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Sample records for redox stratification controlled

  1. Redox stratification of an ancient lake in Gale crater, Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurowitz, J A; Grotzinger, J P; Fischer, W W; McLennan, S M; Milliken, R E; Stein, N; Vasavada, A R; Blake, D F; Dehouck, E; Eigenbrode, J L; Fairén, A G; Frydenvang, J; Gellert, R; Grant, J A; Gupta, S; Herkenhoff, K E; Ming, D W; Rampe, E B; Schmidt, M E; Siebach, K L; Stack-Morgan, K; Sumner, D Y; Wiens, R C

    2017-06-02

    In 2012, NASA's Curiosity rover landed on Mars to assess its potential as a habitat for past life and investigate the paleoclimate record preserved by sedimentary rocks inside the ~150-kilometer-diameter Gale impact crater. Geological reconstructions from Curiosity rover data have revealed an ancient, habitable lake environment fed by rivers draining into the crater. We synthesize geochemical and mineralogical data from lake-bed mudstones collected during the first 1300 martian solar days of rover operations in Gale. We present evidence for lake redox stratification, established by depth-dependent variations in atmospheric oxidant and dissolved-solute concentrations. Paleoclimate proxy data indicate that a transition from colder to warmer climate conditions is preserved in the stratigraphy. Finally, a late phase of geochemical modification by saline fluids is recognized. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  2. Impact of redox-stratification on the diversity and distribution of bacterial communities in sandy reef sediments in a microcosm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Zheng; WANG Xin; Angelos K. HANNIDES; Francis J. SANSONE; WANG Guangyi

    2011-01-01

    Relationships between microbial communities and geochemical environments are important in marine microbial ecology and biogeochemistry.Although biogeochemical redox stratification has been well documented in marine sediments,its impact on microbial communities remains largely unknown.In this study,we applied denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and clone library construction to investigate the diversity and stratification of bacterial communities in redox-stratified sandy reef sediments in a microcosm.A total of 88 Operational Taxonomic Units (OTU) were identified from 16S rRNA clone libraries constructed from sandy reef sediments in a laboratory microcosm.They were members of nine phyla and three candidate divisions,including Proteobacteria (Alpha-,Beta-,Gamma-,Delta-,and Epsilonproteobacteria),Actinobacteria,Acidobacteria,Bacteroidetes,Chloroflexi,Cyanobacteria,Firmicutes,Verrucomicrobia,Spirochaetes,and the candidate divisions WS3,SO31 and AO19.The vast majority of these phylotypes are related to clone sequences from other marine sediments,but OTUs of Epsilonproteobacteria and WS3 are reported for the first time from permeable marine sediments.Several other OTUs are potential new bacterial phylotypes because of their low similarity with reference sequences.Results from the 16S rRNA,gene clone sequence analyses suggested that bacterial communities exhibit clear stratification across large redox gradients in these sediments,with the highest diversity found in the anoxic layer (15-25 mm) and the least diversity in the suboxic layer (3-5 mm).Analysis of the nosZ,and amoA gene libraries also indicated the stratification of denitrifiers and nitrifiers,with their highest diversity being in the anoxic and oxic sediment layers,respectively.These results indicated that redox-stratification can affect the distribution of bacterial communities in sandy reef sediments.

  3. Metabolic Control of Redox and Redox Control of Metabolism in Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernie, Alisdair R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Reduction-oxidation (Redox) status operates as a major integrator of subcellular and extracellular metabolism and is simultaneously itself regulated by metabolic processes. Redox status not only dominates cellular metabolism due to the prominence of NAD(H) and NADP(H) couples in myriad metabolic reactions but also acts as an effective signal that informs the cell of the prevailing environmental conditions. After relay of this information, the cell is able to appropriately respond via a range of mechanisms, including directly affecting cellular functioning and reprogramming nuclear gene expression. Recent Advances: The facile accession of Arabidopsis knockout mutants alongside the adoption of broad-scale post-genomic approaches, which are able to provide transcriptomic-, proteomic-, and metabolomic-level information alongside traditional biochemical and emerging cell biological techniques, has dramatically advanced our understanding of redox status control. This review summarizes redox status control of metabolism and the metabolic control of redox status at both cellular and subcellular levels. Critical Issues: It is becoming apparent that plastid, mitochondria, and peroxisome functions influence a wide range of processes outside of the organelles themselves. While knowledge of the network of metabolic pathways and their intraorganellar redox status regulation has increased in the last years, little is known about the interorganellar redox signals coordinating these networks. A current challenge is, therefore, synthesizing our knowledge and planning experiments that tackle redox status regulation at both inter- and intracellular levels. Future Directions: Emerging tools are enabling ever-increasing spatiotemporal resolution of metabolism and imaging of redox status components. Broader application of these tools will likely greatly enhance our understanding of the interplay of redox status and metabolism as well as elucidating and

  4. Engine combustion control via fuel reactivity stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, Rolf Deneys; Hanson, Reed M; Splitter, Derek A; Kokjohn, Sage L

    2013-12-31

    A compression ignition engine uses two or more fuel charges having two or more reactivities to control the timing and duration of combustion. In a preferred implementation, a lower-reactivity fuel charge is injected or otherwise introduced into the combustion chamber, preferably sufficiently early that it becomes at least substantially homogeneously dispersed within the chamber before a subsequent injection is made. One or more subsequent injections of higher-reactivity fuel charges are then made, and these preferably distribute the higher-reactivity matter within the lower-reactivity chamber space such that combustion begins in the higher-reactivity regions, and with the lower-reactivity regions following thereafter. By appropriately choose the reactivities of the charges, their relative amounts, and their timing, combustion can be tailored to achieve optimal power output (and thus fuel efficiency), at controlled temperatures (and thus controlled NOx), and with controlled equivalence ratios (and thus controlled soot).

  5. Control Carbon to Prevent corium Stratification In-Vessel Retention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Go, A Ra; Hong, Seung Hyun; Kim, Sang Nyung [Kyung Hee Univ., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    As a result, the thermal margin decreases, and the nuclear reactor vessel may be destroyed. To control Carbons, which is the major cause of stratification, Ruthenium and Hafnium are inserted inside the lower reactor head which initiates a chemical reaction with Carbon. SPARTAN program is used to confirm a reaction probability which is measured in bond energy and strength etc. To analyze the possibility of bonding with Carbon, the initial property of Ruthenium and Carbon are measured during the calculated absorbing process. After following that theory, the Spartan program is able to determine if it can insert the metal. After verifying the combination of Ruthenium and Carbon, the Spartan program analyzes the impact of the Carbon to prevent the corium stratification. It determines the possibility of the success with the introduction of the IVR concept. Ruthenium is suitable to Carbon bonding process to decrease affect to corium behavior which do not form stratification. The metal which can combine with Carbon should be satisfied with temperature as high as 2800 .deg. C. Therefore, the further research works are determined by using the Spartan program to calculate the Carbon and Ruthenium bonding energy, and to check other bonding results as follows. After check the results, review this theory to insert the Ruthenium in reactor vessel. APR1400 and OPR1000, Korea Hydro and Nuclear power plant core meltdown accident has been evaluated a high level in severe accident. When the reactor core is melted down, it is stratified into the metal layer and the ceramic layer. As the heat conductivity of metal layer is higher than that of the ceramic layer, heat concentration occurs in the upper part of the bottom hemisphere which comes into contact with the metal layer.

  6. Redox Control of Skeletal Muscle Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Moal, Emmeran; Pialoux, Vincent; Juban, Gaëtan; Groussard, Carole; Zouhal, Hassane; Chazaud, Bénédicte; Mounier, Rémi

    2017-08-10

    Skeletal muscle shows high plasticity in response to external demand. Moreover, adult skeletal muscle is capable of complete regeneration after injury, due to the properties of muscle stem cells (MuSCs), the satellite cells, which follow a tightly regulated myogenic program to generate both new myofibers and new MuSCs for further needs. Although reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) have long been associated with skeletal muscle physiology, their implication in the cell and molecular processes at work during muscle regeneration is more recent. This review focuses on redox regulation during skeletal muscle regeneration. An overview of the basics of ROS/RNS and antioxidant chemistry and biology occurring in skeletal muscle is first provided. Then, the comprehensive knowledge on redox regulation of MuSCs and their surrounding cell partners (macrophages, endothelial cells) during skeletal muscle regeneration is presented in normal muscle and in specific physiological (exercise-induced muscle damage, aging) and pathological (muscular dystrophies) contexts. Recent advances in the comprehension of these processes has led to the development of therapeutic assays using antioxidant supplementation, which result in inconsistent efficiency, underlying the need for new tools that are aimed at precisely deciphering and targeting ROS networks. This review should provide an overall insight of the redox regulation of skeletal muscle regeneration while highlighting the limits of the use of nonspecific antioxidants to improve muscle function. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 27, 276-310.

  7. Factors Controlling Redox Speciation of Plutonium and Neptunium in Extraction Separation Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulenova, Alena [Principal Investigator; Vandegrift, III, George F. [Collaborator

    2013-09-24

    The objective of the project was to examine the factors controlling redox speciation of plutonium and neptunium in UREX+ extraction in terms of redox potentials, redox mechanism, kinetics and thermodynamics. Researchers employed redox-speciation extractions schemes in parallel to the spectroscopic experiments. The resulting distribution of redox species w studied uring spectroscopic, electrochemical, and spectro-electrochemical methods. This work reulted in collection of data on redox stability and distribution of redox couples in the nitric acid/nitrate electrolyte and the development of redox buffers to stabilize the desired oxidation state of separated radionuclides. The effects of temperature and concentrations on the redox behavior of neptunium were evaluated.

  8. Combustion Mode Design with High Efficiency and Low Emissions Controlled by Mixtures Stratification and Fuel Reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu eWang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a review on the combustion mode design with high efficiency and low emissions controlled by fuel reactivity and mixture stratification that have been conducted in the authors’ group, including the charge reactivity controlled homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI combustion, stratification controlled premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI combustion, and dual-fuel combustion concepts controlled by both fuel reactivity and mixture stratification. The review starts with the charge reactivity controlled HCCI combustion, and the works on HCCI fuelled with both high cetane number fuels, such as DME and n-heptane, and high octane number fuels, such as methanol, natural gas, gasoline and mixtures of gasoline/alcohols, are reviewed and discussed. Since single fuel cannot meet the reactivity requirements under different loads to control the combustion process, the studies related to concentration stratification and dual-fuel charge reactivity controlled HCCI combustion are then presented, which have been shown to have the potential to achieve effective combustion control. The efforts of using both mixture and thermal stratifications to achieve the auto-ignition and combustion control are also discussed. Thereafter, both charge reactivity and mixture stratification are then applied to control the combustion process. The potential and capability of thermal-atmosphere controlled compound combustion mode and dual-fuel reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI/highly premixed charge combustion (HPCC mode to achieve clean and high efficiency combustion are then presented and discussed. Based on these results and discussions, combustion mode design with high efficiency and low emissions controlled by fuel reactivity and mixtures stratification in the whole operating range is proposed.

  9. Molecular Controls of the Oxygenation and Redox Reactions of Hemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkens, Robert; Alayash, Abdu I.; Banerjee, Sambuddha; Crumbliss, Alvin L.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The broad classes of O2-binding proteins known as hemoglobins (Hbs) carry out oxygenation and redox functions that allow organisms with significantly different physiological demands to exist in a wide range of environments. This is aided by allosteric controls that modulate the protein's redox reactions as well as its O2-binding functions. Recent Advances: The controls of Hb's redox reactions can differ appreciably from the molecular controls for Hb oxygenation and come into play in elegant mechanisms for dealing with nitrosative stress, in the malarial resistance conferred by sickle cell Hb, and in the as-yet unsuccessful designs for safe and effective blood substitutes. Critical Issues: An important basic principle in consideration of Hb's redox reactions is the distinction between kinetic and thermodynamic reaction control. Clarification of these modes of control is critical to gaining an increased understanding of Hb-mediated oxidative processes and oxidative toxicity in vivo. Future Directions: This review addresses emerging concepts and some unresolved questions regarding the interplay between the oxygenation and oxidation reactions of structurally diverse Hbs, both within red blood cells and under acellular conditions. Developing methods that control Hb-mediated oxidative toxicity will be critical to the future development of Hb-based blood substitutes. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 2298–2313. PMID:23198874

  10. Effects of Mixture Stratification on Combustion and Emissions of Boosted Controlled Auto-Ignition Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Hunicz

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The stratification of in-cylinder mixtures appears to be an effective method for managing the combustion process in controlled auto-ignition (CAI engines. Stratification can be achieved and controlled using various injection strategies such as split fuel injection and the introduction of a portion of fuel directly before the start of combustion. This study investigates the effect of injection timing and the amount of fuel injected for stratification on the combustion and emissions in CAI engine. The experimental research was performed on a single cylinder engine with direct gasoline injection. CAI combustion was achieved using negative valve overlap and exhaust gas trapping. The experiments were performed at constant engine fueling. Intake boost was applied to control the excess air ratio. The results show that the application of the late injection strategy has a significant effect on the heat release process. In general, the later the injection is and the more fuel is injected for stratification, the earlier the auto-ignition occurs. However, the experimental findings reveal that the effect of stratification on combustion duration is much more complex. Changes in combustion are reflected in NOX emissions. The attainable level of stratification is limited by the excessive emission of unburned hydrocarbons, CO and soot.

  11. Exercise and Glycemic Control: Focus on Redox Homeostasis and Redox-Sensitive Protein Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Lewan; Shaw, Christopher S.; Stepto, Nigel K.; Levinger, Itamar

    2017-01-01

    Physical inactivity, excess energy consumption, and obesity are associated with elevated systemic oxidative stress and the sustained activation of redox-sensitive stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK) and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways. Sustained SAPK activation leads to aberrant insulin signaling, impaired glycemic control, and the development and progression of cardiometabolic disease. Paradoxically, acute exercise transiently increases oxidative stress and SAPK signaling, yet postexercise glycemic control and skeletal muscle function are enhanced. Furthermore, regular exercise leads to the upregulation of antioxidant defense, which likely assists in the mitigation of chronic oxidative stress-associated disease. In this review, we explore the complex spatiotemporal interplay between exercise, oxidative stress, and glycemic control, and highlight exercise-induced reactive oxygen species and redox-sensitive protein signaling as important regulators of glucose homeostasis. PMID:28529499

  12. Molecular controls of the oxygenation and redox reactions of hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaventura, Celia; Henkens, Robert; Alayash, Abdu I; Banerjee, Sambuddha; Crumbliss, Alvin L

    2013-06-10

    The broad classes of O(2)-binding proteins known as hemoglobins (Hbs) carry out oxygenation and redox functions that allow organisms with significantly different physiological demands to exist in a wide range of environments. This is aided by allosteric controls that modulate the protein's redox reactions as well as its O(2)-binding functions. The controls of Hb's redox reactions can differ appreciably from the molecular controls for Hb oxygenation and come into play in elegant mechanisms for dealing with nitrosative stress, in the malarial resistance conferred by sickle cell Hb, and in the as-yet unsuccessful designs for safe and effective blood substitutes. An important basic principle in consideration of Hb's redox reactions is the distinction between kinetic and thermodynamic reaction control. Clarification of these modes of control is critical to gaining an increased understanding of Hb-mediated oxidative processes and oxidative toxicity in vivo. This review addresses emerging concepts and some unresolved questions regarding the interplay between the oxygenation and oxidation reactions of structurally diverse Hbs, both within red blood cells and under acellular conditions. Developing methods that control Hb-mediated oxidative toxicity will be critical to the future development of Hb-based blood substitutes.

  13. Redox phenomena controlling systems - a 7. framework programme collaborative project (2008-2012)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this EURATOM collaborative project is to understand Redox phenomena controlling the long-term release/retention of radionuclides (ReCosy programme) in nuclear waste disposal and to provide tools to apply the results to safety assessment. The project has been organized into 6 task forces: 1) implications of Redox for safety, 2) development of Redox determination methods, 3) Redox response of defined and near-natural systems, 4) Redox reactions of radionuclides, 5) Redox processes in radionuclide transport, and 6) Redox reactions affecting the spent fuel source-term

  14. Isoprenoid quinones resolve the stratification of microbial redox processes in a biogeochemical continuum from the photic zone to deep anoxic sediments of the Black Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Kevin W; Elling, Felix J; Schröder, Jan M; Lipp, Julius S; Goldhammer, Tobias; Zabel, Matthias; Elvert, Marcus; Overmann, Jörg; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2018-03-09

    of microorganisms and their metabolisms, as the majority remains uncultured. Thus, culture-independent approaches are critical for determining microbial diversity and active metabolic processes. In order to resolve the stratification of microbial communities in the Black Sea, we comprehensively analyzed redox process-specific isoprenoid quinone biomarkers in a unique continuous record from the photic zone through the chemocline into anoxic subsurface sediments. We describe an unprecedented quinone diversity that allowed us to detect distinct biogeochemical processes including oxygenic photosynthesis, archaeal ammonia oxidation, aerobic methanotrophy and anoxygenic photosynthesis in defined geochemical zones. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  15. Engine combustion control at low loads via fuel reactivity stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, Rolf Deneys; Hanson, Reed M; Splitter, Derek A; Kokjohn, Sage L

    2014-10-07

    A compression ignition (diesel) engine uses two or more fuel charges during a combustion cycle, with the fuel charges having two or more reactivities (e.g., different cetane numbers), in order to control the timing and duration of combustion. By appropriately choosing the reactivities of the charges, their relative amounts, and their timing, combustion can be tailored to achieve optimal power output (and thus fuel efficiency), at controlled temperatures (and thus controlled NOx), and with controlled equivalence ratios (and thus controlled soot). At low load and no load (idling) conditions, the aforementioned results are attained by restricting airflow to the combustion chamber during the intake stroke (as by throttling the incoming air at or prior to the combustion chamber's intake port) so that the cylinder air pressure is below ambient pressure at the start of the compression stroke.

  16. Engine combustion control at low loads via fuel reactivity stratification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reitz, Rolf Deneys; Hanson, Reed M.; Splitter, Derek A.; Kokjohn, Sage

    2017-12-26

    A compression ignition (diesel) engine uses two or more fuel charges during a combustion cycle, with the fuel charges having two or more reactivities (e.g., different cetane numbers), in order to control the timing and duration of combustion. By appropriately choosing the reactivities of the charges, their relative amounts, and their timing, combustion can be tailored to achieve optimal power output (and thus fuel efficiency), at controlled temperatures (and thus controlled NOx), and with controlled equivalence ratios (and thus controlled soot). At low load and no load (idling) conditions, the aforementioned results are attained by restricting airflow to the combustion chamber during the intake stroke (as by throttling the incoming air at or prior to the combustion chamber's intake port) so that the cylinder air pressure is below ambient pressure at the start of the compression stroke.

  17. Redox control of iron biomineralization in Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Stephanie Rhianon

    Magnetotactic bacteria have evolved complex subcellular machinery to construct linear chains of magnetite nanocrystals that allow the host cell to sense direction. Each mixed-valent iron nanoparticle is mineralized from soluble iron within a membrane-encapsulated vesicle termed the magnetosome, which serves as a specialized compartment that regulates the iron, redox, and pH environment of the growing mineral. In order to dissect the biological components that control this process, we have carried out genetic and biochemical studies of proteins proposed to function in iron mineralization in Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1. As iron biomineralization by magnetotactic bacteria represents a particularly interesting case for understanding how the production of nanomaterials can be programmed at the genetic level, we also apply synthetic biology techniques towards the production of new cellular materials and new cellular functions. As the production of magnetite requires both the formation of Fe(II) and Fe(III), the redox components of the magnetosome play an essential role in this process. Using genetic complementation studies, we show that the redox cofactors or heme sites of the two putative redox partners, MamP and MamT, are required for magnetite biomineralization in vivo and that removal of one or both sites leads to defects in mineralization. We develop and optimize a heterologous expression method in the E. coli periplasm to cleanly isolate fully heme-loaded MamP for biochemical studies. Spectrochemical redox titrations show that the reduction potential of MamP lies in a different range than other c-type cytochrome involved in either Fe(III) reduction or Fe(II) oxidation. Nonetheless, in vitro mineralization studies with MamP and Fe(II) show that it is able to catalyze the formation of mixed-valent Fe(II)/Fe(III) oxides such as green rust. Biomineralization also requires lattice-templating proteins that guide the growth of the functional crystalline material. We

  18. Neural Network Predictive Control for Vanadium Redox Flow Battery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Feng Shen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The vanadium redox flow battery (VRB is a nonlinear system with unknown dynamics and disturbances. The flowrate of the electrolyte is an important control mechanism in the operation of a VRB system. Too low or too high flowrate is unfavorable for the safety and performance of VRB. This paper presents a neural network predictive control scheme to enhance the overall performance of the battery. A radial basis function (RBF network is employed to approximate the dynamics of the VRB system. The genetic algorithm (GA is used to obtain the optimum initial values of the RBF network parameters. The gradient descent algorithm is used to optimize the objective function of the predictive controller. Compared with the constant flowrate, the simulation results show that the flowrate optimized by neural network predictive controller can increase the power delivered by the battery during the discharge and decrease the power consumed during the charge.

  19. Quantitative analysis of biogeochemically controlled density stratification in an iron-meromictic lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixdorf, E.; Boehrer, B.

    2015-11-01

    Lake stratification controls the cycling of dissolved matter within the water body. This is of particular interest in the case of meromictic lakes, where permanent density stratification of the deep water limits vertical transport, and a chemically different (reducing) milieu can be established. As a consequence, the geochemical setting and the mixing regime of a lake can stabilize each other mutually. We attempt a quantitative approach to the contribution of chemical reactions sustaining the density stratification. As an example, we chose the prominent case of iron meromixis in Waldsee near Doebern, a small lake that originated from near-surface underground mining of lignite. From a data set covering 4 years of monthly measured electrical conductivity profiles, we calculated summed conductivity as a quantitative variable reflecting the amount of electro-active substances in the entire lake. Seasonal variations followed the changing of the chemocline height. Coinciding changes of electrical conductivities in the monimolimnion indicated that a considerable share of substances, precipitated by the advancing oxygenated epilimnion, re-dissolved in the remaining anoxic deep waters and contributed considerably to the density stratification. In addition, we designed a lab experiment, in which we removed iron compounds and organic material from monimolimnetic waters by introducing air bubbles. Precipitates could be identified by visual inspection. Eventually, the remaining solutes in the aerated water layer looked similar to mixolimnetic Waldsee water. Due to its reduced concentration of solutes, this water became less dense and remained floating on nearly unchanged monimolimnetic water. In conclusion, iron meromixis as seen in Waldsee did not require two different sources of incoming waters, but the inflow of iron-rich deep groundwater and the aeration through the lake surface were fully sufficient for the formation of iron meromixis.

  20. Risk Stratification and Shared Decision Making for Colorectal Cancer Screening: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroy, Paul C; Duhovic, Emir; Chen, Clara A; Heeren, Timothy C; Lopez, William; Apodaca, Danielle L; Wong, John B

    2016-05-01

    Eliciting patient preferences within the context of shared decision making has been advocated for colorectal cancer (CRC) screening, yet providers often fail to comply with patient preferences that differ from their own. To determine whether risk stratification for advanced colorectal neoplasia (ACN) influences provider willingness to comply with patient preferences when selecting a desired CRC screening option. Randomized controlled trial. Asymptomatic, average-risk patients due for CRC screening in an urban safety net health care setting. Patients were randomized 1:1 to a decision aid alone (n= 168) or decision aid plus risk assessment (n= 173) arm between September 2012 and September 2014. The primary outcome was concordance between patient preference and test ordered; secondary outcomes included patient satisfaction with the decision-making process, screening intentions, test completion rates, and provider satisfaction. Although providers perceived risk stratification to be useful in selecting an appropriate screening test for their average-risk patients, no significant differences in concordance were observed between the decision aid alone and decision aid plus risk assessment groups (88.1% v. 85.0%,P= 0.40) or high- and low-risk groups (84.5% v. 87.1%,P= 0.51). Concordance was highest for colonoscopy and relatively low for tests other than colonoscopy, regardless of study arm or risk group. Failure to comply with patient preferences was negatively associated with satisfaction with the decision-making process, screening intentions, and test completion rates. Single-institution setting; lack of provider education about the utility of risk stratification into their decision making. Providers perceived risk stratification to be useful in their decision making but often failed to comply with patient preferences for tests other than colonoscopy, even among those deemed to be at low risk of ACN. © The Author(s) 2016.

  1. Redox control of molecular motion in switchable artificial nanoscale devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Credi, Alberto; Semeraro, Monica; Silvi, Serena; Venturi, Margherita

    2011-03-15

    The design, synthesis, and operation of molecular-scale systems that exhibit controllable motions of their component parts is a topic of great interest in nanoscience and a fascinating challenge of nanotechnology. The development of this kind of species constitutes the premise to the construction of molecular machines and motors, which in a not-too-distant future could find applications in fields such as materials science, information technology, energy conversion, diagnostics, and medicine. In the past 25 years the development of supramolecular chemistry has enabled the construction of an interesting variety of artificial molecular machines. These devices operate via electronic and molecular rearrangements and, like the macroscopic counterparts, they need energy to work as well as signals to communicate with the operator. Here we outline the design principles at the basis of redox switching of molecular motion in artificial nanodevices. Redox processes, chemically, electrically, or photochemically induced, can indeed supply the energy to bring about molecular motions. Moreover, in the case of electrically and photochemically induced processes, electrochemical and photochemical techniques can be used to read the state of the system, and thus to control and monitor the operation of the device. Some selected examples are also reported to describe the most representative achievements in this research area.

  2. Metformin selectively targets redox control of complex I energy transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy R. Cameron

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Many guanide-containing drugs are antihyperglycaemic but most exhibit toxicity, to the extent that only the biguanide metformin has enjoyed sustained clinical use. Here, we have isolated unique mitochondrial redox control properties of metformin that are likely to account for this difference. In primary hepatocytes and H4IIE hepatoma cells we found that antihyperglycaemic diguanides DG5-DG10 and the biguanide phenformin were up to 1000-fold more potent than metformin on cell signalling responses, gluconeogenic promoter expression and hepatocyte glucose production. Each drug inhibited cellular oxygen consumption similarly but there were marked differences in other respects. All diguanides and phenformin but not metformin inhibited NADH oxidation in submitochondrial particles, indicative of complex I inhibition, which also corresponded closely with dehydrogenase activity in living cells measured by WST-1. Consistent with these findings, in isolated mitochondria, DG8 but not metformin caused the NADH/NAD+ couple to become more reduced over time and mitochondrial deterioration ensued, suggesting direct inhibition of complex I and mitochondrial toxicity of DG8. In contrast, metformin exerted a selective oxidation of the mitochondrial NADH/NAD+ couple, without triggering mitochondrial deterioration. Together, our results suggest that metformin suppresses energy transduction by selectively inducing a state in complex I where redox and proton transfer domains are no longer efficiently coupled. Keywords: Diabetes, Metformin, Mitochondria, NADH, NAD+

  3. Risk stratification and rapid geriatric screening in an emergency department - a quasi-randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Chik Loon; Siu, Vivan Wing Yin; Ang, Hou; Phuah, Madeline Wei Ling; Ooi, Chee Kheong

    2014-08-30

    To determine if risk stratification followed by rapid geriatric screening in an emergency department (ED) reduced functional decline, ED reattendance and hospitalisation. This was a quasi-randomised controlled trial. Patients were randomised by the last digit of their national registration identity card (NRIC). Odd number controls received standard ED care; even number patients received geriatric screening, followed by intervention and/or onward referrals. Patients were followed up for 12 months. There were 500 and 280 patients in the control and intervention groups. The intervention group had higher Triage Risk Screening Tool (TRST) scores (34.3% vs 25.4% TRST ≥3, p = 0.01) and lower baseline Instrumental Activity of Daily Living (IADL) scores (22.84 vs 24.18, p fall risk (65.0%), vision (61.4%), and footwear (58.2%). 28.2% were referred to a geriatric clinic and 11.8% were admitted. 425 (85.0%) controls and 234 (83.6%) in the intervention group completed their follow-up. After adjusting for TRST and baseline IADL, the intervention group had significant preservation in function (Basic ADL -0.99 vs -0.24, p geriatric screening at the request of the ED doctor. A major limitation was that a large proportion of patients who were randomized to the intervention group either refused (18.8%) or left the ED before being approached (32.0%). These two groups were not followed up, and hence were excluded in our analysis. Risk stratification and focused geriatric screening in ED resulted in significant preservation of patients' function at 12 months. National Healthcare Group (NHG) Domain Specific Review Board (DSRB) C/09/023. Registered 5th March 2009.

  4. Long-term litter decomposition controlled by manganese redox cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiluweit, Marco; Nico, Peter; Harmon, Mark E; Mao, Jingdong; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Kleber, Markus

    2015-09-22

    Litter decomposition is a keystone ecosystem process impacting nutrient cycling and productivity, soil properties, and the terrestrial carbon (C) balance, but the factors regulating decomposition rate are still poorly understood. Traditional models assume that the rate is controlled by litter quality, relying on parameters such as lignin content as predictors. However, a strong correlation has been observed between the manganese (Mn) content of litter and decomposition rates across a variety of forest ecosystems. Here, we show that long-term litter decomposition in forest ecosystems is tightly coupled to Mn redox cycling. Over 7 years of litter decomposition, microbial transformation of litter was paralleled by variations in Mn oxidation state and concentration. A detailed chemical imaging analysis of the litter revealed that fungi recruit and redistribute unreactive Mn(2+) provided by fresh plant litter to produce oxidative Mn(3+) species at sites of active decay, with Mn eventually accumulating as insoluble Mn(3+/4+) oxides. Formation of reactive Mn(3+) species coincided with the generation of aromatic oxidation products, providing direct proof of the previously posited role of Mn(3+)-based oxidizers in the breakdown of litter. Our results suggest that the litter-decomposing machinery at our coniferous forest site depends on the ability of plants and microbes to supply, accumulate, and regenerate short-lived Mn(3+) species in the litter layer. This observation indicates that biogeochemical constraints on bioavailability, mobility, and reactivity of Mn in the plant-soil system may have a profound impact on litter decomposition rates.

  5. Activator Protein-1: redox switch controlling structure and DNA-binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Zhou; Machius, Mischa; Nestler, Eric J; Rudenko, Gabby

    2017-11-02

    The transcription factor, activator protein-1 (AP-1), binds to cognate DNA under redox control; yet, the underlying mechanism has remained enigmatic. A series of crystal structures of the AP-1 FosB/JunD bZIP domains reveal ordered DNA-binding regions in both FosB and JunD even in absence DNA. However, while JunD is competent to bind DNA, the FosB bZIP domain must undergo a large conformational rearrangement that is controlled by a 'redox switch' centered on an inter-molecular disulfide bond. Solution studies confirm that FosB/JunD cannot undergo structural transition and bind DNA when the redox-switch is in the 'OFF' state, and show that the mid-point redox potential of the redox switch affords it sensitivity to cellular redox homeostasis. The molecular and structural studies presented here thus reveal the mechanism underlying redox-regulation of AP-1 Fos/Jun transcription factors and provide structural insight for therapeutic interventions targeting AP-1 proteins. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  6. Activator Protein-1: redox switch controlling structure and DNA-binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Zhou; Machius, Mischa; Nestler, Eric J.; Rudenko, Gabby (Texas-MED); (Icahn)

    2017-09-07

    The transcription factor, activator protein-1 (AP-1), binds to cognate DNA under redox control; yet, the underlying mechanism has remained enigmatic. A series of crystal structures of the AP-1 FosB/JunD bZIP domains reveal ordered DNA-binding regions in both FosB and JunD even in absence DNA. However, while JunD is competent to bind DNA, the FosB bZIP domain must undergo a large conformational rearrangement that is controlled by a ‘redox switch’ centered on an inter-molecular disulfide bond. Solution studies confirm that FosB/JunD cannot undergo structural transition and bind DNA when the redox-switch is in the ‘OFF’ state, and show that the mid-point redox potential of the redox switch affords it sensitivity to cellular redox homeostasis. The molecular and structural studies presented here thus reveal the mechanism underlying redox-regulation of AP-1 Fos/Jun transcription factors and provide structural insight for therapeutic interventions targeting AP-1 proteins.

  7. Biogeochemical processes controlling density stratification in an iron-meromictic lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixdorf, E.; Boehrer, B.

    2015-06-01

    Biogeochemical processes and mixing regime of a lake can control each other mutually. The prominent case of iron meromixis is investigated in Waldsee near Doebern, a small lake that originated from surface mining of lignite. From a four years data set of monthly measured electrical conductivity profiles, we calculated summed conductivity as a quantitative variable reflecting the amount of electro-active substances in the entire lake. Seasonal variations followed changing chemocline height. Coinciding changes of electrical conductivities in the monimolimnion indicated that a considerable share of substances, precipitated by the advancing oxygenated epilimnion, re-dissolved in the remaining anoxic deep waters and contributed considerably to the density stratification. In addition, we constructed a lab experiment, in which aeration of monimolimnetic waters removed iron compounds and organic material. Precipitates could be identified by visual inspection. Introduced air bubbles ascended through the water column and formed a water mass similar to the mixolimnetic Waldsee water. The remaining less dense water remained floating on the nearly unchanged monimolimnetic water. In conclusion, iron meromixis as seen in Waldsee did not require two different sources of incoming waters, but the inflow of iron rich deep groundwater and the aeration through the lake surface were fully sufficient.

  8. Redox control of electric melters with complex feed compositions. Part I: analytical methods and models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickford, D.F.; Diemer, R.B. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The redox state of glass from electric melters with complex feed compositions is determined by balance between gases above the melt, and transition metals and organic compounds in the feed. Part I discusses experimental and computational methods of relating flowrates and other melter operating conditions to the redox state of glass, and composition of the melter offgas. Computerized thermodynamic computational methods are useful in predicting the sequence and products of redox reactions and in assessing individual process variations. Melter redox state can be predicted by combining monitoring of melter operating conditions, redox measurement of fused melter feed samples, and periodic redox measurement of product. Mossbauer spectroscopy, and other methods which measure Fe(II)/Fe(III) in glass, can be used to measure melter redox state. Part II develops preliminary operating limits for the vitrification of High-Level Radioactive Waste. Limits on reducing potential to preclude the accumulation of combustible gases, accumulation of sulfides and selenides, and degradation of melter components are the most critical. Problems associated with excessively oxidizing conditions, such as glass foaming and potential ruthenium volatility, are controlled when sufficient formic acid is added to adjust melter feed rheology

  9. The SAMHD1 dNTP Triphosphohydrolase Is Controlled by a Redox Switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauney, Christopher H; Rogers, LeAnn C; Harris, Reuben S; Daniel, Larry W; Devarie-Baez, Nelmi O; Wu, Hanzhi; Furdui, Cristina M; Poole, Leslie B; Perrino, Fred W; Hollis, Thomas

    2017-12-01

    Proliferative signaling involves reversible posttranslational oxidation of proteins. However, relatively few molecular targets of these modifications have been identified. We investigate the role of protein oxidation in regulation of SAMHD1 catalysis. Here we report that SAMHD1 is a major target for redox regulation of nucleotide metabolism and cell cycle control. SAMHD1 is a triphosphate hydrolase, whose function involves regulation of deoxynucleotide triphosphate pools. We demonstrate that the redox state of SAMHD1 regulates its catalytic activity. We have identified three cysteine residues that constitute an intrachain disulfide bond "redox switch" that reversibly inhibits protein tetramerization and catalysis. We show that proliferative signals lead to SAMHD1 oxidation in cells and oxidized SAMHD1 is localized outside of the nucleus. Innovation and Conclusions: SAMHD1 catalytic activity is reversibly regulated by protein oxidation. These data identify a previously unknown mechanism for regulation of nucleotide metabolism by SAMHD1. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 27, 1317-1331.

  10. Redox front formation in an uplifting sedimentary rock sequence: An analogue for redox-controlling processes in the geosphere around deep geological repositories for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, H.; Metcalfe, R.; Yamamoto, K.; Murakami, Y.; Hoshii, D.; Kanekiyo, A.; Naganuma, T.; Hayashi, T.

    2008-01-01

    Subsurface redox fronts control the mobilization and fixation of many trace elements, including potential pollutants such as certain radionuclides. Any safety assessment for a deep geological repository for radioactive wastes needs to take into account adequately the long-term redox processes in the geosphere surrounding the repository. To build confidence in understanding these processes, a redox front in a reduced siliceous sedimentary rock distributed in an uplifting area in Japan has been studied in detail. Geochemical analyses show increased concentrations of Fe and trace elements, including rare earth elements (REEs), at the redox front, even though concentrations of reduced rock matrix constituents show little change. Detailed SEM observations revealed that fossilized microorganisms composed of amorphous granules made exclusively of Fe and Si occur in the rock's pore space. Microbial 16S rDNA analysis suggests that there is presently a zonation of different bacterial groups within the redox band, and bacterial zonation played an important role in the concentration of Fe-oxyhydroxides at the redox front. These water-rock-microbe interactions can be considered analogous to the processes occurring in the redox fronts that would develop around geological repositories for radioactive waste. Once formed, the Fe-oxyhydroxides within such a front would be preserved even after reducing conditions resume following repository closure

  11. Redox front formation in an uplifting sedimentary rock sequence: An analogue for redox-controlling processes in the geosphere around deep geological repositories for radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, H. [Nagoya University Museum, Material Research Section, Furocho, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)], E-mail: dora@num.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Metcalfe, R. [Quintessa Japan, Queen' s Tower A7-707, Minatomirai, Yokohama 220-6007 (Japan); Yamamoto, K. [Nagoya University Museum, Material Research Section, Furocho, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Murakami, Y. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tono Geoscience Centre (Japan); Hoshii, D.; Kanekiyo, A.; Naganuma, T. [Hiroshima University, Higashi Hiroshima, Kagamiyama 1-4-4 (Japan); Hayashi, T. [Asahi University, Department of Dental Pharmacology, Hozumi, Gifu (Japan)

    2008-08-15

    Subsurface redox fronts control the mobilization and fixation of many trace elements, including potential pollutants such as certain radionuclides. Any safety assessment for a deep geological repository for radioactive wastes needs to take into account adequately the long-term redox processes in the geosphere surrounding the repository. To build confidence in understanding these processes, a redox front in a reduced siliceous sedimentary rock distributed in an uplifting area in Japan has been studied in detail. Geochemical analyses show increased concentrations of Fe and trace elements, including rare earth elements (REEs), at the redox front, even though concentrations of reduced rock matrix constituents show little change. Detailed SEM observations revealed that fossilized microorganisms composed of amorphous granules made exclusively of Fe and Si occur in the rock's pore space. Microbial 16S rDNA analysis suggests that there is presently a zonation of different bacterial groups within the redox band, and bacterial zonation played an important role in the concentration of Fe-oxyhydroxides at the redox front. These water-rock-microbe interactions can be considered analogous to the processes occurring in the redox fronts that would develop around geological repositories for radioactive waste. Once formed, the Fe-oxyhydroxides within such a front would be preserved even after reducing conditions resume following repository closure.

  12. Redox control of arsenic mobilization in Bangladesh groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Y.; Stute, M.; Geen, A. van; Gavrieli, I.; Dhar, R.; Simpson, H.J.; Schlosser, P.; Ahmed, K.M.

    2004-01-01

    Detailed hydrochemical measurements, δ 34 S SO4 and 3 H analyses were performed on 37 groundwater samples collected during February 1999, January and March 2000 from 6 locations in eastern and southeastern Bangladesh to examine redox processes that lead to As mobilization in groundwater. The study sites were chosen based on available nation-wide As surveys to span the entire spectrum of As concentrations in Bangladesh groundwater, and to represent 3 of 5 major geological units of the Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta: uplifted Pleistocene terrace, fluvial flood plain and delta plain. Arsenic was found to be mobilized under Fe-reducing conditions in shallow aquifers ( 4 -reducing conditions, suggesting that authigenic sulfide precipitation does not constitute a significant sink for As in these groundwaters. The redox state of the water was characterized by a variety of parameters including dissolved O 2 , NO 3 - , Mn 2+ , Fe 2+ concentrations, and SO 4 2- /Cl - ratios. High dissolved [As] (> 50 μg/l; or > 0.7 μM ) were always accompanied by high dissolved [HCO 3 - ] (> 4 mM), and were close to saturation with respect to calcite. Groundwater enriched in As (200-800 μg/l; or 2.7-10.7 μM) and phosphate (30-100 μM) but relatively low in dissolved Fe (5-40 μM) probably resulted from re-oxidation of reducing, As and Fe enriched water. This history was deduced from isotopic signatures of δ 34 S SO4 and 3 H 2 O ( 3 H) to delineate the nature of redox changes for some of the reducing groundwaters. In contrast, As is not mobilized in presumed Pleistocene aquifers, both shallow (30-60 m) and deep (150-270 m), because conditions were not reducing enough due to lack of sufficient O 2 demand

  13. Glutathione Redox Control of Asthma: From Molecular Mechanisms to Therapeutic Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Dean P.; Brown, Lou Ann S.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways associated with airway hyper-responsiveness and airflow limitation in response to specific triggers. Whereas inflammation is important for tissue regeneration and wound healing, the profound and sustained inflammatory response associated with asthma may result in airway remodeling that involves smooth muscle hypertrophy, epithelial goblet-cell hyperplasia, and permanent deposition of airway extracellular matrix proteins. Although the specific mechanisms responsible for asthma are still being unraveled, free radicals such as reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species are important mediators of airway tissue damage that are increased in subjects with asthma. There is also a growing body of literature implicating disturbances in oxidation/reduction (redox) reactions and impaired antioxidant defenses as a risk factor for asthma development and asthma severity. Ultimately, these redox-related perturbations result in a vicious cycle of airway inflammation and injury that is not always amenable to current asthma therapy, particularly in cases of severe asthma. This review will discuss disruptions of redox signaling and control in asthma with a focus on the thiol, glutathione, and reduced (thiol) form (GSH). First, GSH synthesis, GSH distribution, and GSH function and homeostasis are discussed. We then review the literature related to GSH redox balance in health and asthma, with an emphasis on human studies. Finally, therapeutic opportunities to restore the GSH redox balance in subjects with asthma are discussed. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 17, 375–408. PMID:22304503

  14. Redox-control of the alarmin, Interleukin-1α

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald A. McCarthy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The pro-inflammatory cytokine Interleukin-1α (IL-1α has recently emerged as a susceptibility marker for a wide array of inflammatory diseases associated with oxidative stress including Alzheimer's, arthritis, atherosclerosis, diabetes and cancer. In the present study, we establish that expression and nuclear localization of IL-1α are redox-dependent. Shifts in steady-state H2O2 concentrations (SS-[H2O2] resulting from enforced expression of manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2 drive IL-1α mRNA and protein expression. The redox-dependent expression of IL-1α is accompanied by its increased nuclear localization. Both IL-1α expression and its nuclear residency are abrogated by catalase co-expression. Sub-lethal doses of H2O2 also cause IL-1α nuclear localization. Mutagenesis revealed IL-1α nuclear localization does not involve oxidation of cysteines within its N terminal domain. Inhibition of the processing enzyme calpain prevents IL-1α nuclear localization even in the presence of H2O2. H2O2 treatment caused extracellular Ca2+ influx suggesting oxidants may influence calpain activity indirectly through extracellular Ca2+ mobilization. Functionally, as a result of its nuclear activity, IL-1α overexpression promotes NF-kB activity, but also interacts with the histone acetyl transferase (HAT p300. Together, these findings demonstrate a mechanism by which oxidants impact inflammation through IL-1α and suggest that antioxidant-based therapies may prove useful in limiting inflammatory disease progression.

  15. Stratification devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Elsa; Furbo, Simon

    2008-01-01

    Thermal stratification in the storage tank is extremely important in order to achieve high thermal performance of a solar heating system. High temperatures in the top of the storage tank and low temperatures in the bottom of the storage tank lead to the best operation conditions for any solar hea...

  16. Redox-controlled memristive switching in the junctions employing Ti reactive electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitao Li

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We have proposed a kind of memristive device based on the junctions employing Ti as the reactive electrodes. The role of electrically-derived redox of Ti in such memristive switching is shown. The structural and chemical evidence of the electrically-derived oxidation is presented by TEM and XPS experiment, respectively. Due to the redox of the top electrode Ti and the consequent drift of oxygen vacancies, the device shows two distinct resistance states under a sweeping voltage loading. ON state is controlled by tunneling process, while OFF state is controlled by Schottky emission conductive mechanism. The failure behaviors of such memristive junctions are also discussed. In the light of the redox principle, we demonstrate that the devices could be recovered by loading a long electrical reduction treatment.

  17. Mechanisms for redox control and their effects upon modelled properties of Aespoe groundwaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emren, A.T.

    1996-01-01

    In the literature, one finds several models for control of redox properties in groundwater. The proposals for redox controlling substances include iron oxides, chlorites, methane, pyrite and polysulphides. The CRACKER program, which has been successful in modelling of observed Aespoe groundwaters has been used to investigate the influence of several redox control models on the modelled properties of present and possible future Aespoe groundwaters. In the simulations, one or more of the possible redox reactions have been prevented from occurring. The groundwater has then been assumed to react with minerals distributed in the fracture walls. Due to the discreteness of mineral grains, a certain amount of fluctuations in groundwater properties is occurring. The process of sampling water for measurement has been simulated by letting about 900 waters from different locations mix. It has been found that some of the models have difficulties in explaining important groundwater properties, while other models perform quite well. With identical mineral sets, the properties of future groundwaters have been simulated. It is found that some changes in groundwater properties at elevated temperatures may be of importance for assessment of the safety of a future repository for spent nuclear fuel. The difference in behaviour is caused mostly by the fact that the solubility increases with temperature for some minerals, while it decreases for other minerals. (author)

  18. Thioredoxin-linked redox control of metabolism in Methanocaldococcus jannaschii, an evolutionarily deeply-rooted hyperthermophilic methanogenic archaeon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thioredoxin (Trx), a small redox protein, controls multiple processes in eukaryotes and bacteria by changing the thiol redox status of selected proteins. We have investigated this aspect in methanarchaea. These ancient methanogens produce methane almost exclusively from H2 plus CO2 carried approxima...

  19. Understanding controls on redox processes in floodplain sediments of the Upper Colorado River Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noël, Vincent; Boye, Kristin; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Bone, Sharon; Lezama Pacheco, Juan S.; Cardarelli, Emily; Janot, Noémie; Fendorf, Scott; Williams, Kenneth H.; Bargar, John R.

    2017-12-15

    River floodplains, heavily used for water supplies, housing, agriculture, mining, and industry, may have water quality jeopardized by native or exogenous metals. Redox processes mediate the accumulation and release of these species in groundwater. Understanding the physicochemical, hydrological, and biogeochemical controls on the distribution and variability and variability of redox conditions is therefore critical to developing conceptual and numerical models of contaminants transport within floodplains. The distribution and intensity of redox activity at the Rifle, CO, site within the Upper Colorado River Basin (UCRB), are believed to be controlled by textural and compositional heterogeneities. Regionally, the UCRB is impacted by former uranium and vanadium ore processing, resulting in contaminations by U, Mo, V, As, Se, and Mn. Floodplains throughout the UCRB share sediment and groundwater characteristics, making redox activity regionally important to metal and radionuclide mobility. In this study, Fe and S speciation were used to track the distribution and stability of redox processes in sediment cores from three floodplain sites covering a 250 km range in the central portion of the UCRB. The results of the present study support the hypothesis that Fe(III) and sulfate reducing sediments are regionally important in the UCRB. The presence of organic carbon together with pore saturation were the key requirements for reducing conditions, dominated by sulfate-reduction. Sediment texture moderated the response of the system to external forcing, such as oxidant infusion, making fine-grain sediments resistant to change in comparison to coarser-grained sediments. Exposure to O2 and NO3- mediates the reactivity and longevity of freshly precipitated sulfides creating the potential for release of sequestered radionuclides and metals. The physical and chemical parameters of reducing zones evidenced in this study are thus thought to be key parameters on the dynamic exchange

  20. Size-controlled and redox-responsive supramolecular nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weinhart-Mejia, R.; Kronig, G.A.; Huskens, Jurriaan

    2015-01-01

    Control over the assembly and disassembly of nanoparticles is pivotal for their use as drug delivery vehicles. Here, we aim to form supramolecular nanoparticles (SNPs) by combining advantages of the reversible assembly properties of SNPs using host–guest interactions and of a stimulus-responsive

  1. Variability in productivity controlled by haline stratification over 300ky in the Bay of Bengal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva, R.; Mazumdar, A.; Peketi, A.; Joshi, R.; Shaji, A.; Naik, B. G.; Carvalho, M.; Molleti, S.

    2017-12-01

    The unique hydrographic setting of the Bay of Bengal (BoB) makes it an ideal tropical marine system to study the influence of regional and global forcings on productivity and [CO2aq] through the late quaternary. Enormous fresh water flux into the BoB and consequent haline stratification significantly weakens the convective mixing and wind driven processes which are commonly responsible for transport of nutrients to the euphotic zone driving primary productivity. Here, we present a high resolution organic carbon-Calcium carbonate burial flux and δ13CTOC records for the last 300 ky. A giant Calypso piston corer was used on board ORV Marion Dufresne (MD-161) for the retrieval of the sediment core MD161-19 (core length: 39 m) off Mahanadi Basin (Lat.:18º59.1020"; Long.:85º41.1669") in western BoB at a water depth of 1480m. The results show significant productivity variation at marine isotope sub-stages and millennial timescales. Colder sub-stages and stadials (Dansgard-Oeschger cycle) show boost in productivity which may be attributed to thinning of low salinity water cap, thereby facilitating efficient nutrient transport across the euphotic zone by the combination of wind driven processes (entrainment and upwelling), convective mixing and cold core eddies. Our long term high resolution data indicates a possibility of marked changes in productivity/ biogeochemistry of BOB in the future due to global warming, in turn affecting coastal economy.

  2. Controlling the Host-Guest Interaction Mode through a Redox Stimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szalóki, György; Croué, Vincent; Carré, Vincent; Aubriet, Frédéric; Alévêque, Olivier; Levillain, Eric; Allain, Magali; Aragó, Juan; Ortí, Enrique; Goeb, Sébastien; Sallé, Marc

    2017-12-18

    A proof-of-concept related to the redox-control of the binding/releasing process in a host-guest system is achieved by designing a neutral and robust Pt-based redox-active metallacage involving two extended-tetrathiafulvalene (exTTF) ligands. When neutral, the cage is able to bind a planar polyaromatic guest (coronene). Remarkably, the chemical or electrochemical oxidation of the host-guest complex leads to the reversible expulsion of the guest outside the cavity, which is assigned to a drastic change of the host-guest interaction mode, illustrating the key role of counteranions along the exchange process. The reversible process is supported by various experimental data ( 1 H NMR spectroscopy, ESI-FTICR, and spectroelectrochemistry) as well as by in-depth theoretical calculations performed at the density functional theory (DFT) level. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Value of cyclin A immunohistochemistry for cancer risk stratification in Barrett esophagus surveillance: A multicenter case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Olphen, Sophie H; Ten Kate, Fiebo J C; Doukas, Michail; Kastelein, Florine; Steyerberg, Ewout W; Stoop, Hans A; Spaander, Manon C; Looijenga, Leendert H J; Bruno, Marco J; Biermann, Katharina

    2016-11-01

    The value of endoscopic Barrett esophagus (BE) surveillance based on histological diagnosis of low-grade dysplasia (LGD) remains debated given the lack of adequate risk stratification. The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive value of cyclin A expression and to combine these results with our previously reported immunohistochemical p53, AMACR, and SOX2 data, to identify a panel of biomarkers predicting neoplastic progression in BE.We conducted a case-control study within a prospective cohort of 720 BE patients. BE patients who progressed to high-grade dysplasia (HGD, n = 37) or esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC, n = 13), defined as neoplastic progression, were classified as cases and patients without neoplastic progression were classified as controls (n = 575). Cyclin A expression was determined by immunohistochemistry in all 625 patients; these results were combined with the histological diagnosis and our previous p53, AMACR, and SOX2 data in loglinear regression models. Differences in discriminatory ability were quantified as changes in area under the ROC curve (AUC) for predicting neoplastic progression.Cyclin A surface positivity significantly increased throughout the metaplasia-dysplasia-carcinoma sequences and was seen in 10% (107/1050) of biopsy series without dysplasia, 33% (109/335) in LGD, and 69% (34/50) in HGD/EAC. Positive cyclin A expression was associated with an increased risk of neoplastic progression (adjusted relative risk (RR) 2.4; 95% CI: 1.7-3.4). Increases in AUC were substantial for P53 (+0.05), smaller for SOX2 (+0.014), minor for cyclin A (+0.003), and none for AMARC (0.00).Cyclin A immunopositivity was associated with an increased progression risk in BE patients. However, compared to p53 and SOX2, the incremental value of cyclin A was limited. The use of biomarkers has the potential to significantly improve risk stratification in BE.

  4. Endoplasmic reticulum-dependent redox reactions control endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation and pathogen entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walczak, Christopher P; Bernardi, Kaleena M; Tsai, Billy

    2012-04-15

    Protein misfolding within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is managed by an ER quality control system that retro-translocates aberrant proteins into the cytosol for proteasomal destruction. This process, known as ER-associated degradation, utilizes the action of ER redox enzymes to accommodate the disulfide-bonded nature of misfolded proteins. Strikingly, various pathogenic viruses and toxins co-opt these redox components to reach the cytosol during entry. These redox factors thus regulate critical cellular homeostasis and host-pathogen interactions. Recent studies identify specific members of the protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) family, which use their chaperone and catalytic activities, in engaging both misfolded ER proteins and pathogens. The precise molecular mechanism by which a dedicated PDI family member disrupts the disulfide bonds in the misfolded ER proteins and pathogens, as well as how they act to unfold these substrates to promote their ER-to-cytosol membrane transport, remain poorly characterized. How PDI family members distinguish folded versus misfolded ER substrates remains enigmatic. What physical characteristics surrounding a substrate's disulfide bond instruct PDI that it is mispaired or native? For the pathogens, as their disulfide bonds normally serve a critical role in providing physical support, what conformational changes experienced in the host enable their disulfide bonds to be disrupted? A combination of more rigorous biochemical and high-resolution structural studies should begin to address these questions.

  5. CAPL: an efficient association software package using family and case-control data and accounting for population stratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ren-Hua; Schmidt, Michael A; Martin, Eden R

    2011-05-25

    With many genome-wide association study (GWAS) datasets available, it is critical that we have statistical tools that are both flexible to accommodate different study designs and fast. We recently proposed the combined APL (CAPL) method, which can use family and case-control datasets and can account for population stratification in the data. Because computationally intensive algorithms are used in CAPL, implementing CAPL with efficient parallel algorithms is essential. We used a hybrid of open message passing interface (open MPI) and POSIX threads to parallelize CAPL, which enable the program to operate in a cluster environment. We used simulations to demonstrate that the parallel implementation of CAPL can analyze a large GWAS dataset in a reasonable time frame when a parallel computing resource is available. As many GWAS datasets based on both family and case-control designs are available, a flexible and efficient tool such as CAPL will be very helpful to combine the datasets to greatly increase statistical power and finish the analysis in a reasonable time frame.

  6. Control of the intracellular redox state by glucose participates in the insulin secretion mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Rebelato

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS due to chronic exposure to glucose has been associated with impaired beta cell function and diabetes. However, physiologically, beta cells are well equipped to deal with episodic glucose loads, to which they respond with a fine tuned glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS. In the present study, a systematic investigation in rat pancreatic islets about the changes in the redox environment induced by acute exposure to glucose was carried out. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Short term incubations were performed in isolated rat pancreatic islets. Glucose dose- and time-dependently reduced the intracellular ROS content in pancreatic islets as assayed by fluorescence in a confocal microscope. This decrease was due to activation of pentose-phosphate pathway (PPP. Inhibition of PPP blunted the redox control as well as GSIS in a dose-dependent manner. The addition of low doses of ROS scavengers at high glucose concentration acutely improved beta cell function. The ROS scavenger N-acetyl-L-cysteine increased the intracellular calcium response to glucose that was associated with a small decrease in ROS content. Additionally, the presence of the hydrogen peroxide-specific scavenger catalase, in its membrane-permeable form, nearly doubled glucose metabolism. Interestingly, though an increase in GSIS was also observed, this did not match the effect on glucose metabolism. CONCLUSIONS: The control of ROS content via PPP activation by glucose importantly contributes to the mechanisms that couple the glucose stimulus to insulin secretion. Moreover, we identified intracellular hydrogen peroxide as an inhibitor of glucose metabolism intrinsic to rat pancreatic islets. These findings suggest that the intracellular adjustment of the redox environment by glucose plays an important role in the mechanism of GSIS.

  7. Redox non-innocent ligands: versatile new tools to control catalytic reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lyaskovskyy, V.; de Bruin, B.

    2012-01-01

    In this (tutorial overview) perspective we highlight the use of "redox non-innocent" ligands in catalysis. Two main types of reactivity in which the redox non-innocent ligand is involved can be specified: (A) The redox active ligand participates in the catalytic cycle only by accepting/donating

  8. Plant redox proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navrot, Nicolas; Finnie, Christine; Svensson, Birte

    2011-01-01

    PTMs in regulating enzymatic activities and controlling biological processes in plants. Notably, proteins controlling the cellular redox state, e.g. thioredoxin and glutaredoxin, appear to play dual roles to maintain oxidative stress resistance and regulate signal transduction pathways via redox PTMs......In common with other aerobic organisms, plants are exposed to reactive oxygen species resulting in formation of post-translational modifications related to protein oxidoreduction (redox PTMs) that may inflict oxidative protein damage. Accumulating evidence also underscores the importance of redox....... To get a comprehensive overview of these types of redox-regulated pathways there is therefore an emerging interest to monitor changes in redox PTMs on a proteome scale. Compared to some other PTMs, e.g. protein phosphorylation, redox PTMs have received less attention in plant proteome analysis, possibly...

  9. Composition and redox control of waste glasses: Recommendation for process control limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantzen, C.M.; Plodinec, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    An electrochemical series of redox couples, originally developed for Savannah River Laboratory glass frit 131 (SRL-131) as a reference composition, has been extended to two other alkali borosilicate compositions that are candidate glasses for nuclear waste immobilization. Since no dramatic differences were ascertained in the redox chemistry of selected multivalent elements in SRL-131 versus that in Savannah River Laboratory glass frit 165 (SRL-165) and in West Valley glass number-sign 205 (WV-205), the comprehensive electrochemical series can readily be applied to a range of nuclear waste glass compositions. In order to alleviate potential problems with foaming and precipitation of insolubles during the processing of the nuclear waste in these glass melts, the [Fe 2+ ]/[Fe 3+ ] ratio of the melt should be between 0.1 and 0.5. 27 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Radical Decisions in Cancer: Redox Control of Cell Growth and Death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sainz, Rosa M.; Lombo, Felipe; Mayo, Juan C.

    2012-01-01

    Free radicals play a key role in many physiological decisions in cells. Since free radicals are toxic to cellular components, it is known that they cause DNA damage, contribute to DNA instability and mutation and thus favor carcinogenesis. However, nowadays it is assumed that free radicals play a further complex role in cancer. Low levels of free radicals and steady state levels of antioxidant enzymes are responsible for the fine tuning of redox status inside cells. A change in redox state is a way to modify the physiological status of the cell, in fact, a more reduced status is found in resting cells while a more oxidative status is associated with proliferative cells. The mechanisms by which redox status can change the proliferative activity of cancer cells are related to transcriptional and posttranscriptional modifications of proteins that play a critical role in cell cycle control. Since cancer cells show higher levels of free radicals compared with their normal counterparts, it is believed that the anti-oxidative stress mechanism is also increased in cancer cells. In fact, the levels of some of the most important antioxidant enzymes are elevated in advanced status of some types of tumors. Anti-cancer treatment is compromised by survival mechanisms in cancer cells and collateral damage in normal non-pathological tissues. Though some resistance mechanisms have been described, they do not yet explain why treatment of cancer fails in several tumors. Given that some antitumoral treatments are based on the generation of free radicals, we will discuss in this review the possible role of antioxidant enzymes in the survival mechanism in cancer cells and then, its participation in the failure of cancer treatments

  11. Molecular markers of carcinogenesis for risk stratification of individuals with colorectal polyps: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Samir; Sun, Han; Yi, Sang; Storm, Joy; Xiao, Guanghua; Balasubramanian, Bijal A; Zhang, Song; Ashfaq, Raheela; Rockey, Don C

    2014-10-01

    Risk stratification using number, size, and histology of colorectal adenomas is currently suboptimal for identifying patients at increased risk for future colorectal cancer. We hypothesized that molecular markers of carcinogenesis in adenomas, measured via immunohistochemistry, may help identify high-risk patients. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a retrospective, 1:1 matched case-control study (n = 216; 46% female) in which cases were patients with colorectal cancer and synchronous adenoma and controls were patients with adenoma but no colorectal cancer at baseline or within 5 years of follow-up. In phase I of analyses, we compared expression of molecular markers of carcinogenesis in case and control adenomas, blind to case status. In phase II of analyses, patients were randomly divided into independent training and validation groups to develop a model for predicting case status. We found that seven markers [p53, p21, Cox-2, β-catenin (BCAT), DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNApkcs), survivin, and O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT)] were significantly associated with case status on unadjusted analyses, as well as analyses adjusted for age and advanced adenoma status (P marker component). When applied to the validation set, a predictive model using these seven markers showed substantial accuracy for identifying cases [area under the receiver operation characteristic curve (AUC), 0.83; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.74-0.92]. A parsimonious model using three markers performed similarly to the seven-marker model (AUC, 0.84). In summary, we found that molecular markers of carcinogenesis distinguished adenomas from patients with and without colorectal cancer. Furthermore, we speculate that prospective studies using molecular markers to identify individuals with polyps at risk for future neoplasia are warranted. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Redox Control For Hanford HLW Feeds VSL-12R2530-1, REV 0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, A. A.; Matlack, Keith S.; Pegg, Ian L.; Kot, Wing K.; Joseph, Innocent

    2012-01-01

    The principal objectives of this work were to investigate the effects of processing simulated Hanford HLW at the estimated maximum concentrations of nitrates and oxalates and to identify strategies to mitigate any processing issues resulting from high concentrations of nitrates and oxalates. This report provides results for a series of tests that were performed on the DM10 melter system with simulated C-106/AY-102 HLW. The tests employed simulated HLW feeds containing variable amounts of nitrates and waste organic compounds corresponding to maximum concentrations proj ected for Hanford HLW streams in order to determine their effects on glass production rate, processing characteristics, glass redox conditions, melt pool foaming, and the tendency to form secondary phases. Such melter tests provide information on key process factors such as feed processing behavior, dynamic effects during processing, processing rates, off-gas amounts and compositions, foaming control, etc., that cannot be reliably obtained from crucible melts

  13. Redox Control For Hanford HLW Feeds VSL-12R2530-1, REV 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, A. A. [Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Richland, Washington (United States); Matlack, Keith S. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Pegg, Ian L. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Kot, Wing K. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Joseph, Innocent [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States)

    2012-12-13

    The principal objectives of this work were to investigate the effects of processing simulated Hanford HLW at the estimated maximum concentrations of nitrates and oxalates and to identify strategies to mitigate any processing issues resulting from high concentrations of nitrates and oxalates. This report provides results for a series of tests that were performed on the DM10 melter system with simulated C-106/AY-102 HLW. The tests employed simulated HLW feeds containing variable amounts of nitrates and waste organic compounds corresponding to maximum concentrations proj ected for Hanford HLW streams in order to determine their effects on glass production rate, processing characteristics, glass redox conditions, melt pool foaming, and the tendency to form secondary phases. Such melter tests provide information on key process factors such as feed processing behavior, dynamic effects during processing, processing rates, off-gas amounts and compositions, foaming control, etc., that cannot be reliably obtained from crucible melts.

  14. Investigation of potential analytical methods for redox control of the vitrification process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, D.S.

    1985-11-01

    An investigation was conducted to evaluate several analytical techniques to measure ferrous/ferric ratios in simulated and radioactive nuclear waste glasses for eventual redox control of the vitrification process. Redox control will minimize the melt foaming that occurs under highly oxidizing conditions and the metal precipitation that occurs under highly reducing conditions. The analytical method selected must have a rapid response for production problems with minimal complexity and analyst involvement. The wet-chemistry, Moessbauer spectroscopy, glass color analysis, and ion chromatography techniques were explored, with particular emphasis being placed on the Moessbauer technique. In general, all of these methods can be used for nonradioactive samples. The Moessbauer method can readily analyze glasses containing uranium and thorium. A shielded container was designed and built to analyze fully radioactive glasses with the Moessbauer spectrometer in a hot cell environment. However, analyses conducted with radioactive waste glasses containing 90 Sr and 137 Cs were unsuccessful, presumably due to background radiation problems caused by the samples. The color of glass powder can be used to analyze the ferrous/ferric ratio for low chromium glasses, but this method may not be as precise as the others. Ion chromatography was only tested on nonradioactive glasses, but this technique appears to have the required precision due to its analysis of both Fe +2 and Fe +3 and its anticipated adaptability for radioactivity samples. This development would be similar to procedures already in use for shielded inductively coupled plasma emission (ICP) spectrometry. Development of the ion chromatography method is therefore recommended; conventional wet-chemistry is recommended as a backup procedure

  15. Microcosm experiments to control anaerobic redox conditions when studying the fate of organic micropollutants in aquifer material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, Manuela; Carrera, Jesús; Sanchez-Vila, Xavier; Ayora, Carlos; Cama, Jordi; Köck-Schulmeyer, Marianne; López de Alda, Miren; Barceló, Damià; Tobella Brunet, Joana; Hernández García, Marta

    2011-11-01

    The natural processes occurring in subsurface environments have proven to effectively remove a number of organic pollutants from water. The predominant redox conditions revealed to be one of the controlling factors. However, in the case of organic micropollutants the knowledge on this potential redox-dependent behavior is still limited. Motivated by managed aquifer recharge practices microcosm experiments involving aquifer material, settings potentially feasible in field applications, and organic micropollutants at environmental concentrations were carried out. Different anaerobic redox conditions were promoted and sustained in each set of microcosms by adding adequate quantities of electron donors and acceptors. Whereas denitrification and sulfate-reducing conditions are easily achieved and maintained, Fe- and Mn-reduction are strongly constrained by the slower dissolution of the solid phases commonly present in aquifers. The thorough description and numerical modeling of the evolution of the experiments, including major and trace solutes and dissolution/precipitation of solid phases, have been proven necessary to the understanding of the processes and closing the mass balance. As an example of micropollutant results, the ubiquitous beta-blocker atenolol is completely removed in the experiments, the removal occurring faster under more advanced redox conditions. This suggests that aquifers constitute a potentially efficient alternative water treatment for atenolol, especially if adequate redox conditions are promoted during recharge and long enough residence times are ensured. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Redox-controlled backbone dynamics of human cytochrome c revealed by 15N NMR relaxation measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Koichi; Kamiya, Masakatsu; Uchida, Takeshi; Kawano, Keiichi; Ishimori, Koichiro

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → The dynamic parameters for the backbone dynamics in Cyt c were determined. → The backbone mobility of Cyt c is highly restricted due to the covalently bound heme. → The backbone mobility of Cyt c is more restricted upon the oxidation of the heme. → The redox-dependent dynamics are shown in the backbone of Cyt c. → The backbone dynamics of Cyt c would regulate the electron transfer from Cyt c. -- Abstract: Redox-controlled backbone dynamics in cytochrome c (Cyt c) were revealed by 2D 15 N NMR relaxation experiments. 15 N T 1 and T 2 values and 1 H- 15 N NOEs of uniformly 15 N-labeled reduced and oxidized Cyt c were measured, and the generalized order parameters (S 2 ), the effective correlation time for internal motion (τ e ), the 15 N exchange broadening contributions (R ex ) for each residue, and the overall correlation time (τ m ) were estimated by model-free dynamics formalism. These dynamic parameters clearly showed that the backbone dynamics of Cyt c are highly restricted due to the covalently bound heme that functions as the stable hydrophobic core. Upon oxidation of the heme iron in Cyt c, the average S 2 value was increased from 0.88 ± 0.01 to 0.92 ± 0.01, demonstrating that the mobility of the backbone is further restricted in the oxidized form. Such increases in the S 2 values were more prominent in the loop regions, including amino acid residues near the thioether bonds to the heme moiety and positively charged region around Lys87. Both of the regions are supposed to form the interaction site for cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) and the electron pathway from Cyt c to CcO. The redox-dependent mobility of the backbone in the interaction site for the electron transfer to CcO suggests an electron transfer mechanism regulated by the backbone dynamics in the Cyt c-CcO system.

  17. Redox-controlled release dynamics of thallium in periodically flooded arable soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antić-Mladenović, Svetlana; Frohne, Tina; Kresović, Mirjana; Stärk, Hans-Joachim; Savić, Dubravka; Ličina, Vlado; Rinklebe, Jörg

    2017-07-01

    To our knowledge, this is the first work to mechanistically study the impact of the redox potential (E H ) and principal factors, such as pH, iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), chlorides (Cl - ) and sulfates (SO 4 2- ), on the release dynamics of thallium (Tl) in periodically flooded soil. We simulated flooding using an automated biogeochemical microcosm system that allows for systematical control of pre-defined redox windows. The E H value was increased mechanistically at intervals of approximately 100 mV from reducing (-211 mV) to oxidizing (475 mV) conditions. Soluble Tl levels (0.02-0.28 μg L -1 ) increased significantly with increases in E H (r = 0.80, p Thallium mobilization was found to be related to several simultaneous processes involving the gradual oxidation of Tl-bearing sulfides, reductive dissolution of Fe-Mn oxides and desorption from mineral sorbents. Manganese oxides did not appear to have a considerable effect on Tl retention under oxidizing conditions. Before conducting the microcosm experiment, Tl geochemical fractionation was assessed using the modified BCR sequential extraction procedure. The BCR revealed a majority of Tl in the residual fraction (77.7%), followed by reducible (13.3%) and oxidizable fractions (5.9%). By generating high levels of Tl toxicity at low doses, Tl released under oxidizing conditions may pose an environmental threat. In the future, similar studies should be conducted on various soils along with a determination of the Tl species and monitoring of the Tl content in plants to achieve more detailed insight into soluble Tl behavior. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The Redox Proteome*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, Young-Mi; Jones, Dean P.

    2013-01-01

    The redox proteome consists of reversible and irreversible covalent modifications that link redox metabolism to biologic structure and function. These modifications, especially of Cys, function at the molecular level in protein folding and maturation, catalytic activity, signaling, and macromolecular interactions and at the macroscopic level in control of secretion and cell shape. Interaction of the redox proteome with redox-active chemicals is central to macromolecular structure, regulation, and signaling during the life cycle and has a central role in the tolerance and adaptability to diet and environmental challenges. PMID:23861437

  19. A way to limit the corrosion in the Molten Salt Reactor concept: the salt redox potential control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibilaro, M.; Massot, L.; Chamelot, P.

    2015-01-01

    The possibility of controlling the salt redox potential thanks to a redox buffer in the Molten Salt Fast Reactor was investigated, the goal was to limit the oxidation of the reactor structural material. Tests were performed in LiF-CaF 2 at 850 °C on two different redox couples to fix the salt potential, Eu(III)/Eu(II) and U(IV)/U(III), where the first one was used as inactive system to validate the methodology to be applied on the uranium system. A metallic reducing agent (Gd plate for Eu, and U plate for U system) was inserted in the salt, leading to a spontaneous reaction: Eu(III) and U(IV) were then reduced. Eu(III) was fully converted into Eu(II) with metallic Gd, validating the approach. On the U system, the U(IV)/U(III) ratio has to be set between 10 and 100 to limit the core material oxidation: addition of metallic U decreased the concentration ratio from the infinite to 1, showing the feasibility of the salt redox potential control with the U system

  20. Controllable Electrochemical Activities by Oxidative Treatment toward Inner-Sphere Redox Systems at N-Doped Hydrogenated Amorphous Carbon Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoriko Tanaka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical activity of the surface of Nitrogen-doped hydrogenated amorphous carbon thin films (a-CNH, N-doped DLC toward the inner sphere redox species is controllable by modifying the surface termination. At the oxygen plasma treated N-doped DLC surface (O-DLC, the surface functional groups containing carbon doubly bonded to oxygen (C=O, which improves adsorption of polar molecules, were generated. By oxidative treatment, the electron-transfer rate for dopamine (DA positively charged inner-sphere redox analyte could be improved at the N-doped DLC surface. For redox reaction of 2,4-dichlorophenol, which induces an inevitable fouling of the anode surface by forming passivating films, the DLC surfaces exhibited remarkably higher stability and reproducibility of the electrode performance. This is due to the electrochemical decomposition of the passive films without the interference of oxygen evolution by applying higher potential. The N-doped DLC film can offer benefits as the polarizable electrode surface with the higher reactivity and higher stability toward inner-sphere redox species. By making use of these controllable electrochemical reactivity at the O-DLC surface, the selective detection of DA in the mixed solution of DA and uric acid could be achieved.

  1. Control of high level radioactive waste-glass melters - Part 5: Modeling of complex redox effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickford, D.F.; Choi, A.S.

    1991-01-01

    Computerized thermodynamic computations are useful in predicting the sequence and products of redox reactions and in assessing process variations. The redox state of waste-glass melters is determined by balance between the reducing potential of organic compounds in the feed, and the oxidizing potential of gases above the melt, and nitrates and polyvalent elements in the waste. Semiquantitative models predicting limitations of organic content have been developed based on crucible testing. Continuous melter test results have been compared to this improved staged-thermodynamic model of redox behavior

  2. INLET STRATIFICATION DEVICE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2006-01-01

    An inlet stratification device (5) for a circuit circulating a fluid through a tank (1 ) and for providing and maintaining stratification of the fluid in the tank (1 ). The stratification de- vice (5) is arranged vertically in the tank (1) and comprises an inlet pipe (6) being at least partially...... formed of a flexible porous material and having an inlet (19) and outlets formed of the pores of the porous material. The stratification device (5) further comprises at least one outer pipe (7) surrounding the inlet pipe (6) in spaced relationship thereto and being at least partially formed of a porous...

  3. Redox Control of Aphid Resistance through Altered Cell Wall Composition and Nutritional Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasool, Brwa; McGowan, Jack; Pastok, Daria; Marcus, Sue E; Morris, Jenny A; Verrall, Susan R; Hedley, Peter E; Hancock, Robert D; Foyer, Christine H

    2017-09-01

    The mechanisms underpinning plant perception of phloem-feeding insects, particularly aphids, remain poorly characterized. Therefore, the role of apoplastic redox state in controlling aphid infestation was explored using transgenic tobacco ( Nicotiana tabacum ) plants that have either high (PAO) or low (TAO) ascorbate oxidase (AO) activities relative to the wild type. Only a small number of leaf transcripts and metabolites were changed in response to genotype, and cell wall composition was largely unaffected. Aphid fecundity was decreased significantly in TAO plants compared with other lines. Leaf sugar levels were increased and maximum extractable AO activities were decreased in response to aphids in all genotypes. Transcripts encoding the Respiratory Burst Oxidase Homolog F, signaling components involved in ethylene and other hormone-mediated pathways, photosynthetic electron transport components, sugar, amino acid, and cell wall metabolism, were increased significantly in the TAO plants in response to aphid perception relative to other lines. The levels of galactosylated xyloglucan were decreased significantly in response to aphid feeding in all the lines, the effect being the least in the TAO plants. Similarly, all lines exhibited increases in tightly bound (1→4)-β-galactan. Taken together, these findings identify AO-dependent mechanisms that limit aphid infestation. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Purification of reversibly oxidized proteins (PROP reveals a redox switch controlling p38 MAP kinase activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis J Templeton

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Oxidation of cysteine residues of proteins is emerging as an important means of regulation of signal transduction, particularly of protein kinase function. Tools to detect and quantify cysteine oxidation of proteins have been a limiting factor in understanding the role of cysteine oxidation in signal transduction. As an example, the p38 MAP kinase is activated by several stress-related stimuli that are often accompanied by in vitro generation of hydrogen peroxide. We noted that hydrogen peroxide inhibited p38 activity despite paradoxically increasing the activating phosphorylation of p38. To address the possibility that cysteine oxidation may provide a negative regulatory effect on p38 activity, we developed a biochemical assay to detect reversible cysteine oxidation in intact cells. This procedure, PROP, demonstrated in vivo oxidation of p38 in response to hydrogen peroxide and also to the natural inflammatory lipid prostaglandin J2. Mutagenesis of the potential target cysteines showed that oxidation occurred preferentially on residues near the surface of the p38 molecule. Cysteine oxidation thus controls a functional redox switch regulating the intensity or duration of p38 activity that would not be revealed by immunodetection of phosphoprotein commonly interpreted as reflective of p38 activity.

  5. HmsC Controls Yersinia pestis Biofilm Formation in Response to Redox Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gai-Xian Ren

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Yersinia pestis biofilm formation, controlled by intracellular levels of the second messenger molecule cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP, is important for blockage-dependent plague transmission from fleas to mammals. HmsCDE is a tripartite signaling system that modulates intracellular c-di-GMP levels to regulate biofilm formation in Y. pestis. Previously, we found that Y. pestis biofilm formation is stimulated in reducing environments in an hmsCDE-dependent manner. However, the mechanism by which HmsCDE senses the redox state remains elusive. Using a dsbA mutant and the addition of Cu2+ to simulate reducing and oxidizing periplasmic environments, we found that HmsC protein levels are decreased and the HmsC-HmsD protein-protein interaction is weakened in a reducing environment. In addition, we revealed that intraprotein disulphide bonds are critical for HmsC since breakage lowers protein stability and diminishes the interaction with HmsD. Our results suggest that HmsC might play a major role in sensing the environmental changes.

  6. Redox-dependent control of FOXO/DAF-16 by transportin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putker, Marrit; Madl, Tobias; Vos, Harmjan R; de Ruiter, Hesther; Visscher, Marieke; van den Berg, Maaike C W; Kaplan, Mohammed; Korswagen, Hendrik C; Boelens, Rolf; Vermeulen, Michiel; Burgering, Boudewijn M T; Dansen, Tobias B

    2013-02-21

    Forkhead box O (FOXO; DAF-16 in worms) transcription factors, which are of vital importance in cell-cycle control, stress resistance, tumor suppression, and organismal lifespan, are largely regulated through nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling. Insulin signaling keeps FOXO/DAF-16 cytoplasmic, and hence transcriptionally inactive. Conversely, as in loss of insulin signaling, reactive oxygen species (ROS) can activate FOXO/DAF-16 through nuclear accumulation. How ROS regulate the nuclear translocation of FOXO/DAF-16 is largely unknown. Cysteine oxidation can stabilize protein-protein interactions through the formation of disulfide-bridges when cells encounter ROS. Using a proteome-wide screen that identifies ROS-induced mixed disulfide-dependent complexes, we discovered several interaction partners of FOXO4, one of which is the nuclear import receptor transportin-1. We show that disulfide formation with transportin-1 is required for nuclear localization and the activation of FOXO4/DAF-16 induced by ROS, but not by the loss of insulin signaling. This molecular mechanism for nuclear shuttling is conserved in C. elegans and directly connects redox signaling to the longevity protein FOXO/DAF-16. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The effects of redox controls mediated by glutathione peroxidases on root architecture in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passaia, Gisele; Queval, Guillaume; Bai, Juan; Margis-Pinheiro, Marcia; Foyer, Christine H

    2014-03-01

    Glutathione peroxidases (GPXs) fulfil important functions in oxidative signalling and protect against the adverse effects of excessive oxidation. However, there has been no systematic characterization of the functions of the different GPX isoforms in plants. The roles of the different members of the Arabidopsis thaliana GPX gene (AtGPX) family were therefore investigated using gpx1, gpx2, gpx3, gpx4, gpx6, gpx7, and gpx8 T-DNA insertion mutant lines. The shoot phenotypes were largely similar in all genotypes, with small differences from the wild type observed only in the gpx2, gpx3, gpx7, and gpx8 mutants. In contrast, all the mutants showed altered root phenotypes compared with the wild type. The gpx1, gpx4, gpx6, gpx7, and gpx8 mutants had a significantly greater lateral root density (LRD) than the wild type. Conversely, the gpx2 and gpx3 mutants had significantly lower LRD values than the wild type. Auxin increased the LRD in all genotypes, but the effect of auxin was significantly greater in the gpx1, gpx4, and gpx7 mutants than in the wild type. The application of auxin increased GPX4 and GPX7 transcripts, but not GPX1 mRNAs in the roots of wild-type plants. The synthetic strigolactone GR24 and abscisic acid (ABA) decreased LRD to a similar extent in all genotypes, except gpx6, which showed increased sensitivity to ABA. These data not only demonstrate the importance of redox controls mediated by AtGPXs in the control of root architecture but they also show that the plastid-localized GPX1 and GPX7 isoforms are required for the hormone-mediated control of lateral root development.

  8. Redox fronts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, N.; McKinley, I.; Shea, M.; Smellie, J.

    1993-01-01

    This article describes the investigations of redox fronts performed at the Osamu Utsumi mine. Results obtained by modelling groups on the rate of movement of the redox fronts and on the chemical reactions involved are discussed. Some of the most important rockwater interactions which occur at redox fronts can be modelled reasonably well but the complex redox chemistry of elements like sulphur is poorly simulated. The observed enrichment of many trace elements close to the redox fronts could be of significance for high-level waste repositories, but cannot be quantified by existing models. (author) 6 figs., 1 tab

  9. Genetic and biochemical investigations of the role of MamP in redox control of iron biomineralization in Magnetospirillum magneticum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Stephanie R; Wilson, Tiffany D; Brown, Margaret E; Rahn-Lee, Lilah; Yu, Yi; Fredriksen, Laura L; Ozyamak, Ertan; Komeili, Arash; Chang, Michelle C Y

    2015-03-31

    Magnetotactic bacteria have evolved complex subcellular machinery to construct linear chains of magnetite nanocrystals that allow the host cell to sense direction. Each mixed-valent iron nanoparticle is mineralized from soluble iron within a membrane-encapsulated vesicle termed the magnetosome, which serves as a specialized compartment that regulates the iron, redox, and pH environment of the growing mineral. To dissect the biological components that control this process, we have carried out a genetic and biochemical study of proteins proposed to function in iron mineralization. In this study, we show that the redox sites of c-type cytochromes of the Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 magnetosome island, MamP and MamT, are essential to their physiological function and that ablation of one or both heme motifs leads to loss of function, suggesting that their ability to carry out redox chemistry in vivo is important. We also develop a method to heterologously express fully heme-loaded MamP from AMB-1 for in vitro biochemical studies, which show that its Fe(III)-Fe(II) redox couple is set at an unusual potential (-89 ± 11 mV) compared with other related cytochromes involved in iron reduction or oxidation. Despite its low reduction potential, it remains competent to oxidize Fe(II) to Fe(III) and mineralize iron to produce mixed-valent iron oxides. Finally, in vitro mineralization experiments suggest that Mms mineral-templating peptides from AMB-1 can modulate the iron redox chemistry of MamP.

  10. Redox signaling in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foyer, Christine H; Noctor, Graham

    2013-06-01

    Our aim is to deliver an authoritative and challenging perspective of current concepts in plant redox signaling, focusing particularly on the complex interface between the redox and hormone-signaling pathways that allow precise control of plant growth and defense in response to metabolic triggers and environmental constraints and cues. Plants produce significant amounts of singlet oxygen and other reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a result of photosynthetic electron transport and metabolism. Such pathways contribute to the compartment-specific redox-regulated signaling systems in plant cells that convey information to the nucleus to regulate gene expression. Like the chloroplasts and mitochondria, the apoplast-cell wall compartment makes a significant contribution to the redox signaling network, but unlike these organelles, the apoplast has a low antioxidant-buffering capacity. The respective roles of ROS, low-molecular antioxidants, redox-active proteins, and antioxidant enzymes are considered in relation to the functions of plant hormones such as salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, and auxin, in the composite control of plant growth and defense. Regulation of redox gradients between key compartments in plant cells such as those across the plasma membrane facilitates flexible and multiple faceted opportunities for redox signaling that spans the intracellular and extracellular environments. In conclusion, plants are recognized as masters of the art of redox regulation that use oxidants and antioxidants as flexible integrators of signals from metabolism and the environment.

  11. Very high gravity ethanol fermentation by flocculating yeast under redox potential-controlled conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Chen-Guang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Very high gravity (VHG fermentation using medium in excess of 250 g/L sugars for more than 15% (v ethanol can save energy consumption, not only for ethanol distillation, but also for distillage treatment; however, stuck fermentation with prolonged fermentation time and more sugars unfermented is the biggest challenge. Controlling redox potential (ORP during VHG fermentation benefits biomass accumulation and improvement of yeast cell viability that is affected by osmotic pressure and ethanol inhibition, enhancing ethanol productivity and yield, the most important techno-economic aspect of fuel ethanol production. Results Batch fermentation was performed under different ORP conditions using the flocculating yeast and media containing glucose of 201 ± 3.1, 252 ± 2.9 and 298 ± 3.8 g/L. Compared with ethanol fermentation by non-flocculating yeast, different ORP profiles were observed with the flocculating yeast due to the morphological change associated with the flocculation of yeast cells. When ORP was controlled at −100 mV, ethanol fermentation with the high gravity (HG media containing glucose of 201 ± 3.1 and 252 ± 2.9 g/L was completed at 32 and 56 h, respectively, producing 93.0 ± 1.3 and 120.0 ± 1.8 g/L ethanol, correspondingly. In contrast, there were 24.0 ± 0.4 and 17.0 ± 0.3 g/L glucose remained unfermented without ORP control. As high as 131.0 ± 1.8 g/L ethanol was produced at 72 h when ORP was controlled at −150 mV for the VHG fermentation with medium containing 298 ± 3.8 g/L glucose, since yeast cell viability was improved more significantly. Conclusions No lag phase was observed during ethanol fermentation with the flocculating yeast, and the implementation of ORP control improved ethanol productivity and yield. When ORP was controlled at −150 mV, more reducing power was available for yeast cells to survive, which in turn improved their viability and VHG

  12. Redox-active antibiotics control gene expression and community behavior in divergent bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Lars E P; Teal, Tracy K; Price-Whelan, Alexa; Newman, Dianne K

    2008-08-29

    It is thought that bacteria excrete redox-active pigments as antibiotics to inhibit competitors. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the endogenous antibiotic pyocyanin activates SoxR, a transcription factor conserved in Proteo- and Actinobacteria. In Escherichia coli, SoxR regulates the superoxide stress response. Bioinformatic analysis coupled with gene expression studies in P. aeruginosa and Streptomyces coelicolor revealed that the majority of SoxR regulons in bacteria lack the genes required for stress responses, despite the fact that many of these organisms still produce redox-active small molecules, which indicates that redox-active pigments play a role independent of oxidative stress. These compounds had profound effects on the structural organization of colony biofilms in both P. aeruginosa and S. coelicolor, which shows that "secondary metabolites" play important conserved roles in gene expression and development.

  13. Estratificación epidemiológica en el control de los factores de riesgo de la tuberculosis Epidemiological stratification to control the risk factors of tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elba Nieves Moreno Díaz

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un estudio descriptivo longitudinal, con el objetivo de implementar la estratificación epidemiológica en el control de los factores de riesgo de la tuberculosis, provincia Pinar del Río, 2008-2010. El universo de estudio lo constituyó, los habitantes de la provincia en cada uno de los años estudiados. Se revisó el registro de dispensarización y las encuestas epidemiológicas; de ellos se obtuvieron los factores de riesgo: alcoholismo, hábito de fumar, diabetes mellitus, ancianos solos, desnutrición, inmunodeprimidos y casos viviendo con VIH/Sida. Para el procesamiento de la información se trabajó con Microsoft Excel y MapInfo Professional. Se utilizó la metodología estratificación epidemiológica de riesgo hasta nivel municipal; los estratos para los factores de riesgo como para la enfermedad, se clasificaron en: muy alto, alto, mediano y bajo riesgo. Para determinar la significación de cambios se utilizó la prueba Mc Nemar. Los resultados mostraron que en el 2009, el 50% de los municipios que en la estratificación del 2008 estaban en el estrato de muy alto y alto riesgo, el 85,7% cambiaran de estratos, lo que indica un mejor control de los factores de riesgo. El proceso de estratificación en el 2010, no logró cambios favorables en los municipios con mayor riesgo en el 2008, estando el 65% clasificado en estratos de muy alto y alto riesgo, pues el plan de acción previsto, no fue ejecutado con efectividad y seriedad por los jefes de programa, debido a inestabilidad y ausencia de los mismos en los municipios de mayor riesgo.A descriptive, longitudinal study aimed at implementing epidemiological stratification to control the risk factors of tuberculosis in Pinar del Rio province was carried out form 2008 to 2010. The target group was comprised of the inhabitants of the province for each of the years under study. Records and epidemiological survey were revised; taking into account the risk factors of alcoholism

  14. On the mechanism controlling the redox kinetics of Cu-based oxygen carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    San Pio Bordeje, M.A.; Gallucci, F.; Roghair, I.; van Sint Annaland, M.

    2017-01-01

    Copper oxide on alumina is often used as oxygen carrier for chemical looping combustion owing to its very high reduction rates at lower temperatures and its very good mechanical and chemical stability at temperatures below 1000 °C. In this work, the redox behaviour of CuO/Al2O3 has been studied in

  15. Pyruvate Kinase Triggers a Metabolic Feedback Loop that Controls Redox Metabolism in Respiring Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grüning, N.M.; Rinnerthaler, M.; Bluemlein, K.; Mulleder, M.; Wamelink, M.M.C.; Lehrach, H.; Jakobs, C.A.J.M.; Breitenbach, M.; Ralser, M.

    2011-01-01

    In proliferating cells, a transition from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism is known as the Warburg effect, whose reversal inhibits cancer cell proliferation. Studying its regulator pyruvate kinase (PYK) in yeast, we discovered that central metabolism is self-adapting to synchronize redox metabolism

  16. On Optimum Stratification

    OpenAIRE

    M. G. M. Khan; V. D. Prasad; D. K. Rao

    2014-01-01

    In this manuscript, we discuss the problem of determining the optimum stratification of a study (or main) variable based on the auxiliary variable that follows a uniform distribution. If the stratification of survey variable is made using the auxiliary variable it may lead to substantial gains in precision of the estimates. This problem is formulated as a Nonlinear Programming Problem (NLPP), which turn out to multistage decision problem and is solved using dynamic programming technique.

  17. Hydrologic control on redox and nitrogen dynamics in a peatland soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubol, Simonetta; Silver, Whendee L.; Bellin, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Soils are a dominant source of nitrous oxide (N 2 O), a potent greenhouse gas. However, the complexity of the drivers of N 2 O production and emissions has hindered our ability to predict the magnitude and spatial dynamics of N 2 O fluxes. Soil moisture can be considered a key driver because it influences oxygen (O 2 ) supply, which feeds back on N 2 O sources (nitrification versus denitrification) and sinks (reduction to dinitrogen). Soil water content is directly linked to O 2 and redox potential, which regulate microbial metabolism and chemical transformations in the environment. Despite its importance, only a few laboratory studies have addressed the effects of hydrological transient dynamics on nitrogen (N) cycling in the vadose zone. To further investigate these aspects, we performed a long term experiment in a 1.5 m depth soil column supplemented by chamber experiments. With this experiment, we aimed to investigate how soil moisture dynamics influence redox sensitive N cycling in a peatland soil. As expected, increased soil moisture lowered O 2 concentrations and redox potential in the soil. The decline was more severe for prolonged saturated conditions than for short events and at deep than at the soil surface. Gaseous and dissolved N 2 O, dissolved nitrate (NO 3 − ) and ammonium (NH 4 + ) changed considerably along the soil column profile following trends in soil O 2 and redox potential. Hot spots of N 2 O concentrations corresponded to high variability in soil O 2 in the upper and lower parts of the column. Results from chamber experiments confirmed high NO 3 − reduction potential in soils, particularly from the bottom of the column. Under our experimental conditions, we identified a close coupling of soil O 2 and N 2 O dynamics, both of which lagged behind soil moisture changes. These results highlight the relationship among soil hydrologic properties, redox potential and N cycling, and suggest that models working at a daily scale need to consider

  18. Subsurface Conditions Controlling Uranium Incorporation in Iron Oxides: A Redox Stable Sink

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fendorf, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Toxic metals and radionuclides throughout the U.S. Department of Energy Complex pose a serious threat to ecosystems and to human health. Of particular concern is the redox-sensitive radionuclide uranium, which is classified as a priority pollutant in soils and groundwaters at most DOE sites owing to its large inventory, its health risks, and its mobility with respect to primary waste sources. The goal of this research was to contribute to the long-term mission of the Subsurface Biogeochemistry Program by determining reactions of uranium with iron (hydr)oxides that lead to long-term stabilization of this pervasive contaminant. The research objectives of this project were thus to (1) identify the (bio)geochemical conditions, including those of the solid-phase, promoting uranium incorporation in Fe (hydr)oxides, (2) determine the magnitude of uranium incorporation under a variety of relevant subsurface conditions in order to quantify the importance of this pathway when in competition with reduction or adsorption; (3) identify the mechanism(s) of U(VI/V) incorporation in Fe (hydr)oxides; and (4) determine the stability of these phases under different biogeochemical (inclusive of redox) conditions. Our research demonstrates that redox transformations are capable of achieving U incorporation into goethite at ambient temperatures, and that this transformation occurs within days at U and Fe(II) concentrations that are common in subsurface geochemical environments with natural ferrihydrites - inclusive of those with natural impurities. Increasing Fe(II) or U concentration, or initial pH, made U(VI) reduction to U(IV) a more competitive sequestration pathway in this system, presumably by increasing the relative rate of U reduction. Uranium concentrations commonly found in contaminated subsurface environments are often on the order of 1-10 μM, and groundwater Fe(II) concentrations can reach exceed 1 mM in reduced zones of the subsurface. The redox-driven U(V) incorporation

  19. Subsurface Conditions Controlling Uranium Incorporation in Iron Oxides: A Redox Stable Sink

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fendorf, Scott [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2016-04-05

    Toxic metals and radionuclides throughout the U.S. Department of Energy Complex pose a serious threat to ecosystems and to human health. Of particular concern is the redox-sensitive radionuclide uranium, which is classified as a priority pollutant in soils and groundwaters at most DOE sites owing to its large inventory, its health risks, and its mobility with respect to primary waste sources. The goal of this research was to contribute to the long-term mission of the Subsurface Biogeochemistry Program by determining reactions of uranium with iron (hydr)oxides that lead to long-term stabilization of this pervasive contaminant. The research objectives of this project were thus to (1) identify the (bio)geochemical conditions, including those of the solid-phase, promoting uranium incorporation in Fe (hydr)oxides, (2) determine the magnitude of uranium incorporation under a variety of relevant subsurface conditions in order to quantify the importance of this pathway when in competition with reduction or adsorption; (3) identify the mechanism(s) of U(VI/V) incorporation in Fe (hydr)oxides; and (4) determine the stability of these phases under different biogeochemical (inclusive of redox) conditions. Our research demonstrates that redox transformations are capable of achieving U incorporation into goethite at ambient temperatures, and that this transformation occurs within days at U and Fe(II) concentrations that are common in subsurface geochemical environments with natural ferrihydrites—inclusive of those with natural impurities. Increasing Fe(II) or U concentration, or initial pH, made U(VI) reduction to U(IV) a more competitive sequestration pathway in this system, presumably by increasing the relative rate of U reduction. Uranium concentrations commonly found in contaminated subsurface environments are often on the order of 1-10 μM, and groundwater Fe(II) concentrations can reach exceed 1 mM in reduced zones of the subsurface. The redox-driven U(V) incorporation

  20. Control of glucokinase translocation in rat hepatocytes by sorbitol and the cytosolic redox state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agius, L

    1994-02-15

    In rat hepatocytes cultured in 5 mM glucose, glucokinase activity is present predominantly in a bound state, and during permeabilization of the cells with digitonin in the presence of Mg2+ less than 20% of glucokinase activity is released. However, incubation of hepatocytes with a higher [glucose] [concn. giving half-maximal activation (A50) 15 mM] or with fructose (A50 50 microM) causes translocation of glucokinase from its Mg(2+)-dependent binding site to an alternative site [Agius and Peak (1993) Biochem. J. 296, 785-796]. A comparison of various substrates showed that sorbitol (A50 8 microM) was 6-fold more potent than fructose at causing glucokinase translocation, whereas tagatose was as potent and mannitol was > 10-fold less potent (A50 550 microM). These substrates also stimulate glucose conversion into glycogen with a similar relative potency, suggesting that conversion of glucose into glycogen is dependent on the binding and/or location of glucokinase within the hepatocyte. Ethanol and glycerol inhibited the effects of fructose, sorbitol and glucose on glucokinase translocation, whereas dihydroxy-acetone had a small additive effect at sub-maximal substrate stimulation. The converse effects of glycerol and dihydroxy-acetone suggest a role for the cytosolic NADH/NAD+ redox state in controlling glucokinase translocation. Titrations with three competitive inhibitors of glucokinase did not provide evidence for involvement of glucokinase flux in glucose-induced glucokinase translocation: N-acetylglucosamine inhibited glucose conversion into glycogen, but not glucose-induced glucokinase translocation; glucosamine partially suppressed glucose-induced and fructose-induced glucokinase translocation, at concentrations that caused total inhibition of glucose conversion into glycogen; D-mannoheptulose increased glucokinase release and had an additive effect with glucose. 3,3'-Tetramethylene-glutaric acid (5 mM), an inhibitor of aldose reductase, inhibited glucokinase

  1. 4"t"h Annual workshop proceedings of the collaborative project ''Redox phenomena controlling systems'' (7"t"h EC FP CP RECOSY)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altmaier, Marcus; Kienzler, Bernhard; Duro, Lara; Grive, Mireia; Montoya, Vanessa

    2012-01-01

    The EURATOM 7"t"h EC Framework Program Collaborative Project REdox phenomena Controlling SYstems (RECOSY) started in April 2008 and extends over 4 years. Although redox is not a new geochemical issue, different questions are still not resolved. For this reason, main objectives of RECOSY project are a) the sound understanding of redox phenomena controlling the long-term release/retention of radionuclides in nuclear waste disposal, b) providing tools to apply the result to Performance Assessment/Safety Case, c) training of next generation and d) documentation and communication of the results. To this aim, the project set up a consortium of 32 Beneficiaries/Contractors and 6 Associated Groups. The consortium includes key European Research Institutes, Universities, National Waste Management Agencies and SMEs, from 13 EURATOM signatory states, Russia, Japan, Korea, USA and one European Joint Research Centre. The ReCosy concept is innovative in the scientific approach to the redox phenomena. It includes i) advanced analytical tools, ii) investigations of processes responsible for redox control (thermodynamically and kinetically controlled processes, surface reactions and microbial processes,..), iii) provision of required data on redox controlling processes, and iv) response to disturbances in disposal systems. The work program is structured along six RTD workpackages (WP1-6). They cover near-field and far field aspects as well as all relevant host-rocks considered in Europe. In WP1, the scientific state-of-the-art and its application to Performance Assessment/Safety Case is documented and regularly updated. WP2 focuses on development of redox determination methods. WP3 focuses on redox response of defined and near-natural systems. WP4 studies the redox reactions of radionuclides. WP5 focuses on Redox processes in radionuclide transport and WP6 deals with redox reactions affecting the spent fuel source-term. Specific workpackages on knowledge management, education and

  2. 4{sup th} Annual workshop proceedings of the collaborative project ''Redox phenomena controlling systems'' (7{sup th} EC FP CP RECOSY)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altmaier, Marcus; Kienzler, Bernhard; Duro, Lara; Grive, Mireia; Montoya, Vanessa (eds.)

    2012-07-01

    The EURATOM 7{sup th} EC Framework Program Collaborative Project REdox phenomena Controlling SYstems (RECOSY) started in April 2008 and extends over 4 years. Although redox is not a new geochemical issue, different questions are still not resolved. For this reason, main objectives of RECOSY project are a) the sound understanding of redox phenomena controlling the long-term release/retention of radionuclides in nuclear waste disposal, b) providing tools to apply the result to Performance Assessment/Safety Case, c) training of next generation and d) documentation and communication of the results. To this aim, the project set up a consortium of 32 Beneficiaries/Contractors and 6 Associated Groups. The consortium includes key European Research Institutes, Universities, National Waste Management Agencies and SMEs, from 13 EURATOM signatory states, Russia, Japan, Korea, USA and one European Joint Research Centre. The ReCosy concept is innovative in the scientific approach to the redox phenomena. It includes i) advanced analytical tools, ii) investigations of processes responsible for redox control (thermodynamically and kinetically controlled processes, surface reactions and microbial processes,..), iii) provision of required data on redox controlling processes, and iv) response to disturbances in disposal systems. The work program is structured along six RTD workpackages (WP1-6). They cover near-field and far field aspects as well as all relevant host-rocks considered in Europe. In WP1, the scientific state-of-the-art and its application to Performance Assessment/Safety Case is documented and regularly updated. WP2 focuses on development of redox determination methods. WP3 focuses on redox response of defined and near-natural systems. WP4 studies the redox reactions of radionuclides. WP5 focuses on Redox processes in radionuclide transport and WP6 deals with redox reactions affecting the spent fuel source-term. Specific workpackages on knowledge management, education

  3. Control by substrate of the cytochrome p450-dependent redox machinery: mechanistic insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlavica, Peter

    2007-08-01

    Based on initial studies with bacterial CYP101A1, a popular concept emerged predicting that substrate-induced low-to-high spin conversion of P450s is universally associated with shifts of the midpoint potential to a more positive value to maximize rates of electron transfer and metabolic turnover. However, evaluation of the plethora of observations with pro- and eukaryotic hemoproteins suggests a caveat as to generalization of this principle. Thus, some P450s are inherently high-spin, so that there is no need for a supportive substrate-triggered impulse to electron flow. With other enzymes, high-spin content is not consonant with reductive activity, and spin transition as such is not essential to sustaining substrate oxidation. Also, with certain proteins the low-spin conformer is reduced as swift as the high-spin entity. Moreover, there is not regularly a linear relationship between high-spin level and anodic shift of the reduction potential. Similarly, in given cases turnover may proceed despite insignificant or even lacking substrate-provoked alterations in the redox behaviour. Thus, folding of the disparate and sometimes conflicting data into a harmonized overall picture is a lingering problem. Apart from direct perturbation of the electrochemical properties, substrate docking may entail changes in enzyme conformation such as to favour productive complexation with redox partners or modulate electron transfer conduits within preformed donor/acceptor adducts, resulting in elevated ease of flow of reducing equivalents. Substrate-steered ordering of the oligomeric aggregation state of P450s is likely to impose steric constraints on heterodimers, causing one component to more readily align with electron carriers. Careful uncovering of electrochemical mechanisms in these systems will be fruitful to tailoring of novel bioenergetic machines and redox chains via redox-inspired protein engineering or molecular Lego, capable of generating products of interest or degrading

  4. Environmental control of plant nuclear gene expression by chloroplast redox signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeannette ePfalz

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Plant photosynthesis takes place in specialised cell organelles, the chloroplasts, which perform all essential steps of this process. The proteins involved in photosynthesis are encoded by genes located on the plastid and nuclear genomes. Proper function and regulation of light harvesting and energy fixation thus requires a tight coordination of the gene expression machineries in the two genetic compartments. This is achieved by a bi-directional exchange of information between nucleus and plastids. Signals emerging from plastids report the functional and developmental state of the organelle to the nucleus and initiate distinct nuclear gene expression profiles, which trigger responses that support or improve plastid functions. Recent research indicated that this signalling is absolutely essential for plant growth and development. Reduction/oxidation (redox signals from photosynthesis are key players in this information network since they do report functional disturbances in photosynthesis, the primary energy source of plants. Such disturbances are caused by environmental fluctuations for instance in illumination, temperature or water availability. These environmental changes affect the linear electron flow of photosynthesis and result in changes of the redox state of the components involved (e.g. the plastoquinone pool or coupled to it (e.g. the thioredoxin pool. Thus, the changes in redox state directly reflect the environmental impact and serve as immediate plastidial signals to the nucleus. The triggered responses range from counterbalancing reactions within the physiological range up to severe stress responses including cell death. This review focuses on physiological redox signals from photosynthetic electron transport, their relation to the environment, potential transduction pathways to the nucleus and their impact on nuclear gene expression.

  5. Swiss roll nanomembranes with controlled proton diffusion as redox micro-supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Hengxing; Mei, Yongfeng; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2010-06-14

    We demonstrate a redox Swiss roll micro-supercapacitor by rolling up a multilayered nanomembrane with an electrochemical active layer at either the outer or inner surface for different proton diffusion behaviors. The Swiss roll micro-supercapacitor could achieve high performance (e.g. capacity and life time) in a microscale power source and is helpful for studying charge transfer at the electrolyte/electrode interface.

  6. Redox-Active Antibiotics Control Gene Expression and Community Behavior in Divergent Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Dietrich, Lars E. P.; Teal, Tracy K.; Price-Whelan, Alexa; Newman, Dianne K.

    2008-01-01

    It is thought that bacteria excrete redox-active pigments as antibiotics to inhibit competitors. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the endogenous antibiotic pyocyanin activates SoxR, a transcription factor conserved in Proteo- and Actinobacteria. In Escherichia coli, SoxR regulates the superoxide stress response. Bioinformatic analysis coupled with gene expression studies in P. aeruginosa and Streptomyces coelicolor revealed that the majority of SoxR regulons in bacteria lack the genes required for ...

  7. Factors Controlling the Redox Activity of Oxygen in Perovskites: From Theory to Application for Catalytic Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunzhen Yang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Triggering the redox reaction of oxygens has become essential for the development of (electro catalytic properties of transition metal oxides, especially for perovskite materials that have been envisaged for a variety of applications such as the oxygen evolution or reduction reactions (OER and ORR, respectively, CO or hydrocarbons oxidation, NO reduction and others. While the formation of ligand hole for perovskites is well-known for solid state physicists and/or chemists and has been widely studied for the understanding of important electronic properties such as superconductivity, insulator-metal transitions, magnetoresistance, ferroelectrics, redox properties etc., oxygen electrocatalysis in aqueous media at low temperature barely scratches the surface of the concept of oxygen ions oxidation. In this review, we briefly explain the electronic structure of perovskite materials and go through a few important parameters such as the ionization potential, Madelung potential, and charge transfer energy that govern the oxidation of oxygen ions. We then describe the surface reactivity that can be induced by the redox activity of the oxygen network and the formation of highly reactive surface oxygen species before describing their participation in catalytic reactions and providing mechanistic insights and strategies for designing new (electro catalysts. Finally, we give a brief overview of the different techniques that can be employed to detect the formation of such transient oxygen species.

  8. Hydrologic control on redox and nitrogen dynamics in a peatland soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubol, Simonetta; Silver, Whendee L; Bellin, Alberto

    2012-08-15

    Soils are a dominant source of nitrous oxide (N(2)O), a potent greenhouse gas. However, the complexity of the drivers of N(2)O production and emissions has hindered our ability to predict the magnitude and spatial dynamics of N(2)O fluxes. Soil moisture can be considered a key driver because it influences oxygen (O(2)) supply, which feeds back on N(2)O sources (nitrification versus denitrification) and sinks (reduction to dinitrogen). Soil water content is directly linked to O(2) and redox potential, which regulate microbial metabolism and chemical transformations in the environment. Despite its importance, only a few laboratory studies have addressed the effects of hydrological transient dynamics on nitrogen (N) cycling in the vadose zone. To further investigate these aspects, we performed a long term experiment in a 1.5 m depth soil column supplemented by chamber experiments. With this experiment, we aimed to investigate how soil moisture dynamics influence redox sensitive N cycling in a peatland soil. As expected, increased soil moisture lowered O(2) concentrations and redox potential in the soil. The decline was more severe for prolonged saturated conditions than for short events and at deep than at the soil surface. Gaseous and dissolved N(2)O, dissolved nitrate (NO(3)(-)) and ammonium (NH(4)(+)) changed considerably along the soil column profile following trends in soil O(2) and redox potential. Hot spots of N(2)O concentrations corresponded to high variability in soil O(2) in the upper and lower parts of the column. Results from chamber experiments confirmed high NO(3)(-) reduction potential in soils, particularly from the bottom of the column. Under our experimental conditions, we identified a close coupling of soil O(2) and N(2)O dynamics, both of which lagged behind soil moisture changes. These results highlight the relationship among soil hydrologic properties, redox potential and N cycling, and suggest that models working at a daily scale need to

  9. Hydrologic control on redox and nitrogen dynamics in a peatland soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubol, Simonetta, E-mail: rubols@ing.unitn.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile ed Ambientale, Universita di Trento, Via Mesiano 77, I 38123 Trento (Italy); Silver, Whendee L. [Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, 130 Mulford Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA, 94720 (United States); Bellin, Alberto [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile ed Ambientale, Universita di Trento, Via Mesiano 77, I 38123 Trento (Italy)

    2012-08-15

    Soils are a dominant source of nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), a potent greenhouse gas. However, the complexity of the drivers of N{sub 2}O production and emissions has hindered our ability to predict the magnitude and spatial dynamics of N{sub 2}O fluxes. Soil moisture can be considered a key driver because it influences oxygen (O{sub 2}) supply, which feeds back on N{sub 2}O sources (nitrification versus denitrification) and sinks (reduction to dinitrogen). Soil water content is directly linked to O{sub 2} and redox potential, which regulate microbial metabolism and chemical transformations in the environment. Despite its importance, only a few laboratory studies have addressed the effects of hydrological transient dynamics on nitrogen (N) cycling in the vadose zone. To further investigate these aspects, we performed a long term experiment in a 1.5 m depth soil column supplemented by chamber experiments. With this experiment, we aimed to investigate how soil moisture dynamics influence redox sensitive N cycling in a peatland soil. As expected, increased soil moisture lowered O{sub 2} concentrations and redox potential in the soil. The decline was more severe for prolonged saturated conditions than for short events and at deep than at the soil surface. Gaseous and dissolved N{sub 2}O, dissolved nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup -}) and ammonium (NH{sub 4}{sup +}) changed considerably along the soil column profile following trends in soil O{sub 2} and redox potential. Hot spots of N{sub 2}O concentrations corresponded to high variability in soil O{sub 2} in the upper and lower parts of the column. Results from chamber experiments confirmed high NO{sub 3}{sup -} reduction potential in soils, particularly from the bottom of the column. Under our experimental conditions, we identified a close coupling of soil O{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O dynamics, both of which lagged behind soil moisture changes. These results highlight the relationship among soil hydrologic properties, redox potential

  10. Cold stratification, but not stratification in salinity, enhances seedling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-10-26

    Oct 26, 2011 ... Cold stratification was reported to release seed dormancy and enhance plant tolerance to salt stress. ... Key words: Cold stratification, salt stress, seedling emergence, ... methods used to cope with salinity, seed pre-sowing.

  11. Induction of biogenic magnetization and redox control by a component of the target of rapamycin complex 1 signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiji Nishida

    Full Text Available Most organisms are simply diamagnetic, while magnetotactic bacteria and migratory animals are among organisms that exploit magnetism. Biogenic magnetization not only is of fundamental interest, but also has industrial potential. However, the key factor(s that enable biogenic magnetization in coordination with other cellular functions and metabolism remain unknown. To address the requirements for induction and the application of synthetic bio-magnetism, we explored the creation of magnetism in a simple model organism. Cell magnetization was first observed by attraction towards a magnet when normally diamagnetic yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were grown with ferric citrate. The magnetization was further enhanced by genetic modification of iron homeostasis and introduction of ferritin. The acquired magnetizable properties enabled the cells to be attracted to a magnet, and be trapped by a magnetic column. Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID magnetometry confirmed and quantitatively characterized the acquired paramagnetism. Electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy showed electron-dense iron-containing aggregates within the magnetized cells. Magnetization-based screening of gene knockouts identified Tco89p, a component of TORC1 (Target of rapamycin complex 1, as important for magnetization; loss of TCO89 and treatment with rapamycin reduced magnetization in a TCO89-dependent manner. The TCO89 expression level positively correlated with magnetization, enabling inducible magnetization. Several carbon metabolism genes were also shown to affect magnetization. Redox mediators indicated that TCO89 alters the intracellular redox to an oxidized state in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, we demonstrated that synthetic induction of magnetization is possible and that the key factors are local redox control through carbon metabolism and iron supply.

  12. Experimental investigation of factors affecting the control of redox conditions within a radwaste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guppy, R.M.; Atkinson, A.

    1991-04-01

    The maximum aqueous concentration of multivalent radioelements in a radwaste repository can be estimated from the expected Eh (the oxidising or reducing tendency of the solution) and pH of the aqueous phase in the repository so long as equilibrium between all oxidising and reducing species can be guaranteed. The objective of the work reported here was to ascertain whether any significant departures from redox equilibrium are likely to arise. Technetium (VII) species were exposed under anaerobic conditions to concentrations of ferrous, hydrogen sulphide and thiosulphate species likely to be present in a repository environment to establish which species are capable of reducing aqueous Tc(VII) to a less soluble Tc(IV) solid compound. Potential catalytic solid phases and phases capable of electron exchange were also exposed to Tc(VII) species under anaerobic, aerobic and hydrogen atmospheres. We have not been able to demonstrate conclusively that mutual equilibrium was attained between technetium and iron redox couples, nor that the apparent solubility of technetium was that expected from the resulting Eh and pH of the solution, although some technetium was removed from solution. Hydrogen did not reduce Tc(VII) within the timescale of the experiments and no catalytic effects by haematite or a cementitious backfill grout for reductions involving hydrogen were observable. Magnetite removed some technetium from solution, apparently by surface reaction, under inert (argon) and reducing (hydrogen) atmospheres. Sulphides, and to a lesser extent thiosulphates, will reduce the solubility of technetium to a very low level. (author)

  13. Redox Control and Hydrogen Production in Sediment Caps Using Carbon Cloth Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mei; Yan, Fei; Zhang, Ruiling; Reible, Danny D.; Lowry, Gregory V.; Gregory, Kelvin B.

    2010-01-01

    Sediment caps that degrade contaminants can improve their ability to contain contaminants relative to sand and sorbent-amended caps, but few methods to enhance contaminant degradation in sediment caps are available. The objective of this study was to determine if, carbon electrodes emplaced within a sediment cap at poised potential could create a redox gradient and provide electron donor for the potential degradation of contaminants. In a simulated sediment cap overlying sediment from the Anacostia River (Washington, DC), electrochemically induced redox gradients were developed within 3 days and maintained over the period of the test (~100 days). Hydrogen and oxygen were produced by water electrolysis at the electrode surfaces and may serve as electron donor and acceptor for contaminant degradation. Electrochemical and geochemical factors that may influence hydrogen production were studied. Hydrogen production displayed zero order kinetics with ~75% coulombic efficiency and rates were proportional to the applied potential between 2.5V to 5V and not greatly affected by pH. Hydrogen production was promoted by increasing ionic strength and in the presence of natural organic matter. Graphite electrode-stimulated degradation of tetrachlorobenzene in a batch reactor was dependent on applied voltage and production of hydrogen to a concentration above the threshold for biological dechlorination. These findings suggest that electrochemical reactive capping can potentially be used to create “reactive” sediments caps capable of promoting chemical or biological transformations of contaminants within the cap. PMID:20879761

  14. Redox potential monitoring as a method to control unwanted noble metal-catalyzed hydrogen generation from formic acid treatment of simulated nuclear waste media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, R.B.; Bhattacharyya, N.K.

    1998-01-01

    Simulants for the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant feed containing the major nonradioactive components Al, Cd, Fe, Mn, Nd, Ni, Si, Zr, Na, CO 3 2- , NO 3 - , and NO 2 - were used to study redox potential changes in reactions of formic acid at 90 C catalyzed by the noble metals Ru, Rh, and/or Pd found in significant quantities in uranium fission products. Such reactions were monitored using gas chromatography to analyze the CO 2 , H 2 , NO, and N 2 O in the gas phase and a redox electrode to follow redox potential changes as a function of time. In the initial phase of formic acid addition to nitrite-containing feed simulants, the redox potential of the reaction mixture rises typically to +400 mV relative to the Al/AgCl electrode because of the generation of the moderately strongly oxidizing nitrous acid. No H 2 production occurs at this stage of the reaction as long as free nitrous acid is present. After all of the nitrous acid has been destroyed by reduction to N 2 O and NO and disproportionation to NO/NO 3 - , the redox potential of the reaction mixture becomes more negative than the Ag/AgCl electrode. The experiments outlined in this paper suggest the feasibility of controlling the production of H 2 by limiting the amount of formic acid used and monitoring the redox potential during formic acid treatment

  15. Modeling Multimodal Stratification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeriis, Morten

    2017-01-01

    . The article outlines a theoretical experiment exploring how an alternative way of modeling stratification and instantiation may raise some interesting ideas on the concepts of realization dynamics, system-instance, and the different contexts of the semiotic text. This is elaborated in a discussion of how...

  16. Cold stratification, but not stratification in salinity, enhances seedling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cold stratification, but not stratification in salinity, enhances seedling growth of wheat under salt treatment. L Wang, HL Wang, CH Yin, CY Tian. Abstract. Cold stratification was reported to release seed dormancy and enhance plant tolerance to salt stress. Experiments were conducted to test the hypothesis that cold ...

  17. Measurement of europium (III)/europium (II) couple in fluoride molten salt for redox control in a molten salt reactor concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shaoqiang; Shay, Nikolas; Wang, Yafei; Zhou, Wentao; Zhang, Jinsuo

    2017-12-01

    The fluoride molten salt such as FLiNaK and FLiBe is one of the coolant candidates for the next generation nuclear reactor concepts, for example, the fluoride salt cooled high temperature reactor (FHR). For mitigating corrosion of structural materials in molten fluoride salt, the redox condition of the salts needs to be monitored and controlled. This study investigates the feasibility of applying the Eu3+/Eu2+ couple for redox control. Cyclic voltammetry measurements of the Eu3+/Eu2+ couple were able to obtain the concentrations ratio of Eu3+/Eu2+ in the melt. Additionally, the formal standard potential of Eu3+/Eu2+ was characterized over the FHR's operating temperatures allowing for the application of the Nernst equation to establish a Eu3+/Eu2+ concentration ratio below 0.05 to prevent corrosion of candidate structural materials. A platinum quasi-reference electrode with potential calibrated by potassium reduction potential is shown as reliable for the redox potential measurement. These results show that the Eu3+/Eu2+ couple is a feasible redox buffering agent to control the redox condition in molten fluoride salts.

  18. Cyclic electron flow is redox-controlled but independent of state transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hiroko; Clowez, Sophie; Wollman, Francis-André; Vallon, Olivier; Rappaport, Fabrice

    2013-01-01

    Photosynthesis is the biological process that feeds the biosphere with reduced carbon. The assimilation of CO2 requires the fine tuning of two co-existing functional modes: linear electron flow, which provides NADPH and ATP, and cyclic electron flow, which only sustains ATP synthesis. Although the importance of this fine tuning is appreciated, its mechanism remains equivocal. Here we show that cyclic electron flow as well as formation of supercomplexes, thought to contribute to the enhancement of cyclic electron flow, are promoted in reducing conditions with no correlation with the reorganization of the thylakoid membranes associated with the migration of antenna proteins towards Photosystems I or II, a process known as state transition. We show that cyclic electron flow is tuned by the redox power and this provides a mechanistic model applying to the entire green lineage including the vast majority of the cases in which state transition only involves a moderate fraction of the antenna.

  19. The intracellular redox stress caused by hexavalent chromium is selective for proteins that have key roles in cell survival and thiol redox control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, Judith M.; Antholine, William E.; Myers, Charles R.

    2011-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] compounds (e.g. chromates) are strong oxidants that readily enter cells where they are reduced to reactive Cr intermediates that can directly oxidize some cell components and can promote the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Inhalation is a major route of exposure which directly exposes the bronchial epithelium. Previous studies with non-cancerous human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) demonstrated that Cr(VI) treatment results in the irreversible inhibition of thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) and the oxidation of thioredoxins (Trx) and peroxiredoxins (Prx). The mitochondrial Trx/Prx system is somewhat more sensitive to Cr(VI) than the cytosolic Trx/Prx system, and other redox-sensitive mitochondrial functions are subsequently affected including electron transport complexes I and II. Studies reported here show that Cr(VI) does not cause indiscriminant thiol oxidation, and that the Trx/Prx system is among the most sensitive of cellular protein thiols. Trx/Prx oxidation is not unique to BEAS-2B cells, as it was also observed in primary human bronchial epithelial cells. Increasing the intracellular levels of ascorbate, an endogenous Cr(VI) reductant, did not alter the effects on TrxR, Trx, or Prx. The peroxynitrite scavenger MnTBAP did not protect TrxR, Trx, Prx, or the electron transport chain from the effects of Cr(VI), implying that peroxynitrite is not required for these effects. Nitration of tyrosine residues of TrxR was not observed following Cr(VI) treatment, further ruling out peroxynitrite as a significant contributor to the irreversible inhibition of TrxR. Cr(VI) treatments that disrupt the TrxR/Trx/Prx system did not cause detectable mitochondrial DNA damage. Overall, the redox stress that results from Cr(VI) exposure shows selectivity for key proteins which are known to be important for redox signaling, antioxidant defense, and cell survival.

  20. Fuel and combustion stratification study of Partially Premixed Combustion

    OpenAIRE

    Izadi Najafabadi, M.; Dam, N.; Somers, B.; Johansson, B.

    2016-01-01

    Relatively high levels of stratification is one of the main advantages of Partially Premixed Combustion (PPC) over the Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) concept. Fuel stratification smoothens heat release and improves controllability of this kind of combustion. However, the lack of a clear definition of “fuel and combustion stratifications” is obvious in literature. Hence, it is difficult to compare stratification levels of different PPC strategies or other combustion concepts. T...

  1. AGC of a multi-area power system under deregulated environment using redox flow batteries and interline power flow controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulasichandra Sekhar Gorripotu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, Proportional Integral Derivative with Filter (PIDF is proposed for Automatic Generation Control (AGC of a multi-area power system in deregulated environment. Initially, a two area four units thermal system without any physical constraints is considered and the gains of the PIDF controller are optimized employing Differential Evolution (DE algorithm using ITAE criterion. The superiority of proposed DE optimized PIDF controller over Fuzzy Logic controller is demonstrated. Then, to further improve the system performance, an Interline Power Flow Controller (IPFC is placed in the tie-line and Redox Flow Batteries (RFB is considered in the first area and the controller parameters are tuned. Additionally, to get an accurate insight of the AGC problem, important physical constraints such as Time Delay (TD and Generation Rate Constraints (GRC are considered and the controller parameters are retuned. The performance of proposed controller is evaluated under different operating conditions that take place in a deregulated power market. Further, the proposed approach is extended to a two area six units hydro thermal system. Finally, sensitivity analysis is performed by varying the system parameters and operating load conditions from their nominal values.

  2. PI2 controller based coordinated control with Redox Flow Battery and Unified Power Flow Controller for improved Restoration Indices in a deregulated power system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Thirunavukarasu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The nature of power system restoration problem involves status assessment, optimization of generation capability and load pickup. This paper proposes the evaluation of Power System Restoration Indices (PSRI based on the Automatic Generation Control (AGC assessment of interconnected power system in a deregulated environment. The PSRI are useful for system planners to prepare the power system restoration plans and to improve the efficiency of the physical operation of the power system with the increased transmission capacity in the network. The stabilization of frequency and tie-line power oscillations in an interconnected power system becomes challenging when implemented in the future competitive environment. This paper also deals with the concept of AGC in two-area reheat power system having coordinated control action with Redox Flow Battery (RFB and Unified Power Flow Controller (UPFC are capable of controlling the network performance in a very fast manner and improve power transfer limits in order to have a better restoration. In addition to that a new Proportional–Double Integral (PI2 controller is designed and implemented in AGC loop and controller parameters are optimized through Bacterial Foraging Optimization (BFO algorithm. Simulation results reveal that the proposed PI2 controller is that it has good stability during load variations, excellent transient and dynamic responses when compared with the system comprising PI controller. Moreover the AGC loop with RFB coordinated with UPFC has greatly improved the dynamic response and it reduces the control input requirements, to ensure improved PSRI in order to provide the reduced restoration time, thereby improving the system reliability.

  3. Organic molecules as tools to control the growth, surface structure, and redox activity of colloidal quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Emily A

    2013-11-19

    In order to achieve efficient and reliable technology that can harness solar energy, the behavior of electrons and energy at interfaces between different types or phases of materials must be understood. Conversion of light to chemical or electrical potential in condensed phase systems requires gradients in free energy that allow the movement of energy or charge carriers and facilitate redox reactions and dissociation of photoexcited states (excitons) into free charge carriers. Such free energy gradients are present at interfaces between solid and liquid phases or between inorganic and organic materials. Nanostructured materials have a higher density of these interfaces than bulk materials. Nanostructured materials, however, have a structural and chemical complexity that does not exist in bulk materials, which presents a difficult challenge: to lower or eliminate energy barriers to electron and energy flux that inevitably result from forcing different materials to meet in a spatial region of atomic dimensions. Chemical functionalization of nanostructured materials is perhaps the most versatile and powerful strategy for controlling the potential energy landscape of their interfaces and for minimizing losses in energy conversion efficiency due to interfacial structural and electronic defects. Colloidal quantum dots are semiconductor nanocrystals synthesized with wet-chemical methods and coated in organic molecules. Chemists can use these model systems to study the effects of chemical functionalization of nanoscale organic/inorganic interfaces on the optical and electronic properties of a nanostructured material, and the behavior of electrons and energy at interfaces. The optical and electronic properties of colloidal quantum dots have an intense sensitivity to their surface chemistry, and their organic adlayers make them dispersible in solvent. This allows researchers to use high signal-to-noise solution-phase spectroscopy to study processes at interfaces. In this

  4. U3Si2 behavior in H2O environments: Part II, pressurized water with controlled redox chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, A. T.; Migdisov, A.; Wood, E. Sooby; Grote, C. J.

    2018-03-01

    Recent interest in U3Si2 as an advanced light water reactor fuel has driven assessment of numerous properties, but characterization of its response to H2O environments is sparse in available literature. The behavior of U3Si2 in H2O containing atmospheres is investigated and presented in a two-part series of articles. This work examines the behavior of U3Si2 following exposure to pressurized H2O at temperatures from 300 to 350 °C. Testing was performed using two autoclave configurations and multiple redox conditions. Use of solid state buffers to attain a controlled water chemistry is also presented as a means to test actinide-bearing systems. Buffers were used to vary the hydrogen concentration between 1 and 30 parts per million H2. Testing included UN, U3Si5, and UO2. Both UN and U3Si5 were found to rapidly pulverize in less than 50 h at 300 °C. Uranium dioxide was included as a control for the autoclave system, and was found to be minimally impacted by exposure to pressurized water at the conditions tested for extended time periods. Testing of U3Si2 at 300 °C found reasonable stability through 30 days in 1-5 ppm H2. However, pulverization was observed following 35 days. The redox condition of testing strongly affected pulverization. Characterization of the resulting microstructures suggests that the mechanism responsible for pulverization under more strongly reducing conditions differs from that previously identified. Hydride formation is hypothesized to drive this transition. Testing performed at 350 °C resulted in rapid pulverization of U3Si2 in under 50 h.

  5. Redox-controlled dinitrosyl formation at the diiron-oxo center of NorA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramm, Rainer; Strube, Katja

    2008-01-01

    In the denitrifying bacterium Ralstonia eutropha H16, the NorA protein is coproduced with the respiratory nitric oxide (NO) reductase. NorA contains a diiron-oxo center, which can form stable adducts with dioxygen and NO. In contrast to other diiron proteins, the formation of NorA-NO requires both fully reduced protein and additional electrons. A minor fraction of in vitro NorA-NO represents a paramagnetic dinitrosyl iron complex (DNIC), while the major fraction is attributed to a DNIC of the structure {Fe(NO)(2)}, which shows no electron paramagnetic resonance. The NorA-DNIC may be formed either upon direct reaction of the protein with NO or upon incubation with nitrite due to an intrinsic nitrite reduction activity of NorA that liberates NO. NorA can be purified rapidly as a six histidine-tagged derivative from overproducing cells of Escherichia coli. This chapter describes procedures for the preparation of different redox forms of NorA for the formation of NorA adducts with NO, dioxygen, and azide, as well as for the quantification of NorA-bound NO.

  6. Quantitative measurement of beryllium-controlled redox of hydrogen fluoride in molten Flibe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, Michael F.; Smolik, Galen R.; Sharpe, John P.; Anderl, Robert A.; Petti, David A.; Hatano, Yuji; Hara, Masanori; Oya, Yasuhisa; Fukada, Satoshi; Tanaka, Satoru; Terai, Takayuki; Sze, Dai-Kai

    2006-01-01

    In order to investigate the viability of using Be as a redox agent in a molten Flibe (2LiF-BeF 2 ) blanket, a series of kinetics experiments were performed in which HF was bubbled through Flibe with varying concentrations of dissolved Be. The feed gas consisted of 910-1800 ppm HF and 0.1-0.2 vol.% H 2 , with the balance comprised of He. A cylindrical rod of Be was contacted with the salt for periods of time ranging from 600 to 3600 s, resulting in mole fractions in the salt ranging from 4.3 x 10 -5 to 2.6 x 10 -4 . Initially, high HF conversion levels in excess of 90% were observed. As HF reacted with the Be, the conversion levels slowly dropped over a period of several hours to a few days. A simple kinetic model, which is first order in both HF and Be concentration has been coupled with a non-mixed reactor model to yield a good fit to the data. Application of this model indicates that Be should be suitable for keeping the TF concentration in the salt below 0.02 ppb

  7. From differences in means between cases and controls to risk stratification: a business plan for biomarker development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentzensen, Nicolas; Wacholder, Sholom

    2013-02-01

    Researchers developing biomarkers for early detection can determine the potential for clinical benefit at early stages of development. We provide the theoretical background showing the quantitative connection between biomarker levels in cases and controls and clinically meaningful risk measures, as well as a spreadsheet for researchers to use in their own research. We provide researchers with tools to decide whether a test is useful, whether it needs technical improvement, whether it may work only in specific populations, or whether any further development is futile. The methods described here apply to any method that aims to estimate risk of disease based on biomarkers, clinical tests, genetics, environment, or behavior. Many efforts go into futile biomarker development and premature clinical testing. In many instances, predictions for translational success or failure can be made early, simply based on critical analysis of case–control data. Our article presents well-established theory in a form that can be appreciated by biomarker researchers. Furthermore, we provide an interactive spreadsheet that links biomarker performance with specific disease characteristics to evaluate the promise of biomarker candidates at an early stage.

  8. Characterization of plant communities adjacent to the B-C Cribs controlled area and REDOX pond areas on the 200 area plateau

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cline, J.F.; Uresk, D.W.; Rickard, W.H.

    1975-01-01

    The plant communities at the Hanford B-C Cribs controlled area and REDOX study areas are characterized. It is concluded that they are probably very much like the communities that existed prior to 1943 when the Hanford Reservation was established. (CH)

  9. Redox Buffer Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Levie, Robert

    1999-04-01

    The proper functioning of enzymes in bodily fluids requires that the pH be maintained within rather narrow limits. The first line of defense against large pH fluctuations in such fluids is the passive control provided by the presence of pH buffers. The ability of pH buffers to stabilize the pH is indicated by the buffer value b introduced in 1922 by van Slyke. It is equally important for many enzymes that the redox potential is kept within a narrow range. In that case, stability of the potential is most readily achieved with a redox buffer. In this communication we define the redox buffer strength by analogy with acid-base buffer strength.

  10. Determining the control circuitry of redox metabolism at the genome-scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Federowicz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Determining how facultative anaerobic organisms sense and direct cellular responses to electron acceptor availability has been a subject of intense study. However, even in the model organism Escherichia coli, established mechanisms only explain a small fraction of the hundreds of genes that are regulated during electron acceptor shifts. Here we propose a qualitative model that accounts for the full breadth of regulated genes by detailing how two global transcription factors (TFs, ArcA and Fnr of E. coli, sense key metabolic redox ratios and act on a genome-wide basis to regulate anabolic, catabolic, and energy generation pathways. We first fill gaps in our knowledge of this transcriptional regulatory network by carrying out ChIP-chip and gene expression experiments to identify 463 regulatory events. We then interfaced this reconstructed regulatory network with a highly curated genome-scale metabolic model to show that ArcA and Fnr regulate >80% of total metabolic flux and 96% of differential gene expression across fermentative and nitrate respiratory conditions. Based on the data, we propose a feedforward with feedback trim regulatory scheme, given the extensive repression of catabolic genes by ArcA and extensive activation of chemiosmotic genes by Fnr. We further corroborated this regulatory scheme by showing a 0.71 r(2 (p<1e-6 correlation between changes in metabolic flux and changes in regulatory activity across fermentative and nitrate respiratory conditions. Finally, we are able to relate the proposed model to a wealth of previously generated data by contextualizing the existing transcriptional regulatory network.

  11. Fuel and combustion stratification study of Partially Premixed Combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Izadi Najafabadi, M.; Dam, N.; Somers, B.; Johansson, B.

    2016-01-01

    Relatively high levels of stratification is one of the main advantages of Partially Premixed Combustion (PPC) over the Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) concept. Fuel stratification smoothens heat release and improves controllability of this kind of combustion. However, the lack of a

  12. Hot sanitary water production with CO_2 heat pumps: Effect of control strategy on system performance and stratification inside the storage tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tammaro, M.; Mauro, A.W.; Montagud, C.; Corberán, J.M.; Mastrullo, R.

    2016-01-01

    In this work three different control strategies for the production of sanitary hot water by means of an electric heat pump working with CO_2 are investigated. The heat pump is a prototype, here modelled in the vapour-compression software package IMST-ART. By simulating this model, the performance of the heat pump is correlated to the boundary conditions and is scaled to different sizes, namely 1, 1.5, and 2 times larger than the reference system. After having chosen an application for which the load profile of sanitary hot water during the year is known, these heat pumps are simulated in a TRNSYS16 model where the production of sanitary hot water and the consumption are buffered by the presence of a tank. Key parameter in guaranteeing comfort and good performance of the system is the stratification inside the storage tank. The size of the tank necessary to keep a certain level of comfort at the user is then determined through a parametric analysis for each size of the heat pump. The energetic performance is also evaluated for each system in terms of seasonal performance factor. Then, the results obtained are compared with a different system where the heat pump is equipped with an inverter and the circulation pump follows a different control logic. The size of the tank and the seasonal performance factor are therefore determined in this case too. Moreover, a “night&day” control logic is compared to these first two options to have a baseline of comparison in terms of volume of storage needed to guarantee a same level of comfort and performance. To provide information also on the running costs, a parametric analysis was run varying the type of control, the heat pump and the tank sizes for different load profiles. The results show that the size of the heat pump has a significant effect on the comfort of the user, which usually leads to oversizing of the storage tank when the load profile is unknown. With regard to this, the results obtained for the alternative

  13. Control of a Vanadium Redox Battery and supercapacitor using a Three-Level Neutral Point Clamped converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etxeberria, A.; Vechiu, I.; Baudoin, S.; Camblong, H.; Kreckelbergh, S.

    2014-02-01

    The increasing use of distributed generators, which are mainly based on renewable sources, can create several issues in the operation of the electric grid. The microgrid is being analysed as a solution to the integration in the grid of the renewable sources at a high penetration level in a controlled way. The storage systems play a vital role in order to keep the energy and power balance of the microgrid. Due to the technical limitations of the currently available storage systems, it is necessary to use more than one storage technology to satisfy the requirements of the microgrid application. This work validates in simulations and experimentally the use of a Three-Level Neutral Point Clamped converter to control the power flow of a hybrid storage system formed by a SuperCapacitor and a Vanadium Redox Battery. The operation of the system is validated in two case studies in the experimental platform installed in ESTIA. The experimental results prove the validity of the proposed system as well as the designed control algorithm. The good agreement among experimental and simulation results also validates the simulation model, that can therefore be used to analyse the operation of the system in different case studies.

  14. Organ specific mapping of in vivo redox state in control and cigarette smoke-exposed mice using EPR/NMR co-imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caia, George L.; Efimova, Olga V.; Velayutham, Murugesan; El-Mahdy, Mohamed A.; Abdelghany, Tamer M.; Kesselring, Eric; Petryakov, Sergey; Sun, Ziqi; Samouilov, Alexandre; Zweier, Jay L.

    2014-01-01

    In vivo mapping of alterations in redox status is important for understanding organ specific pathology and disease. While electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) enables spatial mapping of free radicals, it does not provide anatomic visualization of the body. Proton MRI is well suited to provide anatomical visualization. We applied EPR/NMR co-imaging instrumentation to map and monitor the redox state of living mice under normal or oxidative stress conditions induced by secondhand cigarette smoke (SHS) exposure. A hybrid co-imaging instrument, EPRI (1.2 GHz) / proton MRI (16.18 MHz), suitable for whole-body co-imaging of mice was utilized with common magnet and gradients along with dual EPR/NMR resonators that enable co-imaging without sample movement. The metabolism of the nitroxide probe, 3–carbamoyl–proxyl (3-CP), was used to map the redox state of control and SHS-exposed mice. Co-imaging allowed precise 3D mapping of radical distribution and reduction in major organs such as the heart, lungs, liver, bladder and kidneys. Reductive metabolism was markedly decreased in SHS-exposed mice and EPR/NMR co-imaging allowed quantitative assessment of this throughout the body. Thus, in vivo EPR/NMR co-imaging enables in vivo organ specific mapping of free radical metabolism and redox stress and the alterations that occur in the pathogenesis of disease. PMID:22296801

  15. Mercury transformations in resuspended contaminated sediment controlled by redox conditions, chemical speciation and sources of organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Song, Yu; Adediran, Gbotemi A.; Jiang, Tao; Reis, Ana T.; Pereira, Eduarda; Skyllberg, Ulf; Björn, Erik

    2018-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) contaminated sediments can be significant sources of Hg in aquatic ecosystems and, through re-emission processes, to the atmosphere. Transformation and release of Hg may be enhanced by various sediment perturbation processes, and controlling biogeochemical factors largely remain unclear. We investigated how rates of Hg transformations in pulp-fiber enriched sediment contaminated by Hg from chlor-alkali industry were controlled by (i) transient redox-changes in sulfur and iron chemistry, (ii) the chemical speciation and solubility of Hg, and (iii) the sources and characteristics of organic matter (OM). Sediment-bottom water microcosm systems were exposed to four combinations of air and nitrogen gas for a total time of 24 h. The treatments were: 24 h N2, 0.5 h air + 23.5 h N2, 4 h air + 20 h N2 and 24 h of air exposure. As a result of these treatments, microcosms spanned a wide range of redox potential, as reflected by the dissolved sulfide concentration range of ≤0.3-97 μM. Four different chemical species of inorganic divalent Hg (HgII) and methyl mercury (MeHg), enriched in different Hg isotope tracers, were added to the microcosms: 201Hg(NO3)2(aq), 202HgII adsorbed to OM (202HgII-OM(ads)), 198HgII as microcrystalline metacinnabar (β-198HgS(s)) and Me204HgCl(aq). Microcosm systems were composed of bottom water mixed with sediment taken at 0-2, 0-5 and 0-10 cm depth intervals. The composition of OM varied with sediment depth such that compared to deeper sediment, the 0-2 cm depth-interval had a 2-fold higher contribution of labile OM originating from algal and terrestrial inputs, serving as metabolic electron-donors for microorganisms. The potential methylation rate constant (kmeth) of Hg tracers and net formation of ambient MeHg (MeHg/THg molar ratio) increased up to 50% and 400%, respectively at intermediate oxidative conditions, likely because of an observed 2-fold increase in sulfate concentration stimulating the activity of sulfate reducing

  16. Talent Complementarity and Organizational Stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamson, Mark

    1973-01-01

    Stratification within organizations as produced by the distribution of functional importance among positions is investigated. According to Stinchcombe's hypothesis from the functional theory of stratification, the rewards given to various positions are expected to be less equal when talent is complementary rather than additive. Actual differences…

  17. One-pot synthesis of redox-responsive polymers-coated mesoporous silica nanoparticles and their controlled drug release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiao-Tong; Piao, Ji-Gang; Wang, Long-Hai; Javed, Mohsin; Hong, Chun-Yan; Pan, Cai-Yuan

    2013-09-01

    A versatile one-pot strategy for the preparation of reversibly cross-linked polymer-coated mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) via surface reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization is presented for the first time in this paper. The less reactive monomer oligo(ethylene glycol) acrylate (OEGA) and the more reactive cross-linker N,N'-cystaminebismethacrylamide (CBMA) are chosen to be copolymerized on the external surfaces of RAFT agent-functionalized MSNs to form the cross-linked polymer shells. Owing to the reversible cleavage and restoration of disulfide bonds via reduction/oxidation reactions, the polymer shells can control the on/off switching of the nanopores and regulate the drug loading and release. The redox-responsive release of doxorubicin (DOX) from this drug carrier is realized. The protein adsorption, in vitro cytotoxicity assays, and endocytosis studies demonstrate that this biocompatible vehicle is a potential candidate for delivering drugs. It is expected that this versatile grafting strategy may help fabricate satisfying MSN-based drug delivery systems for clinical application. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Pyrene Molecular Orbital Shuffle-Controlling Excited State and Redox Properties by Changing the Nature of the Frontier Orbitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merz, Julia; Fink, Julian; Friedrich, Alexandra; Krummenacher, Ivo; Al Mamari, Hamad H; Lorenzen, Sabine; Haehnel, Martin; Eichhorn, Antonius; Moos, Michael; Holzapfel, Marco; Braunschweig, Holger; Lambert, Christoph; Steffen, Andreas; Ji, Lei; Marder, Todd B

    2017-09-21

    We show that by judicious choice of substituents at the 2- and 7-positions of pyrene, the frontier orbital order of pyrene can be modified, giving enhanced control over the nature and properties of the photoexcited states and the redox potentials. Specifically, we introduced a julolidine-like moiety and Bmes 2 (mes=2,4,6-Me 3 C 6 H 2 ) as very strong donor (D) and acceptor (A), respectively, giving 2,7-D-π-D- and unsymmetric 2,7-D-π-A-pyrene derivatives, in which the donor destabilizes the HOMO-1 and the acceptor stabilizes the LUMO+1 of the pyrene core. Consequently, for 2,7-substituted pyrene derivatives, unusual properties are obtained. For example, very large bathochromic shifts were observed for all of our compounds, and unprecedented green light emission occurs for the D/D system. In addition, very high radiative rate constants in solution and in the solid state were recorded for the D-π-D- and D-π-A-substituted compounds. All compounds show reversible one-electron oxidations, and Jul 2 Pyr exhibits a second oxidation, with the largest potential splitting (ΔE=440 mV) thus far reported for 2,7-substituted pyrenes. Spectroelectrochemical measurements confirm an unexpectedly strong coupling between the 2,7-substituents in our pyrene derivatives. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Single-crystalline ceria nanocubes: size-controlled synthesis, characterization and redox property

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Zhiqiang; Zhou Kebin; Liu Xiangwen; Tian Qun; Lu Deyi; Yang Sen

    2007-01-01

    Single-crystalline CeO 2 nanocubes were synthesized through a hydrothermal treatment. By varying reaction temperature and the NaOH concentration, the size control of CeO 2 nanocubes has been achieved, which produces the nanocubes with a controllable edge length in the regime of 20-360 nm. HRTEM studies reveal that the CeO 2 nanocubes expose their high energy {001} planes. Consequently, it is demonstrated that the CeO 2 nanocubes exhibit excellent reducibility and high oxygen storage capacity, indicating they are potential novel catalytic materials

  20. The 1995 Georges Bank Stratification Study and Moored Array Measurements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alessi, C

    2001-01-01

    .... GLOBEC Northwest Atlantic/Georges Bank field program. The GBSS was designed to investigate the physical processes which control the seasonal development of stratification along the southern flank of Georges Bank during spring and summer...

  1. Redox control of rotary motions in ferrocene-based elemental ball bearings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iordache, Adriana; Oltean, Mircea; Milet, Anne; Thomas, Fabrice; Baptiste, Benoît; Saint-Aman, Eric; Bucher, Christophe

    2012-02-08

    Rotational motions of ferrocene-based carousels have been achieved by electron transfer centered on π-dimerizable 4,4'-bipyridinium substituents introduced on both cyclopentadienyl rings through covalent linkers of different size, geometry, and flexibility. Detailed spectroscopic, electrochemical, and theoretical analyses demonstrate that rigid and fully conjugated linkers allow the quantitative formation of intramolecular π-dimers resulting from optimized orbital overlaps within the HOMO of the electrochemically generated bis-radical species. The tetra-cationic "charge-repelled" conformers, the self-assembled π-dimers, and their electron triggered interconversions have been investigated by UV-vis, NMR, and ESR spectroscopy, electrochemistry, X-ray diffraction analysis, and theoretical calculations. These studies support the conclusion that the rotation of both cyclopentadienyl rings in ferrocene can be controlled electrochemically using noncovalent reversible interactions arising from π-radical coupling processes.

  2. Molecular basis for the redox control of nuclear transport of the structural chromatin protein Hmgb1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoppe, George; Talcott, Katherine E.; Bhattacharya, Sanjoy K.; Crabb, John W.; Sears, Jonathan E.

    2006-01-01

    Oxidative stress can induce a covalent disulfide bond between protein and peptide thiols that is reversible through enzymatic catalysis. This process provides a post-translational mechanism for control of protein function and may also protect thiol groups from irreversible oxidation. High mobility group protein B1 (Hmgb1), a DNA-binding structural chromosomal protein and transcriptional co-activator was identified as a substrate of glutaredoxin. Hmgb1 contains 3 cysteines, Cys23, 45, and 106. In mild oxidative conditions, Cys23 and Cys45 readily form an intramolecular disulfide bridge, whereas Cys106 remains in the reduced form. The disulfide bond between Cys23 and Cys45 is a target of glutathione-dependent reduction by glutaredoxin. Endogenous Hmgb1 as well as GFP-tagged wild-type Hmgb1 co-localize in the nucleus of CHO cells. While replacement of Hmgb1 Cys23 and/or 45 with serines did not affect the nuclear distribution of the mutant proteins, Cys106-to-Ser and triple cysteine mutations impaired nuclear localization of Hmgb1. Our cysteine targeted mutational analysis suggests that Cys23 and 45 induce conformational changes in response to oxidative stress, whereas Cys106 appears to be critical for the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of Hmgb1

  3. Electrochemical gate-controlled electron transport of redox-active single perylene bisimide molecular junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, C; Mishchenko, A; Li, Z; Pobelov, I; Wandlowski, Th; Li, X Q; Wuerthner, F; Bagrets, A; Evers, F

    2008-01-01

    We report a scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiment in an electrochemical environment which studies a prototype molecular switch. The target molecules were perylene tetracarboxylic acid bisimides modified with pyridine (P-PBI) and methylthiol (T-PBI) linker groups and with bulky tert-butyl-phenoxy substituents in the bay area. At a fixed bias voltage, we can control the transport current through a symmetric molecular wire Au|P-PBI(T-PBI)|Au by variation of the electrochemical 'gate' potential. The current increases by up to two orders of magnitude. The conductances of the P-PBI junctions are typically a factor 3 larger than those of T-PBI. A theoretical analysis explains this effect as a consequence of shifting the lowest unoccupied perylene level (LUMO) in or out of the bias window when tuning the electrochemical gate potential VG. The difference in on/off ratios reflects the variation of hybridization of the LUMO with the electrode states with the anchor groups. I T -E S(T) curves of asymmetric molecular junctions formed between a bare Au STM tip and a T-PBI (P-PBI) modified Au(111) electrode in an aqueous electrolyte exhibit a pronounced maximum in the tunneling current at -0.740, which is close to the formal potential of the surface-confined molecules. The experimental data were explained by a sequential two-step electron transfer process

  4. Redox regulation of plant development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Considine, Michael J; Foyer, Christine H

    2014-09-20

    We provide a conceptual framework for the interactions between the cellular redox signaling hub and the phytohormone signaling network that controls plant growth and development to maximize plant productivity under stress-free situations, while limiting growth and altering development on exposure to stress. Enhanced cellular oxidation plays a key role in the regulation of plant growth and stress responses. Oxidative signals or cycles of oxidation and reduction are crucial for the alleviation of dormancy and quiescence, activating the cell cycle and triggering genetic and epigenetic control that underpin growth and differentiation responses to changing environmental conditions. The redox signaling hub interfaces directly with the phytohormone network in the synergistic control of growth and its modulation in response to environmental stress, but a few components have been identified. Accumulating evidence points to a complex interplay of phytohormone and redox controls that operate at multiple levels. For simplicity, we focus here on redox-dependent processes that control root growth and development and bud burst. The multiple roles of reactive oxygen species in the control of plant growth and development have been identified, but increasing emphasis should now be placed on the functions of redox-regulated proteins, along with the central roles of reductants such as NAD(P)H, thioredoxins, glutathione, glutaredoxins, peroxiredoxins, ascorbate, and reduced ferredoxin in the regulation of the genetic and epigenetic factors that modulate the growth and vigor of crop plants, particularly within an agricultural context.

  5. Redox control of capillary filling speed in poly(ferrocenylsilane)-modified microfluidic channels for switchable delay valves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dos Ramos, Lionel; Lajoinie, Guillaume Pierre Rene; Kieviet, B.D.; de Beer, Sissi; Versluis, Michel; Hempenius, Mark A.; Vancso, Gyula J.

    2016-01-01

    We present a method to reversibly change the wetting of gold-coated microchannel walls, and, as a result, alter the capillary filling speed of water inside such modified microchannels. To this end, we employ the redox-response of surface-anchored poly(ferrocenylsilane) (PFS) films, which allows for

  6. Temperature Stratification in a Cryogenic Fuel Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daigle, Matthew John; Smelyanskiy, Vadim; Boschee, Jacob; Foygel, Michael Gregory

    2013-01-01

    A reduced dynamical model describing temperature stratification effects driven by natural convection in a liquid hydrogen cryogenic fuel tank has been developed. It accounts for cryogenic propellant loading, storage, and unloading in the conditions of normal, increased, and micro- gravity. The model involves multiple horizontal control volumes in both liquid and ullage spaces. Temperature and velocity boundary layers at the tank walls are taken into account by using correlation relations. Heat exchange involving the tank wall is considered by means of the lumped-parameter method. By employing basic conservation laws, the model takes into consideration the major multi-phase mass and energy exchange processes involved, such as condensation-evaporation of the hydrogen, as well as flows of hydrogen liquid and vapor in the presence of pressurizing helium gas. The model involves a liquid hydrogen feed line and a tank ullage vent valve for pressure control. The temperature stratification effects are investigated, including in the presence of vent valve oscillations. A simulation of temperature stratification effects in a generic cryogenic tank has been implemented in Matlab and results are presented for various tank conditions.

  7. Redox-controlled carbon and phosphorus burial: A mechanism for enhanced organic carbon sequestration during the PETM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komar, Nemanja; Zeebe, Richard E.

    2017-12-01

    Geological records reveal a major perturbation in carbon cycling during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM, ∼56 Ma), marked by global warming of more than 5 °C and a prominent negative carbon isotope excursion of at least 2.5‰ within the marine realm. The entire event lasted about 200,000 yr and was associated with a massive release of light carbon into the ocean-atmosphere system over several thousands of years. Here we focus on the terminal stage of the PETM, during which the ocean-atmosphere system rapidly recovered from the carbon cycle perturbation. We employ a carbon-cycle box model to examine the feedbacks between surface ocean biological production, carbon, oxygen, phosphorus, and carbonate chemistry during massive CO2 release events, such as the PETM. The model results indicate that the redox-controlled carbon-phosphorus feedback is capable of producing enhanced organic carbon sequestration during large carbon emission events. The locale of carbon oxidation (ocean vs. atmosphere) does not affect the amount of carbon sequestered. However, even though the model produces trends consistent with oxygen, excess accumulation rates of organic carbon (∼1700 Pg C during the recovery stage), export production and δ13 C data, it fails to reproduce the magnitude of change of sediment carbonate content and the CCD over-deepening during the recovery stage. The CCD and sediment carbonate content overshoot during the recovery stage is muted by a predicted increase in CaCO3 rain. Nonetheless, there are indications that the CaCO3 export remained relatively constant during the PETM. If this was indeed true, then an initial pulse of 3,000 Pg C followed by an additional, slow leak of 2,500 Pg C could have triggered an accelerated nutrient supply to the surface ocean instigating enhanced organic carbon export, consequently increasing organic carbon sequestration, resulting in an accelerated restoration of ocean-atmosphere biogeochemistry during the termination

  8. Redox Pioneer: Professor Vadim N. Gladyshev.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, Dolph L

    2016-07-01

    Professor Vadim N. Gladyshev is recognized here as a Redox Pioneer, because he has published an article on antioxidant/redox biology that has been cited more than 1000 times and 29 articles that have been cited more than 100 times. Gladyshev is world renowned for his characterization of the human selenoproteome encoded by 25 genes, identification of the majority of known selenoprotein genes in the three domains of life, and discoveries related to thiol oxidoreductases and mechanisms of redox control. Gladyshev's first faculty position was in the Department of Biochemistry, the University of Nebraska. There, he was a Charles Bessey Professor and Director of the Redox Biology Center. He then moved to the Department of Medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, where he is Professor of Medicine and Director of the Center for Redox Medicine. His discoveries in redox biology relate to selenoenzymes, such as methionine sulfoxide reductases and thioredoxin reductases, and various thiol oxidoreductases. He is responsible for the genome-wide identification of catalytic redox-active cysteines and for advancing our understanding of the general use of cysteines by proteins. In addition, Gladyshev has characterized hydrogen peroxide metabolism and signaling and regulation of protein function by methionine-R-sulfoxidation. He has also made important contributions in the areas of aging and lifespan control and pioneered applications of comparative genomics in redox biology, selenium biology, and aging. Gladyshev's discoveries have had a profound impact on redox biology and the role of redox control in health and disease. He is a true Redox Pioneer. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 1-9.

  9. Thermal stratification in the pressurizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baik, S.J.; Lee, K.W.; Ro, T.S.

    2001-01-01

    The thermal stratification in the pressurizer due to the insurge from the hot leg to the pressurizer has been studied. The insurge flow of the cold water into the pressurizer takes place during the heatup/cooldown and the normal or abnormal transients during power operation. The pressurizer vessel can undergo significant thermal fatigue usage caused by insurges and outsurges. Two-dimensional axisymmetric transient analysis for the thermal stratification in the pressurizer is performed using the computational fluid dynamics code, FLUENT, to get the velocity and temperature distribution. Parametric study has been carried out to investigate the effect of the inlet velocity and the temperature difference between the hot leg and the pressurizer on the thermal stratification. The results show that the insurge flow of cold water into the pressurizer does not mix well with hot water, and the cold water remains only in the lower portion of the pressurizer, which leads to the thermal stratification in the pressurizer. The thermal load on the pressurizer due to the thermal stratification or the cyclic thermal transient should be examined with respect to the mechanical integrity and this study can serve the design data for the stress analysis. (authors)

  10. BAYESIAN BICLUSTERING FOR PATIENT STRATIFICATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakabimamaghani, Sahand; Ester, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The move from Empirical Medicine towards Personalized Medicine has attracted attention to Stratified Medicine (SM). Some methods are provided in the literature for patient stratification, which is the central task of SM, however, there are still significant open issues. First, it is still unclear if integrating different datatypes will help in detecting disease subtypes more accurately, and, if not, which datatype(s) are most useful for this task. Second, it is not clear how we can compare different methods of patient stratification. Third, as most of the proposed stratification methods are deterministic, there is a need for investigating the potential benefits of applying probabilistic methods. To address these issues, we introduce a novel integrative Bayesian biclustering method, called B2PS, for patient stratification and propose methods for evaluating the results. Our experimental results demonstrate the superiority of B2PS over a popular state-of-the-art method and the benefits of Bayesian approaches. Our results agree with the intuition that transcriptomic data forms a better basis for patient stratification than genomic data.

  11. TEMPO/viologen electrochemical heterojunction for diffusion-controlled redox mediation: a highly rectifying bilayer-sandwiched device based on cross-reaction at the interface between dissimilar redox polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokue, Hiroshi; Oyaizu, Kenichi; Sukegawa, Takashi; Nishide, Hiroyuki

    2014-03-26

    A couple of totally reversible redox-active molecules, which are different in redox potentials, 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-oxyl (TEMPO) and viologen (V(2+)), were employed to give rise to a rectified redox conduction effect. Single-layer and bilayer devices were fabricated using polymers containing these sites as pendant groups per repeating unit. The devices were obtained by sandwiching the redox polymer layer(s) with indium tin oxide (ITO)/glass and Pt foil electrodes. Electrochemical measurements of the single-layer device composed of polynorbornene-bearing TEMPO (PTNB) exhibited a diffusion-limited current-voltage response based on the TEMPO(+)/TEMPO exchange reaction, which was almost equivalent to a redox gradient through the PTNB layer depending upon the thickness. The bilayer device gave rise to the current rectification because of the thermodynamically favored cross-reaction between TEMPO(+) and V(+) at the polymer/polymer interface. A current-voltage response obtained for the bilayer device demonstrated a two-step diffusion-limited current behavior as a result of the concurrent V(2+)/V(+) and V(+)/V(0) exchange reactions according to the voltage and suggested that the charge transport process through the device was most likely to be rate-determined by a redox gradient in the polymer layer. Current collection experiments revealed a charge transport balance throughout the device, as a result of the electrochemical stability and robustness of the polymers in both redox states.

  12. Biogeochemical Barriers: Redox Behavior of Metals and Metalloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redox conditions and pH are arguably the most important geochemical parameters that control contaminant transport and fate in groundwater systems. Oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions mediate the chemical behavior of both inorganic and organic chemical constituents by affecting...

  13. Nitrogen Starvation Acclimation in Synechococcus elongatus: Redox-Control and the Role of Nitrate Reduction as an Electron Sink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Klotz

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen starvation acclimation in non-diazotrophic cyanobacteria is characterized by a process termed chlorosis, where the light harvesting pigments are degraded and the cells gradually tune down photosynthetic and metabolic activities. The chlorosis response is governed by a complex and poorly understood regulatory network, which converges at the expression of the nblA gene, the triggering factor for phycobiliprotein degradation. This study established a method that allows uncoupling metabolic and redox-signals involved in nitrogen-starvation acclimation. Inhibition of glutamine synthetase (GS by a precise dosage of l-methionine-sulfoximine (MSX mimics the metabolic situation of nitrogen starvation. Addition of nitrate to such MSX-inhibited cells eliminates the associated redox-stress by enabling electron flow towards nitrate/nitrite reduction and thereby, prevents the induction of nblA expression and the associated chlorosis response. This study demonstrates that nitrogen starvation is perceived not only through metabolic signals, but requires a redox signal indicating over-reduction of PSI-reduced electron acceptors. It further establishes a cryptic role of nitrate/nitrite reductases as electron sinks to balance conditions of over-reduction.

  14. Nitrogen Starvation Acclimation in Synechococcus elongatus: Redox-Control and the Role of Nitrate Reduction as an Electron Sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klotz, Alexander; Reinhold, Edgar; Doello, Sofía; Forchhammer, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen starvation acclimation in non-diazotrophic cyanobacteria is characterized by a process termed chlorosis, where the light harvesting pigments are degraded and the cells gradually tune down photosynthetic and metabolic activities. The chlorosis response is governed by a complex and poorly understood regulatory network, which converges at the expression of the nblA gene, the triggering factor for phycobiliprotein degradation. This study established a method that allows uncoupling metabolic and redox-signals involved in nitrogen-starvation acclimation. Inhibition of glutamine synthetase (GS) by a precise dosage of l-methionine-sulfoximine (MSX) mimics the metabolic situation of nitrogen starvation. Addition of nitrate to such MSX-inhibited cells eliminates the associated redox-stress by enabling electron flow towards nitrate/nitrite reduction and thereby, prevents the induction of nblA expression and the associated chlorosis response. This study demonstrates that nitrogen starvation is perceived not only through metabolic signals, but requires a redox signal indicating over-reduction of PSI-reduced electron acceptors. It further establishes a cryptic role of nitrate/nitrite reductases as electron sinks to balance conditions of over-reduction. PMID:25780959

  15. Changing redox potential by controlling soil moisture and addition of inorganic oxidants to dissipate pentachlorophenol in different soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Jiajiang; He Yan; Xu Jianming

    2012-01-01

    The potential for dissipation of pentachlorophenol (PCP) was investigated in soils from four different sites in China. These were an umbraqualf (Soil 1), a Plinthudult (Soil 2), a Haplustalf (Soil 3) and an Argiustoll (Soil 4) which were either flooded, to produce anaerobic conditions, or incubated aerobically at 60% water-holding capacity (WHC). The dissipation of PCP in Soil 1 at 60% WHC was higher than under flooded condition, while the opposite occurred in the other three soils. Under flooded conditions, the redox potential decreased significantly in Soil 1 and Soil 4, where sulphate reduction was occurred and the dissipation of PCP was statistically significant (about 96% and 98%, respectively) at the end of incubation. After addition of inorganic oxidants, dissipation of PCP was significantly inhibited by FeCl 3 , while Na 2 SO 4 and NaNO 3 had different effects, depending upon the soil type. - Highlights: ► The extent of the aerobic/anaerobic interface depends upon the soil properties. ► The dissipation of PCP was accelerated in some soils due to the soil-water interface. ► The addition of oxidants inhibited the decrease in soil redox potential. ► Most external oxidants added under flooded condition inhibited PCP dechlorination. - The addition of inorganic oxidants limited the decrease in redox potential and inhibited the reductive dechlorination of pentachlorophenol.

  16. Design of a Novel Voltage Controller for Conversion of Carbon Dioxide into Clean Fuels Using the Integration of a Vanadium Redox Battery with Solar Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Chia Ou

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This letter presents a design for a novel voltage controller (NVC which can exhibit three different reactions using the integration of a vanadium redox battery (VRB with solar energy, and uses only electrochemical potentials with optimal external bias voltage control to carry out hydrogen production and the conversion of carbon dioxide (CO2 into methane and methanol. This NVC is simply constructed by using dynamic switch and control strategies with a time-variant control system. In this design, the interval voltage bias solutions obtained by the proposed NVC exhibit better voltage ranges and good agreement with the practical scenarios, which will bring significant benefits to operation for continuous reduction of CO2 into value-added clean fuels using the integration of a VRB with solar energy or any other renewable energy resource for future applications.

  17. The Redox Code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Dean P; Sies, Helmut

    2015-09-20

    The redox code is a set of principles that defines the positioning of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD, NADP) and thiol/disulfide and other redox systems as well as the thiol redox proteome in space and time in biological systems. The code is richly elaborated in an oxygen-dependent life, where activation/deactivation cycles involving O₂ and H₂O₂ contribute to spatiotemporal organization for differentiation, development, and adaptation to the environment. Disruption of this organizational structure during oxidative stress represents a fundamental mechanism in system failure and disease. Methodology in assessing components of the redox code under physiological conditions has progressed, permitting insight into spatiotemporal organization and allowing for identification of redox partners in redox proteomics and redox metabolomics. Complexity of redox networks and redox regulation is being revealed step by step, yet much still needs to be learned. Detailed knowledge of the molecular patterns generated from the principles of the redox code under defined physiological or pathological conditions in cells and organs will contribute to understanding the redox component in health and disease. Ultimately, there will be a scientific basis to a modern redox medicine.

  18. Redox Couples with Unequal Diffusion Coefficients: Effect on Redox Cycling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mampallil Augustine, Dileep; Mathwig, Klaus; Kang, Shuo; Lemay, Serge Joseph Guy

    2013-01-01

    Redox cycling between two electrodes separated by a narrow gap allows dramatic amplification of the faradaic current. Unlike conventional electrochemistry at a single electrode, however, the mass-transport-limited current is controlled by the diffusion coefficient of both the reduced and oxidized

  19. Effectiveness of an annular closure device in a "real-world" population: stratification of registry data using screening criteria from a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuršumović, Adisa; Rath, Stefan A

    2018-01-01

    Increased focus has been put on the use of "'real-world" data to support randomized clinical trial (RCT) evidence for clinical decision-making. The objective of this study was to assess the performance of an annular closure device (ACD) after stratifying a consecutive series of "real-world" patients by the screening criteria of an ongoing RCT. This was a single-center registry analysis of 164 subjects who underwent limited discectomy combined with ACD for symptomatic lumbar disc herniation. Patients were stratified into two groups using the selection criteria of a pivotal RCT on the same device: Trial (met inclusion; n=44) or non-Trial (did not meet inclusion; n=120). Patient-reported outcomes, including Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and visual analog scale (VAS) for leg and back pain, and adverse events were collected from baseline to last follow-up (mean: Trial - 15.6 months; non-Trial - 14.6 months). Statistical analyses were performed with significance set at p population. Stratification of this "real-world" series on the basis of RCT screening criteria did not result in significant between-group differences. These findings suggest that the efficacy of the ACD extends beyond the strictly defined patient population being studied in the RCT of this device. Furthermore, reducing the reherniation rate following lumbar discectomy has positive clinical and economic implications.

  20. Multilayer fabric stratification pipes for solar tanks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Elsa; Furbo, Simon; Fan, Jianhua

    2007-01-01

    The thermal performance of solar heating systems is strongly influenced by the thermal stratification in the heat storage. The higher the degree of thermal stratification is, the higher the thermal performance of the solar heating systems. Thermal stratification in water storages can for instance...

  1. Combustion stratification study of partially premixed combustion using Fourier transform analysis of OH* chemiluminescence images

    KAUST Repository

    Izadi Najafabadi, Mohammad

    2017-11-06

    A relatively high level of stratification (qualitatively: lack of homogeneity) is one of the main advantages of partially premixed combustion over the homogeneous charge compression ignition concept. Stratification can smooth the heat release rate and improve the controllability of combustion. In order to compare stratification levels of different partially premixed combustion strategies or other combustion concepts, an objective and meaningful definition of “stratification level” is required. Such a definition is currently lacking; qualitative/quantitative definitions in the literature cannot properly distinguish various levels of stratification. The main purpose of this study is to objectively define combustion stratification (not to be confused with fuel stratification) based on high-speed OH* chemiluminescence imaging, which is assumed to provide spatial information regarding heat release. Stratification essentially being equivalent to spatial structure, we base our definition on two-dimensional Fourier transforms of photographs of OH* chemiluminescence. A light-duty optical diesel engine has been used to perform the OH* bandpass imaging on. Four experimental points are evaluated, with injection timings in the homogeneous regime as well as in the stratified partially premixed combustion regime. Two-dimensional Fourier transforms translate these chemiluminescence images into a range of spatial frequencies. The frequency information is used to define combustion stratification, using a novel normalization procedure. The results indicate that this new definition, based on Fourier analysis of OH* bandpass images, overcomes the drawbacks of previous definitions used in the literature and is a promising method to compare the level of combustion stratification between different experiments.

  2. Fluorescent carbon dot-gated multifunctional mesoporous silica nanocarriers for redox/enzyme dual-responsive targeted and controlled drug delivery and real-time bioimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Cui, Yu; Zhao, Yating; He, Bing; Shi, Xiaoli; Di, Donghua; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Siling

    2017-08-01

    A distinctive and personalized nanocarrier is described here for controlled and targeted antitumor drug delivery and real-time bioimaging by combining a redox/enzyme dual-responsive disulfide-conjugated carbon dot with mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN-SS-CD HA ). The carbon dot with controlling and targeting abilities was prepared through a polymerizing reaction by applying citric acid and HA as starting materials (named CD HA ). The as-prepared MSN-SS-CD HA exhibited not only superior photostability and excellent biocompatibility, but also the ability to target A549 cells with overexpression of CD44 receptors. Upon loading the antitumor drug, doxorubicin (DOX), into the mesoporous channels of MSN nanoparticles, CD HA with a diameter size of 3nm completely blocked the pore entrance of DOX-encapsulated MSN nanoparticles with a pore size of about 3nm, thus preventing the premature leakage of DOX and increasing the antitumor activity until being triggered by specific stimuli in the tumor environment. The results of the cell imaging and cytotoxicity studies demonstrated that the redox/enzyme dual-responsive DOX-encapsulated MSN-SS-CD HA nanoparticles can selectively deliver and control the release of DOX into tumor cells. Ex vivo fluorescence images showed a much stronger fluorescence of MSN-SS-CD HA -DOX in the tumor site than in normal tissues, greatly facilitating the accumulation of DOX in the target tissue. However, its counterpart, MSN-SH-DOX exhibited no or much lower tumor cytotoxicity and drug accumulation in tumor tissue. In addition, MSN-SS-CD was also used as a control to investigate the ability of MSN-SS-CD HA to target A549 cells. The results obtained indicated that MSN-SS-CD HA possessed a higher cellular uptake through the CD44 receptor-mediated endocytosis compared with MSN-SS-CD in the A549 cells. Such specific redox/enzyme dual-responsive targeted nanocarriers are a useful strategy achieving selective controlled and targeted delivery of

  3. European environmental stratifications and typologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hazeu, G.W,; Metzger, M.J.; Mücher, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    their limitations and challenges. As such, they provide a sound basis for describing the factors affecting the robustness of such datasets. The latter is especially relevant, since there is likely to be further interest in European environmental assessment. In addition, advances in data availability and analysis......A range of new spatial datasets classifying the European environment has been constructed over the last few years. These datasets share the common objective of dividing European environmental gradients into convenient units, within which objects and variables of interest have relatively homogeneous...... scale. This paper provides an overview of five recent European stratifications and typologies, constructed for contrasting objectives, and differing in spatial and thematic detail. These datasets are: the Environmental Stratification (EnS), the European Landscape Classification (LANMAP), the Spatial...

  4. Factors controlling the redox potential of ZnCe6 in an engineered bacterioferritin photochemical 'reaction centre'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahboob, Abdullah; Vassiliev, Serguei; Poddutoori, Prashanth K; van der Est, Art; Bruce, Doug

    2013-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) of photosynthesis has the unique ability to photochemically oxidize water. Recently an engineered bacterioferritin photochemical 'reaction centre' (BFR-RC) using a zinc chlorin pigment (ZnCe6) in place of its native heme has been shown to photo-oxidize bound manganese ions through a tyrosine residue, thus mimicking two of the key reactions on the electron donor side of PSII. To understand the mechanism of tyrosine oxidation in BFR-RCs, and explore the possibility of water oxidation in such a system we have built an atomic-level model of the BFR-RC using ONIOM methodology. We studied the influence of axial ligands and carboxyl groups on the oxidation potential of ZnCe6 using DFT theory, and finally calculated the shift of the redox potential of ZnCe6 in the BFR-RC protein using the multi-conformational molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann approach. According to our calculations, the redox potential for the first oxidation of ZnCe6 in the BRF-RC protein is only 0.57 V, too low to oxidize tyrosine. We suggest that the observed tyrosine oxidation in BRF-RC could be driven by the ZnCe6 di-cation. In order to increase the efficiency of tyrosine oxidation, and ultimately oxidize water, the first potential of ZnCe6 would have to attain a value in excess of 0.8 V. We discuss the possibilities for modifying the BFR-RC to achieve this goal.

  5. Cancer Stratification by Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justus Weber

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The lack of specificity of traditional cytotoxic drugs has triggered the development of anticancer agents that selectively address specific molecular targets. An intrinsic property of these specialized drugs is their limited applicability for specific patient subgroups. Consequently, the generation of information about tumor characteristics is the key to exploit the potential of these drugs. Currently, cancer stratification relies on three approaches: Gene expression analysis and cancer proteomics, immunohistochemistry and molecular imaging. In order to enable the precise localization of functionally expressed targets, molecular imaging combines highly selective biomarkers and intense signal sources. Thus, cancer stratification and localization are performed simultaneously. Many cancer types are characterized by altered receptor expression, such as somatostatin receptors, folate receptors or Her2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2. Similar correlations are also known for a multitude of transporters, such as glucose transporters, amino acid transporters or hNIS (human sodium iodide symporter, as well as cell specific proteins, such as the prostate specific membrane antigen, integrins, and CD20. This review provides a comprehensive description of the methods, targets and agents used in molecular imaging, to outline their application for cancer stratification. Emphasis is placed on radiotracers which are used to identify altered expression patterns of cancer associated markers.

  6. Principal stratification in causal inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frangakis, Constantine E; Rubin, Donald B

    2002-03-01

    Many scientific problems require that treatment comparisons be adjusted for posttreatment variables, but the estimands underlying standard methods are not causal effects. To address this deficiency, we propose a general framework for comparing treatments adjusting for posttreatment variables that yields principal effects based on principal stratification. Principal stratification with respect to a posttreatment variable is a cross-classification of subjects defined by the joint potential values of that posttreatment variable tinder each of the treatments being compared. Principal effects are causal effects within a principal stratum. The key property of principal strata is that they are not affected by treatment assignment and therefore can be used just as any pretreatment covariate. such as age category. As a result, the central property of our principal effects is that they are always causal effects and do not suffer from the complications of standard posttreatment-adjusted estimands. We discuss briefly that such principal causal effects are the link between three recent applications with adjustment for posttreatment variables: (i) treatment noncompliance, (ii) missing outcomes (dropout) following treatment noncompliance. and (iii) censoring by death. We then attack the problem of surrogate or biomarker endpoints, where we show, using principal causal effects, that all current definitions of surrogacy, even when perfectly true, do not generally have the desired interpretation as causal effects of treatment on outcome. We go on to forrmulate estimands based on principal stratification and principal causal effects and show their superiority.

  7. Efficient Self-Assembly of mPEG End-Capped Porous Silica as a Redox-Sensitive Nanocarrier for Controlled Doxorubicin Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anh Khoa Nguyen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Porous nanosilica (PNS has been regarded as a promising candidate for controlled delivery of anticancer drugs. Unmodified PNS-based nanocarriers, however, showed a burst release of encapsulated drugs, which may limit their clinical uses. In this report, PNS was surface conjugated with adamantylamine (ADA via disulfide bridges (-SS-, PNS-SS-ADA, which was further modified with cyclodextrin-poly(ethylene glycol methyl ether conjugate (CD-mPEG to form a core@shell structure PNS-SS-ADA@CD-mPEG for redox triggered delivery of doxorubicin (DOX, DOX/PNS-SS-ADA@CD-mPEG. The prepared PNS-SS-ADA@CD-mPEG nanoparticles were spherical in shape with an average diameter of 55.5 ± 3.05 nm, a little larger than their parentally PNS nanocarriers, at 49.6 ± 2.56 nm. In addition, these nanoparticles possessed high drug loading capacity, at 79.2 ± 3.2%, for controlled release. The release of DOX from DOX/PNS-SS-ADA@CD-mPEG nanoparticles was controlled and prolonged up to 120 h in PBS medium (pH 7.4, compared to less than 40 h under reducing condition of 5 mM DTT. Notably, the PNS-SS-ADA@CD-mPEG was a biocompatible nanocarrier, and the toxicity of DOX was dramatically reduced after loading drugs into the porous core. This redox-sensitive PNS-SS-ADA@CD-mPEG nanoparticle could be considered a potential candidate with high drug loading capacity and a lower risk of systemic toxicity.

  8. Haplotype-based case-control study on human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/redox effector factor-1 gene and essential hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naganuma, Takahiro; Nakayama, Tomohiro; Sato, Naoyuki; Fu, Zhenyan; Soma, Masayoshi; Yamaguchi, Mai; Shimodaira, Masanori; Aoi, Noriko; Usami, Ron

    2010-02-01

    Oxidative DNA damage is involved in the pathophysiology of essential hypertension (EH), which is a multifactorial disorder. Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/redox effector factor-1 (APE1/REF-1) is an essential endonuclease in the base excision repair pathway of oxidatively damaged DNA, in addition to having reducing properties that promote the binding of redox-sensitive transcription factors. Blood pressure in APE1/REF-1-knockout mice is reported to be significantly higher than in wild-type mice. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between EH and the human APE1/REF-1 gene through a haplotype-based case-control study using single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We selected five SNPs in the human APE1/REF-1 gene (rs1760944, rs3136814, rs17111967, rs3136817, and rs1130409), and performed case-control studies in 265 EH patients and 266 age-matched normotensive (NT) subjects. rs17111967 was found to show nonheterogeneity among Japanese subjects. There were no significant differences in the overall distribution of genotypes or alleles for each SNP between EH and NT groups. In the overall distribution of the haplotype-based case-control study constructed based on rs1760944, rs3136817, and rs1130409, the frequency of the G-T-T haplotype was significantly higher in the EH group than in the NT group (2.1% vs. 0.0%, P = 0.001). Multiple logistic regression analysis also revealed significant differences for the G-T-T haplotype, even after adjustment for confounding factors (OR = 8.600, 95% CI: 1.073-68.951, P = 0.043). Based on the present results, the G-T-T haplotype appears to be a genetic marker of EH, and the APE1/REF-1 gene appears to be a susceptibility gene for EH.

  9. Effects of redox conditions on the control of arsenic mobility in shallow alluvial aquifers on the Venetian Plain (Italy)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carraro, A. [Institute of Geosciences and Earth Resources, National Research Council (CNR) of Italy, Padova, Italy c/o Department of Geosciences, University of Padova, 35131 Padova (Italy); Fabbri, P. [Institute of Geosciences and Earth Resources, National Research Council (CNR) of Italy, Padova, Italy c/o Department of Geosciences, University of Padova, 35131 Padova (Italy); Department of Geosciences, University of Padova, 35131 Padova (Italy); Giaretta, A.; Peruzzo, L.; Tateo, F.; Tellini, F. [Institute of Geosciences and Earth Resources, National Research Council (CNR) of Italy, Padova, Italy c/o Department of Geosciences, University of Padova, 35131 Padova (Italy)

    2015-11-01

    The Venetian Plain is known for the occurrence of areas with high concentrations of arsenic in groundwater (greater than 400 μg/L). The study area represents the typical residential, industrial and agricultural features of most Western countries and is devoid of hydrothermal, volcanic or anthropogenic sources of arsenic. The aim of the study is to model the arsenic mobilization and the water–rock interaction by a complete hydrogeochemical investigation (analyses of filtered and unfiltered groundwater sediment mineralogy and geochemistry). The groundwater arsenic contamination and redox conditions are highly variable. Groundwaters with oxidizing and strongly reducing potentials have much lower arsenic concentrations than do mildly reducing waters. The grain size of the aquifer sediments includes gravels, sands and silty-clays. A continuous range of organic material concentrations is observed (from zero to 40%). The amount of sedimentary organic matter is highly correlated with the arsenic content of the sediments (up to 300 mg/kg), whereas no relationships are detectable between arsenic and other chemical parameters. The occurrence of arsenic minerals was observed as a peculiar feature under the scanning electron microscope. Arsenic and sulfur are the sole constituents of small tufts or thin crystals concentrated in small masses. These arsenic minerals were clearly observed in the peat sediments, in agreement with the geochemical modeling that requires very reducing conditions for their precipitation from the groundwater. The modeling suggests that, under oxidizing conditions, arsenic is adsorbed; moreover, a continuous decrease in the redox potential causes increasing desorption of arsenic. If the reducing conditions become more intense, the formation of As-S minerals would explain the lower concentration of arsenic measured in the strongly reducing groundwater. Even if As-sulfides are rare under low-temperature conditions, the anomalous abundance of reductants

  10. Redox and pH dual-responsive PEG and chitosan-conjugated hollow mesoporous silica for controlled drug release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao, Jian; Li, Xian; Zhang, Sha; Liu, Jie; Di, Donghua [Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmacy, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, 103 Wenhua Road, Shenyang, Liaoning Province 110016 (China); Zhang, Ying [School of Pharmaceutical Engineering, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, PR China. (China); Zhao, Qinfu, E-mail: zqf021110505@163.com [Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmacy, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, 103 Wenhua Road, Shenyang, Liaoning Province 110016 (China); Wang, Siling, E-mail: silingwang@syphu.edu.cn [Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmacy, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, 103 Wenhua Road, Shenyang, Liaoning Province 110016 (China)

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, a hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles (HMSN) was used as the drug vehicle to develop the redox and pH dual stimuli-responsive delivery system, in which the chitosan (CS), a biodegradable cationic polymer, was grafted on the surface of HMSN via the cleavable disulfide bonds. CS was chosen as the gatekeeper mainly due to its appropriate molecular weight as well as possessing abundant amino groups which could be protonated in the acidic condition to achieve pH-responsive drug release. In addition, the PEG was further grafted on the surface of CS to increase the stability and biocompatibility under physiological conditions. The DOX loaded DOX/HMSN-SS-CS@PEG had a relatively high drug loading efficiency up to 32.8%. In vitro release results indicated that DOX was dramatically blocked within the mesopores of HMSN-SS-CS@PEG in pH 7.4 PBS without addition of GSH. However, the release rate of DOX was markedly increased after the addition of 10 mM GSH or in pH 5.0 release medium. Moreover, the release of DOX was further improved in pH 5.0 PBS with 10 mM GSH. The HMSN-SS-CS@PEG could markedly decrease the hemolysis percent and protein adsorption, and increase the biocompatibility and stability of HMSN compared with the HMSN-SS-CS and bare HMSN. This work suggested an exploration about HMSN based stimuli-responsive drug delivery and these results demonstrated that HMSN-SS-CS@PEG exhibited dual-responsive drug release property and could be used as a promising carrier for cancer therapy. - Highlights: • Hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles (HMSN) were used as a drug carrier. • Chitosan (CS) and PEG were grafted on the surface of HMSN via disulfide bonds. • The DOX loaded DOX/HMSN-SS-CS@PEG had a high drug loading efficiency up to 32.8%. • DOX/HMSN-SS-CS@PEG showed redox/pH dual-responsive drug release property in vitro. • The grafted PEG could increase the biocompatibility and stability of HMSN.

  11. Effects of redox conditions on the control of arsenic mobility in shallow alluvial aquifers on the Venetian Plain (Italy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carraro, A.; Fabbri, P.; Giaretta, A.; Peruzzo, L.; Tateo, F.; Tellini, F.

    2015-01-01

    The Venetian Plain is known for the occurrence of areas with high concentrations of arsenic in groundwater (greater than 400 μg/L). The study area represents the typical residential, industrial and agricultural features of most Western countries and is devoid of hydrothermal, volcanic or anthropogenic sources of arsenic. The aim of the study is to model the arsenic mobilization and the water–rock interaction by a complete hydrogeochemical investigation (analyses of filtered and unfiltered groundwater sediment mineralogy and geochemistry). The groundwater arsenic contamination and redox conditions are highly variable. Groundwaters with oxidizing and strongly reducing potentials have much lower arsenic concentrations than do mildly reducing waters. The grain size of the aquifer sediments includes gravels, sands and silty-clays. A continuous range of organic material concentrations is observed (from zero to 40%). The amount of sedimentary organic matter is highly correlated with the arsenic content of the sediments (up to 300 mg/kg), whereas no relationships are detectable between arsenic and other chemical parameters. The occurrence of arsenic minerals was observed as a peculiar feature under the scanning electron microscope. Arsenic and sulfur are the sole constituents of small tufts or thin crystals concentrated in small masses. These arsenic minerals were clearly observed in the peat sediments, in agreement with the geochemical modeling that requires very reducing conditions for their precipitation from the groundwater. The modeling suggests that, under oxidizing conditions, arsenic is adsorbed; moreover, a continuous decrease in the redox potential causes increasing desorption of arsenic. If the reducing conditions become more intense, the formation of As-S minerals would explain the lower concentration of arsenic measured in the strongly reducing groundwater. Even if As-sulfides are rare under low-temperature conditions, the anomalous abundance of reductants

  12. Redox and pH dual-responsive PEG and chitosan-conjugated hollow mesoporous silica for controlled drug release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiao, Jian; Li, Xian; Zhang, Sha; Liu, Jie; Di, Donghua; Zhang, Ying; Zhao, Qinfu; Wang, Siling

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles (HMSN) was used as the drug vehicle to develop the redox and pH dual stimuli-responsive delivery system, in which the chitosan (CS), a biodegradable cationic polymer, was grafted on the surface of HMSN via the cleavable disulfide bonds. CS was chosen as the gatekeeper mainly due to its appropriate molecular weight as well as possessing abundant amino groups which could be protonated in the acidic condition to achieve pH-responsive drug release. In addition, the PEG was further grafted on the surface of CS to increase the stability and biocompatibility under physiological conditions. The DOX loaded DOX/HMSN-SS-CS@PEG had a relatively high drug loading efficiency up to 32.8%. In vitro release results indicated that DOX was dramatically blocked within the mesopores of HMSN-SS-CS@PEG in pH 7.4 PBS without addition of GSH. However, the release rate of DOX was markedly increased after the addition of 10 mM GSH or in pH 5.0 release medium. Moreover, the release of DOX was further improved in pH 5.0 PBS with 10 mM GSH. The HMSN-SS-CS@PEG could markedly decrease the hemolysis percent and protein adsorption, and increase the biocompatibility and stability of HMSN compared with the HMSN-SS-CS and bare HMSN. This work suggested an exploration about HMSN based stimuli-responsive drug delivery and these results demonstrated that HMSN-SS-CS@PEG exhibited dual-responsive drug release property and could be used as a promising carrier for cancer therapy. - Highlights: • Hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles (HMSN) were used as a drug carrier. • Chitosan (CS) and PEG were grafted on the surface of HMSN via disulfide bonds. • The DOX loaded DOX/HMSN-SS-CS@PEG had a high drug loading efficiency up to 32.8%. • DOX/HMSN-SS-CS@PEG showed redox/pH dual-responsive drug release property in vitro. • The grafted PEG could increase the biocompatibility and stability of HMSN.

  13. Haplotype-based case-control study between human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/redox effector factor-1 gene and cerebral infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naganuma, Takahiro; Nakayama, Tomohiro; Sato, Naoyuki; Fu, Zhenyan; Yamaguchi, Mai; Soma, Masayoshi; Aoi, Noriko; Usami, Ron; Doba, Nobutaka; Hinohara, Shigeaki

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between cerebral infarction (CI) and the human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/redox effector factor-1 (APE1/REF-1) gene using single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and a haplotype-based case-control study. We selected 5 SNPs in the human APE1/REF1 gene (rs1760944, rs3136814, rs17111967, rs3136817 and rs1130409), and performed case-control studies in 177 CI patients and 309 control subjects. rs17111967 was found to have no heterogeneity in Japanese. The overall distribution of the haplotype-based case-control study constructed by rs1760944, rs3136814 and rs1130409 showed a significant difference. The frequency of the G-C-T haplotype was significantly higher in the CI group than in the control group (2.5% vs. 0.0%, p>0.001). Based on the results of the haplotype-based case-control-study, the G-C-T haplotype may be a genetic marker of CI, and the APE1/REF-1 gene may be a CI susceptibility gene.

  14. Redox Behavior of Fe2+/Fe3+ Redox Couple by Absorption Spectroscopy and Measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, J. Y.; Park, S.; Yun, J. I.

    2010-01-01

    Redox behavior has influences on speciation and other geochemical reactions of radionuclides such as sorption, solubility, and colloid formation, etc. It is one of the factors for evaluation of long-term safety assessment under high-level radioactive waste (HLW) disposal conditions. Accordingly, redox potential (Eh) measurement in aquatic system is important to investigate the redox conditions. Eh is usually measured with redox active electrodes (Pt, Au, glassy carbon, etc.). Nevertheless, Eh measurements by general methods using electrodes provide low accuracy and high uncertainty problem. Therefore, Eh calculated from the concentration of redox active elements with a proper complexing reagent by using UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy is progressed. Iron exists mostly as spent nuclear waste container material and in hydro-geologic minerals. In this system, iron controls the redox condition in near-field area and influences chemical behavior and speciation of radionuclides including redox sensitive actinides such as U, Np, and Pu. In the present work, we present the investigation on redox phenomena of iron in aquatic system by a combination of absorption spectroscopy and redox potential measurements

  15. Comprehensively Characterizing the Thioredoxin Interactome In Vivo Highlights the Central Role Played by This Ubiquitous Oxidoreductase in Redox Control*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arts, Isabelle S.; Vertommen, Didier; Baldin, Francesca; Laloux, Géraldine; Collet, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Thioredoxin (Trx) is a ubiquitous oxidoreductase maintaining protein-bound cysteine residues in the reduced thiol state. Here, we combined a well-established method to trap Trx substrates with the power of bacterial genetics to comprehensively characterize the in vivo Trx redox interactome in the model bacterium Escherichia coli. Using strains engineered to optimize trapping, we report the identification of a total 268 Trx substrates, including 201 that had never been reported to depend on Trx for reduction. The newly identified Trx substrates are involved in a variety of cellular processes, ranging from energy metabolism to amino acid synthesis and transcription. The interaction between Trx and two of its newly identified substrates, a protein required for the import of most carbohydrates, PtsI, and the bacterial actin homolog MreB was studied in detail. We provide direct evidence that PtsI and MreB contain cysteine residues that are susceptible to oxidation and that participate in the formation of an intermolecular disulfide with Trx. By considerably expanding the number of Trx targets, our work highlights the role played by this major oxidoreductase in a variety of cellular processes. Moreover, as the dependence on Trx for reduction is often conserved across species, it also provides insightful information on the interactome of Trx in organisms other than E. coli. PMID:27081212

  16. Improvement in Wood Bonding Strength of Poly (Vinyl Acetate-Butyl Acrylate Emulsion by Controlling the Amount of Redox Initiator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyvinyl acetate emulsion adhesive has been widely used due to its good bonding performance and environmentally friendly properties. Indeed, the bonding performance can be further improved by copolymerizing with other monomers. In this study, the effect of the adjunction of redox initiator (hydrogen peroxide–tartaric acid, H2O2–TA on the properties of the poly (vinyl acetate-butyl acrylate (P (VAc–BA emulsion adhesive was investigated. With increasing dosage, the reaction became more complete and the obtained film was more compact, as identified via SEM. The core-shell structure of the emulsion particles was confirmed via TEM. Results indicate that while the initiator content increased from 0.5 to 1.0%, a clearer core-shell structure was obtained and the bonding strength of the plywood improved from 2.34 to 2.97 MPa. With the further incorporation of H2O2–TA (i.e., 1.5%, the bonding performance deteriorated. The optimum wood bonding strength (2.97 MPa of the prepared P (VAc-BA emulsion adhesive was even better than that (2.55 MPa of a commercial PVAc emulsion adhesive, suggesting its potential application for the wood industry.

  17. Beyond the Fe-P-redox connection: preferential regeneration of phosphorus from organic matter as a key control on Baltic Sea nutrient cycles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jilbert, T.; Slomp, C.P.; Gustafsson, B.G.; Boer, W.

    2011-01-01

    Patterns of regeneration and burial of phosphorus (P) in the Baltic Sea are strongly dependent on redox conditions. Redox varies spatially along water depth gradients and temporally in response to the seasonal cycle and multidecadal hydrographic variability. Alongside the welldocumented link

  18. Beyond the Fe-P-redox connection: preferential regeneration of phosphorus from organic matter as a key control on Baltic Sea nutriënt cycles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jilbert, T.; Slomp, C.P.; Gustafsson, B.G.; Boer, W.

    2011-01-01

    Patterns of regeneration and burial of phosphorus (P) in the Baltic Sea are strongly dependent on redox conditions. Redox varies spatially along water depth gradients and temporally in response to the seasonal cycle and multidecadal hydrographic variability. Alongside the well-documented link

  19. Chloroplast Redox Poise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steccanella, Verdiana

    the redox status of the plastoquinone pool and chlorophyll biosynthesis. Furthermore, in the plant cell, the equilibrium between redox reactions and ROS signals is also maintained by various balancing mechanisms among which the thioredoxin reductase-thioredoxin system (TR-Trx) stands out as a mediator......The redox state of the chloroplast is maintained by a delicate balance between energy production and consumption and is affected by the need to avoid increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Redox power and ROS generated in the chloroplast are essential for maintaining physiological...... metabolic pathways and for optimizing chloroplast functions. The redox poise of photosynthetic electron transport components like plastoquinone is crucial to initiate signaling cascades and might also be involved in key biosynthetic pathways such as chlorophyll biosynthesis. We, therefore, explored...

  20. Microbial diversity and stratification of South Pacific abyssal marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durbin, Alan M; Teske, Andreas

    2011-12-01

    Abyssal marine sediments cover a large proportion of the ocean floor, but linkages between their microbial community structure and redox stratification have remained poorly constrained. This study compares the downcore gradients in microbial community composition to porewater oxygen and nitrate concentration profiles in an abyssal marine sediment column in the South Pacific Ocean. Archaeal 16S rRNA clone libraries showed a stratified archaeal community that changed from Marine Group I Archaea in the aerobic and nitrate-reducing upper sediment column towards deeply branching, uncultured crenarchaeotal and euryarchaeotal lineages in nitrate-depleted, anaerobic sediment horizons. Bacterial 16S rRNA clone libraries revealed a similar shift on the phylum and subphylum level within the bacteria, from a complex community of Alpha-, Gamma- and Deltaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Gemmatimonadetes in oxic surface sediments towards uncultured Chloroflexi and Planctomycetes in the anaerobic sediment column. The distinct stratification of largely uncultured bacterial and archaeal groups within the oxic and nitrate-reducing marine sediment column provides initial constraints for their microbial habitat preferences. © 2011 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Redox kinetics and mechanism in silicate melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cochain, B.

    2009-12-01

    This work contributes to better understand iron redox reactions and mechanisms in silicate melts. It was conducted on compositions in both Na 2 O-B 2 O 3 -SiO 2 -FeO and Na 2 O-Al 2 O 3 -SiO 2 -FeO systems. The influence of boron-sodium and aluminum-sodium substitutions and iron content on properties and structure of glasses and on the iron redox kinetics has been studied by Raman, Moessbauer and XANES spectroscopies at the B and Fe K-edges. In borosilicate glasses, an increase in iron content or in the Fe 3+ /ΣFe redox state implies a structural rearrangement of the BO 4 species in the glass network whereas the BO 3 and BO 4 relative proportions remain nearly constant. In all studied glasses and melts, Fe 3+ is a network former in tetrahedral coordination, unless for aluminosilicates of ratio Al/Na≥1 where Fe 3+ is a network modifier in five-fold coordination. Near Tg, diffusion of network modifying cations controls the iron redox kinetics along with a flux of electron holes. At liquidus temperatures, oxygen diffusion is considered to be the mechanism that governs redox reactions. This study shows the role played by the silicate network polymerization on the redox kinetics. In borosilicate melts, iron redox kinetics depends on the boron speciation between BO 3 and BO 4 that depends itself on the sodium content. Furthermore, an increase in the network-former/network-modifier ratio implies a decrease in oxygen diffusion that results in a slowing down of the redox kinetics. The obtained results allow a description of the iron redox kinetics for more complex compositions as natural lavas or nuclear waste model glasses. (author)

  2. Redox regulation of cell proliferation: Bioinformatics and redox proteomics approaches to identify redox-sensitive cell cycle regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foyer, Christine H; Wilson, Michael H; Wright, Megan H

    2018-03-29

    Plant stem cells are the foundation of plant growth and development. The balance of quiescence and division is highly regulated, while ensuring that proliferating cells are protected from the adverse effects of environment fluctuations that may damage the genome. Redox regulation is important in both the activation of proliferation and arrest of the cell cycle upon perception of environmental stress. Within this context, reactive oxygen species serve as 'pro-life' signals with positive roles in the regulation of the cell cycle and survival. However, very little is known about the metabolic mechanisms and redox-sensitive proteins that influence cell cycle progression. We have identified cysteine residues on known cell cycle regulators in Arabidopsis that are potentially accessible, and could play a role in redox regulation, based on secondary structure and solvent accessibility likelihoods for each protein. We propose that redox regulation may function alongside other known posttranslational modifications to control the functions of core cell cycle regulators such as the retinoblastoma protein. Since our current understanding of how redox regulation is involved in cell cycle control is hindered by a lack of knowledge regarding both which residues are important and how modification of those residues alters protein function, we discuss how critical redox modifications can be mapped at the molecular level. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Mitochondrial redox biology and homeostasis in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noctor, Graham; De Paepe, Rosine; Foyer, Christine H

    2007-03-01

    Mitochondria are key players in plant cell redox homeostasis and signalling. Earlier concepts that regarded mitochondria as secondary to chloroplasts as the powerhouses of photosynthetic cells, with roles in cell proliferation, death and ageing described largely by analogy to animal paradigms, have been replaced by the new philosophy of integrated cellular energy and redox metabolism involving mitochondria and chloroplasts. Thanks to oxygenic photosynthesis, plant mitochondria often operate in an oxygen- and carbohydrate-rich environment. This rather unique environment necessitates extensive flexibility in electron transport pathways and associated NAD(P)-linked enzymes. In this review, mitochondrial redox metabolism is discussed in relation to the integrated cellular energy and redox function that controls plant cell biology and fate.

  4. Use of risk stratification to target therapies in patients with recent onset arthritis; design of a prospective randomized multicenter controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claessen Susanne JJ

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early and intensive treatment is important to inducing remission and preventing joint damage in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. While intensive combination therapy (Disease Modifying Anti-rheumatic Drugs and/or biologicals is the most effective, rheumatologists in daily clinical practice prefer to start with monotherapy methotrexate and bridging corticosteroids. Intensive treatment should be started as soon as the first symptoms manifest, but at this early stage, ACR criteria may not be fulfilled, and there is a danger of over-treatment. We will therefore determine which induction therapy is most effective in the very early stage of persistent arthritis. To overcome over-treatment and under-treatment, the intensity of induction therapy will be based on a prediction model that predicts patients' propensity for persistent arthritis. Methods A multicenter stratified randomized single-blind controlled trial is currently being performed in patients 18 years or older with recent-onset arthritis. Eight hundred ten patients are being stratified according to the likelihood of their developing persistent arthritis. In patients with a high probability of persistent arthritis, we will study combination Disease Modifying Antirheumatic Drug therapy compared to monotherapy methotrexate. In patients with an intermediate probability of persistent arthritis, we will study Disease Modifying Antirheumatic Drug of various intensities. In patients with a low probability, we will study non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, hydroxychloroquine and a single dose of corticosteroids. If disease activity is not sufficiently reduced, treatment will be adjusted according to a step-up protocol. If remission is achieved for at least six months, medication will be tapered off. Patients will be followed up every three months over two years. Discussion This is the first rheumatological study to base treatment in early arthritis on a prediction rule

  5. Identification of novel microRNAs in post-transcriptional control of Nrf2 expression and redox homeostasis in neuronal, SH-SY5Y cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhusudhanan Narasimhan

    Full Text Available Nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2/NFE2L2, a redox-sensitive transcription factor plays a critical role in adaptation to cellular stress and affords cellular defense by initiating transcription of antioxidative and detoxification genes. While a protein can be regulated at multiple levels, control of Nrf2 has been largely studied at post-translational regulation points by Keap1. Importantly, post-transcriptional/translational based regulation of Nrf2 is less understood and to date there are no reports on such mechanisms in neuronal systems. In this context, studies involving the role of microRNAs (miRs which are normally considered as fine tuning regulators of protein production through translation repression and/or post-transcriptional alterations, are in place. In the current study, based on in-silico analysis followed by immunoblotting and real time analysis, we have identified and validated for the first time that human NFE2L2 could be targeted by miR153/miR27a/miR142-5p/miR144 in neuronal, SH-SY5Y cells. Co-transfection studies with individual miR mimics along with either WT 3' UTR of human Nrf2 or mutated miRNA targeting seed sequence within Nrf2 3' UTR, demonstrated that Nrf2 is a direct regulatory target of these miRs. In addition, ectopic expression of miR153/miR27a/miR142-5p/miR144 affected Nrf2 mRNA abundance and nucleo-cytoplasmic concentration of Nrf2 in a Keap1 independent manner resulting in inefficient transactivating ability of Nrf2. Furthermore, forced expression of miRs diminished GCLC and GSR expression resulting in alteration of Nrf2 dependent redox homeostasis. Finally, bioinformatics based miRNA-disease network analysis (MDN along with extended computational network analysis of Nrf2 associated pathologic processes suggests that if in a particular cellular scenario where any of these miR153/miR27a/miR142-5p/miR144 either individually or as a group is altered, it could affect Nrf2 thus triggering and

  6. Redox Species of Redox Flow Batteries: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Feng; Wang, Qing

    2015-11-18

    Due to the capricious nature of renewable energy resources, such as wind and solar, large-scale energy storage devices are increasingly required to make the best use of the renewable power. The redox flow battery is considered suitable for large-scale applications due to its modular design, good scalability and flexible operation. The biggest challenge of the redox flow battery is the low energy density. The redox active species is the most important component in redox flow batteries, and the redox potential and solubility of redox species dictate the system energy density. This review is focused on the recent development of redox species. Different categories of redox species, including simple inorganic ions, metal complexes, metal-free organic compounds, polysulfide/sulfur and lithium storage active materials, are reviewed. The future development of redox species towards higher energy density is also suggested.

  7. Redox Species of Redox Flow Batteries: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Pan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Due to the capricious nature of renewable energy resources, such as wind and solar, large-scale energy storage devices are increasingly required to make the best use of the renewable power. The redox flow battery is considered suitable for large-scale applications due to its modular design, good scalability and flexible operation. The biggest challenge of the redox flow battery is the low energy density. The redox active species is the most important component in redox flow batteries, and the redox potential and solubility of redox species dictate the system energy density. This review is focused on the recent development of redox species. Different categories of redox species, including simple inorganic ions, metal complexes, metal-free organic compounds, polysulfide/sulfur and lithium storage active materials, are reviewed. The future development of redox species towards higher energy density is also suggested.

  8. Thiol/disulfide redox states in signaling and sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, Young-Mi; Jones, Dean P.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid advances in redox systems biology are creating new opportunities to understand complexities of human disease and contributions of environmental exposures. New understanding of thiol-disulfide systems have occurred during the past decade as a consequence of the discoveries that thiol and disulfide systems are maintained in kinetically controlled steady-states displaced from thermodynamic equilibrium, that a widely distributed family of NADPH oxidases produces oxidants that function in cell signaling, and that a family of peroxiredoxins utilize thioredoxin as a reductant to complement the well-studied glutathione antioxidant system for peroxide elimination and redox regulation. This review focuses on thiol/disulfide redox state in biologic systems and the knowledge base available to support development of integrated redox systems biology models to better understand the function and dysfunction of thiol-disulfide redox systems. In particular, central principles have emerged concerning redox compartmentalization and utility of thiol/disulfide redox measures as indicators of physiologic function. Advances in redox proteomics show that, in addition to functioning in protein active sites and cell signaling, cysteine residues also serve as redox sensors to integrate biologic functions. These advances provide a framework for translation of redox systems biology concepts to practical use in understanding and treating human disease. Biological responses to cadmium, a widespread environmental agent, are used to illustrate the utility of these advances to the understanding of complex pleiotropic toxicities. PMID:23356510

  9. Utilização de estratificação e modelo de regressão logística na análise de dados de estudos caso-controle Using of stratification and the logistic regression model in the analysis of data of case-control studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suely Godoy Agostinho Gimeno

    1995-08-01

    Full Text Available Exemplifica-se a aplicação de análise multivariada, por estratificação e com regressão logística, utilizando dados de um estudo caso-controle sobre câncer de esôfago. Oitenta e cinco casos e 292 controles foram classificados segundo sexo, idade e os hábitos de beber e de fumar. As estimativas por ponto dos odds ratios foram semelhantes, sendo as duas técnicas consideradas complementares.Data of a case-control study of esophageal cancer were used as an example of the use of multivariate analysis with stratification and logistic regression. Eighty-five cases and 292 controls were classified according to sex, age and smoking and drinking habits. The point estimates of the odds ratios were similar, and the techniques were considered complementary.

  10. Thermal Stratification in Vertical Mantle Tanks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Søren; Furbo, Simon

    2001-01-01

    It is well known that it is important to have a high degree of thermal stratification in the hot water storage tank to achieve a high thermal performance of SDHW systems. This study is concentrated on thermal stratification in vertical mantle tanks. Experiments based on typical operation conditions...... are carried out to investigate how the thermal stratification is affected by different placements of the mantle inlet. The heat transfer between the solar collector fluid in the mantle and the domestic water in the inner tank is analysed by CFD-simulations. Furthermore, the flow pattern in the vertical mantle...

  11. Some device implications of voltage controlled magnetic anisotropy in Co/Gd2O3 thin films through REDOX chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Guanhua; Noviasky, Nicholas; Cao, Shi; Sabirianov, Ildar; Yin, Yuewei; Ilie, Carolina C.; Kirianov, Eugene; Sharma, Nishtha; Sokolov, Andrei; Marshall, Andrew; Xu, Xiaoshan; Dowben, Peter A.

    2018-04-01

    The effect of intermediate interfacial oxidation on the in-plane magnetization of multilayer stack Pt/Co/Gd2O3, on a p-type silicon substrate, has been investigated by magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE) measurements, the anomalous Hall effect, and magnetoresistance measurements. While voltage controlled perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of a metal/oxide heterostructure is known, this heterostructure displays an inverse relationship between voltage and coercivity. The anomalous Hall effect demonstrates a significant change in hysteresis, with the applied bias sign. There is a higher perpendicular magnetic anisotropy with positive bias exposure.

  12. Temperature Stratification in a Cryogenic Fuel Tank

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A reduced dynamical model describing temperature stratification effects driven by natural convection in a liquid hydrogen cryogenic fuel tank has been developed. It...

  13. A reconceptualization of age stratification in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, P; Lai, K H

    1983-09-01

    Using the concepts of age stratification theory--age effect, cohort effect, and subcohort differences--this paper provides a new perspective on age stratification in China. Currently, the literature suggests that the status of elderly people declined after the Communist Revolution and will further decline with modernization. We discuss the problems with this perspective and argue, instead, that the status of elderly adults did not decline for the majority of the aged during the Maoist years. Rather, the most important change in the age stratification system during the Maoist years was the change in the criterion of age stratification--from age differences to cohort and subcohort differences. Furthermore, the subcohort of elderly adults who suffered the most status decline during the Maoist years--the bourgeoisie--may actually enjoy an increase in status with the recent modernization impetus. Research suggestions from this new perspective are discussed.

  14. Implementing system-wide risk stratification approaches: A review of critical success and failure factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huckel Schneider, Carmen; Gillespie, James A; Wilson, Andrew

    2017-05-01

    Risk stratification has become a widely used tool for linking people identified at risk of health deterioration to the most appropriate evidence-based care. This article systematically reviews recent literature to determine key factors that have been identified as critical enablers and/or barriers to successful implementation of risk stratification tools at a system level. A systematic search found 23 articles and four promising protocols for inclusion in the review, covering the use to 20 different risk stratification tools. These articles reported on only a small fraction of the risk stratification tools used in health systems; suggesting that while the development and statistical validation of risk stratification algorithms is widely reported, there has been little published evaluation of how they are implemented in real-world settings. Controlled studies provided some evidence that the use of risk stratification tools in combination with a care management plan offer patient benefits and that the use of a risk stratification tool to determine components of a care management plan may contribute to reductions in hospital readmissions, patient satisfaction and improved patient outcomes. Studies with the strongest focus on implementation used qualitative and case study methods. Among these, the literature converged on four key areas of implementation that were found to be critical for overcoming barriers to success: the engagement of clinicians and safeguarding equity, both of which address barriers of acceptance; the health system context to address administrative, political and system design barriers; and data management and integration to address logistical barriers.

  15. Simultaneous anionic and cationic redox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sung-Kyun; Kang, Kisuk

    2017-12-01

    It is challenging to unlock anionic redox activity, accompanied by full utilization of available cationic redox process, to boost capacity of battery cathodes. Now, material design by tuning the metal-oxygen interaction is shown to be a promising solution.

  16. Redox Regulation of Mitochondrial Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handy, Diane E.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Redox-dependent processes influence most cellular functions, such as differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. Mitochondria are at the center of these processes, as mitochondria both generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) that drive redox-sensitive events and respond to ROS-mediated changes in the cellular redox state. In this review, we examine the regulation of cellular ROS, their modes of production and removal, and the redox-sensitive targets that are modified by their flux. In particular, we focus on the actions of redox-sensitive targets that alter mitochondrial function and the role of these redox modifications on metabolism, mitochondrial biogenesis, receptor-mediated signaling, and apoptotic pathways. We also consider the role of mitochondria in modulating these pathways, and discuss how redox-dependent events may contribute to pathobiology by altering mitochondrial function. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 16, 1323–1367. PMID:22146081

  17. Redox active polymers and colloidal particles for flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavvalapalli, Nagarjuna; Moore, Jeffrey S.; Rodriguez-Lopez, Joaquin; Cheng, Kevin; Shen, Mei; Lichtenstein, Timothy

    2018-05-29

    The invention provides a redox flow battery comprising a microporous or nanoporous size-exclusion membrane, wherein one cell of the battery contains a redox-active polymer dissolved in the non-aqueous solvent or a redox-active colloidal particle dispersed in the non-aqueous solvent. The redox flow battery provides enhanced ionic conductivity across the electrolyte separator and reduced redox-active species crossover, thereby improving the performance and enabling widespread utilization. Redox active poly(vinylbenzyl ethylviologen) (RAPs) and redox active colloidal particles (RACs) were prepared and were found to be highly effective redox species. Controlled potential bulk electrolysis indicates that 94-99% of the nominal charge on different RAPs is accessible and the electrolysis products are stable upon cycling. The high concentration attainable (>2.0 M) for RAPs in common non-aqueous battery solvents, their electrochemical and chemical reversibility, and their hindered transport across porous separators make them attractive materials for non-aqueous redox flow batteries based on size-selectivity.

  18. Redox Flow Batteries, a Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoxville, U. Tennessee; U. Texas Austin; U, McGill; Weber, Adam Z.; Mench, Matthew M.; Meyers, Jeremy P.; Ross, Philip N.; Gostick, Jeffrey T.; Liu, Qinghua

    2011-07-15

    Redox flow batteries are enjoying a renaissance due to their ability to store large amounts of electrical energy relatively cheaply and efficiently. In this review, we examine the components of redox flow batteries with a focus on understanding the underlying physical processes. The various transport and kinetic phenomena are discussed along with the most common redox couples.

  19. Separate effects of flooding and anaerobiosis on soil greenhouse gas emissions and redox sensitive biogeochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavin McNicol; Whendee L. Silver

    2014-01-01

    Soils are large sources of atmospheric greenhouse gases, and both the magnitude and composition of soil gas emissions are strongly controlled by redox conditions. Though the effect of redox dynamics on greenhouse gas emissions has been well studied in flooded soils, less research has focused on redox dynamics without total soil inundation. For the latter, all that is...

  20. Studies of thermal stratification in water pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, P.K.; Chandraker, D.K.; Nayak, A.K.; Vijayan, P.K.

    2015-01-01

    Large water pools are used as a heat sink for various cooling systems used in industry. In context of advance nuclear reactors like AHWR, it is used as ultimate heat sink for passive systems for decay heat removal and containment cooling. This system incorporates heat exchangers submerged in the large water pool. However, heat transfer by natural convection in pool poses a problem of thermal stratification. Due to thermal stratification hot layers of water accumulate over the relatively cold one. The heat transfer performance of heat exchanger gets deteriorated as a hot fluid envelops it. In the nuclear reactors, the walls of the pool are made of concrete and it may subject to high temperature due to thermal stratification which is not desirable. In this paper, a concept of employing shrouds around the heat source is studied. These shrouds provide a bulk flow in the water pool, thereby facilitating mixing of hot and cold fluid, which eliminate stratification. The concept has been applied to the a scaled model of Gravity Driven Water Pool (GDWP) of AHWR in which Isolation Condensers (IC) tubes are submerged for decay heat removal of AHWR using ICS and thermal stratification phenomenon was predicted with and without shrouds. To demonstrate the adequacy of the effectiveness of shroud arrangement and to validate the simulation methodology of RELAP5/Mod3.2, experiments has been conducted on a scaled model of the pool with and without shroud. (author)

  1. Social Stratification in the Workplace in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Obukovwo Okaka

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Nigerian society in pre-colonial era was stratified according to royalty, military might, wealth and religious hierarchy as the case may be. But with the advent of paid employment, the social stratification shifted from a traditional format to one outlined with Western societies. The argument put forward is that social class in modern time has only been re-defined, thereby giving Nigeria a unique social stratification with a strong traditional/religious influence. This paper examined the social stratification in Nigeria with the backdrop of the introduction of paid employment and the impact of this unique social classification in the workplace. In examining social stratification in the workplace, four hundred and eighty respondents were interviewed using structured questionnaire in a onetime survey. Data collected indicates that seventy-nine percent of the surveyed group preferred to be classified with traditional or religious strata than academic class. Indicating that, royalty takes the front seat in the stratification of the Nigerian society even in the work place. This scenario may account for the emphasis Nigerians place on traditional and religious titles over academic titles in almost all sphere of life including the workplace. This calls for the strengthening of the traditional and religious institutions so that they can assist to impart core social values on members of the society, while giving proper honour to those who are accomplished professionals in their various fields of endeavours.

  2. Thermal stratification built up in hot water tank with different inlet stratifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragsted, Janne; Furbo, Simon; Dannemand, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Thermal stratification in a water storage tank can strongly increase the thermal performance of solar heating systems. Thermal stratification can be built up in a storage tank during charge, if the heated water enters through an inlet stratifier. Experiments with a test tank have been carried out...... in order to elucidate how well thermal stratification is established in the tank with differently designed inlet stratifiers under different controlled laboratory conditions. The investigated inlet stratifiers are from Solvis GmbH & Co KG and EyeCular Technologies ApS. The inlet stratifier from Solvis Gmb...... for Solvis GmbH & Co KG had a better performance at 4 l/min. In the intermediate charge test the stratifier from EyeCular Technologies ApS had a better performance in terms of maintaining the thermal stratification in the storage tank while charging with a relative low temperature. [All rights reserved...

  3. Managing the cellular redox hub in photosynthetic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foyer, Christine H; Noctor, Graham

    2012-02-01

    Light-driven redox chemistry is a powerful source of redox signals that has a decisive input into transcriptional control within the cell nucleus. Like photosynthetic electron transport pathways, the respiratory electron transport chain exerts a profound control over gene function, in order to balance energy (reductant and ATP) supply with demand, while preventing excessive over-reduction or over-oxidation that would be adversely affect metabolism. Photosynthetic and respiratory redox chemistries are not merely housekeeping processes but they exert a controlling influence over every aspect of plant biology, participating in the control of gene transcription and translation, post-translational modifications and the regulation of assimilatory reactions, assimilate partitioning and export. The number of processes influenced by redox controls and signals continues to increase as do the components that are recognized participants in the associated signalling pathways. A step change in our understanding of the overall importance of the cellular redox hub to plant cells has occurred in recent years as the complexity of the management of the cellular redox hub in relation to metabolic triggers and environmental cues has been elucidated. This special issue describes aspects of redox regulation and signalling at the cutting edge of current research in this dynamic and rapidly expanding field. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Redox-capacitor to connect electrochemistry to redox-biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunkyoung; Leverage, W Taylor; Liu, Yi; White, Ian M; Bentley, William E; Payne, Gregory F

    2014-01-07

    It is well-established that redox-reactions are integral to biology for energy harvesting (oxidative phosphorylation), immune defense (oxidative burst) and drug metabolism (phase I reactions), yet there is emerging evidence that redox may play broader roles in biology (e.g., redox signaling). A critical challenge is the need for tools that can probe biologically-relevant redox interactions simply, rapidly and without the need for a comprehensive suite of analytical methods. We propose that electrochemistry may provide such a tool. In this tutorial review, we describe recent studies with a redox-capacitor film that can serve as a bio-electrode interface that can accept, store and donate electrons from mediators commonly used in electrochemistry and also in biology. Specifically, we (i) describe the fabrication of this redox-capacitor from catechols and the polysaccharide chitosan, (ii) discuss the mechanistic basis for electron exchange, (iii) illustrate the properties of this redox-capacitor and its capabilities for promoting redox-communication between biology and electrodes, and (iv) suggest the potential for enlisting signal processing strategies to "extract" redox information. We believe these initial studies indicate broad possibilities for enlisting electrochemistry and signal processing to acquire "systems level" redox information from biology.

  5. Microfluidic redox battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin Wook; Goulet, Marc-Antoni; Kjeang, Erik

    2013-07-07

    A miniaturized microfluidic battery is proposed, which is the first membraneless redox battery demonstrated to date. This unique concept capitalizes on dual-pass flow-through porous electrodes combined with stratified, co-laminar flow to generate electrical power on-chip. The fluidic design is symmetric to allow for both charging and discharging operations in forward, reverse, and recirculation modes. The proof-of-concept device fabricated using low-cost materials integrated in a microfluidic chip is shown to produce competitive power levels when operated on a vanadium redox electrolyte. A complete charge/discharge cycle is performed to demonstrate its operation as a rechargeable battery, which is an important step towards providing sustainable power to lab-on-a-chip and microelectronic applications.

  6. Beyond the Fe-P-redox connection: preferential regeneration of phosphorus from organic matter as a key control on Baltic Sea nutrient cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Jilbert

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Patterns of regeneration and burial of phosphorus (P in the Baltic Sea are strongly dependent on redox conditions. Redox varies spatially along water depth gradients and temporally in response to the seasonal cycle and multidecadal hydrographic variability. Alongside the well-documented link between iron oxyhydroxide dissolution and release of P from Baltic Sea sediments, we show that preferential remineralization of P with respect to carbon (C and nitrogen (N during degradation of organic matter plays a key role in determining the surplus of bioavailable P in the water column. Preferential remineralization of P takes place both in the water column and upper sediments and its rate is shown to be redox-dependent, increasing as reducing conditions become more severe at greater water-depth in the deep basins. Existing Redfield-based biogeochemical models of the Baltic may therefore underestimate the imbalance between N and P availability for primary production, and hence the vulnerability of the Baltic to sustained eutrophication via the fixation of atmospheric N. However, burial of organic P is also shown to increase during multidecadal intervals of expanded hypoxia, due to higher net burial rates of organic matter around the margins of the deep basins. Such intervals may be characterized by basin-scale acceleration of all fluxes within the P cycle, including productivity, regeneration and burial, sustained by the relative accessibility of the water column P pool beneath a shallow halocline.

  7. Aqueous liquid redox desulfurisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reicher, M.; Niemiec, B.; Katona, T.

    1999-12-01

    The LO-CAT II process is an aqueous liquid redox process which uses ferric and ferrous iron catalysts to oxidise hydrogen sulfide (from sour gas) to elemental sulfur: the relevant chemical equations are given. Chelating agents keep the iron in solution. The system is described under the headings of (i) LO-CAT chemistry, (ii) design parameters, (iii) startup challenges, (iv) present situation and (v) anticipated future conditions. Further improvements to the system are anticipated.

  8. Ediacaran Redox Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, S. K.; Jiang, G.; Planavsky, N. J.; Kendall, B.; Owens, J. D.; Anbar, A. D.; Lyons, T. W.

    2013-12-01

    Evidence for pervasive oxic conditions, and likely even deep ocean oxygenation has been documented at three intervals in the lower (ca. 632 Ma), middle (ca. 580 Ma) and upper (ca. 551 Ma) Ediacaran. The Doushantuo Formation in South China hosts large enrichments of redox-sensitive trace element (e.g., molybdenum, vanadium and uranium) in anoxic shales, which are indicative of a globally oxic ocean-atmosphere system. However, ocean redox conditions between these periods continue to be a topic of debate and remain elusive. We have found evidence for widespread anoxic conditions through much of the Ediacaran in the deep-water Wuhe section in South China. During most of the Ediacaran-early Cambrian in basinal sections is characterized by Fe speciation data and pyrite morphologies that indicate deposition under euxinic conditions with near-crustal enrichments of redox-sensitive element and positive pyrite-sulfur isotope values, which suggest low levels of marine sulfate and widespread euxinia. Our work reinforces an emerging view that the early Earth, including the Ediacaran, underwent numerous rises and falls in surface oxidation state, rather than a unidirectional rise as originally imagined. The Ediacaran ocean thus experienced repetitive expansion and contraction of marine chalcophilic trace-metal levels that may have had fundamental impact on the slow evolution of early animals and ecosystems. Further, this framework forces us to re-examine the relationship between Neoproterozoic oxygenation and metazoan diversification. Varying redox conditions through the Cryogenian and Ediacaran may help explain molecular clock and biomarker evidence for an early appearance and initial diversification of metazoans but with a delay in the appearance of most major metazoan crown groups until close to Ediacaran-Cambrian boundary.

  9. Experimental study on the thermal stratification in the branch of NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Nyung; Hwang, Seong Hong [Kyunghee Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-02-15

    As more experience is accumulated in the operation of existing nuclear power plants, the long term effects of thermal-hydraulic phenomena, unaccounted in the original designs, have been observed. One such phenomenon is thermal stratification, which has caused through-wall cracks, thermal fatigue, unexpected piping displacements and pipe support damage. Thermal stratification is a phenomenon as temperature layers are formed in the component or piping due to the density difference between hot and cold water. The thermal stratification phenomena in nuclear power plant observed in the pressurizer surge line, and in the piping of feedwater system, Safety Injection System(SIS), residual heat removal system (or shutdown cooling system), and chemical and volume control system during the design transients. A set of experiment has been performed to predict the temperature distribution in the branch piping of nuclear power plant(Ulchin unit 3 and 4) due to the turbulent penetration, the heat transfer through valve disk and valve leakage. The test facility scaled down to 1/10 has been designed and constructed to simulate the thermal stratification in the piping of safety injection system and shutdown cooling system of Ulchin 3 and 4. The experimental results show that the turbulent penetration depth could be : extended to the end of the vertical pipe, and thermal stratification due to the heat transfer through the valve disk to the end of horizontal pipe behind the valve disk. Finally, thermal stratification could effected by the location of valve leakage.

  10. Mitochondrial Energy and Redox Signaling in Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzländer, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: For a plant to grow and develop, energy and appropriate building blocks are a fundamental requirement. Mitochondrial respiration is a vital source for both. The delicate redox processes that make up respiration are affected by the plant's changing environment. Therefore, mitochondrial regulation is critically important to maintain cellular homeostasis. This involves sensing signals from changes in mitochondrial physiology, transducing this information, and mounting tailored responses, by either adjusting mitochondrial and cellular functions directly or reprogramming gene expression. Recent Advances: Retrograde (RTG) signaling, by which mitochondrial signals control nuclear gene expression, has been a field of very active research in recent years. Nevertheless, no mitochondrial RTG-signaling pathway is yet understood in plants. This review summarizes recent advances toward elucidating redox processes and other bioenergetic factors as a part of RTG signaling of plant mitochondria. Critical Issues: Novel insights into mitochondrial physiology and redox-regulation provide a framework of upstream signaling. On the other end, downstream responses to modified mitochondrial function have become available, including transcriptomic data and mitochondrial phenotypes, revealing processes in the plant that are under mitochondrial control. Future Directions: Drawing parallels to chloroplast signaling and mitochondrial signaling in animal systems allows to bridge gaps in the current understanding and to deduce promising directions for future research. It is proposed that targeted usage of new technical approaches, such as quantitative in vivo imaging, will provide novel leverage to the dissection of plant mitochondrial signaling. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 2122–2144. PMID:23234467

  11. Redox processes in radiation biology and cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenstock, C.L.

    1981-01-01

    Free-radical intermediates, particularly the activated oxygen species OH, O - 2 , and 1 O 2 , are implicated in many types of radiation damage to biological systems. In addition, these same species may be formed, either directly or indirectly through biochemical redox reactions, in both essential and aberrant metabolic processes. Cell survival and adaptation to an environment containing ionizing radiation and other physical and chemical carcinogens ultimately depend upon the cell's ability to maintain optimal function in response to free-radical damage at the chemical level. Many of these feedback control mechanisms are redox controlled. Radiation chemical techniques using selective radical scavengers, such as product analysis and pulse radiolysis, enable us to generate, observe, and characterize individually the nature and reactivity of potentially damaging free radicals. From an analysis of the chemical kinetics of free-radical involvement in biological damage, redox mechanisms are proposed to describe the early processes of radiation damage, redox mechanisms are proposed to describe the early processes of radiation damage, its protection and sensitization, and the role of free radicals in radiation and chemical carcinogenesis

  12. Risk stratification in emergency patients by copeptin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Kasper; Gøtze, Jens P; Dalsgaard, Morten

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rapid risk stratification is a core task in emergency medicine. Identifying patients at high and low risk shortly after admission could help clinical decision-making regarding treatment, level of observation, allocation of resources and post discharge follow-up. The purpose of the pre...

  13. Rotating compressible fluids under strong stratification

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Feireisl, Eduard; Lu, Y.; Novotný, A.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 19, October (2014), s. 11-18 ISSN 1468-1218 Keywords : rotating fluid * compressible Navier-Stokes * strong stratification Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 2.519, year: 2014 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1468121814000212#

  14. Polar ocean stratification in a cold climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigman, Daniel M; Jaccard, Samuel L; Haug, Gerald H

    2004-03-04

    The low-latitude ocean is strongly stratified by the warmth of its surface water. As a result, the great volume of the deep ocean has easiest access to the atmosphere through the polar surface ocean. In the modern polar ocean during the winter, the vertical distribution of temperature promotes overturning, with colder water over warmer, while the salinity distribution typically promotes stratification, with fresher water over saltier. However, the sensitivity of seawater density to temperature is reduced as temperature approaches the freezing point, with potential consequences for global ocean circulation under cold climates. Here we present deep-sea records of biogenic opal accumulation and sedimentary nitrogen isotopic composition from the Subarctic North Pacific Ocean and the Southern Ocean. These records indicate that vertical stratification increased in both northern and southern high latitudes 2.7 million years ago, when Northern Hemisphere glaciation intensified in association with global cooling during the late Pliocene epoch. We propose that the cooling caused this increased stratification by weakening the role of temperature in polar ocean density structure so as to reduce its opposition to the stratifying effect of the vertical salinity distribution. The shift towards stratification in the polar ocean 2.7 million years ago may have increased the quantity of carbon dioxide trapped in the abyss, amplifying the global cooling.

  15. Desbalanço redox: NADPH oxidase como um alvo terapêutico no manejo cardiovascular Desbalance redox: NADPH oxidasa como un objetivo terapéutico en el manejo cardiovascular Redox unbalance: NADPH oxidase as therapeutic target in blood pressure control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiza A. Rabêlo

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Vários estudos destacam as espécies reativas de oxigênio e nitrogênio (ERONs como importantes contribuintes na patogênese de numerosas doenças cardiovasculares, incluindo hipertensão, aterosclerose e falência cardíaca. Tais espécies são moléculas altamente bioativas e com vida curta derivadas, principalmente, da redução do oxigênio molecular. O complexo enzimático da NADPH oxidase é a maior fonte dessas espécies reativas na vasculatura. Sob condições fisiológicas, a formação e eliminação destas substâncias aparecem balanceadas na parede vascular. Durante o desbalanço redox, entretanto, há um aumento na atividade da NADPH oxidase e predomínio de agentes pró-oxidantes, superando a capacidade de defesa orgânica antioxidante. Além disso, tal hiperatividade enzimática reduz a biodisponibilidade do óxido nítrico, crucial para a vasodilatação e a manutenção da função vascular normal. Apesar de a NADPH oxidase relacionar-se diretamente à disfunção endotelial, foi primeiramente descrita por sua expressão em fagócitos, onde sua atividade determina a eficácia dos mecanismos de defesa orgânica contra patógenos. As sutis diferenças existentes entre as unidades estruturais das NADPH oxidases, a depender do tipo celular que as expressa, podem ter implicações terapêuticas, permitindo a inibição seletiva do desequilíbrio redox induzido pela NADPH oxidase, sem comprometer, entretanto, sua participação nas vias fisiológicas de sinalização celular que garantem a proteção contra microorganismos.Varios estudios destacan las especies reactivas de oxígeno y nitrógeno (ERON como importantes contribuyentes en la patogénesis de numerosas enfermedades cardiovasculares, incluyendo hipertensión, aterosclerosis y falla cardíaca. Tales especies son moléculas altamente bioactivas y con vida corta derivadas, principalmente, de la reducción del oxígeno molecular. El complejo enzimático de la NADPH oxidasa es

  16. Stratification and salt-wedge in the Seomjin river estuary under the idealized tidal influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jin Hwan; Jang, Dongmin; Kim, Yong Hoon

    2017-12-01

    Advection, straining, and vertical mixing play primary roles in the process of estuarine stratification. Estuaries can be classified as salt-wedge, partially-mixed or well-mixed depending on the vertical density structure determined by the balancing of advection, mixing and straining. In particular, straining plays a major role in the stratification of the estuarine water body along the estuarine channel. Also, the behavior of a salt wedge with a halocline shape in a stratified channel can be controlled by the competition between straining and mixing induced by buoyancy from the riverine source and tidal forcing. The present study uses Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM) to show that straining and vertical mixing play major roles in controlling along-channel flow and stratification structures in the Seomjin river estuary (SRE) under idealized conditions. The Potential Energy Anomaly (PEA) dynamic equation quantifies the governing processes thereby enabling the determination of the stratification type. By comparing terms in the equation, we examined how the relative strengths of straining and mixing alter the stratification types in the SRE due to changes in river discharge and the depth resulting from dredging activities. SRE under idealized tidal forcing tends to be partially-mixed based on an analysis of the balance between terms and the vertical structure of salinity, and the morphological and hydrological change in SRE results in the shift of stratification type. While the depth affects the mixing, the freshwater discharge mainly controls the straining, and the balance between mixing and straining determines the final state of the stratification in an estuarine channel. As a result, the development and location of a salt wedge along the channel in a partially mixed and highly stratified condition is also determined by the ratio of straining to mixing. Finally, our findings confirm that the contributions of mixing and straining can be assessed by using the

  17. Redox electrode materials for supercapatteries

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Linpo; Chen, George Z.

    2016-01-01

    Redox electrode materials, including transition metal oxides and electronically conducting polymers, are capable of faradaic charge transfer reactions, and play important roles in most electrochemical energy storage devices, such as supercapacitor, battery and supercapattery. Batteries are often based on redox materials with low power capability and safety concerns in some cases. Supercapacitors, particularly those based on redox inactive materials, e.g. activated carbon, can offer high power...

  18. Has climate change disrupted stratification patterns in Lake Victoria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Has climate change disrupted stratification patterns in Lake Victoria, East Africa? ... Climate change may threaten the fisheries of Lake Victoria by increasing density differentials in the water column, thereby strengthening stratification and increasing the ... Keywords: deoxygenation, fisheries, global warming, thermocline

  19. Geochemistry of Natural Redox Fronts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, B.A.

    1999-05-01

    Redox fronts are important geochemical boundaries which need to be considered in safety assessment of deep repositories for radioactive waste. In most cases, selected host-rock formations will be reducing due to the presence of ferrous minerals, sulphides, etc. During construction and operation of the repository, air will be introduced into the formation. After repository closure, oxidising conditions may persist locally until all oxygen is consumed. In the case of high-level waste, radiolysis of water may provide an additional source of oxidants. Oxidising conditions within a repository are thus possible and potentially have a strong influence on the mobility of many elements. The rate of movement of redox fronts, the boundary between oxidising and reducing environments, and their influence on migrating radionuclides are thus important factors influencing repository performance. The present report is a review of elemental behaviour at natural redox fronts, based on published information and work of the author. Redox fronts are geochemically and geometrically variable manifestations of a global interface between generally oxidising geochemical milieux in contact with the atmosphere and generally reducing milieux in contact with rocks containing ferrous iron, sulphide and/or organic carbon. A classification of redox fronts based on a subdivision into continental near-surface, marine near-surface, and deep environments is proposed. The global redox interface is often located close to the surface of rocks and sediments and, sometimes, within bodies of water. Temperature conditions are close to ambient. A deeper penetration of the global redox front to depths of several kilometres is found in basins containing oxidised sediments (red beds) and in some hydrothermal circulation systems. Temperatures at such deep redox fronts may reach 200 o C. Both near-surface and deep redox fronts are sites of formation of economic deposits of redox-sensitive elements, particularly of

  20. Determining redox properties of clay-rich sedimentary deposits in the context of performance assessment of radioactive waste repositories : Conceptual and practical aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Behrends, T.; Bruggeman, Christophe

    Redox reactions play a key factor controlling the mobility of redox sensitive radionuclides in clay-rich sediments which might serve as host formations for radioactive waste repositories. Assessing the redox speciation of radionuclides requires information about the redox conditions in the formation

  1. Engineering redox homeostasis to develop efficient alcohol-producing microbial cell factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chunhua; Zhao, Qiuwei; Li, Yin; Zhang, Yanping

    2017-06-24

    The biosynthetic pathways of most alcohols are linked to intracellular redox homeostasis, which is crucial for life. This crucial balance is primarily controlled by the generation of reducing equivalents, as well as the (reduction)-oxidation metabolic cycle and the thiol redox homeostasis system. As a main oxidation pathway of reducing equivalents, the biosynthesis of most alcohols includes redox reactions, which are dependent on cofactors such as NADH or NADPH. Thus, when engineering alcohol-producing strains, the availability of cofactors and redox homeostasis must be considered. In this review, recent advances on the engineering of cellular redox homeostasis systems to accelerate alcohol biosynthesis are summarized. Recent approaches include improving cofactor availability, manipulating the affinity of redox enzymes to specific cofactors, as well as globally controlling redox reactions, indicating the power of these approaches, and opening a path towards improving the production of a number of different industrially-relevant alcohols in the near future.

  2. Pattern-oriented Agent-based Monte Carlo simulation of Cellular Redox Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Jiaowei; Holcombe, Mike; Boonen, Harrie C.M.

    /CYSS) and mitochondrial redox couples. Evidence suggests that both intracellular and extracellular redox can affect overall cell redox state. How redox is communicated between extracellular and intracellular environments is still a matter of debate. Some researchers conclude based on experimental data...... cells. Biochimica Et Biophysica Acta-General Subjects, 2008. 1780(11): p. 1271-1290. 5. Jones, D.P., Redox sensing: orthogonal control in cell cycle and apoptosis signalling. J Intern Med, 2010. 268(5): p. 432-48. 6. Pogson, M., et al., Formal agent-based modelling of intracellular chemical interactions...

  3. Stratification studies in components of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randorf, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    The applicability of two stratification criteria during loss-of-coolant (LOCA) conditions was studied. The first criteria was developed for addressing cold water injection-induced stratification. The second criteria applied to downcomer/cold leg junction stratification. Both criteria provided predictions consistent with measured conditions during small break loss-of-coolant tests

  4. A Comparative Review of Stratification Texts and Readers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peoples, Clayton D.

    2012-01-01

    Social stratification is a core substantive area within sociology. There are a number of textbooks and readers available on the market that deal with this central topic. In this article, I conduct a comparative review of (a) four stratification textbooks and (b) four stratification readers. (Contains 2 tables.)

  5. Long time durability tests of fabric inlet stratification pipes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Elsa; Furbo, Simon

    2008-01-01

    and that this destroys the capability of building up thermal stratification for the fabric inlet stratification pipe. The results also show that although dirt, algae etc. are deposited in the fabric pipes in the space heating tank, the capability of the fabric inlet stratifiers to build up thermal stratification...

  6. Tuning of redox regulatory mechanisms, reactive oxygen species and redox homeostasis under salinity stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossain eSazzad

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Soil salinity is a crucial environmental constraint which limits biomass production at many sites on a global scale. Saline growth conditions cause osmotic and ionic imbalances, oxidative stress and perturb metabolism, e.g. the photosynthetic electron flow. The plant ability to tolerate salinity is determined by multiple biochemical and physiological mechanisms protecting cell functions, in particular by regulating proper water relations and maintaining ion homeostasis. Redox homeostasis is a fundamental cell property. Its regulation includes control of reactive oxygen species (ROS generation, sensing deviation from and readjustment of the cellular redox state. All these redox related functions have been recognized as decisive factors in salinity acclimation and adaptation. This review focuses on the core response of plants to overcome the challenges of salinity stress through regulation of ROS generation and detoxification systems and to maintain redox homeostasis. Emphasis is given to the role of NADH oxidase (RBOH, alternative oxidase (AOX, the plastid terminal oxidase (PTOX and the malate valve with the malate dehydrogenase isoforms under salt stress. Overwhelming evidence assigns an essential auxiliary function of ROS and redox homeostasis to salinity acclimation of plants.

  7. Multiple redox states of multiheme cytochromes may enable bacterial response to changing redox environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbour, T.; Wrighton, K. C.; Mullin, S. W.; Castelle, C.; Luef, B.; Gilbert, B.; Banfield, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    Multiheme c-type cytochromes (MHCs) are key components in electron-transport pathways that enable some microorganisms to transfer electron byproducts of metabolism to a variety of minerals. As a response to changes in mineral redox potential, microbial communities may shift their membership, or individual organisms may adjust protein expression. Alternatively, the ability to respond may be conferred by the innate characteristics of certain electron-transport-chain components. Here, we used potentiostat-controlled microbial fuel cells (MFCs) to measure the timescale of response to imposed changes in redox conditions, thus placing constraints on the importance of these different mechanisms. In the experiments, a solid electrode acts as an electron-accepting mineral whose redox potential can be precisely controlled. We inoculated duplicate MFCs with a sediment/groundwater mixture from an aquifer at Rifle, Colorado, supplied acetate as an electron donor, and obtained stable, mixed-species biofilms dominated by Geobacter and a novel Geobacter-related family. We poised the anode at potentials spanning the range of natural Fe(III)-reduction, then performed cyclic voltammetry (CV) to characterize the overall biofilm redox signature. The apparent biofilm midpoint potential shifted directly with anode set potential when the latter was changed within the range from about -250 to -50 mV vs. SHE. Following a jump in set potential by 200 mV, the CV-midpoint shift by ~100 mV over a timescale of ~30 minutes to a few hours, depending on the direction of the potential change. The extracellular electron transfer molecules, whose overall CV signature is very similar to those of purified MHCs, appear to span a broad redox range (~200 mV), supporting the hypothesis that MHCs confer substantial redox flexibility. This flexibility may be a principle reason for the abundance of MHCs expressed by microorganisms capable of extracellular electron transfer to minerals.

  8. Drainage and Stratification Kinetics of Foam Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiran; Sharma, Vivek

    2014-03-01

    Baking bread, brewing cappuccino, pouring beer, washing dishes, shaving, shampooing, whipping eggs and blowing bubbles all involve creation of aqueous foam films. Foam lifetime, drainage kinetics and stability are strongly influenced by surfactant type (ionic vs non-ionic), and added proteins, particles or polymers modify typical responses. The rate at which fluid drains out from a foam film, i.e. drainage kinetics, is determined in the last stages primarily by molecular interactions and capillarity. Interestingly, for certain low molecular weight surfactants, colloids and polyelectrolyte-surfactant mixtures, a layered ordering of molecules, micelles or particles inside the foam films leads to a stepwise thinning phenomena called stratification. Though stratification is observed in many confined systems including foam films containing particles or polyelectrolytes, films containing globular proteins seem not to show this behavior. Using a Scheludko-type cell, we experimentally study the drainage and stratification kinetics of horizontal foam films formed by protein-surfactant mixtures, and carefully determine how the presence of proteins influences the hydrodynamics and thermodynamics of foam films.

  9. Vertical Stratification Engineering for Organic Bulk-Heterojunction Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Liqiang; Wang, Gang; Zhou, Weihua; Fu, Boyi; Cheng, Xiaofang; Zhang, Lifu; Yuan, Zhibo; Xiong, Sixing; Zhang, Lin; Xie, Yuanpeng; Zhang, Andong; Zhang, Youdi; Ma, Wei; Li, Weiwei; Zhou, Yinhua; Reichmanis, Elsa; Chen, Yiwang

    2018-05-22

    High-efficiency organic solar cells (OSCs) can be produced through optimization of component molecular design, coupled with interfacial engineering and control of active layer morphology. However, vertical stratification of the bulk-heterojunction (BHJ), a spontaneous activity that occurs during the drying process, remains an intricate problem yet to be solved. Routes toward regulating the vertical separation profile and evaluating the effects on the final device should be explored to further enhance the performance of OSCs. Herein, we establish a connection between the material surface energy, absorption, and vertical stratification, which can then be linked to photovoltaic conversion characteristics. Through assessing the performance of temporary, artificial vertically stratified layers created by the sequential casting of the individual components to form a multilayered structure, optimal vertical stratification can be achieved. Adjusting the surface energy offset between the substrate results in donor and acceptor stabilization of that stratified layer. Further, a trade-off between the photocurrent generated in the visible region and the amount of donor or acceptor in close proximity to the electrode was observed. Modification of the substrate surface energy was achieved using self-assembled small molecules (SASM), which, in turn, directly impacted the polymer donor to acceptor ratio at the interface. Using three different donor polymers in conjunction with two alternative acceptors in an inverted organic solar cell architecture, the concentration of polymer donor molecules at the ITO (indium tin oxide)/BHJ interface could be increased relative to the acceptor. Appropriate selection of SASM facilitated a synchronized enhancement in external quantum efficiency and power conversion efficiencies over 10.5%.

  10. Kynurenine pathway metabolites and enzymes involved in redox reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Esquivel, D; Ramírez-Ortega, D; Pineda, B; Castro, N; Ríos, C; Pérez de la Cruz, V

    2017-01-01

    Oxido-reduction reactions are a fundamental part of the life due to support many vital biological processes as cellular respiration and glucose oxidation. In the redox reactions, one substance transfers one or more electrons to another substance. An important electron carrier is the coenzyme NAD + , which is involved in many metabolic pathways. De novo biosynthesis of NAD + is through the kynurenine pathway, the major route of tryptophan catabolism, which is sensitive to redox environment and produces metabolites with redox capacity, able to alter biological functions that are controlled by redox-responsive signaling pathways. Kynurenine pathway metabolites have been implicated in the physiology process and in the physiopathology of many diseases; processes that also share others factors as dysregulation of calcium homeostasis, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, inflammation and cell death, which impact the redox environment. This review examines in detail the available evidence in which kynurenine pathway metabolites participate in redox reactions and their effect on cellular redox homeostasis, since the knowledge of the main factors and mechanisms that lead to cell death in many neurodegenative disorders and other pathologies, such as mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and kynurenines imbalance, will allow to develop therapies using them as targets. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'The Kynurenine Pathway in Health and Disease'. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. NNT reverse mode of operation mediates glucose control of mitochondrial NADPH and glutathione redox state in mouse pancreatic β-cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laila R.B. Santos

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The glucose stimulation of insulin secretion (GSIS by pancreatic β-cells critically depends on increased production of metabolic coupling factors, including NADPH. Nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (NNT typically produces NADPH at the expense of NADH and ΔpH in energized mitochondria. Its spontaneous inactivation in C57BL/6J mice was previously shown to alter ATP production, Ca2+ influx, and GSIS, thereby leading to glucose intolerance. Here, we tested the role of NNT in the glucose regulation of mitochondrial NADPH and glutathione redox state and reinvestigated its role in GSIS coupling events in mouse pancreatic islets. Methods: Islets were isolated from female C57BL/6J mice (J-islets, which lack functional NNT, and genetically close C57BL/6N mice (N-islets. Wild-type mouse NNT was expressed in J-islets by adenoviral infection. Mitochondrial and cytosolic glutathione oxidation was measured with glutaredoxin 1-fused roGFP2 probes targeted or not to the mitochondrial matrix. NADPH and NADH redox state was measured biochemically. Insulin secretion and upstream coupling events were measured under dynamic or static conditions by standard procedures. Results: NNT is largely responsible for the acute glucose-induced rise in islet NADPH/NADP+ ratio and decrease in mitochondrial glutathione oxidation, with a small impact on cytosolic glutathione. However, contrary to current views on NNT in β-cells, these effects resulted from a glucose-dependent reduction in NADPH consumption by NNT reverse mode of operation, rather than from a stimulation of its forward mode of operation. Accordingly, the lack of NNT in J-islets decreased their sensitivity to exogenous H2O2 at non-stimulating glucose. Surprisingly, the lack of NNT did not alter the glucose-stimulation of Ca2+ influx and upstream mitochondrial events, but it markedly reduced both phases of GSIS by altering Ca2+-induced exocytosis and its metabolic amplification. Conclusion: These

  12. Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase 1 (MKP-1) in macrophage biology and cardiovascular disease. A redox-regulated master controller of monocyte function and macrophage phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hong Seok; Asmis, Reto

    2017-08-01

    MAPK pathways play a critical role in the activation of monocytes and macrophages by pathogens, signaling molecules and environmental cues and in the regulation of macrophage function and plasticity. MAPK phosphatase 1 (MKP-1) has emerged as the main counter-regulator of MAPK signaling in monocytes and macrophages. Loss of MKP-1 in monocytes and macrophages in response to metabolic stress leads to dysregulation of monocyte adhesion and migration, and gives rise to dysfunctional, proatherogenic monocyte-derived macrophages. Here we review the properties of this redox-regulated dual-specificity MAPK phosphatase and the role of MKP-1 in monocyte and macrophage biology and cardiovascular diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. PPOOLEX experiments on thermal stratification and mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puustinen, M.; Laine, J.; Raesaenen, A. (Lappeenranta Univ. of Technology, Nuclear Safety Research Unit (Finland))

    2009-08-15

    The results of the thermal stratification experiments in 2008 with the PPOOLEX test facility are presented. PPOOLEX is a closed vessel divided into two compartments, dry well and wet well. Extra temperature measurements for capturing different aspects of the investigated phenomena were added before the experiments. The main purpose of the experiment series was to generate verification data for evaluating the capability of GOTHIC code to predict stratification and mixing phenomena. Altogether six experiments were carried out. Heat-up periods of several thousand seconds by steam injection into the dry well compartment and from there into the wet well water pool were recorded. The initial water bulk temperature was 20 deg. C. Cooling periods of several days were included in three experiments. A large difference between the pool bottom and top layer temperature was measured when small steam flow rates were used. With higher flow rates the mixing effect of steam discharge delayed the start of stratification until the pool bulk temperature exceeded 50 deg. C. The stratification process was also different in these two cases. With a small flow rate stratification was observed only above and just below the blowdown pipe outlet elevation. With a higher flow rate over a 30 deg. C temperature difference between the pool bottom and pipe outlet elevation was measured. Elevations above the pipe outlet indicated almost linear rise until the end of steam discharge. During the cooling periods the measurements of the bottom third of the pool first had an increasing trend although there was no heat input from outside. This was due to thermal diffusion downwards from the higher elevations. Heat-up in the gas space of the wet well was quite strong, first due to compression by pressure build-up and then by heat conduction from the hot dry well compartment via the intermediate floor and test vessel walls and by convection from the upper layers of the hot pool water. The gas space

  14. PPOOLEX experiments on thermal stratification and mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puustinen, M.; Laine, J.; Raesaenen, A.

    2009-08-01

    The results of the thermal stratification experiments in 2008 with the PPOOLEX test facility are presented. PPOOLEX is a closed vessel divided into two compartments, dry well and wet well. Extra temperature measurements for capturing different aspects of the investigated phenomena were added before the experiments. The main purpose of the experiment series was to generate verification data for evaluating the capability of GOTHIC code to predict stratification and mixing phenomena. Altogether six experiments were carried out. Heat-up periods of several thousand seconds by steam injection into the dry well compartment and from there into the wet well water pool were recorded. The initial water bulk temperature was 20 deg. C. Cooling periods of several days were included in three experiments. A large difference between the pool bottom and top layer temperature was measured when small steam flow rates were used. With higher flow rates the mixing effect of steam discharge delayed the start of stratification until the pool bulk temperature exceeded 50 deg. C. The stratification process was also different in these two cases. With a small flow rate stratification was observed only above and just below the blowdown pipe outlet elevation. With a higher flow rate over a 30 deg. C temperature difference between the pool bottom and pipe outlet elevation was measured. Elevations above the pipe outlet indicated almost linear rise until the end of steam discharge. During the cooling periods the measurements of the bottom third of the pool first had an increasing trend although there was no heat input from outside. This was due to thermal diffusion downwards from the higher elevations. Heat-up in the gas space of the wet well was quite strong, first due to compression by pressure build-up and then by heat conduction from the hot dry well compartment via the intermediate floor and test vessel walls and by convection from the upper layers of the hot pool water. The gas space

  15. Experimental study on the fluid stratification mechanism in the density lock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Haifeng; Yan Changqi; Sun Licheng

    2009-01-01

    Visualized experiments were conducted on the forming process of stratification between hot and cold fluids in three tubes with different diameters. The results show that the working fluids were divided into three layers from top to bottom: convective, interfacial, and constant temperature layers. The working fluid in the convective layer always retains the property of a high rate of temperature increase. The rate of temperature increase in the interfacial layer gradually decreased from top to bottom and was less than that in the convective layer. The working fluid temperature in the constant-temperature layer remained stable. Based on the experimental study, we built a simplified theoretical model and analyzed the stratification mechanism. The results indicate the following stratification mechanism: because of the existence of the transition points in the heat transfer modes, the differences in the rates of temperature increase appear. These differences result in the appearance of fluid stratification. In addition, research on the process of stratification under different conditions tells us that the structure of the density lock influences the position of the transition point. The density lock with a structure of variable cross-sectional grids can effectively control the position of the transition points of the heat transfer modes. (author)

  16. Stratification in SNR-300 outlet plenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinders, R.

    1983-01-01

    In the inner outlet plenum of the SNR-300 under steady state conditions a large toroidal vortex is expected. The main flow passes through the gap between dipplate and shield vessel to the outer annular space. Only 3% of the flow pass the 24 emergency cooling holes, situated in the shield vessel. The sodium leaves the reactor tank through the 3 symmetrically arranged outlet nozzles. For a scram flow rates and temperatures are decreased simultaneously, so it is expected, that stratification occurs in the inner outlet plenum. A measure of stratification effects is the Archimedes Number Ar, which is the relation of buoyancy forces (negative) to kinetic energy. (The Archimedes Number is nearly identical with the Richardson Number). For values Ar>1 stratification can occur. Under the assumption of stratification the code TIRE was developed, which is only applicable for the period of time after some 50 sec after scram. This code serves for long term calculations. As the equations are very simple, it is a very fast code which gives the possibility to calculate transients for some hours real time. This code mainly has to take into account the pressure difference between inner plenum and outlet annulus caused by geodatic pressure. That force is in equilibrium with the pressure drop over the gap and holes in the shield vessel. For more detailed calculations of flow pattern and temperature distribution the code MIX and INKO 2T are applied. MIX was developed and validated at ANL, INKO 2T is a development of INTERATOM. INKO 2T is under validation. Mock up experiments were carried out with water to simulate the transient behavior of the SNR-300 outlet plenum. Calculations obtained by INKO 2T for steady state and the transient are shown for the flow pattern. Results of measurements also prove that stratification begins after about 30 sec. Measurements and detailed calculations show that it is admissible to use the code TIRE for the long term calculations. Calculations for a scram

  17. A study of redox kinetic in silicate melt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnien, V.

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this thesis is to understand better iron redox reactions and mechanisms in silicate glasses and melts. Particular interest has been paid to the influence of temperature and chemical composition. For this purpose, the influence of alkali element content, iron content and network formers on the kinetics of redox reactions has been determined through XANES and Raman spectroscopy experiments performed either near the glass transition or above the liquidus temperature. As a complement, electrical conductivity and RBS spectroscopy experiments have been made to characterize the diffusivity of the species that transport electrical charges and the reaction morphology, respectively. Temperature and composition variations can induce changes in the dominating redox mechanism. At a given temperature, the parameters that exert the strongest influence on redox mechanisms are the presence or lack of divalent cations and the existing decoupling between the mobility of network former and modifier elements. Near Tg, the diffusion of divalent cations, when present in the melt, controls the kinetics of iron redox reactions along with a flux of electron holes. Composition, through the degree of polymerization and the silicate network structure, influences the kinetics and the nature of the involved cations, but not the mechanisms of the reaction. Without alkaline earth elements, the kinetics of redox reactions are controlled by the diffusion of oxygen species. With increasing temperatures, the diffusivities of all ionic species tend to become similar. The decoupling between ionic fluxes then is reduced so that several mechanisms become kinetically equivalent and can thus coexist. (author)

  18. Investigating Summer Thermal Stratification in Lake Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, S. C.; Arifin, R. R.; Craig, P. M.; Hamlet, A. F.

    2017-12-01

    Seasonal temperature variations establish strong vertical density gradients (thermoclines) between the epilimnion and hypolimnion. Accurate simulation of vertical mixing and seasonal stratification of large lakes is a crucial element of the thermodynamic coupling between lakes and the atmosphere in integrated models. Time-varying thermal stratification patterns can be accurately simulated with the versatile Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC). Lake Ontario bathymetry was interpolated onto a 2-km-resolution curvilinear grid with vertical layering using a new approach in EFDC+, the so-called "sigma-zed" coordinate system which allows the number of vertical layers to be varied based on water depth. Inflow from the Niagara River and outflow to the St. Lawrence River in conjunction with hourly meteorological data from seven local weather stations plus three-hourly data from the North American Regional Reanalysis govern the hydrodynamic and thermodynamic responses of the Lake. EFDC+'s evaporation algorithm was updated to more accurately simulate net surface heat fluxes. A new vertical mixing scheme from Vinçon-Leite that implements different eddy diffusivity formulations above and below the thermocline was compared to results from the original Mellor-Yamada vertical mixing scheme. The model was calibrated by adjusting solar-radiation absorption coefficients in addition to background horizontal and vertical mixing parameters. Model skill was evaluated by comparing measured and simulated vertical temperature profiles at shallow (20 m) and deep (180 m) locations on the Lake. These model improvements, especially the new sigma-zed vertical discretization, accurately capture thermal-stratification patterns with low root-mean-squared errors when using the Vinçon-Leite vertical mixing scheme.

  19. Skin Antiageing and Systemic Redox Effects of Supplementation with Marine Collagen Peptides and Plant-Derived Antioxidants: A Single-Blind Case-Control Clinical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara De Luca

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, development and research of nutraceuticals based on marine collagen peptides (MCPs have been growing due to their high homology with human collagens, safety, bioavailability through gut, and numerous bioactivities. The major concern regarding safety of MCPs intake relates to increased risk of oxidative stress connected with collagen synthesis (likewise in fibrosis and to ROS production by MCPs-stimulated phagocytes. In this clinical-laboratory study, fish skin MCPs combined with plant-derived skin-targeting antioxidants (AO (coenzyme Q10 + grape-skin extract + luteolin + selenium were administered to volunteers (n=41. Skin properties (moisture, elasticity, sebum production, and biological age and ultrasonic markers (epidermal/dermal thickness and acoustic density were measured thrice (2 months before treatment and before and after cessation of 2-month oral intake. The supplementation remarkably improved skin elasticity, sebum production, and dermal ultrasonic markers. Metabolic data showed significant increase of plasma hydroxyproline and ATP storage in erythrocytes. Redox parameters, GSH/coenzyme Q10 content, and GPx/GST activities were unchanged, while NO and MDA were moderately increased within, however, normal range of values. Conclusions. A combination of MCPs with skin-targeting AOs could be effective and safe supplement to improve skin properties without risk of oxidative damage.

  20. Skin Antiageing and Systemic Redox Effects of Supplementation with Marine Collagen Peptides and Plant-Derived Antioxidants: A Single-Blind Case-Control Clinical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Chiara; Mikhal'chik, Elena V.; Suprun, Maxim V.; Papacharalambous, Michael; Truhanov, Arseniy I.; Korkina, Liudmila G.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, development and research of nutraceuticals based on marine collagen peptides (MCPs) have been growing due to their high homology with human collagens, safety, bioavailability through gut, and numerous bioactivities. The major concern regarding safety of MCPs intake relates to increased risk of oxidative stress connected with collagen synthesis (likewise in fibrosis) and to ROS production by MCPs-stimulated phagocytes. In this clinical-laboratory study, fish skin MCPs combined with plant-derived skin-targeting antioxidants (AO) (coenzyme Q10 + grape-skin extract + luteolin + selenium) were administered to volunteers (n = 41). Skin properties (moisture, elasticity, sebum production, and biological age) and ultrasonic markers (epidermal/dermal thickness and acoustic density) were measured thrice (2 months before treatment and before and after cessation of 2-month oral intake). The supplementation remarkably improved skin elasticity, sebum production, and dermal ultrasonic markers. Metabolic data showed significant increase of plasma hydroxyproline and ATP storage in erythrocytes. Redox parameters, GSH/coenzyme Q10 content, and GPx/GST activities were unchanged, while NO and MDA were moderately increased within, however, normal range of values. Conclusions. A combination of MCPs with skin-targeting AOs could be effective and safe supplement to improve skin properties without risk of oxidative damage. PMID:26904164

  1. Control of magnetism by electrical charge doping or redox reactions in a surface-oxidized Co thin film with a solid-state capacitor structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, T.; Koyama, T.; Chiba, D.

    2018-03-01

    We have investigated the electric field (EF) effect on magnetism in a Co thin film with a naturally oxidized surface. The EF was applied to the oxidized Co surface through a gate insulator layer made of HfO2, which was formed using atomic layer deposition (ALD). The efficiency of the EF effect on the magnetic anisotropy in the sample with the HfO2 layer deposited at the appropriate temperature for the ALD process was relatively large compared to the previously reported values with an unoxidized Co film. The coercivity promptly and reversibly followed the variation in gate voltage. The modulation of the channel resistance was at most ˜0.02%. In contrast, a dramatic change in the magnetic properties including the large change in the saturation magnetic moment and a much larger EF-induced modulation of the channel resistance (˜10%) were observed in the sample with a HfO2 layer deposited at a temperature far below the appropriate temperature range. The response of these properties to the gate voltage was very slow, suggesting that a redox reaction dominated the EF effect on the magnetism in this sample. The frequency response for the capacitive properties was examined to discuss the difference in the mechanism of the EF effect observed here.

  2. Redox control of ferrocene-based complexes with systematically extended π-conjugated connectors: switchable and tailorable second order nonlinear optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Yong; Ma, Na-Na; Sun, Shi-Ling; Qiu, Yong-Qing

    2014-03-14

    The studies of geometrical structures, thermal stabilities, redox properties, nonlinear responses and optoelectronic properties have been carried out on a series of novel ferrocenyl (Fc) chromophores with the view of assessing their switchable and tailorable second order nonlinear optics (NLO). The use of a constant Fc donor and a 4,4'-bipyridinium acceptor and varied conjugated bridges makes it possible to systematically determine the contribution of organic connectors to chromophore nonlinear optical activities. The structures reveal that both the reduction reactions and organic connectors have a significant influence on 4,4'-bipyridinium. The potential energy surface maps along with plots of reduced density gradient mirror the thermal stabilities of the Fc-based chromophores. The first and second reductions take place preferentially at the 4,4'-bipyridinium moieties. Significantly, the reduction processes result in the molecular switches with large NLO contrast varying from zero or very small to a large value. Moreover, time-dependent density functional theory results indicate that the absorption peaks are mainly attributed to Fc to 4,4'-bipyridinium charge transfer and the mixture of intramolecular charge transfer within the two respective 4,4'-bipyridinium moieties coupled with interlayer charge transfer between the two 4,4'-bipyridinium moieties. This provides us with comprehensive information on the effect of organic connectors on the NLO properties.

  3. Bifunctional redox flow battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, Y.H.; Cheng, J.; Xun, Y.; Ma, P.H.; Yang, Y.S.

    2008-01-01

    A new bifunctional redox flow battery (BRFB) system, V(III)/V(II)-L-cystine(O 2 ), was systematically investigated by using different separators. It is shown that during charge, water transfer is significantly restricted with increasing the concentration of HBr when the Nafion 115 cation exchange membrane is employed. The same result can be obtained when the gas diffusion layer (GDL) hot-pressed separator is used. The organic electro-synthesis is directly correlated with the crossover of vanadium. When employing the anion exchange membrane, the electro-synthesis efficiency is over 96% due to a minimal crossover of vanadium. When the GDL hot-pressed separator is applied, the crossover of vanadium and water transfer are noticeably prevented and the electro-synthesis efficiency of over 99% is obtained. Those impurities such as vanadium ions and bromine can be eliminated through the purification of organic electro-synthesized products. The purified product is identified to be L-cysteic acid by IR spectrum. The BRFB shows a favorable discharge performance at a current density of 20 mA cm -2 . Best discharge performance is achieved by using the GDL hot-pressed separator. The coulombic efficiency of 87% and energy efficiency of about 58% can be obtained. The cause of major energy losses is mainly associated with the cross-contamination of anodic and cathodic active electrolytes

  4. Quantitative stratification of diffuse parenchymal lung diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushravya Raghunath

    Full Text Available Diffuse parenchymal lung diseases (DPLDs are characterized by widespread pathological changes within the pulmonary tissue that impair the elasticity and gas exchange properties of the lungs. Clinical-radiological diagnosis of these diseases remains challenging and their clinical course is characterized by variable disease progression. These challenges have hindered the introduction of robust objective biomarkers for patient-specific prediction based on specific phenotypes in clinical practice for patients with DPLD. Therefore, strategies facilitating individualized clinical management, staging and identification of specific phenotypes linked to clinical disease outcomes or therapeutic responses are urgently needed. A classification schema consistently reflecting the radiological, clinical (lung function and clinical outcomes and pathological features of a disease represents a critical need in modern pulmonary medicine. Herein, we report a quantitative stratification paradigm to identify subsets of DPLD patients with characteristic radiologic patterns in an unsupervised manner and demonstrate significant correlation of these self-organized disease groups with clinically accepted surrogate endpoints. The proposed consistent and reproducible technique could potentially transform diagnostic staging, clinical management and prognostication of DPLD patients as well as facilitate patient selection for clinical trials beyond the ability of current radiological tools. In addition, the sequential quantitative stratification of the type and extent of parenchymal process may allow standardized and objective monitoring of disease, early assessment of treatment response and mortality prediction for DPLD patients.

  5. Quantitative Stratification of Diffuse Parenchymal Lung Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunath, Sushravya; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Karwoski, Ronald A.; Maldonado, Fabien; Peikert, Tobias; Moua, Teng; Ryu, Jay H.; Bartholmai, Brian J.; Robb, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Diffuse parenchymal lung diseases (DPLDs) are characterized by widespread pathological changes within the pulmonary tissue that impair the elasticity and gas exchange properties of the lungs. Clinical-radiological diagnosis of these diseases remains challenging and their clinical course is characterized by variable disease progression. These challenges have hindered the introduction of robust objective biomarkers for patient-specific prediction based on specific phenotypes in clinical practice for patients with DPLD. Therefore, strategies facilitating individualized clinical management, staging and identification of specific phenotypes linked to clinical disease outcomes or therapeutic responses are urgently needed. A classification schema consistently reflecting the radiological, clinical (lung function and clinical outcomes) and pathological features of a disease represents a critical need in modern pulmonary medicine. Herein, we report a quantitative stratification paradigm to identify subsets of DPLD patients with characteristic radiologic patterns in an unsupervised manner and demonstrate significant correlation of these self-organized disease groups with clinically accepted surrogate endpoints. The proposed consistent and reproducible technique could potentially transform diagnostic staging, clinical management and prognostication of DPLD patients as well as facilitate patient selection for clinical trials beyond the ability of current radiological tools. In addition, the sequential quantitative stratification of the type and extent of parenchymal process may allow standardized and objective monitoring of disease, early assessment of treatment response and mortality prediction for DPLD patients. PMID:24676019

  6. Characterisation of the Redox Sensitive NMDA Receptor

    KAUST Repository

    Alzahrani, Ohood

    2016-05-01

    Glucose entry into the brain and its subsequent metabolism to L-lactate, regulated by astrocytes, plays a major role in synaptic plasticity and memory formation. A recent study has shown that L-lactate produced by the brain upon stimulation of glycolysis, and glycogen-derived L-lactate from astrocytes and its transport into neurons, is crucial for memory formation. A recent study revealed the molecular mechanisms that underlie the role of L-lactate in neuronal plasticity and long-term memory formation. L-lactate was shown to induce a cascade of molecular events via modulation of redox-sensitive N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activity that was mimicked by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide hydride (NADH) co-enzyme. This indicated that changes in cellular redox state, following L-lactate transport inside the cells and its subsequent metabolism, production of NADH, and favouring a reduced state are the key effects of L-lactate. Therefore, we are investigating the role of L-lactate in modulating NMDA receptor function via redox modulatory sites. Accordingly, crucial redox-sensitive cysteine residues, Cys320 and Cys87, of the NR2A NMDA receptor subunit are mutated using site-directed mutation, transfected, and expressed in HEK293 cells. This cellular system will then be used to characterise and monitor its activity upon Llactate stimulation, compared to the wild type. This will be achieved by calcium imaging, using fluorescent microscopy. Our data shows that L-lactate potentiated NMDA receptor activity and increased intracellular calcium influx in NR1/NR2A wild type compared to the control condition (WT NR1/NR2A perfused with (1μM) glutamate and (1μM) glycine agonist only), showing faster response initiation and slower decay rate of the calcium signal to the baseline. Additionally, stimulating with L-lactate associated with greater numbers of cells having high fluorescent intensity (peak amplitude) compared to the control. Furthermore, L-lactate rescued the

  7. Proteostasis and REDOX state in the heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christians, Elisabeth S.

    2012-01-01

    Force-generating contractile cells of the myocardium must achieve and maintain their primary function as an efficient mechanical pump over the life span of the organism. Because only half of the cardiomyocytes can be replaced during the entire human life span, the maintenance strategy elicited by cardiac cells relies on uninterrupted renewal of their components, including proteins whose specialized functions constitute this complex and sophisticated contractile apparatus. Thus cardiac proteins are continuously synthesized and degraded to ensure proteome homeostasis, also termed “proteostasis.” Once synthesized, proteins undergo additional folding, posttranslational modifications, and trafficking and/or become involved in protein-protein or protein-DNA interactions to exert their functions. This includes key transient interactions of cardiac proteins with molecular chaperones, which assist with quality control at multiple levels to prevent misfolding or to facilitate degradation. Importantly, cardiac proteome maintenance depends on the cellular environment and, in particular, the reduction-oxidation (REDOX) state, which is significantly different among cardiac organelles (e.g., mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum). Taking into account the high metabolic activity for oxygen consumption and ATP production by mitochondria, it is a challenge for cardiac cells to maintain the REDOX state while preventing either excessive oxidative or reductive stress. A perturbed REDOX environment can affect protein handling and conformation (e.g., disulfide bonds), disrupt key structure-function relationships, and trigger a pathogenic cascade of protein aggregation, decreased cell survival, and increased organ dysfunction. This review covers current knowledge regarding the general domain of REDOX state and protein folding, specifically in cardiomyocytes under normal-healthy conditions and during disease states associated with morbidity and mortality in humans. PMID:22003057

  8. Hydrologic influence on redox dynamics in estuarine environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, H. A.; Kim, K. H.; Guimond, J. A.; Heiss, J.; Ullman, W. J.; Seyfferth, A.

    2017-12-01

    Redox conditions in coastal aquifers control reactions that impact nutrient cycling, contaminant release, and carbon budgets, with implications for water resources and ecosystem health. Hydrologic changes can shift redox boundaries and inputs of reactants, especially in dynamic coastal systems subject to fluctuations on tidal, lunar, and longer timescales. We present two examples of redox shifts in estuarine systems in Delaware, USA: a beach aquifer and a saltmarsh. Beach aquifers are biogeochemical hot spots due to mixing between fresh groundwater and infiltrating seawater. At Cape Henlopen, DE, geochemical measurements identified reactions in the intertidal aquifer that include cycling of carbon, nitrogen, iron, and sulfur. Measurements and modeling illustrate that redox potential as well as the locations of redox reactions shift on tidal to seasonal timescales and in response to changing beach and aquifer properties, impacting overall rates of reactions such as denitrification that reduces N loads to coastal waters. In the St. Jones National Estuarine Research Reserve, tidal fluctuations in channels cause periodic groundwater-surface water exchange, water table movement, and intermittent flooding that varies spatially across the saltmarsh. These changes create shifts in redox potential that are greatest near channels and in the top 20 cm of sediments. The magnitude of redox change depends on hydrologic setting (near channels or in marsh interior), hydrologic conditions (tidal stage, seasonal shifts), as well as prevalence of macropores created by crab burrows that change seasonally with crab activity. These shifts correspond to changes in porewater chemistry that have implications for nutrient cycling and carbon export to the ocean. Understanding hydrologic influence on redox geochemistry is critical for predicting how these systems and their ecosystem services may change in the future in response to anthropogenic and climate change.

  9. Organic Redox Species in Aqueous Flow Batteries: Redox Potentials, Chemical Stability and Solubility

    OpenAIRE

    Kristina Wedege; Emil Dražević; Denes Konya; Anders Bentien

    2016-01-01

    Organic molecules are currently investigated as redox species for aqueous low-cost redox flow batteries (RFBs). The envisioned features of using organic redox species are low cost and increased flexibility with respect to tailoring redox potential and solubility from molecular engineering of side groups on the organic redox-active species. In this paper 33, mainly quinone-based, compounds are studied experimentially in terms of pH dependent redox potential, solubility and stability, combined ...

  10. Syncope: risk stratification and clinical decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, Suzanne Y G; Hoek, Amber E; Mollink, Susan M; Huff, J Stephen

    2014-04-01

    Syncope is a common occurrence in the emergency department, accounting for approximately 1% to 3% of presentations. Syncope is best defined as a brief loss of consciousness and postural tone followed by spontaneous and complete recovery. The spectrum of etiologies ranges from benign to life threatening, and a structured approach to evaluating these patients is key to providing care that is thorough, yet cost-effective. This issue reviews the most relevant evidence for managing and risk stratifying the syncope patient, beginning with a focused history, physical examination, electrocardiogram, and tailored diagnostic testing. Several risk stratification decision rules are compared for performance in various scenarios, including how age and associated comorbidities may predict short-term and long-term adverse events. An algorithm for structured, evidence-based care of the syncope patient is included to ensure that patients requiring hospitalization are managed appropriately and those with benign causes are discharged safely.

  11. Thermal stratifications. An industrial point of view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peniguel, C.

    1995-11-01

    In PWR's, mechanical damages (cracks) have been detected at the internal faces of steam generator feedwater piping when thermal stratification occurs. This paper reports some studies of flows under operating conditions leading to of a stable stratified flow. Two geometries corresponding to different mock-up studied at EDF and CEA have been investigated. Numerical simulations have been performed with the code ESTET. Good agreement is observed on the mean temperature but it seems that the present modelling of the temperature variance fails to reproduce correctly the fluctuating phenomena It appears that with a stably stratified flow, wall conduction should be taken into account. It lead us to create a new numerical tool (SYRTHES) to compute the thermal field inside the wall, and the thermal coupling between the fluid and the solid at the interface. Some industrial examples illustrating the use of such a numerical tool are briefly presented. (author). 12 refs., 13 figs

  12. Ventricular repolarization measures for arrhythmic risk stratification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Francesco Monitillo; Marta Leone; Caterina Rizzo; Andrea Passantino; Massimo Iacoviello

    2016-01-01

    Ventricular repolarization is a complex electrical phenomenon which represents a crucial stage in electrical cardiac activity. It is expressed on the surface electrocardiogram by the interval between the start of the QRS complex and the end of the T wave or U wave(QT). Several physiological, pathological and iatrogenic factors can influence ventricular repolarization. It has been demonstrated that small perturbations in this process can be a potential trigger of malignant arrhythmias, therefore the analysis of ventricular repolarization represents an interesting tool to implement risk stratification of arrhythmic events in different clinical settings. The aim of this review is to critically revise the traditional methods of static analysis of ventricular repolarization as well as those for dynamic evaluation, their prognostic significance and the possible application in daily clinical practice.

  13. Nonlinear waves in waveguides with stratification

    CERN Document Server

    Leble, Sergei B

    1991-01-01

    S.B. Leble's book deals with nonlinear waves and their propagation in metallic and dielectric waveguides and media with stratification. The underlying nonlinear evolution equations (NEEs) are derived giving also their solutions for specific situations. The reader will find new elements to the traditional approach. Various dispersion and relaxation laws for different guides are considered as well as the explicit form of projection operators, NEEs, quasi-solitons and of Darboux transforms. Special points relate to: 1. the development of a universal asymptotic method of deriving NEEs for guide propagation; 2. applications to the cases of stratified liquids, gases, solids and plasmas with various nonlinearities and dispersion laws; 3. connections between the basic problem and soliton- like solutions of the corresponding NEEs; 4. discussion of details of simple solutions in higher- order nonsingular perturbation theory.

  14. STRATIFICATION TECHNIQUE IN MAXILLARY ANTERIOR INCISORS RESTORATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet Kirilova

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Because of their main characteristics: transparency, opalescence and color density, the tooth structures are extremely difficult to restore by means of completely inconspicuous restorations of the natural tooth tissue characteristics. The aim is to show successful aesthetic restoration of III Class dental lesions in upper incisors by means of high quality composites. Materials and method: A female patient visited the clinic being not satisfied with the esthetics of her front teeth. The intraoral examination showed previous restorations and carious lesions in 12, 11, 21, 22. After defining the tooth color a silicone key was made. The treatment was performed under anesthesia, the existing restorations were removed and the carious lesions in teeth 11, 12, 21, 22 were treated with restorations using Vanini edge preparation. The teeth were restored by means of stratification technique. After etching and rinsing, bonding was applied for 20 sec. and then polymerized. After fixing the silicone key enamel shade was applied and then dentine shades UD2, UD3, UD4 of 0.5mm thickness each. The polymerization was done layer by layer. Applied were 10 to 15 layers in total. The composite material was preheated in oven up to 55. Teeth 21 and 22 are restored with Enamel Plus HRi (Micerium. Results and Discussion: Excellent aesthetics is achieved with composite material. They have enamel and dentine shades and allow high quality aesthetics. The polishing is excellent in Enamel Plus HRi (Micerium which is typical for this type of composite. The result of the carious lesion treatment in this patient is real improvement of the dental appearance of her anterior incisors. Conclusion: Materials show excellent aesthetic results due to their characteristics and the stratification technique used.

  15. Temperature stratification in a hot water tank with circulation pipe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Elsa

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the project is to investigate the change in temperature stratification due to the operation of a circulation pipe. Further, putting forward rules for design of pipe inlet in order not to disturb the temperature stratification in the hot water tank. A validated computer model based on t...

  16. Dynamo Tests for Stratification Below the Core-Mantle Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, P.; Landeau, M.

    2017-12-01

    Evidence from seismology, mineral physics, and core dynamics points to a layer with an overall stable stratification in the Earth's outer core, possibly thermal in origin, extending below the core-mantle boundary (CMB) for several hundred kilometers. In contrast, energetic deep mantle convection with elevated heat flux implies locally unstable thermal stratification below the CMB in places, consistent with interpretations of non-dipole geomagnetic field behavior that favor upwelling flows below the CMB. Here, we model the structure of convection and magnetic fields in the core using numerical dynamos with laterally heterogeneous boundary heat flux in order to rationalize this conflicting evidence. Strongly heterogeneous boundary heat flux generates localized convection beneath the CMB that coexists with an overall stable stratification there. Partially stratified dynamos have distinctive time average magnetic field structures. Without stratification or with stratification confined to a thin layer, the octupole component is small and the CMB magnetic field structure includes polar intensity minima. With more extensive stratification, the octupole component is large and the magnetic field structure includes intense patches or high intensity lobes in the polar regions. Comparisons with the time-averaged geomagnetic field are generally favorable for partial stratification in a thin layer but unfavorable for stratification in a thick layer beneath the CMB.

  17. Investigations on stratification devices for hot water stores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Elsa; Furbo, Simon; Hampel, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    The significance of the thermal stratification for the energy efficiency of small solar-thermal hot water heat stores is pointed out. Exemplary the thermal stratification build-up with devices already marketed as well as with devices still in development has been investigated experimentally...

  18. Optimized endogenous post-stratification in forest inventories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul L. Patterson

    2012-01-01

    An example of endogenous post-stratification is the use of remote sensing data with a sample of ground data to build a logistic regression model to predict the probability that a plot is forested and using the predicted probabilities to form categories for post-stratification. An optimized endogenous post-stratified estimator of the proportion of forest has been...

  19. Awortwi et al.: Mixing and stratification relationship on phytoplankton ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Awortwi et al.: Mixing and stratification relationship on phytoplankton of Lake Bosomtwe (Ghana) 43 West African Journal of Applied Ecology, vol. 23(2), 2015: 43–62. The Relationship Between Mixing and Stratification Regime on the Phytoplankton of Lake Bo.

  20. The role stratification on Indian ocean mixing under global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praveen, V.; Valsala, V.; Ravindran, A. M.

    2017-12-01

    The impact of changes in Indian ocean stratification on mixing under global warming is examined. Previous studies on global warming and associated weakening of winds reported to increase the stratification of the world ocean leading to a reduction in mixing, increased acidity, reduced oxygen and there by a reduction in productivity. However this processes is not uniform and are also modulated by changes in wind pattern of the future. Our study evaluate the role of stratification and surface fluxes on mixing focusing northern Indian ocean. A dynamical downscaling study using Regional ocean Modelling system (ROMS) forced with stratification and surface fluxes from selected CMIP5 models are presented. Results from an extensive set of historical and Representative Concentration Pathways 8.5 (rcp8.5) scenario simulations are used to quantify the distinctive role of stratification on mixing.

  1. TEMPOL increases NAD+ and improves redox imbalance in obese mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayumi Yamato

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Continuous energy conversion is controlled by reduction–oxidation (redox processes. NAD+ and NADH represent an important redox couple in energy metabolism. 4-Hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl (TEMPOL is a redox-cycling nitroxide that promotes the scavenging of several reactive oxygen species (ROS and is reduced to hydroxylamine by NADH. TEMPOL is also involved in NAD+ production in the ascorbic acid–glutathione redox cycle. We utilized the chemical properties of TEMPOL to investigate the effects of antioxidants and NAD+/NADH modulators on the metabolic imbalance in obese mice. Increases in the NAD+/NADH ratio by TEMPOL ameliorated the metabolic imbalance when combined with a dietary intervention, changing from a high-fat diet to a normal diet. Plasma levels of the superoxide marker dihydroethidium were higher in mice receiving the dietary intervention compared with a control diet, but were normalized with TEMPOL consumption. These findings provide novel insights into redox regulation in obesity.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of redox-active ferric nontronite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilgen, A. G.; Kukkadapu, R. K.; Dunphy, D. R.; Artyushkova, K.; Cerrato, J. M.; Kruichak, J. N.; Janish, M. T.; Sun, C. J.; Argo, J. M.; Washington, R. E.

    2017-10-01

    Heterogeneous redox reactions on clay mineral surfaces control mobility and bioavailability of redox-sensitive nutrients and contaminants. Iron (Fe) residing in clay mineral structures can either catalyze or directly participate in redox reactions; however, chemical controls over its reactivity are not fully understood. In our previous work we demonstrated that converting a minor portion of Fe(III) to Fe(II) (partial reduction) in the octahedral sheet of natural Fe-rich clay mineral nontronite (NAu-1) activates its surface, making it redox-active. In this study we produced and characterized synthetic ferric nontronite (SIP), highlighting structural and chemical similarities and differences between this synthetic nontronite and its natural counterpart NAu-1, and probed whether mineral surface is redox-active by reacting it with arsenic As(III) under oxic and anoxic conditions. We demonstrate that synthetic nontronite SIP undergoes the same activation as natural nontronite NAu-1 following the partial reduction treatment. Similar to NAu-1, SIP oxidized As(III) to As(V) under both oxic (catalytic pathway) and anoxic (direct oxidation) conditions. The similar reactivity trends observed for synthetic nontronite and its natural counterpart make SIP an appropriate analog for laboratory studies. The development of chemically pure analogs for ubiquitous soil minerals will allow for systematic research of the fundamental properties of these minerals.

  3. Correction of population stratification in large multi-ethnic association studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Serre

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The vast majority of genetic risk factors for complex diseases have, taken individually, a small effect on the end phenotype. Population-based association studies therefore need very large sample sizes to detect significant differences between affected and non-affected individuals. Including thousands of affected individuals in a study requires recruitment in numerous centers, possibly from different geographic regions. Unfortunately such a recruitment strategy is likely to complicate the study design and to generate concerns regarding population stratification.We analyzed 9,751 individuals representing three main ethnic groups - Europeans, Arabs and South Asians - that had been enrolled from 154 centers involving 52 countries for a global case/control study of acute myocardial infarction. All individuals were genotyped at 103 candidate genes using 1,536 SNPs selected with a tagging strategy that captures most of the genetic diversity in different populations. We show that relying solely on self-reported ethnicity is not sufficient to exclude population stratification and we present additional methods to identify and correct for stratification.Our results highlight the importance of carefully addressing population stratification and of carefully "cleaning" the sample prior to analyses to obtain stronger signals of association and to avoid spurious results.

  4. Redox Fluctuations Increase the Contribution of Lignin to Soil Respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, S. J.; Silver, W. L.; Timokhin, V.; Hammel, K.

    2014-12-01

    Lignin mineralization represents a critical flux in the terrestrial carbon (C) cycle, yet little is known about mechanisms and environmental factors controlling lignin breakdown in mineral soils. Hypoxia has long been thought to suppress lignin decomposition, yet variation in oxygen (O2) availability in surface soils accompanying moisture fluctuations could potentially stimulate this process by generating reactive oxygen species via coupled biotic and abiotic iron (Fe) redox cycling. Here, we tested the impact of redox fluctuations on lignin breakdown in humid tropical forest soils during ten-week laboratory incubations. We used synthetic lignins labeled with 13C in either of two positions (aromatic methoxyl and propyl Cβ) to provide highly sensitive and specific measures of lignin mineralization not previously employed in soils. Four-day redox fluctuations increased the percent contribution of methoxyl C to soil respiration, and cumulative methoxyl C mineralization was equivalent under static aerobic and fluctuating redox conditions despite lower total C mineralization in the latter treatment. Contributions of the highly stable Cβ to mineralization were also equivalent in static aerobic and fluctuating redox treatments during periods of O2 exposure, and nearly doubled in the fluctuating treatment after normalizing to cumulative O2 exposure. Oxygen fluctuations drove substantial net Fe reduction and oxidation, implying that reactive oxygen species generated during abiotic Fe oxidation likely contributed to the elevated contribution of lignin to C mineralization. Iron redox cycling provides a mechanism for lignin breakdown in soils that experience conditions unfavorable for canonical lignin-degrading organisms, and provides a potential mechanism for lignin depletion in soil organic matter during late-stage decomposition. Thus, close couplings between soil moisture, redox fluctuations, and lignin breakdown provide potential a link between climate variability and

  5. Extracellular redox state: refining the definition of oxidative stress in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Dean P

    2006-01-01

    Oxidative stress in aging can result from an imbalance of prooxidants and antioxidants with excessive, destructive free radical chemistry. Thiol systems are important in the control of these processes, both by protecting against damage and serving in redox signaling mechanisms to sense danger and repair the damage. Studies by a number of research groups in collaboration with the Emory Clinical Biomarkers Laboratory show that the redox state of the central tissue antioxidant, glutathione (GSH), can be measured in human plasma and provides a quantitative systemic indicator of oxidative stress. Plasma GSH/GSSG redox in humans becomes oxidized with age, in response to chemotherapy, as a consequence of cigarette smoking, and in association with common age-related diseases (e.g., type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease). However, the GSH/GSSG redox is not equilibrated with the larger plasma cysteine/cystine (Cys/CySS) pool, and the Cys/CySS redox varies with age in a pattern that is distinct from that of GSH/GSSG redox. Furthermore, in vitro studies show that variation in Cys/CySS redox over the range found in vivo affects signaling pathways, which control cell proliferation and oxidant-induced apoptosis. The results point to the conclusion that free radical scavenging antioxidants are of increased importance when thiol/disulfide redox states are oxidized. Because thiol/disulfide redox states, per se, function in redox signaling and control as well as antioxidant protection, GSH/GSSG and Cys/CySS redox states may provide central parameters to link environmental influences and progression of changes associated with aging.

  6. The redox-Mannich reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weijie; Seidel, Daniel

    2014-06-06

    A complement to the classic three-component Mannich reaction, the redox-Mannich reaction, utilizes the same starting materials but incorporates an isomerization step that enables the facile preparation of ring-substituted β-amino ketones. Reactions occur under relatively mild conditions and are facilitated by benzoic acid.

  7. Optical imaging the redox status change during cell apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ting; Zhang, Zhihong; Lin, Juqiang; Luo, Qingming

    2007-02-01

    Many cellular events involve the alteration in redox equilibrium, globally or locally. In many cases, excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is the underlying cause. Several green fluoresecence protein based indicators are constructed to measure redox status in cells, e.g, rxYFP and roGFPs, which allow real time detection. reduction and oxidization-sensitive GFP (RoGFPs) are more useful due to ratiometric variation by excitation, making the measurement more accurate. Utilizing one of those roGFPs called roGFP1, we establish a mitochondrial redox state probing platform in HeLa cells with laser scan confocal microscopy (LSCM) as detection system. Control experiments confirmed that our platform could produce stable ratiometric values, which made the data more accurately reflect the real environmental changes of redox status that roGFP1 probed. Using exogenous H IIO II and DTT, we evaluated the reactivity and reversibility of roGFP1. The minimal hydrogen peroxide concentration that roGFP1 could show detectable ratiometric changes in our system was about 200μM. Preliminarily applying our platform to exploring the redox status during apoptosis, we observed an increase in ratiometric, suggesting an excessive ROS production.

  8. Dihydroxybenzene/benzoquinone-containing polymers: organic redox polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moulay, S. [Universite de Blida, Lab. de Chimie-Physique Macromoleculaire, Institut de Chimie Industrielle (Algeria)

    2000-08-01

    Polymers containing hydroquinone, catechol or their corresponding benzoquinones are a special class of redox polymers. Three pathways of their syntheses are possible: condensation polymerization of suitable monomers, addition polymerization of vinyl monomers containing redox moiety, and chemical attachment of redox unit onto pre-made polymeric matrix. A range of functionalized matrices have been employed such as polyethers, polyesters, polycarbonates, polyurethanes, polyamides and others. Protection of their phenolic functionality has conducted to chemically interesting redox polymer precursors. The presence of a redox moiety coupled with the extant functionalization of the polymer matrix makes the materials very valuable, of wide properties and consequently of vast applicability. For instance, in the oil field, some polymers such as carboxy-methyl-cellulose (CMC) are often applied as to bring about a viscosity improvement and therefore to facilitate the oil drilling. In this regard, Patel evaluated sulfo-alkylated polymeric catechol, namely sulfo-methylated and sulfo-ethylated resins. Indeed, polymeric catechol chemically modified as such exhibited a marked ability to control the viscosity, the gel strength, as well as the filtrate loss of aqueous oil drilling fluids.

  9. Redox regulation in photosynthetic organisms: signaling, acclimation, and practical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foyer, Christine H; Noctor, Graham

    2009-04-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have multifaceted roles in the orchestration of plant gene expression and gene-product regulation. Cellular redox homeostasis is considered to be an "integrator" of information from metabolism and the environment controlling plant growth and acclimation responses, as well as cell suicide events. The different ROS forms influence gene expression in specific and sometimes antagonistic ways. Low molecular antioxidants (e.g., ascorbate, glutathione) serve not only to limit the lifetime of the ROS signals but also to participate in an extensive range of other redox signaling and regulatory functions. In contrast to the low molecular weight antioxidants, the "redox" states of components involved in photosynthesis such as plastoquinone show rapid and often transient shifts in response to changes in light and other environmental signals. Whereas both types of "redox regulation" are intimately linked through the thioredoxin, peroxiredoxin, and pyridine nucleotide pools, they also act independently of each other to achieve overall energy balance between energy-producing and energy-utilizing pathways. This review focuses on current knowledge of the pathways of redox regulation, with discussion of the somewhat juxtaposed hypotheses of "oxidative damage" versus "oxidative signaling," within the wider context of physiological function, from plant cell biology to potential applications.

  10. Redox-responsive theranostic nanoplatforms based on inorganic nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Lu; Zhang, Xiao-Yong; Wang, Yu-Long; Li, Xi; Yang, Xiao-Hong; Huang, Min; Hu, Kun; Li, Lu-Hai; Wei, Yen

    2017-08-10

    Spurred on by advances in materials chemistry and nanotechnology, scientists have developed many novel nanopreparations for cancer diagnosis and therapy. To treat complex malignant tumors effectively, multifunctional nanomedicines with targeting ability, imaging properties and controlled drug release behavior should be designed and exploited. The therapeutic efficiency of loaded drugs can be dramatically improved using redox-responsive nanoplatforms which can sense the differences in the redox status of tumor tissues and healthy ones. Redox-sensitive nanocarriers can be constructed from both organic and inorganic nanomaterials; however, at present, drug delivery nanovectors progressively lean towards inorganic nanomaterials because of their facile synthesis/modification and their unique physicochemical properties. In this review, we focus specifically on the preparation and application of redox-sensitive nanosystems based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs), carbon nanomaterials, magnetic nanoparticles, gold nanomaterials and other inorganic nanomaterials. We discuss relevant examples of redox-sensitive nanosystems in each category. Finally, we discuss current challenges and future strategies from the aspect of material design and practical application. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Stratification of women's sport in contemporary China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Huan

    2011-01-01

    Since economic reform in the 1980s, Chinese sport has undergone an extraordinary transformation. The most distinguishing phenomenon is the rapid growth of mass sport at the grassroots level with increasing demands for physical activities in women's daily lives. The rapid growth of women's sports participation at the grassroots is deeply embedded in the process of social stratification as a result of the urbanisation of Chinese society. The purpose of this paper is to use the socialist, feminist and theoretical framework to explore how Chinese women's different economic, educational, domestic and cultural situations shape their sports values and patterns of participation, marking social boundaries in Chinese urban communities. Semi-structured interviews and observations were conducted with 60 female physical exercisers in sports clubs, parks and neighbourhood playgrounds. Documentary research was also applied as a complement method to the interview. The findings indicate that within different classes (middle class, working class and a group who were unemployed), many different opportunities for and limitations on women to participate in sport are noticed. Chinese women have not fully and equally utilised sports opportunities created by urbanisation. Most Chinese women still live within patriarchal arrangements. Consequently, they do not completely fulfil their ambitions in sport.

  12. Risk stratification in secondary cardiovascular prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzeroni, Davide; Coruzzi, Paolo

    2018-02-19

    Worldwide, more than 7 million people experience acute myocardial infarction (AMI) every year (1), and although substantial reduction in mortality has been obtained in recent decades, one-year mortality rates are still in the range of 10%. Among patients who survive AMI, 20% suffer a second cardiovascular event in the first year and approximately 50% of major coronary events occur in those with a previous hospital discharge diagnosis of AMI (2). Despite the evidence that lifestyle changes and risk factors management strongly improve long-term prognosis, preventive care post-AMI remains sub-optimal. Cross-sectional data from the serially conducted EUROASPIRE surveys in patients with established ischemic heart disease (IHD) and people at high cardiovascular risk have demonstrated a high prevalence of unhealthy lifestyle, modifiable risk factors and inadequate use of drug therapies to achieve blood pressure and lipid goals (3). Secondary prevention programmes, defined as the level of preventive care focusing on early risk stratification, are highly recommended in all IHD patients, to restore quality of life, maintain or improve functional capacity and prevent recurrence.

  13. The impact of social stratification on cultural consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomić Marta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines theoretical perspectives, research approaches and research results about the relationship between social stratification and cultural consumption. Paper presents main representatives of three sociological discourses: those who believe that class divisions still exist and that thay had an influence on the social inequalities, especially in the domain of cultural consumption and tastes; authors and researchers who emphasize the impact of social stratification on the formation of cultural stratification, and the third group which consists of those who are advocates of cultural consumptions theories and individualization and cultural tastes which means that membership of a particular social class are not by any cultural influences.

  14. Germination and development of pecan cultivar seedlings by seed stratification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Poletto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of seed stratification on germination rate, germination speed, and initial development of seedlings of six pecan (Carya illinoinensis cultivars under subtropical climatic conditions in southern Brazil. For stratification, the seeds were placed in boxes with moist sand, in a cold chamber at 4°C, for 90 days. In the fourteenth week after sowing, the emergence speed index, total emergence, plant height, stem diameter, and number of leaves were evaluated. Seed stratification significantly improves the germination potential and morphological traits of the evaluated cultivars.

  15. Synthesis and structure of a ferric complex of 2,6-di(1H-pyrazol-3-yl)pyridine and its excellent performance in the redox-controlled living ring-opening polymerization of ε-caprolactone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yang-Yang; Gong, Wei-Jie; Shang, Xiu-Juan; Li, Hong-Xi; Gao, Jun; Lang, Jian-Ping

    2014-06-14

    The reaction of FeCl3 with a pincer ligand, 2,6-di(1H-pyrazol-3-yl)pyridine (bppyH2), produced a mononuclear Fe(III) complex [Fe(bppyH2)Cl3] (1), which could be reduced to the corresponding Fe(II) dichloride complex [Fe(bppyH2)Cl2] (2) by suitable reducing agents such as Cp2Co or Fe powder. 1 and 2 exhibited a reversible transformation from each other with appropriate redox reagents. 1 could be utilized as a pre-catalyst to initiate the ring-opening polymerization of ε-caprolactone in the presence of alcohol but did not work. The 1/alcohol system displayed characteristics of a well-controlled polymerization with the resulting poly(ε-caprolactone) having low molecular weight distributions, a linear tendency of molecular weight evolution with conversion, and polymer growth observed for the sequential additions of ε-caprolactone monomer to the polymerization reaction. The polymerization was completely turned off by the in situ reduction of the catalytic Fe center via Cp2Co and then turned back upon the addition of [Cp2Fe]PF6. The rate of polymerization was modified by switching in situ between the Fe(III) and Fe(II) species.

  16. Redox Pioneer: Professor Stuart A. Lipton

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Professor Stuart A. Lipton Stuart A. Lipton, M.D., Ph.D. is recognized here as a Redox Pioneer because of his publication of four articles that have been cited more than 1000 times, and 96 reports which have been cited more than 100 times. In the redox field, Dr. Lipton is best known for his work on the regulation by S-nitrosylation of the NMDA-subtype of neuronal glutamate receptor, which provided early evidence for in situ regulation of protein activity by S-nitrosylation and a prototypic model of allosteric control by this post-translational modification. Over the past several years, Lipton's group has pioneered the discovery of aberrant protein nitrosylation that may contribute to a number of neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig's disease). In particular, the phenotypic effects of rare genetic mutations may be understood to be enhanced or mimicked by nitrosative (and oxidative) modifications of cysteines and thereby help explain common sporadic forms of disease. Thus, Lipton has contributed in a major way to the understanding that nitrosative stress may result from modifications of specific proteins and may operate in conjunction with genetic mutation to create disease phenotype. Lipton (collaborating with Jonathan S. Stamler) has also employed the concept of targeted S-nitrosylation to produce novel neuroprotective drugs that act at allosteric sites in the NMDA receptor. Lipton has won a number of awards, including the Ernst Jung Prize in Medicine, and is an elected fellow of the AAAS. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 757–764. PMID:23815466

  17. Nrf2 and Redox Status in Prediabetic and Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica S. Jiménez-Osorio

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The redox status associated with nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor-2 (Nrf2 was evaluated in prediabetic and diabetic subjects. Total antioxidant status (TAS in plasma and erythrocytes, glutathione (GSH and malondialdehyde (MDA content and activity of antioxidant enzymes were measured as redox status markers in 259 controls, 111 prediabetics and 186 diabetic type 2 subjects. Nrf2 was measured in nuclear extract fractions from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC. Nrf2 levels were lower in prediabetic and diabetic patients. TAS, GSH and activity of glutamate cysteine ligase were lower in diabetic subjects. An increase of MDA and superoxide dismutase activity was found in diabetic subjects. These results suggest that low levels of Nrf2 are involved in the development of oxidative stress and redox status disbalance in diabetic patients.

  18. Arteriovenous oscillations of the redox potential: Is the redox state influencing blood flow?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poznanski, Jaroslaw; Szczesny, Pawel; Pawlinski, Bartosz; Mazurek, Tomasz; Zielenkiewicz, Piotr; Gajewski, Zdzislaw; Paczek, Leszek

    2017-09-01

    Studies on the regulation of human blood flow revealed several modes of oscillations with frequencies ranging from 0.005 to 1 Hz. Several mechanisms were proposed that might influence these oscillations, such as the activity of vascular endothelium, the neurogenic activity of vessel wall, the intrinsic activity of vascular smooth muscle, respiration, and heartbeat. These studies relied typically on non-invasive techniques, for example, laser Doppler flowmetry. Oscillations of biochemical markers were rarely coupled to blood flow. The redox potential difference between the artery and the vein was measured by platinum electrodes placed in the parallel homonymous femoral artery and the femoral vein of ventilated anesthetized pigs. Continuous measurement at 5 Hz sampling rate using a digital nanovoltmeter revealed fluctuating signals with three basic modes of oscillations: ∼ 1, ∼ 0.1 and ∼ 0.01 Hz. These signals clearly overlap with reported modes of oscillations in blood flow, suggesting coupling of the redox potential and blood flow. The amplitude of the oscillations associated with heart action was significantly smaller than for the other two modes, despite the fact that heart action has the greatest influence on blood flow. This finding suggests that redox potential in blood might be not a derivative but either a mediator or an effector of the blood flow control system.

  19. Educational stratification in cultural participation: Cognitive competence or status motivation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Notten, N.; Bol, Th.; van de Werfhorst, H.G.; Ganzeboom, H.B.G.

    2015-01-01

    This article examines educational stratification in highbrow cultural participation. There are two contrasting explanations of why cultural participation is stratified. The status hypothesis predicts that people come to appreciate particular forms of art because it expresses their belonging to a

  20. Effects of cold stratification, sulphuric acid, submersion in hot and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of cold stratification, sulphuric acid, submersion in hot and tap water pretreatments in the greenhouse and open field conditions on germination of bladder-Senna ( Colutea armena Boiss. and Huet.) seeds.

  1. Various manifestations of stratification phenomenon during intravenous cholangiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tada, S; Nanjo, M; Kino, M; Sekiya, T; Harada, J; Kuroda, T; Anno, I [Jikei Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1979-07-01

    A classification has been made of various types of stratification phenomenon during intravenous cholangiography. The stage of gallbladder opacification in the recumbent position has been classified as (I) mottled, (II) dendritic, (III) ring-like, and (IV) homogeneous. 'Dendritic' type of stratification phenomenon has never been reported in the literature to our knowledge. At 20 min following infusion of contrast material homogeneous opacification of the gallbladder was noticed in only 14% of patients. The others fell into types I, II or III of stratification phenomenon. In contrast, 87% of the opacified gallbladders were homogeneous on the after fatty meal film. It is therefore mandatory for diagnosis that either a 24 h film or a fatty meal film be taken to avoid the stratification phenomenon.

  2. Various manifestations of stratification phenomenon during intravenous cholangiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tada, S.; Nanjo, M.; Kino, M.; Sekiya, T.; Harada, J.; Kuroda, T.; Anno, I.

    1979-01-01

    A classification has been made of various types of stratification phenomenon during intravenous cholangiography. The stage of gallbladder opacification in the recumbent position has been classified as (I) mottled, (II) dendritic, (III) ring-like, and (IV) homogeneous. 'Dendritic' type of stratification phenomenon has never been reported in the literature to our knowledge. At 20 min following infusion of contrast material homogeneous opacification of the gallbladder was noticed in only 14% of patients. The others fell into types I, II or III of stratification phenomenon. In contrast, 87% of the opacified gallbladders were homogeneous on the after fatty meal film. It is therefore mandatory for diagnosis that either a 24 h film or a fatty meal film be taken to avoid the stratification phenomenon. (author)

  3. Thermal stratification and fatigue stress analysis for pressurizer surge line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Xiaofei; Zhang Yixiong

    2011-01-01

    Thermal stratification of pressurizer surge line induced by the inside fluid results in the global bending moments, local thermal stresses, unexpected displacements and support loadings of the pipe system. In order to avoid a costly three-dimensional computation, a combined 1D/2D technique has been developed and implemented to analyze the thermal stratification and fatigue stress of pressurize surge line of QINSHAN Phase II Extension Nuclear Power Project in this paper, using the computer codes SYSTUS and ROCOCO. According to the mechanical analysis results of stratification, the maximum stress and cumulative usage factor are obtained. The results indicate that the stress and fatigue intensity considering thermal stratification satisfies RCC-M criterion. (authors)

  4. A new stratification of mourning dove call-count routes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankenship, L.H.; Humphrey, A.B.; MacDonald, D.

    1971-01-01

    The mourning dove (Zenaidura macroura) call-count survey is a nationwide audio-census of breeding mourning doves. Recent analyses of the call-count routes have utilized a stratification based upon physiographic regions of the United States. An analysis of 5 years of call-count data, based upon stratification using potential natural vegetation, has demonstrated that this uew stratification results in strata with greater homogeneity than the physiographic strata, provides lower error variance, and hence generates greatet precision in the analysis without an increase in call-count routes. Error variance was reduced approximately 30 percent for the contiguous United States. This indicates that future analysis based upon the new stratification will result in an increased ability to detect significant year-to-year changes.

  5. Educational stratification in cultural participation: cognitive competence or status motivation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Notten, N.; Lancee, B.; van de Werfhorst, H.G.; Ganzeboom, H.B.G.

    2015-01-01

    This article examines educational stratification in highbrow cultural participation. There are two contrasting explanations of why cultural participation is stratified. The status hypothesis predicts that people come to appreciate particular forms of art because it expresses their belonging to a

  6. Stratification of zooplankton in the northwestern Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Paulinose, V.T.; Gopalakrishnan, T.C.; Nair, K.K.C.; Aravindakshan, P.N.

    Study on stratification of zooplankton in the north western Indian Ocean was carried out with special reference to its relative abundance and distribution. Samples were collected using multiple plankton net, during first cruise of ORV Sagar Kanya...

  7. Combustion Stratification for Naphtha from CI Combustion to PPC

    KAUST Repository

    Vallinayagam, R.; Vedharaj, S.; An, Yanzhao; Dawood, Alaaeldin; Izadi Najafabadi, Mohammad; Somers, Bart; Johansson, Bengt

    2017-01-01

    This study demonstrates the combustion stratification from conventional compression ignition (CI) combustion to partially premixed combustion (PPC). Experiments are performed in an optical CI engine at a speed of 1200 rpm for diesel and naphtha (RON

  8. Water Stratification Raster Images for the Gulf of Maine

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This geodatabase contains seasonal water stratification raster images for the Gulf of Maine. They were created by interpolating water density (sigma t) values at 0...

  9. Breakup of last glacial deep stratification in the South Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basak, Chandranath; Fröllje, Henning; Lamy, Frank; Gersonde, Rainer; Benz, Verena; Anderson, Robert F.; Molina-Kescher, Mario; Pahnke, Katharina

    2018-02-01

    Stratification of the deep Southern Ocean during the Last Glacial Maximum is thought to have facilitated carbon storage and subsequent release during the deglaciation as stratification broke down, contributing to atmospheric CO2 rise. Here, we present neodymium isotope evidence from deep to abyssal waters in the South Pacific that confirms stratification of the deepwater column during the Last Glacial Maximum. The results indicate a glacial northward expansion of Ross Sea Bottom Water and a Southern Hemisphere climate trigger for the deglacial breakup of deep stratification. It highlights the important role of abyssal waters in sustaining a deep glacial carbon reservoir and Southern Hemisphere climate change as a prerequisite for the destabilization of the water column and hence the deglacial release of sequestered CO2 through upwelling.

  10. Effect of sample stratification on dairy GWAS results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Li

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Artificial insemination and genetic selection are major factors contributing to population stratification in dairy cattle. In this study, we analyzed the effect of sample stratification and the effect of stratification correction on results of a dairy genome-wide association study (GWAS. Three methods for stratification correction were used: the efficient mixed-model association expedited (EMMAX method accounting for correlation among all individuals, a generalized least squares (GLS method based on half-sib intraclass correlation, and a principal component analysis (PCA approach. Results Historical pedigree data revealed that the 1,654 contemporary cows in the GWAS were all related when traced through approximately 10–15 generations of ancestors. Genome and phenotype stratifications had a striking overlap with the half-sib structure. A large elite half-sib family of cows contributed to the detection of favorable alleles that had low frequencies in the general population and high frequencies in the elite cows and contributed to the detection of X chromosome effects. All three methods for stratification correction reduced the number of significant effects. EMMAX method had the most severe reduction in the number of significant effects, and the PCA method using 20 principal components and GLS had similar significance levels. Removal of the elite cows from the analysis without using stratification correction removed many effects that were also removed by the three methods for stratification correction, indicating that stratification correction could have removed some true effects due to the elite cows. SNP effects with good consensus between different methods and effect size distributions from USDA’s Holstein genomic evaluation included the DGAT1-NIBP region of BTA14 for production traits, a SNP 45kb upstream from PIGY on BTA6 and two SNPs in NIBP on BTA14 for protein percentage. However, most of these consensus effects had

  11. Asymptomatic internal carotid artery stenosis and cerebrovascular risk stratification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolaides, Andrew N; Kakkos, Stavros K; Kyriacou, Efthyvoulos

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the cerebrovascular risk stratification potential of baseline degree of stenosis, clinical features, and ultrasonic plaque characteristics in patients with asymptomatic internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis.......The purpose of this study was to determine the cerebrovascular risk stratification potential of baseline degree of stenosis, clinical features, and ultrasonic plaque characteristics in patients with asymptomatic internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis....

  12. Degree of glutathione deficiency and redox imbalance depend on subtype of mitochondrial disease and clinical status.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory M Enns

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial disorders are associated with decreased energy production and redox imbalance. Glutathione plays a central role in redox signaling and protecting cells from oxidative damage. In order to understand the consequences of mitochondrial dysfunction on in vivo redox status, and to determine how this varies by mitochondrial disease subtype and clinical severity, we used a sensitive tandem mass spectrometry assay to precisely quantify whole blood reduced (GSH and oxidized (GSSG glutathione levels in a large cohort of mitochondrial disorder patients. Glutathione redox potential was calculated using the Nernst equation. Compared to healthy controls (n = 59, mitochondrial disease patients (n = 58 as a group showed significant redox imbalance (redox potential -251 mV ± 9.7, p<0.0001 with an increased level of oxidation by ∼ 9 mV compared to controls (-260 mV ± 6.4. Underlying this abnormality were significantly lower whole blood GSH levels (p = 0.0008 and GSH/GSSG ratio (p = 0.0002, and significantly higher GSSG levels (p<0.0001 in mitochondrial disease patients compared to controls. Redox potential was significantly more oxidized in all mitochondrial disease subgroups including Leigh syndrome (n = 15, electron transport chain abnormalities (n = 10, mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (n = 8, mtDNA deletion syndrome (n = 7, mtDNA depletion syndrome (n = 7, and miscellaneous other mitochondrial disorders (n = 11. Patients hospitalized in metabolic crisis (n = 7 showed the greatest degree of redox imbalance at -242 mV ± 7. Peripheral whole blood GSH and GSSG levels are promising biomarkers of mitochondrial dysfunction, and may give insights into the contribution of oxidative stress to the pathophysiology of the various mitochondrial disorders. In particular, evaluation of redox potential may be useful in monitoring of clinical status or response to redox-modulating therapies in clinical trials.

  13. Dissolution of UO2 in redox conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casas, I.; Pablo de, J.; Rovira, M.

    1998-01-01

    The performance assessment of the final disposal of the spent nuclear fuel in geological formations is strongly dependent on the spent fuel matrix dissolution. Unirradiated uranium (IV) dioxide has shown to be very useful for such purposes. The stability of UO 2 is very dependent on vault redox conditions. At reducing conditions, which are expected in deep groundwaters, the dissolution of the UO 2 -matrix can be explained in terms of solubility, while under oxidizing conditions, the UO 2 is thermodynamically unstable and the dissolution is kinetically controlled. In this report the parameters which affect the uranium solubility under reducing conditions, basically pH and redox potential are discussed. Under oxidizing conditions, UO 2 dissolution rate equations as a function of pH, carbonate concentration and oxidant concentration are reported. Dissolution experiments performed with spent fuel are also reviewed. The experimental equations presented in this work, have been used to model independent dissolution experiments performed with both unirradiated and irradiated UO 2 . (Author)

  14. Cascade redox flow battery systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Craig R.; Kinoshita, Kim; Hickey, Darren B.; Sha, Jay E.; Bose, Deepak

    2014-07-22

    A reduction/oxidation ("redox") flow battery system includes a series of electrochemical cells arranged in a cascade, whereby liquid electrolyte reacts in a first electrochemical cell (or group of cells) before being directed into a second cell (or group of cells) where it reacts before being directed to subsequent cells. The cascade includes 2 to n stages, each stage having one or more electrochemical cells. During a charge reaction, electrolyte entering a first stage will have a lower state-of-charge than electrolyte entering the nth stage. In some embodiments, cell components and/or characteristics may be configured based on a state-of-charge of electrolytes expected at each cascade stage. Such engineered cascades provide redox flow battery systems with higher energy efficiency over a broader range of current density than prior art arrangements.

  15. Redox signaling in acute pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Salvador; Pereda, Javier; Sabater, Luis; Sastre, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process of the pancreatic gland that eventually may lead to a severe systemic inflammatory response. A key event in pancreatic damage is the intracellular activation of NF-κB and zymogens, involving also calcium, cathepsins, pH disorders, autophagy, and cell death, particularly necrosis. This review focuses on the new role of redox signaling in acute pancreatitis. Oxidative stress and redox status are involved in the onset of acute pancreatitis and also in the development of the systemic inflammatory response, being glutathione depletion, xanthine oxidase activation, and thiol oxidation in proteins critical features of the disease in the pancreas. On the other hand, the release of extracellular hemoglobin into the circulation from the ascitic fluid in severe necrotizing pancreatitis enhances lipid peroxidation in plasma and the inflammatory infiltrate into the lung and up-regulates the HIF–VEGF pathway, contributing to the systemic inflammatory response. Therefore, redox signaling and oxidative stress contribute to the local and systemic inflammatory response during acute pancreatitis. PMID:25778551

  16. Redox signaling in acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Pérez

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process of the pancreatic gland that eventually may lead to a severe systemic inflammatory response. A key event in pancreatic damage is the intracellular activation of NF-κB and zymogens, involving also calcium, cathepsins, pH disorders, autophagy, and cell death, particularly necrosis. This review focuses on the new role of redox signaling in acute pancreatitis. Oxidative stress and redox status are involved in the onset of acute pancreatitis and also in the development of the systemic inflammatory response, being glutathione depletion, xanthine oxidase activation, and thiol oxidation in proteins critical features of the disease in the pancreas. On the other hand, the release of extracellular hemoglobin into the circulation from the ascitic fluid in severe necrotizing pancreatitis enhances lipid peroxidation in plasma and the inflammatory infiltrate into the lung and up-regulates the HIF–VEGF pathway, contributing to the systemic inflammatory response. Therefore, redox signaling and oxidative stress contribute to the local and systemic inflammatory response during acute pancreatitis.

  17. Redox reaction studies by nanosecond pulse radiolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moorthy, P.N.

    1979-01-01

    Free radicals are formed as intermediates in many chemical and biochemical reactions. An important type of reaction which they can undergo is a one electron or redox process. The direction and rate of such electron transfer reactions is governed by the relative redox potentials of the participating species. Because of the generally short lived nature of free radicals, evaluation of their redox potentials poses a number of problems. Two techniques are described for the experimental determination of the redox potentials of short lived species generated by either a nanosecond electron pulse or laser flash. In the first method, redox titration of the short lived species with stable molecules of known redox potential is carried out, employing the technique of fast kinetic spectrophotometry. Conversely, by the same method it is also possible to evaluate the one electron redox potentials of stable molecules by redox titration with free radicals of known redox potential produced as above. In the second method, electrochemical reduction or oxidation of the short lived species at an appropriate electrode (generally a mercury drop) is carried out at different fixed potentials, and the redox potential evaluated from the current-potential curves (polarograms). Full description of the experimental set up and theoretical considerations for interpretation of the raw data are given. The relative merits of the two methods and their practical applicability are discussed. (auth.)

  18. Dissecting Redox Biology Using Fluorescent Protein Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzländer, Markus; Dick, Tobias P; Meyer, Andreas J; Morgan, Bruce

    2016-05-01

    Fluorescent protein sensors have revitalized the field of redox biology by revolutionizing the study of redox processes in living cells and organisms. Within one decade, a set of fundamental new insights has been gained, driven by the rapid technical development of in vivo redox sensing. Redox-sensitive yellow and green fluorescent protein variants (rxYFP and roGFPs) have been the central players. Although widely used as an established standard tool, important questions remain surrounding their meaningful use in vivo. We review the growing range of thiol redox sensor variants and their application in different cells, tissues, and organisms. We highlight five key findings where in vivo sensing has been instrumental in changing our understanding of redox biology, critically assess the interpretation of in vivo redox data, and discuss technical and biological limitations of current redox sensors and sensing approaches. We explore how novel sensor variants may further add to the current momentum toward a novel mechanistic and integrated understanding of redox biology in vivo. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 24, 680-712.

  19. Chloroplasts as source and target of cellular redox regulation: a discussion on chloroplast redox signals in the context of plant physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baier, Margarete; Dietz, Karl-Josef

    2005-06-01

    During the evolution of plants, chloroplasts have lost the exclusive genetic control over redox regulation and antioxidant gene expression. Together with many other genes, all genes encoding antioxidant enzymes and enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of low molecular weight antioxidants were transferred to the nucleus. On the other hand, photosynthesis bears a high risk for photo-oxidative damage. Concomitantly, an intricate network for mutual regulation by anthero- and retrograde signals has emerged to co-ordinate the activities of the different genetic and metabolic compartments. A major focus of recent research in chloroplast regulation addressed the mechanisms of redox sensing and signal transmission, the identification of regulatory targets, and the understanding of adaptation mechanisms. In addition to redox signals communicated through signalling cascades also used in pathogen and wounding responses, specific chloroplast signals control nuclear gene expression. Signalling pathways are triggered by the redox state of the plastoquinone pool, the thioredoxin system, and the acceptor availability at photosystem I, in addition to control by oxolipins, tetrapyrroles, carbohydrates, and abscisic acid. The signalling function is discussed in the context of regulatory circuitries that control the expression of antioxidant enzymes and redox modulators, demonstrating the principal role of chloroplasts as the source and target of redox regulation.

  20. Thiol Redox Transitions in Cell Signaling: a Lesson from N-Acetylcysteine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana Parasassi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The functional status of cells is under the control of external stimuli affecting the function of critical proteins and eventually gene expression. Signal sensing and transduction by messengers to specific effectors operate by post-translational modification of proteins, among which thiol redox switches play a fundamental role that is just beginning to be understood. The maintenance of the redox status is, indeed, crucial for cellular homeostasis and its dysregulation towards a more oxidized intracellular environment is associated with aberrant proliferation, ultimately related to diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes. Redox transitions occur in sensitive cysteine residues of regulatory proteins relevant to signaling, their evolution to metastable disulfides accounting for the functional redox switch. N-acetylcysteine (NAC is a thiol-containing compound that is able to interfere with redox transitions of thiols and, thus, in principle, able to modulate redox signaling. We here review the redox chemistry of NAC, then screen possible mechanisms to explain the effects observed in NAC-treated normal and cancer cells; such effects involve a modification of global gene expression, thus of functions and morphology, with a leitmotif of a switch from proliferation to terminal differentiation. The regulation of thiol redox transitions in cell signaling is, therefore, proposed as a new tool, holding promise not only for a deeper explanation of mechanisms, but indeed for innovative pharmacological interventions.

  1. Improving risk-stratification of Diabetes complications using temporal data mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacchi, Lucia; Dagliati, Arianna; Segagni, Daniele; Leporati, Paola; Chiovato, Luca; Bellazzi, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    To understand which factor trigger worsened disease control is a crucial step in Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) patient management. The MOSAIC project, funded by the European Commission under the FP7 program, has been designed to integrate heterogeneous data sources and provide decision support in chronic T2D management through patients' continuous stratification. In this work we show how temporal data mining can be fruitfully exploited to improve risk stratification. In particular, we exploit administrative data on drug purchases to divide patients in meaningful groups. The detection of drug consumption patterns allows stratifying the population on the basis of subjects' purchasing attitude. Merging these findings with clinical values indicates the relevance of the applied methods while showing significant differences in the identified groups. This extensive approach emphasized the exploitation of administrative data to identify patterns able to explain clinical conditions.

  2. Association of estrogen receptor α PvuII and XbaI polymorphisms with prostate cancer susceptibility and risk stratification: a meta-analysis from case-control studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao YN

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Yining Zhao,1,* Xi Zheng,2,* Lijie Zhang,3 Qiang Hu,3 Yitian Guo,3 Hua Jiang,3 Shennan Shi,4 Xiang Zhang1 1Department of Urology, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan, 2Department of Urology, Drum Tower Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University, Nanjing, 3Department of Urology, Affiliated Zhongda Hospital, Medical School, Southeast University, Nanjing, 4Department of General Surgery, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Studies on the association between two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in estrogen receptor α (ERα, PvuII (rs2234693 T>C and XbaI (rs9340799 A>G, and the prostate cancer risk are inconsistent. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis to derive a more accurate estimation of this relationship. Methods: A literature search of PubMed, Embase, Web of Science databases until October 1, 2016, was conducted. Crude odds ratios (ORs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs were calculated to assess the strength of this association. Results: Eighteen case-control studies, with a total of 3,317 prostate cancer patients and 8,324 controls, were included. Results showed that both PvuII and XbaI polymorphisms were significantly associated with a higher prostate cancer risk in overall populations. To derive a more accurate estimation, subgroup analysis stratified by ethnicity revealed that this relationship existed only in Caucasians, but not in Asians. Furthermore, PvuII polymorphism was significantly associated with high Gleason grade (Gleason score ≥7 cancers. Conclusion: The current meta-analysis demonstrates that ERα PvuII and XbaI polymorphisms are associated with a higher prostate cancer risk in Caucasians, but not in Asians, and PvuII polymorphism is significantly associated with high Gleason grade tumors, indicating the probability of inherited susceptibility to prostate cancer arising from different genomic ERα SNPs

  3. Amplified and in situ detection of redox-active metabolite using a biobased redox capacitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunkyoung; Gordonov, Tanya; Bentley, William E; Payne, Gregory F

    2013-02-19

    Redox cycling provides a mechanism to amplify electrochemical signals for analyte detection. Previous studies have shown that diverse mediators/shuttles can engage in redox-cycling reactions with a biobased redox capacitor that is fabricated by grafting redox-active catechols onto a chitosan film. Here, we report that redox cycling with this catechol-chitosan redox capacitor can amplify electrochemical signals for detecting a redox-active bacterial metabolite. Specifically, we studied the redox-active bacterial metabolite pyocyanin that is reported to be a virulence factor and signaling molecule for the opportunistic pathogen P. aeruginosa. We demonstrate that redox cycling can amplify outputs from various electrochemical methods (cyclic voltammetry, chronocoulometry, and differential pulse voltammetry) and can lower the detection limit of pyocyanin to 50 nM. Further, the compatibility of this biobased redox capacitor allows the in situ monitoring of the production of redox-active metabolites (e.g., pyocyanin) during the course of P. aeruginosa cultivation. We anticipate that the amplified output of redox-active virulence factors should permit an earlier detection of life-threatening infections by the opportunistic pathogen P. aeruginosa while the "bio-compatibility" of this measurement approach should facilitate in situ study of the spatiotemporal dynamics of bacterial redox signaling.

  4. Method of reduction of nitroaromatics by enzymatic reaction with redox enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Manish M.

    2000-01-01

    A method for the controlled reduction of nitroaromatic compounds such as nitrobenzene and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene by enzymatic reaction with redox enzymes, such as Oxyrase (Trademark of Oxyrase, Inc., Mansfield, Ohio).

  5. Redox regulation of the Calvin-Benson cycle: something old, something new

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laure eMichelet

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Reversible redox post-translational modifications such as oxido-reduction of disulfide bonds, S-nitrosylation and S-glutathionylation, play a prominent role in the regulation of cell metabolism and signaling in all organisms. These modifications are mainly controlled by members of the thioredoxin and glutaredoxin families. Early studies in photosynthetic organisms have identified the Calvin-Benson cycle, the photosynthetic pathway responsible for carbon assimilation, as a redox regulated process. Indeed, 4 out of 11 enzymes of the cycle were shown to have a low activity in the dark and to be activated in the light through thioredoxin-dependent reduction of regulatory disulfide bonds. The underlying molecular mechanisms were extensively studied at the biochemical and structural level. Unexpectedly, recent biochemical and proteomic studies have suggested that all enzymes of the cycle and several associated regulatory proteins may undergo redox regulation through multiple redox post-translational modifications including glutathionylation and nitrosylation. The aim of this review is to detail the well-established mechanisms of redox regulation of Calvin-Benson cycle enzymes as well as the most recent reports indicating that this pathway is tightly controlled by multiple interconnected redox post-translational modifications. This redox control is likely allowing fine tuning of the Calvin-Benson cycle required for adaptation to varying environmental conditions, especially during responses to biotic and abiotic stresses.

  6. Influence of precipitating light elements on stable stratification below the core/mantle boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, J. G.; Stevenson, D. J.

    2017-12-01

    Stable stratification below the core/mantle boundary is often invoked to explain anomalously low seismic velocities in this region. Diffusion of light elements like oxygen or, more slowly, silicon could create a stabilizing chemical gradient in the outermost core. Heat flow less than that conducted along the adiabatic gradient may also produce thermal stratification. However, reconciling either origin with the apparent longevity (>3.45 billion years) of Earth's magnetic field remains difficult. Sub-isentropic heat flow would not drive a dynamo by thermal convection before the nucleation of the inner core, which likely occurred less than one billion years ago and did not instantly change the heat flow. Moreover, an oxygen-enriched layer below the core/mantle boundary—the source of thermal buoyancy—could establish double-diffusive convection where motion in the bulk fluid is suppressed below a slowly advancing interface. Here we present new models that explain both stable stratification and a long-lived dynamo by considering ongoing precipitation of magnesium oxide and/or silicon dioxide from the core. Lithophile elements may partition into iron alloys under extreme pressure and temperature during Earth's formation, especially after giant impacts. Modest core/mantle heat flow then drives compositional convection—regardless of thermal conductivity—since their solubility is strongly temperature-dependent. Our models begin with bulk abundances for the mantle and core determined by the redox conditions during accretion. We then track equilibration between the core and a primordial basal magma ocean followed by downward diffusion of light elements. Precipitation begins at a depth that is most sensitive to temperature and oxygen abundance and then creates feedbacks with the radial thermal and chemical profiles. Successful models feature a stable layer with low seismic velocity (which mandates multi-component evolution since a single light element typically

  7. Engineering redox balance through cofactor systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiulai; Li, Shubo; Liu, Liming

    2014-06-01

    Redox balance plays an important role in the production of enzymes, pharmaceuticals, and chemicals. To meet the demands of industrial production, it is desirable that microbes maintain a maximal carbon flux towards target metabolites with no fluctuations in redox. This requires functional cofactor systems that support dynamic homeostasis between different redox states or functional stability in a given redox state. Redox balance can be achieved by improving the self-balance of a cofactor system, regulating the substrate balance of a cofactor system, and engineering the synthetic balance of a cofactor system. This review summarizes how cofactor systems can be manipulated to improve redox balance in microbes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The prostate cancer risk stratification (ProCaRS) project: Recursive partitioning risk stratification analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, George; Lukka, Himu; Warde, Padraig; Brundage, Michael; Souhami, Luis; Crook, Juanita; Cury, Fabio; Catton, Charles; Mok, Gary; Martin, Andre-Guy; Vigneault, Eric; Morris, Jim; Warner, Andrew; Gonzalez Maldonado, Sandra; Pickles, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Background: The Genitourinary Radiation Oncologists of Canada (GUROC) published a three-group risk stratification (RS) system to assist prostate cancer decision-making in 2001. The objective of this project is to use the ProCaRS database to statistically model the predictive accuracy and clinical utility of a proposed new multi-group RS schema. Methods: The RS analyses utilized the ProCaRS database that consists of 7974 patients from four Canadian institutions. Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) was utilized to explore the sub-stratification of groups defined by the existing three-group GUROC scheme. 10-fold cross-validated C-indices and the Net Reclassification Index were both used to assess multivariable models and compare the predictive accuracy of existing and proposed RS systems, respectively. Results: The recursive partitioning analysis has suggested that the existing GUROC classification system could be altered to accommodate as many as six separate and statistical unique groups based on differences in BFFS (C-index 0.67 and AUC 0.70). GUROC low-risk patients would be divided into new favorable-low and low-risk groups based on PSA ⩽6 and PSA >6. GUROC intermediate-risk patients can be subclassified into low-intermediate and high-intermediate groups. GUROC high-intermediate-risk is defined as existing GUROC intermediate-risk with PSA >=10 AND either T2b/c disease or T1T2a disease with Gleason 7. GUROC high-risk patients would be subclassified into an additional extreme-risk group (GUROC high-risk AND (positive cores ⩾87.5% OR PSA >30). Conclusions: Proposed RS subcategories have been identified by a RPA of the ProCaRS database

  9. Radii of Redox Components from Absolute Redox Potentials Compared with Covalent and Aqueous Ionic Radii

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Heyrovská, Raji

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 9 (2010), s. 903-907 ISSN 1040-0397 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : Electrochemistry * Absolute redox potentials * Radii of redox components Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.721, year: 2010

  10. Characterization of redox proteins using electrochemical methods

    OpenAIRE

    Verhagen, M.

    1995-01-01

    The use of electrochemical techniques in combination with proteins started approximately a decade ago and has since then developed into a powerfull technique for the study of small redox proteins. In addition to the determination of redox potentials, electrochemistry can be used to obtain information about the kinetics of electron transfer between proteins and about the dynamic behaviour of redox cofactors in proteins. This thesis describes the results of a study, initiated to get a ...

  11. Redox flow batteries having multiple electroactive elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wei; Li, Liyu; Yang, Zhenguo; Nie, Zimin

    2018-05-01

    Introducing multiple redox reactions with a suitable voltage range can improve the energy density of redox flow battery (RFB) systems. One example includes RFB systems utilizing multiple redox pairs in the positive half cell, the negative half cell, or in both. Such RFB systems can have a negative electrolyte, a positive electrolyte, and a membrane between the negative electrolyte and the positive electrolyte, in which at least two electrochemically active elements exist in the negative electrolyte, the positive electrolyte, or both.

  12. Membranes for Redox Flow Battery Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Prifti, Helen; Parasuraman, Aishwarya; Winardi, Suminto; Lim, Tuti Mariana; Skyllas-Kazacos, Maria

    2012-01-01

    The need for large scale energy storage has become a priority to integrate renewable energy sources into the electricity grid. Redox flow batteries are considered the best option to store electricity from medium to large scale applications. However, the current high cost of redox flow batteries impedes the wide spread adoption of this technology. The membrane is a critical component of redox flow batteries as it determines the performance as well as the economic viability of the batteries. Th...

  13. Regulatory redox state in tree seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewelina Ratajczak

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Peroxiredoxins (Prx are important regulators of the redox status of tree seeds during maturation and long-term storage. Thioredoxins (Trx are redox transmitters and thereby regulate Prx activity. Current research is focused on the association of Trx with Prx in tree seeds differing in the tolerance to desiccation. The results will allow for better understanding the regulation of the redox status in orthodox, recalcitrant, and intermediate seeds. The findings will also elucidate the role of the redox status during the loss of viability of sensitive seeds during drying and long-term storage.

  14. Zinc and the modulation of redox homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oteiza, Patricia I.

    2012-01-01

    Zinc, a redox inactive metal, has been long viewed as a component of the antioxidant network, and growing evidence points to its involvement in redox-regulated signaling. These actions are exerted through several mechanisms based on the unique chemical and functional properties of zinc. Overall, zinc contributes to maintain the cell redox balance through different mechanisms including: i) the regulation of oxidant production and metal-induced oxidative damage; ii) the dynamic association of zinc with sulfur in protein cysteine clusters, from which the metal can be released by nitric oxide, peroxides, oxidized glutathione and other thiol oxidant species; iii) zinc-mediated induction of the zinc-binding protein metallothionein, which releases the metal under oxidative conditions and act per se scavenging oxidants; iv) the involvement of zinc in the regulation of glutathione metabolism and of the overall protein thiol redox status; and v) a direct or indirect regulation of redox signaling. Findings of oxidative stress, altered redox signaling, and associated cell/tissue disfunction in cell and animal models of zinc deficiency, stress the relevant role of zinc in the preservation of cell redox homeostasis. However, while the participation of zinc in antioxidant protection, redox sensing, and redox-regulated signaling is accepted, the involved molecules, targets and mechanisms are still partially known and the subject of active research. PMID:22960578

  15. GOTHIC code simulation of thermal stratification in POOLEX facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, H.; Kudinov, P.

    2009-07-01

    Pressure suppression pool is an important element of BWR containment. It serves as a heat sink and steam condenser to prevent containment pressure buildup during loss of coolant accident or safety relief valve opening during normal operations of a BWR. Insufficient mixing in the pool, in case of low mass flow rate of steam, can cause development of thermal stratification and reduction of pressure suppression pool capacity. For reliable prediction of mixing and stratification phenomena validation of simulation tools has to be performed. Data produced in POOLEX/PPOOLEX facility at Lappeenranta University of Technology about development of thermal stratification in a large scale model of a pressure suppression pool is used for GOTHIC lumped and distributed parameter validation. Sensitivity of GOTHIC solution to different boundary conditions and grid convergence study for 2D simulations of POOLEX STB-20 experiment are performed in the present study. CFD simulation was carried out with FLUENT code in order to get additional insights into physics of stratification phenomena. In order to support development of experimental procedures for new tests in the PPOOLEX facility lumped parameter pre-test GOTHIC simulations were performed. Simulations show that drywell and wetwell pressures can be kept within safety margins during a long transient necessary for development of thermal stratification. (au)

  16. GOTHIC code simulation of thermal stratification in POOLEX facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H.; Kudinov, P. (Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) (Sweden))

    2009-07-15

    Pressure suppression pool is an important element of BWR containment. It serves as a heat sink and steam condenser to prevent containment pressure buildup during loss of coolant accident or safety relief valve opening during normal operations of a BWR. Insufficient mixing in the pool, in case of low mass flow rate of steam, can cause development of thermal stratification and reduction of pressure suppression pool capacity. For reliable prediction of mixing and stratification phenomena validation of simulation tools has to be performed. Data produced in POOLEX/PPOOLEX facility at Lappeenranta University of Technology about development of thermal stratification in a large scale model of a pressure suppression pool is used for GOTHIC lumped and distributed parameter validation. Sensitivity of GOTHIC solution to different boundary conditions and grid convergence study for 2D simulations of POOLEX STB-20 experiment are performed in the present study. CFD simulation was carried out with FLUENT code in order to get additional insights into physics of stratification phenomena. In order to support development of experimental procedures for new tests in the PPOOLEX facility lumped parameter pre-test GOTHIC simulations were performed. Simulations show that drywell and wetwell pressures can be kept within safety margins during a long transient necessary for development of thermal stratification. (au)

  17. Pyridine nucleotide cycling and control of intracellular redox state in relation to poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase activity and nuclear localization of glutathione during exponential growth of Arabidopsis cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellny, Till K; Locato, Vittoria; Vivancos, Pedro Diaz; Markovic, Jelena; De Gara, Laura; Pallardó, Federico V; Foyer, Christine H

    2009-05-01

    Pyridine nucleotides, ascorbate and glutathione are major redox metabolites in plant cells, with specific roles in cellular redox homeostasis and the regulation of the cell cycle. However, the regulation of these metabolite pools during exponential growth and their precise functions in the cell cycle remain to be characterized. The present analysis of the abundance of ascorbate, glutathione, and pyridine nucleotides during exponential growth of Arabidopsis cells in culture provides evidence for the differential regulation of each of these redox pools. Ascorbate was most abundant early in the growth cycle, but glutathione was low at this point. The cellular ascorbate to dehydroascorbate and reduced glutathione (GSH) to glutathione disulphide ratios were high and constant but the pyridine nucleotide pools were largely oxidized over the period of exponential growth and only became more reduced once growth had ceased. The glutathione pool increased in parallel with poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activities and with increases in the abundance of PARP1 and PARP2 mRNAs at a time of high cell cycle activity as indicated by transcriptome information. Marked changes in the intracellular partitioning of GSH between the cytoplasm and nucleus were observed. Extension of the exponential growth phase by dilution or changing the media led to increases in the glutathione and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, oxidized form (NAD)-plus-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, reduced form (NADH) pools and to higher NAD/NADH ratios but the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, oxidized form (NADP)-plus-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, reduced form (NADPH) pool sizes, and NAPD/NADPH ratios were much less affected. The ascorbate, glutathione, and pyridine nucleotide pools and PARP activity decreased before the exponential growth phase ended. We conclude that there are marked changes in intracellular redox state during the growth cycle but that redox homeostasis is

  18. Mycobacterium tuberculosis has diminished capacity to counteract redox stress induced by elevated levels of endogenous superoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Priyanka; Dharmaraja, Allimuthu T; Bhaskar, Ashima; Chakrapani, Harinath; Singh, Amit

    2015-07-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) has evolved protective and detoxification mechanisms to maintain cytoplasmic redox balance in response to exogenous oxidative stress encountered inside host phagocytes. In contrast, little is known about the dynamic response of this pathogen to endogenous oxidative stress generated within Mtb. Using a noninvasive and specific biosensor of cytoplasmic redox state of Mtb, we for first time discovered a surprisingly high sensitivity of this pathogen to perturbation in redox homeostasis induced by elevated endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS). We synthesized a series of hydroquinone-based small molecule ROS generators and found that ATD-3169 permeated mycobacteria to reliably enhance endogenous ROS including superoxide radicals. When Mtb strains including multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) patient isolates were exposed to this compound, a dose-dependent, long-lasting, and irreversible oxidative shift in intramycobacterial redox potential was detected. Dynamic redox potential measurements revealed that Mtb had diminished capacity to restore cytoplasmic redox balance in comparison with Mycobacterium smegmatis (Msm), a fast growing nonpathogenic mycobacterial species. Accordingly, Mtb strains were extremely susceptible to inhibition by ATD-3169 but not Msm, suggesting a functional linkage between dynamic redox changes and survival. Microarray analysis showed major realignment of pathways involved in redox homeostasis, central metabolism, DNA repair, and cell wall lipid biosynthesis in response to ATD-3169, all consistent with enhanced endogenous ROS contributing to lethality induced by this compound. This work provides empirical evidence that the cytoplasmic redox poise of Mtb is uniquely sensitive to manipulation in steady-state endogenous ROS levels, thus revealing the importance of targeting intramycobacterial redox metabolism for controlling TB infection. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by

  19. Redox homeostasis: the linchpin in stem cell self-renewal and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kui; Zhang, Tao; Dong, Qiang; Nice, Edouard Collins; Huang, Canhua; Wei, Yuquan

    2013-03-14

    Stem cells are characterized by their unique ability of self-renewal to maintain the so-called stem cell pool. Over the past decades, reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been recognized as toxic aerobic metabolism byproducts that are harmful to stem cells, leading to DNA damage, senescence or cell death. Recently, a growing body of literature has shown that stem cells reside in redox niches with low ROS levels. The balance of Redox homeostasis facilitates stem cell self-renewal by an intricate network. Thus, to fully decipher the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in the maintenance of stem cell self-renewal, it is critical to address the important role of redox homeostasis in the regulation of self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells. In this regard, we will discuss the regulatory mechanisms involved in the subtly orchestrated balance of redox status in stem cells by scavenger antioxidant enzyme systems that are well monitored by the hypoxia niches and crucial redox regulators including forkhead homeobox type O family (FoxOs), apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease1/redox factor-1 (APE1/Ref-1), nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM). We will also introduce several pivotal ROS-sensitive molecules, such as hypoxia-inducible factors, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38) and p53, involved in the redox-regulated stem cell self-renewal. Specifically, all the aforementioned molecules can act as 'redox sensors' by virtue of redox modifications of their cysteine residues, which are critically important in the control of protein function. Given the importance of redox homeostasis in the regulation of stem cell self-renewal, understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms involved will provide important new insights into stem cell biology.

  20. Thermal stratification effects on MHD radiative flow of nanofluid over nonlinear stretching sheet with variable thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahaya Shagaiya Daniel

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The combined effects of thermal stratification, applied electric and magnetic fields, thermal radiation, viscous dissipation and Joules heating are numerically studied on a boundary layer flow of electrical conducting nanofluid over a nonlinearly stretching sheet with variable thickness. The governing equations which are partial differential equations are converted to a couple of ordinary differential equations with suitable similarity transformation techniques and are solved using implicit finite difference scheme. The electrical conducting nanofluid particle fraction on the boundary is passively rather than actively controlled. The effects of the emerging parameters on the electrical conducting nanofluid velocity, temperature, and nanoparticles concentration volume fraction with skin friction, heat transfer characteristics are examined with the aids of graphs and tabular form. It is observed that the variable thickness enhances the fluid velocity, temperature, and nanoparticle concentration volume fraction. The heat and mass transfer rate at the surface increases with thermal stratification resulting to a reduction in the fluid temperature. Electric field enhances the nanofluid velocity which resolved the sticking effects caused by a magnetic field which suppressed the profiles. Radiative heat transfer and viscous dissipation are sensitive to an increase in the fluid temperature and thicker thermal boundary layer thickness. Comparison with published results is examined and presented. Keywords: MHD nanofluid, Variable thickness, Thermal radiation, Similarity solution, Thermal stratification

  1. Strongly enhanced colorectal cancer risk stratification by combining family history and genetic risk score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weigl K

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Korbinian Weigl,1,2 Jenny Chang-Claude,3,4 Phillip Knebel,5 Li Hsu,6 Michael Hoffmeister,1 Hermann Brenner1,2,7 1Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ, Heidelberg, 2German Cancer Consortium (DKTK, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ, Heidelberg, 3Unit of Genetic Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ, Heidelberg, 4University Cancer Center Hamburg, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, 5Department for General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, University Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany; 6Public Health Sciences Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, USA; 7Division of Preventive Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ and National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT, Heidelberg, Germany Background and aim: Family history (FH and genetic risk scores (GRSs are increasingly used for risk stratification for colorectal cancer (CRC screening. However, they were mostly considered alternatively rather than jointly. The aim of this study was to assess the potential of individual and joint risk stratification for CRC by FH and GRS.Patients and methods: A GRS was built based on the number of risk alleles in 53 previously identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms among 2,363 patients with a first diagnosis of CRC and 2,198 controls in DACHS [colorectal cancer: chances for prevention through screening], a population-based case-control study in Germany. Associations between GRS and FH with CRC risk were quantified by multiple logistic regression.Results: A total of 316 cases (13.4% and 214 controls (9.7% had a first-degree relative (FDR with CRC (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.86, 95% CI 1.52–2.29. A GRS in the highest decile was associated with a 3.0-fold increased risk of CRC (aOR 3.00, 95% CI 2.24–4.02 compared with the lowest decile. This association was tentatively more pronounced in older age groups. FH and GRS were essentially unrelated, and their

  2. Redox reactions in food fermentations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Egon Bech

    2018-01-01

    involves oxidative steps in the early part of the pathways whereas a multitude of different reactions are used as compensating reductions. Much of the diversity seen between food fermentations arise from the different routes and the different electron acceptors used by microorganisms to counterbalance...... and this contributes to the diversity in flavor, color, texture, and shelf life. The review concludes that these reactions are still only incompletely understood and that they represent an interesting area for fundamental research and also represent a fertile field for product development through a more conscious use...... of the redox properties of strains used to compose food cultures....

  3. Method for producing redox shuttles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pupek, Krzysztof Z.; Dzwiniel, Trevor L.; Krumdick, Gregory K.

    2015-03-03

    A single step method for producing a redox shuttle having the formula 2,5-di-tert-butyl-1,4-phenylene tetraethyl bis(phosphate) is provided, the method comprising phosphorylating tert butyl hydroquinone with a phosphate-containing reagent. Also provided is method for producing 2,5-di-tert-butyl-1,4-phenylene tetraethyl bis(phosphate), the method comprising solubilizing tert-butyl hydroquinone and tetrabutylammonium bromide with methyltetrahydrofuran to create a mixture; heating the mixture while adding base to the mixture in an amount to turn the mixture orange; and adding diethyl chlorophosphate to the orange mixture in an amount to phosphorylate the hydroquinone.

  4. Redox Changes During the Cell Cycle in the Embryonic Root Meristem of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Simone, Ambra; Hubbard, Rachel; de la Torre, Natanael Viñegra; Velappan, Yazhini; Wilson, Michael; Considine, Michael J; Soppe, Wim J J; Foyer, Christine H

    2017-12-20

    The aim of this study was to characterize redox changes in the nuclei and cytosol occurring during the mitotic cell cycle in the embryonic roots of germinating Arabidopsis seedlings, and to determine how redox cycling was modified in mutants with a decreased capacity for ascorbate synthesis. Using an in vivo reduction-oxidation (redox) reporter (roGFP2), we show that transient oxidation of the cytosol and the nuclei occurred at G1 in the synchronized dividing cells of the Arabidopsis root apical meristem, with reduction at G2 and mitosis. This redox cycle was absent from low ascorbate mutants in which nuclei were significantly more oxidized than controls. The cell cycle-dependent increase in nuclear size was impaired in the ascorbate-deficient mutants, which had fewer cells per unit area in the root proliferation zone. The transcript profile of the dry seeds and size of the imbibed seeds was strongly influenced by low ascorbate but germination, dormancy release and seed aging characteristics were unaffected. These data demonstrate the presence of a redox cycle within the plant cell cycle and that the redox state of the nuclei is an important factor in cell cycle progression. Controlled oxidation is a key feature of the early stages of the plant cell cycle. However, sustained mild oxidation restricts nuclear functions and impairs progression through the cell cycle leading to fewer cells in the root apical meristem. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 27, 1505-1519.

  5. BWR MARK I pressure suppression pool mixing and stratification analysis using GOTHIC lumped parameter modeling methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozdemir, Ozkan Emre; George, Thomas L.

    2015-01-01

    As a part of the GOTHIC (GOTHIC incorporates technology developed for the electric power industry under the sponsorship of EPRI.) Fukushima Technical Evaluation project (EPRI, 2014a, b, 2015), GOTHIC (EPRI, 2014c) has been benchmarked against test data for pool stratification (EPRI, 2014a, b, Ozdemir and George, 2013). These tests confirmed GOTHIC’s ability to simulate pool mixing and stratification under a variety of anticipated suppression pool operating conditions. The multidimensional modeling requires long simulation times for events that may occur over a period of hours or days. For these scenarios a lumped model of the pressure suppression chamber is desirable to maintain reasonable simulation times. However, a lumped model for the pool is not able to predict the effects of pool stratification that can influence the overall containment response. The main objective of this work is on the development of a correlation that can be used to estimate pool mixing and stratification effects in a lumped modeling approach. A simplified lumped GOTHIC model that includes a two zone model for the suppression pool with controlled circulation between the upper and lower zones was constructed. A pump and associated flow connections are included to provide mixing between the upper and lower pool volumes. Using numerically generated data from a multidimensional GOTHIC model for the suppression pool, a correlation was developed for the mixing rate between the upper and lower pool volumes in a two-zone, lumped model. The mixing rate depends on the pool subcooling, the steam injection rate and the injection depth

  6. Numerical analysis on hydrogen stratification and post-inerting of hydrogen risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Cheng; Tong, Lili; Cao, Xuewu

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A three-dimensional computational model was built and the applicability was discussed. • The formation of helium stratification was further studied. • Three influencing factors on the post-inerting of hydrogen risk were analyzed. - Abstract: In the case of severe accidents, the risk of hydrogen explosion threatens the integrity of the nuclear reactor containment. According to nuclear regulations, hydrogen control is required to ensure the safe operation of the nuclear reactor. In this study, the method of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has been applied to analyze process of hydrogen stratification and the post-inerting of hydrogen risk in the Large-Scale Gas Mixing Facility. A three-dimensional computational model was built and the applicability of different turbulence models was discussed. The result shows that the helium concentration calculated by the standard k–ε turbulence model is closest to the experiment data. Through analyzing the formation of helium stratification at different injection velocities, it is found that when the injection mass flow is constant and the injection velocity of helium increases, the mixture of helium and air is enhanced while there is rarely influence on the formation of helium stratification. In addition, the influences of mass flow rate, injection location and direction and inert gas on the post-inerting of hydrogen risk have been analyzed and the results are as follows: with the increasing of mass flow rate, the mitigation effect of nitrogen on hydrogen risk will be further improved; there is an obvious local difference between the mitigation effects of nitrogen on hydrogen risk in different injection directions and locations; when the inert gas is injected at the same mass flow rate, the mitigation effect of steam on hydrogen risk is better than that of nitrogen. This study can provide technical support for the mitigation of hydrogen risk in the small LWR containment.

  7. Evolution of South Atlantic density and chemical stratification across the last deglaciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Jenny; Gottschalk, Julia; Skinner, Luke C; Peck, Victoria L; Kender, Sev; Elderfield, Henry; Waelbroeck, Claire; Vázquez Riveiros, Natalia; Hodell, David A

    2016-01-19

    Explanations of the glacial-interglacial variations in atmospheric pCO2 invoke a significant role for the deep ocean in the storage of CO2. Deep-ocean density stratification has been proposed as a mechanism to promote the storage of CO2 in the deep ocean during glacial times. A wealth of proxy data supports the presence of a "chemical divide" between intermediate and deep water in the glacial Atlantic Ocean, which indirectly points to an increase in deep-ocean density stratification. However, direct observational evidence of changes in the primary controls of ocean density stratification, i.e., temperature and salinity, remain scarce. Here, we use Mg/Ca-derived seawater temperature and salinity estimates determined from temperature-corrected δ(18)O measurements on the benthic foraminifer Uvigerina spp. from deep and intermediate water-depth marine sediment cores to reconstruct the changes in density of sub-Antarctic South Atlantic water masses over the last deglaciation (i.e., 22-2 ka before present). We find that a major breakdown in the physical density stratification significantly lags the breakdown of the deep-intermediate chemical divide, as indicated by the chemical tracers of benthic foraminifer δ(13)C and foraminifer/coral (14)C. Our results indicate that chemical destratification likely resulted in the first rise in atmospheric pCO2, whereas the density destratification of the deep South Atlantic lags the second rise in atmospheric pCO2 during the late deglacial period. Our findings emphasize that the physical and chemical destratification of the ocean are not as tightly coupled as generally assumed.

  8. Controlled Redox and Electrical Properties in Polyheterocycles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reynolds, John

    2001-01-01

    Electrochromic and conducting polymers may prove especially important for a number of Air Force applications including chameleon coatings, informational displays, IR and microwave attenuation, dialed...

  9. Controlled Redox and Electrical Properties in Polyheterocycles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reynolds, John

    2000-01-01

    Electrochromic polymers may prove especially important for a number of Air Force applications including chameleon coatings, informational displays, IR and microwave attenuation, and dialed tint windows...

  10. Redox zonation for different groundwater flow paths during bank filtration: a case study at Liao River, Shenyang, northeastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiaosi; Lu, Shuai; Yuan, Wenzhen; Woo, Nam Chil; Dai, Zhenxue; Dong, Weihong; Du, Shanghai; Zhang, Xinyue

    2018-03-01

    The spatial and temporal distribution of redox zones in an aquifer is important when designing groundwater supply systems. Redox zonation can have direct or indirect control of the biological and chemical reactions and mobility of pollutants. In this study, redox conditions are characterized by interpreting the hydrogeological conditions and water chemistry in groundwater during bank infiltration at a site in Shenyang, northeast China. The relevant redox processes and zonal differences in a shallow flow path and deeper flow path at the field scale were revealed by monitoring the redox parameters and chemistry of groundwater near the Liao River. The results show obvious horizontal and vertical components of redox zones during bank filtration. Variations in the horizontal extent of the redox zone were controlled by the different permeabilities of the riverbed sediments and aquifer with depth. Horizontally, the redox zone was situated within 17 m of the riverbank for the shallow flow path and within 200 m for the deep flow path. The vertical extent of the redox zone was affected by precipitation and seasonal river floods and extended to 10 m below the surface. During bank filtration, iron and manganese oxides or hydroxides were reductively dissolved, and arsenic that was adsorbed onto the medium surface or coprecipitated is released into the groundwater. This leads to increased arsenic content in groundwater, which poses a serious threat to water supply security.

  11. Validating a Local Failure Risk Stratification for Use in Prospective Studies of Adjuvant Radiation Therapy for Bladder Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, Brian C.; He, Jiwei; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Tucker, Kai N.; Bekelman, Justin E.; Herr, Harry W.; Lerner, Seth P.; Guzzo, Thomas J.; Malkowicz, S. Bruce; Christodouleas, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To inform prospective trials of adjuvant radiation therapy (adj-RT) for bladder cancer after radical cystectomy, a locoregional failure (LF) risk stratification was proposed. This stratification was developed and validated using surgical databases that may not reflect the outcomes expected in prospective trials. Our purpose was to assess sources of bias that may affect the stratification model's validity or alter the LF risk estimates for each subgroup: time bias due to evolving surgical techniques; trial accrual bias due to inclusion of patients who would be ineligible for adj-RT trials because of early disease progression, death, or loss to follow-up shortly after cystectomy; bias due to different statistical methods to estimate LF; and subgrouping bias due to different definitions of the LF subgroups. Methods and Materials: The LF risk stratification was developed using a single-institution cohort (n=442, 1990-2008) and the multi-institutional SWOG 8710 cohort (n=264, 1987-1998) treated with radical cystectomy with or without chemotherapy. We evaluated the sensitivity of the stratification to sources of bias using Fine-Gray regression and Kaplan-Meier analyses. Results: Year of radical cystectomy was not associated with LF risk on univariate or multivariate analysis after controlling for risk group. By use of more stringent inclusion criteria, 26 SWOG patients (10%) and 60 patients from the single-institution cohort (14%) were excluded. Analysis of the remaining patients confirmed 3 subgroups with significantly different LF risks with 3-year rates of 7%, 17%, and 36%, respectively (P<.01), nearly identical to the rates without correcting for trial accrual bias. Kaplan-Meier techniques estimated higher subgroup LF rates than competing risk analysis. The subgroup definitions used in the NRG-GU001 adj-RT trial were validated. Conclusions: These sources of bias did not invalidate the LF risk stratification or substantially change the model's LF estimates.

  12. Effect of layout on surge line thermal stratification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai Jianyong; Huang Wei

    2011-01-01

    In order to analyze and evaluate the effect of layout on the thermal stratification for PWR Pressurizer surge line, numerical simulation by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) method is taken on 6 kinds of layout improvement with 2 improvement schemes, i.e., increasing the obliquity of quasi horizontal section and adding a vertical pipe between the quasi horizontal section and next elbow, and the maximum temperature differences of quasi horizontal section of surge line of various layouts under different flowrate are obtained. The comparison shows that, the increasing of the obliquity of quasi horizontal section can mitigate the thermal stratification phenomena but can not eliminate this phenomena, while the adding of a vertical pipe between the quasi horizontal section and next elbow can effectively mitigate and eliminate the thermal stratification phenomena. (authors)

  13. Social Stratification and Cooperative Behavior in Spatial Prisoners' Dilemma Games.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Lu

    Full Text Available It has been a long-lasting pursuit to promote cooperation, and this study aims to promote cooperation via the combination of social stratification and the spatial prisoners' dilemma game. It is previously assumed that agents share the identical payoff matrix, but the stratification or diversity exists and exerts influences in real societies. Thus, two additional classes, elites and scoundrels, derive from and coexist with the existing class, commons. Three classes have different payoff matrices. We construct a model where agents play the prisoners' dilemma game with neighbors. It indicates that stratification and temptation jointly influence cooperation. Temptation permanently reduces cooperation; elites play a positive role in promoting cooperation while scoundrels undermine it. As the temptation getting larger and larger, elites play a more and more positive and critical role while scoundrels' negative effect becomes weaker and weaker, and it is more obvious when temptation goes beyond its threshold.

  14. Horizontal Stratification in Access to Danish University Programmes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Martin D.; Thomsen, Jens Peter

    2018-01-01

    a relatively detailed classification of parents’ occupations to determine how students are endowed with different forms of capital, even when their parents would typically be characterised as belonging to the same social group. Second, we distinguish among disciplines and among university institutions...... to explain the dynamics of horizontal stratification in the Danish university system. Using unique and exhaustive register data, including all higher education institutions and the entire 1984 cohort as of the age of 24, we uncover distinct differences in the magnitude and type of horizontal stratification...... in different fields of study and university institutions. Most importantly, we find distinct patterns of horizontal stratification by field of study and parental occupation that would have remained hidden had we used more aggregated classifications for field of study and social origin....

  15. Investigation of the Solvis stratification inlet pipe for solar tanks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Elsa; Jordan, Ulrike; Shah, Louise Jivan

    2004-01-01

    Since the 1960’ties the influence of the thermal stratification in hot water tanks on the thermal performance of solar heating systems has been studied intensively. It was found, that the thermal performance of a solar heating system is increasing for increasing thermal stratification in the hot...... water tank. The temperature of the storage water heated by the solar collector loop usually varies strongly during the day. In order to reach a good thermal stratification in the tank, different types of pipes, plates, diffusers and other devices have been investigated in the past (e.g. Loehrke, 1979...... conditions. Temperature measurements were carried out and an optical method called Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was used to visualize the flow around the flaps....

  16. Eddy-driven stratification initiates North Atlantic spring phytoplankton blooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadevan, Amala; D'Asaro, Eric; Lee, Craig; Perry, Mary Jane

    2012-07-06

    Springtime phytoplankton blooms photosynthetically fix carbon and export it from the surface ocean at globally important rates. These blooms are triggered by increased light exposure of the phytoplankton due to both seasonal light increase and the development of a near-surface vertical density gradient (stratification) that inhibits vertical mixing of the phytoplankton. Classically and in current climate models, that stratification is ascribed to a springtime warming of the sea surface. Here, using observations from the subpolar North Atlantic and a three-dimensional biophysical model, we show that the initial stratification and resulting bloom are instead caused by eddy-driven slumping of the basin-scale north-south density gradient, resulting in a patchy bloom beginning 20 to 30 days earlier than would occur by warming.

  17. Salinity-induced stratification and the onset of hypoxia during the Holocene Thermal Maximum and the Medieval Climate Anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadomanolaki, Nina; Dijkstra, Nikki; van Helmond, Niels; Sangiorgi, Francesca; Hagens, Mathilde; Kotthoff, Ulrich; Slomp, Caroline

    2016-04-01

    During the past ~8000 years the Baltic Sea has experienced three distinct intervals of hypoxia, of which the last one is still ongoing. These intervals are characterized by enhanced sedimentary organic matter burial and enrichment of redox-sensitive metals, such as molybdenum and iron. The first two of these intervals occurred during the Holocene Thermal Maximum (HTM) and the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA), two phases with high temperatures and changed precipitation patterns. Studies focussing on the Holocene sedimentary record of the Baltic Sea aim at clarifying the causes of the initiation, evolution and termination of these hypoxic intervals, as well as their consequences. This information could help to potentially aid in finding solutions for the mitigation of present-day hypoxia in the Baltic Sea. The factors contributing to hypoxia development during the HTM and MCA are still debated. Here we present data from a core retrieved during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 347 in the Landsort Deep basin, the deepest basin of the Baltic Sea at 463m water depth. Sediments were analysed at a high resolution using inorganic geochemical and (mainly marine) palynological proxies. Dinoflagellate cyst (dinocyst) assemblages and total elemental compositions provide clues on the role of salinity in enhancing stratification, ultimately causing hypoxia. During the onset of the HTM changes in salinity, as indicated by the palynology, closely follow changes in sedimentary organic carbon burial and trace metal concentrations. This suggests that stratification was an important cause of hypoxia during the HTM. In contrast, the palynology suggests that reduced stratification did not contribute to re-oxygenation during the termination of the HTM. We did not observe major changes in the palynology throughout the hypoxic interval of the MCA. Our results thus suggest that changes in salinity did not cause the onset and termination of hypoxia during the MCA.

  18. Information processing through a bio-based redox capacitor: signatures for redox-cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Kim, Eunkyoung; White, Ian M; Bentley, William E; Payne, Gregory F

    2014-08-01

    Redox-cycling compounds can significantly impact biological systems and can be responsible for activities that range from pathogen virulence and contaminant toxicities, to therapeutic drug mechanisms. Current methods to identify redox-cycling activities rely on the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and employ enzymatic or chemical methods to detect ROS. Here, we couple the speed and sensitivity of electrochemistry with the molecular-electronic properties of a bio-based redox-capacitor to generate signatures of redox-cycling. The redox capacitor film is electrochemically-fabricated at the electrode surface and is composed of a polysaccharide hydrogel with grafted catechol moieties. This capacitor film is redox-active but non-conducting and can engage diffusible compounds in either oxidative or reductive redox-cycling. Using standard electrochemical mediators ferrocene dimethanol (Fc) and Ru(NH3)6Cl3 (Ru(3+)) as model redox-cyclers, we observed signal amplifications and rectifications that serve as signatures of redox-cycling. Three bio-relevant compounds were then probed for these signatures: (i) ascorbate, a redox-active compound that does not redox-cycle; (ii) pyocyanin, a virulence factor well-known for its reductive redox-cycling; and (iii) acetaminophen, an analgesic that oxidatively redox-cycles but also undergoes conjugation reactions. These studies demonstrate that the redox-capacitor can enlist the capabilities of electrochemistry to generate rapid and sensitive signatures of biologically-relevant chemical activities (i.e., redox-cycling). Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Risk Stratification in Differentiated Thyroid Cancer: An Ongoing Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gal Omry-Orbach

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid cancer is an increasingly common malignancy, with a rapidly rising prevalence worldwide. The social and economic ramifications of the increase in thyroid cancer are multiple. Though mortality from thyroid cancer is low, and most patients will do well, the risk of recurrence is not insignificant, up to 30%. Therefore, it is important to accurately identify those patients who are more or less likely to be burdened by their disease over years and tailor their treatment plan accordingly. The goal of risk stratification is to do just that. The risk stratification process generally starts postoperatively with histopathologic staging, based on the AJCC/UICC staging system as well as others designed to predict mortality. These do not, however, accurately assess the risk of recurrence/persistence. Patients initially considered to be at high risk may ultimately do very well yet be burdened by frequent unnecessary monitoring. Conversely, patients initially thought to be low risk, may not respond to their initial treatment as expected and, if left unmonitored, may have higher morbidity. The concept of risk-adaptive management has been adopted, with an understanding that risk stratification for differentiated thyroid cancer is dynamic and ongoing. A multitude of variables not included in AJCC/UICC staging are used initially to classify patients as low, intermediate, or high risk for recurrence. Over the course of time, a response-to-therapy variable is incorporated, and patients essentially undergo continuous risk stratification. Additional tools such as biochemical markers, genetic mutations, and molecular markers have been added to this complex risk stratification process such that this is essentially a continuum of risk. In recent years, additional considerations have been discussed with a suggestion of pre-operative risk stratification based on certain clinical and/or biologic characteristics. With the increasing prevalence of thyroid cancer but

  20. Dependence of offshore wind turbine fatigue loads on atmospheric stratification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Schaldemose; Larsen, Gunner Chr.; Ott, Søren

    2014-01-01

    The stratification of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) is classified in terms of the M-O length and subsequently used to determine the relationship between ABL stability and the fatigue loads of a wind turbine located inside an offshore wind farm. Recorded equivalent fatigue loads, representi...... conditions. In general, impact of ABL stratification is clearly seen on wake affected inflow cases for both blade and tower fatigue loads. However, the character of this dependence varies significantly with the type of inflow conditions – e.g. single wake inflow or multiple wake inflow....

  1. Prodromal Parkinsonism and Neurodegenerative Risk Stratification in REM Sleep Behavior Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Thomas R; Lawton, Michael; Rolinski, Michal; Evetts, Samuel; Baig, Fahd; Ruffmann, Claudio; Gornall, Aimie; Klein, Johannes C; Lo, Christine; Dennis, Gary; Bandmann, Oliver; Quinnell, Timothy; Zaiwalla, Zenobia; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Hu, Michele T M

    2017-08-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is the most specific marker of prodromal alpha-synucleinopathies. We sought to delineate the baseline clinical characteristics of RBD and evaluate risk stratification models. Clinical assessments were performed in 171 RBD, 296 control, and 119 untreated Parkinson's (PD) participants. Putative risk measures were assessed as predictors of prodromal neurodegeneration, and Movement Disorders Society (MDS) criteria for prodromal PD were applied. Participants were screened for common leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2)/glucocerebrosidase gene (GBA) gene mutations. Compared to controls, participants with RBD had higher rates of solvent exposure, head injury, smoking, obesity, and antidepressant use. GBA mutations were more common in RBD, but no LRRK2 mutations were found. RBD participants performed significantly worse than controls on Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS)-III, timed "get-up-and-go", Flamingo test, Sniffin Sticks, and cognitive tests and had worse measures of constipation, quality of life (QOL), and orthostatic hypotension. For all these measures except UPDRS-III, RBD and PD participants were equally impaired. Depression, anxiety, and apathy were worse in RBD compared to PD participants. Stratification of people with RBD according to antidepressant use, obesity, and age altered the odds ratio (OR) of hyposmia compared to controls from 3.4 to 45.5. 74% (95% confidence interval [CI] 66%, 80%) of RBD participants met the MDS criteria for probable prodromal Parkinson's compared to 0.3% (95% CI 0.009%, 2%) of controls. RBD are impaired across a range of clinical measures consistent with prodromal PD and suggestive of a more severe nonmotor subtype. Clinical risk stratification has the potential to select higher risk patients for neuroprotective interventions. © Sleep Research Society 2017. Published by Oxford University Press [on behalf of the Sleep Research Society].

  2. Redox reactivity and coordination chemistry of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nocton, G.

    2009-09-01

    The study and the understanding of actinides chemistry have important implications in the nuclear field both for the development of new actinides materials and the retreatment of the nuclear wastes. One of the major issues in that chemistry is that the actinides elements are known to undergo redox reaction and to form assemblies of different size and different topologies. In that context uranium can be a good model of the heavier radioelement because it is much less radioactive. So, this work concerns the synthesis and the study of the spectroscopy and the magnetic properties of several uranium based polymetallic assemblies synthesized by taking advantage of the redox properties and the coordination chemistry of uranium. The hydrolysis reactivity of trivalent uranium has been studied in absence of sterically hindered ligands and led to the synthesis of oxo/hydroxo uranium assemblies with different sizes by changing the starting complex or the reaction conditions. By following the same strategy, the controlled oxidation of trivalent uranium complexes led to an original azido/nitrido uranium complex. The coordination chemistry of the pentavalent uranyl polymer {[UO 2 py 5 ][KI 2 py 3 ]} n has also been studied with different ligand and in different conditions and led to several cation-cation complexes for which the stability is sufficient for studying there dismutation by proton NMR. By changing the ancillary ligands stable monomeric complexes of pentavalent uranyl complexes were also obtained. The magnetic properties of all the complexes, monomers and polymetallic complexes were studied and an antiferromagnetic coupling was observed for the cation-cation pentavalent uranyl dimer [UO 2 (dbm) 2 (K 18 C 6 )] 2 . (author)

  3. Characterization of redox conditions in pollution plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Banwart, Steven A.

    2000-01-01

    Evalution of redox conditions in groundwater pollution plumes is often a prerequisite for understanding the behviour of the pollutants in the plume and for selecting remediation approaches. Measuring of redox conditions in pollution plumes is, however, a fairly recent issue and yet relative few...

  4. Redox properties of small semiconductor particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liver, N.; Nitzan, A.

    1992-01-01

    The size dependence of electrical and thermodynamic quantities of intermediate-sized semiconductor particles in an electrolyte solution with a given redox pair are studied. The equilibrium constant for this system is then derived based on the relationship of the electrolytic redox components to the size, charges, and concentration of the semiconductor particles. 25 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  5. Characterization of redox proteins using electrochemical methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, M.

    1995-01-01

    The use of electrochemical techniques in combination with proteins started approximately a decade ago and has since then developed into a powerfull technique for the study of small redox proteins. In addition to the determination of redox potentials, electrochemistry can be used to obtain

  6. Adaptive changes in renal mitochondrial redox status in diabetic nephropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putt, David A.; Zhong, Qing; Lash, Lawrence H., E-mail: l.h.lash@wayne.edu

    2012-01-15

    Nephropathy is a serious and common complication of diabetes. In the streptozotocin (STZ)-treated rat model of diabetes, nephropathy does not typically develop until 30 to 45 days post-injection, although hyperglycemia occurs within 24 h. We tested the hypothesis that chronic hyperglycemia results in a modest degree of oxidative stress that is accompanied by compensatory changes in certain antioxidants and mitochondrial redox status. We propose that as kidneys progress to a state of diabetic nephropathy, further adaptations occur in mitochondrial redox status. Basic parameters of renal function in vivo and several parameters of mitochondrial function and glutathione (GSH) and redox status in isolated renal cortical mitochondria from STZ-treated and age-matched control rats were examined at 30 days and 90 days post-injection. While there was no effect of diabetes on blood urea nitrogen, measurement of other, more sensitive parameters, such as urinary albumin and protein, and histopathology showed significant and progressive worsening in diabetic rats. Thus, renal function is compromised even prior to the onset of frank nephropathy. Changes in mitochondrial respiration and enzyme activities indicated existence of a hypermetabolic state. Higher mitochondrial GSH content and rates of GSH transport into mitochondria in kidneys from diabetic rats were only partially due to changes in expression of mitochondrial GSH carriers and were mostly due to higher substrate supply. Although there are few clear indicators of oxidative stress, there are several redox changes that occur early and change further as nephropathy progresses, highlighting the complexity of the disease. Highlights: ►Adaptive changes in renal mitochondrial and redox status in diabetic rats. ►Modest renal dysfunction even prior to onset of nephropathy. ►Elevated concentrations of mitochondrial GSH in diabetic kidneys. ►Change in GSH due partly to increased protein expression of transporter.

  7. Adaptive changes in renal mitochondrial redox status in diabetic nephropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putt, David A.; Zhong, Qing; Lash, Lawrence H.

    2012-01-01

    Nephropathy is a serious and common complication of diabetes. In the streptozotocin (STZ)-treated rat model of diabetes, nephropathy does not typically develop until 30 to 45 days post-injection, although hyperglycemia occurs within 24 h. We tested the hypothesis that chronic hyperglycemia results in a modest degree of oxidative stress that is accompanied by compensatory changes in certain antioxidants and mitochondrial redox status. We propose that as kidneys progress to a state of diabetic nephropathy, further adaptations occur in mitochondrial redox status. Basic parameters of renal function in vivo and several parameters of mitochondrial function and glutathione (GSH) and redox status in isolated renal cortical mitochondria from STZ-treated and age-matched control rats were examined at 30 days and 90 days post-injection. While there was no effect of diabetes on blood urea nitrogen, measurement of other, more sensitive parameters, such as urinary albumin and protein, and histopathology showed significant and progressive worsening in diabetic rats. Thus, renal function is compromised even prior to the onset of frank nephropathy. Changes in mitochondrial respiration and enzyme activities indicated existence of a hypermetabolic state. Higher mitochondrial GSH content and rates of GSH transport into mitochondria in kidneys from diabetic rats were only partially due to changes in expression of mitochondrial GSH carriers and were mostly due to higher substrate supply. Although there are few clear indicators of oxidative stress, there are several redox changes that occur early and change further as nephropathy progresses, highlighting the complexity of the disease. Highlights: ►Adaptive changes in renal mitochondrial and redox status in diabetic rats. ►Modest renal dysfunction even prior to onset of nephropathy. ►Elevated concentrations of mitochondrial GSH in diabetic kidneys. ►Change in GSH due partly to increased protein expression of transporter.

  8. The ABA-INSENSITIVE-4 (ABI4) transcription factor links redox, hormone and sugar signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foyer, Christine H; Kerchev, Pavel I; Hancock, Robert D

    2012-02-01

    The cellular reduction-oxidation (redox) hub processes information from metabolism and the environment and so regulates plant growth and defense through integration with the hormone signaling network. One key pathway of redox control involves interactions with ABSCISIC ACID (ABA). Accumulating evidence suggests that the ABA-INSENSITIVE-4 (ABI4) transcription factor plays a key role in transmitting information concerning the abundance of ascorbate and hence the ability of cells to buffer oxidative challenges. ABI4 is required for the ascorbate-dependent control of growth, a process that involves enhancement of salicylic acid (SA) signaling and inhibition of jasmonic acid (JA) signaling pathways. Low redox buffering capacity reinforces SA- JA- interactions through the mediation of ABA and ABI4 to fine-tune plant growth and defense in relation to metabolic cues and environmental challenges. Moreover, ABI4-mediated pathways of sugar sensitivity are also responsive to the abundance of ascorbate, providing evidence of overlap between redox and sugar signaling pathways.

  9. A robust and versatile mass spectrometry platform for comprehensive assessment of the thiol redox metabolome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.R. Sutton

    2018-06-01

    . Additional determination of acid-labile sulfide/thiols was demonstrated in human blood cells, urine and saliva. Using this simplified mass spectrometry-based workflow the thiol redox metabolome can be determined in samples from clinical and translational studies, providing a novel prognostic/diagnostic platform for patient stratification, drug monitoring, and identification of new therapeutic approaches in redox diseases. Keywords: Oxidative stress, Redox status, Reactive species interactome, Glutathione, Hydrogen sulfide, Persulfides, Thiol-maleimide michael addition

  10. Engineered Proteins: Redox Properties and Their Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhulkar, Shradha; Tian, Hui; Wang, Xiaotang; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Oxidoreductases and metalloproteins, representing more than one third of all known proteins, serve as significant catalysts for numerous biological processes that involve electron transfers such as photosynthesis, respiration, metabolism, and molecular signaling. The functional properties of the oxidoreductases/metalloproteins are determined by the nature of their redox centers. Protein engineering is a powerful approach that is used to incorporate biological and abiological redox cofactors as well as novel enzymes and redox proteins with predictable structures and desirable functions for important biological and chemical applications. The methods of protein engineering, mainly rational design, directed evolution, protein surface modifications, and domain shuffling, have allowed the creation and study of a number of redox proteins. This review presents a selection of engineered redox proteins achieved through these methods, resulting in a manipulation in redox potentials, an increase in electron-transfer efficiency, and an expansion of native proteins by de novo design. Such engineered/modified redox proteins with desired properties have led to a broad spectrum of practical applications, ranging from biosensors, biofuel cells, to pharmaceuticals and hybrid catalysis. Glucose biosensors are one of the most successful products in enzyme electrochemistry, with reconstituted glucose oxidase achieving effective electrical communication with the sensor electrode; direct electron-transfer-type biofuel cells are developed to avoid thermodynamic loss and mediator leakage; and fusion proteins of P450s and redox partners make the biocatalytic generation of drug metabolites possible. In summary, this review includes the properties and applications of the engineered redox proteins as well as their significance and great potential in the exploration of bioelectrochemical sensing devices. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 17, 1796–1822. PMID:22435347

  11. Optimization of a Vanadium Redox Flow Battery with Hydrogen generation

    OpenAIRE

    Wrang, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    We consider the modelling and optimal control of energy storage systems, in this study a Vanadium Redox Flow Battery. Such a battery can be introduced in the electrical grid to be charged when demand is low and discharged when demand is high, increasing the overall efficiency of the network while reducing costs and emission of greenhouse gases. The model of the battery proposed in this study is less complex than the majority of models on batteries and energy storage systems found in literatur...

  12. Evaluation and verification of thermal stratification models for was

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    prediction of the condition of thermal stratification in WSPs under different hydraulic conditions and ... off coefficient. The models are verified with data collected from the full scale waste .... comparing two mathematical models based ..... 2 Comparison of measured and predicted effluent coliform bacteria (N) againsty depth.

  13. Thermal stratification of sodium in the BN 600 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obmelukhin, J.A.; Obukhov, P.I.; Rinejskij, A.A.; Sobolev, V.A.; Sherbakov, S.I.

    1983-01-01

    The signs of thermal stratification of sodium in the BN 600 reactor upper plenum revealed by the analysis of standard temperature sensors' readings are defined. The initial conditions for existence of different temperature sodium layers are given. Two approaches for realizing on a computer of equations describing sodium motion in the upper plenum of the reactor are presented. (author)

  14. Modelling the tides and their impacts on the vertical stratification ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Sofala Bank, a wide shelf located along the central coast of Mozambique, hosts tides with high amplitudes. The Regional Ocean Modelling System (ROMS) was used to analyse the tidal currents on the bank and to investigate their effects on the stratification and generation of tidal fronts. During spring tides, barotropic ...

  15. Simulation of containment atmosphere stratification experiment using local instantaneous description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babic, M.; Kljenak, I.

    2004-01-01

    An experiment on mixing and stratification in the atmosphere of a nuclear power plant containment at accident conditions was simulated with the CFD code CFX4.4. The original experiment was performed in the TOSQAN experimental facility. Simulated nonhomogeneous temperature, species concentration and velocity fields are compared to experimental results. (author)

  16. A Study on an Evaluation of PWR Piping Thermal Stratification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, H.; Kim, B.N.; Lee, S.K.; Jeong, I.S.; Chjung, B.S.; Lee, S.H. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    This report presents the determination of thermal stratification phenomenon of pressurizer surge line for Kori unit No.4. With this regards, the integrity of related piping was evaluated by both various stress analysis and fatigue analysis. (author). 23 refs., 61 figs., 22 tabs.

  17. Schematic Harder–Narasimhan stratification for families of principal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Proceedings – Mathematical Sciences; Volume 124; Issue 3. Schematic Harder–Narasimhan Stratification for Families of Principal Bundles ... Author Affiliations. Sudarshan Gurjar1 Nitin Nitsure1. School of Mathematics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005, India ...

  18. Quantitative risk stratification in Markov chains with limiting conditional distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, David C; Pollett, Philip K; Weinstein, Milton C

    2009-01-01

    Many clinical decisions require patient risk stratification. The authors introduce the concept of limiting conditional distributions, which describe the equilibrium proportion of surviving patients occupying each disease state in a Markov chain with death. Such distributions can quantitatively describe risk stratification. The authors first establish conditions for the existence of a positive limiting conditional distribution in a general Markov chain and describe a framework for risk stratification using the limiting conditional distribution. They then apply their framework to a clinical example of a treatment indicated for high-risk patients, first to infer the risk of patients selected for treatment in clinical trials and then to predict the outcomes of expanding treatment to other populations of risk. For the general chain, a positive limiting conditional distribution exists only if patients in the earliest state have the lowest combined risk of progression or death. The authors show that in their general framework, outcomes and population risk are interchangeable. For the clinical example, they estimate that previous clinical trials have selected the upper quintile of patient risk for this treatment, but they also show that expanded treatment would weakly dominate this degree of targeted treatment, and universal treatment may be cost-effective. Limiting conditional distributions exist in most Markov models of progressive diseases and are well suited to represent risk stratification quantitatively. This framework can characterize patient risk in clinical trials and predict outcomes for other populations of risk.

  19. The Social Stratification of the German VET System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protsch, Paula; Solga, Heike

    2016-01-01

    Germany is widely known for its vocational education and training (VET) system and its dual apprenticeship system in particular. What is often overlooked, however, is the vertical stratification within the German VET system. This is the focus of this study. Our analysis shows that the VET system, like the German school system, is highly…

  20. Similarity rules of thermal stratification phenomena for water and sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtsuka, M.; Ikeda, T.; Yamakawa, M.; Shibata, Y.; Moriya, S.; Ushijima, S.; Fujimoto, K.

    1988-01-01

    Similarity rules for thermal stratification phenomena were studied using sodium and water experiments with scaled cylindrical vessels. The vessel dimensions were identical to focus on the effect of differences in fluid properties upon the phenomena. Comparisons of test results between sodium and water elucidated similar and dissimilar characteristics for thermal stratification phenomena which appeared in the scaled vessels. Results were as follows: (1) The dimensionless upward velocity of the thermal stratification interface was proportional to Ri -0.74 for water and sodium during the period when the buoyancy effect was dominant. (2) Dimensionless temperature transient rate at the outlet slit decreased with Ri for sodium and remained constant for water where Ri>0.2. The applicability of the scaled test results to an actual power plant was also studied by using multi-dimensional numerical analysis which was verified by the water and sodium experiments. Water experiments could simulate liquid metal fast breeder reactor flows more accurately than sodium experiments for dimensionless temperature gradient at the thermal stratification interface and dimensionless temperature transient rate at the intermediate heat exchanger inlet

  1. Clinical Studies in Risk Stratification & Therapy of Thoracic Aortic Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamman, AV

    2017-01-01

    For this thesis we aimed to summarize outcomes and optimal treatment modality for thoracic aortic disease, discuss new imaging techniques and improve the use of current imaging modalities. Furthermore, we aimed to improve risk stratification for uncomplicated type B aortic dissection (TBAD) and

  2. Estimation for small domains in double sampling for stratification ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this article, we investigate the effect of randomness of the size of a small domain on the precision of an estimator of mean for the domain under double sampling for stratification. The result shows that for a small domain that cuts across various strata with unknown weights, the sampling variance depends on the within ...

  3. Formulation parameters influencing self-stratification of coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, P.; Bots, T.L.

    1996-01-01

    Research was carried out aimed at the development of self-stratifying paints for steel which after application during film formation spontaneously form two well established layers of primer and top coat. The parameters affecting stratification were investigated for combinations of epoxy resins and

  4. Stratification of habitats for identifying habitat selection by Merriam's turkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark A. Rumble; Stanley H. Anderson

    1992-01-01

    Habitat selection patterns of Merriam’s Turkeys were compared in hierarchical analyses of three levels of habitat stratification. Habitat descriptions in first-level analyses were based on dominant species of vegetation. Habitat descriptions in second-level analyses were based on dominant species of vegetation and overstory canopy cover. Habitat descriptions in third-...

  5. Viral lysis of marine microbes in relation to vertical stratification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mojica, K.D.A.

    2015-01-01

    Marine microorganisms represent the largest reservoir of living organic carbon in the ocean and collectively manage the pools and fluxes of nutrients and energy. Climate-induced increases in sea surface temperature and associated modifications to vertical stratification are affecting the structure

  6. Viral lysis of marine microbes in relation to vertical stratification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mojica, K.D.A.

    2015-01-01

    The overall aim of this thesis is to investigate how changes in vertical stratification affect autotrophic and heterotrophic microbial communities along a meridional gradient in the Atlantic Ocean. The Northeast Atlantic Ocean is a key area in global ocean circulation and a important sink for

  7. Glacial ocean circulation and stratification explained by reduced atmospheric temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Malte F

    2017-01-03

    Earth's climate has undergone dramatic shifts between glacial and interglacial time periods, with high-latitude temperature changes on the order of 5-10 °C. These climatic shifts have been associated with major rearrangements in the deep ocean circulation and stratification, which have likely played an important role in the observed atmospheric carbon dioxide swings by affecting the partitioning of carbon between the atmosphere and the ocean. The mechanisms by which the deep ocean circulation changed, however, are still unclear and represent a major challenge to our understanding of glacial climates. This study shows that various inferred changes in the deep ocean circulation and stratification between glacial and interglacial climates can be interpreted as a direct consequence of atmospheric temperature differences. Colder atmospheric temperatures lead to increased sea ice cover and formation rate around Antarctica. The associated enhanced brine rejection leads to a strongly increased deep ocean stratification, consistent with high abyssal salinities inferred for the last glacial maximum. The increased stratification goes together with a weakening and shoaling of the interhemispheric overturning circulation, again consistent with proxy evidence for the last glacial. The shallower interhemispheric overturning circulation makes room for slowly moving water of Antarctic origin, which explains the observed middepth radiocarbon age maximum and may play an important role in ocean carbon storage.

  8. Combustion Stratification for Naphtha from CI Combustion to PPC

    KAUST Repository

    Vallinayagam, R.

    2017-03-28

    This study demonstrates the combustion stratification from conventional compression ignition (CI) combustion to partially premixed combustion (PPC). Experiments are performed in an optical CI engine at a speed of 1200 rpm for diesel and naphtha (RON = 46). The motored pressure at TDC is maintained at 35 bar and fuelMEP is kept constant at 5.1 bar to account for the difference in fuel properties between naphtha and diesel. Single injection strategy is employed and the fuel is injected at a pressure of 800 bar. Photron FASTCAM SA4 that captures in-cylinder combustion at the rate of 10000 frames per second is employed. The captured high speed video is processed to study the combustion homogeneity based on an algorithm reported in previous studies. Starting from late fuel injection timings, combustion stratification is investigated by advancing the fuel injection timings. For late start of injection (SOI), a direct link between SOI and combustion phasing is noticed. At early SOI, combustion phasing depends on both intake air temperature and SOI. In order to match the combustion phasing (CA50) of diesel, the intake air temperature is increased to 90°C for naphtha. The combustion stratification from CI to PPC is also investigated for various level of dilution by displacing oxygen with nitrogen in the intake. The start of combustion (SOC) was delayed with the increase in dilution and to compensate for this, the intake air temperature is increased. The mixture homogeneity is enhanced for higher dilution due to longer ignition delay. The results show that high speed image is initially blue and then turned yellow, indicating soot formation and oxidation. The luminosity of combustion images decreases with early SOI and increased dilution. The images are processed to generate the level of stratification based on the image intensity. The level of stratification is same for diesel and naphtha at various SOI. When O concentration in the intake is decreased to 17.7% and 14

  9. Enhanced microbial decolorization of methyl red with oxidized carbon fiber as redox mediator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emilia Rios-Del Toro, E. [División de Ciencias Ambientales, Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica (IPICyT), Camino a la Presa San José 2055, Col. Lomas 4a Sección, San Luis Potosí, SLP 78216 (Mexico); Celis, Lourdes B. [División de Geociencias Aplicadas, Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica (IPICyT), Camino a la Presa San José 2055, Col. Lomas 4a Sección, San Luis Potosí, SLP 78216 (Mexico); Cervantes, Francisco J. [División de Ciencias Ambientales, Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica (IPICyT), Camino a la Presa San José 2055, Col. Lomas 4a Sección, San Luis Potosí, SLP 78216 (Mexico); Rangel-Mendez, J. Rene, E-mail: rene@ipicyt.edu.mx [División de Ciencias Ambientales, Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica (IPICyT), Camino a la Presa San José 2055, Col. Lomas 4a Sección, San Luis Potosí, SLP 78216 (Mexico)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • Activated carbon fibers (ACFs) act as redox mediator. • Electron accepting capacity increased with oxidation time of ACF. •ACFs increased 8-fold the reduction of methyl red in biological assays. •Biofilm formed on the ACFs partly blocked their redox mediator capacity. -- Abstract: The anaerobic degradation of azo dyes under anaerobic conditions is possible but at a slow rate. Redox mediators (quinones, activated carbon) are used to improve the reduction rate. The aim of this work was to use activated carbon fiber (ACF) as a redox mediator for the anaerobic reduction of the azo dye methyl red. ACF was chemically modified with 8 M HNO{sub 3} to increase its redox-mediating capacity and used in chemical and anaerobic biological batch assays for the reduction of methyl red. ACF increased its redox-mediating capacity up to 3-fold in chemical assays; in biological assays ACF increased the reduction rate up to 8-fold compared to controls without ACF. However, since the ACF served as support for biomass, a biofilm formed on the fiber significantly reduced its redox-mediating capacity; substrate consumption suggested that the electron transport from ACF to methyl red was the rate-limiting step in the process. These results are the first evidence of the role of ACF as a redox mediator in the reductive decolorization of methyl red, in addition to the effect of biofilm attached to ACF on methyl red reduction. Due to the versatile characteristics of ACF and its redox-mediating capacity, carbon fibers could be used in biological wastewater treatment systems to accelerate the reductive transformation of pollutants commonly found in industrial effluents.

  10. Enhanced microbial decolorization of methyl red with oxidized carbon fiber as redox mediator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emilia Rios-Del Toro, E.; Celis, Lourdes B.; Cervantes, Francisco J.; Rangel-Mendez, J. Rene

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Activated carbon fibers (ACFs) act as redox mediator. • Electron accepting capacity increased with oxidation time of ACF. •ACFs increased 8-fold the reduction of methyl red in biological assays. •Biofilm formed on the ACFs partly blocked their redox mediator capacity. -- Abstract: The anaerobic degradation of azo dyes under anaerobic conditions is possible but at a slow rate. Redox mediators (quinones, activated carbon) are used to improve the reduction rate. The aim of this work was to use activated carbon fiber (ACF) as a redox mediator for the anaerobic reduction of the azo dye methyl red. ACF was chemically modified with 8 M HNO 3 to increase its redox-mediating capacity and used in chemical and anaerobic biological batch assays for the reduction of methyl red. ACF increased its redox-mediating capacity up to 3-fold in chemical assays; in biological assays ACF increased the reduction rate up to 8-fold compared to controls without ACF. However, since the ACF served as support for biomass, a biofilm formed on the fiber significantly reduced its redox-mediating capacity; substrate consumption suggested that the electron transport from ACF to methyl red was the rate-limiting step in the process. These results are the first evidence of the role of ACF as a redox mediator in the reductive decolorization of methyl red, in addition to the effect of biofilm attached to ACF on methyl red reduction. Due to the versatile characteristics of ACF and its redox-mediating capacity, carbon fibers could be used in biological wastewater treatment systems to accelerate the reductive transformation of pollutants commonly found in industrial effluents

  11. Ruthenium nanocatalysis on redox reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerakumar, Pitchaimani; Ramdass, Arumugam; Rajagopal, Seenivasan

    2013-07-01

    Nanoparticles have generated intense interest over the past 20 years due to their high potential applications in different areas such as catalysis, sensors, nanoscale electronics, fuel and solar cells and optoelectronics. As the large fractions of metal atoms are exposed to the surface, the use of metal nanoparticles as nanocatalysts allows mild reaction conditions and high catalytic efficiency in a large number of chemical transformations. They have emerged as sustainable heterogeneous catalysts and catalyst supports alternative to conventional materials. This review focuses on the synthesis, characterization and catalytic role of ruthenium nanoparticles (RuNPs) on the redox reactions of heteroatom containing organic compounds with the green reagent H2O2, a field that has attracted immense interest among the chemical, materials and industrial communities. We intend to present a broad overview of Ru nanocatalysts for redox reactions with an emphasis on their performance, stability and reusability. The growth in the chemistry of organic sulfoxides and N-oxides during last decade was due to their importance as synthetic intermediates for the production of a wide range of chemically and biologically active molecules. Thus design of efficient methods for the synthesis of sulfoxides and N-oxides becomes important. This review concentrates on the catalysis of RuNPs on the H2O2 oxidation of organic sulfides to sulfoxides and amines to N-oxides. The deoxygenation reactions of sulfoxides to sulfides and reduction of nitro compounds to amines are fundamental reactions in both chemistry and biology. Here, we also highlight the catalysis of metal nanoparticles on the deoxygenation of sulfoxides and sulfones and reduction of nitro compounds with particular emphasis on the mechanistic aspects.

  12. Water-Column Stratification Observed along an AUV-Tracked Isotherm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Messié, M.; Ryan, J. P.; Kieft, B.; Stanway, M. J.; Hobson, B.; O'Reilly, T. C.; Raanan, B. Y.; Smith, J. M.; Chavez, F.

    2016-02-01

    Studies of marine physical, chemical and microbiological processes benefit from observing in a Lagrangian frame of reference, i.e. drifting with ambient water. Because these processes can be organized relative to specific density or temperature ranges, maintaining observing platforms within targeted environmental ranges is an important observing strategy. We have developed a novel method to enable a Tethys-class long-range autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) (which has a propeller and a buoyancy engine) to track a target isotherm in buoyancy-controlled drift mode. In this mode, the vehicle shuts off its propeller and autonomously detects the isotherm and stays with it by actively controlling the vehicle's buoyancy. In the June 2015 CANON (Controlled, Agile, and Novel Observing Network) Experiment in Monterey Bay, California, AUV Makai tracked a target isotherm for 13 hours to study the coastal upwelling system. The tracked isotherm started from 33 m depth, shoaled to 10 m, and then deepened to 29 m. The thickness of the tracked isotherm layer (within 0.3°C error from the target temperature) increased over this duration, reflecting weakened stratification around the isotherm. During Makai's isotherm tracking, another long-range AUV, Daphne, acoustically tracked Makai on a circular yo-yo trajectory, measuring water-column profiles in Makai's vicinity. A wave glider also acoustically tracked Makai, providing sea surface measurements on the track. The presented method is a new approach for studying water-column stratification, but requires careful analysis of the temporal and spatial variations mingled in the vehicles' measurements. We will present a synthesis of the water column's stratification in relation to the upwelling conditions, based on the in situ measurements by the mobile platforms, as well as remote sensing and mooring data.

  13. Representing Reservoir Stratification in Land Surface and Earth System Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yigzaw, W.; Li, H. Y.; Leung, L. R.; Hejazi, M. I.; Voisin, N.; Payn, R. A.; Demissie, Y.

    2017-12-01

    A one-dimensional reservoir stratification modeling has been developed as part of Model for Scale Adaptive River Transport (MOSART), which is the river transport model used in the Accelerated Climate Modeling for Energy (ACME) and Community Earth System Model (CESM). Reservoirs play an important role in modulating the dynamic water, energy and biogeochemical cycles in the riverine system through nutrient sequestration and stratification. However, most earth system models include lake models that assume a simplified geometry featuring a constant depth and a constant surface area. As reservoir geometry has important effects on thermal stratification, we developed a new algorithm for deriving generic, stratified area-elevation-storage relationships that are applicable at regional and global scales using data from Global Reservoir and Dam database (GRanD). This new reservoir geometry dataset is then used to support the development of a reservoir stratification module within MOSART. The mixing of layers (energy and mass) in the reservoir is driven by eddy diffusion, vertical advection, and reservoir inflow and outflow. Upstream inflow into a reservoir is treated as an additional source/sink of energy, while downstream outflow represented a sink. Hourly atmospheric forcing from North American Land Assimilation System (NLDAS) Phase II and simulated daily runoff by ACME land component are used as inputs for the model over the contiguous United States for simulations between 2001-2010. The model is validated using selected observed temperature profile data in a number of reservoirs that are subject to various levels of regulation. The reservoir stratification module completes the representation of riverine mass and heat transfer in earth system models, which is a major step towards quantitative understanding of human influences on the terrestrial hydrological, ecological and biogeochemical cycles.

  14. Organic Redox Species in Aqueous Flow Batteries: Redox Potentials, Chemical Stability and Solubility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedege, Kristina; Dražević, Emil; Konya, Denes; Bentien, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Organic molecules are currently investigated as redox species for aqueous low-cost redox flow batteries (RFBs). The envisioned features of using organic redox species are low cost and increased flexibility with respect to tailoring redox potential and solubility from molecular engineering of side groups on the organic redox-active species. In this paper 33, mainly quinone-based, compounds are studied experimentially in terms of pH dependent redox potential, solubility and stability, combined with single cell battery RFB tests on selected redox pairs. Data shows that both the solubility and redox potential are determined by the position of the side groups and only to a small extent by the number of side groups. Additionally, the chemical stability and possible degradation mechanisms leading to capacity loss over time are discussed. The main challenge for the development of all-organic RFBs is to identify a redox pair for the positive side with sufficiently high stability and redox potential that enables battery cell potentials above 1 V. PMID:27966605

  15. Redox behaviors of iron by absorption spectroscopy and redox potential measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Jae Yong

    2010-02-01

    This work is performed to study the redox (reduction/oxidation) behaviors of iron in aqueous system by a combination of absorption spectroscopy and redox potential measurements. There are many doubts on redox potential measurements generally showing low accuracies and high uncertainties. In the present study, redox potentials are measured by utilizing various redox electrodes such as Pt, Au, Ag, and glassy carbon (GC) electrodes. Measured redox potentials are compared with calculated redox potentials based on the chemical oxidation speciation of iron and thermodynamic data by absorption spectroscopy, which provides one of the sensitive and selective spectroscopic methods for the chemical speciation of Fe(II/III). From the comparison analyses, redox potential values measured by the Ag redox electrode are fairly consistent with those calculated by the chemical aqueous speciation of iron in the whole system. In summary, the uncertainties of measured redox potentials are closely related with the total Fe concentration and affected by the formation of mixed potentials due to Fe(III) precipitates in the pH range of 6 ∼ 9 beyond the solubility of Fe(III), whilst being independent of the initially prepared concentration ratios between Fe(II) and Fe(III)

  16. Organic Redox Species in Aqueous Flow Batteries: Redox Potentials, Chemical Stability and Solubility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedege, Kristina; Dražević, Emil; Konya, Denes; Bentien, Anders

    2016-12-01

    Organic molecules are currently investigated as redox species for aqueous low-cost redox flow batteries (RFBs). The envisioned features of using organic redox species are low cost and increased flexibility with respect to tailoring redox potential and solubility from molecular engineering of side groups on the organic redox-active species. In this paper 33, mainly quinone-based, compounds are studied experimentially in terms of pH dependent redox potential, solubility and stability, combined with single cell battery RFB tests on selected redox pairs. Data shows that both the solubility and redox potential are determined by the position of the side groups and only to a small extent by the number of side groups. Additionally, the chemical stability and possible degradation mechanisms leading to capacity loss over time are discussed. The main challenge for the development of all-organic RFBs is to identify a redox pair for the positive side with sufficiently high stability and redox potential that enables battery cell potentials above 1 V.

  17. Combustion stratification study of partially premixed combustion using Fourier transform analysis of OH* chemiluminescence images

    KAUST Repository

    Izadi Najafabadi, Mohammad; Somers, Bart; Johansson, Bengt; Dam, Nico

    2017-01-01

    A relatively high level of stratification (qualitatively: lack of homogeneity) is one of the main advantages of partially premixed combustion over the homogeneous charge compression ignition concept. Stratification can smooth the heat release rate

  18. Noninvasive non Doses Method for Risk Stratification of Breast Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Apollonova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article concerns a relevant issue that is a development of noninvasive method for screening diagnostics and risk stratification of breast diseases. The developed method and its embodiment use both the analysis of onco-epidemiologic tests and the iridoglyphical research.Widely used onco-epidemiologic tests only reflect the patient’s subjective perception of her own life history and sickness. Therefore to confirm the revealed factors, modern objective and safe methods are necessary.Iridoglyphical research may be considered as one of those methods, since it allows us to reveal changes in iris’ zones in real time. As these zones are functionally linked with intern organs and systems, in this case mammary glands, changes of iris’ zones may be used to assess risk groups for mammary gland disorders.The article presents results of research conducted using a prototype of the hardwaresoftware complex to provide screening diagnostics and risk stratification of mammary gland disorders.Research has been conducted using verified materials, provided by the Biomedical Engineering Faculty and the Scientific Biometry Research and Development Centre of Bauman Moscow State Technical University, the City of Moscow’s GUZ Clinical and Diagnostic Centre N°4 of the Western Administrative District and the First Mammology (Breast Care Centre of the Russian Federation’s Ministry of Health and Social Development.The information, obtained as a result of onco-epidemiological tests and iridoglyphical research, was used to develop a procedure of quantitative diagnostics aimed to assess mammary gland cancer risk groups. The procedure is based on Bayes conditional probability.The task of quantitative diagnostics may be formally divided into the differential assessment of three states. The first, D1, is the norm, which corresponds to the population group with a lack of risk factors or changes of the mammary glands. The second, D2, is the population group

  19. Effect of redox conditions on pharmaceutical loss during biological wastewater treatment using sequencing batch reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stadler, Lauren B.; Su, Lijuan; Moline, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    We lack a clear understanding of how wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) process parameters, such as redox environment, impact pharmaceutical fate. WWTPs increasingly install more advanced aeration control systems to save energy and achieve better nutrient removal performance. The impact of redox...... under different redox conditions: fully aerobic, anoxic/aerobic, and microaerobic (DO concentration ≈0.3 mg/L). Among the pharmaceuticals that were tracked during this study (atenolol, trimethoprim, sulfamethoxazole, desvenlafaxine, venlafaxine, and phenytoin), overall loss varied between them...... and between redox environments. Losses of atenolol and trimethoprim were highest in the aerobic reactor; sulfamethoxazole loss was highest in the microaerobic reactors; and phenytoin was recalcitrant in all reactors. Transformation products of sulfamethoxazole and desvenlafaxine resulted in the reformation...

  20. Garlic protects the glutathione redox cycle in irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu-Ghadeer, A.R.M.; Osman, S.A.A.; Abbady, M.M.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to evaluate the possible radioprotective role of garlic oil on the glutathione redox cycle (GSH, GSH-Px, GR and G6-PD) in blood and tissues (liver, spleen and intestine) of irradiated rats. Garlic oil was orally administered to rats (100 mg/Kg- b.w.) for 7 days before exposure to a fractionated of whole body gamma irradiation up to 9 Gy (3 Gy X 3 at 2 days intervals) and during the whole period of irradiation. The data showed that radiation exposure caused significant inhibition of the biochemical parameters in blood and tissue of irradiated rats all over the investigation periods (3,7 and 15 days). Garlic oil ameliorated the decrease in the tested parameters with noticeable effect on the 15 Th. day after radiation exposure. It is concluded that garlic oil could control the radiation induced changes in the glutathione redox cycle and provided some radioprotective effect

  1. Redox sensor proteins for highly sensitive direct imaging of intracellular redox state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Kazunori; Nagai, Takeharu; Nakano, Masahiro; Ichinose, Hiroshi; Nakabayashi, Takakazu; Ohta, Nobuhiro; Hisabori, Toru

    2015-02-13

    Intracellular redox state is a critical factor for fundamental cellular functions, including regulation of the activities of various metabolic enzymes as well as ROS production and elimination. Genetically-encoded fluorescent redox sensors, such as roGFP (Hanson, G. T., et al. (2004)) and Redoxfluor (Yano, T., et al. (2010)), have been developed to investigate the redox state of living cells. However, these sensors are not useful in cells that contain, for example, other colored pigments. We therefore intended to obtain simpler redox sensor proteins, and have developed oxidation-sensitive fluorescent proteins called Oba-Q (oxidation balance sensed quenching) proteins. Our sensor proteins derived from CFP and Sirius can be used to monitor the intracellular redox state as their fluorescence is drastically quenched upon oxidation. These blue-shifted spectra of the Oba-Q proteins enable us to monitor various redox states in conjunction with other sensor proteins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Characteristics of multiple auroral inverted-V structures and the problem of magnetospheric plasma stratification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonova, E.E.; Stepanova, M.V.; Teltzov, M.V.; Tverskoy, B.A.

    1993-01-01

    The concept of hot stratification of magnetospheric plasma is presented. The stratification mechanism is based on the assumption that in the center of plasma sheet the pressure is approximately isotropic and under steady state conditions the gradient and curvature drift currents play the principal role. The number of formed structures is determined by the parameter of stratification. 7 figs., 2 tabs

  3. Symproportionation versus Disproportionation in Bromine Redox Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toporek, Marcin; Michałowska-Kaczmarczyk, Anna M.; Michałowski, Tadeusz

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted -- Highlights: • The disproportionation and symproportionation of bromine in different media is presented. • All the redox systems are elaborated according to the principles of the generalized approach to electrolytic redox systems (GATES/GEB). • All physicochemical knowledge is involved in the algorithm applied for this purpose. • The graphical representation of the systems is the basis of gaining the detailed physicochemical knowledge on the systems in question. -- Abstract: The paper refers to dynamic (titration) redox systems where symproportionation or disproportionation of bromine species occur. The related systems are modeled according to principles assumed in the Generalized Approach to Electrolytic Redox Systems (GATES), with Generalized Electron Balance (GEB) concept involved in the GATES/GEB software. The results obtained from calculations made with use of iterative computer programs prepared according to MATLAB computational software, are presented graphically, as 2D and 3D graphs

  4. Polyarene mediators for mediated redox flow battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delnick, Frank M.; Ingersoll, David; Liang, Chengdu

    2018-01-02

    The fundamental charge storage mechanisms in a number of currently studied high energy redox couples are based on intercalation, conversion, or displacement reactions. With exception to certain metal-air chemistries, most often the active redox materials are stored physically in the electrochemical cell stack thereby lowering the practical gravimetric and volumetric energy density as a tradeoff to achieve reasonable power density. In a general embodiment, a mediated redox flow battery includes a series of secondary organic molecules that form highly reduced anionic radicals as reaction mediator pairs for the reduction and oxidation of primary high capacity redox species ex situ from the electrochemical cell stack. Arenes are reduced to stable anionic radicals that in turn reduce a primary anode to the charged state. The primary anode is then discharged using a second lower potential (more positive) arene. Compatible separators and solvents are also disclosed herein.

  5. Redox characteristics of the eukaryotic cytosol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López-Mirabal, H Reynaldo; Winther, Jakob R

    2007-01-01

    The eukaryotic cytoplasm has long been regarded as a cellular compartment in which the reduced state of protein cysteines is largely favored. Under normal conditions, the cytosolic low-molecular weight redox buffer, comprising primarily of glutathione, is highly reducing and reactive oxygen species...... (ROS) and glutathionylated proteins are maintained at very low levels. In the present review, recent progress in the understanding of the cytosolic thiol-disulfide redox metabolism and novel analytical approaches to studying cytosolic redox properties are discussed. We will focus on the yeast model...... organism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where the combination of genetic and biochemical approaches has brought us furthest in understanding the mechanisms underlying cellular redox regulation. It has been shown in yeast that, in addition to the enzyme glutathione reductase, other mechanisms may exist...

  6. Redox front penetration in the fractured Toki Granite, central Japan: An analogue for redox reactions and redox buffering in fractured crystalline host rocks for repositories of long-lived radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Koshi; Yoshida, Hidekazu; Akagawa, Fuminori; Nishimoto, Shoji; Metcalfe, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Deep redox front developed in orogenic granitic rock have been studied. • The process was controlled by the buffering capacity of minerals. • This is an analogue of redox front penetration into HLW repositories in Japan. - Abstract: Redox buffering is one important factor to be considered when assessing the barrier function of potential host rocks for a deep geological repository for long-lived radioactive waste. If such a repository is to be sited in fractured crystalline host rock it must be demonstrated that waste will be emplaced deeper than the maximum depth to which oxidizing waters can penetrate from the earth’s surface via fractures, during the assessment timeframe (typically 1 Ma). An analogue for penetration of such oxidizing water occurs in the Cretaceous Toki Granite of central Japan. Here, a deep redox front is developed along water-conducting fractures at a depth of 210 m below the ground surface. Detailed petrographical studies and geochemical analyses were carried out on drill core specimens of this redox front. The aim was to determine the buffering processes and behavior of major and minor elements, including rare earth elements (REEs), during redox front development. The results are compared with analytical data from an oxidized zone found along shallow fractures (up to 20 m from the surface) in the same granitic rock, in order to understand differences in elemental migration according to the depth below the ground surface of redox-front formation. Geochemical analyses by XRF and ICP-MS of the oxidized zone at 210 m depth reveal clear changes in Fe(III)/Fe(II) ratios and Ca depletion across the front, while Fe concentrations vary little. In contrast, the redox front identified along shallow fractures shows strong enrichments of Fe, Mn and trace elements in the oxidized zone compared with the fresh rock matrix. The difference can be ascribed to the changing Eh and pH of groundwater as it flows downwards in the granite, due to

  7. Haplotype-based stratification of Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Michael J; Gillis, Tammy; Atwal, Ranjit S; Mysore, Jayalakshmi Srinidhi; Arjomand, Jamshid; Harold, Denise; Holmans, Peter; Jones, Lesley; Orth, Michael; Myers, Richard H; Kwak, Seung; Wheeler, Vanessa C; MacDonald, Marcy E; Gusella, James F; Lee, Jong-Min

    2017-11-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease caused by expansion of a CAG trinucleotide repeat in HTT, resulting in an extended polyglutamine tract in huntingtin. We and others have previously determined that the HD-causing expansion occurs on multiple different haplotype backbones, reflecting more than one ancestral origin of the same type of mutation. In view of the therapeutic potential of mutant allele-specific gene silencing, we have compared and integrated two major systems of HTT haplotype definition, combining data from 74 sequence variants to identify the most frequent disease-associated and control chromosome backbones and revealing that there is potential for additional resolution of HD haplotypes. We have used the large collection of 4078 heterozygous HD subjects analyzed in our recent genome-wide association study of HD age at onset to estimate the frequency of these haplotypes in European subjects, finding that common genetic variation at HTT can distinguish the normal and CAG-expanded chromosomes for more than 95% of European HD individuals. As a resource for the HD research community, we have also determined the haplotypes present in a series of publicly available HD subject-derived fibroblasts, induced pluripotent cells, and embryonic stem cells in order to facilitate efforts to develop inclusive methods of allele-specific HTT silencing applicable to most HD patients. Our data providing genetic guidance for therapeutic gene-based targeting will significantly contribute to the developments of rational treatments and implementation of precision medicine in HD.

  8. Fatigue of LMFBR piping due to flow stratification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodward, W.S.

    1983-01-01

    Flow stratification due to reverse flow was simulated in a 1/5-scale water model of a LMFBR primary pipe loop. The stratified flow was observed to have a dynamic interface region which oscillated in a wave pattern. The behavior of the interface was characterized in terms of location, local temperature fluctuation and duration for various reverse flow conditions. A structural assessment was performed to determine the effects of stratified flow on the fatigue life of the pipe. Both the static and dynamic aspects of flow stratification were examined. The dynamic interface produces thermal striping on the inside of the pipe wall which is shown to have the most deleterious effect on the pipe wall and produce significant fatigue damage relative to a static interface.

  9. Fatigue of LMFBR piping due to flow stratification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodward, W.S.

    1983-01-01

    Flow stratification due to reverse flow was simulated in a 1/5-scale water model of a LMFBR primary pipe loop. The stratified flow was observed to have a dynamic interface region which oscillated in a wave pattern. The behavior of the interface was characterized in terms of location, local temperature fluctuation and duration for various reverse flow conditions. A structural assessment was performed to determine the effects of stratified flow on the fatigue life of the pipe. Both the static and dynamic aspects of flow stratification were examined. The dynamic interface produces thermal striping on the inside of the pipe wall which is shown to have the most deleterious effect on the pipe wall and produce significant fatigue damage relative to a static interface

  10. Membranes for Redox Flow Battery Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prifti, Helen; Parasuraman, Aishwarya; Winardi, Suminto; Lim, Tuti Mariana; Skyllas-Kazacos, Maria

    2012-01-01

    The need for large scale energy storage has become a priority to integrate renewable energy sources into the electricity grid. Redox flow batteries are considered the best option to store electricity from medium to large scale applications. However, the current high cost of redox flow batteries impedes the wide spread adoption of this technology. The membrane is a critical component of redox flow batteries as it determines the performance as well as the economic viability of the batteries. The membrane acts as a separator to prevent cross-mixing of the positive and negative electrolytes, while still allowing the transport of ions to complete the circuit during the passage of current. An ideal membrane should have high ionic conductivity, low water intake and excellent chemical and thermal stability as well as good ionic exchange capacity. Developing a low cost, chemically stable membrane for redox flow cell batteries has been a major focus for many groups around the world in recent years. This paper reviews the research work on membranes for redox flow batteries, in particular for the all-vanadium redox flow battery which has received the most attention. PMID:24958177

  11. Redox Regulation of Endothelial Cell Fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ping; Zou, Ming-Hui

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are present throughout blood vessels and have variable roles in both physiological and pathological settings. EC fate is altered and regulated by several key factors in physiological or pathological conditions. Reactive nitrogen species and reactive oxygen species derived from NAD(P)H oxidases, mitochondria, or nitric oxide-producing enzymes are not only cytotoxic but also compose a signaling network in the redox system. The formation, actions, key molecular interactions, and physiological and pathological relevance of redox signals in ECs remain unclear. We review the identities, sources, and biological actions of oxidants and reductants produced during EC function or dysfunction. Further, we discuss how ECs shape key redox sensors and examine the biological functions, transcriptional responses, and post-translational modifications evoked by the redox system in ECs. We summarize recent findings regarding the mechanisms by which redox signals regulate the fate of ECs and address the outcome of altered EC fate in health and disease. Future studies will examine if the redox biology of ECs can be targeted in pathophysiological conditions. PMID:24633153

  12. Membranes for redox flow battery applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prifti, Helen; Parasuraman, Aishwarya; Winardi, Suminto; Lim, Tuti Mariana; Skyllas-Kazacos, Maria

    2012-06-19

    The need for large scale energy storage has become a priority to integrate renewable energy sources into the electricity grid. Redox flow batteries are considered the best option to store electricity from medium to large scale applications. However, the current high cost of redox flow batteries impedes the wide spread adoption of this technology. The membrane is a critical component of redox flow batteries as it determines the performance as well as the economic viability of the batteries. The membrane acts as a separator to prevent cross-mixing of the positive and negative electrolytes, while still allowing the transport of ions to complete the circuit during the passage of current. An ideal membrane should have high ionic conductivity, low water intake and excellent chemical and thermal stability as well as good ionic exchange capacity. Developing a low cost, chemically stable membrane for redox flow cell batteries has been a major focus for many groups around the world in recent years. This paper reviews the research work on membranes for redox flow batteries, in particular for the all-vanadium redox flow battery which has received the most attention.

  13. Membranes for Redox Flow Battery Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Skyllas-Kazacos

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The need for large scale energy storage has become a priority to integrate renewable energy sources into the electricity grid. Redox flow batteries are considered the best option to store electricity from medium to large scale applications. However, the current high cost of redox flow batteries impedes the wide spread adoption of this technology. The membrane is a critical component of redox flow batteries as it determines the performance as well as the economic viability of the batteries. The membrane acts as a separator to prevent cross-mixing of the positive and negative electrolytes, while still allowing the transport of ions to complete the circuit during the passage of current. An ideal membrane should have high ionic conductivity, low water intake and excellent chemical and thermal stability as well as good ionic exchange capacity. Developing a low cost, chemically stable membrane for redox flow cell batteries has been a major focus for many groups around the world in recent years. This paper reviews the research work on membranes for redox flow batteries, in particular for the all-vanadium redox flow battery which has received the most attention.

  14. Perception urbaine, distraction et stratification chez Benjamin, Eisenstein et Vertov

    OpenAIRE

    Rousse, Pascal

    2008-01-01

    La ville à l’écran est le substrat imaginaire et historique du cinéma. Mais le cinéma, burlesque et soviétique, transforme ce contexte tout en constituant sa mémoire. Walter Benjamin inaugura cette problématique avec la notion de « distraction », liant architecture et cinéma sur le fond du paradigme de la stratification de l’appareil psychique chez Freud.

  15. AB019. Erectile dysfunction: analysis based on age stratification

    OpenAIRE

    Kai, Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Objective To establish the profile of erectile dysfunction in different age groups, and analysis the effect of sildenafil based on age stratification. Subjects and Methods From 2007 to 2008, a total of 4,507 men diagnosed with erectile dysfunction (ED) were enrolled from 46 centers in China; 4,039 of these patients were treated with sildenafil and asked to complete the Erectile Function domain of the International Index of Erectile Function, Erection Hardness Score, and Quality of Erection Qu...

  16. Potential Impacts of Offshore Wind Farms on North Sea Stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Jeffrey R.; Merckelbach, Lucas; Callies, Ulrich; Clark, Suzanna; Gaslikova, Lidia; Baschek, Burkard

    2016-01-01

    Advances in offshore wind farm (OWF) technology have recently led to their construction in coastal waters that are deep enough to be seasonally stratified. As tidal currents move past the OWF foundation structures they generate a turbulent wake that will contribute to a mixing of the stratified water column. In this study we show that the mixing generated in this way may have a significant impact on the large-scale stratification of the German Bight region of the North Sea. This region is chosen as the focus of this study since the planning of OWFs is particularly widespread. Using a combination of idealised modelling and in situ measurements, we provide order-of-magnitude estimates of two important time scales that are key to understanding the impacts of OWFs: (i) a mixing time scale, describing how long a complete mixing of the stratification takes, and (ii) an advective time scale, quantifying for how long a water parcel is expected to undergo enhanced wind farm mixing. The results are especially sensitive to both the drag coefficient and type of foundation structure, as well as the evolution of the pycnocline under enhanced mixing conditions—both of which are not well known. With these limitations in mind, the results show that OWFs could impact the large-scale stratification, but only when they occupy extensive shelf regions. They are expected to have very little impact on large-scale stratification at the current capacity in the North Sea, but the impact could be significant in future large-scale development scenarios. PMID:27513754

  17. Determining the core stratification in white dwarfs with asteroseismology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charpinet S.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Using the forward modeling approach and a new parameterization for the core chemical stratification in ZZ Ceti stars, we test several situations typical of the usually limited constraints available, such as small numbers of observed independent modes, to carry out asteroseismology of these stars. We find that, even with a limited number of modes, the core chemical stratification (in particular, the location of the steep chemical transitions expected in the oxygen profile can be determined quite precisely due to the significant sensitivity of some confined modes to partial reflexion (trapping effects. These effects are similar to the well known trapping induced by the shallower chemical transitions at the edge of the core and at the bottom of the H-rich envelope. We also find that success to unravel the core structure depends on the information content of the available seismic data. In some cases, it may not be possible to isolate a unique, well-defined seismic solution and the problem remains degenerate. Our results establish that constraining the core chemical stratification in white dwarf stars based solely on asteroseismology is possible, an opportunity that we have started to exploit.

  18. Integrated collector storage solar water heater: Temperature stratification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnier, C.; Currie, J.; Muneer, T.

    2009-01-01

    An analysis of the temperature stratification inside an Integrated Collector Storage Solar Water Heater (ICS-SWH) was carried out. The system takes the form of a rectangular-shaped box incorporating the solar collector and storage tank into a single unit and was optimised for simulation in Scottish weather conditions. A 3-month experimental study on the ICS-SWH was undertaken in order to provide empirical data for comparison with the computed results. Using a previously developed macro model; a number of improvements were made. The initial macro model was able to generate corresponding water bulk temperature in the collector with a given hourly incident solar radiation, ambient temperature and inlet water temperature and therefore able to predict ICS-SWH performance. The new model was able to compute the bulk water temperature variation in different SWH collectors for a given aspect ratio and the water temperature along the height of the collector (temperature stratification). Computed longitudinal temperature stratification results obtained were found to be in close agreement with the experimental data.

  19. Dependence of offshore wind turbine fatigue loads on atmospheric stratification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, K S; Larsen, G C; Ott, S

    2014-01-01

    The stratification of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) is classified in terms of the M-O length and subsequently used to determine the relationship between ABL stability and the fatigue loads of a wind turbine located inside an offshore wind farm. Recorded equivalent fatigue loads, representing blade-bending and tower bottom bending, are combined with the operational statistics from the instrumented wind turbine as well as with meteorological statistics defining the inflow conditions. Only a part of all possible inflow conditions are covered through the approximately 8200 hours of combined measurements. The fatigue polar has been determined for an (almost) complete 360° inflow sector for both load sensors, representing mean wind speeds below and above rated wind speed, respectively, with the inflow conditions classified into three different stratification regimes: unstable, neutral and stable conditions. In general, impact of ABL stratification is clearly seen on wake affected inflow cases for both blade and tower fatigue loads. However, the character of this dependence varies significantly with the type of inflow conditions – e.g. single wake inflow or multiple wake inflow

  20. On the gauge orbit space stratification: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudolph, G.; Schmidt, M.; Volobuev, I.P.

    2002-01-01

    First, we review the basic mathematical structures and results concerning the gauge orbit space stratification. This includes general properties of the gauge group action, fibre bundle structures induced by this action, basic properties of the stratification and the natural Riemannian structures of the strata. In the second part, we study the stratification for theories with gauge group SU(n) in spacetime dimension 4. We develop a general method for determining the orbit types and their partial ordering, based on the 1-1 correspondence between orbit types and holonomy-induced Howe subbundles of the underlying principal SU(n)-bundle. We show that the orbit types are classified by certain cohomology elements of spacetime satisfying two relations and that the partial ordering is characterized by a system of algebraic equations. Moreover, operations for generating direct successors and direct predecessors are formulated, which allow one to construct the set of orbit types, starting from the principal type. Finally, we discuss an application to nodal configurations in Yang-Mills-Chern-Simons theory. (author)

  1. Cynaropicrin targets the trypanothione redox system in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Stefanie; Oufir, Mouhssin; Leroux, Alejandro; Krauth-Siegel, R Luise; Becker, Katja; Kaiser, Marcel; Brun, Reto; Hamburger, Matthias; Adams, Michael

    2013-11-15

    In mice cynaropicrin (CYN) potently inhibits the proliferation of Trypanosoma brucei-the causative agent of Human African Trypanosomiasis-by a so far unknown mechanism. We hypothesized that CYNs α,β-unsaturated methylene moieties act as Michael acceptors for glutathione (GSH) and trypanothione (T(SH)2), the main low molecular mass thiols essential for unique redox metabolism of these parasites. The analysis of this putative mechanism and the effects of CYN on enzymes of the T(SH)2 redox metabolism including trypanothione reductase, trypanothione synthetase, glutathione-S-transferase, and ornithine decarboxylase are shown. A two step extraction protocol with subsequent UPLC-MS/MS analysis was established to quantify intra-cellular CYN, T(SH)2, GSH, as well as GS-CYN and T(S-CYN)2 adducts in intact T. b. rhodesiense cells. Within minutes of exposure to CYN, the cellular GSH and T(SH)2 pools were entirely depleted, and the parasites entered an apoptotic stage and died. CYN also showed inhibition of the ornithine decarboxylase similar to the positive control eflornithine. Significant interactions with the other enzymes involved in the T(SH)2 redox metabolism were not observed. Alongside many other biological activities sesquiterpene lactones including CYN have shown antitrypanosomal effects, which have been postulated to be linked to formation of Michael adducts with cellular nucleophiles. Here the interaction of CYN with biological thiols in a cellular system in general, and with trypanosomal T(SH)2 redox metabolism in particular, thus offering a molecular explanation for the antitrypanosomal activity is demonstrated. At the same time, the study provides a novel extraction and analysis protocol for components of the trypanosomal thiol metabolism. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of redox conditions on pharmaceutical loss during biological wastewater treatment using sequencing batch reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stadler, Lauren B., E-mail: lstadler@umich.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Michigan, 1351 Beal Avenue, EWRE, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Su, Lijuan, E-mail: lijuansu@buffalo.edu [Department of Chemistry, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14260 (United States); Moline, Christopher J., E-mail: christopher.moline@hdrinc.com [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Michigan, 1351 Beal Avenue, EWRE, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Ernstoff, Alexi S., E-mail: alexer@dtu.dk [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Michigan, 1351 Beal Avenue, EWRE, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Aga, Diana S., E-mail: dianaaga@buffalo.edu [Department of Chemistry, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14260 (United States); Love, Nancy G., E-mail: nglove@umich.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Michigan, 1351 Beal Avenue, EWRE, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2015-01-23

    Highlights: • Pharmaceutical fate was studied in SBRs operated at different redox conditions. • Stable carbon oxidation and nitrification occurred under microaerobic conditions. • Losses of atenolol and trimethoprim were highest under fully aerobic conditions. • Loss of sulfamethoxazole was highest under microaerobic conditions. • Deconjugation occurred during treatment to form sulfamethoxazole and desvenlafaxine. - Abstract: We lack a clear understanding of how wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) process parameters, such as redox environment, impact pharmaceutical fate. WWTPs increasingly install more advanced aeration control systems to save energy and achieve better nutrient removal performance. The impact of redox condition, and specifically the use of microaerobic (low dissolved oxygen) treatment, is poorly understood. In this study, the fate of a mixture of pharmaceuticals and several of their transformation products present in the primary effluent of a local WWTP was assessed in sequencing batch reactors operated under different redox conditions: fully aerobic, anoxic/aerobic, and microaerobic (DO concentration ≈0.3 mg/L). Among the pharmaceuticals that were tracked during this study (atenolol, trimethoprim, sulfamethoxazole, desvenlafaxine, venlafaxine, and phenytoin), overall loss varied between them and between redox environments. Losses of atenolol and trimethoprim were highest in the aerobic reactor; sulfamethoxazole loss was highest in the microaerobic reactors; and phenytoin was recalcitrant in all reactors. Transformation products of sulfamethoxazole and desvenlafaxine resulted in the reformation of their parent compounds during treatment. The results suggest that transformation products must be accounted for when assessing removal efficiencies and that redox environment influences the degree of pharmaceutical loss.

  3. Effect of redox conditions on pharmaceutical loss during biological wastewater treatment using sequencing batch reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stadler, Lauren B.; Su, Lijuan; Moline, Christopher J.; Ernstoff, Alexi S.; Aga, Diana S.; Love, Nancy G.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Pharmaceutical fate was studied in SBRs operated at different redox conditions. • Stable carbon oxidation and nitrification occurred under microaerobic conditions. • Losses of atenolol and trimethoprim were highest under fully aerobic conditions. • Loss of sulfamethoxazole was highest under microaerobic conditions. • Deconjugation occurred during treatment to form sulfamethoxazole and desvenlafaxine. - Abstract: We lack a clear understanding of how wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) process parameters, such as redox environment, impact pharmaceutical fate. WWTPs increasingly install more advanced aeration control systems to save energy and achieve better nutrient removal performance. The impact of redox condition, and specifically the use of microaerobic (low dissolved oxygen) treatment, is poorly understood. In this study, the fate of a mixture of pharmaceuticals and several of their transformation products present in the primary effluent of a local WWTP was assessed in sequencing batch reactors operated under different redox conditions: fully aerobic, anoxic/aerobic, and microaerobic (DO concentration ≈0.3 mg/L). Among the pharmaceuticals that were tracked during this study (atenolol, trimethoprim, sulfamethoxazole, desvenlafaxine, venlafaxine, and phenytoin), overall loss varied between them and between redox environments. Losses of atenolol and trimethoprim were highest in the aerobic reactor; sulfamethoxazole loss was highest in the microaerobic reactors; and phenytoin was recalcitrant in all reactors. Transformation products of sulfamethoxazole and desvenlafaxine resulted in the reformation of their parent compounds during treatment. The results suggest that transformation products must be accounted for when assessing removal efficiencies and that redox environment influences the degree of pharmaceutical loss

  4. Redox Impact on Starch Biosynthetic Enzymes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skryhan, Katsiaryna

    Summary The thesis provides new insight into the influence of the plant cell redox state on the transient starch metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana with a focus on starch biosynthetic enzymes. Two main hypotheses forms the basis of this thesis: 1) photosynthesis and starch metabolism are coordina......Summary The thesis provides new insight into the influence of the plant cell redox state on the transient starch metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana with a focus on starch biosynthetic enzymes. Two main hypotheses forms the basis of this thesis: 1) photosynthesis and starch metabolism...... are coordinated by the redox state of the cell via post-translational modification of the starch metabolic enzymes containing redox active cysteine residues and these cysteine residues became cross-linked upon oxidation providing a conformational change leading to activity loss; 2) cysteine residues...... of chloroplast enzymes can play a role not only in enzyme activity and redox sensitivity but also in protein folding and stability upon oxidation. Several redox sensitive enzymes identified in this study can serve as potential targets to control the carbon flux to and from starch during the day and night...

  5. Model creation of moving redox reaction boundary in agarose gel electrophoresis by traditional potassium permanganate method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hai-Yang; Liu, Qian; Li, Jia-Hao; Fan, Liu-Yin; Cao, Cheng-Xi

    2013-02-21

    A novel moving redox reaction boundary (MRRB) model was developed for studying electrophoretic behaviors of analytes involving redox reaction on the principle of moving reaction boundary (MRB). Traditional potassium permanganate method was used to create the boundary model in agarose gel electrophoresis because of the rapid reaction rate associated with MnO(4)(-) ions and Fe(2+) ions. MRB velocity equation was proposed to describe the general functional relationship between velocity of moving redox reaction boundary (V(MRRB)) and concentration of reactant, and can be extrapolated to similar MRB techniques. Parameters affecting the redox reaction boundary were investigated in detail. Under the selected conditions, good linear relationship between boundary movement distance and time were obtained. The potential application of MRRB in electromigration redox reaction titration was performed in two different concentration levels. The precision of the V(MRRB) was studied and the relative standard deviations were below 8.1%, illustrating the good repeatability achieved in this experiment. The proposed MRRB model enriches the MRB theory and also provides a feasible realization of manual control of redox reaction process in electrophoretic analysis.

  6. The Deep Thioredoxome in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: New Insights into Redox Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Pérez, María Esther; Mauriès, Adeline; Maes, Alexandre; Tourasse, Nicolas J; Hamon, Marion; Lemaire, Stéphane D; Marchand, Christophe H

    2017-08-07

    Thiol-based redox post-translational modifications have emerged as important mechanisms of signaling and regulation in all organisms, and thioredoxin plays a key role by controlling the thiol-disulfide status of target proteins. Recent redox proteomic studies revealed hundreds of proteins regulated by glutathionylation and nitrosylation in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, while much less is known about the thioredoxin interactome in this organism. By combining qualitative and quantitative proteomic analyses, we have comprehensively investigated the Chlamydomonas thioredoxome and 1188 targets have been identified. They participate in a wide range of metabolic pathways and cellular processes. This study broadens not only the redox regulation to new enzymes involved in well-known thioredoxin-regulated metabolic pathways but also sheds light on cellular processes for which data supporting redox regulation are scarce (aromatic amino acid biosynthesis, nuclear transport, etc). Moreover, we characterized 1052 thioredoxin-dependent regulatory sites and showed that these data constitute a valuable resource for future functional studies in Chlamydomonas. By comparing this thioredoxome with proteomic data for glutathionylation and nitrosylation at the protein and cysteine levels, this work confirms the existence of a complex redox regulation network in Chlamydomonas and provides evidence of a tremendous selectivity of redox post-translational modifications for specific cysteine residues. Copyright © 2017 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease heterogeneity: challenges for health risk assessment, stratification and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, Josep; Vargas, Claudia; Cano, Isaac; Selivanov, Vitaly; Barreiro, Esther; Maier, Dieter; Falciani, Francesco; Wagner, Peter; Cascante, Marta; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith; Kalko, Susana; De Mas, Igor; Tegnér, Jesper; Escarrabill, Joan; Agustí, Alvar; Gomez-Cabrero, David

    2014-11-28

    Heterogeneity in clinical manifestations and disease progression in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) lead to consequences for patient health risk assessment, stratification and management. Implicit with the classical "spill over" hypothesis is that COPD heterogeneity is driven by the pulmonary events of the disease. Alternatively, we hypothesized that COPD heterogeneities result from the interplay of mechanisms governing three conceptually different phenomena: 1) pulmonary disease, 2) systemic effects of COPD and 3) co-morbidity clustering, each of them with their own dynamics. To explore the potential of a systems analysis of COPD heterogeneity focused on skeletal muscle dysfunction and on co-morbidity clustering aiming at generating predictive modeling with impact on patient management. To this end, strategies combining deterministic modeling and network medicine analyses of the Biobridge dataset were used to investigate the mechanisms of skeletal muscle dysfunction. An independent data driven analysis of co-morbidity clustering examining associated genes and pathways was performed using a large dataset (ICD9-CM data from Medicare, 13 million people). Finally, a targeted network analysis using the outcomes of the two approaches (skeletal muscle dysfunction and co-morbidity clustering) explored shared pathways between these phenomena. (1) Evidence of abnormal regulation of skeletal muscle bioenergetics and skeletal muscle remodeling showing a significant association with nitroso-redox disequilibrium was observed in COPD; (2) COPD patients presented higher risk for co-morbidity clustering than non-COPD patients increasing with ageing; and, (3) the on-going targeted network analyses suggests shared pathways between skeletal muscle dysfunction and co-morbidity clustering. The results indicate the high potential of a systems approach to address COPD heterogeneity. Significant knowledge gaps were identified that are relevant to shape strategies aiming at

  8. A panel of ancestry informative markers to estimate and correct potential effects of population stratification in Han Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Pengfei; Li, Zhiqiang; Jin, Wenfei; Lu, Dongsheng; Lou, Haiyi; Shen, Jiawei; Jin, Li; Shi, Yongyong; Xu, Shuhua

    2014-02-01

    Population stratification acts as a confounding factor in genetic association studies and may lead to false-positive or false-negative results. Previous studies have analyzed the genetic substructures in Han Chinese population, the largest ethnic group in the world comprising ∼20% of the global human population. In this study, we examined 5540 Han Chinese individuals with about 1 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and screened a panel of ancestry informative markers (AIMs) to facilitate the discerning and controlling of population structure in future association studies on Han Chinese. Based on genome-wide data, we first confirmed our previous observation of the north-south differentiation in Han Chinese population. Second, we developed a panel of 150 validated SNP AIMs to determine the northern or southern origin of each Han Chinese individual. We further evaluated the performance of our AIMs panel in association studies in simulation analysis. Our results showed that this AIMs panel had sufficient power to discern and control population stratification in Han Chinese, which could significantly reduce false-positive rates in both genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and candidate gene association studies (CGAS). We suggest this AIMs panel be genotyped and used to control and correct population stratification in the study design or data analysis of future association studies, especially in CGAS which is the most popular approach to validate previous reports on genetic associations of diseases in post-GWAS era.

  9. pH and redox effects of building materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Sloot, H.A.; Van Zomeren, A.; Meeussen, J.C.L.; De Nie, D.S.

    2007-11-01

    The application of relatively fine grained industrial slags as fill material in industrial terrains and parking lots has led to unacceptably elevated pH values and imposed reducing conditions in ground- and surface water. Based on the Dutch Building Materials Decree the materials applied were classified as category 1 materials (free use). There are no limits set to pH and redox in this regulation. In itself a lower or higher pH and a low redox potential are not necessarily critical. Only when the buffer capacity of the surroundings is exceeded, undesirable situations may develop. In this work, the release of alkaline and reducing substances has been studied to assess if regulatory controls are needed and how such controls could be implemented practically. Both pH and redox potential are unsuitable properties for this purpose as it is the buffer capacity of the releasing material and the buffer capacity of the receiving soil and water bodies that determine whether unacceptable conditions develop. As pH and redox are also affected by gas reactions (O2 and CO2), the evaluation becomes relatively complex. Using the chemical speciation-transport model ORCHESTRA, a scenario description has been developed to assess the release of alkaline and reducing species from slag by infiltration under unsaturated conditions. Proper acid neutralization and redox buffering data for the materials were determined. Based on the sophisticated model results, a simplified model description was applied to link observations to impact. Decision schemes for applications above groundwater and in surface water have been developed based on the buffer capacity and particle size distribution of the material to be used, the infiltration rate, the degree of exposure to O2 and CO2 from the atmosphere or from soil air and the dimensions of the application. This has led to a preliminary guidance on implementing rules for acceptance of materials in specific applications. The modeled release predictions

  10. Fundamental Interactions in Gasoline Compression Ignition Engines with Fuel Stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolk, Benjamin Matthew

    Transportation accounted for 28% of the total U.S. energy demand in 2011, with 93% of U.S. transportation energy coming from petroleum. The large impact of the transportation sector on global climate change necessitates more-efficient, cleaner-burning internal combustion engine operating strategies. One such strategy that has received substantial research attention in the last decade is Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI). Although the efficiency and emissions benefits of HCCI are well established, practical limits on the operating range of HCCI engines have inhibited their application in consumer vehicles. One such limit is at high load, where the pressure rise rate in the combustion chamber becomes excessively large. Fuel stratification is a potential strategy for reducing the maximum pressure rise rate in HCCI engines. The aim is to introduce reactivity gradients through fuel stratification to promote sequential auto-ignition rather than a bulk-ignition, as in the homogeneous case. A gasoline-fueled compression ignition engine with fuel stratification is termed a Gasoline Compression Ignition (GCI) engine. Although a reasonable amount of experimental research has been performed for fuel stratification in GCI engines, a clear understanding of how the fundamental in-cylinder processes of fuel spray evaporation, mixing, and heat release contribute to the observed phenomena is lacking. Of particular interest is gasoline's pressure sensitive low-temperature chemistry and how it impacts the sequential auto-ignition of the stratified charge. In order to computationally study GCI with fuel stratification using three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and chemical kinetics, two reduced mechanisms have been developed. The reduced mechanisms were developed from a large, detailed mechanism with about 1400 species for a 4-component gasoline surrogate. The two versions of the reduced mechanism developed in this work are: (1) a 96-species version and (2

  11. Redox interplay between mitochondria and peroxisomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celien eLismont

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Reduction-oxidation or ‘redox’ reactions are an integral part of a broad range of cellular processes such as gene expression, energy metabolism, protein import and folding, and autophagy. As many of these processes are intimately linked with cell fate decisions, transient or chronic changes in cellular redox equilibrium are likely to contribute to the initiation and progression of a plethora of human diseases. Since a long time, it is known that mitochondria are major players in redox regulation and signaling. More recently, it has become clear that also peroxisomes have the capacity to impact redox-linked physiological processes. To serve this function, peroxisomes cooperate with other organelles, including mitochondria. This review provides a comprehensive picture of what is currently known about the redox interplay between mitochondria and peroxisomes in mammals. We first outline the pro- and antioxidant systems of both organelles and how they may function as redox signaling nodes. Next, we critically review and discuss emerging evidence that peroxisomes and mitochondria share an intricate redox-sensitive relationship and cooperate in cell fate decisions. Key issues include possible physiological roles, messengers, and mechanisms. We also provide examples of how data mining of publicly-available datasets from ‘omics’ technologies can be a powerful means to gain additional insights into potential redox signaling pathways between peroxisomes and mitochondria. Finally, we highlight the need for more studies that seek to clarify the mechanisms of how mitochondria may act as dynamic receivers, integrators, and transmitters of peroxisome-derived mediators of oxidative stress. The outcome of such studies may open up exciting new avenues for the community of researchers working on cellular responses to organelle-derived oxidative stress, a research field in which the role of peroxisomes is currently highly underestimated and an issue of

  12. Monitoring thioredoxin redox with a genetically encoded red fluorescent biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yichong; Makar, Merna; Wang, Michael X; Ai, Hui-Wang

    2017-09-01

    Thioredoxin (Trx) is one of the two major thiol antioxidants, playing essential roles in redox homeostasis and signaling. Despite its importance, there is a lack of methods for monitoring Trx redox dynamics in live cells, hindering a better understanding of physiological and pathological roles of the Trx redox system. In this work, we developed the first genetically encoded fluorescent biosensor for Trx redox by engineering a redox relay between the active-site cysteines of human Trx1 and rxRFP1, a redox-sensitive red fluorescent protein. We used the resultant biosensor-TrxRFP1-to selectively monitor perturbations of Trx redox in various mammalian cell lines. We subcellularly localized TrxRFP1 to image compartmentalized Trx redox changes. We further combined TrxRFP1 with a green fluorescent Grx1-roGFP2 biosensor to simultaneously monitor Trx and glutathione redox dynamics in live cells in response to chemical and physiologically relevant stimuli.

  13. Oxygen in human health from life to death – An approach to teaching redox biology and signaling to graduate and medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret M. Briehl

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In the absence of oxygen human life is measured in minutes. In the presence of oxygen, normal metabolism generates reactive species (ROS that have the potential to cause cell injury contributing to human aging and disease. Between these extremes, organisms have developed means for sensing oxygen and ROS and regulating their cellular processes in response. Redox signaling contributes to the control of cell proliferation and death. Aberrant redox signaling underlies many human diseases. The attributes acquired by altered redox homeostasis in cancer cells illustrate this particularly well. This teaching review and the accompanying illustrations provide an introduction to redox biology and signaling aimed at instructors of graduate and medical students.

  14. Mathematical and physical modeling of thermal stratification phenomena in steel ladles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putan, V.; Vilceanu, L.; Socalici, A.; Putan, A.

    2018-01-01

    By means of CFD numerical modeling, a systematic analysis of the similarity between steel ladles and hot-water model regarding natural convection phenomena was studied. The key similarity criteria we found to be dependent on the dimensionless numbers Fr and βΔT. These similarity criteria suggested that hot-water models with scale in the range between 1/5 and 1/3 and using hot water with temperature of 45 °C or higher are appropriate for simulating natural convection in steel ladles. With this physical model, thermal stratification phenomena due to natural convection in steel ladles were investigated. By controlling the cooling intensity of water model to correspond to the heat loss rate of steel ladles, which is governed by Fr and βΔT, the temperature profiles measured in the water bath of the model were to deduce the extent of thermal stratification in liquid steel bath in the ladles. Comparisons between mathematically simulated temperature profiles in the prototype steel ladles and those physically simulated by scaling-up the measured temperatures profiles in the water model showed good agreement. This proved that it is feasible to use a 1/5 scale water model with 45 °C hot water to simulate natural convection in steel ladles. Therefore, besides mathematical CFD models, the physical hot-water model provided an additional means of studying fluid flow and heat transfer in steel ladles.

  15. Risk stratification of patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of cervix treated by radiotherapy alone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, J.-H.; Tsai, C.-S.; Lai, C.-H.; Chang, T.-C.; Wang, C.-C.; Chou, H.-H.; Lee, Steve P.; Lee, C.-C.; Tang, Simon G.; Hsueh Swei

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To identify prognostic factors for local and distant relapse and perform risk stratification for patients with advanced cervical cancer treated with radiotherapy (RT) alone. Methods and Materials: A total of 1031 patients with Stage IB-IVA squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix treated with full-course RT but without any chemotherapy were included for analysis. Of these, 311 patients with nonbulky Stage IB-IIA disease were designated the reference group and the other 720 patients were the study group. The associations of stage, squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC-ag) level, hemoglobin level, age, cell differentiation, and pelvic lymph node status with treatment failure were evaluated. The independent prognostic factors were identified by multivariate analysis. The study group was further stratified into subgroups using combinations of these risk factors. Results: In the study group, independent risk factors for local relapse were advanced stage and age 2, and positive pelvic lymph nodes. The 5-year distant relapse-free survival rate was 83% for patients with bulky Stage IB-IIA and IIB disease, SCC-ag level 2, and positive lymph nodes. Conclusion: The risk of treatment failure in advanced-stage cervical cancer patients treated by RT alone can be more precisely predicted by risk stratification. A certain subgroup of patients had better control than the others. The benefit of treating these relatively low-risk patients with additional treatment such as concurrent chemotherapy should be further evaluated in prospective studies or meta-analyses

  16. Spin-Assisted Layer-by-Layer Assembly: Variation of Stratification as Studied with Neutron Reflectivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharlampieva, Eugenia; Kozlovskaya, Veronika; Chan, Jennifer; Ankner, John Francis; Tsukruk, Vladimir V.

    2009-01-01

    We apply neutron reflectivity to probe the internal structure of spin-assisted layer-by-layer (LbL) films composed of electrostatically assembled polyelectrolytes. We find that the level of stratification and the degree of layer intermixing can be controlled by varying the type and concentration of salt during LbL assembly. We observe well-defined layer structure in spin-assisted LbL films when deposited from salt-free solutions. These films feature 2-nm-thick bilayers, which are ∼3-fold thicker than those in dipped LbL films assembled under similar conditions. Addition of a 10mM phosphate buffer promotes progressive layer inter-diffusion with increasing distance from the substrate. However, adding 0.1M NaCl to the phosphate buffer solution restores the layer stratification. We also find that spin-assisted LbL films obtained from buffer solutions are more highly stratified as compared to the highly intermixed layers seen in dipped LbL films assembled from buffer. Our results yield new insight into the mechanism of spin-assisted LbL assembly that should prove useful for biotechnological applications.

  17. Compartmentation of redox metabolism in malaria parasites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Kehr

    Full Text Available Malaria, caused by the apicomplexan parasite Plasmodium, still represents a major threat to human health and welfare and leads to about one million human deaths annually. Plasmodium is a rapidly multiplying unicellular organism undergoing a complex developmental cycle in man and mosquito - a life style that requires rapid adaptation to various environments. In order to deal with high fluxes of reactive oxygen species and maintain redox regulatory processes and pathogenicity, Plasmodium depends upon an adequate redox balance. By systematically studying the subcellular localization of the major antioxidant and redox regulatory proteins, we obtained the first complete map of redox compartmentation in Plasmodium falciparum. We demonstrate the targeting of two plasmodial peroxiredoxins and a putative glyoxalase system to the apicoplast, a non-photosynthetic plastid. We furthermore obtained a complete picture of the compartmentation of thioredoxin- and glutaredoxin-like proteins. Notably, for the two major antioxidant redox-enzymes--glutathione reductase and thioredoxin reductase--Plasmodium makes use of alternative-translation-initiation (ATI to achieve differential targeting. Dual localization of proteins effected by ATI is likely to occur also in other Apicomplexa and might open new avenues for therapeutic intervention.

  18. Characterization of Redox properties of humic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choppin, G.R.

    1995-01-01

    An important aspect of humic materials is the presence of stable free radicals as shown by the width of 1 H-NMR lines of humic acid in solution as well as ESR spectra of solid samples. Presumably, these are due to quinohdrone functional groups in the humic structure. These free radicals are assumed to be a source of the redox effects of humics in metal cations. Phenolic groups have also been proposed as a source of reduction potential in these substances. The reduction potential of humic material is 0.5-0.7 V (vs. the normal hydrogen electrode). In addition to this inherent redox property, humics undergo photolysis by sunlight in surface waters which results in the production of hydrogen peroxide. The latter can also result in redox reactions with metal cations. Such direct and indirect redox capability can have significant effects on the migration of reducible cations. Studies of the reduction of hexavalent actinide cations by humic acid showed the reactions Np O 2 2+ -> Np O 2 + (E 1/2 0 = 1.47 V) and Pu O 2 2+ -> Pu +4 (E 1/2 0 = 1.04 V) while U O 2 2+ was not reduced. The reduction of plutonium in sea water by humics is discussed. Evidence of the effects of redox by humic material on metal cations in natural waters and sediments are also reviewed. (authors). 16 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  19. De Novo Construction of Redox Active Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, C C; Sheehan, M M; Ennist, N M; Kodali, G; Bialas, C; Englander, M T; Discher, B M; Dutton, P L

    2016-01-01

    Relatively simple principles can be used to plan and construct de novo proteins that bind redox cofactors and participate in a range of electron-transfer reactions analogous to those seen in natural oxidoreductase proteins. These designed redox proteins are called maquettes. Hydrophobic/hydrophilic binary patterning of heptad repeats of amino acids linked together in a single-chain self-assemble into 4-alpha-helix bundles. These bundles form a robust and adaptable frame for uncovering the default properties of protein embedded cofactors independent of the complexities introduced by generations of natural selection and allow us to better understand what factors can be exploited by man or nature to manipulate the physical chemical properties of these cofactors. Anchoring of redox cofactors such as hemes, light active tetrapyrroles, FeS clusters, and flavins by His and Cys residues allow cofactors to be placed at positions in which electron-tunneling rates between cofactors within or between proteins can be predicted in advance. The modularity of heptad repeat designs facilitates the construction of electron-transfer chains and novel combinations of redox cofactors and new redox cofactor assisted functions. Developing de novo designs that can support cofactor incorporation upon expression in a cell is needed to support a synthetic biology advance that integrates with natural bioenergetic pathways. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Redox-flow battery of actinide complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamura, Tomoo; Shiokawa, Yoshinobu

    2006-01-01

    Np battery and U battery were developed. We suggested that Np redox-flow battery should be (-)|Np 3+ ,Np 4+ ||NpO 2 + ,NpO 2 2+ |(+), and U battery (-)|[U III T 2 ] - ,[U IV T 2 ] 0 ||[U V O 2 T] - ,[U VI O 2 T] 0 |(+). The electromotive force at 50 % charge of Np and U battery is 1.10 V and 1.04 V, respectively. The energy efficiency of 70 mA/cm 2 of Np and U battery shows 99 % and 98 %, respectively. V redox-flow battery, electrode reactions of An battery, Np battery, U battery and future of U battery are described. The concept of V redox-flow battery, comparison of energy efficiency of Np, U and V battery, oxidation state and ionic species of 3d transition metals and main An, Purbe diagram of Np and U aqueous solution, shift of redox potential of β-diketones by pKa, and specifications of three redox-flow batteries are reported. (S.Y.)

  1. REDOX IMAGING OF THE p53-DEPENDENT MITOCHONDRIAL REDOX STATE IN COLON CANCER EX VIVO

    Science.gov (United States)

    XU, HE N.; FENG, MIN; MOON, LILY; DOLLOFF, NATHAN; EL-DEIRY, WAFIK; LI, LIN Z.

    2015-01-01

    The mitochondrial redox state and its heterogeneity of colon cancer at tissue level have not been previously reported. Nor has how p53 regulates mitochondrial respiration been measured at (deep) tissue level, presumably due to the unavailability of the technology that has sufficient spatial resolution and tissue penetration depth. Our prior work demonstrated that the mitochondrial redox state and its intratumor heterogeneity is associated with cancer aggressiveness in human melanoma and breast cancer in mouse models, with the more metastatic tumors exhibiting localized regions of more oxidized redox state. Using the Chance redox scanner with an in-plane spatial resolution of 200 μm, we imaged the mitochondrial redox state of the wild-type p53 colon tumors (HCT116 p53 wt) and the p53-deleted colon tumors (HCT116 p53−/−) by collecting the fluorescence signals of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and oxidized flavoproteins [Fp, including flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)] from the mouse xenografts snap-frozen at low temperature. Our results show that: (1) both tumor lines have significant degree of intratumor heterogeneity of the redox state, typically exhibiting a distinct bi-modal distribution that either correlates with the spatial core–rim pattern or the “hot/cold” oxidation-reduction patches; (2) the p53−/− group is significantly more heterogeneous in the mitochondrial redox state and has a more oxidized tumor core compared to the p53 wt group when the tumor sizes of the two groups are matched; (3) the tumor size dependence of the redox indices (such as Fp and Fp redox ratio) is significant in the p53−/− group with the larger ones being more oxidized and more heterogeneous in their redox state, particularly more oxidized in the tumor central regions; (4) the H&E staining images of tumor sections grossly correlate with the redox images. The present work is the first to reveal at the submillimeter scale the intratumor heterogeneity pattern

  2. Carbon Redox-Polymer-Gel Hybrid Supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlad, A.; Singh, N.; Melinte, S.; Gohy, J.-F.; Ajayan, P.M.

    2016-01-01

    Energy storage devices that provide high specific power without compromising on specific energy are highly desirable for many electric-powered applications. Here, we demonstrate that polymer organic radical gel materials support fast bulk-redox charge storage, commensurate to surface double layer ion exchange at carbon electrodes. When integrated with a carbon-based electrical double layer capacitor, nearly ideal electrode properties such as high electrical and ionic conductivity, fast bulk redox and surface charge storage as well as excellent cycling stability are attained. Such hybrid carbon redox-polymer-gel electrodes support unprecedented discharge rate of 1,000C with 50% of the nominal capacity delivered in less than 2 seconds. Devices made with such electrodes hold the potential for battery-scale energy storage while attaining supercapacitor-like power performances. PMID:26917470

  3. Time-dependent stratification in the Gauthami-Godavari Estuary

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, T.V.N.

    . National Academy of Sciences, Washington, D.C. CZITROM, S. P. R. 1986. The effect of river discharge in the re- sidual circulation in the eastern Irish Sea. Continental Shelf Research 6:475–485. DRONKERS,J.AND J. VAN DE KREEKE. 1986. Experimental deter.... Springer- Verlag, New York. SIMPSON, J. H., J. SHARPLES, AND T. P. RIPPETH. 1991. A perspec- tive model of stratification induced by freshwater runoff. Es- tuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science 33:23–35. STOMMEL, H. 1953. Computation of pollution in a...

  4. Effect of long-term fertilization on humic redox mediators in multiple microbial redox reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Peng; Zhang, Chunfang; Wang, Yi; Yu, Xinwei; Zhang, Zhichao; Zhang, Dongdong

    2018-03-01

    This study investigated the effects of different long-term fertilizations on humic substances (HSs), humic acids (HAs) and humins, functioning as redox mediators for various microbial redox biotransformations, including 2,2',4,4',5,5'- hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB 153 ) dechlorination, dissimilatory iron reduction, and nitrate reduction, and their electron-mediating natures. The redox activity of HSs for various microbial redox metabolisms was substantially enhanced by long-term application of organic fertilizer (pig manure). As a redox mediator, only humin extracted from soils with organic fertilizer amendment (OF-HM) maintained microbial PCB 153 dechlorination activity (1.03 μM PCB 153 removal), and corresponding HA (OF-HA) most effectively enhanced iron reduction and nitrate reduction by Shewanella putrefaciens. Electrochemical analysis confirmed the enhancement of their electron transfer capacity and redox properties. Fourier transform infrared analysis showed that C=C and C=O bonds, and carboxylic or phenolic groups in HSs might be the redox functional groups affected by fertilization. This research enhances our understanding of the influence of anthropogenic fertility on the biogeochemical cycling of elements and in situ remediation ability in agroecosystems through microorganisms' metabolisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Rapid and Efficient Redox Processes within 2D Covalent Organic Framework Thin Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeBlase, Catherine R. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cornell University, Baker Laboratory, Ithaca, New York 14853-1301, United States; Hernández-Burgos, Kenneth [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cornell University, Baker Laboratory, Ithaca, New York 14853-1301, United States; Silberstein, Katharine E. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cornell University, Baker Laboratory, Ithaca, New York 14853-1301, United States; Rodríguez-Calero, Gabriel G. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cornell University, Baker Laboratory, Ithaca, New York 14853-1301, United States; Bisbey, Ryan P. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cornell University, Baker Laboratory, Ithaca, New York 14853-1301, United States; Abruña, Héctor D. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cornell University, Baker Laboratory, Ithaca, New York 14853-1301, United States; Dichtel, William R. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cornell University, Baker Laboratory, Ithaca, New York 14853-1301, United States

    2015-02-17

    Two-dimensional covalent organic frameworks (2D COFs) are ideally suited for organizing redox-active subunits into periodic, permanently porous polymer networks of interest for pseudocapacitive energy storage. Here we describe a method for synthesizing crystalline, oriented thin films of a redox-active 2D COF on Au working electrodes. The thickness of the COF film was controlled by varying the initial monomer concentration. A large percentage (80–99%) of the anthraquinone groups are electrochemically accessible in films thinner than 200 nm, an order of magnitude improvement over the same COF prepared as a randomly oriented microcrystalline powder. As a result, electrodes functionalized with oriented COF films exhibit a 400% increase in capacitance scaled to electrode area as compared to those functionalized with the randomly oriented COF powder. These results demonstrate the promise of redox-active COFs for electrical energy storage and highlight the importance of controlling morphology for optimal performance.

  6. Rapid and Efficient Redox Processes within 2D Covalent Organic Framework Thin Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeBlase, Catherine R.; Hernández-Burgos, Kenneth; Silberstein, Katharine E.; Rodríguez-Calero, Gabriel G.; Bisbey, Ryan P.; Abruña, Héctor D.; Dichtel, William R.

    2015-03-24

    Two-dimensional covalent organic frameworks (2D COFs) are ideally suited for organizing redox-active subunits into periodic, permanently porous polymer networks of interest for pseudocapacitive energy storage. Here we describe a method for synthesizing crystalline, oriented thin films of a redox-active 2D COF on Au working electrodes. The thickness of the COF film was controlled by varying the initial monomer concentration. A large percentage (80–99%) of the anthraquinone groups are electrochemically accessible in films thinner than 200 nm, an order of magnitude improvement over the same COF prepared as a randomly oriented microcrystalline powder. As a result, electrodes functionalized with oriented COF films exhibit a 400% increase in capacitance scaled to electrode area as compared to those functionalized with the randomly oriented COF powder. These results demonstrate the promise of redox-active COFs for electrical energy storage and highlight the importance of controlling morphology for optimal performance.

  7. MICROSCALE METABOLIC, REDOX AND ABIOTIC REACTIONS IN HANFORD 300 AREA SUBSURFACE SEDIMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyenal, Haluk [WSU; McLEan, Jeff [JCVI; Majors, Paul [PNNL; Fredrickson, Jim [PNNL

    2013-11-14

    The Hanford 300 Area is a unique site due to periodic hydrologic influence of river water resulting in changes in groundwater elevation and flow direction. This area is also highly subject to uranium remobilization, the source of which is currently believed to be the region at the base of the vadose zone that is subject to period saturation due to the changes in the water levels in the Columbia River. We found that microbial processes and redox and abiotic reactions which operate at the microscale were critical to understanding factors controlling the macroscopic fate and transport of contaminants in the subsurface. The combined laboratory and field research showed how microscale conditions control uranium mobility and how biotic, abiotic and redox reactions relate to each other. Our findings extended the current knowledge to examine U(VI) reduction and immobilization using natural 300 Area communities as well as selected model organisms on redox-sensitive and redox-insensitive minerals. Using innovative techniques developed specifically to probe biogeochemical processes at the microscale, our research expanded our current understanding of the roles played by mineral surfaces, bacterial competition, and local biotic, abiotic and redox reaction rates on the reduction and immobilization of uranium.

  8. Stratification for smoking in case-cohort studies of genetic polymorphisms and lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mette; López, Ana García; Andersen, Per Kragh

    2009-01-01

    and adjustment for smoking on the estimated effect of polymorphisms on lung cancer risk was explored in the case-cohort design. We used an empirical and a statistical simulation approach. The stratification strategies were: no smoking stratification, stratification for smoking status and stratification......The risk estimates obtained in studies of genetic polymorphisms and lung cancer differ markedly between studies, which might be due to chance or differences in study design, in particular the stratification/match of comparison group. The effect of different strategies for stratification...... for smoking duration. The study base was a prospective follow-up study with 57,053 participants. In the simulation approach the glutathione S-transferase T1 null polymorphism, as a model of any polymorphism, was added to simulated data in two different ways, assuming either absence or presence of association...

  9. Differential regulation of tissue thiol-disulfide redox status in a murine model of peritonitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benton Shana M

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glutathione (GSH/glutathione disulfide (GSSG and cysteine (Cys/cystine (CySS are major redox pools with important roles in cytoprotection. We determined the impact of septic peritonitis on thiol-disulfide redox status in mice. Methods FVB/N mice (6–12 week old; 8/group underwent laparotomy with cecal ligation and puncture (CLP or laparotomy alone (control. Sections of ileum, colon, lung and liver were obtained and GSH, GSSG, Cys and CySS concentrations determined by HPLC 24 h after laparotomy. Redox potential [Eh in millivolts (mV] of the GSH/GSSG and Cys/CySS pools was calculated using the Nernst equation. Data were analyzed by ANOVA (mean ± SE. Results GSH/GSSG Eh in ileum, colon, and liver was significantly oxidized in septic mice versus control mice (ileum: septic −202±4 versus control −228±2 mV; colon: -195±8 versus −214±1 mV; and liver: -194±3 vs. -210±1 mV, all Ph was unchanged with CLP, while liver and lung Cys/CySS Eh became significantly more reducing (liver: septic = −103±3 versus control −90±2 mV; lung: -101±5 versus −81±1 mV, each P Conclusions Septic peritonitis induced by CLP oxidizes ileal and colonic GSH/GSSG redox but Cys/CySS Eh remains unchanged in these intestinal tissues. In liver, CLP oxidizes the GSH/GSSG redox pool and CyS/CySS Eh becomes more reducing; in lung, CLP does not alter GSH/GSSG Eh, and Cys/CySS Eh is less oxidized. CLP-induced infection/inflammation differentially regulates major thiol-disulfide redox pools in this murine model.

  10. Electronically Induced Redox Barriers for Treatment of Groundwater

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sale, Tom; Gilbert, David

    2006-01-01

    ...) and Colorado State University (CSU). The focus is an innovative electrolytic approach for managing redox-sensitive contaminants in groundwater, referred to as electrically induced redox barrier (e-barriers...

  11. The effects of chromium(VI) on the thioredoxin system: Implications for redox regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Charles R.

    2014-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] compounds are highly redox active and have long been recognized as potent cytotoxins and carcinogens. The intracellular reduction of Cr(VI) generates reactive Cr intermediates, which are themselves strong oxidants, as well as superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radical. These probably contribute to the oxidative damage and effects on redox-sensitive transcription factors that have been reported. However, the identification of events that initiate these signaling changes has been elusive. More recent studies show that Cr(VI) causes irreversible inhibition of thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) and oxidation of thioredoxin (Trx) and peroxiredoxin (Prx). Mitochondrial Trx2/Prx3 are more sensitive to Cr(VI) treatment than cytosolic Trx1/Prx1, although both compartments show thiol oxidation with higher doses or longer treatments. Thiol redox proteomics demonstrate that Trx2, Prx3, and Trx1 are among the most sensitive proteins in cells to Cr(VI) treatment. Their oxidation could therefore represent initiating events that have widespread implications for protein thiol redox control and for multiple aspects of redox signaling. This review summarizes the effects of Cr(VI) on the TrxR/Trx system and how these events could influence a number of downstream redox signaling systems that are influenced by Cr(VI) exposure. Some of the signaling events discussed include the activation of apoptosis signal regulating kinase and MAP kinases (p38 and JNK) and the modulation of a number of redox-sensitive transcription factors including AP-1, NF-κB, p53, and Nrf2. PMID:22542445

  12. Thioredoxin Selectivity for Thiol-based Redox Regulation of Target Proteins in Chloroplasts*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Keisuke; Hara, Satoshi; Hisabori, Toru

    2015-01-01

    Redox regulation based on the thioredoxin (Trx) system is believed to ensure light-responsive control of various functions in chloroplasts. Five Trx subtypes have been reported to reside in chloroplasts, but their functional diversity in the redox regulation of Trx target proteins remains poorly clarified. To directly address this issue, we studied the Trx-dependent redox shifts of several chloroplast thiol-modulated enzymes in vitro and in vivo. In vitro assays using a series of Arabidopsis recombinant proteins provided new insights into Trx selectivity for the redox regulation as well as the underpinning for previous suggestions. Most notably, by combining the discrimination of thiol status with mass spectrometry and activity measurement, we identified an uncharacterized aspect of the reductive activation of NADP-malate dehydrogenase; two redox-active Cys pairs harbored in this enzyme were reduced via distinct utilization of Trxs even within a single polypeptide. In our in vitro assays, Trx-f was effective in reducing all thiol-modulated enzymes analyzed here. We then investigated the in vivo physiological relevance of these in vitro findings, using Arabidopsis wild-type and Trx-f-deficient plants. Photoreduction of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase was partially impaired in Trx-f-deficient plants, but the global impact of Trx-f deficiency on the redox behaviors of thiol-modulated enzymes was not as striking as expected from the in vitro data. Our results provide support for the in vivo functionality of the Trx system and also highlight the complexity and plasticity of the chloroplast redox network. PMID:25878252

  13. Thermal stratification in sodium. Proceedings of an International Atomic Energy Agency specialists' meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Grenoble, Grenoble (France)

    1983-07-01

    The purpose of the meeting was to discuss and exchange views on thermal stratification existing in sodium of the main vessel, secondary circuits and large components of LMFBRs under various operating conditions. The meeting was divided into four sessions: national position presentations; fundamental studies on theory and application of stratification problems, numerical and experimental investigations applied to stratified flow phenomena; computer codes for evaluation of thermal stratification; applied studies covering the computer codes and experimental studies for prediction of temperature velocity field.

  14. An Improved Model of Cryogenic Propellant Stratification in a Rotating, Reduced Gravity Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Justin; Kirk, Daniel R.; Schallhorn, Paul A.; Piquero, Jorge L.; Campbell, Mike; Chase, Sukhdeep

    2007-01-01

    This paper builds on a series of analytical literature models used to predict thermal stratification within rocket propellant tanks. The primary contribution to the literature is to add the effect of tank rotation and to demonstrate the influence of rotation on stratification times and temperatures. This work also looks levels of thermal stratification for generic propellant tanks (cylindrical shapes) over a parametric range of upper-stage coast times, heating levels, rotation rates, and gravity levels.

  15. Coolant stratification and its thermohydrodynamic specificity under natural circulation in horizontal steam generator collectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blagovechtchenski, A.; Leontieva, V.; Mitriukhin, A. [Saint-Petersburg Technical Univ. (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    The experiments and the test facilities for the study of the stratification phenomenon in the hot plenum of reactor and the upper parts of the steam generator collectors in a nuclear power plant are described. The aim of the experiments was to define the conditions of the stratification initiation, to study the temperature field in the upper part, the definition of the characteristics in the stratification layer, and also to study the factors which cause the intensity of the stagnant volume cooling.

  16. Thermal stratification in sodium. Proceedings of an International Atomic Energy Agency specialists' meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, J.

    1983-07-01

    The purpose of the meeting was to discuss and exchange views on thermal stratification existing in sodium of the main vessel, secondary circuits and large components of LMFBRs under various operating conditions. The meeting was divided into four sessions: national position presentations; fundamental studies on theory and application of stratification problems, numerical and experimental investigations applied to stratified flow phenomena; computer codes for evaluation of thermal stratification; applied studies covering the computer codes and experimental studies for prediction of temperature velocity field

  17. Predictions of stratification in cold leg components using virtual noding schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piper, R.B.; Hassan, Y.A.; Banerjee, S.S.; Barsamian, H.R.; Cebull, P.P.

    1996-01-01

    In this investigation, a virtual noding scheme is used with RELAP5/MOD3.2 to capture thermal stratification effects in a small-break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation. A three-dimensional code (CFD-ACE) has also been used to observe the stratification effects in a similar situation. Stratification temperature differences of the simulations compare well with that of the experiment. The Froude number was also evaluated

  18. Coolant stratification and its thermohydrodynamic specificity under natural circulation in horizontal steam generator collectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blagovechtchenski, A; Leontieva, V; Mitriukhin, A [Saint-Petersburg Technical Univ. (Russian Federation)

    1998-12-31

    The experiments and the test facilities for the study of the stratification phenomenon in the hot plenum of reactor and the upper parts of the steam generator collectors in a nuclear power plant are described. The aim of the experiments was to define the conditions of the stratification initiation, to study the temperature field in the upper part, the definition of the characteristics in the stratification layer, and also to study the factors which cause the intensity of the stagnant volume cooling.

  19. Dynamic modeling of stratification for chilled water storage tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, Kahar; Al Khaireed, Syed Muhammad Nasrul; Ariffin, Mohd Kamal; Senawi, Mohd Yusoff

    2008-01-01

    Air conditioning of buildings can be costly and energy consuming. Application of thermal energy storage (TES) reduces cost and energy consumption. The efficiency of the overall operation is affected by storage tank sizing design, which affects thermal stratification of water during charging and discharging processes in TES system. In this study, numerical simulation is used to determine the relationship between tank size and good thermal stratification. Three dimensional simulations with different tank height-to-diameter ratio (HD) and inlet Reynolds number (Re) are investigated. The effect of the number of diffuser holes is also studied. For shallow tanks (low HD) simulations, no acceptable thermocline thickness can be seen for all Re experimented. Partial mixing is observed throughout the process. Medium HD tanks simulations show good thermocline behavior and clear distinction between warm and cold water can be seen. Finally, deep tanks (high HD) show less acceptable thermocline thickness as compared to that of medium HD tanks. From this study, doubling and halving the number of diffuser holes show no significant effect on the thermocline behavior

  20. MULTIGENERATIONAL ASPECTS OF SOCIAL STRATIFICATION: ISSUES FOR FURTHER RESEARCH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mare, Robert D

    2014-03-01

    The articles in this special issue show the vitality and progress of research on multigenerational aspects of social mobility, stratification, and inequality. The effects of the characteristics and behavior of grandparents and other kin on the statuses, resources, and positions of their descendants are best viewed in a demographic context. Intergenerational effects work through both the intergenerational associations of socioeconomic characteristics and also differential fertility and mortality. A combined socioeconomic and demographic framework informs a research agenda which addresses the following issues: how generational effects combine with variation in age, period, and cohort within each generation; distinguishing causal relationships across generations from statistical associations; how multigenerational effects vary across socioeconomic hierarchies, including the possibility of stronger effects at the extreme top and bottom; distinguishing between endowments and investments in intergenerational effects; multigenerational effects on associated demographic behaviors and outcomes (especially fertility and mortality); optimal tradeoffs among diverse types of data on multigenerational processes; and the variability across time and place in how kin, education, and other institutions affect stratification.

  1. DEM Simulation of Particle Stratification and Segregation in Stockpile Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Dizhe

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Granular stockpiles are commonly observed in nature and industry, and their formation has been extensively investigated experimentally and mathematically in the literature. One of the striking features affecting properties of stockpiles are the internal patterns formed by the stratification and segregation processes. In this work, we conduct a numerical study based on DEM (discrete element method model to study the influencing factors and triggering mechanisms of these two phenomena. With the use of a previously developed mixing index, the effects of parameters including size ratio, injection height and mass ratio are investigated. We found that it is a void-filling mechanism that differentiates the motions of particles with different sizes. This mechanism drives the large particles to flow over the pile surface and segregate at the pile bottom, while it also pushes small particles to fill the voids between large particles, giving rise to separate layers. Consequently, this difference in motion will result in the observed stratification and segregation phenomena.

  2. Study of thermal stratification and mixing using PIV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaji, B.; Szijarto, R.; Aszodi, A.

    2010-01-01

    Paks Nuclear Power Plant uses the REMIX code for the calculation of the coolant mixing in case of the use of high pressure injection system while stagnating flow is present. The use of the code for Russian type WWER-440 reactors needs strict conservative approach, and in several cases the accuracy and the reserves to safety margins cannot be determined now. In order to quantify and improve these characteristics experimental validation of the code is needed. An experimental program has been launched at Institute of Nuclear Techniques with the aim of investigating thermal stratification processes and the mixing of plumes in simple geometries. With the comparison and evaluation of measurement and computational fluid dynamics result computational models can be validated. For the experiments a simple hexahedral plexiglas tank (250 x 500 x 100 mm - H x L x D) was fabricated with five nozzles attached, which can be set up as inlets or outlets. With different inlet and outlet setups and temperature differences thermal stratification, plume mixing may be investigated using Particle Image Velocimetry. In the paper comparison of Particle Image Velocimetry measurements carried out on the plexiglas tank and the results of simulations will be presented. For the calculations the ANSYS CFX three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics code was used. (Authors)

  3. Revealing the timing of ocean stratification using remotely-sensed ocean fronts: links with marine predators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, P. I.; Loveday, B. R.

    2016-02-01

    Stratification is of critical importance to the mixing and productivity of the ocean, though currently it can only be measured using in situ sampling, profiling buoys or underwater autonomous vehicles. Stratification is understood to affect the surface aggregation of pelagic fish and hence the foraging behaviour and distribution of their predators such as seabirds and cetaceans. Satellite Earth observation sensors cannot directly detect stratification, but can observe surface features related to the presence of stratification, for example shelf-sea fronts that separate tidally-mixed water from seasonally stratified water. This presentation describes a novel algorithm that accumulates evidence for stratification from a sequence of oceanic front maps, and in certain regions can reveal the timing of the seasonal onset and breakdown of stratification. Initial comparisons will be made with seabird locations acquired through GPS tagging. If successful, a remotely-sensed stratification timing index would augment the ocean front metrics already developed at PML, that have been applied in over 20 journal articles relating marine predators to ocean fronts. The figure below shows a preliminary remotely-sensed 'stratification' index, for 25-31 Jul. 2010, where red indicates water with stronger evidence for stratification.

  4. Methods to determine stratification efficiency of thermal energy storage processes–Review and theoretical comparison

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haller, Michel; Cruickshank, Chynthia; Streicher, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews different methods that have been proposed to characterize thermal stratification in energy storages from a theoretical point of view. Specifically, this paper focuses on the methods that can be used to determine the ability of a storage to promote and maintain stratification...... during charging, storing and discharging, and represent this ability with a single numerical value in terms of a stratification efficiency for a given experiment or under given boundary conditions. Existing methods for calculating stratification efficiencies have been applied to hypothetical storage...

  5. Are bioassays useful tools to assess redox processes and biodegradation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Pedersen, Philip Grinder; Ludvigsen, L.

    2002-01-01

    sensitive hydrochemical or geochemical parameters, levels of hydrogen, and redox potential. However, all these approaches have to be evaluated against TEAP-bioassays as the most direct measure. We assessed successfully ongoing microbial-mediated redox processes by TEAP-bioassays in degradation studies...... of aromatic and chlorinated aliphatic compounds in landfill leachate plumes, and of pesticides in aquifers with various redox conditions....

  6. Le reazioni redox: un pasticcio concettuale?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Ghibaudi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Le reazioni di ossidoriduzione costituiscono un argomento centrale di qualsiasi corso di base di chimica, sia a livello scolastico che universitario. Il loro apprendimento comporta il superamento di svariati ostacoli concettuali, la cui difficoltà può risultare amplificata da prassi didattiche inadeguate. Gli errori più ricorrenti nel presentare l’argomento sono di due tipi: i fare implicitamente riferimento a modelli esplicativi distinti (es. il numero di ossidazione e il trasferimento elettronico, senza esplicitarli e senza evidenziarne la differente natura e il campo di validità; ii confondere il livello della spiegazione formale con quello della realtà fisica. I fenomeni redox sono normalmente interpretati sulla base di tre distinti modelli empirici, che fanno riferimento al trasferimento di atomi di ossigeno, di atomi di idrogeno, di elettroni; e di un quarto modello, formale, fondato sul cambiamento del numero di ossidazione. La confusione tra questi modelli può generare considerevoli problemi di apprendimento. Il presente lavoro riporta un’analisi critica delle implicazioni concettuali della didattica dei processi redox. L’analisi è articolata in tre sezioni: i disamina della evoluzione storica del concetto di ossidoriduzione; ii analisi dei modelli redox e del loro campo di validità; iii discussione di alcuni aspetti epistemologici inerenti i processi redox che sono rilevanti per la didattica della chimica.

  7. Methods for using redox liposome biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Quan; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides methods and compositions for detecting the presence of biologically-important analytes by using redox liposome biosensors. In particular, the present invention provides liposome/sol-gel electrodes suitable for the detection of a wide variety of organic molecules, including but not limited to bacterial toxins.

  8. Redox regulation in cancer stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ROS-dependent (redox regulation) signaling pathways and transcriptional activities are thought to be critical in stem cell self-renewal and differentiation during growth and organogenesis. Aberrant ROS burst and dysregulation of those ROS-dependent cellular processe...

  9. Redox fluctuations in the Early Ordovician oceans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Arcy, Joan Mary; Gilleaudeau, Geoffrey Jon; Peralta, Silvio

    2017-01-01

    Chromium (Cr) stable isotopes are a useful tracer of changes in redox conditions because changes in its oxidation state are accompanied by an isotopic fractionation. Recent co-precipitation experiments have shown that Cr(VI) is incorporated into the calcite lattice, suggesting that carbonates......, accompanied by exceptionally low Cr concentrations (runoff or hydrothermal input into the global...

  10. Investigating improvements on redox flow batteries

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Swartbooi, AM

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available storage devices coupled to most of their applications. Lead-acid batteries have long been used as the most economical option to store electricity in many small scale applications, but lately more interest have been shown in redox flow batteries. The low...

  11. Redox cycling of potential antitumor aziridinylquinones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lusthof, Klaas J.; de Mol, Nicolaas J.; Richter, Wilma; Janssen, Lambert H.M.; Butler, John; Hoey, Brigid M.; Verboom, Willem; Reinhoudt, David

    1992-01-01

    The formation of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) during redox cycling of newly synthetized potential antitumor 2,5-bis (1-aziridinyl)-1,4-benzoquinone (BABQ) derivatives has been studied by assaying the production of ROI (superoxide, hydroxyl radical, and hydrogen peroxide) by xanthine oxidase

  12. Redox Modulations, Antioxidants, and Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik A. Fraunberger

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although antioxidants, redox modulations, and neuropsychiatric disorders have been widely studied for many years, the field would benefit from an integrative and corroborative review. Our primary objective is to delineate the biological significance of compounds that modulate our redox status (i.e., reactive species and antioxidants as well as outline their current role in brain health and the impact of redox modulations on the severity of illnesses. Therefore, this review will not enter into the debate regarding the perceived medical legitimacy of antioxidants but rather seek to clarify their abilities and limitations. With this in mind, antioxidants may be interpreted as natural products with significant pharmacological actions in the body. A renewed understanding of these often overlooked compounds will allow us to critically appraise the current literature and provide an informed, novel perspective on an important healthcare issue. In this review, we will introduce the complex topics of redox modulations and their role in the development of select neuropsychiatric disorders.

  13. A Membrane‐Free Redox Flow Battery with Two Immiscible Redox Electrolytes

    OpenAIRE

    Navalpotro, Paula; Palma, Jesus; Anderson, Marc; Marcilla, Rebeca

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Flexible and scalable energy storage solutions are necessary for mitigating fluctuations of renewable energy sources. The main advantage of redox flow batteries is their ability to decouple power and energy. However, they present some limitations including poor performance, short‐lifetimes, and expensive ion‐selective membranes as well as high price, toxicity, and scarcity of vanadium compounds. We report a membrane‐free battery that relies on the immiscibility of redox electrolytes ...

  14. Stratification of archaeal membrane lipids in the ocean and implications for adaptation and chemotaxonomy of planktonic archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chun; Wakeham, Stuart G; Elling, Felix J; Basse, Andreas; Mollenhauer, Gesine; Versteegh, Gerard J M; Könneke, Martin; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2016-12-01

    Membrane lipids of marine planktonic archaea have provided unique insights into archaeal ecology and paleoceanography. However, past studies of archaeal lipids in suspended particulate matter (SPM) and sediments mainly focused on a small class of fully saturated glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraether (GDGT) homologues identified decades ago. The apparent low structural diversity of GDGTs is in strong contrast to the high diversity of metabolism and taxonomy among planktonic archaea. Furthermore, adaptation of archaeal lipids in the deep ocean remains poorly constrained. We report the archaeal lipidome in SPM from diverse oceanic regimes. We extend the known inventory of planktonic archaeal lipids to include numerous unsaturated archaeal ether lipids (uns-AELs). We further reveal (i) different thermal regulations and polar headgroup compositions of membrane lipids between the epipelagic (≤ 100 m) and deep (>100 m) populations of archaea, (ii) stratification of unsaturated GDGTs with varying redox conditions, and (iii) enrichment of tetra-unsaturated archaeol and fully saturated GDGTs in epipelagic and deep oxygenated waters, respectively. Such stratified lipid patterns are consistent with the typical distribution of archaeal phylotypes in marine environments. We, thus, provide an ecological context for GDGT-based paleoclimatology and bring about the potential use of uns-AELs as biomarkers for planktonic Euryarchaeota. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. CHOP THERAPY INDUCED MITOCHONDRIAL REDOX STATE ALTERATION IN NON-HODGKIN'S LYMPHOMA XENOGRAFTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. N. XU

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We are interested in investigating whether cancer therapy may alter the mitochondrial redox state in cancer cells to inhibit their growth and survival. The redox state can be imaged by the redox scanner that collects the fluorescence signals from both the oxidized-flavoproteins (Fp and the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH in snap-frozen tissues and has been previously employed to study tumor aggressiveness and treatment responses. Here, with the redox scanner we investigated the effects of chemotherapy on mouse xenografts of a human diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cell line (DLCL2. The mice were treated with CHOP therapy, i.e., cyclophosphamide (C + hydroxydoxorubicin (H + Oncovin (O + prednisone (P with CHO administration on day 1 and prednisone administration on days 1–5. The Fp content of the treated group was significantly decreased (p = 0.033 on day 5, and the mitochondrial redox state of the treated group was slightly more reduced than that of the control group (p = 0.048. The decrease of the Fp heterogeneity (measured by the mean standard deviation had a border-line statistical significance (p = 0.071. The result suggests that the mitochondrial metabolism of lymphoma cells was slightly suppressed and the lymphomas became less aggressive after the CHOP therapy.

  16. Interaction between heavy metals and thiol-linked redox reactions in germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiri, M; Chaoui, A; Ferjani, E E

    2010-09-15

    Thioredoxin (TRX) proteins perform important biological functions in cells by changing the redox state of proteins via dithiol disulfide exchange. Several systems are able to control the activity, stability, and correct folding of enzymes through dithiol/disulfide isomerization reactions including the enzyme protein disulfide-isomerase, the glutathione-dependent glutaredoxin system, and the thioredoxin systems. Plants have devised sophisticated mechanisms to cope with biotic and abiotic stresses imposed by their environment. Among these mechanisms, those collectively referred to as redox reactions induced by endogenous systems. This is of agronomical importance since a better knowledge of the involved mechanisms can offer novel means for crop protection. In the plant life cycle, the seed and seedling stages are key developmental stages conditioning the final yield of crops. Both are very sensitive to heavy metal stress. Plant redox reactions are principally studied on adult plant organs and there is only very scarce informations about the onset of redox regulation at the level of seed germination. In the here presented study, we discussed the importance of redox proteins in plant cell metabolism and defence. Special focus is given to TRX, which are involved in detoxification of ROS and also to their targets.

  17. Powering Lithium-Sulfur Battery Performance by Propelling Polysulfide Redox at Sulfiphilic Hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhe; Peng, Hong-Jie; Hou, Ting-Zheng; Huang, Jia-Qi; Chen, Cheng-Meng; Wang, Dai-Wei; Cheng, Xin-Bing; Wei, Fei; Zhang, Qiang

    2016-01-13

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery system is endowed with tremendous energy density, resulting from the complex sulfur electrochemistry involving multielectron redox reactions and phase transformations. Originated from the slow redox kinetics of polysulfide intermediates, the flood of polysulfides in the batteries during cycling induced low sulfur utilization, severe polarization, low energy efficiency, deteriorated polysulfide shuttle, and short cycling life. Herein, sulfiphilic cobalt disulfide (CoS2) was incorporated into carbon/sulfur cathodes, introducing strong interaction between lithium polysulfides and CoS2 under working conditions. The interfaces between CoS2 and electrolyte served as strong adsorption and activation sites for polar polysulfides and therefore accelerated redox reactions of polysulfides. The high polysulfide reactivity not only guaranteed effective polarization mitigation and promoted energy efficiency by 10% but also promised high discharge capacity and stable cycling performance during 2000 cycles. A slow capacity decay rate of 0.034%/cycle at 2.0 C and a high initial capacity of 1368 mAh g(-1) at 0.5 C were achieved. Since the propelling redox reaction is not limited to Li-S system, we foresee the reported strategy herein can be applied in other high-power devices through the systems with controllable redox reactions.

  18. Redox flow batteries. Already an alternative storage solution for hybrid PV mini-grids?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetter, Matthias; Dennenmoser, Martin; Schwunk, Simon; Smolinka, Tom [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems (ISE), Freiburg (Germany); Doetsch, Christian; Berthold, Sascha [Fraunhofer Institute for Environmental, Safety and Energy Technology (UMSICHT), Oberhausen (Germany); Tuebke, Jens; Noack, Jens [Fraunhofer Institute for Chemical Technology (ICT), Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Due to the flexible scalability of the power to energy ratio redox flow batteries are a suitable solution for quite a lot of decentralized applications. E.g. the autonomy time of a stand-alone system or mini-grid can be raised by increasing the tank size of the redox flow battery. In this paper the test site ''Rappenecker Hof'' in the black forest is used as an example for simulation based life cycle cost analyses of a vanadium redox flow battery integrated in an autonomous hybrid PV system. Two cases with lead acid batteries are considered as benchmarks for economic viability of the redox flow battery solution in such applications. At the moment a 1 KW / 6 kWh system for decentralized solutions is developed and will be installed in the ''Solarhaus'' in Freiburg. The main results of the cell stack and system design as well as performance data are presented. Furthermore simulation models and the model based development of the ''Smart Redox flow Control'' are described. For the optimized integration of the storage unit in the energy system a communication interface for exchanging data with the supervisory energy management system is introduced. On this basis a SOC forecast according to a given demand profile can be determined. (orig.)

  19. Review on anionic redox for high-capacity lithium- and sodium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Chenglong; Lu, Yaxiang; Hu, Yong-Sheng; Chen, Liquan; Wang, Qidi; Li, Baohua

    2017-01-01

    Rechargeable batteries, especially lithium-ion batteries, are now widely used as power sources for portable electronics and electric vehicles, but material innovations are still needed to satisfy the increasing demand for larger energy density. Recently, lithium- and sodium-rich electrode materials, including the A 2 MO 3 -family layered compounds (A  =  Li, Na; M  =  Mn 4+ , Ru 4+ , etc), have been extensively studied as potential high-capacity electrode materials for a cumulative cationic and anionic redox activity. Negatively charged oxide ions can potentially donate electrons to compensate for the absence of oxidable transition metals as a redox center to further increase the reversible capacity. Understanding and controlling the state-of-the-art anionic redox processes is pivotal for the design of advanced energy materials, highlighted in rechargeable batteries. Hence, experimental and theoretical approaches have been developed to consecutively study the diverting processes, states, and structures involved. In this review, we attempt to present a literature overview and provide insight into the reaction mechanism with respect to the anionic redox processes, proposing some opinions as target oriented. It is hoped that, through this discussion, the search for anionic redox electrode materials with high-capacity rechargeable batteries can be advanced, and practical applications realized as soon as possible. (topical review)

  20. Laboratory Eh simulations in relation to the Redox conditions in natural granitic groundwaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wikberg, P.

    1992-01-01

    Redox conditions are one of the prime parameters affecting the sorption of radionuclides released from a nuclear waste repository. The swedish granitic groundwaters are all reducing from a depth of approximately 100 m, the vast majority already from a depth of a few tens of metres. The contents of ferrous iron reaches a maximum at the same depth due to the weathering of iron rich minerals. At greater depths the iron content decreases while sulphide contents increases. The redox buffering capacity (in groundwater) lies mainly in the rock. The contents of iron, sulphide and manganese constitute the buffer in the groundwater. The redox potential (Eh) is controlled by the iron system in the groundwater and the rock. Sulphate is not involved in the groundwater redox processes. Laboratory simulations of the groundwater rock interactions with respect to the redox conditions have been realized, but there is still a difference compared to the natural system. This difference is due to the fact that traces of oxygen diffuses into the laboratory system causing a continuous oxidation. 20 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  1. Electrochemical reverse engineering: A systems-level tool to probe the redox-based molecular communication of biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinyang; Liu, Yi; Kim, Eunkyoung; March, John C; Bentley, William E; Payne, Gregory F

    2017-04-01

    The intestine is the site of digestion and forms a critical interface between the host and the outside world. This interface is composed of host epithelium and a complex microbiota which is "connected" through an extensive web of chemical and biological interactions that determine the balance between health and disease for the host. This biology and the associated chemical dialogues occur within a context of a steep oxygen gradient that provides the driving force for a variety of reduction and oxidation (redox) reactions. While some redox couples (e.g., catecholics) can spontaneously exchange electrons, many others are kinetically "insulated" (e.g., biothiols) allowing the biology to set and control their redox states far from equilibrium. It is well known that within cells, such non-equilibrated redox couples are poised to transfer electrons to perform reactions essential to immune defense (e.g., transfer from NADH to O 2 for reactive oxygen species, ROS, generation) and protection from such oxidative stresses (e.g., glutathione-based reduction of ROS). More recently, it has been recognized that some of these redox-active species (e.g., H 2 O 2 ) cross membranes and diffuse into the extracellular environment including lumen to transmit redox information that is received by atomically-specific receptors (e.g., cysteine-based sulfur switches) that regulate biological functions. Thus, redox has emerged as an important modality in the chemical signaling that occurs in the intestine and there have been emerging efforts to develop the experimental tools needed to probe this modality. We suggest that electrochemistry provides a unique tool to experimentally probe redox interactions at a systems level. Importantly, electrochemistry offers the potential to enlist the extensive theories established in signal processing in an effort to "reverse engineer" the molecular communication occurring in this complex biological system. Here, we review our efforts to develop this

  2. Flows and Stratification of an Enclosure Containing Both Localised and Vertically Distributed Sources of Buoyancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Jamie; Linden, Paul

    2013-11-01

    We examine the flows and stratification established in a naturally ventilated enclosure containing both a localised and vertically distributed source of buoyancy. The enclosure is ventilated through upper and lower openings which connect the space to an external ambient. Small scale laboratory experiments were carried out with water as the working medium and buoyancy being driven directly by temperature differences. A point source plume gave localised heating while the distributed source was driven by a controllable heater mat located in the side wall of the enclosure. The transient temperatures, as well as steady state temperature profiles, were recorded and are reported here. The temperature profiles inside the enclosure were found to be dependent on the effective opening area A*, a combination of the upper and lower openings, and the ratio of buoyancy fluxes from the distributed and localised source Ψ =Bw/Bp . Industrial CASE award with ARUP.

  3. Stratification-mixing cycles and plankton dynamics in a shallow estuary (Limfjord, Denmark)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teixeira, Isabel G.; Crespo, Bibiani G.; Nielsen, Torkel Gissel

    2014-01-01

    The biomass, production and consumption of phytoplankton, bacteria and zooplankton in a shallow Danish estuary (Limfjord) were analysed during a 9-day period.The water column changed between stratified and mixed conditions which influenced the dominant processes in the pelagic system. During strong...... stratification, phytoplankton was mainly controlled by microzooplankton grazing. A mixing event, which homogenized the water column, possibly provided food to a mussel-dominated benthic community. Concomitantly, zooplankton feeding and reproduction decreased.However, the nutrient input to the upper part...... of the water column during mixing and the subsequent stabilization provided the ideal conditions for the recovery of phytoplankton from the loss processes from previous days. Microzooplankton, which was also a significant consumer of bacteria throughout the sampling period, was not the only consumer...

  4. Redox processes in the safety case of deep geological repositories of radioactive wastes. Contribution of the European RECOSY Collaborative Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duro, L.; Bruno, J.; Grivé, M.; Montoya, V.; Kienzler, B.; Altmaier, M.; Buckau, G.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The RECOSY project produced results relevant for the Safety Case of nuclear disposal. • We classify the safety related features where RECOSY has contributed. • Redox processes effect the retention of radionuclides in all repository subsystems. - Abstract: Redox processes influence key geochemical characteristics controlling radionuclide behaviour in the near and far field of a nuclear waste repository. A sound understanding of redox related processes is therefore of high importance for developing a Safety Case, the collection of scientific, technical, administrative and managerial arguments and evidence in support of the safety of a disposal facility. This manuscript presents the contribution of the specific research on redox processes achieved within the EURATOM Collaborative Project RECOSY (REdox phenomena COntrolling SYstems) to the Safety Case of nuclear waste disposal facilities. Main objectives of RECOSY were related to the improved understanding of redox phenomena controlling the long-term release or retention of radionuclides in nuclear waste disposal and providing tools to apply the results to Performance Assessment and the Safety Case. The research developed during the project covered aspects of the near-field and the far-field aspects of the repository, including studies relevant for the rock formations considered in Europe as suitable for hosting an underground repository for radioactive wastes. It is the intention of this paper to highlight in which way the results obtained from RECOSY can feed the scientific process understanding needed for the stepwise development of the Safety Case associated with deep geological disposal of radioactive wastes

  5. Electrochemical redox processes involving soluble cerium species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arenas, L.F.; Ponce de León, C.; Walsh, F.C.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The relevance of cerium in laboratory and industrial electrochemistry is considered. • The history of fundamental electrochemical studies and applications is considered. • The chemistry, redox thermodynamics and electrode kinetics of cerium are summarised. • The uses of cerium ions in synthesis, energy storage, analysis and environmental treatment are illustrated. • Research needs and development perspectives are discussed. - Abstract: Anodic oxidation of cerous ions and cathodic reduction of ceric ions, in aqueous acidic solutions, play an important role in electrochemical processes at laboratory and industrial scale. Ceric ions, which have been used for oxidation of organic wastes and off-gases in environmental treatment, are a well-established oxidant for indirect organic synthesis and specialised cleaning processes, including oxide film removal from tanks and process pipework in nuclear decontamination. They also provide a classical reagent for chemical analysis in the laboratory. The reversible oxidation of cerous ions is an important reaction in the positive compartment of various redox flow batteries during charge and discharge cycling. A knowledge of the thermodynamics and kinetics of the redox reaction is critical to an understanding of the role of cerium redox species in these applications. Suitable choices of electrode material (metal or ceramic; coated or uncoated), geometry/structure (2-or 3-dimensional) and electrolyte flow conditions (hence an acceptable mass transport rate) are critical to achieving effective electrocatalysis, a high performance and a long lifetime. This review considers the electrochemistry of soluble cerium species and their diverse uses in electrochemical technology, especially for redox flow batteries and mediated electrochemical oxidation.

  6. Neuromorphic transistor achieved by redox reaction of WO3 thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Takashi; Jayabalan, Manikandan; Kawamura, Kinya; Takayanagi, Makoto; Higuchi, Tohru; Jayavel, Ramasamy; Terabe, Kazuya

    2018-04-01

    An all-solid-state neuromorphic transistor composed of a WO3 thin film and a proton-conducting electrolyte was fabricated for application to next-generation information and communication technology including artificial neural networks. The drain current exhibited a 4-order-of-magnitude increment by redox reaction of the WO3 thin film owing to proton migration. Learning and forgetting characteristics were well tuned by the gate control of WO3 redox reactions owing to the separation of the current reading path and pulse application path in the transistor structure. This technique should lead to the development of versatile and low-power-consumption neuromorphic devices.

  7. Dual redox catalysts for oxygen reduction and evolution reactions: towards a redox flow Li-O2 battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yun Guang; Jia, Chuankun; Yang, Jing; Pan, Feng; Huang, Qizhao; Wang, Qing

    2015-06-11

    A redox flow lithium-oxygen battery (RFLOB) by using soluble redox catalysts with good performance was demonstrated for large-scale energy storage. The new device enables the reversible formation and decomposition of Li2O2 via redox targeting reactions in a gas diffusion tank, spatially separated from the electrode, which obviates the passivation and pore clogging of the cathode.

  8. Some redox chemistry of HPO2-. and .PO32- radicals. A pulse radiolysis study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Packer, J.E.; Anderson, R.F.

    1990-01-01

    The HO . radical oxidises hypophosphite and phosphite anions to HPO 2 -. and . PO 3 2- respectively, but Br 2 -. and N 3 . do not. The rates of oxidation of HPO 2 -. by a series of oxidising agents of known one electron redox potentials decrease with decreasing potential while the corresponding rates for oxidation of . PO 3 2- remain close to the diffusion controlled limit. . PO 3 2- will oxidise cysteine but HPO 2 -. does not. . PO 3 2- did not oxidise ABTS, ascorbate, or the anion of the vitamin E analogue, trolox. It reduced traces of TMPD +. in TMPD rather than oxidising the substrate. The one electron redox potentials for oxidation and reduction of . PO 3 2- are calculated in light of recently published redox data on penicillamine. (author)

  9. Enhancing the Electronic Conductivity of Vanadium-tellurite Glasses by Tuning the Redox State

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Jonas; Yue, Yuanzheng

    Transition metal oxides are used in a variety of electronic purposes, e.g., vanadium tellurite as cathode material in high-power demanding batteries. By tuning the redox state of vanadium, it is possible to achieve a lower internal resistance within the entire battery unit, thus a higher capacity....... In this work we vary the redox state of a given vanadium tellurite system by performing post heat-treatment in controlled atmosphere. This process is in theory not limited only to varying electronic conductivity, but also varying the glass structure, and hence, changing properties of the glasses, e.g, thermal...... and mechanical properties. Finally we give insight into the relation between the redox state and electronic conductivity....

  10. Influence of Iron Speciation on Redox Cycling and Reactivity with Persistent Organic Contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongwook

    2009-01-01

    Although a number of past studies have been aimed at characterizing iron's redox properties in aqueous systems and its contribution to natural attenuation processes of groundwater contaminants, many questions remain. It is especially important to understand the molecular properties that control the reactivity of both Fe[superscript II] and…

  11. Application of multivariate probabilistic (Bayesian) networks to substance use disorder risk stratification and cost estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Lawrence; Radano, Todd A; Jack, Timothy; Kalina, Philip; Eberhardt, John S

    2009-09-16

    This paper explores the use of machine learning and Bayesian classification models to develop broadly applicable risk stratification models to guide disease management of health plan enrollees with substance use disorder (SUD). While the high costs and morbidities associated with SUD are understood by payers, who manage it through utilization review, acute interventions, coverage and cost limitations, and disease management, the literature shows mixed results for these modalities in improving patient outcomes and controlling cost. Our objective is to evaluate the potential of data mining methods to identify novel risk factors for chronic disease and stratification of enrollee utilization, which can be used to develop new methods for targeting disease management services to maximize benefits to both enrollees and payers. For our evaluation, we used DecisionQ machine learning algorithms to build Bayesian network models of a representative sample of data licensed from Thomson-Reuters' MarketScan consisting of 185,322 enrollees with three full-year claim records. Data sets were prepared, and a stepwise learning process was used to train a series of Bayesian belief networks (BBNs). The BBNs were validated using a 10 percent holdout set. The networks were highly predictive, with the risk-stratification BBNs producing area under the curve (AUC) for SUD positive of 0.948 (95 percent confidence interval [CI], 0.944-0.951) and 0.736 (95 percent CI, 0.721-0.752), respectively, and SUD negative of 0.951 (95 percent CI, 0.947-0.954) and 0.738 (95 percent CI, 0.727-0.750), respectively. The cost estimation models produced area under the curve ranging from 0.72 (95 percent CI, 0.708-0.731) to 0.961 (95 percent CI, 0.95-0.971). We were able to successfully model a large, heterogeneous population of commercial enrollees, applying state-of-the-art machine learning technology to develop complex and accurate multivariate models that support near-real-time scoring of novel payer

  12. Modeling seasonal redox dynamics and the corresponding fate of the pharmaceutical residue phenazone during artificial recharge of groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greskowiak, Janek; Prommer, Henning; Massmann, Gudrun; Nützmann, Gunnar

    2006-11-01

    Reactive multicomponent transport modeling was used to investigate and quantify the factors that affect redox zonation and the fate of the pharmaceutical residue phenazone during artificial recharge of groundwater at an infiltration site in Berlin, Germany. The calibrated model and the corresponding sensitivity analysis demonstrated thattemporal and spatial redox zonation at the study site was driven by seasonally changing, temperature-dependent organic matter degradation rates. Breakthrough of phenazone at monitoring wells occurred primarily during the warmer summer months, when anaerobic conditions developed. Assuming a redox-sensitive phenazone degradation behavior the model results provided an excellent agreement between simulated and measured phenazone concentrations. Therefore, the fate of phenazone was shown to be indirectly controlled by the infiltration water temperature through its effect on the aquifer's redox conditions. Other factors such as variable residence times appeared to be of less importance.

  13. Stratification in the lunar regolith - a preliminary view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duke, M.B.; Nagle, J.S.

    1975-01-01

    Although the knowledge of lunar regolith stratification is incomplete, several categories of thick and thin strata have been identified. Relatively thick units average 2 to 3 cm in thickness, and appear surficially to be massive. On more detailed examination, these units can be uniformly fine-grained, can show internal trends, or can show internal variations which apparently are random. Other thick units contain soil clasts apparently reworked from underlying units. Thin laminae average approximately 1 mm in thickness; lenticular distribution and composition of some thin laminae indicates they are fillets shed from adjacent rock fragments. Other dark, fine-grained, well-sorted thin laminae appear to be surficial zones, reworked by micrometeorites. Interpretations of stratigraphic succession can be strengthened by the occurrence of characteristic coarse rock fragments and the orientation of large spatter agglutinates, which are commonly found in their original depositional orientation. (Auth.)

  14. Consensus and stratification in the affective meaning of human sociality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrasat, Jens; von Scheve, Christian; Conrad, Markus; Schauenburg, Gesche; Schröder, Tobias

    2014-06-03

    We investigate intrasocietal consensus and variation in affective meanings of concepts related to authority and community, two elementary forms of human sociality. Survey participants (n = 2,849) from different socioeconomic status (SES) groups in German society provided ratings of 909 social concepts along three basic dimensions of affective meaning. Results show widespread consensus on these meanings within society and demonstrate that a meaningful structure of socially shared knowledge emerges from organizing concepts according to their affective similarity. The consensus finding is further qualified by evidence for subtle systematic variation along SES differences. In relation to affectively neutral words, high-status individuals evaluate intimacy-related and socially desirable concepts as less positive and powerful than middle- or low-status individuals, while perceiving antisocial concepts as relatively more threatening. This systematic variation across SES groups suggests that the affective meaning of sociality is to some degree a function of social stratification.

  15. Stratification in Business and Agriculture Surveys with R

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Ballin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Usually sample surveys on enterprises and farms adopt a one stage stratified sampling design. In practice the sampling frame is divided in non-overlapping strata and simple random sampling is carried out independently in each stratum. Stratification allows for reduction of the sampling error and permits to derive accurate estimates. Stratified sampling requires a number of decisions strictly related: (i how to stratify the population and how many strata to consider; (ii the size of the whole sample and corresponding partitioning among the strata (so called allocation. This paper will deal mainly with the problem (i and will show how to tackle it in the R environment using packages already available on the CRAN.

  16. Biomarkers for Risk Stratification of Neoplastic Progression in Barrett Esophagus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjon Kerkhof

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Barrett esophagus (BE is caused by chronic gastroesophageal reflux and predisposes to the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma through different grades of dysplasia. Only a subset of BE patients will finally develop esophageal adenocarcinoma. The majority will therefore not benefit from an endoscopic surveillance program, based on the histological identification of dysplasia. Several studies have been performed to find additional biomarkers that can be used to detect the subgroup of patients with an increased risk of developing malignancy in BE. In this review, we will summarize the most promising tissue biomarkers, i.e. proliferation/cell cycle proteins, tumor suppressor genes, adhesion molecules, DNA ploidy status and inflammation associated markers, that can be used for risk stratification in BE, and discuss their respective clinical application.

  17. Deep learning in pharmacogenomics: from gene regulation to patient stratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinin, Alexandr A; Higgins, Gerald A; Reamaroon, Narathip; Soroushmehr, Sayedmohammadreza; Allyn-Feuer, Ari; Dinov, Ivo D; Najarian, Kayvan; Athey, Brian D

    2018-05-01

    This Perspective provides examples of current and future applications of deep learning in pharmacogenomics, including: identification of novel regulatory variants located in noncoding domains of the genome and their function as applied to pharmacoepigenomics; patient stratification from medical records; and the mechanistic prediction of drug response, targets and their interactions. Deep learning encapsulates a family of machine learning algorithms that has transformed many important subfields of artificial intelligence over the last decade, and has demonstrated breakthrough performance improvements on a wide range of tasks in biomedicine. We anticipate that in the future, deep learning will be widely used to predict personalized drug response and optimize medication selection and dosing, using knowledge extracted from large and complex molecular, epidemiological, clinical and demographic datasets.

  18. The stability and stratification of a quantum liquid mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yukalov, V.I.

    1980-01-01

    A mixture of quantum liquids was investigated microscopically. The spectrum of collective excitations at finite temperature was determined. The form of the spectrum demonstrates whether there is a stability or stratification of the mixture. The influence of a relative motion of liquids on the spectrum was considered. It was demonstrated that beginning with some finite momentun, the spectrum of each component of the solution splits into two branches, one of which continues the spectrum into the single-particle region. The dynamic susceptibility, the dynamic form-factor, the coefficients of compressibility and the structure factor for the mixture of two Bose liquids were obtained. The integral relations that generalize some rules concerning the binary Bose solution was established. (author)

  19. The Social ecology of Madrid: Stratification in comparative perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamson, M; Johnson, P

    1974-08-01

    This paper examines the characteristics of residential zones in Madrid, Spain. The primary difference between zones is found to lie in a new bourgeoisie life-style dimension. Working women are found to be the best indicator of this dimension, which also involves servants, natives of Madrid and high degrees of literacy. Fertility-related considerations, however, are unrelated to working women, and this is explained as due to the availability of domestic help and "women-oriented" working arrangements. Fertility and socioeconomic status are found to be interrelated and constitute a second dimension of residential segregation. In conclusion, Madrid is examined in relation to both more and less industrialized cities, leading to a further modification of social area theory contentions concerning the ecology of stratification in developing cities.

  20. Stratification-Based Outlier Detection over the Deep Web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian, Xuefeng; Zhao, Pengpeng; Sheng, Victor S; Fang, Ligang; Gu, Caidong; Yang, Yuanfeng; Cui, Zhiming

    2016-01-01

    For many applications, finding rare instances or outliers can be more interesting than finding common patterns. Existing work in outlier detection never considers the context of deep web. In this paper, we argue that, for many scenarios, it is more meaningful to detect outliers over deep web. In the context of deep web, users must submit queries through a query interface to retrieve corresponding data. Therefore, traditional data mining methods cannot be directly applied. The primary contribution of this paper is to develop a new data mining method for outlier detection over deep web. In our approach, the query space of a deep web data source is stratified based on a pilot sample. Neighborhood sampling and uncertainty sampling are developed in this paper with the goal of improving recall and precision based on stratification. Finally, a careful performance evaluation of our algorithm confirms that our approach can effectively detect outliers in deep web.

  1. Career on the Move: Geography, Stratification, and Scientific Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deville, Pierre; Wang, Dashun; Sinatra, Roberta; Song, Chaoming; Blondel, Vincent D.; Barabási, Albert-László

    2014-04-01

    Changing institutions is an integral part of an academic life. Yet little is known about the mobility patterns of scientists at an institutional level and how these career choices affect scientific outcomes. Here, we examine over 420,000 papers, to track the affiliation information of individual scientists, allowing us to reconstruct their career trajectories over decades. We find that career movements are not only temporally and spatially localized, but also characterized by a high degree of stratification in institutional ranking. When cross-group movement occurs, we find that while going from elite to lower-rank institutions on average associates with modest decrease in scientific performance, transitioning into elite institutions does not result in subsequent performance gain. These results offer empirical evidence on institutional level career choices and movements and have potential implications for science policy.

  2. Redox Biology in Neurological Function, Dysfunction, and Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Rodrigo; Vargas, Marcelo R

    2018-04-23

    Reduction oxidation (redox) reactions are central to life and when altered, they can promote disease progression. In the brain, redox homeostasis is recognized to be involved in all aspects of central nervous system (CNS) development, function, aging, and disease. Recent studies have uncovered the diverse nature by which redox reactions and homeostasis contribute to brain physiology, and when dysregulated to pathological consequences. Redox reactions go beyond what is commonly described as oxidative stress and involve redox mechanisms linked to signaling and metabolism. In contrast to the nonspecific nature of oxidative damage, redox signaling involves specific oxidation/reduction reactions that regulate a myriad of neurological processes such as neurotransmission, homeostasis, and degeneration. This Forum is focused on the role of redox metabolism and signaling in the brain. Six review articles from leading scientists in the field that appraise the role of redox metabolism and signaling in different aspects of brain biology including neurodevelopment, neurotransmission, aging, neuroinflammation, neurodegeneration, and neurotoxicity are included. An original research article exemplifying these concepts uncovers a novel link between oxidative modifications, redox signaling, and neurodegeneration. This Forum highlights the recent advances in the field and we hope it encourages future research aimed to understand the mechanisms by which redox metabolism and signaling regulate CNS physiology and pathophysiology. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 00, 000-000.

  3. Imaging dynamic redox processes with genetically encoded probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezeriņa, Daria; Morgan, Bruce; Dick, Tobias P

    2014-08-01

    Redox signalling plays an important role in many aspects of physiology, including that of the cardiovascular system. Perturbed redox regulation has been associated with numerous pathological conditions; nevertheless, the causal relationships between redox changes and pathology often remain unclear. Redox signalling involves the production of specific redox species at specific times in specific locations. However, until recently, the study of these processes has been impeded by a lack of appropriate tools and methodologies that afford the necessary redox species specificity and spatiotemporal resolution. Recently developed genetically encoded fluorescent redox probes now allow dynamic real-time measurements, of defined redox species, with subcellular compartment resolution, in intact living cells. Here we discuss the available genetically encoded redox probes in terms of their sensitivity and specificity and highlight where uncertainties or controversies currently exist. Furthermore, we outline major goals for future probe development and describe how progress in imaging methodologies will improve our ability to employ genetically encoded redox probes in a wide range of situations. This article is part of a special issue entitled "Redox Signalling in the Cardiovascular System." Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Rumen content stratification in the giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Cathrine; Clauss, Marcus; Bertelsen, Mads F; Weisbjerg, Martin R; Lund, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Ruminants differ in the degree of rumen content stratification, with 'cattle-types' (i.e., the grazing and intermediate feeding ruminants) having stratified content, whereas 'moose-types' (i.e., the browsing ruminants) have unstratified content. The feeding ecology, as well as the digestive morphophysiology of the giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis), suggest that it is a 'moose-type' ruminant. Correspondingly, the giraffe should have an unstratified rumen content and an even rumen papillation pattern. Digesta samples were collected from along the digestive tract of 27 wild-caught giraffes kept in bomas for up to 2months, and 10 giraffes kept in zoological gardens throughout their lives. Samples were analysed for concentration of dry matter, fibre fractions, volatile fatty acids and NH 3 , as well as mean particle size and pH. There was no difference between the dorsal and ventral rumen region in any of these parameters, indicating homogenous rumen content in the giraffes. In addition to the digesta samples, samples of dorsal rumen, ventral rumen and atrium ruminis mucosa were collected and the papillary surface enlargement factor was determined, as a proxy for content stratification. The even rumen papillation pattern observed also supported the concept of an unstratified rumen content in giraffes. Zoo giraffes had a slightly more uneven papillation pattern than boma giraffes. This finding could not be matched by differences in physical characteristics of the rumen content, probably due to an influence of fasting time ante mortem on these parameters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Novel biomarkers for risk stratification in pulmonary arterial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Zelniker

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Risk stratification in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH is paramount to identifying individuals at highest risk of death. So far, there are only limited parameters for prognostication in patients with PAH. 95 patients with confirmed PAH were included in the present analysis and followed for a total of 4 years. Blood samples were analysed for serum levels of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide, high-sensitivity troponin T (hsTnT, pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (proANP, growth differentiation factor 15, soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 and placental growth factor. 27 (28.4% patients died during a follow-up of 4 years. Levels of all tested biomarkers, except for placental growth factor, were significantly elevated in nonsurvivors compared with survivors. Receiver operating characteristic analyses demonstrated that cardiac biomarkers had the highest power in predicting mortality. In particular, proANP exhibited the highest area under the curve, followed by N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide and hsTnT. Furthermore, proANP and hsTnT added significant additive prognostic value to the established markers in categorical and continuous net reclassification index. Moreover, after Cox regression, proANP (hazard ratio (HR 1.91, hsTnT (HR 1.41, echocardiographic right ventricular impairment (HR 1.30 and 6-min walk test (HR 0.97 per 10 m remained the only significant parameters in prognostication of mortality. Our data suggest benefits of the implementation of proANP and hsTnT as additive biomarkers for risk stratification in patients with PAH.

  6. Characterization of redox conditions in groundwater contaminant plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Thomas H.; Bjerg, Poul L.; Banwart, Steven A.; Jakobsen, Rasmus; Heron, Gorm; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2000-10-01

    Evaluation of redox conditions in groundwater pollution plumes is often a prerequisite for understanding the behaviour of the pollutants in the plume and for selecting remediation approaches. Measuring of redox conditions in pollution plumes is, however, a fairly recent issue and yet relative few cases have been reported. No standardised or generally accepted approach exists. Slow electrode kinetics and the common lack of internal equilibrium of redox processes in pollution plumes make, with a few exceptions, direct electrochemical measurement and rigorous interpretation of redox potentials dubious, if not erroneous. Several other approaches have been used in addressing redox conditions in pollution plumes: redox-sensitive compounds in groundwater samples, hydrogen concentrations in groundwater, concentrations of volatile fatty acids in groundwater, sediment characteristics and microbial tools, such as MPN counts, PLFA biomarkers and redox bioassays. This paper reviews the principles behind the different approaches, summarizes methods used and evaluates the approaches based on the experience from the reported applications.

  7. Integrated carbon, sulfur, and nitrogen isotope chemostratigraphy of the Ediacaran Lantian Formation in South China: Spatial gradient, ocean redox oscillation, and fossil distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W; Guan, C; Zhou, C; Peng, Y; Pratt, L M; Chen, X; Chen, L; Chen, Z; Yuan, X; Xiao, S

    2017-07-01

    The Ediacaran Doushantuo Formation in South China is a prime target for geobiological investigation because it offers opportunities to integrate chemostratigraphic and paleobiological data. Previous studies were mostly focused on successions in shallow-water shelf facies, but data from deep-water successions are needed to fully understand basinal redox structures. Here, we report δ 13 C carb , δ 13 C org , δ 34 S pyr , δ 34 S CAS , and δ 15 N sed data from a drill core of the fossiliferous Lantian Formation, which is a deep-water equivalent of the Doushantuo Formation. Our data confirm a large (>10‰) spatial gradient in δ 13 C carb in the lower Doushantuo/Lantian formations, but this gradient is probably due to the greater sensitivity of carbonate-poor deep-water sediments to isotopic mixing with 13 C-depleted carbonate cements. A pronounced negative δ 13 C carb excursion (EN3) in the upper Doushantuo/Lantian formations, however, is spatially consistent and may be an equivalent of the Shuram excursion. δ 34 S pyr is more negative in deeper-water facies than in shallow-water facies, particularly in the lower Doushantuo/Lantian formations, and this spatial pattern is interpreted as evidence for ocean redox stratification: Pyrite precipitated in euxinic deep waters has lower δ 34 S pyr than that formed within shallow-water sediments. The Lantian Formation was probably deposited in oscillating oxic and euxinic conditions. Euxinic black shales have higher TOC and TN contents, but lower δ 34 S pyr and δ 15 N sed values. In euxinic environments, pyrite was predominantly formed in the water column and organic nitrogen was predominantly derived from nitrogen fixation or NH 4 + assimilation because of quantitative denitrification, resulting in lower δ 34 S pyr and δ 15 N sed values. Benthic macroalgae and putative animals occur exclusively in euxinic black shales. If preserved in situ, these organisms must have lived in brief oxic episodes punctuating largely

  8. A study of redox kinetic in silicate melt; Etude cinetique des reactions d'oxydoreduction dans les silicates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnien, V

    2005-12-15

    The aim of this thesis is to understand better iron redox reactions and mechanisms in silicate glasses and melts. Particular interest has been paid to the influence of temperature and chemical composition. For this purpose, the influence of alkali element content, iron content and network formers on the kinetics of redox reactions has been determined through XANES and Raman spectroscopy experiments performed either near the glass transition or above the liquidus temperature. As a complement, electrical conductivity and RBS spectroscopy experiments have been made to characterize the diffusivity of the species that transport electrical charges and the reaction morphology, respectively. Temperature and composition variations can induce changes in the dominating redox mechanism. At a given temperature, the parameters that exert the strongest influence on redox mechanisms are the presence or lack of divalent cations and the existing decoupling between the mobility of network former and modifier elements. Near Tg, the diffusion of divalent cations, when present in the melt, controls the kinetics of iron redox reactions along with a flux of electron holes. Composition, through the degree of polymerization and the silicate network structure, influences the kinetics and the nature of the involved cations, but not the mechanisms of the reaction. Without alkaline earth elements, the kinetics of redox reactions are controlled by the diffusion of oxygen species. With increasing temperatures, the diffusivities of all ionic species tend to become similar. The decoupling between ionic fluxes then is reduced so that several mechanisms become kinetically equivalent and can thus coexist. (author)

  9. A study of redox kinetic in silicate melt; Etude cinetique des reactions d'oxydoreduction dans les silicates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnien, V

    2005-12-15

    The aim of this thesis is to understand better iron redox reactions and mechanisms in silicate glasses and melts. Particular interest has been paid to the influence of temperature and chemical composition. For this purpose, the influence of alkali element content, iron content and network formers on the kinetics of redox reactions has been determined through XANES and Raman spectroscopy experiments performed either near the glass transition or above the liquidus temperature. As a complement, electrical conductivity and RBS spectroscopy experiments have been made to characterize the diffusivity of the species that transport electrical charges and the reaction morphology, respectively. Temperature and composition variations can induce changes in the dominating redox mechanism. At a given temperature, the parameters that exert the strongest influence on redox mechanisms are the presence or lack of divalent cations and the existing decoupling between the mobility of network former and modifier elements. Near Tg, the diffusion of divalent cations, when present in the melt, controls the kinetics of iron redox reactions along with a flux of electron holes. Composition, through the degree of polymerization and the silicate network structure, influences the kinetics and the nature of the involved cations, but not the mechanisms of the reaction. Without alkaline earth elements, the kinetics of redox reactions are controlled by the diffusion of oxygen species. With increasing temperatures, the diffusivities of all ionic species tend to become similar. The decoupling between ionic fluxes then is reduced so that several mechanisms become kinetically equivalent and can thus coexist. (author)

  10. On Stratification in Changing Higher Education: The "Analysis of Status" Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Roland; Mitterle, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    This article seeks to shed light on current dynamics of stratification in changing higher education and proposes an analytical perspective to account for these dynamics based on Martin Trow's work on "the analysis of status." In research on higher education, the term "stratification" is generally understood as a metaphor that…

  11. Near-Surface Effects of Free Atmosphere Stratification in Free Convection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mellado, Juan Pedro; Heerwaarden, van C.C.; Garcia, Jade Rachele

    2016-01-01

    The effect of a linear stratification in the free atmosphere on near-surface properties in a free convective boundary layer (CBL) is investigated by means of direct numerical simulation. We consider two regimes: a neutral stratification regime, which represents a CBL that grows into a residual

  12. Acoustic study of stratification region of melts in In-Se system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glazov, V.M.; Kim, S.G.; Nurova, K.B.

    1989-01-01

    Stratification region of melts in In-Se system was studied in detail with the use of the method of measuring ultrasound velocity. The curve, limiting the region of stratification into two liquid solutions was plotted. It is shown that the curve is characterized as symmetrical finodal

  13. Observed variations in stratification and currents in the Zuari estuary, west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sundar, D.; Unnikrishnan, A.S.; Michael, G.S.; Kankonkar, A.; Nidheesh, A.G.; Subeesh, M.P.

    in stratification at different time scales (daily, spring–neap cycle and seasonal) are described. In the mixed tidal regime with semi-diurnal dominance, stratification at higher low water succeeding lower high water is more intense than that at lower low water...

  14. Economic Stratification Differentiates Home Gardens in the Maya Village of Pomuch, Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poot-Pool, W.S.; Wal, van der J.C.; Flores-Guido, S.; Pat-Fernández, J.M.; Esparza-Olguín, L.

    2012-01-01

    Economic Stratification Differentiates Home Gardens in the Maya Village of Pomuch, Mexico. In this paper, we analyze if economic stratification of peasant families in a Maya village in the Yucatán Peninsula of Mexico influences species composition and structure of home gardens. Our general

  15. Relationship between thermal stratification and flow patterns in steam-quenching suppression pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Daehun; Erkan, Nejdet; Jo, Byeongnam; Okamoto, Koji

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermal stratification mechanism by direct contact condensation is investigated. • Thermal stratification condition changes according to the flow pattern. • Thermal stratification depends on the force balance between buoyancy and momentum. • Flow pattern change was observed even in the same regime. • Flow pattern is affected by the sensitive force balance. - Abstract: This study aims to examine the relationship between thermal stratification and flow patterns in a steam-quenching suppression pool using particle image velocimetry. Thermal stratification was experimentally evaluated in a depressurized water pool under different steam mass flux conditions. The time evolution of the temperature profile of the suppression pool was presented with the variation of condensation regimes, and steam condensation processes were visualized using a high-speed camera. The thermal stratification condition was classified into full mixing, gradual thermal stratification, and developed thermal stratification. It was found that the condition was determined by the flow patterns depending on the force balance between buoyancy and momentum. The force balance affected both the condensation regime and the flow pattern, and hence, the flow pattern was changed with the condensation regime. However, the force balance had a sensitive influence on the flow in the pool; therefore, distinct flow patterns were observed even in the same condensation regime.

  16. Monitoring of coolant temperature stratification on piping components in WWER-440 NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudcovsky, S.; Slanina, M.; Badiar, S.

    2001-01-01

    The presentation deals with the aims of non-standard temperature measurements installed on primary and secondary circuit in WWER-440 NPPs, explains reasons of coolant temperature stratification on the piping components. It describes methods of the measurements on pipings, range of installation of the temperature measurements in EBO and EMO units and illustrates results of measurements of coolant temperature stratification. (Authors)

  17. Mesoporous tungsten oxynitride as electrocatalyst for promoting redox reactions of vanadium redox couple and performance of vanadium redox flow battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wonmi; Jo, Changshin; Youk, Sol; Shin, Hun Yong; Lee, Jinwoo; Chung, Yongjin; Kwon, Yongchai

    2018-01-01

    For enhancing the performance of vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB), a sluggish reaction rate issue of V2+/V3+ redox couple evaluated as the rate determining reaction should be addressed. For doing that, mesoporous tungsten oxide (m-WO3) and oxyniride (m-WON) structures are proposed as the novel catalysts, while m-WON is gained by NH3 heat treatment of m-WO3. Their specific surface area, crystal structure, surface morphology and component analysis are measured using BET, XRD, TEM and XPS, while their catalytic activity for V2+/V3+ redox reaction is electrochemically examined. As a result, the m-WON shows higher peak current, smaller peak potential difference, higher electron transfer rate constant and lower charge transfer resistance than other catalysts, like the m-WO3, WO3 nanoparticle and mesoporous carbon, proving that it is superior catalyst. Regarding the charge-discharge curve tests, the VRFB single cell employing the m-WON demonstrates high voltage and energy efficiencies, high specific capacity and low capacity loss rate. The excellent results of m-WON are due to the reasons like (i) reduced energy band gap, (ii) reaction familiar surface functional groups and (ii) greater electronegativity.

  18. Compromised redox homeostasis, altered nitroso-redox balance, and therapeutic possibilities in atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Jillian N; Ziberna, Klemen; Casadei, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    Although the initiation, development, and maintenance of atrial fibrillation (AF) have been linked to alterations in myocyte redox state, the field lacks a complete understanding of the impact these changes may have on cellular signalling, atrial electrophysiology, and disease progression. Recent studies demonstrate spatiotemporal changes in reactive oxygen species production shortly after the induction of AF in animal models with an uncoupling of nitric oxide synthase activity ensuing in the presence of long-standing persistent AF, ultimately leading to a major shift in nitroso-redox balance. However, it remains unclear which radical or non-radical species are primarily involved in the underlying mechanisms of AF or which proteins are targeted for redox modification. In most instances, only free radical oxygen species have been assessed; yet evidence from the redox signalling field suggests that non-radical species are more likely to regulate cellular processes. A wider appreciation for the distinction of these species and how both species may be involved in the development and maintenance of AF could impact treatment strategies. In this review, we summarize how redox second-messenger systems are regulated and discuss the recent evidence for alterations in redox regulation in the atrial myocardium in the presence of AF, while identifying some critical missing links. We also examine studies looking at antioxidants for the prevention and treatment of AF and propose alternative redox targets that may serve as superior therapeutic options for the treatment of AF. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  19. Experimental studies on the thermal stratification and its influence on BLEVEs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Wensheng; Gong, Yanwu; Gao, Ting; Gu, Anzhong; Lu, Xuesheng [Institute of Refrigeration and Cryogenics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2010-10-15

    The thermal stratification of Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) and its effect on the occurrence of the boiling liquid expanding vapor explosion (BLEVE) have been investigated experimentally. Stratifications in liquid and vapor occur when the LPG tank is heated. The degree of the liquid stratification {beta} increases with an increasing heat flux and decreasing filling ratio. The effect of stratification on the BLEVE has been examined with depressurization tests of LPG. The results show that the pressure recovery for the stratified LPG ({beta} = 1.4) upon sudden depressurization is much lower than that for the isothermal LPG ({beta} = 1). It can be concluded that the liquid stratification decreases the liquid energy and the occurrence of the BLEVE. (author)

  20. Analysis of a gas stratification break-up by a vertical jet using the GOTHIC code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernández-Cosials, Mikel Kevin; Jimenez, Gonzalo; Lopez-Alonso, Emma

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Study of a light gas distribution with the GOTHIC code based on the OECD/NEA IBE-3. • Sensitivity analysis on turbulence model, discretization scheme and heat transfer. • The jet erosion phenomena is captured properly with a relatively coarse mesh. • Development of a tool to evaluate the influence of each parameter on the simulation. • Several recommendation on modeling a stratification break-up are included. - Abstract: During a severe accident in light water reactor (LWR), hydrogen concentration can overpass the flammability limits locally, so the correct simulation of its behavior during a release is critical. The capability assessment of computational fluid dynamics tools to calculate the hydrogen distribution under different conditions has been the focus of intense research worldwide. In this context, the OECD/NEA conducted an international benchmark exercise (IBE-3), which was focused on the break-up of a stratified layer of a light gas by a vertical jet. The participants performed their simulations before the experiment data was released. When the data was released, it was noticed that a combination of several parameters like the mesh, turbulence model or solver controls were responsible for the broad differences between the participants’ results. To obtain information about how each parameter affects the simulation, a post-test sensitivity analysis has been done by the UPM. In this paper, the IBE-3 experiment simulation with GOTHIC 8.0 is presented along with extensive sensitivity analyses of the relevant parameters. The first objective of the work is to test the capability of GOTHIC 8.0 to simulate properly a gas stratification break-up by a vertical jet with a relatively coarse mesh. The second objective of the paper is to relate each sensitivity parameter with each other and with the experiment through the Parameter Influence Chart, a helpful tool specially designed for this purpose.

  1. Analysis of a gas stratification break-up by a vertical jet using the GOTHIC code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernández-Cosials, Mikel Kevin; Jimenez, Gonzalo, E-mail: gonzalo.jimenez@upm.es; Lopez-Alonso, Emma

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • Study of a light gas distribution with the GOTHIC code based on the OECD/NEA IBE-3. • Sensitivity analysis on turbulence model, discretization scheme and heat transfer. • The jet erosion phenomena is captured properly with a relatively coarse mesh. • Development of a tool to evaluate the influence of each parameter on the simulation. • Several recommendation on modeling a stratification break-up are included. - Abstract: During a severe accident in light water reactor (LWR), hydrogen concentration can overpass the flammability limits locally, so the correct simulation of its behavior during a release is critical. The capability assessment of computational fluid dynamics tools to calculate the hydrogen distribution under different conditions has been the focus of intense research worldwide. In this context, the OECD/NEA conducted an international benchmark exercise (IBE-3), which was focused on the break-up of a stratified layer of a light gas by a vertical jet. The participants performed their simulations before the experiment data was released. When the data was released, it was noticed that a combination of several parameters like the mesh, turbulence model or solver controls were responsible for the broad differences between the participants’ results. To obtain information about how each parameter affects the simulation, a post-test sensitivity analysis has been done by the UPM. In this paper, the IBE-3 experiment simulation with GOTHIC 8.0 is presented along with extensive sensitivity analyses of the relevant parameters. The first objective of the work is to test the capability of GOTHIC 8.0 to simulate properly a gas stratification break-up by a vertical jet with a relatively coarse mesh. The second objective of the paper is to relate each sensitivity parameter with each other and with the experiment through the Parameter Influence Chart, a helpful tool specially designed for this purpose.

  2. Rebalancing Redox to Improve Biobutanol Production by Clostridium tyrobutyricum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Ma

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Biobutanol is a sustainable green biofuel that can substitute for gasoline. Carbon flux has been redistributed in Clostridium tyrobutyricum via metabolic cell engineering to produce biobutanol. However, the lack of reducing power hampered the further improvement of butanol production. The objective of this study was to improve butanol production by rebalancing redox. Firstly, a metabolically-engineered mutant CTC-fdh-adhE2 was constructed by introducing heterologous formate dehydrogenase (fdh and bifunctional aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase (adhE2 simultaneously into wild-type C. tyrobutyricum. The mutant evaluation indicated that the fdh-catalyzed NADH-producing pathway improved butanol titer by 2.15-fold in the serum bottle and 2.72-fold in the bioreactor. Secondly, the medium supplements that could shift metabolic flux to improve the production of butyrate or butanol were identified, including vanadate, acetamide, sodium formate, vitamin B12 and methyl viologen hydrate. Finally, the free-cell fermentation produced 12.34 g/L of butanol from glucose using the mutant CTC-fdh-adhE2, which was 3.88-fold higher than that produced by the control mutant CTC-adhE2. This study demonstrated that the redox engineering in C. tyrobutyricum could greatly increase butanol production.

  3. Uranium fixation by mineralization at the redox front

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isobe, Hiroshi

    1998-01-01

    The behavior of actinide elements including uranium in geomedia is controlled by redox conditions. Under the oxidized conditions, uranium forms uranyl ion (UO 2 2+ ) and its complexes, and dissolves in ground water. Under the reduced conditions, U(IV) has much lower solubility than uranyl ion. In the Koongarra uranium deposit, Australia, lead-bearing uraninite, uranyl lead oxide and uranyl silicate minerals occur in the unweathered, primary ore zone, and uranyl phosphate minerals occur in the weathered, secondary ore zone. Between unweathered and weathered zones, the transition zone exists as a redox front. In the transition zone, graphite and sulfide minerals react as reducing agents for species dissolved in ground water. By SEM, spherical grains of uraninite were observed in veins with graphite. Pyrite had coffinite rim with crystals of uraninite. Calculation based on the ground water chemistry and hydrology at Koongarra shows that the uranium in the transition zone may be fixed from the ground water. In the Koongarra transition zone, recent mineralization of uranium by reduction takes place. Mineralization is much stronger fixation mechanism than adsorption on clay minerals. Pyrite in the buffer materials of possible radioactive waste repositories can fix radionuclides in oxidized ground water by mineralization with reducing reactions. (author)

  4. Iron oxide redox chemistry and nuclear fuel disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jobe, D.J.; Lemire, R.J.; Taylor, P.

    1997-04-01

    Solubility and stability data for iron (III) oxides and aqueous Fe(II) and Fe(III) species are reviewed, and selected values are used to calculate potential-pH diagrams for the iron system at temperatures of 25 and 100 deg C, chloride activities {C1 - } = 10 -2 and 1 mol/kg, total carbonate activity {C T } = 10 -3 mol/kg, and iron(III) oxide/oxyhydroxide solubility products (25 deg C values) K sp = {Fe 3+ }{OH - } 3 = 10 -38.5 , 10 -40 and 10 -42 . The temperatures and anion concentrations bracket the range of conditions expected in a Canadian nuclear fuel waste disposal vault. The three solubility products represent a conservative upper limit, a most probable value, and a minimum credible value, respectively, for the iron oxides likely to be important in controlling redox conditions in a disposal vault for CANDU nuclear reactor fuel. Only in the first of these three cases do the calculated redox potentials significantly exceed values under which oxidative dissolution of the fuel may occur. (author)

  5. Optimal scheduling for distribution network with redox flow battery storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosseina, Majid; Bathaee, Seyed Mohammad Taghi

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel method for optimal scheduling of storages in radial network is presented. • Peak shaving and load leveling are the main objectives. • Vanadium redox flow battery is considered as the energy storage unit. • Real data is used for simulation. - Abstract: There are many advantages to utilize storages in electric power system. Peak shaving, load leveling, load frequency control, integration of renewable, energy trading and spinning reserve are the most important of them. Batteries, especially redox flow batteries, are one of the appropriate storages for utilization in distribution network. This paper presents a novel, heuristic and practical method for optimal scheduling in distribution network with flow battery storage. This heuristic method is more suitable for scheduling and operation of distribution networks which require installation of storages. Peak shaving and load leveling is considered as the main objective in this paper. Several indices are presented in this paper for determine the place of storages and also scheduling for optimal use of energy in them. Simulations of this paper are based on real information of distribution network substation that located in Semnan, Iran.

  6. Pre-treatment risk stratification of prostate cancer patients: A critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, George; Warde, Padraig; Pickles, Tom; Crook, Juanita; Brundage, Michael; Souhami, Luis; Lukka, Himu

    2012-04-01

    The use of accepted prostate cancer risk stratification groups based on prostate-specific antigen, T stage and Gleason score assists in therapeutic treatment decision-making, clinical trial design and outcome reporting. The utility of integrating novel prognostic factors into an updated risk stratification schema is an area of current debate. The purpose of this work is to critically review the available literature on novel pre-treatment prognostic factors and alternative prostate cancer risk stratification schema to assess the feasibility and need for changes to existing risk stratification systems. A systematic literature search was conducted to identify original research publications and review articles on prognostic factors and risk stratification in prostate cancer. Search terms included risk stratification, risk assessment, prostate cancer or neoplasms, and prognostic factors. Abstracted information was assessed to draw conclusions regarding the potential utility of changes to existing risk stratification schema. The critical review identified three specific clinically relevant potential changes to the most commonly used three-group risk stratification system: (1) the creation of a very-low risk category; (2) the splitting of intermediate-risk into a low- and high-intermediate risk groups; and (3) the clarification of the interface between intermediate- and high-risk disease. Novel pathological factors regarding high-grade cancer, subtypes of Gleason score 7 and percentage biopsy cores positive were also identified as potentially important risk-stratification factors. Multiple studies of prognostic factors have been performed to create currently utilized prostate cancer risk stratification systems. We propose potential changes to existing systems.

  7. Japanese Structure Survey of Radiation Oncology in 2005 Based on Institutional Stratification of Patterns of Care Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teshima, Teruki; Numasaki, Hodaka; Shibuya, Hitoshi; Nishio, Masamichi; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Ito, Hisao; Sekiguchi, Kenji; Kamikonya, Norihiko; Koizumi, Masahiko; Tago, Masao; Nagata, Yasushi; Masaki, Hidekazu; Nishimura, Tetsuo; Yamada, Shogo

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the structure of radiation oncology in Japan in terms of equipment, personnel, patient load, and geographic distribution to identify and improve any deficiencies. Methods and Materials: A questionnaire-based national structure survey was conducted between March 2006 and February 2007 by the Japanese Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology. These data were analyzed in terms of the institutional stratification of the Patterns of Care Study. Results: The total numbers of new cancer patients and total cancer patients (new and repeat) treated with radiotherapy in 2005 were estimated at approximately 162,000 and 198,000, respectively. In actual use were 765 linear accelerators, 11 telecobalt machines, 48 GammaKnife machines, 64 60 Co remote-controlled after-loading systems, and 119 192 Ir remote-controlled after-loading systems. The linear accelerator systems used dual-energy function in 498 systems (65%), three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in 462 (60%), and intensity-modulated radiotherapy in 170 (22%). There were 426 Japanese Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology-certified radiation oncologists, 774 full-time equivalent radiation oncologists, 117 medical physicists, and 1,635 radiation therapists. Geographically, a significant variation was found in the use of radiotherapy, from 0.9 to 2.1 patients/1,000 population. The annual patient load/FTE radiation oncologist was 247, exceeding the Blue Book guidelines level. Patterns of Care Study stratification can clearly discriminate the maturity of structures according to their academic nature and caseload. Conclusions: The Japanese structure has clearly improved during the past 15 years in terms of equipment and its use, although the shortage of manpower and variations in maturity disclosed by this Patterns of Care Study stratification remain problematic. These constitute the targets for nationwide improvement in quality assurance and quality control

  8. Chronopotentiometric determination of redox states of peptides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dorčák, Vlastimil; Paleček, Emil

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 23 (2007), s. 2405-2412 ISSN 1040-0397 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500040513; GA ČR(CZ) GA301/07/0490; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06035 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : peptide redox states * constant current chronopotentiometry * catalytic hydrogen evolution Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.949, year: 2007

  9. Redox pioneer:Professor Christine Helen Foyer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Río, Luis A

    2011-10-15

    Dr. Christine Foyer (B.Sc. 1974; Ph.D. 1977) is recognized here as a Redox Pioneer because she has published an article on redox biology that has been cited more than 1000 times, 4 other articles that have been cited more than 500 times, and a further 32 articles that have been each cited more than 100 times. During her Ph.D. at the Kings College, University of London, United Kingdom, Dr. Foyer discovered that ascorbate and glutathione and enzymes linking NADPH, glutathione, and ascorbate are localized in isolated chloroplast preparations. These observations pioneered the discovery of the ascorbate-glutathione cycle, now known as Foyer-Halliwell-Asada pathway after the names of the three major contributors, a crucial mechanism for H(2)O(2) metabolism in both animals and plants. Dr. Foyer has made a very significant contribution to our current understanding of the crucial roles of ascorbate and glutathione in redox biology, particularly in relation to photosynthesis, respiration, and chloroplast and mitochondrial redox signaling networks. "My view is that science…is compulsive and you have to keep with it all the time and not get despondent when things do not work well. Being passionate about science is what carries you through the hard times so that it isn't so much work, as a hobby that you do for a living. It is the thrill of achieving a better understanding and finding real pleasure in putting new ideas together, explaining data and passing on knowledge that keeps you going no matter what!" --Prof. Christine Helen Foyer.

  10. Electrochemical determination of thioredoxin redox states

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dorčák, Vlastimil; Paleček, Emil

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 81, č. 4 (2009), s. 1543-1548 ISSN 0003-2700 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KAN400310651; GA ČR(CZ) GA301/07/0490; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06035 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : thioredoxin redox states * constant current chronopotentiometric stripping * carbon and mercury electrodes Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 5.214, year: 2009

  11. Pyridine nucleotides in regulation of cell death and survival by redox and non-redox reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak Kujundžić, Renata; Žarković, Neven; Gall Trošelj, Koraljka

    2014-01-01

    Changes of the level and ratios of pyridine nucleotides determine metabolism- dependent cellular redox status and the activity of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) and sirtuins, thereby influencing several processes closely related to cell survival and death. Pyridine nucleotides participate in numerous metabolic reactions whereby their net cellular level remains constant, but the ratios of NAD+/NADP+ and NADH/NADPH oscillate according to metabolic changes in response to diverse stress signals. In non-redox reactions, NAD+ is degraded and quickly, afterward, resynthesized in the NAD+ salvage pathway, unless overwhelming activation of PARP-1 consumes NAD+ to the point of no return, when the cell can no longer generate enough ATP to accommodate NAD+ resynthesis. The activity of PARP-1 is mandatory for the onset of cytoprotective autophagy on sublethal stress signals. It has become increasingly clear that redox status, largely influenced by the metabolism-dependent composition of the pyridine nucleotides pool, plays an important role in the synthesis of pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic sphingolipids. Awareness of the involvement of the prosurvival sphingolipid, sphingosine-1-phosphate, in transition from inflammation to malignant transformation has recently emerged. Here, the participation of pyridine nucleotides in redox and non-redox reactions, sphingolipid metabolism, and their role in cell fate decisions is reviewed.

  12. Redox Regulation in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parakh, Sonam; Spencer, Damian M.; Halloran, Mark A.; Soo, Kai Y.; Atkin, Julie D.

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease that results from the death of upper and lower motor neurons. Due to a lack of effective treatment, it is imperative to understand the underlying mechanisms and processes involved in disease progression. Regulations in cellular reduction/oxidation (redox) processes are being increasingly implicated in disease. Here we discuss the possible involvement of redox dysregulation in the pathophysiology of ALS, either as a cause of cellular abnormalities or a consequence. We focus on its possible role in oxidative stress, protein misfolding, glutamate excitotoxicity, lipid peroxidation and cholesterol esterification, mitochondrial dysfunction, impaired axonal transport and neurofilament aggregation, autophagic stress, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. We also speculate that an ER chaperone protein disulphide isomerase (PDI) could play a key role in this dysregulation. PDI is essential for normal protein folding by oxidation and reduction of disulphide bonds, and hence any disruption to this process may have consequences for motor neurons. Addressing the mechanism underlying redox regulation and dysregulation may therefore help to unravel the molecular mechanism involved in ALS. PMID:23533690

  13. Measurement of Redox Potential in Nanoecotoxicological Investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratna Tantra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Redox potential has been identified by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD as one of the parameters that should be investigated for the testing of manufactured nanomaterials. There is still some ambiguity concerning this parameter, i.e., as to what and how to measure, particularly when in a nanoecotoxicological context. In this study the redox potentials of six nanomaterials (either zinc oxide (ZnO or cerium oxide (CeO2 dispersions were measured using an oxidation-reduction potential (ORP electrode probe. The particles under testing differed in terms of their particle size and dispersion stability in deionised water and in various ecotox media. The ORP values of the various dispersions and how they fluctuate relative to each other are discussed. Results show that the ORP values are mainly governed by the type of liquid media employed, with little contributions from the nanoparticles. Seawater was shown to have reduced the ORP value, which was attributed to an increase in the concentration of reducing agents such as sulphites or the reduction of dissolved oxygen concentration. The lack of redox potential value contribution from the particles themselves is thought to be due to insufficient interaction of the particles at the Pt electrode of the ORP probe.

  14. Measurement of redox potential in nanoecotoxicological investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantra, Ratna; Cackett, Alex; Peck, Roger; Gohil, Dipak; Snowden, Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    Redox potential has been identified by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) as one of the parameters that should be investigated for the testing of manufactured nanomaterials. There is still some ambiguity concerning this parameter, i.e., as to what and how to measure, particularly when in a nanoecotoxicological context. In this study the redox potentials of six nanomaterials (either zinc oxide (ZnO) or cerium oxide (CeO(2))) dispersions were measured using an oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) electrode probe. The particles under testing differed in terms of their particle size and dispersion stability in deionised water and in various ecotox media. The ORP values of the various dispersions and how they fluctuate relative to each other are discussed. Results show that the ORP values are mainly governed by the type of liquid media employed, with little contributions from the nanoparticles. Seawater was shown to have reduced the ORP value, which was attributed to an increase in the concentration of reducing agents such as sulphites or the reduction of dissolved oxygen concentration. The lack of redox potential value contribution from the particles themselves is thought to be due to insufficient interaction of the particles at the Pt electrode of the ORP probe.

  15. Membrane development for vanadium redox flow batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenzer, Birgit; Zhang, Jianlu; Kim, Soowhan; Li, Liyu; Liu, Jun; Yang, Zhenguo

    2011-10-17

    Large-scale energy storage has become the main bottleneck for increasing the percentage of renewable energy in our electricity grids. Redox flow batteries are considered to be among the best options for electricity storage in the megawatt range and large demonstration systems have already been installed. Although the full technological potential of these systems has not been reached yet, currently the main problem hindering more widespread commercialization is the high cost of redox flow batteries. Nafion, as the preferred membrane material, is responsible for about 11% of the overall cost of a 1 MW/8 MWh system. Therefore, in recent years two main membrane related research threads have emerged: 1) chemical and physical modification of Nafion membranes to optimize their properties with regard to vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) application; and 2) replacement of the Nafion membranes with different, less expensive materials. This review summarizes the underlying basic scientific issues associated with membrane use in VRFBs and presents an overview of membrane-related research approaches aimed at improving the efficiency of VRFBs and making the technology cost-competitive. Promising research strategies and materials are identified and suggestions are provided on how materials issues could be overcome.

  16. Regulation of Cellular Redox Signaling by Matricellular Proteins in Vascular Biology, Immunology, and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, David D; Kaur, Sukhbir; Isenberg, Jeffrey S

    2017-10-20

    In contrast to structural elements of the extracellular matrix, matricellular proteins appear transiently during development and injury responses, but their sustained expression can contribute to chronic disease. Through interactions with other matrix components and specific cell surface receptors, matricellular proteins regulate multiple signaling pathways, including those mediated by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and H 2 S. Dysregulation of matricellular proteins contributes to the pathogenesis of vascular diseases and cancer. Defining the molecular mechanisms and receptors involved is revealing new therapeutic opportunities. Recent Advances: Thrombospondin-1 (TSP1) regulates NO, H 2 S, and superoxide production and signaling in several cell types. The TSP1 receptor CD47 plays a central role in inhibition of NO signaling, but other TSP1 receptors also modulate redox signaling. The matricellular protein CCN1 engages some of the same receptors to regulate redox signaling, and ADAMTS1 regulates NO signaling in Marfan syndrome. In addition to mediating matricellular protein signaling, redox signaling is emerging as an important pathway that controls the expression of several matricellular proteins. Redox signaling remains unexplored for many matricellular proteins. Their interactions with multiple cellular receptors remains an obstacle to defining signaling mechanisms, but improved transgenic models could overcome this barrier. Therapeutics targeting the TSP1 receptor CD47 may have beneficial effects for treating cardiovascular disease and cancer and have recently entered clinical trials. Biomarkers are needed to assess their effects on redox signaling in patients and to evaluate how these contribute to their therapeutic efficacy and potential side effects. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 27, 874-911.

  17. Effects of non-dissolved redox mediators on a hexavalent chromium bioreduction process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Lian

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The effects of six non-dissolved redox mediators (RM immobilized in cellulose acetate beads on enhancing Cr(VI reduction by Mangrovibacter plantisponsor CR1 were investigated. In addition, the voltammetric behaviours and electron transfer capacities of the redox mediators were examined using electrochemical methods. Compared to the control beads, the Cr(VI bioreduction rate with 1-chloroanthraquinone cellulose acetate beads (1-CAQ/CA beads was increased up to 4.5-fold, which was mainly attributed to enhanced electron transfer by 1-CAQ. The redox mediators also improved the oxidation–reduction potential values of the Cr(VI bioreduction processes, which might assist in Cr(VI bioreduction. The role of the redox mediators was discussed based on the cyclic voltammetric characteristics (E0' of the redox mediators and the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy characteristics (Rct of the RM/CA beads. A linear correlation was found for the reaction constant k and the 1-CAQ concentration (C1-CAQ, which was k = 1.5674 C1-CAQ + 4.8506 (R2 = 0.9683. The Cr(VI bioreduction was affected by temperature, and the optimum pH for the Cr(VI bioreduction was 6.5. The results of repeated-batch operations showed that 1-CAQ/CA beads exhibited good stability and persistence. This study contributes to a better understanding of the effects of the redox mediator on Cr(VI bioreduction process and demonstrates its promising potential for environmental bioremediation applications.

  18. Influence of upper-ocean stratification on tropical cyclone-induced surface cooling in the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Neetu, S.; Lengaigne, M.; Vincent, E.M.; Vialard, J.; Madec, G.; Samson, G.; RameshKumar, M.R.; Durand, F.

    homeless people and over $10 billion in economic losses [Webster, 2008; McPhaden et al., 2009]. It is therefore of utter practical importance to identify the key factors that control TC intensity in this region. Uncertainties in TC intensity forecasts... stratification on TC intensification has recently been illustrated within the BoB [Ali et al., 2007]. In the case of TC Nargis, Yu and McPhaden [2011] highlighted the apparent connection between a high temperature, a low salinity front, and the TC intensity...

  19. A probabilistic topic model for clinical risk stratification from electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhengxing; Dong, Wei; Duan, Huilong

    2015-12-01

    Risk stratification aims to provide physicians with the accurate assessment of a patient's clinical risk such that an individualized prevention or management strategy can be developed and delivered. Existing risk stratification techniques mainly focus on predicting the overall risk of an individual patient in a supervised manner, and, at the cohort level, often offer little insight beyond a flat score-based segmentation from the labeled clinical dataset. To this end, in this paper, we propose a new approach for risk stratification by exploring a large volume of electronic health records (EHRs) in an unsupervised fashion. Along this line, this paper proposes a novel probabilistic topic modeling framework called probabilistic risk stratification model (PRSM) based on Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA). The proposed PRSM recognizes a patient clinical state as a probabilistic combination of latent sub-profiles, and generates sub-profile-specific risk tiers of patients from their EHRs in a fully unsupervised fashion. The achieved stratification results can be easily recognized as high-, medium- and low-risk, respectively. In addition, we present an extension of PRSM, called weakly supervised PRSM (WS-PRSM) by incorporating minimum prior information into the model, in order to improve the risk stratification accuracy, and to make our models highly portable to risk stratification tasks of various diseases. We verify the effectiveness of the proposed approach on a clinical dataset containing 3463 coronary heart disease (CHD) patient instances. Both PRSM and WS-PRSM were compared with two established supervised risk stratification algorithms, i.e., logistic regression and support vector machine, and showed the effectiveness of our models in risk stratification of CHD in terms of the Area Under the receiver operating characteristic Curve (AUC) analysis. As well, in comparison with PRSM, WS-PRSM has over 2% performance gain, on the experimental dataset, demonstrating that

  20. Brain redox imaging in the pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced kindling model of epilepsy by using in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance and a nitroxide imaging probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emoto, Miho C; Yamato, Mayumi; Sato-Akaba, Hideo; Yamada, Ken-ichi; Fujii, Hirotada G

    2015-11-03

    Much evidence supports the idea that oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of epilepsy, and therapeutic interventions with antioxidants are expected as adjunct antiepileptic therapy. The aims of this study were to non-invasively obtain spatially resolved redox data from control and pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced kindled mouse brains by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) imaging and to visualize the brain regions that are sensitive to oxidative damage. After infusion of the redox-sensitive imaging probe 3-methoxycarbonyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-piperidine-1-oxyl (MCP), a series of EPR images of PTZ-induced mouse heads were measured. Based on the pharmacokinetics of the reduction reaction of MCP in the mouse heads, the pixel-based rate constant of its reduction reaction was calculated as an index of redox status in vivo and mapped as a redox map. The obtained redox map showed heterogeneity in the redox status in PTZ-induced mouse brains compared with control. The co-registered image of the redox map and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for both control and PTZ-induced mice showed a clear change in the redox status around the hippocampus after PTZ. To examine the role of antioxidants on the brain redox status, the levels of antioxidants were measured in brain tissues of control and PTZ-induced mice. Significantly lower concentrations of glutathione in the hippocampus of PTZ-kindled mice were detected compared with control. From the results of both EPR imaging and the biochemical assay, the hippocampus was found to be susceptible to oxidative damage in the PTZ-induced animal model of epilepsy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.