transmission model to identify the key factors that sustain or intensify malaria transmission; and 3) Implementing a risk algorithm to predict the occurrence of malaria and its transmission intensity. The potential benefits are: 1) Increased warning time for public health organizations to respond to malaria outbreaks; 2) Optimized utilization of pesticide and chemoprophylaxis; 3) Reduced likelihood of pesticide and drug resistance; and 4) Reduced damage to environment. Environmental parameters important to malaria transmission include temperature, relative humidity, precipitation, and vegetation conditions. These parameters are extracted from NASA Earth science data sets. Hindcastings based on these environmental parameters have shown good agreement to epidemiological records.

  3. Malaria Modeling and Surveillance for the Greater Mekong Subregion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiang, Richard; Adimi, Farida; Soika, Valerii; Nigro, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    At 4,200 km, the Mekong River is the tenth longest river in the world. It directly and indirectly influences the lives of hundreds of millions of inhabitants in its basin. The riparian countries - Thailand, Myanmar, Cambodia, Laos, Vietnam, and a small part of China - form the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS). This geographical region has the misfortune of being the world's epicenter of falciparum malaria, which is the most severe form of malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum. Depending on the country, approximately 50 to 90% of all malaria cases are due to this species. In the Malaria Modeling and Surveillance Project, we have been developing techniques to enhance public health's decision capability for malaria risk assessments and controls. The main objectives are: 1) Identifying the potential breeding sites for major vector species; 2) Implementing a malaria transmission model to identify the key factors that sustain or intensify malaria transmission; and 3) Implementing a risk algorithm to predict the occurrence of malaria and its transmission intensity. The potential benefits are: 1) Increased warning time for public health organizations to respond to malaria outbreaks; 2) Optimized utilization of pesticide and chemoprophylaxis; 3) Reduced likelihood of pesticide and drug resistance; and 4) Reduced damage to environment. Environmental parameters important to malaria transmission include temperature, relative humidity, precipitation, and vegetation conditions. These parameters are extracted from NASA Earth science data sets. Hindcastings based on these environmental parameters have shown good agreement to epidemiological records.

  4. Malaria. Can WHO roll back malaria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balter, M

    2000-10-20

    In October 1998, World Health Organization Director-General Gro Harlem Brundtland announced Roll Back Malaria, a multiagency crusade that aims to cut malaria mortality in half over the next 10 years. Brundtland might just be the one to pull it off, say numerous public health experts, although some researchers question whether the goal is realistic.

  5. Epidemiology and Infectivity of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax Gametocytes in Relation to Malaria Control and Elimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousema, Teun; Drakeley, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Malaria remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the tropics, with Plasmodium falciparum responsible for the majority of the disease burden and P. vivax being the geographically most widely distributed cause of malaria. Gametocytes are the sexual-stage parasites that infect Anopheles mosquitoes and mediate the onward transmission of the disease. Gametocytes are poorly studied despite this crucial role, but with a recent resurgence of interest in malaria elimination, the study of gametocytes is in vogue. This review highlights the current state of knowledge with regard to the development and longevity of P. falciparum and P. vivax gametocytes in the human host and the factors influencing their distribution within endemic populations. The evidence for immune responses, antimalarial drugs, and drug resistance influencing infectiousness to mosquitoes is reviewed. We discuss how the application of molecular techniques has led to the identification of submicroscopic gametocyte carriage and to a reassessment of the human infectious reservoir. These components are drawn together to show how control measures that aim to reduce malaria transmission, such as mass drug administration and a transmission-blocking vaccine, might better be deployed. PMID:21482730

  6. EMIRA: Ecologic Malaria Reduction for Africa – innovative tools for integrated malaria control

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    Peter Dambach

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Malaria control is based on early treatment of cases and on vector control. The current measures for malaria vector control in Africa are mainly based on long-lasting insecticide treated nets (LLINs and to a much smaller extent on indoor residual spraying (IRS. A third pillar in the fight against the malaria vector, larval source management (LSM, has virtually not been used in Africa since the ban of DDT in the 1960s. Within the light of recent WHO recommendations for Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (Bti use against malaria and other vector species, larval source management could see a revival in the upcoming years. In this project we analyze the ecologic and health impacts as well as the cost effectiveness of larval source management under different larviciding scenarios in a health district in Burkina Faso. Methods: The project is designed as prospective intervention study with duration of three years (2013–2015. Its spatial scale includes three arms of interventions and control, comprising a total of 127 villages and the district capital Nouna in the extended HDSS (Health Demographic Surveillance System of the Kossi province. Baseline data on mosquito abundance, parasitemia in U5 children, and malaria related morbidity and mortality are gathered over the project duration. Besides the outcome on ecologic and health parameters, the economic costs are seized and valued against the achieved health benefits. Conclusions: Risk map based, guided larvicide application might be a possibility to further decrease economic cost of LSM and facilitate its faster incorporation to integrated malaria control programs. Given the limited resources in many malaria endemic countries, it is of utmost importance to relate the costs of novel strategies for malaria prevention to their effect on the burden of the disease. Occurring costs and the impact on the health situation will be made comparable to other, existing intervention strategies, allowing

  7. Feasibility, safety and effectiveness of combining home based malaria management and seasonal malaria chemoprevention in children less than 10 years in Senegal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tine, Roger C K; Ndour, Cheikh T; Faye, Babacar;

    2014-01-01

    Home-based management of malaria (HMM) may improve access to diagnostic testing and treatment with artemisinin combination therapy (ACT). In the Sahel region, seasonal malaria chemoprevention (SMC) is now recommended for the prevention of malaria in children. It is likely that combinations of ant...... of antimalarial interventions can reduce the malaria burden. This study assessed the feasibility, effectiveness and safety of combining SMC and HMM delivered by community health workers (CHWs)....

  8. MORBIDITY AGENTS: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrivastava Neelesh

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper discuss on clinical representation of morbid jealousy which often termed delusional jealousy or ‘Othello Syndrome’ is a psychiatric condition where a lover believes against all reason and their beloved is being sexually unfaithful. Patients will be preoccupied with their partner’s perceived lack of sexual fidelity and will often behave in an unacceptable or extreme way as they endeavor to prove their ideas. Misuse of any psychomotor is an important association cause morbidity jealousy agents, like CNS stimulants that release the catecholamine, particularly dopamine, from pre synaptic terminals substance should be treated as a priority. Where higher levels of violence are reported Sildenafil may be useful as a diagnostic as well as therapeutic test in such cases .Many studies have shown an association between high alcohol consumption and developing morbid jealousy. Amphetamine-induced psychosis has been extensively studied because of its close resemblance to schizophrenia.

  9. Malaria og graviditet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, A L; Rønn, A M; Langhoff-Roos, J

    1992-01-01

    In regions where malaria is endemism, the disease is a recognised cause of complications of pregnancy such as spontaneous abortion, premature delivery, intrauterine growth retardation and foetal death. Malaria is seldom seen in pregnant women in Denmark but, during the past two years, the authors...... the patients but also their practitioners were unaware that malaria can occur several years after exposure. Three out of the four patients had employed malaria prophylaxis. As resistance to malarial prophylactics in current use is increasing steadily, chemoprophylaxis should be supplemented by mechanical...... protection against malaria and insect repellents. As a rule, malaria is treated with chloroquine. In cases of Falciparum malaria in whom chloroquine resistance is suspected, treatment with mefloquine may be employed although this should only be employed in cases of dire necessity in pregnant patients during...

  10. Economic burden of malaria on businesses in Ghana: a case for private sector investment in malaria control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonvignon, Justice; Aryeetey, Genevieve Cecilia; Malm, Keziah L; Agyemang, Samuel Agyei; Aubyn, Vivian N A; Peprah, Nana Yaw; Bart-Plange, Constance N; Aikins, Moses

    2016-09-06

    Despite the significant gains made globally in reducing the burden of malaria, the disease remains a major public health challenge, especially in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) including Ghana. There is a significant gap in financing malaria control globally. The private sector could become a significant source of financing malaria control. To get the private sector to appreciate the need to invest in malaria control, it is important to provide evidence of the economic burden of malaria on businesses. The objective of this study, therefore, was to estimate the economic burden on malaria on businesses in Ghana, so as to stimulate the sector's investment in malaria control. Data covering 2012-2014 were collected from 62 businesses sampled from Greater Accra, Ashanti and Western Regions of Ghana, which have the highest concentration of businesses in the country. Data on the cost of businesses' spending on treatment and prevention of malaria in staff and their dependants as well as staff absenteeism due to malaria and expenditure on other health-related activities were collected. Views of business leaders on the effect of malaria on their businesses were also compiled. The analysis was extrapolated to cover 5828 businesses across the country. The results show that businesses in Ghana lost about US$6.58 million to malaria in 2014, 90 % of which were direct costs. A total of 3913 workdays were lost due to malaria in firms in the study sample during the period 2012-2014. Businesses in the study sample spent an average of 0.5 % of the annual corporate returns on treatment of malaria in employees and their dependants, 0.3 % on malaria prevention, and 0.5 % on other health-related corporate social responsibilities. Again business leaders affirmed that malaria affects their businesses' efficiency, employee attendance and productivity and expenses. Finally, about 93 % of business leaders expressed the need private sector investment in malaria control. The economic burden of

  11. Spatial Correlations of Malaria Incidence Hotspots with Environmental Factors in Assam, North East India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handique, Bijoy K.; Khan, Siraj A.; Dutta, Prafulla; Nath, Manash J.; Qadir, Abdul; Raju, P. L. N.

    2016-06-01

    Malaria is endemic and a major public health problem in north east (NE) region of India and contributes about 8-12 % of India's malaria positives cases. Historical morbidity pattern of malaria in terms of API (Annual Parasite Incidence) in the state of Assam has been used for delineating the malaria incidence hotspots at health sub centre (HSC) level. Strong spatial autocorrelation (p Malaria incidence hot spots in the state could be identified based on General G statistics and tested for statistical significance. Spatial correlation of malaria incidence hotspots with physiographic and climatic parameters across 6 agro-climatic zones of the state reveals the types of land cover pattern and the range of elevation contributing to the malaria outbreaks. Analysis shows that villages under malaria hotspots are having more agricultural land, evergreen/semi-evergreen forests with abundant waterbodies. Statistical and spatial analyses of malaria incidence showed a significant positive correlation with malaria incidence hotspots and the elevation (p malaria hotspots are having average elevation ranging between 17 to 240 MSL. This conforms to the characteristics of two dominant mosquito species in the state Anopheles minimus and An. baimai that prefers the habitat of slow flowing streams in the foot hills and in forest ecosystems respectively.

  12. Studying Different Clinical Syndromes Of Paediatric Severe Malaria Using Plasma Proteomics

    KAUST Repository

    Ramaprasad, Abhinay

    2012-08-01

    Background- Severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria remains one of the major causes of childhood morbidity and mortality in Africa. Severe malaria manifests itself as three main clinical syndromes-impaired consciousness (cerebral malaria), respiratory distress and severe malarial anaemia. Cerebral malaria and respiratory distress are major contributors to malaria mortality but their pathophysiology remains unclear. Motivation/Objectives- Most children with severe malaria die within the first 24 hours of admission to a hospital because of their pathophysiological conditions. Thus, along with anti-malarial drugs, various adjuvant therapies such as fluid bolus (for hypovolaemia) and anticonvulsants (for seizures) are given to alleviate the sick child’s condition. But these therapies can sometimes have adverse effects. Hence, a clear understanding of severe malaria pathophysiology is essential for making an informed decision regarding adjuvant therapies. Methodology- We used mass spectrometry-based shotgun proteomics to study plasma samples from Gambian children with severe malaria. We compared the proteomic profiles of different severe malaria syndromes and generated hypotheses regarding the underlying disease mechanisms. Results/Conclusions- The main challenges of studying the severe malaria syndromes using proteomics were the high complexity and variability among the samples. We hypothesized that hepatic injury and nitric oxide play roles in the pathophysiology of cerebral malaria and respiratory distress.

  13. Analysis on malaria control data in Heng county Guangxi province in 1950-2010%1950-2010年广西横县疟疾防治资料分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韦斯亮; 卢明飞; 黎军; 韦康; 韦海艳; 黄亚铭

    2012-01-01

    Objective To analyze and evaluation malaria prevention effect in Hengrian from 19S1 to 2010, provide basis for eliminating malaria. Method Collecting the malaria prevention data, including calendar year malaria reporting, prevention scheme, diagnosis and treatment date of malaria patients in rural hospitals, using Excel to carry out statistical a-nalysis. Results This county was the highly mixed epidemic region of plasmodium falciparum, plasmodium vivax and plas-modium malariae of 1950s to 1960s. The malaria morbidity of local residents was 115. 86 /10 000 in 1950s. There were 20 908 malaria cases in 1953, with residents morbidity of 449.01/10000, it reduced to 12.97/100 00 in 1960s and 0.51/10 000 in 1970s. In 1980s, malaria patient were increased among floating population but the morbidity was under 0. 31/10 000. The plasmodium falciparum and plasmodium malaria cases did not discovered after 1979 and 1980. The malaria morbidity descend to 0. 22/10 000 in 1990s and 0.01/10000 in 21 century. In 2001, we only found 1 case among local residents. Conclusions The malaria prevalence had effectively controlled in this county after basically eliminate malaria since 1993, but we still need to strengthen detection of floating population.%目的 分析评价横县1950 - 2010年疟疾防治效果,为该县消除疟疾提供依据.方法 查阅收集全县历年疟疾防治资料,包括历年疟疾疫情报告、防治方案、各乡镇卫生院疟疾病人诊断和治疗资料等,采用Excel软件进行统计分析.结果 该县上世纪50~60年代是恶性疟、间日疟原虫和三日疟原虫高度混合流行区,50年代当地居民疟疾发病率为115.86/万,其中1953年疟疾病例共20908例,居民发病率为449.01/万.60年代下降为12.97/万,70年代为0.51/万.80年代流动人口中疟疾病人增加,但人群发病率下降至0.31/万,恶性疟和三日疟分别于1979年和1980年后在当地居民中未发现.90年代下降为0.22/万,本世纪为0.01/

  14. Endothelial dysfunction in morbid obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauricio, Maria Dolores; Aldasoro, Martin; Ortega, Joaquin; Vila, José María

    2013-01-01

    Morbid obesity is a chronic multifunctional disease characterized by an accumulation of fat. Epidemiological studies have shown that obesity is associated with cardiovascular and metabolic disorders. Endothelial dysfunction, as defined by an imbalance between relaxing and contractile endothelial factors, plays a central role in the pathogenesis of these cardiometabolic diseases. Diminished bioavailability of nitric oxide (NO) contributes to endothelial dysfunction and impairs endothelium- dependent vasodilatation. But this is not the only mechanism that drives to endothelial dysfunction. Obesity has been associated with a chronic inflammatory process, atherosclerosis, and oxidative stress. Moreover levels of asymmetrical dimethyl-L-arginine (ADMA), an endogenous inhibitor of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), are elevated in obesity. On the other hand, increasing prostanoid-dependent vasoconstriction and decreasing vasodilator prostanoids also lead to endothelial dysfunction in obesity. Other mechanisms related to endothelin-1 (ET-1) or endothelium derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) have been proposed. Bariatric surgery (BS) is a safe and effective means to achieve significant weight loss, but its use is limited only to patients with severe obesity including morbid obesity. BS also proved efficient in endothelial dysfunction reduction improving cardiovascular and metabolic comorbidities associated with morbid obesity such as diabetes, coronary artery disease, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and cancer. This review will provide a brief overview of the mechanisms that link obesity with endothelial dysfunction, and how weight loss is a cornerstone treatment for cardiovascular comorbidities obesity-related. A better understanding of the mechanisms of obesity-induced endothelial dysfunction may help develop new therapeutic strategies to reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  15. Malaria on isolated Melanesian islands prior to the initiation of malaria elimination activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Australian Government's Pacific Malaria Initiative (PacMI is supporting the National Malaria Program in both Solomon Islands and Vanuatu, complementing assistance from the Global Fund for AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (GFATM. Two remote island groups - Tafea Province, Vanuatu and Temotu Province, Solomon Islands have been selected by the governments of both countries as possible malaria elimination areas. To provide information on the prevalence and distribution of the disease within these island groups, malariometric surveys were conducted during the wet seasons of 2008. Methods In Tafea Province, a school-based survey was conducted which included the 2-12 y age group, while in Temotu a village based all-ages survey was conducted. An effort was made to sample villages or schools from a wide an area as possible on all islands. Diagnosis was initially based on Giemsa stained blood slides followed by molecular analysis using polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Results In Tafea Province, 73% (5238/7150 of children (2-12 y were surveyed and in Temotu Province, in the all-ages survey, 50.2% (8742/17410 of the provincial population participated in the survey. In both Vanuatu and Solomon Islands malariometric surveys of their southern-most islands in 2008 showed relatively low over-all malaria parasite prevalence (2 to 3%. Other features of malaria in these island groups were low parasitaemia, low gametocyte carriage rates, low spleen rates, low malaria associated morbidity, a high incidence of asymptomatic infections, and a predominance of Plasmodium vivax over Plasmodium falciparum. Conclusion For various reasons malaria rates are declining in these provinces providing a favourable situation for local malaria elimination. This will be advanced using mass distribution of bed nets and selective indoor residual spraying, the introduction of rapid diagnostic tests and artemisinin combination therapy, and intensive case detection and

  16. Morbidity from parotid sialography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalk, WWI; Vissink, A; Spijkervet, FKL; Moller, JM; Roodenburg, JLN

    2001-01-01

    Objective. Sialography is commonly used for the diagnosis of Sjogren's syndrome, although its invasive nature is often regarded as a serious drawback for routine usage. The aim of this study was to evaluate the morbidity and acceptability of parotid sialography using oil-based contrast fluid. Study

  17. Prevalence of congenital malaria among newly born babies at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Many pregnant women suffer from severe anaemia, and even death due to acute ... Malaria is one of the ten most common causes of morbidity in the region. ... to decline participation or withdraw from the study at any stage without the fear of ...

  18. Battling malaria iceberg incorporating strategic reforms in achieving Millennium Development Goals & malaria elimination in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, V P

    2012-12-01

    Malaria control in India has occupied high priority in health sector consuming major resources of the Central and State governments. Several new initiatives were launched from time to time supported by foreign aids but malaria situation has remained static and worsened in years of good rainfall. At times malaria relented temporarily but returned with vengeance at the local, regional and national level, becoming more resilient by acquiring resistance in the vectors and the parasites. National developments to improve the economy, without health impact assessment, have had adverse consequences by providing enormous breeding grounds for the vectors that have become refractory to interventions. As a result, malaria prospers and its control is in dilemma, as finding additional resources is becoming difficult with the ongoing financial crisis. Endemic countries must contribute to make up the needed resources, if malaria is to be contained. Malaria control requires long term planning, one that will reduce receptivity and vulnerability, and uninterrupted financial support for sustained interventions. While this seems to be a far cry, the environment is becoming more receptive for vectors, and epidemics visit the country diverting major resources in their containment, e.g. malaria, dengue and dengue haemorrhagic fevers, and Chikungunya virus infection. In the last six decades malaria has taken deep roots and diversified into various ecotypes, the control of these ecotypes requires local knowledge about the vectors and the parasites. In this review we outline the historical account of malaria and methods of control that have lifted the national economy in many countries. While battles against malaria should continue at the local level, there is a need for large scale environmental improvement. Global Fund for AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria has provided huge funds for malaria control worldwide touching US$ 2 billion in 2011. Unfortunately it is likely to decline to US$ 1

  19. Malaria Treatment Policy Change and Implementation: The Case of Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Nanyunja

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaria due to P. falciparum is the number one cause of morbidity and mortality in Uganda where it is highly endemic in 95% of the country. The use of efficacious and effective antimalarial medicines is one of the key strategies for malaria control. Until 2000, Chloroquine (CQ was the first-line drug for treatment of uncomplicated malaria in Uganda. Due to progressive resistance to CQ and to a combination of CQ with Sulfadoxine-Pyrimethamine, Uganda in 2004 adopted the use of ACTs as first-line drug for treating uncomplicated malaria. A review of the drug policy change process and postimplementation reports highlight the importance of managing the policy change process, generating evidence for policy decisions and availability of adequate and predictable funding for effective policy roll-out. These and other lessons learnt can be used to guide countries that are considering anti-malarial drug change in future.

  20. Malaria treatment policy change and implementation: the case of Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanyunja, Miriam; Nabyonga Orem, Juliet; Kato, Frederick; Kaggwa, Mugagga; Katureebe, Charles; Saweka, Joaquim

    2011-01-01

    Malaria due to P. falciparum is the number one cause of morbidity and mortality in Uganda where it is highly endemic in 95% of the country. The use of efficacious and effective antimalarial medicines is one of the key strategies for malaria control. Until 2000, Chloroquine (CQ) was the first-line drug for treatment of uncomplicated malaria in Uganda. Due to progressive resistance to CQ and to a combination of CQ with Sulfadoxine-Pyrimethamine, Uganda in 2004 adopted the use of ACTs as first-line drug for treating uncomplicated malaria. A review of the drug policy change process and postimplementation reports highlight the importance of managing the policy change process, generating evidence for policy decisions and availability of adequate and predictable funding for effective policy roll-out. These and other lessons learnt can be used to guide countries that are considering anti-malarial drug change in future.

  1. Assessing the Health Effects of Long-Term Exposure to Insecticide-Treated Mosquito Nets in the Control of Malaria in Endemic Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebere C. Anyanwu

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is a protozoan disease caused in humans by the genus Plasmodium of which four species are known: P. falciparum, P. vivax, P. ovale, and P. malariae. It is transmitted through the bite of infected female mosquitoes of the genus Anopheles. Malaria is endemic in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. It is characterized by extreme exhaustion associated with paroxysms of high fever, sweating, shaking chills, and anemia. Approximately 40% of the world's population, mostly those living in the poorest nations, are at risk. Much of the deaths due to malaria occur in Africa, mostly among children. The search for prevention and control interventions that are effective and sustainable remains an abiding challenge for national governments and international health agencies. To this end, the World Health Organization and several nongovernmental organizations are investing in the use of insecticide-treated mosquito nets (ITMNs as a viable option. Trials of ITMNs in the 1980s and 1990s showed that they reduce deaths in young children by an average of 20% and multilateral agencies, spearheaded by Roll Back Malaria (RBM, seek to have 60% of the populations at risk sleeping under ITMNs by 2005. All pesticides are toxic by nature and present risks of adverse effects that depend on toxicity of the chemical and the degree of exposure. While there is agreement that ITMNs can be effective in reducing malaria morbidity and mortality under field trials, a number of factors relating to their sustainability and contribution to health improvement in less-developed countries have yet to be determined. In particular, the adverse effects associated with their long-term use and misuse has yet to be fully evaluated. Although this paper examines potential neurotoxic and neurobehavioral effects of long-term use of ITMNs and discusses priority public health actions for protecting the health of users, it forms the basis for further research.

  2. Climate change unlikely to increase malaria burden in West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamana, Teresa K.; Bomblies, Arne; Eltahir, Elfatih A. B.

    2016-11-01

    The impact of climate change on malaria transmission has been hotly debated. Recent conclusions have been drawn using relatively simple biological models and statistical approaches, with inconsistent predictions. Consequently, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report (IPCC AR5) echoes this uncertainty, with no clear guidance for the impacts of climate change on malaria transmission, yet recognizing a strong association between local climate and malaria. Here, we present results from a decade-long study involving field observations and a sophisticated model simulating village-scale transmission. We drive the malaria model using select climate models that correctly reproduce historical West African climate, and project reduced malaria burden in a western sub-region and insignificant impact in an eastern sub-region. Projected impacts of climate change on malaria transmission in this region are not of serious concern.

  3. Strategies for reducing morbidity and mortality from diabetes through health-care system interventions and diabetes self-management education in community settings. A report on recommendations of the Task Force on Community Preventive Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-09-28

    Reducing morbidity and mortality and improving quality of life for persons with diabetes is an ongoing challenge for health-care providers and organizations and public health practitioners. Interventions are available that focus on persons with diabetes, health-care systems, families, and public policies. The Task Force on Community Preventive Services (the Task Force) has conducted systematic reviews of seven population-oriented interventions that can be implemented by health-care organizations and communities. Two of these interventions focus on health-care systems (disease and case management), and five focus on persons with diabetes (diabetes self-management education delivered in community settings). On the basis of these reviews, the Task Force has made recommendations regarding use of these seven interventions. The Task Force strongly recommends disease and case management in health-care systems for persons with diabetes. Diabetes self-management education is recommended in community gathering places (e.g., community centers or faith institutions) for adults and in the home for children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Evidence was insufficient to recommend diabetes self-management education interventions in other settings (i.e., schools, work sites, and recreational camps) or in the home for adults with type 2 diabetes. This report provides additional information regarding these recommendations, briefly describes how the reviews were conducted, provides sources of full reviews of interventions and information to assist in applying the interventions locally, and describes additional diabetes-related work in progress.

  4. Laboratory diagnosis of malaria -- overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, K M

    1994-01-01

    Features of the laboratory diagnosis of malaria are described. Microscope equipment is absolutely essential. Clinical symptoms are inadequate for the proper diagnosis of malaria. Screening for malaria involves identification of all cases where high fever is present in endemic areas. Diagnosis is complicated because many people take antimalarial drugs which reduce the chances of detecting malarial parasites. Confirmation should be made before treatment is administered. A thick blood slide can be quickly and cheaply taken without much training of health personnel. The disadvantage of thick stains is the difficulty in identifying "plasmodium" strains. When a thin smear with Giemsa and Leishmanin stain is used, a light infection may be missed. Thin smears require trained personnel and time, which in peak seasons may be impractical. Urinary tract and viral infections may be confused with malaria. Evidence of parasites can be discerned from thick stains. Modern assay techniques are also available. There are enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) and immunofluorescent assay techniques (IFAT), which are frequently used in large scale seroepidemiological studies. DNA probes have the limitation of radioisotope handling problems. Acridine orange fluorescent microscopy with capillary centrifuged blood is a technique which improves the viability of Giemsa stain procedures. This technique is desirable because of the sensitivity and speed of diagnosis. The quantitative buddy coat (GBC) technique is superior to Giemsa stained thick blood film in identifying malaria, but it is not reliable with mixed infections. Advanced techniques are not readily available in local settings. The recommendation is to continue use of thick or thin blood film and trained health personnel. Laboratory results must be interpreted in the context of when the flood film was prepared, prior drug administration, and clinical manifestations.

  5. [Malaria importation into Germany in 1989/90].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zastrow, K D; Dieckmann, S; Schöneberg, I

    1993-11-01

    Malaria was in 1989/90 the most important imported disease in Germany. Most of all cases were imported by German tourists (about 75%). Africa was the most prominently represented geographic region (about 75%). Kenia and Ghana represented there the biggest share. About 33% of all patients had not done a sufficient prophylaxis against malaria. An adequate prophylaxis against malaria taking into consideration the recommendations for medicaments for different geographical areas is imperative before the number of importations of malaria into Germany can be reduced.

  6. Cost-effectiveness analysis of malaria rapid diagnostic tests for appropriate treatment of malaria at the community level in Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristian S; Ndyomugyenyi, Richard; Magnussen, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    In Sub-Saharan Africa, malaria remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality among children under 5, due to lack of access to prompt and appropriate diagnosis and treatment. Many countries have scaled-up community health workers (CHWs) as a strategy towards improving access. The present study ...

  7. Low red cell production may protect against severe anemia during a malaria infection – insights from modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Cromer, Deborah; Stark, Jaroslav; P Davenport, Miles

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The malaria parasite causes lysis of red blood cells, resulting in anemia, a major cause of mortality and morbidity. Intuitively, one would expect the production of red blood cells to increase in order to compensate for this loss. However, it has been observed that this response is weaker than would be expected. Furthermore iron supplementation for iron deficient children in malaria endemic regions can paradoxically adversely affect the clinical outcome of malaria infectio...

  8. A Malaria Ecology Index Predicted Spatial and Temporal Variation of Malaria Burden and Efficacy of Antimalarial Interventions Based on African Serological Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCord, Gordon C; Anttila-Hughes, Jesse K

    2017-03-01

    AbstractReducing the global health burden of malaria is complicated by weak reporting systems for infectious diseases and a paucity of vital statistics registration. This limits our ability to predict changes in malaria health burden intensity, target antimalarial resources where needed, and identify malaria impacts in retrospective data. We refined and deployed a temporally and spatially varying Malaria Ecology Index (MEI) incorporating climatological and ecological data to estimate malaria transmission strength and validate it against cross-sectional serology data from 39,875 children from seven sub-Saharan African countries. The MEI is strongly associated with malaria burden; a 1 standard deviation higher MEI is associated with a 50-117% increase in malaria risk and a 3-5 g/dL lower level of Hg. Results show that the relationship between malaria ecology and disease burden is attenuated with sufficient coverage of insecticide treated nets (ITNs) or indoor residual spraying (IRS). Having both ITNs and IRS reduce the added risk from adverse malaria ecology conditions by half. Readily available climate and ecology data can be used to estimate the spatial and temporal variation in malaria disease burden, providing a feasible alternative to direct surveillance. This will help target resources for malaria programs in the absence of national coverage of active case detection systems, and facilitate malaria research using retrospective health data.

  9. Progress towards malaria elimination in Sabang Municipality, Aceh, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herdiana Herdiana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Indonesia has set 2030 as its deadline for elimination of malaria transmission in the archipelago, with regional deadlines established according to present levels of malaria endemicity and strength of health infrastructure. The Municipality of Sabang which historically had one of the highest levels of malaria in Aceh province aims to achieve elimination by the end of 2013. Method From 2008 to 2010, baseline surveys of malaria interventions, mapping of all confirmed malaria cases, categorization of residual foci of malaria transmission and vector surveys were conducted in Sabang, Aceh, a pilot district for malaria elimination in Indonesia. To inform future elimination efforts, mass screening from the focal areas to measure prevalence of malaria with both microscopy and PCR was conducted. G6PD deficiency prevalence was also measured. Result Despite its small size, a diverse mixture of potential malaria vectors were documented in Sabang, including Anopheles sundaicus, Anopheles minimus, Anopheles aconitus and Anopheles dirus. Over a two-year span, the number of sub-villages with ongoing malaria transmission reduced from 61 to 43. Coverage of malaria diagnosis and treatment, IRS, and LLINs was over 80%. Screening of 16,229 residents detected 19 positive people, for a point prevalence of 0.12%. Of the 19 positive cases, three symptomatic infections and five asymptomatic infections were detected with microscopy and 11 asymptomatic infections were detected with PCR. Of the 19 cases, seven were infected with Plasmodium falciparum, 11 were infected with Plasmodium vivax, and one subject was infected with both species. Analysis of the 937 blood samples for G6PD deficiency revealed two subjects (0.2% with deficient G6PD. Discussion The interventions carried out by the government of Sabang have dramatically reduced the burden of malaria over the past seven years. The first phase, carried out between 2005 and 2007, included improved

  10. Spatial analysis of land cover determinants of malaria incidence in the Ashanti Region, Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krefis, Anne Caroline; Schwarz, Norbert Georg; Nkrumah, Bernard; Acquah, Samuel; Loag, Wibke; Oldeland, Jens; Sarpong, Nimako; Adu-Sarkodie, Yaw; Ranft, Ulrich; May, Jürgen

    2011-01-01

    Malaria belongs to the infectious diseases with the highest morbidity and mortality worldwide. As a vector-borne disease malaria distribution is strongly influenced by environmental factors. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between malaria risk and different land cover classes by using high-resolution multispectral Ikonos images and Poisson regression analyses. The association of malaria incidence with land cover around 12 villages in the Ashanti Region, Ghana, was assessed in 1,988 children rural area in Ghana. The analyses demonstrate the usefulness of satellite images for the prediction of malaria endemicity. Thus, planning and monitoring of malaria control measures should be assisted by models based on geographic information systems.

  11. Prevalence and risk factors of malaria in Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayele Dawit G

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background More than 75% of the total area of Ethiopia is malarious, making malaria the leading public health problem in Ethiopia. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence rate and the associated socio-economic, geographic and demographic factors of malaria based on the rapid diagnosis test (RDT survey results. Methods From December 2006 to January 2007, a baseline malaria indicator survey in Amhara, Oromiya and Southern Nation Nationalities and People (SNNP regions of Ethiopia was conducted by The Carter Center. This study uses this data. The method of generalized linear model was used to analyse the data and the response variable was the presence or absence of malaria using the rapid diagnosis test (RDT. Results The analyses show that the RDT result was significantly associated with age and gender. Other significant covariates confounding variables are source of water, trip to obtain water, toilet facility, total number of rooms, material used for walls, and material used for roofing. The prevalence of malaria for households with clean water found to be less. Malaria rapid diagnosis found to be higher for thatch and stick/mud roof and earth/local dung plaster floor. Moreover, spraying anti-malaria to the house was found to be one means of reducing the risk of malaria. Furthermore, the housing condition, source of water and its distance, gender, and ages in the households were identified in order to have two-way interaction effects. Conclusion Individuals with poor socio-economic conditions are positively associated with malaria infection. Improving the housing condition of the household is one of the means of reducing the risk of malaria. Children and female household members are the most vulnerable to the risk of malaria. Such information is essential to design improved strategic intervention for the reduction of malaria epidemic in Ethiopia.

  12. Avian malaria in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoener, E R; Banda, M; Howe, L; Castro, I C; Alley, M R

    2014-07-01

    Avian malaria parasites of the genus Plasmodium have the ability to cause morbidity and mortality in naïve hosts, and their impact on the native biodiversity is potentially serious. Over the last decade, avian malaria has aroused increasing interest as an emerging disease in New Zealand with some endemic avian species, such as the endangered mohua (Mohua ochrocephala), thought to be particularly susceptible. To date, avian malaria parasites have been found in 35 different bird species in New Zealand and have been diagnosed as causing death in threatened species such as dotterel (Charadrius obscurus), South Island saddleback (Philesturnus carunculatus carunculatus), mohua, hihi (Notiomystis cincta) and two species of kiwi (Apteryx spp.). Introduced blackbirds (Turdus merula) have been found to be carriers of at least three strains of Plasmodium spp. and because they are very commonly infected, they are likely sources of infection for many of New Zealand's endemic birds. The spread and abundance of introduced and endemic mosquitoes as the result of climate change is also likely to be an important factor in the high prevalence of infection in some regions and at certain times of the year. Although still limited, there is a growing understanding of the ecology and epidemiology of Plasmodium spp. in New Zealand. Molecular biology has played an important part in this process and has markedly improved our understanding of the taxonomy of the genus Plasmodium. This review presents our current state of knowledge, discusses the possible infection and disease outcomes, the implications for host behaviour and reproduction, methods of diagnosis of infection, and the possible vectors for transmission of the disease in New Zealand.

  13. 疟疾疫苗的研究策略%Study on malaria vaccines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨其仁; 陈思祗; 等

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the major strategies that have been employed in malaria vaccine development. The pre-erythrocytic-stage vaccines aim to prevent the development of all clinical symptoms and subsequent malaria transmission. Erythrocytic-stage vaccine designed aims to induce antibodies that prevent invasion and infection of erythrocytes, to reduce morbidity and mortality by decreasing the parasite load. Sexual-stage 'transmission blocking' vaccines aim to reduce malaria within a community as a whole, but convey no benefit for a malaria-infected individual. The design of a malaria vaccine must overcome genetic restriction to be effective to a diverse population. Due to the complex nature of the malaria life-cycle, it points out multiple antigens from different stages must also be incorporated into a vaccine.%从疟原虫的不同发育时期、不同的疫苗成份和宿主的遗传基因限制性等方面,深入研究抗疟疾疫苗.作用于红细胞前期的疟疾疫苗主要是抑制疟疾的临床发作,控制疟疾的传播;作用于红细胞期的疟疾疫苗诱导宿主体液免疫系统,产生特异性抗体,抑制疟原虫侵入和感染红细胞,达到减少疟原虫虫荷,降低疟疾的发病率和死亡率.作用于疟原虫有性生殖时期,控制疟疾传播的疟疾疫苗,其意义在于控制一个地区疟原虫的感染率和疟疾发病率,但对已感染疟原虫个体的免疫保护作用意义不大.在设计疟疾疫苗的过程中,必须克服不同个体的遗传基因限制性问题.由于疟原虫生活史的复杂性,同时也必须考虑到疟原虫不同发育阶段抗原成份的复杂性.

  14. Malaria and Tropical Travel

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-05-15

    Malaria is a serious mosquito-borne disease that can lead to death. This podcast discusses malaria risk when traveling to tropical areas, as well as how to protect yourself and your family from malaria infection.  Created: 5/15/2008 by National Center for Zoonotic, Vector-Borne, and Enteric Diseases (NCZVED).   Date Released: 5/29/2008.

  15. Plasmodium malariae Infection Associated with a High Burden of Anemia: A Hospital-Based Surveillance Study.

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    Siobhan Langford

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodium malariae is a slow-growing parasite with a wide geographic distribution. Although generally regarded as a benign cause of malaria, it has been associated with nephrotic syndrome, particularly in young children, and can persist in the host for years. Morbidity associated with P. malariae infection has received relatively little attention, and the risk of P. malariae-associated nephrotic syndrome is unknown.We used data from a very large hospital-based surveillance system incorporating information on clinical diagnoses, blood cell parameters and treatment to describe the demographic distribution, morbidity and mortality associated with P. malariae infection in southern Papua, Indonesia. Between April 2004 and December 2013 there were 1,054,674 patient presentations to Mitra Masyarakat Hospital of which 196,380 (18.6% were associated with malaria and 5,097 were with P. malariae infection (constituting 2.6% of all malaria cases. The proportion of malaria cases attributable to P. malariae increased with age from 0.9% for patients under one year old to 3.1% for patients older than 15 years. Overall, 8.5% of patients with P. malariae infection required admission to hospital and the median length of stay for these patients was 2.5 days (Interquartile Range: 2.0-4.0 days. Patients with P. malariae infection had a lower mean hemoglobin concentration (9.0 g/dL than patients with P. falciparum (9.5 g/dL, P. vivax (9.6g/dL and mixed species infections (9.3g/dL. There were four cases of nephrotic syndrome recorded in patients with P. malariae infection, three of which were in children younger than 5 years old, giving a risk in this age group of 0.47% (95% Confidence Interval; 0.10% to 1.4%. Overall, 2.4% (n = 16 of patients hospitalized with P. malariae infection subsequently died in hospital, similar to the proportions for the other endemic Plasmodium species (range: 0% for P. ovale to 1.6% for P. falciparum.Plasmodium malariae infection is

  16. MALARIA TYPHOID CO - INFECTION AMONG FEBRILE PATIENTS

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    Samatha

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Malaria and typhoid fevers, caused by different organisms are major public health problems in developing countries. People in endemic areas are at risk of both infections concurrently. These are the important cause of fevers in many endemic areas especially during rainy season. Each of these diseases can substantially contribute to mortality if not diagnosed and treated early. The present study was designed to find the Sero prevalence of Malaria, Typhoid and Typho malarial co - infections in febrile patients. METHODS: A cross sectional study was conducted from June 2014 to May 2015. A total of five hundred and eighty two subjects were screened for Malaria and Typhoid is included in study irrespective of their age & sex. Data was analysed on the basis of Demographic factors & Serological results. The results were analysed statistically. RESULTS: The seroprevalence of malarial infection was found to be 58.41% , Typhoid as 1.8 % whereas, True Typho Malarial co - infection was seen in 0.7%. CONCLUSION: The present study reports the Prevalence of Malaria, Typhoid and Typho Malarial Co - infection which are important when planning large scale vaccine trials as well as making health policies and a Protocol is required to treat these infections to limit the mortality and morbidity.

  17. [Thijsse, teacher of nature, teacher of malaria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visscher-Endeveld, Lies; Verhave, Jan Peter

    2005-01-01

    The start of organised malaria control in The Netherlands originated from an epidemic that became apparent in 1919. Shortly thereafter the Commission for Malaria Control realised the need for involvement of the population in the endemic area of North-Holland province. Education and propaganda would make them alert to reduce the risk of infection and aware of the need for medical diagnosis and treatment. The commission called upon Dr. Jac. P. Thijsse, a professional educator who had just received an honorary doctor's degree at the University of Amsterdam for his excellent work on bringing nature and field biology to the attention of the general public. He had founded the Society for Nature Conservation. Thijsse was invited to write a book on malaria, for use at primary school level. The booklet was called 'About mosquitoes and malaria' and it was widely used by teachers and pupils. Thijsse was also instrumental in the making of a propaganda film on malaria and its control. It was acclaimed by visiting malariologists from abroad for its quality, and it was watched with astonishment by the people in rural North-Holland. Thijsse was a member of the scientific Malaria Commission for five years. His profound knowledge about flora and fauna made him an expert in predicting the chances of mosquito breeding in polder canals with fresh or brackish water. After his resignation he was nominated president for a committee to organise a contest for a new propaganda poster. He passed away in 1945, just before a new epidemic would strike the war-exhausted population of the coastal provinces. It would have been a disappointment to him, because he had strongly believed that the scientific and organising power of the Malaria Commission would be successful in bringing the fever curse to a halt. This epidemic was the last one, and whatever the cause, malaria had disappeared from the Netherlands in 1960.

  18. History of malaria control in Tajikistan and rapid malaria appraisal in an agro-ecological setting

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    Utzinger Jürg

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reported malaria cases in rice growing areas in western Tajikistan were at the root of a rapid appraisal of the local malaria situation in a selected agro-ecological setting where only scarce information was available. The rapid appraisal was complemented by a review of the epidemiology and control of malaria in Tajikistan and Central Asia from 1920 until today. Following a resurgence in the 1990s, malaria transmission has been reduced considerably in Tajikistan as a result of concerted efforts by the government and international agencies. The goal for 2015 is transmission interruption, with control interventions and surveillance currently concentrated in the South, where foci of Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum persist. Methods The rapid malaria appraisal was carried out in six communities of irrigated rice cultivation during the peak of malaria transmission (August/September 2007 in western Tajikistan. In a cross-sectional survey, blood samples were taken from 363 schoolchildren and examined for Plasmodium under a light microscope. A total of 56 farmers were interviewed about agricultural activities and malaria. Potential Anopheles breeding sites were characterized using standardized procedures. A literature review on the epidemiology and control of malaria in Tajikistan was conducted. Results One case of P. vivax was detected among the 363 schoolchildren examined (0.28%. The interviewees reported to protect themselves against mosquito bites and used their own concepts on fever conditions, which do not distinguish between malaria and other diseases. Three potential malaria vectors were identified, i.e. Anopheles superpictus, Anopheles pulcherrimus and Anopheles hyrcanus in 58 of the 73 breeding sites examined (79.5%. Rice paddies, natural creeks and man-made ponds were the most important Anopheles habitats. Conclusion The presence of malaria vectors and parasite reservoirs, low awareness of, and protection against

  19. Temporal trends in severe malaria in Chittagong, Bangladesh

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    Maude Richard

    2012-09-01

    severe malaria in remote areas and implementation of a referral system for cases requiring additional supportive care could be important contributors to further reducing malaria-attributable disease and death in Bangladesh.

  20. Malaria in rural Mozambique. Part I: Children attending the outpatient clinic

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    Macete Eusébio

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria represents a huge burden for the health care services across Africa. Describing malaria attending health services contributes to quantify the burden and describe the epidemiology and clinical presentation. Methods Retrospective analysis of data collected through the Manhiça morbidity surveillance system (Mozambique on all paediatric visits (Plasmodium falciparum parasitaemia of any density in the blood smear. Results A total of 94,941 outpatient visits were seen during the study period, of which 30.5% had malaria. Children younger than three years accounted for almost half of the total malaria cases and children aged ≥ 5 years represented 36.4% of the cases. Among children who presented with malaria, 56.7% had fever and among children who presented with fever or a history of fever only 37.2% had malaria. The geometric mean parasitaemia in malaria cases was 8582.2 parasites/μL, peaking in children aged two to three years. 13% of malaria cases had a PCV Conclusion Preventive measures should be targeted at children younger than three years, as they carry the highest burden of malaria. Children aged 5–15 years represent around a third of the malaria cases and should also be included in control programmes. Concern should be raised about presumptive treatment of fever cases with artemisinin-combination therapies, as many children will, according to IMCI guidelines, receive treatment unnecessarily.

  1. Malaria control and elimination, Venezuela, 1800s –1970s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffing, Sean M; Villegas, Leopoldo; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam

    2014-10-01

    Venezuela had the highest number of human malaria cases in Latin American before 1936. During 1891–1920,malaria was endemic to >600,000 km2 of this country; malaria death rates led to major population decreases during 1891–1920. No pathogen, including the influenza virus that caused the 1918 pandemic, caused more deaths than malaria during 1905–1945. Early reports of malaria eradication in Venezuela helped spark the world's interest in global eradication. We describe early approaches to malaria epidemiology in Venezuela and how this country developed an efficient control program and an approach to eradication.Arnoldo Gabaldón was a key policy maker during this development process. He directed malaria control in Venezuela from the late 1930s to the end of the 1970s and contributed to malaria program planning of the World Health Organization.We discuss how his efforts helped reduce the incidence of malaria in Venezuela and how his approach diverged from World Health Organization guidelines.

  2. Malaria Control and Elimination,1 Venezuela, 1800s–1970s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas, Leopoldo; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam

    2014-01-01

    Venezuela had the highest number of human malaria cases in Latin American before 1936. During 1891–1920, malaria was endemic to >600,000 km2 of this country; malaria death rates led to major population decreases during 1891–1920. No pathogen, including the influenza virus that caused the 1918 pandemic, caused more deaths than malaria during 1905–1945. Early reports of malaria eradication in Venezuela helped spark the world’s interest in global eradication. We describe early approaches to malaria epidemiology in Venezuela and how this country developed an efficient control program and an approach to eradication. Arnoldo Gabaldón was a key policy maker during this development process. He directed malaria control in Venezuela from the late 1930s to the end of the 1970s and contributed to malaria program planning of the World Health Organization. We discuss how his efforts helped reduce the incidence of malaria in Venezuela and how his approach diverged from World Health Organization guidelines.

  3. Malaria Cases in the U.S. Reach 40-Year High: Information and Guidance for Clinicians

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-02-26

    This podcast is an overview of the Clinician Outreach and Communication Activity (COCA) Call: Malaria Cases in the U.S. Reach 40-Year High: Information and Guidance for Clinicians. The number of malaria cases reported in the United States in 2011 was the largest since 1971, representing a 14 percent increase from 2010 and a 48 percent increase from 2008. A CDC subject matter expert describes malaria prevention strategies aimed at reducing the risk of malaria in travelers, discusses the diagnosis of malaria in patients with suspect malaria, and explains the treatment options for confirmed malaria cases.  Created: 2/26/2014 by Center for Global Health (CGH); Malaria Branch; Emergency Risk Communication Branch (ERCB); Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response (OPHPR).   Date Released: 2/26/2014.

  4. [Malaria in Vanuatu. Recent epidemiological data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastien, P; Saliou, P; Gentilini, M

    1986-01-01

    The Republic of Vanuatu, ex-Condominium of New-Hebrides, is an archipelago in the South Pacific, between Solomon Islands and New-Caledonia. Although the health system is quite satisfactory, malaria has become the major health problem in the whole country. Its epidemiological characteristics are reviewed, and particularly the biology of the only known vector, the Anopheles farauti complex. A sudden and severe aggravation of the malaria morbidity since 1980 is then evidenced. This increase of the yearly incidence (from 21% to 183% between 1980 and 1984) has privileged the rising of Plasmodium falciparum which reached 75% of the national paraside index. Moreover, it has clearly followed a geographical progression from north to south within the group during the four years. Various possible causes to this alarming situation are examined, among which the emergence of chloroquin-resistant strains of P. falciparum, and the possibility of modifications in the vector's population, particularly hold the attention.

  5. 疟疾流行趋势分析及防控措施探讨%Analysis of the epidemic trend of malaria and probe the preventive measures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋静; 杨小兵; 杨绍金; 张皓

    2010-01-01

    Objective To analyze the incidence and epidemic characteristics of malaria cases in Yichang city, and to provide basis for malaria prevention and control. Methods All the epidermiological date of malaria cases from 2005-2009 were analyzed. Results In the past 5 years, the malaria incidences were relatively low, the morbidity c hanged in volatility, most cases were imported. Summer and autumn were peak season for the disease. The main cases returned from malaria endemic areas were the main disease population. Vivax malaria was as the major pest species. Conclusions The situation of imported malaria is grim in Yichang city. While in the control of local disease, the CDC and the relevant departments should increase awareness training and malaria control efforts, do a good job for overseas migrant workers and mobile population management and monitoring, reduce the risk of malaria secondary spread.%目的 分析宜昌市近5年来疟疾的发病特点和流行特征,为巩固疟疾防治成果和制定防控措施提供科学依据.方法 对2005-2009年全市所有疟疾病例流行病学调查资料进行分析.结果 5年间全市疟疾发病率较低,呈波动性变化,以输入性病例为主;每年夏秋季节为发病高峰;病例以男性青壮年为主,男女性别比为7.17∶1,67.35%的患者年龄为30~59岁;疟疾高流行地区返乡及援外务工回国人员是主要患病人群;主要为间日疟.结论 宜昌市输入性疟疾形势严峻,在控制本地发病的同时,各级疾控中心与相关部门应加大宣传培训和疟疾防治工作力度,认真做好出国务工人员及流动人口管理和监测,降低疟疾继发性传播的风险.

  6. The effect of household heads training about the use of treated bed nets on the burden of malaria and anaemia in under-five children: a cluster randomized trial in Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deribew Amare

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long-lasting insecticide-treated bed nets (LLITN have demonstrated a significant effect in reducing malaria-related morbidity and mortality. However, barriers on the utilization of LLITN have hampered the desired outcomes. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of community empowerment on the burden of malaria and anaemia in under-five children in Ethiopia. Methods A cluster randomized trial was done in 22 (11 intervention and 11 control villages in south-west Ethiopia. The intervention consisted of tailored training of household heads about the proper use of LLITN and community network system. The burden of malaria and anaemia in under-five children was determined through mass blood investigation at baseline, six and 12 months of the project period. Cases of malaria and anaemia were treated based on the national protocol. The burden of malaria and anaemia between the intervention and control villages was compared using the complex logistic regression model by taking into account the clustering effect. Eight Focus group discussions were conducted to complement the quantitative findings. Results A total of 2,105 household heads received the intervention and the prevalence of malaria and anaemia was assessed among 2410, 2037 and 2612 under-five children at baseline, six and 12 months of the project period respectively. During the high transmission/epidemic season, children in the intervention arm were less likely to have malaria as compared to children in the control arm (OR = 0.42; 95%CI: 0.32, 0.57. Symptomatic malaria also steadily declined in the intervention villages compared to the control villages in the follow up periods. Children in the intervention arm were less likely to be anaemic compared to those in the control arm both at the high (OR = 0.84; 95%CI: 0.71, 0.99 and low (OR = 0.73; 95%CI: 0.60, 0.89 transmission seasons. Conclusion Training of household heads on the utilization of LLITN significantly

  7. [Morbidity among forestry workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafalski, H; Bernacki, K

    1981-01-01

    The past and presently diagnosed diseases (excluding vibration disease and occupational hearing impairment) were analysed in 1105 sawers operating combustion drive mechanic saws and in 295 controls. The greatest rate, both in the sawers and controls, was that of the diseases of respiratory tract, circulatory system and osseo -- articulo -- muscular system, nervous system and sense organs. These constituted 86% of all diseases that afflicted sawers and controls. No specific general morbidity accompanying vibration disease or occupational hearing impairment was found in the sawers exposed to noise and vibration.

  8. Control of malaria: the rapid fever surveillance programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premanath, M

    1997-11-01

    Eighty-five villages out of nearly 300 villages of Tiptur taluka covering a population of 47,271 where the incidence of Plasmodium falciparum (PF) malaria was very high, were selected for a programme during Aug 93 which lasted for 29 months until the end of Dec 95. Ten days of fever radical treatment (FRT) and 54 weekly and 29 fortnightly rapid fever surveillance (RFS) programmes were conducted. 64,142 blood smears were examined out of which 21,542 were positive for malaria and 14,291 were of PF type. There were 9858 PF cases during the last 5 months of 1993, which came down to 349 by the end of 1995. Fever morbidity which was nearly 1000 new cases per day during FRT came down to 120, 78, and 30 new cases per day during 1993, 1994 and 1995, respectively. Parasite index (PI) for PF Malaria was 140-321 during 1993, came down to 0.6-15 at the end of the study. Four rounds of DDT, two rounds of Ikon and one round of Delta-methrin were sprayed in four and two PHC areas, respectively during this period. Asymptomatic carriers for PF malaria were detected in the children under 14 years of age (3.1%). This programme did prove very effective in bringing down morbidity and mortality due to PF Malaria in the community.

  9. Imported submicroscopic malaria in Madrid

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    Ramírez-Olivencia Germán

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Submicroscopic malaria (SMM can be defined as low-density infections of Plasmodium that are unlikely to be detected by conventional microscopy. Such submicroscopic infections only occasionally cause acute disease, but they are capable of infecting mosquitoes and contributing to transmission. This entity is frequent in endemic countries; however, little is known about imported SMM. The goals of this study were two-fold: a to know the frequency of imported SMM, and b to describe epidemiological, laboratorial and clinical features of imported SMM. Methods A retrospective study based on review of medical records was performed. The study population consisted of patients older than 15 years attended at the Tropical Medicine Unit of Hospital Carlos III, between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2007. Routinely detection techniques for Plasmodium included Field staining and microscopic examination through thick and thin blood smear. A semi-nested multiplex malaria PCR was used to diagnose or to confirm cases with low parasitaemia. Results SMM was diagnosed in 104 cases, representing 35.5% of all malaria cases. Mean age (IC95% was 40.38 years (37.41-43.34, and sex distribution was similar. Most cases were in immigrants, but some cases were found in travellers. Equatorial Guinea was the main country where infection was acquired (81.7%. Symptoms were present only in 28.8% of all SMM cases, mainly asthenia (73.3% of symptomatic patients, fever (60% and arthromialgias (53.3%. The associated laboratory abnormalities were anaemia (27.9%, leukopaenia (15.4% and thrombopaenia (15.4%. Co-morbidity was described in 75 cases (72.1%. Conclusions Results from this study suggest that imported SMM should be considered in some patients attended at Tropical Medicine Units. Although it is usually asymptomatic, it may be responsible of fever, or laboratory abnormalities in patients coming from endemic areas. The possibility of transmission in SMM has

  10. Artesunate-amodiaquine versus artesunate-sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine for uncomplicated falciparum malaria in children

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    Novie H. Rampengan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Malaria is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in children, especially in developing countries. Artemisinin combination therapy (ACT has higher rates of parasite clearance and inhibition of anti-malarial drugs resistance than non-ACT. Hence, we compared the efficacies of artesunate-amodiaquine (AS-AQ versus artesunate-sulfadoxine pyrimethamine (AS-SP combination therapies in children with uncomplicated falciparum malaria. Objective To compare the fever clearance time, parasite clearance time, and length of hospital stay in uncomplicated falciparum malaria patients treated with AS-AQ and AS-SP. Methods We reviewed the medical records of children aged 1-14 years with uncomplicated falciparum malaria admitted to Prof. Dr. R. D. Kandou Hospital between January 2002 – June 2010. Treatment efficacy was evaluated by fever clearance time, parasite clearance time, and length of hospital stay. The differences of treatment efficacy between the two groups of therapy were analyzed by independent T-test. Results We identified 185 children with uncomplicated falciparum malaria, 104 cases were treated with AS-AQ while the other 81 received AS-SP. Parasite clearance time was shorter in AS-AQ group than in AS-SP group at 1.38 (SD 0.69 versus 1.91 (SD 0.93 days, respectively (95%CI of differences 0.30 to 0.76, P<0.05. The length of hospital stay was shorter in AS-AQ group than in the AS-SP group, at 5.01 (SD 1.22 versus 6.04 (SD 0.98 days, respectively (95%CI of differences 0.71 to 1.35, P<0.05. However, there was no statistically significant difference in fever clearance time between the groups. Conclusion AS-AQ combination therapy reduces parasite clearance time and length of hospital stay compared to AS-SP combination therapy in children with uncomplicated falciparum malaria. [Paediatr Indones. 2014;54:46-51.].

  11. [Study of morbidity and Plasmodium species in the several geographic-climatic areas of Mauritania].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouldabdallahi, M; Ouldbezeid, M; Lemrabot, M A; Ouldelvally, A; Ouldkhairi, M L; Dialw, B; Basco, L

    2015-03-01

    We studied the proportion of malaria-infected patients among febrile outpatients in nine health centres selected in relation to their geo-climatic location and the level of malaria transmission in order to establish a reliable database on malaria-associated morbidity and Plasmodium species in three epidemiological strata in Mauritania. Blood samples were collected from a total of 7368 febrile individuals (1603 in sahelian zone, 3023 in sahelian-saharan transition zone, and 2742 in Saharan zone) to examine thin and thick blood smears between August 2010 and July 2011. The proportion of malaria-infected patients was 9.1% (672/7368). Depending on the season, the proportion varied from 16.3% (494/3021), 5.5% (157/2850), to 1.4% (21/1497) during the humid season (July-October), cool dry season (December-March), and hot dry season (April-June), respectively. Febrile patients in the sahelian-Saharan transition zone were most affected by malaria, with 65.6% (441/672) smear-positive cases. P. vivax occurred most frequently (61.6%, 414/672). P. falciparum, P. ovale, and P. malariae accounted for 32.4% (218/672), 5.2% (35/672), and 0.8% (5/672) of smear-positive cases, respectively. These data may contribute to improving our knowledge on malaria in Mauritania, which may in turn help develop control strategies and improved monitoring in each geo-climatic zone.

  12. Study of the climatic change impact on vector-borne diseases in West Africa: the case of tick-borne borreliosis and malaria; Etude de l'impact du changement climatique sur les maladies a transmission vectorielle en Afrique de l'Ouest: le cas de la borreliose a tiques et du paludisme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trape, J.F

    2005-04-15

    Malaria and tick-borne borreliosis are the two first causes of morbidity due to vector-borne diseases in a large part of Sudan-sahelian West Africa. They are also the two tropical diseases which have been the most affected by climatic change in recent years. In the case of tick-borne borreliosis it has been shown in Senegal that the persistence of drought since the years 70 has been associated with a considerable extension of the geographic range of diseases and the vector tick A-sonrai, a species that was in the past limited to the Sahara and Sahel. In the case of malaria, drought has strongly reduced in these same regions of Africa the distribution, abundance and infection rate of Anopheline mosquitoes, but without any significant reduction of the burden of malaria for most populations concerned. The emergence and spread of Plasmodium falciparum resistance to antimalarial drugs only explain part of this phenomenon. (A.L.B.)

  13. Malaria, malnutrition, and birthweight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cates, Jordan E.; Unger, Holger W.; Briand, Valerie

    2017-01-01

    were identified by the Maternal Malaria and Malnutrition (M3) initiative using a convenience sampling approach and were eligible for pooling given adequate ethical approval and availability of essential variables. Study-specific adjusted effect estimates were calculated using inverse probability...... be multiplicative interaction between malaria infection at enrollment and low MUAC within studies conducted in Africa; however, this finding was not consistent on the additive scale, when accounting for multiple comparisons, or when using other definitions of malaria and malnutrition. The major limitations...... of the study included availability of only 2 cross-sectional measurements of malaria and the limited availability of ultrasound-based pregnancy dating to assess impacts on preterm birth and fetal growth in all studies.  Conclusions : Pregnant women with malnutrition and malaria infection are at increased risk...

  14. Rapid Diagnosis of Malaria

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    Clinton K. Murray

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaria's global impact is expansive and includes the extremes of the healthcare system ranging from international travelers returning to nonendemic regions with tertiary referral medical care to residents in hyperendemic regions without access to medical care. Implementation of prompt and accurate diagnosis is needed to curb the expanding global impact of malaria associated with ever-increasing antimalarial drug resistance. Traditionally, malaria is diagnosed using clinical criteria and/or light microscopy even though both strategies are clearly inadequate in many healthcare settings. Hand held immunochromatographic rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs have been recognized as an ideal alternative method for diagnosing malaria. Numerous malaria RDTs have been developed and are widely available; however, an assortment of issues related to these products have become apparent. This review provides a summary of RDT including effectiveness and strategies to select the ideal RDT in varying healthcare settings.

  15. Dengue infection as a potential trigger of an imported Plasmodium ovale malaria relapse or a long incubation period in a non-endemic malaria region

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    Otília Lupi

    2016-03-01

    Conclusions: Concurrent infections of DENV and malaria have rarely been reported; the actual impact of these sequential or simultaneous infections remains unknown. Therefore, DF must be considered as a potential co-morbidity for malaria, because of its influence on fluid electrolyte management. The case presented showed consistent temporal, clinical, and laboratory evidence that the relapse or the long incubation period of P. ovale malaria may have been triggered by a recent DF episode. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first report of DENV and P. ovale co-infection.

  16. Can Wolbachia be used to control malaria?

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    Thomas Walker

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is a mosquito-borne infectious disease caused by Plasmodium parasites transmitted by the infectious bite of Anopheles mosquitoes. Vector control of malaria has predominantly focused on targeting the adult mosquito through insecticides and bed nets. However, current vector control methods are often not sustainable for long periods so alternative methods are needed. A novel biocontrol approach for mosquito-borne diseases has recently been proposed, it uses maternally inherited endosymbiotic Wolbachia bacteria transinfected into mosquitoes in order to interfere with pathogen transmission. Transinfected Wolbachia strains in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, the primary vector of dengue fever, directly inhibit pathogen replication, including Plasmodium gallinaceum, and also affect mosquito reproduction to allow Wolbachia to spread through mosquito populations. In addition, transient Wolbachia infections in Anopheles gambiae significantly reduce Plasmodium levels. Here we review the prospects of using a Wolbachia-based approach to reduce human malaria transmission through transinfection of Anopheles mosquitoes.

  17. Malaria control in the African Region: perceptions and viewspoints on proceedings of the Africa Leaders Malaria Alliance (ALMA

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    Sambo Luis

    2011-06-01

    ; and levering of African Union and regional economic communities to address the cross-border dimension of malaria control. It was agreed that countries needed to secure adequate domestic and external funding for sustained commitment to malaria elimination; strengthen national malaria control programmes in the context of broader health system strengthening; ensure free access to long-lasting insecticide treated nets and malaria diagnosis and treatment for vulnerable groups; strengthen human resource capacity at central, district and community levels; and establish strong logistics, information and surveillance systems. Conclusion It is critically important for countries to have a clear vision and strategy for malaria elimination; effective leadership of national malaria control programmes; draw lessons from other African countries that have succeeded to dramatically reduce the burden of malaria; and sustain funding and ongoing interventions.

  18. Integrated vector management for malaria control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Impoinvil Daniel E

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Integrated vector management (IVM is defined as "a rational decision-making process for the optimal use of resources for vector control" and includes five key elements: 1 evidence-based decision-making, 2 integrated approaches 3, collaboration within the health sector and with other sectors, 4 advocacy, social mobilization, and legislation, and 5 capacity-building. In 2004, the WHO adopted IVM globally for the control of all vector-borne diseases. Important recent progress has been made in developing and promoting IVM for national malaria control programmes in Africa at a time when successful malaria control programmes are scaling-up with insecticide-treated nets (ITN and/or indoor residual spraying (IRS coverage. While interventions using only ITNs and/or IRS successfully reduce transmission intensity and the burden of malaria in many situations, it is not clear if these interventions alone will achieve those critical low levels that result in malaria elimination. Despite the successful employment of comprehensive integrated malaria control programmes, further strengthening of vector control components through IVM is relevant, especially during the "end-game" where control is successful and further efforts are required to go from low transmission situations to sustained local and country-wide malaria elimination. To meet this need and to ensure sustainability of control efforts, malaria control programmes should strengthen their capacity to use data for decision-making with respect to evaluation of current vector control programmes, employment of additional vector control tools in conjunction with ITN/IRS tactics, case-detection and treatment strategies, and determine how much and what types of vector control and interdisciplinary input are required to achieve malaria elimination. Similarly, on a global scale, there is a need for continued research to identify and evaluate new tools for vector control that can be integrated with

  19. Social factors and cardiovascular morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Eric John

    2017-03-01

    Recent progress in population health at aggregate level, measured by life expectancy, has been accompanied by lack of progress in reducing the difference in health prospects between groups defined by social status. Cardiovascular disease is an important contributor to this undesirable situation. The stepwise gradient of higher risk with lower status is accounted for partly by social gradients in health behaviors. The psychosocial hypothesis provides a stronger explanation, based on social patterning of living and working environments and psychological assets that individuals develop during childhood. Three decades of research based on Whitehall II and other cohort studies provide evidence for psychosocial pathways leading to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Job stress is a useful paradigm because exposure is long term and depends on occupational status. Studies of social-biological translation implicate autonomic and neuroendocrine function among the biological systems that mediate between chronic adverse psychosocial exposures and increased cardiometabolic risk and cardiovascular disease incidence.

  20. Battling the malaria iceberg with chloroquine in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vinod P

    2007-08-07

    The National Vector Borne Disease Control Programme (NVBDCP) of the Ministry of Health, Government of India is reporting about 2 million parasite positive cases each year, although case incidence is 30-fold or more under-estimated. Forty five to fifty percent of Plasmodium infections are caused by Plasmodium falciparum, the killer parasite. Anti-malaria drug policy (2007) of the NVBDC recommends chloroquine (CQ) as the first line of drug for the treatment of all malarias. In a Primary Health Centre (PHC) reporting 10% or more cases of CQ resistance in P. falciparum, ACT blister pack is recommended and, so far, the policy has been adopted in 261 PHCs of 71 districts. The NVBDCP still depends on CQ to combat malaria and, as a result, P. falciparum has taken deep roots in malaria-endemic regions, causing unacceptable levels of morbidity and mortality. This policy was a subject of criticism in recent Nature and Lancet articles questioning the World Bank's decision to supply CQ to the NVBDCP. Continuation of an outdated drug in the treatment of P. falciparum is counterproductive in fighting drug resistant malaria and in the containment of P. falciparum. Switchover to Artemisinin-based Combination Therapy (ACT) in the treatment of all P. falciparum cases, ban on artemisinin monotherapy and effective vector control (treated nets/efficient insecticide spraying) would be a rational approach to malaria control in India.

  1. Battling the malaria iceberg with chloroquine in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Vinod P

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The National Vector Borne Disease Control Programme (NVBDCP of the Ministry of Health, Government of India is reporting about 2 million parasite positive cases each year, although case incidence is 30-fold or more under-estimated. Forty five to fifty percent of Plasmodium infections are caused by Plasmodium falciparum, the killer parasite. Anti-malaria drug policy (2007 of the NVBDC recommends chloroquine (CQ as the first line of drug for the treatment of all malarias. In a Primary Health Centre (PHC reporting 10% or more cases of CQ resistance in P. falciparum, ACT blister pack is recommended and, so far, the policy has been adopted in 261 PHCs of 71 districts. The NVBDCP still depends on CQ to combat malaria and, as a result, P. falciparum has taken deep roots in malaria-endemic regions, causing unacceptable levels of morbidity and mortality. This policy was a subject of criticism in recent Nature and Lancet articles questioning the World Bank's decision to supply CQ to the NVBDCP. Continuation of an outdated drug in the treatment of P. falciparum is counterproductive in fighting drug resistant malaria and in the containment of P. falciparum. Switchover to Artemisinin-based Combination Therapy (ACT in the treatment of all P. falciparum cases, ban on artemisinin monotherapy and effective vector control (treated nets/efficient insecticide spraying would be a rational approach to malaria control in India.

  2. Malaria prophylaxis in the French armed forces: evolution of concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touze, J E; Paule, P; Baudon, D; Boutin, J P

    2001-01-01

    Malaria is still a serious public health problem in the world and control remains a major priority for the approximately 25.000 French troops deployed, mostly on permanent assignment, in malaria transmission regions. Epidemiological surveillance of malaria provides data necessary to assess morbidity, monitor changing patterns of Plasmodium falciparum drug-sensitivity, and evaluate the efficacy of malaria control measures. About 540 cases were observed in 1999 for an incidence of 4.1 p. 100 men. year. Since 1991, strong emphasis has been placed on prophylaxis. In addition to vector control measures and individual protection against mosquito bites (impregnated bednets, protective clothing, application of repellents, and indoor insecticide spraying), drug prophylaxis has been recommended using a combination of 100 mg of chloroquine and 200 mg of proguanil chlorhydrate (CQ + PG) in a single capsule manufactured by the French Health Army Service. Initially this policy led to a significant decrease in malaria cases among French soldiers. However the incidence of malaria rose in 1995 and 1996. This recrudescence was attributed to poor compliance with chemoprophylaxis and to the declining efficacy of the CQ + PG combination. In response to these problems, a new policy was implemented especially in countries where cycloguanil-resistant Plasmodium falciparum incidence rate is increasing. The new chemoprophylactic regimen calls for a personal prescription of mefloquine. Doxycycline monohydrate is used in case of mefloquine contra-indication or intolerance. Combination of CQ + PG delivered in a single capsule remains a suitable chemoprophylactic regimen in Sahel countries as well as Horn of Africa.

  3. Gastrointestinal Morbidity in Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Andres; Camilleri, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a complex disease that results from increased energy intake and decreased energy expenditure. The gastrointestinal system plays a key role in the pathogenesis of obesity and facilitates caloric imbalance. Changes in gastrointestinal hormones and the inhibition of mechanisms that curtail caloric intake result in weight gain. It is not clear if the gastrointestinal role in obesity is a cause or an effect of this disease. Obesity is often associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Obesity is also associated with gastrointestinal disorders, which are more frequent and present earlier than T2DM and CVD. Diseases such as gastro-esophageal reflux disease, cholelithiasis or non-alcoholic steatohepatitis are directly related to body weight and abdominal adiposity. Our objective is to assess the role of each gastrointestinal organ in obesity and the gastrointestinal morbidity resulting in those organs from effects of obesity. PMID:24602085

  4. Systemic and cerebral vascular endothelial growth factor levels increase in murine cerebral malaria along with increased Calpain and caspase activity and can be reduced by erythropoietin treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hempel, Casper; Hoyer, Nils; Kildemoes, Anna;

    2014-01-01

    . Furthermore, we noticed increased caspase-3 and calpain activity in terminally ill mice, as measured by protease-specific cleavage of α-spectrin and p35. In conclusion, we detected increased cerebral and systemic VEGF as well as HIF-1α, which in the brain were reduced to normal in EPO-treated mice. Also...... caspase and calpain activity was reduced markedly in EPO-treated mice....

  5. Malaria vaccine offers hope. International / Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-04-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) may soon sign an agreement with the Colombian government to build a plant in Colombia for the mass production of the malaria vaccine SPf66. SPf66 consists of a combination of synthetic peptides. It will eventually be available in Africa, where 90% of all recorded malaria cases occur each year. 1 million of the 1.5-3 million malaria-related deaths each year also occur in Africa. Many of these deaths take place in children. The indirect costs of malaria in Africa is expected to increase from $800 million to $1.8 billion between 1987 and the end of 1995. Based on findings from the various clinical trials in Colombia, Thailand, The Gambia, and Tanzania, WHO's director of Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR) claims that, if SPf66 can reduce the malaria incidence rate by 50% and thereby also the malaria-related death rate, the lives of 500,000 children in Africa would be spared. TDR will meet in mid-1996 to sort through all the SPf66 findings and then develop a policy for further development or production and use of SPf66. The price of each SPf66 vaccination should be around $5, comparable with the higher range of costs of other vaccines provided by WHO's Expanded Program of Immunization and UNICEF. At the 1992 WHO summit in Amsterdam, the president of the Congo called for the international community to join forces to eliminate malaria. When it was first tested on humans, in Colombia, the protection rate of SPf66 ranged from 22% to 77%, with the best results among the young and the very old. It has not caused any harmful side effects.

  6. Iron incorporation and post-malaria anaemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conor P Doherty

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Iron supplementation is employed to treat post-malarial anaemia in environments where iron deficiency is common. Malaria induces an intense inflammatory reaction that stalls reticulo-endothelial macrophagal iron recycling from haemolysed red blood cells and inhibits oral iron absorption, but the magnitude and duration of these effects are unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined the red blood cell incorporation of oral administered stable isotopes of iron and compared incorporation between age matched 18 to 36 months old children with either anaemia post-malaria (n = 37 or presumed iron deficiency anaemia alone (n = 36. All children were supplemented for 30 days with 2 mg/kg elemental iron as liquid iron sulphate and administered (57Fe and (58Fe on days 1 and 15 of supplementation respectively. (57Fe and(58Fe incorporation were significantly reduced (8% vs. 28%: p<0.001 and 14% vs. 26%: p = 0.045 in the malaria vs. non-malaria groups. There was a significantly greater haemoglobin response in the malaria group at both day 15 (p = 0.001 and 30 (p<0.000 with a regression analysis estimated greater change in haemoglobin of 7.2 g/l (s.e. 2.0 and 10.1 g/l (s.e. 2.5 respectively. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Post-malaria anaemia is associated with a better haemoglobin recovery despite a significant depressant effect on oral iron incorporation which may indicate that early erythropoetic iron need is met by iron recycling rather than oral iron. Supplemental iron administration is of questionable utility within 2 weeks of clinical malaria in children with mild or moderate anaemia.

  7. [Malaria in Algerian Sahara].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammadi, D; Boubidi, S C; Chaib, S E; Saber, A; Khechache, Y; Gasmi, M; Harrat, Z

    2009-08-01

    Thanks to the malaria eradication campaign launched in Algeria in 1968, the number of malaria cases fell down significantly from 95,424 cases in 1960 to 30 cases in 1978. At that time the northern part of the country was declared free of Plasmodium falciparum. Only few cases belonging to P. vivax persisted in residual foci in the middle part of the country. In the beginning of the eighties, the south of the country was marked by an increase of imported malaria cases. The resurgence of the disease in the oases coincided with the opening of the Trans-Saharan road and the booming trade with the neighbouring southern countries. Several authors insisted on the risk of introduction of malaria or its exotic potential vectors in Algeria via this new road. Now, the totality of malaria autochthonous cases in Algeria are located in the south of the country where 300 cases were declared during the period (1980-2007). The recent outbreak recorded in 2007 at the borders with Mall and the introduction of Anopheles gambiae into the Algerian territory show the vulnerability of this area to malaria which is probably emphasized by the local environmental changes. The authors assess the evolution of malaria in the Sahara region and draw up the distribution of the anopheles in this area.

  8. Malaria risk factors in north-east Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mtove George

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the factors which determine a household's or individual's risk of malaria infection is important for targeting control interventions at all intensities of transmission. Malaria ecology in Tanzania appears to have reduced over recent years. This study investigated potential risk factors and clustering in face of changing infection dynamics. Methods Household survey data were collected in villages of rural Muheza district. Children aged between six months and thirteen years were tested for presence of malaria parasites using microscopy. A multivariable logistic regression model was constructed to identify significant risk factors for children. Geographical information systems combined with global positioning data and spatial scan statistic analysis were used to identify clusters of malaria. Results Using an insecticide-treated mosquito net of any type proved to be highly protective against malaria (OR 0.75, 95% CI 0.59-0.96. Children aged five to thirteen years were at higher risk of having malaria than those aged under five years (OR 1.71, 95% CI 1.01-2.91. The odds of malaria were less for females when compared to males (OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.39-0.98. Two spatial clusters of significantly increased malaria risk were identified in two out of five villages. Conclusions This study provides evidence that recent declines in malaria transmission and prevalence may shift the age groups at risk of malaria infection to older children. Risk factor analysis provides support for universal coverage and targeting of long-lasting insecticide-treated nets (LLINs to all age groups. Clustering of cases indicates heterogeneity of risk. Improved targeting of LLINs or additional supplementary control interventions to high risk clusters may improve outcomes and efficiency as malaria transmission continues to fall under intensified control.

  9. Assessment of Burden of Malaria in Gwanda District, Zimbabwe, Using the Disability Adjusted Life Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunda, Resign; Chimbari, Moses John; Mukaratirwa, Samson

    2016-02-22

    Malaria is one of the highest contributors to morbidity and mortality in Zimbabwe. However, there is paucity of knowledge regarding disability adjusted life years (DALYs) as a measure of burden of malaria in affected communities. The DALYs metric was used to assess the burden of malaria in Gwanda District with the aim of contributing to a better understanding of the impact of disease on affected communities. Data was collected from health facility malaria registers and the District Health Information System (DHIS) to estimate DALYs at household and district levels respectively. The household DALYs included 130 malaria cases from 2013 to 2015 while the DALYs for the district included 719 confirmed malaria cases from 2011 to 2015. Households lost a total of 153.89 DALYs with the majority of the disease burden (65.55%) occurring in the most economically productive age group (15-45 years) with a mean loss of 1.18 DALYs per malaria case. At district level, 251.09 DALYs were lost due to malaria and the calculated average district DALY rate for 2011-2015 was 36.29 DALYs/100,000 persons per year. It is important to estimate malaria burden to assist policy makers in making informed decisions when channelling resources for control and prevention of the disease.

  10. COMMUNITY KNOWLEDGE ABOUT MALARIA TREATMENT, BATEALIT AND MAYONG SUBDISTRICTS, JEPARA REGENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suharjo Suharjo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Malaria prevalence in endemic areas could result morbidity as well as mortality because of lack of early warning system of malaria program providers in the field and low community participation. A study was conducted in Batealit and Mayong subdistricts to measure of malaria treatment through interview with 100 the knowledge respondents using structured questionnaires. Data analysis was done to obtain descriptive and narrative data regarding education, main occupation, experience of getting and curing malaria. The study revealed that majority of respondent's highest education in Batealit and Mayong was primary school, with the percentage of 37.0% respectively. Most of respondent's occupation in Batealit and Mayong was fishermen, with the proportion of 41% and 24.0% respectively. The number of respondents of suffering malaria in Batealit was lower compared to Mayong, that was 64.0%. The first effort of respondents to cure malaria was curing themselves by taking medicine from vendors, with the percentages of 26,0% in Batealit and in Mayong. The other respondents went to health centers for getting free medicine, with the proportion of 44,0% in Batualit and in Mayong. It seems that level of education would influence the knowledge of respondents and in turn could increase their health status. Therefore, the study suggests that continued dissemination of information regarding malaria and related measures through several kinds of methods would increase community knowledge of malaria treatment. Key words : Malaria, Knowledge, Treatment

  11. Visualizing the uncertainty in the relationship between seasonal average climate and malaria risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, D. A.; Morse, A. P.

    2014-12-01

    Around $1.6 billion per year is spent financing anti-malaria initiatives, and though malaria morbidity is falling, the impact of annual epidemics remains significant. Whilst malaria risk may increase with climate change, projections are highly uncertain and to sidestep this intractable uncertainty, adaptation efforts should improve societal ability to anticipate and mitigate individual events. Anticipation of climate-related events is made possible by seasonal climate forecasting, from which warnings of anomalous seasonal average temperature and rainfall, months in advance are possible. Seasonal climate hindcasts have been used to drive climate-based models for malaria, showing significant skill for observed malaria incidence. However, the relationship between seasonal average climate and malaria risk remains unquantified. Here we explore this relationship, using a dynamic weather-driven malaria model. We also quantify key uncertainty in the malaria model, by introducing variability in one of the first order uncertainties in model formulation. Results are visualized as location-specific impact surfaces: easily integrated with ensemble seasonal climate forecasts, and intuitively communicating quantified uncertainty. Methods are demonstrated for two epidemic regions, and are not limited to malaria modeling; the visualization method could be applied to any climate impact.

  12. Geospatial Technology: A Tool to Aid in the Elimination of Malaria in Bangladesh

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    Karen E. Kirk

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Bangladesh is a malaria endemic country. There are 13 districts in the country bordering India and Myanmar that are at risk of malaria. The majority of malaria morbidity and mortality cases are in the Chittagong Hill Tracts, the mountainous southeastern region of Bangladesh. In recent years, malaria burden has declined in the country. In this study, we reviewed and summarized published data (through 2014 on the use of geospatial technologies on malaria epidemiology in Bangladesh and outlined potential contributions of geospatial technologies for eliminating malaria in the country. We completed a literature review using “malaria, Bangladesh” search terms and found 218 articles published in peer-reviewed journals listed in PubMed. After a detailed review, 201 articles were excluded because they did not meet our inclusion criteria, 17 articles were selected for final evaluation. Published studies indicated geospatial technologies tools (Geographic Information System, Global Positioning System, and Remote Sensing were used to determine vector-breeding sites, land cover classification, accessibility to health facility, treatment seeking behaviors, and risk mapping at the household, regional, and national levels in Bangladesh. To achieve the goal of malaria elimination in Bangladesh, we concluded that further research using geospatial technologies should be integrated into the country’s ongoing surveillance system to identify and better assess progress towards malaria elimination.

  13. Compliance to the treatment of malaria cases in Ahmedabad City- A Qualitative Study

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    Sonal Parikh

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Malaria is a serious public health problem in India, accounting for sizeable morbidity, mortality and economic loss 1,2 . A Revised National Drug Policy on Malaria adopted and the guidelines have been prepared for healthcare personnel including clinicians involved in the treatment of malaria 2. Aim: 1 To study adherence to the protocol in diagnosis & management of malaria cases by private medical practitioners and Urban Health Centres (UHC of Ahmedabad Municipal Corporation (AMC. Methodology- This was a qualitative study in which 29 UHCs and 97 private practitioners of three zones of Ahmedabad Municipal Corporation were visited. Case papers of last 2 months and all malaria related registers maintained at UHCs were evaluated and home visit of 115 malaria cases was carried out. Observation & Discussion- 93.7% of patient with confirmed vivax malaria were prescribed Chloroquine and 99.1% patient with confirmed malaria prescribed Primaquine with correct dose as per age & schedule. Only 78.8% private practitioner was following the guideline dose. 20.2% of private practitioner were not prescribing Primaquine at all. Conclusion & Recommendation There was lack of sensitization in some M.O. of U.H.C & private practitioners (other than M.D. Medicine regarding prescribing treatment as per National Drug Policy for treatment of Malaria especially primaquine. Sensitization & involvement of private doctors for rational prescription through the Indian / Ahmedabad Medical Association must be carried out.

  14. Impact and Lessons Learned from Mass Drug Administrations of Malaria Chemoprevention during the Ebola Outbreak in Monrovia, Liberia, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehne, Anna; Tiffany, Amanda; Lasry, Estrella; Janssens, Michel; Besse, Clement; Okonta, Chibuzo; Larbi, Kwabena; Pah, Alfred C.; Danis, Kostas; Porten, Klaudia

    2016-01-01

    Background In October 2014, during the Ebola outbreak in Liberia healthcare services were limited while malaria transmission continued. Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) implemented a mass drug administration (MDA) of malaria chemoprevention (CP) in Monrovia to reduce malaria-associated morbidity. In order to inform future interventions, we described the scale of the MDA, evaluated its acceptance and estimated the effectiveness. Methods MSF carried out two rounds of MDA with artesunate/amodiaquine (ASAQ) targeting four neighbourhoods of Monrovia (October to December 2014). We systematically selected households in the distribution area and administered standardized questionnaires. We calculated incidence ratios (IR) of side effects using poisson regression and compared self-reported fever risk differences (RD) pre- and post-MDA using a z-test. Findings In total, 1,259,699 courses of ASAQ-CP were distributed. All households surveyed (n = 222; 1233 household members) attended the MDA in round 1 (r1) and 96% in round 2 (r2) (212/222 households; 1,154 household members). 52% (643/1233) initiated ASAQ-CP in r1 and 22% (256/1154) in r2. Of those not initiating ASAQ-CP, 29% (172/590) saved it for later in r1, 47% (423/898) in r2. Experiencing side effects in r1 was not associated with ASAQ-CP initiation in r2 (IR 1.0, 95%CI 0.49–2.1). The incidence of self-reported fever decreased from 4.2% (52/1229) in the month prior to r1 to 1.5% (18/1229) after r1 (p<0.001) and decrease was larger among household members completing ASAQ-CP (RD = 4.9%) compared to those not initiating ASAQ-CP (RD = 0.6%) in r1 (p<0.001). Conclusions The reduction in self-reported fever cases following the intervention suggests that MDAs may be effective in reducing cases of fever during Ebola outbreaks. Despite high coverage, initiation of ASAQ-CP was low. Combining MDAs with longer term interventions to prevent malaria and to improve access to healthcare may reduce both the incidence of malaria and

  15. Malaria prevention in travelers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genton, Blaise; D'Acremont, Valérie

    2012-09-01

    A common approach to malaria prevention is to follow the "A, B, C, D" rule: Awareness of risk, Bite avoidance, Compliance with chemoprophylaxis, and prompt Diagnosis in case of fever. The risk of acquiring malaria depends on the length and intensity of exposure; the risk of developing severe disease is primarily determined by the health status of the traveler. These parameters need to be assessed before recommending chemoprophylaxis and/or stand-by emergency treatment. This review discusses the different strategies and drug options available for the prevention of malaria during and post travel.

  16. Malaria and Vascular Endothelium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alencar, Aristóteles Comte Filho de, E-mail: aristoteles.caf@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Amazonas, Manaus, AM (Brazil); Lacerda, Marcus Vinícius Guimarães de [Fundação de Medicina Tropical Dr. Heitor Vieira Dourado (FMT-HVD), Manaus, AM (Brazil); Okoshi, Katashi; Okoshi, Marina Politi [Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu (Unesp), Botucatu, SP (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Involvement of the cardiovascular system in patients with infectious and parasitic diseases can result from both intrinsic mechanisms of the disease and drug intervention. Malaria is an example, considering that the endothelial injury by Plasmodium-infected erythrocytes can cause circulatory disorders. This is a literature review aimed at discussing the relationship between malaria and endothelial impairment, especially its effects on the cardiovascular system. We discuss the implications of endothelial aggression and the interdisciplinarity that should guide the malaria patient care, whose acute infection can contribute to precipitate or aggravate a preexisting heart disease.

  17. Malaria Modeling and Surveillance in Thailand and Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiang, Richard; Adimi, Farida; Soebiyanto, Radina

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the modeling of malaria transmission in Thailand and Indonesia to assist in the understanding and reducing the incidence of the deadly disease. Satellite observations are being integrated into this work, and this is described herein.

  18. mothers' knowledge on malaria and vector management strategies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-09-01

    Sep 1, 2006 ... such as headache (70%), fever (68.8%), cold (65%), body or joint pain (65.5%) and abdominal pain/ ... and non-immune individuals (1). ..... reduce mosquitoes and their effect. .... Malaria early warning systems, concepts.

  19. Malaria transmission blocking immunity and sexual stage vaccines for interrupting malaria transmission in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam Arévalo-Herrera

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is a vector-borne disease that is considered to be one of the most serious public health problems due to its high global mortality and morbidity rates. Although multiple strategies for controlling malaria have been used, many have had limited impact due to the appearance and rapid dissemination of mosquito resistance to insecticides, parasite resistance to multiple antimalarial drug, and the lack of sustainability. Individuals in endemic areas that have been permanently exposed to the parasite develop specific immune responses capable of diminishing parasite burden and the clinical manifestations of the disease, including blocking of parasite transmission to the mosquito vector. This is referred to as transmission blocking (TB immunity (TBI and is mediated by specific antibodies and other factors ingested during the blood meal that inhibit parasite development in the mosquito. These antibodies recognize proteins expressed on either gametocytes or parasite stages that develop in the mosquito midgut and are considered to be potential malaria vaccine candidates. Although these candidates, collectively called TB vaccines (TBV, would not directly stop malaria from infecting individuals, but would stop transmission from infected person to non-infected person. Here, we review the progress that has been achieved in TBI studies and the development of TBV and we highlight their potential usefulness in areas of low endemicity such as Latin America.

  20. Parasites and vectors carry no passport: how to fund cross-border and regional efforts to achieve malaria elimination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gueye Cara

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tremendous progress has been made in the last ten years in reducing morbidity and mortality caused by malaria, in part because of increases in global funding for malaria control and elimination. Today, many countries are striving for malaria elimination. However, a major challenge is the neglect of cross-border and regional initiatives in malaria control and elimination. This paper seeks to better understand Global Fund support for multi-country initiatives. Methods Documents and proposals were extracted and reviewed from two main sources, the Global Fund website and Aidspan.org. Documents and reports from the Global Fund Technical Review Panel, Board, and Secretariat documents such as guidelines and proposal templates were reviewed to establish the type of policies enacted and guidance provided from the Global Fund on multi-country initiatives and applications. From reviewing this information, the researchers created 29 variables according to eight dimensions to use in a review of Round 10 applications. All Round 10 multi-country applications (for HIV, malaria and tuberculosis and all malaria multi-country applications (6 from Rounds 1 – 10 were extracted from the Global Fund website. A blind review was conducted of Round 10 applications using the 29 variables as a framework, followed by a review of four of the six successful malaria multi-country grant applications from Rounds 1 – 10. Findings During Rounds 3 – 10 of the Global Fund, only 5.8% of grants submitted were for multi-country initiatives. Out of 83 multi-country proposals submitted, 25.3% were approved by the Technical Review Panel (TRP for funding, compared to 44.9% of single-country applications. The majority of approved multi-country applications were for HIV (76.2%, followed by malaria (19.0%, then tuberculosis (4.8%. TRP recommendations resulted in improvements to application forms, although guidance was generally vague. The in-depth review of Round 10

  1. Systemic and cerebral vascular endothelial growth factor levels increase in murine cerebral malaria along with increased Calpain and caspase activity and can be reduced by erythropoietin treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hempel, Casper; Hoyer, Nils; Kildemoes, Anna

    2014-01-01

    increased levels of VEGF in brain and plasma and decreased plasma levels of soluble VEGF receptor 2. EPO treatment normalized VEGF receptor 2 levels and reduced brain VEGF levels. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α was significantly upregulated whereas cerebral HIF-2α and EPO levels remained unchanged....... Furthermore, we noticed increased caspase-3 and calpain activity in terminally ill mice, as measured by protease-specific cleavage of α-spectrin and p35. In conclusion, we detected increased cerebral and systemic VEGF as well as HIF-1α, which in the brain were reduced to normal in EPO-treated mice. Also...

  2. Analysing the quality of routine malaria data in Mozambique

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    Sundby Johanne

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Mozambique, malaria is the principal cause of morbidity and mortality. Efforts are being made to increase control activities within communities. These activities require management decisions based on evidence of malaria incidence. Although some data generated are of poor quality, there is little research towards improving the reporting systems. Methods An analysis of the quality of routine malaria data was performed in selected districts in Southern Mozambique from August to September 2003. The aim was to assess the quality of the source data in terms of completeness, correctness and consistency across management levels. Results Analysis revealed primary data to be of poor quality. The diversity of reporting systems with limited coordination give rise to redundancies and wastage of resources. There was evidence of "invention" of data in health facilities contributing to an incorrect representation of malaria incidence. Large, "non-clinical", time-based variations of malaria cases due to reporting delays were also noted, contributing to false alerts of outbreaks. Furthermore, targets established in the national strategic plan for malaria cannot be calculated through the existing systems; this is the case, for example, for data related to pregnant women and children under-five years. Discussion and recommendations The existing reporting system for malaria is currently not satisfying the information needs of managers. It is suggested that one standardized system, including the creation of one form to include the essential variables required for the calculation of key indicators by age, gender and pregnancy status, and to establish a national database that maps malaria by location.

  3. Plasmodium vivax malaria during pregnancy, Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brutus, Laurent; Santalla, José; Schneider, Dominique; Avila, Juan Carlos; Deloron, Philippe

    2013-10-01

    Plasmodium vivax is a major cause of illness in areas with low transmission of malaria in Latin America, Asia, and the Horn of Africa. However, pregnancy-associated malaria remains poorly characterized in such areas. Using a hospital-based survey of women giving birth and an antenatal survey, we assessed the prevalence rates of Plasmodium spp. infections in pregnant women in Bolivia, and evaluated the consequences of malaria during pregnancy on the health of mothers and newborns. P. vivax infection was detected in 7.9% of pregnant women attending antenatal visits, and placental infection occurred in 2.8% of deliveries; these rates did not vary with parity. Forty-two percent of all P. vivax malaria episodes were symptomatic. P. vivax-infected pregnant women were frequently anemic (6.5%) and delivered babies of reduced birthweight. P. vivax infections during pregnancy are clearly associated with serious adverse outcomes and should be considered in prevention strategies of pregnancy-associated malaria.

  4. Household cost of malaria overdiagnosis in rural Mozambique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armázio Luiz

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is estimated that over 70% of patients with suspected malaria in sub-Saharan Africa, diagnose and manage their illness at home without referral to a formal health clinic. Of those patients who do attend a formal health clinic, malaria overdiagnosis rates are estimated to range between 30–70%. Methods This paper details an observational cohort study documenting the number and cost of repeat consultations as a result of malaria overdiagnosis at two health care providers in a rural district of Mozambique. 535 adults and children with a clinical diagnosis of malaria were enrolled and followed over a 21 day period to assess treatment regimen, symptoms, number and cost of repeat visits to health providers in patients misdiagnosed with malaria compared to those with confirmed malaria (determined by positive bloodfilm reading. Results Diagnosis based solely on clinical symptoms overdiagnosed 23% of children ( Conclusion Overdiagnosis of malaria results in a greater number of healthcare visits and associated cost for adult patients. Additionally, it is clear that the poorest individuals pay significantly more proportionally for their healthcare making it imperative that the treatment they receive is correct in order to prevent wastage of limited economic resources. Thus, investment in accurate malaria diagnosis and appropriate management at primary level is critical for improving health outcomes and reducing poverty.

  5. Temporal and spatial patterns of malaria reinfection in northeastern Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, R; Grillet, M E; Rangel, Y; Berti, J; Aché, A

    1999-11-01

    We stratified the risk of malaria transmission (Plasmodium vivax) in 35 villages along a coastal range in northeastern Venezuela (51 km2) where the main vector is the mosquito Anopheles aquasalis. After 20 years without local malaria transmission, reinfection of the entire area occurred from May to December 1985 by local (continuous) and jump (discontinuous) dispersal. Epidemiologic, environmental, and vector variables were investigated with the aid of a Geographic Information System. Risk factors for malaria transmission were human population density, proximity to pre-adult mosquito habitats (< 500 m), and the number of pre-adult habitats nearby. Most inhabitants, immature mosquito habitats, and malaria cases were located at low elevations and on gentle slopes. High prevalence of malaria during the dry seasons was associated with the presence of permanent bodies of water containing An. aquasalis. Occurrence of a La Niña event in 1988 (wet and cool phase of the El Niño Southern Oscillation) triggered malaria transmission to unusually high levels, consolidating infection in the area, and rendering traditional control efforts useless. We recommend tracking malaria persistence per village and associated risk factors as methods to reduce the cost of malaria control programs.

  6. An eco-hydrologic model of malaria outbreaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Montosi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is a geographically widespread infectious disease that is well known to be affected by climate variability at both seasonal and interannual timescales. In an effort to identify climatic factors that impact malaria dynamics, there has been considerable research focused on the development of appropriate disease models for malaria transmission and their consideration alongside climatic datasets. These analyses have focused largely on variation in temperature and rainfall as direct climatic drivers of malaria dynamics. Here, we further these efforts by considering additionally the role that soil water content may play in driving malaria incidence. Specifically, we hypothesize that hydro-climatic variability should be an important factor in controlling the availability of mosquito habitats, thereby governing mosquito growth rates. To test this hypothesis, we reduce a nonlinear eco-hydrologic model to a simple linear model through a series of consecutive assumptions and apply this model to malaria incidence data from three South African provinces. Despite the assumptions made in the reduction of the model, we show that soil water content can account for a significant portion of malaria's case variability beyond its seasonal patterns, whereas neither temperature nor rainfall alone can do so. Future work should therefore consider soil water content as a simple and computable variable for incorporation into climate-driven disease models of malaria and other vector-borne infectious diseases.

  7. Geographical patterns of malaria transmission based on serological markers for falciparum and vivax malaria in Ratanakiri, Cambodia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Kerkhof

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria transmission is highly heterogeneous, especially in low endemic countries, such as Cambodia. This results in geographical clusters of residual transmission in the dry, low transmission season, which can fuel the transmission to wider areas or populations during the wet season. A better understanding of spatial clustering of malaria can lead to a more efficient, targeted strategy to reduce malaria transmission. This study aims to evaluate the potential of the use of serological markers to define spatial patterns in malaria exposure. Methods Blood samples collected in a community-based randomized trial performed in 98 high endemic communities in Ratanakiri province, north-eastern Cambodia, were screened with a multiplex serological assay for five serological markers (three Plasmodium falciparum and two Plasmodium vivax. The antibody half-lives range from approximately six months until more than two years. Geographical heterogeneity in malaria transmission was examined using a spatial scan statistic on serology, PCR prevalence and malaria incidence rate data. Furthermore, to identify behavioural patterns or intrinsic factors associated with malaria exposure (antibody levels, risk factor analyses were performed by using multivariable random effect logistic regression models. The serological outcomes were then compared to PCR prevalence and malaria incidence data. Results A total of 6502 samples from two surveys were screened in an area where the average parasite prevalence estimated by PCR among the selected villages is 3.4 %. High-risk malaria pockets were observed adjacent to the ‘Tonle San River’ and neighbouring Vietnam for all three sets of data (serology, PCR prevalence and malaria incidence rates. The main risk factors for all P. falciparum antigens and P. vivax MSP1.19 are age, ethnicity and staying overnight at the plot hut. Conclusion It is possible to identify similar malaria pockets of higher malaria

  8. Geographical patterns of malaria transmission based on serological markers for falciparum and vivax malaria in Ratanakiri, Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkhof, Karen; Sluydts, Vincent; Heng, Somony; Kim, Saorin; Pareyn, Myrthe; Willen, Laura; Canier, Lydie; Sovannaroth, Siv; Ménard, Didier; Sochantha, Tho; Coosemans, Marc; Durnez, Lies

    2016-10-19

    Malaria transmission is highly heterogeneous, especially in low endemic countries, such as Cambodia. This results in geographical clusters of residual transmission in the dry, low transmission season, which can fuel the transmission to wider areas or populations during the wet season. A better understanding of spatial clustering of malaria can lead to a more efficient, targeted strategy to reduce malaria transmission. This study aims to evaluate the potential of the use of serological markers to define spatial patterns in malaria exposure. Blood samples collected in a community-based randomized trial performed in 98 high endemic communities in Ratanakiri province, north-eastern Cambodia, were screened with a multiplex serological assay for five serological markers (three Plasmodium falciparum and two Plasmodium vivax). The antibody half-lives range from approximately six months until more than two years. Geographical heterogeneity in malaria transmission was examined using a spatial scan statistic on serology, PCR prevalence and malaria incidence rate data. Furthermore, to identify behavioural patterns or intrinsic factors associated with malaria exposure (antibody levels), risk factor analyses were performed by using multivariable random effect logistic regression models. The serological outcomes were then compared to PCR prevalence and malaria incidence data. A total of 6502 samples from two surveys were screened in an area where the average parasite prevalence estimated by PCR among the selected villages is 3.4 %. High-risk malaria pockets were observed adjacent to the 'Tonle San River' and neighbouring Vietnam for all three sets of data (serology, PCR prevalence and malaria incidence rates). The main risk factors for all P. falciparum antigens and P. vivax MSP1.19 are age, ethnicity and staying overnight at the plot hut. It is possible to identify similar malaria pockets of higher malaria transmission together with the potential risk factors by using serology

  9. Towards a strategy for malaria in pregnancy in Afghanistan: analysis of clinical realities and women's perceptions of malaria and anaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Natasha; Enayatullah, Sayed; Mohammad, Nader; Mayan, Ismail; Shamszai, Zohra; Rowland, Mark; Leslie, Toby

    2015-11-04

    Afghanistan has some of the worst maternal and infant mortality indicators in the world and malaria is a significant public health concern. Study objectives were to assess prevalence of malaria and anaemia, related knowledge and practices, and malaria prevention barriers among pregnant women in eastern Afghanistan. Three studies were conducted: (1) a clinical survey of maternal malaria, maternal anaemia, and neonatal birthweight in a rural district hospital delivery-ward; (2) a case-control study of malaria risk among reproductive-age women attending primary-level clinics; and (3) community surveys of malaria and anaemia prevalence, socioeconomic status, malaria knowledge and reported behaviour among pregnant women. Among 517 delivery-ward participants (1), one malaria case (prevalence 1.9/1000), 179 anaemia cases (prevalence 346/1000), and 59 low-birthweight deliveries (prevalence 107/1000) were detected. Anaemia was not associated with age, gravidity, intestinal parasite prevalence, or low-birthweight at delivery. Among 141 malaria cases and 1010 controls (2), no association was found between malaria infection and pregnancy (AOR 0.89; 95 % CI 0.57-1.39), parity (AOR 0.95; 95 % CI 0.85-1.05), age (AOR 1.02; 95 % CI 1.00-1.04), or anaemia (AOR 1.00; 95 % CI 0.65-1.54). Those reporting insecticide-treated net usage had 40 % reduced odds of malaria infection (AOR 0.60; 95 % CI 0.40-0.91). Among 530 community survey participants (3), malaria and anaemia prevalence were 3.9/1000 and 277/1000 respectively, with 34/1000 experiencing severe anaemia. Despite most women having no formal education, malaria knowledge was high. Most expressed reluctance to take malaria preventive medication during pregnancy, deeming it potentially unsafe. Given the low malaria risk and reported avoidance of medication during pregnancy, intermittent preventive treatment is hard to justify or implement. Preventive strategy should instead focus on long-lasting insecticidal nets for all pregnant

  10. Co-morbidity in psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønnberg, Ann Sophie; Skov, Lone

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Psoriasis is a common, chronic, immune-mediated inflammatory disorder. The disease is associated with several co-morbidities including cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome, and psychiatric disorders. It is important to identify and treat these co-morbidities because they have...... a strongly negative effect on the overall health of patients with psoriasis. Unfortunately, these co-morbidities are often overlooked and/or left untreated. Therefore, the aim of this review is to discuss the mechanisms of how co-morbidities are associated with psoriasis as well as implications...... for the clinic to be able to recognize such co-morbidities. AREAS COVERED: This is a review of studies investigating and discussing co-morbidities of psoriasis and screening. Literature was retrieved by searching on the PubMed database using individual and combined search terms related to relevant co...

  11. Malaria in rural Mozambique. Part I: children attending the outpatient clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinovart, Caterina; Bassat, Quique; Sigaúque, Betuel; Aide, Pedro; Sacarlal, Jahit; Nhampossa, Tacilta; Bardají, Azucena; Nhacolo, Ariel; Macete, Eusébio; Mandomando, Inácio; Aponte, John J; Menéndez, Clara; Alonso, Pedro L

    2008-02-26

    Malaria represents a huge burden for the health care services across Africa. Describing malaria attending health services contributes to quantify the burden and describe the epidemiology and clinical presentation. Retrospective analysis of data collected through the Manhiça morbidity surveillance system (Mozambique) on all paediatric visits (history of fever in the preceding 24 hours with asexual Plasmodium falciparum parasitaemia of any density in the blood smear. A total of 94,941 outpatient visits were seen during the study period, of which 30.5% had malaria. Children younger than three years accounted for almost half of the total malaria cases and children aged > or = 5 years represented 36.4% of the cases. Among children who presented with malaria, 56.7% had fever and among children who presented with fever or a history of fever only 37.2% had malaria. The geometric mean parasitaemia in malaria cases was 8582.2 parasites/muL, peaking in children aged two to three years. 13% of malaria cases had a PCV or = 5 years. The percentage of cases admitted or transferred showed a clear decreasing trend with age. MCBIRs of outpatient malaria per 1,000 child years at risk for the whole study period were of 394 in infants, 630 in children aged 1 to <5 years and 237 in children aged five years or more. A clustering of the cases was observed, whereby most children never had malaria, some had a few episodes and very few had many episodes. Preventive measures should be targeted at children younger than three years, as they carry the highest burden of malaria. Children aged 5-15 years represent around a third of the malaria cases and should also be included in control programmes. Concern should be raised about presumptive treatment of fever cases with artemisinin-combination therapies, as many children will, according to IMCI guidelines, receive treatment unnecessarily.

  12. Adjuvants for malaria vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coler, R N; Carter, D; Friede, M; Reed, S G

    2009-09-01

    There is a renewed enthusiasm about subunit vaccines for malaria coincident with the formation of new alliances and partnerships raising international public awareness, attracting increased resources and the re-focusing of research programs on adjuvant development for infectious disease vaccines. It is generally accepted that subunit vaccines for malaria will require adjuvants to induce protective immune responses, and availability of suitable adjuvants has in the past been a barrier to the development of malaria vaccines. Several novel adjuvants are now in licensed products or in late stage clinical development, while several others are in the earlier development pipeline. Successful vaccine development requires knowing which adjuvants to use and knowing how to formulate adjuvants and antigens to achieve stable, safe, and immunogenic vaccines. For the majority of vaccine researchers this information is not readily available, nor is access to well-characterized adjuvants. In this minireview, we outline the current state of adjuvant research and development as it pertains to effective malaria vaccines.

  13. Malaria prevention and treatment

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to allow prompt and accurate treatment of malaria in areas out of .... Other psychiatric problems ... If possible blood smears should be performed if a reliable laboratory is available. ... If any of the above signs are present, this is an emergency.

  14. Bioinformatics approaches to malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Daniel Aaen

    Malaria is a life threatening disease found in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Each year it kills 781 000 individuals; most of them are children under the age of five in sub-Saharan Africa. The most severe form of malaria in humans is caused by the parasite Plasmodium falciparum......, which is the subject of the first part of this thesis. The PfEMP1 protein which is encoded by the highly variablevargene family is important in the pathogenesis and immune evasion of malaria parasites. We analyzed and classified these genes based on the upstream sequence in seven......Plasmodium falciparumclones. We show that the amount of nucleotide diversity is just as big within each clone as it is between the clones. DNA methylation is an important epigenetic mark in many eukaryotic species. We are studying DNA methylation in the malaria parasitePlasmodium falciparum. The work is still in progress...

  15. The scope of clinical morbidity in sickle cell trait

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    Azza A.G. Tantawy

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell trait (SCT, the heterozygous state of the sickle hemoglobin beta globin gene (HbAS is carried by as many as 100 million individuals including up to 25% of the population in some regions of the World. Sickle cell trait is the best-characterized genetic polymorphism known to protect against falciparum malaria. Although SCT was initially considered as a benign condition, data are accumulating of serious morbidities in SCT individuals including increased incidence of hematuria, renal papillary necrosis, renal failure and malignancy, thromboembolic disorders, splenic infarction as a high altitude complication, and exercise-related rhabdomyolysis and sudden death. Despite these associations, the average life span of individuals with sickle cell trait is similar to that of the general population. Nonetheless, given the large number of people with sickle cell trait, it is important that physicians be aware of these associations. The aim of this article is to review publications reporting and discussing morbidities in SCT individuals.

  16. Comparison of functional assays used in the clinical development of a placental malaria vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pehrson, Caroline; Heno, Kristine K; Adams, Yvonne;

    2017-01-01

    are in clinical development. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the robustness and comparability of binding inhibition assays used in the clinical development of placental malaria vaccines. METHODS: The ability of sera from animals immunised with different VAR2CSA constructs to inhibit IE binding to CSA......BACKGROUND: Malaria in pregnancy is associated with significant morbidity in pregnant women and their offspring. Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes (IE) express VAR2CSA that mediates binding to chondroitin sulphate A (CSA) in the placenta. Two VAR2CSA-based vaccines for placental malaria...

  17. Prevalence of anemia in women with asymptomatic malaria parasitemia at first antenatal care visit at the University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar, Nigeria

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    TU Agan

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available TU Agan1, JE Ekabua1, AE Udoh1, EI Ekanem1, EE Efiok1, MA Mgbekem21Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 2Department of Nursing, College of Medical Sciences, University of Calabar, NigeriaBackground: Anemia in pregnancy in malaria endemic areas is a public health challenge that has contributed either directly or indirectly to maternal morbidity and mortality in our environment. Anemia and malaria during pregnancy are highly preventable and treatable.Objective: The aim of this study is to assess the prevalence of anemia in asymptomatic malaria parasitemic women at first antenatal visit in a tertiary hospital facility.Method: The study was conducted at the antenatal clinic of the University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar, Nigeria over a three-month period. Five hundred and forty-five pregnant women were recruited after obtaining an informed consent. A structured questionnaire was administered to each participant and two thin and thick blood films were used to identify the malaria parasites and estimate density. The average of two packed cell volumes at booking was determined using two capillary tubes and read from a Hawksleys microhematocrit reader.Results: A total of 545 pregnant women participated in the study. The mean ages of primigravidas and multigravidas were 21.4 ± 3.1 and 24.3 ± 4.0 years. Two hundred and ninety (53.2% were primigravidas while 255 (46.8% were multigravidas. The parasite density in primigravidas was 1297 ± 1234 while that for multigravidas was 661 ± 497 (t = 7.7, P < 0.001. The prevalence of anemia in the study population was 59.6%. There was no statistically significant difference in the prevalence of anemia among the primigravidas (60.3% and the multigravidas (58.8% (χ2 = 1.3, P = 0.08. There was a statistically significant association between severity of parasitemia and degree of anemia (χ2 = 441.1, P < 0.001. There was a statistically significant association between antimalarials use before booking and

  18. Malaria, schistosomiasis and soil transmitted helminth burden and their correlation with anemia in children attending primary schools in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo.

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    Junior R Matangila

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Anaemia reduces cognitive potential in school children, retards their growth and predisposes them to other diseases. As there is a paucity of data on the current burden of P. falciparum, S. mansoni and soil transmitted helminths (STH infections and their correlation with schoolchildren's anemia in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC, we collect these data. METHODS: This study reports baseline data collected from a randomized controlled trial investigating the impact of IPT with SP and SP-PQ on anemia and malaria morbidity in Congolese schoolchildren (Trial registration: NCT01722539; PACTR201211000449323. S. mansoni and STH infections were assessed using kato-katz technique. Malaria infection and hemoglobin concentration were assessed using Blood smear and Hemocontrol device, respectively. RESULTS: A total of 616 primary schoolchildren from 4 to 13 years old were enrolled in the study. The prevalence of Plasmodium spp. infection was 18.5% (95%CI:15.6-21.9. Amongst those infected, 24 (21%, 40 (35.1%, 40 (35.1%, 10 (8.8%, had light, moderate, heavy, very high malaria parasite density, respectively. Above 9 years of age (p = 0.02, male and history of fever (p = 0.04 were both associated with malaria infection. The overall prevalence of S. mansoni infection was 6.4% (95%CI:4.4-9.1. Girls were associated with S. mansoni infection (p = 0.04. T. trichiura was the most prevalent STH infection (26.3%, followed by A. lumbricoides (20.1%. Co-infection with malaria-S. mansoni and malaria-STH was, respectively, 1.5% (CI95%:0.7-3.3 and 6.4% (CI95% 4.4-9.1. The prevalence of anemia was found to be 41.6% (95%CI:37.7-45.6 and anemia was strongly related with Plasmodium ssp infection (aOR:4.1; CI95%:2.6-6.5;p<0.001 and S. mansoni infection (aOR:3.3;CI95%:1.4-7.8;p<0.01. CONCLUSION: Malaria and S. mansoni infection were strongly associated with high prevalence of anemia in schoolchildren. Therefore, specific school-based interventions, such as

  19. Malaria Genome Sequencing Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    million cases and up to 2.7 million A whole chromosome shotgun sequencing strategy was used to deaths from malaria each year. The mortality levels are...deaths from malaria each year. The mortality levels are greatest in determine the genome sequence of P. falciparum clone 3D7. This sub-Saharan Africa...aminolevulinic acid dehydratase. Cura . Genet. 40, 391-398 (2002). 15. Lasonder, E. et al Analysis of the Plasmodium falciparum proteome by high-accuracy mass

  20. Malaria in Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Apuzzio, Joseph J.; Abdulla Al-Khan; Jesus R. Alvarez

    2005-01-01

    Recently, there has been a resurgence of malaria in densely populated areas of the United States secondary to human migration from endemic areas where factors such as cessation of vector control, vector resistance to insecticides, disease resistance to drugs, environmental changes, political instability, and indifference, have played a role for malaria becoming an overwhelming infection of these tropical underdeveloped countries. It is important for health care providers of gravida to be aler...

  1. Malaria in pregnancy.

    OpenAIRE

    Jesus R. Alvarez; Al-Khan, Abdulla; Apuzzio, Joseph J.

    2005-01-01

    Recently, there has been a resurgence of malaria in densely populated areas of the United States secondary to human migration from endemic areas where factors such as cessation of vector control, vector resistance to insecticides, disease resistance to drugs, environmental changes, political instability, and indifference, have played a role for malaria becoming an overwhelming infection of these tropical underdeveloped countries. It is important for health care providers of gravida to be aler...

  2. Malaria in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus R. Alvarez

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, there has been a resurgence of malaria in densely populated areas of the United States secondary to human migration from endemic areas where factors such as cessation of vector control, vector resistance to insecticides, disease resistance to drugs, environmental changes, political instability, and indifference, have played a role for malaria becoming an overwhelming infection of these tropical underdeveloped countries. It is important for health care providers of gravida to be alert of the disease and its effects on pregnancy.

  3. Malaria in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Jesus R; Al-Khan, Abdulla; Apuzzio, Joseph J

    2005-12-01

    Recently, there has been a resurgence of malaria in densely populated areas of the United States secondary to human migration from endemic areas where factors such as cessation of vector control, vector resistance to insecticides, disease resistance to drugs, environmental changes, political instability, and indifference, have played a role for malaria becoming an overwhelming infection of these tropical underdeveloped countries. It is important for health care providers of gravida to be alert of the disease and its effects on pregnancy.

  4. Lay knowledge and management of malaria in Baringo county, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutua, Edna N; Bukachi, Salome A; Bett, Bernard K; Estambale, Benson A; Nyamongo, Isaac K

    2016-09-21

    Malaria, a disease caused by protozoan parasites of the genus Plasmodium and transmitted by female anopheline mosquitoes, is a major cause of morbidity, mortality and loss in productivity in humans. Baringo County is prone to seasonal transmissions of malaria mostly in the rainy seasons. This cross-sectional study used a mixed methods approach to collect data on knowledge and lay management of malaria. A questionnaire survey was administered to 560 respondents while qualitative data was collected through 20 focus group discussions in four ecological zones covering Baringo North, Baringo South and Marigat sub-Counties of Baringo County. Analyses were done through summary and inferential statistics for quantitative data and content analysis for qualitative data. The study communities were knowledgeable of malaria signs, symptoms, cause and seasonality but this biomedical knowledge co-existed with other local perceptions. This knowledge, however, did not influence their first (p = 0.77) or second choice treatments (p = 0.49) and compliance to medication (p = 0.84). Up to 88 % of respondents reported having suffered from malaria. At the onset of a suspected malaria case community members reported the following: 28.9 % visited a health facility, 37.2 % used analgesics, 26.6 % herbal treatments, 2.2 % remnant malaria medicines, 2.2 % over the counter malaria medicines, 1 % traditional healers and 1.8 % other treatments. Nearly all respondents (97.8 %) reported visiting a health facility for subsequent treatments. Herbal treatments comprised of infusions and decoctions derived from roots, barks and leaves of plants believed to have medicinal value. Compliance to conventional malaria treatment regime was, however, identified as a challenge in malaria management. Quick relief from symptoms, undesirable qualities like drug bitterness and bad smell, undesirable side-effects, such as nausea and long regimen of treatment were some of the contributors to non

  5. A new malaria protocol in a Congolese refugee camp in West Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, Maria G; Charle, Pilar; Jimenez, Sylvia; Nunez, Milton

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of a new malaria protocol introduced in 2007 at Nyarugusu Refugee Camp. In accordance with this protocol, the delivery of a diagnostic test (rapid diagnostic test or microscopy) was made compulsory prior to the administration of antimalarial drugs (ACTs: artemisinin-based combination therapies). We collected camp clinic records on outpatient malaria diagnoses from 2004 through 2007 and compared the morbidity percentages attributed to malaria during these years, as well as the actual incidence of malaria in 2006 and 2007. Our analyses demonstrate that malaria accounted for 45.8% of all morbidity in 2004 (64,557 malaria cases out of 1,40,669 total morbidity), followed by corresponding figures of 47.8% for 2005 (94,389 malaria cases out of 1,97,400) and 47.9% for 2006 (60,760 malaria cases out of 1,26,754); however, the values dropped sharply to 22.8% in 2007 (20,136 malaria cases out of 88,254). We found a similar drastic drop in the incidence of malaria from an average of 182.415 cases/1000 inhabitants/month in 2006 to only 35.635 cases/1000 inhabitants/month in 2007. The results of our study suggest that because of the overlap of symptoms from malarial and non-malarial febrile illnesses, diagnosing malaria on clinical and epidemiological bases may lead to its overdiagnosis. This could result in both the overprescription of antimalarials and the underdiagnosis and inappropriate treatment of non-malarial febrile processes. The use of affordable and available tests can increase the accuracy of malaria diagnoses, so that only real malaria cases would be treated as such. This would help curb the uncontrolled administration of antimalarials to prevent the development of resistance to new malarial treatments and thus decrease treatment expenses. This way, financial, material and human resources can be allocated to other health issues that currently go unnoticed.

  6. Action plan to regain unnecessary deferred blood donors due to malaria risk in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Değirmenci, Aysu; Döşkaya, Mert; Caner, Ayşe; Nergis, Sebnem; Gül, Kadri; Aydınok, Yeşim; Ertop, Tufan; Aksoy, Nurten; Korkmaz, Metin; Alkan, Mehmet Ziya; Üner, Ahmet; Gürüz, Yüksel

    2012-06-01

    Malaria was expected to be a major problem during blood donation in Turkey due to existence of malaria cases in southeastern region of Turkey. The present study aimed for the first time, to investigate malaria in "donors deferred for malaria risk" and to determine the regional rates of malaria deferral in Turkey. Blood samples were collected from several Blood Banks of southeastern provinces where local malaria cases still exist and from Blood Bank of Ege University Medical School (EUMS) located in western Turkey where malaria is eradicated decades ago. Plasmodium spp. and specific antibodies were investigated by stained smears, antigen detection, PCR and ELISA. Among the donors deferred for malaria risk, Plasmodium spp. were not detected by microscopy, PCR or antigen detection. Seroprevalances were 2% and 3.92% in western and southeastern regions, respectively. Rate of donor deferral for malaria risk was 0.9% in EUMS and deferrals were exclusively because of travel to southeastern Turkey. In southeastern provinces, deferrals were mainly due to malaria like fever history. The present study first time assessed regional rates of donor deferral due to malaria risk in Turkey. Previously, malaria was expected to be a major problem during blood donation in Turkey due to existence of malaria cases in southeastern region of Turkey. The results of the study showed that 97% of the deferrals were unnecessary. In conclusion, to reduce unnecessary donor deferrals in Turkey, in addition to comprehensive questioning for malaria history, the usage of a malaria antibody screening method should be initiated prior to deferral decision.

  7. [Place of malaria among febrile illnesses in two ethnic tribes living in sympatry in Mali from 1998 to 2008].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolo, A; Maïga, B; Dara, V; Tapily, A; Tolo, Y; Arama, C; Daou, M; Doumbo, O

    2012-12-01

    In Africa, malaria is responsible for 25-40% of all outpatient visits and 20-50% of all hospitalizations. In malaria-endemic areas, individuals do not behave the same toward the outcome of clinical malaria. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of malaria in the locality among the different ethnic groups, evaluate the place of malaria among febrile illnesses, and assess the relationship between fever and parasite density of Plasmodium falciparum. Studies on susceptibility to malaria between the Fulani and Dogon groups in Mali were conducted in Mantéourou and the surrounding villages from 1998 to 2008. We carried out six cross-sectional studies during the malaria transmission and longitudinal surveys (July to December depending on the year) during the 10-year duration. In longitudinal studies, clinical data on malaria and other diseases frequently observed in the population were recorded. It appears from this work that malaria is the leading cause of febrile syndromes. We observed a significant reduction in malaria morbidity in the study population from 1998 to 2008. The pyrogenic threshold of parasitaemia was 1,000 parasites/mm(3) of blood in the Dogon and 5,000 parasites/mm(3) of blood in the Fulani.We have also found that high parasitical densities were not always associated with fever. Malaria morbidity was higher among the Dogon than in Fulani. The immunogenetic factors might account for this difference in susceptibility to malaria between Fulani and Dogon in the area under study. With regard to this study, it is important to take into account the ethnic origin of subjects when interpreting data of clinical and malarial vaccine trials.

  8. Morbidity and nutrition status of rural drug-naïve Kenyan women living with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Charlotte G; Nyandiko, Winstone; Siika, Abraham; Drorbaugh, Natalie; Samari, Goleen; Ettyang, Grace; Ernst, Judith A

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes morbidity in a group of HIV-positive drug-naïve rural women in western Kenya. A total of 226 drug-naïve HIV-positive women were evaluated for baseline morbidity, immune function, and anthropometry before a food-based nutrition intervention. Kenyan nurses visited women in their homes and conducted semi-structured interviews regarding symptoms and physical signs experienced at the time of the visit and during the previous week and physical inspection. Blood and urine samples were examined for determination of immune function (CD4, CD8, and total lymphocyte counts), anaemia, malaria, and pregnancy status. Intradermal skin testing with tuberculin (PPD), candida, and tetanus toxoid antigens was also performed to evaluate cell-mediated immunity. Anthropometry was measured, and body mass index (BMI) was calculated. Seventy-six per cent of the women reported being sick on the day of the interview or within the previous week. Illnesses considered serious were reported by 13.7% of women. The most frequent morbidity episodes reported were upper respiratory tract infections (13.3%), suspected malaria (5.85%), skeletal pain (4.87%), and stomach pain (4.42%). The most common morbidity signs on physical inspection were respiratory symptoms, most commonly rhinorrhea and coughing. Confirmed malaria and severe diarrhea were significantly associated with a higher BMI.

  9. Investigation of host candidate malaria-associated risk/protective SNPs in a Brazilian Amazonian population.

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    Simone da Silva Santos

    Full Text Available The Brazilian Amazon is a hypo-endemic malaria region with nearly 300,000 cases each year. A variety of genetic polymorphisms, particularly in erythrocyte receptors and immune response related genes, have been described to be associated with susceptibility and resistance to malaria. In order to identify polymorphisms that might be associated with malaria clinical outcomes in a Brazilian Amazonian population, sixty-four human single nucleotide polymorphisms in 37 genes were analyzed using a Sequenom massARRAY iPLEX platform. A total of 648 individuals from two malaria endemic areas were studied, including 535 malaria cases (113 individuals with clinical mild malaria, 122 individuals with asymptomatic infection and 300 individuals with history of previous mild malaria and 113 health controls with no history of malaria. The data revealed significant associations (p<0.003 between one SNP in the IL10 gene (rs1800896 and one SNP in the TLR4 gene (rs4986790 with reduced risk for clinical malaria, one SNP in the IRF1 gene (rs2706384 with increased risk for clinical malaria, one SNP in the LTA gene (rs909253 with protection from clinical malaria and one SNP in the TNF gene (RS1800750 associated with susceptibility to clinical malaria. Also, a new association was found between a SNP in the CTL4 gene (rs2242665, located at the major histocompatibility complex III region, and reduced risk for clinical malaria. This study represents the first association study from an Amazonian population involving a large number of host genetic polymorphisms with susceptibility or resistance to Plasmodium infection and malaria outcomes. Further studies should include a larger number of individuals, refined parameters and a fine-scale map obtained through DNA sequencing to increase the knowledge of the Amazonian population genetic diversity.

  10. Watch out for malaria: still a leading cause of child death worldwide

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    Buonsenso Danilo

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to the efforts in malaria control promoted by the World Health Organization (WHO, the reported malaria burden is being reduced throughout the world. Nevertheless, malaria remains a leading cause of child death worldwide. Aims purpose of the paper is to summarize the main historical steps in fighting malaria, from the first descriptions to the last ones. Results a case of probable autochthonous malaria has been recently described in Italy, raising concern over the possibility of resurgence of malaria in countries previously interested by this disease. Moreover, both the constant threat of the parasite and vector mosquito developing resistance to medicines and insecticides, and the on-going climate change make the challenge of eradicating malaria really difficult. Therefore, malaria is still an actual disease, requiring adequate programs of surveillance, stronger health systems in poor countries, and efforts in order to develop new and effective tools in malaria control. WHO has definitely demonstrated the effects of "social determinants" on health. So, eradication strategies cannot be based only on a scientific background, because culture, politics, power, resources and wars have a profound impact on health and disease. These elements should be introduced in all the programs of malaria control. Conclusions malaria is still an actual disease with great public health implications, and the approaches for control and prevention should have the appropriate social and political context in addition to the science involved in order to save lives of children at risk.

  11. Imported malaria in pregnancy in Madrid

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    Jiménez Beatriz C

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria in pregnancy is associated with maternal and foetal morbidity and mortality in endemic areas, but information on imported cases to non-endemic areas is scarce. The aim of this study was to describe the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of malaria in pregnancy in two general hospitals in Madrid, Spain. Methods Retrospective descriptive study of laboratory-confirmed malaria in pregnant women at the Fuenlabrada University Hospital and the Príncipe de Asturias University Hospital, in Madrid, over a six- and 11-year period, respectively. Relevant epidemiological, clinical and laboratory data was obtained from medical records. Results There were 19 pregnant women among 346 malaria cases (5.4%. The average age was 27 years. The gestational age (trimester was: 53% 3rd, 31% 1st, 16% 2nd. All but one were multigravidae. Three were HIV positive. All were sub-Saharan immigrants: two were recently arrived immigrants and seventeen (89% had visited friends and relatives. None had taken prophylaxis nor seeked pre-travel advice. Presentation: 16 symptomatic patients (fever in fourteen, asthenia in two, three asymptomatic. Median delay in diagnosis: 7.5 days. Laboratory tests: anaemia (cut off Hb level 11 g/dl 78.9% (mild 31.6%, moderate 31.6%, severe 15.8% thrombocytopaenia 73.7%, hypoglycaemia 10.5%. All cases were due to Plasmodium falciparum, one case of hyperparasitaemia. Quinine + clindamycin prescribed in 84%. Outcomes: no severe maternal complications or deaths, two abortions, fifteen term pregnancies, no low-birth-weight newborns, two patients were lost to follow-up. Conclusions Though cases of malaria in pregnancy are uncommon, a most at risk group is clearly defined: young sub-Saharan mothers visiting friends and relatives without pre-travel counselling and recently-arrived immigrants. The most common adverse maternal and foetal effects were anaemia and stillbirth. Given that presentation can be asymptomatic

  12. Artemisinin-Resistant Plasmodium falciparum Malaria.

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    Fairhurst, Rick M; Dondorp, Arjen M

    2016-06-01

    For more than five decades, Southeast Asia (SEA) has been fertile ground for the emergence of drug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria. After generating parasites resistant to chloroquine, sulfadoxine, pyrimethamine, quinine, and mefloquine, this region has now spawned parasites resistant to artemisinins, the world's most potent antimalarial drugs. In areas where artemisinin resistance is prevalent, artemisinin combination therapies (ACTs)-the first-line treatments for malaria-are failing fast. This worrisome development threatens to make malaria practically untreatable in SEA, and threatens to compromise global endeavors to eliminate this disease. A recent series of clinical, in vitro, genomics, and transcriptomics studies in SEA have defined in vivo and in vitro phenotypes of artemisinin resistance, identified its causal genetic determinant, explored its molecular mechanism, and assessed its clinical impact. Specifically, these studies have established that artemisinin resistance manifests as slow parasite clearance in patients and increased survival of early-ring-stage parasites in vitro; is caused by single nucleotide polymorphisms in the parasite's K13 gene, is associated with an upregulated "unfolded protein response" pathway that may antagonize the pro-oxidant activity of artemisinins, and selects for partner drug resistance that rapidly leads to ACT failures. In SEA, clinical studies are urgently needed to monitor ACT efficacy where K13 mutations are prevalent, test whether new combinations of currently available drugs cure ACT failures, and advance new antimalarial compounds through preclinical pipelines and into clinical trials. Intensifying these efforts should help to forestall the spread of artemisinin and partner drug resistance from SEA to sub-Saharan Africa, where the world's malaria transmission, morbidity, and mortality rates are highest.

  13. Monkey malaria kills four humans.

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    Galinski, Mary R; Barnwell, John W

    2009-05-01

    Four human deaths caused by Plasmodium knowlesi, a simian malaria species, are stimulating a surge of public health interest and clinical vigilance in vulnerable areas of Southeast Asia. We, and other colleagues, emphasize that these cases, identified in Malaysia, are a clear warning that health facilities and clinicians must rethink the diagnosis and treatment of malaria cases presumed to be caused by a less virulent human malaria species, Plasmodium malariae.

  14. A systematic review of the safety and efficacy of artemether-lumefantrine against uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria during pregnancy

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    Manyando Christine

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Malaria during pregnancy, particularly Plasmodium falciparum malaria, has been linked to increased morbidity and mortality, which must be reduced by both preventive measures and effective case management. The World Health Organization (WHO recommends artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT to treat uncomplicated falciparum malaria during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy, and quinine plus clindamycin during the first trimester. However, the national policies of many African countries currently recommend quinine throughout pregnancy. Therefore, the aim of this article is to provide a summary of the available data on the safety and efficacy of artemether-lumefantrine (AL in pregnancy. An English-language search identified 16 publications from 1989 to October 2011 with reports of artemether or AL exposure in pregnancy, including randomized clinical trials, observational studies and systematic reviews. Overall, there were 1,103 reports of AL use in pregnant women: 890 second/third trimester exposures; 212 first trimester exposures; and one case where the trimester of exposure was not reported. In the second and third trimesters, AL was not associated with increased adverse pregnancy outcomes as compared with quinine or sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine, showed improved tolerability relative to quinine, and its efficacy was non-inferior to quinine. There is evidence to suggest that the pharmacokinetics of anti-malarial drugs may change in pregnancy, although the impact on efficacy and safety needs to be studied further, especially since the majority of studies report high cure rates and adequate tolerability. As there are fewer reports of AL safety in the first trimester, additional data are required to assess the potential to use AL in the first trimester. Though the available safety and efficacy data support the use of AL in the second and third trimesters, there is still a need for further information. These findings reinforce the

  15. Oral iron supplements for children in malaria-endemic areas

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    Neuberger, Ami; Okebe, Joseph; Yahav, Dafna; Paul, Mical

    2016-01-01

    , Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. We performed a fixed-effect meta-analysis for all outcomes and random-effects meta-analysis for hematological outcomes, and adjusted analyses for cluster RCTs. We based the subgroup analyses for anaemia at baseline, age, and malaria prevention or management services on trial-level data. Main results Thirty-five trials (31,955 children) met the inclusion criteria. Overall, iron does not cause an excess of clinical malaria (risk ratio (RR) 0.93, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.87 to 1.00; 14 trials, 7168 children, high quality evidence). Iron probably does not cause an excess of clinical malaria in both populations where anaemia is common and those in which anaemia is uncommon. In areas where there are prevention and management services for malaria, iron (with or without folic acid) may reduce clinical malaria (RR 0.91, 95% CI 0.84 to 0.97; seven trials, 5586 participants, low quality evidence), while in areas where such services are unavailable, iron (with or without folic acid) may increase the incidence of malaria, although the lower CIs indicate no difference (RR 1.16, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.31; nine trials, 19,086 participants, low quality evidence). Iron supplementation does not cause an excess of severe malaria (RR 0.90, 95% CI 0.81 to 0.98; 6 trials, 3421 children, high quality evidence). We did not observe any differences for deaths (control event rate 1%, low quality evidence). Iron and antimalarial treatment reduced clinical malaria (RR 0.54, 95% CI 0.43 to 0.67; three trials, 728 children, high quality evidence). Overall, iron resulted in fewer anaemic children at follow up, and the end average change in haemoglobin from base line was higher with iron. Authors' conclusions Iron treatment does not increase the risk of clinical malaria when regular malaria prevention or management services are provided. Where resources are limited, iron can be administered without screening for anaemia or for iron deficiency, as long as malaria

  16. Vector incrimination and effects of antimalarial drugs on malaria transmission and control in the Amazon Basin of Brazil

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    T. A. Klein

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available World ecosystems differ significantly and a multidisciplinary malaria control approach must be adjusted to meet these requirements. These include a comprehensive understanding of the malaria vectors, their behavior, seasonal distribution and abundance, susceptibility to insecticides (physiological and behavioral, methods to reduce the numbers of human gametocyte carriers through effective health care systems and antimalarial drug treatment, urban malaria transmission versus rural or forest malaria transmission, and the impact of vaccine development. Many malaria vectors are members of species complexes and individual relationship to malaria transmission, seasonal distribution, bitting behavior, etc. is poorly understood. Additionaly, malaria patients are not examined for circulating gametocytes and both falciparum and vivax malaria patients may be highly infective to mosquitoes after treatment with currently used antimalarial drugs. Studies on the physiological and behavioral effects of DDT and other insecticides are inconclusive and need to be evalusted.

  17. A refined estimate of the malaria burden in Niger

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    Doudou Maimouna

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The health authorities of Niger have implemented several malaria prevention and control programmes in recent years. These interventions broadly follow WHO guidelines and international recommendations and are based on interventions that have proved successful in other parts of Africa. Most performance indicators are satisfactory but, paradoxically, despite the mobilization of considerable human and financial resources, the malaria-fighting programme in Niger seems to have stalled, as it has not yet yielded the expected significant decrease in malaria burden. Indeed, the number of malaria cases reported by the National Health Information System has actually increased by a factor of five over the last decade, from about 600,000 in 2000 to about 3,000,000 in 2010. One of the weaknesses of the national reporting system is that the recording of malaria cases is still based on a presumptive diagnosis approach, which overestimates malaria incidence. Methods An extensive nationwide survey was carried out to determine by microscopy and RDT testing, the proportion of febrile patients consulting at health facilities for suspected malaria actually suffering from the disease, as a means of assessing the magnitude of this problem and obtaining a better estimate of malaria morbidity in Niger. Results In total, 12,576 febrile patients were included in this study; 57% of the slides analysed were positive for the malaria parasite during the rainy season, when transmission rates are high, and 9% of the slides analysed were positive during the dry season, when transmission rates are lower. The replacement of microscopy methods by rapid diagnostic tests resulted in an even lower rate of confirmation, with only 42% of cases testing positive during the rainy season, and 4% during the dry season. Fever alone has a low predictive value, with a low specificity and sensitivity. These data highlight the absolute necessity of confirming all reported

  18. Delivering insecticide-treated nets for malaria prevention: innovative strategies

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    Krezanoski PJ

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Paul J Krezanoski1–3 1Department of Medicine, 2Department of Pediatrics, Massachusetts General Hospital, 3Medicine and Pedatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: The wide-scale adoption of insecticide-treated nets (ITNs has led to significant reductions in malaria morbidity and mortality worldwide. Delivery of ITNs to the 3.2 billion people at risk of malaria requires multiple steps in diverse settings. The effectiveness of the delivery of ITNs in order to prevent malaria relies on activities that include ITN manufacturing and design, integration into national and international malaria prevention policies, supplying and distributing ITNs to households and individuals, and, finally, programs focused on spurring demand for and use of ITNs by individuals at risk. This paper reviews some recent innovative strategies for ITN delivery across these four domains, places these innovations within the context of the history of ITN deployment, and identifies opportunities to further improve the effectiveness of this ubiquitous public health tool. Keywords: malaria, insecticide-treated bed nets, prevention, access, ownership, use, policies

  19. Prevention and treatment practices and implications for malaria control in Mukono District Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbonye, A K; Bygbjerg, I C; Magnussen, P

    2008-03-01

    Available data in Uganda indicate a resurgence of malaria morbidity and mortality countrywide. This study assessed the burden of malaria, treatment and prevention practices in order initiate a policy debate on the scaling-up of current interventions. A triangulation of methods using a cross-sectional survey and key informant interviews was used to assess self-reported malaria at a household level in Mukono District, Uganda. A total of 5583 households were surveyed, and a high proportion (2897, 51.9%) reported a person with malaria two weeks prior to the survey. Only 546 households (9.8%) owned and used insecticide-treated nets (ITNs) for malaria prevention. Similarly, only a few households (86, 1.5%) used indoor residual spraying. Self-treatment with home-stocked drugs was high, yet there was low awareness of the effectiveness of expired drugs on malaria treatment. Self-reported malaria was associated with socioeconomic, behavioural and environmental factors, but more especially with household ownership of ITNs. These results will contribute to the current debate on identifying new approaches for scaling-up prevention interventions and effective case management, as well as selection of priority interventions for malaria control in Uganda.

  20. Cost risk benefit analysis to support chemoprophylaxis policy for travellers to malaria endemic countries

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    Coutinho Francisco AB

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a number of malaria endemic regions, tourists and travellers face a declining risk of travel associated malaria, in part due to successful malaria control. Many millions of visitors to these regions are recommended, via national and international policy, to use chemoprophylaxis which has a well recognized morbidity profile. To evaluate whether current malaria chemo-prophylactic policy for travellers is cost effective when adjusted for endemic transmission risk and duration of exposure. a framework, based on partial cost-benefit analysis was used Methods Using a three component model combining a probability component, a cost component and a malaria risk component, the study estimated health costs avoided through use of chemoprophylaxis and costs of disease prevention (including adverse events and pre-travel advice for visits to five popular high and low malaria endemic regions and malaria transmission risk using imported malaria cases and numbers of travellers to malarious countries. By calculating the minimal threshold malaria risk below which the economic costs of chemoprophylaxis are greater than the avoided health costs we were able to identify the point at which chemoprophylaxis would be economically rational. Results The threshold incidence at which malaria chemoprophylaxis policy becomes cost effective for UK travellers is an accumulated risk of 1.13% assuming a given set of cost parameters. The period a travellers need to remain exposed to achieve this accumulated risk varied from 30 to more than 365 days, depending on the regions intensity of malaria transmission. Conclusions The cost-benefit analysis identified that chemoprophylaxis use was not a cost-effective policy for travellers to Thailand or the Amazon region of Brazil, but was cost-effective for travel to West Africa and for those staying longer than 45 days in India and Indonesia.

  1. Towards A Malaria Vaccine?

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    B S GARG

    1990-12-01

    Full Text Available The last few years have seen a marked change in the understanding of malaria mmunology.We have very little knowledge on immunity of Malaria based on experiments in humanbeings due to ethical reasons. Whatsoever our knowledge exists at present is based onexperimentas in mice and monkey. However it is clear that it is sporzoite or merozoitewhich is directly exposed to our immune system in the life cycle of Malaria parasite. On thebasis of human experiments we can draw inference that immunity to malaria is species.specific (on cross immunity, stage specific and strain specific as well acquired in the response to surface antigen and relapsed antigen although the parasite also demonstrates escape machanism to immune system.So the host system kills or elimi nate the parasite by means of (a Antbody to extracell~ular form of parasite with the help of mechanism of Block invasion, Agglutination or opsonization and/or (b Cellular machanism-either by phago-cytosis of parasite or by antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity ABCC (? or by effects of mediators like tumor necrosis fJ.ctor (TNF in cerebaral malaria or crisis forming factor as found in sudan or by possible role of lysis mechanism.However, inspite of all these theories the parasite has been able to invade the immunesystem by virtue of its intracellular development stage specificity, sequestration in capillaries and also by its unusual characteristics of antigenic diversity and antigenic variation.

  2. A step forward for understanding the morbidity burden in Guinea: a national descriptive study

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    Hu Guoqing

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little evidence on the burden of disease has been reported about Guinea. This study was conducted to demonstrate the morbidity burden in Guinea and provide basic evidence for setting health priorities. Methods A retrospective descriptive study was designed to present the morbidity burden of Guinea. Morbidity data were extracted from the National Health Statistics Report of Guinea of 2008. The data are collected based on a pyramid of facilities which includes two national hospitals (teaching hospitals, seven regional hospitals, 26 prefectural hospitals, 8 communal medical centers, 390 health centers, and 628 health posts. Morbidity rates were calculated to measure the burden of non-fatal diseases. The contributions of the 10 leading diseases were presented by sex and age group. Results In 2008, a total of 3,936,599 cases occurred. The morbidity rate for males was higher than for females, 461 versus 332 per 1,000 population. Malaria, respiratory infections, diarrheal diseases, helminthiases, and malnutrition ranked in the first 5 places and accounted for 74% of the total burden, respectively having a rate of 148, 64, 33, 32, and 14 per 1,000 population. The elderly aged 65+ had the highest morbidity rate (611 per 1,000 population followed by working-age population (458 per 1,000 population and children (396 per 1,000 population while the working-age population aged 25-64 contributed the largest part (39% to total cases. The sex- and age-specific spectrum of morbidity burden showed a similar profile except for small variations. Conclusion Guinea has its unique morbidity burden. The ten leading causes of morbidity burden, especially for malaria, respiratory infections, diarrheal diseases, helminthiases, and malnutrition, need to be prioritized in Guinea.

  3. Prevention and management of malaria during pregnancy: findings from a comparative qualitative study in Ghana, Kenya and Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pell, Christopher; Meñaca, Arantza; Afrah, Nana A; Manda-Taylor, Lucinda; Chatio, Samuel; Were, Florence; Hodgson, Abraham; Hamel, Mary J; Kalilani, Linda; Tagbor, Harry; Pool, Robert

    2013-11-20

    In endemic regions of sub-Saharan Africa, malaria during pregnancy (MiP) is a major preventable cause of maternal and infant morbidity and mortality. Current recommended MiP prevention and control includes intermittent preventive treatment (IPTp), distribution of insecticide-treated bed nets (ITNs) and appropriate case management. This article explores the social and cultural context to the uptake of these interventions at four sites across Africa. A comparative qualitative study was conducted at four sites in three countries: Ghana, Malawi and Kenya. Individual and group interviews were conducted with pregnant women, their relatives, opinion leaders, other community members and health providers. Observations, which focused on behaviours linked to MiP prevention and treatment, were also undertaken at health facilities and in local communities. ITNs were generally recognized as important for malaria prevention. However, their availability and use differed across the sites. In Malawi and Kenya, ITNs were sought-after items, but there were complaints about availability. In central Ghana, women saved ITNs until the birth of the child and they were used seasonally in northern Ghana. In Kenya and central Ghana, pregnant women did not associate IPTp with malaria, whereas, in Malawi and northern Ghana, IPTp was linked to malaria, but not always with prevention. Although IPTp adherence was common at all sites, whether delivered with directly observed treatment or not, a few women did not comply with IPTp often citing previous side effects. Although generally viewed as positive, experiences of malaria testing varied across the four sites: treatment was sometimes administered in spite of a negative diagnosis in Ghana (observed) and Malawi (reported). Despite generally following the advice of healthcare staff, particularly in Kenya, personal experience, and the availability and accessibility of medication--including anti-malarials--influenced MiP treatment. Although ITNs were

  4. Helminthic Infections Rates and Malaria in HIV-Infected Pregnant Women on Anti-Retroviral Therapy in Rwanda

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    Ivan, Emil; Crowther, Nigel J.; Mutimura, Eugene; Osuwat, Lawrence Obado; Janssen, Saskia; Grobusch, Martin P.

    2013-01-01

    Background Within sub-Saharan Africa, helminth and malaria infections cause considerable morbidity in HIV-positive pregnant women and their offspring. Helminth infections are also associated with a higher risk of mother-to-child HIV transmission. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of, and the protective and risk factors for helminth and malaria infections in pregnant HIV-positive Rwandan women receiving anti-retroviral therapy (ART). Methodology and principle findings Pregnant females (n = 980) were recruited from health centres in rural and peri-urban locations in the central and eastern provinces of Rwanda. Helminth infection was diagnosed using the Kato Katz method whilst the presence of Plasmodium falciparum was identified from blood smears. The prevalence of helminth infections was 34.3%; of malaria 13.3%, and of co-infections 6.6%. Helminth infections were more common in rural (43.1%) than peri-urban (18.0%; p<0.0005) sites. A CD4 count ≤350 cells/mm3 was associated with a higher risk of helminth infections (odds ratio, 3.39; 95% CIs, 2.16–5.33; p<0.0005) and malaria (3.37 [2.11–5.38]; p<0.0005) whilst helminth infection was a risk factor for malaria infection and vice versa. Education and employment reduced the risk of all types of infection whilst hand washing protected against helminth infection (0.29 [0.19–0.46]; p<0.0005);). The TDF-3TC-NVP (3.47 [2.21–5.45]; p<0.0005), D4T-3TC-NVP (2.47 [1.27–4.80]; p<0.05) and AZT-NVP (2.60 [1.33–5.08]; p<0.05) regimens each yielded higher helminth infection rates than the AZT-3TC-NVP regimen. Anti-retroviral therapy had no effect on the risk of malaria. Conclusion/significance HIV-positive pregnant women would benefit from the scaling up of de-worming programs alongside health education and hygiene interventions. The differential effect of certain ART combinations (as observed here most strongly with AZT-3TC-NVP) possibly protecting against helminth infection warrants further

  5. Ivermectin mass drug administration to humans disrupts malaria parasite transmission in Senegalese villages.

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    Kobylinski, Kevin C; Sylla, Massamba; Chapman, Phillip L; Sarr, Moussa D; Foy, Brian D

    2011-07-01

    Ivermectin mass drug administration (MDA) to humans is used to control onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis. Recent field studies have shown an added killing effect of ivermectin MDA against malaria vectors. We report that ivermectin MDA reduced the proportion of Plasmodium falciparum infectious Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto (s.s.) in treated villages in southeastern Senegal. Ivermectin MDA is a different delivery method and has a different mode of action from current malaria control agents. It could be a powerful and synergistic new tool to reduce malaria transmission in regions with epidemic or seasonal malaria transmission, and the prevalence and intensity of neglected tropical diseases.

  6. Population structure of the malaria vector Anopheles darlingi in a malaria-endemic region of Eastern Amazonian Brazil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conn, Jan E.; Vineis, Joseph H.; Bollback, Jonathan Paul;

    2006-01-01

    Anopheles darlingi is the primary malaria vector in Latin America, and is especially important in Amazonian is the primary malaria vector in Latin America, and is especially important in Amazonian Brazil. Historically, control efforts have been focused on indoor house spraying using a variety...... malaria epidemic. In contrast, although An. darlingi was eradicated from some districts of the city of Belem (the capital of Para State) in 1968 to reduce malaria, populations around the water protection area in the eastern district were treated only briefly. To investigate the population structure of An...

  7. HIV, co-morbidity and ageing

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    Reiss P

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available As treatment for HIV infection needs to be used continuously and lifelong, issues concerning long-term outcomes, including those involving tolerability and safety of treatment, are gaining increasing importance. Although current combination antiretroviral therapy (cART regimens are generally better tolerated than those in the early days of cART, treatment toxicity remains an important cause for discontinuation of (components of treatment. Moreover, several of the potential toxicities of cART (including cardiovascular, metabolic, renal and bone toxicity overlap with known ageing-associated co-morbidities. Given that our patient population with HIV is increasingly getting older as a result of the success of cART in reducing traditional HIV-associated morbidity and mortality, these co-morbidities are increasingly being seen and importantly influence patient management. Moreover, persons with HIV, in spite of having suppressed viraemia on cART seem to be at increased risk of the premature development of age-associated non-communicable co-morbidities, including cardiovascular, chronic kidney, liver and pulmonary disease, diabetes mellitus, osteoporosis, non-AIDS associated malignancies, and neurocognitive impairment. It has therefore been hypothesised that such individuals, despite effective cART, may be prone to accelerated ageing. The underlying pathogenesis is likely to be multifactorial and, apart from include sustained immune activation, both systemically and within the central nervous system. The presentation will review the current state of knowledge and investigation in this area.

  8. Insights into the Immunological Properties of Intrinsically Disordered Malaria Proteins Using Proteome Scale Predictions.

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    Andrew J Guy

    Full Text Available Malaria remains a significant global health burden. The development of an effective malaria vaccine remains as a major challenge with the potential to significantly reduce morbidity and mortality. While Plasmodium spp. have been shown to contain a large number of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs or disordered protein regions, the relationship of protein structure to subcellular localisation and adaptive immune responses remains unclear. In this study, we employed several computational prediction algorithms to identify IDPs at the proteome level of six Plasmodium spp. and to investigate the potential impact of protein disorder on adaptive immunity against P. falciparum parasites. IDPs were shown to be particularly enriched within nuclear proteins, apical proteins, exported proteins and proteins localised to the parasitophorous vacuole. Furthermore, several leading vaccine candidates, and proteins with known roles in host-cell invasion, have extensive regions of disorder. Presentation of peptides by MHC molecules plays an important role in adaptive immune responses, and we show that IDP regions are predicted to contain relatively few MHC class I and II binding peptides owing to inherent differences in amino acid composition compared to structured domains. In contrast, linear B-cell epitopes were predicted to be enriched in IDPs. Tandem repeat regions and non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms were found to be strongly associated with regions of disorder. In summary, immune responses against IDPs appear to have characteristics distinct from those against structured protein domains, with increased antibody recognition of linear epitopes but some constraints for MHC presentation and issues of polymorphisms. These findings have major implications for vaccine design, and understanding immunity to malaria.

  9. Nature or nurture in mosquito resistance to malaria?

    OpenAIRE

    Hurd, Hilary

    2007-01-01

    The genetic basis of mosquito resistance to malaria parasites is well established and currently receives a lot of attention. However this is not the sole determinant of the success or failure of an infection. In a recent article, Lambrechts and colleagues report the influence of the quality of the external environment of a mosquito on infection. They indicate that external variations could substantially reduce the importance of resistance genes in determining infection by malaria parasites. F...

  10. Status of vaccine research and development of vaccines for malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkett, Ashley J

    2016-06-03

    Despite recent progress in reducing deaths attributable to malaria, it continues to claim approximately 500,000 lives per year and is associated with approximately 200 million infections. New tools, including safe and effective vaccines, are needed to ensure that the gains of the last 15 years are leveraged toward achieving the ultimate goal of malaria parasite eradication. In 2015, the European Medicines Agency announced the adoption of a positive opinion for the malaria vaccine candidate most advanced in development, RTS,S/AS01, which provides modest protection against clinical malaria; in early 2016, WHO recommended large-scale pilot implementations of RTS,S in settings of moderate-to-high malaria transmission. In alignment with these advancements, the community goals and preferred product characteristics for next-generation vaccines have been updated to inform the development of vaccines that are highly efficacious in preventing clinical malaria, and those needed to accelerate parasite elimination. Next-generation vaccines, targeting all stages of the parasite lifecycle, are in early-stage development with the most advanced in Phase 2 trials. Importantly, progress is being made in the definition of feasible regulatory pathways to accelerate timelines, including for vaccines designed to interrupt transmission of parasites from humans to mosquitoes. The continued absence of financially lucrative, high-income markets to drive investment in malaria vaccine development points to continued heavy reliance on public and philanthropic funding. Copyright © 2016 World Health Organization. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Urinary schistosomiasis and malaria associated anemia in Ethiopia

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    Deribew, Ketema; Tekeste, Zinaye; Petros, Beyene

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the prevalence of anemia in children with urinary schistosomiasis, malaria and concurrent infections by the two diseases. Methods Urine and blood samples were collected from 387 children (216 males and 171 females) to examine urinary schistosomiasis and malaria and to determine hemoglobin concentration at Hassoba and Hassoba Buri village in Amibara woreda, Afar region, Ethiopia. Results The overall prevalence of urinary schistosomiasis and Plasmodium falciparum malaria was 24.54% and 6.20% respectively. Only 2.84% of children carried concurrent infections of both parasites. There was high percentage of anemic patients (81.81%) in the coinfected cases than in either malaria (33.3%) or schistosomiasis (38.94%) cases. There was significantly low mean hemoglobin concentration in concurrently infected children than non-infected and single infected (P0.05). The level of hemoglobin was negatively correlated with the number of S. haematobium eggs/10 mL urine (r=-0.6) and malaria parasitemia (r=-0.53). Conclusions The study showed that anemia is higher in concurrently infected children than non-infected and single infected. Furthermore, level of hemoglobin was negatively correlated with the number of S. haematobium eggs and malaria parsitemia. Therefore, examination of hemoglobin status in patients co-infected with malaria and schistosomiasis is important to reduce the risk of anemia and to improve health of the community. PMID:23620856

  12. Urinary schistosomiasis and malaria associated anemia in Ethiopia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ketema Deribew; Zinaye Tekeste; Beyene Petros

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess the prevalence of anemia in children with urinary schistosomiasis, malaria and concurrent infections by the two diseases. Methods: Urine and blood samples were collected from 387 children (216 males and 171 females) to examine urinary schistosomiasis and malaria and to determine hemoglobin concentration at Hassoba and Hassoba Buri village in Amibara woreda, Afar region, Ethiopia. Results: The overall prevalence of urinary schistosomiasis and Plasmodium falciparum malaria was 24.54% and 6.20% respectively. Only 2.84% of children carried concurrent infections of both parasites. There was high percentage of anemic patients (81.81%) in the coinfected cases than in either malaria (33.3%) or schistosomiasis (38.94%) cases. There was significantly low mean hemoglobin concentration in concurrently infected children than non-infected and single infected (P0.05). The level of hemoglobin was negatively correlated with the number of S. haematobium eggs/10 mL urine (r=-0.6) and malaria parasitemia (r=-0.53). Conclusions: The study showed that anemia is higher in concurrently infected children than non-infected and single infected. Furthermore, level of hemoglobin was negatively correlated with the number of S. haematobium eggs and malaria parsitemia. Therefore, examination of hemoglobin status in patients co-infected with malaria and schistosomiasis is important to reduce the risk of anemia and to improve health of the community.

  13. [Study on malaria vectors in malaria endemic areas of Tibet autonomous region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Song; Huang, Fang; Zhou, Shui-Sen; Tang, Lin-Hua

    2012-12-01

    The malaria situation in Tibet has been in an active status and the malaria incidence reached the second in China in 2010. Malaria vector prevention and control is one of the important methods for malaria control, while the malaria vectors are still unknown in Tibet. The author summarized the past researches on malaria vectors in Tibet, so as to provide the evidence for improving malaria control investigation in malaria endemic areas of Tibet, with hopes to provide useful vector message for other researcher.

  14. Comparison of all-cause and malaria-specific mortality from two West African countries with different malaria transmission patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouyaté Bocar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria is a leading cause of death in children below five years of age in sub-Saharan Africa. All-cause and malaria-specific mortality rates for children under-five years old in a mesoendemic malaria area (The Gambia were compared with those from a hyper/holoendemic area (Burkina Faso. Methods Information on observed person-years (PY, deaths and cause of death was extracted from online search, using key words: "Africa, The Gambia, Burkina Faso, malaria, Plasmodium falciparum, mortality, child survival, morbidity". Missing person-years were estimated and all-cause and malaria-specific mortality were calculated as rates per 1,000 PY. Studies were classified as longitudinal/clinical studies or surveys/censuses. Linear regression was used to investigate mortality trends. Results Overall, 39 and 18 longitudinal/clinical studies plus 10 and 15 surveys and censuses were identified for The Gambia and Burkina Faso respectively (1960–2004. Model-based estimates for under-five all-cause mortality rates show a decline from 1960 to 2000 in both countries (Burkina Faso: from 71.8 to 39.0, but more markedly in The Gambia (from 104.5 to 28.4. The weighted-average malaria-specific mortality rate per 1000 person-years for Burkina Faso (15.4, 95% CI: 13.0–18.3 was higher than that in The Gambia (9.5, 95% CI: 9.1–10.1. Malaria mortality rates did not decline over time in either country. Conclusion Child mortality in both countries declined significantly in the period 1960 to 2004, possibly due to socio-economic development, improved health services and specific intervention projects. However, there was little decline in malaria mortality suggesting that there had been no major impact of malaria control programmes during this period. The difference in malaria mortality rates across countries points to significant differences in national disease control policies and/or disease transmission patterns.

  15. Malaria elimination in Isabel Province, Solomon Islands: establishing a surveillance-response system to prevent introduction and reintroduction of malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whittaker Maxine

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Solomon Islands National Malaria Programme is currently focused on intensified control and progressive elimination. Recent control efforts in Isabel Province have reduced their malaria incidence to 2.6/1,000 population in 2009 1 whereas most neighbouring provinces have much higher incidences. A malaria surveillance-response system that involves testing all travellers entering Isabel Province using rapid diagnostic tests (RDT to prevent cases being imported had been proposed by local health authorities. This study provides information on the feasibility and acceptability of implementing a new approach of surveillance and response in the context of low levels of indigenous malaria transmission in Isabel Province. Methods A total of 13 focus group discussions (FGD and 22 key informant interviews (KII were conducted in Isabel Province, Solomon Islands. Key topics included: the travel patterns of people to, from and within Isabel Province; the acceptability, community perceptions, attitudes and suggestions towards the proposed surveillance programme; and management of suspected malaria cases. This information was triangulated with data obtained from port authorities, airlines and passenger ships travelling to and from Isabel Province in the preceding two years. Results Travel within Isabel Province and to and from other provinces is common with marked seasonality. The majority of inter-provincial travel is done on scheduled public transport; namely passenger ships and aircrafts. In Isabel Province there is a healthy community spirit as well as high concern regarding malaria and its importation and there is currently effective malaria passive case detection and management. Conducting malaria screening at ports and airports would be acceptable to the community. Conclusion A robust surveillance-response system is essential when moving towards malaria elimination. Many factors contribute positively towards the feasibility of an

  16. Malaria elimination in Isabel Province, Solomon Islands: establishing a surveillance-response system to prevent introduction and reintroduction of malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Matthew; Kenilorea, Geoffrey; Yamaguchi, Yuka; Bobogare, Albino; Losi, Landry; Atkinson, Jo-An; Vallely, Andrew; Whittaker, Maxine; Tanner, Marcel; Wijesinghe, Rushika

    2011-08-11

    The Solomon Islands National Malaria Programme is currently focused on intensified control and progressive elimination. Recent control efforts in Isabel Province have reduced their malaria incidence to 2.6/1,000 population in 2009 1 whereas most neighbouring provinces have much higher incidences. A malaria surveillance-response system that involves testing all travellers entering Isabel Province using rapid diagnostic tests (RDT) to prevent cases being imported had been proposed by local health authorities. This study provides information on the feasibility and acceptability of implementing a new approach of surveillance and response in the context of low levels of indigenous malaria transmission in Isabel Province. A total of 13 focus group discussions (FGD) and 22 key informant interviews (KII) were conducted in Isabel Province, Solomon Islands. Key topics included: the travel patterns of people to, from and within Isabel Province; the acceptability, community perceptions, attitudes and suggestions towards the proposed surveillance programme; and management of suspected malaria cases. This information was triangulated with data obtained from port authorities, airlines and passenger ships travelling to and from Isabel Province in the preceding two years. Travel within Isabel Province and to and from other provinces is common with marked seasonality. The majority of inter-provincial travel is done on scheduled public transport; namely passenger ships and aircrafts. In Isabel Province there is a healthy community spirit as well as high concern regarding malaria and its importation and there is currently effective malaria passive case detection and management. Conducting malaria screening at ports and airports would be acceptable to the community. A robust surveillance-response system is essential when moving towards malaria elimination. Many factors contribute positively towards the feasibility of an RDT based malaria surveillance system in Isabel Province. Due to

  17. Knowledge and practice of malaria prevention among caregivers of children with malaria admitted to a teaching hospital in Ghana

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    Emmanuel Ameyaw

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the knowledge and practice of malaria prevention among caregivers of children admitted to a teaching hospital in Ghana. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted on caregivers of children who were hospitalized at the paediatric wards of the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital from March 2009 to June 2009. Data were analysed using StataTM version 8.2. Results: Nearly all caregivers (97.1% had heard of malaria. Of this proportion, 89.7% knew mosquito bite as a cause of malaria. The proportion of caregivers who were able to recognise the signs and symptoms of malaria were 87.6% (for fever, 47.1% (for vomiting and 28.1% (for headache. Radio and television were the major sources of information about malaria. Conclusions: Caregivers of children have adequate knowledge about malaria and its mode of transmission. Further education on the implementation of the preventive methods is still needed to help reduce the incidence of malaria among children.

  18. Preoperative alcoholism and postoperative morbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonnesen, H; Kehlet, H

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Preoperative risk assessment has become part of daily clinical practice, but preoperative alcohol abuse has not received much attention. METHODS: A Medline search was carried out to identify original papers published from 1967 to 1998. Relevant articles on postoperative morbidity...... in alcohol abusers were used to evaluate the evidence. RESULTS: Prospective and retrospective studies demonstrate a twofold to threefold increase in postoperative morbidity in alcohol abusers, the most frequent complications being infections, bleeding and cardiopulmonary insufficiency. Wound complications...... to postoperative morbidity. CONCLUSION: Alcohol consumption should be included in the preoperative assessment of likely postoperative outcome. Reduction of postoperative morbidity in alcohol abusers may include preoperative alcohol abstinence to improve organ function, or perioperative alcohol administration...

  19. Research toward Malaria Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Louis H.; Howard, Russell J.; Carter, Richard; Good, Michael F.; Nussenzweig, Victor; Nussenzweig, Ruth S.

    1986-12-01

    Malaria exacts a toll of disease to people in the Tropics that seems incomprehensible to those only familiar with medicine and human health in the developed world. The methods of molecular biology, immunology, and cell biology are now being used to develop an antimalarial vaccine. The Plasmodium parasites that cause malaria have many stages in their life cycle. Each stage is antigenically distinct and potentially could be interrupted by different vaccines. However, achieving complete protection by vaccination may require a better understanding of the complexities of B- and T-cell priming in natural infections and the development of an appropriate adjuvant for use in humans.

  20. Liver morphology in morbid obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, T; Gluud, C

    1984-01-01

    methods including a computerized survey. Forty-one original articles were included, comprising information on liver morphology in 1515 morbidly obese patients. Liver biopsy was considered normal in 12 per cent of the cases. The most frequent abnormality reported was fatty change, present in 80 per cent...... of obesity, age, sex, alcohol consumption, diabetes mellitus) does not point towards a single causal factor. Co-influence of additional pathogenetic factors are likely in the development of liver changes in morbid obesity....

  1. Morbidity and Mortality in Sarcoidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerke, Alicia K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review Chronic sarcoidosis is a complex disease with numerous comorbid conditions and can be fatal in some cases. Recognizing causes of morbidity and mortality is important to effectively select treatments, manage symptoms, and improve outcomes. The purpose of this review is to examine emerging knowledge on morbidity and mortality in sarcoidosis. Recent Findings Approximately one to five percent of patients with sarcoidosis die from complications of sarcoidosis. Recent population studies indicate that mortality may be increasing over the past decade. The reasons behind these trends are unclear, but could include increasing incidence, detection rates, severity of disease, or age of the population. Morbidity of sarcoidosis is reflected by a trend of increased hospitalizations over recent years and increased use of healthcare resources. Morbidity can be caused by organ damage from granulomatous inflammation, treatment complications, and psychosocial effects of the disease. Recent studies are focused on morbidity related to cardiopulmonary complications, bone health, and aging within the sarcoidosis population. Last, sarcoidosis is associated with autoimmune diseases, pulmonary embolism, and malignancy; however, the underlying mechanisms linking diseases continue to be debated. Summary Morbidity in sarcoidosis is significant and multifactorial. Mortality is infrequent, but may be increasing over the years. PMID:25029298

  2. Malaria, Schistosomiasis and Soil Transmitted Helminth Burden and Their Correlation with Anemia in Children Attending Primary Schools in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matangila, Junior R.; Doua, Joachim Yorokpa; Linsuke, Sylvie; Madinga, Joule; Inocêncio da Luz, Raquel; Van Geertruyden, Jean-Pierre; Lutumba, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Background Anaemia reduces cognitive potential in school children, retards their growth and predisposes them to other diseases. As there is a paucity of data on the current burden of P. falciparum, S. mansoni and soil transmitted helminths (STH) infections and their correlation with schoolchildren’s anemia in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), we collect these data. Methods This study reports baseline data collected from a randomized controlled trial investigating the impact of IPT with SP and SP-PQ on anemia and malaria morbidity in Congolese schoolchildren (Trial registration: NCT01722539; PACTR201211000449323). S. mansoni and STH infections were assessed using kato-katz technique. Malaria infection and hemoglobin concentration were assessed using Blood smear and Hemocontrol device, respectively. Results A total of 616 primary schoolchildren from 4 to 13 years old were enrolled in the study. The prevalence of Plasmodium spp. infection was 18.5% (95%CI:15.6–21.9). Amongst those infected, 24 (21%), 40 (35.1%), 40 (35.1%), 10 (8.8%), had light, moderate, heavy, very high malaria parasite density, respectively. Above 9 years of age (p = 0.02), male and history of fever (p = 0.04) were both associated with malaria infection. The overall prevalence of S. mansoni infection was 6.4% (95%CI:4.4–9.1). Girls were associated with S. mansoni infection (p = 0.04). T. trichiura was the most prevalent STH infection (26.3%), followed by A. lumbricoides (20.1%). Co-infection with malaria-S. mansoni and malaria-STH was, respectively, 1.5% (CI95%:0.7–3.3) and 6.4% (CI95% 4.4–9.1). The prevalence of anemia was found to be 41.6% (95%CI:37.7–45.6) and anemia was strongly related with Plasmodium ssp infection (aOR:4.1; CI95%:2.6–6.5;panemia in schoolchildren. Therefore, specific school-based interventions, such as intermittent preventive treatment or prophylaxis, LLITN distribution, anthelminthic mass treatment and micronutrient supplementation are needed

  3. Determining utility values related to malaria and malaria chemoprophylaxis

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    Coyle Doug

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemoprophylaxis for travellers' malaria is problematic. Decision modeling may help determine optimal prevention strategies for travellers' malaria. Such models can fully assess effect of drug use and disease on quality of life, and help travellers make informed values based decisions. Such models require utility values reflecting societal preferences over different health states of relevance. To date, there are no published utility values relating to clinical malaria or chemoprophylaxis adverse events. Methods Utility estimates for health states related to falciparum malaria, sequelae and drug-related adverse events were obtained using a self-administered visual analogue scale in 20 individuals. Utility values for health states related to clinical malaria were obtained from a survey of 11 malaria experts questioned about length of hospital stay or equivalent disability with simple and severe travellers' malaria. Results The general public (potential travellers, were more tolerant of taking prophylaxis if associated with no or mild AEs and least tolerant of mild sequelae from malaria and severe drug related events. The rating value reported for taking no prophylaxis was quite variable. Tropical medicine specialists estimated a mean hospital stay 3.23 days (range 0.5-4.5 days for simple and 6.36 days (range 4.5 - 7 days for severe malaria. Conclusions This study provides a benchmark for important utility value estimates for modeling malaria and drug-related outcomes in non-immune travellers.

  4. Determining the impact of community awareness-raising activities on the prevention of malaria transmission in Palawan, the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto-Takahashi, Emilie Louise Akiko; Tongol-Rivera, Pilarita; Villacorte, Elena A; Angluben, Ray U; Yasuoka, Junko; Kano, Shigeyuki; Jimba, Masamine

    2014-06-01

    was suggested to be an effective strategy for reducing malaria re-infection in Palawan. These activities should be strengthened to improve preventive measures implemented by ex-patients traveling to mountain areas and to enhance the knowledge on malaria transmission particularly among indigenous residents.

  5. Determinants of malaria control in a rural community in Eastern Rwanda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kateera, F.K.

    2016-01-01

    Malaria disease – particularly that caused by infection with Plasmodium falciparum parasite - remains a leading cause of severe morbidity and mortality particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, of which Rwanda is part. Infection of P. falciparum parasites into the body after a bite with in infected mosqui

  6. Determinants of malaria control in a rural community in Eastern Rwanda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kateera, F.K.

    2016-01-01

    Malaria disease – particularly that caused by infection with Plasmodium falciparum parasite - remains a leading cause of severe morbidity and mortality particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, of which Rwanda is part. Infection of P. falciparum parasites into the body after a bite with in infected mosqui

  7. Prevention and management of malaria during pregnancy: findings from qualitative studies in Ghana and Malawi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Pell; A. Meñaca; N.A. Afrah; L. Manda-Taylor; S. Chatio; F. Were; A. Hodgson; M.J. Hamel; L. Kalilani; H. Tagbor; R. Pool

    2013-01-01

    Background In endemic regions of sub-Saharan Africa, malaria during pregnancy (MiP) is a major preventable cause of maternal and infant morbidity and mortality. Current recommended MiP prevention and control includes intermittent preventive treatment (IPTp), distribution of insecticide-treated bed n